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Sample records for atrophy diagnosed immunohistochemically

  1. Subclassification of newly diagnosed glioblastomas through an immunohistochemical approach.

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    Siobhan Conroy

    Full Text Available Molecular signatures in Glioblastoma (GBM have been described that correlate with clinical outcome and response to therapy. The Proneural (PN and Mesenchymal (MES signatures have been identified most consistently, but others including Classical (CLAS have also been reported. The molecular signatures have been detected by array techniques at RNA and DNA level, but these methods are costly and cannot take into account individual contributions of different cells within a tumor. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether subclasses of newly diagnosed GBMs could be assessed and assigned by application of standard pathology laboratory procedures. 123 newly diagnosed GBMs were analyzed for the tumor cell expression of 23 pre-identified proteins and EGFR amplification, together allowing for the subclassification of 65% of the tumors. Immunohistochemistry (IHC-based profiling was found to be analogous to transcription-based profiling using a 9-gene transcriptional signature for PN and MES subclasses. Based on these data a novel, minimal IHC-based scheme for subclass assignment for GBMs is proposed. Positive staining for IDH1R132H can be used for PN subclass assignment, high EGFR expression for the CLAS subtype and a combined high expression of PTEN, VIM and/or YKL40 for the MES subclass. The application of the proposed scheme was evaluated in an independent tumor set, which resulted in similar subclass assignment rates as those observed in the training set. The IHC-based subclassification scheme proposed in this study therefore could provide very useful in future studies for stratification of individual patient samples.

  2. A retrospective study of the clinical, histological, and immunohistochemical manifestations of 5 dogs originally diagnosed histologically as necrotizing scleritis.

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    Denk, Nora; Sandmeyer, Lynne S; Lim, Christine C; Bauer, Bianca S; Grahn, Bruce H

    2012-03-01

    To describe the clinical, histological, and immunohistochemical manifestations of canine necrotizing scleritis. A retrospective examination of the clinical records and samples of ocular tissues from five dogs with a histological diagnosis 'necrotizing scleritis' was completed. Archived, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples and two control globes were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, Gram, periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) and Masson trichrome stains, and they were immunohistochemically labeled for CD3, CD18, and CD20. Of the five cases reviewed, only two could be confirmed as idiopathic necrotizing scleritis. The other three cases were retrospectively diagnosed as unilateral focal, non-necrotizing scleritis, one as episcleritis and the third was scleritis secondary to a proptosed globe based on our retrospective clinical, histological, and immunohistochemical evaluations. In these two cases, idiopathic necrotizing scleritis manifested as a bilateral, progressive, inflammatory disease of the sclera and cornea that induces significant uveitis. Light microscopic examination confirmed collagen degeneration and granulomatous inflammation. There was no evidence for an infectious etiology based on Gram's and PAS stainings. Immunohistochemical labeling revealed a predominance of B cells in idiopathic, bilateral necrotizing scleritis. Tinctorial staining abnormalities with Masson's trichrome stain were present in scleral collagen of the two cases with idiopathic necrotizing scleritis as well as a case of secondary traumatic scleritis. Based on a limited number of cases, idiopathic canine necrotizing scleritis shares similar histopathological features with non-necrotizing scleritis and episcleritis; however, necrotizing scleritis is B-cell-dominated and bilateral, and significant collagen alterations manifest with Masson's trichrome stain. © 2011 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  3. Surgery and Brain Atrophy In Cognitively Normal Elderly Subjects and Subjects Diagnosed with Mild Cognitive Impairment

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    Kline, Richard P.; Pirraglia, Elizabeth; Cheng, Hao; Santi, Susan De; Li, Yi; Haile, Michael; de Leon, Mony J.; Bekker, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Background Structural MRI is used to longitudinally monitor the progression of Alzheimer's disease from its presymptomatic to symptomatic phases. Using magnetic resonance imaging data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), we tested the hypothesis that surgery would affect brain parameters associated with progression of dementia. Materials and Methods Brain images from the neuroimaging initiative database were used to study normal volunteer subjects and patients with mild cognitive impairment for the age group 55 to 90 inclusive. We compared changes in regional brain anatomy for three visits that defined two inter-visit intervals for a surgical cohort (n=41) and a propensity matched non-surgical control cohort (n = 123). The first interval for the surgical cohort contained the surgical date. Regional brain volumes were determined with Freesurfer and quantitatively described with J-image software (University of California at San Francisco). Statistical analysis used Repeated Measures ANCOVA (SPSS, v.18.0; Chicago, IL). Results We found that surgical patients, during the first follow-up interval (5–9 months), but not subsequently, had increased rates of atrophy for cortical gray matter and hippocampus, and lateral ventricle enlargement, as compared to non-surgical controls. A composite score of five cognitive tests during this interval showed reduced performance for surgical patients with mild cognitive impairment. Conclusions Elderly subjects after surgery experienced an increased rate of brain atrophy during the initial evaluation interval, a time associated with enhanced risk for postoperative cognitive dysfunction. Although there was no difference in atrophy rate by diagnosis, subjects with mild cognitive impairment suffered greater subsequent cognitive effects. PMID:22293721

  4. Muscle atrophy

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    Muscle wasting; Wasting; Atrophy of the muscles ... There are two types of muscle atrophy: disuse and neurogenic. Disuse atrophy is caused by not using the muscles enough . This type of atrophy can often be ...

  5. Case report of optic atrophy in Dentatorubropallidoluysian Atrophy (DRPLA).

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    Silver, Michael R; Sethi, Kapil D; Mehta, Shyamal H; Nichols, Fenwick T; Morgan, John C

    2015-12-18

    Dentatorubropallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) is a rare autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease that is associated with numerous movement disorders. Ocular problems also occur with DRPLA with reports of corneal endothelial degeneration in some patients living with the disease. We report a new visual problem associated with DRPLA, optic atrophy. A 47 year-old man presented complaining of progressive visual loss associated with optic atrophy on ophthalmological evaluation. He gradually developed a progressive ataxia with dystonia. Brain MRI revealed a diffuse leukoencephalopathy. Genetic analysis revealed 62 CAG repeats in one allele of the DRPLA gene and he was diagnosed with DRPLA. Optic atrophy should be included in the clinical spectrum of DRPLA.

  6. Solving a 50 year mystery of a missing OPA1 mutation: more insights from the first family diagnosed with autosomal dominant optic atrophy

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    Zrenner Eberhart

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Up to the 1950s, there was an ongoing debate about the diversity of hereditary optic neuropathies, in particular as to whether all inherited optic atrophies can be ascribed to Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON or represent different disease entities. In 1954 W. Jaeger published a detailed clinical and genealogical investigation of a large family with explicit autosomal dominant segregation of optic atrophy thus proving the existence of a discrete disease different from LHON, which is nowadays known as autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA. Since the year 2000 ADOA is associated with genomic mutations in the OPA1 gene, which codes for a protein that is imported into mitochondria where it is required for mitochondrial fusion. Interestingly enough, the underlying mutation in this family has not been identified since then. Results We have reinvestigated this family with the aim to identify the mutation and to further clarify the underlying pathomechanism. Patients showed a classical non-syndromic ADOA. The long term deterioration in vision in the two teenagers examined 50 years later is of particular note 5/20 to 6/120. Multiplex ligation probe amplification revealed a duplication of the OPA1 exons 7-9 which was confirmed by long distance PCR and cDNA analysis, resulting in an in-frame duplication of 102 amino acids. Segregation was verified in 53 available members of the updated pedigree and a penetrance of 88% was calculated. Fibroblast cultures from skin biopsies were established to assess the mitochondrial network integrity and to qualitatively and quantitatively study the consequences of the mutation on transcript and protein level. Fibroblast cultures demonstrated a fragmented mitochondrial network. Processing of the OPA1 protein was altered. There was no correlation of the OPA1 transcript levels and the OPA1 protein levels in the fibroblasts. Intriguingly an overall decrease of mitochondrial proteins was observed

  7. Multiple System Atrophy

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    ... Home » Disorders » Patient & Caregiver Education » Fact Sheets Multiple System Atrophy Fact Sheet What is multiple system atrophy? ... can I get more information? What is multiple system atrophy? Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a progressive ...

  8. An unusual cause of optic atrophy in a child

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    Nishant Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 13-year-old child presenting with gross visual impairment was diagnosed as a case of optic atrophy. However, radiological investigations revealed osteopetrosis, which, though rare, can result in optic atrophy. The aim of this case report is to highlight this possibility while evaluating cases of optic atrophy in young patients.

  9. [Spinal muscular atrophies in the adult].

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    Camu, W

    2004-02-01

    Spinal muscular atrophies are heterogeneous group. The diagnostic process should be careful to uncover the main differential diagnoses and to identify familial cases. Clinical phenotype is highly variable. In familial ALS cases with SOD1 mutation, the clinical scene may mimic spinal muscular atrophy. A careful questionning and a complete electroneuromyographic exam are warranted to allow the neurologist to choose among more invasive investigations for differential and positive diagnosis such as MRI, nerve or muscle biopsy, genetic analysis.

  10. Optic nerve atrophy

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    Optic atrophy; Optic neuropathy ... There are many causes of optic atrophy. The most common is poor blood flow. This is called ischemic optic neuropathy. The problem most often affects older adults. ...

  11. Multiple System Atrophy (MSA)

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    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) Overview Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a rare, degenerative neurological disorder affecting your body's involuntary (autonomic) functions, including blood pressure, breathing, bladder function and muscle ...

  12. Dominant optic atrophy

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    Lenaers Guy

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Definition of the disease Dominant Optic Atrophy (DOA is a neuro-ophthalmic condition characterized by a bilateral degeneration of the optic nerves, causing insidious visual loss, typically starting during the first decade of life. The disease affects primary the retinal ganglion cells (RGC and their axons forming the optic nerve, which transfer the visual information from the photoreceptors to the lateral geniculus in the brain. Epidemiology The prevalence of the disease varies from 1/10000 in Denmark due to a founder effect, to 1/30000 in the rest of the world. Clinical description DOA patients usually suffer of moderate visual loss, associated with central or paracentral visual field deficits and color vision defects. The severity of the disease is highly variable, the visual acuity ranging from normal to legal blindness. The ophthalmic examination discloses on fundoscopy isolated optic disc pallor or atrophy, related to the RGC death. About 20% of DOA patients harbour extraocular multi-systemic features, including neurosensory hearing loss, or less commonly chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia, myopathy, peripheral neuropathy, multiple sclerosis-like illness, spastic paraplegia or cataracts. Aetiology Two genes (OPA1, OPA3 encoding inner mitochondrial membrane proteins and three loci (OPA4, OPA5, OPA8 are currently known for DOA. Additional loci and genes (OPA2, OPA6 and OPA7 are responsible for X-linked or recessive optic atrophy. All OPA genes yet identified encode mitochondrial proteins embedded in the inner membrane and ubiquitously expressed, as are the proteins mutated in the Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy. OPA1 mutations affect mitochondrial fusion, energy metabolism, control of apoptosis, calcium clearance and maintenance of mitochondrial genome integrity. OPA3 mutations only affect the energy metabolism and the control of apoptosis. Diagnosis Patients are usually diagnosed during their early childhood, because of

  13. Dominant optic atrophy.

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    Lenaers, Guy; Hamel, Christian; Delettre, Cécile; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Procaccio, Vincent; Bonneau, Dominique; Reynier, Pascal; Milea, Dan

    2012-07-09

    DEFINITION OF THE DISEASE: Dominant Optic Atrophy (DOA) is a neuro-ophthalmic condition characterized by a bilateral degeneration of the optic nerves, causing insidious visual loss, typically starting during the first decade of life. The disease affects primary the retinal ganglion cells (RGC) and their axons forming the optic nerve, which transfer the visual information from the photoreceptors to the lateral geniculus in the brain. The prevalence of the disease varies from 1/10000 in Denmark due to a founder effect, to 1/30000 in the rest of the world. DOA patients usually suffer of moderate visual loss, associated with central or paracentral visual field deficits and color vision defects. The severity of the disease is highly variable, the visual acuity ranging from normal to legal blindness. The ophthalmic examination discloses on fundoscopy isolated optic disc pallor or atrophy, related to the RGC death. About 20% of DOA patients harbour extraocular multi-systemic features, including neurosensory hearing loss, or less commonly chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia, myopathy, peripheral neuropathy, multiple sclerosis-like illness, spastic paraplegia or cataracts. Two genes (OPA1, OPA3) encoding inner mitochondrial membrane proteins and three loci (OPA4, OPA5, OPA8) are currently known for DOA. Additional loci and genes (OPA2, OPA6 and OPA7) are responsible for X-linked or recessive optic atrophy. All OPA genes yet identified encode mitochondrial proteins embedded in the inner membrane and ubiquitously expressed, as are the proteins mutated in the Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy. OPA1 mutations affect mitochondrial fusion, energy metabolism, control of apoptosis, calcium clearance and maintenance of mitochondrial genome integrity. OPA3 mutations only affect the energy metabolism and the control of apoptosis. Patients are usually diagnosed during their early childhood, because of bilateral, mild, otherwise unexplained visual loss related to optic discs

  14. Mimic syndromes in sporadic cases of progressive spinal muscular atrophy

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    Visser, J.; van den Berg-Vos, R. M.; Franssen, H.; van den Berg, L. H.; Vogels, O. J.; Wokke, J. H. J.; de Jong, J. M. B. V.; de Visser, M.

    2002-01-01

    Described are patients initially diagnosed with progressive spinal muscular atrophy (PSMA), in whom further evaluation established another diagnosis. The authors prospectively investigated incident and prevalent cases of PSMA. Seventeen of 89 patients, after initial registration, were later excluded

  15. Optic Nerve Atrophy

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    ... cord (hydrocephalus) may prevent further optic nerve damage. Spectacles may be prescribed to correct refractive error. When optic atrophy is unilateral protection of the good eye is essential and wearing of protective lenses should ...

  16. Microvillous inclusion disease (microvillous atrophy

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    Goulet Olivier

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Microvillous inclusion disease (MVID or microvillous atrophy is a congenital disorder of the intestinal epithelial cells that presents with persistent life-threatening watery diarrhea and is characterized by morphological enterocyte abnormalities. MVID manifests either in the first days of life (early-onset form or in the first two months (late-onset form of life. MVID is a very rare disorder of unknown origin, probably transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. To date, no prevalence data are available. Ultrastructural analyses reveal: 1 a partial to total atrophy of microvilli on mature enterocytes with apical accumulation of numerous secretory granules in immature enterocytes; 2 the highly characteristic inclusion bodies containing rudimentary or fully differentiated microvilli in mature enterocytes. Light microscopy shows accumulation of PAS-positive granules at the apical pole of immature enterocytes, together with atrophic band indicating microvillus atrophy and, in parallel, an intracellular PAS or CD10 positive line (marking the microvillous inclusion bodies seen on electron microscopy. Intestinal failure secondary to diarrhea is definitive. To date, no curative therapy exists and children with MVID are totally dependent on parenteral nutrition. Long-term outcome is generally poor, due to metabolic decompensation, repeated states of dehydration, infectious and liver complications related to the parenteral nutrition. As MVID is a very rare disorder, which is extremely difficult to diagnose and manage, children with MVID should be transferred to specialized pediatric gastro-intestinal centers, if possible, a center equipped to perform small bowel transplantation. Early small bowel transplantation resulting in intestinal autonomy gives new hope for disease management and outcome.

  17. Consensus Definition for Atrophy Associated with Age-Related Macular Degeneration on OCT: Classification of Atrophy Report 3.

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    Sadda, Srinivas R; Guymer, Robyn; Holz, Frank G; Schmitz-Valckenberg, Steffen; Curcio, Christine A; Bird, Alan C; Blodi, Barbara A; Bottoni, Ferdinando; Chakravarthy, Usha; Chew, Emily Y; Csaky, Karl; Danis, Ronald P; Fleckenstein, Monika; Freund, K Bailey; Grunwald, Juan; Hoyng, Carel B; Jaffe, Glenn J; Liakopoulos, Sandra; Monés, Jordi M; Pauleikhoff, Daniel; Rosenfeld, Philip J; Sarraf, David; Spaide, Richard F; Tadayoni, Ramin; Tufail, Adnan; Wolf, Sebastian; Staurenghi, Giovanni

    2017-11-02

    To develop consensus terminology and criteria for defining atrophy based on OCT findings in the setting of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Consensus meeting. Panel of retina specialists, image reading center experts, retinal histologists, and optics engineers. As part of the Classification of Atrophy Meetings (CAM) program, an international group of experts surveyed the existing literature, performed a masked analysis of longitudinal multimodal imaging for a series of eyes with AMD, and reviewed the results of this analysis to define areas of agreement and disagreement. Through consensus discussions at 3 meetings over 12 months, a classification system based on OCT was proposed for atrophy secondary to AMD. Specific criteria were defined to establish the presence of atrophy. A consensus classification system for atrophy and OCT-based criteria to identify atrophy. OCT was proposed as the reference standard or base imaging method to diagnose and stage atrophy. Other methods, including fundus autofluorescence, near-infrared reflectance, and color imaging, provided complementary and confirmatory information. Recognizing that photoreceptor atrophy can occur without retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) atrophy and that atrophy can undergo an evolution of different stages, 4 terms and histologic candidates were proposed: complete RPE and outer retinal atrophy (cRORA), incomplete RPE and outer retinal atrophy, complete outer retinal atrophy, and incomplete outer retinal atrophy. Specific OCT criteria to diagnose cRORA were proposed: (1) a region of hypertransmission of at least 250 μm in diameter, (2) a zone of attenuation or disruption of the RPE of at least 250 μm in diameter, (3) evidence of overlying photoreceptor degeneration, and (4) absence of scrolled RPE or other signs of an RPE tear. A classification system and criteria for OCT-defined atrophy in the setting of AMD has been proposed based on an international consensus. This classification is a more complete

  18. Immunohistochemical biomarkers in ameloblastomas.

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    do Canto, Alan Motta; Rozatto, Juliana Rodrigues; Schussel, Juliana Lucena; de Freitas, Ronaldo Rodrigues; Hasséus, Bengt; Braz-Silva, Paulo Henrique

    2016-11-01

    Ameloblastoma is an aggressive odontogenic tumour, which is locally invasive and highly recurrent. Studies show that ameloblastoma is a benign odontogenic neoplasia, being relatively rare and occasionally presenting behaviour of malignant lesions. In addition to these particularities, the histological diagnosis of ameloblastoma can be challenging when the tumour shows high rates of mitosis, absence of nuclear pleomorphism, basilar hyperplasia and neural invasion. In order to help in the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of this neoplasia, some immunohistochemical markers were shown to be associated with tumoural epithelium. The identification of these markers as well as of their association with clinical signs can be useful to elaborate more efficient treatment strategies and to control this pathology, including improvement of the quality of life of patients affected by this neoplasia. This article aims to review some markers associated with specific molecular pathways, bone remodelling, cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell signalling and tumour suppression.

