WorldWideScience

Sample records for atrophy

  1. Muscle atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscle wasting; Wasting; Atrophy of the muscles ... There are two types of muscle atrophy: disuse and neurogenic. Disuse atrophy is caused by not using the muscles enough . This type of atrophy can often be ...

  2. Multiple System Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Multiple System Atrophy Information Page Condensed from Multiple System Atrophy ... Trials Organizations Publicaciones en Español What is Multiple System Atrophy? Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a progressive ...

  3. Sudeck atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staunton, H

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews the contribution of Sudeck to the understanding of the condition commonly referred to as 'Sudeck's atrophy' and which is commonly used as a synonym for a condition variously called reflex sympathetic dystrophy, causalgia, algodystrophy and others. Sudeck came to show in his later papers that the so-called atrophy was, in the majority of cases, a normal inflammatory process of bone change in the course of healing after an inflammatory/infective or traumatic insult. Contrary to the views of much current literature, the vast majority of such cases had a good prognosis. In those cases which became pathological and had a correspondingly poorer prognosis, the characteristic clinical picture becomes associated with radiological and pathological changes, which, uniquely, are described by Sudeck. A knowledge of such radiological and pathological substrate for clinical symptomatology is important in the analysis of pain following trauma. PMID:17274178

  4. Optic nerve atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Optic atrophy; Optic neuropathy ... There are many causes of optic atrophy. The most common is poor blood flow. This is called ischemic optic neuropathy. The problem most often affects older adults. ...

  5. Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a genetic disease that attacks nerve cells, called motor neurons, in the spinal cord. These cells communicate with your voluntary muscles - the ones you can control, like in your ...

  6. Bed Rest Muscular Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    2000-01-01

    A major debilitating response from prolonged bed rest (BR) is muscle atrophy, defined as a "decrease in size of a part of tissue after full development has been attained: a wasting away of tissue as from disuse, old age, injury or disease". Part of the complicated mechanism for the dizziness, increased body instability, and exaggerated gait in patients who arise immediately after BR may be a result of not only foot pain, but also of muscular atrophy and associated reduction in lower limb strength. Also, there seems to be a close association between muscle atrophy and bone atrophy. A discussion of many facets of the total BR homeostatic syndrome has been published. The old adage that use determines form which promotes function of bone (Wolff's law) also applies to those people exposed to prolonged BR (without exercise training) in whom muscle atrophy is a consistent finding. An extreme case involved a 16-year-old boy who was ordered to bed by his mother in 1932: after 50 years in bed he had "a lily-white frame with limbs as thin as the legs of a ladder-back chair". These findings emphasize the close relationship between muscle atrophy and bone atrophy. In addition to loss of muscle mass during deconditioning, there is a significant loss of muscle strength and a decrease in protein synthesis. Because the decreases in force (strength) are proportionately greater than those in fiber size or muscle cross-sectional area, other contributory factors must be involved; muscle fiber dehydration may be important.

  7. Dominant optic atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenaers, Guy; Hamel, Christian; Delettre, Cécile;

    2012-01-01

    DEFINITION OF THE DISEASE: Dominant Optic Atrophy (DOA) is a neuro-ophthalmic condition characterized by a bilateral degeneration of the optic nerves, causing insidious visual loss, typically starting during the first decade of life. The disease affects primary the retinal ganglion cells (RGC) and...... their axons forming the optic nerve, which transfer the visual information from the photoreceptors to the lateral geniculus in the brain....

  8. Progressive hemifacial atrophy with ciliary body atrophy and ocular hypotony

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Ashwini Kini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Progressive hemifacial atrophy (PHA is a disease of unknown etiology affecting one-half of the face. Ocular involvement is uncommon. Atrophy of iris is rare, with only a few cases of partial atrophy being reported in the literature. We report a case of total atrophy of iris and ciliary body with associated ocular hypotony in a 16-year-old girl with PHA. We believe this is the first reported case of complete atrophy of iris and ciliary body in PHA. Ocular hypotony in PHA was thought to be due to intra-ocular inflammation. However in our case it appears to be secondary to severe atrophy of the ciliary body.

  9. Muscular atrophy in diabetic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H; Gadeberg, P C; Brock, B;

    1997-01-01

    Diabetic patients with polyneuropathy develop motor dysfunction. To establish whether motor dysfunction is associated with muscular atrophy the ankle dorsal and plantar flexors of the non-dominant leg were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging in 8 patients with symptomatic neuropathy, in 8 non...... confirmed that the atrophy predominated distally. We conclude that muscular atrophy underlies motor weakness at the ankle in diabetic patients with polyneuropathy and that the atrophy is most pronounced in distal muscles of the lower leg indicating that a length dependent neuropathic process explains...

  10. Dominant optic atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenaers Guy

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Definition of the disease Dominant Optic Atrophy (DOA is a neuro-ophthalmic condition characterized by a bilateral degeneration of the optic nerves, causing insidious visual loss, typically starting during the first decade of life. The disease affects primary the retinal ganglion cells (RGC and their axons forming the optic nerve, which transfer the visual information from the photoreceptors to the lateral geniculus in the brain. Epidemiology The prevalence of the disease varies from 1/10000 in Denmark due to a founder effect, to 1/30000 in the rest of the world. Clinical description DOA patients usually suffer of moderate visual loss, associated with central or paracentral visual field deficits and color vision defects. The severity of the disease is highly variable, the visual acuity ranging from normal to legal blindness. The ophthalmic examination discloses on fundoscopy isolated optic disc pallor or atrophy, related to the RGC death. About 20% of DOA patients harbour extraocular multi-systemic features, including neurosensory hearing loss, or less commonly chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia, myopathy, peripheral neuropathy, multiple sclerosis-like illness, spastic paraplegia or cataracts. Aetiology Two genes (OPA1, OPA3 encoding inner mitochondrial membrane proteins and three loci (OPA4, OPA5, OPA8 are currently known for DOA. Additional loci and genes (OPA2, OPA6 and OPA7 are responsible for X-linked or recessive optic atrophy. All OPA genes yet identified encode mitochondrial proteins embedded in the inner membrane and ubiquitously expressed, as are the proteins mutated in the Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy. OPA1 mutations affect mitochondrial fusion, energy metabolism, control of apoptosis, calcium clearance and maintenance of mitochondrial genome integrity. OPA3 mutations only affect the energy metabolism and the control of apoptosis. Diagnosis Patients are usually diagnosed during their early childhood, because of

  11. Multiple system atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeraully, Tasneem

    2014-04-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a rare adult-onset synucleinopathy associated with dysautonomia and the variable presence of poorly levodopa-responsive parkinsonism and/or cerebellar ataxia. Other clinical symptoms that can be associated with MSA include hyperreflexia, stridor, sleep apnea, and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD). Mean survival from time of diagnosis ranges between 6 to 10 years, and definitive diagnosis is made on autopsy with demonstration of oligodendroglial cytoplasmic inclusions consisting of fibrillar α-synuclein. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be positive for cruciform T2 hyperintensity within the pons (the "hot cross bun sign"), volume loss in the pons and cerebellum, and T2 signal loss in the dorsolateral putamen with hyperintense rim on fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequencing. Although most cases are sporadic, genetic polymorphisms have been identified both in familial and sporadic cases of MSA, and influence observed phenotypes. Treatment is symptomatic, with both pharmacological and nonpharmacological strategies. There are currently no consensus guidelines on management. Current and future research is aimed at identifying biomarkers and developing disease-modifying therapies.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: multiple system atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... atrophy , known as MSA-C, is characterized by cerebellar ataxia , which causes problems with coordination and balance. This ... System Disorders Health Topic: Balance Problems Health Topic: Degenerative Nerve ... type MalaCards: multiple system atrophy, parkinsonian type Merck ...

  13. Gastric atrophy, diagnosing and staging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hala MT El-Zimaity

    2006-01-01

    H pylori is now accepted as the cause of gastritis and gastritis-associated diseases, such as duodenal ulcer,gastric ulcer, gastric carcinoma, and gastric MALT lymphoma. The natural history of H pylori gastritis includes inflammation progressing from the antrum into the adjacent corpus resulting in an atrophic front of advancing injury leading to a reduction in acid secretion and eventual loss of parietal cells and development of atrophy. Sub-typing intestinal metaplasia has no clinical value to the patient, the pathologist, or the endoscopist.The pattern, extent, and severity of atrophy, with or without intestinal metaplasia, is a far more important predictor than is intestinal metaplasia subtype. The challenge remains to identify a reliable marker that relates to pre-malignant potential.

  14. Progressive hemifacial atrophy: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Tolkachjov, Stanislav N; Patel, Nirav G; Tollefson, Megha M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Progressive Hemifacial Atrophy (PHA) is an acquired, typically unilateral, facial distortion with unknown etiology. The true incidence of this disorder has not been reported, but it is often regarded as a subtype of localized scleroderma. Historically, a debate existed whether PHA is a form of linear scleroderma, called morphea en coup de sabre (ECDS), or whether these conditions are inherently different processes or appear on a spectrum (; Adv Exp Med Biol 455:101–4, 1999; J Eur A...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: spinal muscular atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... accumulate and impair the normal function of motor neurons. Other types of spinal muscular atrophy that primarily affect the lower legs and feet and the lower arms and hands are caused by the dysfunction of neurons in the spinal cord. When spinal muscular atrophy ...

  16. Computed tomographic myelography characteristics of spinal cord atrophy in juvenile muscular atrophy of the upper extremity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although atrophy of the lower cervical and upper thoracic cord in juvenile muscular atrophy of distal upper extremity has been reported, the atrophic patterns of the cord, especially in the transverse section, have not been studied extensively. The aim of this study is to clarify the atrophic patterns of the cord by CT myelography (CTM) and to discuss the pathogenesis of cord atrophy. Sixteen patients with juvenile muscular atrophy of distal upper extremity were examined by CTM. Atrophy of the lower cervical and upper thoracic cord, consistent with the segmental weakness, was seen in all patients. Flattening of the ventral convexity was a characteristic atrophic pattern of the cord. Bilateral cord atrophy was commonly observed; 8/12 patients with unilateral clinical form and all 4 patients with bilateral form showed bilateral cord atrophy with dominance on the clinical side. There was no correlation between the degree of cord atrophy and duration of symptoms. Flattening of the ventral convexity, associated with purely motor disturbances, reflects selective atrophy of the anterior horns in the cord, which is attributable to chronic ischemia. Cord atrophy proved to precede clinical manifestations. The characteristic atrophy of the cord provides useful information to confirm the diagnosis without long-term observation. (author). 21 refs.; 3 figs.; 2 tabs

  17. Brain Atrophy in Type 2 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Moran, Chris; Phan, Thanh G.; Chen, Jian; Blizzard, Leigh; Beare, Richard; Venn, Alison; Münch, Gerald; Wood, Amanda G.; Forbes, Josephine; Greenaway, Timothy M.; Pearson, Susan; Srikanth, Velandai

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is associated with brain atrophy and cerebrovascular disease. We aimed to define the regional distribution of brain atrophy in T2DM and to examine whether atrophy or cerebrovascular lesions are feasible links between T2DM and cognitive function. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This cross-sectional study used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans and cognitive tests in 350 participants with T2DM and 363 participants without T2DM. With voxel-based morphometry, we s...

  18. Abdominal integument atrophy after operative procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Smereczyński, Andrzej; Kołaczyk, Katarzyna; Lubiński, Jan; Bojko, Stefania; Gałdyńska, Maria; Bernatowicz, Elżbieta

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze clinical material concerning postoperative atrophy of abdominal integument. Material and methods The evaluated group consisted of 29 patients with sonographically revealed atrophy of the abdominal wall. Those changes were observed after various surgical procedures: mainly after long, anterolateral laparotomies or several classical operations. Ultrasound examinations up to the year 2000 were performed with analog apparatus, in the latter years only with digi...

  19. Does gastric atrophy exist in children?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Georges Dimitrov; Frédéric Gottrand

    2006-01-01

    Several clinical reports confirmed that gastric atrophy is a pathology not only limited to adult patients. In pediatrics, it is most often described in association with a Hpylori infection but this bacteria does not seem to be the only etiological factor of this preneoplastic state in children. The frequency of gastric atrophy and intestinal metaplasia in children are unknown because they are not systematically sought during upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. The lack of specific histological classification of children's gastropathies makes their diagnosis difficult for pathologists. Based on our knowledge to date, we think that it is necessary to describe, in detail, the natural course of this lesion during childhood. A close and prolonged clinical and endoscopic follow-up is important for children with gastric atrophy.

  20. Restless legs syndrome in multiple system atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorayeb, Imad; Dupouy, Sandrine; Tison, François; Meissner, Wassilios G

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the frequency of restless legs syndrome in 30 patients with multiple system atrophy. Eight patients complained from restless legs syndrome, their severity score was 19.4 ± 4.1. Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores were significantly higher in patients with restless legs syndrome than those without (9.3 ± 3.7 vs. 4.8 ± 2.9, p = 0.00165). Periodic limb movements were found in 75% of patients with restless legs syndrome. Restless legs syndrome is more prevalent in multiple system atrophy as compared to the acknowledged prevalence in the general population.

  1. Progressive cerebral atrophy in neuromyelitis optica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warabi, Yoko; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Isozaki, Eiji

    2015-12-01

    We report two cases of neuromyelitis optica patients with progressive cerebral atrophy. The patients exhibited characteristic clinical features, including elderly onset, secondary progressive tetraparesis and cognitive impairment, abnormally elevated CSF protein and myelin basic protein levels, and extremely highly elevated serum anti-AQP-4 antibody titer. Because neuromyelitis optica pathology cannot switch from an inflammatory phase to the degenerative phase until the terminal phase, neuromyelitis optica rarely appears as a secondary progressive clinical course caused by axonal degeneration. However, severe intrathecal inflammation and massive destruction of neuroglia could cause a secondary progressive clinical course associated with cerebral atrophy in neuromyelitis optica patients.

  2. Mirror movements in progressive hemifacial atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Verma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mirror movements are simultaneous, involuntary, identical movements occurring during contralateral voluntary movements. These movements are considered as soft neurologic signs seen uncommonly in clinical practice. The mirror movements are described in various neurological disorders which include parkinsonism, cranio veretebral junction anamolies, and hemiplegic cerebral palsy. These movements are intriguing and can pose significant disability. However, no such observation regarding mirror movements in progressive hemifacial atrophy have been reported previously. We are reporting a teenage girl suffering from progressive hemifacial atrophy and epilepsy with demonstrable mirror movements in hand.

  3. CT features of olivopontocerebellar atrophy in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, S.D. [Sultan Qaboos Univ., Muscat (Oman). Dept. of Radiology; Chand, R.P. [Sultan Qaboos Univ., Muscat (Oman). Dept. of Medicine (Neurology); Gururaj, A.K. [Sultan Qaboos Univ., Muscat (Oman). Dept. of Child Health; Jeans, W.D. [Sultan Qaboos Univ., Muscat (Oman). Dept. of Radiology

    1995-11-01

    Between 1990 and 1992, 14 children were seen in whom a clinical diagnosis of olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA) had been made. The majority of patients presented with cerebellar ataxia and hypotonia. Five children had a family history of a similar illness in first-degree relatives. All cases had undergone clinical and neurologic examinations, routine laboratory tests and cranial CT. CT features were graded to quantitative the degree of atrophy in each cerebellar hemisphere, vermis and brain stem. All patients had varying degrees of atrophic changes of cerebellum, brain stem and cerebrum. These CT features appear to be distinctive enough to enable the diagnosis of OPCA to be made. (orig.).

  4. Genetics Home Reference: spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... myoclonic epilepsy spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Description Spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy (SMA-PME) is a neurological condition that causes ...

  5. Redox control of skeletal muscle atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Scott K; Morton, Aaron B; Ahn, Bumsoo; Smuder, Ashley J

    2016-09-01

    Skeletal muscles comprise the largest organ system in the body and play an essential role in body movement, breathing, and glucose homeostasis. Skeletal muscle is also an important endocrine organ that contributes to the health of numerous body organs. Therefore, maintaining healthy skeletal muscles is important to support overall health of the body. Prolonged periods of muscle inactivity (e.g., bed rest or limb immobilization) or chronic inflammatory diseases (i.e., cancer, kidney failure, etc.) result in skeletal muscle atrophy. An excessive loss of muscle mass is associated with a poor prognosis in several diseases and significant muscle weakness impairs the quality of life. The skeletal muscle atrophy that occurs in response to inflammatory diseases or prolonged inactivity is often associated with both oxidative and nitrosative stress. In this report, we critically review the experimental evidence that provides support for a causative link between oxidants and muscle atrophy. More specifically, this review will debate the sources of oxidant production in skeletal muscle undergoing atrophy as well as provide a detailed discussion on how reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species modulate the signaling pathways that regulate both protein synthesis and protein breakdown. PMID:26912035

  6. Fluid biomarkers in multiple system atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurens, Brice; Constantinescu, Radu; Freeman, Roy;

    2015-01-01

    Despite growing research efforts, no reliable biomarker currently exists for the diagnosis and prognosis of multiple system atrophy (MSA). Such biomarkers are urgently needed to improve diagnostic accuracy, prognostic guidance and also to serve as efficacy measures or surrogates of target...

  7. Cube propagation for focal brain atrophy estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pai, Akshay Sadananda Uppinakudru; Sørensen, Lauge; Darkner, Sune;

    2013-01-01

    Precise and robust whole brain, ventricle, and hippocampal atrophy measurements are important as they serve as biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease. They are used as secondary outcomes in drug trials, and they correlate with the cognitive scores. When two successive scans are non-linearly aligned...

  8. Redox control of skeletal muscle atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Scott K; Morton, Aaron B; Ahn, Bumsoo; Smuder, Ashley J

    2016-09-01

    Skeletal muscles comprise the largest organ system in the body and play an essential role in body movement, breathing, and glucose homeostasis. Skeletal muscle is also an important endocrine organ that contributes to the health of numerous body organs. Therefore, maintaining healthy skeletal muscles is important to support overall health of the body. Prolonged periods of muscle inactivity (e.g., bed rest or limb immobilization) or chronic inflammatory diseases (i.e., cancer, kidney failure, etc.) result in skeletal muscle atrophy. An excessive loss of muscle mass is associated with a poor prognosis in several diseases and significant muscle weakness impairs the quality of life. The skeletal muscle atrophy that occurs in response to inflammatory diseases or prolonged inactivity is often associated with both oxidative and nitrosative stress. In this report, we critically review the experimental evidence that provides support for a causative link between oxidants and muscle atrophy. More specifically, this review will debate the sources of oxidant production in skeletal muscle undergoing atrophy as well as provide a detailed discussion on how reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species modulate the signaling pathways that regulate both protein synthesis and protein breakdown.

  9. [Spinal muscular atrophy in Braunvieh calves].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, H; Ossent, P; Heckmann, R; Oertle, C

    1992-01-01

    Clinical, neurophysiological and histopathological findings of sixteen cases of spinal muscular atrophy in calves are described. The first clinical signs usually were noticed at 2-6 weeks of age. The animals showed weakness in the hindquarters, trembling and ultimate recumbency. There was a marked muscular atrophy in all four extremities. In addition, secondary bronchopneumonia was evident in 11 cases. Histopathological lesions consisted of degenerative changes in the neurons of the ventral horns and the axons of the spinal cord as well as degeneration of nerve axons in the extremities. Neurophysiological measurements revealed spontaneous activity in the muscles of the limbs. The conditions is autosomal recessive. So far 11 bulls have been identified and excluded from breeding.

  10. Cerebellar and cerebral atrophy in trichothiodystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Sargent, Michael A.; Poskitt, Kenneth J. [British Columbia Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Prendiville, Julie S. [British Columbia Children' s Hospital, Division of Paediatric Dermatology, Department of Paediatrics, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2005-10-01

    Trichothiodystrophy is a rare neuroectodermal disorder of autosomal recessive inheritance that is characterized by brittle hair, nail dysplasia, ichthyosis, mental retardation, and gonadal failure. We describe a female patient whose cranial MRI revealed almost total lack of myelination in the supratentorial white matter, which is similar to the previously described cases. In addition, there was progressive cerebellar and cerebral atrophy, which has not been well documented in association with trichothiodystrophy. (orig.)

  11. Sensorimotor gating deficits in multiple system atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoetmulder, Marielle; Biernat, Heidi Bryde; Nikolic, Miki;

    2014-01-01

    Prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the auditory blink reflex is a measure of sensorimotor gating, which reflects an organism's ability to filter out irrelevant sensory information. PPI has never been studied in patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA), although sensorimotor deficits are frequently a...... associated with synucleinopathies. We investigated whether alterations in PPI were more pronounced in MSA compared with Parkinson's disease (PD), idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (iRBD) and healthy controls....

  12. Space travel directly induces skeletal muscle atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenburgh, H.; Chromiak, J.; Shansky, J.; Del Tatto, M.; Lemaire, J.

    1999-01-01

    Space travel causes rapid and pronounced skeletal muscle wasting in humans that reduces their long-term flight capabilities. To develop effective countermeasures, the basis of this atrophy needs to be better understood. Space travel may cause muscle atrophy indirectly by altering circulating levels of factors such as growth hormone, glucocorticoids, and anabolic steroids and/or by a direct effect on the muscle fibers themselves. To determine whether skeletal muscle cells are directly affected by space travel, tissue-cultured avian skeletal muscle cells were tissue engineered into bioartificial muscles and flown in perfusion bioreactors for 9 to 10 days aboard the Space Transportation System (STS, i.e., Space Shuttle). Significant muscle fiber atrophy occurred due to a decrease in protein synthesis rates without alterations in protein degradation. Return of the muscle cells to Earth stimulated protein synthesis rates of both muscle-specific and extracellular matrix proteins relative to ground controls. These results show for the first time that skeletal muscle fibers are directly responsive to space travel and should be a target for countermeasure development.

  13. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of muscle atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Bonaldo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle is a plastic organ that is maintained by multiple pathways regulating cell and protein turnover. During muscle atrophy, proteolytic systems are activated, and contractile proteins and organelles are removed, resulting in the shrinkage of muscle fibers. Excessive loss of muscle mass is associated with poor prognosis in several diseases, including myopathies and muscular dystrophies, as well as in systemic disorders such as cancer, diabetes, sepsis and heart failure. Muscle loss also occurs during aging. In this paper, we review the key mechanisms that regulate the turnover of contractile proteins and organelles in muscle tissue, and discuss how impairments in these mechanisms can contribute to muscle atrophy. We also discuss how protein synthesis and degradation are coordinately regulated by signaling pathways that are influenced by mechanical stress, physical activity, and the availability of nutrients and growth factors. Understanding how these pathways regulate muscle mass will provide new therapeutic targets for the prevention and treatment of muscle atrophy in metabolic and neuromuscular diseases.

  14. Proximal spinal muscular atrophy: current orthopedic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haaker G

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Gerrit Haaker, Albert Fujak Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany Abstract: Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a hereditary neuromuscular disease of lower motor neurons that is caused by a defective "survival motor neuron" (SMN protein that is mainly associated with proximal progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. Although SMA involves a wide range of disease severity and a high mortality and morbidity rate, recent advances in multidisciplinary supportive care have enhanced quality of life and life expectancy. Active research for possible treatment options has become possible since the disease-causing gene defect was identified in 1995. Nevertheless, a causal therapy is not available at present, and therapeutic management of SMA remains challenging; the prolonged survival is increasing, especially orthopedic, respiratory and nutritive problems. This review focuses on orthopedic management of the disease, with discussion of key aspects that include scoliosis, muscular contractures, hip joint disorders, fractures, technical devices, and a comparative approach of conservative and surgical treatment. Also emphasized are associated complications including respiratory involvement, perioperative care and anesthesia, nutrition problems, and rehabilitation. The SMA disease course can be greatly improved with adequate therapy with established orthopedic procedures in a multidisciplinary therapeutic approach. Keywords: spinal muscular atrophy, scoliosis, contractures, fractures, lung function, treatment, rehabilitation, surgery, ventilation, nutrition, perioperative management

  15. Severe spinal muscular atrophy variant associated with congenital bone fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felderhoff-Mueser, Ursula; Grohmann, Katja; Harder, Anja; Stadelmann, Christine; Zerres, Klaus; Bührer, Christoph; Obladen, Michael

    2002-09-01

    Infantile autosomal recessive spinal muscular atrophy (type I) represents a lethal disorder leading to progressive symmetric muscular atrophy of limb and trunk muscles. Ninety-six percent cases of spinal muscular atrophy type I are caused by deletions or mutations in the survival motoneuron gene (SMNI) on chromosome 5q11.2-13.3. However, a number of chromosome 5q-negative patients with additional clinical features (respiratory distress, cerebellar hypoplasia) have been designated in the literature as infantile spinal muscular atrophy plus forms. In addition, the combination of severe spinal muscular atrophy and neurogenic arthrogryposis has been described. We present clinical, molecular, and autopsy findings of a newborn boy presenting with generalized muscular atrophy in combination with congenital bone fractures and extremely thin ribs but without contractures.

  16. Corpus callosum atrophy in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Kristian Steen; Garde, Ellen; Skimminge, Arnold;

    2011-01-01

    Several studies have found atrophy of the corpus callosum (CC) in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, it remains unclear whether callosal atrophy is already present in the early stages of AD, and to what extent it may be associated with other structural changes in the brain, such as ......Several studies have found atrophy of the corpus callosum (CC) in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, it remains unclear whether callosal atrophy is already present in the early stages of AD, and to what extent it may be associated with other structural changes in the brain...

  17. Cardiac atrophy after bed rest and spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perhonen, M. A.; Franco, F.; Lane, L. D.; Buckey, J. C.; Blomqvist, C. G.; Zerwekh, J. E.; Peshock, R. M.; Weatherall, P. T.; Levine, B. D.

    2001-01-01

    Cardiac muscle adapts well to changes in loading conditions. For example, left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy may be induced physiologically (via exercise training) or pathologically (via hypertension or valvular heart disease). If hypertension is treated, LV hypertrophy regresses, suggesting a sensitivity to LV work. However, whether physical inactivity in nonathletic populations causes adaptive changes in LV mass or even frank atrophy is not clear. We exposed previously sedentary men to 6 (n = 5) and 12 (n = 3) wk of horizontal bed rest. LV and right ventricular (RV) mass and end-diastolic volume were measured using cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 2, 6, and 12 wk of bed rest; five healthy men were also studied before and after at least 6 wk of routine daily activities as controls. In addition, four astronauts were exposed to the complete elimination of hydrostatic gradients during a spaceflight of 10 days. During bed rest, LV mass decreased by 8.0 +/- 2.2% (P = 0.005) after 6 wk with an additional atrophy of 7.6 +/- 2.3% in the subjects who remained in bed for 12 wk; there was no change in LV mass for the control subjects (153.0 +/- 12.2 vs. 153.4 +/- 12.1 g, P = 0.81). Mean wall thickness decreased (4 +/- 2.5%, P = 0.01) after 6 wk of bed rest associated with the decrease in LV mass, suggesting a physiological remodeling with respect to altered load. LV end-diastolic volume decreased by 14 +/- 1.7% (P = 0.002) after 2 wk of bed rest and changed minimally thereafter. After 6 wk of bed rest, RV free wall mass decreased by 10 +/- 2.7% (P = 0.06) and RV end-diastolic volume by 16 +/- 7.9% (P = 0.06). After spaceflight, LV mass decreased by 12 +/- 6.9% (P = 0.07). In conclusion, cardiac atrophy occurs during prolonged (6 wk) horizontal bed rest and may also occur after short-term spaceflight. We suggest that cardiac atrophy is due to a physiological adaptation to reduced myocardial load and work in real or simulated microgravity and demonstrates the plasticity

  18. Effects of muscle atrophy on motor control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, D. G.

    1985-01-01

    As a biological tissue, muscle adapts to the demands of usage. One traditional way of assessing the extent of this adaptation has been to examine the effects of an altered-activity protocol on the physiological properties of muscles. However, in order to accurately interpret the changes associated with an activity pattern, it is necessary to employ an appropriate control model. A substantial literature exists which reports altered-use effects by comparing experimental observations with those from animals raised in small laboratory cages. Some evidence suggests that small-cage-reared animals actually represent a model of reduced use. For example, laboratory animals subjected to limited physical activity have shown resistance to insulin-induced glucose uptake which can be altered by exercise training. This project concerned itself with the basic mechanisms underlying muscle atrophy. Specifically, the project addressed the issue of the appropriateness of rats raised in conventional-sized cages as experimental models to examine this phenomenon. The project hypothesis was that rats raised in small cages are inappropriate models for the study of muscle atrophy. The experimental protocol involved: 1) raising two populations of rats, one group in conventional (small)-sized cages and the other group in a much larger (133x) cage, from weanling age (21 days) through to young adulthood (125 days); 2) comparison of size- and force-related characteristics of selected test muscles in an acute terminal paradigm.

  19. A case of spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 mimicking olivopontocerebellar atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, N.; Katayama, T.; Makita, Y.; Kuroda, K.; Aizawa, H.; Kikuchi, K. [First Dept. of Internal Medicine, Asahikawa Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) is an autosomal dominant, slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia without multisystem involvement. We report a 57-year-old woman with genetically confirmed SCA6 who showed clinical features of olivopontocerebellar atrophy. Conventional T2-weighted and FLAIR MRI demonstrated high signal in the middle cerebellar peduncles, in addition to mild atrophy of the pons and cerebellum. (orig.)

  20. Bone and muscle atrophy with suspension of the rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, A.; Marsh, C.; Evans, H.; Johnson, P.; Schneider, V.; Jhingran, S.

    1985-01-01

    In order to identify a suitable model for the study of muscle atrophy due to suspension in space, a modified version of the Morey tail suspension model was used to measure the atrophic responses of rat bone and muscle to 14-30 days of unloading of the hindlimbs. The progress of atrophy was measured by increases in methylene diphosphonate (MDP) uptake. It is found that bone uptake of methylene diphosphonate followed a phasic pattern similar to changes in the bone formation rate of immobilized dogs and cats. Increased MDP uptake after a period of 60 days indicated an accelerated bone metabolism. Maximum muscle atrophy in the suspended rats was distinctly different from immobilization atrophy. On the basis of the experimental results, it is concluded that the tail suspension model is an adequate simulation of bone atrophy due to suspension.

  1. Muscle Atrophy Reversed by Growth Factor Activation of Satellite Cells in a Mouse Muscle Atrophy Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauerslev, Simon; Vissing, John; Krag, Thomas O

    2014-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies comprise a large group of inherited disorders that lead to progressive muscle wasting. We wanted to investigate if targeting satellite cells can enhance muscle regeneration and thus increase muscle mass. We treated mice with hepatocyte growth factor and leukemia inhibitory...... factor under three conditions: normoxia, hypoxia and during myostatin deficiency. We found that hepatocyte growth factor treatment led to activation of the Akt/mTOR/p70S6K protein synthesis pathway, up-regulation of the myognic transcription factors MyoD and myogenin, and subsequently the negative growth...... control factor, myostatin and atrophy markers MAFbx and MuRF1. Hypoxia-induced atrophy was partially restored by hepatocyte growth factor combined with leukemia inhibitory factor treatment. Dividing satellite cells were three-fold increased in the treatment group compared to control. Finally, we...

  2. Different atrophy-hypertrophy transcription pathways in muscles affected by severe and mild spinal muscular atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millino Caterina

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a neurodegenerative disorder associated with mutations of the survival motor neuron gene SMN and is characterized by muscle weakness and atrophy caused by degeneration of spinal motor neurons. SMN has a role in neurons but its deficiency may have a direct effect on muscle tissue. Methods We applied microarray and quantitative real-time PCR to study at transcriptional level the effects of a defective SMN gene in skeletal muscles affected by the two forms of SMA: the most severe type I and the mild type III. Results The two forms of SMA generated distinct expression signatures: the SMA III muscle transcriptome is close to that found under normal conditions, whereas in SMA I there is strong alteration of gene expression. Genes implicated in signal transduction were up-regulated in SMA III whereas those of energy metabolism and muscle contraction were consistently down-regulated in SMA I. The expression pattern of gene networks involved in atrophy signaling was completed by qRT-PCR, showing that specific pathways are involved, namely IGF/PI3K/Akt, TNF-α/p38 MAPK and Ras/ERK pathways. Conclusion Our study suggests a different picture of atrophy pathways in each of the two forms of SMA. In particular, p38 may be the regulator of protein synthesis in SMA I. The SMA III profile appears as the result of the concurrent presence of atrophic and hypertrophic fibers. This more favorable condition might be due to the over-expression of MTOR that, given its role in the activation of protein synthesis, could lead to compensatory hypertrophy in SMA III muscle fibers.

  3. Reviewing the options for local estrogen treatment of vaginal atrophy

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    Lindahl SH

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sarah H Lindahl Sutter East Bay Medical Foundation, SEBMF – Diablo Division, Castro Valley, CA, USA Background: Vaginal atrophy is a chronic condition with symptoms that include vaginal dryness, pain during sex, itching, irritation, burning, and discharge, as well as various urinary problems. Up to 45% of postmenopausal women may be affected, but it often remains underreported and undertreated. This article aims to review the current recommendations for treatment of vaginal atrophy, and current data on the effectiveness and safety of local vaginal estrogen therapies. Methods: Literature regarding vaginal atrophy (2007–2012 was retrieved from PubMed and summarized, with emphasis on data related to the treatment of vaginal atrophy with local vaginal estrogen therapy. Results: Published data support the effectiveness and endometrial safety of low-dose local estrogen therapies. These results further support the general recommendation by the North American Menopause Society that a progestogen is not needed for endometrial protection in patients using low-dose local vaginal estrogen. Benefits of long-term therapy for vaginal atrophy include sustained relief of symptoms as well as physiological improvements (eg, decreased vaginal pH and increased blood flow, epithelial thickness, secretions. Conclusion: Currently available local vaginal estrogen therapies are well tolerated and effective in relieving symptoms of vaginal atrophy. Recent data support the endometrial safety of low-dose regimens for up to 1 year. Keywords: menopause, estrogen, local estrogen therapy, vaginal atrophy

  4. Transcriptional profile of a myotube starvation model of atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Eric J.; Koncarevic, Alan; Giresi, Paul G.; Jackman, Robert W.; Kandarian, Susan C.

    2005-01-01

    Skeletal muscle wasting is a pervasive phenomenon that can result from a wide range of pathological conditions as well as from habitual muscular inactivity. The present work describes a cell-culture condition that induces significant atrophy in skeletal muscle C2C12 myotubes. The failure to replenish differentiation media in mature myotubes leads to rapid atrophy (53% in diameter), which is referred to here as starvation. Affymetrix microarrays were used to develop a transcriptional profile of control (fed) vs. atrophied (nonfed) myotubes. Myotube starvation was characterized by an upregulation of genes involved in translational inhibition, amino acid biosynthesis and transport, and cell cycle arrest/apoptosis, among others. Downregulated genes included several structural and regulatory elements of the extracellular matrix as well as several elements of Wnt/frizzled and TGF-beta signaling pathways. Interestingly, the characteristic transcriptional upregulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, calpains, and cathepsins known to occur in multiple in vivo models of atrophy were not seen during myotube starvation. With the exception of the downregulation of extracellular matrix genes, serine protease inhibitor genes, and the upregulation of the translation initiation factor PHAS-I, this model of atrophy in cell culture has a transcriptional profile quite distinct from any study published to date with atrophy in whole muscle. These data show that, although the gross morphology of atrophied muscle fibers may be similar in whole muscle vs. myotube culture, the processes by which this phenotype is achieved differ markedly.

  5. Botulinum Toxin and Muscle Atrophy: A Wanted or Unwanted Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Paul D; Couto, Rafael A; Isakov, Raymond; Yoo, Donald B; Azizzadeh, Babak; Guyuron, Bahman; Zins, James E

    2016-04-01

    While the facial rejuvenating effect of botulinum toxin type A is well known and widespread, its use in body and facial contouring is less common. We first describe its use for deliberate muscle volume reduction, and then document instances of unanticipated and undesirable muscle atrophy. Finally, we investigate the potential long-term adverse effects of botulinum toxin-induced muscle atrophy. Although the use of botulinum toxin type A in the cosmetic patient has been extensively studied, there are several questions yet to be addressed. Does prolonged botulinum toxin treatment increase its duration of action? What is the mechanism of muscle atrophy and what is the cause of its reversibility once treatment has stopped? We proceed to examine how prolonged chemodenervation with botulinum toxin can increase its duration of effect and potentially contribute to muscle atrophy. Instances of inadvertent botulinum toxin-induced atrophy are also described. These include the "hourglass deformity" secondary to botulinum toxin type A treatment for migraine headaches, and a patient with atrophy of multiple facial muscles from injections for hemifacial spasm. Numerous reports demonstrate that muscle atrophy after botulinum toxin type A treatment occurs and is both reversible and temporary, with current literature supporting the notion that repeated chemodenervation with botulinum toxin likely responsible for both therapeutic and incidental temporary muscle atrophy. Furthermore, duration of response may be increased with subsequent treatments, thus minimizing frequency of reinjection. Practitioners should be aware of the temporary and reversible effect of botulinum toxin-induced muscle atrophy and be prepared to reassure patients on this matter. PMID:26780946

  6. Brain atrophy in multiple sclerosis: therapeutic, cognitive and clinical impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Ignacio Rojas

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Multiple sclerosis (MS was always considered as a white matter inflammatory disease. Today, there is an important body of evidence that supports the hypothesis that gray matter involvement and the neurodegenerative mechanism are at least partially independent from inflammation. Gray matter atrophy develops faster than white matter atrophy, and predominates in the initial stages of the disease. The neurodegenerative mechanism creates permanent damage and correlates with physical and cognitive disability. In this review we describe the current available evidence regarding brain atrophy and its consequence in MS patients.

  7. Deformation-Based Atrophy Estimation for Alzheimer’s Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pai, Akshay Sadananda Uppinakudru

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) - the most common form of dementia, is a term used for accelerated memory loss and cognitive abilities enough to severely hamper day-to-day activities. One of the most globally accepted markers for AD is atrophy, in mainly the brain parenchyma. The goal of the PhD project...... and a new way to estimate atrophy from a deformation field. We demonstrate the performance of the proposed solution but applying it on the publicly available Alzheimer’s disease neuroimaging data (ADNI) initiative and compare to existing state-of-art atrophy estimation methods....

  8. Mechanisms of cisplatin-induced muscle atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Hiroyasu, E-mail: sakai@hoshi.ac.jp [Department of Pharmacology, Hoshi University, 2-4-41 Ebara, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 1428501 (Japan); Division of Pharmacy Professional Development and Research, Hoshi University, 2-4-41 Ebara, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 1428501 (Japan); Sagara, Atsunobu; Arakawa, Kazuhiko; Sugiyama, Ryoto; Hirosaki, Akiko; Takase, Kazuhide; Jo, Ara [Department of Pharmacology, Hoshi University, 2-4-41 Ebara, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 1428501 (Japan); Sato, Ken [Department of Pharmacology, Hoshi University, 2-4-41 Ebara, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 1428501 (Japan); Division of Pharmacy Professional Development and Research, Hoshi University, 2-4-41 Ebara, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 1428501 (Japan); Chiba, Yoshihiko [Department of Biology, Hoshi University, 2-4-41 Ebara, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 1428501 (Japan); Yamazaki, Mitsuaki [Department of Anesthesiology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama-shi, Toyama 9300194 (Japan); Matoba, Motohiro [Department of Palliative Medicine and Psychooncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 1040045 (Japan); Narita, Minoru, E-mail: narita@hoshi.ac.jp [Department of Pharmacology, Hoshi University, 2-4-41 Ebara, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 1428501 (Japan)

    2014-07-15

    Fatigue is the most common side effect of chemotherapy. However, the mechanisms of “muscle fatigue” induced by anti-cancer drugs are not fully understood. We therefore investigated the muscle-atrophic effect of cisplatin, a platinum-based anti-cancer drug, in mice. C57BL/6J mice were treated with cisplatin (3 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline for 4 consecutive days. On Day 5, hindlimb and quadriceps muscles were isolated from mice. The loss of body weight and food intake under the administration of cisplatin was the same as those in a dietary restriction (DR) group. Under the present conditions, the administration of cisplatin significantly decreased not only the muscle mass of the hindlimb and quadriceps but also the myofiber diameter, compared to those in the DR group. The mRNA expression levels of muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx), muscle RING finger-1 (MuRF1) and forkhead box O3 (FOXO3) were significantly and further increased by cisplatin treated group, compared to DR. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of myostatin and p21 were significantly upregulated by the administration of cisplatin, compared to DR. On the other hand, the phosphorylation of Akt and FOXO3a, which leads to the blockade of the upregulation of MuRF1 and MAFbx, was significantly and dramatically decreased by cisplatin. These findings suggest that the administration of cisplatin increases atrophic gene expression, and may lead to an imbalance between protein synthesis and protein degradation pathways, which would lead to muscle atrophy. This phenomenon could, at least in part, explain the mechanism of cisplatin-induced muscle fatigue. - Highlights: • Cisplatin decreased mass and myofiber diameter in quadriceps muscle. • The mRNA of MAFbx, MuRF1 and FOXO3 were increased by the cisplatin. • The mRNA of myostatin and p21 were upregulated by cisplatin. • The phosphorylation of Akt and FOXO3a was decreased by cisplatin.

  9. Circulating micrornas as potential biomarkers of muscle atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei

    2016-07-01

    Noninvasive biomarkers with diagnostic value and prognostic applications have long been desired to replace muscle biopsy for muscle atrophy patients. Growing evidence indicates that circulating microRNAs are biomarkers to assess pathophysiological status. Here, we show that the medium levels of six muscle-specific miRNAs (miR-1/23a/206/133/499/208b, also known as myomiRs) were all elevated in the medium of starved C2C12 cell (P muscle mass and muscle fiber cross section area in muscle atrophy patients, indicating that they might represent the degree of muscle atrophy. Collectively, our data indicated that circulating myomiRs could serve as promising biomarkers for muscle atrophy.

  10. Biochemical adaptations of antigravity muscle fibers to disuse atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, F. W.

    1978-01-01

    Studies are presented in four parts of this report. The four parts include; (1) studies to gain information on the molecular basis of atrophy by antigravity muscle; (2) studies on the work capacity of antigravity muscles during atrophy and during recovery from atrophy; (3) studies on recovery of degenerated antigravity fibers after removal of hind-limb casts; and (4) studies on the atrophy and recovery of bone. The philosophy of these studies was to identify the time sequence of events in the soleus muscle of the rat following immobilization of the hind limbs, so that the length of the soleus muscle within the fixed limb is less than its resting length. In two separate studies, no decline in the weight of the soleus muscle could be detected during the first 72 hours of limb immobilization.

  11. Calculation of brain atrophy using computed tomography and a new atrophy measurement tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin Zahid, Abdullah; Mikheev, Artem; Yang, Andrew Il; Samadani, Uzma; Rusinek, Henry

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To determine if brain atrophy can be calculated by performing volumetric analysis on conventional computed tomography (CT) scans in spite of relatively low contrast for this modality. Materials & Method: CTs for 73 patients from the local Veteran Affairs database were selected. Exclusion criteria: AD, NPH, tumor, and alcohol abuse. Protocol: conventional clinical acquisition (Toshiba; helical, 120 kVp, X-ray tube current 300mA, slice thickness 3-5mm). Locally developed, automatic algorithm was used to segment intracranial cavity (ICC) using (a) white matter seed (b) constrained growth, limited by inner skull layer and (c) topological connectivity. ICC was further segmented into CSF and brain parenchyma using a threshold of 16 Hu. Results: Age distribution: 25-95yrs; (Mean 67+/-17.5yrs.). Significant correlation was found between age and CSF/ICC(r=0.695, p<0.01 2-tailed). A quadratic model (y=0.06-0.001x+2.56x10-5x2 ; where y=CSF/ICC and x=age) was a better fit to data (r=0.716, p < 0.01). This is in agreement with MRI literature. For example, Smith et al. found annual CSF/ICC increase in 58 - 94.5 y.o. individuals to be 0.2%/year, whereas our data, restricted to the same age group yield 0.3%/year(0.2-0.4%/yrs. 95%C.I.). Slightly increased atrophy among elderly VA patients is attributable to the presence of other comorbidities. Conclusion: Brain atrophy can be reliably calculated using automated software and conventional CT. Compared to MRI, CT is more widely available, cheaper, and less affected by head motion due to ~100 times shorter scan time. Work is in progress to improve the precision of the measurements, possibly leading to assessment of longitudinal changes within the patient.

  12. Multiple system atrophy: pathogenic mechanisms and biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellinger, Kurt A; Wenning, Gregor K

    2016-06-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a unique proteinopathy that differs from other α-synucleinopathies since the pathological process resulting from accumulation of aberrant α-synuclein (αSyn) involves the oligodendroglia rather than neurons, although both pathologies affect multiple parts of the brain, spinal cord, autonomic and peripheral nervous system. Both the etiology and pathogenesis of MSA are unknown, although animal models have provided insight into the basic molecular changes of this disorder. Accumulation of aberrant αSyn in oligodendroglial cells and preceded by relocation of p25α protein from myelin to oligodendroglia results in the formation of insoluble glial cytoplasmic inclusions that cause cell dysfunction and demise. These changes are associated with proteasomal, mitochondrial and lipid transport dysfunction, oxidative stress, reduced trophic transport, neuroinflammation and other noxious factors. Their complex interaction induces dysfunction of the oligodendroglial-myelin-axon-neuron complex, resulting in the system-specific pattern of neurodegeneration characterizing MSA as a synucleinopathy with oligodendroglio-neuronopathy. Propagation of modified toxic αSyn species from neurons to oligodendroglia by "prion-like" transfer and its spreading associated with neuronal pathways result in a multi-system involvement. No reliable biomarkers are currently available for the clinical diagnosis and prognosis of MSA. Multidisciplinary research to elucidate the genetic and molecular background of the deleterious cycle of noxious processes, to develop reliable diagnostic biomarkers and to deliver targets for effective treatment of this hitherto incurable disorder is urgently needed. PMID:27098666

  13. Spinal Muscular Atrophy: Current Therapeutic Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselyov, Alex S.; Gurney, Mark E.

    Proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by death of motor neurons in the spinal cord. SMA is caused by deletion and/or mutation of the survival motor neuron gene (SMN1) on chromosome 5q13. There are variable numbers of copies of a second, related gene named SMN2 located in the proximity to SMN1. Both genes encode the same protein (Smn). Loss of SMN1 and incorrect splicing of SMN2 affect cellular levels of Smn triggering death of motor neurons. The severity of SMA is directly related to the normal number of copies of SMN2 carried by the patient. A considerable effort has been dedicated to identifying modalities including both biological and small molecule agents that increase SMN2 promoter activity to upregulate gene transcription and produce increased quantities of full-length Smn protein. This review summarizes recent progress in the area and suggests potential target product profile for an SMA therapeutic.

  14. The Relationship between Osteogenesis Imperfecta and Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Soltani

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveA 4-month-old female with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI type II was admitted in PICU of our center due to severe respiratory distress and fever with a diagnosis of severe pneumonia, and mechanical ventilation was initiated. Due to severe hypotonia, NCV and EMG were performed, and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA type I was diagnosed.Keywords: Osteogenesis imperfecta; spinal muscular atrophy; hypotonia

  15. The Relationship between Osteogenesis Imperfecta and Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Babak Soltani; Abdollah Karimi; Alireza Fahimzad; Mahshid Talebian

    2011-01-01

    ObjectiveA 4-month-old female with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type II was admitted in PICU of our center due to severe respiratory distress and fever with a diagnosis of severe pneumonia, and mechanical ventilation was initiated. Due to severe hypotonia, NCV and EMG were performed, and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) type I was diagnosed.Keywords: Osteogenesis imperfecta; spinal muscular atrophy; hypotonia

  16. Steroid-induced Kager's fat pad atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taneja, Atul K. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Musculoskeletal Radiology Division, Imaging Department, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Musculoskeletal Imaging, Diagnostic Center, Hospital do Coracao (HCor) and Teleimagem, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Santos, Durval C.B. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Musculoskeletal Radiology Division, Imaging Department, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    We report a rare case of Kager's fat pad atrophy and fibrosis in a 60-year-old woman 1 year after a steroid injection for Achilles tendinopathy. There are few published reports of steroid-induced atrophy affecting deeper layers of fat tissue. To our knowledge, this case report is the first to illustrate its features using magnetic resonance imaging. A review of the scientific literature is also presented. (orig.)

  17. Muscle atrophy reversed by growth factor activation of satellite cells in a mouse muscle atrophy model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Hauerslev

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophies comprise a large group of inherited disorders that lead to progressive muscle wasting. We wanted to investigate if targeting satellite cells can enhance muscle regeneration and thus increase muscle mass. We treated mice with hepatocyte growth factor and leukemia inhibitory factor under three conditions: normoxia, hypoxia and during myostatin deficiency. We found that hepatocyte growth factor treatment led to activation of the Akt/mTOR/p70S6K protein synthesis pathway, up-regulation of the myognic transcription factors MyoD and myogenin, and subsequently the negative growth control factor, myostatin and atrophy markers MAFbx and MuRF1. Hypoxia-induced atrophy was partially restored by hepatocyte growth factor combined with leukemia inhibitory factor treatment. Dividing satellite cells were three-fold increased in the treatment group compared to control. Finally, we demonstrated that myostatin regulates satellite cell activation and myogenesis in vivo following treatment, consistent with previous findings in vitro. Our results suggest, not only a novel in vivo pharmacological treatment directed specifically at activating the satellite cells, but also a myostatin dependent mechanism that may contribute to the progressive muscle wasting seen in severely affected patients with muscular dystrophy and significant on-going regeneration. This treatment could potentially be applied to many conditions that feature muscle wasting to increase muscle bulk and strength.

  18. Visual neglect in posterior cortical atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrade Katia

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In posterior cortical atrophy (PCA, there is a progressive impairment of high-level visual functions and parietal damage, which might predict the occurrence of visual neglect. However, neglect may pass undetected if not assessed with specific tests, and might therefore be underestimated in PCA. In this prospective study, we aimed at establishing the side, the frequency and the severity of visual neglect, visual extinction, and primary visual field defects in an unselected sample of PCA patients. Methods Twenty-four right-handed PCA patients underwent a standardized battery of neglect tests. Visual fields were examined clinically by the confrontation method. Results Sixteen of the 24 patients (66% had signs of visual neglect on at least one test, and fourteen (58% also had visual extinction or hemianopia. Five patients (21% had neither neglect nor visual field defects. As expected, left-sided neglect was more severe than right-sided neglect. However, right-sided neglect resulted more frequently in this population (29% than in previous studies on focal brain lesions. Conclusion When assessed with specific visuospatial tests, visual neglect is frequent in patients with PCA. Diagnosis of neglect is important because of its negative impact on daily activities. Clinicians should consider the routine use of neglect tests to screen patients with high-level visual deficits. The relatively high frequency of right-sided neglect in neurodegenerative patients supports the hypothesis that bilateral brain damage is necessary for right-sided neglect signs to occur, perhaps because of the presence in the right hemisphere of crucial structures whose damage contributes to neglect.

  19. In vivo models of multiple system atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernagut, Pierre-Olivier; Ghorayeb, Imad; Diguet, Elsa; Tison, François

    2005-08-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a sporadic adult-onset neurodegenerative disorder of unknown etiology clinically characterized by a combination of parkinsonian, pyramidal, and cerebellar signs. Levodopa-unresponsive parkinsonism is present in 80% of MSA cases, and this dominant clinical presentation (MSA-P) is associated with a combined degeneration of the substantia nigra pars compacta and the striatum in anatomically related areas. The limited knowledge of the pathophysiology of MSA and the lack of therapeutic strategies prompted the development of lesion models reproducing striatonigral degeneration, the substrate of levodopa-unresponsive parkinsonism in MSA-P. This method was carried out first in rats with two different stereotaxic strategies using either two neurotoxins ("double toxin-double lesion") or a single neurotoxin ("single toxin-double lesion"). Double-lesioned rat models showed severe motor impairment compared to those with a single nigral or striatal lesion and helped to mimic different stages of the disease. Systemic models were also developed in mice and primates using the nigral toxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) and the striatal toxin 3-nitropropionic (3-NP). In mice, although MPTP reduced the subsequent sensitivity to 3-NP in a sequential lesion, simultaneous nigral and striatal insults were shown to exacerbate striatal damage. MPTP-treated monkeys displayed a significant worsening of parkinsonism and a loss of levodopa-responsiveness after the appearance of hindlimb dystonia and striatal lesion formation induced by subsequent 3-NP intoxication. The different species and intoxication paradigms used will be useful to investigate functional changes in substantia nigra and striatum and to define neuroprotective, neurorestorative, or symptomatic therapeutic strategies.

  20. Whole-Brain Atrophy Rate in Idiopathic Parkinson's Disease, Multiple System Atrophy, and Progressive Supranuclear Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara, C; Bulatova, K; Barker, G J; Gonzalez, G; Crossley, N; Kempton, M J

    2016-01-01

    In multiple system atrophy (MSA) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), the absence of surrogate endpoints makes clinical trials long and expensive. We aim to determine annualized whole-brain atrophy rates (a-WBAR) in idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD), MSA, and PSP. Ten healthy controls, 20 IPD, 12 PSP, and 8 MSA patients were studied using a volumetric MRI technique (SIENA). In controls, the a-WBAR was 0.37% ± 0.28 (CI 95% 0.17-0.57), while in IPD a-WBAR was 0.54% ± 0.38 (CI 95% 0.32-0.68). The IPD patients did not differ from the controls. In PSP, the a-WBAR was 1.26% ± 0.51 (CI 95%: 0.95-1.58). In MSA, a-WBAR was 1.65% ± 1.12 (CI 95%: 0.71-2.59). MSA did not differ from PSP. The a-WBAR in PSP and MSA were significantly higher than in the IPD group (p = 0.004 and p < 0.001, resp.). In PSP, the use of a-WBAR required one-half of the patients needed for clinical scales to detect a 50% reduction in their progression. In MSA, one-quarter of the patients would be needed to detect the same effect. a-WBAR is a reasonable candidate to consider as a surrogate endpoint in short clinical trials using smaller sample sizes. The confidence intervals for a-WBAR may add a potential retrospective application for a-WBAR to improve the diagnostic accuracy of MSA and PSP versus IPD.

  1. Can endurance exercise preconditioning prevention disuse muscle atrophy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Wiggs

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence suggests that exercise training can provide a level of protection against disuse muscle atrophy. Endurance exercise training imposes oxidative, metabolic, and heat stress on skeletal muscle which activates a variety of cellular signaling pathways that ultimately leads to the increased expression of proteins that have been demonstrated to protect muscle from inactivity –induced atrophy. This review will highlight the effect of exercise-induced oxidative stress on endogenous enzymatic antioxidant capacity (i.e., superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase, the role of oxidative and metabolic stress on PGC1-α, and finally highlight the effect heat stress and HSP70 induction. Finally, this review will discuss the supporting scientific evidence that these proteins can attenuate muscle atrophy through exercise preconditioning.

  2. Apoptosis in skeletal muscle and its relevance to atrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Esther E Dupont-Versteegden

    2006-01-01

    Apoptosis is necessary for maintaining the integrity of proliferative tissues, such as epithelial cells of the gastrointestinal system. The role of apoptosis in post mitotic tissues, such as skeletal muscle, is less well defined. Apoptosis during muscle atrophy occurs in both myonuclei and other muscle cell types. Apoptosis of myonuclei likely contributes to the loss of muscle mass, but the mechanisms underlying this process are largely unknown. Caspase-dependent as well as -independent pathways have been implicated and the mode by which atrophy is induced likely determines the apoptotic mechanisms that are utilized. It remains to be determined whether a decrease in apoptosis will alleviate atrophy and distinct research strategies may be required for different causes of skeletal muscle loss.

  3. The relationship between brain atrophy and asymptomatic cerebral lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to clarify the relationship between brain atrophy and asymptomatic cerebral lesions, total of 235 subjects (130 males and 105 females), who had neither neurologic deficits nor organic lesions on cerebral computed tomography, were studied. The subjects' ages ranged from 40 to 86 years (mean 66). They were divided into two groups: 90 controls without hypertension or diabetes mellitus (Group C), and 145 patients with essential hypertension (Group H). Brain atrophy was diagnosed using the caudate head index (CHI). Asymptomatic cerebral lesions on magnetic resonance imaging were defined as asymptomatic lacunae and white matter lesions. Caudate head index was higher in Group H than it was in Group C, and CHI in both groups was significantly correlated with the number of asymptomatic lacunae and the severity of white matter lesions on magnetic resonance imaging. These results indicate that brain atrophy may progress along with asymptomatic cerebral lesions. (author)

  4. Atrophy of the corpus callosum correlates with white matter lesions in patients with cerebral ischaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many studies of white matter high signal (WMHS) on T2-weighted MRI have disclosed that it is related to cerebral ischaemia and to brain atrophy. Atrophy of the corpus callosum (CC) has also been studied in relation to ischaemia. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that CC atrophy could be due to ischaemia. We therefore assessed CC, WMHS and brain atrophy in patients with risk factors without strokes (the risk factor group) and in those with infarcts (the infarct group), to investigate the relationships between these factors. We studied 30 patients in the infarct group, 14 in the risk factor group, and 29 normal subjects. Using axial T1-weighted MRI, cortical atrophy and ventricular enlargement (brain atrophy) were visually rated. Using axial T2-weighted MRI, WMHS was assessed in three categories: periventricular symmetrical, periventricular asymmetrical and subcortical. Using the mid-sagittal T1-weighted image, the CC was measured in its anterior, posterior, midanterior and midposterior portions. In the normal group, no correlations were noted between parameters. In the infarct group, there were significant correlations between CC and brain atrophy, and between CC atrophy and WMHS. After removing the effects of age, gender and brain atrophy, significant correlations were noted between some CC measures and subcortical WMHS. In the risk factor group, there were significant correlations between CC and brain atrophy and between CC atrophy and WMHS. After allowance for age, gender and brain atrophy, significant correlations between some CC measures and periventricular WMHS remained. The hypothesis that CC atrophy could be due to cerebral ischaemia was supported by other analyses. Namely, for correlations between the extent of infarcts and partial CC atrophy in patients with anterior middle cerebral artery (MCA) and with posterior MCA infarcts, there were significant correlations between the extent of infarct and midanterior CC atrophy in the former, and posterior

  5. Atrophy of the corpus callosum correlates with white matter lesions in patients with cerebral ischaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meguro, K.; Yamadori, A. [Section of Neuropsychology, Division of Disability Science, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1, Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, 980-8575 Sendai (Japan); Constans, J.M.; Courtheoux, P.; Theron, J. [MR Unit, University of Caen School of Medicine, Caen (France); Viader, F. [Department of Neuroradiology, University of Caen School of Medicine, Caen (France)

    2000-06-01

    Many studies of white matter high signal (WMHS) on T2-weighted MRI have disclosed that it is related to cerebral ischaemia and to brain atrophy. Atrophy of the corpus callosum (CC) has also been studied in relation to ischaemia. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that CC atrophy could be due to ischaemia. We therefore assessed CC, WMHS and brain atrophy in patients with risk factors without strokes (the risk factor group) and in those with infarcts (the infarct group), to investigate the relationships between these factors. We studied 30 patients in the infarct group, 14 in the risk factor group, and 29 normal subjects. Using axial T1-weighted MRI, cortical atrophy and ventricular enlargement (brain atrophy) were visually rated. Using axial T2-weighted MRI, WMHS was assessed in three categories: periventricular symmetrical, periventricular asymmetrical and subcortical. Using the mid-sagittal T1-weighted image, the CC was measured in its anterior, posterior, midanterior and midposterior portions. In the normal group, no correlations were noted between parameters. In the infarct group, there were significant correlations between CC and brain atrophy, and between CC atrophy and WMHS. After removing the effects of age, gender and brain atrophy, significant correlations were noted between some CC measures and subcortical WMHS. In the risk factor group, there were significant correlations between CC and brain atrophy and between CC atrophy and WMHS. After allowance for age, gender and brain atrophy, significant correlations between some CC measures and periventricular WMHS remained. The hypothesis that CC atrophy could be due to cerebral ischaemia was supported by other analyses. Namely, for correlations between the extent of infarcts and partial CC atrophy in patients with anterior middle cerebral artery (MCA) and with posterior MCA infarcts, there were significant correlations between the extent of infarct and midanterior CC atrophy in the former, and posterior

  6. Accelerating regional atrophy rates in the progression from normal aging to Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated progression of atrophy in vivo, in Alzheimer's disease (AD), and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We included 64 patients with AD, 44 with MCI and 34 controls with serial MRI examinations (interval 1.8 ± 0.7 years). A nonlinear registration algorithm (fluid) was used to calculate atrophy rates in six regions: frontal, medial temporal, temporal (extramedial), parietal, occipital lobes and insular cortex. In MCI, the highest atrophy rate was observed in the medial temporal lobe, comparable with AD. AD patients showed even higher atrophy rates in the extramedial temporal lobe. Additionally, atrophy rates in frontal, parietal and occipital lobes were increased. Cox proportional hazard models showed that all regional atrophy rates predicted conversion to AD. Hazard ratios varied between 2.6 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.1-6.2) for occipital atrophy and 15.8 (95% CI = 3.5-71.8) for medial temporal lobe atrophy. In conclusion, atrophy spreads through the brain with development of AD. MCI is marked by temporal lobe atrophy. In AD, atrophy rate in the extramedial temporal lobe was even higher. Moreover, atrophy rates also accelerated in parietal, frontal, insular and occipital lobes. Finally, in nondemented elderly, medial temporal lobe atrophy was most predictive of progression to AD, demonstrating the involvement of this region in the development of AD. (orig.)

  7. Accelerating regional atrophy rates in the progression from normal aging to Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sluimer, Jasper D. [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Alzheimer Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Image Analysis Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Alzheimer Centre, PO Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Flier, Wiesje M. van der; Scheltens, Philip [VU University Medical Centre, Alzheimer Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Department of Neurology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Karas, Giorgos B.; Barkhof, Frederik [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Alzheimer Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Image Analysis Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schijndel, Ronald van [VU University Medical Centre, Image Analysis Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Department of Informatics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Barnes, Josephine; Boyes, Richard G. [UCL, Institute of Neurology, Dementia Research Centre, London (United Kingdom); Cover, Keith S. [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Physics and Medical Technology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Olabarriaga, Silvia D. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Fox, Nick C. [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Neurology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); UCL, Institute of Neurology, Dementia Research Centre, London (United Kingdom); Vrenken, Hugo [VU University Medical Centre, Alzheimer Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Image Analysis Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Department of Physics and Medical Technology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-12-15

    We investigated progression of atrophy in vivo, in Alzheimer's disease (AD), and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We included 64 patients with AD, 44 with MCI and 34 controls with serial MRI examinations (interval 1.8 {+-} 0.7 years). A nonlinear registration algorithm (fluid) was used to calculate atrophy rates in six regions: frontal, medial temporal, temporal (extramedial), parietal, occipital lobes and insular cortex. In MCI, the highest atrophy rate was observed in the medial temporal lobe, comparable with AD. AD patients showed even higher atrophy rates in the extramedial temporal lobe. Additionally, atrophy rates in frontal, parietal and occipital lobes were increased. Cox proportional hazard models showed that all regional atrophy rates predicted conversion to AD. Hazard ratios varied between 2.6 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.1-6.2) for occipital atrophy and 15.8 (95% CI = 3.5-71.8) for medial temporal lobe atrophy. In conclusion, atrophy spreads through the brain with development of AD. MCI is marked by temporal lobe atrophy. In AD, atrophy rate in the extramedial temporal lobe was even higher. Moreover, atrophy rates also accelerated in parietal, frontal, insular and occipital lobes. Finally, in nondemented elderly, medial temporal lobe atrophy was most predictive of progression to AD, demonstrating the involvement of this region in the development of AD. (orig.)

  8. [A case of cerebral gigantism with cerebellar atrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitazawa, K; Ikeda, M; Tsukagoshi, H

    1990-05-01

    A 37-year-old housewife, who had physical characteristics of cerebral gigantism, such as the tall stature, acromegaly, macrocephalia, high arched palate and antimongoloid slant, developed cerebellar ataxia and dysarthria. Her mother, uncle and grandmother were also reported to have slowly progressive gait disturbance. Her mother was also tall. Endocrinological studies failed to show any definite abnormality. CT and MRI revealed remarkable cerebellar atrophy. Though cerebral gigantism is often associated with clumsiness and incoordination, the etiology of the ataxia is poorly understood. This case indicates that the ataxia in cerebral gigantism may be, at least partly, caused by cerebellar atrophy. PMID:2401112

  9. [A Case of Musicophilia with Right Predominant Temporal Lobe Atrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinagawa, Shunichiro; Nakayama, Kazuhiko

    2015-11-01

    A 68-year-old woman exhibiting musicophilia with right predominant temporal lobe atrophy happened to visit our clinic. She had no musical background, but beginning two years ago, she acquired a strong preference for especially popular music and sometimes sang at home. She did not exhibit obvious semantic aphasia or facial agnosia, and showed only mild behavioral changes including apathy. Her musicophilia can be explained as an instance of stereotypical behavior. Her right temporal lobe atrophy may have caused changes in her emotional and reward systems, resulting in her music specific behaviors. PMID:26560960

  10. Bilaterally impaired hand dexterity with posterior cortical atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nages Nagaratnam, MD, FRACP, FRCPA, FACC

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A 79-year- old man presented with bilaterally impaired hand movements pertaining to handling of objects although hand movements without the use of objects were preserved, findings consistent with tactile apraxia. His hand and finger movements were slow and clumsy. He had an isolated optic ataxia, a component of Balint's syndrome. The computed tomography scan showed enlargement of the posterior horns of the lateral ventricles. He had recurrent falls probably owing to visual attentional deficits, which may be present in patients with posterior cortical atrophy. The findings can be deemed to fall within the posterior cortical atrophy spectrum. The underlying mechanisms are discussed.

  11. Vulvar and Vaginal Atrophy: Physiology, Clinical Presentation, and Treatment Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev-Sagie, Ahinoam

    2015-09-01

    Vulvovaginal atrophy is a common condition associated with decreased estrogenization of the vaginal tissue. Symptoms include vaginal dryness, irritation, itching, soreness, burning, dyspareunia, discharge, urinary frequency, and urgency. It can occur at any time in a woman's life cycle, although more commonly in the postmenopausal phase, during which the prevalence is approximately 50%. Despite the high prevalence and the substantial effect on quality of life, vulvovaginal atrophy often remains underreported and undertreated. This article aims to review the physiology, clinical presentation, assessment, and current recommendations for treatment, including aspects of effectiveness and safety of local vaginal estrogen therapies.

  12. Tubular atrophy in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelling, Jeffrey R

    2016-05-01

    The longstanding focus in chronic kidney disease (CKD) research has been on the glomerulus, which is sensible because this is where glomerular filtration occurs, and a large proportion of progressive CKD is associated with significant glomerular pathology. However, it has been known for decades that tubular atrophy is also a hallmark of CKD and that it is superior to glomerular pathology as a predictor of glomerular filtration rate decline in CKD. Nevertheless, there are vastly fewer studies that investigate the causes of tubular atrophy, and fewer still that identify potential therapeutic targets. The purpose of this review is to discuss plausible mechanisms of tubular atrophy, including tubular epithelial cell apoptosis, cell senescence, peritubular capillary rarefaction and downstream tubule ischemia, oxidative stress, atubular glomeruli, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, interstitial inflammation, lipotoxicity and Na(+)/H(+) exchanger-1 inactivation. Once a a better understanding of tubular atrophy (and interstitial fibrosis) pathophysiology has been obtained, it might then be possible to consider tandem glomerular and tubular therapeutic strategies, in a manner similar to cancer chemotherapy regimens, which employ multiple drugs to simultaneously target different mechanistic pathways.

  13. Excessive daytime sleepiness in multiple system atrophy (SLEEMSA study)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreno-Lopez, C.; Santamaria, J.; Salamero, M.; Del Sorbo, F.; Albanese, A.; Pellecchia, M.T.; Barone, P.; Overeem, S.; Bloem, B.R.; Aarden, W.C.C.A.; Canesi, M.; Antonini, A.; Duerr, S.; Wenning, G.K.; Poewe, W.; Rubino, A.; Meco, G.; Schneider, S.A.; Bhatia, K.P.; Djaldetti, R.; Coelho, M.; Sampaio, C.; Cochen, V.; Hellriegel, H.; Deuschl, G.; Colosimo, C.; Marsili, L.; Gasser, T.; Tolosa, E.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sleep disorders are common in multiple system atrophy (MSA), but the prevalence of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is not well known. OBJECTIVE: To assess the frequency and associations of EDS in MSA. DESIGN: Survey of EDS in consecutive patients with MSA and comparison with patients

  14. Best practice guidelines for molecular analysis in spinal muscular atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffer, H; Cobben, JM; Matthijs, G; Wirth, B

    2001-01-01

    With a prevalence of approximately 1/10 000, and a carrier frequency of 1/40-1/60 the proximal spinal muscular atrophies (SMAs) are among the most frequent autosomal recessive hereditary disorders. Patients can be classified clinically into four groups: acute, intermediate, mild, and adult (SMA type

  15. Brain atrophy at onset and physical disability in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Ignacio Rojas

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate if brain atrophy in multiple sclerosis (MS patients during the disease onset predicts long term disability. METHODS: MS patients with follow-up time of at least 7 years from disease onset and with baseline and second magnetic resonance 12 months later were included to measure brain atrophy. Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS was categorized in three groups, EDSS=0, EDSS=1 and 2.5 and EDSS>2.5, and used as disability measure. RESULTS: Twenty-six patients were included. Mean atrophy during the first year in patients that reached an EDSS≥3 was -0.76±0.45 %, in patients with an EDSS between 1 and 2.5 was -0.59±0.56, while in patients with an EDSS of 0 it was -0.38±0.42 (p=0.003. DISCUSSION: Brain atrophy rates during the first year of disease were predictive of disease progression in our population.

  16. Ataxia-telangiectasia: the pattern of cerebellar atrophy on MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe MRI of the brain in 19 patients with ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) and correlate the appearances with the degree of neurologic deficit. We examined 10 male and nine female patients; 17 were aged between 2 and 12 years (mean 8 years) but a woman and her brother were 35 and 38 years old, and had a variant of AT. Ataxia was the first recognized sign of the disease in every patient. We detected the following patterns of cerebellar atrophy: in the youngest patient, aged 2 years, the study was normal; in the five next youngest patients 3-7 years of age, the lateral cerebellum and superior vermis showed the earliest changes of atrophy; and all but one of the other patients had moderate to marked diffuse atrophy of vermis and cerebellar hemispheres. There were 12 patients aged 9 years and above; one, who was normal, was 9 years old. The five patients who at the time of examination were unable to walk all had diffuse atrophy involving both vermis and cerebellar hemispheres. (orig.)

  17. The Relationship between Osteogenesis Imperfecta and Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Soltani

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveA 4-month-old female with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI type II was admitted in PICU of our center due to severe respiratory distress and fever with a diagnosis of severe pneumonia, and mechanical ventilation was initiated. Due to severe hypotonia, NCV and EMG were performed, and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA type I was diagnosed.

