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Sample records for attenuated salmonella enterica

  1. Use of RapidChek® SELECT™ Salmonella to detect shedding of live attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi vaccine strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenneman, Karen E; McDonald, Caitlin; Kelly-Aehle, Sandra M; Roland, Kenneth L; Curtiss, Roy

    2012-05-01

    Identification of individuals shedding Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi in stool is imperative during clinical trial safety evaluations. Recovery of live attenuated S. Typhi vaccine strains can be difficult because the mutations necessary for safety in humans often compromise survival in stringent selective enrichment media. RapidChek® SELECT™ Salmonella is a highly sensitive detection method for S. enterica species which utilizes a bacteriophage cocktail designed to reduce the growth of competitor microbes in mildly selective enrichment medium. Detection of Salmonella is enhanced by means of a Salmonella-specific antibody strip targeted to lipopolysaccharide. The RapidChek® SELECT™ Salmonella method was compared to conventional enrichment and plating methods to determine the most sensitive method for detecting attenuated S. Typhi strains in human stool samples. Although traditional enrichment strategies were more sensitive to the presence of wild-type S. Typhi, RapidChek® SELECT™ Salmonella was superior at detecting attenuated strains of S. Typhi. Strains containing a wide variety of attenuating mutations were detected with equal sensitivity as the wild type by RapidChek® SELECT™ Salmonella. The presence of Vi capsule or mutations which affected O-antigen synthesis (Δpmi, ΔgalE) did not decrease the sensitivity of the RapidChek® SELECT™ Salmonella assay.

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of NC983, a Live Attenuated Strain of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium

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    Troxell, Bryan; Fink, Ryan C.; Dickey, Allison N.; Scholl, Elizabeth H.

    2016-01-01

    Foodborne infections caused by Salmonella enterica serovars are a significant problem worldwide. Presented here is the genome sequence of the nontyphoidal S. enterica serovar Typhimurium mutant strain NC983, a potential vaccine candidate. PMID:27738027

  3. An rfaH mutant of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium is attenuated in swine and reduces intestinal colonization, fecal shedding, and disease severity due to virulent Salmonella Typhimurium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swine are often asymptomatic carriers of Salmonella spp., and interventions are needed to limit colonization of swine to enhance food safety and reduce environmental contamination. We evaluated the attenuation and potential vaccine use in pigs of a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium mutant of r...

  4. aroA-Deficient Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Is More Than a Metabolically Attenuated Mutant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Felgner

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains are believed to act as powerful live vaccine carriers that are able to elicit protection against various pathogens. Auxotrophic mutations, such as a deletion of aroA, are commonly introduced into such bacteria for attenuation without incapacitating immunostimulation. In this study, we describe the surprising finding that deletion of aroA dramatically increased the virulence of attenuated Salmonella in mouse models. Mutant bacteria lacking aroA elicited increased levels of the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α after systemic application. A detailed genetic and phenotypic characterization in combination with transcriptomic and metabolic profiling demonstrated that ΔaroA mutants display pleiotropic alterations in cellular physiology and lipid and amino acid metabolism, as well as increased sensitivity to penicillin, complement, and phagocytic uptake. In concert with other immunomodulating mutations, deletion of aroA affected flagellin phase variation and gene expression of the virulence-associated genes arnT and ansB. Finally, ΔaroA strains displayed significantly improved tumor therapeutic activity. These results highlight the importance of a functional shikimate pathway to control homeostatic bacterial physiology. They further highlight the great potential of ΔaroA-attenuated Salmonella for the development of vaccines and cancer therapies with important implications for host-pathogen interactions and translational medicine.

  5. Efficiency of Conditionally Attenuated Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium in Bacterium-Mediated Tumor Therapy

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    Frahm, Michael; Kocijancic, Dino; Rohde, Manfred; Hensel, Michael; Curtiss, Roy; Erhardt, Marc; Weiss, Siegfried

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Increasing numbers of cancer cases generate a great urge for new treatment options. Applying bacteria like Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium for cancer therapy represents an intensively explored option. These bacteria have been shown not only to colonize solid tumors but also to exhibit an intrinsic antitumor effect. In addition, they could serve as tumor-targeting vectors for therapeutic molecules. However, the pathogenic S. Typhimurium strains used for tumor therapy need to be attenuated for safe application. Here, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) deletion mutants (ΔrfaL, ΔrfaG, ΔrfaH, ΔrfaD, ΔrfaP, and ΔmsbB mutants) of Salmonella were investigated for efficiency in tumor therapy. Of such variants, the ΔrfaD and ΔrfaG deep rough mutants exhibited the best tumor specificity and lowest pathogenicity. However, the intrinsic antitumor effect was found to be weak. To overcome this limitation, conditional attenuation was tested by complementing the mutants with an inducible arabinose promoter. The chromosomal integration of the respective LPS biosynthesis genes into the araBAD locus exhibited the best balance of attenuation and therapeutic benefit. Thus, the present study establishes a basis for the development of an applicably cancer therapeutic bacterium. PMID:25873375

  6. Evaluation of regulated delayed attenuation strategies for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi vaccine vectors in neonatal and infant mice.

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    Shi, Huoying; Wang, Shifeng; Curtiss, Roy

    2013-06-01

    We developed regulated delayed attenuation strategies for Salmonella vaccine vectors. In this study, we evaluated the combination of these strategies in recombinant attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium vaccine vectors with similar genetic backgrounds in vitro and in vivo. Our goal is to develop a vaccine to prevent Streptococcus pneumoniae infection in newborns; thus, all strains delivered a pneumococcal antigen PspA and the impact of maternal antibodies was evaluated. The results showed that all strains with the regulated delayed attenuated phenotype (RDAP) displayed an invasive ability stronger than that of the S. Typhi vaccine strain, Ty21a, but weaker than that of their corresponding wild-type parental strains. The survival curves of different RDAP vaccine vectors in vitro and in vivo exhibited diverse regulated delayed attenuation kinetics, which was different from S. Typhi Ty21a and the wild-type parental strains. Under the influence of maternal antibody, the persistence of the S. Typhimurium RDAP strain displayed a regulated delayed attenuation trend in nasal lymphoid tissue (NALT), lung, and Peyer's patches, while the persistence of S. Typhi RDAP strains followed the curve only in NALT. The bacterial loads of S. Typhi RDAP strains were lower in NALT, lung, and Peyer's patches in mice born to immune mothers than in those born to naive mothers. In accordance with these results, RDAP vaccine strains induced high titers of IgG antibodies against PspA and against Salmonella lipopolysaccharides. Immunization of mothers with S. Typhi RDAP strains enhanced the level of vaginal mucosal IgA, gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and interleukin 4 (IL-4) and resulted in a higher level of protection against S. pneumoniae challenge.

  7. Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium strains with regulated delayed attenuation in vivo.

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    Curtiss, Roy; Wanda, Soo-Young; Gunn, Bronwyn M; Zhang, Xin; Tinge, Steven A; Ananthnarayan, Vidya; Mo, Hua; Wang, Shifeng; Kong, Wei

    2009-03-01

    Recombinant bacterial vaccines must be fully attenuated for animal or human hosts to avoid inducing disease symptoms while exhibiting a high degree of immunogenicity. Unfortunately, many well-studied means for attenuating Salmonella render strains more susceptible to host defense stresses encountered following oral vaccination than wild-type virulent strains and/or impair their ability to effectively colonize the gut-associated and internal lymphoid tissues. This thus impairs the ability of recombinant vaccines to serve as factories to produce recombinant antigens to induce the desired protective immunity. To address these problems, we designed strains that display features of wild-type virulent strains of Salmonella at the time of immunization to enable strains first to effectively colonize lymphoid tissues and then to exhibit a regulated delayed attenuation in vivo to preclude inducing disease symptoms. We recently described one means to achieve this based on a reversible smooth-rough synthesis of lipopolysaccharide O antigen. We report here a second means to achieve regulated delayed attenuation in vivo that is based on the substitution of a tightly regulated araC P(BAD) cassette for the promoters of the fur, crp, phoPQ, and rpoS genes such that expression of these genes is dependent on arabinose provided during growth. Thus, following colonization of lymphoid tissues, the Fur, Crp, PhoPQ, and/or RpoS proteins cease to be synthesized due to the absence of arabinose such that attenuation is gradually manifest in vivo to preclude induction of diseases symptoms. Means for achieving regulated delayed attenuation can be combined with other mutations, which together may yield safe efficacious recombinant attenuated Salmonella vaccines.

  8. Immunogenicity of recombinant attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium vaccine strains carrying a gene that encodes Eimeria tenella antigen SO7.

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    Konjufca, Vjollca; Jenkins, Mark; Wang, Shifeng; Juarez-Rodriguez, Maria Dolores; Curtiss, Roy

    2008-12-01

    Recombinant attenuated Salmonella vaccines against avian coccidiosis were developed to deliver Eimeria species antigens to the lymphoid tissues of chickens via the type 3 secretion system (T3SS) and the type 2 secretion system (T2SS) of Salmonella. For antigen delivery via the T3SS, the Eimeria tenella gene encoding sporozoite antigen SO7 was cloned downstream of the translocation domain of the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium sopE gene in the parental pYA3868 and pYA3870 vectors to generate pYA4156 and pYA4157. Newly constructed T3SS vectors were introduced into host strain chi8879 (Delta phoP233 Delta sptP1033::xylE Delta asdA16), an attenuated derivative of the highly virulent UK-1 strain. The SopE-SO7 fusion protein was secreted by the T3SS of Salmonella. The vector pYA4184 was constructed for delivery of the SO7 antigen via the T2SS. The SO7 protein was toxic to Salmonella when larger amounts were synthesized; thus, the synthesis of this protein was placed under the control of the lacI repressor gene, whose expression in turn was dependent on the amount of available arabinose in the medium. The pYA4184 vector was introduced into host strain chi9242 (Delta phoP233 Delta asdA16 Delta araBAD23 Delta relA198::araC P(BAD) lacI TT [TT is the T4ipIII transcription terminator]). In addition to SO7, for immunization and challenge studies we used the EAMZ250 antigen of Eimeria acervulina, which was previously shown to confer partial protection against E. acervulina challenge when it was delivered via the T3SS. Immunization of chickens with a combination of the SO7 and EAMZ250 antigens delivered via the T3SS induced superior protection against challenge by E. acervulina. In contrast, chickens immunized with SO7 that was delivered via the T2SS of Salmonella were better protected from challenge by E. tenella.

  9. Refined live attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Enteritidis vaccines mediate homologous and heterologous serogroup protection in mice.

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    Tennant, Sharon M; Schmidlein, Patrick; Simon, Raphael; Pasetti, Marcela F; Galen, James E; Levine, Myron M

    2015-12-01

    Invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) infections constitute a major health problem among infants and toddlers in sub-Saharan Africa; these infections also occur in infants and the elderly in developed countries. We genetically engineered a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain of multilocus sequence type 313, the predominant genotype circulating in sub-Saharan Africa. We evaluated the capacities of S. Typhimurium and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis ΔguaBA ΔclpX live oral vaccines to protect mice against a highly lethal challenge dose of the homologous serovar and determined protection against other group B and D serovars circulating in sub-Saharan Africa. The vaccines S. Typhimurium CVD 1931 and S. Enteritidis CVD 1944 were immunogenic and protected BALB/c mice against 10,000 50% lethal doses (LD50) of S. Typhimurium or S. Enteritidis, respectively. S. Typhimurium CVD 1931 protected mice against the group B serovar Salmonella enterica serovar Stanleyville (91% vaccine efficacy), and S. Enteritidis CVD 1944 protected mice against the group D serovar Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin (85% vaccine efficacy). High rates of survival were observed when mice were infected 12 weeks postimmunization, indicating that the vaccines elicited long-lived protective immunity. Whereas CVD 1931 did not protect against S. Enteritidis R11, CVD 1944 did mediate protection against S. Typhimurium D65 (81% efficacy). These findings suggest that a bivalent (S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis) vaccine would provide broad protection against the majority of invasive NTS infections in sub-Saharan Africa.

  10. Pangenome and taxonomic analysis of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica

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    Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica (S. enterica ssp. I) contains almost all the major pathogens in this genus. We sequenced 354 new S. enterica ssp. I genomes using paired end 100 base reads to ~80-fold coverage. These genomes were chosen to maximize genetic diversity, representing at least 100...

  11. Deletion of the aceE gene (encoding a component of pyruvate dehydrogenase) attenuates Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Ervinna; Tien-Lin, Chang; Selvaraj, Madhan; Chang, Jason; Kwang, Jimmy

    2011-10-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is a major food-borne pathogen. From a transposon insertion mutant library created previously using S. Enteritidis 10/02, one of the mutants was identified to have a 50% lethal dose (LD(50) ) at least 100 times that of the parental strain in young chicks, with an attenuation in a poorly studied gene encoding a component of pyruvate dehydrogenase, namely the aceE gene. Evaluation of the in vitro virulence characteristics of the ΔaceE∷kan mutant revealed that it was less able to invade epithelial cells, less resistant to reactive oxygen intermediate, less able to survive within a chicken macrophage cell line and had a retarded growth rate compared with the parental strain. Young chicks vaccinated with 2 × 10(9) CFU of the ΔaceE∷kan mutant were protected from the subsequent challenge of the parental strain, with the mutant colonized in the liver and spleen in a shorter time than the group infected with the parental strain. In addition, compared with the parental strain, the ΔaceE∷kan mutant did not cause persistent eggshell contamination of vaccinated hens.

  12. Complete Genome and Methylome Sequences of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Panama (ATCC 7378) and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Sloterdijk (ATCC 15791).

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    Yao, Kuan; Muruvanda, Tim; Roberts, Richard J; Payne, Justin; Allard, Marc W; Hoffmann, Maria

    2016-03-17

    Salmonella enterica spp. are pathogenic bacteria commonly associated with food-borne outbreaks in human and animals. Salmonella enterica spp. are characterized into more than 2,500 different serotypes, which makes epidemiological surveillance and outbreak control more difficult. In this report, we announce the first complete genome and methylome sequences from two Salmonella type strains associated with food-borne outbreaks, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Panama (ATCC 7378) and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Sloterdijk (ATCC 15791).

  13. Live attenuated vaccines for invasive Salmonella infections.

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    Tennant, Sharon M; Levine, Myron M

    2015-06-19

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi produces significant morbidity and mortality worldwide despite the fact that there are licensed Salmonella Typhi vaccines available. This is primarily due to the fact that these vaccines are not used in the countries that most need them. There is growing recognition that an effective invasive Salmonella vaccine formulation must also prevent infection due to other Salmonella serovars. We anticipate that a multivalent vaccine that targets the following serovars will be needed to control invasive Salmonella infections worldwide: Salmonella Typhi, Salmonella Paratyphi A, Salmonella Paratyphi B (currently uncommon but may become dominant again), Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Choleraesuis (as well as other Group C Salmonella). Live attenuated vaccines are an attractive vaccine formulation for use in developing as well as developed countries. Here, we describe the methods of attenuation that have been used to date to create live attenuated Salmonella vaccines and provide an update on the progress that has been made on these vaccines.

  14. Constitutive Expression of the Vi Polysaccharide Capsular Antigen in Attenuated Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi Oral Vaccine Strain CVD 909

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    Wang, Jin Yuan; Noriega, Fernando R.; Galen, James E.; Barry, Eileen; Levine, Myron M.

    2000-01-01

    Live oral Ty21a and parenteral Vi polysaccharide vaccines provide significant protection against typhoid fever, albeit by distinct immune mechanisms. Vi stimulates serum immunoglobulin G Vi antibodies, whereas Ty21a, which does not express Vi, elicits humoral and cell-mediated immune responses other than Vi antibodies. Protection may be enhanced if serum Vi antibody as well as cell-mediated and humoral responses can be stimulated. Disappointingly, several new attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi oral vaccines (e.g., CVD 908-htrA and Ty800) that elicit serum O and H antibody and cell-mediated responses following a single dose do not stimulate serum Vi antibody. Vi expression is regulated in response to environmental signals such as osmolarity by controlling the transcription of tviA in the viaB locus. To investigate if Vi antibodies can be stimulated if Vi expression is rendered constitutive, we replaced PtviA in serovar Typhi vaccine CVD 908-htrA with the constitutive promoter Ptac, resulting in CVD 909. CVD 909 expresses Vi even under high-osmolarity conditions and is less invasive for Henle 407 cells. In mice immunized with a single intranasal dose, CVD 909 was more immunogenic than CVD 908-htrA in eliciting serum Vi antibodies (geometric mean titer of 160 versus 49, P = 0.0007), whereas O antibody responses were virtually identical (geometric mean titer of 87 versus 80). In mice challenged intraperitoneally with wild-type serovar Typhi 4 weeks after a single intranasal immunization, the mortality of those immunized with CVD 909 (3 of 8) was significantly lower than that of control mice (10 of 10, P = 0.043) or mice given CVD 908-htrA (9 of 10, P = 0.0065). PMID:10899868

  15. Oral infection with the Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum 9R attenuated live vaccine as a model to characterise immunity to fowl typhoid in the chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beal Richard

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum (S. Gallinarum is the causative agent of fowl typhoid, a severe systemic disease of chickens that results in high mortality amongst infected flocks. Due to its virulence, the immune response to S. Gallinarum is poorly characterised. In this study we have utilised infection by the live attenuated S. Gallinarum 9R vaccine strain in inbred chickens to characterise humoral, cellular and cytokine responses to systemic salmonellosis. Results Infection with 9R results in a mild systemic infection. Bacterial clearance at three weeks post infection coincides with increases in circulating anti-Salmonella antibodies, increased T cell proliferation to Salmonella challenge and increased expression of interferon gamma. These responses peak at four weeks post infection, then decline. Only modest increases of expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β were detected early in the infection. Conclusion Infection of chickens with the 9R vaccine strain induces a mild form of systemic salmonellosis. This induces both cellular and humoral immune responses, which peak soon after bacterial clearance. Unlike enteric-associated Salmonella infections the immune response is not prolonged, reflecting the absence of persistence of Salmonella in the gastrointestinal tract. The findings here indicate that the use of the S. Gallinarum 9R vaccine strain is an effective model to study immunity to systemic salmonellosis in the chicken and may be employed in further studies to determine which components of the immune response are needed for protection.

  16. Lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria attenuate the proinflammatory response in intestinal epithelial cells induced by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

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    Carey, Christine M; Kostrzynska, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation is a physiological response to infections and tissue injury; however, abnormal immune responses can give rise to chronic inflammation and contribute to disease progression. Various dietary components, including probiotic lactic acid bacteria and prebiotics, have the potential to modulate intestinal inflammatory responses. One factor in particular, the chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8, CXCL-8), is one of the major mediators of the inflammatory response. The purpose of this study was to investigate modulation of the inflammatory host response induced by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 in the presence of selected probiotics and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from human sources, dairy products, and farm animals. IL-8 gene expression and protein production in HT-29 cells were evaluated by real-time PCR and ELISA, respectively. Pre-incubation of HT-29 cells with Lactobacillus kefir IM002, Bifidobacterium adolescentis FRP 61, Bifidobacterium longum FRP 68 and FRP 69, Bifidobacterium breve FRP 334, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides IM080 significantly inhibited IL-8 secretion induced by Salmonella Typhimurium DT104. Co-culture of selected probiotics and Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 reduced IL-8 production, while potential probiotics and LAB had no effect on IL-8 secretion in HT-29 cells preincubated with Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 prior to adding probiotics. Lactobacillus kefir IM002 supernatant also significantly reduced IL-8 production. In conclusion, our study suggests that probiotic bifidobacteria and LAB modulate cytokine induction and possess anti-inflammatory properties; however, the effectiveness is strain dependent.

  17. A novel Salmonella serovar isolated from Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) nestlings in Sweden: Salmonella enterica enterica serovar Pajala (Salmonella Pajala)

    OpenAIRE

    Hernandez, Jorge; Lindberg, Peter; Waldenström, Jonas; Drobni, Mirva; Olsen, Björn

    2012-01-01

    A novel Salmonella serovar was isolated from Peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus) nestlings in northern Sweden in 2006. Three isolates of the same clone was retrieved from three falcon siblings and characterized as Salmonella enterica sub-species enterica: O-phase 13, 23:-: e, n, z 15 and the H-phase was not present. We propose the geographical name Salmonella enterica, sub-species entericaserovar Pajala to this novel Salmonella.Keywords: Salmonella; epidemiology; ecology; peregrine falcon; no...

  18. An altered immune response, but not individual cationic antimicrobial peptides, is associated with the oral attenuation of Ara4N-deficient Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristi L Strandberg

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium uses two-component regulatory systems (TCRS to respond to stimuli in the local microenvironment. Upon infection, the Salmonella TCRSs PhoP-PhoQ (PhoPQ and PmrA-PmrB (PmrAB are activated by environmental signals in the intestinal lumen and within host cells. TCRS-mediated gene expression results in lipopolysaccharide (LPS modification and cationic antimicrobial peptide resistance. The PmrA-regulated pmrHFIJKLM operon mediates 4-amino-4-deoxy-L-arabinose (Ara4N production and attachment to the lipid A of LPS. A ΔpmrF S. Typhimurium strain cannot produce Ara4N, exhibits increased sensitivity to cationic antimicrobial peptide (CAMP-mediated killing, and attenuated virulence in mice upon oral infection. CAMPs are predicted to play a role in elimination of Salmonella, and may activate PhoPQ and PmrAB in vivo, which could increase bacterial resistance to host defenses. Competition experiments between wild type (WT and ΔpmrF mutant strains of S. Typhimurium indicated that selection against this mutant first occurs within the intestinal lumen early during infection. However, CRAMP and active cryptdins alone are not responsible for elimination of Ara4N-deficient bacteria in vivo. Investigation into the early immune response to ΔpmrF showed that it differed slightly from the early immune response to WT S. Typhimurium. Further investigation into the early immune response to infection of Peyer's patches suggests a role for IL-13 in the attenution of the ΔpmrF mutant strain. Thus, prominent CAMPs present in the mouse intestine are not responsible for the selection against the ΔpmrF strain in this location, but limited alterations in innate immune induction were observed that affect bacterial survival and virulence.

  19. Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium trxA mutants are protective against virulent challenge and induce less inflammation than the live-attenuated vaccine strain SL3261.

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    Peters, S E; Paterson, G K; Bandularatne, E S D; Northen, H C; Pleasance, S; Willers, C; Wang, J; Foote, A K; Constantino-Casas, F; Scase, T J; Blacklaws, B A; Bryant, C E; Mastroeni, P; Charles, I G; Maskell, D J

    2010-01-01

    In Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, trxA encodes thioredoxin 1, a small, soluble protein with disulfide reductase activity, which catalyzes thiol disulfide redox reactions in a variety of substrate proteins. Thioredoxins are involved as antioxidants in defense against oxidative stresses, such as exposure to hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals. We have made a defined, complete deletion of trxA in the mouse-virulent S. Typhimurium strain SL1344 (SL1344 trxA), replacing the gene with a kanamycin resistance gene cassette. SL1344 trxA was attenuated for virulence in BALB/c mice by the oral and intravenous routes and when used in immunization experiments provided protection against challenge with the virulent parent strain. SL1344 trxA induced less inflammation in murine spleens and livers than SL3261, the aroA mutant, live attenuated vaccine strain. The reduced splenomegaly observed following infection with SL1344 trxA was partially attributed to a reduction in the number of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and B lymphocytes in the spleen and reduced infiltration by CD11b(+) cells into the spleen compared with spleens from mice infected with SL3261. This less severe pathological response indicates that a trxA mutation might be used to reduce reactogenicity of live attenuated vaccine strains. We tested this by deleting trxA in SL3261. SL3261 trxA was also less inflammatory than SL3261 but was slightly less effective as a vaccine strain than either the SL3261 parent strain or SL1344 trxA.

  20. Regulated delayed expression of rfaH in an attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium vaccine enhances immunogenicity of outer membrane proteins and a heterologous antigen.

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    Kong, Qingke; Liu, Qing; Roland, Kenneth L; Curtiss, Roy

    2009-12-01

    RfaH is a transcriptional antiterminator that reduces the polarity of long operons encoding secreted and surface-associated cell components of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, including O antigen and lipopolysaccharide core sugars. A DeltarfaH mutant strain is attenuated in mice (50% lethal dose [LD(50)], >10(8) CFU). To examine the potential for using rfaH in conjunction with other attenuating mutations, we designed a series of strains in which we replaced the native rfaH promoter with the tightly regulated arabinose-dependent araC P(BAD) promoter so that rfaH expression was dependent on exogenously supplied arabinose provided during in vitro growth. Following colonization of host lymphoid tissues, where arabinose was not available, the P(BAD) promoter was no longer active and rfaH was not expressed. In the absence of RfaH, O antigen and core sugars were not synthesized. We constructed three mutant strains that expressed different levels of RfaH by altering the ribosome-binding sequence and start codon. One mutation, DeltaP(rfaH178), was introduced into the attenuated vaccine strain chi9241 (DeltapabA DeltapabB DeltaasdA) expressing the pneumococcal surface protein PspA from an Asd(+) balanced-lethal plasmid. Mice immunized with this strain and boosted 4 weeks later induced higher levels of serum immunoglobulin G specific for PspA and for outer membrane proteins from other enteric bacteria than either an isogenic DeltarfaH derivative or the isogenic RfaH(+) parent. Eight weeks after primary oral immunization, mice were challenged with 200 LD(50) of virulent Streptococcus pneumoniae WU2. Immunization with DeltaP(rfaH178) mutant strains led to increased levels of protection compared to that of the parent chi9241 and of a DeltarfaH derivative of chi9241.

  1. The Salmonella enterica Pan-genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Annika; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is divided into four subspecies containing a large number of different serovars, several of which are important zoonotic pathogens and some show a high degree of host specificity or host preference. We compare 45 sequenced S. enterica genomes that are publicly available (22......, and the core and pan-genome of Salmonella were estimated to be around 2,800 and 10,000 gene families, respectively. The constructed pan-genomic dendrograms suggest that gene content is often, but not uniformly correlated to serotype. Any given Salmonella strain has a large stable core, whilst...... there is an abundance of accessory genes, including the Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPIs), transposable elements, phages, and plasmid DNA. We visualize conservation in the genomes in relation to chromosomal location and DNA structural features and find that variation in gene content is localized in a selection...

  2. Is the Evolution of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Linked to Restriction-Modification Systems?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roer, Louise; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas

    2016-01-01

    -modification (RM) systems. The aim of this study was to investigate whether RM systems were linked to the evolution of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica. The study included 221 Salmonella enterica genomes, of which 68 were de novo sequenced and 153 were public available genomes from ENA. The data set covered 97...

  3. Induction of deletion mutation onompR gene ofSalmonella enterica serovar Typhi isolates from asymptomatic typhoid carriers to evolve attenuated strains for vaccine development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Senthilkumar B; Anbarasu K; Senbagam D; Rajasekarapandian M

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To develop attenuated strains ofSalmonella enterica serovar Typhi(S. typhi) for the candidate vaccine by osmolar stress.Methods:S. typhiSS3 andSS5 strains were isolated from asymptomatic typhoid carriers inNamakkal,TamilNadu,India.Both strains were grown inLB (LuriaBertani) medium supplemented with various concentration ofNaCl(0.1-0.7M) respectively. The effect of osmolar stress was determined at molecular level byPCR usingMGR06 andMGR 07 primers corresponding to ompR with chromosomalDNA of S. typhiSS3 andSS5 strains. Attenuation by osmolar stress results in deletion mutation of theS. typhi strains was determined by agglutination assays, precipitation method,SDSPAGE analysis and by animal models. Results:The799 bp amplifiedompRgene product from wild typeS. typhiSS3 andSS5 illustrate the presence of virulent gene.Interestingly, there was only a282 bp amplified product fromS. typhiSS3 andSS5 grown in the presence of0.5,0.6 and0.7MNaCl.This illustrates the occurrence of deletion mutation inompRgene at high concentration ofNaCl.Furthermore, both the wild-type and mutantS. typhi outer membraneSDS-PAGE profile reveals the differences in the expression ofompF,ompC andompA proteins.In mice, wild type and mutant strains lethal dose (LD50) were determined.The mice died within72 h when both the wild type strains were injected intraperitoneally with3 logCFU.mL-1.When the mice were injected with the mutants in same dosage, no clinical symptoms were observed; whereas the serum antibody titre was elicited within two weeks indicated that the mutants have the ability to induce protective humoral immune response.These results suggest thatS. typhiSS3 andSS5 may be used as good candidate strains for the development of live attenuated vaccine against salmonellosis.Conclusions:This study demonstrates that theS. typhistrains were attenuated and could be good vaccine candidates in future.

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Bardo Strain CRJJGF_00099 (Phylum Gammaproteobacteria)

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    Gupta, Sushim K.; McMillan, Elizabeth A.; Jackson, Charlene R.; Desai, Prerak T.; Porwollik, Steffen; McClelland, Michael; Hiott, Lari M.; Humayoun, Shaheen B.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report a 4.87-Mbp draft genome sequence of the multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Bardo strain CRJJGF_00099, isolated from dairy cattle in 2005. PMID:27634995

  5. Modulation of systemic and mucosal immunity against an inactivated vaccine of Newcastle disease virus by oral co-administration of live attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium expressing chicken interleukin-18 and interferon-α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Masudur; Uyangaa, Erdenebelig; Han, Young Woo; Hur, Jin; Park, Sang-Youel; Lee, John Hwa; Kim, Koanhoi; Eo, Seong Kug

    2015-04-01

    Newcastle disease (ND) is a highly contagious disease of chickens causing significant economic losses worldwide. Due to limitations in the efficacy against currently circulating ND viruses, existing vaccination strategies require improvements, and incorporating immunomodulatory cytokines with existing vaccines might be a novel approach. Here, we investigated the systemic and mucosal immunomodulatory properties of oral co-administration of chicken interleukin-18 (chIL-18) and chicken interferon-α (chIFN-α) using attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium on an inactivated ND vaccine. Our results demonstrate that oral administration of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium expressing chIL-18 or chIFN-α provided enhanced systemic and mucosal immune responses, as determined by serum hemagglutination inhibition antibody and NDV Ag-specific IgG as well as NDV Ag-specific IgA in lung and duodenal lavages of chickens immunized with inactivated ND vaccine via the intramuscular or intranasal route. Notably, combined oral administration of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium expressing chIL-18 and chIFN-α significantly enhanced systemic and mucosal immunity in ND-vaccinated chickens, compared to single administration of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium expressing chIL-18 or chIFN-α. In addition, oral co-administration of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium expressing chIL-18 and chIFN-α provided enhanced NDV Ag-specific proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells and Th1-biased cell-mediated immunity, compared to single administration of either construct. Therefore, our results provide valuable insight into the modulation of systemic and mucosal immunity by incorporation of immunomodulatory chIL-18 and chIFN-α using Salmonella vaccines into existing ND vaccines.

  6. Enhancement of Th1-biased protective immunity against avian influenza H9N2 virus via oral co-administration of attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium expressing chicken interferon-α and interleukin-18 along with an inactivated vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman Md

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Control of currently circulating re-assorted low-pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI H9N2 is a major concern for both animal and human health. Thus, an improved LPAI H9N2 vaccination strategy is needed to induce complete immunity in chickens against LPAI H9N2 virus strains. Cytokines play a crucial role in mounting both the type and extent of an immune response generated following infection with a pathogen or after vaccination. To improve the efficacy of inactivated LPAI H9N2 vaccine, attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was used for oral co-administration of chicken interferon-α (chIFN-α and chicken interleukin-18 (chIL-18 as natural immunomodulators. Results Oral co-administration of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium expressing chIFN-α and chIL-18, prior to vaccination with inactivated AI H9N2 vaccine, modulated the immune response of chickens against the vaccine antigen through enhanced humoral and Th1-biased cell-mediated immunity, compared to chickens that received single administration of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium expressing either chIFN-α or chIL-18. To further test the protective efficacy of this improved vaccination regimen, immunized chickens were intra-tracheally challenged with a high dose of LPAI H9N2 virus. Combined administration of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium expressing chIFN-α and chIL-18 showed markedly enhanced protection compared to single administration of the construct, as determined by mortality, clinical severity, and feed and water intake. This enhancement of protective immunity was further confirmed by reduced rectal shedding and replication of AIV H9N2 in different tissues of challenged chickens. Conclusions Our results indicate the value of combined administration of chIFN-α and chIL-18 using a Salmonella vaccine strain to generate an effective immunization strategy in chickens against LPAI H9N2.

  7. Complete Whole-Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Java NCTC5706.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazal, Mohammed-Abbas; Alexander, Sarah; Burnett, Edward; Deheer-Graham, Ana; Oliver, Karen; Holroyd, Nancy; Parkhill, Julian; Russell, Julie E

    2016-11-03

    Salmonellae are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality globally. Here, we report the first complete genome sequence for Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Java strain NCTC5706. This strain is of historical significance, having been isolated in the pre-antibiotic era and was deposited into the National Collection of Type Cultures in 1939.

  8. Complete and Closed Genome Sequences of 10 Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Anatum Isolates from Human and Bovine Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Scott V.; Bono, James L.; Smith, Timothy P. L.; Fields, Patricia I.; Dinsmore, Blake A.; Santovenia, Monica; Kelley, Christy M.; Wang, Rong; Bosilevac, Joseph M.; Harhay, Gregory P.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is an important pathogen transmitted by numerous vectors. Genomic comparisons of Salmonella strains from disparate hosts have the potential to further our understanding of mechanisms underlying host specificities and virulence. Here, we present the closed genome and plasmid sequences of 10 Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Anatum isolates from bovine and human sources. PMID:27257192

  9. Optimizing Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium for bacteria-mediated tumor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felgner, Sebastian; Kocijancic, Dino; Frahm, Michael; Curtiss, Roy; Erhardt, Marc; Weiss, Siegfried

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria-mediated tumor therapy using Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a therapeutic option with great potential. Numerous studies explored the potential of Salmonella Typhimurium for therapeutic applications, however reconciling safety with vectorial efficacy remains a major issue. Recently we have described a conditionally attenuated Salmonella vector that is based on genetic lipopolysaccharide modification. This vector combines strong attenuation with appropriate anti-tumor properties by targeting various cancerous tissues in vivo. Therefore, it was promoted as an anti-tumor agent. In this addendum, we summarize these findings and demonstrate additional optimization steps that may further improve the therapeutic efficacy of our vector strain.

  10. Fitness of Salmonella enterica serovar Thompson in the Cilantro Phyllosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Brandl, Maria T.; Robert E Mandrell

    2002-01-01

    The epiphytic fitness of Salmonella enterica was assessed on cilantro plants by using a strain of S. enterica serovar Thompson that was linked to an outbreak resulting from cilantro. Salmonella serovar Thompson had the ability to colonize the surface of cilantro leaves, where it was detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) at high densities on the veins and in natural lesions. The population sizes of two common colonizers of plant surfaces, Pantoea agglomerans and Pseudomonas chl...

  11. Herd-level diagnosis for Salmonella enterica subsp enterica serovar Dublin infection in bovine dairy herds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veling, J.; Barkema, H.W.; Schans, van de J.; Zijderveld, van F.G.; Verhoeff, J.

    2002-01-01

    Herd-level sensitivities of bacteriological and serological methods were compared in 79 bovine dairy herds, recently infected with Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Dublin. All farms experienced clinical signs of salmonellosis for the first time and had no history of vaccination against sa

  12. Risk factors for clinical Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium infection on Dutch dairy farms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veling, J.; Wilpshaar, H.; Frankena, K.; Bartels, C.; Barkema, H.W.

    2002-01-01

    Risk factors for outbreaks in 1999 of clinical Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium infection on dairy farms were studied in a matched case–control study with 47 case farms and 47 control farms. All 47 case farms experienced a clinical outbreak of salmonellosis which was confirmed

  13. Comparative virulence genotyping and antimicrobial susceptibility profiling of environmental and clinical Salmonella enterica from Cochin, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Parvathi, A; Vijayan, J.; Murali, G.; Chandran, P.

    Salmonella enterica serotype Newport is an important cause of non-typhoidal salmonellosis, a clinically less severe infection than typhoid fever caused by S. enterica serotype Typhi. In this investigation, the virulence genotypes of S. enterica...

  14. Regulated delayed expression of rfc enhances the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a heterologous antigen delivered by live attenuated Salmonella enterica vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Qingke; Liu, Qing; Jansen, Angela M; Curtiss, Roy

    2010-08-23

    The Salmonella rfc gene encodes the O-antigen polymerase. We constructed three strains in which we replaced the native rfc promoter with the arabinose-dependent araC P(BAD) promoter so that rfc expression was dependent on exogenously supplied arabinose provided during in vitro growth. The three mutant strains were designed to synthesize different amounts of Rfc by altering the ribosome-binding sequence and start codon. We examined these strains for a number of in vitro characteristics compared to an isogenic Deltarfc mutant and the wild-type parent strain. One promoter-replacement mutation, DeltaP(rfc174), yielded an optimal profile, exhibiting wild-type characteristics when grown with arabinose, and Deltarfc characteristics when grown without arabinose. In addition, when administered orally, the DeltaP(rfc174) strain was completely attenuated in for virulence in mice. The DeltaP(rfc174) mutation was introduced into attenuated Salmonella vaccine strain chi9241 (DeltapabA DeltapabB DeltaasdA) followed by introduction of an Asd(+) balanced-lethal plasmid to designed for expression of the pneumococcal surface protein PspA. Mice immunized with either chi9241 or its DeltaP(rfc174) derivative expressing pspA were protected against S. pneumoniae challenge.

  15. Isolation of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica (O:4,5:i and Salmonella enterica subsp. Typhimurium from free-living domestic pigeons (Columba livia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.C. Rocha-e-Silva

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports the isolation of Salmonella enterica in organs of free-living domestic pigeons. In the clinic examination, the presence of feces in the peri-cloacal and abdominal regions were observed, as well as symptoms such as cachexy, incoordination and opisthotonos. Before any therapeutic protocol was applied the bird died and a necropsy was then performed for the removal of spleen, liver, kidney and intestine for bacteriological examination and antibiotic sensitivity test. Salmonella enterica subsp.enterica (O:4,5:i- and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium were isolated from the liver and intestine and the sensitivity test demonstrated that these strains are sensitive to several antibiotics.

  16. Identification of new secreted effectors in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geddes, Kaoru; Worley, Micah; Niemann, George; Heffron, Fred

    2005-10-01

    A common theme in bacterial pathogenesis is the secretion of bacterial products that modify cellular functions to overcome host defenses. Gram-negative bacterial pathogens use type III secretion systems (TTSSs) to inject effector proteins into host cells. The genes encoding the structural components of the type III secretion apparatus are conserved among bacterial species and can be identified by sequence homology. In contrast, the sequences of secreted effector proteins are less conserved and are therefore difficult to identify. A strategy was developed to identify virulence factors secreted by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium into the host cell cytoplasm. We constructed a transposon, which we refer to as mini-Tn5-cycler, to generate translational fusions between Salmonella chromosomal genes and a fragment of the calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase gene derived from Bordetella pertussis (cyaA'). In-frame fusions to bacterial proteins that are secreted into the eukaryotic cell cytoplasm were identified by high levels of cyclic AMP in infected cells. The assay was sufficiently sensitive that a single secreted fusion could be identified among several hundred that were not secreted. This approach identified three new effectors as well as seven that have been previously characterized. A deletion of one of the new effectors, steA (Salmonella translocated effector A), attenuated virulence. In addition, SteA localizes to the trans-Golgi network in both transfected and infected cells. This approach has identified new secreted effector proteins in Salmonella and will likely be useful for other organisms, even those in which genetic manipulation is more difficult.

  17. Induction of protective immunity against Streptococcus mutans colonization after mucosal immunization with attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium expressing an S. mutans adhesin under the control of in vivo-inducible nirB promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y; Hajishengallis, G; Michalek, S M

    2001-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium vaccine strain expressing the saliva-binding region (SBR) of the Streptococcus mutans antigen I/II adhesin, either alone or linked with the mucosal adjuvant cholera toxin A2 and B subunits (CTA2/B) and under the control of the anaerobically inducible nirB promoter, in inducing a protective immune response against S. mutans infection. BALB/c mice were immunized by either the intranasal or the intragastric route with a single dose of 10(9) or 10(10) Salmonella CFU, respectively. The Salmonella vaccine strain expressing an unrelated antigen (fragment C of tetanus toxin [TetC]) was also used for immunization as a control. Samples of serum and secretion (saliva and vaginal washes) were collected prior to and following immunization and assessed for antibody activity by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Anti-SBR antibodies were detected in the serum and saliva of experimental animals by week 3 after immunization. A booster immunization at week 17 after the initial immunization resulted in enhanced immune responses to the SBR. The serum immunoglobulin G subclass profiles were indicative of T helper type 1 responses against both the vector and the SBR antigen. To determine the effectiveness of these responses on the protection against S. mutans infection, mice were challenged after the second immunization with a virulent strain of S. mutans which was resistant to tetracycline and erythromycin. Prior to the challenge, mice were treated for 5 days with tetracycline, erythromycin, and penicillin. S. mutans was initially recovered from all of the challenged mice. This bacterium persisted at high levels for at least 5 weeks in control TetC-immunized or nonimmunized mice despite the reappearance of indigenous oral organisms. However, mice immunized with Salmonella clones expressing SBR or SBR-CTA2/B demonstrated a significant reduction in the number of S

  18. Salmonella enterica: Survival, Colonization, and Virulence Differences among Serovars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Andino

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Data indicate that prevalence of specific serovars of Salmonella enterica in human foodborne illness is not correlated with their prevalence in feed. Given that feed is a suboptimal environment for S. enterica, it appears that survival in poultry feed may be an independent factor unrelated to virulence of specific serovars of Salmonella. Additionally, S. enterica serovars appear to have different host specificity and the ability to cause disease in those hosts is also serovar dependent. These differences among the serovars may be related to gene presence or absence and expression levels of those genes. With a better understanding of serovar specificity, mitigation methods can be implemented to control Salmonella at preharvest and postharvest levels.

  19. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL RELATIONSHIPS AMONG STRAINS OF Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica, ISOLATED FROM HUMANS, POULTRY AND FOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Méndez

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Human gastro-enteritis caused by Salmonella enterica is a major health problem in developing countries such as Colombia. In some parts of Colombia, the disease is endemic, and its incidence appears to be increasing, with outbreaks and sporadic cases of diarrhea becoming more frequent. At this time, it is not very clear if either poultry or food is responsible for human salmonellosis contamination in Colombia. The objectives of the present study were to analyze the Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiles (PFGEPs of Salmonella enterica from human patients, poultry and food found in Colombia and to determine the epidemiologic associations between these strains. Twenty-nine isolates of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica were isolated from: 10 pediatric patients in Bogotá, D.C., 10 different types of food and 9 chickens. All isolates were analyzed by means of the molecular technique XbaI PFGE. Eleven different patterns were observed. These patterns consisted of 12-17 restriction fragments, each with a molecular size of 30-800 kb. The results suggested that Salmonella enterica was transmitted from poultry and food to humans. Surprisingly, among the strains investigated it was impossible to find a direct linkage between poultry and food, indicating, either that Salmonella was incorporated into the food during food processing by handlers, or that foods other than poultry products were the source of human infection. This study about the molecular epidemiology of Salmonella enterica in Colombia provided new information about possible means of human contamination, and should permit health institutions to take adequate measures to avoid sporadic cases and outbreaks of salmonellosis.

  20. Automated 5 ' nuclease PCR assay for identification of Salmonella enterica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoorfar, Jeffrey; Ahrens, Peter; Rådström, P.

    2000-01-01

    A simple and ready-to-go test based on a 5' nuclease (TaqMan) PCR technique was developed for identification of presumptive Salmonella enterica isolates. The results were compared with those of conventional methods. The TaqMan assay was evaluated for its ability to accurately detect 210 S. enterica...... isolates, including 100 problematic "rough" isolates. An internal positive control was designed to use the same Salmonella primers for amplification of a spiked nonrelevant template (116 bp) in the sample tube. The PCR test correctly identified all the Salmonella strains by resulting in positive end...... Salmonella strains tested resulted in positive FAM and TET signals. In addition, it was found that the complete PCR mixture, predispensed in microwell plates, could be stored for up to 3 months at -20 degrees C, Thus, the diagnostic TaqMan assay developed can be a useful and simple alternative method...

  1. Cefotaxime-resistant Salmonella enterica in travelers returning from Thailand to Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunell, Marianne; Aulu, Laura; Jalava, Jari; Lukinmaa-Åberg, Susanna; Osterblad, Monica; Ollgren, Jukka; Huovinen, Pentti; Siitonen, Anja; Hakanen, Antti J

    2014-07-01

    During 1993-2011, cefotaxime resistance among Salmonella enterica isolates from patients in Finland increased substantially. Most of these infections originated in Thailand; many were qnr positive and belonged to S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and S. enterica monophasic serovar 4,[5],12:i:-. Although cefotaxime-resistant salmonellae mainly originate in discrete geographic areas, they represent a global threat.

  2. Analysis of the contribution of bacteriophage ST64B to in vitro virulence traits of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fresno, Ana Herrero; Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Hendriksen, Rene S.;

    2014-01-01

    Comparison of the publicly available genomes of the virulent Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) strains SL1344, 14028s and D23580 to that of the virulence-attenuated isolate LT2 revealed the absence of a full sequence of bacteriophage ST64B in the latter. Four selected ST64B...

  3. Effects of crp deletion in Salmonella enterica serotype Gallinarum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubino Salvatore

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonella enterica serotype Gallinarum (S. Gallinarum remains an important pathogen of poultry, especially in developing countries. There is a need to develop effective and safe vaccines. In the current study, the effect of crp deletion was investigated with respect to virulence and biochemical properties and the possible use of a deletion mutant as vaccine candidate was preliminarily tested. Methods Mutants were constructed in S. Gallinarum by P22 transduction from Salmonella Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium with deletion of the crp gene. The effect was characterized by measuring biochemical properties and by testing of invasion in a chicken loop model and by challenge of six-day-old chickens. Further, birds were immunized with the deleted strain and challenged with the wild type isolate. Results The crp deletions caused complete attenuation of S. Gallinarum. This was shown by ileal loop experiments not to be due to significantly reduced invasion. Strains with such deletions may have vaccine potential, since oral inoculatoin with S. Gallinarum Δcrp completely protected against challenge with the same dose of wild type S. Gallinarum ten days post immunization. Interestingly, the mutations did not cause the same biochemical and growth changes to the two biotypes of S. Gallinarum. All biochemical effects but not virulence could be complemented by providing an intact crp-gene from S. Typhimurium on the plasmid pSD110. Conclusion Transduction of a Tn10 disrupted crp gene from S. Typhimurium caused attenuation in S. Gallinarum and mutated strains are possible candidates for live vaccines against fowl typhoid.

  4. Effect of residual sanitizers on Salmonella enterica biofilm formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: Salmonella enterica are a diverse group of bacteria that represent a serious risk to public health. Bacterial attachment on food and contact surfaces can lead to biofilm formation, and once in this state, bacteria are more resistant to sanitization and may serve as a continuous contam...

  5. Method for the detection of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agron, Peter G.; Andersen, Gary L.; Walker, Richard L.

    2008-10-28

    Described herein is the identification of a novel Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis locus that serves as a marker for DNA-based identification of this bacterium. In addition, three primer pairs derived from this locus that may be used in a nucleotide detection method to detect the presence of the bacterium are also disclosed herein.

  6. lac repressor is an antivirulence factor of Salmonella enterica: its role in the evolution of virulence in Salmonella.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeepa M Eswarappa

    Full Text Available The genus Salmonella includes many pathogens of great medical and veterinary importance. Bacteria belonging to this genus are very closely related to those belonging to the genus Escherichia. lacZYA operon and lacI are present in Escherichia coli, but not in Salmonella enterica. It has been proposed that Salmonella has lost lacZYA operon and lacI during evolution. In this study, we have investigated the physiological and evolutionary significance of the absence of lacI in Salmonella enterica. Using murine model of typhoid fever, we show that the expression of LacI causes a remarkable reduction in the virulence of Salmonella enterica. LacI also suppresses the ability of Salmonella enterica to proliferate inside murine macrophages. Microarray analysis revealed that LacI interferes with the expression of virulence genes of Salmonella pathogenicity island 2. This effect was confirmed by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Interestingly, we found that SBG0326 of Salmonella bongori is homologous to lacI of Escherichia coli. Salmonella bongori is the only other species of the genus Salmonella and it lacks the virulence genes of Salmonella pathogenicity island 2. Overall, our results demonstrate that LacI is an antivirulence factor of Salmonella enterica and suggest that absence of lacI has facilitated the acquisition of virulence genes of Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 in Salmonella enterica making it a successful systemic pathogen.

  7. Fitness of Salmonella enterica serovar Thompson in the cilantro phyllosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandl, Maria T; Mandrell, Robert E

    2002-07-01

    The epiphytic fitness of Salmonella enterica was assessed on cilantro plants by using a strain of S. enterica serovar Thompson that was linked to an outbreak resulting from cilantro. Salmonella serovar Thompson had the ability to colonize the surface of cilantro leaves, where it was detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) at high densities on the veins and in natural lesions. The population sizes of two common colonizers of plant surfaces, Pantoea agglomerans and Pseudomonas chlororaphis, were 10-fold higher than that of the human pathogen on cilantro incubated at 22 degrees C. However, Salmonella serovar Thompson achieved significantly higher population levels and accounted for a higher proportion of the total culturable bacterial flora on cilantro leaves when the plants were incubated at warm temperatures, such as 30 degrees C, after inoculation, indicating that the higher growth rates exhibited by Salmonella serovar Thompson at warm temperatures may increase the competitiveness of this organism in the phyllosphere. The tolerance of Salmonella serovar Thompson to dry conditions on plants at 60% relative humidity was at least equal to that of P. agglomerans and P. chlororaphis. Moreover, after exposure to low humidity on cilantro, Salmonella serovar Thompson recovered under high humidity to achieve its maximum population size in the cilantro phyllosphere. Visualization by CLSM of green fluorescent protein-tagged Salmonella serovar Thompson and dsRed-tagged P. agglomerans inoculated onto cilantro revealed that the human pathogen and the bacterial epiphyte formed large heterogeneous aggregates on the leaf surface. Our studies support the hypothesis that preharvest contamination of crops by S. enterica plays a role in outbreaks linked to fresh fruits and vegetables.

  8. Reduction of Salmonella enterica on grape tomatoes using microwave heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y; Turley, A; Dong, X; Wu, C

    2011-01-31

    Grape tomatoes were surface inoculated with Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium, Senftenburg, Kentucky and Enteritidis and heated for 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 s using a household microwave oven at two different power levels (medium and high). Following heating, viable counts, temperature measurements and quality measurements were performed on the tomatoes. At high power level, more than 2 log reduction of Salmonella enterica was detected on grape tomatoes after 50 s but the texture were damaged. Three heating treatments, 40 s heating at high power level, 40 and 50 s heating at medium power level, could achieve more than 1.45 log reduction of Salmonella enterica on grape tomatoes, and all the treatments except for 50 s at high power level did not affect the color, pH value and nutritional quality of grape tomato after heating (p>0.05). However, 40 s heating at medium power was the only treatment among the three that did not affect the texture quality of grape tomato. Therefore, it might be a potential way for consumers to use microwave heating at medium power level (700 W) for 40 s to reduce Salmonella population on water immersed grape tomatoes.

  9. Vaccination with attenuated Salmonella enterica Dublin expressing E coli O157:H7 outer membrane protein Intimin induces transient reduction of fecal shedding of E coli O157:H7 in cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Ferric C

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Escherichia coli serogroup O157:H7 has emerged as an important zoonotic bacterial pathogen, causing a range of symptoms from self-limiting bloody diarrhea to severe hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic-uremic syndrome in humans. Beef and dairy cattle are considered the most important animal reservoirs for this pathogen. One of the important virulence characteristics of E. coli O157:H7 is the eaeA gene encoding the 97 kDa surface protein intimin. Intimin is required for attachment and effacement during the interaction of enterohemorrhagic E. coli with human and bovine neonatal enterocytes. The present study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that an adaptive mucosal immune response directed against intimin will reduce or prevent enteric colonization and fecal shedding of E. coli O157:H7 in cattle. Results Cattle were orally inoculated with either milk (control, milk with live attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin (vector, or milk with live attenuated recombinant S. Dublin expressing intimin (vaccinated on days 0, 14 and 28. On day 98, all calves were challenged orally with E. coli O157:H7 to evaluate whether vaccination with the recombinant S. Dublin expressing intimin would reduce the level of E. coli O157:H7 fecal shedding. During the first 28 days, vaccinated calves shed both the vector strain and the intimin-expressing S. Dublin strain at a similar level. The vector strain was shed for a significantly longer period as compared to the level of recombinant vaccine strain. Calves that received the intimin-expressed vaccine ceased shedding S. Dublin from day 28 to day 63. All calves were challenged with E. coli O157:H7 on day 98 to determine the effect on fecal shedding of E. coli O157:H7. The amount of E. coli O157:H7 in feces was measured for 30 days post-challenge. We observed a transient clearance of E. coli O157:H7 from the feces in the vaccinated calves. The magnitude of fecal E. coli O157:H7 shedding did not

  10. Salmonella enterica induces and subverts the plant immune system

    KAUST Repository

    García, Ana V.

    2014-04-04

    Infections with Salmonella enterica belong to the most prominent causes of food poisoning and infected fruits and vegetables represent important vectors for salmonellosis. Although it was shown that plants raise defense responses against Salmonella, these bacteria persist and proliferate in various plant tissues. Recent reports shed light into the molecular interaction between plants and Salmonella, highlighting the defense pathways induced and the means used by the bacteria to escape the plant immune system and accomplish colonization. It was recently shown that plants detect Salmonella pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), such as the flagellin peptide flg22, and activate hallmarks of the defense program known as PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI). Interestingly, certain Salmonella strains carry mutations in the flg22 domain triggering PTI, suggesting that a strategy of Salmonella is to escape plant detection by mutating PAMP motifs. Another strategy may rely on the type III secretion system (T3SS) as T3SS mutants were found to induce stronger plant defense responses than wild type bacteria. Although Salmonella effector delivery into plant cells has not been shown, expression of Salmonella effectors in plant tissues shows that these bacteria also possess powerful means to manipulate the plant immune system. Altogether, these data suggest that Salmonella triggers PTI in plants and evolved strategies to avoid or subvert plant immunity. 2014 Garca and Hirt.

  11. Live Attenuated Human Salmonella Vaccine Candidates: Tracking the Pathogen in Natural Infection and Stimulation of Host Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galen, James E; Buskirk, Amanda D; Tennant, Sharon M; Pasetti, Marcela F

    2016-11-01

    Salmonellosis, caused by members of the genus Salmonella, is responsible for considerable global morbidity and mortality in both animals and humans. In this review, we will discuss the pathogenesis of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, focusing on human Salmonella infections. We will trace the path of Salmonella through the body, including host entry sites, tissues and organs affected, and mechanisms involved in both pathogenesis and stimulation of host immunity. Careful consideration of the natural progression of disease provides an important context in which attenuated live oral vaccines can be rationally designed and developed. With this in mind, we will describe a series of attenuated live oral vaccines that have been successfully tested in clinical trials and demonstrated to be both safe and highly immunogenic. The attenuation strategies summarized in this review offer important insights into further development of attenuated vaccines against other Salmonella for which live oral candidates are currently unavailable.

  12. FAKTOR VIRULENSI Salmonella enterica SEROVAR TYPHI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marvy Khrisna Pranamartha

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK Demam tifoid disebabkan oleh bakteri Salmonella typhi, dengan gejala umum berupa demam tinggi dan nyeri perut. Tifoid adalah penyakit infeksi yang disebabkan oleh bakteri Salmonella typhi, yang masuk ke dalam tubuh melalui mulut dan saluran cerna.1 Untuk bisa memahami patogenesis dari demam tifoid sampai ke tingkat selular dan molekular, ada 5 hal penting yang harus digaris bawahi, yaitu: 1.\tTipe 3 Sistem Sekresi (T3SS 2.\tVirulence Genes dari Salmonella yang mengkode 5 SIP (Salmonella Invasion Protein SIP A, B, C, D, dan E. 3.\tToll R2 dan toll R3 yang merupakan lapisan luar dari makrofag. 4.\tSistem imun lumen usus sampai ke organ dalam 5.\tFungsi endotelial sel dalam inflamasi. Infeksi Salmonella dapat berakibat fatal kepada bayi, balita, ibu hamil dan kandungannya serta orang lanjut usia. Hal ini disebabkan karena kekebalan tubuh mereka yang menurun. Virulensi salmonella tidak lepas dari peranan SPI, yang terletak di dalam kromosom dan plasmid bakteri. Dimana SPI 1 dan SPI 2 telah dikaji cukup mendalam karena keterkaitannya dengan T3SS, dan berperan sangat penting pada invasi awal serta siklus hidup intrasel dari bakteri Salmonella. Kontaminasi Salmonella dapat dicegah dengan mencuci tangan dan menjaga kebersihan makanan yang dikonsumsi. Selalu menjaga kebersihan lingkungan hidup kita agar terhindar dari kontaminasi dengan bakteri Salmonella typhi. Agar mewaspadai sejak dini pencegahan dan pengobatan penyakit typhus. Studi mendalam perlu dilakukan agar kita mampu lebih memahami proses kompleks antara patogen dan sel inang. Mengingat dari 15 SPI yang sudah diketahui, hanya SPI 1 dan SPI 2 yang sudah dikaji secara mendalam. Kata Kunci: Salmonella, Salmonella Invasion Protein, Typhi.

  13. Increasing quinolone resistance in Salmonella enterica serotype enteritidis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølbak, K.; Gerner-Smidt, P.; Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    2002-01-01

    Until recently, Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis has remained sensitive to most antibiotics. However, national surveillance data from Denmark show that quinolone resistance in S. Enteritidis has increased from 0.8% in 1995 to 8.5% in 2000. These data support concerns that the current use...... of quinolone in food animals leads to increasing resistance in S. Enteritidis and that action should be taken to limit such use....

  14. Polyamines Are Required for Virulence in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsbak, Lotte; Thomsen, Line Elnif; Wallrodt, Inke;

    2012-01-01

    Sensing and responding to environmental cues is a fundamental characteristic of bacterial physiology and virulence. Here we identify polyamines as novel environmental signals essential for virulence of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, a major intracellular pathogen and a model organism......, we show that an S. Typhimurium polyamine mutant is defective for invasion, intracellular survival, killing of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and systemic infection of the mouse model of typhoid fever. Virulence of the mutant could be restored by genetic complementation, and invasion...

  15. Adaptation to bile in salmonella enterica

    OpenAIRE

    Hernández Piñero, Sara Belén

    2013-01-01

    Las bacterias pertenecientes al género Salmonella son patógenos Gramnegativos capaces de infectar una gran variedad de animales. En humanos, la infección por Salmonella suele comenzar con la ingestión de agua o alimentos contaminados, y puede dar lugar a

  16. Complete Genome Sequences of 17 Canadian Isolates of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Heidelberg from Human, Animal, and Food Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbé, Geneviève; Ziebell, Kim; Bekal, Sadjia; Macdonald, Kimberley A; Parmley, E Jane; Agunos, Agnes; Desruisseau, Andrea; Daignault, Danielle; Slavic, Durda; Hoang, Linda; Ramsay, Danielle; Pollari, Frank; Robertson, James; Nash, John H E; Johnson, Roger P

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Heidelberg is a highly clonal serovar frequently associated with foodborne illness. To facilitate subtyping efforts, we report fully assembled genome sequences of 17 Canadian S Heidelberg isolates including six pairs of epidemiologically related strains. The plasmid sequences of eight isolates contain several drug resistance genes.

  17. Complete, closed genome sequences of 10 Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium strains isolated from human and bovine sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmonella enterica are a leading cause of enterocolitis for humans and animals. S. enterica serovar Typhimurium infects a broad range of hosts. To facilitate genomic comparisons among isolates from different sources, we present the complete genome sequences of ten S. Typhimurium strains, five each...

  18. Draft Genome Sequences of 18 Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Oranienburg Strains Isolated from Rivers in Northwestern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casteñeda-Ruelas, Gloria M.; Carreón-Gaxiola, César; Castelán-Sánchez, Hugo G.; Acatzi-Silva, Abraham; Romero-Martínez, Salvador; García-Molina, Alejandra

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Oranienburg is recognized as a foodborne pathogen widely distributed in the environment. Here, we report 18 draft genomes of S. Oranienburg strains isolated from rivers in the northwestern region of Mexico. PMID:28280020

  19. Complete genomic sequences of two outbreak strains of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Thompson associated with cilantro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Thompson strains RM1984 (CADPH-99A2334) and RM1986 (CADPH -99A2345) are clinical isolates from 1999, putatively related to an outbreak in California from contaminated cilantro. We report the complete genome sequences and annotation of these two S. Thompson...

  20. Genome Sequences of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Infantis Strains from Hungary Representing Two Peak Incidence Periods in Three Decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilk, Tímea; Szabó, Móni; Szmolka, Ama; Kiss, János

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Four strains of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Infantis isolated from humans (1980 to 1982) and broiler chickens (2016) have been sequenced. They represent the early and recent peak incidences of this serovar in Hungary. Genome sequences of these isolates provide comparative data on the evolution and rise of an endemic S. Infantis clone in Hungary. PMID:28254986

  1. Whole-Genome Sequence and Annotation of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Enteritidis Phage Type 8 Strain EN1660

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Benjamin J.; Fitzgerald, Stephen F.; Kröger, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The genome of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Enteritidis phage type 8 strain EN1660, isolated from an outbreak in Thunder Bay, Canada, was sequenced to 46-fold coverage using an Illumina MiSeq with 300-bp paired-end sequencing chemistry to produce 28 contigs with an N50 value of 490,721 bp. PMID:28126943

  2. Complete Genome Sequences of 17 Canadian Isolates of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Heidelberg from Human, Animal, and Food Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbé, Geneviève; Ziebell, Kim; Bekal, Sadjia; Parmley, E. Jane; Agunos, Agnes; Desruisseau, Andrea; Daignault, Danielle; Slavic, Durda; Hoang, Linda; Ramsay, Danielle; Pollari, Frank; Robertson, James; Nash, John H. E.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Heidelberg is a highly clonal serovar frequently associated with foodborne illness. To facilitate subtyping efforts, we report fully assembled genome sequences of 17 Canadian S. Heidelberg isolates including six pairs of epidemiologically related strains. The plasmid sequences of eight isolates contain several drug resistance genes. PMID:27635008

  3. Evaluation of Salmonella enterica type III secretion system effector proteins as carriers for heterologous vaccine antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegazy, Wael Abdel Halim; Xu, Xin; Metelitsa, Leonid; Hensel, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Live attenuated strains of Salmonella enterica have a high potential as carriers of recombinant vaccines. The type III secretion system (T3SS)-dependent translocation of S. enterica can be deployed for delivery of heterologous antigens to antigen-presenting cells. Here we investigated the efficacy of various effector proteins of the Salmonella pathogenicity island (SPI2)-encoded T3SS for the translocation of model antigens and elicitation of immune responses. The SPI2 T3SS effector proteins SifA, SteC, SseL, SseJ, and SseF share an endosomal membrane-associated subcellular localization after translocation. We observed that all effector proteins could be used to translocate fusion proteins with the model antigens ovalbumin and listeriolysin into the cytosol of host cells. Under in vitro conditions, fusion proteins with SseJ and SteC stimulated T-cell responses that were superior to those triggered by fusion proteins with SseF. However, in mice vaccinated with Salmonella carrier strains, only fusion proteins based on SseJ or SifA elicited potent T-cell responses. These data demonstrate that the selection of an optimal SPI2 effector protein for T3SS-mediated translocation is a critical parameter for the rational design of effective Salmonella-based recombinant vaccines.

  4. Genomic Epidemiology of Salmonella enterica Serotype Enteritidis based on Population Structure of Prevalent Lineages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deng, Xiangyu; Desai, Prerak T.; den Bakker, Henk C.

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis is one of the most commonly reported causes of human salmonellosis. Its low genetic diversity, measured by fingerprinting methods, has made subtyping a challenge. We used whole-genome sequencing to characterize 125 S. enterica Enteritidis and 3 S. enterica...

  5. Repeated isolation of Salmonella enterica Goverdhan, a very rare serovar, from Danish poultry surveillance samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karl; Sørensen, Gitte; Szabo, Istvan

    2014-01-01

    We report here the appearance of a very rare serovar of Salmonella, S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Goverdhan, in routine Salmonella surveillance samples from Danish poultry production. S. Goverdhan was found on nine occasions: in one broiler breeder farm in October 2010, four broiler farms a...

  6. Real-time monitoring of Salmonella enterica in free-range geese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Laurids Siig; Josefsen, Mathilde Hartmann; Pedersen, Karl;

    2011-01-01

    Free-range geese were sampled longitudinally and Salmonella isolates characterized to reveal highly diverging colonization dynamics. One flock was intermittently colonized with one strain of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis from 2 weeks of age, while in another, S. enterica serovar Mbandak...

  7. Immunogenicity of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis virulence protein, InvH, and cross-reactivity of its antisera with Salmonella strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghani, Behzad; Rasooli, Iraj; Gargari, Seyed Latif Mousavi; Nadooshan, Mohammad Reza Jalali; Owlia, Parviz; Nazarian, Shahram

    2013-02-22

    Acellular vaccines containing bacterial immunodominant components such as surface proteins may be potent alternatives to live attenuated vaccines in order to reduce salmonellosis risk to human health. invH gene, an important part of needle complex in type three secretion system (TTSS) plays important role in efficient bacterial adherence and entry into epithelial cells. In this work we hypothesize that use of a 15 kDa recombinant InvH as Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis surface protein could provoke antibody production in mouse and would help us study feasibility of its potential for diagnosis and/or a recombinant vaccine. The purified InvH provoked significant rise of IgG in mice. Active protection induced by immunization with InvH against variable doses of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis, indicated that the immunized mice were completely protected against challenge with 10(4) LD(50). The immunoreaction of sera from immunized mice with other Salmonella strains or cross reaction with sera of Salmonella strains inoculated mice is indicative of possessing by Salmonella strains of the surface protein, InvH, that can be employed in both prophylactic and diagnostic measures against S. enterica. Bacteria free spleen and ileum of the immunized mice in this study indicate that the invH gene affects bacterial invasion. Efficacy of the virulence protein, InvH, in shuttling into host cells in injectisome of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis and inhibition of this phenomenon by active immunization was shown in this study. In conclusion immunization with InvH protein can develop protection against S. enterica serovar Enteritidis infections. InvH in Salmonella strains can be exploited in protective measures as well as a diagnostic tool in Salmonella infections.

  8. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium lacking hfq gene confers protective immunity against murine typhoid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uday Shankar Allam

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica is an important enteric pathogen and its various serovars are involved in causing both systemic and intestinal diseases in humans and domestic animals. The emergence of multidrug-resistant strains of Salmonella leading to increased morbidity and mortality has further complicated its management. Live attenuated vaccines have been proven superior over killed or subunit vaccines due to their ability to induce protective immunity. Of the various strategies used for the generation of live attenuated vaccine strains, focus has gradually shifted towards manipulation of virulence regulator genes. Hfq is a RNA chaperon which mediates the binding of small RNAs to the mRNA and assists in post-transcriptional gene regulation in bacteria. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of the Salmonella Typhimurium Δhfq strain as a candidate for live oral vaccine in murine model of typhoid fever. Salmonella hfq deletion mutant is highly attenuated in cell culture and animal model implying a significant role of Hfq in bacterial virulence. Oral immunization with the Salmonella hfq deletion mutant efficiently protects mice against subsequent oral challenge with virulent strain of Salmonella Typhimurium. Moreover, protection was induced upon both multiple as well as single dose of immunizations. The vaccine strain appears to be safe for use in pregnant mice and the protection is mediated by the increase in the number of CD4(+ T lymphocytes upon vaccination. The levels of serum IgG and secretory-IgA in intestinal washes specific to lipopolysaccharide and outer membrane protein were significantly increased upon vaccination. Furthermore, hfq deletion mutant showed enhanced antigen presentation by dendritic cells compared to the wild type strain. Taken together, the studies in murine immunization model suggest that the Salmonella hfq deletion mutant can be a novel live oral vaccine candidate.

  9. MarA and ramA regulate virulence in Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jen-Jie; Hsuan, Shih-Ling; Kuo, Chih-Jung; Wu, Ying-Chen; Chen, Ter-Hsin

    2015-12-31

    Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis is considered as an important porcine pathogen that causes serious systemic infections and exhibits poor response to treatment because of an increase in multidrug resistance (MDR). Among the various regulators of resistance, multiple antibiotic resistance factor A (marA) and regulator of acetate metabolism A (ramA) are the most effective in conferring antibiotic tolerance by activation of multidrug efflux pumps. Here we investigated the regulation of virulence in Salmonella Choleraesuis through these two transcriptional regulators. We showed that marA andramA are important for the survival of Salmonella Choleraesuis in an environment of acid and bile salts, since marA- or ramA-deficient Salmonella Choleraesuis strains failed to increase protective responses, as observed by quantitative RT-PCR (qPCR). Further, reduced invasion and survival in host cells was observed in the marA and ramA mutant strains. The results from in vitrostudies with marA- and ramA-deficient strains showed attenuated characteristics in comparison to those in the wild-type strain of Salmonella Choleraesuis when it was used to challenge BALB/c mice. The mutant strains had higher LD50 and presented poor clearance efficiency compared to the parental strain. These findings indicate that MarA and RamA not only regulate drug resistance but also play a role in the virulence of SalmonellaCholeraesuis.

