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Sample records for attenuated human rotavirus

  1. Antibody-secreting cell responses to rotavirus proteins in gnotobiotic pigs inoculated with attenuated or virulent human rotavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, K O; Vandal, O H; Yuan, L; Hodgins, D C; Saif, L J

    2001-08-01

    Because of their similarities to infants in mucosal immune responses and their susceptibility to human rotavirus (HRV) diarrhea, gnotobiotic pigs provide a useful model for rotaviral disease. In this study, we performed quantitative enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays to measure local and systemic isotype-specific antibody-secreting cell (ASC) responses to individual structural (VP4, VP6, and VP7) and nonstructural (NSP3 and NSP4) proteins of Wa HRV. The Spodoptera frugiperda cells expressing each recombinant baculovirus HRV protein were formalin fixed and used as antigen for ELISPOT assays. Neonatal gnotobiotic pigs were orally inoculated once with virulent Wa (WaV) or three times with attenuated Wa (WaA) HRV or mock inoculated (Mock) and then were challenged with virulent Wa (WaV/PC) 28 days after the first inoculation. The ASCs from intestinal and systemic lymphoid tissues of pigs from each group were quantitated by ELISPOT assay at the day of challenge, at postinoculation day 28 (WaV, WaA, and Mock) or at postchallenge day (PCD) 7 (WaV+WaV/PC, WaA+WaV/PC, and Mock+WaV/PC). In all virus-inoculated pigs, regardless of the inoculum, lymphoid tissue, or isotype, VP6 induced the highest numbers of ASCs, followed by VP4; ASCs specific for VP7, NSP3, and NSP4 were less numerous. At challenge, total HRV- and HRV protein-specific immunoglobulin A (IgA) and IgG ASCs in intestinal lymphoid tissues were significantly greater in WaV- than in WaA-inoculated pigs, and WaV pigs were fully protected against diarrhea postchallenge, whereas the WaA pigs were partially protected. At PCD 7, there were no significant differences in ASC numbers for any HRV proteins between the WaV+WaV/PC and WaA+WaV/PC groups.

  2. Vitamin A deficiency impairs adaptive B and T cell responses to a prototype monovalent attenuated human rotavirus vaccine and virulent human rotavirus challenge in a gnotobiotic piglet model.

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    Kuldeep S Chattha

    Full Text Available Rotaviruses (RV are a major cause of gastroenteritis in children. Widespread vitamin A deficiency is associated with reduced efficacy of vaccines and higher incidence of diarrheal infections in children in developing countries. We established a vitamin A deficient (VAD gnotobiotic piglet model that mimics subclinical vitamin A deficiency in children to study its effects on an oral human rotavirus (HRV vaccine and virulent HRV challenge. Piglets derived from VAD and vitamin A sufficient (VAS sows were orally vaccinated with attenuated HRV or mock, with/without supplemental vitamin A and challenged with virulent HRV. Unvaccinated VAD control piglets had significantly lower hepatic vitamin A, higher severity and duration of diarrhea and HRV fecal shedding post-challenge as compared to VAS control pigs. Reduced protection coincided with significantly higher innate (IFNα cytokine and CD8 T cell frequencies in the blood and intestinal tissues, higher pro-inflammatory (IL12 and 2-3 fold lower anti-inflammatory (IL10 cytokines, in VAD compared to VAS control pigs. Vaccinated VAD pigs had higher diarrhea severity scores compared to vaccinated VAS pigs, which coincided with lower serum IgA HRV antibody titers and significantly lower intestinal IgA antibody secreting cells post-challenge in the former groups suggesting lower anamnestic responses. A trend for higher serum HRV IgG antibodies was observed in VAD vs VAS vaccinated groups post-challenge. The vaccinated VAD (non-vitamin A supplemented pigs had significantly higher serum IL12 (PID2 and IFNγ (PID6 compared to vaccinated VAS groups suggesting higher Th1 responses in VAD conditions. Furthermore, regulatory T-cell responses were compromised in VAD pigs. Supplemental vitamin A in VAD pigs did not fully restore the dysregulated immune responses to AttHRV vaccine or moderate virulent HRV diarrhea. Our findings suggest that that VAD in children in developing countries may partially contribute to more

  3. Group C rotaviruses in humans.

    OpenAIRE

    Bridger, J C; Pedley, S.; McCrae, M A

    1986-01-01

    Atypical rotaviruses obtained from human feces from Australia, Brazil, and the United Kingdom were shown by a combination of techniques--immunoelectron microscopy, immunofluorescence, genome profile analysis, terminal fingerprint analysis of genome segments, and dot-blot hybridization--to be related to group C porcine rotaviruses. The prevalence of antibody to group C rotaviruses was found to be low in human sera and immunoglobulin pools from six countries. No signs of infection were obtained...

  4. Rotavirus.

    OpenAIRE

    Parashar, U. D.; Bresee, J. S.; Gentsch, J. R.; Glass, R I

    1998-01-01

    Rotavirus, the most common diarrheal pathogen in children worldwide, causes approximately one third of diarrhea-associated hospitalizations and 800,000 deaths per year. Because natural infection reduces the incidence and severity of subsequent episodes, rotavirus diarrhea might be controlled through vaccination. Serotypespecific immunity may play a role in protection from disease. Tetravalent rhesus-human reassortant rotavirus vaccine (RRV-TV) (which contains a rhesus rotavirus with serotype ...

  5. Oral live attenuated human rotavirus vaccine (RotarixTM offers sustained high protection against severe G9P[8] rotavirus gastroenteritis during the first two years of life in Brazilian children

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    Maria Cleonice A Justino

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In a large Phase III trial conducted in 10 Latin American countries, the safety and efficacy of the live attenuated monovalent rotavirus vaccine RIX4414 was evaluated in 15,183 healthy infants followed up during the first two years of life. Belém was the only site in Brazil included in this multicentre trial. The study in Belém included a subset of 653 infants who were followed up until 24 months of age for protection against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis. These subjects were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive two doses of vaccine (n = 328 or two doses of placebo (n = 325 at approximately two and four months of age. Of the 653 enrolled infants, 23 dropped out during the study period. For the combined two-year period, the efficacy of RIX4414 was 72.3% [95% confidence interval (CI 37.5-89.1%] against severe rotavirus-related gastroenteritis, reaching a protection rate of 81.8% (95% CI 36.4-96.6% against circulating wild-type G9 rotavirus strains. It is concluded that two doses of RIX4414 are highly efficacious against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis in Belém during the first two years of life and provide high protection against the worldwide emergence and spread of G9P[8] strains.

  6. Similarity of Bovine Rotavirus Receptor and Human Rotavirus Receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏琦华; 訾自强; 潘菊芬; 徐燕

    2004-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody against bovine rotavirus (BRV) receptor (BRV-R-mAb) was used to explore the similarity between the receptors of BRV and human rotavirus (HRV). ELISA, dot immunobinding assay, cell protection assay, solid-phase assay and immunohistochemistry method were applied. BRV-R-mAb bound both anti-BRV IgG and anti-HRV IgG respectively and could protect MA 104 cells against BRV and HRV challenges. Immunohistochemistry test showed that there were rotavirus receptors on the surfaces of foetal intestinal, tracheal mucosa and MA 104 cells membrane. We purified the rotavirus receptors on MA 104 ceils, which could bind both BRV and HRV in vitro. It is concluded that BRV receptor and HRV receptor are homogenous proteins and can be recognized by both BRV and HRV.

  7. Rotavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Y A; Yolken, R H

    1990-09-01

    Since their discovery in the 1970s, the human rotaviruses have been recognized as the most important cause of acute infectious gastroenteritis among infants and children worldwide. Rotavirus has been found to infect almost all mammalian and avian species tested, and is primarily a disease of the young. In humans, rotavirus is the most frequent gastrointestinal pathogen in infants and children less than 2 years of age. In developing countries, the attack rate peaks at 6 months of age, whereas in developed areas of the world the virus is most commonly found among children 6-12 months of age. Rotavirus displays a marked seasonality in temperate climates, with the number of cases peaking in the colder winter months. In tropical climates, this seasonality is not as apparent, and infection may occur year round. Symptoms of rotavirus infection are non-specific and include vomiting and diarrhoea, occasionally accompanied by a low grade fever. Dehydration is more common with rotavirus infection than with most bacterial pathogens, and is the most common cause of death related to rotavirus infection. Treatment is non-specific and includes the use of oral rehydration therapy, especially in developing countries where malnutrition is common. Strategies for the prevention of rotavirus infection are dependent on advances in the understanding of the molecular biology of the rotavirus. The genetic structure of the virus has been extensively studied, and a number of the structural proteins have been identified. The neutralization antigens, located on VP4 and VP7, may be important in conferring immunity to rotavirus in vivo. Two animal-derived and several reassortant rotavirus vaccines are currently being evaluated in field studies, and a number of other candidate vaccines are being tested in vitro and in animal studies. PMID:1962726

  8. A serotype 10 human rotavirus.

    OpenAIRE

    Beards, G; Xu, L.; Ballard, A.; Desselberger, U; McCrae, M A

    1992-01-01

    Rotaviruses with genome rearrangements isolated from a chronically infected immunodeficient child (F. Hundley, M. McIntyre, B. Clark, G. Beards, D. Wood, I. Chrystie, and U. Desselberger, J. Virol 61:3365-3372, 1987) are the first recognized human isolates of serotype 10. This was shown by both a direct enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and virus neutralization assays using serotype specific monoclonal antibodies. The serotype was confirmed by sequence analysis of the gene encoding VP7, which...

  9. MAVS protein is attenuated by rotavirus nonstructural protein 1.

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    Satabdi Nandi

    Full Text Available Rotavirus is the single, most important agent of infantile gastroenteritis in many animal species, including humans. In developing countries, rotavirus infection attributes approximately 500,000 deaths annually. Like other viruses it establishes an intimate and complex interaction with the host cell to counteract the antiviral responses elicited by the cell. Among various pattern recognition receptors (PAMPs of the host, the cytosolic RNA helicases interact with viral RNA to activate the Mitochondrial Antiviral Signaling protein (MAVS, which regulates cellular interferon response. With an aim to identify the role of different PAMPs in rotavirus infected cell, MAVS was found to degrade in a time dependent and strain independent manner. Rotavirus non-structural protein 1 (NSP1 which is a known IFN antagonist, interacted with MAVS and degraded it in a strain independent manner, resulting in a complete loss of RNA sensing machinery in the infected cell. To best of our knowledge, this is the first report on NSP1 functionality where a signaling protein is targeted unanimously in all strains. In addition NSP1 inhibited the formation of detergent resistant MAVS aggregates, thereby averting the antiviral signaling cascade. The present study highlights the multifunctional role of rotavirus NSP1 and reinforces the fact that the virus orchestrates the cellular antiviral response to its own benefit by various back up strategies.

  10. Unusual assortment of segments in 2 rare human rotavirus genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Grazia, Simona; Giammanco, Giovanni M; Potgieter, Christiaan A; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Banyai, Krisztian; Platia, Maria A; Colomba, Claudia; Martella, Vito

    2010-05-01

    Using full-length genome sequence analysis, we investigated 2 rare G3P[9] human rotavirus strains isolated from children with diarrhea. The genomes were recognized as assortments of genes closely related to rotaviruses originating from cats, ruminants, and humans. Results suggest multiple transmissions of genes from animal to human strains of rotaviruses.

  11. Rotavirus

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Maria Magdalena Simatupang

    2009-01-01

    Rotavirus adalah penyebab utama diare pada bayi. Rotavirus termasuk dalam famili reoviridae. Rotavirus dibagi menjadi 7 grup, A-G dan hanya grup A, B dan C yang menginfeksi manusia. Rotavirus memiliki sedikitnya 14 serotipe G dan 20 serotipe P. Rotavirus memiliki RNA untai ganda dan kapsid ganda tanpa amplod. Rotavirus ditransmisikan melalui jalur fecal oral dan menginfeksi 2/3 proksimal ileum. Gejalanya khas meliputi diare, demam, nyeri perut, dan muntah-muntah diikuti dehidrasi. Diagnosis l...

  12. Human rotavirus HCR3 possesses a genomic RNA constellation indistinguishable from that of feline and canine rotaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagomi, T; Nakagomi, O

    2000-01-01

    Infection and spread of group A rotaviruses under natural conditions are mostly limited to one animal host species. However, rare molecular evidence exists for interspecies transmission by whole virions of animal rotaviruses to humans. Human rotavirus strain HCR3, which was isolated in 1984 from a healthy infant in Philadelphia, U.S.A. was shown by RNA-RNA hybridization to form 11 hybrid bands with feline rotavirus strain FRV64 and canine rotavirus strains CU-1 and K9, but not with rotaviruses commonly found in humans. Thus, HCR3 was concluded to be originally a rotavirus circulating in cats and dogs and accidental interspecies transmission by whole virions to humans was likely to have occurred in the past. PMID:11205126

  13. 口服轮状病毒疫苗及其保护效果%Oral live attenuated rotavirus vaccines and their protective efficacy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何泗涛

    2011-01-01

    Human rotavirus is the most common pathogen of childhood diarrhea,and vaccination is an effective way to reduce the morbidity of rotavirus diseases.This review briefly introduces the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of rotavirus diseases,and summarizes the protection efficacy of oral live attenuated rotavirus vaccines.%人轮状病毒是引起婴幼儿腹泻最常见的病原体,疫苗接种是降低轮状病毒疾病发病率的有效方法.此文简要介绍了轮状病毒疾病的流行病学和临床特征,并对口服轮状病毒减毒活疫苗的保护效果做一综述.

  14. Inactivation of human and simian rotaviruses by ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughn, J.M.; Chen, Y.S.; Lindburg, K.; Morales, D.

    1987-09-01

    The inactivation of simian rotavirus Sa-11 and human rotavirus type 2 (Wa) by ozone was compared at 4/sup 0/C by using single-particle virus stocks. Although the human strain was clearly more sensitive, both virus types were rapidly inactivated by ozone concentrations of 0.25 mg/liter or greater at all pH levels tested. Comparison of the virucidal activity of ozone with that of chlorine in identical experiments indicated little significant difference in rotavirus-inactivating efficiencies when the disinfectants were used at concentrations of 0.25 mg/liter or greater.

  15. Serological comparison of canine rotavirus with various simian and human rotaviruses by plaque reduction neutralization and hemagglutination inhibition tests.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoshino, Y; R G Wyatt; Greenberg, H B; Kalica, A R; Flores, J.; Kapikian, A Z

    1983-01-01

    By the plaque reduction neutralization test, the CU-1 strain of canine rotavirus was similar, if not identical, to three strains (no. 14, no. 15, and P) of the tentatively designated third human rotavirus serotype. In addition, strain CU-1 demonstrated a one-way antigenic relationship with two other strains (M and B) of the third human rotavirus serotype. The CU-1 strain of canine rotavirus hemagglutinated human group O, rhesus monkey, dog, sheep, and guinea pig erythrocytes. A two-way antige...

  16. Rotaviruses

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-01-06

    CDC's Dr. Jon Gentsch discusses rotaviruses, the most important cause of severe gastroenteritis in children less than five years of age. Essentially, all children around the world get the disease during the first few years of life.  Created: 1/6/2009 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 1/6/2009.

  17. Typing of human rotavirus VP4 by an enzyme immunoassay using monoclonal antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Coulson, B S

    1993-01-01

    Two different neutralization specificities exist on the outer capsid of group A rotaviruses. At least seven VP7 (G) antigenic types are distinguishable among human rotaviruses. Four distinct antigenic (P) types of human rotavirus VP4 corresponding to separate rotavirus gene 4 groups have been described. The aim of this study was to identify P types in clinical specimens by developing an enzyme immunoassay, using P-type-specific neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (N-MAbs). Three N-MAbs primari...

  18. Stability of live attenuated rotavirus vaccine with selected preservatives and primary containers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Manjari; Jarrahian, Courtney; Zhu, Changcheng; Hosken, Nancy A; McClurkan, Chris L; Koelle, David M; Saxon, Eugene; Roehrig, Andrew; Zehrung, Darin; Chen, Dexiang

    2016-05-11

    Rotavirus infection, which can be prevented by vaccination, is responsible for a high burden of acute gastroenteritis disease in children, especially in low-income countries. An appropriate formulation, packaging, and delivery device for oral rotavirus vaccine has the potential to reduce the manufacturing cost of the vaccine and the logistical impact associated with introduction of a new vaccine, simplify the vaccination procedure, and ensure that the vaccine is safely and accurately delivered to children. Single-dose prefilled presentations can be easy to use; however, they are typically more expensive, can be a bottleneck during production, and occupy a greater volume per dose vis-à-vis supply chain storage and medical waste disposal, which is a challenge in low-resource settings. Multi-dose presentations used thus far have other issues, including increased wastage of vaccine and the need for separate delivery devices. In this study, the goals were to evaluate both the technical feasibility of using preservatives to develop a liquid multi-dose formulation and the primary packaging alternatives for orally delivered, liquid rotavirus vaccines. The feasibility evaluation included evaluation of commonly used preservatives for compatibility with rotavirus vaccines and stability testing of rotavirus vaccine in various primary containers, including Lameplast's plastic tubes, BD's oral dispenser version of Uniject™ (Uniject DP), rommelag's blow-fill-seal containers, and MEDInstill's multi-dose vial and pouch. These presentations were compared to a standard glass vial. The results showed that none of the preservatives tested were compatible with a live attenuated rotavirus vaccine because they had a detrimental effect on the viability of the virus. In the presence of preservatives, vaccine virus titers declined to undetectable levels within 1 month. The vaccine formulation without preservatives maintained a stability profile over 12 months in all primary containers

  19. Detection of G3P[3] and G3P[9] rotavirus strains in American Indian children with evidence of gene reassortment between human and animal rotaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Lindsay; Esona, Mathew; Gentsch, Jon; Watt, James; Reid, Raymond; Weatherholtz, Robert; Santosham, Mathuram; Parashar, Umesh; O'Brien, Katherine

    2011-07-01

    The distribution and evolution of human rotavirus strains is important for vaccine development and effectiveness. In settings where rotavirus vaccine coverage is high, vaccine pressure could select for replacement of common strains (similar to those included in rotavirus vaccines) with uncommon strains, some of which could be generated by reassortment between human and animal rotaviruses. Between 2002 and 2004, a phase-III rotavirus vaccine clinical trial was conducted among American Indian children of the Navajo and White Mountain Apache tribes, which are known to be at high risk for rotavirus diarrhea. We evaluated the rotavirus strains collected from study participants who received placebo during the trial to determine the distribution of rotavirus genotypes and to detect emerging strains that contribute to disease and could influence rotavirus vaccine effectiveness. Three uncommon strains of human rotavirus, two G3P[3] and one G3P[9] strains were detected in stools of children aged 3 to 6 months of age. Segments of all 11 rotavirus genes were sequenced and genotyped by comparison of cognate gene fragments with reference strains. The G3P[3] strains had similar genotypes to each other and to reference dog and cat strains. The G3P[9] strain had similar genotypes to cow, cat and dog reference strains. Genetic analyses of these three strains support the known diversity generating mechanisms of rotavirus. PMID:21567432

  20. Relative concentrations of serum neutralizing antibody to VP3 and VP7 proteins in adults infected with a human rotavirus.

    OpenAIRE

    Ward, R. L.; Knowlton, D R; Schiff, G M; Hoshino, Y.; Greenberg, H B

    1988-01-01

    Two outer capsid rotavirus proteins, VP3 and VP7, have been found to elicit neutralizing-antibody production, but the immunogenicity of these proteins during human rotavirus infection has not been determined. The relative amounts of serum neutralizing antibody against the VP3 and VP7 proteins of the CJN strain of human rotavirus were, therefore, determined in adult subjects before and after infection with this virus. Reassortant strains of rotavirus that contained the CJN gene segment for onl...

  1. WHO informal consultation on quality, safety and efficacy specifications for live attenuated rotavirus vaccines Mexico City, Mexico, 8-9 February 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, David

    2005-12-01

    Rotavirus vaccines are at an advanced stage of development but there are as yet no WHO recommendations on production and quality control to provide regulatory guidance. A meeting of experts was convened by WHO and PAHO/AMRO to review the scientific basis for production and quality control of rotavirus vaccines, and to discuss specific measures to assure the safety and efficacy of rotavirus vaccines. The meeting was attended by 25 experts from 14 countries, drawn from academia, public health, national regulatory authorities and vaccine producers. It was agreed that existing guidance for other live virus vaccines provides a very good basis for product characterization, especially for source materials and control of production. The basis for attenuation of current vaccines or vaccine candidates is not known but, at least for the vaccines based on the Jennerian approach of using animal (bovine) rotaviruses, is likely to be multigenic. The risk of intussusception in humans is influenced by genetic background and age. Recent analyzes of large vaccine safety trials found that certain strains of vaccine virus were not associated with intussusception, although in these trials the first dose of vaccine was not administered to children over 3 months of age. Since age is a risk factor for intussusception, this may suggest that early delivery of the first dose of vaccine is desirable. However, maternal antibodies may mitigate against early delivery of the first vaccine dose. Factors which could affect vaccine efficacy or safety include strain diversity, malnutrition, other enteric infections, parasitic infection or immune suppression. It was concluded that data from clinical trials conducted in one part of the world would not necessarily be predictive of vaccine efficacy in other places. It was agreed that in nonclinical evaluations there was a need to use oral dosing for toxicity studies and, because rotavirus is non-neurovirulent, that there was no need for an animal

  2. Inactivation of human and simian rotaviruses by chlorine dioxide.

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Y.S.(China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275 (10), Beijing 102413, PR China); Vaughn, J M

    1990-01-01

    The inactivation of single-particle stocks of human (type 2, Wa) and simian (SA-11) rotaviruses by chlorine dioxide was investigated. Experiments were conducted at 4 degrees C in a standard phosphate-carbonate buffer. Both virus types were rapidly inactivated, within 20 s under alkaline conditions, when chlorine dioxide concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 0.2 mg/liter were used. Similar reductions of 10(5)-fold in infectivity required additional exposure time of 120 s at 0.2 mg/liter for Wa a...

  3. Clinical Symptoms of Human Rotavirus Infection Observed in Children in Sokoto, Nigeria

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    B. R. Alkali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotavirus has been identified among the most important causes of infantile diarrhoea, especially in developing countries. The present study was undertaken to determine the occurrence and clinical symptoms of human rotavirus disease among children presenting with varying degree of diarrhoea in selected urban hospitals in Sokoto metropolis, Nigeria. Diarrhoea samples were collected from 200 diarrheic children younger than 5 years of age and tested using a commercially available DAKO Rotavirus ELISA kit which detects the presence of human group A rotaviruses. A questionnaire, based on WHO generic protocol, was completed for each child to generate the primary data. Of the total number of samples collected, 51 were found to be positive for human group A rotavirus indicating 25.5% prevalence of the disease in Sokoto state. The symptoms associated with the disease were analyzed and discussed.

  4. Human group C rotavirus in children with diarrhea in the Federal District, Brazil

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    Teixeira J.M.S.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Group C rotaviruses are fastidious in their in vitro cell culture requirements. Recent serosurveys indicate that antibody to group C rotavirus is present in 3-45% of the human population in certain geographic locations, suggesting that rotavirus group C infection is more prevalent than previously believed and that the low rate of detection of these agents is probably due to the lack of sensitive diagnostic assays. From March to December 1994, 406 fecal specimens were collected from children under five years of age who were outpatients at the emergency services of nine public hospitals in Brasília, Federal District, Brazil. In addition to the samples from children, one public outpatient unit requested virological investigation of a stool sample from an HIV-seropositive adult male with diarrhea of sudden onset. All samples were analyzed by enzyme immunoassay for group A rotavirus and adenovirus (EIARA and by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE. One hundred and seven (26% were positive for group A rotavirus. Four samples from children and the sample from the HIV-seropositive patient, although negative by EIARA, showed a group C rotavirus profile by PAGE and were positive for rotavirus by electron microscopy. Using specific VP6 and VP7 primers for group C rotavirus, a reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR was performed and products were detected by agarose gel electrophoresis and ethidium bromide staining. These products were confirmed to be specific for group C rotavirus by using digoxigenin-oligonucleotide probes, Southern hybridization and chemiluminescent detection. The five positive group C rotavirus samples were detected in August (3 samples and September (2 samples. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of group C rotavirus detected in the Federal District, Brazil and in an HIV-seropositive patient with acute gastroenteritis.

  5. Molecular and biological characterization of the 5 human-bovine rotavirus (WC3)-based reassortant strains of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine, RotaTeq (registered)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RotaTeq (registered) is a pentavalent rotavirus vaccine that contains five human-bovine reassortant strains (designated G1, G2, G3, G4, and P1) on the backbone of the naturally attenuated tissue culture-adapted parental bovine rotavirus (BRV) strain WC3. The viral genomes of each of the reassortant strains were completely sequenced and compared pairwise and phylogenetically among each other and to human rotavirus (HRV) and BRV reference strains. Reassortants G1, G2, G3, and G4 contained the VP7 gene from their corresponding HRV parent strains, while reassortants G1 and G2 also contained the VP3 gene (genotype M1) from the HRV parent strain. The P1 reassortant contained the VP4 gene from the HRV parent strain and all the other gene segments from the BRV WC3 strain. The human VP7s had a high level of overall amino acid identity (G1: 95-99%, G2: 94-99% G3: 96-100%, G4: 93-99%) when compared to those of representative rotavirus strains of their corresponding G serotypes. The VP4 of the P1 reassortant had a high identity (92-97%) with those of serotype P1A[8] HRV reference strains, while the BRV VP7 showed identities ranging from 91% to 94% to those of serotype G6 HRV strains. Sequence analyses of the BRV or HRV genes confirmed that the fundamental structure of the proteins in the vaccine was similar to those of the HRV and BRV references strains. Sequences analyses showed that RotaTeq (registered) exhibited a high degree of genetic stability as no mutations were identified in the material of each reassortant, which undergoes two rounds of replication cycles in cell culture during the manufacturing process, when compared to the final material used to fill the dosing tubes. The infectivity of each of the reassortant strains of RotaTeq (registered) , like HRV strains, did not require the presence of sialic acid residues on the cell surface. The molecular and biologic characterization of RotaTeq (registered) adds to the significant body of clinical data supporting the

  6. Inactivation of human and simian rotaviruses by chlorine dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yu-Shiaw (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Vaughn, J.M. (Univ. of New England College of Medicine, Biddeford, ME (USA))

    1990-05-01

    The inactivation of single-particle stocks of human (type 2, Wa) and simian (SA-11) rotaviruses by chlorine dioxide was investigated. Experiments were conducted at 4{degree}C in a standard phosphate-carbonate buffer. Both virus types were rapidly inactivated, within 20 s under alkaline conditions, when chlorine dioxide concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 0.2 mg/liter were used. Similar reductions of 10{sup 5}-fold in infectivity required additional exposure time of 120 s at 0.2 mg/liter for Wa and at 0.5 mg/liter for SA-11, respectively, at pH 6.0. The inactivation of both virus types was moderate a neutral pH, and the sensitivities to chlorine dioxide were similar. The observed enhancement of virucidal efficiency with increasing pH was contrary to earlier findings with chlorine- and ozone-treated rotavirus particles, where efficiencies decreased with increasing alkalinity. Comparison of 99.9% virus inactivation times revealed ozone to be the most effective virucidal agent among these three disinfectants.

  7. Sunlight-induced inactivation of human Wa and porcine OSU rotaviruses in the presence of exogenous photosensitizers

    KAUST Repository

    Romero-Maraccini, Ofelia C.

    2013-10-01

    Human rotavirus Wa and porcine rotavirus OSU solutions were irradiated with simulated solar UV and visible light in the presence of different photosensitizers dissolved in buffered solutions. For human rotavirus, the exogenous effects were greater than the endogenous effects under irradiation with full spectrum and UVA and visible light at 25 C. For porcine rotavirus, the exogenous effects with UVA and visible light irradiation were only observed at high temperatures, >40 C. The results from dark experiments conducted at different temperatures suggest that porcine rotavirus has higher thermostability than human rotavirus. Concentrations of 3′-MAP excited triplet states of 1.8 fM and above resulted in significant human rotavirus inactivation. The measured excited triplet state concentrations of ≤0.45 fM produced by UVA and visible light irradiation of natural dissolved organic matter solutions were likely not directly responsible for rotavirus inactivation. Instead, the linear correlation for human rotavirus inactivation rate constant (kobs) with the phenol degradation rate constant (kexp) found in both 1 mM NaHCO3 and 1 mM phosphate-buffered solutions suggested that OH radical was a major reactive species for the exogenous inactivation of rotaviruses. Linear correlations between rotavirus kobs and specific UV254 nm absorbance of two river-dissolved organic matter and two effluent organic matter isolates indicated that organic matter aromaticity may help predict formation of radicals responsible for rotavirus inactivation. The results from this study also suggested that the differences in rotavirus strains should be considered when predicting solar inactivation of rotavirus in sunlit surface waters. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  8. Reassortment of Human and Animal Rotavirus Gene Segments in Emerging DS-1-Like G1P[8] Rotavirus Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komoto, Satoshi; Tacharoenmuang, Ratana; Guntapong, Ratigorn; Ide, Tomihiko; Tsuji, Takao; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Tharmaphornpilas, Piyanit; Sangkitporn, Somchai; Taniguchi, Koki

    2016-01-01

    The emergence and rapid spread of novel DS-1-like G1P[8] human rotaviruses in Japan were recently reported. More recently, such intergenogroup reassortant strains were identified in Thailand, implying the ongoing spread of unusual rotavirus strains in Asia. During rotavirus surveillance in Thailand, three DS-1-like intergenogroup reassortant strains having G3P[8] (RVA/Human-wt/THA/SKT-281/2013/G3P[8] and RVA/Human-wt/THA/SKT-289/2013/G3P[8]) and G2P[8] (RVA/Human-wt/THA/LS-04/2013/G2P[8]) genotypes were identified in fecal samples from hospitalized children with acute gastroenteritis. In this study, we sequenced and characterized the complete genomes of strains SKT-281, SKT-289, and LS-04. On whole genomic analysis, all three strains exhibited unique genotype constellations including both genogroup 1 and 2 genes: G3-P[8]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2 for strains SKT-281 and SKT-289, and G2-P[8]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2 for strain LS-04. Except for the G genotype, the unique genotype constellation of the three strains (P[8]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2) is commonly shared with DS-1-like G1P[8] strains. On phylogenetic analysis, nine of the 11 genes of strains SKT-281 and SKT-289 (VP4, VP6, VP1-3, NSP1-3, and NSP5) appeared to have originated from DS-1-like G1P[8] strains, while the remaining VP7 and NSP4 genes appeared to be of equine and bovine origin, respectively. Thus, strains SKT-281 and SKT-289 appeared to be reassortant strains as to DS-1-like G1P[8], animal-derived human, and/or animal rotaviruses. On the other hand, seven of the 11 genes of strain LS-04 (VP7, VP6, VP1, VP3, and NSP3-5) appeared to have originated from locally circulating DS-1-like G2P[4] human rotaviruses, while three genes (VP4, VP2, and NSP1) were assumed to be derived from DS-1-like G1P[8] strains. Notably, the remaining NSP2 gene of strain LS-04 appeared to be of bovine origin. Thus, strain LS-04 was assumed to be a multiple reassortment strain as to DS-1-like G1P[8], locally circulating

  9. Reassortment of Human and Animal Rotavirus Gene Segments in Emerging DS-1-Like G1P[8] Rotavirus Strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Komoto

    Full Text Available The emergence and rapid spread of novel DS-1-like G1P[8] human rotaviruses in Japan were recently reported. More recently, such intergenogroup reassortant strains were identified in Thailand, implying the ongoing spread of unusual rotavirus strains in Asia. During rotavirus surveillance in Thailand, three DS-1-like intergenogroup reassortant strains having G3P[8] (RVA/Human-wt/THA/SKT-281/2013/G3P[8] and RVA/Human-wt/THA/SKT-289/2013/G3P[8] and G2P[8] (RVA/Human-wt/THA/LS-04/2013/G2P[8] genotypes were identified in fecal samples from hospitalized children with acute gastroenteritis. In this study, we sequenced and characterized the complete genomes of strains SKT-281, SKT-289, and LS-04. On whole genomic analysis, all three strains exhibited unique genotype constellations including both genogroup 1 and 2 genes: G3-P[8]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2 for strains SKT-281 and SKT-289, and G2-P[8]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2 for strain LS-04. Except for the G genotype, the unique genotype constellation of the three strains (P[8]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2 is commonly shared with DS-1-like G1P[8] strains. On phylogenetic analysis, nine of the 11 genes of strains SKT-281 and SKT-289 (VP4, VP6, VP1-3, NSP1-3, and NSP5 appeared to have originated from DS-1-like G1P[8] strains, while the remaining VP7 and NSP4 genes appeared to be of equine and bovine origin, respectively. Thus, strains SKT-281 and SKT-289 appeared to be reassortant strains as to DS-1-like G1P[8], animal-derived human, and/or animal rotaviruses. On the other hand, seven of the 11 genes of strain LS-04 (VP7, VP6, VP1, VP3, and NSP3-5 appeared to have originated from locally circulating DS-1-like G2P[4] human rotaviruses, while three genes (VP4, VP2, and NSP1 were assumed to be derived from DS-1-like G1P[8] strains. Notably, the remaining NSP2 gene of strain LS-04 appeared to be of bovine origin. Thus, strain LS-04 was assumed to be a multiple reassortment strain as to DS-1-like G1P[8], locally

  10. Evidence of multiple reassortment events of feline-to-human rotaviruses based on a rare human G3P[9] rotavirus isolated from a patient with acute gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tinh Huu; Than, Van Thai; Thanh, Hien Dang; Kim, Wonyong

    2016-06-01

    A rare human/feline-like rotavirus G3P[9] strain, CAU14-1-262, from a 2-year-old girl with severe gastroenteritis was isolated and sequenced. The 11 gene segments of the CAU14-1-262 strain possessed a novel genotype constellation, G3-P[9]-I3-R3-C3-M3-A3-N3-T1-E3-H6, which was identified for the first time. Phylogenetic analysis of this strain identified the following genome origins: VP7, VP4, VP6, VP1-VP3, NSP1, NSP2, and NSP4 genes possessed an AU-1-like genotype 3 constellation with high sequence identity to those of the feline and human/feline-like rotaviruses; NSP5 possessed a H6 lineage, with highest sequence identity to the human/feline-like E2541 strain; and the NSP3 gene possessed a Wa-like genotype 1 constellation with high sequence identity to those of the of human rotaviruses. These results provided evidence of multiple reassortment events in G3P[9] rotavirus CAU14-1-262 and possibility of feline-to-human interspecies transmission. PMID:27260811

  11. Physicochemical stability and inactivation of human and simian rotaviruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Z.D.; Birch, C.; Heath, R.; Gust, I.

    1987-04-01

    The effects of various physical and chemical treatments on the stability of a human serotype 1 rotavirus and simian agent 11 (SA11) were compared by using a fluorescence focus assay. The infectivity of both strains was retained after storage at room temperature for 14 days, 4 degree C for 22 days, and -20 degree C for 32 days; lyophilization; and treatment at pH 3 to 11. Both viruses were inactivated at pH 12, as was the human virus at pH 2, although this pH resulted in only partial inactivation of SA11. The human virus also appeared to be more sensitive than SA11 to the action of ether and chloroform. The infectivity of both viruses was lost after UV irradiation for 15 min and after treatment with 8% formaldehyde for 5 min, 70% (vol/vol) ethanol for 30 min, and 2% lysol, 2% phenol, and 1% H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ for 1 h each.

  12. Recombinant monovalent llama-derived antibody fragments (VHH to rotavirus VP6 protect neonatal gnotobiotic piglets against human rotavirus-induced diarrhea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celina G Vega

    Full Text Available Group A Rotavirus (RVA is the leading cause of severe diarrhea in children. The aims of the present study were to determine the neutralizing activity of VP6-specific llama-derived single domain nanoantibodies (VHH nanoAbs against different RVA strains in vitro and to evaluate the ability of G6P[1] VP6-specific llama-derived single domain nanoantibodies (VHH to protect against human rotavirus in gnotobiotic (Gn piglets experimentally inoculated with virulent Wa G1P[8] rotavirus. Supplementation of the daily milk diet with 3B2 VHH clone produced using a baculovirus vector expression system (final ELISA antibody -Ab- titer of 4096; virus neutralization -VN- titer of 256 for 9 days conferred full protection against rotavirus associated diarrhea and significantly reduced virus shedding. The administration of comparable levels of porcine IgG Abs only protected 4 out of 6 of the animals from human RVA diarrhea but significantly reduced virus shedding. In contrast, G6P[1]-VP6 rotavirus-specific IgY Abs purified from eggs of hyperimmunized hens failed to protect piglets against human RVA-induced diarrhea or virus shedding when administering similar quantities of Abs. The oral administration of VHH nanoAb neither interfered with the host's isotype profiles of the Ab secreting cell responses to rotavirus, nor induced detectable host Ab responses to the treatment in serum or intestinal contents. This study shows that the oral administration of rotavirus VP6-VHH nanoAb is a broadly reactive and effective treatment against rotavirus-induced diarrhea in neonatal pigs. Our findings highlight the potential value of a broad neutralizing VP6-specific VHH nanoAb as a treatment that can complement or be used as an alternative to the current strain-specific RVA vaccines. Nanobodies could also be scaled-up to develop pediatric medication or functional food like infant milk formulas that might help treat RVA diarrhea.

  13. Human group A rotavirus infections in children in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midgley, S; Böttiger, B; Jensen, T G;

    2014-01-01

    One of the leading causes of severe childhood gastroenteritis are group A rotaviruses, and they have been found to be associated with similar to 40% of the annual gastroenteritis-associated hospitalizations in young Danish children......One of the leading causes of severe childhood gastroenteritis are group A rotaviruses, and they have been found to be associated with similar to 40% of the annual gastroenteritis-associated hospitalizations in young Danish children...

  14. The Meta-Analysis of Vaccine Protective Efficacy of Oral Rotavirus Attenuated Live Vaccine%口服轮状病毒减毒活疫苗保护效果研究Meta分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡昱; 李倩; 陈恩富; 戚小华; 陈雅萍

    2012-01-01

    目的 评价口服轮状病毒减毒活疫苗(Oral Rotavirus Attenuated Live Vaccine,ORV)的流行病学保护效果.方法 电子检索《中国生物医学文献数据库》、《中国期刊全文数据库》、《万方全文数据库》、National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI)(《美国国家医学图书馆数据库》)、《Cochrane(考柯兰)协作网图书馆》等数据库,将有关接种ORV流行病学保护效果的研究纳入分析.使用Rev Man4.2.10软件进行统计分析.结果 共纳入14篇文献,有6项为随机对照试验研究,8项为队列研究.单价兰州羊(Monovalent Lanzhou Lamb) ORV (ORV-L)对轮状病毒胃肠炎( Rotavirus Gastroenteritis,RVGE)的保护率为76% [95%可信区间(Confidence Interval,CI):67%~83%];单价人(Monovalent Human)ORV (ORV-H)和五价人-牛重配(Pentavalent Human-Bovine Reassortant)ORV(ORV-HB)对RVGE、严重(Severe) RVGE (SRVGE)和住院率(Hospitalized rate)的合并保护率分别为61% (95%CI:28%~79%)、71% (95%CI:44%~85%)和88% (95%CI:67%~96%).7篇文献报道了ORV的安全性,无严重不良反应和死亡报告.结论 接种不同种类的ORV可以不同程度地降低RVGE的发病,减少SRVGE和降低AR,具有良好的保护效果.%Objective To evaluate vaccine protective efficacy (VE) of oral rotavirus attenuated live vaccine(ORV) used in China. Methods Searching "China Biology Medicine disc,CBMd", "China National Knowledge Infrastructure, CNKI", "Wanfang Database, WF" database, "National Center for Biotechnology Information, NCBI"," Cochrane Library,CL", the studies of VE for ORV were included, and meta analysis were made by RevMan4.2.10 software. Results A total of 14 studies were included, 6 studies were random clinic trial (RCT), 8 studies were cohort studies. The VE of monovalent Lanzhou lamb rotavirus vaccine(ORV-L) against rotavirus gastroenteritis(RVGE) was 76% [95% (confidence interval, C/) :61% ~83% ]. The combined VE of monovalent

  15. Rotavirus vaccination: a concise review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesikari, T

    2012-10-01

    Live attenuated oral rotavirus vaccines were tested for proof-of-concept in the early 1980s, the first vaccine (RotaShield, Wyeth) was introduced in 1998 but was subsequently withdrawn because of association with intussusception, and the two currently licensed vaccine (Rotarix, GlaxoSmithKline, and RotaTeq, Merck) were introduced in 2006. Before licensure both vaccines were extensively tested for safety (for intussusception) and efficacy in trials comprising in over 60,000 infants each. Rotarix is a single-strain human rotavirus vaccine (RV1) and RotaTeq is a combination of five bovine-human reassortant rotaviruses (RV5). Although the composition of the two vaccines is different, their field effectiveness and, largely, mechanism of action are similar. Both prevent effectively severe rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) but are less efficacious against mild RVGE or rotavirus infection. Field effectiveness of these vaccines in Europe and the USA against severe RVGE has been above 90% and in Latin America around 80%. Trials in Africa have yielded efficacy rates between 50 and 80%. Rotavirus vaccination has been introduced into the national immunization programmes of about 20 countries in Latin America, with Brazil and Mexico as leading countries, as well as in the USA, Australia and South Africa. Introduction into other African countries will start in 2012. In Europe, Belgium, Luxembourg, Austria and Finland and five federal states of Germany have introduced universal rotavirus vaccination. The reasons for the slow progress in Europe include low mortality from RVGE, unfavourable cost-benefit calculations in some countries, and concerns that still exist over intussusception.

  16. Prevention of rotavirus gastroenteritis in infants and children: rotavirus vaccine safety, efficacy, and potential impact of vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aruna Chandran

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Aruna Chandran1, Sean Fitzwater1, Anjie Zhen2, Mathuram Santosham11Department of International Health, Division of Health Systems, 2Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USAAbstract: Rotavirus infection is the most common cause of severe gastroenteritis globally, with greater than 86% of deaths occurring in low-income and middle-income countries. There are two rotavirus vaccines currently licensed in the United States and prequalified by the World Health Organization. RV1 is a monovalent attenuated human rotavirus strain, given orally in two doses. RV5 is a pentavalent human-bovine reassortant rotavirus vaccine, given orally in three doses. A third rotavirus vaccine, LLV, is a lamb rotavirus strain given orally as a single dose, which is currently available only in China. RV1 and RV5 have been shown to be highly efficacious in developed countries, and initial results from trials in Africa and Asia are promising as well. At least three other vaccines are in development, which are being developed by manufacturers of developing countries. Further studies are needed to clarify issues including administration of oral rotavirus vaccines with breastfeeding and other oral vaccines, and alterations in dosing schedule. Using new data on global diarrheal burden, rotavirus is estimated to cause 390,000 deaths in children younger than 5 years. Should rotavirus vaccines be introduced in the routine immunization programs of all countries, a potential of 170,000 deaths could be prevented annually. The largest impact on mortality would be seen in low-income and middle-income countries, despite poor immunization coverage and lower efficacy. Therefore, international efforts are needed to ensure that rotavirus vaccines reach the populations with highest burden of rotavirus disease.Keywords: vaccination, mortality, rotavirus, gastroenteritis

  17. Detection of G12 Human Rotaviruses in Nepal

    OpenAIRE

    Pun, Sher Bahadur; Nakagomi, Toyoko; Sherchand, Jeevan Bahadur; Pandey, Basu Dev; Cuevas, Luis E.; Cunliffe, Nigel A.; Hart, C A; Nakagomi, Osamu

    2007-01-01

    Of 731 stool specimens collected from children with diarrhea in Kathmandu, Nepal, from August 2004 through July 2005, 170 (23.3%) tested positive for rotavirus. Reverse transcription–PCR, including a revised G12-specific primer set, identified 56 (32.9%) as G2P[4] and 39 (23.0%) as G12 with P[6], P[8], or P[4].

  18. Full Genome-Based Classification of Rotaviruses Reveals a Common Origin between Human Wa-Like and Porcine Rotavirus Strains and Human DS-1-Like and Bovine Rotavirus Strains▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Matthijnssens, Jelle; Ciarlet, Max; Heiman, Erica; Arijs, Ingrid; Delbeke, Thomas; McDonald, Sarah M.; Palombo, Enzo A.; Iturriza-Gómara, Miren; Maes, Piet; Patton, John T.; Rahman, Mustafizur; Van Ranst, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Group A rotavirus classification is currently based on the molecular properties of the two outer layer proteins, VP7 and VP4, and the middle layer protein, VP6. As reassortment of all the 11 rotavirus gene segments plays a key role in generating rotavirus diversity in nature, a classification system that is based on all the rotavirus gene segments is desirable for determining which genes influence rotavirus host range restriction, replication, and virulence, as well as for studying rotavirus ...

  19. Rotavirus vaccine: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Goel Manish; Arun, Kumar; Bilas, Jain Ram; Ruchi, Jain; Pardeep, Khanna; Pradeep, Siwach

    2012-12-01

    Worldwide, large proportion i.e., 37% of deaths due to diarrhea in young children is attributed to rotavirus. A monovalent P1A[8] G1 vaccine and a pentavalent bovine-human reassortant vaccine human rotavirus vaccine had shown good clinical efficacy without any increase in intussusception among vaccine recipients. WHO recommends that the first dose of rotavirus vaccine should be administered to infants up to age of 6-15 weeks irrespective of the prior history of rotavirus infection and the maximum age for administering the last dose of the vaccine should be 32 weeks. Booster doses are not recommended. The current update reviews the issues related to rotavirus vaccines and their usages like milestones in the development of rotavirus vaccines, concerns regarding their efficacy and cost-effectiveness, immunity after natural infection, potential for changes in virus strains, current recommendations, post marketing surveillance, and future challenges and scope for further research regarding rotavirus vaccines. PMID:25145068

  20. Rotavirus vaccines: viral shedding and risk of transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Evan J

    2008-10-01

    Rotavirus causes gastroenteritis in almost all children by 5 years of age. Immunity to rotavirus is incomplete, with potential for recurrent infections occurring throughout life. Live rotavirus vaccines have been developed for the protection of children from severe wildtype rotavirus infections. Transmission of vaccine virus strains from vaccinated children to unvaccinated contacts harbours the potential for herd immunity, but also the risk of vaccine-derived disease in immunocompromised contacts. A review of rotavirus vaccine prelicensure studies shows that viral shedding and transmission were higher with the old tetravalent rhesus rotavirus vaccine than with the current human attenuated monovalent rotavirus vaccine and the pentavalent bovine-human reassortant vaccine. Immunocompromised contacts should be advised to avoid contact with stool from the immunised child if possible, particularly after the first vaccine dose for at least 14 days. Since the risk of vaccine transmission and subsequent vaccine-derived disease with the current vaccines is much less than the risk of wildtype rotavirus disease in immunocompromised contacts, vaccination should be encouraged.

  1. Whole genome detection of rotavirus mixed infections in human, porcine and bovine samples co-infected with various rotavirus strains collected from sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyaga, Martin M; Jere, Khuzwayo C; Esona, Mathew D; Seheri, Mapaseka L; Stucker, Karla M; Halpin, Rebecca A; Akopov, Asmik; Stockwell, Timothy B; Peenze, Ina; Diop, Amadou; Ndiaye, Kader; Boula, Angeline; Maphalala, Gugu; Berejena, Chipo; Mwenda, Jason M; Steele, A Duncan; Wentworth, David E; Mphahlele, M Jeffrey

    2015-04-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVA) are among the main global causes of severe diarrhea in children under the age of 5years. Strain diversity, mixed infections and untypeable RVA strains are frequently reported in Africa. We analysed rotavirus-positive human stool samples (n=13) obtained from hospitalised children under the age of 5years who presented with acute gastroenteritis at sentinel hospital sites in six African countries, as well as bovine and porcine stool samples (n=1 each), to gain insights into rotavirus diversity and evolution. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) analysis and genotyping with G-(VP7) and P-specific (VP4) typing primers suggested that 13 of the 15 samples contained more than 11 segments and/or mixed G/P genotypes. Full-length amplicons for each segment were generated using RVA-specific primers and sequenced using the Ion Torrent and/or Illumina MiSeq next-generation sequencing platforms. Sequencing detected at least one segment in each sample for which duplicate sequences, often having distinct genotypes, existed. This supported and extended the PAGE and RT-PCR genotyping findings that suggested these samples were collected from individuals that had mixed rotavirus infections. The study reports the first porcine (MRC-DPRU1567) and bovine (MRC-DPRU3010) mixed infections. We also report a unique genome segment 9 (VP7), whose G9 genotype belongs to lineage VI and clusters with porcine reference strains. Previously, African G9 strains have all been in lineage III. Furthermore, additional RVA segments isolated from humans have a clear evolutionary relationship with porcine, bovine and ovine rotavirus sequences, indicating relatively recent interspecies transmission and reassortment. Thus, multiple RVA strains from sub-Saharan Africa are infecting mammalian hosts with unpredictable variations in their gene segment combinations. Whole-genome sequence analyses of mixed RVA strains underscore the considerable diversity of rotavirus sequences and

  2. Whole genome detection of rotavirus mixed infections in human, porcine and bovine samples co-infected with various rotavirus strains collected from sub-Saharan Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyaga, Martin M.; Jere, Khuzwayo C.; Esona, Mathew D.; Seheri, Mapaseka L.; Stucker, Karla M.; Halpin, Rebecca A.; Akopov, Asmik; Stockwell, Timothy B.; Peenze, Ina; Diop, Amadou; Ndiaye, Kader; Boula, Angeline; Maphalala, Gugu; Berejena, Chipo; Mwenda, Jason M.; Steele, A. Duncan; Wentworth, David E.; Mphahlele, M. Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVA) are among the main global causes of severe diarrhea in children under the age of 5 years. Strain diversity, mixed infections and untypeable RVA strains are frequently reported in Africa. We analysed rotavirus-positive human stool samples (n=13) obtained from hospitalised children under the age of 5 years who presented with acute gastroenteritis at sentinel hospital sites in six African countries, as well as bovine and porcine stool samples (n=1 each), to gain insights into rotavirus diversity and evolution. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) analysis and genotyping with G- (VP7) and P-specific (VP4) typing primers suggested that 13 of the 15 samples contained more than 11 segments and/or mixed G/P genotypes. Full-length amplicons for each segment were generated using RVA-specific primers and sequenced using the Ion Torrent and/or Illumina MiSeq next-generation sequencing platforms. Sequencing detected at least one segment in each sample for which duplicate sequences, often having distinct genotypes, existed. This supported and extended the PAGE and RT-PCR genotyping findings that suggested these samples were collected from individuals that had mixed rotavirus infections. The study reports the first porcine (MRC-DPRU1567) and bovine (MRC-DPRU3010) mixed infections. We also report a unique genome segment 9 (VP7), whose G9 genotype belongs to lineage VI and clusters with porcine reference strains. Previously, African G9 strains have all been in lineage III. Furthermore, additional RVA segments isolated from humans have a clear evolutionary relationship with porcine, bovine and ovine rotavirus sequences, indicating relatively recent interspecies transmission and reassortment. Thus, multiple RVA strains from sub-Saharan Africa are infecting mammalian hosts with unpredictable variations in their gene segment combinations. Whole-genome sequence analyses of mixed RVA strains underscore the considerable diversity of rotavirus sequences and

  3. Full genomic characterization of a novel genotype combination, G4P[14], of a human rotavirus strain from Barbados.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Ka Ian; Roy, Sunando; Esona, Mathew D; Jones, Starlene; Sobers, Stephanie; Morris-Glasgow, Victoria; Rey-Benito, Gloria; Gentsch, Jon R; Bowen, Michael D

    2014-12-01

    Since 2004, the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) has carried out rotavirus surveillance in Latin America and the Caribbean. Here we report the characterization of human rotavirus with the novel G-P combination of G4P[14], detected through PAHO surveillance in Barbados. Full genome sequencing of strain RVA/Human-wt/BRB/CDC1133/2012/G4P[14] revealed that its genotype is G4-P[14]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A8-N1-T1-E1-H1. The possession of a Genogroup 1 (Wa-like) backbone distinguishes this strain from other P[14] rotavirus strains. Phylogenetic analyses suggested that this strain was likely generated by genetic reassortment between human, porcine and possibly other animal rotavirus strains and identified 7 lineages within the P[14] genotype. The results of this study reinforce the potential role of interspecies transmission in generating human rotavirus diversity through reassortment. Continued surveillance is important to determine if rotavirus vaccines will protect against strains that express the P[14] rotavirus genotype. PMID:25251674

  4. Human rotavirus vaccine Rotarix™ provides protection against diverse circulating rotavirus strains in African infants: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steele Andrew

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rotaviruses are the most important cause of severe acute gastroenteritis worldwide in children Rotarix™ significantly reduced severe rotavirus gastroenteritis episodes in a Phase III clinical trial conducted in infants in South Africa and Malawi. This paper examines rotavirus vaccine efficacy in preventing severe rotavirus gastroenteritis, during infancy, caused by the various G and P rotavirus types encountered during the first rotavirus-season. Methods Healthy infants aged 5–10 weeks were enrolled and randomized into three groups to receive either two (10 and 14 weeks or three doses of Rotarix™ (together forming the pooled Rotarix™ group or three doses of placebo at a 6,10,14-week schedule. Weekly home visits were conducted to identify gastroenteritis episodes. Rotaviruses were detected by ELISA and genotyped by RT-PCR and nucleotide sequencing. The percentage of infants with severe rotavirus gastroenteritis caused by the circulating G and P types from 2 weeks post-last dose until one year of age and the corresponding vaccine efficacy was calculated with 95% CI. Results Overall, 4939 infants were vaccinated and 4417 (pooled Rotarix™ = 2974; placebo = 1443 were included in the per protocol efficacy cohort. G1 wild-type was detected in 23 (1.6% severe rotavirus gastroenteritis episodes from the placebo group. This was followed in order of detection by G12 (15 [1%] in placebo and G8 types (15 [1%] in placebo. Vaccine efficacy against G1 wild-type, G12 and G8 types were 64.1% (95% CI: 29.9%; 82%, 51.5% (95% CI:-6.5%; 77.9% and 64.4% (95% CI: 17.1%; 85.2%, respectively. Genotype P[8] was the predominant circulating P type and was detected in 38 (2.6% severe rotavirus gastroenteritis cases in placebo group. The remaining circulating P types comprised of P[4] (20 [1.4%] in placebo and P[6] (13 [0.9%] in placebo. Vaccine efficacy against P[8] was 59.1% (95% CI: 32.8%; 75.3%, P[4] was 70.9% (95% CI: 37.5%; 87

  5. Vacinas contra rotavírus e papilomavírus humano (HPV Vaccines against rotavirus and human papillomavirus (HPV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre C. Linhares

    2006-07-01

    -se que a implementação de vacinas de elevada eficácia na prevenção de tumores benignos e malignos causados por alguns tipos de HPV leve a uma queda acentuada das taxas desses tumores, os quais afetam milhões de pessoas em todo o mundo.OBJECTIVE: To briefly review strategies aimed at the development of rotavirus and HPV vaccines, with emphasis on the current status of studies assessing the safety, reactogenicity, immunogenicity and efficacy of recently developed vaccines. SOURCES OF DATA: This review focuses on articles published from 1996 to 2006, mainly those from the last five years, with special emphasis on data obtained from recently completed studies involving a new live attenuated human rotavirus vaccine and a virus-like particle (HPV vaccine. SUMMARY OF THE FINDINGS: Strategies for developing rotavirus vaccines ranged from Jennerian approaches to the new human-derived rotavirus vaccine. Currently, two rotavirus vaccines are recognized as both efficacious and safe: a pentavalent human-bovine reassortant vaccine and a vaccine derived from an attenuated rotavirus of human origin. The second of these has been evaluated in more than 70,000 infants all over the world. Prophylactic vaccines against HPV have been tested in more than 25,000 young individuals around the world. Results from phase II and III clinical studies indicate that such vaccines against the most common types of HPV, those linked to both genital warts and 70% of cervical cancers, are safe and highly efficacious. CONCLUSIONS: A future rotavirus immunization program covering 60 to 80% of infants worldwide is likely to reduce by at least 50% the number of rotavirus-associated hospitalizations and deaths. It is also reasonable to expect that implementation of HPV prophylactic vaccines will reduce the burden of the HPV-related diseases that presently impact millions of people around the world.

  6. Development of a human rotavirus induced diarrhea model in Chinese mini-pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin-Tao; Wei, Jing; Guo, Hong-Xia; Han, Jiang-Bo; Ye, Nan; He, Hai-Yang; Yu, Tian-Tian; Wu, Yu-Zhang

    2016-01-01

    AIM To establish a new animal model for the research of human rotavirus (HRV) infection, its pathogenesis and immunity and evaluation of potential vaccines. METHODS 5-d, 30-d and 60-d-old Chinese mini-pigs, Guizhou and Bamma, were inoculated with a single oral dose of attenuated strain Wa, G1, G3 of HRV, and PBS (control), respectively, and fecal samples of pigs from 0 to 7 d post infection (DPI) were collected individually. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect HRV antigen in feces. The HRV was tested by real-time PCR (RT-PCR). The sections of the intestinal tissue were stained with hematoxylin and eosin to observe the morphologic variation by microscopy. Immunofluorescence was used to determine the HRV in intestinal tissue. HRV particles in cells of the ileum were observed by electron micrography. RESULTS When inoculated with HRV, mini-pigs younger than 30 d developed diarrhea in an age-dependent manner and shed HRV antigen of the same inoculum, as demonstrated by RT-PCR. Histopathological changes were observed in HRV inoculated mini-pigs including small intestinal cell tumefaction and necrosis. HRV that was distributed in the small intestine was restricted to the top part of the villi on the internal wall of the ileum, which was observed by immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. Virus particles were observed in Golgi like follicles in HRV-infected neonatal mini-pigs. Guizhou mini-pigs were more sensitive to HRV than Bamma with respect to RV antigen shedding and clinical diarrhea. CONCLUSION These results indicate that we have established a mini-pig model of HRV induced diarrhea. Our findings are useful for the understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of HRV infection.

  7. Molecular Characterization of Human Rotavirus from Children with Diarrhoeal Disease in Sokoto State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkali, B. R.; Daneji, A. I.; Magaji, A. A.; Bilbis, L. S.

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to detect and characterize prevalent human group A rotavirus strains from 200 diarrheic children in Sokoto, Nigeria, by ELISA, monoclonal antibody (Mab) serotyping and Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) techniques. Rotavirus was detected in 25.5% of the children. The G-serotypes observed in circulation were G4: 16 (59.3%), G1: 4 (14.8%), G2: 3 (11.1%), G3: 3 (11.1%), and G12: 1 (3.7%). The monoclonal antibody (Mab) serotyping detected G1 and G3 but did not detect G4 and G2 serotypes. The Mab typing of the G1 and G3 serotypes was consistent with the result of the RT-PCR. The VP4 genotypes detected were P[6] 3 (13%), P[8] 11 (47.8%), and the rare human P genotype (P[9]), found in 9 patients (39.1%). Nine strains identified with the common G and P combinations were G4 P[8] 5 (56%), G4 P[6] 1 (11%), G1 P[8] 2 (22%), and G3 P[8] 1 (11%), while seven strains with unusual combinations or rare G or P genotypes identified were G12 P[8] 1 (14%), G2 P[8] 2 (29%), and G4 P[9] 4 (57%). To our knowledge this is the first molecular study of human rotavirus and report of rare human G and P serotypes in Sokoto State. PMID:27051531

  8. Human rotavirus vaccine (Rotarix): focus on effectiveness and impact 6 years after first introduction in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Ryan, Miguel; Giaquinto, Carlo; Benninghoff, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    A decade after licensure of the human rotavirus vaccine (HRV), a wealth of evidence supports a reduction of rotavirus (RV) gastroenteritis-associated mortality and hospitalizations following HRV inclusion in national immunization programs. Nevertheless, the majority of real-world data has been generated in high- or middle-income settings. Clinical efficacy trials previously indicated RV vaccine performance may be lower in less-developed countries compared with wealthier counterparts. Using recently published data from Africa, we examine the effectiveness and impact of HRV in resource-deprived areas, exploring whether vaccine performance differs by socioeconomic setting and the potential underlying factors. HRV vaccine effectiveness in early adopting African countries has proven to be similar or even superior to the efficacy results observed in pre-licensure studies.

  9. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of the VP4 gene of human rotaviruses isolated in Paraguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espínola, E E; Amarilla, A; Arbiza, J; Parra, G I

    2008-01-01

    Nucleotide and amino acid analyzes of the VP4 gene of human rotaviruses isolated both in Paraguay and worldwide were carried out in order to increase our knowledge about the complex pattern of evolution of this virus in nature. Paraguayan strains bearing the P[8] genotype were grouped in the lineages P[8]-1, P[8]-2, and P[8]-3. Regardless of the year of detection, all of the G4 and G9 strains were related to lineage P[8]-3, whereas the G1 strains were related to the three lineages detected in Paraguay; this fact reinforces the notion of the existence of constraints within specific populations of rotavirus strains except for the G1 strains. In addition, we propose a phylogenetic classification for the P[4] strains in five different lineages (i.e. P[4]-1 to P[4]-5). The findings presented in this paper reinforce the importance of a continuous surveillance of rotavirus strains in order to predict the possible variants that will circulate in a country, and ultimately improve current vaccination programs.

  10. Rotavirus Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Why get vaccinated?Rotavirus is a virus that causes diarrhea, mostly in babies and young children. The diarrhea can be severe, and lead ... and fever are also common in babies with rotavirus.Before rotavirus vaccine, rotavirus disease was a common ...

  11. Identification of human rotavirus serotype by hybridization to polymerase chain reaction-generated probes derived from a hyperdivergent region of the gene encoding outer capsid protein VP7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores, J.; Sears, J.; Schael, I.P.; White, L.; Garcia, D.; Lanata, C.; Kapikian, A.Z. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-08-01

    We have synthesized {sup 32}P-labeled hybridization probes from a hyperdivergent region (nucleotides 51 to 392) of the rotavirus gene encoding the VP7 glycoprotein by using the polymerase chain reaction method. Both RNA (after an initial reverse transcription step) and cloned cDNA from human rotavirus serotypes 1 through 4 could be used as templates to amplify this region. High-stringency hybridization of each of the four probes to rotavirus RNAs dotted on nylon membranes allowed the specific detection of corresponding sequences and thus permitted identification of the serotype of the strains dotted. The procedure was useful when applied to rotaviruses isolated from field studies.

  12. Conservation of the fourth gene among rotaviruses recovered from asymptomatic newborn infants and its possible role in attenuation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores, J.; Midthun, K.; Hoshino, Y.; Green, K.; Gorziglia, M.; Kapikian, A.Z.; Chanock, R.M.

    1986-11-01

    RNA-RNA hybridization was performed to assess the extent of genetic relatedness among human rotaviruses isolated from children with gastroenteritis and from asymptomatic newborn infants. /sup 32/P-labeled single-stranded RNAs produced by in vitro transcription from viral cores of the different strains tested were used as probes in two different hybridization assays: (1) undenatured genomic RNAs were resolved by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, denatured in situ, electrophoretically transferred to diazobenzyloxymethyl-paper (Northern blots), and then hybridized to the probes under two different conditions of stringency; and (ii) denatured genomic double-stranded RNAs were hybridized to the probes in solution and the hybrids which formed were identified by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. When analyzed by Northern blot hybridization at a low level of stringency, all genes from the strains tested cross-hybridized, providing evidence for some sequence homology in each of the corresponding genes. However, when hybridization stringency was increased, a difference in gene 4 sequence was detected between strains recovered from asymptomatic newborn infants (nursery strains) and strains recovered from infants and young children with diarrhea. Although the nursery strains exhibited serotypic diversity, the fourth gene appeared to be highly conversed. These results were confirmed and extended during experiments in which the RNA-RNA hybridization was carried out in solution and the resulting hybrids were analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Full-length hybrids did not form between the fourth genes from the nursery strains and the corresponding genes from the strains recovered from symptomatic infants and young children.

  13. Sequence analysis of VP4 genes of wild type and culture adapted human rotavirus G1P[8] strains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ritu Arora; Ganesh S Dhale; Pooja R Patil; Shobha D Chitambar

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To conduct a comparative analysis of the VP4gene sequences of Indian wild type (06361,0613158, 061060and0715880) and cell culture adapted (06361-CA, 0613158-CA, 061060-CAand0715880-CA) G1P[8] rotavirus strains.Methods: Full-length VP4 genes of each of the four wild type G1P[8] rotavirus strains and their cell culture adapted counterparts displaying consistent cytopathic effect were subjected toRT-PCRamplification and nucleotide sequencing. Results: All four cell culture adaptedG1P[8]rotavirus strains showed nucleotide and amino acid substitutions in theVP4 gene as compared to their wild type strains. The number of substitutions however, varied from1-64and 1-13 respectively. The substitutions were distributed in both VP5*andVP8* subunits ofVP4gene respectively of permeabilization and hemagglutinating activity. The presence of unique amino acid substitutions was identified in two of the four wild type (V377G, S387N in 061060and I644Lin0715880) and all four cell culture adapted (A46Vin0613158-CA, T60R in06361-CA, L237V, G389V andQ480H in061060-CA andS615G andT625Pin0715880-CA) strains for the first time in theVP4 gene ofP[8]specificity. Amino acid substitutions generated increase in the hydrophilicity in the cell culture adapted rotavirus strains as compared to their corresponding wild type strains.Conclusions: Amino acid substitutions detected in the VP4 genes ofG1P[8]rotavirus strains from this study together with those from other studies highlight occurrence of only strain and/or host specific substitutions during cell culture adaptation. Further evaluation of such substitutions for their role in attenuation, immunogenicity and conformation is needed for the development of newer rotavirus vaccines.

  14. Whole genome characterisation and engineering of chimaeric rotavirus-like particles using African rotavirus field strains / Khuzwayo Chidiwa Jere

    OpenAIRE

    Jere, Khuzwayo Chidiwa

    2012-01-01

    Despite the global licensure of two live-attenuated rotavirus vaccines, Rotarix® and RotaTeq®, rotavirus remains the major cause of severe dehydrating diarrhoea in young mammals and the need for further development of additional rotavirus vaccines, especially vaccines effective against regional strains in developing country settings, is increasing. The design and formulation of new effective multivalent rotavirus vaccines is complicated by the wide rotavirus strain diversity. N...

  15. Rotavirus structural proteins and dsRNA are required for the human primary plasmacytoid dendritic cell IFNalpha response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily M Deal

    Full Text Available Rotaviruses are the leading cause of severe dehydrating diarrhea in children worldwide. Rotavirus-induced immune responses, especially the T and B cell responses, have been extensively characterized; however, little is known about innate immune mechanisms involved in the control of rotavirus infection. Although increased levels of systemic type I interferon (IFNalpha and beta correlate with accelerated resolution of rotavirus disease, multiple rotavirus strains, including rhesus rotavirus (RRV, have been demonstrated to antagonize type I IFN production in a variety of epithelial and fibroblast cell types through several mechanisms, including degradation of multiple interferon regulatory factors by a viral nonstructural protein. This report demonstrates that stimulation of highly purified primary human peripheral plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs with either live or inactivated RRV induces substantial IFNalpha production by a subset of pDCs in which RRV does not replicate. Characterization of pDC responses to viral stimulus by flow cytometry and Luminex revealed that RRV replicates in a small subset of human primary pDCs and, in this RRV-permissive small subset, IFNalpha production is diminished. pDC activation and maturation were observed independently of viral replication and were enhanced in cells in which virus replicates. Production of IFNalpha by pDCs following RRV exposure required viral dsRNA and surface proteins, but neither viral replication nor activation by trypsin cleavage of VP4. These results demonstrate that a minor subset of purified primary human peripheral pDCs are permissive to RRV infection, and that pDCs retain functionality following RRV stimulus. Additionally, this study demonstrates trypsin-independent infection of primary peripheral cells by rotavirus, which may allow for the establishment of extraintestinal viremia and antigenemia. Importantly, these data provide the first evidence of IFNalpha induction in primary

  16. Molecular characterization of the first G24P[14] rotavirus strain detected in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, M Leanne; Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Roy, Sunando; Rungsrisuriyachai, Kunchala; Boom, Julie A; Sahni, Leila C; Baker, Carol J; Rench, Marcia A; Wikswo, Mary E; Payne, Daniel C; Parashar, Umesh D; Bowen, Michael D

    2016-09-01

    Here we report the genome of a novel rotavirus A (RVA) strain detected in a stool sample collected during routine surveillance by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's New Vaccine Surveillance Network. The strain, RVA/human-wt/USA/2012741499/2012/G24P[14], has a genomic constellation of G24-P[14]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A3-N2-T9-E2-H3. The VP2, VP3, VP7 and NSP3 genes cluster phylogenetically with bovine strains. The other genes occupy mixed clades containing animal and human strains. Strain RVA/human-wt/USA/2012741499/2012/G24P[14] most likely is the product of interspecies transmission and reassortment events. This is the second report of the G24 genotype and the first report of the G24P[14] genotype combination in humans. PMID:27237948

  17. Rotavirus Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotavirus is a virus that causes gastroenteritis. Symptoms include severe diarrhea, vomiting, fever, and dehydration. Almost all ... the U.S. are likely to be infected with rotavirus before their 5th birthday. Infections happen most often ...

  18. Analysis of the full genome of human group C rotaviruses reveals lineage diversification and reassortment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medici, Maria Cristina; Tummolo, Fabio; Martella, Vito; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; De Conto, Flora; Chezzi, Carlo; Fehér, Enikő; Marton, Szilvia; Calderaro, Adriana; Bányai, Krisztián

    2016-08-01

    Group C rotaviruses (RVC) are enteric pathogens of humans and animals. Whole-genome sequences are available only for few RVCs, leaving gaps in our knowledge about their genetic diversity. We determined the full-length genome sequence of two human RVCs (PR2593/2004 and PR713/2012), detected in Italy from hospital-based surveillance for rotavirus infection in 2004 and 2012. In the 11 RNA genomic segments, the two Italian RVCs segregated within separate intra-genotypic lineages showed variation ranging from 1.9 % (VP6) to 15.9 % (VP3) at the nucleotide level. Comprehensive analysis of human RVC sequences available in the databases allowed us to reveal the existence of at least two major genome configurations, defined as type I and type II. Human RVCs of type I were all associated with the M3 VP3 genotype, including the Italian strain PR2593/2004. Conversely, human RVCs of type II were all associated with the M2 VP3 genotype, including the Italian strain PR713/2012. Reassortant RVC strains between these major genome configurations were identified. Although only a few full-genome sequences of human RVCs, mostly of Asian origin, are available, the analysis of human RVC sequences retrieved from the databases indicates that at least two intra-genotypic RVC lineages circulate in European countries. Gathering more sequence data is necessary to develop a standardized genotype and intra-genotypic lineage classification system useful for epidemiological investigations and avoiding confusion in the literature.

  19. Morphological response of human rotavirus to ultra-violet radiation, heat and disinfectants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The morphological damage induced in human rotavirus particles by exposure to UV radiation (254 nm) increased progressively with length of treatment. Exposure of the virus in suspension to 9000 ergs/cm2/s removed the smooth capsid layer from 50% of particles after 1 min and from all the virions within 10 min. By this time, the number of stain-penetrated or empty particles increased markedly, along with the appearance of virus-derived debris in the form of disrupted and isolated capsomeres. After treatment for 120 min no intact virus particles were observed. The action of wet (1000C) or dry (600C) heat resulted in changes similar to those effected by UV radiation. Sodium hypochlorite, cetrimide and 70% ethanol induced a rapid loss of the outer capsid layer, but, compared with UV radiation or heat, a slower increase in the number of stain-penetrated particles was noted. Chlorhexidine and phenol had effects on virus structure only after extended periods of exposure, whilst glutaraldehyde treatment had little influence on virus morphology. Glutaraldehyde 2% v/v would appear to be most suitable for the disinfection of rotavirus-containing electron microscope grids before their examination. (author)

  20. Complete Genome Analysis of a Rabbit Rotavirus Causing Gastroenteritis in a Human Infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melisa Berenice Bonica

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Group A rotaviruses (RVA are responsible for causing infantile diarrhea both in humans and animals. The molecular characteristics of lapine RVA strains are only studied to a limited extent and so far G3P[14] and G3P[22] were found to be the most common G/P-genotypes. During the 2012-2013 rotavirus season in Belgium, a G3P[14] RVA strain was isolated from stool collected from a two-year-old boy. We investigated whether RVA/Human-wt/BEL/BE5028/2012/G3P[14] is completely of lapine origin or the result of reassortment event(s. Phylogenetic analyses of all gene segments revealed the following genotype constellation: G3-P[14]-I2-R2-C2-M3-A9-N2-T6-E5-H3 and indicated that BE5028 probably represents a rabbit to human interspecies transmission able to cause disease in a human child. Interestingly, BE5028 showed a close evolutionary relationship to RVA/Human-wt/BEL/B4106/2000/G3P[14], another lapine-like strain isolated in a Belgian child in 2000. The phylogenetic analysis of the NSP3 segment suggests the introduction of a bovine(-like NSP3 into the lapine RVA population in the past 12 years. Sequence analysis of NSP5 revealed a head-to-tail partial duplication, combined with two short insertions and a deletion, indicative of the continuous circulation of this RVA lineage within the rabbit population.

  1. Complete Genome Analysis of a Rabbit Rotavirus Causing Gastroenteritis in a Human Infant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonica, Melisa Berenice; Zeller, Mark; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Heylen, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVA) are responsible for causing infantile diarrhea both in humans and animals. The molecular characteristics of lapine RVA strains are only studied to a limited extent and so far G3P[14] and G3P[22] were found to be the most common G/P-genotypes. During the 2012-2013 rotavirus season in Belgium, a G3P[14] RVA strain was isolated from stool collected from a two-year-old boy. We investigated whether RVA/Human-wt/BEL/BE5028/2012/G3P[14] is completely of lapine origin or the result of reassortment event(s). Phylogenetic analyses of all gene segments revealed the following genotype constellation: G3-P[14]-I2-R2-C2-M3-A9-N2-T6-E5-H3 and indicated that BE5028 probably represents a rabbit to human interspecies transmission able to cause disease in a human child. Interestingly, BE5028 showed a close evolutionary relationship to RVA/Human-wt/BEL/B4106/2000/G3P[14], another lapine-like strain isolated in a Belgian child in 2000. The phylogenetic analysis of the NSP3 segment suggests the introduction of a bovine(-like) NSP3 into the lapine RVA population in the past 12 years. Sequence analysis of NSP5 revealed a head-to-tail partial duplication, combined with two short insertions and a deletion, indicative of the continuous circulation of this RVA lineage within the rabbit population. PMID:25690801

  2. ROTAVIRUS VACCINES

    OpenAIRE

    Kang G

    2006-01-01

    Rotavirus, the most common cause of severe diarrhea and a leading cause of mortality in children, has been a priority target for vaccine development for the past several years. The first rotavirus vaccine licensed in the United States was withdrawn because of an association of the vaccine with intussusception. However, the need for a vaccine is greatest in the developing world, because the benefits of preventing deaths due to rotavirus disease are substantially greater than the risk of intuss...