  18. Axonal loss occurs early in dominant optic atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milea, Dan; Sander, Birgit; Wegener, Marianne;

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study set out to investigate retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) thickness and best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) in relation to age in healthy subjects and patients with OPA1 autosomal dominant optic atrophy (DOA). Methods: We carried out a cross-sectional investigation of RNFL thick...

  19. Epidural anaesthesia in a child with possible spinal muscular atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, A; Molenbuur, B; Richardson, FJ

    2002-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a rare lower motor neurone disease in which anaesthetic management is often difficult as a result of muscle weakness and hypersensitivity to neuromuscular blocking agents. Neuraxial anaesthesia is controversial in these patients; however, some cases have been reporte

  20. Physical complaints in ageing persons with spinal muscular atrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, I.J.M. de; Witte, L.P de

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: While life expectancy is improving for persons with spinal muscular atrophy, new physical complaints may arise. To investigate this, we studied persons with a long duration and severe course (high functional limitations) of the disease. DESIGN: Cross-sectional descriptive study. SUBJECTS/

  1. CT findings of hereditary dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hereditary dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) has recently been recognized as a clinicopathological entity. It may be defined as a multisystem degenerative disease of dominant inheritance, and characterized clinically by a combination of epilepsy, myoclonus, ataxia, dementia, and choreo-athetosis. This paper reports on the CT findings of ten patients (in four families) with DRPLA. In two families, the diagnosis was established on the basis of the clinicopathological findings, while in the other two, the diagnosis was made clinically. Although the CT findings were not identical in all patients, some degree of atrophic change was always observed in the cerebellum, brainstem, and cerebral cortex. Cerebellar atrophy was always accompanied by a dilatation of the fourth ventricle. Midbrain atrophy was characterized by a prominent tegmental atrophy and aqueductal dilatation, such as is seen in progressive supranuclear palsy. Of the four patients over 40 years of age, three had a diffuse hypodensity of the cerebral white matter on CT. To our knowledge, there have been no previous reports on this hypodensity in patients with spino-cerebellar degeneration or Huntington's chorea. CT may be helpful in the differential diagnosis of progressive neuro-degenerative disorders. (author)

  2. Benefits of Laser Therapy in Postmenopausal Vaginal Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brînzan, Daniela; Pǎiuşan, Lucian; Daşcǎu, Voicu; Furǎu, Gheorghe

    2011-08-01

    Maybe the worst aspect of menopause is the decline of the quality of the sexual life. The aim of the study is to demonstrate the beneficial effects of laser therapy in comparison with topical application of estrogen preparations, for the treatment of vaginal atrophy and sexual dysfunctions induced by menopause. A total of 50 menopausal patients were examined during a one year period. The methods used for objectifying vaginal atrophy and sexual dysfunctions were history taking, local clinical exam and PAP smear. From this group, 40 patients had vaginal atrophy with sexual dysfunctions. They have been treated differently, being included in four groups: patients treated with local estrogens, patients treated with intravaginal laser therapy, patients treated with both laser therapy and estrogens, patients treated with estrogens and placebo laser therapy. Therapeutic benefit, improvement of vaginal atrophy and quality of sexual life, were objectified by anamnesis (questionnaire), local and general clinical examination and PAP smear. The best results have been obtained, by far, in the 3rd group, followed by the women treated only with laser. In conclusion, we can say that laser therapy is the best way for solving the sexual inconveniences of menopause.

  3. Prefrontal involvement related to cognitive impairment in progressive muscular atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raaphorst, Joost; van Tol, Marie-José; Groot, Paul F C; Altena, Ellemarije; van der Werf, Ysbrand D; Majoie, Charles B; van der Kooi, Anneke J; van den Berg, Leonard H; Schmand, Ben; de Visser, Marianne; Veltman, Dick J

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine brain activation patterns during verbal fluency performance in patients with progressive muscular atrophy (PMA) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). METHODS: fMRI was used to examine the blood oxygen level-dependent response during letter and category fluency performance in

  4. Prefrontal involvement related to cognitive impairment in progressive muscular atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Raaphorst; M.J. van Tol; P.F.C. Groot; E. Altena; Y.D. van der Werf; C.B. Majoie; A.J. van der Kooi; L.H. van den Berg; B. Schmand; M. de Visser; D.J. Veltman

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine brain activation patterns during verbal fluency performance in patients with progressive muscular atrophy (PMA) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Methods: fMRI was used to examine the blood oxygen level-dependent response during letter and category fluency performance in

  5. Interpretation of electrodiagnostic findings in sporadic progressive muscular atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, J.; de Visser, M.; Van den Berg-Vos, R. M.; Van den Berg, L. H.; Wokke, J. H. J.; De Jong, J. M. B. V.; Franssen, H.

    2008-01-01

    Objective We present the electrophysiologic data at baseline of 37 patients who were included in our prospective study on sporadic adult-onset progressive muscular atrophy (PMA). The aim was to correlate electrophysiological. signs of lower motor neuron (LMN) loss with clinical signs of LMN loss, an

  6. Ataxia-telangiectasia: the pattern of cerebellar atrophy on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavani, F. [Department of Radiology, University of Modena (Italy); Zimmerman, R.A.; Gatti, R.; Bingham, P. [Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard, PA 19104, Philadelphia (United States); Berry, G.T. [Department of Endocrinology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard, PA 19104, Philadelphia (United States); Sullivan, K. [Department of Immunology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard, PA 19104, Philadelphia (United States)

    2003-05-01

    We describe MRI of the brain in 19 patients with ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) and correlate the appearances with the degree of neurologic deficit. We examined 10 male and nine female patients; 17 were aged between 2 and 12 years (mean 8 years) but a woman and her brother were 35 and 38 years old, and had a variant of AT. Ataxia was the first recognized sign of the disease in every patient. We detected the following patterns of cerebellar atrophy: in the youngest patient, aged 2 years, the study was normal; in the five next youngest patients 3-7 years of age, the lateral cerebellum and superior vermis showed the earliest changes of atrophy; and all but one of the other patients had moderate to marked diffuse atrophy of vermis and cerebellar hemispheres. There were 12 patients aged 9 years and above; one, who was normal, was 9 years old. The five patients who at the time of examination were unable to walk all had diffuse atrophy involving both vermis and cerebellar hemispheres. (orig.)

  7. Characterization of disuse skeletal muscle atrophy and the efficacy of a novel muscle atrophy countermeasure during spaceflight and simulated microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Andrea Marie

    Humans are an integral part of the engineered systems that will enable return to the Moon and eventually travel to Mars. Major advancements in countermeasure development addressing deleterious effects of microgravity and reduced gravity on the musculoskeletal system need to be made to ensure mission safety and success. The primary objectives of this dissertation are to advance the knowledge and understanding of skeletal muscle atrophy, and support development of novel countermeasures for disuse atrophy to enable healthy long-duration human spaceflight. Models simulating microgravity and actual spaceflight were used to examine the musculoskeletal adaptations during periods of unloading. Myostatin inhibition, a novel anti-atrophy drug therapy, and exercise were examined as a means of preventing and recovering from disuse atrophy. A combination of assays was used to quantify adaptation responses to unloading and examine efficacy of the countermeasures. Body and muscle masses were collected to analyze systemic changes due to treatments. Hindlimb strength and individual muscle forces were measured to demonstrate functional adaptations to treatments. Muscle fiber morphology and myosin heavy chain (MHC) expression was examined to identify adaptations at the cellular level. Protein synthesis signals insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), Akt, and p70s6 kinase; and the degradation signals Atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 were examined to identify adaptations at the molecular level that ultimately lead to muscle hypertrophy and atrophy. A time course study provided a thorough characterization of the adaptation of skeletal muscle during unloading in C57BL/6 mice, and baseline data for comparison to and evaluation of subsequent studies. Time points defining the on-set and endpoints of disuse muscle atrophy were identified to enable characterization of rapid vs. long-term responses of skeletal muscle to hindlimb suspension. Unloading-induced atrophy primarily resulted from increased protein

  8. PROLIFERATIVE INFLAMMATORY ATROPHY: POTENTIAL PRECURSOR LESION FOR PROSTATIC ADENOCARCINOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedetti-Padrón Inés

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Prostatic Intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN is currently considered as the only precursor lesion of prostate cancer (PCa; nevertheless, some years ago, it has been suspected that the atrophic lesions also might be involved in its carcinogenesis. In 1999, De Marzo prospered, the expression Proliferative Inflammatory Atrophy (PIA to denominate a lesion located in the peripheral area of the gland, with epithelial cells with high proliferative potential, frequently accompanied of inflammation that has been postulated as possible precursor lesion of PIN and PCa. Objective: To review the concepts about Proliferative Inflammatory Atrophy (PIA, its morphological, genetics and molecular characteristics and to explain the precursor capacity of PIN and PCa. Methods: Databases Pubmed, Sciencedirect, EBSCOhost and OvidSP were reviewed in search of studies, systematic reviews, consensus and meta-analyses with keywords: Proliferative Inflammatory Atrophy, Prostatic Atrophy, Prostatic Carcinoma, using as due date December of 2012. Results: Molecular disorders described in PIA support the beginning of these lesions in a context of oxidative stress, possibly caused by the surrounding inflammatory cells, which induce the expression of defense gene against the oxidative damage of the genome in some epithelial cells, while those that fail in the expression of these gene become vulnerable to oxidants and electrophiles, which do them prone to develop genetic disorders that will benefit their transformation in cells of PIN and PCa. The morphological association PIA-PIN/PCa points to a progressive relationship between these lesions.Conclusion: Topographic association and morphological transition of PIA with PIN and PCa have been observed. Besides, genetic, somatic and molecular disorders have been reported in PIA, similar to those observed in PIN and PCa due to it has been postulated as possible precursor lesion of both. Nevertheless, this approach is

  9. Renal Atrophy Secondary to Chemoradiotherapy of Abdominal Malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To identify factors predictive of renal atrophy after chemoradiotherapy of gastrointestinal malignancies. Methods and Materials: Patients who received chemotherapy and abdominal radiotherapy (RT) between 2002 and 2008 were identified for this study evaluating change in kidney size and function after RT. Imaging and biochemical data were obtained before and after RT in 6-month intervals. Kidney size was defined by craniocaudal measurement on CT images. The primarily irradiated kidney (PK) was defined as the kidney that received the greater mean kidney dose. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated to predict risk for renal atrophy. Results: Of 130 patients, median age was 64 years, and 51.5% were male. Most primary disease sites were pancreas and periampullary tumors (77.7%). Median follow-up was 9.4 months. Creatinine clearance declined 20.89%, and size of the PK decreased 4.67% 1 year after completion of chemoradiation. Compensatory hypertrophy of the non-PK was not seen. Percentage volumes of the PK receiving ≥10 Gy (V10), 15 Gy (V15), and 20 Gy (V20) were significantly associated with renal atrophy 1 year after RT (p = 0.0030, 0.0029, and 0.0028, respectively). Areas under the ROC curves for V10, V15, and V20 to predict >5% decrease in PK size were 0.760, 0.760, and 0.762, respectively. Conclusions: Significant detriments in PK size and renal function were seen after abdominal RT. The V10, V15, and V20 were predictive of risk for PK atrophy 1 year after RT. Analyses suggest the association of lower-dose renal irradiation with subsequent development of renal atrophy.

  10. Factors Associated with Changes in Brain Atrophy during a Three-Year Observation in Elderly Diabetic Patients: Effect of Renal Impairment on Hippocampal Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiko Kawamura

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: We conducted a 3-year longitudinal study concerning factors associated with changes in brain atrophy in elderly diabetic patients. Methods: We evaluated hippocampal and global brain atrophy using automatic voxel-based morphometry of structural magnetic resonance images, 4 cognitive function tests, and cerebral small vessel disease (SVD in 66 diabetic patients. Results: During the 3-year follow-up, hippocampal and global brain atrophy advanced, and cognitive functions worsened. For changes in hippocampal atrophy, changes in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, albuminuria, and being an ApoE ε4 carrier were independent factors; change in the number of silent brain infarctions was an independent factor for changes in global brain atrophy. A significant association of changes in eGFR and albuminuria with hippocampal atrophy remained after adjusting for confounders including SVD. Both types of brain atrophy at baseline were significantly correlated with cognitive impairment at baseline and especially associated with changes in delayed word recall during the follow-up after adjusting for confounders. Conclusion: Changes in eGFR and albuminuria during follow-up were independent risk factors for hippocampal atrophy, which was associated with decline in delayed word recall, suggesting that management of chronic kidney disease may prevent the progression of hippocampal atrophy.

  11. Dynamic Foot Pressure as a Countermeasure to Muscle Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyparos, A.; Layne, C. S.; Martinez, D. A.; Clarke, M. S. F.; Feeback, D. L.

    2002-01-01

    Mechanical unloading of skeletal muscle (SKM) as a consequence of space flight or ground-based analogues, such as human bedrest and rodent hindlimb suspension (HLS) models, induces SKM atrophy particularly affecting the anti-gravity musculature of the lower limbs. In the context of manned space flight, the subsequent loss of muscle strength and functionality will pose operational implications jeopardizing mission success. Exercise, currently the primary muscle degradation countermeasure, has not proven completely effective in preventing muscle atrophy. It is therefore imperative that some other forms of in- flight countermeasure be also developed to supplement the prescribed exercise regimen the astronauts follow during spaceflight. Previous work in both humans and rats has shown that mechanical stimulation of the soles of the feet increases neuromuscular activation in the lower limb musculature and that such stimulation results in the limited prevention of atrophy in the soleus muscle of unloaded rats. This study was designed to investigate the effect of cutaneous mechanoreceptor stimulation on hindlimb unloading- induced SKM atrophy in rats. It was hypothesized that mechanical stimulation of the plantar surface of the rat foot during hindlimb suspension (HLS), utilizing a novel stimulation paradigm known as Dynamic Foot Pressure (DFP), would attenuate unloading-induced SKM atrophy. Mature adult male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to four groups of 10 rats each as follows: sedentary controls (Ctrl), hindlimb suspended only (HLS), hindlimb suspended wearing an inflatable boot (HLS-IFL) and hindlimb suspended rats wearing a non-inflatable boot (HLS-NIFL). The stimulation of mechanoreceptors was achieved by applying pressure to the plantar surface of the foot during the 10-day period of HLS using a custom-built boot. The anti-atrophic effects of DFP application was quantified directly by morphological (muscle wet weight, myofiber cross-sectional area

  12. Crossed cerebellar atrophy in cases with cerebrovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crossed cerebellar atrophy (CCA) was investigated by X-ray CT to establish the incidence, mechanism, and the relation to cerebral lesions in 130 cases of unilateral supratentorial cerebrovascular diseases. The 130 cases consisted of 83 males and 47 females with cerebral infarction (65 cases) and cerebral hemorrhage (65 cases). The patients' average age was 57.6 years. Crossed cerebellar atrophy was demonstrated in 8 cases (6.2%), 6 of whom had massive cerebral infarction in the middle cerebral artery area (9.2% of the 65 cases of cerebral infarction. The six cases of CCA caused by cerebral infarction had lesions in the frontal and temporal lobes. Two had a cerebral hemorrhage in the putamen and in the thalamus, respectively, accounting for 3.1% of the 65 cases of cerebral hemorrhage. Of the 2 cases, one had putaminal hemorrhage, and the other had thalamic hemorrhage. Cerebrovascular stroke had occured in these patients with CCA more than 2 months previously. In 5 of the 8 cases of CCA, atrophy was present in the basis pedunculi and the basis pontis on the side of the cerebral lesion. However, neither dilation nor deformity of the fourth ventricle was present in any of the patients, suggesting that none of the CCA patients had atrophy of the dentate nucleus. The CCA patients had massive cerebral lesion in the frontal and temporal lobes or atrophy of the basis pedunculi and basis pontis, suggesting the presence of the transsynaptic degeneration of the cortico-ponto-cerebellar pathway. In the case of the thalamic hemorrhage, who had not hemorrhagic lesion in the frontal and temporal lobes, atrophy of the basis peduncli and basis pontis was not observed. Though dilation or deformity of the fourth ventricle is not observed in this case, presence of the degeneration of the dentate-rubro-thalamic pathway cannot be denied. CCA seems to be caused by both the transsynaptic degeneration of the cortico-ponto-cerebellar pathway and the dentate-rubro-thalamic pathway. (J.P.N.)

  13. Crustaceans as a model for microgravity-induced muscle atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mykles, D. L.

    Atrophy of skeletal muscles is a serious problem in a microgravity environment. It is hypothesized that the unloading of postural muscles, which no longer must resist gravity force, causes an accelerated breakdown of contractile proteins, resulting in a reduction in muscle mass and strength. A crustacean model using the land crab, Gecarcinus lateralis, to assess the effects of spaceflight on protein metabolism is presented. The model is compared to a developmentally-regulated atrophy in which a premolt reduction in muscle mass allows the withdrawal of the large claws at molt. The biochemical mechanisms underlying protein breakdown involves both Ca^2+-dependent and multicatalytic proteolytic enzymes. Crustacean claw muscle can be used to determine the interactions between shortening and unloading at the molecular level.

  14. Cognitive planning deficit in patients with cerebellar atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grafman, J; Litvan, I; Massaquoi, S; Stewart, M; Sirigu, A; Hallett, M

    1992-08-01

    We compared the performance of 12 patients with cerebellar atrophy (CA) and 12 normal controls matched for age and education on the Tower of Hanoi, a nine-problem task that requires cognitive planning. CA patients performed significantly worse than controls on this task despite no difference in planning and between-move pause times. A reanalysis of the data using just the subgroup of patients with pure cerebellar cortical atrophy (CCA) (N = 9) replicated the above results and also showed that CCA patients had significantly increased planning times compared with controls. Neither age, sex, education level, severity of dementia, word fluency, response time, memory, nor visuomotor procedural learning predicted CA or CCA performance. This deficit in cognitive planning suggests a functional link between the cerebellum, basal ganglia, and the frontal lobe concerning specific cognitive processes. However, the exact role of the cerebellum in cognitive planning remains undetermined. PMID:1641142

  15. Computer tomography investigation of epilepsy the brain atrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of brain atrophy in patients with epilepsy is often discussed in literature. The aim of the study is to present the results of computer tomography measurements of ventricular size and sulci of brain of 90 patients with various electro-clinical forms of epilepsy, including males and females at the age of 15 to 70 years. Computer tomography measurements were performed having in mind 6 parameters (frontal horn index, FHI; Huckman's number, HZ; cella media index,CMI; width of the third and the fourth ventricles; sulci). The results were compared to the CT measurements of a control group of 40 healthy males and females in the same age range.The obtained data indicate high percentage of subcortical atrophy among patients with epilepsy. Ventricular dilatation was found to be in light extent occurring most early in the frontal brain regions (frontal horns and lateral ventricles)., furthermore observed in the young age. (author)

  16. Recommendations for the management of postmenopausal vaginal atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturdee, D W; Panay, N; Ulrich, Lian

    2010-01-01

    for hormone replacement therapy (HRT) over recent years that has suggested an increased risk of breast cancer, heart disease and stroke. But, regardless of whether these scares are justified, local treatment of vaginal atrophy is not associated with these possible risks of systemic HRT. Other reasons...... itching, burning and dyspareunia, and sexual activity is often compromised. But, despite the various safe and effective options, only a minority (about 25% in the Western world and probably considerably less in other areas) will seek medical help. Some of this reluctance is due to the adverse publicity...... dryness can be helped by simple lubricants but the best and most logical treatment for urogenital atrophy is to use local estrogen. This is safe, effective and with few contraindications. It is hoped that these guidelines and recommendations, produced to coincide with World Menopause Day 2010, will help...

  17. Muscle spasms associated with Sudeck's atrophy after injury.

    OpenAIRE

    Marsden, C D; J. A. Obeso; Traub, M M; Rothwell, J C; Kranz, H.; de la Cruz, F.

    1984-01-01

    Four patients developed abnormal involuntary movements of a limb after injury. All subsequently developed sympathetic algodystrophy with Sudeck's atrophy and then abnormal muscle spasms or jerks of the affected limb, lasting years. Sympathetic block in three patients did not relieve the abnormal movements. Two patients obtained partial recovery spontaneously, but the other two required surgery for relief. The pathophysiology of this condition remains to be determined but the evidence suggests...

  18. Spinal muscular atrophy patient-derived motor neurons exhibit hyperexcitability

    OpenAIRE

    Huisheng Liu; Jianfeng Lu; Hong Chen; Zhongwei Du; Xue-Jun Li; Su-Chun Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) presents severe muscle weakness with limited motor neuron (MN) loss at an early stage, suggesting potential functional alterations in MNs that contribute to SMA symptom presentation. Using SMA induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), we found that SMA MNs displayed hyperexcitability with increased membrane input resistance, hyperpolarized threshold, and larger action potential amplitude, which was mimicked by knocking down full length survival motor neuron (SMN) i...

  19. Patterns of regional cerebellar atrophy in genetic frontotemporal dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Bocchetta

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: There appears to be a differential pattern of cerebellar atrophy in the major genetic forms of FTD, being relatively spared in GRN, localized to the lobule VIIa-Crus I in the superior-posterior region of the cerebellum in C9orf72, the area connected via the thalamus to the prefrontal cortex and involved in cognitive function, and localized to the vermis in MAPT, the ‘limbic cerebellum’ involved in emotional processing.

  20. Olmesartan-Induced Enteropathy: An Unusual Cause of Villous Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Eusébio

    2016-03-01

    Olmesartan is an angiotensin receptor blocker commonly prescribed for the management of hypertension. Spruelike enteropathy associated with this drug is a recently described entity with few cases reported. It presents with chronic diarrhea and intestinal villous atrophy and should be included in its differential diagnosis. This case intends to alert clinicians for the possibility of this event in a patient on treatment with this drug.

  1. Neonatal lupus erythematosus associated with unilateral pectoralis major atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Rakesh; Nandi, Madhumita; Sarkar, Sumantra; Mukherjee, Krishnendu

    2011-11-01

    Neonatal lupus erythematosus (NLE), in most cases, presents with cardiac and dermatological manifestation due to transferred IgG auto antibodies (anti Ro/SSA and anti La/SSB) from the mother. Some unusual associations with myelopathy, vasculopathy, transient myasthenia gravis, congenital nephrotic syndrome, chondrodysplasia punctata etc. are also reported. Here, the authors present a case of NLE with isolated left sided pectoralis major muscle atrophy, which has not been reported earlier. PMID:21553209

  2. Familial bulbospinal neuronopathy with optic atrophy: a distinct entity.

    OpenAIRE

    Paradiso, G; Micheli, F.; Taratuto, A L; Parera, I C

    1996-01-01

    A 61 year old woman and her 58 year old brother presented with the clinical picture of late onset progressive bulbar and spinal muscular atrophy with family history of involvement in successive generations. The sister also had optic neuropathy and the brother developed diabetes mellitus and sex hormone abnormalities. Neurophysiological and histopathological studies showed a pattern of motor and sensory neuronopathy. There was no abnormal expansion of CAG repeats in the androgen receptor gene....

  3. Serological assessment of gastric mucosal atrophy in gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bornschein Jan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-invasive tools for gastric cancer screening and diagnosis are lacking. Serological testing with the detection of pepsinogen 1 (PG1, pepsinogen 2 (PG2 and gastrin 17 (G17 offers the possibility to detect preneoplastic gastric mucosal conditions. Aim of this study was to assess the performance of these serological tests in the presence of gastric neoplasia. Methods Histological and serological samples of 118 patients with gastric cancer have been assessed for tumor specific characteristics (Laurén type, localisation, degree of mucosal abnormalities (intestinal metaplasia, atrophy and serological parameters (PG1, PG2, PG1/2-ratio, G17, H. pylori IgG, CagA status. Association of the general factors to the different serological values have been statistically analyzed. Results Patients with intestinal type gastric cancer had lower PG1 levels and a lower PG1/2-ratio compared to those with diffuse type cancer (p = 0.003. The serum levels of PG2 itself and G17 were not significantly altered. H. pylori infection in general had no influence on the levels of PG1, PG2 and G17 in the serum of gastric cancer patients. There was a trend towards lower PG1 levels in case of positive CagA-status (p = 0.058. The degree of both intestinal metaplasia and atrophy correlated inversely with serum levels for PG1 and the PG1/2-ratio (p Conclusions Glandular atrophy and a positive CagA status are determinant factors for decreased pepsinogen 1 levels in the serum of patients with gastric cancer. The serological assessment of gastric atrophy by analysis of serum pepsinogen is only adequate for patients with intestinal type cancer.

  4. Spinal Muscular Atrophy: New and Emerging Insights from Model Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Gyu-Hwan; Kariya, Shingo; Monani, Umrao R.

    2010-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a common and often fatal neurodegenerative disease that primarily afflicts infants and young children. SMA is caused by abnormally low levels of the survival motor neuron (SMN) protein resulting from a combination of recessively inherited mutations in the SMN1 gene and the presence of an almost identical but partially functional copy gene, SMN2. Absence of the uniquely human SMN2 gene in SMA patients has never been reported because the SMN protein is indispens...

  5. Masticatory muscles of mouse do not undergo atrophy in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippou, Anastassios; Minozzo, Fabio C; Spinazzola, Janelle M; Smith, Lucas R; Lei, Hanqin; Rassier, Dilson E; Barton, Elisabeth R

    2015-07-01

    Muscle loading is important for maintaining muscle mass; when load is removed, atrophy is inevitable. However, in clinical situations such as critical care myopathy, masticatory muscles do not lose mass. Thus, their properties may be harnessed to preserve mass. We compared masticatory and appendicular muscles responses to microgravity, using mice aboard the space shuttle Space Transportation System-135. Age- and sex-matched controls remained on the ground. After 13 days of space flight, 1 masseter (MA) and tibialis anterior (TA) were frozen rapidly for biochemical and functional measurements, and the contralateral MA was processed for morphologic measurements. Flight TA muscles exhibited 20 ± 3% decreased muscle mass, 2-fold decreased phosphorylated (P)-Akt, and 4- to 12-fold increased atrogene expression. In contrast, MAs had no significant change in mass but a 3-fold increase in P-focal adhesion kinase, 1.5-fold increase in P-Akt, and 50-90% lower atrogene expression compared with limb muscles, which were unaltered in microgravity. Myofibril force measurements revealed that microgravity caused a 3-fold decrease in specific force and maximal shortening velocity in TA muscles. It is surprising that myofibril-specific force from both control and flight MAs were similar to flight TA muscles, yet power was compromised by 40% following flight. Continued loading in microgravity prevents atrophy, but masticatory muscles have a different set point that mimics disuse atrophy in the appendicular muscle.

  6. Counteracting Muscle Atrophy using Galvanic Stimulation of the Vestibular System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Robert A.; Polyakov, Igor

    1999-01-01

    The unloading of weight bearing from antigravity muscles during space flight produces significant muscle atrophy and is one of the most serious health problems facing the space program. Various exercise regimens have been developed and used either alone or in combination with pharmacological techniques to ameliorate this atrophy, but no effective countermeasure exists for this problem. The research in this project was conducted to evaluate the potential use of vestibular galvanic stimulation (VGS) to prevent muscle atrophy resulting from unloading of weight bearing from antigravity muscles. This approach was developed based on two concepts related to the process of maintaining the status of the anti-gravity neuromuscular system. These two premises are: (1) The "tone," or bias on spinal motorneurons is affected by vestibular projections that contribute importantly to maintaining muscle health and status. (2) VGS can be used to modify the excitability, or 'tone' of motorneuron of antigravity muscles. Thus, the strategy is to use VGS to modify the gain of vestibular projections to antigravity muscles and thereby change the general status of these muscles.

  7. Hippocampal complex atrophy in poststroke and mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selnes, Per; Grambaite, Ramune; Rincon, Mariano; Bjørnerud, Atle; Gjerstad, Leif; Hessen, Erik; Auning, Eirik; Johansen, Krisztina; Almdahl, Ina S; Due-Tønnessen, Paulina; Vegge, Kjetil; Bjelke, Börje; Fladby, Tormod

    2015-11-01

    To investigate putative interacting or distinct pathways for hippocampal complex substructure (HCS) atrophy and cognitive affection in early-stage Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cerebrovascular disease (CVD), we recruited healthy controls, patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and poststroke patients. HCSs were segmented, and quantitative white-matter hyperintensity (WMH) load and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) amyloid-β concentrations were determined. The WMH load was higher poststroke. All examined HCSs were smaller in amyloid-positive MCI than in controls, and the subicular regions were smaller poststroke. Memory was reduced in amyloid-positive MCI, and psychomotor speed and executive function were reduced in poststroke and amyloid-positive MCI. Size of several HCS correlated with WMH load poststroke and with CSF amyloid-β concentrations in MCI. In poststroke and amyloid-positive MCI, neuropsychological function correlated with WMH load and hippocampal volume. There are similar patterns of HCS atrophy in CVD and early-stage AD, but different HCS associations with WMH and CSF biomarkers. WMHs add to hippocampal atrophy and the archetypal AD deficit delayed recall. In line with mounting evidence of a mechanistic link between primary AD pathology and CVD, these additive effects suggest interacting pathologic processes.

  8. A family with optic atrophy and congenital hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amemiya, T; Honda, A

    1994-06-01

    A 37-year-old woman had optic atrophy in both eyes and low-tone hearing disturbance of both ears noted after 34 years of age. Her visual acuity was 0.5 in the right eye and 0.6 in the left. The visual fields of both eyes showed slight progressive concentric narrowing. Hearing loss was gradually progressive. Her 13-year-old daughter also had optic atrophy in both eyes and low-tone hearing loss in both ears after 11 years of age. Her visual acuity was 0.8 in the right eye and 1.0 in the left. Her visual fields showed slight concentric narrowing. She had enlarged blind spots in both eyes. The mother and her daughter had deuteranomaly. Family history showed that the father, one brother and three sisters of the mother had congenital hearing loss. No other cause for the optic nerve atrophy and hearing disturbance could be found except heredity. PMID:7850273

  9. Religious factors and hippocampal atrophy in late life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy D Owen

    Full Text Available Despite a growing interest in the ways spiritual beliefs and practices are reflected in brain activity, there have been relatively few studies using neuroimaging data to assess potential relationships between religious factors and structural neuroanatomy. This study examined prospective relationships between religious factors and hippocampal volume change using high-resolution MRI data of a sample of 268 older adults. Religious factors assessed included life-changing religious experiences, spiritual practices, and religious group membership. Hippocampal volumes were analyzed using the GRID program, which is based on a manual point-counting method and allows for semi-automated determination of region of interest volumes. Significantly greater hippocampal atrophy was observed for participants reporting a life-changing religious experience. Significantly greater hippocampal atrophy was also observed from baseline to final assessment among born-again Protestants, Catholics, and those with no religious affiliation, compared with Protestants not identifying as born-again. These associations were not explained by psychosocial or demographic factors, or baseline cerebral volume. Hippocampal volume has been linked to clinical outcomes, such as depression, dementia, and Alzheimer's Disease. The findings of this study indicate that hippocampal atrophy in late life may be uniquely influenced by certain types of religious factors.

  10. Feasibility of the Medial Temporal lobe Atrophy index (MTAi and derived methods for measuring atrophy of the medial temporal lobe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco eConejo Bayón

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: the Medial Temporal-lobe Atrophy index (MTAi, 2D-Medial Temporal Atrophy (2D-MTA, yearly rate of MTA (yrRMTA and yearly rate of relative MTA (yrRMTA are simple protocols for measuring the relative extent of atrophy in the MTL in relation to the global brain atrophy. Albeit preliminary studies showed interest of these methods in the diagnosis of AD, FTLD and correlation with cognitive impairment in PD, formal feasibility and validity studies remained pending. As a first step, we aimed to assess the feasibility. Mainly, we aimed to assess the reproducibility of measuring the areas needed to compute these indices. We also aimed to assess the efforts needed to start using these methods correctly. Methods: a series of 290 1.5T-MRI studies from 230 subjects ranging 65-85 years old who had been studied for cognitive impairment were used in this study. Six inexperienced tracers (IT plus one experienced tracer (ET traced the three areas needed to compute the indices. Finally, tracers underwent a short survey on their experience learning to compute the MTAi and experience of usage, including items relative to training time needed to understand and apply the MTAi, time to perform a study after training and overall satisfaction. Results: learning to trace the areas needed to compute the MTAi and derived methods is quick and easy. Results indicate very good intrarater ICC for the MTAi, good intrarater ICC for the 2D-MTA, yrMTA and yrRMTA and also good interrater ICC for the MTAi, 2D-MTA, yrMTA and yrRMTA.Conclusion: our data support that MTAi and derived methods (2D-MTA, yrMTA and yrRTMA have good to very good intrarater and interrater reproducibility and may be easily implemented in clinical practice even if new users have no experience tracing the area of regions of interest.

  11. Neuropsychological correlates of brain atrophy in Huntington's disease: a magnetic resonance imaging study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging and a comprehensive cognitive evaluation were carried out in a series of 29 patients with mild to moderate Huntington's disease (HD). A factor analysis of the neuropsychological test scores provided three factors: A memory/speed-of-processing factor, a 'frontal' factor, and a response inhibition factor. The memory/speed factor correlated significantly with measures of caudate atrophy, frontal atrophy, and atrophy of the left (but not the right) sylvian cistern. There were no significant correlations between the 'frontal' or response inhibition factors and measures of cortical or subcortical brain atrophy. Our findings confirm that subcortical atrophy is significantly correlated with specific cognitive deficits in HD, and demonstrate that cortical atrophy also has important association with the cognitive deficits of patients with HD. (orig.)

  12. Neuropsychological correlates of brain atrophy in Huntington's disease: a magnetic resonance imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starkstein, S.E. (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Psychiatry Inst. of Neurological Investigation ' Dr. Raul Carrea' , Buenos Aires (Argentina)); Brandt, J.; Bylsma, F.; Peyser, C.; Folstein, M.; Folstein, S.E. (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Psychiatry)

    1992-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging and a comprehensive cognitive evaluation were carried out in a series of 29 patients with mild to moderate Huntington's disease (HD). A factor analysis of the neuropsychological test scores provided three factors: A memory/speed-of-processing factor, a 'frontal' factor, and a response inhibition factor. The memory/speed factor correlated significantly with measures of caudate atrophy, frontal atrophy, and atrophy of the left (but not the right) sylvian cistern. There were no significant correlations between the 'frontal' or response inhibition factors and measures of cortical or subcortical brain atrophy. Our findings confirm that subcortical atrophy is significantly correlated with specific cognitive deficits in HD, and demonstrate that cortical atrophy also has important association with the cognitive deficits of patients with HD. (orig.).

  13. Muscle hypertrophy induced by myostatin inhibition : a new therapeutic approach of muscle atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Gilson, Hélène

    2009-01-01

    Increasing size and strength of skeletal muscle represents a promising therapeutic strategy for muscular disorders. One possible new tool is Myostatin (Mstn) because it plays a crucial role in regulating skeletal muscle mass. The first goal of our work was to determine whether Mstn inhibition could prevent muscle atrophy in catabolic states. As glucocorticoids play a major role in most muscle atrophy models, we assessed whether muscle atrophy caused by glucocorticoids in excess could be preve...

  14. Biomechanical implications of skeletal muscle hypertrophy and atrophy: a musculoskeletal model

    OpenAIRE

    Vigotsky, Andrew D.; Contreras, Bret; Beardsley, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Muscle hypertrophy and atrophy occur frequently as a result of mechanical loading or unloading, with implications for clinical, general, and athletic populations. The effects of muscle hypertrophy and atrophy on force production and joint moments have been previously described. However, there is a paucity of research showing how hypertrophy and atrophy may affect moment arm (MA) lengths. The purpose of this model was to describe the mathematical relationship between the anatomical cross-secti...

  15. Marked cerebral atrophy is correlated with kidney dysfunction in nondisabled adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship between kidney dysfunction, such as chronic kidney disease (CKD), and brain morphology has attracted increasing attention, but the association between kidney dysfunction and cerebral atrophy has yet to be determined. The purpose of this study was to clarify the relationship between kidney function and a substantial degree of cerebral atrophy. A total of 610 consecutive Japanese adults without neurological disorders who had undergone health screening tests of the brain were studied prospectively. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed using a 1.5-T scanner. Using a computer-assisted processing system, the percentage of cerebrum atrophy (%Cerebrum atrophy) was calculated as an index of cerebral atrophy. Atrophy was defined as >2 s.d.s below the mean %Cerebrum atrophy. The glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was estimated using the revised equations for estimated GFR from serum creatinine in Japan. Kidney function variables included the GFR value and the prevalence of subjects with GFR -1 per 1.73 m2. Cerebral atrophy was found in 25 (4.1%) cases. Univariate analysis showed that age, male sex, hypertension, each kidney function variable, white matter hyperintensities and lacunae were associated with cerebral atrophy. On logistic regression analysis, GFR (odds ratio (OR), 0.64; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.42-0.98) and GFR -1 per 1.73 m2 (OR, 5.93; 95% CI, 1.82-19.27) were significantly associated with cerebral atrophy. On sub-analysis, GFR -1 per 1.73 m2 was significantly associated with cortical atrophy (OR, 3.23; 95% CI, 1.15-9.11). Decreased GFR was significantly associated with cerebral atrophy, indicating that treatment of CKD may control age-related degenerative processes of the brain. (author)

  16. Effect of Oenothera odorata Root Extract on Microgravity and Disuse-Induced Muscle Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Hyeon Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscle atrophy, a reduction of muscle mass, strength, and volume, results from reduced muscle use and plays a key role in various muscular diseases. In the microgravity environment of space especially, muscle atrophy is induced by muscle inactivity. Exposure to microgravity induces muscle atrophy through several biological effects, including associations with reactive oxygen species (ROS. This study used 3D-clinostat to investigate muscle atrophy caused by oxidative stress in vitro, and sciatic denervation was used to investigate muscle atrophy in vivo. We assessed the effect of Oenothera odorata root extract (EVP on muscle atrophy. EVP helped recover cell viability in C2C12 myoblasts exposed to microgravity for 24 h and delayed muscle atrophy in sciatic denervated mice. However, the expressions of HSP70, SOD1, and ceramide in microgravity-exposed C2C12 myoblasts and in sciatic denervated mice were either decreased or completely inhibited. These results suggested that EVP can be expected to have a positive effect on muscle atrophy by disuse and microgravity. In addition, EVP helped characterize the antioxidant function in muscle atrophy.

  17. Smad2/3 Proteins Are Required for Immobilization-induced Skeletal Muscle Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tando, Toshimi; Hirayama, Akiyoshi; Furukawa, Mitsuru; Sato, Yuiko; Kobayashi, Tami; Funayama, Atsushi; Kanaji, Arihiko; Hao, Wu; Watanabe, Ryuichi; Morita, Mayu; Oike, Takatsugu; Miyamoto, Kana; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Nomura, Masatoshi; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Tomita, Masaru; Matsumoto, Morio; Nakamura, Masaya; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Miyamoto, Takeshi

    2016-06-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy promotes muscle weakness, limiting activities of daily living. However, mechanisms underlying atrophy remain unclear. Here, we show that skeletal muscle immobilization elevates Smad2/3 protein but not mRNA levels in muscle, promoting atrophy. Furthermore, we demonstrate that myostatin, which negatively regulates muscle hypertrophy, is dispensable for denervation-induced muscle atrophy and Smad2/3 protein accumulation. Moreover, muscle-specific Smad2/3-deficient mice exhibited significant resistance to denervation-induced muscle atrophy. In addition, expression of the atrogenes Atrogin-1 and MuRF1, which underlie muscle atrophy, did not increase in muscles of Smad2/3-deficient mice following denervation. We also demonstrate that serum starvation promotes Smad2/3 protein accumulation in C2C12 myogenic cells, an in vitro muscle atrophy model, an effect inhibited by IGF1 treatment. In vivo, we observed IGF1 receptor deactivation in immobilized muscle, even in the presence of normal levels of circulating IGF1. Denervation-induced muscle atrophy was accompanied by reduced glucose intake and elevated levels of branched-chain amino acids, effects that were Smad2/3-dependent. Thus, muscle immobilization attenuates IGF1 signals at the receptor rather than the ligand level, leading to Smad2/3 protein accumulation, muscle atrophy, and accompanying metabolic changes. PMID:27129272

  18. APOE ε4 is associated with disproportionate progressive hippocampal atrophy in AD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily N Manning

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether APOE ε4 carriers have higher hippocampal atrophy rates than non-carriers in Alzheimer's disease (AD, mild cognitive impairment (MCI and controls, and if so, whether higher hippocampal atrophy rates are still observed after adjusting for concurrent whole-brain atrophy rates. METHODS: MRI scans from all available visits in ADNI (148 AD, 307 MCI, 167 controls were used. MCI subjects were divided into "progressors" (MCI-P if diagnosed with AD within 36 months or "stable" (MCI-S if a diagnosis of MCI was maintained. A joint multi-level mixed-effect linear regression model was used to analyse the effect of ε4 carrier-status on hippocampal and whole-brain atrophy rates, adjusting for age, gender, MMSE and brain-to-intracranial volume ratio. The difference in hippocampal rates between ε4 carriers and non-carriers after adjustment for concurrent whole-brain atrophy rate was then calculated. RESULTS: Mean adjusted hippocampal atrophy rates in ε4 carriers were significantly higher in AD, MCI-P and MCI-S (p≤0.011, all tests compared with ε4 non-carriers. After adjustment for whole-brain atrophy rate, the difference in mean adjusted hippocampal atrophy rate between ε4 carriers and non-carriers was reduced but remained statistically significant in AD and MCI-P. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that the APOE ε4 allele drives atrophy to the medial-temporal lobe region in AD.

  19. The research progress of clinical diagnosis of spinal muscular atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Ning

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a common autosomal recessive neuromuscular disease caused by degeneration of anterior horn cell in spinal cord. The clinical feature is characterized by progressive symmetrical myasthenia and amyotrophia. The disease is caused by mutation of survival motor neuron (SMN1 gene. Four clinical types are defined for SMA: type Ⅰ, Ⅱ, Ⅲ and Ⅳ. The diagnosis depends on clinical manifestation, inherited history, laboratory test and genetic analysis. To date, there is no effective treatment for SMA, so prenatal diagnosis and carrier screening are important for the prevention of this disease.

  20. Chorioretinal Atrophy after Spontaneous Resolution of Myopic Foveoschisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio García-Ben

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Myopic foveoschisis is one of the major complications of pathologic myopia, and it was most recently identified by new imaging modalities. During the natural evolution of this complication, anatomical and visual improvement without surgical intervention is an unusual course, and most of these eyes remain stable or progressively worsen. The authors report a case of a highly myopic eye that developed patchy chorioretinal atrophy after spontaneous resolution of myopic foveoschisis, which to the best of our knowledge has not been reported previously in the medical literature.

  1. Atrophy rates in asymptomatic amyloidosis: implications for Alzheimer prevention trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Abigail Andrews

    Full Text Available There is considerable interest in designing therapeutic studies of individuals at risk of Alzheimer disease (AD to prevent the onset of symptoms. Cortical β-amyloid plaques, the first stage of AD pathology, can be detected in vivo using positron emission tomography (PET, and several studies have shown that ~1/3 of healthy elderly have significant β-amyloid deposition. Here we assessed whether asymptomatic amyloid-PET-positive controls have increased rates of brain atrophy, which could be harnessed as an outcome measure for AD prevention trials. We assessed 66 control subjects (age = 73.5±7.3 yrs; MMSE = 29±1.3 from the Australian Imaging Biomarkers & Lifestyle study who had a baseline Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB PET scan and two 3T MRI scans ~18-months apart. We calculated PET standard uptake value ratios (SUVR, and classified individuals as amyloid-positive/negative. Baseline and 18-month MRI scans were registered, and brain, hippocampal, and ventricular volumes and annualized volume changes calculated. Increasing baseline PiB-PET measures of β-amyloid load correlated with hippocampal atrophy rate independent of age (p = 0.014. Twenty-two (1/3 were PiB-positive (SUVR>1.40, the remaining 44 PiB-negative (SUVR≤1.31. Compared to PiB-negatives, PiB-positive individuals were older (76.8±7.5 vs. 71.7±7.5, p<0.05 and more were APOE4 positive (63.6% vs. 19.2%, p<0.01 but there were no differences in baseline brain, ventricle or hippocampal volumes, either with or without correction for total intracranial volume, once age and gender were accounted for. The PiB-positive group had greater total hippocampal loss (0.06±0.08 vs. 0.02±0.05 ml/yr, p = 0.02, independent of age and gender, with non-significantly higher rates of whole brain (7.1±9.4 vs. 4.7±5.5 ml/yr and ventricular (2.0±3.0 vs. 1.1±1.0 ml/yr change. Based on the observed effect size, recruiting 384 (95%CI 195-1080 amyloid-positive subjects/arm will provide 80% power to detect 25

  2. Feasibility of the Medial Temporal lobe Atrophy index (MTAi) and derived methods for measuring atrophy of the medial temporal lobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conejo Bayón, Francisco; Maese, Jesús; Fernandez Oliveira, Aníbal; Mesas, Tamara; Herrera de la Llave, Estibaliz; Álvarez Avellón, Tania; Menéndez-González, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The Medial Temporal-lobe Atrophy index (MTAi), 2D-Medial Temporal Atrophy (2D-MTA), yearly rate of MTA (yrRMTA) and yearly rate of relative MTA (yrRMTA) are simple protocols for measuring the relative extent of atrophy in the medial temporal lobe (MTL) in relation to the global brain atrophy. Albeit preliminary studies showed interest of these methods in the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), frontotemporal lobe degeneration (FTLD) and correlation with cognitive impairment in Parkinson’s disease (PD), formal feasibility and validity studies remained pending. As a first step, we aimed to assess the feasibility. Mainly, we aimed to assess the reproducibility of measuring the areas needed to compute these indices. We also aimed to assess the efforts needed to start using these methods correctly. Methods: A series of 290 1.5T-MRI studies from 230 subjects ranging 65–85 years old who had been studied for cognitive impairment were used in this study. Six inexperienced tracers (IT) plus one experienced tracer (ET) traced the three areas needed to compute the indices. Finally, tracers underwent a short survey on their experience learning to compute the MTAi and experience of usage, including items relative to training time needed to understand and apply the MTAi, time to perform a study after training and overall satisfaction. Results: Learning to trace the areas needed to compute the MTAi and derived methods is quick and easy. Results indicate very good intrarater Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) for the MTAi, good intrarater ICC for the 2D-MTA, yrMTA and yrRMTA and also good interrater ICC for the MTAi, 2D-MTA, yrMTA and yrRMTA. Conclusion: Our data support that MTAi and derived methods (2D-MTA, yrMTA and yrRTMA) have good to very good intrarater and interrater reproducibility and may be easily implemented in clinical practice even if new users have no experience tracing the area of regions of interest. PMID:25414666

  3. Carbocalcitonin treatment in Sudeck's atrophy

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    Nuti, R.; Vattimo, A.; Martini, G.; Turchetti, V.; Righi, G.A.

    1987-02-01

    The efficacy of new calcitonin, the amino analog of eel calcitonin (carboCT) on Sudeck's atrophy of the foot was investigated in 14 patients. CarboCT was administered at the dose of 40 Medical Research Council (MRC) units per day, and the duration of treatment was two to ten months. No adverse effects were noted. Bone pain and local edema decreased associated with improvement of motility. CarboCT induced a slight decrease in plasma calcium, plasma phosphate, and 24-hour urinary calcium excretion. An increase in cAMP/Cr ratio, an index of parathyroid function, was also observed (probably a manifestation of the hypocalcemic effect of calcitonin and secondary parathyroid stimulation). The whole body retention of 99mTc-MDP represents a valuable index of bone turnover, it decreased progressively and significantly on treatment. A dynamic study of local bone uptake of 99mTC-MDP was performed in eight patients. After carboCT therapy, statistically significant decreases in local blood flow, early uptake, and delayed uptake were appreciated in the involved foot. These findings lead to the conclusion that carboCT is effective in the treatment of Sudeck's atrophy.

  4. Juvenile spinal muscular atrophy: a new hexosaminidase deficiency phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W G; Wigger, H J; Karp, H R; Glaubiger, L M; Rowland, L P

    1982-01-01

    A 24-year-old Ashkenazi Jewish man was evaluated for a nine-year history of progressive leg weakness with fasciculations. Electromyography, nerve conduction velocities, muscle biopsy, and serum creatine kinase were consistent with anterior horn cell disease. On rectal biopsy, ganglion cells were filled with membranous cytoplasmic bodies and an unusual submucosal layer of periodic acid-Schiff positive histiocytes filled with granules was seen. Hexosaminidase A in serum and leukocytes was severely decreased in the patient and partially decreased in parents and a brother. A paternal relative had classic infantile Tay-Sachs disease. Juvenile spinal muscular atrophy in this patient, closely resembling the Kugelberg-Welander phenotype, resulted from an alpha-locus hexosaminidase deficiency disorder, possibly a genetic compound of HEX alpha 2 and a milder hexosaminidase alpha-locus allele. Other cases of hexosaminidase deficiency have included anterior horn cell disease as part of a more complex disorder, but this is the first case, to our knowledge, of a hexosaminidase deficiency disorder presenting as spinal muscular atrophy. PMID:6460466

  5. Periorbital muscle atrophy associated with topical bimatoprost therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang PX

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Priscilla Xinhui Wang, Victor Teck Chang Koh, Jin Fong ChengDepartment of Ophthalmology, National University Health System, SingaporeAbstract: Topical Bimatoprost is a common and popular prostaglandin analog used as an ocular hypotensive agent in the treatment of glaucoma. Side effects include ocular hyperaemia, ocular pruritus, and periocular and iris pigmentary changes. Perioribital lipodystrophy is another well-documented outcome associated with chronic use of topical bimatoprost, which results in periorbital hallowing, upper eyelid sulcus deepening, eyelid retraction and enophthalmos. We report an unusual case of periocular muscle atrophy and weakness from unilateral topical bimatoprost use. Our patient had primary angle closure and experienced a right upper eyelid ptosis 2 months after she started to use topical bimatoprost in that eye. Clinical measurements of her eyelids clearly showed reduction in the function of her right levator muscle, suggesting that effects of topical bimatoprost may not be limited to periorbital fat. She was advised to stop topical bimatoprost and right ptosis correction surgery with levator muscle advancement was performed successfully. Ophthalmologists and patients should be aware of this potential rare side effect of topical bimatoprost, as it may be potentially disfiguring, especially with monocular use. However, its exact mechanism of action needs to be clarified further.Keywords: prostaglandin analog, levator, muscle atrophy, muscle weakness, ptosis, side effects

  6. Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Posterior Cortical Atrophy and Alzheimer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crutch, Sebastian J.; Franco-Macías, Emilio; Gil-Néciga, Eulogio

    2016-01-01

    Background: Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a rare neurodegenerative syndrome characterized by early progressive visual dysfunction in the context of relative preservation of memory and a pattern of atrophy mainly involving the posterior cortex. The aim of the present study is to characterize the neuropsychiatric profile of PCA. Methods: The Neuropsychiatric Inventory was used to assess 12 neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) in 28 patients with PCA and 34 patients with typical Alzheimer disease (AD) matched by age, disease duration, and illness severity. Results: The most commonly reported NPS in both groups were depression, anxiety, apathy, and irritability. However, aside from a trend toward lower rates of apathy in patients with PCA, there were no differences in the percentage of NPS presented in each group. All those patients presenting visual hallucinations in the PCA group also met diagnostic criteria for dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). Auditory hallucinations were only present in patients meeting diagnosis criteria for DLB. Conclusion: Prevalence of the 12 NPS examined was similar between patients with PCA and AD. Hallucinations in PCA may be helpful in the differential diagnosis between PCA-AD and PCA-DLB. PMID:26404166

  7. Deletion analysis of spinal muscular atrophy in southern Indian population

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    Swaminathan Bhairavi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a genetically heterogeneous disease with paresis and muscle atrophy due to loss of anterior horn cell function. The survival of motor neuron gene (SMN and neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein (NAIP play a primary role. Both the gene homologues exist as inverted duplications on Chromosome 5q. The telomeric/functional (SMN1 and the centromeric (SMN2 copies differ from each other in eight nucleotides. The C→T transition (at Codon 280 within Exon 7 of SMN2 causes disruption of an exonic splicing enhancer (ESE and/or creates an exonic splicing silencer (ESS leading to abnormal splicing and a truncated protein. Objective: To determine the molecular genetics of SMN1 and NAIP genes in SMA from southern India. Materials and Methods: In the present study, 37 patients from the neuromuscular disorders clinic of National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences were assayed for the deletions in the SMN1 and NAIP genes using PCR-RFLP methods. Results: Among the SMA Type I patients, 43% showed deletions of SMN1 and NAIP. In patients Type II SMA, 57% showed deletions of the SMN1 exons. Conclusion: Thus, deletions were found to occur in 47.8% of the Type I and II patients. Lower sensitivity of gene deletion study in clinically suspected SMA needs further study as clinical diagnosis of SMA is not gold standard. However, the results do correlate with other studies conducted in India.

  8. Current Status of Treatment of Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumiaki Tanaka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA is the first member identified among polyglutamine diseases characterized by slowly progressive muscle weakness and atrophy of the bulbar, facial, and limb muscles pathologically associated with motor neuron loss in the spinal cord and brainstem. Androgen receptor (AR, a disease-causing protein of SBMA, is a well-characterized ligand-activated transcription factor, and androgen binding induces nuclear translocation, conformational change and recruitment of coregulators for transactivation of AR target genes. Some therapeutic strategies for SBMA are based on these native functions of AR. Since ligand-induced nuclear translocation of mutant AR has been shown to be a critical step in motor neuron degeneration in SBMA, androgen deprivation therapies using leuprorelin and dutasteride have been developed and translated into clinical trials. Although the results of these trials are inconclusive, renewed clinical trials with more sophisticated design might prove the effectiveness of hormonal intervention in the near future. Furthermore, based on the normal function of AR, therapies targeted for conformational changes of AR including amino-terminal (N and carboxy-terminal (C (N/C interaction and transcriptional coregulators might be promising. Other treatments targeted for mitochondrial function, ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS, and autophagy could be applicable for all types of polyglutamine diseases.

  9. [Spinal muscle atrophy in Brown Swiss x Braunvieh cross calves].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirksen, G; Doll, K; Hafner, A; Hermanns, W; Dahme, E

    1992-05-01

    The report describes seven SMA-cases in descendents of crossbreeds of American Brown Swiss x Deutsches Braunvieh. Symptoms and course: After initially normal development of the calves for one to six weeks the disease set in suddenly followed by a rapid lethal course of one to one and a half weeks duration due to asphyxia and/or secondary diseases. Only one case was reported having been sick since birth (?). Characteristic signs were rapidly progressing muscular atrophy, paresis and paralysis of the limbs, the trunk and the diaphragm, usually accompanied by progressive dyspnoea. Signs of congenital neuromyodysplasia (arthrogryposis) of different degree were present in four of the seven calves. Six calves had contracted a secondary pneumonia. Blood gas analysis (6/7) revealed a compensated (1x) or decompensated (4x) respiratory acidosis. Neurohistological findings: Degeneration and loss of motor neurons in the ventral horns of the spinal cord and neurogenic muscular atrophy. Immunohistochemistry revealed a pronounced accumulation of type 200 kD-neurofilaments in perikarya and dendrites of ventral horn motoneurons indicating disturbed mechanisms of the axonal transport. The disease seems to be inherited as a recessive trait.

  10. Plasma biomarkers of brain atrophy in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhav Thambisetty

    Full Text Available Peripheral biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease (AD reflecting early neuropathological change are critical to the development of treatments for this condition. The most widely used indicator of AD pathology in life at present is neuroimaging evidence of brain atrophy. We therefore performed a proteomic analysis of plasma to derive biomarkers associated with brain atrophy in AD. Using gel based proteomics we previously identified seven plasma proteins that were significantly associated with hippocampal volume in a combined cohort of subjects with AD (N = 27 and MCI (N = 17. In the current report, we validated this finding in a large independent cohort of AD (N = 79, MCI (N = 88 and control (N = 95 subjects using alternative complementary methods-quantitative immunoassays for protein concentrations and estimation of pathology by whole brain volume. We confirmed that plasma concentrations of five proteins, together with age and sex, explained more than 35% of variance in whole brain volume in AD patients. These proteins are complement components C3 and C3a, complement factor-I, γ-fibrinogen and alpha-1-microglobulin. Our findings suggest that these plasma proteins are strong predictors of in vivo AD pathology. Moreover, these proteins are involved in complement activation and coagulation, providing further evidence for an intrinsic role of these pathways in AD pathogenesis.

  11. The evolution of alexia and simultanagnosia in posterior cortical atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, M F; Cherrier, M M

    1998-04-01

    Early alexia and higher visual impairments characterize Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA), a progressive dementing syndrome most often caused by Alzheimer disease. Posterior cortical atrophy is rare, and the nature of the visual impairments in PCA are unclear. The authors observed two patients who had an insidiously progressive reading difficulty characterized by letter-by-letter reading and otherwise intact cognitive functions. Over time, these patients developed "ventral simultanagnosia" with preserved detection of multiple stimuli but inability to interpret whole scenes. Subsequently, they progressed to Balint syndrome with "dorsal simultanagnosia," optic ataxia, and oculomotor apraxia. Structural imaging was normal, but functional imaging revealed posterior cortical dysfunction. On a letter reading task, both patients had a word superiority effect, and on a whole word reading task, they could not read most words with missing or crosshatched letters. An inability to assess whole scenes progressed to an inability to detect more than one stimulus in an array. These findings suggest an evolution of PCA with progressive difficulty in visual integration beginning with letters, progressing to whole scenes, and culminating in Balint syndrome. These changes may reflect an extension of the pathophysiology of PCA from the extrastriate visual cortex to its occipitotemporal and occipitoparietal connections. PMID:9652488

  12. Connectivity network measures predict volumetric atrophy in mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nir, Talia M; Jahanshad, Neda; Toga, Arthur W; Bernstein, Matt A; Jack, Clifford R; Weiner, Michael W; Thompson, Paul M

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by cortical atrophy and disrupted anatomic connectivity, and leads to abnormal interactions between neural systems. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and graph theory can be used to evaluate major brain networks and detect signs of a breakdown in network connectivity. In a longitudinal study using both DWI and standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we assessed baseline white-matter connectivity patterns in 30 subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI, mean age 71.8 ± 7.5 years, 18 males and 12 females) from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. Using both standard MRI-based cortical parcellations and whole-brain tractography, we computed baseline connectivity maps from which we calculated global "small-world" architecture measures, including mean clustering coefficient and characteristic path length. We evaluated whether these baseline network measures predicted future volumetric brain atrophy in MCI subjects, who are at risk for developing AD, as determined by 3-dimensional Jacobian "expansion factor maps" between baseline and 6-month follow-up anatomic scans. This study suggests that DWI-based network measures may be a novel predictor of AD progression.

  13. Memory Impairment at Initial Clinical Presentation in Posterior Cortical Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Samrah; Baker, Ian; Husain, Masud; Thompson, Sian; Kipps, Christopher; Hornberger, Michael; Hodges, John R; Butler, Christopher R

    2016-04-23

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is characterized by core visuospatial and visuoperceptual deficits, and predominant atrophy in the parieto-occipital cortex. The most common underlying pathology is Alzheimer's disease (AD). Existing diagnostic criteria suggest that episodic memory is relatively preserved. The aim of this study was to examine memory performance at initial clinical presentation in PCA, compared to early-onset AD patients (EOAD). 15 PCA patients and 32 EOAD patients, and 34 healthy controls were entered into the study. Patients were tested on the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination (ACE-R), consisting of subscales in memory and visuospatial skills. PCA and EOAD patients were significantly impaired compared to controls on the ACE total score (p skills (p skills compared to EOAD patients (p presentation. The findings suggest that memory impairment must be considered in assessment and management of PCA. Further study into memory in PCA is warranted, since the ACE-R is a brief screening tool and is likely to underestimate the presence of memory impairment. PMID:27128371

  14. [The hemodynamic disorders in Sudeck's atrophy and the effect on them of interference therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolova, L

    1992-01-01

    Interferential currents applied to the forearm fracture region of 80 patients with Sudeck atrophy eliminated hemodynamic changes in the affected limb as shown by capillaroscopy, rheovasography. The effect of the treatment is attributed to recovery of normal blood flow and microcirculation in the region of bone atrophy as well as analgetic action of pulse current. PMID:1384234

  15. Association between blood pressure levels over time and brain atrophy in the elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Heijer, T; Skoog, [No Value; Oudkerk, M; de Leeuw, FE; de Groot, JC; Hofman, A; Breteler, MMB

    2003-01-01

    The relation between blood pressure level and degree of global brain atrophy is equivocal. We evaluated past and present blood pressure levels and change in blood pressure over 20 years in relation to the degree of cortical atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In 1995-1996, we measured blood

  16. Endometrial safety of ultra-low-dose Vagifem 10 microg in postmenopausal women with vaginal atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich, L S G; Naessen, T; Elia, D;

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the endometrial safety of a 10 microg estradiol vaginal tablet in the treatment of vaginal atrophy in postmenopausal women.......The objective of the study was to evaluate the endometrial safety of a 10 microg estradiol vaginal tablet in the treatment of vaginal atrophy in postmenopausal women....

  17. Toll-like Receptor 4 Signaling in Ventilator-induced Diaphragm Atrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, W.J.M.; Hees, H.W.H. van; Vaneker, M.; Linkels, M.; Dekhuijzen, P.N.R.; Scheffer, G.J.; Hoeven, J.G. van der; Heunks, L.M.A.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND:: Mechanical ventilation induces diaphragm muscle atrophy, which plays a key role in difficult weaning from mechanical ventilation. The signaling pathways involved in ventilator-induced diaphragm atrophy are poorly understood. The current study investigated the role of Toll-like receptor

  18. MRI in evaluating atrophy of the external anal sphincter in patients with fecal incontinence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P. Terra; R.G.H. Beets-Tan; V.P.M. van der Hulst; M. Deutekom; M.G.W. Dijkgraaf; P.M.M. Bossuyt; A.C. Dobben; C.G.M.I. Baeten; J. Stoker

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. External anal sphincter atrophy seen at endoanal MRI may predict poor outcome of surgical anal sphincter repair for an external anal sphincter defect. The purposes of this study were to compare external phased-array MRI to endoanal MRI for depicting external anal sphincter atrophy in pati

  19. Dominant inherited distal spinal muscular atrophy with atrophic and hypertrophic calves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, R J; Sie, O G; van Weerden, T W

    1993-01-01

    The clinical, electrophysiological, radiological and morphological data of 3 members of a family with autosomal dominant distal spinal muscular atrophy (DSMA) are reported. One patient has the clinical picture of peroneal muscular atrophy with atrophic calves. His father and sister suffer from cramp

  20. Large deletions within the spinal muscular atrophy gene region in a patient with spinal muscular atrophy type 3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Wei; Chunyue Chen; Wenting Liu; Zhenfang Du; Xiaoling Chen; Xianning Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder characterized by degeneration and loss of anterior horn cells in the spinal cord and brain stem nuclei, leading to progressive limb and trunk paralysis and muscular atrophy. Depending on the age of onset and maximum muscular function achieved, SMA is recognized as SMA1, SMA2, SMA3 or SMA4, and most patients have a deletion or truncation of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. In this report, we present a patient with a mild SMA phenotype, SMA3, and define his genetic abnormality. Tetra-primer amplification refractory mutation system PCR combined with restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and array comparative genomic hybridization were used to determine the genetic variations in this patient. A 500 kb deletion in chromosome 5q13.2, including homozygous deletion of neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein, and heterozygous deletion of occludin and B-double prime 1 was identified. This SMA region deletion did not involve SMN, indicating that SMN was likely to function normally. The phenotype was dependent of the large deletion and neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein, occludin and B-double prime 1 may be candidate genes for SMA3.

  1. Extent of hippocampal atrophy predicts degree of deficit in recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patai, Eva Zita; Gadian, David G; Cooper, Janine M; Dzieciol, Anna M; Mishkin, Mortimer; Vargha-Khadem, Faraneh

    2015-10-13

    Which specific memory functions are dependent on the hippocampus is still debated. The availability of a large cohort of patients who had sustained relatively selective hippocampal damage early in life enabled us to determine which type of mnemonic deficit showed a correlation with extent of hippocampal injury. We assessed our patient cohort on a test that provides measures of recognition and recall that are equated for difficulty and found that the patients' performance on the recall tests correlated significantly with their hippocampal volumes, whereas their performance on the equally difficult recognition tests did not and, indeed, was largely unaffected regardless of extent of hippocampal atrophy. The results provide new evidence in favor of the view that the hippocampus is essential for recall but not for recognition. PMID:26417089

  2. Spinal muscular atrophy patient-derived motor neurons exhibit hyperexcitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huisheng; Lu, Jianfeng; Chen, Hong; Du, Zhongwei; Li, Xue-Jun; Zhang, Su-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) presents severe muscle weakness with limited motor neuron (MN) loss at an early stage, suggesting potential functional alterations in MNs that contribute to SMA symptom presentation. Using SMA induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), we found that SMA MNs displayed hyperexcitability with increased membrane input resistance, hyperpolarized threshold, and larger action potential amplitude, which was mimicked by knocking down full length survival motor neuron (SMN) in non-SMA MNs. We further discovered that SMA MNs exhibit enhanced sodium channel activities with increased current amplitude and facilitated recovery, which was corrected by restoration of SMN1 in SMA MNs. Together we propose that SMN reduction results in MN hyperexcitability and impaired neurotransmission, the latter of which exacerbate each other via a feedback loop, thus contributing to severe symptoms at an early stage of SMA. PMID:26190808

  3. Neocortical Neuronal Loss in Patients with Multiple System Atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salvesen, Lisette; Winge, Kristian; Brudek, Tomasz;

    2016-01-01

    To determine the extent of neocortical involvement in multiple system atrophy (MSA), we used design-based stereological methods to estimate the total numbers of neurons, oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and microglia in the frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital cortex of brains from 11 patients...... with MSA and 11 age- and gender-matched control subjects. The stereological data were supported by cell marker expression analyses in tissue samples from the prefrontal cortex. We found significantly fewer neurons in the frontal and parietal cortex of MSA brains compared with control brains. Significantly...... more astrocytes and microglia were observed in the frontal, parietal, and temporal cortex of MSA brains, whereas no change in the total number of oligodendrocytes was seen in any of the neocortical regions. There were significantly fewer neurons in the frontal cortex of MSA patients with impaired...

  4. LHON and other optic nerve atrophies: the mitochondrial connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Neil

    2003-01-01

    The clinical, biochemical and genetic features of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) are reviewed. The etiology of LHON is complex, but the primary risk factor is a mutation in one of the seven mitochondrial genes that encode subunits of respiratory chain complex I. The pathogenesis of LHON is not yet understood, but one plausible model is that increased or altered mitochondrial ROS production renders the retinal ganglion cells vulnerable to apoptotic cell death. In addition to LHON, there are a large number of other optic nerve degenerative disorders including autosomal dominant optic atrophy, the toxic/nutritional optic neuropathies and glaucoma. A review of the recent scientific literature suggests that these disorders also involve mitochondrial dysfunction or altered mitochondrial signaling pathways in their pathogenesis. This mitochondrial link provides new avenues of experimental investigation to these major causes of loss of vision.

  5. Alexander disease with mild dorsal brainstem atrophy and infantile spasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torisu, Hiroyuki; Yoshikawa, Yoko; Yamaguchi-Takada, Yui; Yano, Tamami; Sanefuji, Masafumi; Ishizaki, Yoshito; Sawaishi, Yukio; Hara, Toshiro

    2013-05-01

    We present the case of a Japanese male infant with Alexander disease who developed infantile spasms at 8 months of age. The patient had a cluster of partial seizures at 4 months of age. He presented with mild general hypotonia and developmental delay. Macrocephaly was not observed. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings fulfilled all MRI-based criteria for the diagnosis of Alexander disease and revealed mild atrophy of the dorsal pons and medulla oblongata with abnormal intensities. DNA analysis disclosed a novel heterozygous missense mutation (c.1154 C>T, p.S385F) in the glial fibrillary acidic protein gene. At 8 months of age, tonic spasms occurred, and electroencephalography (EEG) revealed hypsarrhythmia. Lamotrigine effectively controlled the infantile spasms and improved the abnormal EEG findings. Although most patients with infantile Alexander disease have epilepsy, infantile spasms are rare. This comorbid condition may be associated with the distribution of the brain lesions and the age at onset of Alexander disease.

  6. Recommendations for the management of postmenopausal vaginal atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturdee, D W; Panay, N; Ulrich, Lian

    2010-01-01

    Unlike hot flushes and night sweats which resolve spontaneously in time, atrophic symptoms affecting the vagina and lower urinary tract are often progressive and frequently require treatment. The prevalence of vaginal dryness increases as a woman advances through the postmenopausal years, causing...... for hormone replacement therapy (HRT) over recent years that has suggested an increased risk of breast cancer, heart disease and stroke. But, regardless of whether these scares are justified, local treatment of vaginal atrophy is not associated with these possible risks of systemic HRT. Other reasons...... for the continued suffering in silence may be cultural and an understandable reluctance to discuss such matters, particularly with a male doctor, but the medical profession must also take much of the blame for failing to enquire of all postmenopausal women about the possibility of vaginal atrophic symptoms. Vaginal...