  10. Hemophagocytic macrophages harbor Salmonella enterica during persistent infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca N Nix

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica subspecies can establish persistent, systemic infections in mammals, including human typhoid fever. Persistent S. enterica disease is characterized by an initial acute infection that develops into an asymptomatic chronic infection. During both the acute and persistent stages, the bacteria generally reside within professional phagocytes, usually macrophages. It is unclear how salmonellae can survive within macrophages, cells that evolved, in part, to destroy pathogens. Evidence is presented that during the establishment of persistent murine infection, macrophages that contain S. enterica serotype Typhimurium are hemophagocytic. Hemophagocytic macrophages are characterized by the ingestion of non-apoptotic cells of the hematopoietic lineage and are a clinical marker of typhoid fever as well as certain other infectious and genetic diseases. Cell culture assays were developed to evaluate bacterial survival in hemophagocytic macrophages. S. Typhimurium preferentially replicated in macrophages that pre-phagocytosed viable cells, but the bacteria were killed in macrophages that pre-phagocytosed beads or dead cells. These data suggest that during persistent infection hemophagocytic macrophages may provide S. Typhimurium with a survival niche.

  11. Ingress of Salmonella enterica Typhimurium into tomato leaves through hydathodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganyu Gu

    Full Text Available Internal contamination of Salmonella in plants is attracting increasing attention for food safety reasons. In this study, three different tomato cultivars "Florida Lanai", "Crown Jewel", "Ailsa Craig" and the transgenic line Sp5 of "Ailsa Craig" were inoculated with 1 µl GFP-labeled Salmonella Typhimurium through guttation droplets at concentrations of 10(9 or 10(7 CFU/ml. Survival of Salmonella on/in tomato leaves was detected by both direct plating and enrichment methods. Salmonella cells survived best on/in the inoculated leaves of cultivar "Ailsa Craig" and decreased fastest on/in "Florida Lanai" leaves. Increased guttation in the abscisic acid over-expressing Sp5 plants may have facilitated the entrance of Salmonella into leaves and the colonization on the surface of tomato leaves. Internalization of Salmonella Typhimurium in tomato leaves through guttation drop inoculation was confirmed by confocal laser microscopy. For the first time, convincing evidence is presented that S. enterica can enter tomato leaves through hydathodes and move into the vascular system, which may result in the internal translocation of the bacteria inside plants.

  12. Complete and closed genome sequences of 10 Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Anatum isolated from human and bovine sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmonella enterica is an important pathogen transmitted by numerous vectors. Genomic comparisons of Salmonella from disparate hosts have the potential to further our understanding of mechanisms underlying host specificities and virulence. Here, we present closed genome and plasmid sequences of 10...

  13. Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis, England and Wales, 1945-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Christopher R; LeBaigue, Susan; Esan, Oluwaseun B; Awofisyo, Adedoyin A; Adams, Natalie L; Fisher, Ian S T; Grant, Kathie A; Peters, Tansy M; Larkin, Lesley; Davies, Robert H; Adak, Goutam K

    2014-07-01

    In England and Wales, the emergence of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis resulted in the largest and most persistent epidemic of foodborne infection attributable to a single subtype of any pathogen since systematic national microbiological surveillance was established. We reviewed 67 years of surveillance data to examine the features, underlying causes, and overall effects of S. enterica ser. Enteritidis. The epidemic was associated with the consumption of contaminated chicken meat and eggs, and a decline in the number of infections began after the adoption of vaccination and other measures in production and distribution of chicken meat and eggs. We estimate that >525,000 persons became ill during the course of the epidemic, which caused a total of 6,750,000 days of illness, 27,000 hospitalizations, and 2,000 deaths. Measures undertaken to control the epidemic have resulted in a major reduction in foodborne disease in England and Wales.

  14. Changing trends in antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella enterica serovar typhi and salmonella enterica serovar paratyphi A in Chennai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnan Padma

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Chloramphenicol was considered the anti-microbial gold standard for typhoid treatment but, following the increasing worldwide frequency of antibiotic resistance, ciprofloxacin has been the mainstay of therapy since 1980. Recent studies have shown a shifting of susceptibility to conventional drugs like chloramphenicol, ampicillin and cotrimoxazole. The primary objective of the study was to evaluate the in vitro activity of chloramphenicol and other first-line drugs in comparison with cephalosporins and quinolones. Materials and Methods: Fifty isolates of Salmonella obtained from blood culture were subjected to serotyping at the Central Research Institute, Kasauli. Phage typing and biotyping was performed at the National Phage Typing Centre, New Delhi. Antibiotic sensitivity testing was carried out for 10 drugs by the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method and minimum inhibitory concentration by broth microdilution for nalidixic acid, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, ceftriaxone, cefixime and ofloxacin. Multi-drug-resistant (MDR strains were checked for plasmid. Results: In the present study, 70 and 30% of the isolates were Salmonella enterica serovar typhi and paratyphi A, respectively. They were highly sensitive to chloramphenicol (86%, ampicillin (84% and cotrimoxazole (88%. Highest sensitivity was seen for cephalosporins, followed by quinolones. Seventeen/21 (81% and 100% of the Salmonella enterica serovar typhi strains belonged to E1 phage type and biotype 1, respectively. Antibiogram showed 2% of the strains to be sensitive to all the drugs tested and 12% were MDR and showed the presence of plasmids. Conclusion: The study indicates reemergence of chloramphenicol-susceptible Salmonella enterica serovar typhi and paratyphi A isolates, a significant decline in MDR strains and high resistance to nalidixic acid. E1 phage type and biotype 1 are found to be most prevalent in Chennai, India.

  15. Antimicrobial resistance in Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar typhimurium from humans and production animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seyfarth, Anne Mette; Wegener, Henrik Caspar; FrimodtMoller, N.

    1997-01-01

    to the State Serum Institute during August 1993 (228 isolates). The animal strains were isolated from clinical or subclinical infections in cattle (48 isolates), pigs (99 isolates) or poultry (98 isolates), all from 1993. All strains were tested against 22 different antimicrobial agents used in both human......: Poultry strains were usually resistant only to ampicillin, white pig and cattle isolates were most often resistant to sulphonamide, tetracycline and streptomycin. Typing of the strains showed that some animal strains and human strains were indistinguishable. In conclusion, while antimicrobial resistance......We have studied the frequency of antimicrobial resistance and epidemiological relatedness among 473 isolates of Salmonella enterica subsp, enterica serovar typhimurium (S. typhimurium) from human and veterinary sources. The human strains were clinical isolates from patients with diarrhoea sent...

  16. Genome-wide methylation patterns in Salmonella enterica Subsp. enterica Serovars.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cary Pirone-Davies

    Full Text Available The methylation of DNA bases plays an important role in numerous biological processes including development, gene expression, and DNA replication. Salmonella is an important foodborne pathogen, and methylation in Salmonella is implicated in virulence. Using single molecule real-time (SMRT DNA-sequencing, we sequenced and assembled the complete genomes of eleven Salmonella enterica isolates from nine different serovars, and analysed the whole-genome methylation patterns of each genome. We describe 16 distinct N6-methyladenine (m6A methylated motifs, one N4-methylcytosine (m4C motif, and one combined m6A-m4C motif. Eight of these motifs are novel, i.e., they have not been previously described. We also identified the methyltransferases (MTases associated with 13 of the motifs. Some motifs are conserved across all Salmonella serovars tested, while others were found only in a subset of serovars. Eight of the nine serovars contained a unique methylated motif that was not found in any other serovar (most of these motifs were part of Type I restriction modification systems, indicating the high diversity of methylation patterns present in Salmonella.

  17. Complete Sequences of Six IncA/C Plasmids of Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serotype Newport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Guojie; Allard, Marc W; Hoffmann, Maria; Monday, Steven R; Muruvanda, Tim; Luo, Yan; Payne, Justin; Rump, Lydia; Meng, Kevin; Zhao, Shaohua; McDermott, Patrick F; Brown, Eric W; Meng, Jianghong

    2015-02-26

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype Newport has been a long-standing public health concern in the United States. We present the complete sequences of six IncA/C plasmids from animal-derived MDR S. Newport ranging from 80.1 to 158.5 kb. They shared a genetic backbone with S. Newport IncA/C plasmids pSN254 and pAM04528.

  18. Virulent Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium evades adaptive immunity by preventing dendritic cells from activating T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobar, Jaime A; Carreño, Leandro J; Bueno, Susan M; González, Pablo A; Mora, Jorge E; Quezada, Sergio A; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2006-11-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) constitute the link between innate and adaptive immunity by directly recognizing pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) in bacteria and by presenting bacterial antigens to T cells. Recognition of PAMPs renders DCs as professional antigen-presenting cells able to prime naïve T cells and initiate adaptive immunity against bacteria. Therefore, interfering with DC function would promote bacterial survival and dissemination. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that have evolved in virulent bacteria to evade activation of adaptive immunity requires the characterization of virulence factors that interfere with DC function. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, the causative agent of typhoid-like disease in the mouse, can prevent antigen presentation to T cells by avoiding lysosomal degradation in DCs. Here, we show that this feature of virulent Salmonella applies in vivo to prevent activation of adaptive immunity. In addition, this attribute of virulent Salmonella requires functional expression of a type three secretion system (TTSS) and effector proteins encoded within the Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2). In contrast to wild-type virulent Salmonella, mutant strains carrying specific deletions of SPI-2 genes encoding TTSS components or effectors proteins are targeted to lysosomes and are no longer able to prevent DCs from activating T cells in vitro or in vivo. SPI-2 mutant strains are attenuated in vivo, showing reduced tissue colonization and enhanced T-cell activation, which confers protection against a challenge with wild-type virulent Salmonella. Our data suggest that impairment of DC function by the activity of SPI-2 gene products is crucial for Salmonella pathogenesis.

  19. DNA methylation modulates Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium virulence in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oza, Javin P; Yeh, Jimmy B; Reich, Norbert O

    2005-04-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was previously shown to be virulent in Caenorhabditis elegans. Here we demonstrate that DNA adenine methyltransferase (DAM) modulates Salmonella virulence in the nematode, as it does in mice. After 5 days of continual exposure to bacteria, twice as many worms died when exposed to the wild-type than the dam-mutant strain of Salmonella. Similar trends in virulence were observed when worms were exposed to Salmonella strains for 5 h and transferred to the avirulent Escherichia coli OP50. While a 10-fold attenuation was observed in the absence of DAM, the dam-strain was still able to infect and persist in the host worm. Our results further support the use of C. elegans as an accessible and readily studied animal model of bacterial pathogenesis. However, our results suggest that crucial host responses differ between the murine and nematode models. Additionally, we carried out preliminary liquid culture based experiments with the long term goal of developing high throughput animal based screens of DAM inhibitors.

  20. Improvements to a PCR-based serogrouping scheme for Salmonella enterica from dairy farm samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    The PCR method described by Herrera-León, et al. (Research in Microbiology 158:122-127, 2007) has proved to be a simple and useful technique for characterizing isolates of Salmonella enterica enterica belonging to serogroups B, C1, C2, D1, and E1, groups which encompass a majority of the isolates fr...

  1. Complete genome sequence of a multiple drug resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi CT18

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parkhill, J.; Dougan, G.; James, K.D.

    2001-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. typhi) is the aetiological agent of typhoid fever, a serious invasive bacterial disease of humans with an annual global burden of approximately 16 million cases, leading to 600,000 fatalities(1). Many S. enterica serovars actively invade the mucosal surface o...

  2. Experimental infection by Salmonella enterica subsp enterica serovar kottbus in day-old broiler chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SAM Ribeiro

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The strain used in this work was a Salmonella enterica subsp enterica serovar Kottbus (6,8:e,h:1,5 isolated from imported day-old ducklings in Laboratório Nacional Agropecuário (LANAGRO/SP of the Ministry of Agriculture of Brazil (MAPA. In view of the lack of information available about this Salmonella isolate and also because it was detected in day-old imported birds, this study was carried out to investigate the dissemination of S. Kottbus among newly hatched chicks. The birds were placed in three groups: one group of 20 birds received 0.1 mL of S. Kottbus culture containing 1.2 x 10(8 CFU/mL, the second group of 20 birds was inoculated with 1.2 x 10(5 CFU/mL and the third group of 10 birds was untreated (control group. Results were similar for both infected groups. The bacterium was recovered from cloacal swabs collected from the first day following the experimental infection until the end of the trial (42 days post-inoculation. At 15 and 42 days post-inoculation (dpi, half of the birds of each group were killed for bacteriological examination of cecal contents, liver and spleen. At 15 dpi, viable cell counts of S. Kottbus were obtained in all kinds of samples. At 42 dpi, Salmonella was present in the liver and spleen of few birds, but in large amounts in the cecal contents of almost all birds.

  3. Clustered Intracellular Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Blocks Host Cell Cytokinesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, António J M; Durkin, Charlotte H; Helaine, Sophie; Boucrot, Emmanuel; Holden, David W

    2016-07-01

    Several bacterial pathogens and viruses interfere with the cell cycle of their host cells to enhance virulence. This is especially apparent in bacteria that colonize the gut epithelium, where inhibition of the cell cycle of infected cells enhances the intestinal colonization. We found that intracellular Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium induced the binucleation of a large proportion of epithelial cells by 14 h postinvasion and that the effect was dependent on an intact Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2) type 3 secretion system. The SPI-2 effectors SseF and SseG were required to induce binucleation. SseF and SseG are known to maintain microcolonies of Salmonella-containing vacuoles close to the microtubule organizing center of infected epithelial cells. During host cell division, these clustered microcolonies prevented the correct localization of members of the chromosomal passenger complex and mitotic kinesin-like protein 1 and consequently prevented cytokinesis. Tetraploidy, arising from a cytokinesis defect, is known to have a deleterious effect on subsequent cell divisions, resulting in either chromosomal instabilities or cell cycle arrest. In infected mice, proliferation of small intestinal epithelial cells was compromised in an SseF/SseG-dependent manner, suggesting that cytokinesis failure caused by S Typhimurium delays epithelial cell turnover in the intestine.

  4. RECOVERY IN VIVO OF NONCULTURABLE SUBPOPULATION OF SALMONELLA ENTERICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudin I.P.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. As one of mesophilic, easily cultivated species of pathogenic bacteria, Salmonella enterica transformed into viable but nonculturable (VNC state in response to environmental stresses, including action of biocides. The cells in this state, preserve the integrity of membranes and metabolism of some, but not detected by conventional methods of cultivation. Some researchers suggest that the evolutionary significance of this phenomenon is part of an adaptive response aimed at long-term survival of bacteria in adverse conditions; others argue that it is the result of stochastic cellular damage, in which nonculturable cells are in a state of gradual death. In any case, the phenomenon of existence VNC pathogens if they retain the ability to restore its growth in vivo is a significant problem in medicine, pharmaceutical, veterinary, food industry. VNC subpopulation of S. enterica was obtained under action of ethanol. In this paper was investigated in vivo resuscitation VNC S. enterica using intraperitoneal injection of mice. Materials and methods. Obtaining of stressful S. enterica populations. Bacteria were grown to exponential phase in broth Luria–Bertani (LB. To 1.0 ml sample suspension diluted to 1.5 × 106 cells/ml was added 1.0 ml of ethanol at a concentration of 40 % (v/v. After exposure of 10 to 600 minutes in the suspension were added 8.0 ml of phosphate buffered saline (FBS, washed by centrifugation (4500 g for 5 minutes and serially diluted at a ratio of 1:10 (v/v samples were stained with LIVE/DEAD BacLight (produced by "Invitrogen", USA, filtrated on membrane filters for fluorescence microscopy and parallel plated on LB agar cup to determine colony-forming units (CFU per ml. In vivo resuscitation VNC S. enterica was made following way. Three groups of animals were inoculated by intraperitoneal injection: 1 103 culturable cells (0.1 ml suspension containing 104 CFU / ml; 2 103 VNC cells (0.1 ml suspension containing 104 cells

  5. The ferric enterobactin transporter Fep is required for persistent Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Toni A; Moreland, Sarah M; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene; Detweiler, Corrella S

    2013-11-01

    Most bacterial pathogens require iron to grow and colonize host tissues. The Gram-negative bacterium Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium causes a natural systemic infection of mice that models acute and chronic human typhoid fever. S. Typhimurium resides in tissues within cells of the monocyte lineage, which limit pathogen access to iron, a mechanism of nutritional immunity. The primary ferric iron import system encoded by Salmonella is the siderophore ABC transporter FepBDGC. The Fep system has a known role in acute infection, but it is unclear whether ferric iron uptake or the ferric iron binding siderophores enterobactin and salmochelin are required for persistent infection. We defined the role of the Fep iron transporter and siderophores in the replication of Salmonella in macrophages and in mice that develop acute followed by persistent infections. Replication of wild-type and iron transporter mutant Salmonella strains was quantified in cultured macrophages, fecal pellets, and host tissues in mixed- and single-infection experiments. We show that deletion of fepB attenuated Salmonella replication and colonization within macrophages and mice. Additionally, the genes required to produce and transport enterobactin and salmochelin across the outer membrane receptors, fepA and iroN, are needed for colonization of all tissues examined. However, salmochelin appears to be more important than enterobactin in the colonization of the spleen and liver, both sites of dissemination. Thus, the FepBDGC ferric iron transporter and the siderophores enterobactin and salmochelin are required by Salmonella to evade nutritional immunity in macrophages and cause persistent infection in mice.

  6. Biological and virulence characteristics of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium following deletion of glucose-inhibited division (gidA) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shippy, Daniel C; Eakley, Nicholas M; Bochsler, Philip N; Chopra, Ashok K; Fadl, Amin A

    2011-06-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a frequent cause of enteric disease due to the consumption of contaminated food. Identification and characterization of bacterial factors involved in Salmonella pathogenesis would help develop effective strategies for controlling salmonellosis. To investigate the role of glucose-inhibited division gene (gidA) in Salmonella virulence, we constructed a Salmonella mutant strain in which gidA was deleted. Deletion of gidA rendered Salmonella deficient in the invasion of intestinal epithelial cells, bacterial motility, intracellular survival, and induction of cytotoxicity in host cells. Deletion of gidA rendered the organism to display a filamentous morphology compared to the normal rod-shaped nature of Salmonella. Furthermore, a significant attenuation in the induction of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, histopathological lesions, and systemic infection was observed in mice infected with the gidA mutant. Most importantly, a significant increase in LD(50) was observed in mice infected with the gidA mutant, and mice immunized with the gidA mutant were able to survive a lethal dose of wild-type Salmonella. Additionally, deletion of gidA significantly altered the expression of several bacterial factors associated with pathogenesis as indicated by global transcriptional and proteomic profiling. Taken together, our data indicate GidA as a potential regulator of Salmonella virulence genes.

  7. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and the pathogenesis of typhoid fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougan, Gordon; Baker, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, the cause of typhoid, is host restricted to humans. S. Typhi has a monophyletic population structure, indicating that typhoid in humans is a relatively new disease. Antimicrobial usage is reshaping the current S. Typhi global population and may be driving the emergence of a specific haplotype, H58, that is well adapted to transmission in modern settings and is able to resist antimicrobial killing more efficiently than other S. Typhi. Evidence gathered through genomics and functional studies using the mouse and in vitro cell systems, together with clinical investigations, has provided insight into the mechanisms that underpin the pathogenesis of human typhoid and host restriction. Here we review the latest scientific advances in typhoid research and discuss how these novel approaches are changing our understanding of the disease.

  8. Regulation of biofilm formation in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simm, Roger; Ahmad, Irfan; Rhen, Mikael; Le Guyon, Soazig; Römling, Ute

    2014-01-01

    In animals, plants and the environment, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium forms the red dry and rough (rdar) biofilm characterized by extracellular matrix components curli and cellulose. With complex expression control by at least ten transcription factors, the bistably expressed orphan response regulator CsgD directs rdar morphotype development. CsgD expression is an integral part of the Hfq regulon and the complex cyclic diguanosine monophosphate signaling network partially controlled by the global RNA-binding protein CsrA. Cell wall turnover and the periplasmic redox status regulate csgD expression on a post-transcriptional level by unknown mechanisms. Furthermore, phosphorylation of CsgD is a potential inactivation and degradation signal in biofilm dissolution. Including complex incoherent feed-forward loops, regulation of biofilm formation versus motility and virulence is of recognized complexity.

  9. Deletion of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium sipC gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maryam; Safarpour; Dehkordi; Abbas; Doosti; Asghar; Arshi

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To construct a novel plasmid as Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium(S.typhimurium)sip C gene knockouts candidate.Methods:In this research,50upstream and 30downstream regions of S.typhimurium sip C gene and kanamycin gene were PCR amplified.Each of these DNA fragment was cloned into p GEM T-easy vector.The construct was confirmed by PCR and restriction digest.Results:PCR amplified 320,206 and 835 bp DNA fragments were subcloned into p ET-32 vector resulting with a plasmid called p ET-32-sip C up-kan-sip C down.Conclusions:The new plasmid(p ET-32-sip C up-kan-sip C down)is useful for genetic engineering and for future manipulation of S.typhimurium sip C gene.

  10. Deletion of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium sipC gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maryam Safarpour Dehkordi; Abbas Doosti; Asghar Arshi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To construct a novel plasmid as Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium (S. typhimurium) sipC gene knockouts candidate. Methods: In this research, 50 upstream and 30 downstream regions of S. typhimurium sipC gene and kanamycin gene were PCR amplified. Each of these DNA fragment was cloned into pGEM T-easy vector. The construct was confirmed by PCR and restriction digest. Results: PCR amplified 320, 206 and 835 bp DNA fragments were subcloned into pET-32 vector resulting with a plasmid called pET-32-sipC up-kan-sip C down. Conclusions: The new plasmid (pET-32-sipC up-kan-sip C down) is useful for genetic engineering and for future manipulation of S. typhimurium sipC gene.

  11. Biofilm Formation and Morphotypes of Salmonella enterica subsp.arizonae Differs from Those of Other Salmonella enterica Subspecies in Isolates from Poultry Houses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamas, A; Fernandez-No, I C; Miranda, J M; Vázquez, B; Cepeda, A; Franco, C M

    2016-07-01

    Salmonella serovars are responsible for foodborne diseases around the world. The ability to form biofilms allows microorganisms to survive in the environment. In this study, 73 Salmonella strains, belonging to four different subspecies, were isolated from poultry houses and foodstuffs and tested. Biofilm formation was measured at four different temperatures and two nutrient concentrations. Morphotypes and cellulose production were evaluated at three different temperatures. The presence of several genes related to biofilm production was also examined. All strains and subspecies of Salmonella had the ability to form biofilms, and 46.57% of strains produced biofilms under all conditions tested. Biofilm formation was strain dependent and varied according to the conditions. This is the first study to analyze biofilm formation in a wide number of Salmonella enterica subsp. arizonae strains, and no direct relationship between the high prevalence of Salmonella enterica subsp. arizonae strains and their ability to form biofilm was established. Morphotypes and cellulose production varied as the temperature changed, with 20°C being the optimum temperature for expression of the red, dry, and rough morphotype and cellulose. Salmonella enterica subsp. arizonae, whose morphotype is poorly studied, only showed a smooth and white morphotype and lacked the csgD and gcpA genes that are implicated in biofilm production. Thus, Salmonella biofilm formation under different environmental conditions is a public health problem because it can survive and advance through the food chain to reach the consumer.

  12. Risk factors for clinical Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium infection on Dutch dairy farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veling, J; Wilpshaar, H; Frankena, K; Bartels, C; Barkema, H W

    2002-06-25

    Risk factors for outbreaks in 1999 of clinical Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium infection on dairy farms were studied in a matched case-control study with 47 case farms and 47 control farms. All 47 case farms experienced a clinical outbreak of salmonellosis which was confirmed with a positive bacteriologic culture for serovar Typhimurium in one or more samples. Serovar Typhimurium phage type 401 and 506 (definitive type 104, DT104) were the most frequently isolated phage types (13 isolates). On most farms (66%), clinical signs were seen only among adult cows. The most frequently reported clinical signs were diarrhoea (in 92% of the farms) and depression (in 79% of the farms). Control farms were matched on region and had no history of salmonellosis. A questionnaire was used to collect data on case and control farms. The relationship between serovar Typhimurium status of the farm and possible risk factors was tested using conditional logistic regression. Significant factors in the final model were presence of cats on the farm (OR=0.06), purchase of manure (OR=21.5), feeding colostrum only from own dam (OR=0.08), a non-seasonal calving pattern (OR=25), unrestricted grazing of lactating cows (OR=0.07), and a high mean mowing percentage of pasture (OR=1.02).

  13. The anti-infective activity of punicalagin against Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar typhimurium in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guanghui; Feng, Yuqing; Xu, Yunfeng; Wu, Qian; Han, Qi'an; Liang, Xiujun; Yang, Baowei; Wang, Xin; Xia, Xiaodong

    2015-07-01

    Punicalagin, a major bioactive component of pomegranate peel, has been proven to have antioxidant, antiviral, anti-apoptosis, and hepatoprotective properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-infective activity of punicalagin in a mouse model. C57BL/6 mice were initially challenged with Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar typhimurium (S. typhimurium) and then treated with punicalagin. Food and water consumption and body weight were recorded daily. On day 8 post infection, the mice were sacrificed to examine pathogen counts in tissues, hematological parameters, cytokine levels, and histological changes. Compared to mice only infected with S. typhimurium, punicalagin-treated mice had more food consumption and less weight loss. A higher survival rate and lower counts of viable S. typhimurium in feces, liver, spleen, and kidney were found in the punicalagin-treated mice. The enzyme linked immunosorbent assay showed that the levels of IL-6, IL-10, and IFN-γ in serum and the spleen and TNF-α in serum, the spleen and the liver were reduced by punicalagin. Moreover, more neutrophils and higher neutrophil-to-mononuclear cell ratios in the punicalagin-treated mice were observed. Histological examination showed that punicalagin protected cells in the liver and spleen from hemorrhagic necrosis. It is concluded that punicalagin has a beneficial effect against S. typhimurium infection in mice. The anti-infective properties, together with other nutritionally beneficial effects, make punicalagin a promising supplement in human food or animal feeds to prevent disease associated with S. typhimurium.

  14. Epidemiology of a Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium strain associated with a songbird outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Sonia M; Keel, Kevin; Sanchez, Susan; Trees, Eija; Gerner-Smidt, Peter; Adams, Jennifer K; Cheng, Ying; Ray, Al; Martin, Gordon; Presotto, Andrea; Ruder, Mark G; Brown, Justin; Blehert, David S; Cottrell, Walter; Maurer, John J

    2012-10-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium is responsible for the majority of salmonellosis cases worldwide. This Salmonella serovar is also responsible for die-offs in songbird populations. In 2009, there was an S. Typhimurium epizootic reported in pine siskins in the eastern United States. At the time, there was also a human outbreak with this serovar that was associated with contaminated peanuts. As peanuts are also used in wild-bird food, it was hypothesized that the pine siskin epizootic was related to this human outbreak. A comparison of songbird and human S. Typhimurium pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns revealed that the epizootic was attributed not to the peanut-associated strain but, rather, to a songbird strain first characterized from an American goldfinch in 1998. This same S. Typhimurium strain (PFGE type A3) was also identified in the PulseNet USA database, accounting for 137 of 77,941 total S. Typhimurium PFGE entries. A second molecular typing method, multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA), confirmed that the same strain was responsible for the pine siskin epizootic in the eastern United States but was distinct from a genetically related strain isolated from pine siskins in Minnesota. The pine siskin A3 strain was first encountered in May 2008 in an American goldfinch and later in a northern cardinal at the start of the pine siskin epizootic. MLVA also confirmed the clonal nature of S. Typhimurium in songbirds and established that the pine siskin epizootic strain was unique to the finch family. For 2009, the distribution of PFGE type A3 in passerines and humans mirrored the highest population density of pine siskins for the East Coast.

  15. Epidemiology of a Salmonella enterica subsp. Enterica serovar Typhimurium strain associated with a songbird outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blehert, David S.; Hernandez, Sonia M.; Keel, Kevin; Sanchez, Susan; Trees, Eija; ,

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium is responsible for the majority of salmonellosis cases worldwide. This Salmonella serovar is also responsible for die-offs in songbird populations. In 2009, there was an S. Typhimurium epizootic reported in pine siskins in the eastern United States. At the time, there was also a human outbreak with this serovar that was associated with contaminated peanuts. As peanuts are also used in wild-bird food, it was hypothesized that the pine siskin epizootic was related to this human outbreak. A comparison of songbird and human S. Typhimurium pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns revealed that the epizootic was attributed not to the peanut-associated strain but, rather, to a songbird strain first characterized from an American goldfinch in 1998. This same S. Typhimurium strain (PFGE type A3) was also identified in the PulseNet USA database, accounting for 137 of 77,941 total S. Typhimurium PFGE entries. A second molecular typing method, multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA), confirmed that the same strain was responsible for the pine siskin epizootic in the eastern United States but was distinct from a genetically related strain isolated from pine siskins in Minnesota. The pine siskin A3 strain was first encountered in May 2008 in an American goldfinch and later in a northern cardinal at the start of the pine siskin epizootic. MLVA also confirmed the clonal nature of S. Typhimurium in songbirds and established that the pine siskin epizootic strain was unique to the finch family. For 2009, the distribution of PFGE type A3 in passerines and humans mirrored the highest population density of pine siskins for the East Coast.

  16. Regulation of Salmonella enterica pathogenicity island 1 by DNA adenine methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Garrido, Javier; Casadesús, Josep

    2010-03-01

    DNA adenine methylase (Dam(-)) mutants of Salmonella enterica are attenuated in the mouse model and present multiple virulence-related defects. Impaired interaction of Salmonella Dam(-) mutants with the intestinal epithelium has been tentatively correlated with reduced secretion of pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) effectors. In this study, we show that S. enterica Dam(-) mutants contain lowered levels of the SPI-1 transcriptional regulators HilA, HilC, HilD, and InvF. Epistasis analysis indicates that Dam-dependent regulation of SPI-1 requires HilD, while HilA, HilC, and InvF are dispensable. A transcriptional hilDlac fusion is expressed at similar levels in Dam(+) and Dam(-) hosts. However, lower levels of hilD mRNA are found in a Dam(-) background, thus providing unsuspected evidence that Dam methylation might exert post-transcriptional regulation of hilD expression. This hypothesis is supported by the following lines of evidence: (i) lowered levels of hilD mRNA are found in Salmonella Dam(-) mutants when hilD is transcribed from a heterologous promoter; (ii) increased hilD mRNA turnover is observed in Dam(-) mutants; (iii) lack of the Hfq RNA chaperone enhances hilD mRNA instability in Dam(-) mutants; and (iv) lack of the RNA degradosome components polynucleotide phosphorylase and ribonuclease E suppresses hilD mRNA instability in a Dam(-) background. Our report of Dam-dependent control of hilD mRNA stability suggests that DNA adenine methylation plays hitherto unknown roles in post-transcriptional control of gene expression.

  17. The Giant Adhesin SiiE of Salmonella enterica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britta Barlag

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica is a Gram-negative, food-borne pathogen, which colonizes the intestinal tract and invades enterocytes. Invasion of polarized cells depends on the SPI1-encoded type III secretion system (T3SS and the SPI4-encoded type I secretion system (T1SS. The substrate of this T1SS is the non-fimbrial giant adhesin SiiE. With a size of 595 kDa, SiiE is the largest protein of the Salmonella proteome and consists of 53 repetitive bacterial immunoglobulin (BIg domains, each containing several conserved residues. As known for other T1SS substrates, such as E. coli HlyA, Ca2+ ions bound by conserved D residues within the BIg domains stabilize the protein and facilitate secretion. The adhesin SiiE mediates the first contact to the host cell and thereby positions the SPI1-T3SS to initiate the translocation of a cocktail of effector proteins. This leads to actin remodeling, membrane ruffle formation and bacterial internalization. SiiE binds to host cell apical membranes in a lectin-like manner. GlcNAc and α2–3 linked sialic acid-containing structures are ligands of SiiE. Since SiiE shows repetitive domain architecture, we propose a zipper-like binding mediated by each individual BIg domain. In this review, we discuss the characteristics of the SPI4-T1SS and the giant adhesin SiiE.

  18. Salmonella enterica Subspecies diarizonae Maxillary Sinusitis in a Snake Handler: First Report

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we report the first case of reptile-associated maxillary sinusitis due to Salmonella enterica subspecies diarizonae in a snake handler and the third case of salmonella-associated sinusitis worldwide. The case highlights the potential of respiratory transmission and atypical salmonellosis presentations.

  19. New Flagellin Gene for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi from the East Indonesian Archipelago

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Hatta; A.R. Sultan; R. Pastoor; H.L. Smits

    2011-01-01

    Phase variation is a property unique of some Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi strains from Indonesia. Salmonella Typhi isolates from Indonesia have been described that in addition to the phase 1 Hd flagellin gene contain a second flagellin gene named z66. S. Typhi isolates from Indonesia with a mut

  20. Tetracycline promotes the expression of ten fimbrial operons in specific Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella is associated with increased morbidity in humans and presents an important food safety concern. Antibiotic resistance among isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium has become especially prevalent as over 27 per cent of isolates from humans in the Unit...

  1. Intragastric immunization with recombinant Lactobacillus casei expressing flagellar antigen confers antibody-independent protective immunity against Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kajikawa, A.; Satoh, E.; Leer, R.J.; Yamamoto, S.; Igimi, S.

    2007-01-01

    A recombinant Lactobacillus casei expressing a flagellar antigen from Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis was constructed and evaluated as a mucosal vaccine. Intragastric immunization of the recombinant strain conferred protective immunity against Salmonella infection in mice. This immunization

  2. The O28 Antigen Gene Clusters of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Dakar and Serovar Pomona Are Different

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clifford G. Clark

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 10 kb O-antigen gene cluster was sequenced from a Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Dakar O28 reference strain and from two S. Pomona serogroup O28 isolates. The two S. Pomona O antigen gene clusters showed only moderate identity with the S. Dakar O28 gene cluster, suggesting that the O antigen oligosaccharides may contain one or more sugars conferring the O28 epitope but may otherwise be different. These novel findings are absolutely critical for the correct interpretation of molecular serotyping assays targeting genes within the O antigen gene clusters of these Salmonella serotypes and suggest the possibility that the O antigen gene clusters of other Salmonella serovars may also be heterogenous.

  3. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium exploits inflammation to modify swine intestinal microbiota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna eDrumo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is an important zoonotic gastrointestinal pathogen responsible for foodborne disease worldwide. It is a successful enteric pathogen because it has developed virulence strategies allowing it to survive in a highly inflamed intestinal environment exploiting inflammation to overcome colonization resistance provided by intestinal microbiota. In this study, we used piglets featuring an intact microbiota, which naturally develop gastroenteritis, as model for salmonellosis. We compared the effects on the intestinal microbiota induced by a wild type and an attenuated S. Typhimurium in order to evaluate whether the modifications are correlated with the virulence of the strain. This study showed that Salmonella alters microbiota in a virulence-dependent manner. We found that the wild type S. Typhimurium induced inflammation and a reduction of specific protecting microbiota species (SCFA-producing bacteria normally involved in providing a barrier against pathogens. Both these effects could contribute to impair colonization resistance, increasing the host susceptibility to wild type S. Typhimurium colonization. In contrast, the attenuated S. Typhimurium, which is characterized by a reduced ability to colonize the intestine, and by a very mild inflammatory response, was unable to successfully sustain competition with the microbiota.

  4. Characterization of osmotically induced filaments of Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Zachary L; Chen, Bingming; Czuprynski, Charles J; Wong, Amy C L; Kaspar, Charles W

    2012-09-01

    Salmonella enterica forms aseptate filaments with multiple nucleoids when cultured in hyperosmotic conditions. These osmotic-induced filaments are viable and form single colonies on agar plates even though they contain multiple genomes and have the potential to divide into multiple daughter cells. Introducing filaments that are formed during osmotic stress into culture conditions without additional humectants results in the formation of septa and their division into individual cells, which could present challenges to retrospective analyses of infectious dose and risk assessments. We sought to characterize the underlying mechanisms of osmotic-induced filament formation. The concentration of proteins and chromosomal DNA in filaments and control cells was similar when standardized by biomass. Furthermore, penicillin-binding proteins in the membrane of salmonellae were active in vitro. The activity of penicillin-binding protein 2 was greater in filaments than in control cells, suggesting that it may have a role in osmotic-induced filament formation. Filaments contained more ATP than did control cells in standardized cell suspensions, though the levels of two F(0)F(1)-ATP synthase subunits were reduced. Furthermore, filaments could septate and divide within 8 h in 0.2 × Luria-Bertani broth at 23°C, while nonfilamentous control cells did not replicate. Based upon the ability of filaments to septate and divide in this diluted broth, a method was developed to enumerate by plate count the number of individual, viable cells within a population of filaments. This method could aid in retrospective analyses of infectious dose of filamented salmonellae.

  5. Salmonella enterica Serotype Choleraesuis Infection of the Knee and Femur in a Nonbacteremic Diabetic Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander M. Sy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarticular infections caused by Salmonella are rare. The rates of osteomyelitis and septic arthritis due to Salmonella are estimated to be less than 1% and 0.1%-0.2%, respectively (Kato et al., 2012. Salmonella enterica serotype Choleraesuis is a nontyphoidal Salmonella, highly pathogenic in humans, usually causing septicemic disease with little or no intestinal involvement. Serotype Choleraesuis accounts for a small percentage of published studies of Salmonella infections in the United States. It is not commonly reported in joint fluid and bones in contrast to serotype Enteritidis and Typhi, where a considerable number of cases have been published. Chen et al. in Taiwan found that 21% of bacteremic patients with this infection subsequently develop focal infections such as septic arthritis, pneumonia, peritonitis, and cutaneous abscess (Chen et al., 1999, Chiu et al., 2004. In contrast, our patient presented with localized osteoarticular infection with Salmonella enterica serotype Cholerasuis, but without evidence of bacteremia.

  6. The Salmonella pathogenicity island 2-encoded type III secretion system is essential for the survival of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in free-living amoebae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleasdale, Benjamin; Lott, Penelope J; Jagannathan, Aparna; Stevens, Mark P; Birtles, Richard J; Wigley, Paul

    2009-03-01

    Free-living amoebae represent a potential reservoir and predator of Salmonella enterica. Through the use of type III secretion system (T3SS) mutants and analysis of transcription of selected T3SS genes, we demonstrated that the Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 is highly induced during S. enterica serovar Typhimurium infection of Acanthamoeba polyphaga and is essential for survival within amoebae.

  7. Salmonella enterica Typhimurium fljBA operon stability: implications regarding the origin of Salmonella enterica I 4,[5],12:i:.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomiyama, M P O; Werle, C H; Milanez, G P; Nóbrega, D B; Pereira, J P; Calarga, A P; Flores, F; Brocchi, M

    2015-12-29

    Salmonella enterica subsp enterica serovar 4,5,12:i:- has been responsible for many recent Salmonella outbreaks worldwide. Several studies indicate that this serovar originated from S. enterica subsp enterica serovar Typhimurium, by the loss of the flagellar phase II gene (fljB) and adjacent sequences. However, at least two different clones of S. enterica 4,5,12:i:- exist that differs in the molecular events responsible for fljB deletion. The aim of this study was to test the stability of the fljBA operon responsible for the flagellar phase variation under different growth conditions in order to verify if its deletion is a frequent event that could explain the origin and dissemination of this serovar. In fact, coding sequences for transposons are present near this operon and in some strains, such as S. enterica Typhimurium LT2, the Fels-2 prophage gene is inserted near this operon. The presence of mobile DNA could confer instability to this region. In order to examine this, the cat (chloramphenicol acetyltransferase) gene was inserted adjacent to the fljBA operon so that deletions involving this genomic region could be identified. After growing S. enterica chloramphenicol-resistant strains under different conditions, more than 104 colonies were tested for the loss of chloramphenicol resistance. However, none of the colonies were sensitive to chloramphenicol. These data suggest that the origin of S. enterica serovar 4,5,12:i:- from Typhimurium by fljBA deletion is not a frequent event. The origin and dissemination of 4,5,12:i:- raise several questions about the role of flagellar phase variation in virulence.

  8. Ecology of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica in the primary vegetable production chain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franz, E.; Bruggen, van A.H.C.

    2008-01-01

    There is an increased concern that plants might be more important as a carrier for human enteric pathogens like E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovars than previously thought. This review summarizes the knowledge available on the ecology of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica in the pr

  9. Effects of integrated treatment of nonthermal UV-C light and different antimicrobial wash on Salmonella enterica on plum tomatoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Produce contamination by foodborne pathogens remains a serious threat. This study investigated synergistic effects of ultraviolet-C and various active sanitizers’ washes against Salmonella enterica on plum tomatoes. A bacterial cocktail containing three serotypes of Salmonella enterica (S. Newport H...

  10. Novel Temperate Phages of Salmonella enterica subsp. salamae and subsp. diarizonae and Their Activity against Pathogenic S. enterica subsp. enterica Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikalová, Lenka; Bosák, Juraj; Hříbková, Hana; Dědičová, Daniela; Benada, Oldřich; Šmarda, Jan; Šmajs, David

    2017-01-01

    Forty strains of Salmonella enterica (S. enterica) subspecies salamae (II), arizonae (IIIa), diarizonae (IIIb), and houtenae (IV) were isolated from human or environmental samples and tested for bacteriophage production. Production of bacteriophages was observed in 15 S. enterica strains (37.5%) belonging to either the subspecies salamae (8 strains) or diarizonae (7 strains). Activity of phages was tested against 52 pathogenic S. enterica subsp. enterica isolates and showed that phages produced by subsp. salamae had broader activity against pathogenic salmonellae compared to phages from the subsp. diarizonae. All 15 phages were analyzed using PCR amplification of phage-specific regions and 9 different amplification profiles were identified. Five phages (SEN1, SEN4, SEN5, SEN22, and SEN34) were completely sequenced and classified as temperate phages. Phages SEN4 and SEN5 were genetically identical, thus representing a single phage type (i.e. SEN4/5). SEN1 and SEN4/5 fit into the group of P2-like phages, while the SEN22 phage showed sequence relatedness to P22-like phages. Interestingly, while phage SEN34 was genetically distantly related to Lambda-like phages (Siphoviridae), it had the morphology of the Myoviridae family. Based on sequence analysis and electron microscopy, phages SEN1 and SEN4/5 were members of the Myoviridae family and phage SEN22 belonged to the Podoviridae family.

  11. Survival of Salmonella enterica in poultry feed is strain dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andino, Ana; Pendleton, Sean; Zhang, Nan; Chen, Wei; Critzer, Faith; Hanning, Irene

    2014-02-01

    Feed components have low water activity, making bacterial survival difficult. The mechanisms of Salmonella survival in feed and subsequent colonization of poultry are unknown. The purpose of this research was to compare the ability of Salmonella serovars and strains to survive in broiler feed and to evaluate molecular mechanisms associated with survival and colonization by measuring the expression of genes associated with colonization (hilA, invA) and survival via fatty acid synthesis (cfa, fabA, fabB, fabD). Feed was inoculated with 1 of 15 strains of Salmonella enterica consisting of 11 serovars (Typhimurium, Enteriditis, Kentucky, Seftenburg, Heidelberg, Mbandanka, Newport, Bairely, Javiana, Montevideo, and Infantis). To inoculate feed, cultures were suspended in PBS and survival was evaluated by plating samples onto XLT4 agar plates at specific time points (0 h, 4 h, 8 h, 24 h, 4 d, and 7 d). To evaluate gene expression, RNA was extracted from the samples at the specific time points (0, 4, 8, and 24 h) and gene expression measured with real-time PCR. The largest reduction in Salmonella occurred at the first and third sampling time points (4 h and 4 d) with the average reductions being 1.9 and 1.6 log cfu per g, respectively. For the remaining time points (8 h, 24 h, and 7 d), the average reduction was less than 1 log cfu per g (0.6, 0.4, and 0.6, respectively). Most strains upregulated cfa (cyclopropane fatty acid synthesis) within 8 h, which would modify the fluidity of the cell wall to aid in survival. There was a weak negative correlation between survival and virulence gene expression indicating downregulation to focus energy on other gene expression efforts such as survival-related genes. These data indicate the ability of strains to survive over time in poultry feed was strain dependent and that upregulation of cyclopropane fatty acid synthesis and downregulation of virulence genes were associated with a response to desiccation stress.

  12. Innate immune control of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium: mechanisms contributing to combating systemic Salmonella infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wick, Mary Jo

    2011-01-01

    Infections with Salmonella enterica serovars remain a serious problem worldwide. While serovar Typhi causes significant morbidity and mortality that is restricted to humans, serovar Typhimurium causes gastroenteritidis in humans and can also infect other animals. As mice with the susceptible Nramp1 locus get systemic infection with serovar Typhimurium, murine infection models using this serovar have been widely used to decipher the immune mechanisms required to survive systemic Salmonella infection. This review summarizes recent studies in murine infection models that have advanced our understanding of the events that occur during the first days after oral Salmonella infection. The pathways of bacterial penetration across the intestinal epithelium, bacterial spread to draining (mesenteric) lymph nodes and dissemination to systemic tissues is discussed. The response of myeloid cell populations, including dendritic cells, inflammatory monocytes and neutrophils, during the early stage of infection is also discussed. Finally, the mechanisms driving recruitment of myeloid cells to infected intestinal lymphoid tissues and what is known about Toll-like receptor signaling pathways in innate immunity to Salmonella infection is also discussed.

  13. Genetic Characterization of the Galactitol Utilization Pathway of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolle, Nicoletta; Felsl, Angela; Heermann, Ralf; Fuchs, Thilo M

    2017-02-15

    Galactitol degradation by salmonellae remains underinvestigated, although this metabolic capability contributes to growth in animals (R. R. Chaudhuri et al., PLoS Genet 9:e1003456, 2013, https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1003456). The genes responsible for this metabolic capability are part of a 9.6-kb gene cluster that spans from gatY to gatR (STM3253 to STM3262) and encodes a phosphotransferase system, four enzymes, and a transporter of the major facilitator superfamily. Genome comparison revealed the presence of this genetic determinant in nearly all Salmonella strains. The generation time of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain ST4/74 was higher in minimal medium with galactitol than with glucose. Knockout of STM3254 and gatC resulted in a growth-deficient phenotype of S Typhimurium, with galactitol as the sole carbon source. Partial deletion of gatR strongly reduced the lag phase of growth with galactitol, whereas strains overproducing GatR exhibited a near-zero growth phenotype. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated strong induction of the gatY and gatZ promoters, which control all genes of this cluster except gatR, in the presence of galactitol but not glucose. Purified GatR bound to these two main gat gene cluster promoters as well as to its own promoter, demonstrating that this autoregulated repressor controls galactitol degradation. Surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy revealed distinct binding properties of GatR toward the three promoters, resulting in a model of differential gat gene expression. The cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) bound these promoters with similarly high affinities, and a mutant lacking crp showed severe growth attenuation, demonstrating that galactitol utilization is subject to catabolite repression. Here, we provide the first genetic characterization of galactitol degradation in Salmonella, revealing novel insights into the regulation of this dissimilatory pathway.

  14. Effects of postharvest handling conditions on internalization and growth of Salmonella enterica in tomatoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bin; Luo, Yaguang; Nou, Xiangwu; Yang, Yang; Wu, Yunpeng; Wang, Qin

    2014-03-01

    Salmonella internalization in tomatoes during postharvest handling is a major food safety concern. This study was conducted to determine the effect of immersion time, immersion depth, and temperature differential between bacterial suspension and tomato pulp on the internalization of Salmonella enterica in tomato fruits. The effect of storage temperature and duration on the survival and growth of internalized Salmonella cells was also evaluated. Overall, immersion time significantly affected the incidence and extent of S. enterica internalization (P internalization. The depth of Salmonella internalization in tomato tissues also increased with increasing immersion time. Immersion time also significantly influenced the degree to which the temperature differential affected Salmonella internalization. With an immersion time of 2 min, the temperature differential had no significant effect on Salmonella internalization (P = 0.2536). However, with an immersion time of 15 min, a significantly larger Salmonella population became internalized in tomatoes immersed in solutions with a -30°F (-16.7°C) temperature differential. Internalized S. enterica cells persisted in the core tissues during 14 days of storage. Strain type and storage duration significantly affected (P internalized Salmonella recovered, but storage temperatures of 55 to 70°F (12.8 to 21.1°C) did not (P > 0.05). These findings indicate the importance of preventing pathogen internalization during postharvest handling.

  15. Genomic variation in Salmonella enterica core genes for epidemiological typing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leekitcharoenphon Pimlapas

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Technological advances in high throughput genome sequencing are making whole genome sequencing (WGS available as a routine tool for bacterial typing. Standardized procedures for identification of relevant genes and of variation are needed to enable comparison between studies and over time. The core genes--the genes that are conserved in all (or most members of a genus or species--are potentially good candidates for investigating genomic variation in phylogeny and epidemiology. Results We identify a set of 2,882 core genes clusters based on 73 publicly available Salmonella enterica genomes and evaluate their value as typing targets, comparing whole genome typing and traditional methods such as 16S and MLST. A consensus tree based on variation of core genes gives much better resolution than 16S and MLST; the pan-genome family tree is similar to the consensus tree, but with higher confidence. The core genes can be divided into two categories: a few highly variable genes and a larger set of conserved core genes, with low variance. For the most variable core genes, the variance in amino acid sequences is higher than for the corresponding nucleotide sequences, suggesting that there is a positive selection towards mutations leading to amino acid changes. Conclusions Genomic variation within the core genome is useful for investigating molecular evolution and providing candidate genes for bacterial genome typing. Identification of genes with different degrees of variation is important especially in trend analysis.

  16. Lag phase of Salmonella enterica under osmotic stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, K; George, S M; Métris, A; Li, P L; Baranyi, J

    2011-03-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was grown at salt concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 7.5% in minimal medium with and without added osmoprotectant and in a rich medium. In minimal medium, the cells showed an initial decline period, and consequently the definition of the lag time of the resultant log count curve was revised. The model of Baranyi and Roberts (Int. J. Food Microbiol. 23:277-294, 1994) was modified to take into account the initial decline period, based on the assumption that the log count curve of the total population was the sum of a dying and a surviving-then-growing subpopulation. The lag time was defined as the lag of the surviving subpopulation. It was modeled by means of a parameter quantifying the biochemical work the surviving cells carry out during this phase, the "work to be done." The logarithms of the maximum specific growth rates as a function of the water activity in the three media differed only by additive constants, which gave a theoretical basis for bias factors characterizing the relationships between different media. Models for the lag and the "work to be done" as a function of the water activity showed similar properties, but in rich medium above 5% salt concentrations, the data showed a maximum for this work. An accurate description of the lag time is important to avoid food wastage, which is an issue of increasing significance in the food industry, while maintaining food safety standards.

  17. Complete Genome and Plasmid Sequences of Three Canadian Strains of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Enteritidis Belonging to Phage Types 8, 13, and 13a

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Muhammad Attiq; Labbé, Geneviève; Ziebell, Kim; Nash, John H. E.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis is a prominent cause of human salmonellosis frequently linked to poultry products. In Canada, S. Enteritidis phage types 8, 13, and 13a predominate among both clinical and poultry isolates. Here, we report the complete genome and plasmid sequences of poultry isolates of these three phage types. PMID:26404595

  18. Complete Genome and Plasmid Sequences of Three Canadian Strains of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Enteritidis Belonging to Phage Types 8, 13, and 13a

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis is a prominent cause of human salmonellosis frequently linked to poultry products. In Canada, S. Enteritidis phage types 8, 13, and 13a predominate among both clinical and poultry isolates. Here, we report the complete genome and plasmid sequences of poultry isolates of these three phage types.

  19. Molecular typing of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhimurium isolated in Abruzzo region (Italy from 2008 to 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Alessiani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, 47 antibiotic-resistant strains of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhimurium (ST were characterised, including 15 monophasic variants 1, 4, [5], 12:i:-, (STm isolated from different matrices. They were all selected from 389 Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica strains isolated during 2008-2010 in Abruzzo region (Italy. Thirty-seven strains showed to be resistant to more than 1 antibiotic. Among 47 isolates, phage type U311 and DT104 were identified. The ASSuT resistance pattern was predominant in mST strains and ACSSuT in ST DT104 and U302. A multiplex Polimerase Chain Reaction (PCR method was used to investigate 4 genes: fluorfenicol (floSt, virulence (spvC, invasine (invA and integrase (int. All ST the strain were positive for invA gene and 28,32% of strains were positive for spvC gene. PFGE analysis revealed a large number of small clonal populations, however not ascrivable to outbreaks.

  20. Molecular typing of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhimurium isolated in Abruzzo region (Italy) from 2008 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessiani, Alessandra; Sacchini, Lorena; Pontieri, Eugenio; Gavini, Jacopo; Di Giannatale, Elisabetta

    2014-01-01

    In this study, 47 antibiotic-resistant strains of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhimurium (ST) were characterised, including 15 monophasic variants 1, 4, [5], 12:i:-, (STm) isolated from different matrices. They were all selected from 389 Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica strains isolated during 2008-2010 in Abruzzo region (Italy). Thirty-seven strains showed to be resistant to more than 1 antibiotic. Among 47 isolates, phage type U311 and DT104 were identified. The ASSuT resistance pattern was predominant in mST strains and ACSSuT in ST DT104 and U302. A multiplex Polimerase Chain Reaction (PCR) method was used to investigate 4 genes: fluorfenicol (floSt), virulence (spvC), invasine (invA) and integrase (int). All ST the strain were positive for invA gene and 28,32% of strains were positive for spvC gene. PFGE analysis revealed a large number of small clonal populations, however not ascrivable to outbreaks.

  1. Diversity and antimicrobial susceptibility of Salmonella enterica serovars isolated from pig farms in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fashae, Kayode; Hendriksen, Rene S

    2014-01-01

    Animals including food animals play a significant role in the epidemiology of Salmonella enterica. The control requires identification of sources and institution of targeted interventions. This study investigates the diversity of S. enterica serovars, antimicrobial susceptibility, and occurrence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes in pigs in Ibadan, Nigeria. Pooled fresh pen floor fecal samples of pigs collected from 31 pig farms were cultured; the Salmonella isolates were serotyped and their antimicrobial susceptibility was determined. PMQR genes were screened by polymerase chain reaction. The 229 Salmonella isolates were made of 50 serovars predominated by rare serovars Salmonella Give (n = 36; 15.7 %), Salmonella Brancaster (n = 17; 7.4 %), Salmonella Colindale (n = 15; 6.6 %), Salmonella Elisaberthville (n = 13; 5.7 %), Salmonella Hillingdon (n = 13; 5.7 %), and Salmonella Kingston (n = 13; 5.7 %). The most widely distributed serovars among the farms were Salmonella Give (six farms) and Salmonella Elisaberthville (six farms). Resistance to chloramphenicol, sulfonamides, nalidixic acid, streptomycin, and tetracycline ranged from 11.6 % (n = 26) to 22.8 % (n = 51). Resistance ciprofloxacin and gentamicin was low (n = 2; 0.9 %). Multiply resistant isolates included Salmonella Kentucky, the most resistant serovar. qnrB19 was found in two isolates of Salmonella Corvallis and one isolate of Salmonella Larochelle, respectively, while qnrS1 was found in two isolates of Salmonella Derby. Other PMQR genes were not detected. Pigs constitute an important source of diverse Salmonella serovars in Ibadan. The isolates were more resistant to old antimicrobials with some multiple resistant. Control measures and regulation of antimicrobials are warranted.

  2. Isolation and characterization of Salmonella enterica in day-old ducklings in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Kamelia M; Marouf, Sherif H; Zolnikov, Tara R; AlAtfeehy, Nayerah

    2014-01-01

    Importing day-old ducklings (DOD) unknowingly infected with non-typhoid Salmonella (NTS) may be associated with disease risk. Domestic and international trade may enhance this risk. Salmonella enterica serovars, their virulence genes combinations and antibiotic resistance, garner attention for their potentiality to contribute to the adverse health effects on populations throughout the world. The aim of this study was to estimate the risk of imported versus domestic DOD as potential carriers of NTS. The results confirm the prevalence of salmonellosis in imported ducklings was 18·5% (25/135), whereas only 12% (9/75) of cases were determined in the domestic ducklings. Fourteen serovars (Salmonella enteritidis, Salmonella kisii, Salmonella typhimurium, Salmonella gaillac, Salmonella uno, Salmonella eingedi, Salmonella shubra, Salmonella bardo, Salmonella inganda, Salmonella kentucky, Salmonella stanley, Salmonella virchow, Salmonella haifa, and Salmonella anatum) were isolated from the imported ducklings, whereas only S. enteritidis, S. typhimurium, S. virchow, and S. shubra were isolated from the domestic ducklings. The isolated Salmonella serovars were 100% susceptible to only colistin sulphate and 100% resistant to lincomycin. The 14 Salmonella serovars were screened for 11 virulence genes (invA, avrA, ssaQ, mgtC, siiD, sopB, gipA, sodC1, sopE1, spvC, and bcfC) by PCR. The invA, sopB, and bcfC genes were detected in 100% of the Salmonella serovars; alternatively, the gipA gene was absent in all of the isolated Salmonella serovars. The 11 virulent genes were not detected in either of S. stanley or S. haifa serovars. The results confirm an association between antibiotic resistance and virulence of Salmonella in the DOD. This study confirms the need for a country adherence to strict public health and food safety regimes.

  3. The transcriptional landscape and small RNAs of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kröger, Carsten; Dillon, Shane C.; Cameron, Andrew D. S.

    2012-01-01

    More than 50 y of research have provided great insight into the physiology, metabolism, and molecular biology of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium), but important gaps in our knowledge remain. It is clear that a precise choreography of gene expression is required for Salmone......More than 50 y of research have provided great insight into the physiology, metabolism, and molecular biology of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium), but important gaps in our knowledge remain. It is clear that a precise choreography of gene expression is required...

  4. Salmonella Enterica Serotype Enteritidis Vertebral Osteomyelitis and Epidural Abscess Complicated with Meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oki, Masayuki; Ueda, Akihiro; Tsuda, Ayumi; Yanagi, Hidetaka; Ozawa, Hideki; Takagi, Atsushi

    2016-09-20

    Infection with non-typhoidal Salmonella often results in a self-limited acute gastroenteritis. Extra-intestinal Salmonella infection is relatively rare and occurs predominantly in infants and adults with significant underlying conditions. We describe a 54-year-old Japanese man with a history of heavy alcohol consumption and daily contact with a dog, who developed bacteremia complicated by vertebral osteomyelitis, spinal epidural abscess, and meningitis, due to Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis. This case suggests that Salmonella should be considered as an etiologic pathogen in adult patients with perivertebral infection or meningitis.

  5. Genomic characterisation of invasive non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica Subspecies enterica Serovar Bovismorbificans isolates from Malawi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Bronowski

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Invasive Non-typhoidal Salmonella (iNTS are an important cause of bacteraemia in children and HIV-infected adults in sub-Saharan Africa. Previous research has shown that iNTS strains exhibit a pattern of gene loss that resembles that of host adapted serovars such as Salmonella Typhi and Paratyphi A. Salmonella enterica serovar Bovismorbificans was a common serovar in Malawi between 1997 and 2004. METHODOLOGY: We sequenced the genomes of 14 Malawian bacteraemia and four veterinary isolates from the UK, to identify genomic variations and signs of host adaptation in the Malawian strains. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Whole genome phylogeny of invasive and veterinary S. Bovismorbificans isolates showed that the isolates are highly related, belonging to the most common international S. Bovismorbificans Sequence Type, ST142, in contrast to the findings for S. Typhimurium, where a distinct Sequence Type, ST313, is associated with invasive disease in sub-Saharan Africa. Although genome degradation through pseudogene formation was observed in ST142 isolates, there were no clear overlaps with the patterns of gene loss seen in iNTS ST313 isolates previously described from Malawi, and no clear distinction between S. Bovismorbificans isolates from Malawi and the UK. The only defining differences between S. Bovismorbificans bacteraemia and veterinary isolates were prophage-related regions and the carriage of a S. Bovismorbificans virulence plasmid (pVIRBov. CONCLUSIONS: iNTS S. Bovismorbificans isolates, unlike iNTS S. Typhiumrium isolates, are only distinguished from those circulating elsewhere by differences in the mobile genome. It is likely that these strains have entered a susceptible population and are able to take advantage of this niche. There are tentative signs of convergent evolution to a more human adapted iNTS variant. Considering its importance in causing disease in this region, S. Bovismorbificans may be at the beginning of this process

  6. Comparative proteomic analysis of the PhoP regulon in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi versus Typhimurium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richelle C Charles

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: S. Typhi, a human-restricted Salmonella enterica serovar, causes a systemic intracellular infection in humans (typhoid fever. In comparison, S. Typhimurium causes gastroenteritis in humans, but causes a systemic typhoidal illness in mice. The PhoP regulon is a well studied two component (PhoP/Q coordinately regulated network of genes whose expression is required for intracellular survival of S. enterica. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using high performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS, we examined the protein expression profiles of three sequenced S. enterica strains: S. Typhimurium LT2, S. Typhi CT18, and S. Typhi Ty2 in PhoP-inducing and non-inducing conditions in vitro and compared these results to profiles of phoP(-/Q(- mutants derived from S. Typhimurium LT2 and S. Typhi Ty2. Our analysis identified 53 proteins in S. Typhimurium LT2 and 56 proteins in S. Typhi that were regulated in a PhoP-dependent manner. As expected, many proteins identified in S. Typhi demonstrated concordant differential expression with a homologous protein in S. Typhimurium. However, three proteins (HlyE, STY1499, and CdtB had no homolog in S. Typhimurium. HlyE is a pore-forming toxin. STY1499 encodes a stably expressed protein of unknown function transcribed in the same operon as HlyE. CdtB is a cytolethal distending toxin associated with DNA damage, cell cycle arrest, and cellular distension. Gene expression studies confirmed up-regulation of mRNA of HlyE, STY1499, and CdtB in S. Typhi in PhoP-inducing conditions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study is the first protein expression study of the PhoP virulence associated regulon using strains of Salmonella mutant in PhoP, has identified three Typhi-unique proteins (CdtB, HlyE and STY1499 that are not present in the genome of the wide host-range Typhimurium, and includes the first protein expression profiling of a live attenuated bacterial vaccine studied in humans (Ty800.

  7. Use of Attenuated but Metabolically Competent Salmonella as a Probiotic To Prevent or Treat Salmonella Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabag-Daigle, Anice; Blunk, Henry M; Gonzalez, Juan F; Steidley, Brandi L; Boyaka, Prosper N; Ahmer, Brian M M

    2016-07-01

    Salmonella enterica is among the most burdensome of foodborne disease agents. There are over 2,600 serovars that cause a range of disease manifestations ranging from enterocolitis to typhoid fever. While there are two vaccines in use in humans to protect against typhoid fever, there are none that prevent enterocolitis. If vaccines preventing enterocolitis were to be developed, they would likely protect against only one or a few serovars. In this report, we tested the hypothesis that probiotic organisms could compete for the preferred nutrient sources of Salmonella and thus prevent or treat infection. To this end, we added the fra locus, which encodes a utilization pathway for the Salmonella-specific nutrient source fructose-asparagine (F-Asn), to the probiotic bacterium Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (Nissle) to increase its ability to compete with Salmonella in mouse models. We also tested a metabolically competent, but avirulent, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium mutant for its ability to compete with wild-type Salmonella The modified Nissle strain became more virulent and less able to protect against Salmonella in some instances. On the other hand, the modified Salmonella strain was safe and effective in preventing infection with wild-type Salmonella While we tested for efficacy only against Salmonella Typhimurium, the modified Salmonella strain may be able to compete metabolically with most, if not all, Salmonella serovars, representing a novel approach to control of this pathogen.

  8. Role of soil, crop debris, and a plant pathogen in Salmonella enterica contamination of tomato plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeri D Barak

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the U.S., tomatoes have become the most implicated vehicle for produce-associated Salmonellosis with 12 outbreaks since 1998. Although unconfirmed, trace backs suggest pre-harvest contamination with Salmonella enterica. Routes of tomato crop contamination by S. enterica in the absence of direct artificial inoculation have not been investigated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This work examined the role of contaminated soil, the potential for crop debris to act as inoculum from one crop to the next, and any interaction between the seedbourne plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria and S. enterica on tomato plants. Our results show S. enterica can survive for up to six weeks in fallow soil with the ability to contaminate tomato plants. We found S. enterica can contaminate a subsequent crop via crop debris; however a fallow period between crop incorporation and subsequent seeding can affect contamination patterns. Throughout these studies, populations of S. enterica declined over time and there was no bacterial growth in either the phyllosphere or rhizoplane. The presence of X. campestris pv. vesicatoria on co-colonized tomato plants had no effect on the incidence of S. enterica tomato phyllosphere contamination. However, growth of S. enterica in the tomato phyllosphere occurred on co-colonized plants in the absence of plant disease. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: S. enterica contaminated soil can lead to contamination of the tomato phyllosphere. A six week lag period between soil contamination and tomato seeding did not deter subsequent crop contamination. In the absence of plant disease, presence of the bacterial plant pathogen, X. campestris pv. vesicatoria was beneficial to S. enterica allowing multiplication of the human pathogen population. Any event leading to soil contamination with S. enterica could pose a public health risk with subsequent tomato production, especially in areas prone to bacterial spot disease.

  9. A CRISPR-based MLST Scheme for Understanding the Population Biology and Epidemiology of Salmonella Enterica

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-26

    ARO funds, we have investigated over the past three years whether polymorphic regions called CRISPR can used to differentiate strains of this...pathogen for outbreak investigations. We have also been investigating whether CRISPR in Salmonella protects the bacteria against foreign DNA as described...in other systems, or whether it has alternative functions. Here, we report that CRISPR can be used to subtype Salmonella enterica serovariants

  10. Outbreak-associated Salmonella enterica Serotypes and Food Commodities, United States, 1998–2008

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Brendan R.; Griffin, Patricia M.; Cole, Dana; Walsh, Kelly A.; Chai, Shua J.

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella enterica infections are transmitted not only by animal-derived foods but also by vegetables, fruits, and other plant products. To clarify links between Salmonella serotypes and specific foods, we examined the diversity and predominance of food commodities implicated in outbreaks of salmonellosis during 1998–2008. More than 80% of outbreaks caused by serotypes Enteritidis, Heidelberg, and Hadar were attributed to eggs or poultry, whereas >50% of outbreaks caused by serotypes Javiana...

  11. Dissemination of clonal Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates causing salmonellosis in Mauritius

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium is one of the leading causes of salmonellosis in Mauritius, where it has also been associated with outbreaks of foodborne illness. However, little is known about its molecular epidemiology in the country. This study was therefore undertaken to investigate the clonality and source of Salmonella Typhimurium in Mauritius by studying human, food, and poultry isolates by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and antibiotic minimum inhibitory concentration...

  12. Population Dynamics of Salmonella enterica Serotypes in Commercial Egg and Poultry Production ▿

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Fresh and processed poultry have been frequently implicated in cases of human salmonellosis. Furthermore, increased consumption of meat and poultry has increased the potential for exposure to Salmonella enterica. While advances have been made in reducing the prevalence and frequency of Salmonella contamination in processed poultry, there is mounting pressure on commercial growers to prevent and/or eliminate these human pathogens in preharvest production facilities. Several factors contribute ...

  13. Acid Exposure Induces Multiplication of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahirwar, Suneel Kumar; Pratap, Chandra Bhan; Patel, Saurabh Kumar; Shukla, Vijay K.; Singh, Indarjeet Gambhir; Mishra, Om Prakash; Kumar, Kailash; Singh, Tej Bali

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi faces several environmental stresses while going through the stomach (acidic pH) to the small intestine (basic pH) and intracellularly in macrophages (acidic pH) in humans. The acidic pH followed by alkaline pH in the small intestine might be responsible for expression of certain stress-induced genes, resulting in not only better survival but also induction of multiplication and invasion of the bacterium in the small intestine. Based on this hypothesis, we developed a process wherein we exposed the blood, urine, and stool specimens from 90 acute typhoid fever patients and 36 chronic typhoid carriers to acidic pH to see the effect on isolation rate of S. Typhi. About 5 g of freshly passed unpreserved stool, a centrifuged deposit of 15 ml of urine, and 5 ml of blood clot were subjected to 5 ml of Luria-Bertani (LB) broth (pH 3.5) for 20 min, followed by enrichment in bile broth-selenite F broth. When the combined isolation from all 3 specimens, i.e., blood, urine, and stool, after acid exposure was considered, a total of 77.7% of the acute typhoid patients were observed to be positive for the isolation of the S. Typhi serotype, compared to 8.8% by the conventional method. Similarly, 42% (15/36) of chronic carriers yielded positive for S. Typhi growth after acid exposure, compared to 5.5% (2/36) by the conventional method. It therefore can be concluded that acid shock triggers the multiplication of the bacteria, resulting in better isolation rates from blood clot, stool, and urine specimens. PMID:25320227

  14. Variable carbon catabolism among Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lay Ching Chai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi is strictly a human intracellular pathogen. It causes acute systemic (typhoid fever and chronic infections that result in long-term asymptomatic human carriage. S. Typhi displays diverse disease manifestations in human infection and exhibits high clonality. The principal factors underlying the unique lifestyle of S. Typhi in its human host during acute and chronic infections remain largely unknown and are therefore the main objective of this study. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To obtain insight into the intracellular lifestyle of S. Typhi, a high-throughput phenotypic microarray was employed to characterise the catabolic capacity of 190 carbon sources in S. Typhi strains. The success of this study lies in the carefully selected library of S. Typhi strains, including strains from two geographically distinct areas of typhoid endemicity, an asymptomatic human carrier, clinical stools and blood samples and sewage-contaminated rivers. An extremely low carbon catabolic capacity (27% of 190 carbon substrates was observed among the strains. The carbon catabolic profiles appeared to suggest that S. Typhi strains survived well on carbon subtrates that are found abundantly in the human body but not in others. The strains could not utilise plant-associated carbon substrates. In addition, α-glycerolphosphate, glycerol, L-serine, pyruvate and lactate served as better carbon sources to monosaccharides in the S. Typhi strains tested. CONCLUSION: The carbon catabolic profiles suggest that S. Typhi could survive and persist well in the nutrient depleted metabolic niches in the human host but not in the environment outside of the host. These findings serve as caveats for future studies to understand how carbon catabolism relates to the pathogenesis and transmission of this pathogen.

