WorldWideScience

Sample records for attending ophthalmic outreach

  1. Outreach at Washington State University: a case study in costs and attendance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Elizabeth A.; Bollen, Viktor; Bersano, Thomas M.; Mossman, Sean M.

    2016-09-01

    Making effective and efficient use of outreach resources can be difficult for student groups in smaller rural communities. Washington State University's OSA/SPIE student chapter desires well attended yet cost-effective ways to educate and inform the public. We designed outreach activities focused on three different funding levels: low upfront cost, moderate continuing costs, and high upfront cost with low continuing costs. By featuring our activities at well attended events, such as a pre-football game event, or by advertising a headlining activity, such as a laser maze, we take advantage of large crowds to create a relaxed learning atmosphere. Moreover, participants enjoy casual learning while waiting for a main event. Choosing a particular funding level and associating with well-attended events makes outreach easier. While there are still many challenges to outreach, such as motivating volunteers or designing outreach programs, we hope overcoming two large obstacles will lead to future outreach success.

  2. Public outreach: Multitudes attend the Night of Science

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The Night of Science, which took place in the parc de la Perle du Lac in Geneva last weekend, was a great success, with 30000 visitors attending according to the organisers. Many curious people flocked to the stands and animations until late on Saturday night and all afternoon on Sunday. The CERN stand (photo) received a great amount of interest from participants. Both kids and adults discovered the activities of the Laboratory and the data-processing revolution initiated by CERN, from the Web to the Computing Grid. Hats off to the CERN collaborators in the Communication Group and IT Department who made this event a success.

  3. OUTREACH

    CERN Multimedia

    David Barney

    The highlight for CMS Outreach during the past few months was of course the CERN Open Days on 5th and 6th April. Of the 73000 people who came to CERN during that weekend more than 10000 visited CMS in the cavern, thanks to an incredible logistical effort from many members of CMS. The underground visit was only one of several activites at point 5. Others included a picture gallery (with huge thanks to Michael Hoch), an artwork corner for children, a working spark chamber and regular demonstrations of cryogenics (many thanks to Goran Perinic) and photogrammetry (thanks to Christian Lasseur et al). There were also well-attended public presentations on Particle Physics, CERN and CMS as well as a visit of "Fred" from the popular French television show "C'est pas Sorcier". A souvenir kiosk was also a popular attraction, selling CMS tee-shirts, polo-shirts, baseball caps and keyrings, amongst other items. These things are available to purchase from the CMS Secretariat in build...

  4. OUTREACH

    CERN Multimedia

    Dave Barney

    Planning for a new CMS exhibition centre, next to the CMS Centre (Meyrin), is progressing well. The two rooms that form the exhibition will be divided into an "outreach" room and an "education" room, with the main target audience for both rooms being high school students (about 80% of all visitors to CERN). A global scenario for the exhibition has been developed by the CMS Outreach team in close collaboration with Juliette Davenne (who produced the ATLAS exhibition centre). The aim is to start civil engineering work in the summer and to have the centre operational in early 2010. Preliminary plans for a second exhibition site, at point 5, are also evolving, though on a longer timescale. Recently it has become clear that there are many models of the CMS detector in various institutes around Europe and the world. If you know of such a model please let the outreach team know by dropping us a line at cms.outreach@cern.ch Indeed any ideas for exhibits and hands-on interactive de...

  5. Impact of drug awareness and treatment camps on attendance at a community outreach de-addiction clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Om Prakash Giri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Substance misuse is an increasing problem in urban and rural India. The utility of community-based interventions and preventive strategies are increasingly emphasized in this context. The drug de-addiction and treatment center, Department of Psychiatry, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, has been running a drug de-addiction and treatment clinic at Kharar Civil Hospital, Kharar, District Mohali, Punjab, since 1998. As part of an effort to enhance this community outreach program, community-based drug awareness and treatment camps have been organized since March 2004 in villages in and around Tehsil Kharar of Mohali. Aim: To study the impact of the drug awareness and treatment camps on the attendance of patients at the community outreach drug de-addiction and treatment clinic at Kharar Civil Hospital. Methods: Sociodemographic and clinical variables, including treatment outcome-related variables, of patients attending the clinic at Kharar Civil Hospital, before and after the camps were compared. Discussion and Conclusion: The study showed a positive impact on drug awareness and treatment camps held in the community on outpatient attendance at a community outreach clinic, with attendance increasing more than 1.8 times.

  6. OUTREACH

    CERN Multimedia

    E. Gibney

    Feedback from users on the new CMS Outreach web site has been very encouraging, with a large majority of people finding the new navigation scheme and content clear and easy to use. Suggestions concerning content (in particular) are always welcome. Please send them to: outreach@cern.ch Compared with the LHC startup and mass media attention of the 10th September, the Official Inauguration of the LHC on the 21st October was a relatively subdued event. Even so, many VIPs visited the CMS experimental cavern and were left feeling awed and inspired. The ceremony itself, in the SM18 area at CERN (where all the dipoles were tested) was followed by a tour around a temporary exhibition area in the same building, where pieces of CMS were on display. These were accompanied by films of the lowering operations and preliminary versions of the "virtual reality" images from Peter McReady (soon to be available on the CMS Outreach web site), both of which were well received by the audience. Many thanks to th...

  7. OUTREACH

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Barney

    The main emphasis for the coming months is clearly the Open Days of April 5th and 6th, in all likelihood the last opportunities that visitors will get to see the LHC underground installations. Tens of thousands of visitors are expected, especially on Sunday 6th - the Open Day for the General Public. As announced recently in a mail to the collaboration, CMS collaborators are encouraged to sign-up to be guides. If you are interested in doing this, please contact Catherine Brandt. In addition to guides, we require introductory talks to be given at point 5 and are looking for volunteers (many thanks to those of you who have already volunteered!). If you are interested, please send an email to outreach@cern.ch stating the languages you prefer and your availability on the 6th between 9am and 7pm. The CMS Outreach team has been significantly strengthened recently with the arrival of journalist Elizabeth "Lizzie" Gibney. One of her main tasks over the coming months will be to interview many of you...

  8. OUTREACH

    CERN Multimedia

    E. Gibney D. Barney

    The two core activities of the Outreach group are the continued production of the CMS Times and the evolution of the Outreach web site. Although the former began life as a publication for CMS members it is increasingly being viewed by the public, as evidenced by the external subscribers (nearly 400) and the fact that it is one of the most popular sections of the web-site, with tens of thousands of hits every month. Indeed a statistical analysis of our web-site is underway and already we know that it is host to around 11000 distinct visitors per month with more than half a million pages being viewed! Recent additions to the web-site include several new "virtual reality" movies of CMS underground - ideal for presentations to the public etc. A big effort is also being made to archive the thousands of superb images of CMS taken over the years and our team have recently been interacting with the CERN "CDS" team in order to achieve this in the most efficient way possible. The CDS...

  9. OUTREACH

    CERN Document Server

    David Barney

    The past three months have been very eventful for the CMS Outreach team. The majority of our efforts have concentrated on the update of the public web site at http://www.cern.ch/cmsinfo which was released to the public in time for the first LHC circulating beams. Congratulations in particular to Marzena Lapka and Lizzie Gibney for the excellent job that they have done. The layout of the new site roughly follows that of the main CERN public web site, a decision made long ago so that surfers do not feel lost when they jump from CERN to CMS. Both ALICE and LHCb also made this decision (after us!). The text of the new pages was made after interviewing many CMS collaborators, so has a very human feel to it. The site has been very well received by the community and the public/press alike. This is of course a first version so there will be more to come in the future, and comments are more than welcome. The 10th September is a date that few of us will forget. The world media (represented by nearly 300 journalists!...

  10. OUTREACH

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Barney

    The new underground visit itinerary to CMS was official¬ly launched during the summer. Many hundreds of people from far and near have already been into the caverns and all come away feeling excited and awed. The visitors gallery on the surface has also seen some improvements, including pieces of equipment from most CMS sub-detectors. At the beginning of this CMS week the gallery will receive a further addition - a cosmic ray detector. This detector was made by high school students associated to the US "Quarknet" program and it is these students, together with Dan Karmgard (US-CMS Outreach Coor¬dinator), who will install and commission it at point 5. The other main activity (apart from the CMS Times of course, which recently celebrated it's 1st anniversary!) is with the development of a new CMS public web site. This is needed for many reasons - not least because much of the content of the existing web site is outdated. The look and feel of the new site will be similar to tha...

  11. OUTREACH

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Barney

    The new underground visit itinerary to CMS was officially launched during the summer. Many hundreds of people from far and near have already been into the caverns and all come away feeling excited and awed. The visitors gallery on the surface has also seen some improvements, including pieces of equipment from most CMS sub-detectors. At the beginning of this CMS week the gallery will receive a further addition - a cosmic ray detector. This detector was made by high school students associated to the US "Quarknet" program and it is these students, together with Dan Karmgard (US-CMS Outreach Coordinator), who will install and commission it at point 5. The other main activity (apart from the CMS Times of course, which recently celebrated it's 1st anniversary!) is with the development of a new CMS public web site. This is needed for many reasons - not least because much of the content of the existing web site is outdated. The look and feel of the new site will be similar to that of the new CERN ...

  12. Ciprofloxacin Ophthalmic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciprofloxacin ophthalmic solution is used to treat bacterial infections of the eye including conjunctivitis (pinkeye; infection of ... in the clear front part of the eye). Ciprofloxacin ophthalmic ointment is used to treat conjunctivitis. Ciprofloxacin ...

  13. Bimatoprost Ophthalmic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimatoprost ophthalmic is used to treat glaucoma (a condition in which increased pressure in the eye can ... condition which causes increased pressure in the eye). Bimatoprost is in a class of medications called prostaglandin ...

  14. Ophthalmic Lenses

    CERN Document Server

    Bhootra, Ajay Kumar

    2009-01-01

    This book is uniquely meant for the ophthalmologists, optometrists and opticians to help the world see better by excellent vision through the services of technicians and clinical principle based ophthalmology so that the management of ocular problems can be done for a better vision . Informs that a wide range of material and design of ophthalmic lenses with innovative developments is available. This book presents comprehensively rich information about the ophthalmic lenses and their dispensing tips . It will be highly useful mainly for the students of optometry and opticians, ophthalmologists,

  15. Tech transfer outreach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liebetrau, S. (ed.)

    1992-01-01

    This document provides an informal summary of the conference workshop sessions. Tech Transfer Outreach '' was originally designed as an opportunity for national laboratory communications and technology transfer staff to become better acquainted and to discuss matters of mutual interest. When DOE field office personnel asked if they could attend, and then when one of our keynote speakers became a participant in the discussions, the actual event grew in importance. The conference participants--the laboratories and DOE representatives from across the nation--worked to brainstorm ideas. Their objective: identify ways to cooperate for effective (and cost-effective) technology transfer outreach. Thus, this proceedings is truly a product of ten national laboratories and DOE, working together. It candidly presents the discussion of issues and the ideas generated by each working group. The issues and recommendations are a consensus of their views.

  16. Updates in ophthalmic pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Pia R; Grossniklaus, Hans E

    2017-05-01

    Ophthalmic pathology has a long history and rich heritage in the field of ophthalmology. This review article highlights updates in ophthalmic pathology that have developed significantly through the years because of the efforts of committed individuals and the confluence of technology such as molecular biology and digital pathology. This is an exciting period in the history of ocular pathology, with cutting-edge techniques paving the way for new developments in diagnostics, therapeutics, and research. Collaborations between ocular oncologists and pathologists allow for improved and comprehensive patient care. Ophthalmic pathology continues to be a relevant specialty that is important in the understanding and clinical management of ocular disease, education of eye care providers, and overall advancement of the field.

  17. Collaborative outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanmarti-Vila, Lydia; García-Matos, Marta; Beduini, Federica; Carrasco, Silvia

    2016-09-01

    Many research projects and scientific initiatives multiple their impact and relevance through collaborations. It is the contact and exchange with others that often brings a scientist's work to the next level. The same happens with outreach: sharing activities, concepts, materials and knowhow may lead to greater impact, more innovative, inspirational ideas with enough potential to create pioneering outreach activities. A good example for this is the FP7 European project "GoPhoton!", an initiative of ECOP (European Centres of Outreach in Photonics) that ran through 2014 and 2015 and finished at the beginning of 2016 and was directed at the general public, young minds as well as current and future entrepreneurs. This project was based on the idea of sharing activities - which is at the core of ECOP's identity- already existing in other nodes (institutions within the project), or created within GoPhoton! The main concept was the effective leverage of local links such as the networks of educators and professionals in general, industrial clusters, museums, universities, governmental and non-governmental organizations, all from a Pan-European perspective possible through ECOP. This has resulted in over 200 events impacting over two million people. The sharing of activities across institutions that have different resources, facilities, and cultural environments is not straightforward. One of the biggest challenges for the consortium was to be able to extract the concept and identity of each activity, so that it could be realistically adapted to each local context. A crucial point was being able to effectively use the knowhow gained from a partner's activity, in a way that the essence of the activity remained untainted across the participating nodes, while still triggering innovation locally.

  18. Neuro-ophthalmic sarcoidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baughman RP

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Robert P Baughman1, Kenneth L Weiss2, Karl C Golnik31Department of Medicine, 2Department of Radiology, 3Department of Ophthalmology, University of Cincinnati Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, USAAbstract: Neuro-ophthalmic disease occurs in about a third of patients with neurosarcoidosis. Optic nerve involvement is the most common manifestation, but other cranial nerves and the optic chiasm can be involved. However, there are several other common diseases that cause optic neuropathy, including multiple sclerosis. The diagnosis of sarcoidosis can often be made based on the multi-organ nature of the disease and ancillary testing. Most patients with neuro-ophthalmic sarcoidosis require systemic therapy. While corticosteroids are usually the first step in therapy, cytotoxic agents such as methotrexate and azathioprine have been useful as steroid-sparing agents for chronic disease. The monoclonal antibodies directed against tumor necrosis factor have been reported as effective in refractory cases of neuro-ophthalmic disease.Keywords: sarcoidosis, methotrexate, infliximab, multiple sclerosis, optic neuritis, prednisone

  19. Diagnostic Ophthalmic Ultrasound for Radiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Cynthia J; Prager, Thomas C; Cheng, Han; Gombos, Dan; Tang, Rosa A; Schiffman, Jade S

    2015-08-01

    Ophthalmic ultrasound is an invaluable tool that provides quick and noninvasive evaluation of the eye and the orbit. It not only allows the clinicians to view structures that may not be visible with routine ophthalmic equipment or neuroimaging techniques but also provides unique diagnostic information in various ophthalmic conditions. In this article, the basic principles of ophthalmic ultrasound and examination techniques are discussed. Its clinical application is illustrated through a variety of ocular pathologic abnormalities (eg, narrow angles, ciliary body tumor, detached retina, choroidal melanoma, and papilledema).

  20. 21 CFR 886.4390 - Ophthalmic laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ophthalmic laser. 886.4390 Section 886.4390 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4390 Ophthalmic laser. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic laser is an AC-powered device intended to coagulate or cut tissue of the eye, orbit, or surrounding...

  1. 21 CFR 886.4790 - Ophthalmic sponge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ophthalmic sponge. 886.4790 Section 886.4790 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4790 Ophthalmic sponge. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic sponge is a device that is an absorbant sponge, pad, or spear made of folded gauze,...

  2. Eastern California Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Richard S.

    1976-01-01

    Reports on the outreach program developed at Cerro Coso Community College, which has a service area of 5,000 square miles. This college opened in 1973 and now has a main campus and seven outreach centers. Long-range plans call for connecting all outreach centers by microwave television relay. (DC)

  3. OPHTHALMIC MANIFESTATIONS OF LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Grishina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ophthalmic manifestations of leukemia are variable and are predominantly represented by leukemic infiltration of the eye and hemodynamic abnormalities in the retinal vasculature. Leukemic infiltration of the retina should be differentiated from an inflammatory process, such as retinitis, chorioretinitis of viral or fungal origin that are not uncommon in patients with hematological malignancies. Retinal involvement is mainly seen in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia and is less common in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Retinopathy is more frequent during relapses of the underlying disease. Also, retinopathy can be the first sign of the disease. Leukemia should be included into the list for differential diagnosis with disorders that can be associated with optical nerve edema and retinal hemorrhages. Fundus abnormalities correlate with peripheral blood parameters. Retinopathy and leukemic optic neuropathy are predictors of unfavorable prognosis. Early diagnostics and timely and adequate treatment may fully eliminate ocular symptoms and improve quality of life in patients with hemoblastoses.

  4. Polymyxin B and Trimethoprim Ophthalmic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and trimethoprim ophthalmic combination is used to treat bacterial infections of the eye including conjunctivitis (pinkeye; infection ... follow these steps: Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water. While tilting your head back, pull ...

  5. The ATLAS Education and Outreach Group

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Barnett

    With the unprecedented scale and duration of ATLAS and the unique possibilities to make groundbreaking discoveries in physics, ATLAS has special opportunities to communicate the importance and role of our accomplishments. We want to participate in educating the next generation of scientific and other leaders in our society by involving students of many levels in our research. The Education and Outreach Group has focused on producing informational material of various sorts - like brochures, posters, a film, animations and a public website - to assist the members of the collaboration in their contacts with students, teachers and the general public. Another aim is to facilitate the teaching of particle physics and particularly the role of the ATLAS Experiment by providing ideas and educational material. The Education and Outreach Group meets every ATLAS week, with an attendance of between 25 and 40 people. The meetings have become an interesting forum for education and outreach projects and new ideas. The comi...

  6. Operational morbidity analysis: ophthalmic presentations during Operation TELIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollerton, J E; Hodgetts, T J

    2010-03-01

    This paper analyses all ophthalmic attendances to a deployed emergency department (ED) in Iraq to identify patterns of injury to optimise patient care, plan equipment tables for future operations and emphasise need for prevention of ocular morbidity. The Academic Department of Military Emergency Medicine at the Royal Centre for Defence Medicine in Birmingham maintains an electronic database with derails on all attendances to the emergency departments deployed on Operations. This Operational Emergency Department Attendance Register (OpEDAR) was searched for all patients with medical classification of Ophthalmology over a 52 month period between 1 March 2003 and 30 June 2007. During this period 30,195 patients were seen in the ED on Operation Telic and are available for analysis. Patients with ophthalmic complaints account for 5.3% of all presentations to the ED and rank as the 7th most common reason for attendance. This paper identifies patterns of injury to enable future planning of equipment tables and identifies the need for prevention of injury wherever possible. Implications on days lost from full active duty for the injured can be extrapolated. More data needs to be collated on the use of eye protection and the relevance of contact lenses in deployed personnel with eye injuries.

  7. Marketing University Outreach Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Ralph S., Jr., Ed.; And Others

    A collection of 12 essays and model program descriptions addresses issues in the marketing of university extension, outreach, and distance education programs. They include: (1) "Marketing and University Outreach: Parallel Processes" (William I. Sauser, Jr. and others); (2) "Segmenting and Targeting the Organizational Market"…

  8. The outreach sessions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trache, Livius [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O. Box MG-6, 077125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)

    2015-02-24

    These are moderator’s remarks about the outreach day in the middle of the CSSP14, and in particular about the afternoon outreach session in round table format with the announced theme: “CERN at 60 and the internationalization of science”.

  9. ATLAS Outreach Highlights

    CERN Document Server

    Cheatham, Susan; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS outreach team is very active, promoting particle physics to a broad range of audiences including physicists, general public, policy makers, students and teachers, and media. A selection of current outreach activities and new projects will be presented. Recent highlights include the new ATLAS public website and ATLAS Open Data, the very recent public release of 1 fb-1 of ATLAS data.

  10. Ophthalmic Disorders in Adults with Down Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon J. Krinsky-McHale

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A myriad of ophthalmic disorders is associated with the phenotype of Down syndrome including strabismus, cataracts, and refractive errors potentially resulting in significant visual impairment. Ophthalmic sequelae have been extensively studied in children and adolescents with Down syndrome but less often in older adults. In-depth review of medical records of older adults with Down syndrome indicated that ophthalmic disorders were common. Cataracts were the most frequent ophthalmic disorder reported, followed by refractive errors, strabismus, and presbyopia. Severity of intellectual disability was unrelated to the presence of ophthalmic disorders. Also, ophthalmic disorders were associated with lower vision-dependent functional and cognitive abilities, although not to the extent that was expected. The high prevalence of ophthalmic disorders highlights the need for periodic evaluations and individualized treatment plans for adults with Down syndrome, in general, but especially when concerns are identified.

  11. Transportation Outreach Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Transportation Management Program (TMP) is committed to providing opportunities for public interaction, working cooperatively with groups interested in or affected by DOE transportation, and providing information through the development and implementation of its Outreach Program. This Plan describes how the DOE plans to involve the public in its transportation programs. This Transportation Outreach Program Plan will assist the Secretary of Energy is carrying out his vision of the good neighbor'' policy. The Department of Energy encourages face to face interaction and welcomes comments from everyone. Outreach means to go beyond,'' and the TMP, through its Outreach Program, will hear and address the public's concerns and recommendations about transportation of hazardous and radioactive materials. The TMP Outreach Program is based on a commitment to two-way communication. The TMP coordinates transportation policy for all DOE programs to ensure consistent approaches issues and operations. The TMP conducts outreach by interacting with many groups interested in DOE transportation, facilitating resolution of issues and information exchange, and coordinating the DOE's transportation emergency preparedness capabilities. Many of the specific activities in transportation outreach are usually carried out by field and area offices. 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Chromosome Disorder Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... BLOG Join Us Donate You are not alone. Chromosome Disorder Outreach, Inc. is a non-profit organization, ... Support For all those diagnosed with any rare chromosome disorder. Since 1992, CDO has supported the parents ...

  13. Educational Outreach by the NSF Polymers Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovinger, Andrew J.

    2002-03-01

    Education and outreach have been NSF priority areas over the last few years. Reviewers of all proposals are explicitly asked to evaluate not only the "intellectual merit" of a research proposal but also its "broader impacts", including specifically "integration of research and education". The NSF Polymers Program has strongly emphasized these areas and has initiated and supported a wide variety of outreach activities designed to bring out the importance of polymeric materials to diverse communities and to encourage young students to develop interests in this area. Specific activities have included: Workshops and their broad dissemination through the media; press releases on important polymer-related developments; interviews to the scientific and popular press; outreach to Congress; establishment of widely publicized and broadly attended lecture series; funding and support of conferences, symposia, and workshops aimed at students and teachers from kindergarten to graduate school; support of web-based educational projects aimed at the general public and schoolchildren; participation in web-based "ask-the-experts" resources to answer science questions from children or the general public; and personal outreach to middle- and high-schools through talks and demonstrations on polymers and plastics, participation at science fairs, career days, etc.

  14. Human Microbiota and Ophthalmic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Louise J; Liu, Ji

    2016-09-01

    The human ocular surface, consisting of the cornea and conjunctiva, is colonized by an expansive, diverse microbial community. Molecular-based methods, such as 16S rRNA sequencing, has allowed for more comprehensive and precise identification of the species composition of the ocular surface microbiota compared to traditional culture-based methods. Evidence suggests that the normal microbiota plays a protective immunological role in preventing the proliferation of pathogenic species and thus, alterations in the homeostatic microbiome may be linked to ophthalmic pathologies. Further investigation of the ocular surface microbiome, as well as the microbiome of other areas of the body such as the oral mucosa and gut, and their role in the pathophysiology of diseases is a significant, emerging field of research, and may someday enable the development of novel probiotic approaches for the treatment and prevention of ophthalmic diseases.

  15. Fine needle aspiration biopsy of ophthalmic tumors☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Arun D.; Biscotti, Charles V.

    2012-01-01

    A majority of intraocular tumors can be diagnosed based on clinical examination and ocular imaging studies, which obviate the need for diagnostic ophthalmic fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB). Overall, diagnostic accuracy of ophthalmic FNAB is high but limited cellularity can compromise the diagnostic potential of ophthalmic aspirate samples. The role of ophthalmic FNAB is limited in retinal tumors. Orbital FNAB should be considered in the evaluation of lacrimal gland tumors, orbital metastasis, and lymphoproliferative lesions. Negative cytologic diagnosis of malignancy should not be considered unequivocal proof that an intraocular malignancy does not exist. With improved understanding of genetic prognostic factors of uveal melanoma, ophthalmic FNAB is gaining popularity for prognostic purposes in combination with eye conserving treatment of the primary tumor. In special clinical indications, ancillary studies such as immunohistochemistry and FISH can be performed on ophthalmic FNAB samples. Assistance of an experienced cytopathologist cannot be overemphasized. PMID:23960981

  16. The Evolution of the Penn State University Astronomy Outreach Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, C.; Charlton, J. C.

    2008-06-01

    The Penn State Dept. of Astronomy & Astrophysics has a long tradition of outreach. Faculty, students, and staff all participate as volunteers to create and deliver a variety of outreach programming to diverse audiences, including for example K-12 students, K-12 teachers, and senior citizens, in addition to open events that invite all members of the general public to attend. In the past four years, the University and the Department have provided institutional support for science outreach efforts. Many of our programs also receive financial support through NASA Education and Public outreach awards and through NSF awards to PSU Astronomy faculty. We actively collaborate with the NASA Pennsylvania Space Grant Consortium, the Penn State Center for Science and the Schools, four local school districts, and our colleagues from other science disciplines at the University. With this set of partners we are able to continue to innovate and offer new outreach programming annually. In this poster, we present an overview of the variety of outreach programs offered recently and those in the development stages. We describe how each program fits into the Department and University structure. In this way we provide a case study of a large, dynamic, university-based astronomy outreach venture.

  17. Ophthalmic lymphoma: epidemiology and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjö, Lene Dissing

    2009-02-01

    With a lifetime risk of 1% and 700 new cases per year, Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is the seventh most frequent type of cancer in Denmark. The incidence of NHL has increased considerably in Western countries over the last decades; consequently, NHL is an increasing clinical problem. Ophthalmic lymphoma, (lymphoma localized in the ocular region, i.e. eyelid, conjunctiva, lacrimal sac, lacrimal gland, orbit, or intraocularly) is relatively uncommon, accounting for 5%-10% of all extranodal lymphomas. It is, however, the most common orbital malignancy. The purpose of this thesis was to review specimens from all Danish patients with a diagnosis of ophthalmic lymphoma during the period 1980-2005, in order to determine the distribution of lymphoma subtypes, and the incidence- and time trends in incidence for ophthalmic lymphoma. Furthermore, an extended analysis of the most frequent subtype, extranodal marginal zone lymphoma (MALT lymphoma), was done to analyse clinical factors and cytogenetic changes with influence on prognosis. A total of 228 Danish patients with a biopsy-reviewed verified diagnosis of ocular adnexal-, orbital-, or intraocular lymphoma were identified. We found that more than 50% of orbital- and ocular adnexal lymphomas were of the MALT lymphoma subtype, whereas diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) predominated intraocularly (Sjo et al. 2008a). Furthermore, lymphoma arising in the lacrimal sac was surprisingly predominantly DLBCL (Sjo et al. 2006). Incidence rates were highly dependent on patient age. There was an increase in incidence rates for the whole population from 1980 to 2005, corresponding to an annual average increase of 3.4% (Sjo et al. 2008a). MALT lymphoma arising in the ocular region was found in 116 patients (Sjo et al. 2008b). One third of patients had a relapse or progression of disease after initial therapy and relapses were frequently found at extra-ocular sites. Overall survival, however, was not significantly poorer for patients

  18. Maximum outreach. . . minimum budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laychak, Mary Beth

    2011-06-01

    Many astronomical institutions have budgetary constraints that prevent them from spending large amounts on public outreach. This is especially true for smaller organizations, such as the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), where manpower and funding are at a premium. To maximize our impact, we employ unconventional and affordable outreach techniques that underscore our commitment to astronomy education and our local community. We participate in many unique community interactions, ranging from rodeo calf-dressing tournaments to art gallery exhibitions of CFHT images. Further, we have developed many creative methods to communicate complex astronomical concepts to both children and adults, including the use of a modified webcam to teach infrared astronomy and the production of online newsletter for parents, children, and educators. This presentation will discuss the outreach methods CFHT has found most effective in our local schools and our rural community.

  19. Alternative methods of ophthalmic treatment in Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vader, L

    1994-04-01

    Russian ophthalmic nurses and physicians are using alternative methods of treatment to supplement traditional eye care. As acupuncture and iridology become more popular in the United States, ophthalmic nurses need to be more knowledgeable about these treatments and the implications for patients.

  20. An Insight into Ophthalmic Drug Delivery System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rathore K. S.

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Promising management of eye ailments take off effective concentration of drug at the eye for sufficient period of time. Dosage forms are administered directly to eye for localized ophthalmic therapy. Most of the treatments call for the topical administration of ophthalmic active drugs to the tissues around the ocular cavity. Conventional ophthalmic drug delivery systems including eye drops, ophthalmic ointments, are no longer sufficient to encounter eye diseases. This article reviews the constraints with conventional ocular therapy and explores various novel approaches like in-situ gel, ocular films or ocuserts, nanosuspension, collagen shields, latex systems, nanoparticles, liposomes, niosomes, iontophorosis, eye implants, etc to improve the ophthalmic bioavailability of drugs to the anterior chamber of the eye.

  1. Astronomy Outreach for Large and Unique Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubowich, D.; Sparks, R. T.; Pompea, S. M.; Kendall, J. S.; Dugan, C.

    2013-04-01

    In this session, we discuss different approaches to reaching large audiences. In addition to star parties and astronomy events, the audiences for some of the events include music concerts or festivals, sick children and their families, minority communities, American Indian reservations, and tourist sites such as the National Mall. The goal is to bring science directly to the public—to people who attend astronomy events and to people who do not come to star parties, science museums, or science festivals. These programs allow the entire community to participate in astronomy activities to enhance the public appreciation of science. These programs attract large enthusiastic crowds often with young children participating in these family learning experiences. The public will become more informed, educated, and inspired about astronomy and will also be provided with information that will allow them to continue to learn after this outreach activity. Large and unique audiences often have common problems, and their solutions and the lessons learned will be presented. Interaction with the participants in this session will provide important community feedback used to improve astronomy outreach for large and unique audiences. New ways to expand astronomy outreach to new large audiences will be discussed.

  2. 21 CFR 886.4350 - Manual ophthalmic surgical instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manual ophthalmic surgical instrument. 886.4350... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4350 Manual ophthalmic surgical instrument. (a) Identification. A manual ophthalmic surgical instrument is a nonpowered, handheld...

  3. 21 CFR 886.5800 - Ophthalmic bar reader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ophthalmic bar reader. 886.5800 Section 886.5800...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 886.5800 Ophthalmic bar reader. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic bar reader is a device that consists of a magnifying lens intended for use by a...

  4. 21 CFR 886.5810 - Ophthalmic prism reader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ophthalmic prism reader. 886.5810 Section 886.5810...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 886.5810 Ophthalmic prism reader. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic prism reader is a device intended for use by a patient who is in a supine position...

  5. 21 CFR 886.4250 - Ophthalmic electrolysis unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ophthalmic electrolysis unit. 886.4250 Section 886...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4250 Ophthalmic electrolysis unit. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic electrolysis unit is an AC-powered or battery-powered device intended to...

  6. 21 CFR 886.1860 - Ophthalmic instrument stand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ophthalmic instrument stand. 886.1860 Section 886...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1860 Ophthalmic instrument stand. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic instrument stand is an AC-powered or nonpowered device intended to store...

  7. Big data and ophthalmic research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Antony; Ng, Jonathon Q; Morlet, Nigel; Semmens, James B

    2016-01-01

    Large population-based health administrative databases, clinical registries, and data linkage systems are a rapidly expanding resource for health research. Ophthalmic research has benefited from the use of these databases in expanding the breadth of knowledge in areas such as disease surveillance, disease etiology, health services utilization, and health outcomes. Furthermore, the quantity of data available for research has increased exponentially in recent times, particularly as e-health initiatives come online in health systems across the globe. We review some big data concepts, the databases and data linkage systems used in eye research-including their advantages and limitations, the types of studies previously undertaken, and the future direction for big data in eye research.

  8. Seismology Outreach in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardine, L.; Tape, C.; West, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    Despite residing in a state with 75% of North American earthquakes and three of the top 15 ever recorded, most Alaskans have limited knowledge about the science of earthquakes. To many, earthquakes are just part of everyday life, and to others, they are barely noticed until a large event happens, and often ignored even then. Alaskans are rugged, resilient people with both strong independence and tight community bonds. Rural villages in Alaska, most of which are inaccessible by road, are underrepresented in outreach efforts. Their remote locations and difficulty of access make outreach fiscally challenging. Teacher retention and small student bodies limit exposure to science and hinder student success in college. The arrival of EarthScope's Transportable Array, the 50th anniversary of the Great Alaska Earthquake, targeted projects with large outreach components, and increased community interest in earthquake knowledge have provided opportunities to spread information across Alaska. We have found that performing hands-on demonstrations, identifying seismological relevance toward career opportunities in Alaska (such as natural resource exploration), and engaging residents through place-based experience have increased the public's interest and awareness of our active home.

  9. Anaesthesia for Ophthalmic Surgical Procedures | Onakpoya | East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH ... Background: Ophthalmic surgical procedures are performed under anaesthesia to enhance ... Local anaesthesia was the more commonly (92.1%) employed while general anaesthesia was ...

  10. [Pediatric case series in an ophthalmic camp in Turkana (Kenya)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noval, S; Cabrejas, L; Jarrín, E; Ruiz-Guerrero, M; Ciancas, E

    2013-12-01

    Turkana is the largest district in Kenya, situated in the Northwest of the country. It features a semi-nomadic population of 850,000. Around 60% of population lives below the poverty threshold. The ratio of doctors is 1:75,000 inhabitants. Five ophthalmologists took part in the last deployment in November. Local staff had previously selected the patients from the rural areas, as well as in Lodwar, the capital of the district. Of the 371 patients who attended the clinic, 128 required surgery. To describe the pediatric population attended to in the last «Turkana Eye Project» Camp. Description of the ophthalmic pathologies of the children seen in the clinic in this surgical camp, and the diagnostic and therapeutic options according to the limitations of the environment. Of the 371 patients, 54 were younger than 15 years old (14.5%). Four children had surgery (3.25% of the 128 patients). In 2 more cases surgery was the indicated but not performed. Therefore, of the total of 54 cases, 6 could be considered as surgical (11.1%), and 17 suffered ophthalmic problems other than refraction defects, or mild ocular surface pathologies: traumatic cataracts, neuropathies, impetigo, exophthalmos, retinal dystrophies, dermoid cysts, or nyctalopia. The etiology was traumatic in four of the 17 children (23.5%). Surgical camps are increasing in the developing countries. They are usually focused on particular pathologies, such as cataracts or trachoma. Our case series shows the importance of pediatric teams and the need to be prepared to face complex pediatric pathologies. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. COLLOIDON BABY WITH OPHTHALMIC INVOLVEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrinivas M

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Collodion baby is a rare, genetic heterogeneous skin disorder. It refers to a clinicentity used for newborns who are encased by a translucent, tight and parchment paper like skin sheets so called collodion membrane, on the entire body surface. 1 Collodion baby is a phenotype which broadly describes the above condition which includes a number of phenotypes. The two most common phenotypes are lamellar ichthyosis and non-bullous congenital erythroderma which account for 75% of cases and others like Sjögren-Larsson syndrome, Netherton syndrome, Gaucher disease etc account for 15% of the cases. 2 Lamellar ichthyosis which is more common, is an autosomal recessive condition caused by mutations in the transglutaminase-1 gene, defect on chromosome 14q11.Lid ectropion and ocular complications like exposure keratitis are seen commonly in colloidon babies. 3 15 day old male baby, first issue of a second degree consanguineously married couple, born at a gestation age of 36 weeks (normal vaginal delivery was referred to ophthalmic institute for management of ectropion. Child was diagnosed to have lamellar ichthyosis at the paediatric referral institute. At birth baby weighed 2500 grams, length 48 cm, head circumference of 34 cm.

  12. Fermi Communications and Public Outreach

    CERN Document Server

    Cominsky, L

    2015-01-01

    The Sonoma State University (SSU) Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) group participates in the planning and execution of press conferences that feature noteworthy Fermi discoveries, as well as supporting social media and outreach websites. We have also created many scientific illustrations for the media, tools for amateur astronomers for use at star parties, and have given numerous public talks about Fermi discoveries.

  13. Undergraduate ROV Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacking, Kip; Hurd, Randy; Wright, Geoff; Truscott, Tadd; Splash Lab Team

    2013-11-01

    Grumpy smelly, and apathy stricken middle school students often find science to be ``uncool'' and ``hands-off.'' We are changing this in our local area through an outreach program at ten participating middle schools building underwater remotely operated vehicles (ROV). Participants (300) were mentored by undergraduates (70) from BYU and instructed on various STEM topics including: electrical circuits, buoyancy, material science, design, and simple robotics. Through weekly visits these undergraduates provided teachers with immediate personal support to start their local ROV program, and enhanced their engineering curriculum at the middle school level. Each undergraduate also designed and built an instrument in an on-campus instrumentation class that were compatible with the younger student's ROVs. Designs, videos and building instructions were posted online for current and future student access. This project culminated in a timed competition where students from each school used their ROVs to collect dive rings and maneuver through an underwater obstacle course. In this talk we will discuss how to increase your own outreach efforts by connecting undergraduates with local K-12 students using inexpensive ROVs and instrumentation projects.

  14. Ophthalmic masquerades of the atherosclerotic carotids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupriya Arthur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with carotid atherosclerosis can present with ophthalmic symptoms. These symptoms and signs can be due to retinal emboli, hypoperfusion of the retina and choroid, opening up of collateral channels, or chronic hypoperfusion of the globe (ocular ischemic syndrome. These pathological mechanisms can produce many interesting signs and a careful history can bring out important past symptoms pointing toward the carotid as the source of the patient′s presenting symptom. Such patients are at high risk for an ischemic stroke, especially in the subsequent few days following their first acute symptom. It is important for clinicians to be familiar with these ophthalmic symptoms and signs caused by carotid atherosclerosis for making an early diagnosis and to take appropriate measures to prevent a stroke. This review elaborates the clinical features, importance, and implications of various ophthalmic symptoms and signs resulting from atherosclerotic carotid artery disease.

  15. ASA education outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Uwe J.; Everbach, E. Carr

    2003-04-01

    A number of very successful Hands-on demo sessions for high school students have been a part of regular ASA meetings for some time. In addition, the Education Committee has organized a series of teacher workshops. These workshops are designed to give high school teachers relatively sophisticated tools to enhance their laboratory content. Workshops for teachers in the elementary grades prepare teachers to use music as a vehicle to introduce additional science concepts. Content and methods associated with both workshops will be discussed. Cyberspace outreach by the ASA was accelerated by the establishment of a Home Page Committee, and more recently by the On-Line Education committee, which is creating an educational website. The website provides a fun way for users to access information including acoustics information, history, demos, and links to the Technical Committee's webpages. The ASA has joined other AIP member societies in developing additional mechanisms, including road shows and nightly news spots.

  16. Treatment of neuro-ophthalmic sarcoidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohman, Larry P

    2015-03-01

    Because of the rarity of neuro-ophthalmic sarcoidosis, there are no therapeutic guidelines based on evidence-based medicine for this disorder. Review of literature combined with personal experience. Corticosteroids are the preferred initial therapy for neuro-ophthalmic sarcoidosis. If patients cannot tolerate the requisite dose of corticosteroid needed to control their disease, or if corticosteroids fail to adequately control the disease process, the choices of a second agent are based on the consideration of rapidity of clinical response and the safety profile. Although methotrexate and mycophenolate mofetil are the medications that are often selected after corticosteroid failure, more rapidly acting agents that have been used are infliximab and intravenous cyclophosphamide.

  17. Eliminating the OUCH in OUtreaCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsten, J. L.; Manduca, C. A.

    2004-12-01

    ``I'm a scientist who knows how to conduct research, not an expert in teaching pre-college students!'' is a common complaint within the scientific community in response to recent funding agency mandates that research proposals explicitly address education, public outreach or other broader impacts. Yet, these new requirements address several important goals - fostering public support for research funding in the Earth and Space sciences, recruiting the next generation of talented geoscientists in the face of declining student enrollments, and educating the citizenry for informed decision making and advocacy, chief among them. Further, the phrase ``broader impacts'' is not meant to be synonymous with outreach to pre-college students and teachers - agency program managers actually encourage many different types of activity for meeting these obligations. AGU and its Committee on Education and Human Resources (CEHR) are committed to offering an array of programs that facilitate our members' ability to meet these new education, outreach, and broader impacts criteria in support of the research enterprise. CEHR has an on-going need for scientists willing to speak about their research in Geophysical Information for Teacher (GIFT) Workshops, sponsored lectures at annual and regional conventions of the National Science Teachers Association, special symposia for minority high school students attending annual AGU meetings, and career planning workshops for students and early career investigators. More extensive involvement as meeting mentors for minority undergraduate and graduate students is available through AGU's partnership with the new MSPHDS initiative (A. Pyrtle, P.I.). A new AGU outreach web site now under development will make available scientist biographies and abstracts derived from recent scientific articles originally published in AGU journals, which have been rewritten for a public audience. This resource is expected to serve as an important vehicle for AGU members

  18. Geothermal Outreach and Project Financing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elizabeth Battocletti

    2006-04-06

    The ?Geothermal Outreach and Project Financing? project substantially added to the understanding of geothermal resources, technology, and small business development by both the general public as well as those in the geothermal community.

  19. Public Outreach With Smart-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, M.; Foing, B.; Heather, D.; Marini, A.; Lumb, R.; Racca, G.

    SMART-1 will be the first European Space Agency mission to the Moon. Therefore it is possible to foresee that any public outreach activity related to the mission can have a big impact in the media and public in general. This expectation for a large audience carries with it the large responsibility to create a program where is maximized the quality, both didactic and ludic, of the public outreach products, in order to keep the interest in the mission for a longer period. In order to assure the good quality of these products it is important that even when planning the mission some of the targets are selected for its rich outreach content. This presentation will focus on some of the public outreach activities envisaged for SMART-1 as well as the selection of the most suitable targets for that end.

  20. 21 CFR 886.3130 - Ophthalmic conformer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ophthalmic conformer. 886.3130 Section 886.3130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... adhesions during the healing process following surgery. ] (b) Classification. Class II (special controls...

  1. Ophthalmic implications of seasonal affective disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paramore, J.E.; King, V.M. (Ferris State Univ., Big Rapids, MI (USA))

    1989-07-01

    A review of seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is presented with a discussion of its standard treatment of phototherapy. A number of ophthalmic implications related to SAD are proposed. These implications relate to both the condition and the phototherapy used in its treatment, especially the use of full spectrum light which contains ultraviolet and near ultraviolet radiation. 12 references.

  2. Ophthalmic imaging features of posterior scleritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Li

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To analyze, summarize and describe ophthalmic imaging features of posterior scleritis. METHODS: Clinical data of 16 patients(21 eyeswith posterior scleritis diagnosed in our hospital from October 2008 to June 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. The results of type-B ultrasonic, fundus chromophotograph, fundus fluorescein angiography, CT were recorded for comprehensive evaluation and analysis of ophthalmic imaging features of posterior scleritis. RESULTS: All patients underwent type-B ultrasonic examination and manifested as diffuse and nodular types. The diffuse type showed diffusely thickened sclera and a dark hypoechoic area that connected with the optic nerve to form a typical “T”-shaped sign. The nodular type showed scleral echogenic nodules and relatively regular internal structure. FFA showed that relatively weak mottled fluorescences were visible in the arterial early phase and strong multiple needle-like fluorescences were visible in the arteriovenous phase, which were then progressively larger and fused; fluorescein was leaked to the subretinal tissue in the late phase; varying degrees of strong fluorescences with less clear or unclear boundaries were visible in the optic disk. CT results showed thickened eyeball wall. CONCLUSION: Posterior scleritis is common in young female patients, whose ophthalmic imaging features are varied and more specific in type-B ultrasonic. Selection of rational ophthalmic imaging examination method, combined with clinical manifestations, can accurately diagnose posterior scleritis and avoid the incidence of missed and delayed diagnosis.

  3. Dural AVM supplied by the ophthalmic artery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Flynn, T H

    2012-02-03

    Dural arteriovenous malformations in the anterior cranial fossa are rare and are especially prone to haemorrhage. These lesions are usually treated by surgical excision. We report the embolization of an anterior cranial fossa DAVM using an endovascular approach via the ophthalmic artery.

  4. Educational outreach visits: effects on professional practice and health care outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson O'Brien, M A; Oxman, A D; Davis, D A; Haynes, R B; Freemantle, N; Harvey, E L

    2000-01-01

    Outreach visits have been identified as an intervention that may improve the practice of health care professionals, in particular prescribing. This type of 'face to face' visit has been referred to as university-based educational detailing, public interest detailing, and academic detailing. To assess the effects of outreach visits on improving health professional practice or patient outcomes. We searched MEDLINE up to March 1997, the Research and Development Resource Base in Continuing Medical Education, and reference lists of related systematic reviews and articles. Randomised trials of outreach visits (defined as a personal visit by a trained person to a health care provider in his or her own setting). The participants were health care professionals. Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed study quality. Eighteen studies were included involving more than 1896 physicians. All of the outreach visit interventions consisted of several components, including written materials and conferences. Reminders or audit and feedback complemented some visits. In 13 studies, the targeted behaviours were prescribing practices. In three studies, the behaviours were preventive services, including counselling for smoking cessation. In two studies, the outreach visits were directed toward improving the general management of common problems encountered in general practice, including asthma, diabetes, otitis media, hypertension, anxiety, and acute bronchitis. All studies examined physician behaviour and in three studies other health professionals such as nurses, nursing home attendants or health care workers were targeted. Positive effects on practice were observed in all studies. Only one study measured a patient outcome. Few studies examined the cost effectiveness of outreach. Educational outreach visits, particularly when combined with social marketing, appear to be a promising approach to modifying health professional behaviour, especially prescribing. Further

  5. AN OPHTHALMIC HEALTH SURVEY IN NORTHERN IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kh. Moradpour

    1974-06-01

    Full Text Available The province of Rudsar is located in the Caspian littoral zone of Iran. In 1970 an ophthalmic health survey was carried out in 25 units, which were selected by random sampling in these areas. A total of 2,165 persons were examined and the results of this evaluation have been prepared in 6 parts, consisting of ophthalmic conditions and health customs, infectious eye diseases, visual status and diseases, blindness and its causes, eye complications of malnutrition, and other eye disease. The prevalence of trachoma is 24% and of conjunctivitis 11.2%, but infectious eye diseases are mild in these areas and their complications are very rare, and trachoma is deviated mainly to inclusion conjunctivitis. Visual defect are important problem in the Rudsar area; 17.8% of the persons examined of 10 years of age and over, had visual defects. The most important causes of visual defects are refraction abnor­malities, especially myopic astigmatism and contact. Visual defects are more prevalent in females than in males. Of the total number of persons examined, 2.63% had infectious eye diseases, 2.77% had blindness in at least one eye and 56.7% of the blindness was caused by cataracts. The eye complications of avitaminosis A and ariboflavinosis were observed, especially in rural areas. The establish­ment of an ophthalmic clinic, the use of a mobile dispensary unit for diagnosis, procedures for introducing patients to the ophthalmic clinic, and special procedures for the health of school children would be beneficial and are recommended for the control of ophthalmic disease. It is also necessary to have a special survey on toxoplasmosis, an investigation for clarification of the causes of differences in visual defects in males and females, and a survey on the causes of blepharitis.

  6. The Social Media Evolution: Online Tools Drive Opportunities for Alumni Outreach, Fundraising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halligan, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Keeping up with alumni has always been tough for community colleges. It's not unusual for students to transfer to other institutions and leave the area, or to attend school briefly only to be swallowed up again by the workforce. Fortunately, a new breed of social media is making alumni outreach easier. And colleges are taking advantage. This…

  7. Industry outreach a status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surek, D.; Sen, R. [R.K. Sen & Associates, Inc., Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The Outreach Project was initiated in October 1994 with the objective of developing a multi-year plan for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for targeted outreach activities for stakeholders in industry and the general public. This status report summarizes the work on industry outreach that has been completed since the inception of the project in October 1994. A three-pronged approach was taken to ascertain issues related to industry outreach. First, there was a review of on-going and past industry outreach activities at DOE and NHA. Next, a series of meetings with industry decision makers was arranged to get a better understanding of industry interests and concerns, and to discuss how DOE and industry could work collaboratively to develop hydrogen energy systems. Third, a workshop is scheduled where representatives from industry, DOE and other federal agencies can identify issues that would enhance partnering between the federal government and industry in the development of hydrogen energy systems. At this tiny, the review of on-going and past activities has been completed. Industry interviews are in progress and a majority of meetings have been held. Analysis of the information gained is in progress. The preliminary analysis of this information indicates that for appropriate near-term demonstration-type projects, the level of interest for collaboration between DOE and industry is high. The data also identifies issues industry is concerned with which impact the commercialization of hydrogen energy systems.

  8. Anatomy of the Ophthalmic Artery: Embryological Consideration

    Science.gov (United States)

    TOMA, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    There are considerable variations in the anatomy of the human ophthalmic artery (OphA), such as anomalous origins of the OphA and anastomoses between the OphA and the adjacent arteries. These anatomical variations seem to attribute to complex embryology of the OphA. In human embryos and fetuses, primitive dorsal and ventral ophthalmic arteries (PDOphA and PVOphA) form the ocular branches, and the supraorbital division of the stapedial artery forms the orbital branches of the OphA, and then numerous anastomoses between the internal carotid artery (ICA) and the external carotid artery (ECA) systems emerge in connection with the OphA. These developmental processes can produce anatomical variations of the OphA, and we should notice these variations for neurosurgical and neurointerventional procedures. PMID:27298261

  9. Ophthalmic plastic and orbital surgery in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chi-Hsin; Lin, I-Chan; Shen, Yun-Dun; Hsu, Wen-Ming

    2014-06-01

    We describe in this paper the current status of ophthalmic plastic and orbital surgery in Taiwan. Data were collected from the Bureau of National Health Insurance of Taiwan, the Bulletin of the Taiwan Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Society, and the Statistics Yearbook of Practicing Physicians and Health Care Organizations in Taiwan by the Taiwan Medical Association. We ascertained that 94 ophthalmologists were oculoplastic surgeons and accounted for 5.8% of 1621 ophthalmologists in Taiwan. They had their fellowship training abroad (most ophthalmologists trained in the United States of America) or in Taiwan. All ophthalmologists were well trained and capable of performing major oculoplastic surgeries. The payment rates by our National Health Insurance for oculoplastic and orbital surgeries are relatively low, compared to Medicare payments in the United States. Ophthalmologists should promote the concept that oculoplastic surgeons specialize in periorbital plastic and aesthetic surgeries. However, general ophthalmologists should receive more educational courses on oculoplastic and cosmetic surgery.

  10. Botulinum toxin in ophthalmic plastic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naik Milind

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin chemodenervation has evolved greatly over the past 30 years since its introduction in the 1970s for the management of strabismus. Among ophthalmic plastic surgeons, botulinum toxins are often used as the first line treatment for facial dystonias. These toxins are also efficacious for the temporary management of various other conditions including keratopathies (through so called chemo-tarsorraphy, upper eyelid retraction, orbicularis overaction-induced lower eyelid entropion, gustatory epiphora, Frey′s syndrome, and dynamic facial rhytids such as lateral canthal wrinkles (crow′s feet, glabellar creases and horizontal forehead lines. This article describes the pharmacology, reconstitution techniques and common current applications of botulinum toxins in ophthalmic plastic surgery.

  11. MRI manifestations of enlarged superior ophthalmic vein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Rui-li; MA Xiao-ye; CAI Ji-ping; ZHU Huang

    2002-01-01

    Objective:To assess MRI in the evaluation of enlarged superior ophthalmic vein (SOV). Methods: MRI manifestations and etiology of forty-six patients with enlarged SOV were analyzed. Results: SOV enlargement was noted to occur in carotid-cavernous fistula, ophthalmic Graves'disease, Tolosa-Hunt syndrome, inflammation at the apex of the orbit, orbital pseudotumor and thrombosis of cavernous sinus. The dilated vein appeared as signal void tubular shadows on both T1 and T2 weighted images. The diameter of the enlarged vein was 3.5-6.0 mm. Extraocular muscle enlargement, orbital pathologies, enlarged carotid cavernous sinus etc were also revealed by MRI. Conclusion: The dilated SOV may be well demonstrated by MRI. The etiological diagnosis of enlarged SOV can be made in combination with the associated findings.

  12. Are we pharmacovigilant enough in ophthalmic practice?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Dubey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available No drug is absolutely safe. Pharmacovigilance is the science related to detection, assessment, understanding and prevention of adverse effects or any other possible drug-related problems. The ocular medications and devices can cause localized and systemic adverse effects. Not all adverse effects are known when a drug or device is launched in market because of limitations of clinical trials. Many adverse effects are recognized due to the spontaneous reporting of the vigilant doctors who observe and report such events encountered in their practice. Despite a large ophthalmic patient population base, India does not have robust adverse drug reaction (ADR database because of lack of reporting culture. Government of India recently launched the Pharmacovigilance Programme of India (PvPI to monitor ADRs and create awareness among the healthcare professionals about the importance of ADRs. Suspecting and reporting a possible drug reaction is very important in developing a safe and rational ophthalmic practice.

