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Sample records for atropine

  1. Reverse amblyopia with atropine treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainline, Bryan C; Sprunger, Derek C; Plager, David A; Neely, Daniel E; Guess, Matthew G

    2009-01-01

    Occlusion, pharmacologic pernalization and combined therapy have been documented in controlled studies to effectively treat amblyopia with few complications. However, there remain concerns about the effectiveness and complications when, as in this case, there are not standardized treatment protocols. A retrospective chart review of 133 consecutive patients in one community based ophthalmology practice treated for amblyopia was performed. Treatments evaluated were occlusion only, atropine penalization, and combination of occlusion and atropine. Reverse amblyopia was defined as having occured when the visual acuity of the sound eye was 3 LogMar units worse than visual acuity of the amblyopia eye after treatment. Improvement in vision after 6 months and 1 year of amblyopia therapy was similar among all three groups: 0.26 LogMar lines and 0.30 in the atropine group, 0.32 and 0.34 in the occlusion group, and 0.24 and 0.32 in the combined group. Eight (6%) patients demonstrated reverse amblyopia. The mean age of those who developed reverse amblyopia was 3.5 years, 1.5 years younger than the mean age of the study population, 7/8 had strabismic amblyopia, 6/8 were on daily atropine and had a mean refractive error of +4.77 diopters in the amblyopic eye and +5.06 diopters in the sound eye. Reverse amblyopia did not occur with occlusion only therapy. In this community based ophthalmology practice, atropine, patching, and combination therapy appear to be equally effective modalities to treat ambyopia. Highly hyperopic patients under 4 years of age with dense, strabismic amblyopia and on daily atropine appeared to be most at risk for development of reverse amblyopia.

  2. Accidental epidural injection of Atropine

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    Udayan Bakshi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Intrathecal injection of drugs for anesthesia, regional analgesia, and chronic pain management are common practice now. Local anesthetic, adjuvants, and opioids are in common use. Human error in the Operation Theater and the Intensive Care Unit setup is also known and reported, due to stress and overwork. A case of unintentional atropine injection intrathecally, which was closely observed for any untoward effects, is reported here.

  3. Refractory reverse amblyopia with atropine penalization

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    Preeti Ajit Patil

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacological penalization with atropine has been shown to be equally effective as conventional occlusion therapy in the treatment of amblyopia in children. Reverse amblyopia of the sound eye with atropine penalization has been reported before, but is more common in cases where the effect is augmented with optical penalization and is mostly reversible. We report a case of reverse amblyopia with atropine penalization, in a 4-year-old girl, which was refractory to treatment. This report highlights the need for strict monitoring of the vision in the sound eye and regular follow-up in children undergoing amblyopia treatment.

  4. Optimization of perfusion studies using Atropine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarado, A.N.; Valle, V.M.; Montoya, M.J.; Eskenazi, E.S.; Montiel, M.L.; Cueto, C.C.

    2002-01-01

    The studies of myocardial perfusion require an adequate stress; exercise or pharmacological. Every day, more pharmacological studies are performed, specially in some group of patients (women, AMI, etc). There some drugs that are used for this purpose, as adenosine and dobutamine. However, their cost and the lack of availability and infrastructure in our country do not allow there routinely use. We performed dipyridamol as a pharmacological stress, however in some patients there is a doubt regarding if the pharmacological effect was adequate. Atropine is a drug that is frequently used for different purpose and it is well know its tachycardic response. We present and alternative technique, using dipyridamol-atropine as a protocol of stress perfusion study. Our goal was to correlate the standard dipyridamol -thallium perfusion study and the dipyridamol -atropine-perfusion in patients with chronic coronary disease. We evaluated 6 patients (5 males) with stable angina and chronic coronary disease. A standard dipyridamol-thallium study was performed in all of them. Dipyridamole was administered intravenously at a rate of 0.14 mg/kg/min over 6 min for a total of 0.84 mg/kg body weight. Blood pressure, heart rate, EKG and symptoms were monitored before, during and after the pharmacological infusion. Two minutes after the infusion was completed, the radiotracer was injected intravenously. In the next 6 months, without any modification of the clinical situation (symptoms and therapy) a new dipyridamol study was performed, using 1 mg of atropine after the administration of dipyridamol. There were no differences in the collateral effects and we observed and average increase of 30% in the heart rate in relation with the study using dipyridamol alone. The addition of atropine to the standard dipyridamol perfusion study is safe, cheaper and improved the detection of perfusion defects in patients with coronary artery disease

  5. Sublingual atropine for the treatment of severe and hyoscine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comley C, Galletly C, Ash D. Use of atropine eye drops for clozapine induced hypersalivation. Aust N Z J Psychiatry 2000 ; 34(6):1033-. 1034. 6. Sharma A, Ramaswamy S, Dahl E, Dewan V. Intraoral application of atropine sulphate ophthalmic solution for clozapine-induced sialorrhea. Ann Pharmacother 2004 ; 38(9):1538.

  6. Atropine exposure in adolescence predispose to adult memory loss ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Atropine, drug abuse, adolescence, adulthood, memory loss. INTRODUCTION ... Hence, more attention and focus are on ... that PFC deal with logical reasoning and executive ... to make their own decisions of the arms to follow.

  7. Comparison of Current Recommended Regimens of Atropinization in Organophosphate Poisoning

    OpenAIRE

    Connors, Nicholas J.; Harnett, Zachary H.; Hoffman, Robert S.

    2013-01-01

    Atropine is the mainstay of therapy in organophosphate (OP) toxicity, though research and consensus on dosing is lacking. In 2004, as reported by Eddleston et al. (J Toxicol Clin Toxicol 42(6):865-75, 2004), they noted variation in recommended regimens. We assessed revisions of original references, additional citations, and electronic sources to determine the current variability in atropine dosing recommendations. Updated editions of references from Eddleston et al.’s work, texts of Internal ...

  8. Comparison of current recommended regimens of atropinization in organophosphate poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, Nicholas J; Harnett, Zachary H; Hoffman, Robert S

    2014-06-01

    Atropine is the mainstay of therapy in organophosphate (OP) toxicity, though research and consensus on dosing is lacking. In 2004, as reported by Eddleston et al. (J Toxicol Clin Toxicol 42(6):865-75, 2004), they noted variation in recommended regimens. We assessed revisions of original references, additional citations, and electronic sources to determine the current variability in atropine dosing recommendations. Updated editions of references from Eddleston et al.'s work, texts of Internal and Emergency Medicine, and electronic resources were reviewed for atropine dosing recommendations. For comparison, recommendations were assessed using the same mean dose (23.4 mg) and the highest dose (75 mg) of atropine as used in the original paper. Recommendations were also compared with the dosing regimen from the World Health Organization (WHO). Thirteen of the original recommendations were updated and 15 additional references were added giving a convenience sample of 28. Sufficient information to calculate time to targeted dose was provided by 24 of these samples. Compared to 2004, current recommendations have greatly increased the speed of atropinization with 13/24 able to reach the mean and high atropine dose within 30 min compared to 1/36 in 2004. In 2004, there were 13 regimens where the maximum time to reach 75 mg was over 18 h, whereas now, there are 2. While only one recommendation called for doubling the dose for faster escalation in 2004, 15 of the 24 current works include dose doubling. In 2004, Eddleston et al. called for an evidence-based guideline for the treatment of OP poisoning that could be disseminated worldwide. Many current recommendations can adequately treat patients within 1 h. While the WHO recommendations remain slow to treat patients with OP poisoning, other authorities are close to a consensus on rapid atropinization.

  9. Efficacy of atropine and anisodamine eye drops for adolescent pseudomyopia

    OpenAIRE

    Hui-Jie Wang

    2017-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the effect and local influence of atropine and anisodamine eye drops on adolescent pseudomyopia. METHODS:Totally 110 cases of juvenile pseudomyopia were randomly divided into two groups, the control group was given 10g/L atropine sulfate eye gel, and the observation group was treated with 5g/L raceanisodamine eye drops. The efficacy of two methods, the changes of axial length and intraocular pressure before and after treatment, and the incidence of adverse reactions were co...

  10. Influence of atropine and loperamide on reduced intestinal transit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of Calotropis procera latex alone and in the presence of loperamide and atropine on intestinal transit in rats were determined to elucidate the action of C. procera on intestinal transit. Six groups of rats containing ten rats per group were used. Each rat in the control group (I) received 0.5 ml of normal saline.

  11. Tea of thornapple leaves: a rare cause of atropine intoxication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamens, D.; de Hert, S.; Vermeyen, K.

    1994-01-01

    A patient was admitted with signs of an acute psychosis. There was no clear history of drug intake nor injury. The presenting clinical symptoms were similar to those of an atropine intoxication. This was later confirmed on toxicological screening of the urine. This alkaloid was ingested by means of

  12. Clinical effects of detomidine with or without atropine used for arthrocentesis in horses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Diana L.

    1993-01-01

    The effectiveness of detomidine with or without atropine sulfate premedication in producing sedation and analgesia for arthrocentesis was studied in 12 horses. The effects were evaluated by monitoring heart and respiratory rates, borborygmi, distance from the lower lip to the floor, systolic blood pressure, and response to needle insertion. Either atropine or saline (as a placebo) was administered immediately prior to detomidine. All drugs were administered intravenously. Measurements were taken prior to drug injection and at 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 40, 50, 60, 120, 180 and 240 minutes postinjection. Detomidine with atropine resulted in significantly higher heart rates than detomidine without atropine for the three hours of observation. Borborygmi were significantly decreased for four hours following detomidine with atropine and for three hours following detomidine without atropine, when compared to preinjection levels. Systolic blood pressure was significantly increased for 15 minutes following detomidine and atropine compared to the preinjection level. The head was markedly lowered for 60 minutes with either treatment. Atropine prevented the bradyarrhythmia and bradycardia induced by detomidine, but it induced a tachycardia. A satisfactory response for needle insertion and adequate synovial fluid aspiration was achieved in 95% of the trials with detomidine, with or without atropine sulfate premedication. The results suggest that, although atropine prevents bradyarrhythmia and bradycardia following detomidine, administering detomidine without atropine is satisfactory for arthrocentesis in untrained horses. PMID:17424223

  13. Efficacy of atropine and anisodamine eye drops for adolescent pseudomyopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Jie Wang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To investigate the effect and local influence of atropine and anisodamine eye drops on adolescent pseudomyopia. METHODS:Totally 110 cases of juvenile pseudomyopia were randomly divided into two groups, the control group was given 10g/L atropine sulfate eye gel, and the observation group was treated with 5g/L raceanisodamine eye drops. The efficacy of two methods, the changes of axial length and intraocular pressure before and after treatment, and the incidence of adverse reactions were compared. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in cure rate between the two groups(χ2=0.533, P=0.465, but the effective rate of observation group was significantly better than the control group(χ2=3.907, P=0.048. Compared with the same group before treatment, the length of the axial length of the two groups increased in different degrees,and the increase value of the observation group was significantly higher than that of the control group, the difference was statistically significant(PP>0.05. The intraocular pressure of the two groups was significantly lower than that of the same group before treatment, and the difference between the two groups after treatments was not statistically significant(P >0.05. The incidence of adverse reactions in the observation group was significantly lower than that in the control group(χ2=18.939, PCONCLUSION: Anisodamine eye drops in the treatment of juvenile pseudomyopia has obvious curative effect, its efficacy and safety are better than atropine eye gel.

  14. Acute methaemoglobinaemia initially treated as organophosphate poisoning leading to atropine toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakhandki, Srinivas; Yahya, Mohammed; Praveen, Mudalgi

    2012-07-01

    A case of unknown compound poisoning is presented. It was initially treated as organophosphate poisoning with lack of response. A timely diagnosis of acute methaemoglobinaemia and iatrogenic atropine toxicity was made based on clinical evaluation. Treatment of methaemoglobinaemia using oral methylene blue and of atropine toxicity with supportive measures could save the patient.

  15. Atropine and glycopyrrolate do not support bacterial growth-safety and economic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ittzes, Balazs; Weiling, Zsolt; Batai, Istvan Zoard; Kerenyi, Monika; Batai, Istvan

    2016-12-01

    Evaluation of bacterial growth in atropine and glycopyrrolate. Laboratory investigation. Standard microbiological methods were used to evaluate the impact of atropine and glycopyrrolate on the growth of Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli. Bacterial count was checked at 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 24 hours. Atropine or glycopyrrolate did not support the growth of the above bacteria at any examined time at room temperature. Glycopyrrolate killed all of the examined strains (P < .05), whereas in atropine, only the clinical isolates of Staphylococcus and Acinetobacter were killed (P < .05). Drawing up atropine or glycopyrrolate at the beginning of the operating list and use within 24 hours if needed are a safe practice and do not pose infection hazard. We can also reduce hospital costs if we do not throw away these unused syringes following each case. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Use of atropine to reduce mucosal eversion during intestinal resection and anastomosis in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrodnia, Marta; Hauptman, Joe; Walshaw, Richard

    2003-01-01

    To determine whether atropine altered the degree of mucosal eversion during jejunal resection and anastomosis in the dog. Part I: Prospective, blinded, randomized, controlled study using a therapeutic dose (0.04 mg/kg systemic) of atropine. Part II: Prospective, unblinded, assigned, controlled study using a pharmacologic (0.04 mg/kg local arterial) dose of atropine. Part I: Twenty-two young adult female Beagle dogs used during a nonsurvival third-year veterinary student surgical laboratory (small intestinal resection and anastomosis). Part II: Ten young adult female Beagle dogs used immediately after completion of a nonsurvival third-year veterinary student orthopedic surgical laboratory. Part I: Dogs were randomly assigned to receive either atropine (0.04 mg/kg), or an equal volume of saline, given intramuscularly (premedication) and again intravenously prior to intestinal resection. Part II: In each dog, atropine (0.04 mg/kg)/saline was alternately given in the proximal/distal jejunum. Part I: There was no clinically or statistically significant difference between systemic atropine and saline solution on the degree of jejunal mucosal eversion after resection. Part II: There was a statistically significant decrease in jejunal mucosal eversion with atropine compared with saline solution when injected into a local jejunal artery. Systemic atropine (0.04 mg/kg) does not alter the degree of jejunal mucosal eversion during resection and anastomosis. Jejunal intraarterial atropine (0.04 mg/kg) reduced jejunal mucosal eversion during resection and anastomosis. The clinical usefulness and consequences of jejunal arterial atropine administration to reduce mucosal eversion remain to be determined. Copyright 2003 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons

  17. Effect of atropine, norepinephrine and phenylephrine on cerebral oxygenation and cardiac output during anesthesia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalmar, A.F.; Poterman, Marieke; Mooyaart, E.A.; Struys, Michel; Scheeren, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Background:  Induction of general anesthesia often induces unwanted hypotension which is commonly treated with vasoactive medication to restore an appropriate blood pressure. Phenylephrine, norepinephrine and atropine are commonly used agents for this purpose with different physiological effects.

  18. Clinical effects of detomidine with or without atropine used for arthrocentesis in horses

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Diana L.

    1993-01-01

    The effectiveness of detomidine with or without atropine sulfate premedication in producing sedation and analgesia for arthrocentesis was studied in 12 horses. The effects were evaluated by monitoring heart and respiratory rates, borborygmi, distance from the lower lip to the floor, systolic blood pressure, and response to needle insertion. Either atropine or saline (as a placebo) was administered immediately prior to detomidine. All drugs were administered intravenously. Measurements were ta...

  19. Use of atropine in patients with submaximal heart rate during exercise myocardial perfusion SPECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lorenzo, Andrea; Foerster, James; Sciammarella, Maria G; Suey, Cathy; Hayes, Sean W; Friedman, John D; Berman, Daniel S

    2003-01-01

    Failure to reach 85% of maximal predicted heart rate (MPHR) during exercise may render a myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (MPS) study nondiagnostic for ischemia detection. Although commonly used to increase heart rate (HR) during dobutamine stress, the administration of atropine for patients failing to achieve 85% of MPHR during exercise performed for MPS is still infrequent. Patients undergoing dual-isotope MPS were considered candidates for the study when, during exercise treadmill testing, they had less than 85% of MPHR and were unable to continue because of fatigue, without an ischemic response. Forty-seven patients (aged 65.3 +/- 12.5 years, 78.7% men) received atropine (0.6-1.2 mg). Maximal HR achieved before and after atropine was 118.0 +/- 14.8 beats/min (76.3% +/- 6.2% of MPHR) and 146.4 +/- 12.6 beats/min (94.4% +/- 8.1% of MPHR), respectively (P < .001). Of patients, 44 (93.6%) reached at least 85% of MPHR after atropine and had diagnostic MPS studies. After atropine, arrhythmias occurred in 14 patients (29.8%) and other minor side effects in 1 (2.1%). Atropine allows patients initially failing to achieve 85% of MPHR during exercise to increase HR and have a diagnostic MPS study, without major complications. It may provide an alternative to pharmacologic stress for patients with a blunted HR response to exercise.

  20. The parasympatholytic effects of atropine sulfate and glycopyrrolate in rats and rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, M E; Vizzutti, D; Morck, D W; Cox, A K

    1994-01-01

    Nine groups of rats (n = 5 per group) received an intramuscular (IM) injection of one of the following drugs or drug combinations: saline, atropine (0.05 mg/kg), glycopyrrolate (0.5 mg/kg), ketamine:xylazine (85:15 mg/kg), ketamine:detomidine (60:10 mg/kg), atropine:ketamine:xylazine (0.05: 85:15 mg/kg), glycopyrrolate: ketamine:xylazine (0.5:85:15 mg/kg), atropine:ketamine:detomidine (0.05: 60:10 mg/kg) or glycopyrrolate: ketamine:detomidine (0.5:60:10). Similarly six groups of rabbits (n = 5) received an IM injection of either saline, atropine (0.2 mg/kg), atropine (2 mg/kg), glycopyrrolate (0.1 mg/kg), ketamine:xylazine (35:10 mg/kg) or glycopyrrolate:ketamine:xylazine (0.1:35:10 mg/kg). In rats, atropine sulfate (0.05 mg/kg) and glycopyrrolate (0.5 mg/kg) produced an increase in heart rate for 30 and 240 min, respectively. In rabbits atropine sulfate at either 0.2 or 2.0 mg/kg did not induce a significant increase in heart rate, but glycopyrrolate (0.1 mg/kg) elevated the heart rate above saline treated animals for over 50 min. Both atropine and glycopyrrolate provided protection against a decrease in heart rate in rats anesthetized with ketamine: xylazine (85:15 mg/kg) or ketamine: detomidine (60:10 mg/kg); however, glycopyrrolate was significantly more effective in maintaining the heart rate within the normal range. Glycopprrolate also prevented a decrease in heart rate in rabbits anesthetized with ketamine:xylazine (35:5 mg/kg). Neither glycopyrrolate nor atropine influenced respiration rate, core body temperature or systolic blood pressure when used alone or when combined with the injectable anesthetic. Glycopyrrolate is an effective anticholinergic agent in rabbits and rodents and more useful as a preanesthetic agent than atropine sulfate in these animals. PMID:7889456

  1. The Effect of Atropine on Post-ECT Bradycardia in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder

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    Hassan Farashbandi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is utilized for treatment of a range of psychiatric disorders including major depressive disorder (MDD. One of the major complications in using ECT is cardiovascular problems i.e., bradycardia. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of atropine on the pulse rate (PR of the patients under treatment with ECT. Materials and Methods: In this randomized clinical trial, 30 patients with diagnosis of MDD who received atropine before ECT treatment (control group were compared with 30 patients with the same diagnosis without receiving atropine (experimental group under ECT treatment. Both groups received ECT under the same term and condition. The PR of the patients were recorded 7 times (twice before anesthesia and ECT and 5 fixed one min intervals immediately after receiving ECT; for 10 sessions of treatment with ECT (3 times a week. The results were analyzed using repeated measure analysis of variance. The PR under 50 was the cut off point for differentiating the patients suffering from bradycardia and those without it. Results: Slight increment in PRs for experimental group (patient who did not receive atropine in contrast to control group were observed, but it did not reach a statistically significant level. The gender (male/female did not have different PR. The age of the patients and initial PR (regarded as co-variances did not show significant effect on PR for total sample. Conclusion: There seems to be not necessary to use atropine treatment for depressed patients receiving ECT.

  2. Comparison of sugammadex and neostigmine–atropine on intraocular pressure and postoperative effects

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    Sedat Hakimoğlu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available During surgery, changes in intraocular pressure (IOP can be observed resulting from several factors, such as airway manipulations and drugs used. We aimed to investigate the effects of sugammadex and neostigmine on IOP, hemodynamic parameters, and complications after extubation. Our study comprised 60 patients, aged 18–65 years, with a risk status of the American Society of Anesthesiologists I–II who underwent arthroscopic surgery under general anesthesia. The patients were randomly assigned into two groups. At the end of the surgery, the neuromuscular block was reversed using neostigmine (50 μg/kg plus atropine (15 μg/kg in Group 1, and sugammadex (4 mg/kg in Group 2. Neuromuscular blockade was monitored using acceleromyography and a train-of-four mode of stimulation. IOP was measured before induction and at 30 seconds, 2 minutes, and 10 minutes after extubation. A Tono-Pen XL applanation tonometer was used to measure IOP. This showed that elevation in IOP of patients reversed using sugammadex was similar to that recorded in patients reversed using neostigmine–atropine. When heart rate was compared, there was a significant difference between basal values and those obtained at 30 seconds and 10 minutes after extubation in the neostigmine–atropine group. Extubation time (time from withdrawal of anesthetic gas to extubation was significantly shorter in the sugammadex group (p = 0.003 than in the neostigmine–atropine group. The postextubation IOP values of the sugammadex group were similar to the neostigmine–atropine group. Extubation time (time from withdrawal of anesthetic gas to extubation was significantly shorter in the sugammadex group (p = 0.003 than in the neostigmine–atropine group.

  3. Comparison of sugammadex and neostigmine-atropine on intraocular pressure and postoperative effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakimoğlu, Sedat; Tuzcu, Kasım; Davarcı, Işıl; Karcıoğlu, Murat; Ayhan Tuzcu, Esra; Hancı, Volkan; Aydın, Suzan; Kahraman, Hilal; Elbeyli, Ahmet; Turhanoğlu, Selim

    2016-02-01

    During surgery, changes in intraocular pressure (IOP) can be observed resulting from several factors, such as airway manipulations and drugs used. We aimed to investigate the effects of sugammadex and neostigmine on IOP, hemodynamic parameters, and complications after extubation. Our study comprised 60 patients, aged 18-65 years, with a risk status of the American Society of Anesthesiologists I-II who underwent arthroscopic surgery under general anesthesia. The patients were randomly assigned into two groups. At the end of the surgery, the neuromuscular block was reversed using neostigmine (50 μg/kg) plus atropine (15 μg/kg) in Group 1, and sugammadex (4 mg/kg) in Group 2. Neuromuscular blockade was monitored using acceleromyography and a train-of-four mode of stimulation. IOP was measured before induction and at 30 seconds, 2 minutes, and 10 minutes after extubation. A Tono-Pen XL applanation tonometer was used to measure IOP. This showed that elevation in IOP of patients reversed using sugammadex was similar to that recorded in patients reversed using neostigmine-atropine. When heart rate was compared, there was a significant difference between basal values and those obtained at 30 seconds and 10 minutes after extubation in the neostigmine-atropine group. Extubation time (time from withdrawal of anesthetic gas to extubation) was significantly shorter in the sugammadex group (p = 0.003) than in the neostigmine-atropine group. The postextubation IOP values of the sugammadex group were similar to the neostigmine-atropine group. Extubation time (time from withdrawal of anesthetic gas to extubation) was significantly shorter in the sugammadex group (p = 0.003) than in the neostigmine-atropine group. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  4. Evaluation of Atropine as an Anticholinergic in Buffalo Calves (Bubalus bubalis

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    S. Singh

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Twelve experimental trials were undertaken on clinically healthy male buffalo calves. Atropine was administered @ 0.04 mg/kg, IM. Atropine produced ataxia in all the animals. Muzzle, mouth and nostrils became dry at 37.5±4.924 minute and again became wet at 246.3±28.00 minute of its administration. No analgesia was observed. Heart rate, pulse pressure and mean arterial pressure increased significantly without any significant variations in central venous pressure.

  5. The early alterations in some enzymatic activity, blood glucose and liver glycogen levels induced by atropine injection and whole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Fattah, K.I.; El-Sayed, N.M.; Abou-Safi, H.M.; Hussain, A.H.

    1999-01-01

    Detecting the early physiological and biochemical changes in the biological material after exposure to gamma irradiation is very helpful in the techniques of protection against radiation. The present work was designed for detecting the early changes in plasma phosphatases, transaminases, glucose and liver glycogen levels after irradiation and the role of atropine injected before irradiation on these parameters. Rats were divided into four groups: control. injected (i. m.) with atropine (0.5 mg/100 g B.Wt), irradiated at 6 Gy, and injected with atropine before irradiation. Plasma was collected at 1.3 and 5 hr after radiation exposure. Results showed that atropine exerted some amelioration during the first three hours, mainly, on acid phosphatase and GPT activities and on glucose and liver glycogen one hour only post irradiation. Generally, the limited radioprotective role of atropine is related, to its physiological mechanism in the body

  6. Effect of low-dose atropine administration on dobutamine dose requirement in horses anesthetized with detomidine and halothane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, A B; Keegan, R D; Greene, S A

    1997-12-01

    To determine whether a low dose of atropine is associated with decreased requirement for cardiovascular supportive treatment in horses given detomidine prior to maintenance of general anesthesia with halothane. 3 groups of 10 healthy horses. Detomidine (20 micrograms/kg of body weight, i.m.) was administered to all 30 horses. Then, 10 horses received atropine (0.006 mg/kg, i.v.) 1 hour after detomidine administration, 10 horses received atropine (0.012 mg/kg, i.m.) at the time of detomidine administration, and 10 horses served as a control group. Heart rate was measured prior to detomidine administration and at fixed intervals throughout anesthesia. The dobutamine infusion rate necessary to maintain mean arterial blood pressure between 70 and 80 mm of Hg was recorded. Systemic blood pressures, end-tidal halothane, end-tidal CO2, and arterial blood gas tensions were measured at fixed intervals. Mean heart rate was higher among horses receiving atropine i.v. or i.m., compared with that in control horses. Horses that received atropine i.v. had higher systemic arterial blood pressure and required a lower dobutamine infusion rate than did horses of the other groups. Detomidine-treated, halothane-anesthetized horses given atropine i.v. required less dobutamine, compared with horses receiving or not receiving atropine i.m. Complications, such as colic and dysrhythmias, from use of higher doses of atropine, were not observed at this lower dose of atropine. i.v. administration of a low dose of atropine prior to induction of general anesthesia may result in improved blood pressure in horses that have received detomidine before anesthesia with halothane.

  7. Comparative study between atropine and hyoscine-N-butylbromide for reversal of detomidine induced bradycardia in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenta, E L M; Teixeira Neto, F J; Sá, P A; Pignaton, W; Garofalo, N A

    2011-05-01

    Bradycardia may be implicated as a cause of cardiovascular instability during anaesthesia. Hyoscine would induce positive chronotropism of shorter duration than atropine, without adversely impairing intestinal motility in detomidine sedated horses. Ten minutes after detomidine (0.02 mg/kg bwt, i.v.), physiological saline (control), atropine (0.02 mg/kg bwt) or hyoscine (0.2 mg/kg bwt) were randomly administered i.v. to 6 horses, allowing one week intervals between treatments. Investigators blinded to the treatments monitored cardiopulmonary data and intestinal auscultation for 90 min and 24 h after detomidine, respectively. Gastrointestinal transit was assessed for 96 h via chromium detection in dry faeces. Detomidine significantly decreased heart rate (HR) and cardiac index (CI) from baseline for 30 and 60 min, respectively (control). Mean ± s.d. HR increased significantly 5 min after atropine (79 ± 5 beats/min) and hyoscine (75 ± 8 beats/min). After this time, HR was significantly higher after atropine in comparison to other treatments, while hyoscine resulted in intermediate values (lower than atropine but higher than controls). Hyoscine and atropine resulted in significantly higher CI than controls for 5 and 20 min, respectively; but this effect coincided with significant hypertension (mean arterial pressures >180 mmHg). Auscultation scores decreased from baseline in all treatments. Time to return to auscultation scores ≥12 (medians) did not differ between hyoscine (4 h) and controls (4 h) but atropine resulted in significantly longer time (10 h). Atropine induced colic in one horse. Gastrointestinal transit times did not differ between treatments. Hyoscine is a shorter acting positive chronotropic agent than atropine, but does not potentiate the impairment in intestinal motility induced by detomidine. Because of severe hypertension, routine use of anticholinergics combined with detomidine is not recommended. Hyoscine may represent an alternative to

  8. Permanent alterations in muscarinic receptors and pupil size produced by chronic atropinization in kittens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.L.; Redburn, D.A.; Harwerth, R.S.; Maguire, G.W.

    1984-01-01

    Chronic mydriasis was induced in six kittens (four monocular, two binocular) and two adult cats (both monocular) by the daily topical application of atropine. Both the kittens and the adult cats were atropinized for a 13-week period with the treatment regimen beginning at the time of eye opening for the kittens. Pupil size measurements, obtained 1 year after the atropinization were discontinued, revealed that, although the pupils of the adult cats were normal, the pupils of the kittens' treated eyes were consistently smaller than pupils in control eyes. The status of the muscarinic receptors in the kittens' irides was investigated using 3 H-QNB binding assays. In comparison with iris muscle homogenates from the control eyes, those from the treated eyes demonstrated an eightfold increase in the number of receptor binding sites. The results indicate that pupil size can be altered permanently by chronic mydriasis initiated early in the life of a kitten and that the permanent change in pupil size may result, in part, from a type of permanent supersensitivity response in the muscle following chronic blockade of muscarinic transmission by atropine

  9. Enhanced accumulation of atropine in Atropa belladonna transformed by Rac GTPase gene isolated from Scoparia dulcis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Kyouhei; Lee, Jung-Bum; Yamamura, Yoshimi; Kurosaki, Fumiya

    2013-12-01

    Leaf tissues of Atropa belladonna were transformed by Sdrac2, a Rac GTPase gene, that is isolated from Scoparia dulcis, and the change in atropine concentration of the transformants was examined. Re-differentiated A. belladonna overexpressing Sdrac2 accumulated considerable concentration of atropine in the leaf tissues, whereas the leaves of plants transformed by an empty vector accumulated only a very low concentration of the compound. A. belladonna transformed by CASdrac2, a modified Sdrac2 of which translate was expected to bind guanosine triphosphate (GTP) permanently, accumulated very high concentrations of atropine (approximately 2.4-fold excess to those found in the wild-type plant in its natural habitat). In sharp contrast, the atropine concentration in transformed A. belladonna prepared with negatively modified Sdrac2, DNSdrac2, expected to bind guanosine diphosphate instead of GTP, was very low. These results suggested that Rac GTPases play an important role in the regulation of secondary metabolism in plant cells and that overexpression of the gene(s) may be capable of enhancing the production of natural products accumulated in higher plant cells.

  10. Intravenous and inhalation toxicokinetics of sarin stereoisomers in atropinized guinea pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spruit, W.E.T.; Langenberg, J.P.; Trap, H.C.; Wiel, H.J. van der; Helmich, R.B.; Helden, H.P.M. van; Benschop, H.P.

    2000-01-01

    We report the first toxicokinetic studies of (±)-sarin. The toxicokinetics of the stereoisomers of this nerve agent were studied in anesthetized, atropinized, and restrained guinea pigs after intravenous bolus administration of a dose corresponding to 0.8 LD50 and after nose-only exposure to vapor

  11. [Research on whether atropine can be substituted by the powerful cycloplegic cyclopentolate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiang-tao

    2012-09-01

    For a long time, atropine eye ointment has been widely used as the cycloplegic for children's optometry in China, while internationally, cyclopentolate gutta is widely used as the first choice for cycloplegic. In recent years, 1% cyclopentolate hydrochloride ocular humor has been introduced to our country. This effective and powerful cycloplegic has already been paid close attention to by domestic pedo-ophthalmologists. According to a serious of studies both home and abroad on the therapeutic effects of the own control drugs, the cycloplegia effect of cyclopentolate is close to the atropine. Cyclopentolate can be widely used for the cycloplegia before optometry for the Chinese children. However, the effect of cyclopentolate is still not as good as atropine. So, for the children with farsightedness within 7 years old, all esotropia children, Am children, and children who suffer from decreased vision acuteness and needs to be excluded from accommodative myopia, atropine eye ointment should be routinely used for cycloplegia before optometry. In this article, we also discuss the medication dosage, medication method, possible drug adverse reactions of cyclopentolate humor ocular and the coping measures at the same time.

  12. MRI findings in 6 cases of children by inadvertent ingestion of diphenoxylate-atropine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao Lianxiang [Shandong University School of Medicine, Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute , No. 44 West Wenhua Road, Jinan 250012 (China); Lin Xiangtao, E-mail: yishui1982@126.com [Shandong University School of Medicine, Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, No. 44 West Wenhua Road, Jinan 250012 (China); Cao Jinfeng [Shandong University School of Medicine, Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute , No. 44 West Wenhua Road, Jinan 250012 (China); Wang Xueyu [Division of Pediatrics, Shandong Provincial Hospital, Shandong University, No. 324 Jingwu Road, Jinan 250021 (China); Wu Lebin [Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, No. 324 Jingwu Road, Jinan 250021 (China)

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: Compound diphenoxylate (diphenoxylate-atropine) poisoning can cause toxic encephalopathy in children, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain in this condition has not been reported. This study is to analyze brain MRI findings and to investigate the relations between MRI features and possible pathophysiological changes in children. Methods: Six children accidentally swallowed compound diphenoxylate, 4 males, 2 females, aged 20-46 months, average 33 months. Quantity of ingested diphenoxylate-atropine was from 6 to 30 tablets, each tablet contains diphenoxylate 2.5 mg and atropine 0.025 mg. These patients were referred to our hospital within 24 h after diphenoxylate-atropine ingestion, and underwent brain MRI scan within 24-72 h after emergency treatment. The characteristics of conventional MRI were analyzed. Results: These pediatric patients had various symptoms of opioid intoxication and atropine toxicity. Brain MRI showed abnormal low signal intensity on T1-weighted images (T1WI) and abnormal high signal intensity on T2-weighted images (T2WI) and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) imaging in bilateral in all cases; abnormal high signal intensity on T1WI, T2WI and FLAIR in 4 cases. Encephalomalacia was observed in 3 cases during follow-up. Conclusion: In the early stage of compound diphenoxylate poisoning in children, multiple extensive edema-necrosis and hemorrhagic-necrosis focus were observed in basic nucleus, pallium and cerebellum, these resulted in the corresponding brain dysfunction with encephalomalacia. MRI scan in the early stage in this condition may provide evidences of brain impairment, and is beneficial for the early diagnosis, treatment and prognosis assessment.

  13. Utility of atropine in patients under beta-blocker effect during exercise stress echocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munera, Ana G; Restrepo, Gustavo; Aristizabal, Dagnovar; Cubides, Carlos A

    2006-01-01

    The objective is to assess the usefulness of adding atropine 0.5 to 1.0 mg by intravenous injection during peak exercise in patients under beta-blocker effect that are subjected to exercise stress echocardiography. Population: exercise stress echocardiography was performed in 73 patients receiving beta-blocking agents with basal heart rate below 60 beats per minute (BPM). Two groups were established at random: group I (18 patients that did not receive atropine during maximal exercise) and group II (50 patients from whom 28 received 0.5 mg atropine IV 30 seconds to one minute before concluding the exercise and 22 patients who received 1.0 mg atropine IV 30 seconds to one minute before its conclusion). From a demographic point of view, there were no differences between the two groups. Mean age was 59 ± 10.8 years (57% male). Most of the patients received metoprolol (87%) and no significant statistical differences in relation with the doses were found in these two groups. At the end of the exercise, the patients had a mean heart rate of 84% from their maximal heart rate (MHR). The values post-exercise were 76% at 30 seconds, 68% at 60 sec., 62% at 90 sec., and 59% of the maximal heart rate at 120 sec. When comparing the percentage of the maximal heart rate achieved in maximal exercise and the one observed during the first 120 sec. after exercise, no statistically significant difference was observed between the two groups (p > 0.05). Conclusion: during the performance of stress exercise echocardiography, the administration of intravenous atropine was of no use for incrementing the peak heart rate post-exercise in patients with significant beta-blocker effect (basal heart rate < 60 BPM)

  14. MRI findings in 6 cases of children by inadvertent ingestion of diphenoxylate-atropine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Lianxiang; Lin, Xiangtao; Cao, Jinfeng; Wang, Xueyu; Wu, Lebin

    2011-09-01

    Compound diphenoxylate (diphenoxylate-atropine) poisoning can cause toxic encephalopathy in children, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain in this condition has not been reported. This study is to analyze brain MRI findings and to investigate the relations between MRI features and possible pathophysiological changes in children. Six children accidentally swallowed compound diphenoxylate, 4 males, 2 females, aged 20-46 months, average 33 months. Quantity of ingested diphenoxylate-atropine was from 6 to 30 tablets, each tablet contains diphenoxylate 2.5mg and atropine 0.025 mg. These patients were referred to our hospital within 24h after diphenoxylate-atropine ingestion, and underwent brain MRI scan within 24-72 h after emergency treatment. The characteristics of conventional MRI were analyzed. These pediatric patients had various symptoms of opioid intoxication and atropine toxicity. Brain MRI showed abnormal low signal intensity on T1-weighted images (T1WI) and abnormal high signal intensity on T2-weighted images (T2WI) and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) imaging in bilateral in all cases; abnormal high signal intensity on T1WI, T2WI and FLAIR in 4 cases. Encephalomalacia was observed in 3 cases during follow-up. In the early stage of compound diphenoxylate poisoning in children, multiple extensive edema-necrosis and hemorrhagic-necrosis focus were observed in basic nucleus, pallium and cerebellum, these resulted in the corresponding brain dysfunction with encephalomalacia. MRI scan in the early stage in this condition may provide evidences of brain impairment, and is beneficial for the early diagnosis, treatment and prognosis assessment. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. MRI findings in 6 cases of children by inadvertent ingestion of diphenoxylate-atropine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Lianxiang; Lin Xiangtao; Cao Jinfeng; Wang Xueyu; Wu Lebin

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Compound diphenoxylate (diphenoxylate-atropine) poisoning can cause toxic encephalopathy in children, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain in this condition has not been reported. This study is to analyze brain MRI findings and to investigate the relations between MRI features and possible pathophysiological changes in children. Methods: Six children accidentally swallowed compound diphenoxylate, 4 males, 2 females, aged 20-46 months, average 33 months. Quantity of ingested diphenoxylate-atropine was from 6 to 30 tablets, each tablet contains diphenoxylate 2.5 mg and atropine 0.025 mg. These patients were referred to our hospital within 24 h after diphenoxylate-atropine ingestion, and underwent brain MRI scan within 24-72 h after emergency treatment. The characteristics of conventional MRI were analyzed. Results: These pediatric patients had various symptoms of opioid intoxication and atropine toxicity. Brain MRI showed abnormal low signal intensity on T1-weighted images (T1WI) and abnormal high signal intensity on T2-weighted images (T2WI) and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) imaging in bilateral in all cases; abnormal high signal intensity on T1WI, T2WI and FLAIR in 4 cases. Encephalomalacia was observed in 3 cases during follow-up. Conclusion: In the early stage of compound diphenoxylate poisoning in children, multiple extensive edema-necrosis and hemorrhagic-necrosis focus were observed in basic nucleus, pallium and cerebellum, these resulted in the corresponding brain dysfunction with encephalomalacia. MRI scan in the early stage in this condition may provide evidences of brain impairment, and is beneficial for the early diagnosis, treatment and prognosis assessment.

  16. Minimizing E-factor in the continuous-flow synthesis of diazepam and atropine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bédard, Anne-Catherine; Longstreet, Ashley R; Britton, Joshua; Wang, Yuran; Moriguchi, Hideki; Hicklin, Robert W; Green, William H; Jamison, Timothy F

    2017-12-01

    Minimizing the waste stream associated with the synthesis of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) and commodity chemicals is of high interest within the chemical industry from an economic and environmental perspective. In exploring solutions to this area, we herein report a highly optimized and environmentally conscious continuous-flow synthesis of two APIs identified as essential medicines by the World Health Organization, namely diazepam and atropine. Notably, these approaches significantly reduced the E-factor of previously published routes through the combination of continuous-flow chemistry techniques, computational calculations and solvent minimization. The E-factor associated with the synthesis of atropine was reduced by 94-fold (about two orders of magnitude), from 2245 to 24, while the E-factor for the synthesis of diazepam was reduced by 4-fold, from 36 to 9. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Atropine’s Effects upon the Heart and Its Systemic Output,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    peripheral nerve endings, the concentration of acetylcholine found in the brain appeared low.100 To further lend credence to Heinekamp’s hypothesis, Molenaar ... MOLENAAR , PC. and R.L. POLAK. Stimulation by atropine of acetylcholine release and synthesis in cortical slices from rat brain. Brit. J. Pharmacol. 40:406...William Heinman Medical Books , Ltd., London, 1973, p 536-537. 329. SCHERLAG, B.J., R. LAZZARA, and R.H. HELFONT. Differentiation of A-V junctional

  18. Content of atropine and scopolamine in poisonous solanaceae plants from Slovenia

    OpenAIRE

    Javor Kac; Uroš Klančar; Aleš Mlinarič; Aleš Krbavčič

    2006-01-01

    Background: Some species from the Solanaceae family are still the cause of serious poisoning among youth in Slovenia. Usually intoxication is due to abuse of these plants to provoke hallucinations. There is still not enough data about the alkaloid content of these plants growing in Slovenia.Methods: Different plant samples were analyzed for the content of atropine and scopolamine with capillary electrophoresis after solid phase extraction of alkaloids. Plants were gathered from different area...

  19. Content of atropine and scopolamine in poisonous solanaceae plants from Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javor Kac

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Some species from the Solanaceae family are still the cause of serious poisoning among youth in Slovenia. Usually intoxication is due to abuse of these plants to provoke hallucinations. There is still not enough data about the alkaloid content of these plants growing in Slovenia.Methods: Different plant samples were analyzed for the content of atropine and scopolamine with capillary electrophoresis after solid phase extraction of alkaloids. Plants were gathered from different areas of Slovenia between April and September 2004.Results: Results were compared and possible correlations between the alkaloid content and species, plant parts, growth conditions, and time of harvest were suggested. Atropine and scopolamine contents were assessed in deadly nightshade (Atropa belladonna L., thorn apple (Datura stramonium L., scopolia (Scopolia carniolica Jacq. and angel trumpet. The common name angel trumpet is used for Datura inoxia Mill. as well as for different Brugmansia Pers. species. The most intriguing results were the variable alkaloid content in various Brugmansia species and generally great differences in alkaloid content among various plants and their plant parts.Conclusions: All investigated plants have noticeable atropine and/or scopolamine content. The content is variable between various plants and their plant parts and therefore special care should be taken in cases of possible intoxication. It was shown that smaller or greater amounts of ingested drug can cause the same level of intoxication due to the variability in alkaloid content.

  20. A comparative study of clonidine versus a combination of diazepam and atropine for premedication in orthopaedic patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaurasia S

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Sixty patients in the age group of 18-60 years of A.S.A. Grade I/II risk, scheduled for elective orthopaedic surgeries under general anaesthesia were studied for pre-medication with either oral clonidine or with combination of effects of diazepam & atropine. Patients in Group A (clonidine group received tablet clonidine 100 mcg (1 tablet if less than 50 kg in weight and 200 mcg if weighing more than 50 kg two hours before surgery. Patients in Group B (Diazepam-atropine group received one tablet of Diazepam (10 mg orally two hours before surgery and injection atropine-sulphate 0.01 mg/kg half an hour preoperatively by intramuscular route. In our study, the sedative and anti-sialogogue effects of clonidine were comparable to those of diazepam-atropine combination, which are commonly used premedicants. The anti-anxiety effect of clonidine was found to be better than that of diazepam-atropine combination. Clonidine also proved to be a better agent for the attenuation of pressor response to laryngoscopy and intubation. Thus, oral clonidine is a better premedicant compared to atropine-diazepam combination. Also, it is a more acceptable agent because of its oral route of administration.

  1. Interaction of aconitine with bovine serum albumin and effect of atropine sulphate and glycyrrhizic acid on the binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Yun; Cui Lijian; Wang Jianming; Huo Kun; Chen Chen; Zhan Wenhong; Wang Yongli

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of aconitine with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and effect of atropine sulphate and glycyrrhizic acid on binding constant, binding sites, and conformation were studied in an aqueous buffer solution (pH 7.40) by ultraviolet absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The study results show that aconitine quenched the endogenous fluorescence of BSA via a dynamic quenching procedure. Predominant intermolecular forces between aconitine and BSA were hydrophobic interactions, which stabilized the complex of aconitine–BSA. The distance between the donor and acceptor was 2.62 nm. The conformation of BSA was investigated by synchronous fluorescence techniques, indicating that the microenvironment around tryptophan (Trp) residues was changed. Furthermore, with the addition of atropine sulphate or glycyrrhizic acid, binding constant and the number of binding sites of aconitine to BSA were decreased, and the conformation had no change, which provide an important theoretical support for aconitine detoxification by atropine sulphate and glycyrrhizic acid. - Highlights: ► Effect of atropine or glycyrrhizic acid on aconitine–BSA binding. ► UV–vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic techniques used. ► Aconitine quenched BSA fluorescence via dynamic quenching with r=2.62 nm. ► Atropine sulphate and glycyrrhizic acid decreased K A and n of aconitine–BSA. ► Support for aconitine detoxification by atropine and glycyrrhizic acid.

  2. Systemic delivery of atropine sulfate by the MicroDose Dry-Powder Inhaler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, T E; Venkataramanan, R; Hoffman, R M; George, M P; Petrov, A; Richards, T; Zhang, S; Choi, J; Gao, Y Y; Oakum, C D; Cook, R O; Donahoe, M

    2013-02-01

    Inhaled atropine is being developed as a systemic and pulmonary treatment for the extended recovery period after chemical weapons exposure. We performed a pharmacokinetics study comparing inhaled atropine delivery using the MicroDose Therapeutx Dry Powder Inhaler (DPIA) with intramuscular (IM) atropine delivery via auto-injector (AUTO). The MicroDose DPIA utilizes a novel piezoelectric system to aerosolize drug and excipient from a foil dosing blister. Subjects inhaled a 1.95-mg atropine sulfate dose from the dry powder inhaler on one study day [5 doses × 0.4 mg per dose (nominal) delivered over 12 min] and received a 2-mg IM injection via the AtroPen® auto-injector on another. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamic response, and safety were studied for 12 hr. A total of 17 subjects were enrolled. All subjects completed IM dosing. One subject did not perform inhaled delivery due to a skin reaction from the IM dose. Pharmacokinetic results were as follows: area under the curve concentration, DPIA=20.1±5.8, AUTO=23.7±4.9 ng hr/mL (means±SD); maximum concentration reached, DPIA=7.7±3.5, AUTO=11.0±3.8 ng/mL; time to reach maximum concentration, DPIA=0.25±0.47, AUTO=0.19±0.23 hr. Pharmacodynamic results were as follows: maximum increase in heart rate, DPIA=18±12, AUTO=23±13 beats/min; average change in 1-sec forced expiratory volume at 30 min, DPIA=0.16±0.22 L, AUTO=0.11±0.29 L. The relative bioavailability for DPIA was 87% (based on output dose). Two subjects demonstrated allergic responses: one to the first dose (AUTO), which was mild and transient, and one to the second dose (DPIA), which was moderate in severity, required treatment with oral and intravenous (IV) diphenhydramine and IV steroids, and lasted more than 7 days. Dry powder inhalation is a highly bioavailable route for attaining rapid and consistent systemic concentrations of atropine.

  3. Atropinic burden of prescriptions forms in patients with Alzheimer disease: a cross-sectional study in a French PharmacoVigilance Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montastruc, François; Rouanet, Sarah; Gardette, Virginie; Rousseau, Vanessa; Bagheri, Haleh; Montastruc, Jean-Louis

    2015-07-01

    Atropinic drugs in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) can decrease the effects of anticholinesterase drugs and/or induce adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Several atropinic risk scales defining an atropinic burden of drugs were proposed but were little used in AD patients. All ADRs' notifications of AD patients registered in the Midi-Pyrénées PharmacoVigilance Database between 1999 and 2013 were analyzed using Anticholinergic Drug Scale (ADS) and Anticholinergic Duran's list. The primary objective was to quantify atropinic burden in AD patients and the secondary one to investigate associated factors. Among the 475 notifications, at least one atropinic drug was found in 282 notifications (59.4%) according to ADS and 214 (45.1%) according to Duran. Mean number of atropinics per notifications was 0.9 ± 0.9 (ADS) and 0.7 ± 0.9 (Duran). Mean atropinic burden per notifications was 1.2 ± 1.5 (ADS) and 0.9 ± 1.3 (Duran). Atropinic burden ≥ 3 was found in 87 notifications (18.2%) according to ADS and 50 (10.5%) according to Duran. There was no association between atropinic burden and age of patients. The number of drugs is associated to a high atropinic burden. The present work found an association between an atropinic drug and an anticholinesterase agent in around 1 out of 2 AD patients and a clinically significant atropinic burden (≥ 3) in around 1 to 2 AD patients out of 10. The benefit harm balance of atropinic drugs must be discussed before each prescription in AD patients.

  4. Atropinic burden of drugs during pregnancy and psychological development of children: a cohort study in the EFEMERIS database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beau, Anna-Belle; Montastruc, Jean-Louis; Lacroix, Isabelle; Montastruc, François; Hurault-Delarue, Caroline; Damase-Michel, Christine

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential effect of in utero exposure to drugs with atropinic properties on infant psychological development using atropinic burden (AB) scales. Women from the EFEMERIS cohort, a French database including prescribed and dispensed reimbursed drugs during pregnancy and pregnancy outcomes, delivering between 2004 and 2010 were included (n = 43 740). Each drug was classified as having no (score = 0), few (score = 1) or strong (score = 3) atropinic properties. AB per woman was calculated by adding the atropinic scores of drugs prescribed during pregnancy. AB was categorized as exposure or no exposure. Secondary analyses were performed by dividing the exposure into four scores = [0], [1-8], [9-17] and [≥18]. Data for psychological development were extracted from children's medical certificates completed at 9 and 24 months. Thirty-four% (n = 14 925) of women received at least one atropinic drug during pregnancy. Women with AB ≥1 were older and received more drugs during pregnancy than unexposed women. At 24 months, more infants of mothers with AB ≥1 had difficulties to 'name a picture' (ORa , 1.18, 95% CI 1.03, 1.36) and to 'understand instructions' (ORa , 1.61, 95% CI 1.13, , 2.30]) compared with infants of unexposed women. Analyses of four groups of exposure and analyses excluding women receiving psychotropics led to similar results. The study showed significant association between in utero exposure to drugs with atropinic properties and fewer infant cognitive acquisitions at 24 months. Further exploring the potential effect of simultaneous use of drugs with atropinic effects among pregnant women will bring into consideration whether such prescriptions could be inappropriate for the child. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  5. Atropine and ODQ antagonize tetanic fade induced by L-arginine in cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Cruciol-Souza

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available Although it has been demonstrated that nitric oxide (NO released from sodium nitrite induces tetanic fade in the cat neuromuscular preparations, the effect of L-arginine on tetanic fade and its origin induced by NO have not been studied in these preparations. Furthermore, atropine reduces tetanic fade induced by several cholinergic and anticholinergic drugs in these preparations, whose mechanism is suggested to be mediated by the interaction of acetylcholine with inhibitory presynaptic muscarinic receptors. The present study was conducted in cats to determine the effects of L-arginine alone or after pretreatment with atropine or 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazole [4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ on neuromuscular preparations indirectly stimulated at high frequency. Drugs were injected into the middle genicular artery. L-arginine (2 mg/kg and S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP; 16 µg/kg induced tetanic fade. The Nw-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG; 2 mg/kg alone did not produce any effect, but reduced the tetanic fade induced by L-arginine. D-arginine (2 mg/kg did not induce changes in tetanic fade. The tetanic fade induced by L-arginine or SNAP was reduced by previous injection of atropine (1.0 µg/kg or ODQ (15 µg/kg. ODQ alone did not change tetanic fade. The data suggest that the NO-synthase-GC pathway participates in the L-arginine-induced tetanic fade in cat neuromuscular preparations. The tetanic fade induced by L-arginine probably depends on the action of NO at the presynaptic level. NO may stimulate guanylate cyclase increasing acetylcholine release and thereby stimulating presynaptic muscarinic receptors.

  6. Investigating and comparing effects of atropine and physostigmine in peripheral pain examination due to formalin injection on rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Pourahmadi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available There areseveral neurotransmittersat feel the pain and processing nervoussystem, and until now cholinergic system has not been well studied in this field. The purpose of this research is investigating effects of atropine and physostigmine on the response of formalin pain test. We divided 50 male wistar head rats into 5 groups , first group ( saline normal injection 5 µ , second group ( 1% formalin injection into 50 µ , third group ( physostigmine injection 0/1 mg / kg , fourth group (atropine injection 2 mg / kg , fifth group ( atropine injection 2 mg / kg and physostigmine 0/1 mg/kg , after formalin injection , the animals were placed inside mirror pain machine and it was recorded pain response at the time ranges 0-5 and 15-45 . Results investigated with spss software and ANOVA and Duncan’s test. Formalin injection causes pain response in both time ranges. Atropine injection alone had no effect on pain response. Physostigmine effect alone, with a significant reduction (p< 0/05 in the number of foot motions in both stage and duration causesof licking and biting in the 15-45 minutes stage . Atropine and physostigmine injections in fifth group cause significant reduction in the number of foot motions and duration of licking and biting in the time range of 15-45 minutes.Perhaps there is a close relationship between cholinergic system and peripheral pain that can be taken through the action of muscarinic receptors.

  7. Clinical study of a new therapy for nerve agent poisoning: Ascending dose tolerance study of HI-6 + atropine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clement, J.G.; Bailey, D.G.; Madill, H.D.; Spence, J.D.

    1993-05-13

    HI-6 was rapidly absorbed from an IM injection site. Maximum HI-6 plasma concentrations of 1.88, 4.96, 8.31 15.0 ug/ml were found 28-36 min after administration and maintained above 4 ug/ml concentration for 0, 39, 112 172.5 min following administration of 62.5, 125, 250 or 500 mg HI-6 + atropine (2 mg), respectively. The calculated half life of HI-6 was 78.2 min following 62.5 mg HI-6 + atropine dose and approximately 64-67 min following 125-500 mg HI-6 + atropine doses. Approximately 50 % of the total dose of HI-6 was eliminated unchanged in the urine. There were significant changes (p < 0.05) in AST, CPK, creatinine and gamma GT following the 500 mg HI-6 + atropine dose but they were not considered to be clinically significant. Urinalysis, hematology and semen analysis over the 24 hr observation period was uneventful. There were no clinically significant changes in heart rate or ECG trace, respiration or blood pressure, visual and mental acuity following HI-6 + atropine.

  8. A Case of Bilateral Pigment Dispersion Syndrome Following Many Years of Uninterrupted Treatment With Atropine 1% for Bilateral Congenital Cataracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gizzi, Corrado; Mohamed-Noriega, Jibran; Murdoch, Ian

    2017-10-01

    Describe an unusual case of bilateral pigment dispersion syndrome (PDS) following years of uninterrupted treatment with atropine 1% for bilateral congenital cataracts, speculate on potential mechanisms leading to this condition. This is a case report. A 45-year-old white patient on long-term treatment with atropine 1% ointment since his infancy for bilateral congenital cataracts developed PDS with secondary ocular hypertension. The patient showed all the hallmarks of PDS with secondary ocular hypertension. An anterior segment Swept-Source optical coherence tomography was obtained to review the iris profile. The patient showed good pressure response to topical prostaglandin therapy. This is the second case report of PDS in a patient with chronic use of topical atropine. The proposed mechanisms for pigment dispersion are discussed and the possibility raised of dispersion being a potential side effect of the drug.

  9. Effect of sugammadex versus neostigmine/atropine combination on postoperative cognitive dysfunction after elective surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batistaki, C; Riga, M; Zafeiropoulou, F; Lyrakos, G; Kostopanagiotou, G; Matsota, P

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to assess the effects of sugammadex and neostigmine/atropine on postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) in adult patients after elective surgery. A randomised, double-blind controlled trial was carried out on 160 American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I to III patients who were >40 years. The Mini-Mental State Evaluation, clock-drawing test and the Isaacs Set test were used to assess cognitive function at three timepoints: 1) preoperatively, 2) one hour postoperatively, and 3) at discharge. The anaesthetic protocol was the same for all patients, except for the neuromuscular block reversal, which was administered by random allocation using either sugammadex or neostigmine/atropine after the reappearance of T2 in the train-of-four sequence. POCD was defined as a decline ≥1 standard deviation in ≥2 cognitive tests. The incidence of POCD was similar in both groups at one hour postoperatively and at discharge (28% and 10%, in the neostigmine group, 23% and 5.4% in the sugammadex group, P =0.55 and 0.27 respectively). In relation to individual tests, a significant decline of clock-drawing test in the neostigmine group was observed at one hour postoperatively and at discharge. For the Isaacs Set test, a greater decline was found in the sugammadex group. These findings suggest that there are no clinically important differences in the incidence of POCD after neostigmine or sugammadex administration.

  10. Atropine use may lead to post-operative respiratory acidosis in neonates receiving ductal ligation: A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Szu-Ling; Lin, Wen-Li; Weng, Chien-Hsiang; Wu, Shye-Jao; Tsai, Hsin-Jung; Wang, Shwu-Meei; Peng, Chun-Chih; Chang, Jui-Hsing

    2018-04-01

    Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) is one of the most common cardiac conditions in preterm infants. Closure of the PDA in symptomatic patients can be achieved medically or surgically. Atropine is commonly administered in general anesthesia as a premedication in this age group but with limited evidence addressing the effect of its use. Our study examined the association of the use of atropine as a premedication in PDA ligation and the risk of post-operative respiratory complications. This retrospective cohort study included 150 newborns who have failed medical treatment for PDA and received PDA ligation during 2008-2012 in a single tertiary medical center. Ninety-two of them (61.3%) received atropine as premedication for general anesthesia while 58 (38.7%) did not. Post-operative respiratory condition, the need of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and the presence of bradycardia were measured. Patients with atropine use were associated with increased odds of respiratory acidosis in both univariate analysis (22.9% vs 7.3%; OR = 3.785, 95% CI = 1.211-11.826, p = 0.022) and multivariate analysis (OR = 4.030, 95% CI = 1.230-13.202, p = 0.021), with an even higher odds of respiratory acidosis in patients receiving both atropine and ketamine. The use of atropine as premedication in general anesthesia for neonatal PDA ligation is associated with higher risk of respiratory acidosis, which worsens with the combined use of ketamine. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Intravenously administered oxotremorine and atropine, in doses known to affect pain threshold, affect the intraspinal release of acetylcholine in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abelson, Klas S P; Höglund, A Urban

    2002-01-01

    muscarinic agonists and antagonists modify nociceptive threshold by affecting intraspinal release of acetylcholine (ACh). Catheters were inserted into the femoral vein in rats maintained on isoflurane anaesthesia for administration of oxotremorine (10-300 microg/kg) and atropine (0.1, 10, 5000 microg...

  12. Quantitative coronary angiography in the estimation of the functional significance of coronary stenosis: correlations with dobutamine-atropine stress test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.P. Baptista da Silva (José); M. Arnese (Mariarosaria); J.R.T.C. Roelandt (Jos); P.M. Fioretti (Paolo); D.T.J. Keane (David); J. Escaned (Javier); C. di Mario (Carlo); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); H. Boersma (Eric)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVES. The purpose of this study was to determine the predictive value of quantitative coronary angiography in the assessment of the functional significance of coronary stenosis as judged from the development of left ventricular wall motion abnormalities during dobutamine-atropine

  13. Addition of atropine to submaximal exercise stress testing in patients evaluated for suspected ischaemia with SPECT imaging: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manganelli, Fiore; Sauro, Rosario; Di Lorenzo, Emilio; Rosato, Giuseppe; Spadafora, Marco; Varrella, Paola; Peluso, Giuseppina; Daniele, Stefania; Cuocolo, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of the addition of atropine to exercise testing in patients who failed to achieve their target heart rate (HR) during stress myocardial perfusion imaging with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The study was a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled design. Patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease who failed to achieve a target HR (≥85% of maximal predicted HR) during exercise SPECT imaging were randomized to receive intravenous atropine (n = 100) or placebo (n = 101). The two groups of patients did not differ with respect to demographic or clinical characteristics. A higher proportion of patients in the atropine group achieved the target HR compared to the placebo group (60% versus 3%, p < 0.0001). SPECT imaging was abnormal in a higher proportion of patients in the atropine group as compared to the placebo group (57% versus 42%, p < 0.05). Stress-induced myocardial ischaemia was present in more patients in the atropine group as compared to placebo (47% versus 29%, p < 0.01). In both groups of patients, no major side effects occurred. The addition of atropine at the end of exercise testing is more effective than placebo in raising HR to adequate levels, without additional risks of complications. The use of atropine in patients who initially failed to achieve their maximal predicted HR is associated with a higher probability of achieving a diagnostic myocardial perfusion study. (orig.)

  14. Efficacy of antidotes (midazolam, atropine and HI-6) on nerve agent induced molecular and neuropathological changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    RamaRao, Golime; Afley, Prachiti; Acharya, Jyothiranjan; Bhattacharya, Bijoy Krishna

    2014-04-04

    Recent alleged attacks with nerve agent sarin on civilians in Syria indicate their potential threat to both civilian and military population. Acute nerve agent exposure can cause rapid death or leads to multiple and long term neurological effects. The biochemical changes that occur following nerve agent exposure needs to be elucidated to understand the mechanisms behind their long term neurological effects and to design better therapeutic drugs to block their multiple neurotoxic effects. In the present study, we intend to study the efficacy of antidotes comprising of HI-6 (1-[[[4-(aminocarbonyl)-pyridinio]-methoxy]-methyl]-2-[(hydroxyimino) methyl] pyridinium dichloride), atropine and midazolam on soman induced neurodegeneration and the expression of c-Fos, Calpain, and Bax levels in discrete rat brain areas. Therapeutic regime consisting of HI-6 (50 mg/kg, i.m), atropine (10 mg/kg, i.m) and midazolam (5 mg/kg, i.m) protected animals against soman (2×LD50, s.c) lethality completely at 2 h and 80% at 24 h. HI-6 treatment reactivated soman inhibited plasma and RBC cholinesterase up to 40%. Fluoro-Jade B (FJ-B) staining of neurodegenerative neurons showed that soman induced significant necrotic neuronal cell death, which was reduced by this antidotal treatment. Soman increased the expression of neuronal proteins including c-Fos, Bax and Calpain levels in the hippocampus, cerebral cortex and cerebellum regions of the brain. This therapeutic regime also reduced the soman induced Bax, Calpain expression levels to near control levels in the different brain regions studied, except a mild induction of c-Fos expression in the hippocampus. Rats that received antidotal treatment after soman exposure were protected from mortality and showed reduction in the soman induced expression of c-Fos, Bax and Calpain and necrosis. Results highlight the need for timely administration of better antidotes than standard therapy in order to prevent the molecular and biochemical changes and

  15. Enhancement of the Inhibitor Efficiency of Atropine Methochloride in Corrosion Control of Mild Steel in Sulphuric Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abida Begum

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The inhibition efficiency and synergistic behaviour of 10-4 M Atropine methochloride was carried out using mass loss and polarisation methods in the presence of (i metal ions, Ni2+ and Cu2+ between 10-2 M to 10-6 M concentrations, (ii different concentrations of metal ions and 10-3 M I-, 10-3 M Cl- and 10-3 M Br- solutions and (iii different metal ions, 10-3M I- and at three different temperatures. The analysis reveals that the inhibition efficiency of Atropine methochloride was maximum at 10-2 M in 5 hours of immersion period. Halides decreased the corrosion rate of mild steel in Sulphuric acid. The decrease is maximum with 10-3 M I-. As the temperature increased from 298K to 308K, the inhibition efficiency gradually decreased. The inhibitor was found to be effective up to 303K

  16. Use of atropine to predict the accommodative component in esotropia with hypermetropia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihir Kothari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This cohort study included children with esotropia and hypermetropia of ≥ +2.0 diopters (D. The deviation was measured at presentation, under atropine cycloplegia and 3 months after full refractive correction. Of 44 children with a mean age of 5.2 ± 2.4 years, 25 were males. Eighteen (41% had fully refractive accommodative esotropia (RAE, 10 (23% had partial accommodative esotropia (PAE, and 5 (11% had nonaccommodative esotropia (NAE. Eleven (25% had convergence excess (CE. Under cycloplegia, all with RAE and RAE with CE had orthotropia. There was no significant change in the deviation in the patients with NAE. The deviation under cycloplegia and that with full refractive correction in PAE and PAE with CE (with +3.0 D addition were not different. The intraclass correlation coefficient for deviation under cycloplegia and after full refractive correction (+3.0 D addition for CE was 0.89. It was concluded that ocular deviation under cycloplegia can help to predict the accommodative component in esotropia with hypermetropia.

  17. Highly sensitive determination of atropine using cobalt oxide nanostructures: Influence of functional groups on the signal sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soomro, Razium Ali, E-mail: raziumsoomro@gmail.com [Interface Analysis Centre, School of Physics, University of Bristol, Bristol, BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); National Centre of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro, 76080 (Pakistan); Nafady, Ayman [Department of Chemistry, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Sohag University, Sohag (Egypt); Hallam, Keith Richard [Interface Analysis Centre, School of Physics, University of Bristol, Bristol, BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Jawaid, Sana [National Centre of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro, 76080 (Pakistan); Al Enizi, Abdullah [Department of Chemistry, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Sherazi, Syed Tufail Hussain; Sirajuddin [National Centre of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro, 76080 (Pakistan); Ibupoto, Zafar Hussain [Dr M.A. Kazi Institute of Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro, 76080 (Pakistan); Willander, Magnus [Department of Science and Technology, Campus Norrkoping, Linkoping University, SE-60174, Norrkoping (Sweden)

    2016-12-15

    This study describes sensitive determination of atropine using glassy carbon electrodes (GCE) modified with Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanostructures. The as-synthesised nanostructures were grown using cysteine (CYS), glutathione (GSH) and histidine (HYS) as effective templates under hydrothermal action. The obtained morphologies revealed interesting structural features, including both cavity-based and flower-shaped structures. The as-synthesised morphologies were noted to actively participate in electro-catalysis of atropine (AT) drug where GSH-assisted structures exhibited the best signal response in terms of current density and over-potential value. The study also discusses the influence of functional groups on the signal sensitivity of atropine electro-oxidation. The functionalisation was carried with the amino acids originally used as effective templates for the growth of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanostructures. The highest increment was obtained when GSH was used as the surface functionalising agent. The GSH-functionalised Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}-modified electrode was utilised for the electro-chemical sensing of AT in a concentration range of 0.01–0.46 μM. The developed sensor exhibited excellent working linearity (R{sup 2} = 0.999) and signal sensitivity up to 0.001 μM of AT. The noted high sensitivity of the sensor is associated with the synergy of superb surface architectures and favourable interaction facilitating the electron transfer kinetics for the electro-catalytic oxidation of AT. Significantly, the developed sensor demonstrated excellent working capability when used for AT detection in human urine samples with strong anti-interference potential against common co-existing species, such as glucose, fructose, cysteine, uric acid, dopamine and ascorbic acid. - Highlights: • Template-assisted growth of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanostructures. • Shape-dependent electro-catalysis of atropine. • Effect of functionalisation of signal sensitivity.

  18. Effect of dorsal hippocampal lesion compared to dorsal hippocampal blockade by atropine on reference memory in vision deprived rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhume, R A; Noronha, A; Nagwekar, M D; Mascarenhas, J F

    1989-10-01

    In order to study the primacy of the hippocampus in place learning function 24 male adult albino rats were hippocampally-lesioned in dorsal hippocampus involving fornical damage (group I); sham operated for comparison with group I (group II); cannulated for instillation of atropine sulphate in the same loci as group I (group III); and cannulated for instillation of saline which served as control for group III (group IV). All the animals were enucleated and their reference memory (long-term memory) was tested, using open 4-arm radial maze. There was loss of reference memory in groups I and III. However, hippocampally-lesioned animals, showed recovery of reference memory deficit within a short period of 10 days or so. Whereas atropinized animals showed persistent reference memory deficit as long as the instillation effect continued. The mechanism involved in the recovery of reference memory in hippocampally-lesioned animals and persistent deficit of reference memory in atropinized animals has been postulated to explain the primacy of hippocampus in the place learning function under normal conditions.

  19. Comparison of the treatment effects of methoxamine and combining methoxamine with atropine infusion to maintain blood pressure during spinal anesthesia for cesarean delivery: a double blind randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, X-J; Zheng, M; Tian, G; Zhong, H-Y; Zou, X-J; Jian, D-L

    2016-01-01

    Hypotension is a common complication of spinal anesthesia for cesarean delivery. Atropine is a vagus nerve blocker that can antagonize vagus excitation to mitigate the reflex bradycardia. We aimed to assess the effect of methoxamine-atropine therapy in treating spinal anesthesia hypotension for cesarean section. This is a double-blind randomized controlled study. Women under spinal anesthesia for elective caesarean delivery received boluses of methoxamine 2 mg alone (Group M, n = 40), or with addition of atropine 0.1 mg (Group MA1, n = 40), atropine 0.2 mg (Group MA2, n = 40) or atropine 0.3 mg (Group MA3, n = 40) upon a maternal systolic pressure ≤ 80% of baseline. The primary endpoint was systolic blood pressure and the secondary endpoints were maternal heart rates, instant neonatal heart rates, umbilical artery pH and umbilical artery base excess. Changes in systolic blood pressure were similar among the four groups. The incidences of bradycardia in groups M and MA1 were significantly higher than those in group MA2 and MA3. The fetal heart rates after delivery in groups MA2 and MA3 were higher than those in group M and MA1 but within the normal range. The acid-base status had no difference in the four groups. Methoxamine-atropine combination has a similar efficacy to methoxamine alone but has an increased hemodynamic stability and a less adverse effect occurrence.

  20. Dipyrone in association with atropine inhibits the effect on gastric emptying induced by hypoglycemia in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.F. Collares

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Atropine (AT and dipyrone (Dp induce a delay of gastric emptying (GE of liquids in rats by inhibiting muscarinic receptors and activating β2-adrenergic receptors, respectively. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of pretreatment with AT and Dp, given alone or in combination, on the effect of hypoglycemia in the liquid GE in rats. Male Wistar adult rats (280-310 g were pretreated intravenously with AT, Dp, AT plus Dp or their vehicle and then treated 30 min later with iv insulin or its vehicle (n=8-10 animals/group. Thirty min after treatment, GE was evaluated by determining, in awake rats, the percent gastric retention (%GR of a saline meal labeled with phenol red administered by gavage. The results indicated that insulin induced hypoglycemia in a dose-dependent manner resulting in a significant reduction in %GR of liquid only at the highest dose tested (1 U/kg. Pretreatment with AT significantly increased %GR in the rats treated with 1 U/kg insulin. Surprisingly, after pretreatment with AT, the group treated with the lowest dose of insulin (0.25 U/kg displayed significantly lower %GR compared to its control (vehicle-treated group, which was not seen in the non-pretreated animals. Pretreatment with Dp alone at the dose of 40 mg/kg induced an increase in %GR in both vehicle and 0.25 U/kg-treated rats. A higher dose of Dp alone (80 mg/kg significantly reduced the effect of a marked hypoglycemia induced by 1 U/kg of insulin on GE while in combination with AT the effect was completely abolished. The results with AT suggest that moderate hypoglycemia may render the inhibitory mechanisms of GE ineffective while Dp alone and in combination with AT significantly overcame the effect of hypoglycemia on GE.

  1. Effect of Intensive Atropine Doses (Rapid Incremental Loading and Titration for Management of Organophosphorus Pesticide Poisoning: a Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abu Saleh Ahmed

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background:Acute poisoning with organophosphorus (OP pesticides is a common method of suicide and entails considerable mortality in Bangladesh. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects and outcomes of a protocol for treatment of OP poisoning that included titrated incremental atropine as loading dose and slow infusion for maintenance.  Methods:In this prospective descriptive case series, definitive OP poisoned patients were enrolled in an adult medicine unit of Dhaka Medical College Hospital from April 2006 to April 2007. Clinical examinations were done as soon as the patient entered the ward. Patient’s demographics, comorbid conditions and the occurrence of specific clinical outcomes including death, need for assisted ventilation and clinical complications were recorded. The patients were treated according to the protocol. Results: A total of 56 patients were enrolled over the study period. The median age of the study population was 22.5 years. Most patients were men (67.8%. The most common clinical presentation was miosis (58.9%. In total, 11 patients died (19.6%. Intermediate syndrome developed in 12 patients (21.4% and 6 of them died. Assisted ventilation was required in 16 cases (28.5. Patients with diastolic blood pressure ≤ 70 mmHg and/or GCS ≤ 10 were significantly less likely to survive (P = 0.02, 0.006, respectively. Moreover, early respiratory failure (P < 0.001 and the need for assisted ventilation (P < 0.001 were significantly higher among deceased cases. The mortality rate in this study was similar to previous studies. The frequency of atropine toxicity in the present study (1.8% was considerably lower than conventional regimen used in previous studies. Conclusion:Using the new protocol, lower rate of atropine toxicity developed in victims. Hence, the new protocol appears to be safer and its effectiveness should be further evaluated in case control studies in Bangladesh.    How to cite this article: Ahmed AS

  2. Association between chewing-stimulated salivary flow under the effects of atropine and mixing ability assessed using a color-changeable chewing gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Chieko; Kanazawa, Manabu; Hama, Yohei; Komagamine, Yuriko; Minakuchi, Shunsuke

    2017-10-01

    To assess the time course of chewing-stimulated salivary flow after oral atropine administration, and determine the association between chewing-stimulated salivary flow and mixing ability using color-changeable chewing gum in dentate adults. Ten healthy dentate adults were administered 1mg oral atropine to induce mouth dryness. The subjects' chewing-stimulated salivary flow was assessed using the Saxon test. They were then asked to rinse their mouth with tap water for 15s, and to chew on color-changeable chewing gum for 60s at a constant rate of 60 cycles per min. This procedure was performed before, and at 10-min intervals for up to 120min after the atropine administration. The experiment was repeated after 1 week. Steel's test was used to compare the chewing-stimulated salivary flow rates at each time point after atropine administration with the baseline value. The effect of the stimulated salivary flow rates on the degree of color change was analyzed using linear mixed effects models, with the stimulated salivary flow rates as fixed factors and subjects as the random factor. Chewing-stimulated salivary flow showed a significant decrease from 50 to 120min after oral atropine administration (Pchewing-stimulated salivary flow had a significant effect on the color change of the color-changeable chewing gum (Pchewing gum and chewing-stimulated salivary flow in dentate subjects. Copyright © 2017 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Purity determination of 60Co gamma irradiated atropine sulphate by different analytical techniques (Preprint No. RA.05)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balan, N.; Sharma, G.; Gopal, N.G.S.

    1989-01-01

    Some of the results obtained, employing high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) are reported and some other methods to determine the purit y of radiation sterilized atropine sulphate in solid (I) and in aqueous solutions (0.1 per cent to 1.0 per cent w/v) (II) are also described. (I) and (II) were irradiated to graded doses of 10-100kGy and 5-20kGy respectively. The purity of irradiated sample (I) vis-a-vis unirradiated was determined using non aqueous potentiometric titration, thin layer chromatography, uv-vis spectrophotometry, HPLC and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Purity of (II) was examined only by HPLC vis-a-vis unirradiated aqueous solution. (author). 3 figs

  4. Effect of a mixture of pyridostigmine and atropine on forced expiratory volume (FEV1), and serum cholinesterase activity in normal subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, B F; Gefke, Kaj; Mosbech, H

    1985-01-01

    injection with a decrease to 27 +/- 5% (mean +/- SEM) of the original activity. Forced expiratory volume in the first 1s (FEV1) was measured at fixed time intervals for 90 min. No decrease in FEV1 was observed; on the contrary, there was a small increase. We conclude that atropine effectively antagonizes...

