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Sample records for attached biofilm reactors

  1. Attached biomass growth and substrate utilization rate in a moving bed biofilm reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Marques

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A moving bed bioreactor containing cubes of polyether foam immersed in a synthetic wastewater (an aqueous mixture of meat extract, yeast extract, dextrose, meat peptone, ammonium chloride, potassium chloride, sodium chloride, sodium bicarbonate, potassium mono-hydrogen-phosphate and magnesium sulphate was used to evaluate bacterial growth and biomass yield parameters based on Monod's equation. The wastewater was supplied in the bottom of the equipment flowing ascending in parallel with a diffused air current that provided the mixing of the reactor content. Suspended and attached biomass concentration was measured through gravimetric methods. Good agreement was found between experimental kinetic parameters values and those obtained by other researchers. The only significant difference was the high global biomass content about 2 times the values obtained in conventional processes, providing high performance with volumetric loading rates up to 5.5 kg COD/m³/d.

  2. Biofilm carrier migration model describes reactor performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltz, Joshua P; Johnson, Bruce R; Takács, Imre; Daigger, Glen T; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Brockmann, Doris; Kovács, Róbert; Calhoun, Jason M; Choubert, Jean-Marc; Derlon, Nicolas

    2017-06-01

    The accuracy of a biofilm reactor model depends on the extent to which physical system conditions (particularly bulk-liquid hydrodynamics and their influence on biofilm dynamics) deviate from the ideal conditions upon which the model is based. It follows that an improved capacity to model a biofilm reactor does not necessarily rely on an improved biofilm model, but does rely on an improved mathematical description of the biofilm reactor and its components. Existing biofilm reactor models typically include a one-dimensional biofilm model, a process (biokinetic and stoichiometric) model, and a continuous flow stirred tank reactor (CFSTR) mass balance that [when organizing CFSTRs in series] creates a pseudo two-dimensional (2-D) model of bulk-liquid hydrodynamics approaching plug flow. In such a biofilm reactor model, the user-defined biofilm area is specified for each CFSTR; thereby, Xcarrier does not exit the boundaries of the CFSTR to which they are assigned or exchange boundaries with other CFSTRs in the series. The error introduced by this pseudo 2-D biofilm reactor modeling approach may adversely affect model results and limit model-user capacity to accurately calibrate a model. This paper presents a new sub-model that describes the migration of Xcarrier and associated biofilms, and evaluates the impact that Xcarrier migration and axial dispersion has on simulated system performance. Relevance of the new biofilm reactor model to engineering situations is discussed by applying it to known biofilm reactor types and operational conditions.

  3. The long-term effects of wall attached microalgal biofilm on algae-based wastewater treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, Yanyan; Mennerich, Artur; Urban, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    The influence of the reactor wall attached biofilm on the nutrient removal performance was investigated in an open photobioreactor during long-term operation. Total nitrogen and phosphorus removal efficiencies were statistically similar between reactor with (reactor A) and without (reactor B) bio...

  4. Biofilm reactors for industrial bioconversion processes: employing potential of enhanced reaction rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karcher Patrick

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This article describes the use of biofilm reactors for the production of various chemicals by fermentation and wastewater treatment. Biofilm formation is a natural process where microbial cells attach to the support (adsorbent or form flocs/aggregates (also called granules without use of chemicals and form thick layers of cells known as "biofilms." As a result of biofilm formation, cell densities in the reactor increase and cell concentrations as high as 74 gL-1 can be achieved. The reactor configurations can be as simple as a batch reactor, continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR, packed bed reactor (PBR, fluidized bed reactor (FBR, airlift reactor (ALR, upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB reactor, or any other suitable configuration. In UASB granular biofilm particles are used. This article demonstrates that reactor productivities in these reactors have been superior to any other reactor types. This article describes production of ethanol, butanol, lactic acid, acetic acid/vinegar, succinic acid, and fumaric acid in addition to wastewater treatment in the biofilm reactors. As the title suggests, biofilm reactors have high potential to be employed in biotechnology/bioconversion industry for viable economic reasons. In this article, various reactor types have been compared for the above bioconversion processes.

  5. Physicochemical characteristics and microbial community evolution of biofilms during the start-up period in a moving bed biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yan; Zhang, Yan; Ren, Hong-Qiang; Geng, Jin-Ju; Xu, Ke; Huang, Hui; Ding, Li-Li

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate biofilm properties evolution coupled with different ages during the start-up period in a moving bed biofilm reactor system. Physicochemical characteristics including adhesion force, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), morphology as well as volatile solid and microbial community were studied. Results showed that the formation and development of biofilms exhibited four stages, including (I) initial attachment and young biofilm formation, (II) biofilms accumulation, (III) biofilm sloughing and updating, and (IV) biofilm maturation. During the whole start-up period, adhesion force was positively and significantly correlated with the contents of EPS, especially the content of polysaccharide. In addition, increased adhesion force and EPS were beneficial for biofilm retention. Gram-negative bacteria mainly including Sphaerotilus, Zoogloea and Haliscomenobacter were predominant in the initial stage. Actinobacteria was beneficial to resist sloughing. Furthermore, filamentous bacteria were dominant in maturation biofilm. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. From biofilm ecology to reactors: a focused review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boltz, Joshua P.; Smets, Barth F.; Rittmann, Bruce E.

    2017-01-01

    has led to significant advances in the understanding of biofilm ecology. New metabolic pathways, such as anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) or complete ammonium oxidation (comammox) were first observed in biofilm reactors. The functions, properties, and constituents of the biofilm extracellular...... the following three topics: (1) biofilm ecology, (2) biofilm reactor technology and design, and (3) biofilm modeling. In so doing, it addresses the processes occurring in the biofilm, and how these affect and are affected by the broader biofilm system. The symphonic application of a suite of biological methods...... been used for water treatment, with current focus on moving bed biofilm reactors, integrated fixed-film activated sludge, membrane-supported biofilm reactors, and granular sludge processes. The control and/or beneficial use of biofilms in membrane processes is advancing. Biofilm models have become...

  7. The long-term effects of wall attached microalgal biofilm on algae-based wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yanyan; Mennerich, Artur; Urban, Brigitte

    2016-10-01

    The influence of the reactor wall attached biofilm on the nutrient removal performance was investigated in an open photobioreactor during long-term operation. Total nitrogen and phosphorus removal efficiencies were statistically similar between reactor with (reactor A) and without (reactor B) biofilm at the Hydraulic Retention Time (HRT) of 18, 13.5 and 9days. When the HRT reduced to 8days, total nitrogen and phosphorus removal efficiencies in the reactor A were 42.95±5.11% and 97.97±1.12%, respectively, while significant lower removal efficiencies (38.06±5.80% for total nitrogen and 83.14±8.16% for phosphorus) were obtained in the reactor B. The VSS concentrations throughout the test were statistically similar for the two reactors, with a mean value of 0.63±0.25g/l for reactor A and 0.69±0.20g/l for reactor B. This study indicated that the reactor wall attached biofilm supported high phosphorus and nitrogen removal, which may provide insight into the practical implementation of microalgae-based wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Combined Reactor and Microelectrode Measurements in Laboratory Grown Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tove; Harremoës, Poul

    1994-01-01

    A combined biofilm reactor-/microelectrode experimental set-up has been constructed, allowing for simultaneous reactor mass balances and measurements of concentration profiles within the biofilm. The system consists of an annular biofilm reactor equipped with an oxygen microelectrode. Experiments...

  9. Anaerobic granular sludge and biofilm reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skiadas, Ioannis V.; Gavala, Hariklia N.; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye

    2003-01-01

    by the immobilization of the biomass, which forms static biofilms, particle-supported biofilms, or granules depending on the reactor's operational conditions. The advantages of the high-rate anaerobic digestion over the conventional aerobic wastewater treatment methods has created a clear trend for the change......-rate anaerobic treatment systems based on anaerobic granular sludge and biofilm are described in this chapter. Emphasis is given to a) the Up-flow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) systems, b) the main characteristics of the anaerobic granular sludge, and c) the factors that control the granulation process...

  10. From biofilm ecology to reactors: a focused review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltz, Joshua P; Smets, Barth F; Rittmann, Bruce E; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Daigger, Glen T

    2017-04-01

    Biofilms are complex biostructures that appear on all surfaces that are regularly in contact with water. They are structurally complex, dynamic systems with attributes of primordial multicellular organisms and multifaceted ecosystems. The presence of biofilms may have a negative impact on the performance of various systems, but they can also be used beneficially for the treatment of water (defined herein as potable water, municipal and industrial wastewater, fresh/brackish/salt water bodies, groundwater) as well as in water stream-based biological resource recovery systems. This review addresses the following three topics: (1) biofilm ecology, (2) biofilm reactor technology and design, and (3) biofilm modeling. In so doing, it addresses the processes occurring in the biofilm, and how these affect and are affected by the broader biofilm system. The symphonic application of a suite of biological methods has led to significant advances in the understanding of biofilm ecology. New metabolic pathways, such as anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) or complete ammonium oxidation (comammox) were first observed in biofilm reactors. The functions, properties, and constituents of the biofilm extracellular polymeric substance matrix are somewhat known, but their exact composition and role in the microbial conversion kinetics and biochemical transformations are still to be resolved. Biofilm grown microorganisms may contribute to increased metabolism of micro-pollutants. Several types of biofilm reactors have been used for water treatment, with current focus on moving bed biofilm reactors, integrated fixed-film activated sludge, membrane-supported biofilm reactors, and granular sludge processes. The control and/or beneficial use of biofilms in membrane processes is advancing. Biofilm models have become essential tools for fundamental biofilm research and biofilm reactor engineering and design. At the same time, the divergence between biofilm modeling and biofilm reactor

  11. Monitoring biofilm attachment on medical devices surfaces using hyperspectral imaging

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    Le, Hanh N. D.; Hitchins, Victoria M.; Ilev, Ilko K.; Kim, Do-Hyun

    2014-02-01

    Microbial biofilm is a colony of single bacteria cells (planktonic) that attached to surfaces, attract other microorganisms to attach and grow, and together they build an extracellular matrix composed of polysaccharides, protein, and DNA. Eventually, some cells will detach and spread to other surface. Biofilm on medical devices can cause severe infection to all age ranges from infant to adult. Therefore, it is important to detect biofilm in a fast and efficient manner. Hyperspectral imaging was utilized for distinguishing wide area of biofilm coverage on various materials and on different textures of stainless steeltest coupons. Not only is the coverage of biofilm important, but also the shear stress of biofilm on the attached surfaces is significant. This study investigates the effects of shear stress on the adhesion of biofilms on common medical device surfaces such as glass, polycarbonate, polytetrafluoroethylene, and stainless steel with different textures. Biofilm was grown using Ps. aeruginosa and growth was monitored after 24 and 48 hours at 37° C. The coupons covered with biofilm were tilted at 45 degrees and 90 degrees for 30 seconds to induce shear stress and Hyperspectral images were taken. We hypothesize that stronger attachment on rough surface would be able to withstand greater shear stress compared to smooth surface.

  12. Performance comparison of plant root biofilm, gravel attached ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Performance comparison of plant root biofilm, gravel attached biofilm and planktonic microbial populations, in phenol removal within a constructed wetland wastewater treatment system. Eyal Kurzbaum1*, Felix Kirzhner2 and Robert Armon2. 1Golan Research Institute, University of Haifa, P.O. Box 97, Katzrin 12900, Israel.

  13. A direct viable count method for the enumeration of attached bacteria and assessment of biofilm disinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, F. P.; Pyle, B. H.; McFeters, G. A.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the adaptation of an in situ direct viable count (in situ DVC) method in biofilm disinfection studies. The results obtained with this technique were compared to two other enumeration methods, the plate count (PC) and conventional direct viable count (c-DVC). An environmental isolate (Klebsiella pneumoniae Kp1) was used to form biofilms on stainless steel coupons in a stirred batch reactor. The in situ DVC method was applied to directly assess the viability of bacteria in biofilms without disturbing the integrity of the interfacial community. As additional advantages, the results were observed after 4 h instead of the 24 h incubation time required for colony formation and total cell numbers that remained on the substratum were enumerated. Chlorine and monochloramine were used to determine the susceptibilities of attached and planktonic bacteria to disinfection treatment using this novel analytical approach. The planktonic cells in the reactor showed no significant change in susceptibility to disinfectants during the period of biofilm formation. In addition, the attached cells did not reveal any more resistance to disinfection than planktonic cells. The disinfection studies of young biofilms indicated that 0.25 mg/l free chlorine (at pH 7.2) and 1 mg/l monochloramine (at pH 9.0) have comparable disinfection efficiencies at 25 degrees C. Although being a weaker disinfectant, monochloramine was more effective in removing attached bacteria from the substratum than free chlorine. The in situ DVC method always showed at least one log higher viable cell densities than the PC method, suggesting that the in situ DVC method is more efficient in the enumeration of biofilm bacteria. The results also indicated that the in situ DVC method can provide more accurate information regarding the cell numbers and viability of bacteria within biofilms following disinfection.

  14. Dimensioning of aerated submerged fixed bed biofilm reactors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The description of a biofilm mathematical model application for dimensioning an aerated fixed bed biofilm reactor (ASFBBR) for petrochemical wastewater polishing is presented. A simple one-dimensional model of biofilm, developed by P Harremöes, was chosen for this purpose. The model was calibrated and verified ...

  15. PERKEMBANGAN BIOFILM NITRIFIKASI DI FIXED BED REACTOR PADA SALINITAS TINGGI

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    Sudarno

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Development of nitrification biomass that is growing attached on carried material was examined by measuring its ammonium or nitrit oxidation rates. Porous ceramic rings (36 pieces were put into the fixed bed reactor (FBR . The fixed bed reactor that was operated continuously for more than 500 day was continued to be operated at a HRT of 1 day, a DO of above 5 mg L-1 and pH of 8. Ammonia concentration in the feeding was 50 mg NH4+-N L-1. At days 1, 5, 12, 20, 33 and 50, six porous ceramic rings were taken out and then ammonia and nitrite removal rate by biofilm in the ceramic rings was separately measured. The measurement of rates was done in small cylindrical glass reactors with initial concentration of ammonia and nitrite was 10 mg N L-1. Until 50 days of incubation AORs were always higher than NORs. Additionally, ammonia oxidizers attach or grow faster in the porous ceramic material than nitrite oxidizers.

  16. Degradation Mechanisms of Colloidal Organic Matter in Biofilm Reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tove; Harremoës, Poul

    1994-01-01

    The degradation mechanisms of colloidal organic matter in biofilm reactors have been studied in an idealized laboratory reactor system with soluble starch as a model substrate. Batch tests and experiments with different reactor configurations have shown that for this specific substrate, bulk liquid...

  17. Removing biofilms from stainless steel without changing surface properties relevant for bacterial attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huttenlochner, Katharina; Müller-Renno, Christine; Ziegler, Christiane; Merz, Rolf; Merz, Birgit; Kopnarski, Michael; Chodorski, Jonas; Schlegel, Christin; Ulber, Roland

    2017-04-26

    The influence of oxygen (and argon) plasma cleaning and a base-acid cleaning procedure on stainless steel surfaces was studied. The main aim was to clean stainless steel samples from Paracoccus seriniphilus biofilms without changing the surface properties which are relevant for bacterial attachment to allow reuse in a biofilm reactor. It is shown that oxygen plasma cleaning, which very successfully removes the same kind of biofilm from titanium surfaces, is not suitable for stainless steel. It largely influences the surface chemistry by producing thick metal oxide layers of varying compositions and changing phenomenological surface properties such as wettability. A promising method without changing surface properties while cleaning satisfactorily is a combination of base and acid reagents at elevated temperature.

  18. Biofilm attachment reduction on bioinspired, dynamic, micro-wrinkling surfaces

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    Epstein, Alexander K.; Hong, Donggyoon; Kim, Philseok; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2013-09-01

    Most bacteria live in multicellular communities known as biofilms that are adherent to surfaces in our environment, from sea beds to plumbing systems. Biofilms are often associated with clinical infections, nosocomial deaths and industrial damage such as bio-corrosion and clogging of pipes. As mature biofilms are extremely challenging to eradicate once formed, prevention is advantageous over treatment. However, conventional surface chemistry strategies are either generally transient, due to chemical masking, or toxic, as in the case of leaching marine antifouling paints. Inspired by the nonfouling skins of echinoderms and other marine organisms, which possess highly dynamic surface structures that mechanically frustrate bio-attachment, we have developed and tested a synthetic platform based on both uniaxial mechanical strain and buckling-induced elastomer microtopography. Bacterial biofilm attachment to the dynamic substrates was studied under an array of parameters, including strain amplitude and timescale (1-100 mm s-1), surface wrinkle length scale, bacterial species and cell geometry, and growth time. The optimal conditions for achieving up to ˜ 80% Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm reduction after 24 h growth and ˜ 60% reduction after 48 h were combinatorially elucidated to occur at 20% strain amplitude, a timescale of less than ˜ 5 min between strain cycles and a topography length scale corresponding to the cell dimension of ˜ 1 μm. Divergent effects on the attachment of P. aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli biofilms showed that the dynamic substrate also provides a new means of species-specific biofilm inhibition, or inversely, selection for a desired type of bacteria, without reliance on any toxic or transient surface chemical treatments.

  19. Phenotypes of Non-Attached Pseudomonas aeruginosa Aggregates Resemble Surface Attached Biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Morten; Kragh, Kasper Nørskov; Qvortrup, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    conditions. However, microscopic investigations of samples isolated from sites of chronic infections seem to suggest that some bacteria do not need to be attached to surfaces in order to establish chronic infections. In this study we employed scanning electron microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy......, RT-PCR as well as traditional culturing techniques to study the properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa aggregates. We found that non-attached aggregates from stationary-phase cultures have comparable growth rates to surface attached biofilms. The growth rate estimations indicated that, independently...... the physiological states of the aggregates and particular matrix components. Bacterial surface-attachment and subsequent biofilm formation are considered hallmarks of the capacity of microbes to cause persistent infections. We have observed non-attached aggregates in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients; otitis...

  20. Phenotypes of non-attached Pseudomonas aeruginosa aggregates resemble surface attached biofilm.

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    Morten Alhede

    Full Text Available For a chronic infection to be established, bacteria must be able to cope with hostile conditions such as low iron levels, oxidative stress, and clearance by the host defense, as well as antibiotic treatment. It is generally accepted that biofilm formation facilitates tolerance to these adverse conditions. However, microscopic investigations of samples isolated from sites of chronic infections seem to suggest that some bacteria do not need to be attached to surfaces in order to establish chronic infections. In this study we employed scanning electron microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy, RT-PCR as well as traditional culturing techniques to study the properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa aggregates. We found that non-attached aggregates from stationary-phase cultures have comparable growth rates to surface attached biofilms. The growth rate estimations indicated that, independently of age, both aggregates and flow-cell biofilm had the same slow growth rate as a stationary phase shaking cultures. Internal structures of the aggregates matrix components and their capacity to survive otherwise lethal treatments with antibiotics (referred to as tolerance and resistance to phagocytes were also found to be strikingly similar to flow-cell biofilms. Our data indicate that the tolerance of both biofilms and non-attached aggregates towards antibiotics is reversible by physical disruption. We provide evidence that the antibiotic tolerance is likely to be dependent on both the physiological states of the aggregates and particular matrix components. Bacterial surface-attachment and subsequent biofilm formation are considered hallmarks of the capacity of microbes to cause persistent infections. We have observed non-attached aggregates in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients; otitis media; soft tissue fillers and non-healing wounds, and we propose that aggregated cells exhibit enhanced survival in the hostile host environment, compared with non

  1. Syntrophic microbial communities on straw as biofilm carrier increase the methane yield of a biowaste-digesting biogas reactor

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    Frank R. Bengelsdorf

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Biogas from biowaste can be an important source of renewable energy, but the fermentation process of low-structure waste is often unstable. The present study uses a full-scale biogas reactor to test the hypothesis that straw as an additional biofilm carrier will increase methane yield; and this effect is mirrored in a specific microbial community attached to the straw. Better reactor performance after addition of straw, at simultaneously higher organic loading rate and specific methane yield confirmed the hypothesis. The microbial communities on straw as a biofilm carrier and of the liquid reactor content were investigated using 16S rDNA amplicon sequencing by means of 454 pyrosequencing technology. The results revealed high diversity of the bacterial communities in the liquid reactor content as well as the biofilms on the straw. The most abundant archaea in all samples belonged to the genera Methanoculleus and Methanosarcina. Addition of straw resulted in a significantly different microbial community attached to the biofilm carrier. The bacterium Candidatus Cloacamonas acidaminovorans and methanogenic archaea of the genus Methanoculleus dominated the biofilm on straw. Syntrophic interactions between the hydrogenotrophic Methanoculleus sp. and members of the hydrogen-producing bacterial community within biofilms may explain the improved methane yield. Thus, straw addition can be used to improve and to stabilize the anaerobic process in substrates lacking biofilm-supporting structures.

  2. Nitritation performance and biofilm development of co- and counter-diffusion biofilm reactors: Modeling and experimental comparison

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Rongchang; Terada, Akihiko; Lackner, Susanne

    2009-01-01

    A comparative study was conducted on the start-up performance and biofilm development in two different biofilm reactors with aim of obtaining partial nitritation. The reactors were both operated under oxygen limited conditions, but differed in geometry. While substrates (O-2, NH3) co...... results showed that the counter-diffusion biofilms developed faster and attained a larger maximum biofilm thickness than the co-diffusion biofilms. Under oxygen limited condition (DO

  3. Biological Phosphorus Removal in a Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helness, Herman

    2007-09-15

    The scope of this study was to investigate use of the moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) process for biological phosphorus removal. The goal has been to describe the operating conditions required for biological phosphorus and nitrogen removal in a MBBR operated as a sequencing batch reactor (SBR), and determine dimensioning criteria for such a process

  4. Estimation of spatial distribution of quorum sensing signaling in sequencing batch biofilm reactor (SBBR) biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinfeng; Ding, Lili; Li, Kan; Huang, Hui; Hu, Haidong; Geng, Jinju; Xu, Ke; Ren, Hongqiang

    2018-01-15

    Quorum sensing (QS) signaling, plays a significant role in regulating formation of biofilms in the nature; however, little information about the occurrence and distribution of quorum sensing molecular in the biofilm of carriers has been reported. In this study, distribution of QS signaling molecules (the acylated homoserine lactones-AHLs, and AI-2), extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and the mechanical properties in sequencing batch biofilm reactor (SBBR) biofilms have been investigated. Using increased centrifugal force, the biofilms were detached into different fractions. The AHLs ranged from 5.2ng/g to 98.3ng/g in different fractions of biofilms, and N-decanoyl-dl-homoserine lactone (C10-HSL) and N-dodecanoyl-dl-homoserine lactone (C12-HSL) in the biofilms obtained at various centrifugal forces displayed significant differences (pbiofilms ranged from 79.2ng/g to 98.3ng/g. Soluble EPS and loosely bound EPS content in the different fractions of biofilms displayed significant positive relationship with the distribution of C12-HSL (r=0.86, pbiofilms were positively related with AHLs with 22.76% was significantly positively (pBiofilm adhesion and compliance was the strongest in the tightly-bound biofilm, the weakest in the supernatant/surface biofilm, which was in accordance with the distribution of C12 HSL(r=0.77, pbiofilm application. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Successional development of biofilms in moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) systems treating municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Kristi; Taylor, Michael W; Turner, Susan J

    2014-02-01

    Biofilm-based technologies, such as moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) systems, are widely used to treat wastewater. Biofilm development is important for MBBR systems as much of the microbial biomass is retained within reactors as biofilm on suspended carriers. Little is known about this process of biofilm development and the microorganisms upon which MBBRs rely. We documented successional changes in microbial communities as biofilms established in two full-scale MBBR systems treating municipal wastewater over two seasons. 16S rRNA gene-targeted pyrosequencing and clone libraries were used to describe microbial communities. These data indicate a successional process that commences with the establishment of an aerobic community dominated by Gammaproteobacteria (up to 52 % of sequences). Over time, this community shifts towards dominance by putatively anaerobic organisms including Deltaproteobacteria and Clostridiales. Significant differences were observed between the two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), mostly due to a large number of sequences (up to 55 %) representing Epsilonproteobacteria (mostly Arcobacter) at one site. Archaea in young biofilms included several lineages of Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeota. In contrast, the mature biofilm consisted entirely of Methanosarcinaceae (Euryarchaeota). This study provides new insights into the community structure of developing biofilms at full-scale WWTPs and provides the basis for optimizing MBBR start-up and operational parameters.

  6. Kinetics of carbendazim degradation in a horizontal tubular biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado-Gutiérrez, María Luisa; Ruiz-Ordaz, Nora; Galíndez-Mayer, Juvencio; Santoyo-Tepole, Fortunata; Curiel-Quesada, Everardo; García-Mena, Jaime; Ahuatzi-Chacón, Deifilia

    2017-04-01

    The fungicide carbendazim is an ecotoxic agent affecting aquatic biota. Due to its suspected hormone-disrupting effects, it is considered a "priority hazard substance" by the Water Framework Directive of the European Commission, and its degradation is of major concern. In this work, a horizontal tubular biofilm reactor (HTBR) operating in plug-flow regime was used to study the kinetics of carbendazim removal by an acclimated microbial consortium. The reactor was operated in steady state continuous culture at eight different carbendazim loading rates. The concentrations of the fungicide were determined at several distances of the HTBR. At the loading rates tested, the highest instantaneous removal rates were observed in the first section of the tubular biofilm reactor. No evidence of inhibition of the catabolic activity of the microbial community was found. Strains of the genera Flectobacillus, Klebsiella, Stenotrophomonas, and Flavobacterium were identified in the biofilm; the last three degrade carbendazim in axenic culture.

  7. Syntrophic microbial communities on straw as biofilm carrier increase the methane yield of a biowaste-digesting biogas reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Bengelsdorf, Frank R.; Christina Gabris; Lisa Michel; Manuel Zak; Marian Kazda

    2015-01-01

    Biogas from biowaste can be an important source of renewable energy, but the fermentation process of low-structure waste is often unstable. The present study uses a full-scale biogas reactor to test the hypothesis that straw as an additional biofilm carrier will increase methane yield; and this effect is mirrored in a specific microbial community attached to the straw. Better reactor performance after addition of straw, at simultaneously higher organic loading rate and specific methane yield ...

  8. DEGRADATION OF AROMATIC COMPOUNDS USING MOVING BED BIOFILM REACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ayati, H. Ganjidoust, M. Mir Fattah

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available For biological treatment of water, there are many different biofilm systems in use. Examples of them are trickling filters, rotating biological contactors, fixed media submerged biofilters, granular media biofilters and fluidized bed reactors. They all have their advantages and disadvantages. Hence, the Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor process was developed in Norway in the late 1980s and early 1990s to adopt the best features of the activated sludge process as well as those of the biofilter processes, without including the worst. Two cylindrical moving bed biofilm reactors were used in this study working in upflow stream conditions. Experiments have been done in aerobic batch flow regime. Laboratory experiments were conducted at room temperature (23–28C and synthetic wastewater comprising a composition of phenol and hydroquinone in each reactor as the main organic constituents, plus balanced nutrients and alkalinity were used to feed the reactor. The ratio of influent to effluent COD was determined at different retention times. The results indicated that the removal efficiency of each selected compound is affected by the detention time. At low phenol and hydroquinone concentration (from 700 to 1000 mg/L maximum removal efficiency (over 80 % was obtained. By further increasing in COD loading rate up to 3000 mg/L, a decrease in COD removal rate was occurred. In the reactor containing pyrogallol in COD of 1500 mg/L, the removal rate decreased to 10 percent because of its toxicity for microorganisms.

  9. Modeling phototrophic biofilms in a plug-flow reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Sierra, J D; Picioreanu, C; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2014-01-01

    The use of phototrophic biofilms in wastewater treatment has been recognized as a potential option for development of new reactor configurations. For better understanding of these systems, a numerical model was developed including relevant microbial processes. As a novelty, this model was implemented in COMSOL Multiphysics, a modern computational environment for complex dynamic models. A two-dimensional biofilm model was used to study the spatial distribution of microbial species within the biofilm and along the length of the reactor. The biofilm model was coupled with a one-dimensional plug-flow bulk liquid model. The impact of different operational conditions on the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and ammonia conversions was assessed. The model was tuned by varying two parameters: the half-saturation coefficient for light use by phototrophs and the oxygen mass transfer coefficient. The mass transfer coefficient was found to be determining for the substrate conversion rate. Simulations indicate that heterotrophs would overgrow nitrifiers and phototrophs within the biofilm until a low biodegradable COD value in the wastewater is reached (organic loading rate reactor performance.

  10. Evaluating the effect of biofilm thickness on nitrification in moving bed biofilm reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piculell, Maria; Welander, Pia; Jönsson, Karin; Welander, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluates the effect of biofilm thickness on the nitrifying activity in moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBRs) in a controlled environment. In-depth understanding of biofilm properties in MBBRs and their effect on the overall treatment efficiency is the key to optimizing process stability and efficiency. However, evaluating biofilm properties in continuously operated MBBRs can be extremely challenging. This study uses a carrier design which enables comparison of four different biofilm thicknesses, in otherwise equally operated lab-scale MBBRs. The results show that within the studied range (200-500 µm) and specific operation conditions, biofilm thickness alone had no significant effect on the overall ammonium removal. The nitrate production, however, decreased with a decreasing biofilm thickness, and the ratio between nitrite and ammonia-oxidizing activity decreased both with increasing load and decreasing oxygen concentration for all thicknesses. The suggestion that nitratation is disfavoured in thin biofilms is an interesting contribution to the current research being performed on nitrite-oxidizing bacteria inhibition for deammonification applications. By indicating that different groups of bacteria respond differently to biofilm thickness, this study accentuates the importance of further evaluation of these complex systems.

  11. Biomaterials surfaces capable of resisting fungal attachment and biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coad, Bryan R; Kidd, Sarah E; Ellis, David H; Griesser, Hans J

    2014-01-01

    Microbial attachment onto biomedical devices and implants leads to biofilm formation and infection; such biofilms can be bacterial, fungal, or mixed. In the past 15 years, there has been an increasing research effort into antimicrobial surfaces but the great majority of these publications present research on bacteria, with some reports also testing resistance to fungi. Very few studies have focused exclusively on antifungal surfaces. However, with increasing recognition of the importance of fungal infections to human health, particularly related to infections at biomaterials, it would seem that the interest in antifungal surfaces is disproportionately low. In studies of both bacteria and fungi, fungi tend to be the minor focus with hypothesized antibacterial mechanisms of action often generalized to also explain the antifungal effect. Yet bacteria and fungi represent two Distinct biological Domains and possess substantially different cellular physiology and structure. Thus it is questionable whether these generalizations are valid. Here we review the scientific literature focusing on surface coatings prepared with antifungal agents covalently attached to the biomaterial surface. We present a critical analysis of generalizations and their evidence. This review should be of interest to researchers of "antimicrobial" surfaces by addressing specific issues that are key to designing and understanding antifungal biomaterials surfaces and their putative mechanisms of action. © 2013.

  12. A novel approach for harnessing biofilm communities in moving bed biofilm reactors for industrial wastewater treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe A. Lemire

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBRs are an effective biotechnology for treating industrial wastewater. Biomass retention on moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR carriers (biofilm support materials, allows for the ease-of-operation and high treatment capacity of MBBR systems. Optimization of MBBR systems has largely focused on aspects of carrier design, while little attention has been paid to enhancing strategies for harnessing microbial biomass. Previously, our research group demonstrated that mixed-species biofilms can be harvested from an industrial wastewater inoculum [oil sands process water (OSPW] using the Calgary Biofilm Device (CBD. Moreover, the resultant biofilm communities had the capacity to degrade organic toxins (naphthenic acids—NAs that are found in OSPW. Therefore, we hypothesized that harnessing microbial communities from industrial wastewater, as biofilms, on MBBR carriers may be an effective method to bioremediate industrial wastewater.Here, we detail our methodology adapting the workflow employed for using the CBD, to generate inoculant carriers to seed an MBBR.In this study, OSPW-derived biofilm communities were successfully grown, and their efficacy evaluated, on commercially available MBBR carriers affixed within a modified CBD system. The resultant biofilms demonstrated the capacity to transfer biomass to recipient carriers within a scaled MBBR. Moreover, MBBR systems inoculated in this manner were fully active 2 days post-inoculation, and readily degraded a select population of NAs. Together, these findings suggest that harnessing microbial communities on carriers affixed within a modified CBD system may represent a facile and rapid method for obtaining functional inoculants for use in wastewater MBBR treatment systems.

  13. Benzene degradation in a denitrifying biofilm reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waals, van der Marcelle J.; Atashgahi, Siavash; Rocha, da Ulisses Nunes; Zaan, van der Bas M.; Smidt, Hauke; Gerritse, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Benzene is an aromatic compound and harmful for the environment. Biodegradation of benzene can reduce the toxicological risk after accidental or controlled release of this chemical in the environment. In this study, we further characterized an anaerobic continuous biofilm culture grown for more

  14. Nitrogen Removal by Anammox Biofilm Column Reactor at Moderately Low Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuty Emilia Agustina

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox as a new biological approach for nitrogen removal has been considered to be more cost-effective compared with the combination of nitrification and denitrification process. However, the anammox bioreactors are mostly explored at high temperature (>300C in which temperature controlling system is fully required. This research was intended to develop and to apply anammox process for high nitrogen concentration removal at ambient temperature used for treating wastewater in tropical countries. An up-flow biofilm column reactor, which the upper part constructed with a porous polyester non-woven fabric material as a carrier to attach the anammox bacteria was operated without heating system. A maximum nitrogen removal rate (NRR of 1.05 kg-N m3 d-1 was reached in the operation days of 178 with a Total Nitrogen (TN removal efficiency of 74%. This showed the biofilm column anammox reactor was successfully applied to moderate high nitrogen removal from synthetic wastewater at moderately low temperature. Keywords: Anammox, biofilm column reactor, ambient temperature, nitrogen removal

  15. Establishing a laboratory model of dental unit waterlines bacterial biofilms using a CDC biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hye Young; Lee, Si Young

    2017-11-01

    In this study, a laboratory model to reproduce dental unit waterline (DUWL) biofilms was developed using a CDC biofilm reactor (CBR). Bacteria obtained from DUWLs were filtered and cultured in Reasoner's 2A (R2A) for 10 days, and were subsequently stored at -70°C. This stock was cultivated on R2A in batch mode. After culturing for five days, the bacteria were inoculated into the CBR. Biofilms were grown on polyurethane tubing for four days. Biofilm accumulation and thickness was 1.3 × 105 CFU cm-2 and 10-14 μm respectively, after four days. Bacteria in the biofilms included cocci and rods of short and medium lengths. In addition, 38 bacterial genera were detected in biofilms. In this study, the suitability and reproducibility of the CBR model for DUWL biofilm formation were demonstrated. The model provides a foundation for the development of bacterial control methods for DUWLs.

  16. Behavior of nitrogen removal in an aerobic sponge based moving bed biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinbo; Song, Zi; Guo, Wenshan; Lu, Yanmin; Qi, Li; Wen, Haitao; Ngo, Huu Hao

    2017-08-19

    This study aims to investigate the behavior of nitrogen removal in an aerobic sponge based moving bed biofilm reactor by evaluating nitrification and denitrification rates of sponge biocarriers from three aerobic moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBRs) with filling ratios of 10% (R-10), 20% (R-20) and 30% (R-30). Results showed that the highest removal efficiencies of total nitrogen in three reactors were 84.5% (R-10), 93.6% (R-20) and 95.3% (R-30). Correspondingly, simultaneous nitrification and denitrification rate (SND) was 90.9%, 97.6% and 100%, respectively. Although R-20 had the highest attached-growth biomass (AGB) per gram of sponge compared to the other two reactors, R-30 showed the maximum ammonium oxidation rate (AOR) (2.1826±0.0717mgNH4(+)-N/gAGB/h) and denitrification rate (DNR) (5.0852±0.0891mgNO3(-)-N/gAGB/h), followed by R-20 and R-10. These results indicated AOR, DNR and AGB were affected by the filling ratio under the same operation mode. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. An investigation of moving bed biofilm reactor nitrification during long-term exposure to cold temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Valerie; Delatolla, Robert; Laflamme, Edith; Gadbois, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Biological treatment is the most common and economical means of ammonia removal in wastewater; however, nitrification rates can become completely impeded at cold temperatures. Attached growth processes and, specifically, moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBRs) have shown promise with respect to low-temperature nitrification. In this study, two laboratory MBBRs were used to investigate MBBR nitrification rates at 20, 5, and 1 degree C. Furthermore, the solids detached by the MBBR reactors were investigated and Arrhenius temperature correction models used to predict nitrification rates after long-term low-temperature exposure was evaluated. The nitrification rate at 5 degrees C was 66 +/- 3.9% and 64 +/- 3.7% compared to the rate measured at 20 degrees C for reactors 1 and 2, respectively. The nitrification rates at 1 degree C over a 4-month exposure period compared to the rate at 20 degrees C were 18.7 +/- 5.5% and 15.7 +/- 4.7% for the two reactors. The quantity of solids detached from the MBBR biocarriers was low and the mass of biofilm per carrier did not vary significantly at 20 degrees C compared to that after long-term exposure at 1 degree C. Lastly, a temperature correction model based on exposure time to cold temperatures showed a strong correlation to the calculated ammonia removal rates relative to 20 degrees C following a gradual acclimatization period to cold temperatures.

  18. Chloroform aerobic cometabolism by butane-growing Rhodococcus aetherovorans BCP1 in continuous-flow biofilm reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciavarelli, R; Cappelletti, M; Fedi, S; Pinelli, D; Frascari, D

    2012-06-01

    This work focuses on chloroform (CF) cometabolism by a butane-grown aerobic pure culture (Rhodococcus aetherovorans BCP1) in continuous-flow biofilm reactors. The goals were to obtain preliminary information on the feasibility of CF biodegradation by BCP1 in biofilm reactors and to evaluate the applicability of the pulsed injection of growth substrate and oxygen to biofilm reactors. The attached-cell tests were initially conducted in a 0.165-L bioreactor and, then, scaled-up to a 1.772-L bioreactor. Glass cylinders were utilized as biofilm carriers. The continuous supply of growth substrate (butane), which led to the attainment of the highest CF degradation rate (8.4 mg(CF) day(-1) m (biofilm surface)(-2)), was compared with four schedules of butane and oxygen pulsed feeding. The pulsed injection technique allowed the attainment of a ratio of CF mass degraded per unit mass of butane supplied equal to 0.16 mg(CF) mg (butane)(-1), a value 4.4 times higher than that obtained with the continuous substrate supply. A procedure based on the utilization of integral mass balances and of average concentrations along the bioreactors resulted in a satisfactory match between the predicted and the experimental CF degradation performances, and can therefore be utilized to provide a guideline for optimizing the substrate pulsed injection schedule.

  19. Nitrate-removal activity of a biofilm attached to a perlite carrier under continuous aeration conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Takahiro; Yokoyama, Hiroshi; Kanafusa, Sumiyo; Ogino, Akifumi; Ishida, Mitsuyoshi; Osada, Takashi; Tanaka, Yasuo

    2011-01-01

    The nitrate-removal activity of a biofilm attached to a perlite carrier from an aerobic bioreactor used for treating dairy farm wastewater was examined by batch experiments under continuous aeration conditions. Despite aeration, the biofilm removed nitrate at a rate of 114.4 mg-N/kg-perlite/h from wastewater containing cow milk and manure. In a clone library analysis of the biofilm, bacteria showing high similarity to the denitrifying bacteria Thauera spp. were detected.

  20. Modelling of toluene biodegradation and biofilm growth in a fixed biofilm reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arcangeli, Jean-Pierre; Arvin, Erik

    1992-01-01

    The modelling of aerobic biodegradation of toluene and the associated biofilm growth in a fixed biofilm system is presented. The model includes four biomass fractions, three dissolved components, and seven processes. It is assumed that part of the active biomass is composed of filamentous bacteria...... which grow relatively fast and detach easily, leading to a biomass growth delayed with respect to substrate degradation. The non-filamentous bacteria inside the biofilm also degrade toluene but with a slower rate compared to the filamentous bacteria. Because the nonfilamentous bacteria do not detach...... with toluene degradation was successfully modelled as well as the decay phase when toluene addition was turned off. In addition to this, modelling of toluene removal and oxygen consumption versus toluene concentration in the reactor was performed. This required consideration of inhibition of substrate...

  1. Effects of plastic composite support and pH profiles on pullulan production in a biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kuan-Chen; Demirci, Ali; Catchmark, Jeffrey M

    2010-04-01

    Pullulan is a linear homopolysaccharide which is composed of glucose units and often described as alpha-1, 6-linked maltotriose. The applications of pullulan range from usage as blood plasma substitutes to environmental pollution control agents. In this study, a biofilm reactor with plastic composite support (PCS) was evaluated for pullulan production using Aureobasidium pullulans. In test tube fermentations, PCS with soybean hulls, defatted soy bean flour, yeast extract, dried bovine red blood cells, and mineral salts was selected for biofilm reactor fermentation (due to its high nitrogen content, moderate nitrogen leaching rate, and high biomass attachment). Three pH profiles were later applied to evaluate their effects on pullulan production in a PCS biofilm reactor. The results demonstrated that when a constant pH at 5.0 was applied, the time course of pullulan production was advanced and the concentration of pullulan reached 32.9 g/L after 7-day cultivation, which is 1.8-fold higher than its respective suspension culture. The quality analysis demonstrated that the purity of produced pullulan was 95.8% and its viscosity was 2.4 centipoise. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectra also supported the supposition that the produced exopolysaccharide was mostly pullulan. Overall, this study demonstrated that a biofilm reactor can be successfully implemented to enhance pullulan production and maintain its high purity.

  2. Bio-augmentation as a tool for improving the modified sequencing batch biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai; Ji, Bin; Wang, Hongyu; Zhang, Huaiyu; Zhang, Qian

    2014-06-01

    Biological treatment of domestic sewage was accomplished in a pilot-scale modified sequencing batch biofilm reactor (SBBR) bio-augmented with consortium of 5 strains of indigenous bacteria (genus Pseudomonas and Bacillus). The reactor consisted of fibrous filler in the upper and ceramsite filter media in the bottom. It demonstrated to have a short hydraulic residence time (HRT) for 10 h and good quality effluent to cope with low C/N ratio domestic wastewater. The biofilm attached fibrous fillers mainly contributed to contaminants removal. Bio-augmentation dramatically enhanced the removal efficiency of chemical oxygen demand (COD), total phosphorus (TP), and especially total nitrogen (TN), which increased respectively from 80.3%, 58.1% and 41.3% to 83.7%, 67.8% and 58.7%. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) technique indicated the 5 strains' survival in the reactor and that Bacillus cereus strain ZQN2 was the most dominant bacteria. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Biofilm formation on membranes used for membrane aerated biological reactors, under different stress conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade-Molinar, C.; Ballinas-Casarrubias, M. L.; Solis-Martinez, F. J.; Rivera-Chavira, B. E.; Cuevas-Rodirguez, G.; Nevarez-Moorillon, G. V.

    2009-07-01

    Bacterial biofilm play an important role in wastewater treatment processes, and have been optimized in the membrane aerated biofilm reactors (MABR). In MABR, a hydrophobic membrane is used as support for the formation of biofilm, and supplements enough aeration to assure an aerobic process. (Author)

  4. BIODEGRADATION OF AROMATIC AMINE COMPOUNDS USING MOVING BED BIOFILM REACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Delnavaz ، B. Ayati ، H. Ganjidoust

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Three moving bed biofilm reactors were used to treat synthesized wastewater of aromatic amine compounds including aniline, para-diaminobenzene and para-aminophenol that are found in many industrial wastewaters. The reactors with cylindrical shape had an internal diameter and an effective depth of 10 and 60 cm, respectively. The reactors were filled with light expanded clay aggregate as carriers and operated in an aerobic batch and continuous conditions. Evaluation of the reactors' efficiency was done at different retention time of 8, 24, 48 and 72 h with an influent COD from 100 to 3500 mg/L (filling ratio of 50%. The maximum obtained removal efficiencies were 90% (influent COD=2000 mg/L, 87% (influent COD=1000 mg/L and 75% (influent COD=750 mg/L for aniline, para-diaminobenzene and para-aminophenol, respectively. In the study of decrease in filling ratio from 50 to 30 percent, 6% decrease for both para-diaminobenzene and para-aminophenol and 7% increase for aniline degradation were obtained. The removal efficiency was decreased to about 10% after 15 days of continuous loading for each of the above three substrates. In the shock loading test, initially the COD removal rate was decreased in all reactors, but after about 10 days, it has been approached to the previous values. Finally, biodegradability of aromatic amines has been proved by nuclear magnetic resonance system.

  5. Rotating algal biofilm reactor and spool harvester for wastewater treatment with biofuels by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, Logan B; Sims, Ronald C

    2012-07-01

    Maximizing algae production in a wastewater treatment process can aid in the reduction of soluble nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations in the wastewater. If harvested, the algae-based biomass offers the added benefit as feedstock for the production of biofuels and bioproducts. However, difficulties in harvesting, concentrating, and dewatering the algae-based biomass have limited the development of an economically feasible treatment and production process. When algae-based biomass is grown as a surface attached biofilm as opposed to a suspended culture, the biomass is naturally concentrated and more easily harvested. This can lead to less expensive removal of the biomass from wastewater, and less expensive downstream processing in the production of biofuels and bioproducts. In this study, a novel rotating algal biofilm reactor (RABR) was designed, built, and tested at bench (8 L), medium (535 L), and pilot (8,000 L) scales. The RABR was designed to operate in the photoautotrophic conditions of open tertiary wastewater treatment, producing mixed culture biofilms made up of algae and bacteria. Growth substrata were evaluated for attachment and biofilm formation, and an effective substratum was discovered. The RABR achieved effective nutrient reduction, with average removal rates of 2.1 and 14.1 g m(-2) day(-1) for total dissolved phosphorus and total dissolved nitrogen, respectively. Biomass production ranged from 5.5 g m(-2) day(-1) at bench scale to as high as 31 g m(-2) day(-1) at pilot scale. An efficient spool harvesting technique was also developed at bench and medium scales to obtain a concentrated product (12-16% solids) suitable for further processing in the production of biofuels and bioproducts. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Attachment of and biofilm formation by Enterobacter sakazakii on stainless steel and enteral feeding tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hoikyung; Ryu, Jee-Hoon; Beuchat, Larry R

    2006-09-01

    Enterobacter sakazakii has been reported to form biofilms, but environmental conditions affecting attachment to and biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces have not been described. We did a study to determine the effects of temperature and nutrient availability on attachment and biofilm formation by E. sakazakii on stainless steel and enteral feeding tubes. Five strains grown to stationary phase in tryptic soy broth (TSB), infant formula broth (IFB), or lettuce juice broth (LJB) at 12 and 25 degrees C were examined for the extent to which they attach to these materials. Higher populations attached at 25 degrees C than at 12 degrees C. Stainless steel coupons and enteral feeding tubes were immersed for 24 h at 4 degrees C in phosphate-buffered saline suspensions (7 log CFU/ml) to facilitate the attachment of 5.33 to 5.51 and 5.03 to 5.12 log CFU/cm(2), respectively, before they were immersed in TSB, IFB, or LJB, followed by incubation at 12 or 25 degrees C for up to 10 days. Biofilms were not produced at 12 degrees C. The number of cells of test strains increased by 1.42 to 1.67 log CFU/cm(2) and 1.16 to 1.31 log CFU/cm(2) in biofilms formed on stainless steel and feeding tubes, respectively, immersed in IFB at 25 degrees C; biofilms were not formed on TSB and LJB at 25 degrees C, indicating that nutrient availability plays a major role in processes leading to biofilm formation on the surfaces of these inert materials. These observations emphasize the importance of temperature control in reconstituted infant formula preparation and storage areas in preventing attachment and biofilm formation by E. sakazakii.

  7. Simultaneous removal of nitrate and pesticides from groundwater using a methane-fed membrane biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modin, O; Fukushi, K; Yamamoto, K

    2008-01-01

    Nitrate and pesticide contaminated ground- and surface-waters have been found around the world as a result of the use of these compounds in agricultural activities. In this study we investigated a biological treatment method to simultaneously remove nitrate and pesticides from contaminated water. Methane was supplied as the sole source of carbon to the microbial culture. A methane-fed membrane biofilm reactor (M-MBfR) was developed in which the methane was supplied through hollow-fiber membranes to a biofilm growing on the membrane surface. A methane-oxidizing culture enriched from activated sludge was used as inoculum for the experiments. Removal of nitrate and the four pesticides atrazine, aldicarb, alachlor, and malathion was examined both in suspended culture and in the M-MBfR. The maximum denitrification rate with suspended culture was 36.8 mg N gVSS(-1) d(-1). With the M-MBfR setup, a hydraulic retention time of approximately one hour was required to completely remove an incoming nitrate concentration of about 20 mg NO3-N l(-1). The microbial culture could remove three of the pesticides (aldicarb, alachlor, and malathion). However, no atrazine removal was observed. The removal rates of both nitrate and pesticides were similar in suspended culture and in membrane-attached biofilm. IWA Publishing 2008.

  8. Enhanced production of bacterial cellulose by using a biofilm reactor and its material property analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demirci Ali

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bacterial cellulose has been used in the food industry for applications such as low-calorie desserts, salads, and fabricated foods. It has also been used in the paper manufacturing industry to enhance paper strength, the electronics industry in acoustic diaphragms for audio speakers, the pharmaceutical industry as filtration membranes, and in the medical field as wound dressing and artificial skin material. In this study, different types of plastic composite support (PCS were implemented separately within a fermentation medium in order to enhance bacterial cellulose (BC production by Acetobacter xylinum. The optimal composition of nutritious compounds in PCS was chosen based on the amount of BC produced. The selected PCS was implemented within a bioreactor to examine the effects on BC production in a batch fermentation. The produced BC was analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA. Among thirteen types of PCS, the type SFYR+ was selected as solid support for BC production by A. xylinum in a batch biofilm reactor due to its high nitrogen content, moderate nitrogen leaching rate, and sufficient biomass attached on PCS. The PCS biofilm reactor yielded BC production (7.05 g/L that was 2.5-fold greater than the control (2.82 g/L. The XRD results indicated that the PCS-grown BC exhibited higher crystallinity (93% and similar crystal size (5.2 nm to the control. FESEM results showed the attachment of A. xylinum on PCS, producing an interweaving BC product. TGA results demonstrated that PCS-grown BC had about 95% water retention ability, which was lower than BC produced within suspended-cell reactor. PCS-grown BC also exhibited higher Tmax compared to the control. Finally, DMA results showed that BC from the PCS biofilm reactor increased its mechanical property values, i.e., stress at break and Young's modulus when compared to

  9. Biocidal effect of cathodic protection on bacterial viability in biofilm attached to carbon steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyanaga, Kazuhiko; Terashi, Ryosuke; Kawai, Hirofumi; Unno, Hajime; Tanji, Yasunori

    2007-07-01

    Biofilm formed on carbon steel by various species of bacterial cells causes serious problems such as corrosion of steel, choking of flow in the pipe, deterioration of the heat-transfer efficiency, and so on. Cathodic protection is known to be a reliable method for protecting carbon steel from corrosion. However, the initial attachment of bacteria to the surface and the effects of cathodic protection on bacterial viability in the biofilm have not been clarified. In this study, cathodic protection was applied to an artificial biofilm containing Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1), a biofilm constituent, on carbon steel. The aims of this study were to evaluate the inhibition effect of cathodic protection on biofilm formation and to reveal the inhibition mechanisms. The viability of PAO1 in artificial biofilm of 5 mm thickness on cathodically protected steel decreased to 1% of the initial cell concentration. Analysis of pH distribution in the artificial biofilm by pH microelectrode revealed that pH in proximity to carbon steel increased to approximately 11 after cathodic protection for 5 h. Moreover, 99% of region in the artificial biofilm was under the pH conditions of over nine. A simulation of pH profile was shown to correspond to experimental values. These results indicate cells in the artificial biofilm were killed or damaged by cathodic protection due to pH increase. (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Calcium Increases Xylella fastidiosa Surface Attachment, Biofilm Formation, and Twitching Motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Luisa F.; Cobine, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a plant-pathogenic bacterium that forms biofilms inside xylem vessels, a process thought to be influenced by the chemical composition of xylem sap. In this work, the effect of calcium on the production of X. fastidiosa biofilm and movement was analyzed under in vitro conditions. After a dose-response study with 96-well plates using eight metals, the strongest increase of biofilm formation was observed when medium was supplemented with at least 1.0 mM CaCl2. The removal of Ca by extracellular (EGTA, 1.5 mM) and intracellular [1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid acetoxymethyl ester (BAPTA/AM), 75 μM] chelators reduced biofilm formation without compromising planktonic growth. The concentration of Ca influenced the force of adhesion to the substrate, biofilm thickness, cell-to-cell aggregation, and twitching motility, as shown by assays with microfluidic chambers and other assays. The effect of Ca on attachment was lost when cells were treated with tetracycline, suggesting that Ca has a metabolic or regulatory role in cell adhesion. A double mutant (fimA pilO) lacking type I and type IV pili did not improve biofilm formation or attachment when Ca was added to the medium, while single mutants of type I (fimA) or type IV (pilB) pili formed more biofilm under conditions of higher Ca concentrations. The concentration of Ca in the medium did not significantly influence the levels of exopolysaccharide produced. Our findings indicate that the role of Ca in biofilm formation may be related to the initial surface and cell-to-cell attachment and colonization stages of biofilm establishment, which rely on critical functions by fimbrial structures. PMID:22194297

  11. The effects of stainless steel finish on Salmonella Typhimurium attachment, biofilm formation and sensitivity to chlorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlisselberg, Dov B; Yaron, Sima

    2013-08-01

    Bacterial colonization and biofilm formation on stainless steel (SS) surfaces can be sources for cross contamination in food processing facilities, possessing a great threat to public health and food quality. Here the aim was to demonstrate the influence of surface finish of AISI 316 SS on colonization, biofilm formation and susceptibility of Salmonella Typhimurium to disinfection. Initial attachment of S. Typhimurium on surfaces of SS was four times lower, when surface was polished by Bright-Alum (BA) or Electropolishing (EP), as compared to Mechanical Sanded (MS) or the untreated surface (NT). The correlation between roughness and initial bacterial attachment couldn't account on its own to explain differences seen. Biofilms with similar thickness (15-18 μm) were developed on all surfaces 1-day post inoculation, whereas EP was the least covered surface (23%). Following 5-days, biofilm thickness was lowest on EP and MS (30 μm) and highest on NT (62 μm) surfaces. An analysis of surface composition suggested a link between surface chemistry and biofilm development, where the higher concentrations of metal ions in EP and MS surfaces correlated with limited biofilm formation. Interestingly, disinfection of biofilms with chlorine was up to 130 times more effective on the EP surface (0.005% surviving) than on the other surfaces. Overall these results suggest that surface finish should be considered carefully in a food processing plant. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Bacterial cell numbers and community structures of seawater biofilms depend on the attachment substratum

    KAUST Repository

    Yap, Scott A.

    2018-02-02

    Seawater is increasingly being used as a source for various industrial applications. For such applications, biofilm growth creates various problems including but not limited to pipe biocorrosion. In this study, it is hypothesized that the material type is preferred by certain bacterial populations in the seawater to attach and establish biofilms. By comparing differences in the total cell counts and microbial communities attached to high-density polyethylene (HDPE), polycarbonate, stainless steel (SS316) and titanium, the appropriate material can be used to minimize biofilm growth. All four materials have hydrophilic surfaces, but polycarbonate exhibits higher surface roughness. There were no significant differences in the cell numbers attached to polycarbonate, HDPE and titanium. Instead, there were significantly fewer cells attached to SS316. However, there was a higher relative abundance of genera associated with opportunistic pathogens on SS316. Copy numbers of genes representing Desulfobacteraceae and Desulfobulbaceae, both of which are sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), were approximately 10-fold higher in biofilms sampled from SS316. The enrichment of SRB in the biofilm associated with SS316 indicates that this material may be prone to biocorrosion. This study highlights the need for industries to consider the choice of material used in seawater applications to minimize microbial-associated problems.

  13. Treatment of domestic wastewater in an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor followed by moving bed biofilm reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tawfik, A.; El-Gohary, F.; Temmink, B.G.

    2010-01-01

    The performance of a laboratory-scale sewage treatment system composed of an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor and a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) at a temperature of (22-35 A degrees C) was evaluated. The entire treatment system was operated at different hydraulic retention times

  14. Transformation products of clindamycin in moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ooi, Gordon Tze Hoong; Escola Casas, Monica; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    .0161 h-1) which again has a much higher biological activity for removal of clindamycin than of the suspended bacteria (biofilm-free control). Clindamycin sulfoxide was the main transformation product which was found in concentrations exceeding 10% of the initial clindamycin concentration after 1 day...... applied in the effluent of conventional wastewater treatment plants to remove clindamycin. First, a batch experiment was executed with a high initial concentration of clindamycin to identify the transformation products. It was shown that clindamycin can be removed from wastewater by MBBR and the treatment...... of MBBR treatment. Thus, MBBRs should not necessarily be considered as reactors mineralizing clindamycin as they perform transformation reactions at least to some extent....

  15. Hydrolyzed polyacrylamide biodegradation and mechanism in sequencing batch biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Miao; Zhao, Lanmei; Bao, Mutai; Lu, Jinren

    2016-05-01

    An investigation was performed to study the performance of a sequencing batch biofilm reactor (SBBR) to treat hydrolyzed polyacrylamides (HPAMs) and to determine the mechanisms of HPAM biodegradation. The mechanisms for the optimized parameters that significantly improved the degradation efficiency of the HPAMs were investigated by a synergistic effect of the co-metabolism in the sludge and the enzyme activities. The HPAM and TOC removal ratio reached 54.69% and 70.14%. A significant decrease in the total nitrogen concentration was measured. The carbon backbone of the HPAMs could be degraded after the separation of the amide group according to the data analysis. The HPLC results indicated that the HPAMs could be converted to polymer fragments without the generation of the acrylamide monomer intermediate. The results from high-throughput sequencing analysis revealed proteobacterias, bacteroidetes and planctomycetes were the key microorganisms involved in the degradation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of the C:N:P ratio on the denitrifying dephosphatation in a sequencing batch biofilm reactor (SBBR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielcarek, Artur; Rodziewicz, Joanna; Janczukowicz, Wojciech; Thornton, Arthur J; Jóźwiak, Tomasz; Szymczyk, Paula

    2015-12-01

    A series of investigations were conducted using sequencing batch biofilm reactor (SBBR) to explore the influence of C:N:P ratio on biological dephosphatation including the denitrifying dephosphatation and the denitrification process. Biomass in the reactor occurred mainly in the form of a biofilm attached to completely submerged disks. Acetic acid was used as the source of organic carbon. C:N:P ratios have had a significant effect on the profiles of phosphate release and phosphate uptake and nitrogen removal. The highest rates of phosphate release and phosphate uptake were recorded at the C:N:P ratio of 140:70:7. The C:N ratio of 2.5:1 ensured complete denitrification. The highest rate of denitrification was achieved at the C:N:P ratio of 140:35:7. The increase of nitrogen load caused an increase in phosphates removal until a ratio C:N:P of 140:140:7. Bacteria of the biofilm exposed to alternate conditions of mixing and aeration exhibited enhanced intracellular accumulation of polyphosphates. Also, the structure of the biofilm encouraged anaerobic-aerobic as well as anoxic-anaerobic and absolutely anaerobic conditions in a SBBR. These heterogeneous conditions in the presence of nitrates may be a significant factor determining the promotion of denitrifying polyphosphate accumulating organism (DNPAO) development. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Decolourization of remazol black-5 textile dyes using moving bed bio-film reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratiwi, R.; Notodarmojo, S.; Helmy, Q.

    2018-01-01

    The desizing and dyeing processes in the textile industries produces wastewaster containing high concentration of organic matter and colour, so it needs treatment before released to environment. In this research, removal of azo dye (Remazol Black 5/RB 5) and organic as COD was performed using Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor (MBBR). MBBR is biological treatment process with attached growth media system that can increase removal of organic matter in textile wastewater. The effectiveness of ozonation as pre-treatment process to increase the removal efficiency in MBBR was studied. The results showed that in MBBR batch system with detention time of 1 hour, pre-treatment with ozonation prior to MBBR process able to increase the colour removal efficiency of up to 86.74%. While on the reactor without ozone pre-treatment, the colour removal efficiency of up to 68.6% was achieved. From the continuous reactor experiments found that both colour and COD removal efficiency depends on time detention of RB-5 dyes in the system. The higher of detention time, the higher of colour and COD removal efficiency. It was found that optimum removal of colour and COD was achieved in 24 hour detention time with its efficiency of 96.9% and 89.13%, respectively.

  18. Biofilm removal technique using sands as a research tool for accessing microbial attachment on surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathanon Trachoo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms have profound impacts on improved survival of the constituent microorganisms in nature. Biofilms were believed to protect constituent microorganisms from sanitizer treatment, provide a more suitable habitat for microorganisms, and become a site for genetic material exchanges between microorganisms. As we realize more about the significance of biofilm, methods used for biofilm study should be consistently developed and evaluated. To determine microbial attachment on surfaces, usually biofilms are grown on substratum surfaces and removed by vortexing with glass beads or scraping. However, scraping is not as effective as vortexing with glass beads. Another approach is direct-agar overlaying which cannot be used with high density biofilm. In this experiment, we compared effectiveness of glass beads (298±28 μm in diameter and sands (width: 221±55 μm and length: 329±118 μm in removing biofilm of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by vortexing method. The results suggested that acid-washed sands, which are significantly less inexpensive than glass beads, were as effective as (P>0.05 analytical grade glass beads in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm removal without inhibiting growth of the organism.

  19. De-mercurization of wastewater by Bacillus cereus (JUBT1): Growth kinetics, biofilm reactor study and field emission scanning electron microscopic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghoshal, Sanjukta; Bhattacharya, Pinaki [Chemical Engineering Department, Jadavpur University Kolkata 700 032, West Bengal (India); Chowdhury, Ranjana, E-mail: ranjana.juchem@gmail.com [Chemical Engineering Department, Jadavpur University Kolkata 700 032, West Bengal (India)

    2011-10-30

    Graphical abstract: The assembly of biofilm reactor, based on attached growth of Bacillus cereus (JUBT1) on rice husk packing, and an activated carbon filter has been able to ensure the removal of mercury up to near-zero level. Highlights: {yields} A new mercury resistant bacterial strain, Bacillus cereus (JUBT1), has been isolated. {yields} Growth kinetics has been determined. {yields} Biofilm reactor using attached growth of bacteria ensures near-zero level of mercury. {yields} Confinement of mercury is confirmed through energy dispersive spectrometric analysis. - Abstract: Removal of mercuric ions by a mercury resistant bacteria, called Bacillus cereus (JUBT1), isolated from the sludge of a local chlor-alkali industry, has been investigated. Growth kinetics of the bacteria have been determined. A multiplicative, non-competitive relationship between sucrose and mercury ions has been observed with respect to bacterial growth. A combination of biofilm reactor, using attached growth of Bacillus cereus (JUBT1) on rice husk packing, and an activated carbon filter has been able to ensure the removal of mercury up to near-zero level. Energy dispersive spectrometry analysis of biofilm and the activated carbon has proved the transformation of Hg{sup 2+} to Hg{sup 0} and its confinement in the system.

  20. Effects of Fe(III) on biofilm and its extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in fixed bed biofilm reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xuewei; Chen, Kai; Lai, Xinke; Ji, Siping; Kaiser, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    The effects of Fe(III) on the biofilm mass and activity, the biofilm micromorphology as well as the composition and functional groups characteristics of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in biofilm were investigated in laboratory-scale fixed bed biofilm reactors. The results showed that 2 mg/L of Fe(III) promoted the biofilm mass and improved the biofilm activity, but 16 mg/L of Fe(III) adversely affected biofilm development. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) study indicated a high concentration (16 mg/L) of Fe(III) led to significant reduction of the filaments, great promotion of the EPS secretion in biofilm. The result of the EPS composition suggested 2 mg/L of Fe(III) increased soluble EPS and loosely bound EPS which contributed to the microbial aggregation, while 16 mg/L of Fe(III) promoted tightly bound EPS production unfavourable for substrate mass transfer. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis demonstrated that Fe(III) exerted a significant influence on the -CONH- groups of proteins and the C-O groups of polysaccharides in EPS. This study reveals that Fe(III) influences biofilm development and activity not only by directly impacting the microbial physiology but by indirectly affecting the EPS constituents, and it helps to provide theoretical guidance for iron ion containing wastewater treatment.

  1. Citric acid application for denitrification process support in biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielcarek, Artur; Rodziewicz, Joanna; Janczukowicz, Wojciech; Dabrowska, Dorota; Ciesielski, Slawomir; Thornton, Arthur; Struk-Sokołowska, Joanna

    2017-03-01

    The study demonstrated that citric acid, as an organic carbon source, can improve denitrification in Anaerobic Sequencing Batch Biofilm Reactor (AnSBBR). The consumption rate of the organic substrate and the denitrification rate were lower during the period of the reactor's acclimatization (cycles 1-60; 71.5 mgCOD L(-1) h(-1) and 17.81 mgN L(-1) h(-1), respectively) than under the steady state conditions (cycles 61-180; 143.8 mgCOD L(-1) h(-1) and 24.38 mgN L(-1) h(-1)). The biomass yield coefficient reached 0.04 ± 0.02 mgTSS· mgCODre(-1) (0.22 ± 0.09 mgTSS mgNre(-1)). Observations revealed the diversified microbiological ecology of the denitrifying bacteria. Citric acid was used mainly by bacteria representing the Trichoccocus genus, which represented above 40% of the sample during the first phase of the process (cycles 1-60). In the second phase (cycles 61-180) the microorganisms the genera that consumed the acetate and formate, as the result of citric acid decomposition were Propionibacterium (5.74%), Agrobacterium (5.23%), Flavobacterium (1.32%), Sphaerotilus (1.35%), Erysipelothrix (1.08%). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of UV-photofunctionalization on Oral Bacterial Attachment and Biofilm Formation to Titanium Implant Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Avila, Erica Dorigatti; Lima, Bruno P.; Sekiya, Takeo; Torii, Yasuyoshi; Ogawa, Takahiro; Shi, Wenyuan; Lux, Renate

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial biofilm infections remain prevalent reasons for implant failure. Dental implant placement occurs in the oral environment, which harbors a plethora of biofilm-forming bacteria. Due to its trans-mucosal placement, part of the implant structure is exposed to oral cavity and there is no effective measure to prevent bacterial attachment to implant materials. Here, we demonstrated that UV treatment of titanium immediately prior to use (photofunctionalization) affects the ability of human polymicrobial oral biofilm communities to colonize in the presence of salivary and blood components. UV-treatment of machined titanium transformed the surface from hydrophobic to superhydrophilic. UV-treated surfaces exhibited a significant reduction in bacterial attachment as well as subsequent biofilm formation compared to untreated ones, even though overall bacterial viability was not affected. The function of reducing bacterial colonization was maintained on UV-treated titanium that had been stored in a liquid environment before use. Denaturing gradient gel-electrophoresis (DGGE) and DNA sequencing analyses revealed that while bacterial community profiles appeared different between UV-treated and untreated titanium in the initial attachment phase, this difference vanished as biofilm formation progressed. Our findings confirm that UV-photofunctionalization of titanium has a strong potential to improve outcome of implant placement by creating and maintaining antimicrobial surfaces. PMID:26210175

  3. Biodegradation of pharmaceuticals in hospital wastewater by staged Moving Bed Biofilm Reactors (MBBR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Escola Casas, Monica; Chhetri, Ravi Kumar; Ooi, Gordon Tze Hoong

    2015-01-01

    during 10 months of continuous operation. After this adaption phase batch and continuous experiments were performed for the determination of degradation of pharmaceuticals. Removal of organic matter and nitrification mainly occurred in the first reactor. Most pharmaceuticals were removed significantly...... for hospital wastewater treatment. To investigate the potential of such a hybrid system for the removal of pharmaceuticals in hospital wastewater a pilot plant consisting of a series of one activated sludge reactor, two Hybas™ reactors and one moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) has been established and adapted......− 1 for first, second, third and fourth reactors respectively. Generally, the highest removal rate constants were found in the first and third reactors while the lowest were found in the second one. When the removal rate constants were normalized to biomass amount, the last reactor (biofilm only...

