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Sample records for attenuated inversion recovery

  1. Fast spine echo and fast fluid attenuated inversion recovery sequences in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast spin echo (FSE) and fast fluid attenuated inversion recovery (fast-FLAIR) sequences, were compared with conventional spin echo (CSE) in quantitating multiple sclerosis (MS) lesion burden. For each sequence, the total number and volume of MS lesions were calculated in 38 remitting multiple sclerosis patients using a semiautomated lesion detection program. Conventional spin echo, fast spin echo, and fast fluid attenuated inversion recovery image were reported on randomly and at different times by two expert observers. Interobserver differences, the time needed to quantitative multiple sclerosis lesions and lesion signal intensity (contrast-to-noise ratio and overall contrast) were considered. The lesions were classified by site into infratentorial, white matter and cortical/subcortical. A total of 2970 lesions with a volume of 961.7 cm3 was calculated on conventional spin echo images. Fast spin echo images depicted fewer (16.6%; p < .005) and smaller (24.9%; p < .0001) lesions and the differences were statistically significant. Despite an overall nonsignificant reduction for fast-FLAIR images (-5% and 4.8% for lesion number and volume, respectively), significantly lower values (lesion number: p < 0.1; volume: p < .04)were observed for infratentorial lesions, while significantly higher values were seen for cortical/subcortical lesions (lesion number: p < .01; volume: p < .02). A higher lesion/white matter contrast (p < .002), a significant time saving for lesion burden quantitation (p < .05) and very low interobserver variability were found in favor of fast-FLAIR. Our data suggest that, despite the limitations regarding infratentorial lesions, fast-FLAIR sequences are indicated in R studies because of their good identification of cortical/subcortical lesions, almost complete interobserver agreement, higher contrast-to-noise ratio and limited time needed for semiautomated quantitation

  2. Contrast-enhanced FLAIR (fluid-attenuated inversion recovery for evaluating mild traumatic brain injury.

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    Soo Chin Kim

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate whether adding a contrast-enhanced fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR sequence to routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can detect additional abnormalities in the brains of symptomatic patients with mild traumatic brain injury. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifty-four patients with persistent symptoms following mild closed head injury were included in our retrospective study (M ∶ F =  32 ∶ 22, mean age: 59.8 ± 16.4, age range: 26-84 years. All MRI examinations were obtained within 14 days after head trauma (mean: 3.2 ± 4.1 days, range: 0.2-14 days. Two neuroradiologists recorded (1 the presence of traumatic brain lesions on MR images with and without contrast-enhanced FLAIR images and (2 the pattern and location of meningeal enhancement depicted on contrast-enhanced FLAIR images. The number of additional traumatic brain lesions diagnosed with contrast-enhanced FLAIR was recorded. Correlations between meningeal enhancement and clinical findings were also evaluated. RESULTS: Traumatic brain lesions were detected on routine image sequences in 25 patients. Three additional cases of brain abnormality were detected with the contrast-enhanced FLAIR images. Meningeal enhancement was identified on contrast-enhanced FLAIR images in 9 cases while the other routine image sequences showed no findings of traumatic brain injury. Overall, the additional contrast-enhanced FLAIR images revealed more extensive abnormalities than routine imaging in 37 cases (p<0.001. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, subdural hematoma and posttraumatic loss of consciousness showed a significant association with meningeal enhancement on contrast-enhanced FLAIR images, with odds ratios 13.068 (95% confidence interval 2.037 to 83.852, and 15.487 (95% confidence interval 2.545 to 94.228, respectively. CONCLUSION: Meningeal enhancement on contrast-enhanced FLAIR images can help detect traumatic brain lesions as well as additional abnormalities

  3. Application of variable threshold intensity to segmentation for white matter hyperintensities in fluid attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance images

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    Yoo, Byung Il; Han, Ji Won; Oh, San Yeo Wool; Kim, Tae Hui [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Neuropsychiatry, Seongnam, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung Jae; Lee, Eun Young [Kyungbook National University Chilgok Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, Buk-gu, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); MacFall, James R. [Duke University Medical Center, Neuropsychiatric Imaging Research Laboratory, Durham, NC (United States); Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Durham, NC (United States); Payne, Martha E. [Duke University Medical Center, Neuropsychiatric Imaging Research Laboratory, Durham, NC (United States); Duke University Medical Center, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Durham, NC (United States); Kim, Jae Hyoung [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seongnam, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ki Woong [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Neuropsychiatry, Seongnam, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Natural Sciences, Department of Brain and Cognitive Science, Gwanak-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    White matter hyperintensities (WMHs) are regions of abnormally high intensity on T2-weighted or fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Accurate and reproducible automatic segmentation of WMHs is important since WMHs are often seen in the elderly and are associated with various geriatric and psychiatric disorders. We developed a fully automated monospectral segmentation method for WMHs using FLAIR MRIs. Through this method, we introduce an optimal threshold intensity (I{sub O}) for segmenting WMHs, which varies with WMHs volume (V{sub WMH}), and we establish the I{sub O} -V{sub WMH} relationship. Our method showed accurate validations in volumetric and spatial agreements of automatically segmented WMHs compared with manually segmented WMHs for 32 confirmatory images. Bland-Altman values of volumetric agreement were 0.96 ± 8.311 ml (bias and 95 % confidence interval), and the similarity index of spatial agreement was 0.762 ± 0.127 (mean ± standard deviation). Furthermore, similar validation accuracies were obtained in the images acquired from different scanners. The proposed segmentation method uses only FLAIR MRIs, has the potential to be accurate with images obtained from different scanners, and can be implemented with a fully automated procedure. In our study, validation results were obtained with FLAIR MRIs from only two scanner types. The design of the method may allow its use in large multicenter studies with correct efficiency. (orig.)

  4. Fast fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery imaging: first experience with a 3D version in epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed a 3D version of fast fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery imaging (FLAIR) which provides images with a slice thickness of 1.5 mm. We present our initial experience with 3D fast FLAIR in patients with epilepsy. We compared 3D fast FLAIR (slice thickness 1.5 mm), 2D fast FLAIR (slice thickness 5 mm) and a 3D spoiled GRASS (IRSPGR) sequence (slice thickness 1.5 mm) in 10 patients with lesional epilepsy (head injury 1, hippocampal sclerosis 2, low-grade glioma 2, dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumour 2, polymicrogyria 1, perinatal infarct 1 and presumed thrombosed aneurysm 1). Both 2D and 3D fast FLAIR sequences yielded higher conspicuity for lesions than the T1-weighted IRSPGR sequence, except in the patient with polymicrogyria. The extent of the lesion, in particular that of low-grade tumours, was best assessed on 3D fast FLAIR images. 3D fast FLAIR may be a useful additional tool especially for imaging low-grade tumours. (orig.)

  5. Arterial hyperintensity on BLADE fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images (FLAIR) in hyperacute territorial infarction: comparison with conventional FLAIR

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    Kwag, Eujean; Lim, Soo Mee; Park, Ji Eun; Chae, In Hye [Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Mokdong Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    To evaluate the utility of BLADE fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images (FLAIR) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging compared to conventional FLAIR for the detection of arterial hyperintensity (AH) in hyperacute territorial infarction. We retrospectively analysed MR images of patients with hyperacute (<6 h) territorial infarction over a 9-month study period. Special attention was paid to the presence or absence of AH in the frontal, parietal and temporal lobes and the number of AHs in the sylvian fissure. We also evaluated the presence of three kinds of artefacts on BLADE FLAIR and conventional FLAIR images. AH was seen in 41 (91 %) patients with conventional FLAIR and 45 (100 %) patients with BLADE FLAIR images. More instances of AH were detected in the frontal, parietal and temporal lobes and within the sylvian fissure using BLADE FLAIR. Motion artefacts, pulsation artefacts from the sigmoid sinus and incomplete cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) nulling that reduced image quality were observed more frequently on conventional FLAIR images than on BLADE FLAIR images. BLADE FLAIR sequences are more sensitive than conventional FLAIR for the detection of AH in hyperacute territorial infarctions and provide better image quality by reducing artefacts. They may be used in place of conventional FLAIR for patients with hyperacute stroke. (orig.)

  6. Diffusion-weighted imaging and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequence in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease One-case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rosa Morabito; Placido Bramanti; Silvia Marino; Annalisa Baglieri; Rosella Ciurleo; Francesco Corallo; Rosaria De Luca; Simona De Salvo; Silvia Guerrera; Francesca Timpano; Maria Adele Marino

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) is extremely difficult. Diffusion-weighted imaging has been shown to be the most sensitive technique for the detection of signal alterations in sCJD patients. The present study analyzed the diagnostic value of diffusion-weighted imaging and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequence in the early stage of sCJD in one female patient and correlated the clinical symptoms during disease course and magnetic resonance manifestations. Thalamic and basal ganglia hyperintensities were observed on magnetic resonance images in a very early stage, i.e., when the clinical typical manifestations of the disease were not present. With the progression of the disease, cortical and basal ganglia hyperintensities were observed on magnetic resonance images, showing an obvious cerebral atrophy. These findings suggest that diffusion-weighted imaging and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequence are helpful in diagnosing sCJD.

  7. Clinical implications of sulcal enhancement on postcontrast fluid attenuated inversion recovery images in patients with acute stroke symptoms

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    Lee, Hyuk Joon; Kim, Eun Hee; Lee, Kyung Mi; Kim, Jae Hyoung; Bae, Yun Jung; Choi, Byoung Se; Jung, Cheol Kyu [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Hyperintense acute reperfusion marker (HARM) without diffusion abnormalities is occasionally found in patients with an acute stroke. This study was to determine the prevalence and clinical implications of HARM without diffusion abnormalities. There was a retrospective review of magnetic resonance images 578 patients with acute strokes and identified those who did not have acute infarction lesions, as mapped by diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). These patients were classified into an imaging-negative stroke and HARM without diffusion abnormalities groups, based on the DWI findings and postcontrast fluid attenuated inversion recovery images. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores at admission, 1 day, and 7 days after the event, as well as clinical data and risk factors, were compared between the imaging-negative stroke and HARM without diffusion abnormalities groups. Seventy-seven acute stroke patients without any DWI abnormalities were found. There were 63 patients with an imaging-negative stroke (accounting for 10.9% of 578) and 13 patients with HARM without diffusion abnormalities (accounting for 2.4% of 578). The NIHSS scores at admission were higher in HARM without diffusion abnormalities group than in the imaging-negative stroke group (median, 4.5 vs. 1.0; p < 0.001), but the scores at 7 days after the event were not significantly different between the two groups (median, 0 vs. 0; p = 1). The patients with HARM without diffusion abnormalities were significantly older, compared with patients with an imaging-negative stroke (mean, 73.1 years vs. 55.9 years; p < 0.001). Patients with HARM without diffusion abnormalities are older and have similarly favorable short-term neurological outcomes, compared with the patients with imaging-negative stroke.

  8. Clinical value of periventricular low-intensity areas detected by fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR). Relationships between MRI at near term and long-distant outcome

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    Iwata, Osuke; Kadowaki, Sachiko; Tamura, Masanori [Nagano Children' s Hospital, Toyoshina (Japan)] (and others)

    2002-01-01

    We performed an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) study of neonatal brain to assess the clinical value of periventricular low intensities (PVLI) detected on FLAIR (fluid attenuated inversion recovery) imaging in 280 preterm and term infants. The incidence of PVLI was 62% on early MRI, obtained before two-months corrected age, and it decreased to 3% and 0% on middle (2-8 months) and late (8-18 months) MRI. On middle and late MRI, we observed periventricular hyperintensities (PVHI) both on FLAIR imaging and T2-weighted imaging, which were considered to be chronic lesions of leukomalacia. The severity of white matter damage diagnosed on early FLAIR imaging had a significant correlation with that of late FLAIR imaging. We conclude that early FLAIR imaging would be a good predictor of chronic white matter damage that may influence the motor and mental development of the infants. (author)

  9. Comparison of Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery Sequence with Spin Echo T2-Weighted MRI for Characterization of Brain Pathology

    CERN Document Server

    Sahu, Indra Dev; Shrestha, Shanta Lal; Ghimire, Ram Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Twenty cases of different brain pathology have been studied via MRI using an open resistive magnet with magnetic field strength of 0.2 Tesla. The relative signal intensity with respect to the repetition time (TR) at fixed echo time (TE) 0.117 sec. has been studied. It was found that the signal intensity saturates for most lesions beyond a certain TR~6 sec in the T2 - weighted image. The signal intensity differs with respect to the inversion time (TI) for fat and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). It was found that the intensity is nulled for CSF at TI ~1.5 sec. and for Fat at TI~0.10 sec in the FLAIR imaging sequence. Thus the intensity of the lesions is qualitatively different for the two sequences. From the radiological diagnostic point of view, it was concluded that the FLAIR sequence is more useful for the detection of lesions compared to T2 sequences.

  10. Temporal pole signal abnormality on MR imaging in temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis: a fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the frequency and regional involvement of temporal pole signal abnormality (TPA) in patients with hippocampal sclerosis (HS) using fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) MR imaging, and to correlate this feature with history. Method: Coronal FLAIR images of the temporal pole were assessed in 120 patients with HS and in 30 normal subjects, to evaluate gray-white matter demarcation. Results: Ninety (75%) of 120 patients had associated TPA. The HS side made difference regarding the presence of TPA, with a left side prevalence (p=0.04, χ2 test). The anteromedial zone of temporal pole was affected in 27 (30%) out of 90 patients. In 63 (70%) patients the lateral zone were also affected. Patients with TPA were younger at seizure onset (p=0.018), but without association with duration of epilepsy. Conclusion: Our FLAIR study show temporal pole signal abnormality in 3/4 of patients with HS, mainly seen on the anteromedial region, with a larger prevalence when the left hippocampus was involved. (author)

  11. Bilateral mesial temporal sclerosis: MRI with high-resolution fast spin-echo and fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery sequences

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    Oppenheim, C.; Dormont, D.; Lehericy, S.; Marsault, C. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Groupe Hospitalier Pite-Salpetriere, Paris (France); Hasboun, D. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Groupe Hospitalier Pite-Salpetriere, Paris (France)]|[Dept. of Neurology, Paris VI Univ. (France); Bazin, B.; Samson, S.; Baulac, M. [Dept. of Neurology, Paris VI Univ. (France)

    1999-07-01

    We report a retrospective analysis of MRI in 206 patients with intractable seizures and describe the findings in bilateral mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) on fast spin-echo (FSE) and fast fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (fFLAIR) sequences. Criteria for MTS were atrophy, signal change and loss of the digitations of the head of the hippocampus. In patients with bilateral MRI signs of MTS, correlation with clinical electro, volumetric MRI data and neuropsychological tests, when available, was performed. Bilateral MTS was observed in seven patients. Bilateral loss of the digitations and signal change of fFLAIR was seen in all seven. In three, bilateral atrophy was obvious. In two patients, mild bilateral atrophy was observed and in two others, the hippocampi were: asymmetrical, with obvious atrophy on only one side. Volumetric data confirmed bilateral symmetrical atrophy in five patients, and volumes were at the lowest of the normal range in other two. The EEG showed temporal abnormalities in all patients, unilateral in five and bilateral in two. All patients had memory impairment and neuropsychological data confirmed visual and verbal memory deficits; two patients failed the Wada test on both sides. High-resolution T2-weighted FSE and fFLAIR sequences allow diagnosis of bilateral MTS, which has important therapeutic and prognostic implications. (orig.)

  12. Clinical value of periventricular low-intensity areas detected by fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR). Relationships between perinatal vital parameter and neonatal MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A follow-up study was performed to assess the correlation among the incidence of periventricular low intensities (PVLI) on MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) FLAIR (fluid attenuated inversion recovery) imaging, clinical evidence of perinatal insults that may cause white matter damage, and the outcome of the infants. We evaluated periventricular white matter lesions of 329 neonates whose MRI were obtained before two months corrected age. The detective rate of periventricular abnormalities on FLAIR imaging was significantly higher than that of T1-T2 weighted imaging. The most typical lesion detected on FLAIR imaging was periventricular low intensities (PVLI), frequently observed in the neonates with a history of preterm labour, very low birth weight, birth asphyxia and severe respiratory failure. Although we could not characterize the risk factors of PVLI, the incidence of PVLI had a strong correlation with the scores of motor and developmental tests at 12 and 36-months corrected age. In conclusion, FLAIR imaging, detecting the border zone damage of white matter, would be a strong tool to pick out neonates at high risk of neurological disturbances from those without clinical evidence of neurological insults in the neonatal period. (author)

  13. Regional Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR at 7 Tesla correlates with Amyloid beta in Hippocampus and Brainstem of cognitively normal elderly subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon J Schreiner

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Accumulation of amyloid beta (Aβ may occur during healthy aging and is a risk factor for Alzheimer Disease (AD. While individual Aβ-accumulation can be measured non-invasively using Pittsburgh compound-B positron-emission-tomography (PiB-PET, Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR is a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI sequence, capable of indicating heterogeneous age-related brain pathologies associated with tissue-edema. In the current study cognitively normal elderly subjects were investigated for regional correlation of PiB- and FLAIR- intensity. Methods: 14 healthy elderly subjects without known history of cognitive impairment received 11C-PiB-PET for estimation of regional Aβ-load. In addition, whole brain T1-MPRAGE and FLAIR-MRI sequences were acquired at high field strength of 7 Tesla (7T. Volume-normalized intensities of brain regions were assessed by applying an automated subcortical segmentation algorithm for spatial definition of brain structures. Statistical dependence between FLAIR- and PiB-PET intensities was tested using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rho, followed by Holm-Bonferroni correction for multiple testing. Results: Neuropsychological testing revealed normal cognitive performance levels in all participants. Mean regional PiB-PET and FLAIR intensities were normally distributed and independent. Significant correlation between volume-normalized PiB-PET signals and FLAIR intensities resulted for Hippocampus (right:rho=0.86; left:rho=0.84, Brainstem (rho=0.85 and left Basal Ganglia vessel region (rho=0.82. Conclusions: Our finding of a significant relationship between PiB- and FLAIR-intensity mainly observable in the Hippocampus and Brainstem, indicates regional Aβ associated tissue-edema in cognitively normal elderly subjects. Further studies including clinical populations are necessary to clarify the relevance of our findings for estimating individual risk for age-related neurodegenerative

  14. Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery Hypointensity of the Pulvinar Nucleus of Patients with Alzheimer Disease: Its Possible Association with Iron Accumulation as Evidenced by the T2 Map

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    Moon, Won Jin; Roh, Hong Gee; Choi, Jin Woo [Dept. of Radiology, Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee Jin [Dept. of Neurology, Hanyang University Medical Center, Hanyang University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Seol Heui [Center for Geriatric Neuroscience Research, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    We hypothesized that prominent pulvinar hypointensity in brain MRI represents the disease process due to iron accumulation in Alzheimer disease (AD). We aimed to determine whether or not the pulvinar signal intensity (SI) on the fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences at 3.0T MRI differs between AD patients and normal subjects, and also whether the pulvinar SI is correlated with the T2 map, an imaging marker for tissue iron, and a cognitive scale. Twenty one consecutive patients with AD and 21 age-matched control subjects were prospectively included in this study. The pulvinar SI was assessed on the FLAIR image. We measured the relative SI ratio of the pulvinar to the corpus callosum. The T2 values were calculated from the T2 relaxometry map. The differences between the two groups were analyzed, by using a Student t test. The correlation between the measurements was assessed by the Pearson's correlation test. As compared to the normal white matter, the FLAIR signal intensity of the pulvinar nucleus was significantly more hypointense in the AD patients than in the control subjects (p < 0.01). The pulvinar T2 was shorter in the AD patients than in the control subjects (51.5 {+-} 4.95 ms vs. 56.5 {+-} 5.49 ms, respectively, p = 0.003). The pulvinar SI ratio was strongly correlated with the pulvinar T2 (r = 0.745, p < 0.001). When controlling for age, only the pulvinar-to-CC SI ratio was positively correlated with that of the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score (r = 0.303, p < 0.050). Conversely, the pulvinar T2 was not correlated with the MMSE score (r = 0.277, p = 0.080). The FLAIR hypointensity of the pulvinar nucleus represents an abnormal iron accumulation in AD and may be used as an adjunctive finding for evaluating AD.

  15. Diagnostic value of three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery MR imaging after intratympanic administration of contrast media in Meniere's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: After intratympanic gadolinium administration through the tympanic membrane, three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging (3D-FLAIR MRI) was performed to evaluate endolymphatic visualization and its diagnostic value in Meniere's disease. Methods: Twenty-four hours after intratympanic gadolinium administration through the tympanic membrane, 19 patients with unilateral Meniere's disease diagnosed clinically underwent 3D-FLAIR and 3D-Balance-FFE imaging at 3.0 T MR scanner. The enhanced imaging of perilymphatic space in bilateral cochlea, vestibular and (or) canal were observed. Scala tympani and scala vestibule of bilateral cochlear basal turn were scored respectively. The enhanced range of bilateral vestibule and the signal intensity ratio (SIR) between the vestibule and the brain stem were measured. Wilcoxon tests and paired t tests were used. Results: The gadolinium appeared in almost all parts of the perilymph in cochlea,vestibular and (or) canal, so the endolymphatic space was clearly visualized on 3D-FLAIR imaging. The score of scala vestibuli between the affected side (3 cases scored 2, 9 cases scored 1, 7 cases scored 0) and the healthy side (15 cases scored 2, 2 cases scored 1, 2 cases scored 0) were significantly different (U=3.090, P<0.05). The area of enhanced vestibular were (5.77 ± 2.33) mm2 and (8.11 ± 3.32) mm2 for the affected side and the healthy side, which were significantly different (U=3.090, P<0.05 and t=2.638, P<0.05). Conclusions: According to 3D-Balance-FFE MRI and the enhancement of perilymphatic space, 3D-FLAIR MRI with intratympanic gadolinium injection through the tympanic membrane can be used to show the border between the perilymph and the endolymph and confirm endolymphatic hydrops, thus providing radiographic evidence for the diagnosis of Meniere's disease. (authors)

  16. Three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequence for visualisation of subthalamic nucleus for deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease

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    Heo, Young Jin [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Inje University, Department of Radiology, Busan Paik Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Joon; Kim, Ho Sung; Choi, Choong Gon; Jung, Seung Chai [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung Kyo [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chong Sik; Chung, Sun J. [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, So Hyun [Department of Radiology, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Gyoung Ro [Philips HealthCare Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an accepted treatment for advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). However, targeting the STN is difficult due to its relatively small size and variable location. The purpose of this study was to assess which of the following sequences obtained with the 3.0 T MR system can accurately delineate the STN: coronal 3D fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), 2D T2*-weighted fast-field echo (T2*-FFE) and 2D T2-weighted turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequences. We included 20 consecutive patients with PD who underwent 3.0 T MR for DBS targeting. 3D FLAIR, 2D T2*-FFE and T2-TSE images were obtained for all study patients. Image quality and demarcation of the STN were analysed using 4-point scales, and contrast ratio (CR) of the STN and normal white matter was calculated. The Friedman test was used to compare the three sequences. In qualitative analysis, the 2D T2*-FFE image showed more artefacts than 3D FLAIR or 2D T2-TSE, but the difference did not reach statistical significance. 3D FLAIR images showed significantly superior demarcation of the STN compared with 2D T2*-FFE and T2-TSE images (P < 0.001, respectively). The CR of 3D FLAIR was significantly higher than that of 2D T2*-FFE or T2-TSE images in multiple comparison correction (P < 0.001), but there was no significant difference in the CR between 2D T2*-FFE and T2-TSE images. Coronal 3D FLAIR images showed the most accurate demarcation of the STN for DBS targeting among coronal 3D FLAIR, 2D T2*-FFE and T2-TSE images. (orig.)

  17. A comparison of inner ear imaging features at different time points of sudden sensorineural hearing loss with three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Honglei; Ou, Yongkang; Fu, Jia; Zhang, Ya; Xiong, Hao; Xu, Yaodong

    2015-10-01

    It has been reported that about half of patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) show high signals in the affected inner ear on three-dimensional, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging (3D-FLAIR MRI). These signals may reflect minor hemorrhage or an increased concentration of protein in the inner ear, which has passed through blood vessels with increased permeability. Our objective was to compare the positive ratio of the high signal in affected inner ears at different time points to determine the suitable imaging time point for 3D-FLAIR MRI in SSNHL. 3D-FLAIR MRI images were taken at three times, precontrast and approximately 10 min and 4 h after intravenous injection of a single dose of gadodiamide (Gd) (0.1 mmol/kg), in 46 patients with SNHL. We compared the positive findings of the high signals in the inner ear of patients with SNHL as well as the signal intensity ratio (SIR) between the affected cochleae and unaffected cochleae at three time points. The positive ratios of the high signals in the affected inner ear at the time points of precontrast and 10 min and 4 h after the intravenous Gd injection were 26.1, 32.6, and 41.3%, respectively. The high signal intensity ratios of affected inner ears at the three time points were 1.28, 1.31, and 1.48, respectively. The difference between the positive ratios precontrast and at 10 min after the intravenous Gd injection was statistically significant (P = 0.006); the differences between the positive ratios at 4 h after the intravenous Gd injection and precontrast and between the ratios at 4 h and 10 min after the intravenous Gd injection were not statistically significant. The time effects of the median value of SIR were not significant (P = 0.064). We do not recommend 4 h after intravenous Gd injection as a time point to image the inner ear in SNHL. We believe that imaging precontrast and at 10 min after the intravenous Gd injection are suitable time points.

  18. Comparison of T1-weighted fast spin-echo and T1-weighted fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images of the lumbar spine at 3.0 Tesla

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    Lavdas, Eleftherios; Vlychou, Marianna; Arikidis, Nikos; Kapsalaki, Eftychia; Roka, Violetta; Fezoulidis, Ioannis V. (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital of Larissa, Medical School of Thessaly, Mezourlo (Greece)), e-mail: mvlychou@med.uth.gr

    2010-04-15

    Background: T1-weighted fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequence has been reported to provide improved contrast between lesions and normal anatomical structures compared to T1-weighted fast spin-echo (FSE) imaging at 1.5T regarding imaging of the lumbar spine. Purpose: To compare T1-weighted FSE and fast T1-weighted FLAIR imaging in normal anatomic structures and degenerative and metastatic lesions of the lumbar spine at 3.0T. Material and Methods: Thirty-two consecutive patients (19 females, 13 males; mean age 44 years, range 30-67 years) with lesions of the lumbar spine were prospectively evaluated. Sagittal images of the lumbar spine were obtained using T1-weighted FSE and fast T1-weighted FLAIR sequences. Both qualitative and quantitative analyses measuring the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and relative contrast (ReCon) between degenerative and metastatic lesions and normal anatomic structures were conducted, comparing these sequences. Results: On quantitative evaluation, SNRs of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), nerve root, and fat around the root of fast T1-weighted FLAIR imaging were significantly lower than those of T1-weighted FSE images (P<0.001). CNRs of normal spinal cord/CSF and disc herniation/ CSF for fast T1-weighted FLAIR images were significantly higher than those for T1-weighted FSE images (P<0.001). ReCon of normal spinal cord/CSF, disc herniation/CSF, and vertebral lesions/CSF for fast T1-weighted FLAIR images were significantly higher than those for T1-weighted FSE images (P<0.001). On qualitative evaluation, it was found that CSF nulling and contrast at the spinal cord (cauda equina)/CSF interface for T1-weighted FLAIR images were significantly superior compared to those for T1-weighted FSE images (P<0.001), and the disc/spinal cord (cauda equina) interface was better for T1-weighted FLAIR images (P<0.05). Conclusion: The T1-weighted FLAIR sequence may be considered as the preferred lumbar spine imaging

  19. An Inversion Recovery NMR Kinetics Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Travis J.; Kershaw, Allan D.; Li, Vincent; Wu, Xinping

    2011-01-01

    A convenient laboratory experiment is described in which NMR magnetization transfer by inversion recovery is used to measure the kinetics and thermochemistry of amide bond rotation. The experiment utilizes Varian spectrometers with the VNMRJ 2.3 software, but can be easily adapted to any NMR platform. The procedures and sample data sets in this article will enable instructors to use inversion recovery as a laboratory activity in applied NMR classes and provide research students with a conveni...

  20. Signal intensity change of the labyrinth in patients with surgically confirmed or radiologically diagnosed vestibular schwannoma on isotropic 3D fluid-attenuated inversion recovery MR imaging at 3 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, In Ho; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Kim, Eunhee; Moon, Jung Won; Kim, Sung Tae; Kim, Keon Ha; Jeon, Pyoung; Byun, Hong Sik [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea); Chung, Won Ho [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea)

    2010-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the signal intensity (SI) change of the labyrinth in patients with vestibular schwannoma on isotropic 3D fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) imaging at 3 T. Thirty-four patients with surgically confirmed or radiologically diagnosed vestibular schwannoma were included in this study. Retrospectively, we visually and quantitatively compared the SIs of the cochlea and vestibule on the affected side with those on the unaffected side. We also investigated whether there was correlation between the SI ratios (SIRs) of the labyrinth and the audiometric findings. On 3D FLAIR images, the SI of the cochlea and vestibule on the affected side was significantly increased in 97% (33/34) and 91% (31/34), respectively. While the SI of the cochlea was diffusely increased, that of the vestibule was only partially increased. Quantitative study also revealed statistically significantly higher SIRs of the cochlea (0.99 {+-} 0.29) and vestibule (0.73 {+-} 0.31) on the affected side, compared with the cochlea (0.47 {+-} 0.20) and vestibule (0.19 {+-} 0.10) on the unaffected side. There was no significant correlation of the SIRs of the labyrinth with the degree of hearing loss. In patients with vestibular schwannoma, isotropic 3D FLAIR imaging is a useful method for the evaluation of the SI changes of the labyrinth. (orig.)

  1. An Inversion Recovery NMR Kinetics Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Travis J.; Kershaw, Allan D.; Li, Vincent; Wu, Xinping

    2011-01-01

    A convenient laboratory experiment is described in which NMR magnetization transfer by inversion recovery is used to measure the kinetics and thermochemistry of amide bond rotation. The experiment utilizes Varian spectrometers with the VNMRJ 2.3 software, but can be easily adapted to any NMR platform. The procedures and sample data sets in this…

  2. Seismic Attenuation Inversion with t* Using tstarTomog.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preston, Leiph

    2014-09-01

    Seismic attenuation is defined as the loss of the seismic wave amplitude as the wave propagates excluding losses strictly due to geometric spreading. Information gleaned from seismic waves can be utilized to solve for the attenuation properties of the earth. One method of solving for earth attenuation properties is called t*. This report will start by introducing the basic theory behind t* and delve into inverse theory as it pertains to how the algorithm called tstarTomog inverts for attenuation properties using t* observations. This report also describes how to use the tstarTomog package to go from observed data to a 3-D model of attenuation structure in the earth.

  3. Role of three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (3D FLAIR) and proton density magnetic resonance imaging for the detection and evaluation of lesion extent of focal cortical dysplasia in patients with refractory epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saini, Jitender; Kesavadas, Chandrasekharan; Thomas, Bejoy (Dept. of Imaging Sciences and Interventional Radiology, Sree Chitra Tirunal Inst. for Medical Sciences and Technology, Trivandrum, Kerala (India)), e-mail: chandkesav@yahoo.com; Singh, Atampreet; Rathore, Chathurbhuj; Radhakrishnan, Ashalatha (Dept. of Neurology, Sree Chitra Tirunal Inst. for Medical Sciences and Technology, Trivandrum, Kerala (India)); Radhakrishnan, Kurupath; Bahuleyan, Biji (Dept. of Neurosurgery, Sree Chitra Tirunal Inst. for Medical Sciences and Technology, Trivandrum, Kerala (India))

    2010-03-15

    Background: Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is often associated with epilepsy. Identification of FCD can be difficult due to subtle magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes. Though fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequence detects the majority of these lesions, smaller lesions may go unnoticed while larger lesions may be poorly delineated. Purpose: To determine the ability of a specialized epilepsy protocol in visualizing and delineating the extent of FCD. Material and Methods: We compared the imaging findings in nine patients with cortical malformation who underwent routine epilepsy MR imaging as well as a specialized epilepsy protocol. All imaging was done on a 1.5T MR unit. The specialized epilepsy protocol included 3D FLAIR in the sagittal plane as well as proton density (PD) and high-resolution T2-weighted (T2W) images in the transverse plane. Results: In all nine patients, the specialized protocol identified lesion anatomy better. In three patients in whom routine MRI was normal, the specialized epilepsy protocol including 3D FLAIR helped in identifying the lesions. One of these patients underwent surgery, and histo-pathology revealed a cortical dysplasia. In one patient, lesion characterization was improved, while in the remaining patients the extent of the FCD was more clearly demonstrated in the 3D FLAIR and PD images. Statistical analysis of images for cortical thickness, cortical signal intensity, adjacent white matter abnormalities, and gray-white matter junction showed significant statistical difference in the ability of 3D FLAIR to assess these aspects over conventional images. PD images were also found superior to the routine epilepsy protocol in assessment of cortical signal, adjacent white matter, and gray-white matter junction. Conclusion: Specialized MRI sequences and techniques should be performed whenever there is a high suspicion of cortical dysplasia, especially when they remain occult on conventional MR protocols. These techniques

  4. Role of three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (3D FLAIR) and proton density magnetic resonance imaging for the detection and evaluation of lesion extent of focal cortical dysplasia in patients with refractory epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is often associated with epilepsy. Identification of FCD can be difficult due to subtle magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes. Though fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequence detects the majority of these lesions, smaller lesions may go unnoticed while larger lesions may be poorly delineated. Purpose: To determine the ability of a specialized epilepsy protocol in visualizing and delineating the extent of FCD. Material and Methods: We compared the imaging findings in nine patients with cortical malformation who underwent routine epilepsy MR imaging as well as a specialized epilepsy protocol. All imaging was done on a 1.5T MR unit. The specialized epilepsy protocol included 3D FLAIR in the sagittal plane as well as proton density (PD) and high-resolution T2-weighted (T2W) images in the transverse plane. Results: In all nine patients, the specialized protocol identified lesion anatomy better. In three patients in whom routine MRI was normal, the specialized epilepsy protocol including 3D FLAIR helped in identifying the lesions. One of these patients underwent surgery, and histo-pathology revealed a cortical dysplasia. In one patient, lesion characterization was improved, while in the remaining patients the extent of the FCD was more clearly demonstrated in the 3D FLAIR and PD images. Statistical analysis of images for cortical thickness, cortical signal intensity, adjacent white matter abnormalities, and gray-white matter junction showed significant statistical difference in the ability of 3D FLAIR to assess these aspects over conventional images. PD images were also found superior to the routine epilepsy protocol in assessment of cortical signal, adjacent white matter, and gray-white matter junction. Conclusion: Specialized MRI sequences and techniques should be performed whenever there is a high suspicion of cortical dysplasia, especially when they remain occult on conventional MR protocols. These techniques

  5. Degenerative disc disease of the lumbar spine: a prospective comparison of fast T1-weighted fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and T1-weighted turbo spin echo MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdem, L. Oktay [Department of Radiology, Zonguldak Karaelmas University, School of Medicine, 6700 Kozlu, Zonguldak (Turkey)]. E-mail: sunarerdem@yahoo.com; Erdem, C. Zuhal [Department of Radiology, Zonguldak Karaelmas University, School of Medicine, 6700 Kozlu, Zonguldak (Turkey); Acikgoz, Bektas [Department of Neurosurgery, Zonguldak Karaelmas University, School of Medicine, Zonguldak (Turkey); Gundogdu, Sadi [Department of Radiology, Zonguldak Karaelmas University, School of Medicine, 6700 Kozlu, Zonguldak (Turkey)

    2005-08-01

    Objective: To compare fast T1-weighted fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and T1-weighted turbo spin-echo (TSE) imaging of the degenerative disc disease of the lumbar spine. Materials and methods: Thirty-five consecutive patients (19 females, 16 males; mean age 41 years, range 31-67 years) with suspected degenerative disc disease of the lumbar spine were prospectively evaluated. Sagittal images of the lumbar spine were obtained using T1-weighted TSE and fast T1-weighted FLAIR sequences. Two radiologists compared these sequences both qualitatively and quantitatively. Results: On qualitative evaluation, CSF nulling, contrast at the disc-CSF interface, the disc-spinal cord (cauda equina) interface, and the spinal cord (cauda equina)-CSF interface of fast T1-weighted FLAIR images were significantly higher than those for T1-weighted TSE images (P < 0.001). On quantitative evaluation of the first 15 patients, signal-to-noise ratios of cerebrospinal fluid of fast T1-weighted FLAIR imaging were significantly lower than those for T1-weighted TSE images (P < 0.05). Contrast-to-noise ratios of spinal cord/CSF and normal bone marrow/disc for fast T1-weighted FLAIR images were significantly higher than those for T1-weighted TSE images (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Results in our study have shown that fast T1-weighted FLAIR imaging may be a valuable imaging modality in the armamentarium of lumbar spinal T1-weighted MR imaging, because the former technique has definite superior advantages such as CSF nulling, conspicuousness of the normal anatomic structures and changes in the lumbar spinal discogenic disease and image contrast and also almost equally acquisition times.

  6. Simultaneous inversion for velocity and attenuation by waveform tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fengxia; Wang, Yanghua

    2016-08-01

    Seismic waveform tomography can invert for the velocity and attenuation (Q- 1) variations simultaneously. For this simultaneous inversion, we propose two strategies for waveform tomography. First, we analyze the contributions of the real part and the imaginary part of the gradients, associated with the velocity and attenuation parameters respectively, and determine that the combination of the real part of the gradient subvector for the velocity parameter and the imaginary part of the gradient subvector for the attenuation parameter would produce an optimal inversion result. Second, we attempt to balance the sensitivities of the objective function to the velocity and the attenuation parameters. Considering the magnitude differences between these two-type parameters in the simultaneous inversion, we apply preliminarily a normalization to both the velocity model and the attenuation model. However, for balancing their sensitivities, we further adjust the corresponding model updates using a tuning factor. We determine this tuning parameter adaptively, based on the sensitivities of these two parameters, at each iteration. Numerical tests demonstrate the feasibility and reliability of these two strategies in full waveform inversion.

  7. Diagnostic value of contrast-enhanced fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery MRI for intracranial tumors in comparison with post-contrast T1W spin-echo MRI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Background Contrast-enhanced fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been reported to have higher sensitivity for detecting leptomeningeal disease compared with contrast- enhanced T1-weighted MRI (CE T1WI). However, currently there are no studies showing the potential value of clinical applications of contrast-enhanced FLAIR (CE FLAIR) sequence in diagnosing intracranial tumors in a larger group of patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of CE FLAIR in comparison with CE T1WI for intracranial tumors and to provide more information for clinical diagnosis and therapy.Methods One hundred and four consecutive cases of intracranial tumors referred for CE brain MRI were analyzed with regard to FLAIR and T1WI pre- and post-administration of Gd-DTPA. The CE FLAIR and CE T1WI were evaluated independently by two radiologists for the number of examinations with one or more enhanced lesions, the number and location of enhanced lesions per examination, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-enhancement ratio (CER) of lesions, as well as the size and extent of the enhanced lesions. Results In 98 of 104 cases, enhanced lesions were seen both on the FLAIR and T1W images. More lesions were seen on CE T1WI (n=120) than those on CE FLAIR sequence (n=117), but no differences of statistical significance were found between the two sequences (P>0.05). Four lesions were revealed only on the CE FLAIR images whereas 7 lesions were only found on CE T1WI. Enhanced lesions located in the cerebral hemisphere or the forth ventricle were revealed much more on CE T1WI than on CE FLAIR images. However, CE FLAIR images may be useful in showing superficial abnormalities and those located in the sulcus or lateral ventricle. The CER and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) on CE T1WI was significantly higher (t=7.10,P=0.00;t=9.67,P=0.00, respectively), but grey matter/white matter contrast was lower (t=2.46,P=0.02) than those on CE

  8. Multi-resolution inversion algorithm for the attenuated radon transform

    KAUST Repository

    Barbano, Paolo Emilio

    2011-09-01

    We present a FAST implementation of the Inverse Attenuated Radon Transform which incorporates accurate collimator response, as well as artifact rejection due to statistical noise and data corruption. This new reconstruction procedure is performed by combining a memory-efficient implementation of the analytical inversion formula (AIF [1], [2]) with a wavelet-based version of a recently discovered regularization technique [3]. The paper introduces all the main aspects of the new AIF, as well numerical experiments on real and simulated data. Those display a substantial improvement in reconstruction quality when compared to linear or iterative algorithms. © 2011 IEEE.

  9. Forward- vs. Inverse Problems in Modeling Seismic Attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, I. B.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic attenuation is an important property of wave propagation used in numerous applications. However, the attenuation is also a complex phenomenon, and it is important to differentiate between its two typical uses: 1) in forward problems, to model the amplitudes and spectral contents of waves required for hazard assessment and geotechnical engineering, and 2) in inverse problems, to determine the physical properties of the subsurface. In the forward-problem sense, the attenuation is successfully characterized in terms of empirical parameters of geometric spreading, radiation patterns, scattering amplitudes, t-star, alpha, kappa, or Q. Arguably, the predicted energy losses can be correct even if the underlying attenuation model is phenomenological and not sufficiently based on physics. An example of such phenomenological model is the viscoelasticity based on the correspondence principle and the Q-factor assigned to the material. By contrast, when used to invert for in situ material properties, models addressing the specific physics are required. In many studies (including in this session), a Q-factor is interpreted as a property of a point within the subsurface; however this property is only phenomenological and may be physically insufficient or inconsistent. For example, the bulk or shear Q at the same point can be different when evaluated from different wave modes. The cases of frequency-dependent Q are particularly prone of ambiguities such as trade-off with the assumed background geometric spreading. To rigorously characterize the in situ material properties responsible for seismic-wave attenuation, it is insufficient to only focus on the seismic energy loss. Mechanical models of the material need to be considered. Such models can be constructed by using Lagrangian mechanics. These models should likely contain no Q but will be based on parameters of microstructure such as heterogeneity, fractures, or fluids. I illustrate several such models based on viscosity

  10. Temporal pole signal abnormality on MR imaging in temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis: a fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery study; Anormalidade de sinal na imagem por RM do polo temporal na epilepsia do lobo temporal com esclerose hipocampal: um estudo pela sequencia inversao recuperacao com supressao da agua livre (FLAIR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrete Junior, Henrique; Abdala, Nitamar; Szjenfeld, Jacob; Nogueira, Roberto Gomes [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP-EPM), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem; Lin, Katia; Caboclo, Luis Otavio; Centeno, Ricardo Silva; Sakamoto, Americo Ceiki; Yacubian, Elza Marcia Targas [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP-EPM), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Neurologia e Neurocirurgia

    2007-09-15

    Objective: To determine the frequency and regional involvement of temporal pole signal abnormality (TPA) in patients with hippocampal sclerosis (HS) using fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) MR imaging, and to correlate this feature with history. Method: Coronal FLAIR images of the temporal pole were assessed in 120 patients with HS and in 30 normal subjects, to evaluate gray-white matter demarcation. Results: Ninety (75%) of 120 patients had associated TPA. The HS side made difference regarding the presence of TPA, with a left side prevalence (p=0.04, {chi}{sup 2} test). The anteromedial zone of temporal pole was affected in 27 (30%) out of 90 patients. In 63 (70%) patients the lateral zone were also affected. Patients with TPA were younger at seizure onset (p=0.018), but without association with duration of epilepsy. Conclusion: Our FLAIR study show temporal pole signal abnormality in 3/4 of patients with HS, mainly seen on the anteromedial region, with a larger prevalence when the left hippocampus was involved. (author)

  11. An inversion of site response and Lg attenuation using Lg waveform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Xin-yun; CHEN Yun-tai

    2007-01-01

    Based on spectral ratio method, a joint inversion method was used to obtain parameters of Lg wave attenuation and site response. The inversion method allows simple and direct (two-parameter) determination of Lg wave attenuation and site response from sparse spectral data, which are not affected by radiation pattern factor and different response of same instrument after geometrical spreading. The method was used successfully for estimating site response of stations of Zhejiang Seismic Network and measuring Lg wave attenuation. The study is based on 20 earthquakes occurred in northeast of Taiwan with magnitude Ms5.0~6.7 and 960 seismic wave records from 16 stations in Zhejiang area from 2002 to 2005. The parameters of site response and Lg attenuation were calculated with a frequency interval of 0.2 Hz in the range of 0.5 Hz to 10 Hz. Lg wave attenuation coefficient corresponding to U-D,E-W and N-S components are γ(f)=0.00175f0.43485, γ(f)=0.00145f0.48467 and γ(f)=0.0021f0.41241, respectively.It is found that the site response is component-independent. It is also found that the site response of QIY station is significant above the frequency of 1.5 Hz, and that the site response of NIB station is low for most frequency

  12. Sequential inversion of modal data for sound attenuation in sediment at the New Jersey Shelf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Rui; Chapman, N Ross; Yang, Kunde; Ma, Yuanliang

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a method for estimating bottom geoacoustic properties especially the sediment attenuation from information contained in normal modes of a broadband signal. Propagating modes are resolved using the time-warping technique applied to signals from light bulb sound sources deployed at ranges of 5 and 7 km in the Shallow Water '06 experiment. A sequential inversion approach is designed that uses specific features of the acoustic data that are highly sensitive to specific geoacoustic model parameters. The first feature is the modal group speed, which is inverted for seabed sound speed, density, and sediment thickness. The second feature is the modal depth function for inverting receiver depths. The third feature is related to the modal coefficient spectra, and this is inverted for source depth and sediment attenuation. In each subsequent stage, estimates from the previous stage(s) are used as known values. The sequential inversion is stable and generates estimates for the geoacoustic model parameters that agree very well with results from other experiments carried out in the same region. Notably, the inversion obtains an estimated attenuation of 0.078 dB/λ in the band 120-180 Hz for the de-watered marine sediment characteristic of the continental shelf at the site. PMID:26827006

  13. Ultrasonic attenuation model for measuring particle size and inverse calculation of particle size distribution in mineral slurries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Gui-chun; NI Wen

    2006-01-01

    Based on various ultrasonic loss mechanisms, the formula of the cumulative mass percentage of minerals with different particle sizes was given, with which the particle size distribution was integrated into an ultrasonic attenuation model. And then the correlations between the ultrasonic attenuation and the pulp density, and the particle size were obtained. The derived model was combined with the experiment and the analysis of experimental data to determine the inverse model relating ultrasonic attenuation coefficient with size distribution. Finally, an optimization method of inverse parameter, genetic algorithm was applied for particle size distribution. The results of inverse calculation show that the precision of measurement was high.

  14. FLAIR血管高信号在颈动脉系统短暂性脑缺血发作的意义及相关因素分析%Clinical Significance and Related Factors of Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery Vascular Hyperintensi- ties in Transient Ischemic Attack

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董晓宇; 翟志永; 佡剑非

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨颅脑MRI液体衰减反转恢复序列血管高信号(fluid-attenuated inversion recovery vascular hyper-intensity, FVH)在颈动脉系统短暂性脑缺血发作(transient ischemic attack, TIA)临床意义,分析FVH阳性的相关因素。方法连续收集2012年1月至2014年2月在中国医科大学附属盛京医院神经内科住院的颈动脉系统TIA患者的临床资料,包括一般资料及TIA相关危险因素,全部患者均在发病后72 h内行颅脑MRI及MRA检查,包括FLAIR及弥散加权序列(diffusion weighted imaging,DWI);对全部患者随访1个月,根据临床表现及头部磁共振弥散成像比较梗死组与非梗死组危险因素及FVH情况。结果142例平均年龄(63.2±11.5)岁患者中,男87例(61.27%),FVH阳性患者57例(40.14%),多元Logistic回归分析发现颈动脉系统颅内段大血管局限性狭窄≥50%(OR=2.44,95%CI:1.09~5.49,P=0.03)以及既往缺血性卒中病史(OR=3.88,95%CI:1.04~14.5,P=0.04)与FVH阳性独立相关。随访1个月,142例患者中进展为急性脑梗死40例(28.17%),脑梗死组症状对侧的颈部动脉易损斑块数(P=0.018)、对侧MRA显示颅内大血管狭窄≥50%(P=0.007)及对侧FVH出现率(P=0.001)显著高于非脑梗死组的患者。结论FVH在颈动脉系统TIA患者颅脑MRI中常见,其出现与颈动脉系统颅内段大血管局限性狭窄及既往缺血性卒中病史相关;TIA症状对侧的颈部动脉易损斑块数、对侧颅内大血管狭窄≥50%及对侧FVH出现率可能与颈动脉系统TIA短期进展为急性梗死相关。%Objective To investigate clinical significance and related factors of fluid-attenuated inversion recov⁃ery vascular hyperintensities (FVH) in transient ischemic attack (TIA) of carotid system. Method Data including general information and TIA risk factors was continuously collected from 142 patients with carotid system TIA from the depart

  15. Spectral reconstruction of dental X-ray tubes using laplace inverse transform of the attenuation curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malezan, A.; Tomal, A.; Antoniassi, M.; Watanabe, P. C. A.; Albino, L. D.; Poletti, M. E.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, a spectral reconstruction methodology for diagnostic X-ray, using Laplace inverse transform of the attenuation, was successfully applied to dental X-ray equipments. The attenuation curves of 8 commercially available dental X-ray equipment, from 3 different manufactures (Siemens, Gnatus and Dabi Atlante), were obtained by using an ionization chamber and high purity aluminium filters, while the kVp was obtained with a specific meter. A computational routine was implemented in order to adjust a model function, whose inverse Laplace transform is analytically known, to the attenuation curve. This methodology was validated by comparing the reconstructed and the measured (using semiconductor detector of cadmium telluride) spectra of a given dental X-ray unit. The spectral reconstruction showed the Dabi Atlante equipments generating similar shape spectra. This is a desirable feature from clinic standpoint because it produces similar levels of image quality and dose. We observed that equipments from Siemens and Gnatus generate significantly different spectra, suggesting that, for a given operating protocol, these units will present different levels of image quality and dose. This fact claims for the necessity of individualized operating protocols that maximize image quality and dose. The proposed methodology is suitable to perform a spectral reconstruction of dental X-ray equipments from the simple measurements of attenuation curve and kVp. The simplified experimental apparatus and the low level of technical difficulty make this methodology accessible to a broad range of users. The knowledge of the spectral distribution can help in the development of operating protocols that maximize image quality and dose.

  16. Magnetization transfer using inversion recovery during off-resonance irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangia, Silvia; De Martino, Federico; Liimatainen, Timo; Garwood, Michael; Michaeli, Shalom

    2011-12-01

    Estimation of magnetization transfer (MT) parameters in vivo can be compromised by an inability to drive the magnetization to a steady state using allowable levels of radiofrequency (RF) irradiation, due to safety concerns (tissue heating and specific absorption rate (SAR)). Rather than increasing the RF duration or amplitude, here we propose to circumvent the SAR limitation by sampling the formation of the steady state in separate measurements made with the magnetization initially along the -z and +z axis of the laboratory frame, i.e. with or without an on-resonance inversion pulse prior to the off-resonance irradiation. Results from human brain imaging demonstrate that this choice provides a tremendous benefit in the fitting procedure used to estimate MT parameters. The resulting parametric maps are characterized by notably increased tissue specificity as compared to those obtained with the standard MT acquisition in which magnetization is initially along the +z axis only. PMID:21601405

  17. Consensus recommendations for MS cortical lesion scoring using double inversion recovery MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geurts, J J G; Roosendaal, S D; Calabrese, M;

    2011-01-01

    Different double inversion recovery (DIR) sequences are currently used in multiple sclerosis (MS) research centers to visualize cortical lesions, making it difficult to compare published data. This study aimed to formulate consensus recommendations for scoring cortical lesions in patients with MS...

  18. Temporal pole signal abnormality on MR imaging in temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis: a fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery study Anormalidade de sinal na imagem por RM do pólo temporal na epilepsia do lobo temporal com esclerose hipocampal: um estudo pela seqüência inversão recuperação com supressão da água livre (FLAIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Carrete Junior

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency and regional involvement of temporal pole signal abnormality (TPA in patients with hippocampal sclerosis (HS using fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR MR imaging, and to correlate this feature with history. METHOD: Coronal FLAIR images of the temporal pole were assessed in 120 patients with HS and in 30 normal subjects, to evaluate gray-white matter demarcation. RESULTS: Ninety (75% of 120 patients had associated TPA. The HS side made difference regarding the presence of TPA, with a left side prevalence (p=0.04, chi2 test. The anteromedial zone of temporal pole was affected in 27 (30% out of 90 patients. In 63 (70% patients the lateral zone were also affected. Patients with TPA were younger at seizure onset (p=0.018, but without association with duration of epilepsy. CONCLUSION: Our FLAIR study show temporal pole signal abnormality in 3/4 of patients with HS, mainly seen on the anteromedial region, with a larger prevalence when the left hippocampus was involved.OBJETIVO: Determinar a freqüência e o envolvimento regional da anormalidade de sinal do pólo temporal (APT em pacientes com esclerose hipocampal (EH utilizando seqüência inversão recuperação com supressão da água (FLAIR por RM, e correlacioná-la com a história. MÉTODO: Foram analisadas as imagens coronais FLAIR dos pólos temporais de 120 pacientes com EH e de 30 indivíduos normais, para avaliar a demarcação entre substâncias branca e cinzenta. RESULTADOS: Noventa (75% dos 120 pacientes tinham APT associada. Houve prevalência do lado esquerdo (p=0.04, chi2 teste na relação entre APT e o lado da EH. A zona ântero-medial estava acometida em 27 (30% destes pacientes. Em 63 (70% pacientes também a zona lateral estava acometida. Pacientes com APT apresentaram início da epilepsia quando mais jovens (p=0.018, porém sem associação com a sua duração. CONCLUSÃO: A seqüência FLAIR mostra haver ATP em 3/4 dos pacientes com EH

  19. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance of myocardial edema using a short inversion time inversion recovery (STIR) black-blood technique:Diagnostic accuracy of visual and semi-quantitative assessment

    OpenAIRE

    h-Ici Darach O; Ridgway John P; Kuehne Titus; Berger Felix; Plein Sven; Sivananthan Mohan; Messroghli Daniel R

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The short inversion time inversion recovery (STIR) black-blood technique has been used to visualize myocardial edema, and thus to differentiate acute from chronic myocardial lesions. However, some cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) groups have reported variable image quality, and hence the diagnostic value of STIR in routine clinical practice has been put into question. The aim of our study was to analyze image quality and diagnostic performance of STIR using a set of...

  20. Prediction of heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) noise attenuation using scale model testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracken, M.; Barman, M.; Gambino, V. [Aercoustics Engineering Limited, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    1996-08-01

    An investigation was undertaken to determine whether scale modelling was effective for the study of (1) reactive attenuation on the gas flow path of heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs), (2) attenuation due to diffusion and scattering of sound, and (3) propagation loss due to flow resistivity of the tube bundles. MIDAS, a state-of-the-art measurement system, suitable for use with small models, and a microphone capable of ultrasonic measurement, were used. The noise source used was supplied by a high voltage spark source. The methodology used in the study, and some of the initial results of the scale model testing were described. A review of the initial results showed that it will be possible to model reactive effects, viscous loss and diffusion and scattering. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  1. Inversion formula for the non-uniformly attenuated x-ray transform for emission imaging in R{sup 3} using quaternionic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saberi Fathi, S M, E-mail: majid.saberi@u-cergy.f [Universite de Cergy-Pontoise, Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Modelisation, 95302 Cergy-Pontoise (France)

    2010-08-20

    In this paper, we present a new derivation of the inverse of the non-uniformly attenuated x-ray transform in three dimensions, based on quaternion analysis. An explicit formula is obtained using a set of three-dimensional x-ray projection data. The result without attenuation is recovered as a special case.

  2. Sodium inversion recovery MRI on the knee joint at 7 T with an optimal control pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Seung; Xia, Ding; Madelin, Guillaume; Regatte, Ravinder R.

    2016-01-01

    In the field of sodium magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), inversion recovery (IR) is a convenient and popular method to select sodium in different environments. For the knee joint, IR has been used to suppress the signal from synovial fluids, which improves the correlation between the sodium signal and the concentration of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in cartilage tissues. For the better inversion of the magnetization vector under the spatial variations of the B0 and B1 fields, the IR sequence usually employ adiabatic pulses as the inversion pulse. On the other hand, it has been shown that RF shapes robust against the variations of the B0 and B1 fields can be generated by numerical optimization based on optimal control theory. In this work, we compare the performance of fluid-suppressed sodium MRI on the knee joint in vivo, between one implemented with an adiabatic pulse in the IR sequence and the other with the adiabatic pulse replaced by an optimal-control shaped pulse. While the optimal-control pulse reduces the RF power deposited to the body by 58%, the quality of fluid suppression and the signal level of sodium within cartilage are similar between two implementations.