  5. Combinations of ketamine and atropine are neuroprotective and reduce neuroinflammation after a toxic status epilepticus in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhote, Franck; Carpentier, Pierre; Barbier, Laure; Peinnequin, André; Baille, Valérie; Pernot, Fabien; Testylier, Guy; Beaup, Claire; Foquin, Annie

    2012-01-01

    Epileptic seizures and status epilepticus (SE) induced by the poisoning with organophosphorus nerve agents (OP), like soman, are accompanied by neuroinflammation whose role in seizure-related brain damage (SRBD) is not clear. Antagonists of the NMDA glutamate ionotropic receptors are currently among the few compounds able to arrest seizures and provide neuroprotection even during refractory status epilepticus (RSE). Racemic ketamine (KET), in combination with atropine sulfate (AS), was previously shown to counteract seizures and SRBD in soman-poisoned guinea-pigs. In a mouse model of severe soman-induced SE, we assessed the potentials of KET/AS combinations as a treatment for SE/RSE-induced SRBD and neuroinflammation. When starting 30 min after soman challenge, a protocol involving six injections of a sub-anesthetic dose of KET (25 mg/kg) was evaluated on body weight loss, brain damage, and neuroinflammation whereas during RSE, anesthetic protocols were considered (KET 100 mg/kg). After confirming that during RSE, KET injection was to be repeated despite some iatrogenic deaths, we used these proof-of-concept protocols to study the changes in mRNA and related protein contents of some inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and adhesion molecules in cortex and hippocampus 48 h post-challenge. In both cases, the KET/AS combinations showed important neuroprotective effects, suppressed neutrophil granulocyte infiltration and partially suppressed glial activation. KET/AS could also reduce the increase in mRNA and related pro-inflammatory proteins provoked by the poisoning. In conclusion, the present study confirms that KET/AS treatment has a strong potential for SE/RSE management following OP poisoning. The mechanisms involved in the reduction of central neuroinflammation remain to be studied. -- Highlights: ► During soman-induced status epilepticus, ketamine-atropine limit brain damage. ► Molecular neuroinflammatory response is strongly decreased. ► Glial activation is

  6. Combinations of ketamine and atropine are neuroprotective and reduce neuroinflammation after a toxic status epilepticus in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhote, Franck [Département de Toxicologie et risques chimiques, Institut de Recherche Biomédicale des armées – Centre de recherches du Service de santé des armées IRBA-CRSSA, 24 avenue des Maquis du Grésivaudan, B.P. 87, 38702 La Tronche cedex (France); Carpentier, Pierre; Barbier, Laure [Département de Toxicologie et risques chimiques, Institut de Recherche Biomédicale des armées – Centre de recherches du Service de santé des armées IRBA-CRSSA, 24 avenue des Maquis du Grésivaudan, B.P. 87, 38702 La Tronche cedex (France); Peinnequin, André [Département Effets biologiques des rayonnements, Institut de Recherche Biomédicale des armées – Centre de recherches du Service de santé des armées IRBA-CRSSA, 24 avenue des Maquis du Grésivaudan, B.P. 87, 38702 La Tronche cedex (France); Baille, Valérie; Pernot, Fabien; Testylier, Guy; Beaup, Claire; Foquin, Annie [Département de Toxicologie et risques chimiques, Institut de Recherche Biomédicale des armées – Centre de recherches du Service de santé des armées IRBA-CRSSA, 24 avenue des Maquis du Grésivaudan, B.P. 87, 38702 La Tronche cedex (France); others, and

    2012-03-01

    Epileptic seizures and status epilepticus (SE) induced by the poisoning with organophosphorus nerve agents (OP), like soman, are accompanied by neuroinflammation whose role in seizure-related brain damage (SRBD) is not clear. Antagonists of the NMDA glutamate ionotropic receptors are currently among the few compounds able to arrest seizures and provide neuroprotection even during refractory status epilepticus (RSE). Racemic ketamine (KET), in combination with atropine sulfate (AS), was previously shown to counteract seizures and SRBD in soman-poisoned guinea-pigs. In a mouse model of severe soman-induced SE, we assessed the potentials of KET/AS combinations as a treatment for SE/RSE-induced SRBD and neuroinflammation. When starting 30 min after soman challenge, a protocol involving six injections of a sub-anesthetic dose of KET (25 mg/kg) was evaluated on body weight loss, brain damage, and neuroinflammation whereas during RSE, anesthetic protocols were considered (KET 100 mg/kg). After confirming that during RSE, KET injection was to be repeated despite some iatrogenic deaths, we used these proof-of-concept protocols to study the changes in mRNA and related protein contents of some inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and adhesion molecules in cortex and hippocampus 48 h post-challenge. In both cases, the KET/AS combinations showed important neuroprotective effects, suppressed neutrophil granulocyte infiltration and partially suppressed glial activation. KET/AS could also reduce the increase in mRNA and related pro-inflammatory proteins provoked by the poisoning. In conclusion, the present study confirms that KET/AS treatment has a strong potential for SE/RSE management following OP poisoning. The mechanisms involved in the reduction of central neuroinflammation remain to be studied. -- Highlights: ► During soman-induced status epilepticus, ketamine-atropine limit brain damage. ► Molecular neuroinflammatory response is strongly decreased. ► Glial activation is

  7. Comparison of the effects of atropine and labetalol on trigeminocardiac reflex-induced hemodynamic alterations during percutaneous microballoon compression of the trigeminal ganglion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Yu; Luo, Chiao-Fen; Hsu, Yi-Chun; Chen, Jyi-Feng; Day, Yuan-Ji

    2012-12-01

    A significant abrupt drop in heart rate is the most frequent complication during percutaneous microballoon compression of the trigeminal ganglion. It is suggested that co-activation of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems plays an important role in this occurrence. We hypothesized that not only atropine, but also labetalol might be effective in preventing this cardiovascular reflex during percutaneous microballoon compression of the trigeminal ganglion. Patients who underwent percutaneous microballoon compression for trigeminal neuralgia between September 2007 and December 2009 were prospectively evaluated. The relationship between the hemodynamic changes and intraoperative use of atropine (0.01 mg/kg) or labetalol (0.05 mg/kg) was compared. One-way analysis of variance with Bartlett's and Tukey's post-tests was used, and a value of p compression for trigeminal neuralgia were studied, of whom 38 received atropine before ganglion compression, 36 received labetalol, and 45 received normal saline as a control. Of the patients who received normal saline, 31.3% had moderate bradycardia (heart rate compression. Of the patients who received labetalol, 16.7% had moderate bradycardia, 5.6% had severe bradycardia, and 2.8% had arrhythmia. Systemic blood pressure was markedly elevated straight after compression in all groups and tended to normalize 3 minutes afterwards. Both atropine and labetalol were able to lower the frequency of bradycardia. Neither of them could abolish episodes of bradycardia during the procedure. Patients receiving labetalol before microballoon compression were subject to a smaller change in hemodynamics. Our findings verified that the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems may be involved in the complex interneuronal interaction of the trigeminocardiac reflex. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Clinical value of atropine-four minutes adenosine stressed 99Tcm-MIBI myocardial perfusion imaging in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Xulan; Zhang Baoniu; Jiang Sufang; Liang Hongwei; Liu Jun; Gao Guizhu; Ding Minghui; Hou Junfu

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic efficacy of atropine-4 min adenosine stressed 99 Tc m -methoxyisobutylisonitrile (MIBI) myocardial perfusion imaging in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods: A total of 56 patients were divided into atropine-4 min adenosine stress (research group) and 6 min adenosine infusion (control group). The sex, age, the severity of CAD (judged by coronary, angiography) and associated symptoms were matched between the 2 groups. In research group, 0.5 mg atropine was injected intravenously 10 min before adenosine infusion. Adenosine was infused at a rate of 0.14 mg·kg -1 ·min -1 intravenously for 4 min and 6 min in research and control groups. At 3 min after adenosine infusion, 740 MBq 99 Tc m -MIBI was injected. SPECT myocardial imaging was obtained 1.5 h later. A rest myocardial perfusion imaging was performed on the following day. Results: (1) In research group and control group, the sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic accuracy was 85%, 6/8, 82% and 86%, 5/7, 82%, respectively (χ 2 0.05). (2)The sensitivity of the adenosine test for detection of single vessel, two vessels, three vessels disease were 6/7, 8/9, 3/4 and 7/8, 7/8, 4/5 in research group and control group, respectively(χ 2 0.05). (3) Side affects occurred in 82% of the patients in the research group and in 89% of the patients in the control group. The incidence of side effects in the two groups was not significantly different besides chest depression (43% and 68%, χ 2 =4.000, <0.05). Conclusions: Atropine-4 min adenosine infusion, in combination with perfusion tomography, has similar diagnostic efficacy for CAD to the 6 min protocol, and has lower incidence of chest depression than the standard 6 min infusion. (authors)

  9. The effects of oxotremorine, epibatidine, atropine, mecamylamine and naloxone in the tail-flick, hot-plate, and formalin tests in the naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulu, Thomas D; Kanui, Titus I; Towett, Philemon K; Maloiy, Geoffrey M; Abelson, Klas S P

    2014-01-01

    The naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber) is a promising animal model for the study of pain mechanisms, therefore a thorough characterization of this species is essential. The aim of the present study was to establish the naked mole-rat as a model for studying the cholinergic receptor system in antinociception by investigating the involvement of muscarinic, nicotinic and opioid receptors in nociceptive tests in this species. The effects of systemic administration of the muscarinic receptor agonist oxotremorine and the nicotinic receptor agonist epibatidine were investigated in the tail-flick, the hot-plate, and the formalin tests. The effects of co-administration of the muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine, the nicotinic receptor antagonist mecamylamine, and the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone were also investigated. Oxotremorine and epibatidine induced a significant, dose-dependent antinociceptive effect in the tail-flick, hot-plate, and formalin tests, respectively. The effects of oxotremorine and epibatidine were blocked by atropine and mecamylamine, respectively. In all three nociceptive tests, naloxone in combination with oxotremorine or epibatidine enhanced the antinociceptive effects of the drugs. The present study demonstrated that stimulation of muscarinic and nicotinic receptors produces antinociceptive effects in the naked-mole rat. The reversal effect of atropine and mecamylamine suggests that this effect is mediated by cholinergic receptors. As naloxone increases the antinociceptive effects of cholinergic agonists, it is suggested that the cholinergic antinociception acts via a gateway facilitated by opioid receptor blockage; however, the precise interaction between these receptor systems needs further investigation.

  10. Post-exposure treatment with nasal atropine methyl bromide protects against microinstillation inhalation exposure to sarin in guinea pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Che, Magnus M.; Conti, Michele; Chanda, Soma; Boylan, Megan; Sabnekar, Praveena; Rezk, Peter; Amari, Ethery; Sciuto, Alfred M.; Gordon, Richard K.; Doctor, Bhupendra P.; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P.

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the protective efficacy of nasal atropine methyl bromide (AMB) which does not cross the blood-brain barrier against sarin inhalation exposure. Age and weight matched male guinea pigs were exposed to 846.5 mg/m 3 sarin using a microinstillation inhalation exposure technique for 4 min. The survival rate at this dose was 20%. Post-exposure treatment with nasal AMB (2.5 mg/kg, 1 min) completely protected against sarin induced toxicity (100% survival). Development of muscular tremors was decreased in animals treated with nasal AMB. Post-exposure treatment with nasal AMB also normalized acute decrease in blood oxygen saturation and heart rate following sarin exposure. Inhibition of blood AChE and BChE activities following sarin exposure was reduced in animals treated with nasal AMB, indicating that survival increases the metabolism of sarin or expression of AChE. The body weight loss of animals exposed to sarin and treated with nasal AMB was similar to saline controls. No differences were observed in lung accessory lobe or tracheal edema following exposure to sarin and subsequent treatment with nasal AMB. Total bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) protein, a biomarker of lung injury, showed trends similar to saline controls. Surfactant levels post-exposure treatment with nasal AMB returned to normal, similar to saline controls. Alkaline phosphatase levels post-exposure treatment with nasal AMB were decreased. Taken together, these data suggest that nasal AMB blocks the copious airway secretion and peripheral cholinergic effects and protects against lethal inhalation exposure to sarin thus increasing survival.

  11. COMPARISON OF THREE SHORT-TERM IMMOBILIZATION REGIMES IN WILD VERREAUX'S SIFAKAS (PROPITHECUS VERREAUXI): KETAMINE-XYLAZINE, KETAMINE-XYLAZINE-ATROPINE, AND TILETAMINE-ZOLAZEPAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Andrea; Razafimanantsoa, Léonard; Fichtel, Claudia; Kappeler, Peter M

    2015-09-01

    Although research on lemurid primates in Madagascar has been ongoing for several decades, reports on different drug regimes to immobilize wild lemurs are limited. This study compares the efficacy, reliability, and side effects of ketamine-xylazine, ketamine-xylazine-atropine, and tiletamine-zolazepam immobilization in wild Verreaux's sifakas (Propithecus verreauxi). In the course of a long-term study in Kirindy Forest, western Madagascar, eight animals each received a mixture of ketamine (5.32±1.71 mg/kg) and xylazine (0.56±0.19 mg/kg) (KX; 7 males, 1 female) and ketamine (6.58±1.36 mg/kg), xylazine (1.28±0.28 mg/kg), and atropine (0.013±0.003 mg/kg) (KXA; 5 males, 3 females), respectively, and 14 individuals received tiletamine-zolazepam (7.73±1.37 mg/kg) (TZ; 9 males, 5 females). Induction was smooth in all protocols, but showed considerable variation in duration when animals had received KXA. Immobilization as well as recovery lasted significantly longer with TZ than with KX (Pimmobilized with TZ. Heart rate measurement at 10 min after onset of complete immobilization yielded significantly higher values if the animals had been immobilized with TZ compared to KX (Pimmobilized animals, whereas immobilization with TZ resulted in an increase in heart rate. The results suggest that KX produces good, but short, immobilization in Verreaux's sifakas at approximately 5 mg/kg ketamine and 0.5 mg/kg xylazine and a smoother and shorter recovery phase than 5 to 10 mg/kg TZ, whereas adding atropine to KX did not provide any benefits.

  12. A rat model of nerve agent exposure applicable to the pediatric population: The anticonvulsant efficacies of atropine and GluK1 antagonists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Steven L., E-mail: stevenmiller17@gmail.com [Department of Anatomy, Physiology, and Genetics, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States); Program in Neuroscience, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States); Aroniadou-Anderjaska, Vassiliki, E-mail: vanderjaska@usuhs.edu [Department of Anatomy, Physiology, and Genetics, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States); Department of Psychiatry, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States); Program in Neuroscience, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States); Figueiredo, Taiza H., E-mail: taiza.figueiredo.ctr@usuhs.edu [Department of Anatomy, Physiology, and Genetics, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States); Prager, Eric M., E-mail: eric.prager683@gmail.com [Department of Anatomy, Physiology, and Genetics, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States); Program in Neuroscience, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States); Almeida-Suhett, Camila P., E-mail: camilapalmeida@gmail.com [Department of Anatomy, Physiology, and Genetics, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States); Program in Neuroscience, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States); Apland, James P., E-mail: james.p.apland.civ@mail.mil [Neurotoxicology Branch, U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010 (United States); and others

    2015-04-15

    Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) after nerve agent exposure induces status epilepticus (SE), which causes brain damage or death. The development of countermeasures appropriate for the pediatric population requires testing of anticonvulsant treatments in immature animals. In the present study, exposure of 21-day-old (P21) rats to different doses of soman, followed by probit analysis, produced an LD{sub 50} of 62 μg/kg. The onset of behaviorally-observed SE was accompanied by a dramatic decrease in brain AChE activity; rats who did not develop SE had significantly less reduction of AChE activity in the basolateral amygdala than rats who developed SE. Atropine sulfate (ATS) at 2 mg/kg, administered 20 min after soman exposure (1.2 × LD{sub 50}), terminated seizures. ATS at 0.5 mg/kg, given along with an oxime within 1 min after exposure, allowed testing of anticonvulsants at delayed time-points. The AMPA/GluK1 receptor antagonist LY293558, or the specific GluK1 antagonist UBP302, administered 1 h post-exposure, terminated SE. There were no degenerating neurons in soman-exposed P21 rats, but both the amygdala and the hippocampus were smaller than in control rats at 30 and 90 days post-exposure; this pathology was not present in rats treated with LY293558. Behavioral deficits present at 30 days post-exposure, were also prevented by LY293558 treatment. Thus, in immature animals, a single injection of atropine is sufficient to halt nerve agent-induced seizures, if administered timely. Testing anticonvulsants at delayed time-points requires early administration of ATS at a low dose, sufficient to counteract only peripheral toxicity. LY293558 administered 1 h post-exposure, prevents brain pathology and behavioral deficits. - Highlights: • The LD{sub 50} of soman was determined in postnatal-day-21 rats. • Rats with no seizures after 1.2XLD{sub 50} soman had less reduction of AChE in the amygdala. • Atropine sulfate (ATS) at 2 mg/kg, given at 20 min after

  13. A rat model of nerve agent exposure applicable to the pediatric population: The anticonvulsant efficacies of atropine and GluK1 antagonists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Steven L.; Aroniadou-Anderjaska, Vassiliki; Figueiredo, Taiza H.; Prager, Eric M.; Almeida-Suhett, Camila P.; Apland, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) after nerve agent exposure induces status epilepticus (SE), which causes brain damage or death. The development of countermeasures appropriate for the pediatric population requires testing of anticonvulsant treatments in immature animals. In the present study, exposure of 21-day-old (P21) rats to different doses of soman, followed by probit analysis, produced an LD 50 of 62 μg/kg. The onset of behaviorally-observed SE was accompanied by a dramatic decrease in brain AChE activity; rats who did not develop SE had significantly less reduction of AChE activity in the basolateral amygdala than rats who developed SE. Atropine sulfate (ATS) at 2 mg/kg, administered 20 min after soman exposure (1.2 × LD 50 ), terminated seizures. ATS at 0.5 mg/kg, given along with an oxime within 1 min after exposure, allowed testing of anticonvulsants at delayed time-points. The AMPA/GluK1 receptor antagonist LY293558, or the specific GluK1 antagonist UBP302, administered 1 h post-exposure, terminated SE. There were no degenerating neurons in soman-exposed P21 rats, but both the amygdala and the hippocampus were smaller than in control rats at 30 and 90 days post-exposure; this pathology was not present in rats treated with LY293558. Behavioral deficits present at 30 days post-exposure, were also prevented by LY293558 treatment. Thus, in immature animals, a single injection of atropine is sufficient to halt nerve agent-induced seizures, if administered timely. Testing anticonvulsants at delayed time-points requires early administration of ATS at a low dose, sufficient to counteract only peripheral toxicity. LY293558 administered 1 h post-exposure, prevents brain pathology and behavioral deficits. - Highlights: • The LD 50 of soman was determined in postnatal-day-21 rats. • Rats with no seizures after 1.2XLD 50 soman had less reduction of AChE in the amygdala. • Atropine sulfate (ATS) at 2 mg/kg, given at 20 min after soman, blocked

  14. A rat model of nerve agent exposure applicable to the pediatric population: The anticonvulsant efficacies of atropine and GluK1 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Steven L; Aroniadou-Anderjaska, Vassiliki; Figueiredo, Taiza H; Prager, Eric M; Almeida-Suhett, Camila P; Apland, James P; Braga, Maria F M

    2015-04-15

    Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) after nerve agent exposure induces status epilepticus (SE), which causes brain damage or death. The development of countermeasures appropriate for the pediatric population requires testing of anticonvulsant treatments in immature animals. In the present study, exposure of 21-day-old (P21) rats to different doses of soman, followed by probit analysis, produced an LD50 of 62μg/kg. The onset of behaviorally-observed SE was accompanied by a dramatic decrease in brain AChE activity; rats who did not develop SE had significantly less reduction of AChE activity in the basolateral amygdala than rats who developed SE. Atropine sulfate (ATS) at 2mg/kg, administered 20 min after soman exposure (1.2×LD50), terminated seizures. ATS at 0.5mg/kg, given along with an oxime within 1 min after exposure, allowed testing of anticonvulsants at delayed time-points. The AMPA/GluK1 receptor antagonist LY293558, or the specific GluK1 antagonist UBP302, administered 1h post-exposure, terminated SE. There were no degenerating neurons in soman-exposed P21 rats, but both the amygdala and the hippocampus were smaller than in control rats at 30 and 90days post-exposure; this pathology was not present in rats treated with LY293558. Behavioral deficits present at 30 days post-exposure, were also prevented by LY293558 treatment. Thus, in immature animals, a single injection of atropine is sufficient to halt nerve agent-induced seizures, if administered timely. Testing anticonvulsants at delayed time-points requires early administration of ATS at a low dose, sufficient to counteract only peripheral toxicity. LY293558 administered 1h post-exposure, prevents brain pathology and behavioral deficits. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. "Combined Occlusion and Atropine Therapy" Versus "Augmented Part-Time Patching" in Children with Refractory/Residual Amblyopia: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Virender; Mittal, Vaibhev; Gupta, Varun; Gunturu, Rekha; Kekunnaya, Ramesh; Chandrasekharan, Anjali; Chabblani, Preeti Patil; Rao, Harsha L

    2016-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of combined occlusion and atropine therapy (COAT) and augmented part-time patching for the treatment of unilateral refractory/residual amblyopia. This retrospective study evaluated children between 4 and 11 years with refractory/residual amblyopia who were treated with either additional atropine (COAT group) or increased hours of patching (augmented group). Data were collected on improvement in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA; logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution [logMAR] units) at each follow-up visit. There were 19 children in the COAT group and 17 children in the augmented group. The baseline BCVA of the amblyopic eye was 0.79 ± 0.36 logMAR in the COAT group and 0.72 ± 0.26 logMAR in augmented group. Children were statistically significantly younger in the COAT group (6.4 ± 2.2 years) compared to the augmented group (8.6 ± 3.3 years, P = 0.02). The mean duration of follow-up was statistically significantly longer in the augmented group (20.2 COAT group; 13.9 months augmented group) (P = 0.03). Compliance was similar in both groups. LogMAR BCVA (adjusted for difference in age and baseline BCVA) was statistically significantly better in the COAT group (0.56 ± 0.04) compared to the augmented group (0.80 ± 0.04) at 3 months (P = 0.000); 6 months (COAT group, 0.50 ± 0.04 vs. augmented group, 0.74 ± 0.04; P = 0.04) and at 1 year (COAT group, 0.42 ± 0.04 vs. augmented group, 0.67 ± 0.04, P = 0.000). There was statistically significantly greater improvement in logMAR BCVA at 6 months in COAT group (0.26 ± 0.15) compared to the augmented group (0.02 ± 0.14), (P = 0.0002). Age, gender, pretreatment BCVA, duration of follow-up, or compliance to patching did not affect improvement in BCVA. COAT may result in greater improvement in BCVA than augmented part-time patching in children with unilateral residual/refractory amblyopia.

  16. “Combined Occlusion and Atropine Therapy” Versus “Augmented Part-Time Patching” in Children with Refractory/Residual Amblyopia: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Virender; Mittal, Vaibhev; Gupta, Varun; Gunturu, Rekha; Kekunnaya, Ramesh; Chandrasekharan, Anjali; Chabblani, Preeti Patil; Rao, Harsha L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the efficacy of combined occlusion and atropine therapy (COAT) and augmented part-time patching for the treatment of unilateral refractory/residual amblyopia. Methodology: This retrospective study evaluated children between 4 and 11 years with refractory/residual amblyopia who were treated with either additional atropine (COAT group) or increased hours of patching (augmented group). Data were collected on improvement in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA; logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution [logMAR] units) at each follow-up visit. Results: There were 19 children in the COAT group and 17 children in the augmented group. The baseline BCVA of the amblyopic eye was 0.79 ± 0.36 logMAR in the COAT group and 0.72 ± 0.26 logMAR in augmented group. Children were statistically significantly younger in the COAT group (6.4 ± 2.2 years) compared to the augmented group (8.6 ± 3.3 years, P = 0.02). The mean duration of follow-up was statistically significantly longer in the augmented group (20.2 COAT group; 13.9 months augmented group) (P = 0.03). Compliance was similar in both groups. LogMAR BCVA (adjusted for difference in age and baseline BCVA) was statistically significantly better in the COAT group (0.56 ± 0.04) compared to the augmented group (0.80 ± 0.04) at 3 months (P = 0.000); 6 months (COAT group, 0.50 ± 0.04 vs. augmented group, 0.74 ± 0.04; P = 0.04) and at 1 year (COAT group, 0.42 ± 0.04 vs. augmented group, 0.67 ± 0.04, P = 0.000). There was statistically significantly greater improvement in logMAR BCVA at 6 months in COAT group (0.26 ± 0.15) compared to the augmented group (0.02 ± 0.14), (P = 0.0002). Age, gender, pretreatment BCVA, duration of follow-up, or compliance to patching did not affect improvement in BCVA. Conclusions: COAT may result in greater improvement in BCVA than augmented part-time patching in children with unilateral residual/refractory amblyopia. PMID:27162453

  17. Formulation and Evaluation of Fast-Disintegrating Sublingual Tablets of Atropine Sulfate: the Effect of Tablet Dimensions and Drug Load on Tablet Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aodah, Alhussain; Bafail, Rawan S; Rawas-Qalaji, Mutasem

    2017-07-01

    In this study, we formulated and evaluated the effects of tablet dimensions and drug load on the characteristics of atropine sulfate (AS) fast-disintegrating sublingual tablets (FDSTs). We aim to develop AS FDSTs as an alternative non-invasive and portable dosage form for the emergency treatment of organophosphate (OP) toxicity. AS autoinjector, AtroPen®, is the only self-administered dosage form available as an antidote for-out-of-hospital emergency use, but it is associated with several limitations and drawbacks. Seven FDST formulations of two tablet sizes, 150 mg (A) and 50 mg (B), and of several AS loads, 0 mg (A1, B1), 2 mg (A2, B2), 4 mg (B3), and 8 mg (B4a, B4b), were formulated and manufactured by direct compression. AS FDST characteristics were evaluated using USP and non-USP tests. Results were statistically compared at p < 0.05. All FDSTs passed the USP content uniformity and friability tests, disintegrated and released AS in ≤30 and 60 s. B1 and B2 were significantly harder than A1 and A2. Water uptake of A1 was significantly the highest. However, B1 and B2 had shorter disintegration and wetting times and higher amounts of AS dissolved than did A1 and A2 (p < 0.05). Increasing AS negatively affected FDST tensile strength (p < 0.05 for B4a) and water uptake (p < 0.05 for B3, B4a and B4b), however, without affecting AS dissolution. Formulation of AS up to 16% into smaller FDSTs was successful. Smaller FDSTs were harder and disintegrated more quickly. These AS FDSTS have the potential for further in vivo testing to evaluate their OP antidote potential.

  18. Task 89-06: Determination of the Bioequivalence of HI-6 and Atropine When Delivered by Wet/Dry Autoinjector or Syringe in Sheep: A Pharmacokinetic and Efficacy Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-04-01

    ORGAMLZflON WEORT NUMBSER(S) 6&. ftAAM OF PEFORAiNG ORGANUAlMN 61L OPF4C1 SYMSOL 7S. MAMA Of MO~ITORIMG ORGAJ.LATION Battelle Coluus Operations / U.S. Army...relationship exists between the model-based 4 II II I II . . . • , , ,, ’ 65 TABLE 18. ATROPINE P KARNACOKZNFIC PARAMETERS AUCU. "Cm, AND tm DE *•IVED FROM...excess leukemia. Containers must say *DANGEP CONTAINS BENZENE CANCER HAZARD." OSHA 8-hr permissible exposure limit (PEL) I ppm, Action Level - 0.5 ppm

  19. Suppression of torsades de pointes by atropine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, H. L.; Wilde, A. A.; Peters, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    A 67 year old woman with a history of chronic atrial fibrillation presented with asthma cardiale. She took no medication and there was no family history of long QT syndrome. She was treated with furosemide, nitroprusside, acenocoumarol, and digoxin. Two days later excessively prolonged RR intervals,

  20. Levomepromazina e atropina como medicações pré-anestésicas na anestesia pela associação tiletamina/zolazepam, em cães Comparison between levomepromazine and atropine as premedication agents before anesthesia using tiletamine/zolazepam in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Gonzaga Pompermayer

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo desta pesquisa foi avaliar o emprego da atropina e da levomepromazina como medicações pré-anestésicas para a anestesia pela associação tiletamina/zolazepam. Foram empregados 30 cães, distribuídos em três grupos iguais. O grupo 1 (controle foi tratado com 0,2 ml/kg de solução fisiológica (placebo por via intravenosa; o grupo 2 com 0,044mg/kg de sulfato de atropina por via subcutânea e o grupo 3 com 1mg/kg de cloridrato de levomepromazina por via intravenosa. Quinze minutos após, todos os grupos receberam a associação tiletamina/zolazepam na dose de 10mg/kg por via intramuscular. Antes da medicação pré-anestésica, 15 minutos após a mesma e aos 15, 30, 60 e 105 minutos após a administração da associação tiletamina/zolazepam foram registrados: ECG, temperatura, freqüência respiratória, volume corrente, volume minuto, freqüência cardíaca, pressão arterial, valores hemogasométricos arteriais, graus de analgesia e miorrelaxamento e reflexos protetores. Outros dados como: secreção salivar, período de latência, período anestésico hábil e período de recuperação foram igualmente mensurados para efeito comparativo. De acordo com os resultados obtidos concluiu-se que o sulfato de atropina não deve ser administrado como medicação pré-anestésica, por potencializar a taquicardia induzida pela associação tiletamina/zolazepam. A levomepromazina, além de inibir a sialorréia, mantém a estabilidade cardiorrespiratória e apresenta ação potencializadora dos efeitos anestésicos da associação.The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of levomepromazine and atropine sulfate as a premedication to the dissociative anesthesia produced by a tiletamine/zolazepam combination. Ten dogs were randomly assigned to each of the three groups: control, atropine and levomepromazine. Fifteen minutes before tiletamine/zolazepam, the dogs were treated either with atropine sulfate (0.044mg/kg, subcutaneously

  1. Assessment of serum enzymatic markers of cardiomyocytes injury in female dogs submitted to ketamine S(+, atropin and xylazine association Mensuração da atividade sérica de marcadores de lesão cardíaca em cadelas anestesiadas com cetamina S(+, atropina e xilazina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Guimarães Franco

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To assessment of the aspartate aminotransferase (AST, creatine kinase (CK and creatine kinase isoenzyme fraction MB (CK-MB serum activity in female dogs anesthetized with ketamine S (+, atropine and xylazine in several associations. METHODS: Twenty three healthy female dogs randomly distributed in four groups named as GI (n=6, GII (n=6, GIII (n=6 and GIV (n=5 were treated respectively with atropine and ketamine S(+ (0.04mg/kg; 10 mg/kg; ketamine S(+ (10 mg/kg; atropine, xylazine and ketamine S(+ (0.04mg/kg; 1.1 mg/kg; 10 mg/kg and xylazine and ketamine S(+ (1.1 mg/kg; 10 mg/kg. AST, CK and CK-MB serum activity measurement before pre-medication (M0 and one, two, three, six, 12, 24, 36 hours after. RESULTS: There was no significant change in AST, CK e CK-MB serum activity among groups. However, CK serum activity in relation to moments within the groups was increased in all groups over the time in spite of treatment, except GI. In relation to CK-MB activity, in the moments within the group, it was observed an increase compared to baseline in all groups. CONCLUSION: Creatine kinase and creatine kinase fraction MB isoenzyme showed changes in their mean values remained higher than baseline for a longer time in GIII and GIV.OBJETIVO: Determinar a atividade sérica de AST, CK e CK-MB em cadelas anestesiadas com cetamina S (+, atropina e xilazina em diferentes associações. MÉTODOS: Vinte e três cadelas saudáveis foram distribuídas ao acaso em quarto grupos denominados GI (n=6, GII (n=6, GIII (n=6 e GIV (n=5 tratados respectivamente com atropina e cetamina S (+ (0,04mg/kg; 10 mg/kg; cetamina S (+ (10 mg/kg; atropina, xilazina e cetamina S (+ (0,04mg/kg; 1,1 mg/kg; 10 mg/kg exilazina e cetamina S (+ (1,1 mg/kg; 10 mg/kg. A atividade sérica de AST, CK e CK-MB foi determinada antes da pré-medicação (M0 e uma, duas, três seis, 12, 24 e 36 horas após M0. RESULTADOS: Não foram encontradas mudanças significativas na atividade sérica de

  2. Exeqüibilidade, segurança e acurácia do ecocardiograma sob estresse com dobutamina/ atropina para detecção de doença arterial coronariana em candidatos a transplante renal Feasibility, safety and accuracy of dobutamine/atropine stress echocardiography for the detection of coronary artery disease in renal transplant candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Antonio Muniz Ferreira

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a exeqüibilidade, a segurança e a acurácia diagnóstica do ecocardiograma sob estresse (EEDA com dobutamina/atropina em candidatos a transplante renal. MÉTODOS: Pacientes candidatos a transplante renal com e sem nefropatia diabética realizaram EEDA e cineangiocoronariografia. Consideraram-se dois pontos de corte para doença arterial coronariana (DAC: > 50% e > 70% de obstrução de uma artéria epicárdica. RESULTADOS: Cento e quarenta e oito pacientes realizaram o EEDA e a angiografia coronariana. A média de idade foi de 52±9 anos, 69% eram do sexo masculino, 27% tinham nefropatia diabética, e 73%, HVE; 63% estavam assintomáticos, 36% e 22% apresentaram obstruções coronarianas > 50% e > 70%, respectivamente. A exeqüibilidade foi de 91% e houve 2,7% de complicações maiores. Obtiveram-se as seguintes médias de sensibilidade, especificidade e acurácia, considerando obstrução coronariana > 50%: 53% (IC:45-61, 87% (IC:81-93, e 75% (IC:63-83, respectivamente. Para obstrução >70%, 71% (IC:64-92, 85% (IC:79-91 e 81% (IC:75-87. A sensibilidade para diagnosticar doença uniarterial foi 41% (IC:19-63 e doença multiarterial, 78% (IC:64-92. CONCLUSÃO: O EEDA foi exeqüível e seguro; entretanto, foi ineficiente para rastreamento de DAC, considerando obstruções > 50%, mas pode ser útil para detecção de DAC em pacientes com obstruções > 70% e doença multiarterial.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the feasibility, safety and accuracy of dobutamine/atropine stress echocardiography (DASE for the detection of coronary artery desease (CAD in renal transplant candidates. METHODS: Patients candidates to renal transplant were submitted consecutively to DASE and coronary angiography. The adopted angiographic criteria for CAD were an obstructive lesion of > 50% and > 70%. RESULTS: 148 patients underwent the DASE and the coronary angiography. Mean age was 52 ± 9 years, 69% of the patients were males; 27% had diabetic nephropathy

  3. Pharmacokinetics of IM,IV and IO Atropine in Normovolemic and Hypovolemic Swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-12

    nursing care is provided”.1 On and off the battlefield, highly specialized, well-educated nurses are managing complex injuries as integral member of...Rapid and complete bioavailability of antidotes for organophosphorus nerve agent and cyanide poisoning in minipigs after intraosseous

  4. Efficacy of antidotes (midazolam, atropine and HI-6) on nerve agent induced molecular and neuropathological changes

    OpenAIRE

    RamaRao, Golime; Afley, Prachiti; Acharya, Jyothiranjan; Bhattacharya, Bijoy Krishna

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent alleged attacks with nerve agent sarin on civilians in Syria indicate their potential threat to both civilian and military population. Acute nerve agent exposure can cause rapid death or leads to multiple and long term neurological effects. The biochemical changes that occur following nerve agent exposure needs to be elucidated to understand the mechanisms behind their long term neurological effects and to design better therapeutic drugs to block their multiple neurotoxic ef...

  5. Effect of atropine or atenolol on cardiovascular responses to novelty stress in freely-moving rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Buuse, Maarten

    2002-09-01

    Cardiac hemodynamic mechanisms involved in cardiovascular responses to stress were studied in conscious, freely-moving female spontaneously hypertensive rats exposed for 15 min to an open-field. When pretreated with saline, the rats displayed a rapid rise in blood pressure, heart rate, aortic dP/dt and locomotor activity. In rats pretreated with 0.5 mg/kg of methylatropine, the tachycardia was slightly, but significantly reduced. In rats pretreated with 1 mg/kg of atenolol, the tachycardis and rise in dP/dt were markedly reduced. These data suggest that the cardiac responses to stress include predominantly cardiac sympathetic activation and a minor component of vagal withdrawal.

  6. Anticonvulsants for Nerve Agent-Induced Seizures: The Influence of the Therapeutic Dose of Atropine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shih, Tsung-Ming; Rowland, Tami C; McDonough, John H

    2007-01-01

    Two guinea pig models were used to study the anticonvulsant potency of diazepam, midazolam, and scopolamine against seizures induced by the nerve agents tabun, sarin, soman, cyclosarin, O-ethyl S-(2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl...

  7. Equilibrium Performance Changes Produced by Atropine in M. mulatta and M. fascicularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    the behavior of one animal within each group was more severely disrupted than the others. A Student -Newman-Keuls Multiple Comparison Test (31) on the...Med 45(11):1291- 1297 (1974). 7. I)ix, M. R. Treatment of vertigo. Physiotherapy 60(12):380-384 (1974). 8. Fregly, A. R., M. J. Smith, C. D. Wood, and

  8. Reversal of neuromuscular blockade with sugammadex or neostigmine/atropine: Effect on postoperative gastrointestinal motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, A; Erdivanli, B; Tomak, Y; Pergel, A

    2016-08-01

    To compare sugammadex with conventional reversal of neuromuscular block in terms of postoperative gastrointestinal motility. Double blinded, randomized, controlled clinical trial. Operating room, postoperative recovery area. Seventy-two patients with ASA physical status I or II, scheduled for total thyroid surgery were studied. When 4 twitches were observed on train-of-four stimulation, neuromuscular block was reversed conversatively in the control group, and with sugammadex in the study group. Time to first flatus and feces, incidence of postoperative nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and constipation were collected. Median time of first flatus was 24 hours (18-32 [10-36]) in the neostigmine group, and 24 (18-28 [12-48]) in the sugammadex group (P > .05). Median (IQR) time of first feces was 24 hours (18-36 [10-48]) in neostigmine group, 32 hours (28-36 [12-72]) in sugammadex group (P > .05). There were no occurrences of nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or constipation. Sugammadex may be safely used in cases where postoperative ileus is expected. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Combined Atropine and 2-PAM Cl Effects on Tracking Performance and Visual, Physiological, and Psychological Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-01

    tracking task reveals the magnitude Akitrihm. Spare. and Environmental Medicine • December. I$ II I ANTIDOTE EFFECTS--PEN ETAR ET AL. and duration of the... marihuana on dynamic visual acu- blood pressure following the combination of 2-PAM Cl ity: I. Threshold measurements. Perception Psychophys. 1975

  10. A Comparison between the Rhesus Monkey and the Human on the Effect of Atropine on the Electroencephalogram. Volume 2. Preliminary Statistical Analysis of Spectral EEG Waveforms in Rhesus Monkeys Exposed to Atropine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-11-01

    000000 000000 000000 000000 000000 C) H rHI HHHH HHHHH - rIr- - rIr H HHHHH 1 1 l H HHHHH- rIr- -I ri - HHHHHH H E-1~~ o~o ~ N H W~r ~ ~ W~MqU) co ýH H aiI...NMlCMMH’DHOO I-NNNMNIr- I- NNNNOnMH U) toH H H z. 000000000 000000000 Cl) H HHHHHH HHHHHHqHHH H- E-4 N MWr-N H Mr- N wMn0~r-oMMN Wl MNHOMM0O’ ro m olq~w H...ý C4k 44 4 ýL 4C 00000 HHH.-4 1- HH H HHHH HHHH U) /u) co* o nvr r-IO NOHM H0(-if0 m i c4 HooD- 00 Z 0000 000000000 00000 VI) H HHHHHH HHHHH HHHH 1

  11. The effects of oxotremorine, epibatidine, atropine, mecamylamine and naloxone in the tail-flick, hot-plate, and formalin tests in the naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dulu, Thomas D; Kanui, Titus I; Towett, Philemon K

    2014-01-01

    The naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber) is a promising animal model for the study of pain mechanisms, therefore a thorough characterization of this species is essential. The aim of the present study was to establish the naked mole-rat as a model for studying the cholinergic receptor system in ...

  12. Dgroup: DG00052 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available hiatric agent ... DG01491 ... Muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonist ATC code: A03BA0... DG00052 Chemical ... DGroup Atropine ... D00113 ... Atropine (USP) D02069 ... Atropine sulfate (JP17/USP) ... Neuropsyc

  13. Belladonna Alkaloid Combinations and Phenobarbital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnatal® Elixir (as a combination product containing Atropine, Hyoscyamine, Phenobarbital, Scopolamine) ... PB Hyos® Elixir (as a combination product containing Atropine, Hyoscyamine, Phenobarbital, Scopolamine)

  14. Phénomènes neuro-inflammatoires au cours de l'état de mal épileptique induit par le soman. Correction par des combinaisons atropine-kétamine.

    OpenAIRE

    Dhote , Franck

    2010-01-01

    Epileptic seizures, status epilepticus (SE) and seizure-related brain damage (SRBD) due to organophosphorus nerve agent (OP) poisoning are accompanied by neuro-inflammatory events whose role in SRBD is not clear. Antagonists of the glutamatergic receptor NMDA, such as ketamine (KET), proved to be antiepileptic and neuroprotective even when SE is refractory to benzodiazepines 10 to 20 min after the initiation of seizures. Moreover, peripheral anti-inflammatory properties of KET have been descr...

  15. An Efficacy and Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of a Dose of Diazepam That Will Reduce the Incidence of Convulsions in Indian Rhesus Monkeys Pretreated with Pyridostigmine Bromide, Challenged with Soman, and Treated with Atropine and Pralidoxime Chloride with the Diazepam

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-01

    INOIVIDUAL 22b. TELEPKONE (Include Area Code) 22C. OFFICE SYMBOL d "- . t ,-- ian ., - - ,’ ) " :-" D0 Form 1473, JUN 86 Previous editions are obsolete...9) von Bredow, J., Jaax, N., Hayward, I., Wade, J., Maitland , G., and Kaminskis, A., "Estimate of the Lowest Dose of Diazepam Required to Treat

  16. Blood pressure lowering effect of Tylophora hirsuta wall | Ahmad ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Crude hydromethanolic extract of Tylophora hirsuta (Th.Cr) was studied in spontaneous hypertensive Wistar rats for possible effects on high blood pressure and heart rate. In the absence of atropine, fall in arterial blood pressure was 64±7 mmHg at the dose of 100 mg/kg while in the presence of atropine, there was no effect ...

  17. The effect of anti-parkinsonian drugs on chlorpromazine-induced depression of operant behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Székely, J I; Dunai-Kovács, Z; Borsy, J

    1976-01-01

    Rats were conditioned in automatic Skinner boxes on a discrete trial avoidance-escape schedule. The chlorpromazine-induced conditioned reflex inhibition could be reversed by apomorphine and amantadine, but not by atropine, trihexyphenidyl and diethazine. These findings seem to provide an additional tool for differentiating the atropine-like and dopaminergic anti-parkinsonian drugs.

  18. topics revised

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chantel

    ment of episodes involving drug overdose ... adults present special difficulties and any ... cal dependence, underlying pathology or ... taking a benzodiazepine regularly. .... Note: Over-treatment with atropine may induce atropine poisoning ..... appropriate dose should be used in order to prevent violent withdrawal symptoms.

  19. Risk assessment of buckwheat flour contaminated by thorn-apple (Datura stramonium L.) alkaloids: a case study from Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perharič, Lucija; Koželj, Gordana; Družina, Branko; Stanovnik, Lovro

    2013-01-01

    In Slovenia, a mass poisoning incident involving 73 consumers with symptoms such as dry mouth, hot red skin, blurred vision, tachycardia, urinary retention, ataxia, speech disturbance, disorientation and visual hallucinations occurred in 2003. In all cases, consumers had eaten buckwheat flour food products within the last few hours. Investigations by responsible authorities identified the contamination of a range of buckwheat food products with thorn-apple (Datura stramonium L.) seeds containing toxic alkaloids, atropine and scopolamine. To ensure the safe consumption of buckwheat food products, we carried out risk characterisation and proposed provisional maximum residue levels (MRLs) of atropine and scopolamine mixture in buckwheat flour. In the absence of critical "no observed adverse effect levels" for atropine and scopolamine, we based our estimation of the acute reference doses on the lowest recommended therapeutic doses. Taking into account the additive effect of the two alkaloids, we calculated acute reference doses of the mixture, that is 0.05 µg/kg of body mass for atropine and 0.03 µg/kg of body mass for scopolamine. MRLs for atropine and scopolamine mixture in buckwheat flour were estimated in a worst-case scenario, that is consumption of 100 g of flour by a child weighing 10 kg and taking into account a range of atropine/scopolamine ratio in implicated food products, that is 0.85-3.3. We proposed the national MRLs for atropine/scopolamine mixture in buckwheat food products: 4.0 µg/kg (atropine) and 2.0 µg/kg(scopolamine). However, in view of the large variability in the alkaloid content, depending on the origin of the Datura, we propose that risk assessment should be carried out on a case-by-case basis, taking into account the ratio between atropine and scopolamine content in a particular sample.

  20. Sedation of Pediatric Patients in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ricks, Alesia

    2000-01-01

    .... The purpose of this study was to explore the combination sedative of ketamine, midazolam, and atropine administered intramuscularly and determine if it is safe and effective for pediatric patients...

  1. Drug: D08653 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Neuropsychiatric agent ... DG01745 ... Anticholinergic antiparkinson agent ... DG01967 ... Antiparkinson agent ... DG01745 ... Anticholinergic antipar...kinson agent ATC code: N04AA12 Chemical group: DG00858 ... Atropine [CPD:C01479] deri

  2. Untitled

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Committee for Clini- cal Laboratory Standards (Bauer et al., 1966; CLSI, 2012) protocol was used ..... Atropine in Different Parts of Datura metel during Development, Planta. Med., ... In: Dawit Abebe (Ed), Proceedings of the workshop on De-.

  3. The role of protein kinase-G in the antidepressant-like response of sildenafil in combination with muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liebenberg, Nico; Wegener, Gregers; Brink, Christiaan

    not affect swimming or climbing. Lastly, locomotor activity was unaltered by all treatment conditions. Conclusions These results confirm cholinergic-cGMP-PK-G interactions in the antidepressant-like effects of sildenafil, putatively acting via noradrenergic mechanisms, whereas direct PK-G activation induces...... the antidepressant-like activity of sildenafil + atropine is mediated via the activation of PK-G, a downstream effector for cGMP, and whether this may target known pathways in antidepressant action. Purpose We investigated whether the antidepressant-like response of sildenafil ± atropine could be reversed by Rp-8-Br.......c.v.) ± atropine (1 mg/kg, i.p.), Rp-8-Br-PET-cGMP or atropine. Antidepressant-like activity was scored in terms of a reduction of immobility (in seconds) relative to vehicle-treated controls. Swimming and climbing behaviours were scored as an indication of serotonergic and noradrenergic mechanisms, respectively...

  4. Effect of autonomic blocking agents and structurally related substances on the “salt arousal of drinking”

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wied, D. de

    The effect of autonomic blocking agents and structurally related substances was studied in rats in which thirst was produced by the administration of a hypertonic sodium chloride solution. Scopolamine, methamphetamine, amphetamine, chlorpromazine, atropine, mecamylamine, hexamethonium, nethalide,

  5. Differential anti-ischaemic effects of muscarinic receptor blockade in patients with obstructive coronary artery disease; impaired vs normal left ventricular function.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.F. van den Heuvel; D.J. van Veldhuisen (Dirk); G.L. Bartels; M. van der Ent (Martin); W.J. Remme (Willem)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractAIMS: In patients with coronary artery disease acetylcholine (a muscarinic agonist) causes vasoconstriction. The effect of atropine (a muscarinic antagonist) on coronary vasotone in patients with normal or impaired left ventricular function is unknown.

  6. New generic approach to the treatment of organophosphate poisoning : Adenosine receptor mediated inhibition of ACh-release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Helden, HPM; Moor, E; Westerink, BHC; Bruijnzeel, PLB

    1998-01-01

    Current treatment of acute organophosphate (OP) poisoning includes a combined administration of a cholinesterase reactivator (oxime), a muscarinic receptor antagonist (atropine) and an anticonvulsant (diazepam). This treatment is not adequate since it does not prevent neuronal brain damage and

  7. New generic approach to the treatment of organophosphate poisoning: Adenosine receptor mediated inhibition of ACh-release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helden, H.P.M. van; Groen, B.; Moor, E.; Westerink, B.H.C.; Bruijnzeel, P.L.B.

    1998-01-01

    Current treatment of acute organophosphate (OP) poisoning includes a combined administration of a cholinesterase reactivator (oxime), a muscarinic receptor antagonist (atropine) and an anticonvulsant (diazepam). This treatment is not adequate since it does not prevent neuronal brain damage and

  8. An olfactory ‘stress test’ may detect preclinical Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schofield Peter W

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The olfactory bulb (OB receives extensive cholinergic input from the basal forebrain and is affected very early in Alzheimer’s disease (AD. We speculated that an olfactory ‘stress test’ (OST, targeting the OB, might be used to unmask incipient AD. We investigated if change in olfactory performance following intranasal atropine was associated with several known antecedents or biomarkers of AD. Methods We measured change in performance on the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT in the left nostril before (20-items and after (remaining 20-items intranasal administration of 1 mg of atropine. We administered cognitive tests, measured hippocampal volume from MRI scans and recorded Apolipoprotein E genotype as indices relevant to underlying AD. Results In a convenience sample of 56 elderly individuals (14 probable AD, 13 cognitive impairment no dementia, 29 cognitively intact the change in UPSIT score after atropine (‘atropine effect’ = AE correlated significantly with demographically scaled episodic memory score (r = 0.57, p Conclusions The OST using atropine as an olfactory probe holds promise as a simple, inexpensive screen for early and preclinical AD and further work, including longitudinal studies, is needed to explore this possibility.

  9. Electroacupuncture at Zusanli Prevents Severe Scalds-Induced Gut Ischemia and Paralysis by Activating the Cholinergic Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe burn injuries may result in gastrointestinal paralysis, and barrier dysfunction due to gut ischemia and lowered vagus excitability. In this study we investigate whether electroacupuncture (EA at Zusanli (ST36 could prevent severe scalds-induced gut ischemia, paralysis, and barrier dysfunction and whether the protective role of EA at ST36 is related to the vagus nerve. 35% burn area rats were divided into six groups: (a EAN: EA nonchannel acupoints followed by scald injury; (b EA: EA at ST36 after scald injury; (c VGX/EA: vagotomy (VGX before EA at ST36 and scald injury; (d VGX/EAN: VGX before EAN and scald injury; (e atropine/EA: applying atropine before scald injury and then EA at ST36; (f atropine/EAN: applying atropine before scald injury and then EA at nonchannel acupoints. EA at the Zusanli point significantly promoted the intestinal impelling ratio and increased the amount of mucosal blood flow after scald injury. The plasma diamine oxidase (DAO and intestinal permeability decreased significantly after scald injury in the EA group compared with others. However, EA after atropine injection or cervical vagotomy failed to improve intestinal motility and mucosa blood flow suggesting that the mechanism of EA may be related to the activation of the cholinergic nerve pathway.

  10. Effect of ionizing radiation on advanced life support medications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, D.J.; Hubbard, L.B.; Broadbent, M.V.; Stewart, P.; Jaeger, M.

    1987-01-01

    Advanced life support medications stored in emergency department stretcher areas, diagnostic radiology rooms, and radiotherapy suites are exposed to ionizing radiation. We hypothesized that radiation may decrease the potency and thus the shelf life of medications stored in these areas. Atropine, dopamine, epinephrine, and isoproterenol were exposed to a wide range of ionizing radiation. The potency of the four drugs was unaffected by levels of radiation found in ED stretcher areas and high-volume diagnostic radiograph rooms (eg, chest radiograph, computed tomography, fluoroscopy). The potency of atropine may be reduced by gamma radiation in high-use radiotherapy suites. However, dopamine, epinephrine, and isoproterenol were unaffected by high doses of gamma radiation. Atropine, dopamine, epinephrine, and isoproterenol may be safely kept in ED stretcher areas and diagnostic radiology rooms without loss of potency over the shelf life of the drugs

  11. Medical countermeasure against respiratory toxicity and acute lung injury following inhalation exposure to chemical warfare nerve agent VX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nambiar, Madhusoodana P.; Gordon, Richard K.; Rezk, Peter E.; Katos, Alexander M.; Wajda, Nikolai A.; Moran, Theodore S.; Steele, Keith E.; Doctor, Bhupendra P.; Sciuto, Alfred M.

    2007-01-01

    To develop therapeutics against lung injury and respiratory toxicity following nerve agent VX exposure, we evaluated the protective efficacy of a number of potential pulmonary therapeutics. Guinea pigs were exposed to 27.03 mg/m 3 of VX or saline using a microinstillation inhalation exposure technique for 4 min and then the toxicity was assessed. Exposure to this dose of VX resulted in a 24-h survival rate of 52%. There was a significant increase in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) protein, total cell number, and cell death. Surprisingly, direct pulmonary treatment with surfactant, liquivent, N-acetylcysteine, dexamethasone, or anti-sense syk oligonucleotides 2 min post-exposure did not significantly increase the survival rate of VX-exposed guinea pigs. Further blocking the nostrils, airway, and bronchioles, VX-induced viscous mucous secretions were exacerbated by these aerosolized treatments. To overcome these events, we developed a strategy to protect the animals by treatment with atropine. Atropine inhibits muscarinic stimulation and markedly reduces the copious airway secretion following nerve agent exposure. Indeed, post-exposure treatment with atropine methyl bromide, which does not cross the blood-brain barrier, resulted in 100% survival of VX-exposed animals. Bronchoalveolar lavage from VX-exposed and atropine-treated animals exhibited lower protein levels, cell number, and cell death compared to VX-exposed controls, indicating less lung injury. When pulmonary therapeutics were combined with atropine, significant protection to VX-exposure was observed. These results indicate that combinations of pulmonary therapeutics with atropine or drugs that inhibit mucous secretion are important for the treatment of respiratory toxicity and lung injury following VX exposure

  12. Effect of some drugs on radioprotective effectiveness, toxicity and distribution of 35S-Aminopropyl-aminoethyl-thiophosphate orally administered to mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grechka, I.I.; Belavina, L.P.; Kalistpatov, G.V.; Zherebchenko, P.G.

    1979-01-01

    Studied was the influence of adreno- adn cholinolytics and cholinomimetic substances on radioprotective effectiveness and toxicity of aminopropyl-aminoehtyl-thiophosphate (APAETP) and distribution thereof among organs after oral and intraperitoneal administration. Atropine and INPEA decrease the toxicity and radioprotectiVe efficiency of APAETP when administered orally and do not influence these properties after intraperitoneal in ection. Deposition of the labelled radioprotector within the organs after oral administration is also indicative that atropine and INPEA can delay the transfer of APAETP from the stomach to the intenstine

  13. The relationship between respiratory sinus arrhythmia and heart rate during anesthesia in rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moldovan, M; Spulber, S; Saravan, V

    2004-01-01

    rats, slowing of HR is associated with an increase in HF. The aim of this study was to investigate whether this relationship between HF and HR is preserved during anesthesia in rat. A 15 minutes long ECG signal was recorded from rats (N=15) under moderate chloral hydrate (CHL) anesthesia. Recordings......) the decrease in HR that occurs during CHL anesthesia in rat correlates with an increase in RSA; (2) atropine reduces RSA and the time-dependent decrease in HR; (3) the time-dependent increase in RSA is preserved after atropine. We conclude that the correlation between RSA and HR reflects the cardio...

  14. Central Anticholinergic Syndrome due to Hypoxia-Induced Bradycardia in a Child with Difficult Intubation Undergoing Complete Dental Restoration: A Case Report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Gharavifard

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Central anticholinergic syndrome (CAS following general anesthesia (GA is a well known syndrome in children and adults. Many cases of CAS have been previously reported in the literature. However, there are only two reports of post resuscitation CAS after administration of small doses of atropine. Hereby, we report a case of CAS in a child undergoing complete dental restoration under GA after receiving a small dose of atropine to reverse hypoxia induced bradycardia. Intraoperative events such as hypoxia or cardiac arrest may play a role as triggers for CAS. However, we cannot establish a causal relationship between the occurrence of CAS and such critical events.

  15. Central Anticholinergic Syndrome due to Hypoxia-Induced Bradycardia in a Child with Difficult Intubation Undergoing Complete Dental Restoration: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharavifard, Mohamad; Razavi, Majid; Ghandehari Motlagh, Mehdi; Ziyaeifard, Mohsen

    2014-09-01

    Central anticholinergic syndrome (CAS) following general anesthesia (GA) is a well known syndrome in children and adults. Many cases of CAS have been previously reported in the literature. However, there are only two reports of post resuscitation CAS after administration of small doses of atropine. Hereby, we report a case of CAS in a child undergoing complete dental restoration under GA after receiving a small dose of atropine to reverse hypoxia induced bradycardia. Intraoperative events such as hypoxia or cardiac arrest may play a role as triggers for CAS. However, we cannot establish a causal relationship between the occurrence of CAS and such critical events.

  16. A comparison of the neuroprotective efficacy of individual oxime (HI-6) and combinations of oximes (HI-6+trimedoxime, HI-6+K203) in soman-poisoned rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassa, Jiri; Karasova, Jana Zdarova; Tesarova, Sandra

    2011-07-01

    The ability of two combinations of oximes (HI-6+trimedoxime, HI-6+K203) to reduce soman-induced acute neurotoxic signs and symptoms was compared with the neuroprotective efficacy of the oxime HI-6 alone, using a functional observational battery. Soman-induced neurotoxicity and the neuroprotective effects of HI-6 alone and HI-6 combined with trimedoxime or K203 in rats poisoned with soman at a sublethal dose (90 μg/kg intramuscularly, i.m.; 80% of LD₅₀ value) were monitored by the functional observational battery at 24 hours following soman administration. The results indicate that both tested oxime mixtures combined with atropine were able to allow soman-poisoned rats to survive 24 hours following soman challenge, while 4 nontreated soman-poisoned rats and 1 soman-poisoned rat treated with oxime HI-6 alone combined with atropine died within 24 hours following soman poisoning. While the oxime HI-6 alone combined with atropine treatment was able to eliminate a few soman-induced neurotoxic signs and symptoms, both oxime mixtures showed higher neuroprotective efficacy in soman-poisoned rats. Especially, the combination of HI-6 with trimedoxime was able to eliminate most soman-induced neurotoxic signs and symptoms and markedly reduce acute neurotoxicity of soman in rats. Thus, both tested mixtures of oximes combined with atropine were able to increase the neuroprotective effectiveness of antidotal treatment of acute soman poisonings, compared to the individual oxime.

  17. Development of the OMPAT Neuropsychological/Psychomotor Performance Evaluation and OMPAT Data and Timing Support Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-12-31

    of Kinesiology , Louisiana State University. University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY. Dr. M.B. Sterman, Sepulveda, CA. Veterans...dependent effects of atropine on behavioral and physiologic responses in humans. Pharmacology. Biochemistry , & Behavior, 34, 303-311. 33 1 4 , 4 0

  18. Clinical and laboratory findings in mad honey poisoning: A single ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the evaluation of the patients' heart rhythms on admission to the emergency room, nine (56.3%) patients had sinus bradycardia, three (18.8%) patients had nodal rhythm, two (12.5%) patients had first degree atrioventricular block, and two (12.5%) patients had atrial fibrillation. Atropine 1.1 ± 0.4 mg and saline 1125 ± 465 ...

  19. Changes in intraocular pressure and horizontal pupil diameter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of topical 0.5% tropicamide, 1% atropine sulphate and 10% phenylephrine hydrochloride ophthalmic solutions on intraocular pressure (IOP) and horizontal pupil diameter (HPD) in the dog during the first hour after treatment. Forty clinically and ophthalmologically ...

  20. Anaestesia for high dose-rate after-loading treatment for carcinoma of the uterus. Chapter 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, M.R.

    1980-01-01

    Details of the method of anaesthesia used in patients receiving regular Cathetron treatment for carcinoma of the cervix are given. The drugs used for premedication are prochlorperazine, pethidine and atropine and for induction are prochlorperazine, diazepam, phenoperidine and thiopentone. The advantages of using these particular drugs compared to others generally used are discussed. (U.K.)

  1. The progressive onset of cholinergic and adrenergic control of heart rate during development in the green iguana, Iguana iguana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, Marina R; Leite, Cleo A C; Abe, Augusto S; Crossley, Dane A; Taylor, Edwin W

    2015-10-01

    The autonomic control of heart rate was studied throughout development in embryos of the green iguana, Iguana iguana by applying receptor agonists and antagonists of the parasympathetic and sympathetic systems. Acetylcholine (Ach) slowed or stopped the heart and atropine antagonized the response to Ach indicating the presence of muscarinic cholinoceptors on the heart of early embryos. However, atropine injections had no impact on heart rate until immediately before hatching, when it increased heart rate by 15%. This cholinergic tonus increased to 34% in hatchlings and dropped to 24% in adult iguanas. Although epinephrine was without effect, injection of propranolol slowed the heart throughout development, indicating the presence of β-adrenergic receptors on the heart of early embryos, possibly stimulated by high levels of circulating catecholamines. The calculated excitatory tonus varied between 33% and 68% until immediately before hatching when it fell to 25% and 29%, a level retained in hatchlings and adults. Hypoxia caused a bradycardia in early embryos that was unaffected by injection of atropine indicating that hypoxia has a direct effect upon the heart. In later embryos and hatchlings hypoxia caused a tachycardia that was unaffected by injection of atropine. Subsequent injection of propranolol reduced heart rate both uncovering a hypoxic bradycardia in late embryos and abolishing tachycardia in hatchlings. Hypercapnia was without effect on heart rate in late stage embryos and in hatchlings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of Chloramphenicol Pretreatment on Xylazine/ketamine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keyword: Chloramphenicol, xylazine, ketamine, anaesthesia, cats. The effect of pretreatment with a single intramuscular (im) dose of chloramphenicol (10mg/kg) on the anaethesia induced with im injection of ketamine (25mg/kg) was investigated in five cats premedicated with im xylazine (1.0mg/kg) and atropine ...

  3. The effects and mechanism of action of methane on ileal motor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Y M; Lee, Y J; Hussain, Z; Lee, Y H; Park, H

    2017-09-01

    Methane has been associated with constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome, slowing intestinal transit time by augmenting contractile activity. However, the precise mechanism underlying this effect remains unclear. Therefore, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the effect of methane on contractile activity, and whether such effects are mediated by nerve impulses or muscular contraction. We connected guinea pig ileal muscle strips to a force/tension transducer and measured amplitudes of contraction in response to electrical field stimulation (EFS; 1, 2, 8, 16 Hz) following methane infusion in the presence of tetradotoxin (TTX), atropine, guanethidine, or GR 113808. We then performed calcium imaging using Oregon Green 488 BAPTA-1 AM in order to visualize changes in calcium fluorescence in response to EFS following methane infusion in the presence of TTX, atropine, or a high K + solution. Methane significantly increased amplitudes of contraction (PMethane-induced increases in amplitude were inhibited when lower-frequency (1, 2 Hz) EFS was applied following atropine infusion (PMethane significantly increased calcium fluorescence, while this increase was attenuated following atropine infusion (Pmethane infusion. The actions of methane on the intestine are influenced by the cholinergic pathway of the enteric nervous system. Our findings support the classification of methane as a gasotransmitter. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. 2018-02-23T16:28:52Z https://www.ajol.info/index.php/all/oai oai:ojs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    article/82071 2018-02-23T16:28:52Z pamj:ART Case Report - Atropa Belladonna intoxication: A case report Berdai, MA Labib, S Chetouani, K Harandou, M Intoxication, atropa belladonna, child, anticholinergic toxidrome, atropine Atropa ...

  5. The A- and B-type muscarinic acetylcholine receptors from Drosophila melanogaster couple to different second messenger pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Guilin Robin; Folke, Jonas; Hauser, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that are activated by the agonists acetylcholine and muscarine and blocked by several antagonists, among them atropine. In mammals five mAChRs (m1-m5) exist of which m1, m3, and m5 are coupled to members of the Gq...

  6. 21 CFR 1308.15 - Schedule V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Schedule V. 1308.15 Section 1308.15 Food and Drugs... not less than 25 micrograms of atropine sulfate per dosage unit. (d) Stimulants. Unless specifically... which contains any quantity of the following substances having a stimulant effect on the central nervous...

  7. Mechanisms of carbacholine and GABA action on resting membrane potential and Na+/K+-ATPase of Lumbricus terrestris body wall muscles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Volkov, E. M.; Nurullin, L. F.; Volkov, M. E.; Nikolsky, E. E.; Vyskočil, František

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 158, č. 4 (2011), s. 520-524 ISSN 1095-6433 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110905; GA ČR GA202/09/0806 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : GABA * acetylcholine * atropine Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.235, year: 2011

  8. A Structure-Activity Analysis of the Variation in Oxime Efficacy Against Nerve Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    cyclosarin. Analysis of in vivo oxime protection was conducted with oxime protective ratios (PR) from guinea pigs receiving oxime and atropine therapy ...in our study confirmed previous assessments that oxime protection varies drama - tically against different military nerve agents (Aas, 2003; Dawson... therapy ofacutepoisonings inducedbyanti-cholinesterase neuroparalytic substances. In:Monov, A., Dishovsky, C. (Eds.), Medical Aspects of Chemical and

  9. PHYSIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY OF THE BROWN ADIPOSE TISSUE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies were performed to clarify the influence of various factors which might be involved in vascular regulation. Topical application of lidocain ...and treatment with reserpine effectively blocked, while denervation of brown fat, syrosingopine and atropine were ineffective to prevent the blood flow

  10. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Olayaki, L.A.. Vol 11, No 5 (2017) - Articles Atropine exposure in adolescence predispose to adult memory loss in Wistar rats. Abstract PDF. ISSN: 1997-342X. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions ...

  11. 4R-cembranoid protects against diisopropylfluorophosphate-mediated neurodegeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Ferchmin, P.A.; Andino, Myrna; Salaman, Rebeca Reyes; Alves, Janaina; Velez-Roman, Joyce; Cuadrado, Brenda; Carrasco, Marimeé; Torres-Rivera, Wilmarie; Segarra, Annabell; Martins, Antonio Henrique; Lee, Jae Eun; Eterovic, Vesna A.

    2014-01-01

    Many organophosphorous esters synthesized for applications in industry, agriculture, or warfare irreversibly inhibit acetylcholinesterase, and acute poisoning with these compounds causes life-threatening cholinergic overstimulation. Following classical emergency treatment with atropine, an oxime, and a benzodiazepine, surviving victims often suffer brain neurodegeneration. Currently, there is no pharmacological treatment to prevent this brain injury. Here we show that a cyclic diterpenoid, (1...

  12. Seizures triggered by food intake in antimuscarinic-treated fasted animals: evaluation of the experimental findings in terms of similarities to eating-triggered epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enginar, Nurhan; Nurten, Asiye

    2010-07-01

    Food intake triggers convulsions in fasted mice and rats treated with antimuscarinic drugs, scopolamine or atropine. Bearing some similarities in triggering factor and manifestations of the seizures in patients with eating-evoked epilepsy, seizures in fasted animals may provide insight into the mechanism(s) of this rare and partially controlled form of reflex epilepsy.

  13. Pharmacological Studies of p, N-(3, 4-Methylenedioxy phenyl Benzoic Acid (RRL-1364 - Part-I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahanukar Sharadini

    1978-01-01

    Full Text Available Detailed pharmacological investigations of p-N-(3, 4-methylene dioxy phenyl benzoic acid revealed marked hypotensive action which was dose dependent and most marked in cats; it was absent in rats. Atropine could block this hypotensive action, thus suggest-ing cholinomimetic mechanism. Further studies indicated that the hypotension produced was central and possibly medullary in origin.

  14. Daffodil toxicosis in an adult cat

    OpenAIRE

    Saxon-Buri, Sharon

    2004-01-01

    A domestic longhair cat with a 3-day history of lethargy and vomiting after ingesting dried daffodil stems (Narcissus spp.) was severely hypothermic (33.0°C), with bradycardia (78 beats/min) and hypotension. Treatment with atropine, dexamethasone, fluid therapy, and supportive care resulted in a complete recovery by 6 days after exposure.

  15. Effect of aqueous leaf extract of tridax procumbens on blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    extract- 3mg/Kg did not cause any significant change in the heart rate. The hypotensive and the bradycardiac effects were immediate. The hypotensive effect of Tridax procumbens was inhibited by the pretreatment of the animal with atropine sulfate (1mg/kg). These results therefore seem to support the claim that the leaves ...

  16. Untitled

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    history of haloes around light or redness of his eyes. There was a positive history of traditional eye medication. ... to light (but they were very difficult to dilate with cyclopentolate 1% and phenylephrine 10% or atropine ... Refraction was not possible because of the cataracts. The formation of the small spherical lens is due to.

  17. NIGERIA: Report of a Case that Presented

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    history of haloes around light or redness of his eyes. There was a positive history of traditional eye medication. ... to light (but they were very difficult to dilate with cyclopentolate 1% and phenylephrine 10% or atropine ... may have been myopic; his vision was worse for distance. Refraction was not possible because of the.

  18. In vivo Evaluation Of Antidiarrhoeal Activity Of Rhus semialata Fruit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results indicated that the methanol extract of the fruits of R. semialata possesses significant anti-diarrhoeal effect and substantiated the use of this herbal remedy as a non-specific treatment for diarrhoea in folk medicine. Keywords: Atropin sulphate, Castor oil, Diarrhoea, Diphenoxylate, Rhus semialata. African Journal ...

  19. How to effectively manage myopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Ann Yi-Chiun

    2017-01-01

    Myopia has become epidemic in the world. Without effective control, the progression may lead to excessive myopia with severe complications affecting vision and ocular alignment. The genetic factors and environmental factors of myopia are closely interrelated to each other. Asian ethnicity and parental myopia, among other genetic factors, influence the refractive outcome dramatically when environmental risk factors such as hours of near work and reading distance are analyzed. Outdoor activities are protective measures that retard myopia progression. Total time under the sun and not the specific outdoor activities are contributing factors. Current effective treatments for myopia include atropine of high, moderate, and low doses, relative peripheral myopia-inducing devices, and bifocal spectacles including prism bifocal spectacle lenses. Although atropine is considered highly effective in randomized controlled trials, it is not well tolerated in a clinical setting, especially in high dosage. Since the severity of rebound effect of atropine after cessation of usage and the side effects are directly related to the concentration of the medication, it is recommended that low-dose atropine is used in the initial attempt. Higher concentration for better control can be considered when compliance is observed. Devices that induce relative peripheral myopia such as orthokeratology are moderately effective interventions that are well accepted by children who wish to be spectacle free. Bifocal spectacles generally have low effect in myopia control. Prism bifocal spectacle lenses may have a special niche in myopia retardation for patients with low lags of accommodation.

  20. Dharmalingam et al., Afr J Tradit Complement Altern Med. (2014) 11 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cadewumi

    Abstract. Background: The present study aimed at investigating the effect of ethanolic extract (EtAI), and aqueous extract (AqAI) of Aristolochia indica. Linn roots on castor .... EtAI extract and atropine sulphate (100µg/kg), decreased the propulsion of the charcoal meal through the gastrointestinal tract when compared with the ...

  1. Drug: D03223 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D03223 Crude ... Drug Belladonna leaf (USP) Hyoscyamine [CPD:C02046], Atropine [CP...D:C01479], Norhyoscyamine [CPD:C10862], Scopolamine [CPD:C01851] ... Atropa belladonna [TAX:33113] ... Same as:... E00229 ATC code: A03BA04 Chemical group: DG00054 ... Solanaceae (nightshade family) Belladonna leaf ... PubChem: 17397376 ...

  2. Environ: E00010 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available E00010 Belladonna root (JP17) Crude drug Hyoscyamine [CPD:C02046], Atropine [CPD:C...01479], Norhyoscyamine [CPD:C10862], Scopolamine [CPD:C01851] Atropa belladonna [TAX:33113] Same as: D03224 ...Solanaceae (nightshade family) Belladonna root Major component: Hyoscyamine [DR:D00147] CAS: 8007-93-0

  3. Environ: E00229 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available E00229 Belladonna leaf (USP) Crude drug Hyoscyamine [CPD:C02046], Atropine [CPD:C0...1479], Norhyoscyamine [CPD:C10862], Scopolamine [CPD:C01851] Atropa belladonna [TAX:33113] Same as: D03223 Solanaceae (nightshade family) Belladonna leaf ...

  4. Drug: D03069 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D03069 Crude ... Drug Belladonna (USP); Belladonna extract (JP17) Hyoscyamine [CPD...:C02046], Atropine [CPD:C01479], Norhyoscyamine [CPD:C10862], Scopolamine [CPD:C01851] ... Atropa belladonna... [TAX:33113] ... Same as: E00008 ATC code: A03BA04 Chemical group: DG00054 ... Solanaceae (nightshade family) Belladon

  5. Environ: E00008 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available E00008 Belladonna extract (JP17) Belladonna (USP) Crude drug Hyoscyamine [CPD:C020...46], Atropine [CPD:C01479], Norhyoscyamine [CPD:C10862], Scopolamine [CPD:C01851] Atropa belladonna [TAX:331...13] Same as: D03069 Solanaceae (nightshade family) Belladonna root extract Major component: Hyoscyamine [DR:D00147] CAS: 8007-93-0

  6. Answers for Case Report 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Organophosphate poisoning. lb. Mechanical ventilation and intravenow atropine. Ie. Exposure to rat poison. On the day of adDussion the patient had handled rat poison and had presumably ingested the op compound from his unwashed hands while eating. Organophosphorus poisoning. Dr Dermot Maher MA, MRCP, DTM ...

  7. Paediatric organophosphate poisoning - a rural hospital experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To document the presentation and course of organophosphate poisoning (OPP) in children and to record the frequency of atropine toxicity during treatment. Design. A retrospective observational study was conducted of all recorded paediatric cases of OPP admitted to a regional hospital over a 5-year period from ...

  8. Acute Organophosphate Poisonings: Therapeutic Dilemmas and New Potential Therapeutic Agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vucinic, S.; Jovanovic, D.; Vucinic, Z.; Todorovic, V.; Segrt, Z.

    2007-01-01

    It has been six decades since synthesis of organophosphates, but this chapter has not yet come to a closure. Toxic effects of organophosphates are well known and the current therapeutic scheme includes supportive therapy and antidotes. There is a dilemma on whether and when to apply gastric lavage and activated charcoal. According to Position Statement (by EAPCCT) it should be applied only if the patient presents within one hour of ingestion, with potentially lethal ingested dose. Atropine, a competitive antagonist of acetylcholine at m-receptors, which antagonizes bronchosecretion and bronchoconstriction, is the corner stone of acute organophosphate poisoning therapy. There were many attempts to find a more efficient drug, including glycopyrrolate which has been used even in clinical trials, but it still can not replace atropine. The only dilemma about atropine usage which still exists, concerns usage of high atropine dose and scheme of application. The most efficient atropinization is achieved with bolus doses of 1-2mg of atropine i.v push, with repeating the dose on each 5 minutes until signs of atropinization are registered. Diazepam, with its GABA stabilizing effect, reduces central nervous system damage and central respiratory weakness. Oximes reactivate phosphorylated acetylcholinesterase, which still has not gone ageing, reducing acetylcholine concentration and cholinergic crisis. These effects are clearly demonstrated in experimental conditions, but the clinical significance of oximes is still unclear and there are still those who question oxime therapy. For those who approve it, oxime dosage, duration of therapy, the choice of oxime for certain OP is still an open issue. We need new, more efficient antidotes, and those that are in use are only the small part of the therapy which could be used. Experimental studies show favorable therapeutic effect of many agents, but none of them has been introduced in standard treatment of OPI poisoning in the last 30

  9. Branchial CO(2) receptors and cardiorespiratory adjustments during hypercarbia in Pacific spiny dogfish (Squalus acanthias).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKendry, J E; Milsom, W K; Perry, S F

    2001-04-01

    Adult Pacific spiny dogfish (Squalus acanthias) were exposed to acute (approximately 20 min) hypercarbia while we monitored arterial blood pressure, systemic vascular resistance (R(S)), cardiac output (V(b)) and frequency (fh) as well as ventilatory amplitude (V(AMP)) and frequency (f(V)). Separate series of experiments were conducted on control, atropinized (100 nmol kg(-1)) and branchially denervated fish to investigate putative CO(2)-chemoreceptive sites on the gills and their link to the autonomic nervous system and cardiorespiratory reflexes.In untreated fish, moderate hypercarbia (water CO(2 )partial pressure; Pw(CO2)=6.4+/-0.1 mmHg) (1 mmHg=0.133 kPa) elicited significant increases in V(AMP) (of approximately 92 %) and f(V) (of approximately 18 %) as well as decreases in fh (of approximately 64 %), V.(b) (approximately 29 %) and arterial blood pressure (of approximately 11 %); R(S) did not change significantly. Denervation of the branchial branches of cranial nerves IX and X to the pseudobranch and each gill arch eliminated all cardiorespiratory responses to hypercarbia. Prior administration of the muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine also abolished the hypercarbia-induced ventilatory responses and virtually eliminated all CO(2)-elicited cardiovascular adjustments. Although the atropinized dogfish displayed a hypercarbic bradycardia, the magnitude of the response was significantly attenuated (36+/-6 % decrease in fh in controls versus 9+/-2 % decrease in atropinized fish; means +/- s.e.m.).Thus, the results of the present study reveal the presence of gill CO(2) chemoreceptors in dogfish that are linked to numerous cardiorespiratory reflexes. In addition, because all cardiorespiratory responses to hypercarbia were abolished or attenuated by atropine, the CO(2) chemoreception process and/or one or more downstream elements probably involve cholinergic (muscarinic) neurotransmission.