  3. Rotavirus Gastroenteriti

    OpenAIRE

    Kükner, Şenay; Koç, Esin; Uluşahin, Namdar; Tuna, Fevzi

    1993-01-01

    Akut gastroenteritte rotavirus sıklığını saptamak için Aralık 1989 Haziran 1990 tarihleri arasında akut gastroenterit yakınması ile Dr Sami Ulus Çocuk Hastanesi ne başvuran 110 vakada rotavirus çalışıldı Vakaların 25 45 inde rotavirus olarak bulundu Bu sonuç ülkemizde de rotavirusun akut ishal nedeni olarak önemli bir yer tuttuğunu göstermiştir Anahtar kelimeler: Rotavirus Akut İshal

  4. The Impact of Socio-Economic Determinants on the Vaccination Rates with Rotavirus and Human Papiloma Virus Vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Grdadolnik Urška; Sočan Maja

    2015-01-01

    Background Socio-economic inequalities may have an impact on the uptake of selfpaid vaccines. The aim of the study was to identify the effect of some socio economic determinants on vaccination rates with self-paid human papilloma virus (HPV) and rotavirus (RV) vaccines. Methods Vaccination coverage data, available in electronic database cepljenje.net (administered by the National Institute of Public Health), were collected at administrative unit level. The socio-economic determinants (the ave...

  5. Zoonotic Transmission of Rotavirus in Denmark; a Case Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midgley, Sofie; Gram, N.; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane;

    Rotavirus type A infection is a common cause of hospitalisation of children. However, in our laboratory almost 30% of rotavirus positive samples are from adults. Due to this an epidemiological study into the riskfactors for rotavirus infection in adults was set up. All identified rotavirus positive...... adults are sent a questionnaire to identify potential risk factors. Rotavirus type A infection can also occur in a range of animals, including domestic dogs, cats, cattle, horses, and birds. There is some data suggesting direct transmission between animals and humans. Rotavirus typing is carried out...... in Denmark as part of the EuroRotaNet vaccine study. Samples positive for rotavirus are type...

  6. Expression and Immunoreactivity of a Human Group A Rotavirus Vp4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Rotavirus capsid protein Vp4 plays an important role in the virus adhering and entering the cells. In this study, a Vp4 gene cloned from a rotavirus strain TB-Chen was highly expressed in E.coli BL21 (DE3). The results of the Western blot showed that the protein possesses specific immuno-reactivities and can be specifically recognized by guinea pig antibodies against rotavirus strain SA11 or Wa. Some Vp4 dimers were formed during renaturation. These data obtained from this study provide a strong basis for further study on the structure and function of the Vp4.

  7. Exotic rotaviruses in animals and rotaviruses in exotic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Souvik; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

    2014-01-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVA) are a major cause of viral diarrhea in the young of mammals and birds. RVA strains with certain genotype constellations or VP7-VP4 (G-P) genotype combinations are commonly found in a particular host species, whilst unusual or exotic RVAs have also been reported. In most cases, these exotic rotaviruses are derived from RVA strains common to other host species, possibly through interspecies transmission coupled with reassortment events, whilst a few other strains exhibit novel genotypes/genetic constellations rarely found in other RVAs. The epidemiology and evolutionary patterns of exotic rotaviruses in humans have been thoroughly reviewed previously. On the other hand, there is no comprehensive review article devoted to exotic rotaviruses in domestic animals and birds so far. The present review focuses on the exotic/unusual rotaviruses detected in livestock (cattle and pigs), horses and companion animals (cats and dogs). Avian rotaviruses (group D, group F and group G strains), including RVAs, which are genetically divergent from mammalian RVAs, are also discussed. Although scattered and limited studies have reported rotaviruses in several exotic animals and birds, including wildlife, these data remain to be reviewed. Therefore, a section entitled "rotaviruses in exotic animals" was included in the present review. PMID:25674582

  8. 75 FR 48706 - Proposed Vaccine Information Materials for Rotavirus Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-11

    ..., rotavirus, hepatitis A, meningococcal, human papillomavirus (HPV), and trivalent influenza vaccines... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Proposed Vaccine Information Materials for Rotavirus Vaccine AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of Health and...

  9. Mycophenolic acid potently inhibits rotavirus infection with a high barrier to resistance development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yuebang; Wang, Yijin; Dang, Wen; Xu, Lei; Su, Junhong; Zhou, Xinying; Wang, Wenshi; Felczak, Krzysztof; van der Laan, Luc J W; Pankiewicz, Krzysztof W; van der Eijk, Annemiek A; Bijvelds, Marcel; Sprengers, Dave; de Jonge, Hugo; Koopmans, Marion P G; Metselaar, Herold J; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; Pan, Qiuwei

    2016-09-01

    Rotavirus infection has emerged as an important cause of complications in organ transplantation recipients. Immunosuppressants used to prevent alloreactivity can also interfere with virus infection, but the direct effects of the specific type of immunosuppressants on rotavirus infection are still unclear. Here we profiled the effects of different immunosuppressants on rotavirus using a 2D culture model of Caco2 human intestinal cell line and a 3D model of human primary intestinal organoids inoculated with laboratory and patient-derived rotavirus strains. We found that the responsiveness of rotavirus to Cyclosporine A treatment was moderate and strictly regulated in an opposite direction by its cellular targets cyclophilin A and B. Treatment with mycophenolic acid (MPA) resulted in a 99% inhibition of viral RNA production at the clinically relevant concentration (10 μg/ml) in Caco2 cells. This effect was further confirmed in organoids. Importantly, continuous treatment with MPA for 30 passages did not attenuate its antiviral potency, indicating a high barrier to drug resistance development. Mechanistically, the antiviral effects of MPA act via inhibiting the IMPDH enzyme and resulting in guanosine nucleotide depletion. Thus for transplantation patients at risk for rotavirus infection, the choice of MPA as an immunosuppressive agent appears rational. PMID:27468950

  10. Antigenic and genomic diversity of human rotavirus VP4 in two consecutive epidemic seasons in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla-Noriega, L; Méndez-Toss, M; Menchaca, G; Contreras, J F; Romero-Guido, P; Puerto, F I; Guiscafré, H; Mota, F; Herrera, I; Cedillo, R; Muñoz, O; Calva, J; Guerrero, M L; Coulson, B S; Greenberg, H B; López, S; Arias, C F

    1998-06-01

    In the present investigation we characterized the antigenic diversity of the VP4 and VP7 proteins in 309 and 261 human rotavirus strains isolated during two consecutive epidemic seasons, respectively, in three different regions of Mexico. G3 was found to be the prevalent VP7 serotype during the first year, being superseded by serotype G1 strains during the second season. To antigenically characterize the VP4 protein of the strains isolated, we used five neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) which showed specificity for VP4 serotypes P1A, P1B, and P2 in earlier studies. Eight different patterns of reactivity with these MAbs were found, and the prevalence of three of these patterns varied from one season to the next. The P genotype of a subset of 52 samples was determined by PCR. Among the strains characterized as genotype P[4] and P[8] there were three and five different VP4 MAb reactivity patterns, respectively, indicating that the diversity of neutralization epitopes in VP4 is greater than that previously appreciated by the genomic typing methods.

  11. No evidence of murine leukemia virus-related viruses in live attenuated human vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William M Switzer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The association of xenotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV-related virus (XMRV in prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome reported in previous studies remains controversial as these results have been questioned by recent data. Nonetheless, concerns have been raised regarding contamination of human vaccines as a possible source of introduction of XMRV and MLV into human populations. To address this possibility, we tested eight live attenuated human vaccines using generic PCR for XMRV and MLV sequences. Viral metagenomics using deep sequencing was also done to identify the possibility of other adventitious agents. RESULTS: All eight live attenuated vaccines, including Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV (SA-14-14-2, varicella (Varivax, measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR-II, measles (Attenuvax, rubella (Meruvax-II, rotavirus (Rotateq and Rotarix, and yellow fever virus were negative for XMRV and highly related MLV sequences. However, residual hamster DNA, but not RNA, containing novel endogenous gammaretrovirus sequences was detected in the JEV vaccine using PCR. Metagenomics analysis did not detect any adventitious viral sequences of public health concern. Intracisternal A particle sequences closest to those present in Syrian hamsters and not mice were also detected in the JEV SA-14-14-2 vaccine. Combined, these results are consistent with the production of the JEV vaccine in Syrian hamster cells. CONCLUSIONS: We found no evidence of XMRV and MLV in eight live attenuated human vaccines further supporting the safety of these vaccines. Our findings suggest that vaccines are an unlikely source of XMRV and MLV exposure in humans and are consistent with the mounting evidence on the absence of these viruses in humans.

  12. Therapeutics Insight with Inclusive Immunopharmacology Explication of Human Rotavirus A for the Treatment of Diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mohammad Uzzal; Hashem, Abu; Keya, Chaman Ara; Salimullah, Md

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe infant and childhood diarrhea worldwide, and the morbidity and mortality rate is going to be outnumbered in developing countries like Bangladesh. To mitigate this substantial burden of disease, new therapeutics such as vaccine and drug are swiftly required against rotavirus. The present therapeutics insight study was performed with comprehensive immunoinformatics and pharmacoinformatics approach. T and B-cell epitopes were assessed in the conserved region of outer capsid protein VP4 among the highly reviewed strains from different countries including Bangladesh. The results suggest that epitope SU1 (TLKNLNDNY) could be an ideal candidate among the predicted five epitopes for both T and B-cell epitopes for the development of universal vaccine against rotavirus. This research also suggests five novel drug compounds from medicinal plant Rhizophora mucronata Lamk. for better therapeutics strategies against rotavirus diarrhea based on 3D structure building, pharmacophore, ADMET, and QSAR properties. The exact mode of action between drug compounds and target protein VP4 were revealed by molecular docking analysis. Drug likeness and oral bioavailability further confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed drugs against rotavirus diarrhea. This study might be implemented for experimental validation to facilitate the novel vaccine and drug design. PMID:27445802

  13. MicroRNA profile analysis of host cells before and after wild human rotavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan; Wu, Jinyuan; Geng, Panpan; Kui, Xiang; Xie, Yuping; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Yaling; Yin, Na; Zhang, Guangming; Yi, Shan; Li, Hongjun; Sun, Maosheng

    2016-09-01

    Rotavirus infection is an important cause of acute gastroenteritis in children, but the interaction between rotavirus and host cells is not completely understood. We isolated a wildtype (wt) rotavirus strain, ZTR-68(P [8] G1), which is derived from an infant with diarrhea in southwest China in 2010. In this study, we investigated host cellular miRNA expression profiles changes in response to ZTR-68 in early stage of infection to investigate the role of miRNAs upon rotavirus infection. Differentially expressed miRNAs were identified by deep sequencing and qRT-PCR and the function of their targets predicted by Gene Ontology (GO) function and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway annotation. A total of 36 candidate miRNAs were identified. Comparative analysis indicated that 29 miRNAs were significantly down-regulated and 7 were up-regulated after infection. The data were provided contrasting the types of microRNAs in two different permissive cell lines (HT29 and MA104). The target assays results showed that mml-miR-7 and mml-miR-125a are involved in anti-rotavirus and virus-host interaction in host cells. These results offer clues for identifying potential candidates in vector-based antiviral strategies. J. Med. Virol. 88:1497-1510, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26890217

  14. Segurança, imunogenicidade e eficácia protetora de duas doses da vacina RIX4414 contendo rotavírus atenuado de origem humana Safety, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy of two doses of RIX4414 live attenuated human rotavirus vaccine in healthy Brazilian infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliete C. Araujo

    2007-06-01

    efficacy of two doses of rotavirus vaccine in healthy Brazilian infants. METHODS: A randomized, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted in Brazil, Mexico and Venezuela. Infants received two oral doses of vaccine or placebo at 2 and 4 months of age, concurrently with routine immunizations, except for oral poliomyelitis vaccine (OPV. This paper reports results from Belém, Brazil, where the number of subjects per group and the viral vaccine titers were: 194 (10(4.7 focus forming units - FFU, 196 (10(5.2 FFU, 194 (10(5.8 FFU and 194 (placebo. Anti-rotavirus (anti-RV antibody response was assessed in 307 subjects. Clinical severity of gastroenteritis episodes was measured using a 20-point scoring system with a score of > 11 defined as severe GE. RESULTS: The rates of solicited general symptoms were similar in vaccine and placebo recipients. At 2 months after the second dose, a serum IgA response to RV occurred in 54.7 to 74.4% of vaccinees. No interference was seen in the immunogenicity of routine vaccines. Vaccine efficacy against any rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE was 63.5% (95%CI 20.8-84.4 for the highest concentration (10(5.8 FFU. Efficacy was 81.5% (95%CI 44.5-95.4 against severe RVGE. At its highest concentration (10(5.8 FFU, RIX4414 provided 79.8% (95%CI 26.4-96.3 protection against severe RVGE by G9 strain. CONCLUSIONS: RIX4414 was highly immunogenic with a low reactogenicity profile and did not interfere with seroresponse to diptheria, tetanus, pertussis, hepatitis B and Hib antigens. Two doses of RIX4414 provided significant protection against severe GE caused by RV.

  15. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the VP8* carbohydrate-binding protein of the human rotavirus strain Wa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraschnefski, Mark J.; Scott, Stacy A. [Institute for Glycomics, Griffith University (Gold Coast Campus), PMB 50 Gold Coast Mail Centre, Queensland 9726 (Australia); Holloway, Gavan; Coulson, Barbara S.; Itzstein, Mark von [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Blanchard, Helen, E-mail: h.blanchard@griffith.edu.au [Institute for Glycomics, Griffith University (Gold Coast Campus), PMB 50 Gold Coast Mail Centre, Queensland 9726 (Australia)

    2005-11-01

    The carbohydrate-binding component (VP8*{sub 64–223}) of the human Wa rotavirus spike protein has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized in two different crystal forms. X-ray diffraction data have been collected that have enabled determination of the Wa VP8*{sub 64–223} structure by molecular replacement. Rotaviruses exhibit host-specificity and the first crystallographic information on a rotavirus strain that infects humans is reported here. Recognition and attachment to host cells, leading to invasion and infection, is critically linked to the function of the outer capsid spike protein of the rotavirus particle. In some strains the VP8* component of the spike protein is implicated in recognition and binding of sialic-acid-containing cell-surface carbohydrates, thereby enabling infection by the virus. The cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and initial X-ray diffraction analysis of the VP8* core from human Wa rotavirus is reported. Two crystal forms (trigonal P3{sub 2}21 and monoclinic P2{sub 1}) have been obtained and X-ray diffraction data have been collected, enabling determination of the VP8*{sub 64–223} structure by molecular replacement.

  16. Rotavirus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Surendran, Sankar

    2008-01-01

    Rotavirus infection causing gastroenteritis is one of the major health concerns throughout the world. Millions of children are affected by the disease. Studying molecular mechanism and pathophysiology of the disease is important to understand and interpret possible therapeutical targets. Studies suggest that rotavirus infection alters phosphorylation of p70S6K, mitogen activated kinase (MAPK/ERK) and myosin light chain; induced inflammatory agents such as prostaglandin E2 and nitric oxide lev...

  17. Diversity and relationships of cocirculating modern human rotaviruses revealed using large-scale comparative genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Sarah M; McKell, Allison O; Rippinger, Christine M; McAllen, John K; Akopov, Asmik; Kirkness, Ewen F; Payne, Daniel C; Edwards, Kathryn M; Chappell, James D; Patton, John T

    2012-09-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVs) are 11-segmented, double-stranded RNA viruses and are primary causes of gastroenteritis in young children. Despite their medical relevance, the genetic diversity of modern human RVs is poorly understood, and the impact of vaccine use on circulating strains remains unknown. In this study, we report the complete genome sequence analysis of 58 RVs isolated from children with severe diarrhea and/or vomiting at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) in Nashville, TN, during the years spanning community vaccine implementation (2005 to 2009). The RVs analyzed include 36 G1P[8], 18 G3P[8], and 4 G12P[8] Wa-like genogroup 1 strains with VP6-VP1-VP2-VP3-NSP1-NSP2-NSP3-NSP4-NSP5/6 genotype constellations of I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1. By constructing phylogenetic trees, we identified 2 to 5 subgenotype alleles for each gene. The results show evidence of intragenogroup gene reassortment among the cocirculating strains. However, several isolates from different seasons maintained identical allele constellations, consistent with the notion that certain RV clades persisted in the community. By comparing the genes of VUMC RVs to those of other archival and contemporary RV strains for which sequences are available, we defined phylogenetic lineages and verified that the diversity of the strains analyzed in this study reflects that seen in other regions of the world. Importantly, the VP4 and VP7 proteins encoded by VUMC RVs and other contemporary strains show amino acid changes in or near neutralization domains, which might reflect antigenic drift of the virus. Thus, this large-scale, comparative genomic study of modern human RVs provides significant insight into how this pathogen evolves during its spread in the community. PMID:22696651

  18. Diversity and Relationships of Cocirculating Modern Human Rotaviruses Revealed Using Large-Scale Comparative Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKell, Allison O.; Rippinger, Christine M.; McAllen, John K.; Akopov, Asmik; Kirkness, Ewen F.; Payne, Daniel C.; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Chappell, James D.; Patton, John T.

    2012-01-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVs) are 11-segmented, double-stranded RNA viruses and are primary causes of gastroenteritis in young children. Despite their medical relevance, the genetic diversity of modern human RVs is poorly understood, and the impact of vaccine use on circulating strains remains unknown. In this study, we report the complete genome sequence analysis of 58 RVs isolated from children with severe diarrhea and/or vomiting at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) in Nashville, TN, during the years spanning community vaccine implementation (2005 to 2009). The RVs analyzed include 36 G1P[8], 18 G3P[8], and 4 G12P[8] Wa-like genogroup 1 strains with VP6-VP1-VP2-VP3-NSP1-NSP2-NSP3-NSP4-NSP5/6 genotype constellations of I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1. By constructing phylogenetic trees, we identified 2 to 5 subgenotype alleles for each gene. The results show evidence of intragenogroup gene reassortment among the cocirculating strains. However, several isolates from different seasons maintained identical allele constellations, consistent with the notion that certain RV clades persisted in the community. By comparing the genes of VUMC RVs to those of other archival and contemporary RV strains for which sequences are available, we defined phylogenetic lineages and verified that the diversity of the strains analyzed in this study reflects that seen in other regions of the world. Importantly, the VP4 and VP7 proteins encoded by VUMC RVs and other contemporary strains show amino acid changes in or near neutralization domains, which might reflect antigenic drift of the virus. Thus, this large-scale, comparative genomic study of modern human RVs provides significant insight into how this pathogen evolves during its spread in the community. PMID:22696651

  19. Microarrays for genotyping human group a rotavirus by multiplex capture and type-specific primer extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovmar, Lovisa; Fock, Caroline; Espinoza, Felix; Bucardo, Filemon; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Bondeson, Kåre

    2003-11-01

    Human group A rotavirus (HRV) is the major cause of severe gastroenteritis in infants worldwide. HRV shares the feature of a high degree of genetic diversity with many other RNA viruses, and therefore, genotyping of this organism is more complicated than genotyping of more stable DNA viruses. We describe a novel microarray-based method that allows high-throughput genotyping of RNA viruses with a high degree of polymorphism by multiplex capture and type-specific extension on microarrays. Denatured reverse transcription (RT)-PCR products derived from two outer capsid genes of clinical isolates of HRV were hybridized to immobilized capture oligonucleotides representing the most commonly occurring P and G genotypes on a microarray. Specific primer extension of the type-specific capture oligonucleotides was applied to incorporate the fluorescent nucleotide analogue cyanine 5-labeled dUTP as a detectable label. Laser scanning and fluorescence detection of the microarrays was followed by visual or computer-assisted interpretation of the fluorescence patterns generated on the microarrays. Initially, the method detected HRV in all 40 samples and correctly determined both the G and the P genotypes of 35 of the 40 strains analyzed. After modification by inclusion of additional capture oligonucleotides specific for the initially unassigned genotypes, all genotypes could be correctly defined. The results of genotyping with the microarray fully agreed with the results obtained by nucleotide sequence analysis and sequence-specific multiplex RT-PCR. Owing to its robustness, simplicity, and general utility, the microarray-based method may gain wide applicability for the genotyping of microorganisms, including highly variable RNA and DNA viruses.

  20. Microarrays for Genotyping Human Group A Rotavirus by Multiplex Capture and Type-Specific Primer Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovmar, Lovisa; Fock, Caroline; Espinoza, Felix; Bucardo, Filemon; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Bondeson, Kåre

    2003-01-01

    Human group A rotavirus (HRV) is the major cause of severe gastroenteritis in infants worldwide. HRV shares the feature of a high degree of genetic diversity with many other RNA viruses, and therefore, genotyping of this organism is more complicated than genotyping of more stable DNA viruses. We describe a novel microarray-based method that allows high-throughput genotyping of RNA viruses with a high degree of polymorphism by multiplex capture and type-specific extension on microarrays. Denatured reverse transcription (RT)-PCR products derived from two outer capsid genes of clinical isolates of HRV were hybridized to immobilized capture oligonucleotides representing the most commonly occurring P and G genotypes on a microarray. Specific primer extension of the type-specific capture oligonucleotides was applied to incorporate the fluorescent nucleotide analogue cyanine 5-labeled dUTP as a detectable label. Laser scanning and fluorescence detection of the microarrays was followed by visual or computer-assisted interpretation of the fluorescence patterns generated on the microarrays. Initially, the method detected HRV in all 40 samples and correctly determined both the G and the P genotypes of 35 of the 40 strains analyzed. After modification by inclusion of additional capture oligonucleotides specific for the initially unassigned genotypes, all genotypes could be correctly defined. The results of genotyping with the microarray fully agreed with the results obtained by nucleotide sequence analysis and sequence-specific multiplex RT-PCR. Owing to its robustness, simplicity, and general utility, the microarray-based method may gain wide applicability for the genotyping of microorganisms, including highly variable RNA and DNA viruses. PMID:14605152

  1. Emergence of G9 P[6] Human Rotaviruses in Argentina: Phylogenetic Relationships among G9 Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bok, Karin; Palacios, Gustavo; Sijvarger, Karina; Matson, David; Gomez, Jorge

    2001-01-01

    Because rotavirus diarrhea can be reduced through vaccination and because current vaccine candidates provide protection against only the most common G antigenic types (G1 to G4), detection of uncommon G types is one of the main goals of rotavirus surveillance. After a 2-year nationwide rotavirus surveillance study in Argentina concluded, surveillance was continued and an increase of G9 prevalence in several Argentine cities was detected. During this period G9 strains predominated in the south, and a gradient of decreasing G9 prevalence was observed from south to north (41 to 0%). Sequence analysis of gene 9, encoding the G antigen, showed that Argentine strains cluster with most G9 isolates from other countries, showing less than 2% nucleotide divergence among them, but are distinctive from them in that they present some unique amino acid changes. Our results agree with reports of increased G9 prevalence in other parts of the world, suggesting the need to incorporate G9 into candidate rotavirus vaccines. PMID:11682524

  2. LAS PROTEÍNAS β3 Y PDI AISLADAS DE PLAQUETAS HUMANAS SE UNEN CON EL ROTAVIRUS ECwt IN VITRO β3 and PDI proteins isolated from human platelets bind with ECwt rotavirus in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Mayorga

    2010-01-01

    policlonal contra β3 y establecer que β3 y PDI se unen in vitro, luego de incubar las proteínas aisladas con el rotavirus ECwt, e in vivo, después de incubar el rotavirus con las vellosidades aisladas del intestino delgado de ratón lactante de la cepa ICR.Background. Commercial integrin β3 is currently not available and commercial PDI is too expensive, which is making access difficult to these proteins needed for conducting experiments aimed at the establishment of possible interactions between integrin β3 and PDI and wild type rotavirus strains. Objective. To explore a methodology allowing isolation of proteins β3 and PDI from human platelets to be used as antigens in the generation of rabbit polyclonal antibodies useful in the assessment of interactions between these proteins and rotavirus ECwt. Materials and methods. Proteins β3 and PDI from human platelet lysates were separated using preparative electrophoresis under reducing conditions and then eluted. Interactions of these proteins with rotavirus ECwt were analyzed using co-immunoprecipitation, Western blotting and capture ELISA. Results. Proteins from human platelet lysates were separated by preparative electrophoresis under reducing conditions. The identification of proteins β3 and PDI present in a gel slice was performed through their reaction with commercial antibodies in a Western blotting analysis. Protein purity was established after electroelution from a gel slice. Polyclonal antibodies against protein β3 were generated in rabbit. Incubation of eluted proteins β3 and PDI with rotavirus ECwt showed in co-immunoprecipitation and ELISA assays that these proteins bound virus in vitro. The same binding was showed to occur when rotavirus was incubated with isolated small intestinal villi from suckling mice. Conclusions. Relatively high amounts of proteins β3 and PDI were partially purified from human platelets by preparative electrophoresis. The isolation of these proteins allowed the generation of

  3. Full genome characterization of the first G3P[24] rotavirus strain detected in humans provides evidence of interspecies reassortment and mutational saturation in the VP7 gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Roy, Sunando; Teel, Elizabeth N.; Weinberg, Geoffrey A.; Payne, Daniel C.; Parashar, Umesh D.; Bowen, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    During the 2008–2009 rotavirus season of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention New Vaccine Surveillance Network, one case of paediatric acute gastroenteritis associated with a rotavirus G14P[24] strain was identified. This was the first detection of the genotype G14 and P[24] in humans, and the first detection of the G14P[24] combination. To gain an insight into the origins and the evolution of this strain, we determined the complete ORF sequences of all 11 genes. A majority of the genes identified were similar to the simian strain TUCH, except for the VP1 and VP7 genes that clustered only distantly with the bovine and equine strains, respectively. In addition, this strain carried AU-1-like NSP2 and NSP4 genes. Using codon-partitioning and protein-based phylogenetic approaches, we determined that the VP7 genotype of strain 2009727118 was actually G3; therefore, the proposed full genomic classification of the 2009727118 strain is G3-P[24]-I9-R2-C3-M3-A9-N3-T3-E3-H6. These findings indicate the possibility that the 2009727118 strain originated by interspecies transmission and multiple reassortment events involving human, bovine and equine rotaviruses, resulting in the introduction of some genes into the genome of simian rotaviruses. Additionally, we found evidence of mutational saturation in the third codon position of the VP7 ORF which presented an issue with homoplasy in phylogenetic analyses. PMID:26590163

  4. Full genome characterization of the first G3P[24] rotavirus strain detected in humans provides evidence of interspecies reassortment and mutational saturation in the VP7 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Roy, Sunando; Teel, Elizabeth N; Weinberg, Geoffrey A; Payne, Daniel C; Parashar, Umesh D; Bowen, Michael D

    2016-02-01

    During the 2008-2009 rotavirus season of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention New Vaccine Surveillance Network, one case of paediatric acute gastroenteritis associated with a rotavirus G14P[24] strain was identified. This was the first detection of the genotype G14 and P[24] in humans, and the first detection of the G14P[24] combination. To gain an insight into the origins and the evolution of this strain, we determined the complete ORF sequences of all 11 genes. A majority of the genes identified were similar to the simian strain TUCH, except for the VP1 and VP7 genes that clustered only distantly with the bovine and equine strains, respectively. In addition, this strain carried AU-1-like NSP2 and NSP4 genes. Using codon-partitioning and protein-based phylogenetic approaches, we determined that the VP7 genotype of strain 2009727118 was actually G3; therefore, the proposed full genomic classification of the 2009727118 strain is G3-P[24]-I9-R2-C3-M3-A9-N3-T3-E3-H6. These findings indicate the possibility that the 2009727118 strain originated by interspecies transmission and multiple reassortment events involving human, bovine and equine rotaviruses, resulting in the introduction of some genes into the genome of simian rotaviruses. Additionally, we found evidence of mutational saturation in the third codon position of the VP7 ORF which presented an issue with homoplasy in phylogenetic analyses. PMID:26590163

  5. Zoonotic transmission of rotavirus: surveillance and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dóró, Renáta; Farkas, Szilvia L; Martella, Vito; Bányai, Krisztián

    2015-01-01

    Group A rotavirus (Rotavirus A, RVA) is the main cause of acute dehydrating diarrhea in humans and numerous animal species. RVA shows vast diversity and a variety of human strains share genetic and antigenic features with animal origin RVA strains. This finding suggests that interspecies transmission is an important mechanism of rotavirus evolution and contributes to the diversity of human RVA strains. RVA is responsible for half a million deaths and several million hospitalizations worldwide. Globally, two rotavirus vaccines are available for routine use in infants. These vaccines show a great efficacy profile and induce protective immunity against various rotavirus strains. However, little is known about the long-term evolution and epidemiology of RVA strains under selective pressure related to vaccine use. Continuous strain surveillance in the post-vaccine licensure era is needed to help better understand mechanisms that may affect vaccine effectiveness. PMID:26428261

  6. Development and characterization of candidate rotavirus vaccine strains derived from children with diarrhoea in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Le T; Trang, Nguyen V; Phuong, Nguyen M; Nguyen, Huong T; Ngo, Huong T; Nguyen, Huong T M; Tran, Hanh B; Dang, Ha N; Dang, Anh D; Gentsch, Jon R; Wang, Yuhuan; Esona, Mathew D; Glass, Roger I; Steele, A Duncan; Kilgore, Paul E; Nguyen, Man V; Jiang, Baoming; Nguyen, Hien D

    2009-11-20

    In Vietnam, rotavirus infection accounts for more than one-half of all hospitalizations for diarrhoea among children less than 5 years of age. While new vaccines to prevent rotavirus diarrhoea have been developed and introduced into some countries by multinational manufacturers, the ability for developing countries such as Vietnam to introduce several new and important vaccines into the routine infant immunization schedule may be challenging. In order to be partially self-sufficient in vaccine production, Vietnam has pursued the development of several rotavirus strains as candidate vaccines using isolates obtained from Vietnamese children with diarrhoea. This paper describes the origin, isolation and characterization of 3 human rotavirus strains being considered for further vaccine development in Vietnam. The goal is to prepare a monovalent G1P [8] rotavirus vaccine using one of these strains obtained in Vietnam and naturally attenuated by multiple passages in cell culture. While this is an ambitious project that will require several years' work, we are using the lessons learned to improve the overall quality of vaccine production including the use of Vero cell techniques for the manufacture of other vaccines in Vietnam.

  7. Rotavirus genotype distribution during the pre-vaccine period in Bolivia: 2007–2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Rosario; Forney, Kristen; Castro, Maria René; Rebolledo, Paulina A.; Mamani, Nataniel; Patzi, Maritza; Halkyer, Percy; Leon, Juan S.; Iñiguez, Volga

    2013-01-01

    Summary Objectives Rotavirus is the most important etiology of severe diarrhea in Bolivia. The monovalent attenuated human oral rotavirus vaccine Rotarix® was introduced in Bolivia in 2008. We describe the molecular epidemiology of circulating rotavirus strains before vaccine introduction. Methods Two thousand one hundred thirty-five diarrheal samples were collected from hospitals in four Bolivian cities during 2007–2008. Forty-three percent (445 of 1030 rotavirus-positive samples) were analyzed for G and P genotypes. Among those, 331 were electropherotyped by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Disease severity was quantified using a modified Vesikari scale. Results Among the 445 samples, five genotypes were found to be prevalent: G9P[8] (33%), G1P[6] (17%), G2P[4] (13%), G9P[6] (12%), and G1P[8] (4%). Co-infections with two or more strains accounted for 14% of samples. The most prevalent strain, G9, showed greater electropherotype diversity compared to other serogroups. Strain G1P[6] generally infected younger children and peaked later in the year than other strains. No particular genotype was associated with a higher severity score, though there was a significant difference in the duration of diarrhea between genotypes. Conclusions During the 2-year pre-vaccine period, substantial diversity of rotavirus co-circulating strains was observed. These data constitute a baseline against which changes in circulating strains post-vaccine introduction can be monitored. PMID:23688547

  8. Full-genome sequencing of a Hungarian canine G3P[3] Rotavirus A strain reveals high genetic relatedness with a historic Italian human strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, H; Mihalov-Kovács, E; Dóró, R; Marton, S; Farkas, S L; Giammanco, G M; De Grazia, S; Martella, V; Bányai, K

    2015-04-01

    A canine Rotavirus A strain was identified in the fecal specimen of a young dog during 2012 in Hungary. The strain RVA/Dog-wt/HUN/135/2012/G3P[3] shared complete genotype constellation (G3-P[3]-I3-R3-C3-M3-A15-N2-T3-E3-H6) and high genome sequence similarity (nt, 98.8 %) with a historic human strain, RVA/Human-tc/ITA/PA260-97/1997/G3P[3]. This study provides evidence for the canine origin of the unusual NSP1 genotype, A15, and reinforces the hypothesis of direct interspecies transmission of canine rotaviruses to humans. PMID:25634124

  9. Probiotics and colostrum/milk differentially affect neonatal humoral immune responses to oral rotavirus vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Chattha, Kuldeep S; Vlasova, Anastasia N; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Esseili, Malak A; Siegismund, Christine; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Saif, Linda J.

    2013-01-01

    Breast milk (colostrum [col]/milk) components and gut commensals play important roles in neonatal immune maturation, establishment of gut homeostasis and immune responses to enteric pathogens and oral vaccines. We investigated the impact of colonization by probiotics, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 (Bb12) with/without col/milk (mimicking breast/formula fed infants) on B lymphocyte responses to an attenuated (Att) human rotavirus (HRV) Wa strain vaccine in a n...

  10. Multiple reassortment and interspecies transmission events contribute to the diversity of feline, canine and feline/canine-like human group A rotavirus strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthijnssens, Jelle; De Grazia, Simona; Piessens, Jan; Heylen, Elisabeth; Zeller, Mark; Giammanco, Giovanni M; Bányai, Krisztián; Buonavoglia, Canio; Ciarlet, Max; Martella, Vito; Van Ranst, Marc

    2011-08-01

    RNA-RNA hybridization assays and complete genome sequence analyses have shown that feline rotavirus (FRV) and canine rotavirus (CRV) strains display at least two distinct genotype constellations (genogroups), represented by the FRV strain RVA/Cat-tc/AUS/Cat97/1984/G3P[3] and the human rotavirus (HRV) strain RVA/Human-tc/JPN/AU-1/1982/G3P3[9], respectively. G3P[3] and G3P[9] strains have been detected sporadically in humans. The complete genomes of two CRV strains (RVA/Dog-tc/ITA/RV198-95/1995/G3P[3] and RVA/Dog-tc/ITA/RV52-96/1996/G3P[3]) and an unusual HRV strain (RVA/Human-tc/ITA/PA260-97/1997/G3P[3]) were determined to further elucidate the complex relationships among FRV, CRV and HRV strains. The CRV strains RV198-95 and RV52-96 were shown to possess a Cat97-like genotype constellation. However, 3 and 5 genes of RV198-95 and RV52-96, respectively, were found in distinct subclusters of the same genotypes, suggesting the occurrence of reassortment events among strains belonging to this FRV/CRV/HRV genogroup. Detailed phylogenetic analyses of the HRV strain PA260-97 showed that (i) 8 genome segments (VP3, VP4, VP6, VP7 and NSP2-5) clustered closely with RV198-95 and/or RV52-96; (ii) 2 genome segments (VP1 and VP2) were more closely related to HRV AU-1; and (iii) 1 genome segment (NSP1) was distantly related to any other established NSP1 genotypes and was ratified as a new NSP1 genotype, A15. These findings suggest that the human strain PA260-97 has a history of zoonotic transmission and is likely a reassortant among FRV/CRV strains from the Cat97 and AU-1-like genogroups. In addition, a potential third BA222-05-like genogroup of FRV and HRV strains should be recognized, consisting of rotavirus strains with a stable genetic genotype constellation of genes also partially related to bovine rotavirus (BRV) and bovine-like rotaviruses. The detailed phylogenetic analysis indicated that three major genotype constellations exist among FRV, CRV and feline/canine-like HRV

  11. Rotaviruses: from pathogenesis to vaccination

    OpenAIRE

    Greenberg, Harry B.; Estes, Mary K.

    2009-01-01

    Rotaviruses cause life-threatening gastroenteritis in children worldwide; the enormous disease burden has focused efforts to develop vaccines and led to the discovery of novel mechanisms of gastrointestinal virus pathogenesis and host responses to infection. Two live-attenuated vaccines for gastroenteritis (Rotateq and Rotarix) have been licensed in many countries. This review summarizes the latest data on these vaccines, their effectiveness and challenges to global vaccination. Recent insigh...

  12. Molecular epidemiology and genetic evolution of the whole genome of G3P[8] human rotavirus in Wuhan, China, from 2000 through 2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Hong Wang

    Full Text Available Rotaviruses are a major etiologic agent of gastroenteritis in infants and young children worldwide. Since the latter of the 1990s, G3 human rotaviruses referred to as "new variant G3" have emerged and spread in China, being a dominant genotype until 2010, although their genomic evolution has not yet been well investigated.The complete genomes of 33 G3P[8] human rotavirus strains detected in Wuhan, China, from 2000 through 2013 were analyzed. Phylogenetic trees of concatenated sequences of all the RNA segments and individual genes were constructed together with published rotavirus sequences.Genotypes of 11 gene segments of all the 33 strains were assigned to G3-P[8]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1, belonging to Wa genogroup. Phylogenetic analysis of the concatenated full genome sequences indicated that all the modern G3P[8] strains were assigned to Cluster 2 containing only one clade of G3P[8] strains in the US detected in the 1970s, which was distinct from Cluster 1 comprising most of old G3P[8] strains. While main lineages of all the 11 gene segments persisted during the study period, different lineages appeared occasionally in RNA segments encoding VP1, VP4, VP6, and NSP1-NSP5, exhibiting various allele constellations. In contrast, only a single lineage was detected for VP7, VP2, and VP3 genes. Remarkable lineage shift was observed for NSP1 gene; lineage A1-2 emerged in 2007 and became dominant in 2008-2009 epidemic season, while lineage A1-1 persisted throughout the study period.Chinese G3P[8] rotavirus strains have evolved since 2000 by intra-genogroup reassortment with co-circulating strains, accumulating more reassorted genes over the years. This is the first large-scale whole genome-based study to assess the long-term evolution of common human rotaviruses (G3P[8] in an Asian country.

  13. Attenuation Coefficient Estimation of the Healthy Human Thyroid In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouyer, J.; Cueva, T.; Portal, A.; Yamamoto, T.; Lavarello, R.

    Previous studies have demonstrated that attenuation coefficients can be useful towards characterizing thyroid tissues. In this work, ultrasonic attenuation coefficients were estimated from healthy human thyroids in vivo using a clinical scanner. The selected subjects were five young, healthy volunteers (age: 26 ± 6 years old, gender: three females, two males) with no reported history of thyroid diseases, no palpable thyroid nodules, no smoking habits, and body mass index less than 30 kg/m2. Echographic examinations were conducted by a trained sonographer using a SonixTouch system (Ultrasonix Medical Corporation, Richmond, BC) equipped with an L14-5 linear transducer array (nominal center frequency of 10 MHz, transducer footprint of 3.8 cm). Radiofrequency data corresponding to the collected echographic images in both transverse and longitudinal views were digitized at a sampling rate of 40 MHz and processed with Matlab codes (MathWorks, Natick, MA) to estimate attenuation coefficients using the spectral log difference method. The estimation was performed using an analysis bandwidth spanning from 4.0 to 9.0 MHz. The average value of the estimated ultrasonic attenuation coefficients was equal to 1.34 ± 0.15 dB/(cm.MHz). The standard deviation of the estimated average attenuation coefficient across different volunteers suggests a non-negligible inter-subject variability in the ultrasonic attenuation coefficient of the human thyroid.

  14. New advance of group A human rotavirus epidemiology and vaccine development%A组人轮状病毒流行病学及疫苗研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    童志礼; 方肇寅

    2002-01-01

    A组人轮状病毒(group A human rotavirus, HRV)是世界范围内婴幼儿重症腹泻的主要病因.本文在介绍HRV结构和特性的基础上,对世界范围内HRV血清型流行病学特征以及HRV疫苗研究现状和趋势分别作了综述.

  15. Robustness of the healthcare utilization results from the Rotavirus Efficacy and Safety Trial (REST evaluating the human-bovine (WC3 reassortant pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (RV5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Damme Pierre

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Rotavirus Efficacy and Safety Trial was a placebo-controlled Phase III study that evaluated the safety and efficacy of a three-dose pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (RV5 including its effect on healthcare utilization for rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE. The per-protocol (PP analyses, which counted events occurring 14 days after dose 3 among infants without protocol violations, have already been published. This paper evaluates the consistency of the healthcare utilization results based on the modified intention to treat (MITT analyses with the PP analyses. The MITT analyses include all infants receiving at least one dose of vaccine or placebo and follow-up begins after dose 1. The paper also explores the consistency of the results for different subgroups of the study population with different types of surveillance. Methods Data on healthcare utilization for acute gastroenteritis were collected via telephone interviews after administration of the first dose. Parents were either contacted every 6 weeks or every 2 weeks depending on the substudy in which they were enrolled. Those contacted every 2 weeks were also asked to complete symptom diaries. Poisson regression was used to evaluate the effect of RV5 on the rates of RVGE-associated healthcare encounters in all of the analyses. Results In the first 2 years after vaccination, RV5 reduced the combined rate of hospitalizations and emergency department (ED visits 88.9% (95% CI: 84.9, 91.9 for all RVGE regardless of serotype in the MITT analysis compared with a 94.5% (95% CI: 91.2, 96.6 reduction based on the G1-G4 PP analysis. By type of surveillance, the rate reductions for the G1-G4 PP analysis were 91.0% (95% CI: 81.7, 95.5 and 95.9% (95% CI: 92.2, 97.8 among parents contacted every 2 weeks (number evaluable = 4,451 and every 6 weeks (number evaluable = 52,683 respectively. Conclusions Our analyses demonstrated that the effect of RV5 on reducing the rate of hospitalizations

  16. Isolation and characterization of a new simian rotavirus, YK-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Gary

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To effectively analyze the requirements for protection to rotavirus infection, a reliable animal model that reasonably mimics infection and disease in humans is needed. A requirement for an effective animal model is the availability of appropriate rotavirus stocks for challenge. Results A new simian rotavirus, designated YK-1, was isolated from a 2-year-old immunodeficient pigtailed macaque with chronic diarrhea. YK-1 was distinguishable by electropherotype from the other simian rotavirus strains, SA11 and RRV. One variant of YK-1, clone 311, which was isolated after adaptation and plaque purification in cell cultures, displayed an unusual RNA electropherotype with an abnormally migrating gene 11 segment. Sequence analysis demonstrated a genetic rearrangement that involved a partial duplication of the gene 11 ORF encoding NSP5. YK-1 was identified as a Group A rotavirus belonging to subgroup 1. To further characterize the YK-1 strain, the genes encoding VP4, VP7, and NSP4 were sequenced. Analysis of VP4 and VP7 gene fragments suggests that this strain is a G3P3 rotavirus and is closely related to the simian rotavirus strain RRV. Serotype analysis also identified YK-1 as a G3 rotavirus. The NSP4 genotype of YK-1 is C, the same genotype as RRV. Conclusion This newly isolated rotavirus, YK-1, is being used to establish a nonhuman primate model for studying the infectivity, immunity, and pathogenesis of rotavirus and for evaluating candidate rotavirus vaccines.

  17. Analysis of Human Rotaviruses from a Single Location Over an 18-Year Time Span Suggests that Protein Coadaption Influences Gene Constellations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shu; McDonald, Paul W.; Thompson, Travis A.; Dennis, Allison F.; Akopov, Asmik; Kirkness, Ewen F.; Patton, John T.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rotaviruses (RVs) are 11-segmented, double-stranded RNA viruses that cause severe gastroenteritis in children. In addition to an error-prone genome replication mechanism, RVs can increase their genetic diversity by reassorting genes during host coinfection. Such exchanges allow RVs to acquire advantageous genes and adapt in the face of selective pressures. However, reassortment may also impose fitness costs if it unlinks genes/proteins that have accumulated compensatory, coadaptive mutations and that operate best when kept together. To better understand human RV evolutionary dynamics, we analyzed the genome sequences of 135 strains (genotype G1/G3/G4-P[8]-I1-C1-R1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1) that were collected at a single location in Washington, DC, during the years 1974 to 1991. Intragenotypic phylogenetic trees were constructed for each viral gene using the nucleotide sequences, thereby defining novel allele level gene constellations (GCs) and illuminating putative reassortment events. The results showed that RVs with distinct GCs cocirculated during the vast majority of the collection years and that some of these GCs persisted in the community unchanged by reassortment. To investigate the influence of protein coadaptation on GC maintenance, we performed a mutual information-based analysis of the concatenated amino acid sequences and identified an extensive covariance network. Unexpectedly, amino acid covariation was highest between VP4 and VP2, which are structural components of the RV virion that are not thought to directly interact. These results suggest that GCs may be influenced by the selective constraints placed on functionally coadapted, albeit noninteracting, viral proteins. This work raises important questions about mutation-reassortment interplay and its impact on human RV evolution. IMPORTANCE Rotaviruses are devastating human pathogens that cause severe diarrhea and kill >450,000 children each year. The virus can evolve by accumulating mutations and by

  18. Rotavirus (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... common causes of diarrhea , and severe infection (rotavirus gastroenteritis) is the leading cause of severe, dehydrating diarrhea in infants and young children. In the U.S., rotavirus infections ...

  19. The role of human adenoviruses type 41 in acute diarrheal disease in Minas Gerais after rotavirus vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaís Aparecida Vieira Reis

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human adenovirus species F (HAdV-F type 40 and 41 are commonly associated with acute diarrheal disease (ADD across the world. Despite being the largest state in southeastern Brazil and having the second largest number of inhabitants, there is no information in the State of Minas Gerais regarding the role of HAdV-F in the etiology of ADD. This study was performed to determine the prevalence, to verify the epidemiological aspects of infection, and to characterize the strains of human adenoviruses (HAdV detected. A total of 377 diarrheal fecal samples were obtained between January 2007 and August 2011 from inpatient and outpatient children of age ranging from 0 to 12 years. All samples were previously tested for rotavirus, norovirus, and astrovirus, and 314 of 377 were negative. The viral DNA was extracted, amplified using the polymerase chain reaction and the HAdV-positive samples were sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed. Statistical analyses were performed using the Chi-square test (p < 0.05, considering two conditions: the total of samples tested (377 and the total of negative samples for the remaining viruses tested (314. The overall prevalence of HAdV was 12.47% (47/377; and in 76.60% (36/47 of the positive samples, this virus was the only infectious agent detected. The phylogenetic analysis of partial sequences of 32 positive samples revealed that they all clustered with the HAdV-F type 41. The statistical analysis showed that there was no correlation between the onset of the HAdV infection and the origin of the samples (inpatients or outpatients in the two conditions tested: the total of samples tested (p = 0.598 and the total of negative samples for the remaining viruses tested (p = 0.614. There was a significant association in the occurrence of infection in children aged 0–12 months for the condition 1 (p = 0.030 as well as condition 2 (p = 0.019. The occurrence of infections due to HAdV did not coincide with a pattern of

  20. The role of human adenoviruses type 41 in acute diarrheal disease in Minas Gerais after rotavirus vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Thaís Aparecida Vieira; Assis, Andrêssa Silvino Ferreira; do Valle, Daniel Almeida; Barletta, Vívian Honorato; de Carvalho, Iná Pires; Rose, Tatiana Lundgren; Portes, Silvana Augusta Rodrigues; Leite, José Paulo Gagliardi; da Rosa e Silva, Maria Luzia

    2016-01-01

    Human adenovirus species F (HAdV-F) type 40 and 41 are commonly associated with acute diarrheal disease (ADD) across the world. Despite being the largest state in southeastern Brazil and having the second largest number of inhabitants, there is no information in the State of Minas Gerais regarding the role of HAdV-F in the etiology of ADD. This study was performed to determine the prevalence, to verify the epidemiological aspects of infection, and to characterize the strains of human adenoviruses (HAdV) detected. A total of 377 diarrheal fecal samples were obtained between January 2007 and August 2011 from inpatient and outpatient children of age ranging from 0 to 12 years. All samples were previously tested for rotavirus, norovirus, and astrovirus, and 314 of 377 were negative. The viral DNA was extracted, amplified using the polymerase chain reaction and the HAdV-positive samples were sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed. Statistical analyses were performed using the Chi-square test (p < 0.05), considering two conditions: the total of samples tested (377) and the total of negative samples for the remaining viruses tested (314). The overall prevalence of HAdV was 12.47% (47/377); and in 76.60% (36/47) of the positive samples, this virus was the only infectious agent detected. The phylogenetic analysis of partial sequences of 32 positive samples revealed that they all clustered with the HAdV-F type 41. The statistical analysis showed that there was no correlation between the onset of the HAdV infection and the origin of the samples (inpatients or outpatients) in the two conditions tested: the total of samples tested (p = 0.598) and the total of negative samples for the remaining viruses tested (p = 0.614). There was a significant association in the occurrence of infection in children aged 0–12 months for the condition 1 (p = 0.030) as well as condition 2 (p = 0.019). The occurrence of infections due to HAdV did not coincide with a pattern of seasonal

  1. 一株人源性轮状病毒的分离及适应性培养%Isolation Human Rotavirus Strains and Adaptive Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李松; 张光明; 吴晋元; 尹娜; 易山; 米锴; 曹颖; 李杨; 孙茂盛

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate separation method, the condition for culture and biological properties of wild rotavirus strain . Methods: To the qualitative detection of samples collected rotavirus use colloidal gold, PCR, PAGE . Process the positive samples according to the conventional method, and then do the separation of tissue culture. To analyze and evaluate the genome, gene sequences and proliferation kinetics of different transfer of culture samples. Using the positive serum of the G1P[8] rotavirus to do the virus neutralizing identification test. Results: By testing, the ZTR-68 rotavirus belong to A group were got, the arrangement of genome is 4:2:3 :2,the genotype is G1P[8]. The CPE was observed after the adapted culture the rotavirus ,proliferated in MA104 cells, in the Vero cells. And the typical rotavirus form can be observed by using electron microscope. The processing is stable, which the strain proliferated in the Vero cells. And the infectious titer reached 7. 25 log CCID50/ml, the peak time of proliferation is at 96h. There was not any other virus except the rotavirus in the culture medium of virus neutralizing identification test. Conclusion; The separated strain of human rotavirus, named ZTR-86, which was got from the separation of the diarrhea samples, has a good adaptability to the tissue culture and a good genetic stability. It provides a basis for the further study of its biological properties and the making of corresponding vaccine.%目的:研究轮状病毒野毒株的分离方法、组织培养适应条件及相应生物学性质.方法:对收集的样品采用胶体金、PCR、PAGE进行轮状病毒定性检测.阳性样品按常规方法处理并进行组织培养分离,对不同传代样品做基因组图谱、基因序列、病毒增殖动力学分析评价,采用轮状病毒P[8]G1型阳性血清进行病毒中和鉴别试验.结果:通过检测为A组轮状病毒,基因组为4∶2∶3∶2排列,基因分型G1P [8]型,在MA104细胞中传

  2. Suspected zoonotic transmission of rotavirus group A in Danish adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midgley, S. E.; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Larsen, Lars Erik;

    2012-01-01

    Group A rotaviruses infect humans and a variety of animals. In July 2006 a rare rotavirus strain with G8P[14] specificity was identified in the stool samples of two adult patients with diarrheoa, who lived in the same geographical area in Denmark. Nucleotide sequences of the VP7, VP4, VP6, and NSP4...... genes of the identified strains were identical. Phylogenetic analyses showed that both Danish G8P[14] strains clustered with rotaviruses of animal, mainly, bovine and caprine, origin. The high genetic relatedness to animal rotaviruses and the atypical epidemiological features suggest that these human G8...

  3. Surveillance of rotavirus diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titis Widowati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Rotavirus is a major cause of severe diarrhea and dehydration in children worldwide. Data on the burden of disease in Indonesia is limited. Objective To provide an epidemiological profile of rotavirus infection among children hospitalized for diarrhea in Mohammad Hoesin Hospital, Palembang. Methods In January - December 2006, a prospective, hospital-based surveillance was carried out in children aged less than five years, presenting with diarrhea. Stool samples were examined for rotavirus using enzyme immunoassay (EIA. G- and P-typing were performed on specimens confirmed to be positive by EIA. Results A total of 513 fecal specimens from 534 children were tested for rotavirus. Rotavirus was detected in 64% of the specimens, mostly of the G9 type (62.5%. Incidence of rotavirus diarrhea was highest in the 6 month to 2 years age group (60.4%. Children with rotavirus diarrhea were more likely to present with dehydration, compared to those with non-rotavirus diarrhea (94% vs 70%, respectively, P=0.03. Conclusion Rotavirus was the most common pathogen found in children with diarrhea. Rotavirus was detected in 64% of pediatric diarrheal specimens tested in our study. This finding warrants the use of a large-scale program to prevent disease, such as vaccination against rotavirus. [Paediatr Indones. 2012;52:22-7].

  4. Rotavirus Group A in Danish Cattle and Swine Herds 2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midgley, Sofie; Gram, Nina; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane;

    Rotavirus group A infection causes gastroenteritis in both humans and a variety of animal species. Both domestic pet species such as cats and dogs, and commercial species such as pigs and cows can be affected. Zoonotic transmission is a possibility and could lead to the introduction into human...... populations of novel rotavirus strains....

  5. Rotavirus Type A in Danish Cattle and Swine Herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midgley, Sofie; Gram, Nina; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane;

    Rotavirus group A infection causes gastroenteritis in both humans and a variety of animal species. Both domestic pet species such as cats and dogs, and commercial species such as pigs and cows can be affected. Zoonotic transmission is a possibility and could lead to the introduction into human...... populations of novel rotavirus strains....

  6. MASA DEPAN VAKSIN ROTAVIRUS DI INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krisna Nur Andriana Pangesti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakRotavirus adalah penyebab utama gastroenteritis pada anak-anak. Insiden diare yang disebabkan rotavirus di Indonesia terjadi sepanjang tahun dengan jumlah kematian mencapai sekitar 10.088 anak per tahun. Virus ini ditularkan melalui rute tinja-oral dengan tingkat transmisi tinggi. Lebih dari 50 kombinasi galur G - P yang dikenal sebagai galur yang menginfeksi manusia dengan serotipe dominan akan bervariasi antar wilayah dan tahun. Di Indonesia, berbagai penelitian rotavirus menunjukkan bahwa variasi tipe VP7 (G9 dan VP4 (P[8] merupakan kombinasi genotipe paling sering muncul. Metode pencegahan yang paling mungkin dan sangat diperlukan untuk mengontrol transmisi dan mencegah penyakit yang disebabkan oleh virus ini adalah dengan vaksinasi. Berbagai macam jenis vaksin Rotavirus dikembangkan untuk memberikan kekebalan sebaik infeksi alamiah dan meminimalisasi efek samping yang terjadi. Untuk itu pengawasan yang baik pra dan pasca perizinan diperlukan untuk memantau efek samping dari vaksin yang ada. Infeksi Rotavirus menyebabkan beban penyakit dan ekonomi yang tinggi sehingga vaksin dapat dipertimbangkan sebagai salah satu cara pencegahan yang baik.Kata kunci : Rotavirus, vaksin, diareAbstractRotaviruses are the leading cause of gastroenteritis in young children. The incidence of diarrhea due to rotavirus in Indonesia is evenly throughout the year with the mortality approximately of 10,088 children in a year. These viruses are transmitted by fecal-oral route with high rate of transmission. More than 50 combinations G-P known as strain that infect human with the predominant serotypes will vary between region and year. In Indonesia, rotavirus studies showed that a variety of VP7 type (G9 and VP4 type (P[8] were the genotype combinations most frequently encountered. The most likely methods of prevention and control of transmission for the disease caused by this virus are vaccination. Various types of rotavirus vaccine were developed to provide

  7. 人A组轮状病毒疫苗研究进展%Progress of human group A rotavirus vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段招军

    2012-01-01

    Group A rotavirus( RV) is the leading cause of severe diarrhea disease in infants and young children worldwide, which causes a high desease burden. Studies have indicated that further improvements in hygiene are unlikely to prevent the disease. Rotavirus vaccines are the most effective public health interventions for controlling rotavirus diarrhea. Currently there are 3 different brands of rotavirus vaccines put into use globally in more than 100 countries and regions, and have been included in some countries'childhood vaccination programs. This review briefly introduces the development status of Group A rotavirus vaccines, providing a reference for application and further promotion of rotavirus vaccines in our country.%A组轮状病毒是导致全球婴幼儿重症腹泻的最主要病因,其疾病负担巨大.已有研究证实,卫生状况的改善对轮状病毒腹泻的控制效果甚微,疫苗则是控制轮状病毒腹泻最有效的公共卫生干预措施.目前3种轮状病毒疫苗已在全球100多个国家及地区投入使用,并纳入部分国家的儿童计划免疫程序.本文简要综述人A组轮状病毒疫苗的研究进展,以期对我国轮状病毒疫苗的使用和推广提供借鉴.

  8. Rotavirus and Serotonin Cross-Talk in Diarrhoea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Bialowas

    Full Text Available Rotavirus (RV has been shown to infect and stimulate secretion of serotonin from human enterochromaffin (EC cells and to infect EC cells in the small intestine of mice. It remains to identify which intracellularly expressed viral protein(s is responsible for this novel property and to further establish the clinical role of serotonin in RV infection. First, we found that siRNA specifically silencing NSP4 (siRNANSP4 significantly attenuated secretion of serotonin from Rhesus rotavirus (RRV infected EC tumor cells compared to siRNAVP4, siRNAVP6 and siRNAVP7. Second, intracellular calcium mobilization and diarrhoeal capacity from virulent and avirulent porcine viruses correlated with the capacity to release serotonin from EC tumor cells. Third, following administration of serotonin, all (10/10 infants, but no (0/8 adult mice, responded with diarrhoea. Finally, blocking of serotonin receptors using Ondansetron significantly attenuated murine RV (strain EDIM diarrhoea in infant mice (2.9 vs 4.5 days. Ondansetron-treated mice (n = 11 had significantly (p < 0.05 less diarrhoea, lower diarrhoea severity score and lower total diarrhoea output as compared to mock-treated mice (n = 9. Similarly, Ondansetron-treated mice had better weight gain than mock-treated animals (p < 0.05. A most surprising finding was that the serotonin receptor antagonist significantly (p < 0.05 also attenuated total viral shedding. In summary, we show that intracellularly expressed NSP4 stimulates release of serotonin from human EC tumor cells and that serotonin participates in RV diarrhoea, which can be attenuated by Ondansetron.

  9. Rotavirus and Serotonin Cross-Talk in Diarrhoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialowas, Sonja; Hagbom, Marie; Nordgren, Johan; Karlsson, Thommie; Sharma, Sumit; Magnusson, Karl-Eric; Svensson, Lennart

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) has been shown to infect and stimulate secretion of serotonin from human enterochromaffin (EC) cells and to infect EC cells in the small intestine of mice. It remains to identify which intracellularly expressed viral protein(s) is responsible for this novel property and to further establish the clinical role of serotonin in RV infection. First, we found that siRNA specifically silencing NSP4 (siRNANSP4) significantly attenuated secretion of serotonin from Rhesus rotavirus (RRV) infected EC tumor cells compared to siRNAVP4, siRNAVP6 and siRNAVP7. Second, intracellular calcium mobilization and diarrhoeal capacity from virulent and avirulent porcine viruses correlated with the capacity to release serotonin from EC tumor cells. Third, following administration of serotonin, all (10/10) infants, but no (0/8) adult mice, responded with diarrhoea. Finally, blocking of serotonin receptors using Ondansetron significantly attenuated murine RV (strain EDIM) diarrhoea in infant mice (2.9 vs 4.5 days). Ondansetron-treated mice (n = 11) had significantly (p < 0.05) less diarrhoea, lower diarrhoea severity score and lower total diarrhoea output as compared to mock-treated mice (n = 9). Similarly, Ondansetron-treated mice had better weight gain than mock-treated animals (p < 0.05). A most surprising finding was that the serotonin receptor antagonist significantly (p < 0.05) also attenuated total viral shedding. In summary, we show that intracellularly expressed NSP4 stimulates release of serotonin from human EC tumor cells and that serotonin participates in RV diarrhoea, which can be attenuated by Ondansetron. PMID:27459372

  10. Immunogens of rotaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, P S; Lyoo, Y S

    1993-11-01

    Rotaviruses cause gastroenteritis in neonates of many animal species including cattle, swine, horses, dogs, cats, chickens and turkeys. Rotavirions are nonenveloped, are about 75 nm in diameter, have a double capsid, and contain 11 double-stranded RNA segments as their genome. Several antigenically distinct groups of rotaviruses have been identified and have been alphabetically designated as A through G. Group A rotaviruses were the first group of rotaviruses isolated and are the most commonly detected rotaviruses in diarrheic animals. Group A rotaviruses have two surface proteins, VP4 and VP7, both of which are important in serotype determination and in inducing neutralizing antibodies and protective immunity. Multiple serotypes of group A rotavirus based on glycoprotein VP7 (designated as G types) and based on VP4 (P types) have been identified. The immune response to rotaviruses is essentially serotype specific, however, cross-reactive or heterotypic epitopes have also been identified. Currently acceptable methods for immunogen quantitation include the induction of neutralizing antibody in host or laboratory animals. The in vivo efficacy of vaccines against rotavirus-associated gastroenteritis remains the standard method against which in vitro methods must be compared. Several animal models have been developed which could potentially be used in evaluating the efficacy of candidate vaccines. Monoclonal antibodies to rotavirus immunogens are also currently available and serve as valuable reagents for in vitro quantitation of rotaviral immunogens. PMID:8116188

  11. Whole Genomic Analysis of an Unusual Human G6P[14] Rotavirus Strain Isolated from a Child with Diarrhea in Thailand: Evidence for Bovine-To-Human Interspecies Transmission and Reassortment Events.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratana Tacharoenmuang

    Full Text Available An unusual rotavirus strain, SKT-27, with the G6P[14] genotypes (RVA/Human-wt/THA/SKT-27/2012/G6P[14], was identified in a stool specimen from a hospitalized child aged eight months with severe diarrhea. In this study, we sequenced and characterized the complete genome of strain SKT-27. On whole genomic analysis, strain SKT-27 was found to have a unique genotype constellation: G6-P[14]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A3-N2-T6-E2-H3. The non-G/P genotype constellation of this strain (I2-R2-C2-M2-A3-N2-T6-E2-H3 is commonly shared with rotavirus strains from artiodactyls such as cattle. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that nine of the 11 genes of strain SKT-27 (VP7, VP4, VP6, VP2-3, NSP1, NSP3-5 appeared to be of artiodactyl (likely bovine origin, while the remaining VP1 and NSP2 genes were assumed to be of human origin. Thus, strain SKT-27 was found to have a bovine rotavirus genetic backbone, and thus is likely to be of bovine origin. Furthermore, strain SKT-27 appeared to be derived through interspecies transmission and reassortment events involving bovine and human rotavirus strains. Of note is that the VP7 gene of strain SKT-27 was located in G6 lineage-5 together with those of bovine rotavirus strains, away from the clusters comprising other G6P[14] strains in G6 lineages-2/6, suggesting the occurrence of independent bovine-to-human interspecies transmission events. To our knowledge, this is the first report on full genome-based characterization of human G6P[14] strains that have emerged in Southeast Asia. Our observations will provide important insights into the origin of G6P[14] strains, and into dynamic interactions between human and bovine rotavirus strains.

  12. Whole genomic analysis of human and bovine G8P[1] rotavirus strains isolated in Nigeria provides evidence for direct bovine-to-human interspecies transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komoto, Satoshi; Adah, Mohammed Ignatius; Ide, Tomihiko; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Taniguchi, Koki

    2016-09-01

    Bovine group A rotavirus (RVA) G8P[1] strains have been rarely detected in humans. Two Nigerian G8P[1] strains, HMG035 (RVA/Human-tc/NGA/HMG035/1999/G8P[1]) and NGRBg8 (RVA/Cow-tc/NGA/NGRBg8/1998/G8P[1]), were previously suggested to have the VP7, VP4, and NSP1 genes of bovine origin. In order to obtain precise information on the origin and evolution of these G8P[1] strains, the complete nucleotide sequences of the whole genomes of strains HMG035 and NGRBg8 were determined and analyzed in the present study. On whole genomic analysis, strains HMG035 and NGRBg8 were found to be very closely related to each other in all the 11 segments, and were found to have a bovine RVA-like genotype constellation (G8-P[1]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A11-N2-T6-E2-H3). Furthermore, on phylogenetic analysis, each of the 11 genes of strains HMG035 and NGRBg8 appeared to be of bovine origin. Thus, strains HMG035 and NGRBg8 were suggested to be derived from a common origin, and strain NGRBg8 was assumed to represent an example of bovine RVA strains that were transmitted to humans. Our findings provide clear evidence for direct bovine-to-human interspecies transmission of RVA strains. PMID:27302094

  13. Genetic analysis of Group A rotaviruses: evidence for interspecies transmission of rotavirus genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palombo, Enzo A

    2002-01-01

    Rotaviruses are the major cause of severe gastroenteritis in young children and animals. The rotavirus genome is composed of eleven segments of double-stranded RNA and can undergo genetic reassortment during mixed infections, leading to progeny viruses with novel or atypical phenotypes. There are numerous descriptions of rotavirus strains isolated from human and animals that share genetic and antigenic features of viruses from heterologous species. In many cases, genetic analysis by hybridization has clearly demonstrated the genetic relatedness of gene segments to those from viruses isolated from different species. Together with the observation that some virus strains appear to have been transmitted to a different species as a whole genome constellation, these data suggest that interspecies transmission occurs naturally, albeit at low frequencies. Although interspecies transmission has not been documented directly, there is an increasing number of reports of atypical rotaviruses that are apparently derived from transmission between: humans, cats and dogs; humans and cattle; humans and pigs; pigs and cattle; and pigs and horses. Interspecies evolutionary relationships are supported by phylogenetic analysis of rotavirus genes from different species. The emergence of novel strains derived from interspecies transmission has implications for the design and implementation of successful human rotavirus vaccine strategies. PMID:11928984

  14. Whole Genomic Analysis of Human G12P[6] and G12P[8] Rotavirus Strains that Have Emerged in Myanmar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomihiko Ide

    Full Text Available G12 rotaviruses are emerging rotavirus strains causing severe diarrhea in infants and young children worldwide. However, the whole genomes of only a few G12 strains have been fully sequenced and analyzed. In this study, we sequenced and characterized the complete genomes of six G12 strains (RVA/Human-tc/MMR/A14/2011/G12P[8], RVA/Human-tc/MMR/A23/2011/G12P[6], RVA/Human-tc/MMR/A25/2011/G12P[8], RVA/Human-tc/MMR/P02/2011/G12P[8], RVA/Human-tc/MMR/P39/2011/G12P[8], and RVA/Human-tc/MMR/P43/2011/G12P[8] detected in six stool samples from children with acute gastroenteritis in Myanmar. On whole genomic analysis, all six Myanmarese G12 strains were found to have a Wa-like genetic backbone: G12-P[8]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1 for strains A14, A25, P02, P39, and P43, and G12-P[6]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1 for strain A23. Phylogenetic analysis showed that most genes of the six strains examined in this study were genetically related to globally circulating human G1, G3, G9, and G12 strains. Of note is that the NSP4 gene of strain A23 exhibited the closest relationship with the cognate genes of human-like bovine strains as well as human strains, suggesting the occurrence of reassortment between human and bovine strains. Furthermore, strains A14, A25, P02, P39, and P43 were very closely related to one another in all the 11 gene segments, indicating derivation of the five strains from a common origin. On the other hand, strain A23 consistently formed distinct clusters as to all the 11 gene segments, indicating a distinct origin of strain A23 from that of strains A14, A25, P02, P39, and P43. To our knowledge, this is the first report on whole genome-based characterization of G12 strains that have emerged in Myanmar. Our observations will provide important insights into the evolutionary dynamics of spreading G12 rotaviruses in Asia.

  15. Pathogenesis of Rotavirus Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Boshuizen

    2005-01-01

    textabstractRotaviruses comprise a genus within the family of the Reoviridae and are recognized as the single most significant cause of severe gastroenteritis, malnutrition and diarrhea in young children. Each year rotavirus causes the death of about 440.000 children <5 years of age (313). The resea

  16. VP4 and VP7 genotyping by reverse transcription-PCR of human rotavirus in mexican children with acute diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Castillo, A; Villa, A V; Ramírez González, J E; Mayén Pimentel, E; Melo Munguía, M; Díaz De Jesús, B; Olivera Díaz, H; García Lozano, H

    2000-10-01

    Dual typing (VP4 and VP7) of rotavirus obtained from 257 Mexican children during three epidemiological seasons was performed by reverse transcription-PCR. The P1G1 genotype was the most prevalent (40%), followed by P1G3 (19%) and P2G2 (16%). Thirty-one specimens (12%) presented mixed infections, while some genotypes were not found. This is the first dual typing of isolates from diarrhea cases in Mexico.

  17. Multiple-dose therapy with bovine colostrum confers significant protection against diarrhea in a mouse model of human rotavirus-induced gastrointestinal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, M; Yamamoto, M; Cairangzhuoma; Xijier; Yabe, T; Uchida, K; Kawasaki, M; Nakagomi, T; Nakagomi, O; Minamoto, N; Kanamaru, Y

    2013-02-01

    Rotavirus is the most important etiologic agent of severe gastroenteritis. Previously, we reported that skimmed and concentrated bovine late colostrum (SCBLC) obtained from normal unimmunized cows at 6 to 7d after parturition effectively prevented against human rotavirus (HRV)-induced severe gastroenteritis in vivo, when administered as a single dose 60 min before viral inoculation. In the present study, we examined the efficacy of multiple administrations of SCBLC at smaller dosages after viral inoculation in vivo. We demonstrate that multiple administrations within 24h after virus inoculation resulted in earlier recovery from diarrheal symptoms, in an administration frequency-dependent manner. Furthermore, we investigated whether isolated IgG anti-HRV activity in SCBLC was equivalent to that of IgG isolated from bovine mature milk as measured by in vitro activity assays. We found that IgG-containing fractions from SCBLC and mature milk exhibited approximately the same level of anti-HRV activity. We concluded that the SCBLC contains a high level of IgG against HRV-induced severe gastroenteritis, which will be possible to use in protective effects in immunocompromised hosts, such as children and the elderly. Multiple doses of SCBLC during the early stages of infection or lower dosage of SCBLC given as a single dose both resulted in relief of diarrheal symptoms. PMID:23200479

  18. Mechanical compression attenuates normal human bronchial epithelial wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malavia Nikita

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Airway narrowing associated with chronic asthma results in the transmission of injurious compressive forces to the bronchial epithelium and promotes the release of pro-inflammatory mediators and the denudation of the bronchial epithelium. While the individual effects of compression or denudation are well characterized, there is no data to elucidate how these cells respond to the application of mechanical compression in the presence of a compromised epithelial layer. Methods Accordingly, differentiated normal human bronchial epithelial cells were exposed to one of four conditions: 1 unperturbed control cells, 2 single scrape wound only, 3 static compression (6 hours of 30 cmH2O, and 4 6 hours of static compression after a scrape wound. Following treatment, wound closure rate was recorded, media was assayed for mediator content and the cytoskeletal network was fluorescently labeled. Results We found that mechanical compression and scrape injury increase TGF-β2 and endothelin-1 secretion, while EGF content in the media is attenuated with both injury modes. The application of compression after a pre-existing scrape wound augmented these observations, and also decreased PGE2 media content. Compression stimulated depolymerization of the actin cytoskeleton and significantly attenuated wound healing. Closure rate was partially restored with the addition of exogenous PGE2, but not EGF. Conclusion Our results suggest that mechanical compression reduces the capacity of the bronchial epithelium to close wounds, and is, in part, mediated by PGE2 and a compromised cytoskeleton.

  19. Latex immunoassay for rapid detection of rotavirus.

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, J. H.; Tuomari, A V; Mann, D R; Hamparian, V V

    1984-01-01

    A latex agglutination (LA) test was evaluated for the detection of human rotaviruses in stool specimens. Both antiserum and immunoglobulin G (IgG)-sensitized latex particles were used, with IgG-coated beads being more sensitive for human rotavirus antigen detection. Latex beads sensitized with anti-simian-SA-11 IgG were stable for at least 8 months when stored at 4 degrees C. The sensitivity of the test was compared with that of the Rotazyme (Abbott Laboratories, Diagnostics Div., North Chica...

  20. P[8] and P[4] Rotavirus Infection Associated with Secretor Phenotypes Among Children in South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu-Fu; Long, Yan; Tan, Ming; Zhang, Ting; Huang, Qiong; Jiang, Xi; Tan, Wen-Fang; Li, Jian-Dong; Hu, Gui-Fang; Tang, Shixing; Dai, Ying-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Rotaviruses are known to recognize human histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) as a host ligand that is believed to play an important role in rotavirus host susceptibility and host range. In this study, paired fecal and saliva samples collected from children with viral gastroenteritis, as well as paired serum and saliva samples collected from the general population in south China were studied to evaluate potential association between rotavirus infections and human HBGA phenotypes. Rotavirus was detected in 75 (28%) of 266 fecal samples and P[8] rotaviruses were found to be the predominant genotype. The HBGA phenotypes of the rotavirus-infected children were determined through their saliva samples. Secretor statuses were found to correlate with the risk of rotavirus infection and all P[8]/P[4] rotavirus infected children were secretors. Accordingly, recombinant VP8* proteins of the P[8]/P[4] rotaviruses bound saliva samples from secretor individuals. Furthermore, correlation between serum P[8]/P[4]-specific IgG and host Lewis and secretor phenotypes has been found among 206 studied serum samples. Our study supported the association between rotavirus infection and the host HBGA phenotypes, which would help further understanding of rotavirus host range and epidemiology. PMID:27708367

  1. [Rotavirus infection in Brazil: epidemiology and challenges for its control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linhares, A C

    2000-01-01

    Worldwide, rotaviruses account for 600,000 to 870,000 deaths per year among infants and young children. In Brazil, rotaviruses were first seen in 1976 by scanning electron microscopy of stool samples from diarrheic infants in Belém, Pará. Hospital-based studies have shown that rotaviruses are associated with 12-42% of cases of acute diarrhea. In addition, community-based studies yielded an average of 0.25 rotavirus-related diarrheal episodes per child per year. G types 1 to 4 account for about two-thirds of circulating strains, but the (unusual) P[8],G5 genotype has been claimed to cause over 10% of rotavirus diarrheal episodes. It has been shown that over 70% of children develop rotavirus antibodies by the age of 4-5 years. The tetravalent rhesus-human rotavirus vaccine (RRV-TV) conferred 35% protection according to a two-year follow-up study in Belém, Pará, Brazil, but reached an efficacy of 60% during the first year of life. RRV-TV was also shown to be 75% protective against very severe gastroenteritis in northern Brazil. Vaccination with RRV-TV has been suspended recently in the United States because of the detection of intussusception as a side effect. Therefore, further vaccine trials in Brazil will probably involve rotavirus candidate vaccines other than RRV-TV.

  2. Current status of rotavirus vaccines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ching-Min Wang; Shou-Chien Chen; Kow-Tong Chen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Rotaviruses remain the major cause of childhood diarrheal disease worldwide and of diarrheal deaths of infants and children in developing countries. The huge burden of childhood rotavirus-related diarrhea in the world continues to drive the remarkable pace of vaccine development. Data sources: Research articles were searched using terms "rotavirus" and "rotavirus vaccine" in MEDLINE and PubMed. Articles not published in the English language, articles without abstracts, and opinion articles were excluded from the review. After preliminary screening, all articles were reviewed and synthesized to provide an overview of current vaccines and vaccination programs. Results: In this review of the global rotavirus vaccines and vaccination programs, the principles of rotavirus vaccine development and the efficacy of the currently licensed vaccines from both developed and developing countries were summarized. Conclusions: Rotavirus is a common cause of diarrhea in children in both developed and developing countries. Rotavirus vaccination is a cost-effective measure to prevent rotavirus diarrhea.