  3. Inverse Estimation of Temperature Profiles in Landfills Using Heat Recovery Fluids Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Solisio

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In addition to leachate and gas emission analysis, temperature variations in municipal solid waste landfills are routinely monitored for safety and health reasons, such as the increased production of biogas or the danger of spontaneous combustion phenomena if the temperature exceeds 70–75°C. The increasing constraints on greenhouse gas emissions and the convenience of fuel and heat recovery have helped develop a global approach to landfills' operation and maintenance, generally referred to as bioreactor landfill management. The heat recovery piping we are presently designing can be a significant part of this approach. The heat gained by a fluid circulated in a closed network through the landfill is transferred to an external heat exchanger or used directly as warm water. Additionally, it can help reduce landfill temperature levels and control biogas generation. Since the pipes diameter is large enough to allow for a radial temperature gradient, this information can be used for an inverse estimation of the temperature profile in the landfill which constitutes the boundary conditions of the resulting heat transfer problem. In this paper, we describe an algorithm for regularising the resulting ill-posed free boundary estimation problem using sampled data of the heat recovery fluid on exiting the landfill.

  4. Multi-criterion Optimization Approach to Ill-posed Inverse Problem with Visual Feature’s Recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Weihui Dai

    2010-01-01

    Ill-posed inverse problem is commonly existed in signal processing such as image reconstruction from projection, parameter estimation on electromagnetic field, and path optimization in IP network. Usually, the solution of an inverse problem is unstable, not unique or does not exit. Traditional approach to solve this problem is to estimate the solution by optimizing a regularized objective function. In some cases, recovery of visual features is most emphasized in that solution; thereof the dis...

  5. Short TI inversion-recovery MR imaging of chest wall malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Short-T1 inversion-recovery (STIR) sequences have greater constant, less motion sensitivity, and require shorter imaging times than conventional T2-weighted spin-echo (SE) sequences and are therefore particularly useful for staging chest wall malignancies. MR studies of 49 patients with possible chest wall malignancies were reviewed. Images were produced at 0.15 T with a variety of SE sequences. Forty-five also had STIR (repetition time, 1,400 - 2,100; echo time, 36 or 40; inversion time, 100 or 125). MR studies indicated chest wall involvement in 39 of 49 patients; 12 had obvious rib encasement, the most definitive finding. IN 13, lesions detected on STIR were either not visible or seen only in retrospect on T1 SE images. In five of five, STIR was clearly superior to T2 SE for delineation of tumor margins. The authors have discontinued using T2 SE sequences for chest neoplasms in favor of the higher contrast and sensitivity of STIR

  6. Tissue Border Enhancement by inversion recovery MRI at 7.0 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costagli, Mauro; Tiberi, Gianluigi [Imago7 Foundation, Pisa (Italy); IRCCS Stella Maris, Pisa (Italy); Kelley, Douglas A.C. [GE Healthcare Technologies, San Francisco, CA (United States); Symms, Mark R. [GE Applied Science Laboratory, Pisa (Italy); Biagi, Laura; Tosetti, Michela [IRCCS Stella Maris, Pisa (Italy); Stara, Riccardo; Cosottini, Mirco [Imago7 Foundation, Pisa (Italy); University of Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Maggioni, Eleonora [IRCCS Scientific Institute E. Medea, Bosisio Parini, Lecco (Italy); Politecnico di Milano, Milan (Italy); Barba, Carmen [Children' s Hospital A. Meyer - University of Florence, Neuroscience Department, Florence (Italy); Guerrini, Renzo [IRCCS Stella Maris, Pisa (Italy); Children' s Hospital A. Meyer - University of Florence, Neuroscience Department, Florence (Italy)

    2014-07-15

    This contribution presents a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquisition technique named Tissue Border Enhancement (TBE), whose purpose is to produce images with enhanced visualization of borders between two tissues of interest without any post-processing. The technique is based on an inversion recovery sequence that employs an appropriate inversion time to produce images where the interface between two tissues of interest is hypo-intense; therefore, tissue borders are clearly represented by dark lines. This effect is achieved by setting imaging parameters such that two neighboring tissues of interest have magnetization with equal magnitude but opposite sign; therefore, the voxels containing a mixture of each tissue (that is, the tissue interface) possess minimal net signal. The technique was implemented on a 7.0 T MRI system. This approach can assist the definition of tissue borders, such as that between cortical gray matter and white matter; therefore, it could facilitate segmentation procedures, which are often challenging on ultra-high-field systems due to inhomogeneous radiofrequency distribution. TBE allows delineating the contours of structural abnormalities, and its capabilities were demonstrated with patients with focal cortical dysplasia, gray matter heterotopia, and polymicrogyria. This technique provides a new type of image contrast and has several possible applications in basic neuroscience, neurogenetic research, and clinical practice, as it could improve the detection power of MRI in the characterization of cortical malformations, enhance the contour of small anatomical structures of interest, and facilitate cortical segmentation. (orig.)

  7. Rapid T1 quantification based on 3D phase sensitive inversion recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging fibrotic myocardium can be distinguished from healthy tissue using the difference in the longitudinal T1 relaxation after administration of Gadolinium, the so-called Late Gd Enhancement. The purpose of this work was to measure the myocardial absolute T1 post-Gd from a single breath-hold 3D Phase Sensitivity Inversion Recovery sequence (PSIR). Equations were derived to take the acquisition and saturation effects on the magnetization into account. The accuracy of the method was investigated on phantoms and using simulations. The method was applied to a group of patients with suspected myocardial infarction where the absolute difference in relaxation of healthy and fibrotic myocardium was measured at about 15 minutes post-contrast. The evolution of the absolute R1 relaxation rate (1/T1) over time after contrast injection was followed for one patient and compared to T1 mapping using Look-Locker. Based on the T1 maps synthetic LGE images were reconstructed and compared to the conventional LGE images. The fitting algorithm is robust against variation in acquisition flip angle, the inversion delay time and cardiac arrhythmia. The observed relaxation rate of the myocardium is 1.2 s-1, increasing to 6 - 7 s-1 after contrast injection and decreasing to 2 - 2.5 s-1 for healthy myocardium and to 3.5 - 4 s-1 for fibrotic myocardium. Synthesized images based on the T1 maps correspond very well to actual LGE images. The method provides a robust quantification of post-Gd T1 relaxation for a complete cardiac volume within a single breath-hold

  8. Noncontrast-enhanced renal angiography using multiple inversion recovery and alternating TR balanced steady-state free precession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hattie Z; Worters, Pauline W; Wu, Holden H; Ingle, R Reeve; Vasanawala, Shreyas S; Nishimura, Dwight G

    2013-08-01

    Noncontrast-enhanced renal angiography techniques based on balanced steady-state free precession avoid external contrast agents, take advantage of high inherent blood signal from the T 2 / T 1 contrast mechanism, and have short steady-state free precession acquisition times. However, background suppression is limited; inflow times are inflexible; labeling region is difficult to define when tagging arterial flow; and scan times are long. To overcome these limitations, we propose the use of multiple inversion recovery preparatory pulses combined with alternating pulse repetition time balanced steady-state free precession to produce renal angiograms. Multiple inversion recovery uses selective spatial saturation followed by four nonselective inversion recovery pulses to concurrently null a wide range of background T 1 species while allowing for adjustable inflow times; alternating pulse repetition time steady-state free precession maintains vessel contrast and provides added fat suppression. The high level of suppression enables imaging in three-dimensional as well as projective two-dimensional formats, the latter of which has a scan time as short as one heartbeat. In vivo studies at 1.5 T demonstrate the superior vessel contrast of this technique.

  9. Anomaly Detection and Artifact Recovery in PET Attenuation-Correction Images Using the Likelihood Function

    OpenAIRE

    Laymon, Charles M; Bowsher, James E.

    2013-01-01

    In dual modality PET/CT, CT data are used to generate the attenuation correction applied in the reconstruction of the PET emission image. This requires converting the CT image into a 511-keV attenuation map. Algorithms for making this transformation require assumptions about the makeup of material within the patient. Anomalous material such as contrast agent administered to enhance the CT scan confounds conversion algorithms and has been observed to result in inaccuracies, i.e., inconsistenci...

  10. A research of 3D gravity inversion based on the recovery of sparse underdetermined linear equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhaohai, M.

    2014-12-01

    Because of the properties of gravity data, it is made difficult to solve the problem of multiple solutions. There are two main types of 3D gravity inversion methods:One of two methods is based on the improvement of the instability of the sensitive matrix, solving the problem of multiple solutions and instability in 3D gravity inversion. Another is to join weight function into the 3D gravity inversion iteration. Through constant iteration, it can renewal density values and weight function to achieve the purpose to solve the multiple solutions and instability of the 3D gravity data inversion. Thanks to the sparse nature of the solutions of 3D gravity data inversions, we can transform it into a sparse equation. Then, through solving the sparse equations, we can get perfect 3D gravity inversion results. The main principle is based on zero norm of sparse matrix solution of the equation. Zero norm is mainly to solve the nonzero solution of the sparse matrix. However, the method of this article adopted is same as the principle of zero norm. But the method is the opposite of zero norm to obtain zero value solution. Through the form of a Gaussian fitting solution of the zero norm, we can find the solution by using regularization principle. Moreover, this method has been proved that it had a certain resistance to random noise in the mathematics, and it was more suitable than zero norm for the solution of the geophysical data. 3D gravity which is adopted in this article can well identify abnormal body density distribution characteristics, and it can also recognize the space position of abnormal distribution very well. We can take advantage of the density of the upper and lower limit penalty function to make each rectangular residual density within a reasonable range. Finally, this 3D gravity inversion is applied to a variety of combination model test, such as a single straight three-dimensional model, the adjacent straight three-dimensional model and Y three

  11. Recovery of material parameters of soft hyperelastic tissue by an inverse spectral technique

    KAUST Repository

    Gou, Kun

    2012-07-01

    An inverse spectral method is developed for recovering a spatially inhomogeneous shear modulus for soft tissue. The study is motivated by a novel use of the intravascular ultrasound technique to image arteries. The arterial wall is idealized as a nonlinear isotropic cylindrical hyperelastic body. A boundary value problem is formulated for the response of the arterial wall within a specific class of quasistatic deformations reflective of the response due to imposed blood pressure. Subsequently, a boundary value problem is developed via an asymptotic construction modeling intravascular ultrasound interrogation which generates small amplitude, high frequency time harmonic vibrations superimposed on the static finite deformation. This leads to a system of second order ordinary Sturm-Liouville boundary value problems that are then employed to reconstruct the shear modulus through a nonlinear inverse spectral technique. Numerical examples are demonstrated to show the viability of the method. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Uniqueness result for an inverse conductivity recovery problem with application to EEG

    OpenAIRE

    Clerc, Maureen; Leblond, Juliette; Marmorat, Jean-Paul; Papageorgakis, Christos

    2016-01-01

    Considering a geometry made of three concentric spherical nested layers, each with constant homogeneous conductivity, we establish a uniqueness result in inverse conductivity estimation, from partial boundary data in presence of a known source term. We make use of spherical harmonics and linear algebra computations, that also provide us with stability results and a robust reconstruction algorithm. As an application to electroencephalography (EEG), in a spherical 3-layer head model (brain, sku...

  13. High intensity and reduced volume training attenuates stress and recovery levels in elite swimmers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elbe, Anne-Marie; Rasmussen, Camilla P; Nielsen, Glen;

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of increased high-intensity interval training (HIT) at the expense of total training volume on the stress and recovery levels of elite swimmers. Forty-one elite swimmers participated in the study and were randomly assigned to either a HIT or a control group (CON......). Eleven swimmers did not complete the questionnaires. For 12 weeks both groups trained ~12 h per week. The amount of HIT was ~5 h vs. 1 h, and total distance was ~17 km vs. ~35 km per week for HIT and CON, respectively. HIT was performed as 6-10 × 10-30 s maximal effort interspersed by 2-4 min of rest...... for baseline values. No significant effects could be observed in sports-specific stress or sports-specific recovery. The results indicate that increasing training intensity and reducing training volume for 12 weeks can reduce general stress and increase general recovery levels in competitive swimmers....

  14. On an inverse source problem for enhanced oil recovery by wave motion maximization in reservoirs

    KAUST Repository

    Karve, Pranav M.

    2014-12-28

    © 2014, Springer International Publishing Switzerland. We discuss an optimization methodology for focusing wave energy to subterranean formations using strong motion actuators placed on the ground surface. The motivation stems from the desire to increase the mobility of otherwise entrapped oil. The goal is to arrive at the spatial and temporal description of surface sources that are capable of maximizing mobility in the target reservoir. The focusing problem is posed as an inverse source problem. The underlying wave propagation problems are abstracted in two spatial dimensions, and the semi-infinite extent of the physical domain is negotiated by a buffer of perfectly-matched-layers (PMLs) placed at the domain’s truncation boundary. We discuss two possible numerical implementations: Their utility for deciding the tempo-spatial characteristics of optimal wave sources is shown via numerical experiments. Overall, the simulations demonstrate the inverse source method’s ability to simultaneously optimize load locations and time signals leading to the maximization of energy delivery to a target formation.

  15. Experience with MR cholangiopancreatography with use of a fast inversion recovery sequence during a single breath-hold period

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiono, Takahiro [Dokkyo Univ., Saitama (Japan). Koshigaya Hospital

    1997-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the single breath-hold fast inversion recovery sequence (FIR) for depicting the biliary tract. A prospective study was performed in 40 patients with suspected diseases in the biliary tract. MRCP (magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography) including cholecystograms of diagnostic quality was carried out in 35 patients. Impacted common duct stones were able to be distinguished from malignancies because of their characteristic shapes of obstruction in four of five cases. FIR with thick slices can provide a shorter acquisition time and fewer artifacts with better signal to noise ratio and contrast to noise ratio than MIP images obtained by means of gradient echo methods. MRCP with FIR was a useful adjunctive tool for non-invasive evaluation of patients with obstructive jaundice. (author)

  16. Anterior temporal lobe white matter abnormal signal (ATLAS) as an indicator of seizure focus laterality in temporal lobe epilepsy: comparison of double inversion recovery, FLAIR and T2W MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the diagnostic capability of anterior temporal lobe white matter abnormal signal (ATLAS) for determining seizure focus laterality in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) by comparing different MR sequences. This prospective study was approved by the institutional review board and written informed consent was obtained. Three 3D sequences (double inversion recovery (DIR), fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and T2-weighted imaging (T2WI)) and two 2D sequences (FLAIR and T2WI) were acquired at 3 T. Signal changes in the anterior temporal white matter of 21 normal volunteers were evaluated. ATLAS laterality was evaluated in 21 TLE patients. Agreement of independent evaluations by two neuroradiologists was assessed using κ statistics. Differences in concordance between ATLAS laterality and clinically defined seizure focus laterality were analysed using McNemar's test with multiple comparisons. Pre-amygdala high signals (PAHS) were detected in all volunteers only on 3D-DIR. Inter-evaluator agreement was moderate to almost perfect for each sequence. Correct diagnosis of seizure laterality was significantly more frequent on 3D-DIR than on any other sequences (P ≤ 0.031 for each evaluator). The most sensitive sequence for detecting ATLAS laterality was 3D-DIR. ATLAS laterality on 3D-DIR can be a good indicator for determining seizure focus localization in TLE. (orig.)

  17. Anterior temporal lobe white matter abnormal signal (ATLAS) as an indicator of seizure focus laterality in temporal lobe epilepsy: comparison of double inversion recovery, FLAIR and T2W MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morimoto, Emiko; Kanagaki, Mitsunori; Okada, Tomohisa; Yamamoto, Akira; Togashi, Kaori [Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Mori, Nobuyuki [Tenri Hospital, Department of Radiology, Tenri, Nara (Japan); Matsumoto, Riki; Ikeda, Akio; Takahashi, Ryosuke [Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Kyoto (Japan); Mikuni, Nobuhiro [Sapporo Medical University, Department of Neurosurgery, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Kunieda, Takeharu; Miyamoto, Susumu [Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Kyoto (Japan); Paul, Dominik [Siemens AG Healthcare Sector, Erlangen (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    To investigate the diagnostic capability of anterior temporal lobe white matter abnormal signal (ATLAS) for determining seizure focus laterality in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) by comparing different MR sequences. This prospective study was approved by the institutional review board and written informed consent was obtained. Three 3D sequences (double inversion recovery (DIR), fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and T2-weighted imaging (T2WI)) and two 2D sequences (FLAIR and T2WI) were acquired at 3 T. Signal changes in the anterior temporal white matter of 21 normal volunteers were evaluated. ATLAS laterality was evaluated in 21 TLE patients. Agreement of independent evaluations by two neuroradiologists was assessed using {kappa} statistics. Differences in concordance between ATLAS laterality and clinically defined seizure focus laterality were analysed using McNemar's test with multiple comparisons. Pre-amygdala high signals (PAHS) were detected in all volunteers only on 3D-DIR. Inter-evaluator agreement was moderate to almost perfect for each sequence. Correct diagnosis of seizure laterality was significantly more frequent on 3D-DIR than on any other sequences (P {<=} 0.031 for each evaluator). The most sensitive sequence for detecting ATLAS laterality was 3D-DIR. ATLAS laterality on 3D-DIR can be a good indicator for determining seizure focus localization in TLE. (orig.)

  18. Inhibition of CXCL12 signaling attenuates the postischemic immune response and improves functional recovery after stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruscher, Karsten; Kuric, Enida; Liu, Yawei;

    2013-01-01

    cell-derived factor-1 (CXCL12). To mimic beneficial effects of EE, we studied the impact of inhibiting CXCL12 action on functional recovery after transient MCAO (tMCAO). Rats treated with the specific CXCL12 receptor antagonist 1-[4-(1,4,8,11-tetrazacyclotetradec-1-ylmethyl)phenyl]methyl]-1......(+)) and CD3(+)/CD4(+) T cells. Spleen atrophy and delayed death of splenocytes, induced by tMCAO, was prevented by AMD3100 treatment. We conclude that immoderate excessive activation of the CXCL12 pathway after stroke contributes to depression of neurologic function after stroke and that CXCR4 antagonism...

  19. Three-dimensional phase-sensitive inversion recovery sequencing in the evaluation of left ventricular myocardial scars in ischemic and non-ischemic cardiomyopathy: Comparison to three-dimensional inversion recovery sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kido, Tomoyuki, E-mail: tomozo0421@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Kido, Teruhito; Nakamura, Masashi; Kawaguchi, Naoto; Nishiyama, Yoshiko [Department of Radiology, Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Ogimoto, Akiyoshi [Department of Cardiovascular Internal Medicine, Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Miyagawa, Masao; Mochizuki, Teruhito [Department of Radiology, Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • We evaluate 3D PSIR compared with 3D IR for the detection of myocardial scars. • In image quality, there was no significant difference between IR and PSIR. • A quantitative analysis of LGE volume shows a strong correlation between PSIR and IR. • PSIR detected greater LGE volume in non-ischemic cardiomyopathy patients than IR. • PSIR may have a specific role in scar evaluation of non-ischemic cardiomyopathy. - Abstract: Background: Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a useful technique for detecting myocardial fibrosis. LGE images are typically acquired using the inversion recovery (IR) method. Recently, phase-sensitive inversion recovery (PSIR) technology has been developed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate free-breathing 3D PSIR sequencing in comparison with breath-held 3D IR sequencing for the detection of myocardial fibrosis. Methods: One hundred twenty-three patients with suspected ischemic cardiac disease (n = 27) or non-ischemic cardiomyopathy (hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, n = 29; dilated cardiomyopathy, n = 22; sarcoidosis, n = 21; arrhythmia, n = 9; myocarditis, n = 4; amyloidosis, n = 3; and others, n = 8) were evaluated by LGE–MRI, which was performed first with the IR sequence and then with the PSIR sequence, using a 3 T MRI scanner. Image quality was scored by two independent readers using a four-point scale. The 3D LGE volume was analyzed quantitatively and compared between both sequencing methods. Results: There was no significant difference in overall image quality (p = 0.19). LGE was detected in 73 patients, who were evaluated visually. Ultimately, 58 patients with acceptable image quality were enrolled in further quantitative analyses (volume assessment). Although quantification of LGE volume revealed a strong correlation between both methods, larger LGE volumes were detected with PSIR compared to IR in patients suspected of non-ischemic cardiomyopathy (39.5 ± 25.9 cm{sup 3} for

  20. Diagnostic accuracy of short-time inversion recovery sequence in Graves' ophthalmopathy before and after prednisone treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tortora, Fabio; Belfiore, Maria Paola; Romano, Francesco; Cappabianca, Salvatore; Cirillo, Sossio [' ' F. Magrassi-A. Lanzara' ' Second University, Naples (Italy). Dept. of Clinical and Experimental Medicine and Surgery; Prudente, Mariaevelina [Second University, Naples (Italy). Medicine Dept.; Vita Salute San Raffaele Univ., Milan (Italy). Dept. of Neuroradiology; Cirillo, Mario [Second University, Naples (Italy). Neuroradiological Services; Elefante, Andrea [Federic II Univ., Naples (Italy). Neuroradilogical Dept.; Carella, Carlo [Polidiagnostic Center Check-Up, Salerno (Italy)

    2014-05-15

    In Graves' Ophthalmopathy, it is important to distinguish active inflammatory phase, responsive to immunosuppressive treatment, from fibrotic unresponsive inactive one. The purpose of this study is, first, to identify the relevant orbital magnetic resonance imaging signal intensities before treatment, so to classify patients according to their clinical activity score (CAS), discriminating inactive (CAS < 3) from active Graves' Ophthalmopathy (GO) (CAS > 3) subjects and, second, to follow post-steroid treatment disease. An observational study was executed on 32 GO consecutive patients in different phases of disease, based on clinical and orbital Magnetic Resonance Imaging parameters, compared to 32 healthy volunteers. Orbital Magnetic Resonance Imaging was performed on a 1.5 tesla Magnetic Resonance Unit by an experienced neuroradiologist blinded to the clinical examinations. In pre-therapy patients, compared to controls, a medial rectus muscle statistically significant signal intensity ratio (SIR) in short-time inversion recovery (STIR) (long TR/TE) sequence was found, as well as when comparing patients before and after treatment, both medial and inferior rectus muscle SIR resulted significantly statistically different in STIR. These increased outcomes explain the inflammation oedematous phase of disease, moreover after steroid administration, compared to controls; patients presented lack of that statistically significant difference, thus suggesting treatment effectiveness. In our study, we proved STIR signal intensities increase in inflammation oedematous phase, confirming STIR sequence to define active phase of disease with more sensibility and reproducibility than CAS alone and to evaluate post-therapy involvement. (orig.)

  1. Fast inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging with the real reconstruction method. A diagnostic tool for cerebral gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandai, Hideki; Tsunoda, Akira; Mitsuoka, Hideyuki; Arai, Hajime; Sato, Kiyoshi [Juntendo Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine; Makita, Junichi

    2002-01-01

    The fast inversion recovery (IR) technique was evaluated for the localization of gliomas. Fast IR imaging with real reconstruction and T{sub 1}-weighted spin echo (SE) imaging before and after contrast administration were performed in 20 patients with gliomas. The tumor-to-white matter contrast ratio (TWCR), tumor-to-gray matter contrast ratio (TGCR), tumor-to-white matter contrast-to-noise ratio (TWCNR), and tumor-to-gray matter contrast-to-noise ratio (TGCNR) were calculated and compared. Fast IR imaging visualized tumors with significantly higher TWCR, TGCR, TWCNR, and TGCNR values (p<0.01) than those for T{sub 1}-weighted SE imaging. In particular, fast IR imaging clearly revealed seven non-enhanced tumors that were poorly visualized on T{sub 1}-weighted SE imaging. Fast IR imaging showed a similar TGCR and significantly higher TWCR (p<0.01) compared to T{sub 1}-weighted SE imaging with contrast medium in 13 enhanced tumors. However, fast IR imaging showed similar TWCNR and lower TGCNR compared to T{sub 1}-weighted SE imaging with contrast medium. The fast IR technique can discriminate tumors from normal cerebral tissues with high contrast and without the use of contrast medium. This technique is extremely useful for the localization of non-enhanced tumors. (author)

  2. Quantification of traumatic meningeal injury using dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Marcelo A.; Williford, Joshua P.; Cota, Martin R.; MacLaren, Judy M.; Dardzinski, Bernard J.; Latour, Lawrence L.; Pham, Dzung L.; Butman, John A.

    2016-03-01

    Traumatic meningeal injury is a novel imaging marker of traumatic brain injury, which appears as enhancement of the dura on post-contrast T2-weighted FLAIR images, and is likely associated with inflammation of the meninges. Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI provides a better discrimination of abnormally perfused regions. A method to properly identify those regions is presented. Images of seventeen patients scanned within 96 hours of head injury with positive traumatic meningeal injury were normalized and aligned. The difference between the pre- and last post-contrast acquisitions was segmented and voxels in the higher class were spatially clustered. Spatial and morphological descriptors were used to identify the regions of enhancement: a) centroid; b) distance to the brain mask from external voxels; c) distance from internal voxels; d) size; e) shape. The method properly identified thirteen regions among all patients. The method failed in one case due to the presence of a large brain lesion that altered the mask boundaries. Most false detections were correctly rejected resulting in a sensitivity and specificity of 92.9% and 93.6%, respectively.

  3. MRI of fat necrosis of the breast: The “black hole” sign at short tau inversion recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To describe MRI features of fat necrosis of the breast. Materials and methods: Twenty-five lesions in 16 patients were retrospectively analyzed. MRI was performed due to equivocal findings at conventional imaging after surgical treatment of cancer (n = 14) or during anticoagulant therapy (n = 1), after focal mastitis treated with ductal resection (n = 1). In the 15 patients with previous surgery MRI was performed after a median interval of 24 months, using short tau inversion recovery (STIR) and contrast-enhanced dynamic T1-weighted sequences. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) inside the lesion and surrounding healthy fat was calculated on both STIR and unenhanced T1-weighted images. Maximal lesion diameter was measured on STIR images. All lesions had final clinical and imaging assessment in favor of fat necrosis and negative clinical and imaging follow-up (21–40 months; median 24 months). Results: At STIR sequence, fat necrosis appeared as a “black hole”, being markedly hypointense (median SNR = 29) compared with surrounding fat (median SNR = 95) (P < 0.001), while no significant difference was found at unenhanced T1-weighted sequence. No significant correlation with time from treatment was found. Of 25 lesions, 15 showed ring enhancement, with continuous increase (n = 10), plateau (n = 2), or wash-out curve (n = 3). The 11 enhancing lesions in the 8 patients with previous radiation therapy showed an initial enhancement higher than that of the 4 enhancing lesions in the 2 patients who did not, although the difference was not significant (P = 0.104). Conclusion: Fat necrosis of the breast exhibits a “black hole” sign on STIR images, allowing for an easier diagnosis in clinical practice.

  4. Optimization of iterative reconstruction parameters with attenuation correction, scatter correction and resolution recovery in myocardial perfusion SPECT/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to characterize the optimal reconstruction parameters for ordered-subset expectation maximization (OSEM) with attenuation correction, scatter correction, and depth-dependent resolution recovery (OSEMACSCRR). We assessed the optimal parameters for OSEMACSCRR in an anthropomorphic torso phantom study, and evaluated the validity of the reconstruction parameters in the groups of normal volunteers and patients with abnormal perfusion. Images of the anthropomorphic torso phantom, 9 normal volunteers and 7 patients undergoing myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) were acquired with a SPECT/CT scanner. SPECT data comprised a 64 x 64 matrix with an acquisition pixel size of 6.6 mm. A normalized mean square error (NMSE) of the phantom image was calculated to determine both optimal OSEM update and a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of Gaussian filter. We validated the myocardial count, contrast and noise characteristic for clinical subjects derived from OSEMACSCRR processing. OSEM with depth-dependent resolution recovery (OSEMRR) and filtered back projection (FBP) were simultaneously performed to compare OSEMACSCRR. The combination of OSEMACSCRR with 90-120 OSEM updates and Gaussian filter with 13.2-14.85 mm FWHM yielded low NMSE value in the phantom study. When we used OSEMACSCRR with 120 updates and Gaussian filter with 13.2 mm FWHM in the normal volunteers, myocardial contrast showed significantly higher value than that derived from 120 updates and 14.85 mm FWHM. OSEMACSCRR with the combination of 90-120 OSEM updates and 14.85 mm FWHM produced lowest % root mean square (RMS) noise. Regarding the defect contrast of patients with abnormal perfusion, OSEMACSCRR with the combination of 90-120 OSEM updates and 13.2 mm FWHM produced significantly higher value than that derived from 90-120 OSEM updates and 14.85 mm FWHM. OSEMACSCRR was superior to FBP for the % RMS noise (8.52±1.08 vs. 9.55±1.71, P=0.02) and defect

  5. Attenuation of systolic blood pressure and pulse transit time hysteresis during exercise and recovery in cardiovascular patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing; Yan, Bryan P; Yu, Cheuk-Man; Zhang, Yuan-Ting; Poon, Carmen C Y

    2014-02-01

    Pulse transit time (PTT) is a cardiovascular parameter of emerging interest due to its potential to estimate blood pressure (BP) continuously and without a cuff. Both linear and nonlinear equations have been used in the estimation of BP based on PTT. This study, however, demonstrates that there is a hysteresis phenomenon between BP and PTT during and after dynamic exercise. A total of 46 subjects including 16 healthy subjects, 13 subjects with one or more cardiovascular risk factors, and 17 patients with cardiovascular disease underwent graded exercise stress test. PTT was measured from electrocardiogram and photoplethysmogram of the left index finger of the subject, i.e., a pathway that includes predominately aorta, brachial, and radial arteries. The results of this study showed that, for the same systolic BP (SBP), PTT measured during exercise was significantly larger than PTT measured during recovery for all subject groups. This hysteresis was further quantified as both normalized area bounded by the SBP-PTT relationship (AreaN) and SBP difference at PTT during peak exercise plus 20 ms (ΔSBP20). Significant attenuation of both AreaN (p <; 0.05) and ΔSBP20 (p <; 0.01) is observed in cardiovascular patients compared with healthy subjects, independent of resting BP. Since the SBP-PTT relationship are determined by the mechanical properties of arterial wall, which is predominately mediated by the sympathetic nervous system through altered vascular smooth muscle (VSM) tone during exercise, results of this study are consistent with the previous findings of autonomic nervous dysfunction in cardiovascular patients. We further conclude that VSM tone has a nonnegligible influence on the BP-PTT relationship and thus should be considered in the PTT-based BP estimation. PMID:24158470

  6. Mitochondria-targeted ROS scavenger improves post-ischemic recovery of cardiac function and attenuates mitochondrial abnormalities in aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobales, Nelson; Nuñez, Rebeca E; Jang, Sehwan; Parodi-Rullan, Rebecca; Ayala-Peña, Sylvette; Sacher, Joshua R; Skoda, Erin M; Wipf, Peter; Frontera, Walter; Javadov, Sabzali

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondria-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of aging and age-associated diseases. In this study, we evaluated the effects of XJB-5-131 (XJB), a mitochondria-targeted ROS and electron scavenger, on cardiac resistance to ischemia-reperfusion (IR)-induced oxidative stress in aged rats. Male adult (5-month old, n=17) and aged (29-month old, n=19) Fischer Brown Norway (F344/BN) rats were randomly assigned to the following groups: adult (A), adult+XJB (AX), aged (O), and aged+XJB (OX). XJB was administered 3 times per week (3mg/kg body weight, IP) for four weeks. At the end of the treatment period, cardiac function was continuously monitored in excised hearts using the Langendorff technique for 30 min, followed by 20 min of global ischemia, and 60-min reperfusion. XJB improved post-ischemic recovery of aged hearts, as evidenced by greater left ventricular developed-pressures and rate-pressure products than the untreated, aged-matched group. The state 3 respiration rates at complexes I, II and IV of mitochondria isolated from XJB-treated aged hearts were 57% (P<0.05), 25% (P<0.05) and 28% (P<0.05), respectively, higher than controls. Ca(2+)-induced swelling, an indicator of permeability transition pore opening, was reduced in the mitochondria of XJB-treated aged rats. In addition, XJB significantly attenuated the H2O2-induced depolarization of the mitochondrial inner membrane as well as the total and mitochondrial ROS levels in cultured cardiomyocytes. This study underlines the importance of mitochondrial ROS in aging-induced cardiac dysfunction and suggests that targeting mitochondrial ROS may be an effective therapeutic approach to protect the aged heart against IR injury. PMID:25451170

  7. 15 degrees head-down tilt attenuates the postexercise reduction in cutaneous vascular conductance and sweating and decreases esophageal temperature recovery time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnis, Natalie H; Journeay, W Shane; Jay, Ollie; Leclair, Emily; Kenny, Glen P

    2006-09-01

    The following study examined the effect of 15 degrees head-down tilt (HDT) on postexercise heat loss and hemodynamic responses. We tested the hypothesis that recovery from dynamic exercise in the HDT position would attenuate the reduction in the heat loss responses of cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) and sweating relative to upright seated (URS) recovery in association with an augmented hemodynamic response and an increased rate of core temperature decay. Seven male subjects performed the following three experimental protocols: 1) 60 min in the URS posture followed by 60 min in the 15 degrees HDT position; 2) 15 min of cycle ergometry at 75% of their predetermined V(O2 peak) followed by 60 min of recovery in the URS posture; or 3) 15 min of cycle ergometry at 75% of their predetermined V(O2 peak) followed by 60 min of recovery in the 15 degrees HDT position. Mean skin temperature, esophageal temperature (T(es)), skin blood flow, sweat rate, cardiac output (CO), stroke volume (SV), heart rate (HR), total peripheral resistance, and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were recorded at baseline, end exercise, 2, 5, 8, 12, 15, and 20 min, and every 5 min until end of recovery (60 min). Without preceding exercise, HDT decreased HR and increased SV (P < or = 0.05). During recovery after exercise, a significantly greater MAP, SV, CVC, and sweat rate and a significantly lower HR were found with HDT compared with URS posture (P < or = 0.05). Subsequently, a significantly lower T(es) was observed with HDT after 15 min of recovery onward (P < or = 0.05). At the end of 60 min of recovery, T(es) remained significantly elevated above baseline with URS (P < or = 0.05); however, T(es) returned to baseline with HDT. In conclusion, extended recovery from dynamic exercise in the 15 degrees HDT position attenuates the reduction in CVC and sweating, thereby significantly increasing the rate of T(es) decay compared with recovery in the URS posture. PMID:16741261

  8. Rapid assessment of myocardial infarct size in rodents using multi-slice inversion recovery late gadolinium enhancement CMR at 9.4T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hausenloy Derek J

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myocardial infarction (MI can be readily assessed using late gadolinium enhancement (LGE cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR. Inversion recovery (IR sequences provide the highest contrast between enhanced infarct areas and healthy myocardium. Applying such methods to small animals is challenging due to rapid respiratory and cardiac rates relative to T1 relaxation. Methods Here we present a fast and robust protocol for assessing LGE in small animals using a multi-slice IR gradient echo sequence for efficient assessment of LGE. An additional Look-Locker sequence was used to assess the optimum inversion point on an individual basis and to determine most appropriate gating points for both rat and mouse. The technique was applied to two preclinical scenarios: i an acute (2 hour reperfused model of MI in rats and ii mice 2 days following non-reperfused MI. Results LGE images from all animals revealed clear areas of enhancement allowing for easy volume segmentation. Typical inversion times required to null healthy myocardium in rats were between 300-450 ms equivalent to 2-3 R-waves and ~330 ms in mice, typically 3 R-waves following inversion. Data from rats was also validated against triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining and revealed close agreement for infarct size. Conclusion The LGE protocol presented provides a reliable method for acquiring images of high contrast and quality without excessive scan times, enabling higher throughput in experimental studies requiring reliable assessment of MI.

  9. Surface mass redistribution inversion from global GPS deformation and Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) gravity data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kusche, J.; Schrama, E.J.O.

    2005-01-01

    Monitoring hydrological redistributions through their integrated gravitational effect is the primary aim of the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission. Time‐variable gravity data from GRACE can be uniquely inverted to hydrology, since mass transfers located at or near the Earth's su

  10. Shortened Modified Look-Locker Inversion recovery (ShMOLLI for clinical myocardial T1-mapping at 1.5 and 3 T within a 9 heartbeat breathhold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greiser Andreas

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background T1 mapping allows direct in-vivo quantitation of microscopic changes in the myocardium, providing new diagnostic insights into cardiac disease. Existing methods require long breath holds that are demanding for many cardiac patients. In this work we propose and validate a novel, clinically applicable, pulse sequence for myocardial T1-mapping that is compatible with typical limits for end-expiration breath-holding in patients. Materials and methods The Shortened MOdified Look-Locker Inversion recovery (ShMOLLI method uses sequential inversion recovery measurements within a single short breath-hold. Full recovery of the longitudinal magnetisation between sequential inversion pulses is not achieved, but conditional interpretation of samples for reconstruction of T1-maps is used to yield accurate measurements, and this algorithm is implemented directly on the scanner. We performed computer simulations for 100 msIn-vivo myocardial T1-mapping using this method and the previous gold-standard (MOLLI was performed in 10 healthy volunteers at 1.5T and 3T, 4 volunteers with contrast injection at 1.5T, and 4 patients with recent myocardial infarction (MI at 3T. Results We found good agreement between the average ShMOLLI and MOLLI estimates for T1 In-vivo, ShMOLLI measurements required 9.0 ± 1.1 s (MOLLI = 17.6 ± 2.9 s. Average healthy myocardial T1 s by ShMOLLI at 1.5T were 966 ± 48 ms (mean ± SD and 1166 ± 60 ms at 3T. In MI patients, the T1 in unaffected myocardium (1216 ± 42 ms was similar to controls at 3T. Ischemically injured myocardium showed increased T1 = 1432 ± 33 ms (p in-vivo variability within ShMOLLI T1-maps was only 14% (1.5T or 18% (3T higher than the MOLLI maps, but the MOLLI acquisitions were twice longer than ShMOLLI acquisitions. Conclusion ShMOLLI is an efficient method that generates immediate, high-resolution myocardial T1-maps in a short breath-hold with high precision. This technique provides a valuable

  11. MRI in multiple sclerosis of the spinal cord: evaluation of fast short-tan inversion-recovery and spin-echo sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We compared the sensitivity of T2-weighted spin-echo (FSE) and fast short-tau inversion-recovery (fSTIR) sequences in detection of multiple sclerosis of the spinal cord in 100 consecutive patients with clinically confirmed multiple sclerosis (MS); 86 patients underwent also brain MRI. In all, 310 focal lesions were detected on fSTIR and 212 on T2-weighted FSE, spinal cord lesions were seen better on fSTIR images, with a higher contrast between the lesion and the normal spinal cord. In 24 patients in whom cord plaques were shown with both sequences, the cranial study was normal or inconclusive. Assessment of spinal plaques can be particularly important when MRI of the brain is inconclusive, and in there situations fSTIR can be helpful. (orig.)

  12. Comparison of increased venous contrast in ischemic stroke using phase-sensitive MR imaging with perfusion changes on flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery at 3 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, Eijiro; Kanasaki, Yoshiko; Fujii, Shinya; Ogawa, Toshihide (Div. of Radiology, Dept. of Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Science, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori Univ. Hospital, Yonago, Tottori (Japan)), email: eyamashi-ttr@umin.ac.jp; Tanaka, Takuro; Hirata, Yoshiharu (Div. of Clinical Radiology, Tottori Univ. Hospital, Yonago, Tottori (Japan))

    2011-10-15

    Background Increased venous contrast in ischemic stroke using susceptibility-weighted imaging has been widely reported, although few reports have compared increased venous contrast areas with perfusion change areas. Purpose To compare venous contrast on phase-sensitive MR images (PSI) with perfusion change on flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) images, and to discuss the clinical use of PSI in ischemic stroke. Material and Methods Thirty patients with clinically suspected acute infarction of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory within 7 days of onset were evaluated. Phase-sensitive imaging (PSI), flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) were obtained using 3 Tesla scanner. Two neuroradiologists independently reviewed the MR images, as well as the PSI, DWI, and FAIR images. They were blinded to the clinical data and to each other's findings. The abnormal area of each image was ultimately identified after both neuroradiologists reached consensus. We analyzed areas of increased venous contrast on PSI, perfusion changes on FAIR images and signal changes on DWI for each case. Results Venous contrast increased on PSI and hypoperfusion was evident on FAIR images from 22 of the 30 patients (73%). The distribution of the increased venous contrast was the same as that of the hypoperfused areas on FAIR images in 16 of these 22. The extent of these lesions was larger than that of lesions visualized by on DWI in 18 of the 22 patients. Hypointense signals reflecting hemorrhage and no increased venous contrast on PSI and hyperperfusion on FAIR images were found in six of the remaining eight patients (20%). Findings on PSI were normal and hypoperfusion areas were absent on FAIR images of two patients (7%). Conclusion Increased venous contrast on PSI might serve as an index of misery perfusion and provide useful information

  13. Assessment of myocardial infarction in mice by Late Gadolinium Enhancement MR imaging using an inversion recovery pulse sequence at 9.4T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herlihy Amy H

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To demonstrate the feasibility of using an inversion recovery pulse sequence and to define the optimal inversion time (TI to assess myocardial infarction in mice by late gadolinium enhancement (LGE MRI at 9.4T, and to obtain the maximal contrast between the infarcted and the viable myocardium. Methods MRI was performed at 9.4T in mice, two days after induction of myocardial infarction (n = 4. For cardiovascular MR imaging, a segmented magnetization-prepared fast low angle shot (MP-FLASH sequence was used with varied TIs ranging from 40 to 420 ms following administration of gadolinium-DTPA at 0.6 mmol/kg. Contrast-to-noise (CNR and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR were measured and compared for each myocardial region of interest (ROI. Results The optimal TI, which corresponded to a minimum SNR in the normal myocardium, was 268 ms ± 27.3. The SNR in the viable myocardium was significantly different from that found in the infarcted myocardium (17.2 ± 2.4 vs 82.1 ± 10.8; p = 0.006 leading to a maximal relative SI (Signal Intensity between those two areas (344.9 ± 60.4. Conclusion Despite the rapid heart rate in mice, our study demonstrates that LGE MRI can be performed at 9.4T using a protocol similar to the one used for clinical MR diagnosis of myocardial infarction.

  14. Photoacoustic Imaging Taking into Account Attenuation

    CERN Document Server

    Kowar, Richard

    2010-01-01

    First, we review existing attenuation models and discuss their causality properties, which we believe to be essential for algorithms for inversion with attenuated data. Then, we survey causality properties of common attenuation models. We also derive integro-differential equations which the attenuated waves are satisfying. In addition we discuss the ill--conditionness of the inverse problem for calculating the unattenuated wave from the attenuated one.

  15. Prostaglandin E2 EP2 Receptor Deletion Attenuates Intracerebral Hemorrhage-Induced Brain Injury and Improves Functional Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenna L. Leclerc

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH is a devastating type of stroke characterized by bleeding into the brain parenchyma and secondary brain injury resulting from strong neuroinflammatory responses to blood components. Production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 is significantly upregulated following ICH and contributes to this inflammatory response in part through its E prostanoid receptor subtype 2 (EP2. Signaling through the EP2 receptor has been shown to affect outcomes of many acute and chronic neurological disorders; although, not yet explored in the context of ICH. Wildtype (WT and EP2 receptor knockout (EP2−/− mice were subjected to ICH, and various anatomical and functional outcomes were assessed by histology and neurobehavioral testing, respectively. When compared with age-matched WT controls, EP2−/− mice had 41.9 ± 4.7% smaller ICH-induced brain lesions and displayed significantly less ipsilateral hemispheric enlargement and incidence of intraventricular hemorrhage. Anatomical outcomes correlated with improved functional recovery as identified by neurological deficit scoring. Histological staining was performed to begin investigating the mechanisms involved in EP2-mediated neurotoxicity after ICH. EP2−/− mice exhibited 45.5 ± 5.8% and 41.4 ± 8.1% less blood and ferric iron accumulation, respectively. Furthermore, significantly less striatal and cortical microgliosis, striatal and cortical astrogliosis, blood–brain barrier breakdown, and peripheral neutrophil infiltration were seen in EP2−/− mice. This study is the first to suggest a deleterious role for the PGE2-EP2 signaling axis in modulating brain injury, inflammation, and functional recovery following ICH. Targeting the EP2 G protein-coupled receptor may represent a new therapeutic avenue for the treatment of hemorrhagic stroke.

  16. Mask pattern recovery by level set method based inverse inspection technology (IIT) and its application on defect auto disposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Hyung; Chung, Paul D. H.; Jeon, Chan-Uk; Cho, Han Ku; Pang, Linyong; Peng, Danping; Tolani, Vikram; Cecil, Tom; Kim, David; Baik, KiHo

    2009-10-01

    At the most advanced technology nodes, such as 32nm and 22nm, aggressive OPC and Sub-Resolution Assist Features (SRAFs) are required. However, their use results in significantly increased mask complexity, making mask defect disposition more challenging than ever. This paper describes how mask patterns can first be recovered from the inspection images by applying patented algorithms using Level Set Methods. The mask pattern recovery step is then followed by aerial/wafer image simulation, the results of which can be plugged into an automated mask defect disposition system based on aerial/wafer image. The disposition criteria are primarily based on wafer-plane CD variance. The system also connects to a post-OPC lithography verification tool that can provide gauges and CD specs, thereby enabling them to be used in mask defect disposition as well. Results on both programmed defects and production defects collected at Samsung mask shop are presented to show the accuracy and consistency of using the Level Set Methods and aerial/wafer image based automated mask disposition.

  17. Attenuated RORC expression in the presence of EMT progression in somatotroph adenomas following treatment with somatostatin analogs is associated with poor clinical recovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tove Lekva

    Full Text Available Somatostatin analogs (SA have been established as the first line medical treatment for acromegaly, but following long-term treatment, SA normalizes GH and IGF-I levels in only 40-60% of patients. The epithelial marker E-cadherin plays a crucial role in the epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT and is associated with a poor response to SA treatment. We hypothesized that the characterization of transcripts regulated by SA in somatotroph adenomas with high and low E-cadherin expression may identify signaling pathways and mediators that can explain the poor response to SA treatment. We performed a microarray analysis of sixteen adenomas with different levels of E-cadherin and SA treatment to identify regulated transcripts. Candidate transcripts were further explored in vivo in sixty-five adenomas, and interactions between SA treatment and EMT progression on mRNA expression profiles and associations with clinical recovery were assessed. Finally, the effects of SA treatment on adenoma cells in vitro from acromegalic patients were determined. Microarray analysis of selected adenomas with differential E-cadherin expression, as a marker of EMT progression, identified 172 genes that displayed differential expression that was dependent on SA treatment. The validation of selected candidates in the entire cohort identified 9 transcripts that showed an interaction between E-cadherin expression and SA treatment. Further analysis of the impact of these genes suggests that attenuated RORC expression in somatotroph adenomas is associated with increased tumor size and a blunted clinical response. Our study indicates that attenuated RORC may be involved in the poor clinical response to SA treatment in patients with acromegaly.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of pelvic entheses - a systematic comparison between short tau inversion recovery (STIR) and T1-weighted, contrast-enhanced, fat-saturated sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klang, Eyal; Aharoni, Dvora; Rimon, Uri; Eshed, Iris [Tel Aviv University, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Hermann, Kay-Geert [Department of Radiology, Charite University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Herman, Amir [Sheba Medical Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Tel-Hashomer (Israel); Tel Aviv University, The Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Shazar, Nachshon [Sheba Medical Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Tel-Hashomer (Israel)

    2014-04-15

    To assess the contribution of contrast material in detecting and evaluating enthesitis of pelvic entheses by MRI. Sixty-seven hip or pelvic 1.5-T MRIs (30:37 male:female, mean age: 53 years) were retrospectively evaluated for the presence of hamstring and gluteus medius (GM) enthesitis by two readers (a resident and an experienced radiologist). Short tau inversion recovery (STIR) and T1-weighted pre- and post-contrast (T1+Gd) images were evaluated by each reader at two sessions. A consensus reading of two senior radiologists was regarded as the gold standard. Clinical data was retrieved from patients' referral form and medical files. Cohen's kappa was used for intra- and inter-observer agreement calculation. Diagnostic properties were calculated against the gold standard reading. A total of 228 entheses were evaluated. Gold standard analysis diagnosed 83 (36 %) enthesitis lesions. Intra-reader reliability for the experienced reader was significantly (p = 0.0001) higher in the T1+Gd images compared to the STIR images (hamstring: k = 0.84/0.45, GM: k = 0.84/0.47). Sensitivity and specificity increased from 0.74/0.8 to 0.87/0.9 in the STIR images and T1+Gd sequences. Intra-reader reliability for the inexperienced reader was lower (p > 0.05). Evidence showing that contrast material improves the reliability, sensitivity, and specificity of detecting enthesitis supports its use in this setting. (orig.)

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging with three-dimensional fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition with phase-cycled and short T1 inversion recovery pulse sequence for evaluating brachial plexus injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dianxiu Ning; Zhijin Lang; Di Ning; Guanfu Liu; Xiaochen Ji; Xiufeng Wang; Meiyu Sun; Bo Sun; Li Zhao; Weisheng Zhang; Lijun Wang; Shaowu Wang; Ailian Liu; Jianlin Wu

    2011-01-01

    There is a large amount of fat in the postganglionic segment of the brachial plexus nerve. The use of short T1 inversion recovery pulse sequence may improve signal strength of the brachial plexus postganglionic segment. The present study revealed that the combination of three-dimensional fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition with phase-cycled and short T1 inversion recovery pulse sequence clearly displayed the anatomical morphology and structure of the brachial plexus nerve, together with maximum intensity projection, volume rendering and other three-dimensional reconstruction techniques. Our results suggested that this method is also suitable for providing accurate assessment and diagnosis of the site, severity and scope of brachial plexus injury.

  20. Sensory neuronopathy involves the spinal cord and brachial plexus: a quantitative study employing multiple-echo data image combination (MEDIC) and turbo inversion recovery magnitude (TIRM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Yi-Fang; Tang, Wei-Jun; Li, Yu-Xin; Geng, Dao-Ying [Fudan University, Department of Radiology, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai (China); Zhu, Dong-Qing; Chen, Xiang-Jun [Fudan University, Department of Neurology, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai (China); Zee, Chi-Shing [University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Sensory neuronopathy (SNN) is a distinctive subtype of peripheral neuropathies, specifically targeting dorsal root ganglion (DRG). We utilized MRI to demonstrate the imaging characteristics of DRG, spinal cord (SC), and brachial plexus at C7 level in SNN. We attempted multiple-echo data image combination (MEDIC) and turbo inversion recovery magnitude (TIRM) methods in nine patients with sensory neuronopathy and compared with those in 16 disease controls and 20 healthy volunteers. All participants underwent MRI for the measurement of DRG, posterior column (PC), lateral column, and spinal cord area (SCA) at C7 level. DRG diameters were obtained through its largest cross section, standardized by dividing sagittal diameter of mid-C7 vertebral canal. We also made comparisons of standardized anteroposterior diameter (APD) and left-right diameters of SC and PC in these groups. Signal intensity and diameter of C7 spinal nerve were assessed on TIRM. Compared to control groups, signal intensities of DRG and PC were higher in SNN patients when using MEDIC, but the standardized diameters were shorter in either DRG or PC. Abnormal PC signal intensities were identified in eight out of nine SNN patients (89 %) with MEDIC and five out of nine (56 %) with T2-weighted images. SCA, assessed with MEDIC, was smaller in SNN patients than in the other groups, with significant reduction of its standardized APD. C7 nerve root diameters, assessed with TIRM, were decreased in SNN patients. MEDIC and TIRM sequences demonstrate increased signal intensities and decreased area of DRG and PC, and decreased diameter of nerve roots in patients with SNN, which can play a significant role in early diagnosis. (orig.)

  1. Quantitative assessment of hepatic function: modified look-locker inversion recovery (MOLLI) sequence for T1 mapping on Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced liver MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jeong Hee [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Min; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Paek, Munyoung [Siemens Healthcare, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    To determine whether multislice T1 mapping of the liver using a modified look-locker inversion recovery (MOLLI) sequence on gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used as a quantitative tool to estimate liver function and predict the presence of oesophageal or gastric varices. Phantoms filled with gadoxetic acid were scanned three times using MOLLI sequence to test repeatability. Patients with chronic liver disease or liver cirrhosis who underwent gadoxetic acid-enhanced liver MRI including MOLLI sequence at 3 T were included (n = 343). Pre- and postcontrast T1 relaxation times of the liver (T1liver), changes between pre- and postcontrast T1liver (ΔT1liver), and adjusted postcontrast T1liver (postcontrast T1liver-T1spleen/T1spleen) were compared among Child-Pugh classes. In 62 patients who underwent endoscopy, all T1 parameters and spleen sizes were correlated with varices. Phantom study showed excellent repeatability of MOLLI sequence. As Child-Pugh scores increased, pre- and postcontrast T1liver were significantly prolonged (P < 0.001), and ΔT1liver and adjusted postcontrast T1liver decreased (P< 0.001). Adjusted postcontrast T1liver and spleen size were independently associated with varices (R{sup 2} = 0.29, P < 0.001). T1 mapping of the liver using MOLLI sequence on gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI demonstrated potential in quantitatively estimating liver function, and adjusted postcontrast T1liver was significantly associated with varices. (orig.)