  19. Histopathological and immunohistochemical diagnosis of infectious bursal disease in poultry birds

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    J. Singh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the present study was to diagnose infectious bursal disease (IBD using gross, histopathological, and immunopathological approaches and to compare efficacy of immunohistochemical techniques with conventional diagnostic techniques. Materials and Methods: A total of 33 samples were collected from the six different poultry farms from Ludhiana and the nearby districts. Upon gross analysis of the necropsied birds, the relevant tissue samples such as bursa, kidney, junction of proventriculus and gizzard, heart, and muscles were then processed for histopathological and immunohistochemical studies. Results: Varied macroscopic changes were noted in bursa, characterized as swollen, hemorrhages to atrophy in size. Nonetheless, hemorrhages over thigh muscles were rarely seen. Histologically, the bursa showed prominent fibrotic and atrophic changes. Rarefaction of bursal follicles with intermittent infiltration of lympho-mononuclear cells with chronic cystic changes was additional changes, considered to be paramount for IBD. Expression and localization of IBD specific viral antigens were noticed mainly intracellular to the rarefied areas of bursal follicle section(s, in conjunction to inner lining of the cystic cavities of affected follicles. In addition, the junction of proventriculus and gizzard, the heart muscle, respiratory ciliated epithelium, and proventriculus also revealed positive expression to IBD virus (IBDV antigen. Advanced immunopathological techniques, i.e., immunofluorescence further testified the evidence of antigen as positive green signal within affected follicles. Further consideration to the reliability of various techniques employed, positive correlation (r=0.64623 was emerged out with conventional pathological scoring. Conclusion: It is concluded that the bursa acts as an organ of choice for demonstrating IBDV antigen for specific diagnosis of disease using immunohistochemistry (IHC, and IHC staining is a precise

  20. Dominant optic atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenaers, Guy; Hamel, Christian; Delettre, Cécile

    2012-01-01

    DEFINITION OF THE DISEASE: Dominant Optic Atrophy (DOA) is a neuro-ophthalmic condition characterized by a bilateral degeneration of the optic nerves, causing insidious visual loss, typically starting during the first decade of life. The disease affects primary the retinal ganglion cells (RGC......) and their axons forming the optic nerve, which transfer the visual information from the photoreceptors to the lateral geniculus in the brain....

  1. [Muscle fiber atrophy].

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    Nonaka, Ikuya

    2012-01-01

    Muscle fibers have been classified into two major forms of red (slow twitch) and white (fast twitch) muscles. The red muscle utilizes lipid as energy source through mitochondrial metabolism and function to sustain the position against gravity (sometimes called as antigravity muscle). Under microgravity the red muscle is selectively involved. In our unloading study by hindlimb suspension experiment on rats, the one of the representative red muscle of soleus muscle underwent rapid atrophy; they reduced their weights about 50% after 2 week-unloading. In addition, myofibrils were occasionally markedly disorganized with selective thin filament loss. Mitochondria in the degenerated area were decreased in number. The white muscle fibers in the soleus muscle had mostly transformed to the red ones. It took about 1 month to recover morphologically. The satellite cell playing a major role in muscle regeneration was not activated. There still remained unsolved what are the mechanosensors to keep muscle function under normal gravity. Dr Nikawa's group proposed that one of ubiquitin ligases, Cbl-b is activated under microgravity and induces muscle fiber degeneration. There might be many factors to induce muscle atrophy and degeneration under microgravity. Further study is necessary to explore the pathomechanism of muscle atrophy in disused and under immobility conditions.

  2. Progressive hemifacial atrophy with ciliary body atrophy and ocular hypotony

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    T Ashwini Kini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Progressive hemifacial atrophy (PHA is a disease of unknown etiology affecting one-half of the face. Ocular involvement is uncommon. Atrophy of iris is rare, with only a few cases of partial atrophy being reported in the literature. We report a case of total atrophy of iris and ciliary body with associated ocular hypotony in a 16-year-old girl with PHA. We believe this is the first reported case of complete atrophy of iris and ciliary body in PHA. Ocular hypotony in PHA was thought to be due to intra-ocular inflammation. However in our case it appears to be secondary to severe atrophy of the ciliary body.

  3. Immunohistochemical sweat gland profiles.

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    Noël, Fanchon; Piérard, Gérald E; Delvenne, Philippe; Quatresooz, Pascale; Humbert, Philippe; Piérard-Franchimont, Claudine

    2013-09-01

    Human sweat glands are heterogeneous in their structures and functions. Accordingly, eccrine, apocrine, and apoeccrine glands are distinguished. Some immunohistochemical markers are expected to distinguish the sweat gland types in their secretory and excretory parts. This study used two sets of antibodies. The first panel was composed of antibodies directed to well-defined sweat gland structures. The molecular targets included the low-molecular-weight cytokeratins CAM 5.2, the S100-B protein, the epithelial membrane antigen (EMA), the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and the lectin Ulex europaeus agglutinin-1 (UEA-1). A second exploratory panel of antibodies targeted syndecan-1 (CD138), NKI-C3 (CD63), and CD68. They were used to disclose some undescribed antigen expressions in human sweat glands. The first set of antibodies confirmed previous findings. The immunoreactivities of the three sweat gland types were similar in the excretory ducts. By contrast, they were distinguished in the deeper coiled secretory portions of the glands. Clues supporting their distinction and probably their functional activity were obtained by immunohistochemistry using the S100-B protein, CEA and CD63 antibodies. The immunoreactivity to the S100-B protein, CEA and CD63 possibly help identifying apoeccrine sweat glands or a peculiar functional activity of eccrine sweat glands. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Immunohistochemical evaluation of a malignant phecochromocytoma in a wolfdog.

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    Sako, T; Kitamura, N; Kagawa, Y; Hirayama, K; Morita, M; Kurosawa, T; Yoshino, T; Taniyama, H

    2001-07-01

    A malignant pheochromocytoma with multiple metastases was diagnosed in a 7-year-old male wolfdog that resulted from a cross between an eastern timber wolf (Canis lupus lycaon) and an Alaskan malamute. A yellowish white neoplastic mass approximately 10 cm diameter was found in the right adrenal gland. The neoplasm penetrated through the wall of the caudal vena cava. A diagnosis of pheochromocytoma was established by histopathologic and immunohistochemical procedures. Immunohistochemically, the neoplastic cells expressed chromogranin A, substance P, synaptophysin, Leu-7, protein gene product 9.5, methionine-enkephalin, S100 protein, and galanin. Multiple metastatic tumors were found in the kidneys, spleen, lungs, heart, and liver.

  5. Imaging of the Macula Indicates Early Completion of Structural Deficit in Autosomal-Dominant Optic Atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rönnbäck, Cecilia; Milea, Dan; Larsen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) enables 3-dimensional imaging of the retina, including the layer of ganglion cells that supplies the optic nerve with its axons. We tested OCT as means of diagnosing and phenotyping autosomal-dominant optic atrophy (ADOA)....

  6. [Anatomoclinical correlations of spinal muscular atrophy in infancy].

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    Rufo Campos, M; Chinchón Lara, I; Arias León, E; Martínez López, A; Gómez de Terreros, I

    1993-03-01

    Forty-three cases of infantile spinal muscular atrophy diagnosed in our department between 1977 to 1991 are presented. Following clinical-pathologic evaluation, 27 cases were included in type I, 7 in type II and 9 cases in type III. The most frequent pathologic finding was the presence of large groups of atrophic fibers and hypertrophy of isolated fibers in muscle biopsy. Enzyme study showed higher mean levels of CPK and aldolase in type I with respect to the other two. Likewise, a significant statistical difference was found in the age of onset of the different groups. Finally, the clinical classification of spinal muscular atrophies in infancy is discussed.

  7. [Histopathological and immunohistochemical features of cardiac myxomas].

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    Hernández-Bringas, Omar; Ortiz-Hidalgo, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Mixomas are the most common primary cardiac tumors with an estimate incidence of 0,5-1 per 10(6) individuals per year. These tumors have generated interest due to their unique location (left side of the atrial septum near the fossa ovalis), variable clinical presentation and undefined histogenesis. Most cardiac myxomas occur sporadically while approximately 10% of diagnosed cases develop as part of Carney complex. This neoplasm is of uncertain histogenesis, however, endothelial, neurogenic, fibroblastic, and cardiac and smooth muscle cells differentiation has been proposed, and rarely glandular differentiation has been observed. Recently, due to the expression of certain cardiomyocyte-specific factors, an origin of mesenchymal cardiomyocytes progenitor cells has been suggested. Histologically cardiac myxomas are mainly composed of stellated, fusiform and polygonal cells, immersed in an amorphous myxoid matrix. Immunohistochemically some endothelial markers, such as CD31, CD34, FVIIIAg, are present. Positive staining has also been reported for S-100 protein, calretinin, vimentin, desmin, smooth muscle myosin, CD56, α1 antitrypsin and α 1antichymotrypsin. Surgical resection is currently the only treatment of choice. We present in this article a histopathological and immunohistochemical review of cardiac myxomas. Copyright © 2012 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  8. Antral atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, and preneoplastic markers in Mexican children with Helicobacter pylori-positive and Helicobacter pylori-negative gastritis.

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    Villarreal-Calderon, Rodolfo; Luévano-González, Arturo; Aragón-Flores, Mariana; Zhu, Hongtu; Yuan, Ying; Xiang, Qun; Yan, Benjamin; Stoll, Kathryn Anne; Cross, Janet V; Iczkowski, Kenneth A; Mackinnon, Alexander Craig

    2014-06-01

    Chronic inflammation and infection are major risk factors for gastric carcinogenesis in adults. As chronic gastritis is common in Mexican children, diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori and other causes of gastritis are critical for the identification of children who would benefit from closer surveillance. Antral biopsies from 82 Mexican children (mean age, 8.3 ± 4.8 years) with chronic gastritis (36 H pylori+, 46 H pylori-) were examined for gastritis activity, atrophy, intestinal metaplasia (IM), and immunohistochemical expression of gastric carcinogenesis biomarkers caudal type homeobox 2 (CDX2), ephrin type-B receptor 4 (EphB4), matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP3), macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), p53, β-catenin, and E-cadherin. Atrophy was diagnosed in 7 (9%) of 82, and IM, in 5 (6%) of 82 by routine histology, whereas 6 additional children (7%) (3 H pylori+) exhibited aberrant CDX2 expression without IM. Significant positive correlations were seen between EphB4, MMP3, and MIF (Pgastritis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Etiology and clinical profile of childhood optic nerve atrophy at a tertiary eye care center in South India

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    Chinta, Supriya; Wallang, Batriti S; Sachdeva, Virender; Gupta, Amit; Patil-Chhablani, Preeti; Kekunnaya, Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Optic nerve atrophy is an important ophthalmological sign that may be associated with serious systemic conditions having a significant bearing on the overall morbidity of the child. Studies specific to etiology of childhood optic atrophy are scarce, this being the first such study from India to the best of our knowledge. Aim: The aim was to analyze the clinical features and etiology of diagnosed cases of optic nerve atrophy in children

  10. Spinal muscular atrophy

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    D'Amico Adele

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disease characterized by degeneration of alpha motor neurons in the spinal cord, resulting in progressive proximal muscle weakness and paralysis. Estimated incidence is 1 in 6,000 to 1 in 10,000 live births and carrier frequency of 1/40-1/60. This disease is characterized by generalized muscle weakness and atrophy predominating in proximal limb muscles, and phenotype is classified into four grades of severity (SMA I, SMAII, SMAIII, SMA IV based on age of onset and motor function achieved. This disease is caused by homozygous mutations of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1 gene, and the diagnostic test demonstrates in most patients the homozygous deletion of the SMN1 gene, generally showing the absence of SMN1 exon 7. The test achieves up to 95% sensitivity and nearly 100% specificity. Differential diagnosis should be considered with other neuromuscular disorders which are not associated with increased CK manifesting as infantile hypotonia or as limb girdle weakness starting later in life. Considering the high carrier frequency, carrier testing is requested by siblings of patients or of parents of SMA children and are aimed at gaining information that may help with reproductive planning. Individuals at risk should be tested first and, in case of testing positive, the partner should be then analyzed. It is recommended that in case of a request on carrier testing on siblings of an affected SMA infant, a detailed neurological examination should be done and consideration given doing the direct test to exclude SMA. Prenatal diagnosis should be offered to couples who have previously had a child affected with SMA (recurrence risk 25%. The role of follow-up coordination has to be managed by an expert in neuromuscular disorders and in SMA who is able to plan a multidisciplinary intervention that includes pulmonary, gastroenterology/nutrition, and orthopedic care. Prognosis

  11. Muscular atrophy in diabetic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H; Gadeberg, P C; Brock, B

    1997-01-01

    Diabetic patients with polyneuropathy develop motor dysfunction. To establish whether motor dysfunction is associated with muscular atrophy the ankle dorsal and plantar flexors of the non-dominant leg were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging in 8 patients with symptomatic neuropathy, in 8 non......-neuropathic patients and in 16 individually matched control subjects. In the neuropathic patients the muscle strength of the ankle dorsal and plantar flexors was reduced by 41 % as compared to the non-neuropathic patients (p ... confirmed that the atrophy predominated distally. We conclude that muscular atrophy underlies motor weakness at the ankle in diabetic patients with polyneuropathy and that the atrophy is most pronounced in distal muscles of the lower leg indicating that a length dependent neuropathic process explains...

  12. Multiple system atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeraully, Tasneem

    2014-04-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a rare adult-onset synucleinopathy associated with dysautonomia and the variable presence of poorly levodopa-responsive parkinsonism and/or cerebellar ataxia. Other clinical symptoms that can be associated with MSA include hyperreflexia, stridor, sleep apnea, and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD). Mean survival from time of diagnosis ranges between 6 to 10 years, and definitive diagnosis is made on autopsy with demonstration of oligodendroglial cytoplasmic inclusions consisting of fibrillar α-synuclein. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be positive for cruciform T2 hyperintensity within the pons (the "hot cross bun sign"), volume loss in the pons and cerebellum, and T2 signal loss in the dorsolateral putamen with hyperintense rim on fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequencing. Although most cases are sporadic, genetic polymorphisms have been identified both in familial and sporadic cases of MSA, and influence observed phenotypes. Treatment is symptomatic, with both pharmacological and nonpharmacological strategies. There are currently no consensus guidelines on management. Current and future research is aimed at identifying biomarkers and developing disease-modifying therapies. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  13. Posterior cortical atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakzanis, K K; Boulos, M I

    2001-11-01

    The term posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) was introduced in 1988 to describe five patients with fairly homogeneous, but otherwise unclassified, symptoms. These patients showed signs of a slowly progressive dementia bearing behavioral and physiologic similarities to Alzheimer's disease, but with notable distinctions. Specifically, PCA is characterized by an early onset of visual agnosia, followed by some or all components of Balint's syndrome, Gerstmann's syndrome, and transcortical sensory aphasia. In this review, the history, epidemiology, pathophysiology, neurobehavioral aspects, assessment (including neurologic and neuropsychologic), differential diagnosis, and treatment recommendations for this disorder are reviewed. As originally defined, PCA appears to be a clinically homogeneous syndrome. The cluster of symptoms that are common to virtually all examined cases evidences this. Although the behavioral and cognitive properties of the disorder are well established, many aspects of PCA remain unclear. Specifically, available research and understanding of PCA epidemiology and treatment are highly inadequate. In fact, the majority of such information regarding PCA is derived from studies of Alzheimer's disease. To a lesser extent, Pick's disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease research have also provided insight into the underpinnings of PCA. Until PCA is categorically defined as a variant or subgroup of these other neurodegenerative disorders, however, such derivations are merely speculations.