  4. Characterization of biofilm in 200W fluidized bed reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Michelle H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Saurey, Sabrina D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lee, Brady D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Parker, Kent E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Eisenhauer, Emalee E. R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cordova, Elsa A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Golovich, Elizabeth C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-09-29

    Contaminated groundwater beneath the 200 West Area at the Hanford Site in Southeast Washington is currently being treated using a pump and treat system to remove organics, inorganics, radionuclides, and metals. A granular activated carbon-based fluidized bed reactor (FBR) has been added to remove nitrate, hexavalent chromium and carbon tetrachloride. Initial analytical results indicated the microorganisms effectively reduced many of the contaminants to less than cleanup levels. However shortly thereafter operational upsets of the FBR include carbon carry over, over production of microbial extracellular polymeric substance (biofilm) materials, and over production of hydrogen sulfide. As a result detailed investigations were undertaken to understand the functional diversity and activity of the microbial community present in the FBR over time. Molecular analyses including terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, quantitative polymerase chain reaction and fluorescent in situ hybridization analyses were performed on the microbial community extracted from the biofilm within the bed and from the inoculum, to determine functional dynamics of the FBR bed over time and following operational changes. Findings from these analyses indicated: 1) the microbial community within the bed was completely different than community used for inoculation, and was likely from the groundwater; 2) analyses early in the testing showed an FBR community dominated by a few Curvibacter and Flavobacterium species; 3) the final sample taken indicated that the microbial community in the FBR bed had become more diverse; and 4) qPCR analyses indicated that bacteria involved in nitrogen cycling, including denitrifiers and anaerobic ammonia oxidizing bacteria, were dominant in the bed. These results indicate that molecular tools can be powerful for determining functional diversity within FBR type reactors. Coupled with micronutrient, influent and effluent chemistry

  5. Determination of the external mass transfer coefficient and influence of mixing intensity in moving bed biofilm reactors for wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Bruno L; Pérez, Julio; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Secchi, Argimiro R; Dezotti, Márcia; Biscaia, Evaristo C

    2015-09-01

    In moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBR), the removal of pollutants from wastewater is due to the substrate consumption by bacteria attached on suspended carriers. As a biofilm process, the substrates are transported from the bulk phase to the biofilm passing through a mass transfer resistance layer. This study proposes a methodology to determine the external mass transfer coefficient and identify the influence of the mixing intensity on the conversion process in-situ in MBBR systems. The method allows the determination of the external mass transfer coefficient in the reactor, which is a major advantage when compared to the previous methods that require mimicking hydrodynamics of the reactor in a flow chamber or in a separate vessel. The proposed methodology was evaluated in an aerobic lab-scale system operating with COD removal and nitrification. The impact of the mixing intensity on the conversion rates for ammonium and COD was tested individually. When comparing the effect of mixing intensity on the removal rates of COD and ammonium, a higher apparent external mass transfer resistance was found for ammonium. For the used aeration intensities, the external mass transfer coefficient for ammonium oxidation was ranging from 0.68 to 13.50 m d(-1) and for COD removal 2.9 to 22.4 m d(-1). The lower coefficient range for ammonium oxidation is likely related to the location of nitrifiers deeper in the biofilm. The measurement of external mass transfer rates in MBBR will help in better design and evaluation of MBBR system-based technologies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Biohydrogen production from diary processing wastewater by anaerobic biofilm reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rios-Gonzalez, L.J.; Moreno-Davila, I.M.; Rodriguez-Martinez, J.; Garza-Garcia, Y. [Universidad Autonoma de Coahuila, Saltillo, Coahuila (Mexico)]. E-mail: leopoldo.rios@mail.uadec.mx

    2009-09-15

    This article describes biological hydrogen production from diary wastewater via anaerobic fermentation using pretreated heat shock (100 degrees Celsius, 30 min.) and acid (pH 3.0, 24 h) treatment procedures to selectively enrich the hydrogen producing mixed consortia prior to inoculation to batch reactors. Bioreactor used for immobilization consortia was operated at mesophilic (room) temperature (20{+-}3 degrees Celsius), under acidophilic conditions (pH 4.0-4.5), HRT (2h), and a natural support for generate hydrogen producing mixed consortia biofilm: Opuntia imbricata. Reactor was initially operated with sorbitol (5g/L) for 60 days of operation. Batch tests were conducted using 20{+-}0.02g of natural support with biofilm. Batch experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of COD (2.9-21.1 g-COD/L), at initial pH of 7.0, 32{+-}1 degrees Celsius. Maximum hydrogen yield was obtained at 21.1 g-COD/L. Experiments of pH effect were conducted using the optimal substrate concentration (21.2 g-COD/L), at pH 4 to 7 and 11.32 (pH diary wastewater) ,and 32{+-}1 degrees Celsius. Experiments results indicate the optimum initial cultivation was pH 4.0, but we can consider also a stable hydrogen production at pH 11.32 (pH diary wastewater), so we can avoid to fit the pH, and use diary wastewater as it left the process of cheese manufacture. The operational pH of 4.0 is 1.5 units below that of previously reported hydrogen producing organisms. The influence of the effect of temperature were conducted using the optimal substrate concentration (21.2 g-COD/L), two pH levels: 4.0 and 11.32, and four different temperatures: 16{+-}3 degrees Celsius (room temperature), 3 C, 45{+-}1 degrees Celsius y 55{+-}1 degrees Celsius.Optimal temperature for hydrogen production from diary wastewater at pH 4.0 was 55{+-}1 degrees Celsius, and for pH 11.32 was 16{+-}3 degrees Celsius.Therefore, the results suggests biofilm reactors in a natural support like Opuntia imbricata have good potential

  7. Bioremoval of trivalent chromium using Bacillus biofilms through continuous flow reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundar, K.; Sadiq, I. Mohammed; Mukherjee, Amitava [Centre for Nanobiotechnology, Nano Bio-Medicine Laboratory School of Bio Sciences and Technology VIT University, Vellore - 632014 (India); Chandrasekaran, N., E-mail: nchandrasekaran@vit.ac.in [Centre for Nanobiotechnology, Nano Bio-Medicine Laboratory School of Bio Sciences and Technology VIT University, Vellore - 632014 (India)

    2011-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effective bioremoval of Cr(III) using bacterial biofilms. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simplified bioreactor was fabricated for the biofilm development and Cr(III) removal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Economically feasible substrate like coarse sand and pebbles were used. - Abstract: Present study deals with the applicability of bacterial biofilms for the bioremoval of trivalent chromium from tannery effluents. A continuous flow reactor was designed for the development of biofilms on different substrates like glass beads, pebbles and coarse sand. The parameters for the continuous flow reactor were 20 ml/min flow rate at 30 Degree-Sign C, pH4. Biofilm biomass on the substrates was in the following sequence: coarse sand > pebbles > glass beads (4.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7}, 4.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} and 3.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} CFU/cm{sup 2}), which was confirmed by CLSM. Biofilms developed using consortium of Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus cereus on coarse sand had more surface area and was able to remove 98% of Cr(III), SEM-EDX proved 92.60% Cr(III) adsorption on biofilms supported by coarse sand. Utilization of Bacillus biofilms for effective bioremoval of Cr(III) from chrome tanning effluent could be a better option for tannery industry, especially during post chrome tanning operation.

  8. Microfluidic accumulation assay probes attachment of biofilm forming diatom cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte, Kim A; Schwarze, Jana; Rosenhahn, Axel

    2017-08-01

    Testing of fouling release (FR) technologies is of great relevance for discovery of the next generation of protective marine coatings. In this paper, an accumulation assay to test diatom interaction under laminar flow with the model organism Navicula perminuta is introduced. Using time lapse microscopy with large area sampling allows determination of the accumulation kinetics of the diatom on three model surfaces with different surface properties at different wall shear stresses. The hydrodynamic conditions within the flow cell are described and a suitable shear stress range to perform accumulation experiments is identified at which statistically significant discrimination of surfaces is possible. The observed trends compare well to published adhesion preferences of N. perminuta. Also, previously determined trends of critical wall shear stresses required for cell removal from the same set of functionalized interfaces shows consistent trends. Initial attachment mediated by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) present outside the diatoms leads to the conclusion that the FR potential of the tested coating candidates can be deducted from dynamic accumulation experiments under well-defined hydrodynamic conditions. As well as testing new coating candidates for their FR properties, monitoring of the adhesion process under flow provides additional information on the mechanism and geometry of attachment and the population kinetics.

  9. Population changes in a biofilm reactor for phosphorus removal as evidenced by the use of FISH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkentoft, C.M.; Müller, E.; Arnz, P.

    2002-01-01

    Induction ofdenitrification was investigated for a lab-scale phosphate removing biofilm reactor where oxygen was replaced with nitrate as the electron acceptor. Acetate was used as the carbon source. The original biofilm (acclimatised with oxygen) was taken from a well-established large...... collected and analysed by fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Concurrently, samples were taken from the original reactor with oxygen as electron acceptor in order to investigate natural microbial fluctuations. A similar decrease in the activity...... hybridised to the dominant bacterial groups in the reactors investigated. No noticeable changes were detected in the aerobic bench-scale reactor during this period, indicating that the observed changes in the lab-scale reactor were caused by the changed environment. r 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights...

  10. Sludge granulation in an UASB-moving bed biofilm hybrid reactor for efficient organic matter removal and nitrogen removal in biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Pritha; Ghangrekar, M M; Rao, Surampalli

    2017-03-15

    A hybrid upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB)-moving bed biofilm (MBB) and rope bed biofilm (RBB) reactor was designed for treatment of sewage. Possibility of enhancing granulation in an UASB reactor using moving media to improve sludge retention was explored while treating low-strength wastewater. The presence of moving media in the top portion of the UASB reactor allowed a high solid retention time even at very short hydraulic retention times and helped in maintaining selection pressure in the sludge bed to promote formation of different sized sludge granules with an average settling velocity of 67 m/h. These granules were also found to contain plenty of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) such as 58 mg of polysaccharides (PS) per gram of volatile suspended solids (VSS) and protein (PN) content of 37 mg/g VSS. Enriched sludge of nitrogen-removing bacteria forming a porous biofilm on the media in RBB was also observed in a concentration of around 894 g/m(2). The nitrogen removing sludge also had a high EPS content of around 22 mg PS/g VSS and 28 mg PN/g VSS. This hybrid UASB-MBB-RBB reactor with enhanced anaerobic granular sludge treating both carbonaceous and nitrogenous matter may be a sustainable solution for decentralized sewage treatment.

  11. Influence of operational conditions on biofilm specific activity of an anaerobic fluidized bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Morales, J L; Romero, L I; Sales, D

    2003-01-01

    A key parameter in water and wastewater treatment technology is the biomass activity in terms of substrate removal ability. The effects of organic load rate and percentage of bed expansion on biofilm specific methanogenic activity were determined in an anaerobic fluidized bed reactor treating wine-distillery wastes in the thermophilic range (55 degrees C). The proposed activity tests are highly reproducible: an experiment with three identical tests has shown that the standard deviation with respect to the mean values is less than 3%. Specific tests are applied to measure the maximum methanogenic activities of the biomass carrier in lab-scale anaerobic biofilm reactors. These tests have been successfully applied for monitoring the support colonization process and the evolution of biofilm activity in reactors, anaerobic filter and fluidized bed, with different operating conditions. The results show a dependence between the percentage of bed expansion and the specific activity of methanogenic microbiote on biofilm. There is a relationship between the percentage of bed expansion, the sheer stress on the biofilm and the hydrodynamic conditions in the system. Initial biofilm detachment can be compensated with the increase of biomass and of its activity due to the reduction of the substrate diffusional limitations to the microorganism growth inside the support pores.

  12. Role of Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor and Sequencing Batch Reactor in Biological Degradation of Formaldehyde Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ayati

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays formaldehyde is used as raw material in many industries. It has also disinfection applications in some public places. Due to its toxicity for microorganisms, chemical or anaerobic biological methods are applied for treating wastewater containing formaldehyde.In this research, formaldehyde removal efficiencies of aerobic biological treatment systems including moving bed biofilm (MMBR and sequencing batch reactors (SBR were investigated. During all experiments, the efficiency of SBR was more than MBBR, but the difference was not significant statistically. According to the results, the best efficiencies were obtained for influent formaldehyde COD of 200 mg/L in MBBR and SBR which were 93% and 99.4%, respectively. The systems were also capable to treat higher formaldehyde concentrations (up to 2500 mg/L with lower removal efficiency. The reaction kinetics followed the Stover-Kincannon second order model. The gram-positive and gram-negative bacillus and coccus as well as the gram-positive binary bacillus were found to be the most dominant species. The results of 13C-NMR analysis have shown that formaldehyde and urea were converted into N-{[(aminocarbonyl amino] methyl}urea and the residual formaldehyde was polymerized at room temperature.

  13. Start-up strategies of membrane-aerated biofilm reactor (MABR) for completely autotrophic nitrogen removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Sheng-Peng; Pellicer i Nàcher, Carles; Terada, Akihiko

    2009-01-01

    downside of this process stems from a long start-up period due to the slow growth rate of AnAOB. Therefore, two different start-up strategies, i.e., continuous inoculation of AnAOB and sequential batch inoculation of AOB and AnAOB, were tested in two laboratory scale membrane-aerated biofilm reactor (MABRs...

  14. Fixed-biofilm reactors applied to waste water treatment and aquacultural water recirculating systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bovendeur, J.

    1989-01-01

    Fixed-biofilm waste water treatment may be regarded as one of the oldest engineered biological waste water treatment methods. With the recent introduction of modern packing materials, this type of reactor has received a renewed impuls for implementation in a wide field of water treatment.

    In

  15. [Rapid startup and nitrogen removal characteristic of anaerobic ammonium oxidation reactor in packed bed biofilm reactor with suspended carrier].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sheng; Sun, De-zhi; Yu, Guang-lu

    2010-03-01

    Packed bed biofilm reactor with suspended carrier was used to cultivate ANAMMOX bacteria with sludge inoculums from WWTP secondary settler. The startup of ANAMMOX reactor was comparatively studied using high nitrogen loading method and low nitrogen loading method with aerobically biofilmed on the carrier, and the nitrogen removal characteristic was further investigated. The results showed that the reactor could be started up successfully within 90 days using low nitrogen loading method, the removal efficiencies of ammonium and nitrite were nearly 100% and the TN removal efficiencywas over 75% , however, the high nitrogen loading method was proved unsuccessfully for startup of ANAMMOX reactor probably because of the inhibition effect of high concentration of ammonium and nitrite. The pH value of effluent was slightly higher than the influent and the pH value can be used as an indicator for the process of ANAMMOX reaction. The packed bed ANAMMOX reactor with suspended carrier showed good characteristics of high nitrogen loading and high removal efficiency, 100% of removal efficiency could be achieved when the influent ammonium and nitrite concentration was lower than 800 mg/L.

  16. Sequentially aerated membrane biofilm reactors for autotrophic nitrogen removal: microbial community composition and dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pellicer i Nàcher, Carles; Franck, Stephanie; Gülay, Arda

    2014-01-01

    (rich in oxygen) and AnAOB in regions neighbouring the liquid phase. Both communities were separated by a transition region potentially populated by denitrifying heterotrophic bacteria. AOB and AnAOB bacterial groups were more abundant and diverse than NOB, and dominated by the r......Membrane-aerated biofilm reactors performing autotrophic nitrogen removal can be successfully applied to treat concentrated nitrogen streams. However, their process performance is seriously hampered by the growth of nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB). In this work we document how sequential aeration...... reduction of the NOB Nitrospira and Nitrobacter and a 10-fold increase in AnAOB numbers. The study of biofilm sections with relevant 16S rRNA fluorescent probes revealed strongly stratified biofilm structures fostering aerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in biofilm areas close to the membrane surface...

  17. Microbiological and chemical approaches to degradation of mecoprop in a Moving-Bed Biofilm-Reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Escola, Monica; Tue Kjærgaard Nielsen, Tue; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg

    Micro-pollutants are ubiquitous in wastewater effluents. Therefore, in-situ treatments of highly polluted water or polishing treatments after classical wastewater treatment have been proposed as a solution. Moving Bed Biofilm-Reactors (MBBRs) are a recent-developed biofilm technology for wastewater...... effluent; spiked at with different concentrations of mecoprop. Mecoprop was chosen because it is a well-studied pesticide which commonly appears in wastewater effluents and groundwater. The microbial communities were determined and followed over the experiment, by high-throughput sequencing of the 16S...... treatment. MBBRs consist incontain biofilms which are grown on small (1-4 cm diameter) plastic chips that are suspended and mixed in a water tank. These systems have been recognized as robust and versatile. Besides, biofilm systems fdescribe acilitatedemonstrate a clear, but slow, biodegradation of some...

  18. Microbial activity catalyzes oxygen transfer in membrane-aerated nitritating biofilm reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pellicer i Nàcher, Carles; Domingo Felez, Carlos; Lackner, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    is present, significantly complicating reactor modelling and control. This study shows for the first time the factors affecting oxygen mass transfer across membranes during clean water tests and reactor operation via undisturbed microelectrode inspection and bulk measurements. The mass transfer resistance...... of the liquid boundary layer developed at the membrane-liquid interface during clean water tests accounted for two thirds of the total mass transfer resistance, suggesting a strong underestimation of the oxygen transfer rates when it is absent (e.g. after biofilm growth). Reactor operation to attain partial...

  19. A new approach for development of kinetics of wastewater treatment in aerobic biofilm reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, S.; Sarkar, S.; Mazumder, D.

    2017-09-01

    Biofilm process is widely used for the treatment of a variety of wastewater especially containing slowly biodegradable substances. It provides resistance against toxic environment and is capable of retaining biomass under continuous operation. Development of kinetics is very much pertinent for rational design of a biofilm process for the treatment of wastewater with or without inhibitory substances. A simple approach for development of such kinetics for an aerobic biofilm reactor has been presented using a novel biofilm model. The said biofilm model is formulated from the correlations between substrate concentrations in the influent/effluent and at biofilm liquid interface along with substrate flux and biofilm thickness complying Monod's growth kinetics. The methodology for determining the kinetic coefficients for substrate removal and biomass growth has been demonstrated stepwise along with graphical representations. Kinetic coefficients like K, k, Y, b t, b s, and b d are determined either from the intercepts of X- and Y-axis or from the slope of the graphical plots.

  20. The nitritation performance of biofilm reactor for treating domestic wastewater under high dissolved oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhaoming; Li, Zebing; Ma, Jing; Du, Jia; Chen, Guanghui; Bian, Wei; Li, Jun; Zhao, Baihang

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the nitritation performance in a biofilm reactor for treating domestic wastewater. The reactor was operated in continuous feed mode from phases 1 to 3. The dissolved oxygen (DO) was controlled at 3.5-7 mg/L throughout the experiment. The biofilm reactor showed excellent nitritation performance after the inoculation of nitrifying sludge, with the hydraulic retention time being reduced from 24 to 7 hr. Above 90% nitrite accumulation ratio (NAR) was maintained in phase 1. Afterwards, nitratation occurred with the low NH4(+)-N concentration in the reactor. The improvement of NH4(+)-N concentration to 20-35 mg/L had a limited effect on the recovery of nitritation. However, nitritation recovered rapidly when sequencing batch feed mode was adopted in phase 4, with the effluent NH4(+)-N concentration above 7 mg/L. The improvement of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) activity and the combined inhibition effect of free ammonia (FA) and free nitrous acid (FNA) on the nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) were two key factors for the rapid recovery of nitritation. Sludge activity was obtained in batch tests. The results of batch tests had a good relationship with the long term operation performance of the biofilm reactor. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Development of the floating sulphur biofilm reactor for sulphide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    driniev

    The formation of floating sulphur biofilm was observed in the microbial ecology studies of tannery ponds undertaken by the. Environmental Biotechnology Group at Rhodes University. This was related to the steep Redox gradients established at the air/ water interface of anaerobic, organically loaded and actively sulphate ...

  2. Enrichment and biofilm formation of Anammox bacteria in a non-woven membrane reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Shou-Qing; Lee, Po-Heng; Fessehaie, Anania; Gao, Bao-Yu; Sung, Shihwu

    2010-03-01

    An innovative reactor configuration for Anammox enrichment by connecting a non-woven membrane module with an anaerobic reactor was developed in this study. The Anammox non-woven membrane reactor (ANMR) exhibited high biomass retention ability through the formation of aggregates in the reactor and biofilm on the interior surface of the non-woven membrane. No fouling problems occurred on the membrane after the development of mature biofilms. After 8 months of operation, the nitrogen loading rate (NLR) and nitrogen removal rate (NRR) reached 1263 mg N/l/d and 1047.5 mg N/l/d, respectively, with a maximum specific ammonium consumption (SAC) of 51 nmol/mg protein/min. At steady state, the average ammonium and nitrite removal efficiencies were 90.9% and 95.0%, respectively. Morphological observation of Anammox aggregates and biofilm showed a high degree of compactness. Also, enrichment of Anammox bacteria was quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis as 97.7%. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Biodegradation Rates of Aromatic Contaminants in Biofilm Reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arcangeli, Jean-Pierre; Arvin, Erik

    1995-01-01

    This study has shown that microorganisms can adapt to degrade mixtures of aromatic pollutants at relatively high rates in the μg/l concentration range. The biodegradation rates of the following compounds were investigated in biofilm systems: aromatic hydrocarbons, phenol, methylphenols, chlorophe......This study has shown that microorganisms can adapt to degrade mixtures of aromatic pollutants at relatively high rates in the μg/l concentration range. The biodegradation rates of the following compounds were investigated in biofilm systems: aromatic hydrocarbons, phenol, methylphenols...... compounds was typically controlled by first order kinetics. The first-order surface removal rate constants were surprisingly similar, ranging from 2 to 4 m/d. It appears that NSO-compounds inhibit the degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons, even at very low concentrations of NSO-compounds. Under nitrate...

  4. Influence of carrier concentration on the control of Galactomyces geotrichum bulking and bacterial community of biofilm reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Matos, M.; Pereira, M A; Nicolau, Ana; A.L. Rodrigues; Brito, A. G.; Nogueira, R.

    2012-01-01

    The present work aims to evaluate a strategy to solve Galactomyces geotrichum bulking based on the incorporation of a biofilm carrier in activated sludge systems. For this study, four sequencing batch reactors (SBR) were operated without (SBR1) and with a carrier for biofilm growth (5% [SBR2], 10% [SBR3], and 20% [SBR4] of the reactor volume). As expected, G. geotrichum bulking was observed in the SBR operating just with suspended biomass, as ascertained by direct microscopic inspection. The ...

  5. Oxygen Transfer Model for a Flow-Through Hollow-Fiber Membrane Biofilm Reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilmore, K. R.; Little, J. C.; Smets, Barth F.

    2009-01-01

    A mechanistic oxygen transfer model was developed and applied to a flow-through hollow-fiber membrane-aerated biofilm reactor. Model results are compared to conventional clean water test results as well as performance data obtained when an actively nitrifying biofilm was present on the fibers......-liquid interface was the most accurate of the predictive models (overpredicted by a factor of 1.1) while a coefficient determined by measuring bulk liquid dissolved oxygen underpredicted the oxygen transfer by a factor of 3. The mechanistic model was found to be an adequate tool for design because it used....... With the biofilm present, oxygen transfer efficiencies between 30 and 55% were calculated from the measured data including the outlet gas oxygen concentration, ammonia consumption stoichiometry, and oxidized nitrogen production stoichiometry, all of which were in reasonable agreement. The mechanistic model...

  6. Analysis of the role of the LH92_11085 gene of a biofilm hyper-producing Acinetobacter baumannii strain on biofilm formation and attachment to eukaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Fraga, Laura; Pérez, Astrid; Rumbo-Feal, Soraya; Merino, María; Vallejo, Juan Andrés; Ohneck, Emily J; Edelmann, Richard E; Beceiro, Alejandro; Vázquez-Ucha, Juan C; Valle, Jaione; Actis, Luis A; Bou, Germán; Poza, Margarita

    2016-05-18

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a nosocomial pathogen that has a considerable ability to survive in the hospital environment partly due to its capacity to form biofilms. The first step in the process of establishing an infection is adherence of the bacteria to target cells. Chaperone-usher pili assembly systems are involved in pilus biogenesis pathways that play an important role in adhesion to host cells and tissues as well as medically relevant surfaces. After screening a collection of strains, a biofilm hyper-producing A. baumannii strain (MAR002) was selected to describe potential targets involved in pathogenicity. MAR002 showed a remarkable ability to form biofilm and attach to A549 human alveolar epithelial cells. Analysis of MAR002 using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed a significant presence of pili on the bacterial surface. Putative protein-coding genes involved in pili formation were identified based on the newly sequenced genome of MAR002 strain (JRHB01000001/2 or NZ_JRHB01000001/2). As assessed by qRT-PCR, the gene LH92_11085, belonging to the operon LH92_11070-11085, is overexpressed (ca. 25-fold more) in biofilm-associated cells compared to exponential planktonic cells. In the present work we investigate the role of this gene on the MAR002 biofilm phenotype. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and biofilm assays showed that inactivation of LH92_11085 gene significantly reduced bacterial attachment to A549 cells and biofilm formation on plastic, respectively. TEM analysis of the LH92_11085 mutant showed the absence of long pili formations normally present in the wild-type. These observations indicate the potential role this LH92_11085 gene could play in the pathobiology of A baumannii.

  7. Toluene biodegradation and biofilm growth in an aerobic fixed-film reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arcangeli, Jean-Pierre; Arvin, Erik

    1992-01-01

    Aerobic biodegradation of toluene in a biofilm system was investigated. Toluene is easily biodegradable, like several other aromatic compounds. The degradation was first order at bulk concentrations lower than 0.14 mg/l and zero order above 6–8 mg/l. An average yield coefficient of 1 mg biomass....../mg toluene degraded was found. A chemical oxygen demand balance relative to three biofilm growth scenarios showed that only a minor fraction of the carbon in the influent accumulated as biomass in the reactor. Of this accumulated biomass only a small fraction was active biomass, about 5% protein....... A characterization of the carbon fractions leaving the reactor showed a significant production of soluble polymers and formation of suspended biomass. The latter was probably due to the detachment of filamentous bacteria. A decrease in toluene degradation was observed when the oxygen concentration was increased from...

  8. Biological nutrient removal from municipal wastewater in sequencing batch biofilm reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnz, P.

    2001-07-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) has only been put into practice in activated sludge systems. In recent years, the Sequencing Batch Biofilm Reactor (SBBR) has emerged as an alternative allowing EBPR to be achieved in a biofilm reactor. High efficiency of phosphate removal was demonstrated in a SBBR fed with synthetic wastewater containing acetate. The aim of this study was to investigate EBPR from municipal wastewater in semi full-scale and laboratory-scale SBBRs. The focus of the investigation in the semi full-scale reactor was on determination of achievable reaction rates and effluent concentrations under varying influent conditions throughout all seasons of a year. Interactions between nitrogen and phosphorus removal and the influence of backwashing on the reactor performance was examined. Summing up, it can be stated that the SBBR proved to be an attractive alternative to activated sludge systems. Phosphorus elimination efficiency was comparable to common systems but biomass sedimentation problems were avoided. In order to further exploit the potential of the SBBR and to achieve reactor performances superior to those of existing systems designing a special biofilm carrier material may allow to increase the phenomenon of simultaneous nitrification/denitrification while maintaining EBPR activity. (orig.) [German] Die vermehrte biologische Phosphorelimination (Bio-P) aus Abwasser wurde bisher nur in Belebtschlammsystemen praktiziert. In den letzten Jahren konnte jedoch gezeigt werden, dass sich durch die Anwendung des Sequencing Batch Biofilm Reactor (SBBR) - Verfahrens auch in Biofilmreaktoren Bio-P verwirklichen laesst. Versuche in Laboranlagen haben ergeben, dass sich eine weitgehende Phosphorelimination aufrecht erhalten laesst, wenn die Reaktoren mit einem ideal zusammengesetzten, synthetischen Abwasser beschickt werden. Ziel dieser Arbeit war es, Bio-P aus kommunalem Abwasser in SBBR-Versuchsanlagen im halbtechnischen und im Labormassstab zu

  9. Biofilm Attached Cultivation of Chlorella pyrenoidosa Is a Developed System for Swine Wastewater Treatment and Lipid Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Pengfei; Wang, Yuanzhu; Liu, Tianzhong; Liu, Defu

    2017-01-01

    This study showed the new potential of using soluble contents and heavy metals in swine wastewater as nutrient supplements for the algae Chlorella pyrenoidosa with biofilm attached method. Algae with biofilm attached cultivation grew well in unpasteurized wastewater reaching a biomass productivity of 5.03 g m−2 d−1, lipid content of 35.9% and lipid productivity of 1.80 g m−2 d−1. Chlorella grew in BG11 medium delivered lower values for each of the aforementioned parameters. The FAMEs compositions in the algae paste were mainly consisted of C16:0, C18:2, and C18:3. Algae removed NH4+–N, total phosphorus (TP), and COD by 75.9, 68.4, and 74.8%, respectively. Notably, Zn2+, Cu+, and Fe2+ were removed from wastewater with a ratio of 65.71, 53.64, and 58.89%, respectively. Biofilm attached cultivation of C. pyrenoidosa in swine wastewater containing heavy metals could accumulate considerable biomass and lipid, and the removal ratio of NH4+–N, TP, COD, and as well as heavy metal were high. Treatment of wastewater with biofilm attached cultivation showed an increasingly popular for the concentration of microalgae and environmental sustainability. PMID:28983302

  10. Biofilm Attached Cultivation of Chlorella pyrenoidosa Is a Developed System for Swine Wastewater Treatment and Lipid Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengfei Cheng

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study showed the new potential of using soluble contents and heavy metals in swine wastewater as nutrient supplements for the algae Chlorella pyrenoidosa with biofilm attached method. Algae with biofilm attached cultivation grew well in unpasteurized wastewater reaching a biomass productivity of 5.03 g m−2 d−1, lipid content of 35.9% and lipid productivity of 1.80 g m−2 d−1. Chlorella grew in BG11 medium delivered lower values for each of the aforementioned parameters. The FAMEs compositions in the algae paste were mainly consisted of C16:0, C18:2, and C18:3. Algae removed NH4+–N, total phosphorus (TP, and COD by 75.9, 68.4, and 74.8%, respectively. Notably, Zn2+, Cu+, and Fe2+ were removed from wastewater with a ratio of 65.71, 53.64, and 58.89%, respectively. Biofilm attached cultivation of C. pyrenoidosa in swine wastewater containing heavy metals could accumulate considerable biomass and lipid, and the removal ratio of NH4+–N, TP, COD, and as well as heavy metal were high. Treatment of wastewater with biofilm attached cultivation showed an increasingly popular for the concentration of microalgae and environmental sustainability.

  11. Degradation of formaldehyde in anaerobic sequencing batch biofilm reactor (ASBBR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, N.S. [Laboratorio de Processos Biologicos (LPB), Departamento de Hidraulica e Saneamento, Escola de Engenharia de Sao Carlos (EESC), Universidade de Sao Paulo - USP, Engenharia Ambiental, Bloco 4-F, Av. Joao Dagnone, 1100 Santa Angelina, 13.563-120 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Zaiat, M. [Laboratorio de Processos Biologicos (LPB), Departamento de Hidraulica e Saneamento, Escola de Engenharia de Sao Carlos (EESC), Universidade de Sao Paulo - USP, Engenharia Ambiental, Bloco 4-F, Av. Joao Dagnone, 1100 Santa Angelina, 13.563-120 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: zaiat@sc.usp.br

    2009-04-30

    The present study evaluated the degradation of formaldehyde in a bench-scale anaerobic sequencing batch reactor, which contained biomass immobilized in polyurethane foam matrices. The reactor was operated for 212 days at 35 deg. C with 8 h sequential cycles, under different affluent formaldehyde concentrations ranging from 31.6 to 1104.4 mg/L (formaldehyde loading rates from 0.08 to 2.78 kg/m{sup 3} day). The results indicate excellent reactor stability and over 99% efficiency in formaldehyde removal, with average effluent formaldehyde concentration of 3.6 {+-} 1.7 mg/L. Formaldehyde degradation rates increased from 204.9 to 698.3 mg/L h as the initial concentration of formaldehyde was increased from around 100 to around 1100 mg/L. However, accumulation of organic matter was observed in the effluent (chemical oxygen demand (COD) values above 500 mg/L) due to the presence of non-degraded organic acids, especially acetic and propionic acids. This observation poses an important question regarding the anaerobic route of formaldehyde degradation, which might differ substantially from that reported in the literature. The anaerobic degradation pathway can be associated with the formation of long-chain oligomers from formaldehyde. Such long- or short-chain polymers are probably the precursors of organic acid formation by means of acidogenic anaerobic microorganisms.

  12. A Biofilm Pocket Model to Evaluate Different Non-Surgical Periodontal Treatment Modalities in Terms of Biofilm Removal and Reformation, Surface Alterations and Attachment of Periodontal Ligament Fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägi, Tobias T.; Klemensberger, Sabrina; Bereiter, Riccarda; Nietzsche, Sandor; Cosgarea, Raluca; Flury, Simon; Lussi, Adrian; Sculean, Anton; Eick, Sigrun

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim There is a lack of suitable in vitro models to evaluate various treatment modalities intending to remove subgingival bacterial biofilm. Consequently, the aims of this in vitro-study were: a) to establish a pocket model enabling mechanical removal of biofilm and b) to evaluate repeated non-surgical periodontal treatment with respect to biofilm removal and reformation, surface alterations, tooth hard-substance-loss, and attachment of periodontal ligament (PDL) fibroblasts. Material and Methods Standardized human dentin specimens were colonized by multi-species biofilms for 3.5 days and subsequently placed into artificially created pockets. Non-surgical periodontal treatment was performed as follows: a) hand-instrumentation with curettes (CUR), b) ultrasonication (US), c) subgingival air-polishing using erythritol (EAP) and d) subgingival air-polishing using erythritol combined with chlorhexidine digluconate (EAP-CHX). The reduction and recolonization of bacterial counts, surface roughness (Ra and Rz), the caused tooth substance-loss (thickness) as well as the attachment of PDL fibroblasts were evaluated and statistically analyzed by means of ANOVA with Post-Hoc LSD. Results After 5 treatments, bacterial reduction in biofilms was highest when applying EAP-CHX (4 log10). The lowest reduction was found after CUR (2 log10). Additionally, substance-loss was the highest when using CUR (128±40 µm) in comparison with US (14±12 µm), EAP (6±7 µm) and EAP-CHX (11±10) µm). Surface was roughened when using CUR and US. Surfaces exposed to US and to EAP attracted the highest numbers of PDL fibroblasts. Conclusion The established biofilm model simulating a periodontal pocket combined with interchangeable placements of test specimens with multi-species biofilms enables the evaluation of different non-surgical treatment modalities on biofilm removal and surface alterations. Compared to hand instrumentation the application of ultrasonication and of air

  13. Biohydrogen production from glucose in upflow biofilm reactors with plastic carriers under extreme thermophilic conditions (70(degree)C)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, H.; Zeng, Raymond Jianxiong; Angelidaki, Irini

    2008-01-01

    Biohydrogen could efficiently be produced in glucose-fed biofilm reactors filled with plastic carriers and operated at 70°C. Batch experiments were, in addition, conducted to enrich and cultivate glucose-fed extremethermophilic hydrogen producing microorganisms from a biohydrogen CSTR reactor fed...... with synthetic medium with glucose as the only carbon and energy source. A biofilm reactor, started up with plastic carriers, that were previously inoculated with the enrichment cultures, resulted in higher hydrogen yield (2.21 mol H2/mol glucose consumed) but required longer start up time (1 month), while...... with household solid waste. Kinetic analysis of the biohydrogen enrichment cultures show that substrate (glucose) likely inhibited hydrogen production when its concentration was higher than 1 g/L. Different start up strategies were applied for biohydrogen production in biofilm reactors operated at 70°C, and fed...

  14. Carrier effects on tertiary nitrifying moving bed biofilm reactor: An examination of performance, biofilm and biologically produced solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Daina; Delatolla, Robert; Kennedy, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Increasingly stricter ammonia and nitrogen release regulations with respect to wastewater effluents are creating a need for tertiary treatment systems. The moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) is being considered as an upgrade option for an increasing number of wastewater treatment facilities due to its small footprint and ease of operation. Despite the MBBRs creation as a system to remove nitrogen, recent research on MBBR systems showing that the system's performance is directly related to carrier surface area and is irrespective of carrier shape and type has been performed exclusively on chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal systems. Furthermore, the influence of carrier type on the solids produced by MBBR systems has also been exclusively studied for COD removal systems. This work investigates the effects of three specific carrier types on ammonia removal rates, biofilm morphology, along with solids production and settleability of tertiary nitrifying MBBR systems. The study concludes that carrier type has no significant effect on tertiary nitrifying MBBR system performance under steady, moderate loading conditions. The research does however highlight the propensity of greater surface area to volume carriers to become clogged under high loading conditions and that the high surface area carriers investigated in this study required longer adjustment periods to changes in loading after becoming clogged.

  15. Efficacy of gaseous chlorine dioxide in inactivating Bacillus cereus spores attached to and in a biofilm on stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Hyegyeong; Seo, Hyun-Sun; Bang, Jihyun; Kim, Hoikyung; Beuchat, Larry R; Ryu, Jee-Hoon

    2014-10-01

    We evaluated the lethal activity of gaseous chlorine dioxide (ClO2) against Bacillus cereus spores attached to and in biofilm formed on a stainless steel surface. Aqueous ClO2 was prepared by mixing sulfuric acid (5% w/v) with sodium chlorite (10mg/mL), and gaseous ClO2 was produced by vaporization of aqueous ClO2 in an air-tight container. The concentration of gaseous ClO2 in the air within the container increased rapidly at first but gradually decreased over time. The lethality of gaseous ClO2 against B. cereus spores attached to stainless steel coupons (SSCs) and in biofilm formed by the pathogen on SSCs was determined. The B. cereus spores attached to SSCs (5.3±0.1logCFU/coupon) were completely inactivated within 1h at 25°C when treated with gaseous ClO2 (peak concentration: 115.3±5.0 parts per million [ppm]). The total number of vegetative cells and spores in biofilm formed by B. cereus on SSCs was 5.9±0.3logCFU/coupon; the spore count was 5.3±0.1logCFU/coupon. The vegetative cells and spores in biofilm were completely inactivated within 6h (peak concentration: 115.3±5.0ppm). Results show that B. cereus spores in biofilms are more resistant to gaseous ClO2 than are attached spores not in biofilms. Gaseous ClO2 was, nevertheless, very effective in killing B. cereus spores in biofilm on the surface of stainless steel. Results show promise for application of gaseous ClO2 to enhance the microbiological safety of foods that may come in contact with stainless steel and possibly other hard surfaces on which B. cereus biofilms have formed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Oxygen air enrichment through composite membrane: application to an aerated biofilm reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. Cerqueira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A highly permeable composite hollow-fibre membrane developed for air separation was used in a membrane aerated biofilm reactor (MABR. The composite membrane consisted of a porous support layer covered with a thin dense film, which was responsible for oxygen enrichment of the permeate stream. Besides oxygen enrichment capability, dense membranes overcome major operational problems that occur when using porous membranes for oxygen transfer to biofilms. Air flow rate and oxygen partial pressure inside the fibres were the variables used to adjust the oxygen transfer rate. The membrane aerated biofilm reactor was operated with hydraulic retention times (HRT ranging from 1 to 4 hours. High organic load removal rates, like 6.5 kg.m-3.d-1, were achieved due to oxygen transfer rates as high as 107 kg.m-3.d-1. High COD removals, with improved oxygen transfer efficiency, indicate that a MABR is a compact alternative to the conventional activated sludge process and that the selected membrane is suitable for further applications.

  17. Energy recovery from dairy waste-waters: impacts of biofilm support systems on anaerobic CST reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramasamy, E.V.; Abbasi, S.A. [Pondicherry Central Univ., Centre for Pollution Control and Energy Technology, Pondicherry (India)

    2000-04-01

    Anaerobic digestion is one of the major steps involved in the treatment of dairy industry waste-waters and many CSTRs (continuously-stirred tank reactors) are functioning for this purpose all over the world. In this paper, the authors describe their attempts to upgrade a CSTR's performance by incorporating a biofilm support system (BSS) within the existing reactor. The focus of the work was to find an inexpensive and easy to install BSS which could significantly enhance the rates of waste treatment and methane recovery. Rolls of nylon mesh (with {approx}1 mm openings), of 5 cm height and 2 cm dia, when incorporated in the CSTR at the biofilm surface (with a digester volume ratio 0.3 cm{sup 2}/cm{sup 3}), enabled the CSTR to perform better with > 20% improvement in the methane yield. Such simple BSS devices can significantly improve the performance of a CSTR anaerobic digester treating dairy wastes. The enhancement is due to the development of active biofilms which not only enhance the micro-organism-waste contact but also reduce the microbial washout. Such devices are inexpensive and very easy to incorporate -- the gains are thus achieved with very little cost and effort. (Author)

  18. Salinity effect on simultaneous nitrification and denitrification, microbial characteristics in a hybrid sequencing batch biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Zonglian; Wu, Lan; Wang, Qun; Gao, Mengchun; Jin, Chunji; Zhao, Yangguo; Zhao, Linting; Guo, Liang

    2017-10-09

    The effect of increasing salinity on nitrogen removal via simultaneous nitrification and denitrification, microbial activities and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) were investigated in a hybrid sequencing batch biofilm reactor filled with soft combination carriers. In the influent salinity range from 1.0 to 2.0%, average COD, NH4(+)-N and TN removal efficiencies were higher than 97.1, 97.8 and 86.4% at the steady state. When salinity was increased to 2.5 and 3.0%, ammonium oxidation was obviously inhibited in the reactor. For both suspended sludge (S-sludge) and biofilm, specific ammonium oxidation rate, specific nitrite oxidation rate, specific oxygen uptake rate and dehydrogenase activity reduced with the increase of salinity. The quantity of total EPS increased with the increase of salinity from 1.0 to 2.0%. Generally, humic substances were the dominant composition of EPS in both S-sludge and biofilm, with the percentages of 43.9-54.0 and 43.8-64.6% in total EPS.

  19. Distributions and activities of ammonia oxidizing bacteria and polyphosphate accumulating organisms in a pumped-flow biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guangxue; Nielsen, Michael; Sorensen, Ketil; Zhan, Xinmin; Rodgers, Michael

    2009-10-01

    The spatial distributions and activities of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) were investigated for a novel laboratory-scale sequencing batch pumped-flow biofilm reactor (PFBR) system that was operated for carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus removal. The PFBR comprised of two 16.5l tanks (Reactors 1 and 2), each with a biofilm module of 2m(2) surface area. To facilitate the growth of AOB and PAOs in the reactor biofilms, the influent wastewater was held in Reactor 1 under stagnant un-aerated conditions for 6 h after feeding, and was then pumped over and back between Reactors 1 and 2 for 12 h, creating aerobic conditions in the two reactors during this period; as a consequence, the biofilm in Reactor 2 was in an aerobic environment for almost all the 18.2 h operating cycle. A combination of micro-sensor measurements, molecular techniques, batch experiments and reactor studies were carried out to analyse the performance of the PFBR system. After 100 days operation at a filtered chemical oxygen demand (COD(f)) loading rate of 3.46 g/m(2) per day, the removal efficiencies were 95% COD(f), 87% TN(f) and 74% TP(f). While the PFBR microbial community structure and function were found to be highly diversified with substantial AOB and PAO populations, about 70% of the phosphorus release potential and almost 100% of the nitrification potential were located in Reactors 1 and 2, respectively. Co-enrichment of AOB and PAOs was realized in the Reactor 2 biofilm, where molecular analyses revealed unexpected microbial distributions at micro-scale, with population peaks of AOB in a 100-250 microm deep sub-surface zone and of PAOs in the 0-150 microm surface zone. The micro-distribution of AOB coincided with the position of the nitrification peak identified during micro-sensor analyses. The study demonstrates that enrichment of PAOs can be realized in a constant or near constant aerobic biofilm environment. Furthermore, the findings suggest

  20. Light and electron microscopic examinations of methane-producing biofilms from anaerobic fixed-bed reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, R W; Akin, D E; Nordstedt, R A; Thomas, M V; Aldrich, H C

    1984-07-01

    Ultrastructural examinations were performed on biofilms from eight anaerobic fixed-bed reactors filled with various packing materials and operated on fresh swine waste. By using light, UV, scanning, and transmission electron microscopy, the distribution of a diverse microbial population composed of bacteria and a few yeasts was determined. This is the first time that the ultrastructure of in situ anaerobic digestor biofilms has been reported. A large number of methanogenic bacteria were identified by their fluorescence under 420 nm of radiation. Of these, two morphologically distinct types were most prevalent in the films. Methanothrix spp. was present in high numbers at the film surface, whereas Methanosarcina spp. were commonly embedded in the lower regions of the film. Inhabitants of the film were surrounded by an exopolysaccharide matrix that was very dense toward the base. An extensive network of channels was observed throughout the matrix that may facilitate gas and nutrient exchange to the lower regions of the film.

  1. Conditions for partial nitrification in biofilm reactors and a kinetic explanation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Julio; Costa, Engràcia; Kreft, Jan-Ulrich

    2009-06-01

    Nitrification is a two-step process in which ammonia is incompletely oxidized by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria or archaea (AOB) to nitrite, which is then further oxidized to nitrate by nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB). Literature reports show that segregation of initially coexisting ammonia and nitrite oxidizing populations co-immobilized in gel cubes and cultured in a set-up with three reactors in series (without recirculation) is attained. In those studies NOB were present and nitrite was oxidized mainly in the last reactor. We developed a mathematical model for immobilized biomass that allows for one-dimensional gradients of metabolites and changes of porosity within the gel due to growth. The model reproduced the experimentally observed compartmentalization under the conditions used by Noto et al. (Noto et al., 1998. Water Res 32(3): 769- 773), using standard kinetic parameters of nitrifying bacteria including free ammonia inhibition of AOB and NOB. The model predicted compartmentalization when the ammonium load was sufficiently high and liquid phase mixing sufficiently limited (close to plug-flow). Modeling results demonstrated that inhibition of NOB by free ammonia did not substantially contribute to the compartmentalization in biofilm reactors. Additional simulations identified the higher oxygen affinity of AOB as the key parameter leading to compartmentalization (i.e., partial nitrification) in artificial and natural biofilms since they enable the formation of oxygen gradients. As a result, a tendency for compartmentalization was found even at equal competitiveness. Copyright 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Pseudo-second-order calcium-mediated Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst attachment to environmental biofilms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Luo, Xia; Jedlicka, Sabrina; Jellison, Kristen

    .... The remobilization of biofilm-associated C. parvum oocysts back into the water column by biofilm sloughing or bulk erosion poses a threat to public health and may be responsible for waterborne outbreaks...

  3. Phosphorus removal by a fixed-bed hybrid polymer nanocomposite biofilm reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, M.; Rodrigues,A.L.; Ribeiro, D.C.; Nogueira, R; Machado, A.V.

    2014-01-01

    Eutrophication is one of the main challenges regarding the ecological quality of surface waters, phosphorus bioavailability being its main driver. In this context, a novel hybrid polymer nanocomposite (HPN-Pr) biofilm reactor aimed at integrated chemical phosphorus adsorption and biological removal was conceived. The assays pointed to removal of 1.2 mg P/g of reactive phosphorus and 1.01 mg P/g of total phosphorus under steady-state conditions. A mathematical adsorption–biological model was a...

  4. Hybrid Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor for the biodegradation of benzotriazoles and hydroxy-benzothiazole in wastewater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazioti, Aikaterini A.; Stasinakis, Athanasios S.; Psoma, Aikaterini K.

    2017-01-01

    A laboratory scale Hybrid Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor (HMBBR) was used to study the removal of five benzotriazoles and one benzothiazole from municipal wastewater. The HMBBR system consisted of two serially connected fully aerated bioreactors that contained activated sludge (AS) and K3-biocarriers...... and a settling tank. The average removal of target compounds ranged between 41% (4-methyl-1H-benzotriazole; 4TTR) and 88% (2-hydroxybenzothiazole; OHBTH). Except for 4TTR, degradation mainly occurred in the first bioreactor. Calculation of biodegradation constants in batch experiments and application of a model...

  5. Fate of Enterobacter sakazakii attached to or in biofilms on stainless steel upon exposure to various temperatures or relative humidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hoikyung; Bang, Jihyun; Beuchat, Larry R; Ryu, Jee-Hoon

    2008-05-01

    Survival of Enterobacter sakazakii dried on the surface of stainless steel and exposed to 43% relative humidity, as affected by temperature, was studied. Populations of E. sakazakii (7.4 to 8.6 log CFU per coupon) on coupons dried for 2 h at 22 degrees C decreased significantly (P steel immersed in M9 medium, which contains minimal concentrations of nutrients, and infant formula at 25 degrees C and subsequent survival of cells at 25 degrees C as affected by exposure to 23, 43, 68, 85, and 100% relative humidity were investigated. Some of the cells in these biofilms survived under all test relative humidities for up to 42 days. The overall order of survival as affected by relative humidity was 100 > 23 = 43 = 68 > 85% relative humidity, regardless of the medium in which the biofilm was formed. Reduction in viability of cells was significantly greater in biofilm that had formed in M9 medium than in biofilm formed in infant formula. Results indicate that infant formula provides protection for attached cells, as well as cells in biofilm, against lethality on exposure to desiccation. These results are useful when predicting the survival characteristics of E. sakazakii on stainless steel surfaces in processing and preparation kitchen environments.

  6. Actinomyces naeslundii GroEL-dependent initial attachment and biofilm formation in a flow cell system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Toshiaki; Ochiai, Kuniyasu; Senpuku, Hidenobu

    2015-02-01

    Actinomyces naeslundii is an early colonizer with important roles in the development of the oral biofilm. The effects of butyric acid, one of short chain fatty acids in A. naeslundii biofilm formation was observed using a flow cell system with Tryptic soy broth without dextrose and with 0.25% sucrose (TSB sucrose). Significant biofilms were established involving live and dead cells in TSB sucrose with 60mM butyric acid but not in concentrations of 6, 30, 40, and 50mM. Biofilm formation failed in 60mM sodium butyrate but biofilm level in 60mM sodium butyrate (pH4.7) adjusted with hydrochloric acid as 60mM butyric media (pH4.7) was similar to biofilm levels in 60mM butyric acid. Therefore, butyric acid and low pH are required for significant biofilm formation in the flow cell. To determine the mechanism of biofilm formation, we investigated initial A. naeslundii colonization in various conditions and effects of anti-GroEL antibody. The initial colonization was observed in the 60mM butyric acid condition and anti-GroEL antibody inhibited the initial colonization. In conclusion, we established a new biofilm formation model in which butyric acid induces GroEL-dependent initial colonization of A. naeslundii resulting in significant biofilm formation in a flow system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Evidence of specialized bromate-reducing bacteria in a hollow fiber membrane biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, K J; Downing, L S; Nerenberg, R

    2009-01-01

    Bromate is a carcinogenic disinfection by-product formed from bromide during ozonation or advanced oxidation. We previously observed bromate reduction in a hydrogen-based, denitrifying hollow fiber membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR). In this research, we investigated the potential existence of specialized bromate-reducing bacteria. Using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), we compared the microbial ecology of two denitrifying MBfRs, one amended with nitrate as the electron acceptor and the other with nitrate plus bromate. The DGGE results showed that bromate exerted a selective pressure for a putative, specialized bromate-reducing bacterium, which developed a strong presence only in the reactor with bromate. To gain further insight into the capabilities of specialized, bromate-reducing bacteria, we explored bromate reduction in a control MBfR without any primary electron acceptors. A grown biofilm in the control MBfR reduced bromate without previous exposure, but the rate of reduction decreased over time, especially after perturbations resulting in biomass loss. The decrease in bromate reduction may have been the result of the toxic effects of bromate. We also used batch tests of the perchlorate-reducing pure culture, Dechloromonas sp. PC1 to test bromate reduction and growth. Bromate was reduced without measurable growth. Based on these results, we speculate bromate's selective pressure for the putative, specialized BRB observed in the DGGE was not growth related, but possibly based on resistance to bromate toxicity.

  8. The membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR) for water and wastewater treatment: principles, applications, and recent developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Kelly J; Nerenberg, Robert

    2012-10-01

    The membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR), an emerging technology for water and wastewater treatment, is based on pressurized membranes that supply a gaseous substrate to a biofilm formed on the membrane's exterior. MBfR biofilms behave differently from conventional biofilms due to the counter-diffusion of substrates. MBfRs are uniquely suited for numerous treatment applications, including the removal of carbon and nitrogen when oxygen is supplied, and reduction of oxidized contaminants when hydrogen is supplied. Major benefits include high gas utilization efficiency, low energy consumption, and small reactor footprints. The first commercial MBfR was recently released, and its success may lead to the scale-up of other applications. MBfR development still faces challenges, including biofilm management, the design of scalable reactor configurations, and the identification of cost-effective membranes. If future research and development continue to address these issues, the MBfR may play a key role in the next generation of sustainable treatment systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Development of a simplified biofilm model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Sushovan; Mazumder, Debabrata

    2017-07-01

    A simplified approach for analyzing the biofilm process in deriving an easy model has been presented. This simplified biofilm model formulated correlations between substrate concentration in the influent/effluent and at biofilm-liquid interface along with substrate flux and biofilm thickness. The model essentially considered the external mass transport according to Fick's Law, steady state substrate as well as biomass balance for attached growth microorganisms. In substrate utilization, Monod growth kinetics has been followed incorporating relevant boundary conditions at the liquid-biofilm interface and at the attachment surface. The numerical solution of equations was accomplished using Runge-Kutta method and accordingly an integrated computer program was developed. The model has been successfully applied in a distinct set of trials with varying range of representative input variables. The model performance was compared with available existing methods and it was found an easy, accurate method that can be used for process design of biofilm reactor.

  10. Operation of a full-scale pumped flow biofilm reactor (PFBR) under two aeration regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, E; Rodgers, M; Clifford, E

    2011-01-01

    A novel technology suitable for centralised and decentralised wastewater treatment has been developed, extensively tested at laboratory-scale, and trialled at a number of sites for populations ranging from 15 to 400 population equivalents (PE). The two-reactor-tank pumped flow biofilm reactor (PFBR) is characterised by: (i) its simple construction; (ii) its ease of operation and maintenance; (iii) low operating costs; (iv) low sludge production; and (v) comprising no moving parts or compressors, other than hydraulic pumps. By operating the system in a sequencing batch biofilm reactor (SBBR) mode, the following treatment can be achieved: 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5), chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total suspended solids (TSS) reduction; nitrification and denitrification. During a 100-day full-scale plant study treating municipal wastewater and operating at 165 PE and 200 PE (Experiments 1 and 2, respectively), maximum average removals of 94% BOD5, 86% TSS and 80% ammonium-nitrogen (NH4-N) were achieved. During the latter part of Experiment 2, effluent concentrations averaged: 14 mg BOD5/l; 32 mg COD(filtered)/l; 14 mg TSS/l; 4.4 mg NH4-N/l; and 4.0 mg NO3-N/l (nitrate-nitrogen). The average energy consumption was 0.46-0.63 kWh/m3(treated) or 1.25-1.76 kWh/kg BOD5 removed. No maintenance was required during these experiments. The PFBR technology offers a low energy, minimal maintenance technology for the treatment of municipal wastewater.

  11. Natural genetic transformation in Acinetobacter sp. BD413 Biofilms: introducing natural genetic transformation as a tool for bioenhancement of biofilm reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrickx, L.

    2002-07-01

    This study focussed on the localization and quantification of natural genetic transformation using neutral and disadvantageous genes in monoculture biofilms to investigate gene transfer and expression of the transferred genes in the absence of a selective advantage. Data obtained by this investigation were regarded as initial steps for evaluating the applicability of adding catabolic traits into the indigenous bacterial community of biofilm reactors by in situ natural genetic transformation. Because Acinetobacter spp. strains are readily found in waste water treatment plants and because Acinetobacter sp. BD413 possesses a high effective level of competence, natural genetic transformation was investigated in monoculture Acinetobacter sp. BD413 biofilms. The genes used for transformation encoded for the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and its variants. Monitoring of transformation events were performed with the use of automated confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and semi automated digital image processing and analysis. (orig.)

  12. Nutrient Removal and Biomass Production in an Outdoor Pilot-Scale Phototrophic Biofilm Reactor for Effluent Polishing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelee, N.C.; Janssen, M.; Temmink, H.; Shrestha, R.; Buisman, C.J.N.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2014-01-01

    An innovative pilot-scale phototrophic biofilm reactor was evaluated over a 5-month period to determine its capacity to remove nitrogen and phosphorus from Dutch municipal wastewater effluents. The areal biomass production rate ranged between 2.7 and 4.5 g dry weight/m2/day. The areal nitrogen and

  13. Tracking the dynamics of heterotrophs and nitrifiers in moving-bed biofilm reactors operated at different COD/N ratios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bassin, J.P.; Abbas, B.; Vilela, C.L.S.; Kleerebezem, R.; Muyzer, G.; Rosado, A.S.; van Loosdrecht, M.C.M.; Dezotti, M.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the impact of COD/N ratio and feeding regime on the dynamics of heterotrophs and nitrifiers in moving-bed biofilm reactors was addressed. Based on DGGE analysis of 16S rRNA genes, the influent COD was found to be the main factor determining the overall bacterial diversity. The

  14. Kinetics of nitrate and perchlorate reduction in ion exchange brine using the membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several sources of bacterial inocula were tested for their ability to reduce nitrate and perchlorate in synthetic ion-exchange spent brine (3-4.5% salinity) using a hydrogen-based membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR). Nitrate and perchlorate removal fluxes reached as high as 5.4 g N ...

  15. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly duct-tube-to-inlet-nozzle attachment system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, David W.; Smith, Bob G.

    1982-01-01

    A reusable system for removably attaching the lower end 21 of a nuclear reactor fuel assembly duct tube to an upper end 11 of a nuclear reactor fuel assembly inlet nozzle. The duct tube's lower end 21 has sides terminating in locking tabs 22 which end in inwardly-extending flanges 23. The flanges 23 engage recesses 13 in the top section 12 of the inlet nozzle's upper end 11. A retaining collar 30 slides over the inlet nozzle's upper end 11 to restrain the flanges 23 in the recesses 13. A locking nut 40 has an inside threaded portion 41 which engages an outside threaded portion 15 of the inlet nozzle's upper end 11 to secure the retaining collar 30 against protrusions 24 on the duct tube's sides.

  16. Combating biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Liang; Liu, Yang; Wu, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms are complex microbial communities consisting of microcolonies embedded in a matrix of self-produced polymer substances. Biofilm cells show much greater resistance to environmental challenges including antimicrobial agents than their free-living counterparts. The biofilm mode of life...... is believed to significantly contribute to successful microbial survival in hostile environments. Conventional treatment, disinfection and cleaning strategies do not proficiently deal with biofilm-related problems, such as persistent infections and contamination of food production facilities. In this review......, strategies to control biofilms are discussed, including those of inhibition of microbial attachment, interference of biofilm structure development and differentiation, killing of biofilm cells and induction of biofilm dispersion....

  17. Preliminary Studies on Oleochemical Wastewater Treatment using Submerged Bed Biofilm Reactor (SBBR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Z.; Mahmood, N. A. N.; Ghafar, U. S. A.; Umor, N. A.; Muhammad, S. A. F.

    2017-06-01

    Wastewater discharge from the industry into water sources is one of the main reason for water pollution. The oleochemicals industry effluent produces high content of chemical oxygen demand (COD) with value between 6000-20,000 ppm. Effective treatment is required before wastewater effluent is discharged to environment. The aim of the study is to develop submerged bed biofilm reactor (SBBR) with packing materials in the cosmoball® carrier. Water quality such as chemical oxygen demands (COD), turbidity and pH were analysed. The result shows that the initial COD of 6000 ppm was reduced below 200 ppm. The optimum conditions for SBBR were obtained when green sponges used as packing material in cosmoball® effluent flowrate set at 100 mL/min; 1:1 ratio of cosmoball® volume to reactor volume and 1:1 ratio of active sludge (mixed culture) volume to reactor volume. Turbidity and pH were recorded with 9.0 NTU and 7.0 respectively, which indicated that SBBR is feasible as an alternative for conventional biological treatment in oleochemical industry.

  18. Treatment of domestic wastewater in an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor followed by moving bed biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, A; El-Gohary, F; Temmink, H

    2010-02-01

    The performance of a laboratory-scale sewage treatment system composed of an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor and a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) at a temperature of (22-35 degrees C) was evaluated. The entire treatment system was operated at different hydraulic retention times (HRT's) of 13.3, 10 and 5.0 h. An overall reduction of 80-86% for COD(total); 51-73% for COD(colloidal) and 20-55% for COD(soluble) was found at a total HRT of 5-10 h, respectively. By prolonging the HRT to 13.3 h, the removal efficiencies of COD(total), COD(colloidal) and COD(soluble) increased up to 92, 89 and 80%, respectively. However, the removal efficiency of COD(suspended) in the combined system remained unaffected when increasing the total HRT from 5 to 10 h and from 10 to 13.3 h. This indicates that, the removal of COD(suspended) was independent on the imposed HRT. Ammonia-nitrogen removal in MBBR treating UASB reactor effluent was significantly influenced by organic loading rate (OLR). 62% of ammonia was eliminated at OLR of 4.6 g COD m(-2) day(-1). The removal efficiency was decreased by a value of 34 and 43% at a higher OLR's of 7.4 and 17.8 g COD m(-2) day(-1), respectively. The mean overall residual counts of faecal coliform in the final effluent were 8.9 x 10(4) MPN per 100 ml at a HRT of 13.3 h, 4.9 x 10(5) MPN per 100 ml at a HRT of 10 h and 9.4 x 10(5) MPN per 100 ml at a HRT of 5.0 h, corresponding to overall log(10) reduction of 2.3, 1.4 and 0.7, respectively. The discharged sludge from UASB-MBBR exerts an excellent settling property. Moreover, the mean value of the net sludge yield was only 6% in UASB reactor and 7% in the MBBR of the total influent COD at a total HRT of 13.3 h. Accordingly, the use of the combined UASB-MBBR system for sewage treatment is recommended at a total HRT of 13.3 h.

  19. Analysis of Microbial Communities in Biofilms from CSTR-Type Hollow Fiber Membrane Biofilm Reactors for Autotrophic Nitrification and Hydrogenotrophic Denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jung-Hun; Kim, Byung-Chun; Choi, Okkyoung; Kim, Hyunook; Sang, Byoung-In

    2015-10-01

    Two hollow fiber membrane biofilm reactors (HF-MBfRs) were operated for autotrophic nitrification and hydrogenotrophic denitrification for over 300 days. Oxygen and hydrogen were supplied through the hollow fiber membrane for nitrification and denitrification, respectively. During the period, the nitrogen was removed with the efficiency of 82-97% for ammonium and 87-97% for nitrate and with the nitrogen removal load of 0.09-0.26 kg NH4(+)-N/m(3)/d and 0.10-0.21 kg NO3(-)-N/m(3)/d, depending on hydraulic retention time variation by the two HF-MBfRs for autotrophic nitrification and hydrogenotrophic denitrification, respectively. Biofilms were collected from diverse topological positions in the reactors, each at different nitrogen loading rates, and the microbial communities were analyzed with partial 16S rRNA gene sequences in denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Detected DGGE band sequences in the reactors were correlated with nitrification or denitrification. The profile of the DGGE bands depended on the NH4(+) or NO3(-) loading rate, but it was hard to find a major strain affecting the nitrogen removal efficiency. Nitrospira-related phylum was detected in all biofilm samples from the nitrification reactors. Paracoccus sp. and Aquaspirillum sp., which are an autohydrogenotrophic bacterium and an oligotrophic denitrifier, respectively, were observed in the denitrification reactors. The distribution of microbial communities was relatively stable at different nitrogen loading rates, and DGGE analysis based on 16S rRNA (341f /534r) could successfully detect nitrate-oxidizing and hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria but not ammonium-oxidizing bacteria in the HF-MBfRs.

  20. Conceptual design of the blanket mechanical attachment for the helium-cooled lithium-lead reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera, G. [EURATOM-CIEMAT Association for Fusion, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Branas, B. [EURATOM-CIEMAT Association for Fusion, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: beatriz.branas@ciemat.es; Lucas, J. [Elytt Energy, Po Castellana 114, 3, 7 28046 Madrid (Spain); Doncel, J.; Medrano, M.; Garcia, A. [EURATOM-CIEMAT Association for Fusion, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Giancarli, L. [CEA/Saclay, DEN/CPT, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Ibarra, A. [EURATOM-CIEMAT Association for Fusion, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Li Puma, A. [CEA/Saclay, DEN/CPT, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Maisonnier, D.; Sardain, P. [EFDA-Close Support Unit Garching, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2008-01-15

    The conceptual design of a new type of fusion reactor based on the helium-cooled lithium-lead (HCLL) blanket has been performed within the European Power Plant Conceptual Studies. As part of this activity, a new attachment system suitable for the HCLL blanket modules had to be developed. This attachment is composed of two parts. The first one is the connection between module and the first part of a shield, called high temperature shield, which operates at a temperature around 500 deg. C, close to that of the blanket module. This connection must be made at the lateral walls, in order to avoid openings through the first wall and breeding zone thus avoiding complex design and fabrication issues of the module. The second connection is the one between the high temperature shield and a second shield called low temperature shield, which has a temperature during reactor operation around 150 deg. C. The design of this connection is complex because it must allow the large differential thermal expansion (up to 30 mm) between the two components. Design proposals for both connections are presented, together with the results of finite element mechanical analyses which demonstrate the feasibility to support the blanket and shield modules during normal and accidental operation conditions.

  1. Autotrophic Nitrogen Removal in a Membrane-Aerated Biofilm Reactor Under Continuous Aeration: A Demonstration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilmore, Kevin R.; Terada, Akihiko; Smets, Barth F.

    2013-01-01

    and allowed anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AnaerAOB) to develop and be retained for > 250 days. Daily autotrophic nitrogen removal of 1.7 g N/m(2) (75% of influent N load) was achieved at an oxygen/nitrogen surface loading ratio of 2.2, with up to 85% of the influent N proceeding through Anaer...... nearest to and AnaerAOB furthest from the membrane. Despite the presence of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria, this work demonstrated that these autotrophic processes can be successfully coupled in an MABR with continuous aeration, achieving the benefits of competitive specific N removal rates......This work describes the successful coupling of partial nitrification (nitritation) and anaerobic ammonium oxidation in a membrane-aerated biofilm reactor (MABR) with continuous aeration. Controlling the relative surface loadings of oxygen versus ammonium prevented complete nitrite oxidation...