  2. Documentation of time-scales for onset of natural attenuation in an aquifer treated by a crude-oil recovery system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponsin, Violaine [Aix-Marseille Université-CNRS, Laboratoire Chimie Environnement FRE, 3416 Marseille (France); French Environment and Energy Management Agency, 20 avenue de Grésillé, BP 90406 Angers Cedex 01 (France); Maier, Joachim; Guelorget, Yves [ICF Environnement, 14/30 rue Alexandre Bâtiment C F, 92635 Gennevilliers (France); Hunkeler, Daniel; Bouchard, Daniel; Villavicencio, Hakeline [Centre for Hydrogeology, University of Neuchâtel, Rue Emile-Argand 11, CH-2000 Neuchâtel (Switzerland); Höhener, Patrick, E-mail: patrick.hohener@univ-amu.fr [Aix-Marseille Université-CNRS, Laboratoire Chimie Environnement FRE, 3416 Marseille (France)

    2015-04-15

    A pipeline transporting crude-oil broke in a nature reserve in 2009 and spilled 5100 m{sup 3} of oil that partly reached the aquifer and formed progressively a floating oil lens. Groundwater monitoring started immediately after the spill and crude-oil recovery by dual pump-and-skim technology was operated after oil lens formation. This study aimed at documenting the implementation of redox-specific natural attenuation processes in the saturated zone and at assessing whether dissolved compounds were degraded. Seven targeted water sampling campaigns were done during four years in addition to a routine monitoring of hydrocarbon concentrations. Liquid oil reached the aquifer within 2.5 months, and anaerobic processes, from denitrification to reduction of sulfate, were observable after 8 months. Methanogenesis appeared on site after 28 months. Stable carbon isotope analyses after 16 months showed maximum shifts in δ{sup 13}C of + 4.9 ± 0.22‰ for toluene, + 2.4 ± 0.19‰ for benzene and + 0.9 ± 0.51‰ for ethylbenzene, suggesting anaerobic degradation of these compounds in the source zone. Estimations of fluxes of inorganic carbon produced by biodegradation revealed that, in average, 60% of inorganic carbon production was attributable to sulfate reduction. This percentage tended to decrease with time while the production of carbon attributable to methanogenesis was increasing. Within the investigation time frame, mass balance estimations showed that biodegradation is a more efficient process for control of dissolved concentrations compared to pumping and filtration on an activated charcoal filter. - Highlights: • One of the world largest terrestrial oil spills is studied for 4 years. • Initially pristine aerobic groundwater turns anoxic in 8 months. • Sulfate reduction is the most important redox process thereafter. • Biologically enhanced dissolution of toluene and benzene is evidenced. • Stable carbon isotopes prove the degradation of benzene and

  3. Documentation of time-scales for onset of natural attenuation in an aquifer treated by a crude-oil recovery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pipeline transporting crude-oil broke in a nature reserve in 2009 and spilled 5100 m3 of oil that partly reached the aquifer and formed progressively a floating oil lens. Groundwater monitoring started immediately after the spill and crude-oil recovery by dual pump-and-skim technology was operated after oil lens formation. This study aimed at documenting the implementation of redox-specific natural attenuation processes in the saturated zone and at assessing whether dissolved compounds were degraded. Seven targeted water sampling campaigns were done during four years in addition to a routine monitoring of hydrocarbon concentrations. Liquid oil reached the aquifer within 2.5 months, and anaerobic processes, from denitrification to reduction of sulfate, were observable after 8 months. Methanogenesis appeared on site after 28 months. Stable carbon isotope analyses after 16 months showed maximum shifts in δ13C of + 4.9 ± 0.22‰ for toluene, + 2.4 ± 0.19‰ for benzene and + 0.9 ± 0.51‰ for ethylbenzene, suggesting anaerobic degradation of these compounds in the source zone. Estimations of fluxes of inorganic carbon produced by biodegradation revealed that, in average, 60% of inorganic carbon production was attributable to sulfate reduction. This percentage tended to decrease with time while the production of carbon attributable to methanogenesis was increasing. Within the investigation time frame, mass balance estimations showed that biodegradation is a more efficient process for control of dissolved concentrations compared to pumping and filtration on an activated charcoal filter. - Highlights: • One of the world largest terrestrial oil spills is studied for 4 years. • Initially pristine aerobic groundwater turns anoxic in 8 months. • Sulfate reduction is the most important redox process thereafter. • Biologically enhanced dissolution of toluene and benzene is evidenced. • Stable carbon isotopes prove the degradation of benzene and ethylbenzene

  4. Iron oxide nanoparticles and magnetic field exposure promote functional recovery by attenuating free radical-induced damage in rats with spinal cord transection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pal A

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Ajay Pal,1 Anand Singh,2 Tapas C Nag,3 Parthaprasad Chattopadhyay,2 Rashmi Mathur,1 Suman Jain1 1Department of Physiology, 2Department of Biochemistry, 3Department of Anatomy, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India Background: Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs can attenuate oxidative stress in a neutral pH environment in vitro. In combination with an external electromagnetic field, they can also facilitate axon regeneration. The present study demonstrates the in vivo potential of IONPs to recover functional deficits in rats with complete spinal cord injury. Methods: The spinal cord was completely transected at the T11 vertebra in male albino Wistar rats. Iron oxide nanoparticle solution (25 µg/mL embedded in 3% agarose gel was implanted at the site of transection, which was subsequently exposed to an electromagnetic field (50 Hz, 17.96 µT for two hours daily for five weeks. Results: Locomotor and sensorimotor assessment as well as histological analysis demonstrated significant functional recovery and a reduction in lesion volume in rats with IONP implantation and exposure to an electromagnetic field. No collagenous scar was observed and IONPs were localized intracellularly in the immediate vicinity of the lesion. Further, in vitro experiments to explore the cytotoxic effects of IONPs showed no effect on cell survival. However, a significant decrease in H2O2-mediated oxidative stress was evident in the medium containing IONPs, indicating their free radical scavenging properties. Conclusion: These novel findings indicate a therapeutic role for IONPs in spinal cord injury and other neurodegenerative disorders mediated by reactive oxygen species. Keywords: secondary damage, oxidative stress, electromagnetic field, cytotoxicity, neurodegeneration, pain

  5. The usefulness of diffusion-weighted/fluid-attenuated inversion recovery imaging in the diagnostics and timing of lacunar and nonlacunar stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witkowski, Grzegorz; Sienkiewicz-Jarosz, Halina [Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology, 1st Department of Neurology, Warsaw (Poland); Piliszek, Agnieszka; Ryglewicz, Danuta [Central Clinical Hospital of the Ministry of Interior, Department of Radiology, Warsaw (Poland); Skierczynska, Agnieszka; Poniatowska, Renata [Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology, Department of Radiology, Warsaw (Poland); Dorobek, Malgorzata; Filipek-Gliszczynska, Anna [Central Clinical Hospital of the Ministry of Interior, Department of Neurology, Warsaw (Poland); Walecki, Jerzy [Polish Academy of Science, Mossakowski Medical Research Centre, Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-10-15

    The DWI/FLAIR mismatch is a potential radiological marker for the timing of stroke onset. The aim of the study was to assess if the DWI/FLAIR mismatch can help to identify patients with both lacunar and nonlacunar acute ischemic stroke within 4.5 h of onset. A retrospective study was performed in which the authors analysed data from 86 ischemic lacunar and nonlacunar stroke patients with a known time of symptom onset, imaged within the first 24 h from stroke onset (36 patients <4.5 h, 14 patients 4.5-6 h, 15 patients 6-12 h, and 21 patients 12-24 h). Patients underwent the admission CT and MR scan. The presence of lesions was assessed in correlation with the duration of the stroke. The time from stroke onset to neuroimaging was significantly shorter in patients with an ischemic lesion visible only in the DWI (mean 2.78 h, n = 24) as compared to patients with signs of ischemia also in other modalities (mean 8.6 h, n = 62) (p = 0.0001, Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA). The DWI/FLAIR mismatch was characterised by a global sensitivity of 58 %, specificity 94 %, PPV 87.5 %, and NPV 76 % in identifying patients in the 4.5 h thrombolysis time window. For lacunar strokes (n = 20), these parameters were as follows: sensitivity 50 %, specificity 92.8 %, PPV 75 %, and NPV 81.2 %. The presence of acute ischemic lesions only in DWI can help to identify both lacunar and nonlacunar stroke patients who are in the 4.5 h time window for intravenous thrombolysis with high specificity. (orig.)

  6. The usefulness of diffusion-weighted/fluid-attenuated inversion recovery imaging in the diagnostics and timing of lacunar and nonlacunar stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DWI/FLAIR mismatch is a potential radiological marker for the timing of stroke onset. The aim of the study was to assess if the DWI/FLAIR mismatch can help to identify patients with both lacunar and nonlacunar acute ischemic stroke within 4.5 h of onset. A retrospective study was performed in which the authors analysed data from 86 ischemic lacunar and nonlacunar stroke patients with a known time of symptom onset, imaged within the first 24 h from stroke onset (36 patients <4.5 h, 14 patients 4.5-6 h, 15 patients 6-12 h, and 21 patients 12-24 h). Patients underwent the admission CT and MR scan. The presence of lesions was assessed in correlation with the duration of the stroke. The time from stroke onset to neuroimaging was significantly shorter in patients with an ischemic lesion visible only in the DWI (mean 2.78 h, n = 24) as compared to patients with signs of ischemia also in other modalities (mean 8.6 h, n = 62) (p = 0.0001, Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA). The DWI/FLAIR mismatch was characterised by a global sensitivity of 58 %, specificity 94 %, PPV 87.5 %, and NPV 76 % in identifying patients in the 4.5 h thrombolysis time window. For lacunar strokes (n = 20), these parameters were as follows: sensitivity 50 %, specificity 92.8 %, PPV 75 %, and NPV 81.2 %. The presence of acute ischemic lesions only in DWI can help to identify both lacunar and nonlacunar stroke patients who are in the 4.5 h time window for intravenous thrombolysis with high specificity. (orig.)

  7. Stability of the Gauge Equivalent Classes in Inverse Stationary Transport in Refractive Media

    CERN Document Server

    McDowall, Stephen; Tamasan, Alex

    2010-01-01

    In the inverse stationary transport problem through anisotropic attenuating, scattering, and refractive media, the albedo operator stably determines the gauge equivalent class of the attenuation and scattering coefficients.

  8. Inversion strategies for visco-acoustic waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamei, R.; Pratt, R. G.

    2013-08-01

    Visco-acoustic waveform inversion can potentially yield quantitative images of the distribution of both velocity and the attenuation parameters from seismic data. Intrinsic P-wave attenuation has been of particular interest, but has also proven challenging. Frequency-domain inversion allows attenuation and velocity relations to be easily incorporated, and allows a natural multiscale approach. The Laplace-Fourier approach extends this to allow the natural damping of waveforms to enhance early arrivals. Nevertheless, simultaneous inversion of velocity and attenuation leads to significant `cross-talk' between the resulting images, reflecting a lack of parameter resolution and indicating the need for pre-conditioning and regularization of the inverse problem. We analyse the cross-talk issue by partitioning the inversion parameters into two classes; the velocity parameter class, and the attenuation parameter class. Both parameters are defined at a reference frequency, and a dispersion relation is assumed that describes these parameters at any other frequency. We formulate the model gradients at a forward modelling frequency, and convert them to the reference frequency by employing the Jacobian of the coordinate change represented by the dispersion relation. We show that at a given modelling frequency, the Fréchet derivatives corresponding to these two parameter classes differ only by a 90° phase shift, meaning that the magnitudes of resulting model updates will be unscaled, and will not reflect the expected magnitudes in realistic (Q-1 ≪ 1) media. Due to the lack of scaling, cross-talk will be enhanced by poor subsurface illumination, by errors in kinematics, and by data noise. To solve these issues, we introduce an attenuation scaling term (the inverse of a penalty term) that is used to pre-condition the gradient by controlling the magnitudes of the updates to the attenuation parameters. Initial results from a suite of synthetic cross-hole tests using a three

  9. High-resolution and functional magnetic resonance imaging of the brachial plexus using an isotropic 3D T2 STIR (Short Term Inversion Recovery) SPACE sequence and diffusion tensor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viallon, M.; Vargas, M.I.; Jlassi, H.; Loevblad, K.O.; Delavelle, J. [University Hospital of Geneva, Department of Radiology, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2008-05-15

    This technical note demonstrates the relevance of the isotropic 3D T2 turbo-spin-echo (TSE) sequence with short-term inversion recovery (STIR) and variable flip angle RF excitations (SPACE: Sampling Perfection with Application optimized Contrasts using different flip angle Evolutions) for high-resolution brachial plexus imaging. The sequence was used in 11 patients in the diagnosis of brachial plexus pathologies involving primary and secondary tumors, and in six volunteers. We show that 3D STIR imaging is not only a reliable alternative to 2D STIR imaging, but it also better evaluates the anatomy, nerve site compression and pathology of the plexus, especially to depict space-occupying tumors along its course. Finally, due to its appropriate contrast we describe how 3D-STIR can be used as a high-resolution mask to be fused with fraction of anisotropy (FA) maps calculated from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data of the plexus. (orig.)

  10. Inverse Limits

    CERN Document Server

    Ingram, WT

    2012-01-01

    Inverse limits provide a powerful tool for constructing complicated spaces from simple ones. They also turn the study of a dynamical system consisting of a space and a self-map into a study of a (likely more complicated) space and a self-homeomorphism. In four chapters along with an appendix containing background material the authors develop the theory of inverse limits. The book begins with an introduction through inverse limits on [0,1] before moving to a general treatment of the subject. Special topics in continuum theory complete the book. Although it is not a book on dynamics, the influen

  11. Comparison of turbo inversion recovery magnitude (TIRM) with T2-weighted turbo spin-echo and T1-weighted spin-echo MR imaging in the early diagnosis of acute osteomyelitis in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauer, M.P.; Uhl, M.; Allmann, K.H.; Laubenberger, J.; Langer, M. [Freiburg Univ. (Germany). Radiologische Universitaetsklinik; Zimmerhackl, L.B. [Kinderklinik der Albert-Ludwigs-Univ. Freiburg (Germany)

    1998-11-01

    Objective. To compare turbo inversion recovery magnitude (TIRM) with standard T1-weighted (T1-W) and T2-weighted (T2-W) MR sequences in the very early detection of acute osteomyelitis in children. Materials and methods. In 15 children with osteomyelitis, 15 sets of T1-W spin-echo (SE) (TR/TE, 400-640/12-17), T2-W turbo spin-echo (TSE) (TR/TE/ETL, 3290-4465/112-120/11), and TIRM (TR/TE/TI, 4000-6120/60/160) images were acquired with a 1.0-T magnet. Contrast-to-noise (C/N) ratios and percentage of signal between lesion and normal bone marrow were analysed with a computer-assisted image analysing system in a region of interest (ROI). Results. In 13 of 15 patients, the absolute signal enhancement in a ROI on the TIRM images was better than on the T1-W SE and T2-W TSE images and in 14 of 15 cases, C/N ratios were also better on the TIRM images than on the other sequences. In the other cases, the TIRM signal was diagnostically equivalent. On the TIRM images, the signal difference between normal and pathological tissue was increased to 43-281 % (mean 124 %). On the T2-W TSE images, this signal difference was 4-79 % (mean 36 %) and on the T1-W SE images 6-77 % (mean 37 %). Conclusion. The TIRM sequence is highly sensitive for detecting bone marrow oedema in the very early stage of acute osteomyelitis in children. MRI utilising the TIRM sequence allowed for an early diagnosis. With scan time of less than 4 minutes, this sequence is superior to T1-W SE and T2-W TSE images for detecting early osteomyelitis-associated bone marrow oedema. (orig.) With 3 figs., 2 tabs., 15 refs.

  12. Comparison of turbo inversion recovery magnitude (TIRM) with T2-weighted turbo spin-echo and T1-weighted spin-echo MR imaging in the early diagnosis of acute osteomyelitis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective. To compare turbo inversion recovery magnitude (TIRM) with standard T1-weighted (T1-W) and T2-weighted (T2-W) MR sequences in the very early detection of acute osteomyelitis in children. Materials and methods. In 15 children with osteomyelitis, 15 sets of T1-W spin-echo (SE) (TR/TE, 400-640/12-17), T2-W turbo spin-echo (TSE) (TR/TE/ETL, 3290-4465/112-120/11), and TIRM (TR/TE/TI, 4000-6120/60/160) images were acquired with a 1.0-T magnet. Contrast-to-noise (C/N) ratios and percentage of signal between lesion and normal bone marrow were analysed with a computer-assisted image analysing system in a region of interest (ROI). Results. In 13 of 15 patients, the absolute signal enhancement in a ROI on the TIRM images was better than on the T1-W SE and T2-W TSE images and in 14 of 15 cases, C/N ratios were also better on the TIRM images than on the other sequences. In the other cases, the TIRM signal was diagnostically equivalent. On the TIRM images, the signal difference between normal and pathological tissue was increased to 43-281 % (mean 124 %). On the T2-W TSE images, this signal difference was 4-79 % (mean 36 %) and on the T1-W SE images 6-77 % (mean 37 %). Conclusion. The TIRM sequence is highly sensitive for detecting bone marrow oedema in the very early stage of acute osteomyelitis in children. MRI utilising the TIRM sequence allowed for an early diagnosis. With scan time of less than 4 minutes, this sequence is superior to T1-W SE and T2-W TSE images for detecting early osteomyelitis-associated bone marrow oedema. (orig.)

  13. Age, gender and normalization covariates for spinal cord gray matter and total cross-sectional areas at cervical and thoracic levels: A 2D phase sensitive inversion recovery imaging study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico Papinutto

    Full Text Available The source of inter-subject variability and the influence of age and gender on morphometric characteristics of the spinal cord, such as the total cross-sectional area (TCA, the gray matter (GM and white matter (WM areas, currently remain under investigation. Understanding the effect of covariates such as age, gender, brain volumes, and skull- and vertebra-derived metrics on cervical and thoracic spinal cord TCA and GM areas in healthy subjects would be fundamental for exploring compartment specific changes in neurological diseases affecting the spinal cord. Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 3T we investigated 32 healthy subjects using a 2D phase sensitive inversion recovery sequence and we measured TCA, GM and WM areas at 4 cervical and thoracic levels of the spinal cord. We assessed age and gender relationships of cord measures and explored associations between cord measures and a brain volumes and b skull- and vertebra-derived metrics. Age and gender had a significant effect on TCA, WM and GM areas (with women and elderly having smaller values than men and younger people respectively, but not on the GM area/TCA ratio. The total intracranial volume and C3 vertebra dimensions showed the highest correlations with cord measures. When used in multi-regression models, they reduced cord areas group variability by approximately a third. Age and gender influences on cord measures and normalization strategies here presented might be of use in the study of compartment specific changes in various neurological diseases affecting the spinal cord.

  14. Inverse perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolinsky, Margaret

    2006-02-01

    This paper will discuss the potentiality towards a methodology for creating perceptual shifts in virtual reality (VR) environments. A perceptual shift is a cognitive recognition of having experienced something extra-marginal, on the boundaries of normal awareness, outside of conditioned attenuation. Definitions of perceptual shifts demonstrate a historical tradition for the wonder of devices as well as analyze various categories of sensory and optical illusions. Neuroscience and cognitive science attempt to explain perceptual shifts through biological and perceptual mechanisms using the sciences. This paper explores perspective, illusion and projections to situate an artistic process in terms of perceptual shifts. Most VR environments rely on a single perceptual shift while there remains enormous potential for perceptual shifts in VR. Examples of artwork and VR environments develop and present this idea.

  15. Multiscale full waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtner, Andreas; Trampert, Jeannot; Cupillard, Paul; Saygin, Erdinc; Taymaz, Tuncay; Capdeville, Yann; Villaseñor, Antonio

    2013-07-01

    We develop and apply a full waveform inversion method that incorporates seismic data on a wide range of spatio-temporal scales, thereby constraining the details of both crustal and upper-mantle structure. This is intended to further our understanding of crust-mantle interactions that shape the nature of plate tectonics, and to be a step towards improved tomographic models of strongly scale-dependent earth properties, such as attenuation and anisotropy. The inversion for detailed regional earth structure consistently embedded within a large-scale model requires locally refined numerical meshes that allow us to (1) model regional wave propagation at high frequencies, and (2) capture the inferred fine-scale heterogeneities. The smallest local grid spacing sets the upper bound of the largest possible time step used to iteratively advance the seismic wave field. This limitation leads to extreme computational costs in the presence of fine-scale structure, and it inhibits the construction of full waveform tomographic models that describe earth structure on multiple scales. To reduce computational requirements to a feasible level, we design a multigrid approach based on the decomposition of a multiscale earth model with widely varying grid spacings into a family of single-scale models where the grid spacing is approximately uniform. Each of the single-scale models contains a tractable number of grid points, which ensures computational efficiency. The multi-to-single-scale decomposition is the foundation of iterative, gradient-based optimization schemes that simultaneously and consistently invert data on all scales for one multi-scale model. We demonstrate the applicability of our method in a full waveform inversion for Eurasia, with a special focus on Anatolia where coverage is particularly dense. Continental-scale structure is constrained by complete seismic waveforms in the 30-200 s period range. In addition to the well-known structural elements of the Eurasian mantle

  16. Topological inverse semigroups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Yongwen

    2004-01-01

    That the projective limit of any projective system of compact inverse semigroups is also a compact inverse semigroup,the injective limit of any injective system of inverse semigroups is also an inverse semigroup, and that a compact inverse semigroup is topologically isomorphic to a strict projective limit of compact metric inverse semigroups are proved. It is also demonstrated that Horn (S,T) is a topological inverse semigroup provided that S or T is a topological inverse semigroup with some other conditions. Being proved by means of the combination of topological semigroup theory with inverse semigroup theory,all these results generalize the corresponding ones related to topological semigroups or topological groups.

  17. Three-dimensional SPACE fluid-attenuated inversion recovery at 3 T to improve subthalamic nucleus lead placement for deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease: from preclinical to clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senova, Suhan; Hosomi, Koichi; Gurruchaga, Jean-Marc; Gouello, Gaëtane; Ouerchefani, Naoufel; Beaugendre, Yara; Lepetit, Hélène; Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal; Badin, Romina Aron; Dauguet, Julien; Jan, Caroline; Hantraye, Philippe; Brugières, Pierre; Palfi, Stéphane

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is a well-established therapy for motor symptoms in patients with pharmacoresistant Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the procedure, which requires multimodal perioperative exploration such as imaging, electrophysiology, or clinical examination during macrostimulation to secure lead positioning, remains challenging because the STN cannot be reliably visualized using the gold standard, T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) at 1.5 T. Thus, there is a need to improve imaging tools to better visualize the STN, optimize DBS lead implantation, and enlarge DBS diffusion. METHODS Gradient-echo sequences such as those used in T2WI suffer from higher distortions at higher magnetic fields than spin-echo sequences. First, a spin-echo 3D SPACE (sampling perfection with application-optimized contrasts using different flip angle evolutions) FLAIR sequence at 3 T was designed, validated histologically in 2 nonhuman primates, and applied to 10 patients with PD; their data were clinically compared in a double-blind manner with those of a control group of 10 other patients with PD in whom STN targeting was performed using T2WI. RESULTS Overlap between the nonhuman primate STNs segmented on 3D-histological and on 3D-SPACE-FLAIR volumes was high for the 3 most anterior quarters (mean [± SD] Dice scores 0.73 ± 0.11, 0.74 ± 0.06, and 0.60 ± 0.09). STN limits determined by the 3D-SPACE-FLAIR sequence were more consistent with electrophysiological edges than those determined by T2WI (0.9 vs 1.4 mm, respectively). The imaging contrast of the STN on the 3D-SPACE-FLAIR sequence was 4 times higher (p SPACE-FLAIR-guided implantation than for those in whom T2WI was used (62.2% vs 43.6%, respectively; p SPACE-FLAIR sequence (p SPACE-FLAIR sequences at 3 T improved STN lead placement under stereotactic conditions, improved the clinical outcome of patients with PD, and increased the benefit/risk ratio of STN-DBS surgery.

  18. Multiples waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, D. L.

    2013-01-01

    To increase the illumination of the subsurface and to eliminate the dependency of FWI on the source wavelet, we propose multiples waveform inversion (MWI) that transforms each hydrophone into a virtual point source with a time history equal to that of the recorded data. These virtual sources are used to numerically generate downgoing wavefields that are correlated with the backprojected surface-related multiples to give the migration image. Since the recorded data are treated as the virtual sources, knowledge of the source wavelet is not required, and the subsurface illumination is greatly enhanced because the entire free surface acts as an extended source compared to the radiation pattern of a traditional point source. Numerical tests on the Marmousi2 model show that the convergence rate and the spatial resolution of MWI is, respectively, faster and more accurate then FWI. The potential pitfall with this method is that the multiples undergo more than one roundtrip to the surface, which increases attenuation and reduces spatial resolution. This can lead to less resolved tomograms compared to conventional FWI. The possible solution is to combine both FWI and MWI in inverting for the subsurface velocity distribution.

  19. Importance of Attenuation Correction (AC) for Small Animal PET Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El Ali, Henrik H.; Bodholdt, Rasmus Poul; Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjær;

    2012-01-01

    concentration in the same organ with and without AC revealed an overall attenuation recovery of 9–21% for MAP reconstructed images, i.e., SUV without AC could underestimate the true activity at this level. For subcutaneous tumors, the attenuation was 13 ± 4% (9–17%), for kidneys 20 ± 1% (19...

  20. Importance of Attenuation Correction (AC for Small Animal PET Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik H. El Ali

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a correction for annihilation photon attenuation in small objects such as mice is necessary. The attenuation recovery for specific organs and subcutaneous tumors was investigated. A comparison between different attenuation correction methods was performed. Methods: Ten NMRI nude mice with subcutaneous implantation of human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 were scanned consecutively in small animal PET and CT scanners (MicroPETTM Focus 120 and ImTek’s MicroCATTM II. CT-based AC, PET-based AC and uniform AC methods were compared. Results: The activity concentration in the same organ with and without AC revealed an overall attenuation recovery of 9–21% for MAP reconstructed images, i.e., SUV without AC could underestimate the true activity at this level. For subcutaneous tumors, the attenuation was 13 ± 4% (9–17%, for kidneys 20 ± 1% (19–21%, and for bladder 18 ± 3% (15–21%. The FBP reconstructed images showed almost the same attenuation levels as the MAP reconstructed images for all organs. Conclusions: The annihilation photons are suffering attenuation even in small subjects. Both PET-based and CT-based are adequate as AC methods. The amplitude of the AC recovery could be overestimated using the uniform map. Therefore, application of a global attenuation factor on PET data might not be accurate for attenuation correction.

  1. Particle size characterization by ultrasonic attenuation spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingxu Su; Minghua Xue; Xiaoshu Cai; Zhitao Shang; Feng Xu

    2008-01-01

    This paper contributes to extracting information from signals of broadband ultrasonic attenuation spectrum for effective utilization in particle size characterization. The single particle scattering model and the coupled-phase model are formulated simultaneously, the relationship between particle size distribution and ultrasonic spectrum is established, and a convergence criterion for calculation is quantified. Demonsa'ation inversion by the optimum regularization factor method is carded out to yield typical numerical results for discussion. With the experimental set-up developed by the Institute of Particle and Two-Phase Flow Measurement (IPTFM) at the University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, sand sediment particle size is measured by attenuation spectrum and analyzed using the above inversion algorithm and theoretical models. To validate the proposed ultrasonic spectrum particle sizing method, results are compared with those obtained by microscopy.

  2. Effect of inversion time on flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery perfusion imaging of spinal bone marrow%反转时间对流动敏感性交互反转恢复序列脊柱骨髓灌注成像的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢栋; 查云飞; 刘昌盛; 王克军; 龚威; 闫力永

    2014-01-01

    目的 探讨反转时间(TI)对流动敏感性交互反转恢复(FAIR)序列脊柱骨髓灌注成像的影响,并评价该技术测量脊柱骨髓血流量(BF)的可重复性.方法 前瞻性收集24名经临床和腰椎MRI检查除外全身疾病和腰椎病变的健康志愿者进行观察.前14名志愿者行脊柱骨髓FAIR序列TI值优化研究,后10名志愿者行脊柱骨髓BF的可重复性研究.14名健康志愿者从L1~ L5椎体内选取2个相邻椎体行横断而FAIR扫描,TI值分别为800、1 000、1 200、1 400、1 600 ms,计算不同TI时椎体骨髓灌注的信号强度变化值(△M)和信噪比(SNR).10名健康志愿者选取L4或L5椎体行2次FAIR序列扫描,参数相同(TI值为1 200 ms),测量同一椎体前后2次FAIR扫描生成的BF值,并采用配对t检验及重复性分析评价2次测量的可重复性.结果 14名志愿者采用FAIR序列共扫描28个椎体,TI值分别为800、1 000、1 200、1 400、1 600 ms时,△M值分别为20.8±9.0、29.0± 10.9、36.4± 12.5、26.2±10.2和23.8±11.5,SNR分别为2.0±1.0、2.3±0.8、2.4±1.0、2.3±0.8和2.0±0.7,脊柱骨髓灌注△M值及SNR值,随TI值升高而呈现先升高后下降的趋势,TI为1 200 ms时达到高峰.10名志愿者前后2次扫描所得的椎体骨髓灌注的血流量BF值分别为(108.9±4.6)和(109.2±4.6)ml·10Og-1·min-1,差异无统计学意义(t=-0.157,P=0.879).前后2次扫描间个体间变异系数wCV为3.28%(3.57/109.06),可重复性良好.结论 TI值为1 200 ms时,脊柱椎体骨髓△M最大,灌注图像SNR最高,测量脊柱骨髓BF的可重复性好.%Objective To investigate the effect of inversion time (TI) on flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) perfusion imaging of spinal bone marrow (SBM),and evaluate the reproducibility of blood flow (BF) measurements using this technique.Methods Twenty four healthy volunteers without lumbar and other disease with clinical and MR studies were prospectively included.The first 14 healthy

  3. Inverse anticipating chaos synchronization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahverdiev, E M; Sivaprakasam, S; Shore, K A

    2002-07-01

    We derive conditions for achieving inverse anticipating synchronization where a driven time-delay chaotic system synchronizes to the inverse future state of the driver. The significance of inverse anticipating chaos in delineating synchronization regimes in time-delay systems is elucidated. The concept is extended to cascaded time-delay systems.

  4. Photonic Crystal Fiber Attenuator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joo Beom Eom; Hokyung Kim; Jinchae Kim; Un-Chul Paek; Byeong Ha Lee

    2003-01-01

    We propose a novel fiber attenuator based on photonic crystal fibers. The difference in the modal field diameters of a conventional single mode fiber and a photonic crystal fiber was used. A variable optical attenuator was also achieved by applying macro-bending on the PCF part of the proposed attenuator

  5. Rapid hybrid encoding for high-resolution whole-brain fluid-attenuated imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hoonjae; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Park, Jaeseok

    2013-12-01

    Single-slab three-dimensional (3D) turbo spin-echo (TSE) imaging combined with inversion recovery (IR), which employs short, spatially non-selective refocusing pulses and signal prescription based variable refocusing flip angles (VFA) to increase imaging efficiency, was recently introduced to produce fluid-attenuated brain images for lesion detection. Despite the advantages, the imaging efficiency in this approach still remains limited because a substantially long time of inversion is needed to selectively suppress the signal intensity of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) while fully recovering that of brain tissues. The purpose of this work is to develop a novel, rapid hybrid encoding method for highly efficient whole-brain fluid-attenuated imaging. In each time of repetition, volumetric data are continuously encoded using the hybrid modular acquisition in a sequential fashion even during IR signal transition, wherein reversed fast imaging with steady-state free precession (PSIF) is employed to encode intermediate-to-high spatial frequency signals prior to CSF nulling, while VFA-TSE is used to collect low-to-intermediate spatial frequency signals afterwards. Gradient-induced spin de-phasing between a pair of neighboring radio-frequency (RF) pulses in both PSIF and TSE modules is kept identical to avoid the occurrence of multiple echoes in a single acquisition window. Additionally, a two-step, alternate RF phase-cycling scheme is employed in the low spatial frequency region to eliminate free induction decay induced edge artifacts. Numerical simulations of the Bloch equations were performed to evaluate signal evolution of brain tissues along the echo train while optimizing imaging parameters. In vivo studies demonstrate that the proposed technique produces high-resolution isotropic fluid-attenuated whole-brain images in a clinically acceptable imaging time with substantially high signal-to-noise ratio for white matter while retaining lesion conspicuity.

  6. Inverse Transport Theory of Photoacoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Bal, Guillaume; Jugnon, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    We consider the reconstruction of optical parameters in a domain of interest from photoacoustic data. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) radiates high frequency electromagnetic waves into the domain and measures acoustic signals emitted by the resulting thermal expansion. Acoustic signals are then used to construct the deposited thermal energy map. The latter depends on the constitutive optical parameters in a nontrivial manner. In this paper, we develop and use an inverse transport theory with internal measurements to extract information on the optical coefficients from knowledge of the deposited thermal energy map. We consider the multi-measurement setting in which many electromagnetic radiation patterns are used to probe the domain of interest. By developing an expansion of the measurement operator into singular components, we show that the spatial variations of the intrinsic attenuation and the scattering coefficients may be reconstructed. We also reconstruct coefficients describing anisotropic scattering of ...

  7. Research on Nanosecond Pulse Corona Discharge Attenuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A line-to-plate reactor was set-up in the experimental study on the application of nanosecond pulsed corona discharge plasma technology in environmental pollution control. Investigation on the attenuation and distortion of the amplitude of the pulse wave front and the discharge image as well as the waveform along the corona wire was conducted. The results show that the wave front decreases sharply during the corona discharge along the corona wire. The higher the amplitude of the applied pulse is, the more the amplitude of the wave front decreased. The wave attenuation responds in a lower corona discharge inversely. To get a higher efficiency of the line-to-plate reactor a sharp attenuation of the corona has to be considered in practical design

  8. Research on Nanosecond Pulse Corona Discharge Attenuation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Zheng-hao; XU Huai-li; BAI Jing; YU Fu-sheng; HU Feng; LI Jin

    2007-01-01

    A line-to-plate reactor was set-up in the experimental study on the application of nanosecond pulsed corona discharge plasma technology in environmental pollution control.Investigation on the attenuation and distortion of the amplitude of the pulse wave front and the discharge image as well as the waveform along the corona wire was conducted.The results show that the wave front decreases sharply during the corona discharge along the corona wire.The higher the amplitude of the applied pulse is,the more the amplitude of the wave front decreased.The wave attenuation responds in a lower corona discharge inversely.To get a higher efficiency of the line-to-plate reactor a sharp attenuation of the corona has to be considered in practical design.

  9. A NEW INVERSION METHOD OF TIME-LAPSE SEISMIC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Time-Lapse Seismic improves oil recovery ratio by dynamic reservoir monitoring. Because of the large number of seismic explorations in the process of time-lapse seismic inversion, traditional methods need plenty of inversion calculations which cost high computational works. The method is therefore inefficient. In this paper, in order to reduce the repeating computations in traditional, a new time-lapse seismic inversion method is put forward. Firstly a homotopy-regularization method is proposed for the first time inversion. Secondly, with the first time inversion results as the initial value of following model, a model of the second time inversion is rebuilt by analyzing the characters of time-lapse seismic and localized inversion method is designed by using the model. Finally, through simulation, the comparison between traditional method and the new scheme is given. Our simulation results show that the new scheme could save the algorithm computations greatly.

  10. Inverse Kinematics using Quaternions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Knud; Erleben, Kenny; Engell-Nørregård, Morten

    In this project I describe the status of inverse kinematics research, with the focus firmly on the methods that solve the core problem. An overview of the different methods are presented Three common methods used in inverse kinematics computation have been chosen as subject for closer inspection....... suite, developed in this project and in [4]. Source code developed for this project includes the CCD method , improvements on the BFGS method and Jacobian inverse originally developed in [4]....

  11. Acute puerperal uterine inversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the frequency, causes, clinical presentations, management and maternal mortality associated with acute puerperal inversion of the uterus. Materials and Methods: All the patients who developed acute puerperal inversion of the uterus either in or outside the JPMC were included in the study. Patients of chronic uterine inversion were not included in the present study. Abdominal and vaginal examination was done to confirm and classify inversion into first, second or third degrees. Results: 57036 deliveries and 36 acute uterine inversions occurred during the study period, so the frequency of uterine inversion was 1 in 1584 deliveries. Mismanagement of third stage of labour was responsible for uterine inversion in 75% of patients. Majority of the patients presented with shock, either hypovolemic (69%) or neurogenic (13%) in origin. Manual replacement of the uterus under general anaesthesia with 2% halothane was successfully done in 35 patients (97.5%). Abdominal hysterectomy was done in only one patient. There were three maternal deaths due to inversion. Conclusion: Proper education and training regarding placental delivery, diagnosis and management of uterine inversion must be imparted to the maternity care providers especially to traditional birth attendants and family physicians to prevent this potentially life-threatening condition. (author)

  12. Variable laser attenuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foltyn, Stephen R.

    1988-01-01

    The disclosure relates to low loss, high power variable attenuators comprng one or more transmissive and/or reflective multilayer dielectric filters. The attenuator is particularly suitable to use with unpolarized lasers such as excimer lasers. Beam attenuation is a function of beam polarization and the angle of incidence between the beam and the filter and is controlled by adjusting the angle of incidence the beam makes to the filter or filters. Filters are selected in accordance with beam wavelength.

  13. Inverse agonism and its therapeutic significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurudas Khilnani

    2011-01-01

    2A inverse agonist, attenuates psychosis in patients with Parkinson′s disease with psychosis and is devoid of extrapyramidal side effects. This dissociation is also evident from the development of anxioselective benzodiazepines devoid of habit-forming potential. Hemopressin is a peptide ligand that acts as an antagonist as well as inverse agonist. This agent acts as an antinociceptive agent in different in vivo models of pain. Treatment of obesity by drugs having inverse agonist activity at CB 1/2 receptors is also underway. An exciting development is evaluation of β-blockers in chronic bronchial asthma-a condition akin to congestive heart failure where β-blockade has become the standard mode of therapy. Synthesis and evaluation of selective agents is underway. Therefore, inverse agonism is an important aspect of drug-receptor interaction and has immense untapped therapeutic potential.

  14. Dynamical inverse problems

    CERN Document Server

    Gladwell, Graham ML

    2011-01-01

    The papers in this volume present an overview of the general aspects and practical applications of dynamic inverse methods, through the interaction of several topics, ranging from classical and advanced inverse problems in vibration, isospectral systems, dynamic methods for structural identification, active vibration control and damage detection, imaging shear stiffness in biological tissues, wave propagation, to computational and experimental aspects relevant for engineering problems.

  15. INVERSE SCATTERING PROBLEMS BY SINGULAR SOURCE METHODS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The inverse scattering problems are to detect the property of obstacles from the measurements outside the obstacles. One of important research areas in this topic is the recovery of boundary property for impenetrable obstacles. In this paper, we would like to give a brief review about the recently developed singular source methods. There are three different methods in this category, namely, linear sampling method, pointsource method and probe method. We also present some recent new results about the probe method.

  16. Inverse osmotic process for radioactive laundry waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To effectively recover the processing amount reduced in a continuous treatment. Method: Laundry waste containing radioactive substances discharged from a nuclear power plant is processed in an inverse osmotic process while adding starch digesting enzymes such as amylase and takadiastase, as well as soft spherical bodies such as sponge balls of a particle diameter capable of flowing in the flow of the liquid wastes along the inverse osmotic membrane pipe and having such a softness and roundness as not to damage the inverse osmotic membrane. This process can remove the floating materials such as thread dusts or hairs deposited on the membrane surface by the action of the soft elastic balls and remove paste or the like through decomposition by the digesting enzymes. Consequently, effective recovery can be attained for the reduced processing amount. (Furukawa, Y.)

  17. 0-Semidistributive Inverse Semigroups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田振际

    2004-01-01

    @@ For an inverse semigroup S, the set L(S) of all inverse subsemigroups (including the empty set) of S forms a lattice with respect to intersection denoted as usual by ∩ and union, where the union is the inverse subsemigroup generated by inverse subsemigroups A, B of S. The set LF(S) of all full inverse subsemigroups of S forms a complete sublattice of L(S), with Es as zero element (Es is the set of all idempotent of S)(see [3,5,6]). Note, that if S a group, then LF(S)=L(S), its lattice of all subgroups of S. If S = G0 is a group with adjoined zero, then clearly LF(S) ≌ L(G).

  18. Inverse Symmetric Inflationary Attractors

    CERN Document Server

    Odintsov, S D

    2016-01-01

    We present a class of inflationary potentials which are invariant under a special symmetry, which depends on the parameters of the models. As we show, in certain limiting cases, the inverse symmetric potentials are qualitatively similar to the $\\alpha$-attractors models, since the resulting observational indices are identical. However, there are some quantitative differences which we discuss in some detail. As we show, some inverse symmetric models always yield results compatible with observations, but this strongly depends on the asymptotic form of the potential at large $e$-folding numbers. In fact when the limiting functional form is identical to the one corresponding to the $\\alpha$-attractors models, the compatibility with the observations is guaranteed. Also we find the relation of the inverse symmetric models with the Starobinsky model and we highlight the differences. In addition, an alternative inverse symmetric model is studied and as we show, not all the inverse symmetric models are viable. Moreove...

  19. Towards a Global Upper Mantle Attenuation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaoglu, Haydar; Romanowicz, Barbara

    2015-04-01

    Global anelastic tomography is crucial for addressing the nature of heterogeneity in the Earth's interior. The intrinsic attenuation manifests itself through dispersion and amplitude decay. These are contaminated by elastic effects such as (de)focusing and scattering. Therefore, mapping anelasticity accurately requires separation of elastic effects from the anelastic ones. To achieve this, a possible approach is to try and first predict elastic effects through the computation of seismic waveforms in a high resolution 3D elastic model, which can now be achieved accurately using numerical wavefield computations. Building upon the recent construction of such a whole mantle elastic and radially anisotropic shear velocity model (SEMUCB_WM1, French and Romanowicz, 2014), which will be used as starting model, our goal is to develop a higher resolution 3D attenuation model of the upper mantle based on full waveform inversion. As in the development of SEMUCB_WM1, forward modeling will be performed using the spectral element method, while the inverse problem will be treated approximately, using normal mode asymptotics. Both fundamental and overtone time domain long period waveforms (T>60s) will be used from a dataset of over 200 events observed at several hundred stations globally. Here we present preliminary results of synthetic tests, exploring different iterative inversion strategies.

  20. A quaternionic approach to x-ray transform inversion in R{sup 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fathi, S M Saberi; Truong, T T [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Modelisation, Universite de Cergy-Pontoise, 95302 Cergy-Pontoise (France); Nguyen, M K [Equipes Traitement de l' Image et Systemes, Universite de Cergy-Pontoise, 95302 Cergy-Pontoise (France)], E-mail: majid.saberi@u-cergy.fr, E-mail: truong@u-cergy.fr, E-mail: nguyen@ensea.fr

    2009-10-16

    A new derivation of the inverse of the x-ray transform is presented based on quaternion analysis. As pointed out by practitioners, a direct inversion formula offers more efficient reconstruction algorithms than tomographic inversion. It is shown that the new inverse formula is equivalent to the existing one. The advantage of this approach is that it paves the way for a potential inversion of the x-ray transform with a non-uniform attenuation map in three dimensions, which models single photon emission imaging in nuclear medicine.

  1. Inversive meadows and divisive meadows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Bergstra; C.A. Middelburg

    2009-01-01

    An inversive meadow is a commutative ring with identity and a total multiplicative inverse operation whose value at 0 is 0. Previously, inversive meadows were shortly called meadows. In this paper, we introduce divisive meadows, which are inversive meadows with the multiplicative inverse operation r

  2. Landing gear noise attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Jeffrey W. (Inventor); Whitmire, Julia (Inventor); Kwan, Hwa-Wan (Inventor); Abeysinghe, Amal (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A landing gear noise attenuator mitigates noise generated by airframe deployable landing gear. The noise attenuator can have a first position when the landing gear is in its deployed or down position, and a second position when the landing gear is in its up or stowed position. The noise attenuator may be an inflatable fairing that does not compromise limited space constraints associated with landing gear retraction and stowage. A truck fairing mounted under a truck beam can have a compliant edge to allow for non-destructive impingement of a deflected fire during certain conditions.

  3. MR 双反转恢复序列在难治性癫痫患者中的初步应用%The Preliminary Application of Double Inversion Recovery MR Imaging in the Patients with Intractable Epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张韶辉; 秦林娣; 陆钦池

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the imaging feature and diagnostic value of double invesion recov-ery (DIR) MR imaging in intractable epilepsy.Method: The clinical data,EEG and imaging manifestation of 7 cases with intractable epilepsy were retrospectively analyzed on the signal intensity on DIR sequence . Result:Abnormal DIR signal intensities of the DIR images were observed in 6 patients with complex partial seizure , none of abnormal DIR signal intensities of the DIR images was observed in 1 patient with generalized tonic clonic seizure .Conclusion: DIR can show superior delineation of gray matter and white matter .DIR MR imaging can be valuable for characterizing epileptic foci and may contribute to presurgical evaluation in the intractable epilepsy patients .%目的:探讨 MR双反转恢复( DIR)序列在难治性癫痫定位诊断中的价值。分析DIR显示难治性癫痫患者灰质、白质结构的改变。方法:回顾性分析7例难治性癫痫患者的临床、脑电图和影像学资料,观察患者在DIR上的表现。结果:6例复杂部分发作的患者在DIR上发现异常信号,1例全面性发作的癫痫患者在影像学上未发现异常。结论:DIR序列能突出显示灰质和白质结构,灰白质对比度高,对难治性癫痫术前定位诊断具有一定的价值。

  4. Inversion flachseismischer Wellenfeldspektren

    OpenAIRE

    Forbriger, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    In dieser Arbeit stelle ich ein neues Verfahren zur Inversion flachseismischer Wellenfelder vor. Die Inversion erfolgt in zwei Schritten. Zunächst wird ein Phasenslowness-Frequenz-Spektrum (omega,p-Spektrum) der Seismogramme bestimmt. In einem zweiten Schritt werden dieses Spektrum und die Laufzeiten der Ersteinsätze gemeinsam zu einem rein Tiefen-abhängigen Modell der seismischen Geschwindigkeiten und der Diskontinuitäten des untersuchten Mediums invertiert. Typische flachseismische Messunge...

  5. Generalized emissivity inverse problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, DengMing; Wen, Tao; Dai, XianXi; Dai, JiXin; Evenson, William E

    2002-04-01

    Inverse problems have recently drawn considerable attention from the physics community due to of potential widespread applications [K. Chadan and P. C. Sabatier, Inverse Problems in Quantum Scattering Theory, 2nd ed. (Springer Verlag, Berlin, 1989)]. An inverse emissivity problem that determines the emissivity g(nu) from measurements of only the total radiated power J(T) has recently been studied [Tao Wen, DengMing Ming, Xianxi Dai, Jixin Dai, and William E. Evenson, Phys. Rev. E 63, 045601(R) (2001)]. In this paper, a new type of generalized emissivity and transmissivity inverse (GETI) problem is proposed. The present problem differs from our previous work on inverse problems by allowing the unknown (emissivity) function g(nu) to be temperature dependent as well as frequency dependent. Based on published experimental information, we have developed an exact solution formula for this GETI problem. A universal function set suggested for numerical calculation is shown to be robust, making this inversion method practical and convenient for realistic calculations.

  6. The inverse electroencephalography pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, David Michael

    The inverse electroencephalography (EEG) problem is defined as determining which regions of the brain are active based on remote measurements recorded with scalp EEG electrodes. An accurate solution to this problem would benefit both fundamental neuroscience research and clinical neuroscience applications. However, constructing accurate patient-specific inverse EEG solutions requires complex modeling, simulation, and visualization algorithms, and to date only a few systems have been developed that provide such capabilities. In this dissertation, a computational system for generating and investigating patient-specific inverse EEG solutions is introduced, and the requirements for each stage of this Inverse EEG Pipeline are defined and discussed. While the requirements of many of the stages are satisfied with existing algorithms, others have motivated research into novel modeling and simulation methods. The principal technical results of this work include novel surface-based volume modeling techniques, an efficient construction for the EEG lead field, and the Open Source release of the Inverse EEG Pipeline software for use by the bioelectric field research community. In this work, the Inverse EEG Pipeline is applied to three research problems in neurology: comparing focal and distributed source imaging algorithms; separating measurements into independent activation components for multifocal epilepsy; and localizing the cortical activity that produces the P300 effect in schizophrenia.

  7. Backup & Recovery

    CERN Document Server

    Preston, W

    2009-01-01

    Packed with practical, freely available backup and recovery solutions for Unix, Linux, Windows, and Mac OS X systems -- as well as various databases -- this new guide is a complete overhaul of Unix Backup & Recovery by the same author, now revised and expanded with over 75% new material.

  8. Recovery Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, John R.

    2007-01-01

    Since the founding of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) in 1935, programs offering opportunity for recovery from alcoholism and other addictions have undergone vast changes. The Internet has created nearly limitless opportunities for recovering people and those seeking recovery to find both meetings and places where they can gather virtually and discuss…

  9. Inversive meadows and divisive meadows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Bergstra; C.A. Middelburg

    2011-01-01

    Inversive meadows are commutative rings with a multiplicative identity element and a total multiplicative inverse operation satisfying 0−1=0. Divisive meadows are inversive meadows with the multiplicative inverse operation replaced by a division operation. We give finite equational specifications of

  10. Sharp spatially constrained inversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vignoli, Giulio G.; Fiandaca, Gianluca G.; Christiansen, Anders Vest C A.V.C.;

    2013-01-01

    We present sharp reconstruction of multi-layer models using a spatially constrained inversion with minimum gradient support regularization. In particular, its application to airborne electromagnetic data is discussed. Airborne surveys produce extremely large datasets, traditionally inverted...... by using smoothly varying 1D models. Smoothness is a result of the regularization constraints applied to address the inversion ill-posedness. The standard Occam-type regularized multi-layer inversion produces results where boundaries between layers are smeared. The sharp regularization overcomes......, the results are compatible with the data and, at the same time, favor sharp transitions. The focusing strategy can also be used to constrain the 1D solutions laterally, guaranteeing that lateral sharp transitions are retrieved without losing resolution. By means of real and synthetic datasets, sharp...

  11. Planetary Ices Attenuation Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Christine; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C.

    In this chapter, we review the topic of energy dissipation in the context of icy satellites experiencing tidal forcing. We describe the physics of mechanical dissipation, also known as attenuation, in polycrystalline ice and discuss the history of laboratory methods used to measure and understand it. Because many factors - such as microstructure, composition and defect state - can influence rheological behavior, we review what is known about the mechanisms responsible for attenuation in ice and what can be inferred from the properties of rocks, metals and ceramics. Since attenuation measured in the laboratory must be carefully scaled to geologic time and to planetary conditions in order to provide realistic extrapolation, we discuss various mechanical models that have been used, with varying degrees of success, to describe attenuation as a function of forcing frequency and temperature. We review the literature in which these models have been used to describe dissipation in the moons of Jupiter and Saturn. Finally, we address gaps in our present knowledge of planetary ice attenuation and provide suggestions for future inquiry.

  12. Strategies for visco-acoustic waveform inversion: Parameter resolution, preconditioning and regularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamei, R.; Pratt, R. G.

    2013-12-01

    Visco-acoustic waveform inversion can potentially yield quantitative images of the distribution of both velocity and the attenuation parameters from seismic data. Simultaneous inversion of velocity and attenuation tend to cause significant ';cross-talk' between the resulting images, reflecting a lack of parameter resolution and indicating the need for pre-conditioning and regularization of the inverse problem.We analyse the cross-talk issue by partitioning the inversion parameters into two classes; the velocity parameter class, and the attenuation parameter class. Both parameters are defined at a reference frequency, and a dispersion relation is assumed that describes these parameters at any other frequency. We formulate the model gradient of the objective function at a forward modelling frequency, and convert them to the reference frequency by employing the Jacobian of the coordinate change represented by the dispersion relation. At a given modelling frequency, the Frechet derivatives corresponding to these two parameter classes differ only by a 90 degree phase shift, meaning that the magnitudes of resulting model updates will be unscaled, and will not reflect the expected magnitudes in realistic (Q>>1) media. Due to the lack of scaling, cross-talk will be enhanced by poor subsurface illumination, by errors in kinematics, and by data noise. Initial results from a suite of synthetic cross-hole tests using a three-layer randomly heterogenous model with both intrinsic and extrinsic (scattering) attenuation demonstrate that cross-talk is a significant problem in attenuation inversion. Using the same model, we further show that cross-talk can be suppressed by varying the attenuation scaling term in our pre-conditioning operator. This strategy is effective for simultaneous inversion of velocity and attenuation, and for sequential inversion (a two-stage approach in which only the velocity models are recovered in the first stage). Further regularization using a smoothing

  13. Frequency Dependent Attenuation Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Richard, Kowar; Xavier, Bonnefond

    2009-01-01

    The work is inspired by thermo-and photoacoustic imaging, where recent efforts are devoted to take into account attenuation and varying wave speed parameters. In this paper we study causal equations describing propagation of attenuated pressure waves. We review standard models like frequency power laws and and the thermo-viscous equation. The lack of causality of standard models in the parameter range relevant for photoacoustic imaging requires to derive novel equations. The main ingredients for deriving causal equations are the Kramers-Kronig relation and the mathematical concept of linear system theory. The theoretical results of this work are underpined by numerical experiments.

  14. Calculation of the inverse data space via sparse inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Saragiotis, Christos

    2011-01-01

    The inverse data space provides a natural separation of primaries and surface-related multiples, as the surface multiples map onto the area around the origin while the primaries map elsewhere. However, the calculation of the inverse data is far from trivial as theory requires infinite time and offset recording. Furthermore regularization issues arise during inversion. We perform the inversion by minimizing the least-squares norm of the misfit function by constraining the $ell_1$ norm of the solution, being the inverse data space. In this way a sparse inversion approach is obtained. We show results on field data with an application to surface multiple removal.

  15. Limits to Nonlinear Inversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosegaard, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    For non-linear inverse problems, the mathematical structure of the mapping from model parameters to data is usually unknown or partly unknown. Absence of information about the mathematical structure of this function prevents us from presenting an analytical solution, so our solution depends on ou...

  16. Bayesian seismic AVO inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buland, Arild

    2002-07-01

    A new linearized AVO inversion technique is developed in a Bayesian framework. The objective is to obtain posterior distributions for P-wave velocity, S-wave velocity and density. Distributions for other elastic parameters can also be assessed, for example acoustic impedance, shear impedance and P-wave to S-wave velocity ratio. The inversion algorithm is based on the convolutional model and a linearized weak contrast approximation of the Zoeppritz equation. The solution is represented by a Gaussian posterior distribution with explicit expressions for the posterior expectation and covariance, hence exact prediction intervals for the inverted parameters can be computed under the specified model. The explicit analytical form of the posterior distribution provides a computationally fast inversion method. Tests on synthetic data show that all inverted parameters were almost perfectly retrieved when the noise approached zero. With realistic noise levels, acoustic impedance was the best determined parameter, while the inversion provided practically no information about the density. The inversion algorithm has also been tested on a real 3-D dataset from the Sleipner Field. The results show good agreement with well logs but the uncertainty is high. The stochastic model includes uncertainties of both the elastic parameters, the wavelet and the seismic and well log data. The posterior distribution is explored by Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation using the Gibbs sampler algorithm. The inversion algorithm has been tested on a seismic line from the Heidrun Field with two wells located on the line. The uncertainty of the estimated wavelet is low. In the Heidrun examples the effect of including uncertainty of the wavelet and the noise level was marginal with respect to the AVO inversion results. We have developed a 3-D linearized AVO inversion method with spatially coupled model parameters where the objective is to obtain posterior distributions for P-wave velocity, S

  17. Joint Inversion of Fracture Model Properties for CO2 Storage Monitoring or Oil Recovery History Matching Inversion conjointe des propriétés d’un modèle de fractures pour le monitoring d’un stockage de CO2 ou le calage d’un historique de production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verscheure M.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available For oil recovery or CO2 storage, “reservoirs” are commonly used to designate geological structures where oil can be found or CO2 can be stored. All reservoirs present a heterogeneity in terms of rock type and properties (such as porosity and permeability. In addition, some of these reservoirs present fractures and faults. Fractured reservoirs are an important part of the oil reserves in the world (Middle East, Gulf of Mexico, etc. and some of them are important reservoirs in terms of oil volume and productivity in spite of the fractures. In addition, studies of reservoirs for geologic storage of CO2 have shown the existence of diffuse fractures and faults and their strong impacts on flow. A key point in fractured reservoirs is to understand the geometry and hydraulic conductivity of the network formed by the fractures. This requires the construction of a reservoir model that integrates all available conceptual knowledge and quantitative data. The topic of the present paper deals with a new methodology able to perform the history matching of a fractured reservoir model by adapting the sub-seismic fault properties and positions. The main difficulty of this work is to generate a sub-seismic fault network whose fault positions can be easily modified while respecting the statistical fault model. The sub-seismic fault model we have chosen allows us to obtain a sub-seismic fault network that is consistent with the seismic fault network and that succeeds in capturing the specific spatial organization of the faults. In a first step, the geometry of the seismic fault network is characterized using fractal methods. Sub-seismic faults are then generated according to a stochastic algorithm. Finally, the geometry of this discrete fracture network is optimized in order to match the hydrodynamic data about the reservoir. The optimization algorithm modifies the sub-seismic fault positions, leading to the history matching of the reservoir model. Fractal

  18. AVO inversion based on inverse operator estimation in trust region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xing-Yao; Deng, Wei; Zong, Zhao-Yun

    2016-04-01

    Amplitude variation with offset (AVO) inversion is widely utilized in exploration geophysics, especially for reservoir prediction and fluid identification. Inverse operator estimation in the trust region algorithm is applied for solving AVO inversion problems in which optimization and inversion directly are integrated. The L1 norm constraint is considered on the basis of reasonable initial model in order to improve effciency and stability during the AVO inversion process. In this study, high-order Zoeppritz approximation is utilized to establish the inversion objective function in which variation of {{v}\\text{p}}/{{v}\\text{s}} with time is taken into consideration. A model test indicates that the algorithm has a relatively higher stability and accuracy than the damp least-squares algorithm. Seismic data inversion is feasible and inversion values of three parameters ({{v}\\text{p}},{{v}\\text{s}},ρ ) maintain good consistency with logging curves.

  19. Recovery Spirituality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest Kurtz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is growing interest in Alcoholics Anonymous (A.A. and other secular, spiritual, and religious frameworks of long-term addiction recovery. The present paper explores the varieties of spiritual experience within A.A., with particular reference to the growth of a wing of recovery spirituality promoted within A.A. It is suggested that the essence of secular spirituality is reflected in the experience of beyond (horizontal and vertical transcendence and between (connection and mutuality and in six facets of spirituality (Release, Gratitude, Humility, Tolerance, Forgiveness, and a Sense of Being-at-home shared across religious, spiritual, and secular pathways of addiction recovery. The growing varieties of A.A. spirituality (spanning the “Christianizers” and “Seculizers” reflect A.A.’s adaptation to the larger diversification of religious experience and the growing secularization of spirituality across the cultural contexts within which A.A. is nested.