  13. Frozen section diagnosis in ophthalmic pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswas Jyotirmay

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Frozen section diagnosis is extensively used in various branches of pathology, but its application in ophthalmic pathology was recognised only in the 1970s. We studied 10 sections of ocular and adenexal lesions by frozen section diagnosis, which included orbital lesions (4 cases, lid lesions (3 cases, and intraocular tissue (1 case. The time taken for processing ranged between 10 to 15 minutes. Diagnoses based on frozen section evaluation included lymphoma, mesenchymal chondrosarcoma, solar keratosis, compound naevus, silicone oil globules in cataractous lens, neurofibromatosis, pseudotumour, retinoblastoma, and chronic blepharitis. Although further histopathologic examination correlated well with the frozen section (100% observations, the diagnosis was deferred in the case of naevus and reactive lymphoid hyperplasia. Our study shows that frozen section diagnosis in ophthalmic surgery is quite reliable and is particularly useful in ocular adenexal lesions

  14. Oncocytic lesions of the ophthalmic region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Jens; Prause, Jan U; Heegaard, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to make a nationwide clinicopathological study of oncocytic lesions in the ophthalmic region and to characterize their cytokeratin (CK) expression. Methods: All histologically diagnosed oncocytic lesions in the ophthalmic region registered in Denmark over a 25-year period...... were collected and re-evaluated using a monoclonal antimitochondrial antibody (MU213-UC). Clinical data were registered. Immunohistochemical characterization was performed with a panel of anti-CK antibodies. Results: A total of 34 oncocytic lesions were identified and reviewed. The incidence...... that required surgical intervention in the Danish population could be approximated to 0.3 lesions per million capita per year. Patient ages ranged from 45 years to 89 years, with a peak incidence in the eighth decade. Female patients were twice as common as male. Lesions were typically described as red...

  15. Ophthalmic clues to the endocrine disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z; Chen, Y; Lin, Z; Shi, X

    2017-01-01

    Eye is a vital sense organ and reflects the physical and mental wellbeing of a person. Detailed examination of the eye is an essential part in the clinical evaluation of patients with any systemic disorder. The interaction between ophthalmologists and endocrinologists is often limited to Graves' ophthalmopathy and diabetic retinopathy. However, there are many ophthalmic manifestations, which are characteristically seen in endocrine disorders. In this review, we shall discuss the ocular manifestations of the endocrine syndromes excluding the Graves' ophthalmopathy and diabetic retinopathy. We performed a PubMed search of articles published in English showing the ophthalmic features in the endocrine disorders. Relevant cited articles were also retrieved. Most of the publications included in the review were case reports and review articles. Many endocrine disorders have characteristic manifestations pertaining to the various structures of the eye. The involvement is seen from the external structures of the eye to the inner most layers of the retina. Many ocular-endocrine syndromes also exist with characteristic clues to the clinical diagnosis. The endocrinologists need to be aware of these ocular signs that help in the early diagnosis of the underlying disorder. A syndromic approach is essential in the diagnosis of endocrinopathy in patients presenting with ophthalmic features.

  16. 20 CFR 653.107 - Outreach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... outreach activities. The proposed outreach activities shall be designed to meet the needs determined under... matter, videotapes, slides, and/or cassette recordings. (v) The records to be maintained by the JS... outreach “contact” shall include either the presentation of information and offer of assistance...

  17. Ophthalmic regional blocks: management, challenges, and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palte HD

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Howard D Palte Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative Medicine and Pain Management, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA Abstract: In the past decade ophthalmic anesthesia has witnessed a major transformation. The sun has set on the landscape of ophthalmic procedures performed under general anesthesia at in-hospital settings. In its place a new dawn has ushered in the panorama of eye surgeries conducted under regional and topical anesthesia at specialty eye care centers. The impact of the burgeoning geriatric population is that an increasing number of elderly patients will present for eye surgery. In order to accommodate increased patient volumes and simultaneously satisfy administrative initiatives directed at economic frugality, administrators will seek assistance from anesthesia providers in adopting measures that enhance operating room efficiency. The performance of eye blocks in a holding suite meets many of these objectives. Unfortunately, most practicing anesthesiologists resist performing ophthalmic regional blocks because they lack formal training. In future, anesthesiologists will need to block eyes and manage common medical conditions because economic pressures will eliminate routine preoperative testing. This review addresses a variety of topical issues in ophthalmic anesthesia with special emphasis on cannula and needle-based blocks and the new-generation antithrombotic agents. In a constantly evolving arena, the sub-Tenon’s block has gained popularity while the deep angulated intraconal (retrobulbar block has been largely superseded by the shallower extraconal (peribulbar approach. Improvements in surgical technique have also impacted anesthetic practice. For example, phacoemulsification techniques facilitate the conduct of cataract surgery under topical anesthesia, and suture-free vitrectomy ports may cause venous air embolism during air/fluid exchange. Hyaluronidase is a useful adjuvant because it

  18. Creating Effective K-12 Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, J.

    2011-12-01

    Grant opportunities require investigators to provide 'broader impacts' for their scientific research. For most researchers this involves some kind of educational outreach for the K-12 community. I have been able to participate in many different types of grant funded science teacher professional development programs. The most valuable have been outreach where the research seamlessly integrated with my classroom curriculum and was sustainable with my future classes. To accomplish these types of programs, the investigators needed to research the K-12 community and identify several key aspects of the K-12 environment where their expertise would benefit me and my students. There are a lot of different K-12 learning environments, so researchers need to be sure to match up with the right grade level and administrative environment. You might want to consider non-main stream school settings, such as magnet programs, STEM academies, and distance learning. The goal is to try to make your outreach seem natural and productive. This presentation will illustrate how researchers can create an educational outreach project that will be a win-win situation for everyone involved.

  19. Centennial of Flight Educational Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Marianne (Technical Monitor); Miller, Susan (Technical Monitor); Vanderpool, Celia

    2003-01-01

    The Centennial of Flight Education Outreach project worked with community partners to disseminate NASA Education materials and the Centennial of Flight CD-ROM as a vehicle to increase national awareness of NASA's Aerospace Education products, services and programs. The Azimuth Education Foundation and the Ninety Nines, an International Women Pilots Association, Inc. were chartered to conduct education outreach to the formal and informal educational community. The Dryden Education Office supported the development of a training and information distribution program that established a national group of prepared Centennial of Flight Ambassadors, with a mission of community education outreach. These Ambassadors are members of the Ninety Nines and through the Azimuth Foundation, they assisted the AECC on the national level to promote and disseminate Centennial of Flight and other educational products. Our objectives were to explore partnership outreach growth opportunities with consortium efforts between organizations. This project directly responded to the highlights of NASA s Implementation Plan for Education. It was structured to network, involve the community, and provide a solid link to active educators and current students with NASA education information. Licensed female pilots who live and work in local communities across the nation carried the link. This partnership has been extremely gratifying to all of those Ninety-Nines involved, and they eagerly look forward to further work opportunities.

  20. Outreach work for threatened eviction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, Martin; Metze, Rosalie; Sedney, Paulina; Hauwert, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    This book, ‘Outreach work and imminent eviction: RAAK research’, is a report of the results obtained from the examination of these innovations. The first chapter contains a description of the pilot projects, which brought together care workers from the Blankenberg Foundation and Dynamo for early int

  1. 75 FR 23262 - Notice of FERC Staff Attendance at the Southwest Power Pool ICT Stakeholder Policy Committee...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of FERC Staff Attendance at the Southwest Power Pool ICT Stakeholder... below. Their attendance is part of the Commission's ongoing outreach efforts. ICT Stakeholder...

  2. 75 FR 63168 - Notice of FERC Staff Attendance at the Southwest Power Pool ICT Stakeholder Policy Committee...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of FERC Staff Attendance at the Southwest Power Pool ICT Stakeholder... meetings noted below. Their attendance is part of the Commission's ongoing outreach efforts....

  3. Adjustable fluidic lenses for ophthalmic corrections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Randall; Mathine, David L; Peyman, Gholam; Schwiegerling, Jim; Peyghambarian, Nasser

    2009-02-15

    We report on two fluidic lenses that have been developed for ophthalmic applications. The lenses use a circular aperture to demonstrate optical powers between -20 and +20 D and a rectangular aperture to demonstrate astigmatism with values ranging from 0 to 8 D. Measurements of image quality were made with the fluidic lens using a model eye. Both lenses were variable and controllable by adjusting the fluid volume of the lens. To the best of our knowledge this is the first demonstration of a continuously variable lens for control of astigmatism.

  4. Ion exchange tempering of glass ophthalmic lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeney, A H; Duerson, H L

    1975-08-01

    We performed low velocity drop-ball tests using 5/8-, 7/8-, and 1-inch diameter steel balls on ophthalmic crown glass lenses chemically tempered by the ion exchange process. Four representative dioptric strengths (+ 2.50 spherical, - 2.50 spherical, -2.50 cylindrical, and plano) were studied with the isolated lenses mounted, convex side up, on the American National Standards Institute Z80 test block. New ion exchange lenses exhibited a 100 to 350% greater capacity for attenuation of energy from low velocity, large size missiles than matched lenses of similar strength prepared by the conventional heat-treating and air-quenching process.

  5. 21 CFR 524.1200b - Kanamycin ophthalmic aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Kanamycin ophthalmic aqueous solution. 524.1200b Section 524.1200b Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... § 524.1200b Kanamycin ophthalmic aqueous solution. (a) Specifications. The drug, which is in an...

  6. 21 CFR 524.1484a - Neomycin sulfate ophthalmic ointment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neomycin sulfate ophthalmic ointment. 524.1484a... § 524.1484a Neomycin sulfate ophthalmic ointment. (a) Specifications. Each gram of the ointment contains 5 milligrams of neomycin sulfate equivalent in activity to 3.5 milligrams of neomycin base....

  7. 75 FR 36101 - Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee; Cancellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee... Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee scheduled for June 28, 2010, is cancelled. This meeting...

  8. 21 CFR 524.575 - Cyclosporine ophthalmic ointment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cyclosporine ophthalmic ointment. 524.575 Section... § 524.575 Cyclosporine ophthalmic ointment. (a) Specifications. Each gram of ointment contains 2 milligrams of cyclosporine. (b) Sponsor. See No. 000061 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c) Conditions of...

  9. Ophthalmic contributions of Raja Serfoji II (1798–1832)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Jyotirmay; Badrinath, Vasanthi; Badrinath, Sengamedu S

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate and describe the ophthalmic contribution of Raja Serfoji II (1798-1832). Materials and Method: A team of 2 ophthalmologists, director of laboratory services, one archeologist and a photographer visited Sarasvathi Mahal Library, March 2004. Photographs of ophthalmic records were taken and analysed. An interview of the present prince, S Babaji Rajah Bhonsle was taken. Ophthalmologic case sheets of 44 patients, 18 pictures were found. Results: Forty-four patient's ophthalmic records were found. Six records were written in Modi script, 38 were written in English and 18 drawings were found. Conclusion: In Thanjavur, King Serfoji II carried out methodical ophthalmic practices between 1798 and 1832. Both European and Indian medicines were used. Cataract Surgery was performed. Detailed ophthalmic records were maintained. The only evidence of Serfoji's amazing contribution to medicine lies in 50 charts and manuscripts. PMID:22824599

  10. Ophthalmic contributions of Raja Serfoji II (1798-1832

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyotirmay Biswas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate and describe the ophthalmic contribution of Raja Serfoji II (1798-1832. Materials and Method: A team of 2 ophthalmologists, director of laboratory services, one archeologist and a photographer visited Sarasvathi Mahal Library, March 2004. Photographs of ophthalmic records were taken and analysed. An interview of the present prince, S Babaji Rajah Bhonsle was taken. Ophthalmologic case sheets of 44 patients, 18 pictures were found. Results: Forty-four patient′s ophthalmic records were found. Six records were written in Modi script, 38 were written in English and 18 drawings were found. Conclusion: In Thanjavur, King Serfoji II carried out methodical ophthalmic practices between 1798 and 1832. Both European and Indian medicines were used. Cataract Surgery was performed. Detailed ophthalmic records were maintained. The only evidence of Serfoji′s amazing contribution to medicine lies in 50 charts and manuscripts.

  11. Ophthalmic contributions of Raja Serfoji II (1798-1832).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Jyotirmay; Badrinath, Vasanthi; Badrinath, Sengamedu S

    2012-07-01

    To investigate and describe the ophthalmic contribution of Raja Serfoji II (1798-1832). A team of 2 ophthalmologists, director of laboratory services, one archeologist and a photographer visited Sarasvathi Mahal Library, March 2004. Photographs of ophthalmic records were taken and analysed. An interview of the present prince, S Babaji Rajah Bhonsle was taken. Ophthalmologic case sheets of 44 patients, 18 pictures were found. Forty-four patient's ophthalmic records were found. Six records were written in Modi script, 38 were written in English and 18 drawings were found. In Thanjavur, King Serfoji II carried out methodical ophthalmic practices between 1798 and 1832. Both European and Indian medicines were used. Cataract Surgery was performed. Detailed ophthalmic records were maintained. The only evidence of Serfoji's amazing contribution to medicine lies in 50 charts and manuscripts.

  12. Ophthalmic clinical officers: developments in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godfrey Kaggwa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In the rural areas, OCOs refer patients with complicated clinical problems to ophthalmologists and those requiring complicated refractions are referred to optometrists. They review patients after operations, perform extra-ocular surgery, assist surgeons in theatre, and conduct eye care outreach to schools, rural parts of the community and remote health facilities. At district level, OCOs coordinate eye care services (including planning and budgeting and also train and supervise other eye care personnel.

  13. National Strategies of Ophthalmic Education in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Einollahi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Academic medicine is in a state of dramatic transformation. For this reason strategic thinking is the most essential part of educational planning. The main purpose of the present study was developing the strategic educational planning of Ophthalmology in Iran from 2007 to 2010Methods: A qualitative investigation using focus group discussion has been implemented successfully for developing educational planning. Six to twelve representatives of key stakeholders in the ophthalmic education of Iran participated to this study.Results: Strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of ophthalmology education in Iran were analyzed. Strategic goals in education, research, and health service providing domains were being developed. Educational goals were defined as training of human resources in accordance with the community needs at the level of general practitioner, specialist, and fellowships in ophthalmology. Research goals of the program were defined as scientific inter-departmental and international communications, in order to promote the level of education, research, and treatment in the country. Also, in the field of health services according to the community needs, providing services by the means of advanced and cost effective methods were defined as strategic objectives.Conclusion: Based on this strategic plan in the last three years ophthalmic education in Iran shall be many changes in educational, research and health care provision for social accountability.

  14. National Strategies of Ophthalmic Education in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entezari, A; Javadi, MA; Einollahi, B

    2012-01-01

    Background: Academic medicine is in a state of dramatic transformation. For this reason strategic thinking is the most essential part of educational planning. The main purpose of the present study was developing the strategic educational planning of Ophthalmology in Iran from 2007 to 2010 Methods: A qualitative investigation using focus group discussion has been implemented successfully for developing educational planning. Six to twelve representatives of key stakeholders in the ophthalmic education of Iran participated to this study. Results: Strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of ophthalmology education in Iran were analyzed. Strategic goals in education, research, and health service providing domains were being developed. Educational goals were defined as training of human resources in accordance with the community needs at the level of general practitioner, specialist, and fellowships in ophthalmology. Research goals of the program were defined as scientific inter-departmental and international communications, in order to promote the level of education, research, and treatment in the country. Also, in the field of health services according to the community needs, providing services by the means of advanced and cost effective methods were defined as strategic objectives. Conclusion: Based on this strategic plan in the last three years ophthalmic education in Iran shall be many changes in educational, research and health care provision for social accountability. PMID:23113125

  15. Ophthalmic abnormalities in children with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creavin, Alexandra L; Brown, Ray D

    2009-01-01

    A comprehensive review of the available literature was performed to determine the common ophthalmic disorders in children aged 0 to 16 years with Down syndrome. The UK National Library for Health interface was used to search seven electronic databases, including MEDLINE and EMBASE. Terms related to Down syndrome, ophthalmology, and pediatrics were combined in the search strategy, which yielded 230 articles. Application of exclusion criteria left 23 articles to include in the review. Literature synthesis demonstrated that children with Down syndrome are at risk for several ocular disorders. Refractive error was a common finding, particularly hyperopia. Strabismus was also reported regularly, particularly esodeviation. Other frequent findings included poor visual acuity, nystagmus, and blepharitis, whereas cataract and glaucoma were less common but had potentially serious implications for future vision. Only one study compared routine pediatric examination to that of a pediatric ophthalmologist. The findings of this review confirm the need for an ophthalmic screening program for children with Down syndrome. Additional work should investigate how such a program could be best implemented and ascertain how to involve different professionals in such a service.

  16. [Lacrimal and salivatory glycoproteins in ophthalmic herpes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuk, S E; Terekhina, N A

    2016-01-01

    to compare tear, saliva, and plasma levels of acute phase proteins (APPs) of inflammation in patients with herpes keratitis and to use the RESULTS in treatment evaluation. APPs were measured in tears, oral fluid, and blood plasma from 22 adults and 34 children with ophthalmic herpes as well as 68 healthy controls using immunoturbidimetric and spectrophotometric methods of detection. High levels of C-reactive protein and orosomucoid, low levels of ceruloplasmin, α1-antitrypsin, and transferrin in tears from patients with herpes keratitis as well as abnormal tear, saliva, and plasma APPs levels at discharge are poor prognostic signs. They all indicate that corneal inflammation is still intense and that the treatment should not be ceased yet. Severity of APPs concentration changes in tear from patients with herpes keratitis correlates with the depth of corneal lesions, recurrence rate, and disease dynamics. Quantitative determination of acute phase proteins in tear and oral fluid is an early and sensitive inflammation test and may be also used for non-invasive monitoring and antiviral treatment evaluation. Oral fluid allows to extend the capabilities of non-invasive diagnostics of ophthalmic herpes.

  17. Pulsed UV laser technologies for ophthalmic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razhev, A. M.; Chernykh, V. V.; Bagayev, S. N.; Churkin, D. S.; Kargapol’tsev, E. S.; Iskakov, I. A.; Ermakova, O. V.

    2017-01-01

    The paper provides an overview of the results of multiyear joint researches of team of collaborators of Institute of Laser Physics SB RAS together with NF IRTC “Eye Microsurgery” for the period from 1988 to the present, in which were first proposed and experimentally realized laser medical technologies for correction of refractive errors of known today as LASIK, the treatment of ophthalmic herpes and open-angle glaucoma. It is proposed to carry out operations for the correction of refractive errors the use of UV excimer KrCl laser with a wavelength of 222 nm. The same laser emission is the most suitable for the treatment of ophthalmic herpes, because it has a high clinical effect, combined with many years of absence of recrudescence. A minimally invasive technique of glaucoma operations using excimer XeCl laser (λ=308 nm) is developed. Its wavelength allows perform all stages of glaucoma operations, while the laser head itself has high stability and lifetime, will significantly reduce operating costs, compared with other types of lasers.

  18. Optics outreach in Irish context

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Emer; Smith, Arlene

    2009-06-01

    The Applied Optics Group, National University of Ireland Galway is a research centre involved in programmes that cover a wide variety of topics in applied optics and imaging science, including smart optics, adaptive optics, optical scattering and propagation, and engineering optics. The Group have also developed significant outreach programmes both in Primary and Post-Primary schools. It is recognised that there is a need for innovation in Science Education in Ireland and we are committed to working extensively with schools. The main aim of these outreach programmes is to increase awareness and interest in science with students and enhance the communication skills of the researchers working in the Group. The education outreach team works closely with the relevant teachers in both Primary and Post-Primary schools to design and develop learning initiatives to match the needs of the target group of students. The learning programmes are usually delivered in the participating schools during normal class time by a team of Applied Optics specialists. We are involved in running these programmes in both Primary and Post-Primary schools where the programmes are tailored to the curriculum and concentrating on optics and light. The students may also visit the Groups research centre where presentations and laboratory tours are arranged.

  19. Outreach services in academic and special libraries

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, Linda S

    2013-01-01

    Discover innovative outreach services you can implement for your library! Outreach Services in Academic and Special Libraries examines the creation and delivery of outreach programs designed to promote awareness of the library by meeting the information needs of underserved or uninformed patrons. This book contains the experiences of academic and special librarians who describe a wide array of successful outreach programs that are in place throughout the country. This valuable tool introduces professional librarians and library science students and faculty to current and highly innovative mod

  20. Live From Space Station Outreach Payload Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Live from Space Station? Outreach Payload (LFSSOP) is a technologically challenging, exciting opportunity for university students to conduct significant research...

  1. [Oclusion of upper ophthalmic vein--a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kácerik, M; Alexík, M; Lipková, B

    2009-07-01

    Thrombosis of upper ophthalmic vein is both rare and serious pathologic event. Authors present a case of isolated unilateral upper ophthalmic vein thrombosis in 76-year-old woman, who despite treatment ended with amaurosis and secondary neovascular glaucoma. In differential diagnosis authors focused on searching for inflammatory process of orbit with adjacent structures as well as local and general causes leading to venous thrombosis. None of these were proven; it was a rare case of a patient with isolated upper ophthalmic vein thrombosis.

  2. 78 FR 65608 - Information Collection; Outreach Opportunity Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    ... Forest Service Information Collection; Outreach Opportunity Questionnaire AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA... with revision of a currently approved information collection, Outreach Opportunity Questionnaire. DATES... INFORMATION: Title: Outreach Opportunity Questionnaire. OMB Number: 0596-0207. Expiration Date of...

  3. A polycarbonate ophthalmic-prescription lens series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J K

    1978-08-01

    Improvements in polycarbonate material, production techniques, and scratch-resistant coatings, combined with a process-oriented design, have resulted in a precision lens series. Surface quality is comparable to that of untreated glass ophthalmic lenses. The repeatability of the process results in closely controlled axial power and off-axis performance. For most lens prescriptions, the ANSI Z80.1 optical-center specifications for prescription accuracy are maintained through a total field of view of 40 deg for an 8-mm range of center-of-rotation distances. Off-axis astigmatism is controlled for near-point seeing. The lenses are both lighter and thinner than those of crown glass. A scratch-resistant coating reduces the reflections normally associated with high-index (1.586) materials. Impact resistance exceeds that required by ANSI Z80.7 and is many times that required by ANSI Z80.1.

  4. An historical ophthalmic study of Jane Austen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Graham A

    2012-11-01

    Today, no other classic novelist has the popularity or power of Jane Austen, and in 2013 the world will celebrate 200 years of her comic masterpiece Pride and Prejudice. Her millions of fans have an abiding fascination with all aspects of her life, including her health and the cause of her death. This historical ophthalmic study of Jane Austen, based on very incomplete medical bibliographic data, finds that she had a mild ocular surface disorder from age 23. This disorder did not significantly impact on her visual performance for writing. There are many references to eyes in her novels, but Jane's eyes and those of her characters cannot contribute further to the debate around the cause of her death at age 41.

  5. Coherent methods for measuring ophthalmic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottenkolber, Matthias; Podbielska, Halina

    1996-01-01

    Topographic analysis of the ophthalmic surfaces is an important task. Especially recently, when a laser assisted refractive surgery becomes more and more popular in a daily clinical praxis. Ophthalmologists need to know exact corneal parameters as a basis for proper operational approach, as well as for monitoring of the post-operative process. The fitting of the contact lenses can be more accurate when topography of both, cornea and contacts, can be precisely measured. We develop new coherent methods for measuring of the topography of curved optical surfaces. One of the proposed techniques is based on interferometry with a special distance measurement unit and spatial phase shifting interferogram evaluation. The other one uses deflectometry with spatial carrier frequency. The sensitivity of this method is adjustable and thus it closes the gap between the white light and interferometric measuring methods. The techniques proposed here can be suitable for measurement of the contact lenses or corneal surface.

  6. Flow analysis of the ophthalmic artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harada, Kuniaki; Hashimoto, Masato; Bandoh, Michio; Odawara, Yoshihiro; Kamagata, Masaki; Shirase, Ryuji [Sapporo Medical Univ. (Japan). Hospital

    2003-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the hemodynamics of ophthalmic artery flow using phase contrast MR angiography (PC-MRA). A total of 14 eyes from 10 normal volunteers and a patient with normal tension glaucoma (NTG) were analyzed. The optimal conditions were time repetition (TR)/echo time (TE)/flip angle (FA)/nex=40 ms/minimum/90 deg/2, field of view (FOV)=6 cm, matrix size=256 x 256. The resistive index (RI) and pulsatillity index (PI) values were significantly raised in the patient with NTG when compared to the control group. We therefore believe that PC-MRA may be a useful clinical tool for the assessment of the mechanism of NTG. (author)

  7. Mini drug pump for ophthalmic use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saati, Saloomeh; Lo, Ronalee; Li, Po-Ying; Meng, Ellis; Varma, Rohit; Humayun, Mark S

    2010-03-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of developing a novel mini drug pump for ophthalmic use. Using principles of microelectromechanical systems engineering, a mini drug pump was fabricated. The pumping mechanism is based on electrolysis and the pump includes a drug refill port as well as a check valve to control drug delivery. Drug pumps were tested first on the bench-top and then after implantation in rabbits. For the latter, we implanted 4 elliptical (9.9 x 7.7 x 1.8 mm) non-electrically active pumps into 4 rabbits. The procedure is similar to implantation of a glaucoma aqueous drainage device. To determine the ability to refill and also the patency of the cannula, at intervals of 4-6 weeks after implantation, we accessed the drug reservoir with a transconjunctival needle and delivered approximately as low as 1 microL of trypan blue solution (0.06%) into the anterior chamber. Animals were followed by slit lamp examination, photography, and fluorescein angiography. Bench-top testing showed 2.0 microL/min delivery when using 0.4 mW of power for electrolysis. One-way valves showed reliable opening pressures of 470 mmHg. All implanted devices refilled at 4-6 weeks intervals for 4-6 months. No infection was seen. No devices extruded. No filtering bleb formed over the implant. A prototype ocular mini drug pump was built, implanted, and refilled. Such a platform needs more testing to determine the long term biocompatibility of an electrically-controlled implanted pump. Testing with various pharmacological agents is needed to determine its ultimate potential for ophthalmic use.

  8. Glaucoma awareness among ophthalmic patients at Menelik II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    Raising awareness about glaucoma among the general public, ophthalmic patients and health professionals would ... media to be the main source of information about glaucoma. ..... This can be seen in relation to that of rural Indian study in ...

  9. HIV seroprevalence in patients undergoing Ophthalmic surgery in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    THAMPY

    3 HIV positive cases were detected out of 41 ophthalmic .... southern African countries, the national adult HIV prevalence rate has risen ... Africa with a population of 140 million people. ... Corneal transplantation is a possible route of viral.

  10. Implementing Successful Geoscience Education and Outreach Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braile, L. W.

    2004-12-01

    Successful geoscience Education and Outreach (E&O) efforts associated with a research program benefit from effective planning and a commitment by scientists/researchers to become more knowledgeable about and involved in education. Several suggested strategies have evolved based on experience in Earth science E&O with K-16 educators and students during the past 10 years. E&O programs and materials should be developed at appropriate levels ("start from where they're at") and utilize information, skills and topics that are most relevant to students and teachers. Hands-on and inquiry-based activities that teach or reinforce fundamental science understanding and skills, while introducing new topics, results and discoveries, are particularly effective. It is useful to design materials that can provide for a range of time commitment, level of technical skills, and effort, so that introductory to in-depth curriculum units can be implemented. Use of the Internet and working with teachers can be effective methods for dissemination and taking advantage of a "multiplying factor". Obtaining feedback and evaluation of the programs and developed materials, and connecting the materials to national or state education standards are also highly recommended. Most importantly, scientists should become more involved in the science education community. Attending and presenting papers at appropriate science education sessions or workshops, or state or national science teacher meetings (the annual National Science Teachers Association convention is an excellent place to start) can be a significant educational experience for the scientist/researcher. Effective geoscience E&O programs have significant potential for enhancing K-16 education and scientific literacy, and can help attract students to the sciences. Perhaps surprisingly, these efforts have substantial positive impact on the scientist/researcher as well.

  11. Paired Peer Learning through Engineering Education Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogg-Rogers, Laura; Lewis, Fay; Edmonds, Juliet

    2017-01-01

    Undergraduate education incorporating active learning and vicarious experience through education outreach presents a critical opportunity to influence future engineering teaching and practice capabilities. Engineering education outreach activities have been shown to have multiple benefits; increasing interest and engagement with science and…

  12. Paired Peer Learning through Engineering Education Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogg-Rogers, Laura; Lewis, Fay; Edmonds, Juliet

    2017-01-01

    Undergraduate education incorporating active learning and vicarious experience through education outreach presents a critical opportunity to influence future engineering teaching and practice capabilities. Engineering education outreach activities have been shown to have multiple benefits; increasing interest and engagement with science and…

  13. Universities Conducting STEM Outreach: A Conceptual Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilam, Efrat; Bigger, Stephen W.; Sadler, Kirsten; Barry, Fiachra; Bielik, Tom

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the positioning of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) outreach programmes within universities' operations. Though universities in many respects form a rather homogenous international community, there is wide diversity in regard to the provision of STEM outreach by different institutions. To explain this…

  14. Outreach and efficiency of microfinance institutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermes, C.L.M.; Lensink, B.W.; Meesters, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper uses stochastic frontier analysis to examine whether there is a trade-off between outreach to the poor and efficiency of microfinance institutions (MFIs). We find convincing evidence that outreach is negatively related to efficiency of MFIs. More specifically, we find that MFIs that have

  15. Outreach and Efficiency of Microfinance Institutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermes, N.; Lensink, B.W.; Meesters, A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper uses stochastic frontier analysis to examine whether there is a trade-off between outreach to the poor and efficiency of microfinance institutions (MFIs). We find convincing evidence that outreach is negatively related to efficiency of MFIs. More specifically, we find that MFIs that have

  16. Outreach and efficiency of microfinance institutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermes, C.L.M.; Lensink, B.W.; Meesters, A.J.

    This paper uses stochastic frontier analysis to examine whether there is a trade-off between outreach to the poor and efficiency of microfinance institutions (MFIs). We find convincing evidence that outreach is negatively related to efficiency of MFIs. More specifically, we find that MFIs that have

  17. The League of Astronomers: Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paat, Anthony; Brandel, A.; Schmitz, D.; Sharma, R.; Thomas, N. H.; Trujillo, J.; Laws, C. S.; Astronomers, League of

    2014-01-01

    The University of Washington League of Astronomers (LOA) is an organization comprised of University of Washington (UW) undergraduate students. Our main goal is to share our interest in astronomy with the UW community and with the general public. The LOA hosts star parties on the UW campus and collaborates with the Seattle Astronomical Society (SAS) on larger Seattle-area star parties. At the star parties, we strive to teach our local community about what they can view in our night sky. LOA members share knowledge of how to locate constellations and use a star wheel. The relationship the LOA has with members of SAS increases both the number of events and people we are able to reach. Since the cloudy skies of the Northwest prevent winter star parties, we therefore focus our outreach on the UW Mobile Planetarium, an inflatable dome system utilizing Microsoft’s WorldWide Telescope (WWT) software. The mobile planetarium brings astronomy into the classrooms of schools unable to travel to the UW on-campus planetarium. Members of the LOA volunteer their time towards this project and we make up the majority of the Mobile Planetarium volunteers. Our outreach efforts allow us to connect with the community and enhance our own knowledge of astronomy.

  18. Risk factors of ophthalmic disorders in children with developmental delay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandfeld, L.N.; Jensen, H.; Skov, L.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: To identify diagnoses that increase the risk of ophthalmic disorders in developmentally delayed children. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of 1126 Danish children with developmental delay (IQ Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12......PURPOSE: To identify diagnoses that increase the risk of ophthalmic disorders in developmentally delayed children. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of 1126 Danish children with developmental delay (IQ Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12...

  19. Association between Ophthalmic Timolol and Hospitalisation for Bradycardia

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Ophthalmic timolol, a topical nonselective beta-blocker, has the potential to be absorbed systemically which may cause adverse cardiovascular effects. This study was conducted to determine whether initiation of ophthalmic timolol was associated with an increased risk of hospitalisation for bradycardia. Materials and Methods. A self-controlled case-series study was undertaken in patients who were hospitalised for bradycardia and were exposed to timolol. Person-time after timolol ...

  20. The intervention of outreach: best practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tembreull, Cindy L; Schaffer, Marjorie A

    2005-01-01

    Public health nurses (PHNs) use the intervention of outreach to improve health status by locating "at-risk" or "of interest" populations, providing information about health concerns and linking the population to resources to address the health concerns. The purpose of this study was to analyze PHNs' use of the intervention of outreach. Knowledge about best practices can contribute to the ability to successfully implement outreach activities. The descriptive qualitative study involved interviewing 10 Minnesota PHNs. Findings suggest strategies to increase outreach effectiveness. Recommendations include providing education on population-based concepts, such as community assessment and at-risk populations, and using interventions from the Public Health Intervention Wheel in conjunction with outreach.

  1. Education and Outreach: Advice to Young Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, R. M. C.

    2005-08-01

    Carl Sagan set an example to all scientists when he encouraged us to reach out to the public and share the excitement of discovery and exploration. The prejudice that ensued did not deter Sagan and, with the passing of years, more and more scientists have followed his example. Although at present scientists at all ranks are encouraged by their institutions to do outreach, the balancing of a successful scientific career with teaching and outreach is often not an easy one. Young scientists, in particular, may worry about how their outreach efforts are viewed in the community and how they will find the time and energy for these efforts. This talk will offer suggestions on how to balance an active science research program with outreach activities, the many different ways to engage in education and public outreach, and how the rewards are truly priceless.

  2. [About mental health outreach services in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Shunichi; Fujieda, Yumiko; Shimizu, Kimiko; Ishibashi, Aya; Eguchi, Satoshi

    2013-04-01

    Outreach services are very important in community mental health care. There are two types for outreach services. One is mental health activities, such as early intervention and consultation, and the other is intended to prevent recurrence and readmission by supporting the daily living activities of a patient in a community. We have 2.73 psychiatric care beds in hospitals per 1,000 population. So, it is just the beginning in changing from hospital centered psychiatry to community mental health care. Outreach services are being tried in several places in our country. In this essay, we describe mental health outreach services in Japan and we have illustrated vocational rehabilitation and outreach job support in our day treatment program.

  3. OUTREACH

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Barney

    The CMS public web site is taking shape, with priority being given to a user-friendly interface to multimedia (photos, movies, podcasts). We expect that this part of the web-site will be fully operational by the end of the year. As we all know, 2008 will be a very special year for LHC and CMS. Not only will everything start to be commissioned, but underground visits to CMS and the other LHC installations will cease. Reflecting this, the CERN DG has decided to hold an "Open Weekend" in early April 2008, to give visitors a final opportunity to go underground. Saturday 5th April will be reserved for people who work at CERN and their families. Sunday 6th will be for the public, with priority being given to local residents. Preparations are already underway at Point 5 to cope with the thousands of visitors expected on those days, including a recent meeting with the Maire of Cessy. In addition to point 5, there will also be CMS visit sites at Meyrin building 40, CMS analysis centre, crystal la...

  4. OUTREACH

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Barney

    Excitement is growing as the finalization of CMS and the startup of the LHC approaches – and not just from within our community. The lowering of the central section of CMS – YB0 – at the end of February attracted "an unprecedented amount of media coverage" from the world’s press. Hungry for more, the press again converged on CMS for an event organised in March to mark the completed milestone of YB0 lowering and to thank the fund¬ing agencies and all those who provided support. CERN has since been inundated with visits from journalists, both individually (e.g. a visit from Dutch newspaper "De volkskrant" at the end of May) and in groups (e.g. a visit of around 20 journalists from Norway, also at the end of May) – all of whom visit CMS. In addition to these events at point 5, there have also been local celebrations of important milestones around the world that have witnessed excellent coverage in the media, both prin...

  5. Metabolic Acidosis with Ophthalmic Dorzolamide in a Neonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capino, Amanda C; Dannaway, Douglas C; Miller, Jamie L

    2016-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors are a common cause of normal anion gap metabolic acidosis; however, development is less commonly associated with ophthalmic administration of these agents. We report a case of a premature neonate who was being treated at our institution with betaxolol, dorzolamide, and latanoprost ophthalmic products for suspected bilateral congenital glaucoma. In addition, the patient was also receiving caffeine, ursodiol, and acidified liquid human milk fortifier. The patient developed a normal anion gap metabolic acidosis, and both dorzolamide ophthalmic solution and the acidified human milk fortifier were considered potential causes. Upon discontinuation of the dorzolamide ophthalmic solution and the switching of liquid human milk fortifiers, the normal anion gap metabolic acidosis gradually resolved. As a result of the pH and acidity, the acidified liquid human milk fortifier is thought to be associated with an anion gap acidosis; therefore, dorzolamide is suspected to be the primary cause of a normal gap acidosis. This case demonstrates that systemic effects can occur with ophthalmic administration of dorzolamide in a premature neonate. Ophthalmic agents should not be overlooked as a potential cause of systemic toxicity.

  6. Nicholson Medal for Human Outreach Talk: Physics Outreach: Social Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benczer-Koller, Noemie

    2011-04-01

    Physics constitutes a scientific endeavour that has benefited particularly from the globalization of our planet and the international character of its practitioners. The Medal Award was created by friends of Dwight Nicholson to highlight achievements in humanitarian service, special mentorship of students and junior colleagues while motivating interest in physics in the general public, outreach to the larger community of scientists and nonscientists, and work towards achieving gender and minority equity in the work force. While these are broad goals, they uniquely match the interests of practicing physicists as they weave seamlessly with their scientific work. Examples of the variety of such engagement in the physics community in the present time as well as in the past will be presented.

  7. Exploring leptin antagonism in ophthalmic cell models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Scolaro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Emerging evidence suggests that angiogenic and pro-inflammatory cytokine leptin might be implicated in ocular neovascularization. However, the potential of inhibiting leptin function in ophthalmic cells has never been explored. Here we assessed mitogenic, angiogenic, and signaling leptin activities in retinal and corneal endothelial cells and examined the capability of a specific leptin receptor (ObR antagonist, Allo-aca, to inhibit these functions. METHODS AND RESULTS: The experiments were carried out in monkey retinal (RF/6A and bovine corneal (BCE endothelial cells. Leptin at 50-250 ng/mL stimulated the growth of both cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. The maximal mitogenic response (35±7 and 27±3% in RF6A and BCE cells, respectively was noted at 24 h of 250 ng/mL leptin treatments. Leptin-dependent proliferation was reduced to base levels with 10 and 100 nM Allo-aca in BCE and RF6A cells, respectively. In both cell lines, leptin promoted angiogenic responses, with the maximal increase in tube formation (163±10 and 133±8% in RF6A and BCE cultures, respectively observed under a 250 ng/mL leptin treatment for 3 h. Furthermore, in both cell lines 250 ng/mL leptin modulated the activity or expression of several signaling molecules involved in proliferation, inflammatory activity and angiogenesis, such as STAT3, Akt, and ERK1/2, COX2, and NFκB. In both cell lines, leptin-induced angiogenic and signaling responses were significantly inhibited with 100 nM Allo-aca. We also found that leptin increased its own mRNA and protein expression in both cell lines, and this autocrine effect was abolished by 100-250 nM Allo-aca. CONCLUSIONS: Our data provide new insights into the role of leptin in ocular endothelial cells and represent the first original report on targeting ObR in ophthalmic cell models.

  8. Growing Physics and Astronomy Public Outreach in Montreal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simard, Gabrielle; Lepo, Kelly

    2017-01-01

    AstroMcGill was founded in 2011 by an enthusiastic group of undergraduate students, graduate students and post-doctoral fellows. It serves as the education and public outreach (EPO) branch of the astronomy group within the Physics Department at McGill University in Montreal, Quebec. Over the last five years, AstroMcGill has grown from organizing sporadic visits in a couple primary schools to running a successful inquiry-based outreach programme for grade 4-6 students, the McGill Space Explorers. During the same time span, the attendance at public AstroNight lectures ramped up from attracting a few dozen people to over 500 people each month. We will highlight the recent successes of the programme and our best guesses for the reasons behind this success. We will also discuss the challenges of working in a bilingual city as we juggle our majority anglophone volunteers, a mandatory french science curriculum for primary school children and the (somewhat) overlapping English- and French-speaking communities in the city.

  9. An Introduction to the UK Polar Network: Education and Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, K.; Irvine, E.; Mugford, R.; Freeman, H.; Baker, N.; Thomas, L.; Rye, C.; Cheshire, J.

    2007-12-01

    The UK Polar Network is the UK branch of the IPY Youth Steering Committee, an endorsed IPY Project, and the Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS). We have two aims in the UKPN: (1) to provide a network for early career polar researchers working in the UK and (2) to carry out education and outreach activities in UK schools, science festivals and through our website. The Education and Outreach working group is involved in organising programs for a range of age groups including engaging activities for primary and secondary school children, information packs on careers and gap year ideas to school leavers and undergraduate students. The intention is, as far as possible, to keep these events free through fundraising. In addition we aim to provide funding for UK polar researchers to attend national networking days and international IPY conferences to present their work, and are involved with organising workshops at these events. In addition, our website is being developed to provide discussion boards, careers information for polar researchers, as well as information for the public, photos and blogs from polar researchers in the field.

  10. NASA New England Outreach Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA New England Outreach Center in Nashua, New Hampshire was established to serve as a catalyst for heightening regional business awareness of NASA procurement, technology and commercialization opportunities. Emphasis is placed on small business participation, with the highest priority given to small disadvantaged businesses, women-owned businesses, HUBZone businesses, service disabled veteran owned businesses, and historically black colleges and universities and minority institutions. The Center assists firms and organizations to understand NASA requirements and to develop strategies to capture NASA related procurement and technology opportunities. The establishment of the NASA Outreach Center serves to stimulate business in a historically underserved area. NASA direct business awards have traditionally been highly present in the West, Midwest, South, and Southeast areas of the United States. The Center guides and assists businesses and organizations in the northeast to target opportunities within NASA and its prime contractors and capture business and technology opportunities. The Center employs an array of technology access, one-on-one meetings, seminars, site visits, and targeted conferences to acquaint Northeast firms and organizations with representatives from NASA and its prime contractors to learn about and discuss opportunities to do business and access the inventory of NASA technology. This stimulus of interaction also provides firms and organizations the opportunity to propose the use of their developed technology and ideas for current and future requirements at NASA. The Center provides a complement to the NASA Northeast Regional Technology Transfer Center in developing prospects for commercialization of NASA technology. In addition, the Center responds to local requests for assistance and NASA material and documents, and is available to address immediate concerns and needs in assessing opportunities, timely support to interact with NASA Centers on

  11. Dose uniformity of loteprednol etabonate ophthalmic gel (0.5% compared with branded and generic prednisolone acetate ophthalmic suspension (1%

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlowe ZT

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Zora T Marlowe, Stephen R DavioPharmaceutical Product Development, Global Pharmaceutical Research and Development, Bausch and Lomb, Inc, Rochester, NY, USAIntroduction: Loteprednol etabonate (LE ophthalmic gel 0.5% (Lotemax® is a new polycarbophil-based, nonsettling topical ophthalmic formulation. The formulation is a semisolid gel at rest and a shear thinning fluid when expressed through a dropper tip. The present study was undertaken to determine how the nonsettling character of LE ophthalmic gel affects dose uniformity. Prednisolone acetate ophthalmic suspension 1% (Pred Forte® and a generic prednisolone acetate suspension 1% were used as comparators.Methods: Drug concentrations of LE ophthalmic gel, Pred Forte, and a generic prednisolone acetate suspension were determined following simulated dosing – consisting of 2 drops, expressed four times daily for 2 weeks, with bottles that were shaken or not shaken immediately prior to expressing the drops. Drug concentrations were determined using a reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC method and reported as a percentage of the declared (labeled concentration. Comparative kinetics of drug particle sedimentation were also determined for each formulation, using dispersion analysis under gravity.Results: Mean drug concentrations in drops of all three formulations were within a few percentage points of the declared concentration when the bottles were shaken for 5 seconds prior to dispensing. Only LE ophthalmic gel showed consistent and on-target concentrations when the bottles were unshaken prior to dispensing, with a mean (standard deviation [SD] percent declared concentration of 102% (1.92% over the 2-week dosing regimen. Drug concentrations for the branded and generic prednisolone acetate suspensions following expression from unshaken bottles were highly variable (overall relative SDs of 16.8% and 20.3%, respectively, with mean concentrations for both falling significantly

  12. Evaluation Framework for NASA's Educational Outreach Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Rick; Booker, Angela; Linde, Charlotte; Preston, Connie

    1999-01-01

    The objective of the proposed work is to develop an evaluation framework for NASA's educational outreach efforts. We focus on public (rather than technical or scientific) dissemination efforts, specifically on Internet-based outreach sites for children.The outcome of this work is to propose both methods and criteria for evaluation, which would enable NASA to do a more analytic evaluation of its outreach efforts. The proposed framework is based on IRL's ethnographic and video-based observational methods, which allow us to analyze how these sites are actually used.

  13. Final report (September, 1999--February, 2002) [Public outreach and information dissemination - cellulosic and corn-based ethanol outreach project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ames, Jeremy; Werner, Carol

    2002-08-01

    EESI's ''Ethanol, Climate Protection, Oil Reduction'' (ECO) electr[on]ic newsletter reaches out to the environmental and agricultural communities, state/local government officials and other interested parties, and provides a forum for dialogue about ''the potential benefits of ethanol--and particularly the expanded opportunities provided by cellulosic ethanol--with a special focus on climate protection.'' Each issue features expert commentary, excerpts from recent studies about ethanol, a summary of current government activity on ethanol, and ''notable quotables.'' The newsletter is distributed primarily via email and is also posted on EESI's web site. EESI also conducts outreach on the benefits of ethanol and other biofuels by attending and speaking at conferences, meetings and workshops around the country. The 16 issues of the newsletter published through December 2001 are included as attachments.

  14. OPHTHALMIC DISORDERS AMONG STUDENTS OF SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omolase C O

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aimed at determining the prevalence and pattern of ophthalmic disorders among students of School for the Deaf, Akure, Ondo State, Nigeria.Methodology: This is a cross sectional descriptive study was conducted in October, 2011 as part of activities marking the Annual Physicians’ week of Nigerian Medical Association (NMA,Ondo State. Ethical clearance was obtained from the Ethical Review Committee of Federal Medical Centre, Owo prior to commencement of this study. The permission of the School Authority was also obtained before the commencement of this study. The respondents were selected by simple random sampling technique. All enrolled participants were interviewed with the aid of the study instrument (questionnaire by the authors and interpreters (school teachers.Results: The respondents comprised of 91(56.9% Males and 69 Females (43.1%. Nearly all the respondents;158(98.8% were deaf and dumb. Most respondents; 116(72.5% had ocular examination in the past. Few respondents; 118(73.75% had ophthalmic disorder. The commonest ophthalmic disorder was refractive error which was found in 16 respondents (38.1%. Myopia was diagnosed in 9 respondents.CONCLUSION: Most of the respondents were deaf and dumb. Few respondents had ophthalmic disorder. The commonest ophthalmic disorder was refractive error. Myopia was the most predominant refractive error. There is need for periodic ocular screening and treatment atthe School for the Deaf.

  15. Community Outreach and Education on Soil Fumigants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information on how outreach programs can help address the risk of bystander exposure by educating community members about fumigants, buffer zones, how to recognize warning signs, and how to respond appropriately in case of an incident.

  16. Transitional Justice, Culture and Society: Beyond Outreach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise Ketelaars

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews Transitional Justice, Culture and Society: Beyond Outreach, edited by Clara Ramírez-Barat, International Center for Transitional Justice, New York: Social Science Research Council, 2014 ISBN 978-0-911400-02-1

  17. Reliability and validity of an indicator system for assessing the quality of ophthalmic nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Hua Shi

    2016-12-01

    Conclusions: The indicator system for evaluating the quality of ophthalmic nursing has favorable reliability and validity, which means that it is a suitable clinical tool for assessing the quality of ophthalmic nursing.

  18. Blogging in support of health information outreach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapp, Lara; Cogdill, Keith

    2010-07-01

    Social media technologies are transforming the way librarians are collaborating, creating, and disseminating information. This article discusses how librarians at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio created a blog to support their health information outreach activities. Launched in 2007, the Staying Well Connected blog was established with the goal of promoting access to biomedical and health information for consumers and health professionals in the South Texas region. Postings highlight relevant health news, conferences, funding opportunities, and outreach events.

  19. University Outreach: The Dark Object of Desire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Campos Ríos

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available This article argues that the limited progress in outreach within Mexico’s higher education institutions (HEIs is due to the lack of a clear and socially-shared meaning of what this activity is. We propose a typology based on the actions undertaken in the HEIs. This emphasizes the concept oriented by an economistic point of view. It also raises the possibility of recognizing outreach as a basic function in addition to those usually recognized in the HEIs.

  20. School Counselors Improving Attendance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, LaWanda

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the outcomes of interventions used to address attendance issues at a middle school located in the Southern United States. School-wide interventions were implemented to address absenteeism of all students and individual interventions were implemented to address absenteeism with targeted students. An explanation of each…

  1. Dose uniformity of loteprednol etabonate ophthalmic gel (0.5%) compared with branded and generic prednisolone acetate ophthalmic suspension (1%)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlowe, Zora T; Davio, Stephen R

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Loteprednol etabonate (LE) ophthalmic gel 0.5% (Lotemax®) is a new polycarbophil-based, nonsettling topical ophthalmic formulation. The formulation is a semisolid gel at rest and a shear thinning fluid when expressed through a dropper tip. The present study was undertaken to determine how the nonsettling character of LE ophthalmic gel affects dose uniformity. Prednisolone acetate ophthalmic suspension 1% (Pred Forte®) and a generic prednisolone acetate suspension 1% were used as comparators. Methods Drug concentrations of LE ophthalmic gel, Pred Forte, and a generic prednisolone acetate suspension were determined following simulated dosing – consisting of 2 drops, expressed four times daily for 2 weeks, with bottles that were shaken or not shaken immediately prior to expressing the drops. Drug concentrations were determined using a reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method and reported as a percentage of the declared (labeled) concentration. Comparative kinetics of drug particle sedimentation were also determined for each formulation, using dispersion analysis under gravity. Results Mean drug concentrations in drops of all three formulations were within a few percentage points of the declared concentration when the bottles were shaken for 5 seconds prior to dispensing. Only LE ophthalmic gel showed consistent and on-target concentrations when the bottles were unshaken prior to dispensing, with a mean (standard deviation [SD]) percent declared concentration of 102% (1.92%) over the 2-week dosing regimen. Drug concentrations for the branded and generic prednisolone acetate suspensions following expression from unshaken bottles were highly variable (overall relative SDs of 16.8% and 20.3%, respectively), with mean concentrations for both falling significantly below the declared concentration for drops expressed at the beginning of the 2-week dosing regimen and significantly above the declared concentration for drops expressed

  2. Increasing incidence of ophthalmic lymphoma in Denmark from 1980 to 2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjö, Lene D; Ralfkiær, Elisabeth Methner; Prause, Jan U;

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate patient characteristics and incidence of ophthalmic lymphoma in Denmark during the period 1980 to 2005. METHODS: All patients in Denmark with a diagnosis of ophthalmic lymphoma during the period 1980 to 2005 were retrieved from three different population-based registries......: In the Danish population ophthalmic lymphoma consists primarily of orbital MALT lymphoma. Although it is a rare disease in mostly elderly patients, the incidence of ophthalmic lymphoma is increasing at a rapid pace....

  3. Allergic Contact Dermatitis to Ophthalmic Medications: Relevant Allergens and Alternative Testing Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey, Katherine R; Warshaw, Erin M

    Allergic contact dermatitis is an important cause of periorbital dermatitis. Topical ophthalmic agents are relevant sensitizers. Contact dermatitis to ophthalmic medications can be challenging to diagnose and manage given the numerous possible offending agents, including both active and inactive ingredients. Furthermore, a substantial body of literature reports false-negative patch test results to ophthalmic agents. Subsequently, numerous alternative testing methods have been described. This review outlines the periorbital manifestations, causative agents, and alternative testing methods of allergic contact dermatitis to ophthalmic medications.

  4. Microbiological assay for the determination of azithromycin in ophthalmic solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hérida Regina Nunes SALGADO; Ana Flavia Ferreira RONCARI

    2005-01-01

    The validation of a simple, sensitive and specific agar diffusion bioassay, applying cylinder-plate method, for the determination of the antibiotic azithromycin in ophthalmic solutions is described. Using a strain of Bacillus subtilis ATCC 9372 as the test organism, azithromycin at concentrations ranging from 50.0 to 200.0 μg·mL -1 could be measured in 1.666 7 mg·mL -1 ophthalmic solutions. A prospective validation of the method showed that the method was linear (r=0.999 9) and precise (RSD=0.70) and accurate (it measured the added quantities). The results obtained by bioassay method could be statistically calculated by linear parallel model and by means of regression analysis and verified using analysis of variance (ANOVA). We conclude that the microbiological assay is satisfactory for quantification of azithromycin in ophthalmic solutions.

  5. Smart ophthalmics: the future in tele-ophthalmology has arrived

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Wolfgang; Tarbell, Mark A.; Garcia, Kevin

    2016-05-01

    Smart Ophthalmics© extends ophthalmic healthcare to people who operate/live in austere environments (e.g., military, third world, natural disaster), or are geographically dispersed (e.g., rural populations), where time, cost, and the possibility of travel/transportation make access to even adequate medical care difficult, if at all possible. Operators attach optical devices that act as ophthalmic examination extensions to smartphones and run custom apps to perform examinations of specific areas of the eye. The smartphone apps submit over wireless networks the collected examination data to a smart remote expert system, which provides in-depth medical analyses that are sent back in near real-time to the operators for subsequent triage.