  15. Acid exposure induces multiplication of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahirwar, Suneel Kumar; Pratap, Chandra Bhan; Patel, Saurabh Kumar; Shukla, Vijay K; Singh, Indarjeet Gambhir; Mishra, Om Prakash; Kumar, Kailash; Singh, Tej Bali; Nath, Gopal

    2014-12-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi faces several environmental stresses while going through the stomach (acidic pH) to the small intestine (basic pH) and intracellularly in macrophages (acidic pH) in humans. The acidic pH followed by alkaline pH in the small intestine might be responsible for expression of certain stress-induced genes, resulting in not only better survival but also induction of multiplication and invasion of the bacterium in the small intestine. Based on this hypothesis, we developed a process wherein we exposed the blood, urine, and stool specimens from 90 acute typhoid fever patients and 36 chronic typhoid carriers to acidic pH to see the effect on isolation rate of S. Typhi. About 5 g of freshly passed unpreserved stool, a centrifuged deposit of 15 ml of urine, and 5 ml of blood clot were subjected to 5 ml of Luria-Bertani (LB) broth (pH 3.5) for 20 min, followed by enrichment in bile broth-selenite F broth. When the combined isolation from all 3 specimens, i.e., blood, urine, and stool, after acid exposure was considered, a total of 77.7% of the acute typhoid patients were observed to be positive for the isolation of the S. Typhi serotype, compared to 8.8% by the conventional method. Similarly, 42% (15/36) of chronic carriers yielded positive for S. Typhi growth after acid exposure, compared to 5.5% (2/36) by the conventional method. It therefore can be concluded that acid shock triggers the multiplication of the bacteria, resulting in better isolation rates from blood clot, stool, and urine specimens.

  16. Dissemination of antimicrobial-resistant clones of Salmonella enterica among domestic animals, wild animals, and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomo, Gonzalo; Campos, Maria Jorge; Ugarte, María; Porrero, María Concepción; Alonso, Juan Manuel; Borge, Carmen; Vadillo, Santiago; Domínguez, Lucas; Quesada, Alberto; Píriz, Segundo

    2013-02-01

    Non-typhoidal salmonellosis is an important zoonotic disease caused by Salmonella enterica. This work focuses on the identification of Salmonella enterica clonal strains which, presenting a wide distribution potential, express resistance determinants that compromise effectiveness of the antimicrobial therapy. The screening was performed on 506 Salmonella enterica isolates from animals and humans, which were characterized by serovar and phage typing, genome macrorestriction and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and detection of phenotypic and genotypic traits for antimicrobial resistance. A Salmonella Enteritidis strain with strong quinolone resistance is spread on three host environments carrying one of the four variants found for the GyrA protein: (1) Asp87Tyr, the major polymorphism found in 39 Salmonella isolates from human origin and six from poultry; (2) Ser83Phe, with four isolates from human origin and one from white stork (Ciconia ciconia); and (3) Asp87Asn or (4) Asp87Gly, with two isolates each from human origins. Several Salmonella Typhimurium strains that presented int1 elements and the classically associated pentaresistance (ACSSuT) phenotype were found distributed between two host environments: domestic animals and humans, domestics and wild animals, or wild fauna plus humans. This study points out the importance of monitoring gut microbiota and its antimicrobial resistance from wildlife, in parallel to livestock animals and humans, especially for animal species that are in close contact with people.

  17. Nation-wide Salmonella enterica surveillance and control in Danish slaughter swine herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mousing, Jan; Jensen, P.T.; Halgaard, C.;

    1997-01-01

    A nation-wide Salmonella enterica surveillance and control programme was initiated in Danish finishing herds over the first quarter of 1995, In Denmark, all swine for slaughter are identifiable by a unique herd code. For each herd code, and depending on the herd's annual kill, random samples...... ranging from four to more than 60 swine are obtained quarterly at the abattoir. A meat sample from each pig is frozen, and meat juice (harvested after thawing) is examined for specific antibodies against S. enterica using an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The ELISA combines several S...... herd sizes). Irrespective of Salmonella level, all herds receive a monthly update on the current results of the S. enterica test results. IF a herd is categorized in Level 2 or 3, it must receive an advisory visit by a practising veterinarian and a local swine extension specialist, and certain...

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of a Lytic Siphoviridae Bacteriophage Infecting Several Serovars of Salmonella enterica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradiso, Rubina; Lombardi, Serena; Iodice, Maria Grazia; Riccardi, Marita Georgia; Orsini, Massimiliano; Bolletti Censi, Sergio; Galiero, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    The bacteriophage 100268_sal2 was isolated from water buffalo feces in southern Italy, exhibiting lytic activity against several subspecies of Salmonella enterica. This bacteriophage belongs to the Siphoviridae family and has a 125,114-bp double-stranded DNA (ds-DNA) genome containing 188 coding sequences (CDSs). PMID:27688334

  19. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Salmonella enterica Strains Isolated from Sprouted Chia and Flax Seed Powders

    OpenAIRE

    Ronholm, Jennifer; Petronella, Nicholas; Tamber, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    A 2014 foodborne salmonellosis outbreak in Canada and the United States implicated, for the first time, sprouted chia seed powder as the vehicle of transmission. Here, we report the draft whole genome sequences of two Salmonella enterica strains isolated from sprouted powders related to the aforementioned outbreak.

  20. Genomic epidemiology of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis based on population structure of prevalent lineages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis (SE) is one of the most commonly reported causes of human salmonellosis. The low genetic diversity of SE measured by fingerprinting methods has made subtyping a challenge. In this study, we used whole genome sequencing to characterize a total of 125 SE and Sa...

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of a Myoviridae Bacteriophage Infecting Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradiso, Rubina; Orsini, Massimiliano; Bolletti Censi, Sergio; Galiero, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    The bacteriophage 118970_sal3 was isolated from water buffalo feces in southern Italy, exhibiting lytic activity against Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. This bacteriophage belongs to the Myoviridae family and has a 39,464-bp double-stranded DNA (ds-DNA) genome containing 53 coding sequences (CDSs). PMID:27688333

  2. Class 1 integron-mediated antibiotic resistance in Salmonella enterica strains isolated in Tehran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Ranjbar

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: Our findings showed that integrons class 1 were widely distributed among Salmonella enterica isolates. Surveillance and monitoring of antimicrobial drug resistance, including screening for integrons as likely indicators of drug resistance and acquisition of new resistance traits, are necessary steps in planning effective strategies for containing this phenomenon within foodborne infection organisms.

  3. Salmonella enterica serotype enteritidis in French Polynesia, South Pacific, 2008-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Hello, Simon; Maillard, Fiona; Mallet, Henri-Pierre; Daudens, Elise; Levy, Marc; Roy, Valérie; Branaa, Philippe; Bertrand, Sophie; Fabre, Laetitia; Weill, François-Xavier

    2015-06-01

    Outbreaks of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis infections associated with eggs occurred in French Polynesia during 2008-2013. Molecular analysis of isolates by using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat polymorphisms and multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis was performed. This subtyping made defining the epidemic strain, finding the source, and decontaminating affected poultry flocks possible.

  4. Extremely Drug-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serovar Senftenberg Infections in Patients in Zambia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriksen, Rene S.; Joensen, Katrine Grimstrup; Lukwesa-Musyani, Chileshe;

    2013-01-01

    Two cases of extremely drug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Senftenberg isolated from patients in Zambia were investigated by utilizing MIC determinations and whole-genome sequencing. The isolates were resistant to, and harbored genes toward, nine drug classes, including fluoroquinolones...

  5. Multiple roles of putrescine and spermidine in stress resistance and virulence of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cartas Espinel, Irene; Guerra, Priscila Regina; Jelsbak, Lotte

    2016-01-01

    Polyamines (putrescine and spermidine) are small-cationic amines ubiquitous in nature and present in most living cells. In recent years they have been linked to virulence of several human pathogens including Shigella spp and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium). Central to S...

  6. Differential induction of total IgE by two Salmonella enterica serotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ktsoyan, Zhanna A.; Mkrtchyan, Mkhitar S.; Zakharyan, Magdalina K.;

    2015-01-01

    The main goal of this study was to establish how the inflammation caused by infection with two different Salmonella enterica serotypes, S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis, may lead to the predisposition to allergy as measured by total IgE level in the blood. Infection by S. Typhimurium did not aff...

  7. Effects of Pseudomonas chlororaphis and gaseous chlorine dioxide on the survival of Salmonella enterica on tomatoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Produce contamination incited by Salmonella enterica serovars on tomatoes and various outbreaks of Salmonellisis have been reported periodically. Post-harvest intervention measures applied to limit produce contamination will improve food and consumer safety. The aim of this reserach was to evaluat...

  8. Impact of Strain Variation on the Ability of Biosensor Technology to Detect Salmonella enterica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: It is important to develop methods that can quickly and accurately detect the presence of bacteria in the food supply that cause disease. Salmonella enterica is a bacteria that is often associated with contamination of food. Strains vary in their ability to cause illness and to spread...

  9. Global Genomic Epidemiology of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium DT104

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Le Hello, Simon

    2016-01-01

    It has been 30 years since the initial emergence and subsequent rapid global spread of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 (MDR DT104). Nonetheless, its origin and transmission route have never been revealed. We used whole-genome sequencing (WGS) and temporally struc...

  10. Outbreak-associated Salmonella enterica Serotypes and Food Commodities, United States, 1998- 2008

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-09-09

    Dr. Mike Miller reads an abridged version of the Emerging Infectious Diseases’ study, Outbreak-associated Salmonella enterica Serotypes and Food Commodities, United States, 1998- 2008.  Created: 9/9/2013 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 9/9/2013.

  11. Draft Genome Sequences of Four Salmonella enterica Strains Isolated from Turkey-Associated Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jing; Gokulan, Kuppan; Zhao, Shaohua; Gies, Allen

    2016-01-01

    We report the draft genomes of four Salmonella enterica isolates evaluated for the contribution of plasmids to virulence. Strains SE163A, SE696A, and SE710A carry plasmids demonstrated to facilitate plasmid-associated virulence, while SE819 is less virulent and has been used as a recipient for conjugation experiments to assess plasmid-encoded virulence mechanisms. PMID:27738037

  12. Persistence of fluoroquinolone-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky from poultry and poultry sources in Nigeria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raufu, Ibrahim A.; Fashae, Kayode; Ameh, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This study investigated the antimicrobial resistance and clonality of Salmonella enterica serotype Kentucky in poultry and poultry sources in Nigeria, and compared the isolates with the clone of S. Kentucky STI98-X1 CIPR using (PFGE) and (MIC). Methodology: Fecal samples from chicke...

  13. Subtyping of Salmonella enterica subspecies I using single nucleotide polymorphisms in adenylate cyclase (cyaA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methods to rapidly identify serotypes of Salmonella enterica subspecies I are of vital importance for protecting the safety of food. To supplement the serotyping method dkgB-linked intergenic sequence ribotyping (ISR), single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were characterized within adenylate cyclas...

  14. Biofilm formation, phenotypic production of cellulose and gene expression in Salmonella enterica decrease under anaerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamas, A; Miranda, J M; Vázquez, B; Cepeda, A; Franco, C M

    2016-12-05

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica is one of the main food-borne pathogens. This microorganism combines an aerobic life outside the host with an anaerobic life within the host. One of the main concerns related to S. enterica is biofilm formation and cellulose production. In this study, biofilm formation, morphotype, cellulose production and transcription of biofilm and quorum sensing-related genes of 11 S. enterica strains were tested under three different conditions: aerobiosis, microaerobiosis, and anaerobiosis. The results showed an influence of oxygen levels on biofilm production. Biofilm formation was significantly higher (Pbiofilm and quorum sensing-related genes. Thus, the results from this study indicate that biofilm formation and cellulose production are highly influenced by atmospheric conditions. This must be taken into account as contamination with these bacteria can occur during food processing under vacuum or modified atmospheres.

  15. Prevalence and Characterization of Salmonella enterica and Salmonella Bacteriophages Recovered from Beef Cattle Feedlots in South Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yicheng; Savell, Jeffrey W; Arnold, Ashley N; Gehring, Kerri B; Gill, Jason J; Taylor, T Matthew

    2016-08-01

    Asymptomatic Salmonella carriage in beef cattle is a food safety concern, and the beef feedlot environment may function as a reservoir of this pathogen. The goal of this study was to identify and isolate Salmonella and Salmonella bacteriophages from beef cattle feedlot environments in order to better understand the microbial ecology of Salmonella and identify phages that might be useful as anti-Salmonella beef safety interventions. Three feedlots in south Texas were visited, and 27 distinct samples from each source were collected from dropped feces, feed from feed bunks, drinking water from troughs, and soil in cattle pens (n = 108 samples). Preenrichment, selective enrichment, and selective/differential isolation of Salmonella were performed on each sample. A representative subset of presumptive Salmonella isolates was prepared for biochemical identification and serotyping. Samples were pooled by feedlot and sample type to create 36 samples and enriched to recover phages. Recovered phages were tested for host range against two panels of Salmonella hosts. Salmonella bacteria were identified in 20 (18.5%) of 108 samples by biochemical and/or serological testing. The serovars recovered included Salmonella enterica serovars Anatum, Muenchen, Altona, Kralingen, Kentucky, and Montevideo; Salmonella Anatum was the most frequently recovered serotype. Phage-positive samples were distributed evenly over the three feedlots, suggesting that phage prevalence is not strongly correlated with the presence of culturable Salmonella. Phages were found more frequently in soil and feces than in feed and water samples. The recovery of bacteriophages in the Salmonella-free feedlot suggests that phages might play a role in suppressing the Salmonella population in a feedlot environment.

  16. An outbreak of multidrug-resistant, quinolone-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype typhimurium DT104

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molbak, K.; Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    1999-01-01

    Background Food-borne salmonella infections have become a major problem in industrialized countries. The strain of Salmonella enterica serotype typhimurium known as definitive phage type 104 (DT104) is usually resistant to five drugs: ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfonamides...... findings here. Results Until 1997, DT104 infections made up less than 1 percent of all human salmonella infections. The strain isolated from patients in the first community outbreak of DT104 in Denmark, in 1998, was resistant to nalidixic acid and had reduced susceptibility to fluoroquinolones...

  17. A novel multiplex PCR for the simultaneous detection of Salmonella enterica and Shigella species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhika, M; Saugata, Majumder; Murali, H S; Batra, H V

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica and Shigella species are commonly associated with food and water borne infections leading to gastrointestinal diseases. The present work was undertaken to develop a sensitive and reliable PCR based detection system for simultaneous detection of Salmonella enterica and Shigella at species level. For this the conserved regions of specific genes namely ipaH1, ipaH, wbgZ, wzy and invA were targeted for detection of Shigella genus, S. flexneri, S. sonnei, S. boydii and Salmonella enterica respectively along with an internal amplification control (IAC). The results showed that twenty Salmonella and eleven Shigella spp., were accurately identified by the assay without showing non-specificity against closely related other Enterobacteriaceae organisms and also against other pathogens. Further evaluation of multiplex PCR was undertaken on 50 natural samples of chicken, eggs and poultry litter and results compared with conventional culture isolation and identification procedure. The multiplex PCR identified the presence of Salmonella and Shigella strains with a short pre-enrichment step of 5 h in peptone water and the same samples were processed by conventional procedures for comparison. Therefore, this reported multiplex PCR can serve as an alternative to the tedious time-consuming procedure of culture and identification in food safety laboratories.

  18. A novel multiplex PCR for the simultaneous detection of Salmonella enterica and Shigella species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Radhika

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica and Shigella species are commonly associated with food and water borne infections leading to gastrointestinal diseases. The present work was undertaken to develop a sensitive and reliable PCR based detection system for simultaneous detection of Salmonella enterica and Shigella at species level. For this the conserved regions of specific genes namely ipaH1, ipaH, wbgZ, wzy and invA were targeted for detection of Shigella genus, S. flexneri, S. sonnei, S. boydii and Salmonella enterica respectively along with an internal amplification control (IAC. The results showed that twenty Salmonella and eleven Shigella spp., were accurately identified by the assay without showing non-specificity against closely related other Enterobacteriaceae organisms and also against other pathogens. Further evaluation of multiplex PCR was undertaken on 50 natural samples of chicken, eggs and poultry litter and results compared with conventional culture isolation and identification procedure. The multiplex PCR identified the presence of Salmonella and Shigella strains with a short pre-enrichment step of 5 h in peptone water and the same samples were processed by conventional procedures for comparison. Therefore, this reported multiplex PCR can serve as an alternative to the tedious time-consuming procedure of culture and identification in food safety laboratories.

  19. A comparative study of thermal and acid inactivation kinetics in fruit juices of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Salmonella enterica serovar Senftenberg grown at acidic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Ordóñez, Avelino; Fernández, Ana; Bernardo, Ana; López, Mercedes

    2009-11-01

    Acid and heat inactivation in orange and apple juices of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium Colección Española de Cultivos Tipo (i.e., Spanish Type Culture Collection) 443 (CECT 443) (Salmonella Typhimurium) and S. enterica serovar Senftenberg CECT 4384 (Salmonella Senftenberg) grown in buffered brain heart infusion (pH 7.0) and acidified brain heart infusion up to pH 4.5 with acetic, citric, lactic, and hydrochloric acids was evaluated. Acid adaptation induced an adaptive response that increased the subsequent resistance to extreme pH conditions (pH 2.5) and to heat, although the magnitude of these responses differed between the two isolates and fruit juices. The acid resistance in orange juice for acid-adapted cells (D-values of 28.3-34.5 min for Salmonella Senftenberg and 30.0-39.2 min for Salmonella Typhimurium) resulted to be about two to three times higher than that corresponding to non-acid-adapted cells. In apple juice, acid-adapted Salmonella Senftenberg cells survived better than those of Salmonella Typhimurium, obtaining mean D-values of 114.8 +/- 12.3 and 41.9 +/- 2.5 min, respectively. The thermotolerance of non-acid-adapted Salmonella Typhimurium in orange (D(58)-value: 0.028 min) and apple juices (D(58)-value: 0.10 min) was approximately double for acid-adapted cells. This cross-protection to heat was more strongly expressed in Salmonella Senftenberg. D(58)-values obtained for non-acid-adapted cells in orange (0.11 min) and apple juices (0.19 min) increased approximately 10 and 5 times, respectively, after their growth in acidified media. The conditions prevailing during bacterial growth and heat treatment did not significantly influence the z-values observed (6.0 +/- 0.3 degrees C for Salmonella Typhimurium and 7.0 +/- 0.3 degrees C for Salmonella Senftenberg). The enhanced acid resistance found for both isolates could enable them to survive for prolonged time periods in the gastrointestinal tract, increasing the risk of illness. Further, it

  20. The contribution of genes required for anaerobic respiration to the virulence of Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum for chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.B. Paiva

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum (SG is an intracellular pathogen of chickens. To survive, to invade and to multiply in the intestinal tract and intracellularly it depends on its ability to produce energy in anaerobic conditions. The fumarate reductase (frdABCD, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO-trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO reductase (dmsABC, and nitrate reductase (narGHIJ operons in Salmonella Typhimurium (STM encode enzymes involved in anaerobic respiration to the electron acceptors fumarate, DMSO, TMAO, and nitrate, respectively. They are regulated in response to nitrate and oxygen availability and changes in cell growth rate. In this study mortality rates of chickens challenged with mutants of Salmonella Gallinarum, which were defective in utilising anaerobic electron acceptors, were assessed in comparison to group of bird challenged with wild strain. The greatest degree of attenuation was observed with mutations affecting nitrate reductase (napA, narG with additional attenuations induced by a mutation affecting fumarate reductase (frdA and a double mutant (dmsA torC affecting DMSO and TMAO reductase.

  1. Global gene expression of a murein (Braun) lipoprotein mutant of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium by microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadl, A A; Galindo, C L; Sha, J; Klimpel, G R; Popov, V L; Chopra, A K

    2006-06-01

    Braun/murein lipoprotein (Lpp) is one of the major outer membrane components of gram-negative enteric bacteria involved in inflammatory responses and septic shock. In previous studies, we reported that two copies of the lipoprotein (lpp) gene (designated as lppA and lppB) existed on the chromosome of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Deletion of both lppA and lppB genes rendered Salmonella defective in invasion, motility, induction of cytotoxicity, and production of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines. The lppAB double-knockout (DKO) mutant was attenuated in mice, and animals immunized with this mutant were protected against subsequent challenge with lethal doses of wild-type (wt) S. Typhimurium. To better understand how deletion of the lpp gene might affect Salmonella virulence, we performed global transcriptional profiling of the genes in the wt and the lppAB DKO mutant of S. Typhimurium using microarrays. Our data revealed alterations in the expression of flagellar genes, invasion-associated type III secretion system genes, and transcriptional virulence gene regulators in the lppAB DKO mutant compared to wt S. Typhimurium. These data correlated with the lppAB DKO mutant phenotype and provided possible mechanism(s) of Lpp-associated attenuation in S. Typhimurium. Although these studies were performed in in vitro grown bacteria, our future research will be targeted at global transcriptional profiling of the genes in in vivo grown wt S. Typhimurium and its Lpp mutant.

  2. Antimicrobial activity of sweet basil and thyme against salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis in egg-based pasta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojiljković Jasmina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis is known as one of the most common pathogenic bacteria causing salmonellosis in humans. Raw materials of animal origin (eggs, chicken meat are frequent vectors that transmit this bacterium. Since eggs are used for the production of pasta, due to insufficient thermal treatment during pasta drying, they can be a potential risk to consumer health. Different essential oils of herbs can be used to reduce present pathogenic microorganisms. This paper compares a decrease in the number of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis (D ATCC 13076 and Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis isolated from outbreaks of salmonellosis in egg-based pasta under the influence of thyme and sweet basil essential oils. The results indicate that the utilized oils were more effective against the epidemic strain than the ATCC strain. In addition, thyme oil caused a more significant inhibition of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis during the production process.

  3. Metabolic parameters linked by Phenotype MicroArray to acid resistance profiles of poultry-associated Salmonella enterica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phenotype microarrays were analyzed for 51 datasets derived from Salmonella enterica. The top 4 serovars associated with poultry products and one associated with turkey, respectively Typhimurium, Enteritidis, Heidelberg, Infantis and Senftenberg, were represented. Datasets were clustered into two ...

  4. Hatchery-borne Salmonella enterica serovar Tennessee infections in broilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, J.P.; Brown, D.J.; Madsen, Mogens

    1997-01-01

    A substantial increase in the prevalence of S. enterica serovar Tennessee was observed in broiler flocks in Denmark at the turn of the year 1994 and in the following months. Epidemiological data indicated that a single hatchery was involved in spreading of the infection. Molecular characterization...... of S. enterica serovar Tennessee isolates from Danish broilers (1992 to 1995), the suspected hatchery and strains from various other sources included for comparison was initiated in order to trace the source of infection of the broilers. In general, strains of S. enterica ser. Tennessee showed only....... Restriction enzyme analysis of the plasmid ensured that the plasmids from broilers and the hatchery were identical. By analysis of cleaning and disinfection procedures and by sampling of different control points in the hatchery it was shown that S. enterica ser. Tennessee had colonized areas of the hatchers...

  5. Longitudinal prevalence, faecal shedding and molecular characterisation of Campylobacter spp. and Salmonella enterica in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rongchang; Jacobson, Caroline; Gardner, Graham; Carmichael, Ian; Campbell, Angus J D; Ryan, Una

    2014-11-01

    Faecal excretion of Campylobacter spp. and Salmonella enterica in sheep in Australia was determined using a quantitative multiplex PCR (qPCR) targeting the Campylobacter spp. purine biosynthesis gene (PurA) and the S. enterica outer membrane protein (ompF). The mutiplex qPCR was specific and Campylobacter spp. and S. enterica were each detected with a sensitivity of 5 organisms/µL faecal DNA extract. This multiplex qPCR was used to determine the prevalence and concentration of Campylobacter spp. and S. enterica in 3412 faecal samples collected from 1189 lambs on eight farms across South Australia (n = 2 farms), New South Wales (n = 1), Victoria (n = 2) and Western Australia (n = 3) at three sampling periods (weaning, post-weaning and pre-slaughter). The overall prevalences of Campylobacter spp. and S. enterica were 13.3% and 5.0%, respectively, with the highest prevalence for Campylobacter spp. in South Australia and the highest prevalence for S. enterica in New South Wales. Campylobacter jejuni was the only Campylobacter sp. identified from a subset of 120 positive samples sequenced at the 16S locus. S. enterica serovar Typhimurium was the only serovar of S. enterica identified from a subset of 120 positive samples sequenced at the ompF locus. Across all states, Campylobacter spp. had the highest median bacterial concentration in faeces at weaning and post-weaning (medians of 3.4 × 10(6) and 1.1 × 10(5), respectively), whereas S. enterica had the highest median bacterial concentration at pre-slaughter (1.8 × 10(5)/g faeces).

  6. Immune response of turkey poults exposed at 1 day of age to either attenuated or wild Salmonella strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Martina; Stamm, Andreas; Weber, Rita; Glünder, Gerhard; Berndt, Angela

    2016-06-01

    Salmonellosis is a foodborne zoonosis that is most often acquired by consuming poultry products such as eggs and poultry meat. Amongst other measures the vaccination of food-producing poultry is thought to contribute to a reduction in human salmonellosis. In the European Union (EU) in 2014 the licence of a commercially available Salmonella vaccine for chickens and ducks was extended to turkeys. In the present study, we examined the course of infection with a virulent Salmonella enterica ssp. enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) strain, a virulent S. enterica ssp. enterica serovar Typhimurium (ST) strain, and the respective live vaccine containing attenuated strains of both serovars in turkey poults. Besides collecting microbiological data and detecting invading Salmonella in the caecal mucosa via immunohistochemistry, we also assessed immune reactions in terms of antibody production, influx of CD4-, CD8α- and CD28-positive cells into the caecal mucosa and the expression of four different immune-related proteins. We found that the attenuated strains were able to invade the caecum, but to a lower degree and for a shorter duration of time compared to virulent strains. Infections with virulent Salmonellae also caused an increase in CD4-, CD8α- and CD28-positive cells in the caecal mucosa and an increased transcription of iNOS, IL-8-like chemokines, and IFN-γ. In poults treated with attenuated bacteria we could not detect any evidence of immune responses. In conclusion, the vaccine showed a lower degree of caecal invasion and induced weaker immune reactions compared to the virulent Salmonella strains in turkeys. The efficiency of the vaccine has to be verified in future studies.

  7. Ecology and modelling of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in cattle manure and soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Semenov, A.V.

    2008-01-01

    The number of food poisoning cases caused by enteropathogens has increased in recent years. A significant part of the outbreaks associated with the consumption of raw vegetables has been attributed to Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium. Bovine manure

  8. The Type III Secretion System Effector SeoC of Salmonella enterica subsp. salamae and S. enterica subsp. arizonae ADP-Ribosylates Src and Inhibits Opsonophagocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Dominic J.; Young, Joanna C.; Covarelli, Valentina; Herrera-León, Silvia; Connor, Thomas R.; Fookes, Maria; Walker, Danielle; Echeita, Aurora; Thomson, Nicholas R.; Berger, Cedric N.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella species utilize type III secretion systems (T3SSs) to translocate effectors into the cytosol of mammalian host cells, subverting cell signaling and facilitating the onset of gastroenteritis. In this study, we compared a draft genome assembly of Salmonella enterica subsp. salamae strain 3588/07 against the genomes of S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium strain LT2 and Salmonella bongori strain 12419. S. enterica subsp. salamae encodes the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1), SPI-2, and the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) T3SSs. Though several key S. Typhimurium effector genes are missing (e.g., avrA, sopB, and sseL), S. enterica subsp. salamae invades HeLa cells and contains homologues of S. bongori sboK and sboC, which we named seoC. SboC and SeoC are homologues of EspJ from enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EPEC and EHEC, respectively), which inhibit Src kinase-dependent phagocytosis by ADP-ribosylation. By screening 73 clinical and environmental Salmonella isolates, we identified EspJ homologues in S. bongori, S. enterica subsp. salamae, and Salmonella enterica subsp. arizonae. The β-lactamase TEM-1 reporter system showed that SeoC is translocated by the SPI-1 T3SS. All the Salmonella SeoC/SboC homologues ADP-ribosylate Src E310 in vitro. Ectopic expression of SeoC/SboC inhibited phagocytosis of IgG-opsonized beads into Cos-7 cells stably expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-FcγRIIa. Concurrently, S. enterica subsp. salamae infection of J774.A1 macrophages inhibited phagocytosis of beads, in a seoC-dependent manner. These results show that S. bongori, S. enterica subsp. salamae, and S. enterica subsp. arizonae share features of the infection strategy of extracellular pathogens EPEC and EHEC and shed light on the complexities of the T3SS effector repertoires of Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:27736780

  9. Antibiotic resistances in Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica isolated from foods with animal origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baltasar Balsalobre Hernández

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Extensive use of antibiotics in both human and animal health and in cattle production has generated resistant microorganisms to common antibiotics. Resistances spread caused by human and animal therapeutic is well known, but we know poorly frecuency of resistant bacteria in foods with animal origin and destinated to human consumers. In this paper, sensitivity to nineteen antibiotics was investigated in Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica strains isolated from foods with animal origin, including fresh meat, hamburgers, fresh sausages, boiled ham and new-laid chicken eggs. The plate diffusion method of Bauer-Kirby was used.Listeria monocytogenes strains showed a very high sensitivity to all antibiotics checked, with the exception of one strain tetracycline resistant. In contrast, Salmonella enterica showed a high frecuency of resistances, in special to tetracycline, streptomycin, nalidixic acid, ticarcillin, ampicillin and chloramphenicol. Moreover, multi-resistance was a common phenomenon. Twenty percent of S. enterica strains were resistant to four or more antibiotics. Frecuency of resistances was higher in 4,5,12:i:-, Hadar, Typhimurium and Virchow serotypes.In conclusion, Salmonella enterica strains isolated from foods with animal origin and destinated to human consumers are usually resistant to several antibiotics. The significance of this observation and its potential health risk must be investigated.

  10. First Case of Lung Abscess due to Salmonella enterica Serovar Abony in an Immunocompetent Adult Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassiliki Pitiriga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In healthy individuals, nontyphoidal Salmonella species predominantly cause a self-limited form of gastroenteritis, while they infrequently invade or cause fatal disease. Extraintestinal manifestations of nontyphoidal Salmonella infections are not common and mainly occur among individuals with specific risk factors; among them, focal lung infection is a rare complication caused by nontyphoidal Salmonella strains typically occurring in immunocompromised patients with prior lung disease. We describe the first case of a localized lung abscess formation in an immunocompetent healthy female adult due to Salmonella enterica serovar Abony. The patient underwent lobectomy and was discharged after full clinical recovery. This case report highlights nontyphoidal Salmonellae infections as a potential causative agent of pleuropulmonary infections even in immunocompetent healthy adults.

  11. Evaluation of vaccine candidate potential of deltaaroA, deltahtrA and deltaaroAdeltahtrA mutants of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Abortusequi in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bhoj Raj; Chandra, Mudit; Hansda, Dhananjoy; Alam, Javed; Babu, Narayanan; Siddiqui, Mehtab Z; Agrawal, Ravi K; Sharma, Gautam

    2013-04-01

    Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Abortusequi (S. Abortusequi), a host adapted Salmonella causes abortions, still births and foal mortality in equids. Though known since more than 100 years, it is still a problem in many of the developing countries including India. There is dearth of really good vaccine affording immunity lasting at least for one full gestation. In search of a potential vaccine candidate, three defined deletion mutants (deltaaroA, deltahtrA and deltaaroAdeltahtrA) of S. Abortusequi were tested in guinea pig model for attenuation, safety, immunogenicity, humoral immune response, protective efficacy and persistence in host. The deltahtrA and deltaaroAdeltahtrA mutants were found to be safe on oral inoculation in doses as high as 4.2 x 10(9) cfu/animal. Also through subcutaneous inoculation deltaaroAdeltahtrA mutant did not induce any abortion in pregnant guinea pigs. All the three mutants did not induce any illness or death in 1-2 week-old baby guinea pigs except deltahtrA mutant which caused mortality on intraperitoneal inoculation. Inoculation with mutants protected against challenge and increased breeding efficiency of guinea pigs. After >4.5 months of mutant inoculation, guinea pigs were protected against abortifacient dose of wild type S. Abortusequi and mother guinea pigs also conferred resistance to their babies to the similar challenge. Early humoral immune response of S. Abortusequi mutants was characteristic. Faecal excretion of deltaaroA and htrA mutants was detected up to 45 days of inoculation in guinea pigs while deltaaroAdeltahtrA mutant could not be detected after 21 days of inoculation. The results indicated that the double deletion mutant (deltaaroAdeltahtrA) was the most effective and safe candidate for vaccination against S. Abortusequi through mucosal route of inoculation.

  12. Natural surface coating to inactivate Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and maintain quality of cherry tomatoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Juan; Fan, Xuetong; Li, Xihong; Jin, Tony Z; Jia, Xiaoyu; Mattheis, James P

    2015-01-16

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effectiveness of zein-based coatings in reducing populations of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and preserving quality of cherry tomatoes. Tomatoes were inoculated with a cocktail of S. Typhimurium LT2 plus three attenuated strains on the smooth skin surface and stem scar area. The zein-based coatings with and without cinnamon (up to 20%) and mustard essential oil or a commercial wax formulation were applied onto tomatoes and the treated fruits were stored at 10 °C for up to 3 weeks. Populations of S. Typhimurium decreased with increased essential oil concentration and storage duration. S. Typhimurium populations on the smooth skin surface were reduced by 4.6 and 2.8 log colony forming units(CFU)/g by the zein coatings with 20% cinnamon and 20% mustard oil, respectively, 5h after coating. The same coating reduced populations of S. Typhimurium to levels below detection limit (1.0 log CFU/g) on the stem scar area of tomato during 7 days of storage at 10 °C. Salmonella populations were not reduced on fruit coated with the commercial wax. All of the coatings resulted in reduced weight loss compared with uncoated control. Compared with the control, loss of firmness and ascorbic acid during storage was prevented by all of the coatings except the zein coating with 20% mustard oil which enhanced softening. Color was not consistently affected by any of the coating treatments during 21 days of storage at 10°C. The results suggest that the zein-based coating containing cinnamon oil might be used to enhance microbial safety and quality of tomato.

  13. Variable abattoir conditions affect Salmonella enterica prevalence and meat quality in swine and pork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurd, H S; Gailey, J K; McKean, J D; Griffith, R W

    2005-01-01

    Research suggests that abattoir holding pens pose significant Salmonella enterica risk to swine immediately preharvest. The goal of this study was to evaluate those factors related to holding that increased the prevalence of S. enterica in swine at slaughter. To accomplish this goal, we focused on holding time and flooring. Our objectives were to (1) compare Salmonella enterica prevalence among pigs held for short (15-45 min) versus long (up to 4 h) periods before slaughter; and (2) determine the impact of flooring (slatted vs. concrete) as it relates to the prevalence of S. enterica. The study consisted of seven repetitions at a large volume (11,000 head/day) Midwest abattoir. Each repetition consisted of one truck load of pigs (n = 170) sorted into one of three groups: (1) animals held for a short time (15-45 min) on solid floors (short-hold); (2) animals held for 4 +/- 0.5 h on slatted floors; and (3) animals held for 4 +/- 0.5 h on solid concrete floors. At slaughter, samples were collected from 30 pigs in each group. Cecal contents (20 mL), feces (20 g), and the ileocecal lymph node were cultured for S. enterica. Additionally, the effect of holding time on meat quality parameters (loin pH at 35 min and 6 h, color, drip loss) was evaluated for the first four replicates. The proportion of S. enterica-positive samples was highest (p Meat quality, as measured by multiple parameters, was adversely affected by lack of a rest period. The mean 24-h pH was significantly lower for the short-hold group compared to the other two groups. The mean Minolta L and the drip loss were significantly higher in the short-hold group. From this and other studies, it appears that elimination of the holding process is not feasible S. enterica control option, given current U.S. harvesting systems.

  14. Resistance phenotypes and genotypes of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica isolates from feed, pigs, and carcasses in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Graciela Volz; Pissetti, Caroline; da Cruz Payão Pellegrini, Débora; da Silva, Luis Eduardo; Cardoso, Marisa

    2015-02-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica plays a role as a foodborne pathogen worldwide. The consumption of contaminated pork has been associated with human salmonellosis and the increase in antimicrobial resistance among Salmonella from pigs and pork products is a concern. A total of 225 Salmonella isolates from feed mills, the lairage environment, and the intestinal contents of pigs and carcasses were investigated for their antimicrobial susceptibility. A MIC for ciprofloxacin was screened by agar dilution, and antimicrobial resistance genes were investigated by PCR assays. Among the tested isolates, 171 (76%) showed resistance to at least one antimicrobial agent, and 91 (40.4%) were multiresistant. Resistance occurred most frequently to tetracycline (54.5%), sulfonamides (39.6%), and streptomycin (33.7%). Thirty-two (94.1%) nalidixic acid-resistant isolates exhibited decreased susceptibility to ciprofloxacin. The resistance genes found were blaTEM (ampicillin), tet(A) (tetracycline), tet(B) (tetracycline/minocycline), sul1, sul2, and sul3 (sulfonamides), catA1 (chloramphenicol), floR (florfenicol/chloramphenicol), strA and strB (streptomycin), aph(3')-Ia (kanamycin), aac(3)-IIa and aac(3)-IVa (apramycin/gentamicin), aadA variant (streptomycin/spectinomycin), and dfrA1 (trimethoprim). Salmonella isolates from pig feces and carcasses displayed a higher frequency of resistance to most antimicrobials tested than isolates from feed mills. Common resistance gene profiles were found in isolates from the lairage and the intestinal content of pigs and carcasses, demonstrating that resistance genes selected on farms may be found in pork.

  15. Identification of Key Genes in the Response to Salmonella enterica Enteritidis, Salmonella enterica Pullorum, and Poly(I:C in Chicken Spleen and Caecum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teng Ma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis and Salmonella enterica Pullorum (S. pullorum are regarded as a threat to poultry production. This study’s aim is to characterize the expression profiles in response to three different challenges and to identify infection-related genes in the chicken spleen and caecum. Groups of the Chinese chicken breed Langshan were challenged with either S. Enteritidis, S. pullorum, or poly(I:C. The concentrations of cytokines and antibodies and the Salmonella colonization level of the caecum and liver were detected in each group at 7 days postinfection. Expression microarray experiments were conducted using mRNA isolated from both spleen and caecum. Crucial differentially expressed genes (DEGs associated with immunity were identified. Four DEGs were identified in spleen of all three challenge groups (RBM16, FAH, SOX5, and RBM9 and different four genes in caecum (SOUL, FCN2, ANLN, and ACSL1. Expression profiles were clearly different among the three challenged groups. Genes enriched in the spleen of birds infected with S. pullorum were enriched in lymphocyte proliferation related pathways, but the enriched genes in the caecum of the same group were primarily enriched in innate immunity or antibacterial responses. The DEGs that appear across all three challenge groups might represent global response factors for different pathogens.

  16. Antimicrobial resistance and subtyping of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Enteritidis isolated from human outbreaks and poultry in southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, C S L; Streck, A F; Michael, G B; Marks, F S; Rodrigues, D P; Dos Reis, E M F; Cardoso, M R I; Canal, C W

    2010-07-01

    To investigate antimicrobial resistance, 96 Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Enteritidis strains isolated from salmonellosis outbreaks and poultry-related products obtained in southern Brazil were analyzed. Macrorestriction patterns, obtained by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and phage types, were assessed. Although 43.75% of samples were sensitive to all drugs tested, resistance to sulfonamide (34.37%), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (25.00%), nalidixic acid (14.58%), streptomycin (2.08%), gentamicin, and tetracycline (1.04%) was identified. Furthermore, 89.60% of strains belonged to phage type 4, and a predominant pulsed-field gel electrophoresis genotype represented by 82.29% of the strains was identified, suggesting that a clonal group was distributed in poultry, food, and human isolates. Although it was not possible to associate strains from different sources, the occurrence of antimicrobial-resistant Salmonella Enteritidis strains supports the need to establish monitoring programs to identify the emergence of potential resistance patterns and to direct policies for use of these drugs in food-producing animals.

  17. Isolation, serotype diversity and antibiogram of Salmonella enterica isolated from different species of poultry in India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Irfan Ahmad Mir; Sudhir Kumar Kashyap; Sunil Maherchandani

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To study the occurrence and serotype diversity of Salmonella isolates in different species of poultry (chicken, emu and duck) and determine their resistance pattern against various antibiotics of different classes. Methods:About 507 samples comprising 202 caecal contents and 305 fecal samples from chicken, emu and duck were processed for isolation of Salmonella enterica. Salmonellae were isolated and detected by standard protocol of ISO 6579 Amendment 1:Annex D. Genetic confirmation was also made by using 16S rRNA genus specific PCR. Serotype specific PCR was also done to detect the most common serovars viz. Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Gallinarum. All obtained isolates were subjected to a set of 25 antibiotics to study their antibiogram by using Baeur-Kirby disk diffusion method. Results:Out of 507 samples processed, 32 isolates of Salmonella enterica (18 from caecal contents and 14 from faecal samples) were obtained, of which 24 belonged to 6 different serovars, 6 were untypeable and 2 were rough strains. Salmonella Enteritidis was the most predominant serotype (9), followed by Salmonella Typhimurium (5), Salmonella Virchow (4), Salmonella Gallinarum (3), Salmonella Reading (2) and Salmonella Altona (1). Antibiotic resistance pattern was maximum (100%) to oxacillin, penicillin and clindamycin, followed by ampicillin (68.75%), tetracycline (65.62%), nalidixic acid (56.25%) and colistin (46.87%). High sensitivity of isolates was recorded for chloramphenicol (96.87%) followed by meropenem (84.37%). Conclusions:Occurrence of high proportion of serovars in our study which can cause serious gastroenteritis in humans is a matter of concern. Salmonella Altona has been detected for the first time in India from poultry. This serotype is known to cause serious outbreaks of gastroenteritis in humans. Multidrug resistant isolates were recovered at high percentage which can be attributed to non-judicious use of antibiotics both in

  18. Isolation, serotype diversity and antibiogram of Salmonella enterica isolated from different species of poultry in India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Irfan; Ahmad; Mir; Sudhir; Kumar; Kashyap; Sunil; Maherchandani

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the occurrence and serotype diversity of Salmonella isolates in different species of poultry(chicken, emu and duck) and determine their resistance pattern against various antibiotics of different classes.Methods: About 507 samples comprising 202 caecal contents and 305 fecal samples from chicken, emu and duck were processed for isolation of Salmonella enterica. Salmonellae were isolated and detected by standard protocol of ISO 6579 Amendment 1: Annex D. Genetic confirmation was also made by using 16 S r RNA genus specific PCR. Serotype specific PCR was also done to detect the most common serovars viz. Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Gallinarum. All obtained isolates were subjected to a set of 25 antibiotics to study their antibiogram by using Baeur-Kirby disk diffusion method.Results: Out of 507 samples processed, 32 isolates of Salmonella enterica(18 from caecal contents and 14 from faecal samples) were obtained, of which 24 belonged to 6 different serovars, 6 were untypeable and 2 were rough strains. Salmonella Enteritidis was the most predominant serotype(9), followed by Salmonella Typhimurium(5), Salmonella Virchow(4), Salmonella Gallinarum(3), Salmonella Reading(2) and Salmonella Altona(1). Antibiotic resistance pattern was maximum(100%) to oxacillin, penicillin and clindamycin, followed by ampicillin(68.75%), tetracycline(65.62%), nalidixic acid(56.25%) and colistin(46.87%). High sensitivity of isolates was recorded for chloramphenicol(96.87%) followed by meropenem(84.37%). Conclusions: Occurrence of high proportion of serovars in our study which can cause serious gastroenteritis in humans is a matter of concern. Salmonella Altona has been detected for the first time in India from poultry. This serotype is known to cause serious outbreaks of gastroenteritis in humans. Multidrug resistant isolates were recovered at high percentage which can be attributed to non-judicious use of antibiotics both in prophylaxis

  19. Application of molecular methods for identification of strains classified as Salmonella enterica serovar 6, 7/-/- by conventional serotyping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chadfield, M. S.; Christensen, J. P.; Madsen, Mogens

    2002-01-01

    An increased prevalence of Salmonella enterica serovar Tennessee (6, 7: z(29):-) was observed in broiler flocks in Denmark in 1994 and a parallel increase in the prevalence of Salmonella enterica serovar 6, 7:-:- was demonstrated, albeit at a lower level. Plasmid profiling and ribotyping revealed...... similar genotypes and it was speculated that serovar 6, 7:-:- could represent a non-motile variant of Salmonella Tennessee. Re-testing of the Salmonella 6, 7:-:- isolates demonstrated the presence of flagella through positive motility. All isolates but one demonstrated motility using both tube tests...... and light microscopy of overnight broth cultures. Molecular characterization indicated that all but two isolates previously classified as Salmonella 6, 7:-:, were isolates of Salmonella Tennessee and Salmonella Infantis, exhibiting reduced motility. Re-serotyping and multiplex polymerase chain reaction...

  20. Repression of Salmonella enterica phoP expression by small molecules from physiological bile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, L Caetano M; Wang, Melody; Andersen, Sarah K; Ferreira, Rosana B R; Kappelhoff, Reinhild; Han, Jun; Borchers, Christoph H; Finlay, B Brett

    2012-05-01

    Infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi in humans causes the life-threatening disease typhoid fever. In the laboratory, typhoid fever can be modeled through the inoculation of susceptible mice with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Using this murine model, we previously characterized the interactions between Salmonella Typhimurium and host cells in the gallbladder and showed that this pathogen can successfully invade gallbladder epithelial cells and proliferate. Additionally, we showed that Salmonella Typhimurium can use bile phospholipids to grow at high rates. These abilities are likely important for quick colonization of the gallbladder during typhoid fever and further pathogen dissemination through fecal shedding. To further characterize the interactions between Salmonella and the gallbladder environment, we compared the transcriptomes of Salmonella cultures grown in LB broth or physiological murine bile. Our data showed that many genes involved in bacterial central metabolism are affected by bile, with the citric acid cycle being repressed and alternative respiratory systems being activated. Additionally, our study revealed a new aspect of Salmonella interactions with bile through the identification of the global regulator phoP as a bile-responsive gene. Repression of phoP expression could also be achieved using physiological, but not commercial, bovine bile. The biological activity does not involve PhoPQ sensing of a bile component and is not caused by bile acids, the most abundant organic components of bile. Bioactivity-guided purification allowed the identification of a subset of small molecules from bile that can elicit full activity; however, a single compound with phoP inhibitory activity could not be isolated, suggesting that multiple molecules may act in synergy to achieve this effect. Due to the critical role of phoP in Salmonella virulence, further studies in this area will likely reveal aspects of the interaction between Salmonella

  1. Association between indoor environmental contamination by Salmonella enterica and contamination of eggs on layer farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gole, Vaibhav C; Torok, Valeria; Sexton, Margaret; Caraguel, Charles G B; Chousalkar, Kapil K

    2014-09-01

    This study involves longitudinal and point-in-time surveys of Salmonella carriage and environmental contamination on two commercial cage layer farms positive for Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium (flock A age, 32 weeks; flock B age, 34 weeks). Salmonella-positive fecal, egg belt, and dust samples were all unconditionally associated with eggshells testing positive for Salmonella. The odds of an eggshell testing positive for Salmonella were 91.8, 61.5, and 18.2 times higher when fecal, egg belt, and dust samples, respectively, tested positive for Salmonella. The agreement between the culture-based methods and real-time PCR on preenriched broths for detecting Salmonella was almost perfect for eggshell (observed agreement, 99.19%; kappa coefficient, 0.94) and egg belt samples (observed agreement, 95%; kappa coefficient, 0.88), and it was substantial for fecal (observed agreement, 87.14%; kappa coefficient, 0.47) and floor dust samples (observed agreement, 80.61%; kappa coefficient, 0.58). A 1-log increase in the load of Salmonella detected in the fecal, egg belt, and floor dust samples resulted in 35%, 43%, and 45% increases, respectively (P < 0.001), in the odds of an eggshell testing positive for Salmonella. The multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) patterns of the S. Typhimurium strains isolated from flock A were distinct from those of flock B. S. Typhimurium strains detected from human food poisoning cases exhibited an MLVA pattern similar to those of the strains isolated from flocks A and B.

  2. Assessment of root uptake and systemic vine-transport of Salmonella enterica sv. Typhimurium by melon (Cucumis melo) during field production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Velasco, Gabriela; Sbodio, Adrian; Tomás-Callejas, Alejandro; Wei, Polly; Tan, Kin Hup; Suslow, Trevor V

    2012-08-01

    Among melons, cantaloupes are most frequently implicated in outbreaks and surveillance-based recalls due to Salmonella enterica. There is limited but compelling evidence that associates irrigation water quality as a significant risk of preharvest contamination of melons. However, the potential for root uptake from water and soil and subsequent systemic transport of Salmonella into melon fruit is uncharacterized. The aim of this work was to determine whether root uptake of S. enterica results in systemic transport to fruit at high doses of applied inoculum through sub-surface drip and furrow irrigation during field production of melons. Cantaloupe and honeydew were grown under field conditions, in a silt clay loam soil using standard agronomic practices for California. An attenuated S. enterica sv. Typhimurium strain was applied during furrow irrigation and, in separate plots, buried drip-emitter lines delivered the inoculum directly into the established root zone. Contamination of the water resulted in soil contamination within furrows however Salmonella was not detected on top of the beds or around melon roots of furrow-irrigated rows demonstrating absence of detectable lateral transfer across the soil profile. In contrast, positive detection of the applied isolate occurred in soil and the rhizosphere in drip injected plots; survival of Salmonella was at least 41 days. Despite high populations of the applied bacteria in the rhizosphere, after surface disinfection, internalized Salmonella was not detected in mature melon fruit (n=485). Contamination of the applied Salmonella was detected on the rind surface of melons if fruit developed in contact with soil on the sides of the inoculated furrows. Following an unusual and heavy rain event during fruit maturation, melons collected from the central area of the beds, were shown to harbor the furrow-applied Salmonella. Delivery of Salmonella directly into the peduncle, after minor puncture wounding, resulted in detection

  3. Shoot Injury Increases the Level of Persistence of Salmonella enterica Serovar Sofia and Listeria innocua on Cos Lettuce and of Salmonella enterica Serovar Sofia on Chive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harapas, Dean; Premier, Robert; Tomkins, Bruce; Hepworth, Graham; Ajlouni, Said

    2015-12-01

    Minor shoot injury significantly (P cos lettuce in the greenhouse. Initial mean counts of the Salmonella on the injured and uninjured cos lettuce were on the order of 6 log CFU/g. After 3 days, the mean count decreased to 4.8 log CFU/g on the injured plants compared with the significantly (P cos lettuce and S. enterica serovar Sofia on chive. The findings reaffirm earlier results with Escherichia coli and increase the impetus to avoid shoot injury during the production of cos lettuce and chive, if bacteria of food safety concern are present.

  4. Inhibition of Salmonella enterica biofilm formation using small-molecule adenosine mimetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopman, Jacob A; Marshall, Joanna M; Bhatiya, Aditi; Eguale, Tadesse; Kwiek, Jesse J; Gunn, John S

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms have been widely implicated in chronic infections and environmental persistence of Salmonella enterica, facilitating enhanced colonization of surfaces and increasing the ability of the bacteria to be transmitted to new hosts. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi biofilm formation on gallstones from humans and mice enhances gallbladder colonization and bacterial shedding, while Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium biofilms facilitate long-term persistence in a number of environments important to food, medical, and farming industries. Salmonella regulates expression of many virulence- and biofilm-related processes using kinase-driven pathways. Kinases play pivotal roles in phosphorylation and energy transfer in cellular processes and possess an ATP-binding pocket required for their functions. Many other cellular proteins also require ATP for their activity. Here we test the hypothesis that pharmacological interference with ATP-requiring enzymes utilizing adenosine mimetic compounds would decrease or inhibit bacterial biofilm formation. Through the screening of a 3,000-member ATP mimetic library, we identified a single compound (compound 7955004) capable of significantly reducing biofilm formation by S. Typhimurium and S. Typhi. The compound was not bactericidal or bacteriostatic toward S. Typhimurium or cytotoxic to mammalian cells. An ATP-Sepharose affinity matrix technique was used to discover potential protein-binding targets of the compound and identified GroEL and DeoD. Compound 7955004 was screened against other known biofilm-forming bacterial species and was found to potently inhibit biofilms of Acinetobacter baumannii as well. The identification of a lead compound with biofilm-inhibiting capabilities toward Salmonella provides a potential new avenue of therapeutic intervention against Salmonella biofilm formation, with applicability to biofilms of other bacterial pathogens.

  5. PCR Method To Identify Salmonella enterica Serovars Typhi, Paratyphi A, and Paratyphi B among Salmonella Isolates from the Blood of Patients with Clinical Enteric Fever▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Haim; Diallo, Souleymane; Tennant, Sharon M.; Livio, Sofie; Sow, Samba O.; Tapia, Milagritos; Fields, Patricia I.; Mikoleit, Matthew; Tamboura, Boubou; Kotloff, Karen L.; Lagos, Rosanna; Nataro, James P.; Galen, James E.; Levine, Myron M.

    2008-01-01

    PCR methodology was developed to identify Salmonella enterica serovars Typhi, Paratyphi A, and Paratyphi B. One multiplex PCR identifies serogroup D, A, and B and Vi-positive strains; another confirms flagellar antigen “d,” “a,” or “b.” Blinded testing of 664 Malian and Chilean Salmonella blood isolates demonstrated 100% sensitivity and specificity. PMID:18367574

  6. Chicken serologic response to Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium assessed by Elisa

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    GH Oliveira

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated two enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA in the detection of chicken serologic response against Salmonella enterica sorotype Typhimurium. The assays have used as detecting antigen the soluble bacterial proteins of a non-flagellated strain of Salmonella Typhimurium (AgTM, and antibody conjugated to peroxidase or alkaline phosphatase. According to the results, optimal dilutions of antigen (concentration 5.49 mg/mL and serum samples in both assays were 1:20,000 and 1:1,000, respectively. In such conditions, the ELISA/AgTM was able to detect serological response to Salmonella Typhimurium. Cross-reactions to Salmonella serotypes Gallinarum and Pullorum were seen, but not with other serotypes such as Enteritidis.

  7. Interaction of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium with Intestinal Organoids Derived from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbester, Jessica L; Goulding, David; Vallier, Ludovic; Hannan, Nicholas; Hale, Christine; Pickard, Derek; Mukhopadhyay, Subhankar; Dougan, Gordon

    2015-07-01

    The intestinal mucosa forms the first line of defense against infections mediated by enteric pathogens such as salmonellae. Here we exploited intestinal "organoids" (iHOs) generated from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hIPSCs) to explore the interaction of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium with iHOs. Imaging and RNA sequencing were used to analyze these interactions, and clear changes in transcriptional signatures were detected, including altered patterns of cytokine expression after the exposure of iHOs to bacteria. S. Typhimurium microinjected into the lumen of iHOs was able to invade the epithelial barrier, with many bacteria residing within Salmonella-containing vacuoles. An S. Typhimurium invA mutant defective in the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 invasion apparatus was less capable of invading the iHO epithelium. Hence, we provide evidence that hIPSC-derived organoids are a promising model of the intestinal epithelium for assessing interactions with enteric pathogens.

  8. The Base Excision Repair system of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium counteracts DNA damage by host nitric oxide.

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    Anthony R Richardson

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular pathogens must withstand nitric oxide (NO. generated by host phagocytes. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium interferes with intracellular trafficking of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and possesses multiple systems to detoxify NO.. Consequently, the level of NO. stress encountered by S. Typhimurium during infection in vivo has been unknown. The Base Excision Repair (BER system recognizes and repairs damaged DNA bases including cytosine and guanine residues modified by reactive nitrogen species. Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP sites generated by BER glycosylases require subsequent processing by AP endonucleases. S. Typhimurium xth nfo mutants lacking AP endonuclease activity exhibit increased NO. sensitivity resulting from chromosomal fragmentation at unprocessed AP sites. BER mutant strains were thus used to probe the nature and extent of nitrosative damage sustained by intracellular bacteria during infection. Here we show that an xth nfo S. Typhimurium mutant is attenuated for virulence in C3H/HeN mice, and virulence can be completely restored by the iNOS inhibitor L-NIL. Inactivation of the ung or fpg glycosylase genes partially restores virulence to xth nfo mutant S. Typhimurium, demonstrating that NO. fluxes in vivo are sufficient to modify cytosine and guanine bases, respectively. Mutants lacking ung or fpg exhibit NO.-dependent hypermutability during infection, underscoring the importance of BER in protecting Salmonella from the genotoxic effects of host NO.. These observations demonstrate that host-derived NO. damages Salmonella DNA in vivo, and the BER system is required to maintain bacterial genomic integrity.

  9. Outbreak-associated Salmonella enterica serotypes and food Commodities, United States, 1998-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Brendan R; Griffin, Patricia M; Cole, Dana; Walsh, Kelly A; Chai, Shua J

    2013-08-01

    Salmonella enterica infections are transmitted not only by animal-derived foods but also by vegetables, fruits, and other plant products. To clarify links between Salmonella serotypes and specific foods, we examined the diversity and predominance of food commodities implicated in outbreaks of salmonellosis during 1998-2008. More than 80% of outbreaks caused by serotypes Enteritidis, Heidelberg, and Hadar were attributed to eggs or poultry, whereas >50% of outbreaks caused by serotypes Javiana, Litchfield, Mbandaka, Muenchen, Poona, and Senftenberg were attributed to plant commodities. Serotypes Typhimurium and Newport were associated with a wide variety of food commodities. Knowledge about these associations can help guide outbreak investigations and control measures.

  10. Pleural empyema due to Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in an immunocompetent elderly patient: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karachalios, Kostis; Siagris, Dimitrios; Lekkou, Alexandra; Anastassiou, Evangelos D.; Spiliopoulou, Iris; Gogos, Charalambos

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Pleural empyema as a focal infection due to Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is rare and most commonly described among immunosuppressed patients or patients who suffer from sickle cell anaemia and lung malignancies. Case presentation: Here, we present an 81-year-old immunocompetent Greek woman with bacteraemia and pleural empyema due to Salmonella Enteritidis without any gastrointestinal symptoms. Conclusion: In our case, we suggest that patient’s pleural effusion secondary to heart failure was complicated by empyema and that focal intravascular infection was the cause of bacteraemia. PMID:28348773

  11. Persistence of two Salmonella enterica ser. Montevideo strains throughout horn fly (Diptera: Muscidae) larval and pupal development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strains of Salmonella enterica can be subdivided into clades that differ in their composition of genes, including those that influence microbial ecology and bacterial transmission. Salmonella serovar Montevideo strains 1110 and 304, representatives of two different clades, were used throughout this ...

  12. Emergence and clonal dissemination of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis causing salmonellosis in Mauritius

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Issack, Mohammad I.; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Hyytiae-Trees, Eija

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: For decades, Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis has been among the most prevalent serovars reported worldwide. However, it was rarely encountered in Mauritius until 2007; since then the number of non-typhoidal Salmonella serogroup O:9 (including serovar Enteritidis) increased. ...

  13. PoxA, yjeK, and elongation factor P coordinately modulate virulence and drug resistance in Salmonella enterica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navarre, William Wiley; Zou, S Betty; Roy, Hervé;

    2010-01-01

    We report an interaction between poxA, encoding a paralog of lysyl tRNA-synthetase, and the closely linked yjeK gene, encoding a putative 2,3-beta-lysine aminomutase, that is critical for virulence and stress resistance in Salmonella enterica. Salmonella poxA and yjeK mutants share extensive...

  14. Lipopolysaccharide-Deficient Mutants of Salmonella enterica Have Increased Sensitivity to Catechins

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshii, Miho; OKAMOTO, Akira; Ota, Michio

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial activity is one of the well-known biological characteristics of catechins, the main extract of green tea leaves. It is thought that catechins intercalate into the bacterial cell membrane and damage the lipid bilayer. However, the association between catechins and lipopolysaccharides, which consist of an O side chain, core oligosaccharide, and lipid A, has not been previously investigated. In this study, we evaluated the catechin sensitivity of Salmonella enterica mutants that la...

  15. Thioridazine protects the mouse from a virulent infection by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium 74

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dasgupta, Asish; Mukherjee, Sayanti; Chaki, Shaswati

    2010-01-01

    When administered to mice at doses of 100microg/mouse and 200microg/mouse, thioridazine (TDZ) significantly protected animals from the lethality produced by a virulent strain of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and reduced the number of bacteria retrieved from the spleen, liver and heart b...... to rapid induction of the two-step PmrA/B regulon that results in the eventual synthesis and insertion of lipid A into the nascent lipopolysaccharide layer of the outer membrane....

  16. Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhi Bacteremia Complicating Pregnancy in the Third Trimester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Krunal; Gittens-Williams, Lisa; Apuzzio, Joseph J.; Martimucci, Kristina; Williams, Shauna F.

    2017-01-01

    Background. Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi (S. Typhi) is an anaerobic gram-negative enteric rod that causes infection when contaminated food or water is ingested and may cause illness in pregnancy. Case. This is a patient who presented at 31 weeks' gestation with abdominal pain and fever and was diagnosed with S. Typhi bacteremia. Conclusion. S. Typhi should be considered in febrile patients with recent travel presenting with abdominal discomfort with or without elevated liver enzymes. PMID:28203469

  17. Models of intestinal infection by Salmonella enterica: introduction of a new neonate mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a foodborne pathogen causing inflammatory disease in the intestine following diarrhea and is responsible for thousands of deaths worldwide. Many in vitro investigations using cell culture models are available, but these do not represent the real natural environment present in the intestine of infected hosts. Several in vivo animal models have been used to study the host-pathogen interaction and to unravel the immune responses and cellular processes o...

  18. Pathogenicity of Dodecyltrimethylammonium Chloride-Resistant Salmonella enterica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmonella infection causes a self-limiting gastroenteritis in humans but can also result in a life threatening invasive disease especially in old, young and/or immunocompromised patients. The prevalence of antimicrobial and multidrug-resistant Salmonella has increased worldwide since the 1980’s. Ho...

  19. Experimental Salmonella Enterica Infection in Market-weight Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Market pigs infected with Salmonella pose a significant food safety risk by carrying the pathogen into abattoirs. A study was conducted to determine the dynamic of Salmonella infection in market-weight pigs (220-240 lbs.). Pigs (n=24) were individually inoculated (intranasally; 108 cfu/mL) with Salm...

  20. Salmonella Enterica Prevalence in Finishing Pigs at Slaughter Plants in Northern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacci, Cristina; Lanzoni, Elisa; Brindani, Franco; Bonardi, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Finishing pigs carrying Salmonella enterica are believed to be the main source of carcass contamination at the beginning of slaughtering. The aim of this study was to assess the S. enterica carrier status of finishing pigs at herd level by sampling pooled faeces on farm and mesenteric lymph nodes at slaughter in the North East of Italy. Environmental faecal samples belonging to 30 batches of pigs were collected on farm. At slaughter, mesenteric lymph nodes were collected from five randomly selected pigs per batch. S. enterica was isolated from 16 lymph nodes out of 150 (10.6%) and from seven out of 30 (23.3%) faecal samples. Four batches (13.3%) were positive to S. enterica both in lymph nodes and in faeces. The number of batches positive to S. enterica either in lymph nodes or in faeces was 13 out of 30 (43.3%). The most prevalent serovars from lymph nodes were S. Derby (25.0%) and S. Typhimurium monophasic variant 1, 4,[5],12:i:- (18.6%), which were also isolated from faecal material (14.3 and 42.8% respectively). Contaminated faecal material or lymph nodes could be a primary source of carcass contamination at slaughter during evisceration. S. enterica contamination is widespread on pig farms and carrier pigs pass undetected the inspection visits at slaughter, entering the food chain. Therefore, in order to control S. enterica in pigs, the need to quantify possible risk factors at slaughter and develop effective management strategies on farm is of paramount importance to ensure food safety.

  1. Salmonella enterica serovar Minnesota urosepsis in a patient with Crohn's disease in the absence of recent or current gastrointestinal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinebrunner, Niels; Sandig, Catharina; Zimmermann, Stefan; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Eisenbach, Christoph; Mischnik, Alexander

    2013-09-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Minnesota is a rarely isolated organism in clinical samples mainly grown from stool cultures. Sepsis due to Salmonella is known in severely immunocompromised patients, but so far urosepsis due to S. enterica serovar Minnesota has not been described. We report a case of a 31-year-old patient suffering from Crohn's disease treated with infliximab and azathioprine, in whom was implanted a double-J ureteric catheter for urolithiasis. The patient presented with urinary tract infection and severe sepsis. S. enterica serovar Minnesota was grown from urine and blood cultures. After empiric antimicrobial treatment with meropenem and vancomycin, treatment was changed to ceftriaxone. Antimicrobial treatment was continued for a total of 3 weeks without evidence of Salmonella recurrence on follow-up visits. Salmonella spp. rarely cause urinary tract infection and sepsis. However, in immunocompromised patients, non-typhoidal salmonellosis merits a thorough clinical and microbiological evaluation.

  2. Experimental infection of laying hens with Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum Infecção experimental com Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum em poedeiras comerciais

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    Gláucia Helaine de Oliveira

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Experimental infections were set up in commercial laying birds, comprising a white relatively resistant line and a red susceptible line infecting with Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum. The major findings were that in susceptible birds clinical disease occurred in a dose-dependent manner. Faecal excretion occurred in susceptible birds almost up to death but also occurred in the more resistant line and in birds, which were convalescing. Removal of birds, which had died from the disease, from the environment, reduced the resultant mortality/morbidity and may be regarded as a useful measure for control.Infecções experimentais por Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum foram realizadas em aves de postura comercial, incluindo uma linhagem branca resistente e uma linhagem vermelha susceptível ao desenvolvimento da enfermidade clínica. As aves de linhagem susceptível apresentaram doença clínica dependente da dose administrada. Excreção fecal foi observada em aves da linhagem susceptível próximo ao momento da morte e, eventualmente, em aves da linhagem resistente e aves convalescentes. A remoção das aves mortas do meio ambiente reduziu a taxa de mortalidade/morbidade, procedimento este que pode ser utilizado como medida de controle.

  3. Molecular Characterization of Salmonella enterica Serovar Aberdeen Negative for H2S Production in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fuli; Xu, Xuebin; Xie, Jing; Yi, Shengjie; Wang, Jian; Yang, Xiaoxia; Yang, Chaojie; Liang, Beibei; Ma, Qiuxia; Li, Hao; Song, Hongbin; Qiu, Shaofu

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica infections continue to be a significant burden on public health worldwide. The ability of S. enterica to produce hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an important phenotypic characteristic used to screen and identify Salmonella with selective medium; however, H2S-negative Salmonella have recently emerged. In this study, the H2S phenotype of Salmonella isolates was confirmed, and the selected isolates were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing and molecular identification by multilocus sequence typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) analysis. The phs genetic operon was also analyzed. A total of 160 S. enterica serovar Aberdeen isolates were detected between 2005 and 2013 in China. Of them, seven non-H2S-producing isolates were detected. Notably, four samples yielded four pairs of isolates with different H2S phenotypes, simultaneously. The data demonstrated that H2S-negative isolates were genetically closely related to H2S-positive isolates. Three new spacers (Abe1, Abe2, and Abe3) were identified in CRISPR locus 1 in four pairs of isolates with different H2S phenotypes from the same samples. Sequence analysis revealed a new nonsense mutation at position 208 in the phsA gene of all non-H2S-producing isolates. Additionally, we describe a new screening procedure to avoid H2S-negative Salmonella, which would normally be overlooked during laboratory and hospital screening. The prevalence of this pathogen may be underestimated; therefore, it is important to focus on improving surveillance of this organism to control its spread.

  4. Dietary rice bran promotes resistance to Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium colonization in mice

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    Kumar Ajay

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dietary rice bran consists of many bioactive components with disease fighting properties; including the capacity to modulate the gut microbiota. Studies point to the important roles of the gut microbiota and the mucosal epithelium in the establishment of protection against enteric pathogens, such as Salmonella. The ability of rice bran to reduce the susceptibility of mice to a Salmonella infection has not been previously investigated. Therefore, we hypothesized that the incorporation of rice bran into the diet would inhibit the colonization of Salmonella in mice through the induction of protective mucosal responses. Results Mice were fed diets containing 0%, 10% and 20% rice bran for one week prior to being orally infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. We found that mice consuming the 10 and 20% rice bran diets exhibited a reduction in Salmonella fecal shedding for up to nine days post-infection as compared to control diet fed animals (p Lactobacillus spp. in rice bran fed mice (p Salmonella entry into mouse small intestinal epithelial cells. Conclusions Increasing rice bran consumption represents a novel dietary means for reducing susceptibility to enteric infection with Salmonella and potentially via induction of native Lactobacillus spp.