  7. STARVATION INDUCED PROXIMAL GUT MUCOSAL ATROPHY DIMINISHED WITH AGING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Juquan; Wolf, Steven E.; Wu, Xiao-Wu; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Gauglitz, Gerd G.; Herndon, David N.; Jeschke, Marc G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Starvation induces small bowel atrophy with increased intestinal epithelial apoptosis and decreased proliferation. Here, we examined these parameters after starvation in aged animals. Methods Sixty-four 6 week-old and 26 month-old C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned to either an ad libitum fed or fasted group. The small bowel was harvested at 12, 48, and 72 hours following starvation. Proximal gut mucosal height was measured and epithelial cells counted. Apoptosis was identified by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining. Proliferation was determined by immunohistochemical staining for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Comparison of fed vs. fasted and adult vs. old groups was done by one-way ANOVA with Tukey’s test and unpaired t-test. Significance was accepted at p<0.05. Results Aged mice had higher proximal gut weights, mucosal heights and cell numbers at baseline compared with the adult group (p<0.05). The rate of apoptosis was lower in the aged (p<0.05) while proliferation was not different between groups before starvation. After starvation, proximal gut wet weight decreased only in adult mice (p<0.05); Gut mucosal height and mucosal cell number decreased greater in adult than in aged mice (p<0.05). This was related to decreased proliferation only in the adult group (p<0.05). The fold of epithelial apoptosis increased was higher in the aged group than in the adult after starvation (p<0.05). Conclusions Gut mucosal kinetics change with age had lower rates of apoptosis and greater mucosal mass; the character of starvation-induced atrophy is diminished with aging. PMID:19126762

  8. White matter atrophy and cognitive dysfunctions in neuromyelitis optica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic Blanc

    Full Text Available Neuromyelitis optica (NMO is an inflammatory disease of central nervous system characterized by optic neuritis and longitudinally extensive acute transverse myelitis. NMO patients have cognitive dysfunctions but other clinical symptoms of brain origin are rare. In the present study, we aimed to investigate cognitive functions and brain volume in NMO. The study population consisted of 28 patients with NMO and 28 healthy control subjects matched for age, sex and educational level. We applied a French translation of the Brief Repeatable Battery (BRB-N to the NMO patients. Using SIENAx for global brain volume (Grey Matter, GM; White Matter, WM; and whole brain and VBM for focal brain volume (GM and WM, NMO patients and controls were compared. Voxel-level correlations between diminished brain concentration and cognitive performance for each tests were performed. Focal and global brain volume of NMO patients with and without cognitive impairment were also compared. Fifteen NMO patients (54% had cognitive impairment with memory, executive function, attention and speed of information processing deficits. Global and focal brain atrophy of WM but not Grey Matter (GM was found in the NMO patients group. The focal WM atrophy included the optic chiasm, pons, cerebellum, the corpus callosum and parts of the frontal, temporal and parietal lobes, including superior longitudinal fascicle. Visual memory, verbal memory, speed of information processing, short-term memory and executive functions were correlated to focal WM volumes. The comparison of patients with, to patients without cognitive impairment showed a clear decrease of global and focal WM, including brainstem, corticospinal tracts, corpus callosum but also superior and inferior longitudinal fascicles. Cognitive impairment in NMO patients is correlated to the decreased of global and focal WM volume of the brain. Further studies are needed to better understand the precise origin of cognitive impairment in

  9. Cerebrospinal fluid volumetric MRI mapping as a simple measurement for evaluating brain atrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess whether volumetric cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) MRI can be used as a surrogate for brain atrophy assessment and to evaluate how the T2 of the CSF relates to brain atrophy. Twenty-eight subjects [mean age 64 (sd 2) years] were included; T1-weighted and CSF MRI were performed. The first echo data of the CSF MRI sequence was used to obtain intracranial volume, CSF partial volume was measured voxel-wise to obtain CSF volume (VCSF) and the T2 of CSF (T2,CSF) was calculated. The correlation between VCSF / T2,CSF and brain atrophy scores [global cortical atrophy (GCA) and medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA)] was evaluated. Relative total, peripheral subarachnoidal, and ventricular VCSF increased significantly with increased scores on the GCA and MTA (R = 0.83, 0.78 and 0.78 and R = 0.72, 0.62 and 0.86). Total, peripheral subarachnoidal, and ventricular T2 of the CSF increased significantly with higher scores on the GCA and MTA (R = 0.72, 0.70 and 0.49 and R = 0.60, 0.57 and 0.41). A fast, fully automated CSF MRI volumetric sequence is an alternative for qualitative atrophy scales. The T2 of the CSF is related to brain atrophy and could thus be a marker of neurodegenerative disease. (orig.)

  10. Cerebrospinal fluid volumetric MRI mapping as a simple measurement for evaluating brain atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vis, J.B. de; Zwanenburg, J.J.; Kleij, L.A. van der; Spijkerman, J.M.; Hendrikse, J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Biessels, G.J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Neurology, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht (Netherlands); Petersen, E.T. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Hvidovre Hospital, Danish Research Centre for Magnetic Resonance, Hvidovre (Denmark)

    2016-05-15

    To assess whether volumetric cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) MRI can be used as a surrogate for brain atrophy assessment and to evaluate how the T{sub 2} of the CSF relates to brain atrophy. Twenty-eight subjects [mean age 64 (sd 2) years] were included; T{sub 1}-weighted and CSF MRI were performed. The first echo data of the CSF MRI sequence was used to obtain intracranial volume, CSF partial volume was measured voxel-wise to obtain CSF volume (V{sub CSF}) and the T{sub 2} of CSF (T{sub 2,CSF}) was calculated. The correlation between V{sub CSF} / T{sub 2,CSF} and brain atrophy scores [global cortical atrophy (GCA) and medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA)] was evaluated. Relative total, peripheral subarachnoidal, and ventricular V{sub CSF} increased significantly with increased scores on the GCA and MTA (R = 0.83, 0.78 and 0.78 and R = 0.72, 0.62 and 0.86). Total, peripheral subarachnoidal, and ventricular T{sub 2} of the CSF increased significantly with higher scores on the GCA and MTA (R = 0.72, 0.70 and 0.49 and R = 0.60, 0.57 and 0.41). A fast, fully automated CSF MRI volumetric sequence is an alternative for qualitative atrophy scales. The T{sub 2} of the CSF is related to brain atrophy and could thus be a marker of neurodegenerative disease. (orig.)

  11. Potential hippocampal region atrophy in diabetes mellitus type 2. A voxel-based morphometry VSRAD study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2) patients, the frequency of cognitive dysfunction is higher and the relative risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is approximately twice that of nondiabetics. Cognitive impairment symptoms of AD are induced by limbic system dysfunction, and an early-stage AD brain without dementia has the potential for atrophy in the hippocampal region. In this study, we estimated potential hippocampal region atrophy in DM2 and pursued the association between DM2 and cognitive impairment/AD. Voxel-based morphometry analysis was performed in 28 diabetics (14 men, 14 women; ages 59-79 years, mean 70.7 years) and 28 sex- and age- matched (±1 year) nondiabetics. Severity of gray matter loss in the hippocampal region and whole brain were investigated. Group analysis was performed using two-tailed unpaired t-test; significance was assumed with less than 1% (P<0.01) of the critical rate. There was a significant difference between diabetics and nondiabetics regarding the severity of hippocampal region atrophy and whole-brain atrophy. Only diabetics showed a positive correlation for severity of hippocampal region atrophy and whole-brain atrophy (rs=0.69, P<0.0001). Aged DM2 patients have the potential for hippocampal region atrophy, and its dysfunction can be related to the expression of a cognitive impairment that resembles AD. (author)

  12. Heterogeneity of Regional Brain Atrophy Patterns Associated with Distinct Progression Rates in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Soo Byun

    Full Text Available We aimed to identify and characterize subtypes of Alzheimer's disease (AD exhibiting different patterns of regional brain atrophy on MRI using age- and gender-specific norms of regional brain volumes. AD subjects included in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative study were classified into subtypes based on standardized values (Z-scores of hippocampal and regional cortical volumes on MRI with reference to age- and gender-specific norms obtained from 222 cognitively normal (CN subjects. Baseline and longitudinal changes of clinical characteristics over 2 years were compared across subtypes. Whole-brain-level gray matter (GM atrophy pattern using voxel-based morphometry (VBM and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biomarkers of the subtypes were also investigated. Of 163 AD subjects, 58.9% were classified as the "both impaired" subtype with the typical hippocampal and cortical atrophy pattern, whereas 41.1% were classified as the subtypes with atypical atrophy patterns: "hippocampal atrophy only" (19.0%, "cortical atrophy only" (11.7%, and "both spared" (10.4%. Voxel-based morphometric analysis demonstrated whole-brain-level differences in overall GM atrophy across the subtypes. These subtypes showed different progression rates over 2 years; and all subtypes had significantly lower CSF amyloid-β 1-42 levels compared to CN. In conclusion, we identified four AD subtypes exhibiting heterogeneous atrophy patterns on MRI with different progression rates after controlling the effects of aging and gender on atrophy with normative information. CSF biomarker analysis suggests the presence of Aβ neuropathology irrespective of subtypes. Such heterogeneity of MRI-based neuronal injury biomarker and related heterogeneous progression patterns should be considered in clinical trials and practice with AD patients.

  13. Longitudinal patterns of leukoaraiosis and brain atrophy in symptomatic small vessel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Christian; Benjamin, Philip; Zeestraten, Eva; Lawrence, Andrew J; Barrick, Thomas R; Markus, Hugh S

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease is a common condition associated with lacunar stroke, cognitive impairment and significant functional morbidity. White matter hyperintensities and brain atrophy, seen on magnetic resonance imaging, are correlated with increasing disease severity. However, how the two are related remains an open question. To better define the relationship between white matter hyperintensity growth and brain atrophy, we applied a semi-automated magnetic resonance imaging segmentation analysis pipeline to a 3-year longitudinal cohort of 99 subjects with symptomatic small vessel disease, who were followed-up for ≥1 years. Using a novel two-stage warping pipeline with tissue repair step, voxel-by-voxel rate of change maps were calculated for each tissue class (grey matter, white matter, white matter hyperintensities and lacunes) for each individual. These maps capture both the distribution of disease and spatial information showing local rates of growth and atrophy. These were analysed to answer three primary questions: first, is there a relationship between whole brain atrophy and magnetic resonance imaging markers of small vessel disease (white matter hyperintensities or lacune volume)? Second, is there regional variation within the cerebral white matter in the rate of white matter hyperintensity progression? Finally, are there regionally specific relationships between the rates of white matter hyperintensity progression and cortical grey matter atrophy? We demonstrate that the rates of white matter hyperintensity expansion and grey matter atrophy are strongly correlated (Pearson's R = -0.69, P brain atrophy occurs annually (P brain atrophy in symptomatic cerebral small vessel disease. These measures provide novel insights into the longitudinal pathogenesis of small vessel disease, and imply that therapies aimed at reducing progression of white matter hyperintensities via end-arteriole damage may protect against secondary brain atrophy and consequent

  14. Implication des céramides dans l'atrophie musculaire

    OpenAIRE

    De Larichaudy, Joffrey

    2012-01-01

    Le muscle squelettique fait preuve d'une remarquable plasticité en réponse aux changements physiologiques, comme l’activité physique, et aux situations pathologiques. Il subit notamment une atrophie sévère lors de la cachexie qui accompagne diverses pathologies chroniques comme le cancer, le SIDA, etc. L’atrophie musculaire est aussi une composante de la sarcopénie qui survient lors du vieillissement normal, et se caractérise par un déclin de la force et de la masse musculaire. L'atrophie mus...

  15. Clinical significance of corpus callosum atrophy in a mixed elderly population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, C.; Rostrup, E.; Stegmann, Mikkel Bille;

    2007-01-01

    Corpus callosum (CC) is the main tract connecting the hemispheres, but the clinical significance of CC atrophy is poorly understood. The aim of this work was to investigate clinical and functional correlates of CC atrophy in subjects with age-related white matter changes (ARWMC). In 569 elderly......) score, history of depression, geriatric depression scale (GDS) score, subjective gait difficulty, history of falls, walking speed, and total score on the short physical performance battery (SPPB) were analyzed. Significant correlations between CC atrophy and MMSE, SPPB, and walking speed were identified...

  16. The yearly rate of Relative Thalamic Atrophy (yrRTA: a simple 2D/3D method for estimating deep gray matter atrophy in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel eMenéndez-González

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite a strong correlation to outcome, the measurement of gray matter (GM atrophy is not being used in daily clinical practice as a prognostic factor and monitor the effect of treatments in Multiple Sclerosis (MS. This is mainly because the volumetric methods available to date are sophisticated and difficult to implement for routine use in most hospitals. In addition, the meaning of raw results from volumetric studies on regions of interest are not always easy to understand. Thus, there is a huge need of a methodology suitable to be applied in daily clinical practice in order to estimate GM atrophy in a convenient and comprehensive way. Given the thalamus is the brain structure found to be more consistently implied in MS both in terms of extent of atrophy and in terms of prognostic value, we propose a solution based in this structure. In particular, we propose to compare the extent of thalamus atrophy (TA with the extent of unspecific, global brain atrophy, represented by ventricular enlargement. We name this ratio the yearly rate of Relative Thalamic Atrophy (yrRTA. In this report we aim to describe the concept of yrRTA and the guidelines for computing it under 2D and 3D approaches and explain the rationale behind this method. We have also conducted a very short crossectional retrospective study to proof the concept of yrRTA. However, we do not seek to describe here the validity of this parameter since these researches are being conducted currently and results will be addressed in future publications.

  17. When is Onuf's nucleus involved in multiple system atrophy? A sphincter electromyography study

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, T.; Sakakibara, R.; Uchiyama, T; Liu, Z.; Ito, T.; Awa, Y; Yamamoto, K.; Kinou, M; Yamanishi, T; Hattori, T

    2005-01-01

    Background: External anal sphincter (EAS) electromyography (EMG) abnormalities can distinguish multiple system atrophy (MSA) from Parkinson's disease in the first five years after disease onset. However, the prevalence of the abnormalities in the early stages of MSA is unknown.

  18. Imaging of the Macula Indicates Early Completion of Structural Deficit in Autosomal-Dominant Optic Atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rönnbäck, Cecilia; Milea, Dan; Larsen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) enables 3-dimensional imaging of the retina, including the layer of ganglion cells that supplies the optic nerve with its axons. We tested OCT as means of diagnosing and phenotyping autosomal-dominant optic atrophy (ADOA)....

  19. [Relationship between simulated weightlessness-induced muscle spindle change and muscle atrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xue-Hong; Fan, Xiao-Li

    2013-02-25

    One of the most important and urgent issues in the field of space medicine is to reveal the potential mechanism underlying the disused muscle atrophy during the weightlessness or microgravity environment. It will conduce to find out effective methods for the prevention and treatment of muscle atrophy during a long-term space flight. Increasing data show that muscle spindle discharges are significantly altered following the hindlimb unloading, suggesting a vital role in the progress of muscle atrophy. In the last decades, we have made a series of studies on changes in the morphological structure and function of muscle spindle following simulated weightlessness. This review will discuss our main results and related researches for understanding of muscle spindle activities during microgravity environment, which may provide a theoretic basis for effective prevention and treatment of muscle atrophy induced by weightlessness. PMID:23426520

  20. Atrophying pityriasis versicolor: is this a new variant of pityriasis versicolor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yun-Seok; Shin, Min-Kyung; Haw, Choong-Rim

    2010-11-01

    An atypical clinical form of pityriasis versicolor has been infrequently reported, in which cutaneous atrophy is associated with individual pityriasis versicolor lesions. The pathogenesis of this atrophy remains unclear, but is believed to be a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction to antigens derived from the Malassezia species. A 60-year-old man presented with multiple, slightly scaly, and depressed maculopatches or plaques on the trunk and extremities. Our microscopic examination of the skin scrapings on a KOH preparation revealed numerous short hyphae and spores. The patient was treated daily with 200 mg of itraconazole in combination with topical antifungals, achieving clinical improvement and mycological recovery, which was confirmed upon follow-up 1 month later. This is the first case report of atrophying pityriasis versicolor in Korea. It needs to be differentiated from other atrophying disorders of the skin.

  1. Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Quantitative MR Volumetry in Detection of Hippocampal Atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Farid, Nikdokht; Girard, Holly M.; Kemmotsu, Nobuko; Smith, Michael E.; Magda, Sebastian W.; Lim, Wei Y.; Lee, Roland R.; McDonald, Carrie R.

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative MR imaging can enhance standard visual analysis, providing a viable means for translating volumetric analysis into clinical practice and increasing the detection of hippocampal atrophy in temporal lobe epilepsy in both community and tertiary care settings.

  2. Aging affects the transcriptional regulation of human skeletal muscle disuse atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suetta, Charlotte Arneboe; Frandsen, Ulrik; Jensen, Line;

    2012-01-01

    Important insights concerning the molecular basis of skeletal muscle disuse-atrophy and aging related muscle loss have been obtained in cell culture and animal models, but these regulatory signaling pathways have not previously been studied in aging human muscle. In the present study, muscle...... atrophy was induced by immobilization in healthy old and young individuals to study the time-course and transcriptional factors underlying human skeletal muscle atrophy. The results reveal that irrespectively of age, mRNA expression levels of MuRF-1 and Atrogin-1 increased in the very initial phase (2......-4 days) of human disuse-muscle atrophy along with a marked reduction in PGC-1a and PGC-1ß (1-4 days) and a ~10% decrease in myofiber size (4 days). Further, an age-specific decrease in Akt and S6 phosphorylation was observed in young muscle within the first days (1-4 days) of immobilization. In contrast...

  3. Glutamate prevents intestinal atrophy via luminal nutrient sensing in a mouse model of total parenteral nutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Weidong; Feng, Yongjia; Holst, Jens Juul;

    2014-01-01

    Small intestine luminal nutrient sensing may be crucial for modulating physiological functions. However, its mechanism of action is incompletely understood. We used a model of enteral nutrient deprivation, or total parenteral nutrition (TPN), resulting in intestinal mucosal atrophy and decreased...

  4. Pattern Differences of Small Hand Muscle Atrophy in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Mimic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Fang

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: The different patterns of small hand muscle atrophy between the ALS patients and the patients with mimic disorders presumably reflect distinct pathophysiological mechanisms underlying different disorders, and may aid in distinguishing between ALS and mimic disorders.

  5. Atrophy of sacrospinal muscle groups in patients with chronic, diffusely radiating lumbar back pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laasonen, E.M.

    1984-01-01

    After surgery necessitated by lumbar back pain syndromes, radiolucency verified by CT may appear in the sacrospinal muscle group on the operate side. This radiolucency represents muscular atrophy and is in its most severe form a result of the replacement of muscle tissue with adipose tissue. Such muscular atrophy appeared in the present series in 31 out of all 156 patients (19.9%) and in 29 out of 94 patients operated on because of radiating lumbar back pain (30.9%). The radiological appearance, extent, and HU values of this muscular atrophy are presented in detail. Only weak correlations with the multitude of clinical symptoms and signs were found in this retrospective study. The effects of irreversible muscular atrophy on the indications for surgery and physiotherapy are discussed.

  6. Personality of patients with Sudeck's atrophy following tibial fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vilder, J

    1992-01-01

    Patients with reflex sympathetic dystrophy are often considered by physicians and allied health personnel as having a peculiar personality. In medical literature they are frequently described as anxious and depressive, emotional, nervous and irritable patients with neurovegetative instability. A review of the literature on psychological research in this field is not always illuminating. Hypochondria and hysteria, whether or not accompanied by depression, are frequently reported to be typical traits, whereas other findings point more in the direction of psychosis. Increased anxiety, emotional lability and lowered self-esteem are psychological entities that are regularly encountered. The present study includes 42 cases of severe reflex sympathetic dystrophy. Except for the 7 cases of Sudeck atrophy of the hand and wrist, the localization was always in the foot or ankle. The majority of patients had a history of fractures or orthopedic procedures on the lower limbs as a causative factor. In addition to an interview, two questionnaires and a projective test (Rorschach) were used in the personality assessment. While the Rorschach test did not reveal any findings that could be considered as typical of our study population, we did observe different frequency distributions for the personality traits "self-satisfaction", "rigidity" and "somatization". PMID:1280898

  7. Non-pharmacological intervention for posterior cortical atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weill-Chounlamountry, Agnès; Alves, Jorge; Pradat-Diehl, Pascale

    2016-08-16

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a rare neurodegenerative condition characterized by progressive visual-perceptual deficits. Although the neurocognitive profile of PCA is a growing and relatively well-established field, non-pharmacological care remains understudied and to be widely established in clinical practice. In the present work we review the available literature on non-pharmacological approaches for PCA, such as cognitive rehabilitation including individual cognitive exercises and compensatory techniques to improve autonomy in daily life, and psycho-education aiming to inform people with PCA about the nature of their visual deficits and limits of cognitive rehabilitation. The reviewed studies represented a total of 7 patients. There is a scarcity of the number of studies, and mostly consisting of case studies. Results suggest non-pharmacological intervention to be a potentially beneficial approach for the partial compensation of deficits, improvement of daily functionality and improvement of quality of life. Clinical implications and future directions are also highlighted for the advancement of the field, in order to clarify the possible role of non-pharmacological interventions, and its extent, in PCA. PMID:27574605

  8. Moving towards treatments for spinal muscular atrophy: hopes and limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Brunhilde; Barkats, Martine; Martinat, Cecile; Sendtner, Michael; Gillingwater, Thomas H

    2015-09-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), one of the most frequent and devastating genetic disorders causing neuromuscular degeneration, has reached the forefront of clinical translation. The quite unique genetic situation of SMA patients, who lack functional SMN1 but carry the misspliced SMN2 copy gene, creates the possibility of correcting SMN2 splicing by antisense oligonucleotides or drugs. Both strategies showed impressive results in pre-clinical trials and are now in Phase II-III clinical trials. SMN gene therapy approaches using AAV9-SMN vectors are also highly promising and have entered a Phase I clinical trial. However, careful analysis of SMA animal models and patients has revealed some limitations that need to be taken very seriously, including: i) a limited time-window for successful therapy delivery, making neonatal screening of SMA mandatory; ii) multi-organ impairment, requiring systemic delivery of therapies; and iii) a potential need for combined therapies that both increase SMN levels and target pathways that preserve/rescue motor neuron function over the lifespan. Meeting these challenges will likely be crucial to cure SMA, instead of only ameliorating symptoms, particularly in its most severe form. This review discusses therapies currently in clinical trials, the hopes for SMA therapy, and the potential limitations of these new approaches. PMID:25920617

  9. Progressive Retinal Atrophy in the Border Collie: A new XLPRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Anne

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several forms of progressive retinal atrophy (PRA segregate in more than 100 breeds of dog with each PRA segregating in one or a few breeds. This breed specificity may be accounted for by founder effects and genetic drift, which have reduced the genetic heterogeneity of each breed, thereby facilitating the identification of causal mutations. We report here a new form of PRA segregating in the Border Collie breed. The clinical signs, including the loss of night vision and a progressive loss of day vision, resulting in complete blindness, occur at the age of three to four years and may be detected earlier through systematic ocular fundus examination and electroretinography (ERG. Results Ophthalmic examinations performed on 487 dogs showed that affected dogs present a classical form of PRA. Of those, 274 have been sampled for DNA extraction and 87 could be connected through a large pedigree. Segregation analysis suggested an X-linked mode of transmission; therefore both XLPRA1 and XLPRA2 mutations were excluded through the genetic tests. Conclusion Having excluded these mutations, we suggest that this PRA segregating in Border Collie is a new XLPRA (XLPRA3 and propose it as a potential model for the homologous human disease, X-Linked Retinitis Pigmentosa.

  10. Clinical features of adult spinal muscular atrophy:46 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaojun He; Ping Zhang; Guanghui Chen

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a kind of degenerative disease of nervous system. There are 4 types in clinic, especially types Ⅰ, Ⅱ and Ⅲ are common, and the researches on those 3 types are relative mature. Type Ⅳ is a kind of adult spinal muscular atrophy (ASMA), which has low incidence rate and is often misdiagnosed as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, muscular dystrophy, cervical syndrome, or others.OBJECTIVE: To observe the clinical features of 46 ASMA patients and analyze the relationship between course and activity of daily living.DESIGN: Case analysis.SETTING: Departments of Neurology of the 81 Hospital of Chinese PLA, the Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical College and General Hospital of Nanjing Military Area Command of Chinese PLA.PARTICIPANTS: A total of 46 ASMA patients were selected from the Departments of Neurology of the 81Hospital of Chinese PLA, the Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical College and General Hospital of Nanjing Military Area Command of Chinese PLA between April 1998 and January 2002. All patients were consentient. Among 46 cases, there were 37 males and 9 females with the mean age of 42 years. The patients' courses in all ranged from 6 months to 23 years, concretely, courses of 37 cases were less than or equal to 5 years, and those of 9 cases were more than or equal to 6 years.METHODS : ① All the 46 ASMA patients were asked to check blood sedimentation, anti O, serum creatinine,creatine, blood creatine phosphokinase (CPK) and muscular biopsy as early as possible. ② X-ray was used to measure plain film of cervical vertebra borderline film of cranium and neck at proximal end of upper limb of 25 cases and plain film of abdominal vertebra at proximal end of lower limb of 17 cases.③ Cerebrospinal fluid of lumbar puncture was checked on 42 cases, for routine examination, biochemical examination, and immunoglobulin examination. Electromyogram (EMG) was also examined to 42 cases. ④ Barthel index

  11. Retinal thinning correlates with clinical severity in multiple system atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jeeyun; Lee, Jee-Young; Kim, Tae Wan

    2016-10-01

    To analyze retinal thickness changes in multiple system atrophy (MSA) and correlate changes with disease severity and subtypes of MSA. A total of 36 MSA (27 MSA-P and 9 MSA-C) patients and 71 healthy control subjects underwent general ophthalmologic examination and optical coherence tomography (OCT) scans. Peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness and perifoveal retinal thickness were analyzed separately. The generalized estimating equation model was used with age as a covariate to adjust for within-patient inter-eye correlations and the effect of age on retinal or RNFL thickness. Correlation analysis between RNFL, perifoveal thickness, and clinical parameters, the Unified MSA Rating Scale (UMSARS) and Global Disability Score (GDS), was also done. MSA patients showed significantly decreased peripapillary RNFL thickness in the inferior (P = 0.047) and inferotemporal (P = 0.017) sectors and significant perifoveal thinning in the superior outer sector (P = 0.042) compared to healthy controls. Both RNFL and perifoveal thinning were more marked and widespread in MSA-P than MSA-C patients. The UMSARS and GDS showed significant negative correlation with center and total macular perifoveal thickness and also the inferior and nasal outer sectors. Peripapillary RNFL and perifoveal retinal thinning were observed in MSA patients and retinal thinning correlated with the clinical severity of MSA. Structural changes in the retina may reflect the degree and pattern of neurodegeneration occurring in MSA.

  12. A genome-wide association study in multiple system atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailer, Anna; Nalls, Michael A.; Schulte, Claudia; Federoff, Monica; Price, T. Ryan; Lees, Andrew; Ross, Owen A.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Mok, Kin; Mencacci, Niccolo E.; Schottlaender, Lucia; Chelban, Viorica; Ling, Helen; O'Sullivan, Sean S.; Wood, Nicholas W.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Federoff, Howard J.; Mhyre, Timothy R.; Morris, Huw R.; Deuschl, Günther; Quinn, Niall; Widner, Hakan; Albanese, Alberto; Infante, Jon; Bhatia, Kailash P.; Poewe, Werner; Oertel, Wolfgang; Höglinger, Günter U.; Wüllner, Ullrich; Goldwurm, Stefano; Pellecchia, Maria Teresa; Ferreira, Joaquim; Tolosa, Eduardo; Bloem, Bastiaan R.; Rascol, Olivier; Meissner, Wassilios G.; Hardy, John A.; Revesz, Tamas; Holton, Janice L.; Gasser, Thomas; Wenning, Gregor K.; Singleton, Andrew B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify genetic variants that play a role in the pathogenesis of multiple system atrophy (MSA), we undertook a genome-wide association study (GWAS). Methods: We performed a GWAS with >5 million genotyped and imputed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 918 patients with MSA of European ancestry and 3,864 controls. MSA cases were collected from North American and European centers, one third of which were neuropathologically confirmed. Results: We found no significant loci after stringent multiple testing correction. A number of regions emerged as potentially interesting for follow-up at p < 1 × 10−6, including SNPs in the genes FBXO47, ELOVL7, EDN1, and MAPT. Contrary to previous reports, we found no association of the genes SNCA and COQ2 with MSA. Conclusions: We present a GWAS in MSA. We have identified several potentially interesting gene loci, including the MAPT locus, whose significance will have to be evaluated in a larger sample set. Common genetic variation in SNCA and COQ2 does not seem to be associated with MSA. In the future, additional samples of well-characterized patients with MSA will need to be collected to perform a larger MSA GWAS, but this initial study forms the basis for these next steps. PMID:27629089

  13. Neuropsychological investigation in Chinese patients with progressive muscular atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Cui

    Full Text Available Progressive muscular atrophy (PMA is a rare type of degenerative motor neuron disease (MND of which the onset happens in adult period. Despite its well-defined clinical characteristics, its neuropsychological profile has remained poorly understood, considering the consensus of cognitive and behavioral impairment reached in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS.We conducted a cross-sectional evaluation of Chinese PMA patients with a series of comprehensive batteries emphasizing the executive and attention function, and covering other domains of memory, language, visuospatial function, calculation and behavior as well. Their performances were compared with those of age- and education-matched ALS and healthy controls (HC.21 patients newly diagnosed with PMA were consecutively enrolled into our ALS and other MND registry platform, accounting for 14.7% of all the incident MND cases registered during the same period. 20 patients who completed the neuropsychological batteries were included into analysis. Compared with HC, PMA performed significantly worse in maintenance function of attention, while they exhibited quantitative similarity to ALS in all behavioral inventories and neuropsychological tests except the time for Stroop interference effect.PMA could display mild cognitive dysfunction in the same frontal-mediated territory of ALS but in a lesser degree, whereas they did not differ from ALS behaviorally.

  14. Optimization of Spinal Muscular Atrophy subject's muscle activity during gait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umat, Gazlia; Rambely, Azmin Sham

    2014-06-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is a hereditary disease related muscle nerve disorder caused by degeneration of the anterior cells of the spinal cord. SMA is divided into four types according to the degree of seriousness. SMA patients show different gait with normal people. Therefore, this study focused on the effects of SMA patient muscle actions and the difference that exists between SMA subjects and normal subjects. Therefore, the electromyography (EMG) test will be used to track the behavior of muscle during walking and optimization methods are used to get the muscle stress that is capable of doing the work while walking. Involved objective function is non-linear function of the quadratic and cubic functions. The study concludes with a comparison of the objective function using the force that sought to use the moment of previous studies and the objective function using the data obtained from EMG. The results shows that the same muscles, peroneus longus and bisepsfemoris, were used during walking activity by SMA subjects and control subjects. Muscle stress force best solution achieved from part D in simulation carried out.

  15. Describing nutrition in spinal muscular atrophy: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Georgia E; Lindenmayer, Amara W; McConchie, Grace A; Ryan, Monique M; Davidson, Zoe E

    2016-07-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disease of variable severity. Progressive muscle wasting and impairment in functional ability in SMA have a profound influence on nutritional outcomes. This systematic review summarises the existing evidence on nutrition in SMA. The search strategy was conducted across five databases in August 2014, and updated in March 2016, using key terms relating to growth, nutrition requirements, dietary intake and nutrition management. Studies were selected for inclusion using a two pass method, and data systematically extracted using standardised forms. Thirty-nine studies met eligibility criteria. Body composition is abnormal in patients with SMA, and feeding and swallowing issues are prevalent among sufferers of SMA types I and II. Nutritional management practices vary internationally. There is a paucity of literature regarding nutrition requirements in SMA, although it appears that energy expenditure may be reduced. Children with SMA require individualised nutritional management in order to address their growth and nutrition requirements. There is an urgent need for larger, coordinated, prospective intervention studies of nutrition in SMA. PMID:27241822

  16. Clinical Characteristics of Cases with Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Canpolat

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study is was to evaluate the clinical features of cases with diagnosis of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA. Materials and Methods: Thirty-eight pediatric patients were evaluated retrospectively. All patients were followed in the Pediatric Neurology Department of Erciyes University Faculty of Medicine. The diagnosis of patients had been confirmed by genetic analysis of homozygous deletions of survival motor neuron 1 gene. Detailed history, newborn symptoms, nutritional characteristics, initial complaints, physical examination, concomitant pathologies, genetic characteristics, and treatment modalities were investigated in all patients. Results: The study population consisted of 19 boys (50% and 19 girls (50%. The mean age of patients was 26.9±25.7 months (range: 3-96 months. The mean follow-up period was 12.2±13.3 months (range: 2-48 months. According to SMA classification, 22 patients (57.8% were type 1, 8 patients (21.1% were type 2, and 8 patients were (21.1% type 3. Neonatal respiratory distress, age at early diagnosis, nutritional problems, and recurrent lung diseases were detected as poor prognostic factors. Conclusions: SMA is a neuromuscular disease that requires multidisciplinary approach to medical care. There is a wide range of clinical severity. Identification of poor prognostic factors will help in terms of guiding close monitoring and timely treatments of children with SMA.

  17. Treatment of multiple system atrophy using intravenous immunoglobulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novak Peter

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple system atrophy (MSA is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder of unknown etiology, manifesting as combination of parkinsonism, cerebellar syndrome and dysautonomia. Disease-modifying therapies are unavailable. Activation of microglia and production of toxic cytokines suggest a role of neuroinflammation in MSA pathogenesis. This pilot clinical trial evaluated safety and tolerability of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG in MSA. Methods This was a single-arm interventional, single-center, open-label pilot study. Interventions included monthly infusions of the IVIG preparation Privigen®, dose 0.4 gram/kg, for 6 months. Primary outcome measures evaluated safety and secondary outcome measures evaluated preliminary efficacy of IVIG. Unified MSA Rating Scale (UMSARS was measured monthly. Quantitative brain imaging using 3T MRI was performed before and after treatment. Results Nine subjects were enrolled, and seven (2 women and 5 men, age range 55–64 years completed the protocol. There were no serious adverse events. Systolic blood pressure increased during IVIG infusions (p Conclusions Treatment with IVIG appears to be safe, feasible and well tolerated and may improve functionality in MSA. A larger, placebo-controlled study is needed.

  18. Sudeck's bone atrophy after leg phlebography - a case study of an unusual complication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruenberg, G.

    1982-08-01

    In a 39-year old man, a painful oedema had formed at the back of the foot perimalleolary one day after paravasal contrast medium injection following ascending phlebography. 8 weeks later, the X-ray film showed a maculate Sudeck's bone atrophy in the region of the toes, ankles and the heel. Sudeck's bone atrophy had obviously developed on account of a specific vegetative reactivity, subsequent to the local inflammation.

  19. Cerebral atrophy as outcome measure in short-term phase 2 clinical trials in multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elskamp, I.J. van den; Boden, B.; Barkhof, F. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, MS Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dattola, V. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, MS Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Messina, Department of Neurosciences, Psychiatric and Anaesthesiological Sciences, Messina (Italy); Knol, D.L. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Filippi, M. [Scientific Institute and University Ospedale San Raffaele, Neuroimaging Research Unit, Milan (Italy); Kappos, L. [University Hospital, University of Basel, Department of Neurology, Basel (Switzerland); Fazekas, F. [Medical University of Graz, Department of Neurology, Graz (Austria); Wagner, K. [Bayer-Schering Pharma, Berlin (Germany); Pohl, C. [Bayer-Schering Pharma, Berlin (Germany); University Hospital Bonn, Department of Neurology, Bonn (Germany); Sandbrink, R. [Bayer-Schering Pharma, Berlin (Germany); Heinrich-Heine-University Dusseldorf, Department of Neurology, Dusseldorf (Germany); Polman, C.H. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, MS Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Uitdehaag, B.M.J. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, MS Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-10-15

    Cerebral atrophy is a compound measure of the neurodegenerative component of multiple sclerosis (MS) and a conceivable outcome measure for clinical trials monitoring the effect of neuroprotective agents. In this study, we evaluate the rate of cerebral atrophy in a 6-month period, investigate the predictive and explanatory value of other magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures in relation to cerebral atrophy, and determine sample sizes for future short-term clinical trials using cerebral atrophy as primary outcome measure. One hundred thirty-five relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients underwent six monthly MRI scans from which the percentage brain volume change (PBVC) and the number and volume of gadolinium (Gd)-enhancing lesions, T2 lesions, and persistent black holes (PBH) were determined. By means of multiple linear regression analysis, the relationship between focal MRI variables and PBVC was assessed. Sample size calculations were performed for all patients and subgroups selected for enhancement or a high T2 lesion load at baseline. A significant atrophy occurred over 6 months (PBVC = -0.33%, SE = 0.061, p < 0.0001). The number of baseline T2 lesions (p = 0.024), the on-study Gd-enhancing lesion volume (p = 0.044), and the number of on-study PBHs (p = 0.003) were associated with an increased rate of atrophy. For a 50% decrease in rate of atrophy, the sample size calculations showed that approximately 283 patients per arm are required in an unselected sampled population and 185 patients per arm are required in a selected population. Within a 6-month period, significant atrophy can be detected and on-study associations of PBVC and PBHs emphasizes axonal loss to be a driving mechanism. Application as primary outcome measure in short-term clinical trials with feasible sample size requires a potent drug to obtain sufficient power. (orig.)

  20. Diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus, optic atrophy, and deafness: A case of Wolfram (DIDMOAD) syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Maleki, Nasrollah; Bashardoust, Bahman; Zakeri, Anahita; Salehifar, Azita; Tavosi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To report a case of Wolfram syndrome (WS) characterized by diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus, progressive optic atrophy, and deafness. Case report A 19-year-old female patient, a known case of diabetes mellitus type I from six years before, presented with progressive vision loss since four years earlier. On fundoscopic examination, she had bilateral optic atrophy without diabetic retinopathy. The patient also had diabetes insipidus, neurosensory deafness, and neurogenic bladder. C...

  1. Cerebral atrophy as outcome measure in short-term phase 2 clinical trials in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerebral atrophy is a compound measure of the neurodegenerative component of multiple sclerosis (MS) and a conceivable outcome measure for clinical trials monitoring the effect of neuroprotective agents. In this study, we evaluate the rate of cerebral atrophy in a 6-month period, investigate the predictive and explanatory value of other magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures in relation to cerebral atrophy, and determine sample sizes for future short-term clinical trials using cerebral atrophy as primary outcome measure. One hundred thirty-five relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients underwent six monthly MRI scans from which the percentage brain volume change (PBVC) and the number and volume of gadolinium (Gd)-enhancing lesions, T2 lesions, and persistent black holes (PBH) were determined. By means of multiple linear regression analysis, the relationship between focal MRI variables and PBVC was assessed. Sample size calculations were performed for all patients and subgroups selected for enhancement or a high T2 lesion load at baseline. A significant atrophy occurred over 6 months (PBVC = -0.33%, SE = 0.061, p < 0.0001). The number of baseline T2 lesions (p = 0.024), the on-study Gd-enhancing lesion volume (p = 0.044), and the number of on-study PBHs (p = 0.003) were associated with an increased rate of atrophy. For a 50% decrease in rate of atrophy, the sample size calculations showed that approximately 283 patients per arm are required in an unselected sampled population and 185 patients per arm are required in a selected population. Within a 6-month period, significant atrophy can be detected and on-study associations of PBVC and PBHs emphasizes axonal loss to be a driving mechanism. Application as primary outcome measure in short-term clinical trials with feasible sample size requires a potent drug to obtain sufficient power. (orig.)

  2. Rapidly Worsening Bulbar Symptoms in a Patient with Spinobulbar Muscular Atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Montserrat Diaz-Abad; Porter, Neil C

    2013-01-01

    X-linked spinobulbar muscular atrophy (Kennedy’s disease) affects muscles and motor neurons, manifesting as weakness and wasting of bulbar, facial, and proximal limb muscles due to loss of anterior horn cells in the brain and spinal cord. We present the case of a patient with X-linked spinobulbar muscular atrophy with rapidly worsening bulbar symptoms caused by laryngopharyngeal irritation associated with a viral upper respiratory tract infection, seasonal allergies and laryngopharyngeal refl...

  3. The Genetic Diversity of Helicobacter pylori Virulence Genes Is Not Associated with Gastric Atrophy Progression

    OpenAIRE

    Kita, Masahide; Yokota,Kenji; Okada, Hiroyuki; Take,Susumu; Takenaka, Ryuta; Kawahara, Yoshiro; Oguma, Keiji; Matsushita, Osamu; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2013-01-01

    Atrophy of the gastric mucosa is a precursor of intestinal-type gastric cancer, and Helicobacter pylori infection causes atrophic gastritis. The aim of this study was to determine whether the genetic diversity of H. pylori virulence genes is associated with the development and progression of gastric atrophy in humans. We isolated and cultured H. pylori strains from patients with gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer accompanied by atrophic gastritis in background mucosa. H. pylori strains were sto...

  4. Prostatic atrophy: its spatial proximity to carcinoma and intraepithelial neoplasia based on annotation of digital slides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iczkowski, Kenneth A; Torkko, Kathleen C; Wilson, R Storey; Lucia, M Scott; Bostwick, David G

    2014-01-01

    Whether atrophy is a precursor to high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN) and cancer is controversial. A virtual slide set comprising 48 prostatectomy cases was used to investigate associations among the amounts and spacing of these entities. Foci of atrophy without inflammation (A), atrophy with inflammation (AI), cancer (by patterns), and HGPIN were digitally annotated. Atrophy's proximity to cancer and HGPIN was assessed with two measurements: abutment (touching) or nearness (≤2 μm without touching). Area sums per specimen were computed for A, AI, cancer, and HGPIN. Abutment rates of AI and A foci to cancer were 23% versus 21% (p = NS); for nearness, 29% of AI foci were near to cancer versus 12% of A (P = .0001). Abutment or nearness of A and AI to HGPIN were in the 1.4% to 2.4% range. When A, AI, or HGPIN abutted cancer, it was disproportionately to Gleason grade 3 cancer foci even after adjusting for the lesser frequency of higher-grade cancer foci. Area sums of A, AI, or (A + AI) per specimen showed no correlations with those of HGPIN, and mostly negative ones with area sum and with tumor volume of cancer. In conclusion, atrophy with inflammation showed some preferential spatial association to cancer, although area sums of atrophy with or without inflammation correlated negatively with those of cancer. These divergent spatial associations suggest that atrophy and inflammation in biopsy specimens may have clinical relevance. The frequency of inflammatory atrophy (AI) merging with HGPIN was far less than reported previously, weakening the theory that AI gives rise to HGPIN. PMID:24157066

  5. Preventive Effects of Antioxidants and Exercise on Muscle Atrophy Induced by Ischemic Reperfusion

    OpenAIRE

    Umei, Namiko; Ono, Takeya; Oki, Sadaaki; Otsuka, Akira; Otao, Hiroshi; Tsumiyama, Wakako; Tasaka, Atsushi; Ishikura, Hideki; Aihara, Kazuki; Sato, Yuta; Shimizu, Michele Eisemann

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine whether muscle atrophy induced by ischemic reperfusion injury in rats can be prevented by the administration of antioxidants and exercise. [Subjects] Rats were randomly divided into five groups: non-treated, ischemic, exercise, ascorbic acid and exercise, and tocopherol and exercise. [Methods] The relative weight ratio of the soleus muscle and the length of the soleus muscle fiber cross-section minor axis were used for the evaluation of muscle atrophy. ...

  6. Early Metabolic Crisis-Related Brain Atrophy and Cognition in Traumatic Brain Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, Matthew J.; McArthur, David L.; Alger, Jeffry R.; Van Horn, Jack; Irimia, Andrei; Filippou, Maria; Glenn, Thomas C.; Hovda, David A.; Vespa, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury often results in acute metabolic crisis. We recently demonstrated that this is associated with chronic brain atrophy, which is most prominent in the frontal and temporal lobes. Interestingly, the neuropsychological profile of traumatic brain injury is often characterized as ‘frontal-temporal’ in nature, suggesting a possible link between acute metabolic crisis related-brain atrophy and neurocognitive impairment in this population. While focal lesions and diffuse axonal ...

  7. Denervation causes fiber atrophy and myosin heavy chain co-expression in senescent skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon L Rowan

    Full Text Available Although denervation has long been implicated in aging muscle, the degree to which it is causes the fiber atrophy seen in aging muscle is unknown. To address this question, we quantified motoneuron soma counts in the lumbar spinal cord using choline acetyl transferase immunhistochemistry and quantified the size of denervated versus innervated muscle fibers in the gastrocnemius muscle using the in situ expression of the denervation-specific sodium channel, Nav₁.₅, in young adult (YA and senescent (SEN rats. To gain insights into the mechanisms driving myofiber atrophy, we also examined the myofiber expression of the two primary ubiquitin ligases necessary for muscle atrophy (MAFbx, MuRF1. MN soma number in lumbar spinal cord declined 27% between YA (638±34 MNs×mm⁻¹ and SEN (469±13 MNs×mm⁻¹. Nav₁.₅ positive fibers (1548±70 μm² were 35% smaller than Nav₁.₅ negative fibers (2367±78 μm²; P<0.05 in SEN muscle, whereas Nav₁.₅ negative fibers in SEN were only 7% smaller than fibers in YA (2553±33 μm²; P<0.05 where no Nav₁.₅ labeling was seen, suggesting denervation is the primary cause of aging myofiber atrophy. Nav₁.₅ positive fibers had higher levels of MAFbx and MuRF1 (P<0.05, consistent with involvement of the proteasome proteolytic pathway in the atrophy of denervated muscle fibers in aging muscle. In summary, our study provides the first quantitative assessment of the contribution of denervation to myofiber atrophy in aging muscle, suggesting it explains the majority of the atrophy we observed. This striking result suggests a renewed focus should be placed on denervation in seeking understanding of the causes of and treatments for aging muscle atrophy.

  8. Bilateral spontaneous dislocation of posterior chamber intraocular lens in a patient with gyrate atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Kinori

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a patient with gyrate atrophy, a rare metabolic disease, who had bilateral late spontaneous posterior dislocation of in-the-bag posterior chamber intraocular lens (PCIOL. He underwent pars plana vitrectomy, PCIOL retrieval and anterior chamber intraocular lens implantation in both eyes. This report may imply that patients with gyrate atrophy are at risk for spontaneous dislocation of intraocular lenses.

  9. Notch Signaling Mediates Skeletal Muscle Atrophy in Cancer Cachexia Caused by Osteosarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Mu, Xiaodong; Agarwal, Rashmi; March, Daniel; Rothenberg, Adam; Voigt, Clifford; Tebbets, Jessica; Huard, Johnny; Weiss, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy in cancer cachexia is mediated by the interaction between muscle stem cells and various tumor factors. Although Notch signaling has been known as a key regulator of both cancer development and muscle stem cell activity, the potential involvement of Notch signaling in cancer cachexia and concomitant muscle atrophy has yet to be elucidated. The murine K7M2 osteosarcoma cell line was used to generate an orthotopic model of sarcoma-associated cachexia, and the role of Notc...

  10. Calcified neurocysticercosis associates with hippocampal atrophy: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Brutto, Oscar H; Salgado, Perla; Lama, Julio; Del Brutto, Victor J; Campos, Xavier; Zambrano, Mauricio; García, Héctor H

    2015-01-01

    Calcified neurocysticercosis has been associated with hippocampal atrophy in patients with refractory epilepsy, but the relevance of this association in the population at large is unknown. We assessed calcified cysticerci and its association with hippocampal atrophy in elderly persons living in Atahualpa, an Ecuadorian village endemic for neurocysticercosis. All Atahualpa residents ≥ 60 years of age were invited to undergo computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging for neurocysticercosis detection. Twenty-eight (11%) out of 248 enrolled persons had calcified cysticerci (case-patients) and were matched 1:1 by age, sex, and years of education to individuals without neurocysticercosis on computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (controls). Four case-patients and none of the controls had epilepsy (P = 0.134). Cognitive performance was similar across both groups. The Scheltens' medial temporal atrophy scale was used for hippocampal rating in case-patients and matched controls without neurocysticercosis. Mean score in the Scheltens' scale was higher in case-patients than in controls (P < 0.001). Atrophic hippocampi were noticed in 19 case-patients and five controls (P = 0.003). Atrophy was bilateral in 11 case-patients and unilateral in eight. All case-patients with unilateral hippocampal atrophy had at least one ipsilateral calcification. This study shows an association between calcified cysticerci and hippocampal atrophy and raises the possibility of an inflammation-mediated hippocampal damage as the responsible mechanism for these findings.

  11. Regional gray matter atrophy and neuropsychologcal problems in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aiyu Lin; Fuyong Chen; Fang Liu; Zhiwen Li; Ying Liu; Shifang Lin; Xiaoyi Wang; Jiting Zhu

    2013-01-01

    In multiple sclerosis, gray matter atrophy is extensive, and cognitive deficits and mood disorders are frequently encountered. It has been conjectured that focal atrophy is associated with emotional de-cline. However, conventional MRI has revealed that the pathological characteristics cannot ful y account for the mood disorders. Moreover, there is no correlation between cognitive disorders and MRI results in clinical y isolated syndromes or in cases of definite multiple sclerosis. In this case-control study, voxel-based morphometric analysis was performed on 11 subjects with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, and the results show that these patients exhibit gray matter atrophy. Moreover, the gray matter atrophy in the superior and middle gyri of the right frontal lobe in patients with multiple sclerosis was correlated with scores from the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale. The scores obtained with the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status were associated with gray matter atrophy in the middle gyrus of the left frontal lobe, the superior and middle gyrus of the right frontal lobe, the middle gyrus of the left cingulate, the superior and middle gyri of the left frontal lobe, and the triangular area of the left frontal lobe. However, there was no statistical significance. These findings suggest that the cingulate and frontal cortices of the nant hemisphere are the most severely atrophic regions of the brain, and this atrophy is correlated with cognitive decline and emotional abnormalities.

  12. Overlap in frontotemporal atrophy between normal aging and patients with frontotemporal dementias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Tiffany W; Binns, Malcolm A; Freedman, Morris; Stuss, Donald T; Ramirez, Joel; Scott, Chris J M; Black, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    Normal aging leads to frontocortical atrophy. The degree to which this complicates the use of frontotemporal atrophy as a diagnostic criterion for the frontotemporal dementias (FTDs) has not been reported. The present case-control study compared frontotemporal volumes delineated with semi-automatic brain region extraction [n=30 controls vs. 16 behavioral variant FTD (bvFTD) vs. 14 primary progressive aphasia]. Logistic regression identified those regions least helpful for distinguishing bvFTD and primary progressive aphasia from controls. Linear regression tested the correlation of duration of illness to atrophy severity. The control group showed high variance in volumes. Controls had right frontal lobe volumes that overlapped considerably with bvFTD volumes, but, as anticipated, the left anterior temporal volumes of interest showed 91% accuracy in distinguishing the aphasic subgroup from controls. Left-sided and not right-sided atrophy in the medial middle frontal region distinguished the bvFTD group from controls. The relegation of structural imaging to a supportive criterion for diagnosis is reasonable in the context of the range of atrophy due to normal aging. While volumetry identified left-sided atrophy as useful for identifying FTD cases, future studies should determine whether clinicians could make these distinctions on viewing routine diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging scans. PMID:18695590

  13. INFLUENCE OF SHORTENED AND LENGTHENED IMMOBILIZATION ON RAT SOLEUS MUSCLE ATROPHY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢国刚; 樊小力; 吴苏娣; 宋新爱; 朱保恭; 唐斌

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study the possible mechanism and prevention of disuse muscle atrophy. Methods: The shortened immobilization (plaster fixation) of rat' s soleus muscle (SOL) was used as the model of muscle and the lengthened immobilization of rat' s SOL muscle as "passive stretch" method. Types of skeletal muscle fibers were differentiated with m - ATPase staining technique. The changes of rat' s SOL muscle weight (wet weight) as well as the types and the mean cross - sectional area (CSA) of muscle fibers were examined respectively on day 2, 4,7, 14 and 21 under both shortened and lengthened immobilization and then the effect of passive stretch on soleus muscle atrophy in immobilized rats was observed. Results: When shortened immobilization was applied for 4 days, SOL muscle weight (wet weight) became lighter; the fiber crosssectional area (CSA) shrank and type Ⅰ muscle fibers started transforming into type Ⅱ, which all indicated immobilized muscles began to atrophy and as immobilization proceeded, muscle atrophy proceeded toward higher level. In contrast to that, when lengthened immobilization was applied, SOL muscle didn' t show any sign of atrophy until 7th day, and reached its highest level on day 14 and maintained that level even though immobilization continued. Conclusion: From the results, we conclude that passive stretch can either relieve or defer disuse muscle atrophy.

  14. EFFECTS OF PASSIVE STRETCH ON SOLEUS MUSCLE ATROPHY IN IMMOBILIZED RATS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢国刚; 樊小力; 吴苏娣; 宋新爱; 朱保恭; 唐斌

    2002-01-01

    Objective To study the possible mechanism and prevention of disused muscle atrophy. Methods The shortened immobilization (plaster fixation) of rat's soleus muscle(SOL) was used as the model of muscle "disuse" and the lengthened immobilization of rat's SOL muscle as "passive stretch" method. Types of skeletal muscle fibers were differentiated with m-ATPase staining technique. The changes of rat's SOL weight (wet weight) as well as the types and the mean cross sectional area (CSA) of muscle fibers were examined respectively on days 2,4,7,14 and 21 under both shortened and lengthened immobilization, and then the effect of passive stretch on soleus muscle atrophy in immobilized rats was observed. Results When shortened immobilization was applied for 4 days, SOL weight (wet weight ) became lighter, the fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) shrank, and type Ⅰ muscle fibers started to transform into type Ⅱ, which all indicated that immobilized muscles began to atrophy, and as immobilization proceeded, muscle atrophy proceeded toward higher level. In contrast to that, when lengthened immobilization was applied, SOL didn't show any signs of atrophy until day 7, the sign reached its highest level on day 14 and maintained that level even though immobilization continued. Conclusion From the results, we conclude that the passive stretch can either relieve or retard the disused muscle atrophy.

  15. Atrophy of the left hepatic lobe caused by a biliary tract disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Soon Young; Cho, On Koo; Kim, Yong Soo; Rhim, Hyun Chul; Koh, Buyng Hee; Hong, Eun Kyung; Lee, Kwang Soo [Hangyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine

    1998-02-01

    To study the CT patterns of left lobar atrophy, including pathologic and hemodynamic features, in cases of primary biliary disease. CT findings of left hepatic lobar and segmental atrophy in 26 patients with histologically or radiologically-proven underlying bile-duct disease were reviewed. Seventeen cases were oriental choloangiohepatitis (OCH) with left intrahepatic stones and nine were cholnagiocarcinoma involving the hilar or left hepatic bile duct. The distribution and appearance of atrophy and adjacent lobar hypertrophy were studied. CT scans were examined for the presence of stenosis or obstruction of the left portal vein, and the enhancing pattern of lobar atrophy was analysed. In patients who had undergone left lobectomy, the mechanism of lobar atrophy was correlated with radiographic and pathologic features. Lobar or segmental left hepatic lobe atrophy is seen in bile duct disease caused by OCH or cholangiocarcinoma. This finding suggests that the disease process is advanced, and that there is obstruction or narrowing of the left vein, associated with peripheral fibrosis and inflammation. (author). 19 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Is Intracranial Atherosclerosis an Independent Risk Factor for Cerebral Atrophy? A Retrospective Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Kelly H

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our purpose was to study the association between the intracranial atherosclerosis as measured by cavernous carotid artery calcification (ICAC observed on head CT and atrophic changes of supra-tentorial brain demonstrated by MRI. Methods Institutional review board approval was obtained for this retrospective study incorporating 65 consecutive patients presenting acutely who had both head CT and MRI. Arterial calcifications of the intracranial cavernous carotids (ICAC were assigned a number (1 to 4 in the bone window images from CT scans. These 4 groups were then combined into high (grades 3 and 4 and low calcium (grades 1 and 2 subgroups. Brain MRI was independently evaluated to identify cortical and central atrophy. Demographics and cardiovascular risk factors were evaluated in subjects with high and low ICAC. Relationship between CT demonstrated ICAC and brain atrophy patterns were evaluated both without and with adjustment for cerebral ischemic scores and cardiovascular risk factors. Results Forty-six of the 65 (71% patients had high ICAC on head CT. Subjects with high ICAC were older, and had higher prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, coronary artery disease (CAD, atrial fibrillation and history of previous stroke (CVA compared to those with low ICAC. Age demonstrated strong correlation with both supratentorial atrophy patterns. There was no correlation between ICAC and cortical atrophy. There was correlation however between central atrophy and ICAC. This persisted even after adjustment for age. Conclusion Age is the most important determinant of atrophic cerebral changes. However, high ICAC demonstrated age independent association with central atrophy.

  17. Dehydroepiandrosterone intra vaginal administration for the management of postmenopausal vulvovaginal atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, David F

    2015-01-01

    The effects of intravaginal administration of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) for the management of symptomatic vulvovaginal atrophy are reviewed. A literature search related to vulvovaginal atrophy, vaginal atrophy, atrophic vaginitis, estrogen, dehydroepiandrosterone, vulvar itching, burning, dryness, dyspareunia, and libido was performed. Relevant articles addressing the incidence, management, and outcome of DHEA therapy were identified and used for this Expert Opinion. DHEA compared to a placebo is an effective treatment improving symptoms of vaginal atrophy: dyspareunia, burning, itching, and dryness. Objective parameters of vaginal atrophy, specifically pH, vaginal maturation index (VMI), and investigator-evaluated changes in the vagina: moisture, epithelia integrity and color were improved compared to baseline and placebo. There were significant improvements in libido and dyspareunia with the intravaginal use of DHEA that contribute to improved quality of life for postmenopausal women. Dehydroepiandrosterone administered intravaginally on a daily basis is an effective treatment for symptoms, and signs of vulvovaginal atrophy along with libido in postmenopausal women. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Essential role of DHEA'. PMID:25201455

  18. Recommendations to quantify villous atrophy in video capsule endoscopy images of celiac disease patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciaccio, Edward J; Bhagat, Govind; Lewis, Suzanne K; Green, Peter H

    2016-01-01

    AIM To quantify the presence of villous atrophy in endoscopic images for improved automation. METHODS There are two main categories of quantitative descriptors helpful to detect villous atrophy: (1) Statistical and (2) Syntactic. Statistical descriptors measure the small intestinal substrate in endoscope-acquired images based on mathematical methods. Texture is the most commonly used statistical descriptor to quantify villous atrophy. Syntactic descriptors comprise a syntax, or set of rules, for analyzing and parsing the substrate into a set of objects with boundaries. The syntax is designed to identify and distinguish three-dimensional structures based on their shape. RESULTS The variance texture statistical descriptor is useful to describe the average variability in image gray level representing villous atrophy, but does not determine the range in variability and the spatial relationships between regions. Improved textural descriptors will incorporate these factors, so that areas with variability gradients and regions that are orientation dependent can be distinguished. The protrusion syntactic descriptor is useful to detect three-dimensional architectural components, but is limited to identifying objects of a certain shape. Improvement in this descriptor will require incorporating flexibility to the prototypical template, so that protrusions of any shape can be detected, measured, and distinguished. CONCLUSION Improved quantitative descriptors of villous atrophy are being developed, which will be useful in detecting subtle, varying patterns of villous atrophy in the small intestinal mucosa of suspected and known celiac disease patients. PMID:27803772

  19. Brain atrophy rates in first degree relatives at risk for Alzheimer's.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampert, Erika J; Roy Choudhury, Kingshuk; Hostage, Christopher A; Rathakrishnan, Bharath; Weiner, Michael; Petrella, Jeffrey R; Doraiswamy, P Murali

    2014-01-01

    A positive family history (FH) raises the risk for late-onset Alzheimer's disease though, other than the known risk conferred by apolipoprotein ε4 (ApoE4), much of the genetic variance remains unexplained. We examined the effect of family history on longitudinal regional brain atrophy rates in 184 subjects (42% FH+, mean age 79.9) with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) enrolled in a national biomarker study. An automated image analysis method was applied to T1-weighted MR images to measure atrophy rates for 20 cortical and subcortical regions. Mixed-effects linear regression models incorporating repeated-measures to control for within-subject variation over multiple time points tested the effect of FH over a follow-up of up to 48 months. Most of the 20 regions showed significant atrophy over time. Adjusting for age and gender, subjects with a positive FH had greater atrophy of the amygdala (p atrophy rates was numerically greater in ε3 homozygotes than in E4 carriers, but this difference was not significant. FH+ subjects had numerically greater 4-year cognitive decline and conversion rates than FH- subjects but the difference was not statistically significant after adjusting for ApoE and other variables. We conclude that a positive family history of AD may influence cortical and temporal lobe atrophy in subjects with mild cognitive impairment, but it does not have a significant additional effect beyond the known effect of the E4 genotype.

  20. Dehydroepiandrosterone intra vaginal administration for the management of postmenopausal vulvovaginal atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, David F

    2015-01-01

    The effects of intravaginal administration of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) for the management of symptomatic vulvovaginal atrophy are reviewed. A literature search related to vulvovaginal atrophy, vaginal atrophy, atrophic vaginitis, estrogen, dehydroepiandrosterone, vulvar itching, burning, dryness, dyspareunia, and libido was performed. Relevant articles addressing the incidence, management, and outcome of DHEA therapy were identified and used for this Expert Opinion. DHEA compared to a placebo is an effective treatment improving symptoms of vaginal atrophy: dyspareunia, burning, itching, and dryness. Objective parameters of vaginal atrophy, specifically pH, vaginal maturation index (VMI), and investigator-evaluated changes in the vagina: moisture, epithelia integrity and color were improved compared to baseline and placebo. There were significant improvements in libido and dyspareunia with the intravaginal use of DHEA that contribute to improved quality of life for postmenopausal women. Dehydroepiandrosterone administered intravaginally on a daily basis is an effective treatment for symptoms, and signs of vulvovaginal atrophy along with libido in postmenopausal women. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Essential role of DHEA'.

  1. Atrophy of muscles surrounding the shoulder in hemiplegia. Analysis with MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decrease of range of motion and subluxation of shoulders are common secondary dysfunctions after the stroke. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the atrophy of muscles surrounding shoulders in hemiplegic patients and to delineate the correlations between those atrophies and shoulder functions. MRI studies were done on bilateral shoulders in 13 hemiplegic patients with shoulder pain. The cross sectional areas of muscles surrounding shoulder, i.e., subscapularis, supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor and deltoid muscle were measured on those images obtained. The degree of atrophies were evaluated by dividing cross-sectional area of the muscle on affected shoulder by that of non-affected shoulder, that is muscle atrophy ratio [MAR], for each muscle in every case. Also, the range of movements [ROM], the degree of subluxation and muscle strength of shoulder flexion were evaluated. All muscle cross-sectional areas on the affected side were significantly smaller than those of muscles on the unaffected side (p<0.01). The means of MARs were 0.68, 0.69, 0.86, 0.72 and 0.69 for subscapularis, supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor and deltoid muscle. The pattern of muscle atrophies, however, varies from case to case. Both correlations of ROM versus supraspinatus MAR and degree of shoulder subluxation versus deltoid MAR were statistically significant (p<0.05). These results indicate the contribution of muscle atrophy to the shoulder dysfunction in hemiplegic patients. (author)

  2. Regional cerebral blood flow and brain atrophy in senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT)

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    To investigate the relationship between the reduction of cerebal blood flow and brain atrophy in SDAT, these were measured in 13 cases of senile dementia of Alzheimer type, and compared to 15 cases of multi-infarct Dementia, 39 cases of lacunar infarction without dementia (non-demented CVD group) and 69 cases of aged normal control. Brain atrophy was evaluated by two-dimensional method on CT film by digitizer and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured by 133Xe inhalation method. The degree of brain atrophy in SDAT was almost similar of that of MID. But it was more severe than that of non-demented group. MID showed the lowest rCBF among these groups. SDAT showed significantly lower rCBF than that of aged control, but rCBF in SDAT was equal to that of lacunar stroke without dementia. Focal reduction of cerebral blood flow in bilateral fronto-parietal and left occipital regions were observed in SDAT. Verbal intelligence score (Hasegawa's score) correlated with rCBF and brain atrophy index in MID, and a tendency of correlation between rCBF and brain atrophy in MID was also observed. However, there was no correlation among those indices in SDAT. These findings suggest that the loss of brain substance dose not correspond to the reduction of rCBF in SDAT and simultaneous measurement of rCBF and brain atrophy was useful to differ SDAT from MID. (author)

  3. Association between anti-endomysial antibody and total intestinal villous atrophy in children with coeliac disease.

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    Ozgenc F

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is growing evidence to suggest that detection of anti-gliadin antibody (AGA and anti-endomysial antibody (EmA can serve as sensitive markers of the degree of histological abnormalities in patients with coeliac disease. AIM: To evaluate the association between the presence of AGA and EmA and villous atrophy in intestinal biopsies of children with suspected coeliac disease. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: Intestinal samples of 46 children with failure to thrive, chronic diarrhoea, malabsorption and short stature with either AGA and/or EmA positivity were evaluated, retrospectively. The diagnosis of coeliac disease was based on ESPGHAN criteria. METHODS AND MATERIAL: Patients with total villous atrophy who fulfilled the ESPGHAN criteria for the diagnosis of coeliac disease were diagnosed to have coeliac disease. Nine patients without villous atrophy were taken as negative controls for this study. AGA-IgA was measured both by immunoflourescence (IF and ELISA and EmA-IgA by IF while patients were on normal diet. Relationship between autoantibody positivity and intestinal total villous atrophy was evaluated. RESULTS: Overall positivity for AGA IgA was 85% (39/46 by IF+ELISA and EmA positivity was 85% (39/46 by IF within the study group. Histological examination revealed total villous atrophy with lymphocyte infiltration and crypt hyperplasia in 37 (80% patients. AGA IgA was positive in 14 (38% and 31 (84% of these children by ELISA and IF, respectively. EmA positivity was detected in 35/37 (95% cases with atrophy and 4/9 (44% without atrophy (p=0.002. Thirty out of 37 (81% patients with villous atrophy had both AGA IgA (IF and EmA positivity (p=0.186. All of the sixteen patients that had both positive AGA IgA (ELISA+IF and EmA had total villous atrophy (p=0.037. CONCLUSION: A significant association between total villous atrophy and EmA positivity has been documented in this study.

  4. αA crystallin may protect against geographic atrophy-meta-analysis of cataract vs. cataract surgery for geographic atrophy and experimental studies.

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    Peng Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cataract and geographic atrophy (GA, also called advanced "dry" age-related macular degeneration are the two major causes of visual impairment in the developed world. The association between cataract surgery and the development of GA was controversial in previous studies. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed a meta-analysis by pooling the current evidence in literature and found that cataract is associated with an increased risk of geographic atrophy with a summary odds ratio (OR of 3.75 (95% CI: 95% CI: 1.84-7.62. However, cataract surgery is not associated with the risk of geographic atrophy (polled OR=3.23, 95% CI: 0.63-16.47. Further experiments were performed to analyze how the αA-crystallin, the major component of the lens, influences the development of GA in a mouse model. We found that theαA-crystallin mRNA and protein expression increased after oxidative stress induced by NaIO(3 in immunohistochemistry of retinal section and western blot of posterior eyecups. Both functional and histopathological evidence confirmed that GA is more severe in αA-crystallin knockout mice compared to wild-type mice. CONCLUSIONS: Therefore, αA-crystallin may protect against geographic atrophy. This study provides a better understanding of the relationship between cataract, cataract surgery, and GA.

  5. Clinical, FDG and amyloid PET imaging in posterior cortical atrophy.

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    Singh, Tarun D; Josephs, Keith A; Machulda, Mary M; Drubach, Daniel A; Apostolova, Liana G; Lowe, Val J; Whitwell, Jennifer L

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the clinical, [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and amyloid-PET findings in a large cohort of posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) patients, to examine the neural correlates of the classic features of PCA, and to better understand the features associated with early PCA. We prospectively recruited 25 patients who presented to the Mayo Clinic between March 2013 and August 2014 and met diagnostic criteria for PCA. All patients underwent a standardized set of tests and amyloid imaging with [(11)C] Pittsburg compound B (PiB). Seventeen (68 %) underwent FDG-PET scanning. We divided the cohort at the median disease duration of 4 years in order to assess clinical and FDG-PET correlates of early PCA (n = 13). The most common clinical features were simultanagnosia (92 %), dysgraphia (68 %), poly-mini-myoclonus (64 %) and oculomotor apraxia (56.5 %). On FDG-PET, hypometabolism was observed bilaterally in the lateral and medial parietal and occipital lobes. Simultanagnosia was associated with hypometabolism in the right occipital lobe and posterior cingulum, optic ataxia with hypometabolism in left occipital lobe, and oculomotor apraxia with hypometabolism in the left parietal lobe and posterior cingulate gyrus. All 25 PCA patients were amyloid positive. Simultanagnosia was the only feature present in 85 % of early PCA patients. The syndrome of PCA is associated with posterior hemisphere hypometabolism and with amyloid deposition. Many of the classic features of PCA show associated focal, but not widespread, areas of involvement of these posterior hemispheric regions. Simultanagnosia appears to be the most common and hence sensitive feature of early PCA. PMID:25862483

  6. Hippocampal and cerebellar atrophy in patients with Cushing's disease.

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    Burkhardt, Till; Lüdecke, Daniel; Spies, Lothar; Wittmann, Linus; Westphal, Manfred; Flitsch, Jörg

    2015-11-01

    OBJECT Cushing's disease (CD) may cause atrophy of different regions of the human brain, mostly affecting the hippocampus and the cerebellum. This study evaluates the use of 3-T MRI of newly diagnosed patients with CD to detect atrophic degeneration with voxel-based volumetry. METHODS Subjects with newly diagnosed, untreated CD were included and underwent 3-T MRI. Images were analyzed using a voxelwise statistical test to detect reduction of brain parenchyma. In addition, an atlas-based volumetric study for regions likely to be affected by CD was performed. RESULTS Nineteen patients with a mean disease duration of 24 months were included. Tumor markers included adrenocorticotropic hormone (median 17.5 pmol/L), cortisol (949.4 nmol/L), and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (5.4 μmol/L). The following values are expressed as the mean ± SD. The voxelwise statistical test revealed clusters of significantly reduced gray matter in the hippocampus and cerebellum, with volumes of 2.90 ± 0.26 ml (right hippocampus), 2.89 ± 0.28 ml (left hippocampus), 41.95 ± 4.67 ml (right cerebellar hemisphere), and 42.11 ± 4.59 ml (left cerebellar hemisphere). Healthy control volunteers showed volumes of 3.22 ± 0.25 ml for the right hippocampus, 3.23 ± 0.25 ml for the left hippocampus, 50.87 ± 4.23 ml for the right cerebellar hemisphere, and 50.42 ± 3.97 ml for the left cerebellar hemisphere. CONCLUSIONS Patients with untreated CD show significant reduction of gray matter in the cerebellum and hippocampus. These changes can be analyzed and objectified with the quantitative voxel-based method described in this study.

  7. Brain stem and cerebellar atrophy in chronic progressive neuro-Behçet's disease

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    Kanoto, Masafumi, E-mail: mkanoto@med.id.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Iida-Nishi 2-2-2, 990-9585 Yamagata (Japan); Hosoya, Takaaki, E-mail: thosoya@med.id.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Iida-Nishi 2-2-2, 990-9585 Yamagata (Japan); Toyoguchi, Yuuki, E-mail: c-elegans_0201g@mail.goo.ne.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Iida-Nishi 2-2-2, 990-9585 Yamagata (Japan); Oda, Atsuko, E-mail: a.oda@med.id.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Iida-Nishi 2-2-2, 990-9585 Yamagata (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: Chronic progressive neuro-Behçet's disease (CPNBD) resembles multiple sclerosis (MS) on patient background and image findings, and therefore is difficult to diagnose. The purpose is to identify the characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of CPNBD and to clarify the differences between the MRI findings of CPNBD and those of MS. Materials and methods: The subjects consist of a CPNBD group (n = 4; 1 male and 3 females; mean age, 51 y.o.), a MS group (n = 19; 3 males and 16 females; mean age, 45 y.o.) and a normal control group (n = 23; 10 males and 13 females; mean age, 45 y.o.). Brain stem atrophy, cerebellar atrophy, and leukoencephalopathy were retrospectively evaluated in each subjects. In middle sagittal brain MR images, the prepontine distance was measured as an indirect index of brain stem and cerebellar atrophy and the pontine and mesencephalic distance was measured as a direct index of brain stem atrophy. These indexes were statistically analyzed. Results: Brain stem atrophy, cerebellar atrophy, and leukoencephalopathy were seen in all CPNBD cases. Prepontine distance was significantly different between the CPNBD group and the MS group (p < 0.05), and between the CPNBD group and the normal control group (p < 0.001). Pontine and mesencephalic distance were significantly different between the CPNBD group and the MS group (p < 0.001, p < 0.01 respectively), and between the CPNBD group and the normal control group (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Chronic progressive neuro-Behçet's disease should be considered in patients with brain stem and cerebellar atrophy in addition to leukoencephalopathy similar to that seen in multiple sclerosis.