  6. Turkish Contribution to Ophthalmic Literature From 1990 to 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin Bayramlar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To investigate the frequency and distribution of ophthalmic articles with Turkish origin on Pubmed search engine and to compare these data with those of the world’s leading countries in that field. Materials and Methods: Using the words “ophthalmology” and “Turkey”, an online retrospective search was conducted on Pubmed for the period from 1990 to 2013. Additionally, same search was performed for each ophthalmic journal indexed in Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-E (n=56 and not indexed in SCI-E (n=8, separately. The articles were divided into two groups (research articles and the other articles as case reports, letters, correspondence, editorials and reviews. Results: A total of 5044 articles in the area of ophthalmology were from Turkey in that period. The United States of America, Japan, and Germany had the maximum number of published articles (25%, 6.8%, and 4.9% of all, respectively. There were 3334 articles on ophthalmic journals. 2822 articles were published in SCI-E journals and of those, 2321 were research articles and 501 were other types of articles. Three SCI-E indexed ophthalmic journals which mostly published Turkish articles are the European Journal of Ophthalmology, Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery, and the Ophthalmologica (361, 183, and 152, respectively. Conclusion: In this period, the rate of the published ophthalmic articles originated from Turkey was 1.5%. We observed that the number of Turkish ophthalmic articles has been increasing gradually. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: 465-70

  7. Astronomy TV outreach, CUBA experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Oscar

    2015-08-01

    As professional astronomer and science communicator, I want to share my personal experience communicating Astronomy and general science principles in maybe, the most popular science outreach devoted TV program in Cuba. It is broadcasted nationwide in a prime time schedule every Sunday. The Science Popularization on TV, is in a Third World Country hard to do if you want to produce attractive materials for a broad audience. Budgets constraints in most of the cases and lack of the technical equipment required to produce first class visual materials conspire, against motivation and creativity of local scientists and media professionals. A way to show the advance of the national scientific community in Science fields and connecting them in a friendly relation with a broad majority of the people, is to combine the wisdom and knowledge of the local scientists together with the most spectacular TV production of the first world countries. Commenting, analyzing and conveying the hard science into the public debate of the common citizens. Here is shown a way to convey cutting edge science to the general public, using limited resources to produce imaginative television productions, highlighting the development, knowledge and wisdom of the local scientists.

  8. ARES Education and Public Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jaclyn; Galindo, Charles; Graff, Paige; Willis, Kim

    2014-01-01

    The ARES Directorate education team is charged with translating the work of ARES scientists into content that can be used in formal and informal K-12 education settings and assisting with public outreach. This is accomplished through local efforts and national partnerships. Local efforts include partnerships with universities, school districts, museums, and the Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI) to share the content and excitement of space science research. Sharing astromaterials and exploration science with the public is an essential part of the Directorate's work. As a small enclave of physical scientists at a NASA Center that otherwise emphasizes human space operations and engineering, the ARES staff is frequently called upon by the JSC Public Affairs and Education offices to provide presentations and interviews. Scientists and staff actively volunteer with the JSC Speaker's Bureau, Digital Learning Network, and National Engineers Week programs as well as at Space Center Houston activities and events. The education team also participates in many JSC educator and student workshops, including the Pre-Service Teacher Institute and the Texas Aerospace Scholars program, with workshop presentations, speakers, and printed materials.

  9. 21 CFR 524.1880 - Prednisolone-neomycin sulfate ophthalmic ointment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prednisolone-neomycin sulfate ophthalmic ointment... ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.1880 Prednisolone-neomycin sulfate ophthalmic ointment. (a) Specifications. Prednisolone-neomycin sulfate ophthalmic ointment contains 2 milligrams prednisolone and 5 milligrams...

  10. 77 FR 8262 - Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee; Amendment of Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee... Administration (FDA) is announcing an amendment to the notice of the meeting of the Dermatologic and Ophthalmic... that a meeting of the Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee would be held on February 27...

  11. Ophthalmic Manifestations of Congenital Zika Syndrome in Colombia and Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yepez, Juan B; Murati, Felipe A; Pettito, Michele; Peñaranda, Carlos F; de Yepez, Jazmin; Maestre, Gladys; Arevalo, J Fernando

    2017-05-01

    The ocular manifestations and sequelae of Zika virus infection are not well known. Recently, the World Health Organization changed the declaration of Zika as a public health emergency and designated the viral outbreak and related microcephaly clusters as a long-term program of work. This change indicates the urgent need to evaluate and document ophthalmic manifestations in patients for timely management of this disease. In addition, confirmation whether the public health problem in Brazil extends to other regions in South America is needed. To report the ocular manifestations of congenital Zika syndrome with microcephaly in Colombia and Venezuela. This prospective case series included 43 patients from 2 ophthalmic centers in Colombia and Venezuela who underwent evaluation from October 1, 2015, through June 30, 2016, and were clinically diagnosed with congenital Zika syndrome. Twenty patients were Hispanic; 13, African; 8, white; and 2, Native American. Ophthalmic and systemic evaluations and serologic testing were performed on all infants. Patients underwent external ocular examination and dilated ophthalmoscopy. Serologic testing ruled out toxoplasmosis, rubella, cytomegalovirus, syphilis, and human immunodeficiency virus. Ophthalmic manifestations of congenital Zika syndrome. Of the 43 patients included in this series (28 female and 15 male), the mean (SD) age at examination was 2.1 (1.5) months. The mothers of all the children had no ophthalmic findings and did not report ocular symptoms during pregnancy. All patients had bilateral ophthalmic manifestations. Optic nerve findings included hypoplasia with the double-ring sign, pallor, and increased cup-disc ratio in 5 patients (11.6%). Macular abnormalities included mild to severe pigment mottling in 27 patients (63%) and lacunar maculopathy in 3 (6.9%). Chorioretinal scarring was present in 3 patients (7%). Eleven patients (26%) had a combination of lesions in the posterior pole. Five patients (12%) were

  12. Challenges Encountered Using Ophthalmic Anesthetics in Space Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayuse, T.; Law, J.; Alexander, D.; Moynihan, S.; LeBlanc, C.; Langford, K.; Magalhaes, L.

    2015-01-01

    On orbit, ophthalmic anesthetics are used for tonometry and off-nominal corneal examinations. Proparacaine has been flown traditionally. However, the manufacturers recently changed its storage requirements from room temperature storage to refrigerated storage to preserve stability and prolong the shelf-life. Since refrigeration on orbit is not readily available and there were stability concerns about flying proparacaine unrefrigerated, tetracaine was selected as an alternative ophthalmic anesthetic in 2013. We will discuss the challenges encountered flying and using these anesthetics on the International Space Station.

  13. Public Outreach Guerilla Style: Just Add Science to Existing Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelderman, Richard

    2016-01-01

    We report on a campaign to use the visual appeal of astronomy as a gateway drug to inject public outreach into settings where people aren't expecting an encounter with science. Our inspiration came from the team at guerillascience.org, who have earned a reputation for creating, at sites around the world, "experiences and events that are unexpected, thought-provoking, but, above all, that delight and entertain." Our goal is to insert astronomy into existing festivals of music, culture, and art; county and state fairs; sporting events; and local farmer's markets. With volunteers and near-zero budgets, we have been able to meaningfully engage with audience members who would never willingly attend an event advertised as science related. By purposefully relating astronomy to the non-science aspects of the event that caused the audience members to attend, new learning experiences are created that alter the often negative pre-conceived notions about science that many of them held before our encounter.

  14. 76 FR 62804 - Notice of FERC Staff Attendance at the Entergy Regional State Committee Work Group and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-11

    ... outreach efforts. Entergy Regional State Committee Work Group and Stakeholder Meeting October 19, 2011 (9 a... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of FERC Staff Attendance at the Entergy Regional State Committee Work Group and Stakeholder Meeting The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission hereby gives notice that...

  15. 77 FR 3765 - Notice of FERC Staff Attendance at the Entergy Regional State Committee Work Group and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-25

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of FERC Staff Attendance at the Entergy Regional State Committee Work Group and Stakeholder Meeting The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission hereby gives notice that members... outreach efforts. Entergy Regional State Committee Working Group and Stakeholders Meeting January 26,...

  16. 75 FR 41858 - Notice of FERC Staff Attendance at the Southwest Power Pool ICT Stakeholder Policy Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of FERC Staff Attendance at the Southwest Power Pool ICT Stakeholder... ongoing outreach efforts. ICT Stakeholder Policy Committee Meeting July 21, 2010 (1 p.m.-5 p.m.),...

  17. 76 FR 49764 - Notice of FERC Staff Attendance at the Entergy ICT Transmission Planning Summit and Entegry...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of FERC Staff Attendance at the Entergy ICT Transmission Planning... Commission's ongoing outreach efforts. Entergy ICT Transmission Planning Summit August 23, 2011 (8 a.m.-5...

  18. 76 FR 13613 - Notice of FERC Staff Attendance at the ICT Stakeholders Policy Committee and Entergy Regional...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of FERC Staff Attendance at the ICT Stakeholders Policy Committee and... the Commission's ongoing outreach efforts. ICT Stakeholder Policy Committee Meeting March 16, 2011...

  19. Tech transfer outreach. An informal proceedings of the first technology transfer/communications conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liebetrau, S. [ed.

    1992-10-01

    This document provides an informal summary of the conference workshop sessions. ``Tech Transfer Outreach!`` was originally designed as an opportunity for national laboratory communications and technology transfer staff to become better acquainted and to discuss matters of mutual interest. When DOE field office personnel asked if they could attend, and then when one of our keynote speakers became a participant in the discussions, the actual event grew in importance. The conference participants--the laboratories and DOE representatives from across the nation--worked to brainstorm ideas. Their objective: identify ways to cooperate for effective (and cost-effective) technology transfer outreach. Thus, this proceedings is truly a product of ten national laboratories and DOE, working together. It candidly presents the discussion of issues and the ideas generated by each working group. The issues and recommendations are a consensus of their views.

  20. Astrobiology outreach and the nature of science: the role of creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fergusson, Jennifer; Oliver, Carol; Walter, Malcolm R

    2012-12-01

    There is concern in many developed countries that school students are turning away from science. However, students may be choosing not to study science and dismissing the possibility of a scientific career because, in the junior secondary years, they gain a false view of science and the work of scientists. There is a disparity between science as it is portrayed at school and science as it is practiced. This paper describes a study to explore whether engaging in science through astrobiology outreach activities may improve students' understanding of the nature and processes of science, and how this may influence their interest in a career in science. The results suggest that the students attending these Mars research-related outreach activities are more interested in science than the average student but are lacking in understanding of aspects of the nature of science. A significant difference was detected between pre- and posttest understandings of some concepts of the nature of science.

  1. Team LunaCY Outreach Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heise, James; Hull, Bethanne J.

    2012-01-01

    Iowa State University's Lunabotics Club, Team LunaCY, has worked hard to generate enthusiasm for robotics, engineering, and lunar activities. Team LunaCY participated in a variety of different outreach events making a strong impression on Iowa youth. These events led the chair of the mechanical engineering department, Dr. Ted Heindel, to refer to the club's outreach program as "the model that all other engineering clubs should follow." Team LunaCY's outreach activities totaled over 200 hours and captivated over 3000 students and adults throughout the course of this acaden1ic year, reaching out to people all over Iowa and to several special guests. These guests included Vice-President Joe Biden, during a visit to Iowa State University in March 2012, and astronaut Clayton Anderson, during a visit to Iowa State's campus in the fall 2011. Team LunaCY's outreach events created hands on learning opportunities for local youth ranging in age from elementary school children to high school students. The team strove to make a positive impression on Iowa youth and to encourage interest and involvement in scientific fields. The full list of events is shown in Table 1. Three of the major outreach events the team participated in were the FIRST LEGO League, Science Bound, and iExplore STEM Festival.

  2. 21 CFR 524.390a - Chloramphenicol ophthalmic ointment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS OPHTHALMIC AND TOPICAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS... conjunctivitis, attempts should be made to determine through susceptibility testing, which antibiotics will be... animals producing meat, eggs, or milk. The length of time that residues persist in milk or tissues has...

  3. 21 CFR 524.390b - Chloramphenicol ophthalmic solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS OPHTHALMIC AND TOPICAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS...) Limitations. Therapy for cats should not exceed 7 days. As with other antibiotics, prolonged use may result in... animals. The length of time that residues persist in milk or tissues has not been determined. Federal...

  4. Intraorbital ophthalmic artery aneurysm associated with basilar tip saccular aneurysm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehdashti, A.R.; Tribolet, N. de [Department of Neurosurgery, HUG, Geneva (Switzerland); Safran, A.B. [Department of Ophthalmology, HUG, Geneva (Switzerland); Martin, J.B.; Ruefenacht, D.A. [Division of Neuroradiology, HUG, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2002-07-01

    We present a rare case of intraorbital ophthalmic artery aneurysm found incidentally, together with a ruptured aneurysm of the tip of the basilar artery. The intraorbital aneurysm was asymptomatic, and no treatment was offered. Angiographic control was recommended to detect any progression. Treatment may be indicated for documented enlargement or significant mass effect of the aneurysm. (orig.)

  5. 21 CFR 524.1982 - Proparacaine hydrochloride ophthalmic solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Proparacaine hydrochloride ophthalmic solution. 524.1982 Section 524.1982 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... longterm toxicity of proparacaine is unknown. Prolonged use may possibly delay wound healing. (d...

  6. 21 CFR 886.3100 - Ophthalmic tantalum clip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ophthalmic tantalum clip. 886.3100 Section 886.3100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... or temporarily to bring together the edges of a wound to aid healing or prevent bleeding from small...

  7. Exposure Limits in Ophthalmic Imaging with Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roque, S.S.L.T.; Bicho, S.A.A. [IBILI-Biomedical Institute for Research on Light and Image, Faculty of Medicine, University of Coimbra, Azinhaga de Santa Comba, Celas 3000-354 Coimbra (Portugal); Morgado, A.M.L.S. [IBILI-Biomedical Institute for Research on Light and Image, Faculty of Medicine, University of Coimbra, Azinhaga de Santa Comba, Celas 3000-354 Coimbra (Portugal); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Coimbra, Rua Larga da Universidade, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal)

    2009-05-15

    We present an analysis of the exposure to laser radiation resulting from the use of scanning laser ophthalmoscopes in ophthalmic imaging of the ocular fundus. Exposures limits are determined, based on the IEC/EN 60825-1 standard. These limits are applied on the safety analysis of a commercial scanning laser ophthalmoscope. (author)

  8. Numerical implementation of generalized Coddington equations for ophthalmic lens design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojo, P.; Royo, S.; Ramírez, J.; Madariaga, I.

    2014-02-01

    A method for general implementation in any software platform of the generalized Coddington equations is presented, developed, and validated within a Matlab environment. The ophthalmic lens design strategy is presented thoroughly, and the basic concepts of generalized ray tracing are introduced. The methodology for ray tracing is shown to include two inter-related processes. Firstly, finite ray tracing is used to provide the main direction of propagation of the considered ray at the incidence point of interest. Afterwards, generalized ray tracing provides the principal curvatures of the local wavefront at that point, and its orientation after being refracted by the lens. The curvature values of the local wavefront are interpreted as the sagital and tangential powers of the lens at the point of interest. The proposed approach is validated using a double-check of the calculated lens performance in the spherical lens case: while finite ray tracing is validated using a commercial ray tracing software, generalized ray tracing is validated using a software application for ophthalmic lens design based on the classical version of Coddington equations. Equations of the complete tracing process are developed in detail for the case of generic astigmatic ophthalmic lenses as an example. Three-dimensional representation of the sagital and tangential powers of the ophthalmic lens at all directions of gaze then becomes possible, and results are presented for lenses with different geometries.

  9. Engage: The Science Speaker Series - A novel approach to improving science outreach and communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, R.; Hilton, E.; Rosenfield, P.

    2012-12-01

    Communicating the results and significance of basic research to the general public is of critical importance. Federal funding and university budgets are under substantial pressure, and taxpayer support of basic research is critical. Public outreach by ecologists is an important vehicle for increasing support and understanding of science in an era of anthropogenic global change. At present, very few programs or courses exist to allow young scientists the opportunity to hone and practice their public outreach skills. Although the need for science outreach and communication is recognized, graduate programs often fail to provide any training in making science accessible. Engage: The Science Speaker Series represents a unique, graduate student-led effort to improve public outreach skills. Founded in 2009, Engage was created by three science graduate students at the University of Washington. The students developed a novel, interdisciplinary curriculum to investigate why science outreach often fails, to improve graduate student communication skills, and to help students create a dynamic, public-friendly talk. The course incorporates elements of story-telling, improvisational arts, and development of analogy, all with a focus on clarity, brevity and accessibility. This course was offered to graduate students and post-doctoral researchers from a wide variety of sciences in the autumn of 2010 and 2011, and will be retaught in 2012. Students who participated in the Engage course were then given the opportunity to participate in Engage: The Science Speaker Series. This free, public-friendly speaker series has been hosted at the University of Washington campus and Seattle Town Hall, and has had substantial public attendance and participation. The growing success of Engage illustrates the need for such programs throughout graduate level science curricula. We present the impetus for the development of the program, elements of the curriculum covered in the Engage course, the

  10. CALCULATION AND RESEARCH OF CONTACT OPHTHALMIC DUAL APPLICATION LENSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. N. Cherkasova

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Subject of research. Algorithm for calculation of contact ophthalmic lenses for dual application has been suggested based on unified approach for their calculation. The algorithm has been tested on the composition of Goldmann ophthalmic lenses and Panfundoscope lens optical systems. Method. The condition of mutual unambiguous orientation of patient’s eye and instruments is performed at the initial calculation step by face mounting and movement of coordinate table with optical head. Then such type of patient's eye optical system model is selected that the lens would be combined with the front surface of eye cornea optical system. Pupil of patient eye is under anesthesia. At the final calculation step we determine the functions of optical lens image quality and their values based on medical and technical requirements for the components of the complex system. Main results. The algorithm for ophthalmic lenses calculation has been suggested and its correctness has been proved practically on the example of two basic models in the group of such type lenses being applied in practice as a part of complex system with ophthalmic laser coagulators. Optical calculation of Goldmann ophthalmic contact lenses and Panfundoscope is presented. The method of neutralization is optimal for Goldmann lenses. The first component in Panfundoscope operates the position of object planes whereas the second component operates the position of complex system with ophthalmocoagulator's pupils. Computer modeling of complex system "Computer model of eye-ophthalmic lens" in ZEMAX confirmed the correctness of calculation algorithm in which the criteria of diffraction image quality has been used. Application possibility of simplified computer eye model called "Reduced eye" by Verbitskiy has been demonstrated. Practical relevance. The general scientific approach to the problem of synthesis, calculation and research of complex system with contact ophthalmic lenses for diagnostics

  11. Peri-operative management of ophthalmic patients taking antithrombotic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lip, G Y H; Durrani, O M; Roldan, V; Lip, P L; Marin, F; Reuser, T Q

    2011-03-01

    Increasing number of patients presenting for ophthalmic surgery are using oral anti-coagulant and anti-platelet therapy. The current practice of discontinuing these drugs preoperatively because of a presumed increased risk of bleeding may not be evidence-based and could pose a significant risk to the patient's health. To provide an evidence-based review on the peri-operative management of ophthalmic patients who are taking anti-thrombotic therapy. In addition, we briefly discuss the underlying conditions that necessitate the use of these drugs as well as management of the operative field in anti-coagulated patients. A semi-systematic review of literature was performed. The databases searched included MEDLINE, EMBASE, database of abstracts of reviews of effects (DARE), Cochrane controlled trial register and Cochrane systematic reviews. In addition, the bibliographies of the included papers were also scanned for evidence. The published data suggests that aspirin did not appear to increase the risk of serious postoperative bleeding in any type of ophthalmic surgery. Topical, sub-tenon, peri-bulbar and retrobulbar anaesthesia appear to be safe in patients on anti-thrombotic (warfarin and aspirin) therapy. Warfarin does not increase the risk of significant bleeding in most types of ophthalmic surgery when the INR was within the therapeutic range. Current evidence supports the continued use of aspirin and with some exceptions, warfarin in the peri-operative period. The risk of thrombosis-related complications on disruption of anticoagulation may be higher than the risk of significant bleeding by continuing its use for most types of ophthalmic surgery.

  12. The York College observatory outreach program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglione, T.; Spergel, M.

    The primary mission of the York College Observatory Outreach Program is to im- prove minority participation in space science and space science education. We aim to achieve this goal by developing an urban observatory in central Queens: the York Col- lege Observatory (YCO). We concentrate our efforts in three main areas: academics, outreach and research. Academically, we utilize astronomy?s popular appeal to at- tract and retain students and to enhance existing science courses. We have also created a minor in Astronomy at York College, and are active members of the New York City Space Science Research Alliance, which has developed a City University major in Space Science. Our outreach efforts aim to increase the awareness of the general public through workshops for high school teachers, curriculum development for high schools and public open nights at the YCO. Our research program utilizes the radio and optical capabilities of the YCO and collaborations with other institutions.

  13. Utah's Mobile Earth Science Outreach Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoessow, F. S.; Christian, L.

    2016-12-01

    Students at Utah State University's College of Natural Resources have engineered the first mobile Earth Science outreach platform capable of delivering high-tech and interactive solar-powered educational resources to the traditionally-underserved, remote communities of rural Utah. By retrofitting and modifying an industrial box-truck, this project effectively created a highly mobile and energy independent "school in a box" which seeks to help change the way that Earth science is communicated, eliminate traditional barriers, and increase science accessibility - both physically and conceptually. The project's education platform is focused on developing a more effective, sustainable, and engaging platform for presenting Earth science outreach curricula to community members of all ages in an engaging fashion. Furthermore, this project affords university students the opportunity to demonstrate innovative science communication techniques, translating vital university research into educational outreach operations aimed at doing real, measurable good for local communities.

  14. Library outreach: addressing Utah's "Digital Divide".

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloskey, K M

    2000-10-01

    A "Digital Divide" in information and technological literacy exists in Utah between small hospitals and clinics in rural areas and the larger health care institutions in the major urban area of the state. The goals of the outreach program of the Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library at the University of Utah address solutions to this disparity in partnership with the National Network of Libraries of Medicine-- Midcontinental Region, the Utah Department of Health, and the Utah Area Health Education Centers. In a circuit-rider approach, an outreach librarian offers classes and demonstrations throughout the state that teach information-access skills to health professionals. Provision of traditional library services to unaffiliated health professionals is integrated into the library's daily workload as a component of the outreach program. The paper describes the history, methodology, administration, funding, impact, and results of the program.

  15. The Rocks From Space outreach initiative and The Space Safari: the development of virtual learning environments for planetary science outreach in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, V. K.; Greenwood, R. C.; Bridges, J.; Watson, J.; Brooks, V.

    activities using Elluminate Live! facilities where students could attend "drop-in" sessions with scientists to discuss their exploration. Following these activities, schools were asked to produce a collaborative piece of work about their exploration that could be hosted on the Rocks From Space website (www.rocksfromspace.open.ac.uk; designed by Milton Keynes HE college students) as a resource for future projects and wider public access. Submissions included powerpoint presentations, animations, poems and murals and illustrates the cross curriculum nature of this project. We present the outcomes and evaluation of this pilot study with recommendations for the future use of VLEs in planetary science outreach.

  16. 75 FR 30364 - Information Collection; Outreach Opportunity Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Information Collection; Outreach Opportunity Questionnaire AGENCY... Opportunity Questionnaire. DATES: Comments must be received in writing on or before August 2, 2010 to be... Friday. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Outreach Opportunity Questionnaire. OMB Number:...

  17. NASA's Astrophysics Education and Public Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Hashima

    2011-05-01

    NASA conducts a balanced Astrophysics Education and Public Outreach program over K-12, higher education, informal education and public outreach, with the goal of taking excitement of NASA's scientific discoveries to the public, and generating interest in students in the area of Science, Technology, Education and Mathematics (STEM). Examples of classroom material, innovative research programs for teachers and students, collaborative programs with libraries, museums and planetaria, and programs for special needs individuals are presented. Information is provided on the competitive opportunities provided by NASA for participation in Astrophysics educational programs.

  18. Cost-effective strategies for rural community outreach, Hawaii, 2010-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrin, Karen L; Barbato, Anna; Holuby, R Scott; Ciarleglio, Anita E; Taniguchi, Ronald

    2014-12-11

    Three strategies designed to maximize attendance at educational sessions on chronic disease medication safety in older adults in rural areas were implemented sequentially and compared for cost-effectiveness: 1) existing community groups and events, 2) formal advertisement, and 3) employer-based outreach. Cost-effectiveness was measured by comparing overall cost per attendee recruited and number of attendees per event. The overall cost per attendee was substantially higher for the formal advertising strategy, which produced the lowest number of attendees per event. Leveraging existing community events and employers in rural areas was more cost-effective than formal advertisement for recruiting rural community members.

  19. Fort Lee's Comprehensive Peer Outreach Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehayan, V. Alex

    This paper describes the Peer Outreach Service Team (POST), a peer multi-service, student support system organization operating in the Fort Lee schools in Fort Lee, New Jersey. The goals of the POST program are described as reducing numbers of school dropouts as well as levels of negative behavior, chemical dependency, teenage depression, and…

  20. How Astronomers View Education and Public Outreach

    CERN Document Server

    Dang, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Over the past few years, there have been a few studies on the development of an interest in science and scientists' views on public outreach. Yet, to date, there has been no global study regarding astronomers' views on these matters. Through the completion of our survey by 155 professional astronomers online and in person during the 28th International Astronomical Union General Assembly in 2012, we explored their development of and an interest for astronomy and their views on time constraints and budget restriction regarding public outreach activities. We find that astronomers develop an interest in astronomy between the ages of 4-6 but that the decision to undertake a career in astronomy often comes during late adolescence. We also discuss the claim that education and public outreach is regarded an optional task rather than a scientist's duty. Our study revealed that many astronomers think there should be a larger percentage of their research that should be invested into outreach activities, calling for a ch...

  1. Evaluation of Harmful Algal Bloom Outreach Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Weisman

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available With an apparent increase of harmful algal blooms (HABs worldwide,healthcare providers, public health personnel and coastal managers are struggling toprovide scientifically-based appropriately-targeted HAB outreach and education. Since1998, the Florida Poison Information Center-Miami, with its 24 hour/365 day/year freeAquatic Toxins Hotline (1-888-232-8635 available in several languages, has received over 25,000 HAB-related calls. As part of HAB surveillance, all possible cases of HAB-relatedillness among callers are reported to the Florida Health Department. This pilot studyevaluated an automated call processing menu system that allows callers to access bilingualHAB information, and to speak directly with a trained Poison Information Specialist. Themajority (68% of callers reported satisfaction with the information, and many provided specific suggestions for improvement. This pilot study, the first known evaluation of use and satisfaction with HAB educational outreach materials, demonstrated that the automated system provided useful HAB-related information for the majority of callers, and decreased the routine informational call workload for the Poison Information Specialists, allowing them to focus on callers needing immediate assistance and their healthcare providers. These results will lead to improvement of this valuable HAB outreach, education and surveillance tool. Formal evaluation is recommended for future HAB outreach and educational materials.

  2. 7 CFR 1470.5 - Outreach activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Outreach activities. 1470.5 Section 1470.5 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT... farmers or ranchers, limited resource producers, and socially disadvantaged farmers or ranchers,...

  3. Satellite power system (SPS) public outreach experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNeal, S.R.

    1980-12-01

    To improve the results of the Satellite Power System (SPS) Concept Development and Evaluation Program, an outreach experiment was conducted. Three public interest groups participated: the L-5 Society (L-5), Citizen's Energy Project (CEP), and the Forum for the Advancement of Students in Science and Technology (FASST). Each group disseminated summary information about SPS to approximately 3000 constituents with a request for feedback on the SPS concept. The objectives of the outreach were to (1) determine the areas of major concern relative to the SPS concept, and (2) gain experience with an outreach process for use in future public involvement. Due to the combined efforts of all three groups, 9200 individuals/organizations received information about the SPS concept. Over 1500 receipients of this information provided feedback. The response to the outreach effort was positive for all three groups, suggesting that the effort extended by the SPS Project Division to encourage an information exchange with the public was well received. The general response to the SPS differed with each group. The L-5 position is very much in favor of SPS; CEP is very much opposed and FASST is relatively neutral. The responses are analyzed, and from the responses some questions and answers about the satellite power system are presented in the appendix. (WHK)

  4. Wind Energy Stakeholder Outreach and Education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bob Lawrence; Craig Cox; Jodi Hamrick; DOE Contact - Keith Bennett

    2006-07-27

    Since August of 2001, Bob Lawrence and Associates, Inc. (BL&A) has applied its outreach and support services to lead a highly effective work effort on behalf of Wind Powering America (WPA). In recent years, the company has generated informative brochures and posters, researched and created case studies, and provided technical support to key wind program managers. BL&A has also analyzed Lamar, Colorado’s 162MW wind project and developed a highly regarded 'wind supply chain' report and outreach presentation. BL&A’s efforts were then replicated to characterize similar supply chain presentations in New Mexico and Illinois. Note that during the period of this contract, the recipient met with members of the DOE Wind Program a number of times to obtain specific guidance on tasks that needed to be pursued on behalf of this grant. Thus, as the project developed over the course of 5 years, the recipient varied the tasks and emphasis on tasks to comply with the on-going and continuously developing requirements of the Wind Powering America Program. This report provides only a brief summary of activities to illustrate the recipient's work for advancing wind energy education and outreach from 2001 through the end of the contract period in 2006. It provides examples of how the recipient and DOE leveraged the available funding to provide educational and outreach work to a wide range of stakeholder communities.

  5. Librarians as Community Partners: An Outreach Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Carol, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    Including 66 focused snapshots of outreach in action, this resource reflects the creative solutions of librarians searching for new and innovative ways to build programs that meet customer needs while expanding the library's scope into the community. This contributed volume includes: (1) A huge array of program options for partnering with other…

  6. Introducing Extension/Outreach Education in Tajikistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Julie A.; Prochaska-Cue, Kathleen; Rockwell, S. Kay; Pulatov, Pulat A.

    2010-01-01

    University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) and Khujand branch of the Technological University of Tajikistan (KbTUT) collaborated on the development of an Extension/outreach program in Tajikistan. Fifteen KbTUT administrators, faculty, and students from textiles, food science, and management engaged in training sessions at UNL on entrepreneurship, adult…

  7. Education and Outreach in Particle Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Barnett, R Michael

    2011-01-01

    There are many varied programs of education and outreach in particle physics. This report for the Division of Particles and Fields of the American Physical Society 2001 meeting reviews the impact of these programs in general, and also gives several examples of ongoing programs with a primary focus on those in the US.

  8. A Framework for Outreach Evaluation Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raven, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Much importance is now placed upon the evaluation of outreach interventions by higher education institutions (HEIs). Accompanying this focus are requests that HEIs prepare evaluation plans. Yet, whilst some now have plans in place, others do not. One of the challenges for those preparing such documents is that official guidance is not prescriptive…

  9. Fidget Blankets: A Sensory Stimulation Outreach Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroustos, Kelly Reilly; Trautwein, Heidi; Kerns, Rachel; Sobota, Kristen Finley

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD) include behaviors such as aberrant motor behavior, agitation, anxiety, apathy, delusions, depression, disinhibition, elation, hallucinations, irritability, and sleep or appetite changes. A student-led project to provide sensory stimulation in the form of "fidget blankets" developed into a community outreach program. The goal was to decrease the use of antipsychotics used for BPSD.

  10. Outreach to Future Hispanic Educational Leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafin, Ana Gil

    This paper discusses issues related to the recruitment of Hispanic-American educational leaders, focusing on the El Centro de Recursos Educativos outreach center at Northeastern Illinois University in Chicago, which began operation in Fall 1997. It examines the characteristics of successful programs for Hispanic recruitment and retention and the…

  11. Ophthalmic surgical training in Karnataka and Southern India: Present status and future interests from a survey of final-year residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Settings and Design: This study documents a survey of final-year ophthalmology postgraduates on the subject of their surgical training and their future plans after residency. Purpose: This survey aimed to answer the question, "What is the present status of surgical training in ophthalmic training centers?" by obtaining information from students about (1 various methods used in surgical training (2 numbers and types of surgeries performed by them in the training centers (3 their plans after residency. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire containing 21 questions was distributed to 155 students attending an intensive 4-day teaching program. The questions related to orientation training, wet lab training, facilities for training, free surgical camps and detailed information about numbers and types of surgeries observed and performed. Completed questionnaires were collected, and responses analyzed. Results: One hundred and seven completed responses were analyzed. The majority had not received formal orientation training. More than half had undergone wet lab training. Most residents performed their first ophthalmic surgery during the 1 st year of residency and went to the operation theatre multiple times a week. Most of the students planned to undergo further training after residency. More than half of the students found their surgical training to be fair or satisfactory. Conclusions: The number and frequency of ophthalmic surgeries done by residents appear satisfactory, but further efforts from trainers on enhancing the quality and range of surgical training would benefit students and improve their satisfaction.

  12. Traditional birth attendants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leedam, E

    1985-09-01

    In many countries 60-80% of deliveries are assisted by traditional birth attendants (TBAs). Over the last several decades efforts have been made to regulate, upgrade through training or replace the TBA. The strength of the TBA stems from the fact that she is part of the cultural and social life of the community in which she lives. Her weakness lies in the traditional practices which may have dangers for her clients. With suitable training and supervision these dangers can be minimized and her potential used to improve the health of mothers and babies. Increasingly countries are recognizing that the TBA will represent a major resource where women do not have access to services for either cultural or geographic barriers. The effective use of this resource will require an understanding and appreciation of the TBA's role and contribution by all health authorities, flexibility in the development of training programs and the co-operation of the TBAs themselves.

  13. Outreach and Education with Europlanet 2020 RI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heward, Anita R.; Barrosa, Mariana; Europlanet 2020 RI

    2016-10-01

    Since 2005, Europlanet has provided a framework to bring together Europe's widespread planetary science community. The project has evolved through a number of phases, and currently comprises a Research Infrastructure (RI) funded through the European Commission's Horizon 2020 program, as well as a self-sustaining membership organization. Launched in September 2015, Europlanet 2020 RI provides support, services, access to facilities, new research tools and a virtual planetary observatory. Europlanet 2020 RI's outreach and education program aims to engage members of the public, schools, teachers, policy makers and industrial partners across Europe with planetary science and the opportunities that it provides for innovation, inspiration and job creation. Europlanet's outreach and education activities are led by Science Office Ltd, a Portuguese-based SME, and a network of partners spread across nine countries including University College London, the University of Leiden, University of Latvia, Vilnius University, the Institute of Accelerating Systems and Applications, the Observatoire de Paris, CAB-INTA and the Austrian Space Forum.Europlanet supports educators and outreach providers within the planetary science community by organizing meetings, best practice workshops and communication training sessions, offering a seed-funding scheme for outreach activities, and awarding an annual prize for public engagement. Europlanet is also developing its own education and outreach resources, including an animation on 'Jupiter and its Icy Moons' (the first in a series of video "shorts") and kits for hands-on comparative planetology activities. The Europlanet Media Centre uses traditional and social media channels to communicate newsworthy results and activities to diverse audiences in Europe and worldwide. Using tools like Google Hangouts, the project connects planetary researchers directly with the public and school groups. In addition, Europlanet engages with policy makers in the

  14. Video recording of ophthalmic surgery--ethical and legal considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Andrew M J; Emsley, Elizabeth S

    2014-01-01

    Video documenting is increasingly used in ophthalmic training and research, with many ophthalmologists routinely recording their surgical cases. Although this modality represents an excellent means of improving technique and advancing knowledge, there are major ethical and legal considerations with its use. Informed consent to record is required in most situations. Patients should be advised of any risk of identification and the purpose of the recording. Systems should be in place to deal with issues such as data storage, withdrawal of consent, and patients requesting copies of their recording. Privacy and security of neither patients nor health care professionals should be compromised. Ownership and distribution of video recordings, the potential for their use in medical litigation, the ethics and legality of editing and the impact on surgeon performance are other factors to consider. Although video recording of ophthalmic surgery is useful and technically simple to accomplish, patient safety and welfare must always remain paramount. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Fluorometholone acetate. A new ophthalmic derivative of fluorometholone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupferman, A; Berrospi, A R; Leibowitz, H M

    1982-04-01

    Hourly topical administration of 0.1% fluorometholone acetate ophthalmic suspension produced, on the average, a 47% reduction in the polymorphonuclear leukocytes invading the cornea during an experimentally induced inflammatory keratitis. This is a significantly greater anti-inflammatory effect than we have previously reported for the alcohol derivative of fluorometholone and is not significantly different from the therapeutic effect of 1.0% prednisolone acetate ophthalmic suspension, the most effective corneal anti-inflammatory agent that we have studied to date. Fluorometholone acetate (0.1%) formulated as a high-viscosity carbomer gel and applied at three-hour intervals reduced invading leukocytes in the cornea an average of 48%, an effect not significantly different from hourly administration of the suspension.

  16. Blindness resulting from orbital complications of ophthalmic zoster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosnowska, Magdalena; Zajkowska, Agata; Garkowski, Adam; Czupryna, Piotr; Pancewicz, Sławomir; Zajkowska, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Herpes zoster ophthalmicus occurs when the latent varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivates in the trigeminal ganglion and ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve. In the elderly, there is a sharp increase in the tendency of secondary skin bacterial infections occurrence due to the deterioration of capabilities of self-care and changed sanitation. We present a case of patient who developed phlegmon of the orbit, which resulted with complete unilateral blindness. Varicella zoster virus infection in the elderly may have a severe course due to the progressive weakening of the immune system related to the age. Moreover, skin lesions around the eye socket require special care in prevention of bacterial superinfections due to the extremely high risk of life-threatening complications or disability. Neuralgia resistant to pharmacological treatment present in the course of ophthalmic zoster and difficulty in caring about skin lesions predispose to the occurrence of complications. PMID:26759550

  17. Development of Absorbable, Antibiotic-Eluting Sutures for Ophthalmic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwabuchi, Fabiana; Parikh, Kunal S.; Omiadze, Revaz; Zhang, Shuming; Luo, Lixia; Patel, Himatkumar V.; Xu, Qingguo; Ensign, Laura M.; Mao, Hai-Quan; Hanes, Justin; McDonnell, Peter J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To develop and evaluate an antibiotic-eluting suture for ophthalmic surgery. Methods Wet electrospinning was used to manufacture sutures composed of poly(L-lactide), polyethylene glycol (PEG), and levofloxacin. Size, morphology, and mechanical strength were evaluated via scanning electron microscopy and tensile strength, respectively. In vitro drug release was quantified using high performance liquid chromatography. In vitro suture activity against Staphylococcus epidermidis was investigated through bacterial inhibition studies. Biocompatibility was determined via histological analysis of tissue sections surrounding sutures implanted into Sprague-Dawley rat corneas. Results Sutures manufactured via wet electrospinning were 45.1 ± 7.7 μm in diameter and 0.099 ± 0.007 newtons (N) in breaking strength. The antibiotic release profile demonstrated a burst followed by sustained release for greater than 60 days. Increasing PEG in the polymer formulation, from 1% to 4% by weight, improved drug release without negatively affecting tensile strength. Sutures maintained a bacterial zone of inhibition for at least 1 week in vitro and elicited an in vivo tissue reaction comparable to a nylon suture. Conclusions There is a need for local, postoperative delivery of antibiotics following ophthalmic procedures. Wet electrospinning provides a suitable platform for the development of sutures that meet size requirements for ophthalmic surgery and are capable of sustained drug release; however, tensile strength must be improved prior to clinical use. Translational Relevance No antibiotic-eluting suture exists for ophthalmic surgery. A biocompatible, high strength suture capable of sustained antibiotic release could prevent ocular infection and preclude compliance issues with topical eye drops. PMID:28083445

  18. A Case of Hydranencephaly in Which Ophthalmic Examinations Were Performed

    OpenAIRE

    Shohei Eda; Tomoko Terai; Yuko Nishikawa; Masahiro Tonari; Teruyo Kida; Hidehiro Oku; Jun Sugasawa; Shuichi Shimakawa; Masashi  Hasegawa; Tohru Ogihara; Tsunehiko Ikeda

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We performed ophthalmic examinations, including optical coherence tomography (OCT), on a case diagnosed with hydranencephaly. Case Report: This case involved a female infant born at the gestational age of 35 weeks and 4 days, with the birth weight of 2,152 g, who was one of monochorionic diamniotic twins, and the identical twin died in utero at the gestational age of 24 weeks. After that, examination by fetal echo indicated that she had microcephaly and ventriculomegaly. Postnatal ma...

  19. Gradient-index ophthalmic lens design and polymer material studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, David Joel

    Unifocal ophthalmic lenses are conventionally designed using homogeneous glass or plastic materials and aspheric surfaces. The desired power and aberration correction are provided by selection of surface shape and refractive index. This thesis studies the design of ophthalmic lenses utilizing gradient-index (GRIN) materials for both the optical power and aberration control. This is done using geometrical optical theory and ray-tracing simulations. Progressive addition lenses (PALS) are vision correction lenses with a continuous change in power used to treat presbyopia. The power variation is typically located in the lower half of the lens. Progressive addition lenses are currently made with aspheric surfaces to achieve the focal power transition and aberration control. These surfaces have at most, mirror symmetry about the vertical axis. The possible design of progressive addition lenses with GRIN materials has not been well studied. This thesis studies PALS and identifies how gradient-index materials can be used to provide both the power progression and aberration control. The optical theory for rotationally symmetric and asymmetric power additions is given. Analytical and numerical methods for calculating the index profile are used, and the results examined using ray-tracing simulations. The theory developed for ophthalmic lenses is applied to the design of GRIN axicon. This is the first GRIN axicon manufactured, and is fabricated using ion-exchanged GRIN glass. Experimental measurements of its performance are compared and found to match theoretical predictions. This demonstrates the generality of the theory developed: it may be applied to non-visual applications, and even to non-imaging applications. Realistic implementation of GRIN technology to ophthalmic application requires the fabrication of large scale refractive index gradients in polymer material systems. The methyl-methacrylate/styrene copolymer system is studied to develop an empirical model of its

  20. OPHTHALMIC FINDINGS IN LATE STAGE SJOGREN-LARSSON SYNDROME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Tavish; Kovach, Jaclyn L

    2017-03-15

    To report spectral domain optical coherence tomography and fundus autofluorescence documentation of late stage macular findings associated with Sjogren-Larsson Syndrome in three adult siblings. Three adult siblings with Sjogren-Larsson Syndrome underwent ophthalmic examination and imaging. Crystalline maculopathy and subretinal deposits, presumably lipofuscin accumulation, with macular atrophy were present in varying degrees in all three adult siblings. In adults with Sjogren-Larsson Syndrome, crystalline retinopathy can progress to macular atrophy and the appearance of lipofuscin accumulation.

  1. Numerical implementation of generalized Coddington equations for ophthalmic lens design

    OpenAIRE

    Rojo Badenas, Pilar; Royo Royo, Santiago; RAMÍREZ,JORGE; Madariaga, Inés

    2014-01-01

    A method for general implementation in any software platform of the generalized Coddington equations is presented, developed, and validated within a Matlab environment. The ophthalmic lens design strategy is presented thoroughly, and the basic concepts of generalized ray tracing are introduced. The methodology for ray tracing is shown to include two inter-related processes. Firstly, finite ray tracing is used to provide the main direction of propagation of the considered ray at the incidence ...

  2. [Bibliometric analysis of the current international ophthalmic publications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohba, Norio

    2005-03-01

    To assess the current status of international ophthalmic publications. A collection of 55,591 original articles were found by an on-line National Library of Medicine database Medline search for 32 international ophthalmic journals during a 15-year period from 1988 to 2002 (internet access, November 11-13, 2003). The contributions to international ophthalmic publications were by 49.5% from North America, 31.3% from Western Europe, 15.1% from Asia and Oceania, 2.2% from Middle East, 0.85% from Central and South America, 0.53% from Eastern Europe, and 0.47% from Africa. Countries of Asia and Oceania showed an increasing trend in contributions while North America had a decreasing productivity in a relative sense. The top 10 productive countries were USA, United Kingdom, Japan, Germany, Canada, Australia, Italy, Netherlands, Sweden, and France. Among the Asian countries India ranked 13th, China 18th, and Korea 21st. When related to population, small countries such as Israel, France, Finland, Sweden, and Denmark were more productive. When related to economic productivity as defined by GDP, Israel, the United Kingdom, Australia, Finland, and Sweden were among the most productive countries, whereas rich countries such as Japan and Germany had a lower number of publications relative to their GDP. As regards clinical research in terms of randomized controlled trials, The USA was by far the most productive. The number of authors per article has shown an increasing trend worldwide, so that Japan and France had a significantly larger proportion of multiauthored articles. There is an increasing trend in the productivity of international ophthalmic publications from non-English-speaking countries including Japan, China, and Korea.

  3. Ophthalmic Morbidity in School Children in Hilly Areas of Uttarakhand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surekha Kishore

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: School children constitute about one fourth of population of India. Early detection and treatment of various eye diseases helps in avoiding many complications. The magnitude of blindness is 3-4 times greater in developing countries. Very few studies have been conducted in Uttarakhand revealing the ophthalmic morbidity in school children or general population. Hilly areas especially the remote ones face various problems like, poor transportation facilities, distant health facilities, use of traditional methods for treatment, faith healing, customs and belief system, lack of information.  Moreover   water supply, poor personal hygiene and other factors also add up to these problems. Aim: To study the ophthalmic morbidities in school children in 3 schools of Thatyur block. Methodology: It was a cross sectional study. Result: A total of 705 students were enrolled. Permission from school authorities was seeked before the start of study. Schools were visited twice in a week current and preliminary information was taken from the students & teacher regarding education, occupation, income etc. General examination and ophthalmic examination was done with day & torch light along with refraction, with the help of standard Snellen’s chart. Each eye was examined separately. A vision of 6/6 was considered as normal. Near vision was tested with new vision Snellen’s chart at 12-14 inches away from eye.

  4. Effects of viscoelastic ophthalmic solutions on cell cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhavan Hajib

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of mild but significant inflammation probably attributable to viscoelastic ophthalmic solutions in cataract surgery was recently brought to the notice of the authors, and hence a study of the effects of these solutions available in India, on cell cultures was undertaken. We studied the effects of 6 viscoelastic ophthalmic solutions (2 sodium hyaluronate designated as A and B, and 4 hydroxypropylmethylcellulose designated as C, D, E and F on HeLa, Vero and BHK-21 cell lines in tissue culture microtitre plates using undiluted, 1:10 and 1:100 dilutions of the solutions, and in cover slip cultures using undiluted solutions. Phase contrast microscopic examination of the solutions was also done to determine the presence of floating particles. The products D and F produced cytotoxic changes in HeLa cell line and these products also showed the presence of floating particles under phase contrast microscopy. Other products did not have any adverse effects on the cell lines nor did they show floating particles. The viscoelastic ophthalmic pharmaceutical products designated D and F have cytotoxic effects on HeLa cell line which appears to be a useful cell line for testing these products for their toxicity. The presence of particulate materials in products D and F indicates that the methods used for purification of the solution are not effective.

  5. Testing the long term stability of vancomycin ophthalmic solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, Christine; Ngo, Van; Pasedis, Sophia; Dohlman, Claes H

    2008-01-01

    Some patients with a keratoprosthesis (artificial cornea) are required to use prophylactic vancomycin ophthalmic solution daily for life to prevent infection, a regimen which has proven to be highly successful. The objective of this study was to determine whether such vancomycin solutions would remain stable at room temperature for an extended period of time, beyond that suggested by available published stability data and used in current practice. By relaxing the storage requirement and extending the expiration date of this solution, it was hoped that patient adherence and satisfaction would increase. The studied vancomycin ophthalmic solutions were compounded at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Department of Pharmacy Services, Boston, Massachusetts, and were sent to an outside laboratory for high-performance liquid chromatography potency testing at predefined time points. Vancomycin 14-mg/mL ophthalmic solution compounded with 0.005% benzalkonium retains potency for at least 60 days at room temperature and 6 months frozen. Extending the beyond-use dating of vancomycin may lead to improved patient adherence by lowering costs and increasing convenience of storage and shipment of the medication.

  6. CBP Time and Attendance Management

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The TAMS, supports time and attendance (payroll), overtime cap monitoring, overtime scheduling functions, budget reporting, staffing level reporting, and a variety...

  7. Outreach to Scientists and Engineers at the Hanford Technical Library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buxton, Karen A.

    2008-06-17

    Staff at the Hanford Technical Library has developed a suite of programs designed to help busy researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) make better use of library products and services. Programs include formal training classes, one-on-one consultations, and targeted email messages announcing new materials to researchers in specific fields. A staple of outreach has been to teach classes to library clients covering research tools in their fields. These classes started out in the library classroom and then expanded to other venues around PNNL. Class surveys indicated that many researchers desired a practical approach to learning rather than the traditional lecture format. The library instituted “Library Learning Day” and hosted classes in the PNNL computer training room to provide lab employees with a hands-on learning experience. Classes are generally offered at noon and lab staff attends classes on their lunch hour. Many just do not have time to spend a full hour in training. Library staff added some experimental half-hour mini classes in campus buildings geared to the projects and interests of researchers there to see if this format was more appealing. As other programs have developed librarians are teaching fewer classes but average attendance figures has remained fairly stable from 2005-2007. In summer of 2004 the library began the Traveling Librarian program. Librarians call-on groups and individuals in 24 buildings on the Richland Washington campus. Five full-time and two part-time librarians are involved in the program. Librarians usually send out email announcements prior to visits and encourage scientists and engineers to make appointments for a brief 15 minute consultation in the researcher’s own office. During the meeting lab staff learn about products or product features that can help them work more productively. Librarians also make cold calls to staff that do not request a consultation and may not be making full use of the

  8. Characterization of novel microsphere chain fiber optic tips for potential use in ophthalmic laser surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Hutchens, Thomas C.; Darafsheh, Arash; Fardad, Amir; Antoszyk, Andrew N.; Ying, Howard S.; Astratov, Vasily N.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2012-01-01

    Ophthalmic surgery may benefit from use of more precise fiber delivery systems during laser surgery. Some current ophthalmic surgical techniques rely on tedious mechanical dissection of tissue layers. In this study, chains of sapphire microspheres integrated into a hollow waveguide distal tip are used for erbium:YAG laser ablation studies in contact mode with ophthalmic tissues, ex vivo. The laser’s short optical penetration depth combined with the small spot diameters achieved with this fibe...

  9. Attendance Policies, Student Attendance, and Instructor Verbal Aggressiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Jason; Forbus, Robert; Cistulli, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The authors utilized an experimental design across six sections of a managerial communications course (N = 173) to test the impact of instructor verbal aggressiveness and class attendance policies on student class attendance. The experimental group received a policy based on the principle of social proof (R. B. Cialdini, 2001), which indicated…

  10. A Public Outreach Blog for the CANDELS Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartaltepe, Jeyhan S.; Pforr, J.; CANDELS Collaboration

    2013-01-01

    In May 2012 the CANDELS collaboration launched a public outreach blog, aimed at the general public, where we discuss CANDELS related science. CANDELS (the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey) is a large Hubble Space Telescope Multi-Cycle Treasury Program to image portions of the five most commonly studied deep fields in the near-infrared with WFC3. This large collaboration encompasses a wide range of science topics including galaxy evolution and observational cosmology. We seek to understand how galaxies in the early universe formed and evolved to become the galaxies we see today. We post on a wide variety of topics including general background discussion on many issues in extragalactic astronomy, current science results and papers, highlights from meetings that we have attended, and what life as an astronomer is like (going on observing runs, writing proposals, and how we became interested in astronomy). The posts are written by a large number of collaboration members at different career stages (including students, postdocs, and permanent staff/faculty members) and is widely read and advertised on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+. Our blog can be found here: http://candels-collaboration.blogspot.com

  11. Epidemiological, clinical and laboratory findings of infectious keratitis at Mansoura Ophthalmic Center, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawi, Amani E; Moemen, Dalia; El-Tantawy, Nora L

    2017-01-01

    AIM To analyze the epidemiological, clinical and laboratory findings of infectious keratitis. METHODS A retrospective study on cases of infective keratitis, attended our institution from Mar. 2013 to Feb. 2015, was done at Mansoura Ophthalmic Center, Egypt. Corneal scrapings were performed and processed for direct microscopy and culture in appropriate media using standard laboratory protocols. RESULTS Out of 245 patients enrolled for study, 247 corneal scrapings were obtained. Ocular trauma was the most common predisposing factor (51.4%), followed by diabetes mellitus (15.1%). Cultures were positive in 110 scraping samples (44.5%): 45.5% samples had pure fungal infection, 40% had pure bacterial infections and 10% had mixed fungal and bacterial growths. Acanthamoeba was detected in 5 (4.5%) samples. The most common fungal pathogen was Aspergillus spp. (41%). The most common bacterial isolates were Staphylococcus aureus (38.2%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (21.8%). CONCLUSION Incidence of fungal keratitis is high in our region. Therapeutic approach can initially be based on clinical features and sensitivity/resistance patterns. Microbiological research should direct the antimicrobial treatment. Antibiotic resistance to fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides is an important consideration. PMID:28149778

  12. Geothermal Information Dissemination and Outreach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clutter, Ted J. [Geothermal Resources Council (United States)

    2005-02-18

    Project Purpose. To enhance technological and topical information transfer in support of industry and government efforts to increase geothermal energy use in the United States (power production, direct use, and geothermal groundsource heat pumps). Project Work. GRC 2003 Annual Meeting. The GRC convened the meeting on Oct. 12-15, 2003, at Morelia's Centro de Convenciones y ExpoCentro in Mexico under the theme, International Collaboration for Geothermal Energy in the Americas. The event was also sponsored by the Comision Federal de Electricidad. ~600 participants from more than 20 countries attended the event. The GRC convened a Development of Geothermal Projects Workshop and Geothermal Exploration Techniques Workshop. GRC Field Trips included Los Azufres and Paricutin Volcano on Oct. 11. The Geothermal Energy Association (Washington, DC) staged its Geothermal Energy Trade Show. The Annual Meeting Opening Session was convened on Oct. 13, and included the governor of Michoacan, the Mexico Assistant Secretary of Energy, CFE Geothermal Division Director, DOE Geothermal Program Manager, and private sector representatives. The 2003 Annual Meeting attracted 160 papers for oral and poster presentations. GRC 2004. Under the theme, Geothermal - The Reliable Renewable, the GRC 2004 Annual Meeting convened on Aug. 29-Sept. 1, 2004, at the Hyatt Grand Champions Resort at Indian Wells, CA. Estimated total attendance (including Trade Show personnel, guests and accompanying persons) was ~700. The event included a workshop, Geothermal Production Well Pump Installation, Operation and Maintenance. Field trips went to Coso/Mammoth and Imperial Valley/Salton Sea geothermal fields. The event Opening Session featured speakers from the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Department of the Interior, and the private sector. The Geothermal Energy Association staged its Geothermal Energy Trade Show. The Geothermal Education Office staged its Geothermal Energy Workshop. Several local radio and

  13. Wavelet-based neural network analysis of ophthalmic artery Doppler signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güler, Nihal Fatma; Ubeyli, Elif Derya

    2004-10-01

    In this study, ophthalmic artery Doppler signals were recorded from 115 subjects, 52 of whom had ophthalmic artery stenosis while the rest were healthy controls. Results were classified using a wavelet-based neural network. The wavelet-based neural network model, employing the multilayer perceptron, was used for analysis of ophthalmic artery Doppler signals. A multilayer perceptron neural network (MLPNN) trained with the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm was used to detect stenosis in ophthalmic arteries. In order to determine the MLPNN inputs, spectral analysis of ophthalmic artery Doppler signals was performed using wavelet transform. The MLPNN was trained, cross validated, and tested with training, cross validation, and testing sets, respectively. All data sets were obtained from ophthalmic arteries of healthy subjects and subjects suffering from ophthalmic artery stenosis. The correct classification rate was 97.22% for healthy subjects, and 96.77% for subjects having ophthalmic artery stenosis. The classification results showed that the MLPNN trained with the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm was effective to detect ophthalmic artery stenosis.