  20. Intersections, ideals, and inversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Techniques from computational algebra provide a framework for treating large classes of inverse problems. In particular, the discretization of many types of integral equations and of partial differential equations with undetermined coefficients lead to systems of polynomial equations. The structure of the solution set of such equations may be examined using algebraic techniques.. For example, the existence and dimensionality of the solution set may be determined. Furthermore, it is possible to bound the total number of solutions. The approach is illustrated by a numerical application to the inverse problem associated with the Helmholtz equation. The algebraic methods are used in the inversion of a set of transverse electric (TE) mode magnetotelluric data from Antarctica. The existence of solutions is demonstrated and the number of solutions is found to be finite, bounded from above at 50. The best fitting structure is dominantly one dimensional with a low crustal resistivity of about 2 ohm-m. Such a low value is compatible with studies suggesting lower surface wave velocities than found in typical stable cratons

  1. Intersections, ideals, and inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasco, D.W.

    1998-10-01

    Techniques from computational algebra provide a framework for treating large classes of inverse problems. In particular, the discretization of many types of integral equations and of partial differential equations with undetermined coefficients lead to systems of polynomial equations. The structure of the solution set of such equations may be examined using algebraic techniques.. For example, the existence and dimensionality of the solution set may be determined. Furthermore, it is possible to bound the total number of solutions. The approach is illustrated by a numerical application to the inverse problem associated with the Helmholtz equation. The algebraic methods are used in the inversion of a set of transverse electric (TE) mode magnetotelluric data from Antarctica. The existence of solutions is demonstrated and the number of solutions is found to be finite, bounded from above at 50. The best fitting structure is dominantly onedimensional with a low crustal resistivity of about 2 ohm-m. Such a low value is compatible with studies suggesting lower surface wave velocities than found in typical stable cratons.

  2. Spontaneous Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rescorla, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Spontaneous recovery from extinction is one of the most basic phenomena of Pavlovian conditioning. Although it can be studied by using a variety of designs, some procedures are better than others for identifying the involvement of underlying learning processes. A wide range of different learning mechanisms has been suggested as being engaged by…

  3. Statistical Inversion of Seismic Noise Inversion statistique du bruit sismique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adler P. M.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available A systematic investigation of wave propagation in random media is presented. Spectral analysis, inversion of codas and attenuation of the direct wave front are studied for synthetic data obtained in isotropic or anisotropic, 2D or 3D media. A coda inversion process is developed and checked on two sets of real data. In both cases, it is possible to compare the correlation lengths obtained by inversion to characteristic lengths measured on seismic logs, for the full scale seismic survey, or on a thin section, for the laboratory experiment. These two experiments prove the feasibility and the efficiency of the statistical inversion of codas. Correct characteristic lengths can be obtained which cannot be determined by another method. Le problème de la géophysique est la recherche d'informations concernant le sous-sol, dans des signaux sismiques enregistrés en surface ou dans des puits. Ces informations sont habituellement recherchées sous forme déterministe, c'est-à-dire sous la forme de la donnée en chaque point d'une valeur du paramètre étudié. Notre point de vue est différent puisque notre objectif est de déduire certaines propriétés statistiques du milieu, supposé hétérogène, à partir des sismogrammes enregistrés après propagation. Il apparaît alors deux moyens de remplir l'objectif fixé. Le premier est l'analyse spectrale des codas ; cette analyse permet de déterminer les tailles moyennes des hétérogénéités du sous-sol. La deuxième possibilité est l'étude de l'atténuation du front direct de l'onde, qui conduit aussi à la connaissance des longueurs caractéristiques du sous-sol ; contrairement à la première méthode, elle ne semble pas pouvoir être transposée efficacement à des cas réels. Dans la première partie, on teste numériquement la proportionnalité entre le facteur de rétrodiffraction, relié aux propriétés statistiques du milieu, et le spectre des codas. Les distributions de vitesse, à valeur

  4. Frequency-domain waveform inversion using the phase derivative

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2013-09-26

    Phase wrapping in the frequency domain or cycle skipping in the time domain is the major cause of the local minima problem in the waveform inversion when the starting model is far from the true model. Since the phase derivative does not suffer from the wrapping effect, its inversion has the potential of providing a robust and reliable inversion result. We propose a new waveform inversion algorithm using the phase derivative in the frequency domain along with the exponential damping term to attenuate reflections. We estimate the phase derivative, or what we refer to as the instantaneous traveltime, by taking the derivative of the Fourier-transformed wavefield with respect to the angular frequency, dividing it by the wavefield itself and taking the imaginary part. The objective function is constructed using the phase derivative and the gradient of the objective function is computed using the back-propagation algorithm. Numerical examples show that our inversion algorithm with a strong damping generates a tomographic result even for a high ‘single’ frequency, which can be a good initial model for full waveform inversion and migration.

  5. Applications of elliptic Carleman inequalities to Cauchy and inverse problems

    CERN Document Server

    Choulli, Mourad

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a unified approach to studying the stability of both elliptic Cauchy problems and selected inverse problems. Based on elementary Carleman inequalities, it establishes three-ball inequalities, which are the key to deriving logarithmic stability estimates for elliptic Cauchy problems and are also useful in proving stability estimates for certain elliptic inverse problems. The book presents three inverse problems, the first of which consists in determining the surface impedance of an obstacle from the far field pattern. The second problem investigates the detection of corrosion by electric measurement, while the third concerns the determination of an attenuation coefficient from internal data, which is motivated by a problem encountered in biomedical imaging.

  6. Control algorithms for dynamic attenuators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, Scott S., E-mail: sshsieh@stanford.edu [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Pelc, Norbert J. [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford California 94305 and Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The authors describe algorithms to control dynamic attenuators in CT and compare their performance using simulated scans. Dynamic attenuators are prepatient beam shaping filters that modulate the distribution of x-ray fluence incident on the patient on a view-by-view basis. These attenuators can reduce dose while improving key image quality metrics such as peak or mean variance. In each view, the attenuator presents several degrees of freedom which may be individually adjusted. The total number of degrees of freedom across all views is very large, making many optimization techniques impractical. The authors develop a theory for optimally controlling these attenuators. Special attention is paid to a theoretically perfect attenuator which controls the fluence for each ray individually, but the authors also investigate and compare three other, practical attenuator designs which have been previously proposed: the piecewise-linear attenuator, the translating attenuator, and the double wedge attenuator. Methods: The authors pose and solve the optimization problems of minimizing the mean and peak variance subject to a fixed dose limit. For a perfect attenuator and mean variance minimization, this problem can be solved in simple, closed form. For other attenuator designs, the problem can be decomposed into separate problems for each view to greatly reduce the computational complexity. Peak variance minimization can be approximately solved using iterated, weighted mean variance (WMV) minimization. Also, the authors develop heuristics for the perfect and piecewise-linear attenuators which do not requirea priori knowledge of the patient anatomy. The authors compare these control algorithms on different types of dynamic attenuators using simulated raw data from forward projected DICOM files of a thorax and an abdomen. Results: The translating and double wedge attenuators reduce dose by an average of 30% relative to current techniques (bowtie filter with tube current

  7. of Generalized Inverse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyun Yang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cohen's kappa and weighted kappa statistics are the conventional methods used frequently in measuring agreement for categorical responses. In this paper, through the perspective of a generalized inverse, we propose an alternative general framework of the fixed-effects modeling of Cohen's weighted kappa, proposed by Yang and Chinchilli (2011. Properties of the proposed method are provided. Small sample performance is investigated through bootstrap simulation studies, which demonstrate good performance of the proposed method. When there are only two categories, the proposed method reduces to Cohen's kappa.

  8. Inverse Degree and Connectivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Xiao-ling; TIAN Ying-zhi

    2013-01-01

    Let G be a connected graph with vertex set V(G),order n =丨V(G)丨,minimum degree δ(G) and connectivity κ(G).The graph G is called maximally connected if κ(G) =δ(G).Define the inverse degree of G with no isolated vertices as R(G) =Σv∈V(G)1/d(v),where d(v) denotes the degree of the vertex v.We show that G is maximally connected if R(G) < 1 + 2/δ + n-2δ+1/(n-1)(n-3).

  9. Inversion assuming weak scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xenaki, Angeliki; Gerstoft, Peter; Mosegaard, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    The study of weak scattering from inhomogeneous media or interface roughness has long been of interest in sonar applications. In an acoustic backscattering model of a stationary field of volume inhomogeneities, a stochastic description of the field is more useful than a deterministic description...... due to the complex nature of the field. A method based on linear inversion is employed to infer information about the statistical properties of the scattering field from the obtained cross-spectral matrix. A synthetic example based on an active high-frequency sonar demonstrates that the proposed...

  10. An analysis of seismic attenuation in random porous media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The attenuation of seismic wave in rocks has been one of the interesting research topics, but till now no poroelasticity models can thoroughly explain the strong attenuation of wave in rocks. In this paper, a random porous medium model is designed to study the law of wave propagation in complex rocks based on the theory of Biot poroelasticity and the general theory of stochastic process. This model sets the density of grain, porosity, permeability and modulus of frame as random parameters in space, and only one fluid infiltrates in rocks for the sake of better simulation effect in line with real rocks in earth strata. Numerical simulations are implemented. Two different inverse quality factors of fast P-wave are obtained by different methods to assess attenuation through records of virtual detectors in wave field (One is amplitude decay method in time domain and the other is spectral ratio method in frequency domain). Comparing the attenuation results of random porous medium with those of homogeneous porous medium, we conclude that the attenuation of seismic wave of homogeneous porous medium is far weaker than that of random porous medium. In random porous media, the higher heterogeneous level is, the stronger the attenuation becomes, and when heterogeneity σ = 0.15 in simulation, the attenuation result is consistent with that by actual observation. Since the central frequency (50 Hz) of source in numerical simulation is in earthquake band, the numerical results prove that heterogeneous porous structure is one of the important factors causing strong attenuation in real stratum at intermediate and low frequency.

  11. Statistical perspectives on inverse problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kim Emil

    Inverse problems arise in many scientific disciplines and pertain to situations where inference is to be made about a particular phenomenon from indirect measurements. A typical example, arising in diffusion tomography, is the inverse boundary value problem for non-invasive reconstruction...... of the interior of an object from electrical boundary measurements. One part of this thesis concerns statistical approaches for solving, possibly non-linear, inverse problems. Thus inverse problems are recasted in a form suitable for statistical inference. In particular, a Bayesian approach for regularisation...... is obtained by assuming that the a priori beliefs about the solution before having observed any data can be described by a prior distribution. The solution to the statistical inverse problem is then given by the posterior distribution obtained by Bayes' formula. Hence the solution of an ill-posed inverse...

  12. Inversion amalgam chronopotentiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The review deals with the theoretical principles of the method of inversion amalgam chronopotentiometry. The transition times and the potential-time relations for the electrochemical dissolution of amalgams under galvanostatic conditions are analysed and the applications of the method in electroanalytical practise, in the study of the kinetics of electrode processes and adsorption, in the determination of the numbers of electrons involved in the reaction and diffusion coefficients, and in the study of complex formation, corrosion of amalgams, etc. are examined in detail. The fundamentals of the theory of electrode processes complicated by preceding, subsequent, and simultaneous chemical reactions are described. The possibilities and advantages of the method of amalgam chronopotentiometry in relation to other electrochemical procedures are indicated

  13. Dark Radiative Inverse Seesaw

    CERN Document Server

    Ahriche, Amine; Nasri, Salah

    2016-01-01

    We present a minimal model that simultaneously accounts for neutrino masses and the origin of dark matter (DM) and where the electroweak phase transition is strong enough to allow for electroweak baryogenesis. The Standard Model is enlarged with a Majorana fermion, three generations of chiral fermion pairs, and a single complex scalar that plays a central role in DM production and phenomenology, neutrino masses, and the strength of the phase transition. All the new fields are singlets under the SM gauge group. Neutrino masses are generated via a new variant of radiative inverse seesaw where the required small mass term is generated via loops involving DM and no large hierarchy is assumed among the mass scales. The model offers all the advantage of low-scale neutrino mass models as well as a viable dark matter candidate that is testable with direct detection experiments.

  14. Wavelet Sparse Approximate Inverse Preconditioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tony F.; Tang, W.-P.; Wan, W. L.

    1996-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in using sparse approximate inverses as preconditioners for Krylov subspace iterative methods. Recent studies of Grote and Huckle and Chow and Saad also show that sparse approximate inverse preconditioner can be effective for a variety of matrices, e.g. Harwell-Boeing collections. Nonetheless a drawback is that it requires rapid decay of the inverse entries so that sparse approximate inverse is possible. However, for the class of matrices that, come from elliptic PDE problems, this assumption may not necessarily hold. Our main idea is to look for a basis, other than the standard one, such that a sparse representation of the inverse is feasible. A crucial observation is that the kind of matrices we are interested in typically have a piecewise smooth inverse. We exploit this fact, by applying wavelet techniques to construct a better sparse approximate inverse in the wavelet basis. We shall justify theoretically and numerically that our approach is effective for matrices with smooth inverse. We emphasize that in this paper we have only presented the idea of wavelet approximate inverses and demonstrated its potential but have not yet developed a highly refined and efficient algorithm.

  15. Holocaust inversion and contemporary antisemitism.

    OpenAIRE

    Klaff, Lesley D

    2014-01-01

    One of the cruellest aspects of the new antisemitism is its perverse use of the Holocaust as a stick to beat 'the Jews'. This article explains the phenomenon of 'Holocaust Inversion', which involves an 'inversion of reality' (the Israelis are cast as the 'new' Nazis and the Palestinians as the 'new' Jews) and an 'inversion of morality' (the Holocaust is presented as a moral lesson for, or even a moral indictment of, 'the Jews'). Holocaust inversion is a form of soft-core Holocaust denial, yet...

  16. Inversion of stochastic earthquake model parameters in Korea using the modified Levenberg-Marquardt's method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parameters of stochastic point-source ground motion model were inverted based on extensive digital records from dense seismic networks for small-to-moderate earthquakes in and around the Korea. Modified Levenberg-Marquardt's nonlinear inversion method was employed for stable inversion which considers the second derivatives of the Hessian matrix. After trying various cases with regard to seismic source types, frequency dependency of crustal attenuation, and crustal amplification, the best estimates for earthquake simulation are determined to be 348f0.53 for crustal attenuation, 20∼30 bars for stress drop, 0.02 for site anelastic attenuation (kappa), and 50 km for crossover distance. In addition, detailed features of crustal attenuation such as anisotropy and localized Q were evaluated, which contributes to providing scientific bases for developing site-specific ground motion attenuation relations and interpreting the geological and geophysical characteristics of the Korean Peninsula. In the region where strong ground motion data are scarce such as in Korea, it becomes engineering practice to employ well-founded, validated, and simple stochastic point-source ground motion earthquake model to predict strong ground motion. The parameters for stochastic point-source ground motion model are stress drop for sources, frequency dependent quality factor (Q) for crustal attenuation, and kappa (K) for site effects. In this study, these model parameters were inverted based on extensive earthquake dataset at the first step and more detailed features of crustal attenuation were investigated at the second step. For stable inversion of these parameters under various cases, conventional Levenberg-Marquardt's nonlinear inversion method is simply modified by taking into account the second derivatives of the Hessian matrix

  17. Information fusion in regularized inversion of tomographic pumping tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohling, G.C.; ,

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter we investigate a simple approach to incorporating geophysical information into the analysis of tomographic pumping tests for characterization of the hydraulic conductivity (K) field in an aquifer. A number of authors have suggested a tomographic approach to the analysis of hydraulic tests in aquifers - essentially simultaneous analysis of multiple tests or stresses on the flow system - in order to improve the resolution of the estimated parameter fields. However, even with a large amount of hydraulic data in hand, the inverse problem is still plagued by non-uniqueness and ill-conditioning and the parameter space for the inversion needs to be constrained in some sensible fashion in order to obtain plausible estimates of aquifer properties. For seismic and radar tomography problems, the parameter space is often constrained through the application of regularization terms that impose penalties on deviations of the estimated parameters from a prior or background model, with the tradeoff between data fit and model norm explored through systematic analysis of results for different levels of weighting on the regularization terms. In this study we apply systematic regularized inversion to analysis of tomographic pumping tests in an alluvial aquifer, taking advantage of the steady-shape flow regime exhibited in these tests to expedite the inversion process. In addition, we explore the possibility of incorporating geophysical information into the inversion through a regularization term relating the estimated K distribution to ground penetrating radar velocity and attenuation distributions through a smoothing spline model. ?? 2008 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  18. Evidence of magma activation beneath the Lunayyir basaltic field (Saudi Arabia from attenuation tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Koulakov

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a seismic attenuation model for the crust beneath the Cenozoic basaltic field of Lunayyir (western Saudi Arabia, where a strong seismic swarm occurred in 2009. The tomography inversion uses the envelope shape of the S wave seismograms from over 300 strong events (M > 3.5. The resulting attenuation structures appear to be consistent with the distribution of seismic velocities. The obtained 3-D attenuation model distinguishes the low-attenuation zones down to 5 km depth corresponding to the rigid basaltic cover. At greater depths, we detect a high-attenuation anomaly coinciding with the main seismicity cluster. We propose that this zone corresponds to the upper part of the conduit area ascending from deeper magma sources. According to the distributions of local events, fluids and melts from this conduit appear to reach a depth of ~2 km, but were not able to reach the surface and cause the eruption in 2009.

  19. Optimized simultaneous inversion of primary and multiple reflections; Inversion linearisee simultanee des reflexions primaires et des reflexions multiples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelle, L.

    2003-12-01

    The removal of multiple reflections remains a real problem in seismic imaging. Many preprocessing methods have been developed to attenuate multiples in seismic data but none of them is satisfactory in 3D. The objective of this thesis is to develop a new method to remove multiples, extensible in 3D. Contrary to the existing methods, our approach is not a preprocessing step: we directly include the multiple removal in the imaging process by means of a simultaneous inversion of primaries and multiples. We then propose to improve the standard linearized inversion so as to make it insensitive to the presence of multiples in the data. We exploit kinematics differences between primaries and multiples. We propose to pick in the data the kinematics of the multiples we want to remove. The wave field is decomposed into primaries and multiples. Primaries are modeled by the Ray+Born operator from perturbations of the logarithm of impedance, given the velocity field. Multiples are modeled by the Transport operator from an initial trace, given the picking. The inverse problem simultaneously fits primaries and multiples to the data. To solve this problem with two unknowns, we take advantage of the isometric nature of the Transport operator, which allows to drastically reduce the CPU time: this simultaneous inversion is this almost as fast as the standard linearized inversion. This gain of time opens the way to different applications to multiple removal and in particular, allows to foresee the straightforward 3D extension. (author)

  20. Interlaboratory comparison of radiation-induced attenuation in optical fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friebele, E.J.; Lyons, P.B.; Blackburn, J.C.; Henschel, H.; Johan, A.; Krinsky, J.A.; Robinson, A.; Schneider, W.; Smith, D.; Taylor, E.W. (Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (USA); Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA); Harry Diamond Labs., Adelphi, MD (USA); Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Naturwissenschaftlich-Technische Trendanalysen (INT), Euskirchen (Germany, F.R.); Direction des Recherches, Etudes et Techni

    1989-08-01

    A comparison of the losses induced in step index multimode, graded index multimode and single mode fibers by pulsed radiation exposure has been made among 12 laboratories over a period of 5 years. The recoveries of the incremental attenuations from 10{sup -9} to 10{sup 1} s are reported. Although a standard set of measurement parameters was attempted, differences between the laboratories are evident; possible origins for these are discussed. 18 refs., 18 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. Inversion exercises inspired by mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groetsch, C. W.

    2016-02-01

    An elementary calculus transform, inspired by the centroid and gyration radius, is introduced as a prelude to the study of more advanced transforms. Analysis of the transform, including its inversion, makes use of several key concepts from basic calculus and exercises in the application and inversion of the transform provide practice in the use of technology in calculus.

  2. The R{sup 3} exponential x-ray transform inversion in quaternion analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fathi, S M Saberi, E-mail: majid.saberi@u-cergy.f [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Modelisation, Universite de Cergy-Pontoise, 95302 Cergy-Pontoise (France)

    2010-07-23

    In this paper, we present a new derivation of the inverse of the exponential x-ray transform in the three dimensions, based on quaternion analysis. An explicit formula is obtained using a set of three-dimensional x-ray projection data. The result without attenuation is recovered as a special case.

  3. Inverse fracture network modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic problem in analyzing flow and transport in fractured rock is that the flow may be largely governed by a poorly connected network of fractures. Flow in such a system cannot be modeled with traditional modelling techniques. Fracture network models also have a limitation, in that they are based on geological data on fracture geometry even though it is known that only a small portion of fractures observed is hydraulically active. This paper discusses a new technique developed for treating the problem as well as presents a modelling example carried out to apply it. The approach is developed in Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and it treats the fracture zone as an 'equivalent discontinuum'. The discontinuous nature of the problem is represented through flow on a partially filled lattice. An equivalent discontinuum model is constructed by adding and removing conductive elements through a statistical inverse technique called 'simulated annealing'. The fracture network model is 'annealed' until the modified systems behaves like the observed. The further development of the approach continues at LBL and in a joint LBL/VTT collaboration project the possibilities to apply the technique in Finnish conditions are investigated

  4. Inverse problem in hydrogeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, Jesús; Alcolea, Andrés; Medina, Agustín; Hidalgo, Juan; Slooten, Luit J.

    2005-03-01

    The state of the groundwater inverse problem is synthesized. Emphasis is placed on aquifer characterization, where modelers have to deal with conceptual model uncertainty (notably spatial and temporal variability), scale dependence, many types of unknown parameters (transmissivity, recharge, boundary conditions, etc.), nonlinearity, and often low sensitivity of state variables (typically heads and concentrations) to aquifer properties. Because of these difficulties, calibration cannot be separated from the modeling process, as it is sometimes done in other fields. Instead, it should be viewed as one step in the process of understanding aquifer behavior. In fact, it is shown that actual parameter estimation methods do not differ from each other in the essence, though they may differ in the computational details. It is argued that there is ample room for improvement in groundwater inversion: development of user-friendly codes, accommodation of variability through geostatistics, incorporation of geological information and different types of data (temperature, occurrence and concentration of isotopes, age, etc.), proper accounting of uncertainty, etc. Despite this, even with existing codes, automatic calibration facilitates enormously the task of modeling. Therefore, it is contended that its use should become standard practice. L'état du problème inverse des eaux souterraines est synthétisé. L'accent est placé sur la caractérisation de l'aquifère, où les modélisateurs doivent jouer avec l'incertitude des modèles conceptuels (notamment la variabilité spatiale et temporelle), les facteurs d'échelle, plusieurs inconnues sur différents paramètres (transmissivité, recharge, conditions aux limites, etc.), la non linéarité, et souvent la sensibilité de plusieurs variables d'état (charges hydrauliques, concentrations) des propriétés de l'aquifère. A cause de ces difficultés, le calibrage ne peut êtreséparé du processus de modélisation, comme c'est le

  5. Multiscale Modelling and Inverse Problems

    CERN Document Server

    Nolen, J; Stuart, A M

    2010-01-01

    The need to blend observational data and mathematical models arises in many applications and leads naturally to inverse problems. Parameters appearing in the model, such as constitutive tensors, initial conditions, boundary conditions, and forcing can be estimated on the basis of observed data. The resulting inverse problems are often ill-posed and some form of regularization is required. These notes discuss parameter estimation in situations where the unknown parameters vary across multiple scales. We illustrate the main ideas using a simple model for groundwater flow. We will highlight various approaches to regularization for inverse problems, including Tikhonov and Bayesian methods. We illustrate three ideas that arise when considering inverse problems in the multiscale context. The first idea is that the choice of space or set in which to seek the solution to the inverse problem is intimately related to whether a homogenized or full multiscale solution is required. This is a choice of regularization. The ...

  6. Improvements in Earthquake Location from Joint Inversion of Seismic and Gravity Observations – Application to the Iran Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syracuse, Ellen Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Maceira, Monica [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Phillips, William Scott [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Begnaud, Michael Lee [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nippress, Stuart [Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) Blacknest, Brimpton (United Kingdom); Bergman, Eric [Global Seismological Services (GSS), Golden, CO (United States); Zhang, Haijiang [Univ. of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China)

    2016-07-19

    These are slides which show many graphs and datasets for the above-mentioned topic and then concludes with the following: Joint inversion of multiple geophysical datasets improves recovery of velocity structures, particularly in Vs and in shallow parts of the model, in comparison to travel-time only models. Resulting fits to travel time data are minimally degraded by joint inversions. Correspondingly, fits to independent estimates of ground-truth locations are minimally affected by joint inversions.

  7. Multidimensional NMR Inversion without Kronecker Products: Multilinear Inversion

    CERN Document Server

    Medellín, David; Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Multidimensional NMR inversion using Kronecker products poses several challenges. First, kernel compression is only possible when the kernel matrices are separable, and in recent years, there has been an increasing interest in NMR sequences with non-separable kernels. Second, in three or more dimensions, the singular value decomposition is not unique; therefore kernel compression is not well-defined for higher dimensions. Without kernel compression, the Kronecker product yields matrices that require large amounts of memory, making the inversion intractable for personal computers. Finally, incorporating arbitrary regularization terms is not possible using the Lawson-Hanson (LH) or the Butler-Reeds-Dawson (BRD) algorithms. We develop a minimization-based inversion method that circumvents the above problems by using multilinear forms to perform multidimensional NMR inversion without using kernel compression or Kronecker products. The new method is memory efficient, requiring less than 0.1% of the memory required...

  8. Seismic attenuation in fractured media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prime objective of this paper is to quantitatively estimate seismic attenuation caused by fractures with different physical parameters. In seismic wave simulation, the fractured media are treated as the anisotropic media and fractures are represented by frequency-dependent elastic constants. Based on numerical experiments with three different parameters, namely viscosity, porosity and the Lamé parameters, this paper has the following observations. First, seismic attenuation is not affected by the viscosity within fractures, although it increases with the increase of porosity and decreases with the increase of the Lamé parameters within fractures. Among the latter two parameters, seismic attenuation is more sensitive to the Lamé parameters than to the porosity. Second, for the attenuation anisotropy, low frequencies have more anisotropic effect than high frequencies. For example, a 50 Hz wavefield has the strongest anisotropy effect if compared to 100 and 150 Hz wavefields. The attenuation anisotropy for low frequency (say 50 Hz) is more sensitive to the viscosity than the porosity and the Lamé parameters have the weakest effect among these three parameters. These observations suggest that low-frequency seismic attenuation, and especially the attenuation anisotropy in low frequency, would have great potential for fluid discrimination within fractured media. (paper)

  9. Parameter estimation and inverse problems

    CERN Document Server

    Aster, Richard C; Thurber, Clifford H

    2011-01-01

    Parameter Estimation and Inverse Problems, 2e provides geoscience students and professionals with answers to common questions like how one can derive a physical model from a finite set of observations containing errors, and how one may determine the quality of such a model. This book takes on these fundamental and challenging problems, introducing students and professionals to the broad range of approaches that lie in the realm of inverse theory. The authors present both the underlying theory and practical algorithms for solving inverse problems. The authors' treatment is approp

  10. Inverse Doppler Effects in Flute

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Xiao P; Liu, Song; Shen, Fang L; Li, Lin L; Luo, Chun R

    2015-01-01

    Here we report the observation of the inverse Doppler effects in a flute. It is experimentally verified that, when there is a relative movement between the source and the observer, the inverse Doppler effect could be detected for all seven pitches of a musical scale produced by a flute. Higher tone is associated with a greater shift in frequency. The effect of the inverse frequency shift may provide new insights into why the flute, with its euphonious tone, has been popular for thousands of years in Asia and Europe.

  11. Heart Attack Recovery FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Heart Attack Recovery FAQs Updated:Aug 24,2016 Most people ... recovery. View an animation of a heart attack . Heart Attack Recovery Questions and Answers What treatments will I ...

  12. Parameter estimation and inverse problems

    CERN Document Server

    Aster, Richard C; Thurber, Clifford H

    2005-01-01

    Parameter Estimation and Inverse Problems primarily serves as a textbook for advanced undergraduate and introductory graduate courses. Class notes have been developed and reside on the World Wide Web for faciliting use and feedback by teaching colleagues. The authors'' treatment promotes an understanding of fundamental and practical issus associated with parameter fitting and inverse problems including basic theory of inverse problems, statistical issues, computational issues, and an understanding of how to analyze the success and limitations of solutions to these probles. The text is also a practical resource for general students and professional researchers, where techniques and concepts can be readily picked up on a chapter-by-chapter basis.Parameter Estimation and Inverse Problems is structured around a course at New Mexico Tech and is designed to be accessible to typical graduate students in the physical sciences who may not have an extensive mathematical background. It is accompanied by a Web site that...

  13. Testing earthquake source inversion methodologies

    KAUST Repository

    Page, Morgan T.

    2011-01-01

    Source Inversion Validation Workshop; Palm Springs, California, 11-12 September 2010; Nowadays earthquake source inversions are routinely performed after large earthquakes and represent a key connection between recorded seismic and geodetic data and the complex rupture process at depth. The resulting earthquake source models quantify the spatiotemporal evolution of ruptures. They are also used to provide a rapid assessment of the severity of an earthquake and to estimate losses. However, because of uncertainties in the data, assumed fault geometry and velocity structure, and chosen rupture parameterization, it is not clear which features of these source models are robust. Improved understanding of the uncertainty and reliability of earthquake source inversions will allow the scientific community to use the robust features of kinematic inversions to more thoroughly investigate the complexity of the rupture process and to better constrain other earthquakerelated computations, such as ground motion simulations and static stress change calculations.

  14. Uterine Inversion; A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchikhi, C; Saadi, H; Fakhir, B; Chaara, H; Bouguern, H; Banani, A; Melhouf, Ma

    2008-01-01

    The puerperal uterine inversion is a rare and severe complication occurring in the third stage of labour. The mechanisms are not completely known. However, extrinsic factors such as oxytocic arrests after a prolonged labour, umbilical cord traction or abdominal expression are pointed. Other intrinsic factors such as primiparity, uterine hypotonia, various placental localizations, fundic myoma or short umbilical cord were also reported. The diagnosis of the uterine inversion is mainly supported by clinical symptoms. It is based on three elements: haemorrhage, shock and a strong pelvic pain. The immediate treatment of the uterine inversion is required. It is based on a medical reanimation associated with firstly a manual reduction then surgical treatment using various techniques. We report an observation of a 25 years old grand multiparous patient with a subacute uterine inversion after delivery at home. PMID:21516244

  15. Influence of Weave on Fabric Wrinkle Recovery Property before and after Resin Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马海青; 周翔

    2001-01-01

    Cotton fabrics with different weaves are designed and the influence of weave on wrinkle recovery property and tensile property is analyzed. Weave type plays a prominent part in determining fabric wrinkle recovery property and tensile property. Weave factor C is in direct relation to wrinkle recovery angle and in inverse relation to tensile property. This trend also exists after resin treatment. 3/1 left-twill fabric shows good wrinkle recovery angle and lest tensile loss after resin treatment.

  16. -Colour Self-Inverse Compositions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Geetika Narang; A K Agarwal

    2006-08-01

    MacMahon’s definition of self-inverse composition is extended to -colour self-inverse composition. This introduces four new sequences which satisfy the same recurrence relation with different initial conditions like the famous Fibonacci and Lucas sequences. For these new sequences explicit formulas, recurrence relations, generating functions and a summation formula are obtained. Two new binomial identities with combinatorial meaning are also given.

  17. Uterine Inversion; A case report

    OpenAIRE

    C, Bouchikhi; H, Saadi; B, Fakhir; H, Chaara; H, Bouguern; A, Banani; Melhouf MA

    2008-01-01

    The puerperal uterine inversion is a rare and severe complication occurring in the third stage of labour. The mechanisms are not completely known. However, extrinsic factors such as oxytocic arrests after a prolonged labour, umbilical cord traction or abdominal expression are pointed. Other intrinsic factors such as primiparity, uterine hypotonia, various placental localizations, fundic myoma or short umbilical cord were also reported. The diagnosis of the uterine inversion is mainly supporte...

  18. Thermal measurements and inverse techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Orlande, Helcio RB; Maillet, Denis; Cotta, Renato M

    2011-01-01

    With its uncommon presentation of instructional material regarding mathematical modeling, measurements, and solution of inverse problems, Thermal Measurements and Inverse Techniques is a one-stop reference for those dealing with various aspects of heat transfer. Progress in mathematical modeling of complex industrial and environmental systems has enabled numerical simulations of most physical phenomena. In addition, recent advances in thermal instrumentation and heat transfer modeling have improved experimental procedures and indirect measurements for heat transfer research of both natural phe

  19. Localized recovery of complex networks against failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Yilun

    2016-01-01

    Resilience of complex networks to failure has been an important issue in network research for decades, and recent studies have begun to focus on the inverse recovery of network functionality through strategically healing missing nodes or edges. However, the effect of network recovery is far from fully understood, and a general theory is still missing. Here we propose and study a general model of localized recovery, where a group of neighboring nodes are restored in an invasive way from a seed node. We develop a theoretical framework to compare the effect of random recovery (RR) and localized recovery (LR) in complex networks including Erdős-Rényi networks, random regular networks, and scale-free networks. We find detailed phase diagrams for the subnetwork of occupied nodes and the "complement network" of failed nodes under RR and LR. By identifying the two competitive forces behind LR, we present an analytical and numerical approach to guide us in choosing the appropriate recovery strategy and provide estimation on its effect by using the degree distribution of the original network as the only input. Our work therefore provides insight for quantitatively understanding recovery process and its implications in infrastructure protection in various complex systems. PMID:27456202

  20. Localized recovery of complex networks against failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Yilun

    2016-07-01

    Resilience of complex networks to failure has been an important issue in network research for decades, and recent studies have begun to focus on the inverse recovery of network functionality through strategically healing missing nodes or edges. However, the effect of network recovery is far from fully understood, and a general theory is still missing. Here we propose and study a general model of localized recovery, where a group of neighboring nodes are restored in an invasive way from a seed node. We develop a theoretical framework to compare the effect of random recovery (RR) and localized recovery (LR) in complex networks including Erdős-Rényi networks, random regular networks, and scale-free networks. We find detailed phase diagrams for the subnetwork of occupied nodes and the “complement network” of failed nodes under RR and LR. By identifying the two competitive forces behind LR, we present an analytical and numerical approach to guide us in choosing the appropriate recovery strategy and provide estimation on its effect by using the degree distribution of the original network as the only input. Our work therefore provides insight for quantitatively understanding recovery process and its implications in infrastructure protection in various complex systems.

  1. Chromatid Painting for Chromosomal Inversion Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a novel approach to the detection of chromosomal inversions. Transmissible chromosome aberrations (translocations and inversions) have profound genetic...

  2. Circulating CD133+CD34+ progenitor cells inversely correlate with soluble ICAM-1 in early ischemic stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Joseph

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Purpose Both endothelial progenitor cells (EPC and markers of neuroinflammation are candidate biomarkers for stroke severity and outcome prediction. A relationship between EPC and neuroinflammatory markers in early stroke is not fully elucidated. The objectives were to investigate correlations between EPC and neuroinflammation markers (adhesion molecules ICAM-1, VCAM-1, E-selectin, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, interleukin (IL-6, endothelin (ET-1, markers of tissue injury (matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-9 and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMP-1 in early stroke patients. Methods We prospectively recruited symptomatic patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease. We assessed stroke severity by using of acute (diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI and final lesion volumes (fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR. We measured serum soluble ICAM-1, VCAM-1, E-selectin, MMP-9, TIMP-1 and plasma TNF-α, IL-6, ET-1 by ELISA, and quantified EPC in mononuclear fraction of peripheral blood on days 1 and 3 in 17 patients (mean(SD age 62(14, with admission National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS 10(8 selected from 175 patients with imaging confirmed ischemic stroke. Non-parametric statistics, univariate and multivariate analysis were used. Results Only ICAM-1 inversely correlated with EPC subset CD133+CD34+ on day 1 (Spearman r = -0.6, p Conclusion Our study showed that high ICAM-1 is associated with low CD133+CD34+subset of EPC. Biomarkers of neuroinflammation may predict tissue injury and stroke severity in early ischemia.

  3. Multidimensional NMR inversion without Kronecker products: Multilinear inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medellín, David; Ravi, Vivek R.; Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    Multidimensional NMR inversion using Kronecker products poses several challenges. First, kernel compression is only possible when the kernel matrices are separable, and in recent years, there has been an increasing interest in NMR sequences with non-separable kernels. Second, in three or more dimensions, the singular value decomposition is not unique; therefore kernel compression is not well-defined for higher dimensions. Without kernel compression, the Kronecker product yields matrices that require large amounts of memory, making the inversion intractable for personal computers. Finally, incorporating arbitrary regularization terms is not possible using the Lawson-Hanson (LH) or the Butler-Reeds-Dawson (BRD) algorithms. We develop a minimization-based inversion method that circumvents the above problems by using multilinear forms to perform multidimensional NMR inversion without using kernel compression or Kronecker products. The new method is memory efficient, requiring less than 0.1% of the memory required by the LH or BRD methods. It can also be extended to arbitrary dimensions and adapted to include non-separable kernels, linear constraints, and arbitrary regularization terms. Additionally, it is easy to implement because only a cost function and its first derivative are required to perform the inversion.

  4. Relationship between Secchi depth and the diffuse light attenuation coefficient in Danish estuaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murray, Ciarán; Markager, Stiig

    Analyis of temporal and spatial variation in the in the relationship between light attenuation and Secchi depth in Danish monitoring data There can be found timeseries of Secchi depth measurements in Danish waters which extend relatively far back in time. The Secchi depth measurement is therefore...... useful in that it allows comparison of present conditions with these older observations. An empirical inverse relationship between Secchi depth and light attenuation coefficient, Kd, has traditionally been used to estimate the light attenuation coefficient from Secchi depth measurements. However, studies...... to the present. Our study analyses the temporal and spatial variation in the in the relationship between the light attenuation and the secchi disk depth and attempts to give explanations for this variation....

  5. Relationship between comfort and attenuation measurements for two types of earplugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C Byrne

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise-induced hearing loss is almost always preventable if properly fitted hearing protectors are worn to reduce exposure. Many individuals choose not to wear hearing protection because it may interfere with effective communication in the workplace or it may be uncomfortable. Hearing protector comfort has not received the same amount of attention as noise reduction capability. The present study was conducted to evaluate the comfort level of two different types of insert earplugs as well as the attenuation levels achieved by the earplugs. Attenuation levels were obtained with a commercially available earplug fit-test system, and the comfort ratings were obtained by questionnaire. The primary research objective was to determine whether hearing protector comfort was related to measured attenuation values. A linear mixed effects model provided evidence for an inverse relationship between comfort and attenuation.

  6. Global inversion for anisotropy during full-waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debens, H. A.; Warner, M.; Umpleby, A.

    2015-12-01

    Full-waveform inversion (FWI) is a powerful tool for quantitative estimation of high-resolution high-fidelity models of subsurface seismic parameters, typically P-wave velocity. The solution to FWI's posed nonlinear inverse problem is obtained via an iterative series of linearized local updates to a start model, assuming this model lies within the basin of attraction to the global minimum. Thanks to many successful published applications to three-dimensional (3D) field datasets, its advance has been rapid and driven in large-part by the oil and gas industry. The consideration of seismic anisotropy during FWI is of vital importance, as it holds influence over both the kinematics and dynamics of seismic waveforms. If not appropriately taken into account then inadequacies in the anisotropy model are likely to manifest as significant error in the recovered velocity model. Conventionally, anisotropic FWI employs either an a priori anisotropy model, held fixed during FWI, or it uses a multi-parameter local inversion scheme to recover the anisotropy as part of the FWI; both of these methods can be problematic. Constructing an anisotropy model prior to FWI often involves intensive (and hence expensive) iterative procedures, such as travel-time tomography or moveout velocity analysis. On the other hand, introducing multiple parameters to FWI itself increases the complexity of what is already an underdetermined inverse problem. We propose that global rather than local FWI can be used to recover the long-wavelength acoustic anisotropy model, and that this can then be followed by more-conventional local FWI to recover the detailed model. We validate this approach using a full 3D field dataset, demonstrating that it avoids problems associated to crosstalk that can bedevil local inversion schemes, and reconciles well with in situ borehole measurements. Although our approach includes a global inversion for anisotropy, it is nonetheless affordable and practical for 3D field data.

  7. Measurement of intrinsic and scattering attenuation of shear waves in two sedimentary basins and comparison to crystalline sites in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eulenfeld, Tom; Wegler, Ulrich

    2016-05-01

    We developed an improved method for the separation of intrinsic and scattering attenuation of seismic shear waves by envelope inversion called Qopen. The method optimizes the fit between Green's functions for the acoustic, isotropic radiative transfer theory and observed energy densities of earthquakes. The inversion allows the determination of scattering and intrinsic attenuation, site corrections and spectral source energies for the investigated frequency bands. Source displacement spectrum and the seismic moment of the analysed events can be estimated from the obtained spectral source energies. We report intrinsic and scattering attenuation coefficients of shear waves near three geothermal reservoirs in Germany for frequencies between 1 and 70 Hz. The geothermal reservoirs are located in Insheim, Landau (both Upper Rhine Graben) and Unterhaching (Molasse basin). We compare these three sedimentary sites to two sites located in crystalline rock with respect to scattering and intrinsic attenuation. The inverse quality factor for intrinsic attenuation is constant in sediments for frequencies smaller than 10 Hz and decreasing for higher frequencies. For crystalline rock, it is on a lower level and strictly monotonic decreasing with frequency. Intrinsic attenuation dominates scattering except for the Upper Rhine Graben, where scattering is dominant for frequencies below 10 Hz. Observed source displacement spectra show a high-frequency fall-off greater than or equal to 3.

  8. Estimation of Water Vapour Attenuation And Rain Attenuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.Kalyana Srinivas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Attenuation due to and water vapour and rain can severely degrade the radio wave propagation at centimeter or millimeter wavelengths. It restricts the path length of radio communication systems and limits the use of higher frequencies for line-of-sight microwave links and satellite communications. The attenuation will pose a greater problem to communication as the frequency of occurrence of heavy rain increases.In a tropical region, like Malaysia, where excessive rainfall is a common phenomenon throughout the year, the knowledge of the rain attenuation at the frequency of operation is extremely required for the design of a reliable terrestrial and earth space communication link at a particular location.

  9. Inversion by P4: polarization-picture post-processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schechner, Yoav Y

    2011-03-12

    Polarization may be sensed by imaging modules. This is done in various engineering systems as well as in biological systems, specifically by insects and some marine species. However, polarization per pixel is usually not the direct variable of interest. Rather, polarization-related data serve as a cue for recovering task-specific scene information. How should polarization-picture post-processing (P(4)) be done for the best scene understanding? Answering this question is not only helpful for advanced engineering (computer vision), but also to prompt hypotheses as to the processing occurring within biological systems. In various important cases, the answer is found by a principled expression of scene recovery as an inverse problem. Such an expression relies directly on a physics-based model of effects in the scene. The model includes analysis that depends on the different polarization components, thus facilitating the use of these components during the inversion, in a proper, even if non-trivial, manner. We describe several examples for this approach. These include automatic removal of path radiance in haze or underwater, overcoming partial semireflections and visual reverberations; three-dimensional recovery and distance-adaptive denoising. The resulting inversion algorithms rely on signal-processing methods, such as independent component analysis, deconvolution and optimization.

  10. Layered material characterization using ultrasonic transmission. An inverse estimation methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messineo, María G; Rus, Guillermo; Eliçabe, Guillermo E; Frontini, Gloria L

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents an inverse methodology with the aim to characterize a layered material through the identification of acoustical and mechanical properties of its layers. The framework to accomplish this objective is provided by the Inverse Problems (IPs) theory. Material characterization refers to the detection and localization of discontinuities, as well as to the identification of physical properties, in order to predict the material behaviour. In this particular case, the IP is solved in the form of a parameter estimation problem, in which the goal is the estimation of the characteristic acoustic impedance, transit time, and attenuation of each layer. These parameters are directly related to relevant material properties, such as the speed of sound, density, elastic modulus and elastic energy dissipation constants. The IP solution is obtained by minimizing a cost functional formulated as the least squares error between the waveform calculated using an equivalent model, and the measured waveform obtained from ultrasonic transmission tests. The applied methodology allowed the accurate estimation of the desired parameters in materials composed of up to three layers. As a second contribution, a power law frequency dependence of the wave attenuation was identified for several homogeneous materials, based on the same ultrasonic transmission experiments. PMID:26456278

  11. 磁共振成像 T1加权反转恢复序列在评价婴儿颅脑发育中的应用%Application of MRI T1 weighted inversion recovery sequence in evaluation of brain development in infants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白万晶; 宁刚; 李学胜

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨磁共振成像(MRI)采用 T1加权反转恢复(T1WIR)序列在评价婴儿颅脑发育中的应用。方法选择2014年3月~6月在四川大学华西第二医院行颅脑 MRI 检查的28例婴儿为研究对象,对其采用 T1WIR 序列和 T1加权自旋回波(T1WSE)序列进行颅脑轴位扫描(横断层扫描),评价婴儿颅脑发育情况。由2位放射科医师独立对所有 MRI 图像进行髓鞘形成清晰显示情况评分(0~3分),3分为能清晰显示髓鞘形成者。对评分结果进行一致性检验,计算 Kappa 值,并对评分结果进行秩和检验;计算2种序列灰白质对比率(CR)及相对于 T1WSE 序列的 T1WIR 序列灰、白质信号降低率;分别对2种序列 CR 及灰、白质信号降低率进行配对 t 检验。结果①2位放射科医师对 MRI 图像的髓鞘形成清晰显示情况评分结果存在一致性(u=7.887,P =0.000),并且具有相当满意的一致程度(Kappa 值=0.792);本组28例婴儿采用 T1WIR 序列 MRI 图像的髓鞘形成清晰显示情况评分结果高于 T1WSE 序列,且差异有统计学意义(3分 vs 2分,Z =-3.64,P =0.000)。②T1WIR 序列灰白质 CR 较 T1WSE 序列灰白质 CR 高,且差异有统计学意义[(0.26±0.06)vs (0.05±0.02),t =16.544,P =0.000];对 T1WSE 序列而言, T1WIR 序列的灰质信号降低率较白质信号降低率低,且 差 异 有 统 计 学意义[(2.03±0.83)vs (2.25±1.26),t=-2.616,P =0.014]。结论采用 T1WIR 序列可取代常规 T1WSE 序列进行 MRI 成像,用于评价婴儿颅脑发育。%Objective To explore the application of Magnetic Resonance Imaging(MRI)T1 weighted inversion recovery(T1WIR)sequence in evaluation of brain development in infants.Methods A total of 28 infants who accepted MRI examination of brain in West China Second University Hospital,Sichuan University from March to June 2014 were chosen as study subjects.Every infant was underwent both T1WIR and T1 weighted spin echo (T1WSE)sequence in brain transverse

  12. The attenuation and the attenuators: strategies and tactics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Briz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This work is inscribed in a research project (ES.POR.ATENUAÇÃO that seeks to analyze and explain the attenuator activity in different regional varieties of Spanish and Portuguese, in order to perform, subsequently, different contrastive intralinguistic and interlinguistic studies. In this article, we explain some of the theoretical and methodological principles on which are based the qualitative and quantitative analysis. And especially, we will refer to the concept of attenuation (Briz 1995, 2002, 2003, 2005, 2007a, 2012.

  13. Basin mass dynamic changes in China from GRACE based on a multibasin inversion method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Shuang; Wang, Qiuyu; Sun, Wenke

    2016-05-01

    Complex landforms, miscellaneous climates, and enormous populations have influenced various geophysical phenomena in China, which range from water depletion in the underground to retreating glaciers on high mountains and have attracted abundant scientific interest. This paper, which utilizes gravity observations during 2003-2014 from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), intends to comprehensively estimate the mass status in 16 drainage basins in the region. We propose a multibasin inversion method that features resistance to stripe noise and an ability to alleviate signal attenuation from the truncation and smoothing of GRACE data. The results show both positive and negative trends. Tremendous mass accumulation has occurred from the Tibetan Plateau (12.1 ± 0.6 Gt/yr) to the Yangtze River (7.7 ± 1.3 Gt/yr) and southeastern coastal areas, which is suggested to involve an increase in the groundwater storage, lake and reservoir water volume, and the flow of materials from tectonic processes. Additionally, mass loss has occurred in the Huang-Huai-Hai-Liao River Basin (-10.2 ± 0.9 Gt/yr), the Brahmaputra-Nujiang-Lancang River Basin (-15.0 ± 1.1 Gt/yr), and Tienshan Mountain (-4.1 ± 0.3 Gt/yr), a result of groundwater pumping and glacier melting. Areas with groundwater depletion are consistent with the distribution of cities with land subsidence in North China. We find that intensified precipitation can alter the local water supply and that GRACE can adequately capture these dynamics, which could be instructive for China's South-to-North Water Diversion hydrologic project.

  14. GRACE captures basin mass dynamic changes in China based on a multi-basin inversion method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Shuang; Wang, Qiuyu; Sun, Wenke

    2016-04-01

    Complex landform, miscellaneous climate and enormous population have enriched China with geophysical phenomena ranging from water depletion in the underground to glaciers retreat on the high mountains and have aroused large scientific interests. This paper, utilizing gravity observations 2003-2014 from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), intends to make a comprehensive estimation of mass status in 16 drainage basins in the whole region. We proposed a multi-basin inversion method, which is featured by resistance to the stripe noise and ability to alleviate signal attenuation due to truncation and smoothing of GRACE data. The results show both positive and negative trends: there is a tremendous mass accumulation spreading from the Tibetan plateau (12.2 ± 0.6 Gt/yr) to the Yangtze River (7.6 ± 1.3 Gt/yr), and further to the southeast coastal areas, which is suggested to involve an increase in the ground water storage, lake and reservoir water volume and likely materials flowed in by tectonic process; a mass loss is occurring in Huang-Huai-Hai-Liao River Basin (-10.5 ± 0.8 Gt/yr), as well as the Brahmaputra-Nujiang-Lancang River Basin (-15.0 ± 0.9 Gt/yr) and Tienshan Mountain (-4.1 ± 0.3 Gt/yr), which is a result of groundwater pumping and glacier melting. The groundwater depletion area is well consistent with the distribution of land subsidence in North China. In the end, we find intensified precipitation can alter the local water supply and GRACE is proficient to capture this dynamics, which could be instructive for the South-to-North Water Diversion - one China's giant hydrologic project.

  15. Multi-transmitting formula for attenuating waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈少林; 廖振鹏

    2003-01-01

    The MTF is extended to case of attenuating incident wave by introducing an attenuation coefficient. The reflection coefficients of this modified MTF and MTF areevaluated and compared when an attenuating wave impinges on the boundary, and the results demonstrate that MTF can be used to absorb slightly attenuating wavesand the modified MTF is more capable of absorbing heavily attenuating waves than MTF. The accuracy of modified MTF is also tested by numerical examples of fluid saturated porous media.

  16. Optimization for nonlinear inverse problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nonlinear inversion of geophysical data in general does not yield a unique solution, but a single model, representing the investigated field, is preferred for an easy geological interpretation of the observations. The analyzed region is constituted by a number of sub-regions where the multi-valued nonlinear inversion is applied, which leads to a multi-valued solution. Therefore, combining the values of the solution in each sub-region, many acceptable models are obtained for the entire region and this complicates the geological interpretation of geophysical investigations. In this paper are presented new methodologies, capable to select one model, among all acceptable ones, that satisfies different criteria of smoothness in the explored space of solutions. In this work we focus on the non-linear inversion of surface waves dispersion curves, which gives structural models of shear-wave velocity versus depth, but the basic concepts have a general validity. (author)

  17. Three-dimensional attenuation structure beneath North Island, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satake, Kenji; Hashida, Toshihiko

    1989-03-01

    Three-dimensional attenuation structure beneath North Island, New Zealand is determined by inversion of seismic intensity data. The method developed by Hashida and Shimazaki is used; the seismic intensity is converted to the maximum acceleration of the S-wave to obtain the acceleration at a point source and the attenuation structure. Because seismic intensity data have been accumulated on a uniform scale in New Zealand since the 1950's, we were able to use more than 2000 seismic intensity data from 26 earthquakes. The results show a remarkable contrast in the attenuation structure. In the top crustal layer, a low-Q area corresponding to the Central Volcanic Region is found. This low-Q area becomes wider to the northeast of North Island, suggesting that the Central Volcanic Region continues to the Havre Trough, a young back-arc basin. The southeastern part of the upper mantle beneath North Island shows high Q while the northwestern part shows low Q. The cross section shows that the high-Q region is dipping to the northwest, with a large amount of dip in the northeast and a smaller dip in the southwestern part of North Island. A comparison of the attenuation structure with microearthquake distribution indicates that this high-Q zone is the obliquely subducting Pacific plate. A zone of abnormally low Q which has cut the high-Q slab is found at a depth range of 130 to 230 km beneath the active volcanoes in the Taupo Volcanic Zone. A tear in the Pacific plate is suggested by this discontinuity in the attenuation structure. (1984).

  18. The Transmuted Inverse Exponential Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelumi Oguntunde

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces a two-parameter probability model which represents another generalization of the Inverse Exponential distribution by using the quadratic rank transmuted map. The proposed model is named Transmuted Inverse Exponential (TIE distribution and its statistical properties are systematically studied. We provide explicit expressions for its moments, moment generating function, quantile function, reliability function and hazard function. We estimate the parameters of the TIE distribution using the method of maximum likelihood estimation (MLE. The hazard function of the model has an inverted bathtub shape and we propose the usefulness of the TIE distribution in modeling breast cancer and bladder cancer data sets.

  19. Thermoelectric properties of inverse opals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, G. D.; Poilvert, N.; Crespi, V. H.

    2016-02-01

    Rayleigh's method [Philos. Mag. Ser. 5 34, 481 (1892)] is used to solve for the classical thermoelectric equations in inverse opals. His theory predicts that in an inverse opal, with periodic holes, the Seebeck coefficient and the figure of merit are identical to that of the bulk material. We also provide a major revision to Rayleigh's method, in using the electrochemical potential as an important variable, instead of the electrostatic potential. We also show that in some cases, the thermal boundary resistance is important in the effective thermal conductivity.

  20. -Dimensional Fractional Lagrange's Inversion Theorem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. A. Abd El-Salam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Using Riemann-Liouville fractional differential operator, a fractional extension of the Lagrange inversion theorem and related formulas are developed. The required basic definitions, lemmas, and theorems in the fractional calculus are presented. A fractional form of Lagrange's expansion for one implicitly defined independent variable is obtained. Then, a fractional version of Lagrange's expansion in more than one unknown function is generalized. For extending the treatment in higher dimensions, some relevant vectors and tensors definitions and notations are presented. A fractional Taylor expansion of a function of -dimensional polyadics is derived. A fractional -dimensional Lagrange inversion theorem is proved.

  1. Sound attenuation in magnetorheological fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-López, J.; Elvira, L.; Resa, P.; Montero de Espinosa, F.

    2013-02-01

    In this work, the attenuation of ultrasonic elastic waves propagating through magnetorheological (MR) fluids is analysed as a function of the particle volume fraction and the magnetic field intensity. Non-commercial MR fluids made with iron ferromagnetic particles and two different solvents (an olive oil based solution and an Araldite-epoxy) were used. Particle volume fractions of up to 0.25 were analysed. It is shown that the attenuation of sound depends strongly on the solvent used and the volume fraction. The influence of a magnetic field up to 212 mT was studied and it was found that the sound attenuation increases with the magnetic intensity until saturation is reached. A hysteretic effect is evident once the magnetic field is removed.

  2. Josephson tunnel junction microwave attenuator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koshelets, V. P.; Shitov, S. V.; Shchukin, A. V.;

    1993-01-01

    A new element for superconducting electronic circuitry-a variable attenuator-has been proposed, designed, and successfully tested. The principle of operation is based on the change in the microwave impedance of a superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) Josephson tunnel junction when dc biased...... at different points in the current-voltage characteristic. Both numerical calculations based on the Tien-Gordon theory and 70-GHz microwave experiments have confirmed the wide dynamic range (more than 15-dB attenuation for one stage) and the low insertion loss in the ''open'' state. The performance of a fully...... integrated submillimeter receiver circuit which comprises a flux-flow oscillator (FFO) as local oscillator, a superconducting variable attenuator, and a microwave SIS detector with tuned-out capacitance is also reported....