  5. Prevalence and molecular characterization of Salmonella enterica isolates throughout an integrated broiler supply chain in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, X; Li, M; Xu, C; Cui, K; Feng, Z; Fu, Y; Zhang, J; Liao, M

    2016-10-01

    A total of 1145 samples were collected from chicken breeder farms, hatcheries, broiler farms, a slaughterhouse and retail refrigerated chicken stores in an integrated broiler supply chain in Guangdong Province, China, in 2013. One-hundred and two Salmonella enterica strains were isolated and subjected to serotyping, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, virulence profile determination and molecular subtyping by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The contamination rates in samples from breeder farms, hatcheries, broiler farms, the slaughterhouse and retail stores were 1·46%, 4·31%, 7·00%, 62·86% and 54·67%, respectively. The isolated strains of S. enterica belonged to 10 serotypes; most of them were S. Weltevreden (46·08%, 47/102) and S. Agona (18·63%, 19/102). Isolates were frequently resistant to streptomycin (38·2%), tetracycline (36·3%), sulfisoxazole (35·3%) and gentamicin (34·3%); 31·4% of isolates were multidrug resistant. The isolates were screened for 10 virulence factors. The Salmonella pathogenicity island genes avrA, ssaQ, mgtC, siiD, and sopB and the fimbrial gene bcfC were present in 100% of the strains. PFGE genotyping of the 102 S. enterica isolates yielded 24 PFGE types at an 85% similarity threshold. The PFGE patterns show that the genotypes of S. enterica in the production chain are very diverse, but some strains have 100% similarity in different parts of the production chain, which indicates that some S. enterica persist throughout the broiler supply chain.

  6. Emergence of Ciprofloxacin-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Fernández, Aurora; Gallina, Silvia; Owczarek, Slawomir; Dionisi, Anna Maria; Benedetti, Ildo; Decastelli, Lucia; Luzzi, Ida

    2015-01-01

    In developed countries, typhoid fever is often associated with persons who travel to endemic areas or immigrate from them. Typhoid fever is a systemic infection caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi. Because of the emergence of antimicrobial resistance to standard first-line drugs, fluoroquinolones are the drugs of choice. Resistance to ciprofloxacin by this Salmonella serovar represents an emerging public health issue. Two S. enterica ser. Typhi strains resistant to ciprofloxacin (CIP) were reported to the Italian surveillance system for foodborne and waterborne diseases (EnterNet-Italia) in 2013. The strains were isolated from two Italian tourists upon their arrival from India. A retrospective analysis of 17 other S. enterica ser. Typhi strains isolated in Italy during 2011-2013 was performed to determine their resistance to CIP. For this purpose, we assayed for susceptibility to antimicrobial agents and conducted PCR and nucleotide sequence analyses. Moreover, all strains were typed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to evaluate possible clonal relationships. Sixty-eight percent of the S. enterica ser. Typhi strains were resistant to CIP (MICs, 0.125-16 mg/L), and all isolates were negative for determinants of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance. Analysis of sequences encoding DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV subunits revealed mutations in gyrA, gyrB, and parC. Thirteen different clonal groups were detected, and the two CIP-resistant strains isolated from the individuals who visited India exhibited the same PFGE pattern. Because of these findings, the emergence of CIP-resistant S. enterica ser. Typhi isolates in Italy deserves attention, and monitoring antibiotic susceptibility is important for efficiently managing cases of typhoid fever.

  7. Contribution of proton-translocating proteins to the virulence of Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium, Gallinarum, and Dublin in chickens and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, A K; Barber, L Z; Wigley, P; Muhammad, S; Jones, M A; Lovell, M A; Hulme, S; Barrow, P A

    2003-06-01

    We investigated the attenuating effects of a range of respiratory chain mutations in three Salmonella serovars which might be used in the development of live vaccines. We tested mutations in nuoG, cydA, cyoA, atpB, and atpH in three serovars of Salmonella enterica: Typhimurium, Dublin, and Gallinarum. All three serovars were assessed for attenuation in their relevant virulence assays of typhoid-like infections. Serovar Typhimurium was assessed in 1-day-old chickens and the mouse. Serovar Gallinarum 9 was assessed in 3-week-old chickens, and serovar Dublin was assessed in 6-week-old mice. Our data show variation in attenuation for the nuoG, cydA, and cyoA mutations within the different serovar-host combinations. However, mutations in atpB and atpH were highly attenuating for all three serovars in the various virulence assays. Further investigation of the mutations in the atp operon showed that the bacteria were less invasive in vivo, showing reduced in vitro survival within phagocytic cells and reduced acid tolerance. We present data showing that this reduced acid tolerance is due to an inability to adapt to conditions rather than a general sensitivity to reduced pH. The data support the targeting of respiratory components for the production of live vaccines and suggest that mutations in the atp operon provide suitable candidates for broad-spectrum attenuation of a range of Salmonella serovars.

  8. Immunoprotectivity of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis virulence protein, InvH, against Salmonella typhi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Dehghani

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:Typhoid fever is a dreadful disease of a major threat to public health in developing countries. Vaccination with bacterial immunodominant components such as surface proteins may prove as a potent alternative to live attenuated vaccines. InvH, an important part of needle complex in type three secretion system (TTSS plays important role in efficient bacterial adherence and entry into epithelial cells. Materials and Methods:In this work we used a 15 kDa recombinant InvH protein of Salmonella enteric serovar Enteritidis to provoke antibody production in mouse. The mice were immunized by recombinant InvH and challenged with Salmonella typhi. Histopathology of spleen and liver were studied. Results:The immunized mice showed a significant rise of antibody after the second booster. The immunization induced protection against high doses of S. typhi. The bacterial challenge with sera showed significant protection against challenge dose of 2×109 CFU. Immunized sera reacted with          S. typhi markedly. Immunoreaction of bacterially infected sera and InvH protein was significantly higher than the control group. Bacterial loads of S. typhi in spleen was more than liver. Decreased bacterial load was evident in immunized mice after 7 days. Histological examination of the liver showed the immunized mice liver remained unaffected. Conclusion: Efficacy of the virulence protein, InvH, in inhibition of this phenomenon by active immunization was shown here. It may be concluded that InvH, as an antigen, can develop protection against S. typhi infections. InvH may be exploited in protective measures as well as a diagnostic tool in Salmonella infections.

  9. Antibiotic susceptibility pattern of Salmonella enterica serovar typhi and Salmonella enterica serovar paratyphi A with special reference to quinolone resistance

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    Shoorashetty Manohar Rudresh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Typhoid fever is endemic in India. Extensive use of first-line antibiotics has led to the emergence of multi-drug resistant (MDR Salmonella typhi. Ciprofloxacin has become empirical therapy of choice against MDR salmonellae. Recent year′s emergence of low-level ciprofloxacin resistance in salmonellae resulted in delayed response and serious complications. Nalidixic acid (NA screen test is used as surrogate marker for detection low-level ciprofloxacin resistance. In this study, we evaluated prevalence of MDR and low-level ciprofloxacin resistant S. typhi and Salmonella paratyphi A. Materials and Methods: A total of 50 blood culture isolates of S. typhi and S. paratyphi A were tested for antibiotic susceptibility according to Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI method. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC to ciprofloxacin was carried out by E-test and agar dilution method. Results: Among the 50 salmonella isolates, 80% were S. typhi and 20% were S. paratyphi A. MDR was found in 2% S. typhi. NA resistant salmonellae showed ciprofloxacin MIC ranging from 0.25 to 0.75 μg/ml. One isolate of S. typhi showed ciprofloxacin MIC of 32 μg/ml and was also resistant to ceftriaxone. NA screen test for low-level ciprofloxacin resistance was 100% sensitive and 97.9% specific. Interpretation and Conclusion: NA resistant isolates should be tested for ciprofloxacin MIC to decide therapeutic options. The current CLSI breakpoints may have to be re-evaluated for salmonellae.

  10. Effects of P22 bacteriophage on salmonella Enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium DMC4 strain biofilm formation and eradication

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    Karaca Basar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decades, several antimicrobial agents have been made available. Due to increasing antimicrobial resistance, bacteriophages were rediscovered for their potential applications against bacterial infections. In the present study, biofilm inhibition and eradication of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium DMC4 strain (S. Typhimurium was evaluated with respect to different incubation periods at different P22 phage titrations. The efficacy of P22 phage on biofilm formation and eradication of S. Typhimurium DMC4 strain was screened in vitro on polystyrene and stainless steel surfaces. The biofilm forming capacity of S. Typhimurium was significantly reduced at higher phage titrations (106 pfu/mL ≤. All phage titers (104-108 pfu/mL were found to be effective at the end of the 24 h-incubation period whereas higher phage titrations were found to be effective at the end of the 48 h and 72 h of incubation. P22 phage has less efficacy on already formed, especially mature biofilms (72 h-old biofilm. Notable results of P22 phage treatment on S. Typhimurium biofilm suggest that P22 phage has potential uses in food systems.

  11. Multi-locus sequence typing of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis strains in Japan between 1973 and 2004

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    Kuroki Toshiro

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis was responsible for a worldwide pandemic during the 1980s and 1990s; however, changes in the dominant lineage before and after this event remain unknown. This study determined S. Enteritidis lineages before and after this pandemic event in Japan using multilocus sequence typing (MLST. Thirty S. Enteritidis strains were collected in Japan between 1973 and 2004, consisting of 27 human strains from individual episodes, a bovine strain, a liquid egg strain and an eggshell strain. Strains showed nine phage types and 17 pulsed-field profiles with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. All strains had homologous type 11 sequences without any nucleotide differences in seven housekeeping genes. These MLST results suggest that S. Enteritidis with the diversities revealed by phage typing and pulsed-field profiling has a highly clonal population. Although type 11 S. Enteritidis may exhibit both pleiotropic surface structure and pulsed-field type variation, it is likely to be a stable lineage derived from an ancestor before the 1980s and/or 1990s pandemic in Japan.

  12. Multi-locus sequence typing of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis strains in Japan between 1973 and 2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Tamie; Murakami, Koichi; Asai, Tetsuo; Etoh, Yoshiki; Ishihara, Tomoe; Kuroki, Toshiro; Horikawa, Kazumi; Fujimoto, Shuji

    2011-06-15

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) was responsible for a worldwide pandemic during the 1980s and 1990s; however, changes in the dominant lineage before and after this event remain unknown. This study determined S. Enteritidis lineages before and after this pandemic event in Japan using multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Thirty S. Enteritidis strains were collected in Japan between 1973 and 2004, consisting of 27 human strains from individual episodes, a bovine strain, a liquid egg strain and an eggshell strain. Strains showed nine phage types and 17 pulsed-field profiles with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. All strains had homologous type 11 sequences without any nucleotide differences in seven housekeeping genes. These MLST results suggest that S. Enteritidis with the diversities revealed by phage typing and pulsed-field profiling has a highly clonal population. Although type 11 S. Enteritidis may exhibit both pleiotropic surface structure and pulsed-field type variation, it is likely to be a stable lineage derived from an ancestor before the 1980s and/or 1990s pandemic in Japan.

  13. A comparison of cecal colonization of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium in white leghorn chicks and Salmonella-resistant mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogomolnaya Lydia M

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonellosis is one of the most important bacterial food borne illnesses worldwide. A major source of infection for humans is consumption of chicken or egg products that have been contaminated with Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium, however our knowledge regarding colonization and persistence factors in the chicken is small. Results We compared intestinal and systemic colonization of 1-week-old White Leghorn chicks and Salmonella-resistant CBA/J mice during infection with Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium ATCC14028, one of the most commonly studied isolates. We also studied the distribution of wild type serotype Typhimurium ATCC14028 and an isogenic invA mutant during competitive infection in the cecum of 1-week-old White Leghorn chicks and 8-week-old CBA/J mice. We found that although the systemic levels of serotype Typhimurium in both infected animal models are low, infected mice have significant splenomegaly beginning at 15 days post infection. In the intestinal tract itself, the cecal contents are the major site for recovery of serotype Typhimurium in the cecum of 1-week-old chicks and Salmonella-resistant mice. Additionally we show that only a small minority of Salmonellae are intracellular in the cecal epithelium of both infected animal models, and while SPI-1 is important for successful infection in the murine model, it is important for association with the cecal epithelium of 1-week-old chicks. Finally, we show that in chicks infected with serotype Typhimurium at 1 week of age, the level of fecal shedding of this organism does not reflect the level of cecal colonization as it does in murine models. Conclusion In our study, we highlight important differences in systemic and intestinal colonization levels between chick and murine serotype Typhimurium infections, and provide evidence that suggests that the role of SPI-1 may not be the same during colonization of both animal models.

  14. Multiple‐locus variable‐number tandem repeat analysis of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Dublin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, M. K.; Torpdahl, M.; Campos, J.

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella serovar Dublin causes disease in cattle and leads to considerable production losses. In humans, severe invasive disease and high mortality rates are reported. The presently available typing methods provide insufficient discrimination within Salm. Dublin for epidemiological investigatio...

  15. The evolutionary history and diagnostic utility of the CRISPR-Cas system within Salmonella enterica ssp. enterica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James B. Pettengill

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary studies of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs and their associated (cas genes can provide insights into host-pathogen co-evolutionary dynamics and the frequency at which different genomic events (e.g., horizontal vs. vertical transmission occur. Within this study, we used whole genome sequence (WGS data to determine the evolutionary history and genetic diversity of CRISPR loci and cas genes among a diverse set of 427 Salmonella enterica ssp. enterica isolates representing 64 different serovars. We also evaluated the performance of CRISPR loci for typing when compared to whole genome and multilocus sequence typing (MLST approaches. We found that there was high diversity in array length within both CRISPR1 (median = 22; min = 3; max = 79 and CRISPR2 (median = 27; min = 2; max = 221. There was also much diversity within serovars (e.g., arrays differed by as many as 50 repeat-spacer units among Salmonella ser. Senftenberg isolates. Interestingly, we found that there are two general cas gene profiles that do not track phylogenetic relationships, which suggests that non-vertical transmission events have occurred frequently throughout the evolutionary history of the sampled isolates. There is also considerable variation among the ranges of pairwise distances estimated within each cas gene, which may be indicative of the strength of natural selection acting on those genes. We developed a novel clustering approach based on CRISPR spacer content, but found that typing based on CRISPRs was less accurate than the MLST-based alternative; typing based on WGS data was the most accurate. Notwithstanding cost and accessibility, we anticipate that draft genome sequencing, due to its greater discriminatory power, will eventually become routine for traceback investigations.

  16. Antimicrobial Probiotics Reduce Salmonella enterica in Turkey Gastrointestinal Tracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forkus, Brittany; Ritter, Seth; Vlysidis, Michail; Geldart, Kathryn; Kaznessis, Yiannis N.

    2017-01-01

    Despite the arsenal of technologies employed to control foodborne nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS), infections have not declined in decades. Poultry is the primary source of NTS outbreaks, as well as the fastest growing meat sector worldwide. With recent FDA rules for phasing-out antibiotics in animal production, pressure is mounting to develop new pathogen reduction strategies. We report on a technology to reduce Salmonella enteritidis in poultry. We engineered probiotic E. coli Nissle 1917, to express and secrete the antimicrobial peptide, Microcin J25. Using in vitro experiments and an animal model of 300 turkeys, we establish the efficacy of this technology. Salmonella more rapidly clear the ceca of birds administered the modified probiotic than other treatment groups. Approximately 97% lower Salmonella carriage is measured in a treated group, 14 days post-Salmonella challenge. Probiotic bacteria are generally regarded as safe to consume, are bile-resistant and can plausibly be modified to produce a panoply of antimicrobial peptides now known. The reported systems may provide a foundation for platforms to launch antimicrobials against gastrointestinal tract pathogens, including ones that are multi-drug resistant. PMID:28094807

  17. Salmonella enterica serotype enteritidis outbreak at a long-term care facility, Connecticut, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styles, Timothy; Phan, Quyen; Rabatsky-Ehr, Therese; Applewhite, Christine; Sosa, Lynn; Cartter, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    In May of 2012, the Connecticut Department of Public Health (DPH) was notified of three hospitalized residents of a long-term care facility (LTCF) who had gastrointestinal illness, one of whom had a stool culture positive for Salmonella enterica. A multiagency outbreak investigation was initiated and identified a total of 21 possible salmonellosis cases; nine were culture-confirmed Salmonella serotype Enteritidis with an indistinguishable pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pattern (PFGE). This report describes the epidemiologic, environmental, and laboratory investigation conducted as part of DPH's response. Undercooked raw shell eggs were the likely source of infection. This investigation reemphasizes the vulnerabilityof certain populations to severe illness from Salmonella and further stresses previous recommendations in the literature to use only pasteurized egg products in long-term care and other health care facilities.

  18. Poultry as a possible source of non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica serovars in humans in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barua, Himel; Biswas, Paritosh Kumar; Talukder, Kaisar Ali; Olsen, Katharina E P; Christensen, Jens Peter

    2014-01-31

    We investigated Salmonella enterica isolates from human clinical cases of gastroenteritis to determine the distribution of non-typhoidal Salmonella serovars in the human population, and compared them to isolates originating from poultry by serotyping, phage typing, plasmid profiling, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) to evaluate the potential role of poultry in human non-typhoidal salmonellosis in Bangladesh. Nine different serovars were identified among the human isolates of which Salmonella Paratyphi B var Java (S. Java), S. Kentucky, S. Enteritidis, S. Virchow and S. Weltevreden also were commonly isolated from poultry. The poultry isolates belonging to S. Java, S. Kentucky and S. Enteritidis were indistinguishable from human isolates or genetically closely related, based on PFGE profiles and MLST. S. Kentucky clone ST198 and S. Java clone ST43 both well-known cause of human infections were also isolated from poultry.

  19. The infectious intracellular lifestyle of Salmonella enterica relies on the adaptation to nutritional conditions within the Salmonella-containing vacuole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diacovich, Lautaro; Lorenzi, Lucía; Tomassetti, Mauro; Méresse, Stéphane; Gramajo, Hugo

    2016-12-09

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is a Gram-negative pathogen that causes various host-specific diseases. During their life cycle, Salmonellae survive frequent exposures to a variety of environmental stresses, e.g. carbon-source starvation. The virulence of this pathogen relies on its ability to establish a replicative niche, named Salmonella-containing vacuole, inside host cells. However, the microenvironment of the SCV and the bacterial metabolic pathways required during infection are largely undefined. In this work we developed different biological probes whose expression is modulated by the environment and the physiological state of the bacterium. We constructed transcriptional reporters by fusing promoter regions to the gfpmut3a gene to monitor the expression profile of genes involved in glucose utilization and lipid catabolism. The induction of these probes by a specific metabolic change was first tested in vitro, and then during different conditions of infection in macrophages. We were able to determine that Entner-Doudoroff is the main metabolic pathway utilized by Salmonella during infection in mouse macrophages. Furthermore, we found sub-populations of bacteria expressing genes involved in pathways for the utilization of different sources of carbon. These populations are modified in presence of different metabolizable substrates, suggesting the coexistence of Salmonella with diverse metabolic states during the infection.

  20. Ciprofloxacin-resistant Salmonella enterica Typhimurium and Choleraesuis from pigs to humans, Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, Po-Ren; Teng, Lee-Jene; Tseng, Sung-Pin; Chang, Chao-Fu; Wan, Jen-Hsien; Yan, Jing-Jou; Lee, Chun-Ming; Chuang, Yin-Ching; Huang, Wen-Kuei; Yang, Dine; Shyr, Jainn-Ming; Yu, Kwok-Woon; Wang, Li-Shin; Lu, Jang-Jih; Ko, Wen-Chien; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Chang, Feng-Yee; Yang, Yi-Chueh; Lau, Yeu-Jun; Liu, Yung-Ching; Liu, Cheng-Yi; Ho, Shen-Wu; Luh, Kwen-Tay

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated the disk susceptibility data of 671 nontyphoid Salmonella isolates collected from different parts of Taiwan from March 2001 to August 2001 and 1,261 nontyphoid Salmonella isolates from the National Taiwan University Hospital from 1996 to 2001. Overall, ciprofloxacin resistance was found in 2.7% (18/671) of all nontyphoid Salmonella isolates, in 1.4% (5/347) of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium and in 7.5% (8/107) in S. enterica serotype Choleraesuis nationwide. MICs of six newer fluoroquinolones were determined for the following isolates: 37 isolates of ciprofloxacin-resistant (human) S. Typhimurium (N = 26) and Choleraesuis (N = 11), 10 isolates of ciprofloxacin-susceptible (MIC MIC >0.12 microg/mL). Sequence analysis of the gryA, gyrB, parC, parE, and acrR genes, ciprofloxacin accumulation, and genotypes generated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis with three restriction enzymes (SpeI, XbaI, and BlnI) were performed. All 26 S. Typhimurium isolates from humans and pigs belonged to genotype I. For S. Choleraesuis isolates, 91% (10/11) of human isolates and 54% (7/13) of swine isolates belonged to genotype B. These two genotypes isolates from humans all exhibited a high-level of resistance to ciprofloxacin (MIC 16-64 mg/mL). They had two-base substitutions in the gyrA gene at codons 83 (Ser83Phe) and 87 (Asp87Gly or Asp87Asn) and in the parC gene at codon 80 (Ser80Arg, Ser80Ile, or Ser84Lys). Our investigation documented that not only did these two S. enterica isolates have a high prevalence of ciprofloxacin resistance nationwide but also that some closely related ciprofloxacin-resistant strains are disseminated from pigs to humans.

  1. Characterization of quinolone resistance in Salmonella enterica serovar Indiana from chickens in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yan; Zhao, Hongyu; Liu, Yuqi; Zhou, Xuping; Wang, Jinyuan; Liu, Tiantian; Beier, Ross C; Hou, Xiaolin

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the quinolone resistance of Salmonella enterica serovar Indiana isolated from chickens in China. A total of 293 Salmonella strains were isolated from chicken farms and slaughterhouses in Shandong province of China, and 130 (44.4%) were characterized as Salmonella enterica Indiana (chicken farms, n=52 strains; slaughter houses, n=78 strains). All isolate serotypes were tested with the Kauffmann-White classification system and examined for susceptibility to the quinolones: nalidixic acid, enrofloxacin, norfloxacin, and ciprofloxacin. The resistance of the Salmonella Indiana strains to nalidixic acid, enrofloxacin, norfloxacin, and ciprofloxacin were 100, 73.1, 71.2, and 82.7%, and 100, 59.0, 79.5, and 80.2%, respectively. Selected quinolone resistant strains were evaluated for mutations in genes (gyrA, gyrB, parC, and marA) by DNA sequencing. The gyrA mutation was found in all isolates, the parC mutation was only found in some isolates, and the gyrB and marA mutations were not observed. Quinolone resistance was evaluated in the representative isolates by screening for the quinolone resistance determinants, qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, qepA, and aac (6 ')-Ib-cr using PCR technology. The quinolone resistance determinants in Salmonella, qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, and qepA were negative by PCR, but aac(6 ')-Ib-cr had high detection rates of 90.4 and 96.2% in chicken farms and slaughterhouses, respectively. Salmonella Indiana containing the gyrA mutation was prevalent in farms and slaughterhouses and possessed a high frequency of the quinolone resistance determinant aac(6 ')-Ib-cr. These bacteria may have originated from the same source.

  2. Molecular epidemiological characteristics of Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis, Typhimurium and Livingstone strains isolated in a Tunisian university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ktari, Sonia; Ksibi, Boutheina; Gharsallah, Houda; Mnif, Basma; Maalej, Sonda; Rhimi, Fouzia; Hammami, Adnene

    2016-03-01

    Enteritidis, Typhimurium and Livingstone are the main Salmonella enterica serovars recovered in Tunisia. Here, we aimed to assess the genetic diversity of fifty-seven Salmonella enterica strains from different sampling periods, origins and settings using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) and multi-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA). Salmonella Enteritidis, isolated from human and food sources from two regions in Sfax in 2007, were grouped into one cluster using PFGE. However, using MLVA these strains were divided into two clusters. Salmonella Typhimurium strains, recovered in 2012 and represent sporadic cases of human clinical isolates, were included in one PFGE cluster. Nevertheless, the MLVA technique, divided Salmonella Typhimurium isolates into six clusters with diversity index reaching (DI = 0.757). For Salmonella Livingstone which was responsible of two nosocomial outbreaks during 2000-2003, the PFGE and MLVA methods showed that these strains were genetically closely related. Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Livingstone populations showed a single ST lineage ST11 and ST543 respectively. For Salmonella Typhimurium, two MLST sequence types ST19 and ST328 were defined. Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium strains were clearly differentiated by MLVA which was not the case using PFGE.

  3. Survival of Salmonella enterica in Dried Turkey Manure and Persistence on Spinach Leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oni, Ruth A; Sharma, Manan; Buchanan, Robert L

    2015-10-01

    Concerns about the microbiological safety of fresh produce have attracted attention in the past three decades due to multiple foodborne outbreaks. Animal manure contaminated with enteric pathogens has been identified as an important preharvest pathogen source. This study investigated the survival of Salmonella enterica in dust particles of dehydrated turkey manure and how association with manure dust may enhance the survival of salmonellae on leafy greens in the field. The survival of a cocktail of multiple Salmonella serotypes in the dried fecal material of various particle sizes (125 to 500 μm) was examined at varying moisture contents (5, 10, and 15%). Survival times of the pathogen were inversely related to moisture content and particle size of manure dust, with viable Salmonella still detectable for up to 291 days in the smallest particle size (125 μm) with 5% moisture. Association with manure dust particles increased the survival of Salmonella when subjected to UV light both under laboratory conditions and on the surface of spinach leaves in a greenhouse setting. The results of this study suggest that aerosolized manure particles could be a potential vehicle for Salmonella dispersal to leafy greens if the microorganism is present in the dry manure.

  4. SMM-system: A mining tool to identify specific markers in Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shuijing; Liu, Weibing; Shi, Chunlei; Wang, Dapeng; Dan, Xianlong; Li, Xiao; Shi, Xianming

    2011-03-01

    This report presents SMM-system, a software package that implements various personalized pre- and post-BLASTN tasks for mining specific markers of microbial pathogens. The main functionalities of SMM-system are summarized as follows: (i) converting multi-FASTA file, (ii) cutting interesting genomic sequence, (iii) automatic high-throughput BLASTN searches, and (iv) screening target sequences. The utility of SMM-system was demonstrated by using it to identify 214 Salmonella enterica-specific protein-coding sequences (CDSs). Eighteen primer pairs were designed based on eighteen S. enterica-specific CDSs, respectively. Seven of these primer pairs were validated with PCR assay, which showed 100% inclusivity for the 101 S. enterica genomes and 100% exclusivity of 30 non-S. enterica genomes. Three specific primer pairs were chosen to develop a multiplex PCR assay, which generated specific amplicons with a size of 180bp (SC1286), 238bp (SC1598) and 405bp (SC4361), respectively. This study demonstrates that SMM-system is a high-throughput specific marker generation tool that can be used to identify genus-, species-, serogroup- and even serovar-specific DNA sequences of microbial pathogens, which has a potential to be applied in food industries, diagnostics and taxonomic studies. SMM-system is freely available and can be downloaded from http://foodsafety.sjtu.edu.cn/SMM-system.html.

  5. Transposon mutagenesis of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis identifies genes that contribute to invasiveness in human and chicken cells and survival in egg albumen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Devendra H; Zhou, Xiaohui; Kim, Hye-Young; Call, Douglas R; Guard, Jean

    2012-12-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is an important food-borne pathogen, and chickens are a primary reservoir of human infection. While most knowledge about Salmonella pathogenesis is based on research conducted on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, S. Enteritidis is known to have pathobiology specific to chickens that impacts epidemiology in humans. Therefore, more information is needed about S. Enteritidis pathobiology in comparison to that of S. Typhimurium. We used transposon mutagenesis to identify S. Enteritidis virulence genes by assay of invasiveness in human intestinal epithelial (Caco-2) cells and chicken liver (LMH) cells and survival within chicken (HD-11) macrophages as a surrogate marker for virulence. A total of 4,330 transposon insertion mutants of an invasive G1 Nal(r) strain were screened using Caco-2 cells. This led to the identification of attenuating mutations in a total of 33 different loci, many of which include genes previously known to contribute to enteric infection (e.g., Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 [SPI-1], SPI-4, SPI-5, CS54, fliH, fljB, csgB, spvR, and rfbMN) in S. Enteritidis and other Salmonella serovars. Several genes or genomic islands that have not been reported previously (e.g., SPI-14, ksgA, SEN0034, SEN2278, and SEN3503) or that are absent in S. Typhimurium or in most other Salmonella serovars (e.g., pegD, SEN1152, SEN1393, and SEN1966) were also identified. Most mutants with reduced Caco-2 cell invasiveness also showed significantly reduced invasiveness in chicken liver cells and impaired survival in chicken macrophages and in egg albumen. Consequently, these genes may play an important role during infection of the chicken host and also contribute to successful egg contamination by S. Enteritidis.

  6. Plasmid profile and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis of Salmonella enterica isolates from humans in Turkey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerem Ozdemir

    Full Text Available This study was conducted for typing Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica strains in Turkey using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and plasmid DNA profile analysis. Fourty-two strains were isolated from clinical samples obtained from unrelated patients with acute diarrhea. The samples were collected from state hospitals and public health laboratories located at seven provinces in different regions of Turkey at different times between 2004 and 2010. The strains were determined to belong to 4 different serovars. The Salmonella enterica strains belonged to the serovars Salmonella Enteritidis (n = 23, Salmonella Infantis (n = 14, Salmonella Munchen (n = 2, and Salmonella Typhi (n = 3. Forty-two Salmonella enterica strains were typed with PFGE methods using XbaI restriction enzyme and plasmid analysis. At the end of typing, 11 different PFGE band profiles were obtained. Four different PFGE profiles (type 1, 4, 9, and 10 were found among serotype S. Enteritidis species, 3 different PFGE profiles (type 3, 5, 6 were found among S. Infantis species, 2 different PFGE profiles were found among S. Typhi species (type 2 and 11, and 2 different PFGE profiles were found among S. Munchen species (type 7, 8. The UPGMA dendrogram was built on the PFGE profiles. In this study, it was determined that 4 strains of 42 Salmonella enterica strains possess no plasmid, while the isolates have 1-3 plasmids ranging from 5.0 to 150 kb and making 12 different plasmid profiles (P1-P12. In this study, we have applied the analysis of the PFGE patterns and used bioinformatics methods to identify both inter and intra serotype relationships of 4 frequently encountered serotypes for the first time in Turkey.

  7. Prevalence and characterization of multi-drug resistant Salmonella Enterica serovar Gallinarum biovar Pullorum and Gallinarum from chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Shafiullah Parvej

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Salmonella is an important zoonotic pathogen responsible for animal and human diseases. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence and stereotyping of Salmonella isolates isolated from apparently healthy poultry. Furthermore, the clonal relatedness among the isolated Salmonella serovars was assessed. Materials and Methods: A total of 150 cloacal swab samples from apparently healthy chickens were collected, and were subjected for the isolation and identification of associated Salmonella organisms. The isolated colonies were identified and characterized on the basis of morphology, cultural characters, biochemical tests, slide agglutination test, polymerase chain reaction, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. Antibiotic sensitivity patterns were also investigated using commonly used antibiotics. Results: Of the 150 samples, 11 (7.33% produced characteristics pink colony with black center on XLD agar medium, and all were culturally and biochemically confirmed to be Salmonella. All possessed serovar-specific gene SpeF and reacted uniformly with group D antisera, suggesting that all of the isolates were Salmonella Enterica serovar Gallinarum, biovar Pullorum and/or Gallinarum. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing revealed that 54.54% of the isolated Salmonella Enterica serovars were highly sensitive to ciprofloxacin, whereas the 81.81% isolates were resistant to amoxycillin, doxycycline, kanamycin, gentamycin, and tetracycline. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of the XbaI-digested genomic DNA exhibited identical banding patterns, suggesting that the multidrug resistant Salmonella Enterica serovars occurring in commercial layers are highly clonal in Bangladesh. Conclusion: The present study was conducted to find out the prevalence of poultry Salmonella in layer chicken and to find out the clonal relationship among them. The data in this study suggest the prevalence of Salmonella Enterica, which is multidrug resistant and

  8. Typing of Salmonella enterica serovar Saintpaul: an outbreak investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Wegener, Henrik Caspar; Christensen, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    During the summer of 1993 an outbreak of human salmonellosis caused by Salmonella serovar Saintpaul occurred in Denmark. A total of 35 isolates originating from pigs, turkeys and imported foodstuffs, and 10 human isolates were compared following their characterization by agglutination of the O:5...

  9. Stressors Influence on Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Colonization in Broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Soliman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Poultry industry usually exposing birds to a variety of actions and stressors includs fasting for gastrointestinal emptying before transportation and where birds are often exposed to high environmental temperature during the summer months. These environmental stressors may have influences on bird performance and susceptibility to pathogens such as Salmonella enteritidis by altering the intestinal micrbiota and changes in the gut integrity. Approach: This research was conducted to show that acute stressors in the poultry production can induce changes in the normal intestinal microbiota and epithelium structure and execratory functions, which may cause an increase in the opportunities of attachment of Salmonella enteritidis. Results: Experiments were conducted to determine the influence of 24 h feed withdrawal with 24 h exposure to high temperature (30°C on intestinal characteristics of broilers. Attachment of Salmonella enteritidis to ileal tissue was determined using an in vitro ileal loop assay. Changes in commensally intestinal microbial populations were determined using gel electrophoresis and alterations in ileal morphology were determined histologically. The results showed that attachment of Salmonella enteritidis to ileal tissues increased by 1.5 logs (9.05 log10 Vs 7.59 log10 Salmonella enteritidis/g of ileal tissue; p = 0.0006 in broilers fasted for 24 h also, ileal tissues from birds subjected to 30°C for 24 h had increased the attachment of Salmonella enteritidis (8.77 log10 Vs 8.50 log10 Salmonella enteritidis/g of ileum; p = 0.01 compared with birds held at 23°C. Exposure to 30°C for 24 h also altered the microbial structure in the ileum and cecum. Where subjecting birds to 30°C for 24 h reduced the crypt depth (6.0 Vs 7.8 µm, respectively; p = 0.002, but it had no effect on villus height or villus: Crypt ratio. Conclusion: The findings of the experiment explained the mechanisms by which stressors alters the

  10. A Phylogenetic and Phenotypic Analysis of Salmonella enterica Serovar Weltevreden, an Emerging Agent of Diarrheal Disease in Tropical Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makendi, Carine; Page, Andrew J; Wren, Brendan W; Le Thi Phuong, Tu; Clare, Simon; Hale, Christine; Goulding, David; Klemm, Elizabeth J; Pickard, Derek; Okoro, Chinyere; Hunt, Martin; Thompson, Corinne N; Phu Huong Lan, Nguyen; Tran Do Hoang, Nhu; Thwaites, Guy E; Le Hello, Simon; Brisabois, Anne; Weill, François-Xavier; Baker, Stephen; Dougan, Gordon

    2016-02-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Weltevreden (S. Weltevreden) is an emerging cause of diarrheal and invasive disease in humans residing in tropical regions. Despite the regional and international emergence of this Salmonella serovar, relatively little is known about its genetic diversity, genomics or virulence potential in model systems. Here we used whole genome sequencing and bioinformatics analyses to define the phylogenetic structure of a diverse global selection of S. Weltevreden. Phylogenetic analysis of more than 100 isolates demonstrated that the population of S. Weltevreden can be segregated into two main phylogenetic clusters, one associated predominantly with continental Southeast Asia and the other more internationally dispersed. Subcluster analysis suggested the local evolution of S. Weltevreden within specific geographical regions. Four of the isolates were sequenced using long read sequencing to produce high quality reference genomes. Phenotypic analysis in Hep-2 cells and in a murine infection model indicated that S. Weltevreden were significantly attenuated in these models compared to the classical S. Typhimurium reference strain SL1344. Our work outlines novel insights into this important emerging pathogen and provides a baseline understanding for future research studies.

  11. A Phylogenetic and Phenotypic Analysis of Salmonella enterica Serovar Weltevreden, an Emerging Agent of Diarrheal Disease in Tropical Regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carine Makendi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Weltevreden (S. Weltevreden is an emerging cause of diarrheal and invasive disease in humans residing in tropical regions. Despite the regional and international emergence of this Salmonella serovar, relatively little is known about its genetic diversity, genomics or virulence potential in model systems. Here we used whole genome sequencing and bioinformatics analyses to define the phylogenetic structure of a diverse global selection of S. Weltevreden. Phylogenetic analysis of more than 100 isolates demonstrated that the population of S. Weltevreden can be segregated into two main phylogenetic clusters, one associated predominantly with continental Southeast Asia and the other more internationally dispersed. Subcluster analysis suggested the local evolution of S. Weltevreden within specific geographical regions. Four of the isolates were sequenced using long read sequencing to produce high quality reference genomes. Phenotypic analysis in Hep-2 cells and in a murine infection model indicated that S. Weltevreden were significantly attenuated in these models compared to the classical S. Typhimurium reference strain SL1344. Our work outlines novel insights into this important emerging pathogen and provides a baseline understanding for future research studies.

  12. High Prevalence of Extended-Spectrum Beta Lactamases among Salmonella enterica Typhimurium Isolates from Pediatric Patients with Diarrhea in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fangyou; Chen, Qiang; Yu, Xiaojun; Li, Qiaoqiao; Ding, Baixing; Yang, Lehe; Chen, Cong; Qin, Zhiqiang; Parsons, Chris; Zhang, Xueqing; Huang, Jinwei; Luo, Yun; Wang, Liangxing; Pan, Jingye

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the extended-spectrum beta lactamases among 62 Salmonella enterica Typhimurium isolates recovered from children with diarrhea in a Chinese pediatric hospital. A large proportion of S. enterica Typhimurium isolates were resistant to multiple antimicrobial agents, including ampicillin (90.3%), tetracycline (80.6%), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (74.2%), chloramphenicol (66.1%), cefotaxime (27.4%). Forty-nine (79.0%) of S. enterica Typhimurium isolates were positive for blaTEM-1b and resistant to ampicillin. Thirteen S. enterica Typhimurium isolates (21.0%) were positive for blaCTX-M-1-group and blaCTX-M-9-group, and all isolates harboring blaCTX-M genes were positive for ISEcp1. Two main clones (PFGE type A and D) accounted for nearly 70% of S. enterica Typhimurium isolates, and 7 CTX-M-producing isolates belonged to PFGE type D. Collectively, our data reveal multi-drug resistance and a high prevalence of extended spectrum beta lactamases among S. enterica Typhimurium isolates from children in China. In addition, we report the first identification of blaCTX-M-55 within Salmonella spp. Our data also suggest that clonal spread is responsible for the dissemination of S. enterica Typhimurium isolates. PMID:21390297

  13. High prevalence of extended-spectrum beta lactamases among Salmonella enterica Typhimurium isolates from pediatric patients with diarrhea in China.

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    Fangyou Yu

    Full Text Available We investigated the extended-spectrum beta lactamases among 62 Salmonella enterica Typhimurium isolates recovered from children with diarrhea in a Chinese pediatric hospital. A large proportion of S. enterica Typhimurium isolates were resistant to multiple antimicrobial agents, including ampicillin (90.3%, tetracycline (80.6%, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (74.2%, chloramphenicol (66.1%, cefotaxime (27.4%. Forty-nine (79.0% of S. enterica Typhimurium isolates were positive for bla(TEM-1b and resistant to ampicillin. Thirteen S. enterica Typhimurium isolates (21.0% were positive for bla(CTX-M-1-group and bla(CTX-M-9-group, and all isolates harboring bla(CTX-M genes were positive for ISEcp1. Two main clones (PFGE type A and D accounted for nearly 70% of S. enterica Typhimurium isolates, and 7 CTX-M-producing isolates belonged to PFGE type D. Collectively, our data reveal multi-drug resistance and a high prevalence of extended spectrum beta lactamases among S. enterica Typhimurium isolates from children in China. In addition, we report the first identification of bla(CTX-M-55 within Salmonella spp. Our data also suggest that clonal spread is responsible for the dissemination of S. enterica Typhimurium isolates.

  14. Effect of EDTA on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium involves a component not assignable to lipopolysaccharide release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alakomi, H-L; Saarela, M; Helander, I M

    2003-08-01

    The effect of EDTA on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was studied in different growth phases with cells grown with or without Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) supplementation. EDTA affected the outer membrane much more strongly in the early exponential phase than in the mid- or late exponential phase, as indicated by uptake of 1-N-phenylnaphthylamine (a nonpolar hydrophobic probe, M(r) 219), and detergent (SDS) susceptibility. This effect was, however, not paralleled by LPS release (determined by measuring LPS-specific fatty acids or 14C-labelled LPS in cell-free supernatants, per a standardized cell density), which remained unchanged as a function of the growth curve. The conclusion from these results is that in the early exponential phase the effect of EDTA in S. enterica involves a component that is independent of LPS release.

  15. Outbreak of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium phage type DT41 in Danish poultry production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Löfström, Charlotta; Hintzmann, Ann-Sofie; Sørensen, Gitte;

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is one of the most prevalent serovars in Europe - where both poultry and poultry related products are common sources of human salmonellosis. Due to efficient control programs, the prevalence of S. Typhimurium in Danish...... slaughter house (n = 3, environmental sample and meat) were typed with multi locus variable number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) to investigate the epidemiology of the outbreak. Based on PFGE results isolates were divided into four groups (Simpson's index...... of diversity (DI) = 0.24 ± 0.15). Due to the low DI, PFGE was not sufficient to provide information to unravel the outbreak. Based on MLVA typing the DT41 - (42/47 isolates) and the RDNC isolates (5/47) were split into nine groups (DI = 0.65 ± 0.14). When a maximum divergence at one locus was permitted...

  16. Serotypes and Antimicrobial Resistance of Human Nontyphoidal Isolates of Salmonella enterica from Crete, Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraki, Sofia; Papadakis, Ioannis S

    2014-01-01

    We report on the serotype distribution and the antimicrobial resistance patterns to 20 different antimicrobials of 150 Salmonella enterica strains isolated from stools of diarrhoeal patients on the island of Crete over the period January 2011-December 2012. Among the S. enterica serotypes recovered, Enteritidis was the most prevalent (37.3%), followed by Typhimurium (28.7%) and Newport (8.7%). No resistance was detected to extended-spectrum cephalosporins and carbapenems. Rates of resistance to ampicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and cotrimoxazole were 9.3%, 4%, 2%, 15.3%, and 8.7%, respectively. Resistance to ≥4 antibiotics was primarily observed for serotypes Typhimurium and Hadar. Enteritidis remains the predominant serotype in Crete. Although low resistance to most antimicrobials was detected, continued surveillance of susceptibility is needed due to the risk of resistance.

  17. The Vi capsular polysaccharide enables Salmonella enterica serovar typhi to evade microbe-guided neutrophil chemotaxis.

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    Tamding Wangdi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi causes typhoid fever, a disseminated infection, while the closely related pathogen S. enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium is associated with a localized gastroenteritis in humans. Here we investigated whether both pathogens differ in the chemotactic response they induce in neutrophils using a single-cell experimental approach. Surprisingly, neutrophils extended chemotactic pseudopodia toward Escherichia coli and S. Typhimurium, but not toward S. Typhi. Bacterial-guided chemotaxis was dependent on the presence of complement component 5a (C5a and C5a receptor (C5aR. Deletion of S. Typhi capsule biosynthesis genes markedly enhanced the chemotactic response of neutrophils in vitro. Furthermore, deletion of capsule biosynthesis genes heightened the association of S. Typhi with neutrophils in vivo through a C5aR-dependent mechanism. Collectively, these data suggest that expression of the virulence-associated (Vi capsular polysaccharide of S. Typhi obstructs bacterial-guided neutrophil chemotaxis.

  18. The Vi capsular polysaccharide enables Salmonella enterica serovar typhi to evade microbe-guided neutrophil chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangdi, Tamding; Lee, Cheng-Yuk; Spees, Alanna M; Yu, Chenzhou; Kingsbury, Dawn D; Winter, Sebastian E; Hastey, Christine J; Wilson, R Paul; Heinrich, Volkmar; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2014-08-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) causes typhoid fever, a disseminated infection, while the closely related pathogen S. enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is associated with a localized gastroenteritis in humans. Here we investigated whether both pathogens differ in the chemotactic response they induce in neutrophils using a single-cell experimental approach. Surprisingly, neutrophils extended chemotactic pseudopodia toward Escherichia coli and S. Typhimurium, but not toward S. Typhi. Bacterial-guided chemotaxis was dependent on the presence of complement component 5a (C5a) and C5a receptor (C5aR). Deletion of S. Typhi capsule biosynthesis genes markedly enhanced the chemotactic response of neutrophils in vitro. Furthermore, deletion of capsule biosynthesis genes heightened the association of S. Typhi with neutrophils in vivo through a C5aR-dependent mechanism. Collectively, these data suggest that expression of the virulence-associated (Vi) capsular polysaccharide of S. Typhi obstructs bacterial-guided neutrophil chemotaxis.

  19. Serotypes and Antimicrobial Resistance of Human Nontyphoidal Isolates of Salmonella enterica from Crete, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Maraki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the serotype distribution and the antimicrobial resistance patterns to 20 different antimicrobials of 150 Salmonella enterica strains isolated from stools of diarrhoeal patients on the island of Crete over the period January 2011-December 2012. Among the S. enterica serotypes recovered, Enteritidis was the most prevalent (37.3%, followed by Typhimurium (28.7% and Newport (8.7%. No resistance was detected to extended-spectrum cephalosporins and carbapenems. Rates of resistance to ampicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and cotrimoxazole were 9.3%, 4%, 2%, 15.3%, and 8.7%, respectively. Resistance to ≥4 antibiotics was primarily observed for serotypes Typhimurium and Hadar. Enteritidis remains the predominant serotype in Crete. Although low resistance to most antimicrobials was detected, continued surveillance of susceptibility is needed due to the risk of resistance.

  20. The flagellar regulator TviA reduces pyroptosis by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Sebastian E; Winter, Maria G; Atluri, Vidya; Poon, Victor; Romão, Everton L; Tsolis, Renée M; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2015-04-01

    To discern virulent from innocuous microbes, the innate immune system senses events associated with bacterial access to immunoprivileged sites such as the host cell cytosol. One such pathway is triggered by the cytosolic delivery of flagellin, the major subunit of the flagellum, by bacterial secretion systems. This leads to inflammasome activation and subsequent proinflammatory cell death (pyroptosis) of the infected phagocyte. In this study, we demonstrate that the causative agent of typhoid fever, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, can partially subvert this critical innate immune recognition event. The transcriptional regulator TviA, which is absent from Salmonella serovars associated with human gastroenteritis, repressed the expression of flagellin during infection of human macrophage-like (THP-1) cells. This mechanism allowed S. Typhi to dampen inflammasome activation, leading to reduced interleukin-1β (IL-1β) secretion and diminished cell death. Likewise, the introduction of the tviA gene in nontyphoidal Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium reduced flagellin-induced pyroptosis. These data suggest that gene regulation of virulence factors enables S. Typhi to evade innate immune recognition by concealing a pathogen-induced process from being sensed by the inflammasome.

  1. Molecular Characterisation of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi Isolated from Typhoidial Humans

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    Arunava Das

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi is the major causative agent for typhoidial fever around the globe among human population reported till date. Present research work was carried out for detection and molecular characterisation of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi isolated from humans with Typhoidial fever by biochemical, phenotypical and virulence gene based polymerase chain reaction (PCR techniques. The isolated strains were also investigated for antibiotic susceptibility patterns as a control measure. Methodology and Results: A total of 16 clinical samples were collected from the same numbers of patients (7 males and 9 females from Coimbatore, Erode and Salem districts of Tamil Nadu and were processed via broth enrichment methods for isolation and identification of the causative agent S. enterica serovar Typhi. Microbiological and biochemical investigations revealed the presence of S. Typhi from 16 samples. The biotyping of the isolates showed that all the isolates belonged to biotype IV. The PCR analysis confirmed the presence of invA (Invasion gene, 244bp, tyv (Tyveloseepimerase gene, 615 bp, fliC-d (Phage-1 flagellin gene for d-antigen, 750 bp and viaB (Vi antigen gene, 439bp in all 16 clinical samples. The antibiotic susceptibility test that was carried out among the isolates against 12 antimicrobial agents, showed 100 % resistance to only ampicillin and 100 % sensitivity to carbenicillin, chloramphenicol, clindamycin, gentamycin, kanamycin and tetracycline.Conclusion, significance and impact of study: This study confirmed the association of virulent strains of S. enterica serovar Typhi from Typhoidial fever among human population and suggested that PCR based diagnostic could be very useful for the rapid detection of S. Typhi isolates. Present study emphasized the use of antibiotic like chloramphenicol or in combination with other antibiotics for the effective control of S. Typhi.

  2. Isolation and Characterization of Antimicrobial-Resistant Nontyphoidal Salmonella enterica Serovars from Imported Food Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Dongryeoul; Kweon, Ohgew; Khan, Ashraf A

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine antimicrobial resistance and elucidate the resistance mechanism in nontyphoidal Salmonella enterica serovars isolated from food products imported into the United States from 2011 to 2013. Food products contaminated with antimicrobial-resistant nontyphoidal S. enterica were mainly imported from Taiwan, Indonesia, Vietnam, and China. PCR, DNA sequencing, and plasmid analyses were used to characterize antimicrobial resistance determinants. Twentythree of 110 S. enterica isolates were resistant to various antimicrobial classes, including β-lactam, aminoglycoside, phenicol, glycopeptide, sulfonamide, trimethoprim, and/or fluoroquinolone antimicrobial agents. Twelve of the isolates were multidrug resistant strains. Antimicrobial resistance determinants blaTEM-1, blaCTX-M-9, blaOXA-1, tetA, tetB, tetD, dfrA1, dfrV, dhfrI, dhfrXII, drf17, aadA1, aadA2, aadA5, orfC, qnrS, and mutations of gyrA and parC were detected in one or more antimicrobial-resistant nontyphoidal S. enterica strains. Plasmid profiles revealed that 12 of the 23 antimicrobial-resistant strains harbored plasmids with incompatibility groups IncFIB, IncHI1, IncI1, IncN, IncW, and IncX. Epidemiologic and antimicrobial resistance monitoring data combined with molecular characterization of antimicrobial resistance determinants in Salmonella strains isolated from imported food products may provide information that can be used to establish or implement food safety programs to improve public health.

  3. Identification by PCR of non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica serovars associated with invasive infections among febrile patients in Mali.

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    Sharon M Tennant

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In sub-Saharan Africa, non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS are emerging as a prominent cause of invasive disease (bacteremia and focal infections such as meningitis in infants and young children. Importantly, including data from Mali, three serovars, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Dublin, account for the majority of non-typhoidal Salmonella isolated from these patients. METHODS: We have extended a previously developed series of polymerase chain reactions (PCRs based on O serogrouping and H typing to identify Salmonella Typhimurium and variants (mostly I 4,[5],12:i:-, Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Dublin. We also designed primers to detect Salmonella Stanleyville, a serovar found in West Africa. Another PCR was used to differentiate diphasic Salmonella Typhimurium and monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium from other O serogroup B, H:i serovars. We used these PCRs to blind-test 327 Salmonella serogroup B and D isolates that were obtained from the blood cultures of febrile patients in Bamako, Mali. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have shown that when used in conjunction with our previously described O-serogrouping PCR, our PCRs are 100% sensitive and specific in identifying Salmonella Typhimurium and variants, Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Dublin and Salmonella Stanleyville. When we attempted to differentiate 171 Salmonella Typhimurium (I 4,[ 5],12:i:1,2 strains from 52 monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium (I 4,[5],12:i:- strains, we were able to correctly identify 170 of the Salmonella Typhimurium and 51 of the Salmonella I 4,[5],12:i:- strains. CONCLUSION: We have described a simple yet effective PCR method to support surveillance of the incidence of invasive disease caused by NTS in developing countries.

  4. Development and comparison of a generic multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis with PFGE for typing of Salmonella entericasubsp. enterica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Marianne Kirstine; Torpdahl, Mia; Pedersen, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Aims Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica causes salmonellosis in humans and animals. Serovar specific multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) is widely used for Salmonella surveillance; however, isolates have to be serotyped prior to MLVA typing and only the most common serov...... inexpensive and fast surveillance for laboratories without resources for both serotyping and molecular typing, e.g. PFGE or sequence-based methods, and thereby improve the effectiveness of epidemiological investigations of Salmonella infections globally....

  5. Receptor diversity and host interaction of bacteriophages infecting Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

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    Hakdong Shin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhimurium is a gram-negative pathogen causing salmonellosis. Salmonella Typhimurium-targeting bacteriophages have been proposed as an alternative biocontrol agent to antibiotics. To further understand infection and interaction mechanisms between the host strains and the bacteriophages, the receptor diversity of these phages needs to be elucidated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Twenty-five Salmonella phages were isolated and their receptors were identified by screening a Tn5 random mutant library of S. Typhimurium SL1344. Among them, three types of receptors were identified flagella (11 phages, vitamin B(12 uptake outer membrane protein, BtuB (7 phages and lipopolysaccharide-related O-antigen (7 phages. TEM observation revealed that the phages using flagella (group F or BtuB (group B as a receptor belong to Siphoviridae family, and the phages using O-antigen of LPS as a receptor (group L belong to Podoviridae family. Interestingly, while some of group F phages (F-I target FliC host receptor, others (F-II target both FliC and FljB receptors, suggesting that two subgroups are present in group F phages. Cross-resistance assay of group B and L revealed that group L phages could not infect group B phage-resistant strains and reversely group B phages could not infect group L SPN9TCW-resistant strain. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In this report, three receptor groups of 25 newly isolated S. Typhimurium-targeting phages were determined. Among them, two subgroups of group F phages interact with their host receptors in different manner. In addition, the host receptors of group B or group L SPN9TCW phages hinder other group phage infection, probably due to interaction between receptors of their groups. This study provides novel insights into phage-host receptor interaction for Salmonella phages and will inform development of optimal phage therapy for protection against Salmonella.

  6. First description of food-borne Salmonella enterica resistance regions R1 and R3 associated with IS26 elements

    OpenAIRE

    Eduarda Gomes-Neves; Vera Manageiro; Eugénia Ferreira; José M Correia da Costa; Manuela Caniça

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we assessed the presence of IS26 in food-borne ASSuT-type Salmonella enterica isolates. A new genetic region (R3) wasdescribed, that included a C14 caspase gene between IS26 elements. R3 was present in two Salmonella Rissen isolates from a swine carcass anda meat handler, collected at the same abattoir. Furthermore, a new rearrangement of resistance region R1, harboring the blaTEM-1 gene flanked byIS26 elements, was identified in Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella 4,[5],12:i...

  7. First description of food-borne Salmonella enterica resistance regions R1 and R3 associated with IS26 elements

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes-Neves, Eduarda; Manageiro, Vera; Ferreira, Eugénia; José M Correia da Costa; Caniça, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we assessed the presence of IS26 in food-borne ASSuT-type Salmonella enterica isolates. A new genetic region (R3) was described, that included a C14 caspase gene between IS26 elements. R3 was present in two Salmonella Rissen isolates from a swine carcass and a meat handler, collected at the same abattoir. Furthermore, a new rearrangement of resistance region R1, harboring the blaTEM-1 gene flanked by IS26 elements, was identified in Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella 4,[5],1...

  8. Antimicrobial resistance patterns of bovine Salmonella enterica isolates submitted to the Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory: 2006-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, J R; Sethi, A K; Aulik, N A; Poulsen, K P

    2017-02-01

    Salmonellosis on the dairy continues to have a significant effect on animal health and productivity and in the United States. Additionally, Salmonella enterica ssp. enterica causes an estimated 1.2 million cases of human illness annually. Contributing to the morbidity and mortality in both human and domestic animal species is emergence of antimicrobial resistance by Salmonella species and increased incidence of multidrug-resistant isolates. This study describes serotype distribution and the antimicrobial resistance patterns for various Salmonella serotypes isolated from bovine samples submitted to the Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory (WVDL) over the past 10 yr. Salmonella serotyping and antimicrobial susceptibility testing data were obtained from the laboratory information management system at WVDL. Data from accessions were limited to bovine samples submitted to the WVDL between January 2006 and June 2015 and those that had both a definitive serotype and complete results for antimicrobial susceptibility testing. A total of 4,976 isolates were identified. Salmonella enterica ser. Dublin was the most prevalent serotype identified among bovine samples submitted to the WVDL, accounting for a total of 1,153 isolates (23% of total isolates) over the study period. Along with Dublin, Salmonella enterica ser. Cerro (795, 16%), Newport (720, 14%), Montevideo (421, 8%), Kentucky (419, 8%), and Typhimurium (202, 4%) comprised the top 6 most commonly isolated serotypes during that time. Overall, resistance of bovine Salmonella isolates in the study population remained stable, although decreases in resistance were noted for gentamicin, neomycin, and trimethoprim sulfamethoxazole during the study period. All isolates remained susceptible to enrofloxacin. These data show that antimicrobial susceptibility for bovine Salmonella has changed in the population served by WVDL in the past 10 yr. This information is important for understanding Salmonella disease ecology in

  9. DNA sequence analysis of plasmids from multidrug resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Heidelberg isolates.

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    Jing Han

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg is among the most detected serovars in swine and poultry, ranks among the top five serotypes associated with human salmonellosis and is disproportionately associated with invasive infections and mortality in humans. Salmonella are known to carry plasmids associated with antimicrobial resistance and virulence. To identify plasmid-associated genes in multidrug resistant S. enterica serovar Heidelberg, antimicrobial resistance plasmids from five isolates were sequenced using the 454 LifeSciences pyrosequencing technology. Four of the isolates contained incompatibility group (Inc A/C multidrug resistance plasmids harboring at least eight antimicrobial resistance genes. Each of these strains also carried a second resistance plasmid including two IncFIB, an IncHI2 and a plasmid lacking an identified Inc group. The fifth isolate contained an IncI1 plasmid, encoding resistance to gentamicin, streptomycin and sulfonamides. Some of the IncA/C plasmids lacked the full concert of transfer genes and yet were able to be conjugally transferred, likely due to the transfer genes carried on the companion plasmids in the strains. Several non-IncA/C resistance plasmids also carried putative virulence genes. When the sequences were compared to previously sequenced plasmids, it was found that while all plasmids demonstrated some similarity to other plasmids, they were unique, often due to differences in mobile genetic elements in the plasmids. Our study suggests that Salmonella Heidelberg isolates harbor plasmids that co-select for antimicrobial resistance and virulence, along with genes that can mediate the transfer of plasmids within and among other bacterial isolates. Prevalence of such plasmids can complicate efforts to control the spread of S. enterica serovar Heidelberg in food animal and human populations.

  10. Competition of Lactobacillus paracasei with Salmonella enterica for Adhesion to Caco-2 Cells

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    Alicja Jankowska

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Competition of commensal and probiotic bacteria with pathogens for adhesion and colonization is one of the important protective mechanisms of gastrointestinal tract. In this study, we examined the ability of Lactobacillus paracasei to inhibit the adhesion of pathogenic Salmonella enterica to human colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells. Caco-2 cells were grown for 6 or 21 days to obtain nondifferentiated or well-differentiated cells, respectively. In adhesion experiments, bacteria were added to the cells for 2 or 4 hours. The number of attached bacteria was expressed as colony-forming units (CFUs, Caco-2 cells were counted in hematocytometer. Both bacterial strains used adhered better to well-differentiated than to nondifferentiated Caco-2 cells, however, the amount of Salmonella adhered to Caco-2 after 2 hours of contact was 12-fold higher in comparison to . paracasei and almost 27-fold higher after 4 hours of contact. Two types of experiments were done: coincubation (both bacteria were added to Caco-2 cells simultaneously, and preincubation (. paracasei was incubated with Caco-2 cells first, and then . enterica was added. In coincubation experiment, the presence of . paracasei decreased . enterica adhesion by 4-fold and in preincubation experiment even 7-fold. Generally, Lactobacillus spent culture supernatants (SCSs acted weaker as inhibitors of Salmonella adhesion in comparison to the whole . paracasei culture in coincubation experiment. In conclusion, the displacement of pathogens by lactic acid bacteria and its secretions showed here depends on the time of bacteria-epithelial cell contact, and also on the stage of Caco-2 differentiation.

  11. Requirement for cobalamin by Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium, Pullorum, Gallinarum and Enteritidis during infection in chickens

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    Jacqueline Boldrin de Paiva

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium synthesizes cobalamin (vitamin B12 only during anaerobiosis. Two percent of the S. Typhimurium genome is devoted to the synthesis and uptake of vitamin B12 and to B12-dependent reactions. To understand the requirement for cobalamin synthesis better, we constructed mutants of Salmonella serovars Enteritidis and Pullorum that are double-defective in cobalamin biosynthesis (ΔcobSΔcbiA. We compared the virulence of these mutants to that of their respective wild type strains and found no impairment in their ability to cause disease in chickens. We then assessed B12 production in these mutants and their respective wild type strains, as well as in S. Typhimurium ΔcobSΔcbiA, Salmonella Gallinarum ΔcobSΔcbiA, and their respective wild type strains. None of the mutants was able to produce detectable B12. B12 was detectable in S. Enteritidis, S. Pullorum and S. Typhimurium wild type strains but not in S. Gallinarum. In conclusion, the production of vitamin B12 in vitro differed across the tested Salmonella serotypes and the deletion of the cbiA and cobS genes resulted in different levels of alteration in the host parasite interaction according to Salmonella serotype tested.

  12. Salmonella enterica serovar Ohio septic arthritis and bone abscess in an immunocompetent patient: a case report

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    Kato Hideaki

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Non-typhi Salmonella species cause severe extra-intestinal focal infection after occult bacteremia. Although the number of cases of non-typhi salmonellosis is increasing worldwide among patients with immunocompromising conditions such as human immunodeficiency virus infection, infection is uncommon in immunocompetent subjects. We report a case of septic arthritis and bone abscess due to a rare non-typhi Salmonella organism that developed after a prolonged asymptomatic period. Case presentation A 44-year-old Japanese immunocompetent man presented with acute-onset left knee pain and swelling. He had no history of food poisoning, and his most recent travel to an endemic area was 19 years ago. Salmonella enterica serovar Ohio was identified from samples of bone abscess and joint tissue. Arthrotomy and necrotic tissue debridement followed by intravenous ceftriaxone was successful. Conclusions Non-typhi Salmonella species only rarely cause extra-intestinal focal infections in immunocompetent patients. Our case suggests that non-typhi Salmonella species can cause severe focal infections many years after the occult bacteremia associated with food poisoning.

  13. Molecular typing, antibiotic resistance, virulence gene and biofilm formation of different Salmonella enterica serotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turki, Yousra; Mehr, Ines; Ouzari, Hadda; Khessairi, Amel; Hassen, Abdennaceur

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica isolates representing commonly isolated serotypes in Tunisia were analyzed using genotyping and phenotyping methods. ERIC and ITS-PCR applied to 48 Salmonella spp. isolates revealed the presence of 12 and 10 different profiles, respectively. The distribution of profiles among serotypes demonstrated the presence of strains showing an identical fingerprinting pattern. All Salmonella strains used in this study were positive for the sdiA gene. Three Salmonella isolates belonging to serotypes Anatum, Enteritidis and Amsterdam were negative for the invA gene. The spvC gene was detected in thirteen isolates belonging to serotypes Anatum, Typhimurium, Enteritidis, Gallinarum and Montevideo. Antibiotic resistance was frequent among the recovered Salmonella isolates belonging to serotypes Anatum, Typhimurium, Enteritidis, Zanzibar and Derby. The majority of these isolates exhibited resistance to at least two antibiotic families. Four multidrug-resistant isolates were recovered from food animals and poultry products. These isolates exhibited not only resistance to tetracycline, sulphonamides, and ampicillin, but also have shown resistance to fluoroquinolones. Common resistance to nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin in two S. Anatum and S. Zanzibar strains isolated from raw meat and poultry was also obtained. Furthermore, wastewater and human isolates exhibited frequent resistance to nalidixic acid and tetracycline. Of all isolates, 33.5% were able to form biofilm.

  14. ANALISIS FUNCIONAL DE WBAP, ENZIMA ESENCIAL PARA LA BIOSINTESIS DEL ANTIGENO O EN SALMONELLA ENTERICA.

    OpenAIRE

    SALDIAS MORALES, MARIA SOLEDAD

    2004-01-01

    En Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. typhi), así como en la mayoría de las bacterias Gram negativas, el lipopolisacárido (LPS) es el principal componente de la membrana externa y un importante factor de virulencia. El LPS está formado por tres dominios estructurales: el lípido A anclado a la membrana externa, una región de oligosacáridos, ubicada en la parte media y el antígeno O que se proyecta hacia el exterior de la bacteria. La biosíntesis del LPS es un proceso complejo que se lleva a...

  15. First isolation of Salmonella enterica serovar Napoli from wild birds in Italy

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    Laura Mancini

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Napoli (S. Napoli is an emerging serovar in Italy. It accounts for 2-4% of all serovars isolated from human infections. The zoonotic origin of this serovar is still unknown and this makes difficult to apply any control intervention. We report here the isolation of S. Napoli from a river nightingale (Cettia cetti, Temminck 1820 which represents the first description of this serovar from wild birds. This finding adds knowledge to the ecology of S. Napoli and addresses further studies aimed to assess the epidemiologic link between S. Napoli isolated from wild birds, food, environmental sources and human infections.

  16. Imunidade de aves (Gallus gallus) para Salmonella enterica subesp. enterica Sorovar Gallinarum biovar Gallinarum

    OpenAIRE

    Acelas Díaz, Silvia Juliana [UNESP

    2014-01-01

    The fowl typhoid is a systemic disease of chickens caused by Salmonella enteric subsp. enteric serovar Gallinarum biovar Gallinarum. This bacterium is highly pathogenic for chickens at any age, causing mortality even in adult birds. The progress of clinical signs differs among different lines of chickens. White lines of chickens are considered resistant and hardly mortality is observed. Chickens of brown lines are more susceptible and develop severe clinical signs with high mortality rates. T...

  17. Roles of the outer membrane protein AsmA of Salmonella enterica in the control of marRAB expression and invasion of epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Ana I; Hernández, Sara B; Cota, Ignacio; Pucciarelli, M Graciela; Orlov, Yuri; Ramos-Morales, Francisco; García-del Portillo, Francisco; Casadesús, Josep

    2009-06-01

    A genetic screen for suppressors of bile sensitivity in DNA adenine methylase (dam) mutants of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium yielded insertions in an uncharacterized locus homologous to the Escherichia coli asmA gene. Disruption of asmA suppressed bile sensitivity also in phoP and wec mutants of S. enterica and increased the MIC of sodium deoxycholate for the parental strain ATCC 14028. Increased levels of marA mRNA were found in asmA, asmA dam, asmA phoP, and asmA wec strains of S. enterica, suggesting that lack of AsmA activates expression of the marRAB operon. Hence, asmA mutations may enhance bile resistance by inducing gene expression changes in the marRAB-controlled Mar regulon. In silico analysis of AsmA structure predicted the existence of one transmembrane domain. Biochemical analysis of subcellular fractions revealed that the asmA gene of S. enterica encodes a protein of approximately 70 kDa located in the outer membrane. Because AsmA is unrelated to known transport and/or efflux systems, we propose that activation of marRAB in asmA mutants may be a consequence of envelope reorganization. Competitive infection of BALB/c mice with asmA(+) and asmA isogenic strains indicated that lack of AsmA attenuates Salmonella virulence by the oral route but not by the intraperitoneal route. Furthermore, asmA mutants showed a reduced ability to invade epithelial cells in vitro.

  18. Global Genomic Epidemiology of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium DT104.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Hendriksen, Rene S; Le Hello, Simon; Weill, François-Xavier; Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Jun, Se-Ran; Ussery, David W; Lund, Ole; Crook, Derrick W; Wilson, Daniel J; Aarestrup, Frank M

    2016-04-01

    It has been 30 years since the initial emergence and subsequent rapid global spread of multidrug-resistant Salmonella entericaserovar Typhimurium DT104 (MDR DT104). Nonetheless, its origin and transmission route have never been revealed. We used whole-genome sequencing (WGS) and temporally structured sequence analysis within a Bayesian framework to reconstruct temporal and spatial phylogenetic trees and estimate the rates of mutation and divergence times of 315S Typhimurium DT104 isolates sampled from 1969 to 2012 from 21 countries on six continents. DT104 was estimated to have emerged initially as antimicrobial susceptible in ∼1948 (95% credible interval [CI], 1934 to 1962) and later became MDR DT104 in ∼1972 (95% CI, 1972 to 1988) through horizontal transfer of the 13-kb Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1) MDR region into susceptible strains already containing SGI1. This was followed by multiple transmission events, initially from central Europe and later between several European countries. An independent transmission to the United States and another to Japan occurred, and from there MDR DT104 was probably transmitted to Taiwan and Canada. An independent acquisition of resistance genes took place in Thailand in ∼1975 (95% CI, 1975 to 1990). In Denmark, WGS analysis provided evidence for transmission of the organism between herds of animals. Interestingly, the demographic history of Danish MDR DT104 provided evidence for the success of the program to eradicate Salmonellafrom pig herds in Denmark from 1996 to 2000. The results from this study refute several hypotheses on the evolution of DT104 and suggest that WGS may be useful in monitoring emerging clones and devising strategies for prevention of Salmonella infections.

  19. Recovery of Salmonella enterica from seropositive finishing pig herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Danilo Lo Fo; Dahl, J.; van der Wolf, P.J.

    2003-01-01

    the proportion of culture positive- and seropositive samples in a herd at cut-off OD% > 10 and of 0.58 at cut-off OD% > 40. Serology is a measure of historical exposure, which may or may not correlate closely to the microbiological burden at the time of sampling. Due to the low sensitivity of culture methods......, apparent 'false-positive' serological results may well represent real infections not detected by bacteriological testing. For screening purposes, serological testing provides an indication of exposure to Salmonella, which forms the basis for targeted sampling, intervention and logistic slaughter procedures....