  2. An integrated mathematical model for chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal in moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBR) including predation and hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revilla, Marta; Galán, Berta; Viguri, Javier R

    2016-07-01

    An integrated mathematical model is proposed for modelling a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) for removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) under aerobic conditions. The composite model combines the following: (i) a one-dimensional biofilm model, (ii) a bulk liquid model, and (iii) biological processes in the bulk liquid and biofilm considering the interactions among autotrophic, heterotrophic and predator microorganisms. Depending on the values for the soluble biodegradable COD loading rate (SCLR), the model takes into account a) the hydrolysis of slowly biodegradable compounds in the bulk liquid, and b) the growth of predator microorganisms in the bulk liquid and in the biofilm. The integration of the model and the SCLR allows a general description of the behaviour of COD removal by the MBBR under various conditions. The model is applied for two in-series MBBR wastewater plant from an integrated cellulose and viscose production and accurately describes the experimental concentrations of COD, total suspended solids (TSS), nitrogen and phosphorous obtained during 14 months working at different SCLRs and nutrient dosages. The representation of the microorganism group distribution in the biofilm and in the bulk liquid allow for verification of the presence of predator microorganisms in the second reactor under some operational conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A study on the use of the BioBall® as a biofilm carrier in a sequencing batch reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masłoń, Adam; Tomaszek, Janusz A

    2015-11-01

    Described in this study are experiments conducted to evaluate the removal of organics and nutrients from synthetic wastewater by a moving bed sequencing batch biofilm reactor using BioBall® carriers as biofilm media. The work involving a 15L-laboratory scale MBSBBR (moving bed sequencing batch biofilm reactor) model showed that the wastewater treatment system was based on biochemical processes taking place with activated sludge and biofilm microorganisms developing on the surface of the BioBall® carriers. Classical nitrification and denitrification and the typical enhanced biological phosphorus removal process were achieved in the reactor analyzed, which operated with a volumetric organic loading of 0.84-0.978gCODL(-1)d(-1). The average removal efficiencies for COD, total nitrogen and total phosphorus were found to be 97.7±0.5%, 87.8±2.6% and 94.3±1.3%, respectively. Nitrification efficiency reached levels in the range 96.5-99.7%. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Influence of various operating conditions on wastewater treatment in an AS-biofilm reactor and post-treatment using TiO2-based solar/UV photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manu, D S; Thalla, Arun Kumar

    2018-01-09

    In the present study, the effect of carbon to nitrogen (C/N) ratio, suspended biomass concentration (X), hydraulic retention time (HRT) and dissolved oxygen (DO) on chemical oxygen demand (COD) and nutrient removal from wastewater was investigated in a lab-scale activated sludge (AS)-biofilm reactor. Furthermore, in order to improve the quality of the treated wastewater, photocatalysis by TiO 2 was investigated as a post-treatment technology, using solar and UV irradiations. The AS-biofilm reactor provided a substantial removal efficiency in terms of COD, ammonia nitrogen [Formula: see text], total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorous when the system was maintained at C/N ratio 6.66, X in the range 2-2.5 g/L, HRT 10 h, DO in the range of 3.5-4.5 mg/L and organic loading rate (OLR) of 0.96 kg COD/m 3  d during Run 1. Similarly, when the reactor was maintained at C/N ratio 10, X in the range of 3-3.5 g/L, HRT 8 h, DO in the range of 3.5-4.5 mg/L and OLR of 1.8 kg COD/m 3  d during Run 2. The microstructure of suspended and attached biomass comprised a dense bacterial structure of cocci and bacillus microorganisms. The UV photocatalysis was found to be better than solar photocatalysis during the comparative analysis. The maximum removal efficiencies of COD, most probable number and phosphorous at optimum conditions in the case of UV and solar irradiations were 72%, 95%, 52% and 71%, 99%, 50%, respectively.

  5. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy of S. mutans biofilms attached to relevant dental materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoccolillo, Michelle L; Rogers, Stephen C; Mang, Thomas S

    2016-12-01

    Antimicrobial Photodynamic therapy (aPDT) has demonstrated efficacy in situations where conventional antibiotic therapies can be challenged such as biofilms, gram-negative bacteria, and antimicrobial resistant organisms. Surface characteristics can affect biofilm adherence and integrity and so may modify the effectiveness of aPDT. This study investigates the killing efficacy of aPDT on S. mutans biofilms grown on relevant dental substrata, examining the killing efficacy and specifically the effects of aPDT on the biofilm matrix architecture. S. mutans (NCTC 10449) was grown in 48 hours biofilms on different substrata, specifically glass, titanium, and denture acrylic. During aPDT assays, the biofilms were treated with a purpurin based sensitizer ([25 ug/ml] in DMSO) for 30 minutes, then exposed to a 664 nm diode laser at light doses of 15, 30, and 45 J/cm 2 . Colony forming unit assays were performed to determine survival following treatment. Controls for comparison in survival assays consisted of (No light/No PS; No light/PS; and No light/DMSO). MAIR-IR spectroscopy analysis was performed to investigate aPDT effects on biofilm composition before and after jet impingement. Survival was greatly reduced in the biofilm cultures following the aPDT assays. All light doses achieved a greater then 3-log inactivation on 48 hours biofilms grown on polished denture acrylic. The higher light doses (45 and 30 J) achieved greater than 3-log inactivation in 48 hours biofilms grown on glass. The higher light doses (30 and 45 J/cm 2 ) produced a 2-log inactivation in 48 hours biofilms grown on titanium. Multiple attenuated internal reflection infrared (MAIR-IR) spectroscopy data demonstrates enhanced loss of exopolysaccharide (EPS) and Amide in the aPDT treated biofilms following jet impingement. Antimicrobial PDT experiments using a purpurin based sensitizer and laser light doses of 15, 30, and 45 J/cm 2 , against S. mutans biofilm grown on different

  6. Aerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification in a membrane biofilm reactor: treatment performance and the effect of oxygen ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fei-yun; Dong, Wen-yi; Shao, Ming-fei; Lv, Xiao-mei; Li, Ji; Peng, Liang-yu; Wang, Hong-jie

    2013-10-01

    Aerobic methane-oxidation coupled to denitrification (AME-D) process was successfully achieved in a membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR). PVDF membrane was employed to supply the methane and oxygen for biofilm, which was coexistence of methanotrophs and denitrifier. With a feeding NO3(-)-N of 30 mg/L, up to 97% nitrate could be removed stably. The oxygen ventilation modes impacted the denitrification performance remarkably, resulting in different nitrate removal efficiencies and biofilm microorganism distribution. The biofilm sludge showed a high resistance to the DO inhibition, mainly due to the co-existing methanotroph being capable of utilizing oxygen perferentially within biofilm, and create an anoxic micro-environment. The denitrification of both nitrate and nitrite by biofilm sludge conformed to the Monod equation, and the maximum specific nitrate utilization rate (k) ranged from 1.55 to 1.78 NO3(-)-N/g VSS-d. The research findings should be significant to understand the considerable potential of MBfR as a bioprocess for denitrification. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of Heavy Metal Removal from Wastewater in a Modified Packed Bed Biofilm Reactor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohreh Azizi

    Full Text Available For the effective application of a modified packed bed biofilm reactor (PBBR in wastewater industrial practice, it is essential to distinguish the tolerance of the system for heavy metals removal. The industrial contamination of wastewater from various sources (e.g. Zn, Cu, Cd and Ni was studied to assess the impacts on a PBBR. This biological system was examined by evaluating the tolerance of different strengths of composite heavy metals at the optimum hydraulic retention time (HRT of 2 hours. The heavy metal content of the wastewater outlet stream was then compared to the source material. Different biomass concentrations in the reactor were assessed. The results show that the system can efficiently treat 20 (mg/l concentrations of combined heavy metals at an optimum HRT condition (2 hours, while above this strength there should be a substantially negative impact on treatment efficiency. Average organic reduction, in terms of the chemical oxygen demand (COD of the system, is reduced above the tolerance limits for heavy metals as mentioned above. The PBBR biological system, in the presence of high surface area carrier media and a high microbial population to the tune of 10 000 (mg/l, is capable of removing the industrial contamination in wastewater.

  8. Efficiency of a Bed Biofilm Reactor Using a LECA Carrier to Treat Hospital Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Shokoohi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hospital wastewater is of great environmental concern because it contains a variety of hazardous microbial and chemical substances. This study aims to investigate the efficiency of a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR with a light expanded clay aggregate (LECA carrier for treating hospital wastewater. This pilot study used a Plexiglas reactor that had a volume of 100 L, a continuous up-flow hydraulic regime, and a LECA carrier to test removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD from wastewater in a public hospital. To assess MBBR efficiency, the study used retention times of 8, 12, and 24 hours, filling percentages of 30% and 50%, and mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSSs of 1000, 3000, and 5000 mg/L. The results indicated that using a single LECA carrier in an MBBR system was not sufficient to remove organic materials from hospital wastewater, because the carrier could not be completely suspended. After some modifications, consisting mainly of returning activated sludge, the system was 83% efficient at removing COD using a LECA carrier at a retention time of 24 hours, with 50% filling, and 5000 mg/L of MLSS.

  9. Complete bromate and nitrate reduction using hydrogen as the sole electron donor in a rotating biofilm-electrode reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yu; Li, Xin; Yang, Qi; Wang, Dongbo; Yao, Fubing; Li, Xiaoming; Zhao, Jianwei; Xu, Qiuxiang; Zhang, Chang; Zeng, Guangming

    2016-04-15

    Simultaneous reduction of bromate and nitrate was investigated using a rotating biofilm-electrode reactor (RBER) with graphite carbon (GC) rods as anode and activated carbon fiber (ACF) bonded with steel ring as cathode. In RBER, the community of denitrifying bacteria immobilized on the cathode surface could completely utilize hydrogen (H2) as the electron donor, which was internally produced by the electrolysis of water. The short-term test confirmed that the RBER system could reduce 150-800μg/L bromate to below 10μg/L under autotrophic conditions. The reduced bromate was considered to be roughly equivalent to the amount of bromide in effluent, indicating that bromate was completely reduced to bromide without accumulation of by-products. The long-term test (over 120 days) showed that the removal fluxes of bromate and nitrate could be improved by increasing the electric current and decreasing the hydraulic retention time (HRT). But nitrite in effluent was significantly accumulated when the electric current was beyond 10mA and the HRT was less than 6h. The maximum bromate reduction rate estimated by the Monod equation was 109.12μg/Lh when the electric current was 10mA and HRT was 12h. It was proposed that the electron transfer process in RBER produced H2 on the surface of the ACF cathode, and the microbial cultures attached closely on the cathode which could completely utilize H2 as electron donors for reduction of bromate and nitrate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Standardized reactors for the study of medical biofilms : a review of the principles and latest modifications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomes, Inês B; Meireles, Ana; Gonçalves, Ana L; Goeres, Darla M; Sjollema, Jelmer; Simões, Lúcia C; Simões, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Biofilms can cause severe problems to human health due to the high tolerance to antimicrobials; consequently, biofilm science and technology constitutes an important research field. Growing a relevant biofilm in the laboratory provides insights into the basic understanding of the biofilm life cycle

  11. Luteolin decreases the attachment, invasion and cytotoxicity of UPEC in bladder epithelial cells and inhibits UPEC biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiao-fei; Ren, Lai-bin; Teng, Yan; Zheng, Shuang; Yang, Xiao-long; Guo, Xiao-juan; Wang, Xin-yuan; Sha, Kai-hui; Li, Na; Xu, Guang-ya; Tian, Han-wen; Wang, Xiao-ying; Liu, Xiao-kang; Li, Jingyu; Huang, Ning

    2014-10-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI), primarily caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), is one of the most common infectious diseases worldwide. Emerging antibiotic resistance requires novel treatment strategies. Luteolin, a dietary polyphenolic flavonoid, has been confirmed as a potential antimicrobial agent. Here, we evaluated the sub-MICs of luteolin for potential properties to modulate the UPEC infection. We found that luteolin significantly decreased the attachment and invasion of UPEC J96 or CFT073 in human bladder epithelial cell lines T24. Meanwhile, obvious decreased expression of type 1 fimbriae adhesin fimH gene, lower bacterial surface hydrophobicity and swimming motility, were observed in luteolin-pretreated UPEC. Furthermore, luteolin could attenuate UPEC-induced cytotoxicity in T24 cells, which manifested as decreased activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Simultaneously, the inhibition of luteolin on UPEC-induced cytotoxicity was confirmed by ethidium bromide/acridine orange staining. Finally, the luteolin-pretreated UPEC showed a lower ability of biofilm formation. Collectively, these results indicated that luteolin decreased the attachment and invasion of UPEC in bladder epithelial cells, attenuated UPEC-induced cytotoxicity and biofilm formation via down-regulating the expression of adhesin fimH gene, reducing the bacterial surface hydrophobicity and motility. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Biosurfactants production in biofilm reactor and their recovery by pertraction [abstract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chtioui, O.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was focused on production and isolation of microbial surfactants with interesting properties for application in agriculture, petrol industry, pollution remediation and pharmaceutical fields. The biosurfactant production was performed by free and immobilized aerobic cells of Bacillus subtilis ATCC 21332. This strain produces lipopeptides of the surfactin and fengycin families. The colonizing behavior of Bacillus subtilis strain was evaluated under several experimental and cultural conditions at different sterile solid materials with modified surface properties. After preliminary screening tests with five polymer materials, polypropylene foamed with powder activated carbon (PPch was selected for cells immobilization and production of lipopeptides. The aims of work are to develop a new technology using the specificity of a biofilm reactor as well as a perspective continuous separation based on a liquid membrane technique (known also as pertraction. Using the classical aerated reactor the lipopeptides generate extensive foaming that imposes difficulties on plant-scale process realization. In order to avoid this drawback, while using the new type reactor conditions, the air was injected over the surface of cultural medium. With this configuration, the biofilm on the solid support and the culture medium are alimented in oxygen directly from the interfaces. The obtained results showed that the production of both lipopeptides and especially of the fengycin was greatly enhanced by the immobilization. The longer time of preliminary cells colonization enhanced highly the production of surfactin, especially at the beginning of fermentation process (the first 24 h. This effect was less evident after 48 h fermentation. To confirm the applicability of the liquid membrane process to lipopeptides recovery from aqueous media, including fermentation broth, extraction behavior of the lipopeptides into organic solvents was studied. For both lipopeptides

  13. Microbiota formed on attached stainless steel coupons correlates with the natural biofilm of the sink surface in domestic kitchens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, Birgitte; Røssvoll, Elin; Måge, Ingrid; Møretrø, Trond; Langsrud, Solveig

    2016-02-01

    Stainless steel coupons are frequently used in biofilm studies in the laboratory, as this material is commonly used in the food industry. The coupons are attached to different surfaces to create a "natural" biofilm to be studied further in laboratory trials. However, little has been done to investigate how well the microbiota on such coupons represents the surrounding environment. The microbiota on sink wall surfaces and on new stainless steel coupons attached to the sink wall for 3 months in 8 domestic kitchen sinks was investigated by next-generation sequencing (MiSeq) of the 16S rRNA gene derived from DNA and RNA (cDNA), and by plating and identification of colonies. The mean number of colony-forming units was about 10-fold higher for coupons than sink surfaces, and more variation in bacterial counts between kitchens was seen on sink surfaces than coupons. The microbiota in the majority of biofilms was dominated by Moraxellaceae (genus Moraxella/Enhydrobacter) and Micrococcaceae (genus Kocuria). The results demonstrated that the variation in the microbiota was mainly due to differences between kitchens (38.2%), followed by the different nucleic acid template (DNA vs RNA) (10.8%), and that only 5.1% of the variation was a result of differences between coupons and sink surfaces. The microbiota variation between sink surfaces and coupons was smaller for samples based on their RNA than on their DNA. Overall, our results suggest that new stainless steel coupons are suited to model the dominating part of the natural microbiota of the surrounding environment and, furthermore, are suitable for different downstream studies.

  14. Antimicrobial activity of a bioelectric dressing using an in vitro wound pathogen colony drip-flow reactor biofilm model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H; Izadjoo, M

    2016-07-01

    We performed in vitro antibiofilm testing of a silver and zinc containing microcurrent generating bioelectric dressing (BED) against clinical wound pathogens to determine its efficacy in preventing biofilm formation under low shear and continuous flow conditions, simulating wound infection environments. We customised an in vitro colony drip-flow reactor (DFR) biofilm model for efficacy evaluation of BED. Each bacterial pathogen was diluted to 10(4)CFU/ml and inoculated on the polycarbonate filter membrane as an abiotic support. BED and controls (no treatment, gauze, and blank polyester with no silver and zinc) were applied directly on the membranes where bacterial cultures were inoculated. Biofilms were continuously developed onto the membranes for 72 hours at room temperature. Biofilm formation was confirmed by crystal violet staining and microscopic observation. Through vigorous shaking and sonication, the released bacteria were serially diluted, plated, and incubated for 24 hours at 37°C to determine the numbers of surviving bacteria. Biofilms were well developed onto blank polyesters, but not the BED after 72 hours incubation. Crystal violet staining from the blank polyesters showed large and fully grown biofilms. We observed an inhibition in bacterial growth on BED treatment. The antibiofilm activity of the BED against each of eight monospecies biofilms showed a 1- or 2 log10 (or 10- or 100-fold) reduction in bacterial numbers compared with those of controls. Our results demonstrated that colony DFR biofilm model was an appropriate for testing the antibiofilm efficacy of BED under low shear and continuous flow conditions for simulating clinical wound environments. The bioelectric currents generated from the silver and zinc active ingredients in the dressing resulted in antibiofilm activity of this wound care device.

  15. Anammox moving bed biofilm reactor pilot at the 26th Ward wastewater treatment plants in Brooklyn, New York: start-up, biofilm population diversity and performance optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrdad, M; Park, H; Ramalingam, K; Fillos, J; Beckmann, K; Deur, A; Chandran, K

    2014-01-01

    New York City Environmental Protection in conjunction with City College of New York assessed the application of the anammox process in the reject water treatment using a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) located at the 26th Ward wastewater treatment plant, in Brooklyn, NY. The single-stage nitritation/anammox MBBR was seeded with activated sludge and consequently was enriched with its own 'homegrown' anammox bacteria (AMX). Objectives of this study included collection of additional process kinetic and operating data and assessment of the effect of nitrogen loading rates on process performance. The initial target total inorganic nitrogen removal of 70% was limited by the low alkalinity concentration available in the influent reject water. Higher removals were achieved after supplementing the alkalinity by adding sodium hydroxide. Throughout startup and process optimization, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analyses were used for monitoring the relevant species enriched in the biofilm and in the suspension. Maximum nitrogen removal rate was achieved by stimulating the growth of a thick biofilm on the carriers, and controlling the concentration of dissolved oxygen in the bulk flow and the nitrogen loading rates per surface area; all three appear to have contributed in suppressing nitrite-oxidizing bacteria activity while enriching AMX density within the biofilm.

  16. Biofilm Fixed Film Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipesh Das

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The work reviewed here was published between 2008 and 2010 and describes research that involved aerobic and anoxic biofilm treatment of water pollutants. Biofilm denitrification systems are covered when appropriate. References catalogued here are divided on the basis of fundamental research area or reactor types. Fundamental research into biofilms is presented in two sections, Biofilm Measurement and Characterization and Growth and Modeling. The reactor types covered are: trickling filters, rotating biological contactors, fluidized bed bioreactors, submerged bed biofilm reactors, biological granular activated carbon, membrane bioreactors, and immobilized cell reactors. Innovative reactors, not easily classified, are then presented, followed by a section on biofilms on sand, soil and sediment.

  17. Electrical stimulation on biodegradation of phenol and responses of microbial communities in conductive carriers supported biofilms of the bioelectrochemical reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailijiang, Nuerla; Chang, Jiali; Liang, Peng; Li, Peng; Wu, Qing; Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Huang, Xia

    2016-02-01

    Conductive carbon felts (Cf) were used as biofilm carriers in bioelectrochemical reactors to enhance the electrical stimulation on treatment of phenol-containing synthetic wastewater. In batch test, phenol biodegradation was accelerated under an optimum direct current (DC), which was 2mA for Cf biofilm carriers, lower than that for non-conductive white foam carriers. The stimulation effect was consistent with Adenosine Triphosphate contents in biofilms. The long-term operation further demonstrated that a high and stable phenol removal efficiency could be achieved with applied DC of 2mA, and intermittent DC application was better than continuous one, with phenol removal efficiency of over 97%. Although the quantities of whole microbial communities kept at a high level under all conditions, special microorganisms related with genera of Zoogloea and Desulfovibrio were distinctively enriched under intermittent applied DC pattern. This study shows that the electrical stimulation is potentially effective for biofilm reactors treating phenol-containing wastewater. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Dynamical Analysis of a Continuous Stirred-Tank Reactor with the Formation of Biofilms for Wastewater Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen López Buriticá

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the dynamics of a system that models the formation of biofilms in a continuous stirred-tank reactor (CSTR when it is utilized for wastewater treatment. The growth rate of the microorganisms is modeled using two different kinetics, Monod and Haldane kinetics, with the goal of studying the influence of each in the system. The equilibrium points are identified through a stability analysis, and the bifurcations found are characterized.

  19. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly duct-tube-to-handling-socket attachment system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, David W.; Smith, Bob G.

    1982-01-01

    A reusable system for removably attaching the upper end 10of a nuclear reactor duct tube to the lower end 30 of a nuclear reactor fuel assembly handling socket. A transition ring 20, fixed to the duct tube's upper end 10, has an interior-threaded section 22 with a first locking hole segment 24. An adaptor ring 40, fixed to the handling socket's lower end 30 has an outside-threaded section 42 with a second locking hole segment 44. The inside 22 and outside 42 threaded sections match and can be joined so that the first 24 and second 44 locking hole segments can be aligned to form a locking hole. A locking ring 50, with a locking pin 52, slides over the adaptor ring 40 so that the locking pin 52 fits in the locking hole. A swage lock 60 or a cantilever finger lock 70 is formed from the locking cup collar 26 to fit in a matching groove 54 or 56 in the locking ring 50 to prevent the locking ring's locking pin 52 from backing out of the locking hole.

  20. COD and nitrogen removal and microbial communities in a novel waterfall biofilm reactor operated at different COD/TN ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Siyao; Pu, Yuewu; Wei, Cheng

    2017-01-28

    The aim of this study was to characterize the pollutant removal efficiency and the microbial communities that arose in a newly designed waterfall biofilm reactor (WFBR) at different chemical oxygen demand/total nitrogen (COD/TN) ratios. The reactor was operated continuously for 28 days at different COD/TN ratios, and its efficiency was evaluated. Results showed that as the thickness of the biofilm increased, the structure of the biofilm encouraged anaerobic-aerobic, anoxic-anaerobic, and fully anaerobic conditions in one reactor. The COD/TN ratios used had a significant effect on the removal of COD and nitrogen components. At a COD/TN ratio of 14, the ammonium nitrogen removal efficiency reached its highest value (99%), but the COD removal efficiency remained at approximately 90%. High-throughput sequencing revealed that the highest community diversity and richness were seen at a COD/TN ratio of 18, and the major phyla were Proteobacteria (average abundance of 47%), Actinobacteria (24%), and Bacteroidetes (13%). As the COD/TN ratios increased from 7 to 18, the abundance of Proteobacteria gradually increased from 25% to 68%. These results could provide important guidance for the design of new wastewater treatment systems and also enrich our theoretical understanding of microbial ecology.

  1. Monitoring of dry anaerobic fermentation in experimental facility with use of biofilm reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Šinkora

    2011-01-01

    -called biofilm reactor. An external reactor with a cultivated bacterial biofilm on an immovable carrier with the percolate flowing through it has been constructed in laboratory conditions for this purpose. The choice of suitable percolate strategy (this means the frequency of sprinkling and the amount of percolate directly influences the process of anaerobic fermentation.

  2. Discrete Responses to Limitation for Iron and Manganese in Agrobacterium tumefaciens: Influence on Attachment and Biofilm Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbing, Michael E.; Xu, Jing; Natarajan, Ramya; Buechlein, Aaron M.

    2015-01-01

    . Among the properties that are affected by both iron and manganese levels are those required for normal surface attachment and biofilm formation, but the requirement for each of these transition metals is mechanistically independent from the other. PMID:26712936

  3. Discrete Responses to Limitation for Iron and Manganese in Agrobacterium tumefaciens: Influence on Attachment and Biofilm Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heindl, Jason E; Hibbing, Michael E; Xu, Jing; Natarajan, Ramya; Buechlein, Aaron M; Fuqua, Clay

    2015-12-28

    that are affected by both iron and manganese levels are those required for normal surface attachment and biofilm formation, but the requirement for each of these transition metals is mechanistically independent from the other. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Evaluation of moving-bed biofilm sequencing batch reactor (MBSBR) in operating A2O process with emphasis on biological removal of nutrients existing in wastewater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seyedsalehi, M.; Jaafari, J.; Hélix-Nielsen, Claus

    2018-01-01

    In this study, the performance of moving-bed biofilm sequencing batch reactor in operating the anaerobic/anoxic/oxic (A2O) process for treatment of wastewaters containing nitrogen and phosphorous was evaluated. For this purpose, a pilot system with two bench-scale sequencing batch reactors...

  5. Performances and microbial features of an aerobic packed-bed biofilm reactor developed to post-treat an olive mill effluent from an anaerobic GAC reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchetti Leonardo

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Olive mill wastewater (OMW is the aqueous effluent of olive oil producing processes. Given its high COD and content of phenols, it has to be decontaminated before being discharged. Anaerobic digestion is one of the most promising treatment process for such an effluent, as it combines high decontamination efficiency with methane production. The large scale anaerobic digestion of OMWs is normally conducted in dispersed-growth reactors, where however are generally achieved unsatisfactory COD removal and methane production yields. The possibility of intensifying the performance of the process using a packed bed biofilm reactor, as anaerobic treatment alternative, was demonstrated. Even in this case, however, a post-treatment step is required to further reduce the COD. In this work, a biological post-treatment, consisting of an aerobic biological "Manville" silica bead-packed bed aerobic reactor, was developed, tested for its ability to complete COD removal from the anaerobic digestion effluents, and characterized biologically through molecular tools. Results The aerobic post-treatment was assessed through a 2 month-continuous feeding with the digested effluent at 50.42 and 2.04 gl-1day-1 of COD and phenol loading rates, respectively. It was found to be a stable process, able to remove 24 and 39% of such organic loads, respectively, and to account for 1/4 of the overall decontamination efficiency displayed by the anaerobic-aerobic integrated system when fed with an amended OMW at 31.74 and 1.70 gl-1day-1 of COD and phenol loading rates, respectively. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences of biomass samples from the aerobic reactor biofilm revealed that it was colonized by Rhodobacterales, Bacteroidales, Pseudomonadales, Enterobacteriales, Rhodocyclales and genera incertae sedis TM7. Some taxons occurring in the influent were not detected in the biofilm, whereas others, such as Paracoccus, Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter and Enterobacter

  6. Culture conditions of Roseobacter strain 27-4 affect its attachment and biofilm formation as quantified by real-time PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruhn, Jesper Bartholin; Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Bagge-Ravn, D.

    2006-01-01

    The fish probiotic bacterium Roseobacter strain 27-4 grows only as rosettes and produces its antibacterial compound under static growth conditions. It forms three-dimensional biofilms when precultured under static conditions. We quantified attachment of Roseobacter strain 27-4 using a direct real...

  7. Membrane distillation combined with an anaerobic moving bed biofilm reactor for treating municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Chul; Shin, Jaewon; Won, Seyeon; Lee, Jung-Yeol; Maeng, Sung Kyu; Song, Kyung Guen

    2015-03-15

    A fermentative strategy with an anaerobic moving bed biofilm reactor (AMBBR) was used for the treatment of domestic wastewater. The feasibility of using a membrane separation technique for post-treatment of anaerobic bio-effluent was evaluated with emphasis on employing a membrane distillation (MD). Three different hydrophobic 0.2 μm membranes made of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF), and polypropylene (PP) were examined in this study. The initial permeate flux of the membranes ranged from 2.5 to 6.3 L m(-2) h(-1) when treating AMBBR effluent at a temperature difference between the feed and permeate streams of 20 °C, with the permeate flux increasing in the order PP distillation, while a flux decline in MD with either the PVDF or PP membrane was not found under the identical distillation conditions. During long-term distillation with the PVDF membrane, total phosphorus was completely rejected and >98% rejection of dissolved organic carbon was also achieved. The characterization of wastewater effluent organic matter (EfOM) using an innovative suite of analytical tools verified that almost all of the EfOM was rejected via the PVDF MD treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Treatment of Rural Wastewater Using a Spiral Fiber Based Salinity-Persistent Sequencing Batch Biofilm Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Xin Zhao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Differing from municipal wastewater, rural wastewater in salinization areas is characterized with arbitrary discharge and high concentration of salt, COD, nitrogen and phosphorus, which would cause severe deterioration of rivers and lakes. To overcome the limits of traditional biological processes, a spiral fiber based salinity-persistent Sequencing Biofilm Batch Reactor (SBBR was developed and investigated with synthetic rural wastewater (COD = 500 mg/L, NH4+-N = 50 mg/L, TP = 6 mg/L under different salinity (0.0–10.0 g/L of NaCl. Results indicated that a quick start-up could be achieved in 15 days, along with sufficient biomass up to 7275 mg/L. During operating period, the removal of COD, NH4+-N, TN was almost not disturbed by salt varying from 0.0 to 10.0 g/L with stable efficiency reaching 92%, 82% and 80%, respectively. Although TP could be removed at high efficiency of 90% in low salinity conditions (from 0.0 to 5.0 g/L of NaCl, it was seriously inhibited due to nitrite accumulation and reduction of Phosphorus Accumulating Organisms (PAOs after addition of 10.0 g/L of salt. The behavior proposed in this study will provide theoretical foundation and guidance for application of SBBR in saline rural wastewater treatment.

  9. Evaluation of integrated anaerobic-aerobic biofilm reactor for degradation of azo dye methyl orange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murali, V; Ong, Soon-An; Ho, Li-Ngee; Wong, Yee-Shian

    2013-09-01

    This study was to investigate the mineralization of wastewater containing methyl orange (MO) in integrated anaerobic-aerobic biofilm reactor with coconut fiber as bio-material. Different aeration periods (3h in phase 1 and 2; 3, 6 and 15 h in phase 3; 24 h in phase 4 and 5) in aerobic chamber were studied with different MO concentration 50, 100, 200, 200 and 300 mg/L as influent from phase 1-5. The color removals estimated from the standard curve of dye versus optical density at its maximum absorption wavelength were 97%, 96%, 97%, 97%, and 96% and COD removals were 75%, 72%, 63%, 81%, and 73% in phase 1-5, respectively. The MO decolorization and COD degradation followed first-order kinetic model and second-order kinetic model, respectively. GC-MS analysis indicated the symmetrical cleavage of azo bond and the reduction in aromatic peak ensured the partial mineralization of MO. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of CeO₂ nanoparticles on production and physicochemical characteristics of extracellular polymeric substances in biofilms in sequencing batch biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Guoxiang; Hou, Jun; Xu, Yi; Wang, Chao; Wang, Peifang; Miao, Lingzhan; Ao, Yanhui; Li, Yi; Lv, Bowen

    2015-10-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) are a major component of biofilms that act as a gel-like matrix, binding the cells together to form their three-dimensional structure. The effects of ceria nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs) on the production and physicochemical characteristics of EPS in biofilms in a sequencing batch biofilm reactor were investigated. Total EPS production, including loosely bound EPS (LB-EPS) and tightly bound EPS (TB-EPS), increased by 35.41% compared to in control tests without CeO2 NPs. Protein production increased by 47.02% (LB-EPS) and 58.83% (TB-EPS) after 50 mg/L CeO2 NP exposure. Three-dimensional excitation-emission fluorescence spectra revealed that tyrosine (LB-EPS) and aromatic (TB-EPS) protein-like substances formed after CeO2 NP exposure. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy results indicated the susceptibility of -OH and -NH2 in EPS hydroxyl and amine groups to CeO2 NPs. Exposure to 50 mg/L CeO2 NPs reduced the flocculating capacity of LB-EPS (51.78%) and TB-EPS (17.14%), consistent with the decreased zeta potential. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of surface roughness and stainless steel finish on Listeria monocytogenes attachment and biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Andres; Autio, Wesley R; McLandsborough, Lynne A

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of surface roughness (Ra) and finish of mechanically polished stainless steel (Ra = 0.26 +/- 0.05, 0.49 +/- 0.10, and 0.69 +/- 0.05 microm) and electropolished stainless steel (Ra = 0.16 +/- 0.06, 0.40 +/- 0.003, and 0.67 +/- 0.02 microm) on Listeria adhesion and biofilm formation. A four-strain cocktail of Listeria monocytogenes was used. Each strain (0.1%) was added to 200 ml of tryptic soy broth (TSB), and coupons were inserted to the mixture for 5 min. For biofilm formation, coupons with adhesive cells were incubated in 1:20 diluted TSB at 32 degrees C for 48 h. The experiment was performed by a randomized block design. Our results show that the level of Listeria present after 48 h of incubation (mean = 7 log CFU/cm2) was significantly higher than after 5 min (mean = 6.0 log CFU/cm2) (P adhesion were seen in mechanically finished (mean = 6.7 log CFU/cm2) when compared with electropolished stainless steel (mean = 6.7 log CFU/cm2) (P > 0.05). Listeria initial adhesion (values ranged from 5.9 to 6.1 log CFU/cm2) or biofilm formation (values ranged from 6.9 to 7.2 log CFU/cm2) was not significantly correlated with Ra values (P > 0.05). Image analysis with an atomic force microscope showed that bacteria did not colonize the complete surface after 48 h but were individual cells or grouped in microcolonies that ranged from 5 to 10 microm in diameter and one to three cell layers in thickness. Exopolymeric substances were observed to be associated with the colonies. According to our results, electropolishing stainless steel does not pose a significant advantage for food sanitation over mechanically finished stainless steel.

  12. Population dynamics of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in an aerated submerged biofilm reactor for micropolluted raw water pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ying-Ying; Zhang, Xiao-Wen; Ren, Hong-Qiang; Li, Dao-Tang; Yang, Hong

    2008-05-01

    Population dynamics of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in a full-scale aerated submerged biofilm reactor for micropolluted raw water pretreatment was investigated using molecular techniques for a period of 1 year. The ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) gene fragments were amplified from DNA and RNA extracts of biofilm samples. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profile based on the amoA messenger RNA approach exhibited a more variable pattern of temporal dynamics of AOB communities than the DNA-derived approach during the study. Phylogenetic analysis of excised DGGE bands revealed three AOB groups affiliated with the Nitrosomonas oligotropha lineage, Nitrosomonas communis lineage, and an unknown Nitrosomonas group. The population size of betaproteobacterial AOB, quantified with 16S ribosomal RNA gene real-time polymerase chain reaction assay, ranged from 6.63 x 10(5) to 2.67 x 10(9) cells per gram of dry biofilm and corresponded to 0.23-1.8% of the total bacterial fraction. Quantitative results of amoA gene of the three specific AOB groups revealed changes in competitive dominance between AOB of the N. oligotropha lineage and N. communis lineage. Water temperature is shown to have major influence on AOB population size in the reactor by the statistic analysis, and a positive correlation between AOB cell numbers and ammonia removal efficiency is suggested (r = 0.628, P < 0.05).

  13. The influence of biofilm formation on electricity production from tempe wastewater using tubular membraneless microbial fuel cell reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siagian, Nathania Dwi Karina; Arbianti, Rita; Utami, Tania Surya

    2017-05-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology can be potentially developed as an alternative energy source since it can convert various substrates from renewable sources into electricity using bacteria as biocatalyst. Tempe wastewater as MFC substrate gives advantages in tempe wastewater treatment and reducing the purchasing cost of bacteria. Currently, the applications of MFCs are still limited due to the relatively low electricity production, so many studies have been conducted to improve the electricity production by MFC. This study focused on investigating the influence of biofilm formation time and the use of macromolecule as additional substrate towards electricity production from MFC system with tubular membranless reactor and tempe wastewater as substrate. This study suggested that biofilm formation on anode could improve the electricity production up to 10-folds while the use of glucose as substrate addition reduce the electricity production up to 60%. The biggest electricity output was obtained from the experiment of biofilm formation for 14 days with EPS content in biofilm 0,13 mg/cm2 where the maximum voltage and power density produced was respectively 34,81 mV and 0,26 mW/m2.

  14. Complete bromate and nitrate reduction using hydrogen as the sole electron donor in a rotating biofilm-electrode reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Yu; Li, Xin [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Yang, Qi, E-mail: yangqi@hnu.edu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Wang, Dongbo [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Advanced Water Management Centre, The University of Queensland, QLD 4072 (Australia); Yao, Fubing [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Li, Xiaoming, E-mail: xmli@hnu.edu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Zhao, Jianwei; Xu, Qiuxiang; Zhang, Chang; Zeng, Guangming [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2016-04-15

    Graphical abstract: Main mechanism of simultaneous bromate and nitrate removal in the RBER. - Highlights: • Cathode of RBER was designed to automatically rotate. • Simultaneous bromate and nitrate removal was achieved by auto-hydrogenotrophic reduction. • The maximum bromate reduction rate estimated by the Monod equation was 109.12 μg/L h. • An electron transfer process and main reaction mechanism in RBER was explored. - Abstract: Simultaneous reduction of bromate and nitrate was investigated using a rotating biofilm-electrode reactor (RBER) with graphite carbon (GC) rods as anode and activated carbon fiber (ACF) bonded with steel ring as cathode. In RBER, the community of denitrifying bacteria immobilized on the cathode surface could completely utilize hydrogen (H{sub 2}) as the electron donor, which was internally produced by the electrolysis of water. The short-term test confirmed that the RBER system could reduce 150–800 μg/L bromate to below 10 μg/L under autotrophic conditions. The reduced bromate was considered to be roughly equivalent to the amount of bromide in effluent, indicating that bromate was completely reduced to bromide without accumulation of by-products. The long-term test (over 120 days) showed that the removal fluxes of bromate and nitrate could be improved by increasing the electric current and decreasing the hydraulic retention time (HRT). But nitrite in effluent was significantly accumulated when the electric current was beyond 10 mA and the HRT was less than 6 h. The maximum bromate reduction rate estimated by the Monod equation was 109.12 μg/L h when the electric current was 10 mA and HRT was 12 h. It was proposed that the electron transfer process in RBER produced H{sub 2} on the surface of the ACF cathode, and the microbial cultures attached closely on the cathode which could completely utilize H{sub 2} as electron donors for reduction of bromate and nitrate.

  15. Calibration of hydrodynamic behavior and biokinetics for TOC removal modeling in biofilm reactors under different hydraulic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ming; Soric, Audrey; Roche, Nicolas

    2013-09-01

    In this study, total organic carbon (TOC) biodegradation was simulated by GPS-X software in biofilm reactors with carriers of plastic rings and glass beads under different hydraulic conditions. Hydrodynamic model by retention time distribution and biokinetic measurement by in-situ batch test served as two significant parts of model calibration. Experimental results showed that TOC removal efficiency was stable in both media due to the enough height of column, although the actual hydraulic volume changed during the variation of hydraulic condition. Simulated TOC removal efficiencies were close to experimental ones with low theil inequality coefficient values (below 0.15). Compared with glass beads, more TOC was removed in the filter with plastic rings due to the larger actual hydraulic volume and lower half saturation coefficient in spite of its lower maximum specific growth rate of biofilm, which highlighted the importance of calibrating hydrodynamic behavior and biokinetics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Sequential Aeration of Membrane-Aerated Biofilm Reactors for High-Rate Autotrophic Nitrogen Removal: Experimental Demonstration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pellicer i Nàcher, Carles; Sun, Sheng-Peng; Lackner, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    One-stage autotrophic nitrogen (N) removal, requiring the simultaneous activity of aerobic and anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AOB and AnAOB), can be obtained in spatially redox-stratified biofilms. However, previous experience with Membrane-Aerated Biofilm Reactors (MABRs) has revealed......S rRNA gene confirmed that sequential aeration, even at elevated average O2 loads, stimulated the abundance of AnAOB and AOB and prevented the increase in NOB. Nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions were 100-fold lower compared to other anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox)-nitritation systems. Hence...... a difficulty in reducing the abundance and activity of nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB), which drastically lowers process efficiency. Here we show how sequential aeration is an effective strategy to attain autotrophic N removal in MABRs: Two separate MABRs, which displayed limited or no N removal under...

  17. Light and Electron Microscopic Examinations of Methane-Producing Biofilms from Anaerobic Fixed-Bed Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Ralph W.; Akin, Debra E.; Nordstedt, Roger A.; Thomas, Michael V.; Aldrich, Henry C.

    1984-01-01

    Ultrastructural examinations were performed on biofilms from eight anaerobic fixed-bed reactors filled with various packing materials and operated on fresh swine waste. By using light, UV, scanning, and transmission electron microscopy, the distribution of a diverse microbial population composed of bacteria and a few yeasts was determined. This is the first time that the ultrastructure of in situ anaerobic digestor biofilms has been reported. A large number of methanogenic bacteria were identified by their fluorescence under 420 nm of radiation. Of these, two morphologically distinct types were most prevalent in the films. Methanothrix spp. was present in high numbers at the film surface, whereas Methanosarcina spp. were commonly embedded in the lower regions of the film. Inhabitants of the film were surrounded by an exopolysaccharide matrix that was very dense toward the base. An extensive network of channels was observed throughout the matrix that may facilitate gas and nutrient exchange to the lower regions of the film. Images PMID:16346579

  18. Distribution of Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter winogradskyi in an autotrophic nitrifying biofilm reactor as depicted by molecular analyses and mathematical modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montràs, Anna; Pycke, Benny; Boon, Nico; Gòdia, Francesc; Mergeay, Max; Hendrickx, Larissa; Pérez, Julio

    2008-03-01

    The autotrophic two-species biofilm from the packed bed reactor of a life-support system, containing Nitrosomonas europaea ATCC 19718 and Nitrobacter winogradskyi ATCC 25391, was analysed after 4.8 years of continuous operation performing complete nitrification. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) was used to quantify N. europaea and N. winogradskyi along the vertical axis of the reactor, revealing a spatial segregation of N. europaea and N. winogradskyi. The main parameters influencing the spatial segregation of both nitrifiers along the bed were assessed through a multi-species one-dimensional biofilm model generated with AQUASIM software. The factor that contributed the most to this distribution profile was a small deviation from the flow pattern of a perfectly mixed tank towards plug-flow. The results indicate that the model can estimate the impact of specific biofilm parameters and predict the nitrification efficiency and population dynamics of a multispecies biofilm.

  19. Effect of HCO3- concentration on anammox nitrogen removal rate in a moving bed biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zekker, Ivar; Rikmann, Ergo; Tenno, Toomas; Vabamäe, Priit; Kroon, Kristel; Loorits, Liis; Saluste, Alar; Tenno, Taavo

    2012-01-01

    Anammox biomass enriched in a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) fed by actual sewage sludge reject water and synthetically added NO2- was used to study the total nitrogen (TN) removal rate of the anammox process depending on bicarbonate (HCO3-) concentration. MBBR performance resulted in the maximum TN removal rate of 1100 g N m(-3) d(-1) when the optimum HCO3- concentration (910 mg L(-1)) was used. The average reaction ratio of NO2- removal, NO3- production and NH4+ removal were 1.18/0.20/1. When the HCO3- concentration was increased to 1760mg L(-1) the TN removal rate diminished to 270 g N m(-3) d(-1). The process recovered from bicarbonate inhibition within 1 week. The batch tests performed with biomass taken from the MBBR showed that for the HCO3- concentration of 615 mg L(-1) the TN removal rate was 3.3 mg N L(-1) h(-1), whereas for both lower (120 mg L(-1)) and higher (5750 mg L(-1)) HCO3- concentrations the TN removal rates were 2.3 (+/- 0.15) and 1.6 (+/- 0.12) mg N L(-1) d(-1), respectively. PCR and DGGE analyses resulted in the detection of uncultured Planctomycetales bacterium clone P4 and, surprisingly, low-oxygen-tolerant aerobic ammonia oxidizers. The ability of anammox bacteria for mixotrophy was established by diminished amounts of nitrate produced when comparing the experiments with an organic carbon source and an inorganic carbon source.

  20. Methane-supported nitrate removal from groundwater in a membrane biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jing-Huan; Chen, Hui; Yuan, Zhiguo; Guo, Jianhua

    2018-04-01

    The discovery of denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) has not only improved our understanding of global methane and nitrogen cycles, but also provided new technology options for removal of nitrate from nitrate-contaminated water. Previous studies have demonstrated DAMO organisms could remove nitrate and nitrite from wastewater under strictly anaerobically conditions. In the study, we investigate the feasibility of nitrate removal from groundwater, which contains dissolved oxygen in addition to nitrate. A membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR), inoculated with DAMO co-culture, was capable of treating synthetic groundwater containing highly contaminated nitrate (50  mg N/L) and oxygen (7-9 mg O 2 /L), with a maximum volumetric nitrate removal rate of 45 mg N/L-d. Accumulations of acetate and propionate were observed in some transient periods, indicating the possible involvement of acetate and propionate as intermediates in methane oxidation. The 16 S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing revealed that Candidatus Methylomirabilis, a known bacterial DAMO organism able to couple nitrite reduction with anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), was the dominant population. No archaeal DAMO organisms that are capable of coupling nitrate to AOM were observed, however, considerable amount of denitrifiers were developed in this system. Based on known metabolisms of these microorganisms and a series of batch studies, it was assumed that methane was oxidized into volatile fatty acids (VFAs) under oxygen-limiting conditions, then the generated VFAs served as carbon sources for these heterotrophic denitrifiers to remove nitrate. This study offers a potential technology for nitrate removal from groundwater by DAMO process in MBfR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Low Fluid Shear Culture of Staphylococcus Aureus Represses hfq Expression and Induces an Attachment-Independent Biofilm Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, C. Mark; Castro, S. L.; Nickerson, C. A.; Nelman-Gonzalez, M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The opportunistic pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus, experiences fluctuations in fluid shear during infection and colonization of a human host. Colonization frequently occurs at mucus membrane sites such as in the gastrointestinal tract where the bacterium may experience low levels of fluid shear. The response of S. aureus to low fluid shear remains unclear. Methods: S. aureus was cultured to stationary phase using Rotating-Wall Vessel (RWV) bioreactors which produce a physiologically relevant low fluid shear environment. The bacterial aggregates that developed in the RWV were evaluated by electron microscopy as well as for antibiotic resistance and other virulence-associated stressors. Genetic expression profiles for the low-shear cultured S. aureus were determined by microarray analysis and quantitative real-time PCR. Results: Planktonic S. aureus cultures in the low-shear environment formed aggregates completely encased in high amounts of extracellular polymeric substances. In addition, these aggregates demonstrated increased antibiotic resistance indicating attachment-independent biofilm formation. Carotenoid production in the low-shear cultured S. aureus was significantly decreased, and these cultures displayed an increased susceptibility to oxidative stress and killing by whole blood. The hfq gene, associated with low-shear growth in Gram negative organisms, was also found to be down-regulated in S. aureus. Conclusions: Collectively, this data suggests that S. aureus decreases virulence characteristics in favor of a biofilm-dwelling colonization phenotype in response to a low fluid shear environment. Furthermore, the identification of an Hfq response to low-shear culture in S. aureus, in addition to the previously reported responses in Gram negative organisms, strongly suggests an evolutionarily conserved response to mechanical stimuli among structurally diverse prokaryotes.

  2. An extractive membrane biofilm reactor as alternative technology for the treatment of methyl tert-butyl ether contaminated water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guisado, I M; Purswani, J; González-López, J; Pozo, C

    2016-09-01

    Among the strategies developed for contaminated groundwater bioremediation, those based on the use of bacteria adhering to inert supports and establishing biofilms have gained great importance in this field. Extractive membrane biofilm reactor (EMBFR) technology offers productive solutions for the removal of volatile and semi-volatile compounds. EMBFR technology is based on the use of extractive semipermeable membranes through which contaminants migrate to the biological compartment in which microorganisms with pollutant biotransformation and/or mineralization capacities can grow, forming an active biofilm on the membrane surface. The objective of this study was to assess the use of three bacterial strains (Paenibacillus sp. SH7 CECT 8558, Agrobacterium sp. MS2 CECT 8557, and Rhodococcus ruber EE6 CECT 8612), as inoculum in a lab-scale EMBFR running for 28 days under aerobic conditions to eliminate methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) from water samples. Three different hydraulic retention times (1, 6, and 12 h) were employed. MTBE degradation values were determined daily by a gas GC-MS technique, as well as suspended bacterial growth. The biofilm established by the bacterial strains on the semipermeable membrane was detected by Field-Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) at the end of each experiment. The acute toxicity of the treated effluents and biomedium was determined by Microtox(©) assay (EC50 ).The results achieved from the MTBE degradation, biofilm formation, and toxicity analysis indicated that bacterial strains MS2 and EE6 were the best options as selective inoculum, although further research is needed, particularly with regard to their possible use as a mixed culture. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:1238-1245, 2016. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  3. Microbial community stratification in Membrane-Aerated Biofilm Reactors for Completely Autotrophic Nitrogen Removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pellicer i Nàcher, Carles; Ruscalleda, Maël; Terada, Akihiko

    1028 hollow fiber membranes (200/280 µm inner/outer diameter) covered homogeneously by biofilm. Samples (low, middle and upper part of the biofilm) were collected, fixed, embedded in OCT compound for cryosection and later Fluorescence In-Situ Hybridization (FISH). Emphasis was put on elucidating...

  4. Different response to amine fluoride by Streptococcus mutans and polymicrobial biofilms in a novel high-throughput active attachment model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Exterkate, R.A.M.; Crielaard, W.; ten Cate, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims: The antimicrobial resistance of microorganismsin biofilms and the polymicrobial interactions inthese biofilms that modulate resistance require novel strategies to evaluate the efficacy of caries-preventive compounds.The current study aimed to evaluate the effects of

  5. Performance evaluation and microbial community of a sequencing batch biofilm reactor (SBBR) treating mariculture wastewater at different chlortetracycline concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Dong; Chang, Qingbo; Gao, Mengchun; She, Zonglian; Jin, Chunji; Guo, Liang; Zhao, Yangguo; Wang, Sen; Wang, Xuejiao

    2016-11-01

    The effects of chlortetracycline (CTC) on the performance, microbial activity, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and microbial community of a sequencing batch biofilm reactor (SBBR) were investigated in treating mariculture wastewater. Low CTC concentration (less than 6 mg/L) had no obvious effect on the SBBR performance, whereas high CTC concentration could inhibit the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and nitrogen removal of the SBBR. The microbial activity of the biofilm in the SBBR decreased with the increase of CTC concentration from 0 to 35 mg/L. The protein (PN) contents were always higher than the PS contents in both loosely bound EPS (LB-EPS) and tightly bound EPS (TB-EPS) at different CTC concentrations. The chemical compositions of LB-EPS and TB-EPS had obvious variations with the increase of CTC concentration from 0 to 35 mg/L. The high-throughput sequencing revealed the effects of CTC on the microbial communities of the biofilm at phylum, class and genus level. The relative abundances of some genera displayed a decreasing tendency with the increase of CTC concentration from 0 to 35 mg/L, such as Nitrospira, Paracoccus, Hyphomicrobium, Azospirillum. However, the relative abundances of the genera Flavobacterium, Aequorivita, Buchnera, Azonexus and Thioalbus increased with the increase of CTC concentration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Medical Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Bryers, James D.

    2008-01-01

    For more than two decades, Biotechnology and Bioengineering has documented research focused on natural and engineered microbial biofilms within aquatic and subterranean ecosystems, wastewater and waste-gas treatment systems, marine vessels and structures, and industrial bioprocesses. Compared to suspended culture systems, intentionally engineered biofilms are heterogeneous reaction systems that can increase reactor productivity, system stability, and provide inherent cell: product separation....

  7. Effects of salinity and COD/N on denitrification and bacterial community in dicyclic-type electrode based biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Siyuan; Ji, Min; Zhao, Yingxin; Pavlostathis, Spyros G; Zhao, Qing

    2017-10-23

    A dicyclic-type electrode based biofilm electrode reactor (BER) was developed for advanced nitrate removal from saline municipal wastewater. The denitrification efficiency was evaluated with a synthetic feed (NO3(-)-N, 20 mg L(-1)) under different salinity and COD to nitrogen ratios (COD/N). As the salinity increased from 0% to 1.0%, the denitrification performance of both the traditional biofilm reactor (BR) and BER was inhibited; however, the BER showed better adaptation and ability to recover. The BER achieved a high nitrate removal efficiency (≥90%) at a salinity of 1.0% and a low COD/N of 2.5 (theoretical stoichiometric 2.86 ignoring microbial growth). The abundance of Methylotenera mobilis in BR and Clostridium sticklandii in BER was higher than in the initial sludge sample used as inoculum. Likewise, the abundance of napA, nirS and nosZ genes increased as the COD/N further decreased. Under high salinity stress, the BER had a higher denitrification efficiency and the consumption of the organic carbon source (i.e., methanol) was reduced compared to BR. The cooperation between heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrifiers in the BER system provides a more efficient and feasible solution for nitrate removal from saline municipal wastewater. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. A continuous stirred hydrogen-based polyvinyl chloride membrane biofilm reactor for the treatment of nitrate contaminated drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Siqing; Zhang, YanHao; Zhong, FoHua

    2009-12-01

    A continuous stirred hydrogen-based polyvinyl chloride (PVC) membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR) was investigated to remove nitrate from the drinking water. The reactor was operated over 100 days, and the result showed that the average nitrate denitrification rate of 1.2 g NO(3)(-)-N/m(2) d and the total nitrogen (TN) removal of 95.1% were achieved with the influent nitrate concentration of 50 mg NO(3)(-)-N/L and the hydrogen pressure of 0.05 MPa. Under the same conditions, the average rate of hydrogen utilization by biofilm was 0.031 mg H(2)/cm(2) d, which was sufficient to remove 50 mg NO(3)(-)-N/L from the contaminated water with the effluent nitrate and nitrite concentrations below drinking water limit values. The average hydrogen utilization efficiency was achieved as high as 99.5%. Flux analysis demonstrated that, compared to sulfate reduction, nitrate reduction competed more strongly for hydrogen electron, and obtained more electrons in high influent nitrate loading.

  9. Roles of ionic strength and biofilm roughness on adhesion kinetics of Escherichia coli onto groundwater biofilm grown on PVC surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjaroen, Dao; Ling, Fangqiong; Monroy, Guillermo; Derlon, Nicolas; Mogenroth, Eberhard; Boppart, Stephen A.; Liu, Wen-Tso; Nguyen, Thanh H.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms of Escherichia coli attachment on biofilms grown on PVC coupons were investigated. Biofilms were grown in CDC reactors using groundwater as feed solution over a period up to 27 weeks. Biofilm physical structure was characterized at the micro- and meso-scales using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), respectively. Microbial community diversity was analyzed with Terminal Restricted Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP). Both physical structure and microbial community diversity of the biofilms were shown to be changing from 2 weeks to 14 weeks, and became relatively stable after 16 weeks. A parallel plate flow chamber coupled with an inverted fluorescent microscope was also used to monitor the attachment of fluorescent microspheres and E. coli on clean PVC surfaces and biofilms grown on PVC surfaces for different ages. Two mechanisms of E. coli attachment were identified. The adhesion rate coefficients (kd) of E. coli on nascent PVC surfaces and 2-week biofilms increased with ionic strength. However, after biofilms grew for 8 weeks, the adhesion was found to be independent of solution chemistry. Instead, a positive correlation between kd and biofilm roughness as determined by OCT was obtained, indicating that the physical structure of biofilms could play an important role in facilitating the adhesion of E. coli cells. PMID:23497979

  10. Modelling of biological Cr(VI) removal in draw-fill reactors using microorganisms in suspended and attached growth systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekerlekopoulou, Athanasia G; Tsiflikiotou, Maria; Akritidou, Lydia; Viennas, Anastasios; Tsiamis, George; Pavlou, Stavros; Bourtzis, Kostas; Vayenas, Dimitris V

    2013-02-01

    The kinetics of hexavalent chromium bio-reduction in draw-fill suspended and attached growth reactors was examined using sugar as substrate and indigenous microorganisms from the industrial sludge of the Hellenic Aerospace Industry. Initially, experiments in suspended growth batch reactors for Cr (VI) concentrations of 1.4-110 mg/l were carried out, to extensively study the behaviour of a mixed culture. The maximum Cr(VI) reduction rate of 2 mg/l h was achieved for initial concentration 12.85 mg/l with biomass production rate 4.1 mg biomass/l h. Analysis of the microbial structure in the batch reactor culture indicated that the dominant bacterial communities were constituted by bacterial members of Raoultella sp., Citrobacter sp., Klebsiella sp., Salmonella sp., Achromobacter sp. and Kerstersia sp. while the dominant fungal strain was that of Pichia jadinii. Experiments using the same mixed culture were also carried out in packed-bed reactors with plastic support media. High removal rates were achieved (2.0 mg/l h) even in high initial concentrations (109 mg/l). A combination of the model of Tsao and Hanson for growth enhancement and that of Aiba and Shoda for growth inhibition was used in order to describe and predict the process of Cr(VI) bio-reduction in suspended growth and packed-bed reactors. Kinetic constants of the equation obtained from both batch (or draw-fill) culture experiments. In the draw-fill experiments at the packed-bed reactor, hexavalent chromium inhibitory effects were minimized increasing the inhibitory constant value K(i)' at 148.5 mg/l, compared to suspended growth experiments which was K(i) = 8.219 mg/l. The model adequately predicts hexavalent chromium reduction in both batch reactors for all initial concentrations tested. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Medical biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryers, James D

    2008-05-01

    For more than two decades, Biotechnology and Bioengineering has documented research focused on natural and engineered microbial biofilms within aquatic and subterranean ecosystems, wastewater and waste-gas treatment systems, marine vessels and structures, and industrial bioprocesses. Compared to suspended culture systems, intentionally engineered biofilms are heterogeneous reaction systems that can increase reactor productivity, system stability, and provide inherent cell:product separation. Unwanted biofilms can create enormous increases in fluid frictional resistances, unacceptable reductions in heat transfer efficiency, product contamination, enhanced material deterioration, and accelerated corrosion. Missing from B&B has been an equivalent research dialogue regarding the basic molecular microbiology, immunology, and biotechnological aspects of medical biofilms. Presented here are the current problems related to medical biofilms; current concepts of biofilm formation, persistence, and interactions with the host immune system; and emerging technologies for controlling medical biofilms. Copyright 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. A model of microbial growth in a plug flow reactor with wall attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballyk, M; Smith, H

    1999-05-01

    A mathematical model of microbial growth for limiting nutrient in a plug flow reactor which accounts for the colonization of the reactor wall surface by the microbes is formulated and studied analytically and numerically. It can be viewed as a model of the large intestine or of the fouling of a commercial bio-reactor or pipe flow. Two steady state regimes are identified, namely, the complete washout of the microbes from the reactor and the successful colonization of both the wall and bulk fluid by the microbes. Only one steady state is stable for any particular set of parameter values. Sharp and explicit conditions are given for the stability of each, and for the long term persistence of the bacteria in the reactor.

  13. Bubbles versus biofilms: a novel method for the removal of marine biofilms attached on antifouling coatings using an ultrasonically activated water stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salta, M.; Goodes, L. R.; Maas, B. J.; Dennington, S. P.; Secker, T. J.; Leighton, T. G.

    2016-09-01

    The accumulation of marine organisms on a range of manmade surfaces, termed biofouling, has proven to be the Achilles’ heel of the shipping industry. Current antifouling coatings, such as foul release coatings (FRCs), only partially inhibit biofouling, since biofilms remain a major issue. Mechanical ship hull cleaning is commonly employed to remove biofilms, but these methods tend to damage the antifouling coating and often do not result in full removal. Here, we report the effectiveness of biofilm removal from FRCs through a novel cleaning device that uses an ultrasonically activated stream (UAS). In this device, ultrasound enhances the cleaning properties of microbubbles in a freely flowing stream of water. The UAS was applied on two types of commercial FRCs which were covered with biofilm growth following twelve days immersion in the marine environment. Biofilm removal was quantified in terms of reduction in biovolume and surface roughness, both measured using an optical profilometer, which were then compared with similar measurements after cleaning with a non-ultrasonically activated water stream. It was found that the UAS significantly improves the cleaning capabilities of a water flow, up to the point where no detectable biofilm remained on the coating surfaces. Overall biofilm surface coverage was significantly lower on the FRC coatings cleaned with the UAS system when compared to the coatings cleaned with water or not cleaned at all. When biofilm biomass removal was investigated, the UAS system resulted in significantly lower biovolume values even when compared to the water cleaning treatment with biovolume values close to zero. Remarkably, the surface roughness of the coatings after cleaning with the UAS was found to be comparable to that of the blank, non-immersed coatings, illustrating that the UAS did not damage the coatings in the process. The data supporting this study are openly available from the University of Southampton repository at http

  14. Bioaugmentation of strain Methylobacterium sp. C1 towards p-nitrophenol removal with broad spectrum coaggregating bacteria in sequencing batch biofilm reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Wenlong; Chen, Mei; Cheng, Zhongqin; Xie, Liqun; Li, Mengying

    2018-02-15

    This work was conducted in order to evaluate an instance of bioaugmentation, namely, the addition of a novel p-nitrophenol (PNP)-degrading bacterium Methylobacterium sp. C1 coaggregated with two other broad-spectrum coaggregating strains (Bacillus megaterium T1 and Bacillus cereus G5) within sequence batch biofilm reactors (SBBRs). Results showed that biofilms consisting of C1 and coaggregating bacteria were resistant to shock loads and were more efficient at PNP removal. High-throughput sequencing data revealed that biofilms formed in the presence of the coaggregating bacteria demonstrated greater microbial diversity. These results suggest that broad-spectrum coaggregating bacteria may be capable of mediating the immobilization of exogenous degrading bacteria into biofilms, rendering them more resistant to toxic compounds and environmental stresses. This represents the first attempt to assess the bioaugmentation of PNP-contaminated wastewater treatment through the utilization of broad-spectrum coaggregating bacteria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Biofouling on mortar mixed with steel slags in a laboratory biofilm reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, K.; Masuda, T.; Kanematsu, H.; Yokoyama, S.; Hirai, N.; Ogawa, A.; Kougo, T.; Yamazaki, K.; Tanaka, T.

    2017-01-01

    The slag produced as by-product in steel-making processes is utilized for various purpose due to its special qualities. Bacteria or other microorganisms generally form the biofilm. They are formed at the interface between materials and water environment by the action of bacteria. Biofilm can cause various problems. Therefore, the control of biofilm formation is needed. In this study, we focused on the application of slag to marine environments and carried out a research on biofouling of mortars mixed with various iron/steel slags through marine immersion and laboratory scale experiments. In this research, we dealt with various mortars. In some cases, iron/steel slags were mixed into mortars. In the laboratory scale research, we observed biofilm formation at the surfaces of sample specimens. As for marine immersion, we carried out the field experiments in summer and winter. Both results were compared. As for laboratory scale experiment, the tap water and artificial sea-water were used. And after the immersion, the specimens were measured and observed by a low vacuum SEM-EDX and the anti-fouling properties were analyzed and discussed. From these results, we confirmed that the biofouling became remarkable with the dissolved iron. Therefore, biofilm formation can be controlled by the concentration of iron/steel slags.

  16. Long-term effects of CuO nanoparticles on the surface physicochemical properties of biofilms in a sequencing batch biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jun; You, Guoxiang; Xu, Yi; Wang, Chao; Wang, Peifang; Miao, Lingzhan; Li, Yi; Ao, Yanhui; Lv, Bowen; Yang, Yangyang

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we examined the long-term effects of copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) on the production and properties of EPS and the resulting variations in surface physicochemical characteristics of biofilms in a sequencing batch biofilm reactor. After exposure to 50 mg/L CuO NPs for 45 days, the protein (PRO) and polysaccharide (PS) contents in loosely bound EPS (LB-EPS) decreased as the production of LB-EPS decreased from 34.4 to 30 mg TOC/g EPS. However, the production of tightly bound EPS (TB-EPS) increased by 16.47 % as the PRO and PS contents increased. The content of humic-like substances (HS) increased significantly, becoming the predominant constituent in EPS with the presence of 50 mg/L CuO NPs. Furthermore, the results of three-dimensional excitation-emission fluorescence spectra confirmed the various changes in terms of the LB-EPS and TB-EPS contents after exposure to CuO NPs. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed that the -OH and -NH2 groups of proteins in EPS were involved in the reaction with CuO NPs. Moreover, the chronic exposure to CuO NPs induced a negative impact on the flocculating efficiency of EPS and on the hydrophobicity and aggregation ability of microbial cells. The PRO/PS ratios of different EPS fractions were consistent with their hydrophobicities (R 2 >0.98) and bioflocculating efficiencies (R 2 >0.95); however, there was no correlation with aggregation ability. Additionally, the presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA) prevented the physical contact between CuO NPs and EPS as a result of NP aggregation and electrostatic repulsion.

  17. Morphological observation and microbial population dynamics in anaerobic polyurethane foam biofilm degrading gelatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso G.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This work reports on a preliminary study of anaerobic degradation of gelatin with emphasis on the development of the proteolytic biofilm in polyurethane foam matrices in differential reactors. The evolution of the biofilm was observed during 22 days by optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM analyses. Three distinct immobilization patterns could be observed in the polyurethane foam: cell aggregates entrapped in matrix pores, thin biofilms attached to inner polyurethane foam surfaces and individual cells that have adhered to the support. Rods, cocci and vibrios were observed as the predominant morphologies of bacterial cells. Methane was produced mainly by hydrogenothrophic reactions during the operation of the reactors.

  18. Can those organic micro-pollutants that are recalcitrant in activated sludge treatment be removed from wastewater by biofilm reactors (slow sand filters)?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escolà Casas, Mònica; Bester, Kai, E-mail: kb@dmu.dk

    2015-02-15

    The degradation of seven compounds which are usually recalcitrant in classical activated sludge treatment (e.g., diclofenac, propranolol, iopromide, iohexol, iomeprol tebuconazole and propiconazole) was studied in a biofilm reactor (slow sand filtration). This reactor was used to treat real effluent-wastewater at different flow rates (hydraulic loadings) under aerobic conditions so removal and degradation kinetics of these recalcitrant compounds were calculated. With the hydraulic loading rate of 0.012 m{sup 3} m{sup 2} h{sup −1} the reactor removed 41, 94, 58, 57 and 85% of diclofenac, propranolol, iopromide, iohexol and iomeprol respectively. For these compounds the removal efficiency was dependent on hydraulic residence-times. Only 59 and 21% of the incoming tebuconazole and propiconazole respectively were removed but their removal did not depend on hydraulic residence time. Biofilm reactors are thus efficient in removing micro-pollutants and could be considered as an option for advanced treatment in small wastewater treatment plants. - Highlights: • A biofilm reactor (biofilter) can remove micro-pollutants from WWTP effluent. • Sorption could be excluded as the dominant removal mechanism. • Biodegradation was responsible for removing seven compounds. • The removal efficiency was usually proportional to the hydraulic residence-time. • Single first-order removal rates apply for most compounds.

  19. Roles of a novel Crp/Fnr family transcription factor Lmo0753 in soil survival, biofilm production and surface attachment to fresh produce of Listeria monocytogenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joelle K Salazar

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne bacterial pathogen and the causative agent of an infectious disease, listeriosis. L. monocytogenes is ubiquitous in nature and has the ability to persist in food processing environments for extended periods of time by forming biofilms and resisting industrial sanitization. Human listeriosis outbreaks are commonly linked to contaminated dairy products, ready-to-eat meats, and in recent years, fresh produce such as lettuce and cantaloupes. We identified a putative Crp/Fnr family transcription factor Lmo0753 that is highly specific to human-associated genetic lineages of L. monocytogenes. Lmo0753 possesses two conserved functional domains similar to the major virulence regulator PrfA in L. monocytogenes. To determine if Lmo0753 is involved in environmental persistence-related mechanisms, we compared lmo0753 deletion mutants with respective wild type and complementation mutants of two fully sequenced L. monocytogenes genetic lineage II strains 10403S and EGDe for the relative ability of growth under different nutrient availability and temperatures, soil survival, biofilm productivity and attachment to select fresh produce surfaces including romaine lettuce leaves and cantaloupe rinds. Our results collectively suggested that Lmo0753 plays an important role in L. monocytogenes biofilm production and attachment to fresh produce, which may contribute to the environmental persistence and recent emergence of this pathogen in human listeriosis outbreaks linked to fresh produce.