  3. X-Ray Attenuation Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryutov, D.; Toor, A.

    2000-03-03

    To minimize the pulse-to-pulse variation, the LCLS FEL must operate at saturation, i.e. 10 orders of magnitude brighter spectral brilliance than 3rd-generation light sources. At this intensity, ultra-high vacuums and windowless transport are required. Many of the experiments, however, will need to be conducted at a much lower intensity thereby requiring a reliable means to reduce the x-ray intensity by many orders of magnitude without increasing the pulse-to-pulse variation. In this report we consider a possible solution for controlled attenuation of the LCLS x-ray radiation. We suggest using for this purpose a windowless gas-filled cell with the differential pumping. Although this scheme is easily realizable in principle, it has to be demonstrated that the attenuator can be made short enough to be practical and that the gas loads delivered to the vacuum line of sight (LOS) are acceptable. We are not going to present a final, optimized design. Instead, we will provide a preliminary analysis showing that the whole concept is robust and is worth further study. The spatial structure of the LCLS x-ray pulse at the location of the attenuator is shown in Fig. 1. The central high-intensity component, due to the FEL, has a FWHM of {approx}100 {micro}m. A second component, due to the undulator's broad band spontaneous radiation is seen as a much lower intensity ''halo'' with a FWHM of 1 mm. We discuss two versions of the attenuation cell. The first is directed towards a controlled attenuation of the FEL up to the 4 orders of magnitude in the intensity, with the spontaneous radiation halo being eliminated by collimators. In the second version, the spontaneous radiation is not sacrificed but the FEL component (as well as the first harmonic of the spontaneous radiation) gets attenuated by a more modest factor up to 100. We will make all the estimates assuming that the gas used in the attenuator is Xenon and that the energy of the FEL is 8.25 keV. At

  4. Measurements of frequency dependent shear wave attenuation in sedimentary basins using induced earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Tom; Wegler, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    Modeling of peak ground velocity caused by induced earthquakes requires detailed knowledge about seismic attenuation properties of the subsurface. Especially shear wave attenuation is important, because shear waves usually show the largest amplitude in high frequency seismograms. We report intrinsic and scattering attenuation coefficients of shear waves near three geothermal reservoirs in Germany for frequencies between 2 Hz and 50 Hz. The geothermal plants are located in the sedimentary basins of the upper Rhine graben (Insheim and Landau) and the Molasse basin (Unterhaching). The method optimizes the fit between Green's functions for the acoustic, isotropic radiative transfer theory and observed energy densities of induced earthquakes. The inversion allows the determination of scattering and intrinsic attenuation, site corrections, and spectral source energies for the investigated frequency bands. We performed the inversion at the three sites for events with a magnitude between 0.7 and 2. We determined a transport mean free path of 70 km for Unterhaching. For Landau and Insheim the transport mean free path depends on frequency. It ranges from 2 km (at 2 Hz) to 30 km (at 40 Hz) for Landau and from 9 km to 50 km for Insheim. The quality factor for intrinsic attenuation is constant for frequencies smaller than 10 Hz at all three sites. It is around 100 for Unterhaching and 200 for Landau and Insheim with higher values above 10 Hz.

  5. Phenomenological description of phase inversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piela, K.; Ooms, G.; Sengers, J.V.

    2009-01-01

    We propose an extended Ginzburg-Landau model for a description of the ambivalence region associated with the phenomenon of phase inversion observed in dispersed water-oil flow through a pipe. In analogy to the classical mean-field theory of phase transitions, it is shown that a good quantitative rep

  6. Inversion of the perturbation series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amore, Paolo [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Colima, Bernal DIaz del Castillo 340, Colima, Colima (Mexico); Fernandez, Francisco M [INIFTA (Conicet, UNLP), Division Quimica Teorica, Diag 113 S/N, Sucursal 4, Casilla de Correo 16, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

    2008-01-18

    We investigate the inversion of the perturbation series and its resummation, and prove that it is related to a recently developed parametric perturbation theory. Results for some illustrative examples show that in some cases series reversion may improve the accuracy of the results.

  7. Seismic inversion with generalized Radon transform based on local second-order approximation of scattered field in acoustic media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Wei; Mao, Weijian; Li, Xuelei; Li, Wuqun

    2014-08-01

    Sound velocity inversion problem based on scattering theory is formulated in terms of a nonlinear integral equation associated with scattered field. Because of its nonlinearity, in practice, linearization algorisms (Born/single scattering approximation) are widely used to obtain an approximate inversion solution. However, the linearized strategy is not congruent with seismic wave propagation mechanics in strong perturbation (heterogeneous) medium. In order to partially dispense with the weak perturbation assumption of the Born approximation, we present a new approach from the following two steps: firstly, to handle the forward scattering by taking into account the second-order Born approximation, which is related to generalized Radon transform (GRT) about quadratic scattering potential; then to derive a nonlinear quadratic inversion formula by resorting to inverse GRT. In our formulation, there is a significant quadratic term regarding scattering potential, and it can provide an amplitude correction for inversion results beyond standard linear inversion. The numerical experiments demonstrate that the linear single scattering inversion is only good in amplitude for relative velocity perturbation () of background media up to 10 %, and its inversion errors are unacceptable for the perturbation beyond 10 %. In contrast, the quadratic inversion can give more accurate amplitude-preserved recovery for the perturbation up to 40 %. Our inversion scheme is able to manage double scattering effects by estimating a transmission factor from an integral over a small area, and therefore, only a small portion of computational time is added to the original linear migration/inversion process.

  8. Advanced space recovery systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wailes, William K.

    1989-01-01

    The design evolution of a space recovery system designed by a NASA-contracted study is described, with particular attention given to the design of a recovery system for a propulsion/avionics module (P/AM), which weighs 60,000 lb at the recovery initiation and achieves subsonic terminal descent at or above 50,000 ft msl. The components of the recovery system concept are described together with the operational sequences of the recovery. The recovery system concept offers low cost, low weight, good performance, a potential for pinpoint landing, and an operational flexibility.

  9. Reconstruction of bremsstrahlung spectra from attenuation data using generalized simulated annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menin, O H; Martinez, A S; Costa, A M

    2016-05-01

    A generalized simulated annealing algorithm, combined with a suitable smoothing regularization function is used to solve the inverse problem of X-ray spectrum reconstruction from attenuation data. The approach is to set the initial acceptance and visitation temperatures and to standardize the terms of objective function to automate the algorithm to accommodate different spectra ranges. Experiments with both numerical and measured attenuation data are presented. Results show that the algorithm reconstructs spectra shapes accurately. It should be noted that in this algorithm, the regularization function was formulated to guarantee a smooth spectrum, thus, the presented technique does not apply to X-ray spectrum where characteristic radiation are present. PMID:26943902

  10. Inverse Kinematic Control of Humanoids Under Joint Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inhyeok Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose an inverse kinematic control framework for a position controlled humanoid robot with bounded joint range, velocity, and acceleration limits. The proposed framework comprises two components, an inverse kinematics algorithm and a damping controller. The proposed IKTC (Inverse Kinematics with Task Corrections algorithm is based on the second order task‐ priority method in order to ensure the velocity‐continuity of the solution. When the minimum norm solution exceeds the joint bounds, the problem is treated as a quadratic optimization problem with box constraints; an optimal task correction that lets the solution satisfy the constraints is found. In order to express the three kinds of joint constraints as a second order box constraint, a novel method is also proposed. The joint stiffness of a position controlled humanoid robot necessitates a damping controller to attenuate jolts caused by repeated contacts. We design a damping controller by using an inverted pendulum model with a compliant joint that takes into account the compliance around the foot. By using ZMP [20] measurement, the proposed damping controller is applicable not only in SSP (Single Support Phase but also in DSP (Double Support Phase. The validity of the proposed methods is shown by imitating a captured whole‐body human motion with a position controlled humanoid robot.

  11. Applications of inverse pattern projection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wansong; Bothe, Thorsten; Kalms, Michael K.; von Kopylow, Christoph; Jueptner, Werner P. O.

    2003-05-01

    Fast and robust 3D quality control as well as fast deformation measurement is of particular importance for industrial inspection. Additionally a direct response about measured properties is desired. Therefore, robust optical techniques are needed which use as few images as possible for measurement and visualize results in an efficient way. One promising technique for this aim is the inverse pattern projection which has the following advantages: The technique codes the information of a preceding measurement into the projected inverse pattern. Thus, it is possible to do differential measurements using only one camera frame for each state. Additionally, the results are optimized straight fringes for sampling which are independent of the object curvature. The hardware needs are low as just a programmable projector and a standard camera are necessary. The basic idea of inverse pattern projection, necessary algorithms and found optimizations are demonstrated, roughly. Evaluation techniques were found to preserve a high quality phase measurement under imperfect conditions. The different application fields can be sorted out by the type of pattern used for inverse projection. We select two main topics for presentation. One is the incremental (one image per state) deformation measurement which is a promising technique for high speed deformation measurements. A video series of a wavering flag with projected inverse pattern was evaluated to show the complete deformation series. The other application is the optical feature marking (augmented reality) that allows to map any measured result directly onto the object under investigation. Any properties can be visualized directly on the object"s surface which makes inspections easier than with use of a separated indicating device. The general ability to straighten any kind of information on 3D surfaces is shown while preserving an exact mapping of camera image and object parts. In many cases this supersedes an additional monitor to

  12. Compact plasmonic variable optical attenuator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leosson, Kristjan; Rosenzveig, Tiberiu; Hermannsson, Pétur Gordon;

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate plasmonic nanowire-based thermo-optic variable optical attenuators operating in the 1525-1625 nm wavelength range. The devices have a footprint as low as 1 mm, extinction ratio exceeding 40 dB, driving voltage below 3 V, and full modulation bandwidth of 1 kHz. The polarization...

  13. An adaptive noise attenuation method for edge and amplitude preservation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cai Han-Peng; He Zhen-Hua; Li Ya-Lin; He Guang-Ming; Zou Wen; Zhang Dong-Jun; Liu Pu

    2014-01-01

    Noise intensity distributed in seismic data varies with different frequencies or frequency bands; thus, noise attenuation on the full-frequency band affects the dynamic properties of the seismic reflection signal and the subsequent seismic data interpretation, reservoir description, hydrocarbon detection, etc. Hence, we propose an adaptive noise attenuation method for edge and amplitude preservation, wherein the wavelet packet transform is used to decompose the full-band seismic signal into multiband data and then process these data using nonlinear anisotropic dip-oriented edge-preservingfi ltering. In the fi ltering, the calculated diffusion tensor from the structure tensor can be exploited to establish the direction of smoothing. In addition, the fault confidence measure and discontinuity operator can be used to preserve the structural and stratigraphic discontinuities and edges, and the decorrelation criteria can be used to establish the number of iterations. These parameters can minimize the intervention and subjectivity of the interpreter, and simplify the application of the proposed method. We applied the proposed method to synthetic and real 3D marine seismic data. We found that the proposed method could be used to attenuate noise in seismic data while preserving the effective discontinuity information and amplitude characteristics in seismic refl ection waves, providing high-quality data for interpretation and analysis such as high-resolution processing, attribute analysis, and inversion.

  14. Attenuation Tomography of Sierra Negra Volcano of the Galapagos Archipelago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodd, R.; Lees, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Following relocation of events with the double-difference location algorithm (HypoDD), we apply tomographic methods to extract 3D attenuation models illuminating the plumbing system of the Sierra Negra Caldera of the Galapagos Archipelago. The dataset consists of 1737 events recorded from July 2009 to June 2011 on the 17-station SIGNET broadband seismic array. We use t* spectral decay methods for both P- and S- phases with the clustered locations to highlight locations where significant variations in Q suggest the presence of magma melt. While the presence of a magma sill, at least 2 km depth, is indicated by InSAR and GPS studies, the delineated magma body has not been explored in detail. The lower bound of the proposed magma accumulation is still under question and thus forms the primary target of this research. Melt replenishment and degassing of the magma sill is believed to cause inflation and/or deflation of the caldera floor. Imaging the extent of the magma sill will provide insight into the feeder system and deformation process of the Sierra Negra caldera. Detailed relocation, Qp and Qs inversion, as well as estimates of the scattering attenuation using coda-normalization technique will be presented. The close relationship between seismic attenuation and the thermal state of the magmatic system suggests we can distinguish melt and/or fluid regions within the Sierra Negra plumbing system.

  15. Stormwater Attenuation by Green Roofs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, A.; O'Carroll, D. M.; Robinson, C. E.; Smart, C. C.

    2014-12-01

    Innovative municipal stormwater management technologies are urgently required in urban centers. Inadequate stormwater management can lead to excessive flooding, channel erosion, decreased stream baseflows, and degraded water quality. A major source of urban stormwater is unused roof space. Green roofs can be used as a stormwater management tool to reduce roof generated stormwater and generally improve the quality of runoff. With recent legislation in some North American cities, including Toronto, requiring the installation of green roofs on large buildings, research on the effectiveness of green roofs for stormwater management is important. This study aims to assess the hydrologic response of an extensive sedum green roof in London, Ontario, with emphasis on the response to large precipitation events that stress municipal stormwater infrastructure. A green roof rapidly reaches field capacity during large storm events and can show significantly different behavior before and after field capacity. At field capacity a green roof has no capillary storage left for retention of stormwater, but may still be an effective tool to attenuate peak runoff rates by transport through the green roof substrate. The attenuation of green roofs after field capacity is linked to gravity storage, where gravity storage is the water that is temporarily stored and can drain freely over time after field capacity has been established. Stormwater attenuation of a modular experimental green roof is determined from water balance calculations at 1-minute intervals. Data is used to evaluate green roof attenuation and the impact of field capacity on peak flow rates and gravity storage. In addition, a numerical model is used to simulate event based stormwater attenuation. This model is based off of the Richards equation and supporting theory of multiphase flow through porous media.

  16. EPA Recovery Mapper

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The EPA Recovery Mapper is an Internet interactive mapping application that allows users to discover information about every American Recovery and Reinvestment Act...

  17. Multiple attenuation to reflection seismic data using Radon filter and Wave Equation Multiple Rejection (WEMR) method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erlangga, Mokhammad Puput [Geophysical Engineering, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Ganesha Street no.10 Basic Science B Buliding fl.2-3 Bandung, 40132, West Java Indonesia puput.erlangga@gmail.com (Indonesia)

    2015-04-16

    Separation between signal and noise, incoherent or coherent, is important in seismic data processing. Although we have processed the seismic data, the coherent noise is still mixing with the primary signal. Multiple reflections are a kind of coherent noise. In this research, we processed seismic data to attenuate multiple reflections in the both synthetic and real seismic data of Mentawai. There are several methods to attenuate multiple reflection, one of them is Radon filter method that discriminates between primary reflection and multiple reflection in the τ-p domain based on move out difference between primary reflection and multiple reflection. However, in case where the move out difference is too small, the Radon filter method is not enough to attenuate the multiple reflections. The Radon filter also produces the artifacts on the gathers data. Except the Radon filter method, we also use the Wave Equation Multiple Elimination (WEMR) method to attenuate the long period multiple reflection. The WEMR method can attenuate the long period multiple reflection based on wave equation inversion. Refer to the inversion of wave equation and the magnitude of the seismic wave amplitude that observed on the free surface, we get the water bottom reflectivity which is used to eliminate the multiple reflections. The WEMR method does not depend on the move out difference to attenuate the long period multiple reflection. Therefore, the WEMR method can be applied to the seismic data which has small move out difference as the Mentawai seismic data. The small move out difference on the Mentawai seismic data is caused by the restrictiveness of far offset, which is only 705 meter. We compared the real free multiple stacking data after processing with Radon filter and WEMR process. The conclusion is the WEMR method can more attenuate the long period multiple reflection than the Radon filter method on the real (Mentawai) seismic data.

  18. 3-D joint inversion of the magnetotelluric phase tensor and vertical magnetic transfer functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietze, Kristina; Ritter, Oliver; Egbert, Gary D.

    2015-11-01

    With advancing computational resources, 3-D inversion techniques have become feasible in recent years and are now a more widely used tool for magnetotelluric (MT) data interpretation. Galvanic distortion caused by small-scale near-surface inhomogeneities remains an obstacle for 3-D MT inversion which so far has experienced little attention. If not considered properly, the effect on 3-D inversion can be immense and result in erroneous subsurface models and interpretations. To tackle the problem we implemented inversion of the distortion-free phase tensor into the ModEM inversion package. The dimensionless phase tensor components describe only variations of the conductivity structure. When inverting these data, particular care has to be taken of the conductivity structure in the a priori model, which provides the reference frame when transferring the information from phase tensors into absolute conductivity values. Our results obtained with synthetic data show that phase tensor inversion can recover the regional conductivity structure in presence of galvanic distortion if the a priori model provides a reasonable assumption for the regional resistivity average. Joint inversion of phase tensor data and vertical magnetic transfer functions improves recovery of the absolute resistivity structure and is less dependent on the prior model. We also used phase tensor inversion for a data set of more than 250 MT sites from the central San Andreas fault, California, where a number of sites showed significant galvanic distortion. We find the regional structure of the phase tensor inversion results compatible with previously obtained models from impedance inversion. In the vicinity of distorted sites, phase tensor inversion models exhibit more homogeneous/smoother conductivity structures.

  19. Recovery from mental illness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kirsten Schultz; Friis, Vivi Soegaard; Haxholm, Birthe Lodahl;

    2015-01-01

    Mental health services strive to implement a recovery-oriented approach to rehabilitation. Little is known about service users' perception of the recovery approach. The aim is to explore the service user's perspectives on facilitators and barriers associated with recovery. Twelve residents living...

  20. Reconstruction of bremsstrahlung spectra from attenuation data using generalized simulated annealing

    CERN Document Server

    Menin, Olavo Henrique; da Costa, Alessandro Martins

    2014-01-01

    The throughout knowledge of a X-ray beam spectrum is mandatory to assess the quality of its source device. Since the techniques to directly measurement such spectra are expensive and laborious, the X-ray spectrum reconstruction using attenuation data has been a promising alternative. However, such reconstruction corresponds mathematically to an inverse, nonlinear and ill-posed problem. Therefore, to solve it the use of powerful optimization algorithms and good regularization functions is required. Here, we present a generalized simulated annealing algorithm combined with a suitable smoothing regularization function to solve the X-ray spectrum reconstruction inverse problem. We also propose an approach to set the initial acceptance and visitation temperatures and a standardization of the objective function terms to automatize the algorithm to address with different spectra range. Numerical tests considering three different reference spectra with its attenuation curve are presented. Results show that the algori...

  1. Analysis of RAE-1 inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedland, D. A.; Degonia, P. K.

    1974-01-01

    The RAE-1 spacecraft inversion performed October 31, 1972 is described based upon the in-orbit dynamical data in conjunction with results obtained from previously developed computer simulation models. The computer simulations used are predictive of the satellite dynamics, including boom flexing, and are applicable during boom deployment and retraction, inter-phase coast periods, and post-deployment operations. Attitude data, as well as boom tip data, were analyzed in order to obtain a detailed description of the dynamical behavior of the spacecraft during and after the inversion. Runs were made using the computer model and the results were analyzed and compared with the real time data. Close agreement between the actual recorded spacecraft attitude and the computer simulation results was obtained.

  2. Southern California Adjoint Source Inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tromp, J.; Kim, Y.

    2007-12-01

    Southern California Centroid-Moment Tensor (CMT) solutions with 9 components (6 moment tensor elements, latitude, longitude, and depth) are sought to minimize a misfit function computed from waveform differences. The gradient of a misfit function is obtained based upon two numerical simulations for each earthquake: one forward calculation for the southern California model, and an adjoint calculation that uses time-reversed signals at the receivers. Conjugate gradient and square-root variable metric methods are used to iteratively improve the earthquake source model while reducing the misfit function. The square-root variable metric algorithm has the advantage of providing a direct approximation to the posterior covariance operator. We test the inversion procedure by perturbing each component of the CMT solution, and see how the algorithm converges. Finally, we demonstrate full inversion capabilities using data for real Southern California earthquakes.

  3. Ultrahigh-intensity inverse bremsstrahlung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyukov, I. Yu.; Rax, J.-M.

    1999-01-01

    We study inverse bremsstrahlung in the ultrahigh intensity relativistic regime. The fully relativistic ultrahigh intensity absorption (emission) coefficient is derived for an arbitrary scattering potential and small-angle scattering. We find that in the Coulomb field case this absorption (emission) coefficient can be calculated as a function of the quiver energy, drift momentum, and impact parameter in two complementary regimes: (i) for remote collisions when the impact parameter is larger than the amplitude of the quiver motion, and (ii) for instantaneous collisions when the scattering time is shorter than the period of the wave. Both circular and linear polarizations are considered, and this study reveals that in this relativistic regime inverse bremsstrahlung absorption can be viewed as a harmonic Compton resonance heating of the laser-driven electron by the virtual photon of the ion Coulomb field. The relativistic modification of Marcuse's effect [Bell Syst. Tech. J. 41, 1557 (1962)] are also discussed, and relations with previous nonrelativistic results are elucidated.

  4. Phenomenological description of phase inversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piela, K; Ooms, G; Sengers, J V

    2009-02-01

    We propose an extended Ginzburg-Landau model for a description of the ambivalence region associated with the phenomenon of phase inversion observed in dispersed water-oil flow through a pipe. In analogy to the classical mean-field theory of phase transitions, it is shown that a good quantitative representation of the ambivalence region is obtained by using the injected phase volume fraction and a friction factor as the appropriate physical parameters.

  5. Inverse Design of Electron Lens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The inverae design of electron lens is reelized by two different methods in this paper. One isdamped leastsquare method and the other is the artificial neural network method. Their merits and defects are discussed accordingto our calculation results in the psper. In the condition of selecting the learning samples properly, the artificial neuralnetwork has obvious advantages in the inverse design of electron lens. It is an effective method to solve the inversedesign problem in the electron optic system.

  6. ISIR: Independent Sliced Inverse Regression

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    International audience In this paper we consider a semiparametric regression model involving a $p$-dimensional explanatory variable ${\\mathbf{x}}$ and including a dimension reduction of ${\\mathbf{x}}$ via an index $B'{\\mathbf{x}}$. In this model, the main goal is to estimate $B$ and to predict the real response variable $Y$ conditionally to ${\\mathbf{x}}$. A standard approach is based on sliced inverse regression (SIR). We propose a new version of this method: the independent sliced invers...

  7. Tiling Spaces are Inverse Limits

    OpenAIRE

    Sadun, Lorenzo

    2002-01-01

    Let M be an arbitrary Riemannian homogeneous space, and let Omega be a space of tilings of M, with finite local complexity (relative to some symmetry group Gamma) and closed in the natural topology. Then Omega is the inverse limit of a sequence of compact finite-dimensional branched manifolds. The branched manifolds are (finite) unions of cells, constructed from the tiles themselves and the group Gamma. This result extends previous results of Anderson and Putnam, of Ormes, Radin and Sadun, of...

  8. Subadditive functions and their (pseudo-)inverses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerdal, Lars Peter

    2006-01-01

    The paper considers non-negative increasing functions on intervals with left endpoint closed at zero and investigates the duality between subadditivity and superadditivity via the inverse function and pseudo-inverses...

  9. ENHANCEMENTS TO NATURAL ATTENUATION: SELECTED CASE STUDIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vangelas, K; W. H. Albright, W; E. S. Becvar, E; C. H. Benson, C; T. O. Early, T; E. Hood, E; P. M. Jardine, P; M. Lorah, M; E. Majche, E; D. Major, D; W. J. Waugh, W; G. Wein, G; O. R. West, O

    2007-05-15

    In 2003 the US Department of Energy (DOE) embarked on a project to explore an innovative approach to remediation of subsurface contaminant plumes that focused on introducing mechanisms for augmenting natural attenuation to achieve site closure. Termed enhanced attenuation (EA), this approach has drawn its inspiration from the concept of monitored natural attenuation (MNA).

  10. From time inversion to nonlinear QED

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Wei Min

    2000-01-01

    In Minkowski flat space-time, it is perceived that time inversion is unitary rather than antiunitary, with energy being a time vector changing sign under time inversion. The Dirac equation, in the case of electromagnetic interaction, is not invariant under unitary time inversion, giving rise to a ``Klein paradox''. To render unitary time inversion invariance, a nonlinear wave equation is constructed, in which the ``Klein paradox'' disappears. In the case of Coulomb interaction, the revised no...

  11. Generalized Inverses of Matrices over Rings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩瑞珠; 陈建龙

    1992-01-01

    Let R be a ring,*be an involutory function of the set of all finite matrices over R. In this pa-per,necessary and sufficient conditions are given for a matrix to have a (1,3)-inverse,(1,4)-inverse,or Morre-Penrose inverse,relative to *.Some results about generalized inverses of matrices over division rings are generalized and improved.

  12. SEISMIC ATTENUATION FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel Walls; M.T. Taner; Gary Mavko; Jack Dvorkin

    2002-01-01

    In Section 1 of this first report we will describe the work we are doing to collect and analyze rock physics data for the purpose of modeling seismic attenuation from other measurable quantities such as porosity, water saturation, clay content and net stress. This work and other empirical methods to be presented later, will form the basis for ''Q pseudo-well modeling'' that is a key part of this project. In Section 2 of this report, we will show the fundamentals of a new method to extract Q, dispersion, and attenuation from field seismic data. The method is called Gabor-Morlet time-frequency decomposition. This technique has a number of advantages including greater stability and better time resolution than spectral ratio methods.

  13. Chlorine signal attenuation in concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, A A; Maslehuddin, M; ur-Rehman, Khateeb; Al-Amoudi, O S B

    2015-11-01

    The intensity of prompt gamma-ray was measured at various depths from chlorine-contaminated silica fume (SF) concrete slab concrete specimens using portable neutron generator-based prompt gamma-ray setup. The intensity of 6.11MeV chloride gamma-rays was measured from the chloride contaminated slab at distance of 15.25, 20.25, 25.25, 30.25 and 35.25cm from neutron target in a SF cement concrete slab specimens. Due to attenuation of thermal neutron flux and emitted gamma-ray intensity in SF cement concrete at various depths, the measured intensity of chlorine gamma-rays decreases non-linearly with increasing depth in concrete. A good agreement was noted between the experimental results and the results of Monte Carlo simulation. This study has provided useful experimental data for evaluating the chloride contamination in the SF concrete utilizing gamma-ray attenuation method.

  14. Battleground Energy Recovery Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bullock, Daniel [USDOE Gulf Coast Clean Energy Application Center, Woodlands, TX (United States)

    2011-12-31

    In October 2009, the project partners began a 36-month effort to develop an innovative, commercial-scale demonstration project incorporating state-of-the-art waste heat recovery technology at Clean Harbors, Inc., a large hazardous waste incinerator site located in Deer Park, Texas. With financial support provided by the U.S. Department of Energy, the Battleground Energy Recovery Project was launched to advance waste heat recovery solutions into the hazardous waste incineration market, an area that has seen little adoption of heat recovery in the United States. The goal of the project was to accelerate the use of energy-efficient, waste heat recovery technology as an alternative means to produce steam for industrial processes. The project had three main engineering and business objectives: Prove Feasibility of Waste Heat Recovery Technology at a Hazardous Waste Incinerator Complex; Provide Low-cost Steam to a Major Polypropylene Plant Using Waste Heat; and Create a Showcase Waste Heat Recovery Demonstration Project.

  15. Attenuation compensation for least-squares reverse time migration using the viscoacoustic-wave equation

    KAUST Repository

    Dutta, Gaurav

    2014-10-01

    Strong subsurface attenuation leads to distortion of amplitudes and phases of seismic waves propagating inside the earth. Conventional acoustic reverse time migration (RTM) and least-squares reverse time migration (LSRTM) do not account for this distortion, which can lead to defocusing of migration images in highly attenuative geologic environments. To correct for this distortion, we used a linearized inversion method, denoted as Qp-LSRTM. During the leastsquares iterations, we used a linearized viscoacoustic modeling operator for forward modeling. The adjoint equations were derived using the adjoint-state method for back propagating the residual wavefields. The merit of this approach compared with conventional RTM and LSRTM was that Qp-LSRTM compensated for the amplitude loss due to attenuation and could produce images with better balanced amplitudes and more resolution below highly attenuative layers. Numerical tests on synthetic and field data illustrated the advantages of Qp-LSRTM over RTM and LSRTM when the recorded data had strong attenuation effects. Similar to standard LSRTM, the sensitivity tests for background velocity and Qp errors revealed that the liability of this method is the requirement for smooth and accurate migration velocity and attenuation models.

  16. Anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust beneath the Coso volcanic regionn, California ( USA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, C.; Ho-Liu, P.; Rinn, D.; Hiroo, Kanamori

    1988-01-01

    We use seismograms of local earthquakes to image relative shear wave attenuation structure in the shallow crust beneath the region containing the Coso volcanic-geothermal area of E California. Seismograms of 16 small earthquakes show SV amplitudes which are greatly diminished at some azimuths and takeoff angles, indicating strong lateral variations in S wave attenuation in the area. 3-D images of the relative S wave attenuation structure are obtained from forward modeling and a back projection inversion of the amplitude data. The results indicate regions within a 20 by 30 by 10 km volume of the shallow crust (one shallower than 5 km) that severely attenuate SV waves passing through them. These anomalies lie beneath the Indian Wells Valley, 30 km S of the Coso volcanic field, and are coincident with the epicentral locations of recent earthquake swarms. No anomalous attenuation is seen beneath the Coso volcanic field above about 5 km depth. Geologic relations and the coincidence of anomalously slow P wave velocities suggest that the attenuation anomalies may be related to magmatism along the E Sierra front.-from Authors

  17. Attenuation of mitochondrial, but not cytosolic, Ca2+ overload reduces myocardial injury induced by ischemia and reperfusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-mei CAO; Wing-yee YAN; Jing LIU; Kenneth WL KAM; Shi-zhong ZHAN; James SK SHAM; Tak-ming WONG

    2006-01-01

    Aim: Attenuation of mitochondrial Ca2+ ([Ca2+]m, but not cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]c), overload improves contractile recovery. We hypothesized that attenuation of [Ca2+]m, but not [Ca2+]c, overload confers cardioprotection against ischemia/ reperfusion-induced injury. Methods: Infarct size from isolated perfused rat heart, cell viability, and electrically-induced Ca2+ transient in isolated rat ventricular myocytes were measured. We determined the effects of BAPTA-AM, a Ca2+ chelator, at concentrations that abolish the overload of both [Ca2+]c and [Ca2+]m, and ruthenium red, an inhibitor of mitochondrial uniporter of Ca2+ transport, at concentrations that abolish the overload of [Ca2+]m, but not [Ca2+]c, on cardiac injury induced by ischemia/reperfusion. Results: Attenuation of both [Ca2+]m and [Ca2+]c by BAPTA-AM, and attenuation of [Ca2+]m, but not [Ca2+]c, overload by ruthenium red, reduced the cardiac injury observations, indicating the importance of [Ca2+]m in cardioprotection and contractile recovery in response to ischemia/reperfusion. Conclusion: The study has provided unequivocal evidence using a cause-effect approach that attenuation of [Ca2+]m, but not [Ca2+]c, overload is responsible for cardioprotection against ischemia/reperfusion-induced injury. We also confirmed the previous observation that attenuation of [Ca2+]m, but not [Ca2+]c, by ruthenium red improves contractile recovery following ischemia/ reperfusion.

  18. -Colour even Self-Inverse Compositions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yu-hong Guo

    2010-02-01

    An -colour even self-inverse composition is defined as an -colour self-inverse composition with even parts. In this paper, we get generating functions, explicit formulas and recurrence formulas for -colour even self-inverse compositions. One new binomial identity is also obtained.

  19. Recombination rate predicts inversion size in Diptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres, M; Barbadilla, A; Ruiz, A

    1999-09-01

    Most species of the Drosophila genus and other Diptera are polymorphic for paracentric inversions. A common observation is that successful inversions are of intermediate size. We test here the hypothesis that the selected property is the recombination length of inversions, not their physical length. If so, physical length of successful inversions should be negatively correlated with recombination rate across species. This prediction was tested by a comprehensive statistical analysis of inversion size and recombination map length in 12 Diptera species for which appropriate data are available. We found that (1) there is a wide variation in recombination map length among species; (2) physical length of successful inversions varies greatly among species and is inversely correlated with the species recombination map length; and (3) neither the among-species variation in inversion length nor the correlation are observed in unsuccessful inversions. The clear differences between successful and unsuccessful inversions point to natural selection as the most likely explanation for our results. Presumably the selective advantage of an inversion increases with its length, but so does its detrimental effect on fertility due to double crossovers. Our analysis provides the strongest and most extensive evidence in favor of the notion that the adaptive value of inversions stems from their effect on recombination.

  20. Inverse Computation and the Universal Resolving Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    We survey fundamental concepts for inverse programming and thenpresent the Uni v ersal Resolving Algorithm, an algorithm for inverse computation in a first-orde r , functional programming language. We discuss the key concepts of the algorithm, including a three-step approach based on the notion of a perfect process tree, and demonstrate our implementation with several examples of inverse computation.

  1. Mechanisms of geometrical seismic attenuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor B. Morozov

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In several recent reports, we have explained the frequency dependence of the apparent seismic quality-factor (Q observed in many studies according to the effects of geometrical attenuation, which was defined as the zero-frequency limit of the temporal attenuation coefficient. In particular, geometrical attenuation was found to be positive for most waves traveling within the lithosphere. Here, we present three theoretical models that illustrate the origin of this geometrical attenuation, and we investigate the causes of its preferential positive values. In addition, we discuss the physical basis and limitations of both the conventional and new attenuation models. For waves in media with slowly varying properties, geometrical attenuation is caused by variations in the wavefront curvature, which can be both positive (for defocusing and negative (for focusing. In media with velocity/density contrasts, incoherent reflectivity leads to geometrical-attenuation coefficients which are proportional to the mean squared reflectivity and are always positive. For «coherent» reflectivity, the geometrical attenuation is approximately zero, and the attenuation process can be described according to the concept of «scattering Q». However, the true meaning of this parameter is in describing the mean reflectivity within the medium, and not that of the traditional resonator quality factor known in mechanics. The general conclusion from these models is that non-zero and often positive levels of geometrical attenuation are common in realistic, heterogeneous media, both observationally and theoretically. When transformed into the conventional Q-factor form, this positive geometrical attenuation leads to Q values that quickly increase with frequency. These predictions show that the positive frequency-dependent Q observed in many datasets might represent artifacts of the transformations of the attenuation coefficients into Q.

  1. Imaging Rayleigh wave attenuation with USArray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xueyang; Dalton, Colleen A.; Jin, Ge; Gaherty, James B.; Shen, Yang

    2016-07-01

    The EarthScope USArray provides an opportunity to obtain detailed images of the continental upper mantle at an unprecedented scale. The majority of mantle models derived from USArray data to date contain spatial variations in seismic-wave speed; however, in many cases these data sets do not by themselves allow a non-unique interpretation. Joint interpretation of seismic attenuation and velocity models can improve upon the interpretations based only on velocity and provide important constraints on the temperature, composition, melt content, and volatile content of the mantle. The surface wave amplitudes that constrain upper-mantle attenuation are sensitive to factors in addition to attenuation, including the earthquake source excitation, focusing and defocusing by elastic structure, and local site amplification. Because of the difficulty of isolating attenuation from these other factors, little is known about the attenuation structure of the North American upper mantle. In this study, Rayleigh wave traveltime and amplitude in the period range 25-100 s are measured using an interstation cross-correlation technique, which takes advantage of waveform similarity at nearby stations. Several estimates of Rayleigh wave attenuation and site amplification are generated at each period, using different approaches to separate the effects of attenuation and local site amplification on amplitude. It is assumed that focusing and defocusing effects can be described by the Laplacian of the traveltime field. All approaches identify the same large-scale patterns in attenuation, including areas where the attenuation values are likely contaminated by unmodelled focusing and defocusing effects. Regionally averaged attenuation maps are constructed after removal of the contaminated attenuation values, and the variations in intrinsic shear attenuation that are suggested by these Rayleigh wave attenuation maps are explored.

  2. Inverse problems and inverse scattering of plane waves

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh Roy, Dilip N

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this text is to present the theory and mathematics of inverse scattering, in a simple way, to the many researchers and professionals who use it in their everyday research. While applications range across a broad spectrum of disciplines, examples in this text will focus primarly, but not exclusively, on acoustics. The text will be especially valuable for those applied workers who would like to delve more deeply into the fundamentally mathematical character of the subject matter.Practitioners in this field comprise applied physicists, engineers, and technologists, whereas the theory is almost entirely in the domain of abstract mathematics. This gulf between the two, if bridged, can only lead to improvement in the level of scholarship in this highly important discipline. This is the book''s primary focus.

  3. Solution for Ill-Posed Inverse Kinematics of Robot Arm by Network Inversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takehiko Ogawa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the context of controlling a robot arm with multiple joints, the method of estimating the joint angles from the given end-effector coordinates is called inverse kinematics, which is a type of inverse problems. Network inversion has been proposed as a method for solving inverse problems by using a multilayer neural network. In this paper, network inversion is introduced as a method to solve the inverse kinematics problem of a robot arm with multiple joints, where the joint angles are estimated from the given end-effector coordinates. In general, inverse problems are affected by ill-posedness, which implies that the existence, uniqueness, and stability of their solutions are not guaranteed. In this paper, we show the effectiveness of applying network inversion with regularization, by which ill-posedness can be reduced, to the ill-posed inverse kinematics of an actual robot arm with multiple joints.

  4. Chocolate milk: a post-exercise recovery beverage for endurance sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchett, Kelly; Pritchett, Robert

    2012-01-01

    An optimal post-exercise nutrition regimen is fundamental for ensuring recovery. Therefore, research has aimed to examine post-exercise nutritional strategies for enhanced training stimuli. Chocolate milk has become an affordable recovery beverage for many athletes, taking the place of more expensive commercially available recovery beverages. Low-fat chocolate milk consists of a 4:1 carbohydrate:protein ratio (similar to many commercial recovery beverages) and provides fluids and sodium to aid in post-workout recovery. Consuming chocolate milk (1.0-1.5•g•kg(-1) h(-1)) immediately after exercise and again at 2 h post-exercise appears to be optimal for exercise recovery and may attenuate indices of muscle damage. Future research should examine the optimal amount, timing, and frequency of ingestion of chocolate milk on post-exercise recovery measures including performance, indices of muscle damage, and muscle glycogen resynthesis.

  5. SEISMIC ATTENUATION FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel Walls; M.T. Taner; Naum Derzhi; Gary Mavko; Jack Dvorkin

    2003-12-01

    We have developed and tested technology for a new type of direct hydrocarbon detection. The method uses inelastic rock properties to greatly enhance the sensitivity of surface seismic methods to the presence of oil and gas saturation. These methods include use of energy absorption, dispersion, and attenuation (Q) along with traditional seismic attributes like velocity, impedance, and AVO. Our approach is to combine three elements: (1) a synthesis of the latest rock physics understanding of how rock inelasticity is related to rock type, pore fluid types, and pore microstructure, (2) synthetic seismic modeling that will help identify the relative contributions of scattering and intrinsic inelasticity to apparent Q attributes, and (3) robust algorithms that extract relative wave attenuation attributes from seismic data. This project provides: (1) Additional petrophysical insight from acquired data; (2) Increased understanding of rock and fluid properties; (3) New techniques to measure reservoir properties that are not currently available; and (4) Provide tools to more accurately describe the reservoir and predict oil location and volumes. These methodologies will improve the industry's ability to predict and quantify oil and gas saturation distribution, and to apply this information through geologic models to enhance reservoir simulation. We have applied for two separate patents relating to work that was completed as part of this project.

  6. Magnetoelectric Composite Based Microwave Attenuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatarenko, A. S.; Srinivasan, G.

    2005-03-01

    Ferrite-ferroelectric composites are magnetoelectric (ME) due to their response to elastic and electromagnetic force fields. The ME composites are characterized by tensor permittivity, permeability and ME susceptibility. The unique combination of magnetic, electrical, and ME interactions, therefore, opens up the possibility of electric field tunable ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) based devices [1]. Here we discuss an ME attenuator operating at 9.3 GHz based on FMR in a layered sample consisting of lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate bonded to yttrium iron garnet (YIG) film on a gadolinium gallium garnet substrate. Electrical tuning is realized with the application of a control voltage due to ME effect; the shift is 0-15 Oe as E is increased from 0 to 3 kV/cm. If the attenuator is operated at FMR, the corresponding insertion loss will range from 25 dB to 2 dB. 1. S. Shastry and G. Srinivasan, M.I. Bichurin, V.M. Petrov, A.S. Tatarenko. Phys. Rev. B, 70 064416 (2004). - supported by grants the grants from the National Science Foundation (DMR-0302254), from Russian Ministry of Education (Å02-3.4-278) and from Universities of Russia Foundation (UNR 01.01.026).

  7. Normal mode extraction and environmental inversion from underwater acoustic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilsen, Tracianne Beesley

    2000-11-01

    The normal modes of acoustic propagation in the shallow ocean are extracted from sound recorded on a vertical line array (VLA) of hydrophones as a source travels nearby, and the extracted modes are used to invert for the environmental properties of the ocean. The mode extraction is accomplished by performing a singular value decomposition (SVD) of individual frequency components of the signal's temporally-averaged, spatial cross-spectral density matrix. The SVD produces a matrix containing a mutually orthogonal set of basis functions, which are proportional to the depth-dependent normal modes, and a diagonal matrix containing the singular values, which are proportional to the modal source excitations and mode eigenvalues. The extracted modes exist in the ocean at the time the signal is recorded and thus may be used to estimate the sound speed profile and bottom properties. The inversion scheme iteratively refines the environmental parameters using a Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm such that the modeled modes approach the data- extracted modes Simulations are performed to examine the robustness and practicality of the mode extraction and inversion techniques. Experimental data measured in the Hudson Canyon Area of the New Jersey Shelf are analyzed, and modes are successfully extracted at the frequencies of a towed source. Modes are also extracted from ambient noise recorded on the VLA during the experiment. Using data-extracted modes, inverted values of the water depth, the thickness of a thin first sediment layer, and the compressional sound speed at the top of the first layer are found to be in good agreement with historical values. The density, attenuation, and properties of the second layer are not well determined because the inversion method is only able to obtain reliable values for the parameters that influence the mode shapes in the water column.

  8. Optimization and inverse problems in electromagnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Wiak, Sławomir

    2003-01-01

    From 12 to 14 September 2002, the Academy of Humanities and Economics (AHE) hosted the workshop "Optimization and Inverse Problems in Electromagnetism". After this bi-annual event, a large number of papers were assembled and combined in this book. During the workshop recent developments and applications in optimization and inverse methodologies for electromagnetic fields were discussed. The contributions selected for the present volume cover a wide spectrum of inverse and optimal electromagnetic methodologies, ranging from theoretical to practical applications. A number of new optimal and inverse methodologies were proposed. There are contributions related to dedicated software. Optimization and Inverse Problems in Electromagnetism consists of three thematic chapters, covering: -General papers (survey of specific aspects of optimization and inverse problems in electromagnetism), -Methodologies, -Industrial Applications. The book can be useful to students of electrical and electronics engineering, computer sci...

  9. Northern California Seismic Attenuation: 3-D Qp and Qs models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhart-Phillips, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    The northern California crust exhibits a wide range of rock types and deformation processes which produce pronounced heterogeneity in regional attenuation. Using local earthquakes, 3-D Qp and Qs crustal models have been obtained for this region which includes the San Andreas fault system, the Central Valley, the Sierra Nevada batholith, and the Mendocino subduction volcanic system. Path attenuation t* values were determined from P and S spectra of 959 spatially distributed earthquakes, magnitude 2.5-6.0 from 2005-2014, using 1254 stations from NCEDC networks and IRIS Mendocino and Sierra Nevada temporary arrays. The t* data were used in Q inversions, using existing hypocenters and 3-D velocity models, with basic 10-km node spacing. The uneven data coverage was accounted for with linking of nodes into larger areas in order to provide useful Q images across the 3-D volume. The results at shallow depth (< 2 km) show very low Q in the Sacramento Delta, the Eureka area, and parts of the Bay Area. In the brittle crust, fault zones that have high seismicity exhibit low Q. In the lower crust, low Q is observed along fault zones that have large cumulative displacement and have experienced grain size reduction. Underlying active volcanic areas, low Q features are apparent below 20-km depth. Moderately high Q is associated with igneous rocks of the Sierra Nevada and Salinian block, while the Franciscan subduction complex shows moderately low Q. The most prominent high Q feature is related to the Great Valley Ophiolite.

  10. R-flurbiprofen attenuates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Katja; de Bruin, Natasja; Bishay, Philipp; Männich, Julia; Häussler, Annett; Altmann, Christine; Ferreirós, Nerea; Lötsch, Jörn; Ultsch, Alfred; Parnham, Michael J; Geisslinger, Gerd; Tegeder, Irmgard

    2014-11-01

    R-flurbiprofen is the non-cyclooxygenase inhibiting R-enantiomer of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug flurbiprofen, which was assessed as a remedy for Alzheimer's disease. Because of its anti-inflammatory, endocannabinoid-modulating and antioxidative properties, combined with low toxicity, the present study assessed R-flurbiprofen in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) models of multiple sclerosis in mice. Oral R-flurbiprofen prevented and attenuated primary progressive EAE in C57BL6/J mice and relapsing-remitting EAE in SJL mice, even if the treatment was initiated on or after the first flare of the disease. R-flurbiprofen reduced immune cell infiltration and microglia activation and inflammation in the spinal cord, brain and optic nerve and attenuated myelin destruction and EAE-evoked hyperalgesia. R-flurbiprofen treatment increased CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells, CTLA4(+) inhibitory T cells and interleukin-10, whereas the EAE-evoked upregulation of pro-inflammatory genes in the spinal cord was strongly reduced. The effects were associated with an increase of plasma and cortical endocannabinoids but decreased spinal prostaglandins, the latter likely due to R to S inversion. The promising results suggest potential efficacy of R-flurbiprofen in human MS, and its low toxicity may justify a clinical trial.

  11. Bayesian multitask inverse reinforcement learning

    CERN Document Server

    Dimitrakakis, Christos

    2011-01-01

    We generalise the problem of inverse reinforcement learning to multiple tasks, from a set of demonstrations. Each demonstration may represent one expert trying to solve a different task. Alternatively, one may see each demonstration as given by a different expert trying to solve the same task. Our main technical contribution is to solve the problem by formalising it as statistical preference elicitation, via a number of structured priors, whose form captures our biases about the relatedness of different tasks or expert policies. We show that our methodology allows us not only to learn to efficiently from multiple experts but to also effectively differentiate between the goals of each. Possible applications include analysing the intrinsic motivations of subjects in behavioural experiments and imitation learning from multiple teachers.

  12. Inverse Magnetic/Shear Catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    McInnes, Brett

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that very large magnetic fields are generated when the Quark-Gluon Plasma is formed during peripheral heavy-ion collisions. Lattice, holographic, and other studies strongly suggest that these fields may, for observationally relevant field values, induce ``inverse magnetic catalysis'', signalled by a lowering of the critical temperature for the chiral/deconfinement transition. The theoretical basis of this effect has recently attracted much attention; yet so far these investigations have not included another, equally dramatic consequence of the peripheral collision geometry: the QGP acquires a large angular momentum vector, parallel to the magnetic field. Here we use holographic techniques to argue that the angular momentum can also, independently, have an effect on transition temperatures, and we obtain a rough estimate of the relative effects of the presence of both a magnetic field and an angular momentum density. We find that the shearing angular momentum reinforces the effect of the magne...

  13. Inverse approach to design magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An inverse approach is always better to design an optimised magnet, where the field profile is known, rather than tuning the geometry of the magnet till the desired profile is achieved. We have developed an optimizer based on standard multi dimensional Newton-Raphson technique. The optimum geometry of a magnet is obtained by a combination of analytical and numerical methods. This code is versatile and can be used to design various magnets used in different applications. Here we present two different cases to show the efficiency of the code. First, we present the design of a solenoid magnet for a.c. susceptibility set up. Second, we describe the design of two pairs of Helmholtz coils for ion beam deflection. (author)

  14. Inverse Diffusion Theory of Photoacoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Bal, Guillaume

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyzes the reconstruction of diffusion and absorption parameters in an elliptic equation from knowledge of internal data. In the application of photo-acoustics, the internal data are the amount of thermal energy deposited by high frequency radiation propagating inside a domain of interest. These data are obtained by solving an inverse wave equation, which is well-studied in the literature. We show that knowledge of two internal data based on well-chosen boundary conditions uniquely determines two constitutive parameters in diffusion and Schroedinger equations. Stability of the reconstruction is guaranteed under additional geometric constraints of strict convexity. No geometric constraints are necessary when $2n$ internal data for well-chosen boundary conditions are available, where $n$ is spatial dimension. The set of well-chosen boundary conditions is characterized in terms of appropriate complex geometrical optics (CGO) solutions.

  15. Supersymmetry and the Moebius inversion function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that the Moebius inversion function of number theory can be interpreted as the operator (-1)F in quantum field theory. Consequently, we are able to provide physical interpretations for various properties of the Moebius inversion function. These include a physical understanding of the Moebius Inversion Formula and of a result that is equivalent to the prime number theorem. Supersymmetry and the Witten index play a central role in these constructions. (orig.)

  16. Forward model nonlinearity versus inverse model nonlinearity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehl, S.

    2007-01-01

    The issue of concern is the impact of forward model nonlinearity on the nonlinearity of the inverse model. The question posed is, "Does increased nonlinearity in the head solution (forward model) always result in increased nonlinearity in the inverse solution (estimation of hydraulic conductivity)?" It is shown that the two nonlinearities are separate, and it is not universally true that increased forward model nonlinearity increases inverse model nonlinearity. ?? 2007 National Ground Water Association.

  17. STRUCTURES OF CIRCULANT INVERSE M-MATRICES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yurui Lin; Linzhang Lu

    2007-01-01

    In this paper,we present a useful result on the structures of circulant inverse Mis not a positive matrix and not equal to c0I,then A is an inverse M-matrix if and only if there exists a positive integer k,which is a proper factor of n,such that cjk>0 for The result is then extended to the so-called generalized circulant inverse M-matrices.

  18. Ultrasound fields in an attenuating medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Gandhi,, D; O'Brien,, W.D., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Ultrasound fields propagating in tissue will undergo changes in shape not only due to diffraction, but also due to the frequency dependent attenuation. Linear fields can be fairly well predicted for a non-attenuating medium like water by using the Tupholme-Stepanishen method for calculating...... it into a frequency dependent part and frequency independent part. The latter results in an attenuation factor that is multiplied onto the responses from the individual elements, and the frequency dependent part is handled by attenuating the basic one-dimensional pulse. The influence on ultrasound fields from...

  19. Pharmacologically induced hypothermia attenuates traumatic brain injury in neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xiaohuan; Wei, Zheng Zachory; Espinera, Alyssa; Lee, Jin Hwan; Ji, Xiaoya; Wei, Ling; Dix, Thomas A; Yu, Shan Ping

    2015-05-01

    treated group exhibited improved functional recovery after TBI versus controls. These data support that PIH therapy using our NTR agonist is effective in reducing neuronal and BBB damage, attenuating inflammatory response and detrimental cellular signaling, and promoting functional recovery after TBI in the developing brain, supporting its potential for further evaluation towards clinical development.

  20. The structure of (L)*-inverse semigroups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Xueming; SHUM Karping

    2006-01-01

    The concepts of (L)*-inverse semigroups and left wreath products of semigroups are introduced. It is shown that the (L)*-inverse semigroup can be described as the left wreath product of a type A semigroup Γ and a left regular band B together with a mapping which maps the semigroup Γ into the endomorphism semigroup End(B). This result generalizes the structure theorem of Yamada for the left inverse semigroups in the class of regular semigroups.We shall also provide a constructed example for the (L)*-inverse semigroups by using the left wreath products.

  1. Chromatid Painting for Chromosomal Inversion Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose the continued development of a novel approach to the detection of chromosomal inversions. Transmissible chromosome aberrations (translocations and...

  2. Adaptation through chromosomal inversions in Anopheles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego eAyala

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal inversions have been repeatedly involved in local adaptation in a large number of animals and plants. The ecological and behavioral plasticity of Anopheles species - human malaria vectors - is mirrored by high amounts of polymorphic inversions. The adaptive significance of chromosomal inversions has been consistently attested by strong and significant correlations between their frequencies and a number of phenotypic traits. Here, we provide an extensive literature review of the different adaptive traits associated with chromosomal inversions in the genus Anopheles. Traits having important consequences for the success of present and future vector control measures, such as insecticide resistance and behavioral changes, are discussed.

  3. Signature Inversion in Odd-odd Nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Min-liang; ZHANG Yu-hu; ZHOU Xiao-hong; GUO Ying-xiang; LEI Xiang-guo; GUO Wen-tao

    2009-01-01

    Signature inversion in odd-odd nuclei is investigated by using a proton and a neutron coupling to the coherent state of the core.Two parameters are employed in the Hamiltonian to set the energy scales of rotation,neutron-proton coupling and their competition.Typical level staggering is extracted from the calculated level energies.The calculation can approximately reproduce experimental signature inversion.Signature inversion is attributed to the rotational motion and neutronproton residual interaction having reversed signature splitting rules.It is found signature inversion can appear at axially symmetric shape and high-K band.

  4. Analysis of nonlinear channel friction inverse problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Weiping; LIU Guohua

    2007-01-01

    Based on the Backus-Gilbert inverse theory, the singular value decomposition (SVD) for general inverse matrices and the optimization algorithm are used to solve the channel friction inverse problem. The resolution and covari- ance friction inverse model in matrix form is developed to examine the reliability of solutions. Theoretical analyses demonstrate that the convergence rate of the general Newton optimization algorithm is in the second-order. The Wiggins method is also incorporated into the algorithm. Using the method, noise can be suppressed effectively, and the results are close to accurate solutions with proper control parameters. Also, the numerical stability can be improved.

  5. Application of multi-source waveform inversion to marine streamer data using the global correlation norm

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2012-05-02

    Conventional multi-source waveform inversion using an objective function based on the least-square misfit cannot be applied to marine streamer acquisition data because of inconsistent acquisition geometries between observed and modelled data. To apply the multi-source waveform inversion to marine streamer data, we use the global correlation between observed and modelled data as an alternative objective function. The new residual seismogram derived from the global correlation norm attenuates modelled data not supported by the configuration of observed data and thus, can be applied to multi-source waveform inversion of marine streamer data. We also show that the global correlation norm is theoretically the same as the least-square norm of the normalized wavefield. To efficiently calculate the gradient, our method employs a back-propagation algorithm similar to reverse-time migration based on the adjoint-state of the wave equation. In numerical examples, the multi-source waveform inversion using the global correlation norm results in better inversion results for marine streamer acquisition data than the conventional approach. © 2012 European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers.

  6. Impact of incorrect tissue classification in Dixon-based MR-AC: fat-water tissue inversion

    OpenAIRE

    Ladefoged, Claes Nøhr; Hansen, Adam Espe; Keller, Sune Høgild; Holm, Søren; Law, Ian; Beyer, Thomas; Højgaard, Liselotte; Kjær, Andreas; Andersen, Flemming Littrup

    2014-01-01

    Background The current MR-based attenuation correction (AC) used in combined PET/MR systems computes a Dixon attenuation map (MR-ACDixon) based on fat and water images derived from in- and opposed-phase MRI. We observed an occasional fat/water inversion in MR-ACDixon. The aim of our study was to estimate the prevalence of this phenomenon in a large patient cohort and assess the possible bias on PET data. Methods PET/MRI was performed on a Siemens Biograph mMR (Siemens AG, Erlangen, Germany). ...