  14. [Macular atrophy in Terson's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Vicente, J L; Frau-Aguilera, L; Sánchez-Vicente, P; Herrador-Montiel, A; Rueda-Rueda, T; Castilla-Lázpita, A; Romera-Piñero, A; Medina-Tapia, A

    2015-01-01

    The case is presented on a 63-year-old patient with Terson's syndrome who complained of loss of visual acuity. The optical coherence tomography showed macular atrophy. The patient developed macular atrophy probably secondary to macular hemorrhage caused by the rupture of a cerebral aneurysm. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. [Nocturnal stridor in multiple system atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louter, M.; Pelleboer, R.H.; Broek, G.B. van den; Post, B.; Pevernagie, D.A.; Overeem, S.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multiple system atrophy is a neurodegenerative disorder with parkinsonism, cerebellar ataxia and autonomic dysfunction. The occurrence of nocturnal stridor in patients with multiple system atrophy is associated with a decreased life expectancy. This is what makes adequate treatment so

  16. Automated measurement of medial temporal lobe atrophy by computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hattori, Masumi [Tokai Memorial Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kasugai-shi, Aichi (Japan); Koyama, Shuji; Kodera, Yoshie [Nagoya University School of Health Sciences, Department of Radiological Technology, Higashi-ku, Nagoya (Japan); Kogure, Yosuke [Tokyo Metropolitan Koto Geriatric Medical Center, Department of Radiology, 3-3-20 Shinsuna, Koutou-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Ido, Yasushi; Asano, Hirofumi [Kizawa Memorial Hospital, Department of Radiology, Minokamo-shi, Gifu (Japan)

    2007-04-15

    Objects Evaluation of medial temporal lobe (MTL) atrophy is usually performed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In Japan, however, the availability of computed tomography (CT) is much higher than that of MRI. The evaluation of MTL atrophy using CT may be useful when MRI is unavailable. This project developed a technique to automatically measure MTL atrophy using axial CT imaging and assessed the sensitivity of this method for diagnosing dementia of Alzheimer type (DAT). Materials and methods Linear measurements were taken for the width of the temporal horn, the width of the MTL, and the interuncal distance and the area of the temporal horn were measured. The algorithm developed employs the gray level threshold and the snake technique to process axial CT images. The algorithm was evaluated on 85 patients. Results The efficacy of this automated method was verified by a quantitative comparison of computerdetermined and manually obtained MTL measures, and based on its sensitivity and specificity in differentiating patients with DAT from control subjects. Conclusions This fully automated method of measuring MTL atrophy using CT is feasible and effective in DAT diagnosis, and simple to perform clinically. This method may be a practical alternative for MRI in some settings. (orig.)

  17. Atrophy in prostate needle biopsy cores and its relationship to prostate cancer incidence in screened men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postma, R; Schröder, F H; van der Kwast, T H

    2005-04-01

    To evaluate whether the incidence of atrophy reported on sextant biopsies is associated with subsequent prostate cancer detection and to obtain a more thorough analysis of the different categories and extent of atrophy, we performed a review of benign biopsy cores. In the Rotterdam section of the European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer, 4117 and 1840 men underwent sextant biopsy in the first and second screening round (4-year interval), respectively. Sextant biopsy was prompted by elevated prostate-specific antigen levels. For review, randomly taken benign sextant biopsies (n = 202) with a follow-up of at least 8 years were chosen. Before review, atrophy was reported in the biopsies of 11.4% and 8.7% of the first and second round, respectively. The prostate cancer incidence during 8 years of follow-up after an initial diagnosis of atrophy was 10.4%, which was not significantly different than the 12.3% of cancers detected after a benign diagnosis without reference to atrophy. After review, the incidence of simple atrophy, post-atrophic hyperplasia, and sclerotic atrophy in sextant biopsies was 91%, 47%, and 9%, respectively. Extensive atrophy was observed in 5% of biopsies. Only 2 men (4.7%) in the reviewed group had a subsequent diagnosis of prostate cancer in the 8 years of follow-up. Additionally, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia was diagnosed in 3 men (7.0%) in the second screening round. Atrophy, especially its simple form, is a very common lesion in prostate biopsy cores (94%). Atrophy in an asymptomatic population undergoing screening was not associated with a greater prostate cancer or prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia incidence during subsequent screening rounds.

  18. Immunohistochemical changes and atrophy after chronic ethanol intoxication in rat salivary glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Luanna Melo Pereira; Teixeira, Francisco Bruno; Alves-Junior, Sergio Melo; Pinheiro, João de Jesus Viana; Maia, Cristiane Socorro Ferraz; Lima, Rafael Rodrigues

    2015-09-01

    Alcoholism in humans is a chronic and progressive disease, characterized by loss of ethanol consumption control. Previous studies have reported that prolonged exposure to ethanol was responsible for alterations in glandular tissues of human and rodents. However, the interrelationship between ethanol and the glandular system is still the subject of numerous investigations, including the possible resistance of the submandibular gland (SG). In the present study, we investigated whether chronic ethanol exposure during adolescence may affect the parotid gland (PG) and SG in female rats. Female rats (n=16) were treated with distilled water or ethanol (dose of 6.5 g/kg/day, 22.5% w/v) through gavage for 55 days. Glands were collected, weighed and submitted to histological processing. Morphometric analysis was assessed by parenchymal and stromal area measurements. Smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), cytokeratin-19 (CK19) and apoptotic caspase-3 (CAS) were measured using ImageJ® software. Chronic ethanol administration did not alter the body weight of rats after treatment, although it increased glandular weight (pethanol induced CK19 and CAS overexpression, and the occurrence of duct-like structures in SG. These results suggest that ethanol induces histological and morphometric changes in salivary glands of female rats intoxicated with ethanol during adolescence. Furthermore, the mechanism underlying these alterations needs to be investigated but may be not related to the inflammatory process.

  19. Massive retinal gliosis: An unusual case with immunohistochemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay D Deshmukh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Massive retinal gliosis (MRG is a rare, benign intraocular condition that results from the proliferation of well-differentiated glial cells. Immunohistochemically, these cells show positivity for glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP, neuron specific enolase (NSE, and S-100 protein. We encountered a case of a 45-year-old female with loss of vision in the left eye. She had a history of trauma to that eye two years ago. Enucleation was carried out, because malignancy was suspected due to retinal calcification. On the basis of light microscopy and immunohistochemistry (IHC performed on the enucleated eye, it was diagnosed as massive retinal gliosis.

  20. Sebaceous carcinoma: an immunohistochemical reappraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansai, Shin-ichi; Takeichi, Hiromi; Arase, Seiji; Kawana, Seiji; Kimura, Tetsunori

    2011-08-01

    The rates of distant metastases and tumor death in sebaceous carcinoma (SC) have been reported to be higher than those of other cutaneous carcinomas, such as squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC), regardless of whether they occur in ocular or extraocular regions. Therefore, strict differentiation of SC from SCC and BCC is required. In this article, we report immunohistochemical findings of SC and compare these data to those of SCC, BCC, and sebaceoma. An immunohistochemical study was performed using 7 antibodies [anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), anti-epithelial membrane antigen (EMA), anti-CA15-3, anti-CA19-9, anti-androgen receptor (AR), anti-epithelial antigen (Ber-EP4), and anti-adipophilin (ADP)] on 35 cases of SC (16 cases in ocular and 19 cases in extraocular regions) and 10 cases of each SCC (5 cases in ocular and 5 cases in extraocular regions), BCC (5 cases in ocular and 5 cases in extraocular regions), and sebaceoma (no cases arose on the eyelids). In summary, the typical immunophenotypes of SC were EMA+, CA15-3+, AR+, Ber-EP4-, and ADP+; those of sebaceoma were CEA-, EMA+, Ber-EP4-, and ADP+; those of SCC were CEA-, EMA+, CA19-9-, AR-, Ber-EP4-, and ADP-; and those of BCC were CEA-, EMA-, CA15-3-, Ber-EP4+, and ADP-. Other antibody tests for each neoplasm were positive in about half of the cases. The detection of AR and ADP was useful for differentiating SC from SCC, whereas the determination of EMA, CA15-3, Ber-EP4, and ADP was valuable in differentiating SC from BCC.

  1. Adult-onset spinal muscular atrophy: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juntas Morales, R; Pageot, N; Taieb, G; Camu, W

    2017-05-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) refers to a group of disorders affecting lower motor neurons. The age of onset of these disorders is variable, ranging from the neonatal period to adulthood. Over the last few years, there has been enormous progress in the description of new genes and phenotypes that throw new light on the molecular pathways involved in motor neuron degeneration. Advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of the most frequent forms, SMA linked to SMN1 gene mutations and Kennedy disease, has led to the development of therapeutic strategies currently being tested in clinical trials. This report provides a general overview of the clinical features and pathophysiological mechanisms in adult-onset genetic SMA disorders in which the causative gene has been identified (SMN1-related SMA, Kennedy disease, CHCHD10, TRPV4, DYNC1H1 and BICD2). Sporadic lower motor neuron disease, also known as progressive muscular atrophy (PMA), is also discussed. The finding of TDP-43 aggregates in immunohistochemical studies of PMA strongly supports the idea that it is a phenotypic variant of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Neuronal involvement in muscular atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Alejandro Cisterna

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The innervation of skeletal myofibers exerts a crucial influence on the maintenance of muscle tone and normal operation. Consequently, denervated myofibers manifest atrophy, which is preceded by an increase in sarcolemma permeability. Recently, de novo expression of hemichannels formed by connexins and other none selective channels, including P2X7 receptors, TRPV2 channels were demonstrated in denervated fast skeletal muscles. The denervation-induced atrophy was drastically prevented in denervated muscles deficient in connexins 43 and 45. Nonetheless, the transduction mechanism by which the nerve represses the expression of the above mentioned none selective channels remains unknown. The paracrine action of extracellular signaling molecules including ATP, neurotrophic factors (i.e., BDNF, agrin/Lrp4/MuSK and acetylcholine are among the possible perpetrators of repression for connexin expression. This review discusses the possible role of relevant factors in maintaining the normal functioning of fast skeletal muscles and suppression of connexin hemichannel expression.

  3. Histological and Immunohistochemical Revision of Hepatocellular Adenomas: A Learning Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Fonseca

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Light has been shed on the genotype/phenotype correlation in hepatocellular adenoma (HCA recognizing HNF1α-inactivated HCA (H-HCA, inflammatory HCA (IHCA, and β-catenin-activated HCA (b-HCA. We reviewed retrospectively our surgical HCA series to learn how to recognize the different subtypes histopathologically and how to interpret adequately their immunohistochemical staining. From January 1992 to January 2012, 37 patients underwent surgical resection for HCA in our institution. Nine had H-HCA (25% characterized by steatosis and loss of L-FABP expression; 20 had IHCA (55.5% showing CRP and/or SAA expression, sinusoidal dilatation, and variable inflammation; and 1 patient had both H-HCA and IHCA. In 5 patients (14%, b-HCA with GS and β-catenin nuclear positivity was diagnosed, two already with hepatocellular carcinoma. Two cases (5.5% remained unclassified. One of the b-HCA showed also the H-HCA histological and immunohistochemical characteristics suggesting a subgroup of β-catenin-activated/HNF1α-inactivated HCA, another b-HCA exhibited the IHCA histological and immunohistochemical characteristics suggesting a subgroup of β-catenin-activated/inflammatory HCA. Interestingly, three patients had underlying vascular abnormalities. Using the recently published criteria enabled us to classify histopathologically our retrospective HCA surgical series with accurate recognition of b-HCA for which we confirm the higher risk of malignant transformation. We also underlined the association between HCA and vascular abnormalities.

  4. Lobar atrophy without Pick bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulette, C M; Crain, B J

    1992-01-01

    Four patients from the Kathleen Price Bryan Brain Bank with clinical Pick's syndrome are presented. Thorough neurological evaluation revealed no evidence of a movement disorder. The brains showed marked knife-blade type atrophy of the frontal and temporal lobes with relative sparing of the superior temporal gyrus and parietal and occipital lobes. There was marked caudate atrophy in all four. Histologically there was severe neuronal loss and gemistocytic astrocytosis in the involved areas with marked myelin pallor in the deep white matter and subcortical gliosis. There was sometimes marked spongiform change in cortical layer 2. There was severe neuronal loss and gliosis of the caudate nucleus. The gross and microscopic features were characteristic of Pick's disease except that careful search failed to uncover either Pick's bodies or Pick's cells. Review of the literature revealed that fronto-temporal cortical and caudate atrophy with clinical features of Pick's disease has received many different names including Pick's disease type C, Pick's disease type II, progressive subcortical gliosis, presenile glial dystrophy, long duration Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, frontal lobe degeneration, dysphasic dementia, and dementia lacking distinctive histologic features. Nevertheless, the morphologic findings in the present cases so closely resemble Pick's disease that they may well represent endstage Pick's disease. In our experience, such cases account for a significant proportion of non-Alzheimer disease dementia.

  5. An unusual organ involvement in a case of Werner Syndrome: thyroid atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Altay

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Werner Syndrome (WS is a premature aging disease that begins in adolescence or early adulthood and results in the appearance of old age by 30-40 years of age. Some endocrinological abnormalities were manifested in this rare disease, such as hypogonadism, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia. In this article, we present a nineteen years-old female patient who had been diagnosed as WS two years ago because of type 2 diabetes mellitus, osteopenia, hyperlipidemia, cataract, gray hair, and skin atrophy. Subclinical hypothyroidism was detected at her laboratory tests. Thyroid ultrasonography (USG showed thyroid atrophy. Fine needle aspiration biopsy of both lobes confirmed this diagnose and excluded some infiltrative diseases such as amyloidosis. It should be kept in mind that thyroid atrophy could be seen in WS and, therefore, detailed thyroid examination including thyroid USG and close follow up should be performed in all patients with WS. [J Contemp Med 2015; 5(2.000: 144-146

  6. Little effects of Insulin-like Growth Factor-I on testicular atrophy induced by hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casares Amelia

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insulin-like Growth Factor-I (IGF-I supplementation restores testicular atrophy associated with advanced liver cirrhosis that is a condition of IGF-I deficiency. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of IGF-I in rats with ischemia-induced testicular atrophy (AT without liver disease and consequently with normal serum level of IGF-I. Methods Testicular atrophy was induced by epinephrine (1, 2 mg/Kg intra-scrotal injection five times per week during 11 weeks. Then, rats with testicular atrophy (AT were divided into two groups (n = 10 each: untreated rats (AT receiving saline sc, and AT+IGF, which were treated with IGF-I (2 μg.100 g b.w.-1.day-1, sc. for 28d. Healthy controls (CO, n = 10 were studied in parallel. Animals were sacrificed on day 29th. Hypophyso-gonadal axis, IGF-I and IGFBPs levels, testicular morphometry and histopathology, immuno-histochemical studies and antioxidant enzyme activity phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (PHGPx were assessed. Results Compared to controls, AT rats displayed a reduction in testicular size and weight, with histological testicular atrophy, decreased cellular proliferation and transferrin expression, and all of these alterations were slightly improved by IGF-I at low doses. IGF-I therapy increased signifincantly steroidogenesis and PHGPx activity (p Conclusion In testicular atrophy by hypoxia, condition without IGF-I deficiency, IGF-treatment induces only partial effects. These findings suggest that IGF-I therapy appears as an appropriate treatment in hypogonadism only when this is associated to conditions of IGF-I deficiency (such as Laron Syndrom or liver cirrhosis.

  7. Carrier testing for spinal muscular atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitlin, Jonathan M.; Fischbeck, Kenneth; Crawford, Thomas O.; Cwik, Valerie; Fleischman, Alan; Gonye, Karla; Heine, Deborah; Hobby, Kenneth; Kaufmann, Petra; Keiles, Steven; MacKenzie, Alex; Musci, Thomas; Prior, Thomas; Lloyd-Puryear, Michele; Sugarman, Elaine A.; Terry, Sharon F.; Urv, Tiina; Wang, Ching; Watson, Michael; Yaron, Yuval; Frosst, Phyllis; Howell, R. Rodney

    2014-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy is the most common fatal hereditary disease among newborns and infants. There is as yet no effective treatment. Although a carrier test is available, currently there is disagreement among professional medical societies who proffer standards of care as to whether or not carrier screening for spinal muscular atrophy should be offered as part of routine reproductive care. This leaves health care providers without clear guidance. In fall 2009, a meeting was held by National Institutes of Health to examine the scientific basis for spinal muscular atrophy carrier screening and to consider the issues that accompany such screening. In this article, the meeting participants summarize the discussions and conclude that pan-ethnic carrier screening for spinal muscular atrophy is technically feasible and that the specific study of implementing a spinal muscular atrophy carrier screening program raises broader issues about determining the scope and specifics of carrier screening in general. PMID:20808230

  8. Seronegative Intestinal Villous Atrophy: A Diagnostic Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Martins

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is the most important cause of intestinal villous atrophy. Seronegative intestinal villous atrophy, including those that are nonresponsive to a gluten-free diet, is a diagnostic challenge. In these cases, before establishing the diagnosis of seronegative celiac disease, alternative etiologies of atrophic enteropathy should be considered. Recently, a new clinical entity responsible for seronegative villous atrophy was described—olmesartan-induced sprue-like enteropathy. Herein, we report two uncommon cases of atrophic enteropathy in patients with arterial hypertension under olmesartan, who presented with severe chronic diarrhea and significant involuntary weight loss. Further investigation revealed intestinal villous atrophy and intraepithelial lymphocytosis. Celiac disease and other causes of villous atrophy were ruled out. Drug-induced enteropathy was suspected and clinical improvement and histologic recovery were verified after olmesartan withdrawal. These cases highlight the importance for clinicians to maintain a high index of suspicion for olmesartan as a precipitant of sprue-like enteropathy.