  10. Utility of 2-Pyridine Aldoxime Methyl Chloride (2-PAM) for Acute Organophosphate Poisoning: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenberg, Adam; Benabbas, Roshanak; deSouza, Ian S; Conigliaro, Alyssa; Paladino, Lorenzo; Warman, Elliot; Sinert, Richard; Wiener, Sage W

    2018-03-01

    Organophosphates (OP) account for the majority of pesticide-related unintentional or intentional poisonings in lower- and middle-income countries. The therapeutic role of atropine is well-established for patients with acute OP poisoning. The benefit of adding 2-pyridine aldoxime methyl chloride (2-PAM), however, is controversial. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of available randomized controlled trials (RCT) to compare 2-PAM plus atropine in comparison to atropine alone for acute OP poisoning. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, and SCOPUS up to March 2017. The Cochrane review handbook was used to assess the risk of bias. Data were abstracted and risk ratios (RR) were calculated for mortality, rate of intubation, duration of intubation, intermediate syndrome, and complications such as hospital-acquired infections, dysrhythmias, and pulmonary edema. We found five studies comprising 586 patients with varying risks of bias. The risk of death (RR = 1.5, 95% CI 0.9-2.5); intubation (RR = 1.3, 95% CI 1.0-1.6); intermediate syndrome (RR = 1.6, 95% CI 1.0-2.6); complications (RR = 1.2, 95% CI 0.8-1.8); and the duration of intubation (mean difference 0.0, 95% CI - 1.6-1.6) were not significantly different between the atropine plus 2-PAM and atropine alone. Based on our meta-analysis of the available RCTs, 2-PAM was not shown to improve outcomes in patients with acute OP poisoning.

  11. Intraocular pressure monitoring by rebound tonometry in children with myopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Jenchieh; Tsai, I-Lun; Kuo, Li-Lin; Tsai, Ching-Yao; Woung, Lin-Chung; Hsiao, Ya-Chuan

    2017-01-01

    Topical atropine treatment is generally accepted to retard the progression of myopia, but it is associated with side effects such as photophobia and elevation of intraocular pressure (IOP). IOP measurements in children are challenging. The traditional applanation tonometry by direct contact with the cornea will require patient's cooperation. The rebound tonometer, using a dynamic electromechanical method for measuring IOP, shows good correlation with traditional tonometry. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the IOP of myopic children under atropine treatment using rebound tonometer and to compare the characteristics between rebound tonometry and applanation tonometry. This study is a prospective study measuring IOP by rebound tonometer in myopic children under regular low-dose atropine treatment. We recruited children with refraction error showing myopia over -0.5 D with 0.15%, 0.3%, or 0.5% atropine eye drops use every night or every other night for myopia control. Children with treatment duration of atropine tonometer (Tono-Pen XL, Reichert) and rebound tonometer (ICARE). The reliability of rebound tonometer was analyzed with percentage. Comparison of IOP between rebound tonometer and applanation tonometry was presented. The rebound tonometry was well tolerated by all participants and caused no complaints, discomfort, or adverse events. Totally 42 myopic eyes of 42 subjects were included in the study. The average age of these participants was 10 years old, range from 5 to 16. Median = 10 years old. The average IOP of the right eye by rebound tonometer was 17.4 ± 3 mmHg, and 17.1 ± 3 mmHg by applanation tonometry. Nearly 19%, 33%, and 24% of difference of IOP readings between rebound tonometer and Tono-Pen applanation are within 0 mmHg, 1 mmHg, and 1-2 mmHg, respectively. Rebound tonometry has good correlation with applanation tonometry and 76.1% of differences between two tonometers are <2 mmHg. The advantage of drop-free rebound tonometry has made it

  12. Controlling myopia progression in children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith MJ

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Molly J Smith, Jeffrey J WallineThe Ohio State University College of Optometry, Columbus, OH, USAAbstract: Myopia is a common disorder, affecting approximately one-third of the US population and over 90% of the population in some East Asian countries. High amounts of myopia are associated with an increased risk of sight-threatening problems, such as retinal detachment, choroidal degeneration, cataracts, and glaucoma. Slowing the progression of myopia could potentially benefit millions of children in the USA. To date, few strategies used for myopia control have proven to be effective. Treatment options such as undercorrection of myopia, gas permeable contact lenses, and bifocal or multifocal spectacles have all been proven to be ineffective for myopia control, although one recent randomized clinical trial using executive top bifocal spectacles on children with progressive myopia has shown to decrease the progression to nearly half of the control subjects. The most effective methods are the use of orthokeratology contact lenses, soft bifocal contact lenses, and topical pharmaceutical agents such as atropine or pirenzepine. Although none of these modalities are US Food and Drug Administration-approved to slow myopia progression, they have been shown to slow the progression by approximately 50% with few risks. Both orthokeratology and soft bifocal contact lenses have shown to slow myopia progression by slightly less than 50% in most studies. Parents and eye care practitioners should work together to determine which modality may be best suited for a particular child. Topical pharmaceutical agents such as anti-muscarinic eye drops typically lead to light sensitivity and poor near vision. The most effective myopia control is provided by atropine, but is rarely prescribed due to the side effects. Pirenzepine provides myopia control with little light sensitivity and few near-vision problems, but it is not yet commercially available as an eye drop or

  13. Characterization of muscarinic receptor subtypes in human tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraldo, E.; Martos, F.; Gomez, A.; Garcia, A.; Vigano, M.A.; Ladinsky, H.; Sanchez de La Cuesta, F.

    1988-01-01

    The affinities of selective, pirenzepine and AF-DX 116, and classical, N-methylscopolamine and atropine, muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonists were investigated in displacement binding experiments with [ 3 H]Pirenzepine and [ 3 H]N-methylscopolamine in membranes from human autoptic tissues (forebrain, cerebellum, atria, ventricle and submaxillary salivary glands). Affinity estimates of N-methylscopolamine and atropine indicated a non-selective profile. Pirenzepine showed differentiation between the M 1 neuronal receptor of the forebrain and the receptors in other tissues while AF-DX 116 clearly discriminated between muscarinic receptors of heart and glands. The results in human tissues confirm the previously described selectivity profiles of pirenzepine and AF-DX 116 in rat tissues. These findings thus reveal the presence also in man of three distinct muscarinic receptor subtypes: the neuronal M 1 , the cardiac M 2 and the glandular M 3

  14. Electrocardiographic evaluation of two anesthetic combinations in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tárraga K.M.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate electrocardiographic changes in dogs aged 5 years or more submitted to two anesthetic combinations: atropine, levomeprazine, thiopental and halothane (ALTH, and atropine, tiletamine and zolazepam (ATZ. Forty dogs (24 males/16 females weighing 5-24kg, were used. Dogs had no cardiac problems and were submitted to tartarectomy. All animals were submitted to two electrocardiograms (ECG, one before anesthesia and other immediately before surgery. The dogs were divided into two groups: group 1 received ALTH and group 2 received ATZ. Alterations in the ST segment, T wave, cardiac rhythm and a significant reduction of vagal tonus index were observed in both groups, but in group 2 a significant reduction of the PR and QT intervals and an increase in heart rate were also observed. These data suggest that the ALTH combination caused fewer changes in the ECG than the ATZ combination.

  15. Prejunctional inhibition of norepinephrine release caused by acetylcholine in the human saphenous vein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rorie, D.K.; Rusch, N.J.; Shepherd, J.T.; Vanhoutte, P.M.; Tyce, G.M.

    1981-01-01

    We performed experiments to determine whether or not acetylcholine exerts a prejunctional inhibitory effect on adrenergic neurotransmission in the human blood vessel wall. Rings of human greater saphenous veins were prepared 2 to 15 hours after death and mounted for isometric tension recording in organ chambers filled with Krebs-Ringer solution. Acetylcholine depressed contractile responses to electric activation of the sympathetic nerve endings significantly more than those to exogenous norepinephrine; the relaxations caused by the cholinergic transmitter were antagonized by atropine. Helical strips were incubated with [/sub 3/H]norepinephrine and mounted for superfusion. Electric stimulation augmented the fractional release of labeled norepinephrine. Acetylcholine caused a depression of the evoked /sub 3/H release which was antagonized by atropine but not by hexamethonium. These experiments demonstrate that, as in animal cutaneous veins, there are prejunctional inhibitory muscarinic receptors on the adrenergic nerve endings in the human saphenous vein. By contrast, the human vein also contains postjunctional inhibitory muscarinic receptors

  16. Acetylcholine produces contraction mediated by cyclooxigenase pathway in arterial vessels in the marine fish (Isacia conceptionis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FA. Moraga

    Full Text Available Preliminary studies showed that dorsal artery contraction mediated by acetylcholine (ACh is blocked with indomethacin in intertidal fish (G. laevifrons. Our objective was to characterize the cholinergic pathway in several artery vessels of the I. conceptionis. Afferent and efferent branchial, dorsal and mesenteric arteries were dissected of 6 juvenile specimens, isometric tension studies were done using doses response curves (DRC for Ach (10–13 to 10–3 M, and cholinergic pathways were obtained by blocking with atropine or indomethacin. CRC to ACh showed a pattern of high sensitivity only in efferente branchial artery and low sensibility in all vessels. Furthermore, these contractions were blocked in the presence of atropine and indomethacin in all vessels. Our results corroborate previous results observed in intertidal species that contraction induced by acetylcholine is mediated by receptors that activate a cyclooxygenase contraction pathway.

  17. Severe bradycardia and prolonged hypotension in ciguatera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Thomas Yan Keung

    2013-06-01

    Ciguatera results when ciguatoxin-contaminated coral reef fish from tropical or subtropical waters are consumed. The clinical features that present in affected persons are mainly gastrointestinal, neurological, general, and much less commonly, cardiovascular. We report the case of a 50-year-old man who developed the characteristic combination of acute gastrointestinal and neurological symptoms after the consumption of an unidentified coral reef fish head. In addition to those symptoms, he developed dizziness, severe bradycardia (46 bpm) and prolonged hypotension, which required the administration of intravenous atropine and over three days of intravenous fluid replacement with dopamine infusion. Patients with ciguatera can develop severe bradycardia and prolonged hypotension. Physicians should recognise the possible cardiovascular complications of ciguatera and promptly initiate treatment with intravenous atropine, intravenous fluid replacement and inotropic therapy if such complications are observed.

  18. Migrating Motor Complex in Colectomized Ileo Stoma Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mark B; Wallin, Lene; Husebye, Einar

    2011-01-01

    In colectomized patients with ileo stoma, the reflex modulation of small intestinal functions is disturbed, resulting in high enteric stoma outputs and malabsorption. Serotonin has a pivotal role in initiating motor and secretory reflexes involving activation of neuronal 5-HT(3) and smooth muscle...... muscarinic receptors. We aimed to evaluate the effect of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), ondansetron and atropine on fasting and stimulated antro-duodeno-jejunal migrating motor complex (MMC) in colectomized patients with ileo stoma compared with healthy subjects. Manometric recordings were obtained in a blinded......-induced MMC phase III without affecting fasting or postprandial properties in colectomized patients with ileo stoma. Similar effects were observed for 5-HT and atropine in healthy subjects....

  19. Atropa belladonna intoxication: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdai, Mohamed Adnane; Labib, Smael; Chetouani, Khadija; Harandou, Mustapha

    2012-01-01

    Atropa belladonna is a poisonous plant also called deadly nightshade. Its roots, leaves and fruits contain alkaloids: atropine, hyocyamine and scopolamine. The risk of poisoning in children is important because of possible confusion with other berries. Atropa belladonna acute intoxication is a severe condition, it's should be considered in the presence of anti-cholinergic toxidrome, the differential diagnosis include other plants or psychoactive drugs containing atropine. The treatment is mainly symptomatic including gastrointestinal decontamination with activated charcoal. In severe cases, physostigmine can be used as an antidote. We report the case of 11 year old girl with Atropa belladonna poisoning which was administrated in a therapeutic purpose as a remedy to jaundice. The child presented essentially a central anti-cholinergic syndrome. She was admitted in the intensive care unit, the progression was favorable with symptomatic treatment.

  20. Short report: persistent bradycardia caused by ciguatoxin poisoning after barracuda fish eggs ingestion in southern Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yao-Min; Hung, Shih-Yuan; Chou, Kang-Ju; Huang, Neng-Chyan; Tung, Chung-Ni; Hwang, Deng-Fwu; Chung, Hsiao-Min

    2005-12-01

    We report an outbreak of ciguatoxin poisoning after barracuda fish ingestion in southern Taiwan. Three members of a family developed nausea, vomiting, watery diarrhea, and myalgias about 1 hour after eating three to ten eggs of a barracuda fish. Numbness of the lips and extremities followed the gastrointestinal symptoms about 2 hours after ingestion. Other manifestations included hyperthermia, hypotension, bradycardia, and hyperreflexia. Bradycardia persisted for several days, and one patient required a continuous infusion of intravenous atropine totaling 40 mg over 2 days. Further follow-up of the patients disclosed improvement of neurologic sequelae and bradycardia, but sensory abnormalities resolved several months later. In conclusion, ciguatoxin poisoning causes mainly gastrointestinal and neurologic effects of variable severity. In two patients with ciguatoxin poisoning after barracuda fish egg ingestion, persistent bradycardia required prolonged atropine infusion.

  1. Cephalic phase secretion of insulin and other enteropancreatic hormones in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veedfald, Simon; Plamboeck, Astrid; Deacon, Carolyn F

    2016-01-01

    Enteropancreatic hormone secretion is thought to include a cephalic phase, but the evidence in humans is ambiguous. We studied vagally induced gut hormone responses with and without muscarinic blockade in 10 glucose-clamped healthy men (age: 24.5 ± 0.6 yr, means ± SE; body mass index: 24.0 ± 0.5 kg...... and abolished the MSF response. Neither insulin, C-peptide, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), nor glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels changed in response to MSF or atropine. Glucagon and ghrelin levels were markedly attenuated by atropine prior to and during the clamp: at t = 105 min...... and 3.7 ± 21 pg/ml (means ± SE), P phase response was absent for insulin, glucagon, GLP-1, GIP, and ghrelin....

  2. EFFECTS OF DEXAMETHASONE AND PHENIRAMINE MALEATE ON HEMODYNAMIC AND RESPIRATORY PARAMETERS AFTER CEMENTATION IN CEMENTED PARTIAL HIP PROSTHESIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yektaş, Abdulkadir; Gümüş, Funda; Totoz, Tolga; Gül, Nurten; Erkalp, Kerem; Alagöl, Ayşin

    2015-02-01

    To prevent hemodynamic and respiratory changes that are likely to occur during cementation in partial hip prosthesis by prophylactic use of pheniramine maleate and dexamethasone. The study included 40 patients aged between 60 and 85 years with an American Society ofAnesthesiologists (ASA) grade of II-III who underwent partial hip prosthesis. Just after spinal anesthesia, 4 mL normal saline was pushed in patients in Group S, whereas 45.5 mg pheniramine maleate and 8 mg dexamethasone mixture was pushed intravenously in a total volume of 4 mL in patients in Group PD. Amounts of atropine and adrenaline administered after cementation were significantly higher in Group S than in Group PD (P pheniramine maleate and dexamethasone in partial hip prosthesis led to an increase in SpO2 value and a decrease in the utilization of adrenaline and atropine after cementation.

  3. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) in the pig pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1984-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) in the pig pancreas is localized to nerves, many of which travel along the pancreatic ducts. VIP stimulates pancreatic fluid and bicarbonate secretion like secretin. Electrical vagal stimulation in the pig causes an atropine-resistant profuse secretion...... of bicarbonate-rich pancreatic juice. In an isolated perfused preparation of the pig pancreas with intact vagal nerve supply, electrical vagal stimulation caused an atropine-resistant release of VIP, which accurately parallelled the exocrine secretion of juice and bicarbonate. Perfusion of the pancreas...... with a potent VIP-antiserum inhibited the effect of vagal stimulation on the exocrine secretion. It is concluded, that VIP is responsible for (at least part of) the neurally controlled fluid and bicarbonate secretion from the pig pancreas....

  4. The efficacy of HI-6 DMS in a sustained infusion against percutaneous VX poisoning in the guinea-pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, C; Cook, A R; Mann, T; Price, M E; Emery, E; Roughley, N; Flint, D; Stubbs, S; Armstrong, S J; Rice, H; Tattersall, J E H

    2018-09-01

    Post-exposure nerve agent treatment usually includes administration of an oxime, which acts to restore function of the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE). For immediate treatment of military personnel, this is usually administered with an autoinjector device, or devices containing the oxime such as pralidoxime, atropine and diazepam. In addition to the autoinjector, it is likely that personnel exposed to nerve agents, particularly by the percutaneous route, will require further treatment at medical facilities. As such, there is a need to understand the relationship between dose rate, plasma concentration, reactivation of AChE activity and efficacy, to provide supporting evidence for oxime infusions in nerve agent poisoning. Here, it has been demonstrated that intravenous infusion of HI-6, in combination with atropine, is efficacious against a percutaneous VX challenge in the conscious male Dunkin-Hartley guinea-pig. Inclusion of HI-6, in addition to atropine in the treatment, improved survival when compared to atropine alone. Additionally, erythrocyte AChE activity following poisoning was found to be dose dependent, with an increased dose rate of HI-6 (0.48mg/kg/min) resulting in increased AChE activity. As far as we are aware, this is the first study to correlate the pharmacokinetic profile of HI-6 with both its pharmacodynamic action of reactivating nerve agent inhibited AChE and with its efficacy against a persistent nerve agent exposure challenge in the same conscious animal. Copyright © 2017 Crown Copyright. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Acute effects of a sarin-like organophosphorus agent, bis(isopropyl methyl)phosphonate, on cardiovascular parameters in anaesthetized, artificially ventilated rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Yoshimasa [Department of Pharmacology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Itoh, Takeo, E-mail: titoh@med.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Department of Pharmacology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Shiraishi, Hiroaki [Department of Forensic Medicine, Institute of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Maeno, Yoshitaka [Department of Forensic Medical Science, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Arima, Yosuke; Torikoshi, Aiko; Namera, Akira [Department of Forensic Medicine, Institute of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Makita, Ryosuke [Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, Hiroshima Cosmopolitan University, Hiroshima (Japan); Yoshizumi, Masao [Department of Cardiovascular Physiology and Medicine, Institute of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Nagao, Masataka [Department of Forensic Medicine, Institute of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2013-10-01

    The organophosphorus compound sarin irreversibly inhibits acetylcholinesterase. We examined the acute cardiovascular effects of a sarin-like organophosphorus agent, bis(isopropyl methyl)phosphonate (BIMP), in anaesthetized, artificially ventilated rats. Intravenous administration of BIMP (0.8 mg/kg; the LD50 value) induced a long-lasting increase in blood pressure and tended to increase heart rate. In rats pretreated with the non-selective muscarinic-receptor antagonist atropine, BIMP significantly increased both heart rate and blood pressure. In atropine-treated rats, hexamethonium (antagonist of ganglionic nicotinic receptors) greatly attenuated the BIMP-induced increase in blood pressure without changing the BIMP-induced increase in heart rate. In rats treated with atropine plus hexamethonium, intravenous phentolamine (non-selective α-adrenergic receptor antagonist) plus propranolol (non-selective β-adrenergic receptor antagonist) completely blocked the BIMP-induced increases in blood pressure and heart rate. In atropine-treated rats, the reversible acetylcholinesterase inhibitor neostigmine (1 mg/kg) induced a transient increase in blood pressure, but had no effect on heart rate. These results suggest that in anaesthetized rats, BIMP induces powerful stimulation of sympathetic as well as parasympathetic nerves and thereby modulates heart rate and blood pressure. They may also indicate that an action independent of acetylcholinesterase inhibition contributes to the acute cardiovascular responses induced by BIMP. - Highlights: • A sarin-like agent BIMP markedly increased blood pressure in anaesthetized rats. • Muscarinic receptor blockade enhanced the BIMP-induced increase in blood pressure. • Ganglionic nicotinic receptor blockade attenuated the BIMP-induced response. • Blockade of α- as well as β-receptors attenuated the BIMP-induced response.

  6. Extrinsic control of the release of galanin and VIP from intrinsic nerves of isolated, perfused, porcine ileum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Messell, T; Harling, H; Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1992-01-01

    By immunohistochemistry galanin-like immunoreactivity and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP)-like immunoreactivity were found in nerve cell bodies mostly in the submucous plexus and in nerve fibres in the mucosa, submucosa and muscularis including the myenteric plexus of the porcine ileum an...... was not influenced by atropine. Our results suggest that the galanin- and VIP-producing intrinsic neurons receive inhibitory signals by noradrenergic nerve fibers and stimulatory signals mediated by cholinergic nerves, possibly via a cholinergic interneuron....

  7. Antidiarrhoeal activity of leaf methanolic extract of Rauwolfia serpentina

    OpenAIRE

    II Ezeigbo; MI Ezeja; KG Madubuike; DC Ifenkwe; IA Ukweni; NE Udeh; SC Akomas

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the antidiarrhoeal property of methanol extract of the leaves of Rauwolfia serpentina (R. serpentina) in experimental diarrhoea induced by castor oil in mice. Methods: Doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg R. serpentina leaf methanol extracts were administered to castor oil induced diarrhoea mice to determine its antidiarrhoeal activity. Results: All doses of the extract and the reference drug atropine sulphate (3 mg/kg, i.p.) produced a dose-dependent reduction in inte...

  8. LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHIC / MASS SPECTROMETRIC DETERMINATION OF MORPHINE, CODEINE AND COCAINE IN HUMAN SERA USING A NEW INTERNAL SURFACE REVERSED PHASE COLUMN

    OpenAIRE

    Hattori, Hideki; Arinobu, Tetsuya; Iwai, Masae; Suzuki, Osamu; Seno, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    A new internal surface reversed phase column (Shim-pack MAYI-ODS) was used for analysis of morphine, codeine and cocaine in human sera by LC/MS/MS. The column enabled direct injection of crude biological samples without pretreatment realizing a rapid analytical procedure. Therecoveries of morphine, codeine and cocaine spiked into human sera were 50-60 %. The regression equations for morphine, codeine and cocaine in sera, using atropine as internal standard, showed good linearity in the ranges...

  9. Development of a quantitative method for the analysis of cocaine analogue impregnated into textiles by Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Linda; Alder, Rhiannon; Mehta, Megha; Krayem, Nadine; Cavasinni, Bianca; Laracy, Sean; Cameron, Shane; Fu, Shanlin

    2018-04-01

    Cocaine trafficking in the form of textile impregnation is routinely encountered as a concealment method. Raman spectroscopy has been a popular and successful testing method used for in situ screening of cocaine in textiles and other matrices. Quantitative analysis of cocaine in these matrices using Raman spectroscopy has not been reported to date. This study aimed to develop a simple Raman method for quantifying cocaine using atropine as the model analogue in various types of textiles. Textiles were impregnated with solutions of atropine in methanol. The impregnated atropine was extracted using less hazardous acidified water with the addition of potassium thiocyanate (KSCN) as an internal standard for Raman analysis. Despite the presence of background matrix signals arising from the textiles, the cocaine analogue could easily be identified by its characteristic Raman bands. The successful use of KSCN normalised the analyte signal response due to different textile matrix background interferences and thus removed the need for a matrix-matched calibration. The method was linear over a concentration range of 6.25-37.5 mg/cm 2 with a coefficient of determination (R 2 ) at 0.975 and acceptable precision and accuracy. A simple and accurate Raman spectroscopy method for the analysis and quantification of a cocaine analogue impregnated in textiles has been developed and validated for the first time. This proof-of-concept study has demonstrated that atropine can act as an ideal model compound to study the problem of cocaine impregnation in textile. The method has the potential to be further developed and implemented in real world forensic cases. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Botulinum Toxin as an Alternative to Treat the Spasm of the Near Reflex

    OpenAIRE

    Laria Ochaíta, Carlos; Merino Suárez, María; Piñero Llorens, David Pablo; Gómez-Hurtado Cubillana, Arantxa; Pérez Cambrodí, Rafael J.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the case of an eight-year-old girl with complaints of headaches and blurred vision (uncorrected visual acuity: 0.1 decimal) that showed on examination miotic pupils, pseudomyopia, no ocular motility restrictions, and no associated neurological disease. After initial treatment with cyclopentolate for two months, pseudomyopia persisted with an intermittent and variable esotropia. Spectacles of +1 both eyes and atropine 1% one drop daily were then prescribed. The situation improved a...

  11. Amblyopia treatment of adults with dichoptic training using the virtual reality oculus rift head mounted display: preliminary results

    OpenAIRE

    Žiak, Peter; Holm, Anders; Halička, Juraj; Mojzis, Peter; Piñero, David P.

    2017-01-01

    Background The gold standard treatments in amblyopia are penalizing therapies, such as patching or blurring vision with atropine that are aimed at forcing the use of the amblyopic eye. However, in the last years, new therapies are being developed and validated, such as dichoptic visual training, aimed at stimulating the amblyopic eye and eliminating the interocular supression. Purpose To evaluate the effect of dichoptic visual training using a virtual reality head mounted display in a sample ...

  12. Etudes phytochimique et pharmacologique de Bridelia ferruginea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    L'extrait aqueux de Bridelia ferruginea provoque entre 10-5mg/mL et 10-1mg/mL une augmentation des contractions rythmiques de muscle lisse Taenia coli de cobaye. Ces effets inotropes positifs antagonisés par l'Atropine (10-6mg/mL) sont totalement abolis en milieu pauvre (0Ca2+) et dépourvus de calcium (0Ca2++ ...

  13. taenia coli de cobaye

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AKA BOKO

    . Ces effets inotropes positifs antagonisés par l'Atropine (10-6mg/mL) sont totalement abolis en milieu pauvre (0Ca2+) et dépourvus de calcium (0Ca2++ EDTA 10-5M).Ces résultats suggèrent la présence de substances cholinomimétiques ...

  14. People’s Republic of China Scientific Abstracts, Number 167.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-04-28

    Station, Kwang-si Huan-chiang County TITLE: "Treatment of Uterine Prolapse with Urena Lobata and Eucommia Ulmoides Decoction and Acupuncture" SOURCE... uterine prolapse were treated with Urena lobata and eucommia ulmoides decoction and acupuncture. The decoction was taken twice daily. Acupuncture...rabbits and dogs it was shown that both atropine and scopo- lamine were able to counteract the arrhythmia caused by catecholamines, but could not

  15. A New Association or Coincidence: Supraventricular Tachycardia in a Child Receiving Hyoscine N-Butylbromide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eyup Aslan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Hyoscine N-Butylbromide, is a peripherally acting antimuscarinic, anticholinergic agent. It is used for spasms of gastrointestinal and genitourinary trackt. Because of anticholinergic effects, it exerts positive chronotropic agent like atropine, may lead to sinus tachycardia. However, there has been no reported an association of supraventricular tachycardia and hyoscine n-butylbromide. In this report, we report a case that developed supraventricular tachycardia during hyoscine n-butylbromide therapy for his abdominal pain.

  16. Thermoregulatory Responses of Rats Exposed to 9.3-GHz Radiofrequency Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-10-15

    installed via the left carotid artery. Ketamine HCI ( Veta - lar), 100-150 mg/kg, I.M., was administered as the anesthetic, and atropine sulfate, 0.04 mg...observed during the 1 C cycles under any of the exposure conditions. 71 4S5 40. a 30CW 35- 30 P a 60 CW ’. a0 ESoP E S2S- 20. Fig. 1. Relationship between

  17. Effect of acetylcholine receptors on the pain-related electrical activities in the hippocampal CA3 region of morphine-addicted rats

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Guan Zeng; Liu, Zhe Hui; Wei, XinYa; Zhao, Pan; Yang, Chun Xiao; Xu, Man Ying

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): To determine the effect of acetylcholine (ACh), pilocarpine, and atropine on pain evoked responses of pain excited neurons (PEN) and pain inhibited neurons (PIN) in hippocampal CA3 region of morphine addicted rats. Materials and Methods: Female Wistar rats, weighing between 230-260 g were used in this study. Morphine addicted rats were generated by subcutaneous injection of increasing concentrations of morphine hydrochloride for six days. Trains of electrical impulses applied to...

  18. NMDA antagonists exert distinct effects in experimental organophosphate or carbamate poisoning in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dekundy, Andrzej; Kaminski, Rafal M.; Zielinska, Elzbieta; Turski, Waldemar A.

    2007-01-01

    Organophosphate (OP) and carbamate acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors produce seizures and lethality in mammals. Anticonvulsant and neuroprotective properties of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists encourage the investigation of their effects in AChE inhibitor-induced poisonings. In the present study, the effects of dizocilpine (MK-801, 1 mg/kg) or 3-((RS)-2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl)-propyl-1-phosphonic acid (CPP, 10 mg/kg), alone or combined with muscarinic antagonist atropine (1.8 mg/kg), on convulsant and lethal properties of an OP pesticide dichlorvos or a carbamate drug physostigmine, were studied in mice. Both dichlorvos and physostigmine induced dose-dependent seizure activity and lethality. Atropine did not prevent the occurrence of convulsions but decreased the lethal effects of both dichlorvos and physostigmine. MK-801 or CPP blocked or attenuated, respectively, dichlorvos-induced convulsions. Contrariwise, NMDA antagonists had no effect in physostigmine-induced seizures or lethality produced by dichlorvos or physostigmine. Concurrent pretreatment with atropine and either MK-801 or CPP blocked or alleviated seizures produced by dichlorvos, but not by physostigmine. Both MK-801 and CPP co-administered with atropine enhanced its antilethal effects in both dichlorvos and physostigmine poisoning. In both saline- and AChE inhibitor-treated mice, no interaction of the investigated antidotes with brain cholinesterase was found. The data indicate that both muscarinic ACh and NMDA receptor-mediated mechanisms contribute to the acute toxicity of AChE inhibitors, and NMDA receptors seem critical to OP-induced seizures

  19. Presynaptic M1 muscarinic receptor modulates spontaneous release of acetylcholine from rat basal forearm slices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, T.; Fujimoto, LK.; Oohata, H.; Kawashima, K.

    1988-01-01

    Spontaneous release of (ACh) from rat basal forebrain slices in the presence of cholinesterase inhibitor was directly determined using a specific radioimmunoassay for ACh. The release was calcium dependent. A consistent amount of ACh release was observed throughout the experiment. Atropine (10- 8 to 10- 5 M) and pirenzepine (10- 7 to 10- 5 M) enhanced spontaneous ACh release. These findings indicate the presence of an M 1 muscarenic autoreceptor that modulates spontaneous release of ACh in the rat forebrain

  20. International Journal of Biological and Chemical Sciences - Vol 11 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Atropine exposure in adolescence predispose to adult memory loss in Wistar rats · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. A Olawepo, A.O. Ishola, M.S. Ajao, O.J. Olayemi, L.A. Olayaki, 1937-1947. http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/ijbcs.v11i5.1 ...

  1. Pharmacological treatment of cardiac glycoside poisoning

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, Darren M.; Gallapatthy, Gamini; Dunuwille, Asunga; Chan, Betty S.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac glycosides are an important cause of poisoning, reflecting their widespread clinical usage and presence in natural sources. Poisoning can manifest as varying degrees of toxicity. Predominant clinical features include gastrointestinal signs, bradycardia and heart block. Death occurs from ventricular fibrillation or tachycardia. A wide range of treatments have been used, the more common including activated charcoal, atropine, ??adrenoceptor agonists, temporary pacing, anti?digoxin Fab a...

  2. [A case of Veratrum poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festa, M; Andreetto, B; Ballaris, M A; Panio, A; Piervittori, R

    1996-05-01

    A poisoning from a Veratrum album infusion mistaken for Gentiana lutea is described. Confusion between these two plants can easily occur because they are very similar, although flowers and disposition of leaves allow their botanic determinat: V. album leaves are alternate and flowers are white, while G. lutea leaves are opposite and flowers yellow. The poisoning involves gastrointestinal (pyrosis, vomiting) and cardiocirculatory systems (bradyarrhy-thmias, A-V dissociation, vasodilatation) Atropine is the drug of choice.

  3. Anestesi Pada Operasi Palatoplasty Dengan Penyulit Tetralogy of Fallot

    OpenAIRE

    Munandar, Arief

    2004-01-01

    Di laporkan penatalaksanaan anestesi pada pasien Labiopalatoschisis dengan penyulit Tetralogy of Fallot yang dilakukan operasi palatoplasti pada seorang anak wanita umur 4 tahun, berat badan 9 kg, dengan anestesi umum, status fisik ASA III. Premedikasi dengan midazolam 0,75 mg, sulfas atropin 0,25 mg, ketalar 5 mg. Induksi dengan ketalar 15 mg, fasilitas intubasi dengan Esmeron 6 mg. Pemeliharaan dengan fentanil 20 mg, halotan 0,5% dan oksigen 5 1/mnt. Durante operasi dilakukan monitoring pad...

  4. Effects of cholera toxin on the potential difference and motor responses induced by distension in the rat proximal small intestine in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordasti, Shirin; Sapnara, Maria; Thomas, Evan A; Lindstrom, Erik; Forsman, Mikael; Bornstein, Joel C; Sjövall, Henrik

    2006-05-01

    Cholera toxin (CT) may induce uncontrolled firing in recurrent networks of secretomotor neurons in the submucous plexus. This hypothesis was tested in chloralose-anesthetized rats in vivo. The secretory reflex response to graded intestinal distension was measured with or without prior exposure to luminal CT. The transmural potential difference (PD) was used as a marker for electrogenic chloride secretion. In controls, distension increased PD, and this response was reduced by the neural blocker tetrodotoxin given serosally and the vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) receptor antagonist [4Cl-d-Phe(6),Leu(17)]VIP (2 mug.min(-1).kg(-1) iv) but unaffected by the serotonin 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist granisetron, by the nicotinic receptor antagonist hexamethonium, by the muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine, or by the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin. Basal PD increased significantly with time in CT-exposed segments, an effect blocked by granisetron, by indomethacin, and by [4Cl-d-Phe(6),Leu(17)]VIP but not by hexamethonium or atropine. In contrast, once the increased basal PD produced by CT was established, [4Cl-d-Phe(6),Leu(17)]VIP and indomethacin had no significant effect, whereas granisetron and hexamethonium markedly depressed basal PD. CT significantly reduced the increase in PD produced by distension, an effect reversed by granisetron, indomethacin, and atropine. CT also activated a specific motility response to distension, repeated cluster contractions, but only in animals pretreated with granisetron, indomethacin, or atropine. These data are compatible with the hypothesis that CT induces uncontrolled activity in submucous secretory networks. Development of this state depends on 5-HT(3) receptors, VIP receptors, and prostaglandin synthesis, whereas its maintenance depends on 5-HT(3) and nicotinic receptors but not VIP receptors. The motility effects of CT (probably reflecting myenteric activity) are partially suppressed via a mechanism involving 5-HT(3

  5. EVALUATION OF IRIDOCILIARY AND LENTICULAR ELASTICITY USING SHEAR-WAVE ELASTOGRAPHY IN RABBIT EYES

    OpenAIRE

    Efstathios T. Detorakis; Eleni E. Drakonaki; Harilaos Ginis; Nikolaos Karyotakis; Ioannis G. Pallikaris

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: A previous study has employed shear-wave ultrasound elastographic imaging to assess corneal rigidity in an ex-vivo porcine eye model. This study employs the same modality in vivo in a rabbit eye model in order to assess lens, ciliary body and total ocular rigidity changes following the instillation of atropine and pilocarpine. Methods: Ten non-pigmented female rabbits were examined. Measurements of the lens, ciliary body and total ocular rigidity as well as lens thickness and an...

  6. Acute effects of a sarin-like organophosphorus agent, bis(isopropyl methyl)phosphonate, on cardiovascular parameters in anaesthetized, artificially ventilated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Itoh, Takeo; Shiraishi, Hiroaki; Maeno, Yoshitaka; Arima, Yosuke; Torikoshi, Aiko; Namera, Akira; Makita, Ryosuke; Yoshizumi, Masao; Nagao, Masataka

    2013-01-01

    The organophosphorus compound sarin irreversibly inhibits acetylcholinesterase. We examined the acute cardiovascular effects of a sarin-like organophosphorus agent, bis(isopropyl methyl)phosphonate (BIMP), in anaesthetized, artificially ventilated rats. Intravenous administration of BIMP (0.8 mg/kg; the LD50 value) induced a long-lasting increase in blood pressure and tended to increase heart rate. In rats pretreated with the non-selective muscarinic-receptor antagonist atropine, BIMP significantly increased both heart rate and blood pressure. In atropine-treated rats, hexamethonium (antagonist of ganglionic nicotinic receptors) greatly attenuated the BIMP-induced increase in blood pressure without changing the BIMP-induced increase in heart rate. In rats treated with atropine plus hexamethonium, intravenous phentolamine (non-selective α-adrenergic receptor antagonist) plus propranolol (non-selective β-adrenergic receptor antagonist) completely blocked the BIMP-induced increases in blood pressure and heart rate. In atropine-treated rats, the reversible acetylcholinesterase inhibitor neostigmine (1 mg/kg) induced a transient increase in blood pressure, but had no effect on heart rate. These results suggest that in anaesthetized rats, BIMP induces powerful stimulation of sympathetic as well as parasympathetic nerves and thereby modulates heart rate and blood pressure. They may also indicate that an action independent of acetylcholinesterase inhibition contributes to the acute cardiovascular responses induced by BIMP. - Highlights: • A sarin-like agent BIMP markedly increased blood pressure in anaesthetized rats. • Muscarinic receptor blockade enhanced the BIMP-induced increase in blood pressure. • Ganglionic nicotinic receptor blockade attenuated the BIMP-induced response. • Blockade of α- as well as β-receptors attenuated the BIMP-induced response

  7. Randomised controlled trial of video clips and interactive games to improve vision in children with amblyopia using the I-BiT system

    OpenAIRE

    Herbison, Nicola; MacKeith, Daisy; Vivian, Anthony; Purdy, Jon; Fakis, Apostolos; Ash, Isabel M.; Cobb, Sue V.; Eastgate, Richard M.; Haworth, Stephen M.; Gregson, Richard M.; Foss, Alexander J.E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Traditional treatment of amblyopia involves either wearing a patch or atropine penalisation of the better eye. A new treatment is being developed on the basis of virtual reality technology allowing either DVD footage or computer games which present a common background to both eyes and the foreground, containing the imagery of interest, only to the amblyopic eye. Methods A randomised control trial was performed on patients with amblyopia aged 4?8?years with three arms. All three arm...

  8. Neuronal Adaptive Mechanisms Underlying Intelligent Information Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-01

    event in contrast with PSP or spike production, per se, resulting from natural auditory stimuli which serve as CS’s in Pavlovian blink conditioning...types of neurons responding to ACh or cGHP were conducted using aceclidine, a chol incmimetic drug . Similar effects on membrane resistance were...obtained with this drug , and the effects could be blocked by atropine (a muscarinic receptor blocker), A cell responding to aceclidine with an

  9. The Anticholinergic and Antiglutamatergic Drug Caramiphen Reduces Seizure Duration in Soman-Exposed Rats: Synergism with the Benzodiazepine Diazepam

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    progress to self-sustained seizures ( status epilepticus , SE) and result in extensive neuropathology as seen in rats (de Araujo Furtado et al., 2009, 2010...physostigmineOP organophosphorus BuChE butyrylcholinesterase ChE cholinesterase SE status epilepticus ATR atropine sulfate 2-PAM 2-pralidoxime NMDA N...L.C., Lichtenstein, S., Yourick, D.L., 2010. Spontaneous recurrent seizures after status epilepticus induced by soman in Sprague-Dawley rats

  10. Nicotinic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors are recruited by acetylcholine-mediated neurotransmission within the locus coeruleus during the organisation of post-ictal antinociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Rithiele Cristina; de Oliveira, Ricardo; Biagioni, Audrey Franceschi; Falconi-Sobrinho, Luiz Luciano; Dos Anjos-Garcia, Tayllon; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2016-10-01

    Post-ictal antinociception is characterised by an increase in the nociceptive threshold that accompanies tonic and tonic-clonic seizures (TCS). The locus coeruleus (LC) receives profuse cholinergic inputs from the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus. Different concentrations (1μg, 3μg and 5μg/0.2μL) of the muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonist atropine and the nicotinic cholinergic receptor antagonist mecamylamine were microinjected into the LC of Wistar rats to investigate the role of cholinergic mechanisms in the severity of TCS and the post-ictal antinociceptive response. Five minutes later, TCS were induced by systemic administration of pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) (64mg/kg). Seizures were recorded inside the open field apparatus for an average of 10min. Immediately after seizures, the nociceptive threshold was recorded for 130min using the tail-flick test. Pre-treatment of the LC with 1μg, 3μg and 5μg/0.2μL concentrations of both atropine and mecamylamine did not cause a significant effect on seizure severity. However, the same treatments decreased the post-ictal antinociceptive phenomenon. In addition, mecamylamine caused an earlier decrease in the post-ictal antinociception compared to atropine. These results suggest that muscarinic and mainly nicotinic cholinergic receptors of the LC are recruited to organise tonic-clonic seizure-induced antinociception. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The evaluation of gastroesophageal reflux before and after medical therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malmud, L.S.; Fisher, R.S.

    1981-01-01

    Gastroesophageal scintigraphy is a quantitative technique that can be employed to detect and quantitate gastroesophageal reflux before and after the application of therapeutic modalities, including change in body position, bethanechol, atropine, antacids, and antacid-alginate compounds. Five groups of 10-15 patients each were studied before and after using each therapeutic modality and before and after atropine. The results were compared to the patient's symptomatology and to the acid reflux test. Gastroesophageal scintigraphy was performed following oral administration of 300 microCi 99mTc-sulfur colloid in 300 ml acidified orange juice. Thirty-second gamma camera images were obtained as the gastroesophageal gradient was increased from approximately 10 to 35 mm Hg at 5 mm Hg increments using an inflatable abdominal binder. Data were processed using a digital computer. Reflux was reduced by change in position from recumbent to upright, and by the use of subcutaneous bethanechol, oral antacid, or oral antacidalginate compound. Atropine increased reflux. Gastroesophageal scintigraphy is more sensitive than fluoroscopy, correlates well with clinical symptomatology, and is a reliable and convenient technique for the quantitative estimation of reflux before and after therapy

  12. Comparison of neostigmine and sugammadex for hemodynamic parameters in cardiac patients undergoing noncardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizilay, Deniz; Dal, Didem; Saracoglu, Kemal T; Eti, Zeynep; Gogus, Fevzi Y

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the hemodynamic effects of neostigmine-atropine combination and sugammadex in patients with cardiac problems undergoing noncardiac surgery. Prospective randomized study. In the operating room. Ninety patients with a class 2 or 3 cardiovascular disease according to the New York Heart Association classification and aged between 18 and 75 years undergoing noncardiac surgery were randomized. Group N (n = 45) received 0.03 mg/kg IV neostigmine when T2 appeared as measured with a nerve muscle stimulator. When heart rate was 5 beats/min (±10 beats/min) lower than the heart rate before administration of the medication, 0.5 mg IV atropine sulfate was given. Group S (n = 45) received 3 mg/kg IV sugammadex when T2 appeared as measured with a nerve muscle stimulator. Heart rate, mean systolic and diastolic blood pressures, and electrocardiographic alterations including the QTc (QT Fredericia and QT Bazett) were recorded. There were no significant differences between and within the groups in terms of QTc values. Sugammadex group had a significant decrease on heart rate 1 minute after the medication when compared to the measurement before the medication (P Sugammadex group had lower systolic, diastolic, and mean blood pressures and heart rate when compared to neostigmine group (P sugammadex might be preferred as it provides more hemodynamic stability compared to neostigmine-atropine combination to reverse rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockage in cardiac patients undergoing noncardiac surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Feeding on toxic prey. The praying mantis (Mantodea) as predator of poisonous butterfly and moth (Lepidoptera) caterpillars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mebs, Dietrich; Wunder, Cora; Pogoda, Werner; Toennes, Stefan W

    2017-06-01

    Caterpillars of the monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus, feed on milkweed plants, Asclepias spp. (Apocynaceae), and sequester their toxic cardenolides aimed at deterring predators. Nevertheless, Chinese praying mantids, Tenodera sinensis, consume these caterpillars after removing the midgut ("gutting") including its plant content. In the present study, monarch caterpillars raised on A. curassavica, and those of the death's-head hawkmoth, Acherontia atropos, raised on Atropa belladonna containing atropine, were fed to mantids, Hierodula membranacea, which removed the gut of both species discarding about 59% of cardenolides and more than 90% of atropine, respectively. The ingestion of these compounds produced no apparent ill effects in the mantids and both were excreted with faeces. On the other hand, when mantids were fed with larvae of two moth species, Amata mogadorensis and Brahmaea certia, raised on non-poisonous host plants, the mantids showed the same gutting behaviour, thereby discarding indigestible plant material. As polar compounds, e.g. cardenolides and atropine, are not absorbed from the mantids midgut and do not pass the gut membrane, this enables the mantids to feed on toxic prey. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Suppression and enhancement of non-native molecules within biological systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, E.A. [Surface Analysis Research Centre, CEAS, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: e.jones@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk; Lockyer, N.P. [Surface Analysis Research Centre, CEAS, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Vickerman, J.C. [Surface Analysis Research Centre, CEAS, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-30

    With the aim of evaluating the potential of SIMS to provide molecular information from small molecules within biological systems, here we investigate the effect of different biological compounds as they act as matrices. The results highlight the fact that the chemical environment of a molecule can have a significant effect on its limit of detection. This has implications for the imaging of drugs and xenobiotics in tissue sections and other biological matrices. A 1:1 mixture of the organic acid 2,4,6-trihydroxyacetophenone and the dipeptide valine-valine demonstrates that almost complete suppression of the [M + H]{sup +} ion of one compound can be caused by the presence of a compound of higher proton affinity. The significance of this is highlighted when two similar drug molecules, atropine (a neutral molecule) and ipratropium bromide (a quaternary nitrogen containing salt) are mixed with brain homogenate. The atropine [M + H]{sup +} ion shows significant suppression whilst the [M - Br]{sup +} of ipratopium bromide is detected at an intensity that can be rationalised by its decreased surface concentration. By investigating the effect of two abundant tissue lipids, cholesterol and dipalmitoylphosphatidyl choline (DPPC), on the atropine [M + H]{sup +} signal detected in mixtures with these lipids we see that the DPPC has a strong suppressing effect, which may be attributed to gas phase proton transfer.

  15. The treatment of bronchial obstruction by beta/sub 2/-agonist and anti-cholinergic aerosol. Advantages of associating the two types of substance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minette, A.; Marcq, M.

    1980-01-01

    The authors review the basic aspects of bronchodilatory treatment using beta/sub 2/-agonist and atropinic aerosols; present the results of a review of literature on the subject of the toxicity of various vector gases used in aerosols of this type; discuss the problems associated with the deposition disparity of aerosols in normal and pathological lungs; present and discuss the results of the prevalence of positive responses to atropine methyl-nitrate and to beta-agonist given in aerosol form to a group of subjects with reversible bronchial obstruction; discuss the advantages of oxitropium bromide, an atropic substance which has recently been discovered and which is apparently more interesting than ipratropium bromide, against the background of the ventilatory effects as observed for these 2 substances on 19 patients suffering from reversible bronchial obstruction; and discuss the advantages of associating atropinic and beta/sub 2/-agonist substances in the same aerosol on the bass of the effects of a recently-developed preparation which combines fenoterol and ipratropium bromide. 57 refs.

  16. The study of cardiovascular changes by intravascular injection of contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yang Sook; Park, Chang Yoon

    1986-01-01

    This investigation was aimed to study the effect of contrast media on the cardiovascular system. So in this study, pithed rats were used whether alteration in cardiovascular system by contrast media were controlled centrally. Furthermore, several hypertonic solutions were also used to clarify the effect of contrast media. The results are as follows: 1. Intravenous injection of contrast media in rats (2.5 ml/kg) caused hypotension and bradycardia. The effects were neither blocked by pretreatment of atropine nor pyribenzamine+atropine. 2. NaCI 4.7%, dextrose 24.8%, urea 9.0% and glycerol 10.1% (v/v) which were equiosmolar with contrast media, caused hypotension, but did not affect the heart rate. 3. In pithed rats, intravenous injection of Angiografin increased blood pressure in a dose-dependant manner, and caused decrease in heart rate compared with those of control rats. 4. In pithed rats, bradycardia by intravascular injection with Angiografin was partially blocked by atropine. 5. Metrizamide of which iodine content was adjusted to 280 mg/ml caused increased in blood pressure when was injected intravenously in pithed rats with little effect on heart rate. 6. When perfused with contrast media in rat hindlimb at 15 ml/min./kg speed both perfusion pressure and flow effluent increased, simultaneously. These results suggest that hypotension might be caused by the central effect due to hyperosmolarity of contrast media and bradycardia caused by both parasympathetic stimulation and direct inhibitory action on the cardiac conductive system.

  17. Effect of tricyclic antidepressants on transmitter-stimulated inositol phosphate production in rat brain cortex in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, S.; Enna, S.J.

    1986-01-01

    Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) have anticholinergic and α-adrenergic blocking properties. The present study was undertaken to examine the effects of amitriptyline, imipramine, and desipramine on inositol phosphate accumulation, a brain second messenger system associated with cholinergic and adrenergic receptors. Whereas the TCAs were 28 to 400-fold weaker than atropine as inhibitors of 3 H-QNB binding to brain cholinergic receptors, they were 600 to 2000-fold less active than atropine as inhibitors of carbachol-stimulated IP accumulation in brain. In contrast, the relative potencies of the TCAs and prazosin to inhibit norepinephrine-stimulated IP accumulation and 3 H-prazosin binding appeared to be similar in the two assays. The results suggest pharmacological differences between the cholinergic receptors labeled in the ONB binding assay and those mediating the IP response, whereas the α 1 -adrenergic receptors appear to be similar in the two systems. Since atropine is considered a nonselective muscarinic antagonist, it is possible that the TCAs may differentiate between cholinergic receptor subtypes, which may be an important component of their clinical response

  18. Antagonism of acetylcholine by adrenaline antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benfey, B. G.; Grillo, S. A.

    1963-01-01

    Phenoxybenzamine antagonized the inhibitory action of acetylcholine on the guinea-pig isolated atrium. The antagonism was slow in onset, very slowly reversible, and could be overcome by increased concentrations of acetylcholine. In contrast, atropine inhibited the action of acetylcholine quickly, and the effect disappeared soon after withdrawal. The pA10 of phenoxybenzamine (2 hr of contact) was 6.8, and that of atropine (30 min of contact) was 8.4. In the presence of atropine phenoxybenzamine did not exert a slowly reversible antagonism, and the dose-ratio of acetylcholine returned to normal soon after withdrawal of both drugs. Phenoxybenzamine also antagonized acetylcholine in the guinea-pig isolated ileum, but with higher concentrations acetylcholine did not overcome the antagonism. The pA10 (60 min of contact) was 6.6. The pA10 of chlorpromazine in the atrium (2 hr of contact) and ileum (60 min of contact) was 5.9. Phentolamine, 2-diethylaminomethylbenzo-1,4-dioxan hydrochloride (883 F), and yohimbine antagonized acetylcholine in the atrium and ileum but required higher concentrations than chlorpromazine. PMID:13967429

  19. Efficacy of fresh packed red blood transfusion in organophosphate poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Hang-Xing; Tong, Pei-Jian; Li, Cai-Xia; Du, Jing; Chen, Bing-Yu; Huang, Zhi-Hui; Wang, Ying

    2017-03-01

    The mortality rate caused by organophosphate (OP) poisoning is still high, even the standard treatment such as atropine and oxime improves a lot. To search for alternative therapies, this study was aimed to investigate the effects of packed red blood cell (RBC) transfusion in acute OP poisoning, and compare the therapeutic effects of RBCs at different storage times.Patients diagnosed with OP poisoning were included in this prospective study. Fresh RBCs (packed RBCs stored less than 10 days) and longer-storage RBCs (stored more than 10 days but less than 35 days) were randomly transfused or not into OP poisoning patients. Cholinesterase (ChE) levels in blood, atropine usage and durations, pralidoxime durations were measured.We found that both fresh and longer-storage RBCs (200-400 mL) significantly increased blood ChE levels 6 hours after transfusion, shortened the duration for ChE recovery and length of hospital stay, and reduced the usage of atropine and pralidoxime. In addition, fresh RBCs demonstrated stronger therapeutic effects than longer-storage RBCs.Packed RBCs might be an alternative approach in patients with OP poisoning, especially during early stages.

  20. Role of the thalamic parafascicular nucleus cholinergic system in the modulation of acute corneal nociception in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmaeal Tamaddonfard

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the effects of microinjections of acetylcholine (a cholinergic agonist, physostigmine (a cholinesterase inhibitor, atropine (an antagonist of muscarinic cholinergic receptors and hexamethonium (an antagonist of nicotinic cholinergic receptors into the parafascicular nucleus of thalamus on the acute corneal nociception in rats. Acute corneal nociception was induced by putting a drop of 5 M NaCl solution onto the corneal surface of the eye and the number of eye wipes was counted during the first 30s. Both acetylcholine and physostigmine at the same doses of 0.5, 1 and 2 μg significantly (P < 0.05 reduced the number of eye wipes. The intensity of corneal nociception was not changed when atropine and hexamethonium were used alone. Atropine (4 μg, but not hexamethonium (4 μg significantly (P < 0.05 prevented acetylcholine (2 μg- and physostigmine (2 μg-induced antinociceptive effects. The results indicated that at the level of the parafascicular nucleus of thalamus, the muscarinic cholinergic receptors might be involved in the antinociceptive effects of acetylcholine and physostigmine.

  1. Effect of pilocarpine on the formalin-induced orofacial pain in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmaeal Tamaddonfard

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effects of subcutaneous (SC injection of pilocarpine (a cholinomimetic agent and atropine (a muscarinic receptors antagonist were investigated on a tonic model of orofacial pain in rats. The contribution of the endogenous analgesic opioid system was assessed using naloxone (an opioid receptors antagonist. Tonic orofacial pain was induced by SC injection of a diluted formalin solution (1%, 50 μL in the right upper lip, and the time spent face rubbing was measured in five min blocks for 1 h. Formalin induced a biphasic (first phase: 0-5 min and second phase: 15-35 min pain response. Pilocarpine significantly (P < 0.05 suppressed both phases of orofacial pain. Atropine did not have any effect and naloxone non-significantly increased the intensity of pain when used alone. In the pre-injection examinations, atropine prevented, but naloxone did not reverse the antinociceptive effect of pilocarpine. The results indicated that SC injection of formalin in the orofacial region induced a marked biphasic pain. Pilocarpine via muscarinic cholinergic receptors produced antinociceptive effect in the orofacial formalin-induced pain. The endogenous opioid analgesic system may not have a role in pilocarpine-induced antinociception.

  2. Denervation of the Lacrimal Gland Leads to Corneal Hypoalgesia in a Novel Rat Model of Aqueous Dry Eye Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aicher, Sue A; Hermes, Sam M; Hegarty, Deborah M

    2015-10-01

    Some dry eye disease (DED) patients have sensitized responses to corneal stimulation, while others experience hypoalgesia. Many patients have normal tear production, suggesting that reduced tears are not always the cause of DED sensory dysfunction. In this study, we show that disruption of lacrimal innervation can produce hypoalgesia without changing basal tear production. Injection of a saporin toxin conjugate into the extraorbital lacrimal gland of male Sprague-Dawley rats was used to disrupt cholinergic innervation to the gland. Tear production was assessed by phenol thread test. Corneal sensory responses to noxious stimuli were assessed using eye wipe behavior. Saporin DED animals were compared to animals treated with atropine to produce aqueous DED. Cholinergic innervation and acetylcholine content of the lacrimal gland were significantly reduced in saporin DED animals, yet basal tear production was normal. Saporin DED animals demonstrated normal eye wipe responses to corneal application of capsaicin, but showed hypoalgesia to corneal menthol. Corneal nerve fiber density was normal in saporin DED animals. Atropine-treated animals had reduced tear production but normal responses to ocular stimuli. Because only menthol responses were impaired, cold-sensitive corneal afferents appear to be selectively altered in our saporin DED model. Hypoalgesia is not due to reduced tear production, since we did not observe hypoalgesia in an atropine DED model. Corneal fiber density is unaltered in saporin DED animals, suggesting that molecular mechanisms of nociceptive signaling may be impaired. The saporin DED model will be useful for exploring the mechanism underlying corneal hypoalgesia.

  3. Scopolamine poisoning from homemade 'moon flower' wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, E A; Meloan, C E; Pickell, J A; Oehme, F W

    1991-01-01

    LH, a 76-year-old Caucasian male, ingested 3 teaspoons (15 mL) of a homemade wine over a 1-h period and became ill. Approximately 1.5 h later, he was taken to the emergency room of a local hospital with symptoms of respiratory distress and weakness. The plant used in making the wine was Angel's trumpet (Datura suaveolens), which reportedly contains varying amounts of scopolamine and atropine. A sample of the wine was collected and analyzed for these two compounds by reversed-phase HPLC chromatography using 97% methanol-3% deionized water. The filtered wine contained an estimated 29 mg scopolamine/mL, which produced a total ingested dose of 435 mg. No atropine was detected. The scopolamine was confirmed by TLC. An oral dose of 50 mg of atropine sulfate in humans has been reported fatal, but there is no reported fatal dose for scopolamine. The alcohol content and 3.8 pH of the homemade wine may have increased the extraction of this compound from the plant material, and the wine fermentation process may have concentrated the original extract.

  4. Effect of oral administration of Terminalia chebula on gastric emptying: an experimental study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamhane M

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Terminalia chebula is a commonly advocated agent in Ayurveda for improving gastrointestinal motility. Charles Foster rats (150-200 gms of either sex were divided into four groups as follows--Group 1 (n = 15 normal animals; Group II (n = 6 rats administered metoclopramide (1.35 mg/kg; Group III (n = 8 rats given atropine (0.45 mg/kg. These agents were injected intramuscularly, 30 mins before the experiment. Rats from Group IV (n = 8 were administered Terminalia chebula (100 mg/kg/day for 15 days orally. Metoclopramide and atropine have established prokinetic and antikinetic activities respectively and are therefore included for comparison. All rats were then given a test meal of methyl cellulose (1.5% mixed with phenol red (50 mg/100 ml orally and gastric emptying was measured 20 mins later. Gastric emptying of normal rats (Group I was found to be 51.6 +/- 7.79%. Metoclopramide significantly increased the gastric emptying (76.33 +/- 12.37%; p < 0.01 and atropine inhibited the motility (% gastric emptying being 7.26 +/- 19.76%; p < 0.01. Terminalia chebula was found to increase the percent gastric emptying (86.57 +/- 6.65%; p < 0.01. Thus from this study it appears that Terminalia chebula can serve as an useful alternative to prokinetic drugs available today.

  5. EVALUATION OF IRIDOCILIARY AND LENTICULAR ELASTICITY USING SHEAR-WAVE ELASTOGRAPHY IN RABBIT EYES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efstathios T. Detorakis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A previous study has employed shear-wave ultrasound elastographic imaging to assess corneal rigidity in an ex-vivo porcine eye model. This study employs the same modality in vivo in a rabbit eye model in order to assess lens, ciliary body and total ocular rigidity changes following the instillation of atropine and pilocarpine. Methods: Ten non-pigmented female rabbits were examined. Measurements of the lens, ciliary body and total ocular rigidity as well as lens thickness and anterior chamber depth were taken with the Aixplorer system (SuperSonic Imagine, Aix-en-Provence, France with the SuperLinear™ SL 15-4 transducer in both eyes at baseline as well as after pilocarpine and atropine instillation. The IOP was also measured with the TonoPen tonometer. Results: Changes in rigidity in the examined areas following atropine instillation were statistically not significant. Ciliary body rigidity was significantly increased whereas lens and total ocular rigidity were significantly reduced following pilocarpine instillation. The decrease in lens rigidity following pilocarpine was significantly associated with the respective increase in ciliary body rigidity. Conclusions: Shear-wave ultrasound elastography can detect in vivo rigidity changes in the anterior segment of the rabbit eye model and may potentially be applied in human eyes, providing useful clinical information on conditions in which rigidity changes play an important role, such as glaucoma, pseudoexfoliation syndrome or presbyopia.

  6. Evaluation of iridociliary and lenticular elasticity using shear-wave elastography in rabbit eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detorakis, Efstathios T; Drakonaki, Eleni E; Ginis, Harilaos; Karyotakis, Nikolaos; Pallikaris, Ioannis G

    2014-01-01

    A previous study has employed shear-wave ultrasound elastographic imaging to assess corneal rigidity in an ex-vivo porcine eye model. This study employs the same modality in vivo in a rabbit eye model in order to assess lens, ciliary body and total ocular rigidity changes following the instillation of atropine and pilocarpine. Ten non-pigmented female rabbits were examined. Measurements of the lens, ciliary body and total ocular rigidity as well as lens thickness and anterior chamber depth were taken with the Aixplorer system (SuperSonic Imagine, Aix-en-Provence, France) with the SuperLinear™ SL 15-4 transducer in both eyes at baseline as well as after pilocarpine and atropine instillation. The IOP was also measured with the TonoPen tonometer. Changes in rigidity in the examined areas following atropine instillation were statistically not significant. Ciliary body rigidity was significantly increased whereas lens and total ocular rigidity were significantly reduced following pilocarpine instillation. The decrease in lens rigidity following pilocarpine was significantly associated with the respective increase in ciliary body rigidity. Shear-wave ultrasound elastography can detect in vivo rigidity changes in the anterior segment of the rabbit eye model and may potentially be applied in human eyes, providing useful clinical information on conditions in which rigidity changes play an important role, such as glaucoma, pseudoexfoliation syndrome or presbyopia.

  7. Involvement of dopaminergic and cholinergic pathways in the induction of yawning and genital grooming by the aqueous extract of Saccharum officinarum L. (sugarcane) in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamberini, Maria T; Gamberini, Maria C; Nasello, Antonia G

    2015-01-01

    Yawning, associated with genital grooming, is a physiological response that may be used for elucidating the mechanism of action of drugs. Preliminary analysis showed that aqueous extract (AE) of Saccharum induced yawns in rats. So, we aimed to quantify these behavioral responses and investigate the pharmacological mechanisms involved in these actions. During 120 min, after AE administration, the yawns and the genital grooming were quantified at 10 min intervals. Since dopaminergic and cholinergic pathways are implied in these responses, AE were evaluated in the presence of haloperidol 0.5 mg/kg and atropine 2 mg/kg. AE 0.5 g/kg increased the yawns, effect that was blocked both by haloperidol and atropine. Genital grooming could only be stimulated by AE 0.5 g/kg when dopaminergic receptors were blocked by haloperidol. However, it was inhibited when atropine was previously administered. So, we demonstrated a central action of Saccharum and it was postulated that neural circuits with the participation of dopaminergic and cholinergic pathways are involved. The fact that AE is comprised of innumerous compounds could justify the extract's distinct responses. Also, we cannot disregard the presence of different neural circuits that count on the participation of dopaminergic and cholinergic pathways and could be activated by the same induction agent. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Prognostic Factors of Organophosphate Poisoning Between the Death and Survival Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzeng-Jih Lin

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available In this prospective case series study, we consider the different factors between death and survival groups of organophosphate poisoning. Patients in tertiary-care medical center who had been exposed to organophosphate were included in the study. Pralidoxime (PAM was discontinued after atropine had controlled the clinical situation. We recorded the demographic data, amount of organophosphate consumption, duration of coma, duration of ventilator use, duration of hospitalization, findings of chest X-ray, white blood cell count, acetylcholinesterase concentration, plasma cholinesterase concentration, total atropine amount, duration of atropine use, total PAM amount, duration of PAM use, urine organophosphate peak concentration, duration of urine organophosphate and mortality rate. Urine was collected every 8 hours and was analyzed by gas chromatography equipped with a flame photometric detector and gas chromatography with mass spectrometer detector for organophosphate determination. The urine organophosphate peak concentration was recorded. Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to compare the factors between death and survival groups. Fisher's exact test was used to compare the different findings of chest X-ray between the death and survival groups. Evidently, the death group had a higher amount of organophosphate consumption, duration of coma, and higher white blood cell count than those in the survival group. Also, the death group had lower duration of hospitalization, and decreased concentrations of acetylcholinesterase and plasma cholinesterase. Total PAM amount use and duration of PAM use were lower. However, the duration of ventilator use, findings of chest X-ray, total atropine amount, duration of atropine, urine organophosphate peak concentration and duration of urine organophosphate were similar in both groups. The mortality rate of our 50 cases was 20%. As stated earlier, the cases of the death group had insufficient PAM therapy. The maximum

  9. Pharmacological and morphological characteristics of the muscular system of the giant liver fluke (Fascioloides magna - Bassi 1875).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trailović, Saša M; Marinković, Darko; Trailović, Jelena Nedeljković; Milovanović, Mirjana; Marjanović, Djordje S; Aničić, Milan R

    2015-12-01

    Motility is required for feeding, reproduction and maintenance of the fluke in the host's liver. According to that, the neuromuscular system can be an attractive drugable target for chemotherapy. Musculature of the Fascioloides magna is organized into three layers, an outer circular layer, beneath this layer the longitudinal layer, and third, the oblique, or diagonal layer underlies the longitudinal layer. In our study, the administration of atropine or caffeine did not cause classic muscle contractions of F. magna muscle strips. However, the Electrical Field Stimulation (EFS) induced stable and repeatable contractions, which enabled us to examine their sensitivity to the various substances. Acetylcholine (ACh) (300 μM and 1 mM), caused only a slight relaxation, without affecting the amplitude of spontaneous contractions or the amplitude of contractions induced by EFS. Contrary to that, atropine (100 μM) caused a significant increase in the basal tone and an increase of EFS-induced contractions. If acetylcholine is an inhibitory neurotransmitter in trematodes, the described effects of atropine are achieved by the blockade of inhibitory neurotransmission. On the other hand, with respect to the process of excitation-contraction coupling, the plant alkaloid ryanodine (30 μM) significantly reduced the basal tone, as well as EFS-induced contractions of F. magna muscle strips. Ryanodine inhibited the potentiating effect of atropine on the basal tone and contractions caused by EFS, which indicates that the contractile effect of atropine is dependent on Ca(++) release from intracellular stores. Caffeine (500 μM) caused relaxation of fluke muscle strips and at the same time significantly enhanced the EFS-induced contractions. Both effects of caffeine can be explained by entry of extracellular Ca(++) into muscle cells. The muscle contractility of F. magna depends both on the entry of extracellular calcium, and calcium release from intracellular stores, which are

  10. Effect of experimental diabetes on cholinergic, purinergic and peptidergic motor responses of the isolated rat bladder to electrical field stimulation or capsaicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkó, Rita; Lázár, Zsófia; Pórszász, Róbert; Somogyi, George T; Barthó, Loránd

    2003-09-30

    An attempt has been made to pharmacologically isolate cholinergic, P(2) purinoceptor-mediated and peptidergic (capsaicin-sensitive, tachykinin-mediated) contraction of the guanethidine-treated rat bladder detrusor preparation, in vitro. The effect of experimental diabetes was assessed on these types of contraction. Responses were evoked by electrical field stimulation (single shocks or 1 Hz for 30 s or 10 Hz for 40 s). Single shocks and 1-Hz stimulation were applied in the presence of (a). atropine (1 microM) or (b). P(2) purinoceptor antagonists (50 microM pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonic acid) [PPADS] plus 100 microM suramin. Long-term electrical field stimulation (10 Hz for 40 s) (c). was applied with both atropine and the P(2) purinoceptor antagonists present in the organ bath. The effects of capsaicin (d). and ATP (e). were also studied. Three groups of experimental animals were used: streptozotocin-treated (50 mg.kg(-1) i.p., 8 weeks before the experiment), parallel solvent-treated and untreated rats. (a). Responses to electrical field stimulation in the presence of atropine were reduced by half by PPADS plus suramin, but were resistant to capsaicin tachyphylaxis. They were enhanced in preparations taken from diabetic rats. (b). Contractions to electrical field stimulation in the presence of PPADS plus suramin were reduced by 2/3 by atropine, but were left unchanged by capsaicin or diabetes. (c). Contractions to long-term stimulation had a quick and a sustained phase. Especially the latter was inhibited by capsaicin tachypyhlaxis; it was also strongly reduced in preparations taken from diabetic rats. (d). Contractions to capsaicin (30 nM and 1 microM) were resistant to tetrodotoxin, strongly reduced by a combination of tachykinin NK(1) and NK(2) receptor antagonists, and slightly reduced in preparations from diabetic animals. Capsaicin (1 microM) had no acute inhibitory action on cholinergic or purinergic responses, nor did it cause relaxation

  11. Effect of acetylcholine receptors on the pain-related electrical activities in the hippocampal CA3 region of morphine-addicted rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan Zeng Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:To determine the effect of acetylcholine (ACh, pilocarpine, and atropine on pain evoked responses of pain excited neurons (PEN and pain inhibited neurons (PIN in hippocampal CA3 region of morphine addicted rats. Materials and Methods:Female Wistar rats, weighing between 230-260 g were used in this study. Morphine addicted rats were generated by subcutaneous injection of increasing concentrations of morphine hydrochloride for six days. Trains of electrical impulses applied to the sciatic nerve were used as noxious stimulation and the evoked electrical activities of PEN or PIN in hippocampal CA3 area were recorded using extracellular electrophysiological recording techniques in hippocampal slices. The effect of acetylcholine receptor stimulation byACh, the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine, and the muscarinic antagonist atropine on the pain evoked responses of pain related electrical activities was analyzed in hippocampal CA3 area of morphine addicted rats. Results:Intra-CA3 microinjection of ACh (2 μg/1 μl or pilocarpine (2 μg/1 μl decreased the discharge frequency and prolonged the firing latency of PEN, but increased the discharge frequency and shortened the firing inhibitory duration (ID of PIN. The intra-CA3 administration of atropine (0.5 μg/1 μl produced opposite effect. The peak activity of cholinergic modulators was 2 to 4 min later in morphine addicted rats compared to peak activity previously observed in normal rats. Conclusion: ACh dependent modulation of noxious stimulation exists in hippocampal CA3 area of morphine addicted rats. Morphine treatment may shift the sensitivity of pain related neurons towards a delayed response to muscarinergic neurotransmission in hippocampal CA3 region.

  12. In vivo binding, pharmacokinetics and metabolism of the selective M2 muscarinic antagonists [3H]AF-DX 116 and [3H]AF-DX 384 in the anesthetized rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mickala, Patrick; Boutin, Herve; Bellanger, Cecile; Chevalier, Cyril; MacKenzie, Eric T.; Dauphin, Francois

    1996-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics, in vivo binding and metabolism of two M 2 muscarinic receptor antagonists, [ 3 H]AF-DX 116 and [ 3 H]AF-DX 384, were studied in anesthetized rats, which received either the tracer alone or following a saturating injection of atropine. Both radioligands were cleared from the circulation with distribution half-lives of 17 and 14 sec and elimination half-lives of 17 and 40 min for [ 3 H]AF-DX 116 and [ 3 H]AF-DX 384, respectively. A radioactive distribution, predominant in peripheral organs when compared to brain, was found at each time studied after tracer injection. Atropine-displaceable tracer uptake was evidenced at 20-40 min in brain (31%), submandibular glands (26%), spleen (37%) and notably heart (55%) for [ 3 H]AF-DX 116 but only in heart (50%) for [ 3 H]AF-DX 384 at 10-20 min. Regional brain sampling revealed a relatively uniform distribution of [ 3 H]AF-DX 384 and a -45% atropine saturation effect (i.e., specific binding) in the thalamus 20 min after injection. Sequential thin-layer chromatographic studies performed on tissue extracts demonstrated the rapid appearance of labeled metabolites of both radiotracers in brain (but less so in liver) and especially in cardiac tissues, where almost 70% of total radioactivity still corresponded to authentic tracer 40 min after injection. Thus, based on their low blood-brain barrier permeability and the high presence of labeled metabolites in the central nervous system, AF-DX 116 and AF-DX 384 might be more helpful in the study of M 2 muscarinic receptors present in heart rather than brain. Labeled with positron emittors, these M 2 antagonists might be applicable to the pathophysiological study of disease states, such as cardiomyopathies

  13. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of honey: the involvement of autonomic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owoyele, Bamidele Victor; Oladejo, Rasheed Olajiire; Ajomale, Kayode; Ahmed, Rasheedat Omotayo; Mustapha, Abdulrasheed

    2014-03-01

    The use of honey for therapeutic purposes is on the increase and many studies have shown that honey has the ability to influence biological systems including pain transmission. Therefore, this study was designed to investigate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of honey and the effects of concurrent administration of autonomic nervous system blocking drugs. Studies on analgesic activities was carried out using hotplate and formalin-induced paw licking models while the anti-inflammatory activity was by the carrageenan paw oedema method. Animals were distributed into six groups consisting of five animals each. They were administered saline, honey (600 mg/kg), indomethacin (5 mg/kg), autonomic blockers (3 μg/kg of tamsulosin, 20 mg/kg (intraperitoneally) of propranolol, 2 ml/kg of atropine or 10 mg/kg (intra muscularly) of hexamethonium) or honey (200 and 600 mg/kg) with one of the blockers. The results showed that honey reduced pain perception especially inflammatory pain and the administration of tamsulosin and propranolol spared the effect of honey. Hexamethonium also spared the effects of honey at the early and late phases of the test while atropine only inhibited the early phase of the test. However, atropine and hexamethonium spared the anti-inflammatory effects of honey but tamsulosin abolished the effects while propranolol only abolished the anti-inflammatory effects at the peak of the inflammation. The results suggest the involvement of autonomic receptors in the anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of honey although the level of involvement depends on the different types of the receptors.

  14. Pharmacological action of DA-9701 on the motility of feline stomach circular smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanh Thao; Song, Hyun Ju; Ko, Sung Kwon; Sohn, Uy Dong

    2015-03-01

    DA-9701, a new prokinetic agent for the treatment of functional dyspepsia, is formulated with Pharbitis semen and Corydalis tuber. This study wasconducted to determine the pharmacological action of DA-9701 and to identify the receptors involved in DA-9701 -induced contractile responsesin the feline gastric corporal, fundic and antral circular smooth muscle. Concentration-response curve to DA-9701 was established. The tissue trips were exposed to methylsergide, ketanserin, ondansetron, GR 113808, atropine and dopamine before administration of DA-9701. The contractile force was determined before and after administration of drugs by a polygraph.DA-9701 enhanced the spontaneous contractile amplitude of antrum, corpus and fundus. However, it did not change the spontaneous contractile frequency of antrum and corpus, but concentration-dependently reduced that of fundus. In the fundus, DA-9701 -induced tonic contractions were inhibited by dopamine, methylsergide, ketanserine, ondansetron or GR 113808 respectively, but not by atropine, indicating that the contractile responses are mediated by multiple receptors: 5-HT2, 5-HT3, 5-HT4, and dopamine receptors. In the corpus, DA-9701-induced contractions were blocked by atropine, dopamine or GR 113808, but not by methysergide, ketanserin or ondansetron, indicating that they are involved in receptors on both, smooth muscles and neurons: 5-HT4 and dopamine receptors. However, contractile responses to DA-9701 are mainly mediated by dopamine receptors in the antrum. These results suggest that DA-9701 has important roles in gastric accommodation by enhancing tonic activity of fundus, and in gastric emptying and gastrointestinal transit by phasic contractions of corpus and antrum mediated by multiple receptors.

  15. Effect of acetylcholine receptors on the pain-related electrical activities in the hippocampal CA3 region of morphine-addicted rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guan Zeng; Liu, Zhe Hui; Wei, XinYa; Zhao, Pan; Yang, Chun Xiao; Xu, Man Ying

    2015-07-01

    To determine the effect of acetylcholine (ACh), pilocarpine, and atropine on pain evoked responses of pain excited neurons (PEN) and pain inhibited neurons (PIN) in hippocampal CA3 region of morphine addicted rats. Female Wistar rats, weighing between 230-260 g were used in this study. Morphine addicted rats were generated by subcutaneous injection of increasing concentrations of morphine hydrochloride for six days. Trains of electrical impulses applied to the sciatic nerve were used as noxious stimulation and the evoked electrical activities of PEN or PIN in hippocampal CA3 area were recorded using extracellular electrophysiological recording techniques in hippocampal slices. The effect of acetylcholine receptor stimulation by ACh, the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine, and the muscarinic antagonist atropine on the pain evoked responses of pain related electrical activities was analyzed in hippocampal CA3 area of morphine addicted rats. Intra-CA3 microinjection of ACh (2 μg/1 μl) or pilocarpine (2 μg/1 μl) decreased the discharge frequency and prolonged the firing latency of PEN, but increased the discharge frequency and shortened the firing inhibitory duration (ID) of PIN. The intra-CA3 administration of atropine (0.5 μg/1 μl) produced opposite effect. The peak activity of cholinergic modulators was 2 to 4 min later in morphine addicted rats compared to peak activity previously observed in normal rats. ACh dependent modulation of noxious stimulation exists in hippocampal CA3 area of morphine addicted rats. Morphine treatment may shift the sensitivity of pain related neurons towards a delayed response to muscarinergic neurotransmission in hippocampal CA3 region.

  16. Effect of aqueous extract of mango kernel (Mangifera Indica on basal activity of virgin rat uterine smooth muscle: role of muscarinic receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Noureddini

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mango belongs to the Anacardiaceae and the extracts from its stems, leaves, fruit and kernel are reported to affect smooth muscle contractility. We studied the role of cholinergic muscarinic receptors for the effects of aqueous extract of mango kernel (Mangifera indica on the basal activity of virgin rat uterine smooth muscle. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, mid-sections (n=24 of the uterine of healthy virgin rats were placed in an organ bath containing carbonated Tyrode’s solution under 1 g tension. The cumulative effects of the aqueous extracts of mango kernel (0.002, 0.02, 0.2, 2, 20, 200, and 2000 μg/mL or extract vehicle (Tyrode’s solution in the presence or absence of atropine were examined by isometric method using the strength, frequency and contractile activity of uterine smooth muscle. Results: The cumulative concentrations (0.002-20 µg/ml of mango kernel aqueous extract was significantly decreased the strength, frequency and contractile activity of uterine smooth muscle, but the contractile activity was returned to the basal level at the concentrations of 200 and 2000 µg/ml. Atropine (1 µM could not significantly change the effects of cumulative use of extract on the strength and contractile activity of uterine smooth muscle, but it significantly enhanced the contractile frequency at low concentrations. Conclusion: The effects of aqueous extract of mango kernel on the activity of the uterine smooth muscle might not be through cholinergic muscarinic receptors and atropine could enhance the effects of the extract on frequency through other receptors.