  20. Segmented flow is controlling growth of catalytic biofilms in continuous multiphase microreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karande, Rohan; Halan, Babu; Schmid, Andreas; Buehler, Katja

    2014-09-01

    Biofilm reactors are often mass transfer limited due to excessive biofilm growth, impeding reactor performance. Fluidic conditions play a key role for biofilm structural development and subsequently for overall reactor performance. Continuous interfacial forces generated by aqueous-air segmented flow are controlling biofilm structure and diminish mass transfer limitations in biofilm microreactors. A simple three step method allows the formation of robust biofilms under aqueous-air segmented flow conditions: a first-generation biofilm is developing during single phase flow, followed by the introduction of air segments discarding most of the established biofilm. Finally, a second-generation, mature biofilm is formed in the presence of aqueous-air segments. Confocal laser scanning microscopy experiments revealed that the segmented flow supports the development of a robust biofilm. This mature biofilm is characterized by a three to fourfold increase in growth rate, calculated from an increase in thickness, a faster spatial distribution (95% surface coverage in 24 h), and a significantly more compact structure (roughness coefficient flow conditions. The applicability of the concept in a segmented flow biofilm microreactor was demonstrated using the epoxidation of styrene to (S)-styrene oxide (ee > 99.8%) catalyzed by Pseudomonas sp. strain VLB120ΔC cells in the mono-species biofilm. The limiting factor affecting reactor performance was oxygen transfer as the volumetric productivity rose from 11 to 46 g L tube (-1) day(-1) after increasing the air flow rate. In summary, different interfacial forces can be applied for separating cell attachment and adaptation resulting in the development of a robust catalytic biofilm in continuous microreactors. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Comparing the Chlorine Disinfection of Detached Biofilm Clusters with Those of Sessile Biofilms and Planktonic Cells in Single- and Dual-Species Cultures ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnke, Sabrina; Parker, Albert E.; Woodall, Dawn; Camper, Anne K.

    2011-01-01

    Although the detachment of cells from biofilms is of fundamental importance to the dissemination of organisms in both public health and clinical settings, the disinfection efficacies of commonly used biocides on detached biofilm particles have not been investigated. Therefore, the question arises whether cells in detached aggregates can be killed with disinfectant concentrations sufficient to inactivate planktonic cells. Burkholderia cepacia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were grown in standardized laboratory reactors as single species and in coculture. Cluster size distributions in chemostats and biofilm reactor effluent were measured. Chlorine susceptibility was assessed for planktonic cultures, attached biofilm, and particles and cells detached from the biofilm. Disinfection tolerance generally increased with a higher percentage of larger cell clusters in the chemostat and detached biofilm. Samples with a lower percentage of large clusters were more easily disinfected. Thus, disinfection tolerance depended on the cluster size distribution rather than sample type for chemostat and detached biofilm. Intact biofilms were more tolerant to chlorine independent of species. Homogenization of samples led to significantly increased susceptibility in all biofilm samples as well as detached clusters for single-species B. cepacia, B. cepacia in coculture, and P. aeruginosa in coculture. The disinfection efficacy was also dependent on species composition; coculture was advantageous to the survival of both species when grown as a biofilm or as clusters detached from biofilm but, surprisingly, resulted in a lower disinfection tolerance when they were grown as a mixed planktonic culture. PMID:21856824

  2. Comparing the chlorine disinfection of detached biofilm clusters with those of sessile biofilms and planktonic cells in single- and dual-species cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnke, Sabrina; Parker, Albert E; Woodall, Dawn; Camper, Anne K

    2011-10-01

    Although the detachment of cells from biofilms is of fundamental importance to the dissemination of organisms in both public health and clinical settings, the disinfection efficacies of commonly used biocides on detached biofilm particles have not been investigated. Therefore, the question arises whether cells in detached aggregates can be killed with disinfectant concentrations sufficient to inactivate planktonic cells. Burkholderia cepacia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were grown in standardized laboratory reactors as single species and in coculture. Cluster size distributions in chemostats and biofilm reactor effluent were measured. Chlorine susceptibility was assessed for planktonic cultures, attached biofilm, and particles and cells detached from the biofilm. Disinfection tolerance generally increased with a higher percentage of larger cell clusters in the chemostat and detached biofilm. Samples with a lower percentage of large clusters were more easily disinfected. Thus, disinfection tolerance depended on the cluster size distribution rather than sample type for chemostat and detached biofilm. Intact biofilms were more tolerant to chlorine independent of species. Homogenization of samples led to significantly increased susceptibility in all biofilm samples as well as detached clusters for single-species B. cepacia, B. cepacia in coculture, and P. aeruginosa in coculture. The disinfection efficacy was also dependent on species composition; coculture was advantageous to the survival of both species when grown as a biofilm or as clusters detached from biofilm but, surprisingly, resulted in a lower disinfection tolerance when they were grown as a mixed planktonic culture.

  3. Microbial succession within an anaerobic sequencing batch biofilm reactor (ASBBR treating cane vinasse at 55ºC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Magdalena Ferreira Ribas

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to investigate the anaerobic biomass formation capable of treating vinasse from the production of sugar cane alcohol, which was evolved within an anaerobic sequencing batch biofilm reactor (ASBBR as immobilized biomass on cubes of polyurethane foam at the temperature of 55ºC. The reactor was inoculated with mesophilic granular sludge originally treating poultry slaughterhouse wastewater. The evolution of the biofilm in the polyurethane foam matrices was assessed during seven experimental phases which were thus characterized by the changes in the organic matter concentrations as COD (1.0 to 20.0 g/L. Biomass characterization proceeded with the examination of sludge samples under optical and scanning electron microscopy. The reactor showed high microbial morphological diversity along the trial. The predominance of Methanosaeta-like cells was observed up to the organic load of 2.5 gCOD/L.d. On the other hand, Methanosarcinalike microorganisms were the predominant archaeal population within the foam matrices at high organic loading ratios above 3.3 gCOD/L.d. This was suggested to be associated to a higher specific rate of acetate consumption by the later organisms.Este trabalho investigou a formação de um biofilme anaeróbio capaz de tratar vinhaça da produção de álcool de cana-de-açúcar, que evoluiu dentro de um reator operado em bateladas seqüenciais com biofilme (ASBBR tendo a biomassa imobilizada em cubos de espuma de poliuretano na temperatura de 55ºC. O reator foi inoculado com lodo granular mesofílico tratando água residuária de abatedouro de aves. A evolução do biofilme nas matrizes de espuma de poliuretano foi observada durante sete fases experimentais que foram caracterizadas por mudanças nas concentrações de matéria orgânica como DQO (1,0 a 20,0 g/L. A caracterização da biomassa foi feita por exames de amostras do lodo em microscopia ótica e eletrônica de varredura. O reator apresentou

  4. Bacterial community dynamics in a biodenitrification reactor packed with polylactic acid/poly (3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) blend as the carbon source and biofilm carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Tianlei; Xu, Ying; Gao, Min; Han, Meilin; Wang, Xuming

    2017-05-01

    While heterotrophic denitrification has been widely used for treating such nitrogen-rich wastewater, it requires the use of additional carbon sources. With fluctuations in the nitrate concentration in the influent, controlling the C/N ratio to avoid carbon breakthrough becomes difficult. To overcome this obstacle, solid-phase denitrification (SPD) using biodegradable polymers has been used, where denitrification and carbon source biodegradation depend on microorganisms growing within the reactor. However, the microbial community dynamics in continuous-flow SPD reactors have not been fully elucidated yet. Here, we aimed to study bacterial community dynamics in a biodenitrification reactor packed with a polylactic acid/poly (3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PLA/PHBV) blend as the carbon source and biofilm carrier. A lab-scale denitrifying reactor filled with a PLA/PHBV blend was used. With 85 mg/L of influent NO3-N concentration and a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 2.5 h, more than 92% of the nitrate was removed. The bacterial community of inoculated activated sludge had the highest species richness in all samples. Bacterial species diversity in the reactor first decreased and then increased to a stable level. Diaphorobacter species were predominant in the reactor after day 24. In total, 178 clones were retrieved from the 16S rRNA gene clone library constructed from the biofilm samples in the reactor at 62 days of operation, and 80.9% of the clones were affiliated with Betaproteobacteria. Of these, 97.2% were classified into phylotypes corresponding to Diaphorobacter nitroreducens strain NA10B with 99% sequence similarity. Diaphorobacter, Rhizobium, Acidovorax, Rubrivivax, Azospira, Thermomonas, and Acidaminobacter constituted the biofilm microflora in the stably running reactor. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Enhanced degradation of azo dye by a stacked microbial fuel cell-biofilm electrode reactor coupled system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xian; Wang, Hui; Li, Xiao-Qi; Fang, Zhou; Li, Xian-Ning

    2017-03-01

    In this study, a microbial fuel cell (MFC)-biofilm electrode reactor (BER) coupled system was established for degradation of the azo dye Reactive Brilliant Red X-3B. In this system, electrical energy generated by the MFC degrades the azo dye in the BER without the need for an external power supply, and the effluent from the BER was used as the inflow for the MFC, with further degradation. The results indicated that the X-3B removal efficiency was 29.87% higher using this coupled system than in a control group. Moreover, a method was developed to prevent voltage reversal in stacked MFCs. Current was the key factor influencing removal efficiency in the BER. The X-3B degradation pathway and the types and transfer processes of intermediate products were further explored in our system coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Application of a Loop-Type Laboratory Biofilm Reactor to the Evaluation of Biofilm for Some Metallic Materials and Polymers such as Urinary Stents and Catheters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideyuki Kanematsu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory biofilm reactor (LBR was modified to a new loop-type closed system in order to evaluate novel stents and catheter materials using 3D optical microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Two metallic specimens, pure nickel and cupronickel (80% Cu-20% Ni, along with two polymers, silicone and polyurethane, were chosen as examples to ratify the system. Each set of specimens was assigned to the LBR using either tap water or an NB (Nutrient broth based on peptone from animal foods and beef extract mainly—cultured solution with E-coli formed over 48–72 h. The specimens were then analyzed using Raman Spectroscopy. 3D optical microscopy was employed to corroborate the Raman Spectroscopy results for only the metallic specimens since the inherent roughness of the polymer specimens made such measurements difficult. The findings suggest that the closed loop-type LBR together with Raman spectroscopy analysis is a useful method for evaluating biomaterials as a potential urinary system.

  7. Effects of phosphate addition on biofilm bacterial communities and water quality in annular reactors equipped with stainless steel and ductile cast iron pipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyun-Jung; Choi, Young-June; Ro, Hee-Myong; Ka, Jong-Ok

    2012-02-01

    The impact of orthophosphate addition on biofilm formation and water quality was studied in corrosion-resistant stainless steel (STS) pipe and corrosion-susceptible ductile cast iron (DCI) pipe using cultivation and culture-independent approaches. Sample coupons of DCI pipe and STS pipe were installed in annular reactors, which were operated for 9 months under hydraulic conditions similar to a domestic plumbing system. Addition of 5 mg/L of phosphate to the plumbing systems, under low residual chlorine conditions, promoted a more significant growth of biofilm and led to a greater rate reduction of disinfection by-products in DCI pipe than in STS pipe. While the level of THMs (trihalomethanes) increased under conditions of low biofilm concentration, the levels of HAAs (halo acetic acids) and CH (chloral hydrate) decreased in all cases in proportion to the amount of biofilm. It was also observed that chloroform, the main species of THM, was not readily decomposed biologically and decomposition was not proportional to the biofilm concentration; however, it was easily biodegraded after the addition of phosphate. Analysis of the 16S rDNA sequences of 102 biofilm isolates revealed that Proteobacteria (50%) was the most frequently detected phylum, followed by Firmicutes (10%) and Actinobacteria (2%), with 37% of the bacteria unclassified. Bradyrhizobium was the dominant genus on corroded DCI pipe, while Sphingomonas was predominant on non-corroded STS pipe. Methylobacterium and Afipia were detected only in the reactor without added phosphate. PCR-DGGE analysis showed that the diversity of species in biofilm tended to increase when phosphate was added regardless of the pipe material, indicating that phosphate addition upset the biological stability in the plumbing systems.

  8. Extended mixed-culture biofilms (MCB) model to describe integrated fixed film/activated sludge (IFAS) process behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albizuri, J; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Larrea, L

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents how, in a calibration process, different assumptions regarding the standard Mixed-Culture Biofilms (MCB) model were able to match the average results at a continuous Johannesburg pilot plant (comprising two aerobic reactors, AE1 and AE2), but failed to match the batch test results of either the rate of endogenous carbonaceous oxygen uptake (OUR) or the rate of nitrate production (NPR). Under the first assumption, where attachment and diffusion of particulate components were not used, the OUR in the biofilm of the first aerobic reactor (AE1) was too low due to the absence of slowly biodegradable COD (X(S)) attachment flux. In a second assumption, where high diffusion and attachment coefficients were used, the NPR in the biofilm of the AE1 reactor exceeded the experimental value due to the high attachment flux used for nitrifiers (X(A)) and the low competition for space from X(S) and heterotrophic bacteria (X(H)). The only way to match all the experimental results was through the use of a higher attachment coefficient for X(S) in the first reactor (AE1), but this was considered unreasonable. Hence, an extended model was developed where a colloidal state, which interacts at the same time with the flocs and the biofilm through attachment-detachment processes, is distinguished. This model allowed the experimental results to be matched, but using the same value for the attachment coefficients of all particulate components.

  9. Monitoring and modeling of nitrogen conversions in membrane-aerated biofilm reactors: Effects of intermittent aeration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Yunjie

    relevant biological N2O production pathways. Sensitive kinetic parameters were estimated with long-term bulk performance data. With the calibrated model, roles of HB and AnAOB were discussed and evaluated in mitigating N2O emissions in auto-trophic nitrogen removal MABRs. Moreover, I developed a 1-D...... process. On the other hand, the presence of multiple simultaneous chemical gradients complicates the performance opti-mization. Mathematical modeling offers a way to describe and analyze multi-ple processes that occur simultaneously in time and space in biofilm systems. This PhD project investigated NH4...... the membrane, whilst NH4+ is provid-ed from the bulk liquid phase. The counter substrate supply not only offers flexible aeration control, but also supports the development of a unique mi-crobial community and spatial structure inside the biofilm. In this study, lab-scale MABRs were operated under two types...

  10. Effects of salinity on simultaneous reduction of perchlorate and nitrate in a methane-based membrane biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yin; Chen, Jia-Xian; Wen, Li-Lian; Tang, Youneng; Zhao, He-Ping

    2016-12-01

    This study builds upon prior work showing that methane (CH4) could be utilized as the sole electron donor and carbon source in a membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR) for complete perchlorate (ClO4-) and nitrate (NO3-) removal. Here, we further investigated the effects of salinity on the simultaneous removal of the two contaminants in the reactor. By testing ClO4- and NO3- at different salinities, we found that the reactor performance was very sensitive to salinity. While 0.2 % salinity did not significantly affect the hydrogen-based MBfR for ClO4- and NO3- removals, 1 % salinity completely inhibited ClO4- reduction and significantly lowered NO3- reduction in the CH4-based MBfR. In salinity-free conditions, NO3- and ClO4- removal fluxes were 0.171 g N/m2-day and 0.091 g/m2-day, respectively, but NO3- removal fluxes dropped to 0.0085 g N/m2-day and ClO4- reduction was completely inhibited when the medium changed to 1 % salinity. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that the salinity dramatically changed the microbial morphology, which led to the development of wire-like cell structures. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) indicated that the total number of microorganisms and abundances of functional genes significantly declined in the presence of NaCl. The relative abundances of Methylomonas (methanogens) decreased from 31.3 to 5.9 % and Denitratisoma (denitrifiers) decreased from 10.6 to 4.4 % when 1 % salinity was introduced.

  11. Simultaneous biohydrogen production and wastewater treatment in biofilm configured anaerobic periodic discontinuous batch reactor using distillery wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkata Mohan, S.; Mohanakrishna, G.; Ramanaiah, S.V.; Sarma, P.N. [Bioengineering and Environmental Centre, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Hyderabad 500007 (India)

    2008-01-15

    Biohydrogen (H{sub 2}) production with simultaneous wastewater treatment was studied in anaerobic sequencing batch biofilm reactor (AnSBBR) using distillery wastewater as substrate at two operating pH values. Selectively enriched anaerobic mixed consortia sequentially pretreated with repeated heat-shock (100{sup o}C; 2 h) and acid (pH -3.0; 24 h) methods, was used as parent inoculum to startup the bioreactor. The reactor was operated at ambient temperature (28{+-}2 {sup circle} C) with detention time of 24 h in periodic discontinuous batch mode. Experimental data showed the feasibility of hydrogen production along with substrate degradation with distillery wastewater as substrate. The performance of the reactor was found to be dependent on the operating pH. Adopted acidophilic microenvironment (pH 6.0) favored H{sub 2} production (H{sub 2} production rate - 26 mmol H{sub 2}/day; specific H{sub 2} production - 6.98 mol H{sub 2}/kg COD{sub R}-day) over neutral microenvironment (H{sub 2} production rate - 7 mmol H{sub 2}/day; specific H{sub 2} production - 1.63 mol H{sub 2}/kg COD{sub R}-day). However, COD removal efficiency was found to be effective in operated neutral microenvironment (pH 7 - 69.68%; pH 6.0 - 56.25%). The described process documented the dual benefit of renewable energy generation in the form of H{sub 2} with simultaneous wastewater treatment utilizing it as substrate. (author)

  12. Applying moving bed biofilm reactor for removing linear alkylbenzene sulfonate using synthetic media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalaleddin Mollaei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Detergents and problems of their attendance into water and wastewater cause varied difficulties such as producing foam, abnormality in the growth of algae, accumulation and dispersion in aqueous environments. One of the reactors was designated with 30% of the media with the similar conditions exactly same as the other which had filling rate about 10 %, in order to compare both of them together. A standard method methylene blue active substance was used to measure anionic surfactant. The concentrations of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate which examined were 50, 100, 200, 300 and 400 mg/l in HRT 72, 24 and 8 hrs. The removal percentage for both of reactors at the beginning of operating at50 mg/l concentration of pollutant had a bit difference and with gradually increasing the pollutant concentration and decreasing Hydraulic retention time, the variation between the removal percentage of both reactors became significant as the reactor that had the filling rate about 30 %, showed better condition than the other reactor with 10 % filling rate. Ideal condition in this experiment was caught at hydraulic retention time about 72 hrs and 200 mg/l pollutants concentration with 99.2% removal by the reactor with 30% filling rate. While the ideal condition for the reactor with 10% filling rate with the same hydraulic retention time and 100 mg/l pollutants concentrations was obtained about 99.4% removal. Regarding anionic surfactant standard in Iran which is 1.5 mg/l for surface water discharge, using this process is suitable for treating municipal wastewater and industrial wastewater which has a range of the pollutant between 100-200 mg/l. but for the industries that produce detergents products which make wastewater containing more than 200 mg/l surfactants, using secondary treatment process for achieving discharge standard is required.

  13. A new dry-surface biofilm model: An essential tool for efficacy testing of hospital surface decontamination procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almatroudi, Ahmad; Hu, Honghua; Deva, Anand; Gosbell, Iain B; Jacombs, Anita; Jensen, Slade O; Whiteley, Greg; Glasbey, Trevor; Vickery, Karen

    2015-10-01

    The environment has been shown to be a source of pathogens causing infections in hospitalised patients. Incorporation of pathogens into biofilms, contaminating dry hospital surfaces, prolongs their survival and renders them tolerant to normal hospital cleaning and disinfection procedures. Currently there is no standard method for testing efficacy of detergents and disinfectants against biofilm formed on dry surfaces. The aim of this study was to develop a reproducible method of producing Staphylococcus aureus biofilm with properties similar to those of biofilm obtained from dry hospital clinical surfaces, for use in efficacy testing of decontamination products. The properties (composition, architecture) of model biofilm and biofilm obtained from clinical dry surfaces within an intensive care unit were compared. The CDC Biofilm Reactor was adapted to create a dry surface biofilm model. S. aureus ATCC 25923 was grown on polycarbonate coupons. Alternating cycles of dehydration and hydration in tryptone soy broth (TSB) were performed over 12 days. Number of biofilm bacteria attached to individual coupons was determined by plate culture and the coefficient of variation (CV%) calculated. The DNA, glycoconjugates and protein content of the biofilm were determined by analysing biofilm stained with SYTO 60, Alexa-488-labelled Aleuria aurantia lectin and SyproOrange respectively using Image J and Imaris software. Biofilm architecture was analysed using live/dead staining and confocal microscopy (CM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Model biofilm was compared to naturally formed biofilm containing S. aureus on dry clinical surfaces. The CDC Biofilm reactor reproducibly formed a multi-layered, biofilm containing about 10(7) CFU/coupon embedded in thick extracellular polymeric substances. Within run CV was 9.5% and the between run CV was 10.1%. Protein was the principal component of both the in vitro model biofilm and the biofilms found on clinical surfaces. Continued

  14. Hydrolysis and degradation of filtrated organic particulates in a biofilm reactor under anoxic and aerobic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janning, K.F.; Mesterton, K.; Harremoës, P.

    1997-01-01

    Two experiments were performed in order to investigate the anoxic and the aerobic degradation of filtrated organic matter in a biofilter. In submerged lab: scale reactors with Biocarbone media as filter material, accumulated particulate organic matter from pre-settled wastewater served as the only...

  15. Biofilm Dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Like all sessile organisms, surface-attached communities of bacteria known as biofilms must release and disperse cells into the environment to colonize new sites. For many pathogenic bacteria, biofilm dispersal plays an important role in the transmission of bacteria from environmental reservoirs to human hosts, in horizontal and vertical cross-host transmission, and in the exacerbation and spread of infection within a host. The molecular mechanisms of bacterial biofilm dispersal are only beginning to be elucidated. Biofilm dispersal is a promising area of research that may lead to the development of novel agents that inhibit biofilm formation or promote biofilm cell detachment. Such agents may be useful for the prevention and treatment of biofilms in a variety of industrial and clinical settings. This review describes the current status of research on biofilm dispersal, with an emphasis on studies aimed to characterize dispersal mechanisms, and to identify environmental cues and inter- and intracellular signals that regulate the dispersal process. The clinical implications of biofilm dispersal and the potential therapeutic applications of some of the most recent findings will also be discussed. PMID:20139339

  16. Balancing the organic load and light supply in symbiotic microalgal–bacterial biofilm reactors treating synthetic municipal wastewater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelee, N.C.; Temmink, B.G.; Janssen, M.; Buisman, C.J.N.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2014-01-01

    Symbiotic microalgal–bacterial biofilms can be very attractive for municipal wastewater treatment. Microalgae remove nitrogen and phosphorus and simultaneously produce the oxygen that is required for the aerobic, heterotrophic degradation of organic pollutants. For the application of these biofilms

  17. Pyrosequencing analysis of microbial communities in hollow fiber-membrane biofilm reactors system for treating high-strength nitrogen wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung-Hun; Choi, Okkyoung; Lee, Tae-Ho; Kim, Hyunook; Sang, Byoung-In

    2016-11-01

    Wastewaters from swine farms, nitrogen-dealing industries or side-stream processes of a wastewater treatment plant (e.g., anaerobic digesters, sludge thickening processes, etc.) are characterized by low C/N ratios and not easily treatable. In this study, a hollow fiber-membrane biofilm reactors (HF-MBfR) system consisting of an O2-based HF-MBfR and an H2-based HF-MBfR was applied for treating high-strength wastewater. The reactors were continuously operated with low supply of O2 and H2 and without any supply of organic carbon for 250 d. Gradual increase of ammonium and nitrate concentration in the influent showed stable and high nitrogen removal efficiency, and the maximum ammonium and nitrate removal rates were 0.48 kg NH4(+)-N m(-3) d(-1) and 0.55 kg NO3(-)-N m(-3) d(-1), respectively. The analysis of the microbial communities using pyrosequencing analysis indicated that Nitrosospira multiformis, ammonium-oxidizing bacteria, and Nitrobacter winogradskyi and Nitrobacter vulgaris, nitrite-oxidizing bacteria were highly enriched in the O2-based HF-MBfR. In the H2-based HF-MBfR, hydrogenotrophic denitrifying bacteria belonging to the family of Thiobacillus and Comamonadaceae were initially dominant, but were replaced to heterotrophic denitrifiers belonging to Rhodocyclaceae and Rhodobacteraceae utilizing by-products induced from autotrophic denitrifying bacteria. The pyrosequencing analysis of microbial communities indicates that the autotrophic HF-MBfRs system well developed autotrophic nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria within a relatively short period to accomplish almost complete nitrogen removal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Can those organic micro-pollutants that are recalcitrant in activated sludge treatment be removed from wastewater by biofilm reactors (slow sand filters)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escolà Casas, Mònica; Bester, Kai

    2015-02-15

    The degradation of seven compounds which are usually recalcitrant in classical activated sludge treatment (e.g., diclofenac, propranolol, iopromide, iohexol, iomeprol tebuconazole and propiconazole) was studied in a biofilm reactor (slow sand filtration). This reactor was used to treat real effluent-wastewater at different flow rates (hydraulic loadings) under aerobic conditions so removal and degradation kinetics of these recalcitrant compounds were calculated. With the hydraulic loading rate of 0.012 m(3)m(2)h(-1) the reactor removed 41, 94, 58, 57 and 85% of diclofenac, propranolol, iopromide, iohexol and iomeprol respectively. For these compounds the removal efficiency was dependent on hydraulic residence-times. Only 59 and 21% of the incoming tebuconazole and propiconazole respectively were removed but their removal did not depend on hydraulic residence time. Biofilm reactors are thus efficient in removing micro-pollutants and could be considered as an option for advanced treatment in small wastewater treatment plants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Carbonaceous materials in petrochemical wastewater before and after treatment in an aerated submerged fixed-bed biofilm reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trojanowicz Karol

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Results of the studies for determining fractions of organic contaminants in a pretreated petrochemical wastewater flowing into a pilot Aerated Submerged Fixed-Bed Biofilm Reactor (ASFBBR are presented and discussed. The method of chemical oxygen demand (COD fractionation consisted of physical tests and biological assays. It was found that the main part of the total COD in the petrochemical, pretreated wastewater was soluble organic substance with average value of 57.6%. The fractions of particulate and colloidal organic matter were found to be 31.8% and 10.6%, respectively. About 40% of COD in the influent was determined as readily biodegradable COD. The inert fraction of the soluble organic matter in the petrochemical wastewater constituted about 60% of the influent colloidal and soluble COD. Determination of degree of hydrolysis (DH of the colloidal fraction of COD was also included in the paper. The estimated value of DH was about 62%. Values of the assayed COD fractions were compared with the same parameters obtained for municipal wastewater by other authors.

  20. Effects of Electrical Stimulation on the Degradation of Azo Dye in Three-Dimensional Biofilm Electrode Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian Cao

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional biofilm electrode reactors (3D-BERs were constructed to degrade the azo dye Reactive Brilliant Red (RBR X-3B. The 3D-BERs with different influent concentrations and external voltages were individually studied to investigate their influence on the removal of X-3B. Experimental results showed that 3D-BERs have good X-3B removal efficiency; even when the influent concentration was 800 mg/L, removal efficiency of 73.4% was still achieved. In addition, the X-3B removal efficiency stabilized shortly after the influent concentration increased. In 3D-BERs, the average X-3B removal efficiency increased from 52.8% to 85.4% when the external voltage rose from 0 to 2 V. We further identified the intermediate products via UV-Vis and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS analyses, and discussed the potential mechanism of degradation. After the conjugate structure of X-3B was destroyed, all of the substances generated mainly consisted of lower-molecular-weight organics.

  1. Optimization of C/N and current density in a heterotrophic/biofilm-electrode autotrophic denitrification reactor (HAD-BER).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Shuang; Chen, Nan; Wang, Heng; Liu, Hengyuan; Tao, Chen; Feng, Chuanping; Zhang, Baogang; Hao, Chunbo; Pu, Jiaoyang; Zhao, Jiamin

    2014-11-01

    In this study, central composite design (CCD) and response surface methodology (RSM) were applied to optimize the C/N and current density in a heterotrophic/biofilm-electrode autotrophic denitrification reactor (HAD-BER). Results showed that nitrate could be effectively reduced over a wide range of C/Ns (0.84-1.3535) and current densities (96.8-370.0 mA/m(2)); however, an optimum C/N of 1.13 and optimum current density of 239.6 mA/m(2) were obtained by RSM. Moreover, the HAD-BER performance under the optimum conditions resulted in almost 100% nitrate-N removal efficiency and low nitrite-N and ammonia-N accumulation. Furthermore, under the optimum conditions, H2 generated from water electrolysis matched the CO2 produced by heterotrophic denitrification by stoichiometric calculation. Therefore, CCD and RSM could be used to acquire optimum operational conditions and improve the nitrate removal efficiency and energy consumption in the HAD-BER. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Improvement of poly-γ-glutamic acid biosynthesis in a moving bed biofilm reactor by Bacillus subtilis NX-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yongxiang; Tang, Bao; Xu, Zongqi; Liu, Kun; Xu, Zheng; Feng, Xiaohai; Xu, Hong

    2016-10-01

    The production of poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) by Bacillus subtilis NX-2 using a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) system was tested for the first time in this study. Polypropylene TL-2 was chosen as a suitable carrier, and γ-PGA concentration of 42.7±0.86g/L and productivity of 0.59±0.06g/(Lh) were obtained in batch fermentation. After application of the strategy of dissolved oxygen (DO)-stat feeding, higher γ-PGA concentration and productivity were achieved than with glucose feedback feeding. Finally, the repeated fed-batch cultures implemented in the MBBR system showed high stability, and the maximal γ-PGA concentration and productivity of 74.2g/L and 1.24g/(Lh) were achieved, respectively. In addition, the promotion of oxygen transfer by an MBBR carrier was well explained by a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. These results suggest that an MBBR system could be applied to large-scale γ-PGA production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Enhancing nitrogen removal from low carbon to nitrogen ratio wastewater by using a novel sequencing batch biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jinte; Li, Jun; Ni, Yongjiong; Wei, Su

    2016-12-01

    Removing nitrogen from wastewater with low chemical oxygen demand/total nitrogen (COD/TN) ratio is a difficult task due to the insufficient carbon source available for denitrification. Therefore, in the present work, a novel sequencing batch biofilm reactor (NSBBR) was developed to enhance the nitrogen removal from wastewater with low COD/TN ratio. The NSBBR was divided into two units separated by a vertical clapboard. Alternate feeding and aeration was performed in the two units, which created an anoxic unit with rich substrate content and an aeration unit deficient in substrate simultaneously. Therefore, the utilization of the influent carbon source for denitrification was increased, leading to higher TN removal compared to conventional SBBR (CSBBR) operation. The results show that the CSBBR removed up to 76.8%, 44.5% and 10.4% of TN, respectively, at three tested COD/TN ratios (9.0, 4.8 and 2.5). In contrast, the TN removal of the NSBBR could reach 81.9%, 60.5% and 26.6%, respectively, at the corresponding COD/TN ratios. Therefore, better TN removal performance could be achieved in the NSBBR, especially at low COD/TN ratios (4.8 and 2.5). Furthermore, it is easy to upgrade a CSBBR into an NSBBR in practice. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. First-order kinetics of landfill leachate treatment in a pilot-scale anaerobic sequence batch biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contrera, Ronan Cleber; da Cruz Silva, Katia Cristina; Morita, Dione Mari; Domingues Rodrigues, José Alberto; Zaiat, Marcelo; Schalch, Valdir

    2014-12-01

    This paper reports the kinetics evaluation of landfill leachate anaerobic treatment in a pilot-scale Anaerobic Sequence Batch Biofilm Reactor (AnSBBR). The experiment was carried out at room temperature (23.8 ± 2.1 °C) in the landfill area in São Carlos-SP, Brazil. Biomass from the bottom of a local landfill leachate stabilization pond was used as inoculum. After acclimated and utilizing leachate directly from the landfill, the AnSBBR presented efficiency over 70%, in terms of COD removal, with influent COD ranging from 4825 mg L(-1) to 12,330 mg L(-1). To evaluate the kinetics of landfill leachate treatment, temporal profiles of CODFilt. concentration were performed and a first-order kinetics model was adjusted for substrate consumption, obtaining an average k1 = 4.40 × 10(-5) L mgTVS(-1) d(-1), corrected to 25 °C. Considering the temperature variations, a temperature-activity coefficient θ = 1.07 was obtained. Statistical "Randomness" and "F" tests were used to successfully validate the model considered. Thus, the results demonstrate that the first-order kinetic model is adequate to model the anaerobic treatment of the landfill leachate in the AnSBBR. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing in biofilm-growing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macià, M D; Rojo-Molinero, E; Oliver, A

    2014-10-01

    Biofilms are organized bacterial communities embedded in an extracellular polymeric matrix attached to living or abiotic surfaces. The development of biofilms is currently recognized as one of the most relevant drivers of persistent infections. Among them, chronic respiratory infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients is probably the most intensively studied. The lack of correlation between conventional susceptibility test results and therapeutic success in chronic infections is probably a consequence of the use of planktonically growing instead of biofilm-growing bacteria. Therefore, several in vitro models to evaluate antimicrobial activity on biofilms have been implemented over the last decade. Microtitre plate-based assays, the Calgary device, substratum suspending reactors and the flow cell system are some of the most used in vitro biofilm models for susceptibility studies. Likewise, new pharmacodynamic parameters, including minimal biofilm inhibitory concentration, minimal biofilm-eradication concentration, biofilm bactericidal concentration, and biofilm-prevention concentration, have been defined in recent years to quantify antibiotic activity in biofilms. Using these parameters, several studies have shown very significant quantitative and qualitative differences for the effects of most antibiotics when acting on planktonic or biofilm bacteria. Nevertheless, standardization of the procedures, parameters and breakpoints, by official agencies, is needed before they are implemented in clinical microbiology laboratories for routine susceptibility testing. Research efforts should also be directed to obtaining a deeper understanding of biofilm resistance mechanisms, the evaluation of optimal pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic models for biofilm growth, and correlation with clinical outcome. © 2014 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2014 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  6. Rotating biological contactor reactor with biofilm promoting mats for treatment of benzene and xylene containing wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarayu, K; Sandhya, S

    2012-12-01

    A novel rotating biological contactor (RBC) bioreactor immobilized with microorganisms was designed to remove volatile organic compounds (VOC), such as benzene and xylene from emissions, and its performance was investigated. Gas-phase VOCs stripped by air injection were 98 % removed in the RBC when the superficial air flow rate was 375 ml/h (1,193 and 1,226 mg/l of benzene and xylene, respectively). The maximum removal rate was observed to be 1,007 and 1,872 mg/m(3)/day for benzene and xylene, respectively. The concentration profile of benzene and xylene along the RBC was dependent on the air flow rate and the degree of microbial adaptation. Air flow rate and residence time were found to be the most important operational parameters for the RBC reactor. By manipulating these operational parameters, the removal efficiency and capacity of the bioreactor could be enhanced. The kinetic constant K (s) demonstrated a linear relationship that indicated the maximum removal of benzene and xylene in RBC reactor. The phylogenic profile shows the presence of bacterium like Pseudomonas sp., Bacillus sp., and Enterococcus sp., which belonged to the phylum Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria that were responsible for the 98 % organic removal in the RBC.

  7. Interactions between Lactobacillus crispatus and Bacterial Vaginosis (BV-Associated Bacterial Species in Initial Attachment and Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Kay Jefferson

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Certain anaerobic bacterial species tend to predominate the vaginal flora during bacterial vaginosis (BV, with Gardnerella vaginalis being the most common. However, the exact role of G. vaginalis in BV has not yet been determined. The main goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that G. vaginalis is an early colonizer, paving the way for intermediate (e.g., Fusobacterium nucleatum and late colonizers (e.g., Prevotella bivia. Theoretically, in order to function as an early colonizer, species would need to be able to adhere to vaginal epithelium, even in the presence of vaginal lactobacilli. Therefore, we quantified adherence of G. vaginalis and other BV-associated bacteria to an inert surface pre-coated with Lactobacillus crispatus using a new Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH methodology. We found that G. vaginalis had the greatest capacity to adhere in the presence of L. crispatus. Theoretically, an early colonizer would contribute to the adherence and/or growth of additional species, so we next quantified the effect of G. vaginalis biofilms on the adherence and growth of other BV-associated species by quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR technique. Interestingly, G. vaginalis derived a growth benefit from the addition of a second species, regardless of the species. Conversely, G. vaginalis biofilms enhanced the growth of P. bivia, and to a minor extent of F. nucleatum. These results contribute to our understanding of BV biofilm formation and the progression of the disorder.

  8. Interactions between Lactobacillus crispatus and Bacterial Vaginosis (BV)-Associated Bacterial Species in Initial Attachment and Biofilm Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, António; Jefferson, Kimberly Kay; Cerca, Nuno

    2013-01-01

    Certain anaerobic bacterial species tend to predominate the vaginal flora during bacterial vaginosis (BV), with Gardnerella vaginalis being the most common. However, the exact role of G. vaginalis in BV has not yet been determined. The main goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that G. vaginalis is an early colonizer, paving the way for intermediate (e.g., Fusobacterium nucleatum) and late colonizers (e.g., Prevotella bivia). Theoretically, in order to function as an early colonizer, species would need to be able to adhere to vaginal epithelium, even in the presence of vaginal lactobacilli. Therefore, we quantified adherence of G. vaginalis and other BV-associated bacteria to an inert surface pre-coated with Lactobacillus crispatus using a new Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) methodology. We found that G. vaginalis had the greatest capacity to adhere in the presence of L. crispatus. Theoretically, an early colonizer would contribute to the adherence and/or growth of additional species, so we next quantified the effect of G. vaginalis biofilms on the adherence and growth of other BV-associated species by quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) technique. Interestingly, G. vaginalis derived a growth benefit from the addition of a second species, regardless of the species. Conversely, G. vaginalis biofilms enhanced the growth of P. bivia, and to a minor extent of F. nucleatum. These results contribute to our understanding of BV biofilm formation and the progression of the disorder. PMID:23739678

  9. SURFACE FINISHES ON STAINLESS STEEL REDUCE BACTERIAL ATTACHMENT AND EARLY BIOFILM FORMATION: SCANNING ELECTRON AND ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three common finishing treatments of stainless steel that are used for equipment during poultry processing were tested for resistance to bacterial contamination. Methods were developed to measure attached bacteria and to identify factors that make surface finishes susceptible or ...

  10. Upgrading of a wastewater treatment plant with a hybrid moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Falletti

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The wastewater treatment plant of Porto Tolle (RO, Italy was originally projected for 2200 person equivalent (p.e. and it was made of a pumping station, an activated sludge oxidation tank (395 m3, a settler (315 m3, and two sludge drying beds. Other units were not yet in use in 2008: a fine screen, a sand and grit removal unit, a new settler (570 m3, a disinfection tank and a sludge thickener. Effective hydraulic load was 245% higher, organic load was 46% lower and nitrogen load was 39% higher than project values. Moreover, higher pollutant loads and more strict emission limits for nitrogen were expected. So the plant was upgraded: the old settler was divided into a sector of 180 m3 that was converted into a predenitrification tank, and a sector of 100 m3 that was converted into a hybrid MBBR tank filled with 50% AnoxKaldnesTM K3 carriers; the new settler was connected to the hybrid MBBR, and the other units were started. Biofilm growth was observed two months after plant restarting, its concentration reached 1.1 gTS/m2 (0.26 kgTS/m3, while activated sludge concentration was 2.0–2.8 kgTSS/m3 in all the period of study. The upgraded plant treats 1587 m3/d wastewater with 57 kgCOD/d, 23 kgBOD/d and 13.3 kgN/d, and has a significant residual capacity; the effluent respects all emission limits.

  11. Effect of pH on nitrate and selenate reduction in flue gas desulfurization brine using the H2-based membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ginkel, Steven W; Yang, Ziming; Kim, Bi-o; Sholin, Mark; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2011-01-01

    Increased tightening of air regulations is leading more electric utilities to install flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. These systems produce brine containing high concentrations of nitrate, nitrite, and selenate which must be removed before discharge. The H2-based membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR) was shown to consistently remove nitrate, nitrite, and selenate at high efficiencies. The maximum selenate removal flux reached 362 mgSe m(-2)d(-1) and was higher than that observed in earlier research, which shows continual improvement of the biofilm for selenate reduction. A low pH of 6.8 inhibited precipitation when treating actual FGD brine, yet did not inhibit removal. SO4(2-) was not removed and therefore did not compete with nitrate, nitrite, and selenate reduction for the available H2.

  12. Model extension, calibration and validation of partial nitritation-anammox process in moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) for reject and mainstream wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojanowicz, K; Plaza, E; Trela, J

    2017-11-09

    In the paper, the extension of mathematical model of partial nitritation-anammox process in a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) is presented. The model was calibrated with a set of kinetic, stoichiometric and biofilm parameters, whose values were taken from the literature and batch tests. The model was validated with data obtained from: laboratory batch experiments, pilot-scale MBBR for a reject water deammonification operated at Himmerfjärden wastewater treatment and pilot-scale MBBR for mainstream wastewater deammonification at Hammarby Sjöstadsverk research facility, Sweden. Simulations were conducted in AQUASIM software. The proposed, extended model proved to be useful for simulating of partial nitritation/anammox process in biofilm reactor both for reject water and mainstream wastewater at variable substrate concentrations (influent total ammonium-nitrogen concentration of 530 ± 68; 45 ± 2.6 and 38 ± 3 gN/m3 - for reject water - and two cases of mainstream wastewater treatment, respectively), temperature (24 ± 2.8; 15 ± 1.1 and 18 ± 0.5°C), pH (7.8 ± 0.2; 7.3 ± 0.1 and 7.4 ± 0.1) and aeration patterns (continuous aeration and intermittent aeration with variable dissolved oxygen concentrations and length of aerated and anoxic phases). The model can be utilized for optimizing and testing different operational strategies of deammonification process in biofilm systems.

  13. Enzymatic cleaning of biofouled thin-film composite reverse osmosis (RO) membrane operated in a biofilm membrane reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohiuddin; Danielsen, Steffen; Johansen, Katja; Lorenz, Lindsey; Nelson, Sara; Camper, Anne

    2014-02-01

    Application of environmentally friendly enzymes to remove thin-film composite (TFC) reverse osmosis (RO) membrane biofoulants without changing the physico-chemical properties of the RO surface is a challenging and new concept. Eight enzymes from Novozyme A/S were tested using a commercially available biofouling-resistant TFC polyamide RO membrane (BW30, FilmTech Corporation, Dow Chemical Co.) without filtration in a rotating disk reactor system operated for 58 days. At the end of the operation, the accumulated biofoulants on the TFC RO surfaces were treated with the three best enzymes, Subtilisin protease and lipase; dextranase; and polygalacturonase (PG) based enzymes, at neutral pH (~7) and doses of 50, 100, and 150 ppm. Contact times were 18 and 36 h. Live/dead staining, epifluorescence microscopy measurements, and 5 μm thick cryo-sections of enzyme and physically treated biofouled membranes revealed that Subtilisin protease- and lipase-based enzymes at 100 ppm and 18 h contact time were optimal for removing most of the cells and proteins from the RO surface. Culturable cells inside the biofilm declined by more than five logs even at the lower dose (50 ppm) and shorter incubation period (18 h). Subtilisin protease- and lipase-based enzyme cleaning at 100 ppm and for 18 h contact time restored the hydrophobicity of the TFC RO surface to its virgin condition while physical cleaning alone resulted in a 50° increase in hydrophobicity. Moreover, at this optimum working condition, the Subtilisin protease- and lipase-based enzyme treatment of biofouled RO surface also restored the surface roughness measured with atomic force microscopy and the mass percentage of the chemical compositions on the TFC surface estimated with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to its virgin condition. This novel study will encourage the further development and application of enzymes to remove biofoulants on the RO surface without changing its surface properties.

  14. Upgrading of the Mirmohana Wastewater Treatment Plant in Kish Island, Iran, using a moving bed biofilm reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Ahmadi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: The performance of full-scale moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR was evaluated as an alternative for upgrading of Kish Island Mirmohana wastewater treatment plant. In this study activated sludge process upgrade to MBBR process and different operating parameters were compared. Materials and Methods: Effect of upgrading on different parameters such as organic loading rate (OLR, mixed liquor suspended solid (MLSS, mixed liquor volatile suspended solid, sludge retention time (SRT, sludge volume index (SVI, hydraulic loading rate (HLR, also removal efficiency of chemical oxygen demand, biochemical oxygen demand and total suspended solid were investigated. Results: The study results show that with increasing the average flow influent (625.97 ± 38.6-1335.3 ± 102.06 m3/d and reducing of aeration tank volume (300-150 m3, OLR (0.29 ± 0.1-1.82 ± 0.15, MLSS (1291.14 ± 463.43 mg/L-7382.85 ± 272.42 mg/L, SRT (12.5 ± 4.2 d-28.79 ± 3.84 d, SVI (54.94 ± 15.82-51.2 ± 9.31, HLR (13.85 ± 0.85-29.45 ± 2.25 m/d, and hydraulic retention time (4.61 ± 0.27-2.17 ± 0.17 h were changed. Effluent concentrations under this operation condition were below the guidelines for irrigation water. Conclusion: Hence, MBBR process is a good alternative for upgrading wastewater plants especially when they have inadequacy space or need modification that will require a large investment.

  15. Pilot-scale comparison of constructed wetlands operated under high hydraulicloading rates and attached biofilm reactors for domestic wastewater treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fountoulakis, M.S.; Terzakis, S.; Chatzinotas, A.

    2009-01-01

    and PBF, whereas that of the FWS systemwas only 57%. Average nutrient removal efficiencies for FWS, HSF, RBC and PBF were 6%, 21%, 40% and 43%, respectively for total nitrogen and 21%, 39%, 41% and 42%, respectively for total phosphorus. Removals of total coliforms were lowest in FWS and PBF (1.3 log...

  16. Model-Based Feasibility Assessment of Membrane Biofilm Reactor to Achieve Simultaneous Ammonium, Dissolved Methane, and Sulfide Removal from Anaerobic Digestion Liquor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueming; Liu, Yiwen; Peng, Lai; Yuan, Zhiguo; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR) is proposed to achieve simultaneous removal of ammonium, dissolved methane, and sulfide from main-stream and side-stream anaerobic digestion liquors. To avoid dissolved methane stripping, oxygen is introduced through gas-permeable membranes, which also from the substratum for the growth of a biofilm likely comprising ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AOB), anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) bacteria, denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) microorganisms, aerobic methane oxidizing bacteria (MOB), and sulfur oxidizing bacteria (SOB). A mathematical model is developed and applied to assess the feasibility of such a system and the associated microbial community structure under different operational conditions. The simulation studies demonstrate the feasibility of achieving high-level (>97.0%), simultaneous removal of ammonium, dissolved methane, and sulfide in the MBfRs from both main-stream and side-stream anaerobic digestion liquors through adjusting the influent surface loading (or hydraulic retention time (HRT)) and the oxygen surface loading. The optimal HRT was found to be inversely proportional to the corresponding oxygen surface loading. Under the optimal operational conditions, AOB, DAMO bacteria, MOB, and SOB dominate the biofilm of the main-stream MBfR, while AOB, Anammox bacteria, DAMO bacteria, and SOB coexist in the side-stream MBfR to remove ammonium, dissolved methane, and sulfide simultaneously. PMID:27112502

  17. Nitrogen removal via nitrite in a partial nitrification sequencing batch biofilm reactor treating high strength ammonia wastewater and its greenhouse gas emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Dong; Zhang, Keyi; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan; Wang, Siyu; Li, Jibin; Han, Fei; Du, Bin; Wei, Qin

    2017-04-01

    In present study, the feasibility of partial nitrification (PN) process achievement and its greenhouse gas emission were evaluated in a sequencing batch biofilm reactor (SBBR). After 90days' operation, the average effluent NH4(+)-N removal efficiency and nitrite accumulation rate of PN-SBBR were high of 98.2% and 87.6%, respectively. Both polysaccharide and protein contents were reduced in loosely bound extracellular polymeric substances (LB-EPS) and tightly bound EPS (TB-EPS) during the achievement of PN-biofilm. Excitation-emission matrix spectra implied that aromatic protein-like, tryptophan protein-like and humic acid-like substances were the main compositions of both kinds of EPS in seed sludge and PN-biofilm. According to typical cycle, the emission rate of CO2 had a much higher value than that of N2O, and their total amounts per cycle were 67.7 and 16.5mg, respectively. Free ammonia (FA) played a significant role on the inhibition activity of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria and the occurrence of nitrite accumulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Hydrogenotrophic denitrification process efficiency and the number of denitrifying bacteria (MPN) in the sequencing batch biofilm reactor (SBBR) with platinum and carbon anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kłodowska, Izabella; Rodziewicz, Joanna; Janczukowicz, Wojciech; Gotkowska-Płachta, Anna; Cydzik-Kwiatkowska, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    This work reports on the effect of electric current density and anode material (platinum, carbon) on the concentration of oxidized and mineral forms of nitrogen, on physical parameters (pH, redox potential, electrical conductivity) and the number of denitrifying bacteria in the biofilm (MPN). Experiments were conducted under anaerobic conditions without and with the flow of electric current (with density of 79 mA · m(-2) and 132 mA · m(-2)). Results obtained in the study enabled concluding that increasing density of electric current caused a decreasing concentration of nitrate in the reactor with platinum anode (R1) and carbon anode (R2). Its concentration depended on anode material. The highest hydrogenotrophic denitrification efficiency was achieved in R2 in which the process was aided by inorganic carbon (CO2) that originated from carbon anode oxidation and the electrical conductivity of wastewater increased as a result of the presence of HCO3(-) and CO3(2-) ions. Strong oxidizing properties of the platinum anode (R1) prevented the accumulation of adverse forms of nitrogen, including nitrite and ammonia. The increase in electric current density affected also a lower number of denitrifying bacteria (MPN) in the biofilm in both reactors (R1 and R2). Metal oxides accumulated on the surface of the cathode had a toxic effect upon microorganisms and impaired the production of a hydrogen donor.

  19. Enhanced nitrogen removal from coal gasification wastewater by simultaneous nitrification and denitrification (SND) in an oxygen-limited aeration sequencing batch biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Weiwei; Han, Yuxing; Ma, Wencheng; Han, Hongjun; Zhu, Hao; Xu, Chunyan; Li, Kun; Wang, Dexin

    2017-11-01

    Simultaneous nitrification and denitrification (SND) for treating coal gasification wastewater (CGW) was achieved successfully in a lab-scale sequencing batch biofilm reactor (SBBR) by oxygen-limited aeration. SND efficiency increased gradually with the concentration of dissolved oxygen (DO) decreased from 4.5mg/L to 0.35mg/L. The maximum SND efficiency of 81.23% was obtained at DO concentration of 0.35mg/L, and the corresponding removal efficiency of NH4(+)-N and TN reached 76.91% and 70.23%, respectively. Meanwhile, COD was removed significantly and toxic compounds were degraded into biodegradable substances, which relieved effectively the inhibition on nitrogen removal. The results indicated that oxygen-limited condition performed greater toxic compounds and nitrogen removal compared with the aerobic condition. Furthermore, the results of scanning electron microscopic (SEM) and microbial community structure confirmed robust biofilm formation provided a suitable anoxic micro-environment for co-existence of nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria and organics degradation bacteria in the reactor at oxygen-limited condition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A review of investigations on wastewater treatment with MSOBR (membrane supported and oxygenated biofilm reactors); Una revision de las investigaciones sobre el tratamiento de aguas residuales con RBSOM (reactores de biopelicula que emplean membranas con material soporte y medio de oxigenacion)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esteban Garcia, A. L.; Tejero Monzon, I.

    2007-07-01

    MSOBR (membrane supported and oxygenated biofilm reactors) are biological reactors for wastewater treatment in which biofilm support and oxygenation functions are carried out by gas permeable membranes. In these conditions, with oxygen and substratum (carbonaceous, nitroge neous) diffusing into the biofilm from opposite sides, different environments are developed inside the biofilm, allowing simultaneous nitrification, denitrification and carbon removal. Other added advantages, such us the possibility of a high oxygen transfer efficiency or those derived from the absence of bubbles in aeration (minimizing foaming and VOC emissions), have lead numerous research groups to work in the development of different MSOBR systems, with promising results that make possible to consider their practical applicability in the near future. (Author) 69 refs.

  1. Locomotion of bacteria in liquid flow and the boundary layer effect on bacterial attachment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chao, E-mail: zhangchao@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Low-grade Energy Utilization Technologies and Systems (Chongqing University), Ministry of Education, Chongqing 400030 (China); Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Liao, Qiang, E-mail: lqzx@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Low-grade Energy Utilization Technologies and Systems (Chongqing University), Ministry of Education, Chongqing 400030 (China); Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Chen, Rong, E-mail: rchen@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Low-grade Energy Utilization Technologies and Systems (Chongqing University), Ministry of Education, Chongqing 400030 (China); Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Zhu, Xun, E-mail: zhuxun@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Low-grade Energy Utilization Technologies and Systems (Chongqing University), Ministry of Education, Chongqing 400030 (China); Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China)

    2015-06-12

    The formation of biofilm greatly affects the performance of biological reactors, which highly depends on bacterial swimming and attachment that usually takes place in liquid flow. Therefore, bacterial swimming and attachment on flat and circular surfaces with the consideration of flow was studied experimentally. Besides, a mathematical model comprehensively combining bacterial swimming and motion with flow is proposed for the simulation of bacterial locomotion and attachment in flow. Both experimental and theoretical results revealed that attached bacteria density increases with decreasing boundary layer thickness on both flat and circular surfaces, the consequence of which is inherently related to the competition between bacterial swimming and the non-slip motion with flow evaluated by the Péclet number. In the boundary layer, where the Péclet number is relatively higher, bacterial locomotion mainly depends on bacterial swimming. Thinner boundary layer promotes bacterial swimming towards the surface, leading to higher attachment density. To enhance the performance of biofilm reactors, it is effective to reduce the boundary layer thickness on desired surfaces. - Highlights: • Study of bacterial locomotion in flow as an early stage in biofilm formation. • Mathematical model combining bacterial swimming and the motion with flow. • Boundary layer plays a key role in bacterial attachment under flow condition. • The competition between bacterial swimming and the motion with flow is evaluated.

  2. Monochloramine Cometabolism by Nitrifying Biofilm Relevant ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recently, biological monochloramine removal (i.e., cometabolism) by a pure culture ammonia–oxidizing bacteria, Nitrosomonas europaea, and a nitrifying mixed–culture have been shown to increase monochloramine demand. Although important, these previous suspended culture batch kinetic experiments were not representative of drinking water distribution systems where bacteria grow predominantly as biofilm attached to pipe walls or sediments and physiological differences may exist between suspension and biofilm growth. Therefore, the current research was an important next step in extending the previous results to investigate monochloramine cometabolism by biofilm grown in annular reactors under drinking water relevant conditions. Estimated monochloramine cometabolism kinetics were similar to those of ammonia metabolism, and monochloramine cometabolism was a significant loss mechanism (25–40% of the observed monochloramine loss). These results demonstrated that monochloramine cometabolism occurred in drinking water relevant nitrifying biofilm; thus, cometabolism may be a significant contribution to monochloramine loss during nitrification episodes in distribution systems. Investigate whether or not nitrifying biofilm can biologically transform monochloramine under drinking water relevant conditions.

  3. Reduction Kinetics of Manganese Dioxide by Geobacter Sulfurreducens and Associated Biofilm Morphology in a Flow-Through Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berns, E.; Werth, C. J.; Valocchi, A. J.; Sanford, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Biogeochemical interactions have been investigated extensively to characterize natural nutrient cycling and predict contaminant transport in surface and groundwater. Dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria, many of which form biofilms, play an important role in reducing a variety of metals in these systems. It has been shown that biofilm morphology is impacted by flow conditions, but there has been little work that explores how reduction kinetics change as a result of these different morphologies. Different flow rates may affect physical properties of the biofilm that influence the rate of substrate reduction. We introduce an approach to calculate changes in Monod kinetic parameters while simultaneously evaluating biofilm morphologies under different flow rates. A vertical, cylindrical flow cell with removable glass slide sections coated in manganese dioxide (electron acceptor) was used to grow a biofilm of Geobacter sulfurreducens with acetate as the electron donor under both high (50 mL/hr) and low (5 mL/h) flow rates. The removable sections allowed for visualization of the biofilm at different time points with a confocal microscope, and quantification of the biomass on the surface using a combination of a protein assay and image analysis. Data collected from the experiments was used to determine yield and specific growth rate at the different flow rates, and a simple numerical model was used to estimate the half saturation constant of manganese dioxide at both flow rates. A smaller half saturation constant was estimated at the higher flow rate, indicating that the biofilm was more efficient in the high flow system, but a strong correlation between morphology and the faster reduction rate was not observed. Monod kinetic parameters are important for the development of accurate nutrient cycling and contaminant transport models in natural environments, and understanding how they are impacted by flow will be important for the development of new, improved models.

  4. Biodegradation of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol in a packed-bed biofilm reactor equipped with an internal net draft tube riser for aeration and liquid circulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-De Jesus, A.; Romano-Baez, F.J.; Leyva-Amezcua, L.; Juarez-Ramirez, C.; Ruiz-Ordaz, N. [Departamento de Ingenieria Bioquimica, Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biologicas, IPN. Prol. Carpio y Plan de Ayala, Colonia Santo Tomas, s/n. CP 11340, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Galindez-Mayer, J. [Departamento de Ingenieria Bioquimica, Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biologicas, IPN. Prol. Carpio y Plan de Ayala, Colonia Santo Tomas, s/n. CP 11340, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: cmayer@encb.ipn.mx

    2009-01-30

    For the aerobic biodegradation of the fungicide and defoliant 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP), a bench-scale packed-bed bioreactor equipped with a net draft tube riser for liquid circulation and oxygenation (PB-ALR) was constructed. To obtain a high packed-bed volume relative to the whole bioreactor volume, a high A{sub D}/A{sub R} ratio was used. Reactor's downcomer was packed with a porous support of volcanic stone fragments. PB-ALR hydrodynamics and oxygen mass transfer behavior was evaluated and compared to the observed behavior of the unpacked reactor operating as an internal airlift reactor (ALR). Overall gas holdup values {epsilon}{sub G}, and zonal oxygen mass transfer coefficients determined at various airflow rates in the PB-ALR, were higher than those obtained with the ALR. When comparing mixing time values obtained in both cases, a slight increment in mixing time was observed when reactor was operated as a PB-ALR. By using a mixed microbial community, the biofilm reactor was used to evaluate the aerobic biodegradation of 2,4,6-TCP. Three bacterial strains identified as Burkholderia sp., Burkholderia kururiensis and Stenotrophomonas sp. constituted the microbial consortium able to cometabolically degrade the 2,4,6-TCP, using phenol as primary substrate. This consortium removed 100% of phenol and near 99% of 2,4,6-TCP. Mineralization and dehalogenation of 2,4,6-TCP was evidenced by high COD removal efficiencies ({approx}95%), and by the stoichiometric release of chloride ions from the halogenated compound ({approx}80%). Finally, it was observed that the microbial consortium was also capable to metabolize 2,4,6-TCP without phenol as primary substrate, with high removal efficiencies (near 100% for 2,4,6-TCP, 92% for COD and 88% for chloride ions)

  5. Analysis of the Microbial Community in an Acidic Hollow-Fiber Membrane Biofilm Reactor (Hf-MBfR Used for the Biological Conversion of Carbon Dioxide to Methane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Chul Shin

    Full Text Available Hydrogenotrophic methanogens can use gaseous substrates, such as H2 and CO2, in CH4 production. H2 gas is used to reduce CO2. We have successfully operated a hollow-fiber membrane biofilm reactor (Hf-MBfR for stable and continuous CH4 production from CO2 and H2. CO2 and H2 were diffused into the culture medium through the membrane without bubble formation in the Hf-MBfR, which was operated at pH 4.5-5.5 over 70 days. Focusing on the presence of hydrogenotrophic methanogens, we analyzed the structure of the microbial community in the reactor. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE was conducted with bacterial and archaeal 16S rDNA primers. Real-time qPCR was used to track changes in the community composition of methanogens over the course of operation. Finally, the microbial community and its diversity at the time of maximum CH4 production were analyzed by pyrosequencing methods. Genus Methanobacterium, related to hydrogenotrophic methanogens, dominated the microbial community, but acetate consumption by bacteria, such as unclassified Clostridium sp., restricted the development of acetoclastic methanogens in the acidic CH4 production process. The results show that acidic operation of a CH4 production reactor without any pH adjustment inhibited acetogenic growth and enriched the hydrogenotrophic methanogens, decreasing the growth of acetoclastic methanogens.

  6. Exploration of rapid start-up of the CANON process from activated sludge inoculum in a sequencing biofilm batch reactor (SBBR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yangfan; Zhang, Xiaoling; Miao, Ying; Hu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a laboratory-scale sequencing biofilm batch reactor (SBBR) was employed to explore a fast start-up of completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON) process. Partial nitrification was achieved by controlling free ammonia concentration and operating at above 30 °C; then the reactor was immediately operated with alternating periods of aerobiosis and anaerobiosis to start the anammox process. The CANON process was successfully achieved in less than 50 d, and the total-nitrogen removal efficiency and the nitrogen removal rate were 81% and 0.14 kg-N m(-3) d(-1) respectively. Afterwards, with the increasing of ammonium loading rate a maximum nitrogen removal rate of 0.39 kg-N m(-3) d(-1) was achieved on day 94. DNA analysis showed that 'Candidatus Brocadia' was the dominant anammox species and Nitrosomonas was the dominant aerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria in the CANON reactor. This study revealed that due to shortening the persistent and stable nitrite accumulation period the long start-up time of the CANON process can be significantly reduced.

  7. Optimization of the moving-bed biofilm sequencing batch reactor (MBSBR) to control aeration time by kinetic computational modeling: Simulated sugar-industry wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faridnasr, Maryam; Ghanbari, Bastam; Sassani, Ardavan

    2016-05-01

    A novel approach was applied for optimization of a moving-bed biofilm sequencing batch reactor (MBSBR) to treat sugar-industry wastewater (BOD5=500-2500 and COD=750-3750 mg/L) at 2-4 h of cycle time (CT). Although the experimental data showed that MBSBR reached high BOD5 and COD removal performances, it failed to achieve the standard limits at the mentioned CTs. Thus, optimization of the reactor was rendered by kinetic computational modeling and using statistical error indicator normalized root mean square error (NRMSE). The results of NRMSE revealed that Stover-Kincannon (error=6.40%) and Grau (error=6.15%) models provide better fits to the experimental data and may be used for CT optimization in the reactor. The models predicted required CTs of 4.5, 6.5, 7 and 7.5 h for effluent standardization of 500, 1000, 1500 and 2500 mg/L influent BOD5 concentrations, respectively. Similar pattern of the experimental data also confirmed these findings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Seasonal variation in communities of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria based on polymerase chain reaction - denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis in a biofilm reactor for drinking water pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Wen; Qin, Ying-Ying; Ren, Hong-Qiang; Li, Dao-Tang; Yang, Hong

    2008-05-01

    The diversity and variation of total and active ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in a full-scale aerated submerged biofilm reactor for drinking water pretreatment were characterized by clone libraries and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of 16S rRNA and its gene during a whole year. Sequences obtained from clone libraries affiliated with the Nitrosomonas oligotropha lineage and the Nitrosomonas communis lineage. An uncultured subgroup of Nitrosomonas communis lineage was also detected. Seasonal variations in both total and active ammonia-oxidizing bacteria communities were observed in the DGGE profiles, but an RNA-based analysis reflected more obvious dynamic changes in ammonia-oxidizer community than a DNA-based approach. Statistical study based on canonical correspondence analysis showed that a community shift of active ammonia oxidizers was significantly influenced by temperature and pH, but no significant correlation was found between environmental variables and total ammonia-oxidizer community shift.

  9. Investigation of total bacterial and ammonia-oxidizing bacterial community composition in a full-scale aerated submerged biofilm reactor for drinking water pretreatment in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ying-Ying; Li, Dao-Tang; Yang, Hong

    2007-03-01

    The community composition of total bacteria and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in a full-scale aerated submerged biofilm reactor for drinking water pretreatment was characterized by analysis of 16S rRNA gene and the functional gene amoA, respectively. Sampling was performed in February and in July. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries revealed 13 bacterial divisions. At both sampling dates, the majority of clone sequences were related to the Alpha- and Betaproteobacteria. A minor proportion belonged to the following groups: Gammaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Nitrospira, Firmicutes, Acidobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Actinobacteria, Planctomycetes, Chloroflexi, Gemmatimonadetes and the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides group. Some sequences related to bacteria owning high potential metabolic capacities were detected in both samples, such as Rhodobacter-like rRNA gene sequences. Surveys of cloned amoA genes from the two biofilm samples revealed ammonia-oxidizing bacterial sequences affiliated with the Nitrosomonas oligotropha lineage, Nitrosomonas communis lineage. An unknown Nitrosomonas group of amoA gene sequences was also detected.

  10. Effects of CeO2 nanoparticles on biological nitrogen removal in a sequencing batch biofilm reactor and mechanism of toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jun; You, Guoxiang; Xu, Yi; Wang, Chao; Wang, Peifang; Miao, Lingzhan; Ao, Yanhui; Li, Yi; Lv, Bowen

    2015-09-01

    The effects of CeO2 nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs) exposure on biological nitrogen removal in a sequencing batch biofilm reactor (SBBR) were investigated. At low concentration (1 mg/L), no significant effect was observed on total nitrogen (TN) removal. However, at high concentrations (10 and 50 mg/L), the TN removal efficiency reduced from 74.09% to 64.26% and 55.17%, respectively. Scanning electron microscope imaging showed large amounts of CeO2 NPs adsorbed on the biofilm, which increased the production of reactive oxygen species. The exposure at only 50 mg/L CeO2 NPs measurably affected the lactate dehydrogenase release. Confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that high concentrations of CeO2 NPs reduced bacterial viability. Moreover, after a short-term exposure, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) were observed to increase, forming a compact matrix to protect the bacteria. The activities of nitrate reductase and ammonia monooxygenase were inhibited, but there was no significant impact on the activity of nitrite oxidoreductase. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. COD, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP) and toxicity removal from synthetic wastewater in a rotating perforated-tubes biofilm reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eker, Serkan [Department of Environmental Engineering, Dokuz Eylul University, Buca, Izmir (Turkey); Kargi, Fikret [Department of Environmental Engineering, Dokuz Eylul University, Buca, Izmir (Turkey)], E-mail: fikret.kargi@deu.edu.tr

    2008-11-30

    Synthetic wastewater containing different concentrations of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP) was biologically treated using a novel rotating perforated-tubes biofilm reactor (RTBR) for chemical oxygen demand (COD), TCP and toxicity removal. Performance of the reactor was investigated as function of major operating variables such as the feed TCP and COD concentrations and A/Q (biofilm surface area/feed flow rate) ratio. A Box-Behnken statistical experiment design method was used by considering the feed TCP (0-400 mg L{sup -1}), COD (1000-4000 mg L{sup -1}) and A/Q ratio (23-163 m{sup 2} d m{sup -3}) as the independent variables while percent TCP, COD, and toxicity removals were the objective functions. The results were correlated with the quadratic model since this was found to be the most suitable one. Response function coefficients were determined by correlating the experimental data with the response function. Percent TCP, COD and toxicity removals estimated from the response functions were in good agreement with the experimental results. TCP, COD and toxicity removals increased with increasing A/Q ratio and decreasing feed TCP concentrations. Percent toxicity removals were always lower than TCP removals indicating presence or formation of some toxic by products from TCP biodegradation. For the feed TCP of 400 mg L{sup -1}, the optimum conditions resulting in maximum COD (99%), TCP (100%) and toxicity (93%) removals were A/Q ratio of nearly 165 m{sup 2} d m{sup -3} and feed COD of 2985 mg L{sup -1}.

  12. Nitrogen compounds transformation in the biological filter by means of direct energy supply to the biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, M; Debowski, M; Krzemieniewski, M

    2006-12-01

    The aim of the research was to determine the effect that direct energy supply to the biofilm, which was attached to the packing with its temperature raised, exerts on the course of nitric compounds changes. The experiment was conducted in a laboratory scale. A model reactor which allowed smooth regulations of the packing temperature was used in the experiment. The energy supply was based on the emission of thermal radiation through the reactor's packing to the biofilm. On the basis of the conducted tests it has been found that such a technological solution improves the efficiency of wastewater treatment, nitrification processes in particular. The temperature range between 20 degrees C and 25 degrees C appeared to be optimal for nitrification. At temperatures higher than 25 degrees C anoxic spheres were generated in the deeper layers of the biofilm, which is proved by denitrification.