  9. Classification of feline intraocular neoplasms based on morphology, histochemical staining, and immunohistochemical labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grahn, Bruce H; Peiffer, Robert L; Cullen, Cheryl L; Haines, Deborah M

    2006-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate morphologic, histochemical, and immunohistochemical characteristics of well-differentiated and anaplastic intraocular neoplasms of cats, and to develop a diagnostic algorithm for, and investigate the association of ruptured lenses with these neoplasms. Seventy-five feline globes with intraocular neoplasms were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and examined by light microscopy. Morphologic diagnoses included 33 intraocular sarcomas, 17 diffuse iris melanomas, 15 lymphosarcomas, three ciliary adenomas, one metastatic carcinoma, and six undifferentiated intraocular neoplasms. Sections of these globes were then stained with periodic acid Schiff (PAS), and immunohistochemical (IHC) labels for various cellular markers. Histochemical staining and IHC labeling confirmed cellular differentiation in 73/75 neoplasms but was discordant with morphologic diagnoses in 8/75. These included four neoplasms morphologically diagnosed as lymphosarcomas but which expressed differentiation antigens consistent with melanoma (n = 3) or ciliary adenocarcinoma (n = 1), and four tumors morphologically diagnosed as intraocular sarcomas that expressed differentiation antigens for melanoma (n = 2), metastatic carcinoma (n = 1), or remained undifferentiated (n = 1). Immunohistochemical labeling suggested a diagnosis in 5/6 morphologically undifferentiated neoplasms including one intraocular sarcoma, two diffuse iridal melanomas, and two ciliary adenocarcinomas. Based upon morphologic, histochemical, and IHC characterization, ruptured lens capsules were detected in 28/30 intraocular sarcomas, 3/24 diffuse iris melanomas and 1/11 lymphosarcomas, but not in ciliary epithelial neoplasms, metastatic carcinomas, or undifferentiated intraocular neoplasms. An algorithm is provided that facilitates stain and IHC label selection for differentiating anaplastic intraocular feline neoplasms.

  10. Retrospective study and immunohistochemical analysis of canine mammary sarcomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolka, Izabella; Sapierzyński, Rafał; Król, Magdalena

    2013-12-09

    Canine mammary sarcomas (CMSs) are rarely diagnosed in female dogs, which explains the scarcity of immunohistochemical findings concerning those tumors. This paper presents the results of a retrospective study into CMSs and discusses the clinical features of the analyzed tumors, the expression of intermediate filaments CK, Vim, Des and α-SMA, and the expression of p63, Ki67, ERα, PR and p53 protein. Four percent of all canine mammary tumors (CMTs) were classified as CMSs, and they represented 5.1% of malignant CMTs. The mean age at diagnosis was 11.1 ± 2.8 years. Large breed dogs were more frequently affected (38.7%). The majority of observed CMSs were fibrosarcomas (2.1%). All CMSs expressed vimentin, and higher levels of vimentin expression were noted in fibrosarcomas and osteosarcomas. Ki67 expression was significantly correlated with the grade of CMS. Our results revealed that CMSs form a heterogeneous group, therefore, immunohistochemical examinations could support differential and final diagnosis. Although this study analyzed a limited number of samples, the reported results can expand our knowledge about CMSs. Further work is required in this field.

  11. Etiology and clinical profile of childhood optic nerve atrophy at a tertiary eye care center in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriya Chinta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Optic nerve atrophy is an important ophthalmological sign that may be associated with serious systemic conditions having a significant bearing on the overall morbidity of the child. Studies specific to etiology of childhood optic atrophy are scarce, this being the first such study from India to the best of our knowledge. Aim: The aim was to analyze the clinical features and etiology of diagnosed cases of optic nerve atrophy in children <16 years of age. Materials and Methods: Retrospective review of records of children diagnosed with optic nerve atrophy between the ages of 0 and 16 years from 2006 to 2011. Results: A total of 324 children (583 eyes were identified. Among these 160 (49% presented with defective vision, 71 (22% with strabismus, 18 (6% with only nystagmus. Rest had a combination of two or three of the above symptoms. Sixty-five patients (20% had a unilateral affection. Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy seen in 133 patients (41% was the most frequent cause of childhood optic atrophy, followed by idiopathic in 98 (30%, hydrocephalus in 24 (7%, compressive etiology in 18 (5%, infective in 19 (6%, congenital in 6 (2%, inflammatory in 5 (2% patients, respectively. Conclusion: Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy appears to be the most common cause of optic atrophy in children in this series. The most common presenting complaint was defective vision.

  12. Ductal adenocarcinoma of the prostate: immunohistochemical findings and clinical significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sha JJ

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Jianjun Sha,1,2 Juanjie Bo,1 Jiahua Pan,1 Lianhua Zhang,1 Hanqing Xuan,1 Wei Chen,1 Dong Li,1 Zhaoliang Wang,1 Dongming Liu,1 Yiran Huang1,2 1Department of Urology, Renji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, 2School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China Introduction: To investigate the clinical features, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of ductal adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Methods: The clinicopathological and immunohistochemical data of seven patients with ductal adenocarcinoma of the prostate were retrospectively analyzed. All patients underwent physical examination, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, bone scan, cystoscopy, and computed tomography (CT scan. The level of prostate-specific antigen (PSA before and after surgery was assessed. Different prostate cancer markers were used for immunohistochemical staining. Results: The mean age of the seven patients diagnosed with prostatic ductal adenocarcinoma in this study was 76.2 years (range 57–88. Five patients presented with intermittent and painless gross hematuria, one patient with progressive dysuria, and one patient with elevated serum PSA on routine health examination. The level of PSA before surgery ranged from 1.3 to 45.0 ng/mL. Immunohistochemical staining results of the prostatic ductal adenocarcinoma confirmed positivity for PSA, prostatic acid phosphatase, androgen receptor, and alpha-methyacyl co-enzyme A (CoA-reductase markers. Two of the patients underwent bilateral orchiectomy combined with anti-androgen therapy, three underwent transurethral resection of prostate, one received radical prostatectomy, and one received medical castration therapy. The clinical outcomes of all patients were satisfactory, based on follow-up data. The symptoms of hematuria and dysuria were ameliorated well, and the postoperative PSA level decreased below 4.0 ng/mL. Recurrence or metastasis of disease was

  13. Brain stem and cerebellar atrophy in chronic progressive neuro-Behçet's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanoto, Masafumi, E-mail: mkanoto@med.id.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Iida-Nishi 2-2-2, 990-9585 Yamagata (Japan); Hosoya, Takaaki, E-mail: thosoya@med.id.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Iida-Nishi 2-2-2, 990-9585 Yamagata (Japan); Toyoguchi, Yuuki, E-mail: c-elegans_0201g@mail.goo.ne.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Iida-Nishi 2-2-2, 990-9585 Yamagata (Japan); Oda, Atsuko, E-mail: a.oda@med.id.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Iida-Nishi 2-2-2, 990-9585 Yamagata (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: Chronic progressive neuro-Behçet's disease (CPNBD) resembles multiple sclerosis (MS) on patient background and image findings, and therefore is difficult to diagnose. The purpose is to identify the characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of CPNBD and to clarify the differences between the MRI findings of CPNBD and those of MS. Materials and methods: The subjects consist of a CPNBD group (n = 4; 1 male and 3 females; mean age, 51 y.o.), a MS group (n = 19; 3 males and 16 females; mean age, 45 y.o.) and a normal control group (n = 23; 10 males and 13 females; mean age, 45 y.o.). Brain stem atrophy, cerebellar atrophy, and leukoencephalopathy were retrospectively evaluated in each subjects. In middle sagittal brain MR images, the prepontine distance was measured as an indirect index of brain stem and cerebellar atrophy and the pontine and mesencephalic distance was measured as a direct index of brain stem atrophy. These indexes were statistically analyzed. Results: Brain stem atrophy, cerebellar atrophy, and leukoencephalopathy were seen in all CPNBD cases. Prepontine distance was significantly different between the CPNBD group and the MS group (p < 0.05), and between the CPNBD group and the normal control group (p < 0.001). Pontine and mesencephalic distance were significantly different between the CPNBD group and the MS group (p < 0.001, p < 0.01 respectively), and between the CPNBD group and the normal control group (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Chronic progressive neuro-Behçet's disease should be considered in patients with brain stem and cerebellar atrophy in addition to leukoencephalopathy similar to that seen in multiple sclerosis.

  14. Association between anti-endomysial antibody and total intestinal villous atrophy in children with coeliac disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgenc F

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is growing evidence to suggest that detection of anti-gliadin antibody (AGA and anti-endomysial antibody (EmA can serve as sensitive markers of the degree of histological abnormalities in patients with coeliac disease. AIM: To evaluate the association between the presence of AGA and EmA and villous atrophy in intestinal biopsies of children with suspected coeliac disease. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: Intestinal samples of 46 children with failure to thrive, chronic diarrhoea, malabsorption and short stature with either AGA and/or EmA positivity were evaluated, retrospectively. The diagnosis of coeliac disease was based on ESPGHAN criteria. METHODS AND MATERIAL: Patients with total villous atrophy who fulfilled the ESPGHAN criteria for the diagnosis of coeliac disease were diagnosed to have coeliac disease. Nine patients without villous atrophy were taken as negative controls for this study. AGA-IgA was measured both by immunoflourescence (IF and ELISA and EmA-IgA by IF while patients were on normal diet. Relationship between autoantibody positivity and intestinal total villous atrophy was evaluated. RESULTS: Overall positivity for AGA IgA was 85% (39/46 by IF+ELISA and EmA positivity was 85% (39/46 by IF within the study group. Histological examination revealed total villous atrophy with lymphocyte infiltration and crypt hyperplasia in 37 (80% patients. AGA IgA was positive in 14 (38% and 31 (84% of these children by ELISA and IF, respectively. EmA positivity was detected in 35/37 (95% cases with atrophy and 4/9 (44% without atrophy (p=0.002. Thirty out of 37 (81% patients with villous atrophy had both AGA IgA (IF and EmA positivity (p=0.186. All of the sixteen patients that had both positive AGA IgA (ELISA+IF and EmA had total villous atrophy (p=0.037. CONCLUSION: A significant association between total villous atrophy and EmA positivity has been documented in this study.

  15. Spinal Muscular Atrophy: A Short Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah Ashrafzadeh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a genetic disorder which affect nervous system and is characterized with progressive distal motor neuron weakness. The survival motor neuron (SMN protein level reduces in patients with SMA. Two different genes code survival motor neuron protein in human genome. Skeletal and intercostal muscles denervation lead to weakness, hypotony, hyporeflexia, respiratory failure, symmetric muscle atrophy and paralysis in patients with SMA. Manifestations are prominent in proximal muscle of lower extremities. There is no curative treatment for spinal muscular atrophy, and supportive treatment should be considered to improve patients’ quality of life and independency. New treatment strategies focus on gene therapy or invent method to increase survival motor neuron protein level. The aim of this study is to review Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA clinical and molecular manifestations.

  16. Lectin binding patterns and immunohistochemical antigen detection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ibrahim Eldaghayes

    2018-02-09

    Feb 9, 2018 ... the effect of infection with Brucella abortus on the pattern of lectin binding in bovine fetal lungs (n=6) and bovine placentas (n=5). Fetal lungs and placenta from heifers experimentally inoculated with B. abortus, strain 2308 were examined by histological, lectin-histochemical, immunohistochemical and ...

  17. Immunohistochemical evaluation of iron accumulation in term ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Classical immunohistochemical studies on placenta have shown that there is a linear increase in iron storage in the placenta in the first half of a normal pregnancy, however, these stocks are decreased in normal 3rd trimester placenta. Iron accumulation in term placentas of preeclamptic and normal pregnancies were ...

  18. A morphological and immunohistochemical evaluation of gastric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Gastric resections for carcinoma are common, but gastric carcinoma in South Africa, and particularly within the Western Cape province, has not been well documented. Method: The objective of the study was to immunohistochemically evaluate HER2/ neu overexpression, determine aberrations in β-catenin and ...

  19. Type II muscle fibers atrophy associated with silent corticotroph adenoma in a dog.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Insabato

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The Silent Corticotroph Adenoma (SCA is a pituitary adenoma variant characterized by the immunoreactivity for adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH and related peptides, without the clinical signs of Cushing's disease. SCA has been postulated to either secrete structurally abnormal ACTH that is inactive but detectable by immunohistochemistry or radioimmunoassay, or to secrete ACTH intermittently or at low levels continuously. Excess of ACTH has been associated to type II muscle atrophy. We describe a case of type II muscle fibers atrophy associated with silent corticotroph adenoma in a dog. The dog showed moderate to severe proximal muscle wasting and weakness with normal levels of muscle-associated enzymes. In the limb muscle biopsies, type II fibers were uniformly smaller than type I fibers. In temporalis muscles, there were few atrophic fibers, and several irregular areas of loss of enzymatic activity observed in NADH, SDH and COX stains. The tumour showed a trabecular growth pattern and immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated the presence of cytoplasmic immunoreactivity for ACTH. The muscle atrophy was considered to be related to an excess of inactive ACTH. Studying spontaneous occurring rare diseases in animals could help to understand the mechanism of similar diseases in human has well.

  20. Quantitative Evaluation of Brain Stem Atrophy Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Adult Patients with Alexander Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Tomokatsu; Yasuda, Rei; Mizuta, Ikuko; Nakagawa, Masanori; Mizuno, Toshiki

    2017-01-01

    Brain MRI in adult patients with Alexander disease (AxD) mainly shows atrophy in the medulla oblongata. However, currently there is no quantitative standard for assessing this atrophy. In this study, we quantitatively evaluated the brain stem of AxD patients with glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) mutation using conventional MRI to evaluate its usefulness as an aid to diagnosing AxD in daily clinical practice. Nineteen AxD patients with GFAP mutation were compared with 14 patients negative for GFAP mutation in whom AxD was suspected due to "atrophy of the medulla oblongata." In the GFAP mutation-positive group, the sagittal diameter of the medulla oblongata, the ratio of the diameter of the medulla oblongata to that of the midbrain (MO/MB), and the ratio of the sagittal diameter of the medulla oblongata to that of the pons (MO/Po) were significantly smaller compared to those of the GFAP mutation-negative group (p < 0.01). The sensitivity and specificity of each parameter were 87.5 and 92.3%, 91.7 and 81.3%, and 88.2 and 100% with a sagittal diameter of the medulla oblongata <9.0 mm, MO/MB <0.60, and sagittal MO/Po <0.46, respectively. These parameters can provide very useful information to differentially diagnose AxD from other disorders associated with brain stem atrophy in adult patients. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Collagenous gastritis: a morphologic and immunohistochemical study of 40 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnason, Thomas; Brown, Ian S; Goldsmith, Jeffrey D; Anderson, William; O'Brien, Blake H; Wilson, Claire; Winter, Harland; Lauwers, Gregory Y

    2015-04-01

    Collagenous gastritis is a rare condition defined histologically by a superficial subepithelial collagen layer. This study further characterizes the morphologic spectrum of collagenous gastritis by evaluating a multi-institutional series of 40 patients (26 female and 14 male). The median age at onset was 16 years (range 3-89 years), including 24 patients (60%) under age 18. Twelve patients (30%) had associated celiac disease, collagenous sprue, or collagenous colitis. Hematoxylin and eosin slides were reviewed in biopsies from all patients and tenascin, gastrin, eotaxin, and IgG4/IgG immunohistochemical stains were applied to a subset. The distribution of subepithelial collagen favored the body/fundus in pediatric patients and the antrum in adults. There were increased surface intraepithelial lymphocytes (>25 lymphocytes/100 epithelial cells) in five patients. Three of these patients had associated celiac and/or collagenous sprue/colitis, while the remaining two had increased duodenal lymphocytosis without specific etiology. An eosinophil-rich pattern (>30 eosinophils/high power field) was seen in 21/40 (52%) patients. Seven patients' biopsies demonstrated atrophy of the gastric corpus mucosa. Tenascin immunohistochemistry highlighted the subepithelial collagen in all 21 specimens evaluated and was a more sensitive method of collagen detection in biopsies from two patients with subtle subepithelial collagen. No increased eotaxin expression was identified in 16 specimens evaluated. One of the twenty-three biopsies tested had increased IgG4-positive cells (100/high power field) with an IgG4/IgG ratio of 55%. In summary, collagenous gastritis presents three distinct histologic patterns including a lymphocytic gastritis-like pattern, an eosinophil-rich pattern, and an atrophic pattern. Eotaxin and IgG4 were not elevated enough to implicate these pathways in the pathogenesis. Tenascin immunohistochemistry can be used as a sensitive method of collagen detection.