  17. Muscarinic activation of Ca2+-activated Cl- current in interstitial cells of Cajal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mei Hong; Sung, In Kyung; Zheng, Haifeng; Sung, Tae Sik; Britton, Fiona C; O'Driscoll, Kate; Koh, Sang Don; Sanders, Kenton M

    2011-09-15

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) provide pacemaker activity and functional bridges between enteric motor nerve terminals and gastrointestinal smooth muscle cells. The ionic conductance(s) in ICC that are activated by excitatory neural inputs are unknown. Transgenic mice (Kit(copGFP/+)) with constitutive expression of a bright green fluorescent protein were used to investigate cellular responses of ICC to cholinergic stimulation. ICC displayed spontaneous transient inward currents (STICs) under voltage clamp that corresponded to spontaneous transient depolarizations (STDs) under current clamp. STICs reversed at 0 mV when E(Cl) = 0 mV and at -40 mV when E(Cl) was -40 mV, suggesting the STICs were due to a chloride conductance. Carbachol (CCh, 100 nm and 1 μm) induced a sustained inward current (depolarization in current clamp) and increased the amplitude and frequency of STICs and STDs. CCh responses were blocked by atropine (10 μm) or 4-DAMP (100 nm), an M(3) receptor antagonist. STDs were blocked by niflumic acid and 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid (both 100 μm), and CCh had no effect in the presence of these drugs. The responses of intact circular muscles to CCh and stimulation of intrinsic excitatory nerves by electrical field stimulation (EFS) were also compared. CCh (1 μm) caused atropine-sensitive depolarization and increased the maximum depolarization of slow waves. Similar atropine-sensitive responses were elicited by stimulation of intrinsic excitatory neurons. Niflumic acid (100 μm) blocked responses to EFS but had minor effect on responses to exogenous CCh. These data suggest that different ionic conductances are responsible for electrical responses elicited by bath-applied CCh and cholinergic nerve stimulation.

  18. Muscarinic activation of Ca2+-activated Cl− current in interstitial cells of Cajal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mei Hong; Sung, In Kyung; Zheng, Haifeng; Sung, Tae Sik; Britton, Fiona C; O'Driscoll, Kate; Koh, Sang Don; Sanders, Kenton M

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) provide pacemaker activity and functional bridges between enteric motor nerve terminals and gastrointestinal smooth muscle cells. The ionic conductance(s) in ICC that are activated by excitatory neural inputs are unknown. Transgenic mice (KitcopGFP/+) with constitutive expression of a bright green fluorescent protein were used to investigate cellular responses of ICC to cholinergic stimulation. ICC displayed spontaneous transient inward currents (STICs) under voltage clamp that corresponded to spontaneous transient depolarizations (STDs) under current clamp. STICs reversed at 0 mV when ECl = 0 mV and at –40 mV when ECl was –40 mV, suggesting the STICs were due to a chloride conductance. Carbachol (CCh, 100 nm and 1 μm) induced a sustained inward current (depolarization in current clamp) and increased the amplitude and frequency of STICs and STDs. CCh responses were blocked by atropine (10 μm) or 4-DAMP (100 nm), an M3 receptor antagonist. STDs were blocked by niflumic acid and 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid (both 100 μm), and CCh had no effect in the presence of these drugs. The responses of intact circular muscles to CCh and stimulation of intrinsic excitatory nerves by electrical field stimulation (EFS) were also compared. CCh (1 μm) caused atropine-sensitive depolarization and increased the maximum depolarization of slow waves. Similar atropine-sensitive responses were elicited by stimulation of intrinsic excitatory neurons. Niflumic acid (100 μm) blocked responses to EFS but had minor effect on responses to exogenous CCh. These data suggest that different ionic conductances are responsible for electrical responses elicited by bath-applied CCh and cholinergic nerve stimulation. PMID:21768263

  19. Adrenergic and cholinergic activity contributes to the cardiovascular effects of lionfish (Pterois volitans) venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Jarrod E; Hodgson, Wayne C

    2002-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to further investigate the cardiovascular activity of Pterois volitans crude venom. Venom (0.6-18 microg protein/ml) produced dose- and endothelium-dependent relaxation in porcine coronary arteries that was potentiated by atropine (10nM), but significantly attenuated by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine (NOLA; 0.1mM), by prior exposure of the tissue to stonefish antivenom (SFAV, 3 units/ml, 10 min), or by removal of extracellular Ca(2+). In rat paced left atria, venom (10 microg protein/ml) produced a decrease, followed by an increase, in contractile force. Atropine (0.5 microM) abolished the decrease in force and potentiated the increase. Propranolol (5 microM) did not affect the decrease in force but significantly attenuated the increase. In spontaneously beating right atria, venom (10 microg protein/ml) produced an increase in rate that was significantly attenuated by propranolol (5 microM). Prior incubation with SFAV (0.3 units/microg protein, 10 min) abolished both the inotropic and chronotropic responses to venom. In the anaesthetised rat, venom (100 micro protein/kg, i.v.) produced a pressor response, followed by a sustained depressor response. Atropine (1mg/kg, i.v.) potentiated the pressor response. The further addition of prazosin (50 microg/kg, i.v.) restored the original response to venom. Prior administration of SFAV (100 units/kg, i.v., 10 min) significantly attenuated the in vivo response to venom. It is concluded that P. volitans venom produces its cardiovascular effects primarily by acting on muscarinic cholinergic receptors and adrenoceptors. As SFAV neutralised many of the effects of P. volitans venom, we suggest that the two venoms share a similar component(s). Copright 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  20. Distinct presynaptic control of dopamine release in striosomal and matrix areas of the cat caudate nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemel, M.L.; Desban, M.; Glowinski, J.; Gauchy, C.

    1989-01-01

    By use of a sensitive in vitro microsuperfusion method, the cholinergic presynaptic control of dopamine release was investigated in a prominent striosome (areas poor in acetylcholinesterase activity) located within the core of cat caudate nucleus and also in adjacent matrix area. The spontaneous release of [ 3 H]dopamine continuously synthesized from [ 3 H]tyrosine in the matrix area was found to be twice that in the striosomal area; the spontaneous and potassium-evoked releases of [ 3 H]dopamine were calcium-dependent in both compartments. With 10 -6 M tetrodotoxin, 5 x 10 -5 M acetylcholine stimulated [ 3 H]dopamine release in both striosomal and matrix areas, effects completely antagonized by atropine, thus showing the involvement of muscarinic receptors located on dopaminergic nerve terminals. Experiments without tetrodotoxin revealed a more complex regulation of dopamine release in the matrix: (i) in contrast to results seen in the striosome, acetylcholine induced only a transient stimulatory effect on matrix dopamine release. (ii) Although 10 -6 M atropine completely abolished the cholinergic stimulatory effect on [ 3 H]dopamine release in striosomal area, delayed and prolonged stimulation of [ 3 H] dopamine release was seen with atropine in the matrix. The latter effect was completely abolished by the nicotinic antagonist pempidine. Therefore, in the matrix, in addition to its direct (tetrodotoxin-insensitive) facilitatory action on [ 3 H]dopamine release, acetylcholine exerts two indirect (tetrodotoxin-sensitive) opposing effects: an inhibition and a stimulation of [ 3 H]dopamine release mediated by muscarinic and nicotinic receptors, respectively

  1. [Experimental study on protective effects of HupA in the treatment of isocarbophos poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Xie, Guang-yun; Wang, Jian; Sun, Jin-xiu

    2006-06-01

    To investigate the therapeutic and prophylactic efficiency of HupA in mice with acute isocarbophos poisoning, and the protective effects of the HupA on AChE inhibited by isocarbophos. Mice were randomizedly divided into the non-treatment group, the atropine control group, the HupA treatment group and the atropine and HupA combined treatment group. Toxic signs and survival rates were observed and compared among these groups. The AChE activity was monitored in the whole blood, the red cells and brain tissue exposed to isocarbophos in the either treated with HupA or non-treated groups. In HupA treatment group compared with the non-treatment group, toxic signs were significantly decreased and the survival rate was increased. The therapeutic efficiency in the atropine and HupA combined treatment group was better than other groups. After isocarbophos was administered, the AChE activity in the HupA treatment group and the non-treatment group was decreased. However, the AChE activity in the whole blood (1.096 +/- 0.111), (1.262 +/- 0.146), (1.181 +/- 0.353) U/ml, the red cells (0.798 +/- 0.063), (1.000 +/- 0.176), (0.837 +/- 0.331) and the brain tissue (13.739 +/- 2.970), (18.507 +/- 3.466), (10.764 +/- 2.212) U/g in HupA treatment group 0.5, 1 and 2 hours after isocarbophos was administered was significantly higher than those in the non-treatment group (P HupA has therapeutic effect on mice with acute isocarbophos poisoning. The protective effect of HupA on blood and brain AChE inhibited by isocarbophos may be one of the mechanisms of the therapeutic effect of HupA in acute Isocarbophos poisoning.

  2. Contribution of the autonomic nervous system to blood pressure and heart rate variability changes in early experimental hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safa-Tisseront, V; Ponchon, P; Laude, D; Elghozi, J L

    1998-07-10

    A great deal of uncertainty persists regarding the exact nature of the interaction between autonomic nervous system activity and thyroid hormones in the control of heart rate and blood pressure. We now report on thyrotoxicosis produced by daily intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of L-thyroxine (0.5 mg/kg body wt. in 1 ml of 5 mM NaOH for 5 days). Control rats received i.p. daily injections of the thyroxine solvent. In order to estimate the degree of autonomic activation in hyperthyroidism, specific blockers were administered intravenously: atropine (0.5 mg/kg), prazosin (1 mg/kg), atenolol (1 mg/kg) or the combination of atenolol and atropine. A jet of air was administered in other animals to induce sympathoactivation. Eight animals were studied in each group. The dose and duration of L-thyroxine treatment was sufficient to induce a significant degree of hyperthyroidism with accompanying tachycardia, systolic blood pressure elevation, increased pulse pressure, cardiac hypertrophy, weight loss, tachypnea and hyperthermia. In addition, the intrinsic heart period observed after double blockade (atenolol + atropine) was markedly decreased after treatment with L-thyroxine (121.5+/-3.6 ms vs. 141.2+/-3.7 ms, P hyperthyroidism and in these rats the jet of air did not significantly affect the heart period level. The thyrotoxicosis was associated with a reduction of the 0.4 Hz component of blood pressure variability (analyses on 102.4 s segments, modulus 1.10+/-0.07 vs. 1.41+/-0.06 mm Hg, P hyperthyroidism. The marked rise in the intrinsic heart rate could be the main determinant of tachycardia. The blood pressure elevation may reflexly induce vagal activation and sympathetic (vascular and cardiac) inhibition.

  3. Is the World Health Organization-recommended dose of pralidoxime effective in the treatment of organophosphorus poisoning? A randomized, double-blinded and placebo-controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumaya Syed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Organophosphorus poisoning (OPP is a major global public health problem. Pralidoxime has been used in a complimentary role to atropine for the management of OPP. World Health Organization (WHO recommends use of pralidoxime but studies regarding its role have been inconclusive, ranging from being ineffective to harmful or beneficial. Materials and Methods: The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of pralidoxime. Eddleston′s study was the most compelling factor for our study, as he showed worst outcomes using pralidoxime. Our practice of continuous use of pralidoxime was based on the WHO guidelines and the study by Pawar (2006, which showed better outcome with higher doses of pralidoxime. These conflicting results suggested that a re-evaluation of its use in our clinical practice was indicated. Results: There was no difference in mortality rates, hemodynamic parameters and atropine requirements between the AP and A groups. Mean duration of ventilation (3.6 ± 4.6 in AP group vs. 3.6 ± 4.4 in A group and Intensive Care Unit stay (7.1 ± 5.4 in AP group vs. 6.8 ± 4.7 in A group was comparable. Serum sodium concentrations showed a correlation with mortality, with lower concentrations associated with better outcomes. Conclusion: The study suggests that add-on WHO-recommended pralidoxime therapy does not provide any benefit over atropine monotherapy. Adding pralidoxime does not seem to be beneficial and at the same time does not result in increased mortality rates. Our practice changed after completion of this study, and it has proven to be of significant benefit to patients who had to bear the expense of treatment.

  4. Modulation of the release of ( sup 3 H)norepinephrine from the base and body of the rat urinary bladder by endogenous adrenergic and cholinergic mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somogyi, G.T.; de Groat, W.C. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Modulation of (3H)NE release was studied in rat urinary bladder strips prelabeled with (3H)NE. (3H)NE uptake occurred in strips from the bladder base and body, but was very prominent in the base where the noradrenergic innervation is most dense. Electrical field stimulation markedly increased (3H)NE outflow from the superfused tissue. The quantity of (3H)NE release was approximately equal during three consecutive periods of stimulation. Activation of presynaptic muscarinic receptors by 1.0 microM oxotremorine reduced (3H)NE release to 46% of the control. Atropine (1 microM) blocked the effect of oxotremorine and increased the release to 147% of predrug control levels. Activation of presynaptic alpha-2 adrenoceptors by 1 microM clonidine reduced (3H)NE release to 55% of control. Yohimbine blocked the action of clonidine and increased the release to 148% of control. The release of (3H)NE from the bladder base and body was increased by both 1 microM atropine (to 167% and 174% of control, respectively) and 1 microM yohimbine (to 286% and 425% of control, respectively). Atropine and yohimbine administered in combination had similar facilitatory effects as when administered alone. We conclude that the release of (3H)NE from adrenergic nerve endings in electrically stimulated bladder strips is modulated via endogenous transmitters acting on both muscarinic and alpha-2 adrenergic presynaptic receptors and that the latter provide the most prominent control.

  5. Assessment of antidiarrhoeal activity of the methanol extract of Xylocarpus granatum bark in mice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouf, Razina; Uddin, Shaikh Jamal; Shilpi, Jamil Ahmad; Alamgir, Mahiuddin

    2007-02-12

    The methanol extract of Xylocarpus granatum bark was studied for its antidiarrhoeal properties in experimental diarrhoea, induced by castor oil and magnesium sulphate in mice. At the doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg per oral, the methanol extract showed significant and dose-dependent antidiarrhoeal activity in both models. The extracts also significantly reduced the intestinal transit in charcoal meal test when compared to atropine sulphate (5 mg/kg; i.m.). The results showed that the extracts of Xylocarpus granatum bark have a significant antidiarrhoeal activity and supports its traditional uses in herbal medicine.

  6. Proceedings of the Annual Chemical Defense Bioscience Review (5th) Held at Columbia, Maryland on 29-31 May 1985. Appendix 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-06-01

    Increases Sensitivity to Stress in Rats ........... . A-1373 Dr. G.J. Kant Atropine and 2- PAN Elicit Stress-Induced Convulsions in Mice...RAMIFY IN STRATA 2 AND 4 OF THE INNER PLEXIFORM LAYER AS DO CHOLINERGIC CELLS OF RABBIT, RAT, PIG, CHICKEN , AND GOLDFISH. 3. CELLS IN THE POSITION OF...A " A// 60 -/ A ’A 200 10 . ). >. w c cm It co ~ 0.1 1 10 10 Survival Tirne-(Hours)0 COMPRISN OF RiorwFmiCAi PECOX/ FRY ri IRVFq FfOR FORFRRAIi (FILLED

  7. SUSPECTED CARBARYL TOXICITY IN A CAPTIVE COLONY OF STRAW-COLORED FRUIT BATS ( EIDOLON HELVUM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selig, Michael; Lewandowski, Albert

    2017-12-01

    Carbaryl was the first carbamate insecticide produced and remains the most widely used due to its perceived low level of toxicity in nontarget species. This report describes the management and evaluation of a group of straw-colored fruit bats, Eidolon helvum, that were exposed to carbaryl. Cholinesterase activity of blood, retina, and brain was evaluated to further investigate whether carbaryl was the causative agent. Decreased whole blood and retinal cholinesterase activity coupled with the response to atropine suggests that the cause of the clinical signs in this bat colony was due to carbaryl exposure. Whole blood and retinal tissue may be the best samples for confirming carbamate exposure in this species.

  8. Comparative study of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors of human and rat cortical glial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demushkin, V.P.; Burbaeva, G.S.; Dzhaliashvili, T.A.; Plyashkevich, Y.G.

    1985-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation was a comparative studyof muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in human and rat glial cells. ( 3 H)Quinuclidinyl-benzylate (( 3 H)-QB), atropine, platiphylline, decamethonium, carbamylcholine, tubocurarine, and nicotine were used. The glial cell fraction was obtained from the cerebral cortex of rats weighing 130-140 g and from the frontal pole of the postmortem brain from men aged 60-70 years. The use of the method of radioimmune binding of ( 3 H)-QB with human and rat glial cell membranes demonstrated the presence of a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor in the glial cells

  9. Clear lens extraction for the treatment of persistent accommodative spasm after head trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurray, Catherine J; Burley, Celeste D; Elder, Mark J

    2004-12-01

    We report the case of a 28-year-old man with decreased visual acuity after closed head trauma sustained in a motor vehicle accident 16 weeks earlier. Several structures thought to be associated with the control of accommodation were injured. The patient had a persistent accommodative spasm causing up to 7.0 diopters of pseudomyopia. We present the patient's progress through the clinic, including manifest and cycloplegic refractions and results of a trial with atropine drops, and successful transition to bilateral pseudophakia 2 years and 9 months after the accident.

  10. Digoxinforgiftning hos et spædbarn grundet forveksling af flasker med magistrelt fremstillet medicin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Louise Lindholdt; Herskind, Anne Maria

    2014-01-01

    -fragment and atropine. After three days of hospitalization she was discharged well-being. We suspect that the explanation for this intoxication is due to confusion of bottles of magistral preparations of medicine, as they were very identical. Therefore we call for increased attention in children receiving this type......We hereby describe a case report of a 9-month-old girl, who was accidentally intoxicated with digoxin since her parents by mistake gave her digoxin instead of propranolol. At admission sinusbradycardia and a first-degree atrioventricular block was found and she was treated with antidigitalis Fab...

  11. Characterization of the positive and negative inotropic effects of acetylcholine in the human myocardium

    OpenAIRE

    Du, Xiaoyi; Schoemaker, Regien; Bos, Egbert; Saxena, Pramod Ranjan

    1995-01-01

    textabstractIn the human isolated myocardium, acetylcholine (10−9 to 10−3 M) elicited a biphasic inotropic effect (a decrease in the lower and an increase in the higher concentration range) in atrial and a positive inotropic effect in ventricular trabeculae. However, under conditions of raised contractility achieved by exposure to noradrenaline (10−5 M), only negative inotropic effects were observed in both atria and ventricles. Atropine (10−6 M), but not propranolol (10−6 M), antagonized bot...

  12. [Deadly nightshade (Atropa belladonna) intoxication in a 2-year-old child].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffargue, F; Oudot, C; Constanty, A; Bedu, A; Ketterer-Martinon, S

    2011-02-01

    Plant intoxications account for 5% of all intoxication cases according to French anti-poison centers. We report an uncommon case of intoxication with deadly nightshade (Atropa belladonna) in a 2-year-old child. The child presented at the ER with an atropinic syndrome, both central and peripheral, after ingestion of wild berries a few hours before. The fruit and leaves brought in by the mother allowed the anti-poison center to identify belladonna, in agreement with clinical findings. The child was kept in the intensive care unit for 48 h and progression was favorable with symptomatic treatment. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. The inhibition of phosphodiesterase type 5 as a novel target for antidepressant action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liebenberg, Nico

    2010-01-01

    therapy of depression. A recent study from our laboratory reported an antidepressant-like response in the rat forced swim test (FST) following chronic (11 day) co-administration of the phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitor sildenafil and the muscarinic acetylcholine (mACh) receptor antagonist atropine...... rats were treated with vehicle/drug(s) for 14 days, whereafter immobility, swimming and climbing behaviours were measured in the FST, or time spent in social interaction in the social interaction test. Following decapitation, saturation binding studies were performed for the measurement of m...

  14. Neuropharmacology of vision in goldfish: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Ferrer, Carlos; Neumeyer, Christa

    2009-05-01

    The goldfish is one of the few animals exceptionally well analyzed in behavioral experiments and also in electrophysiological and neuroanatomical investigations of the retina. To get insight into the functional organization of the retina we studied color vision, motion detection and temporal resolution before and after intra-ocular injection of neuropharmaca with known effects on retinal neurons. Bicuculline, strychnine, curare, atropine, and dopamine D1- and D2-receptor antagonists were used. The results reviewed here indicate separate and parallel processing of L-cone contribution to different visual functions, and the influence of several neurotransmitters (dopamine, acetylcholine, glycine, and GABA) on motion vision, color vision, and temporal resolution.

  15. The mechanism of gastrin release in cysteamine-induced duodenal ulcer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1982-01-01

    a rise in serum gastrin from 29 +/- 5 pg/ml to a maximum of 203 +/- 62 pg/ml after 3 h in unoperated rats, whereas no rise was seen in vagotomized or antrectomized rats. The beta-adrenergic blocking agent propranolol strongly inhibited cysteamine-induced gastrin release, whereas atropine dependent......Duodenal ulcer can be induced in rats by a single dose of cysteamine. The ulcer formation is accompanied by acid hypersecretion and elevated serum gastrin levels. This study was performed to elucidate the mechanisms of gastrin release after an ulcerogenic dose of cysteamine. Cysteamine induced...

  16. Plasma volume changes during hypoglycaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Christensen, N J

    1991-01-01

    -induced hypoglycaemia with total autonomic blockade (alpha-adrenoceptor blockade combined with beta-adrenoceptor blockade and atropine); and insulin-induced hypoglycaemia without any autonomic blockade. In the experiments without autonomic blockade the peripheral venous hematocrit increased, plasma volume decreased......, intravascular albumin content decreased and the transcapillary escape rate of albumin increased. In both experiments with autonomic blockade the increase in venous haematocrit was abolished, yet plasma volume decreased, intravascular albumin content decreased and the transcapillary escape rate of albumin...... increased in these experiments. Thus, the changes in plasma volume and composition in response to hypoglycaemia are due to the combined actions of adrenaline and of insulin....

  17. Peculiarities of autonomic regulation assessed by variability of hemodynamic parameters in rats with different stress resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirillina, T N; Usacheva, M A; Belkina, L M

    2006-10-01

    Analysis of contribution of sympathetic and parasympathetic systems into heart rate variability carried out using atenolol and atropine showed that August rats are characterized by enhanced tone of the sympathetic system and reduced tone of the parasympathetic system compared to Wistar rats. Reduced tone of the parasympathetic system is also confirmed by lower sensitivity of the baroreflex. Blockade of NO synthesis with Nw-nitro-L-arginine more markedly increased blood pressure variability in August rats compared to Wistar rats. The data attest to a certain rigidity of the autonomic cardiovascular regulation in August rats.

  18. Neurovascular and Autonomic Dysfunction Associated with Gulf War Illness Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    muscarinic receptor function in guinea pig airway nerves via indirect mechanisms." PLoS One 5(5): e10562. Pung, T., B. Klein, D. Blodgett, B. Jortner and...116 Worek, F. and L. Szinicz (1995). "Cardiorespiratory function in nerve agent poisoned and oxime + atropine treated guinea - pigs : effect of...31 6. Products ……………………………………………………………… 31 7. Participants & Other Collaborating Organizations………………. 36 8. Special Reporting

  19. Dual action of antimuscarinic agents on the intestinal smooth muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acharya SRK

    1979-01-01

    Full Text Available Propantheline, oxyphenonium, isoproponaide, epidosine, adiphe-nine and atropine were studied for their effect on the superfused infesting of guinea pig and rat. In small, concentrations, all drugs produced a contraction, which with increasing concentration, was Hocked. Occasionally, a contraction and a relaxation or vice versa was recorded. A partial antagonism and a potentiation on the action of acetylcholine (Ach during recovery was observed. In very high concentrations, all drugs produced a graded contraction of intestine, except adiphenine which produced a sustained contraction. Some- times, a contraction and a relaxation was also observed.

  20. Species and tissue-specificity of prokinetic, laxative and spasmodic effects of Fumaria parviflora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najeeb-ur-Rehman

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fumaria parviflora Linn. (Fumariaceae, is a small branched annual herb found in many parts of the world including Saudi Arabia and Pakistan. This study was designed to provide pharmacological basis for the medicinal use of Fumaria parviflora in gut motility disorders. Methods The in-vivo prokinetic and laxative assays were conducted in mice. Isolated intestinal preparations (ileum and jejunum from different animal species (mouse, guinea-pig and rabbit were separately suspended in tissue baths containing Tyrode's solution bubbled with carbogen and maintained at 37°C. The spasmogenic responses were recorded using isotonic transducers coupled with PowerLab data acquisition system. Results The aqueous-methanol extract of Fumaria parviflora (Fp.Cr, which tested positive for the presence of alkaloids, saponins, tannins and anthraquinones showed partially atropine-sensitive prokinetic and laxative activities in the in-vivo in mice at 30 and 100 mg/kg. In the in-vitro studies, Fp.Cr (0.01-1 mg/ml caused a concentration-dependent atropine-sensitive stimulatory effect both in mouse tissues (jejunum and ileum, and rabbit jejunum but had no effect in rabbit ileum. In guinea-pig tissues (ileum and jejunum, the crude extract showed a concentration-dependent stimulatory effect with higher efficacy in ileum and the effect was partially blocked by atropine, indicating the involvement of more than one types of gut-stimulant components (atropine-sensitive and insensitive. This could be a plausible reason for the greater efficacy of Fp.Cr in gut preparations of guinea-pig than in rabbit or mouse. Conclusions This study shows the prokinetic, laxative and spasmodic effects of the plant extract partially mediated through cholinergic pathways with species and tissue-selectivity, and provides a sound rationale for the medicinal use of Fumaria parviflora in gut motility disorders such as, indigestion and constipation. This study also suggests using

  1. Datura Stramonium Abuse: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhittin Yilmaz

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Datura stramonium, known as devils apple or tatula by the people of Turkey, is a plant known member of a belladonna alkaloid family contains atropine, hyoscyamine and scopolamine having hallucinogenic and anticholinergic effects. 19 years old male patient admitted to emergency department (ED by his relatives with the complaints of altered mental status, and meaningless speech. History revealed that patient consumed %u201CDatura stramonium%u201D for entertainment about 4 hours before the development of symptoms. In our study we described a case presented by delirium to our emergency department later diagnosed as Datura stramonium poisoning.

  2. Symptoms, adverse effects, and complications associated with dobutamine stress echocardiography. Experience in 1118 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertes, H; Sawada, S G; Ryan, T; Segar, D S; Kovacs, R; Foltz, J; Feigenbaum, H

    1993-07-01

    The use of dobutamine stress echocardiography for the evaluation of coronary artery disease is rapidly expanding. New applications of the technique are being investigated in a wide variety of patients including those with advanced coronary artery disease. Despite its widespread use, the safety of dobutamine stress echocardiography has not been sufficiently documented. A consecutive series of 1118 patients undergoing dobutamine stress echocardiography for evaluation of known or suspected coronary artery disease form the basis of this report. Dobutamine stress testing was performed for evaluation of chest pain, risk assessment before noncardiac surgery, after recent myocardial infarction, or as a part of ongoing research protocols. Over the study period, the maximal dose of dobutamine used was increased from 30 to 50 micrograms/kg per minute, and atropine was used in 420 (37%) patients. There were no occurrences of death, myocardial infarction, or episodes of sustained ventricular tachycardia as a result of dobutamine stress testing. The major reasons for test termination were achievement of target heart rate in 583 patients (52.1%), maximum dose in 255 (22.8%), and angina pectoris in 142 (13%). The test was terminated in 36 (3%) patients because of noncardiac side effects including nausea, anxiety, headache, tremor, and urgency. Angina pectoris occurred in 216 (19.3%) patients. Sublingual nitroglycerin, a short-acting beta-blocker, or both types of medication were administered in 80 of these patients for relief of angina pectoris. None required intravenous nitroglycerin. A total of 736 (65%) patients had stable sinus rhythm throughout the test. The most common arrhythmias were frequent premature ventricular complexes (six or more per minute) in 172 patients (15%), and frequent premature atrial complexes in 86 (8%). There were 40 patients with nonsustained ventricular tachycardia. None had symptoms associated with the tachycardia, and only one received specific

  3. Interventional ovarian tube catheterization in treating tubal ectopic pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Yi; Xiong Linhui; Du Pianqin; Chen Jiabin

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To explore the feasibility and curative effect of treating tubal pregnancy through the fallopian tube with interventional catheterization decrease the difficulty of the procedure and shorten the consuming time. Methods: Applying the method of interventional catheterization of fallopian tube and injecting 0.5 mg atropine at the cervix beforehand, then 70 mg MTX was administered into the fallopian tube. Results: 113 patients were successfully recovered with health except one without any adversary complication. Conclusions: The interventional fallopian tube catheterization for treating ectopic pregnancy is a simple, safe, minitraumatic, quick and effective method. (authors)

  4. Bradycardia after Tube Thoracostomy for Spontaneous Pneumothorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yomi Fashola

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of an elderly patient who became bradycardic after chest tube insertion for spontaneous pneumothorax. Arrhythmia is a rare complication of tube thoracostomy. Unlike other reported cases of chest tube induced arrhythmias, the bradycardia in our patient responded to resuscitative measures without removal or repositioning of the tube. Our patient, who had COPD, presented with shortness of breath due to spontaneous pneumothorax. Moments after tube insertion, patient developed severe bradycardia that responded to Atropine. In patients requiring chest tube insertion, it is important to be prepared to provide cardiopulmonary resuscitative therapy in case the patient develops a life-threatening arrhythmia.

  5. The modulatory role of M2 muscarinic receptor on apomorphine-induced yawning and genital grooming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamberini, Maria Thereza; Bolognesi, Maria Laura; Nasello, Antonia Gladys

    2012-12-07

    The interaction between dopaminergic and cholinergic pathways in the induction of behavioral responses has been previously established. In the brain, M2 receptors are found predominantly in presynaptic cholinergic neurons as autoreceptors, and in dopaminergic neurons as heteroceptors, suggesting a control role of acetylcholine and dopamine release, respectively. Our aim was to investigate the role of M2 receptors on the yawning and genital grooming of rats induced by apomorphine, a dopaminergic receptor agonist, focusing on the interaction between cholinergic and dopaminergic pathways. Initially, the effect of atropine, a non-selective muscarinic antagonist, on yawning and genital grooming induced by apomorphine (100 μg/kg s.c.) was analyzed. Atropine doses of 0.5, 1 and 2 mg/kg i.p. were administered to Wistar rats 30 min before induction of the behavioral responses by apomorphine. Number of yawns and time spent genital grooming were quantified over a 60 min period. Apomorphine-induced yawning was increased by low dose (0.5 mg/kg i.p.) but not by high doses (1 and 2 mg/kg, i.p.) of atropine. Genital grooming was antagonized by 2 mg/kg i.p. of atropine and showed no changes at the other doses tested. Tripitramine, a selective M2 cholinergic antagonist, was used as a tool for distinguishing between M2 and all other muscarinic receptor subtypes in yawning and genital grooming. Tripitramine doses of 0.01, 0.02 and 0.04 μmol/kg i.p. were administered to Wistar rats 30 min before apomorphine (100 μg/kg s.c.). Number of yawns and time spent genital grooming were also quantified over a 60 min period. Tripitramine 0.01 μmol/kg increased all parameters. Higher doses, which possibly block all subtypes of muscarinic receptor, did not modify the response of apomorphine, suggesting a non-selective effect of tripitramine at these doses. Given that low doses of tripitramine increased the behavioral responses induced by apomorphine and that the main distribution of the M2

  6. Asystole Following Profound Vagal Stimulation During Hepatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeta John

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Asystole in a non laparoscopic upper abdominal surgery following intense vagal stimulation is a rare event. This case report highlights the need for awareness of such a complication when a thoracic epidural anaesthetic has been given in addition to a general anaesthetic for an upper abdominal procedure. A combined thoracic epidural and general anaesthetic was given. The anterior abdominal wall was retracted forty minutes after administration of the epidural bolus. This maneuver resulted in a profound vagal response with bradycardia and asystole. The patient was resuscitated successfully with a cardiac massage, atropine and adrenaline and the surgery was resumed. Surgery lasted eleven hours and was uneventful.

  7. Hypotensive and vasorelaxant effects of citronellol, a monoterpene alcohol, in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, Joana F A; Moreira, Italo J A; Ribeiro, Thaís P; Medeiros, Isac A; Antoniolli, Angelo R; De Sousa, Damião P; Santos, Márcio R V

    2010-04-01

    Citronellol is an essential oil constituent from the medicinal plants Cymbopogon citratus, Cymbopogon winterianus and Lippia alba which are thought to possess antihypertensive properties. Citronellol-induced cardiovascular effects were evaluated in this study. In rats, citronellol (1-20 mg/kg, i.v.) induced hypotension, which was not affected by pre-treatment with atropine, hexamethonium, N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride or indomethacin, and tachycardia, which was only attenuated by pre-treatment with atropine and hexamethonium. These responses were less than those obtained for nifedipine, a reference drug. In intact rings of rat mesenteric artery pre-contracted with 10 microM phenylephrine, citronellol induced relaxations (pD(2) = 0.71 +/- 0.11; E(max) = 102 +/- 5%; n = 6) that were not affected by endothelium removal, after tetraethylamonium in rings without endothelium pre-contracted with KCl 80 mM. Citronellol strongly antagonized (maximal inhibition = 97 +/- 4%; n = 6) the contractions induced by CaCl(2) (10(-6) to 3 x 10(-3 )M) and did not induce additional effects on the maximal response of nifedipine (10 microM). Finally, citronellol inhibited the contractions induced by 10 microM phenylephrine or 20 mM caffeine. The present results suggest that citronellol lowers blood pressure by a direct effect on the vascular smooth muscle leading to vasodilation.

  8. Fatal Clostridium botulinum toxicosis in eleven Holstein cattle fed round bale barley haylage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelch, W J; Kerr, L A; Pringle, J K; Rohrbach, B W; Whitlock, R H

    2000-09-01

    Twenty-two lactating Holstein cattle in Tennessee had clinical signs of intoxication with preformed Clostridium botulinum toxin. These signs included weakness, paralysis of the tongue and chest muscles, abdominal breathing, and, in 11 of the 22 cows, death. Differential diagnoses included hypocalcemia, hypomagnesemia, carbohydrate overload, and several toxicoses including mycotoxin, lead, nitrate, organophosphate, atropine or atropine-like alkaloid, and botulism. A diagnosis of botulism by the ingestion of preformed C. botulinum type B toxin was made by eliminating these other diseases, by finding C. botulinum type B spores in 3 bales of round bale barley haylage fed to these cattle, and by isolating preformed type B toxin from 1 of the 3 bales. Confirmation of the toxin type was made by demonstrating mouse lethality by intraperitoneal injection of specimen extracts with neutralization by C. botulinum type B antitoxin. The haylage, harvested green and encased in black plastic bags to facilitate fermentation, was presumably contaminated by the botulinum toxin when fermentation failed to produce enough acid to lower the pH to 4.5, the pH below which C. botulinum growth is inhibited. Farmers and ranchers who use round hay balers to produce haylage should be alert to this potential problem.

  9. Adaptive divergence in resistance to herbivores in Datura stramonium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Castillo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Defensive traits exhibited by plants vary widely across populations. Heritable phenotypic differentiation is likely to be produced by genetic drift and spatially restricted gene flow between populations. However, spatially variable selection exerted by herbivores may also give rise to differences among populations. To explore to what extent these factors promote the among-population differentiation of plant resistance of 13 populations of Datura stramonium, we compared the degree of phenotypic differentiation (PST of leaf resistance traits (trichome density, atropine and scopolamine concentration against neutral genetic differentiation (FST at microsatellite loci. Results showed that phenotypic differentiation in defensive traits among-population is not consistent with divergence promoted by genetic drift and restricted gene flow alone. Phenotypic differentiation in scopolamine concentration was significantly higher than FST across the range of trait heritability values. In contrast, genetic differentiation in trichome density was different from FST only when heritability was very low. On the other hand, differentiation in atropine concentration differed from the neutral expectation when heritability was less than or equal to 0.3. In addition, we did not find a significant correlation between pair-wise neutral genetic distances and distances of phenotypic resistance traits. Our findings reinforce previous evidence that divergent natural selection exerted by herbivores has promoted the among-population phenotypic differentiation of defensive traits in D. stramonium.

  10. Gallic acid, a phenolic compound isolated from Mimosa bimucronata (DC.) Kuntze leaves, induces diuresis and saluresis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlickmann, Fabile; Boeing, Thaise; Mariano, Luisa Nathália Bolda; da Silva, Rita de Cássia Melo Vilhena de Andrade Fonseca; da Silva, Luisa Mota; de Andrade, Sérgio Faloni; de Souza, Priscila; Cechinel-Filho, Valdir

    2018-06-01

    Although present in the leaves of Mimosa bimucronata (DC.) and many other medicinal plants commonly used to augment urinary volume excretion, the effects of gallic acid as a diuretic agent remain to be studied. Wistar rats were orally treated with vehicle, hydrochlorothiazide, or gallic acid. The effects of gallic acid in the presence of hydrochlorothiazide, furosemide, amiloride, L-NAME, atropine, and indomethacin were also investigated. Diuretic index, pH, conductivity, and electrolyte excretion were evaluated at the end of the experiment (after 8 or 24 h). Gallic acid induced diuretic and saluretic (Na + and Cl - ) effects, without interfering with K + excretion, when orally given to female and male rats at a dose of 3 mg/kg. These effects were associated with increased creatinine and conductivity values while pH was unaffected by any of the treatments. Plasma Na + , K + , and Cl - levels were not affected by any of the acute treatments. The combination with hydrochlorothiazide or furosemide was unable to intensify the effects of gallic acid when compared with the response obtained with each drug alone. On the other hand, the treatment with amiloride plus gallic acid amplified both diuresis and saluresis, besides to a marked potassium-sparing effect. Its diuretic action was significantly prevented in the presence of indomethacin, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, but not with the pretreatments with L-NAME or atropine. Although several biological activities have already been described for gallic acid, this is the first study demonstrating its potential as a diuretic agent.

  11. Orthostatic Dysregulation during Postural Change on the Dental Chair and Intraoperative Monitoring by Heart Rate Variability Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukihiro Momota

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This is the first case report of orthostatic dysregulation (OD manifested during postural change on the dental chair and intraoperatively monitored by heart rate variability (HRV analysis. OD-associated autonomic dysfunction is induced by postural changes and easily leads to disturbance in circulatory dynamics; however, most dental practices have not yet realized the importance of managing OD. We measured autonomic activity in a patient with OD during dental therapy and assessed the clinical significance of HRV analysis for OD. The patient was a 17-year-old Japanese female. She was diagnosed with impacted wisdom teeth and had no previous history of a distinct systemic disease. A surgical procedure to extract the teeth was safely performed under both local anesthesia and sedation with nitrous oxide and midazolam. After the surgery, her postural change to sitting induced orthostatic hypotension. HRV variables showed parasympathetic dominance due to the upright position. Subsequently, her posture was returned to supine, and atropine sulfate administration for the immediate treatment of OD returned her blood pressure to normal levels. HRV variables showed relative sympathetic dominance due to an atropine-derived parasympathetic blockade. HRV analysis revealed OD-associated autonomic dysfunction and should become a standard tool for safe and secure dental management of OD.

  12. Analgesic effects of stem bark extracts of Trichilia monadelpha (Thonn.) JJ De Wilde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woode, Eric; Amoh-Barimah, Ama Kyeraa; Abotsi, Wonder Kofi Mensah; Ainooson, George Kwaw; Owusu, George

    2012-01-01

    Various parts of Trichilia monadelpha (Thonn) JJ De Wilde (Fam. Meliaceae) are used in Ghanaian traditional medicine for the treatment of painful and inflammatory conditions. The present study examined the analgesic properties of the petroleum ether (PEE), ethyl acetate (EAE), and the hydro-ethanolic (HAE) extract of the stem bark of the plant in murine models. PEE, EAE, and HAE were assessed in chemical (acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing and formalin tests), thermal (hot plate test), and mechanical (Randall-Selitto paw pressure test) pain models. The possible mechanisms of the antinociceptive action were also examined with various antagonists in the formalin test. HAE, EAE, and PEE, each at doses of 10-100 mg/kg orally, and the positive controls (morphine and diclofenac) elicited significant dose-dependent antinociceptive activity in the chemical (acetic acid abdominal writhing and formalin tests), thermal (hot plate test), and mechanical (Randall-Selitto paw pressure test) pain models in rodents. The antinociceptive effect of HAE was partly or wholly reversed by systemic administration of atropine, naloxone, and glibenclamide. The antinociceptive effects of EAE and PEE were inhibited by atropine. The extracts HAE, EAE, and PEE caused dose-related antinociception in chemical, thermal, and mechanical models of pain in animals. The mechanism of action of HAE involves an interaction with muscarinic cholinergic, adenosinergic, opioidergic pathways, and ATP-sensitive K+ channels while that of EAE and PEE involve the muscarinic cholinergic system.

  13. The effect of the management with fresh frozen plasma on the outcome of patients with acute organophosphate poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameh Saad

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Organophosphate (OP poisoning is an important reason for hospitals and intensive care units admission in the developing countries. OP poisoning patients are classically treated with atropine and oximes, these methods are sometimes shown to be of limited benefit. Objective: Assessment of the effectiveness of the management with fresh frozen plasma (FFP in improving the outcome of patients with acute OP poisoning. Patient and Methods: A randomized clinical trial study was conducted upon 70 acute OP poisoning patients that were referred to the Emergency Department, Suez Canal University Hospital, Ismailia, Egypt. These patients were randomly divided into two groups (35 each; Control group: Treated with the traditional management protocol of OP (atropine and oximes. FFP group: Treated with the traditional management protocol of OP plus FFP. Results: No significant difference was found in cholinesterase level on admission between both groups, Serum cholinesterase level in the FFP group significantly increased after an hour of FFP infusion (2.48 iu/ml vs. 10.36 iu/ml p

  14. Unilateral anterior uveitis complicating zoledronic acid therapy in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Saghir Nagi S

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Zoledronic acid is very widely used in patients with metastatic bone disease and osteoporosis. Only one case of bilateral uveitis was recently reported related to its use. Case presentation We report the first case of severe unilateral anterior uveitis in a patient with breast cancer and an intraocular lens. Following zoledronic acid infusion, the patient developed severe and dramatic right eye pain with decreased visual acuity within 24 hours and was found to have a fibrinous anterior uveitis of moderate severity The patient was treated with topical prednisone and atropine eyedrops and recovered slowly over several months. Conclusion Internists, oncologists, endocrinologists, and ophtalmologists should be aware of uveitis as a possible complication of zoledronic acid therapy. Patients should be instructed to report immediately to their physicians and treatment with topical prednisone and atropine eyedrops should be instituted immediately at the onset of symptoms. This report documents anterior uveitis as a complication of zoledronic acid therapy. This reaction could be an idiosyncratic one but further research may shed more light on the etiology.

  15. Botulinum Toxin as an Alternative to Treat the Spasm of the Near Reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laria, Carlos; Merino-Suárez, María L; Piñero, David P; Gómez-Hurtado, Arantxa; Pérez-Cambrodí, Rafael J

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of an eight-year-old girl with complaints of headaches and blurred vision (uncorrected visual acuity: 0.1 decimal) that showed on examination miotic pupils, pseudomyopia, no ocular motility restrictions, and no associated neurological disease. After initial treatment with cyclopentolate for two months, pseudomyopia persisted with an intermittent and variable esotropia. Spectacles of +1 both eyes and atropine 1% one drop daily were then prescribed. The situation improved and remained stable for several weeks, with pseudomyopia and esotropia reappearing later. Finally, botulinum toxin (2.5 iu Botox) was injected in the medial rectus muscle on two occasions and a visual therapy program based on the stimulation of fusional divergence, diplopia, and stereopsis consciousness was recommended. This prescription was combined with the use of atropine during the first few weeks. Orthotropia and corrected distance visual acuity of 1.0 were found three months after treatment. The evolution and clinical results of this case report suggest that botulinum toxin in combination with other therapeutic alternatives may be useful in the treatment of spasm of the near reflex.

  16. Control of cerebral cortical blood flow by stimulation of basal forebrain cholinergic areas in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Harumi; Uchida, Sae; Kagitani, Fusako; Maruyama, Naoki

    2011-05-01

    We examined whether activity of the nucleus basalis of Meynert (NBM) regulates regional cerebral cortical blood flow (rCBF) in mice, using laser speckle and laser Doppler flowmetry. In anesthetized mice, unilateral focal stimulation, either electrical or chemical, of the NBM increased rCBF of the ipsilateral cerebral cortex in the frontal, parietal and occipital lobes, independent of changes in systemic blood pressure. Most of vasodilative responses to low intensity stimuli (2 times threshold intensity: 2T) were abolished by atropine (a muscarinic cholinergic blocker), whereas responses to higher intensity stimuli (3T) were abolished by atropine and mecamylamine (a nicotinic cholinergic blocker). Blood flow changes were largest when the tip of the electrode was located within the area containing cholinergic neurons shown by choline acetyltransferase-immunocytochemistry. These results suggest that cholinergic projections from basal forebrain neurons in mice cause vasodilation in the ipsilateral cerebral cortex by a combination of muscarinic and nicotinic mechanisms, as previously found in rats and cats.

  17. Synergistic nonuniform shortening of atrial refractory period induced by autonomic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, M; Furukawa, Y; Narita, M; Ren, L M; Karasawa, Y; Murakami, M; Chiba, S

    1991-12-01

    We investigated the nonuniform effects of autonomic nerve stimulation of the effective refractory period (ERP) of the right atrium in the anesthetized dog. Stimulation of the discrete intracardiac sympathetic nerves to the sinoatrial (SA) nodal region uniformly shortened ERPs at three sites in the right atrium after administration of atropine. Right ansa subclavia (RS) stimulation similarly shortened ERPs in the absence of atropine. Stimulation of the discrete intracardiac parasympathetic nerves to the SA nodal region (SAP stimulation) shortened ERPs of the right atrium in a nonuniform manner. Simultaneous RS and SAP stimulation additively shortened ERPs at each site and decreased sinus rate much more than SAP stimulation alone. Shortening of ERP induced by SAP stimulation was greater than that induced by RS stimulation at similar absolute changes in heart rate. These results suggest that simultaneous activation of sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves nonuniformly shortens the ERP in the right atrium as the algebraic sum of the individual responses to each stimulation. However, parasympathetics exert the principal neural control over atrial ERP.

  18. Comparison of sugammadex and conventional reversal on postoperative nausea and vomiting: a randomized, blinded trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyuncu, Onur; Turhanoglu, Selim; Ozbakis Akkurt, Cagla; Karcıoglu, Murat; Ozkan, Mustafa; Ozer, Cahit; Sessler, Daniel I; Turan, Alparslan

    2015-02-01

    To determine whether the new selective binding agent sugammadex causes less postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) than the cholinesterase inhibitor neostigmine. Prospective, randomized, double-blinded study. University-affiliated hospital. One hundred American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status 1 and 2 patients scheduled for extremity surgery. Patients were randomly assigned to neostigmine (70 μg/kg) and atropine (0.4 mg per mg neostigmine) or sugammadex 2 mg/kg for neuromuscular antagonism at the end of anesthesia, when 4 twitches in response to train-of-four stimulation were visible with fade. We recorded PONV, recovery parameters, antiemetic consumption, and side effects. Nausea and vomiting scores were lower in the sugammadex patients upon arrival in the postanesthesia care unit (med: 0 [min-max, 0-3] vs med: 0 [min-max, 0-3]; P sugammadex. Postoperative heart rates were significantly lower in all measured times patients given neostigmine. Nondepolarizing neuromuscular blocking antagonism with sugammadex speeds recovery of neuromuscular strength but only slightly and transiently reduces PONV compared with neostigmine and atropine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Confirmed Datura poisoning in a horse most probably due to D. ferox in contaminated tef hay : clinical communication

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    R. Gerber

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Two out of a group of 23 mares exposed to tef hay contaminated with Datura ferox (and possibly D. stramonium developed colic. The 1st animal was unresponsive to conservative treatment, underwent surgery for severe intestinal atony and had to be euthanased. The 2nd was less seriously affected, responded well to analgesics and made an uneventful recovery. This horse exhibited marked mydriasis on the first 2 days of being poisoned and showed protracted, milder mydriasis for a further 7 days. Scopolamine was chemically confirmed in urine from this horse for 3 days following the colic attack, while atropine could just be detected for 2 days. Scopolamine was also the main tropane alkaloid found in the contaminating plant material, confirming that this had most probably been a case of D. ferox poisoning. Although Datura intoxication of horses from contaminated hay was suspected previously, this is the 1st case where the intoxication could be confirmed by urine analysis for tropane alkaloids. Extraction and detection methods for atropine and scopolamine in urine are described employing enzymatic hydrolysis followed by liquid-liquid extraction and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS.

  20. In vitro production of secondary metabolite using Atropa komarovii Bline&Shal (Solanaceae hairy root culture via Agrobacterium rhizogenes ATCC15834

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    Ofelia Banihashemi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aim:A new sustainable tissue-based system is presented by plant hairy roots, preserving all of the several specialized types of cell with critical roles in allowing bioactive secondary molecules to be synthesized more consistently as usual. The system is also essential for studying the production of alkaloid in culture. Experimental: The Atropa komarovii leaves were wounded and infected with soil gram-negative bacterium Agrobacterium rhizogenes ATCC15834. After three weeks, the transformation roots and control roots without infection, appeared, and for confirming that T-DNA Ri plasmid fragments were transformed and integrated to plant genome, the rolB gene region, was amplified using PCR. HPLC method was then used for assaying how two tropane alkaloids such as atropine (hyosciamine and scopolamine (hyoscine were produced in hairy roots,control roots, leaves and roots of plantlet. Results: The data indicated that diagnostic 500bp rol B product amplification was exhibited to be present by all the transformed hairy roots. Scopolamine content in hairy roots was considerably greater than that in control roots but greatest (Hyoscyamine atropine content was observed in control roots. Analysis of DW, FW and root length showed that fresh and dry root weight increased in hairy roots compared with that in non transformed root. Recommended applications/industries: The present study demonstrated that secondary metabolite production using medicinal plants concerns many researchers worldwide today and hairy root culture is a useful method for producing tropane alkaloids in solanaceae.

  1. [Anticholinergic syndrome caused by contaminated herbal tea; acting swiftly to identify the source].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oerlemans, C; de Vries, I; van Riel, A J H P

    2017-01-01

    Despite good manufacturing practice and quality control, consumer products can become contaminated. In some cases, this can result in severe and life-threatening intoxication with potentially fatal consequences. A 27-year-old man and a 28-year-old pregnant woman presented to the Emergency Department with severe anticholinergic syndrome after using a marshmallow root (Althaea officinalis) herbal remedy, mixed into hot chocolate drink, to reduce symptoms of common cold. After a short stay in Intensive Care, the symptoms diminished and the patients could be released from hospital. The herbs were found to be contaminated with atropine, most probably derived from deadly nightshade (Atropa belladonna). Analyses of the contaminated product indicated that the patients were exposed to 20-200 mg atropine, while a dose of 2 mg is already considered mildly toxic. Consultation of the Dutch National Poisons Information Center resulted in rapid detection of the contamination; close collaboration with the Netherlands Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority and the manufacturer of the product allowed rapid identification of the source of contamination and facilitated the prevention of an epidemic.

  2. (+/-)-cis-2-methylspiro[1,3-oxathiolane-5,3'-quinuclidine] hydrochloride, hemihydrate (SNI-2011, cevimeline hydrochloride) induces saliva and tear secretions in rats and mice: the role of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iga, Y; Arisawa, H; Ogane, N; Saito, Y; Tomizuka, T; Nakagawa-Yagi, Y; Masunaga, H; Yasuda, H; Miyata, N

    1998-11-01

    We investigated effects of (+/-)-cis-2-methylspiro[1,3-oxathiolane-5,3'-quinuclidine] hydrochloride, hemihydrate (SNI-2011, cevimeline hydrochloride), a rigid analogue of acetylcholine, on saliva and tear secretions in rats and mice to evaluate its therapeutical efficacy for xerostomia and xerophthalmia in patients with Sjogren's syndrome and X-ray exposure in the head and neck. Intraduodenal administrations of SNI-2011 increased saliva secretion in a dose-dependent manner at doses ranging from 3 to 30 mg/kg in normal rats and mice, two strains of autoimmune disease mice and X-irradiated saliva secretion defective rats. The salivation elicited by SNI-2011 was completely inhibited by atropine. A similar atropine-sensitive response was observed in tear secretion. In rat submandibular/sublingual gland membranes, [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) binding was saturable, and Scatchard plot analysis revealed a single population of binding sites with a Kd of 22 pM and a maximal binding capacity of 60 fmol/mg protein. The competitive inhibition curve of the [3H]QNB binding by SNI-2011 was obtained, and its dissociation constant value calculated from IC50 was 1-2 microM. These results suggest that SNI-2011 increases saliva and tear secretions through a direct stimulation to muscarinic receptors in salivary and lacrimal glands, and they suggest that SNI-2011 should be beneficial to patients with Sjögren's syndrome and X-ray exposure in the head and neck.

  3. Inhibition of the voltage-dependent chloride channel of Torpedo electric organ by diisopropylfluorophosphate and its reversal by oximes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abalis, I.M.; Chiang, P.K.; Wirtz, R.A.; Andre, R.G.

    1986-01-01

    Diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP), a potent organophosphate inhibitor of cholinesterases, was found to inhibit the specific binding of [ 35 S]t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (TBPS), specific chloride channels ligand, to the electric organ membranes of Torpedo, with a Ki of 21 +/- 3 μM. The binding sites of [ 35 S]TBPS in the Torpedo membranes were found not to be GABA receptors or nicotinic acetylcholine receptors as previously described. Interestingly, a stimulation of the binding of [ 35 S]TBPS was observed in the presence of atropine and three oximes, monopyridinium oxime 2-PAM, bispyridinium bis-oxime TMB-4 and H-oxime HI-6. The maximal stimulation was 300-500% of control, after which, the stimulation was reversed at higher concentrations. The three oximes protected by more than 95% the inhibition by 1 mM DFP of the binding of [ 35 S]TBPS to the voltage-dependent chloride channel. However, atropine protected only 20% of the inhibited channel. These results, thus, suggest that the protection against the toxic effects of DFP or other anticholinesterase agents by the tested oximes may not be solely a result of the reactivation of cholinesterases but also the protection of the voltage-dependent chloride channel

  4. [Effect of prokinetic agents on the electrical activity of stomach and duodenum in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fujun; Zou, Yiyou; Huang, Tianhui

    2009-07-01

    To determine the effect of prokinetic agents such as domperidone, mosapride, clarithromycin, and itopride on the electrical activity of the stomach and duodenum in SD rats,and also to explore the mechanism. The organism functional experiment system BL-420E was used to record the myoelectrical activity in the stomach and duodenum of SD rats in all groups using domperidone, mosapride, itopride, clarithromycin, and physiological saline on the interdigestive phase. The effect of the prokinetic agents on the amplitude and frequency of gastric and duodenal electromyogram in the SD rats was compared. The antagonists such as atropine, phentolamine, and propranolol were added to investigate the mechanism of action with all prokinetic agents. All prokinetic agents increased the amplitude and frequency of gastric and duodenal fast waves in the SD rats(Pitopride was the most obvious among the 3 groups (Pitopride, and physiological saline were inhibited by atropine(PItopride, mosapride, domperidone, and clarithromycin can increase the amplitude and frequency of gastric and duodenal fast waves in the SD rats. The mechanism may be related to cholinergic receptors, but not adrenergic receptors.

  5. Identification of Medication Errors with Similar Pronunciation, Spelling and Packaging in Tabriz Shahid Madani Hospital -1392

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisoo Alizadeh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Evidence suggests that medication errors are among the most common types of medical errors, and over fifty percent of them are preventable. Since a significant proportion of these errors are related to the similarity between drug names, this study was designed to evaluate drugs with similar spelling, spelling and packaging. Material and Methods: This is a qualitative study with phenomenological approach. Participants were selected by purposive sampling. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews and with the help of previously designed guide. Data were analyzed using content analysis. Results: The central themes of the findings of this study include: the accuracy of drug use, the way of recording and monitoring used medication, the storage, reporting, and notification of similar medications, verbal or telephone orders, medication lists with similar spelling, pronunciation and packaging and recommendations of the participants. The most errors in the Heparin-Atropine pair was the packaging of the drugs, spelling was the highest error in Dopamine- Dobutamine pair drug and spelling was the highest error in Atropine and Atorvastatin pair drug. Conclusion: The study findings indicate that there is no certain system for recording, monitoring and storage of similar drugs. Therefore, identifying the medication list with similar pronunciation, spelling and packaging is an opportunity to reduce these types of errors with appropriate interventions. ​

  6. Pharmacological treatment of organophosphorus insecticide poisoning: the old and the (possible) new.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddleston, Michael; Chowdhury, Fazle Rabbi

    2016-03-01

    Despite being a major clinical and public health problem across the developing world, responsible for at least 5 million deaths over the last three decades, the clinical care of patients with organophosphorus (OP) insecticide poisoning has little improved over the last six decades. We are still using the same two antidotes - atropine and oximes - that first came into clinical use in the late 1950s. Clinical research in South Asia has shown how improved regimens of atropine can prevent deaths. However, we are still unsure about which patients are most likely to benefit from the use of oximes. Supplemental antidotes, such as magnesium, clonidine and sodium bicarbonate, have all been proposed and studied in small trials without production of definitive answers. Novel antidotes such as nicotinic receptor antagonists, beta-adrenergic agonists and lipid emulsions are being studied in large animal models and in pilot clinical trials. Hopefully, one or more of these affordable and already licensed antidotes will find their place in routine clinical care. However, the large number of chemically diverse OP insecticides, the varied poisoning they produce and their varied response to treatment might ultimately make it difficult to determine definitively whether these antidotes are truly effective. In addition, the toxicity of the varied solvents and surfactants formulated with the OP active ingredients complicates both treatment and studies. It is possible that the only effective way to reduce deaths from OP insecticide poisoning will be a steady reduction in their agricultural use worldwide. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  7. Precision cut lung slices as test system for candidate therapeutics in organophosphate poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Julia; Thiermann, Horst; Worek, Franz; Wille, Timo

    2017-08-15

    Standard therapeutic options in organophosphate (OP) poisoning are limited to the administration of atropine and oximes, a regimen often lacking in efficacy and applicability. Treatment alternatives are needed, preferably covering a broad spectrum of OP intoxications. Although recent research yielded several promising compounds, e.g. bioscavengers, modulators of the muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptor or bispyridinium non-oximes, these substances still need further evaluation, especially regarding effects on the potentially lethal respiratory symptoms of OP poisoning. Aim of this study was the development of an applicable and easy method to test the therapeutic efficiency of such substances. For this purpose, airway responsiveness in viable precision cut lung slices (PCLS) from rats was analysed. We showed that ACh-induced airway contractions were spontaneously reversible in non-poisoned PCLS, whereas in OP poisoned PCLS, contractions were irreversible. This effect could be antagonized by addition of the standard therapeutic atropine, thereby presenting a clear indication for treatment efficiency. Now, candidate therapeutic compounds can be evaluated, based on their ability to counteract the irreversible airway contraction in OP poisoned PCLS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Is there a role for progesterone in the management of acute organophosphate poisoning during pregnancy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarzadeh, Mostafa; Nasrabadi, Zeynab Nasri; Sheikhazadi, Ardeshir; Abbaspour, Abdollah; Vasigh, Shayesteh; Yousefinejad, Vahid; Marashi, Sayed Mahdi

    2013-06-01

    Organophosphates are commonly used pesticides and cause about one million unintentional and 2 million suicidal exposures with up to 300,000 fatalities every year around the world. Toxicity of organophosphates is due to inhibition cholinesterase activity and prolonging the effects of acetylcholine in the receptor site. Clinical features of organophosphate poisoning are defecation, urination, miosis, bronchorrhea, emesis, lacrimation and salivation. Spontaneous abortion reported some when in pregnant patients. Intravenous administration of benzodiazepines, atropine and pralidoxime is the formal treatment of this toxicity. Atropine and pralidoxime have been assigned to pregnancy class C by the FDA and should be recommended for use in pregnant women clinically suffer organophosphate poisoning. Benzodiazepines have been assigned to pregnancy class D and should be avoided during pregnancy. Clinical experiments suggest transplacental transfer of organophosphates is possible, and fetal sensitivity is probable, but a single acute overdose most likely don't make any physical deformities, therefore termination of pregnancy is not imperative. Nonetheless, no definite strategy focused on maintaining pregnancy. Here we propose an idea that in any female case of acute organophosphate poisoning in childbearing range of age, maternal serum Beta-HCG should be tested for pregnancy and prophylactic progesterone should be used in pregnant cases of organophosphate poisoning. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of paraoxon on muscarinic, dopamine and γ-aminobutyric acid receptors of brain and sensitivity to muscarinic antagonists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernando, J.C.R.; Hoskins, B.; Ho, I.K.

    1986-01-01

    Several acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors decrease muscarinic cholinergic (mACh) receptors in the brain, alteration of dopamine (DA) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors after AChE inhibition was also reported. In view of the important interactions among DA, GABA and ACh systems, whether this is a common effect of AChE inhibitors should be established. They report the effect of the AChE inhibitor, paraoxon, on DA, GABA and mACh receptors in the rat. The binding of 3 H-QNB (for mACh), 3 H-spiperone (for DA) and 3 H-muscimol (for GABA) to striatal and hippocampal membranes was analyzed. Also, behavioral sensitivity to atropine was studied. Twenty-four hr after a single dose (0.75 mg/kg, s.c.) of paraoxon, the density of mACh receptors in the striatum was decreased but, at 3 days, no change was seen. In the hippocampus, the mACh receptors were not affected. Repeated treatment with paraoxon (0.3 mg/kg, 48 hourly) for 2 weeks reduced the mACh receptor density in both regions. Neither single nor repeated paraoxon treatment had an effect on DA or GABA receptors. After single or repeated dosing with paraoxon, myoclonus induced by atropine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) was enhanced. The results show rapid downregulation of mACh receptors by paraoxon. DA or GABA, however, appear not to be affected under these treatment regimens

  10. Neuronally mediated contraction responses of guinea-pig stomach smooth muscle preparations: modification by benzamide derivatives does not reflect a dopamine antagonist action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costall, B; Naylor, R J; Tan, C C

    1984-06-15

    The actions of the substituted benzamide derivatives metoclopramide, clebopride, YM-09151-2, tiapride, (+)- and (-)-sulpiride and (+)- and (-)-sultopride, and the dopamine antagonists haloperidol and domperidone, were studied on the responses to field stimulation (0.125-10 Hz) of smooth muscle strips taken from cardia, fundus, body and antral regions of the longitudinal and circular muscle of guinea-pig stomach. Field stimulation of the longitudinal strips caused contraction responses which were antagonised by atropine (but not by prazosin, yohimbine, propranolol or methysergide) to indicate a muscarinic cholinergic involvement. Antagonism of the contractions revealed or enhanced relaxation responses mediated via unidentified mechanisms (resistant to cholinergic and adrenergic antagonists). Metoclopramide enhanced the field stimulation-induced contractions of the stomach smooth muscle preparations via atropine sensitive mechanisms but failed to attenuate the field stimulation-induced relaxation responses. Clebopride's action closely followed that of metoclopramide but YM-09151-2 only enhanced the contraction responses of the longitudinal muscle preparations. Other dopamine antagonists, (+)- and (-)-sulpiride, (+)- and (-)-sultopride, tiapride, haloperidol and domperidone failed to facilitate contraction to field stimulation of any stomach tissue. Thus, the actions of metoclopramide, clebopride and YM-09151-2 to facilitate contraction to field stimulation of stomach smooth muscle are mediated via a muscarinic cholinergic mechanism and are not the consequence of an antagonism at any recognisable dopamine receptor.

  11. Analisis Gas Darah pada Kucing yang Mengalami Laparohisterotomi dengan Anestesi Xylazin-Ketamin dan Xylazin-Propofol (BLOOD GAS ANALYSIS OF XYLAZIN- KETAMIN AND XYLAZIN-PROPOFOL FOR ANESTHESIA TO LAPARO-HISTEROTOMY SURGERY IN CAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ira Sari Yudaniayanti

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to study the safety application of xylazine-ketamine and xylazinepropofolrecurrent dosage combination as anesthesia for laparo-histerotomy surgery in cat. Thisresearch used 10 female cats, 12-18 months of age, followed randomly divided into two groups, P1:atropine 0,04 mg/kgBW/SC + xylazine 2 mg/kg BW/IM + ketamine 20 mg/kg BW/IM; P2 : atropine0,04mg/kg BW/SC + xylazine 2 mg/kg BW/IM + Propofol 20 mg/kg BW/IV. The blood of the allgroups was taken from vena femuralis at 0 minute (before treatment, 15, 30, 45 and 60 minutesduring anesthesia for measurement of blood gas value pH, pCO2 and HCO3. After all animals wereanesthetized, the animals were treated laparo-histerotomy surgery. The data were analyzed byusing Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD. The result showed both of groups were notsignificantly difference (p>0,05 to blood gas values for pH, pCO2 dan HCO3. Besides, both groupsanaesthetic agent perfectly caused metabolic acidosis with respiratory alkalosis compensationperfectly, therefore it is relatively safe to use as anaesthetic agent for surgery that needs long timeprocedure, as laparo-histerotomy.

  12. Atypical Amniotic Fluid Embolism Managed with a Novel Therapeutic Regimen

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    Shadi Rezai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Amniotic fluid embolism (AFE is the second leading cause of maternal mortality in the USA with an incidence of 1 : 15,200 births. The case fatality rate and perinatal mortality associated with AFE are 13–30% and 9–44%, respectively. This rare but devastating complication can be difficult to diagnose as many of the early signs and symptoms are nonspecific. Compounding this diagnostic challenge is a lack of effective treatment regimens which to date are mostly supportive. We present the case of a 26-year-old woman who suffered from suspected AFE and was successfully treated with the novel regimen of Atropine, Ondansetron, and Ketorolac (A-OK. The authors acknowledge that this case does not meet the new criteria proposed, by Clark in 2016, but feel that it is important to share this case report, due to dramatic patient response to the provided supportive therapy presented in this case report. We hope this case report will prompt further research into this novel approach to treating AFE with Atropine, Ondansetron, and Ketorolac.

  13. Oxidative stress in organophosphate poisoning: role of standard antidotal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanova, Nela; Pejchal, Jaroslav; Herman, David; Dlabkova, Alzbeta; Jun, Daniel

    2018-08-01

    Despite the main mechanism of organophosphate (OP) toxicity through inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) being well known over the years, some chronic adverse health effects indicate the involvement of additional pathways. Oxidative stress is among the most intensively studied. Overstimulation of cholinergic and glutamatergic nervous system is followed by intensified generation of reactive species and oxidative damage in many tissues. In this review, the role of oxidative stress in pathophysiology of OP poisoning and the influence of commonly used medical interventions on its levels are discussed. Current standardized therapy of OP intoxications comprises live-saving administration of the anticholinergic drug atropine accompanied by oxime AChE reactivator and diazepam. The capability of these antidotes to ameliorate OP-induced oxidative stress varies between both therapeutic groups and individual medications within the drug class. Regarding oxidative stress, atropine does not seem to have a significant effect on oxidative stress parameters in OP poisoning. In a case of AChE reactivators, pro-oxidative and antioxidative properties could be found. It is assumed that the ability of oximes to trigger oxidative stress is rather associated with their chemical structure than reactivation efficacy. The data indicating the potency of diazepam in preventing OP-induced oxidative stress are not available. Based on current knowledge on the mechanism of OP-mediated oxidative stress, alternative approaches (including antioxidants or multifunctional drugs) in therapy of OP poisoning are under consideration. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Orexin A-induced anxiety-like behavior is mediated through GABA-ergic, α- and β-adrenergic neurotransmissions in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palotai, Miklós; Telegdy, Gyula; Jászberényi, Miklós

    2014-07-01

    Orexins are hypothalamic neuropeptides, which are involved in several physiological functions of the central nervous system, including anxiety and stress. Several studies provide biochemical and behavioral evidence about the anxiogenic action of orexin A. However, we have little evidence about the underlying neuromodulation. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the involvement of neurotransmitters in the orexin A-induced anxiety-like behavior in elevated plus maze (EPM) test in mice. Accordingly, mice were pretreated with a non-selective muscarinic cholinergic antagonist, atropine; a γ-aminobutyric acid subunit A (GABA-A) receptor antagonist, bicuculline; a D2, D3, D4 dopamine receptor antagonist, haloperidol; a non-specific nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, nitro-l-arginine; a nonselective α-adrenergic receptor antagonist, phenoxybenzamine and a β-adrenergic receptor antagonist, propranolol 30min prior to the intracerebroventricular administration of orexin A. The EPM test started 30min after the i.c.v. injection of the neuropeptide. Our results show that orexin A decreases significantly the time spent in the arms (open/open+closed) and this action is reversed by bicuculline, phenoxybenzamine and propranolol, but not by atropine, haloperidol or nitro-l-arginine. Our results provide evidence for the first time that the orexin A-induced anxiety-like behavior is mediated through GABA-A-ergic, α- and β-adrenergic neurotransmissions, whereas muscarinic cholinergic, dopaminergic and nitrergic neurotransmissions may not be implicated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Strain-specific patterns of autonomic nervous system activity and heart failure susceptibility in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shusterman, Vladimir; Usiene, Irmute; Harrigal, Chivonne; Lee, Joon Sup; Kubota, Toru; Feldman, Arthur M; London, Barry

    2002-06-01

    Transgenic mice are widely used to study cardiac function, but strain-dependent differences in autonomic nervous system activity (ANSA) have not been explored. We compared 1) short-term pharmacological responses of cardiac rhythm in FVB vs. C57Black6/SV129 wild-type mice and 2) long-term physiological dynamics of cardiac rhythm and survival in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha transgenic mice with heart failure (TNF-alpha mice) on defined backgrounds. Ambulatory telemetry electrocardiographic recordings and response to saline, adrenergic, and cholinergic agents were examined in FVB and C57Black6/SV129 mice. In FVB mice, baseline heart rate (HR) was higher and did not change after injection of isoproterenol or atropine but decreased with propranolol. In C57Black6/SV129 mice, HR did not change with propranolol but increased with isoproterenol or atropine. Mean HR, but not indexes of HR variability, was an excellent predictor of response to autonomic agents. The proportion of surviving animals was higher in TNF-alpha mice on an FVB background than on a mixed FVB/C57Black6 background. The homeostatic states of ANSA are strain specific, which can explain the interstrain differences in mean HR, pharmacological responses, and survival of animals with congestive heart failure. Strain-specific differences should be considered in selecting the strains of mice used for transgenic and gene targeting experiments.

  16. Study on the mechanism of the bronchodilatory effects of Cynodon dactylon (Linn.) and identification of the active ingredient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Maulik R; Bhalodia, Yagnik S; Pathak, Nimish L; Patel, Maulik S; Suthar, Kunal; Patel, Nilesh; Golwala, Dharmesh K; Jivani, Nurudin P

    2013-12-12

    In the traditional medicine, Cynodon dactylon (Linn.) is used in asthma, but scientific studies to provide evidence for medicinal uses are sparse. Thus this study was undertaken to provide evidence for medicinal use in asthma as a bronchodilator, and to identify active ingredient(s). In vivo, acetylcholine (Ach)-induced bronchospasm was conducted in guinea pig while isolated rat tracheal strip was suspended in organ bath to measure the concentration response curve using multichannel data acquisition system. The chloroform extract of Cynodon dactylon (CECD) protected against Ach-induced bronchospasm in guinea pigs, similar to atropine. In the in vitro studies, CECD relaxed carbachol (CCh) and high K+-induced contraction of rat tracheal strip, similar to atropine and verapamil respectively, suggesting antimuscarinic and calcium channel blocking (CCB) activities, which were confirmed by right ward shifting of CCh and Ca(+2) concentration response curve (CRC). The phosphodiestrase (PDE) inhibitory activity was confirmed by potentiation of isoprenaline-induced inhibitory response, similar to papaverine. Densitometry analyses led to the identification of scopoletin as an active ingredient. Effectively, it significantly inhibited high K+, and Ca(+2) induced contractile response, similar to verapamil. The phosphodiestrase (PDE) inhibitory activity was confirmed by direct evidence of potentiation of isoprenaline-induced inhibitory response, similar to papaverine. These results suggest that the bronchodilator activity of CECD is partly due to presence of scopoletin, and mediated possibly through CCB and PDE inhibition.

  17. Intraduodenal and intrajejunal administration of the herbal medicine, dai-kenchu-tou, stimulates small intestinal motility via cholinergic receptors in conscious dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, X L; Shibata, C; Naito, H; Ueno, T; Funayama, Y; Fukushima, K; Matsuno, S; Sasaki, I

    2001-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to study the effect and mechanism of action of intraduodenal and intrajejunal dai-kenchu-to, an herbal medicine clinically effective for uncomplicated postoperative adhesive intestinal obstruction, on upper gastrointestinal motility. Five mongrel dogs were equipped with four strain-gauge force transducers on the antrum, duodenum, and proximal and distal jejunum to measure contractile activity. Dai-kenchu-to (0.5, 1.5, and 3.0 g) was administered into the duodenal or proximal jejunal lumen. The effect of atropine, hexamethonium, phentolamine, propranolol, and ondansetron on intraduodenal and intrajejunal dai-kenchu-to-induced contractions was studied. Plasma motilin was measured by specific radioimmunoassay. Intraduodenal and intrajejunal dai-kenchu-to induced phasic contractions in the duodenum and proximal jejunum, respectively, and those contractions migrated distally. Phasic contractions induced by intraduodenal and intrajejunal dai-kenchu-to were inhibited by atropine and hexamethonium at all sites. Plasma motilin was not affected by dai-kenchu-to. Intraduodenal and intrajejunal dai-kenchu-to stimulates upper gastrointestinal motility at and distal to the administration sites through cholinergic receptors.

  18. Intrathecal huperzine A increases thermal escape latency and decreases flinching behavior in the formalin test in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Paula; Schachter, Steven; Yaksh, Tony

    2010-02-05

    Huperzine A (HupA) is an alkaloid isolated from the Chinese club moss Huperzia serrata and has been used for improving memory, cognitive and behavioral function in patients with Alzheimer's disease in China. It has NMDA antagonist and anticholinesterase activity and has shown anticonvulsant and antinociceptive effects in preliminary studies when administered intraperitoneally to mice. To better characterize the antinociceptive effects of HupA at the spinal level, Holtzman rats were implanted with intrathecal catheters to measure thermal escape latency using Hargreaves thermal escape testing system and flinching behavior using the formalin test. Intrathecal (IT) administration of HupA showed a dose-dependent increase in thermal escape latency with an ED50 of 0.57 microg. Atropine reversed the increase in thermal escape latency produced by 10 microg HupA, indicating an antinociceptive mechanism through muscarinic cholinergic receptors. The formalin test showed that HupA decreased flinching behavior in a dose-dependent manner. Atropine also reversed the decrease in flinching behavior caused by 10 microg HupA. A dose-dependent increase of side effects including scratching, biting, and chewing tails was observed, although antinociceptive effects were observed in doses that did not produce any adverse effects. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Salvia miltiorrhiza Induces Tonic Contraction of the Lower Esophageal Sphincter in Rats via Activation of Extracellular Ca2+ Influx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Chung Tsai

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Up to 40% of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD suffer from proton pump inhibitor refractory GERD but clinically the medications to strengthen the lower esophageal sphincter (LES to avoid irritating reflux are few in number. This study aimed to examine whether Salvia miltiorrhiza (SM extracts induce tonic contraction of rat LES ex vivo and elucidate the underlying mechanisms. To investigate the mechanism underlying the SM extract-induced contractile effects, rats were pretreated with atropine (a muscarinic receptor antagonist, tetrodotoxin (a sodium channel blocker, nifedipine (a calcium channel blocker, and Ca2+-free Krebs-Henseleit solution with ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA, followed by administration of cumulative dosages of SM extracts. SM extracts induced dose-related tonic contraction of the LES, which was unaffected by tetrodotoxin, atropine, or nifedipine. However, the SM extract-induced LES contraction was significantly inhibited by Ca2+-free Krebs-Henseleit solution with EGTA. Next, SM extracts significantly induce extracellular Ca2+ entry into primary LES cells in addition to intracellular Ca2+ release and in a dose-response manner. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that the SM extracts consistently induced significant extracellular Ca2+ influx into primary LES cells in a time-dependent manner. In conclusion, SM extracts could induce tonic contraction of LES mainly through the extracellular Ca2+ influx pathway.