  13. Impact of external carbon dose on the removal of micropollutants using methanol and ethanol in post-denitrifying Moving Bed Biofilm Reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torresi, Elena; Escolà Casas, Mònica; Polesel, Fabio; Plósz, Benedek G; Christensson, Magnus; Bester, Kai

    2017-01-01

    Addition of external carbon sources to post-denitrification systems is frequently used in wastewater treatment plants to enhance nitrate removal. However, little is known about the fate of micropollutants in post-denitrification systems and the influence of external carbon dosing on their removal. In this study, we assessed the effects of two different types and availability of commonly used carbon sources -methanol and ethanol- on the removal of micropollutants in biofilm systems. Two laboratory-scale moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBRs), containing AnoxKaldnes K1 carriers with acclimated biofilm from full-scale systems, were operated in continuous-flow using wastewater dosed with methanol and ethanol, respectively. Batch experiments with 22 spiked pharmaceuticals were performed to assess removal kinetics. Acetyl-sulfadiazine, atenolol, citalopram, propranolol and trimethoprim were easily biotransformed in both MBBRs (biotransformations rate constants kbio between 1.2 and 12.9 L gbiomass-1 d-1), 13 compounds were moderately biotransformed (rate constants between 0.2 and 2 L gbiomass-1 d-1) and 4 compounds were recalcitrant. The methanol-dosed MBBR showed higher kbio (e.g., 1.5-2.5-fold) than in the ethanol-dosed MBBR for 9 out of the 22 studied compounds, equal kbio for 10 compounds, while 3 compounds (i.e., targeted sulfonamides) were biotransformed faster in the ethanol-dosed MBBR. While biotransformation of most of the targeted compounds followed first-order kinetics, removal of venlafaxine, carbamazepine, sulfamethoxazole and sulfamethizole could be described with a cometabolic model. Analyses of the microbial composition in the biofilms using 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing revealed that the methanol-dosed MBBR contained higher microbial richness than the one dosed with ethanol, suggesting that improved biotransformation of targeted compounds could be associated with higher microbial richness. During continuous-flow operation, at conditions representative

  14. Staphylococcus epidermidis surfactant peptides promote biofilm maturation and dissemination of biofilm-associated infection in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Rong; Khan, Burhan A.; Cheung, Gordon Y. C.; Bach, Thanh-Huy L.; Jameson-Lee, Max; Kong, Kok-Fai; Queck, Shu Y.; Otto, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Biofilms are surface-attached agglomerations of microorganisms embedded in an extracellular matrix. Biofilm-associated infections are difficult to eradicate and represent a significant reservoir for disseminating and recurring serious infections. Infections involving biofilms frequently develop on indwelling medical devices in hospitalized patients, and Staphylococcus epidermidis is the leading cause of infection in this setting. However, the molecular determinants of biofilm dissemination ar...

  15. Effect of dissolved oxygen on nitrate removal using polycaprolactone as an organic carbon source and biofilm carrier in fixed-film denitrifying reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Guozhi; Xu, Guimei; Gao, Jinfang; Tan, Hongxin

    2016-05-01

    Nitrate-nitrogen (NO3(-)-N) always accumulates in commercial recirculating aquaculture systems (RASs) with aerobic nitrification units. The ability to reduce NO3(-)-N consistently and confidently could help RASs to become more sustainable. The rich dissolved oxygen (DO) content and sensitive organisms stocked in RASs increase the difficulty of denitrifying technology. A denitrifying process using biologically degradable polymers as an organic carbon source and biofilm carrier was proposed because of its space-efficient nature and strong ability to remove NO3(-)-N from RASs. The effect of dissolved oxygen (DO) levels on heterotrophic denitrification in fixed-film reactors filled with polycaprolactone (PCL) was explored in the current experiment. DO conditions in the influent of the denitrifying reactors were set up as follows: the anoxic treatment group (Group A, average DO concentration of 0.28±0.05mg/L), the low-oxygen treatment DO group (Group B, average DO concentration of 2.50±0.24mg/L) and the aerated treatment group (Group C, average DO concentration of 5.63±0.57mg/L). Feeding with 200mg/L of NO3(-)-N, the NO3(-)-N removal rates were 1.53, 1.60 and 1.42kg/m(3) PCL/day in Groups A, B and C, respectively. No significant difference in NO3(-)-N removal rates was observed among the three treatments. It was concluded that the inhibitory effects of DO concentrations lower than 6mg/L on heterotrophic denitrification in the fixed-film reactors filled with PCL can be mitigated. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Calibration and verification of models of organic carbon removal kinetics in Aerated Submerged Fixed-Bed Biofilm Reactors (ASFBBR): a case study of wastewater from an oil-refinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojanowicz, Karol; Wójcik, Włodzimierz

    2011-01-01

    The article presents a case-study on the calibration and verification of mathematical models of organic carbon removal kinetics in biofilm. The chosen Harremöes and Wanner & Reichert models were calibrated with a set of model parameters obtained both during dedicated studies conducted at pilot- and lab-scales for petrochemical wastewater conditions and from the literature. Next, the models were successfully verified through studies carried out utilizing a pilot ASFBBR type bioreactor installed in an oil-refinery wastewater treatment plant. During verification the pilot biofilm reactor worked under varying surface organic loading rates (SOL), dissolved oxygen concentrations and temperatures. The verification proved that the models can be applied in practice to petrochemical wastewater treatment engineering for e.g. biofilm bioreactor dimensioning.

  17. Effects of cerium oxide nanoparticles on the species and distribution of phosphorus in enhanced phosphorus removal sequencing batch biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yi; Wang, Chao; Hou, Jun; Wang, Peifang; You, Guoxiang; Miao, Lingzhan; Lv, Bowen; Yang, Yangyang

    2017-03-01

    The short term (8h) influences of cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2NPs) on the process of phosphorus removal in biofilm were investigated. At concentration of 0.1mg/L, CeO2 NPs posed no impacts on total phosphorus (TP) removal. While at 20mg/L, TP removal efficiency reduced from 85.16% to 59.62%. Results of P distribution analysis and (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy implied that the anaerobic degradation of polyphosphate (polyP) and the release of orthophosphate in extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) were inhibited. After aerobic exposure, the average chain length of polyP in microbial cells and EPS was shorter than control, and monoester and diester phosphates in cells were observed to release into EPS. Moreover, the EPS production and its contribution to P removal increased, while the capacity of EPS in P storage declined. X-ray diffraction analysis and saturation index calculation revealed that the formation of inorganic P precipitation in biofilm was inhibited. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Does reactor staging influence microbial structure and functions in biofilm systems? The case of pre-denitrifying MBBRs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polesel, Fabio; Torresi, Elena; Jensen, Marlene Mark

    -term operation (~500 days) of the three-stage MBBR under continuous-flow conditions, biofilm samples were collected to assess the temporal evolution of the microbial structure in terms of functional gene abundance and biodiversity. A set of batch experiments (day 471) was performed to assess denitrification...... as promising bioengineered solutions (Plósz et al., 2010) for this purpose. In this study, we combined the two solutions and investigated microbial functions (heterotrophic denitrification, pharmaceutical removal) and structure of the microbial community in staged MBBRs for pre-denitrification. A three...... (exposed to lowest availability). These findings indicate that the exposure to tiered substrate availability influenced the capacity of utilizing a different range of carbon sources in each MBBR, thus impacting denitrification and pharmaceutical biotransformation. Preliminary analysis on the microbial...

  19. Biodegradation of benzotriazoles and hydroxy-benzothiazole in wastewater by activated sludge and moving bed biofilm reactor systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazioti, Aikaterini A.; Stasinakis, Athanasios S.; Pantazi, Ypapanti

    2015-01-01

    Two laboratory scale fully aerated continuous flow wastewater treatment systems were used to compare the removal of five benzotriazoles and one benzothiazole by suspended and attached growth biomass. The Activated Sludge system was operated under low organic loading conditions. The Moving Bed Bio...... biomass grown in different bioreactors of MBBR systems were also observed. Batch experiments showed that micropollutants biodegradation by both types of biomass is co-metabolic....

  20. Biodegradation of Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE by a Microbial Consortium in a Continuous Up-Flow Packed-Bed Biofilm Reactor: Kinetic Study, Metabolite Identification and Toxicity Bioassays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guadalupe Alfonso-Gordillo

    Full Text Available This study investigated the aerobic biodegradation of methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE by a microbial consortium in a continuous up-flow packed-bed biofilm reactor using tezontle stone particles as a supporting material for the biofilm. Although MTBE is toxic for microbial communities, the microbial consortium used here was able to resist MTBE loading rates up to 128.3 mg L-1 h-1, with removal efficiencies of MTBE and chemical oxygen demand (COD higher than 90%. A linear relationship was observed between the MTBE loading rate and the MTBE removal rate, as well as between the COD loading rate and the COD removal rate, within the interval of MTBE loading rates from 11.98 to 183.71 mg L-1 h-1. The metabolic intermediate tertiary butyl alcohol (TBA was not detected in the effluent during all reactor runs, and the intermediate 2-hydroxy butyric acid (2-HIBA was only detected at MTBE loading rates higher than 128.3 mg L-1 h-1. The results of toxicity bioassays with organisms from two different trophic levels revealed that the toxicity of the influent was significantly reduced after treatment in the packed-bed reactor. The packed-bed reactor system used in this study was highly effective for the continuous biodegradation of MTBE and is therefore a promising alternative for detoxifying MTBE-laden wastewater and groundwater.

  1. Biodegradation of Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) by a Microbial Consortium in a Continuous Up-Flow Packed-Bed Biofilm Reactor: Kinetic Study, Metabolite Identification and Toxicity Bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso-Gordillo, Guadalupe; Flores-Ortiz, César Mateo; Morales-Barrera, Liliana; Cristiani-Urbina, Eliseo

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the aerobic biodegradation of methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) by a microbial consortium in a continuous up-flow packed-bed biofilm reactor using tezontle stone particles as a supporting material for the biofilm. Although MTBE is toxic for microbial communities, the microbial consortium used here was able to resist MTBE loading rates up to 128.3 mg L-1 h-1, with removal efficiencies of MTBE and chemical oxygen demand (COD) higher than 90%. A linear relationship was observed between the MTBE loading rate and the MTBE removal rate, as well as between the COD loading rate and the COD removal rate, within the interval of MTBE loading rates from 11.98 to 183.71 mg L-1 h-1. The metabolic intermediate tertiary butyl alcohol (TBA) was not detected in the effluent during all reactor runs, and the intermediate 2-hydroxy butyric acid (2-HIBA) was only detected at MTBE loading rates higher than 128.3 mg L-1 h-1. The results of toxicity bioassays with organisms from two different trophic levels revealed that the toxicity of the influent was significantly reduced after treatment in the packed-bed reactor. The packed-bed reactor system used in this study was highly effective for the continuous biodegradation of MTBE and is therefore a promising alternative for detoxifying MTBE-laden wastewater and groundwater.

  2. Effects of influent COD/N ratios on nitrous oxide emission in a sequencing biofilm batch reactor for simultaneous nitrogen and phosphorus removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Guanghuan; Zhao, Jianqiang; Li, Xiaoling; Ding, Xiaoqian; Chen, Aixia; Chen, Ying; Hu, Bo; Wang, Sha

    2017-08-07

    The characteristics of N2O emissions from an anaerobic/aerobic/anoxic (A/O/A) sequencing biofilm batch reactor (SBBR) were investigated under different influent COD/nitrogen (C/N) ratios (from 1-4). Results indicated that the C/N ratios affected the quantity of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) and residual organic substances after the anaerobic period, resulting in the largest N2O emission during aerobic period occurred at a C/N of 2. Moreover, during the anoxic PHB-driven denitrification period, the rapid decline in the dissolved N2O concentration indicated that the nitrite inhibition threshold for N2O reduction increased with the increased C/N ratios, which means the higher influent C/N ratios could lower the inhibition of nitrite on N2O reduction. Finally, more PHB and residual organic substances were provided to denitrification at a high C/N ratio, resulting in less total N2O emission was achieved at a high C/N ratio in the A/O/A SBBR.

  3. Biological treatment of a synthetic dairy wastewater in a sequencing batch biofilm reactor: Statistical modeling using optimization using response surface methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinatizadeh A.A.L.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the interactive effects of initial chemical oxygen demand (CODin, biomass concentration and aeration time on the performance of a lab-scale sequencing batch biofilm reactor (SBBR treating a synthetic dairy wastewater were investigated. The experiments were conducted based on a central composite design (CCD and analyzed using response surface methodology (RSM. The region of exploration for treatment of the synthetic dairy wastewater was taken as the area enclosed by the influent comical oxygen demand (CODin (1000, 3000 and 5000 mg/l, biomass concentration (3000, 5000 and 7000 mg VSS/l and aeration time (2, 8 and 18 h boundaries. Two dependent parameters were measured or calculated as response. These parameters were total COD removal efficiency and sludge volume index (SVI. The maximum COD removal efficiencies (99.5% were obtained at CODin, biomass concentration and aeration time of 5000 mg COD/l, 7000 mg VSS/l and 18 h, respectively. The present study provides valuable information about interrelations of quality and process parameters at different values of the operating variables.

  4. Development of simultaneous nitrification-denitrification (SND) in biofilm reactors with partially coupled a novel biodegradable carrier for nitrogen-rich water purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Feng, Lijuan; Yang, Guangfeng; Dai, Jincheng; Mu, Jun

    2017-11-01

    Development of simultaneous nitrification-denitrification (SND) is a promising approach for nitrogen-rich water purification. Coupling biofilm reactors with novel biodegradable carrier of Pumelo Peel (PP) and various conventional plastic fillers (polyurethane filler, SPR-1 suspension filler, TA-II elastic filler and sphere filler) were examined to achieve SND in this study. Results represented that partially coupled with PP could achieve highly efficient SND. Optimal performance appealed in a bioreactor of coupling PP and SPR-1filler with ammonia and total nitrogen removal efficiencies of 96.8±4.0% and 78.9±9.5%, respectively, as well as low effluent CODMn of 1.85±0.86mgL-1. Notably, PP and conventional plastic filler played obviously different roles in combined bioreactor system. Microbial analysis suggested that dominant genera were Thiothrix, Gemmata, unclassified comanonadaceae, unclassified Rhizobiales, Salipiger, Chloronema and Klebsiella in optimal combined bioreactor, which indicated novel co-existence of heterotrophic nitrification, solid-phase, non-solid-phase heterotrophic and sulfur-based autotrophic denitrification for achieving efficient SND. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Generation, utilization, and transformation of cathode electrons for bioreduction of Fe(III)EDTA in a biofilm electrode reactor related to NOx removal from flue gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Xia, Yinfeng; Zhao, Jingkai; Liu, Nan; Li, Sujing; Zhang, Shihan

    2015-04-07

    A chemical absorption-biological reduction (CABR) integrated system, which employs iron chelate as a solvent, is under development for NOx removal from flue gas. Biofilm electrode reactor (BER) is deemed as a promising bioreactor to regenerate the iron chelate. Although it has been proved that BER can significantly enhance the bioreduction of Fe(III)EDTA, the bioelectrochemistry mechanism involved in the bioreduction of Fe(III)EDTA remains unknown. This work aims to explore this mechanism via the analysis of the generation, utilization, and transformation of cathode electrons in the BER. The results indicate that the generation of cathode electrons follows Faraday's law. The generated cathode electrons were used to produce H2 and directly reduce Fe(III)EDTA in the BER. Meanwhile, the produced H2 served as an electron donor for bioreduction of Fe(III)EDTA. The excess H2 product was transformed to simple organics, e.g., methanol by the hydrogen autotrophy of Pseudomonas under the inorganic and anaerobic conditions. Overall, this work revealed that the reduction of Fe(III)EDTA in the BER was enhanced by both direct electrochemical reduction and indirect bioreduction using H2 as an intermediate. It is also interesting that the excess H2 product was transformed to methanol for microbial metabolism and energy storage in the BER.

  6. High-effective denitrification of low C/N wastewater by combined constructed wetland and biofilm-electrode reactor (CW-BER).

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuan; Wang, Yuhui; Song, Xinshan

    2016-03-01

    The low denitrification effect on constructed wetlands (CWs) treating low carbon to nitrogen ratio (C/N) wastewater was a problem. In this study, a novel coupled system by installing CW and biofilm-electrode reactor (CW-BER) was developed. In this system, the heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrifying bacteria all played their roles in denitrification process. The system was investigated systematically with simulated wastewater at different C/Ns, electric current intensities (I), hydraulic retention times (HRTs), and pH. Results showed that the optimum running conditions were C/N=0.75-1, I=15 mA, HRT=12 h, and pH=7.5. The highest removal efficiency of NO3-N and TN at the best conditions was respectively 63.03% and 98.11% for CW-BER. Also, the TN and NO3-N enhancive removal efficiency of CW-BER was 23.26% and 24.20%, respectively. No residual organic carbon source was detected in final effluent at the best parameters. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Induced biofilm cultivation enhances riboflavin production by an intertidally derived Candida famata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Sayani; Thawrani, Dheeraj; Banerjee, Priyam; Gachhui, Ratan; Mukherjee, Joydeep

    2012-04-01

    The aim of the investigation was to ascertain if surface attachment of Candida famata and aeration enhanced riboflavin production. A newly designed polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) conico-cylindrical flask (CCF) holding eight equidistantly spaced rectangular strips mounted radially on a circular disk allowed comparison of riboflavin production between CCFs with hydrophobic surface (PMMA-CCF), hydrophilic glass surface (GS-CCF), and 500-ml Erlenmeyer flask (EF). Riboflavin production (mg/l) increased from 12.79 to 289.96, from 54.44 to 238.14, and from 36.98 to 158.71 in the GS-CCF, EF, and PMMA-CCF, respectively, when C. famata was grown as biofilm-induced cultures in contrast to traditional planktonic culture. Production was correlated with biofilm formation and planktonic growth was suppressed in cultivations that allowed higher biofilm formation. Enhanced aeration increased riboflavin production in hydrophilic vessels. Temporal pattern of biofilm progression based on two-channel fluorescence detection of extracellular polymeric substances and whole cells in a confocal laser scanning microscope followed by application of PHLIP and ImageJ volume viewer software demonstrated early maturity of a well-developed, stable biofilm on glass in contrast to PMMA surface. A strong correlation between hydrophilic reactor surface, aeration, biofilm formation, and riboflavin production was established in C. famata. Biofilm culture is a new-found means to improve riboflavin production by C. famata.

  8. Application of phototrophic biofilms: from fundamentals to processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strieth, D; Ulber, R; Muffler, K

    2017-12-02

    Biotechnological production of valuables by microorganisms is commonly achieved by cultivating the cells as suspended solids in an appropriate liquid medium. However, the main portion of these organisms features a surface-attached growth in their native habitats. The utilization of such biofilms shows significant challenges, e.g. concerning control of pH, nutrient supply, and heat/mass transfer. But the use of biofilms might also enable novel and innovative production processes addressing robustness and strength of the applied biocatalyst, for example if variable conditions might occur in the process or a feedstock (substrate) is changed in its composition. Besides the robustness of a biofilm, the high density of the immobilized biocatalyst facilitates a simple separation of the catalyst and the extracellular product, whereas intracellular target compounds occur in a concentrated form; thus, expenses for downstream processing can be drastically reduced. While phototrophic organisms feature a fabulous spectrum of metabolites ranging from biofuels to biologically active compounds, the low cell density of phototrophic suspension cultures is still limiting their application for production processes. The review is focusing on pro- and eukaryotic microalgae featuring the production of valuable compounds and highlights requirements for their cultivation as phototrophic biofilms, i.e. setup as well as operation of biofilm reactors, and modeling of phototrophic growth.

  9. Theoretical and practical aspects regarding the development and control of microbial biofilms attached to the surface of dental materials and dental prostheses in particular

    OpenAIRE

    Zisi, Sonila; Bortollini, Sergio; Muntianu, Ligia; Papakoca, Kiro; Burlibasa, Mihai

    2012-01-01

    Microbial biofilms play an essential role in oral pathology, in the etiology of dental caries, periodontopathy, but also in surface contamination of dental materials (and here we refer to prosthetic material such as acrylic materials usedfor dentures, occlusal rims, try-in dentures, dental alloys used in fixed dental restorations, impression materials, etc.)

  10. Locomotion of bacteria in liquid flow and the boundary layer effect on bacterial attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Liao, Qiang; Chen, Rong; Zhu, Xun

    2015-06-12

    The formation of biofilm greatly affects the performance of biological reactors, which highly depends on bacterial swimming and attachment that usually takes place in liquid flow. Therefore, bacterial swimming and attachment on flat and circular surfaces with the consideration of flow was studied experimentally. Besides, a mathematical model comprehensively combining bacterial swimming and motion with flow is proposed for the simulation of bacterial locomotion and attachment in flow. Both experimental and theoretical results revealed that attached bacteria density increases with decreasing boundary layer thickness on both flat and circular surfaces, the consequence of which is inherently related to the competition between bacterial swimming and the non-slip motion with flow evaluated by the Péclet number. In the boundary layer, where the Péclet number is relatively higher, bacterial locomotion mainly depends on bacterial swimming. Thinner boundary layer promotes bacterial swimming towards the surface, leading to higher attachment density. To enhance the performance of biofilm reactors, it is effective to reduce the boundary layer thickness on desired surfaces. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Biofilm roughness determines Cryptosporidium parvum retention in environmental biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiCesare, E A Wolyniak; Hargreaves, B R; Jellison, K L

    2012-06-01

    The genus Cryptosporidium is a group of waterborne protozoan parasites that have been implicated in significant outbreaks of gastrointestinal infections throughout the world. Biofilms trap these pathogens and can contaminate water supplies through subsequent release. Biofilm microbial assemblages were collected seasonally from three streams in eastern Pennsylvania and used to grow biofilms in laboratory microcosms. Daily oocyst counts in the influx and efflux flow allowed the calculation of daily oocyst retention in the biofilm. Following the removal of oocysts from the influx water, oocyst attachment to the biofilm declined to an equilibrium state within 5 days that was sustained for at least 25 days. Varying the oocyst loading rate for the system showed that biofilm retention could be saturated, suggesting that discrete binding sites determined the maximum number of oocysts retained. Oocyst retention varied seasonally but was consistent across all three sites; however, seasonal oocyst retention was not consistent across years at the same site. No correlation between oocyst attachment and any measured water quality parameter was found. However, oocyst retention was strongly correlated with biofilm surface roughness and roughness varied among seasons and across years. We hypothesize that biofilm roughness and oocyst retention are dependent on environmentally driven changes in the biofilm community rather than directly on water quality conditions. It is important to understand oocyst transport dynamics to reduce risks of human infection. Better understanding of factors controlling biofilm retention of oocysts should improve our understanding of oocyst transport at different scales.

  12. Biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Lone

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria can attach to any surface in contact with water and proliferate into complex communities enclosed in an adhesive matrix, these communities are called biofilms. The matrix makes the biofilm difficult to remove by physical means, and bacteria in biofilm can survive treatment with many...... antibiotics, disinfectants and cleaning agents. Biofilms are therefore very difficult to eradicate, and an attractive approach to limit biofilm formation is to reduce bacterial adhesion. In this thesis it was shown that lowering the surface roughness had a greater effect on bacterial retention compared....... The ability to form biofilms, the amount of eDNA produced, and the importance of eDNA for biofilm formation or stability did not correlate and varied from strain to strain. Finally, a method was developed for immobilization of living bacteria for analysis by atomic force microscopy (AFM). AFM is used...

  13. Treatment of petroleum refinery wastewater containing heavily polluting substances in an aerobic submerged fixed-bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendramel, S; Bassin, J P; Dezotti, M; Sant'Anna, G L

    2015-01-01

    Petroleum refineries produce large amount of wastewaters, which often contain a wide range of different compounds. Some of these constituents may be recalcitrant and therefore difficult to be treated biologically. This study evaluated the capability of an aerobic submerged fixed-bed reactor (ASFBR) containing a corrugated PVC support material for biofilm attachment to treat a complex and high-strength organic wastewater coming from a petroleum refinery. The reactor operation was divided into five experimental runs which lasted more than 250 days. During the reactor operation, the applied volumetric organic load was varied within the range of 0.5-2.4 kgCOD.m(-3).d(-1). Despite the inherent fluctuations on the characteristics of the complex wastewater and the slight decrease in the reactor performance when the influent organic load was increased, the ASFBR showed good stability and allowed to reach chemical oxygen demand, dissolved organic carbon and total suspended solids removals up to 91%, 90% and 92%, respectively. Appreciable ammonium removal was obtained (around 90%). Some challenging aspects of reactor operation such as biofilm quantification and important biofilm constituents (e.g. polysaccharides (PS) and proteins (PT)) were also addressed in this work. Average PS/volatile attached solids (VAS) and PT/VAS ratios were around 6% and 50%, respectively. The support material promoted biofilm attachment without appreciable loss of solids and allowed long-term operation without clogging. Microscopic observations of the microbial community revealed great diversity of higher organisms, such as protozoa and rotifers, suggesting that toxic compounds found in the wastewater were possibly removed in the biofilm.

  14. Nuclear reactor neutron shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speaker, Daniel P; Neeley, Gary W; Inman, James B

    2017-09-12

    A nuclear reactor includes a reactor pressure vessel and a nuclear reactor core comprising fissile material disposed in a lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel. The lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel is disposed in a reactor cavity. An annular neutron stop is located at an elevation above the uppermost elevation of the nuclear reactor core. The annular neutron stop comprises neutron absorbing material filling an annular gap between the reactor pressure vessel and the wall of the reactor cavity. The annular neutron stop may comprise an outer neutron stop ring attached to the wall of the reactor cavity, and an inner neutron stop ring attached to the reactor pressure vessel. An excore instrument guide tube penetrates through the annular neutron stop, and a neutron plug comprising neutron absorbing material is disposed in the tube at the penetration through the neutron stop.

  15. Small molecule control of bacterial biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Worthington, Roberta J.; Richards, Justin J.; Melander, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are defined as a surface attached community of bacteria embedded in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances that they have produced. When in the biofilm state, bacteria are more resistant to antibiotics and the host immune response than are their planktonic counterparts. Biofilms are increasingly recognized as being significant in human disease, accounting for 80% of bacterial infections in the body and diseases associated with bacterial biofilms include: lung infect...

  16. Using optical coherence tomography to quantify biofilm structure and mass transfer in combination with mathematical modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Chunyan

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of biofilm structure on the carriers used in moving bed biofilm reactor was investigated by means of optical coherence tomography and biofilm image analysis. A method was developed by combining biofilm imaging and mathematical modeling to study the mass transfer characteristics in the vicinity of biofilm surface. The method was further used to examine the effect of the deposition of organic particle at biofilm surface on the mass transfer from bulk liquid into biofilms.

  17. Application of a new type of moving bio-film in aerobic sequencing batch reactor (aerobic-SBR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirianuntapiboon, Suntud; Yommee, Suriyakit

    2006-01-01

    A moving bio-film (MB), made from the inner tube of used tyres was applied in a conventional-aerobic-SBR for increasing the system efficiency and quality of bio-sludge due to good sedimentation (the density of 1.925+/-0.21 g/cm(3)), non-biodegradability and re-usability of the media without any regeneration. The total bio-sludge mass of the MB-aerobic-SBR was about 30% higher than that of the conventional-aerobic-SBR resulting in a reduction of the F/M value of the system and amount of suspended bio-sludge waste. The amount of suspended bio-sludge waste, SVI and SRT of the MB-aerobic-SBR under a low organic loading of 80+/-9.3g BOD(5)/m(3)-d were 1,485+/-146 mg/d, 51+/-3.7 ml/g and 10.1+/-5.1 days, respectively while they were 1,800+/-152 mg/d, 69+/-4.0 ml/g and 8.3+/-5.3 days, respectively in the conventional-aerobic-SBR. The BOD(5), TKN and TP removal efficiencies of the MB-aerobic-SBR were about 1-2, 2-3 and 10-12% higher, respectively, than that of the conventional-aerobic-SBR. Also, the BOD(5) and COD removal efficiencies of the MB-aerobic-SBR were higher than 95% even when the system was operated with synthetic wastewater containing 800 mg/l BOD(5) under a very low HRT of 1.5 days (organic loading of 528+/-50.8 g BOD(5)/m(3)-d). The effluent BOD(5), COD, total kjeldahl nitrogen, total phosphorus and suspended solids of the MB-aerobic-SBR under a high organic loading of 528+/-50.8 g BOD(5)/m(3)-d were 45+/-5.1, 37+/-3.6, 4.1+/-1.0, 1.5+/-0.80 and 41+/-2mg/l, respectively.

  18. Effects of erythromycin, trimethoprim and clindamycin on attached microbial communities from an effluent dominated prairie stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waiser, M J; Swerhone, G D W; Roy, J; Tumber, V; Lawrence, J R

    2016-10-01

    In this study, differing metrics were utilized to measure effects of erythromycin (ER), trimethoprim (TR) and clindamycin (CL) on the structure and function of attached Wascana Creek, SK microbial communities. All three test antibiotics, especially ER, affected community structure and function of biofilms grown in rotating annular reactors. Biofilm thickness, bacterial biomass, and lectin binding biovolume (exopolymeric substances) were consistently less in ER treated biofilms when compared to the control. As well negative effects on protozoan numbers, and carbon utilization were detected. Finally, PCA analyses of DGGE results indicated that bacterial community diversity in ER exposed biofilms was always different from the control. ER exhibited toxic effects even at lower concentrations. Observations on TR and CL exposed biofilms indicated that bacterial biomass, lectin binding biovolume and carbon utilization were negatively affected as well. In terms of bacterial community diversity, however, CL exposed biofilms tended to group with the control while TR grouped with nutrient additions suggesting both nutritive and toxic effects. This study results represent an important step in understanding antibiotic effects, especially ER, on aquatic microbial communities. And because ER is so ubiquitous in receiving water bodies worldwide, the Wascana study results suggest the possibility of ecosystem disturbance elsewhere. Erythromycin (ER) is ubiquitous in waterbodies receiving sewage effluent. Structure and function of microbial communities from an effluent dominated stream were negatively affected by ER, at realistic concentrations. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Performance of nitrogen and phosphorus removal from municipal wastewater of different C/N ratios using intelligent controlled systems sequencing batch biofilm reactor ( SBBR)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yun-Xiao; Feng, Chuan-Ping; Ding, Da-Hu; Hao, Chun-Bo; Song, Lin

    2011-03-01

    The laboratory-scale experiments were conducted to treat synthetic municipal wastewater at different C/N ratios, using a developed intelligent controller sequencing batch biofilm reactor (SBBR), which formed alternative aerobic-anoxic environment. The performance of nitrogen and phosphorus removal was investigated under different conditions (T = 25 degrees C +/- 1 degrees C, V(aeration) = 150 L/h, COD = 300 mg/L, TP = 5 mg/L, TN = 30 mg/L, t(operation) = 15 d; TN = 60 mg/L, t(operation) = 20 d; TN = 90 mg/L, t(operation) = 20 d). The average removal efficiency of COD reaches 85.2%, 91.1% and 97.7%, the average removal efficiency of TP achieves 94.1%, 95.9%, 96.7% ,the average removal efficiency of NH4(+) -N reaches 95.8%, 99.2%, 80.0%, and the average removal efficiency of TN are 90.7%, 81.1%, 58.3%, respectively. With the decrease of C/N ratios, the removal efficiency of N decreases significantly, while the removal efficiency of COD and TP increase slightly. In intelligent controlled SBBR, simultaneous nitrification and denitrification and shortened simultaneous nitrification and denitrification occur, meanwhile, the denitrification of the system strengthens with the increasing of C/N ratios. After the influent finished, intelligent controlled SBBR starts to operate in aerobic-anoxic environment. The efficiency of phosphorus removal is high, moreover, the theory of phosphorus removal is different from the conventional theory of release anaerobic and uptake aerobic phosphorus.

  20. Bacterial biofilm and associated infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamal, Muhsin; Ahmad, Wisal; Andleeb, Saadia; Jalil, Fazal; Imran, Muhammad; Nawaz, Muhammad Asif; Hussain, Tahir; Ali, Muhammad; Rafiq, Muhammad; Kamil, Muhammad Atif

    2018-01-01

    Microscopic entities, microorganisms that drastically affect human health need to be thoroughly investigated. A biofilm is an architectural colony of microorganisms, within a matrix of extracellular polymeric substance that they produce. Biofilm contains microbial cells adherent to one-another and to a static surface (living or non-living). Bacterial biofilms are usually pathogenic in nature and can cause nosocomial infections. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) revealed that among all microbial and chronic infections, 65% and 80%, respectively, are associated with biofilm formation. The process of biofilm formation consists of many steps, starting with attachment to a living or non-living surface that will lead to formation of micro-colony, giving rise to three-dimensional structures and ending up, after maturation, with detachment. During formation of biofilm several species of bacteria communicate with one another, employing quorum sensing. In general, bacterial biofilms show resistance against human immune system, as well as against antibiotics. Health related concerns speak loud due to the biofilm potential to cause diseases, utilizing both device-related and non-device-related infections. In summary, the understanding of bacterial biofilm is important to manage and/or to eradicate biofilm-related diseases. The current review is, therefore, an effort to encompass the current concepts in biofilm formation and its implications in human health and disease. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Taiwan LLC.

  1. Bacterial biofilm and associated infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhsin Jamal

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Microscopic entities, microorganisms that drastically affect human health need to be thoroughly investigated. A biofilm is an architectural colony of microorganisms, within a matrix of extracellular polymeric substance that they produce. Biofilm contains microbial cells adherent to one-another and to a static surface (living or non-living. Bacterial biofilms are usually pathogenic in nature and can cause nosocomial infections. The National Institutes of Health (NIH revealed that among all microbial and chronic infections, 65% and 80%, respectively, are associated with biofilm formation. The process of biofilm formation consists of many steps, starting with attachment to a living or non-living surface that will lead to formation of micro-colony, giving rise to three-dimensional structures and ending up, after maturation, with detachment. During formation of biofilm several species of bacteria communicate with one another, employing quorum sensing. In general, bacterial biofilms show resistance against human immune system, as well as against antibiotics. Health related concerns speak loud due to the biofilm potential to cause diseases, utilizing both device-related and non-device-related infections. In summary, the understanding of bacterial biofilm is important to manage and/or to eradicate biofilm-related diseases. The current review is, therefore, an effort to encompass the current concepts in biofilm formation and its implications in human health and disease.

  2. Synergistic Interactions in Multispecies Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Dawei

    bacterial species, the study to elucidate the impact of interaction networks on the multispecies biofilms in natural ecosystems, especially in soil, is still at an early stage. The diverse patterns of interactions within the mixed communities as well as the predatorprey relationship between protozoa...... or Paenibacillus amylolyticus as well as in a four-species biofilm. The strongest change in expression profile was observed in the dual-species biofilms of X. retroflexus and P. amylolyticus, while a distinct expression pattern (non-linear response) was detected in the four-species biofilm, indicating...... in integrated communities in multispecies biofilm. However, these conclusions are based on the assumption that this flagellate predator prefers surface attached cells which needs to be confirmed by further studies. Horizontal gene transfer by conjugation occurs more efficiently in biofilms. The connection...

  3. Microtiter dish biofilm formation assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, George A

    2011-01-30

    Biofilms are communities of microbes attached to surfaces, which can be found in medical, industrial and natural settings. In fact, life in a biofilm probably represents the predominate mode of growth for microbes in most environments. Mature biofilms have a few distinct characteristics. Biofilm microbes are typically surrounded by an extracellular matrix that provides structure and protection to the community. Microbes growing in a biofilm also have a characteristic architecture generally comprised of macrocolonies (containing thousands of cells) surrounded by fluid-filled channels. Biofilm-grown microbes are also notorious for their resistance to a range of antimicrobial agents including clinically relevant antibiotics. The microtiter dish assay is an important tool for the study of the early stages in biofilm formation, and has been applied primarily for the study of bacterial biofilms, although this assay has also been used to study fungal biofilm formation. Because this assay uses static, batch-growth conditions, it does not allow for the formation of the mature biofilms typically associated with flow cell systems. However, the assay has been effective at identifying many factors required for initiation of biofilm formation (i.e, flagella, pili, adhesins, enzymes involved in cyclic-di-GMP binding and metabolism) and well as genes involved in extracellular polysaccharide production. Furthermore, published work indicates that biofilms grown in microtiter dishes do develop some properties of mature biofilms, such a antibiotic tolerance and resistance to immune system effectors. This simple microtiter dish assay allows for the formation of a biofilm on the wall and/or bottom of a microtiter dish. The high throughput nature of the assay makes it useful for genetic screens, as well as testing biofilm formation by multiple strains under various growth conditions. Variants of this assay have been used to assess early biofilm formation for a wide variety of microbes

  4. Bacterial lysine decarboxylase influences human dental biofilm lysine content, biofilm accumulation, and subclinical gingival inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohinai, Zsolt; Keremi, Beata; Szoko, Eva; Tabi, Tamas; Szabo, Csaba; Tulassay, Zsolt; Levine, Martin

    2012-08-01

    Dental biofilms contain a protein that inhibits mammalian cell growth, possibly lysine decarboxylase from Eikenella corrodens. This enzyme decarboxylates lysine, an essential amino acid for dentally attached cell turnover in gingival sulci. Lysine depletion may stop this turnover, impairing the barrier to bacterial compounds. The aims of this study are to determine biofilm lysine and cadaverine contents before oral hygiene restriction (OHR) and their association with plaque index (PI) and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) after OHR for 1 week. Laser-induced fluorescence after capillary electrophoresis was used to determine lysine and cadaverine contents in dental biofilm, tongue biofilm, and saliva before OHR and in dental biofilm after OHR. Before OHR, lysine and cadaverine contents of dental biofilm were similar and 10-fold greater than in saliva or tongue biofilm. After 1 week of OHR, the biofilm content of cadaverine increased and that of lysine decreased, consistent with greater biofilm lysine decarboxylase activity. Regression indicated that PI and GCF exudation were positively related to biofilm lysine after OHR, unless biofilm lysine exceeded the minimal blood plasma content, in which case PI was further increased but GCF exudation was reduced. After OHR, lysine decarboxylase activity seems to determine biofilm lysine content and biofilm accumulation. When biofilm lysine exceeds minimal blood plasma content after OHR, less GCF appeared despite more biofilm. Lysine appears important for biofilm accumulation and the epithelial barrier to bacterial proinflammatory agents. Inhibiting lysine decarboxylase may retard the increased GCF exudation required for microbial development and gingivitis.

  5. Turbulence accelerates the growth of drinking water biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsagkari, E; Sloan, W T

    2018-02-10

    Biofilms are found at the inner surfaces of drinking water pipes and, therefore, it is essential to understand biofilm processes to control their formation. Hydrodynamics play a crucial role in shaping biofilms. Thus, knowing how biofilms form, develop and disperse under different flow conditions is critical in the successful management of these systems. Here, the development of biofilms after 4 weeks, the initial formation of biofilms within 10 h and finally, the response of already established biofilms within 24-h intervals in which the flow regime was changed, were studied using a rotating annular reactor under three different flow regimes: turbulent, transition and laminar. Using fluorescence microscopy, information about the number of microcolonies on the reactor slides, the surface area of biofilms and of extracellular polymeric substances and the biofilm structures was acquired. Gravimetric measurements were conducted to characterise the thickness and density of biofilms, and spatial statistics were used to characterise the heterogeneity and spatial correlation of biofilm structures. Contrary to the prevailing view, it was shown that turbulent flow did not correlate with a reduction in biofilms; turbulence was found to enhance both the initial formation and the development of biofilms on the accessible surfaces. Additionally, after 24-h changes of the flow regime it was indicated that biofilms responded to the quick changes of the flow regime. Overall, this work suggests that different flow conditions can cause substantial changes in biofilm morphology and growth and specifically that turbulent flow can accelerate biofilm growth in drinking water.

  6. Wastewater treatment in a hybrid activated sludge baffled reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tizghadam, Mostafa; Dagot, Christophe; Baudu, Michel

    2008-06-15

    A novel hybrid activated sludge baffled reactor (HASBR), which contained both suspended and attached-growth biomass perfect mixing cells in series, was developed by installing standing and hanging baffles and introducing plastic brushes into a conventional activated sludge (CAS) reactor. It was used for the treatment of domestic wastewater. The effects on the operational performance of developing the suspended and attached-growth biomass and reactor configuration were investigated. The change of the flow regime from complete-mix to plug-flow, and the addition of plastic brushes as a support for biofilm, resulted in considerable improvements in the COD, nitrogen removal efficiency of domestic wastewater and sludge settling properties. In steady state, approximately 98+/-2% of the total COD and 98+/-2% of the ammonia of the influent were removed in the HASBR, when the influent wastewater concentration was 593+/-11 mg COD/L and 43+/-5 mg N/L, respectively, at a HRT of 10 h. These results were 93+/-3 and 6+/-3% for the CAS reactor, respectively. Approximately 90+/-7% of the total COD was removed in the HASBR, when the influent wastewater concentration was 654+/-16 mg COD/L at a 3h HRT, and in the organic loading rate (OLR) of 5.36kgCOD m(-3) day(-1). The result for the CAS reactor was 60+/-3%. Existing CAS plants can be upgraded by changing the reactor configuration and introducing biofilm support media into the aeration tank.

  7. Microbial biofilms: a concept for industrial catalysis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosche, Bettina; Li, Xuan Zhong; Hauer, Bernhard; Schmid, Andreas; Buehler, Katja

    2009-11-01

    Biofilm reactors have long been commercially used in the treatment of wastewater and off-gas. New opportunities are arising with the rapid expansion of our understanding of biofilm biology over the last few years. Biofilms have great potential as industrial workhorses for the sustainable production of chemicals because of their inherent characteristics of self-immobilization, high resistance to reactants and long-term activity, which all facilitate continuous processing. A variety of biofilm reactor configurations have been explored for productive catalysis and some reactors have been operated continuously for months. Sectors that might particularly benefit from this biofilm approach include synthetic chemistry (ranging from specialty to bulk chemicals), bioenergy, biologics and the food industry.

  8. Staphylococcus aureus biofilms: recent developments in biofilm dispersal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lister, Jessica L; Horswill, Alexander R

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of nosocomial and community-acquired infections and represents a significant burden on the healthcare system. S. aureus attachment to medical implants and host tissue, and the establishment of a mature biofilm, play an important role in the persistence of chronic infections. The formation of a biofilm, and encasement of cells in a polymer-based matrix, decreases the susceptibility to antimicrobials and immune defenses, making these infections difficult to eradicate. During infection, dispersal of cells from the biofilm can result in spread to secondary sites and worsening of the infection. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of the pathways behind biofilm dispersal in S. aureus, with a focus on enzymatic and newly described broad-spectrum dispersal mechanisms. Additionally, we explore potential applications of dispersal in the treatment of biofilm-mediated infections.

  9. Pilot-scale comparison of constructed wetlands operated under high hydraulic loading rates and attached biofilm reactors for domestic wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountoulakis, M S; Terzakis, S; Chatzinotas, A; Brix, H; Kalogerakis, N; Manios, T

    2009-04-01

    Four different pilot-scale treatment units were constructed to compare the feasibility of treating domestic wastewater in the City of Heraklio, Crete, Greece: (a) a free water surface (FWS) wetland system, (b) a horizontal subsurface flow (HSF) wetland system, (c) a rotating biological contactor (RBC), and (d) a packed bed filter (PBF). All units operated in parallel at various hydraulic loading rates (HLR) ranging from 50% to 175% of designed operating HLR. The study was conducted during an 8 month period and showed that COD removal efficiency of HSF was comparable (>75%) to that of RBC and PBF, whereas that of the FWS system was only 57%. Average nutrient removal efficiencies for FWS, HSF, RBC and PBF were 6%, 21%, 40% and 43%, respectively for total nitrogen and 21%, 39%, 41% and 42%, respectively for total phosphorus. Removals of total coliforms were lowest in FWS and PBF (1.3 log units) and higher in HSF and RBC (2.3 to 2.6 log units). HSF showed slightly lower but comparable effluent quality to that of RBC and PBF systems, but the construction cost and energy requirements for this system are significantly lower. Overall the final decision for the best non-conventional wastewater treatment system depends on the construction and operation cost, the area demand and the required quality of effluent.

  10. Pilot-scale comparison of constructed wetlands operated under high hydraulic loading rates and attached biofilm reactors for domestic wastewater treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fountoulakis, M.S. [School of Agricultural Technology, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, Heraklion (Greece)], E-mail: mfountoul@teemail.gr; Terzakis, S. [School of Agricultural Technology, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, Heraklion (Greece); Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Crete, Chania (Greece); Chatzinotas, A. [UFZ, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ, Department of Environmental Microbiology, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Brix, H. [Department of Biological Sciences, Aarhus University (Denmark); Kalogerakis, N. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Crete, Chania (Greece); Manios, T. [School of Agricultural Technology, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, Heraklion (Greece); Greek Open University, School of Science and Technology, Patras (Greece)

    2009-04-01

    Four different pilot-scale treatment units were constructed to compare the feasibility of treating domestic wastewater in the City of Heraklio, Crete, Greece: (a) a free water surface (FWS) wetland system, (b) a horizontal subsurface flow (HSF) wetland system, (c) a rotating biological contactor (RBC), and (d) a packed bed filter (PBF). All units operated in parallel at various hydraulic loading rates (HLR) ranging from 50% to 175% of designed operating HLR. The study was conducted during an 8 month period and showed that COD removal efficiency of HSF was comparable (> 75%) to that of RBC and PBF, whereas that of the FWS system was only 57%. Average nutrient removal efficiencies for FWS, HSF, RBC and PBF were 6%, 21%, 40% and 43%, respectively for total nitrogen and 21%, 39%, 41% and 42%, respectively for total phosphorus. Removals of total coliforms were lowest in FWS and PBF (1.3 log units) and higher in HSF and RBC (2.3 to 2.6 log units). HSF showed slightly lower but comparable effluent quality to that of RBC and PBF systems, but the construction cost and energy requirements for this system are significantly lower. Overall the final decision for the best non-conventional wastewater treatment system depends on the construction and operation cost, the area demand and the required quality of effluent.

  11. Biogenesis of Enterococcis faecium biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Paganelli, F.L.

    2015-01-01

    Nosocomial infections caused by Enterococcus faecium have rapidly increased worldwide and treatment options become more limited. The presence of antibiotic resistance genes and virulence factors in pathogenic E. faecium contribute to difficult-to-treat infections, frequently biofilm mediated, such as artificial-medical-device-associated infections. Biofilm is defined as a population of bacteria, encased in an extracellular matrix, attached to biotic surfaces, such as plants, animals and the h...

  12. Bacterial interactions in dental biofilm

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Ruijie; Li, Mingyun; Gregory, Richard L

    2011-01-01

    Biofilms are masses of microorganisms that bind to and multiply on a solid surface, typically with a fluid bathing the microbes. The microorganisms that are not attached but are free-floating in an aqueous environment are termed planktonic cells. Traditionally, microbiology research has addressed results from planktonic bacterial cells. However, many recent studies have indicated that biofilms are the preferred form of growth of most microbes and particularly those of a pathogenic nature. Bio...

  13. Municipal wastewater treatment through an aerobic biofilm SBR integrated with a submerged filtration bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai; He, Jiajie; Dougherty, Mark; Yang, Xiaojun; Li, Lu

    2009-01-01

    A biofilm reactor and a gravitational filtration bed were integrated as a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) to aerobically treat a municipal wastewater. Polyacrylonitrile balls (50 mm diameter, 90% porosity) were filled into the upper part of the SBR as biofilm attaching materials and anthracite coal (particle size approximately 1.17 mm) was placed into the lower part as filter media. The SBR was aerated during filling and reaction phases, followed by a 10 min discharge phase during which the wastewater went through the filtration bed without aeration. The SBR was tested with raw wastewater from a municipal WWTP in Wuhan, China from July 2006 to January 2007, during both a warm season and a cold season. The SBR showed a capability to accept COD and turbidity fluctuations in the receiving wastewater. Seasonal influence on COD and nitrogen removal by the biofilm reactor was significant. Nitrogen and phosphorus removals were limited by COD levels in the wastewater. The filtration process removed considerable COD, nitrogen, phosphorus, and turbidity. The overall SBR effluent quality consistently satisfied the national secondary effluent discharge standard of China, except for total phosphorus. An anaerobic phase before the aerobic reaction is proposed to improve phosphorus and nitrogen removal. The filter normally required a backwash every seven days and the water needed for backwash was less than 4% of the wastewater treated by the SBR. This experiment provides information needed for further investigation to improve performance of the SBR.

  14. Bacterial interactions in dental biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ruijie; Li, Mingyun; Gregory, Richard L

    2011-01-01

    Biofilms are masses of microorganisms that bind to and multiply on a solid surface, typically with a fluid bathing the microbes. The microorganisms that are not attached but are free floating in an aqueous environment are termed planktonic cells. Traditionally, microbiology research has addressed results from planktonic bacterial cells. However, many recent studies have indicated that biofilms are the preferred form of growth of most microbes and particularly those of a pathogenic nature. Biofilms on animal hosts have significantly increased resistance to various antimicrobials compared to planktonic cells. These microbial communities form microcolonies that interact with each other using very sophisticated communication methods (i.e., quorum-sensing). The development of unique microbiological tools to detect and assess the various biofilms around us is a tremendously important focus of research in many laboratories. In the present review, we discuss the major biofilm mechanisms and the interactions among oral bacteria.

  15. Enhanced biotransformation of fluoranthene by intertidally derived Cunninghamella elegans under biofilm-based and niche-mimicking conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Sayani; Pramanik, Arnab; Banerjee, Srijoni; Haldar, Saubhik; Gachhui, Ratan; Mukherjee, Joydeep

    2013-12-01

    The aims of the investigation were to ascertain if surface attachment of Cunninghamella elegans and niche intertidal conditions provided in a bioreactor influenced biotransformation of fluoranthene by C. elegans. A newly designed polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) conico-cylindrical flask (CCF) holding eight equidistantly spaced rectangular strips mounted radially on a circular disc allowed comparison of fluoranthene biotransformation between CCFs with a hydrophobic surface (PMMA-CCF) and a hydrophilic glass surface (GS-CCF) and a 500-ml Erlenmeyer flask (EF). Fluoranthene biotransformation was higher by 22-fold, biofilm growth was higher by 3-fold, and cytochrome P450 gene expression was higher by 2.1-fold when C. elegans was cultivated with 2% inoculum as biofilm culture in PMMA-CCF compared to planktonic culture in EF. Biotransformation was enhanced by 7-fold with 10% inoculum. The temporal pattern of biofilm progression based on three-channel fluorescence detection by confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated well-developed, stable biofilm with greater colocalization of fluoranthene within extracellular polymeric substances and filaments of the biofilm grown on PMMA in contrast to a glass surface. A bioreactor with discs rotating at 2 revolutions per day affording 6-hourly emersion and immersion mimicked the niche intertidal habitat of C. elegans and supported biofilm formation and transformation of fluoranthene. The amount of transformed metabolite was 3.5-fold, biofilm growth was 3-fold, and cytochrome P450 gene expression was 1.9-fold higher in the process mimicking the intertidal conditions than in a submerged process without disc rotation. In the CCF and reactor, where biofilm formation was comparatively greater, higher concentration of exopolysaccharides allowed increased mobilization of fluoranthene within the biofilm with consequential higher gene expression leading to enhanced volumetric productivity.

  16. Adsorption and biodegradation of 2-chlorophenol by mixed culture using activated carbon as a supporting medium-reactor performance and model verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yen-Hui

    2017-11-01

    A non-steady-state mathematical model system for the kinetics of adsorption and biodegradation of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP) by attached and suspended biomass on activated carbon process was derived. The mechanisms in the model system included 2-CP adsorption by activated carbon, 2-CP mass transport diffusion in biofilm, and biodegradation by attached and suspended biomass. Batch kinetic tests were performed to determine surface diffusivity of 2-CP, adsorption parameters for 2-CP, and biokinetic parameters of biomass. Experiments were conducted using a biological activated carbon (BAC) reactor system with high recycled rate to approximate a completely mixed flow reactor for model verification. Concentration profiles of 2-CP by model predictions indicated that biofilm bioregenerated the activated carbon by lowering the 2-CP concentration at the biofilm-activated carbon interface as the biofilm grew thicker. The removal efficiency of 2-CP by biomass was approximately 98.5% when 2-CP concentration in the influent was around 190.5 mg L-1 at a steady-state condition. The concentration of suspended biomass reached up to about 25.3 mg L-1 while the thickness of attached biomass was estimated to be 636 μm at a steady-state condition by model prediction. The experimental results agree closely with the results of the model predictions.

  17. Adsorption and biodegradation of 2-chlorophenol by mixed culture using activated carbon as a supporting medium-reactor performance and model verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yen-Hui

    2016-12-01

    A non-steady-state mathematical model system for the kinetics of adsorption and biodegradation of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP) by attached and suspended biomass on activated carbon process was derived. The mechanisms in the model system included 2-CP adsorption by activated carbon, 2-CP mass transport diffusion in biofilm, and biodegradation by attached and suspended biomass. Batch kinetic tests were performed to determine surface diffusivity of 2-CP, adsorption parameters for 2-CP, and biokinetic parameters of biomass. Experiments were conducted using a biological activated carbon (BAC) reactor system with high recycled rate to approximate a completely mixed flow reactor for model verification. Concentration profiles of 2-CP by model predictions indicated that biofilm bioregenerated the activated carbon by lowering the 2-CP concentration at the biofilm-activated carbon interface as the biofilm grew thicker. The removal efficiency of 2-CP by biomass was approximately 98.5% when 2-CP concentration in the influent was around 190.5 mg L-1 at a steady-state condition. The concentration of suspended biomass reached up to about 25.3 mg L-1 while the thickness of attached biomass was estimated to be 636 μm at a steady-state condition by model prediction. The experimental results agree closely with the results of the model predictions.

  18. The catabolite repression control protein Crc plays a role in the development of antimicrobial-tolerant subpopulations in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Lianbo; Chiang, Wen-Chi; Gao, Qingguo

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria form complex surface-attached biofilm communities in nature. Biofilm cells differentiate into subpopulations which display tolerance towards antimicrobial agents. However, the signal transduction pathways regulating subpopulation differentiation in biofilms are largely unelucidated. In t...

  19. Permeabilizing biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukos, Nikolaos S [Revere, MA; Lee, Shun [Arlington, VA; Doukas,; Apostolos, G [Belmont, MA

    2008-02-19

    Methods for permeabilizing biofilms using stress waves are described. The methods involve applying one or more stress waves to a biofilm, e.g., on a surface of a device or food item, or on a tissue surface in a patient, and then inducing stress waves to create transient increases in the permeability of the biofilm. The increased permeability facilitates delivery of compounds, such as antimicrobial or therapeutic agents into and through the biofilm.

  20. An electrochemical impedance model for integrated bacterial biofilms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Yoav, Hadar, E-mail: benyoav@post.tau.ac.il [Department of Physical Electronics, School of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University (Israel); Freeman, Amihay [Department of Molecular Microbiology and Biotechnology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University (Israel); Sternheim, Marek [The Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Tel Aviv University (Israel); Shacham-Diamand, Yosi [Department of Physical Electronics, School of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University (Israel)

    2011-09-30

    Bacterial cells attachment onto solid surfaces and the following growth into mature microbial biofilms may result in highly antibiotic resistant biofilms. Such biofilms may be incidentally formed on tissues or implanted devices, or intentionally formed by directed deposition of microbial sensors on whole-cell bio-chip surface. A new method for electrical characterization of the later on-chip microbial biofilm buildup is presented in this paper. Measurement of impedance vs. frequency in the range of 100 mHz to 400 kHz of Escherichia coli cells attachment to indium-tin-oxide-coated electrodes was carried out while using optical microscopy estimating the electrode area coverage. We show that impedance spectroscopy measurements can be interpreted by a simple electrical equivalent model characterizing both attachment and growth of the biofilm. The correlation of extracted equivalent electrical lumped components with the visual biofilm parameters and their dependence on the attachment and growth phases is confirmed.

  1. Experimental study of biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal in anaerobic/anoxic SBR reactor with separated biofilm nitrification; Indagine sperimentale sulla rimozione biologica di azoto e fosforo in un reattore SBR anaerobico/anossico con nitrificazione separata su biofiltro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bortone, G.; Malaspina, F.; Stante, L.; Tilche, A. [ENEA, Bologna (Italy). Area Energia Ambiente e Salute; Andreottola, G. [Trento Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria Civile-Ambientale

    1995-04-01

    An Anaerobic/Anoxic Sequencing Batch Reactor (A/A SBR) with separated batch biofilm nitrification was tested for nutrient removal against a five step anaerobic anoxic/Oxic SBR (A/O SBR). Piggery waste water, particularly challenging for its low COD/N ratio, was used as feed. A/A SBR, especially in the configuration tested in the second experimental period, showed very good N (97%) and P (90%) removal capacities with excellent sludge settling properties (SVI 52 ml/gSS). On the other hand, organic carbon removal efficiency with nitrate was a little bit lower than with oxygen (90% in A/A SBR against 92% in A/O SBR). Batch biofilm nitrification was very effective, with very high nitrification rates (1.4 mgN gVSS{sup -1} h{sup -1}; 0.1 khN m{sup 3}d{sup -1}). Presence of poly P bacteria in the A/A SBR sludge was assessed through microscopic observation and from the high cellular poly-phosphate content.

  2. Bacterial and archael 16S rRNA sequences and taxonomic summary tables for biofilm samples from the bio-reactors

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — A biofilm anode acclimated with acetate, acetate+methane, and methane growth media for over three years produced a steady current density of 1.6-2.3 mA/m^2 in a...

  3. Impact of external carbon dose on the removal of micropollutants using methanol and ethanol in post-denitrifying Moving Bed Biofilm Reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torresi, Elena; Escolà Casas, Mònica; Polesel, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    of venlafaxine, carbamazepine, sulfamethoxazole and sulfamethizole could be described with a cometabolic model. Analyses of the microbial composition in the biofilms using 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing revealed that the methanol-dosed MBBR contained higher microbial richness than the one dosed with ethanol...

  4. Meningococcal biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lappann, M.; Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Claus, H.

    2006-01-01

    We show that in a standardized in vitro flow system unencapsulated variants of genetically diverse lineages of Neisseria meningitidis formed biofilms, that could be maintained for more than 96 h. Biofilm cells were resistant to penicillin, but not to rifampin or ciprofloxacin. For some strains, m......X alleles was identified among genetically diverse meningococcal strains. PilX alleles differed in their propensity to support autoaggregation of cells in suspension, but not in their ability to support microcolony formation within biofilms in the continuous flow system......., microcolony formation within biofilms was observed. Microcolony formation in strain MC58 depended on a functional copy of the pilE gene encoding the pilus subunit pilin, and was associated with twitching of cells. Nevertheless, unpiliated pilE mutants formed biofilms showing that attachment and accumulation...... of cells did not depend on pilus expression. Mutation and complementation analysis revealed that the type IV pilus-associated protein PilX, which was recently shown to mediate interbacterial aggregation, indirectly supported microcolony formation by contributing to pilus expression. A large number of Pil...

  5. Community Structure and Activity Dynamics of Nitrifying Bacteria in a Phosphate-Removing Biofilm

    OpenAIRE

    Gieseke, Armin; Purkhold, Ulrike; Wagner, Michael; Amann, Rudolf; Schramm, Andreas

    2001-01-01

    The microbial community structure and activity dynamics of a phosphate-removing biofilm from a sequencing batch biofilm reactor were investigated with special focus on the nitrifying community. O2, NO2−, and NO3− profiles in the biofilm were measured with microsensors at various times during the nonaerated-aerated reactor cycle. In the aeration period, nitrification was oxygen limited and restricted to the first 200 μm at the biofilm surface. Additionally, a delayed onset of nitrification aft...

  6. Extracellular DNA formation during biofilm development by freshwater bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Lone; Schramm, Andreas; Revsbech, Niels Peter

    2011-01-01

    Extracellular DNA (eDNA) has been shown to be important for biofilm formation, both in the initial step of biofilm formation (attachment), and for securing the structural stability of the mature biofilm. It is unclear whether a general consensus exists for when in biofilm formation the presence...... of eDNA is most important. In this study, we investigated the significance of eDNA during biofilm formation in four freshwater isolates. The aim was to relate the quantity and timing of eDNA production to the isolates’ ability to form biofilms. eDNA and biofilm biomass was quantified over time during...... biofilm formation in the four environmental isolates: Pseudomonas sp., Serratia sp., Microbacterium sp., and Rheinheimera sp. eDNA was quantified by a novel approach, detecting the fluorescence of PicoGreen® added directly to the biofilm. The isolates Pseudomonas, Serratia and Microbacterium were strong...

  7. Anaerobic rotating disc batch reactor nutrient removal process enhanced by volatile fatty acid addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodziewicz, Joanna; Janczukowicz, Wojciech; Mielcarek, Artur; Filipkowska, Urszula; Kłodowska, Izabella; Ostrowska, Kamila; Duchniewicz, Sylwia

    2015-01-01

    RBC effluent needs further treatment because of water-quality standards requiring low nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations. It may be achieved by using reactors with biomass immobilized on the filling's surface as post-denitrification biofilm reactors. Due to the lack of organic matter in treated wastewater, the introduction of external carbon sources becomes necessary. The new attached growth bioreactor--anaerobic rotating disc batch reactor (ARDBR)--was examined as a post-denitrification reactor. The impact of selected volatile fatty acids on nutrient removal efficiency in an ARDBR was studied. The biofilm was developing on totally submerged discs mounted coaxially on a vertical shaft. Acetic, propionic, butyric and caproic acids were applied. Wastewaters were removed from the reactors after 24-h treatment, together with the excess solids. In the ARDBR tank, there was no biomass in the suspended form at the beginning of the treatment process. Acids with a higher number of carbon atoms (butyric and caproic) were the most efficient in denitrification process. The highest phosphorus removal efficiency was noted in the ARDBR with butyric and propionic acids. The lowest unitary consumption of the external source of carbon in denitrification was recorded for acetic acid, whereas the highest one for caproic acid.

  8. Biofilm Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Moser, Claus Ernst

    A still increasing interest and emphasis on the sessile bacterial lifestyle biofilms has been seen since it was realized that the vast majority of the total microbial biomass exists as biofilms. Aggregation of bacteria was first described by Leeuwenhoek in 1677, but only recently recognized...... as being important in chronic infection. In 1993 the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) recognized that the biofilm mode of growth was relevant to microbiology. This book covers both the evidence for biofilms in many chronic bacterial infections as well as the problems facing these infections...... such as diagnostics, pathogenesis, treatment regimes and in vitro and in vivo models for studying biofilms. This is the first scientific book on biofilm infections, chapters written by the world leading scientist and clinicians. The intended audience of this book is scientists, teachers at university level as well...

  9. An Update on the Management of Endodontic Biofilms Using Root Canal Irrigants and Medicaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Zahed; Soltani, Mohammad Karim; Shalavi, Sousan

    2014-01-01

    Microbial biofilm is defined as a sessile multicellular microbial community characterized by cells that are firmly attached to a surface and enmeshed in a self-produced matrix of extracellular polymeric substances. Biofilms play a very important role in pulp and periradicular pathosis. The aim of this article was to review the role of endodontic biofilms and the effects of root canal irrigants, medicaments as well as lasers on biofilms A Medline search was performed on the English articles published from 1982 to 2013 and was limited to papers published in English. The searched keywords were “Biofilms AND endodontics”, “Biofilms AND sodium hypochlorite”, "Biofilms AND chlorhexidine", "Biofilms AND MTAD", "Biofilms AND calcium hydroxide", “Biofilms AND ozone”, “Biofilms AND lasers” and "Biofilms AND nanoparticles". The reference list of each article was manually searched to find other suitable sources of information. PMID:24688576

  10. Anthranilate deteriorates the structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms and antagonizes the biofilm-enhancing indole effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Kyoung; Park, Ha-Young; Lee, Joon-Hee

    2015-04-01

    Anthranilate and indole are alternative degradation products of tryptophan, depending on the bacterial species. While indole enhances the biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we found that anthranilate, the tryptophan degradation product of P. aeruginosa, had an opposite effect on P. aeruginosa biofilm formation, in which anthranilate deteriorated the mushroom structure of biofilm. The anthranilate effect on biofilm formation was differentially exerted depending on the developmental stage and the presence of shear force. Anthranilate slightly accelerated the initial attachment of P. aeruginosa at the early stage of biofilm development and appeared to build more biofilm without shear force. But anthranilate weakened the biofilm structure in the late stage, deteriorating the mushroom structure of biofilms with shear force to make a flat biofilm. To investigate the interplay of anthranilate with indole in biofilm formation, biofilms were cotreated with anthranilate and indole, and the results showed that anthranilate antagonized the biofilm-enhancing effect of indole. Anthranilate was able to deteriorate the preformed biofilm. The effect of anthranilate and indole on biofilm formation was quorum sensing independent. AntR, a regulator of anthranilate-degrading metabolism was synergistically activated by cotreatment with anthranilate and indole, suggesting that indole might enhance biofilm formation by facilitating the degradation of anthranilate. Anthranilate slightly but significantly affected the cyclic diguaniylate (c-di-GMP) level and transcription of major extracellular polysaccharide (Psl, Pel, and alginate) operons. These results suggest that anthranilate may be a promising antibiofilm agent and antagonize the effect of indole on P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Chlorine dioxide disinfection of single and dual species biofilms, detached biofilm and planktonic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnke, Sabrina; Camper, Anne K

    2012-01-01

    Disinfection efficacy testing is usually done with planktonic cells or more recently, biofilms. While disinfectants are much less effective against biofilms compared to planktonic cells, questions regarding the disinfection tolerance of detached biofilm clusters remain largely unanswered. Burkholderia cepacia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were grown in chemostats and biofilm tubing reactors, with the tubing reactor serving as a source of detached biofilm clusters. Chlorine dioxide susceptibility was assessed for B. cepacia and P. aeruginosa in these three sample types as monocultures and binary cultures. Similar doses of chlorine dioxide inactivated samples of chemostat and tubing reactor effluent and no statistically significant difference between the log(10) reductions was found. This contrasts with chlorine, shown previously to be generally less effective against detached biofilm particles. Biofilms were more tolerant and required chlorine dioxide doses ten times higher than chemostat and tubing reactor effluent samples. A second species was advantageous in all sample types and resulted in lower log(10) reductions when compared to the single species cultures, suggesting a beneficial interaction of the species.