  14. Safety, efficacy, and patient acceptability of lidocaine hydrochloride ophthalmic gel as a topical ocular anesthetic for use in ophthalmic procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Page

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Michael A Page, Frederick W FraunfelderDepartment of Ophthalmology (Casey Eye Institute, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, USAPurpose: To review the current literature on safety, efficacy, and measures of surgeon and patient satisfaction with lidocaine hydrochloride gel as a tool for ocular anesthesia.Methods: Pubmed search using keywords “lidocaine gel,” “ophthalmic,” and “surgery” and compiling cross-references. Twenty-six total references were reviewed, including 15 prospective randomized controlled trials (RCTs, total N = 933, average N = 62, 6 nonrandomized prospective studies (total N = 234, average N = 39, 2 animal studies, 1 microbiologic study, and 2 letters to the editor.Results: The RCTs and nonrandomized prospective studies evaluated a number of measures including timing of onset of anesthesia, duration of anesthesia, intraoperative and postoperative pain, need for additional anesthetic applications, intracameral lidocaine levels, and adverse effects. Control groups received topical drops, subconjunctival anesthetic, retrobulbar anesthetic, or sham gel. Lidocaine gel was shown to be at least as effective for pain control as alternative therapies in all studies, with longer duration of action than topical drops. Patient and surgeon satisfaction were high, and adverse effects were rare and comparable to those for anesthetic drop formulations. Surgical settings included cataract, pterygium, trabeculectomy, strabismus, intravitreal injection, vitrectomy, and penetrating keratoplasty.Conclusions: Lidocaine gel is a safe, effective, and potentially underutilized tool for ophthalmic surgery.Keywords: lidocaine, gel, topical, ophthalmic, ocular, anesthetic

  15. WPA Omnibus Award MT Wind Power Outreach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brian Spangler, Manager Energy Planning and Renewables

    2012-01-30

    The objective of this grant was to further the development of Montana's vast wind resources for small, medium, and large scale benefits to Montana and the nation. This was accomplished through collaborative work with wind industry representatives, state and local governments, the agricultural community, and interested citizens. Through these efforts MT Dept Environmental Quality (DEQ) was able to identify development barriers, educate and inform citizens, as well as to participate in regional and national dialogue that will spur the development of wind resources. The scope of DEQ's wind outreach effort evolved over the course of this agreement from the development of the Montana Wind Working Group and traditional outreach efforts, to the current focus on working with the state's university system to deliver a workforce trained to enter the wind industry.

  16. Staff training and outreach support for Cognitive Stimulation Therapy and its implementation in practice: a cluster randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streater, Amy; Spector, Aimee; Hoare, Zoe; Aguirre, Elisa; Russell, Ian; Orrell, Martin

    2017-01-23

    There is evidence that Cognitive Stimulation Therapy and maintenance Cognitive Stimulation Therapy are effective in mild to moderate dementia. There is, however, little evidence available for its implementation in practice and the impact of outreach support on the sustainability of the programme. Two hundred and forty-one staff members were randomised from 63 dementia care settings between outreach support including an online forum, email, and telephone support, compared to usual Cognitive Stimulation Therapy control group. The primary outcome was average number of attendees to the Cognitive Stimulation Therapy and maintenance Cognitive Stimulation Therapy programmes. There was no difference in average number of attendees between the intervention and usual Cognitive Stimulation Therapy control groups for the Cognitive Stimulation Therapy (p = 0.82) or the maintenance Cognitive Stimulation Therapy programme (p = 0.97). Outreach support does not affect the average number of people with dementia attending the Cognitive Stimulation Therapy or maintenance Cognitive Stimulation Therapy programme. Irrespective of outreach support, the programmes remain widely implemented and yield perceived benefits for people with dementia. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Particle Physics Outreach to Secondary Education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardeen, Marjorie G.; /Fermilab; Johansson, K.Erik; /Stockholm U.; Young, M.Jean

    2011-11-21

    This review summarizes exemplary secondary education and outreach programs of the particle physics community. We examine programs from the following areas: research experiences, high-energy physics data for students, informal learning for students, instructional resources, and professional development. We report findings about these programs' impact on students and teachers and provide suggestions for practices that create effective programs from those findings. We also include some methods for assessing programs.

  18. A Pilot Astronomy Outreach Project in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Dipen; Mridha, Shahjahan; Afroz, Maqsuda

    2015-08-01

    In its strategic planning for the "Astronomy for Development Project," the International Astronomical Union (IAU) has ecognized, among other important missions, the role of astronomy in understanding the far-reaching possibilities for promoting global tolerance and citizenship. Furthermore, astronomy is deemed inspirational for careers in science and technology. The "Pilot Astronomy Outreach Project in Bangladesh"--the first of its kind in the country--aspires to fulfill these missions. As Bangladesh lacks resources to promote astronomy education in universities and schools, the role of disseminating astronomy education to the greater community falls on citizen science organizations. One such group, Anushandhitshu Chokro (AChokro) Science Organization, has been carrying out a successful public outreach program since 1975. Among its documented public events, AChokro organized a total solar eclipse campaign in Bangladesh in 2009, at which 15,000 people were assembled in a single open venue for the eclipse observation. The organization has actively pursued astronomy outreach to dispel public misconceptions about astronomical phenomena and to promote science. AChokro is currently working to build an observatory and Science Outreach Center around a recently-acquired 14-inch Scmidt-Cassegrain telescope and a soon-to-be-acquired new 16-inch reflector, all funded by private donations. The telescopes will be fitted with photometers, spectrometers, and digital and CCD cameras to pursue observations that would include sun spot and solar magnetic fields, planetary surfaces, asteroid search, variable stars and supernovae. The Center will be integrated with schools, colleges, and community groups for regular observation and small-scale research. Special educational and observing sessions for adults will also be organized. Updates on the development of the Center, which is expected to be functioning by the end of 2015, will be shared and feedback invited on the fostering of

  19. Wind Energy Education and Outreach Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loomis, David G. [Illinois State Univ., Normal, IL (United States)

    2013-01-09

    The purpose of Illinois State University's wind project was to further the education and outreach of the university concerning wind energy. This project had three major components: to initiate and coordinate a Wind Working Group for the State of Illinois, to launch a Renewable Energy undergraduate program, and to develop the Center for Renewable Energy that will sustain the Illinois Wind Working Group and the undergraduate program.

  20. Opportunities for IPY Higher Education and Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, E. B.

    2007-12-01

    A very rich network for higher education and outreach during the fourth International Polar Year (IPY) exists through the University of the Arctic (UArctic, www.uarctic.org), a collaborative consortium of more than ninety institutions e.g. universities, colleges, and other organizations committed to higher education and research in the North, as well as eighteen other projects submitted as Expression of Intents to the IPY Joint Committee formed into an IPY cluster. The coordination office for this UArctic IPY education outreach efforts is located at the University of Alaska Fairbanks (www.uaf.edu and www.alaska.edu/ipy). The education outreach programs reflect a continuum of learning as a lifelong process that targets different audiences and approaches: 1) primary and secondary students through teacher professional development workshops on science teaching and research; 2) undergraduate students via education and research experience; 3) graduate students through integrated education and research; 4) early career scientists/university faculty via professional development; and 5) communities/ general public via continuing education/adult education either through formal or informal ways. Additionally there are organizations such as the Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS) and the Youth Steering Committee (YSC) including a newly formed group on tertiary education to nurture the next generation of polar and non-polar scientists and foster the leadership of the next IPY.

  1. Revival of the "Sun Festival": An educational and outreach project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montabone, Luca

    2016-10-01

    In ancient times, past civilisations used to celebrate both the winter and summer solstices, which represented key moments in the periodical cycle of seasons and agricultural activities. In 1904, the French astronomer Camille Flammarion, the engineer Gustave Eiffel, the science writer Wilfrid de Fonvielle and the Spanish astronomer Josep Comas i Solà decided to celebrate the summer solstice with a festival of science, art and astronomical observations opened to the public at the Eiffel tower in Paris. For ten consecutive years (1904-1914) on the day of the summer solstice, the "Sun Festival" (Fête du Soleil in French) included scientific and technological lectures and demostrations, celestial observations, music, poetry, danse, cinema, etc. This celebration was interrupted by the First World War, just to resume in Barcelona, Spain, between 1915 and 1937, and in Marseille, France, in the 1930s. It was the founders' dream to extend this celebration to all cities in France and elsewhere.It is only during the International Year of Astronomy in 2009, to our knowledge, that the "Sun Festival" was given another chance in France, thanks to the joint effort of several scientific and cultural centers (Centres de Culture Scientifique, Technique et Industrielle, CCSTI) and the timely support of the European Space Agency (ESA). In this occasion again, the festival was characterized by the combination of science, art and technological innovation around a common denominator: our Sun!We have recently revived the idea of celebrating the summer solstice with a "Sun Festival" dedicated to scientific education and outreach about our star and related topics. This project started last year in Aix-les-Bains, France, with the "Sun and Light Festival" (2015 was the International Year of Light), attended by about 100 people. This year's second edition was in Le Bourget-du-Lac, France. Following the COP21 event, the specific theme was the "Sun and Climate Festival", and we had about 250

  2. Influencing the Future: Special Considerations for IPY Education and Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beitler, J.

    2004-12-01

    The International Geophysical Year (IGY) of 1957-1958 created a valuable legacy, by not only advancing the sciences involved, but by also stimulating interest in and support for science, and by inspiring many to enter science careers. Successful education and outreach efforts in conjunction with IGY transmitted this energy to the public and helped researchers to create this legacy. The International Polar Year (IPY) for 2007-2008 again holds promise to generate new scientific insights and leave a similar legacy -- if the sciences are once again successful in connecting with the public. Despite the fine example of the IGY of 1958 -1959, the way forward for meaningful education and outreach for IPY isn't entirely clear. Every element affecting science education and outreach today is considerably more complex, and the distinct challenges and opportunities of today may not always be addressed by simply extending what has been helpful in the past. Whether a large research group or an individual researcher, whether working with a dedicated outreach staff or conducting outreach more informally, whether already operating successful outreach programs or starting from scratch, any project intending an education and outreach effort will significantly increase its relevance and effectiveness by taking pause to formulate specific goals and objectives for IPY. Such thinking shouldn't be entirely delegated to non-researchers. The engagement of the scientists themselves in setting objectives for education and outreach will provide the strongest outcome. This discussion analyzes the communication setting for IPY as it affects outreach and education efforts, and proposes a model for discussing and formulating outreach and education objectives. It poses the key questions that should be asked and answered in order to ensure that researchers take full advantage of education and outreach opportunities with IPY, whatever the scope of their efforts. Education and outreach programs that

  3. Polymer Micelles Laden Hydrogel Contact Lenses for Ophthalmic Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaohong; Tan, Huaping; Chen, Pin; Wang, Xin; Pang, Juan

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogel contact lens is an attractive drug carrier for the delivery of ophthalmic drugs. But limited drug loading capacity and burst release restricted its application in this field. Polymer micelle laden hydrogel contact lenses were designed for ophthalmic drug delivery in the work. β-CD/PAA/PEG ternary system was chosen to form polymer micelle. The micelle size could be adjusted by β-CD content and PAA/PEG concentration. The zeta potential of micelle was irrelevant to β-CD content, but influenced by PAA/PEG concentration. The absorbed drug concentration in micelle solution depended on both β-CD content and PAA/PEG concentration. Polymer micelle laden hydrogels were obtained by radical polymerization in situ. The transparency of polymer micelle laden hydrogel declined with PAA/PEG concentration increasing. The equilibrium water content and water loss showed that polymer micelle laden hydrogel with higher PAA/PEG concentration was in a higher swollen state. The dynamic viscoelastic properties howed that all polymer micelle laden hydrogels had some characteristics of crosslinked elastomers. The surface structure of freeze dried composite hydrogels was different from freeze dried pure hydrogel. The drug loading and releasing behaviors were detected to evaluate the drug loading and releasing capacity of hydrogels using orfloxacin and puerarin as model drugs. The results indicated the polymer micelle in hydrogel could hold or help to hold some ophthalmic drugs, and slow down orfloxacin release speed or keep puerarin stably stay for a time in hydrogels. In the end, it was found that the transparency of composite hydrogel became better after the hydrogel had been immersed in PBS for several weeks.

  4. A tolerability study of pirenzepine ophthalmic gel in myopic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Jimmy D; Niemann, Katherine; Houde, Barbara; Allred, Troy; Edmondson, Marcia J; Crockett, R S

    2003-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the safety and tolerability of pirenzepine ophthalmic gel (PIR) and the magnitude of mydriatic and accommodative effects in myopic children. This was a placebo-controlled, parallel double-masked study of unequal (4:1) randomization. Children were randomized to receive 0.5% PIR, b.i.d., or vehicle (placebo) for one week, then titrated to 1% PIR for one week, then 2% PIR for two weeks, and then for an additional 11 months. Enrolled were 26 normal healthy children, 9-12 years old, with myopia (-0.75 to -3 D) and minimal astigmatism (pirenzepine in a larger patient population.

  5. International Council of Ophthalmology: Refocusing Ophthalmic Education in the Asia-Pacific Region and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golnik, Karl; Mayorga, Eduardo; Spivey, Bruce; Ritch, Robert; Gauthier, Tina-Marie

    2012-01-01

    The International Council of Ophthalmology (ICO) is a global organization with a regional focus. Working in partnership with supranational and ICO member societies, the ICO is building a "World Alliance for Sight" to improve access to the highest-quality eye care worldwide. Designed to preserve and restore vision on an international scale, the ICO initiative, "Refocusing Ophthalmic Education," enhances ophthalmic education of residents, subspecialists, medical students, and allied eye care personnel by redefining the most effective ways to teach and in creating beneficial educational opportunities. The "Teaching the Teachers" program helps ophthalmic educators incorporate more effective methods of training and continuing professional development to meet societal needs, achieved in part through regional courses for residency program directors; symposia, and keynote talks presented by ICO's World Ophthalmology Educational Colloquium, Conferences for Ophthalmic Educators, and ophthalmic surgical competency rubrics. Recognizing that standardized curricula are essential for consistent ophthalmic education, the ICO has developed a curricular framework whereby goals, expectations, knowledge base, competencies, and technical training are delineated. The ICO is defining worldwide models of team training and compiling best practice, which will include training-program accreditation to ensure improvement in the education of ophthalmologists. International Council of Ophthalmology Web-based teaching courses, a Webinar Network, and a technology blog further support information and communication technologies for teaching and learning. At the ICO's Center for Ophthalmic Educators (educators.icoph.org), trainers will find valuable teaching resources in multiple languages as well as ways to share ideas and collaborate with peers and other ophthalmic educators.

  6. 21 CFR 524.1484e - Neomycin sulfate and polymyxin B sulfate ophthalmic solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neomycin sulfate and polymyxin B sulfate ophthalmic solution. 524.1484e Section 524.1484e Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.1484e Neomycin sulfate and polymyxin B sulfate ophthalmic solution....

  7. 21 CFR 524.1883 - Prednisolone sodium phosphate-neomycin sulfate ophthalmic ointment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prednisolone sodium phosphate-neomycin sulfate... DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.1883 Prednisolone sodium phosphate-neomycin sulfate ophthalmic ointment. (a) Specifications. Prednisolone sodium phosphate-neomycin sulfate ophthalmic ointment...

  8. 21 CFR 524.1484 - Neomycin sulfate ophthalmic and topical dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neomycin sulfate ophthalmic and topical dosage forms. 524.1484 Section 524.1484 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.1484 Neomycin sulfate ophthalmic and topical dosage forms....

  9. 21 CFR 886.1430 - Ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device... lens radius measuring device. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device is an AC-powered device that is a microscope and dial gauge intended to measure the radius of a...

  10. 76 FR 71349 - Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee...

  11. 75 FR 26264 - Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee...

  12. 76 FR 30176 - Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee...

  13. Selective thrombolysis performed through meningo-ophthalmic artery in central retinal artery occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, José E; Moscovici, Samuel; Halpert, Michael; Itshayek, Eyal

    2012-03-01

    The poor natural history of central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) is usually not modified with conventional, conservative management techniques. Guidelines for selective intraarterial ophthalmic thrombolysis are still lacking. While many centers continue to perform this procedure with promising results, others are reluctant due to conflicting findings in recent studies. We present our experience in a 36-year-old male with CRAO. Based on the patient's clinical presentation, we planned to perform selective intraarterial ophthalmic thrombolysis via the ophthalmic artery. When angiography demonstrated that the retina was not supplied by the ophthalmic artery, but by a meningo-ophthalmic artery branching from the internal maxillary artery, we instead administered thrombolytic agents via the meningo-ophthalmic artery. The patient's vision recovered completely, with visual acuity and visual field examination at 30 day follow up comparable to his pre-treatment status. This case emphasizes the need for external carotid artery examination in cases of nonvisualization of the ophthalmic artery. In addition, it illustrates the successful use of the meningo-ophthalmic artery to perform selective intraarterial thrombolysis for CRAO. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Integrating community outreach into the undergraduate neuroscience classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Courtney

    2011-01-01

    While both federal agencies and professional associations emphasize the importance of neuroscience outreach, this goal seldom reaches the undergraduate neuroscience classroom. However, incorporating outreach into undergraduate neuroscience classes is an efficient means to reach not only future scientists, but also the future practitioners (K-12 teachers, social service workers, etc.) with whom neuroscientists hope to communicate. It also provides a vehicle for faculty members to engage in outreach activities that are typically un- or under-rewarded in faculty reviews. In this article, a Neuroscience Community Outreach Project (NCOP) is described. The project has been used in three offerings of a Cognitive Neuroscience course at a small liberal arts college, shared and applied at a large state university, and presented at a regional Society for Neuroscience meeting as an example of outreach opportunities for faculty. The NCOP assignment is a student-driven, modular activity that can be easily incorporated into existing neuroscience course frameworks. The assignment builds on student interests and connections in the community, providing a way for faculty at institutions without formal outreach programs to incorporate neuroscience outreach into the classroom and connect students to online resources. Several sample student projects are described across three broad domains (K-12 outreach, presentations to social service organizations, and media / popular press presentations). The article ends with a set of suggestions addressing common faculty concerns about incorporating community outreach into the undergraduate neuroscience classroom.

  15. Outreach, Collaboration, Collegiality: Evolving Approaches to Library Video Game Services

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carolyn Bishoff; Shannon L Farrell; Amy E Neeser

    2015-01-01

    .... This paper discusses the early exploration of video game collections and undergraduate events, the challenges encountered, and the resulting outreach strategies, including programs and activities...

  16. 76 FR 71044 - Determination That TRAVATAN (Travoprost Ophthalmic Solution), 0.004%, Was Not Withdrawn From Sale...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Determination That TRAVATAN (Travoprost Ophthalmic Solution... refer to a listed drug. TRAVATAN (travoprost ophthalmic solution), 0.004%, is the subject of NDA 21-257... hypertension. TRAVATAN (travoprost ophthalmic solution), 0.004%, is currently listed in the ``Discontinued...

  17. Resistance to fluoroquinolones and methicillin in ophthalmic isolates of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius from companion animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Min-Hee; Chae, Min-Joo; Yoon, Jang-Won; Lee, So-Young; Yoo, Jong-Hyun; Park, Hee-Myung

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to fluoroquinolones and methicillin was determined for 49 ophthalmic isolates of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius from dogs with and without ophthalmic disease. Resistance was observed for ciprofloxacin (40.8%), ofloxacin (38.8%), enrofloxacin (38.8%), levofloxacin (34.7%), and moxifloxacin (4.1%). Eighteen isolates, 16 of which were resistant to oxacillin, were mecA-positive. Nine of the 16 oxacillin-resistant mecA-positive S. pseudintermedius isolates were resistant to more than one fluoroquinolone and 2 isolates were resistant to 5 fluoroquinolones. The frequency of mecA gene occurrence and fluoroquinolone resistance was twice as high among S. pseudintermedius isolates derived from dogs with ophthalmic disease compared with isolates for dogs without ophthalmic disease. The high prevalence of methicillin and fluoroquinolone resistance in S. pseudintermedius from dogs with ophthalmic disease is a concern. PMID:24982521

  18. The assessment of visually impaired persons working capacities using electrophysiological and ophthalmic ergonomics methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Razumovsky

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim was to analyze working capacities of visually impaired persons by means of complex electrophysiological and ophthalmic ergonomics eye examination.Materials and methods. Standard clinical ophthalmologic examination (visual acuity measurement, refractometry, biomicroscopy, ophthalmoscopy as well as electrophysiological (electrooculography, electrical sensitivity of the eye, critical flicker fusion frequency and ophthalmic ergonomics tests (accommodation measurement, professional testing using automated system «Proftest-1» were performed.Results. Complex electrophysiological and ophthalmic ergonomics tests were performed in 20 visually impaired persons. Their results revealed direct correlation between electrophysiological and ophthalmic ergonomics indices.Conclusion. Working capacities of visually impaired persons can be assessed reliably using complex electrophysiological and ophthalmic ergonomics eye examination only.

  19. A Study To Evaluate Skills Of Ophthalmic Assistants For Assessment Of Cup Disc Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malik J.S

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Research question: 1. Whether paramedical ophthalmic assistants can be trained to examine vertical cup disc ratio? 2. Can the PMO As detect abnormal cup disc ratio after training? Objectives: 1. T o train ophthalmic assistants in cup disc ratio examination 2. To evaluate skills of trained ophthalmic assistants in cup disc ratio examination Study design: Cross sectional Setting: OPD of Ophthalmology department, Pt. B.D. Sharma PGIMS, Rohtak Participants: Five paramedical ophthalmic assistants, one ophthalmologist and 322 patients above 40 years of age. Statistical analysis: Sensitivity, specificity, Kappa values. Results: Data analysis of 322 cases was found by PMO As and ophthalmologist revealed sensitivity between 50-65% and specificity between 84.5-92.62%. A good agreement was found among all the examiners on computation of Kappa Values. It was concluded that ophthalmic assistants can examine vertical cup disc ratio after five days training.

  20. The assessment of visually impaired persons working capacities using electrophysiological and ophthalmic ergonomics methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Razumovsky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim was to analyze working capacities of visually impaired persons by means of complex electrophysiological and ophthalmic ergonomics eye examination.Materials and methods. Standard clinical ophthalmologic examination (visual acuity measurement, refractometry, biomicroscopy, ophthalmoscopy as well as electrophysiological (electrooculography, electrical sensitivity of the eye, critical flicker fusion frequency and ophthalmic ergonomics tests (accommodation measurement, professional testing using automated system «Proftest-1» were performed.Results. Complex electrophysiological and ophthalmic ergonomics tests were performed in 20 visually impaired persons. Their results revealed direct correlation between electrophysiological and ophthalmic ergonomics indices.Conclusion. Working capacities of visually impaired persons can be assessed reliably using complex electrophysiological and ophthalmic ergonomics eye examination only.

  1. Resistance to fluoroquinolones and methicillin in ophthalmic isolates of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius from companion animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Min-Hee; Chae, Min-Joo; Yoon, Jang-Won; Lee, So-Young; Yoo, Jong-Hyun; Park, Hee-Myung

    2014-07-01

    Resistance to fluoroquinolones and methicillin was determined for 49 ophthalmic isolates of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius from dogs with and without ophthalmic disease. Resistance was observed for ciprofloxacin (40.8%), ofloxacin (38.8%), enrofloxacin (38.8%), levofloxacin (34.7%), and moxifloxacin (4.1%). Eighteen isolates, 16 of which were resistant to oxacillin, were mecA-positive. Nine of the 16 oxacillin-resistant mecA-positive S. pseudintermedius isolates were resistant to more than one fluoroquinolone and 2 isolates were resistant to 5 fluoroquinolones. The frequency of mecA gene occurrence and fluoroquinolone resistance was twice as high among S. pseudintermedius isolates derived from dogs with ophthalmic disease compared with isolates for dogs without ophthalmic disease. The high prevalence of methicillin and fluoroquinolone resistance in S. pseudintermedius from dogs with ophthalmic disease is a concern.

  2. Inclusive outreach practices in Palaeontology: Inclusive-Coworking

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Frank, Alejandra; Gomez-Heras, Miguel; Fesharaki, Omid

    2017-04-01

    Previous experiences with people with both physical and intellectual functional diversity around palaeontological issues have demonstrated the important value of science outreach directed to people with disabilities. The aforementioned practices act twofold: as a learning tool and also improving the quality of life of the participants and thus, their self-image. All these pioneer experiences were the first step in a process of developing new attitudes contributing the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development of United Nations, where among the 17 goals proposed an effective social inclusion of people with disabilities is required. For this, real inclusive practices in geological outreach are imperious. A close cooperation with all the parts (researchers and participants), in a kind of coworking attitude is needed. This Inclusive-Coworking is considered in the sense of social gathering in order to share equal values and look for the synergy that this different outlook implies. And what is more important: the change of role of the previously learners into an active part of the scientific outreach, providing the adequate methodology for that. The offer of non-formal learning activities normally includes the participation of university professors and researchers in Science Week editions. During the 2016 session in Madrid, four adults with intellectual disability who were participants in the previous edition, contributed in the palaeontological workshop. They were in charge of four of the eight modules explaining the origin of fossils and how to collect them, the evolution of equids' limbs, and the main dentition types in vertebrates to the twenty 16 year old secondary students who attended the workshop. During the development of the experience all the students were pleased with the inclusive approach, and the interaction of all participants was fruitful. Although the explanations took a bit more time when made by our functional diverse fellows, all the abstracts concepts

  3. Development of the Veterans Healthcare Administration (VHA) Ophthalmic Surgical Outcome Database (OSOD) project and the role of ophthalmic nurse reviewers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara-Smalling, Agueda; Cakiner-Egilmez, Tulay; Miller, Dawn; Redshirt, Ella; Williams, Dale

    2011-01-01

    Currently, ophthalmic surgical cases are not included in the Veterans Administration Surgical Quality Improvement Project data collection. Furthermore, there is no comprehensive protocol in the health system for prospectively measuring outcomes for eye surgery in terms of safety and quality. There are 400,000 operative cases in the system per year. Of those, 48,000 (12%) are ophthalmic surgical cases, with 85% (41,000) of those being cataract cases. The Ophthalmic Surgical Outcome Database Pilot Project was developed to incorporate ophthalmology into VASQIP, thus evaluating risk factors and improving cataract surgical outcomes. Nurse reviewers facilitate the monitoring and measuring of these outcomes. Since its inception in 1778, the Veterans Administration (VA) Health System has provided comprehensive healthcare to millions of deserving veterans throughout the U.S. and its territories. Historically, the quality of healthcare provided by the VA has been the main focus of discussion because it did not meet a standard of care comparable to that of the private sector. Information regarding quality of healthcare services and outcomes data had been unavailable until 1986, when Congress mandated the VA to compare its surgical outcomes to those of the private sector (PL-99-166). 1 Risk adjustment of VA surgical outcomes began in 1987 with the Continuous Improvement in Cardiac Surgery Program (CICSP) in which cardiac surgical outcomes were reported and evaluated. 2 Between 1991 and 1993, the National VA Surgical Risk Study (NVASRS) initiated a validated risk-adjustment model for predicting surgical outcomes and comparative assessment of the quality of surgical care in 44 VA medical centers. 3 The success of NVASRS encouraged the VA to establish an ongoing program for monitoring and improving the quality of surgical care, thus developing the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) in 1994. 4 According to a prospective study conducted between 1991-1997 in 123

  4. Pushing the boundaries of outreach work: the case of needle exchange outreach programs in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strike, Carol J; O'Grady, Caroline; Myers, Ted; Millson, Margaret

    2004-07-01

    In this paper, we examine the challenges of defining the boundaries of outreach work using the example of needle exchange programs. In particular, we examine the multiple and inter-related factors that extend needle exchange outreach work beyond its official mandate. Using semi-structured interviews, 59 workers at 15 programs in Ontario, Canada were asked questions about operational policies and routines. An iterative and inductive analytic process was used. Over time, most outreach workers develop a well-defined sense of the activities they consider to be consistent with a harm reduction approach and the types of conduct that are considered to be acceptable and professional. Workers conceptualize their roles to encompass education and support but are reluctant to impose a rigid definition of their roles. A pragmatic and humble stance combined with strong beliefs in social justice encourages workers to find informal solutions to meet client needs that extend beyond the program mandate. As a result, doing 'extra' is the norm. These extra efforts are informal, but often regular, expansions of the service complement. Construction of flexible boundaries provides opportunities to meet many client needs and unexpected situations; however, going the extra-mile strains resources. A minority of workers blur the boundaries between private and professional lives. Further, a variety of personal, social and socio-political forces encourage outreach workers to continually redefine the boundaries of their roles and service complements.

  5. Association between Ophthalmic Timolol and Hospitalisation for Bradycardia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole L. Pratt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Ophthalmic timolol, a topical nonselective beta-blocker, has the potential to be absorbed systemically which may cause adverse cardiovascular effects. This study was conducted to determine whether initiation of ophthalmic timolol was associated with an increased risk of hospitalisation for bradycardia. Materials and Methods. A self-controlled case-series study was undertaken in patients who were hospitalised for bradycardia and were exposed to timolol. Person-time after timolol initiation was partitioned into risk periods: 1–30 days, 31–180 days, and >180 days. A 30-day risk period prior to initiating timolol was also included. All remaining time was considered unexposed. Results. There were 6,373 patients with at least one hospitalisation for bradycardia during the study period; 267 were exposed to timolol. Risk of bradycardia was significantly increased in the 31–180 days after timolol initiation (incidence rate ratio (IRR = 1.93; 95% confidence interval (CI 1.00–1.87. No increased risk was observed in the first 30 days or beyond 180 days of continuous exposure (IRR = 1.40; 95% CI 0.87–2.26 and IRR = 1.21; 95% CI 0.64–2.31, resp.. Conclusion. Bradycardia is a potential adverse event following timolol initiation. Practitioners should consider patient history before choosing a glaucoma regime and closely monitor patients after treatment initiation with topical nonselective beta-blocker eye drops.

  6. TEAR SUBSTITUTES PREVENT OPHTHALMIC COMPLICATIONS IN INTENSIVE CARE UNIT PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Kochergin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the effects of Cationorm for the prevention of ophthalmic complications in intensive care unit (ICU patients and to compare the efficacy of ocular surface lubricants used in ICU. Patients and methods. 50 ICU patients (100 eyes with bilateral lagophthalmos (2 mm or more were enrolled in the study. Study group and control group each included 25 patients (50 eyes who were on deep sedation and ventilator. Before and after the treatment, general examination, biomicroscopy, tonometry, ophthalmoscopy, Schirmer’s test and Norn’s test (with fluorescein were performed. Results. Cationorm significantly improves tear film stability without any corneal epithelial defects (100 % of patients. In 7 controls (14 eyes, 28 %, initial signs of corneal xerosis and exposure keratitis were revealed. Conclusions. ICU patients are at high risk of complications due to hypodynamia and reduced innervation of the eye and its appendages. Bilateral lagophthalmos develops in 16.67 % of ICU patients who are on deep sedation and ventilator (up to 3 days. In the abscence of preventive therapy, lagophthalmos results in complications, i.e., keratitis and, occasionally, corneal ulceration and perforation. ICU patients require ophthalmological examination and tear substitutes. Regular instillations of Cationorm minimize ophthalmic complications due to intensive therapy. Cationorm restores tear firm architectonics and may be considered as a first-line choice for such disorders. 

  7. Antireflection coating standards of ophthalmic resin lens materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porden, Mark

    1991-12-01

    Current estimates of the percentage of anti-reflection coated lenses verses uncoated in the market today range from 3% in the United States (US.), to 60% in Europe, to 80% in Japan. Currently upwards of 80% of all prescription eyewear lenses dispensed are resin. Glass lenses lose market share yearly, as scratch resistant coatings on resin lenses are improved. Photochromic resin materials are also improving and will shortly equal the performance of glass photockromics. Until recently, the performance characteristics of ophthalmic lenses were divided into two schools. In Europe, the emphasis was on keeping the reflections to an absolute minimum, while in the Asian market the emphasis was on producing a lens, which had exceptional scratch resistance. A typical European lens may average .4% reflection across the visible spectrum (400 to 700 urn.), while the Asian lenses averaged in the 1.5% range. The growth ofAR coating in the U.S. 80 million pair a year total ophthalmic market has been lagging foreign markets for several reasons.

  8. Ophthalmic manifestations of methylmalonic aciduria accompanied with homocystinuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu-Jing Huang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Methylmalonicaciduia(MMAaccompanied with homocystinuria is a rare autosomal-recessive with congenital metabolic disorder of Vitamin B12. There are three subtypes, cblC, cblD, cblF, in which cblC is the most common one. The diagnostic tests are tandem mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Tests for activity of enzyme in fibroblasts from skin, complementary assay and genetic analysis can be used to make the subtype clear. Early-onset patients, defined by onset of symptoms before the age of 1 year, may have severe ocular involvement, including visual loss, nystagmus, strabismus, retinopathy, maculopathy, optic atrophy, abnormal electroretinography. Late-onset patients, defined by onset of symptoms after the age of 4 year, rarely have ocular manifestations. The pathogenesis of the ophthalmic symptoms may be related to the high level of homocystine, oxidative stress and the abnormal development of nervous systems. The treatment for MMA accompanied with homocystinuria is mostly symptomatic based. Ophthalmic treatment is limited. Early supplement of methionine,GSH or other antioxidants may be helpful for retinopathy. There is no standard ophthalmological examination for those patients in China. It is critical to set up inter-departmental cooperation and early stage examination for the treatments and outcomes of the patients.

  9. Mucoadhesive ophthalmic vehicles: evaluation of polymeric low-viscosity formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saettone, M F; Monti, D; Torracca, M T; Chetoni, P

    1994-01-01

    A series of polyanionic natural or semi-synthetic polymers (polygalacturonic acid, hyaluronic acid, carboxymethylamylose, carboxymethylchitin, chondroitin sulfate, heparan sulfate and mesoglycan) were evaluated as potential mucoadhesive carriers for ophthalmic drugs. Solutions containing cyclopentolate (CY) or pilocarpine (PI) as salts (or polyanionic complexes) with the acidic polymers, all showing a low viscosity, were tested for miotic (resp. mydriatic) activity in albino rabbits. In the case of some polymeric complexes, small but significant increases of the areas under the activity vs. time curves (AUC) over reference cyclopentolate hydrochloride (CYHC1) or pilocarpine nitrate (PINO3) vehicles, and significant AUC decreases after removal of precorneal mucin by treatment with N-acetylcysteine were observed. A correlation was found between these data, considered indicative of the occurrence of a mucoadhesive interaction "in vivo", and "in vitro" viscometric data expressing the polymers-mucin force of interaction. The advantages and limitations of the mucoadhesive non-viscous approach in the formulation of ophthalmic vehicles are presented and discussed.

  10. Clinical utility of voriconazole eye drops in ophthalmic fungal keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daoud Al-Badriyeh

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Daoud Al-Badriyeh, Chin Fen Neoh, Kay Stewart, David CM KongCentre for Medicine Use and Safety, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Monash University, Victoria, AustraliaAbstract: Fungal keratitis is one of the major causes of ophthalmic mycosis and is difficult to treat. The range of common antifungal agents available for fungal keratitis remains inadequate and is generally associated with poor clinical outcomes. Voriconazole is a new generation triazole antifungal agent. Only marketed in systemic formulation and, with broad-spectrum activity and high intraocular penetration, voriconazole has demonstrated effectiveness against fungal keratitis. Systemic voriconazole, however, is not without side effects and is costly. Voriconazole eye drops have been prepared extemporaneously and used for the treatment of ophthalmic fungal keratitis. The current article sought to review the literature for evidence related to the effectiveness and safety of topical voriconazole and its corneal penetration into the aqueous humor of the eye. The voriconazole eye drops used are typically of 1% concentration, well tolerated by the eye, and are stable. Despite existing evidence to suggest that the eye drops are effective in the treatment of fungal keratitis, more studies are needed, especially in relation to using the eye drops as first-line and stand-alone treatment, preparation of higher concentrations, and optimal dosing frequency.Keywords: voriconazole, fungal keratitis, eye drops, corneal penetration

  11. Over the counter ophthalmic drug misuse, are we aware?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajani Kadri

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To investigate the misuse of ‘over the counter’ ophthalmic medications in our city. Method: Responses of a structured questionnaire covering various aspects of over the counter drug use was obtained from pharmacy workers in and around our city. Results: Eighty nine pharmacy workers took part in this cross–sectional study. An average number of seven patients per day with ophthalmic complaints were seen by the pharmacy workers. Dispensing over the counter was practiced by 89.9% of the pharmacists. The most common complaint of the patients visiting the pharmacy, was redness and itching (86.5%. Antibiotics (96.6% were the most common eye drops dispensed over the counter, followed by steroids (55.1%, decongestants (54.1%, antibiotic-steroid combination eye drops (29.2% and lubricants (16.8%. Awareness regarding complications of steroid use was seen in 40.6% of pharmacists. 6.7% pharmacists had seen patients with complications following use of over the counter medications. In our study, majority of the eye drops dispensed were prescription drugs. Conclusion: Availability of prescription eye drops over the counter is an immense public threat. Educating the pharmacist and the population can decrease ocular morbidity. Research into methods to effectively deal with over-the-counter drug misuse is required and law can be enforced based on the findings.

  12. Public outreach at the Soudan Underground Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gran, Richard

    2016-04-01

    There are many facets to the outreach program at the Soudan Underground Laboratory, currently host to the MINOS neutrino oscillation experiment and the Cryogenic Dark Matter experiment, plus a number of smaller experiments in the Low Background Counting Facility. The main focus is on twice daily public tours, operated in coordination with the Soudan Underground State Park and Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, who also operate undergound tours of the historical iron mining area. Another important component is the undergraduate interns and high school teachers who lead the tours. They also participate in the operation and/or analysis of the experiments hosted at the mine.

  13. An Assessment of Slacker Astronomy Outreach Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, A.; Gay, P. L.; Searle, T.; Brissenden, G.

    2005-12-01

    Slacker Astronomy is a weekly podcast covering recent astronomical news in a humorous, irreverent manner while respecting the intelligence of the audience. This is a new approach to astronomical outreach both technically and stylistically. Using the Field-tested Learning Assessment Guide (FLAG) and the Quality Function Deployment (QFD) needs analysis survey system, we have have conducted an in-depth project to determine whether this new style is effective and what audience needs are outstanding. Slacker Astronomy currently has around 11,000 weekly listeners and was founded in February, 2005. Recordings and scripts are available to the public under the Creative Commons license at www.slackerastronomy.org.

  14. Reconfigurable Robust Routing for Mobile Outreach Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ching-Fang

    2010-01-01

    The Reconfigurable Robust Routing for Mobile Outreach Network (R3MOO N) provides advanced communications networking technologies suitable for the lunar surface environment and applications. The R3MOON techn ology is based on a detailed concept of operations tailored for luna r surface networks, and includes intelligent routing algorithms and wireless mesh network implementation on AGNC's Coremicro Robots. The product's features include an integrated communication solution inco rporating energy efficiency and disruption-tolerance in a mobile ad h oc network, and a real-time control module to provide researchers an d engineers a convenient tool for reconfiguration, investigation, an d management.

  15. Using Attendance Worksheets to Improve Student Attendance, Participation, and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoads, Edward

    2013-06-01

    As science instructors we are faced with two main barriers with respect to student learning. The first is motivating our students to attend class and the second is to make them active participants in the learning process once we have gotten them to class. As we head further into the internet age this problem only gets exacerbated as students have replaced newspapers with cell phones which can surf the web, check their emails, and play games. Quizzes can motivated the students to attend class but do not necessarily motivate them to pay attention. Active learning techniques work but we as instructors have been bombarded by the active learning message to the point that we either do it already or refuse to. I present another option which in my classroom has doubled the rate at which students learn my material. By using attendance worksheets instead of end of class quizzes I hold students accountable for not just their attendance but for when they show up and when they leave the class. In addition it makes the students an active participant in the class even without using active learning techniques as they are writing notes and answering the questions you have posed while the class is in progress. Therefore using attendance worksheets is an effective tool to use in order to guide student learning.

  16. Access to the ophthalmic artery by retrograde approach through the posterior communicating artery for intra-arterial chemotherapy of retinoblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, Chi-Tuan; Blanc, Raphael; Pistocchi, Silvia; Bartolini, Bruno; Piotin, Michel [Fondation Rothschild Hospital, Department of Interventional Neuroradiology, Paris (France); Lumbroso-Le Rouic, Livia [Institut Curie, Department of Ocular Oncology, Paris (France)

    2012-08-15

    Intra-arterial infusion of chemotherapy into the ophthalmic artery for treatment of retinoblastoma has been realized after catheterization of the internal carotid and temporary balloon occlusion beyond the orifice of the ophthalmic artery, or more recently after superselective canulation of the ophthalmic artery by a microcatheter. The superselective catheterization of the ophthalmic artery could be cumbersome because of the implantation of the ostium on the carotid siphon or because of the tortuosity of the carotid siphon. We report our experience of using a retrograde approach through the posterior communicating artery that allows a more direct angle of access to the origin of the ophthalmic artery. (orig.)

  17. Education and public outreach of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, B.; /Natl. Tech. U., San Rafael; Snow, G.

    2005-08-01

    The Auger collaboration's broad mission in education, outreach and public relations is coordinated in a separate task. Its goals are to encourage and support a wide range of outreach efforts that link schools and the public with the Auger scientists and the science of cosmic rays, particle physics, and associated technologies. This report focuses on recent activities and future initiatives.

  18. 77 FR 69619 - Draft Recommendations of Joint Outreach Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-20

    ... flexible grid while reducing costs to consumers, Western and DOE formed the JOT. The team conducted a... Area Power Administration Draft Recommendations of Joint Outreach Team AGENCY: Western Area Power Administration, DOE. ACTION: Notice of Availability of draft recommendations of Western/DOE Joint Outreach...

  19. Outreach: Recreation and Exercise for the Home-Centered Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flatten, Kay; And Others

    The increasing need for "friendly visitor" programs for the homebound elderly has led to the development of curricular and training materials provided by "Outreach: Recreation/Exercise for Home-Centered Elderly." The "Outreach" materials are designed to train and guide volunteers who work with older adults. The materials are organized into twelve…

  20. The Education and Outreach Program of ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    Barnett, M.

    2006-01-01

    The ATLAS Education and Outreach (E&O) program began in 1997, but the advent of LHC has placed a new urgency in our efforts. Even a year away, we can feel the approaching impact of starting an experiment that could make revolutionary discoveries. The public and teachers are beginning to turn their attention our way, and the newsmedia are showing growing interest in ATLAS. When datataking begins, the interest will peak, and the demands on us are likely to be substantial. The collaboration is responding to this challenge in a number of ways. ATLAS management has begun consultation with experts. The official budget for the E&O group has been growing as have the contributions of many ATLAS institutions. The number of collaboration members joining these efforts has grown, and their time and effort is increasing. We are in ongoing consultation with the CERN Public Affairs Office, as well as the other LHC experiments and the European Particle Physics Outreach Group. The E&O group has expanded the scope...

  1. HEP data in education and outreach efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellis, Matt

    2010-02-01

    The High Energy Physics (HEP) community has recognized that data preservation is an important part of our future and has organized an international working committee to address this. Beyond the continued data mining which can take place, there is a great opportunity to use these datasets as teaching tools, both for university students and an interested general public. The BABAR experiment at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has a dedicated group working on the preservation effort; the education and outreach effort is a significant goal of this group. Retention of knowledge and conceptual understanding is enhanced by active participation in problem solving -- a challenge that can be addressed with more involved projects than currently available to the general public from the HEP outreach centers. We are developing a framework that will make subsets of the BABAR dataset available to others, along with computing tools and tutorials, so that interested parties can work through either parts or the whole of a variety of analyses. With the proper framework, this may be used by other HEP experiments as a way to make their physics available and teachable beyond our community. The scope of this project may be extended to teach the next generation of particle physicists, who may lack immediate data, by providing them with datasets with which to prepare themselves for upcoming experiments. )

  2. Alliance for Sequestration Training, Outreach, Research & Education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, Hilary

    2013-09-01

    The Sequestration Training, Outreach, Research and Education (STORE) Alliance at The University of Texas at Austin completed its activity under Department of Energy Funding (DE- FE0002254) on September 1, 2013. The program began as a partnership between the Institute for Geophysics, the Bureau of Economic Geology and the Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering Department at UT. The initial vision of the program was to promote better understanding of CO2 utilization and storage science and engineering technology through programs and opportunities centered on training, outreach, research and technology transfer, and education. With over 8,000 hrs of formal training and education (and almost 4,500 of those hours awarded as continuing education credits) to almost 1,100 people, STORE programs and activities have provided benefits to the Carbon Storage Program of the Department of Energy by helping to build a skilled workforce for the future CCS and larger energy industry, and fostering scientific public literacy needed to continue the U.S. leadership position in climate change mitigation and energy technologies and application. Now in sustaining mode, the program is housed at the Center for Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering, and benefits from partnerships with the Gulf Coast Carbon Center, TOPCORP and other programs at the university receiving industry funding.

  3. Outreach: Proceedings of the 1980 HCEEP Outreach Project Directors' Conference (Reston, Virginia, September 10-12, 1980).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Lynn, Ed.

    This collection of conference proceedings focuses on the outreach projects of the Handicapped Children's Early Education Program (HCEEP). The goals of these projects are (1) to stimulate quality services to preschool handicapped children, their families and teachers, and (2) to develop effective outreach models. Each of the five key objectives of…

  4. Outreach and Engagement Education for Graduate Students in Natural Resources: Developing a Course to Enrich a Graduate Outreach Requirement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latimore, Jo A.; Dreelin, Erin A.; Burroughs, Jordan Pusateri

    2014-01-01

    Scientists need to engage stakeholders in natural resource management; however, few graduate programs prepare students to conduct outreach and engagement. Given this need, the authors' goals were to (1) create a one-credit course that introduced outreach and engagement practices and participatory approaches, (2) improve the quality of graduate…

  5. Patients treated by dental students in outreach: the first year of a pilot project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkind, A; Potter, C; Watts, C; Blinkhorn, F; Duxbury, J; Hull, P; Blinkhorn, A S

    2005-05-01

    This paper describes the patients treated by 4th year undergraduate students during the first year of a pilot outreach course to teach Restorative Dentistry in community clinics in 2001-02. Data were collected from 908 summaries of patient treatment completed by the students, and from 139 patient questionnaires. Some 75% of patients were aged between 16 and 64, 58% were female, and 16% had dental phobia or anxiety. Most lived locally to the clinic and 41% made their initial contact as an emergency or drop-in. Some 37% made only a single visit (including children treated as emergencies) but 22% made six or more visits. Did not attend (DNA) was a problem and 18% of patients DNA to complete their treatment. Students undertook the full range of restorative procedures, with the emphasis on direct restorations, preventive treatment and advice, scaling, extractions and emergency treatment. Patients' main reasons for attending the clinic were lay recommendation, the need for treatment, convenience, free treatment, or the lack of access to a dentist. Some 30% said they did not have or did not know of an alternative source of dental care, and half had not seen a dentist for at least 2 years. The study demonstrates that despite difficulties related to attendance, a suitable patient base can be established offering students the opportunity to provide comprehensive care for adults in a primary care setting.

  6. Educational outreach to general practitioners reduces children's asthma symptoms: a cluster randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sladden Michael

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Childhood asthma is common in Cape Town, a province of South Africa, but is underdiagnosed by general practitioners. Medications are often prescribed inappropriately, and care is episodic. The objective of this study is to assess the impact of educational outreach to general practitioners on asthma symptoms of children in their practice. Methods This is a cluster randomised trial with general practices as the unit of intervention, randomisation, and analysis. The setting is Mitchells Plain (population 300,000, a dormitory town near Cape Town. Solo general practitioners, without nurse support, operate from storefront practices. Caregiver-reported symptom data were collected for 318 eligible children (2 to 17 years with moderate to severe asthma, who were attending general practitioners in Mitchells Plain. One year post-intervention follow-up data were collected for 271 (85% of these children in all 43 practices. Practices randomised to intervention (21 received two 30-minute educational outreach visits by a trained pharmacist who left materials describing key interventions to improve asthma care. Intervention and control practices received the national childhood asthma guideline. Asthma severity was measured in a parent-completed survey administered through schools using a symptom frequency and severity scale. We compared intervention and control group children on the change in score from pre-to one-year post-intervention. Results Symptom scores declined an additional 0.84 points in the intervention vs. control group (on a nine-point scale. p = 0.03. For every 12 children with asthma exposed to a doctor allocated to the intervention, one extra child will have substantially reduced symptoms. Conclusion Educational outreach was accepted by general practitioners and was effective. It could be applied to other health care quality problems in this setting.

  7. Neuro-ophthalmic manifestation of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-jun ZHANG

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSDs include classic neuromyelitis optica (NMO, opticospinal multiple sclerosis (OSMS, limited form of NMO and isolated optic neuritis or myelitis accompanied by either systemic autoimmune diseases or typical MRI findings of NMO. The common neuro-ophthalmic features of NMOSDs include simultaneous or consecutive bilateral optic neuritis, more commonly seen optic disk edema and surrounding exudate, poor visual recovery, steroid responsiveness and dependency. Combined with serum aquaporin 4 (AQP4 antibody and brain MRI examination, these clinical features can be helpful to the early differential diagnosis between NMOSDs and MS. Some types of eye movement abnormalities have been reported in patients with NMOSDs, but further investigation needs to be done before the specificity of these features are confirmed. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.10.003

  8. Hydroimplantation: foldable intraocular lens implantation without an ophthalmic viscosurgical device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tak, Harshul

    2010-03-01

    I describe a technique for implantation of a 1-piece acrylic foldable intraocular lens (IOL) using an irrigation cannula of the phaco machine without using an ophthalmic viscosurgical device (OVD). The irrigating cannula introduced through a side port provides excellent stability and positioning to the eye; if required, the cannula tip is used to guide the leading haptic of the IOL into the capsular bag. The fluid coming from the side port via a bimanual irrigation cannula maintains adequate formation of the capsular bag and anterior chamber while the foldable IOL is inserted. The hydroimplantation technique has the advantage of increased efficiency, reduced surgical time and cost, no need for OVD removal from behind the IOL or for additional instrumentation, no OVD-induced intraocular pressure elevation postoperatively, and no risk of early capsular bag distension syndrome. Copyright 2010 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Emily Dickinson's ophthalmic consultation with Henry Willard Williams, MD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Donald L

    2012-12-01

    Emily Dickinson is one of America's premier poets of the 19th century. Henry Willard Williams, MD, was one of the very first physicians to limit his practice to ophthalmology and was the established leader in his field in Boston, Massachusetts. They met during the time of the Civil War, when Emily consulted him about her ophthalmic disorder. No records of the diagnosis survive. Photophobia, aching eyes, and a restriction in her ability to work up close were her main symptoms. Iritis, exotropia, or psychiatric problems are the most frequent diagnoses offered to explain her difficulties. Rather than attempt a definitive conclusion, this article will offer an additional possibility that Dr Williams likely considered (ie, hysterical hyperaesthesia of the retina). This was a common diagnosis at that time, although it has currently faded from use.

  10. Permafrost monitoring K12 outreach program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, K.; Saito, T.; Romanovsky, V.