  20. Distribution of the bispyridinium oxime [14C] HI-6 in male and female rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundy, P.M.; Hand, B.T.; Hamilton, M.G.; Broxup, B.R.; Yipchuck, G.

    1990-01-01

    The present study was designed first to determine the distribution pattern and concentration of [ 14 C] HI-6 in rats, and secondly, to determine the possibility that HI-6 might be located in high concentrations in critical tissues in the female as opposed to the male. To these ends, [ 14 C] HI-6 was administered to groups of male and female rats and its radiolabelled distribution determined by whole body autoradiography and/or by measurement of its actual concentration, by scintillation spectrometry. The experiments were repeated in the presence of 2xLD 50 soman and supporting therapy with atropine. In both sexes, HI-6 levels were highest in the kidney, followed in order by cartilage > plasma > liver > heart ≥ lung>> diaphragm > brain and spinal cord. The relative distribution in the two sexes was confirmed by both methods and was not significantly altered in the presence of soman and atropine. The lack of a measurable difference in tissue distribution of [ 14 C] HI-6 derived radioactivity between males and females suggested that the hormone-dependent difference in the protective effects previously observed was not due to selective accumulation of [ 14 C] HI-6 in organs believed to be important in its therapeutic activity, such as brain or diaphragm. (orig.)

  1. Amblyopia therapy: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Catherine E; Moseley, Merrick J; Fielder, Alistair R

    2011-09-01

    We review the findings of trials of mainstay amblyopia treatment conducted within the last 5 years. These have confirmed that an initial period of full-time refractive correction is beneficial in all types of amblyopia. Adopting this practice may allow up to 30% of children to avoid any further treatment. Studies that have investigated the role of atropine occlusion as a first-line treatment for amblyopia have shown "weekend atropine" to be as effective as patching for children with both moderate and severe amblyopia. Where patching is prescribed, 2-4 hours/day of occlusion appears sufficient to provide an optimum outcome for the majority of children, although those over 6 years tend to require a larger dose to achieve best outcome, their amblyopia being more resistant to treatment. Educational interventions such as cartoons and written and video explanations of treatment aimed at improving compliance appear to raise it to a therapeutic level in those who may otherwise have poor compliance or drop out from treatment. Formal, evidence-based practice guidelines for the management of amblyopia have emerged although their adoption by practitioners, at least in the United Kingdom, has been questioned.

  2. Pentobarbital Toxicity after Self-Administration of Euthasol Veterinary Euthanasia Medication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Jason Crellin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Suicide attempt via sodium pentobarbital is uncommon. A 48-year-old woman with a history of depression and prior suicide attempt was found unresponsive by her veterinarian spouse near a syringe containing pink solution. Upon EMS’ arrival, the patient was experiencing apnea, hypoxemia, and miotic pupils; her blood glucose level measured 73 mg/dL. She was bradycardic and administered atropine with transient improvement in heart rate and transported to an emergency department; 2 mg of intravenous naloxone was administered without effect. She was endotracheally intubated via rapid sequence intubation. Rapid urine drug screening detected both benzodiazepines and barbiturates. The patient was transferred to an intensive care unit where she demonstrated a nearly absent radial pulse. Emergent fasciotomy to the left forearm and carpal tunnel was performed for acute compartment syndrome; “Euthasol” had been self-administered into the antecubital fossa. Expanded toxicological analysis via liquid chromatography/mass spectroscopy detected caffeine, atropine, 7-aminoclonazepam, phenytoin, citalopram, and naproxen. The patient’s coma resolved over 48 hours and she was successfully extubated without complication. Emergency physicians must closely monitor patients exposed to veterinary euthanasia agents who develop central nervous system and respiratory depression, hypothermia, bradycardia, hypotension, or skin injury. Consultation with a regional poison center and medical toxicologist is recommended.

  3. Ketamine-propofol sedation in circumcision

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    Handan Gulec

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTBACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: To compare the therapeutic effects of ketamine alone or ketamine plus propofol on analgesia, sedation, recovery time, side effects in premedicated children with midazolam-ketamine-atropin who are prepared circumcision operation.METHODS: 60 American Society of Anaesthesiologists physical status I-II children, aged between 3 and 9 years, undergoing circumcision operations under sedation were recruited according to a randomize and double-blind institutional review board-approved protocol. Patients were randomized into two groups via sealed envelope assignment. Both groups were administered a mixture of midazolam 0.05 mg/kg + ketamine 3 mg/kg + atropine 0.02 mg/kg intramuscularly in the presence of parents in the pre-operative holding area. Patients were induced with propofol-ketamine in Group I or ketamine alone in Group II.RESULTS: In the between-group comparisons, age, weight, initial systolic blood pressure, a difference in terms of the initial pulse rate was observed (p > 0.050. Initial diastolic blood pressure and subsequent serial measurements of 5, 10, 15, 20th min, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and pulse rate in ketamine group were significantly higher (p < 0.050.CONCLUSION: Propofol-ketamine (Ketofol provided better sedation quality and hemodynamy than ketamine alone in pediatric circumcision operations. We did not observe significant complications during sedation in these two groups. Therefore, ketofol appears to be an effective and safe sedation method for circumcision operation.

  4. Antinociception induced by stimulating amygdaloid nuclei in rats: changes produced by systemically administered antagonists

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    M.A. Oliveira

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available The antinociceptive effects of stimulating the medial (ME and central (CE nuclei of the amygdala in rats were evaluated by the changes in the latency for the tail withdrawal reflex to noxious heating of the skin. A 30-s period of sine-wave stimulation of the ME or CE produced a significant and short increase in the duration of tail flick latency. A 15-s period of stimulation was ineffective. Repeated stimulation of these nuclei at 48-h intervals produced progressively smaller effects. The antinociception evoked from the ME was significantly reduced by the previous systemic administration of naloxone, methysergide, atropine, phenoxybenzamine, and propranolol, but not by mecamylamine, all given at the dose of 1.0 mg/kg. Previous systemic administration of naloxone, atropine, and propranolol, but not methysergide, phenoxybenzamine, or mecamylamine, was effective against the effects of stimulating the CE. We conclude that the antinociceptive effects of stimulating the ME involve at least opioid, serotonergic, adrenergic, and muscarinic cholinergic descending mechanisms. The effects of stimulating the CE involve at least opioid, ß-adrenergic, and muscarinic cholinergic descending mechanisms.

  5. Anticholinergic, antihistaminic, and antiserotonergic activity of n-hexane extract of Zanthoxylum alatum seeds on isolated tissue preparations: An ex vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikia, Beenita; Barua, Chandana Choudhury; Haloi, Prakash; Patowary, Pompy

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate anticholinergic, antihistaminic, and antiserotonergic activity of the n-hexane extract of the seeds of Zanthoxylum alatum (ZAHE) on isolated ileum of rat and guinea pig and fundus of rat. ZAHE was prepared using soxhlet extraction and cumulative concentration response curves were constructed using various doses on the tissues for acetylcholine (ACh), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), and histamine with or without n-hexane extract. Atropine, ketanserin, and pheniramine maleate were used as antagonists for ACh, serotonin, and histamine, respectively. ZAHE-induced concentration-dependent inhibition of isolated ileum and fundus in rat and ileum of guinea pig. The half maximal effective concentration (EC 50 ) of ACh in the presence of atropine (10 -6 M; P pheniramine maleate (10 -6 M; P < 0.01) and ZAHE (300 μg/ml; P < 0.01 and 1000 μg/ml; P < 0.05) was also significantly higher than EC 50 of histamine alone. From the study, it was observed that ZAHE shows significant anticholinergic, antiserotonergic, and antihistaminic activity. The study provides sufficient evidence that the seeds can be used in gastric disorders, cough, chest infection, etc., as per folklore claims.

  6. Conditioned insulin secretion and meal feeding in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, S C; Vasselli, J R; Kaestner, E; Szakmary, G A; Milburn, P; Vitiello, M V

    1977-02-01

    Previous researchers have reported that rats placed upon a feeding regimen such that they receive only 2 hr of food per day (meal-fed rats) develop hyperinsulinemia at the time of the day associated with feeding, even in the absence of food. Controls fed ad lib had no such response. In a series of several experiments, meal-fed rats had elevated insulin levels at only the specific time of the day associated with feeding, and the increment of insulin at that time could be eliminated with atropine. Free-feeding controls, on the other hand, always had higher insulin levels than the meal-fed rats, did not have an elevation of insulin at the time of the day that the meal-fed rats normally ate, and had insulin values that were unaffected by atropine. Further experimentation showed that hyperinsulinemia could become associated with arbitrary stimuli always associated with eating for meal-fed rats. It is concluded that the hyperinsulinemia of meal-fed rats associated with their feeding time is a learned response.

  7. New Onset Refractory Status Epilepticus as an Unusual Presentation of a Suspected Organophosphate Poisoning

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    Shahan Waheed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available New onset refractory status epilepticus (NORSE is a new entity in medical literature. It has different infectious and noninfectious etiologies showing a devastating impact onto the clinical outcome of patients. Therapy with anaesthetic and antiepileptic agents often fails to improve the condition, unless the primary cause is rectified. Here is presented the case of a young female with a history of depression who after a recent bereavement came to the Emergency Department of Aga Khan University Hospital with complaints of drowsiness that lasted for few hours. Though she had no history of organophosphate poisoning, her physical examination and further investigations were suggestive of the diagnosis. During her hospital stay, she developed refractory status epilepticus. Her seizures did not respond to standard antiepileptic and intravenous anesthetic agents and subsided only after intravenous infusion of atropine for a few days. Organophosphate poisoning is a very common presentation in the developing world and the associated status epilepticus poses a devastating problem for emergency physicians. In patients with suspected organophosphate poisoning with favoring clinical exam findings, the continuation of atropine intravenous infusion can be a safe option to abate seizures.

  8. Intoxicación por organofosforados con necesidad de altas dosis de atropina y administración tardía de oximas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Andrés Leotau Rodríguez, MD

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available La intoxicación por organofosforados es una de las causas más frecuentes de intoxicación en el mundo y una de las tres normas principales de suicidio, llegando a mortalidades cercanas al 15 %. Esta radica en la inhibición irreversible que sus componentes hacen en la enzima acetilcolinesterasa, llevando con ello a la aparición de signos y síntomas secundarios al exceso de acetilcolina en los sistemas donde actúa. Su manejo aún es controvertido y sigue basándoseen las medidas de descontaminación, utilización de atropina, oximas y benzodiacepinas, sin haber consenso en muchas de las dosis e intervalos de tiempo para la administración de estos medicamentos. En este artículo exponemos un caso en el cual se hace necesario utilizardosis e intervalos de administración de atropina y el uso tardío de las oximas. Con este caso se puede concluir que la administración tardía de oximas y la utilización de grandes cantidades de atropina pueden ser una alternativa en el manejo de este tipo de intoxicación.______________________________________________________________________Organophosphate poisoning is one of the most frequent causes of poisoning in the world and one of the three main forms of suicide, reaching roughly 15% mortality, this lies in the irreversible inhibition that make components in the enzyme acetylcholinesterase, leading thus the signs and symptoms secondary to excessive acetylcholine in the systems where it operates. Its management is still controversial and remains based on the decontaminationmeasures, use of atropine, oximes and benzodiazepines, no consensus on many of the doses and time intervals for administration of these drugs. In this article we present a case in which it becomes necessary to use dose and timing of administration of atropine and late use of oximes. In this case we can conclude that the late administration of oximes using grades and quantities of atropine may be an alternative in handling this type of

  9. New way of dosing sugammadex for termination of vecuronium induced neuromuscular block

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    Blaž Peček

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Goal of Study: Sugammadex is a selective binding agent that bindsaminosteroid muscle relaxants. Each molecule of sugammadex binds one molecule of musclerelaxant. To produce the same depth of the neuromuscular block (NMB much less molecules ofvecuronium are needed than molecules of rocuronium. In theory less sugammadex would beneeded to neutralise the neuromuscular block if vecuronium was used to produce the neuromuscular block. Our aim was to compare reversal of vecuronium induced muscle relaxation between a new way of dosing sugammadex, which takes into account TOF value at the end of the surgery and the amount of vecuronium given during the surgery with neostigmine atropine combination. We also wanted to know how much this dosage regime can save compared to standard per kg dosage.Materials and Methods: 20 adult patients requiring a general anesthesia for surgery were analysed. The first group of 11 patients (SUG received sugammadex at the end of the surgery according to the table one for NMB reversal. The second group of 9 patients (NEO received neostigmine and atropine. Train of four (TOF value was recorded at the end of the surgery and then continuously until the TOF value reached more than 0.9 and the patient was extubated. The time required for the TOF value reaching 0.9 was compared between the groups. For economical evaluation we compared the amount of sugammadex used in the SUG group to standard sugammadex per kg dosage.Results and Discussion: Mean time to recovery to a TOF ratio of 0.9 with sugammadex was 5.12min versus 12.6 min with neostigmine atropine (P < 0.05. No sign of postoperative residual curarisation was observed in the SUG group. For patients in our study 530 mg of sugammadex were used to neutralise the NMB. If standard per kg sugammadex dosing had been used we would have used 2420 mg for the NMB reversal.Conclusion(s: New dosing for sugammadex was successful in neutralising the NMB regardlessof the TOF value

  10. The immune-regulating effect of Xiao'er Qixingcha in constipated mice induced by high-heat and high-protein diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Chang; Yang, Guang-Hua; Zheng, Rong-Bo; Yu, Xiu-Ting; Peng, Shao-Zhong; Xie, Jian-Hui; Chen, Jian-Nan; Wang, Xiu-Fen; Su, Zi-Ren; Zhang, Xiao-Jun

    2017-03-31

    Xiao'er Qixingcha (EXQ) has been extensively applied to relieve dyspepsia and constipation in children for hundreds of years in China. However, the therapeutic mechanism underlying its efficacy remained to be defined. The present study aimed to clarify the possible laxative and immune-regulating effects of EXQ on two models of experimental constipation in mice, which mimicked the pediatric constipation caused by high-heat and high-protein diet (HHPD). The two models of constipated mice were induced by HHPD or HHPD + atropine respectively. To investigate the laxative and immune-regulating activities of EXQ, animals were treated with three doses of EXQ (0.75, 1.5 and 3 g/kg) for 7 consecutive days. The fecal output parameters (number and weight), weight of intestinal content and, the thymus and spleen indexes were measured. The levels of sIgA, IL-10, TNF-α and LPS in colon and serum were determined by ELISA. Furthermore, the pathological changes of colon tissue were examined after routine H&E staining. Both HHPD and HHPD + atropine treatments obviously inhibited the fecal output and reduced the colonic sIgA, prominently increased the levels of IL-10 and TNF-α in colonic tissue and elevated the contents of LPS in serum and colonic tissues. In contrast, oral administration of EXQ significantly improved the feces characters and dose-dependently decreased the intestinal changes in both models. In HHPD model test, EXQ efficaciously boosted the sIgA level in a dose-dependent manner, significantly elicited decreases in TNF-α and IL-10 levels, and evidently decreased the spleen and thymus indexes. In HHPD + atropine model test, EXQ treatment reversed the pathological changes by not only dramatically decreasing the spleen index and the levels of LPS and IL-10, but also markedly elevating the thymus index. Furthermore, microscopic observation revealed that EXQ treatment maintained the integrity of colonic mucosa, and protected the colonic tissues from inflammation in the

  11. Cardiac parasympathetic outflow during dynamic exercise in humans estimated from power spectral analysis of P-P interval variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Makoto; Nakamoto, Tomoko; Matsukawa, Kanji; Ishii, Kei; Watanabe, Tae; Sekikawa, Kiyokazu; Hamada, Hironobu

    2016-03-01

    What is the central question of this study? Should we use the high-frequency (HF) component of P-P interval as an index of cardiac parasympathetic nerve activity during moderate exercise? What is the main finding and its importance? The HF component of P-P interval variability remained even at a heart rate of 120-140 beats min(-1) and was further reduced by atropine, indicating incomplete cardiac vagal withdrawal during moderate exercise. The HF component of R-R interval is invalid as an estimate of cardiac parasympathetic outflow during moderate exercise; instead, the HF component of P-P interval variability should be used. The high-frequency (HF) component of R-R interval variability has been widely used as an indirect estimate of cardiac parasympathetic (vagal) outflow to the sino-atrial node of the heart. However, we have recently found that the variability of the R-R interval becomes much smaller during dynamic exercise than that of the P-P interval above a heart rate (HR) of ∼100 beats min(-1). We hypothesized that cardiac parasympathetic outflow during dynamic exercise with a higher intensity may be better estimated using the HF component of P-P interval variability. To test this hypothesis, the HF components of both P-P and R-R interval variability were analysed using a Wavelet transform during dynamic exercise. Twelve subjects performed ergometer exercise to increase HR from the baseline of 69 ± 3 beats min(-1) to three different levels of 100, 120 and 140 beats min(-1). We also examined the effect of atropine sulfate on the HF components in eight of the 12 subjects during exercise at an HR of 140 beats min(-1) . The HF component of P-P interval variability was significantly greater than that of R-R interval variability during exercise, especially at the HRs of 120 and 140 beats min(-1). The HF component of P-P interval variability was more reduced by atropine than that of R-R interval variability. We conclude that cardiac parasympathetic outflow to the

  12. The role of muscarinic cholinergic signaling in cost-benefit decision making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fobbs, Wambura

    Animals regularly face decisions that affect both their immediate success and long term survival. Such decisions typically involve some form of cost-benefit analysis and engage a number of high level cognitive processes, including learning, memory and motivational influences. While decision making has been a focus of study for over a century, it's only in the last 20 years that researchers have begun to identify functional neural circuits that subserve different forms of cost-benefit decision making. Even though the cholinergic system is both functionally and anatomically positioned to modulate cost-benefit decision circuits, the contribution of the cholinergic system to decision making has been little studied. In this thesis, I investigated the cognitive and neural contribution of muscarinic cholinergic signaling to cost-benefit decision making. I, first, re-examined the effects of systemic administration of 0.3 mg/kg atropine on delay and probability discounting tasks and found that blockade of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors by atropine induced suboptimal choices (impulsive and risky) in both tasks. Since the effect on delay discounting was restricted to the No Cue version of the delay discounting task, I concluded that muscarinic cholinergic signaling mediates both forms of cost-benefit decision making and is selectively engaged when decisions require valuation of reward options whose costs are not externally signified. Second, I assessed the impact of inactivating the nucleus basalis (NBM) on both forms decision making and the effect of injecting atropine locally into the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), basolateral amygdala (BLA), or nucleus accumbens (NAc) core during the No Cue version of the delay discounting task. I discovered that although NBM inactivation failed to affect delay discounting, it induced risk aversion in the probability discounting task; and blockade of intra- NAc core, but not intra-OFC or intra-BLA, muscarinic cholinergic signaling lead to

  13. The efficacy of octreotide in the therapy of acute radiation-induced diarrhea: a randomized controlled study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yavuz, Melek N.; Yavuz, A. Aydin; Aydin, Fazil; Can, Gamze; Kavgaci, Halil

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Although the somatostatin analog octreotide is currently used in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced diarrhea and secretory diarrhea associated with various disorders, its role in the management of radiation enteritis is not well defined. We performed a randomized study that compared octreotide acetate with diphenoxylate hydrochloride plus atropine sulfate, the drug commonly used as therapy for acute radiation-induced diarrhea (ARID). Methods and Materials: Sixty-one patients with Grade 2 (four to six stools per day) or Grade 3 (≥ seven stools per day, National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria) diarrhea associated with pelvic radiotherapy were assigned randomly to receive octreotide s.c., 100 μg three times daily (n=33) or diphenoxylate and atropine orally, 2.5 mg four times daily (n = 28). Radiotherapy was delivered to all patients in a conventional manner, with high-energy photons in a total dose ≥45 Gy, which exceeds the tolerance of intestine. Overall, there was no significant difference in patient characteristics or radiotherapy applied between the two arms. Patients were evaluated daily for the primary study end point, resolution of diarrhea, as well as for interruption of pelvic radiotherapy. Results: Within 3 days, ARID completely resolved in 20 patients in the octreotide arm (2 within the first day, 11 within the second day, and 7 within the third day) vs. only 4 (all within the second day of therapy) in the diphenoxylate arm (p=0.002). On the diphenoxylate arm, 15/28 patients were required to discontinue pelvic radiotherapy; on the octreotide arm, 6/33 patients were required to discontinue pelvic radiotherapy for an average of 1.89±0.5 and 0.45±0.2 days, respectively (p=0.003). No side effects were observed in either arm. Three patients on the diphenoxylate arm and only 1 on the octreotide arm required further treatment for parenteral replenishment of fluids and electrolytes or other antidiarrheal treatments. Conclusion

  14. Determination of the length and position of the lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) by correlation of external measurements with combined radiographic and manometric estimations in the cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashim, M.A.; Waterman, A.E.

    1992-01-01

    Fifty DSH cats were studied radiographically and a highly significant linear correlation was found between the length of the oesophagus measured to the diaphragmatic line on the radiographs and the externally measured distance from the lower jaw incisor teeth to the anterior border of the head of 10th rib. A subsequent manometric study utilizing this correlation in 40 cats suggests that the functional lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) is situated almost at the level of the diaphragm in the cat. Significant differences were found between the length of the LOS in cats anaesthetized with ketamine compared to alphaxalone-alphadolone or xylazine-ketamine-atropine. The mean lengths of the LOS was 1.42 +/- 0.3 cm. The findings of this study indicate that external measurements can be used to position catheters for accurate oesophageal manometry in the cat

  15. Colestipol hydrochloride prophylaxis of diarrhea during pelvic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stryker, J.A.; Chung, C.K.; Layser, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    Thirty-three patients were randomized prior to pelvic radiotherapy to receive the bile acid-sequestering resin colestipol hydrochloride, 5 grams qid, during the entire time of their therapy or diphenoxylate hydrochloride and atropine sulfate 2.5-20 mg per day (control) if they experienced diarrhea. The colestipol patients also took diphenoxylate if they had diarrhea. The patients in the colestipol group often experienced nausea, vomiting, and abdominal cramps and 8 were forced to discontinue the drug. There was no difference in the weekly stool frequency between the colestipol and the control patients but the colestipol patients who took at least 50% of the prescribed dose required fewer diphenoxylate tablets than the controls. The data suggest that colestipol hydrochloride is not of value in preventing radiation-induced diarrhea because of the side effects associated with the drug, but the theory on which the use of bile acid-sequestering agents is based may be correct

  16. Anesthetic management of a child with Down’s Syndrome having atlanto axial instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basant Bhattarai

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Down's syndrome is the most commonly encountered congenital anomaly in medical practice. These patients are of special concern to medical practice because of their associated problems with regard to respiratory, cardiovascular and other systemic problems. As these patients present for repeated surgeries like dental extraction, facial reconstruction and fixation of cervical spine, these patients pose challenges to the anesthesiologist because of their unique set of problems, namely atlantoaxial instability, small trachea, congenital heart disease and repeated chest infections due to lowered immunity. Their reactivity to inhalational anesthetics and atropine is variable. Here we present an interesting case report of a child with Down's syndrome who presented with atlantoaxial instability for MRI of cervical spine under general anesthesia. KeyWords:atlanto axial instability, down’s syndrome, trisomy 21

  17. Evidence of nonvagal neural stimulation of canine gastric acid secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansy, M F; Probst, S J; Martin, J S

    1975-06-01

    In this study, we confirmed our original findings that central vagus stimulation is significantly associated with a subsequent increase in gastric mucus secretion. Central vagus stimulation following phenoxybenzamine hydrochloride administration was associated significantly with protracted elevations in secretory volume and titratable acid. We were unable to conclude that phenoxybenzamine itself in several pharmacologic dosages was associated with an increase in titratable acid. The acid secretory responses could be abolished by transection of the splanchnic nerves. Electrical stimulation of the peripheral part of the splanchnic nerve following administration of phenoxybenzamine was also associated with significant increases in secretory volume and titrable acidity. These secretory responses were not blocked by atropine but were diminished by burimamide. It is concluded that, in the dog, a largely heretofore unsuspected second neural pathway exists which is capable of influencing gastric acid secretion.

  18. Adrenergic effects on renal secretion of epidermal growth factor in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Steen Seier; Nexø, Ebba

    1985-01-01

    Urinary epidermal growth factor (EGF) has been demonstrated recently to originate from the kidneys. The present study was undertaken to investigate the adrenergic and cholinergic influence on secretion of renal EGF. beta-Adrenergic agonists increased the level of urinary EGF, while propranolol......, a beta-adrenergic blocking agent, decreased basal and beta-adrenergic stimulated total output of urinary EGF. Acetylcholine and the anticholinergic agent atropine had no effect on the output of EGF in urine. Also chemical sympathectomy induced by 6-hydroxydopamine reduced the urinary output of EGF. None...... of the experimental groups had a median serum concentration above the detection limit of the assay. The present study shows that secretion of renal EGF is under the influence of the sympathetic nervous system and release of EGF is stimulated by activation of beta-adrenergic receptors in the kidneys....

  19. Arbutus unedo induces endothelium-dependent relaxation of the isolated rat aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziyyat, Abderrahim; Mekhfi, Hassane; Bnouham, Mohamed; Tahri, Abdelhafid; Legssyer, Abdelkhaleq; Hoerter, Jacqueline; Fischmeister, Rodolphe

    2002-09-01

    Arbutus unedo L. (Ericaceae) is used in oriental Morocco to treat arterial hypertension. We studied its vasodilator effect and mechanisms of action in vitro. The root aqueous extract of Arbutus (0.25 mg/mL) produced a relaxation of noradrenaline-precontracted ring preparations of rat aorta with intact endothelium. Relaxation by Arbutus did not occur in specimens without endothelium and was inhibited by pretreatment with 100 microM N(G)-methyl-L-arginine (L-NMA), 10 microM methylene blue or 50 microM 1H-[1,2,4] oxadiazolo [4,3-a] quinoxaline-1-one (ODQ) but not by 10 microM atropine. These results suggest that Arbutus produces an endothelium-dependent relaxation of the isolated rat aorta which may be mediated mainly by a stimulation of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase by mechanisms other than activation of muscarinic receptors. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. [Acetylcholine activation of alpha-ketoglutarate oxidation in liver mitochondria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shostakovskaia, I V; Doliba, N M; Gordiĭ, S K; Babskiĭ, A M; Kondrashova, M N

    1986-01-01

    Activation of alpha-ketoglutarate oxidation in the rat liver mitochondria takes place 15 and 30 min after intraperitoneal injection of acetyl choline. This mediator in doses of 25, 50 and 100 micrograms per 100 g of body weight causes a pronounced stimulation of phosphorylation respiration rate and calcium capacity of mitochondria with alpha-ketoglutarate oxidation. Acetyl choline is found to have a moderate inhibitory action on oxidation of lower (physiological) concentrations of succinate. Its stimulating action on alpha-ketoglutarate oxidation is associated with activation of M-cholinoreceptors; atropine, a choline-blocker, removes completely this effect. It is supposed that alpha-ketoglutarate and succinate are included into the composition of two reciprocal hormonal-substrate nucleotide systems.

  1. Adolf Hitler's medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, D

    2005-02-01

    For the last nine years of his life Adolf Hitler, a lifelong hypochondriac had as his physician Dr Theodor Morell. Hitler's mood swings, Parkinson's disease, gastro-intestinal symptoms, skin problems and steady decline until his suicide in 1945 are documented by reliable observers and historians, and in Morell's diaries. The bizarre and unorthodox medications given to Hitler, often for undisclosed reasons, include topical cocaine, injected amphetamines, glucose, testosterone, estradiol, and corticosteroids. In addition, he was given a preparation made from a gun cleaner, a compound of strychnine and atropine, an extract of seminal vesicles, and numerous vitamins and 'tonics'. It seems possible that some of Hitler's behaviour, illnesses and suffering can be attributed to his medical care. Whether he blindly accepted such unorthodox medications or demanded them is unclear.

  2. Aerial parts of maca (Lepidium meyenii Walp.) as functional vegetables with gastrointestinal prokinetic efficacy in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Wenwen; Chen, Xuemin; Huo, Qing; Cui, Yajie; Yu, Zejun; Yu, Longjiang

    2018-06-20

    Lepidium meyenii Walp. (maca) has been utilized in the Andean region because of its edibleness and medicinal value. The aerial parts of maca (APM) were analyzed for protein, total sugar, vitamins, amino acids, and minerals and its characteristic active ingredients at five different growth stages. The results showed the high protein, total sugar, vitamin C, niacin, potassium, and calcium contents of APM. All 17 amino acids and the characteristic active ingredients, namely, macamide, glucosinolates, adenosine, and total saponins, were detected. We examined the effects of maca plant powders on gastric emptying and intestinal propulsion and the levels of serum motilin and gastrin in atropine-treated mice. Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) was investigated to identify the potential active material in APM. The results revealed that both maca plant powders and BITC can promote the gastrointestinal prokinetic efficacy. Thus, APM feature potential as new functional vegetable sources.

  3. Antidiarrhoeal activity of leaf methanolic extract of Rauwolfia serpentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezeigbo, I I; Ezeja, M I; Madubuike, K G; Ifenkwe, D C; Ukweni, I A; Udeh, N E; Akomas, S C

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate the antidiarrhoeal property of methanol extract of the leaves of Rauwolfia serpentina (R. serpentina) in experimental diarrhoea induced by castor oil in mice. Doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg R. serpentina leaf methanol extracts were administered to castor oil induced diarrhoea mice to determine its antidiarrhoeal activity. All doses of the extract and the reference drug atropine sulphate (3 mg/kg, i.p.) produced a dose-dependent reduction in intestinal weight and fluid volume. The extracts also significantly reduced the intestinal transit in charcoal meal test when compared to diphenoxylate Hcl (5 mg/kg, p.o.). The results show that the extract of R. serpentina leaves has a significant antidiarrhoeal activity and supports its traditional uses in herbal medicine.

  4. Clinical observation of treatment of fungal corneal ulcer with application of iodine tincture and fluconazole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Fang Chen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To explore the effect of 30g/L iodine rubbed and debridement of wound together with 2g/L fluconazole in the treatment of fungal corneal ulcers. METHODS: Fifty fungal keratitis cases(50 eyesdiagnosed by corneal smear examination were cleaned locally, iodine blanch. All patients were given 2g/L fluconazole for systemic treatment, treated eye with 2g/L fluconazole eye-drops and loxacin eye-drops, and 30g/L atropine eye ointment dilate the pupils.RESULTS:Fifty cases(50 eyeswere selected, of which, 40 cases were healed, 8 cases were improved and 2 cases were aggravated with operation being given.CONCLUSION:After early and timely diagnosis of fungal keratitis, local debridement, 30g/L iodine rubbed the wound and joint with systemic and local treatment of fluconazole can achieve good effect.

  5. Effect of topical ophthalmic epinastine and olopatadine on tear volume in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villareal, Arturo L; Farley, William; Pflugfelder, Stephen C

    2006-12-01

    To investigate the effects of topical epinastine and olopatadine on tear volume by using a mouse model. Eighty-five C57BL6 mice (170 eyes) were treated twice daily with topical ophthalmic epinastine 0.05%, olopatadine 0.1%, or atropine 1% or served as untreated controls. A thread-wetting assay was used to measure tear volume at baseline and 15, 45, 90, 120, and 240 minutes after the last instillation of the drug on days 2 and 4 of treatment. After 2 days of treatment, epinastine-treated mice showed greater mean tear volumes than olopatadine-treated mice did at 15, 45, 90, and 240 minutes, with statistical significance at 15 and 45 minutes (Placrimal functional unit, epinastine may be an especially good choice for the treatment of allergic conjunctivitis in patients with dry eye disease or in those who are at risk for developing dry eye.

  6. Asystole following positive pressure insufflation of right pleural cavity: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konia Mojca R

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Adverse hemodynamic effects with severe bradycardia have been previously reported during positive pressure insufflation of the right thoracic cavity in humans. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of asystole during thoracoscopic surgery with positive pressure insufflation. Case presentation A 63-year-old Caucasian woman developed asystole at the onset of positive pressure insufflation of her right hemithorax during a thoracoscopic single-lung ventilation procedure. Immediate deflation of pleural cavity, intravenous glycopyrrolate and atropine administration returned her heart rhythm to normal sinus rhythm. The surgery proceeded in the absence of positive pressure insufflation without any further complications. Conclusions We discuss the proposed mechanisms of hemodynamic instability with positive pressure thoracic insufflation, and anesthetic and insufflation techniques that decrease the likelihood of adverse hemodynamic events.

  7. Cerebral blood flow modulation by Basal forebrain or whisker stimulation can occur independently of large cytosolic Ca2+ signaling in astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, Norio; Nagai, Terumi; Ozawa, Katsuya; Oe, Yuki; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Hirase, Hajime

    2013-01-01

    We report that a brief electrical stimulation of the nucleus basalis of Meynert (NBM), the primary source of cholinergic projection to the cerebral cortex, induces a biphasic cerebral cortical blood flow (CBF) response in the somatosensory cortex of C57BL/6J mice. This CBF response, measured by laser Doppler flowmetry, was attenuated by the muscarinic type acetylcholine receptor antagonist atropine, suggesting a possible involvement of astrocytes in this type of CBF modulation. However, we find that IP3R2 knockout mice, which lack cytosolic Ca2+ surges in astrocytes, show similar CBF changes. Moreover, whisker stimulation resulted in similar degrees of CBF increase in IP3R2 knockout mice and the background strain C57BL/6J. Our results show that neural activity-driven CBF modulation could occur without large cytosolic increases of Ca2+ in astrocytes.

  8. Bilateral ocular abnormalities in a wild stranded harp seal (Phoca groenlandica) suggestive of anterior segment dysgenesis and persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlacher-Reid, Claire; Colitz, Carmen M H; Abrams, Ken; Smith, Ainsley; Tuttle, Allison D

    2011-06-01

    A male yearling harp seal (Phoca groenlandica) stranded and was brought to Mystic Aquarium & Institute for Exploration's Seal Rescue and Rehabilitation Center. The seal presented with a bilateral pendular vertical nystagmus, negative menace response, and a positive palpebral response. Ophthalmological examination by slit lamp biomicroscopy revealed perilimbal corneal edema, excessive iridal surface structures, pupils that appeared to be shaped improperly (dyscoria), and suspected cataracts. Attempts to dilate the pupils with both dark-lighted conditions and repeated dosages of 10% phenylephrine and 1% atropine ophthalmic solution in each eye (OU) were unsuccessful. Ocular ultrasonography findings suggested bilateral cataracts with flattened anterior-posterior (A-P) diameter and possible persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous. It is possible that these structural congenital abnormalities could produce further ocular complications for this seal including uveitis, secondary glaucoma, retinal detachment, and/or vitreal hemorrhage in the future. This case demonstrates the importance of a thorough ophthalmological examination in stranded wild animals, especially if their symptoms appear neurological.

  9. Reduced number of (/sup 3/H)nicotine and (/sup 3/H)acelylcholine binding sites in the frontal cortex of Alzheimer brains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordberg, A; Winblad, B

    1986-12-03

    Nicotinic cholinergic receptors were measured in human frontal cortex using (/sup 3/H)nicotine and (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine (in the presence of atropine) as receptor ligands. A parallel marked reduction in number of (/sup 3/H)nicotine (52%, P<0.01) and (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine (-55%, P<0.05) binding was found in the frontal cortex of Alzheimer brains (AD/SDAT) when compared to age-matched control brains. As a comparison the number of muscarinic receptors was quantified using (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate and found to be significantly increased (+23%, P<0.01) in AD/SDAT compared to controls. 26 refs.

  10. A case of organophosphate poisoning presenting with seizure and unavailable history of parenteral suicide attempt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandit Vinay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Organophosphate (OP poisoning is common in India. Only few case reports of parenteral OP poisoning have been described. We report a case of self-injected methyl parathion poisoning, presenting after four days with seizure, altered sensorium, and respiratory distress which posed a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma. Despite nonavailability of history of OP poisoning, he was treated based on suspicion and showed a good clinical response to treatment trial with atropine and pralidoxime, and had a successful recovery. Atypical presentations may be encountered following parenteral administration of OP poison, and even a slight suspicion of this warrants proper investigations and treatment for a favorable outcome. Persistently low plasma cholinesterase level is a useful marker for making the diagnosis.

  11. [The lazy eye - contemporary strategies of amblyopia treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, V

    2011-02-16

    Amblyopia is a condition of decreased monocular or binocular visual acuity caused by form deprivation or abnormal binocular interaction. Amblyopia is the most common cause of monocular vision loss in children with a prevalence of 2 to 5%. During the last decade, several prospective randomized studies have influenced our clinical management. Based on these studies, optimum refractive correction should be prescribed first. However, most patients will need additional occlusion therapy which is still considered the «gold standard» of amblyopia management. Now much lower doses have been shown to be effective. In moderate amblyopia, penalization with atropine is as effective as patching. New treatment modalities including perceptual learning, pharmacotherapy with levodopa and citicholine or transcranial magnetic stimulation have not yet been widely accepted.

  12. Pharmacodynamic Study of Interaction of Aqueous Leaf Extract of Psidium Guajava Linn. (Myrtaceae) with Receptor Systems Using Isolated Tissue Preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaseth, R K; Kumar, S; Dutta, Shagun; Sehgal, Ratika; Rajora, Preety; Mathur, Rajani

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigates the interaction of aqueous leaf extract of Psidium guajava with muscarinic, serotonergic and adrenergic receptor system using isolated rat ileum, gastric fundus and trachea, respectively. The concentration-dependent contractile response of aqueous leaf extract of Psidium guajava was parallel and rightward of standard agonists, ACh and 5-HT indicating agonistic activity on muscarinic and serotonergic receptor systems. The inhibition of aqueous leaf extract of Psidium guajava mediated contractions in presence of atropine (10(-7) M) and ketanserin (10(-6) M) confirmed the activity. Relaxant effect of PG (0.2 mg/ml) on carbachol induced pre-contracted rat tracheal chain indicated its agonistic action on adrenergic receptor system. Inhibition (P<0.05) of the action in the presence of propranolol (1 ng/ml) confirmed the activity. It may be concluded that PG possesses agonistic action on muscarinic, serotonergic and adrenergic receptor systems.

  13. Characterization of the effect of penehyclidine hydrochloride on muscarinic receptor subtypes mediating the contraction of guinea-pig isolated gastrointestinal smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hong-Tao; Liao, Zhi; Meng, Xian-Min; Yan, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Shu-Jie; Mo, Zheng-Ji

    2009-07-01

    The aim was to characterize the effect of penehyclidine hydrochloride, which mediates the relaxation of guinea-pig isolated gastrointestinal smooth muscle, on muscarinic receptor subtypes. Radioimmune assay was used to determine cAMP levels in isolated guinea-pig gastrointestinal smooth muscle to compare the selective effects of penehyclidine hydrochloride on muscarinic receptor subtypes. The results indicated that the relaxing effect of penehyclidine hydrochloride on isolated gastrointestinal smooth muscle contraction induced by acetylcholine was stronger than that of atropine (based on PA2 values). In the radioimmune assay, penehyclidine hydrochloride increased the cAMP content in isolated guinea-pig stomach smooth muscle and decreased the cAMP content in isolated guinea-pig intestinal smooth muscle, but the difference was not statistically significant at a dose of 10 mumol/l. The results suggest that penehyclidine hydrochloride has little or no effect on M2 receptor subtypes in guinea-pig gastrointestinal smooth muscle.

  14. Development of pretreatment compounds against nerve-gas agents. Annual report (Final), 16 May 88-30 Sep 90

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, F.I.; Abraham, P.

    1990-09-30

    The U. S. Army Medical Research and Development Command is interested in research directed toward the development of countermeasures to chemical warfare (CW) agents such as the nerve gas poison soman. Soman and other nerve gas poisons are extremely potent cholinesterase inhibitors. This inhibition leads to a buildup of excess acetylcholine resulting in over-stimulation of both the peripheral and central nervous system and can lead to death. Standard therapy for organophosphate nerve agent poisoning is based on co-administration of an anticholinergic agent such as atropine to antagonize the effects of accumulated acetylcholine and a cholinesterase reactivator such as 2-PAM to dephosphorylate the inhibited enzyme. However, since many problems remain in the treatment of organophosphate nerve agent poisoning, there is considerable interest and need to develop new pretreatment and treatment drugs, particularly for soman poisoning.

  15. The influence of different pathogens on the lysozyme activity into tissues of rat oral cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Levitsky

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine action of the different pathogens on the lysozyme activity into tissues of oral cavity and serum. Methods: The lysozyme activities was determined into oral mucosa cheek, tongue gum and serum of 158 white rats (11 series experiments. The pathogens were used: atropine, protamine sulfat, indometacyn, bee poison, hydrasine sulfat, cytostatic cyclofosfan, lincomycin, lipopolysaccharide, composition of antibiotic and omeprasol for ACBT Results: The  whole of pathogens decreased lysozyme activity (mean in 1,6-2,5 times into oral tissues and on 16 % into serum. The specific lowering of lysozyme activities (Δ%/mg pathogen was low most for lipopolysaccharide, especially after oral application usage (exceeding was in tens times. Conclusion: The lysozyme activity lowering may play significant role in pathogenesis of stomatologic diseases/ Lipopolysaccharide (LPS send lysozyme activity lowering most especially after oral application. Probably, the antilysozyme action of pathogens realize by LPS. The stomatogenic factor in pathogenesis and profilactic of noninfection diseases is important.

  16. Acute organophosphorus poisoning complicated by acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankaj, Madhu; Krishna, Kavita

    2014-07-01

    We report a case of 30 year old alcoholic male admitted with vomiting, drowsiness, limb weakness and fasciculations after alleged history of consumption of 30 ml of chlorpyriphos insecticide. He had low serum cholinesterase levels. With standard treatment for organophosphorus poisoning (OPP), he improved gradually until day 5, when he developed neck and limb weakness and respiratory distress. This intermediate syndrome was treated with oximes, atropine and artificial ventilation. During treatment, his ECG showed fresh changes of ST elevation. High CPK & CPK-MB levels, septal hypokinesia on 2D echo suggested acute coronary syndrome. Coronary angiography was postponed due to his bedridden and obtunded status. The patient finally recovered fully by day 15 and was discharged. Acute coronary syndrome is a rare occurrence in OP poisoning. The present case thus emphasises the need for careful electrocardiographic and enzymatic monitoring of all patients of organophosphorus poisoning to prevent potential cardiac complication which can prove fatal.

  17. Crude extract and purified components isolated from the stems of Tinospora crispa exhibit positive inotropic effects on the isolated left atrium of rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Praman, Siwaporn; Mulvany, Michael J.; Williams, David E.

    2013-01-01

    of 5 bioactive compounds: higenamine, salsolinol, tyramine, adenosine and uridine. Higenamine, salsolinol (at low concentration) and tyramine acted via the adrenergic receptors to increase the force of the atrial contraction, whereas a high concentration of salsolinol acted indirectly by stimulating...... an increase in the force of contraction of the electrical field stimulated left atrium. This effect was inhibited by propranolol, atenolol, ICI-118,551, phentolamine and atropine. The positive inotropic effect on the reserpenized isolated left atrium of the Tinospora crispa extract was significantly inhibited...... by propranolol, atenolol and ICI-118,551. Phentolamine, on the other hand, caused potentiation and the effect was inhibited when propranolol was also added. Higenamine caused an increase in the force of contraction of the electrical field stimulated left atrium and this effect was significantly inhibited by ICI...

  18. The modulation effects of d-amphetamine and procaine on the spontaneously generated action potentials in the central neuron of snail, Achatina fulica Ferussac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Hsien; Tsai, Ming-Cheng

    2005-05-01

    The modulation effects of d-amphetamine and procaine on the spontaneously generated action potentials were studied on the RP1 central neuron of giant African snails (Achatina fulica Ferussac). Extra-cellular application of d-amphetamine or procaine reversibly elicited bursts of potential (BoP). Prazosin, propranolol, atropine or d-tubocurarine did not alter the BoP elicited by either d-amphetamine or procaine. KT-5720 or H89 (protein kinase A inhibitors) blocked d-amphetamine-elicited BoP, whereas they did not block the procaine-elicited BoP. U73122, neomycin (phospholipase C inhibitors) blocked the procaine-elicited BoP, whereas they did not block the d-amphetamine-elicited BoP in the same neuron. These results suggest that BoP elicited by d-amphetamine or procaine were associated with protein kinase A and phospholipase C activity in the neuron.

  19. Acetylcholine receptors in the human retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchins, J.B.; Hollyfield, J.G.

    1985-01-01

    Evidence for a population of acetylcholine (ACh) receptors in the human retina is presented. The authors have used the irreversible ligand 3 H-propylbenzilylcholine mustard ( 3 H-PrBCM) to label muscarinic receptors. 3 H- or 125 I-alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BTx) was used to label putative nicotinic receptors. Muscarinic receptors are apparently present in the inner plexiform layer of the retina. Autoradiographic grain densities are reduced in the presence of saturating concentrations of atropine, quinuclidinyl benzilate or scopolamine; this indicates that 3 H-PrBCM binding is specific for a population of muscarinic receptors in the human retina. Binding sites for radiolabeled alpha-BTx are found predominantly in the inner plexiform layer of the retina. Grain densities are reduced in the presence of d-tubocurarine, indicating that alpha-BTx may bind to a pharmacologically relevant nicotinic ACh receptor. This study provides evidence for cholinergic neurotransmission in the human retina

  20. The role of nitric oxide in the development of neurogenic pulmonary edema in spinal cord-injured rats: the effect of preventive interventions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šedý, Jiří; Zicha, Josef; Kuneš, Jaroslav; Hejčl, Aleš; Syková, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 297, č. 4 (2009), R1111-R1117 ISSN 0363-6119 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA ČR GA309/06/1246; GA ČR(CZ) GA305/08/0139; GA AV ČR IAA500390902 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0538; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510; GA MZd(CZ) 1A8697; GA MZd(CZ) NR8339; EC FP6 projekt RESCUE(FR) LSHB-CT-2005-518233 Program:1M; 1M Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512; CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : blood pressure * atropine * heart rate Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.058, year: 2009

  1. Effects of Swertia japonica extract and its main compound swertiamarin on gastric emptying and gastrointestinal motility in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yoshiyuki; Sumiyoshi, Maho

    2011-09-01

    The Swertia japonica is used clinically as a remedy for gastrointestinal symptoms in Japan. We examined the effects of a S. japonica and swertiamarin on gastric emptying and gastrointestinal motility in atropine-, dopamine-, and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-treated mice. All three preparations inhibited reductions in gastric emptying and gastrointestinal motility induced by dopamine (1mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection, ip). Neither the powder, swertiamarin, nor itopride had any effect on the reductions in gastric emptying and gastrointestinal motility caused by 5-HT (4 mg/kg, ip). These findings suggest that the powder and swertiamarin stimulate gastric emptying and gastrointestinal motility by inhibiting the dopamine D(2) receptor. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Fluorinated tropinyl esters for application with PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emran, A.M.; Cherif, A.; Yang, D.J.; Flynn, D.D.

    1993-01-01

    Regulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (MAR) number and function occurs with various exogenous chemicals and pathological conditions. Use of positron emission tomography (PET) has potential in investigating MAR in living humans. This requires synthesis of appropriate radiolabelled tracers with high affinity and high specific activity. Several analogs of atropine and tropacocaine, including fluorinated derivatives, were synthesized and evaluated for their MAR binding affinity. Specific structural alterations correlated with changes in receptor affinity. Substitution was directed primarily on aromatic rings of the acid moieties. In vitro binding assays demonstrated that molecular substitution on some of the compounds retained significant affinity for MAR. Changing the acid moiety on these molecules resulted in a change in MAR affinity. Substitution o the aromatic ring of the acid moiety was also associated with change in receptor affinity. Preliminary radiofluorination has been successful. These compounds provide new tools to study MAR dynamics in the living human brain

  3. Clinical emergency treatment of 68 critical patients with severe organophosphorus poisoning and prognosis analysis after rescue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hui; Weng, Yi-Bing; Zhen, Gen-Shen; Li, Feng-Jie; Jin, Ai-Chun; Liu, Jie

    2017-06-01

    This study reports the clinical emergency treatment of 68 critical patients with severe organophosphorus poisoning, and analyzes the prognosis after rescue.The general data of 68 patients with severe organophosphorus poisoning treated in our hospital were retrospectively analyzed. These patients were divided into 2 groups: treatment group, and control group. Patients in the control group received routine emergency treatment, while patients in the treatment group additionally received hemoperfusion plus hemodialysis on the basis of routine emergency treatment. The curative effects in these 2 groups and the prognosis after rescue were compared.Compared with the control group, atropinization time, recovery time of cholinesterase activity, recovery time of consciousness, extubation time, and length of hospital stay were shorter (P poisoning rebound rate was significantly lower (P treatment group.Hemoperfusion and hemodialysis on the basis of routine emergency treatment for critical patients with organophosphorus poisoning can improve rescue outcomes and improve the prognosis of patients, which should be popularized.

  4. Different approaches to acute organophosphorus poison treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurulain, Syed Muhammad

    2012-07-01

    Organophosphorus compounds (OPCs) have a wide variety of applications and are a serious threat for self-poisoning, unintentional misuse, terrorist attack, occupational hazard and warfare attack. The present standard treatment has been reported to be unsatisfactory. Many novel approaches are being used and tested for acute organophosphorus (OP) poison treatment. The bioscavenger concept captured high attention among the scientific community during the last few decades. Other approaches like alkalinisation of blood plasma/serum and use of weak inhibitors against strong inhibitors, though it showed promising results, did not get such wide attention. The introduction of a novel broad-spectrum oxime has also been in focus. In this mini-review, an update of the overview of four different approaches has been discussed. The standard therapy that is atropine+oxime+benzodiazepine along with supportive measures will continue to be the best option with only the replacement of a single oxime to improve its broad-spectrum efficacy.

  5. Effects of Gymnodinium breve toxin on the smooth muscle preparation of guinea-pig ileum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunfeld, Y.; Spiegelstein, M.Y.

    1974-01-01

    1 The effects of Gymnodinium breve neurotoxin (GT) on smooth muscles were studied using the guinea-pig isolated ileum. 2 The toxin caused strong spasmogenic effects at 1-4 μg/ml, characterized by prolonged tonic contraction with superimposed pronounced pendular movements. Tachyphylaxis was observed upon administration of successive doses. 3 Atropine blocked the contractile response elicited by GT, whereas mepyramine and hexamethonium failed to do so. These findings tentatively suggested a cholinergic involvement at a post-ganglionic site of action. 4 In the presence of tetrodotoxin the effects of GT were abolished, excluding direct action of the toxin on the smooth muscle. 5 It is concluded that GT exerts its spasmogenic effects through stimulation of the post-ganglionic cholinergic nerve fibres. PMID:4155337

  6. Autonomic control of the heart in the Asian swamp eel (Monopterus albus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Nina Kerting; Huong, Do Thi Thanh; Bayley, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The Asian swamp eel (Monopterus albus) is an air-breathing teleost with very reduced gills that uses the buccal cavity for air-breathing. Here we characterise the cardiovascular changes associated with the intermittent breathing pattern in M. albus and we study the autonomic control of the heart.......3 cm H2O). The autonomic control of the heart during water- and air-breathing was revealed by infusion of the β-adrenergic antagonist propranolol and muscarinic antagonist atropine (3 mg kg− 1) in eels instrumented with an arterial catheter. Inhibition of the sympathetic and parasympathetic...... innervations of the heart revealed a strong vagal tone on the heart of water-breathing eels and that the tachycardia during air-breathing is primarily mediated by withdrawal of cholinergic tone....

  7. [Acute dietary poisoning by white hellebore (Veratrum album L.). Clinical and analytical data. A propos of 5 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, R; Carlier, P; Hoffelt, J; Savidan, A

    1985-01-01

    Five cases of acute accidental poisoning with White Hellebore are reported. All cases occurred several minutes after the ingestion of home-made gentian wine. The clinical signs were nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, hypotension and bradycardia. The initial ECG showed sinus bradycardia in 4 cases. In one patient, complete atrioventricular block with an ectopic atrial bradycardia and an intermittent idioventricular rhythm was recorded. Symptomatic treatment and/or atropine led to recovery within a few hours. These symptoms suggested poisoning with a veratrum alkaloid. The White Hellebore (Veratrum Album L.) and the Yellow Gentian (Gentiana Lutea L.) often grow side by side in the fields; it is easy to confuse the two plants before they flower if one is not a botanist. Each gentian wine was analysed by thin layer chromatography and chemical ionisation spectrometry. All the wines contained Veratrum alkaloids.

  8. Diverse Presentation of Breath Holding Spells: Two Case Reports with Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetanjali Rathore

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Breath holding spells are a common and dramatic form of syncope and anoxic seizure in infancy. They are usually triggered by an emotional stimuli or minor trauma. Based on the color change, they are classified into 3 types, cyanotic, pallid, and mixed. Pallid breath holding spells result from exaggerated, vagally-mediated cardiac inhibition, whereas the more common, cyanotic breathholding spells are of more complex pathogenesis which is not completely understood. A detailed and accurate history is the mainstay of diagnosis. An EKG should be strongly considered to rule out long QT syndrome. Spontaneous resolution of breath-holding spells is usually seen, without any adverse developmental and intellectual sequelae. Rare cases of status epilepticus, prolonged asystole, and sudden death have been reported. Reassurance and education is the mainstay of therapy. Occasionally, pharmacologic intervention with iron, piracetam; atropine may be of benefit. Here we present 2 cases, one of each, pallid and cyanotic breath holding spells.

  9. Mannich Bases: An Important Pharmacophore in Present Scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Bala

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mannich bases are the end products of Mannich reaction and are known as beta-amino ketone carrying compounds. Mannich reaction is a carbon-carbon bond forming nucleophilic addition reaction and is a key step in synthesis of a wide variety of natural products, pharmaceuticals, and so forth. Mannich reaction is important for the construction of nitrogen containing compounds. There is a number of aminoalkyl chain bearing Mannich bases like fluoxetine, atropine, ethacrynic acid, trihexyphenidyl, and so forth with high curative value. The literature studies enlighten the fact that Mannich bases are very reactive and recognized to possess potent diverse activities like anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antifilarial, antibacterial, antifungal, anticonvulsant, anthelmintic, antitubercular, analgesic, anti-HIV, antimalarial, antipsychotic, antiviral activities and so forth. The biological activity of Mannich bases is mainly attributed to α, β-unsaturated ketone which can be generated by deamination of hydrogen atom of the amine group.

  10. Effect of a crude sulfated polysaccharide from Halymenia floresia (Rhodophyta on gastrointestinal smooth muscle contractility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ronaldo Vasconcelos Graça

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the effect of Halymenia floresia (Hf on duodenum contractility, and on experimental protocols of gastric compliance (GC in rats. Fraction Hf2s exhibited a concentration-dependent myocontractile effect (EC50 12.48 µg/ml, and an inhibitory effect after consecutive washing. The contractile response promoted by Hf2s in the duodenum strips was completely inhibited by verapamil, and the effects were prevented in the presence of Ca2+-free medium. The pretreatment with atropine prevented the Hf2s myocontractile effect. Hf2s was also capable to decrease the GC (from 3.8±0.06 to 3.4±0.13 ml, P<0.05, which did not return to basal levels after more 50 min of observation. These results indicated that the algal polysaccharide possessed in vitro and in vivo gastrointestinal effects.

  11. PENGARUH EKSTRAK BEBERAPA TANAMAN OBAT TERHADAP USUS TERISOLASI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Dzulkarnain

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The extraction of Anacardium occidentale L.leaves, Aegle marmelos Corr leaves and wood bark, Acorus calamus L. tuber and Desmodium triquetrum D.C. leaves has been tested on the isolated rabbit and guinea pig intestine. The extraction of A. occidentale L. leaves stimulated the isolated rabbit and guinea pig intestine which may due to the anacardic acid content. No consistent influence was seen by the extraction of A.marmelos Corr. leaves and wood bark. The A. calamus L. tuber extraction decreases the isolated intestine activities which is of the atropine-like type not antihistamin one. This may explain the use as antidysentri agent from the motility point of view. The D. triquetrum D.C. leaves extraction stimulated the isolated intestine which has a pilocarpine and histamine-like activity but does not exclude a seretonine-like action.

  12. Acute and chronic gastric emptying disorders in rats after localized X-irradiation, and the therapy of these disorders. Akute und chronische Stoerungen in der Magenentleerung nach Roentgenbestrahlung des Rattenmagens und deren therapeutische Beeinflussbarkeit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breiter, N.; Sassy, T. (GSF, Inst. fuer Strahlenbiologie, Neuherberg (Germany) Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Strahlenbiologisches Inst.); Trott, K.R. (St. Bartholomew' s Medical Coll., Dept. of Radiation Biology, London (United Kingdom))

    1992-07-01

    After localized 300 kV X-irradiation of the rat stomach the stomach emptying time of a liquid and a solid test meal was examined with a non-invasive radiological method. In the acute period one to three weeks after irradiation with single doses between 10.7 and 21.3 Gy we observed a faster emptying of the liquid and a delayed emptying of the solid test meal. The faster emptying of the liquid test meal was treated successfully with atropin. In the chromic period we observed a delayed emptying of the liquid and of the solid test meal. These emptying disorders were treated partially successfully with the parasympathomimeticum carbachol and they were treated completeley successfully with the dopamine antagonist metoclopramide. (orig.).

  13. Immediate x-radiation induced contractions of the isolated guinea pig terminal ileum: the localization of the effect by drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spruegel, W; Schubert, E; Mitznegg, P; Heim, F [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany, F.R.). Pharmakologisches Inst.; Hasl, G; Pauly, H [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    1977-04-01

    Tone and motility of the isolated guinea pig ileum were increased by irradiation with a dose of 10 krad. The maximal effect corresponds to that induced by 0.001 ..mu..g/ml acetylcholine or 0.3 ..mu..g/ml nicotine. The pharmacological analysis of this effect performed with acetylcholine and nicotine and several blocking agents including hexamethonium, atropine, tetrodotoxin, diphenhydramine, and verapamil suggests that radiation acts on the postganglionic parasympathetic neuron and the neuromuscular synapse. The mechanism of radiation is likely to consist of both an increased release of acetylcholine from the postganglionic neuron and a sensibilization of the cholinergic receptor site at the smooth muscle cell. The latter effect is thought to result from an increased contractile action induced by acetylcholine or nicotine in the irradiated ileal smooth muscle.

  14. In vivo biodistribution of two [18F]-labelled muscarinic cholinergic receptor ligands: 2-[18F]- and 4-[18F]-fluorodexetimide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, A.A.; Scheffel, U.A.; Dannals, R.F.; Stathis, M.; Ravert, H.T.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Two [ 18 F]-labelled analogues of the potent muscarinic cholinergic receptor (m-AChR) antagonist, dexetimide, were evaluated as potential ligands for imaging m-AChR by positron emission tomography (PET). Intravenous administration of both 2-[ 18 F]- or 4-[ 18 F]-fluorodexetimide resulted in high brain uptake of radioactivity in mice. High binding levels were observed in m-AChR rich areas, such as cortex and striatum, with low levels in the receptor-poor cerebellum. Uptake of radioactivity was saturable and could be blocked by pre-administration of dexetimide or atropine. Drugs with different sites of action were ineffective at blocking receptor binding. The results indicate that both radiotracers are promising candidates for use in PET studies

  15. An Important Chemical Weapon Group: Nerve Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Yaren

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available As a result of developing modern chemistry, nerve agents, which are one of the most important group of efficient chemical warfare agents, were developed just before Second World War. They generate toxic and clinical effects via inhibiting acetylcholinesterase irreversibly and causing excessive amounts of acetylcholine at cholinergic synapses in the body. Clinical symptoms are occurred as a result of affected muscarinic (stimulation of secretuar glands, miosis, breathing problems etc., nicotinic (stimulation of skeletal muscles, paralyse, tremors etc. and central nerve system (convulsions, loss of consciousness, coma etc. areas. In case of a nerve agent exposure, treatment includes the steps of ventilation, decontamination, antidotal treatment (atropine, oximes, diazepam and pyridostigmine bromide and supportive theraphy. Because of arising possibility of using chemical warfare agents due to current conjuncture of the world, medical staff should know about nerve agents, their effects and how to treat the casualties exposured to nerve agents. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2007; 6(6.000: 491-500

  16. Military chemical warfare agent human subjects testing: part 2--long-term health effects among participants of U.S. military chemical warfare agent testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Mark

    2009-10-01

    Military chemical warfare agent testing from World War I to 1975 produced thousands of veterans with concerns about how their participation affected their health. A companion article describes the history of these experiments, and how the lack of clinical data hampers evaluation of long-term health consequences. Conversely, much information is available about specific agents tested and their long-term health effects in other populations, which may be invaluable for helping clinicians respond effectively to the health care and other needs of affected veterans. The following review describes tested agents and their known long-term health consequences. Although hundreds of chemicals were tested, they fall into only about a half-dozen pharmaceutical classes, including common pharmaceuticals; anticholinesterase agents including military nerve agents and pesticides; anticholinergic glycolic acid esters such as atropine; acetylcholine reactivators such as 2-PAM; psychoactive compounds including cannabinoids, phencyclidine, and LSD; and irritants including tear gas and riot control agents.

  17. An Important Chemical Weapon Group: Nerve Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Yaren

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available As a result of developing modern chemistry, nerve agents, which are one of the most important group of efficient chemical warfare agents, were developed just before Second World War. They generate toxic and clinical effects via inhibiting acetylcholinesterase irreversibly and causing excessive amounts of acetylcholine at cholinergic synapses in the body. Clinical symptoms are occurred as a result of affected muscarinic (stimulation of secretuar glands, miosis, breathing problems etc., nicotinic (stimulation of skeletal muscles, paralyse, tremors etc. and central nerve system (convulsions, loss of consciousness, coma etc. areas. In case of a nerve agent exposure, treatment includes the steps of ventilation, decontamination, antidotal treatment (atropine, oximes, diazepam and pyridostigmine bromide and supportive theraphy. Because of arising possibility of using chemical warfare agents due to current conjuncture of the world, medical staff should know about nerve agents, their effects and how to treat the casualties exposured to nerve agents. [TAF Prev Med Bull. 2007; 6(6: 491-500

  18. Cholinergic receptor binding in the frontal cortex of suicide victims

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanley, M.

    1986-01-01

    Because there is a high incidence of individuals diagnosed as having an affective disorder who subsequently commit suicide, the author thought it would be of interest to determine QNB binding in the brains of a large sample of suicide victims, and to compare the findings with a well-matched control group. Brain samples were obtained at autopsy from 22 suicide victims and 22 controls. Frontal cortex samples were diseected, frozen, and stored until assayed. Samples of tissue homogenate were incubated in duplicate with 10 concentrations of tritium-QNB. Specific binding was determined with and without atropine. The results confirmed previous studies in which no changes were noted in suicide versus control brains. While the findings neither disprove nor support the cholinergic hypothesis of depression, they do suggest that the neurochemical basis for the in vivo observations of increased responsivity of depressed individuals to muscarinic cholinergic agents might not involve changes in receptors estimated by QNB binding

  19. Pressor and hemodilution responses compensate for acute hemorrhage in bluefish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvy, C S; Tremml, P G; DuBois, A B

    1988-01-01

    1. After hemorrhage of 21% blood volume (0.9% body weight) blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (H.R.) of unanesthetized bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix) recovered within 5 min. 2. Phentolamine blocked this recovery. 3. Atropine increased control H.R. from 48 to 87 per min, and to 108 after hemorrhage, with delay of BP recovery to 10 min. 4. With small, repeated hemorrhages every 20 min, hemodilution and recovery of BP occurred between hemorrhages. Removal of 27% blood volume resulted in only temporary recovery. 5. Thirty min after hemorrhage, plasma epinephrine was 5 x and norepinephrine 8 x control. 6. Thus, bluefish tolerate hemorrhage with initial vasoconstriction via alpha-adrenergic pathways, and hemodilution.

  20. Electrolyte and protein secretion by the perfused rabbit mandibular gland stimulated with acetylcholine or catecholamines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Case, R M; Conigrave, A D; Novak, I

    1980-01-01

    stimulation, the rate of protein secretion fell off much faster than the rate of fluid secretion.7. The beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol evoked a fluid secretory response only equal to about 5% of that evoked by acetylcholine, but still the response declined during continued stimulation. The electrolyte...... composition of isoproterenol-evoked saliva was vastly different from that evoked by acetylcholine, being particularly rich in K and HCO(3). The isoproterenol-evoked saliva was also extremely rich in protein so that the total protein secretion evoked by isoproterenol was much greater than that evoked...... unstimulated or evoked by acetylcholine or eserine, could be blocked completely by atropine.4. During prolonged stimulation with acetylcholine, the fluid secretory response declined rapidly over a period of about 15 min from an initial high value to a much lower plateau value. After 3 or more hours...

  1. Diastolic and autonomic dysfunction in early cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Emilie Kristine; Møller, Søren; Kjær, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. Presence of cardiac dysfunction in patients with advanced cirrhosis is widely accepted, but data in early stages of cirrhosis are limited. Systolic and diastolic functions, dynamics of QT-interval, and pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (pro-ANP) are investigated in patients with early stage...... cirrhosis during maximal β-adrenergic drive. MATERIAL AND METHODS. Nineteen patients with Child A (n = 12) and Child B cirrhosis (n = 7) and seven matched controls were studied during cardiac stress induced by increasing dosages of dobutamine and atropine. RESULTS. Pharmacological responsiveness was similar...... indicate that patients with early stage cirrhosis exhibit early diastolic and autonomic dysfunction as well as elevated pro-ANP. However, the cardiac chronotropic and inotropic responses to dobutamine stress were normal. The dynamics of ventricular repolarization appears normal in patients with early stage...

  2. Coffee contains cholinomimetic compound distinct from caffeine. I: Purification and chromatographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, S Y

    1991-07-01

    Both regular and decaffeinated coffees were found to have cholinomimetic actions when tested in urethane-anesthetized rats. These actions were distinct from those of caffeine and reversible by atropine. The bioactive fraction was purified from alcoholic extracts of instant decaffeinated coffee by liquid column chromatography and preparative TLC. The purified compound showed similar pharmacological actions as the starting material. Chromatographic behavior was further characterized by analytical TLC and HPLC. Chromatographic analyses of extracts of green coffee beans and roasted ground coffees showed that the cardioactive compound was only present in roasted coffees. Similar analyses of other commonly consumed beverages, including teas and cocoa, showed that this compound was not present in beverages besides coffee.

  3. Gastrointestinal stimulatory and uterotonic activities of dietary radish leaves extract are mediated through multiple pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghayur, Muhammad Nabeel; Gilani, Anwarul Hassan

    2005-09-01

    Raphanus sativus, commonly known as radish, is a food plant known worldwide for its culinary and medicinal properties especially as a laxative and abortifacient. This study reports the gastrointestinal and uterine tone modulatory activities of the crude extract (Rl.Cr) of radish leaves. Rl.Cr, showing the presence of saponins and alkaloids, exhibited a spasmogenic effect (0.03-10 mg/mL) in isolated rabbit jejunum, rat stomach fundus and uterus which was partially blocked by atropine. In contrast, Rl.Cr was found to be devoid of any stimulatory effect in rat ileum, instead showed an inhibitory effect (0.1 mg/mL) on the ACh dose-response curves. A mild relaxant effect was also observed in rabbit jejunum at the lower doses (0.1-0.3 mg/mL) but not against K(+)-induced contractions, ruling out a calcium channel blocking effect. In guinea-pig ileum, Rl.Cr exhibited a stimulant effect resistant to atropine while sensitive to pyrilamine pretreatment. The aqueous fraction, showing a strong presence of saponins, was found to be more efficacious than the non-polar fractions in its spasmogenic effect. This study shows the presence of species-dependent gastrointestinal effects of radish mediated partially through cholinergic receptors in rabbit and rat tissues, but through histaminergic activation in the guinea-pig, providing a scientific basis for its use in gut and uterine affections while also giving a wider picture of the activity profile of radish by using different species of animals. Copyright 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Intragastric Dai-Kenchu-To, a Japanese herbal medicine, stimulates colonic motility via transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Daisuke; Shibata, Chikashi; Imoto, Hirofumi; Naitoh, Takeshi; Miura, Koh; Unno, Michiaki

    2013-08-01

    Japanese herbal medicine, also known as Kampo, is used for various diseases in Japan. One of those medicines, Dai-Kenchu-To (DKT), is considered clinically effective for adhesive bowel obstruction and chronic constipation. Although scientific evidence of DKT to improve adhesive bowel obstruction was shown in several previous reports, mechanism of DKT to improve constipation remains unknown. Our aim was to study the effect of intragastric DKT on colonic motility and defecation, and the involvement of various receptors in DKT-induced colonic contractions. Five beagle dogs were instructed with serosal strain-gauge force transducers to measure circular muscle activity at the proximal, middle, and distal colon. Dogs are suitable for a present study to administer the drugs repeatedly to the same individual and look at its effect on colonic motility. We studied the effects of DKT (2.5 or 5 g) administered into the stomach on colonic motility. Muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine, nicotinic receptor antagonist hexamthonium, or 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 receptor antagonist ondansetron was injected intravenously 10 min before DKT administration. Capsazepine, an antagonist to transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1), was administered into the stomach 5 min before DKT administration. Intragastric DKT (2.5 or 5 g) induced colonic contractions within 10 min after administration but did not induce defecation. Pretreatment with atropine, hexamthonium, ondansetron, or capsazepine inhibited DKT-induced colonic contractions. These results indicate that orally administered DKT stimulates colonic motility via TRPV1, muscarinic, nicotinic, and 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 receptors, thereby providing scientific support for the efficacy of oral DKT in chronic constipation.

  5. Effectiveness of sub-Tenon's block in pediatric strabismus surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuzcu, Kasim; Coskun, Mesut; Tuzcu, Esra Ayhan; Karcioglu, Murat; Davarci, Isil; Hakimoglu, Sedat; Aydın, Suzan; Turhanoglu, Selim

    2015-01-01

    Strabismus surgery is a frequently performed pediatric ocular procedure. A frequently occurring major problem in patients receiving this treatment involves the oculocardiac reflex. This reflex is associated with an increased incidence of postoperative nausea, vomiting, and pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a sub-Tenon's block on the oculocardiac reflex, pain, and postoperative nausea and vomiting. Forty patients aged 5-16 years with American Society of Anesthesiologists status I-II undergoing elective strabismus surgery were included in this study. Patients included were randomly assigned into two groups by using a sealed envelope method. In group 1 (n=20), patients did not receive sub-Tenon's anesthesia. In group 2 (n=20), following intubation, sub-Tenon's anesthesia was performed with the eye undergoing surgery. Atropine use, pain scores, oculocardiac reflex, and postoperative nausea and vomiting incidences were compared between groups. There were no significant differences between groups with regard to oculocardiac reflex and atropine use (p>0.05). Pain scores 30min post-surgery were significantly lower in group 2 than in group 1 (p<0.05). Additional analgesic needed during the postoperative period was significantly lower in group 2 compared to group 1 (p<0.05). In conclusion, we think that a sub-Tenon's block, combined with general anesthesia, is not effective and reliable in decreasing oculocardiac reflex and postoperative nausea and vomiting. However, this method is safe for reducing postoperative pain and decreasing additional analgesia required in pediatric strabismus surgery. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. [Effectiveness of sub-Tenon's block in pediatric strabismus surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuzcu, Kasim; Coskun, Mesut; Tuzcu, Esra Ayhan; Karcioglu, Murat; Davarci, Isil; Hakimoglu, Sedat; Aydın, Suzan; Turhanoglu, Selim

    2015-01-01

    Strabismus surgery is a frequently performed pediatric ocular procedure. A frequently occurring major problem in patients receiving this treatment involves the oculocardiac reflex. This reflex is associated with an increased incidence of postoperative nausea, vomiting, and pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a sub-Tenon's block on the oculocardiac reflex, pain, and postoperative nausea and vomiting. 40 patients aged 5-16 years with American Society of Anesthesiologists status I-II undergoing elective strabismus surgery were included in this study. Patients included were randomly assigned into two groups by using a sealed envelope method. In group 1 (n=20), patients did not receive sub-Tenon's anesthesia. In group 2 (n=20), following intubation, sub-Tenon's anesthesia was performed with the eye undergoing surgery. Atropine use, pain scores, oculocardiac reflex, and postoperative nausea and vomiting incidences were compared between groups. There were no significant differences between groups with regard to oculocardiac reflex and atropine use (p>0.05). Pain scores 30min post-surgery were significantly lower in group 2 than in group 1 (p<0.05). Additional analgesic needed during the postoperative period was significantly lower in group 2 compared to group 1 (p<0.05). In conclusion, we think that a sub-Tenon's block, combined with general anesthesia, is not effective and reliable in decreasing oculocardiac reflex and postoperative nausea and vomiting. However, this method is safe for reducing postoperative pain and decreasing additional analgesia required in pediatric strabismus surgery. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. Human autonomic rhythms: vagal cardiac mechanisms in tetraplegic subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, J.; Brown, T. E.; Beightol, L. A.; Ha, C. Y.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    1. We studied eight young men (age range: 20-37 years) with chronic, clinically complete high cervical spinal cord injuries and ten age-matched healthy men to determine how interruption of connections between the central nervous system and spinal sympathetic motoneurones affects autonomic cardiovascular control. 2. Baseline diastolic pressures and R-R intervals (heart periods) were similar in the two groups. Slopes of R-R interval responses to brief neck pressure changes were significantly lower in tetraplegic than in healthy subjects, but slopes of R-R interval responses to steady-state arterial pressure reductions and increases were comparable. Plasma noradrenaline levels did not change significantly during steady-state arterial pressure reductions in tetraplegic patients, but rose sharply in healthy subjects. The range of arterial pressure and R-R interval responses to vasoactive drugs (nitroprusside and phenylephrine) was significantly greater in tetraplegic than healthy subjects. 3. Resting R-R interval spectral power at respiratory and low frequencies was similar in the two groups. During infusions of vasoactive drugs, low-frequency R-R interval spectral power was directly proportional to arterial pressure in tetraplegic patients, but was unrelated to arterial pressure in healthy subjects. Vagolytic doses of atropine nearly abolished both low- and respiratory-frequency R-R interval spectral power in both groups. 4. Our conclusions are as follows. First, since tetraplegic patients have significant levels of low-frequency arterial pressure and R-R interval spectral power, human Mayer arterial pressure waves may result from mechanisms that do not involve stimulation of spinal sympathetic motoneurones by brainstem neurones. Second, since in tetraplegic patients, low-frequency R-R interval spectral power is proportional to arterial pressure, it is likely to be mediated by a baroreflex mechanism. Third, since low-frequency R-R interval rhythms were nearly abolished

  8. HYPOTENSIVE AND CARDIOINHIBOTORY EFFECTS OF THE AQUEOUS AND ETHANOL EXTRACTS OF CELERY (APIUM GRAVEOLENS, APIACEAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana Pavlović

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study we present the effects of aqueous and ethanol extracts of celery (Apium graveolens L., Apiaceae investigated on the mean blood pressure of anaesthetized rabbits and contractility of isolated atria of the rats. In our experiments were used rabbits and Wistar albino rats. The effects of extracts (0.5-15 mg/kg on blood pressure were recorded directly from the carotid artery. Rat isolated atria was mounted in 10 ml tissue bath. An equilibrium period of 30 min was given before the application of the extracts (0.02-0.75 mg/ml. In anesthetized rabbit, intravenous administration of aqueous extracts induced least hypotensive effects (14.35±2.94%, while the ethanol extract caused the greatest fall in the blood pressure (45.79±10.86%. Hypotensive effects of the extracts were partially blocked by atropine (0.3 mg/kg, an unselective muscarinic receptor antagonist. In isolated rat atria both aqueous and ethanolic extracts of celery, exhibit a negative chronotropic and an inotropic action. Aqueous extract decreased rate of contractions for 12.88±2.74% and amplitude for 8.73±0.89%. Ethanol extract inhibited rate of the atria contractions for 34.26±5.69%, and amplitude for 25.40±3.61%. Pretreatment of the atria with atropine (1μM partially blocked inhibitory response of aqueous and ethanol extracts. Ethanol extract of celery exhibited significantly greater hypotensive and cardio-depressant activities then aqueous extract (p<0.05. These data suggest that the aqueous and ethanol extracts of celery caused the hypotensive, negative inotropic and chronotropic effects, which could partially be mediated possibly via stimulation of muscarinic receptors. Inhibitory effect of ethanol extract was significant comparing to aqueous extract of celery.

  9. Cardiovascular effects of the intracerebroventricular injection of adrenomedullin: roles of the peripheral vasopressin and central cholinergic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Cam-Etoz

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Our objective was to investigate in conscious Sprague-Dawley (6-8 weeks, 250-300 g female rats (N = 7 in each group the effects of intracerebroventricularly (icv injected adrenomedullin (ADM on blood pressure and heart rate (HR, and to determine if ADM and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP receptors, peripheral V1 receptors or the central cholinergic system play roles in these cardiovascular effects. Blood pressure and HR were observed before and for 30 min following drug injections. The following results were obtained: 1 icv ADM (750 ng/10 µL caused an increase in both blood pressure and HR (DMAP = 11.8 ± 2.3 mmHg and ΔHR = 39.7 ± 4.8 bpm. 2 Pretreatment with a CGRP receptor antagonist (CGRP8-37 and ADM receptor antagonist (ADM22-52 blocked the effect of central ADM on blood pressure and HR. 3 The nicotinic receptor antagonist mecamylamine (25 µg/10 µL, icv and the muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine (5 µg/10 µL, icv prevented the stimulating effect of ADM on blood pressure. The effect of ADM on HR was blocked only by atropine (5 µg/10 µL, icv. 4 The V1 receptor antagonist [β-mercapto-β-β-cyclopentamethylenepropionyl¹, O-me-Tyr²,Arg8]-vasopressin (V2255; 10 µg/kg, that was applied intravenously, prevented the effect of ADM on blood pressure and HR. This is the first study reporting the role of specific ADM and CGRP receptors, especially the role of nicotinic and muscarinic central cholinergic receptors and the role of peripheral V1 receptors in the increasing effects of icv ADM on blood pressure and HR.