  12. Short and long term biosorption of silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles in heterotrophic biofilms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrling, Maria P. [Engler-Bunte-Institut, Chair of Water Chemistry and Water Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Engler-Bunte-Ring 1, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Lackner, Susanne [Engler-Bunte-Institut, Chair of Water Chemistry and Water Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Engler-Bunte-Ring 1, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Urban Bioengineering for Resource Recovery, Bauhaus-Institute for Infrastructure Solutions, Bauhaus-Universität Weimar, Coudraystraße 7, 99423 Weimar (Germany); Tatti, Oleg [Engler-Bunte-Institut, Chair of Water Chemistry and Water Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Engler-Bunte-Ring 1, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Guthausen, Gisela [Pro" 2NMR, Institute for Biological Interfaces 4 and Institute for Mechanical Process Engineering and Mechanics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Adenauerring 20b, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Delay, Markus [Engler-Bunte-Institut, Chair of Water Chemistry and Water Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Engler-Bunte-Ring 1, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Franzreb, Matthias [Institute of Functional Interfaces, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Horn, Harald, E-mail: harald.horn@kit.edu [Engler-Bunte-Institut, Chair of Water Chemistry and Water Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Engler-Bunte-Ring 1, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); DVGW Research Laboratories for Water Chemistry and Water Technology, Engler-Bunte-Ring 1, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    The increased application of engineered nanoparticles (ENP) in industrial processes and consumer products has raised concerns about their impact on health and environmental safety. When ENP enter the global water cycle by e.g. wastewater streams, wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) represent potential sinks for ENP. During biological WWT, the attachment of ENP to biofilms is responsible for the desired removal of ENP from the water phase avoiding their release into the aquatic environment. However, the fundamental mechanisms guiding the interactions between ENP and biofilms are not yet fully understood. Therefore, this study investigates the behavior and biosorption of inorganic ENP, here magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles coated with silica (scFe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-NP), with heterotrophic biofilms at different time scales. Their magnetic properties enable to follow scFe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-NP in the biofilm system by a magnetic susceptibility balance and magnetic resonance imaging. Biofilms were exposed to scFe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-NP at short contact times (5 min) in flow cells and complementary, scFe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-NP were introduced into a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) to be observed for 27 d. Mass balances revealed that scFe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-NP sorbed to the biofilm within a few minutes, but that the total biosorption was rather low (3.2 μg Fe/mg TSS). scFe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-NP mainly sorbed to the biofilm surface inducing the detachment of outer biofilm parts starting after an exposure time of 3 h in the MBBR. The biosorption depended on the exposure concentration of scFe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-NP, but less on the contact time. Most scFe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-NP exited the flow cell (up to 65%) and the MBBR (57%) via the effluent. This effect was favored by the stabilization of scFe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-NP in the bulk liquid by organic matter leading to a low retention capacity of the MBBR system. The results contribute to improve our understanding about the fate of ENP in environmental and in

  13. Salmonella biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castelijn, G.A.A.

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm formation by Salmonellaspp. is a problem in the food industry, since biofilms may act as a persistent source of product contamination. Therefore the aim of this study was to obtain more insight in the processes involved and the factors contributing to Salmonellabiofilm formation. A

  14. Dynamics of biofilm formation during anaerobic digestion of organic waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Susanne; Schropp, Daniel; Bengelsdorf, Frank R; Othman, Maazuza; Kazda, Marian

    2014-10-01

    Biofilm-based reactors are effectively used for wastewater treatment but are not common in biogas production. This study investigated biofilm dynamics on biofilm carriers incubated in batch biogas reactors at high and low organic loading rates for sludge from meat industry dissolved air flotation units. Biofilm formation and dynamics were studied using various microscopic techniques. Resulting micrographs were analysed for total cell numbers, thickness of biofilms, biofilm-covered surface area, and the area covered by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Cell numbers within biofilms (10(11) cells ml(-1)) were up to one order of magnitude higher compared to the numbers of cells in the fluid reactor content. Further, biofilm formation and structure mainly correlated with the numbers of microorganisms present in the fluid reactor content and the organic loading. At high organic loading (45 kg VS m(-3)), the thickness of the continuous biofilm layer ranged from 5 to 160 μm with an average of 51 μm and a median of 26 μm. Conversely, at lower organic loading (15 kg VS m(-3)), only microcolonies were detectable. Those microcolonies increased in their frequency of occurrence during ongoing fermentation. Independently from the organic loading rate, biofilms were embedded completely in EPS within seven days. The maturation and maintenance of biofilms changed during the batch fermentation due to decreasing substrate availability. Concomitant, detachment of microorganisms within biofilms was observed simultaneously with the decrease of biogas formation. This study demonstrates that biofilms of high cell densities can enhance digestion of organic waste and have positive effects on biogas production. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Staphylococcus epidermidis surfactant peptides promote biofilm maturation and dissemination of biofilm-associated infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong; Khan, Burhan A; Cheung, Gordon Y C; Bach, Thanh-Huy L; Jameson-Lee, Max; Kong, Kok-Fai; Queck, Shu Y; Otto, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Biofilms are surface-attached agglomerations of microorganisms embedded in an extracellular matrix. Biofilm-associated infections are difficult to eradicate and represent a significant reservoir for disseminating and recurring serious infections. Infections involving biofilms frequently develop on indwelling medical devices in hospitalized patients, and Staphylococcus epidermidis is the leading cause of infection in this setting. However, the molecular determinants of biofilm dissemination are unknown. Here we have demonstrated that specific secreted, surfactant-like S. epidermidis peptides--the β subclass of phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs)--promote S. epidermidis biofilm structuring and detachment in vitro and dissemination from colonized catheters in a mouse model of device-related infection. Our study establishes in vivo significance of biofilm detachment mechanisms for the systemic spread of biofilm-associated infection and identifies the effectors of biofilm maturation and detachment in a premier biofilm-forming pathogen. Furthermore, by demonstrating that antibodies against PSMβ peptides inhibited bacterial spread from indwelling medical devices, we have provided proof of principle that interfering with biofilm detachment mechanisms may prevent dissemination of biofilm-associated infection.

  16. Covalent immobilization of catalase onto spacer-arm attached modified florisil: characterization and application to batch and plug-flow type reactor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alptekin, Ozlem; Tükel, S Seyhan; Yildirim, Deniz; Alagöz, Dilek

    2011-12-10

    Catalase was covalently immobilized onto florisil via glutaraldehyde (GA) and glutaraldehyde+6-amino hexanoic acid (6-AHA) (as a spacer arm). Immobilizations of catalase onto modified supports were optimized to improve the efficiency of the overall immobilization procedures. The V(max) values of catalase immobilized via glutaraldehyde (CIG) and catalase immobilized via glutaraldehyde+6-amino hexanoic acid (CIG-6-AHA) were about 0.6 and 3.4% of free catalase, respectively. The usage of 6-AHA as a spacer arm caused about 40 folds increase in catalytic efficiency of CIG-6-AHA (8.3 × 10⁵ M⁻¹ s⁻¹) as compared to that of CIG (2.1 × 10⁴ M⁻¹ s⁻¹). CIG and CIG-6-AHA retained 67 and 35% of their initial activities at 5 °C and 71 and 18% of their initial activities, respectively at room temperature at the end of 6 days. Operational stabilities of CIG and CIG-6-AHA were investigated in batch and plug-flow type reactors. The highest total amount of decomposed hydrogen peroxide (TAD-H₂O₂) was determined as 219.5 μmol for CIG-6-AHA in plug-flow type reactor. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Treatment of a simulated textile wastewater containing the Reactive Orange 16 azo dye by a combination of ozonation and moving-bed biofilm reactor: evaluating the performance, toxicity, and oxidation by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Francine D; Bassin, João Paulo; Dezotti, Márcia

    2017-03-01

    In this study, an aqueous solution containing the azo dye Reactive Orange 16 (RO16) was subjected to two sequential treatment processes, namely: ozonation and biological treatment in a moving-bed biofilm reactor (MBBR). The most appropriate ozonation pretreatment conditions for the biological process and the toxicity of the by-products resulting from RO16 ozone oxidation were evaluated. The results showed that more than 97 % of color removal from the dye solutions with RO16 concentrations ranging from 25 to 100 mg/L was observed in 5 min of ozone exposure. However, the maximum total organic carbon removal achieved by ozonation was only 48 %, indicating partial mineralization of the dye. Eleven intermediate organic compounds resulting from ozone treatment of RO16 solution were identified by LC/MS analyses at different contact times. The toxicity of the dye-containing solution decreased after 2 min of ozonation, but increased at longer contact times. The results further demonstrated that the ozonolysis products did not affect the performance of the subsequent MBBR, which achieved an average chemical oxygen demand (COD) and ammonium removal of 93 ± 1 and 97 ± 2 %, respectively. A second MBBR system fed with non-ozonated dye-containing wastewater was run in parallel for comparison purposes. This reactor also showed an appreciable COD (90 ± 1 %) and ammonium removal (97 ± 2 %), but was not effective in removing color, which remained practically invariable over the system. The use of short ozonation times (5 min) and a compact MBBR has shown to be effective for the treatment of the simulated textile wastewater containing the RO16 azo dye.

  18. Biodiversity, community structure and function of biofilms in stream ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besemer, Katharina

    2015-12-01

    Multi-species, surface-attached biofilms often dominate microbial life in streams and rivers, where they contribute substantially to biogeochemical processes. The microbial diversity of natural biofilms is huge, and may have important implications for the functioning of aquatic environments and the ecosystem services they provide. Yet the causes and consequences of biofilm biodiversity remain insufficiently understood. This review aims to give an overview of current knowledge on the distribution of stream biofilm biodiversity, the mechanisms generating biodiversity patterns and the relationship between biofilm biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Copyright © 2015 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Biofilm Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2015-01-01

    During the past decade we have gained much knowledge about the molecular mechanisms that are involved in initiation and termination of biofilm formation. In many bacteria, these processes appear to occur in response to specific environmental cues and result in, respectively, induction or terminat......During the past decade we have gained much knowledge about the molecular mechanisms that are involved in initiation and termination of biofilm formation. In many bacteria, these processes appear to occur in response to specific environmental cues and result in, respectively, induction...... or termination of biofilm matrix production via the second messenger molecule c-di-GMP. In between initiation and termination of biofilm formation we have defined specific biofilm stages, but the currently available evidence suggests that these transitions are mainly governed by adaptive responses......, and not by specific genetic programs. It appears that biofilm formation can occur through multiple pathways and that the spatial structure of the biofilms is species dependent as well as dependent on environmental conditions. Bacterial subpopulations, e.g., motile and nonmotile subpopulations, can develop...

  20. Dynamic interactions of neutrophils and biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefine Hirschfeld

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The majority of microbial infections in humans are biofilm-associated and difficult to treat, as biofilms are highly resistant to antimicrobial agents and protect themselves from external threats in various ways. Biofilms are tenaciously attached to surfaces and impede the ability of host defense molecules and cells to penetrate them. On the other hand, some biofilms are beneficial for the host and contain protective microorganisms. Microbes in biofilms express pathogen-associated molecular patterns and epitopes that can be recognized by innate immune cells and opsonins, leading to activation of neutrophils and other leukocytes. Neutrophils are part of the first line of defense and have multiple antimicrobial strategies allowing them to attack pathogenic biofilms. Objective/design: In this paper, interaction modes of neutrophils with biofilms are reviewed. Antimicrobial strategies of neutrophils and the counteractions of the biofilm communities, with special attention to oral biofilms, are presented. Moreover, possible adverse effects of neutrophil activity and their biofilm-promoting side effects are discussed. Results/conclusion: Biofilms are partially, but not entirely, protected against neutrophil assault, which include the processes of phagocytosis, degranulation, and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps. However, virulence factors of microorganisms, microbial composition, and properties of the extracellular matrix determine whether a biofilm and subsequent microbial spread can be controlled by neutrophils and other host defense factors. Besides, neutrophils may inadvertently contribute to the physical and ecological stability of biofilms by promoting selection of more resistant strains. Moreover, neutrophil enzymes can degrade collagen and other proteins and, as a result, cause harm to the host tissues. These parameters could be crucial factors in the onset of periodontal inflammation and the subsequent tissue breakdown.

  1. Survival of Campylobacter jejuni in biofilms after chlorine treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunyaboon, S

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Survival of C. jejuni in biofilms isolated from two chicken houses in Thailand (FBRL-C04, FBRLB05 and FBRL-B06 after chlorine treatment was studied. Biofilm cultures were grown on stainless steel surface in 50% trypticase soy broth for 3 days, subsequently C. jejuni cells were allowed to attach to these biofilms for 4 h at 25ºC. Sodium hypochlorite was used to prepare sanitizing solution with active chlorine of 15 ppm and 25 ppm. Stainless steel coupons containing C. jejuni with and without biofilms were treated with chlorine for 30 sec and neutralized with 0.05% sodium thiosulfate. At both concentrations, C. jejuni were inactivated to lower than 1 log10CFU/cm2 when initial attachment load was approximately 4 log10CFU/cm2. However, C. jejuni in all samples treated with 15 ppm active chlorine were recovered in enrichment media. When treated with the higher concentration of chlorine, 25 ppm, C. jejuni in biofilm of FBRL-C04 (5/9, FBRL-B06 (1/9 and biofilm-free surface (1/9 could also be recovered. This indicates that chlorine treatment at 15 and 25 ppm could not completely inactivate C. jejuni attached to biofilms and biofilm-free surfaces. Biofilm of FBRL-C04 enhanced the survival of C. jejuni after chlorine treatment at 25 ppm although biofilm initial attachment as determined by plate count method was similar to that of other biofilms. Attachment load of viable biofilm cells may not contribute to enhanced survival of C. jejuni in chlorine treatment.

  2. Surface Sensing for Biofilm Formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Yi Chang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aggregating and forming biofilms on biotic or abiotic surfaces are ubiquitous bacterial behaviors under various conditions. In clinical settings, persistent presence of biofilms increases the risks of healthcare-associated infections and imposes huge healthcare and economic burdens. Bacteria within biofilms are protected from external damage and attacks from the host immune system and can exchange genomic information including antibiotic-resistance genes. Dispersed bacterial cells from attached biofilms on medical devices or host tissues may also serve as the origin of further infections. Understanding how bacteria develop biofilms is pertinent to tackle biofilm-associated infections and transmission. Biofilms have been suggested as a continuum of growth modes for adapting to different environments, initiating from bacterial cells sensing their attachment to a surface and then switching cellular physiological status for mature biofilm development. It is crucial to understand bacterial gene regulatory networks and decision-making processes for biofilm formation upon initial surface attachment. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the model microorganisms for studying bacterial population behaviors. Several hypotheses and studies have suggested that extracellular macromolecules and appendages play important roles in bacterial responses to the surface attachment. Here, I review recent studies on potential molecular mechanisms and signal transduction pathways for P. aeruginosa surface sensing.

  3. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) for In-Situ Biofilm Surface Characterization during Free Chlorine and Monochloramine Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinking water distribution system biofilm are attached to pipe walls and found in sediments. These biofilms are complex and contain a variety of microorganisms embedded in a matrix with extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), providing protection from disinfection. Without pro...

  4. Focus on the physics of biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecuyer, Sigolene; Stocker, Roman; Rusconi, Roberto

    2015-03-01

    Bacteria are the smallest and most abundant form of life. They have traditionally been considered as primarily planktonic organisms, swimming or floating in a liquid medium, and this view has shaped many of the approaches to microbial processes, including for example the design of most antibiotics. However, over the last few decades it has become clear that many bacteria often adopt a sessile, surface-associated lifestyle, forming complex multicellular communities called biofilms. Bacterial biofilms are found in a vast range of environments and have major consequences on human health and industrial processes, from biofouling of surfaces to the spread of diseases. Although the study of biofilms has been biologists’ territory for a long time, a multitude of phenomena in the formation and development of biofilms hinges on physical processes. We are pleased to present a collection of research papers that discuss some of the latest developments in many of the areas to which physicists can contribute a deeper understanding of biofilms, both experimentally and theoretically. The topics covered range from the influence of physical environmental parameters on cell attachment and subsequent biofilm growth, to the use of local probes and imaging techniques to investigate biofilm structure, to the development of biofilms in complex environments and the modeling of colony morphogenesis. The results presented contribute to addressing some of the major challenges in microbiology today, including the prevention of surface contamination, the optimization of biofilm disruption methods and the effectiveness of antibiotic treatments.

  5. Electric Charge Characteristics of Biofilms Formed on Various Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andi Kurniawan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Biofilm is predominant habitats of microbes in aquatic environments. Biofilm forms when microbes attach on surfaces and produce extracellular polymeric substances. Biofilm matrix has been showed to have high sorption capacity to accumulate various ions including nutrient ions. The main driving force of the accumulation of the ions is supposed to be an electrostatic interaction between the nutrient and the biofilm polymer. Hence, the understanding of electric charge properties of biofilm polymer is critically important to understand the accumulation process. The present study aimed to investigate the characteristics of electric charge properties of biofilm polymer from biofilms formed on various surfaces (stone, wood, glass bottle, teflon, rubber, and stainless steel. The electric charge properties of biofilm polymers were investigated by measuring the electrophoretic mobility of the biofilms in various pHs (range from pH 2 to pH 9 and titrated HCl and NaOH aqueous solution to the biofilm suspension. The results indicated that biofilm matrices seemed to have both negatively and positively charged sites as a result of ionization of functional groups existed in biofilm polymers. According to the results of this study, there is a universal characteristic of electric charge properties of biofilms regardless of the kind of substrate.

  6. COMPOSITION AND METHOD FOR CONTROLLING MICROBIAL ADHESION AND BIOFILM FORMATION OF SURFACES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    The present invention describes how coating of surfaces with an extract, particularly a fish extract, can significantly reduce microbial adhesion, attachment, colonization and biofilm formation on surfaces. Such reduction of microbial adherence, attachment and colonization will be applicable...

  7. Effect of Lactoferrin on Oral Biofilm Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    dental implant failures, denture stomatitis and oral yeast infections such as candidiasis. It is one of the most widely studied biofilm systems, yet...oral cavity, Lf could reduce the attachment of oral bacteria to surfaces, rendering them more susceptible to mechanical removal by host saliva. The... removal could lead to the reduction of oral biofilms, specialized microbial communi- ties for long-term survival on surfaces in the oral cavity. Data

  8. Biofilm formation and granule properties in anaerobic digestion at high salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliano, M C; Ismail, S B; Stams, A J M; Plugge, C M; Temmink, H; Van Lier, J B

    2017-09-15

    For the anaerobic biological treatment of saline wastewater, Anaerobic Digestion (AD) is currently a possibility, even though elevated salt concentrations can be a major obstacle. Anaerobic consortia and especially methanogenic archaea are very sensitive to fluctuations in salinity. When working with Upflow Sludge Blanket Reactor (UASB) technology, in which the microorganisms are aggregated and retained in the system as a granular biofilm, high sodium concentration negatively affects aggregation and consequently process performances. In this research, we analysed the structure of the biofilm and granules formed during the anaerobic treatment of high salinity (at 10 and 20 g/L of sodium) synthetic wastewater at lab scale. The acclimated inoculum was able to accomplish high rates of organics removal at all the salinity levels tested. 16S rRNA gene clonal analysis and Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) analyses identified the acetoclastic Methanosaeta harundinacea as the key player involved acetate degradation and microbial attachment/granulation. When additional calcium (1 g/L) was added to overcome the negative effect of sodium on microbial aggregation, during the biofilm formation process microbial attachment and acetate degradation decreased. The same result was observed on granules formation: while calcium had a positive effect on granules strength when added to UASB reactors, Methanosaeta filaments were not present and the degradation of the partially acidified substrate was negatively influenced. This research demonstrated the possibility to get granulation at high salinity, bringing to the forefront the importance of a selection towards Methanosaeta cells growing in filamentous form to obtain strong and healthy granules. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. DNase I and proteinase K impair Listeria monocytogenes biofilm formation and induce dispersal of pre-existing biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Uyen T; Burrows, Lori L

    2014-09-18

    Current sanitation methods in the food industry are not always sufficient for prevention or dispersal of Listeria monocytogenes biofilms. Here, we determined if prevention of adherence or dispersal of existing biofilms could occur if biofilm matrix components were disrupted enzymatically. Addition of DNase during biofilm formation reduced attachment (biofilms with 100μg/ml of DNase for 24h induced incomplete biofilm dispersal, with biofilm remaining compared to control. In contrast, addition of proteinase K completely inhibited biofilm formation, and 72h biofilms-including those grown under stimulatory conditions-were completely dispersed with 100μg/ml proteinase K. Generally-regarded-as-safe proteases bromelain and papain were less effective dispersants than proteinase K. In a time course assay, complete dispersal of L. monocytogenes biofilms from both polystyrene and type 304H food-grade stainless steel occurred within 5min at proteinase K concentrations above 25μg/ml. These data confirm that both DNA and proteins are required for L. monocytogenes biofilm development and maintenance, and that these components of the biofilm matrix can be targeted for effective prevention and removal of biofilms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Role of multicellular aggregates in biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Kasper N.; Hutchison, Jaime B.; Melaugh, Gavin

    2016-01-01

    In traditional models of in vitro biofilm development, individual bacterial cells seed a surface, multiply, and mature into multicellular, three-dimensional structures. Much research has been devoted to elucidating the mechanisms governing the initial attachment of single cells to surfaces. However......, in natural environments and during infection, bacterial cells tend to clump as multicellular aggregates, and biofilms can also slough off aggregates as a part of the dispersal process. This makes it likely that biofilms are often seeded by aggregates and single cells, yet how these aggregates impact biofilm...... initiation and development is not known. Here we use a combination of experimental and computational approaches to determine the relative fitness of single cells and preformed aggregates during early development of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. We find that the relative fitness of aggregates depends...

  11. Long term effects of cerium dioxide nanoparticles on the nitrogen removal, micro-environment and community dynamics of a sequencing batch biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yi; Wang, Chao; Hou, Jun; Wang, Peifang; Miao, Lingzhan; You, Guoxiang; Lv, Bowen; Yang, Yangyang; Zhang, Fei

    2017-12-01

    The influences of cerium dioxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs) on nitrogen removal in biofilm were investigated. Prolonged exposure (75d) to 0.1mg/L CeO2 NPs caused no inhibitory effects on nitrogen removal, while continuous addition of 10mg/L CeO2 NPs decreased the treatment efficiency to 53%. With the progressive concentration of CeO2 NPs addition, the removal efficiency could nearly stabilize at 67% even with the continues spike of 10mg/L. The micro-profiles of dissolved oxygen, pH, and oxidation reduction potential suggested the developed protection mechanisms of microbes to progressive CeO2 NPs exposure led to the less influence of microenvironment, denitrification bacteria and enzyme activity than those with continuous ones. Furthermore, high throughput sequencing illustrated the drastic shifted communities with gradual CeO2 NPs spiking was responsible for the adaption and protective mechanisms. The present study demonstrated the acclimated microbial community was able to survive CeO2 NPs addition more readily than those non-acclimated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Disturbance frequency determines morphology and community development in multi-species biofilm at the landscape scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Milferstedt

    Full Text Available Many natural and engineered biofilm systems periodically face disturbances. Here we present how the recovery time of a biofilm between disturbances (expressed as disturbance frequency shapes the development of morphology and community structure in a multi-species biofilm at the landscape scale. It was hypothesized that a high disturbance frequency favors the development of a stable adapted biofilm system while a low disturbance frequency promotes a dynamic biofilm response. Biofilms were grown in laboratory-scale reactors over a period of 55-70 days and exposed to the biocide monochloramine at two frequencies: daily or weekly pulse injections. One untreated reactor served as control. Biofilm morphology and community structure were followed on comparably large biofilm areas at the landscape scale using automated image analysis (spatial gray level dependence matrices and community fingerprinting (single-strand conformation polymorphisms. We demonstrated that a weekly disturbed biofilm developed a resilient morphology and community structure. Immediately after the disturbance, the biofilm simplified but recovered its initial complex morphology and community structure between two biocide pulses. In the daily treated reactor, one organism largely dominated a morphologically simple and stable biofilm. Disturbances primarily affected the abundance distribution of already present bacterial taxa but did not promote growth of previously undetected organisms. Our work indicates that disturbances can be used as lever to engineer biofilms by maintaining a biofilm between two developmental states.

  13. Efficacy of a surfactant-based wound dressing on biofilm control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percival, Steven L; Mayer, Dieter; Salisbury, Anne-Marie

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of both a nonantimicrobial and antimicrobial (1% silver sulfadiazine-SSD) surfactant-based wound dressing in the control of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus sp, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) biofilms. Anti-biofilm efficacy was evaluated in numerous adapted American Standards for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard biofilm models and other bespoke biofilm models. The ASTM standard models employed included the Minimum biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC) biofilm model (ASTM E2799) and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) biofilm reactor model (ASTM 2871). Such bespoke biofilm models included the filter biofilm model and the chamberslide biofilm model. Results showed complete kill of microorganisms within a biofilm using the antimicrobial surfactant-based wound dressing. Interestingly, the nonantimicrobial surfactant-based dressing could disrupt existing biofilms by causing biofilm detachment. Prior to biofilm detachment, we demonstrated, using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), the dispersive effect of the nonantimicrobial surfactant-based wound dressing on the biofilm within 10 minutes of treatment. Furthermore, the non-antimicrobial surfactant-based wound dressing caused an increase in microbial flocculation/aggregation, important for microbial concentration. In conclusion, this nonantimicrobial surfactant-based wound dressing leads to the effective detachment and dispersion of in vitro biofilms. The use of surfactant-based wound dressings in a clinical setting may help to disrupt existing biofilm from wound tissue and may increase the action of antimicrobial treatment. © 2017 by the Wound Healing Society.

  14. Product Attachment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mugge, R.

    2007-01-01

    The topic of this doctoral research is the concept of product attachment for ordinary consumer durables. Product attachment is defined as the strength of the emotional bond a consumer experiences with a specific product. Specifically, the research investigated how this bond develops over time and

  15. Hydrophobin coating prevents Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation on different surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artini, Marco; Cicatiello, Paola; Ricciardelli, Annarita; Papa, Rosanna; Selan, Laura; Dardano, Principia; Tilotta, Marco; Vrenna, Gianluca; Tutino, Maria Luisa; Giardina, Paola; Parrilli, Ermenegilda

    2017-08-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is a significant nosocomial pathogen in predisposed hosts because of its capability of forming a biofilm on indwelling medical devices. The initial stage of biofilm formation has a key role in S. epidermidis abiotic surface colonization. Recently, many strategies have been developed to create new anti-biofilm surfaces able to control bacterial adhesion mechanisms. In this work, the self-assembled amphiphilic layers formed by two fungal hydrophobins (Vmh2 and Pac3) have proven to be able to reduce the biofilm formed by different strains of S. epidermidis on polystyrene surfaces. The reduction in the biofilm thickness on the coated surfaces and the preservation of cell vitality have been demonstrated through confocal laser scanning microscope analysis. Moreover, the anti-biofilm efficiency of the self-assembled layers on different medically relevant materials has also been demonstrated using a CDC biofilm reactor.

  16. Density of founder cells affects spatial pattern formation and cooperation in Bacillus subtilis biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gestel, Jordi; Weissing, Franz J.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Kovacs, Akos T.

    2014-01-01

    In nature, most bacteria live in surface-attached sedentary communities known as biofilms. Biofilms are often studied with respect to bacterial interactions. Many cells inhabiting biofilms are assumed to express 'cooperative traits', like the secretion of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS). These

  17. Wound biofilms: lessons learned from oral biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancl, Kimberly A.; Kirsner, Robert S.; Ajdic, Dragana

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms play an important role in the development and pathogenesis of many chronic infections. Oral biofilms, more commonly known as dental plaque,are a primary cause of oral diseases including caries, gingivitis and periodontitis. Oral biofilms are commonly studied as model biofilm systems as they are easily accessible, thus biofilm research in oral diseases is advanced with details of biofilm formation and bacterial interactions being well-elucidated. In contrast, wound research has relatively recently directed attentionto the role biofilms have in chronic wounds. This review discusses the biofilms in periodontal disease and chronic wounds with comparisons focusing on biofilm detection, biofilm formation, the immune response to biofilms, bacterial interaction and quorum sensing. Current treatment modalities used by both fields as well as future therapies are also discussed. PMID:23551419

  18. Formation of biofilm by strains of Listeria monocytogenes isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quantification of biofilm formation by 40 Listeria monocytogenes strains from wara soft cheese and its processing environment was assessed on glass vials surfaces. Attachement to glass surface was quantified using a crystal violet binding assay. All the 40 strains produced biofilms after 48 and 72 h incubation at 37oC.

  19. Effect of curcumin on Helicobacter pylori biofilm formation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2009-10-05

    Oct 5, 2009 ... human gastric mucosa, which suggested involving in the pathogenicity of gastric ulcers (Carron et ... subjects has supported the possibility of oral cavity being as one another possible ..... Two biofilm characteristics were observed, including pellicle (left test tube; arrowed) and attached biofilm (right test tube; ...

  20. Transformation and sorption of illicit drug biomarkers in sewer biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramin, Pedram; Brock, Andreas Libonati; Causanilles Llanes, Ana

    2017-01-01

    In-sewer transformation of drug biomarkers (excreted parent drugs and metabolites) can be influenced by the presence of biomass in suspended form as well as attached to sewer walls (biofilms). Biofilms are likely the most abundant and biologically active biomass fraction in sewers. In this study...

  1. Characterisation of Lactobacillus plantarum single and multi-strain biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernández Ramírez, Mónica D.

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms consist of microorganisms attached to a surface and embedded in a protective matrix of extracellular polymeric substances. Within a biofilm, micro-organisms are protected from harsh environmental conditions including those resulting from cleaning and disinfecting agents leading to food

  2. [Function of biofilms in phytopathogenic bacterial-host interactions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Liyang; Fang, Rongxiang; Jia, Yantao

    2017-09-25

    Biofilms are complex three-dimensional bacterial assemblages that attach to biotic or abiotic solid surfaces, and frequently embed within a self-produced matrix of extracellular polymeric substances. Biofilm formation is a microbial defense response to biotic and abiotic stresses, and a key factor for survival in adverse environments. A wide variety of microorganisms can colonize distant tissues of higher plants, such as leaves, vascular network and roots, and adhere to the surface of the tissues to form biofilms. The dynamic processes in forming biofilms in response to plant internal environment are key steps required for full virulence of phytopathogenic bacteria. Exploring the mechanisms involved in regulation of bacterial biofilms is important for understanding the plant-pathogens interactions. In this review, we summarized the research progresses related to the biofilms of bacterial phytopathogens, including biofilm characteristics, essential regulatory mechanisms and key signals affecting the transition between a planktonic lifestyle and multicellular behavior.

  3. Bacteriophages as Weapons Against Bacterial Biofilms in the Food Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Diana; Rodríguez-Rubio, Lorena; Martínez, Beatriz; Rodríguez, Ana; García, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Microbiological contamination in the food industry is often attributed to the presence of biofilms in processing plants. Bacterial biofilms are complex communities of bacteria attached to a surface and surrounded by an extracellular polymeric material. Their extreme resistance to cleaning and disinfecting processes is related to a unique organization, which implies a differential bacterial growth and gene expression inside the biofilm. The impact of biofilms on health, and the economic consequences, has promoted the development of different approaches to control or remove biofilm formation. Recently, successful results in phage therapy have boosted new research in bacteriophages and phage lytic proteins for biofilm eradication. In this regard, this review examines the environmental factors that determine biofilm development in food-processing equipment. In addition, future perspectives for the use of bacteriophage-derived tools as disinfectants are discussed. PMID:27375566

  4. Chitinases are negative regulators of Francisella novicida biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Myung-Chul; Dean, Scott; Marakasova, Ekaterina S; Nwabueze, Albert O; van Hoek, Monique L

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms, multicellular communities of bacteria, may be an environmental survival and transmission mechanism of Francisella tularensis. Chitinases of F. tularensis ssp. novicida (Fn) have been suggested to regulate biofilm formation on chitin surfaces. However, the underlying mechanisms of how chitinases may regulate biofilm formation are not fully determined. We hypothesized that Fn chitinase modulates bacterial surface properties resulting in the alteration of biofilm formation. We analyzed biofilm formation under diverse conditions using chitinase mutants and their counterpart parental strain. Substratum surface charges affected biofilm formation and initial attachments. Biophysical analysis of bacterial surfaces confirmed that the chi mutants had a net negative-charge. Lectin binding assays suggest that chitinase cleavage of its substrates could have exposed the concanavalin A-binding epitope. Fn biofilm was sensitive to chitinase, proteinase and DNase, suggesting that Fn biofilm contains exopolysaccharides, proteins and extracellular DNA. Exogenous chitinase increased the drug susceptibility of Fn biofilms to gentamicin while decreasing the amount of biofilm. In addition, chitinase modulated bacterial adhesion and invasion of A549 and J774A.1 cells as well as intracellular bacterial replication. Our results support a key role of the chitinase(s) in biofilm formation through modulation of the bacterial surface properties. Our findings position chitinase as a potential anti-biofilm enzyme in Francisella species.

  5. Biofilm formation of Pasteurella multocida on bentonite clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, Ramachandranpillai; Nair, Govindapillai Krishnan; Mini, Mangattumuruppel; Joseph, Leo; Saseendranath, Mapranath Raghavan; John, Koshy

    2013-06-01

    Biofilms are structural communities of bacterial cells enshrined in a self produced polymeric matrix. The studies on biofilm formation of Pasteurella multocida have become imperative since it is a respiratory pathogen and its biofilm mode could possibly be one of its virulence factors for survival inside a host. The present study describes a biofilm assay for P. multocida on inert hydrophilic material called bentonite clay. The potential of the organism to form in vitro biofilm was assessed by growing the organism under nutrient restriction along with the inert substrate bentonite clay, which will provide a surface for attachment. For quantification of biofilm, plate count by the spread plate method was employed. Capsule production of the attached bacteria was demonstrated by light microscopic examination following Maneval staining and capsular polysaccharide estimation was done using standard procedures. The biofilm formation peaked on the third day of incubation (1.54 ×10(6) cfu/g of bentonite clay) while the planktonic cells were found to be at a maximum on day one post inoculation (8.10 ×10(8) cfu/ml of the broth). Maneval staining of late logarithmic phase biofilm cultures revealed large aggregates of bacterial cells, bacteria appearing as chains or as a meshwork. The capsular polysaccharide estimation of biofilm cells revealed a 3.25 times increase over the planktonic bacteria. The biofilm cells cultured on solid media also produced some exclusive colony morphotypes.

  6. Biofilm Surface Density Determines Biocide Effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Bas

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available High resistance of biofilms for chemical challenges is a serious industrial and medical problem. In this work a gradient of surface covered with biofilm has been produced and correlated to the effectiveness of different commercially available oxidative biocides. The results for thin Escherichia coli biofilms grown in rich media supplemented with glucose or lactose on glass or poly methyl methacrylate surfaces indicate that the effectiveness of hydrogen peroxide or chlorine dioxide and quaternary ammonium compounds is inversely proportional to the fraction of the surface covered with the biofilm. In areas where biofilm covered more than 90% of the available surface the biocide treatment was inefficient after 60 min of incubation. The combined effect of oxidant and surfactant increased the effectiveness of the biocide. On the other hand, the increased biofilm viscoelasticity reduced biocide effectiveness. The results emphasize differential biocide effectiveness depending on the fraction of the attached bacterial cells. The results suggest that biofilm biocide resistance is an acquired property that increases with biofilm maturation. The more dense sessile structures present lower log reductions compared to less dense ones.

  7. Bacterial biofilms. Bacteria Quorum sensing in biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Vorobey

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Data on biofilms, their structure and properties, peculiarities of formation and interaction between microorganisms in the film are presented. Information on discovery and study of biofilms, importance of biofilms in the medical and clinical microbiology are offered. The data allow to interpret biofilm as a form of existence of human normal microflora. For the exchange of information within the biofilm between the individual cells of the same or different species bacteria use the signal molecules of the Quorum sensing system. Coordination of bacterial cells activity in the biofilms gives them significant advantages: in the biofilms bacteria are protected from the influence of the host protective factors and the antibacterial drugs.

  8. Investigation of mass transfer phenomena in biofilm systems; Untersuchung von Stoffuebergangsphaenomenen in Biofilmsystemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waesche, S.; Hempel, D.C. [Technische Univ. Braunschweig (Germany). Inst. fuer Bioverfahrenstechnik; Horn, H. [Fachhochschule Magdeburg (Germany). Hydro- und Abfallchemie

    1999-07-01

    Substance transfer in the boundary layer bulk/biofilm can be only inadequately described by conventional model concepts. In such cases where the surface structure of a biofilm adapts to given hydraulic conditions, the substance transfer phenomena need to be studied in depth. In addition, the entire biofilm structure is much influenced both by substrate conditions and by hydrodynamic conditions during growth. With a view to quantifying these factors, biofilms were cultured under various substrate and hydrodynamic conditions in tube reactors with a diameter of 2.6 cm. For characterizing the cultured biofilms, biofilm density and substrate turnover measured as maximum mass transfer density were determined in each test series. Biofilm density (dry biomass/biofilm volume) was determined by gravimetry. Maximum mass transfer densities in biofilm were established in batch experiments with excess substrate. By means of oxygen microelectrodes, oxygen profiles in the biofilm were measured directly in the reactor. These measurements concerned biofilms of thicknesses ranging from 400 to 2000 {mu}m, where the biofilms did not yet exhibit erosion. (orig.) [German] Der Stoffuebergang in der Grenzschicht Bulk/Biofilm ist mit herkoemmlichen Modellvorstellungen nur ungenuegend beschreibbar. Eine sich an die aktuellen hydraulischen Bedingungen anpassende Oberflaechenstruktur des Biofilms erfordert eine intensive Untersuchung der Stoffuebergangsphaenomene in derartigen Systemen. Darueber hinaus wird die gesamte Biofilmstruktur sowohl von den Substratbedingungen als auch von den hydrodynamischen Bedingungen waehrend des Wachstums stark beeinflusst. Um diese Faktoren quantifizieren zu koennen, wurden Biofilme bei verschiedenen Substrat- und hydrodynamischen Bedingungen in Rohrreaktoren mit einem Durchmesser von 2,6 cm kultiviert. Zur Charakterisierung der kultivierten Biofilme wurde die Biofilmdichte und der Substratumsatz, gemessen als maximale Massestromdichte, bei jeder Versuchsreihe

  9. Strategies for the startup of methanogenic inverse fluidized-bed reactors using colonized particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado-Lassman, A; Sandoval-Ramos, A; Flores-Altamirano, M G; Vallejo-Cantú, N A; Méndez-Contreras, J M

    2010-05-01

    One of the inconveniences in the startup of methanogenic inverse fluidized-bed reactors (IFBRs) is the long period required for biofilm formation and stabilization of the system. Previous researchers have preferred to start up in batch mode to shorten stabilization times. Much less work has been done with continuous-mode startup for the IFBR configuration of reactors. In this study, we prepared two IFBRs with similar characteristics to compare startup times for batch- and continuous-operation modes. The reactors were inoculated with a small quantity of colonized particles and run for a period of 3 months, to establish the optimal startup strategy using synthetic media as a substrate (glucose as a source of carbon). After the startup stage, the continuous- and batch-mode reactors removed more than 80% of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) in 51 and 60 days of operation, respectively; however, at the end of the experiments, the continuous-mode reactor had more biomass attached to the support media than the batch-mode reactor. Both reactors developed fully covered support media, but only the continuous-mode reactor had methane yields close to the theoretical value that is typical of stable reactors. Then, a combined startup strategy was proposed, with industrial wastewater as the substrate, using a sequence of batch cycles followed by continuous operation, which allows stable operation at an organic loading rate of 20 g COD/L x d in 15 days. Using a fraction of colonized support as an inoculum presents advantages, with respect to previously reported strategies.

  10. Individual Constituents from Essential Oils Inhibit Biofilm Mass Production by Multi-Drug Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Espina, Laura; Pagán, Rafael; López, Daniel; García-Gonzalo, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus represents a problem in both the medical field and the food industry, because the biofilm structure provides protection to embedded cells and it strongly attaches to surfaces. This circumstance is leading to many research programs seeking new alternatives to control biofilm formation by this pathogen. In this study we show that a potent inhibition of biofilm mass production can be achieved in community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-M...

  11. A technology for the investigation of biofilm transmission under shearing pressures

    OpenAIRE

    Matilla, Miguel A.

    2017-01-01

    Biofilm formation is a multifactorial and dynamic process. Stages of biofilm formation are highly regulated and include bacterial attachment to a target surface, formation of microcolonies, biofilm maturation and dispersion. This article highlights recent research by Gusnaniar et al., (2017) in which the authors develop a device to investigate bacterial biofilm transmission between surfaces under shearing pressures. The instrument can potentially be used to investigate the role of different g...

  12. Development of a Linear Flow Channel Reactor for sulphur removal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-09-23

    Sep 23, 2013 ... in acid mine wastewater treatment operations ... bed reactor treating a synthetic acid mine water (2 000 mg∙ℓ−1 Na2SO4 solution) and the Liner Flow Channel Reactors (sur- face area 1.1 m2 and ... Keywords: floating sulphur biofilms, acid mine drainage, AMD passive treatment, linear flow channel reactor,.

  13. Bacterial Lysine Decarboxylase Influences Human Dental Biofilm Lysine Content, Biofilm Accumulation and Sub-Clinical Gingival Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohinai, Z.; Keremi, B.; Szoko, E.; Tabi, T.; Szabo, C.; Tulassay, Z.; Levine, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Dental biofilms contain a protein that inhibits mammalian cell growth, possibly lysine decarboxylase from Eikenella corrodens. This enzyme decarboxylates lysine, an essential amino acid for dentally attached cell turnover in gingival sulci. Lysine depletion may stop this turnover, impairing the barrier to bacterial compounds. The aims of this study were to determine biofilm lysine and cadaverine contents before oral hygiene restriction (OHR), and their association with plaque index (PI) and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) after OHR for a week. Methods Laser-induced fluorescence after capillary electrophoresis was used to determine lysine and cadaverine contents in dental biofilm, tongue biofilm and saliva before OHR and in dental biofilm after OHR. Results Before OHR, lysine and cadaverine contents of dental biofilm were similar and 10-fold greater than in saliva or tongue biofilm. After a week of OHR, the biofilm content of cadaverine increased and that of lysine decreased, consistent with greater biofilm lysine decarboxylase activity. Regression indicated that PI and GCF exudation were positively related to biofilm lysine post-OHR, unless biofilm lysine exceeded the minimal blood plasma content in which case PI was further increased but GCF exudation was reduced. Conclusions After OHR, lysine decarboxylase activity seems to determine biofilm lysine content and biofilm accumulation. When biofilm lysine exceeds minimal blood plasma content after OHR, less GCF appeared despite more biofilm. Lysine appears important for biofilm accumulation and the epithelial barrier to bacterial proinflammatory agents. Clinical Relevance Inhibiting lysine decarboxylase may retard the increased GCF exudation required for microbial development and gingivitis. PMID:22141361

  14. Fiber Attachment Module Experiment (FAME): Using a Multiplexed Miniature Hollow Fiber Membrane Bioreactor Solution for Rapid Process Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunn, Griffin; Wheeler, Raymond; Hummerick, Mary; Birmele, Michele; Richards, Jeffrey; Coutts, Janelle; Koss, Lawrence; Spencer, Lashelle.; Johnsey, Marissa; Ellis, Ronald

    Bioreactor research, even today, is mostly limited to continuous stirred-tank reactors (CSTRs). These are not an option for microgravity applications due to the lack of a gravity gradient to drive aeration as described by the Archimedes principle. This has led to testing of Hollow Fiber Membrane Bioreactors (HFMBs) for microgravity applications, including possible use for wastewater treatment systems for the International Space Station (ISS). Bioreactors and filtration systems for treating wastewater could avoid the need for harsh pretreatment chemicals and improve overall water recovery. However, the construction of these reactors is difficult and commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) versions do not exist in small sizes. We have used 1-L modular HFMBs in the past, but the need to perform rapid testing has led us to consider even smaller systems. To address this, we designed and built 125-mL, rectangular reactors, which we have called the Fiber Attachment Module Experiment (FAME) system. A polycarbonate rack of four square modules was developed with each module containing removable hollow fibers. Each FAME reactor is self-contained and can be easily plumbed with peristaltic and syringe pumps for continuous recycling of fluids and feeding, as well as fitted with sensors for monitoring pH, dissolved oxygen, and gas measurements similar to their larger counterparts. The first application tested in the FAME racks allowed analysis of over a dozen fiber surface treatments and three inoculation sources to achieve rapid reactor startup and biofilm attachment (based on carbon oxidation and nitrification of wastewater). With these miniature FAME reactors, data for this multi-factorial test were collected in duplicate over a six-month period; this greatly compressed time period required for gathering data needed to study and improve bioreactor performance.

  15. Biofilm Risks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wirtanen, Gun Linnea; Salo, Satu

    2016-01-01

    in food factories. In the prevention of biofilm formation microbial control in process lines should both limit the number of microbes on surfaces and reduce microbial activity in the process. Thus the hygienic design of process equipment and process lines is important in improving the process hygiene...

  16. Residual structure of Streptococcus mutans biofilm following complete disinfection favors secondary bacterial adhesion and biofilm re-development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya Ohsumi

    Full Text Available Chemical disinfection of oral biofilms often leaves biofilm structures intact. This study aimed to examine whether the residual structure promotes secondary bacterial adhesion. Streptococcus mutans biofilms generated on resin-composite disks in a rotating disc reactor were disinfected completely with 70% isopropyl alcohol, and were again cultured in the same reactor after resupplying with the same bacterial solution. Specimens were subjected to fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy, viable cell counts and PCR-Invader assay in order to observe and quantify secondarily adhered cells. Fluorescence microscopic analysis, particularly after longitudinal cryosectioning, demonstrated stratified patterns of viable cells on the disinfected biofilm structure. Viable cell counts of test specimens were significantly higher than those of controls, and increased according to the amount of residual structure and culture period. Linear regression analysis exhibited a high correlation between viable and total cell counts. It was concluded that disinfected biofilm structures favored secondary bacterial adhesion.

  17. Methane yield and microscopic observation as monitoring biofilm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anaerobic biofilm behavior on polyethylene and Extendosphere™ supports was evaluated during start-up of an inverse fluidized bed reactor using methane yield and microscopic observation as parameter monitoring techniques. Two anaerobic inverse fluidized bed reactors were used, one filled with triturated polyethylene ...

  18. A reproducible oral microcosm biofilm model for testing dental materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudney, J D; Chen, R; Lenton, P; Li, J; Li, Y; Jones, R S; Reilly, C; Fok, A S; Aparicio, C

    2012-12-01

    Most studies of biofilm effects on dental materials use single-species biofilms, or consortia. Microcosm biofilms grown directly from saliva or plaque are much more diverse, but difficult to characterize. We used the Human Oral Microbial Identification Microarray (HOMIM) to validate a reproducible oral microcosm model. Saliva and dental plaque were collected from adults and children. Hydroxyapatite and dental composite discs were inoculated with either saliva or plaque, and microcosm biofilms were grown in a CDC biofilm reactor. In later experiments, the reactor was pulsed with sucrose. DNA from inoculums and microcosms was analysed by HOMIM for 272 species. Microcosms included about 60% of species from the original inoculum. Biofilms grown on hydroxyapatite and composites were extremely similar. Sucrose pulsing decreased diversity and pH, but increased the abundance of Streptococcus and Veillonella. Biofilms from the same donor, grown at different times, clustered together. This model produced reproducible microcosm biofilms that were representative of the oral microbiota. Sucrose induced changes associated with dental caries. This is the first use of HOMIM to validate an oral microcosm model that can be used to study the effects of complex biofilms on dental materials. © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Metagenomic and metaproteomic analyses of Accumulibacter phosphatis-enriched floccular and granular biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Jeremy J; Dutilh, Bas E; Skennerton, Connor T; Fukushima, Toshikazu; Hastie, Marcus L; Gorman, Jeffrey J; Tyson, Gene W; Bond, Philip L

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are ubiquitous in nature, forming diverse adherent microbial communities that perform a plethora of functions. Here we operated two laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactors enriched with Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis (Accumulibacter) performing enhanced biological phosphorus removal. Reactors formed two distinct biofilms, one floccular biofilm, consisting of small, loose, microbial aggregates, and one granular biofilm, forming larger, dense, spherical aggregates. Using metagenomic and metaproteomic methods, we investigated the proteomic differences between these two biofilm communities, identifying a total of 2022 unique proteins. To understand biofilm differences, we compared protein abundances that were statistically enriched in both biofilm states. Floccular biofilms were enriched with pathogenic secretion systems suggesting a highly competitive microbial community. Comparatively, granular biofilms revealed a high-stress environment with evidence of nutrient starvation, phage predation pressure, and increased extracellular polymeric substance and cell lysis. Granular biofilms were enriched in outer membrane transport proteins to scavenge the extracellular milieu for amino acids and other metabolites, likely released through cell lysis, to supplement metabolic pathways. This study provides the first detailed proteomic comparison between Accumulibacter-enriched floccular and granular biofilm communities, proposes a conceptual model for the granule biofilm, and offers novel insights into granule biofilm formation and stability. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Esp-independent biofilm formation by Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristich, Christopher J; Li, Yung-Hua; Cvitkovitch, Dennis G; Dunny, Gary M

    2004-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is a gram-positive opportunistic pathogen known to form biofilms in vitro. In addition, this organism is often isolated from biofilms on the surfaces of various indwelling medical devices. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating biofilm formation in these clinical isolates are largely unknown. Recent work has suggested that a specific cell surface protein (Esp) of E. faecalis is critical for biofilm formation by this organism. However, in the same study, esp-deficient strains of E. faecalis were found to be capable of biofilm formation. To test the hypothesis that Esp is dispensable for biofilm formation by E. faecalis, we used microtiter plate assays and a chemostat-based biofilm fermentor assay to examine biofilm formation by genetically well-defined, non-Esp-expressing strains. Our results demonstrate that in vitro biofilm formation occurs, not only in the absence of esp, but also in the absence of the entire pathogenicity island that harbors the esp coding sequence. Using scanning electron microscopy to evaluate biofilms of E. faecalis OG1RF grown in the fermentor system, biofilm development was observed to progress through multiple stages, including attachment of individual cells to the substratum, microcolony formation, and maturation into complex multilayered structures apparently containing water channels. Microtiter plate biofilm analyses indicated that biofilm formation or maintenance was modulated by environmental conditions. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that expression of a secreted metalloprotease, GelE, enhances biofilm formation by E. faecalis. In summary, E. faecalis forms complex biofilms by a process that is sensitive to environmental conditions and does not require the Esp surface protein.

  1. Ultrastructural morphologic changes in mycobacterial biofilm in different extreme condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Virendra; Sachan, Tarun Kumar; Sharma, Pragya; Rawat, Krishna Dutta

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the morphologic and ultrastructural features of biofilms of slow and fast-growing mycobacteria in different stress conditions, presence and absence of oleic acid albumin dextrose catalase (OADC) enrichment and at different temperatures: 30, 37 and 42 °C. Four hundred mycobacterial isolates were taken. The biomass of each biofilm was quantified using a modified microtiter plate assay method. Isolates were divided into those that formed fully established biofilms, moderately attached biofilms and weakly adherent biofilms by comparison with a known biofilm-forming strain. The large quantity of biofilm was produced by Mycobacterium smegmatis at temperature 37 and 42 °C as compared to 30 °C. Mycobacterium fortuitum and M. avium developed large amount of biofilm at 30 °C as compared to 37 and 42 °C. Mycobacterium tuberculosis developed strong biofilm at 37 °C and no biofilm at 30 and 42 °C in Sauton's media. The selected non-tuberculous mycobacteria and H37Rv developed strong biofilm in the presence of OADC enrichment in Sauton's medium. Microscopic examination of biofilms by scanning electron microscopy revealed that poorly adherent biofilm formers failed to colonize the entire surface of the microtiter well. While moderately adherent biofilm formers grew in uniform monolayers but failed to develop a mature three-dimensional structure. SEM analysis of an isolate representative of the group formed fully established biofilms with a textured, multi-layered, three-dimensional structure.

  2. The Vibrio cholerae Pst2 phosphate transport system is upregulated in biofilms and contributes to biofilm-induced hyperinfectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudrak, Benjamin; Tamayo, Rita

    2012-05-01

    Vibrio cholerae is the causative agent of the deadly diarrheal disease cholera. As part of its life cycle, V. cholerae persists in marine environments, where it forms surface-attached communities commonly described as biofilms. Evidence indicates that these biofilms constitute the infectious form of the pathogen during outbreaks. Previous work has shown that biofilm-derived V. cholerae cells, even when fully dispersed from the biofilm matrix, are vastly more infectious than planktonic (free-living) cells. Here, we sought to identify factors that contribute to biofilm-induced hyperinfectivity in V. cholerae, and we present evidence for one aspect of the molecular basis of this phenotype. We identified proteins upregulated during growth in biofilms and determined their contributions to the hyperinfectivity phenotype. We found that PstS2, the periplasmic component of the Pst2 phosphate uptake system, was enriched in biofilms. Another gene in the pst2 locus was transcriptionally upregulated in biofilms. Using the infant mouse model, we found that mutation of two pst2 components resulted in impaired colonization. Importantly, deletion of the Pst2 inner membrane complex caused a greater colonization defect after growth in a biofilm compared to shaking culture. Based on these data, we propose that V. cholerae cells in biofilms upregulate the Pst2 system and therefore gain an advantage upon entry into the host. Further characterization of factors contributing to biofilm-induced hyperinfectivity in V. cholerae will improve our understanding of the transmission of the bacteria from natural aquatic habitats to the human host.

  3. New approaches to combat Porphyromonas gingivalis biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerits, Evelien; Verstraeten, Natalie; Michiels, Jan

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT In nature, bacteria predominantly reside in structured, surface-attached communities embedded in a self-produced, extracellular matrix. These so-called biofilms play an important role in the development and pathogenesis of many infections, as they are difficult to eradicate due to their resistance to antimicrobials and host defense mechanisms. This review focusses on the biofilm-forming periodontal bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis. Current knowledge on the virulence mechanisms underlying P. gingivalis biofilm formation is presented. In addition, oral infectious diseases in which P. gingivalis plays a key role are described, and an overview of conventional and new therapies for combating P. gingivalis biofilms is given. More insight into this intriguing pathogen might direct the development of better strategies to combat oral infections. PMID:28473880

  4. Crenarchaeal biofilm formation under extreme conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Koerdt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Biofilm formation has been studied in much detail for a variety of bacterial species, as it plays a major role in the pathogenicity of bacteria. However, only limited information is available for the development of archaeal communities that are frequently found in many natural environments. METHODOLOGY: We have analyzed biofilm formation in three closely related hyperthermophilic crenarchaeotes: Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, S. solfataricus and S. tokodaii. We established a microtitre plate assay adapted to high temperatures to determine how pH and temperature influence biofilm formation in these organisms. Biofilm analysis by confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated that the three strains form very different communities ranging from simple carpet-like structures in S. solfataricus to high density tower-like structures in S. acidocaldarius in static systems. Lectin staining indicated that all three strains produced extracellular polysaccharides containing glucose, galactose, mannose and N-acetylglucosamine once biofilm formation was initiated. While flagella mutants had no phenotype in two days old static biofilms of S. solfataricus, a UV-induced pili deletion mutant showed decreased attachment of cells. CONCLUSION: The study gives first insights into formation and development of crenarchaeal biofilms in extreme environments.

  5. Differences in attachment of Salmonella enterica serovars to cabbage and lettuce leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jitendra; Sharma, Manan

    2010-04-30

    This study investigated the ability of five Salmonella enterica serovars to attach to and colonize intact and cut lettuce (Iceberg, Romaine) and cabbage surfaces. Biofilm formation and attachment of Salmonella serovars to intact and cut leaves were determined. Populations of loosely and strongly attached Salmonella were obtained to calculate the attachment strength (S(R)). Biofilm formation, as determined by microtiter plate assay, varied with strain and growth medium used. Salmonella Tennessee and S. Thompson produced stronger biofilms compared to S. Newport, S. Negev, and S. Braenderup. Biofilm formation was also stronger when Salmonella spp. were grown in diluted TSB (1:10). S. Tennessee, which produced strong biofilms, attached to produce surfaces at significantly higher numbers than the populations of S. Negev. Overall, S. Tennessee displayed more biofilm formation in vitro and attached more strongly to lettuce than other serovars. All Salmonella serovars attached rapidly on intact and cut produce surfaces. Salmonella spp. attached to Romaine lettuce at significantly higher numbers than those attached to Iceberg lettuce or cabbage. Salmonella attached preferentially to cut surface of all produce; however, the difference between Salmonella populations attached to intact and cut surfaces was similar (P>0.05). Salmonella attachment to both intact and cut produce surfaces increased with time. The overall attachment strength of Salmonella was significantly lower on cabbage (0.12) followed by Iceberg (0.23) and Romaine lettuce (0.34). Cabbage, intact or cut, did not support attachment of Salmonella as well as Romaine lettuce. Understanding the attachment mechanisms of Salmonella to produce may be useful in developing new intervention strategies to prevent produce outbreaks. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Anti-biofilm activity as a health issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie eMiquel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The formation and persistence of surface-attached microbial communities, known as biofilms, are responsible for 75% of human microbial infections (National Institutes of Health. Biofilm lifestyle confers several advantages to the pathogens, notably during the colonization process of medical devices and/or patients’ organs. In addition, sessile bacteria have a high tolerance to exogenous stress including anti-infectious agents. Biofilms are highly competitive communities and some microorganisms exhibit anti-biofilm capacities such as bacterial growth inhibition, exclusion or competition, which enable them to acquire advantages and become dominant. The deciphering and control of anti-biofilm properties represent future challenges in human infection control. The aim of this review is to compare and discuss the mechanisms of natural bacterial anti-biofilm strategies/mechanisms recently identified in pathogenic, commensal and probiotic bacteria and the main synthetic strategies used in clinical practice, particularly for catheter-related infections.

  7. Extracellular DNA as an essential component and therapeutic target of microbial biofilm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urszula Wnorowska

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The dominant part of human infections is associated with biofilm formations. Biofilm represents structured communities of bacterial or fungal cells enclosed in self-produced polymeric matrixes adherent to supporting surfaces. Microbial DNA and the host cell DNA, after their release at the infection site, show the ability to promote biofilm formation. Between the different constituents of biofilm matrixes, extracellular DNA (eDNA may be the only component indispensable for the initial attachment and early biofilm formation through an enhanced matrix structural integrity. The effect of DNA on bacterial/fungal attachment is non-specific, as indicated by the stimulatory effect of plasmid, chromosome, or eukaryotic DNA. DNase I impaired bacterial biofilm growth and the targeting eDNA were recently proposed to eliminate and/or prevent different microbial infections associated with biofilm formations.

  8. Influence of culture conditions on Escherichia coli O157:H7 biofilm formation by atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Y.J. [Department of Physics and Division of Nano Sciences, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of); Jo, W. [Department of Physics and Division of Nano Sciences, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: wmjo@ewha.ac.kr; Yang, Y.; Park, S. [Division of Nano Sciences, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-10-15

    Biofilms are complex microbial communities that are resistant against attacks by bacteriophages and removal by drugs and chemicals. In this study, biofilms of Escherichia coli O157:H7, a bacterial pathogen, were investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM) in terms of the dynamic transition of morphology and surface properties of bacterial cells over the development of biofilms. The physical and topographical properties of biofilms are different, depending on nutrient availability. Compared to biofilms formed in a high nutrient medium, biofilms form faster and a higher number of bacterial cells were recovered on glass surface in a low nutrient medium. We demonstrate that AFM can obtain high-resolution images and the elastic information about biofilms. As E. coli biofilm becomes mature, the magnitude of the force between a tip and the surface of the biofilm gets stronger, suggesting that extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs), sticky components of biofilms, accumulate over the surface of cells upon the initial attachment of bacterial cells to surfaces.

  9. Resistance of biofilm-covered mortars to microbiologically influenced deterioration simulated by sulfuric acid exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soleimani, Sahar, E-mail: ssoleima@connect.carleton.ca; Isgor, O. Burkan, E-mail: burkan_isgor@carleton.ca; Ormeci, Banu, E-mail: banu_ormeci@carleton.ca

    2013-11-15

    Following the reported success of biofilm applications on metal surfaces to inhibit microbiologically influenced corrosion, effectiveness and sustainability of E. coli DH5α biofilm on mortar surface to prevent microbiologically influenced concrete deterioration (MICD) are investigated. Experiments simulating microbial attack were carried out by exposing incrementally biofilm-covered mortar specimens to sulfuric acid solutions with pH ranging from 3 to 6. Results showed that calcium concentration in control reactors without biofilm was 23–47% higher than the reactors with biofilm-covered mortar. Formation of amorphous silica gel as an indication of early stages of acid attack was observed only on the control mortar specimens without biofilm. During acidification, the biofilm continued to grow and its thickness almost doubled from ∼ 30 μm before acidification to ∼ 60 μm after acidification. These results demonstrated that E. coli DH5α biofilm was able to provide a protective and sustainable barrier on mortar surfaces against medium to strong sulfuric acid attack. -- Highlights: •Effectiveness of E.coli DH5α biofilm to prevent MICD was studied. •Conditions that lead to MICD were simulated by chemical acidification. •Biofilm-covered mortar specimens were exposed to sulfuric acid solutions. •The presence of biofilm helped reduce the chemically-induced mortar deterioration. •Biofilm remained alive and continued to grow during the acidification process.

  10. Rotation Disk Process to Assess the Influence of Metals and Voltage on the Growth of Biofilm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana M. Barry

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms consist of not only bacteria but also extracellular polymer substrates (EPS. They are groups of microorganisms that adhere to each other on a surface, especially as a result of exposure to water and bacteria. They can pose health risks to humans as they grow in hospital settings that include medical supplies and devices. In a previous study, the researchers discovered that bacteria/biofilm grew well on wetted external latex, male catheters. These results concerned the investigators and encouraged them to find ways for prohibiting the growth of bacteria/biofilm on the male catheters (which are made of natural rubber. They carried out a new study to assess the influence of metals and voltage for the growth of bacteria on these latex samples. For this purpose, a unique Rotation Disk Reactor was used to accelerate biofilm formation on external male catheter samples. This setup included a dip tank containing water and a rotating wheel with the attached latex samples (some of which had single electrodes while others had paired electrodes with applied voltage. The process allowed the samples to become wetted and also exposed them to microorganisms in the ambient air during each revolution of the wheel. The results (as viewed from SEM images showed that when compared to the control sample, the presence of metals (brass, stainless steel, and silver was generally effective in preventing bacterial growth. Also the use of voltage (9.5 volt battery essentially eliminated the appearance of rod shaped bacteria in some of the samples. It can be concluded that the presence of metals significantly reduced bacterial growth on latex and the application of voltage was able to essentially eliminate bacteria, providing appropriate electrode combinations were used.

  11. Biofilm Formation As a Response to Ecological Competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Nuno M; Oliveria, Nuno M; Martinez-Garcia, Esteban; Xavier, Joao; Durham, William M; Kolter, Roberto; Kim, Wook; Foster, Kevin R

    2015-07-01

    Bacteria form dense surface-associated communities known as biofilms that are central to their persistence and how they affect us. Biofilm formation is commonly viewed as a cooperative enterprise, where strains and species work together for a common goal. Here we explore an alternative model: biofilm formation is a response to ecological competition. We co-cultured a diverse collection of natural isolates of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa and studied the effect on biofilm formation. We show that strain mixing reliably increases biofilm formation compared to unmixed conditions. Importantly, strain mixing leads to strong competition: one strain dominates and largely excludes the other from the biofilm. Furthermore, we show that pyocins, narrow-spectrum antibiotics made by other P. aeruginosa strains, can stimulate biofilm formation by increasing the attachment of cells. Side-by-side comparisons using microfluidic assays suggest that the increase in biofilm occurs due to a general response to cellular damage: a comparable biofilm response occurs for pyocins that disrupt membranes as for commercial antibiotics that damage DNA, inhibit protein synthesis or transcription. Our data show that bacteria increase biofilm formation in response to ecological competition that is detected by antibiotic stress. This is inconsistent with the idea that sub-lethal concentrations of antibiotics are cooperative signals that coordinate microbial communities, as is often concluded. Instead, our work is consistent with competition sensing where low-levels of antibiotics are used to detect and respond to the competing genotypes that produce them.

  12. Biofilm Formation As a Response to Ecological Competition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno M Oliveira

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria form dense surface-associated communities known as biofilms that are central to their persistence and how they affect us. Biofilm formation is commonly viewed as a cooperative enterprise, where strains and species work together for a common goal. Here we explore an alternative model: biofilm formation is a response to ecological competition. We co-cultured a diverse collection of natural isolates of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa and studied the effect on biofilm formation. We show that strain mixing reliably increases biofilm formation compared to unmixed conditions. Importantly, strain mixing leads to strong competition: one strain dominates and largely excludes the other from the biofilm. Furthermore, we show that pyocins, narrow-spectrum antibiotics made by other P. aeruginosa strains, can stimulate biofilm formation by increasing the attachment of cells. Side-by-side comparisons using microfluidic assays suggest that the increase in biofilm occurs due to a general response to cellular damage: a comparable biofilm response occurs for pyocins that disrupt membranes as for commercial antibiotics that damage DNA, inhibit protein synthesis or transcription. Our data show that bacteria increase biofilm formation in response to ecological competition that is detected by antibiotic stress. This is inconsistent with the idea that sub-lethal concentrations of antibiotics are cooperative signals that coordinate microbial communities, as is often concluded. Instead, our work is consistent with competition sensing where low-levels of antibiotics are used to detect and respond to the competing genotypes that produce them.

  13. Anti-Biofilm Compounds Derived from Marine Sponges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Melander

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial biofilms are surface-attached communities of microorganisms that are protected by an extracellular matrix of biomolecules. In the biofilm state, bacteria are significantly more resistant to external assault, including attack by antibiotics. In their native environment, bacterial biofilms underpin costly biofouling that wreaks havoc on shipping, utilities, and offshore industry. Within a host environment, they are insensitive to antiseptics and basic host immune responses. It is estimated that up to 80% of all microbial infections are biofilm-based. Biofilm infections of indwelling medical devices are of particular concern, since once the device is colonized, infection is almost impossible to eliminate. Given the prominence of biofilms in infectious diseases, there is a notable effort towards developing small, synthetically available molecules that will modulate bacterial biofilm development and maintenance. Here, we highlight the development of small molecules that inhibit and/or disperse bacterial biofilms specifically through non-microbicidal mechanisms. Importantly, we discuss several sets of compounds derived from marine sponges that we are developing in our labs to address the persistent biofilm problem. We will discuss: discovery/synthesis of natural products and their analogues—including our marine sponge-derived compounds and initial adjuvant activity and toxicological screening of our novel anti-biofilm compounds.

  14. Global Identification of Biofilm-Specific Proteolysis in Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B. Winter

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is a fungal species that is part of the normal human microbiota and also an opportunistic pathogen capable of causing mucosal and systemic infections. C. albicans cells proliferate in a planktonic (suspension state, but they also form biofilms, organized and tightly packed communities of cells attached to a solid surface. Biofilms colonize many niches of the human body and persist on implanted medical devices, where they are a major source of new C. albicans infections. Here, we used an unbiased and global substrate-profiling approach to discover proteolytic activities produced specifically by C. albicans biofilms, compared to planktonic cells, with the goal of identifying potential biofilm-specific diagnostic markers and targets for therapeutic intervention. This activity-based profiling approach, coupled with proteomics, identified Sap5 (Candidapepsin-5 and Sap6 (Candidapepsin-6 as major biofilm-specific proteases secreted by C. albicans. Fluorogenic peptide substrates with selectivity for Sap5 or Sap6 confirmed that their activities are highly upregulated in C. albicans biofilms; we also show that these activities are upregulated in other Candida clade pathogens. Deletion of the SAP5 and SAP6 genes in C. albicans compromised biofilm development in vitro in standard biofilm assays and in vivo in a rat central venous catheter biofilm model. This work establishes secreted proteolysis as a promising enzymatic marker and potential therapeutic target for Candida biofilm formation.

  15. Effect of alkaline pH on staphylococcal biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nostro, Antonia; Cellini, Luigina; Di Giulio, Mara; D'Arrigo, Manuela; Marino, Andreana; Blanco, Anna Rita; Favaloro, Angelo; Cutroneo, Giuseppina; Bisignano, Giuseppe

    2012-09-01

    Biofilms are a serious problem, cause of severe inconvenience in the biomedical, food and industrial environment. Staphylococcus aureus and S. epidermidis are important pathogenic bacteria able to form thick and resistant biofilms on various surfaces. Therefore, strategies aimed at preventing or at least interfering with the initial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation are a considerable achievement. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of alkaline pH on bacterial adhesion and further biofilm formation of S. aureus and S. epidermidis strains by biofilm biomass, cell-surface hydrophobicity, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) analysis. The results demonstrated that the amount of biofilm biomass formed and the surface hydrophobicity were significantly less than what were observed at higher levels of pH. SEM and CLSM images revealed a poorly structured and very thin biofilm (2.5-3 times thinner than that of the controls). The inhibiting effect of the alkaline pH on the bacterial attachment impaired the normal development of biofilm that arrested at the microcolony stage. Alkaline formulations could be promising towards the control of bacterial colonization and therefore the reduction of the biofilm-related hazard. In the clinical setting, alkaline solutions or cleaners could be promising to prevent the bacterial colonization, by treating surfaces such as catheters or indwelling medical devices, reducing the risk of biofilm related infections. © 2012 The Authors APMIS © 2012 APMIS.