  3. Study on Rotavirus Infection and Its Genotyping in Children Below 5 Years in South West Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azaran, Azarakhsh; Makvandi, Manoochehr; Samarbafzadeh, Alireza; Neisi, Niloofar; Hoseinzadeh, Mohsen; Rasti, Mojtaba; Teymurirad, Majid; Teimoori, Ali; Varnaseri, Mehran; Makvandi, Kamyar

    2016-01-01

    Background Human rotaviruses are the most important agents for severe dehydrating diarrhea in children below 5 years old. Rotaviruses (RV) is a serious public health problem in developing and developed countries. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of rotavirus infection and their genotypes in children younger than 5 years of age with acute diarrhea in Ahvaz, Iran. Materials and Methods For this study, 200 stool samples from children below 5 years of age with acute diarrhea were collected between October 2011 and March 2012. Initially all stool samples were tested for rotavirus antigen by ELISA, and positive samples were confirmed by RT-PCR targeting the VP6 rotavirus gene. Determination of rotavirus genotypes was carried out by performing RT-PCR for G and P types. Altogether, 15 samples were sequenced. Results Out of 200 stool samples, 100 (50%) had rotavirus antigen detected by ELISA and 73 (36.5%) were found positive by RT-PCR. Of the rotavirus strains identified, only 63 (86.3%) were positive for both VP7 and VP4 while 10 (13.7%) strains were found nontypeable. Rotavirus infection accounts for 36.5% of gastroenteritis cases in samples from symptomatic children. The most prevalent rotavirus genotypes were G1P [8] (80%) followed by G2P [4] (20%). Conclusions Our results suggest that group A rotavirus is a major pathogene of acute diarrhea in Ahvaz city. The genotypes circulating are similar with those of other countries. PMID:27307959

  4. Glutamine attenuates post-traumatic glutathione depletion in human muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fläring, U B; Rooyackers, O E; Wernerman, J; Hammarqvist, F

    2003-03-01

    Glutathione is quantitatively the most important endogenous scavenger system. Glutathione depletion in skeletal muscle is pronounced following major trauma and sepsis in intensive care unit patients. Also, following elective surgery, glutathione depletion occurs in parallel with a progressive decline in muscle glutamine concentration. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that glutamine supplementation may counteract glutathione depletion in a human trauma model. A homogeneous group of patients (n = 17) undergoing a standardized surgical procedure were prospectively randomly allocated to receive glutamine (0.56 g x day(-1) x kg(-1)) or placebo as part of isonitrogenous and isocaloric nutrition. Percutaneous muscle biopsies and blood samples were taken pre-operatively and at 24 and 72 h after surgery. The concentrations of muscle glutathione and related amino acids were determined in muscle tissue and plasma. In the control (unsupplemented) subjects, total muscle glutathione had decreased by 47+/-8% and 37+/-11% and reduced glutathione had decreased by 53+/-10% and 45+/-16% respectively at 24 and 72 h after surgery (P glutamine supplementation attenuates glutathione depletion in skeletal muscle in humans following standardized surgical trauma.

  5. Why does the world need another rotavirus vaccine?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard L Ward

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Richard L Ward1, Monica M McNeal1, A Duncan Steele21Division of Infectious Diseases, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, USA; 2Initiative for Vaccine Research, World Health Organization, Geneva, SwitzerlandAbstract: A “Meeting on Upstream Rotavirus Vaccines and Emerging Vaccine Producers” was held at the World Health Organization in Geneva, Switzerland on March 28–30, 2006. The purpose was to discuss, evaluate, and weigh the importance of additional rotavirus vaccine candidates following the successful international licensure of rotavirus vaccines by two major pharmaceutical companies (GlaxoSmithKline and Merck that had been in development for many years. Both licensed vaccines are composed of live rotaviruses that are delivered orally as have been all candidate rotavirus vaccines evaluated in humans. Each is built on the experience gained with previous candidates whose development had either been discontinued or, in the case of the previously licensed rhesus rotavirus reassortant vaccine (Rotashield, was withdrawn by its manufacturer after the discovery of a rare association with intussusception. Although which alternative candidate vaccines should be supported for development and where this should be done are controversial topics, there was general agreement expressed at the Geneva meeting that further development of alternative candidates is a high priority. This development will help insure that the most safe, effective and economic vaccines are available to children in Third World nations where the vast majority of the >600,000 deaths due to rotavirus occur each year. This review is intended to provide the history and present status of rotavirus vaccines as well as a perspective on the future development of candidate vaccines as a means of promulgating plans suggested at the Geneva meeting.Keywords: rotavirus vaccines, rotavirus immunity, candidate vaccines

  6. Phylogenetic analysis of human group C rotavirus circulating in Brazil reveals a potential unique NSP4 genetic variant and high similarity with Asian strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchs, Adriana; do Carmo Sampaio Tavares Timenetsky, Maria

    2015-06-01

    Group C rotaviruses (RVC) cause gastroenteritis in humans and animals worldwide, and the evidence for a possible zoonotic role has been recently provided. To gain information on the genetic diversity and relationships between human and animal RVC, we sequenced the VP4, VP7, and NSP4 genes of 12, 19, and 15 human strains, respectively, detected in São Paulo state during historical (1988 and 1993) and recent (2007 and 2008) Brazilian rotavirus surveillance. All RVC strains analyzed in the present study grouped into human genotype (G4-P[2]-E2), and did not show any evidence of animal ancestry. Phylogenetic analysis showed that RVC samples detected in 1988 and 1993 clustered together with strains from distinct continents, indicating that historical RVC strains circulating in São Paulo were closely related to those strains circulating worldwide. All three genes (VP7, VP4 and NSP4) of São Paulo RVC strains isolated in 2007-2008 exhibited close phylogenetic relationship with human RVC strains isolated in China and Japan, suggesting that they are genetically linked, and that a gene flow could be occurring between this Asian countries and Brazil. We identified two distinct clusters in the NSP4 phylogenetic tree. One cluster formed exclusively by human Brazilian strains detected in 1997 and 2003-2004 in Rio de Janeiro, Bahia, and Rio Grande do Sul states (Subgroup II) previously described in a different study, that displayed low sequence identities to other human strains formerly published, and to the Brazilian RVC strains (Subgroup I) characterized in the present study. These data suggests the circulation of two genetic profiles of the NSP4 gene in Brazil. High sequence diversity in NSP4 gene was previously reported in Asia, and additional diversity in NSP4 RVC strains spreading in the world should be expected. More in-depth molecular and epidemiological analysis of human RVC throughout the world will be needed to understand their diversity and clarify their evolution

  7. One Family's Struggles with Rotavirus

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Immunizations Rotavirus One family's struggles with rotavirus We provide this video in a variety of formats and ... not possible without a visit to your doctor. Immunizations stop disease from spreading. Check with your family ...

  8. One Family's Struggles with Rotavirus

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Immunizations Rotavirus One family's struggles with rotavirus We provide this video in a variety of formats and lengths for use by your organization free-of-charge. Branded videos contain the "PKIDs. ...

  9. Zoonotic transmission of rotavirus in Denmark; a case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midgley, Sofie; Gram, N.; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane;

    Rotavirus type A infection is a common cause of hospitalisation of children. In addition, almost 30% of diagnosed persons in Denmark are adults. Rotavirus type A infection can also occur in a range of animals, including domestic dogs, cats, cattle, horses, and birds. There is some data suggesting...... direct transmission between animals and humans. Rotavirus genotyping is carried out in Denmark as part of the EUROTAnet vaccine study. In 2006 a total of 180 samples were successfully typed, and to date 85 samples from 2007 have been typed. 19 samples from pigs and 31 samples from cattle (from 2006...... and 2007) have also been typed. For the human samples all common human G types (1-4 and 9), as well the emerging G12 were identified, and were found in combination with the common P types ([4], [6], and [8]). Two samples contained a G8 P[goat] rotavirus (G8 98% identical to bovine G8, 96% identical to goat...

  10. Detection of rotavirus in dogs with diarrhea in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabbay Yvone B.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotavirus was detected by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA in the faeces of a diarrheic dog. Virus particles with morphology typical of rotavirus were visualized by direct electron microscopy. This sample was subsequently tested for the four main human serotypes (G1-G4, by ELISA with monoclonal antibodies. G genotyping was attempted by RT-PCR using G1-G6 and G8-G11 primers but no positive results could be yielded. Also using RT-PCR it was possible to characterize this canine strain as belonging to P[ 3] genotype. This is the first canine rotavirus detected in Brazil.

  11. Group A rotavirus gastroenteritis: post-vaccine era, genotypes and zoonotic transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchs, Adriana; Timenetsky, Maria do Carmo Sampaio Tavares

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This article provides a review of immunity, diagnosis, and clinical aspects of rotavirus disease. It also informs about the changes in epidemiology of diarrheal disease and genetic diversity of circulating group A rotavirus strains following the introduction of vaccines. Group A rotavirus is the major pathogen causing gastroenteritis in animals. Its segmented RNA genome can lead to the emergence of new or unusual strains in human populations via interspecies transmission and/or reassortment events. PMID:27462899

  12. Development of a New Class of Viral Disinfectants: Enzymatic Inactivation of Sa-11 Rotavirus

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, Shawn Christopher

    1997-01-01

    DEVELOPMENT OF A NEW CLASS OF VIRAL DISINFECTANTS: ENZYMATIC INACTIVATION OF SA-11 ROTAVIRUS. Shawn Walker, Thomas E. Toth. Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology. The non-enveloped, pH- and heat resistant rotavirus (RV), which is cross species-infective among cattle, swine and humans may cause dehydration and high mortality in the young. Rotaviruses are inactivated only by corrosive and toxic disinfectants. In thi...

  13. Phylogenetic analysis of probable non-human genes of group A rotaviruses isolated from children with acute gastroenteritis in Belém, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestri, Régis Piloni; Kaiano, Jane Haruko Lima; Neri, Darivaldo Luz; Soares, Luana da Silva; Guerra, Sylvia de Fatima Dos Santos; Oliveira, Darleise de Souza; Farias, Yasmin Nascimento; Gabbay, Yvone Benchimol; Leite, José Paulo Gagliardi; Linhares, Alexandre da Costa; Mascarenhas, Joana D'Arc Pereira

    2012-12-01

    Rotaviruses (RVs) are the main cause of acute viral gastroenteritis in both humans and young animals of various species such as calves, horses, pigs, dogs, cats, and birds. The genetic diversity of RVs is related to a variety of evolutionary mechanisms, including point mutation, and genome reassortment. The objective of this study was to characterize molecularly genes that encode structural and nonstructural proteins in unusual RV strains. The clinical specimens selected for this study were obtained from children and newborn with RV gastroenteritis, who participated in research projects on viral gastroenteritis conducted at the Evandro Chagas Institute. Structural (VP1-VP4, VP6, and VP7) and nonstructural (NSP1-NSP6) genes were amplified from stool samples by the polymerase chain reaction and subsequently sequenced. Eight unusual RV strains isolated from children and newborn with gastroenteritis were studied. Reassortment between genes of animal origin were observed in 5/8 (62.5%) strains analyzed. These results demonstrate that, although rare, interspecies (animal-human) transmission of RVs occurs in nature, as observed in the present study in strains NB150, HSP034, HSP180, HST327, and RV10109. This study is the first to be conducted in the Amazon region and supports previous data showing a close relationship between genes of human and animal origin, representing a challenge to the large-scale introduction of RV vaccines in national immunization programs. PMID:23080508

  14. Diversity and zoonotic potential of rotaviruses in swine and cattle across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midgley, Sofie E.; Bányai, Krisztián; Buesa, Javier;

    2012-01-01

    Group A rotaviruses can infect both humans and animals. Individual rotavirus strains can occasionally cross species barriers and might hereby contribute to the emergence of new genotypes in heterologous hosts. The incidence and impact of zoonotic rotavirus are not well defined, and one reason...... for this is a lack of data about strains circulating in suspected reservoir animal hosts. In this study we report the incidence, genetic diversity, and molecular epidemiology of rotaviruses detected in domestic cattle and swine in 6 European countries. From 2003 to 2007, 1101 and more than 2000 faecal specimens were...... collected from swine and cattle, both healthy and diarrhoeic, and tested for rotaviruses. Viruses from positive stools were genotyped and a subset of strains was characterized by nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the VP7 (G) and VP4 (P) genes. Rotaviruses were detected in 43% of bovine...

  15. Introduktion. Om rotavirus. Teknologi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wejse, Christian

    2012-01-01

    vil skyldes rotavirus. Typisk vil børnene få feber, opkastninger og/eller diarré. Sygdommen går sædvanligvis over af sig selv i løbet af 3 til 7 dage. Nogle børn får dog væske- og saltmangel i en sådan grad, at de må indlægges på hospital til behandling med drop og væske direkte ind i årerne. 85 – 90...... % af danske børn følger det danske børnevaccinationsprogram og bliver vaccineret mod en række infektioner. Der findes i Danmark to velafprøvede og godkendte vacciner mod rotavirus. Begge vacciner gives gennem munden og ikke gennem indsprøjtning i huden, som de øvrige vacciner i det danske...... børnevaccinationsprogram. Verdenssundhedsorganisation (WHO=World Health Organisation) samt nationale og europæiske faglige selskaber har anbefalet at vaccinere mod rotavirus. I en række europæiske lande er vaccination mod rotavirus indført i det nationale børnevaccinationsprogram. Andre europæiske lande har fravalgt...

  16. Intellectual property rights and challenges for development of affordable human papillomavirus, rotavirus and pneumococcal vaccines: Patent landscaping and perspectives of developing country vaccine manufacturers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekharan, Subhashini; Amin, Tahir; Kim, Joyce; Furrer, Eliane; Matterson, Anna-Carin; Schwalbe, Nina; Nguyen, Aurélia

    2015-11-17

    The success of Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance depends on the vaccine markets providing appropriate, affordable vaccines at sufficient and reliable quantities. Gavi's current supplier base for new and underutilized vaccines, such as the human papillomavirus (HPV), rotavirus, and the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine is very small. There is growing concern that following globalization of laws on intellectual property rights (IPRs) through trade agreements, IPRs are impeding new manufacturers from entering the market with competing vaccines. This article examines the extent to which IPRs, specifically patents, can create such obstacles, in particular for developing country vaccine manufacturers (DCVMs). Through building patent landscapes in Brazil, China, and India and interviews with manufacturers and experts in the field, we found intense patenting activity for the HPV and pneumococcal vaccines that could potentially delay the entry of new manufacturers. Increased transparency around patenting of vaccine technologies, stricter patentability criteria suited for local development needs and strengthening of IPRs management capabilities where relevant, may help reduce impediments to market entry for new manufacturers and ensure a competitive supplier base for quality vaccines at sustainably low prices. PMID:26368398

  17. Intellectual property rights and challenges for development of affordable human papillomavirus, rotavirus and pneumococcal vaccines: Patent landscaping and perspectives of developing country vaccine manufacturers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekharan, Subhashini; Amin, Tahir; Kim, Joyce; Furrer, Eliane; Matterson, Anna-Carin; Schwalbe, Nina; Nguyen, Aurélia

    2015-11-17

    The success of Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance depends on the vaccine markets providing appropriate, affordable vaccines at sufficient and reliable quantities. Gavi's current supplier base for new and underutilized vaccines, such as the human papillomavirus (HPV), rotavirus, and the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine is very small. There is growing concern that following globalization of laws on intellectual property rights (IPRs) through trade agreements, IPRs are impeding new manufacturers from entering the market with competing vaccines. This article examines the extent to which IPRs, specifically patents, can create such obstacles, in particular for developing country vaccine manufacturers (DCVMs). Through building patent landscapes in Brazil, China, and India and interviews with manufacturers and experts in the field, we found intense patenting activity for the HPV and pneumococcal vaccines that could potentially delay the entry of new manufacturers. Increased transparency around patenting of vaccine technologies, stricter patentability criteria suited for local development needs and strengthening of IPRs management capabilities where relevant, may help reduce impediments to market entry for new manufacturers and ensure a competitive supplier base for quality vaccines at sustainably low prices.

  18. Human rotavirus specific T cells: quantification by ELISPOT and expression of homing receptors on CD4+ T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using an intracellular cytokine assay, we recently showed that the frequencies of rotavirus (RV)-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells secreting INFγ, circulating in RV infected and healthy adults, are very low compared to the frequencies of circulating cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactive T cells in comparable individuals. In children with acute RV infection, these T cells were barely or not detectable. In the present study, an ELISPOT assay enabled detection of circulating RV-specific INFγ-secreting cells in children with RV diarrhea but not in children with non-RV diarrhea without evidence of a previous RV infection. Using microbead-enriched CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subsets, IFNγ-secreting RV-specific CD8+ but not CD4+ T cells were detected in recently infected children. Using the same approach, both CD4+ and CD8+ RV-specific T cells were detected in healthy adults. Furthermore, stimulation of purified subsets of PBMC that express lymphocyte homing receptors demonstrated that RV-specific INFγ-secreting CD4+ T cells from adult volunteers preferentially express the intestinal homing receptor α4β7, but not the peripheral lymph node homing receptor L-selectin. In contrast, CMV-specific INFγ-secreting CD4+ T cells preferentially express L-selectin but not α4β7. These results suggest that the expression of homing receptors on virus-specific T cells depends on the organ where these cells were originally stimulated and that their capacity to secrete INFγ is independent of the expression of these homing receptors

  19. Epidemiological survey of enteric viruses in wild boars in the Czech Republic: First evidence of close relationship between wild boar and human rotavirus A strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutelíková, Romana; Dufková, Lucie; Kamler, Jiří; Drimaj, Jakub; Plhal, Radim; Prodělalová, Jana

    2016-09-25

    Population of wild boar is increasing in the whole Europe, the animals migrate close to human habitats which greatly increases the possibility of natural transmission between domestic animals or humans and wild boars. The aim of the study was to estimate in population of free-living wild boar in the Czech Republic the prevalence of enteric viral pathogens, namely rotavirus groups A and C (RVA and RVC), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), and members of family Coronaviridae (transmissible gastroenteritis virus - TGEV, porcine epidemic diarrhea virus - PEDV, porcine respiratory coronavirus - PRCV, and porcine hemagglutination encephalomyelitis virus - PHEV) and Picornaviridae,(teschovirus A - PTV, sapelovirus A - PSV, and enterovirus G - EV-G). In our study, stool samples from 203 wild boars culled during hunting season 2014-2015 (from October to January) were examined by RT-PCR. RVA was detected in 2.5% of tested samples. Nucleotide analysis of VP7, VP4, and VP6 genes revealed that four RVA strains belong to G4P[25]I1, G4P[6]I5, G11P[13]I5, and G5P[13]I5 genotypes and phylogenetic analysis suggested close relation to porcine and human RVAs. The prevalence of RVC in wild boar population reached 12.8%, PTV was detected in 20.2%, PSV in 8.9%, and EV-G in 2.5% of samples. During our study no PRRSV or coronaviruses were detected. Our study provides the first evidence of RVC prevalence in wild boars and indicates that wild boars might contribute to the genetic variability of RVA and also serve as an important reservoir of other enteric viruses. PMID:27599927

  20. Bicarbonate attenuates arterial desaturation during maximal exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henning B; Bredmose, Per P; Strømstad, Morten;

    2002-01-01

    was not significantly changed from resting values in the last minute of Sal exercise, but in the Bic trial it increased from 40.5 +/- 0.5 to 45.9 +/- 2.0 Torr (P ventilation was lowered during exercise with Bic (155 +/- 14 vs. 142 +/- 13 l/min; P ... in the difference between the end-tidal O2 pressure and arterial PO2 was similar in the two trials. Also, pulmonary O2 uptake and changes in muscle oxygenation as determined by near-infrared spectrophotometry during exercise were similar. The enlarged blood-buffering capacity after infusion of Bic attenuated...

  1. Detection of Common, Emerging and Uncommon VP4, and VP7 Human Group A Rotavirus Genotypes from Urban Sewage Samples in Uruguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tort, Luis Fernando Lopez; Victoria, Matías; Lizasoain, Andrés; García, Mariana; Berois, Mabel; Cristina, Juan; Leite, José Paulo Gagliardi; Gómez, Mariela Martínez; Miagostovich, Marize Pereira; Colina, Rodney

    2015-12-01

    Environmental approach has proven to be a useful tool for epidemiological studies demonstrating through environmental studies the diversity of viruses circulating in a given population. The aim of this study was to perform a phylogenetic characterization of the group A rotavirus (RVA) glycoprotein (G)- and protease-sensitive (P)-genotypes obtained from sewage samples (n = 116) collected in six cities of Uruguay during March 2011 to April 2013. A worldwide standardized semi-nested multiplex RT-PCR (SNM RT-PCR) protocol directed against VP4 and VP7 genes were conducted for RVA detection and consensual DNA fragments were submitted to nucleotide sequencing. P and/or G genotype was successfully determined by phylogenetic analysis in 61% (n = 37) of the positive samples obtained by SNM RT-PCR (n = 61). The RVA genotypes were as follow: G1 (n = 2), G2 (n = 14), G3 (n = 5), G12 (n = 2), P[4] (n = 4), P[8] (n = 16), and P[3] (n = 2). Interestingly, through phylogenetic analysis, emerging, and uncommon human genotypes could be detected. Results obtained from the comparison of RVA genotypes detected in the current study and Uruguayan RVA strains previously described for contemporary clinical pediatric cases showed that monitoring sewage may be a good screening option for a rapid and economical overview of the circulating genotypes in the surrounding human population and a useful approximation to study RVA epidemiology in a future vaccine monitoring program. The present study represents the first report in Uruguay that describes the phylogenetic diversity of RVA from urban sewage samples.

  2. Comparison of the nucleotide sequence of wild-type hepatitis - A virus and its attenuated candidate vaccine derivative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of attenuated mutants for use as vaccines is in progress for other viruses, including influenza, rotavirus, varicella-zoster, cytomegalovirus, and hepatitis-A virus (HAV). Attenuated viruses may be derived from naturally occurring mutants that infect human or nonhuman hosts. Alternatively, attenuated mutants may be generated by passage of wild-type virus in cell culture. Production of attenuated viruses in cell culture is a laborious and empiric process. Despite previous empiric successes, understanding the molecular basis for attenuation of vaccine viruses could facilitate future development and use of live-virus vaccines. Comparison of the complete nucleotide sequences of wild-type (virulent) and vaccine (attenuated) viruses has been reported for polioviruses and yellow fever virus. Here, the authors compare the nucleotide sequence of wild-type HAV HM-175 with that of a candidate vaccine derivative

  3. Molecular Epidemiology of Rotaviruses

    OpenAIRE

    Nakagomi, Osamu

    2004-01-01

    Molecular epidemiology of rotaviruses emerged a little over 25 years ago as a fascinating branch of science that utilized then cutting-edge technology of RNA polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Molecular epidemiology, as I have observed it closely almost since its dawn, is an ever-evolving discipline which has incorporated the advances of the related sciences including molecular evolutionary biology and ecology, while it is firmly and deeply rooted in the edifice of epidemiology of infectious...

  4. Rotavirus in India: Forty Years of Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Gagandeep

    2016-07-01

    Rotavirus was first identified as a human pathogen just over 40 years ago, and work on this pathogen in India started shortly thereafter. Subsequent studies have confirmed its pre-eminent role in gastroenteritis in children in India. Standardized surveillance has enabled the documentation of the high burden of disease, and has demonstrated that there is considerable geographic and temporal variation in strain circulation. Internationally licensed vaccines, vaccine candidates based on indigenous strains and out-licensed strains have been tested for safety, immunogenicity and efficacy; three vaccines are now licensed in India and are used in the private sector. Public sector vaccination has begun, and it will be path-breaking for Indian vaccinologists to measure impact of vaccine introduction in terms of safety and effectiveness. So far, India has kept pace with international epidemiologic and vaccine research on rotavirus, and these efforts should continue. PMID:27508532

  5. One Family's Struggles with Rotavirus

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Immunizations Rotavirus One family's struggles with rotavirus We provide this video in a variety of formats and lengths for use by your organization ... Immunizations stop disease from spreading. Check with your family doctor to see if you could benefit. Copyright ...

  6. A Randomized, Controlled Trial of the Impact of Alternative Dosing Schedules on the Immune Response to Human Rotavirus Vaccine in Rural Ghanaian Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armah, George; Lewis, Kristen D. C.; Cortese, Margaret M.; Parashar, Umesh D.; Ansah, Akosua; Gazley, Lauren; Victor, John C.; McNeal, Monica M.; Binka, Fred; Steele, A. Duncan

    2016-01-01

    Background. The recommended schedule for receipt of 2-dose human rotavirus vaccine (HRV) coincides with receipt of the first and second doses of diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus vaccine (ie, 6 and 10 weeks of age, respectively). Alternative schedules and additional doses of HRV have been proposed and may improve vaccine performance in low-income countries. Methods. In this randomized trial in rural Ghana, HRV was administered at ages 6 and 10 weeks (group 1), 10 and 14 weeks (group 2), or 6, 10, and 14 weeks (group 3). We compared serum antirotavirus immunoglobulin A (IgA) seroconversion (≥20 U/mL) and geometric mean concentrations (GMCs) between group 1 and groups 2 and 3. Results. Ninety-three percent of participants (424 of 456) completed the study per protocol. In groups 1, 2, and 3, the IgA seroconversion frequencies among participants with IgA levels of <20 U/mL at baseline were 28.9%, 37.4%, and 43.4%, respectively (group 1 vs group 3, P = .014; group 1 vs group 2, P = .163). Postvaccination IgA GMCs were 22.1 U/mL, 26.5 U/mL, and 32.6 U/mL in groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively (group 1 vs group 3, P = .038; group 1 vs group 2, P = .304). Conclusions. A third dose of HRV resulted in increased seroconversion frequencies and GMCs, compared with 2 doses administered at 6 and 10 weeks of age. Since there is no correlate of protection, a postmarketing effectiveness study is required to determine whether the improvement in immune response translates into a public health benefit in low-income countries. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT015751. PMID:26823335

  7. Diarrhea of children with human rotavirus: analysis of detection results%婴幼儿轮状病毒性腹泻检测结果分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高庆双; 高春燕; 胡佳伟

    2011-01-01

    目的 了解唐山市婴幼儿腹泻患者轮状病毒(HRV)的感染情况,为临床治疗和预防提供科学依据.方法 收集2007年4月~2009年3月腹泻病患儿粪便标本2413份,采用胶体金法检测轮状病毒.结果 2413份标本中,阳性率为25.20%,其中<2岁患儿占87.66%;男性标本共1362例,阳性率38.11%;女性标本1051例,阳性率37.16%.结论 HRV是唐山地区儿童腹泻病的主要病原体,<2岁儿童是HRV感染腹泻的易感人群,应注意防范.%OBJECTIVE To investigate the infection of human rotavirus(HRV) among the children in Tangshan.METHODS A total of 2413 diarrhea samples were collected in maternal and child health institute of Tangshan between 2007 Apr to Mar 2009 which were studied with colloidal gold device.RESULTS Out of 2413 samples investigated, 608(25.20%) were HRV positive.Most of the HRV positive specimens(87.66 %) were from those children under two years old.Out of 1362 samples of boys investigated,519(38.11%) were positives Out of 1051 samples of girls investigated, 391 (37.16%)were positive.CONCLUSION HRV is one of the most important pathogens for diarrhea of children in Tangshan.HRV diarrhea is more prevalent among the children under two years old.It should attach importance to the prevention.

  8. Development of primers for sequencing the NSP1, NSP3, and VP6 genes of the group A porcine rotavirus

    OpenAIRE

    Fernanda Dornelas Florentino Silva; Paloma Oliveira Tonietti; Luis Ramiro Luna Espinoza; Paulo Eduardo Brandão; Leonardo José Richtzenhain; Fabio Gregori

    2014-01-01

    Rotavirus is the causative pathogen of diarrhea in humans and in several animal species. Eight pairs of primers were developed and used for Sanger sequencing of the coding region of the NSP1, NSP3, and VP6 genes based on the conserved regions of the genome of the group A porcine rotavirus. Three samples previously screened as positive for group A rotaviruses were subjected to gene amplification and sequencing to characterize the pathogen. The information generated from this study is crucial f...

  9. Mutation Distribution in the NSP4 Protein in Rotaviruses Isolated from Mexican Children with Moderate to Severe Gastroenteritis

    OpenAIRE

    Juan F. Contreras; Tamez, Reyes S.; Carlos E. Hernández; Cristina Rodríguez; Guadalupe González-Ochoa; Menchaca, Griselda E.

    2013-01-01

    The NSP4 protein is a multifunctional protein that plays a role in the morphogenesis and pathogenesis of the rotavirus. Although NSP4 is considered an enterotoxin, the relationship between gastroenteritis severity and amino acid variations in NSP4 of the human rotavirus remains unclear. In this study, we analyzed the sequence diversity of NSP4 and the severity of gastroenteritis of children with moderate to severe gastroenteritis. The rotavirus-infected children were hospitalized before the r...

  10. Development of a human live attenuated West Nile infectious DNA vaccine: Suitability of attenuating mutations found in SA14-14-2 for WN vaccine design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamshchikov, Vladimir; Manuvakhova, Marina; Rodriguez, Efrain

    2016-01-01

    Direct attenuation of West Nile (WN) virus strain NY99 for the purpose of vaccine development is not feasible due to its high virulence and pathogenicity. Instead, we created highly attenuated chimeric virus W1806 with the serological identity of NY99. To further attenuate W1806, we investigated effects of mutations found in Japanese encephalitis virus vaccine SA14-14-2. WN viruses carrying all attenuating mutations lost infectivity in mammalian, but not in mosquito cells. No single reversion restored infectivity in mammalian cells, although increased infectivity in mosquito cells was observed. To identify a subset of mutations suitable for further attenuation of W1806, we analyzed effects of E138K and K279M changes on virulence, growth properties, and immunogenicity of derivatized W956, from which chimeric W1806 inherited its biological properties and attenuation profile. Despite strong dominant attenuating effect, introduction of only two mutations was not sufficient for attenuating W1806 to the safety level acceptable for human use.

  11. 口服轮状病毒减毒活疫苗Rotarix的现状及研究进展%Progress in Research on Oral Live Attenuated Rotavirus Vaccine Rotarix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李肖锋

    2011-01-01

    轮状病毒(Rotavirus,RV)是全世界范围内导致婴幼儿重症腹泻的重要病原.由于当前尚无治疗RV感染的特效药物,因此,开发安全、有效的疫苗具有重要意义.G1型RV流行范围较广,本文主要对目前国内外上市的3种RV疫苗中的GIP[8]型Rotarix疫苗的情况作一综述.%Rotavirus (RV) is an important pathogen of severe diarrhea in infants worldwide.Since there is no specific drug for RV infection, the development of safe and effective vaccine is of important significance.In the three kinds of domestic and imported commercial RV vaccines, Rotarix is of type G1P [8].Since RV type G1 is epidemic widely, this paper reviews the status of Rotarix.

  12. Angiotensin II attenuates the natriuresis of water immersion in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Gabrielsen, Anders; Bruun, Niels Eske;

    2002-01-01

    The hypothesis was tested that suppression of generation of ANG II is one of the mechanisms of the water immersion (WI)-induced natriuresis in humans. In one protocol, eight healthy young males were subjected to 3 h of 1) WI (WI + placebo), 2) WI combined with ANG II infusion of 0.5 ng. kg(-1). min...

  13. 基于LAMP的人轮状病毒检测方法及其在水环境中的应用%LAMP based method for detecting human rotavirus and its application in water samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨柏云; 韦玉梅; 杨丽; 宋涵; 杨海霞; 何晓青

    2013-01-01

    The present paper intends to introduce a method known as loop-mediated isothermal amplification, short for LAMP, for detecting rotavinis, a kind of toxic virus responsible for the acute viral gastroenteritis in the infants and young children in the worldwide sphere. As is known, after replication in the gastrointestinal tract, rotaviruses are usually excreted in large amount and then disperse into the environment water. The stability of rotaviruses in the environmental water and their resistance to the physicochemical treatment process is likely to facilitate their transmission through water. A lot of studies confirm the presence of rotaviruses in the sewage and even in the treated effluents. To combat the spread and transmission of such viruses, a. novel, rapid and sensitive technique called loop-mediated isothermal amplification(LAMP) has been developed in recent years, which attempts to use a DNA polymerase that is very active in stranding the displacement of DNA synthesis and a set of four specially designed primers that recognize a total of six distinct sequences on the targeted DNA. The LAMP method can operate in an extremely high speed. It is also cost-effective, sensitive and specific for the clinic service, and that is why it is now widely used in the area of virus detection. In the present paper, we have renovated the LAMP based-method for quick-finding human rotavinis. By means of the specific VP7-gene of human rotavirus, we have worked out a set of specific primers to amplify the special DNA sequence with the help of LAMP. In addition, we have managed to optimize the reaction conditions of LAMP.The experimental data indicate that the optimal amplification condition proves to be at 65 ℃ for 90 min with 3 mmol/L magnesium ions and 1 mol/L Be-taine. The specificity of RT - LAMP assay has been further validated by the cross-reaction with different viruses (human rotavirus, human astrovirus and human norovirus) and the constrained analysis of the amplified

  14. Detection of rotavirus in dogs with diarrhea in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Gabbay Yvone B.; Homem Valéria S.F.; Munford Veridiana; Alves Antonia S.; Mascarenhas Joana D.P.; Linhares Alexandre C.; Rácz Maria Lúcia

    2003-01-01

    Rotavirus was detected by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in the faeces of a diarrheic dog. Virus particles with morphology typical of rotavirus were visualized by direct electron microscopy. This sample was subsequently tested for the four main human serotypes (G1-G4), by ELISA with monoclonal antibodies. G genotyping was attempted by RT-PCR using G1-G6 and G8-G11 primers but no positive results could be yielded. Also using RT-PCR it was possible to characterize this canine str...

  15. Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid Attenuates the Oxidative Stress-Induced Decrease of CD33 Expression in Human Monocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Guzmán-Beltrán

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA is a natural lignan with recognized antioxidant and beneficial properties that is isolated from Larrea tridentata. In this study, we evaluated the effect of NDGA on the downregulation of oxidant stress-induced CD33 in human monocytes (MNs. Oxidative stress was induced by iodoacetate (IAA or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and was evaluated using reactive oxygen species (ROS production, and cell viability. NDGA attenuates toxicity, ROS production and the oxidative stress-induced decrease of CD33 expression secondary to IAA or H2O2 in human MNs. It was also shown that NDGA (20 μM attenuates cell death in the THP-1 cell line that is caused by treatment with either IAA or H2O2. These results suggest that NDGA has a protective effect on CD33 expression, which is associated with its antioxidant activity in human MNs.

  16. One Family's Struggles with Rotavirus

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... One family's struggles with rotavirus We provide this video in a variety of formats and lengths for use by your organization free-of-charge. Branded videos contain the "PKIDs.ORG" end slate; unbranded videos ...

  17. Attenuated noradrenergic sensitivity during local cooling in aged human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Caitlin S; Holowatz, Lacy A; Kenney, W. Larry

    2005-01-01

    Reflex-mediated cutaneous vasoconstriction (VC) is impaired in older humans; however, it is unclear whether this blunted VC also occurs during local cooling, which mediates VC through different mechanisms. We tested the hypothesis that the sensitization of cutaneous vessels to noradrenaline (NA) during direct skin cooling seen in young skin is blunted in aged skin. In 11 young (18–30 years) and 11 older (62–76 years) men and women, skin blood flow was monitored at two forearm sites with laser Doppler (LD) flowmetry while local skin temperature was cooled and clamped at 24°C. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC; LD flux/mean arterial pressure) was expressed as percentage change from baseline (%ΔCVCbase). At one site, five doses of NA (10−10–10−2m) were sequentially infused via intradermal microdialysis during cooling while the other 24°C site served as control (Ringer solution + cooling). At control sites, VC due to cooling alone was similar in young versus older (−54 ± 5 versus −56 ± 3%ΔCVCbase, P= 0.46). In young, NA infusions induced additional dose-dependent VC (10−8, 10−6, 10−4 and 10−2m: −70 ± 2, −72 ± 3, −78 ± 3 and −79 ± 4%ΔCVCbase; P older skin does not display enhanced VC capacity until treated with saturating doses of NA, possibly due to age-associated decrements in Ca2+ availability or α2C-adrenoceptor function. PMID:15705648

  18. Rotavirus prevalence in the primary care setting in Nicaragua after universal infant rotavirus immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker-Dreps, Sylvia; Paniagua, Margarita; Zambrana, Luis Enrique; Bucardo, Filemon; Hudgens, Michael G; Weber, David J; Morgan, Douglas R; Espinoza, Félix

    2011-11-01

    Nicaragua was the first developing nation to implement universal infant rotavirus immunization with the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (RV5). Initial studies of vaccine effectiveness in Nicaragua and other developing nations have focused on the prevention of hospitalizations and severe rotavirus diarrhea. However, rotavirus diarrhea is more commonly treated in the primary care setting, with only 1-3% of rotavirus cases receiving hospital care. We measured the prevalence of rotavirus infection in primary care clinics in León, Nicaragua, after introduction of the immunization program. In the post-vaccine period, 3.5% (95% confidence interval = 1.9-5.8) of children seeking care for diarrhea tested positive for rotavirus. A high diversity of rotavirus genotypes was encountered among the few positive samples. In conclusion, rotavirus was an uncommon cause of childhood diarrhea in this primary care setting after implementation of a rotavirus immunization program.

  19. Rotavirus Prevalence in the Primary Care Setting in Nicaragua after Universal Infant Rotavirus Immunization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker-Dreps, Sylvia; Paniagua, Margarita; Zambrana, Luis Enrique; Bucardo, Filemon; Hudgens, Michael G.; Weber, David J.; Morgan, Douglas R.; Espinoza, Félix

    2011-01-01

    Nicaragua was the first developing nation to implement universal infant rotavirus immunization with the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (RV5). Initial studies of vaccine effectiveness in Nicaragua and other developing nations have focused on the prevention of hospitalizations and severe rotavirus diarrhea. However, rotavirus diarrhea is more commonly treated in the primary care setting, with only 1–3% of rotavirus cases receiving hospital care. We measured the prevalence of rotavirus infection in primary care clinics in León, Nicaragua, after introduction of the immunization program. In the post-vaccine period, 3.5% (95% confidence interval = 1.9–5.8) of children seeking care for diarrhea tested positive for rotavirus. A high diversity of rotavirus genotypes was encountered among the few positive samples. In conclusion, rotavirus was an uncommon cause of childhood diarrhea in this primary care setting after implementation of a rotavirus immunization program. PMID:22049057

  20. The first detection and whole genome characterization of the G6P[15] group A rotavirus strain from roe deer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamnikar-Ciglenecki, Urska; Kuhar, Urska; Sturm, Sabina; Kirbis, Andrej; Racki, Nejc; Steyer, Andrej

    2016-08-15

    Although rotaviruses have been detected in a variety of host species, there are only limited records of their occurrence in deer, where their role is unknown. In this study, group A rotavirus was identified in roe deer during a study of enteric viruses in game animals. 102 samples of intestinal content were collected from roe deer (56), wild boars (29), chamois (10), red deer (6) and mouflon (1), but only one sample from roe deer was positive. Following whole genome sequence analysis, the rotavirus strain D38/14 was characterized by next generation sequencing. The genotype constellation, comprising 11 genome segments, was G6-P[15]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A3-N2-T6-E2-H3. Phylogenetic analysis of the VP7 genome segment showed that the D38/14 rotavirus strain is closely related to the various G6 zoonotic rotavirus strains of bovine-like origin frequently detected in humans. In the VP4 segment, this strain showed high variation compared to that in the P[15] strain found in sheep and in a goat. This finding suggests that rotaviruses from deer are similar to those in other DS-1 rotavirus groups and could constitute a source of zoonotically transmitted rotaviruses. The epidemiological status of group A rotaviruses in deer should be further investigated. PMID:27374907

  1. Molecular characterization of rotaviruses in a Japanese raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides) and a masked palm civet (Paguma larvata) in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Masako; Yamasaki, Ari; Ito, Naoto; Mizoguchi, Toshio; Asano, Makoto; Okano, Tsukasa; Sugiyama, Makoto

    2010-12-15

    Group A rotaviruses infect and cause diarrhea in humans and a wide range of mammals. Previous studies have suggested that some strains can cross the species barrier to infect humans (Martella et al., 2010). However, there are few reports on infection and characterization of rotaviruses in wild animals. To estimate what types of rotaviruses infect wild animals, we investigated infection of rotaviruses in wild animals living in urban areas in Japan between 2003 and 2008. Of 145 fecal specimens obtained, we detected rotaviruses in one sample from a Japanese raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides) (RAC-DG5) and in one sample from a masked palm civet (Paguma larvata) (MP-CIVET66) by RT-semi-nested PCR. Sequence analyses of the VP4 and VP7 genes of RAC-DG5 and MP-CIVET66 strains revealed that these strains belong to G3bP[9] genotype. Furthermore, phylogenetic analyses showed that RAC-DG5 and MP-CIVET66 strains were closely related to human and feline rotaviruses, suggesting interspecies transmission from humans or cats. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the detection and characterization of rotaviruses in a Japanese raccoon dog and masked palm civet. These findings show that wild animals constitute a potential zoonotic risk of rotaviruses. PMID:20605380

  2. Rotavirus Infections - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Rotavirus Infections URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Rotavirus Infections - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features ...

  3. Transmission, attenuation and reflection of shear waves in the human brain

    OpenAIRE

    Clayton, Erik H.; Guy M. Genin; Bayly, Philip V.

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) are caused by acceleration of the skull or exposure to explosive blast, but the processes by which mechanical loads lead to neurological injury remain poorly understood. We adapted motion-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging methods to measure the motion of the human brain in vivo as the skull was exposed to harmonic pressure excitation (45, 60 and 80 Hz). We analysed displacement fields to quantify the transmission, attenuation and reflection of distortional (...

  4. Candidate new rotavirus species in sheltered dogs, Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalov-Kovács, Eszter; Gellért, Ákos; Marton, Szilvia; Farkas, Szilvia L; Fehér, Enikő; Oldal, Miklós; Jakab, Ferenc; Martella, Vito; Bányai, Krisztián

    2015-04-01

    We identified unusual rotavirus strains in fecal specimens from sheltered dogs in Hungary by viral metagenomics. The novel rotavirus species displayed limited genome sequence homology to representatives of the 8 rotavirus species, A-H, and qualifies as a candidate new rotavirus species that we tentatively named Rotavirus I. PMID:25811414

  5. An atypical rotavirus detected in a child with gastroenteritis in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. G. Pereira

    1983-09-01

    Full Text Available Particles morphologically identical to rotaviruses were found in the faeces of a nine week-old child with gastroenteritis. Analysis of the viral RNA genome by polyacrylamine gel electrophoresis revealed 10 bands (probably 11 segments some of wich differed in migration rate from those of the great majority of rotaviruses infecting man and other animal hosts. The virus was not detected by a highly sensitive enzyme immunoassay (ELISA and therefore probably lacked the crossreactive antigen(s shared by the majority rotaviruses. This was the only strain with such behaviour among 230 rotaviruses of human origin examined in this laboratory since 1979. The implications of the existence of non-crossreactive rotaviruses are discussed.Partículas morfologicamente idênticas a rotavirus foram encontradas nas fezes de uma criança de dois meses com gastroenterite. Análise do genoma viral por eletroforese em gel de poliacrilamida revelou 10 faixas (provavelmente 11 segmentos de RNA, algumas das quais diferem em velocidade de migração das observadas na grande maioria de rotavirus de hospedeiros humanos e de diversas espécies de animais. O vírus não foi revelado por um ensaio imuno-enzimático de alta sensibilidade, o que sugere a ausência do antígeno de grupo que da reações cruzadas entre a maioria dos rotavirus. O vírus descrito no presente trabalho foi o único com tal comportamento entre 230 amostras analisadas por nós desde 1979. A relevância de existência de rotavirus não relacionados antigenicamente a outros membros do grupo é discutida.

  6. Rotavirus strains in neglected animal species including lambs, goats and camelids

    OpenAIRE

    Papp, Hajnalka; Yashpal S. Malik; Farkas, Szilvia L.; Jakab, Ferenc; Martella, Vito; Bányai, Krisztián

    2014-01-01

    Surveillance of rotavirus infections and circulating strains in small ruminants (i.e. lambs, goats and camelids) has been a neglected research area in the past. However, recent years that have seen an intensification of surveillance in humans and livestock animals, where vaccines to reduce disease burden caused by Rotavirus A (RVA) are available, led to the efforts to better understand the epidemiology, ecology and evolution of RVA strains in other hosts, including lambs, goats and camelids. ...

  7. Serial observations of chronic rotavirus infection in an immunodeficient child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, I; Kimura, T; Murakami, T; Haruki, K; Yamazaki, K; Seto, Y; Minekawa, Y; Funamoto, H

    1991-01-01

    Chronic rotavirus infection of an infant with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) was studied by virological examinations in association with long-term observation of his symptoms and immune status. During eleven months of hospitalization, the patient was suffering from incurable severe diarrhea with persisting excretion of rotaviruses detected by electron microscopy and the reversed-passive hemagglutination (R-PHA) test and had transient hepatitis symptom despite multiple administrations of human gammaglobulin and high calorie fluids. The detected viruses were morphologically recognized as rotavirus with double capsid structure. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic (PAGE) analysis of their genomic RNAs showed the long electropherotype of group A virus with abnormal migration profiles changing considerably from the early to the late phase of illness: (1) The 11th segment became undetectable; (2) the molecular weight of the 6th segment slightly increased; (3) seven to fourteen extra segments appeared; and (4) PAGE patterns of viral genomic RNAs changed every three or four months. These findings suggest that chronic infection with rotavirus accompanied the generation of extra viral genomic segments and their unusual assortments in an immunodeficient host. PMID:1663575

  8. Serial observations of chronic rotavirus infection in an immunodeficient child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, I; Kimura, T; Murakami, T; Haruki, K; Yamazaki, K; Seto, Y; Minekawa, Y; Funamoto, H

    1991-01-01

    Chronic rotavirus infection of an infant with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) was studied by virological examinations in association with long-term observation of his symptoms and immune status. During eleven months of hospitalization, the patient was suffering from incurable severe diarrhea with persisting excretion of rotaviruses detected by electron microscopy and the reversed-passive hemagglutination (R-PHA) test and had transient hepatitis symptom despite multiple administrations of human gammaglobulin and high calorie fluids. The detected viruses were morphologically recognized as rotavirus with double capsid structure. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic (PAGE) analysis of their genomic RNAs showed the long electropherotype of group A virus with abnormal migration profiles changing considerably from the early to the late phase of illness: (1) The 11th segment became undetectable; (2) the molecular weight of the 6th segment slightly increased; (3) seven to fourteen extra segments appeared; and (4) PAGE patterns of viral genomic RNAs changed every three or four months. These findings suggest that chronic infection with rotavirus accompanied the generation of extra viral genomic segments and their unusual assortments in an immunodeficient host.

  9. Rotavirus associated acute diarrhoea in hospitalized children in Dibrugarh, north-east India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phukan, Anil C; Patgiri, Dilip K; Mahanta, Jagadish

    2003-04-01

    Faecal specimens from 202 children below 5 years with acute diarrhoea hospitalized in Assam Medical College from April, 1999 to March, 2000 were examined in Regional Medical Research Centre (ICMR), Dibrugarh to know the prevalence of rotavirus diarrhoea and molecular pattern of viral strains from different localities of Dibrugarh using double antibody sandwich ELISA and SDS-PAGE analysis. Human group A rotaviruses were detected in 47 (23.27%) specimens and 33 of 41 (80.49%) positive specimens were electropherotyped where 16 were "long" (48.48%) and 17 "short" (51.52%) types. Rotavirus diarrhoea was significantly high (pupper middle socioeconomic status (61.59%) suffer most (p<0.001). Peak incidence of rotavirus diarrhoea was in winter (38.37%) and showed inverse relation with temperature, humidity and rainfall. Besides diarrhoea, vomiting was a significant clinical manifestation. "Short" electropherotype were common during winter months and in tea garden localities. PMID:15022939

  10. Molecular characterization of group A rotaviruses detected in children with gastroenteritis in Ireland in 2006-2009.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cashman, O

    2012-02-01

    SUMMARYCommunity and hospital-acquired cases of human rotavirus are responsible for millions of gastroenteritis cases in children worldwide, chiefly in developing countries, and vaccines are now available. During surveillance activity for human rotavirus infections in Ireland, between 2006 and 2009, a total of 420 rotavirus strains were collected and analysed. Upon either PCR genotyping and sequence analysis, a variety of VP7 (G1-G4 and G9) and VP4 (P[4], P[6], P[8] and P[9]) genotypes were detected. Strains G1P[8] were found to be predominant throughout the period 2006-2008, with slight fluctuations seen in the very limited samples available in 2008-2009. Upon either PCR genotyping and sequence analysis of selected strains, the G1, G3 and G9 viruses were found to contain E1 (Wa-like) NSP4 and I1 VP6 genotypes, while the analysed G2 strains possessed E2 NSP4 and I2 VP6 genotypes, a genetic make-up which is highly conserved in the major human rotavirus genogroups Wa- and Kun-like, respectively. Upon sequence analysis of the most common VP4 genotype, P[8], at least two distinct lineages were identified, both unrelated to P[8] Irish rotaviruses circulating in previous years, and more closely related to recent European humans rotaviruses. Moreover, sequence analysis of the VP7 of G1 rotaviruses revealed the onset of a G1 variant, previously unseen in the Irish population.

  11. Lactodifucotetraose, a human milk oligosaccharide, attenuates platelet function and inflammatory cytokine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newburg, David S; Tanritanir, Ayse C; Chakrabarti, Subrata

    2016-07-01

    Human milk strongly quenches inflammatory processes in vitro, and breastfed infants have lower incidence of inflammatory diseases than those fed artificially. Platelets from neonates, in contrast to those from adults, are less responsive to platelet agonists such as collagen, thrombin, ADP, and epinephrine. Breastfed infants absorb oligosaccharides intact from the human milk in their gut to the circulation. This study was to determine whether these oligosaccharides can attenuate platelet function and platelet secretion of pro-inflammatory proteins, and to identify the active component. The natural mixture of oligosaccharides from human milk and pure individual human milk oligosaccharides were tested for their ability to modulate responses of platelets isolated from human blood following exposure to thrombin, ADP, and collagen. Human milk and the natural mixture of human milk oligosaccharides inhibited platelet release of inflammatory proteins. Of the purified human milk oligosaccharides tested, only lactodifucotetraose (LDFT) significantly inhibited thrombin induced release of the pro-inflammatory proteins RANTES and sCD40L. LDFT also inhibited platelet adhesion to a collagen-coated surface, as well as platelet aggregation induced by ADP or collagen. These data indicate that LDFT may help modulate hemostasis by suppressing platelet-induced inflammatory processes in breastfed infants. This activity suggests further study of LDFT for its potential as a therapeutic agent in infants and adults.

  12. Lactodifucotetraose, a human milk oligosaccharide, attenuates platelet function and inflammatory cytokine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newburg, David S; Tanritanir, Ayse C; Chakrabarti, Subrata

    2016-07-01

    Human milk strongly quenches inflammatory processes in vitro, and breastfed infants have lower incidence of inflammatory diseases than those fed artificially. Platelets from neonates, in contrast to those from adults, are less responsive to platelet agonists such as collagen, thrombin, ADP, and epinephrine. Breastfed infants absorb oligosaccharides intact from the human milk in their gut to the circulation. This study was to determine whether these oligosaccharides can attenuate platelet function and platelet secretion of pro-inflammatory proteins, and to identify the active component. The natural mixture of oligosaccharides from human milk and pure individual human milk oligosaccharides were tested for their ability to modulate responses of platelets isolated from human blood following exposure to thrombin, ADP, and collagen. Human milk and the natural mixture of human milk oligosaccharides inhibited platelet release of inflammatory proteins. Of the purified human milk oligosaccharides tested, only lactodifucotetraose (LDFT) significantly inhibited thrombin induced release of the pro-inflammatory proteins RANTES and sCD40L. LDFT also inhibited platelet adhesion to a collagen-coated surface, as well as platelet aggregation induced by ADP or collagen. These data indicate that LDFT may help modulate hemostasis by suppressing platelet-induced inflammatory processes in breastfed infants. This activity suggests further study of LDFT for its potential as a therapeutic agent in infants and adults. PMID:26743063

  13. 小儿急性感染性胃肠炎轮状病毒感染的病原学研究%Etiological study on human rotavirus infections in children with acute gastroenteritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵锦铭; 程红; 严岚; 王秀亭; 邓洁; 陈燕; 宋燕燕; 赵同兴; 屈建国

    2001-01-01

    Objective To understand the etiology of human rotavirus infections in children with acute gastroenteritis in China. Methods The investigation covered 1968 feces infants and children with acute gastroenteritis in 19 provinces and cities in China. Feces samples collected from 1968 infants and chil dren with diarrhea, 148 children, 135 newborns and 37 adults without diarrhea, 36 adults with diarrhea were examined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). 1493 feces samples were examined by ELISA; 388 feces samples from sick children and 57 feces samples from children and adults without diarrhea were examined by EM. Bacterial culture were analyzed in 645 feces samples. Results Human rotavirus RNA (HRV RNA) was detected in 804(40.9% ) of 1968 feces samples examined. No virus was detected in the feces samples of children and adults without diarrhea. Rotavirus antigen was detected in 500 (33.5%) of the 1493 feces samples. According to the genome profile of PAGE, 801 (99.6%) of the 804 rotavirus RNA positive belonged to group A virus, and the other 3 (0.4%) belonged to.group C virus. According to the different migration of 10 and 11 segments on PAGE, the RNA pattern of group A rotavirus could be subdivided into two patterns: long and short patterns. The 527 (66.8%) positive HRV RNA was in the long pattern, while the 267 (33.3%) positive were in the short pattern. Among the rest 6 appeared to be mixed types, and the examined one was uncertain. Four different genotypes of HRV RNA in long and short patterns were identified respectively. They were types 4232,4222,3232 and 3222. The eight electropherotype genomes of HRV RNA varied not only in different years or seasons but also with the ages of patients and regions where the patients live. Conclusion Rotavirus infections are the major cause of diarrhea of infants and young children throughout China.%目的了解我国广大地区小儿腹泻中轮状病毒感染的情况。方法从我国有代表性地区收集到1 968

  14. Evaluation of the infectivity, gene and antigenicity persistence of rotaviruses by free chlorine disinfection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dan Li; April Z.Gu; Siyu Zeng; Wan Yang; Miao He; Hanchang Shi

    2011-01-01

    The effects of free chlorine disinfection of tap water and wastewater effluents on the infectivity,gene integrity and surface antigens of rotaviruses were evaluated by a bench-scale chlorine disinfection experiments.Plaque assays,integrated cell culture-quantitative RTPCR (ICC-RT-qPCR),RT-qPCR,and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA),respectively,were used to assess the influence of the disinfectant on virus infectivity as well as genetic and antigenic integrity of simian rotavirus SA11 as a surrogate for human rotaviruses.The ICC-RT-qPCR was able to detect rotaviruses survival from chlorine disinfection at chlorine dose up to 20 mg/L (60 min contact),which suggested a required chlorine dose of 5 folds (from 1 to 5 mg/L) higher than that indicated by the plaque assay to achieve 1.8 log10 reductions in tap water with 60 min exposing.The VP7 gene was more resistant than the infectivity and existed at chlorine dose up to 20 mg/L (60 min contact),while the antigencity was undetectable with chlorine dose more than 5 mg/L (60 ain contact).The water quality also impacted the inactivation efficiencies,and rotaviruses have a relatively higher resistant in secondary effluents than in the tap water under the same chlorine disinfection treatments.This study indicated that rotaviruses have a higher infectivity,gene and antigencity resistance to chlorine than that previously indicated by plaque assay only,which seemed to underestimate the resistance of rotaviruses to chlorine and the risk of rotaviruses in environments.Present results also suggested that re-evaluation of resistance of other waterborne viruses after disinfections by more sensitive infectivity detection method (such as ICC-RT-qPCR) may be necessary,to determine the adequate disinfectant doses required for the inactivation of waterborne viruses.

  15. Lactose tolerance in lambs with rotavirus diarrhoea.

    OpenAIRE

    Ferguson, A.; Paul, G.; Snodgrass, D. R.

    1981-01-01

    It has been suggested that lactose malabsorption is an important factor in producing the diarrhoea of acute rotavirus infection. Accordingly, the lactose tolerance of gnotobiotic newborn lambs, infected with lamb rotavirus, has been investigated by clinical studies and tissue enzyme assays. Although lactase activity is low in affected areas of the small intestine, rotavirus infected lambs are not lactose intolerant as assessed by the measurement of reducing substances in the faeces, or by the...

  16. Characterization of an antigenically distinct porcine rotavirus.

    OpenAIRE

    Bridger, J C; Clarke, I. N.; McCrae, M A

    1982-01-01

    A porcine virus with rotavirus morphology, which was antigenically unrelated to previously described rotaviruses, is described. Particles with an outer capsid layer measured 75 nm and those lacking the outer layer were 63 nm in diameter. Particles which resembled cores were also identified. The virus was shown to be antigenically distinct from other rotaviruses as judged by immunofluorescence and immune electron microscopy, and it failed to protect piglets from challenge with porcine rotaviru...

  17. HMGB1-promoted and TLR2/4-dependent NK cell maturation and activation take part in rotavirus-induced murine biliary atresia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinrong Qiu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies show that NK cells play important roles in murine biliary atresia (BA, and a temporary immunological gap exists in this disease. In this study, we found high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1 and TLRs were overexpressed in human and rotavirus-induced murine BA. The overexpressed HMGB1 released from the nuclei of rotavirus-infected cholangiocytes, as well as macrophages, activated hepatic NK cells via HMGB1-TLRs-MAPK signaling pathways. Immature NK cells had low cytotoxicity on rotavirus-injured cholangiocytes due to low expression of TLRs, which caused persistent rotavirus infection in bile ducts. HMGB1 up-regulated the levels of TLRs of NK cells and promoted NK cell activation in an age-dependent fashion. As NK cells gained increasing activation as mice aged, they gained increasing cytotoxicity on rotavirus-infected cholangiocytes, which finally caused BA. Adult NK cells eliminated rotavirus-infected cholangiocytes shortly after infection, which prevented persistent rotavirus infection in bile ducts. Moreover, adoptive transfer of mature NK cells prior to rotavirus infection decreased the incidence of BA in newborn mice. Thus, the dysfunction of newborn NK cells may, in part, participate in the immunological gap in the development of rotavirus induced murine BA.

  18. Inflammatory and oxidative stress in rotavirus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Carlos A; Acosta, Orlando

    2016-01-01

    Rotaviruses are the single leading cause of life-threatening diarrhea affecting children under 5 years of age. Rotavirus entry into the host cell seems to occur by sequential interactions between virion proteins and various cell surface molecules. The entry mechanisms seem to involve the contribution of cellular molecules having binding, chaperoning and oxido-reducing activities. It appears to be that the receptor usage and tropism of rotaviruses is determined by the species, cell line and rotavirus strain. Rotaviruses have evolved functions which can antagonize the host innate immune response, whereas are able to induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, oxidative stress and inflammatory signaling. A networking between ER stress, inflammation and oxidative stress is suggested, in which release of calcium from the ER increases the generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to toxic accumulation of ROS within ER and mitochondria. Sustained ER stress potentially stimulates inflammatory response through unfolded protein response pathways. However, the detailed characterization of the molecular mechanisms underpinning these rotavirus-induced stressful conditions is still lacking. The signaling events triggered by host recognition of virus-associated molecular patterns offers an opportunity for the development of novel therapeutic strategies aimed at interfering with rotavirus infection. The use of N-acetylcysteine, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and PPARγ agonists to inhibit rotavirus infection opens a new way for treating the rotavirus-induced diarrhea and complementing vaccines. PMID:27175349

  19. NF-kB signalling is attenuated by the E7 protein from cutaneous human papillomaviruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byg, Luise M; Stensson, Jessica; Vasiljevic, Natasa;

    2012-01-01

    The high-risk Alpha-types of human papillomavirus (HPV) are the causative agent of cervical cancer, which is the second major cause of death among women worldwide. Recent investigations have shown that E7 from the Alpha-papillomavirus HPV-16 interacts with IKKa and IKKß of the IKK complex in the NF......-¿B pathway leading to an attenuation of the activity. There is a possible link between development of non melanoma skin cancer and cutaneous Beta-papillomavirus but if these HPV types attenuate the NF-¿B pathway is unclear. Seven different E7 proteins, representing four out of the five different species...... of the Beta genus (HPV-20, -37, -38, -92, -93 and -96) and one from the Gamma genus (HPV-4), were investigated for potential modulation of the NF-¿B pathway in U2OS cells. Our results demonstrate that E7 from all the cutaneous HPV types were capable of inhibiting the NF-¿B activity as well as E7 from HPV-16...

  20. Vitamin D attenuates cytokine-induced remodeling in human fetal airway smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britt, Rodney D; Faksh, Arij; Vogel, Elizabeth R; Thompson, Michael A; Chu, Vivian; Pandya, Hitesh C; Amrani, Yassine; Martin, Richard J; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S

    2015-06-01

    Asthma in the pediatric population remains a significant contributor to morbidity and increasing healthcare costs. Vitamin D3 insufficiency and deficiency have been associated with development of asthma. Recent studies in models of adult airway diseases suggest that the bioactive Vitamin D3 metabolite, calcitriol (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 ; 1,25(OH)2 D3 ), modulates responses to inflammation; however, this concept has not been explored in developing airways in the context of pediatric asthma. We used human fetal airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells as a model of the early postnatal airway to explore how calcitriol modulates remodeling induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines. Cells were pre-treated with calcitriol and then exposed to TNFα or TGFβ for up to 72 h. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, production of extracellular matrix (ECM), and cell proliferation were assessed. Calcitriol attenuated TNFα enhancement of MMP-9 expression and activity. Additionally, calcitriol attenuated TNFα and TGFβ-induced collagen III expression and deposition, and separately, inhibited proliferation of fetal ASM cells induced by either inflammatory mediator. Analysis of signaling pathways suggested that calcitriol effects in fetal ASM involve ERK signaling, but not other major inflammatory pathways. Overall, our data demonstrate that calcitriol can blunt multiple effects of TNFα and TGFβ in developing airway, and point to a potentially novel approach to alleviating structural changes in inflammatory airway diseases of childhood. PMID:25204635

  1. Development of primers for sequencing the NSP1, NSP3, and VP6 genes of the group A porcine rotavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Dornelas Florentino Silva

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Rotavirus is the causative pathogen of diarrhea in humans and in several animal species. Eight pairs of primers were developed and used for Sanger sequencing of the coding region of the NSP1, NSP3, and VP6 genes based on the conserved regions of the genome of the group A porcine rotavirus. Three samples previously screened as positive for group A rotaviruses were subjected to gene amplification and sequencing to characterize the pathogen. The information generated from this study is crucial for the understanding of the epidemiology of the disease.

  2. Hypoxia attenuates anti-Aspergillus fumigatus immune responses initiated by human dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliesser, Mirjam; Wallstein, Marion; Kurzai, Oliver; Einsele, Hermann; Löffler, Jürgen

    2016-08-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an opportunistic mould that causes invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA), a life-threatening infection in immunocompromised patients. During the course of IPA, localised areas of tissue hypoxia occur. Bacterial infection models revealed that hypoxic microenvironments modulate the function of host immune cells. However, the influence of hypoxia on anti-fungal immunity has been largely unknown. We evaluated the impact of hypoxia on the human anti-A. fumigatus immune response. Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) were stimulated in vitro with germ tubes of A. fumigatus under normoxia or hypoxia (1% O2 ), followed by analysis of DC viability, maturation and cytokine release. While DC viability was unaffected, hypoxia attenuated cytokine release from DCs and maturation of DCs upon stimulation with A. fumigatus. These data suggest that hypoxia at the site of A. fumigatus infection inhibits full activation and function of human DCs. Thereby, this study identified hypoxia as a crucial immune-modulating factor in the human anti-fungal immune response that might influence the course and outcome of IPA in immunocompromised patients. PMID:27005862

  3. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation attenuates axonal injur y in stroke rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Xu; Shiwei Du; Xinguang Yu; Xiao Han; Jincai Hou; Hao Guo

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that transplantation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells promotes neural functional recovery after stroke, but the neurorestorative mechanisms remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that functional recovery of myelinated axons may be one of underlying mechanisms. In this study, an ischemia/reperfusion rat model was established using the middle cerebral artery occlusion method. Rats were used to test the hypothesis that in-travenous transplantation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells through the femoral vein could exert neuroprotective effects against cerebral ischemia via a mechanism associated with the ability to attenuate axonal injury. The results of behavioral tests, infarction volume analysis and immunohistochemistry showed that cerebral ischemia caused severe damage to the myelin sheath and axons. After rats were intravenously transplanted with human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, the levels of axon and myelin sheath-related proteins, including mi-crotubule-associated protein 2, myelin basic protein, and growth-associated protein 43, were elevated, infarct volume was decreased and neural function was improved in cerebral ischemic rats. These ifndings suggest that intravenously transplanted human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells promote neural function. Possible mechanisms underlying these beneifcial effects in-clude resistance to demyelination after cerebral ischemia, prevention of axonal degeneration, and promotion of axonal regeneration.

  4. The histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid attenuates human astrocyte neurotoxicity induced by interferon-γ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashioka Sadayuki

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backgrounds Increasing evidence shows that the histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA possesses potent anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties. It is tempting to evaluate the potential of SAHA as a therapeutic agent in various neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative disorders. Methods We examined the effects of SAHA on interferon (IFN-γ-induced neurotoxicity of human astrocytes and on IFN-γ-induced phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT 3 in human astrocytes. We also studied the effects of SAHA on the astrocytic production of two representative IFN-γ-inducible inflammatory molecules, namely IFN-γ-inducible T cell α chemoattractant (I-TAC and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1. Results SAHA significantly attenuated the toxicity of astrocytes activated by IFN-γ towards SH-SY5Y human neuronal cells. In the IFN-γ-activated astrocytes, SAHA reduced the STAT3 phosphorylation. SAHA also inhibited the IFN-γ-induced astrocytic production of I-TAC, but not ICAM-1. These results indicate that SAHA suppresses IFN-γ-induced neurotoxicity of human astrocytes through inhibition of the STAT3 signaling pathway. Conclusion Due to its anti-neurotoxic and anti-inflammatory properties, SAHA appears to have the therapeutic or preventive potential for a wide range of neuroinflammatory disorders associated with activated astrocytes.

  5. Severe Rotavirus gastroenteritis in a patient with infant leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Uygun

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe gastroenteritis in infants and young children. Reports about the clinical relevance of rotavirus in immunocompromised children are rare. We herein presented a case of life-threatening Rotavirus gastroenteritis in an infant with acute myeloblastic leukemia which could be prevented by recently recommended Rotavirus vaccination.

  6. Inhibition of human copper trafficking by a small molecule significantly attenuates cancer cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Luo, Cheng; Shan, Changliang; You, Qiancheng; Lu, Junyan; Elf, Shannon; Zhou, Yu; Wen, Yi; Vinkenborg, Jan L; Fan, Jun; Kang, Heebum; Lin, Ruiting; Han, Dali; Xie, Yuxin; Karpus, Jason; Chen, Shijie; Ouyang, Shisheng; Luan, Chihao; Zhang, Naixia; Ding, Hong; Merkx, Maarten; Liu, Hong; Chen, Jing; Jiang, Hualiang; He, Chuan

    2015-12-01

    Copper is a transition metal that plays critical roles in many life processes. Controlling the cellular concentration and trafficking of copper offers a route to disrupt these processes. Here we report small molecules that inhibit the human copper-trafficking proteins Atox1 and CCS, and so provide a selective approach to disrupt cellular copper transport. The knockdown of Atox1 and CCS or their inhibition leads to a significantly reduced proliferation of cancer cells, but not of normal cells, as well as to attenuated tumour growth in mouse models. We show that blocking copper trafficking induces cellular oxidative stress and reduces levels of cellular ATP. The reduced level of ATP results in activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase that leads to reduced lipogenesis. Both effects contribute to the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation. Our results establish copper chaperones as new targets for future developments in anticancer therapies.

  7. Attenuating the p53 Pathway in Human Cancers: Many Means to the Same End.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasylishen, Amanda R; Lozano, Guillermina

    2016-01-01

    The p53 pathway is perturbed in the majority of human cancers. Although this most frequently occurs through the direct mutation or deletion of p53 itself, there are a number of other alterations that can attenuate the pathway and contribute to tumorigenesis. For example, amplification of important negative regulators, MDM2 and MDM4, occurs in a number of cancers. In this work, we will review both the normal regulation of the p53 pathway and the different mechanisms of pathway inhibition in cancer, discuss these alterations in the context of the global genomic analyses that have been conducted across tumor types, and highlight the translational implications for cancer diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27329033

  8. Inhibition of human copper trafficking by a small molecule significantly attenuates cancer cell proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Luo, Cheng; Shan, Changliang; You, Qiancheng; Lu, Junyan; Elf, Shannon; Zhou, Yu; Wen, Yi; Vinkenborg, Jan L.; Fan, Jun; Kang, Heebum; Lin, Ruiting; Han, Dali; Xie, Yuxin; Karpus, Jason; Chen, Shijie; Ouyang, Shisheng; Luan, Chihao; Zhang, Naixia; Ding, Hong; Merkx, Maarten; Liu, Hong; Chen, Jing; Jiang, Hualiang; He, Chuan

    2015-12-01

    Copper is a transition metal that plays critical roles in many life processes. Controlling the cellular concentration and trafficking of copper offers a route to disrupt these processes. Here we report small molecules that inhibit the human copper-trafficking proteins Atox1 and CCS, and so provide a selective approach to disrupt cellular copper transport. The knockdown of Atox1 and CCS or their inhibition leads to a significantly reduced proliferation of cancer cells, but not of normal cells, as well as to attenuated tumour growth in mouse models. We show that blocking copper trafficking induces cellular oxidative stress and reduces levels of cellular ATP. The reduced level of ATP results in activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase that leads to reduced lipogenesis. Both effects contribute to the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation. Our results establish copper chaperones as new targets for future developments in anticancer therapies.

  9. 牛轮状病毒基因重配二价减毒疫苗接种怀孕母牛的免疫原性评价%Evaluating the immunogenicity of bovine rotavirus reassortant bivalent attenuated vaccine in pregnant cows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常继涛; 于力

    2013-01-01

    In order to evaluate the immunogenicity of a candidate reassortant bivalent attenuated bovine rotavirus (BRV)vaccine (strains LLR-85 and R191),the cows pregnant for 7 to 8 months were immunized with the bivalent attenuated vaccine which was combined with LLR-85 (G10) and R191 (G6) strains in equal proportions and emulsified with adjuvant.The IgG,IgA and viral neutralizing (VN) antibodies against BRV in bovine serum were detected by using indirect ELISA and VN test.The results showed that the highest titers of the serum antibodies were induced in all inoculated cows at 2 weeks post immunization,and the antibody titers were up to 4 to 32 times of the original antibody titer,which lasted about 2 months.In addition,the vaccine had no side effects on the pregnant cows,such as abortion and other clinical reactions.Moreover,calves acquired the highest levels of serum and intestinal mucosal antibodies after birth by feeding the colostrum.The results suggested that the bivalent attenuated vaccine was safe for the pregnant cows and able to efficiently induce specific antibodies for protecting of calf through the colostrum.These results provided experimental basis for the clinical application of the bivalent attenuated reassortant BRV vaccine (LLR-85 and R191).%为评价牛轮状病毒(BRV)基因重组二价减毒疫苗(LLR-85和R191株)对怀孕母牛的免疫反应,本研究将RV LLR-85(G10)和R191(G6)株等比例混合后进行乳化,肌肉途径接种怀孕7个~8个月的母牛.采用间接ELISA和病毒中和(VN)试验对接种牛血清抗BRV的IgG、IgA以及VN抗体进行检测.结果显示,接种2周后抗体水平达到峰值,可以使原有的抗体滴度升高4倍~32倍,高滴度抗体可持续约2个月,接种母牛均未发生流产等副反应.犊牛通过饲喂初乳,可以在出生后1d内获得最高水平的血清和肠道粘膜抗体.结果表明,BRV基因重组二价减毒疫苗对孕牛不但具有良好的安全性、而且其高滴度抗体可以

  10. Rapid and sensitive detection of rotavirus molecular signatures using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy D Driskell

    Full Text Available Human enteric virus infections range from gastroenteritis to life threatening diseases such as myocarditis and aseptic meningitis. Rotavirus is one of the most common enteric agents and mortality associated with infection can be very significant in developing countries. Most enteric viruses produce diseases that are not distinct from other pathogens, and current diagnostics is limited in breadth and sensitivity required to advance virus detection schemes for disease intervention strategies. A spectroscopic assay based on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS has been developed for rapid and sensitive detection of rotavirus. The SERS method relies on the fabrication of silver nanorod array substrates that are extremely SERS-active allowing for direct structural characterization of viruses. SERS spectra for eight rotavirus strains were analyzed to qualitatively identify rotaviruses and to classify each according to G and P genotype and strain with >96% accuracy, and a quantitative model based on partial least squares regression analysis was evaluated. This novel SERS-based virus detection method shows that SERS can be used to identify spectral fingerprints of human rotaviruses, and suggests that this detection method can be used for pathogen detection central to human health care.

  11. Putative canine origin of rotavirus strain detected in a child with diarrhea, Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fang-Tzy; Bányai, Krisztián; Lin, Jen-Shiou; Wu, Ho-Sheng; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Huang, Yhu-Chering; Hwang, Kao-Pin; Jiang, Baoming; Gentsch, Jon R

    2012-02-01

    Rotavirus G3P[3] strains have been reported from a variety of species including humans, cats, dogs, monkeys, goats, and cows. Here, we report the characterization of the first human G3P[3] rotavirus from East Asia identified in a 2-year-old child who was treated in a hospital's emergency ward in Taiwan in February 2005. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis demonstrated a close genetic relationship between the VP4, VP6, VP7, and NSP4 genes of Taiwanese G3P[3] strain 04-94s51 and an Italian canine strain isolated a decade ago, suggesting a canine origin for the Taiwanese strain. In contrast, the Taiwanese strain was only moderately related to well-characterized canine-origin human G3P[3] strains Ro1845 and HCR3, suggesting a distinct origin for the rotavirus strain from Taiwan. PMID:22022813

  12. Unexpected detection of animal VP7 genes among common rotavirus strains isolated from children in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, A R; Ibarra, V; Ruiz-Palacios, G; Guerrero, M L; Glass, R I; Gentsch, J R

    2003-09-01

    In the course of characterizing 103 rotaviruses from children in Mexico, we found that the majority of strains were globally common types (55.4% of total), while uncommon types represented 5.7%, mixed infections with common types represented 14.8%, and partially or fully nontypeable isolates represented about 24%. Serotype G9 was detected for the first time in Mexico. We sequenced a subset of strains that were G nontypeable by reverse transcriptase PCR and found surprisingly that two strains having common human rotavirus P genotypes (8 and 6) had serotype G3 and G4 VP7 gene sequences that shared closer homology with canine and porcine strains, respectively, than with human strains, suggesting that these isolates represented reassortants between human and animal rotaviruses.