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this project is to establish long-term permafrost monitoring sites adjacent to schools along the circum polar permafrost region. Permafrost will be one of the important indicators for monitoring climatic change in the future. Change in permafrost conditions also affects local ecosystems, hydrological regimes and natural disasters. The purpose of the long-term permafrost observation is fitting for future science objectives, and can also benefit students and teachers in remote village schools. Most remote villages depend on a subsistence lifestyle and will be directly affected by changing climate and permafrost condition. Monitoring the permafrost temperature in the arctic for a better understanding of the spatial distribution of permafrost and having students participate to collect the data is an ideal IPY project. Our outreach project involves drilling boreholes at village schools and installing the micro data logger with temperature sensors to measure hourly air and permafrost temperatures. Trained teachers help students download data several times a year and discuss the results in class. The data gathered from these stations is shared and can be viewed by anyone through the Internet (http://www.uaf.edu/permafrost). Using the Internet teachers can also compare their data with data form other monitoring stations. This project is becoming an useful science project for these remote villages, which tends to have limited exposure to science, despite the changing surroundings that they're daily lives depend on. NSF (EPSCoR) funded the previous seeding outreach program. Currently NSF/NASA and the International Polar Year (IPY) program support this project. In the 2006 field season, thirty-one schools participated in installing the monitoring stations. In 2007 we propose the expansion of this project to involve an additional 100 villages along the arctic. The broader impacts of this project are 1). This project will provide opportunities for field

  11. A Case of Hydranencephaly in Which Ophthalmic Examinations Were Performed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohei Eda

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We performed ophthalmic examinations, including optical coherence tomography (OCT, on a case diagnosed with hydranencephaly. Case Report: This case involved a female infant born at the gestational age of 35 weeks and 4 days, with the birth weight of 2,152 g, who was one of monochorionic diamniotic twins, and the identical twin died in utero at the gestational age of 24 weeks. After that, examination by fetal echo indicated that she had microcephaly and ventriculomegaly. Postnatal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of her head indicated microcephaly and significant enlargement of the lateral ventricle on both sides, with no obvious signs of elevated intracranial pressure. The brain parenchyma of both sides of the frontal lobe, parietal lobe, and occipital lobe had marked thinning, yet that of the temporal lobe, basal ganglia, thalamus, brain stem, and cerebellum had been maintained. Moreover, no obvious hematoma or neoplastic lesions were observed. Ophthalmic examinations indicated that both of her eyes had slight light reflex, attributed to optic nerve atrophy. Examination by use of a hand-held OCT system indicated a layered structure of the retina and thinning of the ganglion cell layer. Flicker electroretinogram (ERG examination by use of a hand-held ERG system indicated an almost normal wave. However, no clear visual reaction was observed when she was 10 months old. Conclusion: Our findings in this case of hydranencephaly revealed that even though the outer layer functions of the patient’s retina were maintained, extensive damage to her cerebral cortex resulted in poor visual function.

  12. High School Physics Teacher Outreach Programs at California State University Long Beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Chuhee; Pickett, Galen; Henriques, Laura

    2013-03-01

    One of the goals of the CSULB PhysTEC project has been to establish a physics teaching community that partners CSULB faculty, high school teachers, pre-service teachers, and physics students. In two years, we have created a solid sustainable Physics Teacher Network with local high school teachers. We will discuss the successful outreach programs for high school physics teachers at CSULB and the detailed logistics. Teacher-In-Residence (TIR), high school physics teachers working with the CSULB PhysTEC team, has provided invaluable input for designing and implementing outreach events. The department organizes biannual open house for local high school teachers and their students. The open house event is attended by pre-service teachers, physics undergraduate and graduate students, and faculty. We also host the monthly demo-sharing day that physics teachers bring and share topical demos, which has about 30 - 50 attendees each month. The CSULB PhysTEC project also distributes a monthly newsletter for local physics teachers with upcoming events and information about teaching, and this newsletter is organized and written by TIR. This work is supported by the PhysTEC grant.

  13. Nuclear materials transportation workshops: USDOE outreach to local governments. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-09-28

    To provide direct outreach to local governments, the Transportation Management Division of the United States Department of Energy asked the Urban Consortium and its Energy Task Force to assemble representatives for two workshops focusing on the transport of nuclear materials. The first session, for jurisdictions east of the Mississippi River, was held in New Orleans on May 5--6, 1988; the second was conducted on June 6--7, 1988 in Denver for jurisdictions to the west. Twenty local government professionals with management or operational responsibility for hazardous materials transportation within their jurisdictions were selected to attend each workshop. The discussions identified five major areas of concern to local government professionals; coordination; training; information resources; marking and placarding; and responder resources. Integrated federal, state, and local levels of government emerged as a priority coordination issue along with the need for expanded availability of training and training resources for first-reponders.

  14. Service Users' Perceptions of an Outreach Wellbeing Service: A Social Enterprise for Promoting Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Sandra Elaine

    2017-01-17

    Inadequate provision and limited access to mental healthcare has been highlighted with the need to offer more contemporary ways to provide clinically effective interventions. This study aimed to present an insight into service users' perceptions of an outreach Wellbeing Service (WBS), providing psychological therapy in social settings. Descriptive and thematic analysis was undertaken of 50 returned surveys. Comparison of initial and final mental health measures demonstrated a significant improvement in all outcomes with 96% of participants reporting being helped by attending. Participants were assisted to rebuild social connections in a safe and supportive environment and were facilitated to become more self-determining as their resourcefulness to self-manage was cultivated. Situated within different settings within the community, the WBS offers a workable example of a novel approach to supporting and promoting citizens to become more resilient and lead a more fulfilling and independent life in the community.

  15. News media outreach and newspaper coverage of tobacco control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pederson, Linda L; Nelson, David E; Babb, Stephen; London, Joel; Promoff, Gabbi; Pechacek, Terry

    2012-09-01

    Little is known about the impact of media outreach on news media coverage of tobacco control. Media outreach data were obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Office on Smoking and Health (CDC/OSH) from 2003 to 2006; one to six types of outreach activities for 50 scientific publications were performed during 35 discrete time periods. The authors analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively 205 newspaper articles generated based on the CDC/OSH scientific publications. Media coverage of specific CDC/OSH-related tobacco themes was highest for disparities (100%) and tobacco statistics (98%). More outreach activities increased the likelihood of moderate pickup of the number of themes in newspaper articles (odds ratio = 2.0, 95% confidence interval = 1.5-2.8), but there appeared to be a ceiling effect. Certain types of outreach were more strongly associated with front page and headline coverage. The extent and type of outreach were associated with increased newspaper coverage but the relationship is not necessarily straightforward. Additional research is needed to better understand relationships between scientific findings, outreach, and news media coverage of tobacco.

  16. French language space science educational outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, I.; Masongsong, E. V.; Connors, M. G.

    2015-12-01

    Athabasca University's AUTUMNX ground-based magnetometer array to measure and report geomagnetic conditions in eastern Canada is located in the heart of French speaking Canada. Through the course of the project, we have had the privilege to partner with schools, universities, astronomy clubs and government agencies across Quebec, all of which operate primarily in French. To acknowledge and serve the needs of our research partners, we have endeavored to produce educational and outreach (EPO) material adapted for francophone audiences with the help of UCLA's department of Earth, Planetary and Space Sciences (EPSS). Not only will this provide greater understanding and appreciation of the geospace environment unique to Quebec and surrounding regions, it strengthens our ties with our francophone, first nations (native Americans) and Inuit partners, trailblazing new paths of research collaboration and inspiring future generations of researchers.

  17. Astronomy Outreach Adventures in Rural Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strubbe, L.

    2015-03-01

    Astronomy can be an inspirational gateway to learning science and analytical reasoning, and to careers in STEM fields-particularly important in developing countries where educational opportunities can be scarce. Following this idea and my interest in learning about other cultures, I decided to spend 6 weeks in late 2011 (between Ph.D. and postdoc) doing astronomy public outreach in Guatemala. I volunteered through a Spanish language school embedded in a poor rural community (typical earning ~ $3/day), working mostly with children. My teaching goals were primarily attitudinal: to encourage people to observe and ask questions about the world around them, and to show them that phenomena have explanations that we can understand.

  18. Acoustics outreach program for the deaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vongsawad, Cameron T.; Berardi, Mark L.; Whiting, Jennifer K.; Lawler, M. Jeannette; Gee, Kent L.; Neilsen, Tracianne B.

    2016-03-01

    The Hear and See methodology has often been used as a means of enhancing pedagogy by focusing on the two strongest learning senses, but this naturally does not apply to deaf or hard of hearing students. Because deaf students' prior nonaural experiences with sound will vary significantly from those of students with typical hearing, different methods must be used to build understanding. However, the sensory-focused pedagogical principle can be applied in a different way for the Deaf by utilizing the senses of touch and sight, called here the ``See and Feel'' method. This presentation will provide several examples of how acoustics demonstrations have been adapted to create an outreach program for a group of junior high students from a school for the Deaf and discuss challenges encountered.

  19. Business strategies for hospital outreach programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantus, J E

    1999-01-01

    External customers have a choice in the laboratory they use for testing. They will select the one that best meets their needs and expectations. This article identifies 15 key strategies aimed at creating and maintaining a successful outreach program: 1) marketing must be a "top-down" commitment; 2) assess your market; 3) deploy a focused sales team; 4) develop competitive pricing strategies; 5) seek out managed care affiliations; 6) provide timely and appropriate testing services; 7) become a low-cost provider; 8) deploy a sophisticated laboratory information system; 9) develop customer-friendly billing; 10) provide convenient courier services; 11) establish a strategic patient service center network; 12) make it easy to contact you; 13) develop user-friendly requisition forms; 14) let the market know you're there; 15) know where you are headed.

  20. Science Festivals: Grand Experiments in Public Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hari, K.

    2015-12-01

    Since the Cambridge Science Festival launched in 2007, communities across the United States have experimented with the science festival format, working out what it means to celebrate science and technology. What have we learned, and where might we go from here? The Science Festival Alliance has supported and tracked developments among U.S. festivals, and this presentation will present key findings from three years of independent evaluation. While science festivals have coalesced into a distinct category of outreach activity, the diversity of science festival initiatives reflects the unique character of the regions in which the festivals are organized. This symposium will consider how festivals generate innovative public programming by adapting to local conditions and spur further innovation by sharing insights into such adaptations with other festivals. With over 55 annual large scale science festivals in the US alone, we will discuss the implications of a dramatic increase in future festival activity.

  1. Boreal Forest Watch: A BOREAS Outreach Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Barrett N.

    1999-01-01

    The Boreal Forest Watch program was initiated in the fall of 1994 to act as an educational outreach program for the BOREAS project in both the BOREAS Southern Study Area (SSA) and Northern Study Area (NSA). Boreal Forest Watch (13FW) was designed to introduce area high school teachers and their students to the types of research activities occurring as part of the BOREAS study of Canadian boreal forests. Several teacher training workshops were offered to teachers from central and northern Saskatchewan and northern Manitoba between May, 1995 and February, 1999; teachers were introduced to techniques for involving their students in on-going environmental monitoring studies within local forested stands. Boreal Forest Watch is an educational outreach program which brings high school students and research scientists together to study the forest and foster a sustainable relationship between people and the planetary life-support system we depend upon. Personnel from the University of New Hampshire (UNH), Complex Systems Research Center (CSRC), with the cooperation from the Prince Albert National Park (PANP), instituted this program to help teachers within the BOREAS Study Areas offer real science research experience to their students. The program has the potential to complement large research projects, such as BOREAS, by providing useful student- collected data to scientists. Yet, the primary goal of BFW is to allow teachers and students to experience a hands-on, inquiry-based approach to leaming science - emulating the process followed by research scientists. In addition to introducing these teachers to on-going BOREAS research, the other goals of the BFW program were to: 1) to introduce authentic science topics and methods to students and teachers through hands-on, field-based activities; and, 2) to build a database of student-collected environmental monitoring data for future global change studies in the boreal region.

  2. Train Like an Astronaut Educational Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Yamil L.; Lloyd, Charles; Reeves, Katherine M.; Abadie, Laurie J.

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to reduce the incidence of childhood obesity, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), capitalizing on the theme of human spaceflight developed two educational outreach programs for children ages 8-12. To motivate young "fit explorers," the Train Like an Astronaut National (TLA) program and the Mission X: Train Like an Astronaut International Fitness Challenge (MX) were created. Based on the astronauts' physical training, these programs consist of activities developed by educators and experts in the areas of space life sciences and fitness. These Activities address components of physical fitness. The educational content hopes to promote students to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields. At the national level, in partnership with First Lady Michelle Obama's Let?s Move! Initiative, the TLA program consists of 10 physical and 2 educational activities. The program encourages families, schools, and communities to work collaboratively in order to reinforce in children and their families the importance of healthy lifestyle habits In contrast, the MX challenge is a cooperative outreach program involving numerous space agencies and other international partner institutions. During the six-week period, teams of students from around the world are challenged to improve their physical fitness and collectively accumulate points by completing 18 core activities. During the 2011 pilot year, a t otal of 137 teams and more than 4,000 students from 12 countries participated in the event. MX will be implemented within 24 countries during the 2012 challenge. It is projected that 7,000 children will "train like an astronaut".

  3. You Can't Flush Science Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobnes, Emilie; Mitchell, S. E.

    2008-05-01

    Did you know... that the writing on the bathroom wall isn't just graffiti anymore? Studies have shown that messages in unusual locations can have extraordinary impact. A growing number of companies and non-profit organizations are placing signage in unexpected venues, such as bathroom stalls, sporting arena seatbacks, gas stations, and diaper-changing areas. A 2003 study found that public response to promotional materials posted in restrooms was overwhelmingly positive, and respondents view these materials for up to two minutes instead of the 3 to 5 seconds they spend with traditional print marketing. Recall rates of content and messages are high, and researchers found bathroom signage to be 40% more effective than a typical print sign. It is often difficult to design effective education and outreach programs that reach a broader audience than a fairly self-selective one. Most of our events and projects ask audiences to come to us. This format inherently attracts a science-interested audience. So how do you reach the other half, those non-traditional learners, in an effective manner? Take the science to them! Help your message be more effective by "shocking” them with the science. Placing science, technology, engineering, and mathematical (STEM) content in unexpected venues makes it accessible, memorable, and likely to reach a captive audience that might not otherwise seek it out. The "Did You Know?” campaign brings STEM messages to underserved audiences through innovative placement. Bathroom stalls, movie theaters, and shopping malls are visited by thousands each day and provide a surprising and overlooked venue for outreach.

  4. 33 CFR 385.18 - Public outreach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... process. (4) Project Management Plans and Program Management Plans shall include information concerning...) Project Delivery Team meetings and RECOVER meetings shall be open to attendance by the public. The public... opportunities to review and comment during implementation of the Plan. (3) Project Management Plans and...

  5. Outreach Opportunities for Early Career Scientists at the Phoenix ComiCon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horodyskyj, L.; Walker, S. I.; Forrester, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    The Phoenix ComiCon (PCC) is a rapidly growing annual four-day pop culture event, featuring guests, costuming, exhibits, and discussion panels for popular sci-fi, fantasy, horror, and anime franchises. In 2013, PCC began experimenting with science discussion panels. The popularity of the science programming resulted in an expansion of the track for 2014, which Horodyskyj was responsible for coordinating. Thirty hours of programming were scheduled, including 25 discussion panels, NASA's FameLab, and a Mars room. Panelists included industry specialists, established scientists, STEM outreach enthusiasts, and early career scientists. The majority of the panelists were early career scientists recruited from planetary sciences and biology departments at ASU and UA. Panel topics included cosmology, biotechnology, artificial intelligence, space exploration, astrobiology, and the cross-linkages of each with pop culture. Formats consisted of Q&A, presentations, and interactive game shows. Although most panels were aimed at the general audience, some panels were more specialized. PCC 2014 attracted 77,818 attendees. The science programming received rave reviews from the audience, the PCC management, and the panelists themselves. Many panel rooms were filled to capacity and required crowd control to limit attendance. We observed the formation of science "groupies" who sought out the science panels exclusively and requested more information on other science public events in the Phoenix area. We distributed surveys to several select sessions to evaluate audience reasons for attending the science panels and their opinion of the scientists they observed. We will present the results of these surveys. As the PCC continues to grow at an exponential rate, the science programming will continue to expand. We will discuss ideas for continued expansion of the PCC science programming both to serve the public and as a unique public outreach opportunity for early career scientists.

  6. From school classes to UNESCO: IYL-enabled environments for tackling the STEM skills shortage through student-led outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, Matthew T.; John, Pearl V.; Wong, Nicholas H. L.; Mittal, Vinita; Nunez-Velazquez, Martin M.

    2016-09-01

    The accepted industrial skills shortage in the subjects of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) in the United Kingdom has led to an increasing drive for universities to work with a wider pool of potential students. One contributor to this drive is the Lightwave Roadshow, a photonics-focused outreach program run by postgraduate students from the University of Southampton. The program has benefitted from the unique platform of the International Year of Light (IYL) 2015 for the development and support of hands-on and interactive outreach activities. In this report we review Lightwave activities facilitated by IYL that focused on widening participation for students aged 6 to 18 years from a multitude of societal categories; the roadshow has directly benefitted from the significance and investment into the IYL in conjunction with university recruitment strategies, local schools and the support of international organizations such as SPIE and OSA. Lightwave has used the foundation of the IYL to provide a wide range of activities for over 1,200 UK students in 53 different schools; the assessment tools used to measure learning outcomes, reach and impact are also discussed. The program's activities have been developed to make younger age groups the center of the outreach activity and create an environment which encourages youth pursuit of optics and science from a grassroots level upwards; to illustrate this we will outline a Lightwave project endorsed by the IYL steering committee to permit two 6th form students to attend the IYL opening ceremony in Paris.

  7. Ophthalmic artery color Doppler ultrasonography in mild-to-moderate preeclampsia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayaz, Tunahan; Akansel, Gur. E-mail: gakansel@superonline.com; Hayirlioglu, Alper; Arslan, Arzu; Suer, Necdet; Kuru, Ihsan

    2003-06-01

    Objective: To evaluate the hemodynamic changes in mild-moderate preeclampsia using ophthalmic artery Doppler ultrasonography technique. Methods: Ophthalmic artery pulsatility and resistivity indices were calculated in 30 mild-moderate preeclamptic women and 30 normotensive gravid women of matched gestational age. Student's t-test was performed to test the significance of difference. Results: Both indices of peripheral resistance were found to be significantly lower in the ophthalmic arteries of mild-moderately preeclamptic women than those measured in normotensive gravid women at similar stage of pregnancy. In a small number patients whose disease progressed to severe preeclampsia, both indices increased. Conclusion: In patients with mild-moderate preeclampsia, ophthalmic artery color Doppler ultrasonography detects hemodynamic changes that are not present in normotensive gravid women. Reversal of Doppler patterns in a small number of patients with progressive disease supports the hypotheses suggesting the presence of early vasodilation and late vasospasm in the etiology of preeclampsia.

  8. In vitro testing of thiolated poly(aspartic acid) from ophthalmic formulation aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budai-Szű Cs, Mária; Horvát, Gabriella; Gyarmati, Benjámin; Szilágyi, Barnabás Áron; Szilágyi, András; Csihi, Tímea; Berkó, Szilvia; Szabó-Révész, Piroska; Mori, Michela; Sandri, Giuseppina; Bonferoni, Maria Cristina; Caramella, Carla; Csányi, Erzsébet

    2016-08-01

    Ocular drug delivery formulations must meet anatomical, biopharmaceutical, patient-driven and regulatory requirements. Mucoadhesive polymers can serve as a better alternative to currently available ophthalmic formulations by providing improved bioavailability. If all requirements are addressed, a polymeric formulation resembling the tear film of the eye might be the best solution. The optimum formulation must not have high osmotic activity, should provide appropriate surface tension, pH and refractive index, must be non-toxic and should be transparent and mucoadhesive. We would like to highlight the importance of in vitro polymer testing from a pharmaceutical aspect. We, therefore, carried out physical-chemical investigations to verify the suitability of certain systems for ophthalmic formulations. In this work, in situ gelling, mucoadhesive thiolated poly(aspartic acid)s were tested from ophthalmic formulation aspects. The results of preformulation measurements indicate that these polymers can be used as potential carriers in ophthalmic drug delivery.

  9. Clinical, Pharmacokinetic, and In Vitro Studies to Support Bioequivalence of Ophthalmic Drug Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Stephanie H; Lionberger, Robert A

    2016-07-01

    For ophthalmic drug products, the determination of bioequivalence can be challenging, as drug concentrations at the site of action cannot always be measured. The FDA has recommended a variety of studies that can be used to demonstrate bioequivalence for different ophthalmic drug products. Product-specific bioequivalence recommendations for 28 ophthalmic products have been posted on FDA's website as of May 2016, outlining the specific tests which should be performed to demonstrate bioequivalence. The type of study that can be used to demonstrate bioequivalence depends on the drug product's active pharmaceutical ingredient(s), dosage form, indication, site of action, mechanism of action, and scientific understanding of drug release/drug availability and drug product characteristics. This article outlines the FDA's current guidance on studies to demonstrate bioequivalence through clinical endpoint studies, pharmacokinetic studies, and in vitro studies for generic ophthalmic drug products.

  10. One World, One Sky: Outreach in a Multicultural, Multilingual Metropolis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, M.

    2015-03-01

    As cities around the world grow more and more diverse, we must take this diversity into account in developing outreach activities and materials. The International Year of Astronomy in 2009 brought a lot of attention to the needs of underserved communities and developing countries, emphasizing the ideal of widespread access to astronomy outreach. Increasingly, however, we find that some of the same challenges facing underserved communities and developing countries are also present in modern metropolises. Conveniently, the linguistic and cultural diversity of our cities is more and more accurately reflected among the astronomy community. The diversity of the astronomical community itself creates opportunities for effective multicultural, multilingual outreach.

  11. Instructional Outreach to High Schools: Should You Be Doing It?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth J Burhanna

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Academic librarians have recognized the need for and the benefits of instructional outreach to high schools, but faced with budgetary challenges, increasing workloads, and other pressures, librarians sometimes struggle to determine if and how they can work with high schools. This paper will seek to provide practical direction in considering these questions. Using the library high school outreach program at Kent State University Informed Transitions as a sample case, this paper will share observations, discuss practical considerations, and offer recommendations that will serve to guide academic librarians in determining what role they can play in providing instructional outreach to local high schools.

  12. [Double-blind method of using solcoseryl ophthalmic gel and 2,4% cysteine in ophthalmic gel in patients with chronic recurrent keratitis and keratitis sicca].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzystkowa, K M; Hydzikowa, M; Szpytma, R

    1991-06-01

    A double blind study with Solcoseryl compounds in ophthalmic gel and with 2.4% cystein in ophthalmic gel was performed in the period 1985-1988; it was used in 18 cases: with chronic recurrent keratitis (11 patients) and sicca keratitis (7 patients). Observed was the influence of these compounds on the epithelialization of the cornea, on the improvement of corneal transparency, the diminutation of the troubles connected with dessication of the eye in sicca keratitis. In spite of the small number of cases the observations were interesting. In patients with a chronic recurrent keratitis the influence of both compounds showed to be beneficial for the condition of the cornea. In patients with keratitis sicca one could observe a better tolerance of the Solcoseryl ophthalmic gel which could be applied for a longer period in comparison with cystein in gel.

  13. The international council of ophthalmology: vision for ophthalmic education in an interdependent world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Andrew G; Golnik, Karl C; Tso, Mark O M; Spivey, Bruce; Miller, Kathleen; Gauthier, Tina-Marie

    2012-10-01

    To describe the emerging strategic global perspective of the International Council of Ophthalmology (ICO) efforts in ophthalmic education. A global perspective describing how the development of sophisticated educational tools in tandem with information technology can revolutionize ophthalmic education worldwide. Review of ICO educational tools, resources, and programs that are available to ophthalmic educators across the globe. With the explosive growth of the Internet, the ability to access medical information in the most isolated of locations is now possible. Through specific ICO initiatives, including the ICO curricula, the "Teaching the Teachers" program, and the launching of the new ICO Center for Ophthalmic Educators, the ICO is providing ophthalmic educators across the globe with access to standardized but customizable educational programs and tools to better train ophthalmologists and allied eye care professionals throughout the world. Access to educational tools and strengthening of global learning will help providers meet the goals of VISION 2020 and beyond in eliminating avoidable blindness. It is the intent of the ICO that its programs for ophthalmic educators, including conferences, courses, curricula, and online resources, result in better-trained ophthalmologists and eye care professionals worldwide. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Revealing the Universe to Our Community: NMSU's Society of Astronomy Students' Dedication to Public Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Mercedes; Rees, S.; Medina, A.; Beasley, D.; Campos, A.; Chanover, N. J.; Uckert, K.; McKeever, J.

    2014-01-01

    The New Mexico State University (NMSU) Society of Astronomy Students (SAS) is an undergraduate organization centered on students’ passions for learning and sharing knowledge about the field of astronomy. The SAS strives to become one of the most active clubs on the NMSU campus by their involvement in both astronomy and non-astronomy related public outreach and community service events. NMSU is located in Las Cruces, NM, where Clyde Tombaugh made great contributions both to the field of astronomy and to our local community. He was able to spark the community's interest in astronomy and science in general; this is an aspect of his career that the SAS strives to emulate. To do this, the SAS participates in community outreach events with the goal of stimulating curiosity and providing opportunities for the public to observe and understand exciting phenomenon occurring in our universe. With help from the NMSU Astronomy Department, the SAS is able to volunteer alongside the Astronomy Graduate Student Organization (AGSO) at events for people of all ages. Working jointly with the AGSO allows us to be mentored by the very students who were in our shoes not long ago; they educate us about the wonders of the universe, just as we wish to educate the community. This provides an enlightening and enriching environment for both club and community members. The NMSU Astronomy Department hosts events for the entire community, such as observing nights held at Tombaugh Observatory — which SAS members attend and help advertise — where community members learn about and view objects in the night sky through telescopes. SAS members assist with field trips where local middle and elementary school students attend presentations and participate in astronomy-related activities on the NMSU campus. These hands-on activities are presented in an understandable way, and are meant to increase appreciation for all of the exciting subjects our universe has to offer. Other outreach events include

  15. NASA's Astrophysics Education and Public Outreach: Selected Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, H.; Smith, D.; Sharma, M.

    2013-04-01

    NASA's rich portfolio of Astrophysics Education and Public Outreach (EPO) programs spans formal and informal education from K-12, addresses diverse audiences, and takes the latest NASA scientific discoveries to the public through science museums, planetaria, exhibitions, and other outlets. Public outreach activities use NASA Astrophysics scientific discoveries and technology to inspire students to undertake scientific careers and enhance public understanding of science and technology. Examples of noteworthy activities in the past year include Hubble, Chandra, JWST exhibits at the Intrepid Museum, New York, community collaborations such as the Multiwavelength Universe online course, and a variety of Citizen Science projects associated with robotic telescopes and with flight missions such as HST and Kepler. Special EPO programs have been developed to reach out to girls and underrepresented minorities. NASA's Astrophysics Science Education and Public Outreach Forum (SEPOF) has developed resources to assist the scientific community in participating in education and public outreach.

  16. Science Educational Outreach Programs That Benefit Students and Scientists

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clark, Greg; Russell, Josh; Enyeart, Peter; Gracia, Brant; Wessel, Aimee; Jarmoskaite, Inga; Polioudakis, Damon; Stuart, Yoel; Gonzalez, Tony; MacKrell, Al; Rodenbusch, Stacia; Stovall, Gwendolyn M; Beckham, Josh T; Montgomery, Michael; Tasneem, Tania; Jones, Jack; Simmons, Sarah; Roux, Stanley

    2016-01-01

    Both scientists and the public would benefit from improved communication of basic scientific research and from integrating scientists into education outreach, but opportunities to support these efforts are limited...

  17. CRCHD Launches National Colorectal Cancer Outreach and Screening Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI CRCHD launches National Screen to Save Colorectal Cancer Outreach and Screening Initiative which aims to increase colorectal cancer screening rates among racially and ethnically diverse and rural communities.

  18. Outreach Plan : Sherburne National Wildlife Refuge for Expanded Hunting Opportunities

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Outreach Plan for Sherburne NWR states that hunting opportunities will be expanded on the Refuge to include wild turkey hunting by disabled and youth hunters.

  19. Outreach for Families and Girls- Astronomy at Outdoor Concerts and at Super Bowl or Halloween Star Parties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubowich, Donald A.

    2011-05-01

    Bring telescope to where the people are! Music and Astronomy Under the Stars (MAUS) is a NASA-funded as astronomy outreach program at community parks and music festivals (1000 - 25,000 people/event). While there have been many astronomy outreach activities and telescope observations at sidewalks and parks, this program targets a different audience - music lovers who are attending concerts in community parks or festivals. These music lovers who may not have visited science museums, planetariums, or star parties are exposed to telescope observations and astronomy information with no additional travel costs. MAUS includes solar observing, telescope observations including a live imaging system, an astronomical video, astronomy banners/posters, and hands-on activities. MAUS increased awareness, engagement, and interest in astronomy at classical, pop, rock, and ethnic music concerts. Since 2009 over 50,000 people have participated in these outreach activities including a significant number of families and young girls. In addition to concerts in local Long Island parks, there were MUAS events at Tanglewood (summer home of the Boston Symphony Orchestra), Jazz in Central Park, and Astronomy Night on the National Mall (co-sponsored by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy). In 2011 MUAS will be expanded to include Ravinia (summer home of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra), the Newport Folk Festival, and the Bethel Woods Center for the Arts (site of the 1969 Woodstock festival). According to our survey results, music lovers became more informed about astronomy. Expanding Hofstra University's successful outreach programs, I propose the creation of a National Halloween Stars event targeting children and a National Super Bowl Star Party targeting girls, women, and the 2/3 of Americans who do not watch the Super Bowl. This can be combined with astronomers or amateur astronomers bringing telescopes to Super Bowl parties for football fans to stargaze during

  20. Indian Contribution to IPY Outreach Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, M.; Ravindra, R.

    2007-12-01

    India is involved in a major way in both the aspects, i.e. scientific as well as outreach activities, of the International Polar Year (IPY) 2007-2008. National Centre for Antarctic & Ocean Research (NCAOR, under the Ministry of Earth Sciences, Government of India) is acting as the national coordinating agency. The launching of the Indian chapter of the IPY 2007-2008 took place at NCAOR and parallely at Jawaharlal Nehru National University (JNU), New Delhi on 1st March 2007. Two Indian scientific proposals have been endorsed by IPY, which are Project id. 70 and Project id. 129. Simultaneously, India is actively involved in the outreach activities related to IPY. NCAOR had sponsored the visit of two college students to Antarctica during the 25th Indian Antarctic Expedition (IAE). A series of lectures were delivered by one of them at more than twenty schools & colleges in the rural & suburban areas of Indian state of Maharashtra regarding the wonders of Antarctica to educate the general public and popularize polar science. NCAOR is the only Indian institute that has the capability to store and sample Antarctic ice core with special Cold Room facility that is maintained at -20°C. Students from several schools and colleges and scientists/visitors from various Indian institutes/foreign countries have visited NCAOR to get first hand experience of polar research. NCAOR has also collaborated with WWF-India (World Wide Fund for Nature) for carrying out the outreach activities to schools throughout the vast expanses of India. In this regard a calendar of event was released on 1st March 2007, which lists various competitions and activities that will be held during 2007-2008. It includes competitions such as poster & model making, stamp designing, petition writing etc. for school children. The first competition, poster making & slogan writing, was held at New Delhi on April 10, 2007 and prizes were distributed by the H'ble Minister of Science & Technology and Earth Sciences on

  1. Graduate Students Unite! Building an Outreach Program From Scratch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reif, C.; Labonte, A.

    2005-12-01

    In the spring of 2000, a group of graduate students at Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) gathered and declared the need to facilitate participation in science education outreach. The result was the formation of the Scripps Community Outreach Program for Education (SCOPE, http://sioscope.ucsd.edu). SCOPE has been connecting SIO graduate students, faculty, and staff with existing outreach programs in the San Diego area ever since. While many scientists would like to commit some time to helping the general public understand the world around them, they often do not know where to begin. To make this connection, SCOPE holds meetings and operates an email listserv to announce upcoming outreach opportunities and sign up volunteers. Over the years, SCOPE has developed relationships with local science outreach groups, outreach events, schools, and teachers. There are usually at least two volunteer opportunities a month, some of which take place on the SIO campus itself. These opportunities include speaking to senior citizens, participating in a school career day, mentoring National Ocean Science Bowl teams, providing tours of SIO to minority middle and high school students, and just about anything else one can imagine. The opportunities are coordinated by one or two graduate students who graciously volunteer their time to make sure that community's and the scientist's needs are met. To keep such an organization running requires not only networking with the community but also networking within the university as well. It is necessary to keep in contact with other outreach groups on campus as well as the communication and development offices. In addition we have worked closely with the Birch Aquarium at Scripps and have played an important part of the California Center for Ocean Science Education Excellence (COSEE, http://www.cacosee.net). We believe that SCOPE has been very successful and would like to share the lessons we have learned with interested members of the

  2. Outreach surgical consulting services in North East Victoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chittleborough, Timothy John; Lourensz, Kaleb; Elliott, Matthew; Thomas, Peter; Franzi, Stephen

    2013-12-01

    There is a paucity of data regarding the provision of consultative outreach specialist surgical services to rural areas. This paper aims to describe a model of outreach consultative practice to deliver specialist surgical services to rural communities. Analysis of prospectively collected data for consultations in a three month period for two surgeons based in Wangaratta. Two surgeons in regional Victoria based in Wangaratta, North East Victoria, conducting outreach consultations to Beechworth, Benalla, Bright and Mansfield. All patients seen in consultations over a 3-month period. Patient workload, casemix of presenting complaint, consultation outcome including plan for surgical procedure. Outreach surgical consulting was associated with a higher proportion of new consultations, and there was trend towards being more likely to result in a surgical procedure than consultations in the base rural centre. Outreach surgical consulting provides surgeons with a larger referral base and provides communities with better access to local specialists. Outreach practice should be encouraged for surgeons in regional centres. © 2013 The Authors. Australian Journal of Rural Health © National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  3. Publicising chemistry in a multicultural society through chemistry outreach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce D. Sewry

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Given the emphasis in Higher Education on community engagement in South Africa and the importance of international collaboration, we discuss a joint approach to chemistry outreach in two countries on two continents with widely differing target school audiences. We describe the history of the partnership between the chemistry departments at Rhodes University and the University of Bristol and provide an outline of the chemistry content of their outreach initiatives, the modes of delivery, the advantages to both departments and their students for involvement in various levels of outreach, the challenges they still face and additional opportunities that such work facilitated. The lecture demonstration ‘A Pollutant’s Tale’ was presented to thousands of learners all over the world, including learners at resource-deprived schools in South Africa. Challenges to extend outreach activities in South Africa include long travelling distances, as well as a lack of facilities (such as school halls and electricity at schools. Outreach activities not only impacted on the target audience of young learners, they also impacted upon the postgraduate and other chemistry students taking part in these initiatives. This collaboration strengthened both institutions and their outreach work and may also lead to chemistry research collaborations between the academics involved.

  4. Transvenous Coil Embolization for Dural Arteriovenous Fistulas of the Ophthalmic Sheath: Report of Two Cases and Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Juyoung; Jo, Kyung-Il; Yeon, Je Young; Hong, Seung-Chyul

    2016-01-01

    We present two patients with a dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF) of the ophthalmic sheath who developed progressive exophthalmos, conjunctival chemosis, and visual loss. These symptoms mimic those of cavernous sinus dAVFs. Dural AVFs of the ophthalmic sheath are extremely rare and their clinical management is controversial. We successfully treated these two patients by transvenous coil embolization. Transvenous embolization appears to be a safe and effective method to treat dAVFs of the ophthalmic sheath.

  5. Soil Science Society of America - K-12 Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindbo, David L.; Loynachan, Tom; Mblia, Monday; Robinson, Clay; Chapman, Susan

    2013-04-01

    The Soil Science Society of America created its K12 Committee in 2006 in part to compliment the Dig It! The Secrets of Soil exhibit that opened in July 2008 at the Smithsonian's Institution's Nation Museum of Natural History (of which SSS was a founding sponsor). The committee's work began quickly with a website designed to provide resources for K12 teachers. The first accomplishments included reviewing and posting links to web based information already available to teachers. These links were sorted by subject and grade level to make it easier for teachers to navigate the web and find what they needed quickly. Several presentations and lessons designed for K12 teachers were also posted at this time. Concurrent with this effort a subcommittee review and organized the national teaching standards to show where soils could fit into the overall K12 curriculum. As the website was being developed another subcommittee developed a soils book (Soil! Get the Inside Scoop, 2008) to further compliment the Dig It! exhibit. This was a new endeavor for SSSA having never worked with the non-academic audience in developing a book. Peer-reviews of this book included not only scientist but also students in order to make sure the book was attractive to them. Once the book was published and the website developed it became clear more outreach was needed. SSSA K12 Committee has attended both the National Science Teachers Association (since 2008) the USA Science and Engineering Festival (since 2010) with exhibits and workshops. It has cooperated and contributed to the American Geologic Institutes' Earth Science Week materials with brochures and lesson plans and with National Association of Conservation Districts by providing peer-review and distribution of materials. The most recent developments from the committee include a web redesign that is more student and teacher friendly, the development of a peer-review system to publish K12 Lesson Plans, and finally the publication of a new soils

  6. Preparation of an Ultrafine Rebamipide Ophthalmic Suspension with High Transparency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Takakuni; Hiraoka, Shogo; Urashima, Hiroki; Ogura, Ako; Ishida, Tatsuhiro

    2017-01-01

    A 2% commercially available, milky-white, rebamipide micro-particle suspension is used to treat dry eyes, and it causes short-term blurring of the patient's vision. In the current study, to improve the transparency of a rebamipide suspension, we attempted to obtain a clear rebamipide suspension by transforming the rebamipide particles to an ultrafine state. In the initial few efforts, various rebamipide suspensions were prepared using a neutralizing crystallization method with additives, but the suspensions retained their opaque quality. However, as a consequence of several critical improvements in the neutralizing crystallization methods such as selection of additives for crystallization, process parameters during crystallization, the dispersion method, and dialysis, we obtained an ultrafine rebamipide suspension (2%) that was highly transparent (transmittance at 640 nm: 59%). The particle size and transparency demonstrated the fewest level of changes at 25°C after 3 years, compared to initial levels. During that period, no obvious particle sedimentation was observed. The administration of this ultrafine rebamipide suspension (2%) increased the conjunctival mucin, which was comparable to the commercially available micro-particle suspension (2%). The corneal and conjunctival concentration of rebamipide following ocular administration of the ultrafine suspension was slightly higher than that of the micro-particle suspension. The ultrafine rebamipide suspension (eye-drop formulation) with a highly transparent ophthalmic clearness should improve a patient's QOL by preventing even a shortened period of blurred vision.

  7. Space Flight-Induced Intracranial Hypertension: An Ophthalmic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Charles Robert; Mader, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Although physiologic and pathologic changes associated with microgravity exposure have been studied extensively, the effect of this environment on the eye is largely unknown. Over the last several years, NASA s Space Medicine Division has documented astronauts presenting with varying degrees of disc edema, globe flattening, choroidal folds, cotton wool spots, and hyperopic shifts after long-duration space flight. Methods: Before and after long-duration space flight, six astronauts underwent complete eye examinations to include cycloplegic and/or manifest refraction and fundus photography. Five of these astronauts had Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) performed following their missions. Results: Following exposure to space flight of approximately 6-months duration, six astronauts had neuro-ophthalmic findings. These consisted of disc edema in four astronauts, globe flattening in four astronauts, choroidal folds in four astronauts, cotton wool spots in three astronauts, nerve fiber layer thickening by OCT in five astronauts, and decreased near vision in five astronauts. Four of the astronauts with near vision complaints had a hyperopic shift equal to or greater than + 0.50D between pre- and post-mission spherical equivalent refraction in one or both eyes (range +0.50D to +1.50D). These same four had globe flattening by MRI. Conclusions: The findings we describe may have resulted from a rise in intracranial pressure caused by microgravity fluid shifts, and could represent parts of a spectrum of ocular and cerebral responses to extended microgravity.

  8. Optical testing of progressive ophthalmic glasses based on galvo mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuerwald, S.; Schmitt, R.

    2014-03-01

    In production of ophthalmic freeform optics like progressive eyeglasses, the specimens are tested according to a standardized method which is based on the measurement of the vertex power on usually less than 10 points. For a better quality management and thus to ensure more reliable and valid tests, a more comprehensive measurement approach is required. For Shack Hartmann Sensors (SHS) the dynamic range is defined by the number of micro-lenses and the resolution of the imaging sensor. Here, we present an approach for measuring wavefronts with increased dynamic range and lateral resolution by the use of a scanning procedure. Therefore, the proposed innovative setup is based on galvo mirrors that are capable of measuring the vertex power with a lateral resolution below one millimeter since this is sufficient for a functional test of progressive eyeglasses. Expressed in a more abstract way, the concept is based on a selection and thereby encoding of single sub-apertures of the wave front under test. This allows measuring the wave fronts slope consecutively in a scanning procedure. The use of high precision galvo systems allows a lateral resolution below one millimeter as well as a significant fast scanning ability. The measurement concept and performance of this method will be demonstrated for different spherical and freeformed specimens like progressive eye glasses. Furthermore, approaches for calibration of the measurement system will be characterized and the optical design of the detector will be discussed.

  9. Pterygium: prevalence and severity in an Amazonian ophthalmic setting, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Joanna Coutts

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This is a cross sectional ophthalmic clinic-based study to estimate the prevalence and severity of pterygium in a selected population in the Amazon Basin, Brazil. METHODS: The study included 225 subjects above 20 years age from three different places of residence of Manaus city (group 1, n=89, river based communities (group 2, n= 116 and indigenous rainforest inhabitants (group 3, n=20. Pterygia was graded 1-4 by torch examination and gender, age and occupation determined. RESULTS: were assessed to have pterygia (grades 2-4 117 people; 52% against 108 control subjects with bilateral disease in 43% of subjects. Prevalence of grades 2-4 increased from 36% in group 1 to 62.5 % in group 2 and 75% in group 3. Of these subjects the percentage with outdoor professions increased across the groups from 31.2% to 67.1 % and 70% respectively. Also subjects of group 2 who worked largely outdoors, showed increasing pterygia severity, from grades 2 at 57% (p=0.0002, grade 3 at 93.3% (p,0.0001 to grade 4 at 100% (p=0.0004 CONCLUSION: Amazonian communities have a high prevalence of pterygia, which correlates to greater outdoor occupation and sun exposure. This study agrees with previous worldwide reports and it is the first study to compare the prevalence of pterygium in rural and urban living in Amazonian in Brazil. This study highlights the public health significance and gross need for intervention studies.

  10. Renewable Microgrid STEM Education & Colonias Outreach Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2015-04-01

    To provide Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) outreach and education to secondary students to encourage them to select science and engineering as a career by providing an engineering-based problem-solving experience involving renewable energy systems such as photovoltaic (PV) panels or wind turbines. All public and private schools, community colleges, and vocational training programs would be eligible for participation. The Power Microgrids High School Engineering Experience used renewable energy systems (PV and wind) to provide a design capstone experience to secondary students. The objective for each student team was to design a microgrid for the student’s school using renewable energy sources under cost, schedule, performance, and risk constraints. The students then implemented their designs in a laboratory environment to evaluate the completeness of the proposed design, which is a unique experience even for undergraduate college students. This application-based program was marketed to secondary schools in the 28th Congressional District through the Texas Education Agency’s (TEA) Regional Service Centers. Upon application, TEES identified regionally available engineers to act as mentors and supervisors for the projects. Existing curriculum was modified to include microgrid and additional renewable technologies and was made available to the schools.

  11. Variable Star Astronomy Education & Public Outreach Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Donna L.

    2008-05-01

    The American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO) published a comprehensive variable star curriculum, "Hands-On Astrophysics, Variable Stars in Science, Math, and Computer Education" in 1997. The curriculum, funded by the National Science Foundation, was developed for a comprehensive audience -- amateur astronomers, classroom educators, science fair projects, astronomy clubs, family learning, and anyone interested in learning about variable stars. Some of the activities from the Hands-On Astrophysics curriculum have been incorporated into the educational materials for the Chandra X-Ray Observatory's Educational and Public Outreach (EPO) Office. On two occasions, in 2000 and 2001, triggered by alerts from amateur astronomers, Chandra observed the outburst of the dwarf nova SS Cygni. The cooperation of amateur variable star astronomers and Chandra X-Ray scientists provided proof that the collaboration of amateur and professional astronomers is a powerful tool to study cosmic phenomena. Once again, the Chandra and AAVSO have teamed up -- this time to promote variable star education. The Hands-On Astrophysics curriculum is being re-designed and updated from the original materials to a web-based format. The new version, re-named Variable Star Astronomy, will provide formal and informal educators, and especially amateur astronomers, educational materials to help promote interest in and knowledge of variable stars.

  12. San Diego Science Alliance Education Outreach Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Anne P.

    1996-11-01

    The General Atomics Science Education Outreach Activities as well as those of several other San Diego area institutions led to the formation in 1994 of the San Diego Science Alliance. The Science Alliance is a consortium of science-related industries, institutions of research and higher education, museums, medical health networks, and science competitions in support of K-12 science education. Some Alliance accomplishments include printing over 4000 resource catalogs for teachers, workshops presented by over 20 of their business members at the San Diego Science Education Conference, and hosting of 3 eight-week courses for teachers. The Alliance provides an important forum for interaction between schools and teachers and local industries and institutions. The Science Alliance maintains a World Wide Web Home Page at elvbf http://www.cerf.net/sd_science/. General Atomics' role in the San Diego Science Alliance will be presented.(Presented by Patricia S. Winter for the General Atomics Science Education Groups and San Diego Science Alliance.)

  13. CMS outreach event to close LS1

    CERN Multimedia

    Achintya Rao

    2015-01-01

    CMS opened its doors to about 700 students from schools near CERN, who visited the detector on 16 and 17 February during the last major CMS outreach event of LS1.   Pellentesque sapien mi, pharetra vitae, auctor eu, congue sed, turpis. Enthusiastic CMS guides spent a day and a half showing the equally enthusiastic visitors, aged 10 to 18, the beauty of CMS and particle physics. The recently installed wheelchair lift was called into action and enabled a visitor who arrived on crutches to access the detector cavern unimpeded.  The CMS collaboration had previously devoted a day to school visits after the successful “Neighbourhood Days” in May 2014 and, encouraged by the turnout, decided to extend an invitation to local schools once again. The complement of nearly 40 guides and crowd marshals was aided by a support team that coordinated the transportation of the young guests and received them at Point 5, where a dedicated safety team including first-aiders, security...

  14. NASA Sounding Rocket Program educational outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberspeaker, P. J.

    2005-08-01

    Educational and public outreach is a major focus area for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The NASA Sounding Rocket Program (NSRP) shares in the belief that NASA plays a unique and vital role in inspiring future generations to pursue careers in science, mathematics, and technology. To fulfill this vision, the NASA Sounding Rocket Program engages in a host of student flight projects providing unique and exciting hands-on student space flight experiences. These projects include single stage Orion missions carrying "active" high school experiments and "passive" Explorer School modules, university level Orion and Terrier-Orion flights, and small hybrid rocket flights as part of the Small-scale Educational Rocketry Initiative (SERI) currently under development. Efforts also include educational programs conducted as part of major campaigns. The student flight projects are designed to reach students ranging from Kindergarteners to university undergraduates. The programs are also designed to accommodate student teams with varying levels of technical capabilities - from teams that can fabricate their own payloads to groups that are barely capable of drilling and tapping their own holes. The program also conducts a hands-on student flight project for blind students in collaboration with the National Federation of the Blind. The NASA Sounding Rocket Program is proud of its role in inspiring the "next generation of explorers" and is working to expand its reach to all regions of the United States and the international community as well.

  15. Devious Lies: Adventures in Freelance Science Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatland, D. R.

    2003-12-01

    Observations are given from two freelance science outreach projects undertaken by the author: Tutoring at-risk secondary students and teaching astronomy to 5th-7th graders in a camp retreat environment. Two recurring thematic challenges in these experiences are considered: First the 'Misperception Problem', the institutionalized chasm between the process of doing science and K-12 science education (wherein science is often portrayed as something distant and inaccessible, while ironically children are necessarily excellent scientists). And second the 'Engagement Problem', engaging a student's attention and energy by matching teaching material and--more importantly--teaching techniques to the student's state of development. The objective of this work is twofold: To learn how to address these two challenges and to empower the students in a manner independent of the scientific content of any particular subject. An underlying hypothesis is that confidence to problem solve (a desirable life-skill) can be made more accessible through a combination of problem solving by the student and seeing how others have solved seemingly impossible problems. This hypothesis (or agenda) compels an emphasis on critical thinking and raises the dilemma of reconciling non-directed teaching with very pointed conclusions about the verity of pseudo-science and ideas prevalent about science in popular culture. An interesting pedagogical found-object in this regard is the useful 'devious lie' which can encourage a student to question the assumption that the teacher (and by extension any professed expert) has the right answers.

  16. Education and Outreach for Volunteer Planetary Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, J. D.

    2016-12-01

    When a large meteor exploded over Chelyabinsk in 2013, people saw the bright flash and rushed to windows. Then the blast wave hit and many were injured by flying glass fragments. Education about airbursts might have reduced the casualties. Education and Public Outreach (EPO) can also be important in broadening public involvement in preparations for dealing with cosmic hazards. Amateur astronomers have an important role in discovering potentially hazardous asteroids and comets, and also in making follow-up observations after discovery. This is especially important for Southern Hemisphere observing sites where professional observers are relatively few. The Planetary Society makes small Shoemaker grants to aid amateur astronomers in this work. Much more could be done if educators, students and the general public were aware of the opportunity and the need. Beyond this, public engagement is essential to raise and maintain support for active agencies, including the UN-sponsored International Asteroid Warning Network (IAWN) and Space Mission Planning Advisory Group (SMPAG). This paper will describe and advocate EPO efforts in support of these and other Volunteer Planetary Defense activities.

  17. USArray Public Outreach Activities: 2005-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorr, P. M.; Busby, R. W.; Hafner, K.; Taber, J.; Woodward, R.

    2012-12-01

    Since its inception as a pilot program in 2005, the highly successful Transportable Array Student Siting Program involved students and faculty from colleges and universities in the identification of sites for future Transportable Array stations in their region. More than 135 students from about 55 institutions conducted site reconnaissance for nearly 1375 sites from the West Coast to the East Coast, and from the Gulf of Mexico to the Great Lakes and southern Canada. Students who participated in the program increased their professional skills and deepened their personal growth. Other USArray public outreach outcomes involve exciting informal education and media opportunities where information about EarthScope and its discoveries are shared with educators and the public. Examples include Ground Motion Visualizations and content sets for the Active Earth Monitor to articles in university, local and regional newspapers and stories appearing in national and international print and broadcast media. The Transportable Array has also been featured in documentaries produced by some of the world's most respected scientific and educational production companies. The Transportable Array has also had an impact on long-term seismic monitoring through its adopt-a-station program. There have been over 50 stations adopted to date, including stations that have enhanced existing networks, such as in Washington and Utah, and others that provide data for characterization of regional seismic hazard.

  18. Felt stigma and self-esteem among psychiatric hospital outdoor and community camp attending patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shantna Kumari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Self-stigma of people with mental illness is a major obstacle to recovery, limiting opportunities and undermining self-esteem. Aim: The aim of this study is to compare felt stigma and self-esteem in psychiatric patients receiving treatment from hospital outdoor clinic or from Community Outreach Program (COP. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on psychiatric patients who were on outpatient treatment for at least 6 months, but had never been hospitalized. The study sample included 130 patients receiving outdoor treatment from a Psychiatric Hospital and a matched group of 140 patients receiving treatment from COP of the same hospital. Demographic and clinical details of the patients were recorded on a specially designed proforma. Modified felt stigma scale and Rosenberg self-esteem scale were used to assess stigma and self-esteem, respectively. Results: On the modified felt stigma scale, the mean (±standard deviation [SD] score of psychiatric hospital outpatients (31.89 ± 6.51 was significantly higher than the scores of patients attending COP (29.20 ± 6.80. On Rosenberg self-esteem scale, mean (±SD scores of patients with psychosis (17.98 ± 1.69 was significantly lower compared to scores of patients with epilepsy (21.83 ± 1.60. There was no significant correlation between stigma and self-esteem. Conclusion: As psychiatric hospital outpatients have significantly more self-stigma when compared to patients attending community outreach camps, the availability of more community outreach camps along with educating people about psychiatric illnesses may help in lowering stigma of psychiatric disorders.

  19. Attendance Control System based on RFID technology

    OpenAIRE

    Nurbek Saparkhojayev; Selim Guvercin

    2012-01-01

    In Kazakhstan, checking students' attendance is one of the important issues for universities, because many universities evaluate students attendance and while giving the final grade, professors consider their total number of appearances on classes during the whole semester. This brings to the idea of having some tool to control students attendance. Some universities prefer to use paper sheet for controlling attendance, whereas some universities prefer to use paper sheet for checking students'...

  20. Color Doppler imaging of the ophthalmic artery in patients with chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela B. Almeida-Freitas

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the ophthalmic artery hemodynamics in patients with chronic heart failure. Methods: Doppler parameters of ophthalmic artery of 18 patients with chronic heart failure in different stages of the disease were compared with 21 healthy volunteers (control group. These parameters were also correlated with echocardiographic assessments and clinical cardiologic status. Results: Mean diastolic velocity was 5.14 ± 2.4 cm/s in the chronic heart failure group and 7.44 ± 3.5 cm/s in the control group (p=0.007. Mean resistance index of the ophthalmic artery was 0.76 ± 0.08 in the chronic heart failure group and 0.70 ± 0.08 in the control group (p=0.04. Mean systolic velocity of the ophthalmic artery was 22.03 ± 7.7 cm/s in the chronic heart failure group and 25.32 ± 9.2 cm/s in the control group (p=0.24. There was a negative correlation between the resistance index of the ophthalmic artery and systemic blood pressure of patients with chronic heart failure (r= -0.47, p=0.007. Diastolic velocity of the ophthalmic artery correlated positively with systemic blood pressure (r=0.44, p=0.02. Conclusion: Lower diastolic velocity and higher resistance index were observed in the ophthalmic artery of chronic heart failure patients when compared to the control group, which probably reflects the presence of orbital vasoconstriction in response to low cardiac output. Therefore, the influence of these findings on the structure and function of the optic nerve head deserves investigation.