  20. Polyamines Are Required for Virulence in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsbak, Lotte; Thomsen, Line Elnif; Wallrodt, Inke;

    2012-01-01

    for studying typhoid fever. Central to its virulence are two major virulence loci Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 and 2 (SPI1 and SPI2). SPI1 promotes invasion of epithelial cells, whereas SPI2 enables S. Typhimurium to survive and proliferate within specialized compartments inside host cells. In this study......, we show that an S. Typhimurium polyamine mutant is defective for invasion, intracellular survival, killing of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and systemic infection of the mouse model of typhoid fever. Virulence of the mutant could be restored by genetic complementation, and invasion...

  1. Discovery of novel secreted virulence factors from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium by proteomic analysis of culture supernatants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, George S; Brown, Roslyn N; Gustin, Jean K; Stufkens, Afke; Shaikh-Kidwai, Afshan S; Li, Jie; McDermott, Jason E; Brewer, Heather M; Schepmoes, Athena; Smith, Richard D; Adkins, Joshua N; Heffron, Fred

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a leading cause of acute gastroenteritis throughout the world. This pathogen has two type III secretion systems (TTSS) encoded in Salmonella pathogenicity islands 1 and 2 (SPI-1 and SPI-2) that deliver virulence factors (effectors) to the host cell cytoplasm and are required for virulence. While many effectors have been identified and at least partially characterized, the full repertoire of effectors has not been catalogued. In this proteomic study, we identified effector proteins secreted into defined minimal medium designed to induce expression of the SPI-2 TTSS and its effectors. We compared the secretomes of the parent strain to those of strains missing essential (ssaK::cat) or regulatory (ΔssaL) components of the SPI-2 TTSS. We identified 20 known SPI-2 effectors. Excluding the translocon components SseBCD, all SPI-2 effectors were biased for identification in the ΔssaL mutant, substantiating the regulatory role of SsaL in TTS. To identify novel effector proteins, we coupled our secretome data with a machine learning algorithm (SIEVE, SVM-based identification and evaluation of virulence effectors) and selected 12 candidate proteins for further characterization. Using CyaA' reporter fusions, we identified six novel type III effectors and two additional proteins that were secreted into J774 macrophages independently of a TTSS. To assess their roles in virulence, we constructed nonpolar deletions and performed a competitive index analysis from intraperitoneally infected 129/SvJ mice. Six mutants were significantly attenuated for spleen colonization. Our results also suggest that non-type III secretion mechanisms are required for full Salmonella virulence.

  2. Root internalization, transport and in-planta survival of Salmonella enterica serovar Newport in sweet basil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbatsevich, Elena; Sela Saldinger, Shlomo; Pinto, Riky; Bernstein, Nirit

    2013-02-01

    It is now acknowledged that food-borne pathogens present in the irrigation water or soil can become associated with crop plants in the field, penetrate internal plant tissues via the root, translocate and survive inside plants. Only little information is available concerning interaction between enteric pathogens and plants. The present study evaluated the potential for contamination of the aromatic plant, sweet basil during cultivation, by Salmonella enterica serovar Newport. Root internalization was plant-age-dependent, with the highest susceptibility occurring at the beginning of the rapid growth phase of the root. Higher incidence of internalization was detected in vegetative than reproductive plant organs, pointing at bacterial transport in the transpiration stream. Internalized Salmonella survived only basil.

  3. Identification of in vivo-induced genes during infection of chickens with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Shizhong; Liu, Zhicheng; Lin, Zhijie; Barrow, Paul; Pan, Zhiming; Li, Qiuchun; Jiao, Xinan

    2015-06-01

    Chickens are an important source of food worldwide and are often infected with food-poisoning serovars of Salmonella enterica, frequently Salmonella Enteritidis (SE), without exhibiting clinical signs of disease. Ivi (in vivo induced) genes identified using in vivo-induced antigen technology (IVIAT) are expressed only during bacterial infection and have the potential value of identifying epidemic strains and antigens which can form the basis for sub-unit vaccine development. We applied IVIAT to SE strain 50041 and identified 42 ivi genes. Eight representative ivi genes were further confirmed by qRT-PCR as being expressed only in vivo within 48 h of infection compared with that of in vitro-cultured. Although our results indicated that the identified ivi genes are expressed only in vivo, further research is needed to elucidate the exact roles of these genes during infection and pathogenesis.

  4. Salmonella enterica Typhimurium infection causes metabolic changes in chicken muscle involving AMPK, fatty acid and insulin/mTOR signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Arsenault, Ryan J.; Napper, Scott; Kogut, Michael H.

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (Salmonella Typhimurium) infection of chickens that are more than a few days old results in asymptomatic cecal colonization with persistent shedding of bacteria. We hypothesized that while the bacterium colonizes and persists locally in the cecum it has systemic effects, including changes to metabolic pathways of skeletal muscle, influencing the physiology of the avian host. Using species-specific peptide arrays to perform kinome analysis on metabolic s...

  5. An outbreak of gastroenteritis caused by Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis traced to cream cakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kee Tai Goh

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This paper describes the epidemiological, microbiological and environmental investigations conducted during an outbreak of Salmonella gastroenteritis in Singapore.Methods: A case-control study was undertaken to identify the vehicle of transmission. Microbiological testing was performed on faecal, food and environmental samples. Isolates of Salmonella were further characterized by phage typing and ribotyping.Results: There were 216 gastroenteritis cases reported from 20 November to 4 December 2007. The causative agent was identified as Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serotype Enteritidis for 14 out of 20 cases tested. The vehicle of transmission was traced to cream cakes produced by a bakery and sold at its retail outlets (P < 0.001, OR = 143.00, 95% Cl = 27.23–759.10. More than two-thirds of the 40 Salmonella strains isolated from hospitalized cases, food samples and asymptomatic food handlers were of phage type 1; the others reacted but did not conform to any phage type. The phage types correlated well with their unique antibiograms. The ribotype patterns of 22 selected isolates tested were highly similar, indicating genetic relatedness. The dendrogram of the strains from the outbreak showed distinct clustering and correlation compared to the non-outbreak strains, confirming a common source of infection.Discussion: The cream cakes were likely contaminated by one of the ingredients used in the icing. Cross-contamination down the production line and subsequent storage of cakes at ambient temperatures for a prolonged period before consumption could have resulted in the outbreak.

  6. Effects of indole on drug resistance and virulence of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium revealed by genome-wide analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikaido Eiji

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria produce large quantities of indole as an intercellular signal in microbial communities. Indole demonstrated to affect gene expression in Escherichia coli as an intra-species signaling molecule. In contrast to E. coli, Salmonella does not produce indole because it does not harbor tnaA, which encodes the enzyme responsible for tryptophan metabolism. Our previous study demonstrated that E. coli-conditioned medium and indole induce expression of the AcrAB multidrug efflux pump in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium for inter-species communication; however, the global effect of indole on genes in Salmonella remains unknown. Results To understand the complete picture of genes regulated by indole, we performed DNA microarray analysis of genes in the S. enterica serovar Typhimurium strain ATCC 14028s affected by indole. Predicted Salmonella phenotypes affected by indole based on the microarray data were also examined in this study. Indole induced expression of genes related to efflux-mediated multidrug resistance, including ramA and acrAB, and repressed those related to host cell invasion encoded in the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1, and flagella production. Reduction of invasive activity and motility of Salmonella by indole was also observed phenotypically. Conclusion Our results suggest that indole is an important signaling molecule for inter-species communication to control drug resistance and virulence of S. enterica.

  7. DISSEMINATION OF SALMONELLA ENTERICA SEQUENCE TYPES AMONG ASEAN ECONOMIC COMMUNITY COUNTRIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patchanee, Prapas; Boonkhot, Phacharaporn; Kittiwan, Nattinee; Tadee, Pakpoom; Chotinun, Suwit

    2015-07-01

    Food-borne illness caused by Salmonella enterica remains a public health problem and results in economic loss worldwide. With the up-coming establish- ment of the ASEAN Economic Community (AEC) allowing unrestricted move- ment of labor and goods, there is a higher risk of pathogen transmission among the AEC countries. This study characterized and investigated the spatial and temporal associations of S. enterica strains isolated in AEC countries during 1940- 2012 compared with those isolated in northern-Thailand during 2011-2013. Of the 173 S. enterica strains examined, 68 sequence types (STs) and 32 clonal complexes (CCs) were identified by multi loci sequence typing. Twenty-one strains belonged to four sequence types new to AEC countries, and they constituted only two CCs. A number of strains originated from various countries with multiple hosts, were highlighted. There was evidence of strains circulating in the AEC region well over a decade. Such information will be important in formulating biosecurity measures, as well as in educating regarding the risk of disease transmission in AEC.

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi IMR_TP298/15, a Strain with Intermediate Susceptibility to Ciprofloxacin, Isolated from a Typhoid Outbreak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hii, Shirley Yi Fen; Hashim, Rohaidah

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi with reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin is increasingly being reported globally. An outbreak caused by Salmonella Typhi with decreased ciprofloxacin susceptibility has not been reported before in Malaysia. We present here the annotated draft genome of a Salmonella Typhi strain involved in a typhoid outbreak. PMID:28254988

  9. Isolation and characterization of bacteriophages of Salmonella enterica serovar Pullorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, H; Zhang, H; Wang, R

    2011-10-01

    In this study, 2 bacteriophages of Salmonella Pullorum were isolated using an enrichment protocol and the double agar layer method. They were named PSPu-95 and PSPu-4-116, respectively, against clinical isolates of Salmonella Pullorum SPu-95 and SPu-116. The host ranges of the 2 bacteriophages were determined by performing spot tests with 20 bacteria strains. Both bacteriophages had wide host ranges. Bacteriophage PSPu-95 had a lytic effect on 17 of the 20 isolates (85%), and PSPu-4-116 produced a lytic effect on 14 isolates (70%) and was the only bacteriophage that produced a clear plaque on enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli K88. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the bacteriophages belonged to the order Caudovirales. Bacteriophage PSPu-95 was a member of the family Siphoviridae, but bacteriophage PSPu-4-116 belonged to the family Myoviridae. Both had a double-stranded DNA, which was digested with HindIII or EcoRI, that was estimated to be 58.3 kbp (PSPu-95) and 45.2 kbp (PSPu-4-116) by 1% agar electrophoresis. One-step growth kinetics showed that the latent periods were all less than 20 min, and the burst size was 77.5 pfu/cell for PSPu-95 and 86 pfu/cell for PSPu-4-116. The bacteriophages were able to survive in a pH range between 4 and 10, and they were able to survive in a treatment of 70°C for 60 min. The characterizations of these 2 bacteriophages were helpful in establishing a basis for adopting the most effective bacteriophage to control bacteria in the poultry industry.

  10. Distribution of prophages and SGI-1 antibiotic-resistance genes among different Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermans, A.P.H.M.; Beuling, A.M.; Hoek, van A.H.A.M.; Aarts, H.J.M.; Abee, T.; Zwietering, M.H.

    2006-01-01

    Recently, the authors identified Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) definitive type (DT)104-specific sequences of mainly prophage origin by genomic subtractive hybridization. In the present study, the distribution of the prophages identified, ST104 and ST64B, and the novel prop

  11. Quantification of contamination of lettuce by GFP-expressing Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franz, Eelco; Visser, Anna A; Van Diepeningen, Anne D; Klerks, Michel M; Termorshuizen, Aad J; van Bruggen, Ariena H C

    2007-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the possibility of internalization of GFP-expressing Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) strains MAE 110 (multi-cellular morphology) and 119 (wild type morphology) into lettuce seedlings (Lactuca s

  12. Mobilization properties of small ColE1-like plasmids carrying kanamycin resistance gene isolated from Salmonella enterica serotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Previously we isolated and characterized various groups of small kanamycin resistance (KanR) ColE1-like plasmids from different serotypes of Salmonella enterica isolates. These plasmids all carried the aph(3)-I gene encoding the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase responsible for the kanam...

  13. Beta-glucan plus ascorbic acid in neonatal calves modulates immune functions with and without Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calves often succumb to Salmonella enterica, Dublin after maternal antibody protection has abated. Enhancement of innate immunity or earlier maturation of adaptive immunity to support vaccinations with dietary immune modulators may be the best option for protection during this vulnerable period. I...

  14. Characterization of Isolates of Salmonella enterica Serovar Stanley, a Serovar Endemic to Asia and Associated with Travel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriksen, Rene S.; Le Hello, Simon; Bortolaia, Valeria

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Stanley (S. Stanley) is a common serovar in Southeast Asia and was the second most common serovar implicated in human salmonellosis in Thailand in the years 2002 to 2007. In contrast, this serovar is relatively uncommon in Europe. The objective of this study was to cha...

  15. The global establishment of a highly-fluoroquinolone resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Kentucky ST198 strain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Hello, Simon; Bekhit, Amany; Granier, Sophie A.

    2013-01-01

    While the spread of Salmonella enterica serotype Kentucky resistant to ciprofloxacin across Africa and the Middle-East has been described recently, the presence of this strain in humans, food, various animal species (livestock, pets, and wildlife) and in environment is suspected in other countrie...

  16. Increased detection of extended spectrum beta-lactamase producing Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli isolates from poultry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dierikx, C.M.; Essen-Zandbergen, van A.; Veldman, K.T.; Smith, H.E.; Mevius, D.J.

    2010-01-01

    To gain more information on the genetic basis of the rapid increase in the number of isolates exhibiting non-wild type Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs) for cefotaxime observed since 2003, beta-lactamase genes of 22 Salmonella enterica and 22 Escherichia coli isolates from broilers in 2006 sh

  17. Inactivation of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and quality maintenance of cherry tomatoes treated with gaseous essential oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    The antimicrobial activity of the essential oils (EOs) from cinnamon bark, oregano, mustard and of their major components cinnamaldehyde, carvacrol, and allyl isothiocyanate (AIT) were evaluated as a gaseous treatment to reduce Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in vitro and on tomatoes. In dif...

  18. Recipes for Antimicrobial Wine Marinades against Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella enterica

    Science.gov (United States)

    We evaluated bactericidal activities of several antimicrobial wine recipes consisting of red and white wine extracts of oregano leaves with added garlic juice and oregano oil against Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella enterica. Dose-response plots were...

  19. Inactivation of Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes in cantaloupe puree by high hydrostatic pressure with/without added ascorbic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this research was to evaluate and develop a method for inactivation of Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes in cantaloupe puree (CP) by high hydrostatic pressure (HHP). Cantaloupe being the most netted varieties of melons presents a greater risk of pathogen transmission. ...

  20. Survival of Salmonella enterica on soybean sprouts following treatments with gaseous chlorine dioxide and biocontrol Pseudomonas bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Control of Salmonella enterica on sprouts and minimally processed, ready-to-eat fruits and vegetables is important for food and consumer safety. The aim of this research was to assess the effects of gaseous chlorine dioxide(ClO2)and biocontrol microorganisms (Pseudomonas chlororaphis and P. fluoresc...

  1. Draft Genome Sequences of 40 Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Strains Isolated from Humans and Food in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Fernanda; Medeiros, Marta Inês Cazentini; Rodrigues, Dália Prazeres; Payne, Justin; Timme, Ruth E.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonellosis is an important health problem worldwide and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is one of the most common isolated serovars. Here, we reported the draft genomes of 40 S. Typhimurium strains isolated from humans and food in Brazil. These draft genomes will improve phylogenetic analysis and will help enhance our understanding of strains of this serovar isolated in Brazil. PMID:27660768

  2. Dam methylation is required for efficient biofilm production in Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aya Castañeda, María del Rosario; Sarnacki, Sebastián Hernán; Noto Llana, Mariángeles; López Guerra, Adriana Gabriela; Giacomodonato, Mónica Nancy; Cerquetti, María Cristina

    2015-01-16

    The ecological success of Salmonella enterica to survive in different environments is due, in part, to the ability to form biofilms, something which is especially important for food industry. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the involvement of Dam methylation in biofilm production in S. Enteritidis strains. The ability to generate biofilms was analyzed in wild type and dam mutant strains. In S. Enteritidis, the absence of Dam affected the capacity to develop pellicles at the air-liquid interface and reduced the ability to form biofilm on polystyrene surfaces. Curli and cellulose production, determined by Congo red and calcofluor assays, were affected in dam mutant strains. Relative quantitative real-time PCR experiments showed that the expression of csgD and csgA genes is reduced in mutants lacking dam gene with respect to the wild type strains, whereas transcript levels of bcsA are not affected in the absence of Dam. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the participation of Dam methylation on biofilm production in Enteritidis or any other serovar of S. enterica. Results presented here suggest that changes in gene expression required for biofilm production are finely regulated by Dam methylation. Thus, Dam methylation could modulate csgD expression and upregulate the expression of factors related with biofilm production, including curli and cellulose. This study contributes to the understanding of biofilm regulation in Salmonella spp. and to the design of new strategies to prevent food contamination and humans and animals infections.

  3. Isolation and plasmid characterization of carbapenemase (IMP-4) producing Salmonella enterica Typhimurium from cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Sam; O’Dea, Mark; Trott, Darren J.; Abraham, Rebecca J.; Hughes, David; Pang, Stanley; McKew, Genevieve; Cheong, Elaine Y. L.; Merlino, John; Saputra, Sugiyono; Malik, Richard; Gottlieb, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) are a pressing public health issue due to limited therapeutic options to treat such infections. CREs have been predominantly isolated from humans and environmental samples and they are rarely reported among companion animals. In this study we report on the isolation and plasmid characterization of carbapenemase (IMP-4) producing Salmonella enterica Typhimurium from a companion animal. Carbapenemase-producing S. enterica Typhimurium carrying blaIMP-4 was identified from a systemically unwell (index) cat and three additional cats at an animal shelter. All isolates were identical and belonged to ST19. Genome sequencing revealed the acquisition of a multidrug-resistant IncHI2 plasmid (pIMP4-SEM1) that encoded resistance to nine antimicrobial classes including carbapenems and carried the blaIMP-4-qacG-aacA4-catB3 cassette array. The plasmid also encoded resistance to arsenic (MIC-150 mM). Comparative analysis revealed that the plasmid pIMP4-SEM1 showed greatest similarity to two blaIMP-8 carrying IncHI2 plasmids from Enterobacter spp. isolated from humans in China. This is the first report of CRE carrying a blaIMP-4 gene causing a clinical infection in a companion animal, with presumed nosocomial spread. This study illustrates the broader community risk entailed in escalating CRE transmission within a zoonotic species such as Salmonella, and in a cycle that encompasses humans, animals and the environment. PMID:27767038

  4. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi impairs CD4 T cell responses by reducing antigen availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atif, Shaikh M; Winter, Sebastian E; Winter, Maria G; McSorley, Stephen J; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2014-06-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi is associated with a disseminated febrile illness in humans, termed typhoid fever, while Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium causes localized gastroenteritis in immunocompetent individuals. One of the genetic differences between both pathogens is the presence in S. Typhi of TviA, a regulatory protein that shuts down flagellin (FliC) expression when bacteria transit from the intestinal lumen into the intestinal mucosa. Here we investigated the consequences of TviA-mediated flagellum gene regulation on flagellin-specific CD4 T cell responses in a mouse model of S. Typhimurium infection. Introduction of the S. Typhi tviA gene into S. Typhimurium suppressed antigen presentation of dendritic cells to flagellin-specific CD4 T cells in vitro. Furthermore, TviA-mediated repression of flagellin expression impaired the activation and proliferation of naive flagellin-specific CD4 T cells in Peyer's patches and mesenteric lymph nodes, which was accompanied by increased bacterial dissemination to the spleen. We conclude that TviA-mediated repression of flagellin expression reduces antigen availability, thereby weakening flagellin-specific CD4 T cell responses.

  5. Assessment of antibiotic resistance phenotype and integrons in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolated from swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayamajhi, Nabin; Kang, Sang Gyun; Kang, Mi Lan; Lee, Hee Soo; Park, Kyung Yoon; Yoo, Han Sang

    2008-10-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) isolated and identified from swine were subjected for the analysis of antibiotic resistance pattern and clinically important class 1 and 2 integrons. In addition, S. Typhimurium isolates exhibiting ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline and florfenicol (ACSSuTF) resistance pattern as described in most Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium definitive type 104 (DT104) were characterized by polymerase chain reaction. All the isolates were resistant to more than four antibiotics and showed the highest resistance to streptomycin (94.1%), followed by tetracycline (90.1%), ampicillin (64.7%), chloramphenicol (56.8%) and gentamicin (54.9%). MIC value for the ten isolates ranged between 0.125-2 mug/ml for ciprofloxacin. Among the beta-lactams used, only one of the isolate exhibited resistance to ceftiofur (MIC 8 microg/ml). Sixty eight percent of these multi drug resistance (MDR) S. Typhimurium isolates carried clinically important class 1 integron with 1kb (aadA) and/or 2kb (dhfrXII-orfF-aadA2) resistance gene cassettes. This study reports the increasing trend of multi drug resistance (MDR) S. Typhimurium with clinically important class 1 integron in pigs. In addition, emergence of the ACSSuTF-type resistance in S. Typhimurium PT other than DT104 may limit the use of resistance gene markers in its detection methods by PCR.

  6. The effect of nitric oxide combined with fluoroquinolones against Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coban AY

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Two regulons, soxRS and marRAB, are associated with resistance to quinolones or multiple antibiotic in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. These regulons are activated by nitric oxide and redox-cycling drugs, such as paraquat and cause on activation of the acrAB-encoded efflux pump. In this study, we investigated the effect of nitric oxide (NO alone and in combination with ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and pefloxacin against S. typhimurium clinical isolates and mutant strains in vitro. We did not observe synergistic effect against clinical isolates and SH5014 (parent strain of acr mutant, while we found synergistic effect against PP120 (soxRS mutant and SH7616 (an acr mutant S. typhimurium for all quinolones. Our results suggest that the efficiencies of some antibiotics, including ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and pefloxacin are decreased via activation of soxRS and marRAB regulons by NO in S. enterica serovar Typhimurium. Further studies are warranted to establish the interaction of NO with the genes of Salmonella and, with multiple antibiotic resistance.

  7. Physiological and Immunological Regulations in Caenorhabditis elegans Infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivamaruthi, Bhagavathi Sundaram; Balamurugan, Krishnaswamy

    2014-03-01

    Studies pertaining to Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection by utilizing model systems failed to mimic the essential aspects of immunity induced by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, as the determinants of innate immunity are distinct. The present study investigated the physiological and innate immune responses of S. Typhi infected Caenorhabditis elegans and also explored the Ty21a mediated immune enhancement in C. elegans. Ty21a is a known live vaccine for typhoidal infection in human beings. Physiological responses of C. elegans infected with S. Typhi assessed by survival and behavioral assays revealed that S. Typhi caused host mortality by persistent infection. However, Ty21a exposure to C. elegans was not harmful. Ty21a pre-exposed C. elegans, exhibited significant resistance against S. Typhi infection. Elevated accumulation of S. Typhi inside the infected host was observed when compared to Ty21a exposures. Transcript analysis of candidate innate immune gene (clec-60, clec-87, lys-7, ilys-3, scl-2, cpr-2, F08G5.6, atf-7, age-1, bec-1 and daf-16) regulations in the host during S. Typhi infection have been assessed through qPCR analysis to understand the activation of immune signaling pathways during S. Typhi infections. Gene silencing approaches confirmed that clec-60 and clec-87 has a major role in the defense system of C. elegans during S. Typhi infection. In conclusion, the study revealed that preconditioning of host with Ty21a protects against subsequent S. Typhi infection.

  8. Single passage in mouse organs enhances the survival and spread of Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dybowski, Richard; Restif, Olivier; Goupy, Alexandre; Maskell, Duncan J; Mastroeni, Piero; Grant, Andrew J

    2015-12-01

    Intravenous inoculation of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium into mice is a prime experimental model of invasive salmonellosis. The use of wild-type isogenic tagged strains (WITS) in this system has revealed that bacteria undergo independent bottlenecks in the liver and spleen before establishing a systemic infection. We recently showed that those bacteria that survived the bottleneck exhibited enhanced growth when transferred to naive mice. In this study, we set out to disentangle the components of this in vivo adaptation by inoculating mice with WITS grown either in vitro or in vivo. We developed an original method to estimate the replication and killing rates of bacteria from experimental data, which involved solving the probability-generating function of a non-homogeneous birth-death-immigration process. This revealed a low initial mortality in bacteria obtained from a donor animal. Next, an analysis of WITS distributions in the livers and spleens of recipient animals indicated that in vivo-passaged bacteria started spreading between organs earlier than in vitro-grown bacteria. These results further our understanding of the influence of passage in a host on the fitness and virulence of Salmonella enterica and represent an advance in the power of investigation on the patterns and mechanisms of host-pathogen interactions.

  9. Antimicrobial susceptibility to azithromycin among Salmonella enterica Typhi and Paratyphi A isolates from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Richa; Prasad, Kashi Nath

    2016-12-01

    Decreased ciprofloxacin susceptibility (DCS) and multidrug resistance in typhoidal Salmonella isolates in areas of endemicity are significant therapeutic problems. Guidelines for azithromycin disc diffusion and MIC interpretive criteria for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi were published recently by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute in 2015. We investigated the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of azithromycin in 100 isolates of Salmonella Typhi (n=80), Paratyphi A (n=18) and B (n=2) recovered from bloodstream infections from January 2013 to December 2015. Zone sizes were extrapolated against MIC values, and a scatter plot was constructed. The azithromycin MICs by Etest ranged from 2 to 16 µg ml-1, while the disc diffusion diameters were from 13 to 22 mm. We observed that the margin of the zone of inhibition around the azithromycin disc may not be very clear and therefore difficult to interpret and that there was wide variation in the zone sizes for the same MIC value in both serovars. DCS was observed in 85 % of Salmonella Typhi recovered (68/80) and in 15/18 (83.3 %) Paratyphi A isolates. Judicious use of azithromycin is advocated as an alternative oral agent in endemic areas where DCS is common.

  10. Genomic Analysis of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium from Wild Passerines in England and Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Alison E; Lawson, Becki; de Pinna, Elizabeth; Wigley, Paul; Parkhill, Julian; Thomson, Nicholas R; Page, Andrew J; Holmes, Mark A; Paterson, Gavin K

    2016-11-15

    Passerine salmonellosis is a well-recognized disease of birds in the order Passeriformes, which includes common songbirds such as finches and sparrows, caused by infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Previous research has suggested that some subtypes of S Typhimurium-definitive phage types (DTs) 40, 56 variant, and 160-are host adapted to passerines and that these birds may represent a reservoir of infection for humans and other animals. Here, we have used the whole-genome sequences of 11 isolates from British passerines, five isolates of similar DTs from humans and a domestic cat, and previously published S Typhimurium genomes that include similar DTs from other hosts to investigate the phylogenetic relatedness of passerine salmonellae to other S Typhimurium isolates and investigate possible genetic features of the distinct disease pathogenesis of S Typhimurium in passerines. Our results demonstrate that the 11 passerine isolates and 13 other isolates, including those from nonpasserine hosts, were genetically closely related, with a median pairwise single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) difference of 130 SNPs. These 24 isolates did not carry antimicrobial resistance genetic determinants or the S Typhimurium virulence plasmid. Although our study does not provide evidence of Salmonella transmission from passerines to other hosts, our results are consistent with the hypothesis that wild birds represent a potential reservoir of these Salmonella subtypes, and thus, sensible personal hygiene precautions should be taken when feeding or handling garden birds.

  11. Heat-labile enterotoxin of Escherichia coli promotes intestinal colonization of Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbrugghe, Elin; Van Parys, Alexander; Leyman, Bregje; Boyen, Filip; Arnouts, Sven; Lundberg, Urban; Ducatelle, Richard; Van den Broeck, Wim; Yekta, Maryam Atef; Cox, Eric; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Pasmans, Frank

    2015-12-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an important cause of infantile and travellers' diarrhoea, which poses a serious health burden, especially in developing countries. In addition, ETEC bacteria are a major cause of illness and death in neonatal and recently weaned pigs. The production of a heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) promotes the colonization and pathogenicity of ETEC and may exacerbate co-infections with other enteric pathogens such as Salmonella enterica. We showed that the intraintestinal presence of LT dramatically increased the intestinal Salmonella Typhimurium load in experimentally inoculated pigs. This could not be explained by direct alteration of the invasion or survival capacity of Salmonella in enterocytes, in vitro. However, we demonstrated that LT affects the enteric mucus layer composition in a mucus-secreting goblet cell line by significantly decreasing the expression of mucin 4. The current results show that LT alters the intestinal mucus composition and aggravates a Salmonella Typhimurium infection, which may result in the exacerbation of the diarrhoeal illness.

  12. Specific Monoclonal Antibody Overcomes the Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium's Adaptive Mechanisms of Intramacrophage Survival and Replication.

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    Swarmistha Devi Aribam

    Full Text Available Salmonella-specific antibodies play an important role in host immunity; however, the mechanisms of Salmonella clearance by pathogen-specific antibodies remain to be completely elucidated since previous studies on antibody-mediated protection have yielded inconsistent results. These inconsistencies are at least partially attributable to the use of polyclonal antibodies against Salmonella antigens. Here, we developed a new monoclonal antibody (mAb-449 and identified its related immunogen that protected BALB/c mice from infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. In addition, these data indicate that the mAb-449 immunogen is likely a major protective antigen. Using in vitro infection studies, we also analyzed the mechanism by which mAb-449 conferred host protection. Notably, macrophages infected with mAb-449-treated S. Typhimurium showed enhanced pathogen uptake compared to counterparts infected with control IgG-treated bacteria. Moreover, these macrophages produced elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα and nitric oxide, indicating that mAb-449 enhanced macrophage activation. Finally, the number of intracellular bacteria in mAb-449-activated macrophages decreased considerably, while the opposite was found in IgG-treated controls. Based on these findings, we suggest that, although S. Typhimurium has the potential to survive and replicate within macrophages, host production of a specific antibody can effectively mediate macrophage activation for clearance of intracellular bacteria.

  13. Efficacy of European starling control to reduce Salmonella enterica contamination in a concentrated animal feeding operation in the Texas panhandle

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    Bodenchuk Michael J

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris are an invasive bird species known to cause damage to plant and animal agriculture. New evidence suggests starlings may also contribute to the maintenance and spread of diseases within livestock facilities. Identifying and mitigating the risk pathways that contribute to disease in livestock is necessary to reduce production losses and contamination of human food products. To better understand the impact starlings have on disease transmission to cattle we assessed the efficacy of starling control as a tool to reduce Salmonella enterica within a concentrated animal feeding operation. We matched a large facility, slated for operational control using DRC-1339 (3-chloro-4-methylaniline hydrochloride, also 3-chloro p-toluidine hydrochloride, 3-chloro-4-methylaniline, with a comparable reference facility that was not controlling birds. In both facilities, we sampled cattle feed, cattle water and cattle feces for S. enterica before and after starling control operations. Results Within the starling-controlled CAFO, detections of S. enterica contamination disappeared from feed bunks and substantially declined within water troughs following starling control operations. Within the reference facility, detections of S. enterica contamination increased substantially within feed bunks and water troughs. Starling control was not observed to reduce prevalence of S. enterica in the cattle herd. Following starling control operations, herd prevalence of S. enterica increased on the reference facility but herd prevalence of S. enterica on the starling-controlled CAFO stayed at pretreatment levels. Conclusions Within the starling-controlled facility detections of S. enterica disappeared from feed bunks and substantially declined within water troughs following control operations. Since cattle feed and water are obvious routes for the ingestion of S. enterica, starling control shows promise as a tool to help

  14. Multilocus sequence typing as a replacement for serotyping in Salmonella enterica.

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    Mark Achtman

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica is traditionally subdivided into serovars by serological and nutritional characteristics. We used Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST to assign 4,257 isolates from 554 serovars to 1092 sequence types (STs. The majority of the isolates and many STs were grouped into 138 genetically closely related clusters called eBurstGroups (eBGs. Many eBGs correspond to a serovar, for example most Typhimurium are in eBG1 and most Enteritidis are in eBG4, but many eBGs contained more than one serovar. Furthermore, most serovars were polyphyletic and are distributed across multiple unrelated eBGs. Thus, serovar designations confounded genetically unrelated isolates and failed to recognize natural evolutionary groupings. An inability of serotyping to correctly group isolates was most apparent for Paratyphi B and its variant Java. Most Paratyphi B were included within a sub-cluster of STs belonging to eBG5, which also encompasses a separate sub-cluster of Java STs. However, diphasic Java variants were also found in two other eBGs and monophasic Java variants were in four other eBGs or STs, one of which is in subspecies salamae and a second of which includes isolates assigned to Enteritidis, Dublin and monophasic Paratyphi B. Similarly, Choleraesuis was found in eBG6 and is closely related to Paratyphi C, which is in eBG20. However, Choleraesuis var. Decatur consists of isolates from seven other, unrelated eBGs or STs. The serological assignment of these Decatur isolates to Choleraesuis likely reflects lateral gene transfer of flagellar genes between unrelated bacteria plus purifying selection. By confounding multiple evolutionary groups, serotyping can be misleading about the disease potential of S. enterica. Unlike serotyping, MLST recognizes evolutionary groupings and we recommend that Salmonella classification by serotyping should be replaced by MLST or its equivalents.

  15. A novel secretion pathway of Salmonella enterica acts as an antivirulence modulator during salmonellosis.

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    Ohad Gal-Mor

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella spp. are Gram-negative enteropathogenic bacteria that infect a variety of vertebrate hosts. Like any other living organism, protein secretion is a fundamental process essential for various aspects of Salmonella biology. Herein we report the identification and characterization of a horizontally acquired, autonomous and previously unreported secretion pathway. In Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, this novel secretion pathway is encoded by STM1669 and STM1668, designated zirT and zirS, respectively. We show that ZirT is localized to the bacterial outer membrane, expected to adopt a compact beta-barrel conformation, and functions as a translocator for ZirS. ZirS is an exoprotein, which is secreted into the extracellular environment in a ZirT-dependent manner. The ZirTS secretion pathway was found to share several important features with two-partner secretion (TPS systems and members of the intimin/invasin family of adhesions. We show that zirTS expression is affected by zinc; and that in vivo, induction of zirT occurs distinctively in Salmonella colonizing the small intestine, but not in systemic sites. Additionally, strong expression of zirT takes place in Salmonella shed in fecal pellets during acute and persistent infections of mice. Inactivation of ZirTS results in a hypervirulence phenotype of Salmonella during oral infection of mice. Cumulatively, these results indicate that the ZirTS pathway plays a unique role as an antivirulence modulator during systemic disease and is involved in fine-tuning a host-pathogen balance during salmonellosis.

  16. Diversity and Persistence of Salmonella enterica Strains in Rural Landscapes in the Southeastern United States.

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    John J Maurer

    Full Text Available Salmonellosis cases in the in the United States show distinct geographical trends, with the southeast reporting among the highest rates of illness. In the state of Georgia, USA, non-outbreak associated salmonellosis is especially high in the southern low-lying coastal plain. Here we examined the distribution of Salmonella enterica in environmental waters and associated wildlife in two distinct watersheds, one in the Atlantic Coastal Plain (a high case rate rural area physiographic province and one in the Piedmont (a lower case rate rural area. Salmonella were isolated from the two regions and compared for serovar and strain diversity, as well as distribution, between the two study areas, using both a retrospective and prospective design. Thirty-seven unique serovars and 204 unique strain types were identified by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. Salmonella serovars Braenderup, Give, Hartford, and Muenchen were dominant in both watersheds. Two serovars, specifically S. Muenchen and S. Rubislaw, were consistently isolated from both systems, including water and small mammals. Conversely, 24 serovars tended to be site-specific (64.8%, n = 37. Compared to the other Salmonella serovars isolated from these sites, S. Muenchen and S. Rubislaw exhibited significant genetic diversity. Among a subset of PFGE patterns, approximately half of the environmental strain types matched entries in the USA PulseNet database of human cases. Ninety percent of S. Muenchen strains from the Little River basin (the high case rate area matched PFGE entries in PulseNet compared to 33.33% of S. Muenchen strains from the North Oconee River region (the lower case rate area. Underlying the diversity and turnover of Salmonella strains observed for these two watersheds is the persistence of specific Salmonella serovars and strain types that may be adapted to these watersheds and landscapes.

  17. Enrichment, Amplification, and Sequence-Based Typing of Salmonella enterica and Other Foodborne Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlind, Tom; Brewster, Jeffrey D; Paoli, George C

    2017-01-01

    Detection of Salmonella enterica in foods typically involves microbiological enrichment, molecular-based assay, and subsequent isolation and identification of a pure culture. This is ideally followed by strain typing, which provides information critical to the investigation of outbreaks and the attribution of their sources. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis is the "gold standard" for S. enterica strain typing, but its limitations have encouraged the search for alternative methods, including whole genome sequencing. Both methods typically require a pure culture, which adds to the cost and turnaround time. A more rapid and cost-effective method with sufficient discriminatory power would benefit food industries, regulatory agencies, and public health laboratories. To address this need, a novel enrichment, amplification, and sequence-based typing (EAST) approach was developed involving (i) overnight enrichment and total DNA preparation, (ii) amplification of polymorphic tandem repeat-containing loci with electrophoretic detection, and (iii) DNA sequencing and bioinformatic analysis to identify related strains. EAST requires 3 days or less and provides a strain resolution that exceeds serotyping and is comparable to pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Evaluation with spiked ground turkey demonstrated its sensitivity (with a starting inoculum of ≤1 CFU/g) and specificity (with unique or nearly unique alleles relative to databases of >1,000 strains). In tests with unspiked retail chicken parts, 3 of 11 samples yielded S. enterica -specific PCR products. Sequence analysis of three distinct typing targets (SeMT1, SeCRISPR1, and SeCRISPR2) revealed consistent similarities to specific serotype Schwarzengrund, Montevideo, and Typhimurium strains. EAST provides a time-saving and cost-effective approach for detecting and typing foodborne S. enterica , and postenrichment steps can be commercially outsourced to facilitate its implementation. Initial studies with Listeria

  18. Cadmium resistance and uptake by bacterium, Salmonella enterica 43C, isolated from industrial effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Zaman; Rehman, Abdul; Hussain, Syed Z; Nisar, Muhammad A; Zulfiqar, Soumble; Shakoori, Abdul R

    2016-12-01

    Cadmium resistant bacterium, isolated from industrial wastewater, was characterized as Salmonella enterica 43C on the basis of biochemical and 16S rRNA ribotyping. It is first ever reported S. enterica 43C bared extreme resistance against heavy metal consortia in order of Pb(2+)>Cd(2+)>As(3+)>Zn(2+)>Cr(6+)>Cu(2+)>Hg(2+). Cd(2+) stress altered growth pattern of the bacterium in time dependent manner. It could remove nearly 57 % Cd(2+) from the medium over a period of 8 days. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies based on various adsorption isotherm models (Langmuir and Freundlich) depicted the Cd(2+) biosorption as spontaneous, feasible and endothermic in nature. Interestingly, the bacterium followed pseudo first order kinetics, making it a good biosorbent for heavy metal ions. The S. enterica 43C Cd(2+) processivity was significantly influenced by temperature, pH, initial Cd(2+) concentration, biomass dosage and co-metal ions. FTIR analysis of the bacterium revealed the active participation of amide and carbonyl moieties in Cd(2+) adsorption confirmed by EDX analysis. Electron micrographs beckoned further surface adsorption and increased bacterial size due to intracellular Cd(2+) accumulation. An overwhelming increase in glutathione and other non-protein thiols levels played a significant role in thriving oxidative stress generated by metal cations. Presence of metallothionein clearly depicted the role of such proteins in bacterial metal resistance mechanism. The present study results clearly declare S. enterica 43C a suitable candidate for green chemistry to bioremediate environmental Cd(2+).

  19. Genome sequencing reveals diversification of virulence factor content and possible host adaptation in distinct subpopulations of Salmonella enterica

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    Rodriguez-Rivera Lorraine D

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Divergence of bacterial populations into distinct subpopulations is often the result of ecological isolation. While some studies have suggested the existence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica subclades, evidence for these subdivisions has been ambiguous. Here we used a comparative genomics approach to define the population structure of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica, and identify clade-specific genes that may be the result of ecological specialization. Results Multi-locus sequence analysis (MLSA and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs data for 16 newly sequenced and 30 publicly available genomes showed an unambiguous subdivision of S. enterica subsp. enterica into at least two subpopulations, which we refer to as clade A and clade B. Clade B strains contain several clade-specific genes or operons, including a β-glucuronidase operon, a S-fimbrial operon, and cell surface related genes, which strongly suggests niche specialization of this subpopulation. An additional set of 123 isolates was assigned to clades A and B by using qPCR assays targeting subpopulation-specific SNPs and genes of interest. Among 98 serovars examined, approximately 20% belonged to clade B. All clade B isolates contained two pathogenicity related genomic islands, SPI-18 and a cytolethal distending toxin islet; a combination of these two islands was previously thought to be exclusive to serovars Typhi and Paratyphi A. Presence of β-glucuronidase in clade B isolates specifically suggests an adaptation of this clade to the vertebrate gastrointestinal environment. Conclusions S. enterica subsp. enterica consists of at least two subpopulations that differ specifically in genes involved in host and tissue tropism, utilization of host specific carbon and nitrogen sources and are therefore likely to differ in ecology and transmission characteristics.

  20. Factores Gre de Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, su papel en el control de la filosofía y patogenicidad

    OpenAIRE

    Gaviria Cantín, Tania Cristina

    2016-01-01

    [spa] El género Salmonella, está compuesto de bacterias Gram-negativas, no esporuladas, en forma de bacilo. Salmonella tiene importante relevancia a nivel de salud pública ya que es uno de los principales patógenos entéricos tanto en países desarrollados como en vías de desarrollo. En los casos de gastroenteritis notificados en España, Salmonella se posiciona en segundo lugar, después de Campylobacter. En este trabajo se utilizó como organismo modelo de estudio S. enterica serovar Typhimurium...

  1. The Type III Secretion System Effector SptP of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Rebecca; Byrne, Alexander; Berger, Cedric N; Klemm, Elizabeth; Crepin, Valerie F; Dougan, Gordon; Frankel, Gad

    2017-02-15

    Strains of the various Salmonella enterica serovars cause gastroenteritis or typhoid fever in humans, with virulence depending on the action of two type III secretion systems (Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 [SPI-1] and SPI-2). SptP is a Salmonella SPI-1 effector, involved in mediating recovery of the host cytoskeleton postinfection. SptP requires a chaperone, SicP, for stability and secretion. SptP has 94% identity between S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and S Typhi; direct comparison of the protein sequences revealed that S Typhi SptP has numerous amino acid changes within its chaperone-binding domain. Subsequent comparison of ΔsptP S Typhi and S. Typhimurium strains demonstrated that, unlike SptP in S. Typhimurium, SptP in S Typhi was not involved in invasion or cytoskeletal recovery postinfection. Investigation of whether the observed amino acid changes within SptP of S Typhi affected its function revealed that S Typhi SptP was unable to complement S. Typhimurium ΔsptP due to an absence of secretion. We further demonstrated that while S. Typhimurium SptP is stable intracellularly within S Typhi, S Typhi SptP is unstable, although stability could be recovered following replacement of the chaperone-binding domain with that of S. Typhimurium. Direct assessment of the strength of the interaction between SptP and SicP of both serovars via bacterial two-hybrid analysis demonstrated that S Typhi SptP has a significantly weaker interaction with SicP than the equivalent proteins in S. Typhimurium. Taken together, our results suggest that changes within the chaperone-binding domain of SptP in S Typhi hinder binding to its chaperone, resulting in instability, preventing translocation, and therefore restricting the intracellular activity of this effector.

  2. Chronic proliferative rhinitis associated with Salmonella enterica subspecies diarizonae serovar 61:k:1, 5, (7) in sheep in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacasta, D; Ferrer, L M; Ramos, J J; Bueso, J P; Borobia, M; Ruiz de Arcaute, M; Figueras, L; González-Sainz, J M; De Las Heras, M

    2012-11-01

    A chronic proliferative rhinitis in sheep associated with Salmonella enterica subspecies diarizonae serovar 61:k:1, 5, (7) is described. Ten adult sheep from eight traditionally managed Rasa Aragonesa flocks located in Aragon (Spain) were studied. Clinical signs began with bilateral thick mucus nasal discharge, wheezing and snoring and progressed to partial or complete obstruction of the nostrils. Necropsy examination revealed swollen ventral nasal turbinates with a roughened mucosal surface partially covered by small polyps. Histopathology revealed chronic proliferative rhinitis with a predominant population of neutrophils that infiltrated the mucosal epithelium. Plasma cells and macrophages were present in the lamina propria. Organisms expressing Salmonella antigen immunohistochemically were detected within epithelial cells. Salmonella enterica subspecies diarizonae serovar 61:k:1, 5, (7) was isolated as a sole microorganism from nasal swabs taken from five animals. The implication of finding this bacterium in various diseases in sheep and its role as a potential zoonosis are discussed.

  3. Isolation of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Paratyphi B dT+, or Salmonella Java, from Indonesia and alteration of the d-tartrate fermentation phenotype by disrupting the ORF STM 3356.

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    Han, Kyung Ho; Choi, Seon Young; Lee, Je Hee; Lee, Hyejon; Shin, Eun Hee; Agtini, Magdarina D; von Seidlein, Lorenz; Ochiai, R Leon; Clemens, John D; Wain, John; Hahn, Ji-Sook; Lee, Bok Kwon; Song, Manki; Chun, Jongsik; Kim, Dong Wook

    2006-12-01

    Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Paratyphi B [O1,4,(5),12 : Hb : 1,2] can cause either an enteric fever (paratyphoid fever) or self-limiting gastroenteritis in humans. The d-tartrate non-fermenting variant S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Paratyphi B dT- (S. Paratyphi B) is the causative agent of paratyphoid fever, and the d-tartrate fermenting variant S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Paratyphi B dT+ (S. Paratyphi B dT+; formerly called Salmonella Java) causes gastroenteritis. S. Java is currently recognized as an emerging problem worldwide. Twelve dT+ S. Java isolates were collected in Indonesia between 2000 and 2002. One-third of them contained Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1), which gives the multidrug-resistant phenotype to the bacteria. In this study, a PCR-based method to detect a single nucleotide difference responsible for the inability to ferment d-tartrate, reported elsewhere, was validated. The d-tartrate fermenting phenotype of S. Java was converted to the non-fermenting phenotype by the disruption of the ORF STM 3356, and the d-tartrate non-fermenting phenotype of the ORF STM 3356-disrupted strain and the dT- reference strain was changed to the dT+ phenotype by complementing ORF STM 3356 in trans. The results show that the dT+ phenotype requires a functional product encoded by STM 3356, and support the use of the PCR-based discrimination method for S. Paratyphi B and S. Java as the standard differentiation method.

  4. Antimicrobial Resistance and Molecular Investigation of H2S-Negative Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Choleraesuis Isolates in China.

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    Jing Xie

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Choleraesuis is a highly invasive pathogen of swine that frequently causes serious outbreaks, in particular in Asia, and can also cause severe invasive disease in humans. In this study, 21 S. Choleraesuis isolates, detected from 21 patients with diarrhea in China between 2010 and 2011, were found to include 19 H2S-negative S. Choleraesuis isolates and two H2S-positive isolates. This is the first report of H2S-negative S. Choleraesuis isolated from humans. The majority of H2S-negative isolates exhibited high resistance to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, gentamicin, tetracycline, ticarcillin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, but only six isolates were resistant to norfloxacin. In contrast, all of the isolates were sensitive to cephalosporins. Fifteen isolates were found to be multidrug resistant. In norfloxacin-resistant isolates, we detected mutations in the gyrA and parC genes and identified two new mutations in the parC gene. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE, multilocus sequence typing (MLST, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR analysis were employed to investigate the genetic relatedness of H2S-negative and H2S-positive S. Choleraesuis isolates. PFGE revealed two groups, with all 19 H2S-negative S. Choleraesuis isolates belonging to Group I and H2S-positive isolates belonging to Group II. By MLST analysis, the H2S-negative isolates were all found to belong to ST68 and H2S-positive isolates belong to ST145. By CRISPR analysis, no significant differences in CRISPR 1 were detected; however, one H2S-negative isolate was found to contain three new spacers in CRISPR 2. All 19 H2S-negative isolates also possessed a frame-shift mutation at position 760 of phsA gene compared with H2S-positive isolates, which may be responsible for the H2S-negative phenotype. Moreover, the 19 H2S-negative isolates have similar PFGE patterns and same mutation site in the phsA gene, these

  5. Antimicrobial Resistance and Molecular Investigation of H2S-Negative Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Choleraesuis Isolates in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jing; Yi, Shengjie; Zhu, Jiangong; Li, Peng; Liang, Beibei; Li, Hao; Yang, Xiaoxia; Wang, Ligui; Hao, Rongzhang; Jia, Leili; Wu, Zhihao; Qiu, Shaofu; Song, Hongbin

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Choleraesuis is a highly invasive pathogen of swine that frequently causes serious outbreaks, in particular in Asia, and can also cause severe invasive disease in humans. In this study, 21 S. Choleraesuis isolates, detected from 21 patients with diarrhea in China between 2010 and 2011, were found to include 19 H2S-negative S. Choleraesuis isolates and two H2S-positive isolates. This is the first report of H2S-negative S. Choleraesuis isolated from humans. The majority of H2S-negative isolates exhibited high resistance to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, gentamicin, tetracycline, ticarcillin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, but only six isolates were resistant to norfloxacin. In contrast, all of the isolates were sensitive to cephalosporins. Fifteen isolates were found to be multidrug resistant. In norfloxacin-resistant isolates, we detected mutations in the gyrA and parC genes and identified two new mutations in the parC gene. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) analysis were employed to investigate the genetic relatedness of H2S-negative and H2S-positive S. Choleraesuis isolates. PFGE revealed two groups, with all 19 H2S-negative S. Choleraesuis isolates belonging to Group I and H2S-positive isolates belonging to Group II. By MLST analysis, the H2S-negative isolates were all found to belong to ST68 and H2S-positive isolates belong to ST145. By CRISPR analysis, no significant differences in CRISPR 1 were detected; however, one H2S-negative isolate was found to contain three new spacers in CRISPR 2. All 19 H2S-negative isolates also possessed a frame-shift mutation at position 760 of phsA gene compared with H2S-positive isolates, which may be responsible for the H2S-negative phenotype. Moreover, the 19 H2S-negative isolates have similar PFGE patterns and same mutation site in the phsA gene, these results indicated

  6. An oral recombinant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium mutant elicits systemic antigen-specific CD8+ T cell cytokine responses in mice

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    Chin'ombe Nyasha

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The induction of antigen-specific CD8+ T cell cytokine responses against an attenuated, oral recombinant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium vaccine expressing a green fluorescent protein (GFP model antigen was investigated. A GFP expression plasmid was constructed in which the gfp gene was fused in-frame with the 5' domain of the Escherichia coli β-galactosidase α-gene fragment with expression under the lac promoter. Groups of mice were orally immunized three times with the bacteria and systemic CD8+ T cell cytokine responses were evaluated. Results High level of the GFP model antigen was expressed by the recombinant Salmonella vaccine vector. Systemic GFP-specific CD8+ T cell cytokine (IFN-γ and IL-4 immune responses were detected after mice were orally vaccinated with the bacteria. It was shown that 226 net IFN-γ and 132 net IL-4 GFP-specific SFUs/10e6 splenocytes were formed in an ELISPOT assay. The level of IFN-γ produced by GFP peptide-stimulated cells was 65.2-fold above background (p Conclusion These results suggested that a high expressing recombinant Salmonella vaccine given orally to mice would elicit antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses in the spleen. Salmonella bacteria may, therefore, be used as potential mucosal vaccine vectors.

  7. Prevención de la infección por Salmonella enterica subespecie enterica serotipo Enteritidis (Salmonella Enteritidis en pollos mediante un bacteriófago Prevention of Salmonella enterica subspecie enterica serotype Enteritidis (Salmonella Enteritidis infection in chickens using a bacteriophage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Borie

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Las infecciones por Salmonella Enteritidis son una causa importante de enfermedades transmitidas por alimentos, epidemiológicamente asociada al consumo de productos derivados de las aves. Ya que el tratamiento con antimicrobianos causa la aparición de cepas multirresistentes, los fagos pueden ser usados como método alternativo para controlar S. Enteritidis en la industria avícola. El propósito de este trabajo fue evaluar el efecto del bacteriófago f3αSE sobre la incidencia de S. Enteritidis en pollos. Se formaron 5 grupos de 15 pollos broiler de 10 días de edad; los grupos experimentales A y B recibieron vía oral 1 ml del fago, conteniendo 10(6 y 10(7 UFP/dosis, respectivamente. Dos horas después, las aves fueron desafiadas con 1 mi de S. Enteritidis (4 x 10(6 UFC/dosis. El grupo C sólo recibió fagos (10(7 UFP/dosis y el grupo D sólo S. Enteritidis (4 x 10(6 UFC/dosis; el grupo E no recibió tratamiento y constituyó el grupo control sano. Diez días postinfección, los pollos recibieron eutanasia por inhalación de gas, obteniéndose por cada ave muestras de intestino y órganos para el reaislamiento de la cepa desafío y del fago. La incidencia de infección por S. Enteritidis se redujo en el grupo que recibió 10(7 UFP/dosis (p = 0,028 (7/15 aves del bacteriófago, no así en el grupo que recibió la dosis de 10(6 UFP (p = 0,061 (8/15 aves. La disminución de la incidencia de 5. Enteritidis en pollos, lograda mediante el fago f3αSE, permite considerarlo como una posible alternativa al uso de antimicrobianos en el control de Salmonella.Infections caused by Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serotype Enteritidis (Salmonella Enteritidis are an important cause of foodborne diseases, epidemiologically associated with the consumption of poultry products. Since antibiotic treatments cause the appearance of multiresistant strains, phages can be used as an alternative method for controlling S. Enteritidis in the poultry industry

  8. Haloarchaeal gas vesicle nanoparticles displaying Salmonella SopB antigen reduce bacterial burden when administered with live attenuated bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DasSarma, Priya; Negi, Vidya Devi; Balakrishnan, Arjun; Karan, Ram; Barnes, Susan; Ekulona, Folasade; Chakravortty, Dipshikha; DasSarma, Shiladitya

    2014-07-31

    Innovative vaccines against typhoid and other Salmonella diseases that are safe, effective, and inexpensive are urgently needed. In order to address this need, buoyant, self-adjuvating gas vesicle nanoparticles (GVNPs) from the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 were bioengineered to display the highly conserved Salmonella enterica antigen SopB, a secreted inosine phosphate effector protein injected by pathogenic bacteria during infection into the host cell. Two highly conserved sopB gene segments near the 3'-coding region, named sopB4 and B5, were each fused to the gvpC gene, and resulting GVNPs were purified by centrifugally accelerated flotation. Display of SopB4 and B5 antigenic epitopes on GVNPs was established by Western blotting analysis using antisera raised against short synthetic peptides of SopB. Immunostimulatory activities of the SopB4 and B5 nanoparticles were tested by intraperitoneal administration of recombinant GVNPs to BALB/c mice which had been immunized with S. enterica serovar Typhimurium 14028 ΔpmrG-HM-D (DV-STM-07), a live attenuated vaccine strain. Proinflammatory cytokines IFN-γ, IL-2, and IL-9 were significantly induced in mice boosted with SopB5-GVNPs, consistent with a robust Th1 response. After challenge with virulent S. enterica serovar Typhimurium 14028, bacterial burden was found to be diminished in spleen of mice boosted with SopB4-GVNPs and absent or significantly diminished in liver, mesenteric lymph node, and spleen of mice boosted with SopB5-GVNPs, indicating that the C-terminal portions of SopB displayed on GVNPs elicit a protective response to Salmonella infection in mice. SopB antigen-GVNPs were found to be stable at elevated temperatures for extended periods without refrigeration in Halobacterium cells. The results all together show that bioengineered GVNPs are likely to represent a valuable platform for the development of improved vaccines against Salmonella diseases.

  9. Differential Killing of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi by Antibodies Targeting Vi and Lipopolysaccharide O:9 Antigen.

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    Peter J Hart

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi expresses a capsule of Vi polysaccharide, while most Salmonella serovars, including S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium, do not. Both S. Typhi and S. Enteritidis express the lipopolysaccharide O:9 antigen, yet there is little evidence of cross-protection from anti-O:9 antibodies. Vaccines based on Vi polysaccharide have efficacy against typhoid fever, indicating that antibodies against Vi confer protection. Here we investigate the role of Vi capsule and antibodies against Vi and O:9 in antibody-dependent complement- and phagocyte-mediated killing of Salmonella. Using isogenic Vi-expressing and non-Vi-expressing derivatives of S. Typhi and S. Typhimurium, we show that S. Typhi is inherently more sensitive to serum and blood than S. Typhimurium. Vi expression confers increased resistance to both complement- and phagocyte-mediated modalities of antibody-dependent killing in human blood. The Vi capsule is associated with reduced C3 and C5b-9 deposition, and decreased overall antibody binding to S. Typhi. However, purified human anti-Vi antibodies in the presence of complement are able to kill Vi-expressing Salmonella, while killing by anti-O:9 antibodies is inversely related to Vi expression. Human serum depleted of antibodies to antigens other than Vi retains the ability to kill Vi-expressing bacteria. Our findings support a protective role for Vi capsule in preventing complement and phagocyte killing of Salmonella that can be overcome by specific anti-Vi antibodies, but only to a limited extent by anti-O:9 antibodies.

  10. Differential Killing of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi by Antibodies Targeting Vi and Lipopolysaccharide O:9 Antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Peter J; O'Shaughnessy, Colette M; Siggins, Matthew K; Bobat, Saeeda; Kingsley, Robert A; Goulding, David A; Crump, John A; Reyburn, Hugh; Micoli, Francesca; Dougan, Gordon; Cunningham, Adam F; MacLennan, Calman A

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi expresses a capsule of Vi polysaccharide, while most Salmonella serovars, including S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium, do not. Both S. Typhi and S. Enteritidis express the lipopolysaccharide O:9 antigen, yet there is little evidence of cross-protection from anti-O:9 antibodies. Vaccines based on Vi polysaccharide have efficacy against typhoid fever, indicating that antibodies against Vi confer protection. Here we investigate the role of Vi capsule and antibodies against Vi and O:9 in antibody-dependent complement- and phagocyte-mediated killing of Salmonella. Using isogenic Vi-expressing and non-Vi-expressing derivatives of S. Typhi and S. Typhimurium, we show that S. Typhi is inherently more sensitive to serum and blood than S. Typhimurium. Vi expression confers increased resistance to both complement- and phagocyte-mediated modalities of antibody-dependent killing in human blood. The Vi capsule is associated with reduced C3 and C5b-9 deposition, and decreased overall antibody binding to S. Typhi. However, purified human anti-Vi antibodies in the presence of complement are able to kill Vi-expressing Salmonella, while killing by anti-O:9 antibodies is inversely related to Vi expression. Human serum depleted of antibodies to antigens other than Vi retains the ability to kill Vi-expressing bacteria. Our findings support a protective role for Vi capsule in preventing complement and phagocyte killing of Salmonella that can be overcome by specific anti-Vi antibodies, but only to a limited extent by anti-O:9 antibodies.

  11. Expression of STM4467-encoded arginine deiminase controlled by the STM4463 regulator contributes to Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Younho; Choi, Jeongjoon; Groisman, Eduardo A; Kang, Dong-Hyun; Shin, Dongwoo; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2012-12-01

    Arginine deiminase (ADI), carbamate kinase (CK), and ornithine transcarbamoylase (OTC) constitute the ADI system. In addition to metabolic functions, the ADI system has been implicated in the virulence of certain pathogens. The pathogenic intracellular bacterium Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium possesses the STM4467, STM4466, and STM4465 genes, which are predicted to encode ADI, CK, and OTC, respectively. Here we report that the STM4467 gene encodes an ADI and that ADI activity plays a role in the successful infection of a mammalian host by S. Typhimurium. An STM4467 deletion mutant was defective for replication inside murine macrophages and was attenuated for virulence in mice. We determined that a regulatory protein encoded by the STM4463 gene functions as an activator for STM4467 expression. The expression of the ADI pathway genes was enhanced inside macrophages in a process that required STM4463. Lack of STM4463 impaired the ability of S. Typhimurium to replicate within macrophages. A mutant defective in STM4467-encoded ADI displayed normal production of nitric oxide by macrophages.

  12. Prevalence of enterobacteriaceae in Tupinambis merianae (Squamata: Teiidae from a captive facility in Central Brazil, with a profile of antimicrobial drug resistance in Salmonella enterica

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    Andréa de Moraes Carvalho

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports the presence of enterobacteriaceae in Tegu Lizards (Tupinambis merianaefrom a captive facility in central Brazil. From a total of 30 animals, 10 juveniles and 20 adults (10 males, 10 females, 60 samples were collected, in two periods separated by 15 days. The samples were cultivated in Xylose-lysine-deoxycholate agar (XLT4 and MacConkey agar. The Salmonella enterica were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility. A total of 78 bacteria was isolated, of wich 27 were from juveniles of T. merianae, 30 from adult males and 21 from adult females. Salmonella enterica was the most frequent bacteria followed by Citrobacter freundii, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter sakasakii, Kluivera sp., Citrobacter amalonaticus, Serratia marcescens, Citrobacter diversus, Yersinia frederiksenii, Serratia odorifera, and Serratia liquefaciens. Salmonella enterica subsp. diarizonae and houtenae showed resistance to cotrimoxazole, and serum Salmonella enterica Worthington showed resistance to tetracycline and gentamicin. Salmonella enterica Panama and S. enterica subsp. diarizonae showed intermediate sensitivity to cotrimoxazole. In addition to Enterobacteriaceae in the Tegu lizard, pathogenic serotypes of S. enterica also occur, and their antimicrobial resistance was confirmed.

  13. Curcumin increases the pathogenicity of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in murine model.

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    Sandhya A Marathe

    Full Text Available Curcumin has gained immense importance for its vast therapeutic and prophylactic applications. Contrary to this, our study reveals that it regulates the defense pathways of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium to enhance its pathogenicity. In a murine model of typhoid fever, we observed higher bacterial load in Peyer's patches, mesenteric lymph node, spleen and liver, when infected with curcumin-treated Salmonella. Curcumin increased the resistance of S. Typhimurium against antimicrobial agents like antimicrobial peptides, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. This increased tolerance might be attributed to the up-regulation of genes involved in resistance against antimicrobial peptides--pmrD and pmrHFIJKLM and genes with antioxidant function--mntH, sodA and sitA. We implicate that iron chelation property of curcumin have a role in regulating mntH and sitA. Interestingly, we see that the curcumin-mediated modulation of pmr genes is through the PhoPQ regulatory system. Curcumin downregulates SPI1 genes, required for entry into epithelial cells and upregulates SPI2 genes required to intracellular survival. Since it is known that the SPI1 and SPI2 system can be regulated by the PhoPQ system, this common regulator could explain curcumin's mode of action. This data urges us to rethink the indiscriminate use of curcumin especially during Salmonella outbreaks.

  14. Ceftiofur Resistance in Salmonella enterica Serovar Heidelberg from Chicken Meat and Humans, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Rebecca; Finley, Rita; Ng, Lai King; Avery, Brent; Boerlin, Patrick; Bourgault, Anne-Marie; Cole, Linda; Daignault, Danielle; Desruisseau, Andrea; Demczuk, Walter; Hoang, Linda; Horsman, Greg B.; Ismail, Johanne; Jamieson, Frances; Maki, Anne; Pacagnella, Ana; Pillai, Dylan R.

    2010-01-01

    The Canadian Integrated Program for Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance describes a strong correlation (r = 0.9, p<0.0001) between ceftiofur-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg isolated from retail chicken and incidence of ceftiofur-resistant Salmonella serovar Heidelberg infections in humans across Canada. In Québec, changes of ceftiofur resistance in chicken Salmonella Heidelberg and Escherichia coli isolates appear related to changing levels of ceftiofur use in hatcheries during the study period, from highest to lowest levels before and after a voluntary withdrawal, to increasing levels after reintroduction of use (62% to 7% to 20%, and 34% to 6% to 19%, respectively). These events provide evidence that ceftiofur use in chickens results in extended-spectrum cephalosporin resistance in bacteria from chicken and humans. To ensure the continued effectiveness of extended-spectrum cephalosporins for treating serious infections in humans, multidisciplinary efforts are needed to scrutinize and, where appropriate, limit use of ceftiofur in chicken production in Canada. PMID:20031042

  15. Evaluation of nisin-β-lactam antibiotics against clinical strains of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rishi, Praveen; Preet Singh, Aman; Garg, Neha; Rishi, Madhuri

    2014-12-01

    There is an imperative need to discover novel antimicrobials and anti-infective agents and build up innovative strategies to combat multidrug-resistant Salmonella. In this context, we had earlier confirmed that nisin has the potential to act in conjunction with β-lactams against murine salmonellosis using standard strain. However, evaluation of efficacy of these combinations against clinical isolates of Salmonella could be the next key step to confirm the value added potential of this peptide. The present study was therefore planned to validate the synergistic effects of nisin-β-lactams combinations against clinical isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi. MICs of the selected β-lactams, EDTA and nisin were determined by micro and macro broth dilution assays. In-vitro synergism between the agents was evaluated by fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) index (checkerboard test) and time-kill assay. All the tested combinations showed synergy against the tested clinical strains except three, as evident by FIC index (checkerboard test) and time-kill assay. Especially, nisin-ceftriaxone and nisin-cefotaxime combinations demonstrated excellent synergistic activity. In view of the encouraging results obtained from the previous and present study, further studies need to be carried out using large number of strains from different regions to take into account the clinical variability of the strains. Though it is a simple study but highlights an important point about the possibility of using the said combination while making strategies to develop newer formulations.

  16. Antimicrobial activity of different copper alloy surfaces against copper resistant and sensitive Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Libin; Elguindi, Jutta; Rensing, Christopher; Ravishankar, Sadhana

    2012-05-01

    Copper has shown antibacterial effects against foodborne pathogens. The objective of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of copper surfaces on copper resistant and sensitive strains of Salmonella enterica. Six different copper alloy coupons (60-99.9% copper) were tested along with stainless steel as the control. The coupons were surface inoculated with either S. Enteritidis or one of the 3 copper resistant strains, S. Typhimurium S9, S19 and S20; stored under various incubation conditions at room temperature; and sampled at various times up to 2 h. The results showed that under dry incubation conditions, Salmonella only survived 10-15 min on high copper content alloys. Salmonella on low copper content alloys showed 3-4 log reductions. Under moist incubation conditions, no survivors were detected after 30 min-2 h on high copper content alloys, while the cell counts decreased 2-4 logs on low copper content coupons. Although the copper resistant strains survived better than S. Enteritidis, they were either completely inactivated or survival was decreased. Copper coupons showed better antimicrobial efficacy in the absence of organic compounds. These results clearly show the antibacterial effects of copper and its potential as an alternative to stainless steel for selected food contact surfaces.

  17. Development of ceftriaxone resistance affects the virulence properties of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Yang, Yu-Rong; Liao, Xiao-Ping; Lei, Chun-Yin; Sun, Jian; Li, Lu-Lu; Liu, Bao-Tao; Yang, Shou-Shen; Liu, Ya-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Development of antibiotic resistance may alter the virulence properties of bacterial organisms. In this study, nine clinical ceftriaxone-susceptible Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium strains were subjected to stepwise selection with increasing concentrations of ceftriaxone in culture media. Mutations in virulence-associated genes and antibiotic efflux genes were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing. The expression levels of virulence genes invA and stn as well as efflux pump genes tolC, arcA, and arcB before and after the selection were measured by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The stepwise selection resulted in the development of Salmonella strains that were highly resistant to ceftriaxone. Sequence analysis did not reveal any mutations or deletions in the examined virulence genes and regulatory gene, but a silent mutation (T423C) in acrR (encoding a repressor for the efflux pump) was detected in most of the ceftriaxone-resistant strains. The qRT-PCR revealed increased expression of the AcrAB-TolC efflux pump and decreased expression of invA and stn in the ceftriaxone-resistant strains. Moreover, decreased invasion into cultured epithelial cells and reduced growth rates were observed with the resistant strains. These results suggest that acquisition of ceftriaxone resistance is associated with the overexpression of the AcrAB-TolC efflux pump and leads to reduced virulence in Salmonella Typhimurium.

  18. The role of litter beetles as potential reservoir for Salmonella enterica and thermophilic Campylobacter spp. between broiler flocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, M.N.; Spencer, A.G.; Hald, Birthe

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated the role of beetles infesting broiler chicken rearing facilities as potential reservoirs for Salmonella enterica infections between successive broiler flocks. In addition, their role as potential reservoirs for thermophilic Campylobacter spp. was also investigated. Fourteen broiler...... houses located at 11 different farms were included in the study. The houses were nonrandomly selected on the basis of their salmonella status; nine were persistently contaminated with salmonella whereas five were salmonella negative. For each broiler house, two consecutive broiler flocks (i.e., 28...... broiler flocks in all) as well as beetles collected during both rotations of production and in the empty period (after cleaning and disinfection) between these flocks were monitored for the presence of salmonella. Examinations for the presence of campylobacter in the same sample materials were also...

  19. Role of RpoS in fine-tuning the synthesis of Vi capsular polysaccharide in Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santander, Javier; Wanda, Soo-Young; Nickerson, Cheryl A; Curtiss, Roy

    2007-03-01

    Regulation of the synthesis of Vi polysaccharide, a major virulence determinant in Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi, is under the control of two regulatory systems, ompR-envZ and rscB-rscC, which respond to changes in osmolarity. Some serotype Typhi strains exhibit overexpression of Vi polysaccharide, which masks clinical detection of lipopolysaccharide O antigen. This variation in Vi polysaccharide and O antigen display (VW variation) has been observed since the initial studies of serotype Typhi. In this study, we report that rpoS plays a role in this increased expression in Vi polysaccharide. We constructed a variety of isogenic serotype Typhi mutants that differed in their expression levels of RpoS and examined the role of the rpoS product in synthesis of Vi polysaccharide under different osmolarity conditions. Vi polysaccharide synthesis was also examined in serotype Typhi mutants in which the native promoter of the rpoS was replaced by an araCP(BAD) cassette, so that the expression of rpoS was arabinose dependent. The RpoS(-) strains showed increased syntheses of Vi polysaccharide, which at low and medium osmolarities masked O antigen detection. In contrast, RpoS(+) strains showed lower syntheses of Vi polysaccharide, and an increased detection of O antigen was observed. During exponential growth, when rpoS is unstable or present at low levels, serotype Typhi RpoS(+) strains overexpress the Vi polysaccharide at levels comparable to those for RpoS(-) strains. Our results show that RpoS is another regulator of Vi polysaccharide synthesis and contributes to VW variation in serotype Typhi, which has implications for the development of recombinant attenuated Salmonella vaccines in humans.