  8. Fronto-striatal atrophy in behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia & Alzheimer’s disease

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    Maxime eBertoux

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD has only recently been associated with significant striatal atrophy, whereas the striatum appears to be relatively preserved in Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Considering the critical role the striatum has in cognition and behaviour, striatal degeneration, together with frontal atrophy, could be responsible of some characteristic symptoms in bvFTD and emerges therefore as promising novel diagnostic biomarker to distinguish bvFTD and AD. Previous studies have, however, only taken either cortical or striatal atrophy into account when comparing the two diseases. In this study, we establish for the first time a profile of fronto-striatal atrophy in 23 bvFTD and 29 AD patients at presentation, based on the structural connectivity of striatal and cortical regions. Patients are compared to 50 healthy controls by using a novel probabilistic connectivity atlas, which defines striatal regions by their cortical white matter connectivity, allowing us to explore the degeneration of the frontal and striatal regions that are functionally linked. Comparisons with controls revealed that bvFTD showed substantial fronto-striatal atrophy affecting the ventral as well as anterior and posterior dorso-lateral prefrontal cortices and the related striatal subregions. By contrast, AD showed few fronto-striatal atrophy, despite having significant posterior dorso-lateral prefrontal degeneration. Direct comparison between bvFTD and AD revealed significantly more atrophy in the ventral striatal-ventromedial prefrontal cortex regions in bvFTD. Consequently, deficits in ventral fronto-striatal regions emerge as promising novel and efficient diagnosis biomarker for bvFTD. Future investigations into the contributions of these fronto-striatal loops on bvFTD symptomology are needed to develop simple diagnostic and disease tracking algorithms.

  9. Grey matter atrophy of basal forebrain and hippocampus in mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haobo; Trollor, Julian N; Wen, Wei; Zhu, Wanlin; Crawford, John D; Kochan, Nicole A; Slavin, Melissa J; Brodaty, Henry; Reppermund, Simone; Kang, Kristan; Mather, Karen A; Sachdev, Perminder S

    2011-05-01

    The basal forebrain area (BFA) is closely connected to the hippocampus by virtue of cholinergic neuronal projections. Structural neuroimaging studies have shown reduced volumes of both structures in Alzheimer's disease and its prodromal stage mild cognitive impairment (MCI), but generally not in the same investigation. By combining voxel based morphometry and region of interest methods, we measured the grey matter (GM) volumes of the two brain regions with the goal of elucidating their contributions to MCI and its two subtypes (amnestic MCI and non-amnestic MCI) in an elderly epidemiological sample. The results replicated previous findings that the atrophies of both brain regions were associated with an increased likelihood of MCI and its two subtypes. However, in a regression model for the prediction of MCI with GM volumes for both regions used as predictors, only hippocampal atrophy remained significant. Two possible interpretations for this pattern of results were discussed. One is that the observed correlation between BFA atrophy and MCI is spurious and due to the hippocampal atrophy correlated with both. Alternatively, our observation is consistent with the possibility that BFA atrophy has a causal effect on MCI, which is mediated via its influence on hippocampal atrophy. Furthermore, we found that the left hippocampal atrophy had a stronger effect than the right hippocampus and bilateral BFA in the prediction of amnestic MCI occurrence when the four unilateral areas were entered into one regression model. In addition, a slight but statistically significant difference was found in the left hippocampal volume between APOE ε4 allele carriers and non-carriers, consistent with prior studies.

  10. Relation of cerebral small-vessel disease and brain atrophy to mild Parkinsonism in the elderly.

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    Reitz, Christiane; Trenkwalder, Claudia; Kretzschmar, Konrad; Roesler, Andreas; V Eckardstein, Arnold; Berger, Klaus

    2006-11-01

    The association between cerebral small-vessel disease, brain atrophy, and the risk and severity of mild parkinsonian signs (MPS) remains unclear. The objective of this study is to examine the effect of lacunar brain infarcts, cerebral white matter lesions (WMLs), and cortical atrophy on the risk and severity of MPS. This study is a cross-sectional community-based cohort study comprising 268 subjects, 65 to 83 years of age, residing in the Augsburg region of southern Germany, and without contraindications for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. Main outcome measures. Subcortical and periventricular WMLs, lacunar brain infarcts, and cortical atrophy determined using a standardized MRI protocol developed for the Rotterdam Scan Study and an established rating scale. MPS, assessed in a standardized neurological examination and based on the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale motor scale. Lacunar brain infarcts and large subcortical white matter lesions were associated with an elevated risk of resting tremor. More severe cortical atrophy was related to an increased risk of rigidity and bradykinesia. In a linear regression analysis relating each individual MRI measurement with the severity of MPS, the number of lacunar brain infarcts and the degree of brain atrophy were correlated with the severity of resting tremor, whereas the size of subcortical and periventricular WMLs was correlated with the severity of rigidity. A higher degree of brain atrophy was associated with increased severity of either cardinal sign. In our study, presence and volume of lacunar brain infarcts, cerebral WMLs, and cortical atrophy were associated with the risk as well as severity of MPS. Determining the presence of these brain changes using brain imaging might contribute to identify persons at risk for MPS.

  11. Inflammation and focal atrophy in prostate needle biopsy cores and association to prostatic adenocarcinoma.

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    Benedetti, Ines; Bettin, Alfonso; Reyes, Niradiz

    2016-10-01

    The possible origin of proliferative inflammatory atrophy in the regenerative proliferation of prostate epithelial cells in response to injury caused by inflammation, and their relation to prostate adenocarcinoma have not been defined. Inflammation and focal atrophy are common pathological findings in prostate biopsies, currently not routinely included in surgical pathology reports. The objective of the study was to determine the correlation between inflammation and focal atrophy with prostate adenocarcinoma. Prostate needle biopsies from 203 patients with clinical parameters suspicious for malignancy were evaluated for the presence and extent of chronic inflammation, type and grade of focal atrophy, high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia, and adenocarcinoma. Relations among them and with age were also analyzed. χ(2) tests and binary logistic regression were used to estimate associations. Chronic inflammation was observed in 77.3% of the biopsies, significantly associated to adenocarcinoma (P = .031). Moderate/severe inflammation in at least 1 biopsy core increased the risk of prostate adenocarcinoma (odds ratio, 2.94; 95% confidence interval, 1.27-6.8), whereas glandular localization of inflammation decreased the risk. Focal atrophy was present in 72.9% of the biopsies, proliferative inflammatory atrophy was the most common type, and its grade was significantly associated to inflammation (P < .0001) and inflammation intensity (P = .003). An association between prostate adenocarcinoma and inflammation was found, with higher odds in presence of moderate/severe inflammation in at least 1 biopsy core. Increasing grades of proliferative inflammatory atrophy were associated to high levels of inflammation, supporting its previously proposed inflammatory nature. PMID:27649956

  12. Notch Signaling Mediates Skeletal Muscle Atrophy in Cancer Cachexia Caused by Osteosarcoma.

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    Mu, Xiaodong; Agarwal, Rashmi; March, Daniel; Rothenberg, Adam; Voigt, Clifford; Tebbets, Jessica; Huard, Johnny; Weiss, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy in cancer cachexia is mediated by the interaction between muscle stem cells and various tumor factors. Although Notch signaling has been known as a key regulator of both cancer development and muscle stem cell activity, the potential involvement of Notch signaling in cancer cachexia and concomitant muscle atrophy has yet to be elucidated. The murine K7M2 osteosarcoma cell line was used to generate an orthotopic model of sarcoma-associated cachexia, and the role of Notch signaling was evaluated. Skeletal muscle atrophy was observed in the sarcoma-bearing mice, and Notch signaling was highly active in both tumor tissues and the atrophic skeletal muscles. Systemic inhibition of Notch signaling reduced muscle atrophy. In vitro coculture of osteosarcoma cells with muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs) isolated from normal mice resulted in decreased myogenic potential of MDSCs, while the application of Notch inhibitor was able to rescue this repressed myogenic potential. We further observed that Notch-activating factors reside in the exosomes of osteosarcoma cells, which activate Notch signaling in MDSCs and subsequently repress myogenesis. Our results revealed that signaling between tumor and muscle via the Notch pathway may play an important role in mediating the skeletal muscle atrophy seen in cancer cachexia. PMID:27378829

  13. Cervical Spinal Cord Atrophy Profile in Adult SMN1-Linked SMA.

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    Mohamed-Mounir El Mendili

    Full Text Available The mechanisms underlying the topography of motor deficits in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA remain unknown. We investigated the profile of spinal cord atrophy (SCA in SMN1-linked SMA, and its correlation with the topography of muscle weakness.Eighteen SMN1-linked SMA patients type III/V and 18 age/gender-matched healthy volunteers were included. Patients were scored on manual muscle testing and functional scales. Spinal cord was imaged using 3T MRI system. Radial distance (RD and cord cross-sectional area (CSA measurements in SMA patients were compared to those in controls and correlated with strength and disability scores.CSA measurements revealed a significant cord atrophy gradient mainly located between C3 and C6 vertebral levels with a SCA rate ranging from 5.4% to 23% in SMA patients compared to controls. RD was significantly lower in SMA patients compared to controls in the anterior-posterior direction with a maximum along C4 and C5 vertebral levels (p-values < 10-5. There were no correlations between atrophy measurements, strength and disability scores.Spinal cord atrophy in adult SMN1-linked SMA predominates in the segments innervating the proximal muscles. Additional factors such as neuromuscular junction or intrinsic skeletal muscle defects may play a role in more complex mechanisms underlying weakness in these patients.

  14. A Possible Link between Gastric Mucosal Atrophy and Gastric Cancer after Helicobacter pylori Eradication

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    Tahara, Tomomitsu; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Horiguchi, Noriyuki; Kawamura, Tomohiko; Okubo, Masaaki; Ishizuka, Takamitsu; Nagasaka, Mitsuo; Nakagawa, Yoshihito; Ohmiya, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Background The effect of H. pylori eradication in gastric cancer prevention can be attributed to the improvement of atrophic gastritis, which is a known risk of gastric cancer. However, gastric cancer has also been diagnosed after long-term H. pylori eradication. This study aimed to clarify the association between gastric atrophy and gastric cancer after H. pylori eradication, including its clinicopathological features. Methods A total of 55 consecutive patients with 64 early gastric cancers (EGCs) diagnosed after H. pylori eradication were enrolled. The degree of endoscopic atrophy and the histological degrees of mononuclear cell infiltration, atrophy, and metaplasia in the corpus and adjacent mucosa of the EGCs were determined and scored. Results The majority of EGCs (63/64) were located within the endoscopically assessed atrophic mucosa or along the atrophic border. The adjacent mucosa of the EGCs presented significantly higher degrees of all histological parameters than in the corpus (mononuclear cell infiltration, 0.86+/-0.09 vs. 0.51+/-0.11, P = 0.016; atrophy, 1.77+/-0.13 vs. 0.65+/-0.14, Pgastric ulcers. Conclusions Severe gastric atrophy remained in the adjacent mucosa of the EGCs after H. pylori eradication, which may be linked to gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:27706195

  15. Taurine Rescues Cisplatin-Induced Muscle Atrophy In Vitro: A Morphological Study

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    Alessandra Stacchiotti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin (CisPt is a widely used chemotherapeutic drug whose side effects include muscle weakness and cachexia. Here we analysed CisPt-induced atrophy in C2C12 myotubes by a multidisciplinary morphological approach, focusing on the onset and progression of autophagy, a protective cellular process that, when excessively activated, may trigger protein hypercatabolism and atrophy in skeletal muscle. To visualize autophagy we used confocal and transmission electron microscopy at different times of treatment and doses of CisPt. Moreover we evaluated the effects of taurine, a cytoprotective beta-amino acid able to counteract oxidative stress, apoptosis, and endoplasmic reticulum stress in different tissues and organs. Our microscopic results indicate that autophagy occurs very early in 50 μM CisPt challenged myotubes (4 h–8 h before overt atrophy but it persists even at 24 h, when several autophagic vesicles, damaged mitochondria, and sarcoplasmic blebbings engulf the sarcoplasm. Differently, 25 mM taurine pretreatment rescues the majority of myotubes size upon 50 μM CisPt at 24 h. Taurine appears to counteract atrophy by restoring regular microtubular apparatus and mitochondria and reducing the overload and the localization of autophagolysosomes. Such a promising taurine action in preventing atrophy needs further molecular and biochemical studies to best define its impact on muscle homeostasis and the maintenance of an adequate skeletal mass in vivo.

  16. Impaired cerebral autoregulation is associated with brain atrophy and worse functional status in chronic ischemic stroke.

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    Mikio C Aoi

    Full Text Available Dynamic cerebral autoregulation (dCA is impaired following stroke. However, the relationship between dCA, brain atrophy, and functional outcomes following stroke remains unclear. In this study, we aimed to determine whether impairment of dCA is associated with atrophy in specific regions or globally, thereby affecting daily functions in stroke patients.We performed a retrospective analysis of 33 subjects with chronic infarctions in the middle cerebral artery territory, and 109 age-matched non-stroke subjects. dCA was assessed via the phase relationship between arterial blood pressure and cerebral blood flow velocity. Brain tissue volumes were quantified from MRI. Functional status was assessed by gait speed, instrumental activities of daily living (IADL, modified Rankin Scale, and NIH Stroke Score.Compared to the non-stroke group, stroke subjects showed degraded dCA bilaterally, and showed gray matter atrophy in the frontal, parietal and temporal lobes ipsilateral to infarct. In stroke subjects, better dCA was associated with less temporal lobe gray matter atrophy on the infracted side ([Formula: see text] = 0.029, faster gait speed ([Formula: see text] = 0.018 and lower IADL score ([Formula: see text]0.002. Our results indicate that better dynamic cerebral perfusion regulation is associated with less atrophy and better long-term functional status in older adults with chronic ischemic infarctions.

  17. Case of dentato-rubro-pallido-luysian atrophy. MRI findings and disturbance of ocular movement

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    Usui, Sadanari; Komiya, Tadatoshi

    1988-06-01

    A clinical case of dentato-rubro-pallido-luysian atrophy (DRPLA) was reported. We established several aspects on the basis of MRI findings and a neuro-otological study. A 47-year-old woman had gait disturbance, involuntary movements, speech disturbance, and memory disturbance at the age of 42. She was admitted to the hospital because of worsening of the gait disturbance. Neurological examinations showed choreo-athetosis of the face, neck and upper extremities, mental disturbance, and scanning speech. However, she had neither ocular disturbance nor epilepsy or myoclonus. On the MRI-CT, an atrophy of midbrain and pontine tegmentum was observed. The neuro-otological study showed gaze nystagmus at the horizontal gaze, rebound nystagmus, hypometria of the saccade, saccadic pursuit, reduction of the optokinetic nystagmus, and increase in caloric nystagmus by means of visual input. A severe atrophy of the brainstem tegmentum and a mild atrophy of the cerebellar hemisphere and cerebral cortex are regarded as neuro-radiological features of DRPLA. Moreover, tegmental atrophy is related to ocular disturbance as a clinical feature. Various neuro-otological findings reveal many systems of ocular movements, i.e., a smooth pursuit system, a saccade system, and a vestibulo-ocular reflex system, involving flocculus. DRPLA can be clinically diagnosed by means of clinical features, MRI findings, and neuro-otological findings. A variety of neuro-otological abnormalities may indicate a progression of the ocular disturbance and a variety of lesions.

  18. Detection of cerebral atrophy in type- II diabetes mellitus by magnetic resonance imaging of brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Diabetes is a metabolic disorder that affects many systems in the body. Cerebral atrophy is one of the complications of diabetes and research is on going to find out its aetiopathological factors. The main aim of the study was to determine the frequency of cerebral atrophy in type-II diabetes mellitus using magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. Methods: One hundred diabetic patients (Random blood sugar >126 mg/dl) were recruited in this study after the informed consent from every patient. Duration of diabetes was five years and more in all the patients as determined by their glycosylated haemoglobin which was >6 in all the patients. All the patients were undergone MRI of brain using 1.5 Tesla power magnetic resonance imaging machine of Picker Company. Evan's index, a specific parameter for measurement of cerebral atrophy was calculated on MR images and was used in this study. Results: In male group the frequency of cerebral atrophy was 22 (47%) and in female group it was found to be 23 (43%). When we study the overall population the frequency was found to be 45 (45%). The results are well in concordance with the previous data published on this issue. Conclusions: Cerebral atrophy, a complication of long standing diabetes is quite frequent in our population and is well diagnosed by MRI. (author)

  19. Effects of cerebrospinal fluid proteins on brain atrophy rates in cognitively healthy older adults.

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    Mattsson, Niklas; Insel, Philip; Nosheny, Rachel; Trojanowski, John Q; Shaw, Leslie M; Jack, Clifford R; Tosun, Duygu; Weiner, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Biomarkers associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like brain atrophy in healthy individuals may identify mechanisms involved in early stage AD. Aside from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) β-amyloid42 (Aβ42) and tau, no studies have tested associations between CSF proteins and AD-like brain atrophy. We studied 90 healthy elders, who underwent lumbar puncture at baseline, and serial magnetic resonance imaging scans for up to 4 years. We tested statistical effects of baseline CSF proteins (N = 70 proteins related to Aβ42-metabolism, microglial activity, and synaptic/neuronal function) on atrophy rates in 7 AD-related regions. Besides the effects of Aβ42 and phosphorylated tau (P-tau) that were seen in several regions, novel CSF proteins were found to have effects in inferior and middle temporal cortex (including apolipoprotein CIII, apolipoprotein D, and apolipoprotein H). Several proteins (including S100β and matrix metalloproteinase-3) had effects that depended on the presence of brain Aβ pathology, as measured by CSF Aβ42. Other proteins (including P-tau and apolipoprotein D) had effects even after adjusting for CSF Aβ42. The statistical effects in this exploratory study were mild and not significant after correction for multiple comparisons, but some of the identified proteins may be associated with brain atrophy in healthy persons. Proteins interacting with CSF Aβ42 may be related to Aβ brain pathology, whereas proteins associated with atrophy even after adjusting for CSF Aβ42 may be related to Aβ-independent mechanisms.

  20. Neurosyphilis with dementia and bilateral hippocampal atrophy on brain magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrabian Shima

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This article reports a rare case of active neurosyphilis in a man with mild to moderate dementia and marked hippocampal atrophy, mimicking early onset Alzheimer’s disease. Few cases have so far described bilateral hippocampal atrophy mimicking Alzheimer’s disease in neurosyphilis. Case presentation The patient presented here is a 33 year old Bulgarian male, whose clinical features include progressive cognitive decline and behavioral changes over the last 18 months. Neuropsychological examination revealed mild to moderate dementia (Mini Mental State Examination score was 16/30 with impaired memory and attention, and executive dysfunction. Pyramidal, and extrapyramidal signs, as well as dysarthria and impairment in coordination, were documented. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed cortical atrophy with noticeable bilateral hippocampal atrophy. The diagnosis of active neurosyphilis was based on positive results of the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory test/Treponema pallidum hemagglutination reactions in blood and cerebrospinal fluid samples. In addition, cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed pleocytosis and elevated protein levels. High-dose intravenous penicillin therapy was administered. At 6 month follow up, improvements were noted clinically, on neuropsychological examinations, and in cerebrospinal fluid samples. Conclusion This case underlines the importance of early diagnosis of neurosyphilis. The results suggest that neurosyphilis should be considered when magnetic resonance imaging results indicate mesiotemporal abnormalities and hippocampal atrophy. Neurosyphilis is a treatable condition which requires early aggressive antibiotic therapy.

  1. Neurosyphilis with dementia and bilateral hippocampal atrophy on brain magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Background: This article reports a rare case of active neurosyphilis in a 33-years-old man with mild to moderate dementia and marked hippocampal atrophy, mimicking early onset Alzheimer's disease. Few number of cases described bilateral hippocampal atrophy mimicking Alzheimer's disease in neurosyphilis. Case presentation: The clinical feature is characterized by a progressive cognitive decline and behavioral changes for the last 18 months. Neuropsychological examination revealed mild to moderate dementia (MMSE=16) with impaired memory, attention and executive dysfunction. Pyramidal, extrapyramidal signs, dysarthria and impairment in coordination were documented. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed cortical atrophy with marked bilateral hippocampal atrophy. The diagnosis of active neurosyphilis was based on positive results of Venereal Disease Research Laboratory test - Treponema Pallidum. Hemagglutination reactions in blood and cerebrospinal fluid samples. In addition, cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed pleocytosis and elevated protein levels. High dose intravenous penicillin therapy was administered. During the follow up examination at 6 month, the clinical signs, and neuropsychological examinations, and cerebrospinal fluid samples showed improvement. Conclusion: This case underlines the importance of early diagnosis of neurosyphilis. The results suggest that neurosyphilis should be considered when magnetic resonance imaging results indicate mesiotemporal abnormalities and hippocampal atrophy. Neurosyphilis is a treatable condition and needs early aggressive antibiotic therapy

  2. How to diminish calcium loss and muscle atrophy in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgolewski, S.

    Humans in micro-gravity suffer from Ca loss and muscle atrophy, efforts are made to prevent it by means of physical exercises and with medicaments. The tread-mill and exercise bike are just two most frequently used examples. This can and should be widely extended, and in such a way as to mimic as close as possible the normal loading of the muscles and skeleton which we experience here on the earth. Special very light weight active harness is proposed which monitors the body loading. This is accomplished by means of computer aided monitoring of muscle and bone loading systems. Using feedback it helps the crew to load their bodies and skeletons in the same way as it happens here on the earth. The active exercise mat with pressure sensors first creates a record here on the earth of all normal muscle tensions during exercise. In space the computer guides each exercising crew member to follow their earthbound training routine. High care is needed to select the best and most effective exercises which should demand least energy, yet providing the very best results. May I suggest the very best known to me kind of comprehensive exercises: Yoga. Doing it on the Earth you need next to none special training equipment. Our body is in principle all we need here to do Yoga exercises on the Earth. Integral part of Yoga exercises are abdominal breathing exercises, which can slow down the breathing rate even threefold. This improves the oxygen and CO_2 exchange and massages all internal organs around the clock, helping the adept to stay fit and also keeps their minds steady and calm. Yoga exercises should be mastered already here on the earth, providing the crew with much greater tolerance to micro-gravity. In Yoga we acquire the tolerance not only to zero gravity but also to "negative" gravity: as it happens in all inverted positions. This should help the astronauts to be more tolerant of the half way only step into "zero gravity". Weightlessness state provides us the ultimate in

  3. Impaired Muscle Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Myogenesis in Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripolone, Michela; Ronchi, Dario; Violano, Raffaella; Vallejo, Dionis; Fagiolari, Gigliola; Barca, Emanuele; Lucchini, Valeria; Colombo, Irene; Villa, Luisa; Berardinelli, Angela; Balottin, Umberto; Morandi, Lucia; Mora, Marina; Bordoni, Andreina; Fortunato, Francesco; Corti, Stefania; Parisi, Daniela; Toscano, Antonio; Sciacco, Monica; DiMauro, Salvatore; Comi, Giacomo P.; Moggio, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The important depletion of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and the general depression of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex levels (including complex II) have been confirmed, implying an increasing paucity of mitochondria in the muscle from patients with types I, II, and III spinal muscular atrophy (SMA-I, -II, and -III, respectively). OBJECTIVE To investigate mitochondrial dysfunction in a large series of muscle biopsy samples from patients with SMA. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We studied quadriceps muscle samples from 24 patients with genetically documented SMA and paraspinal muscle samples from 3 patients with SMA-II undergoing surgery for scoliosis correction. Postmortem muscle samples were obtained from 1 additional patient. Age-matched controls consisted of muscle biopsy specimens from healthy children aged 1 to 3 years who had undergone analysis for suspected myopathy. Analyses were performed at the Neuromuscular Unit, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico Foundation Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico-Milano, from April 2011 through January 2015. EXPOSURES We used histochemical, biochemical, and molecular techniques to examine the muscle samples. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Respiratory chain activity and mitochondrial content. RESULTS Results of histochemical analysis revealed that cytochrome-c oxidase (COX) deficiency was more evident in muscle samples from patients with SMA-I and SMA-II. Residual activities for complexes I, II, and IV in muscles from patients with SMA-I were 41%, 27%, and 30%, respectively, compared with control samples (P < .005). Muscle mtDNA content and cytrate synthase activity were also reduced in all 3 SMA types (P < .05). We linked these alterations to downregulation of peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor coactivator 1α, the transcriptional activators nuclear respiratory factor 1 and nuclear respiratory factor 2, mitochondrial transcription factor A, and their downstream targets

  4. Proteomic assessment of a cell model of spinal muscular atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Kelvin H

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deletion or mutation(s of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1 gene causes spinal muscular atrophy (SMA, a neuromuscular disease characterized by spinal motor neuron death and muscle paralysis. Complete loss of the SMN protein is embryonically lethal, yet reduced levels of this protein result in selective death of motor neurons. Why motor neurons are specifically targeted by SMN deficiency remains to be determined. In this study, embryonic stem (ES cells derived from a severe SMA mouse model were differentiated into motor neurons in vitro by addition of retinoic acid and sonic hedgehog agonist. Proteomic and western blot analyses were used to probe protein expression alterations in this cell-culture model of SMA that could be relevant to the disease. Results When ES cells were primed with Noggin/fibroblast growth factors (bFGF and FGF-8 in a more robust neural differentiation medium for 2 days before differentiation induction, the efficiency of in vitro motor neuron differentiation was improved from ~25% to ~50%. The differentiated ES cells expressed a pan-neuronal marker (neurofilament and motor neuron markers (Hb9, Islet-1, and ChAT. Even though SMN-deficient ES cells had marked reduced levels of SMN (~20% of that in control ES cells, the morphology and differentiation efficiency for these cells are comparable to those for control samples. However, proteomics in conjunction with western blot analyses revealed 6 down-regulated and 14 up-regulated proteins with most of them involved in energy metabolism, cell stress-response, protein degradation, and cytoskeleton stability. Some of these activated cellular pathways showed specificity for either undifferentiated or differentiated cells. Increased p21 protein expression indicated that SMA ES cells were responding to cellular stress. Up-regulation of p21 was confirmed in spinal cord tissues from the same SMA mouse model from which the ES cells were derived. Conclusion SMN

  5. MicroRNA in skeletal muscle development, growth, atrophy, and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovanda, Anja; Režen, Tadeja; Rogelj, Boris

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short noncoding RNAs that are important global- as well as tissue- and cell-type-specific regulators of gene expression. Muscle-specific miRNAs or myomirs have been shown to control various processes in skeletal muscles, from myogenesis and muscle homeostasis to different responses to environmental stimuli, such as exercise. Importantly, myomirs are also involved in the development of muscle atrophy arising from aging, immobility, prolonged exposure to microgravity, or muscular and neuromuscular disorders. Additionally, muscle atrophy is both induced by and exacerbates many important chronic and infectious diseases. As global yet specific muscle regulators, myomirs are also good candidates for therapeutic use. Understanding the dynamics of myomirs expression and their role in the development of disease is necessary to determine their potential for muscle atrophy prevention.

  6. Diabetes mellitus, hypertension and medial temporal lobe atrophy: the LADIS study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korf, E S C; van Straaten, E C W; de Leeuw, F-E;

    2007-01-01

    HYPOTHESIS: Based on recent findings on the association between vascular risk factors and hippocampal atrophy, we hypothesized that hypertension and diabetes mellitus (DM) are associated with medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA) in subjects without disability, independent of the severity of white...... matter hyperintensities. METHODS: In the Leukoaraiosis And DISability in the elderly (LADIS) study, we investigated the relationships between DM, hypertension, blood pressure and MTA in 582 subjects, stratified by white matter hyperintensity severity, using multinomial logistic regression. MTA......% CI: 1.1-7.8) compared with an MTA score of 0 (no atrophy). The odds ratio for MTA score 2 was not significantly increased (OR 1.8; CI: 0.9-4). Systolic and diastolic blood pressure and a history of hypertension were not associated with MTA. There was no interaction between DM and hypertension...

  7. Elevated plasma homocysteine is associated with increased brain atrophy rates in older subjects with mild hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Sunil K; Firbank, Michael J; Saxby, Brian K; Stansby, Gerard; Hansrani, Monica; O'Brien, John T; Ford, Gary A

    2011-01-01

    We determined using serial MR imaging whether raised plasma homocysteine levels are associated with increased brain atrophy, white matter lesion (WML) progression or incidence of silent brain infarcts (SBIs) in older hypertensive subjects. Brain atrophy rates (0.58 ± 0.48% per year, mean ± SD) were significantly correlated with homocysteine (β = 0.46, p = 0.001 homocysteine; β = 0.44, p = 0.007 homocysteine/folate/B12 models) but not with folate or B12 levels. Progression of WML (0.08 ± 0.16%) was not associated with homocysteine level (B = 0.01, p = 0.29). New SBIs were uncommon. In older hypertensive individuals, plasma homocysteine levels are associated with increased rates of whole-brain atrophy but not WML progression.

  8. Visualizing stages of cortical atrophy in progressive MCI from the ADNI cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Simon Fristed; Fonov, Vladimir; Coupé, Pierrick;

    Amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is considered a condition where patients are at risk of developing clinically definite Alzheimer’s disease (AD) with an annual conversion rate of approximately 15%[1]. AD is characterized by progressive brain atrophy with major impact on the cerebral cortex...... and medial temporal lobe structures such as hippocampus. Understanding the structural pattern of cortical atrophy at different stages of MCI, before AD can be diagnosed, may help in patient monitoring and prognosis. We used data from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) to calculate...... and visualize the cortical atrophy at different stages in patients who eventually converted to clinically definite AD. We selected patients with a diagnosis of MCI from the ADNI database who converted to AD during the follow-up period. T1-weighted MRI scans were collected at time of conversion(n=140...

  9. Atrophy-specific MRI brain template for Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonov, Vladimir; Coupe, Pierrick; Eskildsen, Simon Fristed;

    Background Rapid brain loss is characteristic for the patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer disease (AD) [1]. Increase of the lateral ventricular volume is strongly correlated with the progression of the disease. High variability in the degree of atrophy for subjects with AD...... and MCI makes use of a single disease-specific template challenging. We propose a novel approach to generate a continuous four-dimensional template, where the 4th dimension is a surrogate measure of overall brain atrophy. Methods We used MRI scans obtained from the ADNI database (www.......loni.ucla.edu/ADNI). Automated methods to estimate intracranial capacity (ICC) and lateral ventricles volume (LVV) [2] was applied to all available datasets at base line. The ratio between LVV and ICC (RLVV) was used as a surrogate measure of overall brain atrophy with mean(standard deviation) value of 2.46(0.87)%. Subsets from...

  10. Barriers to effective treatment of vaginal atrophy with local estrogen therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiter S

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Suzanne ReiterMid-County Health Center, Largo, FL, USAAbstract: Vaginal atrophy is a common condition among postmenopausal women, among whom many exhibit both vulvovaginal symptoms (eg, dryness, irritation, itching, and pain with intercourse and urinary symptoms (eg, increased frequency, urgency, incontinence, urinary tract infections, and dysuria. Unfortunately, few women with symptoms of vaginal atrophy report seeking treatment from a health care provider. The goal of this article is to examine reasons why patients and health care providers do not engage in discourse regarding this important topic. It is important to initiate conversations with postmenopausal women and counsel them on both why the changes occur and potential treatment options.Keywords: local estrogen therapy, vaginal atrophy, barriers, postmenopausal women

  11. Thymus Atrophy and Double-Positive Escape Are Common Features in Infectious Diseases

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    Juliana de Meis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The thymus is a primary lymphoid organ in which bone marrow-derived T-cell precursors undergo differentiation, leading to migration of positively selected thymocytes to the T-cell-dependent areas of secondary lymphoid organs. This organ can undergo atrophy, caused by several endogenous and exogenous factors such as ageing, hormone fluctuations, and infectious agents. This paper will focus on emerging data on the thymic atrophy caused by infectious agents. We present data on the dynamics of thymus lymphocytes during acute Trypanosoma cruzi infection, showing that the resulting thymus atrophy comprises the abnormal release of thymic-derived T cells and may have an impact on host immune response.

  12. Mitochondrial ROS regulate oxidative damage and mitophagy but not age-related muscle fiber atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakellariou, Giorgos K.; Pearson, Timothy; Lightfoot, Adam P.; Nye, Gareth A.; Wells, Nicola; Giakoumaki, Ifigeneia I.; Vasilaki, Aphrodite; Griffiths, Richard D.; Jackson, Malcolm J.; McArdle, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and function is a major contributor to morbidity and has a profound effect on the quality of life of older people. The potential role of age-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction and cumulative oxidative stress as the underlying cause of muscle aging remains a controversial topic. Here we show that the pharmacological attenuation of age-related mitochondrial redox changes in muscle with SS31 is associated with some improvements in oxidative damage and mitophagy in muscles of old mice. However, this treatment failed to rescue the age-related muscle fiber atrophy associated with muscle atrophy and weakness. Collectively, these data imply that the muscle mitochondrial redox environment is not a key regulator of muscle fiber atrophy during sarcopenia but may play a key role in the decline of mitochondrial organelle integrity that occurs with muscle aging. PMID:27681159

  13. Observation on Therapeutic Effect of Mild Moxibustion plus Acupoint Injection for Optic Atrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Bao; Peng Li; Zhou Li-zhi; Mu Jing-ping; Cheng Jian-ming; Huang Guo-qi

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To observe the clinical effect of mild moxibustion plus acupoint injection for optic atrophy.Methods:Ninety-four patients with optic atrophy were divided into a treatment group (51 cases) and a control group (43 cases).The treatment group was treated with mild moxibustion plus acupoint injection,and the control group was treated with medications.After three courses,the change of vision was observed.Results:The total effective rate was 82.4% in the treatment group and 41.9% in the control group,with a statistical difference between the two groups (P<0.05).Conclusion:Moxibustion plus acupoint injection is an effective method to treat optic atrophy.

  14. Models of accelerated sarcopenia: critical pieces for solving the puzzle of age-related muscle atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buford, Thomas W; Anton, Stephen D; Judge, Andrew R; Marzetti, Emanuele; Wohlgemuth, Stephanie E; Carter, Christy S; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Pahor, Marco; Manini, Todd M

    2010-10-01

    Sarcopenia, the age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass, is a significant public health concern that continues to grow in relevance as the population ages. Certain conditions have the strong potential to coincide with sarcopenia to accelerate the progression of muscle atrophy in older adults. Among these conditions are co-morbid diseases common to older individuals such as cancer, kidney disease, diabetes, and peripheral artery disease. Furthermore, behaviors such as poor nutrition and physical inactivity are well-known to contribute to sarcopenia development. However, we argue that these behaviors are not inherent to the development of sarcopenia but rather accelerate its progression. In the present review, we discuss how these factors affect systemic and cellular mechanisms that contribute to skeletal muscle atrophy. In addition, we describe gaps in the literature concerning the role of these factors in accelerating sarcopenia progression. Elucidating biochemical pathways related to accelerated muscle atrophy may allow for improved discovery of therapeutic treatments related to sarcopenia.

  15. Optic Atrophy in a Patient With Atypical Pantothenate Kinase-Associated Neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jinu; Kim, Do Wook; Lee, Chul-Ho; Han, Sueng-Han

    2016-06-01

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN) is an autosomal recessive neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation and characterized by extrapyramidal signs, vision loss, and intellectual decline. PKAN is caused by mutations in the PANK2 gene, which codes for a mitochondrial enzyme that phosphorylates vitamin B5 in the first reaction of the coenzyme A biosynthetic pathway. Visual failure in this disorder is typically due to pigmentary retinopathy. Yet our patient, a 13-year-old girl with PKAN, developed bilateral optic atrophy and the appearance of the retina and electroretinography were normal. Optic atrophy is a rare finding in patients with PKAN. It is important for the clinician to consider PKAN in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with signs of extrapyramidal dysfunction, cognitive decline, and vision loss because of optic atrophy. PMID:26828840

  16. [Extreme atrophy of the shoulder muscles in juvenile ankylosing spondylitis as a (misleading) main symptom].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berliner, M; Schmidt, K L

    1989-01-01

    An extreme unilateral muscular atrophy of the shoulder and upper arm region was a symptom of juvenile ankylosing spondylitis in a 20-year-old female patient. No pathological patterns were found in electromyographic, bioptic, and tomographic (CT, NMR) investigations. The muscular atrophy was caused by a shoulder arthritis with severe erosive damage. The false assumption of a neurological disorder and the disregard of anamnesis and low back pain delayed for several years an accurate diagnosis. After the onset of an arthritis of hip joints a collagen disease with myositis was supposed falsely in spite of normal electromyographic results. The unusual muscular atrophy around the shoulder joint probably must be interpreted as a consequence of reflex inhibition and partly due to inactivity. A real myositis seems to not be probable, because newer investigations in contrast to earlier findings show no evidence for inflammatory muscle disease in ankylosing spondylitis.

  17. Prevalence and pattern of gluteus medius and minimus tendon pathology and muscle atrophy in older individuals using MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, Andrew S. [University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Long, Suzanne S.; Zoga, Adam C.; Read, Paul J.; Deely, Diane M.; Parker, Laurence; Morrison, William B. [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-12-15

    To evaluate gluteus medius and minimus tendon pathology and muscle atrophy in older individuals using MRI. A retrospective MRI study of 185 individuals was performed. The inclusion criterion was age ≥50. Exclusion criteria were hip surgery, fracture, infection, tumor, or inadequate image quality. Greater trochanteric bursitis was graded none, mild, moderate, or severe. Gluteus medius, gluteus minimus, and iliopsoas tendinopathy was graded normal, tendinosis, low-grade partial tear, high-grade partial tear, or full thickness tear. Gluteus medius, gluteus minimus, tensor fascia lata, and iliopsoas muscle atrophy was scored using a standard scale. Insertion site of tendinopathy and location of muscle atrophy were assessed. Descriptive and statistical analysis was performed. There was increasing greater trochanteric bursitis and gluteus medius and minimus tendinopathy and atrophy with advancing age with moderate to strong positive associations (p < 0.0001) for age and tendinopathy, age and atrophy, bursitis and tendinopathy, and tendinopathy and atrophy for the gluteus medius and minimus. There is a weak positive association (p < 0.0001) for age and tensor fascia lata atrophy, and no statistically significant association between age and tendinopathy or between age and atrophy for the iliopsoas. Fisher's exact tests were statistically significant (p < 0.0001) for insertion site of tendon pathology and location of muscle atrophy for the gluteus medius. Gluteus medius and minimus tendon pathology and muscle atrophy increase with advancing age with progression of tendinosis to low-grade tendon tears to high-grade tendon tears. There is an associated progression in atrophy of these muscles, which may be important in fall-related hip fractures. (orig.)

  18. gamma-Diketone neuropathy: axon atrophy and the role of cytoskeletal protein adduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoPachin, Richard M; DeCaprio, Anthony P

    2004-08-15

    Multifocal giant neurofilamentous axonal swellings and secondary distal degeneration have been historically considered the hallmark features of gamma-diketone neuropathy. Accordingly, research conducted over the past 25 years has been directed toward discerning mechanisms of axonal swelling. However, this neuropathological convention has been challenged by recent observations that swollen axons were an exclusive product of long-term 2.5-hexanedione (HD) intoxication at lower daily dose-rates (e.g., 175 mg/kg/day); that is, higher HD dose-rates (e.g., 400 mg/kg/day) produced neurological deficits in the absence of axonal swellings. The observation that neurological toxicity can be expressed without axonal swelling suggests that this lesion is not an important pathophysiological event. Instead, several research groups have now shown that axon atrophy is prevalent in nervous tissues of laboratory animals intoxicated over a wide range of HD dose-rates. The well-documented nerve conduction defects associated with axon atrophy, in conjunction with the temporal correspondence between this lesion and the onset of neurological deficits, strongly suggest that atrophy has pathophysiological significance. In this commentary, we present evidence that supports a pathognomonic role for axon atrophy in gamma-diketone neuropathy and suggests that the functional consequences of this lesion mediate the corresponding neurological toxicity. Previous research has demonstrated that HD interacts with proteins via formation of pyrrole adducts. We therefore discuss the possibility that this chemical process is essential to the mechanism of atrophy. Evidence presented in this review suggests that "distal axonopathy" is an inaccurate classification and future nosological schemes should be based on the apparent primacy of axon atrophy. PMID:15289087

  19. Protective Effects of Clenbuterol against Dexamethasone-Induced Masseter Muscle Atrophy and Myosin Heavy Chain Transition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Umeki

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoid has a direct catabolic effect on skeletal muscle, leading to muscle atrophy, but no effective pharmacotherapy is available. We reported that clenbuterol (CB induced masseter muscle hypertrophy and slow-to-fast myosin heavy chain (MHC isoform transition through direct muscle β2-adrenergic receptor stimulation. Thus, we hypothesized that CB would antagonize glucocorticoid (dexamethasone; DEX-induced muscle atrophy and fast-to-slow MHC isoform transition.We examined the effect of CB on DEX-induced masseter muscle atrophy by measuring masseter muscle weight, fiber diameter, cross-sectional area, and myosin heavy chain (MHC composition. To elucidate the mechanisms involved, we used immunoblotting to study the effects of CB on muscle hypertrophic signaling (insulin growth factor 1 (IGF1 expression, Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway, and calcineurin pathway and atrophic signaling (Akt/Forkhead box-O (FOXO pathway and myostatin expression in masseter muscle of rats treated with DEX and/or CB.Masseter muscle weight in the DEX-treated group was significantly lower than that in the Control group, as expected, but co-treatment with CB suppressed the DEX-induced masseter muscle atrophy, concomitantly with inhibition of fast-to-slow MHC isoforms transition. Activation of the Akt/mTOR pathway in masseter muscle of the DEX-treated group was significantly inhibited compared to that of the Control group, and CB suppressed this inhibition. DEX also suppressed expression of IGF1 (positive regulator of muscle growth, and CB attenuated this inhibition. Myostatin protein expression was unchanged. CB had no effect on activation of the Akt/FOXO pathway. These results indicate that CB antagonizes DEX-induced muscle atrophy and fast-to-slow MHC isoform transition via modulation of Akt/mTOR activity and IGF1 expression. CB might be a useful pharmacological agent for treatment of glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy.

  20. Differential sensitivity of oxidative and glycolytic muscles to hypoxia-induced muscle atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Theije, C C; Langen, R C J; Lamers, W H; Gosker, H R; Schols, A M W J; Köhler, S E

    2015-01-15

    Hypoxia as a consequence of acute and chronic respiratory disease has been associated with muscle atrophy. This study investigated the sensitivity of oxidative and glycolytic muscles to hypoxia-induced muscle atrophy. Male mice were exposed to 8% normobaric oxygen for up to 21 days. Oxidative soleus and glycolytic extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles were isolated, weighed, and assayed for expression profiles of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), the autophagy-lysosome pathway (ALP), and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF1α) signaling. Fiber-type composition and the capillary network were investigated. Hypoxia-induced muscle atrophy was more prominent in the EDL than the soleus muscle. Although increased expression of HIF1α target genes showed that both muscle types sensed hypoxia, their adaptive responses differed. Atrophy consistently involved a hypoxia-specific effect (i.e., not attributable to a hypoxia-mediated reduction of food intake) in the EDL only. Hypoxia-specific activation of the UPS and ALP and increased expression of the glucocorticoid receptor (Gr) and its target genes were also mainly observed in the EDL. In the soleus, stimulation of gene expression of those pathways could be mimicked to a large extent by food restriction alone. Hypoxia increased the number of capillary contacts per fiber cross-sectional area in both muscles. In the EDL, this was due to type II fiber atrophy, whereas in the soleus the absolute number of capillary contacts increased. These responses represent two distinct modes to improve oxygen supply to muscle fibers, but may aggravate muscle atrophy in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients who have a predominance of type II fibers.

  1. Little effects of Insulin-like Growth Factor-I on testicular atrophy induced by hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casares Amelia

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insulin-like Growth Factor-I (IGF-I supplementation restores testicular atrophy associated with advanced liver cirrhosis that is a condition of IGF-I deficiency. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of IGF-I in rats with ischemia-induced testicular atrophy (AT without liver disease and consequently with normal serum level of IGF-I. Methods Testicular atrophy was induced by epinephrine (1, 2 mg/Kg intra-scrotal injection five times per week during 11 weeks. Then, rats with testicular atrophy (AT were divided into two groups (n = 10 each: untreated rats (AT receiving saline sc, and AT+IGF, which were treated with IGF-I (2 μg.100 g b.w.-1.day-1, sc. for 28d. Healthy controls (CO, n = 10 were studied in parallel. Animals were sacrificed on day 29th. Hypophyso-gonadal axis, IGF-I and IGFBPs levels, testicular morphometry and histopathology, immuno-histochemical studies and antioxidant enzyme activity phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (PHGPx were assessed. Results Compared to controls, AT rats displayed a reduction in testicular size and weight, with histological testicular atrophy, decreased cellular proliferation and transferrin expression, and all of these alterations were slightly improved by IGF-I at low doses. IGF-I therapy increased signifincantly steroidogenesis and PHGPx activity (p Conclusion In testicular atrophy by hypoxia, condition without IGF-I deficiency, IGF-treatment induces only partial effects. These findings suggest that IGF-I therapy appears as an appropriate treatment in hypogonadism only when this is associated to conditions of IGF-I deficiency (such as Laron Syndrom or liver cirrhosis.

  2. Crossed cerebellar atrophy in cases with cerebrovascular disease; Investigation using X-ray computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagishita, Toshiyuki; Kojima, Shigeyuki; Hirayama, Keizo (Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine (Japan)); Iwabuchi, Sadamu

    1989-10-01

    Crossed cerebellar atrophy (CCA) was investigated by X-ray CT to establish the incidence, mechanism, and the relation to cerebral lesions in 130 cases of unilateral supratentorial cerebrovascular diseases. The cases consisted of 83 males and 47 females with cerebral infarction (65) and cerebral hemorrhage (65). The patients' average age was 57.6 years. Crossed cerebellar atrophy was demonstrated in 8 cases (6.2%), 6 of whom had massive cerebral infarction in the middle cerebral artery area (9.2%). The six cases of CCA caused by cerebral infarction had lesions in the frontal and temporal lobes. Two had a cerebral hemorrhage in the putamen and in the thalamus, respectively, accounting for 3.1% of the cases of cerebral hemorrhage. One case had putaminal hemorrhage, and another had thalamic hemorrhage. Cerebrovascular stroke had occured in these patients with CCA more than 2 months previously. In 5 of the 8 cases of CCA, atrophy was present in the basis pedunculi and the basis pontis on the side of the cerebral lesion. However, neither dilation nor deformity of the fourth ventricle was present in any of the patients, suggesting that none of the CCA patients had atrophy of the dentate nucleus. The CCA patients had massive cerebral lesion in the frontal and temporal lobes or atrophy of the basis pedunculi and basis pontis, suggesting the presence of the transsynaptic degeneration of the cortico-ponto-cerebellar pathway. In the case of the thalamic hemorrhage, who had not hemorrhagic lesion in the frontal and temporal lobes, atrophy of the basis peduncli and basis pontis was not observed. Though dilation or deformity of the fourth ventricle is not observed in this case, presence of the degeneration of the dentate-rubro-thalamic pathway cannot be denied. CCA seems to be caused by both the transsynaptic degeneration of the cortico-ponto-cerebellar pathway and the dentate-rubro-thalamic pathway.

  3. Brain atrophy rates in first degree relatives at risk for Alzheimer's

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika J. Lampert

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A positive family history (FH raises the risk for late-onset Alzheimer's disease though, other than the known risk conferred by apolipoprotein ε4 (ApoE4, much of the genetic variance remains unexplained. We examined the effect of family history on longitudinal regional brain atrophy rates in 184 subjects (42% FH+, mean age 79.9 with mild cognitive impairment (MCI enrolled in a national biomarker study. An automated image analysis method was applied to T1-weighted MR images to measure atrophy rates for 20 cortical and subcortical regions. Mixed-effects linear regression models incorporating repeated-measures to control for within-subject variation over multiple time points tested the effect of FH over a follow-up of up to 48 months. Most of the 20 regions showed significant atrophy over time. Adjusting for age and gender, subjects with a positive FH had greater atrophy of the amygdala (p < 0.01, entorhinal cortex (p < 0.01, hippocampus (p < 0.053 and cortical gray matter (p < 0.009. However, when E4 genotype was added as a covariate, none of the FH effects remained significant. Analyses by ApoE genotype showed that the effect of FH on amygdala atrophy rates was numerically greater in ε3 homozygotes than in E4 carriers, but this difference was not significant. FH+ subjects had numerically greater 4-year cognitive decline and conversion rates than FH− subjects but the difference was not statistically significant after adjusting for ApoE and other variables. We conclude that a positive family history of AD may influence cortical and temporal lobe atrophy in subjects with mild cognitive impairment, but it does not have a significant additional effect beyond the known effect of the E4 genotype.

  4. Clinicopathological correlation of parapapillary atrophy in monkeys with experimental glaucoma and temporary central retinal artery occlusion

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    Jost B Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the clinicopathological correlation of parapapillary atrophy. Materials and Methods: The study included 16 eyes of rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta - 4 eyes with experimental glaucoma, 11 eyes after experimental temporary occlusion of the central retinal artery, and 1 normal eye. On histological sections, we measured zones with different histological characteristics.On fundus photographs, alpha zone and beta zone of parapapillary atrophy were measured and correlated with the histological data. Results: The size of the clinical alpha zone of parapapillary atrophy was significantly correlated with the size of the histological region with irregularities of the retinal pigment epithelium (P = 0.05; correlation coefficient r = 0.49 and with the size of the histological region with a decreased density of retinal photoreceptors (P = 0.01; r = 0.60. The size of clinical beta zone of parapapillary atrophy significantly correlated with the size of the histological region with complete loss of the retinal pigment epithelium (P <0.001; r = 0.91, with the size of the histological zone with a complete loss of photoreceptors (P <0.001; r = 0.81, and with the size of the histological zone with a closed choriocapillaris (P <0.001; r = 0.89. Conclusions: The clinically seen alpha zone of parapapillary atrophy correlates with histological parapapillary irregularities of the retinal pigment epithelium and decreased density of retinal photoreceptors. The clinically seen beta zone of parapapillary atrophy correlates with histological complete loss of the retinal pigment epithelium and of the photoreceptors, and a closure of the choriocapillaris.

  5. Aging affects the transcriptional regulation of human skeletal muscle disuse atrophy.

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    Charlotte Suetta

    Full Text Available Important insights concerning the molecular basis of skeletal muscle disuse-atrophy and aging related muscle loss have been obtained in cell culture and animal models, but these regulatory signaling pathways have not previously been studied in aging human muscle. In the present study, muscle atrophy was induced by immobilization in healthy old and young individuals to study the time-course and transcriptional factors underlying human skeletal muscle atrophy. The results reveal that irrespectively of age, mRNA expression levels of MuRF-1 and Atrogin-1 increased in the very initial phase (2-4 days of human disuse-muscle atrophy along with a marked reduction in PGC-1α and PGC-1β (1-4 days and a ~10% decrease in myofiber size (4 days. Further, an age-specific decrease in Akt and S6 phosphorylation was observed in young muscle within the first days (1-4 days of immobilization. In contrast, Akt phosphorylation was unchanged in old muscle after 2 days and increased after 4 days of immobilization. Further, an age-specific down-regulation of MuRF-1 and Atrogin-1 expression levels was observed following 2 weeks of immobilization, along with a slowing atrophy response in aged skeletal muscle. Neither the immediate loss of muscle mass, nor the subsequent age-differentiated signaling responses could be explained by changes in inflammatory mediators, apoptosis markers or autophagy indicators. Collectively, these findings indicate that the time-course and regulation of human skeletal muscle atrophy is age dependent, leading to an attenuated loss in aging skeletal muscle when exposed to longer periods of immobility-induced disuse.

  6. Retinal pigment epithelial atrophy following indocyanine green dye-assisted surgery for serous macular detachment

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    Hussain Nazimul

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To report subretinal migration of indocyanine green dye (ICG and subsequent retinal pigment epithelial (RPE atrophy during macular surgery for serous macular detachment. A 65-year-old woman presented with residual epiretinal membrane and serous detachment of the macula following vitreoretinal surgery for epiretinal membrane. She underwent resurgery with ICG-assisted internal limiting membrane peeling and intraocular tamponade. Intraoperatively a large area of subretinal ICG was seen with subsequent RPE mottling and atrophy of the macula in the area involved during follow-up. This case demonstrates that subretinal migration of ICG is possible and can be toxic to RPE.

  7. The atrophy pattern in the subtypes of frontotemporal lobar degeneration and Alzheimer disease by structural MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To analyze the patterns of cortical atrophy of the two subtypes of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), behavioural-variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) and primary progressive aphasia (PPA). And to compare them with that of Alzheimer disease (AD) to provide an objective basis for early diagnosis and differential diagnosis. Methods: A total of 83 patients were enrolled in this study and there were 30 patients with cognitively normal controls (CN), 30 with AD and 23 with FTLD (10 with bvFTD, 13 with PPA). Philips 3.0 T TX scanner and 8 channel head coil was employed. Three dimensional turbo fast echo (3D-TFE) T1WI sequence with high resolution was used to collect the volume data of gray matter. 3D-TFE T1WI images were normalized and segmented into gray matter map for statistical analysis by SPM 8 and VBM 8. The false discovery rate (FDR) was adopted in P value adjustment, P<0.001, and the cluster size was set at 5. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) was set at 4 mm for the smoothing. Paired t test was used for statistics. Results: In bvFTD, PPA and AD groups,there were diffuse regions with reduced volume in cerebral cortex and subcortical structures (such as the hippocampus, the amygdala, the caudate nuclei, et al). The most obvious atrophic region in bvFTD and PPA group was found in the frontotemporal. Compared with AD, gray matter atrophy in bvFTD was found in brain regions including bilateral temporal lobes, bilateral superior temporal pole gyri, bilateral middle temporal pole gyri, right fusiform gyrus and bilateral frontal lobes. Among them, temporal and frontal lobes atrophy had obvious right partial lateralizing, with 14 301 voxels in right temporal lobe and 5105 in left (t=-5.03, P<0.05). The number of atrophy voxels in right and left frontal lobe were 1344 and 125 (t=3.45, P<0.05). The left temporooccipital lobe atrophy was more obvious than the right in PPA,with 15 637 voxels in left and 10 723 in right (t=-2.65, P<0.05). Conclusions

  8. Three patients with mood disorders showing catatonia and frontotemporal lobes atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utumi, Yushi; Iseki, Eizo; Arai, Heii

    2013-12-01

    Here we report the cases of three patients with mood disorders showing catatonia and frontotemporal lobe atrophy. Catatonia is a syndrome linked to frontal dysfunction that most frequently occurs in patients with mood disorders. The diagnostic criteria of catatonia and frontotemporal dementia partly overlap. In the present patients, catatonia might be closely related to frontal dysfunction caused by frontotemporal lobe atrophy. With regard to therapeutics for catatonia, we found that administering a low dose of lorazepam alone or after electroconvulsive therapy may be useful for treating and preventing catatonia. We also found that administering glutaminate antagonists such as memantine may be useful for treating lorazepam-resistant catatonia.

  9. Rapidly worsening bulbar symptoms in a patient with spinobulbar muscular atrophy

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    Montserrat Diaz-Abad

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available X-linked spinobulbar muscular atrophy (Kennedy’s disease affects muscles and motor neurons, manifesting as weakness and wasting of bulbar, facial, and proximal limb muscles due to loss of anterior horn cells in the brain and spinal cord. We present the case of a patient with X-linked spinobulbar muscular atrophy with rapidly worsening bulbar symptoms caused by laryngopharyngeal irritation associated with a viral upper respiratory tract infection, seasonal allergies and laryngopharyngeal reflux, who dramatically improved with multimodality therapy.

  10. Influence of exercise intensity on atrophied quadriceps muscle in the rat

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Shoji; Obatake, Taishi; Hoshino, Koichi; Nakagawa, Takao

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine the effect of resistance training on atrophied skeletal muscle in rats based on evidence derived from physical therapy. [Subjects and Methods] Rats were forced to undergo squats as resistance training for 3 weeks after atrophying the rectus femoris muscle by hindlimb suspension for 2 weeks. The intensity of resistance training was adjusted to 50% and 70% of the maximum lifted weight, i.e., 50% of the one-repetition maximum and 70% of the one-re...

  11. Progression of Cerebral Atrophy and White Matter Hyperintensities in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    de Bresser, Jeroen; Tiehuis, Audrey M.; van den Berg, Esther; Reijmer, Yael D.; Jongen, Cynthia; Kappelle, L Jaap; Mali, Willem P.; Viergever, Max A.; Biessels, Geert Jan; ,

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Type 2 diabetes is associated with a moderate degree of cerebral atrophy and a higher white matter hyperintensity (WMH) volume. How these brain-imaging abnormalities evolve over time is unknown. The present study aims to quantify cerebral atrophy and WMH progression over 4 years in type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 55 patients with type 2 diabetes and 28 age-, sex-, and IQ-matched control participants had two 1.5T magnetic resonance imaging scans with a 4-year ...

  12. Grey matter hypometabolism and atrophy in Parkinson's disease with cognitive impairment: a two-step process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Redondo, Rafael; García-García, David; Clavero, Pedro; Gasca-Salas, Carmen; García-Eulate, Reyes; Zubieta, José L; Arbizu, Javier; Obeso, José A; Rodríguez-Oroz, María C

    2014-08-01

    The pathophysiological process underlying cognitive decline in Parkinson's disease is not well understood. Cerebral atrophy and hypometabolism have been described in patients with Parkinson's disease and dementia or mild cognitive impairment with respect to control subjects. However, the exact relationships between atrophy and hypometabolism are still unclear. To determine the extension and topographical distribution of hypometabolism and atrophy in the different cognitive states of Parkinson's disease, we examined 46 patients with Parkinson's disease (19 female, 27 male; 71.7 ± 5.9 years old; 14.6 ± 4.2 years of disease evolution; modified Hoehn and Yahr mean stage 3.1 ± 0.7). Cognitive status was diagnosed as normal in 14 patients, as mild cognitive impairment in 17 and as dementia in 15 patients. Nineteen normal subjects (eight female, 11 male; 68.1 ± 3.2 years old) were included as controls. (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans were obtained, co-registered, corrected for partial volume effect and spatially normalized to the Montreal Neurological Institute space in each subject. Smoothing was applied to the positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans to equalize their effective smoothness and resolution (10 mm and 12 mm full-width at half-maximum and Gaussian kernel, respectively). Z-score maps for atrophy and for hypometabolism were obtained by comparing individual images to the data set of control subjects. For each group of patients, a paired Student's t-test was performed to statistically compare the two Z-map modalities (P mild cognitive impairment, hypometabolism exceeded atrophy in the angular gyrus, occipital, orbital and anterior frontal lobes. In patients with dementia, the hypometabolic areas observed in the group with mild cognitive impairment were replaced by areas of atrophy, which were surrounded by extensive zones of hypometabolism. Areas where atrophy was more

  13. Adult onset segmental cavernous hemangioma, varicose veins and limb atrophy (klippel-trenaunay-Weber syndrome variant

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    Sawhney MPS

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available A 22 year-old woman presented with multiple soft, compressible, protuberant, bluish cutaneous lesions as well as firm, non-compressible, subcutaneous masses and varicose veins affecting the right upper limb of three years duration. There was atrophy of soft tissue of forearm by 2.5 cm. X-ray showed soft tissue densities, multiple phleboliths and hypoplastic forearm bones. Histopathological examination from cutaneous lesions revealed cavernous hemangioma. Adult onset cavernous hemangioma involving one upper limb and breast with multiple phleboliths and limb atrophy is a very unusual presentation of Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber syndrome.

  14. Posterior Atrophy and Medial Temporal Atrophy Scores Are Associated with Different Symptoms in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment.

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    Jung-Lung Hsu

    Full Text Available Whether the occurrence of posterior atrophy (PA and medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA was correlated with cognitive and non-cognitive symptoms in Alzheimer's disease (AD and mild cognitive impairment (MCI patients are unclear.Patients with probable AD and MCI from a medical center outpatient clinic received attention, memory, language, executive function evaluation and Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE. The severity of dementia was rated by the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR Sum of Box (CDR-SB. The neuropsychiatric inventory (NPI subscale of agitation/aggression and mood symptoms was also applied. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI was scored visually for the MTA, PA and white matter hyperintensity (WMH scores.We recruited 129 AD and 31 MCI (mean age 78.8 years, 48% female patients. MMSE scores, memory, language and executive function were all significantly decreased in individuals with AD than those with MCI (p < 0.01. MTA and PA scores reflected significant atrophy in AD compared to MCI; however, the WMH scores did not differ. The MTA scores were significantly correlated with the frontal, parieto-occipital and global WMH scores (p < 0.01 while the PA scores showed a correlation with the parieto-occipital and temporal WMH scores (p < 0.01. After adjusting for age, education, APOE4 gene and diagnostic group covariates, the MTA scores showed a significant association with MMSE and CDR-SB, while the right side PA scores were significantly associated with NPI-agitation/aggression subscales (p < 0.01.Regional atrophy is related to different symptoms in patients with AD or MCI. PA score is useful as a complementary measure for non-cognitive symptom.

  15. Fatigue in patients with spinal muscular atrophy type II and congenital myopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werlauff, Ulla; Højberg, A; Firla-Holme, R;

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the fatigue severity scale (FSS) is an appropriate instrument to assess fatigue in patients with spinal muscular atrophy type II (SMA II) and congenital myopathies (CM). METHODS: FSS and visual analog scale (VAS) were administered to 33 SMA I...

  16. [Aran-Duchenne? Duchenne-Aran? The quarrel around progressive muscular atrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonduelle, M

    1990-01-01

    A description of progressive muscular atrophy, the first item in neuro-muscular nosography, figures in the memoir published by F.A. Aran in 1850. There, all the essential features of the disease can be found: its usual onset at the distal end of the upper limbs, its slowly progressive worsening, with muscular atrophy sparing certain muscles or muscular fascicles, its peculiar "claw hand", its muscular "fasciculations" and cramps, with untouched sensitivity. After praising Aran's "beautiful description", G.B. Duchenne de Boulogne subsequently persisted in claiming paternity, untiringly referring to a memoir on "muscular atrophy with fatty transformation" said to have been submitted to the Académie des Sciences in 1849. There is no trace of this memoir, and while it is true that the "localized electrisation" technique was applied by Duchenne to all the patients in Aran's memoir, and that he was the sole author of two of his observations, it is Aran who must be credited with the clinical description, the synthetic presentation and the appellation of "progressive muscular atrophy". Initially, this term covered a number of disparate facts which were later identified and put in their proper nosological place, even though this dismemberment left standing what Charcot called "Duchenne-Aran disease" before the Aran-Duchenne denomination prevailed. This denomination is now customary, and rightly so. PMID:2181591

  17. Epithelial atrophy in oral submucous fibrosis is mediated by copper (II) and arecoline of areca nut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Imran; Pant, Ila; Narra, Sivakrishna; Radhesh, Rekha; Ranganathan, Kannan; Rao, Somanahalli Girish; Kondaiah, Paturu

    2015-10-01

    Exposure of oral cavity to areca nut is associated with several pathological conditions including oral submucous fibrosis (OSF). Histopathologically OSF is characterized by epithelial atrophy, chronic inflammation, juxtaepithelial hyalinization, leading to fibrosis of submucosal tissue and affects 0.5% of the population in the Indian subcontinent. As the molecular mechanisms leading to atrophied epithelium and fibrosis are poorly understood, we studied areca nut actions on human keratinocyte and gingival fibroblast cells. Areca nut water extract (ANW) was cytotoxic to epithelial cells and had a pro-proliferative effect on fibroblasts. This opposite effect of ANW on epithelial and fibroblast cells was intriguing but reflects the OSF histopathology such as epithelial atrophy and proliferation of fibroblasts. We demonstrate that the pro-proliferative effects of ANW on fibroblasts are dependent on insulin-like growth factor signalling while the cytotoxic effects on keratinocytes are dependent on the generation of reactive oxygen species. Treatment of keratinocytes with arecoline which is a component of ANW along with copper resulted in enhanced cytotoxicity which becomes comparable to IC(50) of ANW. Furthermore, studies using cyclic voltammetry, mass spectrometry and plasmid cleavage assay suggested that the presence of arecoline increases oxidation reduction potential of copper leading to enhanced cleavage of DNA which could generate an apoptotic response. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP Nick End Labeling assay and Ki-67 index of OSF tissue sections suggested epithelial apoptosis, which could be responsible for the atrophy of OSF epithelium.

  18. Brain Atrophy, Anti-Smooth Muscle Antibody and Cognitive Impairment: An Association Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giulia, Paroni; Michele, Lauriola; Andrea, Fontana; Grazia, D'Onofrio; Filomena, Ciccone; Francesco, Paris; Leandro, Cascavilla; Maria, Urbano; Carolina, Gravina; Massimiliano, Copetti; Antonio, Greco

    2016-08-01

    Cortical atrophy, neuronal loss, beta-amyloid deposition, neuritic plaques, and neurofibrillary tangles are neuropathological key features in the Alzheimer's disease (AD). Antibodies against beta-amyloid, neurotransmitters, microvascular endothelium components and microglial cells have been detected in AD serum suggesting that AD could be another autoimmune disease and provides a link between vascular pathology, endothelium dysfunction and neuronal cells death. Aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between autoantibody profile and cognitive impairment in geriatric patients, accounting for ApoE genotype as a potential confounding factor. Three hundred and forty-four geriatric patients, attending the clinic for the cognitive decline, underwent a biochemical and immunological profile, chest X-ray, cerebral computed tomography scan and complete cognitive evaluation. All patients were also screened for the ApoE genotype. A significantly higher prevalence of Anti-Smooth Muscle Antibody (ASMA) positivity was found in 89/204 (43.63%) patients with diagnosed neuroradiological signs of cerebral atrophy compared with 15/140 (10.71%) patients without the condition (pbrain atrophy and with the presence of ASMA positivity. Our results shows a strong association between brain atrophy and ASMA positivity and are consistent with several studies that focused attention on the mechanisms of endothelial immune response in the development of dementia. PMID:27493830

  19. Differentiating multiple-system atrophy from Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this review is to illustrate the differentiating features of multiple-system atrophy from Parkinson's disease at MRI. The various MRI sequences helpful in the differentiation will be discussed, including newer methods, such as diffusion tensor imaging, MR spectroscopy, and nuclear imaging

  20. Clinical and mutational characteristics of spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1 in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stalpers, Xenia L.; Verrips, Aad; Poll-The, Bwee Tien; Cobben, Jan-Maarten; Snoeck, Irma N.; de Coo, Irenaeus F. M.; Brooks, Alice; Bulk, Saskia; Gooskens, Rob; Fock, Annemarie; Verschuuren-Bemelmans, Corien; Sinke, Richard J.; de Visser, Marianne; Lemmink, Henny H.

    2013-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1 is an autosomal recessive disorder with early respiratory difficulties, distal muscle weakness, and contractures leading to foot deformities as the most striking clinical symptoms. Mutations of the gene encoding the immunoglobulin heavy chain

  1. Schisandrae fructus enhances myogenic differentiation and inhibits atrophy through protein synthesis in human myotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Cy Hyun; Shin, Jin-Hong; Hwang, Sung Jun; Choi, Yung Hyun; Kim, Dae-Seong; Kim, Cheol Min

    2016-01-01

    Schisandrae fructus (SF) has recently been reported to increase skeletal muscle mass and inhibit atrophy in mice. We investigated the effect of SF extract on human myotube differentiation and its acting pathway. Various concentrations (0.1–10 μg/mL) of SF extract were applied on human skeletal muscle cells in vitro. Myotube area and fusion index were measured to quantify myotube differentiation. The maximum effect was observed at 0.5 μg/mL of SF extract, enhancing differentiation up to 1.4-fold in fusion index and 1.6-fold in myotube area at 8 days after induction of differentiation compared to control. Phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 and 70 kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase, which initiate translation as downstream of mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, was upregulated in early phases of differentiation after SF treatment. SF also attenuated dexamethasone-induced atrophy. In conclusion, we show that SF augments myogenic differentiation and attenuates atrophy by increasing protein synthesis through mammalian target of rapamycin/70 kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 signaling pathway in human myotubes. SF can be a useful natural dietary supplement in increasing skeletal muscle mass, especially in the aged with sarcopenia and the patients with disuse atrophy. PMID:27330287

  2. Arginine-Restricted Therapy Resistant Bilateral Macular Edema Associated with Gyrate Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel Doguizi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Gyrate atrophy is a rare genetical metabolic disorder affecting vision. Here, we report a 9-year-old boy with gyrate atrophy associated with bilateral macular edema at the time of diagnosis and the effect of long term metabolic control on macular edema. Case Presentation. A 9-year-old boy presented with a complaint of low visual acuity (best corrected visual acuity: 20/80 in both eyes, refractive error: −12.00 D. Dilated fundus examination revealed multiple bilateral, sharply defined, and scalloped chorioretinal atrophy areas in the midperipheral and peripheral zone. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography revealed bilateral cystoid macular edema in both eyes. Serum ornithine level was high (622 μmol/L. An arginine-restricted diet reduced serum ornithine level (55 μmol/L. However, visual findings including macular edema remained unchanged in 2 years of follow-up. Conclusion. Arginine-restricted diet did not improve macular edema in our patient with gyrate atrophy. A more comprehensive understanding of the underlying factors for macular edema will lead to the development of effective therapies.

  3. A natural history study of late onset spinal muscular atrophy types 3b and 4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piepers, S.; van den Berg, L. H.; Brugman, F.; Scheffer, H.; Ruiterkamp-Versteeg, M.; van Engelen, B. G.; Faber, C. G.; de Visser, M.; van der Pol, W. -L.; Wokke, J. H. J.