  2. Picture agnosia as a characteristic of posterior cortical atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Azusa; Midorikawa, Akira; Koyama, Shinichi; Futamura, Akinori; Hieda, Sotaro; Kawamura, Mitsuru

    2012-01-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a degenerative disease characterized by progressive visual agnosia with posterior cerebral atrophy. We examine the role of the picture naming test and make a number of suggestions with regard to diagnosing PCA as atypical dementia. We investigated 3 cases of early-stage PCA with 7 control cases of Alzheimer disease (AD). The patients and controls underwent a naming test with real objects and colored photographs of familiar objects. We then compared rates of correct answers. Patients with early-stage PCA showed significant inability to recognize photographs compared to real objects (F = 196.284, p = 0.0000) as measured by analysis of variants. This difficulty was also significant to AD controls (F = 58.717, p = 0.0000). Picture agnosia is a characteristic symptom of early-stage PCA, and the picture naming test is useful for the diagnosis of PCA as atypical dementia at an early stage. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Inherited Paediatric Motor Neuron Disorders: Beyond Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Hugo; Mowat, David; Roscioli, Tony

    2017-01-01

    Paediatric motor neuron diseases encompass a group of neurodegenerative diseases characterised by the onset of muscle weakness and atrophy before the age of 18 years, attributable to motor neuron loss across various neuronal networks in the brain and spinal cord. While the genetic underpinnings are diverse, advances in next generation sequencing have transformed diagnostic paradigms. This has reinforced the clinical phenotyping and molecular genetic expertise required to navigate the complexities of such diagnoses. In turn, improved genetic technology and subsequent gene identification have enabled further insights into the mechanisms of motor neuron degeneration and how these diseases form part of a neurodegenerative disorder spectrum. Common pathophysiologies include abnormalities in axonal architecture and function, RNA processing, and protein quality control. This review incorporates an overview of the clinical manifestations, genetics, and pathophysiology of inherited paediatric motor neuron disorders beyond classic SMN1-related spinal muscular atrophy and describes recent advances in next generation sequencing and its clinical application. Specific disease-modifying treatment is becoming a clinical reality in some disorders of the motor neuron highlighting the importance of a timely and specific diagnosis. PMID:28634552

  4. CD3 immunohistochemical staining in diagnosis of lymphocytic colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiehn, Anne-Marie Kanstrup; Engel, Ulla; Holck, Susanne; Munck, Lars Kristian; Engel, Peter Johan Heiberg

    2016-02-01

    Microscopic colitis (MC) is a common cause of chronic watery diarrhea. Traditionally, MC encompasses the 2 subgroups lymphocytic colitis (LC) and collagenous colitis, but recently, an additional subgroup, MC incomplete, has been introduced. Distinguishing between the subgroups relies exclusively on histopathologic evaluation. In the present study, 4 pathologists evaluated 156 archived biopsies originally diagnosed as LC or LC incomplete (LCi). Each pathologist assigned a diagnosis of LC, LCi, or nonspecific inflammation to all cases at 2 independent assessments. At the first assessment, hematoxylin and eosin (HE) stainings were available. At the second assessment, a supplementary CD3 immunohistochemical staining was also available. The aim was to evaluate whether a supplementary CD3 would increase the diagnostic agreement among pathologists, and whether a CD3 stain would change the diagnosis based on HE staining only. After the complete assessment, the cases were divided into 3 groups, that is, full agreement, partial agreement, and disagreement. The CD3 staining increased the number of cases with full agreement from 60 to 78. One hundred thirty-one cases with agreement or partial diagnostic agreement based on HE + CD3 were compared with the HE diagnoses. In 44 (34%) of 131 cases, CD3 changed the diagnosis. Cases assigned to the LCi category based on HE were often changed by a supplementary CD3. Conclusively, it is recommended to use a CD3 before giving the histopathologic diagnosis of LCi. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Immunohistochemical diagnosis of fusariosis with monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, H.E.; Aalbæk, B.; Jungersen, Gregers

    for fusariosis. A panel of newly developed Mabs for immunohistochemical diagnosis of fusariosis was screened for specificity on experimentally infected laboratory animal tissue and on skin tissue biopsies from two neutropenic patients with Fusarium sepsis. Methods: Somatic antigens were made from F. solani (CBS...... for establishing an accurate diagnosis. Although molecular techniques (e.g. in situ hybridization and PCR) have been explored for diagnostic use, the development of specific monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) for immunohistochemical identification of Fusarium spp. will extend the availability of diagnostic options...... containing homologous (fusariosis) and heterologous (aspergillosis, candidosis, and scedosporidiosis) fungal elements. Tissue reactive Mabs were then tested on skin biopsies from two patients with fusariosis sepsis with dissemination to the skin In the patients, a diagnosis of fusariosis-sepsis had been...

  6. Immunohistochemical demonstration of glial markers in retinoblastomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, H D

    1987-01-01

    Twenty retinoblastomas were studied immunohistochemically in order to visualize glial cells. In the retina, the glial cells in the ganglion cell layer and the Müller cells were GFAP positive, while only the glial cells of the ganglion cell layer expressed S-100 reactivity. In the tumours S-100/GF...... cells reactive for both S-100 and GFAP were demonstrated. The latter findings may represent differentiation in a glial direction in the more mature parts of retinoblastoma....

  7. Forehead wrinkles: a histological and immunohistochemical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Domyati, Moetaz; Medhat, Walid; Abdel-Wahab, Hossam M; Moftah, Noha H; Nasif, Ghada A; Hosam, Wael

    2014-09-01

    Wrinkles are associated with cutaneous aging especially on sun-exposed skin. Despite they are considered a major topic in cosmetic dermatology, very few reports have studied the specific histological and immunohistochemical changes characteristic for wrinkles. The study aims to evaluate the histological and immunohistochemical changes of static forehead wrinkles in relation to surrounding photoaged skin. Biopsy specimens were obtained from the forehead wrinkles of 20 volunteers of Glogau's class III-IV wrinkles. Using histological and immunostaining methods coupled with computerized morphometric analysis, measurement of epidermal thickness and quantitative evaluation of total elastin and tropoelastin as well as collagen types I, III, and VII were performed for skin biopsies. In the wrinkle site, there was statistically significant lower epidermal thickness (P = 0.001), elastin (P wrinkle site and adjacent photoaged skin regarding collagen type I (P = 0.07) or III (P = 0.07). This study detected some histological and immunohistochemical differences in the wrinkle site when compared to adjacent photoaged skin. This may help in understanding the pathophysiology of facial wrinkling as well as its ideal way of management. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Geographic atrophy phenotype identification by cluster analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monés, Jordi; Biarnés, Marc

    2017-07-20

    To identify ocular phenotypes in patients with geographic atrophy secondary to age-related macular degeneration (GA) using a data-driven cluster analysis. This was a retrospective analysis of data from a prospective, natural history study of patients with GA who were followed for ≥6 months. Cluster analysis was used to identify subgroups within the population based on the presence of several phenotypic features: soft drusen, reticular pseudodrusen (RPD), primary foveal atrophy, increased fundus autofluorescence (FAF), greyish FAF appearance and subfoveal choroidal thickness (SFCT). A comparison of features between the subgroups was conducted, and a qualitative description of the new phenotypes was proposed. The atrophy growth rate between phenotypes was then compared. Data were analysed from 77 eyes of 77 patients with GA. Cluster analysis identified three groups: phenotype 1 was characterised by high soft drusen load, foveal atrophy and slow growth; phenotype 3 showed high RPD load, extrafoveal and greyish FAF appearance and thin SFCT; the characteristics of phenotype 2 were midway between phenotypes 1 and 3. Phenotypes differed in all measured features (p≤0.013), with decreases in the presence of soft drusen, foveal atrophy and SFCT seen from phenotypes 1 to 3 and corresponding increases in high RPD load, high FAF and greyish FAF appearance. Atrophy growth rate differed between phenotypes 1, 2 and 3 (0.63, 1.91 and 1.73 mm(2)/year, respectively, p=0.0005). Cluster analysis identified three distinct phenotypes in GA. One of them showed a particularly slow growth pattern. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. Mirror movements in progressive hemifacial atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Verma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mirror movements are simultaneous, involuntary, identical movements occurring during contralateral voluntary movements. These movements are considered as soft neurologic signs seen uncommonly in clinical practice. The mirror movements are described in various neurological disorders which include parkinsonism, cranio veretebral junction anamolies, and hemiplegic cerebral palsy. These movements are intriguing and can pose significant disability. However, no such observation regarding mirror movements in progressive hemifacial atrophy have been reported previously. We are reporting a teenage girl suffering from progressive hemifacial atrophy and epilepsy with demonstrable mirror movements in hand.

  10. CT features of olivopontocerebellar atrophy in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, S.D. [Sultan Qaboos Univ., Muscat (Oman). Dept. of Radiology; Chand, R.P. [Sultan Qaboos Univ., Muscat (Oman). Dept. of Medicine (Neurology); Gururaj, A.K. [Sultan Qaboos Univ., Muscat (Oman). Dept. of Child Health; Jeans, W.D. [Sultan Qaboos Univ., Muscat (Oman). Dept. of Radiology

    1995-11-01

    Between 1990 and 1992, 14 children were seen in whom a clinical diagnosis of olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA) had been made. The majority of patients presented with cerebellar ataxia and hypotonia. Five children had a family history of a similar illness in first-degree relatives. All cases had undergone clinical and neurologic examinations, routine laboratory tests and cranial CT. CT features were graded to quantitative the degree of atrophy in each cerebellar hemisphere, vermis and brain stem. All patients had varying degrees of atrophic changes of cerebellum, brain stem and cerebrum. These CT features appear to be distinctive enough to enable the diagnosis of OPCA to be made. (orig.).

  11. Liver Atrophy Associated With Monolobar Caroli's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, L. N.; Kilpadi, A. B.; D'Cunha, S.

    1991-01-01

    The association of the atrophy-hypertrophy complex in monolobar Caroli’s disease (Type I) is reported in a 30 year old male who presented with recurrent cholangitis. Ultrasound and CT scan showed localised, right sided, saccular biliary dilatation in a normal sized liver. Severe right lobar atrophy was detected at operation and the resected right lobe weighed only 140 gms. Distortion of the hilar vascular anatomy and posterior displacement of the right hepatic duct orifice were problems encountered at surgery. PMID:1931788

  12. Fatty muscle atrophy: prevalence in the hindfoot muscles on MR images of asymptomatic volunteers and patients with foot pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Daniel T; Hodler, Juerg; Mengiardi, Bernard; Pfirrmann, Christian W A; Espinosa, Norman; Zanetti, Marco

    2009-10-01

    To determine prevalence and degree of fatty muscle atrophy in plantar foot muscles in asymptomatic volunteers and in patients with foot pain. Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained. The prevalence and degree of fatty muscle atrophy were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging in the abductor digiti minimi (ADM), flexor digitorum brevis (FDB), abductor hallucis (AH), and quadratus plantae (QP) muscles in 80 asymptomatic volunteers (mean age, 48 years; range, 23-84 years) and 80 patients with foot pain (mean age, 48 years; range, 20-86 years). Muscles were characterized as normal (grade 0) or as having mild (grade 1) or substantial (grade 2) fatty atrophy by two readers separately. Results of visual grading for both readers were compared by using the Mann-Whitney test. Associations between age and degree of fatty muscle atrophy were assessed by using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Readers 1 and 2 found substantial fatty atrophy of the ADM muscle in four (5%) and five (6%) volunteers, respectively, and in three (4%) and nine (11%) patients, respectively. One reader diagnosed substantial fatty atrophy of the AH muscle in three (4%) volunteers and of the FDB muscle in two (2%) volunteers. Prevalence for the QP muscle varied between 0% and 1%. An association between age and degree of fatty atrophy of the ADM muscle was found for volunteers by both readers and for patients by reader 1 (P muscle atrophy of the ADM muscle-classically considered to represent entrapment neuropathy-is between 4% and 11% in both asymptomatic volunteers and patients with foot pain, and it increases with age.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... myoclonic epilepsy Spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... boxes. Description Spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy (SMA-PME) is a neurological condition that causes ...

  14. Multifocal motor neuropathy and progressive atrophy : Pathophysiological similarities and differences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlam, L.

    2015-01-01

    Progressive muscular atrophy (PMA) and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) share many clinical similarities. They are both characterized by progressive asymmetric muscle weakness with atrophy and fasciculations. Tendon reflexes are normally low or absent, although in some patients with MMN normal

  15. Bilingualism as a contributor to cognitive reserve: evidence from brain atrophy in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Tom A; Ware, Jenna; Fischer, Corinne E; Craik, Fergus I M; Bialystok, Ellen

    2012-09-01

    Much of the research on delaying the onset of symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has focused on pharmacotherapy, but environmental factors have also been acknowledged to play a significant role. Bilingualism may be one factor contributing to 'cognitive reserve' (CR) and therefore to a delay in symptom onset. If bilingualism is protective, then the brains of bilinguals should show greater atrophy in relevant areas, since their enhanced CR enables them to function at a higher level than would be predicted from their level of disease. We analyzed a number of linear measurements of brain atrophy from the computed tomography (CT) scans of monolingual and bilingual patients diagnosed with probable AD who were matched on level of cognitive performance and years of education. Bilingual patients with AD exhibited substantially greater amounts of brain atrophy than monolingual patients in areas traditionally used to distinguish AD patients from healthy controls, specifically, the radial width of the temporal horn and the temporal horn ratio. Other measures of brain atrophy were comparable for the two groups. Bilingualism appears to contribute to increased CR, thereby delaying the onset of AD and requiring the presence of greater amounts of neuropathology before the disease is manifest. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Srl. All rights reserved.

  16. Cube propagation for focal brain atrophy estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pai, Akshay Sadananda Uppinakudru; Sørensen, Lauge; Darkner, Sune

    2013-01-01

    Precise and robust whole brain, ventricle, and hippocampal atrophy measurements are important as they serve as biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease. They are used as secondary outcomes in drug trials, and they correlate with the cognitive scores. When two successive scans are non-linearly aligned...

  17. Corpus callosum atrophy in Wernicke's encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soon-Tae; Jung, Young-Min; Na, Duk L; Park, Seong Ho; Kim, Manho

    2005-10-01

    Neuropathologic changes in Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) involve variable brain structures. Corpus callosum involvement in WE, however, is largely unknown. The authors investigated the degree and the pattern of corpus callosum changes in WE according to the etiologies. Nineteen patients with WE (between 34 and 81 years) and 19 age- and sex-matched control participants were included. The total cross-sectional callosal area and 5 callosal subregions (C1-C5) were measured by tracing outer margins in the midsagittal sections. Subregions were determined by placing radial dividers with 10 rays. The pixel numbers for corpus callosums were calculated, and the values obtained were adjusted for head size variations. The causes of WE were alcoholism (10), intestinal surgery (5), anorexia (3), and hyperemesis gravidarum (1). The mean size of the total corpus callosum was significantly reduced in alcoholic WE (P< .001; 527.8 +/- 70.8 mm2 for alcoholic WE; 664.6 +/- 58.1 mm2 for the corresponding controls), but not in nonalcoholic WE. In subregion analysis, prefrontal callosum (C2) atrophy was the most prominent in alcoholic WE. In contrast, only splenium (C5) was atrophied in nonalcoholic WE. The degree of atrophy did not change throughout the follow-up period (mean 5.3 weeks). This study suggests that the extent and location of corpus callosum atrophy differs between alcoholic WE and nonalcoholic WE, implying separate contribution of alcohol neurotoxicity and nutritional deficiency.

  18. Hippocampal atrophy in subcortical vascular dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Pol, L.A.; Gertz, H.J.; Scheltens, P.; Wolf, H

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose: New research criteria for subcortical vascular dementia (SVaD) have been suggested to define a more homogeneous subgroup of vascular dementia. Hippocampal (Hc) atrophy is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD), but it also occurs in other dementia disorders including vascular

  19. Sensorimotor gating deficits in multiple system atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoetmulder, Marielle; Biernat, Heidi Bryde; Nikolic, Miki

    2014-01-01

    Prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the auditory blink reflex is a measure of sensorimotor gating, which reflects an organism's ability to filter out irrelevant sensory information. PPI has never been studied in patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA), although sensorimotor deficits are frequently...

  20. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis of spinal muscular atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreesen, JCFM; Bras, M; de Die-Smulders, C; Dumoulin, JCM; Cobben, JM; Evers, JLH; Smeets, HJM; Geraedts, JPM

    After Duchenne muscular dystrophy, spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is the most common severe neuromuscular disease in childhood. Since 1995, homozygous deletions in exon 7 of the survival motor neuron (SMN) gene have been described in >90-95% of SMA patients. However, the presence of a highly

  1. Granuloma faciale: clinical, morphological and immunohistochemical aspects in a series of 10 patients*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Cristiano Claudino; Ianhez, Pedro Eugênio de Carvalho; Marques, Silvio Alencar; Marques, Mariângela Esther Alencar

    2016-01-01

    Granuloma faciale is a chronic, benign, cutaneous vasculitis with well-established clinical and morphological patterns, but with an unknown etiology. This study describes clinical and pathologic aspects of patients diagnosed with granuloma faciale. The authors analyzed demographic, clinical, morphological and immunohistochemical data from patients with a final diagnosis of granuloma faciale, confirmed between 1998 and 2012. There was a proportional and mixed inflammatory infiltrate, Grenz zones were present in almost all the samples. Immunophenotyping confirmed a higher intensity of T lymphocytes than B lymphocytes in thirteen samples, with a predominance of T CD8 lymphocytes in 64% of cases, in contrast to the literature, which indicates that the major component is T CD4 lymphocytes. All cases were positive for IgG4 but the majority (12/14) had less than 25% of stained cells. The pathogenesis of granuloma faciale remains poorly understood, making studies of morphological and immunohistochemical characterization important to better understand it. PMID:28099604

  2. Granuloma faciale: clinical, morphological and immunohistochemical aspects in a series of 10 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Cristiano Claudino; Ianhez, Pedro Eugênio de Carvalho; Marques, Silvio Alencar; Marques, Mariângela Esther Alencar

    2016-01-01

    Granuloma faciale is a chronic, benign, cutaneous vasculitis with well-established clinical and morphological patterns, but with an unknown etiology. This study describes clinical and pathologic aspects of patients diagnosed with granuloma faciale. The authors analyzed demographic, clinical, morphological and immunohistochemical data from patients with a final diagnosis of granuloma faciale, confirmed between 1998 and 2012. There was a proportional and mixed inflammatory infiltrate, Grenz zones were present in almost all the samples. Immunophenotyping confirmed a higher intensity of T lymphocytes than B lymphocytes in thirteen samples, with a predominance of T CD8 lymphocytes in 64% of cases, in contrast to the literature, which indicates that the major component is T CD4 lymphocytes. All cases were positive for IgG4 but the majority (12/14) had less than 25% of stained cells. The pathogenesis of granuloma faciale remains poorly understood, making studies of morphological and immunohistochemical characterization important to better understand it.