  1. Attendance and Attainment in a Calculus Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meulenbroek, Bernard; van den Bogaard, Maartje

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the relationship between attendance and attainment in a standard calculus course is investigated. Calculus could in principle be studied without attending lectures due to the wealth of material available (in hardcopy and online). However, in this study we will show that the pass rate of students attending classes regularly (>75%…

  2. Beyond Outreach: Expanding the UCI Astronomy Outreach Program to New Heights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smecker-Hane, T. A.; Mauzy-Melitz, D. K.; Hood, M. A.

    2010-08-01

    The Astronomy Outreach Program at the University of California, Irvine (UCI) has three major components: (1) tours of the UCI Observatory and visits to local K-12 classrooms that bring hands-on activities and telescopes into the local schools, (2) an annual Teacher's Workshop in Astronomy & Astrophysics, and (3) Visitor Nights at the Observatory for the general public that include lectures on astrophysics topics and star gazing with our telescopes. Here we describe the results of our year long partnership with Grade 3-12 teachers to expand the tour and classroom visit portion of our program. We developed curricula and survey tools for Grades 3, 5, and high school that addresses specific California State Science Content Standards and amplify the impact of our outreach visits to their classrooms and their tours of the UCI Observatory. We describe the lessons and hands-on activities developed for the curricula, report on the results of pre- and post-testing of the students to judge how much they learned and whether or not their attitudes about science have changed, and report on teachers' responses to the program. Many of the lessons and activities we developed are available on our website.

  3. Dropping Knowledge Like Frozen Pumpkins: Successful Physics Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, E. A.

    2011-12-01

    The Society of Physics Students (SPS) is a professional organization specifically designed for college students. A main purpose of SPS is to develop college students into effective members of the physics community; one of the best ways to do this is by promoting science outreach. College students are in a prime position to engage the public in outreach to increase scientific literacy: they're easier for younger, school-age students to identify with, they can reach young adults in a unique way, and they're old enough to seriously engage the general public. SPS helps hundreds of college chapters across the country engage in outreach. One such chapter is at Rhodes College in Memphis, TN. The Rhodes College SPS chapter is active both in K12 schools and on its campus. Rhodes developed a position within its SPS structure to include an officer specifically related to handling outreach. For K12 schools this involved contacting teachers, organizing lessons, and holding training sessions for the college students preparing to teach the lessons. Rhodes SPS also focuses on campus outreach and trying to disabuse students of the notion that physics is stuffy, boring, and only for geniuses. Every fall, Rhodes SPS hosts an extremely popular annual Pumpkin Drop, as well as hosting demo shows, observatory open houses, and contests throughout the year for its students. One of the best received campus outreach programs is something called 'Stall Stories,' where SPS publishes a page flyer that goes in bathrooms around campus involving fun physics, a comic, and a list of SPS events. Rhodes SPS, like the national organization, has the goal of improving physics literacy among K12 students, college students, and the general public through effective outreach.

  4. Swaziland's Traditional Birth Attendants Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, M M; Mngadi, T P

    2005-12-01

    The Traditional Birth Attendants (TBAs) Survey in Swaziland was undertaken between March 27th 1996 and April 8th 1996. The objective of the survey was to generate reliable information regarding activities of TBAs in Swaziland. The survey was conducted in 25 Chiefdoms sampled out of a total of 206 Chiefdoms registered in Swaziland. The total number of sampled respondents in the 25 Chiefdoms was 721. From the survey, it is estimated that there were probably 3000 TBAs in the country, and in the majority of cases such TBAs would be a 51-year old woman who herself had delivered six children and had worked as a TBA for at least 10 years. Between 9,000 and 12,000 deliveries are estimated to take place out of health facilities. Of these many, nearly 43.5% are assisted by "TBAs"; 16.3% of woman interviewed deliver relative/family member and 15.1% are assisted by friends/neighbours, etc. Some of TBAs carry out procedures which are considered to be potentially harmful. Nearly 30% of TBAs have administered herbs; 45% attend to abnormal deliveries (breech and multiple pregnancies); 26.7% re-use their cord cutting tools and in the case of haemorrhage 23.4% do manual procedures within reproductive tract of delivering women.

  5. OCULAR FINDINGS AND SELECT OPHTHALMIC DIAGNOSTIC TESTS IN CAPTIVE AMERICAN WHITE PELICANS (PELECANUS ERYTHRORHYNCHOS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, Matthew E; Ericsson, Aaron C; Franklin, Craig L; Whiting, Rebecca E H; Pearce, Jacqueline W

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to establish normal ophthalmic parameters for select diagnostic tests in American white pelicans (Pelecanuserythrorhynchos). Twenty-one zoo-housed American white pelicans were manually restrained for noninvasive ocular diagnostic testing and complete ophthalmic examination. Tear production quantification using the phenol red thread test (PRTT), fluorescein staining, and intraocular pressure (IOP) evaluation were performed. In addition, conjunctival aerobic bacterial culture and culture-independent 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing were performed on select eyes. Normal variations and ocular abnormalities detected during complete ophthalmic examination were documented and photographed. Direct pupillary light reflex, menace response, and palpebral reflex were present in all birds. The value (mean ± SD) for PRRT and IOP was 14.9 ± 7.84 mm/15 sec and 9.0 ± 1.41 mm Hg oculus uterque, respectively. Conjunctival culture in nine birds revealed no growth for six birds and Staphylococcus aureus growth in three birds. A high relative abundance of Mycoplasma sp. was detected in all samples based on 16S rRNA sequencing. The normal pelican eye was found to have relative conjunctival hyperemia, absent filoplumes, iris color ranging from light blue to brown, and a subcircular vertically elongated pupil. Ophthalmic abnormalities were noted in 10 of 21 birds. Common findings included corneal fibrosis, cataracts, and asteroid hyalosis. The most common ophthalmic abnormality in this species was cataracts.

  6. Effect of rebamipide ophthalmic suspension on the success of lacrimal stent intubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimura, Masashi; Ueki, Mari; Oku, Hidehiro; Sato, Bunpei; Ikeda, Tsunehiko

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of the postoperative administration of rebamipide ophthalmic suspension on the success rate of lacrimal stent intubation (LSI) for the treatment of primary acquired nasolacrimal duct obstruction (PANDO). This comparative interventional cohort study investigated 110 consecutive patients with PANDO who were treated with LSI and followed up for 12 months postoperatively at one institution. LSI was performed by one surgeon, and all patients received identical postoperative care. Among the total 110 patients, 71 underwent LSI with postoperative administration of rebamipide ophthalmic suspension, and 39 underwent LSI without administration of the suspension. Data related to patient age, gender, laterality, and postoperative administration of rebamipide ophthalmic suspension were collected and used as independent variables, and logistic regression analyses were performed to compare the anatomical success rate at 12 months postoperatively between patients with and without postoperative administration of the suspension. The anatomical success rate of LSI in patients with and without postoperative administration of rebamipide ophthalmic suspension was 90.1 and 69.2 %, respectively. A comparison of these success rates showed statistical significance, in that the rate of treatment success was higher in PANDO patients who underwent LSI with postoperative administration of the suspension [odds ratio (OR), 3.37; P rebamipide ophthalmic suspension increases the rate of anatomical success in patients who undergo LSI for the treatment of PANDO.

  7. Surgical glove perforation among nurses in ophthalmic surgery: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Karen Mei-Yan; Chau, Janita Pak-Chun

    2014-04-01

    Many of the ophthalmic surgical instruments are extremely fine and sharp. Due to the dim light environment required for ophthalmic surgical procedures, the passing of sharp instruments among surgeons and scrub nurses also poses a risk for glove perforations. A case-control study was performed to determine the number and site of perforations in the surgical gloves used by a group of scrub nurses during ophthalmic surgery. All six nurses working in an eye and refractive surgery centre in Hong Kong participated in the study. A total of 100 (50 pairs) used surgical gloves were collected following 50 ophthalmic surgeries. Fifty pairs of new surgical gloves were also collected. Every collected surgical glove underwent the water leak test. The surgical procedure perforation rate was 8%, and none of the perforations were detected by the scrub nurses. No perforations were found in any unused gloves. The findings indicate that glove perforations for scrub nurses during ophthalmic surgery do occur and mostly go unnoticed. Future studies should continue to explore factors contributing to surgical glove perforation.

  8. Unusual origin of the left ophthalmic artery from the basilar trunk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Rodrigo; Choi, In Sup; Sordo, Juan Gabriel; Giacaman, Pablo; Badilla, Lautaro; Bravo, Eduardo; Echeverria, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    The formation of the ophthalmic artery (OA) is a complex process with two different proposed embryological steps for its development. Several anatomical variants have been described. We present a very unusual origin of the ophthalmic artery from the basilar trunk, in a 45-year-old male with a history of pontine hemorrhagic stroke. MRI and CTA showed evidence of previous hemorrhage in the pons and several intracranial arterial dysplastic dilatations. DSA confirmed several fusiform dilatations of the basilar trunk. In the left ICA, no ophthalmic artery was seen arising from the carotid siphon. The left ophthalmic artery arises from the basilar trunk and runs lateral to the cavernous sinus through the middle cranial fossa, entering the left orbit at the superior orbital fissure. The patient was treated conservatively. Two main theories for this anomaly are known, one from Lasjaunias and the other from Paget. To our knowledge, this basilar origin of the OA has only been described three times in the literature. For its origin, we propose a partial persistence of the trigeminal artery together with a dominance of the dorsal ophthalmic artery.

  9. Bringing Science Public Outreach to Elementary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lucas; Speck, A.; Tinnin, A.

    2012-01-01

    Many science "museums” already offer fantastic programs for the general public, and even some aimed at elementary school kids. However, these venues are usually located in large cities and are only occasionally used as tools for enriching science education in public schools. Here we present preliminary work to establish exciting educational enrichment environments for public schools that do not easily have access to such facilities. This program is aimed at motivating children's interest in science beyond what they learn in the classroom setting. In this program, we use the experience and experiments/demonstrations developed at a large science museum (in this case, The St. Louis Science Center) and take them into a local elementary school. At the same time, students from the University of Missouri are getting trained on how to present these outreach materials and work with the local elementary schools. Our pilot study has started with implementation of presentations/demonstrations at Benton Elementary School within the Columbia Public School district, Missouri. The school has recently adopted a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) centered learning system throughout all grade levels (K-5), and is therefore receptive to this effort. We have implemented a program in which we have given a series of scientific demonstrations at each grade level's lunch hour. Further enrichment ideas and plans include: addition demonstrations, hands-on experiments, and question and answer sessions. However, the application of these events would be to compliment the curriculum for the appropriate grade level at that time. The focus of this project is to develop public communications which links science museums, college students and local public schools with an emphasis on encouraging college science majors to share their knowledge and to strengthen their ability to work in a public environment.

  10. Evaluations of refraction competencies of ophthalmic technicians in Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Kajal; Naidoo, Kovin; Chagunda, Margarida; Loughman, James

    2016-01-01

    Ophthalmic technicians (OT) work at health facilities in Mozambique and are trained to provide primary and secondary eye care services including basic refraction. This study was designed to assess OT competence and confidence in refraction, and investigate whether an upskilling programme is effective in developing their competence and confidence at refraction. Thirty-one trainee OTs and 16 qualified OTs were recruited to the study. A background questionnaire was administered to determine the demographic profile of the OTs. A confidence levels questionnaire explored their self-reported skills. Clinical competencies were assessed in relation to knowledge (theory exam) and clinical skills (patient exams). 11 OTs were upskilled and the clinical evaluations carried out post training. Initial evaluations demonstrated that confidence and competence levels varied depending on the OTs training (location and duration), and their location of work (clinical load, availability of equipment and other eye care personnel). The qualified OTs were more competent than trainee OTs in most of the evaluations. Post upskilling results demonstrated significant positive impact on confidence and competence levels. These evaluations identified factors affecting the refraction competencies of the OTs and demonstrated that upskilling is effective in improving confidence and competence levels for refraction. They demonstrate the need for a refraction competency framework. The overarching aim of this research was to inform the development of a nationwide programme of OT mentoring, upskilling and leading to the establishment of clinical competency standards for the new OT curricula, relevant to the professional demands. Copyright © 2014 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Removal times and techniques of a viscoadaptive ophthalmic viscosurgical device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auffarth, Gerd U; Holzer, Mike P; Vissesook, Nithi; Apple, David J; Völcker, Hans E

    2004-04-01

    To analyze removal techniques for Healon5 (sodium hyaluronate 2.3%). Center for Research on Ocular Therapeutics and Biodevices, Charleston, South Carolina, USA, and Department of Ophthalmology, Ruprecht-Karls-University, Heidelberg, Germany. In a standardized laboratory setup, the Miyake-Apple posterior view video technique in human autopsy eyes was used to evaluate removal of an ophthalmic viscosurgical device (OVD) from capsular bags implanted with poly(methyl methacrylate), silicone, and acrylic intraocular lenses (IOLs). Healon5 was stained with fluorescein for better visualization. Open-sky preparation and an Alcon Legacy Series 20000 phaco machine with a flow rate of 25 mL/minute and a vacuum setting of +500 mm Hg (maximum irrigation/aspiration [I/A]) were used. With Technique 1, the I/A tip was placed on the center of the IOL and maximum aspiration was applied. With Technique 2 (modified rock 'n roll technique), the I/A tip was moved in quick circular movements on top of the IOL to break the OVD chains and facilitate aspiration. With Technique 1, the mean removal time was 59.0 seconds +/- 23.1 (SD) and with Technique 2, 23.6 +/- 10.3 seconds (P =.004). The removal time of Healon5 correlated with the IOL material. With Technique 2, removal was fastest with silicone IOLs (13.5 +/- 2.1 seconds) followed by PMMA IOLs (17.5 +/- 2.1 seconds). With acrylic IOLs, remnants of the OVD trapped behind the IOL optic resulted in a longer removal time of 34.1 +/- 1.2 seconds. Healon5 was completely removed from the capsular bag with the modified rock 'n roll technique. With acrylic IOLs, remnants can be trapped behind the optic and may be overlooked with an unstained OVD. Aspiration behind the optic is recommended with this IOL type.

  12. Evaluation of health information outreach: theory, practice, and future direction*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Wanda; Dutcher, Gale A.; Keselman, Alla

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Convincing evidence of the effectiveness of health information outreach projects is essential to ensure their continuity. This paper reviews the current state of health information outreach evaluation, characterizes strengths and weaknesses in projects' ability to measure their impact, and assesses enablers of and barriers to projects' success. It also relates the projects' characteristics to evaluation practices. The paper then makes recommendations for strengthening evaluation. Methods: Upon conducting a literature search, the authors identified thirty-three articles describing consumer health information outreach programs, published between 2000 and 2010. We then analyzed the outreach projects with respect to their goals and characteristics, evaluation methods and measures, and reported outcomes. Results: The results uncovered great variation in the quality of evaluation methods, outcome measures, and reporting. Outcome measures did not always match project objectives; few quantitative measures employed pretests or reported statistical significance; and institutional change was not measured in a structured way. While papers reported successful outcomes, greater rigor in measuring and documenting outcomes would be helpful. Conclusion: Planning outcome evaluation carefully and conducting research into mediators between health information and behavior will strengthen the ability to identify best practices and develop a theoretical framework and practical guidance for health information outreach. PMID:23646029

  13. Ophthalmic Start-Up Chief Executive Officers' Perceptions of Development Hurdles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, William C; Nelson, Lindsay A; Kruft, Bonnie; Stewart, Jeanette A

    2017-08-26

    To identify current challenges facing ophthalmic pharmaceutical start-ups in developing new products. Surveys were distributed to the chief executive officer (CEO) or president of ophthalmic start-ups. The survey attracted 24 responses from 78 surveys distributed (31%). The CEOs stated that a lack of financial capital (n = 18, 75%), FDA regulations (n = 6, 25%), and failure to meet clinical endpoints (n = 6, 25%) were their greatest development hurdles. Risk aversion to medicines in early development (n = 18, 75%), mergers and acquisitions reducing corporate choice for licensing agreements (n = 7, 29%), the emergence of large pharmaceutical-based venture capital funding groups (n = 12, 50%), and the failure of many large pharmaceutical companies to develop their own medicines (n = 10, 42%) were noted as recent prominent trends affecting fundraising. The study suggests that development funding, regulatory burden, and meeting clinical endpoints are the greatest development challenges faced by ophthalmic start-up CEOs. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Penicillin susceptibility of non-serotypeable Streptococcus pneumoniae from ophthalmic specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Fumiko; Nakagami, Yoshiko; Takemori, Koichi; Iwatani, Yoshinori; Fujimoto, Shuji

    2006-01-01

    Nontypeable (NT) Streptococcus pneumoniae strains isolated from eyes were examined for both penicillin susceptibility by E-test and penicillin-binding protein (PBP) gene alterations using PCR. Of the 25 ophthalmic isolates, 15 proved to be sensitive (PSSP, MIC penicillin (PISP, MIC = 0.1-1 microg/ml). No penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae (PRSP, MIC > or = 2 microg/ml) were found. PBP gene (pbp1a and pbp2b) alteration PCR indicated that 12 (80.0%) of the 15 ophthalmic PSSPs had unaltered pbp genes and that 3 (20.0%) had alterations in either pbp1a or pbp2b, whereas 8 (80.0%) of the 10 PISPs had unaltered pbp genes and 2 (20.0%) had alterations in both pbp1a and pbp2b. These data suggest that penicillin resistance is spread among NT pneumococci typically associated with ophthalmic infections.

  15. Use of the ophthalmic phacoemulsification instrument for tumors of the spinal cord: report of seven cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, William R; Francis, Ian C

    2004-02-01

    In this retrospective cohort study, we examined the safety, efficacy, and benefits of utilizing the readily available ophthalmic phacoemulsification instrument for the surgery of seven intramedullary spinal cord tumors. Historically, the conventional neurosurgical ultrasonic aspirator was an adaptation of the original Cavitron Phaco-Emulsifier aspirator used in cataract surgery. The ophthalmic instrument has a 1.0-mm internal diameter operating tip. This is much smaller and provides improved visualization and surgical control when compared with the conventional neurosurgical instrument, which has a tip diameter of 3-4 mm. A satisfactory surgical and clinical outcome was achieved in all seven patients with safe and substantial subtotal excision of their tumors. We found the ophthalmic instrument provided excellent visualization and precision in operating on cases of intramedullary spinal cord tumor.

  16. Transvenous embolization of a dural carotid-cavernous sinus fistula via the inferior ophthalmic vein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, Kevin S; Ng, John D; Falardeau, Julie; Roberts, Warren G; Petersen, Bryan; Nesbit, Gary M; Barnwell, Stanley L

    2007-01-01

    A 76-year-old woman presented with an acute onset of right periocular pain, diplopia, ocular injection, progressive proptosis, and periocular swelling. She had an unremarkable past medical history, and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and complete blood count were normal. A carotid-cavernous sinus fistula was suspected, and an MRI demonstrated enlargement of the superior ophthalmic vein posterior to the globe and enlargement of the inferior ophthalmic vein throughout its entire course. Cerebral arteriography demonstrated a dural cavernous sinus fistula. The inferior ophthalmic vein was accessed via the inferonasal orbital space and was catheterized for delivery of multiple platinum coils to the cavernous sinus fistula. Follow-up venograms demonstrated occlusion of the fistula. At 2-month follow-up, there was a residual sixth nerve palsy and resolution of symptoms, including proptosis and periocular swelling.

  17. 78 FR 27971 - Determination That REV-EYES (Dapiprazole Hydrochloride Ophthalmic Solution), 0.5%, Was Not...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Determination That REV-EYES (Dapiprazole Hydrochloride... determined that REV-EYES (dapiprazole hydrochloride ophthalmic solution), 0.5%, was not withdrawn from sale... refer to a listed drug. REV-EYES (dapiprazole hydrochloride ophthalmic solution), 0.5%, is the...

  18. 76 FR 28045 - Determination That XIBROM (Bromfenac Ophthalmic Solution) 0.09% Was Not Withdrawn From Sale for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Determination That XIBROM (Bromfenac Ophthalmic Solution) 0... refer to a listed drug. XIBROM (bromfenac ophthalmic solution) 0.09% is the subject of NDA 021664 held... solution) 0.09% in the ``Discontinued Drug Product List'' section of the Orange Book. The...

  19. Re-evaluation of Magnetic Resonance and Computerised Tomographic Imaging in Neuro-Ophthalmic Patients in an Academic Centre

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koekoek, Clarence G. J.; Meiners, Linda C.; Pott, Jan Willem R.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study is to report the frequency of missed diagnoses on magnetic resonance and computerised tomographic imaging in neuro-ophthalmic patients who were referred to an academic ophthalmology department, with apparent normal imaging. The authors included all neuro-ophthalmic patients, ref

  20. Re-evaluation of Magnetic Resonance and Computerised Tomographic Imaging in Neuro-Ophthalmic Patients in an Academic Centre

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koekoek, Clarence G. J.; Meiners, Linda C.; Pott, Jan Willem R.

    The aim of the study is to report the frequency of missed diagnoses on magnetic resonance and computerised tomographic imaging in neuro-ophthalmic patients who were referred to an academic ophthalmology department, with apparent normal imaging. The authors included all neuro-ophthalmic patients,

  1. Traditional birth attendants in Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. M. Smit

    1994-05-01

    Full Text Available Traditional Birth Attendants (TBAs and traditional healers form an important link in the chain of health personnel providing primary health care in Malawi. In spite of the establishment of hospitals and health centres, it is to these traditional healers and TBAs that the majority of people turn in times of sickness and child-birth. Approximately 60 percent of all deliveries in Malawi occur in the villages. It is therefore important that due regard be paid to the activities of these traditional practitioners in order to ensure the achievement of the goal - "Health for all by the year 2000". The training of TBAs is seen as part of the Maternal and Child Health Services in the country.

  2. Outpatients flow management and ophthalmic electronic medical records system in university hospital using Yahgee Document View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Toshihiko; Gochi, Akira; Hirakawa, Tsuyoshi; Ito, Tadashi; Kohno, Yoshihisa

    2010-10-01

    General electronic medical records systems remain insufficient for ophthalmology outpatient clinics from the viewpoint of dealing with many ophthalmic examinations and images in a large number of patients. Filing systems for documents and images by Yahgee Document View (Yahgee, Inc.) were introduced on the platform of general electronic medical records system (Fujitsu, Inc.). Outpatients flow management system and electronic medical records system for ophthalmology were constructed. All images from ophthalmic appliances were transported to Yahgee Image by the MaxFile gateway system (P4 Medic, Inc.). The flow of outpatients going through examinations such as visual acuity testing were monitored by the list "Ophthalmology Outpatients List" by Yahgee Workflow in addition to the list "Patients Reception List" by Fujitsu. Patients' identification number was scanned with bar code readers attached to ophthalmic appliances. Dual monitors were placed in doctors' rooms to show Fujitsu Medical Records on the left-hand monitor and ophthalmic charts of Yahgee Document on the right-hand monitor. The data of manually-inputted visual acuity, automatically-exported autorefractometry and non-contact tonometry on a new template, MaxFile ED, were again automatically transported to designated boxes on ophthalmic charts of Yahgee Document. Images such as fundus photographs, fluorescein angiograms, optical coherence tomographic and ultrasound scans were viewed by Yahgee Image, and were copy-and-pasted to assigned boxes on the ophthalmic charts. Ordering such as appointments, drug prescription, fees and diagnoses input, central laboratory tests, surgical theater and ward room reservations were placed by functions of the Fujitsu electronic medical records system. The combination of the Fujitsu electronic medical records and Yahgee Document View systems enabled the University Hospital to examine the same number of outpatients as prior to the implementation of the computerized filing system.

  3. Persistent corneal epithelial defect responding to rebamipide ophthalmic solution in a patient with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yusuke; Toshida, Hiroshi; Matsuzaki, Yusuke; Matsui, Asaki; Ohta, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Rebamipide ophthalmic suspension was developed for the treatment of dry eyes and for other corneal diseases, promoting the secretion of both mucin in tear fluid and membrane-associated mucin, increasing the number of goblet cells, and restoring the barrier function of the corneal epithelium. We report a case of a persistent corneal epithelial defect in a patient with diabetes treated with topical application of rebamipide ophthalmic suspension. A 73-year-old woman had a history of type 2 diabetes for 35 years and nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy for 23 years. She presented to our department with discharge and ophthalmalgia in the left eye. A corneal ulcer was detected, and culture of corneal scrapings was performed, with Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus canis being isolated. The infection was treated with levofloxacin eye drops and ofloxacin ophthalmic ointment based on the sensitivity profile of the isolate. However, a corneal epithelial defect persisted for approximately 2 months despite continuing treatment with 0.1% hyaluronic acid ophthalmic suspension and 0.3% ofloxacin eye ointment. Her hemoglobin A1c was 7.3%. The persistent corneal epithelial defect showed improvement at 2 weeks after treatment with rebamipide unit dose 2% ophthalmic suspension, and it did not recur even when vitrectomy was subsequently performed for vitreous hemorrhage due to progression of diabetic retinopathy. This is the first report about efficacy of rebamipide unit dose 2% ophthalmic suspension for presenting persistent corneal epithelial defect in a patient with diabetes. In the present case, the suggested mechanisms are the following: improving the corneal barrier function, stabilization of mucin on the keratoconjunctival epithelium, and improving the wettability and stability of the tear film, which resulted in the promotion of healing of the corneal epithelial defect in a short time period.

  4. Persistent corneal epithelial defect responding to rebamipide ophthalmic solution in a patient with diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayashi Y

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Yusuke Hayashi, Hiroshi Toshida, Yusuke Matsuzaki, Asaki Matsui, Toshihiko Ohta Department of Ophthalmology, Juntendo University Shizuoka Hospital, Izunokuni, Shizuoka, Japan Objective: Rebamipide ophthalmic suspension was developed for the treatment of dry eyes and for other corneal diseases, promoting the secretion of both mucin in tear fluid and membrane-associated mucin, increasing the number of goblet cells, and restoring the barrier function of the corneal epithelium. We report a case of a persistent corneal epithelial defect in a patient with diabetes treated with topical application of rebamipide ophthalmic suspension. Case presentation: A 73-year-old woman had a history of type 2 diabetes for 35 years and nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy for 23 years. She presented to our department with discharge and ophthalmalgia in the left eye. A corneal ulcer was detected, and culture of corneal scrapings was performed, with Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus canis being isolated. The infection was treated with levofloxacin eye drops and ofloxacin ophthalmic ointment based on the sensitivity profile of the isolate. However, a corneal epithelial defect persisted for approximately 2 months despite continuing treatment with 0.1% hyaluronic acid ophthalmic suspension and 0.3% ofloxacin eye ointment. Her hemoglobin A1c was 7.3%. The persistent corneal epithelial defect showed improvement at 2 weeks after treatment with rebamipide unit dose 2% ophthalmic suspension, and it did not recur even when vitrectomy was subsequently performed for vitreous hemorrhage due to progression of diabetic retinopathy. Conclusion: This is the first report about efficacy of rebamipide unit dose 2% ophthalmic suspension for presenting persistent corneal epithelial defect in a patient with diabetes. In the present case, the suggested mechanisms are the following: improving the corneal barrier function, stabilization of mucin on the keratoconjunctival epithelium, and

  5. Evaluation of an outreach education model over five years: Perception of dental students and their outreach clinical mentors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisnert, L; Redmo Emanuelsson, I; Papia, E; Ericson, D

    2017-05-01

    The objective was to investigate changes in students' and clinical mentors' perceptions of a model for outreach education over a 5-year period, 2006-2010. Two cohorts of last-year students of a dental problem-based curriculum and their clinical mentors in the Public Dental Service (PDS) were invited to respond to a questionnaire. In 2006, 85% of 54 students and 72% of their 54 mentors responded; 98% of 40 students and 88% of 41 of the mentors did so in 2010. Participants scored their level of agreement with different statements on a numeric rating scale and gave comments. Dental students and their clinical mentors reported that they shared a consistent and favourable perception of this outreach education model over 5 years. The students reported increased professional confidence and self-reliance. Clinical mentors expressed a transfer of knowledge to their clinics. Differences in scoring were seen between students and mentors for two statements in 2006 and two statements in 2010 (P students perceived that they became self-reliant, which may facilitate their transition from being a student to becoming a professional. The current model supports exchange and professional development for students, faculty and outreach clinics. This leads us to look at outreach education as an opportunity to form a mutual learning community comprised of the outreach clinics and the dental school. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Sustaining educational and public outreach programs in astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Clarkson, William I; Swift, Carrie M; Rasmussen, Eric J; Matzke, David; Murrell, Steven R; LoPresto, Michael C; Campbell, Timothy; Clubb, Robert; Salliotte, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    We advocate meaningful support of sustained education-outreach partnerships between regional metropolitan undergraduate institutions and astronomical clubs and societies. We present our experience as an example, in which we have grown a partnership between the University of Michigan-Dearborn (hereafter UM-D, a 4-year primarily undergraduate institution or PUI), Henry Ford College (hereafter HFC, a 2-year undergraduate college), and maintained a strong collaboration with the Ford Amateur Astronomy Club (FAAC), which is highly active in the Detroit Metropolitan Area. By allowing each organization to play to its strengths, we have developed a continuum of education-outreach efforts at all levels, with connecting tissue between the previously disparate efforts. To-date, faculty and staff effort on these initiatives has been nearly entirely voluntary and somewhat ad-hoc. Here we suggest an initiative to sustain the continuum of education-outreach for the long-term. There are two levels to the suggested initiative....

  7. Education and Outreach for the Pierre Auger Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Snow, Gregory R

    2007-01-01

    The scale and scope of the physics studied at the Auger Observatory offer significant opportunities for original outreach work. Education, outreach, and public relations of the Auger collaboration are coordinated in a task of its own whose goals are to encourage and support a wide range of efforts that link schools and the public with the Auger scientists and the science of cosmic rays, particle physics, and associated technologies. This report focuses on the impact of the collaboration in Mendoza Province, Argentina, as: the Auger Visitor Center in Malargue that has hosted over 29,000 visitors since 2001, the Auger Celebration and a collaboration-sponsored science fair held on the Observatory campus in November 2005, the opening of the James Cronin School in Malargue in November 2006, public lectures, school visits, and courses for science teachers. As the collaboration prepares the proposal for the northern Auger site foreseen to be in southeast Colorado, plans for a comprehensive outreach program are being...

  8. Library outreach: addressing Utah's “Digital Divide”

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloskey, Kathleen M.

    2000-01-01

    A “Digital Divide” in information and technological literacy exists in Utah between small hospitals and clinics in rural areas and the larger health care institutions in the major urban area of the state. The goals of the outreach program of the Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library at the University of Utah address solutions to this disparity in partnership with the National Network of Libraries of Medicine—Midcontinental Region, the Utah Department of Health, and the Utah Area Health Education Centers. In a circuit-rider approach, an outreach librarian offers classes and demonstrations throughout the state that teach information-access skills to health professionals. Provision of traditional library services to unaffiliated health professionals is integrated into the library's daily workload as a component of the outreach program. The paper describes the history, methodology, administration, funding, impact, and results of the program. PMID:11055305

  9. An Historic Encounter: Reviewing the Outreach around ESA's Rosetta Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzen, D.

    2016-03-01

    The Rosetta mission is a milestone in terms of science and public outreach. The European Space Agency and the Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt in particular did a marvellous job of sparking global public interest, driven by various events throughout the mission. In contrast, the actions of the Max Planck Society research group in charge of the high resolution Optical, Spectroscopic, and Infrared Remote Imaging System were, in my opinion, the cause of some concern and bring to light an important debate in the relationship between outreach and science. This article seeks to review the outreach that surrounded the Rosetta mission and to highlight both the best practice that made it a success and the bad practice that set some aspects behind.

  10. Distribution Services of Astronomy and Planetary Sciences Outreach Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Pedro

    2007-08-01

    The coordinated efforts of the planetary science archive data through distribution services will have a major effect on the way planetary scientists work. The huge volume of incoming data and the emergence of technologies and tools to mine the archives will result in important changes for outreach and education. There is unquestionably the great potential for using scientific data and facilities in the fields of education and outreach, but there is equally no doubt that this task is difficult and will need a coordinated worldwide effort. In this paper I will present the first efforts to integrate outreach products under virtual observatories and distribution services and the use of new approaches, like web 2.0 and semantic web to achieve the main objectives.

  11. Google's Geo Education Outreach: Results and Discussion of Outreach Trip to Alaskan High Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, E. J.; Bailey, J.; Bishop, A.; Cain, J.; Goddard, M.; Hurowitz, K.; Kennedy, K.; Ornduff, T.; Sfraga, M.; Wernecke, J.

    2008-12-01

    The focus of Google's Geo Education outreach efforts (http://www.google.com/educators/geo.html) is on helping primary, secondary, and post-secondary educators incorporate Google Earth and Sky, Google Maps, and SketchUp into their classroom lessons. In partnership with the University of Alaska, our Geo Education team members visited several remote Alaskan high schools during a one-week period in September. At each school, we led several 40-minute hands-on learning sessions in which Google products were used by the students to investigate local geologic and environmental processes. For the teachers, we provided several resources including follow-on lesson plans, example KML-based lessons, useful URL's, and website resources that multiple users can contribute to. This talk will highlight results of the trip and discuss how educators can access and use Google's Geo Education resources.

  12. Leveraging Outreach Efforts for Big-Impact Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, D.; Leon, N.

    2000-10-01

    The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) strongly emphasizes the importance of public and educational outreach as an intrinsic part of every space mission. Not only is it necessary to gain and retain public support for space science missions, but also it is an explicit mandate that NASA make every effort to offer genuine and accessible value to the general public in exchange for its support. The product of value is, first of all, information. Of course part of this outreach effort includes industrial technology transfer and free access to raw data for study by science investigators. But an equally important part includes reaching out to a number of different audiences, including those younger members of our society who will soon be choosing their careers, paying taxes, voting, and helping to decide the direction that space exploration and other scientific research will -- or will not -- take in the coming decades. NASA seeks to implement this commitment through each of its space missions Thus, each NASA mission needs include a small budget for public and educational outreach. But how can these missions best use this resource? This paper describes in some detail the approach taken by a small educational outreach team for NASA's New Millennium Program (NMP). The outreach team's approach is twofold: develop a highly desirable suite of products designed to appeal to, as well as inform, a variety of different audiences; then negotiate relationships with existing channels for dissemination of these products. This latter task is normally the most expensive part of outreach. The paper will describe in some detail both the products and the "marketing" approach for those products.

  13. Planning an Effective Speakers Outreach Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Malcolm W.

    1996-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and, in particular, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) have played pivotal roles in the advancement of space exploration and space-related science and discovery since the early 1960's. Many of the extraordinary accomplishments and advancements of NASA and MSFC have gone largely unheralded to the general public, though they often border on the miraculous. This lack of suitable and deserved announcement of these "miracles" seems to have occurred because NASA engineers and scientists are inclined to regard extraordinary accomplishment as a normal course of events. The goal in this project has been to determine an effective structure and mechanism for communicating to the general public the extent to which our investment in our US civilian space program, NASA, is, in fact, a very wise investment. The project has involved discerning important messages of truth which beg to be conveyed to the public. It also sought to identify MSFC personnel who are particularly effective as messengers or communicators. A third aspect of the project was to identify particular target audiences who would appreciate knowing the facts about their NASA investment. The intent is to incorporate the results into the formation of an effective, proactive MSFC speakers bureau. A corollary accomplishment for the summer was participation in the formation of an educational outreach program known as Nasa Ambassadors. Nasa Ambassadors are chosen from the participants in the various MSFC summer programs including: Summer Faculty Fellowship Program (SFFP), Science Teacher Enrichment Program (STEP), Community College Enrichment Program (CCEP), Joint Venture (JOVE) program, and the NASA Academy program. NASA Ambassadors agree to make pre-packaged NASA-related presentations to non-academic audiences in their home communities. The packaged presentations were created by a small cadre of participants from the 1996 MSFC summer programs, volunteering

  14. DOE Building America Stakeholder Outreach and Engagement Highlights: Jan. 1, 2016, through Dec. 31, 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stacey Rothgeb

    2017-05-01

    Fact sheet showing the metrics from calendar year 2016 from Building America's various outreach activities, including website, webinars, publications, etc. Metrics report on data for outreach and stakeholder engagement.

  15. DOE Building America Stakeholder Outreach and Engagement Highlights: Jan. 1, 2016, through Dec. 31, 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothgeb, Stacey K [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-06-08

    Fact sheet showing the metrics from calendar year 2016 from Building America's various outreach activities, including website, webinars, publications, etc. Metrics report on data for outreach and stakeholder engagement.

  16. Gatifloxacin Ophthalmic Solution for Treatment of Bacterial Conjunctivitis: Safety, Efficacy and Patient Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clyde Schultz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gatifloxacin is a fourth generation fluroquinolone antibiotic that has been prescribed for systemic use. However, the drug which was developed by Kyorin (Japan was linked to toxic reactions and death and was banned in the United States and Canada for use as an oral dosage form. It continues to be used as a topical application for ophthalmic conditions as the systemic toxicity seen when taking the drug orally has not been observed with ophthalmic use. The available data indicate that ocular use of gatifloxacin is safe, and effective against a broad spectrum of bacteria, including intracellular bacteria and anaerobes.

  17. Getting to Yes: Supporting Scientists in Education and Public Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhr, S. M.; Lynds, S. E.; Smith, L. K.

    2011-12-01

    Research scientists are busy people, with many demands on their time and few institutional rewards for engagement in education and public outreach (EPO). However, scientist involvement in education has been called for by funding agencies, education researchers and the scientific organizations. In support of this idea, educators consistently rate interaction with scientists as the most meaningful element of an outreach project. What factors help scientists become engaged in EPO, and why do scientists stay engaged? This presentation describes the research-based motivations and barriers for scientists to be engaged in EPO, presents strategies for overcoming barriers, and describes elements of EPO that encourage and support scientist engagement.

  18. Teacher education professionals as partners in health science outreach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houtz, Lynne E; Kosoko-Lasaki, Omofolasade; Zardetto-Smith, Andrea M; Mu, Keli; Royeen, Charlotte B

    2004-01-01

    Medical school and other health science outreach programs to educate and recruit precollege students always have relied on successful collaborative efforts. Creighton University shares the value, significance, and strategies of involving teacher education professionals in several of its current outreach programs, including HPPI, Brains Rule! Neuroscience Expositions, and HHMI Build a Human Project. The education department partner serves as an essential team member in the development, implementation, assessment, and dissemination of these projects to promote science and mathematics achievement and interest in medical careers. Specific examples and mistakes to avoid are included.

  19. Education and public outreach on gravitational-wave astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, M.; Bradaschia, C.; Audley, H.; Barke, S.; Blair, D. G.; Christensen, N.; Danzmann, K.; Freise, A.; Gerberding, O.; Knispel, B.; Lieser, M.; Mandel, I.; Moore, T.; Stuver, A.; Whiting, B.

    2014-08-01

    In this paper we summarise the presentations given during the "Education and Public Outreach on Gravitational-Wave Astronomy" parallel session at the GR-20/Amaldi conference, held in Warsaw, July 2013. The talks presented demonstrate the wide range of education and public outreach activities being undertaken in the field of gravitational-wave astronomy—across science festivals, science education centers, junior schools and high schools, colleges and universities, via both face-to-face delivery and (increasingly) the internet and social media.

  20. Education and Public Outreach at the American Astronomical Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fienberg, R. T.

    2011-09-01

    Recently the Council of the American Astronomical Society (AAS) adopted its first-ever mission-and-vision statement. Independently, the Astronomy Education Board (AEB), which has oversight of the Society's educational activities, adopted new goals for the AAS education program. Much of the responsibility for aligning the AAS mission-and-vision statement and AEB goals and implementing them is vested in a new position: AAS Press Officer and Education and Outreach Coordinator. Here I describe the AAS's priorities for education and public outreach and explain how they are being, or will be, achieved.

  1. Attendance and attainment in a Calculus course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meulenbroek, Bernard; van den Bogaard, Maartje

    2013-10-01

    In this paper the relationship between attendance and attainment in a standard calculus course is investigated. Calculus could in principle be studied without attending lectures due to the wealth of material available (in hardcopy and online). However, in this study we will show that the pass rate of students attending classes regularly (>75% of the classes) is much higher than the pass rate of students attending fewer classes. We use a logistic model to investigate whether this correlation is significant. We will argue why we believe that this correlation between attendance and attainment is causal, i.e. why it is necessary for most students to attend classes in order to (improve their chances to) pass the exam.

  2. Cyclosporine-Associated Leukoencephalopathy in a Case of Sympathetic Ophthalmitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizuki Tagami

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Cyclosporine (CsA is currently widely used as a primary immunosuppressive agent in ocular disease, particularly in severe uveitis. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is a significant complication of CsA therapy. However, there are no reports of the occurrence of PRES in response to the treatment of uveitis in the ophthalmological area. Case Presentation: We report a case with CsA-associated PRES. A 70-year-old woman with sympathetic ophthalmitis was treated with 50 mg/day of CsA for 1 week. However, the trough level in her blood was too low; thus, we increased the dose to 100 mg/day of CsA with prednisolone. She had headaches, hypertension (systolic blood pressure 180-200 mm Hg, loss of consciousness for several hours, and reduced limb movement, and her MRI showed a high signal intensity in both posterior lobes, consistent with PRES. Examination of the cerebrospinal fluid indicated that it was within normal limits. Her CsA trough level in the blood was within normal ranges on the day of the attack. Her symptoms gradually improved over the next several days; however, she presented with cortical blindness, which lasted for several weeks. Finally, she returned to her baseline values from before the attack. Her MRI findings showed that PRES had essentially disappeared. Conclusion: PRES is not directly associated with the dosage of CsA administered; however, in general, it is well known that PRES can affect strongly immunosuppressed cases undergoing organ and bone marrow transplantation. Nevertheless, our CsA dose was only 100 mg (1.8 mg/kg. In this study, we report on the occurrence of PRES after the administration of CsA to treat sympathetic ophthalmia. To our knowledge, PRES can also occur after the administration of a small dose of CsA; thus, ophthalmologists using CsA should carefully observe the systemic conditions of CsA-treated patients.

  3. Prefilled syringes and usability of ophthalmic viscosurgical devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiba T

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Takuya Shiba, Hiroshi TsuneokaDepartment of Ophthalmology, Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo, JapanPurpose: To examine the influence of the configuration of prefilled syringes on the usability of ophthalmic viscosurgical devices (OVDs.Setting: Department of Ophthalmology, Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.Design: Experimental study.Methods: The maximum force needed to extrude the whole OVD (extrusion force was compared among viscous cohesive OVDs (OPEGAN Hi® 0.85 mL and Healon® 0.85 mL and very low viscosity dispersive OVDs (OPEGAN® 0.6 mL and OPEGAN® 1.1 mL. Additionally, to exclude the influence of any differences between syringes of viscous cohesive OVDs on the extrusion force, empty syringes of the same configuration were refilled with the same products. In addition, the syringe inner surface and that of the piston attached to the tip of the plunger were measured.Results: The extrusion force of Healon 0.85 mL (3.28±0.19 kgf was significantly (P<0.01 higher than that of OPEGAN Hi 0.85 mL (2.54±0.23 kgf. The inner syringe chamber for Healon 0.85 mL was vial shaped and had a built-in needle in the Luer tip, which was clearly different from OPEGAN Hi 0.85 mL. There were no significant differences in the extrusion force between refilled syringes. The extrusion force of OPEGAN 1.1 mL (3.44±0.12 kgf was significantly (P<0.01 higher than that of OPEGAN 0.6 mL (1.63±0.06 kgf. The syringe of OPEGAN 1.1 mL was obviously bigger than that of OPEGAN 0.6 mL.Conclusion: It was confirmed that the configuration of the syringes is another determinant of the extrusion force and a factor related to the difference in usability among products that meet the same cohesive class.Keywords: configuration, syringe, extrusion force, viscous cohesive OVDs, low viscosity dispersive OVDs

  4. 78 FR 54946 - Privacy Act; System of Records: Digital Outreach and Communications, State-79

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-06

    ... Act; System of Records: Digital Outreach and Communications, State-79 SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given..., ``Digital Outreach and Communications, State-79,'' will read as set forth below. Catherine Ebert-Gray... apply to Digital Outreach and Communications, State-79. DISCLOSURE TO CONSUMER REPORTING AGENCIES:...

  5. Introducing ``The MOOSE,'' the Menu of Outreach Opportunities for Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraknoi, A.

    2015-11-01

    The Astronomical Society of the Pacific has been working with the American Astronomical Society to develop a new program of outreach training called “AAS Astronomy Ambassadors. ” We describe a key on-line resource from this project, which is now freely available for everyone doing astronomy education and outreach at http://aas.org/outreach/moose.

  6. Finding Win-Win Forms of Economic Development Outreach: Shared Priorities of Business Faculty and Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacdayan, Paul

    2008-01-01

    The mission statements of many public (taxpayer-supported) colleges promise economic development outreach to local business communities. Unfortunately, faculty may be hard-pressed to devote time to outreach. The author looks for specific outreach activities that garner strong support from both faculty and business representatives. The author…

  7. Involving Scientists in Outreach: Incentives, Barriers, and Recommendations from Research Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, G.; Laursen, S.; Andrews, E.; Weaver, A.; Hanley, D.; Shamatha, J. H.

    2004-12-01

    Public agencies that fund scientific research are increasingly requiring that researchers invest some of their funding in education or outreach activities that have a "broader impact." Yet barriers exist that inhibit scientists' motivation to participate in K-12 outreach. We will share findings from a quantitative and qualitative study that examined the motivations, rewards, and obstacles for scientists who participate in outreach. We found that most researchers became interested in doing outreach out of a desire to contribute and an expectation of having fun and enjoying the experience. They typically gave outreach presentations away from work, acted as a resource for school teachers, or helped with teacher professional development. However, scientists viewed outreach as a form of volunteer work that was auxiliary to their other responsibilities. Thus, time constraints, a lack of information about outreach opportunities, and the lower value placed on outreach by departments constituted significant barriers to their participation. Scientists involved in outreach typically found their efforts to be rewarding, but occasionally factors left a negative impression, such as poor audience response, classroom management difficulties, organizational problems, or demonstrations not going as planned. Based upon our findings, we offer recommendations on how scientists' participation and experiences in K-12 outreach can be improved, including how to successfully recruit scientists, create a positive outreach experience, and increase institutional support for outreach work.

  8. 76 FR 45847 - Vendor Outreach Workshop for Small Businesses in New Mexico of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    ... Office of the Secretary Vendor Outreach Workshop for Small Businesses in New Mexico of the United States... Vendor Outreach Workshop for small businesses in the State of New Mexico of the United States that are interested in doing business with each agency. This outreach workshop will review market...

  9. Effect of an Outreach Programme on Vandetanib Safety in Medullary Thyroid Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bastholt, Lars; Kreissl, Michael C; Führer, Dagmar

    2016-01-01

    III study, patients with locally advanced or metastatic medullary thyroid cancer were randomized to a patient outreach programme (outreach) or a standard AE monitoring schedule (vandetanib control) for 52 weeks. In addition to standard AE monitoring, patients in the outreach arm were contacted every 2...

  10. Commentary: Outreach, Engagement, and the Changing Culture of the University--1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, John V.

    2016-01-01

    In this commentary, author John Byrne reflects on his 1998 "Journal of Public Service & Outreach" article, "Outreach, Engagement, and the Changing Culture of the University" reprinted in this 20th anniversary issue of "Journal of Higher Education Outreach and Engagement." Byrne's 1998 article was a call to modify…

  11. Finding Win-Win Forms of Economic Development Outreach: Shared Priorities of Business Faculty and Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacdayan, Paul

    2008-01-01

    The mission statements of many public (taxpayer-supported) colleges promise economic development outreach to local business communities. Unfortunately, faculty may be hard-pressed to devote time to outreach. The author looks for specific outreach activities that garner strong support from both faculty and business representatives. The author…

  12. Traditional eye medicine use by newly presenting ophthalmic patients to a teaching hospital in south-eastern Nigeria: socio-demographic and clinical correlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uche Judith

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study set out to determine the incidence, socio-demographic, and clinical correlates of Traditional Eye Medicine (TEM use in a population of newly presenting ophthalmic outpatients attending a tertiary eye care centre in south-eastern Nigeria. Methods In a comparative cross-sectional survey at the eye clinic of the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital (UNTH, Enugu, between August 2004 - July 2006, all newly presenting ophthalmic outpatients were recruited. Participants' socio-demographic and clinical data and profile of TEM use were obtained from history and examination of each participant and entered into a pretested questionnaire and proforma. Participants were subsequently categorized into TEM- users and non-users; intra-group analysis yielded proportions, frequencies, and percentages while chi-square test was used for inter-group comparisons at P = 0.01, df = 1. Results Of the 2,542 (males, 48.1%; females, 51.9% participants, 149 (5.9% (males, 45%; females, 55% used TEM for their current eye disease. The TEMs used were chemical substances (57.7%, plant products (37.7%, and animal products (4.7%. They were more often prescribed by non-traditional (66.4% than traditional (36.9% medicine practitioners. TEMs were used on account of vision loss (58.5%, ocular itching (25.4% and eye discharge (3.8%. Reported efficacy from previous users (67.1% and belief in potency (28.2% were the main reasons for using TEM. Civil servants (20.1%, farmers (17.7%, and traders (14.1% were the leading users of TEM. TEM use was significantly associated with younger age (p Conclusion The incidence of TEM use among new ophthalmic outpatients at UNTH is low. The reasons for TEM use are amenable to positive change through enhanced delivery of promotive, preventive, and curative public eye care services. This has implications for eye care planners and implementers. To reverse the trend, we suggest strengthening of eye care programmes, even

  13. University Extra-Mural Studies and Extension Outreach: Incompatibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Alan

    2014-01-01

    The argument of this paper is that--within a wide range of university responses to the challenge of outreach--there grew up in the extra-mural or adult education departments of many UK universities an alternative epistemological paradigm to the older and more traditional extension programmes. This paradigm threatened the extension approach and has…

  14. The Bellarmine Outreach Consortium: An Innovative Approach to Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algren, Chris L.; Hockenberger, Susan

    The Bellarmine Outreach Consortium, which provides access to baccalaureate and masters education in nursing for registered nurses in Kentucky, West Virginia, and Tennessee, is described. The components of a marketing process for colleges are also considered, with attention to product, place, price, and promotion. The nursing department of…

  15. Science Outreach through Art: A Journal Article Cover Gallery

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Research faculty journal covers were used to create a gallery in the Science & Technology branch library at the University of Akron. The selection, presentation, and promotion process is shared along with copyright considerations and a review of galleries used for library outreach. The event and display was a great success attracting faculty…

  16. College Student-Athlete Wellness: An Integrative Outreach Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchemin, James

    2014-01-01

    College student-athletes face unique stressors that can contribute to compromised well-being. Additionally, there are a variety of barriers that prevent student-athletes from accessing mental health supports. This study used self-report questionnaires and qualitative interviews to examine the impact of an integrative outreach model that…

  17. 25 CFR 166.904 - What is agriculture education outreach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... post-secondary mathematics and science courses; (2) Promote agriculture career awareness; (3) Involve... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is agriculture education outreach? 166.904 Section... Agriculture Education, Education Assistance, Recruitment, and Training § 166.904 What is agriculture...

  18. Robotics-Centered Outreach Activities: An Integrated Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-del-Solar, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays, universities are making extensive efforts to attract prospective students to the fields of electrical, electronic, and computer engineering. Thus, outreach is becoming increasingly important, and activities with schoolchildren are being extensively carried out as part of this effort. In this context, robotics is a very attractive and…

  19. The science of science outreach: methods to maximise audience engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Kathryn; Lane, Timothy

    2016-04-01

    Effective public engagement relies on a clear understanding of public audiences; their existing knowledge base and their learning preferences. Scientific content that is effective in academic spheres is not necessarily popular in the public domain. This may be due to content (e.g. beginner level to advanced terminology); presentation style (graphical, text, multimedia); audience demographic (children to adults); and entertainment value. Over the last few years, there has been a major expansion in the quantity and quality of science outreach material. For scientists, the production of outreach material, in any form, is the first giant leap to disseminating their knowledge to broader audiences. However, there is also a need to evaluate the performance of outreach material, so that its content and delivery style can be tailored and maximised for the target audience. We examine the Google Analytics data for climate science outreach website Climatica over a 12 month period in 2015. The site publishes regular posts, which take the form of short written articles, graphics, videos, or teaching resources, on all aspects of climate science. The site is publicised via social media including Twitter and Facebook. In particular, we assess website performance, in terms of website visits and post engagement. These are examined in the context of: post topic, post style, social media engagement, and the timing of post publication/advertisement. The findings of this investigation are used to explore audience preferences and mechanisms for future post development to maximise the use of this web resource.

  20. Science Center Partnership: Outreach to Students and Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Linda E.; Laatsch, Shawn; Bosse, Michael J. Boss; Rider, Robin; Lee, Tammy; Anderson, Cynthia J.

    2006-01-01

    A university, medical school, and science center along with numerous K-12 public schools, university departments, local businesses, funded grant projects, and federal, state and private grants all work in concert to produce a unique partnership focusing on outreach to public school teachers and students. This article shares the history, work,…

  1. Library Outreach: Introducing Campus Childcare Providers to the Academic Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Melissa Maxwell; Thornton, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    This case study describes a library outreach effort to university staff members employed by the campus child care center. Authors planned an instructional session to introduce child care staff members to library resources, focusing on the curriculum collection as a source of supplemental materials for classrooms. Surveys were administered before…

  2. Chips for Everyone: A Multifaceted Approach in Electrical Engineering Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magill, J.; Roy, S.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on a multifaceted approach in electrical engineering outreach focused on the area of semiconductor technology. The activities developed can be used in combination for a very wide range of audiences in both age and stage of education, as has been demonstrated with great success. Moreover, the project has developed…

  3. Music Inspired by Astronomy: A Great Outreach Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraknoi, A.

    2015-11-01

    We discuss and explain a selection of musical pieces (both classical and popular) that were inspired by astronomical ideas or observations. While the ideas behind such musical pieces can sometimes be a bit abstract, they make for good discussion in many educational and outreach settings.