    2008-01-01

    Background Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by a homozygous deletion of the survival motor neuron (SMN) 1 gene. The nearly identical SMN2 gene plays a disease modifying role. SMA is classified into four different subtypes based on age of onset and clinical course (SMA types 1-4). The natural

  4. A natural history study of late onset spinal muscular atrophy types 3b and 4.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piepers, S.; Berg, L.H. van den; Brugman, F.; Scheffer, H.; Ruiterkamp-Versteeg, M.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Faber, C.G.; Visser, M. de; Pol, W.L. van der; Wokke, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by a homozygous deletion of the survival motor neuron (SMN)1 gene. The nearly identical SMN2 gene plays a disease modifying role. SMA is classified into four different subtypes based on age of onset and clinical course (SMA types 1-4). The natural

  5. Mapping of the bovine spinal muscular atrophy locus to Chromosome 24.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medugorac, Ivica; Kemter, Juliane; Russ, Ingolf; Pietrowski, Detlef; Nüske, Stefan; Reichenbach, Horst-Dieter; Schmahl, Wolfgang; Förster, Martin

    2003-06-01

    A hereditary form of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) caused by an autosomal recessive gene has been reported for American Brown-Swiss cattle and in advanced backcrosses between American Brown-Swiss and many European brown cattle breeds. Bovine SMA (bovSMA) bears remarkable resemblance to the human SMA (SMA1). Affected homozygous calves also show progressive symmetric weakness and neurogenic atrophy of proximal muscles. The condition is characterized by severe muscle atrophy, quadriparesis, and sternal recumbency as result of neurogenic atrophy. We report on the localization of the gene causing bovSMA within a genomic interval between the microsatellite marker URB031 and the telomeric end of bovine Chromosome (Chr) 24 (BTA24). Linkage analysis of a complex pedigree of German Braunvieh cattle revealed a recombination fraction of 0.06 and a three-point lod score of 11.82. The results of linkage and haplotyping analysis enable a marker-assisted selection against bovSMA based on four microsatellite markers most telomeric on BTA24 to a moderate accuracy of 89-94%. So far, this region is not orthologous to any human chromosome segments responsible for twelve distinct disease phenotypes of autosomal neuropathies. Our results indicate the apoptosis-inhibiting protein BCL2 as the most promising positional candidate gene causing bovSMA. Our findings offer an attractive animal model for a better understanding of human forms of SMA and for a probable anti-apoptotic synergy of SMN-BCL2 aggregates in mammals.

  6. A case of multiple system atrophy: onset with the cold hands sign

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhen-fu; WANG Qiong; WU Wei-ping

    2011-01-01

    @@ To the Editor: The cold hands sign (CHS) presents a distinct feature in some multiple system atrophy (MSA) patients, but it is receiving little consideration.To our knowledge, there are few reported cases of MSA with onset of CHS.We reported here a case of MSA in a patient with onset of a typical CHS.

  7. Intestinal microvillous atrophy in a patient with Down syndrome and aganglionic megacolon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Miguel A; Egea, Anastasio Serrano; López, Javier Manzanares; Benítez, Enrique Medina

    2002-01-01

    Intestinal microvillous disorders are an uncommon cause of severe diarrhea, with very poor prognosis. The authors report the case of a female infant with Down syndrome, aganglionic megacolon, severe diarrhea, and jejunal biopsy with ultrastructural changes consistent with microvillous atrophy. The patient condition improved after a colostomy performed in the setting of the treatment of Hirschprung disease. PMID:12028658

  8. Inflammation and Atrophy Precede Prostate Neoplasia in PhIP Induced Rat Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borowsky, A D; Dingley, K; Ubick, E; Turteltaub, K; Cardiff, R D; DeVere-White, R

    2006-06-01

    2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo(4,5-b)pyridine (PhIP) has been implicated as a major mutagenic heterocyclic amine in the human diet and is carcinogenic in the rat prostate. In order to validate PhIP induced rat prostate neoplasia as a model of human prostate cancer progression, we sought to study the earliest histologic and morphologic changes in the prostate and to follow the progressive changes over time. We fed 67 male Fischer F344 5 week old rats with PhIP (400 PPM) or control diets for 20 weeks, and then sacrificed animals for histomorphologic examination at age 25 weeks, 45 weeks, and 65 weeks. Animals treated with PhIP showed significantly more inflammation (P=.002 (25wk), >.001(45wk), .016(65wk)) and atrophy (P=.003(25wk), >.001(45wk), .006 (65wk)) in their prostate glands relative to controls. Prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) occurred only in PhIP treated rats. PIN lesions arose in areas of glandular atrophy, most often in the ventral prostate. Atypical cells in areas of atrophy show loss of glutathione S-transferase pi immunostaining preceding development of PIN. None of the animals in this study developed invasive carcinomas differing from previous reports. Overall, these findings suggest that the pathogenesis of prostatic neoplasia in the PhIP treated rat prostate proceeds from inflammation to post-inflammatory proliferative atrophy to PIN.

  9. Landmark based shape analysis for cerebellar ataxia classification and cerebellar atrophy pattern visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhen; Abulnaga, S. Mazdak; Carass, Aaron; Kansal, Kalyani; Jedynak, Bruno M.; Onyike, Chiadi; Ying, Sarah H.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-03-01

    Cerebellar dysfunction can lead to a wide range of movement disorders. Studying the cerebellar atrophy pattern associated with different cerebellar disease types can potentially help in diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment planning. In this paper, we present a landmark based shape analysis pipeline to classify healthy control and different ataxia types and to visualize the characteristic cerebellar atrophy patterns associated with different types. A highly informative feature representation of the cerebellar structure is constructed by extracting dense homologous landmarks on the boundary surfaces of cerebellar sub-structures. A diagnosis group classifier based on this representation is built using partial least square dimension reduction and regularized linear discriminant analysis. The characteristic atrophy pattern for an ataxia type is visualized by sampling along the discriminant direction between healthy controls and the ataxia type. Experimental results show that the proposed method can successfully classify healthy controls and different ataxia types. The visualized cerebellar atrophy patterns were consistent with the regional volume decreases observed in previous studies, but the proposed method provides intuitive and detailed understanding about changes of overall size and shape of the cerebellum, as well as that of individual lobules.

  10. Inflammation and Atrophy Precede Prostatic Neoplasia in a PhIP-Induced Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander D. Borowsky

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available 2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo(4,5-bpyridine (PhIP has been implicated as a major mutagenic heterocyclicamine in the human diet and is carcinogenic in the rat prostate. To validate PhIP-induced rat prostatic neoplasia as a model of human prostate cancer progression, we sought to study the earliest histologic and morphologic changes in the prostate and to follow progressive changes over time. We fed sixty-seven 5-week-old male Fischer F344 rats with PhIP (400 ppm or control diets for 20 weeks, and then sacrificed animals for histomorphologic examination at the ages of 25, 45, and 65 weeks. Animals treated with PhIP showed significantly more inflammation (P = .002, > .001, and .016 for 25, 45, and 65 weeks, respectively and atrophy (P = .003, > .001, and .006 for 25, 45, and 65 weeks, respectively in their prostate glands relative to controls. Prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN occurred only in PhIP-treated rats. PIN lesions arose in areas of glandular atrophy, most often in the ventral prostate. Atypical cells in areas of atrophy show loss of glutathione S-transferase π immunostaining preceding the development of PIN.None of the animals in this study developed invasive carcinomas, differing from those in previous reports. Overall, these findings suggest that the pathogenesis of prostatic neoplasia in the PhIP-treated rat prostate proceeds from inflammation to postinflammatory proliferative atrophy to PIN.

  11. Measurement of brain atrophy of aging using x-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We measured brain volume of 1,045 subjects with no brain damage using x-ray computed tomography and investigated brain atrophy of aging. Severity of brain atrophy was estimated by brain atrophy index (BAI): BAI (%)=100 (%)x(cerebrospinal fluid space volume/cranial cavity volume). Atrophy of the brain began with statistical significance in the forties in both sexes. In males 40-49 years of age the mean BAI was 1.0% greater (p<0.001) and the S.D. of BAI was 1.1% greater (p<0.001) than those in their thirties. In females of 40-49 years the mean BAI was 0.5% greater (p<0.001) than that in their thirties, but there was no statistical significance between the two S.D.'s of both decades. The BAI increased exponentially with the increasing age from thirties in both sexes. Correlation coefficients were 0.702 (p< 0.001, n=471) in males and 0.721 (p<0.001, n=480) in females. From the regression coefficients it was calculated that the BAI was doubled in 19.4 years in males and 17.4 years in females after thirties. (author)

  12. No associations of Helicobacter pylori infection and gastric atrophy with plasma total homocysteine in Japanese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Itou, Yasuyuki Goto, Takaaki Kondo, Kazuko Nishio, Sayo Kawai, Yoshiko Ishida, Mariko Naito, Nobuyuki Hamajima

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have suggested that Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection might be a risk factor for atherosclerosis. Since the bacterium has not been isolated from atherosclerotic lesions, a direct role in atherogenesis is not plausible. We examined associations of plasma total homocysteine (tHcy and serum folate, independent risk factors for atherosclerosis, with H. pylori infection and subsequent gastric atrophy among 174 patients (78 males and 96 females aged 20 to 73 years, who visited an H. pylori eradication clinic of Nagoya University from July 2004 to October 2005. Polymorphism genotyping was conducted for methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T and thymidylate synthase (TS 28-bp tandem repeats by PCR with confronting two-pair primers and PCR, respectively. H. pylori infection and gastric atrophy were not significantly associated with hyperhomocysteinemia (tHcy ≥ 12 nmol/ml, when adjusted by sex, age, smoking, alcohol, and genotypes of MTHFR and TS. The adjusted odds ratio of gastric atrophy for low folate level (≤ 4mg/ml was 0.21 (95% confidence interval = 0.05-0.78. The associations of tHcy with serum folate and MTHFR genotype were clearly observed in this dataset. The present study demonstrated that folate and MTHFR genotype were the deterministic factors of plasma tHcy, but not H. pylori infection and subsequent gastric atrophy, indicating that even if H. pylori infection influences the risk of atherosclerosis, the influence may not be through the elevation of homocysteine.

  13. Tongue fasciculations in an infant with spinal muscular atrophy type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Giannopoulou, Eleni Z; Martin, Thomas; Wirth, Brunhilde; Yilmaz, Umut; Gortner, Ludwig; Meyer, Sascha

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Muscular hypotonia in infants may be associated with several conditions, such as spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). We report on an infant with tongue fasciculations and a rare mutation of the SMN1 gene. The presence of tongue fasciculations in combination with a thorough history may be suggestive of SMA.

  14. Accelerating regional atrophy rates in the progression from normal aging to Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.D. Sluimer; W.M. van der Flier; G.B. Karas; R. van Schijndel; J. Barnes; R.G. Boyes; K.S. Cover; S.D. Olabarriaga; N.C. Fox; P. Scheltens; H. Vrenken; F. Barkhof

    2009-01-01

    We investigated progression of atrophy in vivo, in Alzheimer's disease (AD), and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We included 64 patients with AD, 44 with MCI and 34 controls with serial MRI examinations (interval 1.8 +/- 0.7 years). A nonlinear registration algorithm (fluid) was used to calculate a

  15. Voxel-based morphometry to detect brain atrophy in progressive mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hämäläinen, Anne; Tervo, Susanna; Grau-Olivares, Marta; Niskanen, Eini; Pennanen, Corina; Huuskonen, Jari; Kivipelto, Miia; Hänninen, Tuomo; Tapiola, Mia; Vanhanen, Matti; Hallikainen, Merja; Helkala, Eeva-Liisa; Nissinen, Aulikki; Vanninen, Ritva; Soininen, Hilkka

    2007-10-01

    Recent research has shown an increased rate of conversion to dementia in subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) compared to controls. However, there are no specific methods to predict who will later develop dementia. In the present study, 22 controls and 56 MCI subjects were followed on average for 37 months (max. 60 months) and studied with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at baseline to assess changes in brain structure associated to later progression to dementia. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) was used to investigate gray matter atrophy. During the follow-up, 13 subjects progressed to dementia. At baseline, no differences were detected in age or education between the control and MCI subjects, but they differed by several neuropsychological tests. The stable and progressive MCI subjects differed only by CDR sum of boxes scores and delayed verbal recall, which were also significant predictors of conversion to dementia. At the baseline imaging, the MCI subjects showed reduced gray matter density in medial temporal, temporoparietal as well as in frontal cortical areas compared to controls. Interestingly, the progressive MCI subjects showed atrophy in the left temporoparietal and posterior cingulate cortices and in the precuneus bilaterally, and a trend for hippocampal atrophy when compared to the stable MCI subjects. We conclude that widespread cortical atrophy is present already two and a half years before a clinical diagnosis of dementia can be set.

  16. NR2F1 Mutations Cause Optic Atrophy with Intellectual Disability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, D.G.M.; Boonstra, F.N.; Gonzaga-Jauregui, C.; Xu, M.; Ligt, J. de; Jhangiani, S.; Wiszniewski, W.; Muzny, D.M.; Yntema, H.G.; Pfundt, R.P.; Vissers, L.E.L.M.; Spruijt, L.; Blokland, E.A.W.; Chen, C.A.; Lewis, R.A.; Tsai, S.Y.; Gibbs, R.A.; Tsai, M.J.; Lupski, J.R.; Zoghbi, H.Y.; Cremers, F.P.M.; Vries, B. de; Schaaf, C.P.

    2014-01-01

    Optic nerve atrophy and hypoplasia can be primary disorders or can result from trans-synaptic degeneration arising from cerebral visual impairment (CVI). Here we report six individuals with CVI and/or optic nerve abnormalities, born after an uneventful pregnancy and delivery, who have either de novo

  17. Treatment of postmenopausal vaginal atrophy with 10-μg estradiol vaginal tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panay, Nick; Maamari, Ricardo

    2012-03-01

    Postmenopausal estrogen deficiency can lead to symptoms of urogenital atrophy. Individuals with urogenital atrophy have symptoms that include vaginal dryness, vaginal and vulval irritation, vaginal soreness, pain and burning during urination (dysuria), increased vaginal discharge, vaginal odour, vaginal infections, recurrent urinary tract infections, pain associated with sexual activity (dyspareunia) and vaginal bleeding associated with sexual activity. Despite the frequency and effects of vaginal atrophy symptoms, they are often under-reported and, consequently, under-treated. Therefore, care of a menopausal woman should include a physical assessment of vaginal atrophy and a dialogue between the physician and the patient that explores existing symptoms and their effect on vulvovaginal health, sexuality and quality-of-life issues. The development of the ultra-low-dose 10-µg estradiol vaginal tablets is in line with the requirements of regulatory agencies and women's health societies regarding the use of the lowest effective hormonal dose. Because of its effectiveness and safety profiles, in addition to its minimal systemic absorption, the 10-µg estradiol vaginal tablet can offer greater reassurance to health-care providers and postmenopausal women with an annual estradiol administration of only 1.14 mg.

  18. Axonal neuropathy with optic atrophy is caused by mutations in mitofusin 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Zuchner; P. de Jonghe; A. Jordanova; K.G. Claeys; V. Guergueltcheva; S. Cherninkova; S.R. Hamilton; G. van Stavern; K.M. Krajewski; J. Stajich; I. Tournev; K. Verhoeven; C.T. Langerhorst; M. de Visser; F. Baas; T. Bird; V. Timmerman; M. Shy; J.M. Vance

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) neuropathy with visual impairment due to optic atrophy has been designated as hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type VI (HMSN VI). Reports of affected families have indicated autosomal dominant and recessive forms, but the genetic cause of this disease has

  19. Genomic deletions in OPA1 in Danish patients with autosomal dominant optic atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almind, Gitte J; Grønskov, Karen; Milea, Dan;

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA, Kjer disease, MIM #165500) is the most common form of hereditary optic neuropathy. Mutations in OPA1 located at chromosome 3q28 are the predominant cause for ADOA explaining between 32 and 89% of cases. Although deletions of OPA1 were recently reported...

  20. Leiomodin-3-deficient mice display nemaline myopathy with fast-myofiber atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Tian

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nemaline myopathy (NM is one of the most common forms of congenital myopathy, and affects either fast myofibers, slow myofibers, or both. However, an animal model for congenital myopathy with fast-myofiber-specific atrophy is not available. Furthermore, mutations in the leiomodin-3 (LMOD3 gene have recently been identified in a group of individuals with NM. However, it is not clear how loss of LMOD3 leads to NM. Here, we report a mouse mutant in which the piggyBac (PB transposon is inserted into the Lmod3 gene and disrupts its expression. Lmod3PB/PB mice show severe muscle weakness and postnatal growth retardation. Electron microscopy and immunofluorescence studies of the mutant skeletal muscles revealed the presence of nemaline bodies, a hallmark of NM, and disorganized sarcomeric structures. Interestingly, Lmod3 deficiency caused muscle atrophy specific to the fast fibers. Together, our results show that Lmod3 is required in the fast fibers for sarcomere integrity, and this study offers the first NM mouse model with muscle atrophy that is specific to fast fibers. This model could be a valuable resource for interrogating myopathy pathogenesis and developing therapeutics for NM as well as other pathophysiological conditions with preferential atrophy of fast fibers, including cancer cachexia and sarcopenia.

  1. Screening of Toll-like receptors expression in multiple system atrophy brains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brudek, Tomasz; Winge, Kristian; Agander, Tina Klitmøller;

    2013-01-01

    their deregulation may play a role in neurodegeneration. Multiple system atrophy (MSA) together with Parkinson's disease belongs to a diverse group of neurodegenerative conditions termed α-synucleinopathies. MSA is a fatal late onset disease characterized by the presence of α-synuclein positive glial cytoplasmic...

  2. Biomechanical implications of skeletal muscle hypertrophy and atrophy: a musculoskeletal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigotsky, Andrew D; Contreras, Bret; Beardsley, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Muscle hypertrophy and atrophy occur frequently as a result of mechanical loading or unloading, with implications for clinical, general, and athletic populations. The effects of muscle hypertrophy and atrophy on force production and joint moments have been previously described. However, there is a paucity of research showing how hypertrophy and atrophy may affect moment arm (MA) lengths. The purpose of this model was to describe the mathematical relationship between the anatomical cross-sectional area (ACSA) of a muscle and its MA length. In the model, the ACSAs of the biceps brachii and brachialis were altered to hypertrophy up to twice their original size and to atrophy to one-half of their original size. The change in MA length was found to be proportional to the arcsine of the square root of the change in ACSA. This change in MA length may be a small but important contributor to strength, especially in sports that require large joint moments at slow joint angular velocities, such as powerlifting. The paradoxical implications of the increase in MA are discussed, as physiological factors influencing muscle contraction velocity appear to favor a smaller MA length for high velocity movements but a larger muscle MA length for low velocity, high force movements.

  3. Spatial patterns of brain amyloid-beta burden and atrophy rate associations in mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosun, Duygu; Schuff, Norbert; Mathis, Chester A; Jagust, William; Weiner, Michael W

    2011-04-01

    Amyloid-β accumulation in the brain is thought to be one of the earliest events in Alzheimer's disease, possibly leading to synaptic dysfunction, neurodegeneration and cognitive/functional decline. The earliest detectable changes seen with neuroimaging appear to be amyloid-β accumulation detected by (11)C-labelled Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography imaging. However, some individuals tolerate high brain amyloid-β loads without developing symptoms, while others progressively decline, suggesting that events in the brain downstream from amyloid-β deposition, such as regional brain atrophy rates, play an important role. The main purpose of this study was to understand the relationship between the regional distributions of increased amyloid-β and the regional distribution of increased brain atrophy rates in patients with mild cognitive impairment. To simultaneously capture the spatial distributions of amyloid-β and brain atrophy rates, we employed the statistical concept of parallel independent component analysis, an effective method for joint analysis of multimodal imaging data. Parallel independent component analysis identified significant relationships between two patterns of amyloid-β deposition and atrophy rates: (i) increased amyloid-β burden in the left precuneus/cuneus and medial-temporal regions was associated with increased brain atrophy rates in the left medial-temporal and parietal regions; and (ii) in contrast, increased amyloid-β burden in bilateral precuneus/cuneus and parietal regions was associated with increased brain atrophy rates in the right medial temporal regions. The spatial distribution of increased amyloid-β and the associated spatial distribution of increased brain atrophy rates embrace a characteristic pattern of brain structures known for a high vulnerability to Alzheimer's disease pathology, encouraging for the use of (11)C-labelled Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography measures as early indicators of

  4. Preventing Alzheimer's disease-related gray matter atrophy by B-vitamin treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douaud, Gwenaëlle; Refsum, Helga; de Jager, Celeste A; Jacoby, Robin; Nichols, Thomas E; Smith, Stephen M; Smith, A David

    2013-06-01

    Is it possible to prevent atrophy of key brain regions related to cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease (AD)? One approach is to modify nongenetic risk factors, for instance by lowering elevated plasma homocysteine using B vitamins. In an initial, randomized controlled study on elderly subjects with increased dementia risk (mild cognitive impairment according to 2004 Petersen criteria), we showed that high-dose B-vitamin treatment (folic acid 0.8 mg, vitamin B6 20 mg, vitamin B12 0.5 mg) slowed shrinkage of the whole brain volume over 2 y. Here, we go further by demonstrating that B-vitamin treatment reduces, by as much as seven fold, the cerebral atrophy in those gray matter (GM) regions specifically vulnerable to the AD process, including the medial temporal lobe. In the placebo group, higher homocysteine levels at baseline are associated with faster GM atrophy, but this deleterious effect is largely prevented by B-vitamin treatment. We additionally show that the beneficial effect of B vitamins is confined to participants with high homocysteine (above the median, 11 µmol/L) and that, in these participants, a causal Bayesian network analysis indicates the following chain of events: B vitamins lower homocysteine, which directly leads to a decrease in GM atrophy, thereby slowing cognitive decline. Our results show that B-vitamin supplementation can slow the atrophy of specific brain regions that are a key component of the AD process and that are associated with cognitive decline. Further B-vitamin supplementation trials focusing on elderly subjets with high homocysteine levels are warranted to see if progression to dementia can be prevented. PMID:23690582

  5. Quantitative estimation of brain atrophy and function with PET and MRI two-dimensional projection images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Reiko; Uemura, Koji; Uchiyama, Akihiko [Waseda Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Science and Engineering; Toyama, Hinako; Ishii, Kenji; Senda, Michio

    2001-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to estimate the extent of atrophy and the decline in brain function objectively and quantitatively. Two-dimensional (2D) projection images of three-dimensional (3D) transaxial images of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were made by means of the Mollweide method which keeps the area of the brain surface. A correlation image was generated between 2D projection images of MRI and cerebral blood flow (CBF) or {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET images and the sulcus was extracted from the correlation image clustered by K-means method. Furthermore, the extent of atrophy was evaluated from the extracted sulcus on 2D-projection MRI and the cerebral cortical function such as blood flow or glucose metabolic rate was assessed in the cortex excluding sulcus on 2D-projection PET image, and then the relationship between the cerebral atrophy and function was evaluated. This method was applied to the two groups, the young and the aged normal subjects, and the relationship between the age and the rate of atrophy or the cerebral blood flow was investigated. This method was also applied to FDG-PET and MRI studies in the normal controls and in patients with corticobasal degeneration. The mean rate of atrophy in the aged group was found to be higher than that in the young. The mean value and the variance of the cerebral blood flow for the young are greater than those of the aged. The sulci were similarly extracted using either CBF or FDG PET images. The purposed method using 2-D projection images of MRI and PET is clinically useful for quantitative assessment of atrophic change and functional disorder of cerebral cortex. (author)

  6. Association between baseline peri-infarct magnetic resonance spectroscopy and regional white matter atrophy after stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yassi, Nawaf; Campbell, Bruce C.V.; Davis, Stephen M.; Bivard, Andrew [Melbourne Brain Centre rate at The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Departments of Medicine and Neurology, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Moffat, Bradford A.; Steward, Christopher; Desmond, Patricia M. [The University of Melbourne, Department of Radiology, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville (Australia); Churilov, Leonid; Donnan, Geoffrey A. [The University of Melbourne, Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Parkville (Australia); Parsons, Mark W. [University of Newcastle and Hunter Medical Research Institute, Priority Research Centre for Translational Neuroscience and Mental Health, Newcastle (Australia)

    2016-01-15

    Cerebral atrophy after stroke is associated with poor functional outcome. The prediction and prevention of post-stroke brain atrophy could therefore represent a target for neurorestorative therapies. We investigated the associations between peri-infarct metabolite concentrations measured by quantitative MRS and brain volume change in the infarct hemisphere after stroke. Twenty patients with ischemic stroke were enrolled. Patients underwent 3T-MRI within 1 week of onset, and at 1 and 3 months. At the baseline scan, an MRS voxel was placed manually in the peri-infarct area and another in the corresponding contralateral region. Volumetric analysis of T1 images was performed using two automated processing packages. Changes in gray and white matter volume were assessed as percentage change between 1 and 3 months. Mean concentrations (institutional units) of N-acetylaspartic acid (NAA) (6.1 vs 7.0, p = 0.039), total creatine (Cr+PCr) (5.4 vs 5.8, p = 0.043), and inositol (4.5 vs 5.0, p = 0.014), were significantly lower in the peri-infarct region compared with the contralateral hemisphere. There was a significant correlation between baseline peri-infarct NAA and white matter volume change in the infarct hemisphere between 1 and 3 months, with lower NAA being associated with subsequent white matter atrophy (Spearman's rho = 0.66, p = 0.010). The baseline concentration of Cr+PCr was also significantly correlated with white matter atrophy in the infarct hemisphere (Spearman's rho = 0.59, p = 0.027). Both of these associations were significant after adjustment for the false discovery rate and were validated using the secondary volumetric method. MRS may be useful in the prediction of white matter atrophy post-stroke and in the testing of novel neurorestorative therapies. (orig.)

  7. Reversible brain atrophy and cognitive impairment in an adolescent Japanese patient with primary adrenal Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, Nobumasa; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Akiko; Kaneko, Masanori; Ishizawa, Masahiro; Furukawa, Kazuo; Abe, Takahiro; Matsubayashi, Yasuhiro; Yamada, Takaho; Hanyu, Osamu; Shimohata, Takayoshi; Sone, Hirohito

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous Cushing's syndrome is an endocrine disease resulting from chronic exposure to excessive glucocorticoids produced in the adrenal cortex. Although the ultimate outcome remains uncertain, functional and morphological brain changes are not uncommon in patients with this syndrome, and generally persist even after resolution of hypercortisolemia. We present an adolescent patient with Cushing's syndrome who exhibited cognitive impairment with brain atrophy. A 19-year-old Japanese male visited a local hospital following 5 days of behavioral abnormalities, such as money wasting or nighttime wandering. He had hypertension and a 1-year history of a rounded face. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed apparently diffuse brain atrophy. Because of high random plasma cortisol levels (28.7 μg/dL) at 10 AM, he was referred to our hospital in August 2011. Endocrinological testing showed adrenocorticotropic hormone-independent hypercortisolemia, and abdominal computed tomography demonstrated a 2.7 cm tumor in the left adrenal gland. The patient underwent left adrenalectomy in September 2011, and the diagnosis of cortisol-secreting adenoma was confirmed histologically. His hypertension and Cushingoid features regressed. Behavioral abnormalities were no longer observed, and he was classified as cured of his cognitive disturbance caused by Cushing's syndrome in February 2012. MRI performed 8 months after surgery revealed reversal of brain atrophy, and his subsequent course has been uneventful. In summary, the young age at onset and the short duration of Cushing's syndrome probably contributed to the rapid recovery of both cognitive dysfunction and brain atrophy in our patient. Cushing's syndrome should be considered as a possible etiological factor in patients with cognitive impairment and brain atrophy that is atypical for their age.

  8. Redox regulation of E3 ubiquitin ligases and their role in skeletal muscle atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaso-Gonzalez, Gloria; Ferrando, Beatriz; Derbre, Frederic; Salvador-Pascual, Andrea; Cabo, Helena; Pareja-Galeano, Helios; Sabater-Pastor, Frederic; Gomez-Cabrera, Mari Carmen; Vina, Jose

    2014-10-01

    Muscle atrophy is linked to reactive oxygen species (ROS) production during hindlimb-unloading due, at least in part, to the activation of xanthine oxidase (XO). The major aim of our study was to determine the mechanism by which ROS cause muscle atrophy and its possible prevention by allopurinol, a well-known inhibitor of XO widely used in clinical practice, and indomethacin, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. We studied the activation of p38 MAP Kinase and NF-?B pathways, and the expression of two E3 ubiquitin ligases involved in proteolysis, the Muscle atrophy F-Box (MAFb) and Muscle RING Finger-1 (MuRF-1). Male Wistar rats (3 mold) conditioned by 14 days of hindlimb unloading (n=18), with or without the treatment, were compared with freely ambulating controls (n=18). After the experimental intervention, soleus muscles were removed, weighted and analyzed to determine oxidative stress and inflammatory parameters. We found that hindlimb unloading induced a significant increase in XO activity in plasma (39%, p=0.001) and in the protein expression of CuZnSOD and Catalase in skeletal muscle. Inhibitionof XO partially prevented protein carbonylation, both in plasma and in soleus muscle, in the unloaded animals. The most relevant new fact reported is that allopurinol prevents soleus muscle atrophy by ~20% after hindlimb unloading. Combining allopurinol and indomethacin we found a further prevention in the atrophy process. This is mediated by the inhibition of the p38 MAPK-MAFbx and NF-?B -MuRF-1 pathways. Our data point out the potential benefit of allopurinol and indomethacin administration for bedridden, astronauts, sarcopenic and cachexic patients. PMID:26461377

  9. SPINAL MUSCULAR ATROPHY FROM NORTHERN IRAN: A CLINICAL AND GENETIC SPECTRUM OF TEN PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Salehi Omran

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveAutosomal recessive spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is, after cystic fibrosis, the second most common fatal monogenic disorder and the second most common hereditary neuromuscular disease after duchenne dystrophy. The disease is characterized by degeneration of anterior horn cells leading to progressiveparalysis with muscular atrophy. Depending on the clinical type (Werdnig- Hoffmann = type I, intermediate form = type II, Kugelberg-Welander = type III, some workers also have delineated an adult form of SMA (SMA type 4.SMA causes early death or increasing disability in childhood. The aim of this investigation was to describe the clinical findings of patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA with survival motor neuron (SMN gene deletion.Materials & methodsThis is a descriptive study conducted on 10 patients of SMA, confirmed by deletion of the SMN gene. All 10 patients had symmetrical muscle weakness, which was diffuse in those with onset of symptoms up to 1 months of age, and either proximal or predominant in lower limbs. Frequency determination of positive clinical and laboratory data was done according to revised diagnostic criteriaResultsIt was found that all patients with SMA had homozygous deletions of exons 7 and 8 of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1 gene, which is one of the candidate genes identified within 5q13. Fasciculations, atrophy and decreased DTR were frequent findings. Laboratory metabolic tests and all brain CT scans were normal. EMG and NCV findings, all showed normal motor and Sensory NCV and denervation of muscles of upper and lower extremities were compatible with a diagnosis of spinal muscular atrophy.ConclusionOur results confirm that SMN1 copy number analysis is an important parameter for identification of couples at risk of having a child affected with SMA and reduces unwarranted prenatal diagnosis for SMA.

  10. Precuneus atrophy in early-onset Alzheimer's disease: a morphometric structural MRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karas, Giorgos [Vrije Universiteit Medical Centre, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vrije Universiteit Medical Center, Alzheimer Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Scheltens, Philip; Jones, Bethany [Vrije Universiteit Medical Center, Alzheimer Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vrije Universiteit Medical Center, Department of Clinical Neurology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rombouts, Serge [Vrije Universiteit Medical Center, Alzheimer Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vrije Universiteit Medical Center, Department of Clinical Physics and Informatics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schijndel, Ronald van [Vrije Universiteit Medical Center, Image Analysis Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vrije Universiteit Medical Center, Department of Clinical Physics and Informatics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Klein, Martin [Vrije Universiteit Medical Center, Department of Medical Psychology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Flier, Wiesje van der [Vrije Universiteit Medical Center, Alzheimer Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vrenken, Hugo [Vrije Universiteit Medical Center, Image Analysis Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Barkhof, Frederik [Vrije Universiteit Medical Centre, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vrije Universiteit Medical Center, Image Analysis Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vrije Universiteit Medical Center, Alzheimer Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2007-12-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) usually first presents in elderly patients, but may also develop at an earlier age. Patients with an early age at onset tend to present with complaints other than memory impairment, such as visuospatial problems or apraxia, which may reflect a different distribution of cortical involvement. In this study we set out to investigate whether age at onset in patients with AD determines the pattern of atrophy on cerebral MRI scans. We examined 55 patients with AD over a wide age range and analyzed their 3-D T1-weighted structural MRI scans in standard space using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Regression analysis was performed to estimate loss of grey matter as a function of age, corrected for mini-mental state examination (MMSE) scores and sex. The VBM analyses identified multiple areas (including the temporal and parietal lobes), showing more atrophy with advancing age. By contrast, a younger age at onset was found to be associated with lower grey matter density in the precuneus. Regionalized volumetric analysis of this region confirmed the existence of disproportionate atrophy in the precuneus in patients with early-onset AD. Application of a multivariate model with precuneus grey matter density as input, showed that precuneal and hippocampal atrophy are independent from each other. Additionally, we found that a smaller precuneus is associated with impaired visuospatial functioning. Our findings support the notion that age at onset modulates the distribution of cortical involvement, and that disproportionate precuneus atrophy is more prominent in patients with a younger age of onset. (orig.)

  11. The Genetic Diversity of Helicobacter pylori Virulence Genes Is Not Associated with Gastric Atrophy Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kita,Masahide

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Atrophy of the gastric mucosa is a precursor of intestinal-type gastric cancer, and Helicobacter pylori infection causes atrophic gastritis. The aim of this study was to determine whether the genetic diversity of H. pylori virulence genes is associated with the development and progression of gastric atrophy in humans. We isolated and cultured H. pylori strains from patients with gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer accompanied by atrophic gastritis in background mucosa. H. pylori strains were stored at -80℃ prior to the experiments being carried out. We analyzed iceA, babA, vacA, cagA, and cagE genes by PCR. The cagA gene was analyzed through sequencing of the C-terminal region containing the EPIYA motif, which is related to tyrosine phosphorylation. Severe atrophy was observed in patients with gastric ulcer. The major phenotype of the vacA gene was s1c/m1 (93オ. The cagA gene was detected in all strains. The cagE gene was not detected in 2 and 5 strains from the mild cases and severe cases, respectively. The major cagA EPIYA motif, which is amino acids repeat in the C terminus, was the A-B-D type (44 of 58 strains. The virulence genes were not statistically associated with the severity of atrophy in the background gastric mucosa in humans. Not only identification of bacterial virulence factors but also studies of the host response will be necessary to investigate the progression of gastric atrophy and subsequent cancer development in humans.

  12. Denervation atrophy is independent from Akt and mTOR activation and is not rescued by myostatin inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M. MacDonald

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of our study was to compare two acquired muscle atrophies and the use of myostatin inhibition for their treatment. Myostatin naturally inhibits skeletal muscle growth by binding to ActRIIB, a receptor on the cell surface of myofibers. Because blocking myostatin in an adult wild-type mouse induces profound muscle hypertrophy, we applied a soluble ActRIIB receptor to models of disuse (limb immobilization and denervation (sciatic nerve resection atrophy. We found that treatment of immobilized mice with ActRIIB prevented the loss of muscle mass observed in placebo-treated mice. Our results suggest that this protection from disuse atrophy is regulated by serum and glucocorticoid-induced kinase (SGK rather than by Akt. Denervation atrophy, however, was not protected by ActRIIB treatment, yet resulted in an upregulation of the pro-growth factors Akt, SGK and components of the mTOR pathway. We then treated the denervated mice with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin and found that, despite a reduction in mTOR activation, there is no alteration of the atrophy phenotype. Additionally, rapamycin prevented the denervation-induced upregulation of the mTORC2 substrates Akt and SGK. Thus, our studies show that denervation atrophy is not only independent from Akt, SGK and mTOR activation but also has a different underlying pathophysiological mechanism than disuse atrophy.

  13. Denervation atrophy is independent from Akt and mTOR activation and is not rescued by myostatin inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Elizabeth M; Andres-Mateos, Eva; Mejias, Rebeca; Simmers, Jessica L; Mi, Ruifa; Park, Jae-Sung; Ying, Stephanie; Hoke, Ahmet; Lee, Se-Jin; Cohn, Ronald D

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of our study was to compare two acquired muscle atrophies and the use of myostatin inhibition for their treatment. Myostatin naturally inhibits skeletal muscle growth by binding to ActRIIB, a receptor on the cell surface of myofibers. Because blocking myostatin in an adult wild-type mouse induces profound muscle hypertrophy, we applied a soluble ActRIIB receptor to models of disuse (limb immobilization) and denervation (sciatic nerve resection) atrophy. We found that treatment of immobilized mice with ActRIIB prevented the loss of muscle mass observed in placebo-treated mice. Our results suggest that this protection from disuse atrophy is regulated by serum and glucocorticoid-induced kinase (SGK) rather than by Akt. Denervation atrophy, however, was not protected by ActRIIB treatment, yet resulted in an upregulation of the pro-growth factors Akt, SGK and components of the mTOR pathway. We then treated the denervated mice with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin and found that, despite a reduction in mTOR activation, there is no alteration of the atrophy phenotype. Additionally, rapamycin prevented the denervation-induced upregulation of the mTORC2 substrates Akt and SGK. Thus, our studies show that denervation atrophy is not only independent from Akt, SGK and mTOR activation but also has a different underlying pathophysiological mechanism than disuse atrophy. PMID:24504412

  14. Human Skeletal Muscle Disuse Atrophy: Effects on Muscle Protein Synthesis, Breakdown, and Insulin Resistance-A Qualitative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudrappa, Supreeth S; Wilkinson, Daniel J; Greenhaff, Paul L; Smith, Kenneth; Idris, Iskandar; Atherton, Philip J

    2016-01-01

    The ever increasing burden of an aging population and pandemic of metabolic syndrome worldwide demands further understanding of the modifiable risk factors in reducing disability and morbidity associated with these conditions. Disuse skeletal muscle atrophy (sometimes referred to as "simple" atrophy) and insulin resistance are "non-pathological" events resulting from sedentary behavior and periods of enforced immobilization e.g., due to fractures or elective orthopedic surgery. Yet, the processes and drivers regulating disuse atrophy and insulin resistance and the associated molecular events remain unclear-especially in humans. The aim of this review is to present current knowledge of relationships between muscle protein turnover, insulin resistance and muscle atrophy during disuse, principally in humans. Immobilization lowers fasted state muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and induces fed-state "anabolic resistance." While a lack of dynamic measurements of muscle protein breakdown (MPB) precludes defining a definitive role for MPB in disuse atrophy, some proteolytic "marker" studies (e.g., MPB genes) suggest a potential early elevation. Immobilization also induces muscle insulin resistance (IR). Moreover, the trajectory of muscle atrophy appears to be accelerated in persistent IR states (e.g., Type II diabetes), suggesting IR may contribute to muscle disuse atrophy under these conditions. Nonetheless, the role of differences in insulin sensitivity across distinct muscle groups and its effects on rates of atrophy remains unclear. Multifaceted time-course studies into the collective role of insulin resistance and muscle protein turnover in the setting of disuse muscle atrophy, in humans, are needed to facilitate the development of appropriate countermeasures and efficacious rehabilitation protocols. PMID:27610086

  15. Human Skeletal Muscle Disuse Atrophy: Effects on Muscle Protein Synthesis, Breakdown, and Insulin Resistance—A Qualitative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudrappa, Supreeth S.; Wilkinson, Daniel J.; Greenhaff, Paul L.; Smith, Kenneth; Idris, Iskandar; Atherton, Philip J.

    2016-01-01

    The ever increasing burden of an aging population and pandemic of metabolic syndrome worldwide demands further understanding of the modifiable risk factors in reducing disability and morbidity associated with these conditions. Disuse skeletal muscle atrophy (sometimes referred to as “simple” atrophy) and insulin resistance are “non-pathological” events resulting from sedentary behavior and periods of enforced immobilization e.g., due to fractures or elective orthopedic surgery. Yet, the processes and drivers regulating disuse atrophy and insulin resistance and the associated molecular events remain unclear—especially in humans. The aim of this review is to present current knowledge of relationships between muscle protein turnover, insulin resistance and muscle atrophy during disuse, principally in humans. Immobilization lowers fasted state muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and induces fed-state “anabolic resistance.” While a lack of dynamic measurements of muscle protein breakdown (MPB) precludes defining a definitive role for MPB in disuse atrophy, some proteolytic “marker” studies (e.g., MPB genes) suggest a potential early elevation. Immobilization also induces muscle insulin resistance (IR). Moreover, the trajectory of muscle atrophy appears to be accelerated in persistent IR states (e.g., Type II diabetes), suggesting IR may contribute to muscle disuse atrophy under these conditions. Nonetheless, the role of differences in insulin sensitivity across distinct muscle groups and its effects on rates of atrophy remains unclear. Multifaceted time-course studies into the collective role of insulin resistance and muscle protein turnover in the setting of disuse muscle atrophy, in humans, are needed to facilitate the development of appropriate countermeasures and efficacious rehabilitation protocols.

  16. Inhibition of IkappaB kinase alpha (IKKα) or IKKbeta (IKKβ) plus forkhead box O (Foxo) abolishes skeletal muscle atrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Independent inhibition of Foxo, IKKα and IKKβ activities does not alter muscle fiber size in weight bearing muscles. → Inhibition of Foxo activity plus IKKα or IKKβ activities increases muscle fiber size. → Independent inhibition of Foxo and IKKβ activities attenuates cast immobilization-induced muscle fiber atrophy. → Disuse muscle fiber atrophy is abolished by inhibition of Foxo activity plus IKKα or IKKβ activities. -- Abstract: Two transcription factor families that are activated during multiple conditions of skeletal muscle wasting are nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and forkhead box O (Foxo). There is clear evidence that both NF-κB and Foxo activation are sufficient to cause muscle fiber atrophy and they are individually required for at least half of the fiber atrophy during muscle disuse, but there is no work determining the combined effect of inhibiting these factors during a physiological condition of muscle atrophy. Here, we determined whether inhibition of Foxo activation plus inhibition of NF-κB activation, the latter by blocking the upstream inhibitor of kappaB kinases (IKKα and IKKβ), would prevent muscle atrophy induced by 7 days of cast immobilization. Results were based on measurements of mean fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) from 72 muscles transfected with 5 different mutant expression plasmids or plasmid combinations. Immobilization caused a 47% decrease in fiber CSA in muscles injected with control plasmids. Fibers from immobilized muscles transfected with dominant negative (d.n.) IKKα-EGFP, d.n. IKKβ-EGFP or d.n. Foxo-DsRed showed a 22%, 57%, and 76% inhibition of atrophy, respectively. Co-expression of d.n. IKKα-EGFP and d.n. Foxo-DsRed significantly inhibited 89% of the immobilization-induced fiber atrophy. Similarly, co-expression of d.n. IKKβ-EGFP and d.n. Foxo-DsRed inhibited the immobilization-induced fiber atrophy by 95%. These findings demonstrate that the combined effects of inhibiting

  17. Inhibition of IkappaB kinase alpha (IKKα) or IKKbeta (IKKβ) plus forkhead box O (Foxo) abolishes skeletal muscle atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Reed, S. A.; Senf, S.M.; Cornwell, E.W.; Kandarian, S.C.; Judge, A. R.

    2011-01-01

    Two transcription factor families that are activated during multiple conditions of skeletal muscle wasting are nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and forkhead box O (Foxo). There is clear evidence that both NF-κB and Foxo activation are sufficient to cause muscle fiber atrophy and they are individually required for at least half of the fiber atrophy during muscle disuse, but there is no work determining the combined effect of inhibiting these factors during a physiological condition of muscle atrophy....

  18. Investigations of Curcumin and Resveratrol on Neurite Outgrowth: Perspectives on Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamze Bora-Tatar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease with progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. SMA is caused by low levels of the Survival of Motor Neuron (SMN protein, which also leads to neurite outgrowth defects in neuronal cells. Rescue of the outgrowth defect is thought to be a strategy for SMA treatment. Polyphenolic histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors might be good candidates due to their neuritogenic properties. In the present study, it was investigated whether neurite outgrowth defects could be rescued by curcumin and resveratrol, which are SMN-inducing polyphenols, having HDAC inhibition activity. According to our results, although curcumin and resveratrol failed to restore the neurite outgrowth defects, the SMN protein was found to be necessary for the neurite-promoting activity of curcumin in neuron-like PC12 cells.

  19. Bilateral linear scleroderma "en coup de sabre" associated with facial atrophy and neurological complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altmeyer Peter

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Linear scleroderma "en coup de sabre" (LSCS usually affects one side of the face and head in the frontoparietal area with band-like indurated skin lesions. The disease may be associated with facial hemiatrophy. Various ophthalmological and neurological abnormalities have been observed in patients with LSCS. We describe an unusual case of LSC. Case presentation A 23 year old woman presented bilateral LSCS and facial atrophy. The patient had epileptic seizures as well as oculomotor and facial nerve palsy on the left side which also had pronounced skin involvement. Clinical features of different stages of the disease are presented. Conclusions The findings of the presented patient with bilateral LSCS and facial atrophy provide further evidence for a neurological etiology of the disease and may also indicate that classic progressive facial hemiatrophy (Parry-Romberg syndrome and LSCS actually represent different spectra of the same disease.

  20. The quasi-parallel lives of satellite cells and atrophying muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano eBiressi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle atrophy or wasting accompanies various chronic illnesses and the aging process, thereby reducing muscle function. One of the most important components contributing to effective muscle repair in postnatal organisms, the satellite cells, have recently become the focus of several studies examining factors participating in the atrophic process. We critically examine here the experimental evidence linking satellite cell function with muscle loss in connection with various diseases as well as aging, and in the subsequent recovery process. Several recent reports have investigated the changes in satellite cells in terms of their differentiation and proliferative capacity in response to various atrophic stimuli. In this regard, we review the molecular changes within satellite cells that contribute to their dysfunctional status in atrophy, with the intention of shedding light on novel potential pharmacological targets to counteract the loss of muscle mass.

  1. Atrophy and growth failure of rat hindlimb muscles in tail-cast suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaspers, S. R.; Tischler, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    The primary objective of the present study is related to an evaluation of a modified tail-cast suspension model as a means of identifying metabolic factors which control or are associated with muscle atrophy and growth failure. Two different control conditions (normal and tail-casted weight bearing) were studied to determine the appropriate control for tail-cast suspension. A description is presented of a model which is most useful for studying atrophy of hindlimb muscles under certain conditions. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were employed in the experiments. Attention is given to growth rate and urinary excretion of urea and ammonia in different types of rats, the relationship between body weight and skeletal muscle weight, and the relationship between animal body weight and rates of protein synthesis and protein degradation.

  2. Vascularized fibula free flap for implant rehabilitation in the case of extreme atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baj, A; Bellocchio, G; Laganà, F; Beltramini, G A; Testori, T; Giannì, A B

    2010-04-01

    The skeletal reconstruction in cases of extreme atrophy like a class VI Cawood classification can be carried out using free bone flaps. They represent a valid option for preprosthetic rehabilitation of atrophic maxillas. Over the last 5 years, the use of vascularized bone transplants, aimed at implant-prosthetic rehabilitation, has become a practice, which has gradually found the right indications and the range of applications, which are now widely acknowledged. The key to success in the use of free flaps lies in the identification of the correct indications for use, in meticulous programming and the particular motivation that this type of patient has for reacquiring optimum masticatory functions. The final prosthetic implant rehabilitation must be prosthetically guided and an accurate preoperative planning is of fundamental importance for restoring masticatory functions and esthetic harmony to the patient through a fixed prosthesis. The authors present a case of a rehabilitation of an extreme maxillary and mandibular atrophy.

  3. Diabetes mellitus, hypertension and medial temporal lobe atrophy: the LADIS study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korf, E S C; van Straaten, E C W; de Leeuw, F-E;

    2007-01-01

    HYPOTHESIS: Based on recent findings on the association between vascular risk factors and hippocampal atrophy, we hypothesized that hypertension and diabetes mellitus (DM) are associated with medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA) in subjects without disability, independent of the severity of white...... matter hyperintensities. METHODS: In the Leukoaraiosis And DISability in the elderly (LADIS) study, we investigated the relationships between DM, hypertension, blood pressure and MTA in 582 subjects, stratified by white matter hyperintensity severity, using multinomial logistic regression. MTA was...... visually scored for the left and right medial temporal lobe (score 0-4), and meaned. RESULTS: Mean age was 73.5 years (sd 5.1), 54% was female. Of the subjects, 15% had DM, and 70% had a history of hypertension. The likelihood of having MTA score 3 was significantly higher in subjects with DM (OR 2.9; 95...

  4. Macroscopic extent of gastric mucosal atrophy: increased risk factor for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi Noritoshi

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to estimate whether the macroscopic extent of gastric mucosal atrophy is associated with a risk for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma using a case-control study in Japanese subjects, a population known to have a high prevalence of CagA-positive H. pylori infection. Methods Two hundred and fifty-three patients who were diagnosed as having esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, and 253 sex- and age-matched controls were enrolled in the present study. The macroscopic extent of gastric mucosal atrophy was evaluated based on the Kimura and Takemoto Classification. A conditional logistic regression model with adjustment for potential confounding factors was used to assess the associations. Results Body gastritis, defined endoscopically, was independently associated with an increased risk for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Conclusion Our findings suggest that macroscopic body gastritis may be a risk factor for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in Japan. Further studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  5. Congenital neurogenic muscular atrophy in megaconial myopathy due to a mutation in CHKB gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Gago, Manuel; Dacruz-Alvarez, David; Pintos-Martínez, Elena; Beiras-Iglesias, Andrés; Arenas, Joaquín; Martín, Miguel Ángel; Martínez-Azorín, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Choline kinase beta gene (CHKB) mutations have been identified in Megaconial Congenital Muscular Dystrophy (MDCMC) patients, a very rare inborn error of metabolism with 21 cases reported worldwide. We report the case of a Spanish boy of Caucasian origin who presented a generalized congenital muscular hypotonia, more intense at lower limb muscles, mildly elevated creatine kinase (CK), serum aspartate transaminase (AST) and lactate. Electromyography (EMG) showed neurogenic potentials in the proximal muscles. Histological studies of a muscle biopsy showed neurogenic atrophy with enlarged mitochondria in the periphery of the fibers, and complex I deficiency. Finally, genetic analysis showed the presence of a homozygous mutation in the gene for choline kinase beta (CHKB: NM_005198.4:c.810T>A, p.Tyr270(∗)). We describe here the second Spanish patient whit mutation in CHKB gene, who despite having the same mutation, presented an atypical aspect: congenital neurogenic muscular atrophy progressing to a combined neuropathic and myopathic phenotype (mixed pattern).

  6. Changes in muscle protein composition induced by disuse atrophy - Analysis by two-dimensional electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, S.; Giometti, C. S.; Riley, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Using 320 g rats, a two-dimensional electrophoretic analysis of muscle proteins in the soleus and EDL muscles from hindlimbs maintained load-free for 10 days is performed. Statistical analysis of the two-dimensional patterns of control and suspended groups reveals more protein alteration in the soleus muscle, with 25 protein differences, than the EDL muscle, with 9 protein differences, as a result of atrophy. Most of the soleus differences reside in minor components. It is suggested that the EDL may also show alteration in its two-dimensional protein map, even though no significant atrophy occurred in muscle wet weight. It is cautioned that strict interpretation of data must take into account possible endocrine perturbations.

  7. Combined method of treating a complete absence of teeth in the mandible and the prevention of alveolar atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perunov A.Y.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available An alternative fully removable laminar prosthesis on the lower jaw design with poor fixation and sharp atrophy of alveolar ridge - a combined denture with girder construction of titanium, fixed on the implants

  8. Ret finger protein mediates Pax7-induced ubiquitination of MyoD in skeletal muscle atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joung, Hosouk; Eom, Gwang Hyeon; Choe, Nakwon; Lee, Hye Mi; Ko, Jeong-Hyeon; Kwon, Duk-Hwa; Nam, Yoon Seok; Min, Hyunki; Shin, Sera; Kook, Jeewon; Cho, Young Kuk; Kim, Jeong Chul; Seo, Sang Beom; Baik, Yung Hong; Nam, Kwang-Il; Kook, Hyun

    2014-10-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy results from the net loss of muscular proteins and organelles and is caused by pathologic conditions such as nerve injury, immobilization, cancer, and other metabolic diseases. Recently, ubiquitination-mediated degradation of skeletal-muscle-specific transcription factors was shown to be involved in muscle atrophy, although the mechanisms have yet to be defined. Here we report that ret finger protein (RFP), also known as TRIM27, works as an E3 ligase in Pax7-induced degradation of MyoD. Muscle injury induced by sciatic nerve transection up-regulated RFP and RFP physically interacted with both Pax7 and MyoD. RFP and Pax7 synergistically reduced the protein amounts of MyoD but not the mRNA. RFP-induced reduction of MyoD protein was blocked by proteasome inhibitors. The Pax7-induced reduction MyoD was attenuated by RFP siRNA and by MG132, a proteasome inhibitor. RFPΔR, an RFP construct that lacks the RING domain, failed to reduce MyoD amounts. RFP ubiquitinated MyoD, but RFPΔR failed to do so. Forced expression of RFP, but not RFPΔR, enhanced Pax7-induced ubiquitination of MyoD, whereas RFP siRNA blocked the ubiquitination. Sciatic nerve injury-induced muscle atrophy as well the reduction in MyoD was attenuated in RFP knockout mice. Taken together, our results show that RFP works as a novel E3 ligase in the Pax7-mediated degradation of MyoD in response to skeletal muscle atrophy. PMID:25025573

  9. Laryngeal dystonia in the course of multiple system atrophy: a cause of postoperative respiratory insufficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Wujtewicz, Magdalena A.; Chwojnicki, Kamil; Owczuk, Radosław; Wujtewicz, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is an adult onset, incurable neurodegenerative disease, characterized by symptoms of nervous system failure. Occurrence of laryngeal dystonia indicates increased risk of sudden death caused by airway occlusion. We present the case report of 63-year-old patient with history of orthostatic hypotension, parkinsonism, progressive adynamia, and stridor. The patient was admitted to the hospital for diagnosis of orthostatic hypotension. A diagnosis of possible MSA was m...

  10. ECG in neonate mice with spinal muscular atrophy allows assessment of drug efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Heier, Christopher R.; DiDonato, Christine J.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular technologies have produced diverse arrays of animal models for studying genetic diseases and potential therapeutics. Many have neonatal phenotypes. Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neuromuscular disorder primarily affecting children, and is of great interest in translational medicine. The most widely used SMA mouse models require all phenotyping to be performed in neonates since they do not survive much past weaning. Pre-clinical studies in neonate mice can be hindered by toxicity...

  11. A quantitative evaluation of pontine atrophy by MR imaging in patients with spinocerebellar degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Hirotomo; Tsukamoto, Hiroshi; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi [St. Marianna Univ., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate if pontine measurement on MR images is capable of diagnosing spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD). The study population consists of 68 cases with SCD (34 males and 34 females with a mean age of 57.8 years ranging from 28 to 82 years) and 240 controls (120 males and 120 females with a mean age of 49.3 years ranging from 20 to 78 years). Patients with SCD were classified into three groups. Type I includes 23 cases with olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA), 7 with spinocerebellar ataxia 2 (SCA2), one with SCA3, 3 with multiple system atrophy (MSA), and one with dentate-rubro-pallido-luysian atrophy (DRPLA) (total of 35 cases). Type II consists of 12 cases with late cortical cerebellar atrophy (LCCA) and 3 with SCA6 (total of 15 cases). The last group includes 18 cases with unclassified SCD. The pontine index was calculated using the following equation; transverse distance between bilateral trigeminal nerve root x AP distance of the pons between the pontine basilar sulcus and the median sulcus of the fourth ventricle. Measurement was performed at the level of the trigeminal nerve root on axial T1-weighted images. Pontine indexes were 699{+-}77.19 for the controls and 455{+-}134.23 for SCD groups (pERROR [Basic syntax error] in: <0ERROR [Basic syntax error] in:.0001; t-test). For SCD patients the pontine indexes were significantly Small for Type I in contrast to Type II (pERROR [Basic syntax error] in:<0ERROR [Basic syntax error] in:.001; t-test). Sensitivity of the Pontine indexes for SCD was 70.6% with a cutoff value of 540 (mean-2SD of controls). In agreement with the findings of the study it is proposed that the pontine index may be useful in diagnosis of SCD and OPCA in particular. (author)

  12. The relationship between inflammatory activity and brain atrophy in natalizumab treated patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magraner, M., E-mail: majomagbe@ono.com [Multiple Sclerosis Unit, Neurology Service, Hospital Universitari i Politecnic La Fe, Bulevar Sur s/n, 46026 Valencia (Spain); Coret, F., E-mail: coret_fra@gva.es [Multiple Sclerosis Unit, Neurology Service, Hospital Clinic de Valencia, Avda Blasco Ibanez 17, 46010 Valencia (Spain); Casanova, B., E-mail: Casanova_bon@gva.es [Multiple Sclerosis Unit, Neurology Service, Hospital Universitari i Politecnic La Fe, Bulevar Sur s/n, 46026 Valencia (Spain)

    2012-11-15

    Objective: To assess the evolution of brain atrophy and its relationship with inflammatory activity in RRMS patients treated with natalizumab. Methods: Eighteen RRMS patients were prospectively followed up for 18 months after starting natalizumab therapy. Patients were monitored monthly and assessed for signs of relapses, adverse events or disability increase. MRI scans were performed before starting natalizumab and every six months. Cross-sectional T2 lesion volume (T2LV) and the normalized brain volume (NBV) at baseline and 18 months MRI scans were calculated using the Steronauta{sup Registered-Sign} and SIENAx softwares, respectively. Longitudinal Percentage of Brain Volume Change (PBVC) was estimated with SIENA. Linkage between inflammatory activity and brain atrophy was studied. Results: Natalizumab reduced ARR by 67% and cumulative CEL by 87.5%. T2 lesion volume decreased from 1000 mm{sup 3}, to 960 mm{sup 3} (p = 0.006) and NBV decreased from 1.55 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} mm{sup 3} to 1.42 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} mm{sup 3} (p = 0.025). Global PBVC from baseline to 18 months was -2.5%, predominantly during the first six months (0-6 months PBVC -1.7%; 6-12 months PBVC -0.74%; 12-18 months PBVC -0.50%). The number of relapses before treatment was correlated to the PBVC during the first semester (Pearson's coefficient -0.520, p = 0.003), while the number of basal CEL or baseline T2LV did not correlate with brain atrophy rate. During follow-up, nine patients had clinical or radiological inflammatory activity. Their PBVC was significantly higher in the first semester (-2.3% to -1.1%, p = 0.002). Conclusions: Natalizumab reduced relapse rate and CEL in MRI. Brain atrophy predominated in the first semester and was related to previous inflammatory activity.

  13. Early silent microstructural degeneration and atrophy of the thalamocortical network in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deppe, Michael; Krämer, Julia; Tenberge, Jan-Gerd; Marinell, Jasmin; Schwindt, Wolfram; Deppe, Katja; Groppa, Sergiu; Wiendl, Heinz; Meuth, Sven G

    2016-05-01

    Recent studies on patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) and multiple sclerosis (MS) demonstrated thalamic atrophy. Here we addressed the following question: Is early thalamic atrophy in patients with CIS and relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) mainly a direct consequence of white matter (WM) lesions-as frequently claimed-or is the atrophy stronger correlated to "silent" (nonlesional) microstructural thalamic alterations? One-hundred and ten patients with RRMS, 12 with CIS, and 30 healthy controls were admitted to 3 T magnetic resonance imaging. Fractional anisotropy (FA) was computed from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to assess thalamic and WM microstructure. The relative thalamic volume (RTV) and thalamic FA were significantly reduced in patients with CIS and RRMS relative to healthy controls. Both measures were also correlated. The age, gender, WM lesion load, thalamic FA, and gray matter volume-corrected RTV were reduced even in the absence of thalamic and extensive white matter lesions-also in patients with short disease duration (≤24 months). A voxel-based correlation analysis revealed that the RTV reduction had a significant effect on local WM FA-in areas next to the thalamus and basal ganglia. These WM alterations could not be explained by WM lesions, which had a differing spatial distribution. Early thalamic atrophy is mainly driven by silent microstructural thalamic alterations. Lesions do not disclose the early damage of thalamocortical circuits, which seem to be much more affected in CIS and RRMS than expected. Thalamocortical damage can be detected by DTI in normal appearing brain tissue. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1866-1879, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26920497

  14. Posterior cortical atrophy: An investigation of scan paths generated during Face Matching tasks.

    OpenAIRE

    Meek, Benjamin P.; Keri eLocheed; Lawrence-Dewar, Jane M.; Paul A Shelton; Jonathan J Marotta

    2013-01-01

    When viewing a face, healthy individuals focus more on the area containing the eyes and upper nose in order to retrieve important featural and configural information. In contrast, individuals with face blindness (prosopagnosia) tend to direct fixations towards individual facial features – particularly the mouth. Presented here is an examination of face perception deficits in individuals with Posterior Cortical Atrophy (PCA). PCA is a rare progressive neurodegenerative disorder that is charact...

  15. Posterior cortical atrophy: an investigation of scan paths generated during face matching tasks

    OpenAIRE

    Meek, Benjamin P.; Locheed, Keri; Lawrence-Dewar, Jane M.; Shelton, Paul; Jonathan J Marotta

    2013-01-01

    When viewing a face, healthy individuals focus more on the area containing the eyes and upper nose in order to retrieve important featural and configural information. In contrast, individuals with face blindness (prosopagnosia) tend to direct fixations toward individual facial features—particularly the mouth. Presented here is an examination of face perception deficits in individuals with Posterior Cortical Atrophy (PCA). PCA is a rare progressive neurodegenerative disorder that is characteri...

  16. Abnormal right hepatic artery injury resulting in right hepatic atrophy: diagnosed by laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Martino Valter; Ferrarese Alessia; Bindi Marco; Marola Silvia; Gentile Valentina; Rivelli Matteo; Ferrara Yuri; Enrico Stefano; Berti Stefano; Solej Mario

    2015-01-01

    An intact hepatic artery is the gateway to successful hepato-biliary surgery. Introduction of laproscopic cholecystectomy (LC) has stimulated a renewed interest in the anatomy of hepatic artery. In this case report we have highlighted importance of variations of right hepatic artery in terms of origin and course We present a rare asymptomatic case of liver atrophy due to an intraoperative lesion of right hepatic artery. We also performed a literature review about surgical vascular lesions and...

  17. Lentivector-mediated SMN replacement in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Azzouz, Mimoun; Le, Thanh; Ralph, G. Scott; Walmsley, Lucy; Monani, Umrao R.; Lee, Debbie C P; Wilkes, Fraser; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A.; Kingsman, Susan M.; Burghes, Arthur H.M.; Mazarakis, Nicholas D.

    2004-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a frequent recessive autosomal disorder. It is caused by mutations or deletion of the telomeric copy of the survival motor neuron (SMN) gene, leading to depletion in SMN protein levels. The treatment rationale for SMA is to halt or delay the degeneration of motor neurons, but to date there are no effective drug treatments for this disease. We have previously demonstrated that pseudotyping of the nonprimate equine infectious anemia virus (using the lentivector ...

  18. ROCK inhibition as a therapy for spinal muscular atrophy: understanding the repercussions on multiple cellular targets

    OpenAIRE

    Emmanuelle eCoque; Cedric eRaoul; Melissa eBowerman

    2014-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is the most common genetic disease causing infant death, due to an extended loss of motoneurons. This neuromuscular disorder results from deletions and/or mutations within the Survival Motor Neuron 1 (SMN1) gene, leading to a pathological decreased expression of functional full-length SMN protein. Emerging studies suggest that the small GTPase RhoA and its major downstream effector Rho kinase (ROCK), which both play an instrumental role in cytoskeleton organizati...

  19. Spinal Cord Atrophy and Early Motor Recovery following Transverse Myelitis in Pediatric Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jung Yoon; Kim, Sang Jun; Bang, Moon Suk

    2012-01-01

    Objective To compare the motor recovery following transverse myelitis in pediatric patients with and without spinal cord atrophy. Method From January 1995 through December 2009, twenty children (8 boys and 12 girls with an onset at 5.7±3.8 years) that were diagnosed with transverse myelitis at a Children's Hospital in Korea, and undertaken an initial and follow-up spine magnetic resonance image (MRI) were included. Medical records and spine MRI scans were reviewed retrospectively. An initial ...

  20. The distal form of spinal muscular atrophy: an unusual case demonstrating the intermediate variety

    OpenAIRE

    Isenberg, D. A.; Kahn, Pauline A.

    1982-01-01

    A 14-year-old boy with a long history of distal muscle weakness affecting primarily and predominantly the upper limbs is described. There is a family history of pes cavus and congenital dislocation of the hip. Electromyography and histopathological studies of skeletal muscle showed conclusive evidence of a neurogenic muscular disorder, and excluded primary muscle disease. The muscle biopsy showed group atrophy. As many target fibres which are identical to structured cores were a prominent fea...

  1. Effect of the cognitive rehabilitation in patients with mild cognitive impairment and identified brain atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Petr Nilius; Petra Krulová; Dagmar Beránková; Pavel Ressner; Olga Zapletalová; Jana Minarčíková; Jan Pouchlý

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The main objective of this study was to analyse the development of cognitive functions and effect of cognitive rehabilitation on patients diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), as a result of brain atrophy. Design: A quantitative non-randomized intervention study on a control sample of patients. Methods: The effect was observed in a group of patients ranging 59-91 years of age (N = 36). Only patients fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of mild cognitive disorder diagnosed by tomo...

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of mouse skeletal muscle to measure denervation atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jiangyang; Zhang, Gang; Morrison, Brett; Mori, Susumu; Sheikh, Kazim A.

    2008-01-01

    We assessed the potential of different MRI measures to detect and quantify skeletal muscle changes with denervation in two mouse models of denervation/neurogenic atrophy. Acute complete denervation and chronic partial denervation were examined in calf muscles after sciatic nerve axotomy and in transgenic SOD1G93A mice, respectively. Serial T2, diffusion tensor, and high resolution anatomical images were acquired, and compared to behavioral, histological, and electrophysiological data. Increas...

  3. Marinesco-Sjogren Syndrome With Sensori Neural Deafness And Primary Optic Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleem M A

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Marinesco-Sjogren syndrome (MSS is a rare genetically determined disorder characterised by bilateral cataract, cerebellar ataxia and mental deficiency. The pattern of inheritance is autosomal recessive but it may be variable. In MSS association of hyperlactacidaemia and hypopyruvicaemia, a defective oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria, is supposed. We are reporting three patients of MSS along with sensorineural deafness and optic atrophy from a single Indian family.

  4. Caudate atrophy and impaired frontostriatal connections are linked to executive dysfunction in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    OpenAIRE

    Riley, Jeffrey D; Moore, Stephanie; Cramer, Steven C.; Jack J Lin

    2011-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that executive dysfunction, common in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), is associated with an abnormal frontostriatal network. Structural and diffusion tensor MR scans, the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) targeting cognitive flexibility, and the Trail Making Test B examining parallel sequencing were obtained from 9 patients with left TLE and 17 healthy controls. The five major findings were: (1) Caudate volume is reduced on the left side in TLE. (2) The atrophy...

  5. Prophylactic effects of swimming exercise on autophagy-induced muscle atrophy in diabetic rats

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Youngjeon; Kim, Joo-Heon; Hong, Yunkyung; Lee, Sang-Rae; Chang, Kyu-Tae; Hong, Yonggeun

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes decreases skeletal muscle mass and induces atrophy. However, the mechanisms by which hyperglycemia and insulin deficiency modify muscle mass are not well defined. In this study, we evaluated the effects of swimming exercise on muscle mass and intracellular protein degradation in diabetic rats, and proposed that autophagy inhibition induced by swimming exercise serves as a hypercatabolic mechanism in the skeletal muscles of diabetic rats, supporting a notion that swimming exercise cou...

  6. Quantitative EEG and medial temporal lobe atrophy in Alzheimer's dementia: Preliminary study

    OpenAIRE

    Soo-Ji Lee; Min-Ho Park; Sang-Soon Park; Jin-Young Ahn; Jae-Hyeok Heo

    2015-01-01

    Backgrounds: The electroencephalogram (EEG) abnormalities in Alzheimer′s disease (AD) have been widely reported, and medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTLA) is one of the hallmarks in early stage of AD. We aimed to assess the relationship between EEG abnormalities and MTLA and its clinical validity. Materials and Methods: A total of 18 patients with AD were recruited (the mean age: 77.83 years). Baseline EEGs were analyzed with quantitative spectral analysis. MTLA was assessed by a T1-axial visua...

  7. Association of FAS (TNFRSF6)-670 gene polymorphism with villous atrophy in coeliac disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Wu; BZ Alizadeh; TV Veen; JWR Meijer; CJJ Mulder; AS Pe(n)a

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association of FAlSgene polymorphism with coeliac disease (CD) development.METHODS: FAS-G670A gene polymorphism, located in a gamma interferon activation site, was studied in 146 unrelated CD patients and 203 healthy ethnically matched controls. The restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) method was used to identify FAS-G670A gene polymorphism.RESULTS: No significant difference was found in genotype frequency between CD cases and controls. In controls,however, the frequency of the GGgenotype was significantly higher in women (26.5%) than in men (12.8%) (OR= 2.44,95% CI1.15-5.20, P=0.020) and it was also higher in men with CD than controls (OR=2.60, 95% C70.96-7.05, P=0.061).The GG genotype frequency was significantly higher in patients with most severe villous atrophy (Marsh IIIc lesions)(OR=3.74, 95% CI 1.19-11.82, P=0.025). A significantly less proportion of men suffered from Marsh IIIc lesions than women (OR=0.20, 95% CI0.06-0.68, P=0.01). The risk of having severe villous atrophy increased with the additive effect of the Gallele in women (P=0.027 for trend, age and gender adjusted).CONCLUSION: FAS-G670A gene polymorphism is associated with the severity of villous atrophy in CD. Female gender is also associated with the severity of villous atrophy.

  8. No associations of Helicobacter pylori infection and gastric atrophy with plasma total homocysteine in Japanese

    OpenAIRE

    Simon Itou, Yasuyuki Goto, Takaaki Kondo, Kazuko Nishio, Sayo Kawai, Yoshiko Ishida, Mariko Naito, Nobuyuki Hamajima

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection might be a risk factor for atherosclerosis. Since the bacterium has not been isolated from atherosclerotic lesions, a direct role in atherogenesis is not plausible. We examined associations of plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) and serum folate, independent risk factors for atherosclerosis, with H. pylori infection and subsequent gastric atrophy among 174 patients (78 males and 96 females) aged 20 to 73 years, who visi...

  9. AB033. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis of spinal muscular atrophy in Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoa, Tran Van; Nga, Nguyen Thi Thanh; Tao, Nguyen Dinh; Sang, Trieu Tien; Giang, Ngo Truong; Dung, Vu Chi

    2015-01-01

    Objective Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a severe neurodegenerative autosomal recessive disorder. Most of patients are caused by the homozygous absence of exon 7 of the telomeric copy of the SMN gene (SMNt) on chromosome 5. Setting up a molecular diagnostic protocol for detecting exon 7 gen SMNT homozygous deletion in single cell is basic to preimplantation genetic diagnosis of spinal muscular atrophy. Methods This study was carried out on 17 patients and their parents. Firstly, lymphocytes of patients and their parents were isolated from fresh blood by ficoll. Taking a lymphocyte on stereoscopic microscope, lysing the cell, amplifying whole genome, then amplifying exon 7 of SMNT gene by using a polymerase chain reaction, followed by HinfI restriction digest enzyme of the PCR enabling the important SMNT gene to be distinguished from the centromic SMN gene (SMNc) which has no clinical phenotype to detect mutation. Electrophoresis PCR products after digesting by restriction enzyme and analysis. Besides, the minisequencing technique has also been used to detect the absence of exon 7 of SMNT gene based on the difference of one nucleotide at 214-position in exon 7 (C-SMNT, T-SMNc). Secondly, the application of the protocol was set up on one lymphocyte to preimplantation genetic diagnosis of spinal muscular atrophy on biopsied blastomeres. Results Two different protocols which were PCR-RFLP and minisequencing, were set up on 200 lymphocytes from 17 patients and their parents to screen the homozygous deletion in exon 7 SMNT gene with the PCR efficiency in 96%. The results were similar with the gene diagnosed from fresh blood. The methods were also efficient, providing interpretable result in 96.55% (28/29) of the blastomeres tested. Three couples were treated using this method. Three normal embryos were transfer which resulted in one clinical pregnancy. Conclusions We have successfully applied the technique of PCR-RFLP and minisequencing for the preimplantation genetic

  10. Recent developments in the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy and spinal muscular atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Liew, Wendy K. M.; Kang, Peter B.