  7. Acoustic 2D full waveform inversion to solve gas cloud challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srichand Prajapati

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The existing conventional inversion algorithm does not provide satisfactory results due to the complexity of propagated wavefield though the gas cloud. Acoustic full waveform inversion has been developed and applied to a realistic synthetic offshore shallow gas cloud feature with Student-t approach, with and without simultaneous sources encoding. As a modeling operator, we implemented the grid based finite-difference method in frequency domain using second order elastic wave equation. Jacobin operator and its adjoint provide a necessary platform for solving full waveform inversion problem in a reduced Hessian matrix. We invert gas cloud model in 5 frequency band selected from 1 to 12 Hz, each band contains 3 frequencies. The inversion results are highly sensitive to the misfit. The model allows better convergence and recovery of amplitude losses. This approach gives better resolution then the existing least-squares approach. In this paper, we implement the full waveform inversion for low frequency model with minimum number of iteration providing a better resolution of inversion results.

  8. Ultrasonic attenuation in cuprate superconductors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T Gupta; D M Gaitonde

    2002-05-01

    We calculate the longitudinal ultrasonic attenuation rate (UAR) in clean d-wave superconductors in the Meissner and the mixed phases. In the Meissner phase we calculate the contribution of previously ignored processes involving the excitation of a pair of quasi-holes or quasi-particles. There is a contribution ∝ in the regime B ≪ F ≪ 0 and a contribution ∝ 1/ in the regime F ≪ B ≪ 0. We find that these contributions to the UAR are large and cannot be ignored. In the mixed phase, using a semi-classical description, we calculate the electronic quasi-particle contribution to the UAR which at very low , has a independent term proportional to $\\sqrt{H}$.

  9. Attenuation characteristics of gypsum wallboard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increased cost of lead is promoting enhanced usage of common building materials for shielding in diagnostic medical and dental facilities where only a few half-value layers (HVLs) are needed. Attenuation of primary beam X-ray photons in gypsum wallboard as a function of kVp, filtration, and wallboard thickness have been measured. Findings, obtained using a Victoreen 555 with an 0.1 DAS probe in poor geometry, are substantially in agreement with the sparse data in the literature but extend to thicker wall configurations and different kVp and filtration parameters. These findings are of value in maximizing the benefit/cost ratio for diagnostic shielding, and strengthen the conviction that, where used for shielding purposes, common building materials must be installed carefully and HVL-depth dependence considered thoroughly. (author)

  10. Inverse diffraction for the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly in the Solar Dynamics Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Torre, Gabriele; Benvenuto, Federico; Massone, Anna Maria; Piana, Michele

    2015-01-01

    The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly in the Solar Dynamics Observatory provides full Sun images every 1 seconds in each of 7 Extreme Ultraviolet passbands. However, for a significant amount of these images, saturation affects their most intense core, preventing scientists from a full exploitation of their physical meaning. In this paper we describe a mathematical and automatic procedure for the recovery of information in the primary saturation region based on a correlation/inversion analysis of the diffraction pattern associated to the telescope observations. Further, we suggest an interpolation-based method for determining the image background that allows the recovery of information also in the region of secondary saturation (blooming).

  11. Higher Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Concentrations Associate with a Faster Recovery of Skeletal Muscle Strength after Muscular Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Tyler; Henriksen, Vanessa T.; Martins, Thomas B.; Hill, Harry R.; Kjeldsberg, Carl R.; Schneider, Erik D.; Dixon, Brian M.; Weaver, Lindell K.

    2013-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to identify if serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations predict muscular weakness after intense exercise. We hypothesized that pre-exercise serum 25(OH)D concentrations inversely predict exercise-induced muscular weakness. Fourteen recreationally active adults participated in this study. Each subject had one leg randomly assigned as a control. The other leg performed an intense exercise protocol. Single-leg peak isometric force and blood 25(OH)D, aspartate and alanine aminotransferases, albumin, interferon (IFN)-γ, and interleukin-4 were measured prior to and following intense exercise. Following exercise, serum 25(OH)D concentrations increased (p < 0.05) immediately, but within minutes, subsequently decreased (p < 0.05). Circulating albumin increases predicted (p < 0.005) serum 25(OH)D increases, while IFN-γ increases predicted (p < 0.001) serum 25(OH)D decreases. Muscular weakness persisted within the exercise leg (p < 0.05) and compared to the control leg (p < 0.05) after the exercise protocol. Serum 25(OH)D concentrations inversely predicted (p < 0.05) muscular weakness (i.e., control leg vs. exercise leg peak isometric force) immediately and days (i.e., 48-h and 72-h) after exercise, suggesting the attenuation of exercise-induced muscular weakness with increasing serum 25(OH)D prior to exercise. Based on these data, we conclude that pre-exercise serum 25(OH)D concentrations could influence the recovery of skeletal muscle strength after an acute bout of intense exercise. PMID:23595134

  12. Laterally constrained inversion for CSAMT data interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruo; Yin, Changchun; Wang, Miaoyue; Di, Qingyun

    2015-10-01

    Laterally constrained inversion (LCI) has been successfully applied to the inversion of dc resistivity, TEM and airborne EM data. However, it hasn't been yet applied to the interpretation of controlled-source audio-frequency magnetotelluric (CSAMT) data. In this paper, we apply the LCI method for CSAMT data inversion by preconditioning the Jacobian matrix. We apply a weighting matrix to Jacobian to balance the sensitivity of model parameters, so that the resolution with respect to different model parameters becomes more uniform. Numerical experiments confirm that this can improve the convergence of the inversion. We first invert a synthetic dataset with and without noise to investigate the effect of LCI applications to CSAMT data, for the noise free data, the results show that the LCI method can recover the true model better compared to the traditional single-station inversion; and for the noisy data, the true model is recovered even with a noise level of 8%, indicating that LCI inversions are to some extent noise insensitive. Then, we re-invert two CSAMT datasets collected respectively in a watershed and a coal mine area in Northern China and compare our results with those from previous inversions. The comparison with the previous inversion in a coal mine shows that LCI method delivers smoother layer interfaces that well correlate to seismic data, while comparison with a global searching algorithm of simulated annealing (SA) in a watershed shows that though both methods deliver very similar good results, however, LCI algorithm presented in this paper runs much faster. The inversion results for the coal mine CSAMT survey show that a conductive water-bearing zone that was not revealed by the previous inversions has been identified by the LCI. This further demonstrates that the method presented in this paper works for CSAMT data inversion.

  13. Solvent recycle/recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paffhausen, M.W.; Smith, D.L.; Ugaki, S.N.

    1990-09-01

    This report describes Phase I of the Solvent Recycle/Recovery Task of the DOE Chlorinated Solvent Substitution Program for the US Air Force by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, EG G Idaho, Inc., through the US Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office. The purpose of the task is to identify and test recovery and recycling technologies for proposed substitution solvents identified by the Biodegradable Solvent Substitution Program and the Alternative Solvents/Technologies for Paint Stripping Program with the overall objective of minimizing hazardous wastes. A literature search to identify recycle/recovery technologies and initial distillation studies has been conducted. 4 refs.

  14. Inverse combustion force estimation based on response measurements outside the combustion chamber and signal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini Fouladi, Mohammad; Mohd. Nor, Mohd. Jailani; Kamal Ariffin, Ahmad; Abdullah, Shahrir

    2009-11-01

    Exposure to vibration has various physiological effects on vehicle passengers. Engine is one of the main sources of vehicle vibration. The major causes of engine vibration are combustion forces transmitted through the pistons and connection rods. Evaluation of sources is the first step to attenuate this vibration. Assessment of these sources is not an easy task because internal parts of machinery are not accessible. Often, instrumentation for such systems is costly, time consuming and some modifications would be necessary. Aim of the first part of this paper was to validate an inverse technique and carry out mobility analysis on a vehicle crankshaft to achieve matrix of Frequency Response Functions (FRFs). Outcomes were implemented to reconstruct the applied force for single and multiple-input systems. In the second part, the validated inverse technique and FRFs were used to estimate piston forces of an operating engine. Bearings of crankshaft were chosen as nearest accessible parts to piston connecting rods. Accelerometers were connected to the bearings for response measurement during an ideal engine operation. These responses together with FRFs, which were estimated in the previous part, were utilised in the inverse technique. Tikhonov regularization was used to solve the ill-conditioned inverse system. Two methods, namely L-curve criterion and Generalized Cross Validation (GCV), were employed to find the regularization parameter for the Tikhonov method. The inverse problem was solved and piston forces applied to crankpins were estimated. Results were validated by pressure measurement inside a cylinder and estimating the corresponding combustion force. This validation showed that inverse technique and measurement outcomes were roughly in agreement. In presence of various noise, L-curve criterion conduces to more robust results compared to the GCV method. But in the absence of high correlation between sources ( f>600 HzHz), the GCV technique leads to more accurate

  15. Lung attenuation measurements in healthy young adults.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, H.J.M.; Golding, R.P.; Schramel, F.M.N.H.; Devillé, W.L.; Manoliu, R.A.; Postmus, P.E.

    2003-01-01

    Background: High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) attenuation measurements may be more sensitive in finding early emphysematous changes in relatively young subjects than lung function measurements. Objectives: To define lung attenuation parameters in smokers and never-smokers. Methods: A prospe

  16. Simple parameterization of nuclear attenuation data

    CERN Document Server

    Akopov, N; Akopov, Z

    2007-01-01

    Based on the nuclear attenuation data obtained by the HERMES experiment on nitrogen and krypton nuclei, it is shown that the nuclear attenuation $R_M^{h}$ can be parametrised in a form of a linear polynomial $P_1=a_{11}$ + $\\tau a_{12}$, where $\\tau$ is the formation time, which depends on the energy of the virtual photon $\

  17. Precision Model for Microwave Rotary Vane Attenuator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldbrandsen, Tom

    1979-01-01

    A model for a rotary vane attenuator is developed to describe the attenuator reflection and transmission coefficients in detail. All the parameters of the model can be measured in situ, i.e., without diassembling any part. The tranmission errors caused by internal reflections are calculated from ...

  18. Mass conservative three-dimensional water tracer distribution from MCMC inversion of time-lapse GPR data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Lalov; N. Linde; J.A. Vrugt

    2012-01-01

    Time-lapse geophysical measurements are widely used to monitor the movement of water and solutes through the subsurface. Yet commonly used deterministic least squares inversions typically suffer from relatively poor mass recovery, spread overestimation, and limited ability to appropriately estimate

  19. An inversion algorithm for general tridiagonal matrix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui-sheng RAN; Ting-zhu HUANG; Xing-ping LIU; Tong-xiang GU

    2009-01-01

    An algorithm for the inverse of a general tridiagonal matrix is presented. For a tridiagonal matrix having the Doolittle factorization, an inversion algorithm is established.The algorithm is then generalized to deal with a general tridiagonal matrix without any restriction. Comparison with other methods is provided, indicating low computational complexity of the proposed algorithm, and its applicability to general tridiagonal matrices.

  20. Interactive inverse kinematics for human motion estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engell-Nørregård, Morten Pol; Hauberg, Søren; Lapuyade, Jerome;

    2009-01-01

    We present an application of a fast interactive inverse kinematics method as a dimensionality reduction for monocular human motion estimation. The inverse kinematics solver deals efficiently and robustly with box constraints and does not suffer from shaking artifacts. The presented motion estimat...

  1. Integrative inversion of land surface component temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Wenjie; XU Xiru

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the row winter wheat was selected as the example to study the component temperature inversion method of land surface target in detail. The result showed that the structural pattern of row crop can affect the inversion precision of component temperature evidently. Choosing appropriate structural pattern of row crop can improve the inversion precision significantly. The iterative method combining inverse matrix was a stable method that was fit for inversing component temperature of land surface target. The result of simulation and field experiment showed that the integrative method could remarkably improve the inversion accuracy of the lighted soil surface temperature and the top layer canopy temperature, and enhance inversion stability of components temperature. Just two parameters were sufficient for accurate atmospheric correction of multi-angle and multi-spectral thermal infrared data: atmospheric transmittance and the atmospheric upwelling radiance. If the atmospheric parameters and component temperature can be inversed synchronously, the really and truly accurate atmospheric correction can be achieved. The validation using ATSRII data showed that the method was useful.

  2. Non-Linear Logging Parameters Inversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The non-linear logging parameters inversion is based on the field theory, information optimization and predication theory. It uses seismic charaoters,geological model and logging data as a restriction to inverse 2D, 3D logging parameters data volume. Using this method,

  3. Inversion in Mathematical Thinking and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Inversion is a fundamental relational building block both within mathematics as the study of structures and within people's physical and social experience, linked to many other key elements such as equilibrium, invariance, reversal, compensation, symmetry, and balance. Within purely formal arithmetic, the inverse relationships between addition and…

  4. Approximation of the Inverse -Frame Operator

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M R Abdollahpour; A Najati

    2011-05-01

    In this paper, we introduce the concept of (strong) projection method for -frames which works for all conditional -Riesz frames. We also derive a method for approximation of the inverse -frame operator which is efficient for all -frames. We show how the inverse of -frame operator can be approximated as close as we like using finite-dimensional linear algebra.

  5. Applying inversion to construct rational spiral curves

    OpenAIRE

    Kurnosenko, A.

    2009-01-01

    A method is proposed to construct spiral curves by inversion of a spiral arc of parabola. The resulting curve is rational of 4-th order. Proper selection of the parabolic arc and parameters of inversion allows to match a wide range of boundary conditions, namely, tangents and curvatures at the endpoints, including those, assuming inflection.

  6. A Construction of Weakly Inverse Semigroups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing Jun YU; Yan LI

    2009-01-01

    Let S° be an inverse semigroup with semilattice biordered set E° of idempotents and E a weakly inverse biordered set with a subsemilattice Ep = { e ∈ E |(V) f ∈ E, S(f , e)(C) w(e) } isomorphic to E° by θ:Ep→E°. In this paper, it is proved that if(V)f, g∈E, f ←→ ,g(→) f°θ (ζ)s° g°θand there exists a mapping φ from Ep into the symmetric weakly inverse semigroup (ζξ)(E ∪S°) satisfying six appropriate conditions, then a weakly inverse semigroup ∑ can be constructed in (ζξ)(S°), called the weakly inverse hull of a weakly inverse system (S°, E, θ, φ) with I(∑) ≌ S°, E(∑) (≌) E. Conversely,every weakly inverse semigroup can be constructed in this way. Furthermore, a sufficient and necessary condition for two weakly inverse hulls to be isomorphic is also given.

  7. Metaheuristic optimization of acoustic inverse problems.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.V. van Leijen; L. Rothkrantz; F. Groen

    2011-01-01

    Swift solving of geoacoustic inverse problems strongly depends on the application of a global optimization scheme. Given a particular inverse problem, this work aims to answer the questions how to select an appropriate metaheuristic search strategy, and how to configure it for optimal performance. F

  8. 基于微波链路的路径雨强反演方法及实验研究∗%Research on the metho d and exp eriment of path rainfall intensity inversion using a microwave link

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Accurate measurement of rainfall with high spatial and temporal resolution have important significance in mete-orology, hydrology, agriculture, environment, flood warning and weather forecasting, etc. Based on the rain-induced power-law attenuation, an inversion method of the path rainfall intensity is proposed by using a microwave link. Starting from the atmospheric gas absorption attenuation model, a correction model of rainfall effective attenuation and a rainfall inversion model for line-of-sight microwave links are proposed, based on the microwave rain attenuation characteristics and raindrop size distribution statistics. A line-of-sight microwave link is designed and used to measure the rainfall, and the path average rain rate is inversed by means of rainfall inversion model, which is compared with a disdrometer. Results show that the correlation coefficient of rain rate inversed by microwave link with that of disdrometer is higher than 0.6 mostly, and the maximum value is 0.9647; the error of the accumulated rain amount is less than 0.5 mm, and the minimum value is 0.0827 mm; the relative error of the accumulated rain amount is less than 15%, the minimum value is 3.3415%. Experiments confirm the feasibility and accuracy of rainfall inversion obtained using a microwave link.

  9. Inverse diffraction for the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly in the Solar Dynamics Observatory

    OpenAIRE

    Torre, Gabriele; Schwartz, Richard A.; Benvenuto, Federico; Massone, Anna Maria; Piana, Michele

    2015-01-01

    The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly in the Solar Dynamics Observatory provides full Sun images every 1 seconds in each of 7 Extreme Ultraviolet passbands. However, for a significant amount of these images, saturation affects their most intense core, preventing scientists from a full exploitation of their physical meaning. In this paper we describe a mathematical and automatic procedure for the recovery of information in the primary saturation region based on a correlation/inversion analysis of t...

  10. FEMA Disaster Recovery Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This is a search site for FEMA's Disaster Recovery Centers (DRC). A DRC is a readily accessible facility or mobile office set up by FEMA where applicants may go for...

  11. Recovery Action Mapping Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Recovery Action Mapping Tool is a web map that allows users to visually interact with and query actions that were developed to recover species listed under the...

  12. A Bumpy Recovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN FENGYING

    2010-01-01

    @@ The world economic situation has been extremely complicated in 2010. This year saw fluctuating market confidence,changing commodity prices, imbalanced economic recovery, diverse economic policies, lingering trade protectionism, and fierce currency battles.

  13. Disaster Debris Recovery Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The US EPA Region 5 Disaster Debris Recovery Database includes public datasets of over 3,500 composting facilities, demolition contractors, haulers, transfer...

  14. RECOVERY OF RUTHENIUM VALUES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grummitt, W.E.; Hardwick, W.H.

    1961-01-01

    A process is given for the recovery of ruthenium from its aqueous solutions by oxidizing the ruthenium to the octavalent state and subsequently extracting the ruthenium into a halogen-substituted liquid paraffin.

  15. Recovery Audit Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Recovery Audit Programs mission is to identify and correct Medicare improper payments through the efficient detection and collection of overpayments made on...

  16. Inverse problem in Parker's dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Reshetnyak, M Yu

    2015-01-01

    The inverse solution of the 1D Parker dynamo equations is considered. The method is based on minimization of the cost-function, which characterize deviation of the model solution properties from the desired ones. The output is the latitude distribution of the magnetic field generation sources: the $\\alpha$- and $\\omega$-effects. Minimization is made using the Monte-Carlo method. The details of the method, as well as some applications, which can be interesting for the broad dynamo community, are considered: conditions when the invisible for the observer at the surface of the planet toroidal part of the magnetic field is much larger than the poloidal counterpart. It is shown that at some particular distributions of $\\alpha$ and $\\omega$ the well-known thesis that sign of the dynamo-number defines equatorial symmetry of the magnetic field to the equator plane, is violated. It is also demonstrated in what circumstances magnetic field in the both hemispheres have different properties, and simple physical explanati...

  17. Inverse magnetic/shear catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, Brett

    2016-05-01

    It is well known that very large magnetic fields are generated when the Quark-Gluon Plasma is formed during peripheral heavy-ion collisions. Lattice, holographic, and other studies strongly suggest that these fields may, for observationally relevant field values, induce "inverse magnetic catalysis", signalled by a lowering of the critical temperature for the chiral/deconfinement transition. The theoretical basis of this effect has recently attracted much attention; yet so far these investigations have not included another, equally dramatic consequence of the peripheral collision geometry: the QGP acquires a large angular momentum vector, parallel to the magnetic field. Here we use holographic techniques to argue that the angular momentum can also, independently, have an effect on transition temperatures, and we obtain a rough estimate of the relative effects of the presence of both a magnetic field and an angular momentum density. We find that the shearing angular momentum reinforces the effect of the magnetic field at low values of the baryonic chemical potential, but that it can actually decrease that effect at high chemical potentials.

  18. Fast wavelet based sparse approximate inverse preconditioner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, W.L. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Incomplete LU factorization is a robust preconditioner for both general and PDE problems but unfortunately not easy to parallelize. Recent study of Huckle and Grote and Chow and Saad showed that sparse approximate inverse could be a potential alternative while readily parallelizable. However, for special class of matrix A that comes from elliptic PDE problems, their preconditioners are not optimal in the sense that independent of mesh size. A reason may be that no good sparse approximate inverse exists for the dense inverse matrix. Our observation is that for this kind of matrices, its inverse entries typically have piecewise smooth changes. We can take advantage of this fact and use wavelet compression techniques to construct a better sparse approximate inverse preconditioner. We shall show numerically that our approach is effective for this kind of matrices.

  19. An Introduction to Inverse Problems with Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Moura Neto, Francisco Duarte

    2013-01-01

    Computational engineering/science uses a blend of applications, mathematical models and computations. Mathematical models require accurate approximations of their parameters, which are often viewed as solutions to inverse problems. Thus, the study of inverse problems is an integral part of computational engineering/science. This book presents several aspects of inverse problems along with needed prerequisite topics in numerical analysis and matrix algebra. If the reader has previously studied these prerequisites, then one can rapidly move to the inverse problems in chapters 4-8 on image restoration, thermal radiation, thermal characterization and heat transfer. “This text does provide a comprehensive introduction to inverse problems and fills a void in the literature”. Robert E White, Professor of Mathematics, North Carolina State University

  20. Forward modeling. Route to electromagnetic inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groom, R.; Walker, P. [PetRos EiKon Incorporated, Ontario (Canada)

    1996-05-01

    Inversion of electromagnetic data is a topical subject in the literature, and much time has been devoted to understanding the convergence properties of various inverse methods. The relative lack of success of electromagnetic inversion techniques is partly attributable to the difficulties in the kernel forward modeling software. These difficulties come in two broad classes: (1) Completeness and robustness, and (2) convergence, execution time and model simplicity. If such problems exist in the forward modeling kernel, it was demonstrated that inversion can fail to generate reasonable results. It was suggested that classical inversion techniques, which are based on minimizing a norm of the error between data and the simulated data, will only be successful when these difficulties in forward modeling kernels are properly dealt with. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Recurrent Neural Network for Computing Outer Inverse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Živković, Ivan S; Stanimirović, Predrag S; Wei, Yimin

    2016-05-01

    Two linear recurrent neural networks for generating outer inverses with prescribed range and null space are defined. Each of the proposed recurrent neural networks is based on the matrix-valued differential equation, a generalization of dynamic equations proposed earlier for the nonsingular matrix inversion, the Moore-Penrose inversion, as well as the Drazin inversion, under the condition of zero initial state. The application of the first approach is conditioned by the properties of the spectrum of a certain matrix; the second approach eliminates this drawback, though at the cost of increasing the number of matrix operations. The cases corresponding to the most common generalized inverses are defined. The conditions that ensure stability of the proposed neural network are presented. Illustrative examples present the results of numerical simulations.

  2. Inverse m-matrices and ultrametric matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Dellacherie, Claude; San Martin, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    The study of M-matrices, their inverses and discrete potential theory is now a well-established part of linear algebra and the theory of Markov chains. The main focus of this monograph is the so-called inverse M-matrix problem, which asks for a characterization of nonnegative matrices whose inverses are M-matrices. We present an answer in terms of discrete potential theory based on the Choquet-Deny Theorem. A distinguished subclass of inverse M-matrices is ultrametric matrices, which are important in applications such as taxonomy. Ultrametricity is revealed to be a relevant concept in linear algebra and discrete potential theory because of its relation with trees in graph theory and mean expected value matrices in probability theory. Remarkable properties of Hadamard functions and products for the class of inverse M-matrices are developed and probabilistic insights are provided throughout the monograph.

  3. Particle sizing in dense two-phase droplet systems by ultrasonic attenuation and velocity spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Size and size distribution of particles in particulate two-phase flow play an important role in a wide variety of industrial areas,while their measurement still remains a hard task till now.Ultrasonic wave as a mechanical vibration contains plenty of information about medium when it passes through.Thus the size distribution could be extracted from the measured ultrasonic attenuation and velocity spectra by means of well established models and data processing techniques.This paper contributes to the extraction of information of droplet size of a two-phase fat emulsion simultaneously from signals of broad-band ultrasonic attenuation and velocity spectra.According to the formulated single particle scattering model,the relationship between particle size distribution and ultrasonic spectrum is estab-lished.The sensitivities of ultrasonic spectra to the variation of particle size are illustrated.Distin-guishing features for attenuation and velocity spectra are summarized.Demonstration calculations of inversion by optimum regularization factor method are carried out to yield the typical numerical results for discussion.Based on the proposed inversion algorithm and theoretical model,a fat emulsion sam-ple with a volume fraction up to 20% is measured and analyzed.To validate the proposed ultrasonic spectrum particle sizing method,the results are compared to those obtained from optical measure-ment.

  4. Particle sizing in dense two-phase droplet systems by ultrasonic attenuation and velocity spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU MingXu; CAI XiaoShu; XUE MingHua; DONG LiLi; XU Feng

    2009-01-01

    Size and size distribution of particles in particulate two-phase flow play an important role in a wide va-riety of industrial areas, while their measurement still remains a hard task till now. Ultrasonic wave as a mechanical vibration contains plenty of information about medium when it passes through. Thus the size distribution could be extracted from the measured ultrasonic attenuation and velocity spectra by means of well established models and data processing techniques. This paper contributes to the ex-traction of information of droplet size of a two-phase fat emulsion simultaneously from signals of broad-band ultrasonic attenuation and velocity spectra. According to the formulated single particle scattering model, the relationship between particle size distribution and ultrasonic spectrum is estab-lished. The sensitivilles of ultrasonic spectra to the variation of particle size are illustrated. Distin-guishing features for attenuation and velocity spectra are summarized. Demonstration calculations of inversion by optimum regularization factor method are carried out to yield the typical numerical results for discussion. Based on the proposed inversion algorithm and theoretical model, a fat emulsion sam-ple with a volume fraction up to 20% is measured and analyzed. To validate the proposed ultrasonic spectrum particle sizing method, the results are compared to those obtained from optical measure-ment.

  5. Determination of transient fluid temperature using the inverse method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaremkiewicz Magdalena

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an inverse method to obtain accurate measurements of the transient temperature of fluid. A method for unit step and linear rise of temperature is presented. For this purpose, the thermometer housing is modelled as a full cylindrical element (with no inner hole, divided into four control volumes. Using the control volume method, the heat balance equations can be written for each of the nodes for each of the control volumes. Thus, for a known temperature in the middle of the cylindrical element, the distribution of temperature in three nodes and heat flux at the outer surface were obtained. For a known value of the heat transfer coefficient the temperature of the fluid can be calculated using the boundary condition. Additionally, results of experimental research are presented. The research was carried out during the start-up of an experimental installation, which comprises: a steam generator unit, an installation for boiler feed water treatment, a tray-type deaerator, a blow down flashvessel for heat recovery, a steam pressure reduction station, a boiler control system and a steam header made of martensitic high alloy P91 steel. Based on temperature measurements made in the steam header using the inverse method, accurate measurements of the transient temperature of the steam were obtained. The results of the calculations are compared with the real temperature of the steam, which can be determined for a known pressure and enthalpy.

  6. Determination of transient fluid temperature using the inverse method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaremkiewicz, Magdalena

    2014-03-01

    This paper proposes an inverse method to obtain accurate measurements of the transient temperature of fluid. A method for unit step and linear rise of temperature is presented. For this purpose, the thermometer housing is modelled as a full cylindrical element (with no inner hole), divided into four control volumes. Using the control volume method, the heat balance equations can be written for each of the nodes for each of the control volumes. Thus, for a known temperature in the middle of the cylindrical element, the distribution of temperature in three nodes and heat flux at the outer surface were obtained. For a known value of the heat transfer coefficient the temperature of the fluid can be calculated using the boundary condition. Additionally, results of experimental research are presented. The research was carried out during the start-up of an experimental installation, which comprises: a steam generator unit, an installation for boiler feed water treatment, a tray-type deaerator, a blow down flashvessel for heat recovery, a steam pressure reduction station, a boiler control system and a steam header made of martensitic high alloy P91 steel. Based on temperature measurements made in the steam header using the inverse method, accurate measurements of the transient temperature of the steam were obtained. The results of the calculations are compared with the real temperature of the steam, which can be determined for a known pressure and enthalpy.

  7. Live attenuated intranasal influenza vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Susanna; Montinaro, Valentina; Groppali, Elena; Tenconi, Rossana; Semino, Margherita; Principi, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    Annual vaccination is the most effective means of preventing and controlling influenza epidemics, and the traditional trivalent inactivated vaccine (TIV) is by far the most widely used. Unfortunately, it has a number of limitations, the most important of which is its poor immunogenicity in younger children and the elderly, the populations at greatest risk of severe influenza. Live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) has characteristics that can overcome some of these limitations. It does not have to be injected because it is administered intranasally. It is very effective in children and adolescents, among whom it prevents significantly more cases of influenza than the traditional TIV. However, its efficacy in adults has not been adequately documented, which is why it has not been licensed for use by adults by the European health authorities. LAIV is safe and well tolerated by children aged > 2 y and adults, but some concerns arisen regarding its safety in younger children and subjects with previous asthma or with recurrent wheezing. Further studies are needed to solve these problems and to evaluate the possible role of LAIV in the annual vaccination of the general population.

  8. Beta attenuation transmission system (BATS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagan, R.C.; Fullbright, H.J.

    1977-01-01

    The beta attenuation transmission system (BATS) is an automated radiation gauge designed for quantitative measurement of component thickness in explosive detonators. The BATS was designed and built by Group M-1, the Nondestructive Testing Group, of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory to measure the areal thickness, in mg/cm/sup 2/, of a cylinder of high explosive (HE) enclosed within a plastic holder. The problem is to determine the density of the HE. A /sup 90/Sr source is collimated by a 0.25 x 1.59-mm slit, and the transmitted beta-particle flux is detected by a plastic scintillator, coupled to a photomultiplier tube. The detonator is transported through the radiation beam by a leadscrew, ballnut, stepping-motor combination. Continuous analog position data are available, derived from the output from a linear-actuated potentiometer attached to the scanner. A linear electrometer amplifies the detected signal, which is then integrated for a preselected time, to obtain the desired statistical accuracy. A microprocessor (..mu..P) is used to control the scanner position and to make the data readings at the assigned positions. The data are stored, and, at the completion of the scan, are processed into the desired format. The final answer is displayed to the operator or output to a peripheral device for permanent record. The characteristics of the radiation source, the collimator, the signal detection and conditioning, and the final results are described in detail. The scanner and the microprocessor control system are briefly outlined.

  9. Attenuation of diacylglycerol second messengers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, W.R.; Ganong, B.R.; Bell, R.M.

    1986-05-01

    Diacylglycerol(DAG) derived from phosphatidylinositol activates protein kinase C in agonist-stimulated cells. At least two pathways may contribute to the attenuation of the DAG signal: (1) phosphorylation to phosphatidic acid(PA) by DAG kinase(DGK), and (2) deacylation by DAG and monoacylglycerol lipases. A number of DAG analogs were tested as substrates and inhibitors of partially purified pig brain DGK. Two analogs were potent inhibitors in vitro, 1-monooleoylglycerol(MOG,K/sub I/ = 91 ..mu..M) and diotanoylethyleneglycol (diC/sub 8/EG, K/sub I/ = 58 ..mu..M). These compounds were tested in human platelets. DiC/sub 8/EG inhibited (70 - 100%) (/sup 32/P/sub i/) incorporation into PA in thrombin-stimulated platelets. Under these conditions the DAG signal was somewhat long-lived but was still metabolized, presumably by the lipase pathway. MOG treatment elevated DAG levels up to 4-fold in unstimulated platelets. The DAG formed was in a pool where it did not activate protein kinase C. Thrombin-stimulation of MOG-treated platelets resulted in DAG levels 10-fold higher than control platelets. This appears to be due to the inability of these platelets to metabolize agonist-linked DAG via the lipase pathway. The development of specific inhibitors of DAG kinase and DAG lipase, in conjunction with mass quantification of DAG levels as used here, will provide further insights into the regulation of DAG second messengers.

  10. Carbon capture and storage reservoir properties from poroelastic inversion: A numerical evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepore, Simone; Ghose, Ranajit

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the prospect of estimating carbon capture and storage (CCS) reservoir properties from P-wave intrinsic attenuation and velocity dispersion. Numerical analogues for two CCS reservoirs are examined: the Utsira saline formation at Sleipner (Norway) and the coal-bed methane basin at Atzbach-Schwanestadt (Austria). P-wave intrinsic dispersion curves in the field-seismic frequency band, obtained from theoretical studies based on simulation of oscillatory compressibility and shear tests upon representative rock samples, are considered as observed data. We carry out forward modelling using poroelasticity theories, making use of previously established empirical relations, pertinent to CCS reservoirs, to link pressure, temperature and CO2 saturation to other properties. To derive the reservoir properties, poroelastic inversions are performed through a global multiparameter optimization using simulated annealing. We find that the combination of attenuation and velocity dispersion in the error function helps significantly in eliminating the local minima and obtaining a stable result in inversion. This is because of the presence of convexity in the solution space when an integrated error function is minimized, which is governed by the underlying physics. The results show that, even in the presence of fairly large model discrepancies, the inversion provides reliable values for the reservoir properties, with the error being less than 10% for most of them. The estimated values of velocity and attenuation and their sensitivity to effective stress and CO2 saturation generally agree with the earlier experimental observation. Although developed and tested for numerical analogues of CCS reservoirs, the approach presented here can be adapted in order to predict key properties in a fluid-bearing porous reservoir, in general.

  11. Characterization of myocardial T1-mapping bias caused by intramyocardial fat in inversion recovery and saturation recovery techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kellman, Peter; Bandettini, W Patricia; Mancini, Christine;

    2015-01-01

    or within the myocardium in the case of lipomatous metaplasia of replacement fibrosis, which is commonly seen in chronic myocardial infarction. The presence of fat leads to a bias in T1 measurement. The mechanism for this artifact for widely used T1 mapping protocols using balanced steady state free...... imaging protocols using balanced steady state free precession are considered. In-vivo imaging with T1-mapping, water/fat separated imaging, and late enhancement imaging was performed on subjects with chronic myocardial infarction. RESULTS: In n = 17 subjects with chronic myocardial infarction, lipomatous...... agreement with simulation of the specific imaging protocols. CONCLUSIONS: Measurement of the myocardial T1 by widely used balanced steady state free precession mapping methods is subject to bias when there is a mixture of water and fat in the myocardium. Intramyocardial fat is frequently present in...

  12. 3rd Annual Workshop on Inverse Problem

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This proceeding volume is based on papers presented on the Third Annual Workshop on Inverse Problems which was organized by the Department of Mathematical Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology and University of Gothenburg, and took place in May 2013 in Stockholm. The purpose of this workshop was to present new analytical developments and numerical techniques for solution of inverse problems for a wide range of applications in acoustics, electromagnetics, optical fibers, medical imaging, geophysics, etc. The contributions in this volume reflect these themes and will be beneficial to researchers who are working in the area of applied inverse problems.

  13. Regularizing priors for linear inverse problems

    OpenAIRE

    Florens, Jean-Pierre; De Simoni, Anna

    2010-01-01

    We consider statistical linear inverse problems in Hilbert spaces of the type ˆ Y = Kx + U where we want to estimate the function x from indirect noisy functional observations ˆY . In several applications the operator K has an inverse that is not continuous on the whole space of reference; this phenomenon is known as ill-posedness of the inverse problem. We use a Bayesian approach and a conjugate-Gaussian model. For a very general specification of the probability model the posterior distribut...

  14. New recursive algorithm for matrix inversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cao Jianshu; Wang Xuegang

    2008-01-01

    To reduce the computational complexity of matrix inversion, which is the majority of processing in many practical applications, two numerically efficient recursive algorithms (called algorithms Ⅰ and Ⅱ, respectively)are presented. Algorithm Ⅰ is used to calculate the inverse of such a matrix, whose leading principal minors are all nonzero. Algorithm Ⅱ, whereby, the inverse of an arbitrary nonsingular matrix can be evaluated is derived via improving the algorithm Ⅰ. The implementation, for algorithm Ⅱ or Ⅰ, involves matrix-vector multiplications and vector outer products. These operations are computationally fast and highly parallelizable. MATLAB simulations show that both recursive algorithms are valid.

  15. Parallel Algorithm in Surface Wave Waveform Inversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In Surface wave waveform inversion, we want to reconstruct 3Dshear wav e velocity structure, which calculation beyond the capability of the powerful pr esent day personal computer or even workstation. So we designed a high parallele d algorithm and carried out the inversion on Parallel computer based on the part itioned waveform inversion (PWI). It partitions the large scale optimization pro blem into a number of independent small scale problems and reduces the computati onal effort by several orders of magnitude. We adopted surface waveform inversio n with a equal block(2°×2°) discretization.

  16. Inversion symmetry protected topological insulators and superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dung-Hai; Lu, Yuan-Ming

    2015-03-01

    Three dimensional topological insulator represents a class of novel quantum phases hosting robust gapless boundary excitations, which is protected by global symmetries such as time reversal, charge conservation and spin rotational symmetry. In this work we systematically study another class of topological phases of weakly interacting electrons protected by spatial inversion symmetry, which generally don't support stable gapless boundary states. We classify these inversion-symmetric topological insulators and superconductors in the framework of K-theory, and construct their lattice models. We also discuss quantized response functions of these inversion-protected topological phases, which serve as their experimental signatures.

  17. Voxel inversion of airborne EM data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiandaca, Gianluca G.; Auken, Esben; Christiansen, Anders Vest C A.V.C.;

    2013-01-01

    We present a geophysical inversion algorithm working directly in a voxel grid disconnected from the actual measuring points, which allows for straightforward integration of different data types in joint inversion, for informing geological/hydrogeological models directly and for easier incorporation...... for jointly inverting airborne and ground-based geophysical data. Furthermore, geological and groundwater models most often refer to a regular voxel grid not correlated to the geophysical model space, and incorporating the geophysical data into the geological/hydrological modelling grids is problematic. We...... present a voxel grid inversion routine that overcomes these problems and we discuss in detail the algorithm implementation....

  18. Nonlinear system compound inverse control method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan ZHANG; Zengqiang CHEN; Peng YANG; Zhuzhi YUAN

    2005-01-01

    A compound neural network is utilized to identify the dynamic nonlinear system.This network is composed of two parts: one is a linear neural network,and the other is a recurrent neural network.Based on the inverse theory a compound inverse control method is proposed.The controller has also two parts:a linear controller and a nonlinear neural network controller.The stability condition of the closed-loop neural network-based compound inverse control system is demonstrated based on the Lyapunov theory.Simulation studies have shown that this scheme is simple and has good control accuracy and robustness.

  19. Graph inverse semigroups: their characterization and completion

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, David G

    2011-01-01

    Graph inverse semigroups generalize the polycyclic inverse monoids and play an important role in the theory of C*-algebras. This paper has two main goals: first, to provide an abstract characterization of graph inverse semigroups; and second, to show how they may be completed, under suitable conditions, to form what we call the Cuntz-Krieger semigroup of the graph. This semigroup is the ample semigroup of a topological groupoid associated with the graph, and the semigroup analogue of the Leavitt path algebra of the graph.

  20. Graphene-based Electronically Tuneable Microstrip Attenuator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Pierantoni

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design of a graphene- based electronically tuneable microstrip attenuator operating at a frequency of 5 GHz. The use of graphene as a variable resistor is discussed and the modelling of its electromagnetic properties at microwave frequencies is fully addressed. The design of the graphene-based attenuator is described. The structure integrates a patch of graphene, whose characteristics can range from being a fairly good conductor to a highly lossy material, depending on the applied voltage. By applying the proper voltage through two high-impedance bias lines, the surface resistivity of graphene can be modified, thereby changing the insertion loss of the microstrip attenuator.

  1. BOOK REVIEW: Inverse Problems. Activities for Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2003-06-01

    This book is a valuable introduction to inverse problems. In particular, from the educational point of view, the author addresses the questions of what constitutes an inverse problem and how and why we should study them. Such an approach has been eagerly awaited for a long time. Professor Groetsch, of the University of Cincinnati, is a world-renowned specialist in inverse problems, in particular the theory of regularization. Moreover, he has made a remarkable contribution to educational activities in the field of inverse problems, which was the subject of his previous book (Groetsch C W 1993 Inverse Problems in the Mathematical Sciences (Braunschweig: Vieweg)). For this reason, he is one of the most qualified to write an introductory book on inverse problems. Without question, inverse problems are important, necessary and appear in various aspects. So it is crucial to introduce students to exercises in inverse problems. However, there are not many introductory books which are directly accessible by students in the first two undergraduate years. As a consequence, students often encounter diverse concrete inverse problems before becoming aware of their general principles. The main purpose of this book is to present activities to allow first-year undergraduates to learn inverse theory. To my knowledge, this book is a rare attempt to do this and, in my opinion, a great success. The author emphasizes that it is very important to teach inverse theory in the early years. He writes; `If students consider only the direct problem, they are not looking at the problem from all sides .... The habit of always looking at problems from the direct point of view is intellectually limiting ...' (page 21). The book is very carefully organized so that teachers will be able to use it as a textbook. After an introduction in chapter 1, sucessive chapters deal with inverse problems in precalculus, calculus, differential equations and linear algebra. In order to let one gain some insight

  2. Study on inelastic attenuation coefficient, site response and source parameters in Shanxi region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    啜永清; 苏燕; 贾建喜; 黄金刚

    2004-01-01

    Based on 310 horizontal-component digital seismograms recorded at 14 seismic stations in Shanxi Digital Seismograph Network, the inelastic attenuation coefficient in Shanxi region is studied. By the methods of Atkinson and Moya, the site response of each station and several source parameters are obtained and the inversion results from both methods are compared and analyzed. The frequency-dependent inelastic attenuation coefficient Q is estimated as Q( f )=323.2 f 0.506. The site responses of 14 seismic stations do not show significant amplification, which is consistent with their basement on rock. We also found the dependence of corner frequency on seismic moment, seismic moment on stress drop, source radius on stress drop.

  3. Ecological recovery in ERA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    EFSA Scientific Committee (Scientific Committee); Topping, Christopher John

    2016-01-01

    recognises the importance of more integrated ERAs considering both the local and landscape scales, as well as the possible co-occurrence of multiple potential stressors that fall under the remit of EFSA, which are important when addressing ecological recovery. In this scientific opinion, the Scientific...... Committee gathered scientific knowledge on the potential for the recovery of non-target organisms for the further development of ERA. Current EFSA guidance documents and opinions were reviewed on how ecological recovery is addressed in ERA schemes. In addition, this scientific opinion is based on expert...... knowledge and data retrieved from the literature. Finally, the information presented in this opinion was reviewed by experts from the relevant EFSA Panels, European risk assessment bodies and through an open consultation requesting input from stakeholders. A conceptual framework was developed to address...

  4. Nonlinear Least Squares for Inverse Problems

    CERN Document Server

    Chavent, Guy

    2009-01-01

    Presents an introduction into the least squares resolution of nonlinear inverse problems. This title intends to develop a geometrical theory to analyze nonlinear least square (NLS) problems with respect to their quadratic wellposedness, that is, both wellposedness and optimizability

  5. The Transmuted Generalized Inverse Weibull Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faton Merovci

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A generalization of the generalized inverse Weibull distribution the so-called transmuted generalized inverse Weibull distribution is proposed and studied. We will use the quadratic rank transmutation map (QRTM in order to generate a flexible family of probability distributions taking the generalized inverseWeibull distribution as the base value distribution by introducing a new parameter that would offer more distributional flexibility. Various structural properties including explicit expressions for the moments, quantiles, and moment generating function of the new distribution are derived. We propose the method of maximum likelihood for estimating the model parameters and obtain the observed information matrix. A real data set are used to compare the flexibility of the transmuted version versus the generalized inverse Weibull distribution.

  6. Computing matrix inversion with optical networks

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Kan; Shum, Perry Ping; Zheludev, Nikolay I

    2013-01-01

    With this paper we bring about a discussion on the computing potential of complex optical networks and provide experimental demonstration that an optical fiber network can be used as an analog processor to calculate matrix inversion. A 3x3 matrix is inverted as a proof-of-concept demonstration using a fiber network containing three nodes and operating at telecomm wavelength. For an NxN matrix, the overall solving time (including setting time of the matrix elements and calculation time of inversion) scales as O(N^2), whereas matrix inversion by most advanced computer algorithms requires ~O(N^2.37) computational time. For well-conditioned matrices, the error of the inversion performed optically is found to be less than 3%, limited by the accuracy of measurement equipment.

  7. Acoustic Impedance Inversion VIa Wavelet Transform COnstraints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HuiyanZHANG; BainianLU; 等

    1998-01-01

    As is well known,the acoustic impedance inversion problem is,in general.an underdetermined inverse problem and some constraints about the model have to be incorporated in the inversion scheme,In this article,we assume that a prioir scale information about the model is available to constrain the inversion.We then explore another approach by means of the wavelet transform.WT,where we are specifically concerned with the selection and application of a priori scale information in the wavelet domain to reconstruct the acoustic impedance model.A simple example is explored,which show that the WT approach improves results in comparison with the conventional approach.

  8. Inverse Doppler Effects in Broadband Acoustic Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, S. L.; Zhao, X. P.; Liu, S.; Shen, F. L.; Li, L. L.; Luo, C. R.

    2016-08-01

    The Doppler effect refers to the change in frequency of a wave source as a consequence of the relative motion between the source and an observer. Veselago theoretically predicted that materials with negative refractions can induce inverse Doppler effects. With the development of metamaterials, inverse Doppler effects have been extensively investigated. However, the ideal material parameters prescribed by these metamaterial design approaches are complex and also challenging to obtain experimentally. Here, we demonstrated a method of designing and experimentally characterising arbitrary broadband acoustic metamaterials. These omni-directional, double-negative, acoustic metamaterials are constructed with ‘flute-like’ acoustic meta-cluster sets with seven double meta-molecules; these metamaterials also overcome the limitations of broadband negative bulk modulus and mass density to provide a region of negative refraction and inverse Doppler effects. It was also shown that inverse Doppler effects can be detected in a flute, which has been popular for thousands of years in Asia and Europe.

  9. Zinc oxide inverse opal enzymatic biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Xueqiu; Pikul, James H.; King, William P.; Pak, James J.

    2013-06-01

    We report ZnO inverse opal- and nanowire (NW)-based enzymatic glucose biosensors with extended linear detection ranges. The ZnO inverse opal sensors have 0.01-18 mM linear detection range, which is 2.5 times greater than that of ZnO NW sensors and 1.5 times greater than that of other reported ZnO sensors. This larger range is because of reduced glucose diffusivity through the inverse opal geometry. The ZnO inverse opal sensors have an average sensitivity of 22.5 μA/(mM cm2), which diminished by 10% after 35 days, are more stable than ZnO NW sensors whose sensitivity decreased by 10% after 7 days.

  10. Inverse Doppler Effects in Broadband Acoustic Metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, S L; Zhao, X P; Liu, S; Shen, F L; Li, L L; Luo, C R

    2016-08-31

    The Doppler effect refers to the change in frequency of a wave source as a consequence of the relative motion between the source and an observer. Veselago theoretically predicted that materials with negative refractions can induce inverse Doppler effects. With the development of metamaterials, inverse Doppler effects have been extensively investigated. However, the ideal material parameters prescribed by these metamaterial design approaches are complex and also challenging to obtain experimentally. Here, we demonstrated a method of designing and experimentally characterising arbitrary broadband acoustic metamaterials. These omni-directional, double-negative, acoustic metamaterials are constructed with 'flute-like' acoustic meta-cluster sets with seven double meta-molecules; these metamaterials also overcome the limitations of broadband negative bulk modulus and mass density to provide a region of negative refraction and inverse Doppler effects. It was also shown that inverse Doppler effects can be detected in a flute, which has been popular for thousands of years in Asia and Europe.

  11. Inverse Doppler Effects in Broadband Acoustic Metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, S L; Zhao, X P; Liu, S; Shen, F L; Li, L L; Luo, C R

    2016-01-01

    The Doppler effect refers to the change in frequency of a wave source as a consequence of the relative motion between the source and an observer. Veselago theoretically predicted that materials with negative refractions can induce inverse Doppler effects. With the development of metamaterials, inverse Doppler effects have been extensively investigated. However, the ideal material parameters prescribed by these metamaterial design approaches are complex and also challenging to obtain experimentally. Here, we demonstrated a method of designing and experimentally characterising arbitrary broadband acoustic metamaterials. These omni-directional, double-negative, acoustic metamaterials are constructed with 'flute-like' acoustic meta-cluster sets with seven double meta-molecules; these metamaterials also overcome the limitations of broadband negative bulk modulus and mass density to provide a region of negative refraction and inverse Doppler effects. It was also shown that inverse Doppler effects can be detected in a flute, which has been popular for thousands of years in Asia and Europe. PMID:27578317

  12. Inversion of hysteresis and creep operators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krejci, Pavel, E-mail: krejci@math.cas.cz [Institute of Mathematics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Zitna 25, CZ-11567 Praha 1 (Czech Republic); Al Janaideh, Mohammad, E-mail: aljanaideh@gmail.com [Department of Mechatronics Engineering, The University of Jordan, Amman (Jordan); Deasy, Fergal, E-mail: deasy@math.cas.cz [Institute of Mathematics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Zitna 25, CZ-11567 Praha 1 (Czech Republic)

    2012-05-01

    The explicit inversion formula for rate dependent Prandtl-Ishlinskii operators is extended to cases without the threshold dilation condition. This solves a problem in hysteresis and creep modeling of magnetostrictive behavior.

  13. Orimulsion containment and recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommerville, M. [Briggs Marine Environmental Services, Aberdeen (United Kingdom)

    1999-01-01

    This paper focuses on the need for examination of Orimulsion fuel and its spill behaviour in the light of the anticipated increase in consumption of this fuel which comprises bitumen dispersed in water with addition of a small amount of surfactant. The behaviour and fate of Orimulsion at sea, and observations from experimental and sea trials are examined. The identification of spill control techniques, spill detection, the predictive modeling of the spill and response, sub-surface plume measurement, and containment and deflection are considered. Recovery of the bitumen produced from an Orimulsion spill, combined containment and recovery, dispersed Orimulsion, and beach cleaning are addressed. The properties of Orimulsion are tabulated. (UK)

  14. Recovery in aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundlach, Carsten

    2006-01-01

    In the present thesis the development of a unique experimental method for volume characterisation of individual embedded crystallites down to a radius of 150 nm is presented. This method is applied to in-situ studies of recovery in aluminium. The method is an extension of 3DXRD microscopy, an X...... are represented as strings. To identify the strings a combination of a 5D connected component type algorithm and multi-peak fitting was found to be superior. The first use of the method was a study of recovery of a deformed aluminium alloy (AA1050). The aluminium alloy was deformed by cold rolling to a thickness...

  15. Psychosocial Recovery and Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antai-Otong, Deborah

    2016-06-01

    This article discusses a psychosocial recovery and rehabilitation recovery model that uses an intensive case management approach. The approach offers an interdisciplinary model that integrates pharmacotherapy, social skills training, cognitive remediation, family involvement, and community integration. This evidence-based plan of care instills hope and nurtures one's capacity to learn and improve function and quality of life. It is cost-effective and offers psychiatric nurses opportunities to facilitate symptomatic remission, facilitate self-efficacy, and improve communication and social cognition skills. Nurses in diverse practice settings must be willing to plan and implement innovative treatment models that provide seamless mental health care across the treatment continuum. PMID:27229282

  16. Attenuation layer for magnetostatic wave (MSW) absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, H. L.; Adkins, L. R.; Stearns, F. S.

    1984-09-01

    A new technique has been developed for the suppression of MSW end reflections which give rise to passband ripple. The basic idea is to provide a thin film of highly attenuating epitaxial material at the ends of a MSW delay line while preserving high quality YIG in the active region of the device. The GGG wafer preparation is a three step process which involves: (1) the growth of the attenuation layer, (2) the removal of this layer from the central region of the wafer and (3) the growth of high quality YIG on the remaining structure. Delay lines using the attenuation layer for end terminations have been evaluated experimentally and compared to devices utilizing other termination methods. The results indicate that the attenuation layer method produces ripple suppression characteristics which are the equal of those obtained with other termination techniques. The advantage of this new method lies in its suitability for large quantity fabrication requirements.

  17. Radiation-attenuated vaccine for lungworm disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work done at the Indian Veternary Research Institute, Izatnagar, on the development of a vaccine for lungworm diseases is reported. Research work done includes: (1) studies on the epidemiology and the incidence of the lungworm infections, (ii) studies on the radiation-attenuated lungworm Dictyocaulus filaria vaccine, (iii) studies on other parasites using ionizing radiation, (iv) incidence of lungworm infection in sheep in Jammu and Kashmir State, (v) suitable dose of gamma radiation for attenuation, (vi) laboratory studies with radiation-attenuated D. filaria vaccine, (vii) serology of D. filaria infection, (viii) field trials with the radiation-attenuated vaccine, (ix) immune response of previously exposed lambs to vaccination, (x) comparative susceptibility of sheep and goats to infection with D. filaria, (xi) quantitative studies of D. filaria in lambs and (xii) production and supply of lungworm vaccine. (A.K.)

  18. On some nonlinear inverse problems in elasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Andrieux S.; Bui H.D.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we make a review of some inverse problems in elasticity, in statics and dynamics, in acoustics, thermoelasticity and viscoelasticity. Crack inverse problems have been solved in closed form, by considering a nonlinear variational equation provided by the reciprocity gap functional. This equation involves the unknown geometry of the crack and the boundary data. It results from the symmetry lost between current fields and adjoint fields which is related to their support. The...

  19. A fluorophosphate-based inverse Keggin structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fielden, John; Quasdorf, Kyle; Cronin, Leroy; Kogerler, Paul

    2012-07-17

    An unusual PFO(3)(2-)-templated "inverse Keggin" polyanion, [Mo(12)O(46)(PF)(4)](4-), has been isolated from the degradation reaction of an {Mo(132)}-type Keplerate to [PMo(12)O(40)](3-) by [Cu(MeCN)(4)](PF(6)) in acetonitrile. (31)P-NMR studies suggest a structure-directing role for [Cu(MeCN)(4)](+) in the formation of the highly unusual all-inorganic inverse Keggin structure.

  20. Inverse semigroups the theory of partial symmetries

    CERN Document Server

    Lawson, Mark V

    1998-01-01

    Symmetry is one of the most important organising principles in the natural sciences. The mathematical theory of symmetry has long been associated with group theory, but it is a basic premise of this book that there are aspects of symmetry which are more faithfully represented by a generalization of groups called inverse semigroups. The theory of inverse semigroups is described from its origins in the foundations of differential geometry through to its most recent applications in combinatorial group theory, and the theory tilings.

  1. INVERSE COEFFICIENT PROBLEMS FOR PARABOLIC HEMIVARIATIONAL INEQUALITIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Zhenhai; I.Szántó

    2011-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the class of inverse problems for a nonlinear parabolic hemivariational inequality.The unknown coefficient of the operator depends on the gradient of the solution and belongs to a set of admissible coefficients.It is proved that the convergence of solutions for the corresponding direct problems continuously depends on the coefficient convergence.Based on this result the existence of a quasisolution of the inverse problem is obtained.

  2. SVD Analysis of Full Wave Inversion

    OpenAIRE

    F Watson and WRB Lionheart

    2014-01-01

    Full-wave inversion (FWI) is an imaging approach in which we find thequantitative subsurface parameters (such as the dielectric permittivity) whichwould best fit the recorded GPR data. This optimisation problem isnonlinear and ill-posed, and there have been numerous successes inapplying FWI to GPR data. The dominant propertiesof the FWI inversion process can be observed in the Jacobian matrix ofpartial derivatives of the forward map for each acquisition system. Here, weuse singular value d...

  3. Notions of M\\"obius inversion

    OpenAIRE

    Leinster, Tom

    2012-01-01

    M\\"obius inversion, originally a tool in number theory, was generalized to posets for use in group theory and combinatorics. It was later generalized to categories in two different ways, both of which are useful. We provide a unifying abstract framework. This allows us to compare and contrast the two theories of M\\"obius inversion for categories, and advance each of them. Among several side benefits is an improved understanding of the following fact: the Euler characteristic of the classifyin...

  4. Notions of Möbius inversion

    OpenAIRE

    Leinster, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Möbius inversion, originally a tool in number theory, was generalized to posets for use in group theory and combinatorics. It was later generalized to categories in two different ways, both of which are useful. We provide a unifying abstract framework. This allows us to compare and contrast the two theories of Möbius inversion for categories, and advance each of them. Among several side benefits is an improved understanding of the following fact: the Euler characteristic ...