  20. Antimicrobial susceptibility profile, treatment outcome and serotype distribution of clinical isolates of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica: a 2-year study from Kerala, South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harichandran D

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Deepa Harichandran, Kavitha Radhakrishnan Dinesh Department of Microbiology, Amrita School of Medicine, Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham University, Kochi, Kerala, India Background/purpose: Typhoid and paratyphoid fever continue to be important causes of illness and death in parts of Asia, being associated with poor sanitation and consumption of unsafe food and water. Antimicrobial resistance has emerged to traditional first-line drugs, namely, the fluoroquinolones, as well as to third-generation cephalosporins, posing challenges to treatment. Azithromycin has proven to be an effective alternative for treatment of uncomplicated typhoid fever. The purpose of this study was to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility, clinical outcome and serotype distribution pattern of clinical isolates belonging to Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica. Methodology: All clinical isolates of S. enterica obtained from blood, sterile body fluids, as well as stool and urine samples at Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre, Kerala, India, between August 2011 and July 2013 were included in the study and processed based on standard microbiology protocols. Results: A total of 118 isolates of Salmonella were obtained during the study period. Out of these, 79 were of S. Typhi (66.95%, followed by isolates of S. Paratyphi A (22; 18.64% and S. Typhimurium 12 (10.17%. Five isolates could not be identified further. There was 100% susceptibility to ceftriaxone in all S. enterica subspecies. Ciprofloxacin susceptibility was 32.91% for S. Typhi and 40.90% for S. Paratyphi A as determined by the disk diffusion method. The susceptibility profile of S. Typhi isolates to different antimicrobials was as follows: chloramphenicol (94.93%, ampicillin (77.21%, cotrimoxazole (75.94% and azithromycin (78.48%. For S. Typhi, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of ciprofloxacin required to inhibit the growth

  1. Construcción de mutantes de Salmonella enterica por inactivación de los genes invG/invE y ssaJ/ssaK de las islas de patogenicidad 1 y 2

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    Judith Velasco

    2010-10-01

    To understand the genetic basis of Salmonella pathogenicity mechanisms, various methods have been described to manipulate and generate mutant genomic DNA with specific characteristics. In this study we report the construction of mutants from several serotypes of S. enterica, substitution and inactivation of genes invG/invE in SPI-1 gene and ssaJ/ssaK in SPI-2 by the technique of phage λ Red recombinase, as described by Datsenko and Wanner (2000. The gene deletion in SPI-1 and SPI-2 encodes proteins involved in the formation of type III secretion systems responsible for the invasion and intracellular survival of S. enterica in the host cells. The results of this work will allow in vivo studies to evaluate the possible attenuation of virulence of the mutant strains, as well as to provide new insights into the genetic mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of diseases caused by these bacteria. Moreover, this technique is recommended to efficiently generate mutants of different serotypes of S. enterica in order to study the chromosomal genes and their products. Key words: red recombinasa, mutation, pathogenicity islands, Salmonella enterica.

  2. Comparison of a PCR serotyping assay, Check&Trace assay for Salmonella, and Luminex Salmonella serotyping assay for the characterization of Salmonella enterica identified from fresh and naturally contaminated cilantro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean-Gilles Beaubrun, J; Ewing, L; Jarvis, K; Dudley, K; Grim, C; Gopinath, G; Flamer, M-L; Auguste, W; Jayaram, A; Elmore, J; Lamont, M; McGrath, T; Hanes, D E

    2014-09-01

    Salmonella enterica isolated from fresh cilantro samples collected through the USDA/AMS Microbiological Data Program (MDP) were used to compare a PCR serotyping assay against the Check&Trace assay and the Luminex (BioPlex) Salmonella serotyping assay. The study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the three methods for serotyping Salmonella from both enrichment broth cultures and pure Salmonella cultures. In this investigation, Salmonella spp. serotyping was conducted using 24 h enrichment broth cultures and pure Salmonella cultures from cilantro samples, with the PCR serotyping assay. Conversely, the Check&Trace and Luminex for Salmonella assays required pure cultures for Salmonella serotyping. The cilantro samples contained S. enterica serovar Montevideo, Newport, Saintpaul, and Tennessee, identified by the PCR serotyping assay and Check&Trace for Salmonella, but the Luminex assay only identified two of the four serotypes of the cilantro samples. The anticipated impact from this study is that the PCR serotyping assay provides a time- and cost-effective means for screening, identifying and serotyping Salmonella using DNA extracted from 24 h enrichment cilantro samples.

  3. Development of stable reporter system cloning luxCDABE genes into chromosome of Salmonella enterica serotypes using Tn7 transposon

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    Lawrence Mark L

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonellosis may be a food safety problem when raw food products are mishandled and not fully cooked. In previous work, we developed bioluminescent Salmonella enterica serotypes using a plasmid-based reporting system that can be used for real-time monitoring of the pathogen's growth on food products in short term studies. In this study, we report the use of a Tn7-based transposon system for subcloning of luxCDABE genes into the chromosome of eleven Salmonella enterica serotypes isolated from the broiler production continuum. Results We found that the lux operon is constitutively expressed from the chromosome post-transposition and the lux cassette is stable without external pressure, i.e. antibiotic selection, for all Salmonella enterica serotypes used. Bioluminescence expression is based on an active electron transport chain and is directly related with metabolic activity. This relationship was quantified by measuring bioluminescence against a temperature gradient in aqueous solution using a luminometer. In addition, bioluminescent monitoring of two serotypes confirmed that our chicken skin model has the potential to be used to evaluate pathogen mitigation strategies. Conclusions This study demonstrated that our new stable reporting system eliminates bioluminescence variation due to plasmid instability and provides a reliable real-time experimental system to study application of preventive measures for Salmonella on food products in real-time for both short and long term studies.

  4. Higher Storage Temperature Causes Greater Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Internal Penetration of Artificially Contaminated, Commercially Available, Washed Free Range Eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiley, Alice; Fallowfield, Howard; Ross, Kirstin; McEvoy, Vanessa; Whiley, Harriet

    2016-07-01

    Foodborne salmonellosis is a major public health concern, with contaminated eggs identified as a significant source of infection. In Australia, the most prevalent cause of salmonellosis from eggs is Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium. This study explored the effect of temperature after 1, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days of storage on commercially available washed free range eggs, artificially contaminated with Salmonella Typhimurium on the external surface. At each time point, the external surface of the egg, the crushed eggshell, and the internal egg yolk and albumen were analyzed for Salmonella. After 28 days of storage, 25% of eggs stored at 4°C, 50% of eggs stored at 14°C, and 100% of eggs stored at 23 and 35°C were internally contaminated with Salmonella. After 1 day of storage, more than 50% of all eggs had Salmonella present in the crushed shell after the external surface had been disinfected with ethanol. This is the first study to demonstrate that refrigeration reduced the potential for Salmonella Typhimurium to penetrate the eggshell membrane and internally contaminate table eggs commercially available in Australia. It also suggests that the processes of cracking eggs may be a source of cross-contamination within the kitchen.

  5. Osteomyelitis due to Salmonella enterica subsp. arizonae: the price of exotic pets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolker, S; Itsekzon, T; Yinnon, A M; Lachish, T

    2012-02-01

    We describe a 31-year-old immunocompromised patient who developed sepsis and osteomyelitis due to Salmonella enterica subsp. arizonae secondary to exposure to iguana and snakes kept as pets at her home, and review all 23 previously published cases of bone and joint infections due to this organism, for a total of nine children and 15 adults. Eleven of the adults were female (73%), compared with three (33%) of the children (p child only (17%) (p child only (11%, p <0.01). Antibiotic therapy was prolonged in both adults and children, and in most cases consisted of 4-6 weeks of parenteral treatment. Complete cure and survival was attained in 11 of 15 adults (73%) and all nine children (NS). Optimal antibiotic treatment probably consists of ceftriaxone or a fluoroquinolone, if the organism is susceptible.

  6. Development and validation of a resistance and virulence gene microarray targeting Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Margaret A.; Lim, Ji Youn; Soyer, Yesim; Harbottle, Heather; Chang, Yung-Fu; New, Daniel; Orfe, Lisa H.; Besser, Thomas E.; Call, Douglas R.

    2010-01-01

    A microarray was developed to simultaneously screen Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica for multiple genetic traits. The final array included 203 60-mer oligonucleotide probes, including 117 for resistance genes, 16 for virulence genes, 25 for replicon markers, and 45 other markers. Validity of the array was tested by assessing interlaboratory agreement among four collaborating groups using a blinded study design. Internal validation indicated that the assay was reliable (area under the receiver-operator characteristic curve=0.97). Inter-laboratory agreement, however, was poor when estimated using the intraclass correlation coefficient, which ranged from 0.27 (95% confidence interval 0.24, 0.29) to 0.29 (0.23, 0.34). These findings suggest that extensive testing and procedure standardization will be needed before bacterial genotyping arrays can be readily shared between laboratories. PMID:20362014

  7. An optimized affordable DNA-extraction method from Salmonella enterica Enteritidis for PCR experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karimnasab, N.,

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In diagnostic and research bacteriology settings with budget and staff restrictions, fast and cost-effective genome extraction methods are desirable. If not inactivated properly, cellular and/or environmental DNA nucleases will degrade genomic material during the extraction stage, and therefore might give rise to incorrect results in PCR experiments. When crude cell extracts, proteinase K–treated templates and purified DNAs prepared by phenol-chloroform-isoamylalcohol method as well as a commercial extraction kit were subjected to the Salmonella enterica Enteritidis specific STM2 PCR, with exception of crude cell extract, PCR products from all other three methods saved their integrity for 28 days post-generation. This work aimed to find out whether improvement to boiling method can guaranty stability of PCR products. As results showed, treatment of crude cell extracts from S. Enteritidis with proteinase K offers an inexpensive, fast and effective DNA extraction method suitable for high-throughput laboratories.

  8. Evidence for glycosylation on a DNA-binding protein of Salmonella enterica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida Igor C

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All organisms living under aerobic atmosphere have powerful mechanisms that confer their macromolecules protection against oxygen reactive species. Microorganisms have developed biomolecule-protecting systems in response to starvation and/or oxidative stress, such as DNA biocrystallization with Dps (DNA-binding protein from starved cells. Dps is a protein that is produced in large amounts when the bacterial cell faces harm, which results in DNA protection. In this work, we evaluated the glycosylation in the Dps extracted from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. This Dps was purified from the crude extract as an 18-kDa protein, by means of affinity chromatography on an immobilized jacalin column. Results The N-terminal sequencing of the jacalin-bound protein revealed 100% identity with the Dps of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium. Methyl-alpha-galactopyranoside inhibited the binding of Dps to jacalin in an enzyme-linked lectin assay, suggesting that the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD of jacalin is involved in the interaction with Dps. Furthermore, monosaccharide compositional analysis showed that Dps contained mannose, glucose, and an unknown sugar residue. Finally, jacalin-binding Dps was detected in larger amounts during the bacterial earlier growth periods, whereas high detection of total Dps was verified throughout the bacterial growth period. Conclusion Taken together, these results indicate that Dps undergoes post-translational modifications in the pre- and early stationary phases of bacterial growth. There is also evidence that a small mannose-containing oligosaccharide is linked to this bacterial protein.

  9. Regulation of fucose and 1,2-propanediol utilization by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staib, Lena; Fuchs, Thilo M

    2015-01-01

    After ingestion, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) encounters a densely populated, competitive environment in the gastrointestinal tract. To escape nutrient limitation caused by the intestinal microbiota, this pathogen has acquired specific metabolic traits to use compounds that are not metabolized by the commensal bacteria. For example, the utilization of 1,2-propanediol (1,2-PD), a product of the fermentation of L-fucose, which is present in foods of herbal origin and is also a terminal sugar of gut mucins. Under anaerobic conditions and in the presence of tetrathionate, 1,2-PD can serve as an energy source for S. Typhimurium. Comprehensive database analysis revealed that the 1,2-PD and fucose utilization operons are present in all S. enterica serovars sequenced thus far. The operon, consisting of 21 genes, is expressed as a single polycistronic mRNA. As demonstrated here, 1,2-PD was formed and further used when S. Typhimurium strain 14028 was grown with L-fucose, and the gene fucA encoding L-fuculose-1-phosphate aldolase was required for this growth. Using promoter fusions, we monitored the expression of the propanediol utilization operon that was induced at very low concentrations of 1,2-PD and was inhibited by the presence of D-glucose.

  10. Distribution and Genetic Diversity of Salmonella enterica in the Upper Suwannee River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Rajabi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Suwannee River spans the Florida/Georgia border to the Gulf of Mexico, and contributes to regional irrigation and recreational activities. Association of Salmonella enterica with these resources may result in the contamination of produce and disease outbreaks. Therefore, surface water was examined for the distribution of S. enterica at multiple time points from 4 sites on the upper Suwannee River. Isolates were confirmed by detection of the invA gene, and 96% of all samples were positive for the bacterium. Most probable number enumeration ranged from 60% similarity and distributed into 16 rep-PCR genogroups. Most (74% of the Suwannee River isolates were clustered into two genogroups that were comprised almost exclusively (97% of just these isolates. Conversely, 85% of the clinical reference strains clustered into other genogroups. However, some Suwannee River isolates (12% were clustered with these primarily clinically-associated genogroups, supporting the hypothesis that river water can serve as a disease reservoir and that pathogenic strains may persist or possibly originate from environmental sources.

  11. Salmonella Enterica Serovar Typhimurium BipA Exhibits Two Distinct Ribosome Binding Modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    deLivron, M.; Robinson, V

    2008-01-01

    BipA is a highly conserved prokaryotic GTPase that functions to influence numerous cellular processes in bacteria. In Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, BipA has been implicated in controlling bacterial motility, modulating attachment and effacement processes, and upregulating the expression of virulence genes and is also responsible for avoidance of host defense mechanisms. In addition, BipA is thought to be involved in bacterial stress responses, such as those associated with virulence, temperature, and symbiosis. Thus, BipA is necessary for securing bacterial survival and successful invasion of the host. Steady-state kinetic analysis and pelleting assays were used to assess the GTPase and ribosome-binding properties of S. enterica BipA. Under normal bacterial growth, BipA associates with the ribosome in the GTP-bound state. However, using sucrose density gradients, we demonstrate that the association of BipA and the ribosome is altered under stress conditions in bacteria similar to those experienced during virulence. The data show that this differential binding is brought about by the presence of ppGpp, an alarmone that signals the onset of stress-related events in bacteria.

  12. Genomic relationships between selected phage types of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype typhimurium defined by ribotyping, IS200 typing and PFGE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, J. E.; Skov, M. N.; Angen, Øystein;

    1997-01-01

    — DTs 69, 103 and 153. The same grouping was observed by principal component analysis, but a minimum spanning tree linked DT 12 to group E and not group D in this analysis. Among the typing methods used, IS200 gave the best representation of the overall similarity between the S. typhimurium isolates......The genomic relationship between isolates representing 17 definitive phage types (DTs) of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype typhimurium (S. typhimurium) were analysed using three different typing methods: IS200 typing using the restriction enzymes EcoRI and Pvull, ribotyping using Smal...... similarity was indicated between isolates of the following phage types: group A — DTs 44, 49, 135 and 204c, with DT 9 distantly related; group B — DTs 95 and 99; and group C — DTs 104a, 110 and 120. The other large cluster contained group D — DTs 10, 20 and 146, with DT 12 distantly related, and group E...

  13. Protection of epithelial cells from Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis invasion by antibodies against the SPI-1 type III secretion system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desin, Taseen S; Mickael, Claudia S; Lam, Po-King S; Potter, Andrew A; Köster, Wolfgang

    2010-06-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (Salmonella Enteritidis) is one of the major causes of bacterial food-borne illness in humans. During the course of infection, Salmonella Enteritidis uses 2 type III secretion systems (T3SS), one of which is encoded on Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1). SPI-1 plays a major role in the invasion process. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of sera against the SPI-1 T3SS components on invasion in vitro using polarized human intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2). Antisera to SipD protected Caco-2 cells against entry of wild-type Salmonella Enteritidis. On the other hand, sera against InvG, PrgI, SipA, SipC, SopB, SopE, and SopE2 did not affect Salmonella Enteritidis entry. To illustrate the specificity of anti-SipD mediated inhibition, SipD-specific antibodies were depleted from the serum. Antiserum depleted of SipD-specific antibodies lost its capacity to inhibit Salmonella Enteritidis entry. Thus, we demonstrate for the first time that antibodies against the SPI-1 needle tip protein (SipD) inhibit Salmonella Enteritidis invasion and that the SipD protein may be an important target in blocking SPI-1 mediated virulence of Salmonella Enteritidis.

  14. Nosocomial outbreak of neonatal Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis meningitis in a rural hospital in northern Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krüger Carsten

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinicians at Haydom Lutheran Hospital, a rural hospital in northern Tanzania noted an unusually high case-fatality rate of pediatric meningitis and suspected an outbreak of an unknown agent or an organism resistant to the empirical therapy. Methods We established a provisional microbiology laboratory to investigate the suspected outbreak. Blood and spinal fluid specimens were taken from children below the age of seven years with suspected meningitis. The blood and spinal fluid specimens were inoculated in commercial blood culture bottles and locally prepared Thayer-Martin medium in slanted tubes, respectively. The bacterial isolates were sent to Norway for further investigation, including susceptibility testing and pulsed-field gel-electrophoresis (PFGE. Results Among 24 children with suspected meningitis and/or septicemia, five neonates had meningitis caused by Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis, all of whom died. Two children had S. Enteritidis septicemia without meningitis and both survived. Genotyping with PFGE suggested a clonal outbreak. The salmonella strain was resistant to ampicillin and sensitive to gentamicin, the two drugs commonly used to treat neonatal meningitis at the hospital. Conclusion The investigation reminds us that nontyphoidal salmonellae can cause meningitis associated with very high case-fatality rates. Resistance to multiple antimicrobial agents increases the risk of treatment failure and may have contributed to the fatal outcome in all of the five patients with salmonella meningitis. The investigation indicated that the outbreak was nosocomial and the outbreak subsided after hygienic measures were instituted. Establishing a provisional microbiological laboratory is a valuable and affordable tool to investigate and control outbreaks even in remote rural areas.

  15. Dissemination of clonal Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates causing salmonellosis in Mauritius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issack, Mohammad I; Garcia-Migura, Lourdes; Ramsamy, Veemala D; Svendsen, Christina A; Pornruangwong, Srirat; Pulsrikarn, Chaiwat; Hendriksen, Rene S

    2013-07-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium is one of the leading causes of salmonellosis in Mauritius, where it has also been associated with outbreaks of foodborne illness. However, little is known about its molecular epidemiology in the country. This study was therefore undertaken to investigate the clonality and source of Salmonella Typhimurium in Mauritius by studying human, food, and poultry isolates by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and antibiotic minimum inhibitory concentration determination. Forty-nine isolates collected between 2008 and 2011 were analyzed, including 25 stool isolates from foodborne illness outbreaks and sporadic gastroenteritis cases, four blood isolates, one postmortem colon isolate, 14 food isolates, and five poultry isolates. All isolates were pansusceptible to the 16 antibiotics tested, except for two isolates that were resistant to sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim. Overall characterization of the isolates by PFGE digested with XbaI and BlnI resulted in eight different patterns. The largest of the clusters in the composite dataset consisted of 20 isolates, including two raw chicken isolates, four poultry isolates, and nine human stool isolates from two outbreaks. A second cluster consisted of 18 isolates, of which 12 originated from human blood and stool samples from both sporadic and outbreak cases. Six food isolates were also found in this cluster, including isolates from raw and grilled chicken, marlin mousse, and cooked pork. One poultry isolate had a closely related PFGE pattern. The results indicate that one clone of Salmonella Typhimurium found in poultry has been causing outbreaks of foodborne illness in Mauritius and another clone that has caused many cases of gastrointestinal illness and bacteremia in humans could also be linked to poultry. Thus, poultry appears to be a major reservoir for Salmonella Typhimurium in Mauritius. Initiating on-farm control strategies and measures against future dissemination may

  16. Antibiotic resistance determinants and genetic analysis of Salmonella enterica isolated from food in Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgia, Manuela; Bouchrif, Brahim; Timinouni, Mohammed; Al-Qahtani, Ahmed; Al-Ahdal, Mohammed N; Cappuccinelli, Pietro; Rubino, Salvatore; Paglietti, Bianca

    2015-12-23

    Antimicrobial-resistant non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) are an important cause of infection in Africa, but there is a lack of information on their molecular mechanisms of resistance and epidemiology. This study contributes to fill this gap through the characterization by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), plasmid profiling and analysis of antibiotic-resistance determinants of 94 Salmonella enterica strains isolated from food in Morocco. PFGE revealed considerable heterogeneity among the strains, showing 32 pulsotypes. MLST of strains representative of the different serovars evidenced 13 sequence types (STs), three of which were newly identified (ST1694, ST1768 and ST1818) and nine not previously reported in Morocco. Thirty-four strains harbored from one to four plasmids, of IncI1 group in S. Mbandaka, IncFIIA in S. Typhimurium, IncL/M in S. Hadar and S. Blockley. For the first time in Morocco an intact Salmonella Genomic Island 1 (SGI1) carrying the resistance genes aadA2, floR, tetG, blaPSE-1 and sul1 was detected in S. Typhimurium DT104. In serovar Hadar resistance to ampicillin, tetracycline and streptomycin was associated to blaTEM-1, tetA and strA genes respectively, whereas one mutation in gyrA (Asp87Asn) and one in parC (Thr54Ser) genes conferred resistance to nalidixic acid. These findings improve the information on foodborne Salmonella in Morocco, evidencing the presence of MDR strains potentially dangerous to humans, and provide useful data for future studies.

  17. Involvement of SPI-2-encoded SpiC in flagellum synthesis in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugita Asami

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SpiC encoded within Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 on the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium chromosome is required for survival within macrophages and systemic infection in mice. Additionally, SpiC contributes to Salmonella-induced activation of the signal transduction pathways in macrophages by affecting the expression of FliC, a component of flagella filaments. Here, we show the contribution of SpiC in flagellum synthesis. Results Quantitative RT-PCR shows that the expression levels of the class 3 fliD and motA genes that encode for the flagella cap and motor torque proteins, respectively, were lower for a spiC mutant strain than for the wild-type Salmonella. Further, this mutant had lower expression levels of the class 2 genes including the fliA gene encoding the flagellar-specific alternative sigma factor. We also found differences in flagella assembly between the wild-type strain and the spiC mutant. Many flagella filaments were observed on the bacterial surface of the wild-type strain, whereas the spiC mutant had only few flagella. The absence of spiC led to reduced expression of the FlhD protein, which functions as the master regulator in flagella gene expression, although no significant difference at the transcription level of the flhDC operon was observed between the wild-type strain and the spiC mutant. Conclusion The data show that SpiC is involved in flagella assembly by affecting the post-transcription expression of flhDC.

  18. Effects of leachate from crumb rubber and zinc in green roofs on the survival, growth, and resistance characteristics of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crampton, Mollee; Ryan, Allayna; Eckert, Cori; Baker, Katherine H; Herson, Diane S

    2014-05-01

    The use of green roofs is a growing practice worldwide, particularly in densely populated areas. In an attempt to find new methods for recycling crumb rubber, incorporation of crumb rubber into artificial medium for plant growth in green roofs and similar engineered environments has become an attractive option for the recycling of waste tires. Though this approach decreases waste in landfills, there are concerns about the leaching of zinc and other heavy metals, as well as nutrient and organic compounds, into the environment. The present study analyzed the impact of leachate from crumb rubber and zinc on the growth and viability of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium. Zinc was chosen for further studies since it has been previously implicated with other biological functions, including biofilm formation, motility, and possible cross-resistance to antimicrobial agents. The study showed that Salmonella can colonize crumb rubber and that crumb rubber extract may provide nutrients that are usable by this bacterium. Salmonella strains with reduced susceptibility (SRS) to zinc were obtained after subculturing in increasing concentrations of zinc. The SRS exhibited differences in gene expression of flux pump genes zntA and znuA compared to that of the parent when exposed to 20 mM added zinc. In biofilm formation studies, the SRS formed less biofilm but was more motile than the parental strain.

  19. Identification of bapA in Strains of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Isolated from Wild Animals Kept in Captivity in Sinaloa, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Silva-Hidalgo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available bapA, previously named stm2689, encodes the BapA protein, which, along with cellulose and fimbriae, constitutes biofilms. Biofilms are communities of microorganisms that grow in a matrix of exopolysaccharides and may adhere to living tissues or inert surfaces. Biofilm formation is associated with the ability to persist in different environments, which contributes to the pathogenicity of several species. We analyzed the presence of bapA in 83 strains belonging to 17 serovars of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica from wildlife in captivity at Culiacan’s Zoo and Mazatlán’s Aquarium. Each isolate amplified a product of 667 bp, which corresponds to the expected size of the bapA initiator, with no observed variation between different serovars analyzed. bapA gene was found to be highly conserved in Salmonella and can be targeted for the genus-specific detection of this organism from different sources. Since bapA expression improves bacterial proliferation outside of the host and facilitates resistance to disinfectants and desiccation, the survival of Salmonella in natural habitats may be favored. Thus, the risk of bacterial contamination from these animals is increased.

  20. Incidence and growth of Salmonella enterica on the peel and pulp of avocado (Persea americana) and custard apple (Annona squamosa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, Ana Carolina B; Crucello, Juliana; Moreira, Rafael C; Silva, Beatriz S; Sant'Ana, Anderson S

    2016-10-17

    The aim of this study was to assess the incidence and to estimate the growth kinetic parameters (maximum growth rate, μ; lag time, λ; and maximum population, κ) of Salmonella on the peel and pulp of avocado (Perseaamericana var. americana) and custard apple (Annona squamosa L.) as affected by temperature (10-30°C). The incidence of Salmonella was assessed on the peel and pulp of the fruits (n=200 of each fruit), separately, totalizing 800 analyses. Only three samples of custard apple pulp were positive for Salmonella enterica and the three isolates recovered belonged to serotype S. Typhimurium. Salmonella was not recovered from avocado and custard apple peels and from avocado pulp. Generally, the substrate (pulp or peel) of growth did not affect μ values of S. enterica (p>0.05). Very similar μ values were found for S. enterica inoculated in custard apple and avocado. S. enterica presented the highest λ in the peel of the fruits. The growth of S. enterica resulted in larger λ in custard apple in comparison to avocado. For example, the λ of S. enterica in the pulp of custard apple and avocado were 47.0±0.78h and 10.0±3.78h, respectively. The lowest values of κ were obtained at the lower storage temperature conditions (10°C). For instance, κ values of 3.7±0.06log CFU/g and 2.9±0.03log CFU/g were obtained from the growth of S. enterica in avocado and custard apple pulps at 10°C (p<0.05), respectively. On the other hand, at 30°C, κ values were 6.5±0.25log CFU/g and 6.5±0.05log CFU/g, respectively. Significantly higher κ were obtained from the growth of S. enterica in the pulp than in the peel of the fruits (p<0.05). For instance, the growth of S. enterica in the pulp of avocado led to a κ value of 6.5±0.25log CFU/g, while in the peel led to a κ value of 4.6±0.23log CFU/g (p<0.05). In general, growth kinetic parameters indicated that avocado comprises a better substrate than custard apple for the growth of S. enterica. The square root model

  1. Antibiotic resistances in Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica isolated from foods with animal origin Resistencias a antibióticos en Listeria monocytogenes y Salmonella enterica aislados de alimentos de origen animal

    OpenAIRE

    Baltasar Balsalobre Hernández; Joaquín Hernández-Godoy

    2004-01-01

    Extensive use of antibiotics in both human and animal health and in cattle production has generated resistant microorganisms to common antibiotics. Resistances spread caused by human and animal therapeutic is well known, but we know poorly frecuency of resistant bacteria in foods with animal origin and destinated to human consumers. In this paper, sensitivity to nineteen antibiotics was investigated in Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica strains isolated from foods with animal orig...

  2. Elimination of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in artificially contaminated eggs through correct cooking and frying procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geovana Dagostim Savi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Salmonellosis is a serious foodborne disease associated with the presence of bacteria in eggs or foods containing raw eggs. However, the use of appropriate procedures of cooking and frying can eliminate this contamination. There are few studies on the elimination of contamination of Salmonella in hens' eggs through typical frying procedures, especially for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (or S. typhimurium. The aim of this study was to determine the appropriate conditions for cooking and frying hens' eggs artificially contaminated with S. typhimurium, making them free of bacterial contamination. Hens' eggs were artificially contaminated with S. typhimurium and subjected to various processes of cooking, frying and food preparation. It was observed that the minimum time necessary to eliminate contamination through cooking procedures is 5 minutes after the water starts boiling, and also that, cooking in the microwave oven complete eliminates the bacterial contamination. When the eggs were fried on both sides, keeping the yolk hard, a complete bacterial elimination was observed. Mayonnaise prepared with vinegar presented a decrease in bacterial colonies when compared mayonese prepared with lemon.

  3. Proteome of Salmonella enterica serotype Tyhimurium Grown in Low Mg2+/pH Medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Liang; Ansong, Charles; Smallwood, Heather S.; Rommereim, Leah M.; McDermott, Jason E.; Brewer, Heather M.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Taylor, Ronald C.; Gustin, Jean K.; Heffron, Fred; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2009-09-04

    To determine the impact of a low Mg2+/pH defined growth medium (MgM) on the proteome of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium, we cultured S. Typhimurium cells in the medium under two different conditions termed MgM Shock and MgM Dilution and then comparatively analyzed the bacterial cells harvested from these conditions by a global proteomic approach. Proteomic results showed that MgM Shock and MgM Dilution differentially affected the S. Typhimurium proteome. MgM Shock induced a group of proteins whose induction usually occurred at low O2 level, while MgM Dilution induced those related to the type III secretion system (T3SS) of Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 2 (SPI2) and those involved in thiamine or biotin biosynthesis. The metabolic state of the S. Typhimurium cells grown under MgM Shock condition also differed significantly from that under MgM Dilution condition. Western blot analysis not only confirmed the proteomic results, but also showed that the abundances of SPI2-T3SS proteins SsaQ and SseE and biotin biosynthesis proteins BioB and BioD increased after S. Typhimurium infection of RAW 264.7 macrophages. Deletion of the gene encoding BioB reduced the bacterial ability to replicate inside the macrophages, suggesting a biotin-limited environment encountered by S. Typhimurium within RAW 264.7 macrophages.

  4. Pathoadaptive mutations in Salmonella enterica isolated after serial passage in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanna Koskiniemi

    Full Text Available How pathogenic bacteria adapt and evolve in the complex and variable environment of the host remains a largely unresolved question. Here we have used whole genome sequencing of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2 populations serially passaged in mice to identify mutations that adapt bacteria to systemic growth in mice. We found unique pathoadaptive mutations in two global regulators, phoQ and stpA, which increase the competitive indexes of the bacteria 3- to 5-fold. Also, all mouse-adapted lineages had changed the orientation of the hin invertable element, resulting in production of a FliC type of flagellum. Competition experiments in mice with locked flagellum mutants showed that strains expressing the FliC type of flagellum had a 5-fold increase in competitive index as compared to those expressing FljB type flagellum. Combination of the flagellum cassette inversion with the stpA mutation increased competitive indexes up to 20-fold. These experiments show that Salmonella can rapidly adapt to a mouse environment by acquiring a few mutations of moderate individual effect that when combined confer substantial increases in growth.

  5. Caracterización Molecular Y Epidemiológica de Cepas Monofásicas de Salmonella Enterica

    OpenAIRE

    Laorden Muñoz, Lorena

    2014-01-01

    225 p. La salmonelosis, producida por bacterias del género Salmonella, es una de las intoxicaciones alimentarias más comunes en los países desarrollados siendo la principal manifestación la gastroenteritis aguda. Salmonella enterica es un patógeno conocido desde el siglo XIX y en la actualidad hay descritos más de 2.500 serotipos. Sin embargo no todos han tenido la misma relevancia y por tanto, son los más frecuentemente aislados en muestras clínicas los que han recibido un control y segui...

  6. DsbL and DsbI contribute to periplasmic disulfide bond formation in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Dongxia; Kim, Byoungkwan; Slauch, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Disulfide bond formation in periplasmic proteins is catalysed by the DsbA/DsbB system in most Gram-negative bacteria. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium also encodes a paralogous pair of proteins to DsbA and DsbB, DsbL and DsbI, respectively, downstream of a periplasmic arylsulfate sulfotransferase (ASST). We show that DsbL and DsbI function as a redox pair contributing to periplasmic disulfide bond formation and, as such, affect transcription of the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SP...

  7. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis identifies an outbreak of Salmonella enterica serotype Montevideo infection associated with a supermarket hot food outlet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Threlfall, E J; Hampton, M D; Ward, L R; Richardson, I R; Lanser, S; Greener, T

    1999-09-01

    In February 1996 Salmonella enterica serotype Montevideo infection in a patient in the North Tyneside area was attributed to consumption of cooked chicken bought from a supermarket hot food outlet. Isolates from the patient, leftover food, and environmental samples were indistinguishable by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). PFGE also demonstrated that an outbreak of infection with S. Montevideo associated with the hot food outlet had occurred in late 1995 and early 1996. This study shows the importance of microbial strain discrimination in outbreak investigations and illustrates the value of close liaison between microbiologists, epidemiologists, and environmental health officers in the control of salmonella outbreaks.

  8. Identification of novel Salmonella enterica Serovar Thyphimurium DT104-specific prophage and nonprophage chromosomal sequences among serovar Thyphimurium isolates by genomic subtractive hybridization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermans, A.P.H.M.; Abee, T.; Zwietering, M.H.; Aarts, H.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Genomic subtractive hybridization was performed between Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2 and DT104 to search for novel Salmonella serovar Typhimurium DT104-specific sequences. The subtraction resulted mainly in the isolation of DNA fragments with sequence similarity to phages. Two fragmen

  9. Conjugative transferability of the A/C plasmids from Salmonella enterica isolates that possess or lack blaCMY in the A/C plasmid backbone

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to gain a better understanding of the conjugative transfer of antimicrobial resistance plasmids from 205 Salmonella enterica strains, isolated from cattle to E. coli or Salmonella recipients. PCR-based replicon typing (PBRT) was used to type incompatibility plasmid r...

  10. Genomic and Phenotypic Analyses Reveal the Emergence of an Atypical Salmonella enterica Serovar Senftenberg Variant in China

    KAUST Repository

    Abd El Ghany, Moataz

    2016-05-25

    Human infections with Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Senftenberg are often associated with exposure to poultry flocks, farm environments, or contaminated food. The recent emergence of multidrug-resistant isolates has raised public health concerns. In this study, comparative genomics and phenotypic analysis were used to characterize 14 Salmonella Senftenberg clinical isolates recovered from multiple outbreaks in Shenzhen and Shanghai, China, between 2002 and 2011. Single-nucleotide polymorphism analyses identified two phylogenetically distinct clades of S. Senftenberg, designated SC1 and SC2, harboring variations in Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) and SPI-2 and exhibiting distinct biochemical and phenotypic signatures. Although the two variants shared the same serotype, the SC2 isolates of sequence type 14 (ST14) harbored intact SPI-1 and -2 and hence were characterized by possessing efficient invasion capabilities. In contrast, the SC1 isolates had structural deletion patterns in both SPI-1 and -2 that correlated with an impaired capacity to invade cultured human cells and also the year of their isolation. These atypical SC1 isolates also lacked the capacity to produce hydrogen sulfide. These findings highlight the emergence of atypical Salmonella Senftenberg variants in China and provide genetic validation that variants lacking SPI-1 and regions of SPI-2, which leads to impaired invasion capacity, can still cause clinical disease. These data have identified an emerging public health concern and highlight the need to strengthen surveillance to detect the prevalence and transmission of nontyphoidal Salmonella species.

  11. Adhesion and splash dispersal of Salmonella enterica Typhimurium on tomato leaflets: effects of rdar morphotype and trichome density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevallos-Cevallos, Juan M; Gu, Ganyu; Danyluk, Michelle D; van Bruggen, Ariena H C

    2012-11-01

    Salmonella enterica strains with rdar (red dry and rough) and saw (smooth and white) morphotypes have previously been associated with tomato outbreaks but the dispersal mechanisms of these morphotypes are still poorly understood. In this study, Salmonella adhesion was distinguished from attachment by comparing different contact periods. Initial adhesion of rdar and saw morphotypes of Salmonella was compared in relation to tomato plants with different leaf trichome densities. Trichome densities were increased or reduced by treatment with jasmonic or salicylic acid, respectively. The overall effect of Salmonella morphotype and trichome density on splash dispersal was assessed in a rain simulator and correlated to cell hydrophobicity and initial adhesion. The presence of the rdar morphotype increased initial adhesion at high trichome densities but not at low trichome densities. Attachment of the rdar strain occurred after 30s contact time regardless of trichome density. Splash dispersal was slightly further for the saw morphotype than the rdar morphotype of S. enterica at all trichome densities. Salmonella cells of both morphotypes survived significantly better on the surface of high trichome density leaflets.

  12. Aggregation via the red, dry, and rough morphotype is not a virulence adaptation in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, A P; Gibson, D L; Grassl, G A; Kay, W W; Finlay, B B; Vallance, B A; Surette, M G

    2008-03-01

    The Salmonella rdar (red, dry, and rough) morphotype is an aggregative and resistant physiology that has been linked to survival in nutrient-limited environments. Growth of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was analyzed in a variety of nutrient-limiting conditions to determine whether aggregation would occur at low cell densities and whether the rdar morphotype was involved in this process. The resulting cultures consisted of two populations of cells, aggregated and nonaggregated, with the aggregated cells preferentially displaying rdar morphotype gene expression. The two groups of cells could be separated based on the principle that aggregated cells were producing greater amounts of thin aggregative fimbriae (Tafi or curli). In addition, the aggregated cells retained some physiological characteristics of the rdar morphotype, such as increased resistance to sodium hypochlorite. Competitive infection experiments in mice showed that nonaggregative DeltaagfA cells outcompeted rdar-positive wild-type cells in all tissues analyzed, indicating that aggregation via the rdar morphotype was not a virulence adaptation in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Furthermore, in vivo imaging experiments showed that Tafi genes were not expressed during infection but were expressed once Salmonella was passed out of the mice into the feces. We hypothesize that the primary role of the rdar morphotype is to enhance Salmonella survival outside the host, thereby aiding in transmission.

  13. Antimicrobial Drug Resistance of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi in Asia and Molecular Mechanism of Reduced Susceptibility to the Fluoroquinolones▿

    OpenAIRE

    Chau, Tran Thuy; Campbell, James Ian; Galindo, Claudia M; Van Minh Hoang, Nguyen; Diep, To Song; Nga, Tran Thu Thi; van Vinh Chau, Nguyen; Tuan, Phung Quoc; Page, Anne Laure; Ochiai, R Leon; Schultsz, Constance; Wain, John; Zulfiqar A. Bhutta; Parry, Christopher M.; Bhattacharya, Sujit K.

    2007-01-01

    This study describes the pattern and extent of drug resistance in 1,774 strains of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi isolated across Asia between 1993 and 2005 and characterizes the molecular mechanisms underlying the reduced susceptibilities to fluoroquinolones of these strains. For 1,393 serovar Typhi strains collected in southern Vietnam, the proportion of multidrug resistance has remained high since 1993 (50% in 2004) and there was a dramatic increase in nalidixic acid resistance between ...

  14. Atmospheric Cold Plasma Inactivation of Escherichia Coli, Salmonella Enterica Serovar Typhimurium and Listeria Monocytogenes Inoculated on Fresh Produce

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric cold plasma (ACP) represents a potential alternative to traditional methods for non-thermal decontamination of foods. In this study, the antimicrobial efficacy of a novel dielectric barrier discharge ACP device against Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes inoculated on cherry tomatoes and strawberries, was examined. Bacteria were spot inoculated on the produce surface, air dried and sealed inside a rigid polypropylene container. Samples were...

  15. Comparison of API 20E and invA PCR for identification of Salmonella enterica isolates from swine production units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nucera, Daniele M; Maddox, Carol W; Hoien-Dalen, Patricia; Weigel, Ronald M

    2006-09-01

    API 20E and invA PCR were evaluated for the identification of Salmonella enterica isolates from swine farms. API 20E had the highest agreement with other tests at the 99.9% likelihood level. Both tests had 100% sensitivity and 96% specificity compared to 16S rRNA sequencing. Compared to serotyping, both tests had 96% sensitivity; specificity was 86% for API 20E and 79% for invA PCR.

  16. A functional cra gene is required for Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium virulence in BALB/c mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allen, J. H.; Utley, M.; Van den Bosch, H.;

    2000-01-01

    A minitransposon mutant of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SR-11, SR-11 Fad(-), is unable to utilize gluconeogenic substrates as carbon sources and is avirulent and immunogenic when administered perorally to BALB/c mice (M. J. Utley et al., FEMS Microbiol. Lett., 163:129-134, 1998). Here......, evidence is presented that the mutation in SR-11 Fad(-) that renders the strain avirulent is in the cra gene, which encodes the Cra protein, a regulator of central carbon metabolism....

  17. Respiratory hydrogen use by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is essential for virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, R J; Olczak, A; Maier, S; Soni, S; Gunn, J

    2004-11-01

    Based on available annotated gene sequence information, the enteric pathogen salmonella, like other enteric bacteria, contains three putative membrane-associated H2-using hydrogenase enzymes. These enzymes split molecular H2, releasing low-potential electrons that are used to reduce quinone or heme-containing components of the respiratory chain. Here we show that each of the three distinct membrane-associated hydrogenases of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is coupled to a respiratory pathway that uses oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor. Cells grown in a blood-based medium expressed four times the amount of hydrogenase (H2 oxidation) activity that cells grown on Luria Bertani medium did. Cells suspended in phosphate-buffered saline consumed 2 mol of H2 per mol of O2 used in the H2-O2 respiratory pathway, and the activity was inhibited by the respiration inhibitor cyanide. Molecular hydrogen levels averaging over 40 microM were measured in organs (i.e., livers and spleens) of live mice, and levels within the intestinal tract (the presumed origin of the gas) were four times greater than this. The half-saturation affinity of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium for H2 is only 2.1 microM, so it is expected that H2-utilizing hydrogenase enzymes are saturated with the reducing substrate in vivo. All three hydrogenase enzymes contribute to the virulence of the bacterium in a typhoid fever-mouse model, based on results from strains with mutations in each of the three hydrogenase genes. The introduced mutations are nonpolar, and growth of the mutant strains was like that of the parent strain. The combined removal of all three hydrogenases resulted in a strain that is avirulent and (in contrast to the parent strain) one that is unable to invade liver or spleen tissue. The introduction of one of the hydrogenase genes into the triple mutant strain on a low-copy-number plasmid resulted in a strain that was able to both oxidize H2 and cause morbidity in mice within 11

  18. Virulence and metabolic characteristics of Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis strains with different sefD variants in hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Cesar A; Guard, Jean; Sanchez-Ingunza, Roxana; Shah, Devendra H; Harrison, Mark

    2012-09-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is one of a few Salmonella enterica serotypes that has SEF14 fimbriae encoded by the sef operon, which consists of 4 cotranscribed genes, sefABCD, regulated by sefR. A parental strain was used to construct a sefD mutant and its complement, and all 3 strains were compared for gene expression, metabolic properties, and virulence characteristics in hens. Transcription of sefD by wild type was suppressed at 42°C and absent for the mutant under conditions where the complemented mutant had 10(3) times higher transcription. Growth of the complemented mutant was restricted in comparison to that of the mutant and wild type. Hens infected with the wild type and mutant showed decreased blood calcium and egg production, but infection with the complemented mutant did not. Thus, the absence of sefD correlated with increased metabolic capacity and enhanced virulence of the pathogen. These results suggest that any contribution that sefD makes to egg contamination is either unknown or would be limited to early transmission from the environment to the host. Absence of sefD, either through mutation or by suppression of transcription at the body temperature of the host, may contribute to the virulence of Salmonella enterica by facilitating growth on a wide range of metabolites.

  19. Osmoprotection of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium by Ngamma-acetyldiaminobutyrate, the precursor of the compatible solute ectoine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Estepa, Raul; Cánovas, David; Iglesias-Guerra, Fernando; Ventosa, Antonio; Csonka, Laszlo N; Nieto, Joaquín J; Vargas, Carmen

    2006-12-01

    N(gamma)-acetyl-2,4-diaminobutyrate (NADA), the precursor of the compatible solute ectoine, was shown to function as an osmoprotectant for the non-halophilic bacterium Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. The addition of NADA-containing extracts of an ectoine synthase mutant of the broad salt-growing halophile Chromohalobacter salexigens DSM 3043(T) could alleviate the inhibitory effects of high salinity in S. enterica, which lacks the ectoine biosynthetic pathway. NADA, purified from extracts of the mutant, protected S. enterica against salinity stress. This osmoprotective effect was slightly lower than that of ectoine, but more potent than that of hydroxyectoine. Accumulation of purified NADA by S. enterica was demonstrated by (13)C-NMR spectroscopy and HPLC analysis. In addition, it was shown that NADA was taken up by S. enterica via the ProP and ProU transport systems, which are known to transport glycine betaine and proline. This finding provides evidence that these permeases can recognize a diaminoacid that carries an unsubstituted alpha-amino group. This is the first time that NADA has been connected with osmoprotective functions in non-halophilic bacteria.

  20. Enhancement of host immune responses by oral vaccination to Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium harboring both FliC and FljB flagella.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Seon Eom

    Full Text Available Flagellin, the structural component of the flagellar filament in various motile bacteria, can contribute to the activation of NF-κB and proinflammatory cytokine expression during the innate immune response in host cells. Thus, flagellin proteins represent a particularly attractive target for the development of vaccine candidates. In this study, we investigated the immune response by increasing the flagella number in the iacP mutant strain and the adjuvant activity of the flagellin component FljB of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. We found that the iacP mutant strain expresses two flagellin proteins (FliC and FljB, which result in increased NF-κB-dependent gene expression in bone marrow derived macrophages. Using an oral immunization mouse model, we observed that the administration of a live attenuated S. typhimurium BRD509 strain expressing the FliC and FljB flagellins induced significantly enhanced flagellin-specific IgG responses in the systemic compartment. The mice immunized with the recombinant attenuated S. typhimurium strain that has two types of flagella were protected from lethal challenge with the Salmonella SL1344 strain. These results indicate that overexpression of flagella in the iacP mutant strain enhance the induction of an antigen-specific immune responses in macrophage cell, and both the FliC and FljB flagellar filament proteins-producing S. typhimurium can induce protective immune responses against salmonellosis.

  1. Genomic analysis of Salmonella enterica serotype Paratyphi A during an outbreak in Cambodia, 2013–2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawal, Nizar; Fabre, Laetitia; Tourdjman, Mathieu; Dufour, Muriel; Sar, Dara; Kham, Chun; Phe, Thong; Vlieghe, Erika; Bouchier, Christiane; Jacobs, Jan

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, an unusual increase in the number of Salmonella enterica serotype Paratyphi A (Salmonella Paratyphi A) infections was reported in patients in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, and in European, American and Japanese travellers returning from Cambodia. Epidemiological investigations did not identify a common source of exposure. To analyse the population structure and genetic diversity of these Salmonella Paratyphi A isolates, we used whole-genome sequencing on 65 isolates collected from 1999 to 2014: 55 from infections acquired in Cambodia and 10 from infections acquired in other countries in Asia, Africa and Europe. Short-read sequences from 80 published genomes from around the world and from 13 published genomes associated with an outbreak in China were also included. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was performed on a subset of isolates. Genomic analyses were found to provide much more accurate information for tracking the individual strains than PFGE. All but 2 of the 36 isolates acquired in Cambodia during 2013–2014 belonged to the same clade, C5, of lineage C. This clade has been isolated in Cambodia since at least 1999. The Chinese outbreak isolates belonged to a different clade (C4) and were resistant to nalidixic acid, whereas the Cambodian outbreak isolates displayed pan-susceptibility to antibiotics. Since 2014, the total number of cases has decreased, but there has been an increase in the frequency with which nalidixic acid-resistant C5 isolates are isolated. The frequency of these isolates should be monitored over time, because they display decreased susceptibility to ciprofloxacin, the first-choice antibiotic for treating paratyphoid fever. PMID:28348832

  2. Survival and virulence of Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis filaments induced by reduced water activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stackhouse, Robert R; Faith, Nancy G; Kaspar, Charles W; Czuprynski, Charles J; Wong, Amy C Lee

    2012-04-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis strain E40 filaments were developed under conditions of a reduced water activity (a(w)) of 0.95 in tryptic soy broth (TSB) or tryptic soy agar (TSA) supplemented with 8% or 7% NaCl, respectively. Filament formation was accompanied by an increase of biomass without an increase in CFU and was affected by incubation temperature and the physical milieu. The greatest amount of filaments was recovered from TSA with 7% NaCl and incubation at 30°C. Within 2 h of transfer to fresh TSB, filaments started to septate into normal-sized cells, resulting in a rapid increase in CFU. S. Enteritidis E40 filaments were not more tolerant of low- or high-temperature stresses than nonfilamented control cells. However, there was greater survival of filaments in 10% bile salts after 24 to 48 h of incubation, during pH 2.0 acid challenge for 10 min, and under desiccation on stainless steel surfaces at 25°C and 75.5% relative humidity for 7 days. S. Enteritidis E40 filaments invaded and multiplied within Caco-2 human intestinal epithelial cells to a similar degree as control cells when a comparable CFU of filaments and control cells was used. S. Enteritidis E40 filaments established a successful infection in mice via intragastric inoculation. The filaments colonized the gastrointestinal tract and disseminated to the spleen and liver at levels comparable to those attained by control cells, even when animals were inoculated with 10- to 100-fold fewer CFU. To our knowledge this is the first demonstration of virulence of stress-induced Salmonella filaments in vitro and in vivo. Formation of filaments by Salmonella in food products and food processing environments is significant to food safety, because detection and quantitation of the pathogen may be compromised. The finding that these filaments are virulent further enhances their potential public health impact.

  3. Acute diarrhea associated with Salmonella enterica in Belo Horizonte-MG: prevalence and characterization of isolates Diarreia aguda associada a Salmonella enterica em Belo Horizonte-MG: prevalência e caracterização das amostras isoladas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mireille Ângela Bernardes Sousa

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acute infectious diarrhea is still regarded as a public health problem associated with a wide range of etiologic agents, from which Salmonella enterica is particularly worth mentioning inasmuch as it is a major cause of inflammatory diarrhea in both developed and developing countries. Objective: To assess the distribution of S. enterica among children with acute diarrhea in Belo Horizonte and to characterize bacterium isolates. Material and methods: The study group comprised a total of 157 children from low socioeconomic background. Stool samples were collected for leukocyte analysis and Salmonella bacterial culture. The isolates were serotyped and evaluated as to antimicrobial susceptibility profile, extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL production, and presence of virulence markers (invA, iroB, and spvC. RESULTS: A total of 5/3.2% children were infected by S. enterica, 3/60% by S. enterica Typhimurium, 1/20% by S. enterica Enteritidis and 1/20% S. enterica subsp. enterica serotype 8.20:z4,z23:-. Fecal leucocytes were detected in two out of five fecal specimens positive for S. enterica. Isolates from three children were resistant to nalidixic acid, nalidixic acid + chloramphenicol, and nalidixic acid + chloramphenicol + ampicillin. ESBL production was not detected. All samples presented invA and iroB genes. spvC marker was observed in isolates from two children infected by S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis. Conclusion: The results demonstrate that S. enterica infection is uncommon among children from our region. Furthermore, they indicate the need for periodic monitoring of bacterial antimicrobial susceptibility profile in order to establish suitable antimicrobial therapy when required.INTRODUÇÃO: A diarreia infecciosa aguda é considerada um problema de saúde pública associado a uma ampla gama de agentes etiológicos, entre os quais destaca-se Salmonella enterica, causa importante de diarreia inflamatória em pa

  4. A Constitutively Mannose-Sensitive Agglutinating Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Typhimurium Strain, Carrying a Transposon in the Fimbrial Usher Gene stbC, Exhibits Multidrug Resistance and Flagellated Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan-Hsun Wu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Static broth culture favors Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium to produce type 1 fimbriae, while solid agar inhibits its expression. A transposon inserted in stbC, which would encode an usher for Stb fimbriae of a non-flagellar Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium LB5010 strain, conferred it to agglutinate yeast cells on both cultures. RT-PCR revealed that the expression of the fimbrial subunit gene fimA, and fimZ, a regulatory gene of fimA, were both increased in the stbC mutant when grown on LB agar; fimW, a repressor gene of fimA, exhibited lower expression. Flagella were observed in the stbC mutant and this phenotype was correlated with the motile phenotype. Microarray data and RT-PCR indicated that the expression of three genes, motA, motB, and cheM, was enhanced in the stbC mutant. The stbC mutant was resistant to several antibiotics, consistent with the finding that expression of yhcQ and ramA was enhanced. A complementation test revealed that transforming a recombinant plasmid possessing the stbC restored the mannose-sensitive agglutination phenotype to the stbC mutant much as that in the parental Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium LB5010 strain, indicating the possibility of an interplay of different fimbrial systems in coordinating their expression.

  5. Murein lipoprotein is a critical outer membrane component involved in Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium systemic infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadl, A A; Sha, J; Klimpel, G R; Olano, J P; Niesel, D W; Chopra, A K

    2005-02-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and Braun (murein) lipoprotein (Lpp) are major components of the outer membrane of gram-negative enteric bacteria that function as potent stimulators of inflammatory and immune responses. In a previous paper, we provided evidence that two functional copies of the lipoprotein gene (lppA and lppB) located on the chromosome of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium contributed to bacterial virulence. In this study, we characterized lppA and lppB single-knockout (SKO) mutants and compared them with an lpp double-knockout (DKO) mutant using in vitro and in vivo models. Compared to the lpp DKO mutant, which was nonmotile, the motility of the lpp SKO mutants was significantly increased (73 to 77%), although the level of motility did not reach the level of wild-type (WT) S. enterica serovar Typhimurium. Likewise, the cytotoxicity was also significantly increased when T84 human intestinal epithelial cells and RAW264.7 murine macrophages were infected with the lpp SKO mutants compared to the cytotoxicity when cells were infected with the lpp DKO mutant. The level of interleukin-8 (IL-8) in polarized T84 cells infected with the lppB SKO mutant was significantly higher (two- to threefold higher), reaching the level in cells infected with WT S. enterica serovar Typhimurium, than the level in host cells infected with the lppA SKO mutant. The lpp DKO mutant induced minimal levels of IL-8. Similarly, sera from mice infected with the lppB SKO mutant contained 4.5- to 10-fold-higher levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and IL-6; the levels of these cytokines were 1.7- to 3.0-fold greater in the lppA SKO mutant-infected mice than in animals challenged with the lpp DKO mutant. The increased cytokine levels observed with the lppB SKO mutant in mice correlated with greater tissue damage in the livers and spleens of these mice than in the organs of animals infected with the lppA SKO and lpp DKO mutants. Moreover, the lppB SKO mutant-infected mice had increased

  6. Unique lipid anchor attaches Vi antigen capsule to the surface of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liston, Sean D; Ovchinnikova, Olga G; Whitfield, Chris

    2016-06-14

    Polysaccharide capsules are surface structures that are critical for the virulence of many Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi is the etiological agent of typhoid fever. It produces a capsular polysaccharide known as "Vi antigen," which is composed of nonstoichiometrically O-acetylated α-1,4-linked N-acetylgalactosaminuronic acid residues. This glycan is a component of currently available vaccines. The genetic locus for Vi antigen production is also present in soil bacteria belonging to the genus Achromobacter Vi antigen assembly follows a widespread general strategy with a characteristic glycan export step involving an ATP-binding cassette transporter. However, Vi antigen producers lack the enzymes that build the conserved terminal glycolipid characterizing other capsules using this method. Achromobacter species possess a Vi antigen-specific depolymerase enzyme missing in S enterica Typhi, and we exploited this enzyme to isolate acylated Vi antigen termini. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed a reducing terminal N-acetylhexosamine residue modified with two β-hydroxyl acyl chains. This terminal structure resembles one half of lipid A, the hydrophobic portion of bacterial lipopolysaccharides. The VexE protein encoded in the Vi antigen biosynthesis locus shares similarity with LpxL, an acyltransferase from lipid A biosynthesis. In the absence of VexE, Vi antigen is produced, but its physical properties are altered, its export is impaired, and a Vi capsule structure is not assembled on the cell surface. The structure of the lipidated terminus dictates a unique assembly mechanism and has potential implications in pathogenesis and vaccine production.

  7. Reduction of Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis on the surface of raw shelled almonds by exposure to steam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun-Young; Oh, Se-wook; Chung, Hyun-Jung; Reyes-De-Corcuera, Jose I; Powers, Joseph R; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2006-03-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of steam treatment on the reduction of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis on the surface of raw almonds. Two cultivars, 'Nonpareil' and 'Mission', were studied. Salmonella Enteritidis was inoculated on the surface of raw almonds, which were then treated with steam (93 degrees C +/- 1 degrees C) for 5, 15, 25, 35, 45, 55, and 65 s. After steam treatment, samples were plated on xylose lysine desoxycholate (XLD) and overlay (OV) XLD as a selective and nonselective agar for Salmonella, respectively, to investigate the extent of sublethal injury in Salmonella. Steam treatment of raw almonds effectively reduced Salmonella Enteritidis, and the effect was pronounced with increasing treatment time. After 65 s of steam treatment, reductions in Salmonella Enteritidis populations were 5.7 log and 5.8 log for 'Nonpareil' and 4.0 log and 4.1 log for 'Mission' when enumerated on XLD and OV XLD, respectively. There was no significant difference in population estimates determined with XLD and OV XLD over time (P > 0.05). The effect of the steam treatment was significantly different between two almond cultivars. Salmonella inoculated onto 'Mission' was more resistant to the steam treatment than that on 'Nonpareil', indicating that varietal differences must be considered in the application of steam for the disinfection of raw almonds. The present investigation revealed the potential usefulness of steam treatments for the control of pathogens in raw almonds.

  8. A murine model to study the antibacterial effect of copper on infectivity of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharan, Riti; Chhibber, Sanjay; Reed, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of copper as an antibacterial agent on the infectivity of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Mice were infected orally with a standardized dose of unstressed Salmonella Typhimurium and copper-stressed cells of Salmonella Typhimurium. Bacterial counts in ileum, blood, liver and spleen were observed up to 168 h under normal aerobic conditions. Serum sensitivity, phagocytosis, malondialdehyde levels and histopathology were studied for both set of animals. A decreased bacterial count in the organs with mild symptoms of infection and a complete recovery by 48 h was observed in mice infected with copper-stressed bacteria. Histopathological examination of ileum tissue demonstrated regeneration of damaged tissue post-infection with copper-stressed bacteria and no malondialdehyde levels were detected after 24 h in ileum, spleen and liver. Exposure to copper sensitized Salmonella Typhimurium to the lytic action of serum and intracellular killing by peritoneal macrophages. It can be concluded that copper stress confers a decrease in the infectivity of healthy Salmonella Typhimurium in normal mice. This study highlights the significance of use of copper as an antibacterial agent against Salmonella Typhimurium in reducing the risk of incidence of Salmonella infections from contaminated water.

  9. A Murine Model to Study the Antibacterial Effect of Copper on Infectivity of Salmonella Enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H. Reed

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of copper as an antibacterial agent on the infectivity of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Mice were infected orally with a standardized dose of unstressed Salmonella Typhimurium and copper-stressed cells of Salmonella Typhimurium. Bacterial counts in ileum, blood, liver and spleen were observed up to 168 h under normal aerobic conditions. Serum sensitivity, phagocytosis, malondialdehyde levels and histopathology were studied for both set of animals. A decreased bacterial count in the organs with mild symptoms of infection and a complete recovery by 48 h was observed in mice infected with copper-stressed bacteria. Histopathological examination of ileum tissue demonstrated regeneration of damaged tissue post-infection with copper-stressed bacteria and no malondialdehyde levels were detected after 24 h in ileum, spleen and liver. Exposure to copper sensitized Salmonella Typhimurium to the lytic action of serum and intracellular killing by peritoneal macrophages. It can be concluded that copper stress confers a decrease in the infectivity of healthy Salmonella Typhimurium in normal mice. This study highlights the significance of use of copper as an antibacterial agent against Salmonella Typhimurium in reducing the risk of incidence of Salmonella infections from contaminated water.

  10. A comparison of transmission characteristics of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis between pair-housed and group-housed laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Ekelijn

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human cases of bacterial gastro-enteritis are often caused by the consumption of eggs contaminated with Salmonella species, mainly Salmonella enterica serovar Enteriditis (Salmonella Enteritidis. To reduce human exposure, in several countries worldwide surveillance programmes are implemented to detect colonized layer flocks. The sampling schemes are based on the within-flock prevalence, and, as this changes over time, knowledge of the within-flock dynamics of Salmonella Enteritidis is required. Transmission of Salmonella Enteritidis has been quantified in pairs of layers, but the question is whether the dynamics in pairs is comparable to transmission in large groups, which are more representative for commercial layer flocks. The aim of this study was to compare results of transmission experiments between pairs and groups of laying hens. Experimental groups of either 2 or 200 hens were housed at similar densities, and 1 or 4 hens were inoculated with Salmonella Enteritidis, respectively. Excretion was monitored by regularly testing of fecal samples for the presence of Salmonella Enteritidis. Using mathematical modeling, the group experiments were simulated with transmission parameter estimates from the pairwise experiments. Transmission of the bacteria did not differ significantly between pairs or groups. This finding suggests that the transmission parameter estimates from small-scale experiments might be extrapolated to the field situation.

  11. A comparison of transmission characteristics of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis between pair-housed and group-housed laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Ekelijn; Bouma, Annemarie; Klinkenberg, Don

    2011-02-23

    Human cases of bacterial gastro-enteritis are often caused by the consumption of eggs contaminated with Salmonella species, mainly Salmonella enterica serovar Enteriditis (Salmonella Enteritidis). To reduce human exposure, in several countries worldwide surveillance programmes are implemented to detect colonized layer flocks. The sampling schemes are based on the within-flock prevalence, and, as this changes over time, knowledge of the within-flock dynamics of Salmonella Enteritidis is required. Transmission of Salmonella Enteritidis has been quantified in pairs of layers, but the question is whether the dynamics in pairs is comparable to transmission in large groups, which are more representative for commercial layer flocks. The aim of this study was to compare results of transmission experiments between pairs and groups of laying hens. Experimental groups of either 2 or 200 hens were housed at similar densities, and 1 or 4 hens were inoculated with Salmonella Enteritidis, respectively. Excretion was monitored by regularly testing of fecal samples for the presence of Salmonella Enteritidis. Using mathematical modeling, the group experiments were simulated with transmission parameter estimates from the pairwise experiments. Transmission of the bacteria did not differ significantly between pairs or groups. This finding suggests that the transmission parameter estimates from small-scale experiments might be extrapolated to the field situation.

  12. Diversity and antimicrobial susceptibility of Salmonella enterica serovars isolated from pig farms in Ibadan, Nigeria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fashae, Kayode; Hendriksen, Rene S.

    2014-01-01

    reaction. The 229 Salmonella isolates were made of 50 serovars predominated by rare serovars Salmonella Give (n = 36; 15.7 %), Salmonella Brancaster (n = 17; 7.4 %), Salmonella Colindale (n = 15; 6.6 %), Salmonella Elisaberthville (n = 13; 5.7 %), Salmonella Hillingdon (n = 13; 5.7 %), and Salmonella...

  13. .Analysis of the contribution of bacteriophage ST64B to in vitro virulence traits of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero-Fresno, Ana; Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Hendriksen, Rene S; Olsen, John E; Aarestrup, Frank M

    2014-03-01

    Comparison of the publicly available genomes of the virulent Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) strains SL1344, 14028s and D23580 to that of the virulence-attenuated isolate LT2 revealed the absence of a full sequence of bacteriophage ST64B in the latter. Four selected ST64B regions of unknown function (sb7-sb11, sb46, sb49-sb50 and sb54) were mapped by PCR in two strain collections: (i) 310 isolates of S. Typhimurium from human blood or stool samples, and from food, animal and environmental reservoirs; and (ii) 90 isolates belonging to other serovars. The region sb49-sb50 was found to be unique to S. Typhimurium and was strongly associated with strains isolated from blood samples (100  and 28.4 % of the blood and non-blood isolates, respectively). The region was cloned into LT2 and knocked out in SL1344, and these strains were compared to wild-type isogenic strains in in vitro assays used to predict virulence association. No difference in invasion of the Int407 human cell line was observed between the wild-type and mutated strains, but the isolate carrying the whole ST64B prophage was found to have a slightly better survival in blood. The study showed a high prevalence and a strong association between the prophage ST64B and isolates of S. Typhimurium collected from blood, and may indicate that such strains constitute a selected subpopulation within this serovar. Further studies are indicated to determine whether the slight increase in blood survival observed in the strain carrying ST64B genes is of paramount importance for systemic infections.

  14. Characterization of tetracycline resistance in Salmonella enterica strains recovered from irrigation water in the Culiacan Valley, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo-Melchor, Yadira; Quiñones, Beatriz; Amézquita-López, Bianca A; León-Félix, Josefina; García-Estrada, Raymundo; Chaidez, Cristóbal

    2010-09-01

    The increase of Salmonella enterica strains showing resistance against antibiotics has resulted in limiting the effective treatment of human infections. The present study characterized the resistance to tetracycline in S. enterica serovar Typhimurium strains, recovered from irrigation water in distinct regions in the Culiacan Valley, an important agricultural region in Mexico for horticultural crops that are exported to the United States. Analysis of the genomic diversity by pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing showed that the Salmonella Typhimurium strains were grouped into four distinct genotypic clusters, indicating genomic diversity among 12 strains examined. The polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing analysis demonstrated that the tet(A) gene was found on the genomic DNA and was located within a truncated version of transposon Tn1721. The comparative analysis of the tet(A) gene sequence in Salmonella Typhimurium strains identified high sequence similarity to the tet determinant of plasmid RP1, which is homologous to the tet gene in Tn1721. The findings show the presence of tet(A) among the tetracycline-resistant Salmonella Typhimurium strains isolated from irrigation water used for growing fresh fruits and vegetables.