  13. Establishment of indirect immunofluorescence assay for rotavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, J; Zhang, J; Liu, X; Jin, H; Jiang, C; Yin, Y

    2016-03-01

    Rotavirus infection is the most frequent cause of infantile gastroenteritis worldwide and a significant cause of death in infants and young children, following severe diarrhea and dehydration. Rotavirus vaccines are considered the most effective way to prevent rotavirus infections. In the process of developing rotavirus vaccines, it is crucial to establish a reliable and standardized method to determine vaccine titer. In this study, we developed an indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) to determine the infectious titer of Lanzhou lamb rotavirus (LLR) vaccine grown in MA104 cells. The activating concentration of trypsin was 1 µg/ml for healthy monolayers of MA104 cells at 100% confluence. After incubation for 18 hr, a rabbit anti-SA11 polyclonal antibody, diluted at 1:800 in PBS, was added to all wells, followed by an Alexa-488-conjugated secondary antibody diluted at 1:500 in PBS. Cells were examined with a fluorescence microscope. Our results show that IFA was more reproducible, more sensitive, simpler, and more rapid than the log 50% cell culture infectious dose-ELISA (lgCCID50-ELISA) in measuring the rotavirus vaccines. IFA provided a reliable basis for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of rotavirus, and the certification of rotavirus vaccine production.

  14. Diagnosis of rotavirus gastroenteritis by smell.

    OpenAIRE

    Poulton, J.; Tarlow, M J

    1987-01-01

    Clinical features cannot differentiate rotavirus gastroenteritis from other types of diarrhoea. Sixty eight stool specimens were examined by nurses on an infant gastroenteritis ward. Of these, 69% were correctly classified by smell alone. The results are significant (p = 0.009) and support the suggestion that rotavirus stools have a characteristic smell.

  15. Genetic variability of VP7, VP4, VP6 and NSP4 genes of common human G1P[8] rotavirus strains circulating in Italy between 2010 and 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianiro, Giovanni; Delogu, Roberto; Fiore, Lucia; Ruggeri, Franco M

    2016-07-15

    Group A rotaviruses (RVA) are the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in young children worldwide. The RVA outer capsid layer is composed of the VP7 and VP4 proteins. The VP7 (G-type) and VP4 (P-type) genotypes are the basis for the binary RVA nomenclature. At least 27 G-types and 37 P-types of RVA are currently known, but most of human infections are related to the five major genotypes G1P[8], G2P[4], G3P[8], G4P[8], and G9P[8]. Every year G1P[8] strains cause approximately 50% of all symptomatic RVA infections reported in children in Italy. Fifteen G1P[8] RVA strains identified in different areas of Italy between 2010 and 2014 were selected. Strains were subjected to nucleotide sequencing of the VP7, VP4, VP6 and NSP4 genes to investigate their genetic variability with respect to geographic area and date of detection. Phylogenetic analyses showed that the 15 G1P[8] RVA strains belonged to two different lineages for both the VP7 and NSP4 genes, and showed some intra-lineage diversity in VP4 and VP6 genes. Similarities between strains correlated by either area or date of detection were also evaluated. The results obtained by phylogenetic analyses were confirmed analyzing the deduced amino acid sequences of the VP7, VP4, VP6 and NSP4 proteins of the G1P[8] RVA strains, detecting several substitutions in all proteins. The genetic variability observed between common G1P[8] RVAs highlights the constant evolution of the RVA genome through random point mutations (genetic drift) and intra-genotype reassortment (genetic shift). The evolution and diversity of the G1 RVA strains observed in this study can be related to the naturally acquired herd immunity, which represents the main mechanism of selective pressure in Italy, where mass anti-rotavirus vaccination was missing during the years of the study. PMID:27130628

  16. First Molecular Detection of Group A Rotavirus in Urban and Hospital Sewage systems by Nested-RT PCR in Shiraz, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya Tahamtan

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Group A rotaviruses are the most significant cause of acute gastroenteritis in children worldwide. Rotaviruses are shed in high numbers and dispersed widely throughout bodies of water in the environment. This represents a significant health hazard for humans, mainly due to the stability of the viruses during wastewater treatment processes. This study was conducted to evaluate the prevalence of rotaviruses, to determine G genotypes of circulating rotaviruses and to assess the efficiency of rotavirus removal in urban and hospital sewage treatment plants in Shiraz, Iran.Materials and methods: During the period from October 2010 to June 2011, a total of sixty sewage samples from urban and hospital sewage disposal systems were collected by Grab Sampling in Shiraz, Iran. All the samples were concentrated in pellet form and two-phase methods and then group A rotaviruses were investigated with enzyme immunoassays (EIA. Rotavirus-positive specimens were genotyped by the nested RT-PCR and by using different types of specific primers.Results:In total, rotaviruses were identified in 25% (15 cases of sewage samples, representing 73.33% (11 cases of influent and 26.67% (4 cases of effluent systems. The frequency of rotavirus detection in autumn, winter and spring was 46.67%, 33.33% and 20%, respectively (P= 0.004. The most common circulating genotype was G1 (73.33%, followed by G1G4 (20% and non-typeable (6.67%, respectively.Conclusions:The high prevalence of rotaviruses in urban and hospital sewage systems highlights the importance of environmental surveillance as a tool to detect new genotypes and to investigate the epidemiology of rotaviruses circulating in the community.

  17. Genome-Wide Evolutionary Analyses of G1P[8] Strains Isolated Before and After Rotavirus Vaccine Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, Mark; Donato, Celeste; Trovão, Nídia Sequeira; Cowley, Daniel; Heylen, Elisabeth; Donker, Nicole C.; McAllen, John K.; Akopov, Asmik; Kirkness, Ewen F.; Lemey, Philippe; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Kirkwood, Carl D.

    2015-01-01

    Rotaviruses are the most important etiological agent of acute gastroenteritis in young children worldwide. Among the first countries to introduce rotavirus vaccines into their national immunization programs were Belgium (November 2006) and Australia (July 2007). Surveillance programs in Belgium (since 1999) and Australia (since 1989) offer the opportunity to perform a detailed comparison of rotavirus strains circulating pre- and postvaccine introduction. G1P[8] rotaviruses are the most prominent genotype in humans, and a total of 157 G1P[8] rotaviruses isolated between 1999 and 2011 were selected from Belgium and Australia and their complete genomes were sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis showed evidence of frequent reassortment among Belgian and Australian G1P[8] rotaviruses. Although many different phylogenetic subclusters were present before and after vaccine introduction, some unique clusters were only identified after vaccine introduction, which could be due to natural fluctuation or the first signs of vaccine-driven evolution. The times to the most recent common ancestors for the Belgian and Australian G1P[8] rotaviruses ranged from 1846 to 1955 depending on the gene segment, with VP7 and NSP4 resulting in the most recent estimates. We found no evidence that rotavirus population size was affected after vaccine introduction and only six amino acid sites in VP2, VP3, VP7, and NSP1 were identified to be under positive selective pressure. Continued surveillance of G1P[8] strains is needed to determine long-term effects of vaccine introductions, particularly now rotavirus vaccines are implemented in the national immunization programs of an increasing number of countries worldwide. PMID:26254487

  18. Genome-Wide Evolutionary Analyses of G1P[8] Strains Isolated Before and After Rotavirus Vaccine Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, Mark; Donato, Celeste; Trovão, Nídia Sequeira; Cowley, Daniel; Heylen, Elisabeth; Donker, Nicole C; McAllen, John K; Akopov, Asmik; Kirkness, Ewen F; Lemey, Philippe; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Kirkwood, Carl D

    2015-09-01

    Rotaviruses are the most important etiological agent of acute gastroenteritis in young children worldwide. Among the first countries to introduce rotavirus vaccines into their national immunization programs were Belgium (November 2006) and Australia (July 2007). Surveillance programs in Belgium (since 1999) and Australia (since 1989) offer the opportunity to perform a detailed comparison of rotavirus strains circulating pre- and postvaccine introduction. G1P[8] rotaviruses are the most prominent genotype in humans, and a total of 157 G1P[8] rotaviruses isolated between 1999 and 2011 were selected from Belgium and Australia and their complete genomes were sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis showed evidence of frequent reassortment among Belgian and Australian G1P[8] rotaviruses. Although many different phylogenetic subclusters were present before and after vaccine introduction, some unique clusters were only identified after vaccine introduction, which could be due to natural fluctuation or the first signs of vaccine-driven evolution. The times to the most recent common ancestors for the Belgian and Australian G1P[8] rotaviruses ranged from 1846 to 1955 depending on the gene segment, with VP7 and NSP4 resulting in the most recent estimates. We found no evidence that rotavirus population size was affected after vaccine introduction and only six amino acid sites in VP2, VP3, VP7, and NSP1 were identified to be under positive selective pressure. Continued surveillance of G1P[8] strains is needed to determine long-term effects of vaccine introductions, particularly now rotavirus vaccines are implemented in the national immunization programs of an increasing number of countries worldwide. PMID:26254487

  19. Transgenic Tobacco Expressing a Modified VP6 Gene Protects Mice Against Rotavirus Infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang-Li DONG; Bo ZHOU; Gang SHENG; Tao WANG

    2005-01-01

    Elevated expression of the rotavirus VP6 antigen in transgenic plants is a critical factor in the development of a safe and effective rotavirus vaccine. Using codon optimization, a gene that encodes the inner capsid protein VP6 of the human group A rotavirus was synthesized (sVP6). The VP6 and sVp6genes were transformed into tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants using Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The expression level of the sVP6 gene in transgenic plants was 3.8-34-fold higher than that of controls containing the non-modified VP6 gene, accounting for up to 0.34% of the total soluble protein (TSP). Then, BALB/c female mice that had been gavaged weekly with 10 mg TSP containing 34 μg VP6 protein, in which VP6-specific serum IgG and mucosal IgA antibodies were investigated. The severity and duration of diarrhea caused by simian rotavirus SA-11 challenge were reduced significantly in passively immunized pups, which indicates that anti-VP6 antibodies generated in orally immunized female mice can be passed onto pups and provide heterotypic protection. An edible vaccine based on the VP6 of human rotavirus group A could provide a means to protect children and young animals from severe acute diarrhea.

  20. Rotavirus infection induces transient pancreatic involution and hyperglycemia in weanling mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margo C Honeyman

    Full Text Available Rotavirus is a ubiquitous double-stranded RNA virus responsible for most cases of infantile gastroenteritis. It infects pancreatic islets in vitro and is implicated as a trigger of autoimmune destruction of islet beta cells leading to type 1 diabetes, but pancreatic pathology secondary to rotavirus infection in vivo has not been documented. To address this issue, we inoculated 3 week-old C57Bl/6 mice at weaning with rhesus rotavirus, which is closely related to human rotaviruses and known to infect mouse islets in vitro. Virus was quantified in tissues by culture-isolation and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A requirement for viral double stranded RNA was investigated in toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3-deficient mice. Cell proliferation and apoptosis, and insulin expression, were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Following rotavirus inoculation by gavage, two phases of mild, transient hyperglycemia were observed beginning after 2 and 8 days. In the first phase, widespread apoptosis of pancreatic cells was associated with a decrease in pancreas mass and insulin production, without detectable virus in the pancreas. These effects were mimicked by injection of the double-stranded RNA mimic, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid, and were TLR3-dependent. By the second phase, the pancreas had regenerated but islets were smaller than normal and viral antigen was then detected in the pancreas for several days. These findings directly demonstrate pathogenic effects of rotavirus infection on the pancreas in vivo, mediated initially by the interaction of rotavirus double-stranded RNA with TLR3.

  1. Complex evolutionary patterns of two rare human G3P[9] rotavirus strains possessing a feline/canine-like H6 genotype on an AU-1-like genotype constellation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan-Hong; Pang, Bei-Bei; Zhou, Xuan; Ghosh, Souvik; Tang, Wei-Feng; Peng, Jin-Song; Hu, Quan; Zhou, Dun-Jin; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

    2013-06-01

    The group A rotavirus (RVA) G3P[9] is a rare VP7-VP4 genotype combination, detected occasionally in humans and cats. Other than the prototype G3P[9] strain, RVA/Human- tc/JPN/AU-l/1982/G3P3[9], the whole genomes of only two human G3P[9] RVA strains and two feline G3P[9] RVA strains have been analyzed so far, revealing complex evolutionary patterns, distinct from that of AU-1. We report here the whole genomic analyses of two human G3P[9] RVA strains, RVA/Human-tc/CHN/L621/2006/G3P[9] and RVA/Human-wt/CHN/E2451/2011/G3P[9], detected in patients with diarrhea in China. Strains L621 and E2451 possessed a H6 NSP5 genotype on an AU-1-like genotype constellation, not reported previously. However, not all the genes of L621 and E2451 were closely related to those of AU-1, or to each other, revealing different evolutionary patterns among the AU-1-like RVAs. The VP7, VP4, VP6 and NSP4 genes of E2451 and L621 were found to cluster together with human G3P[9] RVA strains believed to be of possible feline/canine origin, and feline or raccoon dog RVA strains. The VP1, VP3, NSP2 and NSP5 genes of E2451 and L621 formed distinct clusters in genotypes typically found in feline/canine RVA strains or RVA strains from other host species which are believed to be of feline/canine RVA origin. The VP2 genes of E2451 and L621, and NSP3 gene of L621 clustered among RVA strains from different host species which are believed to have a complete or partial feline/canine RVA origin. The NSP1 genes of E2451 and L621, and NSP3 gene of E2451 clustered with AU-1 and several other strains possessing a complete or partial feline RVA strain BA222-05-like genotype constellation. Taken together, these observations suggest that nearly all the eleven gene segments of G3P[9] RVA strains L621 and E2451 might have originated from feline/canine RVAs, and that reassortments may have occurred among these feline/canine RVA strains, before being transmitted to humans. PMID:23403096

  2. [Universal vaccination for Rotavirus infection control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mita, Valentin; Capanna, Alessandra; Gervasi, Giuseppe; Zaratti, Laura; Franco, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Rotaviruses are the most common etiological cause for pediatric acute gastroenteritis, particularly in children under 5 years of age or immunocompromised. Since 2008, vaccination program has determined a decrease in Rotavirus-related hospitalization, outpatient's visits, emergency department visits and mortality. These indicators of illness for Rotaviruses diseases remain high in those countries where there is no access to rehydrating therapies. In Italy vaccine coverage is very low, even if the burden of RV disease is well known, and at present vaccination is offered free of charge in a single region.

  3. IL-17 attenuates the anti-apoptotic effects of GM-CSF in human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragon, Stéphane; Saffar, Arash Shoja; Shan, Lianyu; Gounni, Abdelilah Soussi

    2008-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-17A is a pleiotropic, pro-inflammatory cytokine that is implicated in chronic inflammatory and degenerative disorders. IL-17 has been demonstrated to link activated T-lymphocyte with the recruitment of neutrophils at sites of inflammation, however whether IL-17 can mediate neutrophil survival and subsequently affect inflammatory responses has not fully been elucidated. In our study, we demonstrate that human peripheral blood and HL-60 differentiated neutrophils express mRNA and cell surface IL-17A receptor. IL-17A does not affect the rate of spontaneous neutrophil apoptosis, however significantly decreased granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-mediated survival by antagonizing the signal transduction pathways of p38, Erk1/2 and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 5B. These events were associated with reduced myeloid cell lymphoma-1 (Mcl-1) protein levels, increased translocation and aggregation of Bax to mitochondria, decreased mitochondrial transmembrane potential and in an increase in caspase-3/7 activity. These events were independent of increased Fas or soluble Fas ligand expression levels. Taken together, our findings suggest that IL-17 may regulate neutrophil homeostasis and favor the resolution of inflamed tissues by attenuating the delay in neutrophil apoptosis induced by inflammatory cytokines.

  4. Lacidipine Attenuates Apoptosis via a Caspase-3 Dependent Pathway in Human Kidney Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiqi Zhang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute kidney injury (AKI is common in hospitalised patients and has a poor prognosis. Therefore, new therapeutic strategies are anticipated. Lacidipine, a novel third-generation dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker, has been demonstrated effective for hypertension. However, its potential effect on renal injury remains unknown. In the present study, an in vitro model of renal ischemia reperfusion (I/R injury was used to investigate the protective effect and underlying mechanisms of lacidipine on human kidney cell (HKC apoptosis. Methods: HKCs were subjected to adenosine triphosphate (ATP depletion and recovery (0.01 µM AA, depletion for 2 h and recovery for 30 min, with or without lacidipine (1 µM and 10 µM, 24 h, then cell viability and apoptosis were determined using the cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8 assay and Annexin V flow cytometry. The expression of Bcl-2, Bax, and cytochrome c (cyt c was examined by western blot. Results: Antimycin A (AA was found to induce apoptosis of HKCs. The proportion of early apoptosis and activity of caspase-3 peaked at 30 min after ATP depletion and recovery and were attenuated by lacidipine. The expression of cyt c and Bax was decreased, while that of Bcl-2 was increased significantly in lacidipine treated group. Conclusion: We conclude that lacidipine protects HKCs against apoptosis induced by ATP depletion and recovery by regulating the caspase-3 pathway.

  5. Bed rest attenuates sympathetic and pressor responses to isometric exercise in antigravity leg muscles in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Atsunori; Michikami, Daisaku; Shiozawa, Tomoki; Iwase, Satoshi; Hayano, Junichiro; Kawada, Toru; Sunagawa, Kenji; Mano, Tadaaki

    2004-05-01

    Although spaceflight and bed rest are known to cause muscular atrophy in the antigravity muscles of the legs, the changes in sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to exercises using the atrophied muscles remain unknown. We hypothesized that bed rest would augment sympathetic responses to isometric exercise using antigravity leg muscles in humans. Ten healthy male volunteers were subjected to 14-day 6 degrees head-down bed rest. Before and after bed rest, they performed isometric exercises using leg (plantar flexion) and forearm (handgrip) muscles, followed by 2-min postexercise muscle ischemia (PEMI) that continues to stimulate the muscle metaboreflex. These exercises were sustained to fatigue. We measured muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) in the contralateral resting leg by microneurography. In both pre- and post-bed-rest exercise tests, exercise intensities were set at 30 and 70% of the maximum voluntary force measured before bed rest. Bed rest attenuated the increase in MSNA in response to fatiguing plantar flexion by approximately 70% at both exercise intensities (both P antigravity leg muscles.

  6. Surveillance of rotavirus and human calicivirus gastroenteritis in pediatric diarrheal patients in enteric clinics in Beijing%北京市儿童肠道门诊腹泻患者轮状病毒及人杯状病毒腹泻监测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    纪晋文; 张震; 刘国涛; 刘潇潇; 高志勇; 李锡太

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the epidemiogical characteristics of rotavirus and human calicivirus gastroenteritis in pediatric diarrheal patients. Methods; The stool samples of 228 children with diarrhea were collected from April 2010 to March 2011, and the rotavirus and human calicivirus were determined by enzyme linked immunosor-bent assay (ELISA) and reverse transcription - polymerase reaction (RT 桺CR) respectively. Results; The positive rate of rotavirus and human calicivirus were 22. 81% (52/228) and 32. 89% (75/228) respectively, and difference of the positive rates had significant difference in different month (P <0.05). Difference of rotavirus positive rate in different clinical features (vomiting, stool character and stool routine test of white blood cells) were statistically significant (P <0.05) ,and difference of human calicivirus positive rate in different clinical feature (vomiting) was statistically significant(P<0.05). The erroneous diagnosis rates in rotavirus and human calicivirus positive cases were 78. 85% , 77.33% respectively. Conclusion; The infection rates of rotavirus and human calicivirus in children were high, and erroneous diagnosis rates in viral diarrhea was also high.%目的:了解儿童腹泻患者轮状病毒及人杯状病毒腹泻流行病学特点.方法:2010年4月-2011年3月,收集228例儿童急性腹泻患者粪便标本,运用ELISA方法进行轮状病毒检测,RT - PCR方法进行人杯状病毒检测,采用Epi Info3.5.1进行统计分析.结果:228例便标本中轮状病毒、人杯状病毒检测阳性率分别为22.81%、32.89%;各月间两种病毒榆出率的差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05);不同临床特征(呕吐、大便性状、便检白细胞)与轮状病毒检测阳性率的差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05),人杯状病毒检测阳性率与患者是否呕吐的差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05);轮状病毒、人杯状病毒阳性患者的误诊率分别为78.85%、77.33%.结论:儿童

  7. Nitrosative stress in human skeletal muscle attenuated by exercise countermeasure after chronic disuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Salanova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Activity-induced nitric oxide (NO imbalance and “nitrosative stress” are proposed mechanisms of disrupted Ca2+ homeostasis in atrophic skeletal muscle. We thus mapped S-nitrosylated (SNO functional muscle proteins in healthy male subjects in a long-term bed rest study (BBR2-2 Study without and with exercise as countermeasure in order to assess (i the negative effects of chronic muscle disuse by nitrosative stress, (ii to test for possible attenuation by exercise countermeasure in bed rest and (iii to identify new NO target proteins. Muscle biopsies from calf soleus and hip vastus lateralis were harvested at start (Pre and at end (End from a bed rest disuse control group (CTR, n=9 and two bed rest resistive exercise groups either without (RE, n=7 or with superimposed vibration stimuli (RVE, n=7. At subcellular compartments, strong anti-SNO-Cys immunofluorescence patterns in control muscle fibers after bed rest returned to baseline following vibration exercise. Total SNO-protein levels, Nrf-2 gene expression and nucleocytoplasmic shuttling were changed to varying degrees in all groups. Excess SNO-protein levels of specific calcium release/uptake proteins (SNO-RyR1, –SERCA1 and –PMCA and of contractile myosin heavy chains seen in biopsy samples of chronically disused skeletal muscle were largely reduced by vibration exercise. We also identified NOS1 as a novel NO target in human skeletal muscle controlled by activity driven auto-nitrosylation mechanisms. Our findings suggest that aberrant levels of functional SNO-proteins represent signatures of uncontrolled nitrosative stress management in disused human skeletal muscle that can be offset by exercise as countermeasure.

  8. A Systems Survey of Progressive Host-Cell Reorganization during Rotavirus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Victoria A; Pelkmans, Lucas

    2016-07-13

    Pathogen invasion is often accompanied by widespread alterations in cellular physiology, which reflects the hijacking of host factors and processes for pathogen entry and replication. Although genetic perturbation screens have revealed the complexity of host factors involved for numerous pathogens, it has remained challenging to temporally define the progression of events in host cell reorganization during infection. We combine high-confidence genome-scale RNAi screening of host factors required for rotavirus infection in human intestinal cells with an innovative approach to infer the trajectory of virus infection from fixed cell populations. This approach reveals a comprehensive network of host cellular processes involved in rotavirus infection and implicates AMPK in initiating the development of a rotavirus-permissive environment. Our work provides a powerful approach that can be generalized to order complex host cellular requirements along a trajectory of cellular reorganization during pathogen invasion. PMID:27414499

  9. A Systems Survey of Progressive Host-Cell Reorganization during Rotavirus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Victoria A; Pelkmans, Lucas

    2016-07-13

    Pathogen invasion is often accompanied by widespread alterations in cellular physiology, which reflects the hijacking of host factors and processes for pathogen entry and replication. Although genetic perturbation screens have revealed the complexity of host factors involved for numerous pathogens, it has remained challenging to temporally define the progression of events in host cell reorganization during infection. We combine high-confidence genome-scale RNAi screening of host factors required for rotavirus infection in human intestinal cells with an innovative approach to infer the trajectory of virus infection from fixed cell populations. This approach reveals a comprehensive network of host cellular processes involved in rotavirus infection and implicates AMPK in initiating the development of a rotavirus-permissive environment. Our work provides a powerful approach that can be generalized to order complex host cellular requirements along a trajectory of cellular reorganization during pathogen invasion.

  10. Rotavirus strains in neglected animal species including lambs, goats and camelids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, Hajnalka; Malik, Yashpal S; Farkas, Szilvia L; Jakab, Ferenc; Martella, Vito; Bányai, Krisztián

    2014-01-01

    Surveillance of rotavirus infections and circulating strains in small ruminants (i.e. lambs, goats and camelids) has been a neglected research area in the past. However, recent years that have seen an intensification of surveillance in humans and livestock animals, where vaccines to reduce disease burden caused by Rotavirus A (RVA) are available, led to the efforts to better understand the epidemiology, ecology and evolution of RVA strains in other hosts, including lambs, goats and camelids. The aim of this review is to provide an update of the epidemiology and strain diversity of RV strains in these species through searching for relevant information in public data bases. PMID:25674588

  11. DETECTION OF ROTAVIRUS WITH A NEW POLYCLONAL ANTIBODY ENZYME IMMUNOASSAY (ROTAZYME 2) AND A COMMERCIAL LATEX AGGLUTINATION TEXT (ROTALEX): COMPARISON WITH A MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY ENZYME IMMUNOASSAY

    Science.gov (United States)

    A total of 176 human fecal specimens were examined for the presence of rotavirus using four different assays: a monoclonal antibody enzyme immunoassay; the original polyclonal antibody enzyme immunoassay marketed by Abbott Laboratories, Chicago, IL (Rotazyme I); a modification of...

  12. A组人轮状病毒VP3基因的原核表达及鉴定%Prokaryotic expression and identification of VP3 gene of group A human rotavirus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张顺; 潘小霞; 袁静; 文喻玲; 陈元鼎

    2012-01-01

    Objective To clone the gene encoding structural protein VP3 of group A human rotavirus (RV) TB-Chen strain, express in prokaryotic cells and investigate its molecular phylogenesis and genotype. Methods The gene encoding VP3 of TB-Chen strain was amplified by PCR and cloned into pETL vactor. The constructed recombinant plasmid pET-VP3 was transformed to E. Coli BL21 (DE3). The expressed recombinant protein was identified by SDS-PAGE and Western blot, based on which the cloned VP3 gene was analyzed for molecular phylogenesis and genotype. Results Restriction analysis and sequencing proved that recombinant plasmid pET-VP3 was constructed correctly. The expressed recombinant protein, with a relative molecular mass of about 98 000, existed in a form of inclusion body and was recognized by the guinea pig sera against whole virus of SA11 strain. By the so far, the discovered RV VP3 was of seven genotypes, of which those from TB-Chen and SA11 strains were belonged to genotypes M2 and M5 respectively. Conclusion The VP3 protein of group A human RV TB-Chen strain was successfully expressed in prokaryotic cells, which laid a foundation of further study on structure and function as well as development of VP3.%目的 克隆并原核表达A组人轮状病毒( Rotavirus,RV)TB-Chen株结构蛋白VP3基因,并进行分子系统进化和基因分型.方法 采用PCR法扩增A组人轮状病毒TB-Chen株VP3编码基因,克隆至pETL载体上,构建重组原核表达质粒pET-VP3,转化大肠杆菌BL21(DE3),并进行表达.表达的重组蛋白经SDS-PAGE及Western blot鉴定后,对VP3基因进行分子 系统进化及基因型分析.结果 重组表达质粒pET-VP3经双酶切及测序证实构建正确;表达的重组蛋白相对分子质量约为98 000,以包涵体形式存在;重组VP3蛋白可被抗SA11株全病毒豚鼠免疫血清识别;迄今发现的A组RV VP3可分为7个基因型,TB-Chen株和SA11株VP3基因分别属于M2型和M5型.结论

  13. Amino Acid sequence analysis of the two major outer Capsid Proteins (VP7 and VP4 from human-derived canine G3P[3] Rotavirus Strain Detected in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Luchs

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A close look at the rotavirus group A (RVA genotypes in Brazil revealed the detection of a rare G3P[3] strain close related to canine strains. The aim of this study was to add to the already known genetic analysis by the description of the G3P[3] (IAL-R2638 strain amino acid characteristics. Methods: Amino acid sequence analysis and protein based trees were conducted using BioEdit and MEGA 4.0. Results: The VP7 and VP4 protein of the IAL-R2638 strain displayed the highest amino acid identity to the canine-derived human strain HCR3A (99.2%, and to the canine strain RV52/96 (96.4%, respectively. IAL-R2638 strain did not possess an extra VP7 N-linked glycosylation site at amino acid 238 recently described for some G3 strains, as well as RotaTeqTM G3 vaccine strain. The topology exhibited by phylogenetic trees in previous analysis were maintained in the present amino acid-based trees, reinforcing a stable relationship between G3P[3] strains. Conclusions: Amino acid analysis data were consistent with the previous sequence of data obtained for the IAL-R2638 strain, supporting its possible canine origin. Theoretically, RotaTeqTM vaccine could efficiently protect against G3P[3] infections based on the lack of the extra VP7 N-linked glycosylation site at amino acid 238. Phylogenetic analysis hypothesizes that all features undergo evolution independently of each other; however, unfavorable effects of nucleotide substitutions may be compensated by substitutions in other positions. The present study raises the question as to whether the amino acid-based trees could be applied as an approach to the study of RVA evolution, avoiding incorrect phylogenetic reconstructions.

  14. Canine-origin G3P[3] rotavirus strain in child with acute gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Grazia, Simona; Martella, Vito; Giammanco, Giovanni M; Gòmara, Miren Iturriza; Ramirez, Stefania; Cascio, Antonio; Colomba, Claudia; Arista, Serenella

    2007-07-01

    Infection by an animal-like strain of rotavirus (PA260/97) was diagnosed in a child with gastroenteritis in Palermo, Italy, in 1997. Sequence analysis of VP7, VP4, VP6, and NSP4 genes showed resemblance to a G3P[3] canine strain identified in Italy in 1996. Dogs are a potential source of human viral pathogens. PMID:18214189

  15. Molecular analysis of non structural rotavirus group A enterotoxin gene of bovine origin from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Yashpal Singh; Kumar, Naveen; Sharma, Kuldeep; Ghosh, Souvik; Bányai, Krisztián; Balasubramanian, Ganesh; Kobayashi, Nobumichi; Matthijnssens, Jelle

    2014-07-01

    The rotavirus enterotoxin NSP4 (nonstructural protein 4), plays a pivotal role in viral morphogenesis as well as pathogenesis. In this study, the NSP4 gene of rotavirus group A (RVA) isolates of bovine origin isolated in several states of India from 2008 to 2011 were characterized. The complete open reading frame of 23 RVA strains were sequenced and analyzed phylogenetically. Genotype E1 was detected for the first time in bovines from India, in addition to the more common bovine genotype E2. Sequence similarity analysis of the E1 sequences showed a close genetic relatedness to human strains. Six of the bovine E2 genotypes strains clustered near bovine and unusual human strains (possible human animal reassortant) from Thailand, while the remaining E2 sequences clustered with Indian bovine strains. Analysis pointed out one positively selected site (154aa), believe to be part of an antigenic region and 123 negatively selected sites. Unexpectedly, a pentameric NSP4 structure of the coiled coil domain in the E1 carrying strains and a monomeric NSP4 in RVA strain P14 (E2) was predicted based on homology modeling, potentially affecting the biological properties of NSP4. The close relationship between bovine and human rotavirus strains further highlights the complex interaction among rotaviruses of different species. PMID:24747605

  16. Canine-Origin G3P[3] Rotavirus Strain in Child with Acute Gastroenteritis

    OpenAIRE

    De Grazia, Simona; Martella, Vito; Giammanco, Giovanni M; Gòmara, Miren Iturriza; Ramirez, Stefania; Cascio, Antonio; Colomba, Claudia; Arista, Serenella

    2007-01-01

    Infection by an animal-like strain of rotavirus (PA260/97) was diagnosed in a child with gastroenteritis in Palermo, Italy, in 1997. Sequence analysis of VP7, VP4, VP6, and NSP4 genes showed resemblance to a G3P[3] canine strain identified in Italy in 1996. Dogs are a potential source of human viral pathogens.

  17. Measuring indirect effects of rotavirus vaccine in low income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Aisleen; Bar-Zeev, Naor; Cunliffe, Nigel A

    2016-08-17

    Widespread introduction of rotavirus vaccines has led to major reductions in the burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis worldwide. Vaccine effectiveness is diminished, however, in low income countries, that harbour the greatest burden of rotavirus attributed morbidity and mortality. Indirect effects of rotavirus vaccine (herd immunity and herd protection) could increase population level impact and improve vaccine cost effectiveness in such settings. While rotavirus vaccine indirect effects have been demonstrated in high and middle income countries, there are very little data from low income countries where force of infection, population structures and vaccine schedules differ. Targeted efforts to evaluate indirect effects of rotavirus vaccine in low income countries are required to understand the total impact of rotavirus vaccine on the global burden of rotavirus disease. PMID:27443593

  18. Rotavirus and the Vaccine (Drops) to Prevent It

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Immunizations Rotavirus and the Vaccine (Drops) to Prevent It Language: English Español (Spanish) Format: Select one PDF [ ... eating and drinking while they are sick. Is it serious? Rotavirus can be very harmful. Diarrhea, vomiting, ...

  19. HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS TYPE 16 L1 PROTEIN CAN BE EXPRESSED IN LIVE ATTENUATED SHIGELLA FLEXNERI 5A STRAIN SH42

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qu Xinzhong; Yang Xiaofeng; Zheng Jin; Wang Kai; Si Lüsheng; Wang Yili

    2005-01-01

    Objective Attenuated strains of Shigella are attractive live vaccine candidates for eliciting mucosal immune responses which is a suitable carrier for the prophylactic human papillomaviruses (HPV) vaccine development, To examine the potential of a live Shigella based prophylactic HPV vaccine, HPV16L1should be expressed in attenuated shigella strain. Methods A Shigella large invasive plasmid (icsA/virG) based prokaryotic expression plasmid pHS3199 was constructed. HPV16L1 gene was inserted into plasmid pHS3199 to form pHS3199-HPV16 L1 construct, and pHS3199-hpv16L1 was electroporated into a live attenuated shigella strain sh42. The expression of HPV16L1 protein was demonstrated by Western blotting with monoclonal antibody to HPV16L1, The genetic stability of recombinant strain sh42-HPV16 L1 was monitored by consecutive passage culture. Invasive ability of sh42-HPV16L1 was evaluated by Hela cell infection assay. Results HPV16 L1 protein can be expressed in recombinant strain sh42-HPV16 L1, and the protein stably expressed over 140 generations. The invasive ability of sh42-HPV16L1 was diminished dramatically compared to its parent strain, but not abolished completely. Conclusion HPV16L1 protein was constitutively expressed in the attenuated strain of shigella flexneri sh42, and maintained partial invasive ability. Our strategy may represent a promising vaccine candidate against genital HPV16 infection.

  20. Celecoxib attenuates 5-fluorouracil-induced apoptosis in HCT-15 and HT-29 human colon cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun Jeong Lim; Jong Chul Rhee; Young Mee Bae; Wan Joo Chun

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the combined chemotherapeutic effects of celecoxib when used with 5-FU in vitro.METHODS: Two human colon cancer cell lines (HCT-15and HT-29) were treated with 5-FU and celecoxib, alone and in combination. The effects of each drug were evaluated using the MTT (3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay, flow cytometry,and western blotting.RESULTS: 5-FU and celecoxib showed a dosedependent cytotoxic effect. When treated with 10-3mol/L 5-FU (IC50) and celecoxib with its concentration ranging from 10-8 mol/L to 10-4 mol/L of celecoxib,cells showed reduced cytotoxic effect than 5-FU(10-3 mol/L) alone. Flow cytometry showed that celecoxib attenuated 5-FU induced accumulation of cells at subG1 phase. Western blot analyses for caspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage showed that celecoxib attenuated 5-FU induced apoptosis. Western blot analyses for cell cycle molecules showed that G2/M arrest might be possible cause of 5-FU induced apoptosis and celecoxib attenuated 5-FU induced apoptosis via blocking of cell cycle progression to the G2/M phase,causing an accumulation of cells at the G1/S phase.CONCLUSION: We found that celecoxib attenuated cytotoxic effect of 5-FU. Celecoxib might act via inhibition of cell cycle progression, thus preventing apoptosis induced by 5-FU.

  1. Whole-genome analyses reveals the animal origin of a rotavirus G4P[6] detected in a child with severe diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Magaly; Galeano, Maria E; Akopov, Asmik; Palacios, Ruth; Russomando, Graciela; Kirkness, Ewen F; Parra, Gabriel I

    2014-10-01

    Group A rotaviruses are a major cause of severe gastroenteritis in children worldwide. Currently, two rotavirus vaccines are being used in vaccination programs, and one of the factors involved in lower vaccine efficacy is the mismatch among the circulating strains and the vaccine strains. Thus, the emergence of animal strains in the human population could affect the efficacy of vaccination programs. Here we report the presence of a G4P[6] strain in a Paraguayan child presenting acute gastroenteritis in 2009. Genomic analyses revealed that the strain presents a porcine-like genome (G4-P[6]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A8-N1-T7-E1-H1), suggesting a direct animal-to-human transmission. Continuous surveillance of rotaviruses in humans and animals will help us to better understand rotavirus epidemiology and evolution. PMID:25075468

  2. Evaluation of new commercial enzyme immunoassay for rotavirus detection.

    OpenAIRE

    Cromien, J L; Himmelreich, C A; Glass, R I; Storch, G A

    1987-01-01

    We evaluated a new commercial enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for rotavirus (Rotavirus EIA; International Diagnostic Laboratories, Chesterfield, Mo.). A total of 161 consecutive stool samples (including 18 from infants less than 30 days old) submitted to the diagnostic laboratory at Children's Hospital, Washington University Medical Center, St. Louis, Mo., for rotavirus detection were tested by Rotavirus EIA and by Rotazyme II (Abbott Laboratories, North Chicago, III.) according to the instructions ...

  3. 轮状病毒及轮状病毒疫苗研究进展%Research Progress of Rotavirus and Rotavirus Vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙丽丽; 吴晋元; 孙茂盛

    2016-01-01

    Human rotavirus has been discovered since the early 1970s, which is still a primary pathogen causing infant diarrhea under the age of five. Each year about 600,000 infant died of severe body dehydration caused by rotavirus infection. Since the current rotavirus diarrhea have no specific therapeutic drugs, using vaccine to prevent rotavirus infection is an effective method. Research on a vaccine often involved in a multidisciplinary theory and technology. This article reviewed the epidemic situation of rotavirus,animal model,the body's immune response after infection, developing and using vaccine and other related issues.%人轮状病毒(human rotavirus,HRV)自上世纪70年代初发现以来,至今仍然是世界范围内引起5岁以下婴幼儿腹泻的最主要病原体,每年约60万婴幼儿因轮状病毒感染导致严重脱水死亡。由于轮状病毒腹泻尚无特异性治疗药物,使用疫苗预防轮状病毒感染是目前有效手段。一种疫苗的研究往往涉及了多学科理论和技术,就轮状病毒流行情况、动物实验模型、机体感染后的免疫应答及疫苗研发使用等相关问题作一综述。

  4. Association of Rotavirus Gastroenteritis with Histo-blood Group Antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, E; Dwibedi, B; Kar, S K; Pandey, R M

    2016-07-01

    Association of rotavirus gastroenteritis with histo-blood group antigens in children younger than 5 years admitted with diarrhea (n=389) was studied. Distribution of blood groups in rotavirus positive (n=96) and rotavirus negative (n=51) diarrhea gastroenteritis cases did not show any susceptibility to any blood group; blood group O seemed to be protective. PMID:27508550

  5. Rational Design of Human Metapneumovirus Live Attenuated Vaccine Candidates by Inhibiting Viral mRNA Cap Methyltransferase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Wei, Yongwei; Zhang, Xiaodong; Cai, Hui; Niewiesk, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The paramyxoviruses human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV), human metapneumovirus (hMPV), and human parainfluenza virus type 3 (hPIV3) are responsible for the majority of pediatric respiratory diseases and inflict significant economic loss, health care costs, and emotional burdens. Despite major efforts, there are no vaccines available for these viruses. The conserved region VI (CR VI) of the large (L) polymerase proteins of paramyxoviruses catalyzes methyltransferase (MTase) activities that typically methylate viral mRNAs at positions guanine N-7 (G-N-7) and ribose 2′-O. In this study, we generated a panel of recombinant hMPVs carrying mutations in the S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) binding site in CR VI of L protein. These recombinant viruses were specifically defective in ribose 2′-O methylation but not G-N-7 methylation and were genetically stable and highly attenuated in cell culture and viral replication in the upper and lower respiratory tracts of cotton rats. Importantly, vaccination of cotton rats with these recombinant hMPVs (rhMPVs) with defective MTases triggered a high level of neutralizing antibody, and the rats were completely protected from challenge with wild-type rhMPV. Collectively, our results indicate that (i) amino acid residues in the SAM binding site in the hMPV L protein are essential for 2′-O methylation and (ii) inhibition of mRNA cap MTase can serve as a novel target to rationally design live attenuated vaccines for hMPV and perhaps other paramyxoviruses, such as hRSV and hPIV3. IMPORTANCE Human paramyxoviruses, including hRSV, hMPV, and hPIV3, cause the majority of acute upper and lower respiratory tract infections in humans, particularly in infants, children, the elderly, and immunocompromised individuals. Currently, there is no licensed vaccine available. A formalin-inactivated vaccine is not suitable for these viruses because it causes enhanced lung damage upon reinfection with the same virus. A live attenuated vaccine

  6. Live Attenuated Francisella novicida Vaccine Protects against Francisella tularensis Pulmonary Challenge in Rats and Non-human Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Ping; Cunningham, Aimee L.; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Nguyen, Jesse Q.; Barker, Jeffrey R.; Lyons, C. Rick; Wilder, Julie; Valderas, Michelle; Sherwood, Robert L.; Arulanandam, Bernard P.; Klose, Karl E.

    2014-01-01

    Francisella tularensis causes the disease tularemia. Human pulmonary exposure to the most virulent form, F. tularensis subsp. tularensis (Ftt), leads to high morbidity and mortality, resulting in this bacterium being classified as a potential biothreat agent. However, a closely-related species, F. novicida, is avirulent in healthy humans. No tularemia vaccine is currently approved for human use. We demonstrate that a single dose vaccine of a live attenuated F. novicida strain (Fn iglD) protects against subsequent pulmonary challenge with Ftt using two different animal models, Fischer 344 rats and cynomolgus macaques (NHP). The Fn iglD vaccine showed protective efficacy in rats, as did a Ftt iglD vaccine, suggesting no disadvantage to utilizing the low human virulent Francisella species to induce protective immunity. Comparison of specific antibody profiles in vaccinated rat and NHP sera by proteome array identified a core set of immunodominant antigens in vaccinated animals. This is the first report of a defined live attenuated vaccine that demonstrates efficacy against pulmonary tularemia in a NHP, and indicates that the low human virulence F. novicida functions as an effective tularemia vaccine platform. PMID:25340543

  7. Live attenuated Francisella novicida vaccine protects against Francisella tularensis pulmonary challenge in rats and non-human primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Chu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis causes the disease tularemia. Human pulmonary exposure to the most virulent form, F. tularensis subsp. tularensis (Ftt, leads to high morbidity and mortality, resulting in this bacterium being classified as a potential biothreat agent. However, a closely-related species, F. novicida, is avirulent in healthy humans. No tularemia vaccine is currently approved for human use. We demonstrate that a single dose vaccine of a live attenuated F. novicida strain (Fn iglD protects against subsequent pulmonary challenge with Ftt using two different animal models, Fischer 344 rats and cynomolgus macaques (NHP. The Fn iglD vaccine showed protective efficacy in rats, as did a Ftt iglD vaccine, suggesting no disadvantage to utilizing the low human virulent Francisella species to induce protective immunity. Comparison of specific antibody profiles in vaccinated rat and NHP sera by proteome array identified a core set of immunodominant antigens in vaccinated animals. This is the first report of a defined live attenuated vaccine that demonstrates efficacy against pulmonary tularemia in a NHP, and indicates that the low human virulence F. novicida functions as an effective tularemia vaccine platform.

  8. Interleukin 17A evoked mucosal damage is attenuated by cannabidiol and anandamide in a human colonic explant model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, B S; Sia, T C; Wattchow, D A; Smid, S D

    2014-02-01

    Interleukin 17A (IL-17A) is a cytokine linked to inflammatory bowel disease. We investigated IL-17A expression in human colonic mucosa, whether IL-17A can elicit colonic mucosal damage in a human explant model and modulate gastrointestinal epithelial permeability in cell culture. We also tested if select cannabinoid ligands, shown to be protective in colitis models could attenuate damage caused by IL-17A. In addition, the ability of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β to modulate levels of IL-17A in the explant colitis model was also explored. IL-17A incubation caused significant mucosal epithelial and crypt damage which were attenuated following hydrocortisone treatment, and also reduced following anandamide or cannabidiol incubation. IL-17A-evoked mucosal damage was also associated with an increase in matrix metalloprotease activity. However, IL-17A did not induce any significant changes in epithelial permeability in confluent Caco-2 cell monolayers over a 48h incubation period. IL-17A was located predominantly in human mucosal epithelium together with IL-17C, but both IL-17A and IL-17C were also expressed in the lamina propria and submucosa. Incubation of human colonic mucosal tissue or Caco-2 cells with pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β however did not alter IL-17A expression. These results indicate IL-17A has a widespread distribution in the human colon and the capacity to elicit mucosal damage which can be attenuated by cannabinoid ligands. PMID:24238999

  9. Activation and Genetic Modification of Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells using Attenuated Salmonella typhimurium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Michael

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Live attenuated bacterial vectors, such as Salmonella typhimurium, have shown promise as delivery vehicles for DNA. We have examined two new strains of S. typhimurium and their impact on dendritic cell maturation (CD12-sifA/aroC mutant and WT05-ssaV/aroC, both in TML background. Strain WT05 matured dendritic cells in a more efficient way; caused higher release of cytokines TNF-α, IL-12, IL-1β; and was efficient for gene transfer. These findings suggest that the genetic background of the attenuation can influence the pattern of inflammatory immune response to Salmonella infection.

  10. Voluntary activation of the sympathetic nervous system and attenuation of the innate immune response in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kox, M.; Eijk, L.T.G.J. van; Zwaag, J.; Wildenberg, J. van den; Sweep, F.C.; Hoeven, J.G. van der; Pickkers, P.

    2014-01-01

    Excessive or persistent proinflammatory cytokine production plays a central role in autoimmune diseases. Acute activation of the sympathetic nervous system attenuates the innate immune response. However, both the autonomic nervous system and innate immune system are regarded as systems that cannot b

  11. Identification of the two rotavirus genes determining neutralization specificities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Offit, P.A.; Blavat, G.

    1986-01-01

    Bovine rotavirus NCDV and simian rotavirus SA-11 represent two distinct rotavirus serotypes. A genetic approach was used to determine which viral gene segments segregated with serotype-specific viral neutralization. There were 16 reassortant rotarviruses derived by coinfection of MA-104 cells in vitro with the SA-11 and NCDV strains. The parental origin of reassortant rotavirus double-stranded RNA segments was determined by gene segment mobility in polyacrylamide gels and by hybridization with radioactively labeled parental viral transcripts. The authors found that two rotavirus gene segments found previously to code for outer capsid proteins vp3 and vp7 cosegreated with virus neutralization specificities.

  12. Rotavirus in children with diarrhea in Tripoli, Libya

    OpenAIRE

    Kalaf, Rasha Noori; Elahmer, Omar R.; Zorgani, Abdulaziz A.; Ghenghesh, Khalifa Sifaw

    2011-01-01

    The most common cause of acute diarrhea in young children in developed and developing countries are rotaviruses. In developing countries, it is estimated that 20-70% of hospitalizations and close to one million children below the age of five die annually because of rotavirus infections. Of the seven groups (A-G) of rotaviruses, group A is usually the cause of rotavirus-associated diarrhea. Infections due to rotaviruses occur via the fecal-oral route. Previous studies from Libya showed that ro...

  13. Conquering rotavirus: from discovery to global vaccine implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bines, Julie E; Kirkwood, Carl D

    2015-01-01

    Rotavirus, the commonest cause of severe dehydrating gastroenteritis world-wide, was discovered less than 50 years ago. It causes about 450,000 deaths per year in children impact on hospital admissions due to rotavirus gastroenteritis and all-cause gastroenteritis and reduce mortality in developing countries. In Australia, there has been a 71% decrease in rotavirus hospitalisations in children 0-5 years of age. From the discovery of rotavirus as the major causative agent for severe gastroenteritis, through vaccine development and vaccine post-marketing surveillance activities, Australian scientists and clinicians have played a significant role in the global effort to reduce the burden of rotavirus infection. PMID:25586843

  14. Field of view extension and truncation correction for MR-based human attenuation correction in simultaneous MR/PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumhagen, Jan O., E-mail: janole.blumhagen@siemens.com; Ladebeck, Ralf; Fenchel, Matthias [Magnetic Resonance, Siemens AG Healthcare Sector, Erlangen 91052 (Germany); Braun, Harald; Quick, Harald H. [Institute of Medical Physics, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen 91052 (Germany); Faul, David [Siemens Medical Solutions, New York, New York 10015 (United States); Scheffler, Klaus [MRC Department, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen 72076, Germany and Department of Biomedical Magnetic Resonance, University Hospital Tübingen, Tübingen 72076 (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: In quantitative PET imaging, it is critical to accurately measure and compensate for the attenuation of the photons absorbed in the tissue. While in PET/CT the linear attenuation coefficients can be easily determined from a low-dose CT-based transmission scan, in whole-body MR/PET the computation of the linear attenuation coefficients is based on the MR data. However, a constraint of the MR-based attenuation correction (AC) is the MR-inherent field-of-view (FoV) limitation due to static magnetic field (B{sub 0}) inhomogeneities and gradient nonlinearities. Therefore, the MR-based human AC map may be truncated or geometrically distorted toward the edges of the FoV and, consequently, the PET reconstruction with MR-based AC may be biased. This is especially of impact laterally where the patient arms rest beside the body and are not fully considered. Methods: A method is proposed to extend the MR FoV by determining an optimal readout gradient field which locally compensates B{sub 0} inhomogeneities and gradient nonlinearities. This technique was used to reduce truncation in AC maps of 12 patients, and the impact on the PET quantification was analyzed and compared to truncated data without applying the FoV extension and additionally to an established approach of PET-based FoV extension. Results: The truncation artifacts in the MR-based AC maps were successfully reduced in all patients, and the mean body volume was thereby increased by 5.4%. In some cases large patient-dependent changes in SUV of up to 30% were observed in individual lesions when compared to the standard truncated attenuation map. Conclusions: The proposed technique successfully extends the MR FoV in MR-based attenuation correction and shows an improvement of PET quantification in whole-body MR/PET hybrid imaging. In comparison to the PET-based completion of the truncated body contour, the proposed method is also applicable to specialized PET tracers with little uptake in the arms and might

  15. Healthy aging attenuates task-related specialization in the human medial temporal lobe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramsøy, Thomas Z.; Liptrot, Matthew George; Skimminge, Arnold Jesper Møller;

    2012-01-01

    whether this greater MTL activation during encoding of objects varies with age. Fifty-four healthy individuals aged between 18 and 81 years underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while they encoded and subsequently made new-old judgments on objects and positions. Region of interest (ROI) analysis......Recent research on aging has established important links between the neurobiology of normal aging and age-related decline in episodic memory, yet the exact nature of this relationship is still unknown. Functional neuroimaging of regions such as the medial temporal lobe (MTL) have produced...... hemisphere were defined as ROIs. Aging had an adverse effect on memory performance that was similar for memorizing objects or positions. In left and right MTL, relatively greater activation for object stimuli was attenuated in older individuals. Age-related attenuation in content specificity was most...

  16. A new technique to characterize CT scanner bow-tie filter attenuation and applications in human cadaver dosimetry simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To present a noninvasive technique for directly measuring the CT bow-tie filter attenuation with a linear array x-ray detector. Methods: A scintillator based x-ray detector of 384 pixels, 307 mm active length, and fast data acquisition (model X-Scan 0.8c4-307, Detection Technology, FI-91100 Ii, Finland) was used to simultaneously detect radiation levels across a scan field-of-view. The sampling time was as short as 0.24 ms. To measure the body bow-tie attenuation on a GE Lightspeed Pro 16 CT scanner, the x-ray tube was parked at the 12 o’clock position, and the detector was centered in the scan field at the isocenter height. Two radiation exposures were made with and without the bow-tie in the beam path. Each readout signal was corrected for the detector background offset and signal-level related nonlinear gain, and the ratio of the two exposures gave the bow-tie attenuation. The results were used in the GEANT4 based simulations of the point doses measured using six thimble chambers placed in a human cadaver with abdomen/pelvis CT scans at 100 or 120 kV, helical pitch at 1.375, constant or variable tube current, and distinct x-ray tube starting angles. Results: Absolute attenuation was measured with the body bow-tie scanned at 80–140 kV. For 24 doses measured in six organs of the cadaver, the median or maximum difference between the simulation results and the measurements on the CT scanner was 8.9% or 25.9%, respectively. Conclusions: The described method allows fast and accurate bow-tie filter characterization

  17. A new technique to characterize CT scanner bow-tie filter attenuation and applications in human cadaver dosimetry simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xinhua; Shi, Jim Q.; Zhang, Da; Singh, Sarabjeet; Padole, Atul; Otrakji, Alexi; Kalra, Mannudeep K.; Liu, Bob, E-mail: bliu7@mgh.harvard.edu [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Xu, X. George [Nuclear Engineering Program, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To present a noninvasive technique for directly measuring the CT bow-tie filter attenuation with a linear array x-ray detector. Methods: A scintillator based x-ray detector of 384 pixels, 307 mm active length, and fast data acquisition (model X-Scan 0.8c4-307, Detection Technology, FI-91100 Ii, Finland) was used to simultaneously detect radiation levels across a scan field-of-view. The sampling time was as short as 0.24 ms. To measure the body bow-tie attenuation on a GE Lightspeed Pro 16 CT scanner, the x-ray tube was parked at the 12 o’clock position, and the detector was centered in the scan field at the isocenter height. Two radiation exposures were made with and without the bow-tie in the beam path. Each readout signal was corrected for the detector background offset and signal-level related nonlinear gain, and the ratio of the two exposures gave the bow-tie attenuation. The results were used in the GEANT4 based simulations of the point doses measured using six thimble chambers placed in a human cadaver with abdomen/pelvis CT scans at 100 or 120 kV, helical pitch at 1.375, constant or variable tube current, and distinct x-ray tube starting angles. Results: Absolute attenuation was measured with the body bow-tie scanned at 80–140 kV. For 24 doses measured in six organs of the cadaver, the median or maximum difference between the simulation results and the measurements on the CT scanner was 8.9% or 25.9%, respectively. Conclusions: The described method allows fast and accurate bow-tie filter characterization.

  18. Rotavirus Antagonism of the Innate Immune Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle M. Arnold

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Rotavirus is a primary cause of severe dehydrating gastroenteritis in infants and young children. The virus is sensitive to the antiviral effects triggered by the interferon (IFN-signaling pathway, an important component of the host cell innate immune response. To counteract these effects, rotavirus encodes a nonstructural protein (NSP1 that induces the degradation of proteins involved in regulating IFN expression, such as members of the IFN regulatory factor (IRF family. In some instances, NSP1 also subverts IFN expression by causing the degradation of a component of the E3 ubiquitin ligase complex responsible for activating NF-κB. By antagonizing multiple components of the IFN-induction pathway, NSP1 aids viral spread and contributes to rotavirus pathogenesis.

  19. Incidence of rotavirus gastroenteritis by age in African, Asian and European children: Relevance for timing of rotavirus vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, A. Duncan; Madhi, Shabir A.; Cunliffe, Nigel A.; Vesikari, Timo; Phua, Kong Boo; Lim, Fong Seng; Nelson, E. Anthony S.; Lau, Yu-Lung; Huang, Li-Min; Karkada, Naveen; Debrus, Serge; Han, Htay Htay; Benninghoff, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Variability in rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) epidemiology can influence the optimal vaccination schedule. We evaluated regional trends in the age of RVGE episodes in low- to middle- versus high-income countries in three continents. We undertook a post-hoc analysis based on efficacy trials of a human rotavirus vaccine (HRV; Rotarix™, GSK Vaccines), in which 1348, 1641, and 5250 healthy infants received a placebo in Europe (NCT00140686), Africa (NCT00241644), and Asia (NCT00197210, NCT00329745). Incidence of any/severe RVGE by age at onset was evaluated by active surveillance over the first two years of life. Severity of RVGE episodes was assessed using the Vesikari-scale. The incidence of any RVGE in Africa was higher than in Europe during the first year of life (≤2.78% vs. ≤2.03% per month), but much lower during the second one (≤0.86% versus ≤2.00% per month). The incidence of severe RVGE in Africa was slightly lower than in Europe during the first year of life. Nevertheless, temporal profiles for the incidence of severe RVGE in Africa and Europe during the first (≤1.00% and ≤1.23% per month) and second (≤0.53% and ≤1.13% per month) years of life were similar to those of any RVGE. Any/severe RVGE incidences peaked at younger ages in Africa vs. Europe. In high-income Asian regions, severe RVGE incidence (≤0.31% per month) remained low during the study. The burden of any RVGE was higher earlier in life in children from low- to middle- compared with high-income countries. Differing rotavirus vaccine schedules are likely warranted to maximize protection in different settings. PMID:27260009

  20. Molecular characterization of group A rotavirus isolates obtained from hospitalized children in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil

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    Karina Serravalle

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Rotavirus is a major cause of infectious diarrhea in infants and young children. The objective of this study was to characterize the genotypes of Human Rotavirus found in children hospitalized with acute diarrhea in the Pediatric Hospital Prof. Hosannah de Oliveira of the UFBA in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil, during the years of 1999, 2000 and 2002. Fecal samples were analyzed (n=358 by methods EIARA and SDS-PAGE for detection of Rotavirus. Positive samples of one or two of these methods (n=168 were submitted to RT-PCR and Multiplex-Nested PCR to determine genotypes G and P. A hundred sixty-eight (46.9% samples were positive and 190 (53.1% negative. Only 17 (4.7% samples had divergent results. The distribution of genotypes G during the first year, showed that the genotype G9 was present in 96,8% of the analyzed samples, in the second year, it was responsible for 96% and in the third year, 88,1%. The characterization of genotypes P demonstrated that the genotype P1A[8] was the most outstanding in all years. In this study we discuss the benefit to control the genotypes of Rotavirus through the molecular characterization for the development of potential vaccines.

  1. Rotavirus vaccines: targeting the developing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Roger I; Bresee, Joseph S; Turcios, Reina; Fischer, Thea K; Parashar, Umesh D; Steele, A Duncan

    2005-09-01

    For the past 2 decades, rotavirus infection, the most common cause of severe diarrhea in children, has been a priority target for vaccine development. This decision to develop rotavirus vaccines is predicated on the great burden associated with fatal rotavirus disease (i.e., 440,000 deaths/year), the firm scientific basis for developing live oral vaccines, the belief that increased investment in development at this time could speed the introduction of vaccines in developing countries, and the appreciation that implementation of a vaccine program should result in a measurable decrease in the number of hospitalizations and deaths associated with rotavirus disease within 2-3 years. RotaShield (Wyeth-Ayerst), the first rotavirus vaccine licensed in the United States, was withdrawn after 9 months because of a rare association of the vaccine with the development of intussusception. In the developing world, this vaccine could still have had a measurable effect, because the benefits of preventing deaths due to rotavirus disease would have been substantially greater than the rare risk of intussusception. Two live oral vaccines being prepared by GlaxoSmithKline and Merck have completed large-scale clinical trials. The GlaxoSmithKline vaccine has been licensed in Mexico and the Dominican Republic, and the Merck vaccine could be licensed in the United States within 1 year; several other candidate vaccines are in earlier stages of testing. However, many challenges remain before any of these vaccines can be incorporated into childhood immunization programs in the developing world. First, vaccine efficacy, which has already been demonstrated in children in industrialized and middle-income countries, needs to be proven in poor developing countries in Africa and Asia. The safety of vaccines with regard to the associated risk of intussusception must be demonstrated as well. Novel financing strategies will be needed to ensure that new vaccines are affordable and available in the

  2. A (p)ppGpp-null mutant of Haemophilus ducreyi is partially attenuated in humans due to multiple conflicting phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holley, Concerta; Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Li, Wei; Fortney, Kate R; Janowicz, Diane M; Ellinger, Sheila; Zwickl, Beth; Katz, Barry P; Spinola, Stanley M

    2014-08-01

    (p)ppGpp responds to nutrient limitation through a global change in gene regulation patterns to increase survival. The stringent response has been implicated in the virulence of several pathogenic bacterial species. Haemophilus ducreyi, the causative agent of chancroid, has homologs of both relA and spoT, which primarily synthesize and hydrolyze (p)ppGpp in Escherichia coli. We constructed relA and relA spoT deletion mutants to assess the contribution of (p)ppGpp to H. ducreyi pathogenesis. Both the relA single mutant and the relA spoT double mutant failed to synthesize (p)ppGpp, suggesting that relA is the primary synthetase of (p)ppGpp in H. ducreyi. Compared to the parent strain, the double mutant was partially attenuated for pustule formation in human volunteers. The double mutant had several phenotypes that favored attenuation, including increased sensitivity to oxidative stress. The increased sensitivity to oxidative stress could be complemented in trans. However, the double mutant also exhibited phenotypes that favored virulence. When grown to the mid-log phase, the double mutant was significantly more resistant than its parent to being taken up by human macrophages and exhibited increased transcription of lspB, which is involved in resistance to phagocytosis. Additionally, compared to the parent, the double mutant also exhibited prolonged survival in the stationary phase. In E. coli, overexpression of DksA compensates for the loss of (p)ppGpp; the H. ducreyi double mutant expressed higher transcript levels of dksA than the parent strain. These data suggest that the partial attenuation of the double mutant is likely the net result of multiple conflicting phenotypes.

  3. Protective effect of Lactobacillus acidophilus on intestinal mucosa of neonatal mice infected with a human rotavirus%嗜酸乳杆菌对感染人轮状病毒乳鼠肠黏膜的保护作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高源; 张振; 王宝香; 鲍连生; 彭罕鸣

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the possible protective effect of Lactobacillus addophilus (L.acidophilus) on intestinal mucosa of neonatal mice infected with a human rotavirus (HRV).METHODS: Sixty 4-day-old Kunming mice were randomly and equally divided into control group, HRV-infected group, L.acidophilus-pretreated group (treated before HRV infection) and L.acidophilus-tieated group (treated after HRV infection). The symptoms in these micewere observed each day for 8 d. On day 8, nine mice of each group were sacrificed by cervical dislocation. Caecum samples were taken for bacterial isolation and culture to count bacterial colonies. Secretory IgA (sIgA) from the intestinal mucosa and serum interferon-y (IFN-y) and tumor necrosis factors-a (TNF-a) were detected by ELISA. The thickness of intestinal mucosa, height of villus and depth of crypt were measured using Image-Pro Plus 5.1 software.RESULTS: The mice in the normal control group did not suffer from diarrhea, whereas the HRV-infected group showed altered intestinal flora, decreased level of intestinal sIgA, increased serum IFN-y and TNF-a levels, and damaged intestinal mucosal barrier. Compared to the HRV-infected group, mice of the L.acidophilus-pretreated and -treated groups showed some amelioration in intestinal flora, intestinal sIgA, serum IFN-γ and TNF-a, and intestinal mucosal barrier. More obvious protective effect on intestinal mucosa was observed in the pretreatment group than in the treatment group.CONCLUSION: L.acidophilus possesses protective effect on intestinal mucosa of HRV-infected neonatal mice. Pretreatment with L.acidophilus has better protective effect than L.acidophilus treatment.%目的:观察嗜酸乳杆菌(L..acidophilus)对感染人轮状病毒(human rotavirus,HRV)乳鼠肠黏膜的保护作用.方法:将60只昆明种乳鼠随母鼠按窝随机均分为4组,给4日龄的乳鼠灌服HRV作为感染组,灌服HRV的前和后灌服L.acidophilus作为预防组和治疗组,正

  4. Molecular characterization of rotavirus isolates from select Canadian pediatric hospitals

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    McDermid Andrew

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We report the first multi-site rotavirus genotype analysis in Canada. Prior to this study, there was a dearth of rotavirus G and P genotyping data in Canada. Publically funded universal rotavirus vaccination in Canada started in 2011 and has been introduced by four provinces to date. Uptake of rotavirus vaccines in Canada prior to 2012 has been very limited. The aim of this study was to describe the genotypes of rotavirus strains circulating in Canada prior to widespread implementation of rotavirus vaccine by genotyping samples collected from selected paediatric hospitals. Secondly we identified rotavirus strains that differed genetically from those included in the vaccines and which could affect vaccine effectiveness. Methods Stool specimens were collected by opportunity sampling of children with gastroenteritis who presented to emergency departments. Samples were genotyped for G (VP7 genotypes and P (VP4 genotypes by hemi-nested multiplex PCR methods. Phylogenetic analysis was carried out on Canadian G9 strains to investigate their relationship to G9 strains that have circulated in other regions of the world. Results 348 samples were collected, of which 259 samples were rotavirus positive and genotyped. There were 34 rotavirus antigen immunoassay negative samples genotyped using PCR-based methods. Over the four rotavirus seasons, 174 samples were G1P[8], 45 were G3P[8], 22 were G2P[4], 13 were G9P[8], 3 were G4P[8] and 2 were G9P[4]. Sequence analysis showed that all Canadian G9 isolates are within lineage III. Conclusions Although a limited number of samples were obtained from a median of 4 centres during the 4 years of the study, it appears that currently approved rotavirus vaccines are well matched to the rotavirus genotypes identified at these hospitals. Further surveillance to monitor the emergence of rotavirus genotypes in Canada is warranted.

  5. Mutation distribution in the NSP4 protein in rotaviruses isolated from Mexican children with moderate to severe gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Ochoa, Guadalupe; Menchaca, Griselda E; Hernández, Carlos E; Rodríguez, Cristina; Tamez, Reyes S; Contreras, Juan F

    2013-03-11

    The NSP4 protein is a multifunctional protein that plays a role in the morphogenesis and pathogenesis of the rotavirus. Although NSP4 is considered an enterotoxin, the relationship between gastroenteritis severity and amino acid variations in NSP4 of the human rotavirus remains unclear. In this study, we analyzed the sequence diversity of NSP4 and the severity of gastroenteritis of children with moderate to severe gastroenteritis. The rotavirus-infected children were hospitalized before the rotavirus vaccine program in Mexico. All children had diarrhea within 1-4 days, 44 (88%) were vomiting and 35 (70%) had fevers. The severity analysis showed that 13 (26%) cases had mild gastroenteritis, 23 (46%) moderate gastroenteritis and 14 (28%) severe. NSP4 phylogenetic analysis showed three clusters within the genotype E1. Sequence analysis revealed similar mutations inside each cluster, and an uncommon variation in residue 144 was found in five of the Mexican NSP4 sequences. Most of the amino acid variations were located in the VP4 and VP6 binding site domains, with no relationship to different grades of gastroenteritis. This finding indicates that severe gastroenteritis caused by the rotavirus appears to be related to diverse viral or cellular factors instead of NSP4 activity as a unique pathogenic factor.

  6. Mutation Distribution in the NSP4 Protein in Rotaviruses Isolated from Mexican Children with Moderate to Severe Gastroenteritis

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    Juan F. Contreras

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The NSP4 protein is a multifunctional protein that plays a role in the morphogenesis and pathogenesis of the rotavirus. Although NSP4 is considered an enterotoxin, the relationship between gastroenteritis severity and amino acid variations in NSP4 of the human rotavirus remains unclear. In this study, we analyzed the sequence diversity of NSP4 and the severity of gastroenteritis of children with moderate to severe gastroenteritis. The rotavirus-infected children were hospitalized before the rotavirus vaccine program in Mexico. All children had diarrhea within 1-4 days, 44 (88% were vomiting and 35 (70% had fevers. The severity analysis showed that 13 (26% cases had mild gastroenteritis, 23 (46% moderate gastroenteritis and 14 (28% severe. NSP4 phylogenetic analysis showed three clusters within the genotype E1. Sequence analysis revealed similar mutations inside each cluster, and an uncommon variation in residue 144 was found in five of the Mexican NSP4 sequences. Most of the amino acid variations were located in the VP4 and VP6 binding site domains, with no relationship to different grades of gastroenteritis. This finding indicates that severe gastroenteritis caused by the rotavirus appears to be related to diverse viral or cellular factors instead of NSP4 activity as a unique pathogenic factor.

  7. Nicotinamide attenuates aquaporin 3 overexpression induced by retinoic acid through inhibition of EGFR/ERK in cultured human skin keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiuzu; Xu, Aie; Pan, Wei; Wallin, Brittany; Kivlin, Rebecca; Lu, Shan; Cao, Cong; Bi, Zhigang; Wan, Yinsheng

    2008-08-01

    The most common adverse effects that are related to all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) treatment are irritation and dryness of the skin. atRA therapy is reported to impair barrier function as achieved by trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL). Treatment with nicotinamide prior to initiation of atRA therapy provides additional barrier protection and thus reduces susceptibility of retinoic acid. Our previous studies showed that atRA upregulates aquaporin 3 (AQP3) in cultured human skin keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Others have demonstrated that in atopic dermatitis, overexpression of AQP3 is linked to elevated TEWL and that nicotinamide treatment reduces skin TEWL. In this study, we observed that while atRA upregulates AQP3 expression in cultured human skin keratinocytes (HaCaT cells), nicotinamide attenuates the effect of atRA in a concentration-dependent manner. atRA treatment induces EGFR and ERK activation. PD153035, an EGFR inhibitor, and U0126, an ERK inhibitor, inhibit atRA-induced upregulation of AQP3. Nicotinamide also inhibits atRA-induced activation of EGFR/ERK signal transduction and decreases water permeability by downregulating AQP3 expression. Collectively, our results indicate that the effect of atRA on AQP3 expression is at least partly mediated by EGFR/ERK signaling in cultured human skin keratinocytes. Nicotinamide attenuates atRA-induced AQP3 expression through inhibition of EGFR/ERK signal transduction and eventually decreases water permeability and water loss. Our study provides insights into the molecular mechanism through which nicotinamide reverses the side effects of dryness in human skin after treatment with atRA.

  8. Pronóstico de la diarrea por rotavirus Prognosis of rotavirus diarrhea

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    Felipe Mota-Hernández

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Comparar la gravedad de la diarrea por rotavirus (RV y por no rotavirus. Material y métodos. Estudio transversal en 520 lactantes con diarrea aguda, efectuado entre octubre de 1994 y marzo de 1995 en siete centros del primer nivel de atención en cinco estados de México. El diagnóstico de RV se realizó con ensayo inmunoenzimático o por electroforesis. El análisis se hizo a través de medidas de tendencia central. Los resultados se presentan como promedio y desviación estándar o mediana o variación. Resultados. Se aisló RV en 264 lactantes (50.7% con predominio en varones de 6 meses a un año. Las manifestaciones clínicas fueron significativamente diferentes entre el grupo rotavirus positivo y el grupo rotavirus negativo en mediana de evacuaciones por 24 horas, frecuencia de vómitos, temperatura > 38° C, deshidratación y calificación de gravedad, respectivamente. Conclusiones. Estos resultados mostraron peor pronóstico por mayor gravedad de la diarrea por RV en lactantes, con relación a otra etiología. El texto completo en inglés de este artículo está disponible en: http://www.insp.mx/salud/index.htmlObjective. To compare the severity of rotavirus diarrhea (RV and non-rotavirus diarrhea. Material and Methods. Between October 1994 and March 1995, a cross-sectional study was performed in 520 infants with acute diarrhea, at seven primary care level centers in five states of Mexico. Diagnosis of RV was done through immunoenzymatic assay or electrophoresis. Central tendency measures were used for data analysis. Results were presented as means and standard deviations, or median and variation. Results. RV was isolated from 264 children; most of them were males aged 6 months to 1 year. Differences in clinical manifestations were statistically significant between the rotavirus-positive group and the rotavirus-negative group, in the following variables: median number of stools/24 hours; frequency of vomiting; temperature > 38

  9. Identification of an avian group A rotavirus containing a novel VP4 gene with a close relationship to those of mammalian rotaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojnar, Eva; Sachsenröder, Jana; Twardziok, Sven; Reetz, Jochen; Otto, Peter H; Johne, Reimar

    2013-01-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVAs) are an important cause of diarrhoeal illness in humans, as well as in mammalian and avian animal species. Previous sequence analyses indicated that avian RVAs are related only distantly to mammalian RVAs. Here, the complete genomes of RVA strain 03V0002E10 from turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) and RVA strain 10V0112H5 from pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) were analysed using a combination of 454 deep sequencing and Sanger sequencing technologies. An adenine-rich insertion similar to that found in the chicken RVA strain 02V0002G3, but considerably shorter, was found in the 3' NCR of the NSP1 gene of the pheasant strain. Most genome segments of both strains were related closely to those of avian RVAs. The novel genotype N10 was assigned to the NSP2 gene of the pheasant RVA, which is related most closely to genotype N6 found in avian RVAs. However, this virus contains a VP4 gene of the novel genotype P[37], which is related most closely to RVAs from pigs, dogs and humans. This strain either may represent an avian/mammalian rotavirus reassortant, or it carries an unusual avian rotavirus VP4 gene, thereby broadening the potential genetic and antigenic variability among RVAs. PMID:23052396

  10. Rotavirus infection in children: clinical and laboratory features and catamnesis

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    Mikhailova E.V.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose is to study the clinical, laboratory and instrumental characteristics of the course of rotavirus infection in children up to 3 years in the acute phase and during the convalescence period. Material and methods. A clinical, laboratory and instrumental examination of 320 children up to 3 years with moderate to severe rotavirus infection. Results. The presence of long-term persistence of rotavirus recovering from rotavirus infection. Identified functional disorders of the digestive system in the acute period and the period of convalescence in children up to 3 years with rotavirus infection. Conclusion. For a long period (up to 3 months, almost half of patients may experience intestinal dysfunction, possibly related to the long-term persistence of rotavirus.

  11. Incidence and cost of rotavirus hospitalizations in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Thea Kølsen; Nielsen, Nete Munk; Wohlfahrt, Jan;

    2007-01-01

    In anticipation of licensure and introduction of rotavirus vaccine into the western market, we used modeling of national hospital registry data to determine the incidence and direct medical costs of annual rotavirus-associated admissions over >11 years in Denmark. Diarrhea-associated hospitalizat......In anticipation of licensure and introduction of rotavirus vaccine into the western market, we used modeling of national hospital registry data to determine the incidence and direct medical costs of annual rotavirus-associated admissions over >11 years in Denmark. Diarrhea......-associated hospitalizations coded as nonspecified viral or presumed infectious have demonstrated a marked winter peak similar to that of rotavirus-associated hospitalizations, which suggests that the registered rotavirus-coded admissions are grossly underestimated. We therefore obtained more realistic estimates by 2...... different models, which indicated 2.4 and 2.5 (for children costs of US $1.7-1.8 million per year. Using 2 simple...

  12. Genotypification of bovine group A rotavirus in México.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Limas, William A; Flores-Samaniego, Beatriz; de la Mora, Germán; Ramírez, Octavio T; Palomares, Laura A

    2009-10-30

    Bovine scours, frequently provoked by rotavirus infection, causes significant economic losses. Nevertheless, no information exists about the bovine rotavirus genotypes present in Mexico. This information is necessary for designing efficient vaccines. In this work, 128 samples from diarrheic calves were collected between 2005 and 2006 in 26 dairy and/or beef cattle herds located in 10 regions of Mexico, and analyzed for the presence of group A rotavirus. G and P genotypes were determined by PCR in rotavirus-positive samples (12/128). Three different genotype combinations were found, G10, P[11]; G6, P[5]; and G10, P[5]; in 67, 25 and 8% of the positive samples, respectively. Some rotavirus-positive animals had been vaccinated with an inactivated rotavirus strain of a different genotype.