  3. Tympanomastoid cholesterol granulomas: Immunohistochemical evaluation of angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannella, Giannicola; Di Gioia, Cira; Carletti, Raffaella; Magliulo, Giuseppe

    2017-08-01

    This study investigates the immunohistochemical expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and CD34 in patients treated for middle ear and mastoid cholesterol granulomas to evaluate the angiogenesis and vascularization of this type of lesion. A correlation between the immunohistochemical data and the radiological and intraoperative evidence of temporal bone marrow invasion and blood source connection was performed to validate this hypothesis. Retrospective study. Immunohistochemical expression of VEGF and CD34 in a group of 16 patients surgically treated for cholesterol granuloma was examined. Middle ear cholesteatomas with normal middle ear mucosa and external auditory canal skin were used as the control groups. The radiological and intraoperative features of cholesterol granulomas were also examined. In endothelial cells, there was an increased expression of angiogenetic growth factor receptors in all the cholesterol granulomas in this study. The quantitative analysis of VEGF showed a mean value of 37.5, whereas the CD34 quantitative analysis gave a mean value of 6.8. Seven patients presented radiological or intraoperative evidence of bone marrow invasion, hematopoietic potentialities, or blood source connections that might support the bleeding theory. In all of these cases there was computed tomography or intraoperative evidence of bone erosion of the middle ear and/or temporal bone structures. The mean values of VEGF and CD34 were 41.1 and 7.7, respectively. High values of VEGF and CD34 are present in patients with cholesterol granulomas. Upregulation of VEGF and CD34 is indicative of a remarkable angiogenesis and a widespread vascular concentration in cholesterol granulomas. 3b. Laryngoscope, 127:E283-E290, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  4. Phenotypic and immunohistochemical characterization of sarcoglycanopathies

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    Ana F. B. Ferreira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy presents with heterogeneous clinical and molecular features. The primary characteristic of this disorder is proximal muscular weakness with variable age of onset, speed of progression, and intensity of symptoms. Sarcoglycanopathies, which are a subgroup of the limb-girdle muscular dystrophies, are caused by mutations in sarcoglycan genes. Mutations in these genes cause secondary deficiencies in other proteins, due to the instability of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. Therefore, determining the etiology of a given sarcoglycanopathy requires costly and occasionally inaccessible molecular methods. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to identify phenotypic differences among limb-girdle muscular dystrophy patients who were grouped according to the immunohistochemical phenotypes for the four sarcoglycans. METHODS: To identify phenotypic differences among patients with different types of sarcoglycanopathies, a questionnaire was used and the muscle strength and range of motion of nine joints in 45 patients recruited from the Department of Neurology - HC-FMUSP (Clinics Hospital of the Faculty of Medicine of the University of São Paulo were evaluated. The findings obtained from these analyses were compared with the results of the immunohistochemical findings. RESULTS: The patients were divided into the following groups based on the immunohistochemical findings: a-sarcoglycanopathies (16 patients, b-sarcoglycanopathies (1 patient, y-sarcoglycanopathies (5 patients, and nonsarcoglycanopathies (23 patients. The muscle strength analysis revealed significant differences for both upper and lower limb muscles, particularly the shoulder and hip muscles, as expected. No pattern of joint contractures was found among the four groups analyzed, even within the same family. However, a high frequency of tiptoe gait was observed in patients with a-sarcoglycanopathies, while calf pseudo-hypertrophy was most common in

  5. Immunohistochemical assessment of oestrogen and progesterone receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grabau, D A; Thorpe, S M; Knoop, A

    2000-01-01

    Two different methods to determine steroid receptors were analysed with respect to their ability to estimate prognosis in primary breast cancer patients. The immunohistochemical assay (IHA) was compared with the dextran-coated charcoal (DCC) method of receptor determination. A random sample of 281...... of patients, receptor positive cases fared better than negative cases in all situations. Investigation of the prognostic power revealed that classification based on IHA allowed better discrimination of patients than classification based on the DCC method. The reason for this difference might be because...

  6. Immunohistochemical characterization of human olfactory tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, Eric H; Wu, Enming; Curry, William T; Lin, Derrick T; Schwob, James E

    2011-08-01

    The pathophysiology underlying human olfactory disorders is poorly understood because biopsying the olfactory epithelium (OE) can be unrepresentative and extensive immunohistochemical analysis is lacking. Autopsy tissue enriches our grasp of normal and abnormal olfactory immunohistology and guides the sampling of the OE by biopsy. Furthermore, a comparison of the molecular phenotype of olfactory epithelial cells between rodents and humans will improve our ability to correlate human histopathology with olfactory dysfunction. An immunohistochemical analysis of human olfactory tissue using a comprehensive battery of proven antibodies. Human olfactory mucosa obtained from 21 autopsy specimens was analyzed with immunohistochemistry. The position and extent of olfactory mucosa was assayed by staining whole mounts (WMs) with neuronal markers. Sections of the OE were analyzed with an extensive group of antibodies directed against cytoskeletal proteins and transcription factors, as were surgical specimens from an esthesioneuroblastoma. Neuron-rich epithelium is always found inferior to the cribriform plate, even at advanced age, despite the interruptions in the neuroepithelial sheet caused by patchy respiratory metaplasia. The pattern of immunostaining with our antibody panel identifies two distinct types of basal cell progenitors in human OE similar to rodents. The panel also clarifies the complex composition of esthesioneuroblastoma. The extent of human olfactory mucosa at autopsy can easily be delineated as a function of age and neurologic disease. The similarities in human versus rodent OE will enable us to translate knowledge from experimental animals to humans and will extend our understanding of human olfactory pathophysiology. Copyright © 2011 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  7. [Infantile spinal atrophy: our experience in the last 25 years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrid Rodríguez, A; Martínez Martínez, P L; Ramos Fernández, J M; Urda Cardona, A; Martínez Antón, J

    2015-03-01

    To determine the incidence of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) in our study population and genetic distribution and epidemiological and clinical characteristics and to analyze the level of care and development. Retrospective descriptive study of patients treated in our hospital in the past 25 years (from 1987 to early 2013), with a clinical and neurophysiological diagnosis of SMA. A total of 37 patients were found, representing an incidence for our reference population and year of 1 case per 10,000 live births. Males predominated (male/female ratio: 1.6/1). The type of SMA diagnosed more frequently was, type i (26 cases), followed by type ii (9 cases), one case with SMA type iii, and one case of spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1 (SMARD1). The most frequent genetic alteration was homozygous deletion of exons 7 and 8 of SMN1 gene in 31 cases, while five patients had atypical genetics. The median survival for type i was 8.0 months and 15.8 years for type ii. The incidence in our population remains stable at around 1/10.000. Most cases presented with, predominantly male, typical genetics. In approximately 1/10 patients the genetic alteration was different from the classical one to the SMN gene. The prevalence of AME unrelated SMN gene was 1/37. The level of care has increased in line with social and welfare demands in recent years. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Plurihormonality of pituitary adenomas in light of immunohistochemical studies.

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    Pawlikowski, Marek; Kunert-Radek, Jolanta; Radek, Maciej

    2010-01-01

    Plurihormonality of pituitary adenomas can be defined as the ability of an adenoma to express more than one pituitary hormone. The application of immunohistochemistry to diagnose surgically removed pituitary tumours revealed that a great number of pituitary adenomas are in fact plurihormonal. However, data on the incidence and the clinical relevance of the pituitary adenoma plurihormonality are still scarce and controversial. Hundred fifty-five pituitary adenomas, surgically removed, were studied immunohistochemically with the antibodies against pituitary hormones or their subunits. Additionally, 40 adenomas were immunostained with Ki-67 antibody to evaluate the proliferative potential. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations, we did not consider tumours expressing both FSH and LH (gonadotropinomas) or somatoprolactinomas expressing both GH and prolactin as plurihormonal. Even with this limitation, plurihormonality was found to be a frequent finding in both hormonally active and clinically non-functioning pituitary adenomas. It was shown that over one-third (36.1%) of the investigated adenomas expressed more than one hormone. Plurihormonality, especially that which is connected with co-expression of ACTH, seems to be more frequent in the recurrent tumours. Plurihormonal adenomas also possess higher Ki-67 indices, as compared to monohormonal tumours. Plurihormonality is a frequent phenomenon in both hormonally active and clinically non-functioning pituitary adenomas. It also seems to predict a higher risk of tumour recurrence. (Pol J Endocrinol 2010; 61 (1): 63-66).

  9. Pediatric meningiomas an aggressive subset: A clinicopathological and immunohistochemical study

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    M Hui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Meningiomas are uncommon neoplasms in the pediatric age group and differ in various aspects from their adult counterparts. They account for 0.4-4.6% of all primary brain tumors. Aims: To retrospectively analyze the clinicopathological and immunohistochemical features of pediatric meningiomas. Materials and Methods: Meningiomas in patients under 18 years of age diagnosed between January 2001 to December 2011 were analyzed retrospectively. The hematoxylin and eosin stained sections and Ki 67 labelling index (LI were reviewed for all the cases Results: The pediatric meningiomas accounted for 1.52% of total meningiomas (15/983. The mean age at presentation was 12 years with male to female ratio of 1.5:1. The presenting symptoms were headache, seizures, and motor deficits. The histology included 9 cases (60% of atypical meningioma (WHO grade II followed by 4 cases (26.67% of WHO grade-I and 2 cases (13.33% of anaplastic meningioma (WHO grade III. Five cases had a recurrence. Ki67 LI ranged from 0.5% to 1.5% in grade I, 0.5% to 15% in grade II and 13% to 24% in grade III meningiomas. Conclusion: Meningiomas are rare in children and show a male preponderance. There was a higher incidence of atypical and anaplastic meningiomas in pediatric population.

  10. Clinicopathological and Immunohistochemical Characterisation of Gastric Schwannomas in 29 Cases

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    Lijun Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas are tumors arising from the nervous system that also occur infrequently in the gastrointestinal tract, most commonly in the stomach. This report characterizes 29 patients with benign or malignant gastric schwannomas. Surgical data and clinical follow-up information were available for 28 cases with a median postoperative duration of 57 months. Clinicopathological and immunohistochemical characteristics of benign and malignant schwannomas were analysed. Four cases (13.7% were histologically diagnosed with malignant schwannoma. All tumors were positive for S-100 and CD56 proteins, displaying a diffuse staining pattern. Vimentin was expressed in 100% cases and all schwannomas were negative for smooth muscle actin, c-kit, and HMB-45. A significant difference was observed between the group of benign and malignant schwannomas as regards recurrences and metastasis after complete resection (P=0.015. The survival time of patients with benign schwannomas was longer than the malignant group (P=0.013, so gastric malignant schwannomas have a potential for recurrence and metastasis, with subsequently short survival. Complete resection with an attempt to remove all tumor tissue with negative margins is of paramount importance in the management of gastric schwannomas, particularly when they turn out to be malignant.

  11. Macroscopic extent of gastric mucosal atrophy: increased risk factor for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in Japan

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    Kobayashi Noritoshi

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to estimate whether the macroscopic extent of gastric mucosal atrophy is associated with a risk for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma using a case-control study in Japanese subjects, a population known to have a high prevalence of CagA-positive H. pylori infection. Methods Two hundred and fifty-three patients who were diagnosed as having esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, and 253 sex- and age-matched controls were enrolled in the present study. The macroscopic extent of gastric mucosal atrophy was evaluated based on the Kimura and Takemoto Classification. A conditional logistic regression model with adjustment for potential confounding factors was used to assess the associations. Results Body gastritis, defined endoscopically, was independently associated with an increased risk for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Conclusion Our findings suggest that macroscopic body gastritis may be a risk factor for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in Japan. Further studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  12. Visualizing stages of cortical atrophy in progressive MCI from the ADNI cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Simon Fristed; Fonov, Vladimir; Coupé, Pierrick

    Amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is considered a condition where patients are at risk of developing clinically definite Alzheimer’s disease (AD) with an annual conversion rate of approximately 15%[1]. AD is characterized by progressive brain atrophy with major impact on the cerebral cortex...... and medial temporal lobe structures such as hippocampus. Understanding the structural pattern of cortical atrophy at different stages of MCI, before AD can be diagnosed, may help in patient monitoring and prognosis. We used data from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) to calculate...... thickness were measured using FACE[6] and mapped to an average cortical surface. Statistical maps of differences in cortical thickness between groups of MCI patients and HC were constructed and corrected for multiple comparisons. Three years prior to clinically definite AD, the MCI patients show signs...

  13. Diagnosing Acoustic Neuroma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Values Leadership & Staff Annual Reports Shop ANA Home Learn Diagnosing English English Arabic Catalan Chinese (Simplified) Chinese (Traditional) Danish French German Greek Haitian Creole Hebrew Hindi Italian Japanese Korean Portuguese Romanian Spanish Diagnosing The diagnosis of an acoustic ...

  14. Oxyntic atrophy, metaplasia and gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenring, James R.; Nam, Ki Taek

    2015-01-01

    The process of gastric carcinogenesis involves the loss of parietal cells (oxyntic atrophy) and subsequent replacement of the normal gastric lineages with metaplastic lineages. In humans, two metaplastic lineages develop as sequelae of chronic Helicobacter pylori infection: intestinal metaplasia and Spasmolytic Polypeptide-expressing Metaplasia (SPEM). Mouse models of both chronic Helicobacter infection and acute pharmacological oxyntic atrophy have led to the recognition that SPEM arises from transdifferentiation of mature chief cells. The presence of inflammation promotes the expansion of SPEM in mice. Furthermore, studies in Mongolian gerbils as well as increasing evidence from human studies indicates that SPEM likely represents a precursor for development of intestinal metaplasia. These findings indicate that loss of parietal cells, augmented by chronic inflammation, leads to a cascade of metaplastic events. Identification of specific biomarkers for SPEM and intestinal metaplasia hold promise for providing both early detection of pre-neoplasia as well as information on prognostic outcome following curative resection. PMID:21075342

  15. [Posterior cortical atrophy with progressive visual agnosia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarranz, J J; Lasa, A; Fernández, M; Lezcano, E; Pérez Bas, M; Varona, L; Ruiz, J; Beristain, X

    1995-03-01

    Interest in progressive focal cerebral syndromes associated with classical degenerative diseases has increased in recent years. Descriptions of posterior cortical atrophy with progressive visual agnosia are relatively rare. We present 5 patients (2 women) ranging in age between 57 and 72 years old. In all cases symptoms began and progressed with no known etiology. All cases were sporadic. The main clinical signs are difficulty in recognizing objects, colors, persons or places; topographical disorientation and visual memory alterations; alexia, simultagnosia, loss of ocular fixing and optic ataxia. Some patients presented other disturbances of praxis or memory and 2 progressed to global dementia. Language function was preserved and behavioral disturbances did not develop. The amplitude of the P100 visual evoked potential was low but latency was normal in 4 patients and prolonged in 1. Brain images showed atrophy and hypoperfusion in the parieto-occipital area. The neuropathology status of these patients is unknown.

  16. [Posterior cortical atrophy. Report of five cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado D, Carolina; Donoso S, Archibaldo

    2009-11-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a neurodegenerative syndrome, usually due to Alzheimer's disease. The first symptoms are progressive impairment of visuo spatial (Balint's and Gertsmann's syndromes) or visuo perceptive (visual agnosia, alexia) function. Episodic memory and executive function are spared until later stages. We report two males aged 51 and 55years and three females aged 50, 54 and 56 years, with posterior cortical atrophy. Ophthalmologic study was normal in all. Presenting signs and symptoms were visual ataxia, simultagnosia, agraphia, acalculia, spatial disorientation and unilateral neglect (Balint's and Gerstmann's syndromes). Apperceptive visual agnosia, aphasia, apraxia and alexia were also observed. One female had cortical blindness. Structural images were inconclusive, but PET scan and SPECT disclosed functional impairments in occipitotemporal or occipitoparietal areas.

  17. Space travel directly induces skeletal muscle atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenburgh, H.; Chromiak, J.; Shansky, J.; Del Tatto, M.; Lemaire, J.

    1999-01-01

    Space travel causes rapid and pronounced skeletal muscle wasting in humans that reduces their long-term flight capabilities. To develop effective countermeasures, the basis of this atrophy needs to be better understood. Space travel may cause muscle atrophy indirectly by altering circulating levels of factors such as growth hormone, glucocorticoids, and anabolic steroids and/or by a direct effect on the muscle fibers themselves. To determine whether skeletal muscle cells are directly affected by space travel, tissue-cultured avian skeletal muscle cells were tissue engineered into bioartificial muscles and flown in perfusion bioreactors for 9 to 10 days aboard the Space Transportation System (STS, i.e., Space Shuttle). Significant muscle fiber atrophy occurred due to a decrease in protein synthesis rates without alterations in protein degradation. Return of the muscle cells to Earth stimulated protein synthesis rates of both muscle-specific and extracellular matrix proteins relative to ground controls. These results show for the first time that skeletal muscle fibers are directly responsive to space travel and should be a target for countermeasure development.