  5. Bow Ties in the Sky I: The Angular Structure of Inverse Compton Gamma-ray Halos in the Fermi Sky

    CERN Document Server

    Broderick, Avery E; Shalaby, Mohamad; Pfrommer, Christoph; Puchwein, Ewald; Chang, Philip; Lamberts, Astrid

    2016-01-01

    Extended inverse Compton halos are generally anticipated around extragalactic sources of gamma rays with energies above 100 GeV. These result from inverse Compton scattered cosmic microwave background photons by a population of high-energy electron/positron pairs produced by the annihilation of the high-energy gamma rays on the infrared background. Despite the observed attenuation of the high-energy gamma rays, the halo emission has yet to be directly detected. Here, we demonstrate that in most cases these halos are expected to be highly anisotropic, distributing the up-scattered gamma rays along axes defined either by the radio jets of the sources or oriented perpendicular to a global magnetic field. We present a pedagogical derivation of the angular structure in the inverse Compton halo and provide an analytic formalism that facilitates the generation of mock images. We discuss exploiting this fact for the purpose of detecting gamma-ray halos in a set of companion papers.

  6. Time-lapse imaging of saline-tracer transport in fractured rock using difference-attenuation radar tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day-Lewis, F. D.; Lane, J.W.; Harris, J.M.; Gorelick, S.M.

    2003-01-01

    Accurate characterization of fractured-rock aquifer heterogeneity remains one of the most challenging and important problems in groundwater hydrology. We demonstrate a promising strategy to identify preferential flow paths in fractured rock using a combination of geophysical monitoring and conventional hydrogeologic tests. Cross-well difference-attenuation ground-penetrating radar was used to monitor saline-tracer migration in an experiment at the U.S. Geological Survey Fractured Rock Hydrology Research Site in Grafton County, New Hampshire. Radar data sets were collected every 10 min in three adjoining planes for 5 hours during each of 12 tracer tests. An innovative inversion method accounts for data acquisition times and temporal changes in attenuation during data collection. The inverse algorithm minimizes a combination of two functions. The first is the sum of weighted squared data residuals. Second is a measure of solution complexity based on an a priori space-time covariance function, subject to constraints that limit radar-attenuation changes to regions of the tomograms traversed by high difference-attenuation ray paths. The time series of tomograms indicate relative tracer concentrations and tracer arrival times in the image planes; from these we infer the presence and location of a preferential flow path within a previously identified zone of transmissive fractures. These results provide new insights into solute channeling and the nature of aquifer heterogeneity at the site.

  7. Electron Effective-Attenuation-Length Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 82 NIST Electron Effective-Attenuation-Length Database (PC database, no charge)   This database provides values of electron effective attenuation lengths (EALs) in solid elements and compounds at selected electron energies between 50 eV and 2,000 eV. The database was designed mainly to provide EALs (to account for effects of elastic-eletron scattering) for applications in surface analysis by Auger-electron spectroscopy (AES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).

  8. ATTENUATION AND FLANKING TRANSMISSION IN LIGHTWEIGHT STRUCTURES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunskog, Jonas; Lhomond, Alice; Ohlrich, Mogens

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the attenuation and flanking transmissions of impact noise in lightweight building structures is studied using a modal approach. The structural field is mainly analysed, putting the main attention to the parts being important in the modelling. The amount of attenuation produced by the...... periodically reinforcing beams used in lightweight building structures is analysed. The consequence of these factors in modelling flanking transmission is also discussed....

  9. Geoacoustic inversion with ships as sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Robert A; Knobles, David P

    2005-02-01

    Estimation of geoacoustic parameters using acoustic data from a surface ship was performed for a shallow water region in the Gulf of Mexico. The data were recorded from hydrophones in a bottom mounted, horizontal line array (HLA). The techniques developed to produce the geoacoustic inversion are described, and an efficient method for geoacoustic inversion with broadband beam cross-spectral data is demonstrated. The performance of cost functions that involve coherent or incoherent sums over frequency and one or multiple time segments is discussed. Successful inversions for the first sediment layer sound speed and thickness and some of the parameters for the deeper layers were obtained with the surface ship at nominal ranges of 20, 30, or 50 water depths. The data for these inversions were beam cross-spectra from four subapertures of the HLA spanning a little more than two water depths. The subaperture beams included ten frequencies equally spaced in the 120-200 Hz band. The values of the geoacoustic parameters from the inversions are validated by comparisons with geophysical observations and with the parameter values from previous inversions by other invesigators, and by comparing transmission loss (TL) measured in the experiment with modeled TL based on the inverted geoacoustic parameters.

  10. An application of sparse inversion on the calculation of the inverse data space of geophysical data

    KAUST Repository

    Saragiotis, Christos

    2011-07-01

    Multiple reflections as observed in seismic reflection measurements often hide arrivals from the deeper target reflectors and need to be removed. The inverse data space provides a natural separation of primaries and surface-related multiples, as the surface multiples map onto the area around the origin while the primaries map elsewhere. However, the calculation of the inverse data is far from trivial as theory requires infinite time and offset recording. Furthermore regularization issues arise during inversion. We perform the inversion by minimizing the least-squares norm of the misfit function and by constraining the 1 norm of the solution, being the inverse data space. In this way a sparse inversion approach is obtained. We show results on field data with an application to surface multiple removal. © 2011 IEEE.

  11. Application of the least-squares inversion method: Fourier series versus waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Dong-Joo; Shin, Jungkyun; Shin, Changsoo

    2015-11-01

    We describe an implicit link between waveform inversion and Fourier series based on inversion methods such as gradient, Gauss-Newton, and full Newton methods. Fourier series have been widely used as a basic concept in studies on seismic data interpretation, and their coefficients are obtained in the classical Fourier analysis. We show that Fourier coefficients can also be obtained by inversion algorithms, and compare the method to seismic waveform inversion algorithms. In that case, Fourier coefficients correspond to model parameters (velocities, density or elastic constants), whereas cosine and sine functions correspond to components of the Jacobian matrix, that is, partial derivative wavefields in seismic inversion. In the classical Fourier analysis, optimal coefficients are determined by the sensitivity of a given function to sine and cosine functions. In the inversion method for Fourier series, Fourier coefficients are obtained by measuring the sensitivity of residuals between given functions and test functions (defined as the sum of weighted cosine and sine functions) to cosine and sine functions. The orthogonal property of cosine and sine functions makes the full or approximate Hessian matrix become a diagonal matrix in the inversion for Fourier series. In seismic waveform inversion, the Hessian matrix may or may not be a diagonal matrix, because partial derivative wavefields correlate with each other to some extent, making them semi-orthogonal. At the high-frequency limits, however, the Hessian matrix can be approximated by either a diagonal matrix or a diagonally-dominant matrix. Since we usually deal with relatively low frequencies in seismic waveform inversion, it is not diagonally dominant and thus it is prohibitively expensive to compute the full or approximate Hessian matrix. By interpreting Fourier series with the inversion algorithms, we note that the Fourier series can be computed at an iteration step using any inversion algorithms such as the

  12. Inverse feasibility problems of the inverse maximum flow problems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Adrian Deaconu; Eleonor Ciurea

    2013-04-01

    A linear time method to decide if any inverse maximum flow (denoted General Inverse Maximum Flow problems (IMFG)) problem has solution is deduced. If IMFG does not have solution, methods to transform IMFG into a feasible problem are presented. The methods consist of modifying as little as possible the restrictions to the variation of the bounds of the flow. New inverse combinatorial optimization problems are introduced and solved.

  13. A Bumpy Recovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The world economy crawls ahead amid risk and uncertainty The world economic situation has been extremely complicated in 2010. This year saw fluctuating market confidence,changing commodity prices, imbalanced economic recovery, diverse economic policies, lingering trade protectionism, and fierce currency battles.

  14. Recovery of Interdependent Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Di Muro, M A; Stanley, H E; Havlin, S; Braunstein, L A

    2015-01-01

    Recent network research has focused on the cascading failures in a system of interdependent networks and the necessary preconditions for system collapse. An important question that has not been addressed is how to repair a failing system before it suffers total breakdown. Here we introduce a recovery strategy of nodes and develop an analytic and numerical framework for studying the concurrent failure and recovery of a system of interdependent networks based on an efficient and practically reasonable strategy. Our strategy consists of repairing a fraction of failed nodes, with probability of recovery $\\gamma$, that are neighbors of the largest connected component of each constituent network. We find that, for a given initial failure of a fraction $1-p$ of nodes, there is a critical probability of recovery above which the cascade is halted and the system fully restores to its initial state and below which the system abruptly collapses. As a consequence we find in the plane $\\gamma-p$ of the phase diagram three ...

  15. Recovery post ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christina

    2014-10-01

    Many ICU patients struggle to recovery following critical illness and may be left with physical, cognitive and psychological problems, which have a negative impact on their quality of life. Gross muscle mass loss and weakness can take some months to recover after the patients' Intensive Care Unit (ICU) discharge, in addition critical illness polyneuropathies can further complicate physical recovery. Psychological problems such as anxiety, depression and post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are common and have an negative impact on the patients' ability to engage in rehabilitation after ICU discharge. Finally cognitive deficit affecting memory can be a significant problem. The first step in helping patients to recover from such a devastating illness is to recognise those who have the greatest need and target interventions. Research now suggests that there are interventions that can accelerate physical recovery and reduce the incidence of psychological problems such as anxiety, depression and PTSD. Cognitive rehabilitation, however, is still in its infancy. This review will look at the research into patients' recovery and what can be done to improve this where needed.

  16. Sulfur recovery further improved

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borsboom, J.; Grinsven, M. van; Warners, A. van [Jacobs Nederland B.V., (Netherlands); Nisselrooy, P. van [Gastec N.V., (Netherlands)

    2002-04-01

    The original 100-year-old Claus process for producing sulfur from hydrogen sulfide in acid gas is described together with improvements which have been made over the years. The most recent modification, EUROCLAUS, achieves sulfur recoveries of 99-99.9 per cent. Five commercial units are being designed.

  17. Disaster Recovery: Courting Disaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hanlon, Charlene

    2007-01-01

    An inadequate or nonexistent disaster recovery plan can have dire results. Fire, power outage, and severe weather all can brin down the best of networks in an instant. This article draws on the experiences of the Charlotte County Public Schools (Port Charlotte, Florida), which were able to lessen the damage caused by Hurricane Charley when it hit…

  18. Cost Recovery Through Depreciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Robert T.; Wesolowski, Leonard V.

    1983-01-01

    The approach of adopting depreciation rather than use allowance in order to recover more accurately the cost of college buildings and equipment used on federal projects is considered. It is suggested that depreciation will offer most colleges and universities a higher annual recovery rate, and an opportunity for better facilities planning. For…

  19. Spatially Dispersed Employee Recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvass, Kristian Anders; Torfadóttir, Embla

    2014-01-01

    Employee recovery addresses either employee well-being or management's practices in aiding employees in recovering themselves following a service failure. This paper surveys the cabin crew at a small, European, low-cost carrier and investigates employees' perceptions of management practices to ai...

  20. The Road of Recovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Yan

    2010-01-01

    @@ Guangdong, one of China's largest exporting provinces and one of the world's most important manufacturing bases, was severely affected by the international financial crisis. Business was unusual for the past year, and while there are still many difficulties for 2010,we are on the way to recovery.

  1. Recovery in the East

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    As robust as the economic recovery in East Asia has been in recent months,attention must now be turned to managing emerging risks challenging macroeconomic stability,said World Bank’s latest East Asia and Pacific Economic Update released on October 19.Edited excerpts follow

  2. Effects of Attenuation of Gas Hydrate-bearing Sediments on Seismic Data: Example from Mallik, Northwest Territories, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellefleur, G.; Riedel, M.; Brent, T.

    2007-05-01

    Wave attenuation is an important physical property of hydrate-bearing sediments that is rarely taken into account in site characterization with seismic data. We present a field example showing improved images of hydrate- bearing sediments on seismic data after compensation of attenuation effects. Compressional quality factors (Q) are estimated from zero-offset Vertical Seismic Profiling data acquired at Mallik, Northwest Territories, Canada. During the last 10 years, two internationally-partnered research drilling programs have intersected three major intervals of sub-permafrost gas hydrates at Mallik, and have successfully extracted core samples containing significant amount of gas hydrates. Individual gas hydrate intervals are up to 40m in thickness and are characterized by high in situ gas hydrate saturation, sometimes exceeding 80% of pore volume of unconsolidated clastic sediments having average porosities ranging from 25% to 40%. The Q-factors obtained from the VSP data demonstrate significant wave attenuation for permafrost and hydrate- bearing sediments. These results are in agreement with previous attenuation estimates from sonic logs and crosshole data at different frequency intervals. The Q-factors obtained from VSP data were used to compensate attenuation effects on surface 3D seismic data acquired over the Mallik gas hydrate research wells. Intervals of gas hydrate on surface seismic data are characterized by strong reflectivity and effects from attenuation are not perceptible from a simple visual inspection of the data. However, the application of an inverse Q-filter increases the resolution of the data and improves correlation with log data, particularly for the shallowest gas hydrate interval. Compensation of the attenuation effects of the permafrost likely explains most of the improvements for the shallow gas hydrate zone. Our results show that characterization of the Mallik gas hydrates with seismic data not corrected for attenuation would tend to

  3. Successful management of recurrent puerperal uterine inversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindu Nambisan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The puerperal uterine inversion is a rare and severe complication occurring in the third stage of labour. The exact mechanisms are unclear. However, extrinsic factors such as prolonged labour, umbilical cord traction, oxytocic use etc. have been mentioned. Other intrinsic factors such as primiparity, uterine hypotonia, different placental localizations, fundal location of a myoma or short umbilical cord have also been reported. The diagnosis of uterine inversion is mainly made on the basis of clinical symptoms which include haemorrhage, shock and a strong pelvic pain. The immediate treatment of the uterine inversion is required. A case of 23 years old, second gravida with one previous spontaneous first trimester abortion, who had a full term normal vaginal delivery but while trying to deliver the placenta after confirmation of placental separation clinically, uterine inversion was diagnosed immediately and manual repositioning of uterus was done under general anaesthesia. On the 6 th post natal day, during the routine postnatal rounds, uterus was not palpable per abdomen and a local examination revealed a mass at the introitus. A diagnosis of grade 3 sub-acute inversion was made and she was taken up for exploratory laparotomy. Reinsertion was done according to the Huntington technique by placing clamps on the round ligament, near its insertion on the uterus, and applying traction upwards while the assistant exerted traction on the contra lateral way through the vagina. As persistent atonicity and diffuse oozing was noted multiple Cho sutures were put over the uterus. Patient had an uneventful postnatal period. This is a rare scenario where the same patient had an acute inversion initially followed by sub-acute inversion. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(10.000: 3619-3621

  4. Maximum likelihood estimation of the attenuated ultrasound pulse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Klaus Bolding

    1994-01-01

    The attenuated ultrasound pulse is divided into two parts: a stationary basic pulse and a nonstationary attenuation pulse. A standard ARMA model is used for the basic pulse, and a nonstandard ARMA model is derived for the attenuation pulse. The maximum likelihood estimator of the attenuated ultra...

  5. Cyclic Compressive Loading Facilitates Recovery after Eccentric Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    BUTTERFIELD, TIMOTHY A.; ZHAO, YI; AGARWAL, SUDHA; HAQ, FURQAN; BEST, THOMAS M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess the biologic basis of massage therapies, we developed an experimental approach to mimic Swedish massage and evaluate this approach on recovery from eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage using a well-controlled animal model. Methods Tibialis anterior muscles of six New Zealand White rabbits were subjected to one bout of damaging, eccentric contractions. One muscle was immediately subjected to cyclic compressive loads, and the contralateral served as the exercised control. Results We found that commencing 30 min of cyclic compressive loading to the muscle, immediately after a bout of eccentric exercise, facilitated recovery of function and attenuated leukocyte infiltration. In addition, fiber necrosis and wet weight of the tissue were also reduced by compressive loading. Conclusion We conclude that subjecting muscle to compressive loads immediately after exercise leads to an enhanced recovery of muscle function and attenuation of the damaging effects of inflammation in the rabbit model. Although these observations suggest that skeletal muscle responds to cyclic compressive forces similar to those generated by clinical approaches, such as therapeutic massage, further research is needed to assess the translational efficacy of these findings. PMID:18580410

  6. Sampling of finite elements for sparse recovery in large scale 3D electrical impedance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study proposes a method to improve performance of sparse recovery inverse solvers in 3D electrical impedance tomography (3D EIT), especially when the volume under study contains small-sized inclusions, e.g. 3D imaging of breast tumours. Initially, a quadratic regularized inverse solver is applied in a fast manner with a stopping threshold much greater than the optimum. Based on assuming a fixed level of sparsity for the conductivity field, finite elements are then sampled via applying a compressive sensing (CS) algorithm to the rough blurred estimation previously made by the quadratic solver. Finally, a sparse inverse solver is applied solely to the sampled finite elements, with the solution to the CS as its initial guess. The results show the great potential of the proposed CS-based sparse recovery in improving accuracy of sparse solution to the large-size 3D EIT. (paper)

  7. Inversion concept of the origin of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kompanichenko, V N

    2012-06-01

    The essence of the inversion concept of the origin of life can be narrowed down to the following theses: 1) thermodynamic inversion is the key transformation of prebiotic microsystems leading to their transition into primary forms of life; 2) this transformation might occur only in the microsystems oscillating around the bifurcation point under far-from-equilibrium conditions. The transformation consists in the inversion of the balance "free energy contribution / entropy contribution", from negative to positive values. At the inversion moment the microsystem radically reorganizes in accordance with the new negentropy (i.e. biological) way of organization. According to this approach, the origin-of-life process on the early Earth took place in the fluctuating hydrothermal medium. The process occurred in two successive stages: a) spontaneous self-assembly of initial three-dimensional prebiotic microsystems composed mainly of hydrocarbons, lipids and simple amino acids, or their precursors, within the temperature interval of 100-300°C (prebiotic stage); b) non-spontaneous synthesis of sugars, ATP and nucleic acids started at the inversion moment under the temperature 70-100°C (biotic stage). Macro- and microfluctuations of thermodynamic and physico-chemical parameters able to sustain this way of chemical conversion have been detected in several contemporary hydrothermal systems. A minimal self-sufficient unit of life on the early Earth was a community of simplest microorganisms (not a separate microorganism).

  8. Unwrapped phase inversion with an exponential damping

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yunseok

    2015-07-28

    Full-waveform inversion (FWI) suffers from the phase wrapping (cycle skipping) problem when the frequency of data is not low enough. Unless we obtain a good initial velocity model, the phase wrapping problem in FWI causes a result corresponding to a local minimum, usually far away from the true solution, especially at depth. Thus, we have developed an inversion algorithm based on a space-domain unwrapped phase, and we also used exponential damping to mitigate the nonlinearity associated with the reflections. We construct the 2D phase residual map, which usually contains the wrapping discontinuities, especially if the model is complex and the frequency is high. We then unwrap the phase map and remove these cycle-based jumps. However, if the phase map has several residues, the unwrapping process becomes very complicated. We apply a strong exponential damping to the wavefield to eliminate much of the residues in the phase map, thus making the unwrapping process simple. We finally invert the unwrapped phases using the back-propagation algorithm to calculate the gradient. We progressively reduce the damping factor to obtain a high-resolution image. Numerical examples determined that the unwrapped phase inversion with a strong exponential damping generated convergent long-wavelength updates without low-frequency information. This model can be used as a good starting model for a subsequent inversion with a reduced damping, eventually leading to conventional waveform inversion.

  9. QCD-instantons and conformal inversion symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klammer, D.

    2006-07-15

    Instantons are an essential and non-perturbative part of Quantum Chromodynamics, the theory of strong interactions. One of the most relevant quantities in the instanton calculus is the instanton-size distribution, which can be described on the one hand within the framework of instanton perturbation theory and on the other hand investigated numerically by means of lattice computations. A rapid onset of a drastic discrepancy between these respective results indicates that the underlying physics is not yet well understood. In this work we investigate the appealing possibility of a symmetry under conformal inversion of space-time leading to this deviation. The motivation being that the lattice data seem to be invariant under an inversion of the instanton size. Since the instanton solution of a given size turns into an anti-instanton solution having an inverted size under conformal inversion of space-time, we ask in a first investigation, whether this property is transferred to the quantum level. In order to introduce a new scale, which is indicated by the lattice data and corresponds to the average instanton size as inversion radius, we project the instanton calculus onto the four-dimensional surface of a five-dimensional sphere via stereographic projection. The radius of this sphere is associated with the average instanton size. The result for the instanton size-distribution projected onto the sphere agrees surprisingly well with the lattice data at qualitative level. The resulting symmetry under an inversion of the instanton size is almost perfect. (orig.)

  10. Varying prior information in Bayesian inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Matthew; Curtis, Andrew

    2014-06-01

    Bayes' rule is used to combine likelihood and prior probability distributions. The former represents knowledge derived from new data, the latter represents pre-existing knowledge; the Bayesian combination is the so-called posterior distribution, representing the resultant new state of knowledge. While varying the likelihood due to differing data observations is common, there are also situations where the prior distribution must be changed or replaced repeatedly. For example, in mixture density neural network (MDN) inversion, using current methods the neural network employed for inversion needs to be retrained every time prior information changes. We develop a method of prior replacement to vary the prior without re-training the network. Thus the efficiency of MDN inversions can be increased, typically by orders of magnitude when applied to geophysical problems. We demonstrate this for the inversion of seismic attributes in a synthetic subsurface geological reservoir model. We also present results which suggest that prior replacement can be used to control the statistical properties (such as variance) of the final estimate of the posterior in more general (e.g., Monte Carlo based) inverse problem solutions.

  11. Inverse kinematic-based robot control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolovich, W. A.; Flueckiger, K. F.

    1987-01-01

    A fundamental problem which must be resolved in virtually all non-trivial robotic operations is the well-known inverse kinematic question. More specifically, most of the tasks which robots are called upon to perform are specified in Cartesian (x,y,z) space, such as simple tracking along one or more straight line paths or following a specified surfacer with compliant force sensors and/or visual feedback. In all cases, control is actually implemented through coordinated motion of the various links which comprise the manipulator; i.e., in link space. As a consequence, the control computer of every sophisticated anthropomorphic robot must contain provisions for solving the inverse kinematic problem which, in the case of simple, non-redundant position control, involves the determination of the first three link angles, theta sub 1, theta sub 2, and theta sub 3, which produce a desired wrist origin position P sub xw, P sub yw, and P sub zw at the end of link 3 relative to some fixed base frame. Researchers outline a new inverse kinematic solution and demonstrate its potential via some recent computer simulations. They also compare it to current inverse kinematic methods and outline some of the remaining problems which will be addressed in order to render it fully operational. Also discussed are a number of practical consequences of this technique beyond its obvious use in solving the inverse kinematic question.

  12. Cost recovery by Government agencies

    OpenAIRE

    Productivity Commission

    2002-01-01

    The Commonwealth Government asked the Productivity Commisison to review cost recovery arrangements across the Government's regulatory,administrative and information agencies,and to develop guidelines for the future application of cost recovery.

  13. Karner Blue Butterfly Recovery Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This recovery plan has been prepared by the Karner Blue Butterfly Recovery Team under the leadership of Dr. David Andow, University of Minnesota-St. Paul. Dr. John...

  14. Comparison of non-attenuation corrected and attenuation corrected myocardial perfusion SPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Raza

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: This study demonstrates that CT based attenuation corrected Tc-99mm sestamibi SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging significantly improved the specificity of the RCA territory compared with non-attenuation corrected Tc-99mm sestamibi SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging in both genders irrespective of BMI.

  15. In vivo ultrasound biomicroscopy of skin: spectral system characteristics and inverse filtering optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Michael; Ermert, Helmut

    2007-08-01

    High-frequency ultrasound (HFUS) in the 20 MHz to 100 MHz range has to meet the opposite requirements of good spatial resolution and of high penetration depth for in vivo ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) of skin. The attenuation of water, which serves as sound propagation medium between utilized single element transducers and the skin, becomes very eminent with increasing frequency. Furthermore, the spectra of acquired radio frequency (rf) echo signals change over depth because of the diffracted sound field characteristics. The reduction of the system's center frequency and bandwidth causes a significant loss of spatial resolution over depth. In this paper, the spectral characteristics of HFUS imaging systems and the potential of inverse echo signal filtering for the optimization of pulse-echo measurements is analyzed and validated. A Gaussian model of the system's transfer function, which takes into account the frequency-dependent attenuation of the water path, was developed. Predictions of system performance are derived from this model and compared with measurement results. The design of a HFUS skin imaging system with a 100 MHz range transducer and a broadband driving electronics is discussed. A time-variant filter for inverse rf echo signal filtering was designed to compensate the system's depth-dependent imaging properties. Results of in vivo measurements are shown and discussed. PMID:17703658

  16. On the Block Independence in G-Inverse and Reflexive Inner Inverse of A Partitioned Matrix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Hui LIU; Mu Sheng WEI

    2007-01-01

    By applying the multiple quotient singular value decomposition QQQQQ-SVD, we study the block independence in g-inverse and reflexive inner inverse of 2×2 partitioned matrices, and prove a conjecture in [YijuWang,SIAM J. Matrix Anal. Appl., 19(2), 407-415(1998)].

  17. Interplay of Nitrogen-Atom Inversion and Conformational Inversion in Enantiomerization of 1H-1-Benzazepines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramig, Keith; Subramaniam, Gopal; Karimi, Sasan; Szalda, David J; Ko, Allen; Lam, Aaron; Li, Jeffrey; Coaderaj, Ani; Cavdar, Leyla; Bogdan, Lukasz; Kwon, Kitae; Greer, Edyta M

    2016-04-15

    A series of 2,4-disubstituted 1H-1-benzazepines, 2a-d, 4, and 6, were studied, varying both the substituents at C2 and C4 and at the nitrogen atom. The conformational inversion (ring-flip) and nitrogen-atom inversion (N-inversion) energetics were studied by variable-temperature NMR spectroscopy and computations. The steric bulk of the nitrogen-atom substituent was found to affect both the conformation of the azepine ring and the geometry around the nitrogen atom. Also affected were the Gibbs free energy barriers for the ring-flip and the N-inversion. When the nitrogen-atom substituent was alkyl, as in 2a-c, the geometry of the nitrogen atom was nearly planar and the azepine ring was highly puckered; the result was a relatively high-energy barrier to ring-flip and a low barrier to N-inversion. Conversely, when the nitrogen-atom substituent was a hydrogen atom, as in 2d, 4, and 6, the nitrogen atom was significantly pyramidalized and the azepine ring was less puckered; the result here was a relatively high energy barrier to N-inversion and a low barrier to ring-flip. In these N-unsubstituted compounds, it was found computationally that the lowest-energy stereodynamic process was ring-flip coupled with N-inversion, as N-inversion alone had a much higher energy barrier.

  18. Cine CT for Attenuation Correction in Cardiac PET/CT

    OpenAIRE

    Alessio, Adam M.; Kohlmyer, Steve; Branch, Kelley; Chen, Grace; Caldwell, James; Kinahan, Paul

    2007-01-01

    In dual-modality PET/CT systems, the CT scan provides the attenuation map for PET attenuation correction. The current clinical practice of obtaining a single helical CT scan provides only a snapshot of the respiratory cycle, whereas PET occurs over multiple respiratory cycles. Misalignment of the attenuation map and emission image because of respiratory motion causes errors in the attenuation correction factors and artifacts in the attenuation-corrected PET image. To rectify this problem, we ...

  19. Ventilation with heat recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tommerup, Henrik M.; Svendsen, Svend

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the experiences from the use of ventilation with heat recovery in several experimental single-family houses developed and built within the last four years to meet the new Danish energy requirements of 2005. Included are descriptions of the ventilation system components...... and the main functional demands as well as measurements of the thermal efficiency, electricity consumptions and building air tightness. The paper addresses the aspects of minimizing the heat loss from the duct system and the heat recovery unit (when placed in an unheated attic space) in order to obtain...... an acceptable efficiency. Furthermore, solutions to secure the air tightness of the building envelope are suggested. The paper does not address problems with condensate of water in the exchanger that may freeze in cold climate conditions. This complex of problem is dealt with in a separate paper....

  20. Water recovery in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamponnet, C; Savage, C J; Amblard, P; Lasserre, J C; Personne, J C; Germain, J C

    1999-03-01

    In the absence of recycling, water represents over 90% of the life-support consumables for a manned spacecraft. In addition, over 90% of the waste water generated can be classified as moderately or slightly contaminated (e.g. shower water, condensate from the air-conditioning system, etc.). The ability to recover potable water from moderately contaminated waste water hence enables significant savings to be made in resupply costs. A development model of such a water-recovery system, based on membrane technology has been produced and tested using "real waste water" based on used shower water Results indicate some 95% recovery of potable water meeting ESA standards, with total elimination of microbial contaminants such as bacteria, spores and viruses. PMID:11725802

  1. Recovery in aluminium

    OpenAIRE

    Gundlach, Carsten

    2006-01-01

    In the present thesis the development of a unique experimental method for volume characterisation of individual embedded crystallites down to a radius of 150 nm is presented. This method is applied to in-situ studies of recovery in aluminium. The method is an extension of 3DXRD microscopy, an X-ray diffraction technique for studies of the evolution of grains within polycrystalline materials. The much smaller volume of the crystallites of interest here in comparison to grains implies that the ...

  2. Sludge recovery apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved design of a sludge recovery apparatus used in the fabrication of nuclear fuel is described. This apparatus provides for automatic separation of sludge from the grinder coolant, drying of the sludge into a flowable powder and transfer of the dry powder to a salvage container. It can be constructed to comply with criticality-safe-geometry requirements and to obviate need for operating personnel in its immediate vicinity. (UK)

  3. Superconducting energy recovery linacs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    2016-10-01

    High-average-power and high-brightness electron beams from a combination of laser photocathode electron guns and a superconducting energy recovery linac (ERL) is an emerging accelerator science with applications in ERL light sources, high repetition rate free electron lasers , electron cooling, electron ion colliders and more. This paper reviews the accelerator physics issues of superconducting ERLs, discusses major subsystems and provides a few examples of superconducting ERLs.

  4. Anatomically Correct Surface Recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Ramsbøl; Nielsen, Jannik Boll; Larsen, Rasmus;

    2015-01-01

    We present a method for 3D surface recovery in partial surface scans. The method is based on an Active Shape Model, which is used to predict missing data. The model is constructed using a bootstrap framework, where an initially small collection of hand-annotated samples is used to fit......-of-the-art surface reconstruction algorithm, the presented method gives matching prediction results for the synthetic evaluation samples and superior results for the direct scanner data....

  5. The Recovery Theorem

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen A. Ross

    2011-01-01

    We can only estimate the distribution of stock returns but we observe the distribution of risk neutral state prices. Risk neutral state prices are the product of risk aversion - the pricing kernel - and the natural probability distribution. The Recovery Theorem enables us to separate these and to determine the market's forecast of returns and the market's risk aversion from state prices alone. Among other things, this allows us to determine the pricing kernel, the market risk premium, the pro...

  6. Frequency dependent attenuation characteristics of coda waves in the Northwestern Himalayan (India) region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sushil; Singh, Priyamvada; Singh, Pitam; Biswal, Shubhasmita; Parija, Mahesh Prasad

    2016-03-01

    Digital seismogram data of 82 earthquakes from the Northwestern Himalayan (India) region recorded at different stations during 2004-2006 were analyzed to study the seismic coda wave attenuation characteristics in this region. We used 132 seismic observations from local earthquakes with a hypocentral distance India) by the Wadia institute of Himalayan Geology, Dehradun. The QC values were estimated at 10 central frequencies: 1.5, 3, 5, 7, 9, 12, 16, 20, 24, and 28 Hz using starting lapse-times of 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 s and coda window-lengths of 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 s. The QC fits the frequency dependent power-law, QC =Q0fn . For a 10 s lapse time with a 10-s coda window length QC = 47.42f1.012 and for a 50 s lapse time with a 50 s coda window length, QC = 204.1f0.934 . Q0 (QC at 1 Hz) varied from ∼47 for a 10 s lapse time and a 10 s window length, to ∼204 for a 50 s lapse time and a 50 s window length. An average frequency dependent power law fit for the study region may be given as QC = 116.716f0.9943 . The exponent of the frequency dependence law n ranged from 1.08 to 0.9, which correlates well with values obtained in other seismically and tectonically active and heterogeneous regions of the world. In our study region, QC increases both with respect to lapse time and frequency, i.e., the attenuation decreases as the quality factor is inversely proportional to attenuation. The low QC values or high attenuation at lower frequencies and high QC values or low attenuation at higher frequencies suggest that the heterogeneity decreases with increasing depth in our study region.

  7. Isoflurane anesthesia initiated at the onset of reperfusion attenuates oxidative and hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey A Sosunov

    Full Text Available This study demonstrates that in mice subjected to hypoxia-ischemia (HI brain injury isoflurane anesthesia initiated upon reperfusion limits a release of mitochondrial oxidative radicals by inhibiting a recovery of complex-I dependent mitochondrial respiration. This significantly attenuates an oxidative stress and reduces the extent of HI brain injury. Neonatal mice were subjected to HI, and at the initiation of reperfusion were exposed to isoflurane with or without mechanical ventilation. At the end of HI and isoflurane exposure cerebral mitochondrial respiration, H2O2 emission rates were measured followed by an assessment of cerebral oxidative damage and infarct volumes. At 8 weeks after HI navigational memory and brain atrophy were assessed. In vitro, direct effect of isoflurane on mitochondrial H2O2 emission was compared to that of complex-I inhibitor, rotenone. Compared to controls, 15 minutes of isoflurane anesthesia inhibited recovery of the compex I-dependent mitochondrial respiration and decreased H2O2 production in mitochondria supported with succinate. This was associated with reduced oxidative brain injury, superior navigational memory and decreased cerebral atrophy compared to the vehicle-treated HI-mice. Extended isoflurane anesthesia was associated with sluggish recovery of cerebral blood flow (CBF and the neuroprotection was lost. However, when isoflurane anesthesia was supported with mechanical ventilation the CBF recovery improved, the event associated with further reduction of infarct volume compared to HI-mice exposed to isoflurane without respiratory support. Thus, in neonatal mice brief isoflurane anesthesia initiated at the onset of reperfusion limits mitochondrial release of oxidative radicals and attenuates an oxidative stress. This novel mechanism contributes to neuroprotective action of isoflurane. The use of mechanical ventilation during isoflurane anesthesia counterbalances negative effect of isoflurane anesthesia on

  8. Physical mechanism of seismic attenuation in a two-phase medium%双相介质中地震波衰减的物理机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李子顺

    2008-01-01

    High-frequency seismic attenuation is conventionally attributed to anelastic absorption. In this paper, I present three studies on high-frequency seismic attenuation and propose that the physical mechanism results from the interference of elastic microscopic multiple scattering waves. First, I propose a new theory on wave propagation in a two-phase medium which is based on the concept that the basic unit for wave propagation is a nano-mass point. As a result of the elasticity variations of pore fluid and rock framework, micro multiple scattering waves would emerge at the wavelength of the seismic waves passing through the two-phase medium and their interference and overlap would generate high-frequency seismic attenuation. Second, I present a study of the frequency response of seismic transmitted waves by modeling thin-layers with thicknesses no larger than pore diameters. Results indicate that high-frequency seismic waves attenuate slightly in a near-surface water zone but decay significantly in a near-surface gas zone. Third, I analyze the seismic attenuation characteristics in near-surface water and gas zones using dual-well shots in the Songliao Basin, and demonstrate that the high-frequency seismic waves attenuate slightly in water zones but in gas zones the 160-1600 Hz propagating waves decay significantly. The seismic attenuation characteristics from field observations coincide with the modeling results. Conclusions drawn from these studies theoretically support seismic attenuation recovery.

  9. FAST INVERSION OF SOLAR Ca II SPECTRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, C. [National Solar Observatory (NSO), 3010 Coronal Loop, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Choudhary, D. P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University, Northridge (CSUN), CA 91330-8268 (United States); Rezaei, R. [Kiepenheuer-Institut für Sonnenphysik (KIS), Schöneckstr. 6, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Louis, R. E., E-mail: cbeck@nso.edu [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany)

    2015-01-10

    We present a fast (<<1 s per profile) inversion code for solar Ca II lines. The code uses an archive of spectra that are synthesized prior to the inversion under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). We show that it can be successfully applied to spectrograph data or more sparsely sampled spectra from two-dimensional spectrometers. From a comparison to a non-LTE inversion of the same set of spectra, we derive a first-order non-LTE correction to the temperature stratifications derived in the LTE approach. The correction factor is close to unity up to log τ ∼ –3 and increases to values of 2.5 and 4 at log τ = –6 in the quiet Sun and the umbra, respectively.

  10. Inversion for seismic anisotropy using genetic algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horne, S. (British Geological Survey, Edinburgh (United Kingdom) Univ. of Edinburgh (United Kingdom). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics); MacBeth, C. (Univ. of Edinburgh (United Kingdom). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1994-11-01

    A general inversion scheme based on a genetic algorithm is developed to invert seismic observations for anisotropic parameters. The technique is applied to the inversion of shear-wave observations from two azimuthal VSP data sets from the Conoco test site in Oklahoma. Horizontal polarizations and time-delays are inverted for hexagonal and orthorhombic symmetries. The model solutions are consistent with previous studies using trial and error matching of full waveform synthetics. The shear-wave splitting observations suggest the presence of a shear-wave line singularity and are consistent with a dipping fracture system which is known to exist at the test site. Application of the inversion scheme prior to full waveform modeling demonstrates that a considerable saving in time is possible while retaining the same degree of accuracy.

  11. Estimating stellar mean density through seismic inversions

    CERN Document Server

    Reese, D R; Goupil, M J; Thompson, M J; Deheuvels, S

    2012-01-01

    Determining the mass of stars is crucial both to improving stellar evolution theory and to characterising exoplanetary systems. Asteroseismology offers a promising way to estimate stellar mean density. When combined with accurate radii determinations, such as is expected from GAIA, this yields accurate stellar masses. The main difficulty is finding the best way to extract the mean density from a set of observed frequencies. We seek to establish a new method for estimating stellar mean density, which combines the simplicity of a scaling law while providing the accuracy of an inversion technique. We provide a framework in which to construct and evaluate kernel-based linear inversions which yield directly the mean density of a star. We then describe three different inversion techniques (SOLA and two scaling laws) and apply them to the sun, several test cases and three stars. The SOLA approach and the scaling law based on the surface correcting technique described by Kjeldsen et al. (2008) yield comparable result...

  12. Probabilistic inversion for chicken processing lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, Roger M. [Department of Mathematics, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands)]. E-mail: r.m.cooke@ewi.tudelft.nl; Nauta, Maarten [Microbiological Laboratory for Health Protection RIVM, Bilthoven (Netherlands); Havelaar, Arie H. [Microbiological Laboratory for Health Protection RIVM, Bilthoven (Netherlands); Fels, Ine van der [Microbiological Laboratory for Health Protection RIVM, Bilthoven (Netherlands)

    2006-10-15

    We discuss an application of probabilistic inversion techniques to a model of campylobacter transmission in chicken processing lines. Such techniques are indicated when we wish to quantify a model which is new and perhaps unfamiliar to the expert community. In this case there are no measurements for estimating model parameters, and experts are typically unable to give a considered judgment. In such cases, experts are asked to quantify their uncertainty regarding variables which can be predicted by the model. The experts' distributions (after combination) are then pulled back onto the parameter space of the model, a process termed 'probabilistic inversion'. This study illustrates two such techniques, iterative proportional fitting (IPF) and PARmeter fitting for uncertain models (PARFUM). In addition, we illustrate how expert judgement on predicted observable quantities in combination with probabilistic inversion may be used for model validation and/or model criticism.

  13. Optimization and Inverse Design of Pump Impeller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyauchi, S.; Zhu, B.; Luo, X.; Piao, B.; Matsumoto, H.; Sano, M.; Kassai, N.

    2012-11-01

    As for pump impellers, the meridional flow channel and blade-to-blade flow channel, which are relatively independent of each other but greatly affect performance, are designed in parallel. And the optimization design is used for the former and the inverse design is used for the latter. To verify this new design method, a mixed-flow impeller was made. Next, we use Tani's inverse design method for the blade loading of inverse design. It is useful enough to change a deceleration rate freely and greatly. And it can integrally express the rear blade loading of various methods by NACA, Zangeneh and Stratford. We controlled the deceleration rate by shape parameter m, and its value became almost same with Tani's recommended value of the laminar airfoil.

  14. Fast inversion of solar Ca II spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, C; Rezaei, R; Louis, R E

    2014-01-01

    We present a fast (<< 1 s per profile) inversion code for solar Ca II lines. The code uses an archive of spectra that are synthesized prior to the inversion under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). We show that it can be successfully applied to spectrograph data or more sparsely sampled spectra from two-dimensional spectrometers. From a comparison to a non-LTE inversion of the same set of spectra, we derive a first-order non-LTE correction to the temperature stratifications derived in the LTE approach. The correction factor is close to unity up to log tau ~ -3 and increases to values of 2.5 and 4 at log tau = -6 in the quiet Sun and the umbra, respectively.

  15. Optimization and Inverse Design of Pump Impeller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As for pump impellers, the meridional flow channel and blade-to-blade flow channel, which are relatively independent of each other but greatly affect performance, are designed in parallel. And the optimization design is used for the former and the inverse design is used for the latter. To verify this new design method, a mixed-flow impeller was made. Next, we use Tani's inverse design method for the blade loading of inverse design. It is useful enough to change a deceleration rate freely and greatly. And it can integrally express the rear blade loading of various methods by NACA, Zangeneh and Stratford. We controlled the deceleration rate by shape parameter m, and its value became almost same with Tani's recommended value of the laminar airfoil.

  16. Inverse Scattering Approach to Improving Pattern Recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapline, G; Fu, C

    2005-02-15

    The Helmholtz machine provides what may be the best existing model for how the mammalian brain recognizes patterns. Based on the observation that the ''wake-sleep'' algorithm for training a Helmholtz machine is similar to the problem of finding the potential for a multi-channel Schrodinger equation, we propose that the construction of a Schrodinger potential using inverse scattering methods can serve as a model for how the mammalian brain learns to extract essential information from sensory data. In particular, inverse scattering theory provides a conceptual framework for imagining how one might use EEG and MEG observations of brain-waves together with sensory feedback to improve human learning and pattern recognition. Longer term, implementation of inverse scattering algorithms on a digital or optical computer could be a step towards mimicking the seamless information fusion of the mammalian brain.

  17. Geometric theory of inversion and seismic imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Lau, August

    2015-01-01

    The goal of inversion is to estimate the model which generates the data of observations with a specific modeling equation. One general approach to inversion is to use optimization methods which are algebraic in nature to define an objective function. This is the case for objective functions like minimizing RMS of amplitude, residual traveltime error in tomography, cross correlation and sometimes mixing different norms (e.g. L1 of model + L2 of RMS error). Algebraic objective function assumes that the optimal solution will come up with the correct geometry. It is sometimes difficult to understand how one number (error of the fit) could miraculously come up with the detail geometry of the earth model. If one models the earth as binary rock parameters (only two values for velocity variation), one could see that the geometry of the rugose boundaries of the geobodies might not be solvable by inversion using algebraic objective function.

  18. Error handling strategies in multiphase inverse modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finsterle, S.; Zhang, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Parameter estimation by inverse modeling involves the repeated evaluation of a function of residuals. These residuals represent both errors in the model and errors in the data. In practical applications of inverse modeling of multiphase flow and transport, the error structure of the final residuals often significantly deviates from the statistical assumptions that underlie standard maximum likelihood estimation using the least-squares method. Large random or systematic errors are likely to lead to convergence problems, biased parameter estimates, misleading uncertainty measures, or poor predictive capabilities of the calibrated model. The multiphase inverse modeling code iTOUGH2 supports strategies that identify and mitigate the impact of systematic or non-normal error structures. We discuss these approaches and provide an overview of the error handling features implemented in iTOUGH2.

  19. Inversion of Stokes Profiles with Systematic Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Ramos, A Asensio; Gonzalez, M J Martinez; Yabar, A Pastor

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative thermodynamical, dynamical and magnetic properties of the solar and stellar plasmas are obtained by interpreting their emergent non-polarized and polarized spectrum. This inference requires the selection of a set of spectral lines particularly sensitive to the physical conditions in the plasma and a suitable parametric model of the solar/stellar atmosphere. Nonlinear inversion codes are then used to fit the model to the observations. However, the presence of systematic effects like nearby or blended spectral lines, telluric absorption or incorrect correction of the continuum, among others, can strongly affect the results. We present an extension to current inversion codes that can deal with these effects in a transparent way. The resulting algorithm is very simple and can be applied to any existing inversion code with the addition of a few lines of code as an extra step in each iteration.

  20. Psycholinguistic Evidence for Inverse Scope in Korean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sunyoung; O'Grady, William

    2016-08-01

    We use experimental data to shed light on the ongoing question of whether Korean allows inverse scope interpretation in sentences containing an indefinite subject and a universally quantified direct object (e.g., 'Someone bought each loaf of bread at the bakery'). The results of an off-line acceptability judgment task (n = 38) and an online self-paced reading task (n [Formula: see text] 22) indicate that inverse scope interpretations are in fact permitted in Korean as a secondary option, as is also the case in English. We argue that the dispreference for the inverse scope reading reflects processing considerations related to burden on working memory.

  1. Inverse Folding of RNA Pseudoknot Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, James Z M; Reidys, Christian M

    2010-01-01

    Background: RNA exhibits a variety of structural configurations. Here we consider a structure to be tantamount to the noncrossing Watson-Crick and \\pairGU-base pairings (secondary structure) and additional cross-serial base pairs. These interactions are called pseudoknots and are observed across the whole spectrum of RNA functionalities. In the context of studying natural RNA structures, searching for new ribozymes and designing artificial RNA, it is of interest to find RNA sequences folding into a specific structure and to analyze their induced neutral networks. Since the established inverse folding algorithms, {\\tt RNAinverse}, {\\tt RNA-SSD} as well as {\\tt INFO-RNA} are limited to RNA secondary structures, we present in this paper the inverse folding algorithm {\\tt Inv} which can deal with 3-noncrossing, canonical pseudoknot structures. Results: In this paper we present the inverse folding algorithm {\\tt Inv}. We give a detailed analysis of {\\tt Inv}, including pseudocodes. We show that {\\tt Inv} allows to...

  2. Reservoir parameter inversion based on weighted statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Jin-Yong; Gao, Jian-Hu; Yong, Xue-Shan; Li, Sheng-Jun; Liu, Bin-Yang; Zhao, Wan-Jin

    2015-12-01

    Variation of reservoir physical properties can cause changes in its elastic parameters. However, this is not a simple linear relation. Furthermore, the lack of observations, data overlap, noise interference, and idealized models increases the uncertainties of the inversion result. Thus, we propose an inversion method that is different from traditional statistical rock physics modeling. First, we use deterministic and stochastic rock physics models considering the uncertainties of elastic parameters obtained by prestack seismic inversion and introduce weighting coefficients to establish a weighted statistical relation between reservoir and elastic parameters. Second, based on the weighted statistical relation, we use Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations to generate the random joint distribution space of reservoir and elastic parameters that serves as a sample solution space of an objective function. Finally, we propose a fast solution criterion to maximize the posterior probability density and obtain reservoir parameters. The method has high efficiency and application potential.

  3. Recovery of Phenotypes Obtained by Adaptive Evolution through Inverse Metabolic Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hong, Kuk-Ki; Nielsen, Jens

    2012-01-01

    In a previous study, system level analysis of adaptively evolved yeast mutants showing improved galactose utilization revealed relevant mutations. The governing mutations were suggested to be in the Ras/PKA signaling pathway and ergosterol metabolism. Here, site-directed mutants having one of the...... the identification of specific mutations by systems biology can direct new metabolic engineering strategies for improving galactose utilization by yeast....

  4. New Modified Band Limited Impedance (BLIMP) Inversion Method Using Envelope Attribute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulana, Z. L.; Saputro, O. D.; Latief, F. D. E.

    2016-01-01

    Earth attenuates high frequencies from seismic wavelet. Low frequency seismics cannot be obtained by low quality geophone. The low frequencies (0-10 Hz) that are not present in seismic data are important to obtain a good result in acoustic impedance (AI) inversion. AI is important to determine reservoir quality by converting AI to reservoir properties like porosity, permeability and water saturation. The low frequencies can be supplied from impedance log (AI logs), velocity analysis, and from the combination of both data. In this study, we propose that the low frequencies could be obtained from the envelope seismic attribute. This new proposed method is essentially a modified BLIMP (Band Limited Impedance) inversion method, in which the AI logs for BLIMP substituted with the envelope attribute. In low frequency domain (0-10 Hz), the envelope attribute produces high amplitude. This low frequency from the envelope attribute is utilized to replace low frequency from AI logs in BLIMP. Linear trend in this method is acquired from the AI logs. In this study, the method is applied on synthetic seismograms created from impedance log from well ‘X’. The mean squared error from the modified BLIMP inversion is 2-4% for each trace (variation in error is caused by different normalization constant), lower than the conventional BLIMP inversion which produces error of 8%. The new method is also applied on Marmousi2 dataset and show promising result. The modified BLIMP inversion result from Marmousi2 by using one log AI is better than the one produced from the conventional method.

  5. An effective medium inversion algorithm for gas hydrate quantification and its application to laboratory and borehole measurements of gas hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chand, S.; Minshull, T.A.; Priest, J.A.; Best, A.I.; Clayton, C.R.I.; Waite, W.F.

    2006-01-01

    The presence of gas hydrate in marine sediments alters their physical properties. In some circumstances, gas hydrate may cement sediment grains together and dramatically increase the seismic P- and S-wave velocities of the composite medium. Hydrate may also form a load-bearing structure within the sediment microstructure, but with different seismic wave attenuation characteristics, changing the attenuation behaviour of the composite. Here we introduce an inversion algorithm based on effective medium modelling to infer hydrate saturations from velocity and attenuation measurements on hydrate-bearing sediments. The velocity increase is modelled as extra binding developed by gas hydrate that strengthens the sediment microstructure. The attenuation increase is modelled through a difference in fluid flow properties caused by different permeabilities in the sediment and hydrate microstructures. We relate velocity and attenuation increases in hydrate-bearing sediments to their hydrate content, using an effective medium inversion algorithm based on the self-consistent approximation (SCA), differential effective medium (DEM) theory, and Biot and squirt flow mechanisms of fluid flow. The inversion algorithm is able to convert observations in compressional and shear wave velocities and attenuations to hydrate saturation in the sediment pore space. We applied our algorithm to a data set from the Mallik 2L–38 well, Mackenzie delta, Canada, and to data from laboratory measurements on gas-rich and water-saturated sand samples. Predictions using our algorithm match the borehole data and water-saturated laboratory data if the proportion of hydrate contributing to the load-bearing structure increases with hydrate saturation. The predictions match the gas-rich laboratory data if that proportion decreases with hydrate saturation. We attribute this difference to differences in hydrate formation mechanisms between the two environments.

  6. Mesoscale inversion of carbon sources and sinks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inverse methods at large scales are used to infer the spatial variability of carbon sources and sinks over the continents but their uncertainties remain large. Atmospheric concentrations integrate the surface flux variability but atmospheric transport models at low resolution are not able to simulate properly the local atmospheric dynamics at the measurement sites. However, the inverse estimates are more representative of the large spatial heterogeneity of the ecosystems compared to direct flux measurements. Top-down and bottom-up methods that aim at quantifying the carbon exchanges between the surface and the atmosphere correspond to different scales and are not easily comparable. During this phD, a mesoscale inverse system was developed to correct carbon fluxes at 8 km resolution. The high resolution transport model MesoNH was used to simulate accurately the variability of the atmospheric concentrations, which allowed us to reduce the uncertainty of the retrieved fluxes. All the measurements used here were observed during the intensive regional campaign CERES of May and June 2005, during which several instrumented towers measured CO2 concentrations and fluxes in the South West of France. Airborne measurements allowed us to observe concentrations at high altitude but also CO2 surface fluxes over large parts of the domain. First, the capacity of the inverse system to correct the CO2 fluxes was estimated using pseudo-data experiments. The largest fraction of the concentration variability was attributed to regional surface fluxes over an area of about 300 km around the site locations depending on the meteorological conditions. Second, an ensemble of simulations allowed us to define the spatial and temporal structures of the transport errors. Finally, the inverse fluxes at 8 km resolution were compared to direct flux measurements. The inverse system has been validated in space and time and showed an improvement of the first guess fluxes from a vegetation model

  7. Trimming and procrastination as inversion techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backus, George E.

    1996-12-01

    By examining the processes of truncating and approximating the model space (trimming it), and by committing to neither the objectivist nor the subjectivist interpretation of probability (procrastinating), we construct a formal scheme for solving linear and non-linear geophysical inverse problems. The necessary prior information about the correct model xE can be either a collection of inequalities or a probability measure describing where xE was likely to be in the model space X before the data vector y0 was measured. The results of the inversion are (1) a vector z0 that estimates some numerical properties zE of xE; (2) an estimate of the error δz = z0 - zE. As y0 is finite dimensional, so is z0, and hence in principle inversion cannot describe all of xE. The error δz is studied under successively more specialized assumptions about the inverse problem, culminating in a complete analysis of the linear inverse problem with a prior quadratic bound on xE. Our formalism appears to encompass and provide error estimates for many of the inversion schemes current in geomagnetism, and would be equally applicable in geodesy and seismology if adequate prior information were available there. As an idealized example we study the magnetic field at the core-mantle boundary, using satellite measurements of field elements at sites assumed to be almost uniformly distributed on a single spherical surface. Magnetospheric currents are neglected and the crustal field is idealized as a random process with rotationally invariant statistics. We find that an appropriate data compression diagonalizes the variance matrix of the crustal signal and permits an analytic trimming of the idealized problem.

  8. Ensemble Kalman methods for inverse problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) was introduced by Evensen in 1994 (Evensen 1994 J. Geophys. Res. 99 10143–62) as a novel method for data assimilation: state estimation for noisily observed time-dependent problems. Since that time it has had enormous impact in many application domains because of its robustness and ease of implementation, and numerical evidence of its accuracy. In this paper we propose the application of an iterative ensemble Kalman method for the solution of a wide class of inverse problems. In this context we show that the estimate of the unknown function that we obtain with the ensemble Kalman method lies in a subspace A spanned by the initial ensemble. Hence the resulting error may be bounded above by the error found from the best approximation in this subspace. We provide numerical experiments which compare the error incurred by the ensemble Kalman method for inverse problems with the error of the best approximation in A, and with variants on traditional least-squares approaches, restricted to the subspace A. In so doing we demonstrate that the ensemble Kalman method for inverse problems provides a derivative-free optimization method with comparable accuracy to that achieved by traditional least-squares approaches. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that the accuracy is of the same order of magnitude as that achieved by the best approximation. Three examples are used to demonstrate these assertions: inversion of a compact linear operator; inversion of piezometric head to determine hydraulic conductivity in a Darcy model of groundwater flow; and inversion of Eulerian velocity measurements at positive times to determine the initial condition in an incompressible fluid. (paper)

  9. Predicting functional recovery after acute ankle sprain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean R O'Connor

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Ankle sprains are among the most common acute musculoskeletal conditions presenting to primary care. Their clinical course is variable but there are limited recommendations on prognostic factors. Our primary aim was to identify clinical predictors of short and medium term functional recovery after ankle sprain. METHODS: A secondary analysis of data from adult participants (N = 85 with an acute ankle sprain, enrolled in a randomized controlled trial was undertaken. The predictive value of variables (age, BMI, gender, injury mechanism, previous injury, weight-bearing status, medial joint line pain, pain during weight-bearing dorsiflexion and lateral hop test recorded at baseline and at 4 weeks post injury were investigated for their prognostic ability. Recovery was determined from measures of subjective ankle function at short (4 weeks and medium term (4 months follow ups. Multivariate stepwise linear regression analyses were undertaken to evaluate the association between the aforementioned variables and functional recovery. RESULTS: Greater age, greater injury grade and weight-bearing status at baseline were associated with lower function at 4 weeks post injury (p<0.01; adjusted R square=0.34. Greater age, weight-bearing status at baseline and non-inversion injury mechanisms were associated with lower function at 4 months (p<0.01; adjusted R square=0.20. Pain on medial palpation and pain on dorsiflexion at 4 weeks were the most valuable prognostic indicators of function at 4 months (p< 0.01; adjusted R square=0.49. CONCLUSION: The results of the present study provide further evidence that ankle sprains have a variable clinical course. Age, injury grade, mechanism and weight-bearing status at baseline provide some prognostic information for short and medium term recovery. Clinical assessment variables at 4 weeks were the strongest predictors of recovery, explaining 50% of the variance in ankle function at 4 months. Further

  10. Light beam attenuation and backscattering properties of particles in the Bohai Sea and Yellow Sea with relation to biogeochemical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shengqiang; Qiu, Zhongfeng; Sun, Deyong; Shen, Xiaojing; Zhang, Hailong

    2016-06-01

    This study reports the first results of the variability in light beam attenuation and the backscattering properties of particles and their controlling factors during the summer in the Bohai Sea (BS) and Yellow Sea (YS), which are two typical shallow and semienclosed seas. We observe large variations in the particulate beam attenuation (cp) and backscattering coefficients (bbp); such variations are mainly attributed to changes in the total suspended matter, while the cross-sectional area concentration shows tighter relationships with both cp and bbp. The mass-specific beam attenuation (cp*) and backscattering coefficients (bbp*) vary more widely over about two orders of magnitude. The attenuation (Qce) and backscattering efficiencies (Qbbe) are important factors that control cp* and bbp*, which clearly separate all the samples into two types. Type 1 samples show low Qce and Qbbe and contain relatively high proportions of organic or large particles, while type 2 samples have high Qce and Qbbe and mainly contain relatively small mineral particles. The majority of the variability in cp* and bbp* within each type is related to the inverse of the product of particle apparent density (ρa) and mean diameter (DA); ρa plays a major role, while DA exerts only a slight impact. Overall, this study provides general knowledge of particulate beam attenuation and the backscattering properties in the BS and YS, which may improve our understanding of underwater radiative transfer processes, marine biogeochemical processes and ocean color algorithms.