  13. Analysis of human rotavirus G1P[8] strains by RFLP reveals higher genetic drift in the VP7 than the VP4 gene during a 4-year period in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Castillo, Araceli; Ramírez-González, José Ernesto; Padilla-Noriega, Luis; Barrón, Blanca Lilia

    2006-12-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that rotaviruses of the G1P[8] genotype are among the most important worldwide. Sequence analysis of G1P[8] strains has revealed high genetic variability of VP4 and VP7 genes. The aim of this study was to investigate by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis the genetic variability of the VP7 and VP4 genes within rotaviruses of the G1P[8] genotype. A total of 60 rotavirus-positive fecal samples genotyped as G1P[8], were collected from children with acute diarrhea under 5 years of age, between October 1995 and October 1998. The VP7 and VP4 genes were amplified by RT/PCR, using the Beg9/End9 primer pair and the Con3 and Con2 primers, respectively. VP7 amplicons were digested with three restriction enzymes Hae III, Taq I and Rsa I in separate reactions and VP4 amplicons were digested similarly with endonucleases Hinf I, Sau96 I and Rsa I. Analysis of the digested VP7 and VP4 amplicons showed a higher genetic drift for the VP7 gene (18 RFLPs) compared to the VP4 gene (9 RFLPs). The combination of profiles for both VP7 and VP4 amplicons, showed 27 different patterns, none of them similar to the Wa-1 strain. Furthermore, RFLP analysis of these G1P[8] strains, clearly differentiated the viruses into two main clusters, both of them sharing the same restriction pattern for the VP4 gene, and a different one for the VP7 gene.

  14. Elevation of iron storage in humans attenuates the pulmonary vascular response to hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bart, Nicole K; Curtis, M Kate; Cheng, Hung-Yuan; Hungerford, Sara L; McLaren, Ross; Petousi, Nayia; Dorrington, Keith L; Robbins, Peter A

    2016-08-01

    Sustained hypoxia over several hours induces a progressive rise in pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP). Administration of intravenous iron immediately prior to the hypoxia exposure abrogates this effect, suggesting that manipulation of iron stores may modify hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. Iron (ferric carboxymaltose) administered intravenously has a plasma half-life of 7-12 h. Thus any therapeutic use of intravenous iron would require its effect on PASP to persist long after the iron-sugar complex has been cleared from the blood. To examine this, we studied PASP during sustained (6 h) hypoxia on 4 separate days (days 0, 1, 8, and 43) in 22 participants. On day 0, the rise in PASP with hypoxia was well matched between the iron and saline groups. On day 1, each participant received either 1 g of ferric carboxymaltose or saline in a double-blind manner. After administration of intravenous iron, the rise in PASP with hypoxia was attenuated by ∼50%, and this response remained suppressed on both days 8 and 43 (P < 0.001). Following administration of intravenous iron, values for ferritin concentration, transferrin saturation, and hepcidin concentration rose significantly (P < 0.001, P < 0.005, and P < 0.001, respectively), and values for transferrin concentration fell significantly (P < 0.001). These changes remained significant at day 43 We conclude that the attenuation of the pulmonary vascular response to hypoxia by elevation of iron stores persists long after the artificial iron-sugar complex has been eliminated from the blood. The persistence of this effect suggests that intravenous iron may be of benefit in some forms of pulmonary hypertension.

  15. The effectiveness of rotavirus vaccine in preventing acute gastroenteritis during rotavirus seasons among Polish children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieltyka, Agnieszka; Majewska, Renata; Augustyniak, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Rotavirus is the main etiological cause of intestinal infections in children. Voluntary rotavirus vaccines were included in the Polish vaccination schedule in 2007. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a completed rotavirus vaccination course in preventing acute gastroenteritis in Polish infants during their first five years of life. Material and methods This was a retrospective cohort study conducted in Lesser Poland (Malopolska Province). The sample population included a group of 303 children who received the completed rotavirus vaccination course and 303 children not vaccinated against rotavirus. The date of the child's acute gastroenteritis diagnosis and his or her vaccination history were extracted from the physicians’ records. Each kind of diagnosed acute gastroenteritis during winter-spring rotavirus seasons was treated as the endpoint. The relative risk of having gastrointestinal infection was assessed using the hazard ratio from the Cox proportional hazards regression model. Results In the examined group, 96 (15.8%) children had winter-spring gastrointestinal infections. In the non-vaccinated children, the cumulative incidence of these infections in the first 5 years of life was 20.8%, whereas in the children vaccinated with Rotarix it was only 10.9%. Those who were vaccinated with Rotarix had a 44% reduction in the risk of a winter-spring acute gastroenteritis infection compared to those not vaccinated with Rotarix (p = 0.005). Birth weight less than 2500 g increased the risk of the infection twofold and also reached statistical significance (p = 0.044). Conclusions The results showed that Rotarix is effective in preventing acute gastroenteritis in Polish children during rotavirus seasons. PMID:27279856

  16. Lycopene attenuates Aβ1-42 secretion and its toxicity in human cell and Caenorhabditis elegans models of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Mao, Liuqun; Xing, Huanhuan; Xu, Lei; Fu, Xiang; Huang, Liyingzi; Huang, Dongling; Pu, Zhijun; Li, Qinghua

    2015-11-01

    Growing evidence suggests concentration of lycopene was reduced in plasma of patients with Alzheimer disease (AD). Lycopene, a member of the carotenoid family, has been identified as an antioxidant to attenuate oxidative damage and has neuroprotective role in several AD models. However, whether lycopene is involved in the pathogenesis of AD and molecular underpinnings are elusive. In this study, we found that lycopene can significantly delay paralysis in the Aβ1-42-transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans strain GMC101. Lycopene treatment reduced Aβ1-42 secretion in SH-SY5Y cells overexpressing the Swedish mutant form of human β-amyloid precursor protein (APPsw). Next, we found lycopene can down-regulate expression level of β-amyloid precursor protein(APP) in APPsw cells. Moreover, lycopene treatment can not change endogenous reactive oxygen species level and apoptosis in APPsw cells. However, lycopene treatment protected against H2O2-induced oxidative stress and copper-induced damage in APPsw cells. Collectively, our data support that elevated lycopene contributes to the lower pathogenesis of AD. Our findings suggest that increasing lycopene in neurons may be a novel approach to attenuate onset and development of AD.

  17. The presence of a dog attenuates cortisol and heart rate in the Trier Social Stress Test compared to human friends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polheber, John P; Matchock, Robert L

    2014-10-01

    Limited research has addressed how social support in the form of a pet can affect both sympathetic and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal reactivity in response to a psychological challenge. The present study examined the effects of social support on salivary cortisol and heart rate (HR). Forty-eight participants were randomly assigned to three different conditions (human friend, novel dog, or control). All participants completed the Trier Social Stress Test and provided cortisol, HR, and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory measures. For participants paired with a dog, overall cortisol levels were attenuated throughout the experimental procedure, and HR was attenuated during the Trier Social Stress Test. For all groups, state anxiety increased after the Trier Social Stress Test, and HR during the Trier Social Stress Test was a predictor of cortisol. These results suggest that short-term exposure to a novel dog in an unfamiliar setting can be beneficial. They also suggest a possible mechanism for the beneficial effect associated with affiliation with pets. PMID:24170391

  18. WHO working group on the quality, safety and efficacy of japanese encephalitis vaccines (live attenuated) for human use, Bangkok, Thailand, 21-23 February 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, Dennis W; Minor, Philip; Jivapaisarnpong, Teeranart; Shin, Jinho

    2013-11-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is one of the most important viral encephalitides in Asia. Two live-attenuated vaccines have been developed and licensed for use in countries in the region. Given the advancement of immunization of humans with increasing use of live-attenuated vaccines to prevent JE, there is increased interest to define quality standards for their manufacture, testing, nonclinical studies, and clinical studies to assess their efficacy and safety in humans. To this end, WHO convened a meeting with a group of international experts in February 2012 to develop guidelines for evaluating the quality, safety and efficacy of live-attenuated JE virus vaccines for prevention of human disease. This report summarizes collective views of the participants on scientific and technical issues that need to be considered in the guidelines.

  19. Demographic Variability, Vaccination, and the Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Rotavirus Epidemics

    OpenAIRE

    Pitzer, Virginia E.; Viboud, Cécile; Simonsen, Lone; Steiner, Claudia; Panozzo, Catherine A.; Alonso, Wladimir J.; Miller, Mark A.; Glass, Roger I.; Glasser, John W.; Parashar, Umesh D.; Grenfell, Bryan T.

    2009-01-01

    Historically, annual rotavirus activity in the United States has started in the southwest in late fall and ended in the northeast 3 months later; this trend has diminished in recent years. Traveling waves of infection or local environmental drivers cannot account for these patterns. A transmission model calibrated against epidemiological data shows that spatiotemporal variation in birth rate can explain the timing of rotavirus epidemics. The recent large-scale introduction of rotavirus vaccin...

  20. Circulating rotaviral RNA in children with rotavirus antigenemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Kamruddin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rotavirus antigenemia is a common phenomenon in children with rotavirus diarrhea, but information is scarce on aspects of this phenomenon, such as genotype specificity, presence of intact viruses and correlation between genomic RNA and antigen concentration. Such information may help in understanding rotavirus pathogenesis and eventually be useful for diagnosis, treatment and prevention. Methods and findings Serum samples were collected from children who presented at hospitals with diarrhea. Antigenemia was present in 162/250 (64.8% samples from children with rotavirus diarrhea. No specific rotavirus genotype was found to be associated with antigenemia. Rotavirus particles could not be found by electron microscopy in concentrated serum from children with high levels of antigenemia. In passaged rotavirus suspension a significant correlation (r = 0.9559; P = 0.0029 was found between antigen level and viral copy number, but no significant correlation (r = 0.001480; P = 0.9919 was found between antigenemia level and viral copy number in serum. When intact rotavirus was treated with benzonase endonuclease, genomic double-stranded (ds RNA was not degraded, but when sera of patients with antigenemia were treated with benzonase endonuclease, genomic dsRNA was degraded, indicating genomic dsRNA was free in sera and not inside virus capsid protein. Conclusions Antigenemia is present in a significant number of patients with rotavirus diarrhea. Rotavirus viremia was absent in the children with rotavirus diarrhea who participated in our study, and was not indicated by the presence of antigenemia. The significance of circulating rotavirus antigen and genomic dsRNA in serum of patients with diarrhea deserves further study.

  1. Mucosal Immunity and acute viral gastroenteritis: The example rotavirus

    OpenAIRE

    Rose, Markus A

    2014-01-01

    Acute gastroenteritis is a major killer of the very young worldwide. Rotavirus is the most common intestinal virus, causing acute gastroenteritis and extra-intestinal complications especially in young and chronically ill subjects. As early as 1991, the WHO recommended as high priority the development of a vaccine against rotavirus, the major pathogen causing enteric infections. Since the introduction of rotavirus vaccines for infant immunization programmes in different parts of the world in 2...

  2. Macrophage-stimulating protein attenuates gentamicin-induced inflammation and apoptosis in human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ko Eun [Department of Internal Medicine, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju 501-757 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun Young [Department of Physiology, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju 501-757 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chang Seong; Choi, Joon Seok; Bae, Eun Hui; Ma, Seong Kwon [Department of Internal Medicine, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju 501-757 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyung Keun [Department of Pharmacology, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju 501-757 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Un [Department of Physiology, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju 501-757 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Soo Wan, E-mail: skimw@chonnam.ac.kr [Department of Internal Medicine, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju 501-757 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •MSP/RON system is activated in rat kidney damaged by gentamicin. •MSP inhibits GM-induced cellular apoptosis and inflammation in HK-2 cells. •MSP attenuates GM-induced activation of MAPKs and NF-κB pathways in HK-2 cells. -- Abstract: The present study aimed to investigate whether macrophage-stimulating protein (MSP) treatment attenuates renal apoptosis and inflammation in gentamicin (GM)-induced tubule injury and its underlying molecular mechanisms. To examine changes in MSP and its receptor, recepteur d’origine nantais (RON) in GM-induced nephropathy, rats were injected with GM for 7 days. Human renal proximal tubular epithelial (HK-2) cells were incubated with GM for 24 h in the presence of different concentrations of MSP and cell viability was measured by MTT assay. Apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry of cells stained with fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated annexin V protein and propidium iodide. Expression of Bcl-2, Bax, caspase-3, cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), IκB-α, and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) was analyzed by semiquantitative immunoblotting. MSP and RON expression was significantly greater in GM-treated rats, than in untreated controls. GM-treatment reduced HK-2 cell viability, an effect that was counteracted by MSP. Flow cytometry and DAPI staining revealed GM-induced apoptosis was prevented by MSP. GM reduced expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and induced expression of Bax and cleaved caspase 3; these effects and GM-induced expression of COX-2 and iNOS were also attenuated by MSP. GM caused MSP-reversible induction of phospho-ERK, phospho-JNK, and phospho-p38. GM induced NF-κB activation and degradation of IκB-α; the increase in nuclear NF-κB was blocked by inhibitors of ERK, JNK, p-38, or MSP pretreatment. These findings suggest that MSP attenuates GM-induced inflammation and apoptosis by inhibition of the MAPKs

  3. Surveillance of Rotavirus Diarrhea in Hasan Sadikin Hospital Bandung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Prasetyo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The diarrhea morbidity in Indonesia has increased, however, all the reports had not been done carefully, so that accurate surveillance are essential for improving quality of morbidity data. To determine the prevalence and clinical manifestations of rotavirus diarrhea and to characterize the circulating rotavirus strains, children below 5 years old who were admitted to Hasan Sadikin Hospital, Bandung because of diarrhea, from January 2006 through March 2007 were enrolled in a surveillance study and had stool specimens tested for the presence of rotavirus using enzyme immunoassay (EIA. The strains of rotavirus were determined using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Rotavirus were detected in 47.8% analyzed samples (87/184, G and P-genotype of rotavirus were G[1] (37.5% and P[6] (53.5%. Most subjects were males (56%, 6–11 months of age (35%. Most common clinical manifestations besides diarrhea were dehydration (72.7% and vomiting (50%. Subjects with positive rotavirus more common had dehydration (72% vs 28% and vomiting (61% vs 39%. In conclusion, vomiting and dehydration are the prominent clinical manifestations of diarrhea with positive rotavirus infection. G1 and P6 are the most common genotype of rotavirus.

  4. Three infants with rotavirus gastroenteritis complicated by severe gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Yoshiki; Miura, Hiroki; Mori, Yuji; Sugata, Ken; Nakajima, Yoichi; Yamamoto, Yasuto; Morooka, Masashi; Tsuge, Ikuya; Yoshikawa, Akiko; Taniguchi, Koki; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus gastroenteritis causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide in children. We report three infants with rotavirus gastroenteritis complicated by various severity of gastrointestinal bleeding. Two patients (cases 1 and 2) recovered completely without any specific treatments. One patient (case 3) died despite extensive treatments including a red blood cell transfusion and endoscopic hemostatic therapy. Rotavirus genotypes G1P[8] and G9P[8] were detected in cases 2 and 3, respectively. Rotavirus antigenemia levels were not high at the onset of melena, suggesting that systemic rotaviral infection does not play an important role in causing melena. PMID:26100228

  5. Asymptomatic rotavirus infections in England: prevalence, characteristics, and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Gemma; Lopman, Ben; Rodrigues, Laura C; Tam, Clarence C

    2010-05-01

    Rotavirus is a major cause of infectious intestinal disease in young children; a substantial prevalence of asymptomatic infection has been reported across all age groups. In this study, the authors determined characteristics of asymptomatic rotavirus infection and potential risk factors for infection. Healthy persons were recruited at random from the general population of England during the Study of Infectious Intestinal Disease in England (1993-1996). Rotavirus infection was identified using reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Multivariable logistic regression was used to compare exposures reported by participants with rotavirus infection with those of participants who tested negative. Multiple imputation was used to account for missing responses in the data set. The age-adjusted prevalence of asymptomatic rotavirus infection was 11%; prevalence was highest in children under age 18 years. Attendance at day care was a risk factor for asymptomatic rotavirus infection in children under age 5 years; living in a household with a baby that was still in diapers was a risk factor in older adults. The results suggest that asymptomatic rotavirus infection is transmitted through the same route as rotavirus infectious intestinal disease: person-to-person contact. More work is needed to understand the role of asymptomatic infections in transmission leading to rotavirus disease. PMID:20392863

  6. Vaccine-derived NSP2 segment in rotaviruses from vaccinated children with gastroenteritis in Nicaragua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucardo, Filemón; Rippinger, Christine M; Svensson, Lennart; Patton, John T

    2012-08-01

    Rotavirus (RV) vaccination programs have been established in several countries using the human-attenuated G1P[8] monovalent vaccine Rotarix (GlaxoSmithKline) and/or the human-bovine reassortant G1, G2, G3, G4, P[8] pentavalent vaccine RotaTeq (Merck). The efficacy of both vaccines is high (∼90%) in developed countries, but can be remarkably lower in developing countries. For example, a vaccine efficacy against severe diarrhea of only 58% was observed in a 2007-2009 Nicaraguan study using RotaTeq. To gain insight into the significant level of vaccine failure in this country, we sequenced the genomes of RVs recovered from vaccinated Nicaraguan children with gastroenteritis. The results revealed that all had genotype specificities typical for human RVs (11 G1P[8], 1 G3P[8]) and that the sequences and antigenic epitopes of the outer capsid proteins (VP4 and VP7) of these viruses were similar to those reported for RVs isolated elsewhere in the world. As expected, nine of the G1P[8] viruses and the single G3P[8] virus had genome constellations typical of human G1P[8] and G3P[8] RVs: G1/3-P[8]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1. However, two of the G1P[8] viruses had atypical constellations, G1-P[8]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N2-T1-E1-H1, due to the presence of a genotype-2 NSP2 (N2) gene. The sequence of the N2 NSP2 gene was identical to the bovine N2 NSP2 gene of RotaTeq, indicating that the two atypical viruses originated via reassortment of human G1P[8] RVs with RotaTeq viruses. Together, our data suggest that the high level of vaccine failure in Nicaraguan is probably not due to antigenic drift of commonly circulating virus strains nor the emergence of new antigenetically distinct virus strains. Furthermore, our data suggest that the widespread use of the RotaTeq vaccine has led to the introduction of vaccine genes into circulating human RVs.

  7. Vaccine-Derived NSP2 Segment in Rotaviruses from Vaccinated Children with Gastroenteritis in Nicaragua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucardo, Filemón; Rippinger, Christine M.; Svensson, Lennart; Patton, John T.

    2012-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) vaccination programs have been established in several countries using the human-attenuated G1P[8] monovalent vaccine Rotarix™ (GlaxoSmithKline) and/or the human-bovine reassortant G1, G2, G3, G4, P[8] pentavalent vaccine RotaTeq™ (Merck). The efficacy of both vaccines is high (~90%) in developed countries, but can be remarkably lower in developing countries. For example, a vaccine efficacy against severe diarrhea of only 58% was observed in a 2007–2009 Nicaraguan study using RotaTeq. To gain insight into the significant level of vaccine failure in this country, we sequenced the genomes of RVs recovered from vaccinated Nicaraguan children with gastroenteritis. The results revealed that all had genotype specificities typical for human RVs (11 G1P[8], 1 G3P[8]) and that the sequences and antigenic epitopes of the outer capsid proteins (VP4 and VP7) of these viruses were similar to those reported for RVs isolated elsewhere in the world. As expected, nine of the G1P[8] viruses and the single G3P[8] virus had genome constellations typical of human G1P[8] and G3P[8] RVs: G1/3-P[8]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1. However, two of the G1P[8] viruses had atypical constellations, G1-P[8]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N2-T1-E1-H1, due to the presence of a genotype-2 NSP2 (N2) gene. The sequence of the N2 NSP2 gene was identical to the bovine N2 NSP2 gene of RotaTeq, indicating that the two atypical viruses originated via reassortment of human G1P[8] RVs with RotaTeq viruses. Together, our data suggest that the high level of vaccine failure in Nicaraguan is probably not due to antigenic drift of commonly circulating virus strains nor the emergence of new antigenetically distinct virus strains. Furthermore, our data suggests that the widespread use of the RotaTeq vaccine has led to the introduction of vaccine genes into circulating human RVs. PMID:22487061

  8. Gracilaria bursa-pastoris (Gmelin) Silva extract attenuates ultraviolet B radiation-induced oxidative stress in human keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, M J; Kim, K C; Zheng, J; Yao, C W; Cha, J W; Kang, H K; Yoo, E S; Koh, Y S; Ko, M H; Lee, N H; Hyun, Jin Won

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the protective effects of an ethanol extract derived from the red alga Gracilaria bursa-pastoris (Gmelin) Silva (GBE) on ultraviolet B (UVB)-irradiated human HaCaT keratinocytes. GBE exhibited scavenging activity against intracellular reactive oxygen species that were induced by either hydrogen peroxide or UVB radiation. In addition, both the superoxide anion and the hydroxyl radical were scavenged by GBE in cell-free systems. GBE absorbed light in the UVB range (280-320 nm) of the electromagnetic spectrum and lessened the extent of UVB-induced oxidative damage to cellular lipids, proteins, and DNA. Finally, GBE-treated keratinocytes showed a reduction in UVB-induced apoptosis, as exemplified by fewer apoptotic bodies. These results suggest that GBE exerts cytoprotective actions against UVB-stimulated oxidative stress by scavenging ROS and absorbing UVB rays, thereby attenuating injury to cellular constituents and preventing cell death.

  9. Psilocybin-induced deficits in automatic and controlled inhibition are attenuated by ketanserin in healthy human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quednow, Boris B; Kometer, Michael; Geyer, Mark A; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2012-02-01

    The serotonin-2A receptor (5-HT(2A)R) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and related inhibitory gating and behavioral inhibition deficits of schizophrenia patients. The hallucinogen psilocybin disrupts automatic forms of sensorimotor gating and response inhibition in humans, but it is unclear so far whether the 5-HT(2A)R or 5-HT(1A)R agonist properties of its bioactive metabolite psilocin account for these effects. Thus, we investigated whether psilocybin-induced deficits in automatic and controlled inhibition in healthy humans could be attenuated by the 5-HT(2A/2C)R antagonist ketanserin. A total of 16 healthy participants received placebo, ketanserin (40 mg p.o.), psilocybin (260 μg/kg p.o.), or psilocybin plus ketanserin in a double-blind, randomized, and counterbalanced order. Sensorimotor gating was measured by prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the acoustic startle response. The effects on psychopathological core dimensions and behavioral inhibition were assessed by the altered states of consciousness questionnaire (5D-ASC), and the Color-Word Stroop Test. Psilocybin decreased PPI at short lead intervals (30 ms), increased all 5D-ASC scores, and selectively increased errors in the interference condition of the Stroop Test. Stroop interference and Stroop effect of the response latencies were increased under psilocybin as well. Psilocybin-induced alterations were attenuated by ketanserin pretreatment, whereas ketanserin alone had no significant effects. These findings suggest that the disrupting effects of psilocybin on automatic and controlled inhibition processes are attributable to 5-HT(2A)R stimulation. Sensorimotor gating and attentional control deficits of schizophrenia patients might be due to changes within the 5-HT(2A)R system. PMID:21956447

  10. Psilocybin-induced deficits in automatic and controlled inhibition are attenuated by ketanserin in healthy human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quednow, Boris B; Kometer, Michael; Geyer, Mark A; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2012-02-01

    The serotonin-2A receptor (5-HT(2A)R) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and related inhibitory gating and behavioral inhibition deficits of schizophrenia patients. The hallucinogen psilocybin disrupts automatic forms of sensorimotor gating and response inhibition in humans, but it is unclear so far whether the 5-HT(2A)R or 5-HT(1A)R agonist properties of its bioactive metabolite psilocin account for these effects. Thus, we investigated whether psilocybin-induced deficits in automatic and controlled inhibition in healthy humans could be attenuated by the 5-HT(2A/2C)R antagonist ketanserin. A total of 16 healthy participants received placebo, ketanserin (40 mg p.o.), psilocybin (260 μg/kg p.o.), or psilocybin plus ketanserin in a double-blind, randomized, and counterbalanced order. Sensorimotor gating was measured by prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the acoustic startle response. The effects on psychopathological core dimensions and behavioral inhibition were assessed by the altered states of consciousness questionnaire (5D-ASC), and the Color-Word Stroop Test. Psilocybin decreased PPI at short lead intervals (30 ms), increased all 5D-ASC scores, and selectively increased errors in the interference condition of the Stroop Test. Stroop interference and Stroop effect of the response latencies were increased under psilocybin as well. Psilocybin-induced alterations were attenuated by ketanserin pretreatment, whereas ketanserin alone had no significant effects. These findings suggest that the disrupting effects of psilocybin on automatic and controlled inhibition processes are attributable to 5-HT(2A)R stimulation. Sensorimotor gating and attentional control deficits of schizophrenia patients might be due to changes within the 5-HT(2A)R system.

  11. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation attenuates axonal injury in stroke rats

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Yi; Du, Shiwei; Yu, Xinguang; HAN, XIAO; Hou, Jincai; Guo, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that transplantation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells promotes neural functional recovery after stroke, but the neurorestorative mechanisms remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that functional recovery of myelinated axons may be one of underlying mechanisms. In this study, an ischemia/reperfusion rat model was established using the middle cerebral artery occlusion method. Rats were used to test the hypothesis that intravenous transplantation of human ...

  12. A Multi-Center, Qualitative Assessment of Pediatrician and Maternal Perspectives on Rotavirus Vaccines and the Detection of Porcine circovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Locke David

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2010, researchers using novel laboratory techniques found that US-licensed rotavirus vaccines contain DNA or DNA fragments from Porcine circovirus (PCV, a virus common among pigs but not believed to cause illness in humans. We sought to understand pediatricians' and mothers' perspectives on this finding. Methods We conducted three iterations of focus groups for pediatricians and non-vaccine hesitant mothers in Seattle, WA, Cincinnati, OH, and Rochester, NY. Focus groups explored perceptions of rotavirus disease, rotavirus vaccination, and attitudes about the detection of PCV material in rotavirus vaccines. Results Pediatricians understood firsthand the success of rotavirus vaccines in preventing severe acute gastroenteritis among infants and young children. They measured this benefit against the theoretical risk of DNA material from PCV in rotavirus vaccines, determining overall that the PCV finding was of no clinical significance. Particularly influential was the realization that the large, randomized clinical trials that found both vaccines to be highly effective and safe were conducted with DNA material from PCV already in the vaccines. Most mothers supported the ideal of full disclosure regarding vaccination risks and benefits. However, with a scientific topic of this complexity, simplified information regarding PCV material in rotavirus vaccines seemed frightening and suspicious, and detailed information was frequently overwhelming. Mothers often remarked that if they did not understand a medical or technical topic regarding their child's health, they relied on their pediatrician's guidance. Many mothers and pediatricians were also concerned that persons who abstain from pork consumption for religious or personal reasons may have unsubstantiated fears of the PCV finding. Conclusions Pediatricians considered the detection of DNA material from PCV in rotavirus vaccines a "non-issue" and reported little hesitation in

  13. Human thioredoxin exerts cardioprotective effect and attenuates reperfusion injury in rats partially via inhibiting apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Xiao-wei; TENG Zong-yan; JIANG Li-hong; FAN Ying; ZHANG Yu-hua; LI Xiu-rong; ZHANG Yi-na

    2008-01-01

    Background Thioredoxin is one of the most important redox regulating proteins. Although thioredoxin has been shown to protect cells against different kinds of oxidative stress, the role of thioredoxin in myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury has not been fully understood. This study was conducted to explore the protective role of human thioredoxin on myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury and its potential mechanisms.Methods Purified human thioredoxin was injected into adult Wister rats, which were subjected to 30 minutes of myocardial ischemia followed by 2 or 24 hours of reperfusion. We detected 1) the infarct size; 2) the level of malondisldehyde (MDA) in serum; 3) the expression of caspase-9, and cytochrome c in/out of mitochondia by Western blotting; 4) apoptosis by terminal-deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated nick end labeling ('rUNEL) assay and caspase-3 and its protein by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting; 5) the expression of bcl-2 and bax in cardium by immunohistochemical (IHC) assay.Results Human thioredoxin reduced myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury as evidenced by significant decrease of myocardial infarct size (P<0.01), notable reduction of myocyte apoptosis (P <0.01), lower systemic oxidative stress level (P <0.01) after reperfusion for 2 hours, and few inflammatory cell infiltration after reperfusion for 24 hours in rats. Furthermore, treatment with human thioredoxin significantly reduced the release of mitochondrial cytochrome C (P<0.05),and inhibited the activity of caspase-9 (P <0.05) and caspase-3 (P <0.01 in mRNA and P <0.05 at protein level).Meanwhile, human thioredoxin markedly increased bcl-2 expression (P <0.05).Conclusions These results strongly suggest that human thioredoxin has cardioprotective effects on myocardial ischemia/reperfusion and its anti-apoptotic role may be mediated by modulating bcl-2 and the mitochondria-dependent apoptotic signaling pathway.

  14. Neonatal Gut Microbiota and Human Milk Glycans Cooperate to Attenuate Infection and Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newburg, David S; He, Yingying

    2015-12-01

    Glycans of the intestinal mucosa and oligosaccharides of human milk influence the early colonization of the infant gut and establishment of mucosal homeostasis, and differences in colonization of the gut influence the ontogeny of glycans on the surface of the intestinal mucosa, proinflammatory signaling, homeostasis, and resilience to insult. This interkingdom reciprocal interaction is typical of a mutualistic symbiotic relationship. The period in which the infant gut most needs protection from hypersensitive inflammation overlaps with the recommended period of exclusive nursing; electively substituting artificial formula that lacks human milk protective glycans seems ill advised, especially for premature infants.

  15. E Durans Strain M4-5 Isolated From Human Colonic Flora Attenuates Intestinal Inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avram-Hananel, L.; Stock, J.; Parlesak, Alexandr;

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro and in vivo effects of a unique high-butyrate-producing bacterial strain from human colonic flora, Enterococcus durans, in prevention and treatment of intestinal inflammation. METHODS: A compartmentalized Caco-2/leukocyte coculture model was...

  16. Hypoxia attenuates inflammatory mediators production induced by Acanthamoeba via Toll-like receptor 4 signaling in human corneal epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Hong [Department of Ophthalmology, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, 107, Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan 250012 (China); The Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Chinese Ministry of Education and Chinese Ministry of Public Health, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, 107, Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan 250012 (China); Wu, Xinyi, E-mail: xywu8868@163.com [Department of Ophthalmology, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, 107, Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan 250012 (China)

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hypoxia attenuates Acanthamoeba-induced the production of IL-8 and IFN-{beta}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hypoxia inhibits TLR4 expression in a time-dependent manner in HCECs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hypoxia inhibits Acanthamoeba-induced the activation of NF-{kappa}B and ERK1/2 in HCECs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hypoxia decreases Acanthamoeba-induced inflammatory response via TLR4 signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LPS-induced the secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 is abated by hypoxia via TLR4 signaling. -- Abstract: Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) is a vision-threatening corneal infection that is intimately associated with contact lens use which leads to hypoxic conditions on the corneal surface. However, the effect of hypoxia on the Acanthamoeba-induced host inflammatory response of corneal epithelial cells has not been studied. In the present study, we investigated the effect of hypoxia on the Acanthamoeba-induced production of inflammatory mediators interleukin-8 (IL-8) and interferon-{beta} (IFN-{beta}) in human corneal epithelial cells and then evaluated its effects on the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling, including TLR4 and myeloid differentiation primary response gene (88) (MyD88) expression as well as the activation of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-{kappa}B) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2). We then studied the effect of hypoxia on a TLR4-specific inflammatory response triggered by the TLR4 ligand lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Our data showed that hypoxia significantly decreased the production of IL-8 and IFN-{beta}. Furthermore, hypoxia attenuated Acanthamoeba-triggered TLR4 expression as well as the activation of NF-{kappa}B and ERK1/2, indicating that hypoxia abated Acanthamoeba-induced inflammatory responses by affecting TLR4 signaling. Hypoxia also inhibited LPS-induced IL-6 and IL-8 secretion, myeloid differentiation primary response gene (88

  17. Sphingosine-1-phosphate attenuates proteoglycan aggrecan expression via production of prostaglandin E2 from human articular chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishioka Kusuki

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P, a downstream metabolite of ceramide, induces various bioactivities via two distinct pathways: as an intracellular second messenger or through receptor activation. The receptor for S1P (S1PR is the family of Endothelial differentiation, sphingolipid G-protein-coupled receptor (EDG. We have here attempted to reveal the expression of EDG/S1PR in human articular chondrocytes (HAC, exploring the implications of S1P in cartilage degradation. Methods Articular cartilage specimens were obtained from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA, osteoarthritis (OA or traumatic fracture (representing normal chondrocytes who underwent joint surgery. Isolated HAC were cultured in vitro by monolayer and stimulated with S1P in the presence or absence of inhibitors of signaling molecules. Stimulated cells and culture supernatants were collected and subjected to analyses using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, Western blotting, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Results All of the tested HAC samples showed positive results in terms of EDG/S1PR expression in basal condition. When HAC was stimulated with S1P, a significant increase in prostaglandin (PG E2 production was observed together with enhanced expression of cyclooxygenase (COX-2. S1P stimulated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK in HAC, and the PGE2 induction was abrogated by PD98059 and SB203580. Pertussis toxin inhibited the PGE2 induction from HAC by S1P, suggesting an essential role for Gi protein. S1P also attenuated the expression of proteoglycan aggrecan, a component of cartilage matrix, in HAC at transcriptional level. Conclusion It was suggested that the S1P-induced PGE2 was at least in part involved in the aggrecan-suppressing effect of S1P, seeing as COX inhibitors attenuated the effect. Accordingly, S1P might play an important role in cartilage degradation in

  18. Tamarind seed coat extract restores reactive oxygen species through attenuation of glutathione level and antioxidant enzyme expression in human skin fibroblasts in response to oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oranuch Nakchat

    2014-05-01

    Conclusions: TSCE exhibited antioxidant activities by scavenging ROS, attenuating GSH level that could protect human skin fibroblast cells from oxidative stress. Our results highlight the antioxidant mechanism of tamarind seed coat through an antioxidant enzyme system, the extract potentially benefits for health food and cosmeceutical application of tamarind seed coat.

  19. Gene deleted live attenuated Leishmania vaccine candidates against visceral leishmaniasis elicit pro-inflammatory cytokines response in human PBMCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avishek, Kumar; Kaushal, Himanshu; Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Dey, Ranadhir; Selvapandiyan, Angamuthu; Ramesh, V.; Negi, Narender Singh; Dubey, Uma S.; Nakhasi, Hira L.; Salotra, Poonam

    2016-01-01

    Currently no effective vaccine is available for human visceral leishmaniasis(VL) caused by Leishmania donovani. Previously, we showed that centrin1 and p27gene deleted live attenuated Leishmania parasites (LdCen1−/− and Ldp27−/−) are safe, immunogenic and protective in animal models. Here, to assess the correlates of protection, we evaluated immune responses induced by LdCen1−/− and Ldp27−/− in human blood samples obtained from healthy, healed VL (HVL), post kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis(PKDL) and VL subjects. Both parasites infected human macrophages, as effectively as the wild type parasites. Further, LdCen1−/− and Ldp27−/− strongly stimulated production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including, IL-12, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2, IL-6 and IL-17 in the PBMCs obtained from individuals with a prior exposure to Leishmania (HVL and PKDL). There was no significant stimulation of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10). Induction of Th1 biased immune responses was supported by a remarkable increase in IFN-γ secreting CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and IL-17 secreting CD4+ cells in PBMCs from HVL cases with no increase in IL-10 secreting T cells. Hence, LdCen1−/− and Ldp27−/− are promising as live vaccine candidates against VL since they elicit strong protective immune response in human PBMCs from HVL, similar to the wild type parasite infection, mimicking a naturally acquired protection following cure. PMID:27624408

  20. Estrogen directly attenuates human osteoclastogenesis, but has no effect on resorption by mature osteoclasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M G; Henriksen, K; Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld;

    2006-01-01

    -estradiol inhibited bone resorption, as measured by the release of the C-terminal crosslinked telopeptide (CTX), by 60% at 0.1 nM, but had no effect on the overall cell viability. In contrast to the results obtained with differentiating osteoclasts, addition of 17beta-estradiol (0.001-10 nM) to mature osteoclasts did......Estrogen deficiency arising with the menopause promotes marked acceleration of bone resorption, which can be restored by hormone replacement therapy. The inhibitory effects of estrogen seem to involve indirect cytokine- mediated effects via supporting bone marrow cells, but direct estrogen......-receptor mediated effects on the bone-resorbing osteoclasts have also been proposed. Little information is available on whether estrogens modulate human osteoclastogenesis or merely inhibit the functional activity of osteoclasts. To clarify whether estrogens directly modulate osteoclastic activities human CD14...

  1. Cost Effectiveness of Infant Vaccination for Rotavirus in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doug Coyle

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Rotavirus is the main cause of gastroenteritis in Canadian children younger than five years of age, resulting in significant morbidity and cost. The present study provides evidence on the cost effectiveness of two alternative rotavirus vaccinations (RotaTeq [Merck Frosst Canada Ltd, Canada] and Rotarix [GlaxoSmithKline, Canada] available in Canada.

  2. Rotavirus epidemiology in San Luis Potosí, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyola, Daniel E; Herrera, Ismael F

    2005-07-01

    The epidemiology of rotavirus infections was investigated in San Luis Potosí, Mexico during a 6-year period. In each of the study years, the epidemic period started in October or November; peak activity was detected between December and February, and the end of the epidemic occurred in March or April. Rotavirus infections show a consistent temporal pattern in our community.

  3. Vibration Attenuation of Magnetorheological Landing Gear System with Human Simulated Intelligent Control

    OpenAIRE

    X. M. Dong; Xiong, G. W.

    2013-01-01

    Due to the short duration of impulsive impact of an aircraft during touchdown, a traditional landing gear can only achieve limited performance. In this study, a magnetorheological (MR) absorber is incorporated into a landing gear system; an intelligent control algorithm, a human simulated intelligent control (HSIC), is proposed to adaptively tune the MR absorber. First, a two degree-of-freedom (DOF) dynamic model of a landing gear system featuring an MR absorber is constructed. The control mo...

  4. Zinc sulphate attenuates chloride secretion in human colonic mucosae in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medani, Mekki; Bzik, Victoria A; Rogers, Ailin; Collins, Danielle; Kennelly, Rory; Winter, Des C; Brayden, David J; Baird, Alan W

    2012-12-01

    Zinc's usefulness in the treatment of diarrhoea is well established as an addition to oral rehydration. Mechanisms of action of zinc have been explored in intestinal epithelia from rodents and in cell lines. The aim was to examine how zinc alters ion transport and signal transduction in human colon in vitro. Voltage clamped colonic sheets obtained at the time of surgical resection were used to quantify ion transport responses to established secretagogues. Nystatin permeabilisation was used to study basolaterally-sited ion channels. Direct actions of zinc were determined using preparations of colonic crypts isolated from human mucosal sheets. Electrophysiological measurements revealed zinc to be an inhibitor of electrogenic ion transport stimulated by forskolin, PGE(2), histamine and carbachol in isolated human colonic epithelium. Basolateral addition of zinc sulphate had no direct effect on the epithelium. To further outline the mechanism of action, levels of secondary intracellular messengers (3', 5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate; cAMP) were determined in isolated colonic crypts, and were found to be reduced by zinc sulphate. Finally, indirect evidence from nystatin-permeabilised mucosae further suggested that zinc inhibits basolateral K(+) channels, which are critical for transepithelial Cl(-) secretion linked to water flux. Anti-secretory, and therefore anti-diarrhoeal, actions of exogenous zinc are due, at least in part, to direct basolateral epithelial K(+) channel inhibition. PMID:23022335

  5. Nucleotide-binding Oligomerization Domain-1 Ligand Induces Inflammation and Attenuates Glucose Uptake in Human Adipocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-jun Zhou; Ai Li; Yu-ling Song; Yan Li; Hui Zhou

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of stimulant for nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1) on secretion of proinflammatory chemokine/cytokines and insulin-dependent glucose uptake in human differentiated adipocytes.Methods Adipose tissues were obtained from patients undergoing liposuction.Stromal vascular cells were extracted and differentiated into adipocytes.A specific ligand for NOD1,was administered to human adipocytes in culture.Nuclear factor-κB transcriptional activity and proinflammatory chemokine/cytokines production were determined by reporter plasmid assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay,respectively.Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake was measured by 2-deoxy-D-[3H]glucose uptake assay.Furthermore,chemokine/cytokine secretion and glucose uptake in adipocytes transfected with small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting NOD1 upon stimulation of NOD1 ligand were analyzed.Results Nuclear factor-κB transcriptional activity and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1),interleukin (IL)-6,and IL-8 secretion in human adipocytes were markedly increased stimulated with NOD1 ligand (all P<0.01).Insulin-induced glucose uptake was decreased upon the activation of NOD1 (P<0.05).NOD1 gene silencing by siRNA reduced NOD1 ligand-induced MCP-1,IL-6,and IL-8 release and increased insulin-induced glucose uptake (all P<0.05).Conclusion NOD1 activation in adipocytes might be implicated in the onset of insulin resistance.

  6. Connective tissue growth factor hammerhead ribozyme attenuates human hepatic stellate cell function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Run-Ping Gao; David R Brigstock

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To determine the effect of hammerhead ribozyme targeting connective tissue growth factor (CCN2) on human hepatic stellate cell (HSC) function. METHODS: CCN2 hammerhead ribozyme cDNA plus two self-cleaving sequences were inserted into pTriEx2 to produce pTriCCN2-Rz. Each vector was individually transfected into cultured LX-2 human HSCs, which were then stimulated by addition of transforming growth factor (TGF)-b1 to the culture medium. Semiquantitative RT-PCR was used to determine mRNA levels for CCN2 or collagen Ⅰ, while protein levels of each molecule in cell lysates and conditioned medium were measured by ELISA. Cell-cycle progression of the transfected cells was assessed by flow cytometry. RESULTS: In pTriEx2-transfected LX-2 cells, TGF-β1 treatment caused an increase in the mRNA level for CCN2 or collagen Ⅰ, and an increase in produced and secreted CCN2 or extracellular collagen Ⅰ protein levels. pTriCCN2-Rz-transfected LX-2 cells showed decreased basal CCN2 or collagen mRNA levels, as well as produced and secreted CCN2 or collagen Ⅰ protein. Furthermore, the TGF-b1-induced increase in mRNA or protein for CCN2 or collagen Ⅰ was inhibited partially in pTriCCN2-Rz-transfected LX-2 cells. Inhibition of CCN2 using hammerhead ribozyme cDNA resulted in fewer of the cells transitioning into S phase. CONCLUSION: Endogenous CCN2 is a mediator of basal or TGF-b1-induced collagen Ⅰ production in human HSCs and regulates entry of the cells into Sphase.

  7. An update of "Cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination in the Netherlands : the results of a Consensus Rotavirus Vaccine model"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tu, Hong Anh T.; Rozenbaum, Mark H.; de Boer, Pieter T.; Noort, Albert C.; Postma, Maarten J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: To update a cost-effectiveness analysis of rotavirus vaccination in the Netherlands previously published in 2011.Methods: The rotavirus burden of disease and the indirect protection of older children and young adults (herd protection) were updated.Results: When updated data was used, rou

  8. Insulin Attenuates Beta-Amyloid-Associated Insulin/Akt/EAAT Signaling Perturbations in Human Astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiaojuan; Yang, Liling; Du, Heng; Sun, Qinjian; Wang, Xiang; Cong, Lin; Liu, Xiaohui; Yin, Ling; Li, Shan; Du, Yifeng

    2016-08-01

    The excitatory amino acid transporters 1 and 2 (EAAT1 and EAAT2), mostly located on astrocytes, are the main mediators for glutamate clearance in humans. Malfunctions of these transporters may lead to excessive glutamate accumulation and subsequent excitotoxicity to neurons, which has been implicated in many kinds of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Yet, the specific mechanism of the glutamate system dysregulation remains vague. To explore whether the insulin/protein kinase B (Akt)/EAAT signaling in human astrocytes could be disturbed by beta-amyloid protein (Aβ) and be protected by insulin, we incubated HA-1800 cells with varying concentrations of Aβ1-42 oligomers and insulin. Then the alterations of several key substrates in this signal transduction pathway were determined. Our results showed that expressions of insulin receptor, phospho-insulin receptor, phospho-protein kinase B, phospho-mammalian target of rapamycin, and EAAT1 and EAAT2 were decreased by the Aβ1-42 oligomers in a dose-dependent manner (p  0.05), and the mRNA levels of EAAT1 and EAAT2 were also unchanged (p > 0.05). Taken together, this study indicates that Aβ1-42 oligomers could cause disturbances in insulin/Akt/EAAT signaling in astrocytes, which might be responsible for AD onset and progression. Additionally, insulin can exert protective functions to the brain by modulating protein modifications or expressions. PMID:26358886

  9. Diarrheal Diseases Hospitalization in Yemen before and after Rotavirus Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amood Al-Kamarany, Mohammed; Al-Areqi, Lina; Mujally, Abulatif; Alkarshy, Fawzya; Nasser, Arwa; Jumaan, Aisha O

    2016-01-01

    The study aims to assess the impact of rotavirus vaccine introduction on diarrheal diseases hospitalization and to identify the rotavirus genotypes most prevalent before and after vaccine introduction among children ≤ 5 years of age. Rotarix™ ® rotavirus vaccine is currently licensed for infants in Yemen and was introduced in 2012. The vaccination course consists of two doses. The first dose is administrated at 6 weeks of age and the second dose is completed by 10 weeks. Based on a longitudinal observational study, we assessed the impact of vaccination on rotavirus hospitalization before and after vaccination among children ≤ 5 years of age at the Yemeni-Swedish Hospital (YSH) in Taiz, Yemen. Prevaccination covered January 2009-July 2012 during which 2335 fecal samples were collected from children ≤ 5 years old. Postvaccination covered January 2013-December 2014 during which 1114 fecal samples were collected. Rotavirus was detected by Enzyme Linkage Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). The incidence of rotavirus hospitalization decreased from 43.79% in 2009 to 10.54% in 2014. Hospitalization due to rotavirus diarrhea was reduced by 75.93%. Vaccine coverage increased from 23% in 2012 to 72% in 2014. Also, the results showed that the most predominant genotypes in prevaccination period were G2P[4] (55.0%), followed by G1P[8] (15.0%), while in postvaccination period G1P[8] (31%) was the predominant genotype, followed by G9P[8] (27.5%). In conclusion, rotavirus vaccination in Yemen resulted in sharp reduction in diarrheal hospitalization. A successful rotavirus vaccination program in Yemen will rely upon efficient vaccine delivery systems and sustained vaccine efficacy against diverse and evolving rotavirus strains. PMID:27437161

  10. Diarrheal Diseases Hospitalization in Yemen before and after Rotavirus Vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Amood AL-Kamarany

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to assess the impact of rotavirus vaccine introduction on diarrheal diseases hospitalization and to identify the rotavirus genotypes most prevalent before and after vaccine introduction among children ≤ 5 years of age. Rotarix™ ® rotavirus vaccine is currently licensed for infants in Yemen and was introduced in 2012. The vaccination course consists of two doses. The first dose is administrated at 6 weeks of age and the second dose is completed by 10 weeks. Based on a longitudinal observational study, we assessed the impact of vaccination on rotavirus hospitalization before and after vaccination among children ≤ 5 years of age at the Yemeni-Swedish Hospital (YSH in Taiz, Yemen. Prevaccination covered January 2009–July 2012 during which 2335 fecal samples were collected from children ≤ 5 years old. Postvaccination covered January 2013–December 2014 during which 1114 fecal samples were collected. Rotavirus was detected by Enzyme Linkage Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA. The incidence of rotavirus hospitalization decreased from 43.79% in 2009 to 10.54% in 2014. Hospitalization due to rotavirus diarrhea was reduced by 75.93%. Vaccine coverage increased from 23% in 2012 to 72% in 2014. Also, the results showed that the most predominant genotypes in prevaccination period were G2P[4] (55.0%, followed by G1P[8] (15.0%, while in postvaccination period G1P[8] (31% was the predominant genotype, followed by G9P[8] (27.5%. In conclusion, rotavirus vaccination in Yemen resulted in sharp reduction in diarrheal hospitalization. A successful rotavirus vaccination program in Yemen will rely upon efficient vaccine delivery systems and sustained vaccine efficacy against diverse and evolving rotavirus strains.

  11. A gastrointestinal rotavirus infection mouse model for immune modulation studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Amerongen Geert

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rotaviruses are the single most important cause of severe diarrhea in young children worldwide. The current study was conducted to assess whether colostrum containing rotavirus-specific antibodies (Gastrogard-R® could protect against rotavirus infection. In addition, this illness model was used to study modulatory effects of intervention on several immune parameters after re-infection. Methods BALB/c mice were treated by gavage once daily with Gastrogard-R® from the age of 4 to 10 days, and were inoculated with rhesus rotavirus (RRV at 7 days of age. A secondary inoculation with epizootic-diarrhea infant-mouse (EDIM virus was administered at 17 days of age. Disease symptoms were scored daily and viral shedding was measured in fecal samples during the post-inoculation periods. Rotavirus-specific IgM, IgG and IgG subclasses in serum, T cell proliferation and rotavirus-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH responses were also measured. Results Primary inoculation with RRV induced a mild but consistent level of diarrhea during 3-4 days post-inoculation. All mice receiving Gastrogard-R® were 100% protected against rotavirus-induced diarrhea. Mice receiving both RRV and EDIM inoculation had a lower faecal-viral load following EDIM inoculation then mice receiving EDIM alone or Gastrogard-R®. Mice receiving Gastrogard-R® however displayed an enhanced rotavirus-specific T-cell proliferation whereas rotavirus-specific antibody subtypes were not affected. Conclusions Preventing RRV-induced diarrhea by Gastrogard-R® early in life showed a diminished protection against EDIM re-infection, but a rotavirus-specific immune response was developed including both B cell and T cell responses. In general, this intervention model can be used for studying clinical symptoms as well as the immune responses required for protection against viral re-infection.

  12. Paeoniflorin attenuates ultraviolet B-induced apoptosis in human keratinocytes by inhibiting the ROS-p38-p53 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lingwen; Wang, Shangshang; Wu, Xiao; Zuo, Fuguo; Qin, Haihong; Wu, Jinfeng

    2016-04-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light is one of the most harmful environmental factors that contribute to skin damage. Exposure to UV induces extensive generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and results in photoaging and skin cancer development. One approach to protecting human skin against UV radiation is the use of antioxidants. In recent years, naturally occurring herbal compounds have gained considerable attention as protective agents for UV exposure. Paeoniflorin (PF) is a novel natural antioxidant, which is isolated from peony root (Radix Paeoniae Alba). The present study evaluated the protective effects of PF on UV‑induced skin damage in vitro, and demonstrated that the effects were mediated via the ROS‑p38‑p53 pathway. The results of the present study demonstrated that treatment with PF (25, 50, and 100 µM) significantly increased the percentage of viable keratinocytes after UV‑B exposure. In addition, cell death analysis indicated that PF treatment markedly reduced UV‑B‑radiation‑induced apoptosis in keratinocytes, which was accompanied by increased procaspase 3 expression and decreased cleaved caspase 3 expression. Treatment with PF markedly reduced the production of ROS, and inhibited the activation of p38 and p53 in human keratinocytes, thus suggesting that the ROS‑p38‑p53 pathway has a role in UV‑B‑induced skin damage. In conclusion, the present study reported that PF was able to attenuate UV‑B‑induced cell damage in human keratinocytes. Notably, these effects were shown to be mediated, at least in part, via inhibition of the ROS-p38-p53 pathway. PMID:26936104

  13. E durans strain M4-5 isolated from human colonic flora attenuates intestinal inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avram-Hananel, Liraz; Stock, Julia; Parlesak, Alexandr;

    2010-01-01

    effects, mediated by regulation of pro- and anti-inflammatory immune factors as well as preservation of intestine epithelial integrity, suggesting that this novel anti-inflammatory bacterium may be preferentially a useful prophylactic treatment to avoid inflammatory bowel disease.......PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro and in vivo effects of a unique high-butyrate-producing bacterial strain from human colonic flora, Enterococcus durans, in prevention and treatment of intestinal inflammation. METHODS: A compartmentalized Caco-2/leukocyte coculture model...... was used to examine the in vitro effects of E durans and its metabolite butyrate on basal and Escherichia coli-stimulated secretion of proinflammatory immune factors (IL-8, IL-6, and TNF-α) and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. A murine model of dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis was used...

  14. Recombinant human deoxyribonuclease attenuates oxidative stress in a model of eosinophilic pulmonary response in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, Aline Andrea; Nuñez, Nailê Karine; de Souza, Rodrigo Godinho; Vargas, Mauro Henrique Moraes; Silveira, Josiane Silva; Antunes, Géssica Luana; Schmitz, Felipe; de Souza Wyse, Angela Terezinha; Jones, Marcus Herbert; Pitrez, Paulo Márcio

    2016-02-01

    The inflammatory cells infiltrating the airways produce several mediators, such as reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS and the oxidant-antioxidant imbalance might play an important role in the modulation of airways inflammation. In order to avoid the undesirable effects of ROS, various endogenous antioxidant strategies have evolved, incorporating both enzymatic and non-enzymatic mechanisms. Recombinant human deoxyribonuclease (rhDNase) in clinical studies demonstrated a reduction in sputum viscosity, cleaving extracellular DNA in the airways, and facilitating mucus clearance, but an antioxidant effect was not studied so far. Therefore, we evaluated whether the administration of rhDNase improves oxidative stress in a murine model of asthma. Mice were sensitized by two subcutaneous injections of ovalbumin (OVA), on days 0 and 7, followed by three lung challenges with OVA on days 14, 15, and 16. On days 15 and 16, after 2 h of the challenge with OVA, mice received 1 mg/mL of rhDNase in the lungs. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue were obtained on day 17, for inflammatory and oxidative stress analysis. We showed that rhDNase did not alter the population of inflammatory cells, such as eosinophil cells, in OVA-treated rhDNase group but significantly improved oxidative stress in lung tissue, by decreasing oxygen reactive species and increasing superoxide dismutase/catalase ratio, glutathione peroxidase activity, and thiol content. Our data provide the first evidence that rhDNase decreases some measures of oxidative stress and antioxidant status in a murine model of asthma, with a potential antioxidant effect to be further studied in human asthma. PMID:26738487

  15. Household transmission of rotavirus in a community with rotavirus vaccination in Quininde, Ecuador.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Lopman

    Full Text Available We studied the transmission of rotavirus infection in households in peri-urban Ecuador in the vaccination era.Stool samples were collected from household contacts of child rotavirus cases, diarrhea controls and healthy controls following presentation of the index child to health facilities. Rotavirus infection status of contacts was determined by RT-qPCR. We examined factors associated with transmissibility (index-case characteristics and susceptibility (household-contact characteristics.Amongst cases, diarrhea controls and healthy control household contacts, infection attack rates (iAR were 55%, 8% and 2%, (n = 137, 130, 137 respectively. iARs were higher from index cases with vomiting, and amongst siblings. Disease ARs were higher when the index child was <18 months and had vomiting, with household contact <10 years and those sharing a room with the index case being more susceptible. We found no evidence of asymptomatic infections leading to disease transmission.Transmission rates of rotavirus are high in households with an infected child, while background infections are rare. We have identified factors associated with transmission (vomiting/young age of index case and susceptibility (young age/sharing a room/being a sibling of the index case. Vaccination may lead to indirect benefits by averting episodes or reducing symptoms in vaccinees.

  16. Pomegranate juice and punicalagin attenuate oxidative stress and apoptosis in human placenta and in human placental trophoblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Baosheng; TUULI, Methodius G.; Mark S Longtine; Shin, Joong Sik; Lawrence, Russell; Inder, Terrie; Michael Nelson, D.

    2012-01-01

    The human placenta is key to pregnancy outcome, and the elevated oxidative stress present in many complicated pregnancies contributes to placental dysfunction and suboptimal pregnancy outcomes. We tested the hypothesis that pomegranate juice, which is rich in polyphenolic antioxidants, limits placental trophoblast injury in vivo and in vitro. Pregnant women with singleton pregnancies were randomized at 35∼38 wk gestation to 8 oz/day of pomegranate juice or apple juice (placebo) until the time...

  17. Co-expression of anti-rotavirus proteins (llama VHH antibody fragments in Lactobacillus: development and functionality of vectors containing two expression cassettes in tandem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökçe Günaydın

    Full Text Available Rotavirus is an important pediatric pathogen, causing severe diarrhea and being associated with a high mortality rate causing approximately 500 000 deaths annually worldwide. Even though some vaccines are currently available, their efficacy is lower in the developing world, as compared to developed countries. Therefore, alternative or complementary treatment options are needed in the developing countries where the disease burden is the largest. The effect of Lactobacillus in promoting health and its use as a vehicle for delivery of protein and antibody fragments was previously shown. In this study, we have developed co-expression vectors enabling Lactobacillus paracasei BL23 to produce two VHH fragments against rotavirus (referred to as anti-rotavirus proteins 1 and 3, ARP1 and ARP3 as secreted and/or surface displayed products. ARP1 and ARP3 fragments were successfully co-expressed as shown by Western blot and flow cytometry. In addition, engineered Lactobacillus produced VHH antibody fragments were shown to bind to a broad range of rotavirus serotypes (including the human rotavirus strains 69M, Va70, F45, DS1, Wa and ST3 and simian rotavirus strains including RRV and SA11, by flow cytometry and ELISA. Hereby, we have demonstrated for the first time that when RRV was captured by one VHH displayed on the surface of co-expressor Lactobacillus, targeting other epitope was possible with another VHH secreted from the same bacterium. Therefore, Lactobacillus producing two VHH antibody fragments may potentially serve as treatment against rotavirus with a reduced risk of development of escape mutants. This co-expression and delivery platform can also be used for delivery of VHH fragments against a variety of mucosal pathogens or production of other therapeutic molecules.

  18. First Evidence that Ecklonia cava-Derived Dieckol Attenuates MCF-7 Human Breast Carcinoma Cell Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Kyung Kim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effect of Ecklonia cava (E. cava-derived dieckol on movement behavior and the expression of migration-related genes in MCF-7 human breast cancer cell. Phlorotannins (e.g., dieckol, 6,6′-biecko, and 2,7″-phloroglucinol-6,6′-bieckol were purified from E. cava by using centrifugal partition chromatography. Among the phlorotannins, we found that dieckol inhibited breast cancer cell the most and was selected for further study. Radius™-well was used to assess cell migration, and dieckol (1–100 µM was found to suppress breast cancer cell movement. Metastasis-related gene expressions were evaluated by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. In addition, dieckol inhibited the expression of migration-related genes such as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. On the other hand, it stimulated the expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP-1 and TIMP-2. These results suggest that dieckol exerts anti-breast cancer activity via the regulation of the expressions of metastasis-related genes, and this is the first report on the anti-breast cancer effect of dieckol.

  19. Vibration Attenuation of Magnetorheological Landing Gear System with Human Simulated Intelligent Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. M. Dong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the short duration of impulsive impact of an aircraft during touchdown, a traditional landing gear can only achieve limited performance. In this study, a magnetorheological (MR absorber is incorporated into a landing gear system; an intelligent control algorithm, a human simulated intelligent control (HSIC, is proposed to adaptively tune the MR absorber. First, a two degree-of-freedom (DOF dynamic model of a landing gear system featuring an MR absorber is constructed. The control model of an MR damper is also developed. After analyzing the impact characteristic during touchdown, an HSIC is then formulated. A genetic algorithm is adopted to optimize the control parameters of HSIC. Finally, a numerical simulation is performed to validate the proposed damper and the controller considering the varieties of sink velocities and sprung masses. The simulations under different scenarios show that the landing gear system based on the MR absorber can greatly reduce the peak impact load of sprung mass within the stroke. The biggest improvement of the proposed controller is over 40% compared to that of skyhook controller. Furthermore, HSIC exhibits better adaptive ability and strong robustness than skyhook controller under various payloads and sink velocities.

  20. Vanillin attenuates negative effects of ultraviolet A on the stemness of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Yeol; Park, See-Hyoung; Kim, Mi Ok; Lim, Inhwan; Kang, Mingyeong; Oh, Sae Woong; Jung, Kwangseon; Jo, Dong Gyu; Cho, Il-Hoon; Lee, Jongsung

    2016-10-01

    Ultraviolet A (UVA) irradiation induces various changes in cell biology. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of vanillin on UVA irradiation-induced damages in the stemness properties of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSCs). UVA-antagonizing mechanisms of vanillin were also examined. The results revealed that vanillin attenuated UVA-induced reduction of the proliferative potential and stemness of hAMSCs evidenced by increased proliferative activity in BrdU incorporation assay and upregulation of stemness-related genes (OCT4, NANOG and SOX2) in response to vanillin treatment. UVA-induced reduction in mRNA level of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α was significantly recovered by vanillin. In addition, the antagonizing effect of vanillin on UVA was found to be mediated by reduced production of PGE2 through inhibiting JNK and p38 MAPK. Taken together, these findings showed that vanillin could improve the reduced stemness of hAMSCs induced by UVA. The effect of vanillin is mediated by upregulating HIF-1α via inhibiting PGE2-cAMP signaling. Therefore, vanillin might be used as an antagonizing agent to mitigate the effects of UVA. PMID:27470612

  1. Vanillin attenuates negative effects of ultraviolet A on the stemness of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Yeol; Park, See-Hyoung; Kim, Mi Ok; Lim, Inhwan; Kang, Mingyeong; Oh, Sae Woong; Jung, Kwangseon; Jo, Dong Gyu; Cho, Il-Hoon; Lee, Jongsung

    2016-10-01

    Ultraviolet A (UVA) irradiation induces various changes in cell biology. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of vanillin on UVA irradiation-induced damages in the stemness properties of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSCs). UVA-antagonizing mechanisms of vanillin were also examined. The results revealed that vanillin attenuated UVA-induced reduction of the proliferative potential and stemness of hAMSCs evidenced by increased proliferative activity in BrdU incorporation assay and upregulation of stemness-related genes (OCT4, NANOG and SOX2) in response to vanillin treatment. UVA-induced reduction in mRNA level of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α was significantly recovered by vanillin. In addition, the antagonizing effect of vanillin on UVA was found to be mediated by reduced production of PGE2 through inhibiting JNK and p38 MAPK. Taken together, these findings showed that vanillin could improve the reduced stemness of hAMSCs induced by UVA. The effect of vanillin is mediated by upregulating HIF-1α via inhibiting PGE2-cAMP signaling. Therefore, vanillin might be used as an antagonizing agent to mitigate the effects of UVA.

  2. Offset-Control Attenuates Context Conditioning Induced by US-unpredictability in a Human Conditioned Suppression Paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Meulders

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated whether offset-control of the unconditioned stimulus (US reduces context conditioning induced by US-unpredictability within a human conditioned suppression preparation. We also examined lack of control 'vs'. loss of control. Three groups (No Controllability, NC; Controllability, C; Loss of Controllability, LC received unsignaled USs during two learning phases (ACQ1-2. The NC group, never had offset-control, whereas the C group, always had offset-control. The LC group, had offset-control during ACQ1, but not during ACQ2. Results indicated that US-unpredictability led to contextual conditioned suppression during ACQ1, only when participants did not have offset-control; when they did, no context conditioning was established. From ACQ1 to ACQ2, contextual conditioned suppression increased in the LC group, but it was not more pronounced than in the NC group. These data suggest that offset-control attenuates context conditioning induced by US-unpredictability and – at least in this paradigm – loss of control is not worse than lack of control.

  3. Identification of nonspecific reactions in laboratory rodent specimens tested by Rotazyme rotavirus ELISA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jure, M N; Morse, S S; Stark, D M

    1988-06-01

    Fecal specimens from several laboratory animal species were tested for rotavirus antigen by Rotazyme II, a commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that is widely used in human diagnostic studies. Fecal samples from rabbits, hamsters, guinea pigs, dogs, and cats tested negative; whereas those from rats and mice yielded a high proportion of positive results. Rats had the highest rate with 82% of the samples being positive. However, the presence of rotavirus in positive rodent samples could not be confirmed by virus isolation, electron microscopy or blocking ELISA using anti-EDIM mouse rotavirus serum. Several lines of evidence indicated that these positive reactions were false positives, apparently due to a non-specifically reacting substance in the diet of rats and mice. All the positive fecal samples were from rats and mice that had been fed nonautoclaved diet. Samples from rodents fed autoclaved diet were consistently negative in the Rotazyme test. When rats fed autoclaved diet were subsequently fed nonautoclaved diet, their stool converted from negative to positive within 6 hours. Conversely, rats with positive stool samples converted to negative within 15 hours when fed autoclaved diet. Similar results were found with mice. Positive fecal specimens and nonautoclaved rodent diet both contained a substance that apparently attached nonspecifically to the antibody coated beads used in the ELISA and reacted directly with the substrate in the absence of the conjugate. This substance was heat labile and trypsin sensitive, suggesting that it was a protein. PMID:2842540

  4. Group A rotavirus gastroenteritis: post-vaccine era, genotypes and zoonotic transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchs, Adriana; Timenetsky, Maria do Carmo Sampaio Tavares

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACTThis article provides a review of immunity, diagnosis, and clinical aspects of rotavirus disease. It also informs about the changes in epidemiology of diarrheal disease and genetic diversity of circulating group A rotavirus strains following the introduction of vaccines. Group A rotavirus is the major pathogen causing gastroenteritis in animals. Its segmented RNA genome can lead to the emergence of new or unusual strains in human populations via interspecies transmission and/or reassortment events.RESUMOEste artigo fornece uma revisão sobre imunidade, diagnóstico e aspectos clínicos da doença causada por rotavírus. Também aponta as principais mudanças no perfil epidemiológico da doença diarreica e na diversidade genética das cepas circulantes de rotavírus do grupo A, após a introdução vacinal. O rotavírus do grupo A é o principal patógeno associado à gastroenterite em animais. Seu genoma RNA segmentado pode levar ao surgimento de cepas novas ou incomuns na população humana, por meio de transmissão entre espécies e eventos de rearranjo. PMID:27462899

  5. Nucleotide sequence variation of the VP7 gene of two G3-type rotaviruses isolated from dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martella, V; Pratelli, A; Greco, G; Gentile, M; Fiorente, P; Tempesta, M; Buonavoglia, C

    2001-04-01

    The sequence of the VP7 gene of two rotaviruses isolated from dogs in southern Italy was determined and the inferred amino acid sequence was compared with that of other rotavirus strains. There was very high nucleotide and amino acid identity between canine strain RV198/95 and other canine strains, and to the human strain HCR3A. Strain RV52/96, however, was found to have about 95% identity to the G3 serotype canine strains K9, A79-10 and CU-1 and 96% identity to strain RV198/95 and to the simian strain RRV. Therefore both of the canine strains belong to the G3 serotype. Nevertheless, detailed analysis of the VP7 variable regions revealed that RV52/96 possesses amino acid substitutions uncommon to the other canine isolates. In addition, strain RV52/96 exhibited a nucleotide divergence greater than 16% from all the other canine strains studied; however, it revealed the closest identity (90.4%) to the simian strain RRV. With only a few exceptions, phylogenetic analysis allowed clear differentiation of the G3 rotaviruses on the basis of the species of origin. The nucleotide and amino acid variations observed in strain RV52/96 could account for the existence of a canine rotavirus G3 sub-type. PMID:11226570

  6. Two G3 feline rotavirus strains lacking cross-neutralization reactions represent distinct subtypes of serotype G3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, M; Nakagomi, O

    1994-01-01

    Two feline rotavirus strains, FRV-1 and FRV64, that have been shown to lack cross-neutralization reactions despite the sharing of serotype G3 were examined by plaque-reduction neutralization assays in relation to other G3 strains originating from cats, dogs, humans and monkeys. While FRV-1 and human G3 strains constituted one subtype (G3A), FRV64, canine strains and simian strains constituted another subtype (G3B). PMID:8078427

  7. Incidence and cost of rotavirus hospitalizations in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Thea Kølsen; Nielsen, Nete Munk; Wohlfahrt, Jan;

    2007-01-01

    In anticipation of licensure and introduction of rotavirus vaccine into the western market, we used modeling of national hospital registry data to determine the incidence and direct medical costs of annual rotavirus-associated admissions over >11 years in Denmark. Diarrhea-associated hospitalizat......In anticipation of licensure and introduction of rotavirus vaccine into the western market, we used modeling of national hospital registry data to determine the incidence and direct medical costs of annual rotavirus-associated admissions over >11 years in Denmark. Diarrhea......-associated hospitalizations coded as nonspecified viral or presumed infectious have demonstrated a marked winter peak similar to that of rotavirus-associated hospitalizations, which suggests that the registered rotavirus-coded admissions are grossly underestimated. We therefore obtained more realistic estimates by 2...... different models, which indicated 2.4 and 2.5 (for children rotavirus-associated admissions per 1,000 children per year, respectively. These admissions amount to associated direct medical costs of US $1.7-1.8 million per year. Using 2 simple...

  8. Perspectivas de la diarrea por rotavirus en El Salvador

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    Roberto Arturo Zablah

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available In December 2000, a large outbreak of gastroenteritis (GE occurred in El Salvador that was associated with hospitalizations and deaths among children nationwide. Public concern was raised because the etiology was initially unknown and enteric control measures seemed ineffective. The outbreak was eventually linked to rotavirus, control measures were redirected to improving treatment with oral rehydration, and surveillance was initiated to characterize the etiologic agents of gastroenteritis. Demographic and clinical data and fecal specimens were collected from a systematic sample of children < 5 years old with acute gastroenteritis. Stools were examined for rotavirus, bacteria, and parasites. Surveillance results were extrapolated to national data in order to estimate the national burden of rotavirus disease. Results: Surveillance between May 2001 and April 2002 demonstrated that rotavirus with winter seasonality, was associated with vomiting and dehydration, and accounted for an estimated 27% of 12,083 consultations for diarrhea. Children with rotavirus gastroenteritis were younger (median 9 months than those with GE due to other agents (median 13 months for bacteria, 16 months for parasites. Extrapolating to national data, we estimated the risk of a child experiencing a rotavirus-related medical visit, hospitalization, and death by the age of 5 years as 1:7, 1:56, and 1:531, respectively. Conclusions: The outbreak of gastroenteritis among children <5 years of age between December 2000 and February 2001 represented an exaggerated rotavirus season. The surveillance activity following the outbreak suggests that rotavirus is the most common cause of diarrheal disease in El Salvador. Further surveillance could provide a sound basis for improving the response to epidemics of gastroenteritis and could provide data needed to decide whether rotavirus vaccination should be included in the national program for childhood immunizations.

  9. Avian rotavirus enteritis - an updated review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhama, Kuldeep; Saminathan, Mani; Karthik, Kumaragurubaran; Tiwari, Ruchi; Shabbir, Muhammad Zubair; Kumar, Naveen; Malik, Yashpal Singh; Singh, Raj Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Rotaviruses (RVs) are among the leading causes of enteritis and diarrhea in a number of mammalian and avian species, and impose colossal loss to livestock and poultry industry globally. Subsequent to detection of rotavirus in mammalian hosts in 1973, avian rotavirus (AvRV) was first reported in turkey poults in USA during 1977 and since then RVs of group A (RVA), D (RVD), F (RVF) and G (RVG) have been identified around the globe. Besides RVA, other AvRV groups (RVD, RVF and RVG) may also contribute to disease. However, their significance has yet to be unraveled. Under field conditions, co-infection of AvRVs occurs with other infectious agents such as astroviruses, enteroviruses, reoviruses, paramyxovirus, adenovirus, Salmonella, Escherichia coli, cryptosporidium and Eimeria species prospering severity of disease outcome. Birds surviving to RV disease predominantly succumb to secondary bacterial infections, mostly E. coli and Salmonella spp. Recent developments in molecular tools including state-of-the-art diagnostics and vaccine development have led to advances in our understanding towards AvRVs. Development of new generation vaccines using immunogenic antigens of AvRV has to be explored and given due importance. Till now, no effective vaccines are available. Although specific as well as sensitive approaches are available to identify and characterize AvRVs, there is still need to have point-of-care detection assays to review disease burden, contemplate new directions for adopting vaccination and follow improvements in public health measures. This review discusses AvRVs, their epidemiology, pathology and pathogenesis, immunity, recent trends in diagnostics, vaccines, therapeutics as well as appropriate prevention and control strategies.

  10. Detection of rotavirus using padlock probes and rolling circle amplification.

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    Anja Mezger

    Full Text Available Rotavirus infections are one of the most common reasons for hospitalizations due to gastrointestinal diseases. Rotavirus is often diagnosed by latex agglutination assay, chromatography immunoassay, or by electron microscopy, which are all quite insensitive. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, on the other hand, is very sensitive to variations at the genomic level. We developed a novel assay based on a set of 58 different padlock probes with a detection limit of 1,000 copies. Twenty-two patient samples were analyzed and the assay showed high concordance with a PCR-based assay. In summary, we present a new assay for sensitive and variation tolerant detection of rotavirus.

  11. Dynamic modeling of cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination, Kazakhstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freiesleben de Blasio, Birgitte; Flem, Elmira; Latipov, Renat; Kuatbaeva, Ajnagul; Kristiansen, Ivar Sønbø

    2014-01-01

    The government of Kazakhstan, a middle-income country in Central Asia, is considering the introduction of rotavirus vaccination into its national immunization program. We performed a cost-effectiveness analysis of rotavirus vaccination spanning 20 years by using a synthesis of dynamic transmission models accounting for herd protection. We found that a vaccination program with 90% coverage would prevent ≈880 rotavirus deaths and save an average of 54,784 life-years for children vaccine cost at vaccination program costs would be entirely offset. To further evaluate efficacy of a vaccine program, benefits of indirect protection conferred by vaccination warrant further study.

  12. Prevalence of rotavirus genotypes in children younger than 5 years of age before the introduction of a universal rotavirus vaccination program: report of rotavirus surveillance in Turkey.

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    Riza Durmaz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Group A rotaviruses are the most common causative agent of acute gastroenteritis among children less than 5 years of age throughout the world. This sentinel surveillance study was aimed to obtain baseline data on the rotavirus G and P genotypes across Turkey before the introduction of a universal rotavirus vaccination program. METHODS: Rotavirus antigen-positive samples were collected from 2102 children less than 5 years of age who attended hospitals participating in the Turkish Rotavirus Surveillance Network. Rotavirus antigen was detected in the laboratories of participating hospitals by commercial serological tests such as latex agglutination, immunochromatographic test or enzyme immunoassay. Rotavirus G and P genotypes were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR using consensus primers detecting the VP7 and VP4 genes, followed by semi-nested type-specific multiplex PCR. RESULTS: RT-PCR found rotavirus RNA in 1644 (78.2% of the samples tested. The highest rate of rotavirus positivity (38.7% was observed among children in the 13 to 24 month age group, followed by children in the age group of 25 to 36 months (28.3%. A total of eight different G types, six different P types, and 42 different G-P combinations were obtained. Four common G types (G1, G2, G3, and G9 and two common P types (P[8] and P[4] accounted for 95.1% and 98.8% of the strains, respectively. G9P[8] was the most common G/P combination found in 40.5% of the strains followed by G1P[8] (21.6%, G2P[8] (9.3%, G2P[4] (6.5%, G3P[8] (3.5%, and finally, G4P[8] (3.4%. These six common genotypes included 83.7% of the strains tested in this study. The rate of uncommon genotypes was 14%. CONCLUSION: The majority of the strains analyzed belonged to the G1-G4 and G9 genotypes, suggesting high coverage of current rotavirus vaccines. This study also demonstrates a dramatic increase in G9 genotype across the country.

  13. Glucagon like peptide-1-induced glucose metabolism in differentiated human muscle satellite cells is attenuated by hyperglycemia.