  18. Proximal spinal muscular atrophy: current orthopedic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haaker G

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Gerrit Haaker, Albert Fujak Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany Abstract: Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a hereditary neuromuscular disease of lower motor neurons that is caused by a defective "survival motor neuron" (SMN protein that is mainly associated with proximal progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. Although SMA involves a wide range of disease severity and a high mortality and morbidity rate, recent advances in multidisciplinary supportive care have enhanced quality of life and life expectancy. Active research for possible treatment options has become possible since the disease-causing gene defect was identified in 1995. Nevertheless, a causal therapy is not available at present, and therapeutic management of SMA remains challenging; the prolonged survival is increasing, especially orthopedic, respiratory and nutritive problems. This review focuses on orthopedic management of the disease, with discussion of key aspects that include scoliosis, muscular contractures, hip joint disorders, fractures, technical devices, and a comparative approach of conservative and surgical treatment. Also emphasized are associated complications including respiratory involvement, perioperative care and anesthesia, nutrition problems, and rehabilitation. The SMA disease course can be greatly improved with adequate therapy with established orthopedic procedures in a multidisciplinary therapeutic approach. Keywords: spinal muscular atrophy, scoliosis, contractures, fractures, lung function, treatment, rehabilitation, surgery, ventilation, nutrition, perioperative management

  19. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of muscle atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Bonaldo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle is a plastic organ that is maintained by multiple pathways regulating cell and protein turnover. During muscle atrophy, proteolytic systems are activated, and contractile proteins and organelles are removed, resulting in the shrinkage of muscle fibers. Excessive loss of muscle mass is associated with poor prognosis in several diseases, including myopathies and muscular dystrophies, as well as in systemic disorders such as cancer, diabetes, sepsis and heart failure. Muscle loss also occurs during aging. In this paper, we review the key mechanisms that regulate the turnover of contractile proteins and organelles in muscle tissue, and discuss how impairments in these mechanisms can contribute to muscle atrophy. We also discuss how protein synthesis and degradation are coordinately regulated by signaling pathways that are influenced by mechanical stress, physical activity, and the availability of nutrients and growth factors. Understanding how these pathways regulate muscle mass will provide new therapeutic targets for the prevention and treatment of muscle atrophy in metabolic and neuromuscular diseases.

  20. An immunohistochemical study of feline endometrial adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil da Costa, R M; Santos, M; Amorim, I; Lopes, C; Pereira, P Dias; Faustino, A M

    2009-05-01

    Feline endometrial adenocarcinomas are uncommon malignant neoplasms that have to date been poorly characterized. The present immunohistochemical study describes the expression of the pancytokeratins AE1 and AE3, cytokeratin-14, vimentin, alpha-actin, cyclo-oxygenase-2, E-cadherin, beta-catenin, the progesterone receptor, the oestrogen receptor and caveolin-1 within normal feline uterine tissue and tissue from six cats with endometrial adenocarcinoma. Synthesis of cyclo-oxygenase-2 and reduced expression of progesterone receptors may be involved in the neoplastic transformation of feline endometrium. The loss of cellular adhesion that occurs within these tumours does not require down-regulation of E-cadherin expression and nuclear translocation of beta-catenin is not a feature of these neoplasms.

  1. [Immunohistochemical examination of skin biopsy specimens with calculation of C fibers in the diagnosis of polyneuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopishinskaya, S V; Gustov, A V; Kolchanova, T V

    2015-01-01

    The paper discusses the anatomy of innervation of the skin, the epidermis and dermis in particular, which are related to pain, the markers of skin nerves and cells. It gives data on the diagnosis of fine unmyelinated fibers, by immunohistochemically examining skin biopsy specimens. The paper also describes the morphometry of skin nerves: intraepidermal nerve fibers, dermal nerve fibers, and autonomic nerve fibers. It discusses whether a skin biopsy specimen may be used to diagnose polyneuropathies of different etiology: diabetic, immune, HIV-related, and hereditary ones.

  2. Immunohistochemical expression of phosphatase and tensin homolog in histologic gradings of oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiny S.R. Jasphin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN is a tumor suppressor gene located on chromosome 10q23. PTEN has its major function in the regulation of cell adhesion, cell cycle arrest, migration, apoptosis programming, and differentiation. This genomic region suffers loss of heterozygosity in many human cancers. Aims: The aim of this study was to compare the immunohistochemical expression of PTEN in normal oral mucosa and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC and to correlate the PTEN expression in gradings of OSCC. Materials and Methods: Thirty cases of paraffin tissue sections of previously diagnosed OSCC were taken. Of thirty cases, ten were well differentiated, ten were moderately differentiated, and ten were poorly differentiated. As a control, ten paraffin sections of oral normal mucosa tissue specimens were taken from patients undergoing extractions. The sections were stained for immunohistochemical expression of PTEN. The cells stained by PTEN antibody were counted, and an immunohistochemical score was obtained. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was done using Mann–Whitney's test and Kruskal–Wallis test. Results: Statistical analysis revealed that there was a significant difference between normal mucosa and OSCC in immunohistochemistry staining. However, there was no significant difference in PTEN expression among gradings of OSCC. Conclusions: The study concluded that there was a decrease in PTEN expression in OSCC than normal mucosa. It also concluded that PTEN is a tumor suppressor gene which has a wide role in oral carcinogenesis.

  3. Melanin Bleaching With Warm Hydrogen Peroxide and Integrated Immunohistochemical Analysis: An Automated Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chia-Hsing; Lin, Chih-Hung; Tsai, Min-Jan; Chen, Yu-Hsuan; Yang, Sheau-Fang; Tsai, Kun-Bow

    2018-02-01

    Diagnosing melanocytic lesions is among the most challenging problems in the practice of pathology. The difficulty of physically masking melanin pigment and the similarity of its color to commonly used chromogens often complicate examination of the cytomorphology and immunohistochemical staining results for tumor cells. Melanin bleach can be very helpful for histopathological diagnosis of heavily pigmented melanocytic lesions. Although various depigmentation methods have been reported, no standardized methods have been developed. This study developed a fully automated platform that incorporates hydrogen peroxide-based melanin depigmentation in an automated immunohistochemical analysis. The utility of the method was tested in 1 cell block of malignant melanoma cells in pleural effusion, 10 ocular melanoma tissue samples, and 10 cutaneous melanoma tissue samples. Our results demonstrated that the proposed method, which can be performed in only 3 hours, effectively preserves cell cytomorphology and immunoreactivity. The method is particularly effective for removing melanin pigment to facilitate histopathological examination of cytomorphology and for obtaining an unmasked tissue section for immunohistochemical analysis.

  4. [Prospects for using immunohistochemical methods in forensic medical thanatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogomolov, D V; Bogomolova, I N; Karavaeva, I E

    2009-01-01

    This review of Russian and foreign literature is focused on the use of immunohistochemical methods in forensic medical practice. It shows that forensic medical specialists not infrequently underestimate the value of these techniques. Recommendations are proposed for a more extensive application of immunohistochemical methods in practical and fundamental medico-legal thanatology.

  5. The expression of MDM2 in gastrointestinal stromal tumors: immunohistochemical analysis of 35 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efared, Boubacar; Atsame-Ebang, Gabrielle; Tahiri, Layla; Sidibé, Ibrahim Sory; Erregad, Fatimazahra; Hammas, Nawal; Arifi, Samia; Mellouki, Ihsane; Ousadden, Abdelmalek; Mazaz, Khalid; El Fatemi, Hinde; Chbani, Laila

    2018-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are the most common primary mesenchymal tumors of the digestive system. The assessment of their biological behavior still remains a scientific challenge. To date, there are no well-established biological prognostic markers of GIST. Our aim is to study the expression of the MDM2 oncoprotein in GIST through an immunohistochemical analysis. It was a retrospective study of 35 cases of GIST diagnosed from 2009 to 2012 in the department of pathology of Hassan II university hospital, Fès, Morocco. MDM2 immunohistochemical staining was performed on archival paraffin-embedded and formalin-fixed specimens (with a threshold of nuclear positivity > 10%). Analysis of correlations between MDM2 immunoexpression and clinicopathological features of GIST has been performed. The mean age was 55.23 years (range 25-84 years) with a male predominance (sex ratio = 1.5). The stomach was the main site of GIST, with 17 cases (48.57%) followed by the small bowel (9 cases, 25.71%). The spindle cell type GIST was the most frequent morphological variant (29 cases, 82.85%). Tumor necrosis was present in 8 cases (22.85%). Two patients (5.71%) had very low risk GIST, 5 (14.28%) had low risk GIST, 7 patients (20%) had intermediate risk tumors. The remaining 21 cases (60%) had high risk GIST. At the time of diagnosis, 9 patients (25.71%) had metastatic tumors. At immunohistochemical analysis, 40% of cases (14 patients) stained positive for MDM2. Of these MDMD2-positive tumors, 11/14 (78.57%) had high risk tumors and 8/14 cases (57.14%) presented with metastatic GIST. MDM2 positivity was significantly associated with the metastatic status ( p  = 0.001). The current study suggests that MDM2 immunohistochemical expression is a negative histoprognostic factor in GIST with a statistically significant correlation with metastasis.

  6. Integrins, muscle agrin and sarcoglycans during muscular inactivity conditions: an immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasi, G; Cutroneo, G; Santoro, G; Arco, A; Rizzo, G; Trommino, C; Bramanti, P; Soscia, L; Favaloro, A

    2006-01-01

    Sarcoglycans are transmembrane proteins that seem to be functionally and pathologically as important as dystrophin. Sarcoglycans cluster together to form a complex, which is localized in the cell membrane of skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle. It has been proposed that the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC) links the actin cytoskeleton with the extracellular matrix and the proper maintenance of this connection is thought to be crucial to the mechanical stability of the sarcolemma. The integrins are a family of heterodimeric cell surface receptors which play a crucial role in cell adhesion including cell-matrix and intracellular interactions and therefore are involved in various biological phenomena, including cell migration, and differentiation tissue repair. Sarcoglycans and integrins play a mechanical and signaling role stabilizing the systems during cycles of contraction and relaxation. Several studies suggested the possibility that integrins might play a role in muscle agrin signalling. On these basis, we performed an immunohistochemical analyzing sarcoglycans, integrins and agrin, on human skeletal muscle affected by sensitive-motor polyneuropathy, in order to better define the correlation between these proteins and neurogenic atrophy due to peripheral neuropathy. Our results showed the existence of a cascade mechanism which provoke a loss of regulatory effects of muscle activity on costameres, due to loss of muscle and neural agrin. This cascade mechanism could determine a quantitative modification of transmembrane receptors and loss of alpha7B could be replaced and reinforced by enhanced expression of the alpha7A integrin to restore muscle fiber viability. Second, it is possible that the reduced cycles of contraction and relaxation of muscle fibers, during muscular atrophy, provoke a loss of mechanical stresses transmitted over cell surface receptors that physically couple the cytoskeleton to extracellular matrix. Consequently, these mechanical changes

  7. Integrins, muscle agrin and sarcoglycans during muscular inactivity conditions: an immunohistochemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Anastasi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoglycans are transmembrane proteins that seem to be functionally and pathologically as important as dystrophin. Sarcoglycans cluster together to form a complex, which is localized in the cell membrane of skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle. It has been proposed that the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC links the actin cytoskeleton with the extracellular matrix and the proper maintenance of this connection is thought to be crucial to the mechanical stability of the sarcolemma. The integrins are a family of heterodimeric cell surface receptors which play a crucial role in cell adhesion including cell-matrix and intracellular interactions and therefore are involved in various biological phenomena, including cell migration, and differentiation tissue repair. Sarcoglycans and integrins play a mechanical and signaling role stabilizing the systems during cycles of contraction and relaxation.Several studies suggested the possibility that integrins might play a role in muscle agrin signalling. On these basis, we performed an immunohistochemical analyzing sarcoglycans, integrins and agrin, on human skeletal muscle affected by sensitive-motor polyneuropathy, in order to better define the correlation between these proteins and neurogenic atrophy due to peripheral neuropathy. Our results showed the existence of a cascade mechanism which provoke a loss of regulatory effects of muscle activity on costameres, due to loss of muscle and neural agrin.This cascade mechanism could determine a quantitative modification of transmembrane receptors and loss of ?7B could be replaced and reinforced by enhanced expression of the ?7A integrin to restore muscle fiber viability. Second, it is possible that the reduced cycles of contraction and relaxation of muscle fibers, during muscular atrophy, provoke a loss of mechanical stresses transmitted over cell surface receptors that physically couple the cytoskeleton to extracellular matrix. Consequently, these mechanical

  8. Ocular features of multiple system atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Maria D; Pulido, Jose S; Coon, Elizabeth A; Chen, John J

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to gain better understanding of the ocular manifestations of multiple system atrophy (MSA), a neurodegenerative disorder rarely studied in terms of its ophthalmologic features. We performed a retrospective case series (1/1/05-12/31/14) to search for patients seen at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, who had mention of MSA in the medical record and an eye examination, which yielded 285 cases. Of the 285, we identified 39 cases of true MSA. Each of these 39 patients was further reviewed for ocular abnormalities potentially related to MSA. Ocular findings potentially attributable to MSA were found in 64% of patients. Most common were dry eye (N = 14), conjugate eye movement abnormalities (N = 13), and ocular misalignment (N = 7). One patient had dry eye and monocular diplopia from trichiasis due to cicatricial pemphigoid, one had bilateral optic atrophy, and one had Adie's tonic pupil. Conjugate eye movement abnormalities (33%) and ocular misalignment (18%) were more common in patients with MSA-C. Patients with ocular findings, excluding dry eye, had a significantly shorter lifespan from time of initial neurologic symptoms to death. Our study confirms conjugate eye movement abnormalities and misalignment are common ocular findings in patients with MSA. Bilateral optic atrophy and cicatricial pemphigoid are possibly attributable to the disease. Ocular manifestations in MSA predict a poor prognosis as these patients have a significantly shorter lifespan. Therefore, we recommend patients with MSA have a comprehensive neuro-ophthalmologic exam at time of diagnosis, and thereafter, to screen for eye findings that may indicate a shorter lifespan. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. [Homonymous hemianopia and posterior cortical atrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formaglio, M; Krolak-Salmon, P; Tilikete, C; Bernard, M; Croisile, B; Vighetto, A

    2009-03-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a clinically and radiologically defined syndrome, in which predominant symptoms focus on higher visual dysfunction with progressive course and association with cortical atrophy or hypometabolism that predominates in the posterior part of the hemispheres. Homonymous hemianopia (HH) has rarely been described in this syndrome. We report on six patients (four females, two males, aged 63 to 80) referred for visual disorder which led to demonstration of HH using perimetry testing. These patients were followed for 1 to 5 years after discovery of HH. Brain imaging with MRI or CT scan was obtained in the six cases and a SPECT scan was performed in four cases. HH was left-sided in four cases and right-sided in two cases. Associated symptoms related to higher visual dysfunction were simultagnosia, alone or as part of a full Balint's syndrome, alexia, constructional apraxia, dressing apraxia, visual form agnosia, prosopagnosia and hemispatial neglect. These symptoms were mild at onset but invariably worsened with disease progression. Dementia eventually developed in all cases. The clinical diagnosis was probable Alzheimer's disease in five cases and corticobasal degeneration in one case. Radiology showed posterior cortex atrophy in all cases as well as reduced cerebral blood flow in the same region, with an asymmetrical pattern compatible with the side of HH. Elementary cortical lesions in PCA can develop mainly in the associative visual areas and even in the primary visual area, resulting in HH. HH has rarely been documented in PCA, but its prevalence would probably be higher if systematic search was conducted. Apparently isolated HH of insidious onset should suggest PCA and lead to neuropsychological testing and search for discrete atrophic changes of the posterior cortex on MRI as well as for metabolic alterations with SPECT or PET.

  10. Skin lightening cream induced dermatitis and atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremmer, Matthew; Gardner, James; Driscoll, Marcia

    2011-03-15

    We present the case of a Malian woman who had been using skin-lightening creams for an excess of 5 years. On presentation to our clinic she had multiple areas of atrophy and striae with erythema. She had been using a topical estrogen cream over all effected areas for two weeks. We present this case to draw attention to the serious problem of widespread and unregulated use of skin lightening creams in Africa. Herein we include a review of the literature on the prevalence of the problem as well as associated side effects of commonly implicated medications.

  11. Congenital heart defects in spinal muscular atrophy type I : A clinical report of two siblings and a review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menke, Leonie A.; Poll-The, Bwee Tien; Clur, Sally-Ann; Bilardo, Catia M.; van der Wal, Allard C.; Lenunink, Henny H.; Cobben, Jan Maarten

    2008-01-01

    A newborn girl presented with asphyxia, joint contractures and diminished spontaneous movements. Echocardiography showed hypoplastic left heart. Spinal muscular atrophy type I (SMA I) was diagnosed by detecting a homozygous deletion in the survival motor neuron 1 gene (SMN1). In the first trimester

  12. Hypospadias as a novel feature in spinal bulbar muscle atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordenvall, Anna Skarin; Paucar, Martin; Almqvist, Catarina; Nordenström, Anna; Frisén, Louise; Nordenskjöld, Agneta

    2016-04-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscle atrophy (SBMA) is an X-linked neuromuscular disorder caused by CAG repeat expansions in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. The SBMA phenotype consists of slowly progressive neuromuscular symptoms and undermasculinization features as the result of malfunction of the AR. The latter mainly includes gynecomastia and infertility. Hypospadias is also a feature of undermasculinization with an underdeveloped urethra and penis; it has not been described as part of the SBMA phenotype but has been suggested to be associated with a prolonged CAG repeat in the AR gene. This study includes the first epidemiologic description of the co-occurrence of hypospadias and SBMA in subjects and their male relatives in Swedish population-based health registers, as well as an additional clinical case. One boy with severe hypospadias was screened for mutations in the AR gene and was found to have 42 CAG repeats in it, which is in the full range of mutations causing SBMA later in life. We also detected a maximum of four cases displaying the combination of SBMA and hypospadias in our national register databases. This is the third case report with hypospadias in association with CAG repeat expansions in the AR gene in the full range known to cause SBMA later in life. Our findings suggest that hypospadias may be an under diagnosed feature of the SBMA phenotype and we propose that neurologists working with SBMA further investigate and report the true prevalence of hypospadias among patients with SBMA.