  4. Creating Chicago History: Making Outreach Craft Activities Meaningful

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Madeline

    2012-01-01

    When it comes to having a traveling outreach activity for a museum, a craft can seem like the perfect solution. It can seemingly be all things at once--educational, quick and fun. But, if poorly constructed, crafts can also have serious fallbacks. Using the Chicago History Museum and the Millennium Park Family Fun Festival as a case study, this…

  5. Advancing Technology: GPS and GIS Outreach Training for Agricultural Producers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Allison; Arnold, Shannon

    2010-01-01

    The use of the Global Positioning System (GPS) and Global Information Systems (GIS) has made significant impacts on agricultural production practices. However, constant changes in the technologies require continuing educational updates. The outreach program described here introduces the operation, use, and applications of GPS receivers and GIS…

  6. 24 CFR 92.351 - Affirmative marketing; minority outreach program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Affirmative marketing; minority outreach program. 92.351 Section 92.351 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development HOME INVESTMENT PARTNERSHIPS PROGRAM Other Federal Requirements §...

  7. Creating Chicago History: Making Outreach Craft Activities Meaningful

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Madeline

    2012-01-01

    When it comes to having a traveling outreach activity for a museum, a craft can seem like the perfect solution. It can seemingly be all things at once--educational, quick and fun. But, if poorly constructed, crafts can also have serious fallbacks. Using the Chicago History Museum and the Millennium Park Family Fun Festival as a case study, this…

  8. From ICU top Outreach: A South African experience | Carter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This shift has led to the development of various approaches to assist in the recognition ... A Critical Care Outreach Nurse was appointed at the target hospital to ... Night staff appears to be less compliant than day staff in the majority of wards.

  9. Wyman Teen Outreach Program (TOP). What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The "Wyman Teen Outreach Program" (TOP) is a life skills curriculum for 12- to 17-year-olds that aims to prevent negative youth behaviors, such as school failure and early pregnancy. Trained facilitators deliver the curriculum in weekly classes throughout the school year. Participants discuss topics such as goal-setting, peer pressure,…

  10. Outreach to Science Faculty and Students through Research Exhibitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tina; Hebblethwaite, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Penfield Library at the State University of New York at Oswego (SUNY Oswego) has a gallery exhibit space near the front entrance that is used to showcase student-faculty research and art class projects. This article features the library's outreach efforts to science faculty and students through research exhibitions. The library held an exhibition…

  11. Education and public outreach at the SIRTF science center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daou, D.

    2002-01-01

    Communicating the world of infrared astronomy to the public is the main vocation of the Education and Public Outreach Office of the SIRTF Science Center; but certainly not its only goal. In the past few years we have created a wide variety of educational products that explains the infrared as well as the multi-wavelength universe.

  12. Therapy Dogs on Campus: Recommendations for Counseling Center Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daltry, Rachel M.; Mehr, Kristin E.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the design and implementation of a dog therapy outreach program through the counseling center at West Chester University in Pennsylvania. Two main goals were identified for this program: (a) provide stress relief and comfort to students across campus, and (b) increase potential access to counseling services and improve…

  13. The Ninos Especiales Outreach Training Project (NEOTP). Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruder, Mary Beth; And Others

    The Ninos Especiales Outreach Training Project was a 3-year federally funded project to provide information, training, and evaluation related to a culturally sensitive, family-focused model of early intervention services for infants with severe disabilities and their families of Puerto Rican heritage. Implementation occurred through three major…

  14. New Outreach Initiatives at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwicker, Andrew; Dominguez, Arturo; Greco, Shannon; Ortiz, Deedee; Delooper, John

    2015-11-01

    In FY15, PPPL concentrated its efforts on a portfolio of outreach activities centered around plasma science and fusion energy that have the potential to reach a large audience and have a significant and measurable impact. The overall goal of these outreach activities is to expose the public (within New Jersey, the US and the world) to the Department of Energy's scientific endeavors and specifically to PPPL's research regarding fusion and plasma science. The projects include several new activities along with upgrades to existing ones. The new activities include the development of outreach demos for the plasma physics community and the upgrade of the Internet Plasma Physics Experience (IPPEX). Our first plasma demo is a low cost DC glow discharge, suitable for tours as well as for student laboratories (plasma breakdown, spectroscopy, probes). This has been field tested in a variety of classes and events. The upgrade to the IPPEX web site includes a new template and a new interactive virtual tokamak. Future work on IPPEX will provide users limited access to data from NSTX-U. Finally, our Young Women's Conference was expanded and improved. These and other new outreach activities will be presented.

  15. Caffeine, HPLC, Outreach (How Can We Interest Kids in Science?)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A current challenge for the scientific community is to generate an interest in science in the general public. If we can interest our youth in science we can produce more scientists and raise awareness of science in our society. An outreach activity will be described which can be brought into the cl...

  16. Comparative analysis of image classification methods for automatic diagnosis of ophthalmic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liming; Zhang, Kai; Liu, Xiyang; Long, Erping; Jiang, Jiewei; An, Yingying; Zhang, Jia; Liu, Zhenzhen; Lin, Zhuoling; Li, Xiaoyan; Chen, Jingjing; Cao, Qianzhong; Li, Jing; Wu, Xiaohang; Wang, Dongni; Li, Wangting; Lin, Haotian

    2017-01-01

    There are many image classification methods, but it remains unclear which methods are most helpful for analyzing and intelligently identifying ophthalmic images. We select representative slit-lamp images which show the complexity of ocular images as research material to compare image classification algorithms for diagnosing ophthalmic diseases. To facilitate this study, some feature extraction algorithms and classifiers are combined to automatic diagnose pediatric cataract with same dataset and then their performance are compared using multiple criteria. This comparative study reveals the general characteristics of the existing methods for automatic identification of ophthalmic images and provides new insights into the strengths and shortcomings of these methods. The relevant methods (local binary pattern +SVMs, wavelet transformation +SVMs) which achieve an average accuracy of 87% and can be adopted in specific situations to aid doctors in preliminarily disease screening. Furthermore, some methods requiring fewer computational resources and less time could be applied in remote places or mobile devices to assist individuals in understanding the condition of their body. In addition, it would be helpful to accelerate the development of innovative approaches and to apply these methods to assist doctors in diagnosing ophthalmic disease.

  17. 75 FR 26647 - Ophthalmic and Topical Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Ivermectin Topical Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 524 Ophthalmic and Topical Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Ivermectin Topical Solution AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Final rule, technical amendment. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending the animal drug...

  18. 76 FR 81806 - Ophthalmic and Topical Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Ivermectin Topical Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 524 Ophthalmic and Topical Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Ivermectin Topical Solution AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending the animal drug regulations to...

  19. A nuclear magnetic resonance approach to the comparison of mucoadhesive properties of polysaccharides for ophthalmic uses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uccello-Barretta, Gloria; Nazzi, Samuele; Balzano, Federica; Sansò, Marco

    2011-03-15

    Mucoadhesive properties of tamarind seed polysaccharide (TSP) and larch arabinogalactan (AG), which are developed for ophthalmic applications, were investigated by NMR spectroscopy. Polysaccharide to mucin affinities were compared by using ketotifen fumarate as low molecular weight interaction probe. Proton selective relaxation rate measurements revealed enhanced affinity of TSP to mucin with respect to AG.

  20. 78 FR 9349 - Medical Devices; Ophthalmic Devices; Classification of the Eyelid Weight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 886 Medical Devices; Ophthalmic Devices; Classification of the Eyelid Weight AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is proposing to classify the eyelid weight into class...

  1. 21 CFR 524.960 - Flumethasone, neomycin sulfate, and polymyxin B sulfate ophthalmic solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Flumethasone, neomycin sulfate, and polymyxin B sulfate ophthalmic solutions. 524.960 Section 524.960 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... fundamental healing mechanism. Adrenocorticoid compounds have been reported to cause an increase in...

  2. Application of ultrasound microbubble contrast technology in ophthalmic targeted therapy: literature analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jia-Ying; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Tang, Chong; Zhu, Hong; Xie, Hua; Gao, Shuan-Jie

    2011-01-01

    To analyze the application of microbubble contrast technology in the treatment of ophthalmic diseases, mainly analyzing its advantages and existing problems. A total of 30 representative literatures about the application of ultrasound contrast agent in gene targeted therapy at home and abroad were collected, and focusing on sorting out the literature reporting the treatment of ophthalmic diseases with microbubble contrast technology in recent years, then recalling its advantages and problems, finally making reasonable assessment on existing problems and proposing possible solutions to the problems. DUE TO ITS UNIQUE SAFETY AND EFFICACY, THE TREATMENT OF OPHTHALMIC DISEASES WITH MICROBUBBLE CONTRAST TECHNOLOGY HAS INCREASINGLY DRAWN THE ATTENTION OF CLINICIANS, BUT TWO RELEVANT ISSUES SHOULD BE CONSIDERED: first, the nature of contrast agent and the choice of corresponding ultrasound parameters; second, relative incidence of tissue bleeding, intravascular hemolysis, moderate or severe allergy as well as other side effects. Microbubble may become the carrier of targeted therapy, and as a kind of new non-invasive delivery system, the ultrasound contrast agent has broad application prospects, but its application in ophthalmic research is still in its initial stage and the safety of contrast-enhanced ultrasound still needs further study.

  3. Efficacy of Detergent and Water Versus Bleach for the Disinfection of Direct Contact Ophthalmic Lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbey, Ashkan M.; Gregori, Ninel Z.; Surapaneni, Krishna; Miller, Darlene

    2014-01-01

    Purpose While manufacturers recommend cleaning ophthalmic lenses with detergent and water and then a specific disinfectant, disinfectants are rarely used in ophthalmic practices. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the efficacy of detergent and water versus bleach, a recommended disinfectant, to eliminate common ocular bacteria and viruses from ophthalmic lenses. Methods Three bacterial strains (Staphylococcus epidermidis, Corynebacterium straitum, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and two viral strains (adenovirus and herpes simplex virus (HSV) type-1) were individually inoculated to 20 gonioscopy and laser lenses. Lenses were washed with detergent and water and then disinfected with 10% bleach. All lenses were cultured after inoculation, after detergent and water, and after the bleach. Bacterial cultures in thioglycollate broth were observed for 3 weeks and viral cultures for 2 weeks. The presence of viruses was also detected by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results All 20 lenses inoculated with Staphylococcus epidermidis, Corynebacterium straitum, adenovirus, and HSV-1 showed growth after inoculation, but no growth after detergent/water and after the bleach. All lenses showed positive HSV and adenovirus PCR after inoculation and negative PCR after detergent/water and after bleach. All MRSA contaminated lenses showed growth after inoculation and no growth after detergent and water. However, one lens showed positive growth after bleach. Conclusions Cleaning with detergent and water appeared to effectively eliminate bacteria and viruses from the surface of contaminated ophthalmic lenses. Further studies are warranted to design practical disinfection protocols that minimize lens damage. PMID:24747806

  4. Characterization of novel microsphere chain fiber optic tips for potential use in ophthalmic laser surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchens, Thomas C.; Darafsheh, Arash; Fardad, Amir; Antoszyk, Andrew N.; Ying, Howard S.; Astratov, Vasily N.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2012-06-01

    Ophthalmic surgery may benefit from use of more precise fiber delivery systems during laser surgery. Some current ophthalmic surgical techniques rely on tedious mechanical dissection of tissue layers. In this study, chains of sapphire microspheres integrated into a hollow waveguide distal tip are used for erbium:YAG laser ablation studies in contact mode with ophthalmic tissues, ex vivo. The laser's short optical penetration depth combined with the small spot diameters achieved with this fiber probe may provide more precise tissue removal. One-, three-, and five-microsphere chain structures were characterized, resulting in FWHM diameters of 67, 32, and 30 μm in air, respectively, with beam profiles comparable to simulations. Single Er:YAG pulses of 0.1 mJ and 75-μs duration produced ablation craters with average diameters of 44, 30, and 17 μm and depths of 26, 10, and 8 μm, for one-, three-, and five-sphere structures, respectively. Microsphere chains produced spatial filtering of the multimode Er:YAG laser beam and fiber, providing spot diameters not otherwise available with conventional fiber systems. Because of the extremely shallow treatment depth, compact focused beam, and contact mode operation, this probe may have potential for use in dissecting epiretinal membranes and other ophthalmic tissues without damaging adjacent retinal tissue.

  5. Vitamin B2-sensitised photooxidation of the ophthalmic drugs Timolol and Pindolol: kinetics and mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criado, Susana; García, Norman A

    2004-01-01

    The kinetics and mechanistic aspects of the riboflavin-photosensitised oxidation of the topically administrable ophthalmic drugs Timolol (Tim) and Pindolol (Pin) were investigated in water-MeOH (9:1, v/v) solution employing light of wavelength > 400 nm. riboflavin, belonging to the vitamin B(2) complex, is a known human endogenous photosensitiser. The irradiation of riboflavin in the presence of ophthalmic drugs triggers a complex picture of competitive reactions which produces the photodegradation of both the drugs and the pigment itself. The mechanism was elucidated employing stationary photolysis, polarographic detection of dissolved oxygen, stationary and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, and laser flash photolysis. Ophthalmic drugs quench riboflavin-excited singlet and triplet states. From the quenching of excited triplet riboflavin, the semireduced form of the pigment is generated, through an electron transfer process from the drug, with the subsequent production of superoxide anion radical (O(2)(*-)) by reaction with dissolved molecular oxygen. Through the interaction of dissolved oxygen with excited triplet riboflavin, the species singlet oxygen (O(2)((1)Delta(g))) is also generated to a lesser extent. Both O(2)(*-) and O(2)((1)Delta(g)) induce photodegradation of ophthalmic drugs, Tim being approximately 3-fold more easily photooxidisable than Pin, as estimated by oxygen consumption experiments.

  6. Characterization of novel microsphere chain fiber optic tips for potential use in ophthalmic laser surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchens, Thomas C; Darafsheh, Arash; Fardad, Amir; Antoszyk, Andrew N; Ying, Howard S; Astratov, Vasily N; Fried, Nathaniel M

    2012-06-01

    Ophthalmic surgery may benefit from use of more precise fiber delivery systems during laser surgery. Some current ophthalmic surgical techniques rely on tedious mechanical dissection of tissue layers. In this study, chains of sapphire microspheres integrated into a hollow waveguide distal tip are used for erbium:YAG laser ablation studies in contact mode with ophthalmic tissues, ex vivo. The laser's short optical penetration depth combined with the small spot diameters achieved with this fiber probe may provide more precise tissue removal. One-, three-, and five-microsphere chain structures were characterized, resulting in FWHM diameters of 67, 32, and 30 μm in air, respectively, with beam profiles comparable to simulations. Single Er:YAG pulses of 0.1 mJ and 75-μs duration produced ablation craters with average diameters of 44, 30, and 17 μm and depths of 26, 10, and 8 μm, for one-, three-, and five-sphere structures, respectively. Microsphere chains produced spatial filtering of the multimode Er:YAG laser beam and fiber, providing spot diameters not otherwise available with conventional fiber systems. Because of the extremely shallow treatment depth, compact focused beam, and contact mode operation, this probe may have potential for use in dissecting epiretinal membranes and other ophthalmic tissues without damaging adjacent retinal tissue.

  7. Comparative studies of various hyaluronic acids produced by microbial fermentation for potential topical ophthalmic applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guillaumie, Fanny; Furrer, Pascal; Felt-Baeyens, Olivia

    2010-01-01

    This work presents a comparative study of various hyaluronic acids (HA) produced by fermentation of either Bacillus subtilis or Streptococcus towards the selection of an optimal molecular weight (MW) HA for the preparation of topical ophthalmic formulations. The influence of HA MW on water bindin...

  8. A Case Against Mandatory Lecture Attendance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Richard M.; Flournoy, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    Students' lecture attendance, course grades, class rank at the end of the first year of medical school, and scores on the NBME Part I examinations were correlated. The data suggest that a significant number of students who did not attend lectures did well academically. (MLW)

  9. Does Mandatory Attendance Improve Student Performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marburger, Daniel R.

    2006-01-01

    Previous empirical literature indicates that student performance is inversely correlated with absenteeism. The author investigates the impact of enforcing an attendance policy on absenteeism and student performance. The evidence suggests that an enforced mandatory attendance policy significantly reduces absenteeism and improves exam performance.

  10. The Jade Ribbon Campaign: a model program for community outreach and education to prevent liver cancer in Asian Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Stephanie D; Chang, Ellen T; Le, Phuoc V; Prapong, Wijan; Kiernan, Michaela; So, Samuel K S

    2009-08-01

    The Jade Ribbon Campaign (JRC) is a culturally targeted, community-based outreach program to promote the prevention, early detection, and management of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and liver cancer among Asian Americans. In 2001, 476 Chinese American adults from the San Francisco Bay Area attended an HBV screening clinic and educational seminar. The prevalence of chronic HBV infection was 13%; only 8% of participants showed serologic evidence of protective antibody from prior vaccination. Participants reported low preventive action before the clinic, but after one year, 67% of those with chronic HBV infection had consulted a physician for liver cancer screening, and 78% of all participants had encouraged family members to be tested for HBV. The increase in HBV awareness, screening, and physician follow-up suggests that culturally aligned interventions similar to the JRC may help reduce the disproportionate burden of disease to chronic HBV infection among Asian Americans.

  11. A Study on Attendance and Academic Achievement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sund, Kristian J.; Bignoux, Stephane

    In this study we attempt to answer Romer’s (1993) question: “Should attendance be mandatory?” Contrary to many existing studies, we conclude that in the case of business and management programs the answer is ‘no’. In a study of over 900 undergraduate strategy students, spanning four academic years......, we examine the link between attendance and exam results. Unlike prior research on this topic, our findings show that attendance is not the best determinant of student performance. We find instead that the best determinant of student performance for third year bachelor students is their over......-all degree classification, which we see as a proxy for academic ability. We suggest that attendance may simply be a reflection of student conscientiousness, engagement and motivation. We also challenge the assumptions about gender differences found in prior research on student attendance and student...

  12. Besifloxacin ophthalmic suspension, 0.6%: a novel topical fluoroquinolone for bacterial conjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Terrence P

    2012-06-01

    Acute bacterial conjunctivitis, the most common cause of conjunctivitis, is responsible for approximately 1% of all primary-care consultations. Of the topical ophthalmic antibiotics used to treat acute bacterial conjunctivitis, fluoroquinolones are especially useful because they possess a broad antibacterial spectrum, are bactericidal in action, are generally well tolerated, and have been less prone to development of bacterial resistance. Besifloxacin, the latest advanced fluoroquinolone approved for treating bacterial conjunctivitis, is the first fluoroquinolone developed specifically for topical ophthalmic use. It has a C-8 chlorine substituent and is known as a chloro-fluoroquinolone. Besifloxacin possesses relatively balanced dual-targeting activity against bacterial topoisomerase IV and DNA gyrase (topoisomerse II), two essential enzymes involved in bacterial DNA replication, leading to increased potency and decreased likelihood of bacterial resistance developing to besifloxacin. Microbiological data suggest a relatively high potency and rapid bactericidal activity for besifloxacin against common ocular pathogens, including bacteria resistant to other fluoroquinolones, especially resistant staphylococcal species. Randomized, double-masked, controlled clinical studies demonstrated the clinical efficacy of besifloxacin ophthalmic suspension 0.6% administered three-times daily for 5 days to be superior to the vehicle alone and similar to moxifloxacin ophthalmic solution 0.5% for bacterial conjunctivitis. In addition, besifloxacin ophthalmic suspension 0.6% administered two-times daily for 3 days was clinically more effective than the vehicle alone for bacterial conjunctivitis. Besifloxacin has also been shown in preclinical animal studies to be potentially effective for the "off-label" treatment of infections following ocular surgery, prophylaxis of endophthalmitis, and the treatment of bacterial keratitis. Taken together, clinical and preclinical animal studies

  13. The Space Public Outreach Team (SPOT): Adapting a successful outreach programme to a new region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, K.; Jardins, A. D.; Grimberg, I.; Larson, , S. L.; Key, J.; Larson, M. B.; Heatherly, S. A.; McKenzie, D.; Littenberg, T. B.

    2014-12-01

    The Space Public Outreach Team (SPOT) recruits and trains undergraduate ambassadors from all disciplines to deliver astronomy and space-science-themed interactive presentations. They deliver these presentations to primary and secondary schools and organisations across the state of Montana, USA. SPOT was started in 1996 by physics graduate students at Montana State University, USA, and it has grown to reach an average of 10 000 students per year for a low institutional cost of less than five dollars (four euros) per student. In the last year, the Montana SPOT model has been adopted in the state of West Virginia. The West Virginia SPOT programme also shows great potential, with eleven ambassadors trained to give two new feature presentations, reaching over 2600 students. In this paper, we describe how the Montana SPOT model works in practice and discuss how this model was adapted with new resources, and for a new audience, such that others may also adapt the programme to inspire space science interest for their own particular setting. We invite these groups to plug into the SPOT brand to broaden the impact of astronomy and space programmes and applications in their own region.

  14. Application of bimatoprost ophthalmic solution 0.03% for the treatment of eyebrow hypotrichosis: series of ten cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergilis-Kalner, Irene J

    2014-06-15

    In December 2008, bimatoprost ophthalmic solution 0.03% was approved in the United States for the treatment of hypotrichosis of the eyelashes. Since then, there have been several reports in the literature on the off-label use of bimatoprost ophthalmic solution 0.03% for the treatment of thinning in other hair bearing areas, such as in the eyebrows and in the scalp. Herein, a prospective pilot study is presented in which bimatoprost ophthalmic solution 0.03% is evaluated for helping to re-grow hair in the eyebrow region of ten female patients.

  15. Self-Esteem and Feelings of Community Connectedness of At-Risk Adolescents Attending Community-Based Afterschool Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Loughlin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This research investigated the relationship between adolescent afterschool program attendance, self-esteem and feelings of community connectedness. Thirty-nine of the 61 at-risk adolescents enrolled in two federally funded, community based afterschool programs participated in the study. Participants completed a 10-item self-esteem questionnaire and a 5-item section of the Youth Involved in Community Issues Survey (YICI to measure perceptions of community connectedness. Attendance records were also collected from the sites. Data were analyzed using Pearson Correlations. Results indicated that there was not a significant relationship between the total variables. The individual item analysis, however, did find a significant relationship between adolescent community connectedness and self esteem items. Findings suggest that there is a relationship to be explored and strengthened through means of community outreach for adolescents. Conclusions from this study have important implications for youth practice. Specifically, program leaders need to help adolescents get involved in the community as contributing members.

  16. Space-Hotel Early Bird - An Educational and Public Outreach Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amekrane, R.; Holze, C.

    2002-01-01

    In April 2001 the German Aerospace Society DGLR e.V. in cooperation with the Technical University of Darmstadt, Germany initiated an interdisciplinary students contest, under the patronage of Mr. Joerg Feustel-Buechl, the Director of Manned Spaceflight and Microgravity, European Space Agency (ESA), for the summer term 2001. It was directed to graduated architecture students, who had to conceive and design a space-hotel with specific technical, economical and social requirements. The to be developed Space Hotel for a low earth orbit has to accommodate 220 guests. It was of utmost importance that this contest becomes an integral part of the student's tuition and that professors of the different academic and industrial institutions supported the project idea. During the summer term 2001 about fifty students occupied themselves with the topic, "design of an innovative space-hotel". The overall challenge was to create rooms used under microgravity environment, which means to overcome existing definitions and to find a new definition of living space. Because none of the students were able to experience such a room under microgravity they were forced to use the power of their imagination capability. The students attended moreover a number of lectures on different technical subjects focusing on space and went on several space-related excursions. Having specialists, as volunteers, in the field of space in charge meant that it could be ensured that the designs reflected a certain possibility of being able to be realized. Within the summer term seventeen major designs developed from the conceptual status to high sophisticated concepts and later on also to respective models. A competition combined with a public exhibition, that took place within the Annual German Aeronautics and Astronautics Congress, and intense media relations finalized this project. The project idea of "Early Bird - Visions of a Space Hotel" which was developed within six month is a remarkable example, how

  17. Frequent attenders in out-of-hours general practice care: attendance prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedsted, Peter; Olesen, Frede

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to describe the use of out-of-hours service and analyse attendance prognosis for frequent attenders and other groups of attenders, and to present a concept describing frequent attendance over time. METHODS: All adult attenders in 1990 were included in a 4-year follow-up study...... or three contacts per year. The setting was out-of-hours general practice in Aarhus County, Denmark. Data were collected from the database of the Public Health Insurance, Aarhus County. The county had approximately 600,000 inhabitants, of whom 465,000 were aged 18 years and over. The subjects were 101...

  18. Mini-med school for Aboriginal youth: experiential science outreach to tackle systemic barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita I. Henderson

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Addressing systemic barriers experienced by low-income and minority students to accessing medical school, the University of Calgary's Cumming School of Medicine has spearheaded a year-round, mini-med school outreach initiative for Aboriginal students. Method: Junior and senior high school youth generally attend the half-day program in classes or camps of 15–25, breaking into small groups for multisession activities. Undergraduate medical education students mentor the youth in stations offering experiential lessons in physical examination, reading x-rays, and anatomy. All resources from the medical school are offered in-kind, including a pizza lunch at midday, whereas community partners organize transportation for the attendees. Results: Opening the medical school and its resources to the community offers great benefits to resource-constrained schools often limited in terms of science education resources. The model is also an effort to address challenges among the medical professions around attracting and retaining students from underserved populations. Conclusion: The prospect of increasing admission rates and successful completion of medical education among students from marginalized communities poses a real, though difficult-to-measure, possibility of increasing the workforce most likely to return to and work in such challenging contexts. A mini-medical school for Aboriginal youth highlights mutual, long-term benefit for diverse partners, encouraging medical educators and community-based science educators to explore the possibilities for deepening partnerships in their own regions.

  19. International Observe the Moon Night: Using Public Outreach Events to Tell Your Story to the Public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, B. C.; International Observe the Moon Night Coordinating Committee

    2011-12-01

    From various interpretations of the lunar "face," early pictograms of the Moon's phases, or to the use of the lunar cycle for festivals or harvests, the Moon has an undeniable influence on human civilization. International Observe the Moon Night (InOMN) capitalizes on the human connection to the Moon by engaging the public in annual lunar observation campaigns that share the excitement of lunar science and exploration. In 2010 (InOMN's inaugural year), over 500,000 people attended events in 53 countries around the world. About 68% of InOMN hosts - astronomy clubs, museums, schools, or other groups - used the resources on the InOMN website (http://observethemoonnight.org). The InOMN website provided supporting materials for InOMN event hosts in the form of downloadable advertising materials, Moon maps, suggestions for hands-on educational activities, and links to lunar science content. InOMN event participants shared their experiences with the world using the Web and social media, event hosts shared their experiences with evaluation data, and amateur astronomers and photographers shared their images of the Moon through the lunar photography contest. The overwhelming response from InOMN in 2010 represents an untapped potential for infusing cutting edge lunar science and exploration into a large-scale public outreach event.

  20. Fulfilling the potential of traditional birth attendants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubagzhi, G S

    1988-01-01

    In the Gondar region of Ethiopia, a study was conducted which examined the role of traditional birth attendants in the health care of mother and child, as opposed to modern medical practitioners, and the effects of training on the success of these attendants. 855 women who gave birth in the year before training of the attendants and 861 women who gave birth in the year after training were compared. Differences seen after training included the amount of women receiving antenatal care (48.6% before; 61.2% after), the proportion of women immunized during pregnancy (29.1% before; 65.5% after), a reduction in unsafe practices, utilization of UNICEF kits to cut the umbilical cord after training, a decrease in the amount of newborns requiring resuscitation (11% before; 7% after), an increase in the knowledge of family planning (13.85 of women before training; 43.4% after), and a slight decrease in infant mortality (rate fell from 103 to 99.4/1000). Those practices remaining unchanged included place of delivery (71.1% at home; 28.9% in the hospital), infant feeding, and the performance of uvulectomies. The traditional birth attendants were trained to give the mother care before and after birth. Unless these attendants are compensated by the community in the future, it may be difficult for them to continue their services since their workload is very heavy. The trained attendants complained of basic equipment shortages which may be relieved by community cooperation with the Revolutionary Ethiopia Women's Association. Traditional attendants remain the preferred human resource for pregnant women in Ethiopia, so it is important for trainers to understand local practices before training. Trained attendants should be supervised by health care personnel and should be trained to recognize and refer high risk cases to doctors. The importance of training should be discussed with community leaders and compensation for the attendants should be provided.

  1. Molecular Modeling-Based Inclusion Mechanism and Stability Studies of Doxycycline and Hydroxypropyl-β-Cyclodextrin Complex for Ophthalmic Delivery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, Haohao; Chen, Meiwan; He, Zixin; Wang, Zhouhua; Zhang, Meimei; He, Zhouyang; Wan, Qian; Liang, Dan; Repka, Michael A; Wu, Chuanbin

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to prepare a stable complex of doxycycline (Doxy) and hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) for ophthalmic delivery and investigate the inclusion mechanism and the inclusion effects on the stability of Doxy...

  2. Assessing Models of Public Understanding In ELSI Outreach Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce V. Lewenstein, Ph.D.; Dominique Brossard, Ph.D.

    2006-03-01

    Advances in the science of genetics have implications for individuals and society, and have to be taken into account at the policy level. Studies of ethical, legal and social issues related to genomic research have therefore been integrated in the Human Genome Project (HGP) since the earliest days of the project. Since 1990, three to five percent of the HGP annual budget has been devoted to such studies, under the umbrella of the Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications (ELSI) Programs of the National Human Genome Research Institute of the National Institute of Health, and of the Office of Biological and Environmental Research of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The DOE-ELSI budget has been used to fund a variety of projects that have aimed at ?promoting education and help guide the conduct of genetic research and the development of related medical and public policies? (HGP, 2003). As part of the educational component, a significant portion of DOE-ELSI funds have been dedicated to public outreach projects, with the underlying goal of promoting public awareness and ultimately public discussion of ethical, legal, and social issues surrounding availability of genetic information (Drell, 2002). The essential assumption behind these projects is that greater access to information will lead to more knowledge about ethical, legal and social issues, which in turn will lead to enhanced ability on the part of individuals and communities to deal with these issues when they encounter them. Over the same period of time, new concepts of ?public understanding of science? have emerged in the theoretical realm, moving from a ?deficit? or linear dissemination of popularization, to models stressing lay-knowledge, public engagement and public participation in science policy-making (Lewenstein, 2003). The present project uses the base of DOE-funded ELSI educational project to explore the ways that information about a new and emerging area of science that is intertwined with public

  3. Documentation as Problem Solving for Literacy Outreach Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girill, T R

    2004-07-06

    Age-appropriate technical writing lessons for underperforming high-school students can offer them an innovative, ''authentic'' way to improve how they read and write. Thus the techniques and principles of effective technical communication routinely applied at work also provide a positive response to one of today's great educational challenges. This workshop shows participants how to (1) introduce English and science teachers to the value of technical writing as a response to school literacy problems, (2) prepare plausible practice exercises to help students improve their basic literacy, and (3) recognize and respond to known literacy outreach pitfalls. Every effective literacy outreach project based on technical writing needs to address four key problems.

  4. Science Educational Outreach Programs That Benefit Students and Scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Greg; Russell, Josh; Enyeart, Peter; Gracia, Brant; Wessel, Aimee; Jarmoskaite, Inga; Polioudakis, Damon; Stuart, Yoel; Gonzalez, Tony; MacKrell, Al; Rodenbusch, Stacia; Stovall, Gwendolyn M; Beckham, Josh T; Montgomery, Michael; Tasneem, Tania; Jones, Jack; Simmons, Sarah; Roux, Stanley

    2016-02-01

    Both scientists and the public would benefit from improved communication of basic scientific research and from integrating scientists into education outreach, but opportunities to support these efforts are limited. We have developed two low-cost programs--"Present Your PhD Thesis to a 12-Year-Old" and "Shadow a Scientist"--that combine training in science communication with outreach to area middle schools. We assessed the outcomes of these programs and found a 2-fold benefit: scientists improve their communication skills by explaining basic science research to a general audience, and students' enthusiasm for science and their scientific knowledge are increased. Here we present details about both programs, along with our assessment of them, and discuss the feasibility of exporting these programs to other universities.

  5. Impact of NASA's Astrophysics Education and Public Outreach Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Denise A.; Hasan, H.

    2014-01-01

    NASA has through the years developed a diverse portfolio of Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) programs that have taken the science of NASA's Astrophysics missions into classrooms, museums, planetaria and other public venues. From lesson plans, teacher workshops, public exhibitions, to social media and citizen science, these programs have reached vast audiences internationally. NASA's Science and Education Outreach Forums have developed valuable resources, such as NASA Wavelength, which is a user friendly website of a catalog of NASA's E/PO programs. A sample of programs and their metrics will be presented to demonstrate the impact of the NASA Science Mission Directorate E/PO program in providing a direct return on the public's investment in NASA science.

  6. Astronomy on Tap: Public Outreach Events in Bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, E. L.; Levine, B. W.

    2016-12-01

    Astronomy on Tap public outreach events are as easy to organise or as elaborate as you would like them to be. In addition to communicating cutting-edge research and fundamental concepts to the public, Astronomy on Tap events showcase the passion, creativity and diversity of scientists, facilitate personal and meaningful interactions between scientists and the general public, and offer networking and professional development opportunities for scientists. Astronomy on Tap organisers provide a growing cadre of resources for starting similar events, which have so far taken place in twenty locations around the world, mainly in the United States but also in Canada, Chile, and Taiwan, reaching a total of almost 15 000 people. Through this reflection on the Astronomy on Tap project we invite you to consider whether you could adopt aspects of the Astronomy on Tap model for existing outreach programmes, or even organise a new satellite event in your location.

  7. Outreach innovative practices for archives and special collections

    CERN Document Server

    Theimer, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Outreach: Innovative Practices for Archives and Special Collections explores how archives of different sizes and types are reaching out to new potential users and increasing awareness of programs and collections. The book features twelve case studies that demonstrate ideas that can be transferred into many other settings. Some of the practices described in the case studies rely primarily on technology and the Web to interact with the public, while others are centered on face-to-face activities. This volume will be useful to those working in archives and special collections as well as other cultural heritage organizations, and provides ideas ranging from those that require long-term planning and coordination to those that could be immediately implemented. It also provides students and educators in archives, library, and public history graduate programs a resource for understanding the variety of ways people conduct outreach in the field today and the kinds of strategies archivists are using to attract new user...

  8. CoffeeShop Astrophysics: An Adventure in Public Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlin, Sydney; Decesar, Megan; Caudill, Sarah; Sadeghian, Laleh; Nuttall, Laura; Urban, Alex; McGrath, Casey

    2016-03-01

    Engaging non-scientists in scientific discussions is inarguably important, both for researchers and society. Public lectures have long been utilized as a method for performing such outreach, but due to their format and location often reach a limited audience. More recently, events such as science cafés (events pairing a scientist with the public in a casual venue) have emerged as a potential tool for connecting with general audiences. The success of these events depends on multiple variables. In this talk, we describe an example of such an event entitled CoffeeShop Astrophysics, that uses multiple speakers, demonstrations and humor to successfully engage members of the public. We discuss the key elements that make CoffeeShop Astrophysics effective, and the viability of grassroots, coffeeshop-style outreach. The authors gratefully acknowledge support from the American Physical Society for this work.

  9. Final Scientific Report - Wind Powering America State Outreach Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinclair, Mark; Margolis, Anne

    2012-02-01

    The goal of the Wind Powering America State Outreach Project was to facilitate the adoption of effective state legislation, policy, finance programs, and siting best practices to accelerate public acceptance and development of wind energy. This was accomplished by Clean Energy States Alliance (CESA) through provision of informational tools including reports and webinars as well as the provision of technical assistance to state leaders on wind siting, policy, and finance best practices, identification of strategic federal-state partnership activities for both onshore and offshore wind, and participation in regional wind development collaboratives. The Final Scientific Report - Wind Powering America State Outreach Project provides a summary of the objectives, activities, and outcomes of this project as accomplished by CESA over the period 12/1/2009 - 11/30/2011.

  10. Multicultural media outreach: increasing cancer information coverage in minority communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, James; Kwon, Harry T; Strecher, Rachael; Bartholomew, Jill

    2013-12-01

    Ethnic media can serve as an opportunity for cancer education and outreach to minority communities. The National Cancer Institute developed the Multicultural Media Outreach (MMO) program which utilizes an integrated approach of both traditional and social media to disseminate evidence-based cancer education information for minority communities. The MMO program is the contact point for multicultural media outlets seeking evidence-based cancer information, education materials, minority spokespersons, and news tailored to minority communities affected by cancer health disparities. MMO developed Lifelines®, a cancer education series that addresses cancer prevention, treatment, survivorship, clinical trials, and other cancer-related topics for African American, Hispanic, Asian American, American Indian, and Alaska Native audiences. Lifelines® content is disseminated through traditional media (radio, print, and television) as well as social media (web, Twitter, YouTube, and RSS feed). This article describes the MMO program and lessons learned to date.

  11. Astronomy Education and Public Outreach in Virtual Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Adrienne J.

    2008-05-01

    Multi-user 3-dimensional virtual worlds, like Second Life or Active Worlds, are the latest trend for innovation in higher education. There are over 100 college/university projects currently in Second Life. These social environments are also being utilized as a public relation and outreach method by such organizations as NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration), JPL (Jet Propulsion Lab), NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration), NPL (National Physical Laboratory), Exploratorium, and The Tech Museum of Innovation. Immersive virtual environments can offer new methods for education and public outreach projects in astronomy and astrobiology. Whether you are a faculty member wanting to dabble in Second Life with your students or an EPO professional considering a virtual world presence you will learn about the challenges and opportunities for developing content for 3D worlds. A review of popular science areas in Second Life as well as a 'quick start' guide will be included.

  12. Science Educational Outreach Programs That Benefit Students and Scientists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Clark

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Both scientists and the public would benefit from improved communication of basic scientific research and from integrating scientists into education outreach, but opportunities to support these efforts are limited. We have developed two low-cost programs--"Present Your PhD Thesis to a 12-Year-Old" and "Shadow a Scientist"--that combine training in science communication with outreach to area middle schools. We assessed the outcomes of these programs and found a 2-fold benefit: scientists improve their communication skills by explaining basic science research to a general audience, and students' enthusiasm for science and their scientific knowledge are increased. Here we present details about both programs, along with our assessment of them, and discuss the feasibility of exporting these programs to other universities.

  13. Physical Environmental Barriers to School Attendance among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Physical Environmental Barriers to School Attendance among Children with. Disabilities in two ... with learning, speech, cognitive, hearing, seeing, mo- bility and emotional, are ..... http://www.eenet.org.uk/theory (Accessed March. 2007). 26.

  14. Training traditional birth attendants in southern Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haarsager, Mary

    2008-01-01

    Traditional birth attendants are currently the principal service providers to pregnant women in southern Sudan. A training program provides education to promote maternal and newborn health as well as birth preparedness and establishes mechanisms for supportive supervision.

  15. Library outreach: addressing Utah's “Digital Divide”

    OpenAIRE

    McCloskey, Kathleen M.

    2000-01-01

    A “Digital Divide” in information and technological literacy exists in Utah between small hospitals and clinics in rural areas and the larger health care institutions in the major urban area of the state. The goals of the outreach program of the Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library at the University of Utah address solutions to this disparity in partnership with the National Network of Libraries of Medicine—Midcontinental Region, the Utah Department of Health, and the Utah Area Health Ed...

  16. Crowdfunding Campaigns Help Researchers Launch Projects and Generate Outreach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlhausen, Katherine; Krebs, Bethany L; Watters, Jason V; Ganz, Holly H

    2016-03-01

    Organizers of participatory research (citizen science) projects can generate funds and outreach through crowdfunding. Here we provide insights from three successful science crowdfunding campaigns recently completed on Indiegogo, Experiment, and Kickstarter. Choosing a crowdfunding platform that fits the project is just the beginning; a successful campaign reflects its content, management, and marketing, and some researchers may need to acquire new skills. In addition, the growing trend of crowdfunding for science reinforces the importance of academic engagement with social media.

  17. Crowdfunding Campaigns Help Researchers Launch Projects and Generate Outreach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Dahlhausen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Organizers of participatory research (citizen science projects can generate funds and outreach through crowdfunding. Here we provide insights from three successful science crowdfunding campaigns recently completed on Indiegogo, Experiment, and Kickstarter. Choosing a crowdfunding platform that fits the project is just the beginning; a successful campaign reflects its content, management, and marketing, and some researchers may need to acquire new skills. In addition, the growing trend of crowdfunding for science reinforces the importance of academic engagement with social media.

  18. Resources for Education and Outreach Activities discussion session

    CERN Document Server

    Barney, David; The ATLAS collaboration; Bourdarios, Claire; Kobel, Michael; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Melo, Ivan; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Alexopoulos, Angelos

    2015-01-01

    Over the past few years a variety of resources have been developed, by individuals and groups, to support Education & Outreach activities in particle physics. Following short (five-minute) presentations by six speakers, a discussion session allowed the audience to go further in depth in activities they found particularly interesting. This paper presents brief overviews from each of the six speakers, followed by a summary of the ensuing discussion

  19. Young Researchers Engaged in Educational Outreach to Increase Polar Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, M.; Baeseman, J.; Xavier, J.; Kaiser, B.; Vendrell-Simon, B.

    2008-12-01

    The Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS) grew out of the 4th International Polar Year (IPY-4) 2007-08 and is an international and interdisciplinary organization of over 1200 undergraduate and graduate students, postdoctoral researchers, early faculty members, educators and others with interests in Polar Regions and the wider cryosphere from more than 40 countries. Our aims are to stimulate interdisciplinary and international research collaborations, and develop effective future leaders in polar research, education and outreach. As potentially one of the major legacies of IPY-4, APECS members have been at the forefront of increasing scientific knowledge and public interest in the polar regions, centered around global climate change, and enhancing scientific understanding, media attention, primary and secondary school (K-12) educational programs, undergraduate institutions, and public literacy campaigns. Research and Educational Outreach activities by APECS members during IPY-4 have improved both our understanding and the communication of all aspects of the Polar Regions and the importance of their broader global connections. APECS National Committees have run Polar Contests where young researchers partnered with teachers and students to develop curriculum and activities to share their research, have participated in many field based communication exchanges and are mentoring youth to pursue careers in science, and enhancing the public perception of scientists through photo, video and museum exhibits. In cooperation with the IPY Teachers Network and the IPY IPO, APECS is developing a polar education resource book that will feature education and outreach activities by young researchers, as well as provide examples of classroom activities for teachers to incorporate polar literacy into their curriculum and a How-To guide for researchers interested in conducting education and outreach. As young researchers interactively share their excitement and

  20. Asteroids Outreach Toolkit Development: Using Iterative Feedback In Informal Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Vivian; Berendsen, M.; Gurton, S.; Dusenbery, P. B.

    2011-01-01

    The Night Sky Network is a collaboration of close to 350 astronomy clubs across the US that actively engage in public outreach within their communities. Since 2004, the Astronomical Society of the Pacific has been creating outreach ToolKits filled with carefully crafted sets of physical materials designed to help these volunteer clubs explain the wonders of the night sky to the public. The effectiveness of the ToolKit activities and demonstrations is the direct result of a thorough testing and vetting process. Find out how this iterative assessment process can help other programs create useful tools for both formal and informal educators. The current Space Rocks Outreach ToolKit focuses on explaining asteroids, comets, and meteorites to the general public using quick, big-picture activities that get audiences involved. Eight previous ToolKits cover a wide range of topics from the Moon to black holes. In each case, amateur astronomers and the public helped direct the development the activities along the way through surveys, focus groups, and active field-testing. The resulting activities have been embraced by the larger informal learning community and are enthusiastically being delivered to millions of people across the US and around the world. Each ToolKit is delivered free of charge to active Night Sky Network astronomy clubs. All activity write-ups are available free to download at the website listed here. Amateur astronomers receive frequent questions from the public about Earth impacts, meteors, and comets so this set of activities will help them explain the dynamics of these phenomena to the public. The Space Rocks ToolKit resources complement the Great Balls of Fire museum exhibit produced by Space Science Institute's National Center for Interactive Learning and scheduled for release in 2011. NSF has funded this national traveling exhibition and outreach ToolKit under Grant DRL-0813528.

  1. Outreach on a National Scale: The Critical Role of Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartel, B. A.; Charlevoix, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Facilities provide infrastructure for science that would not be feasible at a single institution. Facilities are also a resource for development of outreach products and activities that reach a national audience of diverse stakeholders. UNAVCO manages the NSF geodetic facility GAGE (Geodesy Advancing Geosciences and Earthscope). Staff at UNAVCO with expertise in education, outreach, and communication translate the science and supporting infrastructure into materials consumable by a wide array of users including teachers, students, museum attendees, emergency managers, park interpreters, and members of the general public. UNAVCO has the ability to distribute materials to a national and international audience, thereby greatly increasing the impact of the science and increasing the value of the investment by the National Science Foundation. In 2014 and 2015, UNAVCO produced multiple print products focused on the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), the geodetic component of EarthScope. Products include a deck of playing cards featuring PBO GPS stations, a poster featuring GPS velocities of the Western United States, and another poster focused on GPS velocities in Alaska. We are distributing these products to a broad audience, including teachers, station permit holders, and community members. The Tectonics of the Western United States poster was distributed this year in the American Geosciences Institute Earth Science Week kit for teachers, reaching 16,000 educators around the country. These posters and the PBO playing cards (PBO-52) were distributed to more than 100 teachers through workshops led by UNAVCO, the EarthScope National Office, the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC), and more. Additionally, these cards serve as a way to engage landowners who host these scientific stations on their property. This presentation will address the strategies for creating nationally relevant materials and the tools used for dissemination of materials to a broad audience. We

  2. Attendance and Exam Performance at University

    OpenAIRE

    David O Allen; Webber, Don J

    2006-01-01

    Marburger (2006) explored the link between absenteeism and exam performance by assessing the impact on absenteeism of removing a university wide policy of mandatory attendance for a single class. His results indicate that while an attendance policy has a strong impact on reducing absenteeism the link between absenteeism and exam performance is weak.This paper presents an alternative exploration into the link between absenteeism and exam performance by assessing the impact of implementing a mo...

  3. Extreme Urban Stargazing: Outreach in New York City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Jason S.

    2013-01-01

    There is a fundamental need for the professional community to cultivate and nurture active relationships with amateur organizations. The rewards of such work are highly beneficial to general public education and town-gown relations, but are time-consuming and hard-won. New York City and the surrounding area is both ideally suited and unambiguously ill-suited for astronomy public outreach. I will detail the results of three major outreach efforts in coordination with the Amateur Astronomers Association of New York. I will highlight large public-space observing in the context of the Transit of Venus and star parties at other locations. I will also outline outreach efforts at William Paterson University, where two public nights and a Curiosity EDL event created a clear impact in Northern New Jersey. I will detail methods for encouraging and bringing out amateur observers to events, urban crowd management, publicity issues, and the benefits and pitfalls of social media in the promotion and execution of large-scale and moderate events.

  4. An Urban Observatory for Research, Education and Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglione, T. A. D.; Spergel, M.; Schlein, J.; Denecke, E.

    2002-12-01

    The primary mission of the York College Observatory and Outreach Program is to improve minority participation in space science and space science education. We aim to achieve this goal by developing an urban observatory in central Queens, the York College Observatory (YCO). We concentrate our efforts in three main areas: academics, outreach and research. Academically, we utilize astronomy's popular appeal to attract and retain students and to enhance existing science courses. We have also created a minor in Astronomy at York College, and are active members of the New York City Space Science Research Alliance, which has developed a City University major in Space Science. Our outreach efforts aim to increase the awareness of the general public through workshops for high school teachers, curriculum development for NYC middle and high schools, participation in summer programs for 4th to 9th graders, and public open nights at the YCO. Our research program utilizes the radio and optical capabilities of the YCO and our collaborations with other institutions.

  5. Human migration, protected areas, and conservation outreach in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Jonathan D; Borgerhoff Mulder, Monique; Kefauver, Shawn C

    2014-06-01

    A recent discussion debates the extent of human in-migration around protected areas (PAs) in the tropics. One proposed argument is that rural migrants move to bordering areas to access conservation outreach benefits. A counter proposal maintains that PAs have largely negative effects on local populations and that outreach initiatives even if successful present insufficient benefits to drive in-migration. Using data from Tanzania, we examined merits of statistical tests and spatial methods used previously to evaluate migration near PAs and applied hierarchical modeling with appropriate controls for demographic and geographic factors to advance the debate. Areas bordering national parks in Tanzania did not have elevated rates of in-migration. Low baseline population density and high vegetation productivity with low interannual variation rather than conservation outreach explained observed migration patterns. More generally we argue that to produce results of conservation policy significance, analyses must be conducted at appropriate scales, and we caution against use of demographic data without appropriate controls when drawing conclusions about migration dynamics. © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  6. Developing Smartphone Apps for Education, Outreach, Science, and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherwax, A. T.; Fitzsimmons, Z.; Czajkowski, J.; Breimer, E.; Hellman, S. B.; Hunter, S.; Dematteo, J.; Savery, T.; Melsert, K.; Sneeringer, J.

    2010-12-01

    The increased popularity of mobile phone apps provide scientists with a new avenue for sharing and distributing data and knowledge with colleagues, while also providing meaningful education and outreach products for consumption by the general public. Our initial development of iPhone and Android apps centered on the distribution of exciting auroral images taken at the South Pole for education and outreach purposes. These portable platforms, with limited resources when compared to computers, presented a unique set of design and implementation challenges that we will discuss in this presentation. For example, the design must account for limited memory; screen size; processing power; battery life; and potentially high data transport costs. Some of these unique requirements created an environment that enabled undergraduate and high-school students to participate in the creation of these apps. Additionally, during development it became apparent that these apps could also serve as data analysis and engineering tools. Our presentation will further discuss our plans to use apps not only for Education and Public Outreach, but for teaching, science and engineering.

  7. Nuclear Science Outreach in the World Year of Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahan, Margaret

    2006-04-01

    The ability of scientists to articulate the importance and value of their research has become increasingly important in the present climate of declining budgets, and this is most critical in the field of nuclear science ,where researchers must fight an uphill battle against negative public perception. Yet nuclear science encompasses important technical and societal issues that should be of primary interest to informed citizens, and the need for scientists trained in nuclear techniques are important for many applications in nuclear medicine, national security and future energy sources. The NSAC Education Subcommittee Report [1] identified the need for a nationally coordinated effort in nuclear science outreach, naming as its first recommendation that `the highest priority for new investment in education be the creation by the DOE and NSF of a Center for Nuclear Science Outreach'. This talk will review the present status of public outreach in nuclear science and highlight some specific efforts that have taken place during the World Year of Physics. [1] Education in Nuclear Science: A Status Report and Recommendations for the Beginning of the 21^st Century, A Report of the DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee Subcommittee on Education, November 2004, http://www.sc.doe.gov/henp/np/nsac/docs/NSACCReducationreportfinal.pdf.

  8. One Health training, research, and outreach in North America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl Stroud

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The One Health (OH concept, formerly referred to as ‘One Medicine’ in the later part of the 20th century, has gained exceptional popularity in the early 21st century, and numerous academic and non-academic institutions have developed One Health programs. Objectives: To summarize One Health training, research, and outreach activities originating in North America. Methods: We used data from extensive electronic records maintained by the One Health Commission (OHC (www.onehealthcommission.org/ and the One Health Initiative (www.onehealthinitiative.com/ and from web-based searches, combined with the corporate knowledge of the authors and their professional contacts. Finally, a call was released to members of the OHC's Global One Health Community listserv, asking that they populate a Google document with information on One Health training, research, and outreach activities in North American academic and non-academic institutions. Results: A current snapshot of North American One Health training, research, and outreach activities as of August 2016 has evolved. Conclusions: It is clear that the One Health concept has gained considerable recognition during the first decade of the 21st century, with numerous current training and research activities carried out among North American academic, non-academic, government, corporate, and non-profit entities.

  9. Flow diverter assisted coil embolization of a very small ruptured ophthalmic artery aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornbos, David; Pillai, Promod; Sauvageau, Eric

    2016-06-01

    Small ruptured aneurysms present a unique problem to endovascular therapy. We report a case in which a patient presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage and a very small ruptured ophthalmic artery aneurysm, for which endovascular therapy was preferred secondary to severe cardiac comorbidities. Due to the aneurysm size, a small 1.5 mm coil was needed, but presented a significant risk of migration. Conventional stent assisted coiling was considered suboptimal as the small coil could have easily migrated through the strut. We present a novel technique of flow diverter assisted coil embolization in which a coil was placed within the aneurysm and a pipeline embolization device was then partially deployed, jailing the microcatheter and coil mass. Once in place, the coil was detached, securing the aneurysm, and preventing coil migration. Through the use of a flow diverter, some degree of aneurysm protection would still be expected in the event of coil migration toward the ophthalmic artery origin.

  10. Alkali Burn Treated with 2% Rebamipide Ophthalmic Suspension: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidenori Sasaki

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A 47-year-old man presented at the Ophthalmology Department of Saku City Asama General Hospital complaining of hyperemia and pain after industrial sodium hydroxide (approx. 40% concentration had entered his left eye. With an epithelial defect of the bulbar and palpebral conjunctiva, ischemia of the inferior third of the limbal conjunctiva, a total corneal epithelial defect and mild corneal stromal opacity, the damage was determined as Roper-Hall grade III. 2% rebamipide ophthalmic suspension, which is used for dry eye disease, was administered 4 times a day followed by conventional treatment for serious alkali injury. The corneal epithelial defect was resolved, and there were no side effects. The effectiveness of 2% rebamipide ophthalmic suspension in both the repair and improvement of the damage in the conjunctival and corneal epithelia, and its anti-inflammatory effect suggest that it may be an effective treatment not only for dry eye disease but also for alkali ocular damage.