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    Charlotte J Green

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1 stimulates insulin secretion from the pancreas but also has extra-pancreatic effects. GLP-1 may stimulate glucose uptake in cultured muscle cells but the mechanism is not clearly defined. Furthermore, while the pancreatic effects of GLP-1 are glucose-dependent, the glucose-dependency of its extra-pancreatic effects has not been examined. METHODS: Skeletal muscle satellite cells isolated from young (22.5 ± 0.97 yr, lean (BMI 22.5 ± 0.6 kg/m(2, healthy males were differentiated in media containing either 22.5 mM (high or 5 mM (normal glucose for 7 days in the absence or presence of insulin and/or various GLP-1 concentrations. Myocellular effects of GLP-1, insulin and glucose were assessed by western-blot, glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis. RESULTS: We firstly show that the GLP-1 receptor protein is expressed in differentiated human muscle satellite cells (myocytes. Secondly, we show that in 5 mM glucose media, exposure of myocytes to GLP-1 results in a dose dependent increase in glucose uptake, GLUT4 amount and subsequently glycogen synthesis in a PI3K dependent manner, independent of the insulin signaling cascade. Importantly, we provide evidence that differentiation of human satellite cells in hyperglycemic (22.5 mM glucose conditions increases GLUT1 expression, and renders the cells insulin resistant and interestingly GLP-1 resistant in terms of glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis. Hyperglycemic conditions did not affect the ability of insulin to phosphorylate downstream targets, PKB or GSK3. Interestingly we show that at 5 mM glucose, GLP-1 increases GLUT4 protein levels and that this effect is abolished by hyperglycemia. CONCLUSIONS: GLP-1 increases glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis into fully-differentiated human satellite cells in a PI3-K dependent mechanism potentially through increased GLUT4 protein levels. The latter occurs independently of the insulin signaling pathway. Attenuation

  14. Outstanding challenges for rotavirus vaccine introduction in low-income countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ustrup, Marte; Madsen, Lizell B; Bygbjerg, Ib C;

    2011-01-01

    Rotavirus infections are the most common cause of severe diarrhoea in children worldwide. Two internationally licensed rotavirus vaccines have proven to be efficacious in middle and high-income countries and they could potentially be valuable tools for the prevention of rotavirus....... There is also a need for political commitment to prevent rotavirus infections as well as a need for an overall strengthening of the health systems in low-income countries. If these challenges were met, rotavirus vaccination could substantially improve child health and survival from rotavirus...

  15. Early Transcriptional Signatures of the Immune Response to a Live Attenuated Tetravalent Dengue Vaccine Candidate in Non-human Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strouts, Fiona R.; Popper, Stephen J.; Partidos, Charalambos D.; Stinchcomb, Dan T.; Osorio, Jorge E.; Relman, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The development of a vaccine against dengue faces unique challenges, including the complexity of the immune responses to the four antigenically distinct serotypes. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling provides insight into the pathways and molecular features that underlie responses to immune system stimulation, and may facilitate predictions of immune protection. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we measured early transcriptional responses in the peripheral blood of cynomolgus macaques following vaccination with a live, attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate, TDV, which is based on a DENV-2 backbone. Different doses and routes of vaccine administration were used, and viral load and neutralizing antibody titers were measured at different time-points following vaccination. All 30 vaccinated animals developed a neutralizing antibody response to each of the four dengue serotypes, and only 3 of these animals had detectable serum viral RNA after challenge with wild-type dengue virus (DENV), suggesting protection of vaccinated animals to DENV infection. The vaccine induced statistically significant changes in 595 gene transcripts on days 1, 3, 5 and 7 as compared with baseline and placebo-treated animals. Genes involved in the type I interferon (IFN) response, including IFI44, DDX58, MX1 and OASL, exhibited the highest fold-change in transcript abundance, and this response was strongest following double dose and subcutaneous (versus intradermal) vaccine administration. In addition, modules of genes involved in antigen presentation, dendritic cell activation, and T cell activation and signaling were enriched following vaccination. Increased abundance of gene transcripts related to T cell activation on day 5, and the type I IFN response on day 7, were significantly correlated with the development of high neutralizing antibody titers on day 30. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest that early transcriptional responses may be

  16. Growth Hormone Releasing Peptide-2 Attenuation of Protein Kinase C-Induced Inflammation in Human Ovarian Granulosa Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Yi-Ning; Sun, David; Peng, Yen-Chun; Wu, Yuh-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) are two important inflammatory mediators in ovulation. Ghrelin may modulate inflammatory signaling via growth hormone secretagogue receptors. We investigated the role of ghrelin in KGN human ovarian granulosa cells using protein kinase C (PKC) activator phorbol 12, 13-didecanoate (PDD) and synthetic ghrelin analog growth hormone releasing peptide-2 (GHRP-2). GHRP-2 attenuated PDD-induced expression of protein and mRNA, the promoter activity of COX-2 and IL-8 genes, and the secretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and IL-8. GHRP-2 promoted the degradation of PDD-induced COX-2 and IL-8 proteins with the involvement of proteasomal and lysosomal pathways. PDD-mediated COX-2 production acts via the p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) pathways; PDD-mediated IL-8 production acts via the p38, JNK and ERK pathways. GHRP-2 reduced the PDD-induced phosphorylation of p38 and JNK and activator protein 1 (AP-1) reporter activation and PDD-induced NF-κB nuclear translocation and reporter activation. The inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) and protein phosphatase 2 (PP2A) reduced the inhibitory effect of GHRP-2 on PDD-induced COX-2 and IL-8 expression. Our findings demonstrate an anti-inflammatory role for ghrelin (GHRP-2) in PKC-mediated inflammation of granulosa cells, at least in part, due to its inhibitory effect on PKC-induced activation of p38, JNK and NF-κB, possibly by targeting to MKP-1 and PP2A. PMID:27548147

  17. Potent Paracrine Effects of human induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Attenuate Doxorubicin-induced Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuelin; Liang, Xiaoting; Liao, Songyan; Wang, Weixin; Wang, Junwen; Li, Xiang; Ding, Yue; Liang, Yingmin; Gao, Fei; Yang, Mo; Fu, Qingling; Xu, Aimin; Chai, Yuet-Hung; He, Jia; Tse, Hung-Fat; Lian, Qizhou

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) can protect cardiomyocytes against anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy (AIC) through paracrine effects. Nonetheless the paracrine effects of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived MSCs (iPSC-MSCs) on AIC are poorly understood. In vitro studies reveal that doxorubicin (Dox)-induced reactive oxidative stress (ROS) generation and cell apoptosis in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCMs) are significantly reduced when treated with conditioned medium harvested from BM-MSCs (BM-MSCs-CdM) or iPSC-MSCs (iPSC-MSCs-CdM). Compared with BM-MSCs-CdM, NRCMs treated with iPSC-MSCs-CdM exhibit significantly less ROS and cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Transplantation of BM-MSCs-CdM or iPSC-MSCs-CdM into mice with AIC remarkably attenuated left ventricular (LV) dysfunction and dilatation. Compared with BM-MSCs-CdM, iPSC-MSCs-CdM treatment showed better alleviation of heart failure, less cardiomyocyte apoptosis and fibrosis. Analysis of common and distinct cytokines revealed that macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) and growth differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15) were uniquely overpresented in iPSC-MSC-CdM. Immunodepletion of MIF and GDF-15 in iPSC-MSCs-CdM dramatically decreased cardioprotection. Injection of GDF-15/MIF cytokines could partially reverse Dox-induced heart dysfunction. We suggest that the potent paracrine effects of iPSC-MSCs provide novel “cell-free” therapeutic cardioprotection against AIC, and that MIF and GDF-15 in iPSC-MSCs-CdM are critical for these enhanced cardioprotective effects. PMID:26057572

  18. Attenuation of skeletal muscle wasting with recombinant human growth hormone secreted from a tissue-engineered bioartificial muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenburgh, H.; Del Tatto, M.; Shansky, J.; Goldstein, L.; Russell, K.; Genes, N.; Chromiak, J.; Yamada, S.

    1998-01-01

    Skeletal muscle wasting is a significant problem in elderly and debilitated patients. Growth hormone (GH) is an anabolic growth factor for skeletal muscle but is difficult to deliver in a therapeutic manner by injection owing to its in vivo instability. A novel method is presented for the sustained secretion of recombinant human GH (rhGH) from genetically modified skeletal muscle implants, which reduces host muscle wasting. Proliferating murine C2C12 skeletal myoblasts stably transduced with the rhGH gene were tissue engineered in vitro into bioartificial muscles (C2-BAMs) containing organized postmitotic myofibers secreting 3-5 microg of rhGH/day in vitro. When implanted subcutaneously into syngeneic mice, C2-BAMs delivered a sustained physiologic dose of 2.5 to 11.3 ng of rhGH per milliliter of serum. rhGH synthesized and secreted by the myofibers was in the 22-kDa monomeric form and was biologically active, based on downregulation of a GH-sensitive protein synthesized in the liver. Skeletal muscle disuse atrophy was induced in mice by hindlimb unloading, causing the fast plantaris and slow soleus muscles to atrophy by 21 to 35% ( < 0.02). This atrophy was significantly attenuated 41 to 55% (p < 0.02) in animals that received C2-BAM implants, but not in animals receiving daily injections of purified rhGH (1 mg/kg/day). These data support the concept that delivery of rhGH from BAMs may be efficacious in treating muscle-wasting disorders.

  19. Population Impact and Effectiveness of Monovalent Rotavirus Vaccination in Urban Malawian Children 3 Years After Vaccine Introduction: Ecological and Case-Control Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Zeev, Naor; Jere, Khuzwayo C.; Bennett, Aisleen; Pollock, Louisa; Tate, Jacqueline E.; Nakagomi, Osamu; Iturriza-Gomara, Miren; Costello, Anthony; Mwansambo, Charles; Parashar, Umesh D.; Heyderman, Robert S.; French, Neil; Cunliffe, Nigel A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Rotavirus vaccines have been introduced in many low-income African countries including Malawi in 2012. Despite early evidence of vaccine impact, determining persistence of protection beyond infancy, the utility of the vaccine against specific rotavirus genotypes, and effectiveness in vulnerable subgroups is important. Methods. We compared rotavirus prevalence in diarrheal stool and hospitalization incidence before and following rotavirus vaccine introduction in Malawi. Using case-control analysis, we derived vaccine effectiveness (VE) in the second year of life and for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–exposed and stunted children. Results. Rotavirus prevalence declined concurrent with increasing vaccine coverage, and in 2015 was 24% compared with prevaccine mean baseline in 1997–2011 of 32%. Since vaccine introduction, population rotavirus hospitalization incidence declined in infants by 54.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 32.8–68.8), but did not fall in older children. Comparing 241 rotavirus cases with 692 test-negative controls, VE was 70.6% (95% CI, 33.6%–87.0%) and 31.7% (95% CI, −140.6% to 80.6%) in the first and second year of life, respectively, whereas mean age of rotavirus cases increased from 9.3 to 11.8 months. Despite higher VE against G1P[8] than against other genotypes, no resurgence of nonvaccine genotypes has occurred. VE did not differ significantly by nutritional status (78.1% [95% CI, 5.6%–94.9%] in 257 well-nourished and 27.8% [95% CI, −99.5% to 73.9%] in 205 stunted children; P = .12), or by HIV exposure (60.5% [95% CI, 13.3%–82.0%] in 745 HIV-unexposed and 42.2% [95% CI, −106.9% to 83.8%] in 174 exposed children; P = .91). Conclusions. Rotavirus vaccination in Malawi has resulted in reductions in disease burden in infants <12 months, but not in older children. Despite differences in genotype-specific VE, no genotype has emerged to suggest vaccine escape. VE was not demonstrably affected by HIV exposure

  20. Association of Maternal Immunity with Rotavirus Vaccine Immunogenicity in Zambian Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilengi, Roma; Simuyandi, Michelo; Beach, Lauren; Mwila, Katayi; Becker-Dreps, Sylvia; Emperador, Devy M.; Velasquez, Daniel E.; Bosomprah, Samuel; Jiang, Baoming

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Live attenuated oral vaccines against rotavirus (RV) have been shown to be less efficacious in children from developing countries. Reasons for this disparity are not fully understood. We assessed the role of maternal factors including breast milk RV-specific IgA, transplacentally acquired infant serum RV-specific IgG and maternal HIV status in seroconversion among Zambian infants routinely immunized with Rotarix™ (RV1). Methods 420 mother-child pairs were recruited at infant age 6–12 weeks in Lusaka. Clinical information and samples were collected at baseline and at one month following the second dose of RV1. Determination of breast milk RV-specific IgA and serum RV-specific IgA and IgG was done using standardized ELISA. Seroconversion was defined as a ≥ 4 fold rise in serum IgA titre from baseline to one-month post RV1 dose 2, while seropositivity of IgA was defined as serum titre ≥ 40 and antibody variables were modelled on log-base 2. Logistic regression was used to identify predictors of the odds of seroconversion. Results Baseline infant seropositivity was 25.5% (91/357). The seroconversion frequency was 60.2% (130/216). Infants who were IgA seropositive at baseline were less likely to seroconvert compared to their seronegative counterparts (P = 0.04). There was no evidence of an association between maternal HIV status and seroconversion (P = 0.25). Higher titres of breast milk rotavirus-specific IgA were associated with a lower frequency of seroconverson (Nonparametric test for trend Z = -2.84; P<0.01): a two-fold increase in breast milk RV-specific IgA titres was associated with a 22% lower odds of seroconversion (OR = 0.80; 95% CI = 0.68–0.94; P = 0.01). There was seasonal variation in baseline breast milk rotavirus-specific IgA titres, with significantly higher GMTs during the cold dry months (P = 0.01). Conclusion Low immunogenicity of RV1 vaccine could be explained in part by exposure to high antibody titres in breast milk and

  1. Structural correlates of rotavirus cell entry.

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    Aliaa H Abdelhakim

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cell entry by non-enveloped viruses requires translocation into the cytosol of a macromolecular complex--for double-strand RNA viruses, a complete subviral particle. We have used live-cell fluorescence imaging to follow rotavirus entry and penetration into the cytosol of its ∼ 700 Å inner capsid particle ("double-layered particle", DLP. We label with distinct fluorescent tags the DLP and each of the two outer-layer proteins and track the fates of each species as the particles bind and enter BSC-1 cells. Virions attach to their glycolipid receptors in the host cell membrane and rapidly become inaccessible to externally added agents; most particles that release their DLP into the cytosol have done so by ∼ 10 minutes, as detected by rapid diffusional motion of the DLP away from residual outer-layer proteins. Electron microscopy shows images of particles at various stages of engulfment into tightly fitting membrane invaginations, consistent with the interpretation that rotavirus particles drive their own uptake. Electron cryotomography of membrane-bound virions also shows closely wrapped membrane. Combined with high resolution structural information about the viral components, these observations suggest a molecular model for membrane disruption and DLP penetration.

  2. The burden of rotavirus disease in Denmark 2009-2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Thea Kølsen; Rungø, Christine; Jensen, Claus Sixtus;

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study sought to determine the incidence and the burden of severe diarrheal disease in Denmark with emphasis on rotavirus (RV) disease. METHODS: This study was designed as a national prospective disease surveillance of children

  3. The rotavirus experience in Mexico: discovery to control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manish M; Parashar, Umesh D; Santosham, Mathuram; Richardson, Vesta

    2013-02-01

    The recent introduction of a rotavirus vaccine program in Mexico to control rotavirus disease, a common killer of children worldwide, has dramatically reduced the number of Mexican children dying and being hospitalized because of diarrhea. The successful introduction of a rotavirus vaccine program was preceded by several decades of focused research efforts to document the burden of disease and to generate the knowledge base to develop and deploy a vaccine. The postlicensure experience from Mexico demonstrates that evaluating the impact and safety of the vaccination program is vitally necessary for sustaining it. All in all, the immensely successful Mexico experience with control of rotavirus disease, if copied, could yield tremendously favorable results for children and parents worldwide.

  4. Rotavirus activates lymphocytes from non-obese diabetic mice by triggering toll-like receptor 7 signaling and interferon production in plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A Pane

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available It has been proposed that rotavirus infection promotes the progression of genetically-predisposed children to type 1 diabetes, a chronic autoimmune disease marked by infiltration of activated lymphocytes into pancreatic islets. Non-obese diabetic (NOD mice provide a model for the human disease. Infection of adult NOD mice with rhesus monkey rotavirus (RRV accelerates diabetes onset, without evidence of pancreatic infection. Rather, RRV spreads to the pancreatic and mesenteric lymph nodes where its association with antigen-presenting cells, including dendritic cells, induces cellular maturation. RRV infection increases levels of the class I major histocompatibility complex on B cells and proinflammatory cytokine expression by T cells at these sites. In autoimmunity-resistant mice and human mononuclear cells from blood, rotavirus-exposed plasmacytoid dendritic cells contribute to bystander polyclonal B cell activation through type I interferon expression. Here we tested the hypothesis that rotavirus induces bystander activation of lymphocytes from NOD mice by provoking dendritic cell activation and proinflammatory cytokine secretion. NOD mouse splenocytes were stimulated with rotavirus and assessed for activation by flow cytometry. This stimulation activated antigen-presenting cells and B cells independently of virus strain and replicative ability. Instead, activation depended on virus dose and was prevented by blockade of virus decapsidation, inhibition of endosomal acidification and interference with signaling through Toll-like receptor 7 and the type I interferon receptor. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells were more efficiently activated than conventional dendritic cells by RRV, and contributed to the activation of B and T cells, including islet-autoreactive CD8+ T cells. Thus, a double-stranded RNA virus can induce Toll-like receptor 7 signaling, resulting in lymphocyte activation. Our findings suggest that bystander activation mediated by type I

  5. Molecular epidemiology of rotavirus in cats in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, A C; Iturriza-Gómara, M; Dove, W; Sandrasegaram, M; Nakagomi, T; Nakagomi, O; Cunliffe, N; Radford, A D; Morgan, K L

    2015-02-01

    Rotaviruses are leading causes of gastroenteritis in the young of many species. Molecular epidemiological studies in children suggest that interspecies transmission contributes to rotavirus strain diversity in people. However, population-based studies of rotaviruses in animals are few. We investigated the prevalence, risk factors for infection, and genetic diversity of rotavirus A in a cross-sectional survey of cats housed within 25 rescue catteries across the United Kingdom. Morning litter tray fecal samples were collected during the winter and summer in 2012 from all pens containing kittens and a random sample of those housing adult cats. Group A rotavirus RNA was detected by real-time reverse transcription-PCR, and positive samples were G and P genotyped using nested VP4 and VP7 PCR assays. A total of 1,727 fecal samples were collected from 1,105 pens. Overall, the prevalence of rotavirus was 3.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2 to 4.9%). Thirteen out of 25 (52%; 95% CI, 31.3 to 72.2%) centers housed at least one rotavirus-positive cat. The prevalence of rotavirus was associated with season (odds ratio, 14.8 [95% CI, 1.1 to 200.4]; P = 0.04) but not age or diarrhea. It was higher during the summer (4.7%; 95% CI, 1.2 to 8.3%) than in winter (0.8%; 95% CI, 0.2 to 1.5%). Asymptomatic epidemics of infection were detected in two centers. G genotypes were characterized for 19 (33.3%) of the 57 rotavirus-positive samples and P genotypes for 36 (59.7%). Two rotavirus genotypes were identified, G3P[9] and G6P[9]. This is the first population-based study of rotavirus in cats and the first report of feline G6P[9], which questions the previous belief that G6P[9] in people is of bovine origin. PMID:25411173

  6. Change in incidence of clinic visits for all-cause and rotavirus gastroenteritis in young children following the introduction of universal rotavirus vaccination in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhsen, Khitam; Chodick, Gabriel; Goren, Sophy; Anis, Emilia; Ziv-Baran, Tomer; Shalev, Varda; Cohen, Dani

    2015-01-01

    Both rotavirus vaccines RotaTeq and Rotarix were efficacious against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis in clinical trials; yet real-world data on the effect of rotavirus vaccines on mild to moderate disease are limited. We used a large computerised database of Maccabi Health Services Health Maintenance Organisation (HMO), the second largest HMO in Israel covering 25% of the Israeli population, to compare the incidence of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) clinic visits in community settings (n=302,445) before (2005-10) and after (2011-13) the introduction of universal rotavirus immunisation in Israel. We retrieved laboratory results of rotavirus antigen tests (n=18,133) and using a weighted analysis, we estimated the impact of rotavirus immunisation on the disease burden of rotavirus AGE clinic visits. Following the introduction of universal rotavirus immunisation, the typical winter peaks of rotavirus AGE were substantially lower and significant reductions of 14.8% (95% confidence interval (CI): 13.5-16.1) in all-cause AGE clinic visits and of 59.7% (95% CI: 59.8-62.6) in rotavirus AGE clinic visits were observed. The decrease was observed in all age groups, but it was greater in children aged 0 to 23 months than those aged 24 to 59 months. Continued rotavirus laboratory surveillance is warranted to monitor the sustainability of these changes. PMID:26538450

  7. THE IMPROVEMENT OF RT-PCR TECHNIQUE ON DETECTING ROTAVIRUS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To establish a speed and effective method to detect rotavirus. Methods Using ELISA and one step RT-PCR to detect 196 clinic samples from Xi'an area. Results Compared with ELISA method, one step RT PCR was more sensitive and specific (P <0.05). Conclusion One step RT-PCR is a simple, speed, sensitive and spe cific method for clinic and epidemic studies of rotavirus.

  8. Unexpectedly high burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis in very young infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reilly Megan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The highest incidence of rotavirus gastroenteritis has generally been reported in children 6-24 months of age. Young infants are thought to be partially protected by maternal antibodies acquired transplacentally or via breast milk. The purpose of our study was to assess the age distribution of children with confirmed community-acquired rotavirus gastroenteritis presenting to an urban referral hospital. Methods Children presenting to The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia with acute gastroenteritis have been monitored for the presence of rotavirus antigen in the stool by ELISA (followed by genotyping if ELISA-positive since the 1994-95 epidemic season. Results Over the last 12 rotavirus seasons prior to the introduction of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine in 2006, stool specimens from 1646 patients tested positive for community-acquired rotavirus infection. Gender or age was not recorded in 6 and 5 cases, respectively. Overall, 58% of the cases occurred in boys. G1 was the predominant VP7 serotype, accounting for 72% of cases. The median (IQR age was 11 (5-21 months. A total of 790 (48% cases occurred in children outside the commonly quoted peak age range, with 27% in infants 24 months of age. A total of 220 (13% cases occurred during the first 3 months of life, and the highest number of episodes per month of age [97 (6%] was observed during the second month of life. Conclusions The incidence of community-acquired rotavirus gastroenteritis monitored over 12 seasons in the prevaccine era at a major university hospital was nearly constant for each month of age during the first year of life, revealing an unexpectedly high incidence of symptomatic rotavirus disease in infants

  9. Molecular biology of rotaviruses. III. Isolation and characterization of temperature-sensitive mutants of bovine rotavirus.

    OpenAIRE

    Faulkner-Valle, G P; Clayton, A V; McCrae, M A

    1982-01-01

    Twenty-six temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants of United Kingdom tissue culture-adapted bovine rotavirus were isolated and characterized. Fourteen of these mutants were determined to be ts both by efficiency of plating and by virus yield at the nonpermissive temperature of 39.5 degrees C as compared with that at the permissive temperature of 32 degrees C. The remaining mutants were only ts by the criterion of efficiency of plating. High-frequency recombination (gene reassortment) was observed ...

  10. Estimating rotavirus vaccine effectiveness in Japan using a screening method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Kaoru; Hara, Megumi; Sakanishi, Yuta; Shimanoe, Chisato; Nishida, Yuichiro; Matsuo, Muneaki; Tanaka, Keitaro

    2016-01-01

    abstract Rotavirus gastroenteritis is a highly contagious, acute viral disease that imposes a significant health burden worldwide. In Japan, rotavirus vaccines have been commercially available since 2011 for voluntary vaccination, but vaccine coverage and effectiveness have not been evaluated. In the absence of a vaccination registry in Japan, vaccination coverage in the general population was estimated according to the number of vaccines supplied by the manufacturer, the number of children who received financial support for vaccination, and the size of the target population. Patients with rotavirus gastroenteritis were identified by reviewing the medical records of all children who consulted 6 major hospitals in Saga Prefecture with gastroenteritis symptoms. Vaccination status among these patients was investigated by reviewing their medical records or interviewing their guardians by telephone. Vaccine effectiveness was determined using a screening method. Vaccination coverage increased with time, and it was 2-times higher in municipalities where the vaccination fee was supported. In the 2012/13 season, vaccination coverage in Saga Prefecture was 14.9% whereas the proportion of patients vaccinated was 5.1% among those with clinically diagnosed rotavirus gastroenteritis and 1.9% among those hospitalized for rotavirus gastroenteritis. Thus, vaccine effectiveness was estimated as 69.5% and 88.8%, respectively. This is the first study to evaluate rotavirus vaccination coverage and effectiveness in Japan since vaccination began. PMID:26680277

  11. Estimating rotavirus vaccine effectiveness in Japan using a screening method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Kaoru; Hara, Megumi; Sakanishi, Yuta; Shimanoe, Chisato; Nishida, Yuichiro; Matsuo, Muneaki; Tanaka, Keitaro

    2016-05-01

    Rotavirus gastroenteritis is a highly contagious, acute viral disease that imposes a significant health burden worldwide. In Japan, rotavirus vaccines have been commercially available since 2011 for voluntary vaccination, but vaccine coverage and effectiveness have not been evaluated. In the absence of a vaccination registry in Japan, vaccination coverage in the general population was estimated according to the number of vaccines supplied by the manufacturer, the number of children who received financial support for vaccination, and the size of the target population. Patients with rotavirus gastroenteritis were identified by reviewing the medical records of all children who consulted 6 major hospitals in Saga Prefecture with gastroenteritis symptoms. Vaccination status among these patients was investigated by reviewing their medical records or interviewing their guardians by telephone. Vaccine effectiveness was determined using a screening method. Vaccination coverage increased with time, and it was 2-times higher in municipalities where the vaccination fee was supported. In the 2012/13 season, vaccination coverage in Saga Prefecture was 14.9% whereas the proportion of patients vaccinated was 5.1% among those with clinically diagnosed rotavirus gastroenteritis and 1.9% among those hospitalized for rotavirus gastroenteritis. Thus, vaccine effectiveness was estimated as 69.5% and 88.8%, respectively. This is the first study to evaluate rotavirus vaccination coverage and effectiveness in Japan since vaccination began. PMID:26680277

  12. Scope for rotavirus vaccination in India: revisiting the scientific evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neogi, Sutapa Bandyopadhyay; Hasan, Habib; Sheikh, Kabir; Zodpey, Sanjay

    2011-10-01

    Rotavirus vaccines have been developed to prevent deaths resulting from severe diarrhea of rotavirus origin. The use of vaccines as an intervention at scale to prevent and control the burden of rotavirus diarrhea is supported by the argument that prevailing public health measures such as hygiene and sanitation, breast feeding and use of ORS have failed to prevent severe dehydration resulting from diarrhea. The article reviews the existing evidence on the rationale of using rotavirus vaccine as against the feasibility of scaling it up in developing countries like India. The vaccines currently available may not cover the strains circulating in Indian population. The diversity of Rotavirus infection in the country is tremendous and since the safety, immunogenicity and efficacy data has not been collected for India, there is first a need to conduct studies to measure the extent of protection and cross-protection provided by the available vaccines for local strains, before venturing into Rotavirus vaccination program. The potential benefits of immunization have to be first vetted against the risks involved by the policymakers and other stakeholders.

  13. Genotyping of Rotavirus by Using RT-PCR Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hera Nirwati

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available There is a great diversity of rotavirus genotypes circulating worldwide, with dominant genotypes changing from year to year. Rotavirus genotyping was performed by using reverse transcription PCR with type-specifi c-primers. Since rotavirus is a RNA virus that has high mutation rate, there was a possibility of technical diffi culty in genotyping due to mutation in the primer binding sites. During Indonesian rotavirus surveillance study 2006-2009, it was reported that 17% of samples subjected for G type and 21% of samplessubjected for P type were untypeable. The objective of this study was to identify genotypes of the samples that were untypeable previously using RT-PCR based on the method described by Das et al. (1994 and Gentsch et al. (1992. There were 30 samples subjected to G type and 61 samples subjected to P type to be re-typed using method described by Gouvea et al. (1990 and Simmond et al. (2008 for G and P typing, respectively. By using another set of primer, the genotype of all samples was identifi ed. This study highlights the importance of a constant reconsideration of primer sequences employed for the molecular typing of rotaviruses.Key words: rotavirus, G typing, P typing

  14. Targeting of rotavirus VP6 to DEC-205 induces protection against the infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badillo-Godinez, O; Gutierrez-Xicotencatl, L; Plett-Torres, T; Pedroza-Saavedra, A; Gonzalez-Jaimes, A; Chihu-Amparan, L; Maldonado-Gama, M; Espino-Solis, G; Bonifaz, L C; Esquivel-Guadarrama, F

    2015-08-20

    Rotavirus (RV) is the primary etiologic agent of severe gastroenteritis in human infants. Although two attenuated RV-based vaccines have been licensed to be applied worldwide, they are not so effective in low-income countries, and the induced protection mechanisms have not been clearly established. Thus, it is important to develop new generation vaccines that induce long lasting heterotypic immunity. VP6 constitutes the middle layer protein of the RV virion. It is the most conserved protein and it is the target of protective T-cells; therefore, it is a potential candidate antigen for a new generation vaccine against the RV infection. We determined whether targeting the DEC-205 present in dendritic cells (DCs) with RV VP6 could induce protection at the intestinal level. VP6 was cross-linked to a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against murine DEC-205 (αDEC-205:VP6), and BALB/c mice were inoculated subcutaneously (s.c.) twice with the conjugated containing 1.5 μg of VP6 in the presence of polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (Poly I:C) as adjuvant. As controls and following the same protocol, mice were immunized with ovalbumin (OVA) cross-linked to the mAb anti-DEC-205 (αDEC-205:OVA), VP6 cross-linked to a control isotype mAb (Isotype:VP6), 3 μg of VP6 alone, Poly I:C or PBS. Two weeks after the last inoculation, mice were orally challenged with a murine RV. Mice immunized with α-DEC-205:VP6 and VP6 alone presented similar levels of serum Abs to VP6 previous to the virus challenge. However, after the virus challenge, only α-DEC-205:VP6 induced up to a 45% IgA-independent protection. Memory T-helper (Th) cells from the spleen and the mesenteric lymph node (MLN) showed a Th1-type response upon antigen stimulation in vitro. These results show that when VP6 is administered parenterally targeting DEC-205, it can induce protection at the intestinal level at a very low dose, and this protection may be Th1-type cell dependent.

  15. Monovalent rotavirus vaccine provides protection against an emerging fully heterotypic G9P[4] rotavirus strain in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Catherine; Figueroa, Jesùs Reyna; Uribe, Edgar Sánchez; Carmen-Hernández, Luz Del; Tate, Jacqueline E; Parashar, Umesh D; Patel, Manish M; Richardson López-Collado, Vesta

    2011-09-01

    After the introduction of monovalent rotavirus vaccine (RV1) in Mexico in 2006-2007, diarrhea mortality and morbidity declined substantially among Mexican children under 5 years of age. In January 2010, surveillance identified the emergence of a novel G9P[4] rotavirus strain nationwide. We conducted a case-control study to assess the field effectiveness of RV1 against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis caused by this unusual strain and to determine whether the G9P[4] emergence was related to vaccine failure or failure to vaccinate. RV1 was 94% effective (95% confidence interval, 16%-100%) against G9P[4] rotavirus-related hospitalization, indicating that its emergence was likely unrelated to vaccine pressure.

  16. Cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination in the Netherlands; the results of a consensus model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozenbaum, M.H.; Mangen, M.J.J.; Giaquinto, C.; Wilschut, J.C.; Hak, E.; Postma, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Each year rotavirus gastroenteritis results in thousands of paediatric hospitalisations and primary care visits in the Netherlands. While two vaccines against rotavirus are registered, routine immunisation of infants has not yet been implemented. Existing cost-effectiveness studies showe

  17. How can a multilevel promotion of breastfeeding reduce the required budget for rotavirus vaccination in Indonesia?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zakiyah, N.; Suwantika, A.A.; Postma, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Breast milk is considered to give protection against rotavirus infection since it contains anti-rotavirus maternal antibodies and other nonspecific inhibitors. Multilevel promotion of breastfeeding is a complex intervention that modifies behavioral determinants through multiple levels of

  18. Cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination in the Netherlands; the results of a consensus model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozenbaum, M.H.; Mangen, M.J.; Giaquinto, C.; Wilschut, J.C.; Hak, E.; Postma, M.J.; Groot, R. de

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Each year rotavirus gastroenteritis results in thousands of paediatric hospitalisations and primary care visits in the Netherlands. While two vaccines against rotavirus are registered, routine immunisation of infants has not yet been implemented. Existing cost-effectiveness studies showe

  19. Recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide attenuates LPS-induced cellular injury in human fetal lung fibroblasts via inhibiting MAPK and NF-κB pathway activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhi; Zhao, Xiu; Liu, Martin; Jin, Hongxu; Cui, Yan; Hou, Mingxiao; Gao, Yan

    2016-08-01

    Inflammatory responses are vital in lung injury diseases, particularly acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide (rhBNP) has been shown to exhibit anti‑inflammatory effects in vivo in our previous studies. The present study aimed to investigate the mechanisms underlying the anti‑inflammatory effects of rhBNP on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced human fetal lung fibroblasts (HFL-1). The results showed that LPS induced a significant increase in the leakage of lactate dehydrogenase and the secretion of interleukin (IL)‑1β. Activation of p38, extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, c‑Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) mitogen‑activated protein kinases (MAPK)s, and nuclear factor (NF)‑κB in HFL‑1 cells was also observed following treatment with LPS. Treatment with rhBNP (0.1 µM) reduced the production of IL‑1β at the protein and mRNA levels. Moreover, rhBNP decreased the phosphorylation of p38, ERK1/2 and JNK induced by LPS. However, the JNK inhibitor, SP600125, significantly inhibited LPS‑induced IL‑1β production. These results indicate that the inhibition of IL‑1β by may dependent upon the JNK signaling pathway. The LPS‑induced NF‑κB activation was also suppressed by rhBNP, and IL‑1β production was inhibited by the NF‑κB inhibitor. Furthermore, NF‑κB activation was attenuated by the JNK inhibitor, indicating that NF‑κB activation was dependent on the JNK signaling pathway. The present study suggests that rhBNP exhibits an anti‑inflammatory effect on LPS‑induced HFL‑1 cell injury via the inhibition of MAPK and NF‑κB signaling pathways and may exhibit therapeutic potential for acute lung injury and ARDS. PMID:27314600

  20. Serological and molecular diversity of human rotavirus in São Paulo, Brazil Diversidade sorológica e molecular de rotavírus identificados em crianças em São Paulo, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veridiana Munford

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available From a total of 187 fecal samples from children with ages between 0 and 5 years, collected in the Hospital Universitário -USP, Brazil, from 1994 to 1996, 54 (28.9% were positive for rotavirus. Positive samples were characterized by electropherotyping, subgrouping, G serotype and genotype and P genotype. Rotavirus electropherotypes were characterized in four different long genome patterns (38.9%, one short genome pattern (34.0% and 18.0% were characterized as an unusual pattern. Subgroup I was found in 38.9% strains, subgroup II in 50.0% and 7.7% was subgroup nonI-nonII. For G serotypes, G2 was found in 59.3%, G1 was identified in 33.3% of strains, two samples showed mixtures of G1+G2 and one sample was G1+G3. Ten samples characterized as serotype G2 showed a long eletropherotype. Genotype G2 was the most frequently and was found in 37 (44.0% samples (23 samples as a single genotype and 14 as mixtures of genotypes. G1 was found in 15 samples. G3 and G4 was detected mainly in mixtures of genotypes and G5, G6 and G9 were identified only in mixtures. A total of 20 (38.5% samples were characterized as G genotype mixtures and P mixtures were found in 16 (29.6% samples. P[4] was found in 55.6% of samples, P[8] in 51.9% and P[6-M37 like] in 22.3% of cases. P[6-Gottfried like] and P[11] were detected only in mixtures. One sample with G6 specificity, mixed with a G2 rotavirus and a P[11] strain, mixed with P[4] and P[8]strain was described for the first time in Latin America.De um total de 187 amostras fecais de crianças com idades entre 0 e 5 anos, coletadas no Hospital Universitário -USP, Brasil, de 1994 a 1996, 54 (28.9% foram positivas para rotavírus. As amostras positivas foram caracterizadas quanto ao eletroferótipo, subgrupo, sorotipo G e genotipo G e P. Foram identificados quatro diferentes eletroferótipo longos em 38.9% das amostras, um eletroferótipo curto (34,0% e 18,0% foram caracterizadas como um eletroferótipo não usual. O subgrupo

  1. Molecular characterisation of a bovine-like rotavirus detected from a giraffe

    OpenAIRE

    O'Shea Helen; Bainbridge John; Lloyd Andrew; Garon Lucie; Pidgeon Eugene; O'Grady Luke; Beltman Marijke; Bryan Jill; Mulherin Emily; Whyte Paul; Fanning Séamus

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Rotavirus (RV), is a member of the Reoviridae family and an important etiological agent of acute viral gastroenteritis in the young. Rotaviruses have a wide host range infecting a broad range of animal species, however little is known about rotavirus infection in exotic animals. In this paper we report the first characterisation of a RV strain from a giraffe calf. Results This report describes the identification and detailed molecular characterisation of a rotavirus strain...

  2. Molecular characterisation of a bovine-like rotavirus detected from a giraffe

    OpenAIRE

    Mulherin, Emily; Bryan, Jill; Beltman, Marijke; O'Grady, Luke; Pidgeon, Eugene; Garon, Lucie; Lloyd, Andrew; Bainbridge, John; O'Shea, Helen; Whyte, Paul; Fanning, Séamus

    2008-01-01

    Background Rotavirus (RV), is a member of the Reoviridae family and an important etiological agent of acute viral gastroenteritis in the young. Rotaviruses have a wide host range infecting a broad range of animal species, however little is known about rotavirus infection in exotic animals. In this paper we report the first characterisation of a RV strain from a giraffe calf. Results This report describes the identification and detailed molecular characterisation of a rotavirus strain detected...

  3. Determinants of Parents' Decision to Vaccinate Their Children against Rotavirus: Results of a Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dube, E.; Bettinger, J. A.; Halperin, B.; Bradet, R.; Lavoie, F.; Sauvageau, C.; Gilca, V.; Boulianne, N.

    2012-01-01

    Rotavirus disease is a common cause of health care utilization and almost all children are affected by the age of 5 years. In Canada, at the time of this survey (2008-09), immunization rates for rotavirus were less than 20%. We assessed the determinants of a parent's acceptance to have their child immunized against rotavirus. The survey…

  4. Rotavirus enterotoxin NSP4 binds to the extracellular matrix proteins laminin-beta3 and fibronectin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Boshuizen; J.W. Rossen (John); C.K. Sitaram; F.F.P. Kimenai; Y. Simons-Oosterhuis (Ytje); C. Laffeber; H.A. Büller (Hans); A.W.C. Einerhand (Sandra)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractRotavirus is the most important cause of viral gastroenteritis and dehydrating diarrhea in young children. Rotavirus nonstructural protein 4 (NSP4) is an enterotoxin that was identified as an important agent in symptomatic rotavirus infection. To identify cellular prote

  5. Health economics of rotavirus immunization in Vietnam : Potentials for favorable cost-effectiveness in developing countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tu, Hong-Anh T.; Rozenbaum, Mark H.; Coyte, Peter C.; Li, Shu Chuen; Woerdenbag, Herman J.; Postma, Maarten J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe diarrhoea worldwide. Vietnam is situated in the region of high rotavirus infection incidence and eligible for financial support to introduce rotavirus vaccines into the Expanded Program of Immunization (EPI) from the GAVI. This study was des

  6. Rotavirus enterotoxin NSP4 binds to the extracellular matrix proteins laminin-beta3 and fibronectin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boshuizen, J A; Rossen, J W A; Sitaram, C K; Kimenai, F F P; Simons-Oosterhuis, Y; Laffeber, C; Büller, H A; Einerhand, A W C

    2004-01-01

    Rotavirus is the most important cause of viral gastroenteritis and dehydrating diarrhea in young children. Rotavirus nonstructural protein 4 (NSP4) is an enterotoxin that was identified as an important agent in symptomatic rotavirus infection. To identify cellular proteins that interact with NSP4, a

  7. Genomic Characterization of an Unusual Human G3P[3] Rotavirus with Multiple Cross-species Reassortment%一株与儿童腹泻相关的跨多种属的基因重配G3P[3]型轮状病毒

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董慧瑾; 钱渊; 农艺; 张又; 莫兆军; 李荣成

    2016-01-01

    One unusual human G3P[3] group A rotavirus (RVA) strain M2-102 was identified in stool sample collected from a child with diarrhea in Guangxi Province,China in 2014.It is well known that G3P[3] is a genotype commonly identified in feline and canine RVAs.However,the preliminary phylogenetic analyses of the VP7 and VP4 genes of strain M2-102 indicated that these two genes were closely related to bat RVA strain MYAS33 and simian strain RRV,respectively,whereas both clustered distantly to feline/canine-like RVA strains.In this study,full genome sequencing and molecular analyses were conducted to obtain the true origin of strain M2-102.It was revealed that strain RVA/Human-wt/CHN/M2-102/2014/G3P[3] exhibited a G3-P[3]-I3-R3-C3-M3-A9-N3-T3-E3-H6 genotype constellation for VP7-VP4-VP6-VP1-VP2-VP3-NSP1-NSP2-NSP3-NSP4-NSP5 genes.Phylogenetic analyses revealed that 5 genes (VP7,VP1,VP2,NSP2 and NSP3) from strain M2-102 were closely related to those of bat strain MYAS33 from Yunnan Province which was thought a true bat RVA strain rather than a virus transmitted between species,while another 5 genes (VP4,VP3,NSP1,NSP4 and NSP5) clustered closely with those of simian strain RRV,yet the VP6 gene was closely related to that of human G3P[-9] strain AU-1 and AU-1-like RVAs.The epidemiological data indicated that the child infected with M2-102 came from a countryside village,located in Dong Autonomous County of Sanjiang (subtropical hilly wooded area),Liuzhou city in Guangxi Province which might provide natural environment for reassortment events occurring among animal and human RVAs.Therefore,the data suggest that human strain M2-102 might originate from multiple reassortment events among bat,simian and human AU-1-like RVAs,yet it is not clear whether the genomic backbone based on bat MYAS33 (5 genes) and simian RRV (5 genes) like rotaviruses had been obtained through reassortment before being transmitted to the human.This is the first report on whole genome analysis of human G3P[3

  8. Rotavirus genotypes in Belarus, 2008-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semeiko, Galina V; Yermalovich, Marina A; Poliakova, Nadezhda; Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Kerin, Tara K; Wasley, Annemarie; Videbaek, Dovile; Gentsch, Jon R; Bowen, Michael D; Samoilovich, Elena O

    2014-12-01

    This study describes group A rotavirus (RVA) genotype prevalence in Belarus from 2008 to 2012. In 2008, data from 3 sites in Belarus (Brest, Mogilev, Minsk) indicated that G4P[8] was the predominant genotype. Data from Minsk (2008-2012) showed that G4P[8] was the predominant RVA genotype in all years except in 2011 when G3P[8] was most frequently detected. Other RVA genotypes common in Europe (G1P[8], G2P[4]) were detected each year of the study. This study reveals the dominance of genotype G4P[8] in Belarus and helps to establish the baseline genotype prevalence prior to RVA vaccine introduction in the country.

  9. Anti-rotaviral effects of Glycyrrhiza uralensis extract in piglets with rotavirus diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfajaro Mia Madel

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since rotavirus is one of the leading pathogens that cause severe gastroenteritis and represents a serious threat to human and animal health, researchers have been searching for cheap, safe, and effective anti-rotaviral drugs. There is a widespread of interest in using natural products as antiviral agents, and among them, licorice derived from Glycyrrhiza spp. has exerted antiviral properties against several viruses. In this study, anti-rotaviral efficacy of Glycyrrhiza uralensis extract (GUE as an effective and cheaper remedy without side-effects was evaluated in colostrums-deprived piglets after induction of rotavirus diarrhea. Methods Colostrums-deprived piglets were inoculated with porcine rotavirus K85 (G5P[7] strain. On the onset of diarrhea, piglets were treated with different concentration of GUE. To evaluate the antiviral efficacy of GUE, fecal consistency score, fecal virus shedding and histological changes of the small intestine, mRNA expression levels of inflammation-related cytokines (IL8, IL10, IFN-β, IFN-γ and TNF-α, signaling molecules (p38 and JNK, and transcription factor (NFκB in the small intestine and spleen were determined. Results Among the dosages (100-400 mg/ml administrated to animals, 400 mg/ml of GUE cured diarrhea, and markedly improved small intestinal lesion score and fecal virus shedding. mRNA expression levels of inflammation-related cytokines (IL8, IL10, IFN-β, IFN-γ and TNF-α, signaling molecules (p38 and JNK, and transcription factor (NFκB in the small intestine and spleen were markedly increased in animals with RVA-induced diarrhea, but dose- dependently decreased in GUE treated animals after RVA-induced diarrhea. Conclusions GUE cures rotaviral enteritis by coordinating antiviral and anti-inflammatory effects. Therapy of this herbal medicine can be a viable medication for curing rotaviral enteritis in animals and humans.

  10. Rotavirus vaccination and herd immunity: an evidence-based review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seybolt LM

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Lorna M Seybolt, Rodolfo E BéguéDepartment of Pediatrics, Division of Infectious Diseases, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA, USAAbstract: Until recently, rotavirus was the most common cause of diarrhea in infants and young children with over 100 million cases and 400,000 deaths every year worldwide. Yet, its epidemiology is changing rapidly with the introduction of two rotavirus vaccines in the mid 2000s. Both vaccines were shown to be highly efficacious in prelicensure studies to reduce severe rotavirus disease; the efficacy being more pronounced in high- and middle-income countries than in low-income countries. Herd immunity – the indirect protection of unimmunized individuals as a result of others being immunized – was not expected to be a benefit of rotavirus vaccination programs since the vaccines were thought to reduce severe disease but not to decrease virus transmission significantly. Postlicensure studies, however, have suggested that this assumption may need reassessment. Studies in a variety of settings have shown evidence of greater than expected declines in rotavirus disease. While these studies were not designed specifically to detect herd immunity – and few failed to detect this phenomenon – the consistency of the evidence is compelling. These studies are reviewed and described here. While further work is needed, clarifying the presence of herd immunity is not just an academic exercise but an important issue for rotavirus control, especially in lower income countries where the incidence of the disease is highest and the direct protection of the vaccines is lower.Keywords: rotavirus, vaccine, herd immunity, efficacy

  11. Curcumin attenuates quinocetone induced apoptosis and inflammation via the opposite modulation of Nrf2/HO-1 and NF-kB pathway in human hepatocyte L02 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Chongshan; Li, Bin; Zhou, Yan; Li, Daowen; Zhang, Shen; Li, Hui; Xiao, Xilong; Tang, Shusheng

    2016-09-01

    The potential toxicity of quinocetone (QCT) has raised widely concern, but its mechanism is still unclear. This study aimed to investigate the protective effect of curcumin on QCT induced apoptosis and the underlying mechanism in human hepatocyte L02 cells. The results showed that QCT treatment significantly decreased the cell viability of L02 cell and increased the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), which was attenuated by curcumin pre-treatment at 1.25, 2.5 and 5 μM. Compared to the QCT alone group, curcumin pre-treatment significantly attenuated QCT induced oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis. In addition, curcumin pretreatment markedly attenuated QCT-induced increase of iNOS activity and NO production in a dose-dependent manner. Meanwhile, curcumin pretreatment markedly down-regulated the expression of nuclear factor -kB (NF-kB) and iNOS mRNAs, but up-regulated the expressions of Nrf2 and HO-1 mRNAs, compared to the QCT alone group. Zinc protoporphyrin IX, a HO-1 inhibitor, markedly partly abolished the cytoprotective effect of curcumin against QCT-induced caspase activation, NF-kB mRNA expression. These results indicate that curcumin could effectively inhibit QCT induced apoptosis and inflammatory response in L02 cells, which may involve the activation of Nrf2/HO-1 and inhibition of NF-kB pathway. PMID:27375190

  12. A bovine G8P[1] group A rotavirus isolated from an asymptomatically infected dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieg, Michael; Rückner, Antje; Köhler, Christian; Burgener, Iwan; Vahlenkamp, Thomas W

    2015-01-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVAs) are enteric pathogens with well-documented zoonotic transmissions to humans. The segmented genome of the virus enables reassortment events which might alter host susceptibility and/or disease course. Genetic analysis of rotavirus in dogs has so far only revealed RVAs with the VP7 and VP4 genome constellation G3P[3]. RVA G3P[3] have also been found in cats, humans, monkeys and bats. In the present study, we described an unusual RVA of genotype G8P[1] which was isolated from an asymptomatically infected young dog. The dog did not show signs of diarrhoea. Analysis of full-length segments of VP2, VP6 and VP7 as well as NSP1-NSP5 revealed a typical bovine-like genotype constellation G8-P[1]-I2-Rx-C2-Mx-A3-N2-T6-E2-H3. Phylogenetic analysis supported the hypothesis of an interspecies transmission from a bovine/artiodactyl species or from humans to the young dog. The isolate was likely to represent a multiple reassortant virus. PMID:25304653

  13. Expression of NF-kappaB in rotavirus-induced damage to the liver and biliar y tract in neonatal mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Huang; Wei-Zhong Gu; Xin-Min Si; Ming-Fa Wei; Jie-Xiong Feng

    2007-01-01

    in the newborn human. Similar inoculation with SA11 rotavirus can only result in moderate impairment that disappears quickly. The difference of pathogenicity between the two rotaviruses may depend on their differing capacities to increase the expression of NF-κB in the liver and biliary tract.

  14. Nursing Care of Patients With Rotavirus Infection%人轮状病毒感染患者的护理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘华

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical nursing measures of human rotavirus infection.MethodsFrom March 2013 to June 2014, 30 cases were treated in our hospital for human rotavirus infection, analysised the clinical nursing.ResultsAmong the 30 cases, 13 cases were markedly effective, 11 cases were effective, 6 cases were ineffective, the total effective rate was 75%.Conclusion It is helpful to improve the clinical effcacy of comprehensive nursing intervention for patients with rotavirus infection in the condition of disease monitoring and symptomatic nursing.%目的:探讨人轮状病毒感染患者的临床护理措施。方法选取2013年3月~2014年6月收治的人轮状病毒感染患者30例,分析其临床护理方法。结果30例患者经治疗,显效13例,有效11例,无效6例,总有效率为75.00%。结论对轮状病毒感染患者做好病情监测和对症护理等综合护理干预,有助于提高临床疗效。

  15. A Nampt inhibitor FK866 mimics vitamin B3 deficiency by causing senescence of human fibroblastic Hs68 cells via attenuation of NAD(+)-SIRT1 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Tuzz-Ying; Yeh, Shu-Lan; Hu, Miao-Lin; Chen, Mei-Yau; Yang, Nae-Cherng

    2015-12-01

    Vitamin B3 (niacin) deficiency can cause pellagra with symptoms of dermatitis, diarrhea and dementia. However, it is unclear whether the vitamin B3 deficiency causes human aging. FK866 (a Nampt inhibitor) can reduce intracellular NAD(+) level and induce senescence of human Hs68 cells. However, the mechanisms underlying FK866-induced senescence of Hs68 cells are unclear. In this study, we used FK866 to mimic the effects of vitamin B3 deficiency to reduce the NAD(+) level and investigated the mechanisms of FK866-induced senescence of Hs68 cells. We hypothesized that FK866 induced the senescence of Hs68 cells via an attenuation of NAD(+)-silent information regulator T1 (SIRT1) signaling. We found that FK866 induced cell senescence and diminished cellular NAD(+) levels and SIRT1 activity (detected by acetylation of p53), and these effects were dramatically antagonized by co-treatment with nicotinic acid, nicotinamide, or NAD(+). In contrast, the protein expression of SIRT1, AMP-activated protein kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin, and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) was not affected by FK866. In addition, the role of GSH in the FK866-induced cells senescence may be limited, as N-acetylcysteine did not antagonize FK866-induced cell senescence. These results suggest that FK866 induces cell senescence via attenuation of NAD(+)-SIRT1 signaling. The effects of vitamin B3 deficiency on human aging warrant further investigation. PMID:26330291

  16. A Chimeric Human-Bovine Parainfluenza Virus Type 3 Expressing Measles Virus Hemagglutinin Is Attenuated for Replication but Is Still Immunogenic in Rhesus Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skiadopoulos, Mario H.; Surman, Sonja R.; Riggs, Jeffrey M.; Collins, Peter L.; Murphy, Brian R.

    2001-01-01

    The chimeric recombinant virus rHPIV3-NB, a version of human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3) that is attenuated due to the presence of the bovine PIV3 nucleocapsid (N) protein open reading frame (ORF) in place of the HPIV3 ORF, was modified to encode the measles virus hemagglutinin (HA) inserted as an additional, supernumerary gene between the HPIV3 P and M genes. This recombinant, designated rHPIV3-NBHA, replicated like its attenuated rHPIV3-NB parent virus in vitro and in the upper and lower respiratory tracts of rhesus monkeys, indicating that the insertion of the measles virus HA did not further attenuate rHPIV3-NB in vitro or in vivo. Monkeys immunized with rHPIV3-NBHA developed a vigorous immune response to both measles virus and HPIV3, with serum antibody titers to both measles virus (neutralizing antibody) and HPIV3 (hemagglutination inhibiting antibody) of over 1:500. An attenuated HPIV3 expressing a major protective antigen of measles virus provides a method for immunization against measles by the intranasal route, a route that has been shown with HPIV3 and respiratory syncytial virus vaccines to be relatively refractory to the neutralizing and immunosuppressive effects of maternally derived virus-specific serum antibodies. It should now be possible to induce a protective immune response against measles virus in 6-month-old infants, an age group that in developing areas of the world is not responsive to the current measles virus vaccine. PMID:11581420

  17. In Vitro Neutralisation of Rotavirus Infection by Two Broadly Specific Recombinant Monovalent Llama-Derived Antibody Fragments

    OpenAIRE

    Farah Aladin; Einerhand, Alexandra W. C.; Janneke Bouma; Sandra Bezemer; Pim Hermans; Danielle Wolvers; Kate Bellamy; Frenken, Leon G J; Jim Gray; Miren Iturriza-Gómara

    2012-01-01

    textabstractRotavirus is the main cause of viral gastroenteritis in young children. Therefore, the development of inexpensive antiviral products for the prevention and/or treatment of rotavirus disease remains a priority. Previously we have shown that a recombinant monovalent antibody fragment (referred to as Anti-Rotavirus Proteins or ARP1) derived from a heavy chain antibody of a llama immunised with rotavirus was able to neutralise rotavirus infection in a mouse model system. In the presen...

  18. Rotavirus, vaccine and unanswered questions: a perspective from a least developed country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pun, Sher Bahadur

    2013-01-01

    Two rotavirus vaccines, RotaTeq (Merck) and Rotarix (GlaxoSmithKline) have been developed to neutralize the most common rotavirus serotypes, and are now available in the global market. These vaccines are primarily aimed at reducing rotavirus gastroenteritis in children in the least developed countries, where rotavirus mortality rate is believed to be greatest. Thus, the World Health Organization (WHO) has recommended rotavirus vaccination be included in all national immunization programs, while the least developed countries have so far not come up with clear vision and long term strategy on vaccine implementation, and several questions, in addition to this, remain unanswered.

  19. Effects of wastewater sludge and its detergents on the stability of rotavirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, R.L. (Sandia Labs., Albuquerque, NM); Ashley, C.S.

    1980-06-01

    Wastewater sludge reduced the heat required to inactivate rotavirus SA-11, and ionic detergents were identified as the sludge components responsible for this effect. A similar result was found previously with reovirus. The quantitative effects of individual ionic detergents on rotavirus and reovirus were very different, and rotavirus was found to be extremely sensitive to several of these detergents. However, neither virus was destabilized by nonionic detergents. On the contrary, rotavirus was stabilized by a nonionic detergent against the potent destabilizing effects of the ionic detergent sodium dodecyl sulfate. The destabilizing effects of both cationic and anionic detergents on rotavirus were greatly altered by changes in the pH of the medium.

  20. Escherichia coli Meningitis after Rotavirus Gastroenteritis in an Infant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermezoglu, Oznur; Ocal Topcu, Didem; Karbuz, Adem; Hacihamdioglu, Bulent

    2016-01-01

    Although rotavirus gastroenteritis is quite common in the pediatric population, secondary bacterial sepsis following rotavirus infection is a rare clinical entity. Gram-negative bacilli are the fifth most common cause of meningitis in infants but this infection rarely occurs after gastroenteritis. Here, we report a 2.5-month-old infant who developed Escherichia coli (E. coli) meningitis after acute rotavirus gastroenteritis. The 2.5-month-old male infant with fever, vomiting, and watery diarrhea that started 1 day earlier was admitted to the hospital. Rotavirus antigen in stool sample was positive. He was hospitalized, and fever was measured at 39.5°C on the second day. Lumbar puncture was done for suspicion of meningitis, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) findings suggested meningitis. Intravenous vancomycin and cefotaxime were started empirically. Since E. coli reproduction was seen in blood culture and CSF culture, treatment was continued with cefotaxime. The patient was discharged with minimal midlevel hydrocephalus findings in cranial ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging following 21 days of antibiotics treatment. Septicemia development following rotavirus gastroenteritis is an extremely rare clinical condition. It is vital to start prompt antibiotic treatment as soon as the diagnosis of secondary bacterial infection is made because of high mortality and morbidity rates.

  1. Molecular biology of rotaviruses. IV. Molecular cloning of the bovine rotavirus genome.

    OpenAIRE

    McCrae, M A; McCorquodale, J G

    1982-01-01

    A new cloning strategy has been developed for cloning the genomes of double-stranded RNA viruses by using bovine rotavirus as a test system. The major modification adopted was the use of denatured polyadenylated double-stranded RNA as the template for reverse transcriptase. This allowed the two complementary strands of cDNA to be synthesized in a single reaction and removed the need for S1 nuclease digestion to remove the 5' hairpin structure normally generated in cDNA synthesis.

  2. Fulfilling the promise of rotavirus vaccines: how far have we come since licensure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manish M; Glass, Roger; Desai, Rishi; Tate, Jacqueline E; Parashar, Umesh D

    2012-07-01

    Rotavirus is the most common cause of fatal and severe childhood diarrhoea worldwide. Two new rotavirus vaccines have shown efficacy against severe rotavirus disease in large clinical trials. Between 2006 and 2010, 27 countries introduced rotavirus vaccination into national immunisation programmes and, subsequently, the burden of severe rotavirus disease in these countries has decreased substantially in both vaccinated and unvaccinated children. Rotavirus vaccination has led to large, sustained declines in childhood deaths from diarrhoea in Brazil and Mexico, which supports estimates that rotavirus was the leading cause of diarrhoeal deaths in these countries. Studies after licensing have provided new insights into these vaccines, such as the duration of protection, relative effectiveness in poor populations, and strain evolution after vaccine introduction. The challenge for policy makers worldwide is to analyse the effect of vaccination in early adopter countries and to assess whether the benefits outweigh the costs and encourage wider dissemination of these vaccines.

  3. Comparison of a new rapid test (TestPack Rotavirus) with standard enzyme immunoassay and electron microscopy for the detection of rotavirus in symptomatic hospitalized children.

    OpenAIRE

    Brooks, R G; Brown, L.; Franklin, R. B.

    1989-01-01

    We compared a new, rapid, qualitative test for rotavirus (TestPack Rotavirus; Abbott Laboratories, North Chicago, Ill.) with another enzyme immunoassay (Pathfinder Rotavirus; Kallestad Laboratories, Inc., Austin, Tex.) and electron microscopy to determine its clinical utility in a population of symptomatic hospitalized children. In the first part of the study, 100 frozen stool samples were tested. The results after resolution with a blocking reagent showed a sensitivity of only 50% and a spec...

  4. A novel type of VP4 carried by a porcine rotavirus strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gene encoding the VP8* trypsin-cleavage product of the VP4 protein of porcine rotavirus strain A34 was sequenced, and the predicted amino acid (aa) sequence was compared to the homologous region of all known P genotypes. The aa sequence of the VP8* of strain A34 shared low identity, ranging from 39% (bovine strain B223, P8[11]) to 76% (human strain 69M, P4[10]), with the homologous sequences of representative strains of the remaining 21 P genotypes. Phylogenetic relationships showed that the VP8* of strain A34 shares a common evolutionary lineage with those of human 69M (P4[10]) and equine H-2 (P4[12]) strains. Hyperimmune sera raised to strain A34 and to a genetic reassortant strain containing the VP4 gene from strain A34, both with high homologous neutralization titer via VP4, failed to neutralize strains representative of 15 different P genotypes. These results indicate that strain A34 should be considered as prototype of a new P genotype and serotype (P14[23]) and provide further evidence for the vast genetic and antigenic diversity of group A rotaviruses

  5. Demographic variability, vaccination, and the spatiotemporal dynamics of rotavirus epidemics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitzer, Virginia E; Viboud, Cécile; Simonsen, Lone; Steiner, Claudia; Panozzo, Catherine A; Alonso, Wladimir J; Miller, Mark A; Glass, Roger I; Glasser, John W; Parashar, Umesh D; Grenfell, Bryan T

    2009-07-17

    Historically, annual rotavirus activity in the United States has started in the southwest in late fall and ended in the northeast 3 months later; this trend has diminished in recent years. Traveling waves of infection or local environmental drivers cannot account for these patterns. A transmission model calibrated against epidemiological data shows that spatiotemporal variation in birth rate can explain the timing of rotavirus epidemics. The recent large-scale introduction of rotavirus vaccination provides a natural experiment to further test the impact of susceptible recruitment on disease dynamics. The model predicts a pattern of reduced and lagged epidemics postvaccination, closely matching the observed dynamics. Armed with this validated model, we explore the relative importance of direct and indirect protection, a key issue in determining the worldwide benefits of vaccination. PMID:19608910

  6. Prevalence of Rotavirus in shellfish from Southern Kerala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vysakh Mohan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To study the prevalence of Rotavirus in shellfish from Southern Kerala. Materials and Methods: The shellfish samples after processing was concentrated using proteinase K. RNA was isolated from the concentrated samples using phenol chloroform method. Rota viral RNA was detected using reverse transcriptionpolymerase chain reaction. Results: A low prevalence of 2.5% (5/200 was obtained during the study. Rotavirus was detected in 2 out of 60 brown mussels (3.33%, 2 out of 70 yellow clams (2.86% and 1 out of 70 black clams (1.43%. Conclusion: Low prevalence of Rotavirus was obtained in our study. A more extensive study need to be conducted to estimate the prevalence of enteric virus in shellfish.

  7. Tamarind seed coat extract restores reactive oxygen species through attenuation of glutathione level and antioxidant enzyme expression in human skin fibroblasts in response to oxidative stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Oranuch Nakchat; Nonthaneth Nalinratana; Duangdeun Meksuriyen; Sunanta Pongsamart

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the role and mechanism of tamarind seed coat extract (TSCE) on normal human skin fibroblast CCD-1064Sk cells under normal and oxidative stress conditions induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Methods:Tamarind seed coats were extracted with boiling water and then partitioned with ethyl acetate before the cell analysis. Effect of TSCE on intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), glutathione (GSH) level, antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and catalase activity including antioxidant protein expression was investigated. Results: TSCE significantly attenuated intracellular ROS in the absence and presence of H2O2 by increasing GSH level. In the absence of H2O2, TSCE significantly enhanced SOD and catalase activity but did not affected on GPx. Meanwhile, TSCE significantly increased the protein expression of SOD and GPx in H2O2-treated cells. Conclusions: TSCE exhibited antioxidant activities by scavenging ROS, attenuating GSH level that could protect human skin fibroblast cells from oxidative stress. Our results highlight the antioxidant mechanism of tamarind seed coat through an antioxidant enzyme system, the extract potentially benefits for health food and cosmeceutical application of tamarind seed coat.

  8. Limited Protection from a Pathogenic Chimeric Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Challenge following Immunization with Attenuated Simian Immunodeficiency Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Mark G.; Yalley-Ogunro, Jake; Greenhouse, Jack J.; Brennan, Terry P.; Jiang, Jennifer Bo; Thomas C VanCott; Lu, Yichen; Eddy, Gerald A.; Birx, Deborah L.

    1999-01-01

    Two live attenuated single-deletion mutant simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) constructs, SIV239Δnef and SIVPBj6.6Δnef, were tested for their abilities to stimulate protective immunity in macaques. During the immunization period the animals were examined for specific immune responses and virus growth. Each construct generated high levels of specific immunity in all of the immunized animals. The SIV239Δnef construct was found to grow to high levels in all immunized animals, with some animals ...

  9. Rotavirus diarrhoea in Buffaloes: epidemiology, pathogenesys and prophilaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Pagnini

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Globally, rotavirus infection is the most important cause of severe diarrhea in infants and animals. In this report, we review the results of pathogenesys studies, strain surveillance and characterization studies published and discuss new insights gained from these studies on the potential mechanisms of the evolution and spread of new rotavirus strains. Early epidemiological studies in Italian buffalo herds revealed the predominance of strains with G8 specificity and detected strains with the rare, RRV-like, VP4 P[3] genotype. In an our previous study 125 fecal samples were collected from buffalo calves affected with diarrhoea, in seven dairy farms in Southern Italy. Rotaviruses were detected in 21 samples (16.8% by an immunochromatographic assay and by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR. Analysis of the VP7 gene revealed that 57% (12 of 21 of the isolates were G6, 23.8% were G8 (5 of 21 and 19% (4 of 21 were G10. Analysis of the VP4 revealed that 71.4% (15 of 21 of the isolates were P[5] and that 28.6% (6 of 21 were P[1]. The most common combination of G and P types was P[5],G6 (57%, followed by P[1],G10 (19%, P[5],G8 (14% and P[1],G8 (9.5%. While P[5],G6 rotaviruses are very common in Italian bovine herds, the antigenic combination P[1],G10 is unusual and presumably derives from reassortment between P[1] and G10 strains, that appear to be more frequent in buffaloes and bovines, respectively. The presence of bovine-like G and P serotypes suggests that in Italy the epidemiology of buffalo rotaviruses overlaps the epidemiology of bovine rotaviruses, presumably because of the strict species affinity and/or of the intermingled distribution over the same geographical areas of the buffalo and bovine herds.

  10. Efficacy of synbiotic treatment in children with acute rotavirus diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Made Ratna Dewi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Diarrhea is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in children throughout the world, mostly due to rotavirus infection. In daily practice, we routinely use the World Health Organization Five steps for managing acute diarrhea.This practice has shown great success in diarrhea management, but concerns remain on reducing the duration of diarrhea to prevent complications. Synbiotics can reduce the severity of diarrhea. However, there has been limited data on synbiotic therapy for treating acute rotavirus diarrhea in children. Objective To compare the durations of acute rotavirus diarrhea treated with synbiotics vs. placebo. Methods This study was a randomized, double-blind, clinical trial, performed at the Pediatric Gastrohepatology Division, Sanglah and Wangaya Hospitals in Denpasar. Subjects were children aged 6 to 59 months with acute rotavirus diarrhea. Rotavirus was diagnosed by immune chromatography assay. The synbiotic group received probiotic comprised of Lactobacillus sp., Streptococcus sp., Bifidobacterium sp. (total viable count 1.00x109 CFU per dose, and prebiotic consisted of 990.00 mg fructooligosacharide (FOS. The placebo consisted of lactose monohydrate packaged similarly as the synbiotics. Subjects orally ingested 1 pack per day for 5 days. Results Seventy children with acute rotavirus diarrhea was involved in this study. The median duration of diarrhea in the synbiotic group was 50.0 (SE 1.1; 95%CI 47.9 to 52.1 hours, while that of the placebo group was 63.0 (SE 5.9; 95%CI 51.4 to 74.6 hours. Based on Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, the duration of diarrhea in the synbiotic group was significantly shorter than that of the placebo group (log-rank test P <0.0001. Conclusion In children with acute rotaviral diarrhea, synbiotic reduces the duration of diarrhea compared to placebo. [Paediatr Indones. 2015;55:74-8.].

  11. Rotavirus electropherotypes from the Kuala Lumpur Hospital: a re-examination after an interval of seven years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, K L; Lim, Y H; Tan, S C

    1998-06-01

    The objective of this study was to ascertain the extent changes have occurred in the epidemiology of human rotavirus electropherotypes from the same location 7 to 8 years after an earlier study. Genomic RNA profiles of rotaviruses from diarrhoeic children admitted to the Kuala Lumpur Hospital from April to December 1996 were determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver staining. A total of 179 group A rotaviruses were detected from 870 children: 175 with legible staining of all RNA segments were classified into 14 distinct electropherotypes (10 and 4 with long and short migration patterns respectively). In addition, the results revealed: high predominance of long pattern electropherotypes (94% of the total electropherotypes); most long electropherotypes with RNA profiles which all 11 RNAs migrated separately (8 of 10 electropherotypes); all short electropherotypes had segments 2 and 3 that co-migrated; presence of a very numerically dominant electropherotype (75% of all electropherotypes); frequent co-circulation of the dominant electropherotype-present throughout the study period--with other electropherotypes present for limited periods; sequential temporal appearances by similar electropherotypes. These observations were similar to that of an earlier study conducted in 1988/89. Nevertheless, the dominant electropherotype in the present study was different and not among the electropherotypes detected in the earlier study.

  12. New Insights into Rotavirus Entry Machinery: Stabilization of Rotavirus Spike Conformation Is Independent of Trypsin Cleavage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Javier M.; Chichón, Francisco J.; Martín-Forero, Esther; González-Camacho, Fernando; Carrascosa, José L.; Castón, José R.; Luque, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The infectivity of rotavirus, the main causative agent of childhood diarrhea, is dependent on activation of the extracellular viral particles by trypsin-like proteases in the host intestinal lumen. This step entails proteolytic cleavage of the VP4 spike protein into its mature products, VP8* and VP5*. Previous cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) analysis of trypsin-activated particles showed well-resolved spikes, although no density was identified for the spikes in uncleaved particles; these data suggested that trypsin activation triggers important conformational changes that give rise to the rigid, entry-competent spike. The nature of these structural changes is not well understood, due to lack of data relative to the uncleaved spike structure. Here we used cryo-EM and cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) to characterize the structure of the uncleaved virion in two model rotavirus strains. Cryo-EM three-dimensional reconstruction of uncleaved virions showed spikes with a structure compatible with the atomic model of the cleaved spike, and indistinguishable from that of digested particles. Cryo-ET and subvolume average, combined with classification methods, resolved the presence of non-icosahedral structures, providing a model for the complete structure of the uncleaved spike. Despite the similar rigid structure observed for uncleaved and cleaved particles, trypsin activation is necessary for successful infection. These observations suggest that the spike precursor protein must be proteolytically processed, not to achieve a rigid conformation, but to allow the conformational changes that drive virus entry. PMID:24873828

  13. Nutritional status in relation to the efficacy of the rhesus-human reassortant, tetravalent rotavirus vaccine (RRV-TV in infants from Belém, Pará State, Brazil Relação entre o estado nutricional e a eficácia da vacina tetravalente contra rotavírus de origem símio-humana, geneticamente rearranjada (RRV-TV, em crianças de Belém, Pará, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre C. LINHARES

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available The rhesus-human reassortant, tetravalent rotavirus vaccine (RRV-TV was licensed for routine use in the United States of America but it was recently withdrawn from the market because of its possible association with intussusception as an adverse event. The protective efficacy of 3 doses of RRV-TV, in its lower-titer (4 x 10(4 pfu/dose formulation, was evaluated according to the nutritional status of infants who participated in a phase III trial in Belém, Northern Brazil. A moderate protection conferred by RRV-TV was related to weight-for-age Z-scores (WAZ greater than -1 only, with rates of 38% (p = 0.04 and 40% (p = 0.04 for all- and- pure rotavirus diarrhoeal cases, respectively. In addition, there was a trend for greater efficacy (43%, p = 0.05 among infants reaching an height-for-age Z-score (HAZ of > -1. Taking WAZ, HAZ and weight-for-height Z-score (WHZ indices 0.05 if both placebo and vaccine groups are compared. There was no significant difference if rates of mixed and pure rotavirus diarrhoeal cases are compared in relation to HAZ, WAZ and weight-for-height Z-score (WHZ indices. Although a low number of malnourished infants could be identified in the present study, our data show some evidence that malnutrition may interfere with the efficacy of rotavirus vaccines in developing countries.A vacina tetravalente contra rotavírus de origem símio-humana, geneticamente rearranjada (RRV-TV, foi licenciada para uso rotineiro nos Estados Unidos da América do Norte; entretanto, tal imunizante foi removido do mercado, uma vez que a intussuscepção emergiu como possível evento adverso vacinal. A eficácia da RRV-TV - em sua formulação menos concentrada (10 x 10(4 pfu/dose - foi avaliada no tocante ao estado nutricional das crianças que integraram estudo caracterizado como de fase III, levado a efeito em Belém, região norte do Brasil. Observou-se proteção (moderada apenas entre os indivíduos com escore "Z" (peso-por-idade, WAZ superior

  14. PATHOGENETIC ROLE OF CYTOKINES IN CHILDHOOD ROTAVIRUS INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Benyova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Results of cytokine network studies system in children with rotavirus infection are presented. Concentrations of cytokines were determined at both local and systemic levels. Analysis of cytokine levels was performed at initial terms (day 1 to 3, and in the course of disease (day 7 to 10. It was revealed that mild and mid-severe cases of rotavirus infection in the children are characterized by early increase in proinflammatory cytokines with restricted overshoot of proinflammatory cytokines at early recovery period. Meanwhile, the patients with severe forms of viral gastroenteritis exhibited high levels of proinflammatory cytokines. However, this balance was shifted towards anti-inflammatory cytokines during early reconvalescence.

  15. Epidemiología molecular de rotavirus humanos en Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    Bok, Karin; Gomez, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    Los rotavirus son el principal agente productor de diarrea infantil aguda en todo el mundo. El virus se transmite por vía fecal-oral de persona a persona, enfermando solo a los individuos no inmunes, en general niños en los primeros años de vida. Con episodios sucesivos de este trastorno, la inmunidad contra este virus se incrementa y los síntomas se manifiestan de manera más leve. La infección por rotavirus presenta características estacionales con picos de la enfermedad durante los meses de...

  16. Attenuation of hind-limb ischemia in mice with endothelial-like cells derived from different sources of human stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wing-Hon Lai

    Full Text Available Functional endothelial-like cells (EC have been successfully derived from different cell sources and potentially used for treatment of cardiovascular diseases; however, their relative therapeutic efficacy remains unclear. We differentiated functional EC from human bone marrow mononuclear cells (BM-EC, human embryonic stem cells (hESC-EC and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC-EC, and compared their in-vitro tube formation, migration and cytokine expression profiles, and in-vivo capacity to attenuate hind-limb ischemia in mice. Successful differentiation of BM-EC was only achieved in 1/6 patient with severe coronary artery disease. Nevertheless, BM-EC, hESC-EC and hiPSC-EC exhibited typical cobblestone morphology, had the ability of uptaking DiI-labeled acetylated low-density-lipoprotein, and binding of Ulex europaeus lectin. In-vitro functional assay demonstrated that hiPSC-EC and hESC-EC had similar capacity for tube formation and migration as human umbilical cord endothelial cells (HUVEC and BM-EC (P>0.05. While increased expression of major angiogenic factors including epidermal growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor, placental growth factor and stromal derived factor-1 were observed in all EC cultures during hypoxia compared with normoxia (P<0.05, the magnitudes of cytokine up-regulation upon hypoxic were more dramatic in hiPSC-EC and hESC-EC (P<0.05. Compared with medium, transplanting BM-EC (n = 6, HUVEC (n = 6, hESC-EC (n = 8 or hiPSC-EC (n = 8 significantly attenuated severe hind-limb ischemia in mice via enhancement of neovascularization. In conclusion, functional EC can be generated from hECS and hiPSC with similar therapeutic efficacy for attenuation of severe hind-limb ischemia. Differentiation of functional BM-EC was more difficult to achieve in patients with cardiovascular diseases, and hESC-EC or iPSC-EC are readily available as "off-the-shelf" format for the treatment

  17. Role of Temperature and Suwannee River Natural Organic Matter on Inactivation Kinetics of Rotavirus and Bacteriophage MS2 by Solar Irradiation

    KAUST Repository

    Romero, Ofelia C.