  16. Biofilm Thickness Influences Biodiversity in Nitrifying MBBRs-Implications on Micropollutant Removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torresi, Elena; Fowler, Jane; Polesel, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    In biofilm systems for wastewater treatment (e.g., moving bed biofilms reactors-MBBRs) biofilm thickness is typically not under direct control. Nevertheless, biofilm thickness is likely to have a profound effect on the microbial diversity and activity, as a result of diffusion limitation and thus...... substrate penetration in the biofilm. In this study, we investigated the impact of biofilm thickness on nitrification and on the removal of more than 20 organic micropollutants in laboratory-scale nitrifying MBBRs. We used novel carriers (Z-carriers, AnoxKaldnes) that allowed controlling biofilm thickness...... at 50, 200, 300, 400, and 500 μm. The impact of biofilm thickness on microbial community was assessed via 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing and ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) abundance quantification through quantitative PCR (qPCR). Results from batch experiments and microbial analysis showed that (i...

  17. Paired methods to measure biofilm killing and removal: a case study with Penicillin G treatment of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausbacher, D; Lorenz, L; Pitts, B; Stewart, P S; Goeres, D M

    2017-12-30

    Biofilms are microbial aggregates that show high tolerance to antibiotic treatments in vitro and in vivo. Killing and removal are both important in biofilm control, therefore methods that measure these two mechanisms were evaluated in a parallel experimental design. Kill was measured using the single tube method (ASTM method E2871) and removal was determined by video microscopy and image analysis using a new treatment flow cell. The advantage of the parallel test design is that both methods used biofilm covered coupons harvested from a CDC biofilm reactor, a well-established and standardized biofilm growth method. The control Staphylococcus aureus biofilms treated with growth medium increased by 0·6 logs during a 3-h contact time. Efficacy testing showed biofilms exposed to 400 μmol l-1 penicillin G decreased by only 0·3 logs. Interestingly, time-lapse confocal scanning laser microscopy revealed that penicillin G treatment dispersed the biofilm despite being an ineffective killing agent. In addition, no biofilm removal was detected when assays were performed in 96-well plates. These results illustrate that biofilm behaviour and impact of treatments can vary substantially when assayed by different methods. Measuring both killing and removal with well-characterized methods will be crucial for the discovery of new anti-biofilm strategies. Biofilms are tolerant to antimicrobial treatments and can lead to persistent infections. Finding new anti-biofilm strategies and understanding their mode-of-action is therefore of high importance. Historically, antimicrobial testing has focused on measuring the decrease in viability. While kill data are undeniably important, measuring biofilm disruption provides equally useful information. Starting with biofilm grown in the same reactor, we paired assessment of biofilm removal using a new treatment-flow-cell and real-time microscopy with kill data collected using the single tube method (ASTM E2871). Pairing these two methods

  18. Developed Fungal-Bacterial Biofilms as A Novel Tool for Bioremoval of Hexavelant Chromium from Wastewater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herath, Lasantha; Rajapaksha, R. M. A. U.; Vithanage, M.

    2014-01-01

    Remediation measures for hexavalent Chromium [Cr(VI)] are required for a safe environment. As a recent development in microbiology, bacterial biofilms are being studied as effective bioremediation agents. When bacteria are in fungal surface-attached biofilm mode, they are called fungal-bacterial ......Remediation measures for hexavalent Chromium [Cr(VI)] are required for a safe environment. As a recent development in microbiology, bacterial biofilms are being studied as effective bioremediation agents. When bacteria are in fungal surface-attached biofilm mode, they are called fungal...

  19. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris biofilms: carbon and energy flow contribute to the distinct biofilm growth state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Melinda E; He, Zhili; Redding, Alyssa M; Joachimiak, Marcin P; Keasling, Jay D; Zhou, Jizhong Z; Arkin, Adam P; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Fields, Matthew W

    2012-04-16

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough is a sulfate-reducing bacterium (SRB) that is intensively studied in the context of metal corrosion and heavy-metal bioremediation, and SRB populations are commonly observed in pipe and subsurface environments as surface-associated populations. In order to elucidate physiological changes associated with biofilm growth at both the transcript and protein level, transcriptomic and proteomic analyses were done on mature biofilm cells and compared to both batch and reactor planktonic populations. The biofilms were cultivated with lactate and sulfate in a continuously fed biofilm reactor, and compared to both batch and reactor planktonic populations. The functional genomic analysis demonstrated that biofilm cells were different compared to planktonic cells, and the majority of altered abundances for genes and proteins were annotated as hypothetical (unknown function), energy conservation, amino acid metabolism, and signal transduction. Genes and proteins that showed similar trends in detected levels were particularly involved in energy conservation such as increases in an annotated ech hydrogenase, formate dehydrogenase, pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase, and rnf oxidoreductase, and the biofilm cells had elevated formate dehydrogenase activity. Several other hydrogenases and formate dehydrogenases also showed an increased protein level, while decreased transcript and protein levels were observed for putative coo hydrogenase as well as a lactate permease and hyp hydrogenases for biofilm cells. Genes annotated for amino acid synthesis and nitrogen utilization were also predominant changers within the biofilm state. Ribosomal transcripts and proteins were notably decreased within the biofilm cells compared to exponential-phase cells but were not as low as levels observed in planktonic, stationary-phase cells. Several putative, extracellular proteins (DVU1012, 1545) were also detected in the extracellular fraction from biofilm cells

  20. The Biofilm Challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Maria; Alhede, Morten

    2014-01-01

    The concept of biofilms has emerged in the clinical setting during the last decade. Infections involving biofilms have been documented in all parts of the human body, and it is currently believed that the presence of biofilm-forming bacteria is equivalent to chronic infection. A quick Pubmed search...... reveals the significance of biofilms, as evidenced by a dramatic increase in scientific publications on the topic, as well as in publications concerning wounds with biofilms, which reached 600 publications in 2013. Judged from the number of publications, it appears that biofilms play a significant role...... in wounds. However, the impact of biofilms is often debated, because infected wounds were also treated before the concept of biofilms was coined. In this short review, we will address the significance of biofilms and their role in wounds, and discuss the future tasks of the biofilm challenge....

  1. The in vivo biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Alhede, Maria; Alhede, Morten

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria can grow and proliferate either as single, independent cells or organized in aggregates commonly referred to as biofilms. When bacteria succeed in forming a biofilm within the human host, the infection often becomes very resistant to treatment and can develop into a chronic state. Biofilms...... have been studied for decades using various in vitro models, but it remains debatable whether such in vitro biofilms actually resemble in vivo biofilms in chronic infections. In vivo biofilms share several structural characteristics that differ from most in vitro biofilms. Additionally, the in vivo...... experimental time span and presence of host defenses differ from chronic infections and the chemical microenvironment of both in vivo and in vitro biofilms is seldom taken into account. In this review, we discuss why the current in vitro models of biofilms might be limited for describing infectious biofilms...

  2. Beneficial Oral Biofilms as Smart Bioactive Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Gutt

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is a very common health problem caused by formation of pathogenic bacterial biofilm that triggers inflammation resulting in either reversible gingivitis or irreversible periodontal hard and soft tissue damages, leading to loss of teeth when left untreated. Commensal bacteria play an important role in oral health in many aspects. Mainly by colonizing oral tissues, they (i contribute to maturation of immune response, and (ii foreclose attachment of pathobiont and, therefore, prevent from infection. The main goal of the study was to investigate if blocking of receptors on a commensal biofilm can prevent or reduce the attachment of pathogenic strains. To do so, biofilm produced by commensal Streptococcus sanguinis was treated with whole cell lysate of pathobionts Fusobacterium nucleatum or Porphyromonas gingivalis, followed by incubation with respective strain(s. The study revealed significant reduction in pathobiont adhesion to lysate-treated commensal biofilm. Therefore, adhesion of pathobionts onto the lysate-blocked biofilm was hindered; however, not completely eliminated supporting the idea that such approach in the oral cavity would benefit the production of a well-balanced and healthy bioactive interface.

  3. Direct Comparison of Physical Properties of Bacillus subtilis NCIB 3610 and B-1 Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesel, Sara; Grumbein, Stefan; Gümperlein, Ina; Tallawi, Marwa; Marel, Anna-Kristina; Lieleg, Oliver; Opitz, Madeleine

    2016-04-01

    Many bacteria form surface-attached communities known as biofilms. Due to the extreme resistance of these bacterial biofilms to antibiotics and mechanical stresses, biofilms are of growing interest not only in microbiology but also in medicine and industry. Previous studies have determined the extracellular polymeric substances present in the matrix of biofilms formed by Bacillus subtilis NCIB 3610. However, studies on the physical properties of biofilms formed by this strain are just emerging. In particular, quantitative data on the contributions of biofilm matrix biopolymers to these physical properties are lacking. Here, we quantitatively investigated three physical properties of B. subtilis NCIB 3610 biofilms: the surface roughness and stiffness and the bulk viscoelasticity of these biofilms. We show how specific biomolecules constituting the biofilm matrix formed by this strain contribute to those biofilm properties. In particular, we demonstrate that the surface roughness and surface elasticity of 1-day-old NCIB 3610 biofilms are strongly affected by the surface layer protein BslA. For a second strain,B. subtilis B-1, which forms biofilms containing mainly γ-polyglutamate, we found significantly different physical biofilm properties that are also differently affected by the commonly used antibacterial agent ethanol. We show that B-1 biofilms are protected from ethanol-induced changes in the biofilm's stiffness and that this protective effect can be transferred to NCIB 3610 biofilms by the sole addition of γ-polyglutamate to growing NCIB 3610 biofilms. Together, our results demonstrate the importance of specific biofilm matrix components for the distinct physical properties of B. subtilis biofilms. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Direct Comparison of Physical Properties of Bacillus subtilis NCIB 3610 and B-1 Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesel, Sara; Grumbein, Stefan; Gümperlein, Ina; Tallawi, Marwa; Marel, Anna-Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Many bacteria form surface-attached communities known as biofilms. Due to the extreme resistance of these bacterial biofilms to antibiotics and mechanical stresses, biofilms are of growing interest not only in microbiology but also in medicine and industry. Previous studies have determined the extracellular polymeric substances present in the matrix of biofilms formed by Bacillus subtilis NCIB 3610. However, studies on the physical properties of biofilms formed by this strain are just emerging. In particular, quantitative data on the contributions of biofilm matrix biopolymers to these physical properties are lacking. Here, we quantitatively investigated three physical properties of B. subtilis NCIB 3610 biofilms: the surface roughness and stiffness and the bulk viscoelasticity of these biofilms. We show how specific biomolecules constituting the biofilm matrix formed by this strain contribute to those biofilm properties. In particular, we demonstrate that the surface roughness and surface elasticity of 1-day-old NCIB 3610 biofilms are strongly affected by the surface layer protein BslA. For a second strain, B. subtilis B-1, which forms biofilms containing mainly γ-polyglutamate, we found significantly different physical biofilm properties that are also differently affected by the commonly used antibacterial agent ethanol. We show that B-1 biofilms are protected from ethanol-induced changes in the biofilm's stiffness and that this protective effect can be transferred to NCIB 3610 biofilms by the sole addition of γ-polyglutamate to growing NCIB 3610 biofilms. Together, our results demonstrate the importance of specific biofilm matrix components for the distinct physical properties of B. subtilis biofilms. PMID:26873313

  5. Fungal Biofilms: Inside Out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagree, Katherine; Mitchell, Aaron P

    2017-04-01

    We focus this article on turning a biofilm inside out. The "inside" of the biofilm comprises the individual biofilm-related phenotypes, their environmental drivers and genetic determinants, and the coordination of gene functions through transcriptional regulators. Investigators have viewed the inside of the biofilm through diverse approaches, and this article will attempt to capture the essence of many. The ultimate goal is to connect the inside to the "outside," which we view as biofilm structure, development, pharmacological attributes, and medical impact.

  6. Infeksi Biofilm Bakterial

    OpenAIRE

    Homenta, Heriyannis

    2016-01-01

    : Biofilm is the unity of microbial cell surface surrounded by a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Bacteria composing the biofilm are heterogeneous in space and time. This biofilm continues to grow influenced by internal and external processes. Moreover, biofilm can be found on the surface of medical devices, as well as in bacterial endocarditis and cystic fibrosis. Biofilm that is already formed can lead to antibiotic resistance.

  7. IMPACTS OF BIOFILM FORMATION ON CELLULOSE FERMENTATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leschine, Susan

    2009-10-31

    colonizes and degrades insoluble substrates. Major accomplishments of the project include: • Development of media containing dialysis tubing (described by the manufacturer as “regenerated cellulose”) as sole carbon and energy source and a nutritive surface for the growth of cellulolytic bacteria, and development of various microscopic methods to image biofilms on dialysis tubing. • Demonstration that cultures of C. phytofermentans, an obligate anaerobe, C. uda, a facultative aerobe, and T. fusca, a filamentous aerobe, formed microbial communities on the surface of dialysis tubing, which possessed architectural features and functional characteristics typical of biofilms. • Demonstration that biofilm formation on the nutritive surface, cellulose, involves a complex developmental processes, including colonization of dialysis tubing, formation of cell clusters attached to the nutritive surface, cell morphological changes, formation of complex structures embedded in extracellular polymeric matrices, and dispersal of biofilm communities as the nutritive surface is degraded. • Determination of surface specificity and regulatory aspects of biofilm formation by C. phytofermentans, C. uda, and T. fusca. • Demonstration that biofilm formation by T. fusca forms an integral part of the life cycle of this filamentous cellulolytic bacterium, including studies on the role of mycelial pellet formation in the T. fusca life cycle and a comparison of mycelial pellets to surface-attached T. fusca biofilms. • Characterization of T. fusca biofilm EPS, including demonstration of a functional role for EPS constituents. • Correlation of T. fusca developmental life cycle and cellulase gene expression.

  8. Biophysics of biofilm infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Philip S

    2014-04-01

    This article examines a likely basis of the tenacity of biofilm infections that has received relatively little attention: the resistance of biofilms to mechanical clearance. One way that a biofilm infection persists is by withstanding the flow of fluid or other mechanical forces that work to wash or sweep microorganisms out of the body. The fundamental criterion for mechanical persistence is that the biofilm failure strength exceeds the external applied stress. Mechanical failure of the biofilm and release of planktonic microbial cells is also important in vivo because it can result in dissemination of infection. The fundamental criterion for detachment and dissemination is that the applied stress exceeds the biofilm failure strength. The apparent contradiction for a biofilm to both persist and disseminate is resolved by recognizing that biofilm material properties are inherently heterogeneous. There are also mechanical aspects to the ways that infectious biofilms evade leukocyte phagocytosis. The possibility of alternative therapies for treating biofilm infections that work by reducing biofilm cohesion could (1) allow prevailing hydrodynamic shear to remove biofilm, (2) increase the efficacy of designed interventions for removing biofilms, (3) enable phagocytic engulfment of softened biofilm aggregates, and (4) improve phagocyte mobility and access to biofilm. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The contribution of cell-cell signaling and motility to bacterial biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shrout, Joshua D; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Givskov, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Many bacteria grow attached to a surface as biofilms. Several factors dictate biofilm formation, including responses by the colonizing bacteria to their environment. Here we review how bacteria use cell-cell signaling (also called quorum sensing) and motility during biofilm formation. Specifically...... gene expression important to the production of polysaccharides, rhamnolipid, and other virulence factors. Surface motility affects the assembly and architecture of biofilms, and some aspects of motility are also influenced by quorum sensing. While some genes and their function are specific to P....... aeruginosa, many aspects of biofilm development can be used as a model system to understand how bacteria differentially colonize surfaces....

  10. Monitoring of biofilm formation on different material surfaces of medical devices using hyperspectral imaging method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do-Hyun; Kim, Moon S.; Hwang, Jeeseong

    2012-03-01

    Contamination of the inner surface of indwelling (implanted) medical devices by microbial biofilm is a serious problem. Some microbial bacteria such as Escherichia coli form biofilms that lead to potentially lifethreatening infections. Other types of medical devices such as bronchoscopes and duodenoscopes account for the highest number of reported endoscopic infections where microbial biofilm is one of the major causes for these infections. We applied a hyperspectral imaging method to detect biofilm contamination on the surface of several common materials used for medical devices. Such materials include stainless steel, titanium, and stainless-steeltitanium alloy. Potential uses of hyperspectral imaging technique to monitor biofilm attachment to different material surfaces are discussed.

  11. Histophilus somni biofilm formation in cardiopulmonary tissue of the bovine host following respiratory challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandal, Indra; Shao, Jian Q.; Annadata, Satish

    2009-01-01

    cultured with H. somni from heart and lung samples. Transposon mutagenesis of H. somni strain 2336 resulted in the generation of mutants that expressed more or less biofilm. than the parent strain. Six mutants deficient in biofilm formation had an insertion in the gene encoding for a homolog of filamentous...... haemagglutinin (FHA), predicted to be involved in attachment. Thus, this investigation demonstrated that H. somni is capable of forming a biofilm in its natural host, that such a biofilm may be capable of harboring other bovine respiratory disease pathogens, and that the genes responsible for biofilm formation...

  12. The effect of mucA allele on biofilm architecture and the biofilm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-29

    Aug 29, 2011 ... almost complete substratum coverage and even biomass distribution. However, PDO300 formed significantly different biofilm architecture, with attached cells growing exclusively in discrete micro-colonies, resulting in a low substratum coverage and high structural heterogeneity. Further proteome research ...

  13. H Reactor

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The H Reactor was the first reactor to be built at Hanford after World War II.It became operational in October of 1949, and represented the fourth nuclear reactor on...

  14. Influence of Polymer Substratum onto Arthobacter Oxydans 1388 Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinkova D.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms attach to surfaces and develop biofilms. Biofilm-associated cells can be differentiated from their suspended counterparts by generation of an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS matrix, reduced growth rates, and the up- and down- regulation of specific genes. Attachment is a complex process regulated by diverse characteristics of the growth medium, substratum, and cell surface. Biofilms have great importance for public health because of their role in certain infectious diseases and importance in a variety of device-related infections. Biofilms are composed primarily of microbial cells and EPS. EPS may account for 50% to 90% of the total organic carbon of biofilms and can be considered the primary matrix material of the biofilm. EPS may vary in chemical and physical properties, but it is primarily composed of polysaccharides. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS are biopolymers of microbial origin in which biofilm microorganisms are embedded. Exopolysaccharides and proteins are one of the main factors in biofilm formation, evidence for microenviromental changes of microbial cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the formation, growth and biofilm characteristics from strain Arthrobacter oxydans 1388 onto different kinds of polymer matrixes and biochemical research of EPS production. It was compared three different kinds of polymer matrixes and their influence onto biofilm formation. Matrixes were obtained on the base of copolymer of acrylonitrile with acrylamide and mixed with cellulose acetate butyrate. In this case they were with high mechanical stability. The obtained results demonstrated that the most appropriate carrier for biofilm formation is the polymer matrix on the base of copolymer of acrylonitrile with acrylamide and mixed with cellulose acetate butyrate.

  15. Bacterial interactions in dental biofilm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojo, K; Nagaoka, S; Ohshima, T; Maeda, N

    2009-11-01

    Recent analyses with ribosomal RNA-based technologies have revealed the diversity of bacterial populations within dental biofilms, and have highlighted their important contributions to oral health and disease. Dental biofilms are exceedingly complex and multispecies ecosystems, where oral bacteria interact cooperatively or competitively with other members. Bacterial interactions that influence dental biofilm communities include various different mechanisms. During the early stage of biofilm formation, it is known that planktonic bacterial cells directly attach to surfaces of the oral cavity or indirectly bind to other bacterial cells that have already colonized. Adherence through co-aggregation may be critical for the temporary retention of bacteria on dental surfaces, and may facilitate eventual bacterial colonization. It is likely that metabolic communication, genetic exchange, production of inhibitory factors (e.g., bacteriocins, hydrogen peroxide, etc.), and quorum-sensing are pivotal regulatory factors that determine the bacterial composition and/or metabolism. Since each bacterium can easily access a neighboring bacterial cell and its metabolites, genetic exchanges and metabolic communication may occur frequently in dental biofilms. Quorum-sensing is defined as gene regulation in response to cell density, which influences various functions, e.g., virulence and bacteriocin production. In this review, we discuss these important interactions among oral bacteria within the dental biofilm communities.

  16. Actinomyces naeslundii in initial dental biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dige, I; Raarup, M K; Nyengaard, J R; Kilian, M; Nyvad, B

    2009-07-01

    The combined use of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) offers new opportunities for analysis of the spatial relationships and temporal changes of specific members of the microbiota of intact dental biofilms. The purpose of this study was to analyse the patterns of colonization and population dynamics of Actinomyces naeslundii compared to streptococci and other bacteria during the initial 48 h of biofilm formation in the oral cavity. Biofilms developed on standardized glass slabs mounted in intra-oral appliances worn by ten individuals for 6, 12, 24 and 48 h. The biofilms were subsequently labelled with probes against A. naeslundii (ACT476), streptococci (STR405) or all bacteria (EUB338), and were analysed by CLSM. Labelled bacteria were quantified by stereological tools. The results showed a notable increase in the number of streptococci and A. naeslundii over time, with a tendency towards a slower growth rate for A. naeslundii compared with streptococci. A. naeslundii was located mainly in the inner part of the multilayered biofilm, indicating that it is one of the species that attaches directly to the acquired pellicle. The participation of A. naeslundii in the initial stages of dental biofilm formation may have important ecological consequences.

  17. Characterization of Pleurotus ostreatus Biofilms by Using the Calgary Biofilm Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesciaroli, Lorena; Petruccioli, Maurizio; Fedi, Stefano; Firrincieli, Andrea; Federici, Federico

    2013-01-01

    The adequacy of the Calgary biofilm device, often referred to as the MBEC system, as a high-throughput approach to the production and subsequent characterization of Pleurotus ostreatus biofilms was assessed. The hydroxyapatite-coating of pegs was necessary to enable biofilm attachment, and the standardization of vegetative inocula ensured a uniform distribution of P. ostreatus biofilms, which is necessary for high-throughput evaluations of several antimicrobials and exposure conditions. Scanning electron microscopy showed surface-associated growth, the occurrence of a complex aggregated growth organized in multilayers or hyphal bundles, and the encasement of hyphae within an extracellular matrix (ECM), the extent of which increased with time. Chemical analyses showed that biofilms differed from free-floating cultures for their higher contents of total sugars (TS) and ECM, with the latter being mainly composed of TS and, to a lesser extent, protein. Confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis of 4-day-old biofilms showed the presence of interspersed interstitial voids and water channels in the mycelial network, the density and compactness of which increased after a 7-day incubation, with the novel occurrence of ECM aggregates with an α-glucan moiety. In 4- and 7-day-old biofilms, tolerance to cadmium was increased by factors of 3.2 and 11.1, respectively, compared to coeval free-floating counterparts. PMID:23892744

  18. Characterization of Pleurotus ostreatus biofilms by using the calgary biofilm device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesciaroli, Lorena; Petruccioli, Maurizio; Fedi, Stefano; Firrincieli, Andrea; Federici, Federico; D'Annibale, Alessandro

    2013-10-01

    The adequacy of the Calgary biofilm device, often referred to as the MBEC system, as a high-throughput approach to the production and subsequent characterization of Pleurotus ostreatus biofilms was assessed. The hydroxyapatite-coating of pegs was necessary to enable biofilm attachment, and the standardization of vegetative inocula ensured a uniform distribution of P. ostreatus biofilms, which is necessary for high-throughput evaluations of several antimicrobials and exposure conditions. Scanning electron microscopy showed surface-associated growth, the occurrence of a complex aggregated growth organized in multilayers or hyphal bundles, and the encasement of hyphae within an extracellular matrix (ECM), the extent of which increased with time. Chemical analyses showed that biofilms differed from free-floating cultures for their higher contents of total sugars (TS) and ECM, with the latter being mainly composed of TS and, to a lesser extent, protein. Confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis of 4-day-old biofilms showed the presence of interspersed interstitial voids and water channels in the mycelial network, the density and compactness of which increased after a 7-day incubation, with the novel occurrence of ECM aggregates with an α-glucan moiety. In 4- and 7-day-old biofilms, tolerance to cadmium was increased by factors of 3.2 and 11.1, respectively, compared to coeval free-floating counterparts.

  19. Effect of silver nanoparticles on Pseudomonas putida biofilms at different stages of maturity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thuptimdang, Pumis, E-mail: pumis.th@gmail.com [International Program in Hazardous Substance and Environmental Management, Graduate School, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Center of Excellence on Hazardous Substance Management, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Limpiyakorn, Tawan, E-mail: tawan.l@chula.ac.th [Center of Excellence on Hazardous Substance Management, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Department of Environmental Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Research Unit Control of Emerging Micropollutants in Environment, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); McEvoy, John, E-mail: john.mcevoy@ndsu.edu [Department of Veterinary and Microbiological Sciences, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND 58108 (United States); Prüß, Birgit M., E-mail: birgit.pruess@ndsu.edu [Department of Veterinary and Microbiological Sciences, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND 58108 (United States); Khan, Eakalak, E-mail: eakalak.khan@ndsu.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND 58108 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Biofilm stages in static batch conditions were similar to dynamic conditions. • Expression of csgA gene increased earlier than alg8 gene in biofilm maturation. • AgNPs had higher effect on less mature biofilms. • Removal of extracellular polymeric substance made biofilms susceptible to AgNPs. - Abstract: This study determined the effect of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on Pseudomonas putida KT2440 biofilms at different stages of maturity. Three biofilm stages (1–3, representing early to late stages of development) were identified from bacterial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) activity under static (96-well plate) and dynamic conditions (Center for Disease Control and Prevention biofilm reactor). Extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) levels, measured using crystal violet and total carbohydrate assays, and expression of the EPS-associated genes, csgA and alg8, supported the conclusion that biofilms at later stages were older than those at earlier stages. More mature biofilms (stages 2 and 3) showed little to no reduction in ATP activity following exposure to AgNPs. In contrast, the same treatment reduced ATP activity by more than 90% in the less mature stage 1 biofilms. Regardless of maturity, biofilms with EPS stripped off were more susceptible to AgNPs than controls with intact EPS, demonstrating that EPS is critical for biofilm tolerance of AgNPs. The findings from this study show that stage of maturity is an important factor to consider when studying effect of AgNPs on biofilms.

  20. Strategies for combating bacterial biofilms: A focus on anti-biofilm agents and their mechanisms of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Ranita; Tiwari, Monalisa; Donelli, Gianfranco; Tiwari, Vishvanath

    2017-03-31

    Biofilm refers to the complex, sessile communities of microbes found either attached to a surface or buried firmly in an extracellular matrix as aggregates. The biofilm matrix surrounding bacteria makes them tolerant to harsh conditions and resistant to antibacterial treatments. Moreover, the biofilms are responsible for causing a broad range of chronic diseases and due to the emergence of antibiotic resistance in bacteria it has really become difficult to treat them with efficacy. Furthermore, the antibiotics available till date are ineffective for treating these biofilm related infections due to their higher values of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC), which may result in in-vivo toxicity. Hence, it is critically important to design or screen anti-biofilm molecules that can effectively minimize and eradicate biofilm related infections. In the present review, we have highlighted the mechanism of biofilm formation with reference to different models and various methods used for biofilm detection. A major focus has been put on various anti-biofilm molecules discovered or tested till date which may include herbal active compounds, chelating agents, peptide antibiotics, lantibiotics and synthetic chemical compounds along with their structures, mechanism of action and their respective MICs, MBCs, minimum biofilm inhibitory concentrations (MBICs) as well as the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values available in the literature so far. Different mode of action of anti biofilm molecules addressed here are inhibition via interference in the quorum sensing pathways, adhesion mechanism, disruption of extracellular DNA, protein, lipopolysaccharides, exopolysaccharides and secondary messengers involved in various signaling pathways. From this study, we conclude that the molecules considered here might be used to treat biofilm-associated infections after significant structural modifications, thereby investigating its

  1. Metagenomic and metaproteomic analyses of Accumulibacter phosphatis-enriched floccular and granular biofilm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barr, J.J.; Dutilh, B.E.; Skennerton, C.T.; Fukushima, T.; Hastie, M.L.; Gorman, J.J.; Tyson, G.W.; Bond, P.L.

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are ubiquitous in nature, forming diverse adherent microbial communities that perform a plethora of functions. Here we operated two laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactors enriched with Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis (Accumulibacter) performing enhanced biological phosphorus

  2. Metagenomic and metaproteomic analyses of Accumulibacter phosphatis enriched floccular and granular biofilm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barr, Jeremy J; Dutilh, Bas E; Skennerton, Connor T; Fukushima, Toshikazu; Hastie, Marcus L; Gorman, Jeffrey J; Tyson, Gene W; Bond, Philip L

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms are ubiquitous in nature, forming diverse adherent microbial communities that perform a plethora of functions. Here we operated two laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactors enriched with Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis (Accumulibacter) performing enhanced biological phosphorus

  3. Bacterial swimmers that infiltrate and take over the biofilm matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houry, Ali; Gohar, Michel; Deschamps, Julien; Tischenko, Ekaterina; Aymerich, Stéphane; Gruss, Alexandra; Briandet, Romain

    2012-08-07

    Bacteria grow in either planktonic form or as biofilms, which are attached to either inert or biological surfaces. Both growth forms are highly relevant states in nature and of paramount scientific focus. However, interchanges between bacteria in these two states have been little explored. We discovered that a subpopulation of planktonic bacilli is propelled by flagella to tunnel deep within a biofilm structure. Swimmers create transient pores that increase macromolecular transfer within the biofilm. Irrigation of the biofilm by swimmer bacteria may improve biofilm bacterial fitness by increasing nutrient flow in the matrix. However, we show that the opposite may also occur (i.e., swimmers can exacerbate killing of biofilm bacteria by facilitating penetration of toxic substances from the environment). We combined these observations with the fact that numerous bacteria produce antimicrobial substances in nature. We hypothesized and proved that motile bacilli expressing a bactericide can also kill a heterologous biofilm population, Staphylococcus aureus in this case, and then occupy the newly created space. These findings identify microbial motility as a determinant of the biofilm landscape and add motility to the complement of traits contributing to rapid alterations in biofilm populations.

  4. Control of Biofilms with the Fatty Acid Signaling Molecule cis-2-Decenoic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia N. H. Marques

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms are complex communities of microorganisms in organized structures attached to surfaces. Importantly, biofilms are a major cause of bacterial infections in humans, and remain one of the most significant challenges to modern medical practice. Unfortunately, conventional therapies have shown to be inadequate in the treatment of most chronic biofilm infections based on the extraordinary innate tolerance of biofilms to antibiotics. Antagonists of quorum sensing signaling molecules have been used as means to control biofilms. QS and other cell-cell communication molecules are able to revert biofilm tolerance, prevent biofilm formation and disrupt fully developed biofilms, albeit with restricted effectiveness. Recently however, it has been demonstrated that Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces a small messenger molecule cis-2-decenoic acid (cis-DA that shows significant promise as an effective adjunctive to antimicrobial treatment of biofilms. This molecule is responsible for induction of the native biofilm dispersion response in a range of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria and in yeast, and has been shown to reverse persistence, increase microbial metabolic activity and significantly enhance the cidal effects of conventional antimicrobial agents. In this manuscript, the use of cis-2-decenoic acid as a novel agent for biofilm control is discussed. Stimulating the biofilm dispersion response as a novel antimicrobial strategy holds significant promise for enhanced treatment of infections and in the prevention of biofilm formation.

  5. Bacterial Composition of Biofilms Collected From Two Service Areas in a Metropolitan Drinking Water Distribution System

    Science.gov (United States)

    The development and succession of bacteria were examined by 16S rRNA gene clone libraries generated from various biofilms within a metropolitan water distribution system. Biofilms were obtained from off-line devices using polycarbonate coupons from annular reactors incubated for ...

  6. Suspended biofilm carrier and activated sludge removal of acidic pharmaceuticals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falås, Per; Baillon-Dhumez, Aude; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2012-01-01

    Removal of seven active pharmaceutical substances (ibuprofen, ketoprofen, naproxen, diclofenac, clofibric acid, mefenamic acid, and gemfibrozil) was assessed by batch experiments, with suspended biofilm carriers and activated sludge from several full-scale wastewater treatment plants. A distinct...... and attached solids for the carriers) of diclofenac, ketoprofen, gemfibrozil, clofibric acid and mefenamic acid compared to the sludges. Among the target pharmaceuticals, only ibuprofen and naproxen showed similar removal rates per unit biomass for the sludges and biofilm carriers. In contrast...

  7. Impact of the surface characteristics of rainwater tank material on biofilm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mikyeong; Ravault, Juliette; Han, Mooyoung; Kim, Kiyoung

    2012-01-01

    In order to determine the impact of rainwater construction material on the development of a biofilm, three materials were tested: concrete, clay, and PVC. The biofilm attachment was initially more effective on clay coupons, but, after a period of three days, concrete coupons produced a greater quantity of biofilm than clay and PVC, in that order. The heterotrophic plate count in the rainwater indicated that this quantity tended to first increase following a rainfall, and then decrease. The new materials seemed to attach themselves to the existing biofilm on the wall and/or sediment in the form of small particles. The presence of fecal coliforms in the biofilm coupons was noted after major rainfall events, and this was correlated with the increase in fecal coliforms in the water. This study concluded that the most favorable support for biofilm development is concrete, clay, and PVC, in that order.

  8. Calcium transcriptionally regulates the biofilm machinery of Xylella fastidiosa to promote continued biofilm development in batch cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jennifer K; Chen, Hongyu; McCarty, Sara E; Liu, Lawrence Y; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2016-05-01

    The functions of calcium (Ca) in bacteria are less characterized than in eukaryotes, where its role has been studied extensively. The plant-pathogenic bacterium Xylella fastidiosa has several virulence features that are enhanced by increased Ca concentrations, including biofilm formation. However, the specific mechanisms driving modulation of this feature are unclear. Characterization of biofilm formation over time showed that 4 mM Ca supplementation produced denser biofilms that were still developing at 96 h, while biofilm in non-supplemented media had reached the dispersal stage by 72 h. To identify changes in global gene expression in X. fastidiosa grown in supplemental Ca, RNA-Seq of batch culture biofilm cells was conducted at three 24-h time intervals. Results indicate that a variety of genes are differentially expressed in response to Ca, including genes related to attachment, motility, exopolysaccharide synthesis, biofilm formation, peptidoglycan synthesis, regulatory functions, iron homeostasis, and phages. Collectively, results demonstrate that Ca supplementation induces a transcriptional response that promotes continued biofilm development, while biofilm cells in nonsupplemented media are driven towards dispersion of cells from the biofilm structure. These results have important implications for disease progression in planta, where xylem sap is the source of Ca and other nutrients for X. fastidiosa. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. New approaches to the treatment of biofilm-related infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Matthew; Hall-Stoodley, Luanne; Allan, Raymond N; Faust, Saul N

    2014-11-01

    Bacteria causing chronic infections predominately grow as surface-attached, sessile communities known as biofilms. Biofilm-related infections including cystic fibrosis lung infection, chronic and recurrent otitis media, chronic wounds and implant- and catheter-associated infections, are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality and financial cost. Chronic biofilm-based infections are recalcitrant to conventional antibiotic therapy and are often unperturbed by host immune responses such as phagocytosis, despite a sustained presence of host inflammation. The diagnosis of clinically important biofilm infections is often difficult as Koch's postulates are rarely met. If treatment is required, surgical removal of the infected implant, or debridement of wound or bone, is the most efficient means of eradicating a clinically significant biofilm. New approaches to treatment are under investigation. Copyright © 2014 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Isolation and identification of biofilm microorganisms from silicone gastrostomy devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dautle, Melanie P; Wilkinson, T Ross; Gauderer, Michael W L

    2003-02-01

    Silicone gastrostomy devices (tubes and "buttons") are used extensively for long-term feeding and administration of special diets and medications. However, their potential for harboring microorganisms and possibly compromising the host largely is unknown. This study was conducted to isolate and identify the microbial species in viable biofilms attached to these devices in a pediatric cohort. A total of 78 domains on 18 silicone gastrostomy devices (12 "buttons" and 6 tubes converted to skin level devices), previously used for feeding (3 to 47 months) in children ranging in age from 6 months to 17 years were analyzed for microbial content. Biofilms were removed from the silicone tube surfaces and inoculated into enriched nutrient media using standard procedures. Intact biofilms also were observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal scanning laser microscopy. All devices analyzed in this investigation were found to exhibit biofilm growth. Of the 24 identified bacterial species, the predominant genera included Bacillus, Enterococcus, and Staphylococcus. Control studies of the tubes under SEM showed a multitude of crevices serving as niches for microbial colonization. Observation of the attached biofilm by SEM showed various biomasses with numerous morphologies. Biofilm composition and attachment to silicone enteral access devices has not received appropriate attention previously. This study shows that devices are colonized with various bacteria and fungi posing a potential threat to patients, particularly those who are immunocompromised. These microorganisms also may play a significant role in the formation of granulation tissue and contribute to device failure. Copyright 2003, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  11. Xylella fastidiosa differentially accumulates mineral elements in biofilm and planktonic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A Cobine

    Full Text Available Xylella fastidiosa is a bacterial plant pathogen that infects numerous plant hosts. Disease develops when the bacterium colonizes the xylem vessels and forms a biofilm. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy was used to examine the mineral element content of this pathogen in biofilm and planktonic states. Significant accumulations of copper (30-fold, manganese (6-fold, zinc (5-fold, calcium (2-fold and potassium (2-fold in the biofilm compared to planktonic cells were observed. Other mineral elements such as sodium, magnesium and iron did not significantly differ between biofilm and planktonic cells. The distribution of mineral elements in the planktonic cells loosely mirrors the media composition; however the unique mineral element distribution in biofilm suggests specific mechanisms of accumulation from the media. A cell-to-surface attachment assay shows that addition of 50 to 100 µM Cu to standard X. fastidiosa media increases biofilm, while higher concentrations (>200 µM slow cell growth and prevent biofilm formation. Moreover cell-to-surface attachment was blocked by specific chelation of copper. Growth of X. fastidiosa in microfluidic chambers under flow conditions showed that addition of 50 µM Cu to the media accelerated attachment and aggregation, while 400 µM prevented this process. Supplementation of standard media with Mn showed increased biofilm formation and cell-to-cell attachment. In contrast, while the biofilm accumulated Zn, supplementation to the media with this element caused inhibited growth of planktonic cells and impaired biofilm formation. Collectively these data suggest roles for these minerals in attachment and biofilm formation and therefore the virulence of this pathogen.

  12. Xylella fastidiosa differentially accumulates mineral elements in biofilm and planktonic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobine, Paul A; Cruz, Luisa F; Navarrete, Fernando; Duncan, Daniel; Tygart, Melissa; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a bacterial plant pathogen that infects numerous plant hosts. Disease develops when the bacterium colonizes the xylem vessels and forms a biofilm. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy was used to examine the mineral element content of this pathogen in biofilm and planktonic states. Significant accumulations of copper (30-fold), manganese (6-fold), zinc (5-fold), calcium (2-fold) and potassium (2-fold) in the biofilm compared to planktonic cells were observed. Other mineral elements such as sodium, magnesium and iron did not significantly differ between biofilm and planktonic cells. The distribution of mineral elements in the planktonic cells loosely mirrors the media composition; however the unique mineral element distribution in biofilm suggests specific mechanisms of accumulation from the media. A cell-to-surface attachment assay shows that addition of 50 to 100 µM Cu to standard X. fastidiosa media increases biofilm, while higher concentrations (>200 µM) slow cell growth and prevent biofilm formation. Moreover cell-to-surface attachment was blocked by specific chelation of copper. Growth of X. fastidiosa in microfluidic chambers under flow conditions showed that addition of 50 µM Cu to the media accelerated attachment and aggregation, while 400 µM prevented this process. Supplementation of standard media with Mn showed increased biofilm formation and cell-to-cell attachment. In contrast, while the biofilm accumulated Zn, supplementation to the media with this element caused inhibited growth of planktonic cells and impaired biofilm formation. Collectively these data suggest roles for these minerals in attachment and biofilm formation and therefore the virulence of this pathogen.

  13. Latest developments in biofilm technologies for wastewater treatment: Twenty five years of research of the environmental engineering group (University of Cantabria, Spain); Tecnologias de biopelicula innovadoras para la depuracion de aguas residuales: veinticinco anos de investigacion del Grupo de Ingenieria Ambiental de la Universidad de Camtabria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tejero Monzon, J. I.; Esteban-Garcia, A. L.; Florio, L. del; Diez Montero, R.; Lobo Garcia de Cortazar, A.; Rodriguez-Hernandez, L.

    2012-07-01

    Biological wastewater treatments are based on the use of active biomass, or set of organisms, in charge of carrying out the removal of contaminants. the biomass can be dispersed in suspension within the bulk liquid (activated sludge processes) or attached to a support media (biofilm processes). Biofilm technology was historically the first to be spread and applied. Nevertheless, since the 1950s, activated sludge technology gained more and more popularity given the supposed operation simplicity and higher quality of the effluent. Recently, new developments pushed forward the biofilm technology again. In this context, the Environmental Engineering Group of the University of Cantabria, since its foundation more than 2 decades ago, has been working on research and development of innovative wastewater treatment technologies based on biofilm. In this article, the know-how of the Group is illustrated, including the development of innovative submerged fixed bed reactors with and without (micro) filtration membranes, processes of biofilm supported by and aerated through membranes, as well as integrated systems (hybrid or combined) aimed at nutrient removal. submerged aerated fixed technologies, especially in hybrid configuration, as much as sludge blanket reactors (combined with biofilm processes) allow for increasing biomass concentration and may provide an attractive solution to upgrade existing WWTP. In combination with membrane filtration, they produce an effluent suitable for reuse o discharge in sensitive areas. On the other, hand, the possibility of aerating (diffusing the gas) directly through the membrane lumen into the biomass thereby grown, without need of oxygenating the whole wastewater flow to be treated, may be a real energetic paradigm shift. The developed technologies are here described alongside their experimental and modeling assessment, ranging from laboratory and bench scale up to pilot scale systems treating real municipal wastewater. (Author)

  14. Unraveling microbial biofilms of importance for food microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelströter, Lizziane Kretli; Teixeira, Fernanda Barbosa dos Reis; Silva, Eliane Pereira; Alves, Virgínia Farias; De Martinis, Elaine Cristina Pereira

    2014-07-01

    The presence of biofilms is a relevant risk factors in the food industry due to the potential contamination of food products with pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms. The majority of bacteria are able to adhere and to form biofilms, where they can persist and survive for days to weeks or even longer, depending on the microorganism and the environmental conditions. The biological cycle of biofilms includes several developmental phases such as: initial attachment, maturation, maintenance, and dispersal. Bacteria in biofilms are generally well protected against environmental stress, consequently, extremely difficult to eradicate and detect in food industry. In the present manuscript, some techniques and compounds used to control and to prevent the biofilm formation are presented and discussed. Moreover, a number of novel techniques have been recently employed to detect and evaluate bacteria attached to surfaces, including real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), DNA microarray and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Better knowledge on the architecture, physiology and molecular signaling in biofilms can contribute for preventing and controlling food-related spoilage and pathogenic bacteria. The present study highlights basic and applied concepts important for understanding the role of biofilms in bacterial survival, persistence and dissemination in food processing environments.

  15. Biofilm Thickness Influences Biodiversity in Nitrifying MBBRs-Implications on Micropollutant Removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torresi, Elena; Fowler, Jane; Polesel, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    In biofilm systems for wastewater treatment (e.g., moving bed biofilms reactors-MBBRs) biofilm thickness is typically not under direct control. Nevertheless, biofilm thickness is likely to have a profound effect on the microbial diversity and activity, as a result of diffusion limitation and thus...... at 50, 200, 300, 400, and 500 μm. The impact of biofilm thickness on microbial community was assessed via 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing and ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) abundance quantification through quantitative PCR (qPCR). Results from batch experiments and microbial analysis showed that (i......) the thickest biofilm (500 μm) presented the highest specific biotransformation rate constants (kbio, L g(-1) d(-1)) for 14 out of 22 micropollutants; (ii) biofilm thickness positively associated with biodiversity, which was suggested as the main factor for the observed enhancement of kbio; (iii) the thinnest...

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rybtke, Morten; Hultqvist, Louise Dahl; Givskov, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Studies of biopsies from infectious sites, explanted tissue and medical devises have provided evidence that biofilms are the underlying cause of a variety of tissue-associated and implant-associated recalcitrant human infections. With a need for novel anti-biofilm treatment strategies, research...... in biofilm infection microbiology, biofilm formation mechanisms and biofilm-associated antimicrobial tolerance has become an important area in microbiology. Substantial knowledge about biofilm formation mechanisms, biofilm-associated antimicrobial tolerance and immune evasion mechanisms has been obtained...... through work with biofilms grown in in vitro experimental setups, and the relevance of this information in the context of chronic infections is being investigated by the use of animal models of infection. Because our current in vitro experimental setups and animal models have limitations, new advanced...

  17. A coverslip-based technique for evaluating Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation on human plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer N Walker

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The ability of the opportunistic pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus, to form biofilms is increasingly being viewed as an important contributor to chronic infections. In vitro methods for analyzing S. aureus biofilm formation have focused on bacterial attachment and accumulation on abiotic surfaces, such as in microtiter plate and flow cell assays. Microtiter plates provide a rapid measure of relative biomass levels, while flow cells have limited experimental throughput but are superior for confocal microscopy biofilm visualization. Although these assays have proven effective at identifying mechanisms involved in cell attachment and biofilm accumulation, the significance of these assays in vivo remains unclear. Studies have shown that when medical devices are implanted they are coated with host factors, such as matrix proteins, that facilitate S. aureus attachment and biofilm formation. To address the challenge of integrating existing biofilm assay features with a biotic surface, we have established an in vitro biofilm technique utilizing UV-sterilized coverslips coated with human plasma. The substratum more closely resembles the in vivo state and provides a platform for S. aureus to establish a robust biofilm. Importantly, these coverslips are amenable to confocal microscopy imaging to provide a visual reference of the biofilm growth stage, effectively merging the benefits of the microtiter and flow cell assays. We confirmed the approach using clinical S. aureus isolates and mutants with known biofilm phenotypes. Altogether, this new biofilm assay can be used to assess the function of S. aureus virulence factors associated with biofilm formation and for monitoring the efficacy of biofilm treatment modalities.

  18. Impact of Chloramination on the Development of Laboratory-Grown Biofilms Fed with Filter-Pretreated Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Fangqiong; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the continuous impact of monochloramine disinfection on laboratory-grown biofilms through the characterization of biofilm architecture and microbial community structure. Biofilm development and disinfection were achieved using CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) biofilm reactor systems with polyvinyl chloride (PVC) coupons as the substratum and sand filter-pretreated groundwater as the source of microbial seeding and growth nutrient. After 2 weeks of growth, the biofilms were subjected to chloramination for 8 more weeks at concentrations of 7.5±1.4 to 9.1±0.4 mg Cl2 L−1. Control reactors received no disinfection during the development of biofilms. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and image analysis indicated that chloramination could lead to 81.4–83.5% and 86.3–95.6% reduction in biofilm biomass and thickness, respectively, but could not eliminate biofilm growth. 16S rRNA gene terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis indicated that microbial community structures between chloraminated and non-chloraminated biofilms exhibited different successional trends. 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing analysis further revealed that chloramination could select members of Actinobacteria and Acidobacteria as the dominant populations, whereas natural development leads to the selection of members of Nitrospira and Bacteroidetes as dominant biofilm populations. Overall, chloramination treatment could alter the growth of multi-species biofilms on the PVC surface, shape the biofilm architecture, and select a certain microbial community that can survive or proliferate under chloramination. PMID:23124766

  19. Impact of Chloramination on the Development of Laboratory-Grown Biofilms Fed with Filter-Pretreated Groundwater

    KAUST Repository

    Ling, Fangqiong

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the continuous impact of monochloramine disinfection on laboratory-grown biofilms through the characterization of biofilm architecture and microbial community structure. Biofilm development and disinfection were achieved using CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) biofilm reactor systems with polyvinyl chloride (PVC) coupons as the substratum and sand filter-pretreated groundwater as the source of microbial seeding and growth nutrient. After 2 weeks of growth, the biofilms were subjected to chloramination for 8 more weeks at concentrations of 7.5±1.4 to 9.1±0.4 mg Cl2 L-1. Control reactors received no disinfection during the development of biofilms. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and image analysis indicated that chloramination could lead to 81.4-83.5% and 86.3-95.6% reduction in biofilm biomass and thickness, respectively, but could not eliminate biofilm growth. 16S rRNA gene terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis indicated that microbial community structures between chloraminated and non-chloraminated biofilms exhibited different successional trends. 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing analysis further revealed that chloramination could select members of Actinobacteria and Acidobacteria as the dominant populations, whereas natural development leads to the selection of members of Nitrospira and Bacteroidetes as dominant biofilm populations. Overall, chloramination treatment could alter the growth of multi-species biofilms on the PVC surface, shape the biofilm architecture, and select a certain microbial community that can survive or proliferate under chloramination.

  20. A new method to measure and model dynamic oxygen microdistributions in moving biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-Hui; Chen, You-Peng; Dong, Yang; Wang, Xi-Xi; Guo, Jin-Song; Shen, Yu; Yan, Peng; Ma, Teng-Fei; Sun, Xiu-Qian; Fang, Fang; Wang, Jing

    2017-10-01

    Biofilms in natural environments offer a superior solution to mitigate water pollution. Artificially intensified biofilm reactors represented by rotating biological contactors (RBCs) are widely applied and studied. Understanding the oxygen transfer process in biofilms is an important aspect of these studies, and describing this process in moving biofilms (such as biofilms in RBCs) is a particular challenge. Oxygen transfer in RBCs behaves differently than in other biological reactors due to the special oxygen supply mode that results from alternate exposure of the biofilm to wastewater and air. The study of oxygen transfer in biofilms is indispensable for understanding biodegradation in RBCs. However, the mechanisms are still not well known due to a lack of effective tools to dynamically analyze oxygen diffusion, reaction, and microdistribution in biofilms. A new experimental device, the Oxygen Transfer Modeling Device (OTMD), was designed and manufactured for this purpose, and a mathematical model was developed to model oxygen transfer in biofilm produced by an RBC. This device allowed the simulation of the local environment around the biofilm during normal RBC operation, and oxygen concentrations varying with time and depth in biofilm were measured using an oxygen microelectrode. The experimental data conformed well to the model description, indicating that the OTMD and the model were stable and reliable. Moreover, the OTMD offered a flexible approach to study the impact of a single-factor on oxygen transfer in moving biofilms. In situ environment of biofilm in an RBC was simulated, and dynamic oxygen microdistributions in the biofilm were measured and well fitted to the built model description. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Contamination potential of drinking water distribution network biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingender, J; Flemming, H C

    2004-01-01

    Drinking water distribution system biofilms were investigated for the presence of hygienically relevant microorganisms. Early biofilm formation was evaluated in biofilm reactors on stainless steel, copper, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and polyethylene coupons exposed to unchlorinated drinking water. After 12 to 18 months, a plateau phase of biofilm development was reached. Surface colonization on the materials ranged between 4 x 10(6) and 3 x 10(7) cells/cm2, with heterotrophic plate count (HPC) bacteria between 9 x 10(3) and 7 x 10(5) colony-forming units (cfu)/cm2. Established biofilms were investigated in 18 pipe sections (2 to 99 years old) cut out from distribution pipelines. Materials included cast iron, galvanized steel, cement and PVC. Colonization ranged from 4 x 10(5) to 2 x 10(8) cells/cm2, HPC levels varied between 1 and 2 x 10(5) cfu/cm2. No correlation was found between extent of colonization and age of the pipes. Using cultural detection methods, coliform bacteria were rarely found, while Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Legionella spp. were not detected in the biofilms. In regular operation, distribution system biofilms do not seem to be common habitats for pathogens. However, nutrient-leaching materials like rubber-coated valves were observed with massive biofilms which harboured coliform bacteria contaminating drinking water.

  2. From a thin film model for passive suspensions towards the description of osmotic biofilm spreading

    CERN Document Server

    Trinschek, Sarah; Thiele, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are ubiquitous macro-colonies of bacteria that develop at various interfaces (solid-liquid, solid-gas or liquid-gas). The formation of biofilms starts with the attachment of individual bacteria to an interface, where they proliferate and produce a slimy polymeric matrix - two processes that result in colony growth and spreading. Recent experiments on the growth of biofilms on agar substrates under air have shown that for certain bacterial strains, the production of the extracellular matrix and the resulting osmotic influx of nutrient-rich water from the agar into the biofilm are more crucial for the spreading behaviour of a biofilm than the motility of individual bacteria. We present a model which describes the biofilm evolution and the advancing biofilm edge for this spreading mechanism. The model is based on a gradient dynamics formulation for thin films of biologically passive liquid mixtures and suspensions, supplemented by bioactive processes which play a decisive role in the osmotic spreading o...

  3. Membrane biofouling characterization: effects of sample preparation procedures on biofilm structure and the microbial community

    KAUST Repository

    Xue, Zheng

    2014-07-15

    Ensuring the quality and reproducibility of results from biofilm structure and microbial community analysis is essential to membrane biofouling studies. This study evaluated the impacts of three sample preparation factors (ie number of buffer rinses, storage time at 4°C, and DNA extraction method) on the downstream analysis of nitrifying biofilms grown on ultrafiltration membranes. Both rinse and storage affected biofilm structure, as suggested by their strong correlation with total biovolume, biofilm thickness, roughness and the spatial distribution of EPS. Significant variations in DNA yields and microbial community diversity were also observed among samples treated by different rinses, storage and DNA extraction methods. For the tested biofilms, two rinses, no storage and DNA extraction with both mechanical and chemical cell lysis from attached biofilm were the optimal sample preparation procedures for obtaining accurate information about biofilm structure, EPS distribution and the microbial community. © 2014 © 2014 Taylor & Francis.

  4. The Membrane Gradostat Reactor: Secondary metabolite production ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-05-16

    May 16, 2007 ... immobilise microbial cells or enzymes, depending on the bioreactor's application. .... systems. The term MGR is used to describe a biofilm reactor, which uses a synthetic capillary ultrafiltration membrane as a support matrix for the ..... Phanerochaete chrysosporium. from a binary metal system-Kinetics.

  5. Reduced Efficiency of Chlorine Disinfection of Naegleria fowleri in a Drinking Water Distribution Biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Haylea C; Wylie, Jason; Dejean, Guillaume; Kaksonen, Anna H; Sutton, David; Braun, Kalan; Puzon, Geoffrey J

    2015-09-15

    Naegleria fowleri associated with biofilm and biological demand water (organic matter suspended in water that consumes disinfectants) sourced from operational drinking water distribution systems (DWDSs) had significantly increased resistance to chlorine disinfection. N. fowleri survived intermittent chlorine dosing of 0.6 mg/L for 7 days in a mixed biofilm from field and laboratory-cultured Escherichia coli strains. However, N. fowleri associated with an attached drinking water distribution biofilm survived more than 30 times (20 mg/L for 3 h) the recommended concentration of chlorine for drinking water. N. fowleri showed considerably more resistance to chlorine when associated with a real field biofilm compared to the mixed laboratory biofilm. This increased resistance is likely due to not only the consumption of disinfectants by the biofilm and the reduced disinfectant penetration into the biofilm but also the composition and microbial community of the biofilm itself. The increased diversity of the field biofilm community likely increased N. fowleri's resistance to chlorine disinfection compared to that of the laboratory-cultured biofilm. Previous research has been conducted in only laboratory scale models of DWDSs and laboratory-cultured biofilms. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating how N. fowleri can persist in a field drinking water distribution biofilm despite chlorination.

  6. Reactor Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait Abderrahim, A

    2001-04-01

    The Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis of reactor fuel. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are summarised.

  7. Sulfate reducing bacteria and their activities in oil sands process-affected water biofilm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hong; Yu, Tong, E-mail: tong.yu@ualberta.ca; Liu, Yang, E-mail: yang.liu@ualberta.ca

    2015-12-01

    Biofilm reactors were constructed to grow stratified multispecies biofilm in oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) supplemented with growth medium. The development of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) within the biofilm and the biofilm treatment of OSPW were evaluated. The community structure and potential activity of SRB in the biofilm were investigated with H{sub 2}S microsensor measurements, dsrB gene-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), and the real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Multispecies biofilm with a thickness of 1000 μm was successfully developed on engineered biocarriers. H{sub 2}S production was observed in the deeper anoxic zone of the biofilm from around 750 μm to 1000 μm below the bulk water-biofilm interface, revealing sulfate reduction in the deeper zone of the stratified biofilm. The biofilm removed chemical oxygen demand (COD), sulfate, and nitrogen. The study expands current knowledge of biofilm treatment of OSPW and the function of anaerobic SRB in OSPW biofilm, and thus provides information for future bioreactor development in the reclamation of OSPW. - Graphical abstract: The development of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) within Oil Sands Process-affected Water (OSPW) biofilm and the biofilm treatment of OSPW were evaluated by Liu and coworkers. Combined microsensor and molecular biology techniques were utilized in this study. Their results demonstrated that multispecies biofilm with a thickness of 1000 μm was successfully developed on engineered biocarriers. H{sub 2}S production was observed in the deeper anoxic zone of the biofilm from around 750 μm to 1000 μm below the bulk water-biofilm interface, revealing sulfate reduction in the deeper zone of the biofilm. The biofilm removed chemical oxygen demand (COD), sulfate, and nitrogen. - Highlights: • Biofilm in oil sands wastewater was developed on engineered biocarriers. • Bacterial community and in situ activity of SRB were studied in the

  8. Global Identification of Biofilm-Specific Proteolysis in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Michael B; Salcedo, Eugenia C; Lohse, Matthew B; Hartooni, Nairi; Gulati, Megha; Sanchez, Hiram; Takagi, Julie; Hube, Bernhard; Andes, David R; Johnson, Alexander D; Craik, Charles S; Nobile, Clarissa J

    2016-09-13

    Candida albicans is a fungal species that is part of the normal human microbiota and also an opportunistic pathogen capable of causing mucosal and systemic infections. C. albicans cells proliferate in a planktonic (suspension) state, but they also form biofilms, organized and tightly packed communities of cells attached to a solid surface. Biofilms colonize many niches of the human body and persist on implanted medical devices, where they are a major source of new C. albicans infections. Here, we used an unbiased and global substrate-profiling approach to discover proteolytic activities produced specifically by C. albicans biofilms, compared to planktonic cells, with the goal of identifying potential biofilm-specific diagnostic markers and targets for therapeutic intervention. This activity-based profiling approach, coupled with proteomics, identified Sap5 (Candidapepsin-5) and Sap6 (Candidapepsin-6) as major biofilm-specific proteases secreted by C. albicans Fluorogenic peptide substrates with selectivity for Sap5 or Sap6 confirmed that their activities are highly upregulated in C. albicans biofilms; we also show that these activities are upregulated in other Candida clade pathogens. Deletion of the SAP5 and SAP6 genes in C. albicans compromised biofilm development in vitro in standard biofilm assays and in vivo in a rat central venous catheter biofilm model. This work establishes secreted proteolysis as a promising enzymatic marker and potential therapeutic target for Candida biofilm formation. Biofilm formation by the opportunistic fungal pathogen C. albicans is a major cause of life-threatening infections. This work provides a global characterization of secreted proteolytic activity produced specifically by C. albicans biofilms. We identify activity from the proteases Sap5 and Sap6 as highly upregulated during C. albicans biofilm formation and develop Sap-cleavable fluorogenic substrates that enable the detection of biofilms from C. albicans and also

  9. Reactor safeguards

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, Charles R

    1962-01-01

    Reactor Safeguards provides information for all who are interested in the subject of reactor safeguards. Much of the material is descriptive although some sections are written for the engineer or physicist directly concerned with hazards analysis or site selection problems. The book opens with an introductory chapter on radiation hazards, the construction of nuclear reactors, safety issues, and the operation of nuclear reactors. This is followed by separate chapters that discuss radioactive materials, reactor kinetics, control and safety systems, containment, safety features for water reactor

  10. Reactor operation

    CERN Document Server

    Shaw, J

    2013-01-01

    Reactor Operation covers the theoretical aspects and design information of nuclear reactors. This book is composed of nine chapters that also consider their control, calibration, and experimentation.The opening chapters present the general problems of reactor operation and the principles of reactor control and operation. The succeeding chapters deal with the instrumentation, start-up, pre-commissioning, and physical experiments of nuclear reactors. The remaining chapters are devoted to the control rod calibrations and temperature coefficient measurements in the reactor. These chapters also exp

  11. Biofilm streamers cause rapid clogging of flow systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yi; Drescher, Knut; Wingreen, Ned; Bassler, Bonnie; Stone, Howard

    2012-11-01

    Biofilms are antibiotic-resistant, sessile bacterial communities that are found on most surfaces on Earth. In addition to constituting the most abundant form of bacterial life, biofilms also cause chronic and medical device-associated infections. Despite their importance, basic information about how biofilms behave in common ecological environments is lacking. Here we demonstrate that flow through soil-like porous materials, industrial filters, and medical stents dramatically modifies the morphology of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms to form streamers which over time bridge the space between obstacles and corners in non-uniform environments. Using a microfluidic model system we find that, contrary to the accepted paradigm, the accumulation of surface-attached bacterial biofilm has little effect on flow resistance whereas the formation of biofilm streamers causes sudden and rapid clogging. The time at which clogging happens depends on bacterial growth, while the duration of the clogging transition is driven by flow-mediated transport of bacteria to the clogging site. Flow-induced shedding of extracellular matrix from the resident biofilm generates a sieve-like network that catches bacteria flowing by, which add to the network of extracellular matrix, to cause exponentially rapid clogging. We expect these biofilm streamers to be ubiquitous in nature, and to have profound effects on flow through porous materials in environmental, industrial, and medical environments.

  12. Desmids and biofilms of freshwater wetlands: development and microarchitecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domozych, David S; Domozych, Catherine Rogers

    2008-01-01

    Freshwater wetlands constitute important ecosystems, and their benthic, attached microbial communities, including biofilms, represent key habitats that contribute to primary productivity, nutrient cycling, and substrate stabilization. In many wetland biofilms, algae constitute significant parts of the microbial population, yet little is known about their activities in these communities. An analysis of wetland biofilms from the Adirondack region of New York (USA) was performed with special emphasis on desmids, a group of evolutionarily advanced green algae commonly found in these habitats. Desmids constituted as much as 23.7% of the total algal and cyanobacterial flora of the biofilms during the July and August study periods. These algae represented some of the first eukaryotes to colonize new substrates, and during July their numbers correlated with fluctuations in general biofilm parameters such as biofilm thickness and dry weight as well as total carbohydrate. Significant numbers of bacteria were associated with both the EPS sheaths and cell wall surfaces of the desmids. Colonization of new substrates and development of biofilms were rapid and were followed by various fluctuations in microbial community structure over the short- and long-term observations. In addition to desmids, diatoms, filamentous green algae and transient non-motile phases of flagellates represented the photosynthetic eukaryotes of these biofilms.

  13. Characterization of a filamentous biofilm community established in a cellulose-fed microbial fuel cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hotta Yasuaki

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microbial fuel cells (MFCs are devices that exploit microorganisms to generate electric power from organic matter. Despite the development of efficient MFC reactors, the microbiology of electricity generation remains to be sufficiently understood. Results A laboratory-scale two-chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC was inoculated with rice paddy field soil and fed cellulose as the carbon and energy source. Electricity-generating microorganisms were enriched by subculturing biofilms that attached onto anode electrodes. An electric current of 0.2 mA was generated from the first enrichment culture, and ratios of the major metabolites (e.g., electric current, methane and acetate became stable after the forth enrichment. In order to investigate the electrogenic microbial community in the anode biofilm, it was morphologically analyzed by electron microscopy, and community members were phylogenetically identified by 16S rRNA gene clone-library analyses. Electron microscopy revealed that filamentous cells and rod-shaped cells with prosthecae-like filamentous appendages were abundantly present in the biofilm. Filamentous cells and appendages were interconnected via thin filaments. The clone library analyses frequently detected phylotypes affiliated with Clostridiales, Chloroflexi, Rhizobiales and Methanobacterium. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization revealed that the Rhizobiales population represented rod-shaped cells with filamentous appendages and constituted over 30% of the total population. Conclusion Bacteria affiliated with the Rhizobiales constituted the major population in the cellulose-fed MFC and exhibited unique morphology with filamentous appendages. They are considered to play important roles in the cellulose-degrading electrogenic community.

  14. Real-time monitoring of Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation using a quartz crystal microbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, K; Kinsinger, N; Ayala, P; Qi, F; Shi, W; Myung, N V

    2007-01-01

    The ability of Streptococcus mutans, a well-known etiological agent in dental caries, to attach and form a biofilm is an important key to its virulence. The effects of various environmental factors (i.e. sucrose concentration, flow rate and temperature as well as genetic manipulations) on the capability of S. mutans (UA 140) to attach, form and detach were monitored in situ using quartz crystal microbalance. The biofilm growth rate was much slower than that of planktonic growth. Greater availability of sucrose contributed to biofilms with less lag time, lower doubling times and earlier detachment. Flow rate experiments showed that as the shear stress was reduced, the maximum mass accumulated also decreased. However, the detachment process was independent of shear force, perhaps indicative of quorum sensing. Increasing the incubation temperature from 37 to 40 degrees C extended the lag period and inhibited the ability of the biofilm to attach readily. Absence of either the ciaH, luxS, gtfB or gtfC genes also greatly affected the ability of the S. mutans to adhere to a surface in comparison to the wild type. Quartz crystal microbalance results indicate that the gtfC gene possibly has a greater contribution to biofilm attachment than the gtfB gene, that the presence of the luxS gene is critical for attachment and that the ciaH gene primarily affects the initial reversible attachment of the biofilm. (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cystic Fibrosis isolates of similar RAPD genotype exhibit diversity in biofilm forming ability in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elborn Stuart J

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is considered to grow in a biofilm in cystic fibrosis (CF chronic lung infections. Bacterial cell motility is one of the main factors that have been connected with P. aeruginosa adherence to both biotic and abiotic surfaces. In this investigation, we employed molecular and microscopic methods to determine the presence or absence of motility in P. aeruginosa CF isolates, and statistically correlated this with their biofilm forming ability in vitro. Results Our investigations revealed a wide diversity in the production, architecture and control of biofilm formation. Of 96 isolates, 49% possessed swimming motility, 27% twitching and 52% swarming motility, while 47% were non-motile. Microtitre plate assays for biofilm formation showed a range of biofilm formation ability from biofilm deficient phenotypes to those that formed very thick biofilms. A comparison of the motility and adherence properties of individual strains demonstrated that the presence of swimming and twitching motility positively affected biofilm biomass. Crucially, however, motility was not an absolute requirement for biofilm formation, as 30 non-motile isolates actually formed thick biofilms, and three motile isolates that had both flagella and type IV pili attached only weakly. In addition, CLSM analysis showed that biofilm-forming strains of P. aeruginosa were in fact capable of entrapping non-biofilm forming strains, such that these 'non-biofilm forming' cells could be observed as part of the mature biofilm architecture. Conclusions Clinical isolates that do not produce biofilms in the laboratory must have the ability to survive in the patient lung. We propose that a synergy exists between isolates in vivo, which allows "non biofilm-forming" isolates to be incorporated into the biofilm. Therefore, there is the potential for strains that are apparently non-biofilm forming in vitro to participate in biofilm-mediated pathogenesis in the CF

  16. Paternal Attachment, Parenting Beliefs and Children's Attachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Kimberly S.

    2010-01-01

    Relationships between fathers' romantic attachment style, parenting beliefs and father-child attachment security and dependence were examined in a diverse sample of 72 fathers of young children. Paternal romantic attachment style was coded based on fathers' endorsement of a particular style represented in the Hazan and Shaver Three-Category…

  17. Biofilm systems for the removal of micro-pollutants from wastewater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Escola, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Among the different technologies available to improve the removal of organic micropollutants in wastewater, biofilms (a microbial community founded on a surface) have been envisioned as a promising solution. Different processes involving the degradation of micro-pollutants by biofilms were studied...... and identification of enantiomers of the fungicide imazalil were achieved, allowing further studies on enantioselective toxicity and degradation. Testing the performance of different biofilm reactors for the removal of micro-pollutants provided a first insight on the efficiency of biofilms for micro...