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric neuromuscular disorders comprise a large variety of disorders that can be classified based on their neuroanatomical localization, patterns of weakness, and laboratory test results. Over the last decade, the field of translational research has been active with many ongoing clinical trials. This is particularly so in two common pediatric neuromuscular disorders: Duchenne muscular dystrophy and spinal muscular atrophy. Although no definitive therapy has yet been found, numerous active ...

  11. [STUDY EFFECT OF ASSOSIATED PATHOLOGY ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF OPTIC NERVE ATROPHY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasyuta, V A

    2015-01-01

    Studied effect of assosiated pathology on the development of optic nerve atrophy (ONA). The basis of population study was comparison some factors in the groups with ONA and without ONA (analysis case-control) and evaluation of relative risk. Analysis showed that the risk of development of ONA increased in coronary heart disease, hypertension, diabetes, atherosclerosis. A functional-organizational model of care for patients with ONA was proposed.

  12. Spinal Muscular Atrophy Associated with Progressive Myoclonic Epilepsy Is Caused by Mutations in ASAH1

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Jie; Tawk, Marcel; Tiziano, Francesco Danilo; Veillet, Julien; Bayes, Monica; Nolent, Flora; Garcia, Virginie; Servidei, Serenella; Bertini, Enrico; Castro-Giner, Francesc; Renda, Yavuz; Carpentier, Stéphane; Andrieu-Abadie, Nathalie; Gut, Ivo; Levade, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disease characterized by the degeneration of lower motor neurons. The most frequent form is linked to mutations in SMN1. Childhood SMA associated with progressive myoclonic epilepsy (SMA-PME) has been reported as a rare autosomal-recessive condition unlinked to mutations in SMN1. Through linkage analysis, homozygosity mapping, and exome sequencing in three unrelated SMA-PME-affected families, we identified a homozygou...

  13. Microstructural white matter changes, not hippocampal atrophy, detect early amnestic mild cognitive impairment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Zhuang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alzheimer's disease (AD is generally considered to be characterized by pathology in gray matter of the brain, but convergent evidence suggests that white matter degradation also plays a vital role in its pathogenesis. The evolution of white matter deterioration and its relationship with gray matter atrophy remains elusive in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI, a prodromal stage of AD. METHODS: We studied 155 cognitively normal (CN and 27 'late' aMCI individuals with stable diagnosis over 2 years, and 39 'early' aMCI individuals who had converted from CN to aMCI at 2-year follow up. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI tractography was used to reconstruct six white matter tracts three limbic tracts critical for episodic memory function - the fornix, the parahippocampal cingulum, and the uncinate fasciculus; two cortico-cortical association fiber tracts - superior longitudinal fasciculus and inferior longitudinal fasciculus; and one projection fiber tract - corticospinal tract. Microstructural integrity as measured by fractional anisotropy (FA, mean diffusivity (MD, radial diffusivity (RD and axial diffusivity (AxD was assessed for these tracts. RESULTS: Compared with CN, late aMCI had lower white matter integrity in the fornix, the parahippocampal cingulum, and the uncinate fasciculus, while early aMCI showed white matter damage in the fornix. In addition, fornical measures were correlated with hippocampal atrophy in late aMCI, whereas abnormality of the fornix in early aMCI occurred in the absence of hippocampal atrophy and did not correlate with hippocampal volumes. CONCLUSIONS: Limbic white matter tracts are preferentially affected in the early stages of cognitive dysfunction. Microstructural degradation of the fornix preceding hippocampal atrophy may serve as a novel imaging marker for aMCI at an early stage.

  14. Association of amyloid burden, brain atrophy and memory deficits in aged apolipoprotein ε4 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Junxiang; Turner, Gregory H; Coons, Stephen W; Maalouf, Marwan; Reiman, Eric M; Shi, Jiong

    2014-03-01

    Apolipoprotein E ε4 allele (ApoE4) has been associated with increased risk of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD) and of conversion from mild cognitive impairment to AD. But the underlying mechanism of ApoE4 affecting brain atrophy and cognition is not fully understood. We investigated the effect of ApoE4 on amyloid beta (Aβ) protein burden and its correlation with the structure change of hippocampus and cortex, cognitive and behavioral changes in ApoE4 transgenic mice. Male ApoE4 transgenic mice and age-matched control mice at age 12 months and 24 months were tested in the Morris Water Maze (MWM). Brain volume changes (including whole brain, hippocampus, cortex, total ventricles and caudate putamen) were assessed by using small animal 7T-MRI. Aβ level was assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and immunoprecipitation/western blot. In MWM, escape latency was longer and time spent in the target quadrant was shorter in aged ApoE4 mice (12- and 24-month-old), suggesting age- and ApoE4-dependent visuospatial deficits. Atrophy on MRI was prominent in the hippocampus (p=0.039) and cortex (p=0.013) of ApoE4 mice (24-month-old) as compared to age-matched control mice. IHC revealed elevated Aβ deposition in the hippocampus. Consistently, both soluble and insoluble Aβ aggregates were increased in aged ApoE4 mice. This increase was correlated inversely with hippocampal atrophy and cognitive deficits. These data give further evidence that ApoE4 plays an important role in brain atrophy and memory impairment by modulating amyloid production and deposition.

  15. Treating dyspareunia caused by vaginal atrophy: a review of treatment options using vaginal estrogen therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SA Kingsberg

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available SA Kingsberg¹, S Kellogg², M Krychman³1University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University Cleveland OH, USA; 2The Pelvic and Sexual Health Institute of Philadelphia, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, USA; 3Southern California Center for Sexual Health and Survivorship Medicine, Newport Beach, CA, USAAbstract: Vulvovaginal atrophy (VVA and dryness are common symptoms of the decline in endogenous production of estrogen at menopause and often result in dyspareunia. Yet while 10% to 40% of women experience discomfort due to VVA, it is estimated that only 25% seek medical help. The main goals of treatment for vaginal atrophy are to improve symptoms and to restore vaginal and vulvar anatomic changes. Treatment choices for postmenopausal dyspareunia resulting from vulvovaginal atrophy will depend on the underlying etiology and might include individualized treatment. A number of forms of vaginal estrogen and manner of delivery are currently available to treat moderate to severe dyspareunia caused by VVA. They all have been shown to be effective and are often the preferred treatment due to the targeted efficacy for urogenital tissues while resulting in only minimal systemic absorption. Both healthcare professionals and patients often find it difficult to broach the subject of sexual problems associated with VVA. However, with minimal effort to initiate a conversation about these problems, healthcare providers can provide useful information to their postmenopausal patients in order to help them each choose the optimal treatment for their needs and symptoms.Keywords: dyspareunia, postmenopausal vulvovaginal atrophy, vaginal estrogen therapy

  16. Gyrate atrophy with hyperornithinaemia: different types of responsiveness to vitamin B6.

    OpenAIRE

    Hayasaka, S.; Saito, T.; Nakajima, H.; Takaku, Y; Shiono, T; Mizuno, K; Ohmura, K.; Tada, K

    1981-01-01

    Three cases of Japanese patients with gyrate atrophy of the choroid and retina with hyperornithinaemia were studied clinically and biochemically. The types of disease differed in responsiveness to vitamin B6. In-vivo responsiveness to vitamin B6 was correlated with in-vitro data. It is suggested that the in-vitro examination of the influence of pyridoxal phosphate on ornithine ketoacid transaminase activity in cultured fibroblasts may be useful in ascertaining the efficacy of vitamin B6 treat...

  17. Novel C12orf65 mutations in patients with axonal neuropathy and optic atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Tucci,A; Liu, Y. T.; Preza, E; Pitceathly, R. D.; Chalasani, A.; Plagnol, V.; Land, J. M.; Trabzuni, D.; Ryten, M.; Jaunmuktane, Z.; Reilly, M.M.; Brandner, S; Hargreaves, I.; Hardy, J.; Singleton, A B

    2013-01-01

    Objective Charcot-Marie Tooth disease (CMT) forms a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders. Although a number of disease genes have been identified for CMT, the gene discovery for some complex form of CMT has lagged behind. The association of neuropathy and optic atrophy (also known as CMT type 6) has been described with autosomaldominant, recessive and X-linked modes of inheritance. Mutations in Mitofusin 2 have been found to cause dominant forms of CMT6. Phosphoribosylp...

  18. Multiple-System Atrophy with Cerebellar Predominance Presenting as Respiratory Insufficiency and Vocal Cords Paralysis

    OpenAIRE

    João Manuel Quinaz; Ramon Andrade Bezerra de Mello; José Manuel Dias da Costa; Maria José Rosas; Diana Ferreira

    2010-01-01

    Background. MSA (Multiple System Atrophy) may be associated either with Parkinsonism or with cerebellar ataxia (MSA-c subtype). It is considered a rare disease, but many patients are misdiagnosed as suffering from idiopathic Parkinson's disease. In this paper, we report a case of a patient admitted with respiratory failure and vocal cords paralysis due to MSA-c. Case Report. A 79-year-old Caucasian woman was admitted in March 2010 with dyspnea, asthenia, stridor, and respiratory failure needi...

  19. Resistive vibration exercise reduced lower limb atrophy during 56-day bed-rest

    OpenAIRE

    Belavy, Daniel Ludovic; Miokovic, Tania; Armbrecht, Gabi; Richardson, Carolyne; Rittweger, Jörn; Felsenberg, Dieter

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The current study aimed to examine the effectiveness of a resistive vibration exercise countermeasure during prolonged bed-rest in preventing lower-limb muscle atrophy. Methods: 20 male subjects underwent 56-days of bed-rest and were assigned to either an inactive control, or a countermeasure group which performed high-load resistive exercises (including squats, heel raises and toe raises) with whole-body vibration. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lower-limbs was performed at tw...

  20. Intermittent blood flow restriction does not reduce atrophy following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Erik Iversen; Vibeke Røstad; Arne Larmo

    2016-01-01

    Background: A previous study has reported a 50%reduction in disuse atrophy of the quadriceps during the first 14 days after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. A follow-up trial is needed to confirm these promising results. The present study aims to investigate the effect of an occlusion stimulus on quadriceps atrophy after ACL reconstruction. Methods: A total of 24 subjects participated in the study. They were randomized into two groups. Starting the 2nd day after surgery, the occlusion group received an occlusion stimulus for 5 min, followed by removal of the occlusive pressure for 3 min. This was repeated five times in one training session, twice daily. During the period of occlusive stimulus, the subjects performed 20 low load exercises for the quadriceps. The control group followed the same exercise protocol, but without the occlusion stimulus. Changes in quadriceps anatomical cross section area (ACSA) were measured using axial magnetic resonance (MR) images at 40%and 50%of the length of the femur. Results: Both groups had a significant reduction of quadriceps ACSA from 2 days before surgery to 16 days after surgery. During the intervention period, the occlusion group lost 13.8% ± 1.1% (mean ± SEM) and the control group lost 13.1% ± 1.0% of their quadriceps ACSA, respectively. There was no significant difference between the occlusion and control groups with regards to atrophy of the quadriceps muscles. Conclusion: In conflict with other studies using a similar protocol, application of blood flow restriction the first 14 days after ACL reconstruction did not reduce quadriceps ACSA muscle atrophy measured by MR in a population of athletes.

  1. Carpal tunnel syndrome, syndrome of partial thenar atrophy, and W. Russell Brain: a historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boskovski, Marko T; Thomson, J Grant

    2014-09-01

    This article presents the history of the discovery of compression of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel without an identifiable cause as a distinct clinical entity. By analyzing primary sources, we show that, at the beginning of the twentieth century, physicians described patients with paresthesias and numbness in the hands, most prominent at night, accompanied by bilateral symmetrical atrophy along the radial side of thenar eminence. At the time, the 2 most influential hypotheses regarding etiology were, first, compression of the lower trunk of the brachial plexus by a cervical or first rib, and second, compression of the thenar branch of the median nerve as it passes beneath the anterior annular ligament of the wrist. The condition was named syndrome of partial thenar atrophy and was considered a distinct clinical entity. In 1946, after extensive analysis, neurologist Walter Russell Brain concluded that both sensory and motor symptoms of the syndrome were caused by "compression neuritis" of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel. At his suggestion, surgeon Arthur Dickson Wright performed decompression of the nerve by "an incision of the carpal ligament," with excellent results. Brain presented this work at the Royal Society of Medicine in London in 1946 and published his landmark paper in Lancet the following year. In so doing, he established the basis for the disease we know today as idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome. Unfortunately, in 1947, Brain did not realize that another "condition" with the same clinical picture but without atrophy of the thenar muscles, known as acroparesthesia at the time, was actually the same disease as syndrome of partial thenar atrophy, but of lesser severity. As a result of Brain's influence, 7 other papers were published by 1950. Between 1946 and 1950, there were at least 10 papers that presented, in total, 31 patients (26 women) who exhibited symptoms of compression of the median nerve without an identifiable cause and underwent

  2. Choroidal atrophy in a patient with paraneoplastic retinopathy and anti-TRPM1 antibody

    OpenAIRE

    Ueno S.; Ito Y.; Maruko R; Kondo M; Terasaki H

    2014-01-01

    Shinji Ueno,1 Yasuki Ito,1 Ruka Maruko,1 Mineo Kondo,2 Hiroko Terasaki1 1Department of Ophthalmology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, 2Department of Ophthalmology, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsu, Japan Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to report choroidal atrophy in a patient with cancer-associated retinopathy who had autoantibodies against the transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 1 (TRPM1). A 69-year-old man visited ou...

  3. Frequent seizures are associated with a network of gray matter atrophy in temporal lobe epilepsy with or without hippocampal sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana C Coan

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE with hippocampal sclerosis (HS have diffuse subtle gray matter (GM atrophy detectable by MRI quantification analyses. However, it is not clear whether the etiology and seizure frequency are associated with this atrophy. We aimed to evaluate the occurrence of GM atrophy and the influence of seizure frequency in patients with TLE and either normal MRI (TLE-NL or MRI signs of HS (TLE-HS. METHODS: We evaluated a group of 172 consecutive patients with unilateral TLE-HS or TLE-NL as defined by hippocampal volumetry and signal quantification (122 TLE-HS and 50 TLE-NL plus a group of 82 healthy individuals. Voxel-based morphometry was performed with VBM8/SPM8 in 3T MRIs. Patients with up to three complex partial seizures and no generalized tonic-clonic seizures in the previous year were considered to have infrequent seizures. Those who did not fulfill these criteria were considered to have frequent seizures. RESULTS: Patients with TLE-HS had more pronounced GM atrophy, including the ipsilateral mesial temporal structures, temporal lobe, bilateral thalami and pre/post-central gyri. Patients with TLE-NL had more subtle GM atrophy, including the ipsilateral orbitofrontal cortex, bilateral thalami and pre/post-central gyri. Both TLE-HS and TLE-NL showed increased GM volume in the contralateral pons. TLE-HS patients with frequent seizures had more pronounced GM atrophy in extra-temporal regions than TLE-HS with infrequent seizures. Patients with TLE-NL and infrequent seizures had no detectable GM atrophy. In both TLE-HS and TLE-NL, the duration of epilepsy correlated with GM atrophy in extra-hippocampal regions. CONCLUSION: Although a diffuse network GM atrophy occurs in both TLE-HS and TLE-NL, this is strikingly more evident in TLE-HS and in patients with frequent seizures. These findings suggest that neocortical atrophy in TLE is related to the ongoing seizures and epilepsy duration, while thalamic

  4. Icaritin requires Phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling to counteract skeletal muscle atrophy following mechanical unloading

    OpenAIRE

    ZHANG, Zong-Kang; Li, Jie; Liu, Jin; Baosheng GUO; Leung, Albert; Zhang, Ge; Zhang, Bao-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Counteracting muscle atrophy induced by mechanical unloading/inactivity is of great clinical need and challenge. A therapeutic agent that could counteract muscle atrophy following mechanical unloading in safety is desired. This study showed that natural product Icaritin (ICT) could increase the phosphorylation level of Phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K) at p110 catalytic subunit and promote PI3K/Akt signaling markers in C2C12 cells. This study further showed that the high dose ICT treatment...

  5. Money for nothing — Atrophy correlates of gambling decision making in behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer's disease ☆

    OpenAIRE

    Kloeters, Silvie; Bertoux, Maxime; O'Callaghan, Claire; Hodges, John R.; Hornberger, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Neurodegenerative patients show often severe everyday decision making problems. Currently it is however not clear which brain atrophy regions are implicated in such decision making problems. We investigated the atrophy correlates of gambling decision making in a sample of 63 participants, including two neurodegenerative conditions (behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia — bvFTD; Alzheimer's disease — AD) as well as healthy age-matched controls. All participants were tested on the Iowa Ga...

  6. Multiple-System Atrophy with Cerebellar Predominance Presenting as Respiratory Insufficiency and Vocal Cords Paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Andrade Bezerra de Mello

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. MSA (Multiple System Atrophy may be associated either with Parkinsonism or with cerebellar ataxia (MSA-c subtype. It is considered a rare disease, but many patients are misdiagnosed as suffering from idiopathic Parkinson's disease. In this paper, we report a case of a patient admitted with respiratory failure and vocal cords paralysis due to MSA-c. Case Report. A 79-year-old Caucasian woman was admitted in March 2010 with dyspnea, asthenia, stridor, and respiratory failure needing noninvasive ventilation. She had orthostatic blood pressure decline, constipation, insomnia, daytime sleepiness, and snoring. The neurologic examination revealed cerebellar ataxia. A laryngoscopy revealed vocal cord paralysis in midline position and tracheostomy was performed. The Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging revealed atrophy of middle cerebellar peduncles and pons with the “hot cross bun sign.” Conclusion. Although Multiple-system atrophy is a rare disease, unexplained respiratory failure, bilateral vocal cord paralysis, or stridor should lead to consider MSA as diagnosis.

  7. Effects of muscle immobilization at different lengths on tetrodotoxin-induced disuse atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont Salter, Anne-Caroline; Richmond, Frances J R; Loeb, Gerald E

    2003-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that immobilization causes muscle atrophy and that the rate of atrophy depends on the length at which the muscle is immobilized. However, most studies have been carried out in neurologically intact animals that were capable of generating at least some voluntary muscle activation. In this study, tetrodotoxin was applied chronically to the rat sciatic nerve to produce complete paralysis of distal muscles for seven days, and the ankle was immobilized to hold the muscles at long or short lengths. Paralysis without immobilization resulted in relative weight losses of 36% for soleus, 19% for tibialis anterior (TA), and 17% for lateral gastrocnemius (LG) muscles. Casting the ankle in plantarflexion stretched TA and reduced its weight loss to 10%. Soleus and LG were shortened by this intervention and had increased losses of 43% and 28%, respectively. Fixing the limb in dorsiflexion resulted in a posture similar to that adopted by the unrestrained rats and had no significant effect on the amount of muscle atrophy compared to that in unrestrained paralyzed animals. PMID:14518783

  8. Functional and morphological effects of resistance exercise on disuse-induced skeletal muscle atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Nicastro

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The reduction of skeletal muscle loss in pathological states, such as muscle disuse, has considerable effects in terms of rehabilitation and quality of life. Since there is no currently effective and safe treatment available for skeletal muscle atrophy, the search for new alternatives is necessary. Resistance exercise (RE seems to be an important tool in the treatment of disuse-induced skeletal muscle atrophy by promoting positive functional (strength and power and structural (hypertrophy and phenotypic changes adaptive responses. Human and animal studies using different types of resistance exercise (flywheel, vascular occlusion, dynamic, isometric, and eccentric have obtained results of great importance. However, since RE is a complex phenomenon, lack of strict control of its variables (volume, frequency, intensity, muscle action, rest intervals limits the interpretation of the impact of the manipulation on skeletal muscle remodeling and function under disuse. The aim of this review is to critically describe the functional and morphological role of resistance exercise in disuse-induced skeletal muscle atrophy with emphasis on the principles of training.

  9. Electron Micro­scopic Studies on Retinochoroidal Atrophy in the Human Eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okabe,Shiro

    1982-02-01

    Full Text Available Nine eyeballs were enucleated from nine patients with excessive myopia, secondary retinochoroidal atrophy, absolute glaucoma, uveal malignant melanoma, Behcet's disease and sympathetic ophthalmia. The retina and choroid were studied with light and electron microscopes. The results were: In excessive myopia, marked blockade of choriocapillaries was accompanied by progressive retinal degeneration. In secondary retinochoroidal atrophy induced by retrobulbar fibrosis, the choriocapillaries were partially blocked and the retina had markedly degenerated. In Behcet's disease, exudative inflammation was recognized in the choroid extending to the retina and causing retinal detachment, though the choriocapillaries remained morphologically normal. In sympathetic ophthalmia, both the choriocapillaries and the retina remained normal, though marked inflammation was recognized in the outer layer of the choroid. In absolute glaucoma, the fine structures of the choriocapillary were well preserved in spite of bulbar hypertonia. In uveal malignant melanoma, the ultra structure of the choriocapillary near the tumor was well preserved. The choriocapillaries were normal even when the retina had degenerated. Retinal degeneration was recognized when changes such as blockage, disappearance, dilatation and increased permeability were found in the choriocapillaries. Damage to the choriocapillaries might play an important role in inducing and developing retinochoroidal atrophy.

  10. Visual assessment of posterior atrophy development of a MRI rating scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koedam, Esther L.G.E.; Scheltens, Philip; Pijnenburg, Yolande A.L. [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Neurology and Alzheimer Centre, PO Box 7057, MB, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lehmann, Manja; Fox, Nick [UCL Institute of Neurology, Dementia Research Centre, London (United Kingdom); Flier, Wiesje M. van der [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Neurology and Alzheimer Centre, PO Box 7057, MB, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Department Epidemiology and Biostatistics, PO Box 7057, MB, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Barkhof, Frederik; Wattjes, Mike P. [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, PO Box 7057, MB, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-12-15

    To develop a visual rating scale for posterior atrophy (PA) assessment and to analyse whether this scale aids in the discrimination between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other dementias. Magnetic resonance imaging of 118 memory clinic patients were analysed for PA (range 0-3), medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA) (range 0-4) and global cortical atrophy (range 0-3) by different raters. Weighted-kappas were calculated for inter- and intra-rater agreement. Relationships between PA and MTA with the MMSE and age were estimated with linear-regression analysis. Intra-rater agreement ranged between 0.93 and 0.95 and inter-rater agreement between 0.65 and 0.84. Mean PA scores were higher in AD compared to controls (1.6 {+-} 0.9 and 0.6 {+-} 0.7, p < 0.01), and other dementias (0.8 {+-} 0.8, p < 0.01). PA was not associated with age compared to MTA (B = 1.1 (0.8) versus B = 3.1 (0.7), p < 0.01). PA and MTA were independently negatively associated with the MMSE (B = -1.6 (0.5), p < 0.01 versus B = -1.4 (0.5), p < 0.01). This robust and reproducible scale for PA assessment conveys independent information in a clinical setting and may be useful in the discrimination of AD from other dementias. (orig.)

  11. Quantitative regional validation of the visual rating scale for posterior cortical atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, Christiane; Benedictus, Marije R.; Koedam, Esther L.G.M.; Scheltens, Philip [VU University Medical Center, Alzheimer Center and Department of Neurology, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, P.O. Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Flier, Wiesje M. van der [VU University Medical Center, Alzheimer Center and Department of Neurology, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, P.O. Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, P.O. Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Versteeg, Adriaan; Wattjes, Mike P.; Barkhof, Frederik [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, P.O. Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vrenken, Hugo [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, P.O. Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Center, Department of Physics and Medical Technology, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, P.O. Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-02-15

    Validate the four-point visual rating scale for posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) on magnetic resonance images (MRI) through quantitative grey matter (GM) volumetry and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to justify its use in clinical practice. Two hundred twenty-nine patients with probable Alzheimer's disease and 128 with subjective memory complaints underwent 3T MRI. PCA was rated according to the visual rating scale. GM volumes of six posterior structures and the total posterior region were extracted using IBASPM and compared among PCA groups. To determine which anatomical regions contributed most to the visual scores, we used binary logistic regression. VBM compared local GM density among groups. Patients were categorised according to their PCA scores: PCA-0 (n = 122), PCA-1 (n = 143), PCA-2 (n = 79), and PCA-3 (n = 13). All structures except the posterior cingulate differed significantly among groups. The inferior parietal gyrus volume discriminated the most between rating scale levels. VBM showed that PCA-1 had a lower GM volume than PCA-0 in the parietal region and other brain regions, whereas between PCA-1 and PCA-2/3 GM atrophy was mostly restricted to posterior regions. The visual PCA rating scale is quantitatively validated and reliably reflects GM atrophy in parietal regions, making it a valuable tool for the daily radiological assessment of dementia. (orig.)

  12. Relationship between plasma analytes and SPARE-AD defined brain atrophy patterns in ADNI.

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    Jon B Toledo

    Full Text Available Different inflammatory and metabolic pathways have been associated with Alzheimeŕs disease (AD. However, only recently multi-analyte panels to study a large number of molecules in well characterized cohorts have been made available. These panels could help identify molecules that point to the affected pathways. We studied the relationship between a panel of plasma biomarkers (Human DiscoveryMAP and presence of AD-like brain atrophy patterns defined by a previously published index (SPARE-AD at baseline in subjects of the ADNI cohort. 818 subjects had MRI-derived SPARE-AD scores, of these subjects 69% had plasma biomarkers and 51% had CSF tau and Aβ measurements. Significant analyte-SPARE-AD and analytes correlations were studied in adjusted models. Plasma cortisol and chromogranin A showed a significant association that did not remain significant in the CSF signature adjusted model. Plasma macrophage inhibitory protein-1α and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 2 showed a significant association with brain atrophy in the adjusted model. Cortisol levels showed an inverse association with tests measuring processing speed. Our results indicate that stress and insulin responses and cytokines associated with recruitment of inflammatory cells in MCI-AD are associated with its characteristic AD-like brain atrophy pattern and correlate with clinical changes or CSF biomarkers.

  13. Type II muscle fibers atrophy associated with silent corticotroph adenoma in a dog.

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    L Insabato

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The Silent Corticotroph Adenoma (SCA is a pituitary adenoma variant characterized by the immunoreactivity for adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH and related peptides, without the clinical signs of Cushing's disease. SCA has been postulated to either secrete structurally abnormal ACTH that is inactive but detectable by immunohistochemistry or radioimmunoassay, or to secrete ACTH intermittently or at low levels continuously. Excess of ACTH has been associated to type II muscle atrophy. We describe a case of type II muscle fibers atrophy associated with silent corticotroph adenoma in a dog. The dog showed moderate to severe proximal muscle wasting and weakness with normal levels of muscle-associated enzymes. In the limb muscle biopsies, type II fibers were uniformly smaller than type I fibers. In temporalis muscles, there were few atrophic fibers, and several irregular areas of loss of enzymatic activity observed in NADH, SDH and COX stains. The tumour showed a trabecular growth pattern and immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated the presence of cytoplasmic immunoreactivity for ACTH. The muscle atrophy was considered to be related to an excess of inactive ACTH. Studying spontaneous occurring rare diseases in animals could help to understand the mechanism of similar diseases in human has well.

  14. Prevention of disuse muscle atrophy by dietary ingestion of 8-prenylnaringenin in denervated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Rie; Horikawa, Hitomi; Fujikura, Yutaka; Kawamura, Tomoyuki; Nemoto, Hisao; Nikawa, Takeshi; Terao, Junji

    2012-01-01

    Flavonoids have attracted considerable attention in relation to their effects upon health. 8-Prenylnaringenin (8-PN) is found in the common hop (Humulus lupulus) and assumed to be responsible for the health impact of beer consumption. We wanted to clarify the effects of prenylation on the physiological functions of dietary flavonoids by comparing the effects of 8-PN with that of intact naringenin in the prevention of disuse muscle atrophy using a model of denervation in mice. Consumption of 8-PN (but not naringenin) prevented loss of weight in the gastrocnemius muscle further supported by the lack of induction of the protein content of a key ubiquitin ligase involved in muscle atrophy, atrogin-1, and by the activation of Akt phosphorylation. 8-PN content in the gastrocnemius muscle was tenfold higher than that of naringenin. These results suggested that, compared with naringenin, 8-PN was effectively concentrated into skeletal muscle to exert its preventive effects upon disuse muscle atrophy. It is likely that prenylation generates novel functions for 8-PN by enhancing its accumulation into muscle tissue through dietary intake. PMID:23028754

  15. A clinical case of dentato-rubro-pallido-luysian atrophy (DRPLA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dentato-rubro-pallido-luysian atrophy (DRPLA) has been described as an atypical type of spino-cerebellar degeneration by J.K. Smith (1958). Choreo-athetoid movement characterizes the DRPLA. We here report a case of DRPLA that was suspected from clinical symptoms and CT brain examinations. Case report: A 36-year-old man was admitted to the hospital because of involuntary movements of the extremities in July, 1978. He had epileptic seizures since the age of 25. Since then, his intelligence had gradually been getting worse. At the same time, dysarthria (slow and slurred speech) also appeared. The neurological examination on admission revealed choreo-athetoid movements, with ataxia of the extremities, trancal ataxia, ataxic speech, moderate dementia, and a disturbance of the smooth-pursuit eye movements. He could not maintain his eye position in a steady gaze, but nystagmus was absent. A brain CT scan revealed a marked atrophy of the upper brain stem and cerebellar peduncle. The cerebral atrophy was mild, and caudate nuclei were spared. The electroencephalograph showed a slow, diffuse, high-voltage wave, with an associated spike and waves. The cerebrospinal fluid examination was normal. An electrophysiological examination revealed no myoclonus in the extremities. These clinical findings suggested that this case is a pseudo-Huntington form of DRPLA. (author)

  16. Quantitative EEG and medial temporal lobe atrophy in Alzheimer′s dementia: Preliminary study

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    Soo-Ji Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Backgrounds: The electroencephalogram (EEG abnormalities in Alzheimer′s disease (AD have been widely reported, and medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTLA is one of the hallmarks in early stage of AD. We aimed to assess the relationship between EEG abnormalities and MTLA and its clinical validity. Materials and Methods: A total of 18 patients with AD were recruited (the mean age: 77.83 years. Baseline EEGs were analyzed with quantitative spectral analysis. MTLA was assessed by a T1-axial visual rating scale (VRS. Results: In relative power spectrum analysis according to the right MTLA severity, the power of theta waves in C4, T4, F4, F8, and T5 increased significantly and the power of beta waves in T6, C4, T4, F8, T5, P3, T3, and F7 decreased significantly in severe atrophy group. In relative power spectrum analysis according to the left MTLA severity, the power of theta waves in T3 increased significantly and that of beta waves in P4, T6, C4, F4, F8, T5, P3, C3, T3, F3, and F7 decreased significantly in severe atrophy group. Conclusion: The severe MTLA group, regardless of laterality, showed more severe quantitative EEG alterations. These results suggest that quantitative EEG abnormalities are correlated with the MTLA, which may play an important role in AD process.

  17. Jacobian integration method increases the statistical power to measure gray matter atrophy in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunio Nakamura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gray matter atrophy provides important insights into neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis (MS and can be used as a marker of neuroprotection in clinical trials. Jacobian integration is a method for measuring volume change that uses integration of the local Jacobian determinants of the nonlinear deformation field registering two images, and is a promising tool for measuring gray matter atrophy. Our main objective was to compare the statistical power of the Jacobian integration method to commonly used methods in terms of the sample size required to detect a treatment effect on gray matter atrophy. We used multi-center longitudinal data from relapsing–remitting MS patients and evaluated combinations of cross-sectional and longitudinal pre-processing with SIENAX/FSL, SPM, and FreeSurfer, as well as the Jacobian integration method. The Jacobian integration method outperformed these other commonly used methods, reducing the required sample size by a factor of 4–5. The results demonstrate the advantage of using the Jacobian integration method to assess neuroprotection in MS clinical trials.

  18. Progressive Muscle Atrophy and Weakness After Treatment by Mantle Field Radiotherapy in Hodgkin Lymphoma Survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leeuwen-Segarceanu, Elena M. van, E-mail: e.segarceanu@antoniusziekenhuis.nl [Department of Internal Medicine, St. Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Dorresteijn, Lucille D.A. [Department of Neurology, Medisch Spectrum Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Pillen, Sigrid [Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, Donders Center for Neuroscience, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Biesma, Douwe H. [Department of Internal Medicine, University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands); Vogels, Oscar J.M. [Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, St. Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Alfen, Nens van [Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, Donders Center for Neuroscience, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To describe the damage to the muscles and propose a pathophysiologic mechanism for muscle atrophy and weakness after mantle field radiotherapy in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors. Methods and Materials: We examined 12 patients treated by mantle field radiotherapy between 1969 and 1998. Besides evaluation of their symptoms, the following tests were performed: dynamometry; ultrasound of the sternocleidomastoid, biceps, and antebrachial flexor muscles; and needle electromyography of the neck, deltoid, and ultrasonographically affected arm muscles. Results: Ten patients (83%) experienced neck complaints, mostly pain and muscle weakness. On clinical examination, neck flexors were more often affected than neck extensors. On ultrasound, the sternocleidomastoid was severely atrophic in 8 patients, but abnormal echo intensity was seen in only 3 patients. Electromyography of the neck muscles showed mostly myogenic changes, whereas the deltoid, biceps, and antebrachial flexor muscles seemed to have mostly neurogenic damage. Conclusions: Many patients previously treated by mantle field radiotherapy develop severe atrophy and weakness of the neck muscles. Neck muscles within the radiation field show mostly myogenic damage, and muscles outside the mantle field show mostly neurogenic damage. The discrepancy between echo intensity and atrophy suggests that muscle damage is most likely caused by an extrinsic factor such as progressive microvascular fibrosis. This is also presumed to cause damage to nerves within the radiated field, resulting in neurogenic damage of the deltoid and arm muscles.

  19. Postural muscle atrophy prevention and recovery and bone remodelling through high frequency proprioception for astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Dario; Rossitto, Franco; Battocchio, Luciano

    2009-09-01

    The difficulty in applying active exercises during space flights increases the importance of passive countermeasures, but coupling load and instability remains indispensable for generating high frequency (HF) proprioceptive flows and preventing muscle atrophy and osteoporosis. The present study, in microgravity conditions during a parabolic flight, verified whether an electronic system, composed of a rocking board, a postural reader and a bungee-cord loading apparatus creates HF postural instability comparable to that reachable on the Earth. Tracking the subject, in single stance, to real-time visual signals is necessary to obtain HF instability situations. The bungee-cord loading apparatus allowed the subject to manage the 81.5% body weight load (100% could easily be exceeded). A preliminary training programme schedule on the Earth and in space is suggested. Comparison with a pathological muscle atrophy is presented. The possibility of generating HF proprioceptive flows could complement current countermeasures for the prevention and recovery of muscle atrophy and osteoporosis in terrestrial and space environments. These exercises combine massive activation of spindles and joint receptors, applying simultaneously HF variations of pressure to different areas of the sole of the foot. This class of exercises could improve the effectiveness of current countermeasures, reducing working time and fatigue.

  20. Atrophy and structural covariance of the cholinergic basal forebrain in primary progressive aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teipel, Stefan; Raiser, Theresa; Riedl, Lina; Riederer, Isabelle; Schroeter, Matthias L; Bisenius, Sandrine; Schneider, Anja; Kornhuber, Johannes; Fliessbach, Klaus; Spottke, Annika; Grothe, Michel J; Prudlo, Johannes; Kassubek, Jan; Ludolph, Albert; Landwehrmeyer, Bernhard; Straub, Sarah; Otto, Markus; Danek, Adrian

    2016-10-01

    Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is characterized by profound destruction of cortical language areas. Anatomical studies suggest an involvement of cholinergic basal forebrain (BF) in PPA syndromes, particularly in the area of the nucleus subputaminalis (NSP). Here we aimed to determine the pattern of atrophy and structural covariance as a proxy of structural connectivity of BF nuclei in PPA variants. We studied 62 prospectively recruited cases with the clinical diagnosis of PPA and 31 healthy older control participants from the cohort study of the German consortium for frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). We determined cortical and BF atrophy based on high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Patterns of structural covariance of BF with cortical regions were determined using voxel-based partial least square analysis. We found significant atrophy of total BF and BF subregions in PPA patients compared with controls [F(1, 82) = 20.2, p covariance analysis in healthy controls revealed associations of the BF nuclei, particularly the NSP, with left hemispheric predominant prefrontal, lateral temporal, and parietal cortical areas, including Broca's speech area (p covariance of the BF nuclei mostly with right but not with left hemispheric cortical areas (p covariance of the BF with left hemispheric cortical areas in healthy aging towards right hemispheric cortical areas in PPA, possibly reflecting a consequence of the profound and early destruction of cortical language areas in PPA.

  1. Activity of calcium activated protease in skeletal muscles and its changes in atrophy and stretch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, S.; Nagainis, P. A.

    1984-01-01

    The reduction of protein content in skeletal muscle undergoing disuse-induced atrophy is correlated with accelerated rates of protein degradation and reduced rates of protein synthesis (Goldspink, 1977). It is not known in what manner myofibers are partially disassembled during disuse atrophy to fibers of smaller diameter; nor is it known which proteases are responsible for this morphological change in contractile protein mass. Dayton and colleagues (1975) have suggested that the Ca(2+)-activated protease (CaP) may initiate myofibril degradation. The discovery of a form of CaP that is activatable by nano-molar concentrations of Ca(2+) indicates that CaP activity may be regulated by physiological concentrations of Ca(2+) (Mellgren, 1980). The enhancement of proteolysis by the Ca(2+) ionophore A23187, reported by Etlinger (1979), is consistent with a significant role for CaP in protein degradation. It was of interest, therefore, to measure the levels of CaP activity and the CaP inhibitor in extracts obtained from skeletal muscles of rat and chicken limbs undergoing disuse atrophy or stretch hypertrophy, respectively.

  2. Progression of brain atrophy in spinocerebellar ataxia type 2: a longitudinal tensor-based morphometry study.

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    Mario Mascalchi

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2 is the second most frequent autosomal dominant inherited ataxia worldwide. We investigated the capability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to track in vivo progression of brain atrophy in SCA2 by examining twice 10 SCA2 patients (mean interval 3.6 years and 16 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (mean interval 3.3 years on the same 1.5 T MRI scanner. We used T1-weighted images and tensor-based morphometry (TBM to investigate volume changes and the Inherited Ataxia Clinical Rating Scale to assess the clinical deficit. With respect to controls, SCA2 patients showed significant higher atrophy rates in the midbrain, including substantia nigra, basis pontis, middle cerebellar peduncles and posterior medulla corresponding to the gracilis and cuneatus tracts and nuclei, cerebellar white matter (WM and cortical gray matter (GM in the inferior portions of the cerebellar hemisphers. No differences in WM or GM volume loss were observed in the supratentorial compartment. TBM findings did not correlate with modifications of the neurological deficit. In conclusion, MRI volumetry using TBM is capable of demonstrating the progression of pontocerebellar atrophy in SCA2, supporting a possible role of MRI as biomarker in future trials.

  3. Progressive Muscle Atrophy and Weakness After Treatment by Mantle Field Radiotherapy in Hodgkin Lymphoma Survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To describe the damage to the muscles and propose a pathophysiologic mechanism for muscle atrophy and weakness after mantle field radiotherapy in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors. Methods and Materials: We examined 12 patients treated by mantle field radiotherapy between 1969 and 1998. Besides evaluation of their symptoms, the following tests were performed: dynamometry; ultrasound of the sternocleidomastoid, biceps, and antebrachial flexor muscles; and needle electromyography of the neck, deltoid, and ultrasonographically affected arm muscles. Results: Ten patients (83%) experienced neck complaints, mostly pain and muscle weakness. On clinical examination, neck flexors were more often affected than neck extensors. On ultrasound, the sternocleidomastoid was severely atrophic in 8 patients, but abnormal echo intensity was seen in only 3 patients. Electromyography of the neck muscles showed mostly myogenic changes, whereas the deltoid, biceps, and antebrachial flexor muscles seemed to have mostly neurogenic damage. Conclusions: Many patients previously treated by mantle field radiotherapy develop severe atrophy and weakness of the neck muscles. Neck muscles within the radiation field show mostly myogenic damage, and muscles outside the mantle field show mostly neurogenic damage. The discrepancy between echo intensity and atrophy suggests that muscle damage is most likely caused by an extrinsic factor such as progressive microvascular fibrosis. This is also presumed to cause damage to nerves within the radiated field, resulting in neurogenic damage of the deltoid and arm muscles.

  4. Etiology and clinical profile of childhood optic nerve atrophy at a tertiary eye care center in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriya Chinta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Optic nerve atrophy is an important ophthalmological sign that may be associated with serious systemic conditions having a significant bearing on the overall morbidity of the child. Studies specific to etiology of childhood optic atrophy are scarce, this being the first such study from India to the best of our knowledge. Aim: The aim was to analyze the clinical features and etiology of diagnosed cases of optic nerve atrophy in children <16 years of age. Materials and Methods: Retrospective review of records of children diagnosed with optic nerve atrophy between the ages of 0 and 16 years from 2006 to 2011. Results: A total of 324 children (583 eyes were identified. Among these 160 (49% presented with defective vision, 71 (22% with strabismus, 18 (6% with only nystagmus. Rest had a combination of two or three of the above symptoms. Sixty-five patients (20% had a unilateral affection. Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy seen in 133 patients (41% was the most frequent cause of childhood optic atrophy, followed by idiopathic in 98 (30%, hydrocephalus in 24 (7%, compressive etiology in 18 (5%, infective in 19 (6%, congenital in 6 (2%, inflammatory in 5 (2% patients, respectively. Conclusion: Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy appears to be the most common cause of optic atrophy in children in this series. The most common presenting complaint was defective vision.

  5. Is radiological evaluation as good as computer-based volumetry to assess hippocampal atrophy in Alzheimer's disease?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hippocampus volumetry is a useful surrogate marker for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Our purpose was to compare visual assessment of medial temporal lobe atrophy made by radiologists with automatic hippocampal volume and to compare their performances for the classification of AD, mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and cognitively normal (CN). We studied 30 CN, 30 MCI and 30 AD subjects. Six radiologists with two levels of expertise performed two readings of medial temporal lobe atrophy. Medial temporal lobe atrophy was evaluated on coronal three-dimensional T1-weighted images using Scheltens scale and compared with hippocampal volume obtained using a fully automatic segmentation method (Spearman's rank coefficient). Visual assessment of medial temporal lobe atrophy was correlated with hippocampal volume (p < 0.01). Classification performances between MCI converter and CN was better using volumetry than visual assessment of non-expert readers whereas classification of AD and CN did not differ between visual assessment and volumetry except for the first reading of one non-expert (p = 0.03). Visual assessment of medial temporal lobe atrophy by radiologists was well correlated with hippocampal volume. Radiological assessment is as good as computer-based volumetry for the classification of AD, MCI non-converter and CN and less good for the classification of MCI converter versus CN. Use of Scheltens scale for assessing hippocampal atrophy in AD seems thus justified in clinical routine. (orig.)

  6. Is radiological evaluation as good as computer-based volumetry to assess hippocampal atrophy in Alzheimer's disease?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutet, Claire; Drier, Aurelie; Dormont, Didier; Lehericy, Stephane [Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Department of Neuroradiology, AP-HP, Paris Cedex 13 (France); Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, Centre de Recherche de l' Institut du Cerveau et de la Moelle epiniere, UMR-S975, Paris (France); Inserm, Paris (France); CNRS, Paris (France); ICM-Institut du Cerveau et de la Moelle epiniere, Paris (France); Chupin, Marie; Colliot, Olivier [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, Centre de Recherche de l' Institut du Cerveau et de la Moelle epiniere, UMR-S975, Paris (France); Inserm, Paris (France); CNRS, Paris (France); ICM-Institut du Cerveau et de la Moelle epiniere, Paris (France); Equipe Cogimage-CRICM, Paris Cedex 13 (France); Sarazin, Marie [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, Centre de Recherche de l' Institut du Cerveau et de la Moelle epiniere, UMR-S975, Paris (France); Inserm, Paris (France); CNRS, Paris (France); ICM-Institut du Cerveau et de la Moelle epiniere, Paris (France); Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Department of Neurology, Institut de la Memoire et de la Maladie d' Alzheimer-IM2A, Paris Cedex 13 (France); Mutlu, Gurkan [Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Urgences Cerebro-Vasculaires, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, Paris Cedex 13 (France); Hopital Saint-Louis, Inserm, Universite Paris 7-Denis Diderot, Paris (France); Pellot, Audrey [Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Department of Neuroradiology, AP-HP, Paris Cedex 13 (France); Collaboration: And the Alzheimer' s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

    2012-12-15

    Hippocampus volumetry is a useful surrogate marker for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Our purpose was to compare visual assessment of medial temporal lobe atrophy made by radiologists with automatic hippocampal volume and to compare their performances for the classification of AD, mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and cognitively normal (CN). We studied 30 CN, 30 MCI and 30 AD subjects. Six radiologists with two levels of expertise performed two readings of medial temporal lobe atrophy. Medial temporal lobe atrophy was evaluated on coronal three-dimensional T1-weighted images using Scheltens scale and compared with hippocampal volume obtained using a fully automatic segmentation method (Spearman's rank coefficient). Visual assessment of medial temporal lobe atrophy was correlated with hippocampal volume (p < 0.01). Classification performances between MCI converter and CN was better using volumetry than visual assessment of non-expert readers whereas classification of AD and CN did not differ between visual assessment and volumetry except for the first reading of one non-expert (p = 0.03). Visual assessment of medial temporal lobe atrophy by radiologists was well correlated with hippocampal volume. Radiological assessment is as good as computer-based volumetry for the classification of AD, MCI non-converter and CN and less good for the classification of MCI converter versus CN. Use of Scheltens scale for assessing hippocampal atrophy in AD seems thus justified in clinical routine. (orig.)

  7. Cortical atrophy patterns in multiple sclerosis are non-random and clinically relevant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenwijk, Martijn D; Geurts, Jeroen J G; Daams, Marita; Tijms, Betty M; Wink, Alle Meije; Balk, Lisanne J; Tewarie, Prejaas K; Uitdehaag, Bernard M J; Barkhof, Frederik; Vrenken, Hugo; Pouwels, Petra J W

    2016-01-01

    Grey matter atrophy is common in multiple sclerosis. However, in contrast with other neurodegenerative diseases, it is unclear whether grey matter atrophy in multiple sclerosis is a diffuse 'global' process or develops, instead, according to distinct anatomical patterns. Using source-based morphometry we searched for anatomical patterns of co-varying cortical thickness and assessed their relationships with white matter pathology, physical disability and cognitive functioning. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed at 3 T in 208 patients with long-standing multiple sclerosis (141 females; age = 53.7 ± 9.6 years; disease duration = 20.2 ± 7.1 years) and 60 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Spatial independent component analysis was performed on cortical thickness maps derived from 3D T1-weighted images across all subjects to identify co-varying patterns. The loadings, which reflect the presence of each cortical thickness pattern in a subject, were compared between patients with multiple sclerosis and healthy controls with generalized linear models. Stepwise linear regression analyses were used to assess whether white matter pathology was associated with these loadings and to identify the cortical thickness patterns that predict measures of physical and cognitive dysfunction. Ten cortical thickness patterns were identified, of which six had significantly lower loadings in patients with multiple sclerosis than in controls: the largest loading differences corresponded to the pattern predominantly involving the bilateral temporal pole and entorhinal cortex, and the pattern involving the bilateral posterior cingulate cortex. In patients with multiple sclerosis, overall white matter lesion load was negatively associated with the loadings of these two patterns. The final model for physical dysfunction as measured with Expanded Disability Status Scale score (adjusted R(2) = 0.297; P multiple sclerosis were found. This suggests that cortical atrophy in multiple

  8. Tideglusib reduces progression of brain atrophy in progressive supranuclear palsy in a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höglinger, Günter U; Huppertz, Hans-Jürgen; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Andrés, María V; Belloch, Vincente; León, Teresa; Del Ser, Teodoro

    2014-04-01

    It is believed that glycogen synthase kinase-3 hyperphosphorylates tau protein in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). The Tau Restoration on PSP (TAUROS) trial assessed the glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitor tideglusib as potential treatment. For the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) substudy reported here, we assessed the progression of brain atrophy. TAUROS was a multinational, phase 2, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in patients with mild-to-moderate PSP who were treated with oral tideglusib (600 mg or 800 mg daily) or with placebo for 1 year. A subset of patients underwent baseline and 52-week MRI. Automated, observer-independent, atlas-based, and mask-based volumetry was done on high-resolution, T1-weighted, three-dimensional data. For primary outcomes, progression of atrophy was compared both globally (brain, cerebrum) and regionally (third ventricle, midbrain, pons) between the active and placebo groups (Bonferroni correction). For secondary outcomes, 15 additional brain structures were explored (Benjamini & Yekutieli correction). In total, MRIs from 37 patient were studied (placebo group, N = 9; tideglusib 600 mg group, N = 19; tideglusib 800 mg group, N = 9). The groups compared well in their demographic characteristics. Clinical results showed no effect of tideglusib over placebo. Progression of atrophy was significantly lower in the active group than in the placebo group for the brain (mean ± standard error of the mean: -1.3% ± 1.4% vs. -3.1% ± 2.3%, respectively), cerebrum (-1.3% ± 1.5% vs. -3.2% ± 2.1%, respectively), parietal lobe (-1.6% ± 1.9% vs. -4.1% ± 3.0%, respectively), and occipital lobe (-0.3% ± 1.8% vs. -2.7% ± 3.2%, respectively). A trend toward reduced atrophy also was observed in the frontal lobe, hippocampus, caudate nucleus, midbrain, and brainstem. In patients with PSP, tideglusib reduced the progression of atrophy in the whole brain, particularly in the parietal and occipital lobes.

  9. The ChIP-seq-defined networks of Bcl-3 gene binding support its required role in skeletal muscle atrophy.

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    Robert W Jackman

    Full Text Available NF-kappaB transcriptional activation is required for skeletal muscle disuse atrophy. We are continuing to study how the activation of NF-kB regulates the genes that encode the protein products that cause atrophy. Using ChIP-sequencing we found that Bcl-3, an NF-kB transcriptional activator required for atrophy, binds to the promoters of a number of genes whose collective function describes two major aspects of muscle wasting. By means of bioinformatics analysis of ChIP-sequencing data we found Bcl-3 to be directing transcription networks of proteolysis and energy metabolism. The proteolytic arm of the Bcl-3 networks includes many E3 ligases associated with proteasomal protein degradation, including that of the N-end rule pathway. The metabolic arm appears to be involved in organizing the change from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis in atrophying muscle. For one gene, MuRF1, ChIP-sequencing data identified the location of Bcl-3 and p50 binding in the promoter region which directed the creation of deletant and base-substitution mutations of MuRF1 promoter constructs to determine the effect on gene transcription. The results provide the first direct confirmation that the NF-kB binding site is involved in the muscle unloading regulation of MuRF1. Finally, we have combined the ChIP-sequencing results with gene expression microarray data from unloaded muscle to map several direct targets of Bcl-3 that are transcription factors whose own targets describe a set of indirect targets for NF-kB in atrophy. ChIP-sequencing provides the first molecular explanation for the finding that Bcl3 knockout mice are resistant to disuse muscle atrophy. Mapping the transcriptional regulation of muscle atrophy requires an unbiased analysis of the whole genome, which we show is now possible with ChIP-sequencing.

  10. [Effect of gravitation loading and retabolil on development of atrophy in muscles and bones of rats due to suspension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    KaplanskiI, A S; Il'ina-Kakueva, E I; Durnova, G N; Alekseev, E A; Loginov, V I

    1999-01-01

    In a 3-wk experiment with tail-suspended rats histological and histomorphometric methods were used to determine the effects of graded gravitational loading (GGL) and anabolic steroid retabolil (nortestosterone decanoate) on the course of atrophy in soleus m. (SM), gastrocnemius m. (GM), tibia and humerus, and functioning of somatotrophic hormones (STH) of the pituitary and thyrocytes of the thyroid. Suspension was found to produce atrophy in SM and, to a less degree, in GM, partial transformation of SM slow fibers into the fast ones, suppression of the tibial longitudinal growth, demineralization of the tibial and humeral spongious metaphyses; besides, functional activities of STH-cells and thyrocytes were inhibited. Graded gravitational loading of rats by intermittence of suspension for 2 hrs slowed down atrophy in both muscles and osteopenia in tibia, stimulated the synthetic and secretory functions of STH-cells without any marked effect on thyrocytes or humeral osteopenia. GGL failed to influence the slow-to-fast transformation of SM fibers. Two injections of retabolil at the total dose of 3 mg/kg of the body mass somewhat interfered with the SM atrophy and humoral osteopenia, and were favorable to the synthetic but not secretory activity of STH-cells. Neither SM and tibial atrophies nor thyroid activity of the gland were improved. The prophylactic action of GGL upon the SM and humeral atrophies was significantly higher when combined with retabolil, whereas GM and tibia were not noticeably cured by retabolil. Inhibition of the SM atrophy and humeral osteopenia in rats treated with GGL and retabolil concurred with elevated activities of STH-cells and thyrocytes indirectly suggesting their more intensive production of the growth hormone and thyroid hormones, respectively. PMID:10590810

  11. Is the subcallosal medial prefrontal cortex a common site of atrophy in Alzheimer’s disease and frontotemporal lobar degeneration?

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    Olof eLindberg

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Regions affected late in neurodegenerative disease are thought to be anatomically connected to regions affected earlier. The subcallosal medial prefrontal cortex (SMPC has connections with the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC, orbitofrontal cortex (OFC and hippocampus (HC, which are regions that may become atrophic in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD and Alzheimer’s disease (AD. We hypothesized that the SMPC is a common site of frontal atrophy in the FTLD subtypes and in AD. The volume of the SMPC, DLPFC, OFC, HC and entorhinal cortex were manually delineated for 12 subjects with frontotemporal dementia (FTD, 13 with semantic dementia (SD, 9 with progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA, 10 AD cases and 13 controls. Results revealed significant volume loss in the left SMPC in FTD, SD and PNFA, while the right SMPC was also atrophied in SD and FTD. In AD a non significant tendency of volume loss in the left SMPC was found (p=0.08, with no volume loss on the right side. Results indicated that volume loss reflected the degree of brain connectivity. In SD and AD temporal regions displayed most atrophy. Among the frontal regions, the SMPC (which receives the strongest temporal projections demonstrated most volume loss, the OFC (which receives less temporal projections less volume loss, while the DLPFC (which is at multisynaptic distance from the temporal regions demonstrated no volume loss. In PNFA, the left SMPC was atrophic, possibly reflecting progression from the left anterior insula, while FTD patients may have had SMPC atrophy at the initial stages of the disease. Atrophy of the SMPC may thus be affected by either initial temporal or initial frontal atrophy, making it a common site of frontal atrophy in the dementia subtypes investigated.

  12. Meta-analysis of expression signatures of muscle atrophy: gene interaction networks in early and late stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanfranchi Gerolamo

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Skeletal muscle mass can be markedly reduced through a process called atrophy, as a consequence of many diseases or critical physiological and environmental situations. Atrophy is characterised by loss of contractile proteins and reduction of fiber volume. Although in the last decade the molecular aspects underlying muscle atrophy have received increased attention, the fine mechanisms controlling muscle degeneration are still incomplete. In this study we applied meta-analysis on gene expression signatures pertaining to different types of muscle atrophy for the identification of novel key regulatory signals implicated in these degenerative processes. Results We found a general down-regulation of genes involved in energy production and carbohydrate metabolism and up-regulation of genes for protein degradation and catabolism. Six functional pathways occupy central positions in the molecular network obtained by the integration of atrophy transcriptome and molecular interaction data. They are TGF-β pathway, apoptosis, membrane trafficking/cytoskeleton organization, NFKB pathways, inflammation and reorganization of the extracellular matrix. Protein degradation pathway is evident only in the network specific for muscle short-term response to atrophy. TGF-β pathway plays a central role with proteins SMAD3/4, MYC, MAX and CDKN1A in the general network, and JUN, MYC, GNB2L1/RACK1 in the short-term muscle response network. Conclusion Our study offers a general overview of the molecular pathways and cellular processes regulating the establishment and maintenance of atrophic state in skeletal muscle, showing also how the different pathways are interconnected. This analysis identifies novel key factors that could be further investigated as potential targets for the development of therapeutic treatments. We suggest that the transcription factors SMAD3/4, GNB2L1/RACK1, MYC, MAX and JUN, whose functions have been extensively studied in

  13. Sequential relationships between grey matter and white matter atrophy and brain metabolic abnormalities in early Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villain, Nicolas; Fouquet, Marine; Baron, Jean-Claude; Mézenge, Florence; Landeau, Brigitte; de La Sayette, Vincent; Viader, Fausto; Eustache, Francis; Desgranges, Béatrice; Chételat, Gaël

    2010-11-01

    Hippocampal atrophy, posterior cingulate and frontal glucose hypometabolism, and white-matter tract disruption are well described early macroscopic events in Alzheimer's disease. The relationships between these three types of alterations have been documented in previous studies, but their chronology still remains to be established. The present study used multi-modal fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging longitudinal data to address this question in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment. We found unidirectional, specific sequential relationships between: (i) baseline hippocampal atrophy and both cingulum bundle (r = 0.70; P = 3 × 10⁻³) and uncinate fasciculus (r = 0.75; P = 7 × 10⁻⁴) rate of atrophy; (ii) baseline cingulum bundle atrophy and rate of decline of posterior (r = 0.72; P = 2 × 10⁻³); and anterior (r = 0.74; P = 1 × 10⁻³) cingulate metabolism; and (iii) baseline uncinate white matter atrophy and subgenual metabolism rate of change (r = 0.65; P = 6 × 10⁻³). Baseline local grey matter atrophy was not found to contribute to hypometabolism progression within the posterior and anterior cingulate as well as subgenual cortices. These findings suggest that hippocampal atrophy progressively leads to disruption of the cingulum bundle and uncinate fasciculus, which in turn leads to glucose hypometabolism of the cingulate and subgenual cortices, respectively. This study reinforces the relevance of remote mechanisms above local interactions to account for the pattern of metabolic brain alteration observed in amnestic mild cognitive impairment, and provides new avenues to assess the sequence of events in complex diseases characterized by multiple manifestations.

  14. White Matter Atrophy in Patients with Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Voxel-Based Morphometry Analysis of T1- and T2-Weighted MR Images

    OpenAIRE

    Barbara Braga; Yasuda, Clarissa L.; Fernando Cendes

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) associated with hippocampal sclerosis is highly refractory to clinical treatment. MRI voxel-based morphometry (VBM) of T1-weighted images has revealed a widespread pattern of gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) atrophy in MTLE. Few studies have investigated the role of T2-weighted images in revealing WM atrophy using VBM. Objectives. To compare the results of WM atrophy between T1- and T2-weighted images through VBM. Methods. We selected 2...

  15. Homocysteine-Lowering by B Vitamins Slows the Rate of Accelerated Brain Atrophy in Mild Cognitive Impairment: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    A David Smith; Smith, Stephen M.; de Jager, Celeste A.; Philippa Whitbread; Carole Johnston; Grzegorz Agacinski; Abderrahim Oulhaj; Bradley, Kevin M.; Robin Jacoby; Helga Refsum

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An increased rate of brain atrophy is often observed in older subjects, in particular those who suffer from cognitive decline. Homocysteine is a risk factor for brain atrophy, cognitive impairment and dementia. Plasma concentrations of homocysteine can be lowered by dietary administration of B vitamins. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether supplementation with B vitamins that lower levels of plasma total homocysteine can slow the rate of brain atrophy in subjects with mild cognitive im...

  16. Changes in muscular strength and electromyogram in rats with muscular disuse atrophy following electrical stimulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoyu Lü; Xuanming Hao

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atrophy of skeletal muscle is found under the condition of muscular disuse or in the process of fixation. It is affected by fixation, and electromyogram (EMG) discharge and muscular strength levels will be significantly decreased with accelerating tendency. Electrical stimulation (ES) therapy can release the velocity of muscular disuse atrophy effectively, so it is an effective method for preventing and treating muscular disuse atrophy and accelerating rehabilitation velocity following removal of fixation.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effect of ES therapy at different time points following the fixation of rat models of muscular disuse atrophy on muscular strength and EMG of quadriceps femoris.DESIGN: A randomized and controlled animal experiment.SETTING: Department of Rehabilitation and Physiotherapy, Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Area Command of Chinese PLA; College of Sports Science, South China Normal University.MATERIALS: Male SD rats, of clean grade, aged 4 months old, weighing (230±10) g, were provided by the Animal Experimental Center of Sun Yat-sen University. EMG measurement and analysis system (NEC Company, Japan) and four-channel recorder (NEC Company, Japan) were used in this experiment.METHODS: This experiment was carried out in the Laboratory of Human Sports Science, South China Normal University between September 2003 and March 2004. Totally 125 successful SD rat models of muscular disuse atrophy were randomly divided into 5 groups with 25 rats in each by a lot: normal control group, in which, the rats were untouched; ES 24 hours, 1, 2 and 3 weeks groups: the knees of rats in these four groups were fixed. Rats in four groups underwent ES therapy at 24 hours, 1, 2 and 3 weeks after fixation. T90- Ⅱ computer ES muscular strength training instrument was used in ES therapy every other day. The instrument was set as square wave,5 mA current intensity and 10 minutes a day. Muscular strength of quadriceps femoris and data of

  17. Man Versus Machine Part 2: Comparison of Radiologists' Interpretations and NeuroQuant Measures of Brain Asymmetry and Progressive Atrophy in Patients With Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, David E; Ochs, Alfred L; DeSmit, Megan E; Seabaugh, Jan M; Havranek, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    This study is an expanded version of an earlier study, which compared NeuroQuant measures of MRI brain volume with the radiologist's traditional approach in outpatients with mild or moderate traumatic brain injury. NeuroQuant volumetric analyses were compared with the radiologists' interpretations. NeuroQuant found significantly higher rates of atrophy (50.0%), abnormal asymmetry (83.3%), and progressive atrophy (70.0%) than the radiologists (12.5%, 0% and 0%, respectively). Overall, NeuroQuant was more sensitive for detecting at least one sign of atrophy, abnormal asymmetry, or progressive atrophy (95.8%) than the traditional radiologist's approach (12.5%).

  18. A novel OPA1 mutation in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant optic atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Juanjuan; Yuan, Yimin; Lin, Bing; Feng, Hao; Li, Yan [School of Ophthalmology and Optometry, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325027, Zhejiang (China); Dai, Xianning; Zhou, Huihui [Attardi Institute of Mitochondrial Biomedicine and Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Medical Genetics, School of Life Sciences, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325035, Zhejiang (China); Dong, Xujie [School of Ophthalmology and Optometry, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325027, Zhejiang (China); Liu, Xiao-Ling, E-mail: lxl@mail.eye.ac.cn [School of Ophthalmology and Optometry, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325027, Zhejiang (China); Guan, Min-Xin, E-mail: min-xin.guan@cchmc.org [Attardi Institute of Mitochondrial Biomedicine and Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Medical Genetics, School of Life Sciences, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325035, Zhejiang (China); Institute of Genetics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310012 (China); Division of Human Genetics, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, OH 45229 (United States)

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We report the characterization of a four-generation large Chinese family with ADOA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find a new heterozygous mutation c.C1198G in OPA1 gene which may be a novel pathogenic mutation in this pedigree. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We do not find any mitochondrial DNA mutations associated with optic atrophy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Other factors may also contribute to the phenotypic variability of ADOA in this pedigree. -- Abstract: A large four-generation Chinese family with autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) was investigated in the present study. Eight of the family members were affected in this pedigree. The affected family members exhibited early-onset and progressive visual impairment, resulting in mild to profound loss of visual acuity. The average age-at-onset was 15.9 years. A new heterozygous mutation c.C1198G was identified by sequence analysis of the 12th exon of the OPA1 gene. This mutation resulted in a proline to alanine substitution at codon 400, which was located in an evolutionarily conserved region. This missense mutation in the GTPase domain was supposed to result in a loss of function for the encoded protein and act through a dominant negative effect. No other mutations associated with optic atrophy were found in our present study. The c.C1198G heterozygous mutation in the OPA1 gene may be a novel key pathogenic mutation in this pedigree with ADOA. Furthermore, additional nuclear modifier genes, environmental factors, and psychological factors may also contribute to the phenotypic variability of ADOA in this pedigree.

  19. Contribution of brain atrophy on CT and aging to intelligence level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decrased intellectual functions due to senility have been much discussed in connection with aging or brain atophy alternatively. But this change should be analysed under multifactorial basis. Furthermore, variations between individuals should be taken into account in dealing with an advanced age group. In these regards, the author performed multivariate analysis on intellectual changes, aging and brain arophy demonstrated on brain CT. Clonological study was also performed to reveal the individual variations. The objects were consisted of 72 people, including the patients of more than 65 years of age who were hospitalized to a geriatrics hospital because of senile dementia, and, as a control group residents in a home for the aged nearby the hospital. Average age was 75.4 years old. Intellectual level was measured through Hasegawa's dementia rating scale. Ventricular enlargement was measured on brain CT to determine the severity of brain atrophy. These two factors and age were processed with multivariate analysis. And clonological study was made to the deviation of intellectual level vs. the change of ventricular enlargement. As the result, firstly, this simple analysing model was able to reveal some aspcts of the deteriolating phenomena of intellectual leve through double factorial basis, i.e. brain atrophy on CT and age. Secondly, the group showing greater changes in the brain atrophy on CT, which included one case with rapid deteriolation in dementia scale of more than 10 points, was distributed mainly around full marks or zero point in dementia scale. This result postulates that the range of the dementia scale should be expanded upwrds as well as downwards for the better explanation of the relation between intellectual deteriolation and above mentioned two factors. (author)

  20. Development of a functional food or drug against unloading-mediated muscle atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikawa, Takeshi; Nakao, Reiko; Kagawa, Sachiko; Yamada, Chiharu; Abe, Manami; Tamura, Seiko; Kohno, Shohei; Sukeno, Akiko; Hirasaka, Katsuya; Okumura, Yuushi; Ishidoh, Kazumi

    The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is a primary regulator of muscle protein turnover, providing a mechanism for selective degradation of regulatory and structural proteins. This pathway is constitutively active in muscle fibers and mediates both intracellular signaling events and normal muscle protein turnover. However, conditions of decreased muscle use, so called unloading, remarkably stimulate activity of this pathway, resulting in loss of muscle protein. In fact, we previously reported that expression of several ubiquitin ligase genes, such as MuRF-1, Cbl-b, and Siah-1A, which are rate-limiting enzymes of the ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway, are significantly up-regulated in rat skeletal muscle during spaceflight. Moreover, we found that Cbl-b-mediated ubiquitination and degradation of IRS-1, an important intermediates of IGF-1 signal transduction, contributes to muscle atrophy during unloading. Therefore, we hypothesized that inhibition of Cbl-b-mediated ubiquitination and degradation of IRS-1 leads to prevention of muscle atrophy during unloading. In this study, we aimed to evaluate oligopeptide as an inhibitor against ubiquitination of IRS-1 by Cbl-b. We synthesized various oligopeptides that may competitively inhibit the binding of Cbl-b to IRS-1 on the basis of their structures and screened inhibitory effects of these synthesized oligopeptides on Cbl-b-mediated ubiquitination of IRS-1 using in vitro ubiquitination systems. We found that two synthetic oligopeptides with specific amino acid sequences effectively inhibited interaction with Cbl-b and IRS-1, resulting in decreased ubiquitination and degradation of IRS-1 (Patent pending). In contrast, we also found inhibitory activity against Cbl-b-mediated ubiquitination of IRS-1 in soy protein-derived oligopeptides, whereas their inhibitory effects were weaker than those of synthetic oligopeptides. Our results suggest that specific oligopeptides may be available as a functional food against the muscle

  1. Visual MRI grading system to evaluate atrophy of the supeaspinatus muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Hyun Kyoung; Hong, Sung Hwan; Yoo, Hye Jin; Choi, Ja Young; Kim, Sae Hoon; Choi, Jung Ah; Kang, Heung Sik [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    To investigate the interobserver reproducibility and diagnostic feasibility of a visual grading system for assessing atrophy of the supraspinatus muscle on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Three independent radiologists retrospectively evaluated the occupying ratio of the supraspinatus muscle in the supraspinatus fossa on 192 shoulder MRI examinations in 188 patients using a 3-point visual grading system (1, ≥ 60%; 2, 30-59%; 3, < 30%) on oblique sagittal T1-weighted images. The inter-reader agreement and the agreement with the reference standard (3-point grades according to absolute occupying ratio values quantitatively measured by directly contouring the muscles on MRI) were analyzed using weighted kappa. The visual grading was applied by a single reader to a group of 100 consecutive patients who had undergone rotator cuff repair to retrospectively determine the association between the visual grades at preoperative state and postsurgical occurrences of retear. The inter-reader weighted kappa value for the visual grading was 0.74 when averaged across three reader pairs (0.70-0.77 for individual reader pairs). The weighted kappa value between the visual grading and the reference standard ranged from 0.75 to 0.83. There was a significant difference in retear rates of the rotator cuff between the 3 visual grades of supraspinatus muscle atrophy on MRI in univariable analysis (p < 0.001), but not in multivariable analysis (p = 0.026). The 3-point visual grading system may be a feasible method to assess the severity of supraspinatus muscle atrophy on MRI and assist in the clinical management of patients with rotator cuff tear.

  2. Acute endotoxin-induced thymic atrophy is characterized by intrathymic inflammatory and wound healing responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Billard

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Productive thymopoiesis is essential for a robust and healthy immune system. Thymus unfortunately is acutely sensitive to stress resulting in involution and decreased T cell production. Thymic involution is a complication of many clinical settings, including infection, malnutrition, starvation, and irradiation or immunosuppressive therapies. Systemic rises in glucocorticoids and inflammatory cytokines are known to contribute to thymic atrophy. Little is known, however, about intrathymic mechanisms that may actively contribute to thymus atrophy or initiate thymic recovery following stress events. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Phenotypic, histologic and transcriptome/pathway analysis of murine thymic tissue during the early stages of endotoxemia-induced thymic involution was performed to identify putative mechanisms that drive thymic involution during stress. Thymus atrophy in this murine model was confirmed by down-regulation of genes involved in T cell development, cell activation, and cell cycle progression, correlating with observed phenotypic and histologic thymus involution. Significant gene changes support the hypothesis that multiple key intrathymic pathways are differentially activated during stress-induced thymic involution. These included direct activation of thymus tissue by LPS through TLR signaling, local expression of inflammatory cytokines, inhibition of T cell signaling, and induction of wound healing/tissue remodeling. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, these observations demonstrated that in addition to the classic systemic response, a direct intrathymic response to endotoxin challenge concurrently contributes to thymic involution during endotoxemia. These findings are a substantial advancement over current understanding of thymus response to stress and may lead to the development of novel therapeutic approaches to ameliorate immune deficiency associated with stress events.