  10. Cardiovascular effects of the intracerebroventricular injection of adrenomedullin: roles of the peripheral vasopressin and central cholinergic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cam-Etoz, B.; Isbil-Buyukcoskun, N.; Ozluk, K. [Department of Physiology, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle/Bursa (Turkey)

    2012-03-02

    Our objective was to investigate in conscious Sprague-Dawley (6-8 weeks, 250-300 g) female rats (N = 7 in each group) the effects of intracerebroventricularly (icv) injected adrenomedullin (ADM) on blood pressure and heart rate (HR), and to determine if ADM and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptors, peripheral V{sub 1} receptors or the central cholinergic system play roles in these cardiovascular effects. Blood pressure and HR were observed before and for 30 min following drug injections. The following results were obtained: 1) icv ADM (750 ng/10 µL) caused an increase in both blood pressure and HR (ΔMAP = 11.8 ± 2.3 mmHg and ΔHR = 39.7 ± 4.8 bpm). 2) Pretreatment with a CGRP receptor antagonist (CGRP{sub 8-37}) and ADM receptor antagonist (ADM{sub 22-52}) blocked the effect of central ADM on blood pressure and HR. 3) The nicotinic receptor antagonist mecamylamine (25 µg/10 µL, icv) and the muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine (5 µg/10 µL, icv) prevented the stimulating effect of ADM on blood pressure. The effect of ADM on HR was blocked only by atropine (5 µg/10 µL, icv). 4) The V{sub 1} receptor antagonist [β-mercapto-β-β-cyclopentamethylenepropionyl{sup 1}, O-me-Tyr{sup 2},Arg{sup 8}]-vasopressin (V2255; 10 µg/kg), that was applied intravenously, prevented the effect of ADM on blood pressure and HR. This is the first study reporting the role of specific ADM and CGRP receptors, especially the role of nicotinic and muscarinic central cholinergic receptors and the role of peripheral V{sub 1} receptors in the increasing effects of icv ADM on blood pressure and HR.

  11. Evaluation of the cholinomimetic actions of trimethylsulfonium, a compound present in the midgut gland of the sea hare Aplysia brasiliana (Gastropoda, Opisthobranchia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M. Kerchove

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Trimethylsulfonium, a compound present in the midgut gland of the sea hare Aplysia brasiliana, negatively modulates vagal response, indicating a probable ability to inhibit cholinergic responses. In the present study, the pharmacological profile of trimethylsulfonium was characterized on muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. In rat jejunum the contractile response induced by trimethylsulfonium (pD2 = 2.46 ± 0.12 and maximal response = 2.14 ± 0.32 g was not antagonized competitively by atropine. The maximal response (Emax to trimethylsulfonium was diminished in the presence of increasing doses of atropine (P<0.05, suggesting that trimethylsulfonium-induced contraction was not related to muscarinic stimulation, but might be caused by acetylcholine release due to presynaptic stimulation. Trimethylsulfonium displaced [³H]-quinuclidinyl benzilate from rat cortex membranes with a low affinity (Ki = 0.5 mM. Furthermore, it caused contraction of frog rectus abdominis muscles (pD2 = 2.70 ± 0.06 and Emax = 4.16 ± 0.9 g, which was competitively antagonized by d-tubocurarine (1, 3 or 10 µM with a pA2 of 5.79, suggesting a positive interaction with nicotinic receptors. In fact, trimethylsulfonium displaced [³H]-nicotine from rat diaphragm muscle membranes with a Ki of 27.1 µM. These results suggest that trimethylsulfonium acts as an agonist on nicotinic receptors, and thus contracts frog skeletal rectus abdominis muscle and rat jejunum smooth muscle via stimulation of postjunctional and neuronal prejunctional nicotinic cholinoreceptors, respectively.

  12. Myotropic Effects of Cholinergic Muscarinic Agonists and Antagonists in the Beetle Tenebrio molitor L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowanski, Szymon; Rosinski, Grzegorz

    2017-01-01

    In mammals, the cholinergic nervous system plays a crucial role in neuronal regulation of physiological processes. It acts on cells by two types of receptors - nicotinic and muscarinic receptors. Both signal transmission pathways also operate in the central and peripheral cholinergic nervous system of insects. In our pharmacological experiments, we studied the effects of two muscarinic agonists (carbachol, pilocarpine) and two muscarinic antagonists (atropine, scopolamine) on the muscle contractile activity of visceral organs in the beetle, Tenebrio molitor. Both antagonists, when injected to haemolymph at concentration 10-5 M, caused delayed and prolonged cardioinhibitory effects on heart contractility in ortho- and antidromic phases of heart activity in T. molitor pupa what was observed as negative chrono- and inotropic effects. Agonist of muscarinic receptors - carbachol evoked opposite effect and increased contraction rate but only in antidromic phase. Pilocarpine, the second agonist induced weak negative chronotropic effects in the antiand orthodromic phases of heart activity. However, neither agonists had an effect on semi-isolated beetle heart in vitro. Only atropine at the highest tested concentrations slightly decreased the frequency of myocardial contractions. These suggest the regulation of heart activity by muscarinic system indirectly. The tested compounds also affected the contractility of the oviduct and hindgut, but the responses of these organs were varied and depended on the concentration of the applied compounds. These pharmacological experiments suggest the possible modulation of insect visceral muscle contractility by the cholinergic nervous system and indirectly indicate the presence of muscarinic receptor(s) in the visceral organs of the beetle T. molitor. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Acetylcholine Attenuates Hypoxia/ Reoxygenation-Induced Mitochondrial and Cytosolic ROS Formation in H9c2 Cells via M2 Acetylcholine Receptor

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    Yi Miao

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The anti-infammatory and cardioprotective effect of acetylcholine (ACh has been reported; nevertheless, whether and how ACh exhibits an antioxidant property against ischemia/reperfusion (I/R-induced oxidative stress remains obscure. Methods: In the present study, H9c2 rat cardiomyocytes were exposed to hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R to mimic I/R injury. We estimated intracellular different sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS by measuring mitochondrial ROS (mtROS, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA copy number, xanthine oxidase (XO and NADPH oxidase (NOX activity and expression of rac 1. Cell injury was determined by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release and cleaved caspase-3 expression. The siRNA transfection was performed to knockdown of M2 acetylcholine receptor (M2 AChR expression. Results: 12-h hypoxia followed by 2-h reoxygenation resulted in an abrupt burst of ROS in H9c2 cells. Administration of ACh reduced the levels of ROS in a concentration-dependent manner. Compared to the H/R group, ACh decreased mtROS, recovered mtDNA copy number, diminished XO and NOX activity, rac 1 expression as well as cell injury. Co- treatment with atropine rather than hexamethonium abolished the antioxidant and cardioprotective effect of ACh. Moreover, knockdown of M2 AChR by siRNA showed the similar trends as atropine co-treatment group. Conclusions: ACh inhibits mitochondria-, XO- and NOX-derived ROS production thus protecting H9c2 cells against H/R-induced oxidative stress, and these benefcial effects are mainly mediated by M2 AChR. Our findings suggested that increasing ACh release could be a potential therapeutic strategy for treatment and prevention of I/R injury.

  14. Role of taurine on acid secretion in the rat stomach

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    Ho Jau-Der

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Taurine has chemical structure similar to an inhibitory neurotransmitter, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA. Previous studies on GABA in the stomach suggest GABAergic neuron is involved in acid secretion, but the effects of taurine are poor understood. Methods The effects of taurine on acid secretion, signal transduction, and localization of taurinergic neurons were determined in the rat stomach using everted whole stomach, RIA kit and immunohistochemical methods. Results We used antibodies against taurine-synthesizing enzyme, cysteine sulfuric acid decarboxylase (CSAD, and taurine. CSAD- and taurine-positive cells were found in the muscle and mucosal layers. Distributions of CSAD- and taurine-positive cells in both mucosal and muscle layers were heterogeneous in the stomach. Taurine at 10-9~10-4 M induced acid secretion, and the maximum secretion was at 10-5 M, 1.6-fold higher than the spontaneous secretion. Taurine-induced acid secretion was completely inhibited by bicuculline and atropine but not by cimetidine, proglumide, or strychnine. Atropine and tetrodotoxin (TTX completely inhibited the acid secretion induced by low concentrations of taurine and partially inhibited induced by high concentrations. Verapamil, a calcium blocker agent, inhibited acid output elicited by taurine. We assumed all Ca2+ channels involved in the response to these secretagogues were equally affected by verapamil. Intracellular cAMP (adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphat in the stomach significantly increased with taurine treatment in a dose-dependent manner. High correlation (r=0.859, p Conclusions Our results demonstrated for the first time in taurine-induced acid secretion due to increase intracellular calcium may act through the A type of GABA receptors, which are mainly located on cholinergic neurons though cAMP pathway and partially on nonneuronal cells in the rat stomach.

  15. Nitrergic Pathway Is the Main Contributing Mechanism in the Human Gastric Fundus Relaxation: An In Vitro Study.

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    Yang Won Min

    Full Text Available Human gastric fundus relaxation is mediated by intrinsic inhibitory pathway. We investigated the roles of nitrergic and purinergic pathways, two known inhibitory factors in gastric motility, on spontaneous and nerve-evoked contractions in human gastric fundus muscles.Gastric fundus muscle strips (12 circular and 13 longitudinal were obtained from patients without previous gastrointestinal motility disorder who underwent gastrectomy for stomach cancer. Using these specimens, we examined basal tone, peak, amplitude, and frequency of spontaneous contractions, and peak and nadir values under electrical field stimulation (EFS, 150 V, 0.3 ms, 10 Hz, 20 s. To examine responses to purinergic and nitrergic inhibition without cholinergic innervation, atropine (muscarinic antagonist, 1 μM, MRS2500 (a purinergic P2Y1 receptor antagonist, 1 μM, and N-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, 100 μM were added sequentially for spontaneous and electrically-stimulated contractions. Tetrodotoxin was used to confirm any neuronal involvement.In spontaneous contraction, L-NNA increased basal tone and peak in both muscle layers, while amplitude and frequency were unaffected. EFS (up to 10 Hz uniformly induced initial contraction and subsequent relaxation in a frequency-dependent manner. Atropine abolished initial on-contraction and induced only relaxation during EFS. While MRS2500 showed no additional influence, L-NNA reversed relaxation (p = 0.012 in circular muscle, and p = 0.006 in longitudinal muscle. Tetrodotoxin abolished any EFS-induced motor response.The relaxation of human gastric fundus muscle is reduced by nitrergic inhibition. Hence, nitrergic pathway appears to be the main mechanism for the human gastric fundus relaxation.

  16. Cholinergic activation of neurons in the medulla oblongata changes urinary bladder activity by plasma vasopressin release in female rats.

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    Cafarchio, Eduardo M; da Silva, Luiz A; Auresco, Luciana C; Ogihara, Cristiana A; Almeida, Roberto L; Giannocco, Gisele; Luz, Maria C B; Fonseca, Fernando L A; Sato, Monica A

    2016-04-05

    The central control of the micturition is dependent on cortical areas and other ascending and descending pathways in the brain stem. The descendent pathways from the pons to the urinary bladder (UB) can be direct or indirect through medullary neurons (MN). Chemical stimulation with l-glutamate of MN known for their involvement in cardiovascular regulation evokes changes in pelvic nerves activities, which innervate the urinary bladder. Different neurotransmitters have been found in medullary areas; nevertheless, their involvement in UB control is few understood. We focused to investigate if cholinergic activation of neurons in the medulla oblongata changes the urinary bladder activity. Carbachol (cholinergic agonist) or atropine (cholinergic antagonist) was injected into the 4thV in anesthetized female Wistar rats and the intravesical pressure (IP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR) and renal conductance (RC) were recorded for 30 min. Carbachol injection into the 4thV increased IP with peak response at 30 min after carbachol and yielded no changes in MAP, HR and RC. Atropine injection into the 4thV decreased IP and elicited no changes in MAP, HR and RC. Plasma vasopressin levels evaluated by ELISA kit assay increased after carbachol into the 4th V. Intravenous blockade of V1 receptors prior to carbachol into the 4thV abolished the increase in IP evoked by carbachol. Therefore, our findings suggest that cholinergic activation of neurons in the medulla oblongata by carbachol injections into the 4thV increases IP due to plasma vasopressin release, which acts in V1 receptors in the UB. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Cardiovascular effects of the intracerebroventricular injection of adrenomedullin: roles of the peripheral vasopressin and central cholinergic systems

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    Cam-Etoz, B.; Isbil-Buyukcoskun, N.; Ozluk, K.

    2012-01-01

    Our objective was to investigate in conscious Sprague-Dawley (6-8 weeks, 250-300 g) female rats (N = 7 in each group) the effects of intracerebroventricularly (icv) injected adrenomedullin (ADM) on blood pressure and heart rate (HR), and to determine if ADM and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptors, peripheral V 1 receptors or the central cholinergic system play roles in these cardiovascular effects. Blood pressure and HR were observed before and for 30 min following drug injections. The following results were obtained: 1) icv ADM (750 ng/10 µL) caused an increase in both blood pressure and HR (ΔMAP = 11.8 ± 2.3 mmHg and ΔHR = 39.7 ± 4.8 bpm). 2) Pretreatment with a CGRP receptor antagonist (CGRP 8-37 ) and ADM receptor antagonist (ADM 22-52 ) blocked the effect of central ADM on blood pressure and HR. 3) The nicotinic receptor antagonist mecamylamine (25 µg/10 µL, icv) and the muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine (5 µg/10 µL, icv) prevented the stimulating effect of ADM on blood pressure. The effect of ADM on HR was blocked only by atropine (5 µg/10 µL, icv). 4) The V 1 receptor antagonist [β-mercapto-β-β-cyclopentamethylenepropionyl 1 , O-me-Tyr 2 ,Arg 8 ]-vasopressin (V2255; 10 µg/kg), that was applied intravenously, prevented the effect of ADM on blood pressure and HR. This is the first study reporting the role of specific ADM and CGRP receptors, especially the role of nicotinic and muscarinic central cholinergic receptors and the role of peripheral V 1 receptors in the increasing effects of icv ADM on blood pressure and HR

  18. Sensitivity of temporal heart rate variability in Poincaré plot to changes in parasympathetic nervous system activity.

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    Karmakar, Chandan K; Khandoker, Ahsan H; Voss, Andreas; Palaniswami, Marimuthu

    2011-03-03

    A novel descriptor (Complex Correlation Measure (CCM)) for measuring the variability in the temporal structure of Poincaré plot has been developed to characterize or distinguish between Poincaré plots with similar shapes. This study was designed to assess the changes in temporal structure of the Poincaré plot using CCM during atropine infusion, 70° head-up tilt and scopolamine administration in healthy human subjects. CCM quantifies the point-to-point variation of the signal rather than gross description of the Poincaré plot. The physiological relevance of CCM was demonstrated by comparing the changes in CCM values with autonomic perturbation during all phases of the experiment. The sensitivities of short term variability (SD1), long term variability (SD2) and variability in temporal structure (CCM) were analyzed by changing the temporal structure by shuffling the sequences of points of the Poincaré plot. Surrogate analysis was used to show CCM as a measure of changes in temporal structure rather than random noise and sensitivity of CCM with changes in parasympathetic activity. CCM was found to be most sensitive to changes in temporal structure of the Poincaré plot as compared to SD1 and SD2. The values of all descriptors decreased with decrease in parasympathetic activity during atropine infusion and 70° head-up tilt phase. In contrast, values of all descriptors increased with increase in parasympathetic activity during scopolamine administration. The concordant reduction and enhancement in CCM values with parasympathetic activity indicates that the temporal variability of Poincaré plot is modulated by the parasympathetic activity which correlates with changes in CCM values. CCM is more sensitive than SD1 and SD2 to changes of parasympathetic activity.

  19. Intravenous granisetron attenuates hypotension during spinal anesthesia in cesarean delivery: A double-blind, prospective randomized controlled study

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    Ahmed A Eldaba

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: This study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of intravenous (IV granisetron in the prevention of hypotension and bradycardia during spinal anesthesia in cesarean delivery. Material and Methods: A total of 200 parturients scheduled for elective cesarean section were included in this study. They were randomly divided into two groups. Group I was given 1 mg granisetron diluted in 10 ml normal saline slowly IV, 5 min before spinal anesthesia. Group II was given 10 ml of normal saline, 5 min before spinal anesthesia. Mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate (HR were recorded every 3 min until the end of surgery (for 45 min. The total consumption of vasopressors and atropine were recorded. Apgar scores at 1 and 5 min were also assessed. Results: Serial mean arterial blood pressure and HR values for 45 min after onset of spinal anesthesia were decreased significantly in group II, P < 0.0001. The incidence of hypotension after spinal anesthesia was 64% in group II and 3% in group I (P < 0.0001. The total doses of ephedrine (4.07 ± 3.87 mg vs 10.7 ± 8.9 mg, P < 0.0001, phenylephrine (0.0 microg vs 23.2 ± 55.1 microg, P < 0.0001, and atropine (0.0 mg vs 0.35 ± 0.49 mg P < 0.0001 consumed in both the groups respectively, were significantly less in group I versus group II. Conclusion: Premedication with 1 mg IV granisetron before spinal anesthesia in an elective cesarean section significantly reduces hypotension, bradycardia and vasopressors usage.

  20. Betabloqueador tópico pode determinar resultados inconclusivos no ecocardiograma sob estresse com dobutamina em pacientes com glaucoma Topical betablocker use can result in inconclusive dobutamine stress echocardiography in patients with glaucoma

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    Adriana Cordovil

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available O ecocardiograma sob estresse com dobutamina é um método bem estabelecido para avaliar doença arterial coronária, cuja sensibilidade tem sido potencializada pela adição de atropina no final do protocolo. Indivíduos com glaucoma, doença com alta prevalência em pacientes cardiopatas com mais de 40 anos, não podem se beneficiar do uso de atropina por ser contra-indicada neste grupo. Além disso, estes indivíduos são tratados freqüentemente com betabloqueadores tópicos (colírios, que podem exercer efeitos sistêmicos diminuindo a freqüência cardíaca, pressão arterial e capacidade pulmonar. O objetivo do nosso trabalho foi verificar se a ocorrência de um possível efeito sistêmico causado por estes colírios, causando baixa resposta cronotrópica, poderia determinar resultados inconclusivos no ecocardiograma sob estresse pela dobutamina nestes pacientes com glaucoma.Dobutamine stress echocardiography is a well-established method to assess coronary artery disease, of which sensitivity has been enhanced by adding atropine at the end of the protocol. Individuals with glaucoma, a disease with a high prevalence in patients with cardiac diseases older than 40 years, cannot benefit from the use of atropine as it is contraindicated for this group of patients. Additionally, these individuals are often treated with topical betablockers (eye drops, which can have systemic effects by decreasing cardiac frequency, blood pressure and pulmonary capacity. The aim of our study was to verify whether a possible systemic effect caused by the use of these eye drops, yielding a low chronotropic response, could result in inconclusive dobutamine stress echocardiography in patients with glaucoma.

  1. [Participation of parasympathetic part of nervous system in realization of bioflavonoids action on gastric secretion in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vovkun, T V; Yanchuk, P I; Shtanova, L Y; Veselskyy, S P; Shalamay, A S

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated the effects of corvitin--modified form of flavonoid quercetin on the stomach secretory function and physiological mechanisms involved in the maintenance of such effects in rat's pylorus-ligated model. In animals which corvitin was injected at a dose of 5 mg/kg, regardless of the route of administration--in the stomach or duodenum, did not observe any changes in the volume of gastric juice or general production of hydrochloric acid, compared with the control data. Dose of 40 mg/kg caused an increase in the volume of gastric juice and hydrochloric acid output as when administered in the stomach and in the duodenum. We also found that after the application of a large dose of corvitin (intragastrically) in the blood of experimental animals showed reduction in glucose levels, which was not detected when using the drug in a dose of 5 mg/kg. Nonspecific antagonist of M-cholinergic receptors--atropine almost completely blocked the enhancement of gastric secretion, which was caused by the introduction into the stomach of corvitin in large dose. From the present data, it is reasonable to conclude that intragastric administration of a large dose of corvitin to pylorus-ligated rats induces hypoglycemic reaction of blood, which may causes an increase in vagus nerve activity with subsequent stimulation of gastric secretion. The increase in gastric juice volume and gastric acid output induced by corvitin was completely inhibited by atropine. These results suggested that the increase in gastric secretion induced by intragastrically administered corvitin could be mediated by the parasympathetic nervous system.

  2. Human organic cation transporter 2 (hOCT2): Inhibitor studies using S2-hOCT2 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, Shoetsu; Ikawa, Toru; Takeshita, Hiroshi; Kanno, Sanae; Nagai, Tomonori; Takada, Meri; Mukai, Toshiji; Wempe, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Highly expressed in kidney and located on the basolateral membrane, human organic cation transporter 2 (hOCT2) can transport various compounds (i.e. drugs and toxins) into the proximal tubular cell. Using cultured proximal tubule cells stably expressing hOCT2 (i.e. S2-hOCT2 cells), we sought to probe different compound classes (e.g. analgesics, anti-depressants, anti-psychotics, disinfectant, herbicides, insecticides, local anesthetic, muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, sedatives, steroid hormone, stimulants and toxins) for their ability to inhibit 14 C-TEA uptake, a prototypical OCT2 substrate. Aconitine, amitriptyline, atropine, chlorpyrifos, diazepam, fenitrothion, haloperidol, lidocaine, malathion, mianserin, nicotine and triazolam significantly inhibited 14 C-TEA uptake; IC 50 values were 59.2, 2.4, 2.0, 20.7, 32.3, 13.2, 32.5, 104.6, 71.1, 17.7, 52.8 and 65.5 μM, respectively. In addition, aconitine, amitriptyline, atropine, chlorpyrifos, fenitrothion, haloperidol, lidocaine, and nicotine displayed competitive inhibition with K i values of 145.6, 2.5, 2.4, 24.8, 16.9, 51.6, 86.8 and 57.7 μM, respectively. These in vitro data support the notion that compounds pertaining to a wide variety of different drug classes have the potential to decrease renal clearance of drugs transported via hOCT2. Consequently, these data warrant additional studies to probe hOCT2 and its role to influence drug pharmacokinetics

  3. Appropriate Utilization and Stocking of Antidotes in Qatar Public Hospitals

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    Rawan Salameh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are a few studies that evaluate preparedness and availability of antidotes in the emergency setting and none have been conducted in Qatar. Published studies show that timely availability of antidotes in the emergency department setting is a common issue. To address this, we conducted a study to evaluate antidote stocking and utilization in Qatar hospital pharmacies and emergency departments. Methods: In order to evaluate the appropriate use and timely administration of antidotes, research assistants prospectively collected data on ED patients. All ED patients who received any key antidote over the 6-month study period were identified through both ED and pharmacy records. In order to evaluate the stocking of the 31 most important antidotes in our main public hospitals, a survey assessing the stocking of these key antidotes was sent to the four general hospitals in Qatar, to determine their availability and whether they are stocked in the ED or only in the main pharmacy. Results: Poison exposure was evaluated in 471 cases. Antidotes were given within 30 minutes in 73% of cases, which included atropine, calcium, dextrose, flumazenil, naloxone, pralidoxime, sodium bicarbonate, thiamine, vitamin K and scorpion and snake antivenoms. Administration occurred later than 60 minutes in 2% of cases, exclusively with N-acetylcysteine and activated charcoal. Atropine, calcium, dextrose, naloxone, pralidoxime (2-PAM, sodium bicarbonate, and anti-venoms were clinically indicated 92% of the times they were ordered. N-acetylcysteine was indicated in only 51.5% of administrations. Significant variation in antidote stocking existed between hospitals, and there was no stocked hydroxocobalamin as antidotes for cyanide poisoning or fomepizole for toxic alcohol poisoning. Conclusion: Antidote stocking varied significantly between hospitals, and antidotes necessary for cyanide and toxic alcohol poisoning were deficient in all public hospitals. The

  4. Total Glucosides of Paeony Promote Intestinal Motility in Slow Transit Constipation Rats through Amelioration of Interstitial Cells of Cajal.

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    Feiye Zhu

    Full Text Available Using an atropine-diphenoxylate-induced slow transit constipation (STC model, this study explored the effects of the total glucosides of paeony (TGP in the treatment of STC and the possible mechanisms.A prospective experimental animal study.The constipation model was set up in rats with an oral gavage of atropine-diphenoxylate and then treated with the TGP. The volume and moisture content of the faeces were observed and the intestinal kinetic power was evaluated. Meanwhile, the colorimetric method and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA were employed to determine the changes of nitric oxide (NO, nitric oxide synthase (NOS, vasoative intestinal peptide (VIP and the P substance (SP in the serum, respectively. The protein expressions of c-kit and stem cell factor (SCF were assessed by immunohistochemical analysis and western blot, respectively, and the mRNA level of c-kit was measured by a reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR.The TGP attenuated STC responses in terms of an increase in the fecal volume and moisture content, an enhancement of intestinal transit rate and the reduction of NO, NOS and VIP in the serum. In addition, the c-kit, a labeling of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC increased at both protein and mRNA levels. SCF, which serves as a ligand of c-kit also increased at protein level.The analysis of our data indicated that the TGP could obviously attenuate STC through improving the function of ICC and blocking the inhibitory neurotransmitters such as NO, NOS and VIP.

  5. Total Glucosides of Paeony Promote Intestinal Motility in Slow Transit Constipation Rats through Amelioration of Interstitial Cells of Cajal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Feiye; Xu, Shan; Zhang, Yongsheng; Chen, Fangming; Ji, Jinjun; Xie, Guanqun

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Using an atropine-diphenoxylate-induced slow transit constipation (STC) model, this study explored the effects of the total glucosides of paeony (TGP) in the treatment of STC and the possible mechanisms. Study Design A prospective experimental animal study. Methods The constipation model was set up in rats with an oral gavage of atropine-diphenoxylate and then treated with the TGP. The volume and moisture content of the faeces were observed and the intestinal kinetic power was evaluated. Meanwhile, the colorimetric method and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were employed to determine the changes of nitric oxide (NO), nitric oxide synthase (NOS), vasoative intestinal peptide (VIP) and the P substance (SP) in the serum, respectively. The protein expressions of c-kit and stem cell factor (SCF) were assessed by immunohistochemical analysis and western blot, respectively, and the mRNA level of c-kit was measured by a reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results The TGP attenuated STC responses in terms of an increase in the fecal volume and moisture content, an enhancement of intestinal transit rate and the reduction of NO, NOS and VIP in the serum. In addition, the c-kit, a labeling of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) increased at both protein and mRNA levels. SCF, which serves as a ligand of c-kit also increased at protein level. Conclusion The analysis of our data indicated that the TGP could obviously attenuate STC through improving the function of ICC and blocking the inhibitory neurotransmitters such as NO, NOS and VIP. PMID:27478893

  6. Changes in cholinergic and nitrergic systems of defunctionalized colons after colostomy in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moralıoğlu, Serdar; Vural, İsmail Mert; Özen, İbrahim Onur; Öztürk, Gökçe; Sarıoğlu, Yusuf; Başaklar, Abdullah Can

    2017-01-01

    This study was designed to assess smooth muscle function and motility in defunctionalized colonic segments and subsequent changes in pathways responsible for gastrointestinal motility. Two-month-old New Zealand rabbits were randomly allocated into control and study groups. Sigmoid colostomies were performed in the study group. After a 2-month waiting period, colonic segments were harvested in both groups. For the in vitro experiment, the isolated circular muscle strips which were prepared from the harvested distal colon were used. First, contraction responses were detected using KCl and carbachol; relaxation responses were detected using papaverine, sodium nitroprusside, sildenafil, and l-arginine. The neurologic responses of muscle strips to electrical field stimulation (EFS) were evaluated in an environment with guanethidine and indomethacin. EFS studies were then repeated with atropine, Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, atropine, and Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester-added environments. Although macroscopic atrophy had developed in the distal colonic segment of the colostomy, the contraction and relaxation capacity of the smooth muscle did not change. EFS-induced nitrergic-peptidergic, cholinergic-peptidergic, and noncholinergic nonnitrergic responses significantly decreased at all frequencies (0.5-32 Hz) in the study group compared with those in the control group (P < 0.05). Although the contraction capacity of the smooth muscle was not affected, the motility of the distal colon deteriorated owing to the defective secretion of presynaptic neurotransmitters such as acetylcholine, nitric oxide, and neuropeptides. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluate the impact of hospital types on the availability of antidotes for the management of acute toxic exposures and poisonings in Malaysia.

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    Al-Sohaim, Sulaiman I; Awang, Rahmat; Zyoud, Sa'ed H; Rashid, Sazaroni M D; Hashim, Sirajuddin

    2012-03-01

    The availability of antidotes may be considered essential and lifesaving in the management of certain poisonings. Surveys carried out in a number of countries have demonstrated inadequate availability of a variety of poisoning antidotes. The purpose of this study was to determine the availability of antidote stocking at hospitals, based on published guidelines for antidote stocking, and to evaluate the impact of hospital types on the availability of antidotes for the management of acute toxic exposures and poisonings in Malaysia. A questionnaire on the availability of antidotes was sent to all government accident and emergency departments in Malaysia. The list of commonly required antidotes and essential drugs was compiled from published guidelines. Collected data were analysed in SPSS version 16 using descriptive and comparative analysis. The response rate was 59.06%. None of the responding hospitals stocked all of the antidotes on the lists. In relation to hospital type, there was great variability in the availability of antidotes (there were significant differences between hospitals for 13 antidotes). The availabilities of most antidotes were far better in the General Hospitals and the District Hospitals with specialists compared to District Hospitals without specialists. Calcium gluconate, sodium bicarbonate, atropine sulphate, naloxone, flumazenil, vitamin K, and pyridoxine were available at all general hospitals. Atropine sulphate and naloxone were available at all district hospitals with specialists. Most Malaysian government hospitals stocked some important antidotes. Raising awareness of the importance of antidotes by education, regular review of antidote storage, distribution plans, and appropriate legislation might provide solutions. Coordination between Malaysian hospitals and the National Poison Centre at Universiti Sains Malaysia is also important.

  8. Management of acute organophosphorus pesticide poisoning.

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    Eddleston, Michael; Buckley, Nick A; Eyer, Peter; Dawson, Andrew H

    2008-02-16

    Organophosphorus pesticide self-poisoning is an important clinical problem in rural regions of the developing world, and kills an estimated 200,000 people every year. Unintentional poisoning kills far fewer people but is a problem in places where highly toxic organophosphorus pesticides are available. Medical management is difficult, with case fatality generally more than 15%. We describe the limited evidence that can guide therapy and the factors that should be considered when designing further clinical studies. 50 years after first use, we still do not know how the core treatments--atropine, oximes, and diazepam--should best be given. Important constraints in the collection of useful data have included the late recognition of great variability in activity and action of the individual pesticides, and the care needed cholinesterase assays for results to be comparable between studies. However, consensus suggests that early resuscitation with atropine, oxygen, respiratory support, and fluids is needed to improve oxygen delivery to tissues. The role of oximes is not completely clear; they might benefit only patients poisoned by specific pesticides or patients with moderate poisoning. Small studies suggest benefit from new treatments such as magnesium sulphate, but much larger trials are needed. Gastric lavage could have a role but should only be undertaken once the patient is stable. Randomised controlled trials are underway in rural Asia to assess the effectiveness of these therapies. However, some organophosphorus pesticides might prove very difficult to treat with current therapies, such that bans on particular pesticides could be the only method to substantially reduce the case fatality after poisoning. Improved medical management of organophosphorus poisoning should result in a reduction in worldwide deaths from suicide.

  9. Evaluation of Pralidoxime Use in an Iranian Teaching Referral Hospital

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    Ali Banagozar Mohammadi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Organophosphorus (OP poisonings, a common source of pesticide poisoning, are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the developing countries. Combination therapy with atropine and oxime is a common practice in the management of OP poisoning. However, the additive benefit of using pralidoxime in addition to atropine remains controversial. Due to inappropriate and widespread use of this relatively expensive and low available antidote, we aimed to evaluate its usage in an Iranian teaching hospital. Methods: Medical files of patients with pesticide poisoning who had been admitted to the poisoning ward between September 2013 and September 2014 were reviewed. Patients with definite diagnosis of OPs poisoning were selected to evaluate rational use of pralidoxime in their treatment regimen. Data were collected using a checklist containing demographic, clinical, and para clinical characteristics, as well as the type of pesticide poisoning. Appropriateness of the pralidoxime therapy was determined based on clinical practice guideline and endorsed by an attending medical toxicologist. Results: 68.8% of patients had been poisoned with insecticides, 27.1% with aluminum phosphide, 2.1% with herbicides, and 2% with rodenticides, respectively. OPs were responsible for 43.8% of all poisoning. All patients with OPs poisoning received pralidoxime after they had been admitted to emergency department, while only 55% of them were eligible to receive pralidoxime. Moreover, pralidoxime had been administered for 59% of patients with non-OPs poisoning, which all of them were clinically inappropriate. Conclusion: The use of pralidoxime in the northwest of Iran is not appropriate and thus, it is highly recommended that a patient-tailored treatment guideline be provided and implemented regionally.

  10. Prevention of organophosphate-induced chronic epilepsy by early benzodiazepine treatment.

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    Shrot, Shai; Ramaty, Erez; Biala, Yoav; Bar-Klein, Guy; Daninos, Moshe; Kamintsky, Lyn; Makarovsky, Igor; Statlender, Liran; Rosman, Yossi; Krivoy, Amir; Lavon, Ophir; Kassirer, Michael; Friedman, Alon; Yaari, Yoel

    2014-09-02

    Poisoning with organophosphates (OPs) may induce status epilepticus (SE), leading to severe brain damage. Our objectives were to investigate whether OP-induced SE leads to the emergence of spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRSs), the hallmark of chronic epilepsy, and if so, to assess the efficacy of benzodiazepine therapy following SE onset in preventing the epileptogenesis. We also explored early changes in hippocampal pyramidal cells excitability in this model. Adult rats were poisoned with the paraoxon (450μg/kg) and immediately treated with atropine (3mg/kg) and obidoxime (20mg/kg) to reduce acute mortality due to peripheral acetylcholinesterase inhibition. Electrical brain activity was assessed for two weeks during weeks 4-6 after poisoning using telemetric electrocorticographic intracranial recordings. All OP-poisoned animals developed SE, which could be suppressed by midazolam. Most (88%) rats which were not treated with midazolam developed SRSs, indicating that they have become chronically epileptic. Application of midazolam 1min following SE onset had a significant antiepileptogenic effect (only 11% of the rats became epileptic; p=0.001 compared to non-midazolam-treated rats). Applying midazolam 30min after SE onset did not significantly prevent chronic epilepsy. The electrophysiological properties of CA1 pyramidal cells, assessed electrophysiologically in hippocampal slices, were not altered by OP-induced SE. Thus we show for the first time that a single episode of OP-induced SE in rats leads to the acquisition of chronic epilepsy, and that this epileptogenic outcome can be largely prevented by immediate, but not delayed, administration of midazolam. Extrapolating these results to humans would suggest that midazolam should be provided together with atropine and an oxime in the immediate pharmacological treatment of OP poisoning. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Role of taurine on acid secretion in the rat stomach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Taurine has chemical structure similar to an inhibitory neurotransmitter, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Previous studies on GABA in the stomach suggest GABAergic neuron is involved in acid secretion, but the effects of taurine are poor understood. Methods The effects of taurine on acid secretion, signal transduction, and localization of taurinergic neurons were determined in the rat stomach using everted whole stomach, RIA kit and immunohistochemical methods. Results We used antibodies against taurine-synthesizing enzyme, cysteine sulfuric acid decarboxylase (CSAD), and taurine. CSAD- and taurine-positive cells were found in the muscle and mucosal layers. Distributions of CSAD- and taurine-positive cells in both mucosal and muscle layers were heterogeneous in the stomach. Taurine at 10-9~10-4 M induced acid secretion, and the maximum secretion was at 10-5 M, 1.6-fold higher than the spontaneous secretion. Taurine-induced acid secretion was completely inhibited by bicuculline and atropine but not by cimetidine, proglumide, or strychnine. Atropine and tetrodotoxin (TTX) completely inhibited the acid secretion induced by low concentrations of taurine and partially inhibited induced by high concentrations. Verapamil, a calcium blocker agent, inhibited acid output elicited by taurine. We assumed all Ca2+ channels involved in the response to these secretagogues were equally affected by verapamil. Intracellular cAMP (adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphat) in the stomach significantly increased with taurine treatment in a dose-dependent manner. High correlation (r=0.859, p taurine concentrations with cAMP was observed. Conclusions Our results demonstrated for the first time in taurine-induced acid secretion due to increase intracellular calcium may act through the A type of GABA receptors, which are mainly located on cholinergic neurons though cAMP pathway and partially on nonneuronal cells in the rat stomach. PMID:21294907

  12. A central site of action for benzamide facilitation of gastric emptying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costall, B; Gunning, S J; Naylor, R J; Simpson, K H

    1983-07-22

    Gastric emptying of the fed guinea-pig was measured using a non-invasive X-ray fluoroscopic technique to determine passage from the stomach of polystyrene-coated barium sulphate spheroids. Peripherally administered metoclopramide (0.1-10 mg/kg i.p.), clebopride (1-10 mg/kg i.p.), (-)-sulpiride (40 mg/kg i.p.), haloperidol (1 mg/kg i.p.) and domperidone (1-10 mg/kg i.p.) failed to modify gastric emptying. Stress inhibited emptying, and this was considered to explain the effects of eserine and high dose metoclopramide. Gastric emptying was decreased by peripherally administered atropine (0.5 mg/kg i.p.) and apomorphine (0.1-0.5 mg/kg s.c.); the apomorphine response was antagonised by pretreatment with haloperidol, domperidone, (-)-sulpiride, metoclopramide and clebopride but not by prazosin + propranolol. Gastric emptying was facilitated by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administrations of metoclopramide and clebopride (40, 100 and 200 micrograms) but not by i.c.v. domperidone, haloperidol, fluphenazine or (-)-sulpiride (100, 200 micrograms) and was inhibited by i.c.v. apomorphine (100, 200 micrograms); the response to i.c.v. apomorphine was antagonised by i.c.v. pretreatments with haloperidol, domperidone, (-)-sulpiride, metoclopramide and clebopride (40-50 micrograms). Facilitation of emptying by i.c.v. metoclopramide was prevented by peripheral pretreatment with atropine (0.5 mg/kg i.p.). It is concluded that the actions of apomorphine and metoclopramide/clebopride to respectively inhibit and facilitate gastric emptying may be mediated, at least in part, via central mechanisms. Whilst apomorphine's action may be mediated via dopamine receptor mechanisms, metoclopramide and clebopride act at additional unspecified sites, metoclopramide's action being expressed via cholinergic mechanisms.

  13. An analysis of the hypothalamic sites at which substituted benzamide drugs act to facilitate gastric emptying in the guinea-pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costall, B; Gunning, S J; Naylor, R J

    1985-09-01

    An analysis of the hypothalamic sites at which the substituted benzamides, metoclopramide and clebopride, act to facilitate gastric emptying was undertaken in the guinea-pig. Standard stereotaxic techniques for intracerebral injection via chronically indwelling intracerebral guides were combined with measurement of gastric emptying by fluoroscopic following of the passage of barium sulphate spheroids from the stomach. Injections were made at 7 different locations within the hypothalamus at Ant. 8.0, 8.9 and 9.6, Lat. +/- 1.0, +/- 1.6, +/- 2.2 (relative to the stereotaxic frame) and at 7.0, 8.0 and 9.0 mm below guide tips in the cortex. The most sensitive sites for gastric facilitation by the substituted benzamides were located at Ant. 8.9, Lat. +/- 1.6, Vert. -8.0, -9.0, the "perifornical area". As the distance of the injection site from the area of the fornix increased, so the facilitatory gastric action diminished, with marked delays or loss in response occurring when injection sites were moved 1 mm above, 0.6 mm lateral, 0.4 mm medial, 0.9 mm posterior or 0.7 mm anterior. The facilitatory gastric actions of metoclopramide and clebopride in the perifornical area of the hypothalamus were not mimicked by haloperidol, domperidone or sulpiride. Atropine, injected into the hypothalamus, markedly reduced gastric emptying; hexamethonium was less effective, and phentolamine, propranolol and methysergide were inactive. Atropine (but not hexamethonium, phentolamine, propranolol or methysergide), injected into the hypothalamus, dose-dependently antagonised the facilitatory gastric action of metoclopramide injected at the same site. Carbachol (but not serotonin, noradrenaline, dopamine or apomorphine), injected into the perifornical area, caused marked facilitation of gastric emptying.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Origin and pharmacological response of atrial tachyarrhythmias induced by activation of mediastinal nerves in canines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, J Andrew; Richer, Louis-Philippe; Pagé, Pierre; Vinet, Alain; Kus, Teresa; Vermeulen, Michel; Nadeau, Réginald; Cardinal, René

    2005-03-31

    We sought to determine the sites of origin of atrial tachyarrhythmias induced by activating mediastinal nerves, as well as the response of such arrhythmias to autonomic modulation. Under general anaesthesia, atrioventricular block was induced after thoracotomy in 19 canines. Brief trains of 5 electrical stimuli were delivered to right-sided mediastinal nerves during the atrial refractory period. Unipolar electrograms were recorded from 191 right and left atrial epicardial sites under several conditions, i.e. (i) with intact nervous systems and following (ii) acute decentralization of the intrathoracic nervous system or administration of (iii) atropine, (iv) timolol, (v) hexamethonium. Concomitant right atrial endocardial mapping was performed in 7 of these dogs. Mediastinal nerve stimulation consistently initiated bradycardia followed by atrial tachyarrhythmias. In the initial tachyarrhythmia beats, early epicardial breakthroughs were identified in the right atrial free wall (28/50 episodes) or Bachmann bundle region (22/50), which corresponded to endocardial sites of origin associated with the right atrial subsidiary pacemaker complex, i.e. the crista terminalis and dorsal locations including the right atrial aspect of the interatrial septum. Neuronally induced responses were eliminated by atropine, modified by timolol and unaffected by acute neuronal decentralization. After hexamethonium, responses to extra-pericardial but not intra-pericardial nerve stimulation were eliminated. It is concluded that concomitant activation of cholinergic and adrenergic efferent intrinsic cardiac neurons induced by right-sided efferent neuronal stimulation initiates atrial tachyarrhythmias that originate from foci anatomically related to the right atrial pacemaker complex and tissues underlying major atrial ganglionated plexuses.

  15. Role of ventrolateral orbital cortex muscarinic and nicotinic receptors in modulation of capsaicin-induced orofacial pain-related behaviors in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaddonfard, Esmaeal; Erfanparast, Amir; Abbas Farshid, Amir; Delkhosh-Kasmaie, Fatmeh

    2017-11-15

    Acetylcholine, as a major neurotransmitter, mediates many brain functions such as pain. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of microinjection of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists and agonists into the ventrolateral orbital cortex (VLOC) on capsaicin-induced orofacial nociception and subsequent hyperalgesia. The right side of VLOC was surgically implanted with a guide cannula in anaesthetized rats. Orofacial pain-related behaviors were induced by subcutaneous injection of a capsaicin solution (1.5µg/20µl) into the left vibrissa pad. The time spent face rubbing with ipsilateral forepaw and general behavior were recorded for 10min, and then mechanical hyperalgesia was determined using von Frey filaments at 15, 30, 45 and 60min post-capsaicin injection. Alone intra-VLOC microinjection of atropine (a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist) and mecamylamine (a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist) at a similar dose of 200ng/site did not alter nocifensive behavior and hyperalgesia. Microinjection of oxotremorine (a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist) at doses of 50 and 100ng/site and epibatidine (a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist) at doses of 12.5, 25, 50 and 100ng/site into the VLOC suppressed pain-related behaviors. Prior microinjections of 200ng/site atropine and mecamylamine (200ng/site) prevented oxotremorine (100ng/site)-, and epibatidine (100ng/site)-induced antinociception, respectively. None of the above-mentioned chemicals changed general behavior. These results showed that the VLOC muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors might be involved in modulation of orofacial nociception and hypersensitivity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Cholinergic modulation of epithelial integrity in the proximal colon of pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesko, Szilvia; Wessler, Ignaz; Gäbel, Gotthold; Petto, Carola; Pfannkuche, Helga

    2013-01-01

    Within the gut, acetylcholine (ACh) is synthesised by enteric neurons, as well as by 'non-neuronal' epithelial cells. In studies of non-intestinal epithelia, ACh was involved in the generation of an intact epithelial barrier. In the present study, primary cultured porcine colonocytes were used to determine whether treatment with exogenous ACh or expression of endogenous epithelium-derived ACh may modulate epithelial tightness in the gastrointestinal tract. Piglet colonocytes were cultured on filter membranes for 8 days. The tightness of the growing epithelial cell layer was evaluated by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER). To determine whether ACh modulates the tightness of the cell layer, cells were treated with cholinergic, muscarinic and/or nicotinic agonists and antagonists. Choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), cholinergic receptors and ACh were determined by immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR and HPLC, respectively. Application of the cholinergic agonist carbachol (10 µm) and the muscarinic agonist oxotremorine (10 µM) resulted in significantly higher TEER values compared to controls. The effect was completely inhibited by the muscarinic antagonist atropine. Application of atropine alone (without any agonist) led to significantly lower TEER values compared to controls. Synthesis of ACh by epithelial cells was proven by detection of muscarinic and nicotinic receptor mRNAs, immunohistochemical detection of ChAT and detection of ACh by HPLC. ACh is strongly involved in the regulation of epithelial tightness in the proximal colon of pigs via muscarinic pathways. Non-neuronal ACh seems to be of particular importance for epithelial cells forming a tight barrier. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Do β3-adrenergic receptors play a role in guinea pig detrusor smooth muscle excitability and contractility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afeli, Serge A. Y.; Hristov, Kiril L.

    2012-01-01

    In many species, β3-adrenergic receptors (β3-ARs) have been reported to play a primary role in pharmacologically induced detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) relaxation. However, their role in guinea pig DSM remains controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate whether β3-ARs are expressed in guinea pig DSM and to evaluate how BRL37344 and L-755,507, two selective β3-AR agonists, modulate guinea pig DSM excitability and contractility. We used a combined experimental approach including RT-PCR, patch-clamp electrophysiology, and isometric DSM tension recordings. β3-AR mRNA message was detected in freshly isolated guinea pig DSM single cells. BRL37344 but not L-755,507 caused a slight decrease in DSM spontaneous phasic contraction amplitude and frequency in a concentration-dependent manner. In the presence of atropine (1 μM), only the spontaneous phasic contractions frequency was inhibited by BRL37344 at higher concentrations. Both BRL37344 and L-755,507 significantly decreased DSM carbachol-induced phasic and tonic contractions in a concentration-dependent manner. However, only BRL37344 inhibitory effect was partially antagonized by SR59230A (10 μM), a β3-AR antagonist. In the presence of atropine, BRL37344 and L-755,507 had no inhibitory effect on electrical field stimulation-induced contractions. Patch-clamp experiments showed that BRL37344 (100 μM) did not affect the DSM cell resting membrane potential and K+ conductance. Although β3-ARs are expressed at the mRNA level, they play a minor to no role in guinea pig DSM spontaneous contractility without affecting cell excitability. However, BRL37344 and L-755,507 have pronounced inhibitory effects on guinea pig DSM carbachol-induced contractions. The study outlines important DSM β3-ARs species differences. PMID:21993887

  18. Cholinergic signaling mediates the effects of xenin-25 on secretion of pancreatic polypeptide but not insulin or glucagon in humans with impaired glucose tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songyan Wang

    Full Text Available We previously demonstrated that infusion of an intestinal peptide called xenin-25 (Xen amplifies the effects of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP on insulin secretion rates (ISRs and plasma glucagon levels in humans. However, these effects of Xen, but not GIP, were blunted in humans with type 2 diabetes. Thus, Xen rather than GIP signaling to islets fails early during development of type 2 diabetes. The current crossover study determines if cholinergic signaling relays the effects of Xen on insulin and glucagon release in humans as in mice. Fasted subjects with impaired glucose tolerance were studied. On eight separate occasions, each person underwent a single graded glucose infusion- two each with infusion of albumin, Xen, GIP, and GIP plus Xen. Each infusate was administered ± atropine. Heart rate and plasma glucose, insulin, C-peptide, glucagon, and pancreatic polypeptide (PP levels were measured. ISRs were calculated from C-peptide levels. All peptides profoundly increased PP responses. From 0 to 40 min, peptide(s infusions had little effect on plasma glucose concentrations. However, GIP, but not Xen, rapidly and transiently increased ISRs and glucagon levels. Both responses were further amplified when Xen was co-administered with GIP. From 40 to 240 min, glucose levels and ISRs continually increased while glucagon concentrations declined, regardless of infusate. Atropine increased resting heart rate and blocked all PP responses but did not affect ISRs or plasma glucagon levels during any of the peptide infusions. Thus, cholinergic signaling mediates the effects of Xen on insulin and glucagon release in mice but not humans.

  19. Vascular mechanisms underlying the hypotensive effect of Rumex acetosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamar, Hafiz Misbah-Ud-Din; Qayyum, Rahila; Salma, Umme; Khan, Shamim; Khan, Taous; Shah, Abdul Jabbar

    2018-12-01

    Rumex acetosa L. (Polygonaceae) is well known in traditional medicine for its therapeutic efficacy as an antihypertensive. The study investigates antihypertensive potential of crude methanol extract (Ra.Cr) and fractions of Rumex acetosa in normotensive and hypertensive rat models and probes the underlying vascular mechanisms. Ra.Cr and its fractions were tested in vivo on normotensive and hypertensive Sprague-Dawley rats under anaesthesia for blood pressure lowering effect. In vitro experiments on rat and Oryctolagus cuniculus rabbit aortae were employed to probe the underlying vasorelaxant mechanism. In normotensive rats under anaesthesia, Ra.Cr caused fall in MAP (40 mmHg) at 50 mg/kg with % fall of 27.88 ± 4.55. Among the fractions tested, aqueous fraction was more potent at the dose of 50 mg/kg with % fall of 45.63 ± 2.84. In hypertensive rats under similar conditions, extract and fractions showed antihypertensive effect at same doses while aqueous fraction being more potent, exhibited 68.53 ± 4.45% fall in MAP (70 mmHg). In isolated rat aortic rings precontracted with phenylephrine (PE), Ra.Cr and fractions induced endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation, which was partially blocked in presence of l-NAME, indomethacin and atropine. In isolated rabbit aortic rings pre-contracted with PE and K + -(80 mM), Ra.Cr induced vasorelaxation and shifted Ca 2+ concentration-response curves to the right and suppressed PE peak formation, similar to verapamil, in Ca 2+ -free medium. The data indicate that l-NAME and atropine-sensitive endothelial-derived NO and COX enzyme inhibitors and Ca 2+ entry blocking-mediated vasodilator effect of the extract explain its antihypertensive potential.

  20. Participation of the cholinergic system in the ethanol-induced suppression of paradoxical sleep in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. Papale

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Sleep disturbance is among the many consequences of ethanol abuse in both humans and rodents. Ethanol consumption can reduce REM or paradoxical sleep (PS in humans and rats, respectively. The first aim of this study was to develop an animal model of ethanol-induced PS suppression. This model administered intragastrically (by gavage to male Wistar rats (3 months old, 200-250 g 0.5 to 3.5 g/kg ethanol. The 3.5 g/kg dose of ethanol suppressed the PS stage compared with the vehicle group (distilled water during the first 2-h interval (0-2 h; 1.3 vs 10.2; P < 0.001. The second aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms by which ethanol suppresses PS. We examined the effects of cholinergic drug pretreatment. The cholinergic system was chosen because of the involvement of cholinergic neurotransmitters in regulating the sleep-wake cycle. A second set of animals was pretreated with 2.5, 5.0, and 10 mg/kg pilocarpine (cholinergic agonist or atropine (cholinergic antagonist. These drugs were administered 1 h prior to ethanol (3.5 g/kg or vehicle. Treatment with atropine prior to vehicle or ethanol produced a statistically significant decrease in PS, whereas pilocarpine had no effect on minutes of PS. Although the mechanism by which ethanol induces PS suppression is not fully understood, these data suggest that the cholinergic system is not the only system involved in this interaction.

  1. Repeated anaesthesia with isoflurane and medetomidine-midazolam-fentanyl in guinea pigs and its influence on physiological parameters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Schmitz

    Full Text Available Repeated anaesthesia may be required in experimental protocols and in daily veterinary practice, but anaesthesia is known to alter physiological parameters in GPs (Cavia porcellus, GPs. This study investigated the effects of repeated anaesthesia with either medetomidine-midazolam-fentanyl (MMF or isoflurane (Iso on physiological parameters in the GP. Twelve GPs were repeatedly administered with MMF or Iso in two anaesthesia sets. One set consisted of six 40-min anaesthesias, performed over 3 weeks (2 per week; the anaesthetic used first was randomized. Prior to Iso anaesthesia, atropine was injected. MMF anaesthesia was antagonized with AFN (atipamezole-flumazenil-naloxone. Abdominally implanted radio-telemetry devices recorded the mean arterial blood pressure (MAP, heart rate (HR and core body temperature continuously. Additionally, respiratory rate, blood glucose and body weight were assessed. An operable state could be achieved and maintained for 40 min in all GPs. During the surgical tolerance with MMF, the GPs showed a large MAP range between the individuals. In the MMF wake- up phase, the time was shortened until the righting reflex (RR returned and that occurred at lower MAP and HR values. Repeated Iso anaesthesia led to an increasing HR during induction (anaesthesias 2-6, non-surgical tolerance (anaesthesias 3-6 and surgical tolerance (anaesthesias 4, 6. Both anaesthetics may be used repeatedly, as repeating the anaesthesias resulted in only slightly different physiological parameters, compared to those seen with single anaesthesias. The regular atropine premedication induced HR increases and repeated MMF anaesthesia resulted in a metabolism increase which led to the faster return of RR. Nevertheless, Iso's anaesthesia effects of strong respiratory depression and severe hypotension remained. Based on this increased anaesthesia risk with Iso, MMF anaesthesia is preferable for repeated use in GPs.

  2. Anxiolytic action of neuromedin-U and neurotransmitters involved in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telegdy, G; Adamik, A

    2013-09-10

    Peptide Neuromedin-U (NmU) is widely distributed in the central nervous system and the peripheral tissues. Its physiological effects include the regulation of blood pressure, heart rate, and body temperature, and the inhibition of gastric acid secretion. The action of NmU in rats is mediated by two G-protein-coupled receptors, NmU-1R and NmU-2R. NmU-2R is present mainly in the brain, and NmU-1R mainly in the periphery. Despite the great variety of the physiological action of NmU, little is known about its possible effects in different forms of behavior, such as anxiety. In the present work, NmU-23 (the rodent form of the peptide) was tested for its effect on anxiety in elevated plus maze test in mice. For detection of the possible involvement of neurotransmitters, the mice were pretreated with receptor blockers: haloperidol (a D2, dopamine receptor antagonist), propranolol (a β-adrenergic receptor antagonist), atropine (a nonselective muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist), phenoxybenzamine (a nonselective α-adrenergic receptor antagonist) or nitro-l-arginine (a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor). The peptide and nitro-l-arginine were administered into the lateral brain ventricle, while the receptor blockers were applied intraperitoneally. An NmU-23 dose 0.5μg elicited anxiolytic action, whereas this action is faded away when the dose was increased. For further testing therefore 0.5μg i.c.v. was used. Propranolol and atropine fully blocked the NmU-induced anxiolytic action, while haloperidol, phenoxybenzamine and nitro-l-arginine were ineffective. The results suggest that β-adrenergic and cholinergic mechanisms are involved in the anxiolytic action of NmU. © 2013.

  3. Neuropeptide AF induces anxiety-like and antidepressant-like behavior in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palotai, Miklós; Telegdy, Gyula; Tanaka, Masaru; Bagosi, Zsolt; Jászberényi, Miklós

    2014-11-01

    Little is known about the action of neuropeptide AF (NPAF) on anxiety and depression. Only our previous study provides evidence that NPAF induces anxiety-like behavior in rats. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the action of NPAF on depression-like behavior and the underlying neurotransmissions in mice. In order to determine whether there are species differences between rats and mice, we have investigated the action of NPAF on anxiety-like behavior in mice as well. A modified forced swimming test (mFST) and an elevated plus maze test (EPMT) were used to investigate the depression and anxiety-related behaviors, respectively. Mice were treated with NPAF 30min prior to the tests. In the mFST, the animals were pretreated with a non-selective muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, atropine, a non-selective 5-HT2 serotonergic receptor antagonist, cyproheptadine, a mixed 5-HT1/5-HT2 serotonergic receptor antagonist, methysergide, a D2/D3/D4 dopamine receptor antagonist, haloperidol, a α1/α2β-adrenergic receptor antagonist, prazosin or a non-selective β-adrenergic receptor antagonist, propranolol 30min before the NPAF administration. In the mFST, NPAF decreased the immobility time and increased the climbing and swimming times. This action was reversed completely by methysergide and partially by atropine, whereas cyproheptadine, haloperidol, prazosin and propranolol were ineffective. In the EPMT, NPAF decreased the time spent in the arms (open/open+closed). Our results demonstrate that NPAF induces anti-depressant-like behavior in mice, which is mediated, at least in part, through 5HT2-serotonergic and muscarinic cholinergic neurotransmissions. In addition, the NPAF-induced anxiety is species-independent, since it develops also in mice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A comparison of the contractile properties of smooth muscle from pig urethra and internal anal sphincter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalingam, Thanesan; Durlu-Kandilci, N Tugba; Brading, Alison F

    2010-09-01

    Smooth muscles from the urethra and internal anal sphincter (IAS) play an essential role in the maintenance of urinary and fecal continence. Any damage in these muscles may cause serious problems. The aim of this study was to directly compare the contractile properties of pig urethra and IAS taken from the same animal. Smooth muscle strips of urethra and IAS dissected from the same pig were transferred to organ baths superfused with Krebs' solution, loaded with 1 g tension and equilibrated for 1 hr. Carbachol and phenylephrine response curves and EFS responses were elicited in the absence and presence of inhibitors. Both tissues developed tone during the 1 hr equilibration period. Carbachol (3 × 10(-6)-10(-3) M) contracted urethra whilst relaxing IAS. Guanethidine (10(-6) M) inhibited the carbachol responses in both tissues. L-NOARG (10(-4) M) decreased carbachol responses in IAS, but not in urethra. Phenylephrine (3 × 10(-6)-10(-2) M) contracted both tissues. EFS (1-40 Hz) induced a contractile response in urethra which was decreased with guanethidine (10(-6) M) and further blocked by atropine (10(-6) M). In the presence of both, a relaxation response was observed that is sensitive to NOS inhibitors especially at low frequencies. EFS induced a relaxation followed by a contraction in IAS strips. This contraction was blocked by guanethidine but not by atropine, and the remaining relaxation at 20 Hz was decreased with L-NOARG and increased with L-arginine. There are differences between urethra and IAS in terms of muscarinic activation and neural innervation, relevant for pharmacotherapy. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Application of forgetful analgesia induction in induction period in patients with obstructive jaundice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei DU

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe the effect of forgetful analgesia induction and tracheal intubation on the hemodynamic changes in induction period in patients with obstructive jaundice, and explore a safe method for anesthesia induction and tracheal intubation. Methods Sixty patients with obstructive jaundice undergoing elective abdominal operation in General Hospital of PLA from February, 2013 to August, 2013 were involved in the present study. Participants included 36 male and 24 female patients, aging 19-65 years (mean 42±5 years, weighing 47-73 kg (mean 54±6 kg, with ASA Ⅰ-Ⅱ. These 60 patients were randomly divided into forgetful analgesia induction-tracheal intubation group (group A, n=30 and rapid induction-tracheal intubation group (group B, n=30. The heart rate (HR, mean arterial pressure (MAP, pulse oxygen saturation (SpO2 at the time point of before induction (T0, before intubation (T1, at the moment of intubation (T2 and 3 min after intubation (T3 were determined in both groups. Administration times of ephedrine hydrochloride and atropine was recorded in both groups. Results There was no significant difference in HR, MAP, SpO2 before and after induction in group A. In the patients of group B, the HR increased and MAP decreased after induction compared with those before induction (P<0.05, and the change of SpO2 was not significant. Ephedrine hydrochloride and atropine were administrated in both groups, and the cases and times of ephedrine hydrochloride administration were more in group B than in group A (P<0.05. Conclusion The forgetful analgesia induction-tracheal intubation could effectively control the stress response and reduce the fluctuation in hemodynamics during induction of anesthesia in patients with obstructive jaundice. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.02.15

  6. Advances in toxicology and medical treatment of chemical warfare nerve agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Organophosphorous (OP) Nerve agents (NAs) are known as the deadliest chemical warfare agents. They are divided into two classes of G and V agents. Most of them are liquid at room temperature. NAs chemical structures and mechanisms of actions are similar to OP pesticides, but their toxicities are higher than these compounds. The main mechanism of action is irreversible inhibition of Acetyl Choline Esterase (AChE) resulting in accumulation of toxic levels of acetylcholine (ACh) at the synaptic junctions and thus induces muscarinic and nicotinic receptors stimulation. However, other mechanisms have recently been described. Central nervous system (CNS) depression particularly on respiratory and vasomotor centers may induce respiratory failure and cardiac arrest. Intermediate syndrome after NAs exposure is less common than OP pesticides poisoning. There are four approaches to detect exposure to NAs in biological samples: (I) AChE activity measurement, (II) Determination of hydrolysis products in plasma and urine, (III) Fluoride reactivation of phosphylated binding sites and (IV) Mass spectrometric determination of cholinesterase adducts. The clinical manifestations are similar to OP pesticides poisoning, but with more severity and fatalities. The management should be started as soon as possible. The victims should immediately be removed from the field and treatment is commenced with auto-injector antidotes (atropine and oximes) such as MARK I kit. A 0.5% hypochlorite solution as well as novel products like M291 Resin kit, G117H and Phosphotriesterase isolated from soil bacterias, are now available for decontamination of NAs. Atropine and oximes are the well known antidotes that should be infused as clinically indicated. However, some new adjuvant and additional treatment such as magnesium sulfate, sodium bicarbonate, gacyclidine, benactyzine, tezampanel, hemoperfusion, antioxidants and bioscavengers have recently been used for OP NAs poisoning. PMID:23351280

  7. Effects of Cheap Antidotes; Sodium Bicarbonate and Magnesium Sulfate in Organophosphorous Poisoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balali-Mood, M.; Afshari, R.

    2007-01-01

    Organophosphorous (OP) compounds have been used as pesticides and chemical warfare nerve agents. Despite administration of well known antidotes (atropine and oximes), morbidity and mortality of OP poisoning were still high. Besides, oximes are very expensive and not available in most developing countries. It was thus aimed to study the effects of cheap available antidotes; sodium bicarbonate and magnesium sulfate in OP poisoning. In addition to the standard antidotal treatment, out of 117 patients (63M, 47F) aged 25.2 ± 9.5 years with moderate to severe acute OP pesticide poisoning 59 were given sodium bicarbonate 5 mEq/kg in 60 min. followed by 5-6 mEq/kg/day to obtain arterial blood pH of 7.45 to 7.55. Arterial blood pH increased significantly (p less than 0.01) to 7.48 ± 0.05 compared to the controls (7.32 ± 0.06). Morbidity based on hospitalization days reduced significantly (p less than 0.05) from 5.62 ± 3.4 in the controls to 3.1 ± 2.6 days in the sodium bicarbonate group. Total atropine dose was also significantly (p less than 0.05) lower in the test group. Mortality was lower, but not significantly due to the low numbers (5 and 2 of the controls and test group, respectively). Sodium bicarbonate appeared to be effective and could be added to the treatment regime of OP poisoning. Magnesium sulfate was administered four gram intravenously only for the first 24 hr of hospitalization day for the patients with moderate to severe OP poisoning in a pilot study. The results were promising and thus further investigations are continued.(author)

  8. Recent Advances in the Treatment of Organophosphorous Poisonings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Balali-Mood

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Organophosphorous compounds have been employed as pesticides and chemical warfare nerve agents. Toxicity of organophosphorous compounds is a result of excessive cholinergic stimulation through inhibition of acetyl cholinesterase. Clinical manifestations include cholinergic syndromes, central nervous system and cardiovascular disorders. Organophosphorous pesticide poisonings are common in developing worlds including Iran and Sri Lanka. Nerve agents were used during the Iraq-Iran war in 1983-1988 and in a terrorist attack in Japan in 1994-1995. Following decontamination, depending on the severity of intoxication the administration of atropine to counteract muscarinic over-stimulation, and an oxime to reactivate acetyl cholinesterase are indicated. Supportive and intensive care therapy including diazepam to control convulsions and mechanical respiration may be required. Recent investigations have revealed that intravenous infusion of sodium bicarbonate to produce mild to moderate alkalinization is effective. Gacyclidine; an antiglutamatergic compound, was also proved to be beneficial in conjunction with atropine, pralidoxime, and diazepam in nerve agent poisoning. Intravenous magnesium sulfate decreased hospitalization duration and improved outcomes in patients with organophosphorous poisoning. Bio-scavengers including fresh frozen plasma or albumin have recently been suggested as a useful therapy through clearing of free organophosphates. Hemofiltration and antioxidants are also suggested for organophosphorous poisoning. Recombinant bacterial phosphotriesterases and hydrolases that are able to transfer organophosphorous-degrading enzymes are very promising in delayed treatment of organophosphorous poisoning. Recently, encapsulation of drugs or enzymes in nanocarriers has also been proposed. Given the signs and symptoms of organophosphorous poisoning, health professionals should remain updated about the recent advances in treatment of

  9. Recent Advances in the Treatment of Organophosphorous Poisonings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balali-Mood, Mahdi; Saber, Hamidreza

    2012-01-01

    Organophosphorous compounds have been employed as pesticides and chemical warfare nerve agents. Toxicity of organophosphorous compounds is a result of excessive cholinergic stimulation through inhibition of acetyl cholinesterase. Clinical manifestations include cholinergic syndromes, central nervous system and cardiovascular disorders. Organophosphorous pesticide poisonings are common in developing worlds including Iran and Sri Lanka. Nerve agents were used during the Iraq-Iran war in 1983-1988 and in a terrorist attack in Japan in 1994-1995. Following decontamination, depending on the severity of intoxication the administration of atropine to counteract muscarinic over-stimulation, and an oxime to reactivate acetyl cholinesterase are indicated. Supportive and intensive care therapy including diazepam to control convulsions and mechanical respiration may be required. Recent investigations have revealed that intravenous infusion of sodium bicarbonate to produce mild to moderate alkalinization is effective. Gacyclidine; an antiglutamatergic compound, was also proved to be beneficial in conjunction with atropine, pralidoxime, and diazepam in nerve agent poisoning. Intravenous magnesium sulfate decreased hospitalization duration and improved outcomes in patients with organophosphorous poisoning. Bio-scavengers including fresh frozen plasma or albumin have recently been suggested as a useful therapy through clearing of free organophosphates. Hemofiltration and antioxidants are also suggested for organophosphorous poisoning. Recombinant bacterial phosphotriesterases and hydrolases that are able to transfer organophosphorous-degrading enzymes are very promising in delayed treatment of organophosphorous poisoning. Recently, encapsulation of drugs or enzymes in nanocarriers has also been proposed. Given the signs and symptoms of organophosphorous poisoning, health professionals should remain updated about the recent advances in treatment of organophosphorous poisoning

  10. [Usefulness of a protocol for carotid sinus massage in supine and erect postures in patients with syncope without other cardiovascular or neurological diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocchiardo, M; Alciati, M; Buscemi, A; Cravetto, A; Richiardi, E; Gaita, F

    1995-05-01

    Carotid sinus massage is a first level test when investigating the cause of syncope. It is normally performed in the supine and erect positions. However, there is no standard complete protocol. So we have devised a new protocol to evaluate the utility of carotid sinus massage in different postures and the influence of patients age on the response. Two groups of subjects were selected: a group of 167 patients (mean age 50 ys +/- 18, 105 males, 62 females) with a history of syncope without cardiovascular and neurological disease and 20 asymptomatic control subjects (mean age 52 ys +/- 13, 11 males, 9 females). Carotid sinus massage was performed supine, just after passive tilt, after 5 minutes of tilt and just after passive return to supine. If a pause > 3" was detected, the protocol was repeated after atropine i.v. injection. Borderline vasodepressor: blood pressure reduction > 30 but blood pressure reduction > 50 mm Hg or > 30 mm Hg with symptoms like dizziness, vertigo or syncope; cardioinhibitory: pause > 3"; mixed: cardioinhibitory with blood pressure reduction > 30 mm Hg after atropine. Carotid sinus massage gave all informations in the supine position in 14 (12%) patients, after passive tilt in 67 (57%), after 5 minutes of tilt in 30 (26%), and after return to supine in 6 (5%). The responses were: 13 (8%) borderline vasodepressor, 32 (19%) vasodepressor, 2 (1%) cardioinhibitory, 70 (42%) mixed, 50 (30%) negative. Positive responses were more frequent in patients over 45 years (90% versus 43%). In the control group only 3 (15%) positive responses were elicited (2 borderline vasodepressor, and 1 vasodepressor, all in subjects over 45). This protocol for carotid sinus massage evidenced positive responses in 70% of patients with syncope without cardiovascular and neurological disease; cardioinhibitory responses are rare (2%); positive responses are more frequent in patients over 45 years; the protocol specificity was 85%.

  11. The application of 1,8-cineole, a terpenoid oxide present in medicinal plants, inhibits castor oil-induced diarrhea in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilzadeh-Amin, Ghader; Maham, Massoud

    2015-04-01

    1,8-Cineole, a terpene, characterized as a major constituent occurring in the essential oils of several aromatic plants. It is widely used in pharmaceutical industry, as a food additive and for culinary purposes. This study investigates the inhibitory effect of 1,8-cineole on transit time and diarrhea in animal models. Acute toxicity and lethality of 1-8-cineole was determined by Lork's guidelines. The antidiarrheal effect of 1,8-cineole was investigated by determining the intestinal transit and enterpooling in rats. In all experiments, different doses of 1,8-cineole (20-120 mg/kg), atropine, and loperamide were administered orally. The LD50 of 1,8-cineole for oral administration was estimated to be 1280 mg/kg. 1,8-Cineole (20-120 mg/kg) did not show a significant decrease in small intestine transit (p > 0.05); however, the highest dose displayed a significant decrease in comparison with atropine (p castor oil transit test. 1,8-Cineole significantly delayed the onset of diarrhea to -142.33 ± 6.08 min at 120 mg/kg, while the time was 103.66 ± 20.73 min for the control and >240 min for the loperamide. Moreover, 1,8-cineole significantly decreased intestinal fluid accumulation (p < 0.05). This study demonstrated antispasmodic and antisecretory activities of 1,8-cineole and rationalized the traditional use of the plant containing various levels of this terpene in the treatment of gastrointestinal complains such as diarrhea.

  12. The role of the autonomic nervous system in the resting tachycardia of human hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciel, B C; Gallo, L; Marin Neto, J A; Maciel, L M; Alves, M L; Paccola, G M; Iazigi, N

    1987-02-01

    The mechanisms that control resting heart rate in hyperthyroidism were evaluated in six patients before and after treatment with propylthiouracil. The patients were subjected to pharmacological blockade under resting conditions in two experimental sessions: first session, propranolol (0.2 mg/kg body weight); second session, atropine (0.04 mg/kg body weight) followed by propranolol (0.2 mg/kg body weight). All drugs were administered intravenously. Resting heart rate was significantly reduced from 100 +/- 6.5 beats/min to 72 +/- 2.5 beats/min (P less than 0.005) after clinical and laboratory control of the disease. After double blockade, intrinsic heart rate was reduced from 105 +/- 6.8 beats/min before treatment to 98 +/- 6.0 beats/min after treatment (P less than 0.025). The reduction in heart rate caused by propranolol was not significantly different before (-13 +/- 1.4 beats/min) and after (-9 +/- 1.0 beats/min) propylthiouracil. In contrast, atropine induced a higher elevation of heart rate after treatment (45 +/- 8.6 beats/min) than before treatment (26 +/- 4.0 beats/min). The present results suggest no appreciable participation of the sympathetic component of the autonomic nervous system in the tachycardia of hyperthyroidism, at least under the conditions of the present study. The small change observed in intrinsic heart rate, although significant, seems to indicate that this is not the most important mechanism involved in this tachycardia. Our results suggest that an important reduction in the efferent activity of the parasympathetic component participates in the mechanisms that modify resting heart rte in hyperthyroidism.

  13. Electroacupuncture at LI11 promotes jejunal motility via the parasympathetic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xuanming; Yuan, Mengqian; Yin, Yin; Wang, Yidan; Li, Yuqin; Zhang, Na; Sun, Xueyi; Yu, Zhi; Xu, Bin

    2017-06-21

    Gastrointestinal motility disorder has been demonstrated to be regulated by acupuncture treatment. The mechanisms underlying the effects of acupuncture stimulation of abdominal and lower limb acupoints on gastrointestinal motility have been thoroughly studied; however, the physiology underlying the effects of acupuncture on the forelimbs to mediate gastrointestinal motility requires further exploration. The aim of this study was to determine whether electroacupuncture (EA) at LI11 promotes jejunal motility, whether the parasympathetic pathway participates in this effect, and if so, which somatic afferent nerve fibres are involved. A manometric balloon was used to observe jejunal motility. The effects and mechanisms of EA at LI11 were explored in male Sprague-Dawley rats with or without drug administration (propranolol, clenbuterol, acetylcholine, and atropine) and with or without vagotomy. Three types of male mice (β 1 β 2 receptor-knockout [β 1 β 2 -/- ] mice, M 2 M 3 receptor-knockout [M 2 M 3 -/- ] mice and wild-type [WT] mice) were also studied by using different EA intensities (1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 mA). A total of 72 rats and 56 mice were included in the study. EA at LI11 increased the contractile amplitude of jejunal motility in the majority of both rats and mice. However, EA at LI11 did not enhance jejunal motility in rats administered atropine, rats that underwent vagotomy, and M 2 M 3 -‍‍/- mice (at all intensities). In WT mice, EA at LI11 significantly increased jejunal motility at all intensities except 1 mA, and a plateau was reached at intensities greater than 4 mA. Our results suggest that EA at LI11 promotes jejunal motility primarily by exciting the parasympathetic pathway, and that Aδ-fibres and C-fibres may play important roles in the process.

  14. Stress cine MRI for detection of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, T.; Hofer, U.; Schild, H.

    2002-01-01

    Stress testing is the cornerstone in the diagnosis of patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). Stress echocardiography has become a well-established modality for the detection of ischemia-induced wall motion abnormalities. However, display and reliable interpretation of stress echocardiography studies are user-dependent, the test reproducibility is low, and 10 to 15% of patients yield suboptimal or non-diagnostic images. Due to its high spatial and contrast resolution, MRI is known to permit an accurate determination of left ventricular function and wall thickness at rest. Early stress MRI studies provided promising results with respect to the detection of CAD. However, the clinical impact was limited due to long imaging time and problematic patient monitoring in the MRI environment. Recent technical improvements - namely ultrafast MR image acquisition - led to a significant reduction of imaging time and improved patient safety. Stress can be induced by physical exercise or pharmacologically by administration of a beta 1 -agonist (dobutamine) or vasodilatator (dipyridamole and adenosine). The best developed and most promising stress MRI technique is a high-dose dobutamine/atropine stress protocol (10, 20, 30, 40 μg/kg/min; optionally 0.25-mg fractions of atropine up to maximal dose 1 mg). Severe complications (myocardial infarction, ventricular fibrillation and sustained tachycardia, cardiogenic shock) may be expected in 0.25% of patients. Currently, data of three high-dose dobutamine stress MRI studies are available, revealing a good sensitivity (83 - 87%) and specificity (83 - 86%) in the assessment of CAD. The direct comparison between echocardiography and MRI for the detection of stress-induced wall motion abnormalities yielded better results for dobutamine-MRI in terms of sensitivity (86.2% vs. 74.3%; p [de

  15. Time course of ozone-induced changes in breathing pattern in healthy exercising humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelegle, Edward S; Walby, William F; Adams, William C

    2007-02-01

    We examined the time course of O3-induced changes in breathing pattern in 97 healthy human subjects (70 men and 27 women). One- to five-minute averages of breathing frequency (f(B)) and minute ventilation (Ve) were used to generate plots of cumulative breaths and cumulative exposure volume vs. time and cumulative exposure volume vs. cumulative breaths. Analysis revealed a three-phase response; delay, no response detected; onset, f(B) began to increase; response, f(B) stabilized. Regression analysis was used to identify four parameters: time to onset, number of breaths at onset, cumulative inhaled dose of ozone at onset of O3-induced tachypnea, and the percent change in f(B). The effect of altering O3 concentration, Ve, atropine treatment, and indomethacin treatment were examined. We found that the lower the O3 concentration, the greater the number of breaths at onset of tachypnea at a fixed ventilation, whereas number of breaths at onset of tachypnea remains unchanged when Ve is altered and O3 concentration is fixed. The cumulative inhaled dose of O3 at onset of tachypnea remained constant and showed no relationship with the magnitude of percent change in f(B). Atropine did not affect any of the derived parameters, whereas indomethacin did not affect time to onset, number of breaths at onset, or cumulative inhaled dose of O3 at onset of tachypnea but did attenuate percent change in f(B). The results are discussed in the context of dose response and intrinsic mechanisms of action.