  15. Pseudogene accumulation in the evolutionary histories of Salmonella enterica serovars Paratyphi A and Typhi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    White Brian

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Of the > 2000 serovars of Salmonella enterica subspecies I, most cause self-limiting gastrointestinal disease in a wide range of mammalian hosts. However, S. enterica serovars Typhi and Paratyphi A are restricted to the human host and cause the similar systemic diseases typhoid and paratyphoid fever. Genome sequence similarity between Paratyphi A and Typhi has been attributed to convergent evolution via relatively recent recombination of a quarter of their genomes. The accumulation of pseudogenes is a key feature of these and other host-adapted pathogens, and overlapping pseudogene complements are evident in Paratyphi A and Typhi. Results We report the 4.5 Mbp genome of a clinical isolate of Paratyphi A, strain AKU_12601, completely sequenced using capillary techniques and subsequently checked using Illumina/Solexa resequencing. Comparison with the published genome of Paratyphi A ATCC9150 revealed the two are collinear and highly similar, with 188 single nucleotide polymorphisms and 39 insertions/deletions. A comparative analysis of pseudogene complements of these and two finished Typhi genomes (CT18, Ty2 identified several pseudogenes that had been overlooked in prior genome annotations of one or both serovars, and identified 66 pseudogenes shared between serovars. By determining whether each shared and serovar-specific pseudogene had been recombined between Paratyphi A and Typhi, we found evidence that most pseudogenes have accumulated after the recombination between serovars. We also divided pseudogenes into relative-time groups: ancestral pseudogenes inherited from a common ancestor, pseudogenes recombined between serovars which likely arose between initial divergence and later recombination, serovar-specific pseudogenes arising after recombination but prior to the last evolutionary bottlenecks in each population, and more recent strain-specific pseudogenes. Conclusion Recombination and pseudogene-formation have been

  16. Antibiotic resistances in Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica isolated from foods with animal origin Resistencias a antibióticos en Listeria monocytogenes y Salmonella enterica aislados de alimentos de origen animal

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    Baltasar Balsalobre Hernández

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Extensive use of antibiotics in both human and animal health and in cattle production has generated resistant microorganisms to common antibiotics. Resistances spread caused by human and animal therapeutic is well known, but we know poorly frecuency of resistant bacteria in foods with animal origin and destinated to human consumers. In this paper, sensitivity to nineteen antibiotics was investigated in Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica strains isolated from foods with animal origin, including fresh meat, hamburgers, fresh sausages, boiled ham and new-laid chicken eggs. The plate diffusion method of Bauer-Kirby was used.Listeria monocytogenes strains showed a very high sensitivity to all antibiotics checked, with the exception of one strain tetracycline resistant. In contrast, Salmonella enterica showed a high frecuency of resistances, in special to tetracycline, streptomycin, nalidixic acid, ticarcillin, ampicillin and chloramphenicol. Moreover, multi-resistance was a common phenomenon. Twenty percent of S. enterica strains were resistant to four or more antibiotics. Frecuency of resistances was higher in 4,5,12:i:-, Hadar, Typhimurium and Virchow serotypes.In conclusion, Salmonella enterica strains isolated from foods with animal origin and destinated to human consumers are usually resistant to several antibiotics. The significance of this observation and its potential health risk must be investigated.El uso extensivo de antibióticos para la salud humana y animal así como para mejorar la producción ganadera ha generado un gran número de cepas microbianas resistentes a antibióticos de uso común. Es bien conocida la difusión de resistencias a través de la terapéutica humana y animal, pero desconocemos en qué medida los alimentos de origen animal destinados a consumo humano son portadores de resistencias.En este trabajo, se investigó la sensibilidad a diecinueve antibióticos de cepas de Listeria monocytogenes y Salmonella

  17. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Escherichia coli contamination of root and leaf vegetables grown in soils with incorporated bovine manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natvig, Erin E; Ingham, Steven C; Ingham, Barbara H; Cooperband, Leslie R; Roper, Teryl R

    2002-06-01

    Bovine manure, with or without added Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (three strains), was incorporated into silty clay loam (SCL) and loamy sand (LS) soil beds (53- by 114-cm surface area, 17.5 cm deep) and maintained in two controlled-environment chambers. The S. enterica serovar Typhimurium inoculum was 4 to 5 log CFU/g in manure-fertilized soil. The conditions in the two environmental chambers, each containing inoculated and uninoculated beds of manure-fertilized soil, simulated daily average Madison, Wis., weather conditions (hourly temperatures, rainfall, daylight, and humidity) for a 1 March or a 1 June manure application and subsequent vegetable growing seasons ending 9 August or 28 September, respectively. Core soil samples were taken biweekly from both inoculated and uninoculated soil beds in each chamber. Radishes, arugula, and carrots were planted in soil beds, thinned, and harvested. Soils, thinned vegetables, and harvested vegetables were analyzed for S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and Escherichia coli (indigenous in manure). After the 1 March manure application, S. enterica serovar Typhimurium was detected at low levels in both soils on 31 May, but not on vegetables planted 1 May and harvested 12 July from either soil. After the 1 June manure application, S. enterica serovar Typhimurium was detected in SCL soil on 7 September and on radishes and arugula planted in SCL soil on 15 August and harvested on 27 September. In LS soil, S. enterica serovar Typhimurium died at a similar rate (P >or= 0.05) after the 1 June manure application and was less often detected on arugula and radishes harvested from this soil compared to the SCL soil. Pathogen levels on vegetables were decreased by washing. Manure application in cool (daily average maximum temperature of 20 degrees C) summer conditions is not recommended when vegetable planting is done between the time of manure application and late summer. A late fall manure application will not increase the

  18. Prevalence of Salmonella Isolates from Chicken and Pig Slaughterhouses and Emergence of Ciprofloxacin and Cefotaxime Co-Resistant S. enterica Serovar Indiana in Henan, China.

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    Li Bai

    Full Text Available The prevalence of Salmonella from chicken and pig slaughterhouses in Henan, China and antimicrobial susceptibility of these isolates to antibiotics was determined. From 283 chicken samples and 240 pig samples collected, 128 and 70 Salmonella isolates were recovered with an isolation rate of 45.2 and 29.2% respectively. The predominant serovars in chicken samples were S. enterica serovar Enteritidis, S. enterica serovar Hadar and S. enterica serovar Indiana, while those in pig samples were S. enterica serovar Typhimurium, S. enterica serovar Derby and S. enterica serovar Enteritidis. Resistance to ciprofloxacin was 8.6 and 10.0% for isolates from chickens and pigs respectively, whereas resistance to cefotaxime was 5.5 and 8.6%, respectively. Multidrug resistance (resistance to three or more classes of antimicrobial agent was markedly higher in pig isolates (57.1% than in chicken isolates (39.8%. Of particular concern was the detection of ciprofloxacin and cefotaxime co-resistant S. enterica serovar Indiana isolates, which pose risk to public health. All 16 S. enterica serovar Indiana isolates detected were resistant to ciprofloxacin, among which 11 were co-resistant to cefotaxime. The S. enterica serovar Indiana isolates accumulated point mutations in quinolone resistance determination regions of gyrA (S83F/D87G or S83F/D87N and parC (T57S/S80R. Two plasmid mediated quinolone resistant determinants were found with aac (6'-Ib-cr and oqxAB in 16 and 12 S. enterica serovar Indiana isolates respectively. Cefotaxime-resistance of S. enterica serovar Indiana was associated with the acquisition of a blaCTX-M-65 gene. The potential risk of ciprofloxacin and cefotaxime co-resistant S. enterica serovar Indiana infection is a significant concern due to limited alternative treatment options. Reduction of Salmonella in chicken and pig slaughterhouses, in particular, ciprofloxacin and cefotaxime co-resistant S. enterica serovar Indiana will be an important

  19. Polyamines are essential for virulence in Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum despite evolutionary decay of polyamine biosynthesis genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroll, Casper; Christensen, Jens P.; Christensen, Henrik;

    2014-01-01

    Serovars of Salmonella enterica exhibit different host-specificities where some have broad host-ranges and others, like S. Gallinarum and S. Typhi, are host-specific for poultry and humans, respectively. With the recent availability of whole genome sequences it has been reported that host...... to putrescine. The first pathway is not active in S. Gallinarum and S. Typhi, and this prompted us to investigate the importance of polyamines for virulence in S. Gallinarum. Bioinformatic analysis of all sequenced genomes of Salmonella revealed that pseudogene formation of the speC gene was exclusive for S......-specificity coincides with accumulation of pseudogenes, indicating adaptation of host-restricted serovars to their narrow niches. Polyamines are small cationic amines and in Salmonella they can be synthesized through two alternative pathways directly from l-ornithine to putrescine and from l-arginine via agmatine...

  20. Detection of Salmonella enterica in Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus) of Chilean Patagonia: evidences of inter-species transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougnac, C; Pardo, C; Meza, K; Arredondo, C; Blank, O; Abalos, P; Vidal, R; Fernandez, A; Fredes, F; Retamal, P

    2015-04-01

    Patagonia in southern South America is among the few world regions where direct human impact is still limited but progressively increasing, mainly represented by tourism, farming, fishing and mining activities. The sanitary condition of Patagonian wildlife is unknown, in spite of being critical for the assessment of anthropogenic effects there. The aim of this study was the characterization of Salmonella enterica strains isolated from wild colonies of Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus) located in Magdalena Island and Otway Sound, in Chilean Patagonia. Eight isolates of Salmonella were found, belonging to Agona and Enteritidis serotypes, with an infection rate of 0·38%. Resistance to ampicillin, cefotaxime, ceftiofur and tetracycline antimicrobials were detected, and some of these strains showed genotypic similarity with Salmonella strains isolated from humans and gulls, suggesting inter-species transmission cycles and strengthening the role of penguins as sanitary sentinels in the Patagonian ecosystem.

  1. Reduction of Salmonella enterica on the surface of eggshells by sequential treatment with aqueous chlorine dioxide and drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seonyeong; Park, Sunhyung; Kim, Yoonsook; Kim, Byeong-sam; Beuchat, Larry R; Hoikyung, Kim; Ryu, Jee-Hoon

    2015-10-01

    The synergistic effects of sequential treatments with chlorine dioxide (ClO2) and drying in killing Salmonella enterica on the surface of chicken eggshells were investigated. Initial experiments were focused on comparing lethalities of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and ClO2. Eggs surface-inoculated with S. enterica in chicken feces as a carrier were immersed in water, NaOCl (50 or 200 μg/mL), or ClO2 (50 or 200 μg/mL) for 1 or 5 min. For 1-min treatments, lethal activities of sanitizers were not significantly different (P>0.05). However, after treatment with ClO2 for 5 min, reductions of S. enterica were significantly greater (P≤0.05) than reductions after treatment with water or NaOCl. The effect of treatment of eggs with ClO2 or NaOCl, followed by drying at 43% relative humidity and 25 °C for 24 and 48 h, were determined. Populations of S. enterica decreased during drying, regardless of the type of sanitizer treatment. ClO2 treatment, compared to water or NaOCl treatments, resulted in additional reductions of ca. >1.3 log CFU/egg during drying. This indicates that sequential treatments with ClO2 and drying induced synergistic lethal effects against S. enterica on the surface of eggshells. These observations will be useful when selecting a sanitizer to control S. enterica on the surface of eggshells and designing an effective egg sanitization system exploiting the synergistic lethal effects of sanitizer and drying.

  2. Modeling the fate of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica in the agricultural environment: current perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongeng, Duncan; Haberbeck, Leticia U; Mauriello, Gianluigi; Ryckeboer, Jaak; Springael, Dirk; Geeraerd, Annemie H

    2014-04-01

    The significance of fresh vegetable consumption on human nutrition and health is well recognized. Human infections with Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica linked to fresh vegetable consumption have become a serious public health problem inflicting a heavy economic burden. The use of contaminated livestock wastes such as manure and manure slurry in crop production is believed to be one of the principal routes of fresh vegetable contamination with E. coli O157:H7 and S. enterica at preharvest stage because both ruminant and nonruminant livestock are known carriers of E. coli O157:H7 and S. enterica in the environment. A number of challenge-testing studies have examined the fate of E. coli O157:H7 and S. enterica in the agricultural environment with the view of designing strategies for controlling vegetable contamination preharvest. In this review, we examined the mathematical modeling approaches that have been used to study the behavior of E. coli O157:H7 and S. enterica in the manure, manure-amended soil, and in manure-amended soil-plant ecosystem during cultivation of fresh vegetable crops. We focused on how the models have been applied to fit survivor curves, predict survival, and assess the risk of vegetable contamination preharvest. The inadequacies of the current modeling approaches are discussed and suggestions for improvements to enhance the applicability of the models as decision tools to control E. coli O157:H7 and S. enterica contamination of fresh vegetables during primary production are presented.

  3. Antibacterial activity of honey against clinical isolates of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shyamapada Mandal; Manisha DebMandal; Nishith Kumar Pal; Krishnendu Saha

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain the potential antibacterial activity of honey against clinical isolates ofEscherichia coli (E. coli), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. enterica serovar Typhi) by in vitro methods. Methods: The partial inhibitory concentration (PIC), minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) values of the autoclaved honey (extracted from Apis indica hive by indigenous method) were determined for S. enterica serovar Typhi (n=8; from blood cultute),E. coli (n=5; from urine culture) and P. aeruginosa (n=5; from pus culture) isolates by in vitro methods. Results: The PICs of the honey tested for the isolates ranged 0.50%-1.25 % (v/v) for S. enterica serovar Typhi, 0.75%-1.50% (v/v) for E. coli and 1.00%-1.25 % (v/v) for P. aeruginosa, while the MICs ranged 1.75%-3.00% (v/v), 3.00%-3.50% (v/v) and 3.50% (v/v), respectively. The P. aeruginosa and E. coli isolates had MBC value of 4.00% (v/v); the S. enterica serovar Typhi showed MBCs in between 3.00% and 3.50% (v/v). The bactericidal activity of honey was achieved at concentration 3.00% (v/v) for S. enterica serovar Typhi and E. coli, and at 3.50% (v/v) for P. aeruginosa. Conclusions: The excellent antibacterial activity of honey against clinical bacterial isolates indicates the usefulness of honey in clinical practice against bacterial infection.

  4. Adaptive Resistance and Differential Protein Expression of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Biofilms Exposed to Benzalkonium Chloride▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangalappalli-Illathu, Anil K.; Korber, Darren R.

    2006-01-01

    The development of adaptive resistance of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis ATCC 4931 biofilms following exposure to benzalkonium chloride (BC) either continuously (1 μg ml−1) or intermittently (10 μg ml−1 for 10 min daily) was examined. Biofilms adapted to BC over a 144-h period could survive a normally lethal BC challenge (500 μg ml−1 for 10 min) and then regrow, as determined by increases in biofilm thickness, total biomass, and the ratio of the viable biomass to the nonviable biomass. Exposure of untreated control biofilms to the lethal BC challenge resulted in biofilm erosion and cell death. Proteins found to be up-regulated following BC adaptation were those involved in energy metabolism (TpiA and Eno), amino acid and protein biosynthesis (WrbA, TrxA, RplL, Tsf, Tuf, DsbA, and RpoZ), nutrient binding (FruB), adaptation (CspA), detoxification (Tpx, SodB, and a probable peroxidase), and degradation of 1,2-propanediol (PduJ and PduA). A putative universal stress protein (YnaF) was also found to be up-regulated. Proteins involved in proteolysis (DegQ), cell envelope formation (RfbH), adaptation (UspA), heat shock response (DnaK), and broad regulatory functions (Hns) were found to be down-regulated following adaptation. An overall increase in cellular protein biosynthesis was deduced from the significant up-regulation of ribosomal subunit proteins, translation elongation factors, and amino acid biosynthesis protein and down-regulation of serine endoprotease. The cold shock response, stress response, and detoxification are suggested to play roles in the adaptive resistance of Salmonella serovar Enteritidis biofilms to BC. PMID:16940079

  5. Role in virulence and protective efficacy in pigs of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium secreted components identified by signature-tagged mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnell, Sonya C; Bowen, Alison; Morgan, Eirwen; Maskell, Duncan J; Wallis, Timothy S; Stevens, Mark P

    2007-06-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is a zoonotic enteric pathogen of worldwide importance and pigs are a significant reservoir of human infection. Signature-tagged transposon mutagenesis (STM) was used to identify genes required by S. Typhimurium to colonize porcine intestines. A library of 1045 signature-tagged mutants of S. Typhimurium ST4/74 Nal(R) was screened following oral inoculation of pigs in duplicate. A total of 119 attenuating mutations were identified in 95 different genes, many of which encode known or putative secreted or surface-anchored molecules. A large number of attenuating mutations were located within Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPI)-1 and -2, confirming important roles for type III secretion systems (T3SS)-1 and -2 in intestinal colonization of pigs. Roles for genes encoded in other pathogenicity islands and islets, including the SPI-6-encoded Saf atypical fimbriae, were also identified. Given the role of secreted factors and the protection conferred against other pathogens by vaccination with extracellular and type III secreted proteins, the efficacy of a secreted protein vaccine from wild-type S. Typhimurium following intramuscular vaccination of pigs was evaluated. Serum IgG responses against type III secreted proteins were induced following vaccination and a significant reduction in faecal excretion of S. Typhimurium was observed in the acute phase of infection compared to mock-vaccinated animals. Vaccination with secreted proteins from an isogenic S. Typhimurium prgH mutant produced comparable levels of protection to vaccination with the preparation from the parent strain, indicating that protection was not reliant on T3SS-1 secreted proteins. The data provide valuable information for the control of Salmonella in pigs.

  6. Isolation of Salmonella enterica and serologic reactivity to Leptospira interrogans in opossums (Didelphis virginiana from Yucatán, México Aislamiento de Salmonella enterica y reactividad serológica a Leptospira interrogans en tlacuaches (Didelphis virginiana de Yucatán, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Antonio RUIZ-PIÑA

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The presence of Salmonella enterica and serologic evidence of infection by Leptospira interrogans, were detected in the opossum Didelphis virginiana in a semi-urban locality of the Yucatán State, México. Ninety-one opossums were captured during the period April 1996 and May 1998. From a total of 17 feces samples, four Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotypes (Sandiego, Newport, Anatum, and Minnesota, and one Salmonella enterica subsp. arizonae serovar O44:Z4,Z23:- were isolated. Some opossums presented mixed infections. From 81 sera samples, four (4.9% were positive to antibodies to Leptospira serovars pomona and wolfii. Both animals infected with Salmonella enterica and those serologically positive to Leptospira interrogans were captured in peridomestic habitat. Opossums infected with Salmonella enterica, were captured in dry season, and those seropositive to Leptospira interrogans during the rainy season. The implications of infection and reactivity of these zoonotic pathogens in D. virginiana in the Yucatan state are briefly discussed.La presencia de Salmonella enterica y evidencia serológica de infección por Leptospira interrogans fueron detectadas en tlacuaches de la especie Didelphis virginiana capturados en una localidad semi-urbana del estado de Yucatán, México. Se capturaron 91 marsupiales durante el período de abril de 1996 a mayo de 1998. De un total de 17 muestras de heces, se aislaron cuatro serotipos de Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica (Sandiego, Newport, Anatum y Minnesota y una Salmonella enterica subsp. arizonae serovar O44:Z4,Z23:-. En algunos tlacuaches se registraron infecciones mixtas. De 81 muestras de suero, cuatro (4,9% presentaron reacciones positivas con los serovares pomona y wolffi, ambos pertenecientes al género Leptospira. Los tlacuaches con serología positiva fueron capturados en el hábitat peridomiciliar. Los animales infectados con Salmonella enterica fueron capturados en los períodos de seca y

  7. Iranian clonal population of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis, char- acterized by multi-locus sequence typing (MLST method

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    Rainak Ghaderi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Some 2 million tons of chicken meat is produced by Iran per annum, positioning Iran among the top producers in the region. This study aimed to evaluate the molecular epidemiology and genetic characteristics of Sal- monella enterica Enteritidis in Iran.Materials and Methods: A representative selection of isolates (n=76, initially genotyped by a 7-locus MLVA typing sys- tem, was examined by the standard MLST genotyping.Results and Conclusion: All the MLVA typed isolates, classified into six types, were gathered under a single ST11 MLST type. This is an intriguing observation as much more genome heterogeneity was expected considering the extent of diversity in the host and geography origin of the examined isolates. ST11, on the other hand is not exclusively found in Iran as it is reported also from Brazil, Denmark, Japan and the United States. In explanation of these observations, ST11 might stand for a single probably ancestral clone of Salmonella enterica Enteritidis successfully scattered in all these geographically diverse countries. Further global investigation covering more isolates and methods like whole genome sequencing would be advisable. Keywords: Salmonella enterica Enteritidis, MLST, MLVA, Genetic diversity

  8. Differences in the early response of hatchlings of different chicken breeding lines to Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schokker, D; Peters, T H F; Hoekman, A J W; Rebel, J M J; Smits, M A

    2012-02-01

    Poultry products are the major source of food-borne Salmonella infection in humans. Broiler lines selected to be more resistant to Salmonella could reduce the transfer of Salmonella to humans. To investigate differences in the susceptibility of newly hatched chicks to oral infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis, 3 commercial broiler lines (A, B, and C) were infected immediately after hatch and compared to healthy controls at 0.33, 1, and 2 d postinfection. Weight, bacteriological examination, and the jejunal influx of CD4, CD8, TCRαβ, TCRγδ, and KUL01 (macrophages and dendritic cells) cells that are positive was investigated. In addition, the jejunal transcriptional response was analyzed using whole-genome chicken cDNA arrays. Salmonella colony-forming unit counts from cecal content and liver revealed that Salmonella enterica entered the body at 0.33 d postinfection. Broiler line A appeared most susceptible to intestinal colonization and the systemic spread of Salmonella. In addition, the Salmonella-induced jejunal influx of macrophages in this line showed a clear increase in time, which is in contrast to lines B and C. On the other hand, all lines showed a peak of CD4(+) cells at 1 d postinfection when infected chicks were compared to control chicks. The transcriptional response of line A clearly differed from the responses in lines B and C. Functional analysis indicated that the majority of the differentially expressed genes at 0.33 d postinfection in line A were involved in cell-cycle functions, whereas at 2 d postinfection the majority of the differentially expressed genes could be assigned to inflammatory disorder, differentiation and proliferation of (T) lymphocytes. These data indicate that hatchlings of different broiler lines differ in their systemic spread of Salmonella and suggest that intestinal barrier functions, as well as immunological responses, may be the underlying factors. We hypothesize that the differences between genetic

  9. Effects of nitrogen and potassium fertilization on the susceptibility of tomatoes to post-harvest proliferation of Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvasi, Massimiliano; George, Andrée S; Giurcanu, Mihai; Hochmuth, George J; Noel, Jason T; Gause, Elizabeth; Teplitski, Max

    2014-10-01

    Fresh fruits and vegetables are increasingly recognized as vehicles of salmonellosis. Pre- and post-harvest environmental conditions, and physiological, and genetic factors are thought to contribute to the ability of human pathogens to persist in the production environment, attach to, colonize and proliferate in and on raw produce. How field production conditions affect the post-harvest food safety outcomes is not entirely understood. This study tested how varying nitrogen and potassium fertilization levels affected the "susceptibility" of tomatoes to Salmonella infections following the harvest of fruits. Two tomato varieties grown over three seasons under high, medium, and low levels of nitrogen and potassium fertilization in two locations were inoculated with seven strains of Salmonella. Even though the main effects of nitrogen and potassium fertilization on the susceptibility of tomatoes to infections with Salmonella enterica were not statistically significant overall, differences in nitrogen concentrations in plant tissues correlated with the susceptibility of partially ripe tomatoes (cv. Solar Fire) to Salmonella. Tomato maturity and the season in which tomatoes were produced had the strongest effect on the ability of Salmonella to multiply in tomatoes. Tomato phenolics, accumulation of which is known to correlate with rates of the N fertilization, did not inhibit growth of Salmonella in vitro.

  10. Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis enterocolitis during late stages of gestation induces an adverse pregnancy outcome in the murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariángeles Noto Llana

    Full Text Available Foodborne diseases caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis are a significant health problem. Pregnancy, state of immunological tolerance, is a predisposing condition for the development of infections with intracellular pathogens. Salmonella species can cause pregnancy complications such as chorioamnionitis, transplacental fetal infection, pre term labor, abortions, neonatal and maternal septicemia. However, the specific mechanisms by which Salmonella infections trigger these alterations are not clear. In the present work, using a self-limiting enterocolitis murine model, we show that the ingestion of a low dose of S. Enteritidis at late stages of pregnancy (day 15 of gestation is sufficient to induce massive maternal infection. We found that Salmonella infection leads to 40% of pre term delivery, 33% of abortion and fetal growth restriction. Placental dysfunction during S. Enteritidis enterocolitis was confirmed through cellular infiltration and hypoxia markers (MPO activity and COX-1 and COX-2 expression, respectively. Apoptosis in placental tissue due to Salmonella infection was also evident at day 18 of gestation when investigated by morphometric procedure, DNA fragmentation and Fas/FasL expression. Also, the expression of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-17 and IL-10 was up regulated in response to Salmonella not only in placenta, but also in amniotic fluid and maternal serum. Altogether, our results demonstrate that S. Enteritidis enterocolitis during late stages of gestation causes detrimental effect on pregnancy outcome.

  11. Sequence variation of the 16S to 23S rRNA spacer region in Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, H; Møller, P L; Vogensen, F K; Olsen, J E

    2000-01-01

    The possibility for identification of Salmonella enterica serotypes by sequence analysis of the 16S to 23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer was investigated by direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction-amplified DNA from all operons simultaneously in a collection of 25 strains of 18 different serotypes of S. enterica, and by sequencing individual cloned operons from a single strain. It was only possible to determine the first 117 bases upstream from the 23S rRNA gene by direct sequencing because of variation between the rrn operons. Comparison of sequences from this region allowed separation of only 15 out of the 18 serotypes investigated and was not specific even at the subspecies level of S. enterica. To determine the differences between internal transcribed spacers in more detail, the individual rrn operons of strain JEO 197, serotype IV 43:z4,z23:-, were cloned and sequenced. The strain contained four short internal transcribed spacer fragments of 382-384 bases in length, which were 98.4-99.7% similar to each other and three long fragments of 505 bases with 98.0-99.8% similarity. The study demonstrated a higher degree of interbacterial variation than intrabacterial variation between operons for serotypes of S. enterica.

  12. SOS System Induction Inhibits the Assembly of Chemoreceptor Signaling Clusters in Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irazoki, Oihane; Mayola, Albert; Campoy, Susana; Barbé, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Swarming, a flagellar-driven multicellular form of motility, is associated with bacterial virulence and increased antibiotic resistance. In this work we demonstrate that activation of the SOS response reversibly inhibits swarming motility by preventing the assembly of chemoreceptor-signaling polar arrays. We also show that an increase in the concentration of the RecA protein, generated by SOS system activation, rather than another function of this genetic network impairs chemoreceptor polar cluster formation. Our data provide evidence that the molecular balance between RecA and CheW proteins is crucial to allow polar cluster formation in Salmonella enterica cells. Thus, activation of the SOS response by the presence of a DNA-injuring compound increases the RecA concentration, thereby disturbing the equilibrium between RecA and CheW and resulting in the cessation of swarming. Nevertheless, when the DNA-damage decreases and the SOS response is no longer activated, basal RecA levels and thus polar cluster assembly are reestablished. These results clearly show that bacterial populations moving over surfaces make use of specific mechanisms to avoid contact with DNA-damaging compounds.

  13. Antagonistic activity of Lactobacillus acidophilus LA10 against Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis SE86 in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Scapin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is one of the main pathogens responsible for foodborne illness in Brazil. Probiotic bacteria can play a role in defense and recovery from enteropathogenic -infections. In this study, the ability of Lactobacillus acidophilus LA10 to colonise and exert anta-gonistic effects in the gastrointestinal tract was tested before and during experimental infection in conventional mice contaminated with S. Enteritidis (SE86. A dose of 0.1 mL containing 10(8 viable cells of SE86 and L. acidophilus LA10 was orally administered by gavage to mice. The experiment was divided into groups. As a negative control, Group 1 was administered only sterile saline solution. As a positive control, Group 2 was administered only SE86. Group 3 was first administered SE86, and after 10 days, treated with L. acidophilus LA10. Group 4 was first administered L. acidophilus LA10,and after 10 days, challenged with SE86.The results demonstrated that a significant number of SE86 cells were able to colonize the gastrointestinal tract of mice, specifically in the colon and ileum. L. acidophilus LA10 demonstrated an antagonistic effect against SE86, with better results observed for Group 3 over Group 4. Thus, L. acidophilus LA10 shows potential antagonistic effects against S. Enteritidis SE86, especially if administered after infection.

  14. Immunological evaluation of Vi capsular polysaccharide of Salmonella enterica subsp. Typhi vaccine by serum bactericidal assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, H; Tabaraie, B; Maleknia, S; Shapouri, R; Nejati, M; Pour Mirza Gholi, F; Hedayati, M; Sadati, M; Zahednia, S; Sharifat Salmani, A

    2013-02-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. Typhi (S. Typhi) Vi antigen capsular polysaccharide (Vi-CPS) is a licensed vaccine against typhoid fever. As there is no animal model for S. Typhi fever to evaluate the protective efficacy of the Vi-CPS vaccine, a serum bactericidal assay (SBA) is the recommended 'gold standard' to evaluate its potency. Vi-CPS was extracted from S. Typhi Ty6S (CSBPI-B191) using a modified Gotschlich method. Purified Vi-CPS (50 µg) was injected intramuscularly into three groups of five rabbits; group 2 received an additional booster dose of 50 µg Vi-CPS on day 15 and group 3 received two additional boosters on days 15 and 30. The sera obtained from each group were tested by SBA on days 0, 15, 30 and 45. The anti-Vi-CPS titres for groups 1, 2 and 3 on days 15, 30 and 45 were 4, 16 and 16; 4, 32 and 32; and 16, 64 and 64, respectively. Thus, Vi-CPS was shown to be a potent immunogen, as even one dose could induce an efficient bactericidal effect against S. Typhi. Although Vi-CPS is a reliable vaccine, sometimes depolymerization during purification can affect its potency, which can be resolved through a potency test. As the passive haemagglutination test recommended by the World Health Organization does not indicate vaccine potency, we recommend using an SBA to evaluate the bactericidal ability of Vi-CPS.

  15. Inactivation of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium on fresh produce by cold atmospheric gas plasma technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, A; Noriega, E; Thompson, A

    2013-02-01

    Cold atmospheric gas plasma treatment (CAP) is an alternative approach for the decontamination of fresh and minimally processed food. In this study, the effects of growth phase, growth temperature and chemical treatment regime on the inactivation of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) by Nitrogen CAP were examined. Furthermore, the efficacy of CAP treatment for decontaminating lettuce and strawberry surfaces and potato tissue inoculated with S. Typhimurium was evaluated. It was found that the rate of inactivation of S. Typhimurium was independent of the growth phase, growth temperature and chemical treatment regime. Under optimal conditions, a 2 min treatment resulted in a 2.71 log-reduction of S. Typhimurium viability on membrane filters whereas a 15 min treatment was necessary to achieve 2.72, 1.76 and 0.94 log-reductions of viability on lettuce, strawberry and potato, respectively. We suggest that the differing efficiency of CAP treatment on the inactivation of S. Typhimurium on these different types of fresh foods is a consequence of their surface features. Scanning electron microscopy of the surface structures of contaminated samples of lettuce, strawberry and potato revealed topographical features whereby S. Typhimurium cells could be protected from the active species generated by plasma.

  16. Regulation and production of Tcf, a cable-like fimbriae from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclerc, Jean-Mathieu; Quevillon, Eve-Lyne; Houde, Yoan; Paranjape, Kiran; Dozois, Charles M; Daigle, France

    2016-05-01

    tcf (Typhi colonization factor) is one of the 12 putative chaperone/usher fimbrial clusters present in the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi genome. We investigated the production, expression and regulation of tcf as well as its role during interaction with human cells. The tcf gene cluster was cloned and induced in Escherichia coli and S. Typhi, and the production of intertwined fibres similar to the Cbl (cable) pili of Burkholderia cepacia was observed on the bacterial surface by electron microscopy. In S. Typhi, tcf was expressed more after growth in M63 minimal medium than in standard Luria-Bertani medium. Analysis of the promoter region identified putative binding sites for the global regulators RcsB, ArgR and Fur. The expression of tcf was measured in isogenic strains lacking these global regulators. Under the conditions tested, the results showed that tcf expression was higher in the fur mutant and was regulated by iron concentration. Fur may regulate these fimbriae indirectly via the small RNAs RyhB1 and RyhB2. An isogenic mutant harbouring a deletion of the tcf cluster did not demonstrate any defect in adhesion or invasion of human epithelial cells, or in phagocytosis or survival in macrophages, when compared to the WT serovar Typhi strain. However, the tcf cluster contributed to adherence to human epithelial cells when introduced into E. coli. Thus, tcf genes encode functional fimbriae that can act as an adhesin and may contribute to colonization during typhoid fever.

  17. Biofilm formation ability of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium acrAB mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlisselberg, Dov B; Kler, Edna; Kisluk, Guy; Shachar, Dina; Yaron, Sima

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies offer contradictory findings about the role of multidrug efflux pumps in bacterial biofilm development. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of the AcrAB efflux pump in biofilm formation by investigating the ability of AcrB and AcrAB null mutants of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to produce biofilms. Three models were used to compare the ability of S. Typhimurium wild-type and its mutants to form biofilms: formation of biofilm on polystyrene surfaces; production of biofilm (mat model) on the air/liquid interface; and expression of curli and cellulose on Congo red-supplemented agar plates. All three investigated genotypes formed biofilms with similar characteristics. However, upon exposure to chloramphenicol, formation of biofilms on solid surfaces as well as the production of curli were either reduced or were delayed more significantly in both mutants, whilst there was no visible effect on pellicle formation. It can be concluded that when no selective pressure is applied, S. Typhimurium is able to produce biofilms even when the AcrAB efflux pumps are inactivated, implying that the use of efflux pump inhibitors to prevent biofilm formation is not a general solution and that combined treatments might be more efficient. Other factors that affect the ability to produce biofilms depending on efflux pump activity are yet to be identified.

  18. Genomic Variability of Serial Human Isolates of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Associated with Prolonged Carriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Octavia, Sophie; Wang, Qinning; Tanaka, Mark M; Sintchenko, Vitali; Lan, Ruiting

    2015-11-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is an important foodborne human pathogen that often causes self-limiting but severe gastroenteritis. Prolonged excretion of S. Typhimurium after the infection can lead to secondary transmissions. However, little is known about within-host genomic variation in bacteria associated with asymptomatic shedding. Genomes of 35 longitudinal isolates of S. Typhimurium recovered from 11 patients (children and adults) with culture-confirmed gastroenteritis were sequenced. There were three or four isolates obtained from each patient. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were analyzed in these isolates, which were recovered between 1 and 279 days after the initial diagnosis. Limited genomic variation (5 SNPs or fewer) was associated with short- and long-term carriage of S. Typhimurium. None of the isolates was shown to be due to reinfection. SNPs occurred randomly, and the majority of the SNPs were nonsynonymous. Two nonsense mutations were observed. A nonsense mutation in flhC rendered the isolate nonmotile, whereas the significance of a nonsense mutation in yihV is unknown. The estimated mutation rate is 1.49 × 10(-6) substitution per site per year. S. Typhimurium isolates excreted in stools following acute gastroenteritis in children and adults demonstrated limited genomic variability over time, regardless of the duration of carriage. These findings have important implications for the detection of possible transmission events suspected by public health genomic surveillance of S. Typhimurium infections.

  19. SufC may promote the survival of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min; Qi, Lin; Xiao, Yan; Wang, Min; Qin, Chenhao; Zhang, Haifang; Sheng, Yongmei; Du, Hong

    2015-08-01

    The sufC gene of Escherichia coli (E. coli) is required for the biogenesis of iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster under oxidative stress conditions. In order to investigate the roles of sufC in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi), isogenic S. Typhi strain GIFU10007 harboring a non-polar mutation of sufC (ΔsufC) was constructed and the results showed that the sufC deleted mutant grew more slowly than the wild type strain when encounter oxidative stresses. Moreover, the deletion of sufC gene decreased S. Typhi survival within macrophages. After macrophages infected by sufC deleted mutant and wild type strain, we detected IL-6 and TNF-α released into the supernatant, and found the expression of IL-6 and TNF-α decreased in the supernatant of sufC deleted mutant infected groups than the wild type strain infected ones. In summary, our results showed that SufC may promote S. Typhi coping oxidative stress and help S. Typhi survival in macrophages.

  20. Antimicrobial resistance in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi isolates from Bangladesh, Indonesia, Taiwan, and Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Chien-Shun; Lauderdale, Tsai-Ling; Phung, Dac Cam; Watanabe, Haruo; Kuo, Jung-Che; Wang, Pei-Jen; Liu, Yen-Yi; Liang, Shiu-Yun; Chen, Pei-Chen

    2014-11-01

    We characterized Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi isolates from Bangladesh, Indonesia, Taiwan, and Vietnam to investigate their genetic relatedness and antimicrobial resistance. The isolates from Bangladesh and Vietnam were genetically closely related but were distant from those from Indonesia and Taiwan. All but a few isolates from Indonesia and Taiwan were susceptible to all antimicrobials tested. The majority of isolates from Bangladesh and Vietnam were multidrug resistant (MDR) and belonged to the widespread haplotype H58 clone. IncHI1 plasmids were detected in all MDR S. Typhi isolates from Vietnam but in only 15% of MDR isolates from Bangladesh. Resistance genes in the majority of MDR S. Typhi isolates from Bangladesh should reside in the chromosome. Among the isolates from Bangladesh, 82% and 40% were resistant to various concentrations of nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin, respectively. Several resistance mechanisms, including alterations in gyrase A, the presence of QnrS, and enhanced efflux pumps, were involved in the reduced susceptibility and resistance to fluoroquinolones. Intensive surveillance is necessary to monitor the spread of chromosome-mediated MDR and fluoroquinolone-resistant S. Typhi emerging in Bangladesh.

  1. Interaction of graphene family materials with Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurantowicz, Natalia; Sawosz, Ewa; Jaworski, Sławomir; Kutwin, Marta; Strojny, Barbara; Wierzbicki, Mateusz; Szeliga, Jacek; Hotowy, Anna; Lipińska, Ludwika; Koziński, Rafał; Jagiełło, Joanna; Chwalibog, André

    2015-01-01

    Graphene family materials have unique properties, which make them valuable for a range of applications. The antibacterial properties of graphene have been reported; however, findings have been contradictory. This study reports on the antimicrobial proprieties of three different graphene materials (pristine graphene (pG), graphene oxide (GO), and reduced graphene oxide (rGO)) against the food-borne bacterial pathogens Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica. A high concentration (250 μg/mL) of all the analyzed graphenes completely inhibited the growth of both pathogens, despite their difference in bacterial cell wall structure. At a lower concentration (25 μg/mL), similar effects were only observed with GO, as growth inhibition decreased with pG and rGO at the lower concentration. Interaction of the nanoparticles with the pathogenic bacteria was found to differ depending on the form of graphene. Microscopic imaging demonstrated that bacteria were arranged at the edges of pG and rGO, while with GO, they adhered to the nanoparticle surface. GO was found to have the highest antibacterial activity.

  2. Antioxidant oils and Salmonella enterica Typhimurium reduce tumor in an experimental model of hepatic metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorenson BS

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Brent S Sorenson, Kaysie L Banton, Lance B Augustin, Arnold S Leonard, Daniel A SaltzmanDepartment of Surgery, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN, USAAbstract: Fruit seeds high in antioxidants have been shown to have anticancer properties and enhance host protection against microbial infection. Recently we showed that a single oral dose of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium expressing a truncated human interleukin-2 gene (SalpIL2 is avirulent, immunogenic, and reduces hepatic metastases through increased natural killer cell populations in mice. To determine whether antioxidant compounds enhance the antitumor effect seen in SalpIL2-treated animals, we assayed black cumin (BC, black raspberry (BR, and milk thistle (MT seed oils for the ability to reduce experimental hepatic metastases in mice. In animals without tumor, BC and BR oil diets altered the kinetics of the splenic lymphocyte response to SalpIL2. Consistent with previous reports, BR and BC seed oils demonstrated independent antitumor properties and moderate adjuvant potential with SalpIL2. MT oil, however, inhibited the efficacy of SalpIL2 in our model. Based on these data, we conclude that a diet high in antioxidant oils promoted a more robust immune response to SalpIL2, thus enhancing its antitumor efficacy.Keywords: antioxidants, colorectal cancer, tumor models, metastasis

  3. Influence of Temperature, Source, and Serotype on Biofilm Formation of Salmonella enterica Isolates from Pig Slaughterhouses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piras, Francesca; Fois, Federica; Consolati, Simonetta Gianna; Mazza, Roberta; Mazzette, Rina

    2015-10-01

    Quantitative assessment of in vitro biofilm formation by 40 Salmonella enterica isolates isolated in pig abattoirs from animal and environmental sources (surfaces in contact and not in contact with meat) and classified in eight seroytpes was carried out by using a microtiter plate assay with spectrophotometric reading (optical density at 620 nm). Biofilm-forming ability was statistically correlated with the temperature of incubation (22 and 35°C), the source of the isolates, and the antimicrobial resistance profile. After incubation at 35°C, 9 isolates (22.5%) were classified as weak biofilm producers. After incubation at 22°C, 25 isolates (62.5%) were classified as weak producers and 3 (7.5%) as moderate producers. The quantity of biofilm formed after incubation at 22°C was significantly higher (P < 0.01) than at 35°C. This result is notable because 22°C is a common temperature in meat processing facilities and in slaughterhouses. At 35°C, isolates detected from surfaces in contact with meat showed significantly higher (P < 0.1) optical density values compared to isolates from other samples, highlighting the risk of cross-contamination for carcasses and offal. No correlation was detected between quantity of biofilm and serotype or between biofilm formation and resistance to antimicrobials.

  4. Genomic variants of bacteriophages against Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis with potential application in the poultry industry

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    J Robeson

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE is a prevalent gastrointestinal pathogen worldwide, threatening both animal and human health. In the latter, disease is associated to the consumption of SE-contaminated products from the poultry industry. The control of SE infection is largely based on the use of antibiotics and vaccines, but the use of lytic bacteriophages is re-emerging as an additional strategy for SE control. In fact, a number of recent reports point to the adequacy of bacteriophage as an efficient prophylactic or therapeutic countermeasure to SE infections. However, less attention has been focused on the basic biology of these bacteriophages. Here we report on three bacteriophages (f18, IF1 and EST2 that share a common viral particle morphology but are genomic variants as judged by their EcoRI DNA restriction patterns. Furthermore, they differ in their lytic capability towards SE, being EST2 the most efficient. They show a very narrow host range, efficiently infecting only SE strains. In terms of stability in various suspension media, including distilled water, all three bacteriophages remained viable, without noticeable decay in titer for at least 15 days at 25ºC. These results suggest the suitability of the tested bacteriophages as SE-controlling agents in the poultry industry.

  5. Lack of efflux mediated quinolone resistance in Salmonella enterica serovars Typhi and Paratyphi A

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    Sylvie eBaucheron

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovars Typhi and Paratyphi A isolates from human patients in France displaying different levels of resistance to quinolones or fluoroquinolones were studied for resistance mechanisms to these antimicrobial agents. All resistant isolates carried either single or multiple target gene mutations (i.e. in gyrA, gyrB, or parC correlating with the resistance levels observed. Active efflux, through upregulation of multipartite efflux systems, has also been previously reported as contributing mechanism for other serovars. Therefore, we investigated also the occurrence of non-target gene mutations in regulatory regions affecting efflux pump expression. However, no mutation was detected in these regions in both Typhi and Paratyphi isolates of this study. Besides, no overexpression of the major efflux systems was observed for these isolates. Nevertheless, a large deletion of 2334 bp was identified in the acrS-acrE region of all S. Typhi strains but which did not affect the resistance phenotype. As being specific to S. Typhi, this deletion could be used for specific molecular detection purposes. In conclusion, the different levels of quinolone or FQ resistance in both S. Typhi and S. Paratyphi A seem to rely only on target modifications.

  6. Antagonistic activity of Lactobacillus acidophilus LA10 against Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis SE86 in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scapin, Diane; Grando, Williani Fabiola; Rossi, Eliandra Mirlei; Perez, Karla Joseane; Malheiros, Patrícia da Silva; Tondo, Eduardo Cesar

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is one of the main pathogens responsible for foodborne illness in Brazil. Probiotic bacteria can play a role in defense and recovery from enteropathogenic infections. In this study, the ability of Lactobacillus acidophilus LA10 to colonise and exert antagonistic effects in the gastrointestinal tract was tested before and during experimental infection in conventional mice contaminated with S. Enteritidis (SE86). A dose of 0.1 mL containing 108 viable cells of SE86 and L. acidophilus LA10 was orally administered by gavage to mice. The experiment was divided into groups. As a negative control, Group 1 was administered only sterile saline solution. As a positive control, Group 2 was administered only SE86. Group 3 was first administered SE86, and after 10 days, treated with L. acidophilus LA10. Group 4 was first administered L. acidophilus LA10, and after 10 days, challenged with SE86. The results demonstrated that a significant number of SE86 cells were able to colonize the gastrointestinal tract of mice, specifically in the colon and ileum. L. acidophilus LA10 demonstrated an antagonistic effect against SE86, with better results observed for Group 3 over Group 4. Thus, L. acidophilus LA10 shows potential antagonistic effects against S. Enteritidis SE86, especially if administered after infection. PMID:24159284

  7. Hierarchical involvement of various GGDEF domain proteins in rdar morphotype development of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kader, Abdul; Simm, Roger; Gerstel, Ulrich; Morr, Michael; Römling, Ute

    2006-05-01

    GGDEF and EAL domain proteins are involved in the turnover of the novel secondary messenger cyclic-di(3'-->5')-guanylic acid (c-di-GMP) in many bacteria. In this work the role of the 12 GGDEF domain proteins encoded by the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) chromosome in rdar morphotype development was investigated. Previously, it was shown that the GGDEF domain protein AdrA activated the biosynthesis of cellulose by production of c-di-GMP. Enhancement of the c-di-GMP levels by overexpression of the GGDEF domain protein AdrA did lead to the activation of curli fimbriae biosynthesis through the elevated expression of CsgD and CsgA. Although knock-out of the chromosomal copy of adrA influenced CsgA expression, CsgD expression was not altered, although more than half of the total cellular c-di-GMP was produced by AdrA at 16 h of growth. On the other hand, chromosomally encoded GGDEF-EAL domain proteins STM2123 and STM3388 were required to additively activate CsgD expression on a transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. Enhanced c-di-GMP levels did overcome temperature regulation of rdar morphotype expression by activation of curli fimbriae as well as cellulose biosynthesis through CsgD expression. Thus in the regulatory cascade leading to rdar morphotype expression c-di-GMP activates several subsequent steps in the network.

  8. Molecular Architecture of an N-formyltransferase from Salmonella enterica O60.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodford, Colin R; Thoden, James B; Holden, Hazel M

    2017-03-02

    N-formylated sugars are found on the lipopolysaccharides of various pathogenic Gram negative bacteria including Campylobacter jejuni 81116, Francisella tularensis, Providencia alcalifaciens O30, and Providencia alcalifaciens O40. The last step in the biosynthetic pathways for these unusual sugars is catalyzed by N-formyltransferases that utilize N(10)-formyltetrahydrofolate as the carbon source. The substrates are dTDP-linked amino sugars with the functional groups installed at either the C-3' or C-4' positions of the pyranosyl rings. Here we describe a structural and enzymological investigation of the putative N-formyltransferase, FdtF, from Salmonella enterica O60. In keeping with its proposed role in the organism, the kinetic data reveal that the enzyme is more active with dTDP-3-amino-3,6-dideoxy-d-galactose than with dTDP-3-amino-3,6-dideoxy-d-glucose. The structural data demonstrate that the enzyme contains, in addition to the canonical N-formyltransferase fold, an ankyrin repeat moiety that houses a second dTDP-sugar binding pocket. This is only the second time an ankyrin repeat has been shown to be involved in small molecule binding. The research described herein represents the first structural analysis of a sugar N-formyltransferase that specifically functions on dTDP-3-amino-3,6-dideoxy-d-galactose in vivo and thus adds to our understanding of these intriguing enzymes.

  9. Differential induction of total IgE by two Salmonella enterica serotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanna eKtsoyan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this study was to establish how the inflammation caused by infection with two different Salmonella enterica serotypes, S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis, may lead to the predisposition to allergy as measured by total IgE level in the blood. Infection by S. Typhimurium did not affect the systemic IgE concentration while in S. Enteritidis-infected patients there was a significant 3.5-fold increase. This effect was especially profound in patients >4 years old, with up to the eight-fold increase above the norm. The degree of dysbiosis in these two infections measured with the comparative counts of cultivated bacteria showed an inverse relationship with the IgE concentration. Earlier we reported the elevated level of IL-17 in patients infected by S. Enteritidis. In the current study a significant correlation was found between the concentrations of IL-17 and IgE suggesting a possible role played by this cytokine in triggering the production of IgE in response to S. Enteritidis infection.

  10. Molecular characteristics of Salmonella enterica Paratyphi A in Yunnan Province, southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Wenpeng; Yang, Zushun; Chen, Yujuan; Yin, Jianwen; Yang, Jianbin; Li, Chaoqun; Zhou, Yongming; Yin, Jie; Xu, Wen; Zhao, Shiwen; Liang, Junrong; Wang, Xin; Jing, Huaiqi; Fu, Xiaoqing

    2015-03-01

    Previously, the prevalence of Salmonella enterica Paratyphi A in Yunnan was high; and recently Yunnan was the predominant endemic province in China. To identify the molecular epidemiology, antibiotic resistance profile and genotypic diversity of the S. Paratyphi A isolates from 1995 to 2013 in Yunnan, we performed the study. Antibiotic susceptibility tests, pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) were used to identify the characteristics of the bacterial isolates. The results showed from 1995 to 2013, 366 S. Paratyphi A were isolated: 295 isolates (80.6%) from Yuxi and 68 isolates (18.58%) from Honghe. All of the strains were resistant to nalidixic acid, and some were resistant to ampicillin and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole in different years. All the isolates were sensitive to cefotaxime and ciprofloxacin. Identical PFGE with two enzyme digestion patterns were found for 339 isolates. Some environmental isolates in different years were homologous with the strains isolated from food and patients. MLST showed 349 strains were ST85, only 17 isolates were ST129. S. Paratyphi A isolates from Yunnan showed a high similarity, and we found the pathogen isolated from patients, the environment and food had the close epidemiological relationship, forming a transmission circulation. These findings have important implications for paratyphoid-control strategies.

  11. SOS System Induction Inhibits the Assembly of Chemoreceptor Signaling Clusters in Salmonella enterica.

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    Oihane Irazoki

    Full Text Available Swarming, a flagellar-driven multicellular form of motility, is associated with bacterial virulence and increased antibiotic resistance. In this work we demonstrate that activation of the SOS response reversibly inhibits swarming motility by preventing the assembly of chemoreceptor-signaling polar arrays. We also show that an increase in the concentration of the RecA protein, generated by SOS system activation, rather than another function of this genetic network impairs chemoreceptor polar cluster formation. Our data provide evidence that the molecular balance between RecA and CheW proteins is crucial to allow polar cluster formation in Salmonella enterica cells. Thus, activation of the SOS response by the presence of a DNA-injuring compound increases the RecA concentration, thereby disturbing the equilibrium between RecA and CheW and resulting in the cessation of swarming. Nevertheless, when the DNA-damage decreases and the SOS response is no longer activated, basal RecA levels and thus polar cluster assembly are reestablished. These results clearly show that bacterial populations moving over surfaces make use of specific mechanisms to avoid contact with DNA-damaging compounds.

  12. Temperature and oxygen dependent metabolite utilization by Salmonella enterica serovars Derby and Mbandaka.

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    Matthew R Hayward

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica is a zoonotic pathogen of clinical and veterinary significance, with over 2500 serovars. In previous work we compared two serovars displaying host associations inferred from isolation statistics. Here, to validate genome sequence data and to expand on the role of environmental metabolite constitution in host range determination we use a phenotypic microarray approach to assess the ability of these serovars to metabolise ~500 substrates at 25°C with oxygen (aerobic conditions to represent the ex vivo environment and at 37°C with and without oxygen (aerobic/anaerobic conditions to represent the in vivo environment. A total of 26 substrates elicited a significant difference in the rate of metabolism of which only one, D-galactonic acid-g-lactone, could be explained by the presence (S. Mbandaka or the absence (S. Derby of metabolic genes. We find that S. Mbandaka respires more efficiently at ambient temperatures and under aerobic conditions on 18 substrates including: glucosominic acid, saccharic acid, trehalose, fumaric acid, maltotriose, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, N-acetyl-beta-D-mannosamine, fucose, L-serine and dihydroxy-acetone; whereas S. Derby is more metabolically competent anaerobically at 37°C for dipeptides, glutamine-glutamine, alanine-lysine, asparagine-glutamine and nitrogen sources glycine and nitrite. We conclude that the specific phenotype cannot be reliably predicted from the presence of metabolic genes directly relating to the metabolic pathways under study.

  13. Identification of in vivo induced protein antigens of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi during human infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    During infectious disease episodes, pathogens express distinct subsets of virulence factors which allow them to adapt to different environments. Hence, genes that are expressed or upregulated in vivo are implicated in pathogenesis. We used in vivo induced antigen technology (IVIAT) to identify antigens which are expressed during infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi. We identified 7 in vivo induced (IVI) antigens, which included BcfD (a fimbrial structural subunit), GrxC (a glutaredoxin 3), SapB (an ABC-type transport system), T3663 (an ABC-type uncharacterized transport system), T3816 (a putative rhodanese-related sulfurtransferase), T1497 (a probable TonB-dependent receptor) and T3689 (unknown function). Of the 7 identified antigens, 5 antigens had no cross-immunoreactivity in adsorbed control sera from healthy subjects. These 5 included BcfD, GrxC, SapB, T3663 and T3689. Antigens identified in this study are potential targets for drug and vaccine development and may be utilized as diagnostic agents.

  14. Identification of in vivo induced protein antigens of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi during human infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Yong; CONG YanGuang; LI Shu; RAO XianCai; WANG Gang; HU FuQuan

    2009-01-01

    During infectious disease episodes, pathogens express distinct subsets of virulence factors which allow them to adapt to different environments. Hence, genes that are expressed or upregulated in vivo are implicated in pathogenesis. We used in vivo induced antigen technology (IVIAT) to identify antigens which are expressed during infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi. We identified 7 in vivo induced (IVI) antigens, which included BcfD (a fimbrial structural subunit), GrxC (a giutaredoxin 3),SapB (an ABC-type transport system), T3663 (an ABC-type uncharacterized transport system), T3816 (a putative rhodanese-related sulfurtransferase), T1497 (a probable TonB-dependent receptor) and T3689 (unknown function). Of the 7 identified antigens, 5 antigens had no cross-immunoreactivity in adsorbed control sera from healthy subjects. These 5 included BcfD, GrxC, SapB, T3663 and T3689. Antigens identified in this study are potential targets for drug and vaccine development and may be utilized as diagnostic agents.

  15. Contribution of the SirA regulon to biofilm formation in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teplitski, Max; Al-Agely, Ali; Ahmer, Brian M M

    2006-11-01

    Orthologues of the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. typhimurium) BarA/SirA two-component system are important for biofilm formation and virulence in many gamma-Proteobacteria. In S. typhimurium, SirA activates the csrB and csrC carbon storage regulatory RNAs and the virulence gene regulators hilA and hilC. The regulatory RNAs antagonize the activity of the CsrA protein, allowing translation of those same virulence genes, and inhibiting the translation of flagellar genes. In this report, it was determined that SirA and the Csr system also control the fim operon that encodes type 1 fimbriae. sirA orthologues in other bacterial species, and the fim operon of S. typhimurium, are known to play a role in biofilm formation; therefore, all members of the S. typhimurium sirA regulon were tested for in vitro biofilm production. A sirA mutant, a csrB csrC double mutant, and a fimI mutant, were all defective in biofilm formation. Conversely, inactivation of flhDC increased biofilm formation. Therefore, SirA activates csrB, csrC and the fim operon to promote biofilm formation. In turn, csrB and csrC promote the translation of the fim operon, while at the same time inhibiting the translation of flagella, which are inhibitory to biofilm formation.

  16. Orquiepididimite em carneiro por Salmonella enterica sub-diarizonae: primeiro caso na América do Sul Orchiepididymitis in ram by Salmonella enterica sub diarizonae: first case in South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.C.C. Celeghini

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste artigo é relatar um caso de orquiepididimite associado com infecção por Salmonella enterica subespécie diarizonae em carneiro da raça Santa Inês de quatro anos de idade, vasectomizado. Ao exame clínico reprodutivo, o animal mostrou aumento severo do conteúdo escrotal, sendo o testículo direito maior do que o esquerdo e a cauda do epidídimo direita maior do que a esquerda. A consistência testicular, avaliada em escala de 1 a 5, foi 5 para o testículo direito e 2,5 para o esquerdo; o órgão apresentava-se muito sensível ao toque. Na ultrassonografia foram observadas estruturas anecoicas/hipoecoicas circulares na cauda do epidídimo, sugestivas de abscessos; alguns pontos hiperecogênicos no parênquima testicular, sugerindo lesões de calcificação; e todo o testículo direito rodeado por imagem hipoecoica, indicativa de edema. Uma das estruturas da cauda do epidídimo direita foi puncionada, encontrando-se exsudato purulento, o qual foi enviado para exame microbiológico, sendo isolada e identificada Salmonella enterica subespécie diarizonae. O carneiro foi submetido a orquiepididectomia, e o órgão foi caracterizado macroscopicamente por adesões fibrosas entre as camadas escrotais, coexistência de abscessos epididimários e degeneração testicular. A Salmonella enterica subespécie diarizonae deve ser considerada no diagnóstico diferencial de infecção genital em ovinos.The objective of this manuscript was to report a case of orchiepididymitis associated with Salmonella enterica subespécie diarizonae infection in a vasectomized 4-year-old Santa Inês ram. In the clinical-reproductive examination, the animal showed a severe enlargement of the scrotal contents, being the right testicle larger than left, and the right epididymal cauda was higher than the left. The testicular consistency, evaluated in a scale from 1 to 5, was 5 to the right and 2.5 to the left, and the organ was very sensitive to the touch. In

  17. Genomic Comparison of Non-Typhoidal Salmonella enterica Serovars Typhimurium, Enteritidis, Heidelberg, Hadar and Kentucky Isolates from Broiler Chickens.

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    Akhilesh S Dhanani

    Full Text Available Non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica serovars, associated with different foods including poultry products, are important causes of bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. The colonization of the chicken gut by S. enterica could result in the contamination of the environment and food chain. The aim of this study was to compare the genomes of 25 S. enterica serovars isolated from broiler chicken farms to assess their intra- and inter-genetic variability, with a focus on virulence and antibiotic resistance characteristics.The genomes of 25 S. enterica isolates covering five serovars (ten Typhimurium including three monophasic 4,[5],12:i:, four Enteritidis, three Hadar, four Heidelberg and four Kentucky were sequenced. Most serovars were clustered in strongly supported phylogenetic clades, except for isolates of serovar Enteritidis that were scattered throughout the tree. Plasmids of varying sizes were detected in several isolates independently of serovars. Genes associated with the IncF plasmid and the IncI1 plasmid were identified in twelve and four isolates, respectively, while genes associated with the IncQ plasmid were found in one isolate. The presence of numerous genes associated with Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPIs was also confirmed. Components of the type III and IV secretion systems (T3SS and T4SS varied in different isolates, which could explain in part, differences of their pathogenicity in humans and/or persistence in broilers. Conserved clusters of genes in the T3SS were detected that could be used in designing effective strategies (diagnostic, vaccination or treatments to combat Salmonella. Antibiotic resistance genes (CMY, aadA, ampC, florR, sul1, sulI, tetAB, and srtA and class I integrons were detected in resistant isolates while all isolates carried multidrug efflux pump systems regardless of their antibiotic susceptibility profile.This study showed that the predominant Salmonella serovars in broiler chickens harbor genes

  18. The two murein lipoproteins of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium contribute to the virulence of the organism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, J; Fadl, A A; Klimpel, G R; Niesel, D W; Popov, V L; Chopra, A K

    2004-07-01

    Septic shock due to Salmonella and other gram-negative enteric pathogens is a leading cause of death worldwide. The role of lipopolysaccharide in sepsis is well studied; however, the contribution of other bacterial outer membrane components, such as Braun (murein) lipoprotein (Lpp), is not well defined. The genome of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium harbors two copies of the lipoprotein (lpp) gene. We constructed a serovar Typhimurium strain with deletions in both copies of the lpp gene (lpp1 and lpp2) by marker exchange mutagenesis. The integrity of the cell membrane and the secretion of the effector proteins through the type III secretion system were not affected in the lpp double-knockout mutant. Subsequently, the virulence potential of this mutant was examined in a cell culture system using T84 intestinal epithelial and RAW264.7 macrophage cell lines and a mouse model of salmonellosis. The lpp double-knockout mutant was defective in invading and inducing cytotoxic effects in T84 and RAW264.7 cells, although binding of the mutant to the host cell was not affected when compared to the wild-type (WT) serovar Typhimurium. The motility of the mutant was impaired, despite the finding that the number of flagella was similar in the lpp double knockout mutant and the WT serovar Typhimurium. Deletion in the lpp genes did not affect the intracellular survival and replication of Salmonella in macrophages and T84 cells. Induction of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-8 (IL-8) was significantly reduced in macrophages and T84 cells infected with the lpp double-knockout mutant. The levels of IL-8 remained unaffected in T84 cells when infected with either live or heat-killed WT and lpp mutant, indicating that invasion was not required for IL-8 production and that Toll-like receptor 2 signaling might be affected in the Lpp double-knockout mutant. These effects of the Lpp protein could be restored by complementation of the isogenic

  19. Relationships between multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica Serovar Schwarzengrund and both broiler chickens and retail chicken meats in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Tetsuo; Murakami, Koichi; Ozawa, Manao; Koike, Ryoji; Ishikawa, Hitoshi

    2009-05-01

    We examined 29 isolates of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Schwarzengrund from broiler chickens (n=19) and retail chicken meats (n=10) in Japan for antimicrobial susceptibility and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profiling. All isolates exhibited resistance to both bicozamycin and sulfadimethoxine (minimum inhibitory concentration of both antimicrobial agents: >512 microg/ml). Nalidixic acid resistance was found in only one broiler chicken isolate. PFGE analysis showed that there were two genotypes among S. Schwarzengrund isolates. Isolates from 11 of 19 broiler chickens and from 6 of 10 retail chicken meats exhibited resistance to dihydrostreptomycin, kanamycin, oxytetracycline, bicozamycin, trimethoprim, and sulfadimethoxine, and had an identical PFGE pattern classified into a predominant genotype. Thus, our results indicate that genetically identical multidrug-resistant S. Schwarzengrund appeared to be disseminated among broiler chickens and retail chicken meats in Japan.

  20. Similarity of genes horizontally acquired by Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica is evidence of a supraspecies pangenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karberg, Katherine A; Olsen, Gary J; Davis, James J

    2011-12-13

    Most bacterial and archaeal genomes contain many genes with little or no similarity to other genes, a property that impedes identification of gene origins. By comparing the codon usage of genes shared among strains (primarily vertically inherited genes) and genes unique to one strain (primarily recently horizontally acquired genes), we found that the plurality of unique genes in Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica are much more similar to each other than are their vertically inherited genes. We conclude that E. coli and S. enterica derive these unique genes from a common source, a supraspecies phylogenetic group that includes the organisms themselves. The phylogenetic range of the sharing appears to include other (but not all) members of the Enterobacteriaceae. We found evidence of similar gene sharing in other bacterial and archaeal taxa. Thus, we conclude that frequent gene exchange, particularly that of genetic novelties, extends well beyond accepted species boundaries.

  1. Excision of an unstable pathogenicity island in Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is induced during infection of phagocytic cells.

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    Tania S Quiroz

    Full Text Available The availability of the complete genome sequence of several Salmonella enterica serovars has revealed the presence of unstable genetic elements in these bacteria, such as pathogenicity islands and prophages. This is the case of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis, a bacterium that causes gastroenteritis in humans and systemic infection in mice. The whole genome sequence analysis for S. Enteritidis unveiled the presence of several genetic regions that are absent in other Salmonella serovars. These regions have been denominated "regions of difference" (ROD. In this study we show that ROD21, one of such regions, behaves as an unstable pathogenicity island. We observed that ROD21 undergoes spontaneous excision by two independent recombination events, either under laboratory growth conditions or during infection of murine cells. Importantly, we also found that one type of excision occurred at higher rates when S. Enteritidis was residing inside murine phagocytic cells. These data suggest that ROD21 is an unstable pathogenicity island, whose frequency of excision depends on the environmental conditions found inside phagocytic cells.

  2. Excision of an unstable pathogenicity island in Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is induced during infection of phagocytic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, Tania S; Nieto, Pamela A; Tobar, Hugo E; Salazar-Echegarai, Francisco J; Lizana, Rodrigo J; Quezada, Carolina P; Santiviago, Carlos A; Araya, Daniela V; Riedel, Claudia A; Kalergis, Alexis M; Bueno, Susan M

    2011-01-01

    The availability of the complete genome sequence of several Salmonella enterica serovars has revealed the presence of unstable genetic elements in these bacteria, such as pathogenicity islands and prophages. This is the case of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis), a bacterium that causes gastroenteritis in humans and systemic infection in mice. The whole genome sequence analysis for S. Enteritidis unveiled the presence of several genetic regions that are absent in other Salmonella serovars. These regions have been denominated "regions of difference" (ROD). In this study we show that ROD21, one of such regions, behaves as an unstable pathogenicity island. We observed that ROD21 undergoes spontaneous excision by two independent recombination events, either under laboratory growth conditions or during infection of murine cells. Importantly, we also found that one type of excision occurred at higher rates when S. Enteritidis was residing inside murine phagocytic cells. These data suggest that ROD21 is an unstable pathogenicity island, whose frequency of excision depends on the environmental conditions found inside phagocytic cells.

  3. Efficacy of several vaccination programmes in commercial layer and broiler breeder hens against experimental challenge with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penha Filho, Rafael Antonio Casarin; de Paiva, Jacqueline Boldrin; Arguello, Yuli Melisa Sierra; da Silva, Mariana Dias; Gardin, Yannick; Resende, Fernando; Berchieri Junior, Angelo Berchieri; Sesti, Luiz

    2009-10-01

    Two experiments were performed to evaluate the protective effect of various vaccination combinations given at 5 and 9 weeks of age against experimental challenge with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) phage type 4 at 12 weeks of age. In Experiment 1, groups of commercial layers were vaccinated by one of the following programmes: Group 1, two doses of a SE bacterin (Layermune SE); Group 2, one dose of a live Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum vaccine (Cevac SG9R) followed by one dose of the SE bacterin; Group 3, one dose of each of two different multivalent inactivated vaccines containing SE cells (Corymune 4K and Corymune 7K; and Group 4, unvaccinated, challenged controls. In Experiment 2, groups of broiler breeders were vaccinated by the same programmes as Groups 1 and 2 above while Group 3 was an unvaccinated, challenged control group. All vaccination programmes and the challenge induced significant (P liver and caeca) colonization by the challenge strain as well as reducing faecal excretion for at least 3 weeks. Vaccinated layers in Groups 1 and 2 and broiler breeders in Group 2 showed the greatest reduction in organ colonization and the least faecal excretion. In Experiment 1, layers vaccinated with multivalent inactivated vaccines containing a SE component (Group 3) were only moderately protected, indicating that such a vaccination programme may be useful in farms with good husbandry and housing conditions and low environmental infectious pressure by Salmonella.

  4. Effect of lime juice on Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Salmonella enterica inactivation during the preparation of the raw fish dish ceviche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathurand, Prateek; Schaffner, Donald W

    2013-06-01

    Ceviche is a raw fish dish common in Peru and other Latin American counties. The most characteristic feature of ceviche is the use of lime juice for marinating or "cooking" the raw fish. Confirmed cases of cholera in Peru, New Jersey, and Florida have been associated with ceviche. Although the effect of organic acids on pathogenic bacteria has been well characterized, few data exist on the effect of these acids in seafood systems. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effects of lime juice marination on pathogens likely to be present in ceviche. Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) fillet pieces were inoculated with Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Salmonella enterica (>7 log CFU/g) and incubated at 25 and 4°C for 30 or 120 min in the presence of fresh lime juice at concentrations typical for the preparation of ceviche. Similar levels of cells were also inoculated into fresh lime juice without tilapia. Surviving cells were enumerated on selective (xylose lysine Tergitol 4 and thiosulfate-bile-citrate-sucrose) and nonselective (tryptic soy agar) media. V. parahaemolyticus levels were reduced to below detection limits (∼5-log reduction) under all conditions studied. Salmonella strains on tilapia were much more resistant to inactivation and were only slightly reduced (∼1- to 2-log reduction). Salmonella and V. parahaemolyticus inoculated directly into lime juice without tilapia were all reduced to below detection limits (∼5-log reduction). A typical ceviche recipe reduces V. parahaemolyticus risk significantly but is less effective for control of S. enterica.

  5. Coordinated regulation of virulence during systemic infection of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

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    Hyunjin Yoon

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available To cause a systemic infection, Salmonella must respond to many environmental cues during mouse infection and express specific subsets of genes in a temporal and spatial manner, but the regulatory pathways are poorly established. To unravel how micro-environmental signals are processed and integrated into coordinated action, we constructed in-frame non-polar deletions of 83 regulators inferred to play a role in Salmonella enteriditis Typhimurium (STM virulence and tested them in three virulence assays (intraperitoneal [i.p.], and intragastric [i.g.] infection in BALB/c mice, and persistence in 129X1/SvJ mice. Overall, 35 regulators were identified whose absence attenuated virulence in at least one assay, and of those, 14 regulators were required for systemic mouse infection, the most stringent virulence assay. As a first step towards understanding the interplay between a pathogen and its host from a systems biology standpoint, we focused on these 14 genes. Transcriptional profiles were obtained for deletions of each of these 14 regulators grown under four different environmental conditions. These results, as well as publicly available transcriptional profiles, were analyzed using both network inference and cluster analysis algorithms. The analysis predicts a regulatory network in which all 14 regulators control the same set of genes necessary for Salmonella to cause systemic infection. We tested the regulatory model by expressing a subset of the regulators in trans and monitoring transcription of 7 known virulence factors located within Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2. These experiments validated the regulatory model and showed that the response regulator SsrB and the MarR type regulator, SlyA, are the terminal regulators in a cascade that integrates multiple signals. Furthermore, experiments to demonstrate epistatic relationships showed that SsrB can replace SlyA and, in some cases, SlyA can replace SsrB for expression of SPI-2 encoded

  6. Salmonella enterica serovar Oranienburg outbreak in a veterinary medical teaching hospital with evidence of nosocomial and on-farm transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Kevin J; Rodriguez-Rivera, Lorraine D; Mitchell, Katharyn J; Hoelzer, Karin; Wiedmann, Martin; McDonough, Patrick L; Altier, Craig; Warnick, Lorin D; Perkins, Gillian A

    2014-07-01

    Nosocomial salmonellosis continues to pose an important threat to veterinary medical teaching hospitals. The objectives of this study were to describe an outbreak of salmonellosis caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Oranienburg within our hospital and to highlight its unique features, which can be used to help mitigate or prevent nosocomial outbreaks in the future. We retrospectively analyzed data from patients that were fecal culture-positive for Salmonella Oranienburg between January 1, 2006, and June 1, 2011, including historical, clinical, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) data. Salmonella Oranienburg was identified in 20 horses, five alpacas, and three cows during this time frame, with dates of admission spanning the period from August, 2006, through January, 2008. We consider most of these patients to have become infected through either nosocomial or on-farm transmission, as evidenced by molecular subtyping results and supportive epidemiologic data. Interpretation of PFGE results in this outbreak was challenging because of the identification of several closely related Salmonella Oranienburg subtypes. Furthermore, a high percentage of cases were fecal culture-positive for Salmonella Oranienburg within 24 h of admission. These patients initially appeared to represent new introductions of Salmonella into the hospital, but closer inspection of their medical records revealed epidemiologic links to the hospital following the index case. Cessation of this outbreak was observed following efforts to further heighten biosecurity efforts, with no known cases or positive environmental samples after January, 2008. This study demonstrates that a Salmonella-positive culture result within 24 h of admission does not exclude the hospital as the source of infection, and it underscores the important role played by veterinary medical teaching hospitals as nodes of Salmonella infection that can promote transmission outside of the hospital setting.