    2011-12-15

    Although the sunlight-mediated inactivation of viruses has been recognized as an important process that controls surface water quality, the mechanisms of virus inactivation by sunlight are not yet clearly understood. We investigated the synergistic role of temperature and Suwannee River natural organic matter (SRNOM), an exogenous sensitizer, for sunlight-mediated inactivation of porcine rotavirus and MS2 bacteriophage. Upon irradiation by a full spectrum of simulated sunlight in the absence of SRNOM and in the temperature range of 14-42 °C, high inactivation rate constants, kobs, of MS2 (k obs ≤ 3.8 h-1 or 1-log10 over 0.6 h) and rotavirus (kobs ≤ 11.8 h-1 or ∼1-log10 over 0.2 h) were measured. A weak temperature (14-42 °C) dependence of kobs values was observed for both viruses irradiated by the full sunlight spectrum. Under the same irradiation condition, the presence of SRNOM reduced the inactivation of both viruses due to attenuation of lower wavelengths of the simulated sunlight. For rotavirus and MS2 solutions irradiated by only UVA and visible light in the absence of SRNOM, inactivation kinetics were slow (kobs < 0.3 h-1 or <1-log10 unit reduction over 7 h) and temperature-independent for the range considered. Conversely, under UVA and visible light irradiation and in the presence of SRNOM, temperature-dependent inactivation of MS2 was observed. For rotavirus, the SRNOM-mediated exogenous inactivation was only important at temperatures >33 °C, with low rotavirus kobs values (kobs ≈ 0.2 h-1; 1-log10 unit reduction over 12 h) for the temperature range of 14-33 °C. These kobs values increased to 0.5 h-1 at 43 °C and 1.5 h-1 (1-log10 reduction over 1.6 h) at 50 °C. While SRNOM-mediated exogenous inactivation of MS2 was triggered by singlet oxygen, the presence of hydrogen peroxide was important for rotavirus inactivation in the 40-50 °C range. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  18. Construction of Prophylactic Human Papillomavirus Type 16 L1 Capsid Protein Vaccine Delivered by Live Attenuated Shigella flexneri Strain sh42

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Feng YANG; Xin-Zhong QU; Kai WANG; Jin ZHENG; Lü-Sheng SI; Xiao-Ping DONG; Yi-Li WANG

    2005-01-01

    To express human papillomavirus (HPV) L1 capsid protein in the recombinant strain of Shigella and study the potential of a live attenuated Shigella-based HPV prophylactic vaccine in preventing HPV infection, the icsA/virG fragment of Shigella-based prokaryotic expression plasmid pHS3199 was constructed.HPV type 16 L 1 (HPV 16L 1) gene was inserted into plasmid pHS 3199 to form the pHS3199-HPV 16L1construct, and pHS3199-HPV16L1 was electroporated into a live attenuated Shigella strain sh42. Western blotting analysis showed that HPV 16L1 could be expressed stably in the recombinant strain sh42-HPV 16L1.Sereny test results were negative, which showed that the sh42-HPV16L1 lost virulence. However, the attenuated recombinant strain partially maintained the invasive property as indicated by the HeLa cell infection assay. Specific IgG, IgA antibody against HPV16L1 virus-like particles (VLPs) were detected in the sera,intestinal lavage and vaginal lavage from animals immunized by sh42-HPV 16L 1. The number of antibodysecreting cells in the spleen and draining lymph nodes were increased significantly compared with the control group. Sera from immunized animals inhibited murine hemagglutination induced by HPV16L1 VLPs, which indicated that the candidate vaccine could stimulate an efficient immune response in guinea pig's mucosal sites. This may be an effective strategy for the development of an HPV prophylactic oral vaccine.

  19. Development of a Rotavirus-Shedding Model in Rhesus Macaques, Using a Homologous Wild-Type Rotavirus of a New P Genotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeal, Monica M.; Sestak, Karol; Choi, Anthony H.-C.; Basu, Mitali; Cole, Michael J.; Aye, Pyone P.; Bohm, Rudolf P.; Ward, Richard L.

    2005-01-01

    Although there are several reports on rotavirus inoculation of nonhuman primates, no reliable model exists. Therefore, this study was designed to develop a rhesus macaque model for rotavirus studies. The goals were to obtain a wild-type macaque rotavirus and evaluate it as a challenge virus for model studies. Once rotavirus was shown to be endemic within the macaque colony at the Tulane National Primate Research Center, stool specimens were collected from juvenile animals (2.6 to 5.9 months of age) without evidence of previous rotavirus infection and examined for rotavirus antigen. Six of 10 animals shed rotavirus during the 10-week collection period, and the electropherotypes of all isolates were identical to each other but distinct from those of prototype simian rotaviruses. These viruses were characterized as serotype G3 and subgroup 1, properties typical of many animal rotaviruses, including simian strains. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the VP4 gene was performed with a culture-grown isolate from the stool of one animal, designated the TUCH strain. Based on both genotypic and phylogenetic comparisons between TUCH VP4 and cognate proteins of representatives of the reported 22 P genotypes, the TUCH virus belongs to a new genotype, P[23]. A pool of wild-type TUCH was prepared and intragastrically administered to eight cesarean section-derived, specific-pathogen-free macaques 14 to 42 days of age. All animals were kept in a biocontainment level 2 facility. Although no diarrhea was observed and the animals remained clinically normal, all animals shed large quantities of rotavirus antigen in their feces after inoculation, which resolved by the end of the 14-day observation period. Therefore, TUCH infection of macaques provides a useful nonhuman primate model for studies on rotavirus protection. PMID:15613323

  20. Attenuation of graft-versus-host-disease in NOD scid IL-2Rγ(-/-) (NSG) mice by ex vivo modulation of human CD4(+) T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilger, Nadja; Glaser, Jakob; Müller, Claudia; Halbich, Christoph; Müller, Anne; Schwertassek, Ulla; Lehmann, Jörg; Ruschpler, Peter; Lange, Franziska; Boldt, Andreas; Stahl, Lilly; Sack, Ulrich; Oelkrug, Christopher; Emmrich, Frank; Fricke, Stephan

    2016-09-01

    NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid) IL-2rg(tm1Wjl) /SzJ (NSG) mice are a valuable tool for studying Graft-versus-Host-Disease (GvHD) induced by human immune cells. We used a model of acute GvHD by transfer of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) into NSG mice. The severity of GvHD was reflected by weight loss and was associated with engraftment of human cells and the expansion of leukocytes, particularly granulocytes and monocytes. Pre-treatment of PBMCs with the anti-human CD4 antibody MAX.16H5 IgG1 or IgG4 attenuated GvHD. The transplantation of 2 × 10(7) PBMCs without anti-human CD4 pre-treatment induced a severe GvHD (0% survival). In animals receiving 2 × 10(7) PBMCs pre-incubated with MAX.16H5 IgG1 or IgG4, GvHD development was reduced and survival was increased. Immune reconstitution was measured by flow cytometry and confirmed for human leukocytes (CD45), CD3(+) /CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells and CD3(+) /CD4(+) T helper cells. Human B cells (CD19) and monocytes (CD14) could not be detected. Histopathological analysis (TUNEL assay) of the gut of recipient animals showed significantly less apoptotic crypt cells in animals receiving a MAX.16H5 IgG1 pre-incubated graft. These findings indicate that pre-incubation of an allogeneic graft with an anti-human CD4 antibody may decrease the frequency and severity of GvHD after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and the need of conventional immunosuppressive drugs. Moreover, this approach most probably provides a safer HSCT that must be confirmed in appropriate clinical trials in the future. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. PMID:27560708

  1. Detection of emerging rotavirus G12P[8] in Sonora, México.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Ochoa, G; J, G de; Calleja-García, P M; Rosas-Rodríguez, J A; Virgen-Ortíz, A; Tamez-Guerra, P

    2016-06-01

    Rotavirus is the most common cause of gastroenteritis in children up to five years of age worldwide. The aim of the present study was to analyze the genotypes of rotavirus strains isolated from children with gastroenteritis, after the introduction of the rotavirus vaccine in México. Rotavirus was detected in 14/100 (14%) fecal samples from children with gastroenteritis, using a commercial test kit. The viral genome was purified from these samples and used as a template in RT-PCR amplification of the VP4 and VP7 genes, followed by gene cloning and sequencing. Among the rotavirus strains, 4/14 (28.5%) were characterized as G12P[8], 2/14 (14.3%), as G12P (not typed), and 3/14 (21.42%) as G (not typed) P[8]. Phylogenetic analysis of the VP7 gene showed that G12 genotypes clustered in lineage III. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that VP4 genotype P[8] sequences clustered in lineage V, whereas other P[8] sequences previously reported in Mexico (2005-2008) clustered in different lineages. Rotavirus genotype G12 is currently recognized as a globally emerging rotavirus. To our knowledge, this is the first report of this emerging rotavirus strain G12P[8] in México. Ongoing surveillance is recommended to monitor the distribution of rotavirus genotypes and to continually reassess the suitability of currently available rotavirus vaccines.

  2. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of yeast extracts containing rotavirus-like particles: a potential veterinary vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Limas, William A; Pastor, Ana Ruth; Esquivel-Soto, Ernesto; Esquivel-Guadarrama, Fernando; Ramírez, Octavio T; Palomares, Laura A

    2014-05-19

    Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe diarrhea in many animal species of economic interest. A simple, safe and cost-effective vaccine is required for the control and prevention of rotavirus in animals. In this study, we evaluated the use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae extracts containing rotavirus-like particles (RLP) as a vaccine candidate in an adult mice model. Two doses of 1mg of yeast extract containing rotavirus proteins (between 0.3 and 3 μg) resulted in an immunological response capable of reducing the replication of rotavirus after infection. Viral shedding in all mice groups diminished in comparison with the control group when challenged with 100 50% diarrhea doses (DD50) of murine rotavirus strain EDIM. Interestingly, when immunizing intranasally protection against rotavirus infection was observed even when no increase in rotavirus-specific antibody titers was evident, suggesting that cellular responses were responsible of protection. Our results indicate that raw yeast extracts containing rotavirus proteins and RLP are a simple, cost-effective alternative for veterinary vaccines against rotavirus.

  3. Detection of emerging rotavirus G12P[8] in Sonora, México.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Ochoa, G; J, G de; Calleja-García, P M; Rosas-Rodríguez, J A; Virgen-Ortíz, A; Tamez-Guerra, P

    2016-06-01

    Rotavirus is the most common cause of gastroenteritis in children up to five years of age worldwide. The aim of the present study was to analyze the genotypes of rotavirus strains isolated from children with gastroenteritis, after the introduction of the rotavirus vaccine in México. Rotavirus was detected in 14/100 (14%) fecal samples from children with gastroenteritis, using a commercial test kit. The viral genome was purified from these samples and used as a template in RT-PCR amplification of the VP4 and VP7 genes, followed by gene cloning and sequencing. Among the rotavirus strains, 4/14 (28.5%) were characterized as G12P[8], 2/14 (14.3%), as G12P (not typed), and 3/14 (21.42%) as G (not typed) P[8]. Phylogenetic analysis of the VP7 gene showed that G12 genotypes clustered in lineage III. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that VP4 genotype P[8] sequences clustered in lineage V, whereas other P[8] sequences previously reported in Mexico (2005-2008) clustered in different lineages. Rotavirus genotype G12 is currently recognized as a globally emerging rotavirus. To our knowledge, this is the first report of this emerging rotavirus strain G12P[8] in México. Ongoing surveillance is recommended to monitor the distribution of rotavirus genotypes and to continually reassess the suitability of currently available rotavirus vaccines. PMID:27265462

  4. Progress in the introduction of rotavirus vaccine--Latin America and the Caribbean, 2006-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Rotavirus disease is the leading cause of childhood morbidity and mortality related to diarrhea in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC), where an estimated 8,000 deaths related to rotavirus diarrhea occur annually among children aged rotavirus vaccines became available, the World Health Organization (WHO) in 2007 recommended inclusion of rotavirus vaccine in the immunization programs of Europe and the Americas, and in 2009 expanded the recommendation to all infants aged rotavirus vaccine in LAC, where it was first introduced in 2006 in Brazil, El Salvador, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, and Venezuela; by January 2011, it was included in the national immunization schedules of 14 countries in LAC. Estimated national rotavirus vaccine coverage (2 doses of the monovalent vaccine or 3 doses of the pentavalent vaccine) among children aged rotavirus vaccine into their national immunization programs, 13 participate in a hospital-based rotavirus surveillance network. Data from some countries in this network and from other monitoring efforts in LAC countries have shown declines in hospitalizations and deaths related to severe diarrhea after rotavirus vaccine introduction. The rapid introduction of rotavirus vaccine in LAC demonstrates the benefits of the early commitment of national decision makers to introduce these vaccines in low-income and middle-income countries at the same time as in high-income countries.

  5. Canine rotavirus C strain detected in Hungary shows marked genotype diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marton, Szilvia; Mihalov-Kovács, Eszter; Dóró, Renáta; Csata, Tünde; Fehér, Enikő; Oldal, Miklós; Jakab, Ferenc; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Martella, Vito; Bányai, Krisztián

    2015-10-01

    Species C rotaviruses (RVC) have been identified in humans and animals, including pigs, cows and ferrets. In dogs, RVC strains have been reported anecdotally on the basis of visualization of rotavirus-like virions by electron microscopy combined with specific electrophoretic migration patterns of the genomic RNA segments. However, no further molecular characterization of these viruses was performed. Here, we report the detection of a canine RVC in the stool of a dog with enteritis. Analysis of the complete viral genome uncovered distinctive genetic features of the identified RVC strain. The genes encoding VP7, VP4 and VP6 were distantly related to those of other RVC strains and were putatively classified as G10, P8 and I8, respectively. The new strain was named RVC/Dog-wt/HUN/KE174/2012/G10P[8]. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that canine RVC was most closely related to bovine RVC strains with the exception of the NSP4 gene, which clustered together with porcine RVC strains. These findings provide further evidence for the genetic diversity of RVC strains. PMID:26297005

  6. Anti-rotavirus effects by combination therapy of stevioside and Sophora flavescens extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfajaro, Mia Madel; Rho, Mun-Chual; Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Park, Jun-Gyu; Kim, Deok-Song; Hosmillo, Myra; Son, Kyu-Yeol; Lee, Ju-Hwan; Park, Sang-Ik; Kang, Mun-Il; Ryu, Young Bae; Park, Ki Hun; Oh, Hyun-Mee; Lee, Seung Woong; Park, Su-Jin; Lee, Woo Song; Cho, Kyoung-Oh

    2014-06-01

    Anti-rotaviral activities of Sophora flavescens extract (SFE) and stevioside (SV) from Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni either singly or in various combinations were examined in vitro and in vivo using a porcine rotavirus G5[P7] strain. Combination of SFE and SV inhibited in vitro virus replication more efficiently than each single treatment. In the piglet model, SV had no effect on rotavirus enteritis, whereas SFE improved but did not completely cure rotaviral enteritis. Interestingly, combination therapy of SFE and SV alleviated diarrhea, and markedly improved small intestinal lesion score and fecal virus shedding. Acute toxicity tests including the piglet lethal dose 50, and body weight, organ weight and pathological changes for the combination therapy did not show any adverse effect on the piglets. These preliminary data suggest that the combination therapy of SV and SFE is a potential curative medication for rotaviral diarrhea in pigs. Determination of the efficacy of this combination therapy in other species including humans needs to be addressed in the future. PMID:24704033

  7. Rapid detection of infectious rotavirus group A using a molecular beacon assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertol, Jéssica Wildgrube; Gatti, Maria Silvia Viccari

    2016-08-01

    Rapid, sensitive and specific methods are necessary to detect and quantify infectious viruses. Cultivating and detecting enteric viruses in cell culture are difficult, thus impairing the advancement of knowledge regarding virus-induced diarrhea. Rotavirus (RV) detection has been conducted by serological or molecular biology methods, which do not provide information regarding viral infectivity. Molecular beacons (MBs) have demonstrated efficacy for viral detection in cell culture. We propose a MB assay to detect human rotavirus group A (HuRVA) in cell culture. MA104 cells were mock-infected or infected with HuRVA strains (RotaTeq(®) vaccine and K8 strains), and a specific MB for the HuRVA VP6 gene was used for virus detection. Mock-infected cells showed basal fluorescence, while infected cells exhibited increased fluorescence emission. MB hybridization to the viral mRNA target of HuRVA was confirmed. Fluorescence increased according to the increase in the number of infectious viral particles per cell (MOI 0.5-MOI 1). This technique provides quick and efficient HuRVA detection in cell culture without a need for viral culture for several days or many times until cytopathic effects are visualized. This methodology could be applied in the selection of samples for developing RV vaccines.

  8. Rotavirus infection in a tertiary hospital: laboratory diagnosis and impact of immunization on pediatric hospitalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciane Aparecida Pereira

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Rotavirus (RV is the main etiological agent of diarrhea in childhood; its laboratory diagnosis is crucial to guide the clinical management and prevention of its spread. RV immunization was introduced in Brazilian 6-month-old children in 2006. The present study was aimed to evaluate three methodologies used for human RV detection in stool samples obtained from patients hospitalized due to gastroenteritis in a teaching hospital and report the impact of RV immunization in hospitalization by diarrhea. METHODS: 293 stool samples collected in the 2001-2008 period were analyzed by enzyme immunoassay (EIA, latex agglutination (LA and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE. RESULTS: Rotavirus was detected in 34.8% of samples by LA assay, 28.3% of samples by EIA assay and in 25.6% of samples by PAGE assay. Considering the PAGE method as gold standard, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of EIA were 94.6%, 94.4% and 94.5%, and to LA were 82.6%, 81.6% and 81.9%, respectively. CONCLUSION: These results indicate that antigen detection by EIA is a rapid, sensitive and specific method, and could be used in large-scale applications for screening stool samples suspected of RV infection. This study showed decreased incidence of RV infection in hospitalized children prior to the implementation of the national immunization program against RV.

  9. Rapid detection of infectious rotavirus group A using a molecular beacon assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertol, Jéssica Wildgrube; Gatti, Maria Silvia Viccari

    2016-08-01

    Rapid, sensitive and specific methods are necessary to detect and quantify infectious viruses. Cultivating and detecting enteric viruses in cell culture are difficult, thus impairing the advancement of knowledge regarding virus-induced diarrhea. Rotavirus (RV) detection has been conducted by serological or molecular biology methods, which do not provide information regarding viral infectivity. Molecular beacons (MBs) have demonstrated efficacy for viral detection in cell culture. We propose a MB assay to detect human rotavirus group A (HuRVA) in cell culture. MA104 cells were mock-infected or infected with HuRVA strains (RotaTeq(®) vaccine and K8 strains), and a specific MB for the HuRVA VP6 gene was used for virus detection. Mock-infected cells showed basal fluorescence, while infected cells exhibited increased fluorescence emission. MB hybridization to the viral mRNA target of HuRVA was confirmed. Fluorescence increased according to the increase in the number of infectious viral particles per cell (MOI 0.5-MOI 1). This technique provides quick and efficient HuRVA detection in cell culture without a need for viral culture for several days or many times until cytopathic effects are visualized. This methodology could be applied in the selection of samples for developing RV vaccines. PMID:27131514

  10. The Attenuated Brucella abortus Strain 19 Invades, Persists in, and Activates Human Dendritic Cells, and Induces the Secretion of IL-12p70 but Not IL-23.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Weinhold

    Full Text Available Bacterial vectors have been proposed as novel vaccine strategies to induce strong cellular immunity. Attenuated strains of Brucella abortus comprise promising vector candidates since they have the potential to induce strong CD4(+ and CD8(+ T-cell mediated immune responses in the absence of excessive inflammation as observed with other Gram-negative bacteria. However, some Brucella strains interfere with the maturation of dendritic cells (DCs, which is essential for antigen-specific T-cell priming. In the present study, we investigated the interaction of human monocyte-derived DCs with the smooth attenuated B. abortus strain (S 19, which has previously been employed successfully to vaccinate cattle.We first looked into the potential of S19 to hamper the cytokine-induced maturation of DCs; however, infected cells expressed CD25, CD40, CD80, and CD86 to a comparable extent as uninfected, cytokine-matured DCs. Furthermore, S19 activated DCs in the absence of exogeneous stimuli, enhanced the expression of HLA-ABC and HLA-DR, and was able to persist intracellularly without causing cytotoxicity. Thus, DCs provide a cellular niche for persisting brucellae in vivo as a permanent source of antigen. S19-infected DCs produced IL-12/23p40, IL-12p70, and IL-10, but not IL-23. While heat-killed bacteria also activated DCs, soluble mediators were not involved in S19-induced activation of human DCs. HEK 293 transfectants revealed cellular activation by S19 primarily through engagement of Toll-like receptor (TLR2.Thus, as an immunological prerequisite for vaccine efficacy, B. abortus S19 potently infects and potently activates (most likely via TLR2 human DCs to produce Th1-promoting cytokines.

  11. The Attenuated Brucella abortus Strain 19 Invades, Persists in, and Activates Human Dendritic Cells, and Induces the Secretion of IL-12p70 but Not IL-23

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinhold, Mario; Eisenblätter, Martin; Jasny, Edith; Fehlings, Michael; Finke, Antje; Gayum, Hermine; Rüschendorf, Ursula; Renner Viveros, Pablo; Moos, Verena; Allers, Kristina; Schneider, Thomas; Schaible, Ulrich E.; Schumann, Ralf R.; Mielke, Martin E.; Ignatius, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Background Bacterial vectors have been proposed as novel vaccine strategies to induce strong cellular immunity. Attenuated strains of Brucella abortus comprise promising vector candidates since they have the potential to induce strong CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell mediated immune responses in the absence of excessive inflammation as observed with other Gram-negative bacteria. However, some Brucella strains interfere with the maturation of dendritic cells (DCs), which is essential for antigen-specific T-cell priming. In the present study, we investigated the interaction of human monocyte-derived DCs with the smooth attenuated B. abortus strain (S) 19, which has previously been employed successfully to vaccinate cattle. Methodology/Principal findings We first looked into the potential of S19 to hamper the cytokine-induced maturation of DCs; however, infected cells expressed CD25, CD40, CD80, and CD86 to a comparable extent as uninfected, cytokine-matured DCs. Furthermore, S19 activated DCs in the absence of exogeneous stimuli, enhanced the expression of HLA-ABC and HLA-DR, and was able to persist intracellularly without causing cytotoxicity. Thus, DCs provide a cellular niche for persisting brucellae in vivo as a permanent source of antigen. S19-infected DCs produced IL-12/23p40, IL-12p70, and IL-10, but not IL-23. While heat-killed bacteria also activated DCs, soluble mediators were not involved in S19-induced activation of human DCs. HEK 293 transfectants revealed cellular activation by S19 primarily through engagement of Toll-like receptor (TLR)2. Conclusions/Significance Thus, as an immunological prerequisite for vaccine efficacy, B. abortus S19 potently infects and potently activates (most likely via TLR2) human DCs to produce Th1-promoting cytokines. PMID:23805193

  12. Rotavirus-Like Particles: A Novel Nanocarrier for the Gut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naima G. Cortes-Perez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The delivery of bioactive molecules directly to damaged tissues represents a technological challenge. We propose here a new system based on virus-like particles (VLP from rotavirus, with a marked tropism for the gut to deliver bio-active molecules to intestinal cells. For this, nonreplicative VLP nanoparticles were constructed using a baculovirus expression system and used to deliver an exogenous biomolecule, the green fluorescent protein (GFP, into either MA104 cells or intestinal cells from healthy and 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS-treated mice. Our results show that expression of rotavirus capsid proteins in baculovirus led to the auto assembly of VLP that display similar properties to rotavirus. In vitro experiments showed that VLP were able to enter into MA104 cells and deliver the reporter protein. Intragastric administration of fluorescent VLP in healthy and TNBS-treated mice resulted in the detection of GFP and viral proteins in intestinal samples. Our results demonstrate an efficient entry of non-replicative rotavirus VLP into the epithelial cell line MA104 and provide the first in vivo evidence of the potential of these nanoparticles as a promising safe candidate for drug delivery to intestinal cells.

  13. Duodenal perforation associated with norovirus and rotavirus gastroenteritis

    OpenAIRE

    Ueda, Norishi; Shimotake, Takashi; Ohama, Kazunori

    2013-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Norovirus (NoV) and rotavirus (RV) gastroenteritis are usually self-limiting. However, few pediatric cases of bowel perforation and no duodenal perforation with NoV gastroenteritis were reported. We describe two children with duodenal perforation due to NoV or RV gastroenteritis. Suspicion for this association enables prompt intervention, preventing lethal outcomes of these common infections.

  14. Accelerating the introduction of rotavirus immunization in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suwantika, Auliya A.; Zakiyah, Neily; Lestari, Keri; Postma, Maarten J.

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of the rotavirus vaccine in Indonesia is currently in its infancy. Delay in its development might be caused by factors related to the perceived value of the vaccine, health system characteristics and policy considerations. Other factors, which may also interfere with optimizing the

  15. Pronóstico de la diarrea por rotavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mota-Hernández Felipe

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Comparar la gravedad de la diarrea por rotavirus (RV y por no rotavirus. Material y métodos. Estudio transversal en 520 lactantes con diarrea aguda, efectuado entre octubre de 1994 y marzo de 1995 en siete centros del primer nivel de atención en cinco estados de México. El diagnóstico de RV se realizó con ensayo inmunoenzimático o por electroforesis. El análisis se hizo a través de medidas de tendencia central. Los resultados se presentan como promedio y desviación estándar o mediana o variación. Resultados. Se aisló RV en 264 lactantes (50.7% con predominio en varones de 6 meses a un año. Las manifestaciones clínicas fueron significativamente diferentes entre el grupo rotavirus positivo y el grupo rotavirus negativo en mediana de evacuaciones por 24 horas, frecuencia de vómitos, temperatura > 38° C, deshidratación y calificación de gravedad, respectivamente. Conclusiones. Estos resultados mostraron peor pronóstico por mayor gravedad de la diarrea por RV en lactantes, con relación a otra etiología. El texto completo en inglés de este artículo está disponible en: http://www.insp.mx/salud/index.html

  16. Noninterference of Rotavirus Vaccine With Measles-Rubella Vaccine at 9 Months of Age and Improvements in Antirotavirus Immunity: A Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, K.; Fleming, Jessica A.; Victor, John C.; Yunus, Mohammad; Bari, Tajul Islam A.; Azim, Tasnim; Rahman, Mustafizur; Mowla, Syed Mohammad Niaz; Bellini, William J.; McNeal, Monica; Icenogle, Joseph P.; Lopman, Ben; Parashar, Umesh; Cortese, Margaret M.; Steele, A. Duncan; Neuzil, Kathleen M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The burden of rotavirus morbidity and mortality is high in children aged <5 years in developing countries, and evaluations indicate waning protection from rotavirus immunization in the second year. An additional dose of rotavirus vaccine may enhance the immune response and lengthen the period of protection against disease, but coadministration of this dose should not interfere with immune responses to concurrently given vaccines. Methods. A total of 480 9-month-old participants from Matlab, Bangladesh, were enrolled in a study with a primary objective to establish noninferiority of concomitant administration of measles-rubella vaccine (MR) and a third dose of human rotavirus vaccine (HRV; MR + HRV), compared with MR given alone. Secondary objectives included noninferiority of rubella antibody seroconversion and evaluating rotavirus IgA/IgG seroresponses in MR + HRV recipients. Results. Two months after vaccination, 75.3% and 74.3% of MR + HRV and MR recipients, respectively, had seroprotective levels of measles virus antibodies; 100.0% and 99.6%, respectively, showed anti–rubella virus immunoglobulin G (IgG) seroprotection. In the MR + HRV group, antirotavirus immunoglobulin A and IgG seropositivity frequencies before vaccination (52.7% and 66.3%, respectively) increased to 69.6% and 88.3% after vaccination. Conclusions. Vaccine-induced measles and rubella antibody responses are not negatively affected by concomitant administration of HRV. The HRV dose increases antirotavirus serum antibody titers and the proportion of infants with detectable antirotavirus antibody. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT01700621. PMID:26823338

  17. 口服轮状病毒活疫苗罗特威研究进展%Progress of oral rotavirus (live) vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢澎; 李青; 庞兴; 付敏强; 魏至栋

    2012-01-01

    Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe diarrhea disease in infants and young children worldwide, and its infection has a major global impact on childhood morbidity and mortality. Rotavirus can cause an annual morbidity of more than 10 million diarrhea in children under the age of five in China, of which almost 30 000 to 40 000 children die. Safe and effective vaccination is the principal means to prevent diarrhea caused by rotaviruses. Oral rotavirus (live) vaccine has been approved for human use in 2001 and the sale has been accumulated to more than 30 million doses on the market. The result proved that it is safe and effective, and can effectively reduce the incidence of rotavirus diarrhea.%轮状病毒是引起婴幼儿重症腹泻的最主要病原体,是全球范围内导致婴幼儿发病和死亡的主要病因之一.我国5岁以下婴幼儿轮状病毒腹泻发病人数每年超过1 000万,每年导致大约3~4万名婴幼儿死亡.接种安全有效的疫苗是预防轮状病毒腹泻的主要手段.口服轮状病毒活疫苗罗特威于2001年获准上市,累计接种已超过3 000万剂,安全有效,可有效降低轮状病毒腹泻的发病率.

  18. Incidence of rotavirus infection in children with gastroenteritis attending Jos university teaching hospital, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olabode Atanda O

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study was conducted to determine the incidence of rotavirus infection in children with gastroenteritis attending Jos university teaching hospital, Plateau State. A total of 160 children with acute diarrhea were selected by random sampling. Stool samples were obtained and assayed for rotavirus antigens by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay technique using standard diagnostic BIOLINE Rotavirus kit. Demographic data of parents were also recorded. Rotavirus were detected in faeces of 22(13.8% children with acute diarrhea, 90.9% of positive cases of rotavirus gastroenteritis were under 2 years of age with highest prevalence in children 7-12 months of age. Males excreted rotavirus at a significant higher rate than females (P

  19. Development of immunity to porcine rotavirus in piglets protected from disease by bovine colostrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridger, J C; Brown, J F

    1981-01-01

    Bovine colostrum with rotavirus-neutralizing activity was fed for 10 days to two groups of piglets, one of which was inoculated intranasally with a rotavirus of porcine origin. A third group, which did not receive colostrum, was also inoculated with the virus, and these piglets developed diarrhea, excreted rotavirus in the feces, and died 6 days after infection. In contrast, the infected piglets fed with bovine colostrum remained healthy, although they developed antibody to rotavirus. Twenty-seven days after the primary inoculation, piglets in the colostrum-fed groups were inoculated intranasally with virus. Those in the previously unexposed group became clinically ill and excreted rotavirus, whereas those which had experienced a previous subclinical infection (the colostrum-fed, virus-inoculated group) remained healthy. It was concluded that bovine colostrum protected piglets from the clinical effects of a porcine rotavirus and that these animals developed an immunity which prevented subsequent disease. PMID:6262251

  20. Emergence and Characterization of Unusual DS-1-Like G1P[8] Rotavirus Strains in Children with Diarrhea in Thailand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Komoto

    Full Text Available The emergence and rapid spread of unusual DS-1-like G1P[8] rotaviruses in Japan have been recently reported. During rotavirus surveillance in Thailand, three DS-1-like G1P[8] strains (RVA/Human-wt/THA/PCB-180/2013/G1P[8], RVA/Human-wt/THA/SKT-109/2013/G1P[8], and RVA/Human-wt/THA/SSKT-41/2013/G1P[8] were identified in stool specimens from hospitalized children with severe diarrhea. In this study, we sequenced and characterized the complete genomes of strains PCB-180, SKT-109, and SSKT-41. On whole genomic analysis, all three strains exhibited a unique genotype constellation including both genogroup 1 and 2 genes: G1-P[8]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2. This novel genotype constellation is shared with Japanese DS-1-like G1P[8] strains. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the G/P genes of strains PCB-180, SKT-109, and SSKT-41 appeared to have originated from human Wa-like G1P[8] strains. On the other hand, the non-G/P genes of the three strains were assumed to have originated from human DS-1-like strains. Thus, strains PCB-180, SKT-109, and SSKT-41 appeared to be derived through reassortment event(s between Wa-like G1P[8] and DS-1-like human rotaviruses. Furthermore, strains PCB-180, SKT-109, and SSKT-41 were found to have the 11-segment genome almost indistinguishable from one another in their nucleotide sequences and phylogenetic lineages, indicating the derivation of the three strains from a common origin. Moreover, all the 11 genes of the three strains were closely related to those of Japanese DS-1-like G1P[8] strains. Therefore, DS-1-like G1P[8] strains that have emerged in Thailand and Japan were assumed to have originated from a recent common ancestor. To our knowledge, this is the first report on whole genome-based characterization of DS-1-like G1P[8] strains that have emerged in an area other than Japan. Our observations will provide important insights into the evolutionary dynamics of emerging DS-1-like G1P[8] rotaviruses.

  1. Reduction in Rotavirus-associated Acute Gastroenteritis Following Introduction of Rotavirus Vaccine Into Australia's National Childhood Vaccine Schedule

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buttery, Jim P.; Lambert, Stephen B.; Grimwood, Keith; Nissen, Michael D.; Field, Emma J.; Macartney, Kristine K.; Akikusa, Jonathan D.; Kelly, Julian J.; Kirkwood, Carl D.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Rotavirus vaccines were introduced into the funded Australian National Immunization Program (NIP) in July 2007. Due to purchasing arrangements, individual states and territories chose either a 2-dose RV1 (Rotarix, GSK) regimen or 3-dose RV5 (Rotateq, Merck/CSL) regimen. This allowed co

  2. Understanding Reduced Rotavirus Vaccine Efficacy in Low Socio-Economic Settings

    OpenAIRE

    Lopman, Benjamin A.; Pitzer, Virginia E.; Rajiv Sarkar; Beryl Gladstone; Manish Patel; John Glasser; Manoj Gambhir; Christina Atchison; Grenfell, Bryan T.; W John Edmunds; Gagandeep Kang; Umesh D Parashar

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Rotavirus vaccine efficacy ranges from >90% in high socio-economic settings (SES) to 50% in low SES. With the imminent introduction of rotavirus vaccine in low SES countries, understanding reasons for reduced efficacy in these settings could identify strategies to improve vaccine performance. METHODS We developed a mathematical model to predict rotavirus vaccine efficacy in high, middle and low SES based on data specific for each setting on incidence, protection conferred by...

  3. Demonstration of group C rotaviruses in fecal samples of diarrheic dogs in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, P; Schulze, P; Herbst, W

    1999-01-01

    Three out of 9 fecal samples from diarrheic dogs, which were positive for rotavirus by electron microscopy, revealed RNA-migration patterns identical to those of porcine group C rotavirus when studied by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). The results were further confirmed by solid phase immuno electron microscopy (SPIEM). This is the first report of the occurrence of group C rotaviruses in dogs. PMID:10664399

  4. Catching-up with pentavalent vaccine: Exploring reasons behind lower rotavirus vaccine coverage in El Salvador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez-Castaneda, Eduardo; Burnett, Eleanor; Elas, Miguel; Baltrons, Rafael; Pezzoli, Lorenzo; Flannery, Brendan; Kleinbaum, David; de Oliveira, Lucia Helena; Danovaro-Holliday, M Carolina

    2015-11-27

    Rotavirus vaccine was introduced in El Salvador in 2006 and is recommended to be given concomitantly with DTP-HepB-Haemophilus influenzae type b (pentavalent) vaccine at ages 2 months (upper age limit 15 weeks) and 4 months (upper age limit 8 months) of age. However, rotavirus vaccination coverage continues to lag behind that of pentavalent vaccine, even in years when national rotavirus vaccine stock-outs have not occurred. We analyzed factors associated with receipt of oral rotavirus vaccine among children who received at least 2 doses of pentavalent vaccine in a stratified cluster survey of children aged 24-59 months conducted in El Salvador in 2011. Vaccine doses included were documented on vaccination cards (94.4%) or in health facility records (5.6%). Logistic regression and survival analysis were used to assess factors associated with vaccination status and age at vaccination. Receipt of pentavalent vaccine by age 15 weeks was associated with rotavirus vaccination (OR: 5.1; 95% CI 2.7, 9.4), and receipt of the second pentavalent dose by age 32 weeks was associated with receipt of two rotavirus vaccine doses (OR: 5.0; 95% CI 2.1-12.3). Timely coverage with the first pentavalent vaccine dose was 88.2% in the 2007 cohort and 91.1% in the 2008 cohort (p=0.04). Children born in 2009, when a four-month national rotavirus vaccine stock-out occurred, had an older median age of receipt of rotavirus vaccine and were less likely to receive rotavirus on the same date as the same dose of pentavalent vaccine than children born in 2007 and 2008. Upper age limit recommendations for rotavirus vaccine administration contributed to suboptimal vaccination coverage. Survey data suggest that late rotavirus vaccination and co-administration with later doses of pentavalent vaccine among children born in 2009 helped increase rotavirus vaccine coverage following shortages. PMID:26263200

  5. Catching-up with pentavalent vaccine: Exploring reasons behind lower rotavirus vaccine coverage in El Salvador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez-Castaneda, Eduardo; Burnett, Eleanor; Elas, Miguel; Baltrons, Rafael; Pezzoli, Lorenzo; Flannery, Brendan; Kleinbaum, David; de Oliveira, Lucia Helena; Danovaro-Holliday, M Carolina

    2015-11-27

    Rotavirus vaccine was introduced in El Salvador in 2006 and is recommended to be given concomitantly with DTP-HepB-Haemophilus influenzae type b (pentavalent) vaccine at ages 2 months (upper age limit 15 weeks) and 4 months (upper age limit 8 months) of age. However, rotavirus vaccination coverage continues to lag behind that of pentavalent vaccine, even in years when national rotavirus vaccine stock-outs have not occurred. We analyzed factors associated with receipt of oral rotavirus vaccine among children who received at least 2 doses of pentavalent vaccine in a stratified cluster survey of children aged 24-59 months conducted in El Salvador in 2011. Vaccine doses included were documented on vaccination cards (94.4%) or in health facility records (5.6%). Logistic regression and survival analysis were used to assess factors associated with vaccination status and age at vaccination. Receipt of pentavalent vaccine by age 15 weeks was associated with rotavirus vaccination (OR: 5.1; 95% CI 2.7, 9.4), and receipt of the second pentavalent dose by age 32 weeks was associated with receipt of two rotavirus vaccine doses (OR: 5.0; 95% CI 2.1-12.3). Timely coverage with the first pentavalent vaccine dose was 88.2% in the 2007 cohort and 91.1% in the 2008 cohort (p=0.04). Children born in 2009, when a four-month national rotavirus vaccine stock-out occurred, had an older median age of receipt of rotavirus vaccine and were less likely to receive rotavirus on the same date as the same dose of pentavalent vaccine than children born in 2007 and 2008. Upper age limit recommendations for rotavirus vaccine administration contributed to suboptimal vaccination coverage. Survey data suggest that late rotavirus vaccination and co-administration with later doses of pentavalent vaccine among children born in 2009 helped increase rotavirus vaccine coverage following shortages.

  6. Incidence of rotavirus infection in different age groups of pediatric patients with gastroenteritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Truant, A L; Chonmaitree, T

    1982-01-01

    An enzyme immunoassay was used to detect rotavirus in the stools of 176 pediatric patients presenting with gastroenteritis. The highest incidence of rotavirus infection was found among patients less than 1 year of age. In contrast to previously reported studies, 23% of neonates with gastroenteritis had rotavirus in their stools. This relatively easy and rapid method was helpful in the management of pediatric patients with gastroenteritis.

  7. Frequency of Rotavirus and Enteric Adenoviruses among children with acute gastroenteritis in a district hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Özer, Türkan Toka; Yula, Erkan; Deveci, Özcan; Tekin, Alicem; Durmaz, Süleyman; Gülenç, Mustafa; Yanık, Keramettin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Rotavirus and Enteric Adenoviruses (EA) are most important viral enteric agents which cause acute infectious gastroenteritis. Little is known about the epidemiology of Rotavirus and EA gastroenteritis in our city. In this study, it was purposed to determine of the frequency of Rotavirus, EA, and to detect of the seasonal distribution among pediatric patients with acute gastroenteritis in Kiziltepe General Hospital, Mardin-Turkey. Materials and methods: The records of acute infe...

  8. The frequency of rotavirus and enteric adenovirus in children with acute gastroenteritis in Mardin

    OpenAIRE

    Alicem Tekin

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Infectious gastroenteritis is one of most important causes of morbidity and mortality in children. Rotavirus and enteric adenoviruses are the most important agents of infectious gastroenteritis. Little is known about the epide-miology of rotavirus and enteric adenovirus gastroenteritis in our region. This study was aimed to determine the fre-quency of rotavirus and enteric adenovirus gastroenteritis in pediatric patients admitted to our hospital.Materials and Methods: Fresh stool ...

  9. Frequency of Rotavirus and Enteric Adenoviruses among children with acute gastroenteritis in a district hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Süleyman Durmaz; Mustafa Gülenç; Alicem Tekin; Keramettin Yanık; Türkan Toka Özer; Özcan Deveci; Erkan Yula

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Rotavirus and Enteric Adenoviruses (EA) are most important viral enteric agents which cause acute infectious gastroenteritis. Little is known about the epidemiology of Rotavirus and EA gastroenteritis in our city. In this study, it was purposed to determine of the frequency of Rotavirus, EA, and to detect of the seasonal distribution among pediatric patients with acute gastroenteritis in Kiziltepe General Hospital, Mardin-Turkey.Materials and methods: The records of acute infectiou...

  10. Rotavirus vaccine a€“ What are the concerns of the developing countries?

    OpenAIRE

    SHAH, Nitin K

    2010-01-01

    It is estimated that 0.6 million children die annually due to rotavirus diarrhea under the age of 5 years world over. 90% of these deaths occur in developing countries. Western data suggests that current rotavirus vaccines have 85-95% efficacy against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE). There are concerns while using the same in developing countries. Data from African trial has shown 76% efficacy against severe RVGE. Efficacy in malnourished children has been found to be 73% as against 7...

  11. Inhibition of UBE2D3 expression attenuates radiosensitivity of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells by increasing hTERT expression and activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbo Wang

    Full Text Available The known functions of telomerase in tumor cells include replenishing telomeric DNA and maintaining cell immortality. We have previously shown the existence of a negative correlation between human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT and radiosensitivity in tumor cells. Here we set out to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying regulation by telomerase of radiosensitivity in MCF-7 cells. Toward this aim, yeast two-hybrid (Y2H screening of a human laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma radioresistant (Hep2R cDNA library was first performed to search for potential hTERT interacting proteins. We identified ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2D3 (UBE2D3 as a principle hTERT-interacting protein and validated this association biochemically. ShRNA-mediated inhibition of UBE2D3 expression attenuated MCF-7 radiosensitivity, and induced the accumulation of hTERT and cyclin D1 in these cells. Moreover, down-regulation of UBE2D3 increased hTERT activity and cell proliferation, accelerating G1 to S phase transition in MCF-7 cells. Collectively these findings suggest that UBE2D3 participates in the process of hTERT-mediated radiosensitivity in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells by regulating hTERT and cyclin D1.

  12. Prospective study of the burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis in Danish children and their families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Thomas; Iturriza, Miren; Faaborg-Andersen, Jens;

    2011-01-01

    This was the first study to characterize the total burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) at both hospital and general physician (GP) clinics in Denmark, and also the first to confirm rotavirus (RV) as the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis (GE) among children......This was the first study to characterize the total burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) at both hospital and general physician (GP) clinics in Denmark, and also the first to confirm rotavirus (RV) as the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis (GE) among children...

  13. Rotavirus disease in Guinea-Bissau, West Africa: a review of longitudinal community and hospital studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Thea Kølsen; Aaby, Peter; Mølbak, Kåre;

    2010-01-01

    Rotavirus is one of the most common causes of childhood diarrheal disease and deaths in sub-Saharan Africa. This article reviews community- and hospital-based surveillance of rotavirus disease in Bissau, Guinea-Bissau, West Africa. Here, rotavirus infections exhibit a seasonal pattern, with annual...... epidemics occurring during the relatively dry and cooler months, from January to April, and few cases registered from May to December. Most children (74%) experience their first infection before the age of 2 years, and rotavirus has been identified as the most pathogenic of all diarrheal agents during 2...

  14. A human herpesvirus miRNA attenuates interferon signaling and contributes to maintenance of viral latency by targeting IKKε

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deguang Liang; Yuan Gao; Xianzhi Lin; Zhiheng He; Qinglan Zhao; Qiang Deng; Ke Lan

    2011-01-01

    Type I interferon(IFN)signaling is the principal response mediating antiviral innate immunity. IFN transcription is dependent upon the activation of transcription factors IRF3/IRF7 and NF-KB. Many viral proteins have been shown as being capable of interfering with IFN signaling to facilitate evasion from the host innate immune response.Here, we report that a viral miRNA, miR-K12-11, encoded by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus(KSHV)is critical for the modulation of IFN signaling and acts through targeting 1-kappa-B kinase epsilon(IKKε). Ectopic expression of miR-K12-11 resulted in decreased IKKε expression, while inhibition of miR-K12-11 was found to restore IKKE expression in KSHV-infected cells. Importantly, expression of milk-K12-I1 attenuated IFN signaling by decreasing IKKε-mediated IRF3/IRF7 phosphorylation and by inhibiting the activation of IKKE-dependent IFN stimulating genes(ISGs), allowing miR-K12-11 suppression of antiviral immunity. Our data suggest that IKKE targeting by miR-K12-11 is an important strategy utilized by KSHV to modulate IFN signaling during the KSHV lifecycle, especially in latency. We also demonstrated that IKKE was able to enhance KSHV reactivation synergistically with the treatment of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate. Moreover, inhibition of miR-K12-11enhanced KSHV reactivation induced by vesicular stomatitis virus infection. Taken together, our findings also suggest that miR-K12-11 can contribute to maintenance of KSHV latency by targeting IKKE.

  15. ACUMULACIÓN DE LA PROTEÍNA DE CHOQUE TÉRMICO, HSC70, EN CÉLULAS MA104 DESPUÉS DE LA INFECCIÓN CON ROTAVIRUS Increase of heat shock cognate protein, HSC70, in MA104 cells following rotavirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Rocio Pulido Morera

    2007-12-01

    rotavirus particles during the infection of MA104 cells, but changes in the accumulation levels of this protein through the rotavirus infection cycle are unknown. Objetive. To determine if the accumulation levels of HSC70 in MA104 cells change during the infection by rotavirus. Materials and methods. Immunofluorescene microscopy, Western blotting an ELISA were used in order to determine HSC70 accumulation levels in MA104 cells after infection (0 up to 16 h p.i. by rotavirus strains Wa (human, Rf (bovine and RRV (simian. Additionally, a rabbit polyclonal serum against purified rotavirus particles was used for detecting rotavirus antigen in an immunoperoxidase assay. Results. The immunofluorescence staining of cells infected with each of three rotavirus strains showed a direct correlation between the increase of fluorescence in the cytoplasm and the increase of the viral antigen. The intensity of the cytoplasm fluorescence was 1.1 to 2.0 times higher in infected cells than that observed in control cells. On the other hand, the intensity of the fluorescence in the cell membrane was similar to that of the non-infected control cells. The Western blotting assay did not allow to establish measurable differences between infected and non-infected MA104 cells, because the increase of the protein are below the detection limit. According to the results of ELISA, HSC70 level increases 1 to 3 times in MA104 cells after (8 h p.i. the infection with strain RRV, whereas infection with strain RF produced an increase which ranged from 1.3 to 2.5 times after 10 h p.i. Infection by strain Wa was correlated with un increase of HSC70 level between 1.7 and 3.0 times after 2 h p.i. Conclusions. The results suggest that the increase of HSC70 accumulation level possibly corresponds to an increased expression of its gene during the rotavirus infection and probably it is involved in rotavirus multiplication steps additional to those of entry and exit processes.

  16. Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccine Strains Elicit a Greater Innate Immune Response than Antigenically-Matched Seasonal Influenza Viruses during Infection of Human Nasal Epithelial Cell Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, William A.; Brighton, Missy; Jaspers, Ilona

    2014-01-01

    Influenza viruses are global pathogens that infect approximately 10–20% of the world’s population each year. Vaccines, including the live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV), are the best defense against influenza infections. The LAIV is a novel vaccine that actively replicates in the human nasal epithelium and elicits both mucosal and systemic protective immune responses. The differences in replication and innate immune responses following infection of human nasal epithelium with influenza seasonal wild type (WT) and LAIV viruses remain unknown. Using a model of primary differentiated human nasal epithelial cell (hNECs) cultures, we compared influenza WT and antigenically-matched cold adapted (CA) LAIV virus replication and the subsequent innate immune response including host cellular pattern recognition protein expression, host innate immune gene expression, secreted pro-inflammatory cytokine production, and intracellular viral RNA levels. Growth curves comparing virus replication between WT and LAIV strains revealed significantly less infectious virus production during LAIV compared with WT infection. Despite this disparity in infectious virus production the LAIV strains elicited a more robust innate immune response with increased expression of RIG-I, TLR-3, IFNβ, STAT-1, IRF-7, MxA, and IP-10. There were no differences in cytotoxicity between hNEC cultures infected with WT and LAIV strains as measured by basolateral levels of LDH. Elevated levels of intracellular viral RNA during LAIV as compared with WT virus infection of hNEC cultures at 33°C may explain the augmented innate immune response via the up-regulation of pattern recognition receptors and down-stream type I IFN expression. Taken together our results suggest that the decreased replication of LAIV strains in human nasal epithelial cells is associated with a robust innate immune response that differs from infection with seasonal influenza viruses, limits LAIV shedding and plays a role in the

  17. Live attenuated influenza vaccine strains elicit a greater innate immune response than antigenically-matched seasonal influenza viruses during infection of human nasal epithelial cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, William A; Chason, Kelly D; Brighton, Missy; Jaspers, Ilona

    2014-03-26

    Influenza viruses are global pathogens that infect approximately 10-20% of the world's population each year. Vaccines, including the live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV), are the best defense against influenza infections. The LAIV is a novel vaccine that actively replicates in the human nasal epithelium and elicits both mucosal and systemic protective immune responses. The differences in replication and innate immune responses following infection of human nasal epithelium with influenza seasonal wild type (WT) and LAIV viruses remain unknown. Using a model of primary differentiated human nasal epithelial cell (hNECs) cultures, we compared influenza WT and antigenically-matched cold adapted (CA) LAIV virus replication and the subsequent innate immune response including host cellular pattern recognition protein expression, host innate immune gene expression, secreted pro-inflammatory cytokine production, and intracellular viral RNA levels. Growth curves comparing virus replication between WT and LAIV strains revealed significantly less infectious virus production during LAIV compared with WT infection. Despite this disparity in infectious virus production the LAIV strains elicited a more robust innate immune response with increased expression of RIG-I, TLR-3, IFNβ, STAT-1, IRF-7, MxA, and IP-10. There were no differences in cytotoxicity between hNEC cultures infected with WT and LAIV strains as measured by basolateral levels of LDH. Elevated levels of intracellular viral RNA during LAIV as compared with WT virus infection of hNEC cultures at 33°C may explain the augmented innate immune response via the up-regulation of pattern recognition receptors and down-stream type I IFN expression. Taken together our results suggest that the decreased replication of LAIV strains in human nasal epithelial cells is associated with a robust innate immune response that differs from infection with seasonal influenza viruses, limits LAIV shedding and plays a role in the silent

  18. Oral glucose ingestion attenuates exercise-induced activation of 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Åkerström, Thorbjörn; Birk, Jesper Bratz; Klein, Ditte Kjærsgaard;

    2006-01-01

    5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been suggested to be a 'metabolic master switch' regulating various aspects of muscle glucose and fat metabolism. In isolated rat skeletal muscle, glucose suppresses the activity of AMPK and in human muscle glycogen loading decreases exercise-induced AMPK...

  19. A rapid immunization strategy with a live attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine elicits protective neutralizing antibody responses in non-human primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuping eAmbuel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Dengue viruses (DENVs cause approximately 390 million cases of DENV infections annually and over 3 billion people worldwide are at risk of infection. No dengue vaccine is currently available nor is there an antiviral therapy for DENV infections. We have developed a tetravalent live-attenuated DENV vaccine (TDV that consists of a molecularly characterized attenuated DENV-2 strain (TDV-2 and three chimeric viruses containing the pre-membrane and envelope genes of DENV-1, -3 and -4 expressed in the context of the TDV-2 genome. To impact dengue vaccine delivery in endemic areas and immunize travelers, a simple and rapid immunization strategy (RIS is preferred. We investigated RIS consisting of two full vaccine doses being administered subcutaneously or intradermally on the initial vaccination visit (day 0 at two different anatomical locations with a needle-free disposable syringe jet injection (DSJI delivery devices (PharmaJet in non-human primates (NHP. This vaccination strategy resulted in efficient priming and induction of neutralizing antibody responses to all four DENV serotypes comparable to those elicited by the traditional prime and boost (two months later vaccination schedule. In addition, the vaccine induced CD4+ and CD8+ T cells producing IFN-γ, IL-2, and TNF-α, and targeting the DENV-2 NS1, NS3 and NS5 proteins. Moreover, vaccine-specific T cells were cross-reactive with the non-structural NS3 and NS5 proteins of DENV-4. When animals were challenged with DENV-2 they were protected with no detectable viremia, and exhibited sterilizing immunity (no increase of neutralizing titers post- challenge. RIS could decrease vaccination visits and provide quick immune response to all four DENV serotypes. This strategy could increase vaccination compliance and would be especially advantageous for travelers into endemic areas.

  20. An Ethanol Extract Derived from Bonnemaisonia hamifera Scavenges Ultraviolet B (UVB Radiation-Induced Reactive Oxygen Species and Attenuates UVB-Induced Cell Damage in Human Keratinocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam Ho Lee

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the photoprotective properties of an ethanol extract derived from the red alga Bonnemaisonia hamifera against ultraviolet B (UVB-induced cell damage in human HaCaT keratinocytes. The Bonnemaisonia hamifera ethanol extract (BHE scavenged the superoxide anion generated by the xanthine/xanthine oxidase system and the hydroxyl radical generated by the Fenton reaction (FeSO4 + H2O2, both of which were detected by using electron spin resonance spectrometry. In addition, BHE exhibited scavenging activity against the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS that were induced by either hydrogen peroxide or UVB radiation. BHE reduced UVB-induced apoptosis, as shown by decreased apoptotic body formation and DNA fragmentation. BHE also attenuated DNA damage and the elevated levels of 8-isoprostane and protein carbonyls resulting from UVB-mediated oxidative stress. Furthermore, BHE absorbed electromagnetic radiation in the UVB range (280–320 nm. These results suggest that BHE protects human HaCaT keratinocytes against UVB-induced oxidative damage by scavenging ROS and absorbing UVB photons, thereby reducing injury to cellular components.

  1. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells reduce systemic inflammation and attenuate LPS-induced acute lung injury in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Li Jianjun; Li Dong; Liu Xiaomei; Tang Shuhai; Wei Fengcai

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess potent immunomodulatory properties and simultaneously lack the ability to illicit immune responses. Hence, MSCs have emerged as a promising candidate for cellular therapeutics for inflammatory diseases. Within the context of this study, we investigated whether human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) could ameliorate lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced acute lung injury (ALI) in a rat model. Methods ALI was induced ...

  2. Acquisition and extinction of human avoidance behavior: Attenuating effect of safety signals and associations with anxiety vulnerabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Jony eSheynin; Beck, Kevin D.; Servatius, Richard J.; Myers, Catherine E.

    2014-01-01

    While avoidance behavior is often an adaptive strategy, exaggerated avoidance can be detrimental and result in the development of psychopathologies, such as anxiety disorders. A large animal literature shows that the acquisition and extinction of avoidance behavior in rodents depends on individual differences (e.g., sex, strain) and might be modulated by the presence of environmental cues. However, there is a dearth of such reports in human literature, mainly due to the lack of adequate exper...

  3. Cost-effectiveness of rotavirus immunization in vietnam: Exploring impacts of herd immunity and patterns of breastfeedingof

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tu, H.A.T.; Coyte, P.; Li, S.C.; Postma, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: : Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe diarrhoea worldwide. This study was designed to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of rotavirus immunization in Vietnam taking into account herd immunity and patterns of breastfeeding. The affordability of implementing universal rotavirus immun

  4. Development of a Real-time PCR test for porcine group A rotavirus diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth C.M. Marconi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Group A Rotavirus (RVA is one of the most common causes of diarrhea in humans and several animal species. A SYBR-Green Real-Time polymerase chain reaction (PCR was developed to diagnose RVA from porcine fecal samples, targeting amplification of a 137-bp fragment of nonstructural protein 5 (NSP5 gene using mRNA of bovine NADH-desidrogenase-5 as exogenous internal control. Sixty-five samples were tested (25 tested positive for conventional PCR and genetic sequencing. The overall agreement (kappa was 0.843, indicating 'very good' concordance between tests, presenting 100% of relative sensitivity (25+ Real Time PCR/25+ Conventional PCR and 87.5% of relative sensitivity (35- Real Time PCR/40- Conventional PCR. The results also demonstrated high intra- and inter-assay reproducibility (coefficient of variation ≤1.42%; thus, this method proved to be a fast and sensitive approach for the diagnosis of RVA in pigs.

  5. Rotavirus genotypes in Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Honduras and the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdett-Stanziola, Lurys; Ortega-Barria, Eduardo; Espinoza, Felix; Bucardo, Filemon; Jimenez, Carlos; Ferrera, Annabelle

    2011-01-01

    In this study, 574 stool samples from children with gastroenteritis were obtained from different hospitals in Costa Rica, Honduras, Nicaragua and the Dominican Republic during 2005-2006. Diarrhea stool samples were analyzed for rotavirus (RV) by ELISA and typed by the RT-PCR-based method. Unusual strains were detected: G1P6, G2P8, G3P6, G9P4, and mixed infections. Recent studies have indicated that unusual human RV strains are emerging as global strains, which has important implications for effective vaccine development. In this context, the next generation of RV vaccines will need to provide adequate protection against diseases caused not only by mixed infections, but also by unusual G/P combinations.

  6. Diversity of VP7 genes of G1 rotaviruses isolated in Iran, 2009-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilvand, Somayeh; Afchangi, Atefeh; Mohajel, Nasir; Roohvand, Farzin; Shoja, Zabihollah

    2016-01-01

    Genotype G1 of rotaviruses (RVs) is the most prevalent strain in human RV infections around the world. The present study evaluated genetic variations in the VP7 gene of RV G1 genotype isolates from Iran. Genetic and phylogenetic analyses indicated that RV strains from Iran clustered with G1 lineages IA, IC, and IIC, showing highest average of similarity versus reference sequences of the G1 lineages I and II. This study highlights the genetic pattern of G1 RV on the basis of distinct lineages and sublineages and indicates the importance of continuous monitoring on genetic variation and evolution pattern of G1 RV strains across the Iranian population for the final aim of RV vaccine introduction.

  7. The cost-effectiveness of pentavalent rotavirus vaccination in England and Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Katherine E; Shim, Eunha; Carroll, Stuart; Quilici, Sibilia; Galvani, Alison P

    2012-11-01

    Rotavirus vaccines have shown great potential for reducing the disease burden of the major cause of severe childhood gastroenteritis. The decision regarding whether rotavirus vaccination will be introduced into the national immunization program is currently being reviewed. The conclusions of previous evaluations of rotavirus vaccination cost-effectiveness contradict each other. This is the first analysis to incorporate a dynamic transmission model to assess the cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination in England and Wales. Most previously reported models do not include herd protection, and thus may underestimate the cost-effectiveness of vaccination against rotavirus. We incorporate a dynamic model of rotavirus transmission in England and Wales into a cost-effectiveness analysis to determine the probability that the pentavalent rotavirus vaccination will be cost-effective over a range of full-course vaccine prices. This novel approach allows the cost-effectiveness analysis to include a feasible level of herd protection provided by a vaccination program. Our base case model predicts that pentavalent rotavirus vaccination is likely to be cost-effective in England and Wales at £ 60 per course. In some scenarios the vaccination is predicted to be not only cost-effective but also cost-saving. These savings could be generated within ten years after vaccine introduction. Our budget impact analysis demonstrates that for the realistic base case scenarios, 58-96% of the cost outlay for vaccination will be recouped within the first four years of a program. Our results indicate that rotavirus vaccination would be beneficial to public health and could be economically sound. Since rotavirus vaccination is not presently on the immunization schedule for England and Wales but is currently under review, this study can inform policymakers of the cost-effectiveness and budget impact of implementing a mass rotavirus vaccine strategy.

  8. Attenuation of radiation-induced DNA damage due to paracrine interactions between normal human epithelial and stromal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Objective: Developmentally, every tissue accommodates different types of cells, such as epitheliocytes and stromal cells in parenchymal organs. To better understand the complexity of radiation response, it is necessary to evaluate possible cross-talk between different tissue components. This work was set out to investigate reciprocal influence of normal human epithelial cells and fibroblasts on the extent of radiation-induced DNA damage. Methods: Model cultures of primary human thyrocytes (PT), normal diploid fibroblasts (BJ), PT/BJ cell co-culture and conditioned medium transfer were used to examine DNA damage in terms of γ-H2AX foci number per cell or by Comet assay after exposure to different doses of γ-rays. Results: In co-cultures, the kinetics of γ-H2AX foci number change was dose-dependent and similar to that in individual PT and BJ cultures. The number of γ-H2AX foci in co-cultures was significantly lower (∼25%) in both types of cells comparing to individual cultures. Reciprocal conditioned medium transfer to individual counterpart cells prior to irradiation resulted in approximately 35% reduction in the number γ-H2AX foci at 1 Gy and lower doses in both PT and BJ demonstrating the role of paracrine soluble factors. Comet assay corroborated the results of γ-H2AX foci counting in conditioned medium transfer experiments. In contrast to medium conditioned on PT cells, conditioned medium collected from several human thyroid cancer cell lines failed to establish DNA-protected state in BJ fibroblasts. In its turn, medium conditioned on BJ cells did not change the extent of radiation-induced DNA damage in cancer cell lines tested. Conclusion: The results imply the existence of a network of soluble factor-mediated paracrine interactions between normal epithelial and stromal cells that could be a part of natural mechanism by which cells protect DNA from genotoxic stress.

  9. KR-31543 reduces the production of proinflammatory molecules in human endothelial cells and monocytes and attenuates atherosclerosis in mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae-Hoon; Yoo, Ji-Young; Kim, Sun-Ok; Yoo, Sung-Eun; Oh, Goo Taeg

    2012-12-31

    KR-31543, (2S, 3R, 4S)-6-amino-4-[N-(4-chlorophenyl)- N-(2-methyl-2H-tetrazol-5-ylmethyl) amino]-3,4-dihydro- 2-dimethyoxymethyl-3-hydroxy-2-methyl-2H-1-benz opyran is a new neuroprotective agent for ischemiareperfusion damage. It has also been reported that KR-31543 has protective effects on lipid peroxidation and H₂O₂-induced reactive oxygen species production. In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic properties of KR-31543. We observed that KR-31543 treatment reduced the production of MCP-1, IL-8, and VCAM-1 in HUVECs, and of MCP-1 and IL-6 in THP-1 human monocytes. We also examined the effect of KR-31543 on monocytes migration in vitro. KR-31543 treatment effectively reduced the migration of THP-1 human monocytes to the HUVEC monolayer in a dose-dependent manner. We next examined the effects of this compound on atherogenesis in LDL receptor deficient (Ldlr ⁻/⁻) mice. After 10 weeks of western diet, the formation of atherosclerotic lesion in aorta was reduced in the KR-31543-treated group compared to the control group. The accumulation of macrophages in lesion was also reduced in KR-31543 treated group. However, the plasma levels of total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, and triglyceride were not affected by KR-31543 treatment. Taken together, these results show that KR-31543 has anti-inflammatory properties on human monocytes and endothelial cells, and inhibits fatty streak lesion formation in mouse model of atherosclerosis, suggesting the potential of KR-31543 for the treatment for atherosclerosis.

  10. Dielectrophoresis and dielectrophoretic impedance detection of adenovirus and rotavirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Michihiko; Ding, Zhenhao; Suehiro, Junya

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is the electrical detection of pathogenic viruses, namely, adenovirus and rotavirus, using dielectrophoretic impedance measurement (DEPIM). DEPIM consists of two simultaneous processes: dielectrophoretic trapping of the target and measurement of the impedance change and increase in conductance with the number of trapped targets. This is the first study of applying DEPIM, which was originally developed to detect bacteria suspended in aqueous solutions, to virus detection. The dielectric properties of the viruses were also investigated in terms of their dielectrophoretic behavior. Although their estimated dielectric properties were different from those of bacteria, the trapped viruses increased the conductance of the microelectrode in a manner similar to that in bacteria detection. We demonstrated the electrical detection of viruses within 60 s at concentrations as low as 70 ng/ml for adenovirus and 50 ng/ml for rotavirus.

  11. HIC1 attenuates invasion and metastasis by inhibiting the IL-6/STAT3 signalling pathway in human pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bin; Zhang, Kundong; Li, Shaobo; Li, Hao; Yan, Zhaowen; Huang, Li; Wu, Jianghong; Han, Xiao; Jiang, Weiliang; Mulatibieke, Tunike; Zheng, Lin; Wan, Rong; Wang, Xingpeng; Hu, Guoyong

    2016-07-01

    Hypermethylated in cancer 1 (HIC1) is a tumour suppressor gene that is frequently deleted or epigenetically silenced in many human cancers. However, the molecular function of HIC1 in pancreatic cancer has not been fully elucidated, especially in cancer invasion and metastasis. We aimed to clarify the clinical relevance of HIC1 and human pancreatic cancer and the mechanism of its effect on invasion and metastasis .HIC1 was downregulated in pancreatic cancer patient cancer tissue and pancreatic cancer cell lines. A tissue microarray analysis demonstrated that negative HIC1 expression predicted advanced pathological stages and worse patient survival. In addition, HIC1 inhibited the invasion and metastasis of pancreatic cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. Finally, HIC1 repressed the expression of STAT3 target genes, including c-Myc, VEGF, CyclinD1, MMP2 and MMP9, by binding and interacting with STAT3 to impede its DNA-binding ability but without affecting the protein levels of STAT3 and p-STAT3. Therefore, HIC1 appears to function as a STAT3 inhibitor and may be a promising target for cancer research and for the development of an optimal treatment approach for pancreatic cancer. PMID:27085461

  12. Perspectivas de la diarrea por rotavirus en El Salvador

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto Arturo Zablah

    2005-01-01

    In December 2000, a large outbreak of gastroenteritis (GE) occurred in El Salvador that was associated with hospitalizations and deaths among children nationwide. Public concern was raised because the etiology was initially unknown and enteric control measures seemed ineffective. The outbreak was eventually linked to rotavirus, control measures were redirected to improving treatment with oral rehydration, and surveillance was initiated to characterize the etiologic agents of gastroenteritis. ...

  13. Sequence analysis and structural implications of rotavirus capsid proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parbhoo, N; Dewar, J B; Gildenhuys, S

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus is the major cause of severe virus-associated gastroenteritis worldwide in children aged 5 and younger. Many children lose their lives annually due to this infection and the impact is particularly pronounced in developing countries. The mature rotavirus is a non-enveloped triple-layered nucleocapsid containing 11 double stranded RNA segments. Here a global view on the sequence and structure of the three main capsid proteins, VP2, VP6 and VP7 is shown by generating a consensus sequence for each of these rotavirus proteins, for each species obtained from published data of representative rotavirus genotypes from across the world and across species. Degree of conservation between species was represented on homology models for each of the proteins. VP7 shows the highest level of variation with 14-45 amino acids showing conservation of less than 60%. These changes are localised to the outer surface alluding to a possible mechanism in evading the immune system. The middle layer, VP6 shows lower variability with only 14-32 sites having lower than 70% conservation. The inner structural layer made up of VP2 showed the lowest variability with only 1-16 sites having less than 70% conservation across species. The results correlate with each protein's multiple structural roles in the infection cycle. Thus, although the nucleotide sequences vary due to the error-prone nature of replication and lack of proof reading, the corresponding amino acid sequence of VP2, 6 and 7 remain relatively conserved. Benefits of this knowledge about the conservation include the ability to target proteins at sites that cannot undergo mutational changes without influencing viral fitness; as well as possibility to study systems that are highly evolved for structure and function in order to determine how to generate and manipulate such systems for use in various biotechnological applications. PMID:27640436

  14. Molecular Epidemiology of Rotavirus in Central and Southeastern Europe▿

    OpenAIRE

    Tcheremenskaia, Olga; Marucci, Gianluca; De Petris, Simona; Ruggeri, Franco Maria; Dovecar, Darja; Sternak, Suncanica Ljubin; Matyasova, Irena; Dhimolea, Majlinda Kota; Mladenova, Zornitsa; Fiore, Lucia

    2007-01-01

    A surveillance network was implemented by the Istituto Superiore di Sanità of Rome in collaboration with laboratories of virology in Czech Republic, Slovenia, Croatia, Albania, and Bulgaria. About 1,500 rotavirus-positive stool samples were collected from children with severe gastroenteritis admitted to hospitals or outpatient wards between 2004 and 2006. The G and P genotypes were determined by reverse transcription-nested PCR. Significant differences were found in the geographical distribut...

  15. Molecular epidemiology of rotavirus in black infants in South Africa.

    OpenAIRE

    Steele, A. D.; Alexander, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    The molecular epidemiology of rotavirus infections in black infants in Ga-Rankuwa, South Africa, was investigated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Between 1983 and 1986, 14 different RNA electrophoretic patterns were observed for children with acute gastroenteritis. These electrophoretypes showed a sequential pattern of appearance, with a limited number being present at any one time. In contrast, for neonates only one RNA electrophoretype was detected, which persisted for at least 3 years.

  16. Detection of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome-Like, Middle East Respiratory Syndrome-Like Bat Coronaviruses and Group H Rotavirus in Faeces of Korean Bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H K; Yoon, S-W; Kim, D-J; Koo, B-S; Noh, J Y; Kim, J H; Choi, Y G; Na, W; Chang, K-T; Song, D; Jeong, D G

    2016-08-01

    Bat species around the world have recently been recognized as major reservoirs of several zoonotic viruses, such as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), Nipah virus and Hendra virus. In this study, consensus primer-based reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCRs) and high-throughput sequencing were performed to investigate viruses in bat faecal samples collected at 11 natural bat habitat sites from July to December 2015 in Korea. Diverse coronaviruses were first detected in Korean bat faeces, including alphacoronaviruses, SARS-CoV-like and MERS-CoV-like betacoronaviruses. In addition, we identified a novel bat rotavirus belonging to group H rotavirus which has only been described in human and pigs until now. Therefore, our results suggest the need for continuing surveillance and additional virological studies in domestic bat. PMID:27213718

  17. Acquisition and extinction of human avoidance behavior: Attenuating effect of safety signals and associations with anxiety vulnerabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jony eSheynin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available While avoidance behavior is often an adaptive strategy, exaggerated avoidance can be detrimental and result in the development of psychopathologies, such as anxiety disorders. A large animal literature shows that the acquisition and extinction of avoidance behavior in rodents depends on individual differences (e.g., sex, strain and might be modulated by the presence of environmental cues. However, there is a dearth of such reports in human literature, mainly due to the lack of adequate experimental paradigms. In the current study, we employed a computer-based task, where participants control a spaceship and attempt to gain points by shooting an enemy spaceship that appears on the screen. Warning signals predict on-screen aversive events; the participants can learn a protective response to escape or avoid these events. This task has been recently used to reveal facilitated acquisition of avoidance behavior in individuals with anxiety vulnerability, due to female sex or inhibited personality. Here, we extended the task to include an extinction phase, and tested the effect of signals that appeared during safe periods. Healthy young adults (n=122 were randomly assigned to a testing condition with or without such signals. Results showed that the addition of safety signals during the acquisition phase impaired acquisition (in females and facilitated extinction of the avoidance behavior. We also replicated our recent finding of an association between female sex and longer avoidance duration and further showed that females continued to demonstrate more avoidance behavior even on extinction trials when the aversive events no longer occurred. This study is the first to show sex differences on the acquisition and extinction of human avoidance behavior and to demonstrate the role of safety signals in such behavior, highlighting the potential relevance of safety signals for cognitive therapies that focus on extinction learning to treat anxiety symptoms.

  18. Electron microscopic analysis of rotavirus assembly-replication intermediates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotaviruses (RVs) replicate their segmented, double-stranded RNA genomes in tandem with early virion assembly. In this study, we sought to gain insight into the ultrastructure of RV assembly-replication intermediates (RIs) using transmission electron microscopy (EM). Specifically, we examined a replicase-competent, subcellular fraction that contains all known RV RIs. Three never-before-seen complexes were visualized in this fraction. Using in vitro reconstitution, we showed that ~15-nm doughnut-shaped proteins in strings were nonstructural protein 2 (NSP2) bound to viral RNA transcripts. Moreover, using immunoaffinity-capture EM, we revealed that ~20-nm pebble-shaped complexes contain the viral RNA polymerase (VP1) and RNA capping enzyme (VP3). Finally, using a gel purification method, we demonstrated that ~30–70-nm electron-dense, particle-shaped complexes represent replicase-competent core RIs, containing VP1, VP3, and NSP2 as well as capsid proteins VP2 and VP6. The results of this study raise new questions about the interactions among viral proteins and RNA during the concerted assembly–replicase process. - Highlights: • Rotaviruses replicate their genomes in tandem with early virion assembly. • Little is known about rotavirus assembly-replication intermediates. • Assembly-replication intermediates were imaged using electron microscopy

  19. Application of Xiyanping in treatment of infantile rotavirus diarrhea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian-Xiong Tang

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To observe the application effect of Xiyanping in the treatment of infantile rotavirus diarrhea.Methods:A total of 80 children with rotavirus diarrhea who were admitted in our hospital from January, 2014 to April, 2015 were included in the study and randomized into the treatment group and the control group with 40 cases in each group. The patients in the two groups were given ribavirin 10 mg/kg.d, iv drip, qd. On this basis, the patients in the treatment group were given additional Xiyanping injection 7.5 mg/kg, iv drip, qd. The symptom and sign relieving time and temperature reduced degree after treatment in the two groups were compared. The serum BDNF, NGF, and NTF levels in the two groups were detected.Results:The treatment total effective rate in the treatment group was significantly higher than that in the control group (P<0.05). The symptom and sign relieving time in the treatment group was significantly shorter than that in the control group (P<0.05), and the temperature recovering degree was significantly superior to that in the control group (P<0.05). The serum BDNF, NGF, and NTF levels after treatment in the treatment group were significantly higher than those in the control group (P<0.05).Conclusions: Xiyanping in combined with ribavirin in the treatment of infantile rotavirus diarrhea can effectively relieve the symptoms and signs, and protect the neurological function, with efficacy superior to that by pure ribavirin treatment.