  11. Effect of methyl cellulose on gelation behavior and drug release from poloxamer based ophthalmic formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewan, Mitali; Bhowmick, Biplab; Sarkar, Gunjan; Rana, Dipak; Bain, Mrinal Kanti; Bhowmik, Manas; Chattopadhyay, Dipankar

    2015-01-01

    The effect of weight average molecular weight (Mw) of methyl cellulose (MC) on the gelation behavior of Poloxamer 407 (PM) and in vitro release of Ketorolac Tromethamine (KT) from different ophthalmic formulations based on PM is examined. A drop of gelation temperature of PM is observed using MC of various M(w) by test tube tilting method, UV-vis spectroscopy, viscometry and rheometry. It is also observed that the viscosity and gel strength of all the formulations are increased with the increase in Mw of MC. PM with highest Mw of MC provides best drug release property among all the formulations. It is evident from this investigation that there is a distinct effect of M(w) of MC on the gelation behavior of PM as well as on the drug release profile of KT from PM-MC based ophthalmic formulations.

  12. Chronic perfusion changes and reduction in preeclampsia incidence in pregnant smokers: an ophthalmic artery Doppler study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paes, Maria Marta B M; Diniz, Angélica L D

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate the hemodynamic profile of the ophthalmic artery in preeclamptic women, pregnant smokers and pregnant controls with no known diseases. A prospective cross-sectional study using the performed ophthalmic artery Doppler ultrasonography in 20 mild preeclamptic women and 20 severe preeclamptic women, 37 pregnant smokers and 51 controls. Data evaluated by using Doppler ultrasonography were as follows: resistance index, pulsatility index, peak systolic velocity, end diastolic velocity, second peak systolic velocity and peak ratio. The Doppler results, gestational age, patient age and systolic and diastolic pressure of groups were subjected to analysis of variance (p pregnant smokers showed vasospasm (0.84 ± 0.04, 2.27 ± 0.43, 4.78 ± 1.28, respectively) indicating divergent vascular pattern between these two groups (p changes in pregnant smokers might reduce the number of sudden and catastrophic events in preeclampsia.

  13. On the actual state of industrial quality assurance procedures with regard to (106)Ru ophthalmic plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaulich, Theodor W; Zurheide, Jens; Haug, Thomas; Budach, Wilfried; Nüsslin, Fridtjof; Bamberg, Michael

    2004-06-01

    In radiotherapy of intraocular tumors, e. g., in the case of malign choroid melanomas, episcleral brachytherapy with (106)Ru ophthalmic plaques has proven to be successful. In a study, the authors reported on the discovery of the following shortcomings in industrial quality assurance, which are relevant to therapy, during the course of an internal clinical acceptance test of (106)Ru ophthalmic plaques, manufactured by the company Bebig from Berlin, Germany. This consisted of inconsistent dose rate specifications in the manufacturer's certificate, covering a range of 111% and with the risk of leakage of the plaques. Bebig was called upon to adapt state-of-the-art production methods with regard to (106)Ru ophthalmic plaques. In the meantime, Bebig has modernized production of (106)Ru ophthalmic plaques and adopted all the quality assurance procedures proposed by the authors. Moreover, the requested traceability of the calibration of activity and dose rate of the (106)Ru ophthalmic plaques to standards of the federal authorities in charge of measurement procedures has been implemented. In the year 2002, Bebig updated, among other things, the ASMW (GDR) calibration of the dose rate of the (106)Ru ophthalmic plaques from the years 1987-1989 by a calibration of the NIST (USA). The current NIST calibration, together with the new equipment for the measurement of the depth dose curves, led to the consequence that the new NIST 2001 dose rate values show, in the mean, a deviation of 0.75 times (plaque type CCC) up to 2.06 times (plaque types CCX, CCY, and CCZ) compared to the dose rate values that had been indicated so far in Bebig's certificate, based on the ASMW 1987 calibration. For the 95% confidence interval, Bebig estimated the measurement uncertainty to be +/- 25%. If one takes into consideration the minimal and maximal values in such 95% confidence intervals, it follows that the new NIST 2001 dose rate values deviate between 0.56 times (plaque type CCC) and 2.58 times

  14. Influencing factors on lecture attendance at a tertiary institution ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The tendency towards decreasing class attendance by students is a concern for ... Various factors contribute to the motivation of students, which in turn directly or ... lecture attendance, lecture/r quality as well as reasons for attending classes.

  15. Two cases of myotonic dystrophy manifesting various ophthalmic findings with genetic evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Min Ji Kang; Hye Bin Yim; Hyung Bin Hwang

    2016-01-01

    We report two cases of myotonic dystrophy in one family; both diagnosed from genetic analysis following ophthalmic indications, but before the manifestation of systemic symptoms. A 39-year-old female visited our clinic for routine examination. Mild ptosis, sluggish pupillary response, and bilateral snowflake cataracts were found. Fundus examination revealed an increased cup-to-disc ratio (CDR) in both eyes and a defect in the retinal nerve fiber layer in the right eye. Intraocular pressure wa...

  16. The Ophthalmic Anomalies in Children with Down Syndrome in Split-Dalmatian County

    OpenAIRE

    Karlica, Dobrila; Skelin, Siniša; Culic, Vida; Galetović, Davor; Znaor, Ljubo; Karlica, Hana; Pavelić, Jasminka

    2011-01-01

    Our aim was to present the ophthalmic anomalies in patients with Down syndrome in Split-Dalmatia County born from 1992 until 2009 year. It was a cross-sectional study. 153 children with Down syndrome aged 0–18 years from the Split-Dalmatia County were examined. One hundred twelve participants were borne in Split,13 in Vrgorac,16 in Makarska, 12 in Sinj. All enrolled children underwent a complete ophthalmological examination (anterior segment, ocular motility, refractive status, fu...

  17. Ion activated in situ gel system for ophthalmic delivery of moxifloxacin hydrochloride

    OpenAIRE

    Mali, Mahesh N.; Ashok A. Hajare

    2010-01-01

    Rapid precorneal elimination of drug is a major limitation of conventional ophthalmic formulations. An ion activated in situ gel forming systems of an antibacterial agent moxifloxacin hydrochloride for instillation as drops into eye undergoing a sol to gel transition in the cul-de-sac was formulated. Sodium alginate was used as the gelling agent in combination with hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose. Formulations were evaluated for gelling capacity, pH, in vitro release, rheological study, Draize ...

  18. Quantitative evaluation of besifloxacin ophthalmic suspension by HPLC, application to bioassay method and cytotoxicity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Márcia C N; Barden, Amanda T; Andrade, Juliana M M; Oppe, Tércio P; Schapoval, Elfrides E S

    2014-02-01

    Besifloxacin (BSF) is a synthetic chiral fluoroquinolone developed for the topical treatment of ophthalmic infections. The present study reports the development and validation of a microbiological assay, applying the cylinder-plate method, for determination of BSF in ophthalmic suspension. To assess this methodology, the development and validation of the method was performed for the quantification of BSF by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The HPLC method showed specificity, linearity in the range of 20-80 µg mL(-1) (r=0.9998), precision, accuracy and robustness. The microbiological method is based on the inhibitory effect of BSF upon the strain of Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC 12228 used as a test microorganism. The bioassay validation method yielded excellent results and included linearity, precision, accuracy, robustness and selectivity. The assay results were treated statistically by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and were found to be linear (r=0.9974) in the range of 0.5-2.0 µg mL(-1), precise (inter-assay: RSD=0.84), accurate (101.4%), specific and robust. The bioassay and the previously validated high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method were compared using Student's t test, which indicated that there was no statistically significant difference between these two methods. These results confirm that the proposed microbiological method can be used as routine analysis for the quantitative determination of BSF in an ophthalmic suspension. A preliminary stability study during the HPLC validation was performed and demonstrated that BSF is unstable under UV conditions. The photodegradation kinetics of BSF in water showed a first-order reaction for the drug product (ophthalmic suspension) and a second-order reaction for the reference standard (RS) under UVA light. UVA degraded samples of BSF were also studied in order to determine the preliminary in vitro cytotoxicity against mononuclear cells. The results indicated that BSF does not alter

  19. The superior ophthalmic vein approach for the treatment of carotid-cavernous fistulas: our first experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiriac A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Complex cavernous sinus fistulae (CCF are still a technical challenge to neurovascular team. The most commonly performed treatment consists in endovascular embolization of the lesion through an arterial or venous approach. Not always these conventional routes are feasible, requiring alternative routes. We report a case of a 44-year-old woman with a complex indirect (Barrow D carotid cavernous sinus fistula treated by two interventional sessions that imposing a retrograde direct transvenous approach via the superior ophthalmic vein.

  20. EarthScope Education and Outreach: Accomplishments and Emerging Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, S.; Ellins, K. K.; Semken, S. C.; Arrowsmith, R.

    2014-12-01

    EarthScope's Education and Outreach (E&O) program aims to increase public awareness of Earth science and enhance geoscience education at the K-12 and college level. The program is distinctive among major geoscience programs in two ways. First, planning for education and public engagement occurred in tandem with planning for the science mission. Second, the NSF EarthScope program includes funding support for education and outreach. In this presentation, we highlight key examples of the program's accomplishments and identify emerging E&O opportunities. E&O efforts have been collaboratively led by the EarthScope National Office (ESNO), IRIS, UNAVCO, the EarthScope Education and Outreach Subcommittee (EEOSC) and PI-driven EarthScope projects. Efforts by the EEOSC, guided by an EarthScope Education and Outreach Implementation Plan that is periodically updated, focus EarthScope E&O. EarthScope demonstrated early success in engaging undergraduate students (and teachers) in its mission through their involvement in siting USArray across the contiguous U.S. Funded E&O programs such as TOTLE, Illinois EarthScope, CEETEP (for K-12), InTeGrate and GETSI (for undergraduates) foster use of freely available EarthScope data and research findings. The Next Generation Science Standards, which stress science and engineering practices, offer an opportunity for alignment with existing EarthScope K-12 educational resources, and the EEOSC recommends focusing efforts on this task. The EEOSC recognizes the rapidly growing use of mobile smart devices by the public and in formal classrooms, which bring new opportunities to connect with the public and students. This will capitalize on EarthScope's already prominent social media presence, an effort that developed to accomplish one of the primary goals of the EarthScope E&O Implementation Plan to "Create a high-profile public identity for EarthScope" and to "Promote science literacy and understanding of EarthScope among all audiences through

  1. Antibiotic resistance and molecular characterization of ophthalmic Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolates from dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Min-Hee; Chae, Min-Joo; Yoon, Jang-Won; Kim, Seung-Gon; Lee, So-Young; Yoo, Jong-Hyun; Park, Hee-Myung

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence, virulence potential, and antibiotic resistance of ophthalmic Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (SP) isolated from dogs were examined. Sixty-seven Staphylococcus species were isolated from ophthalmic samples and surveyed for species-specific sequences in the Staphylococcus intermedius group (SIG) nuclease gene (SInuc), exfoliative toxin gene for SIG (siet), and antibiotic resistance genes (blaZ and mecA). PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the pta gene was also performed. Fifty isolates were identified as SIG strains, all of which were found to be SP. The blaZ gene was detected in 42 of the 50 SP strains and mecA gene was observed in 18 of the 50 SP strains. The 50 SP strains were most susceptible to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (94%) and chlorampenicol (70%), and highly resistant to tetracycline (94%) and penicillin (92%). It was also found that 16 (88.9%) mecA-positive SP strains were resistant to oxacillin, tetracycline and penicillin. All mecA-positive SP were resistant to more than four of the eight tested antibiotics and therefore considered SP with multi-drug resistance (MDR). Our results indicate a high prevalence of antibiotic resistance genes in ophthalmic SP along with a close relationship between MDR SP strains and the mecA gene. Based on our findings, judicious administration of antibiotics to companion dogs is necessary.

  2. The Gatekeepers in the Mouse Ophthalmic Artery: Endothelium-Dependent Mechanisms of Cholinergic Vasodilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manicam, Caroline; Staubitz, Julia; Brochhausen, Christoph; Grus, Franz H; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Gericke, Adrian

    2016-02-02

    Cholinergic regulation of arterial luminal diameter involves intricate network of intercellular communication between the endothelial and smooth muscle cells that is highly dependent on the molecular mediators released by the endothelium. Albeit the well-recognized contribution of nitric oxide (NO) towards vasodilation, the identity of compensatory mechanisms that maintain vasomotor tone when NO synthesis is deranged remain largely unknown in the ophthalmic artery. This is the first study to identify the vasodilatory signalling mechanisms of the ophthalmic artery employing wild type mice. Acetylcholine (ACh)-induced vasodilation was only partially attenuated when NO synthesis was inhibited. Intriguingly, the combined blocking of cytochrome P450 oxygenase (CYP450) and lipoxygenase (LOX), as well as CYP450 and gap junctions, abolished vasodilation; demonstrating that the key compensatory mechanisms comprise arachidonic acid metabolites which, work in concert with gap junctions for downstream signal transmission. Furthermore, the voltage-gated potassium ion channel, Kv1.6, was functionally relevant in mediating vasodilation. Its localization was found exclusively in the smooth muscle. In conclusion, ACh-induced vasodilation of mouse ophthalmic artery is mediated in part by NO and predominantly via arachidonic acid metabolites, with active involvement of gap junctions. Particularly, the Kv1.6 channel represents an attractive therapeutic target in ophthalmopathologies when NO synthesis is compromised.

  3. Needle Segmentation in Volumetric Optical Coherence Tomography Images for Ophthalmic Microsurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingchuan Zhou

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Needle segmentation is a fundamental step for needle reconstruction and image-guided surgery. Although there has been success stories in needle segmentation for non-microsurgeries, the methods cannot be directly extended to ophthalmic surgery due to the challenges bounded to required spatial resolution. As the ophthalmic surgery is performed by finer and smaller surgical instruments in micro-structural anatomies, specifically in retinal domains, difficulties are raised for delicate operation and sensitive perception. To address these challenges, in this paper we investigate needle segmentation in ophthalmic operation on 60 Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT cubes captured during needle injection surgeries on ex-vivo pig eyes. Furthermore, we developed two different approaches, a conventional method based on morphological features (MF and a specifically designed full convolution neural networks (FCN method, moreover, we evaluate them on the benchmark for needle segmentation in the volumetric OCT images. The experimental results show that FCN method has a better segmentation performance based on four evaluation metrics while MF method has a short inference time, which provides valuable reference for future works.

  4. The effect of live classical piano music on the vital signs of patients undergoing ophthalmic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camara, Jorge G; Ruszkowski, Joseph M; Worak, Sandra R

    2008-06-25

    Music and surgery. To determine the effect of live classical piano music on vital signs of patients undergoing ophthalmic surgery. Retrospective case series. 203 patients who underwent various ophthalmologic procedures in a period during which a piano was present in the operating room of St. Francis Medical Center. [Note: St. Francis Medical Center has recently been renamed Hawaii Medical Center East.] Demographic data, surgical procedures, and the vital signs of 203 patients who underwent ophthalmic procedures were obtained from patient records. Blood pressure, heart rate, and respiratory rate measured in the preoperative holding area were compared with the same parameters taken in the operating room, with and without exposure to live piano music. A paired t-test was used for statistical analysis. Mean arterial pressure, heart rate, and respiratory rate. 115 patients who were exposed to live piano music showed a statistically significant decrease in mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate, and respiratory rate in the operating room compared with their vital signs measured in the preoperative holding area (P piano music showed a statistically significant increase in mean arterial blood pressure (P piano music lowered the blood pressure, heart rate, and respiratory rate in patients undergoing ophthalmic surgery.

  5. Clinical utility of 3% diquafosol ophthalmic solution in the treatment of dry eyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koh S

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Shizuka Koh Department of Ophthalmology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka, Japan Abstract: Diquafosol is a drug used for dry eye treatment with a novel mechanism of action. It stimulates the secretion of tear fluid and mucin on the ocular surface, thus enabling us to selectively treat the tear film layer, playing an important role in the establishment of the concept of “Tear Film Oriented Therapy (TFOT”, an effective therapeutic approach to dry eye in Japan. The 3% diquafosol ophthalmic solution has been widely used for the treatment of dry eye in clinical practice, and it is currently available in Japan and South Korea. This review provides an overview of the clinical utility of 3% diquafosol ophthalmic solution, focusing on the results of clinical studies on various types of dry eye, including aqueous-deficient dry eye, short tear film breakup time-type dry eye, and post dry eye after laser in situ keratomileusis. It also introduces the additive effect of diquafosol on sodium hyaluronate monotherapy for dry eye, and the effect of 3% diquafosol ophthalmic solution for dry eye-related conditions. Additionally, it summarizes the ocular effects of diquafosol in healthy human eyes. Lastly, the importance of improving tear film stability in dry eye treatment, as well as general advances in dry eye treatments, are described. Keywords: diquafosol, dry eye, mucin secretion, fluid secretion, ocular surface, vision

  6. Effectiveness and relevant factors of 2% rebamipide ophthalmic suspension treatment in dry eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Kaori; Matsumiya, Wataru; Otsuka, Keiko; Maeda, Yoshifumi; Nagai, Takayuki; Nakamura, Makoto

    2015-06-06

    Rebamipide with mucin secretagogue activity was recently approved for the treatment of dry eye. The efficacy and safety in the treatment of rebamipide were shown in two pivotal clinical trials. It was the aim of this study to evaluate the effect of 2% rebamipide ophthalmic suspension in patients with dry eye and analyze relevant factors for favorable effects of rebamipide in clinical practice. This was a retrospective cohort study of 48 eyes from 24 patients with dry eye treated with 2% rebamipide ophthalmic suspension. Dry eye-related symptom score, tear film break-up time (TBUT), fluorescein ocular surface staining score (FOS) and the Schirmer test were used to collect the data from patients at baseline, and at 2, 4, 8, and 12 week visits. To determine the relevant factors, multiple regression analyses were then performed. Mean dry eye-related symptom score showed a significant improvement from the baseline (14.5 points) at 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks (9.80, 7.04, 7.04 and 7.83 points, corrected P value rebamipide ophthalmic suspension was an effective therapy for dry eye patients. Moreover the fluorescein conjunctiva staining score and dry eye-related symptom score might be good relevant factors for favorable effects of rebamipide.

  7. Effect of Rebamipide Ophthalmic Suspension on Intraocular Light Scattering for Dry Eye After Corneal Refractive Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Akihito; Kamiya, Kazutaka; Kobashi, Hidenaga; Shimizu, Kimiya

    2015-08-01

    To assess the changes in intraocular scattering before and after instillation of rebamipide ophthalmic suspension in patients with dry eye after corneal refractive surgery. This study enrolled 60 eyes of 30 dry eye patients undergoing corneal refractive surgery. Patients were randomly assigned to start topical administration of rebamipide ophthalmic suspension (rebamipide group) or artificial tears (control group) 4 times daily for 4 weeks. Tear secretion, tear break-up time (TBUT), and the fluorescein score were measured before and after treatment. Intraocular light scattering was also measured as the objective scattering index (OSI) at 0.5-second intervals over 10 seconds. In the rebamipide group, the Schirmer I test, TBUT, and fluorescein score improved significantly, from 11.4 ± 9.0 mm, 2.2 ± 0.7 seconds, and 4.3 ± 1.3 to 14.9 ± 7.4 mm, 4.5 ± 1.7 seconds, and 1.9 ± 1.0, respectively (P = 0.006, P Rebamipide ophthalmic suspension was effective for improving both ocular surface parameters and optical quality in patients with dry eye undergoing corneal refractive surgery, suggesting that it may hold promise for the treatment of such patients.

  8. Novel microsphere chain fiber tips for use in mid-infrared ophthalmic laser surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchens, Thomas C.; Darafsheh, Arash; Fardad, Amir; Antoszyk, Andrew N.; Ying, Howard S.; Astratov, Vasily N.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2012-01-01

    Ophthalmic surgery may benefit from the use of more precise fiber delivery systems for laser surgery. In this study, chains of sapphire microspheres integrated into the distal tip of a hollow waveguide are used for preliminary mid-infrared, Erbium:YAG laser ablation studies in contact mode with ophthalmic tissues, ex vivo. The combination of the Er:YAG laser's short optical penetration depth and small spot diameters achieved with this novel fiber probe may provide more precise tissue removal. One, three, and five microsphere chain structures were assembled and compared, resulting in spot diameters of 67, 32, and 30 μm, respectively. Single laser pulses of 0.1 mJ energy and 75 μs duration produced craters with average widths of 44, 30, and 17 μm and depths of 26, 10, and 8 μm, for one, three, and five sphere structures, respectively. Chains of microspheres produced spatial filtering of the multimode Er:YAG laser beam and fiber, thus providing spot diameters not otherwise available for precise tissue ablation using conventional fiber delivery systems. With further probe development, this novel approach to mid-IR laser ablation may provide an alternative to mechanical tools for ultra-precise surgical dissection and removal of ophthalmic tissues.

  9. Preparation, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of ophthalmic thermosensitive in situ hydrogel of betaxolol hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weiwei; Zhang, Nan; Hua, Haiying; Liu, Tuanbing; Tang, Yafang; Fu, Lingling; Yang, Yanan; Ma, Xiujie; Zhao, Yongxing

    2016-10-01

    Conventional ophthalmic formulations often eliminate rapidly after administration and cannot provide and maintain an adequate concentration of the drug in the precorneal area. To solve those problems, a thermosensitive in situ gelling and mucoadhesive ophthalmic drug delivery system was prepared and evaluated, the system was composed of poloxamer analogs and polycarbophil (PCP) and betaxolol hydrochloride (BH) was selected as model drug. The concentrations of poloxamer 407 (P407) (22% (w/v)) and poloxamer 188 (P188) (3.5% (w/v)) were identified through central composite design-response surface methodology (CCD-RSM). The BH in situ hydrogel (BH-HG) was liquid solution at low temperature and turned to semisolid at eye temperature. BH-HG showed good stability and biocompatibility, which fulfilled the requirements of ocular application. In vitro studies indicated that addition of PCP enhanced the viscosity of BH-HG and the release results of BH from BH-HG demonstrated a sustained release behavior of BH because of the gel dissolution. In vivo pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics studies indicated that the BH-HG formulation resulted in an improved bioavailability and a significantly lower intraocular pressure (IOP). The results suggested BH-HG could be potentially used as an in situ gelling system for ophthalmic delivery to enhance the bioavailability and efficacy.

  10. Enduring influence of elizabethan ophthalmic texts of the 1580s: bailey, grassus, and guillemeau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffler, Christopher T; Schwartz, Stephen G; Davenport, Byrd; Randolph, Jessica; Busscher, Joshua; Hadi, Tamer

    2014-01-01

    Three English ophthalmic texts of the 1580s were frequently republished: 1) Walter Bailey's A Briefe Treatise Touching the Preseruation of the Eie Sight, 2) The Method of Phisicke, an adaptation of the medieval treatise of Benevenutus Grassus, and 3) A Worthy Treatise of the Eyes, a translation of Jacques Guillemeau's treatise. Their history is intertwined through composite publications, some of which lacked clear attribution. At least 21 editions incorporated these texts. Although not previously realized, major elements of all 3 works are found in Two Treatises Concerning the Preseruation of Eie-sight, first published in 1616. To preserve eyesight, Bailey recommended eyebright (Euphrasia officinalis), fennel (Fæniculum vulgare), and a moderate lifestyle incorporating wine. In the works of Grassus and Guillemeau, cataracts were believed to lie anterior to the 'crystalline humor,' and were treated by the 'art of the needle,' or couching. Links are found between Grassus, Guillemeau, and eighteenth century glaucoma concepts. Although one of his students has traditionally received credit, it was English oculist John Thomas Woolhouse who first combined the early concepts and used the term glaucoma to describe the palpably hard eye in the early eighteenth century. The three primary ophthalmic texts of 1580s England influenced ophthalmic thought for over a century.

  11. Formulation and process factors influencing product quality and in vitro performance of ophthalmic ointments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoming; Al-Ghabeish, Manar; Rahman, Ziyaur; Krishnaiah, Yellela S R; Yerlikaya, Firat; Yang, Yang; Manda, Prashanth; Hunt, Robert L; Khan, Mansoor A

    2015-09-30

    Owing to its unique anatomical and physiological functions, ocular surface presents special challenges for both design and performance evaluation of the ophthalmic ointment drug products formulated with a variety of bases. The current investigation was carried out to understand and identify the appropriate in vitro methods suitable for quality and performance evaluation of ophthalmic ointment, and to study the effect of formulation and process variables on its critical quality attributes (CQA). The evaluated critical formulation variables include API initial size, drug percentage, and mineral oil percentage while the critical process parameters include mixing rate, temperature, time and cooling rate. The investigated quality and performance attributes include drug assay, content uniformity, API particle size in ointment, rheological characteristics, in vitro drug release and in vitro transcorneal drug permeation. Using design of experiments (DoE) as well as a novel principle component analysis approach, five of the quality and performance attributes (API particle size, storage modulus of ointment, high shear viscosity of ointment, in vitro drug release constant and in vitro transcorneal drug permeation rate constant) were found to be highly influenced by the formulation, in particular the strength of API, and to a lesser degree by processing variables. Correlating the ocular physiology with the physicochemical characteristics of acyclovir ophthalmic ointment suggested that in vitro quality metrics could be a valuable predictor of its in vivo performance. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Development and characterization of in-situ gel for ophthalmic formulation containing ciprofloxacin hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makwana, S B; Patel, V A; Parmar, S J

    2016-01-01

    In situ gels are systems which are applied as solutions or suspensions and are capable of undergoing rapid sol-to-gel transformation triggered by external stimulus such as temperature, pH etc. on instillation. The aim of the present study was to formulate and evaluate pH responsive in-situ gel for ophthalmic delivery. Ciprofloxacin hydrochloride is popularly used as a broad spectrum antibiotic in the treatment of corneal ulcers of ocular infections. However, rapid dilution on instillation, wash out, poor retention of drug concentration delimit the therapeutic benefits of the drug when used in form of conventional eye drops. Sodium alginate, an ophthalmic gel forming mucoadhesive polymer was chosen as polymer which undergoes instantaneous gel formation due to formation of calcium alginate by virtue of its interaction with divalent cation (Ca(+2)) present in lachrymal fluid. Hydroxy Propyl Methyl Cellulose (HPMC K4M and E5 0LV) was further incorporated as a viscosity enhancer in order to achieve the desired consistency so as to facilitate sustained drug release. The developed formulations were evaluated for clarity, pH measurement, gelling capacity, drug content, rheological study, and in vitro drug release. Thus, in situ gel based systems containing gums can be a valuable approach for ophthalmic drug delivery when compared to conventional systems.

  13. Financial return-on-investment of ophthalmic interventions: a new paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Melissa M; Brown, Gary C; Lieske, Heidi B; Lieske, P Alexander

    2014-05-01

    Although the patient value gain (improvement in quality-of-life and/or length-of-life) has been highlighted in Value-based Medicine cost-utility analyses, the financial value gain associated with healthcare interventions has received less emphasis. It is important for professional healthcare providers to realize their interventions often confer a large financial return-on-investment (ROI) to society. The societal costs associated with vitreoretinal and other ophthalmic interventions include: direct ophthalmic medical costs expended (hospital, physician, drug, diagnostic testing and so forth), direct medical costs saved (decreased costs for depression, injury, skilled nursing facility, nursing home and others), direct nonmedical costs saved (decreased costs for caregivers, transportation, residence costs, moving costs, and others), and indirect medical costs saved (improving employment incidence and wages). The financial ROI for direct ophthalmic medical costs expended for ranibizumab therapy for neovascular age-related macular degeneration is 450%, whereas that for cataract surgery is 4500% and for medical open-angle glaucoma therapy is 4000%. Many costs gained add to the Gross Domestic Product and increase the wealth of the nation. Many vitreoretinal and other ophthalmologic interventions confer considerable patient value, but also result in a large financial ROI to society. This financial ROI increases the wealth of the nation.

  14. Diffusion-Based Design of Multi-Layered Ophthalmic Lenses for Controlled Drug Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenta, Andreia F R; Serro, Ana Paula; Paradiso, Patrizia; Saramago, Benilde; Colaço, Rogério

    2016-01-01

    The study of ocular drug delivery systems has been one of the most covered topics in drug delivery research. One potential drug carrier solution is the use of materials that are already commercially available in ophthalmic lenses for the correction of refractive errors. In this study, we present a diffusion-based mathematical model in which the parameters can be adjusted based on experimental results obtained under controlled conditions. The model allows for the design of multi-layered therapeutic ophthalmic lenses for controlled drug delivery. We show that the proper combination of materials with adequate drug diffusion coefficients, thicknesses and interfacial transport characteristics allows for the control of the delivery of drugs from multi-layered ophthalmic lenses, such that drug bursts can be minimized, and the release time can be maximized. As far as we know, this combination of a mathematical modelling approach with experimental validation of non-constant activity source lamellar structures, made of layers of different materials, accounting for the interface resistance to the drug diffusion, is a novel approach to the design of drug loaded multi-layered contact lenses.

  15. Epidemiology of frequent attenders: a 3-year historic cohort study comparing attendance, morbidity and prescriptions of one-year and persistent frequent attenders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ter Riet Gerben

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background General Practitioners spend a disproportionate amount of time on frequent attenders. So far, trials on the effect of interventions on frequent attenders have shown negative results. However, these trials were conducted in short-term frequent attenders. It would be more reasonable to target intervention at persistent frequent attenders. Typical characteristics of persistent frequent attenders, as opposed to 1-year frequent attenders and non-frequent attenders, may generate hypotheses regarding modifiable factors on which new randomized trials may be designed. Methods We used the data of all 28,860 adult patients from 5 primary healthcare centers. Frequent attenders were patients whose attendance rate ranked in the (age and sex adjusted top 10 percent during 1 year (1-year frequent attenders or 3 years (persistent frequent attenders. All other patients on the register over the 3-year period were referred to as non-frequent attenders. The lists of medical problems coded by the GP using the International Classification of Primary Care (ICPC were used to assess morbidity. First, we determined which proportion of 1-year frequent attenders was still a frequent attender during the next two consecutive years and calculated the GPs' workload for these patients. Second, we compared morbidity and number of prescriptions for non-frequent attenders, 1-year frequent attenders and persistent frequent attenders. Results Of all 1-year frequent attenders, 15.4% became a persistent frequent attender equal to 1.6% of all patients. The 1-year frequent attenders (3,045; 10.6% were responsible for 39% of the face-to-face consultations; the 470 patients who would become persistent frequent attenders (1.6% were responsible for 8% of all consultations in 2003. Persistent frequent attenders presented more social problems, more psychiatric problems and medically unexplained physical symptoms, but also more chronic somatic diseases (especially diabetes

  16. Determinants of microfinance outreach in Sub-Saharan Africa: A panel approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulai Adams

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The study focused on analysing the outreach performance of microfinance institutions (MFIs in providing critical services for the poor using innovative lending techniques within constrained environments. Research purpose: The study examined the trade-off relations between the depth and the breadth of outreach and identified institutional level factors that influence MFIs outreach in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA. Motivation for the study: MFIs continue to play critical roles in extending financial services to the poor and yet previous studies have not analysed comprehensively the dimensions of outreach necessary for financial inclusion. Research design, approach and methods: The study employed correlation analysis and random effects methodology to panel data regression analysis (619 observations, 71 MFIs across 10 countries to establish the trade-off relations and the determinants of outreach in SSA. Main findings: It was established that a trade-off exists between the depth of outreach (access to credit disbursement by poor clients and breadth of outreach (number of clients served. The results further revealed that gross loan portfolio, portfolio at risk, borrower per staff member, interest rate, and operating expenses to assets ratio are the main institutional determinants of MFIs outreach in SSA. Practical/managerial implications: The policy implication is that MFIs that concentrate efforts in reaching the relatively poor do so at the expense of reaching a large number of poor clients. We suggest that effective monitoring of depth and breadth and the adoption and implementation of cost-saving outreach technologies by MFIs could enable them to operate sustainably and efficiently. Contribution/value added: A major contribution of the study is the trade-off relations revealed between the depth of outreach and the breadth of outreach of MFIs which advances the outreach literature.

  17. Evaluation of the cytotoxic effects of ophthalmic solutions containing benzalkonium chloride on corneal epithelium using an organotypic 3-D model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoh-Reiter, Su; Jessen, Bart A

    2009-01-01

    Background Benzalkonium chloride (BAC) is a common preservative used in ophthalmic solutions. The aim of this study was to compare the cytotoxic effects of BAC-containing ophthalmic solutions with a BAC-free ophthalmic solution using an organotypic 3-dimensional (3-D) corneal epithelial model and to determine the effects of latanoprost ophthalmic solution and its BAC-containing vehicle on corneal thickness in a monkey model. Methods The cytotoxicity of commercially available BAC-containing ophthalmic formulations of latanoprost (0.02% BAC) and olopatadine (0.01% BAC) was compared to that of BAC-free travoprost and saline in a corneal organotypic 3-D model using incubation times of 10 and 25 minutes. To compare the extent of differentiation of 3-D corneal cultures to monolayer transformed human corneal epithelial (HCE-T) cell cultures, expression levels (mRNA and protein) of the corneal markers epidermal growth factor receptor, transglutaminase 1 and involucrin were quantified. Finally, latanoprost ophthalmic solution or its vehicle was administered at suprapharmacologic doses (two 30 μL drops twice daily in 1 eye for 1 year) in monkey eyes, and corneal pachymetry was performed at baseline and at weeks 4, 13, 26 and 52. Results In the 3-D corneal epithelial culture assays, there were no significant differences in cytotoxicity between the BAC-containing latanoprost and olopatadine ophthalmic solutions and BAC-free travoprost ophthalmic solution at either the 10- or 25-minute time points. The 3-D cultures expressed higher levels of corneal epithelial markers than the HCE-T monolayers, indicating a greater degree of differentiation. There were no significant differences between the corneal thickness of monkey eyes treated with latanoprost ophthalmic solution or its vehicle (both containing 0.02% BAC) and untreated eyes. Conclusion The lack of cytotoxicity demonstrated in 3-D corneal cultures and in monkey studies suggests that the levels of BAC contained in ophthalmic

  18. Evaluation of the cytotoxic effects of ophthalmic solutions containing benzalkonium chloride on corneal epithelium using an organotypic 3-D model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessen Bart A

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Benzalkonium chloride (BAC is a common preservative used in ophthalmic solutions. The aim of this study was to compare the cytotoxic effects of BAC-containing ophthalmic solutions with a BAC-free ophthalmic solution using an organotypic 3-dimensional (3-D corneal epithelial model and to determine the effects of latanoprost ophthalmic solution and its BAC-containing vehicle on corneal thickness in a monkey model. Methods The cytotoxicity of commercially available BAC-containing ophthalmic formulations of latanoprost (0.02% BAC and olopatadine (0.01% BAC was compared to that of BAC-free travoprost and saline in a corneal organotypic 3-D model using incubation times of 10 and 25 minutes. To compare the extent of differentiation of 3-D corneal cultures to monolayer transformed human corneal epithelial (HCE-T cell cultures, expression levels (mRNA and protein of the corneal markers epidermal growth factor receptor, transglutaminase 1 and involucrin were quantified. Finally, latanoprost ophthalmic solution or its vehicle was administered at suprapharmacologic doses (two 30 μL drops twice daily in 1 eye for 1 year in monkey eyes, and corneal pachymetry was performed at baseline and at weeks 4, 13, 26 and 52. Results In the 3-D corneal epithelial culture assays, there were no significant differences in cytotoxicity between the BAC-containing latanoprost and olopatadine ophthalmic solutions and BAC-free travoprost ophthalmic solution at either the 10- or 25-minute time points. The 3-D cultures expressed higher levels of corneal epithelial markers than the HCE-T monolayers, indicating a greater degree of differentiation. There were no significant differences between the corneal thickness of monkey eyes treated with latanoprost ophthalmic solution or its vehicle (both containing 0.02% BAC and untreated eyes. Conclusion The lack of cytotoxicity demonstrated in 3-D corneal cultures and in monkey studies suggests that the levels of BAC

  19. An International Perspective for Education, Outreach and Communication During IPY 2007- 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, R. A.; Carlson, D. J.; Hansen, C.

    2006-12-01

    The international education and outreach action plan will be presented including examples of how an integrated approach will strengthen all forms of communication, and involve access to real-time science direct from the poles. The IPY Education and Outreach Strategy considers education, outreach and communication (EOC) as a continuum of information and activities. There will be many individual EOC initiatives during IPY, including development of educational material, films, documentaries, web-blogs, and press releases to name a few. It is important that all participants in such events also see their part in the global picture of education and outreach, and IPY scientists realise their opportunities for getting involved.

  20. Religious Affiliation, Religious Service Attendance, and Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jibum; Smith, Tom W; Kang, Jeong-han

    2015-12-01

    Very few studies have examined the effects of both religious affiliation and religiosity on mortality at the same time, and studies employing multiple dimensions of religiosity other than religious attendance are rare. Using the newly created General Social Survey-National Death Index data, our report contributes to the religion and mortality literature by examining religious affiliation and religiosity at the same time. Compared to Mainline Protestants, Catholics, Jews, and other religious groups have lower risk of death, but Black Protestants, Evangelical Protestants, and even those with no religious affiliation are not different from Mainline Protestants. While our study is consistent with previous findings that religious attendance leads to a reduction in mortality, we did not find other religious measures, such as strength of religious affiliation, frequency of praying, belief in an afterlife, and belief in God to be associated with mortality. We also find interaction effects between religious affiliation and attendance. The lowest mortality of Jews and other religious groups is more apparent for those with lower religious attendance. Thus, our result may emphasize the need for other research to focus on the effects of religious group and religious attendance on mortality at the same time.

  1. Maternal ophthalmic artery Doppler velocimetry in pre-eclampsia in Southwestern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olatunji RB

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Richard Busayo Olatunji,1 Ademola Joseph Adekanmi,1 Millicent Olubunmi Obajimi,1 Olumuyiwa Adebola Roberts,2 Temitope Olumuyiwa Ojo3 1Department of Radiology, 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Oyo State, 3Department of Community Medicine, Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital Complex, Ile-Ife, Osun State, Nigeria Background: Pre-eclampsia (PE poses a serious challenge to maternal and fetal health in Africa. It is associated with hemodynamic changes that may affect the internal carotid/ophthalmic artery circulation with consequent neuro-ophthalmic manifestations. Ophthalmic artery Doppler (OAD ultrasound is an important tool that can be used to detect hemodynamic changes in PE and monitor its severity. In this study, we evaluated hemodynamic changes on OAD ultrasound in the ophthalmic arteries of pre-eclamptic women and compared these with values in healthy pregnant women. Methods: OAD parameters, such as, peak systolic velocity, peak diastolic velocity, end diastolic velocity, pulsatility index, and peak ratio, were measured on transorbital triplex ultrasound scan with a 7–10 MHz multifrequency linear transducer in 42 consenting pre-eclamptic patients and 41 pregnant controls matched for maternal age, gestational age, and parity at the Department of Radiology, University College Hospital, Ibadan. Univariate, bivariate, and receiver operating characteristic curve data analyses were performed. P<0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results: Mean resistivity index, pulsatility index, and peak systolic velocity were significantly lower in pre-eclamptic patients than in the controls. Mean peak diastolic velocity, end diastolic velocity, and peak ratio were significantly higher in the pre-eclamptic group. The receiver operating characteristic curve showed that the resistivity index (sensitivity 75%, specificity 77.8% could distinguish mild from severe PE while the peak ratio

  2. Socioeconomic deprivation and accident and emergency attendances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scantlebury, Rachel; Rowlands, Gillian; Durbaba, Stevo;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Demand for England's accident and emergency (A&E) services is increasing and is particularly concentrated in areas of high deprivation. The extent to which primary care services, relative to population characteristics, can impact on A&E is not fully understood. AIM: To conduct...... a detailed analysis to identify population and primary care characteristics associated with A&E attendance rates, particularly those that may be amenable to change by primary care services. DESIGN AND SETTING: This study used a cross-sectional population-based design. The setting was general practices.......1, B = 547.3 [95% CI = 418.6 to 676.0]). The final model explained 34.4% of the variation in A&E attendance rates, mostly due to factors that could not be modified by primary care services. CONCLUSION: Demographic characteristics were the strongest predictors of A&E attendance rates. Primary care...

  3. An evaluation of rheumatology practitioner outreach clinics: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Services for Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) have evolved with the development of independently led outreach Rheumatology Practitioner (RP) clinics in Primary Care (PC). Their clinical and cost effectiveness, compared with Secondary Care (SC) services, has not been assessed. The RECIPROCATE study aims to evaluate their clinical and cost effectiveness. This part of the study aimed to explore health professionals’ opinions of rheumatology outreach service. Methods Using a qualitative design, semi-structured interviews were conducted with GPs, practice nurses, hospital doctors and RPs, from one hospital and seven PC practices in Norfolk, to elicit their opinions of the service. The interviews were analysed using thematic analysis. Results All participants agreed the service was supportive and valuable providing high quality personalised care, disease management, social, and educational support. Advantages identified included convenience, continuity of care and proximity of services to home. RPs helped bridge the communication gap between PC and SC. Some participants suggested having a doctor alongside RPs. The service was considered to be cost effective for patients but there was uncertainty about cost effectiveness for service providers. Few disadvantages were identified the most recurring being the lack of other onsite services when needed. It was noted that more services could be provided by RPs such as prescribing and joint injections as well as playing a more active role in knowledge transfer to PC. Conclusions Professionals involved in the care of RA patients recognised the valuable role of the RP outreach clinics. This service can be further developed in rheumatology and the example can be replicated for other chronic conditions. PMID:22607063

  4. Educational Outreach to Opioid Prescribers: The Case for Academic Detailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotter Davis, Margot; Bateman, Brian; Avorn, Jerry

    2017-02-01

    Nonmedical use of opioid medications constitutes a serious health threat as the rates of addiction, overdoses, and deaths have risen in recent years. Increasingly, inappropriate and excessively liberal prescribing of opioids by physicians is understood to be a central part of the crisis. Public health officials, hospital systems, and legislators are developing programs and regulations to address the problem in sustained and systematic ways that both insures effective treatment of pain and appropriate limits on the availability of opioids. Three approaches have obtained prominence as means of avoiding excessive and inappropriate prescribing, including: providing financial incentives to physicians to change their clinical decision through pay-for-performance contracts, monitoring patient medications through Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs, and educational outreach to physicians. A promising approach to educational outreach to physicians is an intervention known as "academic detailing." It was developed in the 1980s to provide one-on-one educational outreach to physicians using similar methods as the pharmaceutical industry that sends "detailers" to market their products to physician practices. Core to academic detailing, however, is the idea that medical decisions should be based on evidence-based information, including managing conditions with updated assessment measures, behavioral, and nonpharmacological interventions. With the pharmaceutical industry spending billions of dollars to advertise their products, individual practitioners can have difficulty gathering unbiased information, especially as the number of approved medications grows each year. Academic detailing has successfully affected the management of health conditions, such as atrial fibrillation, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and recently, has targeted physicians who prescribe opioids. This article discusses the approach as a potentially effective preventative intervention to address the

  5. Impact Through Outreach and Education with Europlanet 2020 Research Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heward, A.; Barrosa, M.; Miller, S.

    2015-10-01

    Since 2005, Europlanet has provided a framework to bring together Europe's fragmented planetary science community. The project has evolved through a number of phases into a self-sustaining membership organization. Now, Europlanet is launching a new Research Infrastructure (RI) funded through the European Commission's Horizon 2020 programme that, for the next four years, will provide support, services, access to facilities, new research tools and a virtual planetary observatory. Europlanet 2020 RI's Impact Through Outreach and Education (IOE) activities aim to ensure that the work of Europlanet and the community it supports is known, understood and used by stakeholders, and that their inputs are taken into account by the project. We will engage citizens, policy makers and potential industrial partners across Europe with planetary science and the opportunities that it provides for innovation, inspiration and job creation. We will reach out to educators and students, both directly and through partner networks, to provide an interactive showcase of Europlanet's activities e.g through live link-ups with scientists participating in planetary analogue field trips, educational video "shorts" and through using real planetary data from the virtual observatory in comparative planetology educational activities. We will support outreach providers within the planetary science community (e.g. schools liaison officers, press officers, social media managers and scientists active in communicating their work) through meetings and best practice workshops, communication training sessions, an annual prize for public engagement and a seed-funding scheme for outreach activities. We will use traditional and social media channels to communicate newsworthy results and activities to diverse audiences not just in Europe but also around the globe.

  6. Bones, Bodies, and Blogs: Outreach and Engagement in Bioarchaeology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katy Meyers Emery

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Surprisingly few bioarchaeology blogs currently exist, but their numbers belie their reach. In this article, we survey the ecology of the bioarchaeology blogosphere and address the impact of blogging in bioarchaeology, specifically addressing its utility in outreach and public engagement. In providing specific examples from our collective decade of blogging and from other bioarchaeology bloggers, we provide best practices to encourage bioarchaeologists who may want to add their voices to this sphere. The difficulties and potential issues of blogging bioarchaeology are far outweighed by the benefits of expanding communication and furthering disciplinary engagement in an increasingly digital world. We call on bioarchaeologists to be protagonists and advocates of our discipline.

  7. Connecting the Libraries and Athletics through Instruction and Outreach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapp, Lara; Vaughan, K T L

    2017-01-01

    This column describes the approaches taken by librarians and staff at James Madison University (JMU) Libraries & Educational Technologies (LET) to extend library support to university athletics. The model resembles that used for outreach to academic programs and was first adapted to the semi-clinical, nonacademic Strength & Conditioning Department, then to JMU Athletics as a whole. Librarians offered targeted instructional sessions, orientations, and asynchronous learning modules embedded in the learning management system. This new relationship has provided an opportunity for broader collaboration, increasing LET's presence across campus.

  8. Technology Transfer and Outreach for SNL/Rochester ALPHA Project.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinars, Daniel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the next stage goals and resource needs for the joint Sandia and University of Rochester ARPA-E project. A key portion of this project is Technology Transfer and Outreach, with the goal being to help ensure that this project develops a credible method or tool that the magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) research community can use to broaden the advocacy base, to pursue a viable path to commercial fusion energy, and to develop other commercial opportunities for the associated technology. This report describes an analysis of next stage goals and resource needs as requested by Milestone 5.1.1.

  9. Education and Outreach for EarthScope's USArray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, G.; Taber, J.

    2005-12-01

    Maintaining public interest throughout the 10-year EarthScope project is a challenge and will require an ongoing community-based effort within a national support structure. The initial education and outreach effort of the USArray portion of the EarthScope project involves siting outreach that assists in finding potential sites and promoting the value of hosting a seismograph. This aspect of the program will continue as the Transportable Array (TA) moves across the US. As more of the TA is installed, the primary focus will shift to using the educational hook that there will be an EarthScope seismograph in almost every county of the US at some point in the next 10 years. The program will be closely linked to the efforts of EarthScope Education and Outreach, and other EarthScope partners such as UNAVCO. In the long term, the program will provide a way for local communities to stay engaged after the TA moves to the next region. IRIS, as a national consortium of universities, is well placed to engage groups via local connections in multiple regions. An example of university involvement is a small group of students from Oregon State University who spent the summer finding sites for USArray. Not only did they promote the project within the community, but by working with professional permitters and scientists, the students got a rare opportunity to get practical experience doing real science. At Arizona State University (ASU) two students are currently working on finding sites across Arizona. ASU also works closely with Native American communities to promote EarthScope siting and educational activities within an appropriate cultural context. Universities are helping to develop college and secondary school GIS-related exercises associated with the process of siting. Ongoing siting outreach activities have both a community and broad focus. When schools are engaged as a TA station host, students have access to "their" TA station data via the online IRIS Data Management System

  10. Outrageous Outreach — Unconventional Ways of Communicating Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandu, O.; Christensen, L. L.

    2011-07-01

    The golden rule of communication, advertising, public relations and marketing is "follow your target group". In this article, we look at how this mantra is applied in science communication and public outreach. Do we really follow our target groups? Do we regularly research the behaviour, interests and preferences of the individuals behind the demographic categories? Or do we just believe that we are following them when in fact we are "preaching to the converted" — the demographic group that is already intrinsically interested in science and actively scours the science sections of the national newspapers?

  11. 3-D Printed Asteroids for Outreach Astronomy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, April

    2015-11-01

    3-D printed asteroids provide new opportunities for outreach astronomy education due to their low cost, interactive potential, and high interest value. Telescopes are expensive, bulky, fragile, and cannot be used effectively during the day. 3-D printing of asteroids combines exciting new technology with astronomy, appealing to a broader audience. The printed models are scientifically accurate, as their shapes have been modeled using light-curve inversion techniques using and occultation data to provide a jumping off point for discussions of these advanced and exciting topics.

  12. Lessons learned from ten years of distance learning outreach*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatis, Craig; Gaines, Cynthia; Liu, Wei-Li; Gill, Michael; Ackerman, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The study tested the efficacy of providing distance learning with real-time videoconferencing to broaden high school student knowledge of health careers. Methods: A pilot program was tried out and extended over ten years to include other schools in four different time zones and the National Library of Medicine. Survey results, site visits, and continued school participation were used as effectiveness indicators. Student ratings, site visits, and ongoing discussions were used to evaluate critical factors in the program. Results: Nine program factors contributed to success. Conclusions: Synchronous communication can be effective for outreach to special populations given appropriate infrastructure, technology, program design, and implementation. PMID:25918486

  13. Lessons learned from ten years of distance learning outreach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatis, Craig; Gaines, Cynthia; Liu, Wei-Li; Gill, Michael; Ackerman, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The study tested the efficacy of providing distance learning with real-time videoconferencing to broaden high school student knowledge of health careers. A pilot program was tried out and extended over ten years to include other schools in four different time zones and the National Library of Medicine. Survey results, site visits, and continued school participation were used as effectiveness indicators. Student ratings, site visits, and ongoing discussions were used to evaluate critical factors in the program. Nine program factors contributed to success. Synchronous communication can be effective for outreach to special populations given appropriate infrastructure, technology, program design, and implementation.

  14. STEMdex: CliffsNotes for Education and Public Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolone, L.; Nichols-Yehling, M.; Brinkworth, C.; Hurt, R. L.; Llamas, J.; Squires, G. K.; Wenger, M.; Martin, A.

    2014-07-01

    We present a new resource for the astronomy education community, with the goal of improving our community's knowledge and understanding of the educational research pertinent to our work. STEMdex will be a searchable database of summaries of peer-reviewed education papers, written by educators and researchers, and posted for the entire community to use. While we know we should base our EPO work on a solid research foundation, many people have limited time when it comes to staying on top of the literature. STEMdex aims to reduce that workload. Our database will summarize papers across the astronomy education spectrum, including formal and informal education, outreach, pedagogy, evaluation, and other topics.

  15. Comparative effiacy of marine Streptomyces formulation versus ciproflxacin ophthalmic solution for treating Staphylococcus aureus-induced conjunctivitis in animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Femina Wahaab

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To report the efficacy of marine actinomycetes in controlling Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus-induced conjunctivitis in experimental rabbit. Methods: The ethyl acetate extracts of the best isolates of actinomycetes from the soil samples of Rameswaram coastal regions, Tamil Nadu, India, were concentrated and re-constituted in buffer and used as actinomycetes ophthalmic suspension in this study. The anti-inflammatory efficacy of actinomycetes ophthalmic suspension was analysed in controlling S. aureusinduced conjunctivitis in rabbit in comparison with that of ciprofloxacin. Results: Among the four best isolates, the RAM25C4 isolate had the highest antimicrobial activity in the secondary screening. Shelf life studies indicated that the activity can be retained for 75 days when it was stored at 8 °C and the optimum temperature for storage was between –20°C and 30°C. The animal model studies indicated that there was a profound anti-conjunctivitis effect. The actinomycetes ophthalmic suspension had better activity than ciprofloxacin ophthalmic solution. Conclusions: This is the first time to report that Streptomyces bacillaris strain RAM25C4 has antimicrobial effect in controlling ophthalmic pathogen S. aureus under in vitro condition and the in vivo anti-inflammatory activity in controlling S. aureus-induced conjunctivitis.

  16. NSFC Vice President Attended IIASA Council Meeting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    From November 6th to 10th,2011,at the invitation of the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis(IIASA),Prof.Wang Jie,NSFC Vice President led a delegation to attend the IIASA Autumn Council Meeting.After the meeting,the delegation participated in the Mid-term Workshop of

  17. Race, College Attendance and College Completion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Thomas J.

    This study examined the college attendance and degree completion rates of black and white students using census data and data from the class of 1980 of the High School and Beyond Study. Introductory information examines the racial gap in earnings. The following sections consider: differences in educational attainment in relation to wage…

  18. International Determinants of Private School Attendance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkowski, Leslie; Rutkowski, David; Plucker, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    The current study uses Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2006 data to investigate international determinants of private school attendance. In particular, we seek to understand whether student achievement and home background factors such as socioeconomic status (SES) or motivational and goal-oriented factors are more predictive…

  19. Adolescent Marijuana Use and School Attendance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roebuck, M. Christopher; French, Michael T.; Dennis, Michael L.

    2004-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between adolescent marijuana use and school attendance. Data were pooled from the 1997 and 1998 National Household Surveys on Drug Abuse to form a sample of 15 168 adolescents, aged 12-18 years, who had not yet complete high school. The analysis determined the role of marijuana use in adolescent school dropout…

  20. Time Slot Management in Attended Home Delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.W.P. Savelsbergh (Martin); M. Fleischmann (Moritz); N.A.H. Agatz (Niels); A.M. Campbell (Ann Melissa)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractMany e-tailers providing attended home delivery, especially e-grocers, offer narrow delivery time slots to ensure satisfactory customer service. The choice of delivery time slots has to balance marketing and operational considerations, which results in a complex planning problem. We