  16. The influence of midazolam on heart rate arises from cardiac autonomic tones alterations in Burmese pythons, Python molurus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Ivã Guidini; Armelin, Vinicius Araújo; Braga, Victor Hugo da Silva; Florindo, Luiz Henrique

    2017-12-01

    The GABA A receptor agonist midazolam is a compound widely used as a tranquilizer and sedative in mammals and reptiles. It is already known that this benzodiazepine produces small to intermediate heart rate (HR) alterations in mammals, however, its influence on reptiles' HR remains unexplored. Thus, the present study sought to verify the effects of midazolam on HR and cardiac modulation in the snake Python molurus. To do so, the snakes' HR, cardiac autonomic tones, and HR variability were evaluated during four different experimental stages. The first stage consisted on the data acquisition of animals under untreated conditions, in which were then administered atropine (2.5mgkg -1 ; intraperitoneal), followed later by propranolol (3.5mgkg -1 ; intraperitoneal) (cardiac double autonomic blockade). The second stage focused on the data acquisition of animals under midazolam effect (1.0mgkg -1 ; intramuscular), which passed through the same autonomic blockade protocol of the first stage. The third and fourth stages consisted of the same protocol of stages one and two, respectively, with the exception that atropine and propranolol injections were reversed. By comparing the HR of animals that received midazolam (second and fourth stages) with those that did not (first and third stages), it could be observed that this benzodiazepine reduced the snakes' HR by ~60%. The calculated autonomic tones showed that such cardiac depression was elicited by an ~80% decrease in cardiac adrenergic tone and an ~620% increase in cardiac cholinergic tone - a finding that was further supported by the results of HR variability analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A functional study on small intestinal smooth muscles in jejunal atresia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Tyagi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was aimed to assess the contractile status of neonatal small intestinal smooth muscle of dilated pre-atretic part of intestinal atresia to resolve debatable issues related to mechanisms of persistent dysmotility after surgical repair. Materials and Methods: A total of 34 longitudinally sectioned strips were prepared from pre-atretic dilated part of freshly excised 8 jejunal atresia type III a cases. Spontaneous as well as acetylcholine- and histamine-induced contractions were recorded in vitro by using organ bath preparations. Chemically evoked contractions were further evaluated after application of atropine (muscarinic blocker, pheniramine (H1 blocker, and lignocaine (neuronal blocker to ascertain receptors and neuronal involvement. Histological examinations of strips were made by using Masson trichrome stain to assess the fibrotic changes. Results: All 34 strips, except four showed spontaneous contractions with mean frequency and amplitude of 5.49 ± 0.26/min and 24.41 ± 5.26 g/g wet tissue respectively. The response to ACh was nearly twice as compared to histamine for equimolar concentrations (100 μM. ACh (100 μM induced contractions were attenuated (by 60% by atropine. Histamine (100 μM-induced contractions was blocked by pheniramine (0.32 μM and lignocaine (4 μM by 74% and 78%, respectively. Histopathological examination showed varying degree of fibrotic changes in muscle layers. Conclusions: Pre-atretic dilated part of jejunal atresia retains functional activity but with definitive histopathologic abnormalities. It is suggested that excision of a length of pre-atretic part and early stimulation of peristalsis by locally acting cholinomimetic or H1 agonist may help in reducing postoperative motility problems in atresia patients.

  18. A functional study on small intestinal smooth muscles in jejunal atresia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Preeti; Mandal, Maloy B; Gangopadhyay, Ajay N; Patne, Shashikant C U

    2016-01-01

    The present study was aimed to assess the contractile status of neonatal small intestinal smooth muscle of dilated pre-atretic part of intestinal atresia to resolve debatable issues related to mechanisms of persistent dysmotility after surgical repair. A total of 34 longitudinally sectioned strips were prepared from pre-atretic dilated part of freshly excised 8 jejunal atresia type III a cases. Spontaneous as well as acetylcholine- and histamine-induced contractions were recorded in vitro by using organ bath preparations. Chemically evoked contractions were further evaluated after application of atropine (muscarinic blocker), pheniramine (H1 blocker), and lignocaine (neuronal blocker) to ascertain receptors and neuronal involvement. Histological examinations of strips were made by using Masson trichrome stain to assess the fibrotic changes. All 34 strips, except four showed spontaneous contractions with mean frequency and amplitude of 5.49 ± 0.26/min and 24.41 ± 5.26 g/g wet tissue respectively. The response to ACh was nearly twice as compared to histamine for equimolar concentrations (100 μM). ACh (100 μM) induced contractions were attenuated (by 60%) by atropine. Histamine (100 μM)-induced contractions was blocked by pheniramine (0.32 μM) and lignocaine (4 μM) by 74% and 78%, respectively. Histopathological examination showed varying degree of fibrotic changes in muscle layers. Pre-atretic dilated part of jejunal atresia retains functional activity but with definitive histopathologic abnormalities. It is suggested that excision of a length of pre-atretic part and early stimulation of peristalsis by locally acting cholinomimetic or H1 agonist may help in reducing postoperative motility problems in atresia patients.

  19. Modulation of release of [3H]acetylcholine in the major pelvic ganglion of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somogyi, G T; de Groat, W C

    1993-06-01

    Cholinergic modulation of [3H]acetylcholine release evoked by electrical stimulation was studied in the rat major pelvic ganglion, which was prelabeled with [3H]choline. Acetylcholine (ACh) release was independent of the frequency of stimulation; 0.3 Hz produced the same volley output as 10 Hz. Tetrodotoxin (1 microM) or omission of Ca2+ from the medium abolished ACh release. The M1 receptor agonist (4-hydroxy-2-butynyl)-1-trimethylammonium m-chlorocarbanilate chloride (McN-A 343, 50 microM) increased release (by 136%), whereas the M2 muscarinic agonist oxotremorine (1 microM) decreased ACh release (by 22%). The muscarinic antagonists, atropine (1 microM) or pirenzepine (M1 selective, 1 microM), did not change ACh release. However, pirenzepine (1 microM) blocked the facilitatory effect of McN-A 343, and atropine (1 microM) blocked the inhibitory effect of oxotremorine. The cholinesterase inhibitor physostigmine (1-5 microM), the nicotinic agonist 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium (DMPP, 10 microM), and the nicotinic antagonist D-tubocurarine (50 microM) did not change ACh release. 4-Aminopyridine, a K+ channel blocker, significantly increased the release (by 146%). Seven days after decentralization of the major pelvic ganglion, the evoked release of ACh was abolished. It is concluded that release of ACh occurs from the preganglionic nerve terminals rather than from the cholinergic cell bodies and is not modulated by actions of endogenous ACh on either muscarinic or nicotinic autoreceptors. These data confirm and extend previous electrophysiological findings indicating that synapses in the major pelvic ganglion have primarily a relay function.

  20. Evidence for inhibitory nicotinic and facilitatory muscarinic receptors in cholinergic nerve terminals of the rat urinary bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somogyi, G T; de Groat, W C

    1992-02-01

    Cholinergic prejunctional modulatory receptors on parasympathetic nerves in the rat urinary bladder were studied by measuring 3H-acetylcholine (ACh) release in muscle strips from the bladder body. Electrical field stimulation markedly increased 3H-ACh overflow in strips preloaded with 3H-choline. Oxotremorine (1 microM), an M2 receptor agonist and DMPP (10 microM) a nicotinic (N) receptor agonist decreased the release of ACh (50% and 55% respectively); whereas McN-A 343 (50 microM) an M1 receptor agonist increased the release (33%), indicating the presence of three types of modulatory receptors. The anticholinesterase agent, physostigmine in concentrations of 1, 5 and 25 microM and neostigmine (5 microM) increased ACh release (44-710%). However a low concentration of physostigmine (0.05 microM) decreased release. Pirenzepine, an M1 muscarinic antagonist or atropine blocked the increased ACh release in physostigmine-treated strips, but in normal strips pirenzepine did not change release and atropine increased release. McN-A 343 or prolonged application (15 min) of DMPP increased ACh release (376% and 391% respectively) in physostigmine-treated strips. The response to McN-A 343 was blocked by pirenzepine. d-Tubocurarine (DTC), a nicotinic receptor blocker, enhanced ACh release in the presence of physostigmine but proved to be ineffective in normal preparations. These findings suggest that all three cholinergic receptors (M1 facilitatory, N inhibitory and M2 inhibitory) are activated by endogenous ACh in physostigmine treated preparations whereas only M2-inhibitory receptors are activated in normal preparations. It will be important in future studies to determine whether M1 and M2 mechanisms can also be activated under more physiological conditions in the bladder and whether they are present at other cholinergic synapses.

  1. Effectiveness of donepezil, rivastigmine, and (+/-)huperzine A in counteracting the acute toxicity of organophosphorus nerve agents: comparison with galantamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aracava, Yasco; Pereira, Edna F R; Akkerman, Miriam; Adler, Michael; Albuquerque, Edson X

    2009-12-01

    Galantamine, a centrally acting cholinesterase (ChE) inhibitor and a nicotinic allosteric potentiating ligand used to treat Alzheimer's disease, is an effective and safe antidote against poisoning with nerve agents, including soman. Here, the effectiveness of galantamine was compared with that of the centrally active ChE inhibitors donepezil, rivastigmine, and (+/-)huperzine A as a pre- and/or post-treatment to counteract the acute toxicity of soman. In the first set of experiments, male prepubertal guinea pigs were treated intramuscularly with one of the test drugs and 30 min later challenged with 1.5 x LD(50) soman (42 microg/kg s.c.). All animals that were pretreated with galantamine (6-8 mg/kg), 3 mg/kg donepezil, 6 mg/kg rivastigmine, or 0.3 mg/kg (+/-)huperzine A survived the soman challenge, provided that they were also post-treated with atropine (10 mg/kg i.m.). However, only galantamine was well tolerated. In subsequent experiments, the effectiveness of specific treatment regimens using 8 mg/kg galantamine, 3 mg/kg donepezil, 6 mg/kg rivastigmine, or 0.3 mg/kg (+/-)huperzine A was compared in guinea pigs challenged with soman. In the absence of atropine, only galantamine worked as an effective and safe pretreatment in animals challenged with 1.0 x LD(50) soman. Galantamine was also the only drug to afford significant protection when given to guinea pigs after 1.0 x LD(50) soman. Finally, all test drugs except galantamine reduced the survival of the animals when administered 1 or 3 h after the challenge with 0.6 or 0.7 x LD(50) soman. Thus, galantamine emerges as a superior antidotal therapy against the toxicity of soman.

  2. Drug-Induced Dental Caries: A Disproportionality Analysis Using Data from VigiBase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Campaigno, Emilie Patras; Kebir, Inès; Montastruc, Jean-Louis; Rueter, Manuela; Maret, Delphine; Lapeyre-Mestre, Maryse; Sallerin, Brigitte; Despas, Fabien

    2017-12-01

    Dental caries is defined as a pathological breakdown of the tooth. It is an infectious phenomenon involving a multifactorial aetiology. The impact of drugs on cariogenic risk has been poorly investigated. In this study, we identified drugs suspected to induce dental caries as adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and then studied a possible pathogenic mechanism for each drug that had a statistically significant disproportionality. We extracted individual case safety reports of dental caries associated with drugs from VigiBase ® (the World Health Organization global individual case safety report database). We calculated disproportionality for each drug with a reporting odds ratio (ROR) and 99% confidence interval. We analysed the pharmacodynamics of each drug that had a statistically significant disproportionality. In VigiBase ® , 5229 safety reports for dental caries concerning 733 drugs were identified. Among these drugs, 88 had a significant ROR, and for 65 of them (73.9%), no information about dental caries was found in the summaries of the product characteristics, the Micromedex ® DRUGDEX, or the Martindale databases. Regarding the pharmacological classes of drugs involved in dental caries, we identified bisphosphonates, atropinic drugs, antidepressants, corticoids, immunomodulating drugs, antipsychotics, antiepileptics, opioids and β 2 -adrenoreceptor agonist drugs. Regarding possible pathogenic mechanisms for these drugs, we identified changes in salivary flow/composition for 54 drugs (61.4%), bone metabolism changes for 31 drugs (35.2%), hyperglycaemia for 32 drugs (36.4%) and/or immunosuppression for 23 drugs (26.1%). For nine drugs (10.2%), the mechanism was unclear. We identified 88 drugs with a significant positive disproportionality for dental caries. Special attention has to be paid to bisphosphonates, atropinic drugs, immunosuppressants and drugs causing hyperglycaemia.

  3. Neural influences on human intestinal epithelium in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Dagmar; Michel, Klaus; Zeller, Florian; Demir, Ihsan E; Ceyhan, Güralp O; Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Schemann, Michael

    2016-01-15

    We present the first systematic and, up to now, most comprehensive evaluation of the basic features of epithelial functions, such as basal and nerve-evoked secretion, as well as tissue resistance, in over 2200 surgical specimens of human small and large intestine. We found no evidence for impaired nerve-evoked epithelial secretion or tissue resistance with age or disease pathologies (stomach, pancreas or colon cancer, polyps, diverticulitis, stoma reversal). This indicates the validity of future studies on epithelial secretion or resistance that are based on data from a variety of surgical specimens. ACh mainly mediated nerve-evoked and basal secretion in the small intestine, whereas vasoactive intestinal peptide and nitric oxide were the primary pro-secretory transmitters in the large intestine. The results of the present study revealed novel insights into regional differences in nerve-mediated secretion in the human intestine and comprise the basis by which to more specifically target impaired epithelial functions in the diseased gut. Knowledge on basic features of epithelial functions in the human intestine is scarce. We used Ussing chamber techniques to record basal tissue resistance (R-basal) and short circuit currents (ISC; secretion) under basal conditions (ISC-basal) and after electrical field stimulation (ISC-EFS) of nerves in 2221 resectates from 435 patients. ISC-EFS was TTX-sensitive and of comparable magnitude in the small and large intestine. ISC-EFS or R-basal were not influenced by the patients' age, sex or disease pathologies (cancer, polyps, diverticulitis). Ion substitution, bumetanide or adenylate cyclase inhibition studies suggested that ISC-EFS depended on epithelial cAMP-driven chloride and bicarbonate secretion but not on amiloride-sensitive sodium absorption. Although atropine-sensitive cholinergic components prevailed for ISC-EFS of the duodenum, jejunum and ileum, PG97-269-sensitive [vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) receptor 1

  4. Carbon monoxide contributes to the constipating effects of granisetron in rat colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacci, Carmela; Fanelli, Margherita; Potenza, Maria Assunta; Leo, Valentina; Montagnani, Monica; De Salvia, Maria Antonietta

    2016-11-14

    To investigate the mechanisms underlying the potential contribution of the heme oxygenase/carbon monoxide (HO/CO) pathway in the constipating effects of granisetron. For in vivo studies, gastrointestinal motility was evaluated in male rats acutely treated with granisetron [25, 50, 75 μg/kg/subcutaneous (sc)], zinc protoporphyrin IX [ZnPPIX, 50 μg/kg/intraperitoneal (ip)] and hemin (50 μmol/L/kg/ip), alone or in combination. For in vitro studies, the contractile neurogenic response to electrical field stimulation (EFS, 3, 5, 10 Hz, 14 V, 1 ms, pulse trains lasting 10 s), as well as the contractile myogenic response to acetylcholine (ACh, 0.1-100 μmol/L) were evaluated on colon specimens incubated with granisetron (3 μmol/L, 15 min), ZnPPIX (10 μmol/L, 60 min) or CO-releasing molecule-3 (CORM-3, 100, 200, 400 μmol/L) alone or in combination. These experiments were performed under co-treatment with or without atropine (3 μmol/L, a muscarinic receptor antagonist) or N G -nitro-L-Arginine (L-NNA, 100 μmol/L, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor). Administration of granisetron (50, 75 μg/kg) in vivo significantly increased the time to first defecation ( P = 0.045 vs vehicle-treated rats), clearly suggesting a constipating effect of this drug. Although administration of ZnPPIX or hemin alone had no effect on this gastrointestinal motility parameter, ZnPPIX co-administered with granisetron abolished the granisetron-induced constipation. On the other hand, co-administration of hemin and granisetron did not modify the increased constipation observed under granisetron alone. When administered in vitro , granisetron alone (3 μmol/L) did not significantly modify the colon's contractile response to either EFS or ACh. Incubation with ZnPPIX alone (10 μmol/L) significantly reduced the colon's contractile response to EFS ( P = 0.016) but had no effect on contractile response to ACh. Co-administration of ZnPPIX and atropine (3 μmol/L) abolished the ZnPPIX-mediated decrease

  5. Development of novel encapsulated formulations using albumin-chitosan as a polymer matrix for ocular drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addo, Richard Tettey

    Designing formulations for ophthalmic drug delivery is one of the most challenging endeavors facing the pharmaceutical scientist due to the unique anatomy, physiology, and biochemistry of the eye. Current treatment protocols for administration of drugs in eye diseases are primarily solution formulations, gels or ointments. However, these modes of delivery have several drawbacks such as short duration of exposure, need for repeated administrations and non-specific toxicity. We hypothesize that development of ocular drugs in microparticles will overcome the deficiencies of the current modalities of treatment. We based the hypothesis on the preliminary studies conducted with encapsulated tetracaine, an anesthetic used for surgical purposes and atropine, a medication used for several ophthalmic indications including mydriatic and cycloplegic effects. However, atropine is well absorbed into the systemic circulation and has been reported to exert severe systemic side effects after ocular administration (Hoefnagel D. 1961, Morton H. G. 1939 and Lang J. C. 1995) and may lead to serious side effects including death in extreme cases with pediatric use. Based on these observations, the focus of this dissertation is to formulate microparticulate drug carrier for treatment of various conditions of the eye. Purpose: To prepare, characterize, study the in vitro and in vivo interaction of albumin-chitosan microparticles (BSA-CSN MS), a novel particulate drug carrier for ocular drug delivery. Method: Microparticle formulations were prepared by method of spray drying. The percentage drug loading and efficiency were assessed using USP (I) dissolution apparatus. Using Malvern Zeta-Sizer, we determined size and surface charge of the fabrication. Surface morphology of the microparticles was examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy. Microparticles were characterized in terms of thermal properties using Differential Scanning Calorimetry. Human corneal epithelial cells (HCET-1) were

  6. Outcome of cardiopulmonary resuscitation - predictors of survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishtiaq, O.; Iqbal, M.; Zubair, M.; Qayyum, R.; Adil, M.

    2008-01-01

    To assess the outcomes of patients undergoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Data were collected retrospectively of all adult patients who underwent CPR. Clinical outcomes of interest were survival at the end of CPR and survival at discharge from hospital. Factors associated with survival were evaluated using logistic regression analysis. Of the 159 patients included, 55 (35%) were alive at the end of CPR and 17 (11%) were discharged alive from the hospital. At the end of CPR, univariate logistic regression analysis found the following factors associated with survival: cardiac arrest within hospital as compared to outside the hospital (odds ratio = 2.8, 95% CI = 1.27-6.20, p-value = 0.01), both cardiac and pulmonary arrest as compared to either cardiac or pulmonary arrest (odds ratio = 0.37, 95% CI = 0.19- 0.73, p-value = 0.004), asystole as cardiac rhythm at presentation (odds ratio = 0.47, 95% CI = 0.24-0.93, p-value = 0.03), and total atropine dose given during CPR (odds ratio = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.62-0.97, p-value = 0.02). In multivariate logistic regression, cardiac arrest within hospital (odds ratio = 2.52, 95% CI = 1.06-5.99, p-value = 0.04) and both cardiac and pulmonary arrest as compared to cardiac or pulmonary arrest (odds ratio = 0.44, 95% CI = 0.21-0.91, p-value = 0.03) were associated with survival at the end of CPR. At the time of discharge from hospital, univariate logistic regression analysis found following factors that were associated with survival: cardiac arrest within hospital (odds ratio = 8.4, 95% CI = 1.09-65.64, p-value = 0.04), duration of CPR (odds ratio = 0.91, 95% CI = 0.85-0.96, p-value = 0.001), and total atropine dose given during CPR (odds ratio = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.47-0.99, p-value = 0.05). In multivariate logistic regression analysis cardiac arrest within hospital (odds ratio 8.69, 95% CI = 1.01-74.6, p-value = 0.05) and duration of CPR (odds ratio 0.92, 95% CI = 0.87-0.98, p-value = 0.01) were associated with survival at

  7. Early metabolic responses to lithium/pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, Imran; Hillert, Markus H; Klein, Jochen

    2015-12-01

    The lithium-pilocarpine model of status epilepticus is a well-known animal model of temporal lobe epilepsy. We combined this model with in vivo microdialysis to investigate energy metabolites and acute cellular membrane damage during seizure development. Rats were implanted with dialysis probes and pretreated with lithium chloride (127 mg/kg i.p.). Twenty-four hours later, they received pilocarpine (30 mg/kg s.c.) which initiated seizures within 30 min. In the dialysate from rat hippocampus, we observed a transient increase in glucose and a prominent, five-fold increase in lactate during seizures. Lactate release was because of neuronal activation as it was strongly reduced by infusion of tetrodotoxin, administration of atropine or when seizures were terminated by diazepam or ketamine. In ex vivo assays, mitochondrial function as measured by respirometry was not affected by 90 min of seizures. Extracellular levels of choline, however, increased two-fold and glycerol levels 10-fold, which indicate cellular phospholipid breakdown during seizures. Within 60 min of pilocarpine administration, hydroxylation of salicylate increased two-fold and formation of isoprostanes 20-fold, revealing significant oxidative stress in hippocampal tissue. Increases in lactate, glycerol and isoprostanes were abrogated, and increases in choline were completely prevented, when hippocampal probes were perfused with calcium-free solution. Similarly, administration of pregabalin (100 mg/kg i.p.), a calcium channel ligand, 15 min prior to pilocarpine strongly attenuated parameters of membrane damage and oxidative stress. We conclude that seizure development in a rat model of status epilepticus is accompanied by increases in extracellular lactate, choline and glycerol, and by oxidative stress, while mitochondrial function remains intact for at least 90 min. Membrane damage depends on calcium influx and can be prevented by treatment with pregabalin. Status epilepticus (SE) was induced in rats by

  8. [A preliminary study on the role of substance P in histamine-nasal-spray-induced allergic conjunctivitis in guinea pigs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tong; Zhao, Changqing

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the effect of the non adrenergic non cholinergic nerve (NANC) and substance P (SP) in allergic rhinoconjunctivitis by observing histamine nasal provocation induced conjunctivitis in guinea pigs. Forty male guinea pigs were randomly divided into five groups with each group consisting of eight guinea pigs. All anesthetized guinea pigs were exposed either to histamine (0.2%, 5 µl) (group B~E) or saline (5 µl, group A) via unilateral nostril. No pretreatment was done in group A and B while pretreatment was done in groups C~E through injection into the unilateral common carotid artery with cholinergic nerve inhibitor (atropine, 1 mg/kg, group C), cholinergic nerve inhibitor plus adrenergic nerve inhibitors (atropine, 1 mg/kg, phentolamine, 1 mg/kg plus Esmolol, 1 mg/kg, group D) and cholinergic nerve inhibitor, adrenergic nerve inhibitors plus SP receptor antagonist (the same treatment with group D plus D-SP 10(-6) mol/L, 1 µl/g, group E), respectively. To assess the ipsilateral conjunctival inflammatory reaction, conjunctiva leakage with Evans blue dye assessments and HE staining of conjunctival tissues were performed. The SP expression in ipsilateral conjunctival tissue in different groups of guinea pigs were assessed by immunofluorescence and RT-PCR. The activity of eosinophils was assessed by eosinophil major basic protein 1 (MBP1) with RT-PCR, meanwhile, the activity of mast cells was assessed by tryptase with RT-PCR. SPSS 17.0 software was used to analyze the data. At 30 min after nasal application of histamine, ipsilateral conjunctivitis was successfully induced as shown by the change of conjunctiva leakage and histology. The content of Evans blue in ipsilateral conjunctival tissue of group A~E was (13.78 ± 2.48), (29.62 ± 3.31), (19.03 ± 1.47), (18.42 ± 2.52), (14.83 ± 2.14) µg/ml, respectively. There was statistically significant difference between group A and B (t = -10.66, P 0.05). Histamine nasal provocation induced allergic

  9. Role of ghrelin in small intestinal motility following pediatric intracerebral hemorrhage in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zan, Jieyu; Song, Lei; Wang, Jiejie; Zou, Rong; Hong, Fei; Zhao, Jinhua; Cheng, Yijun; Xu, Ming

    2017-11-01

    Small intestinal motility (SIM) disorder is a common complication following pediatric intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), leading to a poor prognosis in patients. Previous studies have shown that ghrelin is involved in SIM in various diseases; however, the role of ghrelin in pediatric ICH‑induced SIM disorder remains to be elucidated. The present study was designed to investigate the association between ghrelin and SIM post‑ICH, and to examine the effect of exogenous ghrelin administration on SIM in vivo. An ICH model was induced in mice by autologous blood infusion. Neurobehavioral deficits were evaluated using a Rotarod test, forelimb placing test, and corner turn test. Intestinal mucosal damage was examined using hematoxylin and eosin staining. SIM was measured using charcoal meal staining. An enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay was used to evaluate serum levels of ghrelin and nitric oxide (NO). Reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses were performed to determine the levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) at the mRNA and protein levels. Nω‑nitro‑L‑arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L‑NAME), L‑arginine, atropine, phentolamine and propranolol were used to manipulate the putative pathways induced by ghrelin. Neurological dysfunction was observed post‑ICH. ICH caused damage to the intestinal mucosa and delayed SIM. Serum levels of ghrelin increased between 3 h and 3 days, peaking at 12 h, and showed a significant negative correlation with SIM post‑ICH. Ghrelin administration dose‑dependently attenua-ted ICH‑induced SIM disorder. Ghrelin also decreased NO levels by downregulating the mRNA and protein expression levels of iNOS, but not those of nNOS or eNOS, post‑ICH. Consistently, the effect was enhanced by L‑NAME and weakened by L‑arginine, respectively. The protective effect of ghrelin was

  10. A STUDY OF PREDICTING THE NEED FOR VENTILATOR SUPPORT AND OUTCOME IN ORGANOPHOSPHORUS POISONING

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    Kalinga Bommankatte Eranaik

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Organophosphorus compound poisoning is the most common poisonings in India because of easy availability, often requiring ICU care and ventilator support. Clinical research has indicated that respiratory failure is the most important cause of death due to Organophosphorus poisoning. It results in respiratory muscle weakness, pulmonary oedema, respiratory depression, increased secretions and bronchospasm. These complications and death can be prevented with timely Institution of ventilator support. The aim of present study was to identify the factors and predicting the need for ventilator support and outcome. Aim of the Study- To predict the need for ventilator support and outcome in organophosphate poisoning. MATERIALS AND METHODS Seventy consecutive patients admitted with a history of organophosphorus poisoning at KIMS, Hubli were taken for study after considering the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Detailed history, confirmation of poisoning, examination and other than routine investigations serum pseudocholinesterase and arterial blood gas analysis was done. The severity of organophosphorus poisoning was graded as mild, moderate and severe based on the factors which influence the need for ventilator support. RESULTS This study was conducted in 70 patients, out of which 48 (68.6% were male patients and 22 (31.4% were female patients. Among them 37 (53% patients required ventilation and 33 (47% expired. Chlorpyrifos, Dichlorvos and Monocrotophos were most commonly consumed poisons. 74% patients who consumed these compounds required ventilator support and 73% patients expired. 100% of patients presented with pin point pupil, fasciculation score > 4, respiratory rate > 20, GCS score < 7 and severe grade of poisoning required ventilator support and pseudocholinesterase < 900 U/L, 70% of metabolic acidosis and atropine requirement more than 180 mg within 48 hours required ventilator support and associated with high mortality. CONCLUSION

  11. Hairy root culture in a liquid-dispersed bioreactor: characterization of spatial heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, G R; Doran, P M

    2000-01-01

    A liquid-dispersed reactor equipped with a vertical mesh cylinder for inoculum support was developed for culture of Atropa belladonna hairy roots. The working volume of the culture vessel was 4.4 L with an aspect ratio of 1.7. Medium was dispersed as a spray onto the top of the root bed, and the roots grew radially outward from the central mesh cylinder to the vessel wall. Significant benefits in terms of liquid drainage and reduced interstitial liquid holdup were obtained using a vertical rather than horizontal support structure for the biomass and by operating the reactor with cocurrent air and liquid flow. With root growth, a pattern of spatial heterogeneity developed in the vessel. Higher local biomass densities, lower volumes of interstitial liquid, lower sugar concentrations, and higher root atropine contents were found in the upper sections of the root bed compared with the lower sections, suggesting a greater level of metabolic activity toward the top of the reactor. Although gas-liquid oxygen transfer to the spray droplets was very rapid, there was evidence of significant oxygen limitations in the reactor. Substantial volumes of non-free-draining interstitial liquid accumulated in the root bed. Roots near the bottom of the vessel trapped up to 3-4 times their own weight in liquid, thus eliminating the advantages of improved contact with the gas phase offered by liquid-dispersed culture systems. Local nutrient and product concentrations in the non-free-draining liquid were significantly different from those in the bulk medium, indicating poor liquid mixing within the root bed. Oxygen enrichment of the gas phase improved neither growth nor atropine production, highlighting the greater importance of liquid-solid compared with gas-liquid oxygen transfer resistance. The absence of mechanical or pneumatic agitation and the tendency of the root bed to accumulate liquid and impede drainage were identified as the major limitations to reactor performance. Improved

  12. Mechanisms of the antinociceptive action of (− Epicatechin obtained from the hydroalcoholic fraction of Combretum leprosum Mart & Eic in rodents

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    Lopes Luciano da

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms of the antinociceptive activity of (− epicatechin (EPI, a compound isolated from the hydroalcoholic fraction of Combreum leprosum Mart & Eicher. Methods were assessed in the model of chemical nociception induced by glutamate (20 μmol/paw. To evaluate the mechanisms involved, the animals , male Swiss mice (25-30 g, received EPI (50 mg/kg p.o. after pretreatment with naloxone (2 mg/kg s.c. opioid antagonist, glibenclamide (2 mg/kg s.c. antagonist K + channels sensitive to ATP, ketanserin (0.3 mg/kg s.c. antagonist of receptor 5-HT2A, yoimbine (0.15 mg/kg s.c. α2 adrenergic receptor antagonist, pindolol (1 mg/kg s.c. 5-HT1a/1b receptor antagonist, atropine (0.1 mg/kg s.c. muscarinic antagonist and caffeine (3 mg/kg s.c. adenosine receptor antagonist, ondansetron (0.5 mg/kg s.c. for 5-HT3 receptor and L-arginine (600 mg/kg i.p.. Results The antinociceptive effect of EPI was reversed by pretreatment with naloxone and glibenclamide, ketanserin, yoimbine, atropine and pindolol, which demonstrates the involvement of opioid receptors and potassium channels sensitive to ATP, the serotoninergic (receptor 5HT1A and 5HT2A, adrenergic (receptor alpha 2 and cholinergic (muscarinic receptor systems in the activities that were observed. The effects of EPI, however, were not reversed by pretreatment with caffeine, L-arginine or ondansetron, which shows that there is no involvement of 5HT3 receptors or the purinergic and nitrergic systems in the antinociceptive effect of EPI. In the Open Field and Rotarod test, EPI had no significant effect, which shows that there was no central nervous system depressant or muscle relaxant effect on the results. Conclusions This study demonstrates that the antinociceptive activity of EPI in the glutamate model involves the participation of the opioid system, serotonin, adrenergic and cholinergic.

  13. Electrical and chemical stimulation of the same hypothalamic loci in relation to agressive behaviour in cats: a comparison study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, S C; Manchanda, S K; Kapoor, B K; Aneja, I S

    1995-10-01

    obtained while violent flight was never exhibited at any of these sites. Microinfusion of atropine (10 microgram in 1.0 microliter saline) at these loci completely blocked the carbachol induced response. Both somatomotor and affective components were completely inhibited. However, the responses obtained on electrical stimulation were not totally blocked following atropine infusion and some of the somatomotor and affective components could be elicited with higher current strength. These studies indicate the involvement of cholinoceptive mechanisms in the elicitation of hypothalamically induced aggresive behaviour. Microinfustion of hexamethonium bromide, a nicotinic blocker in 50 micrograms doses did not affect the aggressive response.

  14. Spasmogenic and spasmolytic activities of Agastache mexicana ssp. mexicana and A. mexicana ssp. xolocotziana methanolic extracts on the guinea pig ileum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura-Martínez, Rosa; Rodríguez, Rodolfo; González-Trujano, María Eva; Ángeles-López, Guadalupe E; Déciga-Campos, Myrna; Gómez, Claudia

    2017-01-20

    Agastache mexicana has been used in traditional medicine for relief of abdominal pain and treatment of other diseases. Two subspecies have been identified: A. mexicana ssp. mexicana (AMM) and A. mexicana ssp. xolocotziana (AMX) and both are used traditionally without distinction or in combination. To determine the effect of methanol extracts of A. mexicana ssp. mexicana and A. mexicana ssp. xolocotziana on gut motility and their possible mechanism of action. The effect of AMM and AMX methanol extracts were tested on the spontaneous activity in the isolated guinea pig ileum and on tissues pre-contracted with KCl, electrical field stimulation (EFS) or ACh. In addition, the possible mechanism of action of each subspecies on gut motility was analyzed in the presence of hexametonium, indomethacin, L-NAME, verapamil, atropine or pyrylamine. A comparative chromatographic profile of these extracts was also done to indicate the most abundant flavonoids presents in methanol extracts of both subspecies. AMM, but not AMX, induced a contractile effect in the guinea pig ileum. This spasmogenic effect was partially inhibited by atropine, antagonist of muscarinic receptors; and pyrilamine, antagonist of H 1 receptors. In contrast, AMX, but not AMM, diminished the contractions induced by KCl, EFS or ACh. The spasmolytic activity of AMX was partially inhibited by hexamethonium, ganglionic blocker; and indomethacin, inhibitor of the synthesis of prostaglandins; but not by L-NAME, inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase. In addition, AMX diminished the maximal contraction induced by CaCl 2 in a calcium-free medium. Chromatographic analyses of these methanol extracts showed the presence of acacetin and tilanin in both. These results suggest that in folk medicine only AMX should be used as spasmolytic, and not in combination with AMM as traditionally occurs, due to the spasmogenic effects of the latter. In addition, activation of nicotinic receptors, prostaglandins and calcium channels, but

  15. Early differential cell death and survival mechanisms initiate and contribute to the development of OPIDN: A study of molecular, cellular, and anatomical parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damodaran, T.V.; Attia, M.K.; Abou-Donia, M.B.

    2011-01-01

    Organophosphorus-ester induced delayed neurotoxicity (OPIDN) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by ataxia progressing to paralysis with a concomitant central and peripheral, distal axonapathy. Diisopropylphosphorofluoridate (DFP) produces OPIDN in the chicken that results in mild ataxia in 7–14 days and severe paralysis as the disease progresses with a single dose. White leghorn layer hens were treated with DFP (1.7 mg/kg, sc) after prophylactic treatment with atropine (1 mg/kg, sc) in normal saline and eserine (1 mg/kg, sc) in dimethyl sulfoxide. Control groups were treated with vehicle propylene glycol (0.1 ml/kg, sc), atropine in normal saline and eserine in dimethyl sulfoxide. The hens were euthanized at different time points such as 1, 2, 5, 10 and 20 days, and the tissues from cerebrum, midbrain, cerebellum, brainstem and spinal cord were quickly dissected and frozen for mRNA (northern) studies. Northern blots were probed with BCL2, GADD45, beta actin, and 28S RNA to investigate their expression pattern. Another set of hens was treated for a series of time points and perfused with phosphate buffered saline and fixative for histological studies. Various staining protocols such as Hematoxylin and Eosin (H and E); Sevier-Munger; Cresyl echt Violet for Nissl substance; and Gallocynin stain for Nissl granules were used to assess various patterns of cell death and degenerative changes. Complex cell death mechanisms may be involved in the neuronal and axonal degeneration. These data indicate altered and differential mRNA expressions of BCL2 (anti apoptotic gene) and GADD45 (DNA damage inducible gene) in various tissues. Increased cell death and other degenerative changes noted in the susceptible regions (spinal cord and cerebellum) than the resistant region (cerebrum), may indicate complex molecular pathways via altered BCL2 and GADD45 gene expression, causing the homeostatic imbalance between cell survival and cell death mechanisms. Semi quantitative

  16. A comprehensive evaluation of the efficacy of leading oxime therapies in guinea pigs exposed to organophosphorus chemical warfare agents or pesticides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilhelm, Christina M., E-mail: wilhelmc@battelle.org [Battelle, 505 King Avenue, JM-7, Columbus, OH 43201-2693 (United States); Snider, Thomas H., E-mail: snidert@battelle.org [Battelle, 505 King Avenue, JM-7, Columbus, OH 43201-2693 (United States); Babin, Michael C., E-mail: babinm@battelle.org [Battelle, 505 King Avenue, JM-7, Columbus, OH 43201-2693 (United States); Jett, David A., E-mail: jettd@ninds.nih.gov [National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Platoff, Gennady E., E-mail: platoffg@niaid.nih.gov [National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Yeung, David T., E-mail: dy70v@nih.gov [National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    The currently fielded pre-hospital therapeutic regimen for the treatment of organophosphorus (OP) poisoning in the United States (U.S.) is the administration of atropine in combination with an oxime antidote (2-PAM Cl) to reactivate inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Depending on clinical symptoms, an anticonvulsant, e.g., diazepam, may also be administered. Unfortunately, 2-PAM Cl does not offer sufficient protection across the range of OP threat agents, and there is some question as to whether it is the most effective oxime compound available. The objective of the present study is to identify an oxime antidote, under standardized and comparable conditions, that offers protection at the FDA approved human equivalent dose (HED) of 2-PAM Cl against tabun (GA), sarin (GB), soman (GD), cyclosarin (GF), and VX, and the pesticides paraoxon, chlorpyrifos oxon, and phorate oxon. Male Hartley guinea pigs were subcutaneously challenged with a lethal level of OP and treated at approximately 1 min post challenge with atropine followed by equimolar oxime therapy (2-PAM Cl, HI-6 DMS, obidoxime Cl{sub 2}, TMB-4, MMB4-DMS, HLö-7 DMS, MINA, and RS194B) or therapeutic-index (TI) level therapy (HI-6 DMS, MMB4-DMS, MINA, and RS194B). Clinical signs of toxicity were observed for 24 h post challenge and blood cholinesterase [AChE and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE)] activity was analyzed utilizing a modified Ellman's method. When the oxime is standardized against the HED of 2-PAM Cl for guinea pigs, the evidence from clinical observations, lethality, quality of life (QOL) scores, and cholinesterase reactivation rates across all OPs indicated that MMB4 DMS and HLö-7 DMS were the two most consistently efficacious oximes. - Highlights: • First comprehensive evaluation of leading AChE oxime reactivators • All oximes are compared against current U.S. therapy 2-PAM Cl. • Relative therapeutic oxime efficacies against OP CWNA and pesticides • Contribution to more effective

  17. Huperzine A prophylaxis against pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures in rats is associated with increased cortical inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersner, R; Ekstein, D; Dhamne, S C; Schachter, S C; Rotenberg, A

    2015-11-01

    Huperzine A (HupA) is a naturally occurring compound found in the firmoss Huperzia serrata. While HupA is a potent acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, its full pharmacologic profile is incompletely described. Since previous works suggested a capacity for HupA to prophylax against seizures, we tested the HupA antiepileptic potential in pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) rat epilepsy model and explored its mechanism of action by spectral EEG analysis and by paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (ppTMS), a measure of GABA-mediated intracortical inhibition. We tested whether HupA suppresses seizures in the rat PTZ acute seizure model, and quantified latency to first myoclonus and to generalized tonic-clonic seizure, and spike frequency on EEG. Additionally, we measured power in the EEG gamma frequency band which is associated with GABAergic cortical interneuron activation. Then, as a step toward further examining the HupA antiepileptic mechanism of action, we tested long-interval intracortical inhibition (LICI) using ppTMS coupled with electromyography to assess whether HupA augments GABA-mediated paired-pulse inhibition of the motor evoked potential. We also tested whether the HupA effect on paired-pulse inhibition was central or peripheral by comparison of outcomes following administration of HupA or the peripheral acetylcholinesterase inhibitor pyridostigmine. We also tested whether the HupA effect was dependent on central muscarinic or GABAA receptors by co-administration of HupA and atropine or PTZ, respectively. In tests of antiepileptic potential, HupA suppressed seizures and epileptic spikes on EEG. Spectral EEG analysis also revealed enhanced gamma frequency band power with HupA treatment. By ppTMS we found that HupA increases intracortical inhibition and blocks PTZ-induced cortical excitation. Atropine co-administration with HupA did not alter HupA-induced intracortical inhibition suggesting independent of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors mechanism in this model

  18. The possible mechanisms of protocatechuic acid-induced central analgesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana Arslan

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available It is aimed to investigate the central antinociceptive effect of protocatechuic acid and the involvement of stimulation of opioidergic, serotonin 5-HT2A/2C, α2-adrenergic and muscarinic receptors in protocatechuic acid-induced central analgesia in mice. Time-dependent antinociceptive effects of protocatechuic acid at the oral doses of 75, 150 and 300 mg/kg were tested in hot-plate (integrated supraspinal response and tail-immersion (spinal reflex tests in mice. To investigate the mechanisms of action; the mice administered 300 mg/kg protocatechuic acid (p.o. were pre-treated with non-specific opioid antagonist naloxone (5 mg/kg, i.p., serotonin 5-HT2A/2C receptor antagonist ketanserin (1 mg/kg, i.p., α2-adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine (1 mg/kg, i.p. and non-specific muscarinic antagonist atropine (5 mg/kg, i.p., respectively. The antinociceptive effect of protocatechuic acid was observed at the doses of 75, 150 and 300 mg/kg in tail-immersion test, at the doses of 150 and 300 mg/kg in hot-plate test at different time interval. The enhancement in the latency of protocatechuic acid-induced response to thermal stimuli was antagonized by yohimbine, naloxone and atropine in tail-immersion test, while it was antagonized only by yohimbine and naloxone pretreatments in hot-plate test. These results indicated that protocatechuic acid has the central antinociceptive action that is probably organized by spinal mediated cholinergic and opiodiergic, also spinal and supraspinal mediated noradrenergic modulation. However, further studies are required to understand how protocatechuic acid organizes the interactions of these modulatory systems. As a whole, these findings reinforce that protocatechuic acid is a potential agent that might be used for pain relief. Additionally, the clarification of the effect and mechanisms of action of protocatechuic acid will contribute to new therapeutic approaches and provide guidance for new drug

  19. Role of adenosine A2A receptor signaling in the nicotine-evoked attenuation of reflex cardiac sympathetic control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Mas, Mahmoud M.; El-gowilly, Sahar M.; Fouda, Mohamed A.; Saad, Evan I.

    2011-01-01

    Baroreflex dysfunction contributes to increased cardiovascular risk in cigarette smokers. Given the importance of adenosinergic pathways in baroreflex control, the hypothesis was tested that defective central adenosinergic modulation of cardiac autonomic activity mediates the nicotine-baroreflex interaction. Baroreflex curves relating changes in heart rate (HR) to increases or decreases in blood pressure (BP) evoked by i.v. doses (1-16 μg/kg) of phenylephrine (PE) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP), respectively, were constructed in conscious rats; slopes of the curves were taken as measures of baroreflex sensitivity (BRS). Nicotine (25 and 100 μg/kg i.v.) dose-dependently reduced BRS SNP in contrast to no effect on BRS PE . BRS SNP was also attenuated after intracisternal (i.c.) administration of nicotine. Similar reductions in BRS SNP were observed in rats pretreated with atropine or propranolol. The combined treatment with nicotine and atropine produced additive inhibitory effects on BRS, an effect that was not demonstrated upon concurrent exposure to nicotine and propranolol. BRS SNP was reduced in preparations treated with i.c. 8-phenyltheophylline (8-PT, nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist), 8-(3-Chlorostyryl) caffeine (CSC, A 2A antagonist), or VUF5574 (A 3 antagonist). In contrast, BRS SNP was preserved after blockade of A 1 (DPCPX) or A 2B (alloxazine) receptors or inhibition of adenosine uptake by dipyridamole. CSC or 8-PT abrogated the BRS SNP depressant effect of nicotine whereas other adenosinergic antagonists were without effect. Together, nicotine preferentially impairs reflex tachycardia via disruption of adenosine A 2A receptor-mediated facilitation of reflex cardiac sympathoexcitation. Clinically, the attenuation by nicotine of compensatory sympathoexcitation may be detrimental in conditions such as hypothalamic defense response, posture changes, and ventricular rhythms. - Research highlights: → The role of central adenosinergic sites in

  20. Effect of fractionated extracts and isolated pure compounds of Spondias mombin (L. Anacardiaceae) leaves on novelty-induced rearing and grooming behaviours in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayoka, Abiodun O; Owolabi, Rotimi A; Bamitale, Samuel K; Akomolafe, Rufus O; Aladesanmi, Joseph A; Ukponmwan, Eghe O

    2013-01-01

    This study attempted to elucidate the neurotransmitter systems involved in the neurophysiological properties of ethanolic extract, fractions and pure isolates of Spondias mombin leaves in mice (n = 6) after intraperitoneal (i.p.) route of administration.The crude ethanolic extract of Spondian mombin leaves was fractionated using the partitioning method to obtain the ethylacetate, butanolic and aqueous fractions. Open column chromatographic fractionation of the ethylacetate fraction yielded seven sub-fractions, out of which the pure coumaroyl, quercetin and gallic acid derivatives were obtained after purification on Sephadex LH 20. The ethanolic extract, butanolic fraction, ethylacetate subfractions and pure isolates of the Spondian mombin leaves were tested on novelty-induced rearing and grooming behaviours in mice with standard pharmacological tools using the open field method. The extract and its fractions decreased novelty-induced rearing in a dose-dependent manner. While the Coumaroyl derivative had no effect on novelty-induced rearing, it significantly reversed the inhibitory effect of yohimbine, propranolol and haloperidol on novelty-induced rearing. Quercetin significantly potentiated the inhibitory effect of yohimbine on novelty-induced rearing. Naloxone significantly potentiated the quercetin-induced suppression of novelty-induced rearing. Gallic acid derivative significantly potentiated the inhibitory effect of yohimbine on novelty-induced rearing. Naloxone, atropine and haloperidol pretreatments significantly potentiated gallic acid derivative-induced suppression of novelty-induced rearing.The extract and its fractions had biphasic effect on novelty-induced grooming in mice. Coumaroyl derivative significantly increased novelty-induced grooming, while quercetin and gallic acid derivative decreased novelty-induced grooming significantly. The three pure isolates significantly reversed the effects of yohimbine and atropine on the novelty-induced grooming in

  1. Imidazenil, a non-sedating anticonvulsant benzodiazepine, is more potent than diazepam in protecting against DFP-induced seizures and neuronal damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadriu, Bashkim; Guidotti, Alessandro; Costa, Erminio [Psychiatric Institute, Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1601 W. Taylor St., Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Auta, James [Psychiatric Institute, Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1601 W. Taylor St., Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)

    2009-02-27

    Organophosphate (OP)-nerve agent poisoning may lead to prolonged epileptiform seizure activity, which can result in irreversible neuronal brain damage. A timely and effective control of seizures with pharmacological agents can minimize the secondary and long-term neuropathology that may result from this damage. Diazepam, the current anticonvulsant of choice in the management of OP poisoning, is associated with unwanted effects such as sedation, amnesia, cardio-respiratory depression, anticonvulsant tolerance, and dependence liabilities. In search for an efficacious and safer anticonvulsant benzodiazepine, we studied imidazenil, a potent anticonvulsant that is devoid of sedative action and has a low intrinsic efficacy at {alpha}1- but is a high efficacy positive allosteric modulator at {alpha}5-containing GABA{sub A} receptors. We compared the potency of a combination of 2 mg/kg, i.p. atropine with: (a) imidazenil 0.05-0.5 mg/kg i.p. or (b) equipotent anti-bicuculline doses of diazepam (0.5-5 mg/kg, i.p.), against diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP; 1.5 mg/kg, s.c.)-induced status epilepticus and its associated neuronal damage. The severity and frequency of seizure activities were determined by continuous radio telemetry recordings while the extent of neuronal damage and neuronal degeneration were assessed using the TUNEL-based cleaved DNA end-labeling technique or neuron-specific nuclear protein (NeuN)-immunolabeling and Fluoro-Jade B (FJB) staining, respectively. We report here that the combination of atropine and imidazenil is at least 10-fold more potent and longer lasting than the combination with diazepam at protecting rats from DFP-induced seizures and the associated neuronal damage or ongoing degeneration in the anterior cingulate cortex, CA1 hippocampus, and dentate gyrus. While 0.5 mg/kg imidazenil effectively attenuated DFP-induced neuronal damage and the ongoing neuronal degeneration in the anterior cingulate cortex, dentate gyrus, and CA1 hippocampus, 5

  2. Imidazenil, a non-sedating anticonvulsant benzodiazepine, is more potent than diazepam in protecting against DFP-induced seizures and neuronal damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadriu, Bashkim; Guidotti, Alessandro; Costa, Erminio; Auta, James

    2009-01-01

    Organophosphate (OP)-nerve agent poisoning may lead to prolonged epileptiform seizure activity, which can result in irreversible neuronal brain damage. A timely and effective control of seizures with pharmacological agents can minimize the secondary and long-term neuropathology that may result from this damage. Diazepam, the current anticonvulsant of choice in the management of OP poisoning, is associated with unwanted effects such as sedation, amnesia, cardio-respiratory depression, anticonvulsant tolerance, and dependence liabilities. In search for an efficacious and safer anticonvulsant benzodiazepine, we studied imidazenil, a potent anticonvulsant that is devoid of sedative action and has a low intrinsic efficacy at α1- but is a high efficacy positive allosteric modulator at α5-containing GABA A receptors. We compared the potency of a combination of 2 mg/kg, i.p. atropine with: (a) imidazenil 0.05-0.5 mg/kg i.p. or (b) equipotent anti-bicuculline doses of diazepam (0.5-5 mg/kg, i.p.), against diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP; 1.5 mg/kg, s.c.)-induced status epilepticus and its associated neuronal damage. The severity and frequency of seizure activities were determined by continuous radio telemetry recordings while the extent of neuronal damage and neuronal degeneration were assessed using the TUNEL-based cleaved DNA end-labeling technique or neuron-specific nuclear protein (NeuN)-immunolabeling and Fluoro-Jade B (FJB) staining, respectively. We report here that the combination of atropine and imidazenil is at least 10-fold more potent and longer lasting than the combination with diazepam at protecting rats from DFP-induced seizures and the associated neuronal damage or ongoing degeneration in the anterior cingulate cortex, CA1 hippocampus, and dentate gyrus. While 0.5 mg/kg imidazenil effectively attenuated DFP-induced neuronal damage and the ongoing neuronal degeneration in the anterior cingulate cortex, dentate gyrus, and CA1 hippocampus, 5 mg/kg or a

  3. Automated high-throughput measurement of body movements and cardiac activity of Xenopus tropicalis tadpoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kay Eckelt

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Xenopus tadpoles are an emerging model for developmental, genetic and behavioral studies. A small size, optical accessibility of most of their organs, together with a close genetic and structural relationship to humans make them a convenient experimental model. However, there is only a limited toolset available to measure behavior and organ function of these animals at medium or high-throughput. Herein, we describe an imaging-based platform to quantify body and autonomic movements of Xenopus tropicalis tadpoles of advanced developmental stages. Animals alternate periods of quiescence and locomotor movements and display buccal pumping for oxygen uptake from water and rhythmic cardiac movements. We imaged up to 24 animals in parallel and automatically tracked and quantified their movements by using image analysis software. Animal trajectories, moved distances, activity time, buccal pumping rates and heart beat rates were calculated and used to characterize the effects of test compounds. We evaluated the effects of propranolol and atropine, observing a dose-dependent bradycardia and tachycardia, respectively. This imaging and analysis platform is a simple, cost-effective high-throughput in vivo assay system for genetic, toxicological or pharmacological characterizations.

  4. Detection of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy using exercise testing in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banthia, Smriti; Bergner, Daniel W; Chicos, Alexandru B; Ng, Jason; Pelchovitz, Daniel J; Subacius, Haris; Kadish, Alan H; Goldberger, Jeffrey J

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated autonomic nervous system function in subjects with diabetes during exercise and recovery. Eighteen type 2 diabetics (age 55±2 years) and twenty healthy controls (age 51±1 years) underwent two 16-min bicycle submaximal ECG stress tests followed by 45 min of recovery. During session #2, atropine (0.04 mg/kg) was administered at peak exercise, and the final two minutes of exercise and entire recovery occurred under parasympathetic blockade. Plasma catecholamines were measured throughout. Parasympathetic effect was defined as the difference between a measured parameter at baseline and after parasympathetic blockade. The parasympathetic effect on the RR interval was blunted (P=.004) in diabetic subjects during recovery. Parasympathetic effect on QT-RR slope during early recovery was diminished in the diabetes group (diabetes 0.13±0.02, control 0.21±0.02, P=.03). Subjects with diabetes had a lower heart rate recovery at 1 min (diabetes 18.5±1.9 bpm, control 27.6±1.5 bpm, Pdiabetes, even with minimal evidence of CAN using current methodology, altered cardiac autonomic balance is present and can be detected through an exercise-based assessment for CAN. The early post-exercise recovery period in diabetes was characterized by enhanced sympathoexcitation, diminished parasympathetic reactivation and delay in heart rate recovery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A comparison of the reactivating and therapeutic efficacy of two novel bispyridinium oximes (K727, K733) with the oxime HI-6 and obidoxime in sarin-poisoned rats and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassa, Jiri; Sepsova, Vendula; Matouskova, Lenka; Horova, Anna; Musilek, Kamil

    2015-03-01

    The ability of two novel bispyridinium oximes K727 and K733 and currently available oximes (HI-6, obidoxime) to reactivate sarin-inhibited acetylcholinesterase and to reduce acute toxicity of sarin was evaluated. To investigate the reactivating efficacy of the oximes, the rats were administered intramuscularly with atropine and oximes in equitoxic doses corresponding to 5% of their LD50 values at 1 min after the intramuscular administration of sarin at a dose of 24 µg/kg (LD50). The activity of acetylcholinesterase was measured at 60 min after sarin poisoning. The LD50 value of sarin in non-treated and treated mice was assessed using probit-logarithmical analysis of death occurring within 24 h after intramuscular administration of sarin at five different doses. In vivo determined percentage of reactivation of sarin-inhibited rat blood, diaphragm and brain acetylcholinesterase showed that the potency of both novel oximes K727 and K733 to reactivate sarin-inhibited acetylcholinesterase roughly corresponds to the reactivating efficacy of obidoxime. On the other hand, the oxime HI-6 was found to be the most efficient reactivator of sarin-inhibited acetylcholinesterase. While the oxime HI-6 was able to reduce the acute toxicity of sarin >3 times, both novel oximes and obidoxime decreased the acute toxicity of sarin HI-6 and, therefore, they are not suitable for the replacement of the oxime HI-6 for the antidotal treatment of acute sarin poisoning.

  6. Freeze-drying of HI-6-loaded recombinant human serum albumin nanoparticles for improved storage stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadparvar, Miriam; Wagner, Sylvia; Wien, Sascha; Worek, Franz; von Briesen, Hagen; Kreuter, Jörg

    2014-10-01

    Severe intoxications with organophosphates require the immediate administration of atropine in combination with acetyl cholinesterase (AChE) reactivators such as HI-6. Although this therapy regimen enables the treatment of peripheral symptoms, the blood-brain barrier (BBB) restricts the access of the hydrophilic antidotes to the central nervous system which could lead to a fatal respiratory arrest. Therefore, HI-6-loaded albumin nanoparticles were previously developed to enhance the transport across this barrier and were able to reactivate organophosphate-(OP)-inhibited AChE in an in vitro BBB model. Since HI-6 is known to be moisture-sensitive, the feasibility of freeze-drying of the HI-6-loaded nanoparticles was investigated in the present study using different cryo- and lyoprotectants at different concentrations. Trehalose and sucrose (3%, w/v)-containing formulations were superior to mannitol concerning the physicochemical parameters of the nanoparticles whereas trehalose-containing samples were subject of a prolonged storage stability study at temperatures between -20°C and +40°C for predetermined time intervals. Shelf-life computations of the freeze-dried HI-6 nanoparticle formulations revealed a shelf-life time of 18 months when stored at -20°C. The formulations' efficacy was proven in vitro by reactivation of OP-inhibited AChE after transport over a porcine brain capillary endothelial cell layer model. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of combined therapy in 80 cases of accommodative esotropia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Liu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate a comprehensive treatment for accommodative esotropia.METHODS: Eighty patients with accommodative esotropia were analyzed. All cases wore corrective glasses 7d after mydriasis by 10g/L atropine. The pupils were all comprehensively trained. If the position of the esotropic eyes could not be corrected by spectacles and both eyes had similar visual acuity in one year, surgical intervention was taken to correct the position. Refraction, visual acuity, visual function and strabismus degree change before and after treatment were evaluated.RESULTS: One year after wearing glasses, 50 cases had corrected eye position through correction and 30 cases were partially accommodative esotropia. Ten cases of esotropia degree >+15△ which could not be complete corrected by cure correction got surgical intervention. Seven cases of them got normal eye positions and 3 cases were over corrected 10△-20△. After comprehensive treatment of 3 years, the cure rate of amblyopia was 88.7%.CONCLUSION: The treatment for accommodative esotropia is a comprehensive course. It is necessary to pay attention to eye position correction, but also for the treatment of amblyopia, while paying attention to establish binocular vision.

  8. Interventions designed using quality improvement methods reduce the incidence of serious airway events and airway cardiac arrests during pediatric anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaeth, James P; Kreeger, Renee; Varughese, Anna M; Wittkugel, Eric

    2016-02-01

    Although serious complications during pediatric anesthesia are less common than they were 20 years ago, serious airway events continue to occur. Based on Quality Improvement (QI) data from our institution, a QI project was designed to reduce the incidence of serious airway events and airway cardiac arrests. A quality improvement team consisting of members of the Department of Anesthesia was formed and QI data from previous years were analyzed. The QI team developed a Smart Aim, Key Driver Diagram, and specific Interventions that focused on the accessibility of emergency drugs, the use of nondepolarizing muscle relaxants for endotracheal intubation in children 2 years and younger, and the presence of anesthesia providers until emergence from anesthesia in high-risk patients. The percentage of cases where muscle relaxants were utilized in children 2 years and younger for endotracheal intubation and where atropine and succinylcholine were readily available increased at both our base and outpatient facilities. Over the 2.5-year study period, the incidence of serious airway events and airway cardiac arrests was reduced by 44% and 59%, respectively compared to the previous 2-year period. We utilized QI methodology to design and implement a project which led to greater standardization of clinical practice within a large pediatric anesthesia group. Based on an understanding of system issues impacting our clinical practice, we designed and tested interventions that led to a significant reduction in the incidence of serious airway events and airway cardiac arrests. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Effect of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) on local cerebral glucose utilization, by the autoradiographic 2-deoxy [14C] glucose method, in conscious and pentobarbitalized rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, Y.; Narumi, S.; Nagawa, Y.; Sakurada, O.; Ueno, H.; Ishii, S.

    1980-01-01

    Effects of TRH and pentobarbital alone, and in combination, on local cerebral glucose utilization of rats were studied by the autoradiographic 2-deoxy[ 14 C] glucose method. TRH (5 mg/kg i.v.) reduced the rate of cerebral glucose utilization slightly in the whole brain. Locally, significant depression was observed in the following structures: frontal and visual cortices, hippocampus Ammon's horn and dentate gyrus, medial and lateral geniculate bodies, nucleus accumbens, caudate-putamen, substantia nigra, pontine gray matter, superior colliculus, superior olivary nucleus, vestibular nucleus, lateral lemniscus and cerebellar cortex. Pentobarbital (30 mg/kg i.v.) produced a marked and diffuse reduction in the rate of glucose utilization throughout the brain. TRH given 15 min after the administration of pentobarbital markedly shortened the pentobarbital sleeping time and caused some reversal of the depression in local cerebral glucose utilization produced by pentobarbital., These effects were almost completely abolished by pretreatment with intracerebroventricular injection of atropine methyl bromide (20 μg/rat). These results indicate that although TRH acts to cause a reduction in the rate of cerebral glucose utilization, it reverses the depression induced by pentobarbital, via a cholinergic mechanism, in a number of structures, some of which are related to monoaminergic systems and the reticulo-thalamo-cortical activating system. (author)

  10. Fluoxetine induces vasodilatation of cerebral arterioles by co-modulating NO/muscarinic signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofek, Keren; Schoknecht, Karl; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Heinemann, Uwe; Friedman, Alon; Soreq, Hermona

    2012-01-01

    Ischaemic stroke patients treated with Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRI) show improved motor, cognitive and executive functions, but the underlying mechanism(s) are incompletely understood. Here, we report that cerebral arterioles in the rat brain superfused with therapeutically effective doses of the SSRI fluoxetine showed consistent, dose-dependent vasodilatation (by 1.2 to 1.6-fold), suppressible by muscarinic and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) antagonists [atropine, NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME)] but resistant to nicotinic and serotoninergic antagonists (mecamylamine, methylsergide). Fluoxetine administered 10–30 min. following experimental vascular photo-thrombosis increased arterial diameter (1.3–1.6), inducing partial, but lasting reperfusion of the ischaemic brain. In brain endothelial b.End.3 cells, fluoxetine induced rapid muscarinic receptor-dependent increases in intracellular [Ca2+] and promoted albumin- and eNOS-dependent nitric oxide (NO) production and HSP90 interaction. In vitro, fluoxetine suppressed recombinant human acetylcholinesterase (rhAChE) activity only in the presence of albumin. That fluoxetine induces vasodilatation of cerebral arterioles suggests co-promotion of endothelial muscarinic and nitric oxide signalling, facilitated by albumin-dependent inhibition of serum AChE. PMID:22697296

  11. Methyl-CpG binding-protein 2 function in cholinergic neurons mediates cardiac arrhythmogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, José A; Ward, Christopher S; Wehrens, Xander H T; Neul, Jeffrey L

    2016-11-15

    Sudden unexpected death occurs in one quarter of deaths in Rett Syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutations in Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2). People with RTT show a variety of autonomic nervous system (ANS) abnormalities and mouse models show similar problems including QTc interval prolongation and hypothermia. To explore the role of cardiac problems in sudden death in RTT, we characterized cardiac rhythm in mice lacking Mecp2 function. Male and female mutant mice exhibited spontaneous cardiac rhythm abnormalities including bradycardic events, sinus pauses, atrioventricular block, premature ventricular contractions, non-sustained ventricular arrhythmias, and increased heart rate variability. Death was associated with spontaneous cardiac arrhythmias and complete conduction block. Atropine treatment reduced cardiac arrhythmias in mutant mice, implicating overactive parasympathetic tone. To explore the role of MeCP2 within the parasympathetic neurons, we selectively removed MeCP2 function from cholinergic neurons (MeCP2 ChAT KO), which recapitulated the cardiac rhythm abnormalities, hypothermia, and early death seen in RTT male mice. Conversely, restoring MeCP2 only in cholinergic neurons rescued these phenotypes. Thus, MeCP2 in cholinergic neurons is necessary and sufficient for autonomic cardiac control, thermoregulation, and survival, and targeting the overactive parasympathetic system may be a useful therapeutic strategy to prevent sudden unexpected death in RTT.

  12. Paraventricular Stimulation with Glutamate Elicits Bradycardia and Pituitary Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlington, Daniel N.; Miyamoto, Michael; Keil, Lanny C.; Dallman, Mary F.

    1989-01-01

    The excitatory neurotransmitter, L-glutamate (0.5 M, pH 7.4), or the organic acid, acetate (0.5 M, pH 7.4), was microinjected (50 nl over 2 min) directly into the paraventricular nuclei (PVN) of pentobarbital sodium-anesthetized rats while arterial blood pressure and heart rate and plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), vasopressin, and oxytocin were measured. Activation of PVN neurons with L-glutamate led to increases in plasma ACTH, vasopressin, and oxytocin and a profound bradycardia (-80 beats/min) with little change in arterial blood pressure. Microinjection of acetate had no effect on the above variables. The decrease in heart rate was shown to be dependent on the concentration of glutamate injected and the volume of injectate. The bradycardia was mediated through the autonomic nervous system because ganglionic blockade (pentolinium tartrate) eliminated the response; atropine and propranolol severely attenuated the bradycardia. The bradycardia was greatest when L-glutamate was microinjected into the caudal PVN. Injections into the rostral PVN or into nuclei surrounding the PVN led to small or nonsignificant decreases in heart rate. Focal electric stimulation (2-50 pA) of the PVN also led to decreases in heart rate and arterial blood pressure. These data suggest that activation of PVN neurons leads to the release of ACTH, vasopressin, and oxytocin from the pituitary and a bradycardia that is mediated by the autonomic nervous system.

  13. Electrocardiographic and hemato-biochemical effects of two balanced anesthetic protocols in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anubhav Khurana

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this study was to compare the electrocardiographic (ECG, hematological and clinico-biochemical effects of two balanced anesthetic protocols in dogs. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 clinical cases of dogs, randomly divided into two groups of 10 animals each were made part of study. All dogs were premedicated with injection atropine sulfate @ 0.04 mg/kg body weight (b. wt. subcutaneously followed 15 min later with injection butorphanol tartarate @ 0.2 mg/kg b. wt. intravenous (IV. Subsequently after 10 min premedicated with injection diazepam @ 0.5 mg/kg b. wt. IV (Group DP or injection acepromazine maleate @ 0.015 mg/kg b. wt. IV (Group AP followed by injection propofol “till effect” IV for induction of surgical anesthesia. The animals were immediately transferred to halothane in oxygen. Observations recorded in dogs included ECG recordings, hematological and clinico-biochemical observations at various time intervals. Results: No arrhythmia was observed in any animal pre-operatively and intra-operatively in any of the groups. Significant fall in packed cell volume (PCV and total erythrocyte count occurred in DP group in early phase, whereas only PCV decreased significantly in AP group. Biochemical parameters were non-significant in both the groups. Conclusion: Both diazepam-butorphanol-propofol-halothane and acepromazine-butorphanol-propofol-halothane are safe with respect to their ECG, hematological and biochemical effects in clinical cases.

  14. Carotid sinus hypersensitivity: Entity warrants a caution in the critical care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugata Dasgupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Carotid sinus hypersensitivity (CSH syndrome is an entity caused by an overreaction of the carotid sinus baroreceptors to stimulation. Three subtypes of CSH syndrome are recognized according to the response to carotid sinus massage (CSM: Predominantly cardioinhibitory, predominantly vasodepressor and a mixed subtype. We report here the case of a middle-aged female patient admitted in our critical care unit with respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. There were episodes of severe bradycardia whenever her head was rotated to any side, relieved on neutralizing head position and administering intravenous atropine. CSM revealed she had predominantly cardioinhibitory type of CSH syndrome. A cardioinhibitory form of hypersensitive carotid sinus reflex, which is idiopathic in causation, probably explains the severe bradycardia on head rotation seen in our patient. A heightened awareness of this syndrome is necessary for timely diagnosis and management. CSH syndrome results from an overreaction of the carotid sinus baroreceptors to stimulation, manifesting commonly as bradycardia, hypotension and syncope. It is an entity, which warrants caution during routine critical care practices.

  15. The binding of [3H]AF-DX 384 to rat ileal smooth muscle muscarinic receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Entzeroth, M.; Mayer, N.

    1991-01-01

    The tritiated cardioselective muscarinic antagonist AF-DX 384 (5,11-dihydro-11-[2-[-(8-dipropylamino)methyl]-1-piperidinyl-ethyl-amino-carbonyl]-6H-pyrido [2,3-b] [1,4]benzodiazepin-6-one) was used to label muscarinic receptors in the rat ileum. Saturation binding to membrane suspensions revealed a high affinity binding site with a Kd of 9.2 nM. The maximal number of binding sites labeled in this tissue (Bmax) is 237 fmol/mg protein. The association and dissociation kinetics were well represented by single exponential reactions, and the dissociation constant obtained from the ratio of rate constants was in agreement with that derived from saturation experiments. Specific binding was inhibited by muscarinic antagonists with a rank order of potencies of atropine (pKi: 8.80) greater than 4-DAMP (pKi: 8.23) = AF-DX 384 (pKi: 8.20) greater than AF-DX 116 (pKi: 7.09) = hexahydro-sila-difenidol (pKi: 6.97) greater than pirenzepine (pKi: 6.49) and is consistent with the interaction of [3H]AF-DX 384 with muscarinic receptors of the M2 subtype. It can be concluded that [3H]AF-DX 384 can be used to selectively label M2 muscarinic receptors in heterogeneous receptor populations

  16. Cylindrocarpon lichenicola keratomycosis in Nigeria: the challenge of limited access to effective antimicrobials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel O. Irek

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We report a rare cause of keratitis, due to Cylindrocarpon lichenicola, in a farmer with keratomycosis. Despite the acknowledged virulence of this fungus, a suitable antifungal for its management was not accessible. Case presentation: A 67-year-old farmer presented with a two-week history of pain, mucopurulent discharge, redness and a corneal ulcer with a visual acuity of hand movement in the right eye. With a working diagnosis of infective keratitis, corneal scrapings were taken under a slit lamp biomicroscope for microbiological testing. Direct lactophenol cotton blue mounts revealed septate fungal hyphae, while fungal culture on Sabouraud dextrose agar at room temperature grew woolly mould phenotypically consistent with C. lichenicola. Management and outcome: The patient was started on hourly topical natamycin (5%, ciprofloxacin (0.3%, two-hourly instillation of tobramycin (0.3% and atropine (1% twice daily for three months following the isolation of the fungus. The eye healed with a corneal scar and no improvements in visual acuity. Discussion: This infection was difficult to manage due to the inaccessibility of a suitable antifungal, namely, voriconazole in our setting. Hence, there is a need for prompt identification and early institution of suitable antifungals in any patient with suspected keratomycosis.

  17. In vivo and in vitro hypotensive effect of aqueous extract of Moringa stenopetala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengistu, M; Abebe, Y; Mekonnen, Y; Tolessa, T

    2012-12-01

    Moringa stenopetala, Baker f. (Moringaceae) is used for food and medicine in Southern Ethiopia. To substantiate the hypotensive effect of M. stenopetala in vivo and in vitro. An in vivo experiment was carried out on male guinea pigs anaesthetized with pentobarbital. The arterial blood pressure was recorded from a carotid artery filled with heparinized saline via an arterial cannula connected to a pressure transducer. For the in vitro experiment the descending thoracic aorta was removed and kept moistened in Krebs-Henseleit solution and then mounted in a 20ml tissue bath maintained at 37°C and bubbled with a mixture of 95% oxygen and 5% carbon dioxide. Crude aqueous leaf extract of M. stenopetala caused significant fall in systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) at doses of 10, 20, 30 and 40 mg/kg in normotensive anaesthetized guinea pigs (n = 12). The effect might have been mediated by non-autonomic nervous system as the effect is not altered by atropine and propranolol. The extract also caused significant dose and time dependent inhibition of K(+) induced contraction on guinea pig aorta. M.stenopetala has blood pressure lowering effect substantiating the use of the plant in traditional medicine.

  18. Effects of autonomic nerve stimulation on colorectal motility in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Wei Dong; Ridolfi, Timothy J.; Kosinski, Lauren; Ludwig, Kirk; Takahashi, Toku

    2010-01-01

    Background Several disease processes of the colon and rectum, including constipation and incontinence, have been associated with abnormalities of the autonomic nervous system. However, the autonomic innervation to the colon and rectum are not fully understood. The aims of this study were to investigate the effect of stimulation of vagus nerves, pelvic nerves (PN) and hypogastric nerves (HGN) on colorectal motility in rats. Methods Four strain gauge transducers were implanted on the proximal colon, mid colon, distal colon and rectum to record circular muscle contractions in rats. Electrical stimulation was administered to the efferent distal ends of the cervical vagus nerve, PN and HGN. Motility index (MI) was evaluated before and during stimulation. Key Results Electrical stimulation (5–20 Hz) of the cervical vagus elicited significant contractions in the mid colon and distal colon, whereas less pronounced contractions were observed in the proximal colon. PN stimulation elicited significant contractions in the rectum as well as the mid colon and distal colon. Atropine treatment almost completely abolished the contractions induced by vagus nerve and PN stimulation. HGN stimulation caused relaxations in the rectum, mid colon and distal colon. The relaxations in response to HGN stimulation were abolished by propranolol. Conclusions & Inferences Vagal innervation extends to the distal colon, while the PN has projections in the distribution of the rectum through the mid colon. This suggests a pattern of dual parasympathetic innervation in the left colon. Parasympathetic fibers regulate colorectal contractions via muscarinic receptors. The HGN mainly regulates colorectal relaxations via beta-adrenoceptors. PMID:20067587

  19. Characteristics and classification of hippocampal θ rhythm induced by passive translational displacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Kangning; Yan, Yili; Fang, Xiaolei; Gao, Shangkai; Hong, Bo

    2012-04-25

    Theta rhythms in the hippocampus are believed to be the "metric" relating to various behavior patterns for free roaming rats. In this study, the theta rhythms were studied while rats either walked or were passively translated by a toy car on a linear track (referred to as WALK and TRANS respectively). For the similar running speeds in WALK and TRANS conditions, theta frequency and amplitude were both reduced during TRANS. Theta modulation of pyramidal cells during TRANS was reduced compared to that during WALK. Theta frequency was positively correlated with translation speed during TRANS. Theta rhythm remained apparent during TRANS and WALK after large dose of atropine sulfate (blocking the cholinergic pathway) was injected compared to still states. The present study demonstrated the patterns of theta rhythm induced by passive translation in rats and suggested that the Type I theta rhythm could occur during non-voluntary locomotion. We further argued that the perception of actual self-motion may be the underlying mechanism that initiates and modulates type I theta. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Saw palmetto is an indirectly acting sympathomimetic in the rat-isolated prostate gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Nga; Haynes, John M; Ventura, Sabatino

    2006-02-01

    To investigate whether saw palmetto that inhibits alpha1-adrenoceptor binding in vitro affects contractility of the rat prostate gland. The effects of a commercially available saw palmetto extract were examined on the contractility of rat-isolated prostate glands. The extract was tested in the presence and absence of phentolamine, prazosin, yohimbine, propranolol, hexamethonium, cocaine, desipramine, nifedipine, guanethidine, atropine, and alpha,beta-methylene ATP to evaluate the mechanism of action. Isolated preparations of rat vas deferens and bladder were used for comparison. Unexpectedly, saw palmetto extract caused contractions of the rat prostate gland that could be attenuated by prazosin, phentolamine, nifedipine, guanethidine, cocaine, and desipramine but not by any of the other pharmacological tools. Similar contractile effects were observed in rat-isolated vas deferens preparations but not in rat-isolated bladder preparations. In the rat prostate gland, saw palmetto extract causes indirect alpha1-adrenoceptor-mediated contractions via the release of noradrenaline from sympathetic neurons. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Laparoscopic female sterilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filshie, G M

    1989-09-01

    An overview of laparoscopic sterilization techniques from a historical and practical viewpoint includes instrumentation, operative techniques, mechanical occlusive devices, anesthesia, failure rates, morbidity and mortality. Laparoscope was first reported in 1893, but was developed simultaneously in France, Great Britain, Canada and the US in the 1960s. There are smaller laparoscopes for double-puncture procedures, and larger, single-puncture laparoscopes. To use a ring or clip, a much larger operating channel, up to 8 mm is needed. Insufflating gas may be CO2, which does not support combustion, but is more uncomfortable, NO2, which is also an anesthetic, and room air often used in developing countries. Unipolar electrocautery is now rarely used, in fact most third party payers do not allow it. Bipolar cautery, thermal coagulation and laser photocoagulation are safer methods. Falope rings, Hulka-Clemens, Filshie, Bleier, Weck and Tupla clips are described and illustrated. General anesthesia, usually a short acting agent with a muscle relaxant, causes 33% of the mortality of laparoscope, often due to cardiac arrest and arrhythmias, preventable with atropine. Local anesthesia is safer and cheaper and often used in developing countries. Failure rates of the various laparoscopic tubal sterilization methods are reviewed: most result from fistula formation. Mortality and morbidity can be caused by bowel damage, injury or infection, pre- existing pelvic infection, hemorrhage, gas embolism (avoidable by the saline drip test), and other rare events.