  3. Calpain 3 Expression Pattern during Gastrocnemius Muscle Atrophy and Regeneration Following Sciatic Nerve Injury in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronghua Wu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Calpain 3 (CAPN3, also known as p94, is a skeletal muscle-specific member of the calpain family that is involved in muscular dystrophy; however, the roles of CAPN3 in muscular atrophy and regeneration are yet to be understood. In the present study, we attempted to explain the effect of CAPN3 in muscle atrophy by evaluating CAPN3 expression in rat gastrocnemius muscle following reversible sciatic nerve injury. After nerve injury, the wet weight ratio and cross sectional area (CSA of gastrocnemius muscle were decreased gradually from 1–14 days and then recovery from 14–28 days. The active form of CAPN3 (~62 kDa protein decreased slightly on day 3 and then increased from day 7 to 14 before a decrease from day 14 to 28. The result of linear correlation analysis showed that expression of the active CAPN3 protein level was negatively correlated with muscle wet weight ratio. CAPN3 knockdown by short interfering RNA (siRNA injection improved muscle recovery on days 7 and 14 after injury as compared to that observed with control siRNA treatment. Depletion of CAPN3 gene expression could promote myoblast differentiation in L6 cells. Based on these findings, we conclude that the expression pattern of the active CAPN3 protein is linked to muscle atrophy and regeneration following denervation: its upregulation during early stages may promote satellite cell renewal by inhibiting differentiation, whereas in later stages, CAPN3 expression may be downregulated to stimulate myogenic differentiation and enhance recovery. These results provide a novel mechanistic insight into the role of CAPN3 protein in muscle regeneration after peripheral nerve injury.

  4. Impaired Axonal Na(+) Current by Hindlimb Unloading: Implication for Disuse Neuromuscular Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banzrai, Chimeglkham; Nodera, Hiroyuki; Kawarai, Toshitaka; Higashi, Saki; Okada, Ryo; Mori, Atsuko; Shimatani, Yoshimitsu; Osaki, Yusuke; Kaji, Ryuji

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to characterize the excitability changes in peripheral motor axons caused by hindlimb unloading (HLU), which is a model of disuse neuromuscular atrophy. HLU was performed in normal 8-week-old male mice by fixing the proximal tail by a clip connected to the top of the animal's cage for 3 weeks. Axonal excitability studies were performed by stimulating the sciatic nerve at the ankle and recording the compound muscle action potential (CMAP) from the foot. The amplitudes of the motor responses of the unloading group were 51% of the control amplitudes [2.2 ± 1.3 mV (HLU) vs. 4.3 ± 1.2 mV (Control), P = 0.03]. Multiple axonal excitability analysis showed that the unloading group had a smaller strength-duration time constant (SDTC) and late subexcitability (recovery cycle) than the controls [0.075 ± 0.01 (HLU) vs. 0.12 ± 0.01 (Control), P < 0.01; 5.4 ± 1.0 (HLU) vs. 10.0 ± 1.3 % (Control), P = 0.01, respectively]. Three weeks after releasing from HLU, the SDTC became comparable to the control range. Using a modeling study, the observed differences in the waveforms could be explained by reduced persistent Na(+) currents along with parameters related to current leakage. Quantification of RNA of a SCA1A gene coding a voltage-gated Na(+) channel tended to be decreased in the sciatic nerve in HLU. The present study suggested that axonal ion currents are altered in vivo by HLU. It is still undetermined whether the dysfunctional axonal ion currents have any pathogenicity on neuromuscular atrophy or are the results of neural plasticity by atrophy. PMID:26909041

  5. Pattern Differences of Small Hand Muscle Atrophy in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Mimic Disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Fang; Ming-Sheng Liu; Yu-Zhou Guan; Hua Du; Ben-Hong Li; Bo Cui; Qing-Yun Ding

    2016-01-01

    Background:Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and some mimic disorders,such as distal-type cervical spondylotic amyotrophy (CSA),Hirayama disease (HD),and spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) may present with intrinsic hand muscle atrophy.This study aimed to investigate different patterns of small hand muscle involvement in ALS and some mimic disorders.Methods:We compared the abductor digiti minimi/abductor pollicis brevis (ADM/APB) compound muscle action potential (CMAP) ratios between 200 ALS patients,95 patients with distal-type CSA,88 HD patients,43 SBMA patients,and 150 normal controls.Results:The ADM/APB CMAP amplitude ratio was significantly higher in the ALS patients (P < 0.001) than that in the normal controls.The ADM/APB CMAP amplitude ratio was significantly reduced in the patients with distal-type CSA (P < 0.001) and the HD patients (P < 0.001) compared with that in the normal controls.The patients with distal-type CSA had significantly lower APB CMAP amplitude than the HD patients (P =0.004).The ADM/APB CMAP amplitude ratio was significantly lower in the HD patients (P < 0.001) than that in the patients with distal-type CSA.The ADM/APB CMAP amplitude ratio of the SBMA patients was similar to that of the normal controls (P =0.862).An absent APB CMAP and an abnormally high ADM/APB CMAP amplitude ratio (>4.5) were observed exclusively in the ALS patients.Conclusions:The different patterns of small hand muscle atrophy between the ALS patients and the patients with mimic disorders presumably reflect distinct pathophysiological mechanisms underlying different disorders,and may aid in distinguishing between ALS and mimic disorders.

  6. DcpS as a Therapeutic Target for Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Jasbir; Salcius, Michael; Liu, Shin-Wu; Staker, Bart L.; Mishra, Rama; Thurmond, John; Michaud, Gregory; Mattoon, Dawn R; Printen, John; Pollok, Brian A.; Kiledjian, Megerditch; Christensen, Jeffery; Stewart, Lance; Jarecki, Jill; Bjornsson, Jon Mar

    2008-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by deletion or mutation of both copies of the SMN1 gene which produces an essential protein known as SMN. The severity of SMA is modified by variable copy number of a second gene, SMN2 that produces an mRNA that is incorrectly spliced with deletion of the last exon. We described previously the discovery of potent C5-substituted quinazolines that increase SMN2 gene expression by two-fold. Discovery of potent SMN2 promoter inducers relied on a cellular as...

  7. Angiotensin-(1-7 attenuates disuse skeletal muscle atrophy in mice via its receptor, Mas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Gabriela Morales

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Immobilization is a form of disuse characterized by a loss of strength and muscle mass. Among the main features are decreased IGF-1/Akt signalling and increased ubiquitin-proteasome pathway signalling, which induce greater myosin heavy chain degradation. Activation of the classical renin-angiotensin system (RAS causes deleterious effects in skeletal muscle, including muscle wasting. In contrast, angiotensin-(1-7 [Ang-(1-7], a peptide of the non-classical RAS, produces beneficial effects in skeletal muscle. However, the role of Ang-(1-7 in skeletal muscle disuse atrophy and independent of classical RAS activation has not been evaluated. Therefore, we assessed the functions of Ang-(1-7 and the Mas receptor in disuse muscle atrophy in vivo using unilateral cast immobilization of the hind limb in male, 12-week-old wild-type (WT and Mas-knockout (Mas KO mice for 1 and 14 days. Additionally, we evaluated the participation of IGF-1/IGFR-1/Akt signalling and ubiquitin-proteasome pathway expression on the effects of Ang-(1-7 immobilization-induced muscle atrophy. Our results found that Ang-(1-7 prevented decreased muscle strength and reduced myofiber diameter, myosin heavy chain levels, and the induction of atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 expressions, all of which normally occur during immobilization. Analyses indicated that Ang-(1-7 increases IGF-1/IGFR-1/Akt pathway signalling through IGFR-1 and Akt phosphorylation, and the concomitant activation of two downstream targets of Akt, p70S6K and FoxO3. These anti-atrophic effects of Ang-(1-7 were not observed in Mas KO mice, indicating crucial participation of the Mas receptor. This report is the first to propose anti-atrophic effects of Ang-(1-7 via the Mas receptor and the participation of the IGF-1/IGFR-1/Akt/p70S6K/FoxO3 mechanism in disuse skeletal muscle atrophy.

  8. Different levels of implicit emotional recognition in posterior cortical atrophy (PCA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Gadea, María Luz; Ibanez, Agustín; Damm, Juliane; Ramirez Romero, Diana Andrea; Abrevaya, Sofia; Manes, Facundo; Richly, Pablo; Roca, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Previous single-case reports in posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) have shown preserved nonconscious visual recognition despite the absence of explicit recognition. In this study, we investigated three levels of visual recognition in both a female patient with PCA and a control group during the presentation of neutral, positive, and negative affective stimuli. Our results confirmed the profile of impaired explicit recognition and intact psychophysiological responses in the patient. In addition, she was able to implicitly recognize the valence and intensity of arousal of these stimuli. We suggest that implicit emotional awareness may mediates explicit and psychophysiological recognition in PCA.

  9. Macular sensitivity and fixation patterns in patients with autosomal dominant optic atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rönnbäck, Cecilia; Larsen, Michael

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The objective of this study was to test macular sensitivity, fixation stability and fixation location using microperimetry in patients with autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) and mutation-free relatives. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study of 43 patients with...... exon 28 (2826 delT) mutation in OPA1 (age 11.7-71.5 years, best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) 20/24-20/13). The patients and 49 mutation-free first-degree relatives (BCVA 20/25-20/10) underwent ophthalmic examination including macular microperimetry out to 12° eccentricity with registration of...

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of juvenile-type distal and segmental muscular atrophy of upper extremities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juvenile-type distal and segmental muscular atrophy of the upper extremities is a disorder characterized by juvenile onset, muscular atrophy localized in the hand and forearm, lack of definite sensory disturbances and non or very slow progressive course. A magnetic resonance imaging study was made of 19 patients with this disease. The subjects were all males. The age at onset ranged from 12 to 24 years, and the age at the time of study ranged from 17 to 45 years. A superconducting MRI unit operating at 0.5 tesla was employed. Spin-echo images (TR 1000 ms, TE 40 ms) showed a flattening and ventral shifting of the cord at C5 - C7 in the ventroflexed head position in 18 out of 19 cases. Cord atrophy was asymmetrical with dominance on the same side of muscular atrophy. In the prone flexed position, spin-echo images (TR 2000 ms, TE 80 ms) showed narrowing and anterior shift of the dural sac at C5 - C7 and a high signal intensity lesion in the posterior epidural space at C4 - C7 level in 15 out of 19 cases. With the inversion recovery images (TR 2000 ms, TI 500 ms) the intensity of the lesion in the posterior epidural space was much weaker than that of fatty tissue. Dynamic CT was carried out and the analysis of time-density curves showed that the lesion had venous compartment. The lesions of increased signal intensity were considered to represent congestion of the internal vertebral venous plexus. These findings suggest that the spinal cord is stretched with the fulculm at the fifth and sixth cervical vertebra when the neck is ventroflexed, producing traction, compression and circulatory cord damage. Moreover, compression of the spinal cord may arise due to an extreme narrowing of the dural sac. The most probable cause of the circulatory disorder is ischemia in the anterior spinal artery and the intraspinal arterioles due to compression of the spinal cord. (J.P.N.)

  11. Epithelial cell proliferation and glandular atrophy in lymphocytic gastritis: Effect of H pylori treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Johanna M. Makinen; Seppo Niemela; Tuomo Kerola; Juhani Lehtola; Tuomo J. Karttunen

    2003-01-01

    AIM: Lymphocytic gastritis is commonly ass ociated with Helicobacter pylori infection. The presence of glandular atrophy and foveolar hyperplasia in lymphocytic gastritis suggests abnormalities in cell proliferation and differentiation,forming a potential link with the suspected association with gastric cancer. Our aim was to compare epithelial cell proliferation and morphology in H pylori associated lymphocytic gastritis and H pylori gastritis without features of lymphocytic gastritis,and to evaluate the effect of H pylori treatment.METHODS: We studied 14 lymphocytic gastritis patients with H pylori infection. For controls, we selected 14 matched dyspeptic patients participating in another treatment trial whose H pylori infection had successfully been eradicated.Both groups were treated with a triple therapy and followed up with biopsies for 6-18 months (patients) or 3 months (controls). Blinded evaluation for histopathological features was carried out. To determine the cell proliferation index,the sections were labeled with Ki-67 antibody.RESULTS: Before treatment, lymphocytic gastritis was characterized by foveolar hyperplasia (P=0.001) and glandular atrophy in the body (P=0.008), and increased proliferation in both the body (P=0.001) and antrum (P=0.002). Proliferation correlated with foveolar hyperplasia and inflammation activity. After eradication therapy, the number of intraepithelial lymphocytes decreased in the body (P=0.004)and antrum (P=0.065), remaining higher than in controls (P<0.001). Simultaneously, the proliferation index decreased in the body from 0.38 to 0.15 (P=0.043), and in the antrum from 0.34 to 0.20 (P=0.069), the antral index still being higher in lymphocytic gastritis than in controls (P=0.010).Foveolar hyperplasia and glandular atrophy in the body improved (P=0.021), reaching the non-LG level.CONCLUSION: In lymphocytic gastritis, excessive epithelial cell proliferation is predominantly present in the body, where it associates with

  12. Perivascular Stem Cells Diminish Muscle Atrophy and Retain Viability in a Rotator Cuff Tear Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliasberg, Claire; Jensen, Andrew; Dar, Ayelet; Kowalski, Tomasz J.; Murray, Iain; Khan, Adam Z.; Natsuhara, Kyle; Garagozlo, Cameron; McAllister, David R.; Petrigliano, Frank A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Rotator cuff tears (RCTs) are a common cause of shoulder pain and often necessitate surgical repair. Muscle changes including atrophy, fibrosis, and fatty degeneration can develop after RCTs, which may compromise surgical repair and clinical outcomes. Lipoaspirate-derived human perivascular stem cells (PSCs) have demonstrated myogenic and angiogenic potential in other small animal models of muscle injury. We hypothesized that the administration of PSCs following massive RCTs may help to diminish these muscle changes in a small animal model. Methods: A total of 90 immunodeficient mice were used (15 groups, N=6). Each was assigned to one of three surgical groups: i) sham, ii) supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendon transection (TT), or iii) TT and suprascapular nerve denervation (TT+DN). PSCs were harvested from human lipoaspirate and sorted using fluorescence-activated cell sorting into small blood vessel residing pericytes (CD146+ CD34- CD45- CD31-) and large blood perivascular adventitial cells (CD146- CD34+ CD45- CD31-). Mice received either a) no injection, b) saline injection, c) pericyte injection, or d) adventitial cell injection at the time of the index procedure or at two weeks following index surgery. The supraspinatus muscles were harvested six weeks after the index procedure. Muscle atrophy was assessed by measuring percent wet muscle weight change for each sample. Muscle fiber cross-sectional area (CSA), fibrosis, and fatty degeneration were analyzed using Image J™. Additionally, pericytes and adventitial cells were transduced with a luciferase-containing construct. Animals were given injections of luciferin and imaged using IVIS to track in vivo bioluminescence following injections to assess cell viability. Results: Treatment with PSC injection after TT resulted in less wet weight loss and greater muscle fiber CSA than control groups (PBioluminescence imaging demonstrated viability of the injected cells at three weeks following injections

  13. Life-threatening Anemia with Hemolysis, Thrombocytopenia and Brain Atrophy due to Vitamin B12 Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru Yilmaz Keskin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Megaloblastic anemia due to vitamin B12 deficiency is rare in infancy. It usually occurs in exclusively breast-fed infants born to vitamin B12-deficient mothers. We report a one-year-old female infant with initial diagnosis of leukemia who was found severely vitamin B12-deficient secondary to maternal deficiency. She had marked neurodevelopmental retardation, and presented with life-threatening anemia, findings of hemolysis, thrombocytopenia and cerebral atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging. [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(4.000: 900-904

  14. [Subcutaneous atrophy following steroid injection in the treatment of trigger finger].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Peter Birk; Tjørnild, Michael Kjelager

    2014-11-10

    Trigger finger (TF), also known as stenosing tenosynovitis, is a rather common condition that causes entrapment of the flexor tendon at the site of the annular pulley. The accepted first-line treatment for TF is injection of long-acting corticosteroid in the involved flexor tendon sheath. This treatment is characterized by a high success rate and a low level of reported adverse effects in the literature. We report a case of subcutaneous atrophy after steroid injection in the treatment of TF. PMID:25394923

  15. Braille alexia during visual hallucination in a blind man with selective calcarine atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Kengo; Yasuda, Hitoshi; Haneda, Masakazu; Kashiwagi, Atsunori

    2003-04-01

    The case of a 56-year-old man who has been blind for 25 years due to retinal degeneration is herein described. The patient complained of elementary visual hallucination, during which it was difficult for him to read Braille. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed marked atrophy of the bilateral striate cortex. Visual hallucination as a release phenomenon of the primary visual cortex has never been reported to cause alexia for Braille. The present case supports the results of recent functional imaging studies of the recruitment of striate and prestriate cortex for Braille reading.

  16. White matter changes contribute to corpus callosum atrophy in the elderly: The LADIS study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, C.; Rostrup, E.; Sjöstrand, Karl;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The corpus callosum (CC) is the most important structure involved in the transmission of interhemispheric information. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential correlation between regional age-related white matter changes (ARWMC) and atrophy of CC in elderly...... subjects.MATERIALS AND METHODS: In 578 subjects with ARWMC from the Leukoaraiosis And DISability (LADIS) study, the cross-sectional area of the CC was automatically segmented on the normalized midsagittal MR imaging section and subdivided into 5 regions The ARWMC volumes were measured quantitatively...

  17. Preventing Alzheimer’s disease-related gray matter atrophy by B-vitamin treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Douaud, Gwenaëlle; Refsum, Helga; de Jager, Celeste A.; Jacoby, Robin; E. Nichols, Thomas; Smith, Stephen M.; Smith, A. David

    2013-01-01

    Is it possible to prevent atrophy of key brain regions related to cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease (AD)? One approach is to modify nongenetic risk factors, for instance by lowering elevated plasma homocysteine using B vitamins. In an initial, randomized controlled study on elderly subjects with increased dementia risk (mild cognitive impairment according to 2004 Petersen criteria), we showed that high-dose B-vitamin treatment (folic acid 0.8 mg, vitamin B6 20 mg, vitamin B12 0.5 mg) ...

  18. Repurposing an orally available drug for the treatment of geographic atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Chulbul M.; Biswal, Manas R; Li, Hong; Han, Pingyang; Ildefonso, Cristhian J; Lewin, Alfred S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Chronic oxidative stress and subacute inflammation have been implicated as causes of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In this study, we tested whether an orally available 5-OH-tryptamine (5HT) 1a receptor agonist, xaliproden, could protect against retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cell damage in culture and in a mouse model of geographic atrophy. Methods Paraquat was used to create mitochondrial oxidative stress in ARPE-19 cells, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) was used to s...

  19. Hyperpigmentation and atrophy in folds as cutaneous manifestation in a case of mitochondrial myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campuzano-García, Andrés Eduardo; Rodríguez-Arámbula, Adriana; Torres-Alvarez, Bertha; Castanedo-Cázares, Juan Pablo

    2015-05-01

    Mitochondrial myopathies are inborn metabolism defect diseases manifested by symptoms reflecting failure of the final step in the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Clinical expression of these conditions can vary widely, but typically includes organ systems with a high energy demand, such as striated muscle, myocardium, and nervous and liver tissues. In contrast, cutaneous manifestations are rare and are non-specific, most commonly presenting as pigmentation disorders. In this case report, we present a case of Alpers syndrome accompanied by hyperpigmentation and atrophy in skin folds. PMID:26295861

  20. Consistent multi-time-point brain atrophy estimation from the boundary shift integral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Kelvin K; Ridgway, Gerard R; Ourselin, Sébastien; Fox, Nick C

    2012-02-15

    Brain atrophy measurement is increasingly important in studies of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), with particular relevance to trials of potential disease-modifying drugs. Automated registration-based methods such as the boundary shift integral (BSI) have been developed to provide more precise measures of change from a pair of serial MR scans. However, when a method treats one image of the pair (typically the baseline) as the reference to which the other is compared, this systematic asymmetry risks introducing bias into the measurement. Recent concern about potential biases in longitudinal studies has led to several suggestions to use symmetric image registration, though some of these methods are limited to two time-points per subject. Therapeutic trials and natural history studies increasingly involve several serial scans, it would therefore be useful to have a method that can consistently estimate brain atrophy over multiple time-points. Here, we use the log-Euclidean concept of a within-subject average to develop affine registration and differential bias correction methods suitable for any number of time-points, yielding a longitudinally consistent multi-time-point BSI technique. Baseline, 12-month and 24-month MR scans of healthy controls, subjects with mild cognitive impairment and AD patients from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative are used for testing the bias in processing scans with different amounts of atrophy. Four tests are used to assess bias in brain volume loss from BSI: (a) inverse consistency with respect to ordering of pairs of scans 12 months apart; (b) transitivity consistency over three time-points; (c) randomly ordered back-to-back scans, expected to show no consistent change over subjects; and (d) linear regression of the atrophy rates calculated from the baseline and 12-month scans and the baseline and 24-month scans, where any additive bias should be indicated by a non-zero intercept. Results

  1. An overview of chronic vaginal atrophy and options for symptom management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Nancy Fugate

    2012-12-01

    During the menopausal transition and after menopause, up to 45 percent of women will develop vaginal atrophy as a consequence of decreased levels of circulating estrogen. Symptoms include vaginal dryness, itching, soreness, bleeding, increased susceptibility to infection and pain with sexual intercourse. Treatments are often underused because of patient and clinician lack of knowledge of available treatments, embarrassment about initiating a discussion of symptoms and reluctance to initiate hormonal therapy. Methods of symptom management include self-care with over-the-counter agents and prescription treatment with various forms of localized estrogen. Clinicians should consider each woman's unique situation and health history before recommending a management strategy.

  2. Clinical significance of corpus callosum atrophy in a mixed elderly population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, C; Rostrup, E; Stegmann, M B;

    2007-01-01

    subjects with ARWMC from the Leukoaraiosis And DISability (LADIS) study, the CC was segmented on the normalised mid-sagittal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) slice and subdivided into five regions. Correlations between the CC areas and subjective memory complaints, mini mental state examination (MMSE......) score, history of depression, geriatric depression scale (GDS) score, subjective gait difficulty, history of falls, walking speed, and total score on the short physical performance battery (SPPB) were analyzed. Significant correlations between CC atrophy and MMSE, SPPB, and walking speed were identified...

  3. Very severe spinal muscular atrophy: Type 0 with Dandy-Walker variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geeta Gathwala

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disease characterized by degeneration of alpha motor neurons in the spinal cord, resulting in progressive proximal muscle weakness and paralysis. In addition to the three classical SMA types, a new form known as type 0 with intrauterine onset, profound hypotonia and a progressive and early fatal course has been described. Herein we report a case of type 0 SMA with a Dandy Walker variant anomaly, which has not hitherto been reported in the world literature.

  4. VERY SEVERE SPINAL MUSCULAR ATROPHY (TYPE 0: A REPORT OF THREE CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BARZEGAR mohammad MD

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjectiveWe describe three patients with very severe Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA presented with reduced fetal movement in utero, profound hypotonia, severe weakness and respiratory insufficiency at birth. In all infants, electrodiagnostic studies were compatible with a neurogenic pattern. In genetic studies, all cases had homozygous deletions of exons 7 and 8 of Survival Motor Neuron (SMN and exon 5 of Neuronal Apoptosis Inhibitory Protein (NAIP gene. SMA should be considered in the differential diagnosis of reduced fetal movement and respiratory insufficiency at birth.

  5. The combined effect of electrical stimulation and resistance isometric contraction on muscle atrophy in rat tibialis anterior muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Naoto; Murakami, Shinichiro; Arakawa, Takamitsu; Miki, Akinori; Fujino, Hidemi

    2011-05-01

    Electrical stimulation has been used to prevent muscle atrophy, but this method is different in many previous studies, appropriate stimulation protocol is still not decided. Although resistance exercise has also been shown to be an effective countermeasure on muscle atrophy, almost previous studies carried out an electrical stimulation without resistance. It was hypothesized that electrical stimulation without resistance is insufficient to contract skeletal muscle forcefully, and the combination of electrical stimulation and forceful resistance contraction is more effective than electrical stimulation without resistance to attenuate muscle atrophy. This study investigated the combined effects of electrical stimulation and resistance isometric contraction on muscle atrophy in the rat tibialis anterior muscle. The animals were divided into control, hindlimb unloading (HU), hindlimb unloading plus electrical stimulation (ES), and hindlimb unloading plus the combination of electrical stimulation and resistance isometric contraction (ES+IC). Electrical stimulation was applied to the tibialis anterior muscle percutaneously for total 240 sec per day. In the ES+IC group, the ankle joint was fixed to produce resistance isometric contraction during electrical stimulation. After 7 days, the cross-sectional areas of each muscle fiber type in the HU group decreased. Those were prevented in the ES+IC group rather than the ES group. The expression of heat shock protein 72 was enhanced in the ES and ES+IC groups. These results indicated that although electrical stimulation is effective to prevent muscle atrophy, the combination of electrical stimulation and isometric contraction have further effect. PMID:21619551

  6. Soy Glycinin Contains a Functional Inhibitory Sequence against Muscle-Atrophy-Associated Ubiquitin Ligase Cbl-b

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoki Abe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Unloading stress induces skeletal muscle atrophy. We have reported that Cbl-b ubiquitin ligase is a master regulator of unloading-associated muscle atrophy. The present study was designed to elucidate whether dietary soy glycinin protein prevents denervation-mediated muscle atrophy, based on the presence of inhibitory peptides against Cbl-b ubiquitin ligase in soy glycinin protein. Methods. Mice were fed either 20% casein diet, 20% soy protein isolate diet, 10% glycinin diet containing 10% casein, or 20% glycinin diet. One week later, the right sciatic nerve was cut. The wet weight, cross sectional area (CSA, IGF-1 signaling, and atrogene expression in hindlimb muscles were examined at 1, 3, 3.5, or 4 days after denervation. Results. 20% soy glycinin diet significantly prevented denervation-induced decreases in muscle wet weight and myofiber CSA. Furthermore, dietary soy protein inhibited denervation-induced ubiquitination and degradation of IRS-1 in tibialis anterior muscle. Dietary soy glycinin partially suppressed the denervation-mediated expression of atrogenes, such as MAFbx/atrogin-1 and MuRF-1, through the protection of IGF-1 signaling estimated by phosphorylation of Akt-1. Conclusions. Soy glycinin contains a functional inhibitory sequence against muscle-atrophy-associated ubiquitin ligase Cbl-b. Dietary soy glycinin protein significantly prevented muscle atrophy after denervation in mice.

  7. Advanced brain aging: relationship with epidemiologic and genetic risk factors, and overlap with Alzheimer disease atrophy patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habes, M; Janowitz, D; Erus, G; Toledo, J B; Resnick, S M; Doshi, J; Van der Auwera, S; Wittfeld, K; Hegenscheid, K; Hosten, N; Biffar, R; Homuth, G; Völzke, H; Grabe, H J; Hoffmann, W; Davatzikos, C

    2016-01-01

    We systematically compared structural imaging patterns of advanced brain aging (ABA) in the general-population, herein defined as significant deviation from typical BA to those found in Alzheimer disease (AD). The hypothesis that ABA would show different patterns of structural change compared with those found in AD was tested via advanced pattern analysis methods. In particular, magnetic resonance images of 2705 participants from the Study of Health in Pomerania (aged 20-90 years) were analyzed using an index that captures aging atrophy patterns (Spatial Pattern of Atrophy for Recognition of BA (SPARE-BA)), and an index previously shown to capture atrophy patterns found in clinical AD (Spatial Patterns of Abnormality for Recognition of Early Alzheimer's Disease (SPARE-AD)). We studied the association between these indices and risk factors, including an AD polygenic risk score. Finally, we compared the ABA-associated atrophy with typical AD-like patterns. We observed that SPARE-BA had significant association with: smoking (Ppatterns of atrophy were partially overlapping with, but notably deviating from those typically found in AD. Subjects with ABA had higher SPARE-AD values; largely due to the partial spatial overlap of associated patterns in temporal regions. The AD polygenic risk score was significantly associated with SPARE-AD but not with SPARE-BA. Our findings suggest that ABA is likely characterized by pathophysiologic mechanisms that are distinct from, or only partially overlapping with those of AD. PMID:27045845

  8. Steroid atrophy scarring treated with fat grafting in a patient with complex regional pain syndrome: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Leah R; Collawn, Sherry S

    2016-06-01

    Subcutaneous atrophy is a known complication of steroid injections. Excellent results with fat grafting for the treatment of steroid atrophy have been documented. However, the benefit of treating steroid-induced subcutaneous atrophy in an extremity diagnosed with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) has not been described. CRPS, known formerly as reflex sympathetic dystrophy or RSD, causalgia, or reflex neurovascular dystrophy, is a severe, progressive musculoskeletal pain syndrome characterized by pain which is disproportionate to the severity of the inciting event, edema, or skin changes. Common treatment modalities include pharmacotherapy, physical therapy, and nerve blocks-each therapy producing varying results. We present a literature review of CRPS and the case of a 15-year-old female who developed CRPS of the left lower leg after arthroscopic debridement with retrograde drilling of an osteochondral lesion. Steroid atrophy of the involved area following a saphenous nerve block complicated the patient's treatment course. The area of atrophy was treated with autologous fat grafting. Following the adipose injection procedure, the patient experienced almost complete resolution of her CPRS-associated pain symptoms, along with improved cosmetic appearance of the area. PMID:26735938

  9. Neuroimaging of hippocampal atrophy in early recognition of Alzheimer's disease--a critical appraisal after two decades of research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Johannes; Pantel, Johannes

    2016-01-30

    As a characteristic feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD) hippocampal atrophy (HA) can be demonstrated in the majority of patients by using neuroimaging techniques in particular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Hippocampal atrophy is associated with declarative memory deficits and can also be associated with changes of adjacent medial temporal substructures such as the parahippocampal gyrus or the the entorhinal cortex. Similar findings are present in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) albeit to a lesser extent. While these finding facilitate the diagnostic process in patients with clinical suspicious AD, the metric properties of hippocampal atrophy for delineating healthy aging from MCI and mild AD still appear to be rather limited; as such it is not sufficient to establish the diagnosis of AD (and even more so of MCI). This limitation partly refers to methodological issues and partly to the fact that hippocampal tissue integrity is subject to various pathogenetic influences other than AD. Moreover,the effects of hippocampal atrophy on the behavioral level (e.g. cognitive deficits) are modulated by the individual's cognitive reserve. From a clinical standpoint these observations are in line with the hypothesis that the onset and course of AD is influenced by a number of peristatic factors which are partly conceptualized in the concepts of brain and/or cognitive reserve. These complex interactions have to be considered when using the presence of hippocampal atrophy in the routine diagnostic procedure of AD.

  10. Objectively measured physical activity, brain atrophy, and white matter lesions in older adults with mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Takehiko; Makizako, Hyuma; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Tsutsumimoto, Kota; Hotta, Ryo; Nakakubo, Sho; Park, Hyuntae; Suzuki, Takao

    2015-02-01

    Physical activity may help to prevent or delay brain atrophy. Numerous studies have shown associations between physical activity and age-related changes in the brain. However, most of these studies involved self-reported physical activity, not objectively measured physical activity. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the association between objectively measured physical activity, as determined using accelerometers, and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures in older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We analyzed 323 older subjects with MCI (mean age 71.4 years) who were recruited from the participants of the Obu Study of Health Promotion for the Elderly. We recorded demographic data and measured physical activity using a tri-axial accelerometer. Physical activity was classified as light-intensity physical activity (LPA) or moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Brain atrophy and the severity of white matter lesions (WML) were determined by MRI. Low levels of LPA and MVPA were associated with severe WML. Subjects with severe WML were older, had lower mobility, and had greater brain atrophy than subjects with mild WML (all Pbrain atrophy, even after adjustment for WML (β=-0.126, P=0.015), but LPA was not (β=-0.102, P=0.136). Our study revealed that objectively measured physical activity, especially MVPA, was associated with brain atrophy in MCI subjects, even after adjusting for WML. These findings support the hypothesis that physical activity plays a crucial role in maintaining brain health.

  11. Insulinlike growth factor (IGF)-1 administration ameliorates disease manifestations in a mouse model of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Carlo; Bott, Laura C; Chen, Ke-lian; Harmison, George G; Katsuno, Masahisa; Sobue, Gen; Pennuto, Maria; Fischbeck, Kenneth H

    2012-12-06

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy is an X-linked motor neuron disease caused by polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor. Patients develop slowly progressive proximal muscle weakness, muscle atrophy and fasciculations. Affected individuals often show gynecomastia, testicular atrophy and reduced fertility as a result of mild androgen insensitivity. No effective disease-modifying therapy is currently available for this disease. Our recent studies have demonstrated that insulinlike growth factor (IGF)-1 reduces the mutant androgen receptor toxicity through activation of Akt in vitro, and spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy transgenic mice that also overexpress a noncirculating muscle isoform of IGF-1 have a less severe phenotype. Here we sought to establish the efficacy of daily intraperitoneal injections of mecasermin rinfabate, recombinant human IGF-1 and IGF-1 binding protein 3, in a transgenic mouse model expressing the mutant androgen receptor with an expanded 97 glutamine tract. The study was done in a controlled, randomized, blinded fashion, and, to reflect the clinical settings, the injections were started after the onset of disease manifestations. The treatment resulted in increased Akt phosphorylation and reduced mutant androgen receptor aggregation in muscle. In comparison to vehicle-treated controls, IGF-1-treated transgenic mice showed improved motor performance, attenuated weight loss and increased survival. Our results suggest that peripheral tissue can be targeted to improve the spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy phenotype and indicate that IGF-1 warrants further investigation in clinical trials as a potential treatment for this disease.

  12. Olivopontocerebellar atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease Speech and physical therapy Techniques to prevent choking Walking aids to help with balance and prevent ... Choking Infection from inhaling food into the lungs ( aspiration pneumonia ) Injury from falls Nutrition problems due to ...

  13. Vaginal Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cuidadores Hormones and Health Journey Through the Endocrine System Endocrine Glands and Types of Hormones Brainy Hormones What ... Health Hormones and Health Journey Through the Endocrine System Endocrine Glands and Types of Hormones Brainy Hormones What ...

  14. Evoked Potentials and Memory/Cognition Tests Validate Brain Atrophy as Measured by 3T MRI (NeuroQuant in Cognitively Impaired Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric R Braverman

    Full Text Available To our knowledge, this is the largest study evaluating relationships between 3T Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and P300 and memory/cognitive tests in the literature. The 3T MRI using NeuroQuant has an increased resolution 15 times that of 1.5T MRI. Utilizing NeuroQuant 3T MRI as a diagnostic tool in primary care, subjects (N=169; 19-90 years displayed increased areas of anatomical atrophy: 34.62% hippocampal atrophy (N=54, 57.14% central atrophy (N=88, and 44.52% temporal atrophy (N=69. A majority of these patients exhibited overlap in measured areas of atrophy and were cognitively impaired. These results positively correlated with decreased P300 values and WMS-III (WMS-III scores differentially across various brain loci. Delayed latency (p=0.0740 was marginally associated with temporal atrophy; reduced fractional anisotropy (FA in frontal lobes correlated with aging, delayed P300 latency, and decreased visual and working memory (p=0.0115. Aging and delayed P300 latency correlated with lower FA. The correlation between working memory and reduced FA in frontal lobes is marginally significant (p=0.0787. In the centrum semiovale (CS, reduced FA correlated with visual memory (p=0.0622. Lower demyelination correlated with higher P300 amplitude (p=0.0002. Compared to males, females have higher demyelination (p=0.0064. Along these lines, the higher the P300 amplitude, the lower the bilateral atrophy (p=0.0165. Hippocampal atrophy correlated with increased auditory memory and gender, especially in males (p=0.0087. In considering temporal lobe atrophy correlations: delayed P300 latency and high temporal atrophy (p=0.0740; high auditory memory and low temporal atrophy (p=0.0417; and high working memory and low temporal atrophy (p=0.0166. Central atrophy correlated with aging and immediate memory (p=0.0294: the higher the immediate memory, the lower the central atrophy. Generally, the validation of brain atrophy by P300 and WMS-III could lead to cost

  15. A refined technique for sciatic denervation in a golden-mantled ground squirrel (Callospermophilus lateralis) model of disuse atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarukhanov, Valeri; Van Andel, Roger; Treat, Michael D; Utz, Jenifer C; van Breukelen, Frank

    2014-06-01

    Disuse atrophy of both muscle and bone can occur rapidly during periods of inactivity. In several rodent models developed for the study of disuse atrophy, immobilization is induced by prolonged cage restraint, hind limb unloading, tenotomy, sciatic nerve block or sciatic denervation. In less tractable species such as wild-caught hibernating rodents, the sciatic denervation model is superior in terms of both animal welfare and applicability to the characteristics of natural cases of disuse atrophy. The authors describe a refined surgical approach to sciatic denervation in golden-mantled ground squirrels (Callospermophilus lateralis), a hibernating species, that improves animal welfare and reduces the incidence of post-operative complications such as autotomy. PMID:24845006

  16. The progression of bone and muscle atrophy in mice hind limb with immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minematsu, Akira; Imagita, Hidetaka; Kanemura, Naohiko; Yoshimura, Osamu

    2006-09-01

    This study investigated the time course of changes of bone and muscle atrophy in mice with immobilization by denervation and fixation. The animals were fifty-two male C57 BL/6J mice, aged 10 weeks old. Eight mice were used as the base line, and the remaining ones were cut at the sciatic nerve of the left hind limb and fixed with a plaster cast. At week 1, 2, 3, and 4 after the operation, a cross-sectional area of the rectus femoris muscles and bone mechanical strength with a three-point bending test of the femur and tibia were measured. The time course of changes of the bone mechanical strength and of the cross-sectional area of the rectus femoris muscles between the intact and experimental limbs in each period compared with the control limbs, was determined. The bone mechanical strength of the femur, tibia, and the cross-sectional area of the rectus femoris muscles of the experimental limbs significantly decreased compared with those of the intact limbs at week 4, 3, 2 and 1 after the operation (pimmobilization by denervation and fixation, and that both types of atrophy progressed simultaneously in the present study. PMID:16995493

  17. Cerebrolysin reverses hippocampal neural atrophy in a mice model of diabetes mellitus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Vega, Lizzette; Juárez, Ismael; Gomez-Villalobos, Maria De Jesus; Flores, Gonzalo

    2015-06-01

    The animal model of streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus type 1 (DM1) is used to study neuronal and behavioral changes produced by an increase in blood-glucose levels. Our previous report showed that chronic streptozotocin administration induced atrophy of dendritic morphology of pyramidal neurons of the CA1 dorsal hippocampus. In addition, we showed that Cerebrolysin (Cbl), a neurotrophic peptide mixture, reduces the dendritic atrophy in animal models of aging. This study aimed to determine whether Cbl was capable of reducing behavioral and neuronal alterations, after 6 weeks of hyperglycemia in mice (streptozotocin-induced DM1). The levels of glucose in the blood were evaluated before and after streptozotocin administration and only animals with more than 240 mg/dL of blood-levels of glucose were used. After streptozotocin treatment, the mice received 6 weeks of Cbl, locomotor activity was measured and dendritic morphological changes were evaluated using Golgi-Cox stain procedure, and analyzed by the Sholl method. In mice treated with streptozotocin there was a clear reduction in the dendritic length of pyramidal neurons of the CA1 and granular cells of the dental gyrus of the dorsal hippocampus. Interestingly, Cbl reversed the morphological changes induced by streptozotocin. Our results extend the list of abnormal morphological changes detected in this model of DM, and support the possibility that Cbl may have beneficial effects in the management of brain alterations induced by DM. PMID:25851531

  18. Retinal dysplasia and progressive atrophy in dogs irradiated during ocular development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beagle dogs were given a single, whole-body gamma-radiation exposure at various stages during ocular development and were evaluated for the presence of ocular lesions. Dogs were exposed during middle or late pregnancy at 28 or 55 days postcoitus (dpc) or as neonates at 2 days postpartum (dpp). Mean whole-body and ocular doses ranged from 1.0 to 3.8 Gy. Dogs were sacrificed and ocular lesions were evaluated at 70 days, 2 years, or 4 years of age. Retinal dysplasias and atrophy were the most striking lesions related to radiation exposure. These lesions were bilateral and focal to diffuse in nature, and they increased in severity with increasing radiation dose. The stage of development at irradiation had a marked effect on the distribution of retinal lesions, with the most severe changes being present in that portion of the retina undergoing differentiation at the time of the insult. In dogs sacrificed at 70 days of age the lesions were primarily dysplasias consisting of ectopic nuclear aggregates in the photoreceptor layer, retinal folds, and retinal rosettes. With increasing age (up to 4 years), there appeared to be progression of the extent of the clinically evident lesions, and there was a change in the nature of the lesions from dysplasia to atrophy. This was accompanied by marked attenuation of the retinal vasculature

  19. Neonatal hypoxia, hippocampal atrophy, and memory impairment: evidence of a causal sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Janine M; Gadian, David G; Jentschke, Sebastian; Goldman, Allan; Munoz, Monica; Pitts, Georgia; Banks, Tina; Chong, W Kling; Hoskote, Aparna; Deanfield, John; Baldeweg, Torsten; de Haan, Michelle; Mishkin, Mortimer; Vargha-Khadem, Faraneh

    2015-06-01

    Neonates treated for acute respiratory failure experience episodes of hypoxia. The hippocampus, a structure essential for memory, is particularly vulnerable to such insults. Hence, some neonates undergoing treatment for acute respiratory failure might sustain bilateral hippocampal pathology early in life and memory problems later in childhood. We investigated this possibility in a cohort of 40 children who had been treated neonatally for acute respiratory failure but were free of overt neurological impairment. The cohort had mean hippocampal volumes (HVs) significantly below normal control values, memory scores significantly below the standard population means, and memory quotients significantly below those predicted by their full scale IQs. Brain white matter volume also fell below the volume of the controls, but brain gray matter volumes and scores on nonmnemonic neuropsychological tests were within the normal range. Stepwise linear regression models revealed that the cohort's HVs were predictive of degree of memory impairment, and gestational age at treatment was predictive of HVs: the younger the age, the greater the atrophy. We conclude that many neonates treated for acute respiratory failure sustain significant hippocampal atrophy as a result of the associated hypoxia and, consequently, show deficient memory later in life. PMID:24343890

  20. Ipsilateral mamillary body atrophy after infarction of the posterior cerebral artery territory: MR imaging

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    Uchino, Akira; Sawada, Akihiro; Takase, Yukinori; Nomiyama, Keita; Egashira, Ryoko; Kudo, Sho [Saga Medical School, Department of Radiology, Saga (Japan)

    2005-11-01

    We describe herein magnetic resonance (MR) features of ipsilateral mamillary body atrophy after infarction of the posterior cerebral artery (PCA) territory. During the period May 2000 through July 2004, 13 patients with infarction of the PCA territory underwent cranial MR imaging in the chronic stage. Two 1.5-T scanners were used to obtain axial T1- and T2-weighted images with conventional spin-echo and fast spin-echo pulse sequences, respectively. The slice thickness was 6 mm, with a 2-mm interslice gap. Five of the 13 patients with PCA territory infarction had ipsilateral mamillary body atrophy. However, this asymmetry of the mamillary bodies was unclear in two of the five patients because of the thickness of the axial image slices. All five patients had a temporo-parieto-occipital infarction. The remaining eight patients had a parieto-occipital or an occipital infarction. Unilateral transneuronal mamillary body degeneration after infarction of the ipsilateral PCA territory including the posteromedial temporal lobe can be detected on conventional thick axial MR images. (orig.)

  1. Effect of age at onset on cortical thickness and cognition in posterior cortical atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-González, Aida; Lehmann, Manja; Shakespeare, Timothy J; Yong, Keir X X; Paterson, Ross W; Slattery, Catherine F; Foulkes, Alexander J M; Rabinovici, Gil D; Gil-Néciga, Eulogio; Roldán-Lora, Florinda; Schott, Jonathan M; Fox, Nick C; Crutch, Sebastian J

    2016-08-01

    Age at onset (AAO) has been shown to influence the phenotype of Alzheimer's disease (AD), but how it affects atypical presentations of AD remains unknown. Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is the most common form of atypical AD. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect of AAO on cortical thickness and cognitive function in 98 PCA patients. We used Freesurfer (v5.3.0) to compare cortical thickness with AAO both as a continuous variable, and by dichotomizing the groups based on median age (58 years). In both the continuous and dichotomized analyses, we found a pattern suggestive of thinner cortex in precuneus and parietal areas in earlier-onset PCA, and lower cortical thickness in anterior cingulate and prefrontal cortex in later-onset PCA. These cortical thickness differences between PCA subgroups were consistent with earlier-onset PCA patients performing worse on cognitive tests involving parietal functions. Our results provide a suggestion that AAO may not only affect the clinico-anatomical characteristics in AD but may also affect atrophy patterns and cognition within atypical AD phenotypes. PMID:27318138

  2. Multiple sclerosis risk loci correlate with cervical cord atrophy and may explain the course of disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkad, Denis A; Bellenberg, Barbara; Esser, Sarika; Weiler, Florian; Epplen, Jörg T; Gold, Ralf; Lukas, Carsten; Haghikia, Aiden

    2015-07-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) underscore the genetic basis of multiple sclerosis (MS); however, only few of the newly reported genetic variations relevant in MS have been replicated or correlated for clinical/paraclinical phenotypes such as spinal cord atrophy in independent patient cohorts. We genotyped 141 MS patients for 58 variations reported to reach significance in GWAS. Expanded disability status scale (EDSS) and disease duration (DD) are available from regular clinical examinations. MRI included sagittal high-resolution 3D T1-weighted magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient echo of the cervical cord region used for volumetry. Due dependency of mean upper cervical cord area (MUCCA) with EDSS and/or DD, correction operations were performed compensating for EDSS/DD. We assessed each MS risk locus for possible MUCCA association. We identified twelve risk loci that significantly correlated with MUCCA. For nine loci-BATF, CYP27B1, IL12B, NFKB1, IL7, PLEK, EVI5, TAGAP and nrs669607-patients revealed significantly higher degree of atrophy; TYK2, RGS1 and CLEC16A revealed inverse effects. The weighted genetic risk score over the twelve loci showed significant correlation with MUCCA. Our data reveal a risk gene depending paraclinical/clinical phenotype. Since MUCCA clearly correlates with disability, the candidates identified here may serve as prognostic markers for disability progression. PMID:25620546

  3. Cortical complexity as a measure of age-related brain atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, Christopher R; Kensinger, Elizabeth A

    2016-07-01

    The structure of the human brain changes in a variety of ways as we age. While a sizeable literature has examined age-related differences in cortical thickness, and to a lesser degree, gyrification, here we examined differences in cortical complexity, as indexed by fractal dimensionality in a sample of over 400 individuals across the adult lifespan. While prior studies have shown differences in fractal dimensionality between patient populations and age-matched, healthy controls, it is unclear how well this measure would relate to age-related cortical atrophy. Initially computing a single measure for the entire cortical ribbon, i.e., unparcellated gray matter, we found fractal dimensionality to be more sensitive to age-related differences than either cortical thickness or gyrification index. We additionally observed regional differences in age-related atrophy between the three measures, suggesting that they may index distinct differences in cortical structure. We also provide a freely available MATLAB toolbox for calculating fractal dimensionality. PMID:27103141

  4. Peripheral androgen receptor gene suppression rescues disease in mouse models of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Andrew P; Yu, Zhigang; Murray, Sue; Peralta, Raechel; Low, Audrey; Guo, Shuling; Yu, Xing Xian; Cortes, Constanza J; Bennett, C Frank; Monia, Brett P; La Spada, Albert R; Hung, Gene

    2014-05-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is caused by the polyglutamine androgen receptor (polyQ-AR), a protein expressed by both lower motor neurons and skeletal muscle. Although viewed as a motor neuronopathy, data from patients and mouse models suggest that muscle contributes to disease pathogenesis. Here, we tested this hypothesis using AR113Q knockin and human bacterial artificial chromosome/clone (BAC) transgenic mice that express the full-length polyQ-AR and display androgen-dependent weakness, muscle atrophy, and early death. We developed antisense oligonucleotides that suppressed AR gene expression in the periphery but not the CNS after subcutaneous administration. Suppression of polyQ-AR in the periphery rescued deficits in muscle weight, fiber size, and grip strength, reversed changes in muscle gene expression, and extended the lifespan of mutant males. We conclude that polyQ-AR expression in the periphery is an important contributor to pathology in SBMA mice and that peripheral administration of therapeutics should be explored for SBMA patients.

  5. Silencing neuronal mutant androgen receptor in a mouse model of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahashi, Kentaro; Katsuno, Masahisa; Hung, Gene; Adachi, Hiroaki; Kondo, Naohide; Nakatsuji, Hideaki; Tohnai, Genki; Iida, Madoka; Bennett, C Frank; Sobue, Gen

    2015-11-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), an adult-onset neurodegenerative disease that affects males, results from a CAG triplet repeat/polyglutamine expansions in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. Patients develop progressive muscular weakness and atrophy, and no effective therapy is currently available. The tissue-specific pathogenesis, especially relative pathological contributions between degenerative motor neurons and muscles, remains inconclusive. Though peripheral pathology in skeletal muscle caused by toxic AR protein has been recently reported to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of SBMA using mouse models, the role of motor neuron degeneration in SBMA has not been rigorously investigated. Here, we exploited synthetic antisense oligonucleotides to inhibit the RNA levels of mutant AR in the central nervous system (CNS) and explore its therapeutic effects in our SBMA mouse model that harbors a mutant AR gene with 97 CAG expansions and characteristic SBMA-like neurogenic phenotypes. A single intracerebroventricular administration of the antisense oligonucleotides in the presymptomatic phase efficiently suppressed the mutant gene expression in the CNS, and delayed the onset and progression of motor dysfunction, improved body weight gain and survival with the amelioration of neuronal histopathology in motor units such as spinal motor neurons, neuromuscular junctions and skeletal muscle. These findings highlight the importance of the neurotoxicity of mutant AR protein in motor neurons as a therapeutic target.

  6. Peripheral Androgen Receptor Gene Suppression Rescues Disease in Mouse Models of Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew P. Lieberman

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA is caused by the polyglutamine androgen receptor (polyQ-AR, a protein expressed by both lower motor neurons and skeletal muscle. Although viewed as a motor neuronopathy, data from patients and mouse models suggest that muscle contributes to disease pathogenesis. Here, we tested this hypothesis using AR113Q knockin and human bacterial artificial chromosome/clone (BAC transgenic mice that express the full-length polyQ-AR and display androgen-dependent weakness, muscle atrophy, and early death. We developed antisense oligonucleotides that suppressed AR gene expression in the periphery but not the CNS after subcutaneous administration. Suppression of polyQ-AR in the periphery rescued deficits in muscle weight, fiber size, and grip strength, reversed changes in muscle gene expression, and extended the lifespan of mutant males. We conclude that polyQ-AR expression in the periphery is an important contributor to pathology in SBMA mice and that peripheral administration of therapeutics should be explored for SBMA patients.

  7. What do we really know about the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in muscle atrophy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagoe, R. T.; Goldberg, A. L.

    2001-01-01

    Studies of many different rodent models of muscle wasting have indicated that accelerated proteolysis via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is the principal cause of muscle atrophy induced by fasting, cancer cachexia, metabolic acidosis, denervation, disuse, diabetes, sepsis, burns, hyperthyroidism and excess glucocorticoids. However, our understanding about how muscle proteins are degraded, and how the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is activated in muscle under these conditions, is still very limited. The identities of the important ubiquitin-protein ligases in skeletal muscle, and the ways in which they recognize substrates are still largely unknown. Recent in-vitro studies have suggested that one set of ubquitination enzymes, E2(14K) and E3(alpha), which are responsible for the 'N-end rule' system of ubiquitination, plays an important role in muscle, especially in catabolic states. However, their functional significance in degrading different muscle proteins is still unclear. This review focuses on the many gaps in our understanding of the functioning of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in muscle atrophy, and highlights the strengths and limitations of the different experimental approaches used in such studies.

  8. Neurobehavioral and Imaging Correlates of Hippocampal Atrophy in a Mouse Model of Vascular Cognitive Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuloaga, Kristen L.; Zhang, Wenri; Yeiser, Lauren A.; Stewart, Blair; Kukino, Ayaka; Nie, Xiao; Roese, Natalie E.; Grafe, Marjorie R.; Pike, Martin M.; Raber, Jacob; Alkayed, Nabil J.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) is the second most common cause of dementia. Reduced cerebral blood flow is thought to play a major role in the etiology of VCI. Therefore, chronic cerebral hypoperfusion has been used to model VCI in rodents. The goal of the current study was to determine the histopathological and neuroimaging substrates of neurocognitive impairments in a mouse model of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion induced by unilateral common carotid artery occlusion (UCCAO). Mice were subjected to sham or right UCCAO (VCI) surgeries. Three months later, neurocognitive function was evaluated using the novel object recognition task, Morris water maze, and contextual and cued fear conditioning tests. Next, cerebral perfusion was evaluated with dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using an ultra-high fieild (11.75 Tesla) animal MRI system. Finally, brain pathology was evaluated using histology and T2 weighted MRI (magnetic resonance imaging). VCI, but not sham, mice had significantly reduced cerebral blood flow in the right vs. left cerebral cortex. VCI mice showed deficits in object recognition. T2 weighted MRI of VCI brains revealed enlargement of lateral ventricles, which corresponded to areas of hippocampal atrophy upon histological analysis. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that the UCCAO model of chronic hypoperfusion induces hippocampal atrophy and ventricular enlargement, resulting in neurocognitive deficits characteristic of VCI. PMID:26040424

  9. Coenzyme Q10 Levels Are Decreased in the Cerebellum of Multiple-System Atrophy Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia V Schottlaender

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate whether the levels of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 in brain tissue of multiple system atrophy (MSA patients differ from those in elderly controls and in patients with other neurodegenerative diseases.Flash frozen brain tissue of a series of 20 pathologically confirmed MSA patients [9 olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA type, 6 striatonigral degeneration (SND type, and 5 mixed type] was used for this study. Elderly controls (n = 37 as well as idiopathic Parkinson's disease (n = 7, dementia with Lewy bodies (n = 20, corticobasal degeneration (n = 15 and cerebellar ataxia (n = 18 patients were used as comparison groups. CoQ10 was measured in cerebellar and frontal cortex tissue by high performance liquid chromatography.We detected a statistically significant decrease (by 3-5% in the level of CoQ10 in the cerebellum of MSA cases (P = 0.001, specifically in OPCA (P = 0.001 and mixed cases (P = 0.005, when compared to controls as well as to other neurodegenerative diseases [dementia with Lewy bodies (P<0.001, idiopathic Parkinson's disease (P<0.001, corticobasal degeneration (P<0.001, and cerebellar ataxia (P = 0.001].Our results suggest that a perturbation in the CoQ10 biosynthetic pathway is associated with the pathogenesis of MSA but the mechanism behind this finding remains to be elucidated.

  10. Amygdala atrophy affects emotion-related activity in face-responsive regions in frontotemporal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Winter, François-Laurent; Van den Stock, Jan; de Gelder, Beatrice; Peeters, Ronald; Jastorff, Jan; Sunaert, Stefan; Vanduffel, Wim; Vandenberghe, Rik; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu

    2016-09-01

    In the healthy brain, modulatory influences from the amygdala commonly explain enhanced activation in face-responsive areas by emotional facial expressions relative to neutral expressions. In the behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) facial emotion recognition is impaired and has been associated with atrophy of the amygdala. By combining structural and functional MRI in 19 patients with bvFTD and 20 controls we investigated the neural effects of emotion in face-responsive cortex and its relationship with amygdalar gray matter (GM) volume in neurodegeneration. Voxel-based morphometry revealed decreased GM volume in anterior medio-temporal regions including amygdala in patients compared to controls. During fMRI, we presented dynamic facial expressions (fear and chewing) and their spatiotemporally scrambled versions. We found enhanced activation for fearful compared to neutral faces in ventral temporal cortex and superior temporal sulcus in controls, but not in patients. In the bvFTD group left amygdalar GM volume correlated positively with emotion-related activity in left fusiform face area (FFA). This correlation was amygdala-specific and driven by GM in superficial and basolateral (BLA) subnuclei, consistent with reported amygdalar-cortical networks. The data suggests that anterior medio-temporal atrophy in bvFTD affects emotion processing in distant posterior areas. PMID:27389802

  11. Diagnostic Clues in Multiple System Atrophy: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Yücel

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Multiple system atrophy (MSA is an adult-onset, sporadic, progressive neurodegenerative disease. According to the consensus criteria, patients with MSA are clinically classified into cerebellar (MSA-C and parkinsonian (MSA-P subtype. Besides the poor response to levodopa, and the additional presence of pyramidal or cerebellar signs (ataxia or autonomic failure as major diagnostic criteria, certain other clinical features known as ‘‘red flags’’ or warning signs may raise the clinical suspicion of MSA. Case report: A 67-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital due to inability to walk. Neurological examination revealed severe Parkinsonism with poor response to levodopa therapy, ataxia. Brain MR imaging showed severe atrophy of the cerebellum, pons, minimal cerebrum, and revealed cross section at the pons in the axial section. Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE was normal, Median SEP within normal limits but left Tibial SEP was longer than right side (right: 41, left: 44.2. Although sympathetic skin response of upper extremities was normal, the sympathetic skin responses of lower extremities were absent. RR interval study and a graded head-up tilt test were consistent with autonomic dysfunction. We report a patient with MSA because in clinical practice a case who fullfits all criteria is really rare.

  12. Videostroboscopic and morphological aspects of voice disturbances in patients with larynx atrophy and coexisting hypopharynx cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawid Falkowski

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vocal folds play a crucial role in voice production. The physiological vibrations of vocal folds depend on the unchanged multilayered structure of the vocal folds mucosa. Morphological changes of mucosa are the cause of voice quality disorders — dysphonia. The aim of this study was to determine the morphological base of dysphonia in patients with vocal folds atrophy. A group of 24 patients with larynx atrophy confirmed by endoscopic (VLS and stroboscopic (VLSS examination of the larynx was included in the study. The morphological assessment of the larynx mucosa was carried out with the use of the transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Ultramorphological examinations revealed changes in the epithelium, basal membrane and lamina propria of the vocal folds mucosa. An increased number of collagenous fibers, fibroblasts with signs of vacuolar degeneration inflammatory cells and a decreased number of blood vessels and pericytes were observed. Morphological changes found in the epithelium, basal membrane and lamina propria of the vocal folds mucosa were the cause of disorders of vocal folds vibrations registered in the stroboscopic examination of the larynx (VLSS. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011; Vol. 49, No. 4, pp. 659–663

  13. Cerebrolysin improves memory and ameliorates neuronal atrophy in spontaneously hypertensive, aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis-Gaspar, Carlos; Vazquez-Roque, Ruben A; De Jesús Gómez-Villalobos, Ma; Flores, Gonzalo

    2016-09-01

    The spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rat has been used as an animal model of vascular dementia (VD). Our previous report showed that, SH rats exhibited dendritic atrophy of pyramidal neurons of the CA1 dorsal hippocampus and layers 3 and 5 of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) at 8 months of age. In addition, we showed that cerebrolysin (Cbl), a neurotrophic peptide mixture, reduces the dendritic atrophy in aged animal models. This study aimed to determine whether Cbl was capable of reducing behavioral and neuronal alterations, in old female SH rats. The level of diastolic and systolic pressure was measured every month for the 6 first months and only animals with more than 160 mm Hg of systolic pressure were used. Female SH rats (6 months old) received 6 months of Cbl treatment. Immediately after the Cbl treatment, two behavioral tests were applied, the Morris water maze test for memory and learning and locomotor activity in novel environments. Immediately after the last behavioral test, dendritic morphology was studied with the Golgi-Cox stain procedure followed by a Sholl analysis. Clearly, SH rats with Cbl showed an increase in the dendritic length and dendritic spine density of pyramidal neurons in the CA1 in the dorsal hippocampus and layers 3 and 5 of the PFC. Interestingly, Cbl improved memory of the old SH rats. Our results support the possibility that Cbl may have beneficial effects on the management of brain alterations in an animal model with VD. Synapse 70:378-389, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Cerebrolysin reverses hippocampal neural atrophy in a mice model of diabetes mellitus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Vega, Lizzette; Juárez, Ismael; Gomez-Villalobos, Maria De Jesus; Flores, Gonzalo

    2015-06-01

    The animal model of streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus type 1 (DM1) is used to study neuronal and behavioral changes produced by an increase in blood-glucose levels. Our previous report showed that chronic streptozotocin administration induced atrophy of dendritic morphology of pyramidal neurons of the CA1 dorsal hippocampus. In addition, we showed that Cerebrolysin (Cbl), a neurotrophic peptide mixture, reduces the dendritic atrophy in animal models of aging. This study aimed to determine whether Cbl was capable of reducing behavioral and neuronal alterations, after 6 weeks of hyperglycemia in mice (streptozotocin-induced DM1). The levels of glucose in the blood were evaluated before and after streptozotocin administration and only animals with more than 240 mg/dL of blood-levels of glucose were used. After streptozotocin treatment, the mice received 6 weeks of Cbl, locomotor activity was measured and dendritic morphological changes were evaluated using Golgi-Cox stain procedure, and analyzed by the Sholl method. In mice treated with streptozotocin there was a clear reduction in the dendritic length of pyramidal neurons of the CA1 and granular cells of the dental gyrus of the dorsal hippocampus. Interestingly, Cbl reversed the morphological changes induced by streptozotocin. Our results extend the list of abnormal morphological changes detected in this model of DM, and support the possibility that Cbl may have beneficial effects in the management of brain alterations induced by DM.

  15. Impact of vulvovaginal health on postmenopausal women: a review of surveys on symptoms of vulvovaginal atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parish SJ

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Sharon J Parish,1 Rossella E Nappi,2 Michael L Krychman,3 Susan Kellogg-Spadt,4 James A Simon,5 Jeffrey A Goldstein,6 Sheryl A Kingsberg7 1Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo University, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy; 3Southern California Center for Sexual Health and Survivorship Medicine and Clinical Faculty University of California Irvine, Newport Beach and Irvine, CA, USA; 4Pelvic and Sexual Health Institute, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 5Obstetrics and Gynecology, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA; 6Novo Nordisk Inc, Princeton, NJ, USA; 7Departments of Reproductive Biology and Psychiatry, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USA Abstract: Several recent, large-scale studies have provided valuable insights into patient perspectives on postmenopausal vulvovaginal health. Symptoms of vulvovaginal atrophy, which include dryness, irritation, itching, dysuria, and dyspareunia, can adversely affect interpersonal relationships, quality of life, and sexual function. While approximately half of postmenopausal women report these symptoms, far fewer seek treatment, often because they are uninformed about hypoestrogenic postmenopausal vulvovaginal changes and the availability of safe, effective, and well-tolerated treatments, particularly local vaginal estrogen therapy. Because women hesitate to seek help for symptoms, a proactive approach to conversations about vulvovaginal discomfort would improve diagnosis and treatment. Keywords: health care professional, hypoactive sexual desire disorder, local vaginal estrogen therapy, quality of life, urinary tract infection, vulvovaginal atrophy

  16. Ultra-low-dose vaginal estrogen tablets for the treatment of postmenopausal vaginal atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, J A; Maamari, R V

    2013-08-01

    Vaginal atrophy is a common chronic condition affecting up to 57% of postmenopausal women. The decrease in estrogen following cessation of menses can lead to bothersome symptoms that include vaginal dryness and irritation, pain and burning during urination (dysuria), urinary tract infections, and pain (dyspareunia) and bleeding during sexual activities. These symptoms can be safely and effectively managed with the use of local estrogen therapy, which reduces the risks associated with long-term systemic hormone therapy. The ultra-low-dose 10 μg estradiol vaginal tablet is the lowest approved dose available and has an annual estradiol exposure of only 1.14 mg. Its development addresses recommendations from regulatory agencies and women's health societies regarding the use of the lowest hormonal dose. The 10 μg vaginal tablet displays minimal estradiol absorption, causes no increased risk of endometrial hyperplasia or carcinoma, and provides significant symptom relief. The clinical evidence presented here may offer greater reassurance to health-care professionals and postmenopausal women that vaginal atrophy can be treated safely and effectively.

  17. Clinical study on eating disorders. Brain atrophy revealed by cranial computed tomography scans

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    Nishiwaki, Shinichi

    1988-06-01

    Cranial computed tomography (CT) scans were reviewed in 34 patients with anorexia nervosa (Group I) and 22 with bulimia (Group II) to elucidate the cause and pathological significance of morphological brain alterations. The findings were compared with those from 47 normal women. The incidence of brain atrophy was significantly higher in Group I (17/34, 50%) and Group II (11/22, 50%) than the control group (3/47, 6%). In Group I, there was a significant increase in the left septum-caudate distance, the maximum width of interhemispheric fissure, the width of the both-side Sylvian fissures adjacent to the skull, and the maximum width of the third ventricle. A significant increase in the maximum width of interhemispheric fissure and the width of the left-side Sylvian fissure adjacent to the skull were noted as well in Group II. Ventricular brain ratios were significantly higher in Groups I and II than the control group (6.76 and 7.29 vs 4.55). Brain atrophy did not correlate with age, body weight, malnutrition, eating behavior, depression, thyroid function, EEG findings, or intelligence scale. In Group I, serum cortisol levels after the administration of dexamethasone were correlated with ventricular brain ratio. (Namekawa, K) 51 refs.

  18. OPA1-related dominant optic atrophy is not strongly influenced by mitochondrial DNA background

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    Amati-Bonneau Patrizia

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON and autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA are the most frequent forms of hereditary optic neuropathies. LHON is associated with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutations whereas ADOA is mainly due to mutations in the OPA1 gene that encodes a mitochondrial protein involved in the mitochondrial inner membrane remodeling. A striking influence of mtDNA haplogroup J on LHON expression has been demonstrated and it has been recently suggested that this haplogroup could also influence ADOA expression. In this study, we have tested the influence of mtDNA backgrounds on OPA1 mutations. Methods To define the relationships between OPA1 mutations and mtDNA backgrounds, we determined the haplogroup affiliation of 41 French patients affected by OPA1-related ADOA by control-region sequencing and RFLP survey of their mtDNAs. Results The comparison between patient and reference populations did not revealed any significant difference. Conclusion Our results argue against a strong influence of mtDNA background on ADOA expression. These data allow to conclude that OPA1 could be considered as a "severe mutation", directly responsible of the optic atrophy, whereas OPA1-negative ADOA and LHON mutations need an external factor(s to express the pathology (i.e. synergistic interaction with mitochondrial background.

  19. Deformation-based atrophy computation by surface propagation and its application to Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Akshay; Sporring, Jon; Darkner, Sune; Dam, Erik B; Lillholm, Martin; Jørgensen, Dan; Oh, Joonmi; Chen, Gennan; Suhy, Joyce; Sørensen, Lauge; Nielsen, Mads

    2016-01-01

    Obtaining regional volume changes from a deformation field is more precise when using simplex counting (SC) compared with Jacobian integration (JI) due to the numerics involved in the latter. Although SC has been proposed before, numerical properties underpinning the method and a thorough evaluation of the method against JI is missing in the literature. The contributions of this paper are: (a) we propose surface propagation (SP)-a simplification to SC that significantly reduces its computational complexity; (b) we will derive the orders of approximation of SP which can also be extended to SC. In the experiments, we will begin by empirically showing that SP is indeed nearly identical to SC, and that both methods are more stable than JI in presence of moderate to large deformation noise. Since SC and SP are identical, we consider SP as a representative of both the methods for a practical evaluation against JI. In a real application on Alzheimer's disease neuroimaging initiative data, we show the following: (a) SP produces whole brain and medial temporal lobe atrophy numbers that are significantly better than JI at separating between normal controls and Alzheimer's disease patients; (b) SP produces disease group atrophy differences comparable to or better than those obtained using FreeSurfer, demonstrating the validity of the obtained clinical results. Finally, in a reproducibility study, we show that the voxel-wise application of SP yields significantly lower variance when compared to JI. PMID:27014717

  20. [Dissociated Small Hand Muscle Atrophy Occurs in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: Split Hand].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibuya, Kazumoto

    2016-05-01

    Split hand is a peculiar atrophy of hand muscle and was named by Willbourn in 1992. In this phenomenon, the hypothenar muscle is relatively preserved, but the thenar and the first dorsal interossei (FDI) muscles are preferentially involved. Some studies have measured compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitudes of intrinsic hand muscles in various neurological diseases and have revealed that this phenomenon is a specific feature of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The measurements of CMAP amplitude in intrinsic hand muscles may be useful for diagnosis of ALS. FDI and thenar muscles are innervated by the same ulnar nerve and same spinal segments (C8 and Th1), although atrophies of these muscles are dissociated. Anatomical innervations are not enough to explain this phenomenon. Motor neuronal hyperexcitability potentially contributes to motor neuron death in ALS, and in several articles, it is reported to be the possible mechanism of this phenomenon. In healthy controls and ALS patients, cortical and peripheral motor nerves, which project to the thenar and FDI muscles, may be more excitable than those of the hypothenar muscle. This article reviews the findings of previous articles about the utility of this phenomenon as a diagnostic marker, and its potential mechanisms. PMID:27156503

  1. TWEAK/Fn14 signaling axis mediates skeletal muscle atrophy and metabolic dysfunction

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    Shuichi eSato

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor (TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK through binding to its receptor fibroblast growth factor inducible 14 (Fn14 has been shown to regulate many cellular responses including proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, inflammation, and fibrosis under both physiological and pathological conditions. Emerging evidence suggests that TWEAK is also a major muscle wasting cytokine. TWEAK activates nuclear factor-kappa B signaling and proteolytic pathways such as ubiquitin proteasome system, autophagy, and caspases to induce muscle proteolysis in cultured myotubes. Fn14 is dormant or expressed in minimal amounts in normal healthy muscle. However, specific atrophic conditions, such as denervation, immobilization, and starvation stimulate the expression of Fn14 leading to activation of TWEAK/Fn14 signaling and eventually skeletal muscle atrophy. TWEAK also causes slow-to-fast type fiber transition in skeletal muscle. Furthermore, recent studies suggest that TWEAK diminishes mitochondrial content and represses skeletal muscle oxidative phosphorylation capacity. TWEAK mediates these effects through affecting the expression of a number of genes and microRNAs. In this review article, we have discussed the recent advancements towards understanding the role and mechanisms of action of TWEAK/Fn14 signaling in skeletal muscle with particular reference to different models of atrophy and oxidative metabolism.