  11. Attenuation of ear muffs in Canadian mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savich, M.U.

    1979-12-01

    The main characteristics of eleven commercially available ear muffs were investigated in the laboratory and analyzed by a psychophysical and a physical method. Nine ear muffs were tested in mines. The three best muffs had bands passing behind the head. The ear muff with a support strap, which improves comfort and maintains a good fit during wear, showed the best attenuation. Causes of poor attenuation are listed. None of the ear muffs tested had all the characteristics desirable in an ideal unit. Because of unsatisfactory attenuation in working conditions, it should be a mandatory requirement that workers wear both ear muffs and ear plugs if the noise level is higher than 105 dBA.

  12. Finite Element Analysis of Honeycomb Impact Attenuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Seung-Yong; Choi, Seung-Kyu; Kim, Nohyu

    To participate in Student Formula Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) competitions, it is necessary to build an impact attenuator that would give an average deceleration not to exceed 20g when it runs into a rigid wall. Students can use numerical simulations or experimental test data to show that their car satisfies this safety requirement. A student group to study formula cars at the Korea University of Technology and Education has designed a vehicle to take part in a SAE competition, and a honeycomb structure was adopted as the impact attenuator. In this paper, finite element calculations were carried out to investigate the dynamic behavior of the honeycomb attenuator. Deceleration and deformation behaviors were studied. Effect of the yield strength was checked by comparing the numerical results. ABAQUS/Explicit finite element code was used.

  13. Live attenuated vaccines for invasive Salmonella infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennant, Sharon M; Levine, Myron M

    2015-06-19

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi produces significant morbidity and mortality worldwide despite the fact that there are licensed Salmonella Typhi vaccines available. This is primarily due to the fact that these vaccines are not used in the countries that most need them. There is growing recognition that an effective invasive Salmonella vaccine formulation must also prevent infection due to other Salmonella serovars. We anticipate that a multivalent vaccine that targets the following serovars will be needed to control invasive Salmonella infections worldwide: Salmonella Typhi, Salmonella Paratyphi A, Salmonella Paratyphi B (currently uncommon but may become dominant again), Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Choleraesuis (as well as other Group C Salmonella). Live attenuated vaccines are an attractive vaccine formulation for use in developing as well as developed countries. Here, we describe the methods of attenuation that have been used to date to create live attenuated Salmonella vaccines and provide an update on the progress that has been made on these vaccines.

  14. Graphene-Based Waveguide Terahertz Wave Attenuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian-rong, Hu; Jiu-sheng, Li; Guo-hua, Qiu

    2016-07-01

    We design an electrically controllable terahertz wave attenuator by using graphene. We show that terahertz wave can be confined and propagate on S-shaped graphene waveguide with little radiation losses, and the confined terahertz wave is further manipulated and controlled via external applied voltage bias. The simulated results show that, when chemical potential changes from 0.03 into 0.05 eV, the extinction ratio of the terahertz wave attenuator can be tuned from 1.28 to 39.42 dB. Besides the simplicity, this novel terahertz wave attenuator has advantages of small size (24 × 30 μm2), a low insertion loss, and good controllability. It has a potential application for forthcoming planar terahertz wave integrated circuit fields.

  15. Dispersion analysis with inverse dielectric function modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayerhöfer, Thomas G; Ivanovski, Vladimir; Popp, Jürgen

    2016-11-01

    We investigate how dispersion analysis can profit from the use of a Lorentz-type description of the inverse dielectric function. In particular at higher angles of incidence, reflectance spectra using p-polarized light are dominated by bands from modes that have their transition moments perpendicular to the surface. Accordingly, the spectra increasingly resemble inverse dielectric functions. A corresponding description can therefore eliminate the complex dependencies of the dispersion parameters, allow their determination and facilitate a more accurate description of the optical properties of single crystals. PMID:27294550

  16. Inverse problem for axial-deformed potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the literature about Inverse Problems there are no tractable methods for construction of nonspherical potentials from the asymptotic wave function. This problem turned out to be solved in special cases. The methods of reconstruction from scattering data are given for the class of potentials admitting the separation of variables in spheroidal coordinates. This is the first case when the agorithms of the inverse problem solution for spherically-nonsymmetrical local potentials can practically be realised. The modifications of the formalisms of Regge-Newton-Sabatier and finite-difference approximation of Hooshyar-Rasavy are considered

  17. Relative risk regression models with inverse polynomials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Yang; Woodward, Mark

    2013-08-30

    The proportional hazards model assumes that the log hazard ratio is a linear function of parameters. In the current paper, we model the log relative risk as an inverse polynomial, which is particularly suitable for modeling bounded and asymmetric functions. The parameters estimated by maximizing the partial likelihood are consistent and asymptotically normal. The advantages of the inverse polynomial model over the ordinary polynomial model and the fractional polynomial model for fitting various asymmetric log relative risk functions are shown by simulation. The utility of the method is further supported by analyzing two real data sets, addressing the specific question of the location of the minimum risk threshold.

  18. Emergent strategies for inverse molecular design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BERATAN; David; N.

    2009-01-01

    Molecular design is essential and ubiquitous in chemistry,physics,biology,and material science.The immense space of available candidate molecules requires novel optimization strategies and algorithms for exploring the space and achieving efficient and effective molecular design.This paper summarizes the current progress toward developing practical theoretical optimization schemes for molecular design.In particular,we emphasize emergent strategies for inverse molecular design.Several representative design examples,based on recently developed strategies,are described to demonstrate the principles of inverse molecular design.

  19. Optimal Transport for Seismic Full Waveform Inversion

    CERN Document Server

    Engquist, Bjorn; Yang, Yunan

    2016-01-01

    Full waveform inversion is a successful procedure for determining properties of the earth from surface measurements in seismology. This inverse problem is solved by a PDE constrained optimization where unknown coefficients in a computed wavefield are adjusted to minimize the mismatch with the measured data. We propose using the Wasserstein metric, which is related to optimal transport, for measuring this mismatch. Several advantageous properties are proved with regards to convexity of the objective function and robustness with respect to noise. The Wasserstein metric is computed by solving a Monge-Ampere equation. We describe an algorithm for computing its Frechet gradient for use in the optimization. Numerical examples are given.

  20. APPROXIMATE AMENABILITY OF CERTAIN INVERSE SEMIGROUP ALGEBRAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mehdi ROSTAMI; Abdolrasoul POURABBAS; Morteza ESSMAILI

    2013-01-01

    In this article,the approximate amenability of semigroup algebra e1(S) is investigated,where S is a uniformly locally finite inverse semigroup.Indeed,we show that for a uniformly locally finite inverse semigroup S,the notions of amenability,approximate amenability and bounded approximate amenability of e1 (S) are equivalent.We use this to give a direct proof of the approximate amenability of e1(S) for a Brandt semigroup S.Moreover,we characterize the approximate amenability of e1(S),where S is a uniformly locally finite band semigroup.

  1. Inverse potential scattering in duct acoustics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Barbara J; Pike, E Roy; Sharp, David B; Aktosun, Tuncay

    2006-01-01

    The inverse problem of the noninvasive measurement of the shape of an acoustical duct in which one-dimensional wave propagation can be assumed is examined within the theoretical framework of the governing Klein-Gordon equation. Previous deterministic methods developed over the last 40 years have all required direct measurement of the reflectance or input impedance but now, by application of the methods of inverse quantum scattering to the acoustical system, it is shown that the reflectance can be algorithmically derived from the radiated wave. The potential and area functions of the duct can subsequently be reconstructed. The results are discussed with particular reference to acoustic pulse reflectometry.

  2. 3D geophysical inversion for contact surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelièvre, Peter; Farquharson, Colin

    2014-05-01

    Geologists' interpretations about the Earth typically involve distinct rock units with contacts (interfaces) between them. In contrast, standard minimum-structure volumetric inversions (performed on meshes of space-filling cells) recover smooth models inconsistent with such interpretations. There are several approaches through which geophysical inversion can help recover models with the desired characteristics. Some authors have developed iterative strategies in which several volumetric inversions are performed with regularization parameters changing to achieve sharper interfaces at automatically determined locations. Another approach is to redesign the regularization to be consistent with the desired model characteristics, e.g. L1-like norms or compactness measures. A few researchers have taken approaches that limit the recovered values to lie within particular ranges, resulting in sharp discontinuities; these include binary inversion, level set methods and clustering strategies. In most of the approaches mentioned above, the model parameterization considers the physical properties in each of the many space-filling cells within the volume of interest. The exception are level set methods, in which a higher dimensional function is parameterized and the contact surface is determined from the zero-level of that function. However, even level-set methods rely on an underlying volumetric mesh. We are researching a fundamentally different type of inversion that parameterizes the Earth in terms of the contact surfaces between rock units. 3D geological Earth models typically comprise wireframe surfaces of tessellated triangles or other polygonal planar facets. This wireframe representation allows for flexible and efficient generation of complicated geological structures. Therefore, a natural approach for representing a geophysical model in an inversion is to parameterize the wireframe contact surfaces as the coordinates of the nodes (facet vertices). The geological and

  3. Efficient matrix inversion based on VLIW architecture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zhang,Fu Li,; Guangming Shi

    2014-01-01

    Matrix inversion is a critical part in communication, signal processing and electromagnetic system. A flexible and scal-able very long instruction word (VLIW) processor with clustered architecture is proposed for matrix inversion. A global register file (RF) is used to connect al the clusters. Two nearby clusters share a local register file. The instruction sets are also designed for the VLIW processor. Experimental results show that the proposed VLIW architecture takes only 45 latency to invert a 4 × 4 matrix when running at 150 MHz. The proposed design is roughly five times faster than the DSP solution in processing speed.

  4. Ill-posed inverse problems in economics

    OpenAIRE

    Horowitz, Joel

    2013-01-01

    A parameter of an econometric model is identified if there is a one-to-one or many-to-one mapping from the population distribution of the available data to the parameter. Often, this mapping is obtained by inverting a mapping from the parameter to the population distribution. If the inverse mapping is discontinuous, then estimation of the parameter usually presents an ill-posed inverse problem. Such problems arise in many settings in economics and other fields in which the parameter of intere...

  5. Inverse splicing of a group II intron.

    OpenAIRE

    Jarrell, K A

    1993-01-01

    I describe the self-splicing of an RNA that consists of exon sequences flanked by group II intron sequences. I find that this RNA undergoes accurate splicing in vitro, yielding an excised exon circle. This splicing reaction involves the joining of the 5' splice site at the end of an exon to the 3' splice site at the beginning of the same exon; thus, I term it inverse splicing. Inverse splicing provides a potential mechanism for exon scrambling, for exon deletion in alternative splicing pathwa...

  6. Inversion improves the recognition of facial expression in thatcherized images

    OpenAIRE

    Psalta, Lilia; Andrews, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    The Thatcher illusion provides a compelling example of the face inversion effect. However, the marked effect of inversion in the Thatcher illusion contrasts to other studies that report only a small effect of inversion on the recognition of facial expressions. To address this discrepancy, we compared the effects of inversion and thatcherization on the recognition of facial expressions. We found that inversion of normal faces caused only a small reduction in the recognition of facial expressio...

  7. Application of homotopy parameter inversion method in Miyun Reservoir

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xin; LI Yong; CHEN Duowei

    2009-01-01

    The large-scale convergence of homotopy parametric inversion method on the water quality model parameters calculated was used, with application in parametric inversion calculation of total phosphorus of Beijing Miyun Reservoir. Through calculated and compared the error of sedimentation rate by homotopy parametric inversion method and genetic inversion calculation method, the results indicate that homotopy parametric inversion method has good stability, calculating speed, and even if the initial selection away from the objective function, the solution still has a good convergence.

  8. Is there seismic attenuation in the mantle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricard, Y.; Durand, S.; Montagner, J.-P.; Chambat, F.

    2014-02-01

    The small scale heterogeneity of the mantle is mostly due to the mixing of petrological heterogeneities by a smooth but chaotic convection and should consist in a laminated structure (marble cake) with a power spectrum S(k) varying as 1/k, where k is the wavenumber of the anomalies. This distribution of heterogeneities during convective stirring with negligible diffusion, called Batchelor regime is documented by fluid dynamic experiments and corresponds to what can be inferred from geochemistry and seismic tomography. This laminated structure imposes density, seismic velocity and potentially, anisotropic heterogeneities with similar 1/k spectra. A seismic wave of wavenumber k0 crossing such a medium is partly reflected by the heterogeneities and we show that the scattered energy is proportional to k0S(2k0). The reduction of energy for the propagating wave appears therefore equivalent to a quality factor 1/Q∝k0S(2k0). With the specific 1/k spectrum of the mantle, the resulting apparent attenuation should therefore be frequency independent. We show that the total contribution of 6-9% RMS density, velocity and anisotropy would explain the observed S and P attenuation of the mantle. Although these values are large, they are not unreasonable and we discuss how they depend on the range of frequencies over which the attenuation is explained. If such a level of heterogeneity were present, most of the attenuation of the Earth would be due to small scale scattering by laminations, not by intrinsic dissipation. Intrinsic dissipation must certainly exist but might correspond to a larger, yet unobserved Q. This provocative result would explain the very weak frequency dependence of the attenuation, and the fact that bulk attenuation seems negligible, two observations that have been difficult to explain for 50 years.

  9. Imaging the Kemaliye geothermal reservoir using three-dimensional magnetotelluric inversion with full distortion correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorkamp, M.; Avdeeva, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Gediz Graben in western Anatolia is a well studied tectonic feature and an area of ongoing exploration for geothermal energy. The target of exploration are typically fault damage zones associated with graben bounding normal faults that allow the migration of hot fluids. Within the Kemaliye concession, located at the northern margin of the Gediz Graben, more than 300 MT/AMT stations were acquired in order to image the geometry of the basement and infer the location of major faults. In addition, time-domain electromagnetic (TDEM) measurements were acquired at each site to be able to correct for static-shift. We present 3D inversion results for this dataset using a novel inversion technique that simultaneously inverts for a conductivity model and the four parameters of the full distortion matrix at each site. Using this approach results in a better recovery of structures and less artefacts for the near-surface compared to inversion without any correction. We will demonstrate how this approach works in practice and compare the recovered distortion parameters with the static-shift correction inferred from the TDEM measurements. A comparison with recently drilled boreholes in the area allows us to further verify the accuracy of our inversion results.

  10. A Stochastic Inversion Method for Potential Field Data: Ant Colony Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuang; Hu, Xiangyun; Liu, Tianyou

    2014-07-01

    Simulating natural ants' foraging behavior, the ant colony optimization (ACO) algorithm performs excellently in combinational optimization problems, for example the traveling salesman problem and the quadratic assignment problem. However, the ACO is seldom used to inverted for gravitational and magnetic data. On the basis of the continuous and multi-dimensional objective function for potential field data optimization inversion, we present the node partition strategy ACO (NP-ACO) algorithm for inversion of model variables of fixed shape and recovery of physical property distributions of complicated shape models. We divide the continuous variables into discrete nodes and ants directionally tour the nodes by use of transition probabilities. We update the pheromone trails by use of Gaussian mapping between the objective function value and the quantity of pheromone. It can analyze the search results in real time and promote the rate of convergence and precision of inversion. Traditional mapping, including the ant-cycle system, weaken the differences between ant individuals and lead to premature convergence. We tested our method by use of synthetic data and real data from scenarios involving gravity and magnetic anomalies. The inverted model variables and recovered physical property distributions were in good agreement with the true values. The ACO algorithm for binary representation imaging and full imaging can recover sharper physical property distributions than traditional linear inversion methods. The ACO has good optimization capability and some excellent characteristics, for example robustness, parallel implementation, and portability, compared with other stochastic metaheuristics.

  11. A tomography image of the Aegean region (Greece derived from inversion of macroseismic intensity data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Papanastassiou

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available The three-dimensional attenuation structure beneath the Aegean sea and the surrounding regions was determined by inversion of seismic intensity data. A large number of seismic intensity data have been accumulated in a uniform scale in the Aegean region, where the seismic activity is much higher than that of the other Mediterranean regions. Nearly 11000 seismic intensity data from 47 earthquakes that have occurred in these regions were used to determine the seismic attenuation structure. The resulting structure reveals a remarkable contrast of attenuation. In the top layer (depth 0-20 km, low Q is dominant in the central Aegean sea, while high Q is dominant in the surrounding land areas, except for Southwestern Turkey. The low-Q regions correspond to areas of Neogene-Quaternary grabens where the high seismicity of shallow earthquakes appears. In the lower layer (20-40 km low-Q areas are located in the southeastern part of the Hellenic arc. Some low-Q spots corresponding to the distribution of volcanoes exist along the volcanic arc. The low-Q spots might correspond to diapirs causing subduction volcanism.

  12. A review on the systematic formulation of 3D multiparameter full waveform inversion in viscoelastic medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Pengliang; Brossier, Romain; Métivier, Ludovic; Virieux, Jean

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we study 3D multiparameter full waveform inversion (FWI) in viscoelastic media based on the generalized Maxwell/Zener body (GMB/GZB) including arbitrary number of attenuation mechanisms. We present a frequency-domain energy analysis to establish the stability condition of a full anisotropic viscoelastic system, according to zero-valued boundary condition and the elastic-viscoelastic correspondence principle: the real-valued stiffness matrix becomes a complex-valued one in Fourier domain when seismic attenuation is taken into account. We develop a least-squares optimization approach to linearly relate the quality factor with the anelastic coefficients by estimating a set of constants which are independent of the spatial coordinates, which supplies an explicit incorporation of the parameter Q in the general viscoelastic wave equation. By introducing the Lagrangian multipliers into the matrix expression of the wave equation with implicit time integration, we build a systematic formulation of multiparameter full waveform inversion for full anisotropic viscoelastic wave equation, while the equivalent form of the state and adjoint equation with explicit time integration is available to be resolved efficiently. In particular, this formulation lays the foundation for the inversion of the parameter Q in the time domain with full anisotropic viscoelastic properties. In the 3D isotropic viscoelastic settings, the anelastic coefficients and the quality factors using bulk and shear moduli parameterization can be related to the counterparts using P- and S- velocity. Gradients with respect to any other parameter of interest can be found by chain rule. Pioneering numerical validations as well as the real applications of this most generic framework will be carried out to disclose the potential of viscoelastic FWI when adequate high performance computing resources and the field data are available.

  13. Umbilical Cable Recovery Load Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Shu-wang; JIA Zhao-lin; FENG Xiao-wei; LI Shi-tao

    2013-01-01

    Umbilical cable is a kind of integrated subsea cable widely used in the exploration and exploitation of oil and gas field.The severe ocean environment makes great challenges to umbilical maintenance and repair work.Damaged umbilical is usually recovered for the regular operation of the offshore production system.Analysis on cables in essence is a two-point boundary problem.The tension load at the mudline must be known first,and then the recovery load and recovery angle on the vessel can be solved by use of catenary equation.The recovery analysis also involves umbilicalsoil interaction and becomes more complicated.Calculation methods for recovery load of the exposed and buried umbilical are established and the relationship between the position of touch down point and the recovery load as well as the recovery angle and recovery load are analyzed.The analysis results provide a theoretical reference for offshore on-deck operation.

  14. Ultrasound transmission attenuation tomography using energy-scaled amplitude ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting; Shin, Junseob; Huang, Lianjie

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound attenuation of breast tumors is related to their types and pathological states, and can be used to detect and characterize breast cancer. Particularly, ultrasound scattering attenuation can infer the margin properties of breast tumors. Ultrasound attenuation tomography quantitatively reconstructs the attenuation properties of the breast. Our synthetic-aperture breast ultrasound tomography system with two parallel transducer arrays records both ultrasound reflection and transmission signals. We develop an ultrasound attenuation tomography method using ultrasound energy-scaled amplitude decays of ultrasound transmission signals and conduct ultrasound attenuation tomography using a known sound-speed model. We apply our ultrasound transmission attenuation tomography method to a breast phantom dataset, and compare the ultrasound attenuation tomography results with conventional beamforming ultrasound images obtained using reflection signals. We show that ultrasound transmission attenuation tomography complements beamforming images in identifying breast lesions.

  15. Coherent source imaging and dynamic support tracking for inverse scattering using compressive MUSIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Okkyun; Kim, Jong Min; Yoo, Jaejoon; Jin, Kyunghwan; Ye, Jong Chul

    2011-09-01

    The goal of this paper is to develop novel algorithms for inverse scattering problems such as EEG/MEG, microwave imaging, and/or diffuse optical tomograpahy, and etc. One of the main contributions of this paper is a class of novel non-iterative exact nonlinear inverse scattering theory for coherent source imaging and moving targets. Specifically, the new algorithms guarantee the exact recovery under a very relaxed constraint on the number of source and receivers, under which the conventional methods fail. Such breakthrough was possible thanks to the recent theory of compressive MUSIC and its extension using support correction criterion, where partial support are estimated using the conventional compressed sensing approaches, then the remaining supports are estimated using a novel generalized MUSIC criterion. Numerical results using coherent sources in EEG/MEG and dynamic targets confirm that the new algorithms outperform the conventional ones.

  16. Solving inverse problems through a smooth formulation of multiple-point geostatistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melnikova, Yulia

    In oil and gas sector accurate reservoir description play a crucial role in problems associated with recovery of hydrocarbons, risk estimation and predicting reservoir performance. Knowledge on reservoir properties can be inferred from measurements typically made at the surface by solving...... corresponding inverse problems. However, noise in data, non-linear relationships and sparse observations impede creation of realistic reservoir models. Including complex a priori information on reservoir parameters facilitates the process of obtaining acceptable solutions. Such a priori knowledge may......: existence of multiple, most often geologically unfeasible, solutions and high computational cost of the forward simulation. The developed methodology resulted in a new method for solving inverse problems with training-image based a priori information, when the computational time matters.Specifically, we...

  17. On the Stewart-Lyth Inverse Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Ayón-Beato, E; Mansilla, R; Terrero-Escalante, C A; Ay\\'on-Beato, Eloy; Garc\\'{\\i}a, Alberto; Mansilla, Ricardo

    2000-01-01

    In this paper the Stewart-Lyth inverse problem is rewritten using the comoving scales as the basic parameter. It is shown that some information on the inflaton potential can be obtained from observations taking into account only the scalar power spectrum.

  18. Modeling and Inversion of Scattered Surface waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riyanti, C.D.

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis, we present a modeling method based on a domain-type integral representation for waves propagating along the surface of the Earth which have been scattered in the vicinity of the source or the receivers. Using this model as starting point, we formulate an inversion scheme to estimat

  19. Inverse photoemission in strongly correlated electron systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eder, R; Ohta, Y.

    1996-01-01

    Based on exact results for small clusters of t-J models, we point out the existence of several distinct channels in the inverse photoemission (IPSE) spectrum. Holelike quasiparticles can either be annihilated completely or leave behind a variable number of spin excitations, which formed the dressing

  20. Laplace's 1774 Memoir on Inverse Probability

    OpenAIRE

    Stigler, Stephen M.

    1986-01-01

    Laplace's first major article on mathematical statistics was published in 1774. It is arguably the most influential article in this field to appear before 1800, being the first widely read presentation of inverse probability and its application to both binomial and location parameter estimation. After a brief introduction, and English translation of this epochal memoir is given.

  1. The inverse problem of bioelectricity: an evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterom, A. van

    2012-01-01

    This invited paper presents a personal view on the current status of the solution to the inverse problem of bioelectricity. Its focus lies on applications in the field of electrocardiography. The topic discussed is also relevant in other medical domains, such as electroencephalography, electroneurog

  2. Inverse Doppler Effects in Broadband Acoustic Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, S. L.; Zhao, X. P.; Liu, S.; Shen, F. L.; Li, L. L.; Luo, C. R.

    2016-01-01

    The Doppler effect refers to the change in frequency of a wave source as a consequence of the relative motion between the source and an observer. Veselago theoretically predicted that materials with negative refractions can induce inverse Doppler effects. With the development of metamaterials, inverse Doppler effects have been extensively investigated. However, the ideal material parameters prescribed by these metamaterial design approaches are complex and also challenging to obtain experimentally. Here, we demonstrated a method of designing and experimentally characterising arbitrary broadband acoustic metamaterials. These omni-directional, double-negative, acoustic metamaterials are constructed with ‘flute-like’ acoustic meta-cluster sets with seven double meta-molecules; these metamaterials also overcome the limitations of broadband negative bulk modulus and mass density to provide a region of negative refraction and inverse Doppler effects. It was also shown that inverse Doppler effects can be detected in a flute, which has been popular for thousands of years in Asia and Europe. PMID:27578317

  3. Semi-Inversion of Functional Parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Torben Ægidius

    2008-01-01

    Semi-invertering er en generalisering af invertering: Et programs semi-inverse tager nogle af dets inddata og nogen af dets uddata og returnerer de resterende ind- og uddata. Tidligere arbejder har beskrevet semi-invertering af et førsteordens funktionssprog. Vi udvider nu med funktionelle...

  4. Experimental Verification of Acoustic Impedance Inversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭永刚; 王宁; 林俊轩

    2003-01-01

    Well controlled model experiments were carried out to verify acoustic impedance inversion scheme, and different methods of extracting impulse responses were investigated by practical data. The acoustic impedance profiles reconstructed from impulse responses are in good agreement with the measured value and theoretical value.

  5. Frame approximation of pseudo-inverse operators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ole

    2001-01-01

    Let T denote an operator on a Hilbert space (H, [.,.]), and let {f(i)}(i=1)(infinity) be a frame for the orthogonal complement of the kernel NT. We construct a sequence of operators {Phi (n)} of the form Phi (n) (.) = Sigma (n)(i=1) [., g(t)(n)]f(i) which converges to the psuedo-inverse T+ of T i...

  6. Inverse acoustic problem of N homogeneous scatterers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berntsen, Svend

    2002-01-01

    The three-dimensional inverse acoustic medium problem of N homogeneous objects with known geometry and location is considered. It is proven that one scattering experiment is sufficient for the unique determination of the complex wavenumbers of the objects. The mapping from the scattered fields...

  7. The role of nonlinearity in inverse problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snieder, Roel

    1998-06-01

    In many practical inverse problems, one aims to retrieve a model that has infinitely many degrees of freedom from a finite amount of data. It follows from a simple variable count that this cannot be done in a unique way. Therefore, inversion entails more than estimating a model: any inversion is not complete without a description of the class of models that is consistent with the data; this is called the appraisal problem. Nonlinearity makes the appraisal problem particularly difficult. The first reason for this is that nonlinear error propagation is a difficult problem. The second reason is that for some nonlinear problems the model parameters affect the way in which the model is being interrogated by the data. Two examples are given of this, and it is shown how the nonlinearity may make the problem more ill-posed. Finally, three attempts are shown to carry out the model appraisal for nonlinear inverse problems that are based on an analytical approach, a numerical approach and a common sense approach.

  8. Sensitivity of the inverse wave crest problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peterson, Pearu; Groesen, van E.

    2001-01-01

    In a previous paper [Physica D 141 (3-4) (2000) 316], the inverse problem for wave crests was introduced and a solution strategy for two-wave interactions was given. Here these solutions are actually constructed, in particular for the cases with small interaction angle, moderate phase shifts, and/or

  9. Deep controls on intraplate basin inversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S.B.; Stephenson, Randell Alexander; Schiffer, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Basin inversion is an intermediate-scale manifestation of continental intraplate deformation, which produces earthquake activity in the interior of continents. The sedimentary basins of central Europe, inverted in the Late Cretaceous– Paleocene, represent a classic example of this phenomenon. It ...

  10. Inverse scattering problem in turbulent magnetic fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Treumann, R A; Narita, Y

    2016-01-01

    We apply a particular form of the inverse scattering theory to turbulent magnetic fluctuations in a plasma. In the present note we develop the theory, formulate the magnetic fluctuation problem in terms of its electrodynamic turbulent response function, and reduce it to the solution of a special form of the famous Gel$'$fand-Levitan-Marchenko equation of quantum mechanical scattering theory.

  11. Magnetotelluric data inversion with seismic data constraint

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Wei-qi; SUN Shan

    2005-01-01

    In the paper we present a new method to invert the interior structure in the basement or ancient hidden hill by using magnetotelluric (MT) data with seismic data constraint. We first obtain the thickness and resistivity of each layer above the basement or buried hill by the inversion of seismic and log data and create a geoelectrical model for the layers above the basement or hidden hill. Then with the reference to the inversion of 1D MT data, a geoelectrical model for the layers below the basement or hidden hill is created. On the basis of the above initial model, we present an effective and practical forward method, i.e., a model-matched approach to conduct forward inversion arithmetic. Finally, by the method of conjugate gradient iteration, a forward and backward iterative calculation is made. Taking No. 618 profile of Shengli Oil Field as an example, we have found out that the tectonic information that is unreflective in the seismic data below the basement is better reflected in the inversion result.

  12. Inverse scattering problem in relativistic quasiclassical approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inverse scattering problem is solved on the basis of quasipotential approach in quantum field theory within the framework of relativistic quasiclassical approximation. Formulas of quasipotential restoration by phase shifts are derived. Cases of non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic approximations are investigated

  13. Auditory model inversion and its application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Heming; WANG Yongqi; CHEN Xueqin

    2005-01-01

    Auditory model has been applied to several aspects of speech signal processing field, and appears to be effective in performance. This paper presents the inverse transform of each stage of one widely used auditory model. First of all it is necessary to invert correlogram and reconstruct phase information by repetitious iterations in order to get auditory-nerve firing rate. The next step is to obtain the negative parts of the signal via the reverse process of the HWR (Half Wave Rectification). Finally the functions of inner hair cell/synapse model and Gammatone filters have to be inverted. Thus the whole auditory model inversion has been achieved. An application of noisy speech enhancement based on auditory model inversion algorithm is proposed. Many experiments show that this method is effective in reducing noise.Especially when SNR of noisy speech is low it is more effective than other methods. Thus this auditory model inversion method given in this paper is applicable to speech enhancement field.

  14. Nonlinear approximation with dictionaries. II. Inverse Estimates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gribonval, Rémi; Nielsen, Morten

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, which is the sequel to [16], we study inverse estimates of the Bernstein type for nonlinear approximation with structured redundant dictionaries in a Banach space. The main results are for blockwise incoherent dictionaries in Hilbert spaces, which generalize the notion of joint block-diagonal...

  15. Nonlinear approximation with dictionaries,.. II: Inverse estimates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gribonval, Rémi; Nielsen, Morten

    In this paper we study inverse estimates of the Bernstein type for nonlinear approximation with structured redundant dictionaries in a Banach space. The main results are for separated decomposable dictionaries in Hilbert spaces, which generalize the notion of joint block-diagonal mutually...

  16. Frnakenstein: multiple target inverse RNA folding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyngsø Rune B

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA secondary structure prediction, or folding, is a classic problem in bioinformatics: given a sequence of nucleotides, the aim is to predict the base pairs formed in its three dimensional conformation. The inverse problem of designing a sequence folding into a particular target structure has only more recently received notable interest. With a growing appreciation and understanding of the functional and structural properties of RNA motifs, and a growing interest in utilising biomolecules in nano-scale designs, the interest in the inverse RNA folding problem is bound to increase. However, whereas the RNA folding problem from an algorithmic viewpoint has an elegant and efficient solution, the inverse RNA folding problem appears to be hard. Results In this paper we present a genetic algorithm approach to solve the inverse folding problem. The main aims of the development was to address the hitherto mostly ignored extension of solving the inverse folding problem, the multi-target inverse folding problem, while simultaneously designing a method with superior performance when measured on the quality of designed sequences. The genetic algorithm has been implemented as a Python program called Frnakenstein. It was benchmarked against four existing methods and several data sets totalling 769 real and predicted single structure targets, and on 292 two structure targets. It performed as well as or better at finding sequences which folded in silico into the target structure than all existing methods, without the heavy bias towards CG base pairs that was observed for all other top performing methods. On the two structure targets it also performed well, generating a perfect design for about 80% of the targets. Conclusions Our method illustrates that successful designs for the inverse RNA folding problem does not necessarily have to rely on heavy biases in base pair and unpaired base distributions. The design problem seems to become more

  17. Uncertainty estimations for seismic source inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duputel, Zacharie; Rivera, Luis; Fukahata, Yukitoshi; Kanamori, Hiroo

    2012-08-01

    Source inversion is a widely used practice in seismology. Magnitudes, moment tensors, slip distributions are now routinely calculated and disseminated whenever an earthquake occurs. The accuracy of such models depends on many aspects like the event magnitude, the data coverage and the data quality (instrument response, isolation, timing, etc.). Here, like in any observational problem, the error estimation should be part of the solution. It is however very rare to find a source inversion algorithm which includes realistic error analyses, and the solutions are often given without any estimates of uncertainties. Our goal here is to stress the importance of such estimation and to explore different techniques aimed at achieving such analyses. In this perspective, we use the W phase source inversion algorithm recently developed to provide fast CMT estimations for large earthquakes. We focus in particular on the linear-inverse problem of estimating the moment tensor components at a given source location. We assume that the initial probability densities can be modelled by Gaussian distributions. Formally, we can separate two sources of error which generally contribute to the model parameter uncertainties. The first source of uncertainty is the error introduced by the more or less imperfect data. This is carried by the covariance matrix for the data (Cd). The second source of uncertainty, often overlooked, is associated with modelling error or mismodelling. This is represented by the covariance matrix on the theory, CT. Among the different sources of mismodelling, we focus here on the modelling error associated with the mislocation of the centroid position. Both Cd and CT describe probability densities in the data space and it is well known that it is in fact CD=Cd+CT that should be included into the error propagation process. In source inversion problems, like in many other fields of geophysics, the data covariance (CD) is often considered as diagonal or even proportional

  18. Tectonic forward modelling of positive inversion structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandes, C. [Leibniz Univ. Hannover (Germany). Inst. fuer Geologie; Schmidt, C. [Landesamt fuer Bergbau, Energie und Geologie (LBEG), Hannover (Germany)

    2013-08-01

    Positive tectonic inversion structures are common features that were recognized in many deformed sedimentary basins (Lowell, 1995). They are characterized by a two phase fault evolution, where initial normal faulting was followed by reverse faulting along the same fault, accompanied by the development of hanging wall deformation. Analysing the evolution of such inversion structures is important for understanding the tectonics of sedimentary basins and the formation of hydrocarbon traps. We used a 2D tectonic forward modelling approach to simulate the stepwise structural evolution of inversion structures in cross-section. The modelling was performed with the software FaultFold Forward v. 6, which is based on trishear kinematics (Zehnder and Allmendinger, 2000). Key aspect of the study was to derive the controlling factors for the geometry of inversion structures. The simulation results show, that the trishear approach is able to reproduce the geometry of tectonic inversion structures in a realistic way. This implies that inversion structures are simply fault-related folds that initiated as extensional fault-propagation folds, which were subsequently transformed into compressional fault-propagation folds when the stress field changed. The hanging wall deformation is a consequence of the decrease in slip towards the tip line of the fault. Trishear angle and propagation-to-slip ratio are the key controlling factors for the geometry of the fault-related deformation. We tested trishear angles in the range of 30 - 60 and propagation-to-slip ratios between 1 and 2 in increments of 0.1. Small trishear angles and low propagation-to-slip ratios produced tight folds, whereas large trishear angles and high propagation-to-slip ratios led to more open folds with concentric shapes. This has a direct effect on the size and geometry of potential hydrocarbon traps. The 2D simulations can be extended to a pseudo 3D approach, where a set of parallel cross-sections is used to describe

  19. Fast and accurate analytical model to solve inverse problem in SHM using Lamb wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poddar, Banibrata; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2016-04-01

    Lamb wave propagation is at the center of attention of researchers for structural health monitoring of thin walled structures. This is due to the fact that Lamb wave modes are natural modes of wave propagation in these structures with long travel distances and without much attenuation. This brings the prospect of monitoring large structure with few sensors/actuators. However the problem of damage detection and identification is an "inverse problem" where we do not have the luxury to know the exact mathematical model of the system. On top of that the problem is more challenging due to the confounding factors of statistical variation of the material and geometric properties. Typically this problem may also be ill posed. Due to all these complexities the direct solution of the problem of damage detection and identification in SHM is impossible. Therefore an indirect method using the solution of the "forward problem" is popular for solving the "inverse problem". This requires a fast forward problem solver. Due to the complexities involved with the forward problem of scattering of Lamb waves from damages researchers rely primarily on numerical techniques such as FEM, BEM, etc. But these methods are slow and practically impossible to be used in structural health monitoring. We have developed a fast and accurate analytical forward problem solver for this purpose. This solver, CMEP (complex modes expansion and vector projection), can simulate scattering of Lamb waves from all types of damages in thin walled structures fast and accurately to assist the inverse problem solver.

  20. Energy Recovery Linacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolitsa Merminga

    2007-06-01

    The success and continuing progress of the three operating FELs based on Energy Recovery Linacs (ERLs), the Jefferson Lab IR FEL Upgrade, the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) FEL, and the Novosibirsk High Power THz FEL, have inspired multiple future applications of ERLs, which include higher power FELs, synchrotron radiation sources, electron cooling devices, and high luminosity electron-ion colliders. The benefits of using ERLs for these applications are presented. The key accelerator physics and technology challenges of realizing future ERL designs, and recent developments towards resolving these challenges are reviewed.

  1. Waste heat recovery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Konzen in-house designed anaerobic digester system for the POME (Palm Oil Mill Effluent) treatment process is one of the registered Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) projects in Malaysia. It is an organic wastewater treatment process which achieves excellent co-benefits objectives through the prevention of water pollution and reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, which is estimated to be 40,000 to 50,000 t-CO2 per year. The anaerobic digester was designed in mesophile mode with temperature ranging from 37 degree Celsius to 45 degree Celsius. A microorganisms growth is optimum under moderately warm temperature conditions. The operating temperature of the anaerobic digester needs to be maintained constantly. There are two waste heat recovery systems designed to make the treatment process self-sustaining. The heat recovered will be utilised as a clean energy source to heat up the anaerobic digester indirectly. The first design for the waste heat recovery system utilises heat generated from the flue gas of the biogas flaring system. A stainless steel water tank with an internal water layer is installed at the top level of the flare stack. The circulating water is heated by the methane enriched biogas combustion process. The second design utilizes heat generated during the compression process for the biogas compressor operation. The compressed biogas needs to be cooled before being recycled back into the digester tank for mixing purposes. Both the waste heat recovery systems use a design which applies a common water circulation loop and hot water tank to effectively become a closed loop. The hot water tank will perform both storage and temperature buffer functions. The hot water is then used to heat up recycled sludge from 30 degree Celsius to 45 degree Celsius with the maximum temperature setting at 50 degree Celsius. The recycled sludge line temperature will be measured and monitored by a temperature sensor and transmitter, which will activate the

  2. Switching Control for Adaptive Disturbance Attenuation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Battistelli, Giorgio; Mari, Daniele; Selvi, Daniela; Tesi, Alberto; Tesi, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    The problem of adaptive disturbance attenuation is addressed in this paper using a switching control approach. A finite family of stabilizing controllers is pre-designed, with the assumption that, for any possible operating condition, at least one controller is able to achieve a prescribed level of

  3. Microwave attenuation with composite of copper microwires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorriti, A.G.; Marin, P. [Instituto de Magnetismo Aplicado, (UCM-ADIF-CSIC) and Departamento de Fisica de Materiales (UCM). P.O. Box 155, Las Rozas, Madrid 28230 (Spain); Cortina, D. [Micromag S.L., Las Rozas, Madrid 28230 (Spain); Hernando, A., E-mail: antonio.hernando@adif.e [Instituto de Magnetismo Aplicado, (UCM-ADIF-CSIC) and Departamento de Fisica de Materiales (UCM). P.O. Box 155, Las Rozas, Madrid 28230 (Spain); Micromag S.L., Las Rozas, Madrid 28230 (Spain)

    2010-05-15

    It is shown that copper microwires composite media attenuates microwave reflection of metallic surfaces. We show how the distance to the metallic surface, as well as the length and volume fraction of microwires, determine the frequency of maximum absorption and the return loss level. Furthermore, we were able to fit the experimental results with a theoretical model based on Maxwell-Garnett mixing formula.

  4. Attenuation of PRRSV by chimera construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two genetically distinct infectious recombinant virus clones (pMLV, constructed from Ingelvac® PRRS MLV and pMN184, constructed from virulent strain MN184) were developed to study attenuation of contemporary PRRSV. Two reciprocal chimeric clones (pMLVORF1/MN184 and pMN184ORF1/MLV) were then constru...

  5. ULTRASONIC ATTENUATION IN MIXED STATE OF NIOBIUM

    OpenAIRE

    Dominec, J.; MÍŠek, K.

    1987-01-01

    We have investigated the attenuation of ultrasonic waves in the mixed state of niobium, where a remarkable dip appears near the lower critical field . The measurement has been performed on one sample for various orientations of the wave vector and of the principal crystallographic axes of the sample with respect to external magnetic field.

  6. Hadron attenuation at HERMES and JLab

    OpenAIRE

    Falter, T.; Cassing, W.; Gallmeister, K.; Mosel, U.

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the attenuation of hadrons in deep inelastic lepton-nucleus scattering in the kinematical regime of the HERMES and Jefferson Lab experiments. The calculation is carried out in the framework of a BUU transport model. Our results indicate a strong influence of (pre)hadronic final state interactions on the observed multiplicity ratios.

  7. Attenuation correction for small animal PET tomographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, Patrick L [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, University of California, 700 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Rannou, Fernando R [Departamento de Ingenieria Informatica, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH), Av. Ecuador 3659, Santiago (Chile); Chatziioannou, Arion F [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, University of California, 700 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2005-04-21

    Attenuation correction is one of the important corrections required for quantitative positron emission tomography (PET). This work will compare the quantitative accuracy of attenuation correction using a simple global scale factor with traditional transmission-based methods acquired either with a small animal PET or a small animal x-ray computed tomography (CT) scanner. Two phantoms (one mouse-sized and one rat-sized) and two animal subjects (one mouse and one rat) were scanned in CTI Concorde Microsystem's microPET (registered) Focus{sup TM} for emission and transmission data and in ImTek's MicroCAT{sup TM} II for transmission data. PET emission image values were calibrated against a scintillation well counter. Results indicate that the scale factor method of attenuation correction places the average measured activity concentration about the expected value, without correcting for the cupping artefact from attenuation. Noise analysis in the phantom studies with the PET-based method shows that noise in the transmission data increases the noise in the corrected emission data. The CT-based method was accurate and delivered low-noise images suitable for both PET data correction and PET tracer localization.

  8. Estimating uncertainties in complex joint inverse problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso, Juan Carlos

    2016-04-01

    Sources of uncertainty affecting geophysical inversions can be classified either as reflective (i.e. the practitioner is aware of her/his ignorance) or non-reflective (i.e. the practitioner does not know that she/he does not know!). Although we should be always conscious of the latter, the former are the ones that, in principle, can be estimated either empirically (by making measurements or collecting data) or subjectively (based on the experience of the researchers). For complex parameter estimation problems in geophysics, subjective estimation of uncertainty is the most common type. In this context, probabilistic (aka Bayesian) methods are commonly claimed to offer a natural and realistic platform from which to estimate model uncertainties. This is because in the Bayesian approach, errors (whatever their nature) can be naturally included as part of the global statistical model, the solution of which represents the actual solution to the inverse problem. However, although we agree that probabilistic inversion methods are the most powerful tool for uncertainty estimation, the common claim that they produce "realistic" or "representative" uncertainties is not always justified. Typically, ALL UNCERTAINTY ESTIMATES ARE MODEL DEPENDENT, and therefore, besides a thorough characterization of experimental uncertainties, particular care must be paid to the uncertainty arising from model errors and input uncertainties. We recall here two quotes by G. Box and M. Gunzburger, respectively, of special significance for inversion practitioners and for this session: "…all models are wrong, but some are useful" and "computational results are believed by no one, except the person who wrote the code". In this presentation I will discuss and present examples of some problems associated with the estimation and quantification of uncertainties in complex multi-observable probabilistic inversions, and how to address them. Although the emphasis will be on sources of uncertainty related

  9. An equivalence between inverse sumset theorems and inverse conjectures for the U^3 norm

    CERN Document Server

    Green, Ben

    2009-01-01

    We establish a correspondence between inverse sumset theorems (which can be viewed as classifications of approximate (abelian) groups) and inverse theorems for the Gowers norms (which can be viewed as classifications of approximate polynomials). In particular, we show that the inverse sumset theorems of Freiman type are equivalent to the known inverse results for the Gowers U^3 norms, and moreover that the conjectured polynomial strengthening of the former is also equivalent to the polynomial strengthening of the latter. We establish this equivalence in two model settings, namely that of the finite field vector spaces F_2^n, and of the cyclic groups Z/NZ. In both cases the argument involves clarifying the structure of certain types of approximate homomorphism.

  10. SISYPHUS: A high performance seismic inversion factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokhberg, Alexey; Simutė, Saulė; Boehm, Christian; Fichtner, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    In the recent years the massively parallel high performance computers became the standard instruments for solving the forward and inverse problems in seismology. The respective software packages dedicated to forward and inverse waveform modelling specially designed for such computers (SPECFEM3D, SES3D) became mature and widely available. These packages achieve significant computational performance and provide researchers with an opportunity to solve problems of bigger size at higher resolution within a shorter time. However, a typical seismic inversion process contains various activities that are beyond the common solver functionality. They include management of information on seismic events and stations, 3D models, observed and synthetic seismograms, pre-processing of the observed signals, computation of misfits and adjoint sources, minimization of misfits, and process workflow management. These activities are time consuming, seldom sufficiently automated, and therefore represent a bottleneck that can substantially offset performance benefits provided by even the most powerful modern supercomputers. Furthermore, a typical system architecture of modern supercomputing platforms is oriented towards the maximum computational performance and provides limited standard facilities for automation of the supporting activities. We present a prototype solution that automates all aspects of the seismic inversion process and is tuned for the modern massively parallel high performance computing systems. We address several major aspects of the solution architecture, which include (1) design of an inversion state database for tracing all relevant aspects of the entire solution process, (2) design of an extensible workflow management framework, (3) integration with wave propagation solvers, (4) integration with optimization packages, (5) computation of misfits and adjoint sources, and (6) process monitoring. The inversion state database represents a hierarchical structure with

  11. On MSDT inversion with multi-angle remote sensing data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    With the wavelet transform, image of multi-angle remote sensing is decomposed into multi-resolution. With data of each resolution, we try target-based multi-stages inversion, taking the inversion result of coarse resolution as the prior information of the next inversion. The result gets finer and finer until the resolution of satellite observation. In this way, the target-based multi-stages inversion can be used in remote sensing inversion of large-scaled coverage. With MISR data, we inverse structure parameters of vegetation in semiarid grassland of the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region. The result proves that this way is efficient.

  12. GENERATING FRACTAL PATTERNS BY USING p-CIRCLE INVERSION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, José L.; Rubiano, Gustavo N.; Zlobec, Borut Jurčič

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we introduce the p-circle inversion which generalizes the classical inversion with respect to a circle (p = 2) and the taxicab inversion (p = 1). We study some basic properties and we also show the inversive images of some basic curves. We apply this new transformation to well-known fractals such as Sierpinski triangle, Koch curve, dragon curve, Fibonacci fractal, among others. Then we obtain new fractal patterns. Moreover, we generalize the method called circle inversion fractal be means of the p-circle inversion.

  13. Stratigraphic inversion of pre-stack multicomponent data; Inversion stratigraphique multicomposante avant sommation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agullo, Y.

    2005-09-15

    This thesis present the extension of mono-component seismic pre-stack data stratigraphical inversion method to multicomponent data, with the objective of improving the determination of reservoir elastic parameters. In addiction to the PP pressure waves, the PS converted waves proved their interest for imaging under gas clouds; and their potential is highly significant for the characterization of lithologies, fluids, fractures... Nevertheless the simultaneous use ol PP and PS data remains problematic because of their different the time scales. To jointly use the information contained in PP and PS data, we propose a method in three steps first, mono-component stratigraphic inversions of PP then PS data; second, estimation of the PP to PS time conversion law; third, multicomponent stratigraphic inversion. For the second point, the estimation of the PP to PS conversion law is based on minimizing the difference between the S impedances obtained from PP and PS mono-component stratigraphic inversion. The pre-stack mono-component stratigraphic inversions was adapted to the case of multicomponent data by leaving each type of data in its own time scale in order to avoid the distortion of the seismic wavelet. The results obtained on a realistic synthetic PP-PS case show on one hand that determining PP to PS conversion law (from the mono-component inversion results) is feasible, and on the other hand that the joint inversion of PP and PS data with this conversion law improves the results compared to the mono-component inversion ones. Although this is presented within the framework of the PP and PS multi-component data, the developed methodology adapts directly to PP and SS data for example. (author)

  14. Implementing Performance Competitive Logical Recovery

    CERN Document Server

    Lomet, David; Zwilling, Michael

    2011-01-01

    New hardware platforms, e.g. cloud, multi-core, etc., have led to a reconsideration of database system architecture. Our Deuteronomy project separates transactional functionality from data management functionality, enabling a flexible response to exploiting new platforms. This separation requires, however, that recovery is described logically. In this paper, we extend current recovery methods to work in this logical setting. While this is straightforward in principle, performance is an issue. We show how ARIES style recovery optimizations can work for logical recovery where page information is not captured on the log. In side-by-side performance experiments using a common log, we compare logical recovery with a state-of-the art ARIES style recovery implementation and show that logical redo performance can be competitive.

  15. Robust Disaster Recovery System Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Highly security-critical system should possess features of continuous service. We present a new Robust Disaster Recovery System Model (RDRSM). Through strengthening the ability of safe communications, RDRSM guarantees the secure and reliable command on disaster recovery. Its self-supervision capability can monitor the integrality and security of disaster recovery system itself. By 2D and 3D real-time visible platform provided by GIS, GPS and RS, the model makes the using, management and maintenance of disaster recovery system easier. RDRSM possesses predominant features of security, robustness and controllability. And it can be applied to highly security-critical environments such as E-government and bank. Conducted by RDRSM, an important E-government disaster recovery system has been constructed successfully. The feasibility of this model is verified by practice. We especially emphasize the significance of some components of the model, such as risk assessment, disaster recovery planning, system supervision and robust communication support.

  16. Recovery of Sparsely Corrupted Signals

    CERN Document Server

    Studer, Christoph; Pope, Graeme; Bölcskei, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the recovery of signals exhibiting a sparse representation in a general (i.e., possibly redundant or incomplete) dictionary that are corrupted by additive noise admitting a sparse representation in another general dictionary. This setup covers a wide range of applications, such as image inpainting, super-resolution, signal separation, and recovery of signals that are impaired by, e.g., clipping, impulse noise, or narrowband interference. We present deterministic recovery guarantees based on a novel uncertainty relation for pairs of general dictionaries and we provide corresponding practicable recovery algorithms. The recovery guarantees we find depend on the signal and noise sparsity levels, on the coherence parameters of the involved dictionaries, and on the amount of prior knowledge on the support sets of signal and noise. We finally identify situations under which the recovery guarantees are tight.

  17. Integrated Resource Management and Recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2014-01-01

    . Over the recent decades, DTU Environment has worked extensively both with resource recovery technologies and life cycle assessment (LCA) models (www.EASETECH.dk) dedicated to evaluating resource management and recovery systems. Advanced sustainability assessments of resource recovery and utilization...... resources, i.e. security of supply, but also the need for efficient recovery of the same resources after the use-phase of the products. While this recovery may appear simple, considerable challenges exist. Management and recovery of resources in waste materials, or in general residual streams in society...... have been carried out e.g. in relation to household and industrial waste systems, biomass residues from agriculture and forestry, energy producing technologies as well as entire energy systems. The presentation provides an introduction to key challenges in relation to sustainability assessment...

  18. Gravity inversion in spherical coordinates using tesseroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uieda, Leonardo; Barbosa, Valeria C. F.

    2014-05-01

    Satellite observations of the gravity field have provided geophysicists with exceptionally dense and uniform coverage of data over vast areas. This enables regional or global scale high resolution geophysical investigations. Techniques like forward modeling and inversion of gravity anomalies are routinely used to investigate large geologic structures, such as large igneous provinces, suture zones, intracratonic basins, and the Moho. Accurately modeling such large structures requires taking the sphericity of the Earth into account. A reasonable approximation is to assume a spherical Earth and use spherical coordinates. In recent years, efforts have been made to advance forward modeling in spherical coordinates using tesseroids, particularly with respect to speed and accuracy. Conversely, traditional space domain inverse modeling methods have not yet been adapted to use spherical coordinates and tesseroids. In the literature there are a range of inversion methods that have been developed for Cartesian coordinates and right rectangular prisms. These include methods for estimating the relief of an interface, like the Moho or the basement of a sedimentary basin. Another category includes methods to estimate the density distribution in a medium. The latter apply many algorithms to solve the inverse problem, ranging from analytic solutions to random search methods as well as systematic search methods. We present an adaptation for tesseroids of the systematic search method of "planting anomalous densities". This method can be used to estimate the geometry of geologic structures. As prior information, it requires knowledge of the approximate densities and positions of the structures. The main advantage of this method is its computational efficiency, requiring little computer memory and processing time. We demonstrate the shortcomings and capabilities of this approach using applications to synthetic and field data. Performing the inversion of gravity and gravity gradient

  19. A Bayesian method for microseismic source inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, D. J.; White, R. S.; Christie, P. A. F.

    2016-08-01

    Earthquake source inversion is highly dependent on location determination and velocity models. Uncertainties in both the model parameters and the observations need to be rigorously incorporated into an inversion approach. Here, we show a probabilistic Bayesian method that allows formal inclusion of the uncertainties in the moment tensor inversion. This method allows the combination of different sets of far-field observations, such as P-wave and S-wave polarities and amplitude ratios, into one inversion. Additional observations can be included by deriving a suitable likelihood function from the uncertainties. This inversion produces samples from the source posterior probability distribution, including a best-fitting solution for the source mechanism and associated probability. The inversion can be constrained to the double-couple space or allowed to explore the gamut of moment tensor solutions, allowing volumetric and other non-double-couple components. The posterior probability of the double-couple and full moment tensor source models can be evaluated from the Bayesian evidence, using samples from the likelihood distributions for the two source models, producing an estimate of whether or not a source is double-couple. Such an approach is ideally suited to microseismic studies where there are many sources of uncertainty and it is often difficult to produce reliability estimates of the source mechanism, although this can be true of many other cases. Using full-waveform synthetic seismograms, we also show the effects of noise, location, network distribution and velocity model uncertainty on the source probability density function. The noise has the largest effect on the results, especially as it can affect other parts of the event processing. This uncertainty can lead to erroneous non-double-couple source probability distributions, even when no other uncertainties exist. Although including amplitude ratios can improve the constraint on the source probability

  20. Teaching recovery to medical students.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Feeney, Larkin

    2013-03-01

    Community mental health services are evolving toward more holistic, patient-centered, recovery-based practices. This change necessitates an attitudinal shift from mental health workers, and training in recovery principles is helpful in achieving this change. Medical students often have narrow, doctor-centered concepts of mental health care. Traditional clinical placements in psychiatry do little to address this. We evaluated a recovery-focused teaching program for medical students in psychiatry.