  18. Mechanisms and regulation of surface interactions and biofilm formation in Agrobacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heindl, Jason E.; Wang, Yi; Heckel, Brynn C.; Mohari, Bitan; Feirer, Nathan; Fuqua, Clay

    2014-01-01

    For many pathogenic bacteria surface attachment is a required first step during host interactions. Attachment can proceed to invasion of host tissue or cells or to establishment of a multicellular bacterial community known as a biofilm. The transition from a unicellular, often motile, state to a sessile, multicellular, biofilm-associated state is one of the most important developmental decisions for bacteria. Agrobacterium tumefaciens genetically transforms plant cells by transfer and integration of a segment of plasmid-encoded transferred DNA (T-DNA) into the host genome, and has also been a valuable tool for plant geneticists. A. tumefaciens attaches to and forms a complex biofilm on a variety of biotic and abiotic substrates in vitro. Although rarely studied in situ, it is hypothesized that the biofilm state plays an important functional role in the ecology of this organism. Surface attachment, motility, and cell division are coordinated through a complex regulatory network that imparts an unexpected asymmetry to the A. tumefaciens life cycle. In this review, we describe the mechanisms by which A. tumefaciens associates with surfaces, and regulation of this process. We focus on the transition between flagellar-based motility and surface attachment, and on the composition, production, and secretion of multiple extracellular components that contribute to the biofilm matrix. Biofilm formation by A. tumefaciens is linked with virulence both mechanistically and through shared regulatory molecules. We detail our current understanding of these and other regulatory schemes, as well as the internal and external (environmental) cues mediating development of the biofilm state, including the second messenger cyclic-di-GMP, nutrient levels, and the role of the plant host in influencing attachment and biofilm formation. A. tumefaciens is an important model system contributing to our understanding of developmental transitions, bacterial cell biology, and biofilm formation

  19. Mechanisms and Regulation of Surface Interactions and Biofilm Formation in Agrobacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason E. Heindl

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available For many pathogenic bacteria surface attachment is a required first step during host interactions. Attachment can proceed to invasion of host tissue or cells or to establishment of a multicellular bacterial community known as a biofilm. The transition from a unicellular, often motile, state to a sessile, multicellular, biofilm-associated state is one of the most important developmental decisions for bacteria. Agrobacterium tumefaciens genetically transforms plant cells by transfer and integration of a segment of plasmid-encoded transferred DNA (T-DNA into the host genome, and has also been a valuable tool for plant geneticists. A. tumefaciens attaches to and forms a complex biofilm on a variety of biotic and abiotic substrates in vitro. Although rarely studied in situ, it is hypothesized that the biofilm state plays an important functional role in the ecology of this organism. Surface attachment, motility, and cell division are coordinated through a complex regulatory network that imparts an unexpected asymmetry to the A. tumefaciens life cycle. In this review we describe the mechanisms by which A. tumefaciens associates with surfaces, and regulation of this process. We focus on the transition between flagellar-based motility and surface attachment, and on the composition, production, and secretion of multiple extracellular components that contribute to the biofilm matrix. Biofilm formation by A. tumefaciens is linked with virulence both mechanistically and through shared regulatory molecules. We detail our current understanding of these and other regulatory schemes, as well as the internal and external (environmental cues mediating development of the biofilm state, including the second messenger cyclic-di-GMP, nutrient levels, and the role of the plant host in influencing attachment and biofilm formation. A. tumefaciens is an important model system contributing to our understanding of developmental transitions, bacterial cell biology, and

  20. Biofilm processes in treating mariculture wastewater may be a reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuai; Zhang, Shenghua; Ye, Chengsong; Lin, Wenfang; Zhang, Menglu; Chen, Lihua; Li, Jinmei; Yu, Xin

    2017-05-15

    Antibiotics are heavily used in Chinese mariculture, but only a small portion of the added antibiotics are absorbed by living creatures. Biofilm processes are universally used in mariculture wastewater treatment. In this study, removal of antibiotics (norfloxacin, rifampicin, and oxytetracycline) from wastewater by moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBRs) and the influence of antibiotics on reactor biofilm were investigated. The results demonstrated that there was no significant effect of sub-μg/L-sub-mg/L concentrations of antibiotics on TOC removal. Moreover, the relative abundance of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and antibiotic resistance bacteria (ARB) in MBBR biofilm increased because of selective pressure of antibiotics. In addition, antibiotics decreased the diversity of the biofilm bacterial community and altered bacterial community structure. These findings provide an empirical basis for the development of appropriate practices for mariculture, and suggest that disinfection and advanced oxidation should be applied to eliminate antibiotics, ARGs, and ARB from mariculture wastewater. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martens, Frederick H. [Argonne National Laboratory; Jacobson, Norman H.

    1968-09-01

    This booklet discusses research reactors - reactors designed to provide a source of neutrons and/or gamma radiation for research, or to aid in the investigation of the effects of radiation on any type of material.

  2. The pulsed light inactivation of veterinary relevant microbial biofilms and the use of a RTPCR assay to detect parasite species within biofilm structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Garvey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of pathogenic organisms namely parasite species and bacteria in biofilms in veterinary settings, is a public health concern in relation to human and animal exposure. Veterinary clinics represent a significant risk factor for the transfer of pathogens from housed animals to humans, especially in cases of wound infection and the shedding of faecal matter. This study aims to provide a means of detecting veterinary relevant parasite species in bacterial biofilms, and to provide a means of disinfecting these biofilms. A real time PCR assay was utilized to detect parasite DNA in Bacillus cereus biofilms on stainless steel and PVC surfaces. Results show that both Cryptosporidium and Giardia attach to biofilms in large numbers (100-1000 oo/cysts in as little as 72 hours. Pulsed light successfully inactivated all test species (Listeria, Salmonella, Bacillus, Escherichia in planktonic and biofilm form with an increase in inactivation for every increase in UV dose.

  3. Chlorine stress mediates microbial surface attachment in drinking water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Le, Yang; Jin, Juliang; Zhou, Yuliang; Chen, Guowei

    2015-03-01

    Microbial attachment to drinking water pipe surfaces facilitates pathogen survival and deteriorates disinfection performance, directly threatening the safety of drinking water. Notwithstanding that the formation of biofilm has been studied for decades, the underlying mechanisms for the origins of microbial surface attachment in biofilm development in drinking water pipelines remain largely elusive. We combined experimental and mathematical methods to investigate the role of environmental stress-mediated cell motility on microbial surface attachment in chlorination-stressed drinking water distribution systems. Results show that at low levels of disinfectant (0.0-1.0 mg/L), the presence of chlorine promotes initiation of microbial surface attachment, while higher amounts of disinfectant (>1.0 mg/L) inhibit microbial attachment. The proposed mathematical model further demonstrates that chlorination stress (0.0-5.0 mg/L)-mediated microbial cell motility regulates the frequency of cell-wall collision and thereby controls initial microbial surface attachment. The results reveal that transport processes and decay patterns of chlorine in drinking water pipelines regulate microbial cell motility and, thus, control initial surface cell attachment. It provides a mechanistic understanding of microbial attachment shaped by environmental disinfection stress and leads to new insights into microbial safety protocols in water distribution systems.

  4. Quantifying dental biofilm growth using cross-polarization optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, R; Rudney, J; Aparicio, C; Fok, A; Jones, R S

    2012-06-01

    Quantifying the ex vivo growth of complex multispecies dental biofilms using cross-polarization 1310-nm optical coherence tomography (CP-OCT) system was investigated. Bacterial microcosms, which were derived from plaque samples of paediatric subjects, were incubated in a biofilm reactor system containing discs of different dental materials for 72 h with daily sucrose pulsing (5×). CP-OCT analysis of biofilm mass was validated with crystal violet (CV) assays at various growth stages of these complex biofilms. CP-OCT was able to filter out the back-reflected signals of water layers in the hydrated biofilm and allowed for direct biofilm quantification. The overall depth-resolved scattering intensity of the biofilm showed very strong positive correlation with CV assay quantification (Spearman's ρ = 0.92) during the growth phase of the biofilm. CP-OCT was able to quantify the mass of the biofilm by measuring the overall depth-resolved scattering of the biofilm. CP-OCT has the ability to nondestructively monitor biofilm growth and elucidate the growth characteristics of these microcosms on different dental material compositions. © No claim to US Government works. Letters in Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. Investigating the effect of colloids on the performance of a biofilm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper was originally presented at the 2006 Water Institute of. South Africa ... NTNU - Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Department of Hydraulic and Environmental Engineering, ... Performance of membrane reactor in combination with moving-bed-biofilm reactor (BF-MBR) for treatment of municipal.

  6. Investigating the effect of colloids on the performance of a biofilm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Performance of membrane reactor in combination with moving-bed-biofilm reactor (BF-MBR) for treatment of municipal wastewater was investigated in relation to different organic loading rates; high and low rates. The membrane was operated with a constant flux of 50 LMH and 96% recovery. The fouling rate was evaluated ...

  7. The Influence of Prior Modes of Growth, Temperature, Medium, and Substrate Surface on Biofilm Formation by Antibiotic-Resistant Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Amy Huei Teen; Lee, Sui Mae; Dykes, Gary A

    2016-12-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is one of the most common causes of bacterial gastrointestinal food-borne infection worldwide. It has been suggested that biofilm formation may play a role in survival of these bacteria in the environment. In this study, the influence of prior modes of growth (planktonic or sessile), temperatures (37 and 42 °C), and nutrient conditions (nutrient broth and Mueller-Hinton broth) on biofilm formation by eight C. jejuni strains with different antibiotic resistance profiles was examined. The ability of these strains to form biofilm on different abiotic surfaces (stainless steel, glass, and polystyrene) as well as factors potentially associated with biofilm formation (bacterial surface hydrophobicity, auto-aggregation, and initial attachment) was also determined. The results showed that cells grown as sessile culture generally have a greater ability to form biofilm (P Biofilm was also greater (P biofilm formation in a strain-dependent manner. The strains were able to attach and form biofilms on different abiotic surfaces, but none of them demonstrated strong, complex, or structured biofilm formation. There were no clear trends between the bacterial surface hydrophobicity, auto-aggregation, attachment, and biofilm formation by the strains. This finding suggests that environmental factors did affect biofilm formation by C. jejuni, and they are more likely to persist in the environment in the form of mixed-species rather than monospecies biofilms.

  8. Impact of growth temperature and surface type on the resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus biofilms to disinfectants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Marwan; Khelissa, Oussama; Ibrahim, Ali; Benoliel, Corinne; Heliot, Laurent; Dhulster, Pascal; Chihib, Nour-Eddine

    2015-12-02

    Biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus on food-contact-surfaces represents a significant risk for the public health. In this context, the present study investigates the relationship between the environmental conditions of biofilm formation and the resistance to disinfectants. Therefore, a static biofilm reactor, called NEC-Biofilm System, was established in order to study the effect of growth temperature (20, 30 and 37°C), and of the surface type (stainless steel and polycarbonate), on biofilm resistance to disinfectants. These conditions were selected to mimic the biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces of food processing industries. The antibiofilm assays were performed on biofilms grown during 24 h. The results showed that the growth temperature influenced significantly the biofilm resistance to disinfectants. These data also revealed that the growth temperature has a significant effect on the biofilm structure of both bacteria. Furthermore, the increase of the biofilm growth temperature increased significantly the algD transcript level in sessile P. aeruginosa cells, whereas the icaA one was not affected in S. aureus cells. Overall, our findings show that the biofilm structure and matrix cannot fully explain the biofilm resistance to disinfectant agents. Nevertheless, it underlines the intimate link between environmental conditions, commonly met in food sectors, and the biofilm resistance to disinfectants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Antimicrobial Tolerance in Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Philip S.

    2015-01-01

    The tolerance of microorganisms in biofilms to antimicrobial agents is examined through a meta-analysis of literature data. A numerical tolerance factor comparing the rates of killing in the planktonic and biofilm states is defined to provide a quantitative basis for the analysis. Tolerance factors for biocides and antibiotics range over three orders of magnitude. This variation is not explained by taking into account the molecular weight of the agent, the chemistry of the agent, the substratum material, or the speciation of the microorganisms. Tolerance factors do depend on the areal cell density of the biofilm at the time of treatment and on the age of the biofilm as grown in a particular experimental system. This suggests that there is something that happens during biofilm maturation, either physical or physiological, that is essential for full biofilm tolerance. Experimental measurements of antimicrobial penetration times in biofilms range over orders of magnitude, with slower penetration (>12 min) observed for reactive oxidants and cationic molecules. These agents are retarded through the interaction of reaction, sorption, and diffusion. The specific physiological status of microbial cells in a biofilm contributes to antimicrobial tolerance. A conceptual framework for categorizing physiological cell states is discussed in the context of antimicrobial susceptibility. It is likely that biofilms harbor cells in multiple states simultaneously (e.g., growing, stress-adapted, dormant, inactive) and that this physiological heterogeneity is an important factor in the tolerance of the biofilm state. PMID:26185072

  10. Revamping the role of biofilm regulating operons in device-associated Staphylococci and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep P Halebeedu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive use of indwelling devices in modern medicine has revoked higher incidence of device associated infections and most of these devices provide an ideal surface for microbial attachment to form strong biofilms. These obnoxious biofilms are responsible for persistent infections, longer hospitalization and high mortality rate. Gene regulations in bacteria play a significant role in survival, colonization and pathogenesis. Operons being a part of gene regulatory network favour cell colonization and biofilm formation in various pathogens. This review explains the functional role of various operons in biofilm expression and regulation observed in device-associated pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  11. A bacterial extracellular DNA inhibits settling of motile progeny cells within a biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berne, Cécile; Kysela, David T; Brun, Yves V

    2010-08-01

    In natural systems, bacteria form complex, surface-attached communities known as biofilms. This lifestyle presents numerous advantages compared with unattached or planktonic life, such as exchange of nutrients, protection from environmental stresses and increased tolerance to biocides. Despite such benefits, dispersal also plays an important role in escaping deteriorating environments and in successfully colonizing favourable, unoccupied habitat patches. The α-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus produces a motile swarmer cell and a sessile stalked cell at each cell division. We show here that C. crescentus extracellular DNA (eDNA) inhibits the ability of its motile cell type to settle in a biofilm. eDNA binds to the polar holdfast, an adhesive structure required for permanent surface attachment and biofilm formation, thereby inhibiting cell attachment. Because stalked cells associate tightly with the biofilm through their holdfast, we hypothesize that this novel mechanism acts on swarmer cells born in a biofilm, where eDNA can accumulate to a sufficient concentration to inhibit their ability to settle. By targeting a specific cell type in a biofilm, this mechanism modulates biofilm development and promotes dispersal without causing a potentially undesirable dissolution of the existing biofilm. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. CONVECTION REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, R.P.; King, L.D.P.

    1960-03-22

    An homogeneous nuclear power reactor utilizing convection circulation of the liquid fuel is proposed. The reactor has an internal heat exchanger looated in the same pressure vessel as the critical assembly, thereby eliminating necessity for handling the hot liquid fuel outside the reactor pressure vessel during normal operation. The liquid fuel used in this reactor eliminates the necessity for extensive radiolytic gas rocombination apparatus, and the reactor is resiliently pressurized and, without any movable mechanical apparatus, automatically regulates itself to the condition of criticality during moderate variations in temperature snd pressure and shuts itself down as the pressure exceeds a predetermined safe operating value.

  13. Nutrient transitions are a source of persisters in Escherichia coli biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie M Amato

    Full Text Available Chronic and recurrent infections have been attributed to persisters in biofilms, and despite this importance, the mechanisms of persister formation in biofilms remain unclear. The plethora of biofilm characteristics that could give rise to persisters, including slower growth, quorum signaling, oxidative stress, and nutrient heterogeneity, have complicated efforts to delineate formation pathways that generate persisters during biofilm development. Here we sought to specifically determine whether nutrient transitions, which are a common metabolic stress encountered within surface-attached communities, stimulate persister formation in biofilms and if so, to then identify the pathway. To accomplish this, we established an experimental methodology where nutrient availability to biofilm cells could be controlled exogenously, and then used that method to discover that diauxic carbon source transitions stimulated persister formation in Escherichia coli biofilms. Previously, we found that carbon source transitions stimulate persister formation in planktonic E. coli cultures, through a pathway that involved ppGpp and nucleoid-associated proteins, and therefore, tested the functionality of that pathway in biofilms. Biofilm persister formation was also found to be dependent on ppGpp and nucleoid-associated proteins, but the importance of specific proteins and enzymes between biofilm and planktonic lifestyles was significantly different. Data presented here support the increasingly appreciated role of ppGpp as a central mediator of bacterial persistence and demonstrate that nutrient transitions can be a source of persisters in biofilms.

  14. A method for rapid quantitative assessment of biofilms with biomolecular staining and image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larimer, Curtis; Winder, Eric; Jeters, Robert; Prowant, Matthew; Nettleship, Ian; Addleman, Raymond Shane; Bonheyo, George T

    2016-01-01

    The accumulation of bacteria in surface-attached biofilms can be detrimental to human health, dental hygiene, and many industrial processes. Natural biofilms are soft and often transparent, and they have heterogeneous biological composition and structure over micro- and macroscales. As a result, it is challenging to quantify the spatial distribution and overall intensity of biofilms. In this work, a new method was developed to enhance the visibility and quantification of bacterial biofilms. First, broad-spectrum biomolecular staining was used to enhance the visibility of the cells, nucleic acids, and proteins that make up biofilms. Then, an image analysis algorithm was developed to objectively and quantitatively measure biofilm accumulation from digital photographs and results were compared to independent measurements of cell density. This new method was used to quantify the growth intensity of Pseudomonas putida biofilms as they grew over time. This method is simple and fast, and can quantify biofilm growth over a large area with approximately the same precision as the more laborious cell counting method. Stained and processed images facilitate assessment of spatial heterogeneity of a biofilm across a surface. This new approach to biofilm analysis could be applied in studies of natural, industrial, and environmental biofilms.

  15. Antimicrobial peptide AMPNT-6 from Bacillus subtilis inhibits biofilm formation by Shewanella putrefaciens and disrupts its preformed biofilms on both abiotic and shrimp shell surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Qi; Pu, Yuehua; Sun, Lijun; Wang, Yaling; Liu, Yang; Wang, Rundong; Liao, Jianmeng; Xu, Defeng; Liu, Ying; Ye, Riying; Fang, Zhijia; Gooneratne, Ravi

    2017-12-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens biofilm formation is of great concern for the shrimp industry because it adheres easily to food and food-contact surfaces and is a source of persistent and unseen contamination that causes shrimp spoilage and economic losses to the shrimp industry. Different concentrations of an antimicrobial lipopeptide, the fermentation product of Bacillus subtilis, AMPNT-6, were tested for the ability to reduce adhesion and disrupt S. putrefaciens preformed biofilms on two different contact surfaces (shrimp shell, stainless steel sheet). AMPNT-6 displayed a marked dose- and time-dependent anti-adhesive effect>biofilm removal. 3MIC AMPNT-6 was able both to remove biofilm and prevent bacteria from forming biofilm in a 96-well polystyrene microplate used as the model surface. 2MIC AMPNT-6 prevented bacteria from adhering to the microplate surface to form biofilm for 3h and removed already existing biofilm within 24h. Secretion of extracellular polymeric substances incubated in LB broth for 24h by S. putrefaciens was minimal at 3× MIC AMPNT-6. Scanning electron microscopy showed that damage to S. putrefaciens bacteria by AMPNT-6 possibly contributed to the non-adherence to the surfaces. Disruption of the mature biofilm structure by AMPNT-6 contributed to biofilm removal. It is concluded that AMPNT-6 can be used effectively to prevent attachment and also detach S. putrefaciens biofilms from shrimp shells, stainless steel sheets and polystyrene surfaces. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 exopolysaccharides are important for mixed species biofilm community development and stress tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periasamy, Saravanan; Nair, Harikrishnan A S; Lee, Kai W K; Ong, Jolene; Goh, Jie Q J; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Rice, Scott A

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 produces three polysaccharides, alginate, Psl, and Pel that play distinct roles in attachment and biofilm formation for monospecies biofilms. Considerably less is known about their role in the development of mixed species biofilm communities. This study has investigated the roles of alginate, Psl, and Pel during biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa in a defined and experimentally informative mixed species biofilm community, consisting of P. aeruginosa, Pseudomonas protegens, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Loss of the Psl polysaccharide had the biggest impact on the integration of P. aeruginosa in the mixed species biofilms, where the percent composition of the psl mutant was significantly lower (0.06%) than its wild-type (WT) parent (2.44%). In contrast, loss of the Pel polysaccharide had no impact on mixed species biofilm development. Loss of alginate or its overproduction resulted in P. aeruginosa representing 8.4 and 18.11%, respectively, of the mixed species biofilm. Dual species biofilms of P. aeruginosa and K. pneumoniae were not affected by loss of alginate, Pel, or Psl, while the mucoid P. aeruginosa strain achieved a greater biomass than its parent strain. When P. aeruginosa was grown with P. protegens, loss of the Pel or alginate polysaccharides resulted in biofilms that were not significantly different from biofilms formed by the WT PAO1. In contrast, overproduction of alginate resulted in biofilms that were comprised of 35-40% of P. aeruginosa, which was significantly higher than the WT (5-20%). Loss of the Psl polysaccharide significantly reduced the percentage composition of P. aeruginosa in dual species biofilms with P. protegens (<1%). Loss of the Psl polysaccharide significantly disrupted the communal stress resistance of the three species biofilms. Thus, the polysaccharide composition of an individual species significantly impacts mixed species biofilm development and the emergent properties of such communities.

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 exopolysaccharides are important for mixed species biofilm community development and stress tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravanan ePeriasamy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 produces three polysaccharides, alginate, Psl and Pel that play distinct roles in attachment and biofilm formation for monospecies biofilms. Considerably less is known about their role in the development of mixed species biofilm communities. This study has investigated the roles of alginate, Psl and Pel during biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa in a defined and experimentally informative mixed species biofilm community, consisting of P. aeruginosa, Pseudomonas protegens and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Loss of the Psl polysaccharide had the biggest impact on the integration of P. aeruginosa in the mixed species biofilms, where the percent composition of the psl mutant was significantly lower (0.06% than its wild-type parent (2.44%. In contrast, loss of the Pel polysaccharide had no impact on mixed species biofilm development. Loss of alginate or its overproduction resulted in P. aeruginosa representing 8.4% and 18.11%, respectively, of the mixed species biofilm. Dual species biofilms of P. aeruginosa and K. pneumoniae were not affected by loss of alginate, Pel or Psl, while the mucoid P. aeruginosa strain achieved a greater biomass than its parent strain. When P. aeruginosa was grown with P. protegens, loss of the Pel or alginate polysaccharides resulted in biofilms that were not significantly different from biofilms formed by the wild-type PAO1. In contrast, overproduction of alginate resulted in biofilms that were comprised of 35-40% of P. aeruginosa, which was significantly higher than the wild-type (5-20%. Loss of the Psl polysaccharide significantly reduced the percentage composition of P. aeruginosa in dual species biofilms with P. protegens (<1%. Loss of the Psl polysaccharide significantly disrupted the communal stress resistance of the three species biofilms. Thus, the polysaccharide composition of an individual species significantly impacts mixed species biofilm development and the emergent properties of such

  18. Metal-contaminated Sediment Effects on Biofilm Communities: Impairment of Multiple Stream Ecosystem Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, G.; Costello, D.

    2012-12-01

    Photosynthetic biofilms are crucial drivers of many important stream ecosystem functions (e.g., primary and secondary production, N cycling), yet we have a limited understanding of how these critical communities respond to contaminated sediments. Divalent metals (e.g., Cu, Ni, Zn) are ubiquitous in urban streams and may be contributing to the decline in ecosystem function in urban waters. We exposed natural biofilm communities in five different streams to a common sediment amended with four concentrations of Ni and Cu. Contaminated sediments were placed into cups, covered with mesh disks for biofilm attachment, and secured to the streambed. After 6 weeks, biofilm-colonized disks were analyzed for net primary production (NPP), chlorophyll a, and metal content. Sediments below the biofilms were analyzed for total metals, acid volatile sulfide, and high-resolution vertical dissolved oxygen concentrations. Additional biofilm disks were separated from the sediment and fed to Lymnaea stagnalis to assess indirect effects of sediment metal on grazers. Among our five streams, we found variation in the biofilm response to metals with the most productive stream (Elm Creek) showing the strongest negative response to metal-contaminated sediment. Contaminated sediments in Elm Creek reduced biofilm growth, slowed primary production, and prevented penetration of oxygen into surface sediments. In the less productive streams, biofilms did not reduce NPP in the presence of sediment metal and there was still substantial penetration of oxygen into sediments; however, metals moved out of the sediment and accumulated in the biofilm. L. stagnalis exposed to metal-contaminated biofilms fed at a slower rate than those given clean biofilms. This study suggests that biofilms, and the biogeochemical cycles they drive, can potentially be impaired by contaminated sediment but the response is context dependent. Further, indirect dietary effects of contaminated sediment occur more widely than

  19. Rapid methods to assess sanitizing efficacy of benzalkonium chloride to Listeria monocytogenes biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanova, Nadya A; Gawande, Purushottam V; Brovko, Lubov Y; Griffiths, Mansel W

    2007-12-01

    Different methods were used to investigate biofilm growth including crystal violet staining, ATP bioluminescence and total viable count. Seven strains of Listeria monocytogenes and 8 of their derivative strains were screened for their capacity to form biofilms. Both adaptation to benzalkonium chloride (BC) and curing of plasmids did not significantly affect biofilm-forming ability. The strains of L. monocytogenes belonging to serotype 1 formed biofilms significantly better as compared to serotype 4 (P=0.0003). To estimate the efficacy of BC for biofilm elimination the best and the poorest biofilm-formers were used (C719 and LJH 381). It was observed that, L. monocytogenes strain C719 in biofilms is at least 1000 times more resistant to BC than in planktonic form. Cells present in biofilms were shown to recover and grow after BC treatment thus providing a source of recontamination. It was shown that ATP bioluminescence provides good correlation with bacterial counts of L. monocytogenes in biofilms. Staining with crystal violet, on the contrary, did not correlate with bacterial growth in biofilms in the presence of high concentrations of BC but provided information on the concentration of bacterial cells, both live and dead, attached to the surface. ATP bioluminescence was found to be a reliable method for rapid estimation of the efficacy of sanitizers for biofilm disinfection. Crystal violet staining, on the other hand, was shown to be a suitable method to monitor removal of biofilms. Our investigation showed that for Listeria biofilms concentrations of BC higher then 10 mg/ml should be applied for at least 30 min to kill almost all the live cells in biofilms. However, this concentration was still not enough to remove biofilms from the surface of plastic.

  20. Assembly and development of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm matrix.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luyan Ma

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Virtually all cells living in multicellular structures such as tissues and organs are encased in an extracellular matrix. One of the most important features of a biofilm is the extracellular polymeric substance that functions as a matrix, holding bacterial cells together. Yet very little is known about how the matrix forms or how matrix components encase bacteria during biofilm development. Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms environmentally and clinically relevant biofilms and is a paradigm organism for the study of biofilms. The extracellular polymeric substance of P. aeruginosa biofilms is an ill-defined mix of polysaccharides, nucleic acids, and proteins. Here, we directly visualize the product of the polysaccharide synthesis locus (Psl exopolysaccharide at different stages of biofilm development. During attachment, Psl is anchored on the cell surface in a helical pattern. This promotes cell-cell interactions and assembly of a matrix, which holds bacteria in the biofilm and on the surface. Chemical dissociation of Psl from the bacterial surface disrupted the Psl matrix as well as the biofilm structure. During biofilm maturation, Psl accumulates on the periphery of 3-D-structured microcolonies, resulting in a Psl matrix-free cavity in the microcolony center. At the dispersion stage, swimming cells appear in this matrix cavity. Dead cells and extracellular DNA (eDNA are also concentrated in the Psl matrix-free area. Deletion of genes that control cell death and autolysis affects the formation of the matrix cavity and microcolony dispersion. These data provide a mechanism for how P. aeruginosa builds a matrix and subsequently a cavity to free a portion of cells for seeding dispersal. Direct visualization reveals that Psl is a key scaffolding matrix component and opens up avenues for therapeutics of biofilm-related complications.

  1. Adhesins Involved in Attachment to Abiotic Surfaces by Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berne, Cécile; Ducret, Adrien; Hardy, Gail G; Brun, Yves V

    2015-08-01

    During the first step of biofilm formation, initial attachment is dictated by physicochemical and electrostatic interactions between the surface and the bacterial envelope. Depending on the nature of these interactions, attachment can be transient or permanent. To achieve irreversible attachment, bacterial cells have developed a series of surface adhesins promoting specific or nonspecific adhesion under various environmental conditions. This article reviews the recent advances in our understanding of the secretion, assembly, and regulation of the bacterial adhesins during biofilm formation, with a particular emphasis on the fimbrial, nonfimbrial, and discrete polysaccharide adhesins in Gram-negative bacteria.

  2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria in natural, industrial and clinical settings predominantly live in biofilms, i.e., sessile structured microbial communities encased in self-produced extracellular matrix material. One of the most important characteristics of microbial biofilms is that the resident bacteria display...... a remarkable increased tolerance toward antimicrobial attack. Biofilms formed by opportunistic pathogenic bacteria are involved in devastating persistent medical device-associated infections, and chronic infections in individuals who are immune-compromised or otherwise impaired in the host defense. Because...... the use of conventional antimicrobial compounds in many cases cannot eradicate biofilms, there is an urgent need to develop alternative measures to combat biofilm infections. The present review is focussed on the important opportunistic pathogen and biofilm model organism Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Initially...

  3. Uranium immobilization by sulfate-reducing biofilms grown on hematite, dolomite, and calcite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsili, Enrico; Beyenal, Haluk; Di Palma, Luca; Merli, Carlo; Dohnalkova, Alice; Amonette, James E; Lewandowski, Zbigniew

    2007-12-15

    Biofilms of sulfate-reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20 were used to reduce dissolved U(VI) and subsequently immobilize U(IV) in the presence of uranium-complexing carbonates. The biofilms were grown in three identically operated fixed bed reactors, filled with three types of minerals: one noncarbonate-bearing mineral (hematite) and two carbonate-bearing minerals (calcite and dolomite). The source of carbonates in the reactors filled with calcite and dolomite were the minerals, while in the reactor filled with hematite it was a 10 mM carbonate buffer, pH 7.2, which we added to the growth medium. Our five-month study demonstrated that the sulfate-reducing biofilms grown in all reactors were able to immobilize/reduce uranium efficiently, despite the presence of uranium-complexing carbonates.

  4. Host Proteins Determine MRSA Biofilm Structure and Integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreier, Cindy; Nielsen, Astrid; Jørgensen, Nis Pedersen

    Human extracellular matrix (hECM) proteins aids the initial attachment and initiation of an infection, by specific binding to bacterial cell surface proteins. However, the importance of hECM proteins in structure, integrity and antibiotic resilience of a biofilm is unknown. This study aims to det...

  5. Cellulase production by Aspergillus niger in biofilm, solid-state, and submerged fermentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamarra, Norma N; Villena, Gretty K; Gutiérrez-Correa, Marcel

    2010-06-01

    Cellulase production by Aspergillus niger was compared in three different culture systems: biofilm, solid-state, and submerged fermentation. Biofilm and solid-state fermentations were carried out on perlite as inert support, and lactose was used as a carbon source in the three culture systems. In cryo-scanning electron microscopy, biofilm and solid-state cultures gave similar morphological patterns and confirmed that both spore first attachment and hyphal adhered growth are helped by the production of an adhesive extracellular matrix. Biofilm cultures produced higher cellulase activities than those in submerged and solid-state cultures (1,768, 1,165, and 1,174 U l(-1), respectively). Although biofilm cultures grew less than the other cultures, they produced significantly higher cellulase yields (370, 212, and 217 U g(-1) lactose, respectively) and volumetric productivities (24, 16, and 16 U l(-1) h(-1), respectively). Likewise, endoglucanase and xylanase activities were higher in biofilm cultures. Under the conditions tested, it seems that fungal attached growth on perlite may favor better enzyme production. Biofilms are efficient systems for cellulase production and may replace solid-state fermentation. Biofilm fermentation holds promise for further optimization and development. The results of this work reveal that fungal biofilms may be used for the commercial production of cellulase employing the technology developed for submerged fermentation at high cell densities.

  6. Roles of Pel and Psl in very early biofilm development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, B. J.; Thatcher, Travis; L'Her, Guillaume; Reed, Erin; Stuart, Jamie; Kissinger, April; Gordon, Vernita

    2012-02-01

    Biofilms are dynamic, multicellular communities of unicellular organisms. Biofilms cause many chronic infections; an important case is the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Bacteria in biofilms produce an extracellular matrix that binds bacteria to each other and to a surface. The two primary extracellular matrix components produced by P. aeruginosa are the polysaccharides Pel and Psl. Here we examine the roles of Pel and Psl in the very early stages of biofilm development, just after initial surface attachment. We use high-throughput automated tracking and analysis to compare wild-type bacteria with mutants incapable of producing Pel, Psl, or both. We examine motion on a surface as well as inter-bacterial interactions. These results quantify the unique roles played by Pel and Psl and show an unexpected relationship between Pel expression and adhesion to a surface.

  7. Innovative approaches to treat Staphylococcus aureus biofilm-related infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Katharina; Van den Driessche, Freija; Coenye, Tom

    2017-02-28

    Many bacterial infections in humans and animals are caused by bacteria residing in biofilms, complex communities of attached organisms embedded in an extracellular matrix. One of the key properties of microorganisms residing in a biofilm is decreased susceptibility towards antimicrobial agents. This decreased susceptibility, together with conventional mechanisms leading to antimicrobial resistance, makes biofilm-related infections increasingly difficult to treat and alternative antibiofilm strategies are urgently required. In this review, we present three such strategies to combat biofilm-related infections with the important human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus: (i) targeting the bacterial communication system with quorum sensing (QS) inhibitors, (ii) a 'Trojan Horse' strategy to disturb iron metabolism by using gallium-based therapeutics and (iii) the use of 'non-antibiotics' with antibiofilm activity identified through screening of repurposing libraries. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  8. Filifactor alocis--involvement in periodontal biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Riep, Birgit; Griffen, Ann L; Petrich, Annett; Hübner, Julia; Berning, Moritz; Friedmann, Anton; Göbel, Ulf B; Moter, Annette

    2010-03-01

    Bacteria in periodontal pockets develop complex sessile communities that attach to the tooth surface. These highly dynamic microfloral environments challenge both clinicians and researchers alike. The exploration of structural organisation and bacterial interactions within these biofilms is critically important for a thorough understanding of periodontal disease. In recent years, Filifactor alocis, a fastidious, Gram-positive, obligately anaerobic rod was repeatedly identified in periodontal lesions using DNA-based methods. It has been suggested to be a marker for periodontal deterioration. The present study investigated the epidemiology of F. alocis in periodontal pockets and analysed the spatial arrangement and architectural role of the organism in in vivo grown subgingival biofilms. A species-specific oligonucleotide probe, FIAL, was designed and evaluated. A total of 490 subgingival plaque samples were submitted to PCR and subsequent dot blot hybridization to compare the prevalence of F. alocis in patients suffering from generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAP), chronic periodontitis (CP), and control subjects resistant to periodontitis. Moreover, a specially designed carrier system was used to collect in vivo grown subgingival biofilms from GAP patients. Subsequent topographic analysis was performed using fluorescence in situ hybridization.While the majority of patients suffering from GAP or CP harboured F. alocis, it was rarely detected in the control group. In the examined carrier-borne biofilms the organism predominantly colonized apical parts of the pocket in close proximity to the soft tissues and was involved in numerous structures that constitute characteristic architectural features of subgingival periodontal biofilms. F. alocis is likely to make a relevant contribution to the pathogenetic structure of biofilms accounting for periodontal inflammation and can be considered an excellent marker organism for periodontal disease.

  9. Filifactor alocis - involvement in periodontal biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Göbel Ulf B

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacteria in periodontal pockets develop complex sessile communities that attach to the tooth surface. These highly dynamic microfloral environments challenge both clinicians and researchers alike. The exploration of structural organisation and bacterial interactions within these biofilms is critically important for a thorough understanding of periodontal disease. In recent years, Filifactor alocis, a fastidious, Gram-positive, obligately anaerobic rod was repeatedly identified in periodontal lesions using DNA-based methods. It has been suggested to be a marker for periodontal deterioration. The present study investigated the epidemiology of F. alocis in periodontal pockets and analysed the spatial arrangement and architectural role of the organism in in vivo grown subgingival biofilms. Results A species-specific oligonucleotide probe, FIAL, was designed and evaluated. A total of 490 subgingival plaque samples were submitted to PCR and subsequent dot blot hybridization to compare the prevalence of F. alocis in patients suffering from generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAP, chronic periodontitis (CP, and control subjects resistant to periodontitis. Moreover, a specially designed carrier system was used to collect in vivo grown subgingival biofilms from GAP patients. Subsequent topographic analysis was performed using fluorescence in situ hybridization. While the majority of patients suffering from GAP or CP harboured F. alocis, it was rarely detected in the control group. In the examined carrier-borne biofilms the organism predominantly colonized apical parts of the pocket in close proximity to the soft tissues and was involved in numerous structures that constitute characteristic architectural features of subgingival periodontal biofilms. Conclusions F. alocis is likely to make a relevant contribution to the pathogenetic structure of biofilms accounting for periodontal inflammation and can be considered an excellent marker

  10. Staphylococcal biofilm disassembly

    OpenAIRE

    Boles, Blaise R.; Horswill, Alexander R.

    2011-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis are a frequent cause of biofilm-associated infections that are a tremendous burden on our healthcare system. Staphylococcal biofilms exhibit extraordinary resistance to antimicrobial killing, limiting the efficacy of antibiotic therapy and often require surgical intervention to remove infected tissues or implanted devices. Recent work has provided new insight into the molecular basis of biofilm development in these opportunistic pathogens. ...

  11. Bacterial biofilms, resistance mechanisms to disinfection; Biopeliculas bacterianas (biofilms), mecanismos de resistencia a la desinfeccion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Codony Iglesias, F.; Morato Farreras, J.

    2002-07-01

    Biofilm is a cell community attached to a support surface, frequently enmeshed within a polymeric matrix secreted by the bacteria. Usually, such structures are developed in a wide range of materials. This development as attached to surfaces or forming suspended aggregates, greatly improve the microbial growth and their survival. This fact may be responsible of adverse effects over equipment and may constitute a public health hazard. In this work are reviewed the basis of the different microbial resistance mechanisms to disinfection from the cellular level to more complex microbial structure. (Author) 16 refs.

  12. Depression and attachment problems.

    OpenAIRE

    Pettem, O; West, M.; Mahoney, A; Keller, A

    1993-01-01

    This study investigated the characteristics related to attachment of 42 depressed psychiatric patients and 42 non-depressed psychiatric controls. The depressed subjects demonstrated an anxious pattern of attachment, characterized by either intense care-seeking in relation to their attachment figure or angry withdrawal from their attachment figure when their desire for security was frustrated. The results are discussed in terms of Bowlby's attachment construct.

  13. Fungal Metabolites for the Control of Biofilm Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréia Bergamo Estrela

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Many microbes attach to surfaces and produce a complex matrix of polymers surrounding their cells, forming a biofilm. In biofilms, microbes are much better protected against hostile environments, impairing the action of most antibiotics. A pressing demand exists for novel therapeutic strategies against biofilm infections, which are a grave health wise on mucosal surfaces and medical devices. From fungi, a large number of secondary metabolites with antimicrobial activity have been characterized. This review discusses natural compounds from fungi which are effective against fungal and bacterial biofilms. Some molecules are able to block the cell communication process essential for biofilm formation (known as quorum sensing, others can penetrate and kill cells within the structure. Several targets have been identified, ranging from the inhibition of quorum sensing receptors and virulence factors, to cell wall synthesizing enzymes. Only one group of these fungal metabolites has been optimized and made it to the market, but more preclinical studies are ongoing to expand the biofilm-fighting arsenal. The broad diversity of bioactive compounds from fungi, their activities against various pathogens, and the multi-target trait of some molecules are promising aspects of fungal secondary metabolites. Future screenings for biofilm-controlling compounds will contribute to several novel clinical applications.

  14. Staphylococcus aureus CcpA affects biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidl, Kati; Goerke, Christiane; Wolz, Christiane; Mack, Dietrich; Berger-Bächi, Brigitte; Bischoff, Markus

    2008-05-01

    Biofilm formation in Staphylococcus aureus under in vitro growth conditions is generally promoted by high concentrations of sugar and/or salts. The addition of glucose to routinely used complex growth media triggered biofilm formation in S. aureus strain SA113. Deletion of ccpA, coding for the catabolite control protein A (CcpA), which regulates gene expression in response to the carbon source, abolished the capacity of SA113 to form a biofilm under static and flow conditions, while still allowing primary attachment to polystyrene surfaces. This suggested that CcpA mainly affects biofilm accumulation and intercellular aggregation. trans-Complementation of the mutant with the wild-type ccpA allele fully restored the biofilm formation. The biofilm produced by SA113 was susceptible to sodium metaperiodate, DNase I, and proteinase K treatment, indicating the presence of polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA), protein factors, and extracellular DNA (eDNA). The investigation of several factors which were reported to influence biofilm formation in S. aureus (arlRS, mgrA, rbf, sarA, atl, ica, citZ, citB, and cidABC) showed that CcpA up-regulated the transcription of cidA, which was recently shown to contribute to eDNA production. Moreover, we showed that CcpA increased icaA expression and PIA production, presumably over the down-regulation of the tricarboxylic acid cycle genes citB and citZ.

  15. Staphylococcus aureus CcpA Affects Biofilm Formation▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidl, Kati; Goerke, Christiane; Wolz, Christiane; Mack, Dietrich; Berger-Bächi, Brigitte; Bischoff, Markus

    2008-01-01

    Biofilm formation in Staphylococcus aureus under in vitro growth conditions is generally promoted by high concentrations of sugar and/or salts. The addition of glucose to routinely used complex growth media triggered biofilm formation in S. aureus strain SA113. Deletion of ccpA, coding for the catabolite control protein A (CcpA), which regulates gene expression in response to the carbon source, abolished the capacity of SA113 to form a biofilm under static and flow conditions, while still allowing primary attachment to polystyrene surfaces. This suggested that CcpA mainly affects biofilm accumulation and intercellular aggregation. trans-Complementation of the mutant with the wild-type ccpA allele fully restored the biofilm formation. The biofilm produced by SA113 was susceptible to sodium metaperiodate, DNase I, and proteinase K treatment, indicating the presence of polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA), protein factors, and extracellular DNA (eDNA). The investigation of several factors which were reported to influence biofilm formation in S. aureus (arlRS, mgrA, rbf, sarA, atl, ica, citZ, citB, and cidABC) showed that CcpA up-regulated the transcription of cidA, which was recently shown to contribute to eDNA production. Moreover, we showed that CcpA increased icaA expression and PIA production, presumably over the down-regulation of the tricarboxylic acid cycle genes citB and citZ. PMID:18347047

  16. Organic compounds inhibiting S. epidermidis adhesion and biofilm formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Zhiqiang [Department of Systems Biology, Technical University of Denmark, Dk-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Virology of Ministry of Education and Public Health, Institute of Medical Microbiology and Institutes of Biomedical Science, Shanghai Medical School of Fudan University, Yi Xue Yuan Road 138, Shanghai 200032 (China); Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, 86 Jonathan Lucas Street, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Zhang, Jingdong; Hu, Yifan; Chi, Qijin [Department of Chemistry, Building 207, NanoDTU, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Mortensen, Ninell P. [Department of Systems Biology, Technical University of Denmark, Dk-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Department of Biochemistry and Cellular and Molecular Biology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37932 (United States); Qu, Di [Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Virology of Ministry of Education and Public Health, Institute of Medical Microbiology and Institutes of Biomedical Science, Shanghai Medical School of Fudan University, Yi Xue Yuan Road 138, Shanghai 200032 (China); Molin, Soren [Department of Systems Biology, Technical University of Denmark, Dk-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Ulstrup, Jens, E-mail: ju@kemi.dtu.dk [Department of Chemistry, Building 207, NanoDTU, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2009-07-15

    The formation of biofilms on surfaces of indwelling medical devices is a serious medical problem. Staphylococcus epidermidis is a common pathogen found to colonize implanted devices and as a biofilm is more resistant to the host immune system as well as to antibiotic treatments. Combating S. epidermidis infections by preventing or eradicating biofilm formation of the bacterium is therefore a medically important challenge. We report here a study of biofilm formation of S. epidermidis on solid surfaces using a combination of confocal laser scanning (CLSM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) in both air and aqueous environments. We have investigated the inhibitory effects of surfaces treated with four organic compounds, two benzoate derivatives denoted as compound 59 and 75 and two carboxamide derivatives denoted as compound 47 and 73, on S. epidermidis adhesion and biofilm formation. All four compounds evoke significant inhibitory effects on the formation of S. epidermidis biofilms with compounds 47 and 73 being most effective. None of the compounds were found to inhibit growth of S. epidermidis in liquid cultures. Bacteria attached to the substrate when exposed to the compounds were not affected indicating that these compounds inhibit initial adhesion. These results suggest a pretreatment for medically implanted surfaces that can prevent the biofilm formation and reduce infection.

  17. Adult attachment styles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maša Žvelc

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Theory of attachment primarily described early relationships between a child and his caretakers. In the last twenty years there is a growing interest in adult attachment research. Theories and research findings of adult attachment stem from two different methodological approaches. The first approach measures adult attachment through Adult Attachment Interview (AAI; Main, 1991 where the attachment is assessed through the narratives of adult people of their early child experiences with their primary caretakers. The second approach measures adult attachment with the help of self-evaluative questionnaires, developed by (a Hazan and Shaver (1987 who started this approach in the field of personality and social psychology, and (b Bartholomew and Horowitz (1991. Research shows that there is significant correlation between early and adult attachment style. Attachment styles are passed from generation to generation. Basic adult attachment styles are: securely attached, preoccupied, fearful-avoidant, dismissing-avoidant and disorganized. Previous research using Barholomew and Horowitz (1991 Relationship Questionnaire on 176 Slovenian students showed that 48% students are securely attached, 29% are fearful-avoidant, 10% are dismissing-avoidant, and 13% have preoccupied attachment style. Theory of attachment is very useful for understanding the behavior and subjective experiences of children and adults. It is applicable to different contexts (psychotherapy, counseling, education .... The paper proposes further research focused on integration of adult attachment styles and types of object relations measured by Test of object relations (Žvelc, 1998 and Pictorial test of Separation and Individuation (Žvelc, 2003.

  18. Characterization, Microbial Community Structure, and Pathogen Occurrence in Urban Faucet Biofilms in South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Huirong; Zhang, Shuting; Gong, Song; Zhang, Shenghua; Yu, Xin

    2015-01-01

    The composition and microbial community structure of the drinking water system biofilms were investigated using microstructure analysis and 454 pyrosequencing technique in Xiamen city, southeast of China. SEM (scanning electron microscope) results showed different features of biofilm morphology in different fields of PVC pipe. Extracellular matrix material and sparse populations of bacteria (mainly rod-shaped and coccoid) were observed. CLSM (confocal laser scanning microscope) revealed different distributions of attached cells, extracellular proteins, α-polysaccharides, and β-polysaccharides. The biofilms had complex bacterial compositions. Differences in bacteria diversity and composition from different tap materials and ages were observed. Proteobacteria was the common and predominant group in all biofilms samples. Some potential pathogens (Legionellales, Enterobacteriales, Chromatiales, and Pseudomonadales) and corrosive microorganisms were also found in the biofilms. This study provides the information of characterization and visualization of the drinking water biofilms matrix, as well as the microbial community structure and opportunistic pathogens occurrence.

  19. Biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa wild type, flagella and type IV pili mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, M.; Heydorn, Arne; Ragas, Paula Cornelia

    2003-01-01

    Biofilm formation by Gfp-tagged Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 wild type, flagella and type IV pili mutants in flow chambers irrigated with citrate minimal medium was characterized by the use of confocal laser scanning microscopy and comstat image analysis. Flagella and type IV pili were not necessary...... for P. aeruginosa initial attachment or biofilm formation, but the cell appendages had roles in biofilm development, as wild type, flagella and type IV pili mutants formed biofilms with different structures. Dynamics and selection during biofilm formation were investigated by tagging the wild type...... and flagella/type IV mutants with Yfp and Cfp and performing time-lapse confocal laser scanning microscopy in mixed colour biofilms. The initial microcolony formation occurred by clonal growth, after which wild-type P. aeruginosa bacteria spread over the substratum by means of twitching motility. The wild-type...

  20. Characterization, Microbial Community Structure, and Pathogen Occurrence in Urban Faucet Biofilms in South China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huirong Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The composition and microbial community structure of the drinking water system biofilms were investigated using microstructure analysis and 454 pyrosequencing technique in Xiamen city, southeast of China. SEM (scanning electron microscope results showed different features of biofilm morphology in different fields of PVC pipe. Extracellular matrix material and sparse populations of bacteria (mainly rod-shaped and coccoid were observed. CLSM (confocal laser scanning microscope revealed different distributions of attached cells, extracellular proteins, α-polysaccharides, and β-polysaccharides. The biofilms had complex bacterial compositions. Differences in bacteria diversity and composition from different tap materials and ages were observed. Proteobacteria was the common and predominant group in all biofilms samples. Some potential pathogens (Legionellales, Enterobacteriales, Chromatiales, and Pseudomonadales and corrosive microorganisms were also found in the biofilms. This study provides the information of characterization and visualization of the drinking water biofilms matrix, as well as the microbial community structure and opportunistic pathogens occurrence.

  1. Bacterial Extracellular Polysaccharides Involved in Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena P. Ivanova

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS produced by microorganisms are a complex mixture of biopolymers primarily consisting of polysaccharides, as well as proteins, nucleic acids, lipids and humic substances. EPS make up the intercellular space of microbial aggregates and form the structure and architecture of the biofilm matrix. The key functions of EPS comprise the mediation of the initial attachment of cells to different substrata and protection against environmental stress and dehydration. The aim of this review is to present a summary of the current status of the research into the role of EPS in bacterial attachment followed by biofilm formation. The latter has a profound impact on an array of biomedical, biotechnology and industrial fields including pharmaceutical and surgical applications, food engineering, bioremediation and biohydrometallurgy. The diverse structural variations of EPS produced by bacteria of different taxonomic lineages, together with examples of biotechnological applications, are discussed. Finally, a range of novel techniques that can be used in studies involving biofilm-specific polysaccharides is discussed.

  2. Immobilization of Rhodococcus rhodochrous BX2 (an acetonitrile-degrading bacterium) with biofilm-forming bacteria for wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunyan; Li, Yue; Cheng, Xiaosong; Feng, Liping; Xi, Chuanwu; Zhang, Ying

    2013-03-01

    In this study, a unique biofilm consisting of three bacterial strains with high biofilm-forming capability (Bacillus subtilis E2, E3, and N4) and an acetonitrile-degrading bacterium (Rhodococcus rhodochrous BX2) was established for acetonitrile-containing wastewater treatment. The results indicated that this biofilm exhibited strong resistance to acetonitrile loading shock and displayed a typical spatial and structural heterogeneity and completely depleted the initial concentration of acetonitrile (800mgL(-1)) within 24h in a moving-bed-biofilm reactor (MBBR) after operation for 30days. The immobilization of BX2 cells in the biofilm was confirmed by PCR-DGGE. It has been demonstrated that biofilm-forming bacteria can promote the immobilization of contaminant-degrading bacteria in the biofilms and can subsequently improve the degradation of contaminants in wastewater. This approach offers a novel strategy for enhancing biological oxidation of toxic pollutants in wastewater. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Mass Transfer Enhancement in Moving Biofilm Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taherzadeh, Danial; Picioreanu, Cristian; Horn, Harald

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms are layers of microbial cells growing on an interface and they can form highly complex structures adapted to a wide variety of environmental conditions. Biofilm streamers have a small immobile base attached to the support and a flexible tail elongated in the flow direction, which can vibrate in fast flows. Herein we report numerical results for the role of the periodical movement of biofilm streamers on the nutrient uptake and in general on the solute mass transfer enhancement due to flow-induced oscillations. We developed what to our knowledge is a novel two-dimensional fluid-structure interaction model coupled to unsteady solute mass transport and solved the model using the finite element method with a moving mesh. Results demonstrate that the oscillatory movement of the biofilm tail significantly increases the substrate uptake. The mass transfer coefficient is the highest in regions close to the streamer tip. The reason for substrate transfer enhancement is the increase in speed of tip movement relative to the surrounding liquid, thereby reducing the thickness of the mass transfer boundary layer. In addition, we show that the relative mass transfer enhancement in unsteady conditions compared with the rigid static structure is larger at higher flow velocities, and this relative increase favors a more flexible structure. PMID:22500748

  4. Characterization and performance of constructed nitrifying biofilms during nitrogen bioremediation of a wastewater effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Rivera, A; Paniagua-Michel, J; Zamora-Castro, J

    2007-04-01

    Constructed ammonium oxidizing biofilms (CAOB) and constructed nitrite oxidizing biofilms (CNOB) were characterized during the bioremediation of a wastewater effluent. The maximum ammonium removal rate and removal efficiency in CAOB was 322 mg N-NH4+ m(-3) d(-1) and 96%, respectively, while in CNOB a maximum removal rate of 255 mg N-NH4+ m(-3) d(-1) and a removal efficiency of 76% was achieved. Both constructed biofilms on low-density polyester Dacron support achieved removal efficiencies higher than that of the concentrations normally present in reactors without constructed biofilms (P Nitrobacter hamburgensis, N. winogradskyi and N. alkalicus were identified according to 16S rRNA gene sequences comparison. The biofilm reactors were nitrifying over the whole experimental period (15 days), showing a definite advantage of constructed biofilms for enhancing a high biomass concentration as evidenced by environmental electron microscopic analysis (ESEM). Our research demonstrates that low-density polyester Dacron can be effectively used for the construction of nitrifying biofilms obtaining high removal efficiencies of nitrogen in a relatively short time from municipal effluents from wastewater treatment plants. CAOB and CNOB are potentially promissory for the treatment of industrial wastewaters that otherwise requires very large and expensive reactors for efficient bioremediation of effluents.

  5. More than a decade of experience of landfill leachate treatment with a full-scale anammox plant combining activated sludge and activated carbon biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azari, Mohammad; Walter, Uwe; Rekers, Volker; Gu, Ji-Dong; Denecke, Martin

    2017-05-01

    The performance of biological treatment for high ammonium removal from landfill leachate has been demonstrated. The plant was upgraded combining the activated sludge process followed by activated carbon reactor. Based on a long-term analysis of data collected from 2006 to 2015, the average total nitrogen removal efficiency of 94% was achieved for wastewaters with a C: N ratio varying from 1 to 5 kg-COD kg-TN -1 . But without the presence of activated carbon reactor, the average of biological removal efficiency for total nitrogen was only 82% ± 6% for the activated sludge stage. It means that up to 20% of the nitrogen in the influent can only be eliminated by microorganisms attached to granular activated carbon. After upgrades of the plant, the energy efficiency showed a reduction in the specific energy demand from 1.6 to less than 0.2 kWh m -3 . Methanol consumption and sludge production was reduced by 91% and 96%, respectively. Fluorescent in situ Hybridization was used for microbial diversity analysis on floccular sludge and granular biofilm samples. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) bacteria and nitrifiers were detected and Candidatus Scalindua was found in two forms of flocs and biofilms. Due to stochastic risk assessment based on the long-term data analysis given in this research, the treatment criteria were achieved and the combination of granular activated carbon biofilm process and activated sludge can be a novel and sought approach to better enrich anammox biomass for full-scale treatment applications to reduce operating costs and promote nutrient removal stability and efficiency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. REACTOR COOLING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quackenbush, C.F.

    1959-09-29

    A nuclear reactor with provisions for selectively cooling the fuel elements is described. The reactor has a plurality of tubes extending throughout. Cylindrical fuel elements are disposed within the tubes and the coolant flows through the tubes and around the fuel elements. The fuel elements within the central portion of the reactor are provided with roughened surfaces of material. The fuel elements in the end portions of the tubes within the reactor are provlded with low conduction jackets and the fuel elements in the region between the central portion and the end portions are provided with smooth surfaces of high heat conduction material.

  7. Hydraulic resistance of biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Dreszer, C.

    2013-02-01

    Biofilms may interfere with membrane performance in at least three ways: (i) increase of the transmembrane pressure drop, (ii) increase of feed channel (feed-concentrate) pressure drop, and (iii) increase of transmembrane passage. Given the relevance of biofouling, it is surprising how few data exist about the hydraulic resistance of biofilms that may affect the transmembrane pressure drop and membrane passage. In this study, biofilms were generated in a lab scale cross flow microfiltration system at two fluxes (20 and 100Lm-2h-1) and constant cross flow (0.1ms-1). As a nutrient source, acetate was added (1.0mgL-1 acetate C) besides a control without nutrient supply. A microfiltration (MF) membrane was chosen because the MF membrane resistance is very low compared to the expected biofilm resistance and, thus, biofilm resistance can be determined accurately. Transmembrane pressure drop was monitored. As biofilm parameters, thickness, total cell number, TOC, and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) were determined, it was demonstrated that no internal membrane fouling occurred and that the fouling layer actually consisted of a grown biofilm and was not a filter cake of accumulated bacterial cells. At 20Lm-2h-1 flux with a nutrient dosage of 1mgL-1 acetate C, the resistance after 4 days reached a value of 6×1012m-1. At 100Lm-2h-1 flux under the same conditions, the resistance was 5×1013m-1. No correlation of biofilm resistance to biofilm thickness was found; Biofilms with similar thickness could have different resistance depending on the applied flux. The cell number in biofilms was between 4×107 and 5×108 cellscm-2. At this number, bacterial cells make up less than a half percent of the overall biofilm volume and therefore did not hamper the water flow through the biofilm significantly. A flux of 100Lm-2h-1 with nutrient supply caused higher cell numbers, more biomass, and higher biofilm resistance than a flux of 20Lm-2h-1. However, the biofilm thickness

  8. Effects of Low-Dose Amoxicillin on Staphylococcus aureus USA300 Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynek, Kevin D; Callahan, Mary T; Shimkevitch, Anton V; Farmer, Jackson T; Endres, Jennifer L; Marchand, Mélodie; Bayles, Kenneth W; Horswill, Alexander R; Kaplan, Jeffrey B

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies showed that sub-MIC levels of β-lactam antibiotics stimulate biofilm formation in most methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains. Here, we investigated this process by measuring the effects of sub-MIC amoxicillin on biofilm formation by the epidemic community-associated MRSA strain USA300. We found that sub-MIC amoxicillin increased the ability of USA300 cells to attach to surfaces and form biofilms under both static and flow conditions. We also found that USA300 biofilms cultured in sub-MIC amoxicillin were thicker, contained more pillar and channel structures, and were less porous than biofilms cultured without antibiotic. Biofilm formation in sub-MIC amoxicillin correlated with the production of extracellular DNA (eDNA). However, eDNA released by amoxicillin-induced cell lysis alone was evidently not sufficient to stimulate biofilm. Sub-MIC levels of two other cell wall-active agents with different mechanisms of action-d-cycloserine and fosfomycin-also stimulated eDNA-dependent biofilm, suggesting that biofilm formation may be a mechanistic adaptation to cell wall stress. Screening a USA300 mariner transposon library for mutants deficient in biofilm formation in sub-MIC amoxicillin identified numerous known mediators of S. aureus β-lactam resistance and biofilm formation, as well as novel genes not previously associated with these phenotypes. Our results link cell wall stress and biofilm formation in MRSA and suggest that eDNA-dependent biofilm formation by strain USA300 in low-dose amoxicillin is an inducible phenotype that can be used to identify novel genes impacting MRSA β-lactam resistance and biofilm formation. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Biofilm layers affect the treatment outcomes of NaF and Nano-hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M; He, L B; Exterkate, R A M; Cheng, L; Li, J Y; Ten Cate, J M; Crielaard, W; Deng, D M

    2015-04-01

    During caries formation, dental biofilms function not only as acid producers but also as reservoirs and diffusion barriers for active caries-preventive components. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of biofilms as a stagnant layer on the efficacy of NaF and nano-hydroxyapatite (nHA). Biofilms of Streptococcus mutans C180-2 were formed on the surfaces of artificially demineralized enamel in an active attachment biofilm model. After 2 days of biofilm formation, the model was subjected to a pH-cycling schedule, together with a control group without biofilms. Specimens were treated for 5 min twice daily with water, a 10% nHA slurry, or 18.4 mM NaF. At the end of the pH-cycling period, the biofilms were removed for the determination of the viable counts, the lactic acid production, and the calcium content. The mineral changes in the demineralized enamel blocks were analyzed by transversal microradiography. No differences in the biofilm viable counts and lactic acid production were found in the different treatment groups. The mean calcium content of the biofilms in the nHA group was 60.7 ± 15.3 mmol/g wet weight, which was approximately 8-fold higher than in the other 2 groups. The application of NaF resulted in net remineralization, but in the presence of a biofilm, net demineralization was observed. In contrast, nHA treatment reduced further demineralization compared with the water treatment, but the presence of a biofilm enhanced this effect. In conclusion, the presence of biofilms clearly influenced the treatment outcomes of anticaries products. Biofilms could either enhance or impede their efficacy. This result implies that biofilms should be included in the in vitro tests for the preclinical screening of caries-protective agents. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2015.

  10. Effect of arginine on the growth and biofilm formation of oral bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xuelian; Zhang, Keke; Deng, Meng; Exterkate, Robertus A M; Liu, Chengcheng; Zhou, Xuedong; Cheng, Lei; Ten Cate, Jacob M

    2017-10-01

    Alkali production via arginine deiminase system (ADS) of oral bacteria plays a significant role in oral ecology, pH homeostasis and inhibition of dental caries. ADS activity in dental plaque varies greatly between individuals, which may profoundly affect their susceptibility to caries. To investigate the effect of arginine on the growth and biofilm formation of oral bacteria. Polymicrobial dental biofilms derived from saliva were formed in a high-throughput active attachment biofilm model and l-arginine (Arg) was shown to reduce the colony forming units (CFU) counts of such biofilms grown for various periods or biofilms derived from saliva of subjects with different caries status. Arg hardly disturbed bacterial growth of Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Streptococcus sanguinis and Streptococcus gordonii in BHI medium, but only inhibited biofilm formation of S. mutans. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed S. mutans biofilms harboured fewer cells grown with Arg than that without Arg, even in the initial 2h and 8h phase. Confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) images of poly-microbial dental and S. mutans biofilms revealed the biofilms grown with Arg had lower exopolysaccharide (EPS)/bacteria ratios than those without Arg (P=0.004, 0.002, respectively). Arg could significantly reduce the production of water-insoluble EPS in S. mutans biofilms (PgtfC or gtfD (P=0.32, 0.06, 0.44 respectively). Arg could reduce the biomass of poly-microbial dental biofilms and S. mutans biofilms, which may be due to the impact of Arg on water-insoluble EPS. Considering the contribution to pH homeostasis in dental biofilms, Arg may serve as an important agent keeping oral biofilms healthy thus prevent dental caries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Optimizing carbon dioxide utilization for microalgae biofilm cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanken, Ward; Schaap, Stefan; Theobald, Sophie; Rinzema, Arjen; Wijffels, René H; Janssen, Marcel

    2017-04-01

    The loss of carbon dioxide (CO2 ) to the environment during microalgae cultivation is undesirable for both environmental and economic reasons. In this study, a phototrophic biofilm growth model was developed and validated with the objective to maximize both CO2 utilization efficiency and production of microalgae in biofilms. The model was validated in growth experiments with CO2 as the limiting substrate. The CO2 utilization and biomass productivity were maximized by changing the gas flow rate, the number of biofilm reactors in series and gas composition. Based on simulations, the maximum CO2 utilization efficiency that was reached was 96% based on a process employing flue gas. The corresponding drop in productivity was only 2% in comparison to the non-CO2 limited reference situation. In order to achieve this, 25 biofilm reactors units, or more, must be operated in series. Based on these results, it was concluded that concentrated CO2 streams and plug flow behavior of the gaseous phase over the biofilm surface are essential for high productivity and CO2 utilization efficiency. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 769-776. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Contribution of Autolysin and Sortase A during Enterococcus faecalis DNA-Dependent Biofilm Development▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiton, Pascale S.; Hung, Chia S.; Kline, Kimberly A.; Roth, Robyn; Kau, Andrew L.; Hayes, Ericka; Heuser, John; Dodson, Karen W.; Caparon, Michael G.; Hultgren, Scott J.

    2009-01-01

    Biofilm production is a major attribute of Enterococcus faecalis clinical isolates. Although some factors, such as sortases, autolysin, and extracellular DNA (eDNA), have been associated with E. faecalis biofilm production, the mechanisms underlying the contributions of these factors to this process have not been completely elucidated yet. In this study we define important roles for the major E. faecalis autolysin (Atn), eDNA, and sortase A (SrtA) during the developmental stages of biofilm formation under static and hydrodynamic conditions. Deletion of srtA affects the attachment stage and results in a deficiency in biofilm production. Atn-deficient mutants are delayed in biofilm development due to defects in primary adherence and DNA release, which we show to be particularly important during the accumulative phase for maturation and architectural stability of biofilms. Confocal laser scanning and freeze-dry electron microscopy of biofilms grown under hydrodynamic conditions revealed that E. faecalis produces a DNase I-sensitive fibrous network, which is important for biofilm stability and is absent in atn-deficient mutant biofilms. This study establishes the stage-specific requirements for SrtA and Atn and demonstrates a role for Atn in the pathway leading to DNA release during biofilm development in E. faecalis. PMID:19528211

  13. Contribution of autolysin and Sortase a during Enterococcus faecalis DNA-dependent biofilm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiton, Pascale S; Hung, Chia S; Kline, Kimberly A; Roth, Robyn; Kau, Andrew L; Hayes, Ericka; Heuser, John; Dodson, Karen W; Caparon, Michael G; Hultgren, Scott J

    2009-09-01

    Biofilm production is a major attribute of Enterococcus faecalis clinical isolates. Although some factors, such as sortases, autolysin, and extracellular DNA (eDNA), have been associated with E. faecalis biofilm production, the mechanisms underlying the contributions of these factors to this process have not been completely elucidated yet. In this study we define important roles for the major E. faecalis autolysin (Atn), eDNA, and sortase A (SrtA) during the developmental stages of biofilm formation under static and hydrodynamic conditions. Deletion of srtA affects the attachment stage and results in a deficiency in biofilm production. Atn-deficient mutants are delayed in biofilm development due to defects in primary adherence and DNA release, which we show to be particularly important during the accumulative phase for maturation and architectural stability of biofilms. Confocal laser scanning and freeze-dry electron microscopy of biofilms grown under hydrodynamic conditions revealed that E. faecalis produces a DNase I-sensitive fibrous network, which is important for biofilm stability and is absent in atn-deficient mutant biofilms. This study establishes the stage-specific requirements for SrtA and Atn and demonstrates a role for Atn in the pathway leading to DNA release during biofilm development in E. faecalis.

  14. Modulation of eDNA release and degradation affects Staphylococcus aureus biofilm maturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethan E Mann

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated a role for Staphylococcus aureus cidA-mediated cell lysis and genomic DNA release in biofilm adherence. The current study extends these findings by examining both temporal and additional genetic factors involved in the control of genomic DNA release and degradation during biofilm maturation. Cell lysis and DNA release were found to be critical for biofilm attachment during the initial stages of development and the released DNA (eDNA remained an important matrix component during biofilm maturation. This study also revealed that an lrgAB mutant exhibits increased biofilm adherence and matrix-associated eDNA consistent with its proposed role as an inhibitor of cidA-mediated lysis. In flow-cell assays, both cid and lrg mutations had dramatic effects on biofilm maturation and tower formation. Finally, staphylococcal thermonuclease was shown to be involved in biofilm development as a nuc mutant formed a thicker biofilm containing increased levels of matrix-associated eDNA. Together, these findings suggest a model in which the opposing activities of the cid and lrg gene products control cell lysis and genomic DNA release during biofilm development, while staphylococcal thermonuclease functions to degrade the eDNA, possibly as a means to promote biofilm dispersal.

  15. Eff