  20. Electron microscopic analysis of rotavirus assembly-replication intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudreaux, Crystal E.; Kelly, Deborah F. [Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine and Research Institute, Roanoke, VA (United States); McDonald, Sarah M., E-mail: mcdonaldsa@vtc.vt.edu [Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine and Research Institute, Roanoke, VA (United States); Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology, Virginia—Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Rotaviruses (RVs) replicate their segmented, double-stranded RNA genomes in tandem with early virion assembly. In this study, we sought to gain insight into the ultrastructure of RV assembly-replication intermediates (RIs) using transmission electron microscopy (EM). Specifically, we examined a replicase-competent, subcellular fraction that contains all known RV RIs. Three never-before-seen complexes were visualized in this fraction. Using in vitro reconstitution, we showed that ~15-nm doughnut-shaped proteins in strings were nonstructural protein 2 (NSP2) bound to viral RNA transcripts. Moreover, using immunoaffinity-capture EM, we revealed that ~20-nm pebble-shaped complexes contain the viral RNA polymerase (VP1) and RNA capping enzyme (VP3). Finally, using a gel purification method, we demonstrated that ~30–70-nm electron-dense, particle-shaped complexes represent replicase-competent core RIs, containing VP1, VP3, and NSP2 as well as capsid proteins VP2 and VP6. The results of this study raise new questions about the interactions among viral proteins and RNA during the concerted assembly–replicase process. - Highlights: • Rotaviruses replicate their genomes in tandem with early virion assembly. • Little is known about rotavirus assembly-replication intermediates. • Assembly-replication intermediates were imaged using electron microscopy.

  1. Molecular characterization of noroviruses and rotaviruses involved in a large outbreak of gastroenteritis in Northern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bartolo, Ilaria; Monini, Marina; Losio, Marina Nadia; Pavoni, Enrico; Lavazza, Antonio; Ruggeri, Franco Maria

    2011-08-01

    Noroviruses and rotaviruses from a gastroenteritis outbreak affecting >300 people near Garda Lake (Northern Italy) in 2009 were investigated. Characterization of viruses from 40 patient stool samples and 5 environmental samples identified three distinct rotavirus and five norovirus genotypes; two of the latter were detected in both patient and environmental samples.

  2. Economic evaluations of rotavirus immunization for developing countries : a review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tu, H.A.T.; Woerdenbag, H.J.; Kane, S.; Rozenbaum, M.H.; Li, S.C.; Postma, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    Diarrhea is a leading cause of mortality for children under 5 years of age, and rotavirus is identified as the main cause of severe diarrhea worldwide. Since 2006, two rotavirus vaccines, Rotarix and Rotateq, have been available in the market. These vaccines have proved to have high efficacy in deve

  3. Complete genomic sequence for an avian group G rotavirus from South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stucker, Karla M; Stockwell, Timothy B; Nyaga, Martin M; Halpin, Rebecca A; Fedorova, Nadia; Akopov, Asmik; Ngoveni, Harry; Peenze, Ina; Seheri, Mapaseka L; Mphahlele, M Jeffrey; Wentworth, David E

    2015-01-01

    We report the first complete sequence for an avian group G rotavirus (RVG) genome from Africa, which is the third publically available RVG genome. These RVG genomes are highly diverse, especially in their VP4, VP7, NSP4, and NSP3 segments, indicating that RVG diversity is comparable to that of rotavirus A. PMID:25767240

  4. Complete Genomic Sequence for an Avian Group G Rotavirus from South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stucker, Karla M.; Stockwell, Timothy B.; Nyaga, Martin M.; Halpin, Rebecca A.; Fedorova, Nadia; Akopov, Asmik; Ngoveni, Harry; Peenze, Ina; Seheri, Mapaseka L.; Mphahlele, M. Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    We report the first complete sequence for an avian group G rotavirus (RVG) genome from Africa, which is the third publically available RVG genome. These RVG genomes are highly diverse, especially in their VP4, VP7, NSP4, and NSP3 segments, indicating that RVG diversity is comparable to that of rotavirus A. PMID:25767240

  5. Increased Rotavirus Prevalence in Diarrheal Outbreak Precipitated by Localized Flooding, Solomon Islands, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Forrest K; Ko, Albert I; Becha, Chris; Joshua, Cynthia; Musto, Jennie; Thomas, Sarah; Ronsse, Axelle; Kirkwood, Carl D; Sio, Alison; Aumua, Audrey; Nilles, Eric J

    2016-05-01

    Flooding on 1 of the Solomon Islands precipitated a nationwide epidemic of diarrhea that spread to regions unaffected by flooding and caused >6,000 cases and 27 deaths. Rotavirus was identified in 38% of case-patients tested in the city with the most flooding. Outbreak potential related to weather reinforces the need for global rotavirus vaccination. PMID:27088272

  6. Increased Rotavirus Prevalence in Diarrheal Outbreak Precipitated by Localized Flooding, Solomon Islands, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Forrest K.; Ko, Albert I.; Becha, Chris; Joshua, Cynthia; Musto, Jennie; Thomas, Sarah; Ronsse, Axelle; Kirkwood, Carl D.; Sio, Alison; Aumua, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    Flooding on 1 of the Solomon Islands precipitated a nationwide epidemic of diarrhea that spread to regions unaffected by flooding and caused >6,000 cases and 27 deaths. Rotavirus was identified in 38% of case-patients tested in the city with the most flooding. Outbreak potential related to weather reinforces the need for global rotavirus vaccination. PMID:27088272

  7. Rotavirus in Ireland: national estimates of disease burden, 1997 to 1998.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lynch, M

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: We estimated the disease burden caused by rotavirus hospitalizations in the Republic of Ireland by using national data on the number of hospitalizations for diarrhea in children and laboratory surveillance of confirmed rotavirus detections. METHODS: We examined trends in diarrheal hospitalizations among children <5 years old as coded by ICD-9-CM for the period January, 1997, to December, 1998. We collated data on laboratory-confirmed rotavirus detections nationally for the same period among children <2 years old. We calculated the overall contribution of rotavirus to laboratory-confirmed intestinal disease in children <5 years old from INFOSCAN, a disease bulletin for one-third of the population. We compared data from all sources and estimated the proportion of diarrheal hospitalizations that are likely the result of rotavirus in children <5 years old. RESULTS: In children <5 years old, 9% of all hospitalizations are for diarrheal illness. In this age group 1 in 8 are hospitalized for a diarrheal illness, and 1 in 17 are hospitalized for rotavirus by 5 years of age. In hospitalized children <2 years old, 1 in 38 have a laboratory confirmed rotavirus infection. CONCLUSIONS: The disease burden of rotavirus hospitalizations is higher than in other industrialized countries. Access to comprehensive national databases may have contributed to the high hospitalization rates, as well as a greater tendency to hospitalize children with diarrhea in Ireland.

  8. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase activity reduces rotavirus infection at a postbinding step

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossen, John W A; Bouma, Janneke; Raatgeep, Rolien H C; Büller, Hans A; Einerhand, Alexandra W C

    2004-01-01

    Elevated levels of prostaglandins (PGs), products of cyclooxygenases (COXs), are found in the plasma and stool of rotavirus-infected children. We sought to determine the role of COXs, PGs, and the signal transduction pathways involved in rotavirus infection to elucidate possible new targets for anti

  9. Detection and distribution of rotavirus in raw sewage and creeks in Sao Paulo, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehnert, D.U.; Stewien, K.E. (Univ. of Sao Paulo (Brazil))

    1993-01-01

    Rotavirus invection is an important cause of hospitalization and mortality of infants and children in developing countries, especially where the water supply and sewage disposal systems are in precarious conditions. This report describes the detection, quantitation, and distribution of rotaviruses in domestic sewage and sewage polluted creeks in the city of San Paulo. 22 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  10. Cost-effectiveness of rotavirus immunization in Vietnam: Results and challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tu, H.A.T.; Rozenbaum, M.; Coyte, P.C.; Li, S.C.; Postma, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the cost-effectiveness of universal rotavirus immunization, explicitly the use of Rotateq® and affordability of implementing rotavirus immunization based on the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization (GAVI)-subsidized vaccine price in the context of Vietnamese health car

  11. Effect of breastfeeding promotion interventions on cost-effectiveness of rotavirus immunization in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suwantika, Auliya A.; Postma, Maarten J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rotavirus infection has been reported to be responsible for the majority of severe diarrhea in children under-5-years-old in Indonesia. Breast milk is considered to give protection against rotavirus infection. Increasing breastfeeding promotion programs could be an alternative target to

  12. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase activity reduces rotavirus infection at a postbinding step.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W. Rossen (John); J. Bouma (Janneke); R.H. Raatgeep (Rolien); H.A. Büller (Hans); A.W.C. Einerhand (Sandra)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractElevated levels of prostaglandins (PGs), products of cyclooxygenases (COXs), are found in the plasma and stool of rotavirus-infected children. We sought to determine the role of COXs, PGs, and the signal transduction pathways involved in rotavirus infection to elucidate

  13. Changes in small intestinal homeostasis, morphology, and gene expression during rotavirus infection of infant mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Boshuizen; J.H. Reimerink; A.M. Korteland-van Male (Anita); V.J. van Ham; H.A. Büller (Hans); J. Dekker (Jan); A.W.C. Einerhand (Sandra); M.P.G. Koopmans D.V.M. (Marion)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractRotavirus is the most important cause of infantile gastroenteritis. Since in vivo mucosal responses to a rotavirus infection thus far have not been extensively studied, we related viral replication in the murine small intestine to alterations in mucosal structure, epith

  14. Design and Construction of Chimeric VP8-S2 Antigen for Bovine Rotavirus and Bovine Coronavirus

    OpenAIRE

    Nasiri, Khadijeh; Nassiri, Mohammadreza; Tahmoorespur, Mojtaba; Haghparast, Alireza; Zibaee, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Bovine Rotavirus and Bovine Coronavirus are the most important causes of diarrhea in newborn calves and in some other species such as pigs and sheep. Rotavirus VP8 subunit is the major determinant of the viral infectivity and neutralization. Spike glycoprotein of coronavirus is responsible for induction of neutralizing antibody response.

  15. Characterization of a G1P[8] rotavirus causing an outbreak of gastroenteritis in the Northern Territory, Australia, in the vaccine era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, Celeste M; Cowley, Daniel; Snelling, Thomas L; Akopov, Asmik; Kirkness, Ewen F; Kirkwood, Carl D

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, a large outbreak of rotavirus gastroenteritis occurred in the Alice Springs region of the Northern Territory, Australia. The outbreak occurred 43 months after the introduction of the G1P[8] rotavirus vaccine Rotarix®. Forty-three infants were hospitalized during the outbreak and analysis of fecal samples from each infant revealed a G1P[8] rotavirus strain. The outbreak strain was adapted to cell culture and neutralization assays were performed using VP7 and VP4 neutralizing monoclonal antibodies. The outbreak strain exhibited a distinct neutralization resistance pattern compared to the Rotarix® vaccine strain. Whole genome sequencing of the 2010 outbreak virus strain demonstrated numerous amino acid differences compared to the Rotarix® vaccine strain in the characterized neutralization epitopes of the VP7 and VP4 proteins. Phylogenetic analysis of the outbreak strain revealed a close genetic relationship to global strains, in particular RVA/Human-wt/BEL/BE0098/2009/G1P[8] and RVA/Human-wt/BEL/BE00038/2008/G1P[8] for numerous genes. The 2010 outbreak strain was likely introduced from a globally circulating population of strains rather than evolving from an endemic Australian strain. The outbreak strain possessed antigenic differences in the VP7 and VP4 proteins compared to the Rotarix® vaccine strain. The outbreak was associated with moderate vaccine coverage and possibly low vaccine take in the population. PMID:26038746

  16. Characterization of a G1P[8] rotavirus causing an outbreak of gastroenteritis in the Northern Territory, Australia, in the vaccine era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, Celeste M; Cowley, Daniel; Snelling, Thomas L; Akopov, Asmik; Kirkness, Ewen F; Kirkwood, Carl D

    2014-07-01

    In 2010, a large outbreak of rotavirus gastroenteritis occurred in the Alice Springs region of the Northern Territory, Australia. The outbreak occurred 43 months after the introduction of the G1P[8] rotavirus vaccine Rotarix(®). Forty-three infants were hospitalized during the outbreak and analysis of fecal samples from each infant revealed a G1P[8] rotavirus strain. The outbreak strain was adapted to cell culture and neutralization assays were performed using VP7 and VP4 neutralizing monoclonal antibodies. The outbreak strain exhibited a distinct neutralization resistance pattern compared to the Rotarix(®) vaccine strain. Whole genome sequencing of the 2010 outbreak virus strain demonstrated numerous amino acid differences compared to the Rotarix(®) vaccine strain in the characterized neutralization epitopes of the VP7 and VP4 proteins. Phylogenetic analysis of the outbreak strain revealed a close genetic relationship to global strains, in particular RVA/Human-wt/BEL/BE0098/2009/G1P[8] and RVA/Human-wt/BEL/BE00038/2008/G1P[8] for numerous genes. The 2010 outbreak strain was likely introduced from a globally circulating population of strains rather than evolving from an endemic Australian strain. The outbreak strain possessed antigenic differences in the VP7 and VP4 proteins compared to the Rotarix(®) vaccine strain. The outbreak was associated with moderate vaccine coverage and possibly low vaccine take in the population. PMID:26038746

  17. One-step multiplex real-time RT-PCR assay for detecting and genotyping wild-type group A rotavirus strains and vaccine strains (Rotarix® and RotaTeq®) in stool samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Rashi; Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Esona, Mathew D; Tam, Ka Ian; Quaye, Osbourne; Bowen, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Background. Group A rotavirus (RVA) infection is the major cause of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in young children worldwide. Introduction of two live-attenuated rotavirus vaccines, RotaTeq® and Rotarix®, has dramatically reduced RVA associated AGE and mortality in developed as well as in many developing countries. High-throughput methods are needed to genotype rotavirus wild-type strains and to identify vaccine strains in stool samples. Quantitative RT-PCR assays (qRT-PCR) offer several advantages including increased sensitivity, higher throughput, and faster turnaround time. Methods. In this study, a one-step multiplex qRT-PCR assay was developed to detect and genotype wild-type strains and vaccine (Rotarix® and RotaTeq®) rotavirus strains along with an internal processing control (Xeno or MS2 RNA). Real-time RT-PCR assays were designed for VP7 (G1, G2, G3, G4, G9, G12) and VP4 (P[4], P[6] and P[8]) genotypes. The multiplex qRT-PCR assay also included previously published NSP3 qRT-PCR for rotavirus detection and Rotarix® NSP2 and RotaTeq® VP6 qRT-PCRs for detection of Rotarix® and RotaTeq® vaccine strains respectively. The multiplex qRT-PCR assay was validated using 853 sequence confirmed stool samples and 24 lab cultured strains of different rotavirus genotypes. By using thermostable rTth polymerase enzyme, dsRNA denaturation, reverse transcription (RT) and amplification (PCR) steps were performed in single tube by uninterrupted thermocycling profile to reduce chances of sample cross contamination and for rapid generation of results. For quantification, standard curves were generated using dsRNA transcripts derived from RVA gene segments. Results. The VP7 qRT-PCRs exhibited 98.8-100% sensitivity, 99.7-100% specificity, 85-95% efficiency and a limit of detection of 4-60 copies per singleplex reaction. The VP7 qRT-PCRs exhibited 81-92% efficiency and limit of detection of 150-600 copies in multiplex reactions. The VP4 qRT-PCRs exhibited 98

  18. Heterogeneity of Rotavirus Testing and Admitting Practices for Gastroenteritis among 12 Tertiary Care Pediatric Hospitals: Implications for Surveillance

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    Julie A. Bettinger

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Canadian Immunization Monitoring Program, ACTive (IMPACT surveillance for rotavirus relies on monitoring hospital admissions. Because a diagnosis of rotavirus is not necessary for treatment purposes, and rotavirus is not a reportable disease, wide variation may exist in the admitting and testing practices for this disease. From 2005 to 2007, the number of rotavirus admissions differed significantly among IMPACT centres, and this variation could not be explained by population differences alone. Understanding this variation is important when interpreting surveillance data and estimating the cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination programs.

  19. Molecular epidemiology of rotavirus in children and animals and characterization of an unusual G10P[15] strain associated with bovine diarrhea in south India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Priya; Kang, Gagandeep

    2014-08-11

    Rotaviruses are enteric pathogens causing acute, watery, dehydrating diarrhea in various host species, including birds and mammals. This study collected data on the disease burden and strain prevalence of Group A rotavirus in animals and humans in Vellore and investigated interspecies transmission by comparison of circulating genotypes. Stool samples from children aged less than 5 years, admitted to the hospital between January 2003 and May 2006 for diarrhea and diarrheal samples from animals that were collected from a veterinary clinic and several dairy farms near Vellore between February 2007 and May 2008 were processed and subjected to RNA extraction and reverse-transcription PCR for genotyping of VP7 and VP4. Of 394 children with diarrhea, 158 (40%) were positive for rotavirus and the common G types identified were G1 (47, 29.7%), G2 (43, 27.2%), G9 (22, 13.9%), G10 (2, 1.2%), G12 (1, 0.6%) and mixed infections (27, 17.8%). The common P types were P[4] accounting for 57 (36%) samples, P[8] 57 (36%), P[11] 3 (1.8%) and P[6] 2 (1.2%). Of 627 animals, 35 (1 bullock, 2 goats, 32 cows) were found to be infected with rotavirus (5.5%). The common G types identified in order of frequency were G6 (17, 48.5%), G2 (10, 28%), G10 (4, 11%), G8 (2, 5.7%) and mixed infections (2, 5.7%). The common P types were P[6] accounting for 16 (46%) samples, P[4] 7 (20%), P[1] 3 (8.5%) and P[8] 3 (8.5%). An unusual P type P[15] was seen in one sample in combination with G10. The finding of G2 infections which are rarely identified in animals implies anthroponotic transmission since this genotype is predominantly associated with infection in humans. PMID:25091687

  20. Attenuation of skeletal muscle wasting with recombinant human growth hormone secreted from a tissue-engineered bioartificial muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenburgh, H.; Del Tatto, M.; Shansky, J.; Goldstein, L.; Russell, K.; Genes, N.; Chromiak, J.; Yamada, S.

    1998-01-01

    Skeletal muscle wasting is a significant problem in elderly and debilitated patients. Growth hormone (GH) is an anabolic growth factor for skeletal muscle but is difficult to deliver in a therapeutic manner by injection owing to its in vivo instability. A novel method is presented for the sustained secretion of recombinant human GH (rhGH) from genetically modified skeletal muscle implants, which reduces host muscle wasting. Proliferating murine C2C12 skeletal myoblasts stably transduced with the rhGH gene were tissue engineered in vitro into bioartificial muscles (C2-BAMs) containing organized postmitotic myofibers secreting 3-5 microg of rhGH/day in vitro. When implanted subcutaneously into syngeneic mice, C2-BAMs delivered a sustained physiologic dose of 2.5 to 11.3 ng of rhGH per milliliter of serum. rhGH synthesized and secreted by the myofibers was in the 22-kDa monomeric form and was biologically active, based on downregulation of a GH-sensitive protein synthesized in the liver. Skeletal muscle disuse atrophy was induced in mice by hindlimb unloading, causing the fast plantaris and slow soleus muscles to atrophy by 21 to 35% ( muscle-wasting disorders.

  1. Topical application of superoxide dismutase mediated by HIV-TAT peptide attenuates UVB-induced damages in human skin.

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    Chen, Xiaochao; Liu, Shutao; Rao, Pingfan; Bradshaw, Jeremy; Weller, Richard

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether topical application of superoxide dismutase with cell penetrating peptide (HIV-TAT) could protect against skin damage induced by UVB irradiation in humans. The permeability through stratum corneum of large proteins linked to TAT peptide was firstly confirmed by confocal microscopy and tape stripping. Ten healthy volunteers with either Fitzpatrick skin type II or III were recruited in this clinical study. TAT-SOD (300units/cm(2)) and vehicle cream were applied on two symmetric areas of both inner upper arms 1h prior to UVB irradiation. After one hour of pretreatment, subjects received 10 incremental doses of UVB on pretreated areas. 24h later, erythema, blood flow and apoptotic cells were measured. Pretreatment with TAT-SOD 1h prior to UVB radiation promoted a mean minimal erythema dose (MED) increase of 36.6±18.4% (p=0.013skin damage in man. These biological effects of TAT-SOD are probably mediated via its free radical scavenging properties, clearly differentiating it from other physical sunscreen agents. PMID:27460952

  2. Recombinant Human Leptin Does Not Alter Gut Hormone Levels after Gastric Bypass but May Attenuate Sweet Cravings

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    Rushika Conroy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bariatric surgery improves glucose homeostasis and alters gut hormones partly independent of weight loss. Leptin plays a role in these processes; levels are decreased following bariatric surgery, creating a relative leptin insufficiency. We previously showed that leptin administration in a weight-reduced state after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB caused no further weight loss. Here, we discuss the impact of leptin administration on gut hormones, glucostasis, and appetite. Weight stable women after RYGB were randomized to receive placebo or recombinant human metreleptin (0.05 mg/kg twice daily. At weeks 0 and 16, a liquid meal challenge was performed. Glucose, insulin, C-peptide, GLP-1, PYY, glucagon, and ghrelin (total, acyl, and desacyl were measured fasting and postprandially. Appetite was assessed using a visual analog scale. Mean post-op period was 53±2.3 months; mean BMI was 34.6±0.2 kg/m2. At 16 weeks, there was no significant change in weight within or between groups. Fasting PYY was significantly different between groups and the leptin group had lower sweets craving at week 16 than the placebo group (P<0.05. No other differences were observed. Leptin replacement does not alter gut hormones or glucostasis but may diminish sweet cravings compared to placebo in this population of post-RYGB women.

  3. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells reduce systemic inflammation and attenuate LPS-induced acute lung injury in rats

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    Li Jianjun

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs possess potent immunomodulatory properties and simultaneously lack the ability to illicit immune responses. Hence, MSCs have emerged as a promising candidate for cellular therapeutics for inflammatory diseases. Within the context of this study, we investigated whether human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs could ameliorate lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- induced acute lung injury (ALI in a rat model. Methods ALI was induced via injection of LPS. Rats were divided into three groups: (1 saline group(control, (2 LPS group, and (3 MSC + LPS group. The rats were sacrificed at 6, 24, and 48 hours after injection. Serum, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF, and lungs were collected for cytokine concentration measurements, assessment of lung injury, and histology. Results UC-MSCs increased survival rate and suppressed LPS-induced increase of serum concentrations of pro-inflammatory mediators TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 without decreasing the level of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. The MSC + LPS group exhibited significant improvements in lung inflammation, injury, edema, lung wet/dry ratio, protein concentration, and neutrophil counts in the BALF, as well as improved myeloperoxidase (MPO activity in the lung tissue. Furthermore, UC-MSCs decreased malondialdehyde (MDA production and increased Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1 protein production and activity in the lung tissue. Conclusion UC-MSCs noticeably increased the survival rate of rats suffering from LPS-induced lung injury and significantly reduced systemic and pulmonary inflammation. Promoting anti-inflammatory homeostasis and reducing oxidative stress might be the therapeutic basis of UC-MSCs.

  4. Gardenia jasminoides attenuates hepatocellular injury and fibrosis in bile duct-ligated rats and human hepatic stellate cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-Hua Chen; Tian Lan; Jing Li; Chun-Hui Qiu; Teng Wu; Hong-Ju Gou; Min-Qiang Lu

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the anti-hepatofibrotic effects of Gardenia jasminoides in liver fibrosis.METHODS:Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent common bile duct ligation (BDL) for 14 d and were treated with Gardenia jasminoides by gavage.The effects of Gardenia jasminoides on liver fibrosis and the detailed molecular mechanisms were also assessed in human hepatic stellate cells (LX-2) in vitro.RESULTS:Treatment with Gardenia jasminoides decreased serum alanine aminotransferase (BDL vs BDL +100 mg/kg Gardenia jasminoides,146.6 ± 15 U/L vs 77± 6.5 U/L,P =0.0007) and aspartate aminotransferase (BDL vs BDL + 100 mg/kg Gardenia jasminoides,188 ± 35.2 U/L vs 128 ± 19 U/L,P =0.005) as well as hydroxyproline (BDL vs BDL + 100 mg/kg Gardenia jasminoides,438 ± 40.2 μg/g vs 228 ± 10.3 μg/g liver tissue,P =0.004) after BDL.Furthermore,Gardenia jasminoides significantly reduced liver mRNA and/or protein expression of transforming growth factor β1(TGF-β1),collagen type Ⅰ (Col Ⅰ) and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA).Gardenia jasminoides significantly suppressed the upregulation of TGF-β1,Col Ⅰ and α-SMA in LX-2 exposed to recombinant TGF-β1.Moreover,Gardenia jasminoides inhibited TGF-β1-induced Smad2 phosphorylation in LX-2 cells.CONCLUSION:Gardeniajasminoides exerts antifibrotic effects in the liver fibrosis and may represent a novel antifibrotic agent.

  5. Molecular Epidemiology of Rotavirus Strains Circulating Among Children with Gastroenteritis in Iran

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    Akram Najafi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was conducted to evaluate the prevalence of rotavirus disease and to investigate the genotypes of rotavirus strains causing acute gastroenteritis among children aged <5 years old in Marvdasht, Iran.Methods: One hundred and forty-one children, aged 1 month to 5 years, afflicted with severe diarrhea wereenrolled during January 2007 to December 2008. Their stool samples were studied with enzyme immunoassays (EIA for group A rotaviruses. Rotavirus-positive specimens were genotyped by the NestedRT-PCR using different types of specific primers.Findings: Out of total collected samples rotavirus infection was detected in 40 (28.37%. Of the rotavirus episodes, 72.91% occurred during the first 2 years of life (P=0.038. The highest prevalence of infection was identified in summer (52.50% and the lowest in winter (7.50%. The most common clinical features includeddiarrhea (96.25%, vomiting (82.50% and fever (45.0%. Mixed genotypes were the predominant G type (60.0%, followed by non-typeable (12.50%, G2 (12.50%, G4 (10.0% and G1 (5.0% genotypes. G3/G8 mixed infection is the first of these rotavirus genotypes to be reported in Iran.Conclusion: Regarding high frequency of rotavirus infection, continuous surveillance is needed to inform diarrhea prevention programs as well as to provide information about the occurrence of new rotavirus strains. This will assist policy makers in decision making on rotavirus vaccine introduction.

  6. Recombinant Outer Capsid Glycoprotein (VP7 of Rotavirus Expressed in Insect Cells Induces Neutralizing Antibodies in Rabbits

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    H Keyvani

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background:Rotaviruses cause diarrhea in infants and young children worldwide. Rotavirus outer capsid protein, VP7 is major neutralizing antigen that is important component of subunit vaccine to prevent rotavirus infection.Many efforts have been done to produce recombinant VP7 that maintain native characteristics.We used baculovirus expression system to produce rotavirus VP7 protein and to study its immunogenicity. Methods: Simian rotavirus SA11 full-length VP7 ORF was cloned into a cloning plasmid and then the cloned gene was inserted into the linear DNA of baculovirus Autographa californica Nuclear Polyhedrosis Virus (AcNPV downstream of the polyhedrin promoter by in vitro recombination reactions. The expressed VP7 in the insect cells was recognized by rabbit hyperimmune serum raised against SA11 rotavirus by Immunofluorescence and western blotting assays. Rabbits were immunized subcutaneously by cell extracts expressing VP7 protein. Results: Reactivity with anti-rotavirus antibody suggested that expressed VP7 protein had native antigenic determinants.Injection of recombinant VP7 in rabbits elicited the production of serum antibodies,which were able to recognize VP7 protein from SA11 rotavirus by Western blotting test and neutralized SA11 rotavirus in cell culture.Conclusion: Recombinant outer capsid glycoprotein (VP7 of rotavirus expressed in insect cells induces neutralizing antibodies in rabbits and may be a candidate of rotavirus vaccine.

  7. Detection, epidemiology and characterization of VP6 and VP7 genes of group D rotavirus in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, Delana Andreza Melo; da Silva, René Ribeiro; Kaiano, Jane Haruko Lima; de Souza Oliveira, Darleise; Gabbay, Yvone Benchimol; Linhares, Alexandre Costa; Mascarenhas, Joana D'Arc Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Rotaviruses infect humans and animals and are classified into eight groups (A to H). Group D rotavirus (RVD) has been described in birds, although relatively few reports are available. The present study focused on RVD, including epidemiological and molecular aspects of samples collected from broiler chickens in the state of Pará, Brazil. A total of 85 faecal samples were collected between 2008 and 2011 from 37 chicken farms located in eight different municipalities. The viral double-stranded RNA was extracted from faecal suspensions and analysed using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), followed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and nucleotide sequencing of the VP6 and VP7 genes. Comparing the positive results, 16.5% (14/85) were obtained by PAGE and 35.3% (30/85) by RT-PCR. Samples from seven of eight municipalities were positive for RVD and infections were recorded in 17 (45.9%) of 37 chicken farms. The RVD infection rate was significantly higher in the 16-day to 30-day age group (62.2%; 23/37) compared with other ages. No consistent relationship was found between the infection rate and either the population density in poultry houses or the climatic conditions. The nucleotide sequences of the VP6 gene were 89.9 to 90.9% similar to the prototype strain 05V0049 and were 88.3 to 100% similar among themselves; VP7 gene nucleotide sequences were 84.3 to 85.4% similar to the prototype strain 05V0049 and 93.8 to 100% similar among themselves. Overall, this study provides new insights into the epidemiology and genome characterization of group D rotaviruses. PMID:24875189

  8. Randomized, controlled human challenge study of the safety, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy of a single dose of Peru-15, a live attenuated oral cholera vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Mitchell B; Giannella, Ralph A; Bean, Judy; Taylor, David N; Parker, Susan; Hoeper, Amy; Wowk, Stephen; Hawkins, Jennifer; Kochi, Sims K; Schiff, Gilbert; Killeen, Kevin P

    2002-04-01

    Peru-15 is a live attenuated oral vaccine derived from a Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor Inaba strain by a series of deletions and modifications, including deletion of the entire CT genetic element. Peru-15 is also a stable, motility-defective strain and is unable to recombine with homologous DNA. We wished to determine whether a single oral dose of Peru-15 was safe and immunogenic and whether it would provide significant protection against moderate and severe diarrhea in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled human volunteer cholera challenge model. A total of 59 volunteers were randomly allocated to groups to receive either 2 x 10(8) CFU of reconstituted, lyophilized Peru-15 vaccine diluted in CeraVacx buffer or placebo (CeraVacx buffer alone). Approximately 3 months after vaccination, 36 of these volunteers were challenged with approximately 10(5) CFU of virulent V. cholerae O1 El Tor Inaba strain N16961, prepared from a standardized frozen inoculum. Among vaccinees, 98% showed at least a fourfold increase in vibriocidal antibody titers. After challenge, 5 (42%) of the 12 placebo recipients and none (0%) of the 24 vaccinees had moderate or severe diarrhea (> or = 3,000 g of diarrheal stool) (P = 0.002; protective efficacy, 100%; lower one-sided 95% confidence limit, 75%). A total of 7 (58%) of the 12 placebo recipients and 1 (4%) of the 24 vaccinees had any diarrhea (P Peru-15 is a well-tolerated and immunogenic oral cholera vaccine that affords protective efficacy against life-threatening cholera diarrhea in a human volunteer challenge model. This vaccine may therefore be a safe and effective tool to prevent cholera in travelers and is a strong candidate for further evaluation to prevent cholera in an area where cholera is endemic.

  9. A hepatoprotective Lindera obtusiloba extract suppresses growth and attenuates insulin like growth factor-1 receptor signaling and NF-kappaB activity in human liver cancer cell lines

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    Stroh Thorsten

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In traditional Chinese and Korean medicine, an aqueous extract derived from wood and bark of the Japanese spice bush Lindera obtusiloba (L.obtusiloba is applied to treat inflammations and chronic liver diseases including hepatocellular carcinoma. We previously demonstrated anti-fibrotic effects of L.obtusiloba extract in hepatic stellate cells. Thus, we here consequently examine anti-neoplastic effects of L.obtusiloba extract on human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC cell lines and the signaling pathways involved. Methods Four human HCC cell lines representing diverse stages of differentiation were treated with L.obtusiloba extract, standardized according to its known suppressive effects on proliferation and TGF-β-expression. Beside measurement of proliferation, invasion and apoptosis, effects on signal transduction and NF-κB-activity were determined. Results L.obtusiloba extract inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in all HCC cell lines and provoked a reduced basal and IGF-1-induced activation of the IGF-1R signaling cascade and a reduced transcriptional NF-κB-activity, particularly in the poorly differentiated SK-Hep1 cells. Pointing to anti-angiogenic effects, L.obtusiloba extract attenuated the basal and IGF-1-induced expression of hypoxia inducible factor-1α, vascular endothelial growth factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase. Conclusions The traditional application of the extract is confirmed by our experimental data. Due to its potential to inhibit critical receptor tyrosine kinases involved in HCC progression via the IGF-1 signaling pathway and NF-κB, the standardized L.obtusiloba extract should be further analysed for its active compounds and explored as (complementary treatment option for HCC.

  10. Truncated recombinant human SP-D attenuates emphysema and type II cell changes in SP-D deficient mice

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    Mühlfeld Christian

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surfactant protein D (SP-D deficient mice develop emphysema-like pathology associated with focal accumulations of foamy alveolar macrophages, an excess of surfactant phospholipids in the alveolar space and both hypertrophy and hyperplasia of alveolar type II cells. These findings are associated with a chronic inflammatory state. Treatment of SP-D deficient mice with a truncated recombinant fragment of human SP-D (rfhSP-D has been shown to decrease the lipidosis and alveolar macrophage accumulation as well as production of proinflammatory chemokines. The aim of this study was to investigate if rfhSP-D treatment reduces the structural abnormalities in parenchymal architecture and type II cells characteristic of SP-D deficiency. Methods SP-D knock-out mice, aged 3 weeks, 6 weeks and 9 weeks were treated with rfhSP-D for 9, 6 and 3 weeks, respectively. All mice were sacrificed at age 12 weeks and compared to both PBS treated SP-D deficient and wild-type groups. Lung structure was quantified by design-based stereology at the light and electron microscopic level. Emphasis was put on quantification of emphysema, type II cell changes and intracellular surfactant. Data were analysed with two sided non-parametric Mann-Whitney U-test. Main Results After 3 weeks of treatment, alveolar number was higher and mean alveolar size was smaller compared to saline-treated SP-D knock-out controls. There was no significant difference concerning these indices of pulmonary emphysema within rfhSP-D treated groups. Type II cell number and size were smaller as a consequence of treatment. The total volume of lamellar bodies per type II cell and per lung was smaller after 6 weeks of treatment. Conclusion Treatment of SP-D deficient mice with rfhSP-D leads to a reduction in the degree of emphysema and a correction of type II cell hyperplasia and hypertrophy. This supports the concept that rfhSP-D might become a therapeutic option in diseases that are

  11. Recombinant human MFG-E8 attenuates intestinal injury and mortality in severe whole body irradiation in rats.

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    Michael A Ajakaiye

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal (GI syndrome component of acute radiation syndrome (ARS results from depletion of immature parenchymal stem cells after high dose irradiation and contributes significantly to early mortality. It is associated with severe, irreparable damage in the GI tract and extremely low survival. There is a need for the development of viable mitigators of whole body irradiation (WBI due to the possibility of unexpected high level radiation exposure from nuclear accidents or attacks. We therefore examined the effect of recombinant human milk fat globule-EGF factor 8 (rhMFG-E8 in mitigating damage after WBI. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 10 Gy WBI using Cesium-137 as the radiation source. The animals in the treatment group received rhMFG-E8 (166 µg/kg BW subcutaneously once a day with the first dose given 6 h after WBI. Blood and tissue samples from the ileum were collected after 3 days of treatment. A separate cohort of animals was treated for 7 days and the 21 day mortality rate was determined. Treatment with rhMFG-E8 significantly improved the survival from 31% to 75% over 21 days. Furthermore, rhMFG-E8 treatment resulted in a 36% reduction in the radiation injury intestinal mucosal damage score, corresponding to visible histological changes. MFG-E8 gene expression was significantly decreased in WBI-induced animals as compared to sham controls. Treatment with rhMFG-E8 increased p53 and p21 expression by 207% and 84% compared to untreated controls. This was accompanied by an 80% increase in the expression of anti-apoptotic cell regulator Bcl-2. p53 and p21 levels correlate with improved survival after radiation injury. These cell regulators arrest the cell after DNA damage and enable DNA repair as well as optimize cell survival. Taken together, these results indicate that rhMFG-E8 ameliorates the GI syndrome and improves survival after WBI by minimizing intestinal cell damage and optimizing recovery.

  12. DETECCIÓN DE ROTAVIRUS BOVINO DEL GRUPO A. ANÁLISIS FILOGENÉTICO DEL GEN QUE CODIFICA PARA LA PROTEÍNA VP7 DE SU CÁPSIDE EXTERNA

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    M.E. Guriérrez

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Rotaviruses of group A are the major cause of diarrhea in young calves. To investigate the percentage ofgroup A rotaviruses in newborn calves and examine their evolutionary relationship with those from otheranimals and humans, we collected 74 fecal specimens from calves of 0-1 month of age with acute diarrheain towns of Colombia. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was found that 7% of specimenswere positive for rotaviruses of group A. A representative strain (UJ was chosen to determine its nucleotide and to deduce amino acid sequences of VP7 gene. Nucleotide sequence of UJ VP7 gene was aligned withcorresponding sequences from 15 other strains, including 2 from cattle, 4 from swine, 6 from humans,and 1 each from chickens, dogs, and rabbits, by using Clustal W. Phylogenetic analysis was performedwith the MEGA analytical package. UJ strain clusters with a group A rotavirus strain (SI-B8 recentlyisolated from a calf in Slovenia in the neighbor-joining tree. UJ VP7 gene shares 84% and 70% amino acidsequence identity with the corresponding gene of the recently isolated bovine strains SI-B8 in Sloveniaand PP-1 in the United Kingdom. Identities in amino acid sequence between 48-73% were found withrotavirus of group A strains from humans and other animals, including swine, dogs, and rabbits. To ourknowledge, this is the first study to detect and characterize a bovine group A rotavirus in Colombia.Findings may increase our understanding of burden of viral gastroenteritis in calves and allow us todevelop strategies to prevent and control this important livestock disease.

  13. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation attenuates blood pressure increase at onset of isometric handgrip exercise in healthy young and older humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Christine M; Monahan, Kevin D; Drew, Rachel C

    2016-07-01

    Aging is associated with alterations of autonomic nerve activity, and dietary intake of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) found in fish oil (FO), can modulate autonomic nerve activity. However, the effect of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid consumption on age-related cardiovascular responses at the onset of isometric handgrip exercise, a time of rapid autonomic adjustments, is unknown. Accordingly, 14 young (25 ± 1 years; mean ± SE) and 15 older (64 ± 2 years) healthy subjects ingested 4 g FO daily for 12 weeks. On pre- and postintervention visits, participants performed 15-sec bouts of isometric handgrip at 10%, 30%, 50%, and 70% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) while beat-to-beat systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressure (SBP, DBP, MAP; Finometer) and heart rate (HR; electrocardiogram) were recorded. All baseline cardiovascular variables were similar between groups and visits, except DBP was higher in older subjects (P EPA and DHA content in both groups (P < 0.05). FO attenuated MAP and DBP increases in response to handgrip in both age groups (change from baseline during 70% MVC handgrip pre- and post-FO: young MAPΔ 14 ± 2 mmHg versus 10 ± 2 mmHg, older MAPΔ 14 ± 3 mmHg versus 11 ± 2 mmHg; young DBPΔ 12 ± 1 mmHg versus 7 ± 2 mmHg, older DBPΔ 12 ± 1 mmHg versus 7 ± 1 mmHg; P < 0.05). FO augmented the PP (SBP-DBP) increase with 70% MVC handgrip in both groups (P < 0.05), but did not alter SBP or HR increases with handgrip. These findings suggest that FO supplementation attenuates MAP and DBP increases at the onset of isometric handgrip exercise in healthy young and older humans. PMID:27440746

  14. APT070 (Mirococept), a membrane-localizing C3 convertase inhibitor, attenuates early human islet allograft damage in vitro and in vivo in a humanized mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Fang; Ma, Liang; Zhao, Min; Smith, Richard A.; Huang, Guocai; Peter M Jones; Persaud, Shanta; Pingitore, Attilio; Dorling, Anthony; Lechler, Robert; Lombardi, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose A major obstacle to islet cell transplantation is the early loss of transplanted islets resulting from the instant blood‐mediated inflammation reaction (IBMIR). The activation of complement pathways plays a central role in IBMIR. The aim of this study was to test the inhibitory effect of “painting” human islets with APT070, a membrane‐localizing C3 convertase inhibitor, on inflammation evoked by exposure to human serum in vitro and by transplantation in vivo in a humani...

  15. Changes in epidemiology of rotavirus in the Triângulo Mineiro region of Brazil: lack of two consecutive rotavirus seasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulgheroff, A C B; Figueiredo, E F; Gouvêa, V S; Domingues, A L S

    2014-12-01

    Rotaviruses are the main cause of infantile acute diarrhea, and a monovalent (G1P[8]) vaccine against the virus was introduced into the Brazilian National Immunization Program for all infants in March 2006. The objectives of this study were to determine the rate and genotype distribution of rotavirus causing infantile diarrhea in the Triângulo Mineiro region of Brazil during 2011-2012 and to assess the impact of local vaccination. Fecal specimens were analyzed for detection and characterization of rotavirus using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, reverse transcription followed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and PCR-genotyping assays. Overall, rotavirus was diagnosed in 1.7% (6/348) of cases. Rotavirus positivity rates decreased 88% [95% confidence intervals (CI)=15.2, 98.3%; P=0.026] in 2011 and 78% (95%CI=30.6, 93.0%; P=0.007) in 2012 when compared with available data for baseline years (2005/2006) in Uberaba. In Uberlândia, reductions of 95.3% (95%CI=66.0, 99.4%; P=0.002) in 2011, and 94.2% (95%CI=56.4, 99.2%; P=0.004) in 2012 were also observed compared with data for 2008. The circulation of rotavirus G2P[4] strains decreased during the period under study, and strains related to the P[8] genotype reemerged in the region. This study showed a marked and sustained reduction of rotavirus-related cases, with a lack of rotavirus in the 2011 and 2012 seasons, suggesting a positive impact of the vaccination program.

  16. Phylogenetic analysis of porcine rotavirus in Argentina: increasing diversity of G4 strains and evidence of interspecies transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Gabriel I; Vidales, Graciela; Gomez, Jorge A; Fernandez, Fernando M; Parreño, Viviana; Bok, Karin

    2008-01-01

    Group A rotaviruses are one of the most frequently detected viral agents associated with neonatal diarrhea in piglets. In order to characterize rotavirus (RV) strains circulating in Argentinean swine, four porcine production farms located in Buenos Aires were studied. RV strains genotyped as P[6]G4, P[6]G8 and P[1]G6 were found in piglets under 30 days of age, without diarrhea. Phylogenetic and sequence analysis of the VP7 gene from G4 strains available in databases, reveals five porcine new lineages (III-VII) and three sublineages (VIIa-VIIc). The G4 porcine Argentinean strains were grouped with a porcine RV strain isolated in Brazil and another RV strain isolated from a child with diarrhea in Mexico, constituting an American lineage (VII). On the other hand, porcine G6 and G8 were closely related to RV's circulating in Argentinean cattle and South-American camelids, respectively. The fact that G4 porcine lineages were epidemiologically related to human strains, and G6 and G8 Argentinean porcine strains were found related to bovine and South-American camelids, respectively, suggests that pigs might play a crucial role as reservoir and generator of newly adapted emerging RV strains for human and other species.

  17. Cost-effectiveness of universal rotavirus vaccination in reducing rotavirus gastroenteritis in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tilson, L

    2011-10-06

    We evaluated the cost-effectiveness of universal infant rotavirus (RV) vaccination compared to current standard of care of "no vaccination". Two RV vaccines are currently licensed in Ireland: Rotarix and RotaTeq. A cohort model used in several European countries was adapted using Irish epidemiological, resource utilisation and cost data. The base case model considers the impact of Rotarix vaccination on health-related quality of life of children under five years old from a healthcare payer perspective. Other scenarios explored the use of RotaTeq, impact on one caregiver, on societal costs and on cases that do not seek medical attention. Cost was varied between the vaccine list price (€100\\/course) in the base case and an assumed tender price (€70\\/course). One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were conducted. Implementing universal RV vaccination may prevent around 1970 GP visits, 3280 A&E attendances and 2490 hospitalisations. A vaccination programme was estimated to cost approximately €6.54 million per year but €4.65 million of this would be offset by reducing healthcare resource use. The baseline ICER was €112,048\\/QALY and €72,736\\/QALY from the healthcare payer and societal perspective, respectively, falling to €68,896 and €43,916\\/QALY, respectively, if the impact on one caregiver was considered. If the price fell to €70 per course, universal RV vaccination would be cost saving under all scenarios. Results were sensitive to vaccination costs, incidence of RV infection and direct medical costs. Universal RV vaccination would not be cost-effective under base case assumptions. However, it could be cost-effective at a lower vaccine price or from a wider societal perspective.

  18. Elevated NF-κB activation is conserved in human myocytes cultured from obese type 2 diabetic patients and attenuated by AMP-activated protein kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Charlotte Jane; Pedersen, Maria; Pedersen, Bente K;

    2011-01-01

    To examine whether the inflammatory phenotype found in obese and diabetic individuals is preserved in isolated, cultured myocytes and to assess the effectiveness of pharmacological AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation upon the attenuation of inflammation in these myocytes....

  19. Isolation and identification of the porcine rotavirus isolate of Rotavirus A pig/China/NMTL/2009/G9P[23]%猪轮状病毒Rotavirus A pig/China/NMTL/2009/G9P[23]株的分离与鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    时洪艳; 陈建飞; 王承宝; 张志榜; 石达; 冯力

    2011-01-01

    Group A rotaviruses are the main pathogens which cause diarrhea in human and animals. An virus was isolated from piglet with diarrhea in Inner Mongolia and purified 3 times in MA104 cell. The virus was identified to be porcine rotavirus by electron microscopic observation, PCR and sequencing analysis, designated A pig/China/NMTL/2009/G9P[23]. The pathogenicity experiment showed that the virus caused acute diarrhea in piglet. According to the sequence analysis, the virus was classified as group A rotaviruses, the genotype of VP4/6/7 was belonged to P[23], 15, and G9, respectively.%A群轮状病毒(GAR)是引起人类和多种动物腹泻的主要病原体,病原的分离与鉴定是轮状病毒(RV)流行病学、病原学等研究的基础.本研究采用接种MA 104细胞的方法,从内蒙古某猪场患病猪腹泻粪便中分离一株病毒,经3次蚀斑克隆纯化后,采用电镜观察、PCR鉴定和序列测定进行分析,结果表明该分离株为猪轮状病毒(PoRV).致病性试验表明该分离株能够引起仔猪急性腹泻,RT-PCR扩增其VP4、VP6和VP7的基因节段并进行序列测定,按照A群RV的最新分类方法,确定该分离株的VP6、VP7和VP4基因型分别为I5型、G9型和P[23]型.因此,将该分离株命名为Rotavirus A pig/China/NMTL/2009/Q9P[23].

  20. Prevention of the murine model of biliary atresia following live rotavirus vaccination of dams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondoc, Alexander J; Jafri, Mubeen A; Donnelly, Bryan; Mohanty, Sujit K; McNeal, Monica M; Ward, Richard L; Tiao, Greg M

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Biliary atresia (BA) is a neonatal disease that results in the obliteration of the biliary tree. The murine model of biliary atresia (BA) has been established where rhesus rotavirus (RRV) infection of newborn mice leads to an obstructive cholangiopathy. We determined whether maternal, post-conception rotavirus vaccination could prevent the murine model of biliary atresia. Materials and Methods Female mice were mated and injected intraperitoneally with one of the following materials: purified rotavirus strains RRV or Wa, high or low dose Rotateq® (a pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (PRV)), purified recombinant viral antigens of rotavirus (VP6) or influenza (NP), or saline. B-cell-deficient females also underwent post-conception PRV injection. Maternal vaccination with PRV improves survival of pups infected with RRV. Results Maternal vaccination with PRV improves survival of pups infected with RRV. Serum rotavirus IgG, but not IgA, levels were increased in pups delivered from dams who received RRV, Wa, PRV, or VP6, but in the case of the Wa, PRV, and VP6 groups, these antibodies were not neutralizing. Post-conception injection of high dose PRV did not improve survival of pups born to B-cell deficient dams. Conclusion Maternal vaccination against RRV can prevent the rotavirus-induced murine model of biliary atresia in newborn mouse pups. PMID:19635292

  1. Health Impact of Rotavirus Vaccination in Developing Countries: Progress and Way Forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parashar, Umesh D; Johnson, Hope; Steele, A Duncan; Tate, Jacqueline E

    2016-05-01

    Two rotavirus vaccines have been licensed in >100 countries worldwide since 2006. As of October 2105, these vaccines have been implemented in the national immunization programs of 79 countries, including 36 low-income countries that are eligible for support for vaccine purchase from Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance. Rotavirus vaccines were initially introduced in Australia and countries of the Americas and Europe after completion of successful clinical trials in these regions, and the impact of routine vaccination in reducing the health burden of severe childhood gastroenteritis in these regions has been well documented. Because of concerns around the performance of orally administered rotavirus vaccines in developing countries, vaccine implementation in these settings only began after additional clinical trials were completed and the World Health Organization issued a global recommendation for use of rotavirus vaccines in 2009. This supplementary issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases includes a collection of articles describing the impact and effectiveness of routine rotavirus vaccination in developing countries that were among the early adopters of rotavirus vaccine. The data highlight the benefits of vaccination and should provide valuable evidence to sustain vaccine use in these countries and encourage other countries to adopt routine rotavirus vaccination to reduce the health burden of severe childhood gastroenteritis. PMID:27059361

  2. Burden of rotavirus infections in Liguria, Northern Italy: hospitalisations and potential savings by vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panatto, D; Amicizia, D; Giacchino, R; Tacchella, A; Natalizia, A R; Melioli, G; Bandettini, R; Di Pietro, P; Diana, M C; Gasparini, R

    2011-08-01

    We evaluated the rates of gastroenteritis admissions to the emergency department and of rotavirus-related hospitalisations in children ≤5 years of age in 2006 at an Italian paediatric hospital. We calculated the number of rotavirus cases avoidable through the universal vaccination of children. Epidemiological data were extracted from the Data Elaboration Centre. To calculate the hospitalisation rate due to rotavirus, the virus was sought in the faeces of children hospitalised for acute gastroenteritis by means of rapid immunochromatographic assay. Emergency department admissions due to gastroenteritis numbered 2,396 (11.58% of the total admissions). Of these, 276 children (11.52%) were examined and then sent home, 1,286 (53.67%) were kept in short observation and 776 (32.38%) were hospitalised. In 27.83% of hospitalised cases, the rotavirus test proved positive. The rotavirus hospitalisation rate was 55 per 10,000 children ≤5 years of age in Genoa in 2006. In 85.6% of hospitalised patients with community-acquired rotavirus infection, the disease was severe. The number of avoidable cases confirmed that the vaccination of children ≤1 year of age could reduce the burden of rotavirus infection, especially with regard to hospitalisation (45 per 10,000 children ≤5 years of age) and admissions to short observation (85 per 10,000), generating benefits for the Italian healthcare system.

  3. A high concentration of triiodothyronine attenuates the stimulatory effect on hemin-induced erythroid differentiation of human erythroleukemia K562 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Mieno; Yamamoto, Yoritsuna; Hirooka, Nobutaka; Obuchi, Yasuhiro; Tachibana, Shoichi; Makishima, Makoto; Tanaka, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    Although thyroid hormone is a known stimulator of erythropoietic differentiation, severe anemia is sometimes observed in patients with hyperthyroidism and this mechanism is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of triiodothyronine (T3) on hemin-induced erythropoiesis. Human erythroleukemia K562 cells were used as an erythroid differentiation model. Cell differentiation was induced by hemin and the effect of pre-incubation with T3 (0.1 to 100 nM) was analyzed by measuring the benzidine-positive rate, hemoglobin content, CD71 expression (transferrin receptor), and mRNA expression for transcription factors related to erythropoiesis and thyroid hormone receptors (TRs). Hemin, a promoter of erythroid differentiation, increased the levels of mRNAs for TRα, TRβ, and retinoid X receptor α (RXRα), as well as those for nuclear factor-erythroid 2 (NFE2), GATA-binding protein 1 (GATA1) and GATA-binding protein 2 (GATA2). Lower concentrations of T3 had a stimulatory effect on hemin-induced hemoglobin production (1 and 10 nM), CD71 expression (0.1 nM), and α-globin mRNA expression (1 nM), while a higher concentration of T3 (100 nM) abrogated the stimulatory effect on these parameters. T3 at 100 nM did not affect cell viability and proliferation, suggesting that the abrogation of erythropoiesis enhancement was not due to toxicity. T3 at 100 nM also significantly inhibited expression of GATA2 and RXRα mRNA, compared to 1 nM T3. We conclude that a high concentration of T3 attenuates the classical stimulatory effect on erythropoiesis exerted by a low concentration of T3 in hemin-induced K562 cells. PMID:25787723

  4. Attenuation of pathogenic immune responses during infection with human and simian immunodeficiency virus (HIV/SIV by the tetracycline derivative minocycline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia L Drewes

    Full Text Available HIV immune pathogenesis is postulated to involve two major mechanisms: 1 chronic innate immune responses that drive T cell activation and apoptosis and 2 induction of immune regulators that suppress T cell function and proliferation. Both arms are elevated chronically in lymphoid tissues of non-natural hosts, which ultimately develop AIDS. However, these mechanisms are not elevated chronically in natural hosts of SIV infection that avert immune pathogenesis despite similarly high viral loads. In this study we investigated whether minocycline could modulate these pathogenic antiviral responses in non-natural hosts of HIV and SIV. We found that minocycline attenuated in vitro induction of type I interferon (IFN and the IFN-stimulated genes indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO1 and TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL in human plasmacytoid dendritic cells and PBMCs exposed to aldrithiol-2 inactivated HIV or infectious influenza virus. Activation-induced TRAIL and expression of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4 in isolated CD4+ T cells were also reduced by minocycline. Translation of these in vitro findings to in vivo effects, however, were mixed as minocycline significantly reduced markers of activation and activation-induced cell death (CD25, Fas, caspase-3 but did not affect expression of IFNβ or the IFN-stimulated genes IDO1, FasL, or Mx in the spleens of chronically SIV-infected pigtailed macaques. TRAIL expression, reflecting the mixed effects of minocycline on activation and type I IFN stimuli, was reduced by half, but this change was not significant. These results show that minocycline administered after infection may protect against aspects of activation-induced cell death during HIV/SIV immune disease, but that in vitro effects of minocycline on type I IFN responses are not recapitulated in a rapid progressor model in vivo.

  5. Microvesicles derived from human umbilical cord Wharton's jelly mesenchymal stem cells attenuate bladder tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Wu

    Full Text Available Several studies suggest that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs possess antitumor properties; however, the exact mechanisms remain unclear. Recently, microvesicles (MVs are considered as a novel avenue intercellular communication, which may be a mediator in MSCs-related antitumor effect. In the present study, we evaluated whether MVs derived from human umbilical cord Wharton's jelly mesenchymal stem cells (hWJMSCs may inhibit bladder tumor T24 cells growth using cell culture and the BALB/c nu/nu mice xenograft model. CCK-8 assay and Ki-67 immunostaining were performed to estimate cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Flow cytometry and TUNEL assay were used to assess cell cycle and apoptosis. To study the conceivable mechanism by which hWJMSC-MVs attenuate bladder tumor T24 cells, we estimated the expression of Akt/p-Akt, p-p53, p21 and cleaved Caspase 3 by Western blot technique after exposing T24 cells to hWJMSC-MVs for 24, 48 and 72h. Our data indicated that hWJMSC-MVs can inhibit T24 cells proliferative viability via cell cycle arrest and induce apoptosis in T24 cells in vitro and in vivo. This study showed that hWJMSC-MVs down-regulated phosphorylation of Akt protein kinase and up-regulated cleaved Caspase 3 during the process of anti-proliferation and pro-apoptosis in T24 cells. These results demonstrate that hWJMSC-MVs play a vital role in hWJMSC-induced antitumor effect and may be a novel tool for cancer therapy as a new mechanism of cell-to-cell communication.

  6. Rotavirus en animales asintomáticos: Detección y clasificación antigénica Rotavirus in asymptomatic animals: Detection and antigenic classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Polanco

    2004-01-01

    classification of RV was carried out using monoclonal antibodies from the subgroup and serotypes G and P. Twenty houses were identified in which one animal each (4% was found to be infected with rotavirus. Eight different serotype-subgroup antigenic combinations were detected. Fifteen out of the 20 positive samples(75% belonged to subgroup no I/no II. All the samples reacted to antibodies against serotype G., the most common was G3 found in 50% of the samples. The following 3 lines are not in the resumen and therfore should not be included in the summary either (or vice versa. Grammar and spelling are corrected below: Serotype G1 was found in 35%, G2 15% and G4 in 10% and two animals had mixed infections. Only 30% of the samples reacted with antibodies against serotype P, the most common was P1A in 25% of the samples. The presence of RV strains with antigenic characteristics frequently reported in humans, suggests that asymptomatic domesticated animals could act as reservoirs for infection with RV, maintaining this virus in circulation between the annual outbreaks in our environment.

  7. Evaluation of the Intussusception Risk after Pentavalent Rotavirus Vaccination in Finnish Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leino, Tuija; Ollgren, Jukka; Strömberg, Nina; Elonsalo, Ulpu

    2016-01-01

    Background An association between rotavirus immunisation and intussusception (IS) has been suggested with present rotavirus vaccines in post-licensure studies. In Finland, rotavirus vaccination programme was implemented in September 2009 using a 2, 3, and 5 months schedule with the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine. By the end of 2013, it is estimated that 719 000 rotavirus vaccine doses have been given in the national programme of which 240 000 were first doses. Nationwide register allows us to evaluate the association between rotavirus vaccination and IS. Methods and Materials Cases of IS diagnosed during 1999–2013 were identified from National Hospital Discharge Register. All cases under 250 days of age diagnosed during 2009–2013 were confirmed by reviewing medical charts. Self-controlled case-series method was used to assess the risk of IS during 1–21 days compared to 22–42 days post vaccination. Findings In register data the relative incidence of IS at 2 months of age between the post and pre vaccination era was 9.1 (95%CI 2.0–84.3). We identified 22 verified cases with date of admission less than 43 days after any of the three rotavirus vaccine doses. The incidence of IS in the risk period after the 1st dose relative to the control period was 2.0 (95% CI 0.5–8.4; p = 0.34.) Number of excess IS cases per 100 000 first vaccine doses was therefore estimated to be 1.04 (95% CI 0.0–2.5), i.e. one additional IS case per 96 000 first doses of rotavirus vaccine (95% CI 54 600 to ∞). There was no risk detected after 2nd and 3rd doses. Conclusion The finding is in line with the recent published estimates. The benefits of rotavirus immunisation programme outweigh possible small risks of intussusception. PMID:26950702

  8. Evaluation of the Intussusception Risk after Pentavalent Rotavirus Vaccination in Finnish Infants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuija Leino

    Full Text Available An association between rotavirus immunisation and intussusception (IS has been suggested with present rotavirus vaccines in post-licensure studies. In Finland, rotavirus vaccination programme was implemented in September 2009 using a 2, 3, and 5 months schedule with the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine. By the end of 2013, it is estimated that 719 000 rotavirus vaccine doses have been given in the national programme of which 240 000 were first doses. Nationwide register allows us to evaluate the association between rotavirus vaccination and IS.Cases of IS diagnosed during 1999-2013 were identified from National Hospital Discharge Register. All cases under 250 days of age diagnosed during 2009-2013 were confirmed by reviewing medical charts. Self-controlled case-series method was used to assess the risk of IS during 1-21 days compared to 22-42 days post vaccination.In register data the relative incidence of IS at 2 months of age between the post and pre vaccination era was 9.1 (95%CI 2.0-84.3. We identified 22 verified cases with date of admission less than 43 days after any of the three rotavirus vaccine doses. The incidence of IS in the risk period after the 1st dose relative to the control period was 2.0 (95% CI 0.5-8.4; p = 0.34. Number of excess IS cases per 100 000 first vaccine doses was therefore estimated to be 1.04 (95% CI 0.0-2.5, i.e. one additional IS case per 96 000 first doses of rotavirus vaccine (95% CI 54 600 to ∞. There was no risk detected after 2nd and 3rd doses.The finding is in line with the recent published estimates. The benefits of rotavirus immunisation programme outweigh possible small risks of intussusception.

  9. Sentinel hospital-based surveillance for assessment of burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis in children in Pakistan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Momin Kazi

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To determine the burden and molecular epidemiology of rotavirus gastroenteritis in children hospitalized with severe acute watery diarrhea in Pakistan prior to introduction of rotavirus vaccine. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out over a period of two years from 2006 - 2008 at five sentinel hospitals in the cities of Karachi, Lahore, Rawalpindi, and Peshawar. Stool samples collected from children under five years of age hospitalized with severe acute watery diarrhea were tested for rotavirus antigen via enzyme immunoassay (EIA (IDEA REF K6020 Oxoid Ltd (Ely, Cambridge, United Kingdom. A subset of EIA positive stool samples were further processed for genotyping. RESULTS: 6679 children were enrolled and stool specimens of 2039 (30.5% were positive for rotavirus. Rotavirus positivity ranged from 16.3% to 39.4% in the 5 hospitals with highest positivity in Lahore. 1241 (61% of all rotavirus cases were in infants under one year of age. Among the strains examined for G-serotypes, the occurrence of G1, G2, G9 and G4 strains was found to be 28%, 24%, 14% and 13%, respectively. Among P-types, the most commonly occurring strains were P6 (31.5% followed by P8 (20% and P4 (12%. Prevalent rotavirus genotype in hospitalized children of severe diarrhea were G1P[8] 11.6% (69/593, followed by G2P[4] 10.4% (62/593, and G4P[6] 10.1% (60/593. CONCLUSIONS: Approximately one third of children hospitalized with severe gastroenteritis in urban centers in Pakistan have rotavirus. Introduction of rotavirus vaccine in Pakistan's national immunization program could prevent many severe episodes and diarrheal deaths.

  10. Passive immunity to bovine rotavirus in newborn calves fed colostrum supplements from immunized or nonimmunized cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saif, L J; Redman, D R; Smith, K L; Theil, K W

    1983-01-01

    Colostrum was collected and pooled from each of five cows in three experimental groups: group I cows received intramuscular and intramammary inoculations of adjuvanted modified live Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center rotavirus vaccine; group II cows were injected intramuscularly with a commercial modified-live rota-coronavirus vaccine; and group III cows were uninoculated controls. Pooled colostrum from group I cows had higher (P less than 0.05) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) immunoglobulin G (IgG1) and virus neutralization (VN) rotavirus antibody titers (ELISA IgG1 = 2,413,682; VN = 360,205) than did colostrum from group II (ELISA IgG1 = 8,192; VN = 4,395) or group III cows (ELISA IgG1 = 5,916; VN = 2,865). The antibody titers of these last two colostrum pools did not differ (P greater than 0.05). Samples of these colostrum pools were fed as daily supplements (percent [vol/vol] in cow's milk infant formula) to 28 newborn, unsuckled, antibody-seronegative, male Holstein calves. Eight calves received no supplemental colostrum. The calves were orally challenged with virulent bovine rotavirus and monitored daily for diarrhea and fecal rotavirus shedding. Diarrhea and rotavirus shedding occurred in the eight calves fed no supplemental colostrum and persisted longest in this group. The pooled colostrum from group I cows protected eight of eight calves from both rotavirus diarrhea and shedding when fed as a 1% supplement. The pooled colostrum from neither group II nor group III cows protected 12 other calves against rotavirus diarrhea or shedding when fed at the same concentration (1%). Six rotavirus-challenged calves fed 0.1% supplemental colostrum from group I cows and two calves fed 10 and 50% supplemental colostrum from control cows displayed partial passive immunity, exemplified by delayed onset and shortened duration of rotavirus-associated diarrhea and virus shedding. PMID:6309660

  11. The cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination in Armenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jit, Mark; Yuzbashyan, Ruzanna; Sahakyan, Gayane; Avagyan, Tigran; Mosina, Liudmila

    2011-11-01

    The cost-effectiveness of introducing infant rotavirus vaccination in Armenia in 2012 using Rotarix(R) was evaluated using a multiple birth cohort model. The model considered the cost and health implications of hospitalisations, primary health care consultations and episodes not leading to medical care in children under five years old. Rotavirus vaccination is expected to cost the Ministry of Health $220,000 in 2012, rising to $830,000 in 2016 following termination of GAVI co-financing, then declining to $260,000 in 2025 due to vaccine price maturity. It may reduce health care costs by $34,000 in the first year, rising to $180,000 by 2019. By 2025, vaccination may be close to cost saving to the Ministry of Health if the vaccine purchase price declines as expected. Once coverage has reached high levels, vaccination may prevent 25,000 cases, 3000 primary care consultations, 1000 hospitalisations and 8 deaths per birth cohort vaccinated. The cost per disability-adjusted life year (DALY) saved is estimated to be about $650 from the perspective of the Ministry of Health, $850 including costs accrued to both the Ministry and to GAVI, $820 from a societal perspective excluding indirect costs and $44 from a societal perspective including indirect costs. Since the gross domestic product per capita of Armenia in 2008 was $3800, rotavirus vaccination is likely to be regarded as "very cost-effective" from a WHO standpoint. Vaccination may still be "very cost-effective" if less favourable assumptions are used regarding vaccine price and disease incidence, as long as DALYs are not age-weighted.

  12. Sustained low rotavirus activity and hospitalisation rates in the post-vaccination era in Belgium, 2007 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbe, Martine; Berger, Nicolas; Blommaert, Adriaan; Ogunjimi, Benson; Grammens, Tine; Callens, Michiel; Van Herck, Koen; Beutels, Philippe; Van Damme, Pierre; Bilcke, Joke

    2016-07-01

    In 2006, Belgium was the first country in the European Union to recommend rotavirus vaccination in the routine infant vaccination schedule and rapidly achieved high vaccine uptake (86-89% in 2007). We used regional and national data sources up to 7 years post-vaccination to study the impact of vaccination on laboratory-confirmed rotavirus cases and rotavirus-related hospitalisations and deaths. We showed that (i) from 2007 until 2013, vaccination coverage remained at 79-88% for a complete course, (ii) in children 0-2 years, rotavirus cases decreased by 79% (95% confidence intervals (CI): 68--89%) in 2008-2014 compared to the pre-vaccination period (1999--2006) and by 50% (95% CI: 14-82%) in the age group ≥ 10 years, (iii) hospitalisations for rotavirus gastroenteritis decreased by 87% (95% CI: 84-90%) in 2008--2012 compared to the pre-vaccination period (2002--2006), (iv) median age of rotavirus cases increased from 12 months to 17 months and (v) the rotavirus seasonal peak was reduced and delayed in all post-vaccination years. The substantial decline in rotavirus gastroenteritis requiring hospitalisations and in rotavirus activity following introduction of rotavirus vaccination is sustained over time and more pronounced in the target age group, but with evidence of herd immunity. PMID:27418466

  13. Photonic Crystal Fiber Attenuator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joo Beom Eom; Hokyung Kim; Jinchae Kim; Un-Chul Paek; Byeong Ha Lee

    2003-01-01

    We propose a novel fiber attenuator based on photonic crystal fibers. The difference in the modal field diameters of a conventional single mode fiber and a photonic crystal fiber was used. A variable optical attenuator was also achieved by applying macro-bending on the PCF part of the proposed attenuator

  14. Rapid detection and high occurrence of porcine rotavirus A, B, and C by RT-qPCR in diagnostic samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marthaler, Douglas; Homwong, Nitipong; Rossow, Kurt; Culhane, Marie; Goyal, Sagar; Collins, James; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Ciarlet, Max

    2014-12-01

    Rotaviruses are important cause of diarrhea in animals, including humans. Currently, rotavirus species A, B, C, E, and H (RVA-RVC, RVE, and RVH) have been identified in pigs. Traditionally, RVA has been considered the primary cause of diarrhea in pigs, and RVB and RVC had been described sporadically in pigs until recently. Qualitative porcine RVA, RVB, and RVC RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) assays were designed and 7508 porcine diarrheic samples, submitted to University of Minnesota, were tested to estimate the percentage of RVA, RVB, and RVC over a period of approximately 2 years (from 2009 to 2011). The individual RVA and RVC RT-qPCR assays were multiplex into a single RT-qPCR while the RVB RT-qPCR assay remained as an individual RT-qPCR. In total, 83% of the samples were positive for RVA, RVB, or RVC. As expected, RVA was detected at the highest overall percentage (62%). However, 33% and 53% of the samples were positive for RVB and RVC, respectively, indicating that both RVB and RVC are also epidemiologically important in the swine population. RVC was most predominant in young pigs (1-20 days of age), while RVA and RVB were most predominant in ≥21 day old pigs. As diagnostic tools, the developed RT-qPCR assays could successfully discriminate among infecting RV species, which could lead to better surveillance and epidemiological studies for ultimately better prevention and control strategies. PMID:25194889

  15. The prevalence and genetic diversity of group A rotaviruses on pig farms in the Mekong Delta region of Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Hong Anh; Carrique-Mas, Juan J; Nguyen, Van Cuong; Ngo, Thi Hoa; Nguyet, Lam Anh; Do, Tien Duy; Vo, Be Hien; Phan, Vu Tra My; Rabaa, Maia A; Farrar, Jeremy; Baker, Stephen; Bryant, Juliet E

    2014-06-01

    Group A rotaviruses (ARoVs) are a common cause of severe diarrhea among children worldwide and the cause of approximately 45% of pediatric hospitalizations for acute diarrhea in Vietnam. ARoVs are known to cause significant economic losses to livestock producers by reducing growth performance and production efficiencies, however little is known about the implications of asymptomatic endemic circulation of ARoV. We aimed to determine the prevalence and predominant circulating genotypes of ARoVs on pig farms in a southern province of Vietnam. We found overall animal-level and farm-level prevalence of 32.7% (239/730) and 74% (77/104), respectively, and identified six different G types and 4 P types in various combinations (G2, G3, G4, G5, G9, G11 and P[6], P[13], P[23], and P[34]). There was no significant association between ARoV infection and clinical disease in pigs, suggesting that endemic asymptomatic circulation of ARoV may complicate rotavirus disease attribution during outbreaks of diarrhea in swine. Sequence analysis of the detected ARoVs suggested homology to recent human clinical cases and extensive genetic diversity. The epidemiological relevance of these findings for veterinary practitioners and to ongoing pediatric ARoV vaccine initiatives in Vietnam merits further study. PMID:24679960

  16. Assignment of simian rotavirus SA11 temperature-sensitive mutant groups B and E to genome segments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gombold, J.L.; Estes, M.K.; Ramig, R.F.

    1985-05-01

    Recombinant (reassortant) viruses were selected from crosses between temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants of simian rotavirus SA11 and wild-type human rotavirus Wa. The double-stranded genome RNAs of the reassortants were examined by electrophoresis in Tris-glycine-buffered polyacrylamide gels and by dot hybridization with a cloned DNA probe for genome segment 2. Analysis of replacements of genome segments in the reassortants allowed construction of a map correlating genome segments providing functions interchangeable between SA11 and Wa. The reassortants revealed a functional correspondence in order of increasing electrophoretic mobility of genome segments. Analysis of the parental origin of genome segments in ts+ SA11/Wa reassortants derived from the crosses SA11 tsB(339) X Wa and SA11 tsE(1400) X Wa revealed that the group B lesion of tsB(339) was located on genome segment 3 and the group E lesion of tsE(1400) was on segment 8.

  17. Nosocomial rotavirus diarrhea in two medical wards of a pediatric hospital in Calcutta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, P; Bhattacharya, S K; Saha, M R; Dutta, D; Bhattacharya, M K; Mitra, A K

    1992-06-01

    One hundred eighty nine children suffering from different medical problems were admitted in two wards of a pediatric hospital in Calcutta during the period between November 18, 1985 and February 10, 1986. Amongst them, 36 children developed nosocomial diarrhea and rotavirus was detected from 80.5% of the cases. The nosocomial rotavirus diarrhea cases had lesser frequency of stools and only mild dehydration but the course of illness was longer in comparison to that of the hospitalized rotavirus diarrhea cases. There is a possibility of spread of infection via fomites, environmental surfaces and most likely mothers.

  18. [Research progress of real-time quantitative PCR method for group A rotavirus detection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yan-Qing; Li, Dan-Di; Duan, Zhao-Jun

    2013-11-01

    Group A rotavirus is one of the most significant etiological agents which causes acute gastroenteritis among infants and young children worldwide. So far, several method which includes electron microscopy (EM), enzyme immunoassay (EIA), reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)and Real-time Quantitative PCR has been established for the detection of rotavirus. Compared with other methods, Real-time quantitative PCR have advantages in specificity, sensitivity, genotyping and quantitative accuracy. This article shows a overview of the application of real-time quantitative PCR technique to detecte group A rotavirus.

  19. Vigilancia de diarreas por rotavirus en hospitales centinelas, Chile 2006-2008

    OpenAIRE

    Díaz Tito, Janepsy

    2010-01-01

    La infección por rotavirus es una de las más importantes causas de diarrea moderada a grave en niños menores de cinco años en todo el mundo. En Chile, la enteritis por rotavirus ha ido en aumento con el transcurso de los años. En el periodo de enero a diciembre de 2006-2008, se condujo una investigación operacional, con el propósito de desarrollar una estrategia de vigilancia que permitiera la caracterización integral de las diarreas causadas por rotavirus en niños chilenos menores de cinco a...

  20. Burden of paediatric Rotavirus Gastroenteritis (RVGE and potential benefits of a universal Rotavirus vaccination programme with a pentavalent vaccine in Spain

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    Diez-Domingo Javier

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rotavirus is the most common cause of gastroenteritis in young children worldwide. The aim of the study was to assess the health outcomes and the economic impact of a universal rotavirus vaccination programme with RotaTeq, the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine, versus no vaccination programme in Spain. Methods A birth cohort was followed up to the age of 5 using a cohort model. Epidemiological parameters were taken from the REVEAL study (a prospective epidemiological study conducted in Spain, 2004-2005 and from the literature. Direct and indirect costs were assessed from the national healthcare payer and societal perspectives by combining health care resource utilisation collected in REVEAL study and unit costs from official sources. RotaTeq per protocol efficacy data was taken from a large worldwide rotavirus clinical trial (70,000 children. Health outcomes included home care cases, General Practioner (GP/Paediatrician, emergency department visits, hospitalisations and nosocomial infections. Results The model estimates that the introduction of a universal rotavirus vaccination programme with RotaTeq (90% coverage rate would reduce the rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE burden by 75% in Spain; 53,692 home care cases, 35,187 GP/Paediatrician visits, 34,287 emergency department visits, 10,987 hospitalisations and 2,053 nosocomial infections would be avoided. The introduction of RotaTeq would avoid about 76% of RVGE-related costs from both perspectives: €22 million from the national health system perspective and €38 million from the societal perspective. Conclusions A rotavirus vaccination programme with RotaTeq would reduce significantly the important medical and economic burden of RVGE in Spain.