  2. A model for hypokinesia: effects on muscle atrophy in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musacchia, X J; Deavers, D R; Meininger, G A; Davis, T P

    1980-03-01

    Hypokinesia in the hindlimbs of rats were induced by suspension; a newly developed harness system was used. The animal was able to use its forelimbs to maneuver, within a 140 degrees arc, to obtain food and water and to permit limited grooming of the forequarters. The hindlimbs were nonload bearing for 7 days; following a 7-day period of hypodynamia, selected animals were placed in metabolic cages for 7 days to study recovery from hypokinesia. During the 7-day period of hypokinesia there was evidence of muscle atrophy. Gastrocnemius weight decreased, renal papillary urea content increased, and daily urinary losses of urea, NH3, and 3-methylhistidine increased. During the 7-day recovery period muscle mass and excretion rate of urea, NH3 and 3-methylhistidine returned to control levels. Calcium balance was positive throughout the 7-day period of hypokinesia. Hypertrophy of the adrenals suggested the occurrence of some level of stress despite the apparent behavioral adjustment to the suspension harness. It was concluded that significant muscle atrophy and parallel changes in nitrogen metabolism occur in suspended rats and these changes are readily reversible.

  3. 痿证理论的源流梳理%Origin of theory of atrophy syndrome *

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊永平

    2011-01-01

    中医痿证包括手足痿软无力为主要特征的诸多疾病,病因有外感六淫、内伤七情、饮食劳倦,古有痿躄、痿痹、痿易、痿厥、解亦相关名称.立"痿论"专篇,突出五脏,强调病始于肺热叶焦,而治疗则"独取阳明".后世医家对此理论有所发展,主要观点有3:其一,遵循"独取阳明",但重心从针灸移向药物;其二,以补肾为要,盖肾总司筋骨;其三,痿证、痹症治疗有别,痿证以补益为要,不可祛风,痹症以祛风为主,不宜补虚."独取阳明"强调针刺阳明经,"调其荥而补其俞",可以调节全身的气血,助"宗筋束骨而利机关";后世"独取阳明"多用药物调理脾胃脏腑,扶正气,祛湿热,助纳运,复升降,则气血生化有源;补益肝肾更是药物治疗痿证的主要方法,补益肝肾可以强筋壮骨.总之,治疗痿证宜针药结合,取长补短;取阳明与补肝肾不可偏废,应当以辨证为主;痿痹、痿厥等名称源于临床实践,迄今仍有现实意义,所谓痿证宜补、痹症当泻,有失偏颇.%Atrophy syndrome in Chinese medicine consists of a variety of diseases characterized by flaccidity of hands and feet. The causes include six excesses, seven emotions, improper diet and overstrain. Atrophy syndrome is also named Weibi, Weiyi, Weijue and Jieyi in ancient time. There is a specific chapter-Weilun in Neijing, which emphasizes five zang-viscera, and underlines atrophy syndrome originating from scorched lung and the therapeutic method being to needle only in Yangming Meridians.The doctors of later ages have developed the above-mentioned theory and they focused on three opinions:the first one moved the main point from acupuncture to Chinese medicinal though they abiding by the therapeutic method of needling only in Yangming Meridians. The second one took the therapy of tonifying kidney as core because kidney governing tendons and bones. The third one differentiated the therapeutic methods for atrophy syndrome from

  4. Clinical implications of brain atrophy by computed tomography in patients with age-related dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the present study is to clarify the clinical significance of brain atrophy by computed tomography in age-related dementia. Eighty elderly patients with clinical diagnosis of presenile or senile dementia whose mental states were assessed clinically and by several psychometric test were studied by computed tomography. Patients with suspected cerebrovascular disorders and normal pressure hydrocephalus were excluded. Three tomographic sections through anterior and posterior horns and cella media of lateral ventricles and cortex with intracranial space of 60 - 80 cm2 were evaluated. CSF spaces (%) were measured as an index of brain atrophy. The measurement of CSF spaces (%) was carried out by the computerized planimetric method to avoid visual definition of ventricular borders. In this study, CSF spaces comprised ventricular and subarachnoid spaces. Hasegawa's dementia scale, Bender-Gestalt test and Kohs' block design test were employed for the cognitive assessment of the subjects. In two sections through lateral ventricles, significant correlations were obtained between CSF spaces (%) and scores of Hasegawa's dementia scale and Kohs' block design test. Scores of Bender-Gestalt test did not correlate with CSF spaces (%) in these two sections. In the section through cortex, no correlation were found between CSF spaces (%) and scores of any psychometric test. Also, no positive correlations were obtained between age and CSF spaces (%) in the three sections. (author)

  5. Choroidal atrophy in a patient with paraneoplastic retinopathy and anti-TRPM1 antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Shinji; Ito, Yasuki; Maruko, Ruka; Kondo, Mineo; Terasaki, Hiroko

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report choroidal atrophy in a patient with cancer-associated retinopathy who had autoantibodies against the transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 1 (TRPM1). A 69-year-old man visited our clinic in July 2010 with complaints of blurred vision and night blindness in both eyes. The full-field electroretinograms were negative type, indicating ON bipolar cell dysfunction. General physical examination revealed small cell carcinoma of the lung, and Western blot of the patient's serum showed autoantibodies against TRPM1. We diagnosed this patient with cancer-associated retinopathy and retinal ON bipolar dysfunction due to anti-TRPM1 autoantibody. We followed him for more than 2 years from the initial visit and his symptoms have not changed. However, consistent with the choroidal hypopigmentation of the fundus, spectral domain optical coherence tomography showed a decrease in choroidal thickness of about one third over a 2-year follow-up period. We suggest that this case of gradually progressive choroidal atrophy was caused by the autoantibody against TRPM1 directly, because TRPM1 is expressed not only on ON bipolar cells but also on melanocytes. These findings indicate that we should be aware of choroidal thickness in patients with paraneoplastic retinopathy who have retinal ON bipolar dysfunction with the anti-TRPM1 antibody. PMID:24523577

  6. Inhibition of xanthine oxidase by allopurinol prevents skeletal muscle atrophy: role of p38 MAPKinase and E3 ubiquitin ligases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic Derbre

    Full Text Available Alterations in muscle play an important role in common diseases and conditions. Reactive oxygen species (ROS are generated during hindlimb unloading due, at least in part, to the activation of xanthine oxidase (XO. The major aim of this study was to determine the mechanism by which XO activation causes unloading-induced muscle atrophy in rats, and its possible prevention by allopurinol, a well-known inhibitor of this enzyme. For this purpose we studied one of the main redox sensitive signalling cascades involved in skeletal muscle atrophy i.e. p38 MAPKinase, and the expression of two well known muscle specific E3 ubiquitin ligases involved in proteolysis, the Muscle atrophy F-Box (MAFbx; also known as atrogin-1 and Muscle RING (Really Interesting New Gene Finger-1 (MuRF-1. We found that hindlimb unloading induced a significant increase in XO activity and in the protein expression of the antioxidant enzymes CuZnSOD and Catalase in skeletal muscle. The most relevant new fact reported in this paper is that inhibition of XO with allopurinol, a drug widely used in clinical practice, prevents soleus muscle atrophy by ~20% after hindlimb unloading. This was associated with the inhibition of the p38 MAPK-MAFbx pathway. Our data suggest that XO was involved in the loss of muscle mass via the activation of the p38MAPK-MAFbx pathway in unloaded muscle atrophy. Thus, allopurinol may have clinical benefits to combat skeletal muscle atrophy in bedridden, astronauts, sarcopenic, and cachexic patients.

  7. Dexamethasone-Induced Skeletal Muscle Atrophy Increases O-GlcNAcylation in C2C12 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaccesi, Luca; Goi, Giancarlo; Tringali, Cristina; Barassi, Alessandra; Venerando, Bruno; Papini, Nadia

    2016-08-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is a well-known adverse effect of chronic treatment with glucocorticoids and it also occurs when stress conditions such as sepsis and cachexia increase the release of endogenous glucocorticoids. Although the mechanisms of action of these hormones have been elucidated, the possible molecular mechanisms causing atrophy are not yet fully understood. The involvement of the O-GlcNAcylation process has recently been reported in disuse atrophy. O-GlcNAcylation, a regulatory post-translational modification of nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins consists in the attachment of O-GlcNAc residues on cell proteins and is regulated by two enzymes: O-GlcNAc-transferase (OGT) and O-GlcNAcase (OGA). O-GlcNAcylation plays a crucial role in many cellular processes and it seems to be related to skeletal muscle physiological function. The aim of this study is to investigate the involvement of O-GlcNAcylation in glucocorticoid-induced atrophy by using an "in vitro" model, achieved by treatment of C2C12 with 10 μM dexamethasone for 48 h. In atrophic condition, we observed that O-GlcNAc levels in cell proteins increased and concomitantly protein phosphorylation on serine and threonine residues decreased. Analysis of OGA expression at mRNA and protein levels showed a reduction in this enzyme in atrophic myotubes, whereas no significant changes of OGT expression were found. Furthermore, inhibition of OGA activity by Thiamet G induced atrophy marker expression. Our current findings suggest that O-GlcNAcylation is involved in dexamethasone-induced atrophy. In particular, we propose that the decrease in OGA content causes an excessive and mostly durable level of O-GlcNAc residues on sarcomeric proteins that might modify their function and stability. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1833-1842, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26728070

  8. Brain atrophy and neuropsychological outcome after treatment of ruptured anterior cerebral artery aneurysms: a voxel-based morphometric study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bendel, Paula; Koskenkorva, Paeivi; Vanninen, Ritva [Kuopio University Hospital and University of Kuopio, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuopio (Finland); Koivisto, Timo; Aeikiae, Marja [Kuopio University Hospital and University of Kuopio, Department of Neurosurgery, Kuopio (Finland); Niskanen, Eini [Kuopio University Hospital and University of Kuopio, Department of Neurology, Kuopio (Finland); Kuopio University Hospital and University of Kuopio, Department of Physics, Kuopio (Finland); Koenoenen, Mervi [Kuopio University Hospital and University of Kuopio, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuopio (Finland); Kuopio University Hospital and University of Kuopio, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Kuopio (Finland); Haenninen, Tuomo [Kuopio University Hospital and University of Kuopio, Department of Neurology, Kuopio (Finland)

    2009-11-15

    Cognitive impairment after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is frequently detected. Here, we describe the pattern of cerebral (gray matter) atrophy and its clinical relevance after treatment of aSAH caused by a ruptured anterior cerebral artery (ACA) aneurysm. Thirty-seven aSAH patients with ACA aneurysm (17 surgical, 20 endovascular treatment) and a good or moderate clinical outcome (Glasgow Outcome Scale V or IV) and 30 controls underwent brain MRI. Voxel-based morphometric analysis was applied to compare the patients and controls. Patients also underwent a detailed neuropsychological assessment. The comparisons between controls and either all patients (n=37) or the subgroup of surgically treated patients (n=17) revealed bilateral cortical atrophy in the frontal lobes, mainly in the basal areas. The brainstem, bilateral thalamic and hypothalamic areas, and ipsilateral caudate nucleus were also involved. Small areas of atrophy were detected in temporal lobes. The hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus showed atrophy ipsilateral to the surgical approach. In the subgroup of endovascularly treated patients (n = 15), small areas of atrophy were detected in the bilateral orbitofrontal cortex and in the thalamic region. Twenty patients (54%) showed cognitive deficits in neuropsychological assessment. Group analysis after aSAH and treatment of the ruptured ACA aneurysm revealed gray matter atrophy, principally involving the frontobasal cortical areas and hippocampus ipsilateral to the surgical approach. Areas of reduced gray matter were more pronounced after surgical than endovascular treatment. Together with possible focal cortical infarctions and brain retraction deficits in individual patients, this finding may explain the neuropsychological disturbances commonly detected after treatment of ruptured ACA aneurysms. (orig.)

  9. Brain atrophy and neuropsychological outcome after treatment of ruptured anterior cerebral artery aneurysms: a voxel-based morphometric study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cognitive impairment after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is frequently detected. Here, we describe the pattern of cerebral (gray matter) atrophy and its clinical relevance after treatment of aSAH caused by a ruptured anterior cerebral artery (ACA) aneurysm. Thirty-seven aSAH patients with ACA aneurysm (17 surgical, 20 endovascular treatment) and a good or moderate clinical outcome (Glasgow Outcome Scale V or IV) and 30 controls underwent brain MRI. Voxel-based morphometric analysis was applied to compare the patients and controls. Patients also underwent a detailed neuropsychological assessment. The comparisons between controls and either all patients (n=37) or the subgroup of surgically treated patients (n=17) revealed bilateral cortical atrophy in the frontal lobes, mainly in the basal areas. The brainstem, bilateral thalamic and hypothalamic areas, and ipsilateral caudate nucleus were also involved. Small areas of atrophy were detected in temporal lobes. The hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus showed atrophy ipsilateral to the surgical approach. In the subgroup of endovascularly treated patients (n = 15), small areas of atrophy were detected in the bilateral orbitofrontal cortex and in the thalamic region. Twenty patients (54%) showed cognitive deficits in neuropsychological assessment. Group analysis after aSAH and treatment of the ruptured ACA aneurysm revealed gray matter atrophy, principally involving the frontobasal cortical areas and hippocampus ipsilateral to the surgical approach. Areas of reduced gray matter were more pronounced after surgical than endovascular treatment. Together with possible focal cortical infarctions and brain retraction deficits in individual patients, this finding may explain the neuropsychological disturbances commonly detected after treatment of ruptured ACA aneurysms. (orig.)

  10. Identification of genes that elicit disuse muscle atrophy via the transcription factors p50 and Bcl-3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Ling Wu

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle atrophy is a debilitating condition associated with weakness, fatigue, and reduced functional capacity. Nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB transcription factors play a critical role in atrophy. Knockout of genes encoding p50 or the NF-κB co-transactivator, Bcl-3, abolish disuse atrophy and thus they are NF-κB factors required for disuse atrophy. We do not know however, the genes targeted by NF-κB that produce the atrophied phenotype. Here we identify the genes required to produce disuse atrophy using gene expression profiling in wild type compared to Nfkb1 (gene encodes p50 and Bcl-3 deficient mice. There were 185 and 240 genes upregulated in wild type mice due to unloading, that were not upregulated in Nfkb1⁻/⁻ and Bcl-3⁻/⁻ mice, respectively, and so these genes were considered direct or indirect targets of p50 and Bcl-3. All of the p50 gene targets were contained in the Bcl-3 gene target list. Most genes were involved with protein degradation, signaling, translation, transcription, and transport. To identify direct targets of p50 and Bcl-3 we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation of selected genes previously shown to have roles in atrophy. Trim63 (MuRF1, Fbxo32 (MAFbx, Ubc, Ctsl, Runx1, Tnfrsf12a (Tweak receptor, and Cxcl10 (IP-10 showed increased Bcl-3 binding to κB sites in unloaded muscle and thus were direct targets of Bcl-3. p50 binding to the same sites on these genes either did not change or increased, supporting the idea of p50:Bcl-3 binding complexes. p65 binding to κB sites showed decreased or no binding to these genes with unloading. Fbxo9, Psma6, Psmc4, Psmg4, Foxo3, Ankrd1 (CARP, and Eif4ebp1 did not show changes in p65, p50, or Bcl-3 binding to κB sites, and so were considered indirect targets of p50 and Bcl-3. This work represents the first study to use a global approach to identify genes required to produce the atrophied phenotype with disuse.

  11. Gyrate atrophy of choroid and retina with myopia, cataract and systemic proximal myopathy: A rare case report from rural India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surekha Bangal

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available AbstractGyrate atrophy is a rare metabolic disease with autosomal recessive inheritance pattern characterised by hyperornithinemia and typical ocular findings. This report presents a 17-year-old intellectually challenged girl consulting for a progressive fall of visual acuity with night blindness. Fundus examination showed patches of chorioretinal atrophy with typical scalloped borders and peri vascular pigmentation in the equatorial region. Fundus fluroscein angiography revealed characteristic staining pattern. Other ocular associations included myopia and posterior sub capsular cataract. Progressive systemic proximal myopathy was one of the associated features. Dietary supplementation of vitamin B6 was advised.

  12. Clinical variability in hereditary optic neuropathies: Two novel mutations in two patients with dominant optic atrophy and Wolfram syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvez-Ruiz, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Dominant optic atrophy (DOA) and Wolfram syndrome share a great deal of clinical variability, including an association with hearing loss and the presence of optic atrophy at similar ages. The objective of this paper was to discuss the phenotypic variability of these syndromes with respect to the presentation of two clinical cases. We present two patients, each with either DOA or Wolfram syndrome, and contribute to the research literature through our findings of two novel mutations. The overlapping of several clinical characteristics in hereditary optic neuropathies can complicate the differential diagnosis. Future studies are needed to better determine the genotype-phenotype correlation for these diseases.

  13. Non-invasive diagnosis of gastric mucosal atrophy in an asymptomatic population with high prevalence of gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Antonio Rollan; Catterina Ferreccio; Alessandra Gederlini; Carolina Serrano; Javiera Torres; Paul Harris

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To validate a non-invasive method to detect gastric mucosal atrophy in a Chilean population with high prevalence of gastric cancer and a poor survival rate.METHODS: We first determined the optimal cut-off level of serum pepsinogen (PG)-1, PG-1/PG-2 ratio and 17-gastrin in 31 voluntary symptomatic patients (mean age: 66.1 years), of them 61% had histologically confirmed gastric atrophy. Then, in a population-based sample of 536 healthy individuals (209 residents in counties with higher relative risk and 327 residents in counties with lower relative risk for gastric cancer),we measured serum anti-Hpylori antibodies, PG and 17-gastrin and estimated their risk of gastric cancer.RESULTS: We found that serum PG-1 < 61.5 μg/L,PG-1/PG-2 ratio < 2.2 and 17-gastrin > 13.3 pmol/L had a high specificity (91%-100%) and a fair sensitivity (56%-78%) to detect corpus-predominant atrophy.Based on low serum PG-1 and PG-1/PG-2 ratio together as diagnostic criteria, 12.5% of the asymptomatic subjects had corpus-predominant atrophy (0% of those under 25 years and 20.2% over 65 years old). The frequency of gastric atrophy was similar (12% vs 13%)but H pylori infection rate was slightly higher (77% vs 71%) in the high-risk compared to the low-risk counties.Based on their estimated gastric cancer risk, individuals were classified as: low-risk group (no H pylori infection and no atrophy; n = 115; 21.4%); moderate-risk group (H pylori infection but no atrophy; n = 354, 66.0%);and high-risk group (gastric atrophy, with or without H pylori infection; n = 67, 12.5%). The high-risk group was significantly older (mean age: 61.9 ± 13.3 years),more frequently men and less educated as compared with the low-risk group.CONCLUSION: We propose to concentrate on an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for detection of early gastric cancer in the high-risk group. This intervention model could improve the poor prognosis of gastric cancer in Chile.

  14. Cardiac Atrophy and Diastolic Dysfunction During and After Long Duration Spaceflight: Functional Consequences for Orthostatic Intolerance, Exercise Capability and Risk for Cardiac Arrhythmias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Benjamin D.; Bungo, Michael W.; Platts, Steven H.; Hamilton, Douglas R.; Johnston, Smith L.

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac Atrophy and Diastolic Dysfunction During and After Long Duration Spaceflight: Functional Consequences for Orthostatic Intolerance, Exercise Capability and Risk for Cardiac Arrhythmias (Integrated Cardiovascular) will quantify the extent of long-duration space flightassociated cardiac atrophy (deterioration) on the International Space Station crewmembers.

  15. Cobalt triggers necrotic cell death and atrophy in skeletal C2C12 myotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rovetta, Francesca [Unit of Biotechnologies, Department of Molecular and Translational Medicine, University of Brescia, Brescia I-25123 (Italy); Interuniversity Institute of Myology (IIM) (Italy); Stacchiotti, Alessandra [Institute of Human Anatomy, Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, University of Brescia, Brescia I-25123 (Italy); Faggi, Fiorella [Unit of Biotechnologies, Department of Molecular and Translational Medicine, University of Brescia, Brescia I-25123 (Italy); Interuniversity Institute of Myology (IIM) (Italy); Catalani, Simona; Apostoli, Pietro [Unit of Occupational Health and Industrial Hygiene, Department of Medical and Surgical Specialties, Radiological Sciences and Public Health, University of Brescia, Brescia I-25123 (Italy); Fanzani, Alessandro, E-mail: fanzani@med.unibs.it [Unit of Biotechnologies, Department of Molecular and Translational Medicine, University of Brescia, Brescia I-25123 (Italy); Interuniversity Institute of Myology (IIM) (Italy); Aleo, Maria Francesca, E-mail: aleo@med.unibs.it [Unit of Biotechnologies, Department of Molecular and Translational Medicine, University of Brescia, Brescia I-25123 (Italy); Interuniversity Institute of Myology (IIM) (Italy)

    2013-09-01

    Severe poisoning has recently been diagnosed in humans having hip implants composed of cobalt–chrome alloys due to the release of particulate wear debris on polyethylene and ceramic implants which stimulates macrophagic infiltration and destroys bone and soft tissue, leading to neurological, sensorial and muscular impairments. Consistent with this premise, in this study, we focused on the mechanisms underlying the toxicity of Co(II) ions on skeletal muscle using mouse skeletal C2C12 myotubes as an in vitro model. As detected using propidium iodide incorporation, increasing CoCl{sub 2} doses (from 5 to 200 μM) affected the viability of C2C12 myotubes, mainly by cell necrosis, which was attenuated by necrostatin-1, an inhibitor of the necroptotic branch of the death domain receptor signaling pathway. On the other hand, apoptosis was hardly detectable as supported by the lack of caspase-3 and -8 activation, the latter resulting in only faint activation after exposure to higher CoCl{sub 2} doses for prolonged time points. Furthermore, CoCl{sub 2} treatment resulted in atrophy of the C2C12 myotubes which was characterized by the increased expression of HSP25 and GRP94 stress proteins and other typical 'pro-atrophic molecular hallmarks, such as early activation of the NF-kB pathway and down-regulation of AKT phosphorylation, followed by the activation of the proteasome and autophagy systems. Overall, these results suggested that cobalt may impact skeletal muscle homeostasis as an inducer of cell necrosis and myofiber atrophy. - Highlights: • The effects of cobalt on muscle myofibers in vitro were investigated. • Cobalt treatment mainly causes cell necrosis in skeletal C2C12 myotubes. • Cobalt impacts the PI3K/AKT and NFkB pathways and induces cell stress markers. • Cobalt induces atrophy of C2C12 myotubes through the activation of proteasome and autophagy systems. • Co treatment triggers NF-kB and PI3K/AKT pathways in C2C12 myotubes.

  16. Plasma clusterin concentration is associated with longitudinal brain atrophy in mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thambisetty, Madhav; An, Yang; Kinsey, Anna; Koka, Deepthi; Saleem, Muzamil; Güntert, Andreas; Kraut, Michael; Ferrucci, Luigi; Davatzikos, Christos; Lovestone, Simon; Resnick, Susan M

    2012-01-01

    Recent genetic and proteomic studies demonstrate that clusterin/apolipoprotein-J is associated with risk, pathology, and progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Our main aim was to examine associations between plasma clusterin concentration and longitudinal changes in brain volume in normal aging and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). A secondary objective was to examine associations between peripheral concentration of clusterin and its concentration in the brain within regions that undergo neuropathological changes in AD. Non-demented individuals (N=139; mean baseline age 70.5 years) received annual volumetric MRI (912 MRI scans in total) over a mean six-year interval. Sixteen participants (92 MRI scans in total) were diagnosed during the course of the study with amnestic MCI. Clusterin concentration was assayed by ELISA in plasma samples collected within a year of the baseline MRI. Mixed effects regression models investigated whether plasma clusterin concentration was associated with rates of brain atrophy for control and MCI groups and whether these associations differed between groups. In a separate autopsy sample of individuals with AD (N=17) and healthy controls (N=4), we examined the association between antemortem clusterin concentration in plasma and postmortem levels in the superior temporal gyrus, hippocampus and cerebellum. The associations of plasma clusterin concentration with rates of change in brain volume were significantly different between MCI and control groups in several volumes including whole brain, ventricular CSF, temporal gray matter as well as parahippocampal, superior temporal and cingulate gyri. Within the MCI but not control group, higher baseline concentration of plasma clusterin was associated with slower rates of brain atrophy in these regions. In the combined autopsy sample of AD and control cases, representing a range of severity in AD pathology, we observed a significant association between clusterin concentration in the plasma and

  17. Visuoperceptive region atrophy independent of cognitive status in patients with Parkinson's disease with hallucinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Jennifer G; Stebbins, Glenn T; Dinh, Vy; Bernard, Bryan; Merkitch, Doug; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Goetz, Christopher G

    2014-03-01

    Visual hallucinations are frequent, disabling complications of advanced Parkinson's disease, but their neuroanatomical basis is incompletely understood. Previous structural brain magnetic resonance imaging studies suggest volume loss in the mesial temporal lobe and limbic regions in subjects with Parkinson's disease with visual hallucinations, relative to those without visual hallucinations. However, these studies have not always controlled for the presence of cognitive impairment or dementia, which are common co-morbidities of hallucinations in Parkinson's disease and whose neuroanatomical substrates may involve mesial temporal lobe and limbic regions. Therefore, we used structural magnetic resonance imaging to examine grey matter atrophy patterns associated with visual hallucinations, comparing Parkinson's disease hallucinators to Parkinson's disease non-hallucinators of comparable cognitive function. We studied 50 subjects with Parkinson's disease: 25 classified as current and chronic visual hallucinators and 25 as non-hallucinators, who were matched for cognitive status (demented or non-demented) and age (± 3 years). Subjects underwent (i) clinical evaluations; and (ii) brain MRI scans analysed using whole-brain voxel-based morphometry techniques. Clinically, the Parkinson's disease hallucinators did not differ in their cognitive classification or performance in any of the five assessed cognitive domains, compared with the non-hallucinators. The Parkinson's disease groups also did not differ significantly in age, motor severity, medication use or duration of disease. On imaging analyses, the hallucinators, all of whom experienced visual hallucinations, exhibited grey matter atrophy with significant voxel-wise differences in the cuneus, lingual and fusiform gyri, middle occipital lobe, inferior parietal lobule, and also cingulate, paracentral, and precentral gyri, compared with the non-hallucinators. Grey matter atrophy in the hallucinators occurred

  18. Unilateral hindlimb casting induced a delayed generalized muscle atrophy during rehabilitation that is prevented by a whey or a high protein diet but not a free leucine-enriched diet

    OpenAIRE

    Hugues Magne; Isabelle Savary-Auzeloux; Carole Migné; Marie-Agnès Peyron; Lydie Combaret; Didier Rémond; Dominique Dardevet

    2013-01-01

    Sarcopenia is the general muscle mass and strength loss associated with ageing. Muscle atrophy could be made worse by exposure to acute periods of immobilization, because muscle disuse by itself is a stimulus for atrophy. Using a model of unilateral hindlimb casting in old adult rats, we have already demonstrated that the primary effect of immobilization was atrophy in the casted leg, but was also surprisingly associated with a retarded atrophy in the non-casted leg during rehabilitation. In ...

  19. Case Report of Neurological Sequelae and Bilateral Optic Atrophy Developed Due to Tuberculosis Meningitis Treatment - A Rare Clinical Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Prasamse

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis meningitis (TBM is common CNS infection associated with neurologic sequelae and mortality if untreated. Recommended treatment regimen consists; two months of daily Isoniazide (INH, Rifampin (RIF, Pyrazinamide (PZA and either Streptomycin (SM or Ethambutol (EMB followed by 7–10 months of INH and RIF. Optic atrophy as neurologic complication may develop in TBM patients with anti TB therapy. Infection and/or drugs can be an etiologic factor also. In this case patient was diagnosed with TBM at the age of three years and was on anti TB drugs. At the age of four years he was completely cured from TBM but developed seizure as neurologic sequelae. Provisionally, child was diagnosed as known case of TBM with seizures and visual defect. Ophthalmologist revealed; bilateral optic atrophy and Neurophysician confirmed as Neurological sequelae and bilateral optic atrophy developed due to TBM treatment. A thorough patient history including past medication history is a clinical pearl to identify such rare clinical complication. In this case optic atrophy and neurological sequelae was confirmed only after thorough history and evaluation by various specialists. Not only confirmation of rare clinical syndrome is important, also identification of possible etiology and appropriate management is required for better management. Clinical pharmacists play a crucial role even in identification and reporting of such rare clinical condition as a part of health care system to create awareness among others.

  20. Cortical atrophy rates in Alzheimer's patients and subjects with mild cognitive impairment from the AddNeuroMed data collection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Simon Fristed; Westman, Eric; Gwadry-Sridhar, Femida;

    Background: The AddNeuroMed project is a multi-centre European project which aims to identify biomarkers in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study we measured the rate of cortical atrophy in AD patients, subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and healthy controls (HC) using MRI. Methods...

  1. Ospemifene for the treatment of dyspareunia associated with vulvar and vaginal atrophy: potential benefits in bone and breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soe LH

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Lin H Soe, Gregory T Wurz, Chiao-Jung Kao, Michael W DeGregorio Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Hematology and Oncology, School of Medicine, University of California, Davis, Sacramento, CA, USA Abstract: Ospemifene is a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM, or estrogen receptor agonist/antagonist, that was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of dyspareunia associated with vulvar and vaginal atrophy, a chronic condition that affects up to 60% of postmenopausal women. Ospemifene is the first and only nonestrogen compound approved for this indication. Compared with other approved SERMs, such as tamoxifen, toremifene, bazedoxifene, and raloxifene, the estrogen-like effects of ospemifene in the vaginal epithelium are unique. This review first discusses the rationale for developing ospemifene, including its mechanism of action, and then focuses on the clinical development of ospemifene for the treatment of dyspareunia associated with vulvar and vaginal atrophy. Included are discussions of the effects of ospemifene on the endometrium, serum lipids, coagulation markers, bone, and breast cancer. In conclusion, ospemifene is a SERM with a unique estrogen agonist/antagonist tissue profile that was recently approved in the US for the treatment of dyspareunia associated with vulvar and vaginal atrophy in postmenopausal women. Ospemifene warrants further clinical investigation for the treatment and prevention of osteoporosis and breast cancer. Keywords: ospemifene, dyspareunia, vulvar and vaginal atrophy, osteoporosis, breast cancer

  2. Synergic prodegradative activity of Bicalutamide and trehalose on the mutant androgen receptor responsible for spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giorgetti, Elise; Rusmini, Paola; Crippa, Valeria; Cristofani, Riccardo; Boncoraglio, Alessandra; Cicardi, Maria E.; Galbiati, Mariarita; Poletti, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an X-linked motoneuron disease due to a CAG triplet-repeat expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) gene, which is translated into an elongated polyglutamine (polyQ) tract in AR protein (ARpolyQ). ARpolyQ toxicity is activated by the AR ligand testosterone

  3. Onset of small intestinal atrophy is associated with reduced intestinal blood flow in TPN-fed neonatal piglets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niinikoski, Harri; Stoll, Barbara; Guan, Xinfu;

    2004-01-01

    Our aim was to determine the speed of onset of total parenteral nutrition (TPN)-induced mucosal atrophy, and whether this is associated with changes in intestinal blood flow and tissue metabolism in neonatal piglets. Piglets were implanted with jugular venous and duodenal catheters and either a p...

  4. Malignant ventricular arrhythmia in a case of adult onset of spinal muscular atrophy (Kugelberg-Welander disease).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, M.; Sarkozy, A.; Chierchia, G.B.; Wilde, P.C.M. de; Schmedding, E.; Brugada, P.

    2009-01-01

    We present a case of a 43-year-old male patient with adult onset of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). The patient first came to our attention with atrioventricular (AV) block. A dual-chamber pacemaker (DDD-PM) was implanted. Four years later, the PM data log showed occurrence of frequent episodes of no

  5. Infantile spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type I presenting without respiratory involvement: Novel mutations and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Xinghua; Huang, Xiaojun; Liu, Xiaoli; Zhou, Haiyan; Chen, Shengdi; Cao, Li

    2016-08-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1 (SMARD1), also known as distal spinal muscular atrophy 1 (DSMA1) or distal hereditary motor neuropathies type 6 (dHMN6), is a rare autosomal recessive motor neuron disorder that affects infants and is characterized by diaphragmatic palsy, distal muscular weakness and muscle atrophy. The disease is caused by mutations in the gene encoding immunoglobulinm-binding protein 2 (IGHMBP2). We present a female child with novel compound heterozygous mutations in IGHMBP2 gene c.344C>T (p.115T>M) and c.1737C>A (p.579F>L), displaying distal limbs weakness and atrophy without signs of diaphragmatic palsy or respiratory insufficiency. We review 20 reported SMARD1 cases that have no respiratory involvement or have late onsets. We propose that IGHMBP2 gene mutations are characterized by significant phenotypic heterogeneity. Diaphragmatic palsy and respiratory distress may be absent and SMARD1 should be considered in infantile with the onset of peripheral neuropathies. PMID:26922252

  6. Relationships between personality traits, medial temporal lobe atrophy and white matter lesion in subjects suffering from mild cognitive impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle eDuron

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI is a heterogeneous cognitive status that can be a prodromal stage of Alzheimer‘s disease (AD. It is particularly relevant to focus on prodromal stages of AD such as MCI, because pathophysiological abnormalities of AD start years before the dementia stage. Medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTL resulting from AD lesions and cerebrovascular lesions (i.e. white matter lesions (WML, lacunar strokes and strokes are often revealed concurrently on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI in MCI subjects. Personality changes have been reported to be associated with MCI status and early AD. More specifically, an increase in neuroticism and a decrease in conscientiousness have been reported, suggesting that higher and lower scores, respectively in neuroticism and conscientiousness are associated with an increased risk of developing the disease. However, personality changes have not been studied concomitantly with pathological structural brain alterations detected on MRI in patients suffering from MCI. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to assess the relationship between MTL atrophy, WML, lacunar strokes and personality traits in such patients. The severity of WML was strongly associated with lower levels of conscientiousness and higher levels of neuroticism. Conversely, no association was detected between personality traits and the presence of lacunar strokes or MTL atrophy. Altogether, these results strongly suggest that personality changes occurring in a MCI population, at high risk of AD, are associated with WML, which can induce executive dysfunctions, rather than with MTL atrophy.

  7. A longitudinal study of atrophy in amnestic mild cognitive impairment and normal aging revealed by cortical thickness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijun Yao

    Full Text Available In recent years, amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI has attracted significant attention as an indicator of high risk for Alzheimer's disease. An understanding of the pathology of aMCI may benefit the development of effective clinical treatments for dementia. In this work, we measured the cortical thickness of 109 aMCI subjects and 99 normal controls (NC twice over two years. The longitudinal changes and the cross-sectional differences between the two types of participants were explored using the vertex thickness values. The thickness of the cortex in aMCI was found significantly reduced in both longitudinal and between-group comparisons, mainly in the temporal lobe, superolateral parietal lobe and some regions of the frontal cortices. Compared to NC, the aMCI showed a significantly high atrophy rate in the left lateral temporal lobe and left parahippocampal gyrus over two years. Additionally, a significant positive correlation between brain atrophy and the decline of Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE scores was also found in the left superior and left middle temporal gyrus in aMCI. These findings demonstrated specific longitudinal spatial patterns of cortical atrophy in aMCI and NC. The higher atrophy rate in aMCI might be responsible for the accelerated functional decline in the aMCI progression process.

  8. A longitudinal study of atrophy in amnestic mild cognitive impairment and normal aging revealed by cortical thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhijun; Hu, Bin; Liang, Chuanjiang; Zhao, Lina; Jackson, Mike

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) has attracted significant attention as an indicator of high risk for Alzheimer's disease. An understanding of the pathology of aMCI may benefit the development of effective clinical treatments for dementia. In this work, we measured the cortical thickness of 109 aMCI subjects and 99 normal controls (NC) twice over two years. The longitudinal changes and the cross-sectional differences between the two types of participants were explored using the vertex thickness values. The thickness of the cortex in aMCI was found significantly reduced in both longitudinal and between-group comparisons, mainly in the temporal lobe, superolateral parietal lobe and some regions of the frontal cortices. Compared to NC, the aMCI showed a significantly high atrophy rate in the left lateral temporal lobe and left parahippocampal gyrus over two years. Additionally, a significant positive correlation between brain atrophy and the decline of Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores was also found in the left superior and left middle temporal gyrus in aMCI. These findings demonstrated specific longitudinal spatial patterns of cortical atrophy in aMCI and NC. The higher atrophy rate in aMCI might be responsible for the accelerated functional decline in the aMCI progression process.

  9. Intranasal Insulin Prevents Cognitive Decline, Cerebral Atrophy and White Matter Changes in Murine Type I Diabetic Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, George J.; Martinez, Jose A.; Liu, Wei Q.; Xu, Kevin; Ayer, Amit; Fine, Jared; Tuor, Ursula I.; Glazner, Gordon; Hanson, Leah R.; Frey, William H., II; Toth, Cory

    2008-01-01

    Insulin deficiency in type I diabetes may lead to cognitive impairment, cerebral atrophy and white matter abnormalities. We studied the impact of a novel delivery system using intranasal insulin (I-I) in a mouse model of type I diabetes (streptozotocin-induced) for direct targeting of pathological and cognitive deficits while avoiding potential…

  10. Muscle Plasticity and β2-Adrenergic Receptors: Adaptive Responses of β2-Adrenergic Receptor Expression to Muscle Hypertrophy and Atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Shogo Sato; Ken Shirato; Kaoru Tachiyashiki; Kazuhiko Imaizumi

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the functional roles of β2-adrenergic receptors in skeletal muscle hypertrophy and atrophy as well as the adaptive responses of β2-adrenergic receptor expression to anabolic and catabolic conditions. β2-Adrenergic receptor stimulation using anabolic drugs increases muscle mass by promoting muscle protein synthesis and/or attenuating protein degradation. These effects are prevented ...

  11. Measurement of a MMP-2 degraded Titin fragment in serum reflects changes in muscle turnover induced by atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, S; Henriksen, K; Karsdal, M A;

    2014-01-01

    ELISA assay for measurement in serum. Rat tissue extractions in the presence or absence of a series of proteases of interest were used to identify its enzymatic origin. A rat model of dexamethasone (DEX) induced muscle atrophy and a human 56-day bed rest study with and without vibration therapy were...

  12. Association of white-matter lesions with brain atrophy markers: the three-city Dijon MRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Brain atrophy and white-matter lesions (WML) are common features at cerebral MRI of both normal and demented elderly people. In a population-based study of 1, 792 elderly subjects aged 65-80 years, free of dementia, who had a cerebral MRI at entry, we investigated the relationship between WML volume and brain atrophy markers estimated by hippocampal, gray matter (GM) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volumes. Methods: An automated algorithm of detection and quantification of WML was developed, and voxel-based morphometry methods were used to estimate GM, CSF and hippocampal volumes. To evaluate the relation between those volumes and WML load, we used analysis of covariance and multiple linear regression models adjusting for potential confounders and total intracranial volumes. Results: Age was highly correlated with WML load and all brain atrophy markers. Total WML volume was negatively associated with both GM (β = -0.03, p ≤ 0.0001) and hippocampal volumes (β = -0.75, p = 0.0009) and positively with CSF volumes (beta 0.008, p = 0.02) after controlling for sex, age, education level, hypertension and apolipoprotein E genotype. Evidence for a relationship between brain atrophy markers and WML was stronger for periventricular WML. We found that the relationship between WML and hippocampal volumes was independent of other brain tissue volumes. Conclusion: These results suggest that, in the brain of non demented elderly subjects, degenerative processes and vascular changes co-occur and are related independently of vascular risk factors. (authors)

  13. One-Dimensional-Ratio Measures of Atrophy Progression in Multiple Sclerosis as Evaluated by Longitudinal Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: For decades, normalized one-dimensional (1D) measures have been used in the evaluation of brain atrophy. In multiple sclerosis (MS), the use of normalized linear measures over longitudinal follow-up remains insufficiently documented. Purpose: To evaluate the association between different regional atrophy measures and disability in MS patients over four decades in a longitudinal cross-sectional study. Material and Methods: 37 consecutively selected MS patients were included. At baseline, patients had a range of disease duration (1-33 years) and age (24-65 years). Each patient was followed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for a mean of 9.25 years (range 7.3-10 years). Four 1D measures were applied at three time points on axial 5-mm T1-weighted images. Three clinical MS subgroups were represented: relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS), secondary progressive MS (SPMS), and primary progressive MS (PPMS). Results: There were significant changes in all 1D ratios during follow-up. The Evans ratio (ER) and the bifrontal ratio (BFR) were associated with the development of disability. Changes of ER and BFR reflected more aggressive disease progression, as expressed by MS severity score (MSSS). Conclusion: All four normalized ratios showed uniform atrophy progression, suggesting a consistent rate of atrophy over long-term disease duration independent of MS course. Disability status correlated with 1D measures, suggesting that serial evaluation of Evans and bifrontal ratios might contribute to the radiological evaluation of MS patients

  14. Critical levels of brain atrophy associated with homocysteine and cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jager, Celeste A

    2014-09-01

    Few B-vitamin trials to lower homocysteine (Hcy) have reported evidence of beneficial effects on cognition in older adults with cognitive impairment or Alzheimer's disease. This article reviews the role of Hcy in cognitive decline. It also considers some reasons why meta-analyses have failed to find effects of B-vitamin treatment. Findings from the successful VITACOG trial are examined from a new perspective of critical levels of Hcy and brain atrophy that may impact on the efficacy of B-vitamin treatment. It appears that there is a critical level of brain shrinkage, possibly mediated by elevated Hcy, which when reached, results in cognitive decline, especially in episodic memory performance. Supplements, food sources, and effects of folic acid fortification are discussed in relation to B12 deficiency. PMID:24927906

  15. Kinesio taping application in a pediatric patient with spinal muscular atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayram Kelle

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Kinesio taping is one of the elastic bandage methods which has been quite popular in the last 20 years and has been applied in various musculoskeletal conditions. Although the mechanism of action is not clear, many theories have been suggested so far. In this case report, we aimed to present the results of kinesiotape application for back pain of the patient with spinal muscular atrophy which is one of the progressive muscular disorders. It was performed for three times with four days interval. Fascial technique B (Space technique was applied. Reduce of pain was also observed during the subsequent applications. The application of kinesio taping could be beneficial on reducing the pain in patients with progressive muscle diseases. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(2.000: 386-389

  16. Detecting Optic Atrophy in Multiple Sclerosis Patients Using New Colorimetric Analysis Software: From Idea to Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bambo, Maria Pilar; Garcia-Martin, Elena; Perez-Olivan, Susana; Larrosa-Povés, José Manuel; Polo-Llorens, Vicente; Gonzalez-De la Rosa, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Neuro-ophthalmologists typically observe a temporal pallor of the optic disc in patients with multiple sclerosis. Here, we describe the emergence of an idea to quantify these optic disc color changes in multiple sclerosis patients. We recruited 12 multiple sclerosis patients with previous optic neuritis attack and obtained photographs of their optic discs. The Laguna ONhE, a new colorimetric software using hemoglobin as the reference pigment in the papilla, was used for the analysis. The papilla of these multiple sclerosis patients showed greater pallor, especially in the temporal sector. The software detected the pallor and assigned hemoglobin percentages below normal reference values. Measurements of optic disc hemoglobin levels obtained with the Laguna ONhE software program had good ability to detect optic atrophy and, consequently, axonal loss in multiple sclerosis patients. This new technology is easy to implement in routine clinical practice.

  17. Loss of Periostin Results in Impaired Regeneration and Pancreatic Atrophy after Cerulein-Induced Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausmann, Simone; Regel, Ivonne; Steiger, Katja; Wagner, Nadine; Thorwirth, Manja; Schlitter, Anna M; Esposito, Irene; Michalski, Christoph W; Friess, Helmut; Kleeff, Jörg; Erkan, Mert

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix molecule periostin (POSTN, encoded by POSTN), which is secreted by activated pancreatic stellate cells, has important functions in chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. However, the role of POSTN in acute pancreatitis and subsequent regeneration processes has not been addressed so far. We analyzed the function of POSTN in pancreatic exocrine regeneration after the induction of a severe acute pancreatitis. Postn-deficient mice and wild-type control animals received repetitive cerulein injections, and a detailed histologic analysis of pancreatic tissues was performed. Although there was no difference in pancreatitis severity in the acute inflammatory phase, the recovery of the exocrine pancreas was massively impaired in Postn-deficient mice. Loss of Postn expression was accompanied by strong pancreatic atrophy and acinar-to-adipocyte differentiation, which was also reflected in gene expression patterns. Our data suggest that POSTN is a crucial factor for proper exocrine lineage-specific regeneration after severe acute pancreatitis.

  18. Nemo-like kinase is a novel regulator of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Tiffany W; Kokubu, Hiroshi; Miranda, Helen C; Cortes, Constanza J; La Spada, Albert R; Lim, Janghoo

    2015-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a progressive neuromuscular disease caused by polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) protein. Despite extensive research, the exact pathogenic mechanisms underlying SBMA remain elusive. In this study, we present evidence that Nemo-like kinase (NLK) promotes disease pathogenesis across multiple SBMA model systems. Most remarkably, loss of one copy of Nlk rescues SBMA phenotypes in mice, including extending lifespan. We also investigated the molecular mechanisms by which NLK exerts its effects in SBMA. Specifically, we have found that NLK can phosphorylate the mutant polyglutamine-expanded AR, enhance its aggregation, and promote AR-dependent gene transcription by regulating AR-cofactor interactions. Furthermore, NLK modulates the toxicity of a mutant AR fragment via a mechanism that is independent of AR-mediated gene transcription. Our findings uncover a crucial role for NLK in controlling SBMA toxicity and reveal a novel avenue for therapy development in SBMA. PMID:26308581

  19. Ospemifene 12-month safety and efficacy in postmenopausal women with vulvar and vaginal atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldstein, S R; Bachmann, G A; Koninckx, P R;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Assessment of 12-month safety of ospemifene 60 mg/day for treatment of postmenopausal women with vulvar and vaginal atrophy (VVA). METHODS: In this 52-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study, women 40-80 years with VVA and an intact uterus were randomized...... with ospemifene were considered mild or moderate. Three cases (1.0%) of active proliferation were observed in the ospemifene group. For one, active proliferation was seen at end of study week 52, and diagnosed as simple hyperplasia without atypia on follow-up biopsy 3 months after the last dose. This subsequently...... baseline to week 12 in percentage of superficial and parabasal cells and vaginal pH. RESULTS: Of 426 randomized subjects, 81.9% (n = 349) completed the study with adverse events the most common reason for discontinuation (ospemifene 9.5%; placebo 3.9%). Most (88%) treatment-emergent adverse events...

  20. CT muscle scanning in the evaluation of patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sambrook, P.; Rickards, D.; Cumming, W.J.K.

    1988-12-01

    One hundred with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) were assessed by CT scanning using a standardised technique. The spectrum of CT abnormality occurring in SMA was observed and by overall analysis the patients were divided into 4 groups. While the CT appearances of these groups correlated well with clinical assessment of severity of disease, the disease process was usually much more widespread than clinical examination suggested. CT abnormality was first observed in the leg and gluteal muscles, progressing to the posterior spinal, thigh, shoulder girdle and sternomastoid muscles. Hypertrophy of sartorius and gracilis was observed in a significant number of patients. Fascial planes were preserved in involved muscles in over half of the patients, even in late-stage disease. Asymmetrical muscle involvement was seen with increasing frequency as the disease process increased in extent as evaluated by CT scanning. There was no discernible difference in the CT appearances in those patients who clinically had limb-girdle, facioscapulohumeral or scapuloperoneal distribution of weakness.

  1. Spinal muscular atrophy astrocytes exhibit abnormal calcium regulation and reduced growth factor production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGivern, Jered V; Patitucci, Teresa N; Nord, Joshua A; Barabas, Marie-Elizabeth A; Stucky, Cheryl L; Ebert, Allison D

    2013-09-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a genetic disorder caused by the deletion of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene that leads to loss of motor neurons in the spinal cord. Although motor neurons are selectively lost during SMA pathology, selective replacement of SMN in motor neurons does not lead to full rescue in mouse models. Due to the ubiquitous expression of SMN, it is likely that other cell types besides motor neurons are affected by its disruption and therefore may contribute to disease pathology. Here we show that astrocytes in SMAΔ7 mouse spinal cord and from SMA-induced pluripotent stem cells exhibit morphological and cellular changes indicative of activation before overt motor neuron loss. Furthermore, our in vitro studies show mis-regulation of basal calcium and decreased response to adenosine triphosphate stimulation indicating abnormal astrocyte function. Together, for the first time, these data show early disruptions in astrocytes that may contribute to SMA disease pathology. PMID:23839956

  2. Loss of Periostin Results in Impaired Regeneration and Pancreatic Atrophy after Cerulein-Induced Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausmann, Simone; Regel, Ivonne; Steiger, Katja; Wagner, Nadine; Thorwirth, Manja; Schlitter, Anna M; Esposito, Irene; Michalski, Christoph W; Friess, Helmut; Kleeff, Jörg; Erkan, Mert

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix molecule periostin (POSTN, encoded by POSTN), which is secreted by activated pancreatic stellate cells, has important functions in chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. However, the role of POSTN in acute pancreatitis and subsequent regeneration processes has not been addressed so far. We analyzed the function of POSTN in pancreatic exocrine regeneration after the induction of a severe acute pancreatitis. Postn-deficient mice and wild-type control animals received repetitive cerulein injections, and a detailed histologic analysis of pancreatic tissues was performed. Although there was no difference in pancreatitis severity in the acute inflammatory phase, the recovery of the exocrine pancreas was massively impaired in Postn-deficient mice. Loss of Postn expression was accompanied by strong pancreatic atrophy and acinar-to-adipocyte differentiation, which was also reflected in gene expression patterns. Our data suggest that POSTN is a crucial factor for proper exocrine lineage-specific regeneration after severe acute pancreatitis. PMID:26632158

  3. Identification and characterization of sebaceous gland atrophy-sparing DGAT1 inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric S Muise

    Full Text Available Inhibition of Diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1 has been a mechanism of interest for metabolic disorders. DGAT1 inhibition has been shown to be a key regulator in an array of metabolic pathways; however, based on the DGAT1 KO mouse phenotype the anticipation is that pharmacological inhibition of DGAT1 could potentially lead to skin related adverse effects. One of the aims in developing small molecule DGAT1 inhibitors that target key metabolic tissues is to avoid activity on skin-localized DGAT1 enzyme. In this report we describe a modeling-based approach to identify molecules with physical properties leading to differential exposure distribution. In addition, we demonstrate histological and RNA based biomarker approaches that can detect sebaceous gland atrophy pre-clinically that could be used as potential biomarkers in a clinical setting.

  4. Isolated and painless (? atrophy of the infraspinatus muscle: left handed versus right handed volleyball players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago D. Gonçalves Côelho

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available The suprascapular nerve originates from the upper trunk of the brachial plexus or less frequently from the root of C5. It runs a short way and crosses the suprascapular notch. It innervates the supraspinatus muscle and the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joints. Then, it crosses the lateral edge of the spine of the scapula passing through the spinoglenoid notch, and innervates the infraspinatus muscle. These are potential sites of injury to the suprascapular nerve. Three cases of suprascapular nerve entrapment causing an isolated infraspinatus muscle atrophy in volleyball players were studied. It is suggested the hypothesis that the nature of the smash, in which the athlete uses the arm violently, more than does in volleyball service or in the art of reception, is the key to the pathogenesis of the lesion in volleyball players.

  5. p25alpha relocalizes in oligodendroglia from myelin to cytoplasmic inclusions in multiple system atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Yun Ju C; Lundvig, Ditte M S; Huang, Yue;

    2007-01-01

    of myelin and a high-affinity ligand for myelin basic protein (MBP), and in situ immunohistochemistry revealed that MBP and p25alpha colocalize in myelin in normal human brains. Analysis of MSA cases reveals dramatic changes in p25alpha and MBP throughout the course of the disease. In situ...... immunohistochemistry revealed a cellular redistribution of p25alpha immunoreactivity from the myelin to the oligodendroglial cell soma, with no overall change in p25alpha protein concentration using immunoblotting. Concomitantly, an approximately 80% reduction in the concentration of full-length MBP protein......p25alpha is an oligodendroglial protein that can induce aggregation of alpha-synuclein and accumulates in oligodendroglial cell bodies containing fibrillized alpha-synuclein in the neurodegenerative disease multiple system atrophy (MSA). We demonstrate biochemically that p25alpha is a constituent...

  6. Atrophy of foot muscles in diabetic patients can be detected with ultrasonography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Severinsen, Kaare; Obel, Annette; Jakobsen, Johannes;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To establish a bedside test with ultrasonography for evaluation of foot muscle atrophy in diabetic patients. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Thickness and cross-sectional area (CSA) of the extensor digitorum brevis muscle (EDB) and of the muscles of the first interstitium (MILs) were...... determined in 26 diabetic patients and in 26 matched control subjects using ultrasonography. To estimate the validity, findings were related to the total volume of all foot muscles determined at magnetic resonance imaging (MRI-FM(vol)). Furthermore, the relations of ultrasonographic estimates to nerve...... than in nonneuropathic diabetic patients (5.8 +/- 2.1 vs. 7.5 +/- 1.7 mm [P foot muscles determined at ultrasonography is directly related to foot muscle volume determined by MRI and to various...

  7. Bilateral Iris Atrophy after the Femtosecond Assisted Laser In Situ Keratomileusis Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenan Olcay

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To report an unknown complication of laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK surgery. Case Presentation. A 28-year-old female presented with photophobia and glare to our eye service. She stated in her medical history that she had undergone femtosecond assisted LASIK surgery in both eyes 15 months ago and her symptoms started just after this surgery. On admission, her best-corrected visual acuity was 10/10 in both eyes. She had mydriatic pupils with no direct light reflex. Examination of the anterior segment revealed bilateral iris atrophy projecting within the LASIK ablation zone and a transillumination defect was remarkable on the slit lamp examination. Conclusion. We hypothesized that this condition may have been caused by the abnormally increased IOP that resulted in ischemia in the iris vascular plexus during the suction process of surgery.

  8. Direct optical activation of skeletal muscle fibres efficiently controls muscle contraction and attenuates denervation atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magown, Philippe; Shettar, Basavaraj; Zhang, Ying; Rafuse, Victor F

    2015-10-13

    Neural prostheses can restore meaningful function to paralysed muscles by electrically stimulating innervating motor axons, but fail when muscles are completely denervated, as seen in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or after a peripheral nerve or spinal cord injury. Here we show that channelrhodopsin-2 is expressed within the sarcolemma and T-tubules of skeletal muscle fibres in transgenic mice. This expression pattern allows for optical control of muscle contraction with comparable forces to nerve stimulation. Force can be controlled by varying light pulse intensity, duration or frequency. Light-stimulated muscle fibres depolarize proportionally to light intensity and duration. Denervated triceps surae muscles transcutaneously stimulated optically on a daily basis for 10 days show a significant attenuation in atrophy resulting in significantly greater contractile forces compared with chronically denervated muscles. Together, this study shows that channelrhodopsin-2/H134R can be used to restore function to permanently denervated muscles and reduce pathophysiological changes associated with denervation pathologies.

  9. Visuospatial deficits with preserved reading ability in a patient with posterior cortical atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, M F

    2001-09-01

    Visuospatial deficits are characteristic of posterior cortical atrophy (PCA). A 58 year old woman had progressive dressing apraxia and environmental disorientation but continued to read voraciously. Positron emission tomography revealed hypometabolism of the occipitoparietal regions bilaterally, consistent with PCA. The symptoms suggested predominant dysfunction of the dorsal ("where") stream with abnormalities in visual localization and visuospatial integration; however, the patient also had a less pronounced apperceptive object agnosia. Further analysis of her preserved reading ability was performed. Familiar irregular words were read rapidly, but nonsense words were read slowly in a letter-by-letter fashion. She had a word superiority effect for embedded words and words with obscured letters but had difficulty reading stylized script or printing in unusual fonts. These findings suggested a dissociation between reading routes. Although the patient had a phonological dyslexia, her visuospatial processing was sufficient for access to preserved visual word forms for efficient lexical reading. PMID:11721864

  10. Perceptions of dyspareunia in postmenopausal women with vulvar and vaginal atrophy: findings from the REVIVE survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Murray A

    2014-07-01

    Symptoms of vulvar and vaginal atrophy (VVA), including dyspareunia and vaginal dryness, have a distinct negative impact on a woman's quality of life. The REVIVE survey highlighted the lack of awareness of VVA symptoms among postmenopausal women with vaginal symptoms, with many women reluctant to initiate discussions with their healthcare professionals despite the presence of vaginal symptoms. The REVIVE survey also provided insights into women's views of VVA treatments. Women reported displeasure with the vaginal administration route, lack of symptom relief with over-the-counter products, and concerns about the safety of estrogen therapies. With the high prevalence of VVA, obstetricians/gynecologists should become vigilant in identifying women with VVA by implementing screening and discussion of symptoms during routine office visits - providing patients with information about appropriate therapies based on the severity and impact of symptoms, keeping in mind individual preferences and perceptions.

  11. Correlation between muscle atrophy on MRI and manual strength testing in hereditary neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Porto, Lana A; Nicholson, Garth A; Ketheswaren, Pon

    2010-07-01

    MRI shows areas where muscle has been replaced by fat, a process which occurs in neuropathies. The purpose of this study was to investigate the usefulness of MRI in assessing disease severity in Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) and hereditary motor neuropathy (HMN) compared to manual muscle testing (MMT). MRI and MMT correlated well (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient 0.910, 0.789-1.0). MRI was useful to document the extent and pattern of muscle atrophy and fat replacement and to determine the level of denervation. In addition, nerve length dependent denervation was confirmed in both CMT and HMN. MRI will be useful to confirm MMT findings and may be helpful for diagnosis of early or subclinical disease, as well as to further investigate the mechanisms of hereditary neuropathies.

  12. Diagnosis of Progressive Spinal Muscular Atrophy by Using Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚娟; 丁新生; 陈克连; 程虹; 邓晓萱; 沈鸣九; 王颖

    2001-01-01

    Objective To understand the deletion in the survival motor neuron gene (SMN) of childhood-onset spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) in Chinese, and the value of diagnosis of SMA using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP)method. Methods Deletions of SMN gene of exon 7 and 8 in 10 cases of presumed SMA, and 20 normal controls from 6 families and 30 unrelated controls were performed by PCR-RFLP analysis. Results Deletions of SMN gene detected in 9 of 10 (90%) cases of presumed SMA . No deletions of SMN in the telomere were found in the other members of families and controls.Conclusion PCR-RFLP is a sensitive, specific and simple method in diagnosis of SMA.

  13. Charles Bonnet Syndrome Following Trans-Sphenoidal Adenomectomy without Optic Nerve Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jang-Ho; Ahn, Joon-Ho; Park, Jun-Bum

    2016-01-01

    Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS) can develop after trans-sphenoidal adenomectomy (TSA); however, the neural mechanisms remain unknown. Sensory deprivation and releasing phenomenon are both hypothetical explanations for this condition; however, there is no definite evidence that strongly supports either supposition. We report the first case of CBS after TSA without optic nerve atrophy. Postoperatively, the patient's vision seemed to be relatively well preserved, apart from the left-side hemianopsia in the right eye. Distinctive visual hallucinations only appeared when his eyes were closed, and these responded to quetiapine in a dose-dependent manner. Dose dependent change in colors and formation of hallucination was reported. Two weeks after quetiapine initiation, the patient's CBS was completely resolved. This unique case suggests that blocking sensory input from the periphery is more critical than neural damage of the bottom-up connection to the visual association cortex. In addition, quetiapine should be considered as a specific treatment for CBS. PMID:27757139

  14. Prenatal diagnosis of spinal muscular atrophy in Chinese by genetic analysis of fetal cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ting; DING Xin-sheng; LI Wen-lei; YAO Juan; DENG Xiao-xuan

    2005-01-01

    Background Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by degeneration of anterior horn cells of the spinal cord.The survival motor neuron gene is SMA-determining gene deleted in approximately 95% of SMA patients.This study was undertaken to predict prenatal SMA efficiently and rapidly in families with previously affected child.Methods Prenatal diagnosis was made in 8 fetuses with a family history of SMA.Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) were used for the detection of the survival motor neuron gene.Results The survival motor neuron gene was not found in 6 fetuses, ruling out the diagnosis of SMA.Two fetuses were detected positive and the pregnancies were terminated.Conclusion Our method is effective and convenient in prenatal diagnosis of SMA.

  15. Altered Alpha-Synuclein, Parkin, and Synphilin Isoform Levels in Multiple System Atrophy Brains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brudek, Tomasz; Winge, Kristian; Bredo Rasmussen, Nadja;

    2016-01-01

    Together with Parkinson's disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), Multiple System Atrophy (MSA) is a member of a diverse group of neurodegenerative disorders termed α-synucleinopathies. Previously, it has been shown that alpha-synuclein, parkin and synphilin-1 display disease specific...... controls using isoform-specific primers and exon specific antibodies in substantia nigra, striatum, cerebellar cortex, and nucleus dentatus. These regions are severely affected by alpha-synuclein pathology and neurodegeneration. Further, we have also investigated transcript levels for parkin and synphilin...... increased levels of parkin isoforms lacking the N-terminal ubiquitin-like domain and an aggregation-prone synphiln-1A isoform that causes neuronal toxicity in MSA. In PD brains, Parkin transcript variant 3, 7 and 11 were significantly and specifically overexpressed in the striatum and cerebellar cortex...

  16. PGC-1α is important for maintaining the balance of muscle mass and myofiber types in unloaded muscle atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoping; He, Jian; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Peng; Liu, Hongju; Li, Wenjiong

    2016-07-01

    PGC-1α, a transcriptional co-activator, has been shown mainly to determine the development of oxidative myofibers in skeletal muscle. However, whether PGC-1α functions to regulate the unloaded muscle atrophy and composition of myofiber types keeps unclear. MCK-PGC-1α overexpression transgenic mice (TG) and its wild type littermates (WT) were subjected to hindlimb unloading (HU) and induced unloaded muscle atrophy. After 14 days of HU, the mass of gastrocnemius, soleus, and plantaris muscles in WT mice decreased 17.9%, 28.2%, and 14.8%, respectively (Pmuscles. PGC-1α transgenic mice showed a 14.0% (Pmuscles mass after HU. To further confirm the effect of PGC-1α over-expression on the muscle mass loss under HU, change rate of muscle-body weight ratio was calculated, and the results indicated that the reduction of change rate of muscle-body weight ratio in PGC-1α transgenic gastrocnemius and soleus was significantly less than in WT mice (Pmuscle atrophy and myofiber switching from oxidative to glycolytic associated with a decrease in pSmad3 level after 14 days of HU. Importantly, overexpression of PGC-1α in C2C12 myoblasts protected PGC-1α-transfected myotubes from atrophy in vitro and the effect could be partially blocked by inducing pSmad3 with constitutively activated Smad3(C.A. smad3) transfection. Therefore, this study demonstrated a novel role and mechanism for PGC-1α in maintaining the balance of muscle mass and myofiber type MHCs in unloaded muscle atrophy via suppressing Smad3 activation. This report may prompt a hopeful therapeutic strategy for maintaining muscle mass and fiber type composition in disused muscle atrophies such as space weightlessness- or immobilization-induced muscle atrophy. Acknowledgments This work was supported by the Natural Sciences Foundation of China (31171144, 81272177 and 31171148), the State Key Laboratory Grant of Space Medicine Fundamentals and Application (SMFA13A01), and the National Key Laboratory Grant of Human

  17. Grb2-associated binder 1 polymorphism was associated with the risk of Helicobactor pylori infection and gastric atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuyuki Goto, Takafumi Ando, Kazuko Nishio, Sayo Kawai, Yoshiko Ishida, Mariko Naito, Hidemi Goto, Nobuyuki Hamajima

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Various single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs have explained the association between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori and gastric atrophy and cancer. This study investigated the associations of Grb2 associated binder 1 (Gab1 polymorphism and the combination of PTPN11 gene encoding src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP2 and Gab1 gene with gastric cancer and gastric atrophy among H. pylori seropositive subjects. Methods: A single nucleotide polymorphism at intron 2 of Gab1 (JST164345 was examined for 454 Japanese health checkup examinees (126 males and 328 females aged 35 to 85 without a history of gastric cancer and 202 gastric cancer patients (134 males and 68 females aged 33 to 94 with pathologically confirmed diagnosis of gastric adenocarcinoma. Results: The decreased OR of the Gab1 A/A for H. pylori seropositivity was 0.25 (95% confidence interval (CI: 0.08-0.71. Among seropositive healthy controls, the OR of the Gab1 G/A+A/A for gastric atrophy was significant (OR=1.95, 95% CI: 1.12 -3.40. Seropositive individuals with PTPN11 G/G and Gab1 G/A+A/A demonstrated the highest risk of gastric atrophy with significance (OR=3.49, 95% CI: 1.54-7.90 relative to PTPN11 G/A+A/A and Gab1 G/G, the lowest risk combination, as a reference. However, the gene-gene interaction between PTPN11 and Gab1 was not observed (OR=1.39, 95% CI: 0.41-4.66. Compared to gastric cancer case, the Gab1 did not influence the step of atrophy/metaplasia-gastric cancer sequence. Conclusions: This study represents that the Gab1 polymorphism was associated with the low risk of H. pylori infection and the high risk of gastric atrophy among seropositive healthy controls, and that seropositive individuals with PTPN11 G/G and Gab1 G/A+G/G were associated with the greatest risk of gastric atrophy. These findings require confirmation in much larger studies.

  18. Callosal atrophy in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease: different effects in different stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Paola, Margherita; Luders, Eileen; Di Iulio, Fulvia; Cherubini, Andrea; Passafiume, Domenico; Thompson, Paul M; Caltagirone, Carlo; Toga, Arthur W; Spalletta, Gianfranco

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that mainly affects grey matter (GM). Nevertheless, a number of investigations have documented white matter (WM) pathology associated with AD. The corpus callosum (CC) is the largest WM fiber bundle in the human brain. It has been shown to be susceptible to atrophy in AD mainly as a correlate of Wallerian degeneration of commissural nerve fibers of the neocortex. The aim of this study was to investigate which callosal regions are affected and whether callosal degeneration is associated with the stage of the disease. For this purpose, we analyzed high-resolution MRI data of patients with amnesic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) (n=20), mild AD (n=20), severe AD (n=10), and of healthy controls (n=20). Callosal morphology was investigated applying two different structural techniques: mesh-based geometrical modeling methods and whole-brain voxel-based analyses. Our findings indicate significant reductions in severe AD patients compared to healthy controls in anterior (genu and anterior body) and posterior (splenium) sections. In contrast, differences between healthy controls and mild AD patients or amnesic MCI patients were less pronounced and did not survive corrections for multiple comparisons. When correlating anterior and posterior WM density of the CC with GM density of the cortex in the severe AD group, we detected significant positive relationships between posterior sections of the CC and the cortex. We conclude that callosal atrophy is present predominantly in the latest stage of AD, where two mechanisms might contribute to WM alterations in severe AD: the Wallerian degeneration in posterior subregions and the myelin breakdown process in anterior subregions.

  19. Helicobacter pylori eradication lowers serum homocysteine level in patients without gastric atrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Birol Ozer; Ender Serin; Yuksel Gumurdulu; Fazilet Kayaselcuk; Ruksan Anarat; Gurden Gur; Kemal Kul; Mustafa Gu(c)lu; Sedat Boyacioglu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether Helicobacter pylori ( H pylori)infection caused hyperhomocysteinemia by altering serum vitamin B12, serum folate and erythrocyte folate levels and whether eradication of this organism decreased serum homocysteine level.METHODS: The study involved 73 dyspeptic H pylori positive patients, none of them had gastric mucosal atrophy based on rapid urease test and histology. Out of 73patients, 41 (56.2%) showed a successful eradication of H pylori 4 wk after the end of treatment. In these 41 patients, fasting serum vitamin B12, folate and homocysteine levels, and erythrocyte folate levels before and 4 wk after H pylorieradication therapy were compared.RESULTS: The group with a successful eradication of Hpylori had significantly higher serum vitamin B12 and erythrocyte folate levels in the post-treatment period compared to those in pre-treatment period (210±97 pg/mL vs 237±94 pg/mL, P<0.001 and 442±212 ng/mL vs 539±304 ng/mL, P = 0.024, respectively), but showed no significant change in serum folate levels (5.6±2.6 ng/mL vs 6.0±2.4 ng/mL, P= 0.341). Also, the serum homocysteine levels in this group were significantly lower after therapy (13.1±5.2 μmol/L vs 11.9±6.2 μmol/L, P = 0.002). Regression analysisshowed that serum homocysteine level was positively correlated with age (P = 0.01) and negatively with serum folate level before therapy (P = 0.003). CONCLUSION: Eradication of H pylori decreases serum homocysteine even in patients who do not exhibit gastric mucosal atrophy. It appears that the level of homocysteine in serum is related to a complex interaction among serum vitamin B12, serum folate and erythrocyte folate levels.

  20. Cortical brain atrophy and intra-individual variability in neuropsychological test performance in HIV disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Lindsay J; Miller, Eric N; Hinkin, Charles H; Alger, Jeffery R; Barker, Peter; Goodkin, Karl; Martin, Eileen M; Maruca, Victoria; Ragin, Ann; Sacktor, Ned; Sanders, Joanne; Selnes, Ola; Becker, James T

    2016-09-01

    To characterize the relationship between dispersion-based intra-individual variability (IIVd) in neuropsychological test performance and brain volume among HIV seropositive and seronegative men and to determine the effects of cardiovascular risk and HIV infection on this relationship. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) was used to acquire high-resolution neuroanatomic data from 147 men age 50 and over, including 80 HIV seropositive (HIV+) and 67 seronegative controls (HIV-) in this cross-sectional cohort study. Voxel Based Morphometry was used to derive volumetric measurements at the level of the individual voxel. These brain structure maps were analyzed using Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM2). IIVd was measured by computing intra-individual standard deviations (ISD's) from the standardized performance scores of five neuropsychological tests: Wechsler Memory Scale-III Visual Reproduction I and II, Logical Memory I and II, Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III Letter Number Sequencing. Total gray matter (GM) volume was inversely associated with IIVd. Among all subjects, IIVd -related GM atrophy was observed primarily in: 1) the inferior frontal gyrus bilaterally, the left inferior temporal gyrus extending to the supramarginal gyrus, spanning the lateral sulcus; 2) the right superior parietal lobule and intraparietal sulcus; and, 3) dorsal/ventral regions of the posterior section of the transverse temporal gyrus. HIV status, biological, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) variables were not linked to IIVd -related GM atrophy. IIVd in neuropsychological test performance may be a sensitive marker of cortical integrity in older adults, regardless of HIV infection status or CVD risk factors, and degree of intra-individual variability links with volume loss in specific cortical regions; independent of mean-level performance on neuropsychological tests. PMID:26303224