  2. Pharmacological stress agents in nuclear cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buscombe, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    Treadmill test combined with myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) is a commonly used technique in the assessment of coronary artery disease. However there are a group of patients who may not be able to undergo treadmill tests. Patients with underlying conditions like neuromuscular disease, musculoskeletal disorder, heart failure and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on renal dialysis would find it difficult to perform exercise on a treadmill or bicycle ergometer. These conditions prevent them from performing adequate exercise. Such patients would benefit from pharmacological stress procedures combined with MPS. Nuclear medicine departments use various pharmacological agents while performing stress tests on cardiac patients. The most commonly used pharmacological agents for cardiac stress are coronary vasodilators and catecholamines. In addition to these agents, adjuvant use of nitrates and atropine is also a common practice in nuclear cardiology. This review addresses various physiological and pharmacological properties of the commonly used pharmacological stress agents in MPS and critically analyses their advantages and disadvantages, as well as their safety and efficacy. (author)

  3. The effect of (+)-lysergic acid diethylamide and other drugs on the carotid sinus reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    GINZEL, K H

    1958-09-01

    In cats, lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) selectively blocked the reflex blood pressure rise following carotid chemoreceptor stimulation. It also reduced or abolished the chemoreceptor component of the pressor response to occlusion of the common carotid arteries. It did not inhibit the respiratory reflexes arising from the carotid chemoreceptors, unless spontaneous respiration was interfered with as a whole. The site of action was central, probably below the intercollicular level, regardless of whether the drug was administered by the intravenous route or into the lateral ventricle of the brain.LSD did not block the baroreceptor depressor reflex elicited by stimulation of one carotid sinus nerve. LSD frequently caused the systemic pressure to fall, even after vagotomy and atropine, and this effect might account for the occasional reduction of the baroreceptor component of the carotid occlusion response. On the other hand, no relationship was found between the action of LSD on vasomotor tone and its blocking effect on the chemoreceptor pressor reflex.Some derivatives of LSD produced effects similar to those described for LSD, whether or not they possessed a psychotropic action in man, and independently of their efficiency as antagonists to 5-hydroxytryptamine. Of a series of compounds chemically unrelated to LSD, chlorpromazine was found to block the chemoreceptor pressor rise after intracerebroventricular injection.

  4. Drugs Interfering with Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors and Their Effects on Place Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Svoboda

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs have been found to regulate many diverse functions, ranging from motivation and feeding to spatial navigation, an important and widely studied type of cognitive behavior. Systemic administration of non-selective antagonists of mAChRs, such as scopolamine or atropine, have been found to have adverse effects on a vast majority of place navigation tasks. However, many of these results may be potentially confounded by disruptions of functions other than spatial learning and memory. Although studies with selective antimuscarinics point to mutually opposite effects of M1 and M2 receptors, their particular contribution to spatial cognition is still poorly understood, partly due to a lack of truly selective agents. Furthermore, constitutive knock-outs do not always support results from selective antagonists. For modeling impaired spatial cognition, the scopolamine-induced amnesia model still maintains some limited validity, but there is an apparent need for more targeted approaches such as local intracerebral administration of antagonists, as well as novel techniques such as optogenetics focused on cholinergic neurons and chemogenetics aimed at cells expressing metabotropic mAChRs.

  5. Libidibia ferrea mature seeds promote antinociceptive effect by peripheral and central pathway: possible involvement of opioid and cholinergic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Luis Armando; Monteiro, Vanessa Sâmia da Conçeição; Rabelo, Guilherme Rodrigues; Dias, Germana Bueno; Da Cunha, Maura; do Nascimento, José Luiz Martins; Bastos, Gilmara de Nazareth Tavares

    2014-01-01

    Libidibia ferrea (LF) is a medicinal plant that holds many pharmacological properties. We evaluated the antinociceptive effect in the LF aqueous seed extract and Lipidic Portion of Libidibia ferrea (LPLF), partially elucidating their mechanisms. Histochemical tests and Gas chromatography of the LPLF were performed to characterize its fatty acids. Acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction, formalin-induced pain, and hot-plate test in mice were employed in the study. In all experiments, aqueous extract or LPLF was administered systemically at the doses of 1, 5, and 10 mg/kg. LF aqueous seed extract and LPLF demonstrated a dose-dependent antinociceptive effect in all tests indicating both peripheral anti-inflammatory and central analgesia properties. Also, the use of atropine (5 mg/kg), naloxone (5 mg/kg) in the abdominal writhing test was able to reverse the antinociceptive effect of the LPLF, indicating that at least one of LF lipids components is responsible for the dose related antinociceptive action in chemical and thermal models of nociception in mice. Together, the present results suggested that Libidibia ferrea induced antinociceptive activity is possibly related to its ability to inhibit opioid, cholinergic receptors, and cyclooxygenase-2 pathway, since its main component, linoleic acid, has been demonstrated to produce such effect in previous studies.

  6. Libidibia ferrea Mature Seeds Promote Antinociceptive Effect by Peripheral and Central Pathway: Possible Involvement of Opioid and Cholinergic Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Armando Sawada

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Libidibia ferrea (LF is a medicinal plant that holds many pharmacological properties. We evaluated the antinociceptive effect in the LF aqueous seed extract and Lipidic Portion of Libidibia ferrea (LPLF, partially elucidating their mechanisms. Histochemical tests and Gas chromatography of the LPLF were performed to characterize its fatty acids. Acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction, formalin-induced pain, and hot-plate test in mice were employed in the study. In all experiments, aqueous extract or LPLF was administered systemically at the doses of 1, 5, and 10 mg/kg. LF aqueous seed extract and LPLF demonstrated a dose-dependent antinociceptive effect in all tests indicating both peripheral anti-inflammatory and central analgesia properties. Also, the use of atropine (5 mg/kg, naloxone (5 mg/kg in the abdominal writhing test was able to reverse the antinociceptive effect of the LPLF, indicating that at least one of LF lipids components is responsible for the dose related antinociceptive action in chemical and thermal models of nociception in mice. Together, the present results suggested that Libidibia ferrea induced antinociceptive activity is possibly related to its ability to inhibit opioid, cholinergic receptors, and cyclooxygenase-2 pathway, since its main component, linoleic acid, has been demonstrated to produce such effect in previous studies.

  7. Chlorpyrifos induces oxidative stress in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saulsbury, Marilyn D.; Heyliger, Simone O.; Wang, Kaiyu; Johnson, Deadre J.

    2009-01-01

    There are increasing concerns regarding the relative safety of chlorpyrifos (CPF) to various facets of the environment. Although published works suggest that CPF is relatively safe in adult animals, recent evidence indicates that juveniles, both animals and humans, may be more sensitive to CPF toxicity than adults. In young animals, CPF is neurotoxic and mechanistically interferes with cellular replication and cellular differentiation, which culminates in the alteration of synaptic neurotransmission in neurons. However, the effects of CPF on glial cells are not fully elucidated. Here we report that chlorpyrifos is toxic to oligodendrocyte progenitors. In addition, CPF produced dose-dependent increases in 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (H 2 DCF-DA) and dihydroethidium (DHE) fluorescence intensities relative to the vehicle control. Moreover, CPF toxicity is associated with nuclear condensation and elevation of caspase 3/7 activity and Heme oxygenase-1 mRNA expression. Pan-caspase inhibitor QVDOPh and cholinergic receptor antagonists' atropine and mecamylamine failed to protect oligodendrocyte progenitors from CPF-induced injury. Finally, glutathione (GSH) depletion enhanced CPF-induced toxicity whereas nitric oxide synthetase inhibitor L-NAME partially protected progenitors and the non-specific antioxidant vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol) completely spared cells from injury. Collectively, this data suggests that CPF induced toxicity is independent of cholinergic stimulation and is most likely caused by the induction of oxidative stress.

  8. Retrospective study on clinical management of indolent ulcers in Boxer dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Hvenegaard

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Indolent ulcers are superficial corneal ulcers secondary to several changes on the corneal surface. They are frequently observed in middle-aged Boxer dogs, cause pain of acute onset and requires appropriate treatment. Aiming to evaluate the efficacy of clinical managements on the rate of healing of indolent ulcers, a retrospective study was conducted (1997-2008. Results demonstrated that proteinase inhibitors were the most often prescribed medication, and its administration did not interfere on the healing rate, as well as observed in dogs that received 1% atropine, antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs. Healing was delayed in dogs administered orally with vitamin C, but the healing process was faster on those dogs that went through corneal debridement/cauterization. In conclusion, to know the various types of treatments seems to be fundamental for the rapid resolution of the disease. It is suggested that debridement/cauterization, administration of proteinase inhibitor eye drops, prophylactic topical antibiotics and oral vitamin C, should be considered as an effective clinical management for indolent ulcers in Boxer dogs.

  9. Activation of neural cholecystokinin-1 receptors induces relaxation of the isolated rat duodenum which is reduced by nitric oxide synthase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.R. Martins

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Cholecystokinin (CCK influences gastrointestinal motility, by acting on central and peripheral receptors. The aim of the present study was to determine whether CCK has any effect on isolated duodenum longitudinal muscle activity and to characterize the mechanisms involved. Isolated segments of the rat proximal duodenum were mounted for the recording of isometric contractions of longitudinal muscle in the presence of atropine and guanethidine. CCK-8S (EC50: 39; 95% CI: 4.1-152 nM and cerulein (EC50: 58; 95% CI: 18-281 nM induced a concentration-dependent and tetrodotoxin-sensitive relaxation. Nomeganitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG reduced CCK-8S- and cerulein-induced relaxation (IC50: 5.2; 95% CI: 2.5-18 µM in a concentration-dependent manner. The magnitude of 300 nM CCK-8S-induced relaxation was reduced by 100 µM L-NOARG from 73 ± 5.1 to 19 ± 3.5% in an L-arginine but not D-arginine preventable manner. The CCK-1 receptor antagonists proglumide, lorglumide and devazepide, but not the CCK-2 receptor antagonist L-365,260, antagonized CCK-8S-induced relaxation in a concentration-dependent manner. These findings suggest that CCK-8S and cerulein activate intrinsic nitrergic nerves acting on CCK-1 receptors in order to cause relaxation of the rat duodenum longitudinal muscle.

  10. Functional and Structural Changes in a Canine Model of Hereditary Primary Angle-Closure Glaucoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kecova, Helga; Harper, Matthew M.; Nilaweera, Wijitha; Kuehn, Markus H.; Kardon, Randy H.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. To characterize functional and structural changes in a canine model of hereditary primary angle-closure glaucoma. Methods. Intraocular pressure (IOP) was evaluated with tonometry in a colony of glaucomatous dogs at 8, 15, 18, 20, and 30 months of age. Retinal function was evaluated using electroretinography (scotopic, photopic, and pattern). Examination of anterior segment structures was performed using gonioscopy and high-frequency ultrasonography (HFU). Results. A gradual rise in IOP was observed with an increase in age: 8 months, 14 mm Hg (median value); 15 months, 15.5 mm Hg; 18 months, 17.5 mm Hg; 20 months, 24 mm Hg; 30 months, 36 mm Hg. Provocative testing with mydriatic agents (tropicamide and atropine 1%) caused significant increases in IOP (35% and 50%, respectively). HFU analysis showed complete collapse of iridocorneal angles by 20 months of age. Scotopic and photopic ERG analysis did not reveal significant deficits, but pattern ERG analysis showed significantly reduced amplitudes in glaucomatous dogs (glaucoma, 3.5 ± 0.4 μV; control, 6.2 ± 0.3 μV; P = 0.004; Student's t-test). Histologic analysis revealed collapse of the iridocorneal angle, posterior bowing of the lamina cribrosa, swelling and loss of large retinal ganglion cells, increased glial reactivity, and increased thickening of the lamina cribrosa. Conclusions. Canine hereditary angle-closure glaucoma is characterized by a progressive increase in intraocular pressure, loss of optic nerve function, and retinal ganglion cell loss. PMID:19661222

  11. A report of the anesthesia in posterior fossa operations in the sitting position in 55 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahanguiri B

    1994-04-01

    Full Text Available In this survey, 55 patients were studied in a period of six years for having the anesthesia in the sitting position. In this position, the surgeon will had a better access to the location, whose damages have been sustained, so less damages would be given to the healthy tissues. For the patients, due to their critical general conditions, one week prior to giving anesthesia to the posterior fossa, operation in the sitting position the right ventriculoatiral shunt was placed. For preventing the fall of blood pressure, a bandage was placed in the lower limbs after inducing anesthesia and changing supine position to sitting position. Before the induction, central venous pressure was measured for treating the air embolism. The head of catheter was placed inside the right atrial. Premedications such as atropine, pethidine, and inductive agents like thiopenton, and muscle relaxants, maintained with halothane and nitrous oxide. All of the patients endured this condition without the fall of blood pressure and air embolism

  12. Large outbreaks of ciguatera after consumption of brown marbled grouper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Thomas Y K

    2014-07-11

    Brown marbled grouper (Epinephelus fuscoguttatus) is an apex predator from coral reefs of the Indo-Pacific region. All five published case series of ciguatera after consumption of brown marbled grouper were reviewed to characterize the types, severity and chronicity of ciguatera symptoms associated with its consumption. Three of these case series were from large outbreaks affecting over 100-200 subjects who had eaten this reef fish served at banquets. Affected subjects generally developed a combination of gastrointestinal, neurological and, less commonly, cardiovascular symptoms. Gastrointestinal symptoms occurred early and generally subsided in 1-2 days. Some neurological symptoms (e.g., paresthesia of four limbs) could last for weeks or months. Sinus bradycardia and hypotension occurred early, but could be severe and prolonged, necessitating the timely use of intravenous fluids, atropine and dopamine. Other cardiovascular and neurological features included atrial ectopics, ventricular ectopics, dyspnea, chest tightness, PR interval >0.2 s, ST segment changes, polymyositis and coma. Concomitant alcohol consumption was associated with a much higher risk of developing bradycardia, hypotension and altered skin sensation. The public should realize that consumption of the high-risk fish (especially the ciguatoxin-rich parts and together with alcohol use) and repeated ciguatoxin exposures will result in more severe and chronic illness.

  13. Correlation between oxytocin neuronal sensitivity and oxytocin receptor binding: An electrophysiological and autoradiographical study comparing rat and guinea pig hippocampus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raggenbass, M.; Tribollet, E.; Dubois-Dauphin, M.; Dreifuss, J.J.

    1989-01-01

    In transverse hippocampal slices from rat and guinea pig brains, the authors obtained unitary extracellular recordings from nonpyramidal neurones located in or near the stratum pyramidale in the CA1 field and in the transition region between the CA1 and the subiculum. In rats, these neurones responded to oxytocin at 50-1,000 nM by a reversible increase in firing rate. The oxytocin-induced excitation was suppressed by a synthetic structural analogue that acts as a potent, selective antioxytocic on peripheral receptors. Nonpyramidal neurones were also excited by carbachol at 0.5-10 μM. The effect of this compound was postsynaptic and was blocked by the muscarinic antagonist atropine. In guinea pigs, by contrast, nonpyramidal neurones were unaffected by oxytocin, although they were excited by carbachol. Light microscopic autoradiography, carried out using a radioiodinated selective antioxytocic as a ligand, revealed labeling in the subiculum and in the CA1 area of the hippocampus of rats, whereas no oxytocin-binding sites were detected in the hippocampus of guinea pigs. The results indicate (i) that a hippocampal action of oxytocin is species-dependent and (ii) that a positive correlation exists between neuronal responsiveness to oxytocin and the presence in the hippocampus of high-affinity binding sites for this peptide

  14. [Psychoactive substances in biological samples--toxicological laboratory data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomółka, Ewa; Wilimowska, Jolanta; Piekoszewski, Wojciech; Groszek, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    The subject of the research was the analysis of frequency and type of psychoactive substances used, basing on the determinations the blood and/or urine samples, performed in the toxicological laboratory of the Department of Clinical and Industrial Toxicology Jagiellonian University in Kraków in the period from December 2001 to November 2003. From 17,649 performed determinations--45.5% were positive. 50% of the positive determinations were psychoactive substances. The most often psychoactive substance determined was ethyl alcohol (52.86%), next benzodiazepines (17.41%), amphetamines (10.54%), opiates (8.05%), THC (6.87%), barbiturates (3.74%), and occasionally atropine and cocaine. There was observed a variety of mixed, simultaneously taking psychoactive substances, especially ethyl alcohol, opiates, amphetamine derivatives and cannabinoids. The analysis of the occurrence of psychoactive substances in biological samples from patients treated in different hospital departments, others hospitals and ordered by private persons also was performed. In the last two years 369 private patients ordered psychoactive substances determinations and 78 of them were positive.

  15. The cholinergic and purinergic components of detrusor contractility in a whole rabbit bladder model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chancellor, M B; Kaplan, S A; Blaivas, J G

    1992-09-01

    Whole rabbit bladders were suspended in a bath chamber and stimulated with ATP, bethanechol, electrical field stimulation, and bethanechol + ATP. Detrusor pressure and fluid expelled by the bladder were recorded, synchronized, and digitized. Detrusor work and power were calculated with a computer program. Maximum work was 61.4 +/- 28.7, 83.3 +/- 17.0, 85.0 +/- 15.0, 90.8 +/- 13.1 cm. H2O, ml. for ATP, bethanechol, electrical and bethanechol + ATP, respectively. Maximum power generated by ATP was 4.8 +/- 3.0 cm. H2O, ml./sec and was approximately 66% of that generated by bethanechol, and 50% of that generated by electrical stimulation, and bethanechol + ATP. ATP cannot empty the bladder with moderate outlet resistance while bethanechol and electrical stimulation can. Our results suggest that ATP is able to generate detrusor power and achieve work in bladder emptying. However, ATP generated power and work is considerably less than that of electrical stimulation or bethanechol alone. ATP mediated contraction is not inhibited by atropine or tetrodotoxin but is inhibited by P2 purinoceptor desensitization, suggesting a functional role of purine receptors on detrusor smooth muscle. Since ATP generated pressure is more rapid than with bethanechol alone, we support the hypothesis that ATP may be important in the initiation of micturition.

  16. Cambios en la presión sanguínea durante la microcompresión retrogasseriana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Zulueta Nocedo

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available La microcompresión percutánea del ganglio trigémino es una alternativa terapéutica en la neuralgia trigeminal, que induce cifras elevadas de tensión arterial durante el transoperatorio y otros riesgos de complicaciones cardiovasculares. Se describe brevemente la técnica quirúrgica. En este estudio se utilizó atropina en la premedicación; se administró anestesia general a todos los pacientes e hidralazina para el control de la presión arterial. Se demuestran los resultados de cambios en la presión arterial durante los distintos niveles de tratamiento. Las complicaciones inmediatas fueron: el incremento significativo de la presión arterial, la hemorragia subconjuntival y la punción de la arteria carótidaPercutaneous microcompression of the trigeminal ganglion is a therapeutic alternative in trigeminal neuralgia that induces high readings of arterial pressure during the transoperative and other risks of cardiovascular complications. The surgical technique is briefly described. Atropine was used in the premedication of this study. General anesthesia was administered to all patients and hidrizaline was given to control the arterial pressure. The changes observed in the arterial pressure during the different levels of treatment are shown. The immediate complications were: the significant increase of arterial pressure, the subconjunctival hemorrhage, and the carotid artery puncture

  17. Mechanisms involved in the vasorelaxant effects produced by the acute application of amfepramone in vitro to rat aortic rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López-Canales, J.S. [Section of Postgraduate Studies and Investigation, Higher School of Medicine from the National Polytechnic Institute, Mexico City (Mexico); Department of Cellular Biology, National Institute of Perinatology, Mexico City (Mexico); Lozano-Cuenca, J.; Muãoz-Islas, E.; Aguilar-Carrasco, J.C. [Department of Cellular Biology, National Institute of Perinatology, Mexico City (Mexico); López-Canales, O.A.; López-Mayorga, R.M.; Castillo-Henkel, E.F.; Valencia-Hernández, I.; Castillo-Henkel, C. [Section of Postgraduate Studies and Investigation, Higher School of Medicine from the National Polytechnic Institute, Mexico City (Mexico)

    2015-03-27

    Amfepramone (diethylpropion) is an appetite-suppressant drug used for the treatment of overweight and obesity. It has been suggested that the systemic and central activity of amfepramone produces cardiovascular effects such as transient ischemic attacks and primary pulmonary hypertension. However, it is not known whether amfepramone produces immediate vascular effects when applied in vitro to rat aortic rings and, if so, what mechanisms may be involved. We analyzed the effect of amfepramone on phenylephrine-precontracted rat aortic rings with or without endothelium and the influence of inhibitors or blockers on this effect. Amfepramone produced a concentration-dependent vasorelaxation in phenylephrine-precontracted rat aortic rings that was not affected by the vehicle, atropine, 4-AP, glibenclamide, indomethacin, clotrimazole, or cycloheximide. The vasorelaxant effect of amfepramone was significantly attenuated by NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and tetraethylammonium (TEA), and was blocked by removal of the vascular endothelium. These results suggest that amfepramone had a direct vasorelaxant effect on phenylephrine-precontracted rat aortic rings, and that inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and the opening of Ca{sup 2+}-activated K{sup +} channels were involved in this effect.

  18. Severe symptomatic bradycardia after a dinner of spicy oleander soup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Tampieri

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac glycosides similar to digoxin are produced by different plants in nature. Nerium oleander, commonly grown as an ornamental shrub, can be found worldwide in temperate countries. Intentional or accidental ingestion of any part of the plant can lead to clinically relevant intoxication. A 63-year-old woman came to the emergency department with acute dyspeptic symptoms after eating vegetable soup flavored with unfamiliar flowers she have collected herself. However, the electrocardiography (ECG showed abnormalities that raised suspicions for an overdose of digoxin-like cardiac glycosides. The patient was not on treatment with digoxin and a careful anamnesis revealed that she had eaten oleander leaves. Digoxin specific Fab antibody fragments were administered for marked bradycardia that was not responding to atropine administration, after counseling with the reference toxicology center. The patient was also treated with activated charcoal and magnesium sulphate, intravenous fluids and pantoprazole. Four days later she was discharged as asymptomatic, with normal sinus rhythm. Emergency physicians should be aware of this type of poisoning, especially in cases with typical ECG alterations in patients not treated with digoxin and medical history of plants ingestion. Cardio-active glycosides are present in different plants, often used inappropriately, with potential toxic effects and harmful drug interactions.

  19. Increase in vagal activity during hypotensive lower-body negative pressure in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander-Jensen, K; Mehlsen, J; Stadeager, C

    1988-01-01

    Progressive central hypovolemia is characterized by a normotensive, tachycardic stage followed by a reversible, hypotensive stage with slowing of the heart rate (HR). We investigated circulatory changes and arterial hormone concentrations in response to lower-body negative pressure (LBNP) in six...... volunteers before and after atropine administration. LBNP of 55 mmHg initially resulted in an increase in HR from 55 +/- 4 to 90 +/- 5 beats/min and decreases in mean arterial pressure (MAP) from 94 +/- 4 to 81 +/- 5 mmHg, in central venous pressure from 7 +/- 1 to -3 +/- 1 mmHg, and in cardiac output from 6.......1 +/- 0.5 to 3.7 +/- 0.11/min. Concomitantly, epinephrine and norepinephrine levels increased. After 8.2 +/- 2.3 min of LBNP, the MAP had decreased to 41 +/- 7 mmHg and HR had decreased to 57 +/- 3 beats/min. Vasopressin increased from 1.2 +/- 0.3 to 137 +/- 45 pg/ml and renin activity increased from 1...

  20. Intermittent bradyarrhythmia in a Hispaniolan Amazon parrot (Amazona ventralis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rembert, Melanie S; Smith, Julie A; Strickland, Keith N; Tully, Thomas N

    2008-03-01

    A clinically normal 2-year-old Hispaniolan Amazon parrot (Amazona ventralis) was found to have periodic second-degree atrioventricular (AV) block with variable nodal conductions while anesthetized with isoflurane during a thermal-support research project. Arrhythmias were observed on 5 successive weekly electrocardiograms. A complete cardiac evaluation, including a diagnostic electrocardiogram, revealed intermittent bradyarrhythmias ranging from a 2:1 to a 7:1 second-degree AV block, with concurrent hypotensive episodes during the nodal blocks. Results of a complete blood cell count, plasma biochemical profile, blood gas analysis, and atropine-response test, as well as radiography and auscultation, revealed no obvious cause for the arrhythmias. Echocardiography demonstrated cardiac wall thickness, chamber size, and systolic function similar to other psittacine birds. On return to the colony, the parrot continued to be outwardly asymptomatic despite the dramatic conduction disturbances. Although cardiac arrhythmias, including second-degree AV block, have been widely reported in birds, the wide variation of nodal conductions, the intermittent nature, and an arrhythmia with a 7:1 second-degree AV block that spontaneously reverts to normal as seen in this case have not been well documented in parrots.

  1. Effect and sustainability of part-time occlusion therapy for patients with anisometropic amblyopia aged > or =8 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, D J; Kim, Y J; Lee, J Y

    2010-09-01

    To study the effect and long-term sustainability of part-time occlusion therapy for anisometropic amblyopia after 8 years of age. A total of 41 anisometropic amblyopes aged > or =8 years were analysed. In six patients, best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of amblyopic eye improved more than two lines within 2 weeks of full-time spectacle wear. The remaining patients were assigned to perform part-time patching during out-of-school hours. Long-term results were assessed in patients who were observed over 1 year after the end of the treatment. Among 35 patients, four dropped out, refusing further treatment, and one changed to atropine penalisation. The part-time patching schedule was completed in 30 patients. 90% of patients (27/30) complied well. Mean BCVA in the amblyopic eye improved significantly (ppart-time occlusion treatment in school-aged amblyopes, which had been carried out after school hours, was successful and the effect was sustained in most cases.

  2. Possible mechanisms involved in the vasorelaxant effect produced by clobenzorex in aortic segments of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Cuenca, J; González-Hernández, A; López-Canales, O A; Villagrana-Zesati, J R; Rodríguez-Choreão, J D; Morín-Zaragoza, R; Castillo-Henkel, E F; López-Canales, J S

    2017-08-07

    Clobenzorex is a metabolic precursor of amphetamine indicated for the treatment of obesity. Amphetamines have been involved with cardiovascular side effects such as hypertension and pulmonary arterial hypertension. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the direct application of 10-9-10-5 M clobenzorex on isolated phenylephrine-precontracted rat aortic rings produces vascular effects, and if so, what mechanisms may be involved. Clobenzorex produced an immediate concentration-dependent vasorelaxant effect at the higher concentrations (10-7.5-10-5 M). The present outcome was not modified by 10-6 M atropine (an antagonist of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors), 3.1×10-7 M glibenclamide (an ATP-sensitive K+ channel blocker), 10-3 M 4-aminopyridine (4-AP; a voltage-activated K+ channel blocker), 10-5 M indomethacin (a prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor), 10-5 M clotrimazole (a cytochrome P450 inhibitor) or 10-5 M cycloheximide (a general protein synthesis inhibitor). Contrarily, the clobenzorex-induced vasorelaxation was significantly attenuated (Pclobenzorex on phenylephrine-precontracted rat aortic rings involved stimulation of the NO/cGMP/PKG/Ca2+-activated K+ channel pathway.

  3. The absorption, distribution, excretion, and metabolism of a single oral dose of O-ethyl O-4-nitrophenyl phenylphosphonothioate in hens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou-Donia, M.B.; Reichert, B.L.; Ashry, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    The disposition and metabolism of a single oral 10 mg/kg (LD50) of uniformly phenyl-labeled [ 14 C]EPN (O-ethyl O-4-nitrophenyl [ 14 C]phenylphosphonothioate) were studied in adult hens. The birds were protected from acute toxicity with atropine sulfate. Three treated hens were killed at each time interval (days): 0.5, 2, 4, 8, 12. Radioactivity was adsorbed from the gastrointestinal tract and distributed in all tissues. Most of the dose was excreted in the combined urinary-fecal excreta (74%). Only traces of the radioactivity (0.2%) were detected in expired CO 2 . Most of the excreted radioactive materials were identified as phenylphosphonic acid (PPA), O-ethyl phenylphosphonic acid (EPPA), and O-ethyl phenylphosphonothioc acid (EPPTA). Radioactivity in tissues reached a peak of 11.8% in 12 days. The highest concentration of radioactivity was present in the liver followed by bile, kidney, adipose tissue, and muscle. EPN was the major compound identified in brain, spinal cord, sciatic nerve, kidney, and plasma. Most of the radioactivity in the liver was identified as EPPA followed by EPPTA and PPA. Kinetic studies showed that EPN disappeared exponentially from tissues. The half-life of the elimination of EPN from plasma was 16.5 days corresponding to a constant rate value of 0.04 day-1. Relative residence (RR) of EPN relative to plasma was shortest in liver and longest in adipose tissue followed by sciatic nerve and spinal cord

  4. Analysis of physiological (pao/sub 2/, pulse and blood pressure) changes during modified ect under general anaesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, M.; Shah, H.A.; Shah, F.S.

    2015-01-01

    To study the changes in physiological parameters i e PAO2, pulse and blood pressure changes during ECT under GA. Study Design: Quasi-experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Psychiatry and Department of Anaesthesiology, Combined Military Hospital Abbottabad from Sep 2009 to Feb 2010. Patients and Methods: A total of 50 patients with depression were given four separate ECT sessions each. All patients were anaesthetized using propofol 180-200 mg I/V and suxamethonium 50 mg i e 0.75-1 mg per kg I/V without atropine. They were stratified according to physiological changes including PAO2, pulse and blood pressure at 1, 2 and 5 min after ECT. Oxygen saturation was measured using a pulse oximeter, which measures saturations in the range of 65-100%. Results: Age range was 19-65 years; mean 46 years (SD+-13). Mean diastolic BP before ECT was 84.72 that decreased post ECT ie 78.02 and 77.46 and 74.44 at interval of 1, 2 and 5 minute respectively. Post-ECT pulse and PAO2 behaved similarly. Post ECT systolic BP decreased at 1 and 5 minutes. Pulse rate decreased after ECT. Conclusion: ECT under propofol is one of the most effective and safe modality of treatment for psychiatric patients under the supervision of qualified psychiatrists and anaesthesiologists and it gives more stable hemodynamic changes. (author)

  5. Analysis of responses to angiotensin II in the mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trinity J Bivalacqua

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Responses to angiotensin II (Ang II were investigated in anaesthetised CD1 mice. Injections of Ang II caused dose-related increases in systemic arterial pressure that were antagonised by candesartan. Responses to Ang II were not altered by PD 123319. At the lowest dose studied (20 µg/kg i.v., the inhibitory effects of candesartan were competitive, whereas at the highest dose (100 µg/kg i.v., the dose-response curve for Ang II was shifted to the right in a non-parallel manner. The inhibitory effects of candesartan were selective and were similar in animals pretreated with enalaprilat to reduce endogenous Ang II production. Pressor responses to Ang II were not altered by propranolol, phentolamine or atropine, but were enhanced by hexamethonium. Increases in total peripheral resistance were inhibited by the AT1-receptor antagonist (ARB but were not altered by AT2-receptor, alpha- or beta-receptor antagonists. These results suggest that pressor responses to Ang II are mediated by AT 1-receptors, are buffered by the baroreceptors, are not modulated by effects on AT2receptors, and that activation of the sympathetic nervous system plays little role in mediating rapid haemodynamic responses to the peptide in anaesthetised mice.

  6. Conducta anestésica en un lactante con enfisema lobar congénito Behavior of anesthesia in an infant with congenital lobar emphysema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl de Jesús Nápoles Smith

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta el caso clínico de un lactante con enfisema lobar congénito, tratado en el Hospital Infantil Sur de Santiago de Cuba con antecedentes de cuadros respiratorios recurrentes y varias hospitalizaciones previas. Inicialmente ingresó con bronconeumonía y disnea, por lo que se sospechó la presencia de un neumotórax, pero mediante estudios radiológicos se obtuvo el diagnóstico definitivo y se decidió aplicarle tratamiento quirúrgico. En el período intraoperatorio tuvo una complicación cardiovascular (bradicardia extrema, que fue tratada con las medidas adecuadas (oxígeno a 100 %, masaje cardíaco directo y sulfato de atropina, las cuales permitieron una evolución posoperatoria satisfactoria en la Unidad de Cuidados Intensivos Pediátricos.The case of an infant with congenital lobar emphysema is reported, who was treated in the Southern Children Hospital of Santiago de Cuba with history of recurrent respiratory symptoms and several previous hospitalizations. Initially he was admitted with bronchopneumonia and dyspnea, and the presence of pneumothorax was suspected, but a definitive diagnosis was obtained by radiological studies and surgical treatment was decided. In the intraoperative period he had a cardiovascular complication (extreme bradycardia, which was treated with appropriate measures (100 % oxygen, direct heart massage and atropine sulfate, which allowed a satisfactory postoperative course in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit.

  7. Studies on chemotherapy of parasitic helminths (VI) effects of various neuropharmacological agents on the motility of Dipylidium caninum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, M; Ishii, A I; Kino, H; Sano, M

    1982-06-01

    Effects of various neuropharmacological agents on the motility of Dipylidium caninum was studied. 5-HT stimulated the motility of D. caninum, while other drugs such as GABA, adrenaline, phenylephrine, isoproterenol, dibenamine, and propranolol showed little effect. The stimulatory action of 5-HT was antagonized by tryptophol. Stibnal caused paralysis which was blocked by the pretreatment with 5-HT. Paralytic effects were caused by eserine, dichlorovos, ACh, carbachol and DMPP, but not by pilocarpine and McN-A-343. d-Tubocurarine, hexamethonium, and atropine all showed little effect on the motility and on the paralytic action of eserine. Though guanidine showed little effect, strychnine remarkably stimulated the motility. The action of strychnine was stimulated by 5-HT but partially inhibited by tryptophol. Morphine and picrate slightly stimulated the motility, but showed little influence on the paralytic action of eserine. These two agents stimulated the paralyzed preparation by tryptophol transiently and sustainedly, respectively. These results on the cholinergic and serotonergic drugs basically showed good agreement with those reported in trematodes such as Schistosoma mansoni and Fasciola hepatica.

  8. The role of the vagus nerve in the generation of cardiorespiratory interactions in a neotropical fish, the pacu, Piaractus mesopotamicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Cleo Alcantara Costa; Taylor, E W; Guerra, C D R; Florindo, L H; Belão, T; Rantin, F T

    2009-08-01

    The role of the vagus nerve in determining heart rate (f(H)) and cardiorespiratory interactions was investigated in a neotropical fish, Piaractus mesopotamicus. During progressive hypoxia f(H) initially increased, establishing a 1:1 ratio with ventilation rate (f(R)). Subsequently there was a hypoxic bradycardia. Injection of atropine abolished a normoxic inhibitory tonus on the heart and the f(H) adjustments during progressive hypoxia, confirming that they are imposed by efferent parasympathetic inputs via the vagus nerve. Efferent activity recorded from the cardiac vagus in lightly anesthetized normoxic fish included occasional bursts of activity related to spontaneous changes in ventilation amplitude, which increased the cardiac interval. Restricting the flow of aerated water irrigating the gills resulted in increased respiratory effort and bursts of respiration-related activity in the cardiac vagus that seemed to cause f(H) to couple with f(R). Cell bodies of cardiac vagal pre-ganglionic neurons were located in two distinct groups within the dorsal vagal motor column having an overlapping distribution with respiratory motor-neurons. A small proportion of cardiac vagal pre-ganglionic neurons (2%) was in scattered positions in the ventrolateral medulla. This division of cardiac vagal pre-ganglionic neurons into distinct motor groups may relate to their functional roles in determining cardiorespiratory interactions.

  9. Variable effects of soman on macromolecular secretion by ferret trachea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McBride, R.K.; Zwierzynski, D.J.; Stone, K.K.; Culp, D.J.; Marin, M.G.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of the anticholinesterase agent, soman, on macromolecular secretion by ferret trachea, in vitro. We mounted pieces of ferret trachea in Ussing-type chambers. Secreted sulfated macromolecules were radiolabeled by adding 500 microCi of 35 SO 4 to the submucosal medium and incubating for 17 hr. Soman added to the submucosal side produced a concentration-dependent increase in radiolabeled macromolecular release with a maximal secretory response (mean +/- SD) of 202 +/- 125% (n = 8) relative to the basal secretion rate at a concentration of 10 - 7 M. The addition of either 10 -6 M pralidoxime (acetylcholinesterase reactivator) or 10 -6 M atropine blocked the response to 10 -7 M soman. At soman concentrations greater than 10 -7 M, secretion rate decreased and was not significantly different from basal secretion. Additional experiments utilizing acetylcholine and the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, physostigmine, suggest that inhibition of secretion by high concentrations of soman may be due to a secondary antagonistic effect of soman on muscarinic receptors

  10. Antinociceptive Effect of the Essential Oil from Croton conduplicatus Kunth (Euphorbiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimundo Gonçalves de Oliveira Júnior

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Medicinal plants have been widely used in the treatment of chronic pain. In this study, we describe the antinociceptive effect of the essential oil from Croton conduplicatus (the EO 25, 50, and 100 mg/kg, i.p., a medicinal plant native to Brazil. Antinociceptive activity was investigated by measuring the nociception induced by acetic acid, formalin, hot plate and carrageenan. A docking study was performed with the major constituents of the EO (E-caryophyllene, caryophyllene oxide, and camphor. The EO reduced nociceptive behavior at all doses tested in the acetic acid-induced nociception test (p < 0.05. The same was observed in both phases (neurogenic and inflammatory of the formalin test. When the hot-plate test was conducted, the EO (50 mg/kg extended the latency time after 60 min of treatment. The EO also reduced leukocyte migration at all doses, suggesting that its antinociceptive effect involves both central and peripheral mechanisms. Pretreatment with glibenclamide and atropine reversed the antinociceptive effect of the EO on the formalin test, suggesting the involvement of KATP channels and muscarinic receptors. The docking study revealed a satisfactory interaction profile between the major components of the EO and the different muscarinic receptor subtypes (M2, M3, and M4. These results corroborate the medicinal use of C. conduplicatus in folk medicine.

  11. Prescribing practices in hospice patients with adult failure to thrive or debility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sera, Leah; Holmes, Holly M; McPherson, Mary Lynn

    2014-04-01

    Despite being a common admitting diagnosis, there is very little published literature on medication management in hospice patients admitted with a diagnosis of failure to thrive or debility. The purpose of this study was to describe medication prescribing practices in hospice patients with either of these primary diagnoses by characterizing prescribed medications by name and by pharmaceutical class, and determining whether the patient or the hospice organization provided each medication. A retrospective review of a patient information database compiled by a national hospice organization was conducted. Patients were included in this retrospective study if they were admitted to hospice care with a primary diagnosis of failure to thrive or debility, and if they were admitted on or after 1 January 2010, and discharged by death on or before 31 December 2010. Overall 293 patients and 6181 medication entries were evaluated. The most commonly prescribed drugs were acetaminophen, lorazepam, morphine, atropine, prochlorperazine, haloperidol, docusate, aspirin, and bisacodyl. The most commonly prescribed pharmacological classes were opioid and non-opioid analgesics, anxiolytics, anticholinergics, antihypertensives, laxatives, antidepressants, and supplements. The hospice organization provided over 90% of prescriptions for analgesics, antipsychotics, anticholinergics, and anxiolytics, and these medications were discontinued before death in less than 5% of patients. Recognized clinical components of failure to thrive syndrome include cognitive impairment, malnutrition, and depression. The hospice organization provided 80% of antidepressants, but infrequently provided appetite stimulants and drugs treating dementia. The most commonly provided drugs were those used for symptoms associated with most end-stage diseases.

  12. Comparison between children dilated computer and retinoscopy

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    Li-Li Qi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the dilation effect of computer optometry and retinoscopy optometry before and after mydriasis in children and to understand whether the application of computer refractor in children.METHODS: Therelated data of 500 children cases(1 000 eyeswith ametropia in our hospital were analyzed. The children firstly received computer optometry, and then use the 10g/L atropine sulfate eye gel drops, respectively. After 3d, they were performed computer optometry and retinoscopy, and compared the effect of two refraction.RESULTS: Spherical reading of computer optometry group was 2.70±2.75DS, cylinder degree was 1.54±1.10DC, were lower than those of retinoscopy group(PPPP>0.05. Before mydriasis, astigmatism was 1.54±1.10D, astigmatic axis was(14.38±11.11°. After mydriasis, astigmatism was 1.45±1.21D and astigmatic axis was(12.78±10.31°, significantly higher than those of retinoscopy(PCONCLUSION: Children optometry concerns the visual development of children. Computer optometry and retinoscopy are the pros and cons. As for computer optometry can not replace retinoscopy optometry, it can be used as an auxiliary tool for fast optometry.

  13. [Treatment of recurrent neurocardiogenic syncope with cardiac inhibitors with ipratropium bromide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friederich, H-C; Michaelsen, J; Hesse, C; Schellberg, D; Schwab, M; Herzog, W

    2004-06-01

    Pharmacological approaches for the treatment of cardioinhibitory vasovagal syncope are controversially discussed in the literature. In acute treatment of neurocardiogenic syncope, anticholinergics (atropine) are used effectively. Randomised and placebo-controlled clinical trials evaluating the preventive significance of anticholinergic agents in the therapy of cardioinhibitory vasovagal syncope are still missing. We report the case of an 18-year-old male patient with recurrent convulsive, cardioinhibitory neurocardiogenic syncope. Vasovagal syncope occurred predominantly as centrally induced syncope triggered by negative emotions such as fear or by seeing blood. Under resting conditions, the patient revealed increased parasympathetic tone with nocturnal bradycardia of 38 beats/min. In the course of head-up tilt table testing a cardioinhibitory syncope with an asystolic pause of 10 seconds occurred without any prodromes after 10 minutes of upright positioning. In order to inhibit parasympathetic tone, medication with ipratropiumbromide was initiated. Time-variant analysis of heart rate variability (autoregressive model) during head-up tilt table testing showed under the medication with ipratropiumbromide a vagal mediated cardioinhibition to 56 beats/min, but no further sinus arrest. Throughout clinical follow-up of 6 months the patient remained syncope-free under the medication. The usefulness of ipratropiumbromide in inhibiting vagal mediated cardioinhibition will be discussed referring to the case report and to studies evaluating anticholinergic agents in the treatment of neurocardiogenic syncope.

  14. Comparison of the effects of sugammadex and neostigmine on postoperative nausea and vomiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yağan, Özgür; Taş, Nilay; Mutlu, Tuğçe; Hancı, Volkan

    The aim of our study is to compare the effects of sugammadex and neostigmine, used for neuromuscular blockage antagonism, on postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV). Our study was completed with 98 ASA I-II risk patients undergoing endotracheal intubation under general anesthesia. At the end of the surgery patients were randomly divided into two groups given 2mgkg -1 sugammadex (Group S) or 50μgkg -1 neostigmine plus 0.2mgkg -1 atropine (Group N). Monitoring and recording times were set as 1 hour postoperative and from 1-6, 6-12, and 12-24hours. The anti-emetic amounts administered were recorded. In the first hour postoperative 13 patients in Group N (27%) and 4 in Group S (8%) were observed to have nausea and/or vomiting and the difference was statistically significant (p=0.0016). During the 24 hours of monitoring there was no significant difference in the incidence and severity of PONV (p>0.05), however the number of patients given ondansetron for PONV treatment in Group N was statistically significantly higher than the number in Group S (16 in Group N, 6 in Group S, psugammadex for neuromuscular blockage antagonism, we found use of sugammadex had lower incidence of PONV in the postoperative 1st hour and less anti-emetic use in 24 hours of monitoring. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison of the effects of sugammadex and neostigmine on postoperative nausea and vomiting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgür Yağan

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: The aim of our study is to compare the effects of sugammadex and neostigmine, used for neuromuscular blockage antagonism, on postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV. Methods: Our study was completed with 98 ASA I-II risk patients undergoing endotracheal intubation under general anesthesia. At the end of the surgery patients were randomly divided into two groups given 2 mg kg-1 sugammadex (Group S or 50 µg kg-1 neostigmine plus 0.2 mg kg-1 atropine (Group N. Monitoring and recording times were set as 1 hour postoperative and from 1-6, 6-12, and 12-24 hours. The anti-emetic amounts administered were recorded. Results: In the first hour postoperative 13 patients in Group N (27% and 4 in Group S (8% were observed to have nausea and/or vomiting and the difference was statistically significant (p = 0.0016. During the 24 hours of monitoring there was no significant difference in the incidence and severity of PONV (p > 0.05, however the number of patients given ondansetron for PONV treatment in Group N was statistically significantly higher than the number in Group S (16 in Group N, 6 in Group S, p < 0.011. Conclusions: At the end of our study comparing neostigmine with sugammadex for neuromuscular blockage antagonism, we found use of sugammadex had lower incidence of PONV in the postoperative 1st hour and less anti-emetic use in 24 hours of monitoring.

  16. Rocuronium blockade reversal with sugammadex vs. neostigmine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Xinmin; Oerding, Helle; Liu, Jin

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study compared efficacy and safety of the selective relaxant binding agent sugammadex (2 mg/kg) with neostigmine (50 μg/kg) for neuromuscular blockade (NMB) reversal in Chinese and Caucasian subjects. METHODS: This was a randomized, active-controlled, multicenter, safety-assessor......BACKGROUND: This study compared efficacy and safety of the selective relaxant binding agent sugammadex (2 mg/kg) with neostigmine (50 μg/kg) for neuromuscular blockade (NMB) reversal in Chinese and Caucasian subjects. METHODS: This was a randomized, active-controlled, multicenter, safety...... twitch reappearance, after last rocuronium dose, subjects received sugammadex 2 mg/kg or neostigmine 50 μg/kg plus atropine 10-20 μg/kg, according to randomization. Primary efficacy variable was time from sugammadex/neostigmine to recovery of the train-of-four (TOF) ratio to 0.9. RESULTS: Overall, 230...... Chinese subjects (sugammadex, n = 119, neostigmine, n = 111); and 59 Caucasian subjects (sugammadex, n = 29, neostigmine, n = 30) had evaluable data. Geometric mean (95% CI) time to recovery to TOF ratio 0.9 was 1.6 (1.5-1.7) min with sugammadex vs 9.1 (8.0-10.3) min with neostigmine in Chinese subjects...

  17. Combined spinal epidural anesthesia during colon surgery in a high-risk patient: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbelloni, Luiz Eduardo; Fornasari, Marcos; Fialho, José Carlos

    2009-01-01

    Combined spinal epidural anesthesia (CSEA) has advantages over single injection epidural or subarachnoid blockades. The objective of this report was to present a case in which segmental subarachnoid block can be an effective technique for gastrointestinal surgery with spontaneous respiration. Patient with physical status ASA III, with diabetes mellitus type II, hypertension, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was scheduled for resection of a right colon tumor. Combined spinal epidural block was performed in the T5-T6 space and 8 mg of 0.5% isobaric bupivacaine with 50 microg of morphine were injected in the subarachnoid space. The epidural catheter (20G) was introduced four centimeters in the cephalad direction. Sedation was achieved with fractionated doses of 1 mg of midazolam (total of 6 mg). A bolus of 25 mg of 0.5% bupivacaine was administered through the catheter two hours after the subarachnoid block. Vasopressors and atropine were not used. This case provides evidence that segmental spinal block can be the anesthetic technique used in gastrointestinal surgeries with spontaneous respiration.

  18. Protection against Ischemia-Induced Oxidative Stress Conferred by Vagal Stimulation in the Rat Heart: Involvement of the AMPK-PKC Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Jin Zang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS production is an important mechanism in myocardial ischemia and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase is one of major sources of ROS in the heart. Previous studies showed that vagus nerve stimulation (VNS is beneficial in treating ischemic heart diseases. However, the effect of VNS on ROS production remains elusive. In this study, we investigated the role of VNS onischemia-induced ROS production. Our results demonstrated that VNS alleviated the myocardial injury, attenuated the cardiac dysfunction, reserved the antioxidant enzyme activity and inhibited the formation of ROS as evidenced by the decreased NADPH oxidase (Nox activity and superoxide fluorescence intensity as well as the expression of p67phox, Rac1 and nitrotyrosine. Furthermore, VNS resulted in the phosphorylation and activation of adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK, which in turn led to an inactivation of Nox by protein kinase C (PKC; however, the phenomena were repressed by the administration of a muscarinic antagonist atropine. Taken together, these data indicate that VNS decreases ROS via AMPK-PKC-Nox pathway; this may have potential importance for the treatment of ischemic heart diseases.

  19. Identification of Receptor Ligands and Receptor Subtypes Using Antagonists in a Capillary Electrophoresis Single-Cell Biosensor Separation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Harvey A.; Orwar, Owe; Scheller, Richard H.; Zare, Richard N.

    1995-08-01

    A capillary electrophoresis system with single-cell biosensors as a detector has been used to separate and identify ligands in complex biological samples. The power of this procedure was significantly increased by introducing antagonists that inhibited the cellular response from selected ligand-receptor interactions. The single-cell biosensor was based on the ligand-receptor binding and G-protein-mediated signal transduction pathways in PC12 and NG108-15 cell lines. Receptor activation was measured as increases in cytosolic free calcium ion concentration by using fluorescence microscopy with the intracellular calcium ion indicator fluo-3 acetoxymethyl ester. Specifically, a mixture of bradykinin (BK) and acetylcholine (ACh) was fractionated and the components were identified by inhibiting the cellular response with icatibant (HOE 140), a selective antagonist to the BK B_2 receptor subtype (B_2BK), and atropine, an antagonist to muscarinic ACh receptor subtypes. Structurally related forms of BK were also identified based on inhibiting B_2BK receptors. Applications of this technique include identification of endogenous BK in a lysate of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (Hep G2) and screening for bioactivity of BK degradation products in human blood plasma. The data demonstrate that the use of antagonists with a single-cell biosensor separation system aids identification of separated components and receptor subtypes.

  20. Blind rats are not profoundly impaired in the reference memory Morris water maze and cannot be clearly discriminated from rats with cognitive deficits in the cued platform task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, M D; Plone, M A; Schallert, T; Emerich, D F

    1997-06-01

    The Morris water maze is commonly used to test cognitive function in rodent models of neurological disorders including age-related cognitive deficits. It is often assumed that the most profoundly impaired aged rats may be blind due to retinal degeneration, and it has been reported that animals with visual sensory deficits can be identified based on their performance in a cued platform task. The results of the present study demonstrate that blind rats can perform surprisingly well in the reference memory version of the Morris water maze, and that blind rats cannot be selectively excluded based on performance in the cued platform task since atropine-treated rats also perform poorly in the cued platform task. Future studies may be able to develop screening procedures that help to eliminate subjects with non-cognitive deficits, but the present results do not support the use of the cued platform or straight swim task as screening procedures. Experimenters must be careful to consider the role that visual sensory function and other non-cognitive factors may have in performance of the spatial learning Morris water maze, and also the role that severe cognitive deficits may have in performance of the cued platform task.

  1. Black henbane and its toxicity – a descriptive review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anahita Alizadeh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Black henbane (BH or Hyoscyamus niger, has been used as a medicine since last centuries and has been described in all traditional medicines. It applies as a herbal medicine, but may induce intoxication accidentally or intentionally. All part of BH including leaves, seeds and roots contain some alkaloids such as Hyoscyamine, Atropine, Tropane and Scopolamine. BH has pharmacological effects like bronchodilating, antisecretory, urinary bladder relaxant, spasmolytic, hypnotic, hallucinogenic, pupil dilating, sedative and anti-diarrheal properties. Clinical manifestations of acute BH poisoning are very wide which include mydriasis, tachycardia, arrhythmia, agitation, convulsion and coma, dry mouth, thirst, slurred speech, difficulty speaking, dysphagia, warm flushed skin, pyrexia, nausea, vomiting, headache, blurred vision and photophobia, urinary retention, distension of the bladder, drowsiness, hyper reflexia, auditory, visual or tactile hallucinations, confusion, disorientation, delirium, aggressiveness, and combative behavior. The main treatment of BH intoxicated patients is supportive therapies including gastric emptying (not by Ipecac, administration of activated charcoal and benzodiazepines. Health care providers and physicians particularly emergency physicians and clinical toxicologists should know the nature, medical uses, clinical features, diagnosis and management of BH poisoning.

  2. Endothelium-Dependent Vasorelaxant Effect of Butanolic Fraction from Caryocar brasiliense Camb. Leaves in Rat Thoracic Aorta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lais Moraes de Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Caryocar brasiliense Camb. “pequi” is a native plant from the Cerrado region of Brazil that contains bioactive components reported to be antioxidant agents. Previous work has demonstrated that dietary supplementation with pequi decreased the arterial pressure of volunteer athletes. We found that the crude hydroalcoholic extract (CHE of C. brasiliense leaves relaxed, in a concentration-dependent manner, rat aortic rings precontracted with phenylephrine, and that the butanolic fraction (BF produced an effect similar to that of the CHE. Aortic relaxation induced by BF was abolished by endothelium removal, by incubation of the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME, or the soluble guanylatecyclase inhibitor ODQ. However, incubation with atropine and pyrilamine had no effect on the BF-induced vasorelaxation. Moreover, this effect was not inhibited by indomethacin and tetraethylammonium. The concentration-response curve to calcium in denuded-endothelium rings was not modified after incubation with BF, and the vasorelaxation by BF in endothelium-intact rings precontracted with KCl was abolished after incubation with L-NAME. In addition, administration of BF in anesthetized rats resulted in a reversible hypotension. The results reveal that C. brasiliense possesses both in vivo and in vitro activities and that the vascular effect of BF involves stimulation of the nitric oxide/cyclic GMP pathway.

  3. Acetylcholine promotes the emergence and elongation of lateral roots of Raphanus sativus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Kou-ichi; Tezuka, Takafumi

    2011-10-01

    Radish (Raphanus sativus L.) was grown on four layers of paper towel moistened with distilled water with and without acetylcholine (ACh) for five days in the dark after sowing. ACh at 1 nM promoted the growth (emergence and elongation) of lateral roots of radish plants, but had no effect on the stems and main roots. Moreover, ACh enhanced the dry weight of roots [main (primary) + lateral roots]. Neostigmine, an inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) also promoted the emergence and elongation of lateral roots, and atropine, a competitive inhibitor of ACh receptor, suppressed the emergence and elongation. ACh suppressed the activity of AChE and increased the amount of proteins and pyridine nucleotides (NAD and NADH) in the roots of the seedlings. It also increased the activities of NAD-forming enzymes [NAD synthetase and ATP-nicotinamide mononucleotide (ATP-NMN) adenyltransferase], and enhanced the amount of DNA in the roots of the seedlings. The relationship between ACh and the emergence and growth of lateral roots was discussed from a biochemical viewpoint.

  4. Gastrointestinal motor inhibition by exogenous human, salmon, and eel calcitonin in conscious dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, H; Asano, T; Haruta, K; Takeda, K

    1995-01-01

    Effects of synthetic eel (E-), salmon (S-), and human (H-) calcitonin (CT) on gastrointestinal motility were studied in conscious beagle dogs, which had been implanted with strain gauge force transducers. Intramuscular administration of E-, S-, or H-CT interrupted gastric migrating motor complexes, digestive pattern, and gastric emptying. The order of potency was E-CT = S-CT > H-CT. Motor inhibition induced by CT occurred independently of plasma immunoreactive motilin levels or hypocalcemia. In addition, E-CT and S-CT induced vomiting without a retrograde giant contraction (RGC) during the postprandial state. Apomorphine or CuSO4 initiated RGC prior to vomiting. RGC induced by apomorphine was inhibited by pretreatment with E-CT as well as hexamethonium, atropine, or surgical vagotomy. E-CT showed no inhibitory effect on nicotine stimulated contraction of isolated guinea-pig ileum. These results suggest that peripherally administered CT inhibits canine gastrointestinal motility at the central nervous system level by lowering vagal activity.

  5. Gastric vagus mediates immobilization-induced hypocalcemia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, J; Aou, S; Matsui, H; Hori, T

    1993-09-01

    The involvement of the parasympathetic nervous system in the etiology of stress-induced hypocalcemia was investigated in the rat. Atropine methyl bromide (0.1 and 0.6 mg/kg ip) given 20 min before immobilization (IMB) was observed to suppress the induction of hypocalcemia in a dose-dependent manner. A vagotomy of the bilateral cervical trunks also abolished the IMB-induced hypocalcemia. A vagotomy on either the thyroid/parathyroid branches or the celiac branches had no effect on the IMB-induced hypocalcemia, but a vagotomy on the gastric branches completely abolished it. Pretreatment with either secretin (2 and 6 micrograms/kg ip), an inhibitor of gastrin release, or cimetidine (5 and 10 mg/kg ip), a histamine H2-receptor antagonist, diminished the IMB-induced hypocalcemia. The concentration of serum gastrin increased significantly during IMB. It is thus concluded that the decreased levels of plasma calcium caused by IMB are due to the activation of the vagus innervating the stomach. Gastrin and histamine are also involved as a consequence of the activation of the vagus.

  6. 6-[N,S-dimethyl-N'-cyanothioureidomethyl]-6,11-dihydro-5H- dibenz[b,e]azepine hydrochloride (Fran 12): a histamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine antagonist with pressor properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, S C; Guyett, F J; King, R G; Boura, A L; Jackson, W R; Hodgson, W C

    1992-01-01

    We have synthesized and examined some of the pharmacological properties of 6-[N,S-dimethyl-N'-cyanoisothioureidomethyl]-6,11-dihydro-5H- dibenz(b,e)azepine hydrochloride (Fran 12), a derivative of 6-methylaminomethyl-6,11-dihydro-5H- dibenz[b,e,]azepine. In the guinea-pig isolated ileum, Fran 12 (10(-7)-10(-5) M) caused parallel rightward shifts of the concentration-response curves to histamine. A Schild plot gave a pA2 of 7.48, with a slope not significantly different from -1.0. In the rat stomach fundus strip and in endothelium-denuded aortic rings, Fran 12 inhibited contractile responses to 5-hydroxytryptamine in a non-competitive manner. In both chloralose-anaesthetized and pithed rats, it inhibited pressor responses to 5-hydroxytryptamine. It had no effect on depressor responses to 5-hydroxytryptamine in anaesthetized rats. In pithed rats, Fran 12 (0.25-2 mg/kg, i.v.) produced dose-dependent increases in blood pressure. These were not inhibited by i.v. phentolamine, prazosin, yohimbine, propranolol, methysergide, pentolinium or atropine but were inhibited by verapamil. These results indicate that Fran 12 is a histamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine antagonist which also exerts pressor effects via a peripheral action. The pressor action does not appear to be mediated via effects on alpha 1- or alpha 2-adrenoceptors, muscarinic or nicotinic cholinoceptors or 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors, although calcium channel activation may play a role.

  7. DRUGS – “WAY” OF LIFE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Nowacka

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This article refers to the phenomenon of an increasing number of people abusing drugs in the 20th century. In addition to the natural types of narcotics there are many other semi-synthetic and fully synthetic substances made available to the market by chemical and pharmaceutical industries. The use of narcotics and psychoactive substances usually causes adverse and often irreversible health effects. In Department of Laboratory Diagnostics of the Institute of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health in Sosnowiec tests for presence of drugs are among routinely conducted analyses. The presence of drugs has been revealed in 898 cases between the years 2004 and 2008. On top of the list of the most frequently detected narcotics were: amphetamine, cannabis, opiates, methamphetamine and cocaine. At the same time the most popular psychoactive substances are atropine, scopolamine and psilocybin. Additionally, the laboratory analyses indicated in many cases the presence of derivatives of benzodiazepines, trycyclic antidepressants and alcohol. Regional Centre of Acute Intoxication in Sosnowiec, Poland, hospitalized 78 patients due to overdose of drugs, narcotics or psychoactive substances as a result of experimenting with such substances. Half of the hospitalized cases patients have tried to commit suicide; one of the attempts has led to death. According to patients’ history their problems with reaching out for the use of psychoactive substances and narcotics were mainly caused by socio-psychological disorders.

  8. Medical emergencies facing general practitioners: Drugs for the doctor's bag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janković Slobodan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available General practitioners are frequently facing medical emergencies. In order to react properly and administer therapy on time, a general practitioner needs to prepare and keep with himself the appropriate set of drugs which could be effectively used for treatment of the emergencies. The following drugs should find their place in the doctor's bag: acetaminophen (for mild and moderate pain, and for fever, morphine (for severe pain, naloxone (for heroin poisoning, ceftriaxone (for meningococcal meningitis, albuterol (for bronchial asthma attack, hydrocortisone (for bronchial asthma attack, glucagon (for severe hypoglycemia, dextrose (for mild to moderate hypoglycemia, diazepam (for febrile convulsions or epileptic status, epinephrine (for anaphylaxis and cardiac arrest, atropine (for symptomatic bradicardia, chloropyramine (for acute allergy, aspirin (for acute myocardial infarction, nitroglycerine (for acute coronary syndrome, metoclopramide (for nausea and vomiting, haloperidol (for delirium, methylergometrine (for control of bleeding after delivery or abortion, furosemide (for acute pulmonary edema and flumazenil (for benzodiazepine poisoning. For each of the listed drugs a physician should well know the recommended doses, indications, contraindications and warnings. All of the listed drugs are either registered in Serbia or available through special import, so general practitioners may fill their bags with all necessary drugs and effectively and safely treat medical emergencies.

  9. Modulation of Visceral Nociception, Inflammation and Gastric Mucosal Injury by Cinnarizine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar M.E. Abdel-Salam

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of cinnarizine, a drug used for the treatment of vertigo was assessed in animal models of visceral nociception, inflammation and gastric mucosal injury. Cinnarizine (1.25–20 mg/kg, s.c. caused dose-dependent inhibition of the abdominal constrictions evoked by i.p. injection of acetic acid by 38.7–99.4%. This effect of cinnarizine (2.5 mg/kg was unaffected by co-administration of the centrally acting dopamine D2 receptor antagonists, sulpiride, haloperidol or metoclopramide, the peripherally acting D2 receptor antagonist domperidone, but increased by the D2 receptor agonist bromocryptine and by the non-selective dopamine receptor antagonist chlorpromazine. The antinociception caused by cinnarizine was naloxone insenstive, but enhanced by propranolol, atropine and by yohimbine. The antinociceptive effect of cinnarizine was prevented by co-treatment with the adenosine receptor blocker theophylline or by the ATP-sensitive potassium channel (KATP blocker glibenclamide. Cinnarizine at 2.5 mg/kg reversed the baclofen-induced antinociception. Cinnarizine at 2.5 mg/kg reduced immobility time in the Porsolt’s forced-swimming test by 24%. Cinnarizine inhibited the paw oedema response to carrageenan and reduced gastric mucosal lesions caused by indomethacin in rats. It is suggested that cinnarizine exerts anti-infl ammatory, antinociceptive and gastric protective properties. The mechanism by which cinnarizine modulates pain transmission is likely to involve adenosine receptors and KATP channels.

  10. Analeptic activity produced by TRH microinjection into basal forebrain area of the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horita, A.; Carino, M.A.; Lai, H.

    1986-01-01

    Earlier, Kalivas and Horita demonstrated that the analeptic effect of TRH was mediated in part by cholinergic neurons in the medial septum-diagonal band of Broca (MS-DBB). Since the MS-DBB constitutes part of the cholinergic basal forebrain system, the present study investigated whether the area designated as the n. basalis of Meynert (NBM) was also sensitive to TRH in producing an antipentobarbital effect. Saline or TRH (0.5 μl) was microinjected via bilateral stainless steel cannulae implanted stereotaxically into the NBM using the coordinates of Wenk et al. Accuracy of cannula placement was confirmed by histological examination. Rats treated with PB (40 mg/kg, i.p.) lost their righting reflex for 130 +/- 28 min. Intrabasalis injection of TRH (but not saline) in doses of 0.1-1.0 μg exerted analeptic activity as follows: 0.1 μg = 81 +/- 21 min; 0.5 μg = 65 +/- 19 min; 1.0 μg = 45 +/- 10 min. All of these doses exerted significant shortening of narcosis duration of pentobarbitalized rats. The analeptic effect of TRH was blocked by atropine pretreatment, indicating that it was mediated via cholinergic mechanisms. High affinity, sodium-dependent 3 H-choline uptake by cortical synaptosomes prepared from these animals was also increased by TRH. These results suggest that the cholinergic neurons of NBM are highly sensitive to TRH and contributes to the analeptic effect of TRH

  11. Enhancement of rat bladder contraction by artificial sweeteners via increased extracellular Ca2+ influx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasgupta, Jaydip; Elliott, Ruth A.; Doshani, Angie; Tincello, Douglas G.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Consumption of carbonated soft drinks has been shown to be independently associated with the development of overactive bladder symptoms (OR 1.62, 95% CI 1.18, 2.22) [Dallosso, H.M., McGrother, C.W., Matthews, R.J., Donaldson, M.M.K., 2003. The association of diet and other lifestyle factors with overactive bladder and stress incontinence: a longitudinal study in women. BJU Int. 92, 69-77]. We evaluated the effects of three artificial sweeteners, acesulfame K, aspartame and sodium saccharin, on the contractile response of isolated rat detrusor muscle strips. Methods: Strips of detrusor muscle were placed in an organ bath and stimulated with electrical field stimulation (EFS) in the absence and presence of atropine, and with α,β methylene ATP, potassium, calcium and carbachol. Results: Sweeteners 10 -7 M to 10 -2 M enhanced the contractile response to 10 Hz EFS compared to control (p -6 M, aspartame 10 -7 M and sodium saccharin 10 -7 M. Acesulfame K 10 -6 M increased the maximum contractile response to α,β methylene ATP by 35% (± 9.6%) (p -6 M increased the log EC 5 from -2.79 (± 0.037) to -3.03 (± 0.048, p -7 M from -2.74 (± 0.03) to 2.86 (± 0.031, p +2 channels

  12. Laboratory practical to study the differential innervation pathways of urinary tract smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rembetski, Benjamin E; Cobine, Caroline A; Drumm, Bernard T

    2018-06-01

    In the mammalian lower urinary tract, there is a reciprocal relationship between the contractile state of the bladder and urethra. As the bladder fills with urine, it remains relaxed to accommodate increases in volume, while the urethra remains contracted to prevent leakage of urine from the bladder to the exterior. Disruptions to the normal contractile state of the bladder and urethra can lead to abnormal micturition patterns and urinary incontinence. While both the bladder and urethra are smooth-muscle organs, they are differentially contracted by input from cholinergic and sympathetic nerves, respectively. The laboratory practical described here provides an experiential approach to understanding the anatomy of the lower urinary tract. Several key factors in urinary tract physiology are outlined, e.g., the bladder is contracted by activation of the parasympathetic pathway via cholinergic stimulation on muscarinic receptors, whereas the urethra is contracted by activation of the sympathetic pathway via adrenergic stimulation on α 1 -adrenoceptors. This is achieved by measuring the force generated by bladder and urethra smooth muscle to demonstrate that acetylcholine contracts the smooth muscle of the bladder, whereas adrenergic agonists contract the urethral smooth muscle. An inhibition of these effects is also demonstrated by application of the muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine and the α 1 -adrenergic receptor blocker phentolamine. A list of suggested techniques and exam questions to evaluate student understanding on this topic is also provided.

  13. Atropa belladonna neurotoxicity: Implications to neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwakye, Gunnar F; Jiménez, Jennifer; Jiménez, Jessica A; Aschner, Michael

    2018-06-01

    Atropa belladonna, commonly known as belladonna or deadly nightshade, ranks among one of the most poisonous plants in Europe and other parts of the world. The plant contains tropane alkaloids including atropine, scopolamine, and hyoscyamine, which are used as anticholinergics in Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drugs and homeopathic remedies. These alkaloids can be very toxic at high dose. The FDA has recently reported that Hyland's baby teething tablets contain inconsistent amounts of Atropa belladonna that may have adverse effects on the nervous system and cause death in children, thus recalled the product in 2017. A greater understanding of the neurotoxicity of Atropa belladonna and its modification of genetic polymorphisms in the nervous system is critical in order to develop better treatment strategies, therapies, regulations, education of at-risk populations, and a more cohesive paradigm for future research. This review offers an integrated view of the homeopathy and neurotoxicity of Atropa belladonna in children, adults, and animal models as well as its implications to neurological disorders. Particular attention is dedicated to the pharmaco/toxicodynamics, pharmaco/toxicokinetics, pathophysiology, epidemiological cases, and animal studies associated with the effects of Atropa belladonna on the nervous system. Additionally, we discuss the influence of active tropane alkaloids in Atropa belladonna and other similar plants on FDA-approved therapeutic drugs for treatment of neurological disorders. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Comparison of the effects of salmon calcitonin (sCT) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in a number of in vivo and in vitro tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, S.P.; Brase, D.; Cooper, C.; Dewey, W.L.

    1986-01-01

    sCT and CGRP have been shown previously to have multiple activities in the central nervous system (CNS). Recent work has shown that CGRP (15 μg) intraventricularly (IVT) produces a naloxone reversible 37% inhibition in the p-phenylquinone test (PPQ) accompanied by severe diarrhea. The ED50 of sCT in the PPQ test is 362 ng and this effect is not reversed totally by naloxone. The onset of CGRP is more rapid than that of sCT. sCT and CGRP (10 -6 M) both produce naloxone reversible inhibition of the electrically stimulated guinea pig ileum (GPI) (25% and 50% respectively). Both sCT and CGRP (10 -6 M) produce contracture (15% and 40% respectively) of the non-stimulated GPI that is not blocked by atropine. Both sCT and CGRP block the naloxone-induced contracture of the morphine (MS04) dependent ilea (29% and 68% respectively). Both sCT and CGRP produce biphasic shifts in the MS04 acetylcholine dose-effect curves in the stimulated and nonstimulated GPI, respectively. Neither sCT nor CGRP (10 -9 to 10 -4 M) displaces 3 H-naloxone binding to mouse brain membranes. Both sCT and CGRP may produce their effects by modulation of CA +2 fluxes in the CNS and GPI

  15. Large Outbreaks of Ciguatera after Consumption of Brown Marbled Grouper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Thomas Y. K.

    2014-01-01

    Brown marbled grouper (Epinephelus fuscoguttatus) is an apex predator from coral reefs of the Indo-Pacific region. All five published case series of ciguatera after consumption of brown marbled grouper were reviewed to characterize the types, severity and chronicity of ciguatera symptoms associated with its consumption. Three of these case series were from large outbreaks affecting over 100–200 subjects who had eaten this reef fish served at banquets. Affected subjects generally developed a combination of gastrointestinal, neurological and, less commonly, cardiovascular symptoms. Gastrointestinal symptoms occurred early and generally subsided in 1–2 days. Some neurological symptoms (e.g., paresthesia of four limbs) could last for weeks or months. Sinus bradycardia and hypotension occurred early, but could be severe and prolonged, necessitating the timely use of intravenous fluids, atropine and dopamine. Other cardiovascular and neurological features included atrial ectopics, ventricular ectopics, dyspnea, chest tightness, PR interval >0.2 s, ST segment changes, polymyositis and coma. Concomitant alcohol consumption was associated with a much higher risk of developing bradycardia, hypotension and altered skin sensation. The public should realize that consumption of the high-risk fish (especially the ciguatoxin-rich parts and together with alcohol use) and repeated ciguatoxin exposures will result in more severe and chronic illness. PMID:25019942

  16. Giant multimodal heart motoneurons of Achatina fulica: a new cardioregulatory input in pulmonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuravlev, V; Bugaj, V; Kodirov, S; Safonova, T; Staruschenko, A

    2001-08-01

    The regulation of the heartbeat by the two largest neurons, d-VLN and d-RPLN, on the dorsal surface of visceral and right parietal ganglia of Giant African snail, Achatina fulica, was examined. Using the new method of animal preparation, for the first time, discrete biphasic inhibitory-excitatory junction potentials (I-EJPs) in the heart and several muscles of the visceral sac were recorded. The duration of hyperpolarizing phase (H-phase) of biphasic I-EJPs was 269+/-5.6 ms (n=5), which is 2-3 times less than that of the cholinergic inhibitory JPs (682+/-68.5 ms, n=5). The H-phase of I-EJPs was not altered by the application of atropine, picrotoxine, succinylcholinchloride, D-tubocurarine and tetraethylammonium or substitution of Cl(-) ions. Even the low-frequency neuronal discharges (1-2 imp/s) evoked significant facilitation and potentiation of the H-phase. Between the multimodal neurons d-VLN/d-RPLN and mantle or visceral organs there is evidence of direct synaptic connections. These neurons were found to have no axonal branches in the intestinal nerve as once suspected but reach the heart through several other nerves. New giant heart motoneurons do not interact with previously identified cardioregulatory neurons.

  17. Effects of procaine on a central neuron of the snail, Achatina fulica Ferussac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Hsien; Tsai, Ming-Cheng

    2005-02-18

    Effects of procaine on a central neuron (RP1) of the giant African snail (Achatina fulica Ferussac) were studied pharmacologically. The RP1 neuron showed spontaneous firing of action potential. Extra-cellular application of procaine (10 mM) reversibly elicited bursts of potential. The bursts of potential elicited by procaine were not blocked after administration of (1) prazosin, propranolol, atropine, d-tubocurarine, (2) calcium-free solution, (3) ryanodine (4) pretreatment with KT-5720 or chelerythrine. The bursts of potential elicited by procaine were blocked by adding U73122 (10 microM) and the bursts of potential were decreased if physiological sodium ion was replaced with lithium ion or incubated with either neomycin (3.5 mM) or high magnesium solution (30 mM). Preatment with U73122 (10 microM) blocked the initiation of bursts of potential. Ruthenium red (100 microM) or caffeine (10 mM) facilitated the procaine-elicited bursts of potential. It is concluded that procaine reversibly elicits bursts of potential in the central snail neuron. This effect was not directly related to (1) the extra-cellular calcium ion fluxes, (2) the ryanodine sensitive calcium channels in the neuron, or (3) the PKC or PKA related messenger systems. The procaine-elicited bursts of potential were associated with the phospholipase activity and the calcium mobilization in the neuron.

  18. Gender-Specific Hippocampal Dysrhythmia and Aberrant Hippocampal and Cortical Excitability in the APPswePS1dE9 Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Papazoglou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a multifactorial disorder leading to progressive memory loss and eventually death. In this study an APPswePS1dE9 AD mouse model has been analyzed using implantable video-EEG radiotelemetry to perform long-term EEG recordings from the primary motor cortex M1 and the hippocampal CA1 region in both genders. Besides motor activity, EEG recordings were analyzed for electroencephalographic seizure activity and frequency characteristics using a Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT based approach. Automatic seizure detection revealed severe electroencephalographic seizure activity in both M1 and CA1 deflection in APPswePS1dE9 mice with gender-specific characteristics. Frequency analysis of both surface and deep EEG recordings elicited complex age, gender, and activity dependent alterations in the theta and gamma range. Females displayed an antithetic decrease in theta (θ and increase in gamma (γ power at 18-19 weeks of age whereas related changes in males occurred earlier at 14 weeks of age. In females, theta (θ and gamma (γ power alterations predominated in the inactive state suggesting a reduction in atropine-sensitive type II theta in APPswePS1dE9 animals. Gender-specific central dysrhythmia and network alterations in APPswePS1dE9 point to a functional role in behavioral and cognitive deficits and might serve as early biomarkers for AD in the future.

  19. Large Outbreaks of Ciguatera after Consumption of Brown Marbled Grouper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Y. K. Chan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Brown marbled grouper (Epinephelus fuscoguttatus is an apex predator from coral reefs of the Indo-Pacific region. All five published case series of ciguatera after consumption of brown marbled grouper were reviewed to characterize the types, severity and chronicity of ciguatera symptoms associated with its consumption. Three of these case series were from large outbreaks affecting over 100–200 subjects who had eaten this reef fish served at banquets. Affected subjects generally developed a combination of gastrointestinal, neurological and, less commonly, cardiovascular symptoms. Gastrointestinal symptoms occurred early and generally subsided in 1–2 days. Some neurological symptoms (e.g., paresthesia of four limbs could last for weeks or months. Sinus bradycardia and hypotension occurred early, but could be severe and prolonged, necessitating the timely use of intravenous fluids, atropine and dopamine. Other cardiovascular and neurological features included atrial ectopics, ventricular ectopics, dyspnea, chest tightness, PR interval >0.2 s, ST segment changes, polymyositis and coma. Concomitant alcohol consumption was associated with a much higher risk of developing bradycardia, hypotension and altered skin sensation. The public should realize that consumption of the high-risk fish (especially the ciguatoxin-rich parts and together with alcohol use and repeated ciguatoxin exposures will result in more severe and chronic illness.

  20. Anesthetic management of a 2-day-old with complete congenital heart block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneet Khanna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Maternal connective tissue disorders such as Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (most common, Sjogren′s syndrome, mixed connective tissue disorders may lead to the rare condition of complete congenital heart block in the neonate. Rare fetal syndromes such as myocarditis, 18p syndrome, mucopolysaccharidoses and mitochondrial diseases are other causes. The mortality rate of this condition is inversely propotional to the age of presentation being 6 % in the neonatal age group. As the cardiac output in the neonate is heart rate dependent, it is crucial to maintain the heart rate in these patients. Pharamacological interventions with dopamine, isoprenaline, epinephrine and atropine are known for their variable response. Although permanent pacing is the most reliable mode of management, the access to it is often not readily available, especially in the developing countries. In such cases temporary pacing methods become lifesaving. Of all the modalities of temporary pacing (transcutaneous, transesophageal and transvenous transcutaneous pacing is the most readily available and immediate mode. In this case report we present a two day old neonate with isolated complete congenital heart block and a resting heart rate of 50-55/min in immediate need of palliative surgery for trachea-esophageal fistula (TEF. With pharmacological intervention the heart rate could only be raised to 75-80/min. The surgery was successfully carried out using transcutaneous pacing to maintain a heart rate of 100/min.