  7. Comprehensive identification of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium genes required for infection of BALB/c mice.

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    Roy R Chaudhuri

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Genes required for infection of mice by Salmonella Typhimurium can be identified by the interrogation of random transposon mutant libraries for mutants that cannot survive in vivo. Inactivation of such genes produces attenuated S. Typhimurium strains that have potential for use as live attenuated vaccines. A quantitative screen, Transposon Mediated Differential Hybridisation (TMDH, has been developed that identifies those members of a large library of transposon mutants that are attenuated. TMDH employs custom transposons with outward-facing T7 and SP6 promoters. Fluorescently-labelled transcripts from the promoters are hybridised to whole-genome tiling microarrays, to allow the position of the transposon insertions to be determined. Comparison of microarray data from the mutant library grown in vitro (input with equivalent data produced after passage of the library through mice (output enables an attenuation score to be determined for each transposon mutant. These scores are significantly correlated with bacterial counts obtained during infection of mice using mutants with individual defined deletions of the same genes. Defined deletion mutants of several novel targets identified in the TMDH screen are effective live vaccines.

  8. Orquiepididimite em carneiro por Salmonella enterica sub-diarizonae: primeiro caso na América do Sul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.C.C. Celeghini

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste artigo é relatar um caso de orquiepididimite associado com infecção por Salmonella enterica subespécie diarizonae em carneiro da raça Santa Inês de quatro anos de idade, vasectomizado. Ao exame clínico reprodutivo, o animal mostrou aumento severo do conteúdo escrotal, sendo o testículo direito maior do que o esquerdo e a cauda do epidídimo direita maior do que a esquerda. A consistência testicular, avaliada em escala de 1 a 5, foi 5 para o testículo direito e 2,5 para o esquerdo; o órgão apresentava-se muito sensível ao toque. Na ultrassonografia foram observadas estruturas anecoicas/hipoecoicas circulares na cauda do epidídimo, sugestivas de abscessos; alguns pontos hiperecogênicos no parênquima testicular, sugerindo lesões de calcificação; e todo o testículo direito rodeado por imagem hipoecoica, indicativa de edema. Uma das estruturas da cauda do epidídimo direita foi puncionada, encontrando-se exsudato purulento, o qual foi enviado para exame microbiológico, sendo isolada e identificada Salmonella enterica subespécie diarizonae. O carneiro foi submetido a orquiepididectomia, e o órgão foi caracterizado macroscopicamente por adesões fibrosas entre as camadas escrotais, coexistência de abscessos epididimários e degeneração testicular. A Salmonella enterica subespécie diarizonae deve ser considerada no diagnóstico diferencial de infecção genital em ovinos.

  9. The combination of CRISPR-MVLST and PFGE provides increased discriminatory power for differentiating human clinical isolates of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariat, Nikki; DiMarzio, Michael J; Yin, Shuang; Dettinger, Lisa; Sandt, Carol H; Lute, James R; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Dudley, Edward G

    2013-05-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is a major cause of foodborne salmonellosis. Rapid, efficient and accurate methods for identification are required to track specific strains of S. Enteritidis during outbreaks of human salmonellosis. By exploiting the hypervariable nature of virulence genes and Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs), we previously developed a powerful sequence-based subtyping approach, designated CRISPR-MVLST. To substantiate the applicability of CRISPR-MVLST, we analyzed a broad set of S. Enteritidis isolates collected over a six-year period. Among 141 isolates we defined 22 Enteritidis Sequence Types (ESTs), the majority of which were novel. Notably, strains exhibiting the common PFGE pattern, JEGX01.0004 (characteristic of ∼40% of S. Enteritidis isolates in the United States), were separated into twelve distinct sequence types. Conversely, isolates of EST4, the most predominant EST we observed, comprised eight different PFGE patterns. Importantly, we showed that some genotypes that were previously associated with the food supply chain at the farm level have now been identified in clinical samples. CRISPR sequence data shows subtle but distinct differences among different alleles of S. Enteritidis, suggesting that evolution of these loci occurs vertically, as opposed to previously reported evolution by spacer acquisition in other bacteria.

  10. Protection by Lactobacillus acidophilus UFV-H2B20 against experimental oral infection with Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Ser. Typhimurium in gnotobiotic and conventional mice

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    Moura Lilian Nobre

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability of Lactobacillus acidophilus UFV-H2B20 to antagonize Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica ser. Typhimurium and to reduce the pathological consequences for the host was determining using conventional and gnotobiotic animals. Conventional NIH mice received daily by gavage a 0.1 ml suspension containing about 10(8 cfu L. acidophilus UFV-H2B20 and germfree animals received a single 0.1 ml dose. The gnotobiotic and conventional groups were infected orally with 10² and 10(5 cfu of S. Typhimurium, respectively, 7 days after the beginning of treatment. Control groups were treated with sterile saline instead of Lactobacillus. Survival data showed a protective effect against the pathogenic bacteria in both conventional and gnotobiotic Lactobacillus-treated mice. L. acidophilus UFV-H2B20 colonized the digestive tract of gnotobiotic mice and the number of viable cells ranged from 10(9 to 10(10 cfu/g of faeces. In both experimental and control gnotobiotic animals, S. Typhimurium became rapidly established at a level ranging from 10(8 to 10(10 cfu/g of faeces and remained at high levels until the animals died or were sacrificed. In conclusion, the previous treatment of mice with L. acidophilus UFV-H2B20 protects the animals against the experimental infection with S. Typhimurium but this protection was not due to the reduction of the pathogenic populations in the intestines.

  11. Molecular epidemiological investigation of a diffuse outbreak caused by Salmonella enterica serotype Montevideo isolates in Osaka Prefecture, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Tetsuya; Sakata, Junko; Kanki, Masashi; Seto, Kazuko; Taguchi, Masumi; Kumeda, Yuko

    2011-10-01

    In Osaka Prefecture, Japan, three foodborne outbreaks were caused by Salmonella enterica serotype Montevideo in rapid succession between September 2007 and May 2008. Further, Salmonella Montevideo was also isolated from several sporadic diarrhea patients and asymptomatic carriers examined during approximately the identical period. To investigate the relatedness of the isolates, we performed antimicrobial susceptibility testing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis, and multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA) for 29 Salmonella Montevideo isolates obtained in this region between 1991 and 2008. Although antimicrobial susceptibility tests had low discriminatory power, PFGE patterns revealed 17 unique types with outbreaks, one sporadic patient, and three different carriers between 2007 and 2008 had nearly identical PFGE patterns and were classified into the identical MLVA type; further, the isolates with this PFGE and MLVA pattern appeared only at that time between 1991 and 2008. These data strongly suggest that genetically identical Salmonella Montevideo strains may have caused the 2007 and 2008 outbreaks in Osaka Prefecture. Our results demonstrate that PFGE using XbaI and BlnI is useful for discriminating between Salmonella Montevideo isolates, even within a limited area, and reconfirm that continuous epidemiological surveillance for bacterial intestinal infections such as salmonellosis may be useful to not only monitor changes in the genetic diversity of isolates, but to also detect diffuse outbreaks.

  12. Salmonella enterica Typhimurium infection causes metabolic changes in chicken muscle involving AMPK, fatty acid and insulin/mTOR signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenault, Ryan J; Napper, Scott; Kogut, Michael H

    2013-05-17

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (Salmonella Typhimurium) infection of chickens that are more than a few days old results in asymptomatic cecal colonization with persistent shedding of bacteria. We hypothesized that while the bacterium colonizes and persists locally in the cecum it has systemic effects, including changes to metabolic pathways of skeletal muscle, influencing the physiology of the avian host. Using species-specific peptide arrays to perform kinome analysis on metabolic signaling pathways in skeletal muscle of Salmonella Typhimurium infected chickens, we have observed key metabolic changes that affected fatty acid and glucose metabolism through the 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and the insulin/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. Over a three week time course of infection, we observed changes in the phosphorylation state of the AMPK protein, and proteins up and down the pathway. In addition, changes to a large subset of the protein intermediates of the insulin/mTOR pathway in the skeletal muscle were altered by infection. These changes occur in pathways with direct effects on fatty acid and glucose metabolism. This is the first report of significant cellular metabolic changes occurring systemically in chicken due to a Salmonella infection. These results have implications not only for animal production and health but also for the understanding of how Salmonella infection in the intestine can have widespread, systemic effects on the metabolism of chickens without disease-like symptoms.

  13. Serotypes and Antimicrobial Resistance in Salmonella enterica Recovered from Clinical Samples from Cattle and Swine in Minnesota, 2006 to 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Samuel; Rovira, Albert; Davies, Peter; Ahlstrom, Christina; Muellner, Petra; Rendahl, Aaron; Olsen, Karen; Bender, Jeff B.; Wells, Scott; Perez, Andres

    2016-01-01

    Salmonellosis remains one of the leading causes of foodborne disease worldwide despite preventive efforts at various stages of the food production chain. The emergence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica represents an additional challenge for public health authorities. Food animals are considered a major reservoir and potential source of foodborne salmonellosis; thus, monitoring of Salmonella strains in livestock may help to detect emergence of new serotypes/MDR phenotypes and to gain a better understanding of Salmonella epidemiology. For this reason, we analyzed trends over a nine-year period in serotypes, and antimicrobial resistance, of Salmonella isolates recovered at the Minnesota Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory (MVDL) from swine (n = 2,537) and cattle (n = 1,028) samples. Prevalence of predominant serotypes changed over time; in swine, S. Typhimurium and S. Derby decreased and S. Agona and S. 4,5,12:i:- increased throughout the study period. In cattle, S. Dublin, S. Montevideo and S. Cerro increased and S. Muenster became less frequent. Median minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values and proportion of antibiotic resistant isolates were higher for those recovered from swine compared with cattle, and were particularly high for certain antibiotic-serotype combinations. The proportion of resistant swine isolates was also higher than observed in the NARMS data, probably due to the different cohort of animals represented in each dataset. Results provide insight into the dynamics of antimicrobial resistant Salmonella in livestock in Minnesota, and can help to monitor emerging trends in antimicrobial resistance. PMID:27936204

  14. [Phenotypic and molecular characteristics of Salmonella enterica serotype 1,4, [5] ,12:i:--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaojuan; Wu, Qingping; Zhang, Jumei; Guo, Weipeng

    2014-11-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype 1, 4, [5 ], 12: i:- ( Salmonella 1, 4, [5], 12: i:-), an emerging serotype antigenically related to Salmonella Typhimurium (1,4, [5], 12 : i:1,2) but lacking the second phase flagellar antigen, has been frequently detected in many countries over the last 10 years. Nowadays it seems to be one of the major serotypes responsible for human salmonellosis cases worldwide. In addition, multidrug resistance is quite common in Salmonella 1, 4, [5],12:i:-, the two major clones (labelled as Spanish and European clones) show multidrug resistance to four or more unrelated classes of antimicrobials mediated by plasmids or chromosome. Some resistance determinants including bla(TEM), bla(CTX-M(-1), aac(3)-IV, aadA2, cmlA1, sul1, sul2, dfrA12, strA-strB, tet (A) and tet (B) have been found in these multidrug resistance strains. The genomic characterization of 1,4, [5] ,12:i:- isolates suggests that this serovar is likely to gather several clones or strains that have independently emerged from S. Typhimurium, and have changed through multiple independent events involving different clonal groups. In later study, emphasis should be paid on development of rapid and precise detection methods and study of pathogenic and resistance mechanisms of Salmonella 1,4, [5] ,12:i:-.

  15. Gamma radiation used as hygienization technique for foods does not induce viable but non-culturable state (VBNC) in Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium.

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    Saroj, Sunil; Shashidhar, R; Bandekar, Jayant

    2009-10-01

    Gamma radiation has been widely used for hygienization of food products. Whether gamma radiation stress induces VBNC state in Salmonella is of great concern. Therefore, the study was carried out to determine whether gamma radiation exposure induces VBNC state in Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. typhimurium). The parameters tested were culturability on agar medium, transcriptional activity by RT-PCR, cytoplasmic membrane integrity, and direct viable count using LIVE/DEAD BacLight bacterial viability kit. The LIVE/DEAD BacLight counts for S. typhimurium cells treated with 0.5 and 1.0 kGy radiation dose were 0.8 and 0.1% of the control, respectively. Plate counts for S. typhimurium cells treated with 0.5 and 1.0 kGy radiation dose were 0.7 and 0.05% of the control, respectively. No viable cells of S. typhimurium were detected by both plate count and LIVE/DEAD BacLight after radiation treatment with 2 kGy. No transcriptional activity was detected in cells treated with 2 kGy radiation dose. If there were VBNC cells present, then significant differences in the counts between the LIVE/DEAD BacLight microscopic counts and plate agar counts must be observed. No significant difference (P > 0.05) in the counts were observed. Thus, it can be concluded that treatment with 2 kGy results in complete killing and does not induce VBNC state in S. typhimurium.

  16. Molecular and epidemiologic analysis of a county-wide outbreak caused by Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis traced to a bakery

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    Lu Po-Liang

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An increase in the number of attendees due to acute gastroenteritis and fever was noted at one hospital emergency room in Taiwan over a seven-day period from July to August, 2001. Molecular and epidemiological surveys were performed to trace the possible source of infection. Methods An epidemiological investigation was undertaken to determine the cause of the outbreak. Stool and blood samples were collected according to standard protocols per Center for Disease Control, Taiwan. Typing of the Salmonella isolates from stool, blood, and food samples was performed with serotyping, antibiotypes, and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE following XbaI restriction enzyme digestion. Results Comparison of the number of patients with and without acute gastroenteritis (506 and 4467, respectively during the six weeks before the outbreak week revealed a significant increase in the number of patients during the outbreak week (162 and 942, respectively (relative risk (RR: 1.44, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.22–1.70, P value Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis was isolated from the stool samples of 28 of 32 individuals and from a recalled bread sample. All S. Enteritidis isolates were of the same antibiogram. PFGE typing revealed that all except two of the clinical isolates and the bread isolates were of the same DNA macrorestriction pattern. Conclusions The egg-covered bread contaminated with S. Enteritidis was confirmed as the vehicle of infection. Alertness in the emergency room, surveillance by the microbiology laboratory, prompt and thorough investigation to trace the source of outbreaks, and institution of appropriate control measures provide effective control of community outbreaks.

  17. Complex Function for SicA, a Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Type III Secretion-Associated Chaperone

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    Tucker, Stephanie C.; Jorge E Galán

    2000-01-01

    Salmonella enterica encodes a type III secretion system within a pathogenicity island located at centisome 63 that is essential for virulence. All type III secretion systems require the function of a family of low-molecular-weight proteins that aid the secretion process by acting as partitioning factors and/or secretion pilots. One such protein is SicA, which is encoded immediately upstream of the type III secreted proteins SipB and SipC. We found that the absence of SicA results in the degra...

  18. β-1,3/1,6-Glucan alleviated intestinal mucosal barrier impairment of broiler chickens challenged with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yujing; Guo, Yuming; Wang, Zhong

    2013-07-01

    This study investigated the protective effect of β-1,3/1,6-glucan on gut morphology, intestinal epithelial tight junctions, and bacterial translocation of broiler chickens challenged with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Ninety Salmonella-free Arbor Acre male broiler chickens were randomly divided into 3 groups: negative control group (NC), Salmonella Typhimurium-infected positive group (PC), and the Salmonella Typhimurium-infected group with dietary 100 mg/kg of β-1,3/1,6-glucan supplementation (T) to determine the effect of β-1,3/1,6-glucan on intestinal barrier function. Salmonella Typhimurium challenge alone significantly decreased villus height (P cells (P cells at 14 dpi (P cells (P cells (P Salmonella Typhimurium in comparison with Salmonella Typhimurium challenge alone. β-1,3/1,6-Glucan addition had significant inhibitory effects (P Salmonella colonization levels and liver Salmonella invasion of the Salmonella Typhimurium-infected birds compared with the PC group. Intestinal tight junction proteins claudin-1, claudin-4, and occludin mRNA expression in the jejunum at 14 dpi was significantly decreased by Salmonella Typhimurium challenge alone (P Salmonella Typhimurium-infected birds in comparison with the PC group. Our results indicate that dietary β-1,3/1,6-glucan can alleviate intestinal mucosal barrier impairment in broiler chickens challenged with Salmonella Typhimurium.

  19. Characterization of integrons and resistance genes in multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica isolated from meat and dairy products in Egypt.

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    Ahmed, Ashraf M; Shimamoto, Toshi; Shimamoto, Tadashi

    2014-10-17

    Foodborne pathogens are a leading cause of illness and death, especially in developing countries. The problem is exacerbated if bacteria attain multidrug resistance. Little is currently known about the extent of antibiotic resistance in foodborne pathogens and the molecular mechanisms underlying this resistance in Africa. Therefore, the current study was carried out to characterize, at the molecular level, the mechanism of multidrug resistance in Salmonella enterica isolated from 1600 food samples (800 meat products and 800 dairy products) collected from different street venders, butchers, retail markets and slaughterhouses in Egypt. Forty-seven out of 69 isolates (68.1%) showed multidrug resistance phenotypes to at least three classes of antimicrobials. The incidence of multidrug-resistant isolates was higher in meat products (37, 69.8%) than in dairy products (10, 62.5%). The multidrug-resistant serovars included, S. enterica serovar Typhimurium (24 isolates, 34.8%), S. enterica serovar Enteritidis, (15 isolates, 21.8%), S. enterica serovar Infantis (7 isolates, 10.1%) and S. enterica non-typable serovar (1 isolate, 1.4%). The highest resistance was to ampicillin (95.7%), then to kanamycin (93.6%), spectinomycin (93.6%), streptomycin (91.5%) and sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (91.5%). PCR and DNA sequencing were used to screen and characterize integrons and antibiotic resistance genes and 39.1% and 8.7% of isolates were positive for class 1 and class 2 integrons, respectively. β-lactamase-encoding genes were identified in 75.4% of isolates and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes were identified in 27.5% of isolates. Finally, the florphenicol resistance gene, floR, was identified in 18.8% of isolates. PCR screening identified S. enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 in both meat and dairy products. This is the first study to report many of these resistance genes in dairy products. This study highlights the high incidence of multidrug-resistant S. enterica in

  20. Studies on the effects of phosphine on Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis in culture medium and in black pepper (Piper nigrum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, M F P M; Rezende, A C B; Benato, E A; Valentini, S R T; Furlani, R P Z; Tfouni, S A V

    2011-04-01

    The effect of phosphine on Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis inoculated in culture medium and in black pepper grains (Piper nigrum), as well as on the reduction of the microbial load of the dried and moisturized product, was verified. The postfumigation effect was verified in inoculated samples with 0.92 and 0.97 water activity (a(w)) exposed to 6 g/m(3) phosphine for 72 h, dried to 0.67 a(w), and stored for 24, 48, and 72 h. No decreases were observed in Salmonella Enteritidis populations in culture medium when fumigant concentrations up to 6 g/m(3) were applied for 48 h at 35°C. However, the colonies showed reductions in size and atypical coloration as the phosphine concentration increased. No reduction in Salmonella counts occurred on the inoculated dried samples after fumigation. On the other hand, when phosphine at concentrations of 6 g/m(3) was applied on moisturized black pepper for 72 h, decreases in Salmonella counts of around 80% were observed. The counts of total aerobic mesophilic bacterium populations of the dried and moisturized black pepper were not affected by the fumigant treatment. The results of the postfumigation studies indicated that Salmonella Enteritidis was absent in the fumigated grains after drying and storage for 72 h, indicating a promising application for this technique. It was concluded that for Salmonella Enteritidis control, phosphine fumigation could be applied to black pepper grains before drying and the producers should rigidly follow good agricultural practices, mainly during the drying process, in order to avoid product recontamination. Additional work is needed to confirm the findings with more Salmonella serotypes and strains.

  1. Specific responses of Salmonella enterica to tomato varieties and fruit ripeness identified by in vivo expression technology.

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    Jason T Noel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent outbreaks of vegetable-associated gastroenteritis suggest that enteric pathogens colonize, multiply and persist in plants for extended periods of time, eventually infecting people. Genetic and physiological pathways, by which enterics colonize plants, are still poorly understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To better understand interactions between Salmonella enterica sv. Typhimurium and tomatoes, a gfp-tagged Salmonella promoter library was screened inside red ripe fruits. Fifty-one unique constructs that were potentially differentially regulated in tomato relative to in vitro growth were identified. The expression of a subset of these promoters was tested in planta using recombinase-based in vivo expression technology (RIVET and fitness of the corresponding mutants was tested. Gene expression in Salmonella was affected by fruit maturity and tomato cultivar. A putative fadH promoter was upregulated most strongly in immature tomatoes. Expression of the fadH construct depended on the presence of linoleic acid, which is consistent with the reduced accumulation of this compound in mature tomato fruits. The cysB construct was activated in the fruit of cv. Hawaii 7997 (resistant to a race of Ralstonia solanacearum more strongly than in the universally susceptible tomato cv. Bonny Best. Known Salmonella motility and animal virulence genes (hilA, flhDC, fliF and those encoded on the pSLT virulence plasmid did not contribute significantly to fitness of the bacteria inside tomatoes, even though deletions of sirA and motA modestly increased fitness of Salmonella inside tomatoes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study reveals the genetic basis of the interactions of Salmonella with plant hosts. Salmonella relies on a distinct set of metabolic and regulatory genes, which are differentially regulated in planta in response to host genotype and fruit maturity. This enteric pathogen colonizes tissues of tomatoes differently than plant

  2. Analysis of the ArcA regulon in anaerobically grown Salmonella enterica sv. Typhimurium

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    Porwollik Steffen

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium is a Gram-negative pathogen that must successfully adapt to the broad fluctuations in the concentration of dissolved dioxygen encountered in the host. In Escherichia coli, ArcA (Aerobic Respiratory Control helps the cells to sense and respond to the presence of dioxygen. The global role of ArcA in E. coli is well characterized; however, little is known about its role in anaerobically grown S. Typhimurium. Results We compared the transcriptional profiles of the virulent wild-type (WT strain (ATCC 14028s and its isogenic arcA mutant grown under anaerobic conditions. We found that ArcA directly or indirectly regulates 392 genes (8.5% of the genome; of these, 138 genes are poorly characterized. Regulation by ArcA in S. Typhimurium is similar, but distinct from that in E. coli. Thus, genes/operons involved in core metabolic pathways (e.g., succinyl-CoA, fatty acid degradation, cytochrome oxidase complexes, flagellar biosynthesis, motility, and chemotaxis were regulated similarly in the two organisms. However, genes/operons present in both organisms, but regulated differently by ArcA in S. Typhimurium included those coding for ethanolamine utilization, lactate transport and metabolism, and succinate dehydrogenases. Salmonella-specific genes/operons regulated by ArcA included those required for propanediol utilization, flagellar genes (mcpAC, cheV, Gifsy-1 prophage genes, and three SPI-3 genes (mgtBC, slsA, STM3784. In agreement with our microarray data, the arcA mutant was non-motile, lacked flagella, and was as virulent in mice as the WT. Additionally, we identified a set of 120 genes whose regulation was shared with the anaerobic redox regulator, Fnr. Conclusion(s We have identified the ArcA regulon in anaerobically grown S. Typhimurium. Our results demonstrated that in S. Typhimurium, ArcA serves as a transcriptional regulator coordinating cellular metabolism, flagella

  3. Characterization and differential gene expression between two phenotypic phase variants in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

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    Sheila K Patterson

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain 798 has previously been shown to undergo phenotypic phase variation. One of the phenotypes expresses virulence traits such as adhesion, while the other phenotype does not. Phenotypic phase variation appears to correlate with the ability of this strain to cause persistent, asymptomatic infections of swine. A new method to detect cells in either phenotypic phase was developed using Evans Blue-Uranine agar plates. Using this new assay, rates of phenotypic phase variation were obtained. The rate of phase variation from non-adhesive to adhesive phenotype was approximately 10(-4 per cell per generation while phase variation from the adhesive to the non-adhesive phenotype was approximately 10(-6 per cell per generation. Two highly virulent S. Typhimurium strains, SL1344 and ATCC 14028, were also shown to undergo phase variation. However, while the rate from adhesive to non-adhesive phenotype was approximately the same as for strain 798, the non-adhesive to adhesive phenotype shift was 37-fold higher. Differential gene expression was measured using RNA-Seq. Eighty-three genes were more highly expressed by 798 cells in the adhesive phenotype compared to the non-adhesive cells. Most of the up-regulated genes were in virulence genes and in particular all genes in the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 were up-regulated. When compared to the virulent strain SL1344, expression of the virulence genes was approximately equal to those up-regulated in the adhesive phenotype of strain 798. A comparison of invasive ability demonstrated that strain SL1344 was the most invasive followed by the adhesive phenotype of strain 798, then the non-adhesive phenotype of strain 798. The least invasive strain was ATCC 14028. The genome of strain 798 was sequenced and compared to SL1344. Both strains had very similar genome sequences and gene deletions could not readily explain differences in the rates of phase variation from non

  4. Isolation of Salmonella enterica serotype Worthington from a splenic abscess in a patient with chronic myeloid leukemia

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    Ghadage D.P.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Splenic abscesses are caused by Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus and bacteria belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae. We report a case of splenic abscess caused by an unusual serotype of Salmonella. A 55 year old man was admitted with complaints of fever and abdominal pain. On the basis of clinical findings and laboratory reports, a diagnosis of chronic myeloid leukemia was made. Ultrasonography of the abdomen revealed a single large cystic lesion in the spleen. Percutaneous drainage of the abscess was carried out. Salmonella enterica serotype Worthington was isolated from a pus sample taken from the abscess. The isolate was resistant to ampicillin, gentamicin, cefotaxime, chloramphenicol and tetracycline, and sensitive to amikacin and norfloxacin. Serotype Worthington is an emerging pathogen. This is the first report of isolation of this serotype from a splenic abscess. In seriously ill patients, such infections should be treated with a combination of antibiotics to circumvent problems with multidrug resistance.

  5. IS200 and multilocus sequence typing for the identification of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi strains from Indonesia.

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    Martínez-Gamboa, Areli; Silva, Claudia; Fernández-Mora, Marcos; Wiesner, Magdalena; Ponce de León, Alfredo; Calva, Edmundo

    2015-06-01

    In this work, IS200 and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) were used to analyze 19 strains previously serotyped as Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and isolated in Indonesia (16 strains), Mexico (2 strains), and Switzerland (1 strain). Most of the strains showed the most common Typhi sequence types, ST1 and ST2, and a new Typhi genotype (ST1856) was described. However, one isolate from Mexico and another from Indonesia were of the ST365 and ST426 sequence types, indicating that they belonged to serovars Weltevreden and Aberdeen, respectively. These results were supported by the amplification of IS200 fragments, which rapidly distinguish Typhi from other serovars. Our results demonstrate the utility of IS200 and MLST in the classification of Salmonella strains into serovars. These methods provide information on the clonal relatedness of strains isolated worldwide.

  6. Characterization of the yehUT two-component regulatory system of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi and Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Vanessa K; Pickard, Derek J; Barquist, Lars; Sivaraman, Karthikeyan; Page, Andrew J; Hart, Peter J; Arends, Mark J; Holt, Kathryn E; Kane, Leanne; Mottram, Lynda F; Ellison, Louise; Bautista, Ruben; McGee, Chris J; Kay, Sally J; Wileman, Thomas M; Kenney, Linda J; MacLennan, Calman A; Kingsley, Robert A; Dougan, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    Proteins exhibiting hyper-variable sequences within a bacterial pathogen may be associated with host adaptation. Several lineages of the monophyletic pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) have accumulated non-synonymous mutations in the putative two-component regulatory system yehUT. Consequently we evaluated the function of yehUT in S. Typhi BRD948 and S. Typhimurium ST4/74. Transcriptome analysis identified the cstA gene, encoding a carbon starvation protein as the predominantly yehUT regulated gene in both these serovars. Deletion of yehUT had no detectable effect on the ability of these mutant Salmonella to invade cultured epithelial cells (S. Typhi and S. Typhimurium) or induce colitis in a murine model (S. Typhimurium only). Growth, metabolic and antimicrobial susceptibility tests identified no obvious influences of yehUT on these phenotypes.

  7. Reinterpreting a community outbreak of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis in the light of molecular typing

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    Nastasi Antonino

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In November 2005, a large outbreak due to Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis was observed within children who had eaten their meals at 53 school cafeterias in Florence and the surrounding area. A total of 154 isolates of S. Enteritidis were recovered from human cases between November 2005 and January 2006. All strains were assigned phage type 8 (PT8 and a common XbaI pulsotype. This paper reports the findings of a molecular epidemiological investigation performed on 124 strains of S. Enteritidis isolated in the years 2005 and 2006 in Florence and the surrounding area, including the epidemic isolates. Methods One hundred twenty-four human isolates of S. Enteritidis identified in the period January 2005 – December 2006 were submitted to molecular typing by single enzyme – amplified fragment length polymorphism (SE-AFLP. Results Molecular subtyping by SE-AFLP yielded five different profiles. In the pre-epidemic phase, type A included 78.4% of isolates, whereas only three (8.1% belonged to type C. All isolates, but one, of the epidemic phase were indistinguishable and attributed to type C. In the post-epidemic period, a polymorphic pattern of SE-AFLP types was again recognized but type C accounted for 73.3% of the isolates during the first six months of 2006, whereas during the remaining six months type A regained the first place, including 52.0% of the isolates. Conclusion The epidemic event was attributed to the emergence and clonal expansion of a strain of S. Enteritidis PT8-SE-AFLP type C. Circulation of the epidemic clone was much more extensive than the surveillance and traditional laboratory data demonstrated.

  8. Growth and virulence properties of biofilm-forming Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium under different acidic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hua; Lee, Hyeon-Yong; Ahn, Juhee

    2010-12-01

    This study was designed to characterize the viability and potential virulence of bofilm-forming Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium under different pH levels, ranging from 5 to 7. The plate count method and real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) were used to evaluate the survival of S. Typhimurium grown in Trypticase soy broth (TSB) adjusted to pH 5, 6, and 7 (TSB-5, TSB-6, and TSB-7, respectively) at 37°C for 10 days. In TSB-5 and TSB-6, the numbers of viable cells estimated by using the real-time RT-PCR were greater than the culturable counts enumerated by the plate count method. Reflectance micro-Fourier transform infrared (micro-FTIR) spectroscopy was used to evaluate the biochemical changes in biofilm cells. Considerable changes in chemical components were observed in the biofilm cells grown in TSB-5 and TSB-6 when compared to the cells grown in TSB-7. The enterotoxin production and invasive ability of planktonic and biofilm S. Typhimurium cells were inferred by the relative levels of expression of stn and invA. The levels of expression of stn and invA were significantly increased in biofilm S. Typhimurium cells grown in TSB-5 (1.9-fold and 3.2-fold) and TSB-6 (2.1-fold and 22.3-fold) after 10 days of incubation. These results suggest that the biofilm-forming S. Typhimurium under different pH levels might change the virulence production and stress response mechanisms.

  9. Clinical and veterinary isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis defective in lipopolysaccharide O-chain polymerization

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    Guard-Petter, J.; Parker, C.T. [Agricultural Research Service, Athens, GA (United States). Southeast Poultry Research Lab.; Asokan, K.; Carlson, R.W. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Complex Carbohydrate Research Center

    1999-05-01

    Twelve human and chicken isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis belonging to phage types 4, 8, 13a, and 23 were characterized for variability in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) composition. Isolates were differentiated into two groups, i.e., those that lacked immunoreactive O-chain, termed rough isolates, and those that had immunoreactive O-chain, termed smooth isolates. Isolates within these groups could be further differentiated by LPS compositional differences as detected by gel electrophoresis and gas liquid chromatography of samples extracted with water, which yielded significantly more LPS in comparison to phenol-chloroform extraction. The rough isolates were of two types, the O-antigen synthesis mutants and the O-antigen polymerization (wzy) mutants. Smooth isolates were also of two types, one producing low-molecular-weight (LMW) LPS and the other producing high-molecular-weight (HMW) LPS. To determine the genetic basis for the O-chain variability of the smooth isolates, the authors analyzed the effects of a null mutation in the O-chain length determinant gene, wzz (cld) of serovar Typhimurium. This mutation results in a loss of HMW LPS; however, the LMW LPS of this mutant was longer and more glucosylated than that from clinical isolates of serovar Enteritidis. Cluster analysis of these data and of those from two previously characterized isogenic strains of serovar Enteritidis that had different virulence attributes indicated that glucosylation of HMW LPS (via oafR function) is variable and results in two types of HMW structures, one that is highly glucosylated and one that is minimally glucosylated. These results strongly indicate that naturally occurring variability in wzy, wzz, and oafR function can be used to subtype isolates of serovar Enteritidis during epidemiological investigations.

  10. Characterization of Novel Factors Involved in Swimming and Swarming Motility in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium.

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    Julia Andrea Deditius

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica utilizes flagellar motility to swim through liquid environments and on surfaces. The biosynthesis of the flagellum is regulated on various levels, including transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms. Here, we investigated the motility phenotype of 24 selected single gene deletions that were previously described to display swimming and swarming motility effects. Mutations in flgE, fliH, ydiV, rfaG, yjcC, STM1267 and STM3363 showed an altered motility phenotype. Deletions of flgE and fliH displayed a non-motile phenotype in both swimming and swarming motility assays as expected. The deletions of STM1267, STM3363, ydiV, rfaG and yjcC were further analyzed in detail for flagellar and fimbrial gene expression and filament formation. A ΔydiV mutant showed increased swimming motility, but a decrease in swarming motility, which coincided with derepression of curli fimbriae. A deletion of yjcC, encoding for an EAL domain-containing protein, increased swimming motility independent on flagellar gene expression. A ΔSTM1267 mutant displayed a hypermotile phenotype on swarm agar plates and was found to have increased numbers of flagella. In contrast, a knockout of STM3363 did also display an increase in swarming motility, but did not alter flagella numbers. Finally, a deletion of the LPS biosynthesis-related protein RfaG reduced swimming and swarming motility, associated with a decrease in transcription from flagellar class II and class III promoters and a lack of flagellar filaments.

  11. Antimicrobial resistance, virulence profiles and molecular subtypes of Salmonella enterica serovars Typhi and Paratyphi A blood isolates from Kolkata, India during 2009-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Shanta; Das, Surojit; Mitra, Utpala; Jain, Priyanka; Roy, Indranil; Ganguly, Shelley S; Ray, Ujjwayini; Dutta, Phalguni; Paul, Dilip Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Enteric fever, caused by Salmonella enterica, remains an unresolved public health problem in India and antimicrobial therapy is the main mode of treatment. The objective of this study was to characterize the Salmonella enterica isolates from Kolkata with respect to their antimicrobial resistance (AMR), virulence profiles and molecular subtypes. Salmonella enterica blood isolates were collected from clinically suspected enteric fever patients attending various hospitals in Kolkata, India from January 2009 to June 2013 and were tested for AMR profiles by standard protocols; for resistance gene transfer by conjugation; for resistance and virulence genes profiles by PCR; and for molecular subtypes by Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE). A total of 77 Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) and 25 Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi A (S. Paratyphi A) from Kolkata were included in this study. Although multidrug resistance (resistance to chloramphenicol, ampicillin, co-trimoxazole) was decreasing in S. Typhi (18.2%) and absent in S. Paratyphi A, increased resistance to fluoroquinolone, the current drug of choice, caused growing concern for typhoid treatment. A single, non-conjugative non-IncHI1 plasmid of 180 kb was found in 71.4% multidrug resistant (MDR) S. Typhi; the remaining 28.6% isolates were without plasmid. Various AMR markers (blaTEM-1, catA, sul1, sul2, dfrA15, strA-strB) and class 1 integron with dfrA7 gene were detected in MDR S. Typhi by PCR and sequencing. Most of the study isolates were likely to be virulent due to the presence of virulence markers. Major diversity was not noticed among S. Typhi and S. Paratyphi A from Kolkata by PFGE. The observed association between AMR profiles and S. Typhi pulsotypes might be useful in controlling the spread of the organism by appropriate intervention. The study reiterated the importance of continuous monitoring of AMR and molecular subtypes of Salmonella isolates from endemic regions for better

  12. Virulence characterisation of Salmonella enterica isolates of differing antimicrobial resistance recovered from UK livestock and imported meat samples.

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    Roderick eCard

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica is a foodborne zoonotic pathogen of significant public health concern. We have characterised the virulence and antimicrobial resistance gene content of 95 Salmonella isolates from 11 serovars by DNA microarray recovered from UK livestock or imported meat. Genes encoding resistance to sulphonamides (sul1, sul2, tetracycline (tet(A, tet(B, streptomycin (strA, strB, aminoglycoside (aadA1, aadA2, beta-lactam (blaTEM, and trimethoprim (dfrA17 were common. Virulence gene content differed between serovars; S. Typhimurium formed two subclades based on virulence plasmid presence. Thirteen isolates were selected by their virulence profile for pathotyping using the Galleria mellonella pathogenesis model. Infection with a chicken invasive S. Enteritidis or S. Gallinarum isolate, a multidrug resistant S. Kentucky, or a S. Typhimurium DT104 isolate resulted in high mortality of the larvae; notably presence of the virulence plasmid in S. Typhimurium was not associated with increased larvae mortality. Histopathological examination showed that infection caused severe damage to the Galleria gut structure. Enumeration of intracellular bacteria in the larvae 24 hours post-infection showed increases of up to 7 log above the initial inoculum and transmission electron microscopy (TEM showed bacterial replication in the haemolymph. TEM also revealed the presence of vacuoles containing bacteria in the haemocytes, similar to Salmonella containing vacuoles observed in mammalian macrophages; although there was no evidence from our work of bacterial replication within vacuoles. This work shows that microarrays can be used for rapid virulence genotyping of S. enterica and that the Galleria animal model replicates some aspects of Salmonella infection in mammals. These procedures can be used to help inform on the pathogenicity of isolates that may be antibiotic resistant and have scope to aid the assessment of their potential public and animal health risk.

  13. Tolerance response of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica strains to habituation to Origanum vulgare L essential oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eMonte

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica isolates from human outbreaks or from poultry origin were investigated for their ability to develop direct-tolerance or cross-tolerance to sodium chloride (NaCl, potassium chloride (KCl, lactic acid (LA, acetic acid (AA and ciprofloxacin (CIP after habituation in subinhibitory amounts (½ of the minimum inhibitory concentration - ½ MIC and ¼ of the minimum inhibitory concentration - ¼ MIC of Origanum vulgare L. essential oil (OVEO at different time intervals. The habituation of S. enterica to OVEO did not induce direct-tolerance or cross-tolerance in the tested strains, as assessed by the modulation of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC values. However, cells habituated to OVEO maintained or increased susceptibility to the tested antimicrobials agents, with up to four-fold double dilution decrease from previously determined MIC values. This study reports for the first time the non-inductive effect of OVEO on the acquisition of direct-tolerance or cross-tolerance in multidrug-resistant S. enterica strains to antimicrobial agents that are largely used in food preservation, as well as to CIP, the therapeutic drug of salmonellosis.

  14. Comparison of Methods of Extracting Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis DNA from Environmental Substrates and Quantification of Organisms by Using a General Internal Procedural Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klerks, M.M.; Bruggen, van A.H.C.; Zijlstra, C.; Donnikov, M.; Vos, de R.

    2006-01-01

    This paper compares five commercially available DNA extraction methods with respect to DNA extraction efficiency of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis from soil, manure, and compost and uses an Escherichia coli strain harboring a plasmid expressing green fluorescent protein as a general interna

  15. Translocation of integron-associated resistance in a natural system: Acquisition of resistance determinants by Inc P and Inc W Plasmids from Salmonella enterica Typhimurium DT104

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvang, Dorthe; Diggle, M.; Platt, D.J.

    2002-01-01

    Salmonella enterica Typhimurium DT104, 961368, a veterinary field isolate that encodes a chromosomal cluster of resistance genes as well as two integrons, was used to study the mobility of resistance cassettes (aadA2 and pse-1) and nonintegron-associated resistance determinants (chloramphenicol...

  16. An Evaluation of Alternatives to Nitrites and Sulfites to Inhibit the Growth of Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes in Meat Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamas, Alexandre; Miranda, José Manuel; Vázquez, Beatriz; Cepeda, Alberto; Franco, Carlos Manuel

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the use of nitrites and sulfites as food preservatives has been a cause for concern due to the health problems that these additives can cause in humans. Natural products have been studied as an alternative, but most of them have hardly been applied in the food industry for technological and economic reasons. In this sense, organic salts such as sodium acetate are a good alternative due to their affordability. Thus, this study evaluated the capacity of sodium nitrite, sodium sulfite, a sodium acetate product (TQI C-6000), and chitosan to inhibit two important foodborne pathogens, Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes. The MIC of each chemical was in vitro evaluated and their antibacterial action was subsequently checked in situ using minced meat as a food model. MIC values of sodium nitrite (10,000 mg/L) and sodium sulfite (50,000 mg/L) for Salmonella enterica were higher than the values allowed by legislation (450 mg/L for sulfites and 150 mg/L for nitrites). Additionally, the sodium acetate product caused the inhibition of Salmonella enterica and Listeria at a relative low quantity. The two foodborne pathogens were inhibited in the food model with 1% of the sodium acetate product. Additionally, there were no significant differences between sodium nitrite, sodium sulfite, and sodium acetate products in the inhibition of Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes in the food model. Thus, products based on sodium acetate can be an alternative to traditional preservatives in food products. PMID:28231169

  17. Mixed biofilm formation by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium enhanced bacterial resistance to sanitization due to extracellular polymeric substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium are important foodborne pathogens capable of forming single-species biofilms or coexisting in multispecies biofilm communities. Bacterial biofilm cells are usually more resistant to sanitization than their pla...

  18. Characterization of epidemic IncI1-Iγ plasmids harboring ambler class A and C genes in Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica from animals and humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, Hilde; Bossers, Alex; Harders, Frank; Wu, Guanghui; Woodford, Neil; Schwarz, Stefan; Guerra, Beatriz; Rodríguez, Irene; Essen-Zandbergen, Van Alieda; Brouwer, Michael; Mevius, Dik

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to identify the plasmid-encoded factors contributing to the emergence and spread of epidemic IncI1-Iγ plasmids obtained from Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica isolates from animal and human reservoirs. For this, 251 IncI1-Iγ plasmids carrying various extended-spect

  19. Characterization of Anti-Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhi Antibody Responses in Bacteremic Bangladeshi Patients by an Immuno-affinity Proteomic-based Technology (IPT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi (S. Typhi) is the cause of typhoid fever and a human-restricted pathogen. Currently available typhoid vaccines provide only 50-75% protection for 2-5 years, and available diagnostic assays to identify individuals with typhoid fever lack both sensitivity and specif...

  20. Characterization of Anti-Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhi Antibody Responses in Bacteremic Bangladeshi Patients Using Immuno-affinity Proteomic-based Technology (IPT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi (S. Typhi) is the cause of typhoid fever and a human-restricted pathogen. Currently available typhoid vaccines provide only 50-75% protection for 2-5 years, and available diagnostic assays to identify individuals with typhoid fever lack both sensitivity and specifi...

  1. Multi-Locus Variable-Number Tandem Repeat Profiling of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi Isolates from Blood Cultures and Gallbladder Specimens from Makassar, South-Sulawesi, Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hatta, M.; Pastoor, R.; Scheelbeek, P.F.D.; Sultan, A.R.; Dwiyanti, R.; Labeda, I.; Smits, H.L.

    2011-01-01

    Multi-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis differentiated 297 Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi blood culture isolates from Makassar in 76 genotypes and a single unique S. Typhi genotype was isolated from the cholecystectomy specimens of four patients with cholelithiasis. The high diversity

  2. Chicken-specific kinome array reveals that Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis modulates host immune signaling pathways in the cecum to establish a persistence infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica induce an early, short-lived, pro-inflammatory response in chickens that is asymptomatic of clinical disease and results in a persistent colonization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract that transmits infections to naïve hosts via fecal shedding of bacteria. The und...

  3. An Evaluation of Alternatives to Nitrites and Sulfites to Inhibit the Growth of Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes in Meat Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Lamas

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the use of nitrites and sulfites as food preservatives has been a cause for concern due to the health problems that these additives can cause in humans. Natural products have been studied as an alternative, but most of them have hardly been applied in the food industry for technological and economic reasons. In this sense, organic salts such as sodium acetate are a good alternative due to their affordability. Thus, this study evaluated the capacity of sodium nitrite, sodium sulfite, a sodium acetate product (TQI C-6000, and chitosan to inhibit two important foodborne pathogens, Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes. The MIC of each chemical was in vitro evaluated and their antibacterial action was subsequently checked in situ using minced meat as a food model. MIC values of sodium nitrite (10,000 mg/L and sodium sulfite (50,000 mg/L for Salmonella enterica were higher than the values allowed by legislation (450 mg/L for sulfites and 150 mg/L for nitrites. Additionally, the sodium acetate product caused the inhibition of Salmonella enterica and Listeria at a relative low quantity. The two foodborne pathogens were inhibited in the food model with 1% of the sodium acetate product. Additionally, there were no significant differences between sodium nitrite, sodium sulfite, and sodium acetate products in the inhibition of Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes in the food model. Thus, products based on sodium acetate can be an alternative to traditional preservatives in food products.

  4. Bactericidal activities of health-promoting,food-derived powders against the foodborne pathogens Escherichia coli,listeria monocytogenes, salmonella enterica,and staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    We evaluated the relative bactericidal activities of 10 presumed health-promoting food-based powders (nutraceuticals) and for comparison, several selected known components of such powders against the following foodborne pathogens: Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica, Listeria monocytogenes...

  5. Effect of X-ray treatments on Escherichia coli 0157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, Shigella flexneri, Salmonella enterica and inherent microbiota on whole mangoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aims of this investigation were to; (i) study the effect of X-ray treatments in reducing Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella enterica and Shigella flexneri on whole mangoes, and (ii) study the effect of Xray treatments on microflora counts (mesophilic counts, psychrotrop...

  6. Proteomic pleiotropy of OpgGH, an operon necessary for efficient growth of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium under low-osmotic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmonella enterica, a bacterial, food-borne pathogen of humans, can contaminate raw fruits and vegetables. Causing much public concern, the bacteria can survive in water used to wash produce. The ability to survive the low-osmolarity of the wash waters is attributed to the OpgGH operon that leads...

  7. Highly expressed amino acid biosynthesis genes revealed by global gene expression analysis of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis during growth in whole egg are not essential for this growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakociune, Dziuginta; Herrero-Fresno, Ana; Jelsbak, Lotte;

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is the most common cause of egg borne salmonellosis in many parts of the world. This study analyzed gene expression of this bacterium during growth in whole egg, and whether highly expressed genes were essential for the growth. High quality...

  8. Antimicrobial activities of red wine-based formulations containing plant extracts against Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Hadar

    Science.gov (United States)

    We evaluated the bactericidal activities of red wine and red wine solutions containing a commercial olive extract called Hydrox-12, oregano oil, or a mixture of both in red wine against the following foodborne pathogens: Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica, Listeria monocytogenes, and Stap...

  9. Inactivation of Bacillus cereus and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium by aqueous ozone (O3): Modeling and Uv-Vis spectroscopic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozone (O3) is a natural antimicrobial agent with potential applications in food industry. In this study, inactivation of Bacillus cereus and Salmonella enterica Typhimurium by aqueous ozone was evaluated. Ozone gas was generated using a domestic ozone generator with an output of 200 mg/hr (approx. 0...

  10. Effect of the surfactant Tween 80 on the detachment and dispersal of Salmonella enterica Thompson single cells and aggregates from cilantro leaves as revealed by image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biofilms formed by human enteric pathogens on plants are a great concern to the produce industry. Salmonella enterica has the ability to form biofilms and large aggregates on leaf surfaces, including on cilantro leaves. Aggregates that remained attached after rigorous washing of cilantro leaves and ...

  11. Feasibility of a molecular screening method for detection of Salmonella enterica and Campylobacter jejuni in a routine community-based clinical microbiology laboratory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurman, T.; de Boer, R. F.; van Zanten, E.; van Slochteren, K. R.; Scheper, H. R.; Dijk-Alberts, B. G.; Moller, A. V. M.; Kooistra-Smid, A. M. D.

    2007-01-01

    Conventional diagnostic methods for the detection of Salmonella enterica and Campylobacter jejuni are laborious and time-consuming procedures, resulting in final results, for the majority of specimens, only after 3 to 4 days. Molecular detection can improve the time to reporting of the final results

  12. Characterization of epidemic IncI1-Iγ plasmids harboring ambler class A and C genes in Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica from animals and humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, Hilde; Bossers, Alex; Harders, Frank; Wu, Guanghui; Woodford, Neil; Schwarz, Stefan; Guerra, Beatriz; Rodríguez, Irene; van Essen-Zandbergen, Alieda; Brouwer, Michael; Mevius, Dik

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to identify the plasmid-encoded factors contributing to the emergence and spread of epidemic IncI1-Iγ plasmids obtained from Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica isolates from animal and human reservoirs. For this, 251 IncI1-Iγ plasmids carrying various extended-spectrum

  13. Immuno-fluorescence based Vi capsular polysaccharide detection for specific recognition of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi in clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Satish K; Vinayaka, Aaydha C; Rishi, Dharam B; Rishi, Praveen; Suri, C Raman

    2014-09-01

    Typhoid fever is a life threatening bacterial infection that remains a major global health concern. This continued high burden associated with significant morbidity and mortality rate demands specific and rapid detection technique. This work reports a new sandwich type fluorescence immunoassay format using polymyxin B, a cationic receptor molecule, as a binder agent while anti-Vi antibody served as the capturing agent for specifically detecting Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi. Anti-Vi IgG antibody raised against Vi-BSA conjugate revealed affinity of 7.779nM(-1) signifying immunodominancy of O-acetyls groups in Vi polysaccharide. The detection limit of the developed assay was around 10(1) cellsmL(-1) of Vi expressing Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi with a correlation coefficient (R(2)) equal to 0.97. Positive response obtained for all the tested serovar Typhi clinical isolates as well as the pathogen spiked blood samples recommended specificity and accuracy of Vi antigen as a biomarker during typhoid fever. The intra- and inter-assay precision with Vi spiked samples were satisfactory revealing coefficient of variance (CV%) with a mean of 4.05% and 5.97% respectively. This may be the novel attempt and constructive report on the fluorescence based detection of Vi antigen of serovar Typhi in the epidemic as well as pandemic outbreaks.

  14. Divergent roles of Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 and metabolic traits during interaction of S. enterica serovar typhimurium with host cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie U Hölzer

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms of virulence of the gastrointestinal pathogen Salmonella enterica are commonly studied using cell culture models of infection. In this work, we performed a direct comparison of the interaction of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium with the non-polarized epithelial cell line HeLa, the polarized cell lines CaCo2, T84 and MDCK, and macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells. The ability of S. Typhimurium wild-type and previously characterized auxotrophic mutant strains to enter host cells, survive and proliferate within mammalian cells and deploy the Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 2-encoded type III secretion system (SPI2-T3SS was quantified. We found that the entry of S. Typhimurium into polarized cells was much more efficient than entry into non-polarized cells or phagocytic uptake. While SPI2-T3SS dependent intracellular proliferation was observed in HeLa and RAW cells, the intracellular replication in polarized cells was highly restricted and not affected by defective SPI2-T3SS. The contribution of aromatic amino acid metabolism and purine biosynthesis to intracellular proliferation was distinct in the various cell lines investigated. These observations indicate that the virulence phenotypes of S. Typhimurium are significantly affected by the cell culture model applied.

  15. "Multiplex PCR" identification of the atypical and monophasic Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype 1,4,[5],12:i:- in São Paulo State, Brazil: frequency and antibiotic resistance patterns Identificação por "Multiplex PCR" do sorotipo monofásico e atípico Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica sorotipo 1,4,[5],12:i:-, no Estado de São Paulo, Brasil: freqüência e resistência antimicrobiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana T. Tavechio

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella spp. are the etiologic agents of salmonellosis, a worldwide spread zoonoses causing foodborne outbreaks and clinical diseases. By serological identification, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype 1,4,[5],12:i:- accounted for 8.8% of human and 1.6% of nonhuman Salmonella strains isolated in São Paulo State, during 1991-2000. A total of 28.6% of them amplified a fragment corresponding to H:1,2 (flagellar phase two through PCR analysis and were further assigned as S. Typhimurium. Antimicrobial resistance was detected in 36.3% of the 369 PCR-negative strains tested, including the multiresistance to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, sulfonamides, tetracycline, and streptomycin.Salmonella spp. é o agente etiológico da salmonelose, zoonose mundialmente distribuída e responsável por surtos de doenças transmitidas por alimentos e doenças clínicas. Sorologicamente, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica sorotipo 1,4,[5],12:i:- correspondeu a 8,8% e 1,6% das cepas de Salmonella de origem humana e não-humana, respectivamente, isoladas no Estado de São Paulo, no decênio 1991-2000. Aproximadamente 28,6% destas cepas amplificaram o fragmento correspondente a H:1,2 (fase flagelar dois em testes de PCR e foram, então, identificadas como S. Typhimurium. Das 369 cepas negativas em PCR, 36,3% apresentou resistência antimicrobiana, incluindo multirresistência a ampicilina, cloranfenicol, sulfonamidas, tetraciclina e estreptomicina.

  16. A defective mutant of Salmonella enterica Serovar Gallinarum in cobalamin biosynthesis is avirulent in chickens Mutante de Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum duplo defectivo na biossíntese de cobalamina é avirulento para aves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Boldrin de Paiva

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum (SG is a fowl typhoid agent in chickens and is a severe disease with worldwide economic impact as its mortality may reach up to 80%. It is one of a small group of serovars that typically produces typhoid-like infections in a narrow range of host species and which therefore represents a good model for human typhoid. The survival mechanisms are not considered to be virulent mechanisms but are essential for the life of the bacterium. Mutants of Salmonella Gallinarum containing defective genes, related to cobalamin biosynthesis and which Salmonella spp. has to be produced to survive when it is in an anaerobic environment, were produced in this study. Salmonella Gallinarum is an intracellular parasite. Therefore, this study could provide information about whether vitamin B12 biosynthesis might be essential to its survival in the host. The results showed that the singular deletion in cbiA or cobS genes did not interfere in the life of Salmonella Gallinarum in the host, perhaps because single deletion is not enough to impede vitamin B12 biosynthesis. It was noticed that diluted SG mutants with single deletion produced higher mortality than the wild strain of SG. When double mutation was carried out, the Salmonella Gallinarum mutant was unable to provoke mortality in susceptible chickens. This work showed that B12 biosynthesis is a very important step in the metabolism of Salmonella Gallinarum during the infection of the chickens. Further research on bacterium physiology should be carried out to elucidate the events described in this research and to assess the mutant as a vaccine strain.Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum (SG é o agente do tifo aviário, doença severa que provoca mortalidade em até 80% do plantel de aves. SG encontra-se entre os poucos sorotipos de Salmonella que são agentes etiológicos de enfermidade específica, à semelhança de Salmonella Typhi em seres humanos podendo, portanto, servir

  17. Influence of lactic acid bacteria on longevity of Caenorhabditis elegans and host defense against salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Takanori; Yasui, Chikako; Hoshino, Kaori; Arikawa, Kentaro; Nishikawa, Yoshikazu

    2007-10-01

    This study aimed to develop a convenient model to investigate the senescence of host defenses and the influence of food and nutrition. A small soil nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, was grown for 3 days from hatching on a lawn of Escherichia coli OP50 as the normal food source, and subsequently some of the nematodes were fed lactic acid bacteria (LAB). The life spans of worms fed LAB were significantly longer than the life spans of those fed OP50. To investigate the effect of age on host defenses, 3- to 7-day-old worms fed OP50 were transferred onto a lawn of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis for infection. The nematodes died over the course of several days, and the accumulation of salmonella in the intestinal lumen suggested that the worms were infected. The 7-day-old worms showed a higher death rate during the 5 days after infection than nematodes infected at the age of 3 days; no clear difference was observed when the worms were exposed to OP50. We then investigated whether the LAB could exert probiotic effects on the worms' host defenses and improve life span. Seven-day-old nematodes fed LAB from the age of 3 days were more resistant to salmonella than worms fed OP50 until they were infected with salmonella. This study clearly showed that LAB can enhance the host defense of C. elegans and prolong life span. The nematode appears to be an appropriate model for screening useful probiotic strains or dietetic antiaging substances.

  18. No beneficial effects evident for Enterococcus faecium NCIMB 10415 in weaned pigs infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuzer, Susanne; Janczyk, Pawel; Assmus, Jens; Schmidt, Michael F G; Brockmann, Gudrun A; Nöckler, Karsten

    2012-07-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT 104 is the major pathogen for salmonellosis outbreaks in Europe. We tested if the probiotic bacterium Enterococcus faecium NCIMB 10415 can prevent or alleviate salmonellosis. Therefore, piglets of the German Landrace breed that were treated with E. faecium (n = 16) as a feed additive and untreated controls (n = 16) were challenged with S. Typhimurium 10 days after weaning. The presence of salmonellae in feces and selected organs, as well as the immune response, were investigated. Piglets treated with E. faecium gained less weight than control piglets (P = 0.05). The feeding of E. faecium had no effect on the fecal shedding of salmonellae and resulted in a higher abundance of the pathogen in tonsils of all challenged animals. The specific (anti-Salmonella IgG) and nonspecific (haptoglobin) humoral immune responses as well as the cellular immune response (T helper cells, cytotoxic T cells, regulatory T cells, γδ T cells, and B cells) in the lymph nodes, Peyer's patches of different segments of the intestine (jejunal and ileocecal), the ileal papilla, and in the blood were affected in the course of time after infection (P < 0.05) but not by the E. faecium treatment. These results led to the conclusion that E. faecium may not have beneficial effects on the performance of weaned piglets in the case of S. Typhimurium infection. Therefore, we suggest a critical discussion and reconsideration of E. faecium NCIMB 10415 administration as a probiotic for pigs.

  19. Models of intestinal infection by Salmonella enterica: introduction of a new neonate mouse model [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Schulte

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a foodborne pathogen causing inflammatory disease in the intestine following diarrhea and is responsible for thousands of deaths worldwide. Many in vitro investigations using cell culture models are available, but these do not represent the real natural environment present in the intestine of infected hosts. Several in vivo animal models have been used to study the host-pathogen interaction and to unravel the immune responses and cellular processes occurring during infection. An animal model for Salmonella-induced intestinal inflammation relies on the pretreatment of mice with streptomycin. This model is of great importance but still shows limitations to investigate the host-pathogen interaction in the small intestine in vivo. Here, we review the use of mouse models for Salmonella infections and focus on a new small animal model using 1-day-old neonate mice. The neonate model enables researchers to observe infection of both the small and large intestine, thereby offering perspectives for new experimental approaches, as well as to analyze the Salmonella-enterocyte interaction in the small intestine in vivo.

  20. Phage types of Salmonella enterica ssp. enterica serovar Typhimurium isolated from production animals and humans in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    1994-01-01

    S. Typhimurium is one of the 2 most common salmonella serotypes causing human salmonellosis in Denmark. In order to illustrate the significance of different production animals as a source of infection, 1461 isolates were characterized by phage typing. The isolates originated from human patients...

  1. Microarray-based detection of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium transposon mutants that cannot survive in macrophages and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kaman; Kim, Charles C; Falkow, Stanley

    2005-09-01

    DNA microarrays provide an opportunity to combine the principles of signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) with microarray technology to identify potentially important bacterial virulence genes. The scope of DNA microarrays allows for less laborious screening on a much larger scale than possible by STM alone. We have adapted a microarray-based transposon tracking strategy for use with a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium cDNA microarray in order to identify genes important for survival and replication in RAW 264.7 mouse macrophage-like cells or in the spleens of BALB/cJ mice. A 50,000-CFU transposon library of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium strain SL1344 was serially passaged in cultured macrophages or intraperitoneally inoculated into BALB/cJ mice. The bacterial genomic DNA was isolated and processed for analysis on the microarray. The novel application of this approach to identify mutants unable to survive in cultured cells resulted in the identification of components of Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI2), which is known to be critical for intracellular survival and replication. In addition, array results indicated that a number of SPI1-associated genes, currently not associated with intracellular survival, are negatively selected. However, of the SPI1-associated mutants individually tested for intracellular survival, only a sirA mutant exhibited reduced numbers relative to those of wild-type bacteria. Of the mutants unable to survive in mice, significant proportions are either components of the SPI2 pathogenicity island or involved in lipopolysaccharide synthesis. This observation is in agreement with results obtained in the original S. enterica serovar Typhimurium STM screen, illustrating the utility of this approach for the high-throughput identification of virulence factors important for survival in the host.

  2. Influence of 5 major Salmonella pathogenicity islands on NK cell depletion in mice infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondrackova Petra

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this study we were interested in the colonisation and early immune response of Balb/C mice to infection with Salmonella Enteritidis and isogenic pathogenicity island free mutants. Results The virulence of S. Enteritidis for Balb/C mice was exclusively dependent on intact SPI-2. Infections with any of the mutants harbouring SPI-2 (including the mutant in which we left only SPI-2 but removed SPI-1, SPI-3, SPI-4 and SPI-5 resulted in fatalities, liver injures and NK cell depletion from the spleen. The infection was of minimal influence on counts of splenic CD4 CD8 T lymphocytes and γδ T-lymphocytes although a reduced ability of splenic lymphocytes to respond to non-specific mitogens indicated general immunosuppression in mice infected with SPI-2 positive S. Enteritidis mutants. Further investigations showed that NK cells were depleted also in blood but not in the caecal lamina propria. However, NK cell depletion was not directly associated with the presence of SPI-2 and was rather an indicator of virulence or avirulence of a particular mutant because the depletion was not observed in mice infected with other attenuated mutants such as lon and rfaL. Conclusions The virulence of S. Enteritidis for Balb/C mice is exclusively dependent on the presence of SPI-2 in its genome, and a major hallmark of the infection in terms of early changes in lymphocyte populations is the depletion of NK cells in spleen and blood. The decrease of NK cells in circulation can be used as a marker of attenuation of S. Enteritidis mutants for Balb/C mice.

  3. Multiplex PCR-Based Serogrouping and Serotyping of Salmonella enterica from Tonsil and Jejunum with Jejunal Lymph Nodes of Slaughtered Swine in Metro Manila, Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Kamela Charmaine S; Rivera, Windell L

    2015-05-01

    Food poisoning outbreaks and livestock mortalities caused by Salmonella enterica are widespread in the Philippines, with hogs being the most commonly recognized carriers of the pathogen. To prevent and control the occurrence of S. enterica infection in the country, methods were used in this study to isolate and rapidly detect, differentiate, and characterize S. enterica in tonsils and jejuna with jejunal lymph nodes of swine slaughtered in four locally registered meat establishments (LRMEs) and four meat establishments accredited by the National Meat Inspection Services in Metro Manila. A total of 480 samples were collected from 240 animals (120 pigs from each type of meat establishment). A significantly higher proportion of pigs were positive for S. enterica in LRMEs (60 of 120) compared with meat establishments accredited by the National Meat Inspection Services (38 of 120). More S. enterica-positive samples were found in tonsils compared with jejuna with jejunal lymph nodes in LRMEs, but this difference was not significant. A PCR assay targeting the invA gene had sensitivity that was statistically similar to that of the culture method, detecting 93 of 98 culture-confirmed samples. Multiplex PCR-based O-serogrouping and H/Sdf I typing revealed four S. enterica serogroups (B, C1, D, and E) and six serotypes (Agona, Choleraesuis, Enteritidis, Heidelberg, Typhimurium, and Weltevreden), respectively, which was confirmed by DNA sequencing of the PCR products. This study was the first to report detection of S. enterica serotype Agona in the country.

  4. Mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomic analysis of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis protein expression upon exposure to hydrogen peroxide

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    Su Jing

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonella enterica, a common food-borne bacterial pathogen, is believed to change its protein expression profile in the presence of different environmental stress such as that caused by the exposure to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, which can be generated by phagocytes during infection and represents an important antibacterial mechanism of host cells. Among Salmonella proteins, the effectors of Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 and 2 (SPI-1 and SPI-2 are of particular interest since they are expressed during host infection in vivo and are important for invasion of epithelial cells and for replication in organs during systemic infection, respectively. However, the expression profiles of these proteins upon exposure to H2O2 or to host cells in vivo during the established phase of systemic infection have not been extensively studied. Results Using stable isotope labeling coupled with mass spectrometry, we performed quantitative proteomic analysis of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis and identified 76 proteins whose expression is modulated upon exposure to H2O2. SPI-1 effector SipC was expressed about 3-fold higher and SopB was expressed approximately 2-fold lower in the presence of H2O2, while no significant change in the expression of another SPI-1 protein SipA was observed. The relative abundance of SipA, SipC, and SopB was confirmed by Western analyses, validating the accuracy and reproducibility of our approach for quantitative analysis of protein expression. Furthermore, immuno-detection showed substantial expression of SipA and SipC but not SopB in the late phase of infection in macrophages and in the spleen of infected mice. Conclusions We have identified Salmonella proteins whose expression is modulated in the presence of H2O2. Our results also provide the first direct evidence that SipC is highly expressed in the spleen at late stage of salmonellosis in vivo. These results suggest a possible role of SipC and other

  5. Cross-protection against Salmonella Typhimurium infection conferred by a live attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccine.

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    Nandre, Rahul M; Lee, Dajeong; Lee, John Hwa

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a genetically engineered live attenuated Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) vaccine was evaluated for its ability to protect against Salmonella Typhimurium (ST) infection in chickens. The birds were orally primed with the vaccine on the 1st day of life and given an oral booster at 5 wk of age. Control birds were orally inoculated with phosphate-buffered saline. Both groups of birds were orally challenged with a virulent ST strain at 9 wk of age. Compared with the control chickens, the vaccinated chickens had significantly higher levels of systemic IgG and mucosal IgA against specific ST antigens and a significantly greater lymphoproliferative response to ST antigens. The excretion of ST into the feces was significantly lower in the vaccinated group than in the control group on days 9 and 13 d after challenge. In addition, the vaccinated group had significantly fewer pronounced gross lesions in the liver and spleen and lower bacterial counts in the internal organs than the control group after challenge. These data indicate that genetically engineered live attenuated SE may induce humoral and cellular immune responses against ST antigens and may confer protection against virulent ST challenge.

  6. Horizontal gene transfer of a ColV plasmid has resulted in a dominant avian clonal type of Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky.

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    Timothy J Johnson

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica continues to be a significant cause of foodborne gastrointestinal illness in humans. A wide variety of Salmonella serovars have been isolated from production birds and from retail poultry meat. Recently, though, S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Kentucky has emerged as one of the prominent Salmonella serovars isolated from broiler chickens. Recent work suggests that its emergence apparently coincides with its acquisition of a ColV virulence plasmid. In the present study, we examined 902 Salmonella isolates belonging to 59 different serovars for the presence of this plasmid. Of the serovars examined, the ColV plasmid was found only among isolates belonging to the serovars Kentucky (72.9%, Typhimurium (15.0% and Heidelberg (1.7%. We demonstrated that a single PFGE clonal type of S. Kentucky harbors this plasmid, and acquisition of this plasmid by S. Kentucky significantly increased its ability to colonize the chicken cecum and cause extraintestinal disease. Comparison of the completed sequences of three ColV plasmids from S. Kentucky isolated from different geographical locales, timepoints and sources revealed a nearly identical genetic structure with few single nucleotide changes or insertions/deletions. Overall, it appears that the ColV plasmid was recently acquired by a single clonal type S. Kentucky and confers to its host enhanced colonization and fitness capabilities. Thus, the potential for horizontal gene transfer of virulence and fitness factors to Salmonella from other enteric bacteria exists in poultry, representing a potential human health hazard.

  7. Antimicrobial activity of apple, hibiscus, olive, and hydrogen peroxide formulations against Salmonella enterica on organic leafy greens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Katherine L; Patel, Jitendra; Jaroni, Divya; Friedman, Mendel; Ravishankar, Sadhana

    2011-10-01

    Salmonella enterica is one of the most common bacterial pathogens implicated in foodborne outbreaks involving fresh produce in the last decade. In an effort to discover natural antimicrobials for use on fresh produce, the objective of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of different antimicrobial plant extract-concentrate formulations on four types of organic leafy greens inoculated with S. enterica serovar Newport. The leafy greens tested included organic romaine and iceberg lettuce, and organic adult and baby spinach. Each leaf sample was washed, dip inoculated with Salmonella Newport (10(6) CFU/ml), and dried. Apple and olive extract formulations were prepared at 1, 3, and 5% concentrations, and hibiscus concentrates were prepared at 10, 20, and 30%. Inoculated leaves were immersed in the treatment solution for 2 min and individually incubated at 4°C. After incubation, samples were taken on days 0, 1, and 3 for enumeration of survivors. Our results showed that the antimicrobial activity was both concentration and time dependent. Olive extract exhibited the greatest antimicrobial activity, resulting in 2- to 3-log CFU/g reductions for each concentration and type of leafy green by day 3. Apple extract showed 1- to 2-log CFU/g reductions by day 3 on various leafy greens. Hibiscus concentrate showed an overall reduction of 1 log CFU/g for all leafy greens. The maximum reduction by hydrogen peroxide (3%) was about 1 log CFU/g. The antimicrobial activity was also tested on the background microflora of organic leafy greens, and reductions ranged from 0 to 2.8 log. This study demonstrates the potential of natural plant extract formulations to inactivate Salmonella Newport on organic leafy greens.

  8. The Fur regulon in anaerobically grown Salmonella enterica sv. Typhimurium: identification of new Fur targets

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