  13. Bulbar and spinal muscular atrophy (Kennedy's disease): a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, J

    2009-05-01

    Bulbar and spinal muscular atrophy (BSMA) is an adult-onset, X-linked recessive trinucleotide, polyglutamine disorder, caused by expansion of a polymorphic CAG tandem-repeat in exon 1 of the androgen-receptor (AR) gene on chromosome Xq11-12. Pathogenetically, mutated AR accumulates in nuclei and cytoplasm of motor neurons, resulting in their degeneration and loss. Phenotypically, patients present with amyotrophic, proximal or distal weakness and wasting of the facial, bulbar and limb muscles, occasionally sensory disturbances, and endocrinologic disturbances, such as androgen resistance, gynecomastia, elevated testosterone or progesterone, and reduced fertility. There may be mild hyper-CK-emia, abnormal motor and sensory nerve conduction studies, and neuropathic and myopathic alterations on muscle biopsy. The golden standard for diagnosing BSMA is genetic analysis, demonstrating a CAG-repeat number >40. No causal therapy is available, but symptomatic therapy should be provided for tremor, endocrinologic abnormalities, sensory disturbances, or muscle cramps. The course is slowly progressive, the ability to walk lost only late in life, only few patients require ventilatory support, and life expectancy only slightly reduced.

  14. Subacute brain atrophy after radiation therapy for malignant brain tumor

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    Asai, A.; Matsutani, M.; Kohno, T.; Nakamura, O.; Tanaka, H.; Fujimaki, T.; Funada, N.; Matsuda, T.; Nagata, K.; Takakura, K.

    1989-05-15

    Brain atrophy with mental and neurologic deterioration developing a few months after radiation therapy in patients without residual or recurrent brain tumors has been recognized. Two illustrative case reports of this pathologic entity are presented. Six autopsy cases with this entity including the two cases were reviewed neurologically, radiographically, and histopathologically. All patients presented progressive disturbances of mental status and consciousness, akinesia, and tremor-like involuntary movement. Computerized tomography (CT) demonstrated marked enlargement of the ventricles, moderate widening of the cortical sulci, and a moderately attenuated CT number for the white matter in all six patients. Four of the six patients had CSF drainage (ventriculoperitoneal shunt or continuous lumbar drainage), however, none of them improved. Histologic examination demonstrated swelling and loss of the myelin sheath in the white matter in all patients, and reactive astrocytosis in three of the six patients. Neither prominent neuronal loss in the cerebral cortex or basal ganglia, nor axonal loss in the white matter was generally identified. The blood vessels of the cerebral cortex and white matter were normal. Ependymal layer and the surrounding brain tissue were normal in all patients. These findings suggested that this pathologic condition results from demyelination secondary to direct neurotoxic effect of irradiation. The authors' previous report was reviewed and the differential diagnoses, the risk factors for this pathologic entity, and the indication for radiation therapy in aged patients with a malignant brain tumor are discussed.

  15. Neuropsychological investigation in Chinese patients with progressive muscular atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Cui

    Full Text Available Progressive muscular atrophy (PMA is a rare type of degenerative motor neuron disease (MND of which the onset happens in adult period. Despite its well-defined clinical characteristics, its neuropsychological profile has remained poorly understood, considering the consensus of cognitive and behavioral impairment reached in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS.We conducted a cross-sectional evaluation of Chinese PMA patients with a series of comprehensive batteries emphasizing the executive and attention function, and covering other domains of memory, language, visuospatial function, calculation and behavior as well. Their performances were compared with those of age- and education-matched ALS and healthy controls (HC.21 patients newly diagnosed with PMA were consecutively enrolled into our ALS and other MND registry platform, accounting for 14.7% of all the incident MND cases registered during the same period. 20 patients who completed the neuropsychological batteries were included into analysis. Compared with HC, PMA performed significantly worse in maintenance function of attention, while they exhibited quantitative similarity to ALS in all behavioral inventories and neuropsychological tests except the time for Stroop interference effect.PMA could display mild cognitive dysfunction in the same frontal-mediated territory of ALS but in a lesser degree, whereas they did not differ from ALS behaviorally.

  16. A comparative analysis of angiopoietin 2 immunohistochemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There was a significant correlation between Ang 2 expression rate of expression and the histologic type of lung cancer (P = 0.033). Ang 2 expression rate in tumor cells of cancer tissues diagnosed with adenocarcinoma was low. There was a significant correlation between Ang 2 expression rate in stromal cells of cancer ...

  17. Immunohistochemical localization of human papilloma virus in conjunctival neoplasias: A retrospective study

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    Sen Seema

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The extent of association of human papilloma virus (HPV in human conjunctival neoplasias has been debated in studies originating from different parts of the world, but no substantial evidence has been generated on Indian subjects. This prompted us to carry out a retrospective study on conjunctival neoplasias diagnosed over the past 12 years. Materials and Methods: Histopathological and immunohistochemical analysis of 65 specimens of ocular neoplasias and 30 normal controls diagnosed between 1991 and 2002 at a tertiary eye care hospital, was undertaken. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues were reviewed for confirming histopathological diagnosis, presence of koilocytosis and changes related to actinic keratosis. Immunohistochemical analysis was done using HPV-specific monoclonal antibodies. Clinicopathological correlation and the association of HPV antigen with the histopathological features were performed. Results: Out of the 65 cases analyzed, 35 were papillomas and 30 were ocular surface squamous neoplasias (OSSN. The mean age was 48 years with a male preponderance. Histologically, koilocytosis was observed in 17.1% of papillomas and 36.6% of OSSN. Actinic keratosis was present in 33% of OSSN. Immunohistochemically 17.1% conjunctival papillomas stained positive for HPV antigen, all cases of OSSN were negative for HPV. There was no correlation between koilocytosis or actinic keratosis and the detection of HPV antigen. Conclusions: The association between HPV and conjunctival neoplasias is variable in different geographical areas and also depends on the methods of detection used. This study warrants the need for applying more advanced techniques at a molecular level to determine the possible etiology of HPV in conjunctival neoplasias among Asian-Indians.

  18. Vocal fold nodules: morphological and immunohistochemical investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Regina Helena Garcia; Defaveri, Julio; Custódio Domingues, Maria Aparecida; de Albuquerque E Silva, Rafael; Fabro, Alexandre

    2010-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the morphological and immunohistochemical characteristics of vocal fold nodules. The study design was prospective and retrospective. For the histological study, we reviewed 15 slides from the surgical cases of vocal fold nodules, in which we analyzed epithelium, basal membrane (bm), and lamina propria. For the transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM, SEM) studies, five new cases on vocal fold nodules were included. Immunohistochemistry study was carried out in the 15 specimens, using antifibronectin, antilaminin, and anticollagen IV antibodies. The main histological alterations were epithelial hyperplasia (73.33%), basement membrane thickening (86.66%), edema, and fibrosis (93.33%). SEM--reduction in mucous lacing and increase in the desquamating cells, without epithelial erosion. TEM--hyperplasia of the epithelium, enlargement of the intercellular junctions, which was filled by fluid, subepithelial thickening of the lamina reticularis, and break points in the basal membrane. Immunohistochemistry--we identified greater immunoexpression of fibronectin on the basal membrane, on the lamina propria, and around the vessels. Antilaminin and anticollagen IV antibodies showed higher pigmentation on the endothelium of the vessels than that on the basal membrane. In vocal fold nodules, combined assessment using light microscopy, electron microscopy, and immunohistochemistry can reveal important morphological details useful in characterizing these lesions. 2010 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Immunohistochemical markers of cancerogenesis in the lung.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lech Chyczewski

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths for people of both sexes worldwide. Early diagnosis of precancer lesions may be of crucial significance to lowering lung cancer mortality. The World Health Organization has defined three preneoplastic lesions of the bronchial epithelium: squamous dysplasia and carcinoma in situ, atypical adenomatous hyperplasia and diffuse idiopathic pulmonary neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia. These lesions are believed to progress to squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma and carcinoid tumors, respectively. Apart from WHO classification, two other lesions such as bronchiolization and bronchiolar columnar cell dysplasia (BCCD can be observed and thought to be preneoplastic lesions leading to adenocarcinoma. In this review we summarize the data of morphological and cell cycle related proteins changes in both central and peripheral compartments of lung. Many molecular changes, which accompany the multistep process of the development of invasive types of cancer, may be observed thanks to the application of immunohistochemical markers. A deeper knowledge of molecular and genetic changes accompanying pre-cancer states may show new directions of early diagnostics of cancer development.

  20. Immunohistochemical CD3 staining detects additional patients with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubarak, Amani; Wolters, Victorien M; Houwen, Roderick H J; ten Kate, Fiebo J W

    2015-06-28

    To investigate whether performing immunohistochemical CD3 staining, in order to improve the detection of intra-epithelial lymphocytosis, has an additional value in the histological diagnosis of celiac disease. Biopsies obtained from 159 children were stained by hematoxylin and eosin (HE) and evaluated using the Marsh classification. CD3 staining was subsequently evaluated separately and independently. Differences in evaluation between the routine HE sections and CD3 staining were present in 20 (12.6%) cases. In 10 (6.3%) patients the diagnosis of celiac disease (Marsh II and III) changed on examination of CD3 staining: in 9 cases, celiac disease had initially been missed on the HE sections, while 1 patient had been over-diagnosed on the routine sections. In all patients, the final diagnosis based on CD3 staining, was concordant with serological results, which was not found previously. In the other 10 (12.3%) patients, the detection of sole intra-epithelial lymphocytosis (Marsh I) improved. Nine patients were found to have Marsh I on CD3 sections, which had been missed on routine sections. Interestingly, the only patient with negative serology had Giardiasis. Finally, in 1 patient with negative serology, in whom Marsh I was suspected on HE sections, this diagnosis was withdrawn after evaluation of the CD3 sections. Staining for CD3 has an additional value in the histological detection of celiac disease lesions, and CD3 staining should be performed when there is a discrepancy between serology and the diagnosis made on HE sections.

  1. p53 immunohistochemical staining patterns in oral squamous cell carcinoma

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    G Dundy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mutation of p53 gene is one of the most common events in oral carcinogenesis. Accumulation of p53 protein has also been detected in premalignant lesions.Materials and Methods:  This study included 40 biopsy samples, which were received in department of pathology, Sarojini Naidu Medical College, Agra, to ascertain p53 expression by immunohistochemically, in patients with oral squamous cell carcinomas and to correlate its expression with histological grade, different sites in oral cavity and tobacco intake/smoking habits.Results: Out of 40 biopsies of oral mucosa, 03 showed normal oral mucosa and 37 were diagnosed as squamous cell carcinoma (SCC, most patients were in 5th and 6th decade and majority (86.5% of oral SCC were males with buccal mucosa being the most common site. There was a statistically significant difference in p53 expression between oral SCC and normal oral mucosa (p value <0.05. Of total 37 cases, 12 cases were well differentiated type, 16 moderately differentiated and 09 of poorly differentiated type of SCC. In each category, about two thirds were positive for p53 staining. Out of total 37 cases of oral SCC, 64.9% were positive and 35.1% were negative for p53 expression, 34 cases had positive history of tobacco intake/smoking habits, of which 23 cases were positive while 11 cases were negative for p53 staining.Conclusion: Abnormal p53 protein was detected in 64.9% of oral squamous cell carcinoma, but not in normal oral mucosa. p53 expression was associated with malignant transformation of oral mucosa. 

  2. Novel OPA1 missense mutation in a family with optic atrophy and severe widespread neurological disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liskova, Petra; Ulmanova, Olga; Tesina, Petr; Melsova, Hana; Diblik, Pavel; Hansikova, Hana; Tesarova, Marketa; Votruba, Marcela

    2013-05-01

    To identify the underlying molecular genetic cause in a Czech family with optic atrophy, deafness, ptosis, ophthalmoplegia, polyneuropathy and ataxia transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. Ophthalmological and neurological examination followed by molecular genetic analyses. Seven family members were clinically affected. There was a variable but progressive visual, hearing and neurological disability across the family as a whole. The majority of subjects presented with impairment of visual function and a variable degree of ptosis and/or ophthalmoplegia from the first to the third decade of life. Deafness, neuropathy and ataxia appeared later, in the third and fourth decade. Migraine, tachycardia, intention tremor, nystagmus and cervical dystonia were observed in isolated individuals. A significant overall feature was the high level of neurological disability leading to 3 of 4 members being unable to walk or stand unaided before the age of 60 years. A novel missense mutation c.1345A>C (p.Thr449Pro) in OPA1 segregating with the disease phenotype over three generations was detected. In silico analysis supported pathogenicity of the identified sequence variant. Our work expands the spectrum of mutation in OPA1, which may lead to severe multisystem neurological disorder. The molecular genetic cause of dominant optic atrophy in the Czech population is reported for the first time. We propose that regular cardiac follow-up in patients diagnosed with dominant optic atrophy and widespread neurological disease should be considered. © 2013 The Authors. Acta Ophthalmologica © 2013 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  3. Rehabilitation and nutritional support for sarcopenic dysphagia and tongue atrophy after glossectomy: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashida, Nao; Shamoto, Hiroshi; Maeda, Keisuke; Wakabayashi, Hidetaka; Suzuki, Motoyuki; Fujii, Takashi

    2017-03-01

    Swallowing dysfunction is related to long-term weight loss and reduced body mass index in patients with head and neck cancer. We describe a 76-y-old woman who had severe sarcopenic dysphagia and atrophy of the reconstructed tongue for 17 mo after subtotal glossectomy due to tongue cancer and lost 14 kg during that period. Upon admission, the patient received diagnoses of malnutrition in the context of social or environmental circumstances with insufficient energy intake, loss of muscle mass, localized fluid accumulation, weight loss, and sarcopenia due to reduced skeletal muscle mass (skeletal muscle index dysphagia rehabilitation to improve sarcopenia, atrophy of the reconstructed tongue, and dysphagia. After 20 mo of treatment, she was considered to be no longer malnourished (11 kg weight gain) and without sarcopenia (skeletal muscle index 4.01 cm2/m2), and the volume of the reconstructed tongue was increased. Sarcopenia and atrophy of the reconstructed tongue may cause dysphagia after glossectomy due to tongue cancer. Additionally, nutritional support and rehabilitation could improve such dysphagia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Automated analysis of whole skeletal muscle for muscular atrophy detection of ALS in whole-body CT images: preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Naoki; Ieda, Kosuke; Zhou, Xiangrong; Yamada, Megumi; Kato, Hiroki; Muramatsu, Chisako; Hara, Takeshi; Miyoshi, Toshiharu; Inuzuka, Takashi; Matsuo, Masayuki; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2017-03-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) causes functional disorders such as difficulty in breathing and swallowing through the atrophy of voluntary muscles. ALS in its early stages is difficult to diagnose because of the difficulty in differentiating it from other muscular diseases. In addition, image inspection methods for aggressive diagnosis for ALS have not yet been established. The purpose of this study is to develop an automatic analysis system of the whole skeletal muscle to support the early differential diagnosis of ALS using whole-body CT images. In this study, the muscular atrophy parts including ALS patients are automatically identified by recognizing and segmenting whole skeletal muscle in the preliminary steps. First, the skeleton is identified by its gray value information. Second, the initial area of the body cavity is recognized by the deformation of the thoracic cavity based on the anatomical segmented skeleton. Third, the abdominal cavity boundary is recognized using ABM for precisely recognizing the body cavity. The body cavity is precisely recognized by non-rigid registration method based on the reference points of the abdominal cavity boundary. Fourth, the whole skeletal muscle is recognized by excluding the skeleton, the body cavity, and the subcutaneous fat. Additionally, the areas of muscular atrophy including ALS patients are automatically identified by comparison of the muscle mass. The experiments were carried out for ten cases with abnormality in the skeletal muscle. Global recognition and segmentation of the whole skeletal muscle were well realized in eight cases. Moreover, the areas of muscular atrophy including ALS patients were well identified in the lower limbs. As a result, this study indicated the basic technology to detect the muscle atrophy including ALS. In the future, it will be necessary to consider methods to differentiate other kinds of muscular atrophy as well as the clinical application of this detection method for early ALS

  5. Abnormal pain perception in patients with Multiple System Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ory-Magne, F; Pellaprat, J; Harroch, E; Galitzsky, M; Rousseau, V; Pavy-Le Traon, A; Rascol, O; Gerdelat, A; Brefel-Courbon, C

    2018-03-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease or Multiple System Atrophy frequently experience painful sensations. The few studies investigating pain mechanisms in Multiple System Atrophy patients have reported contradictory results. In our study, we compared pain thresholds in Multiple System Atrophy and Parkinson's disease patients and healthy controls and evaluated the effect of l-DOPA on pain thresholds. We assessed subjective and objective pain thresholds (using a thermotest and RIII reflex), and pain tolerance in OFF and ON conditions, clinical pain, motor and psychological evaluation. Pain was reported in 78.6% of Multiple System Atrophy patients and in 37.5% of Parkinson's disease patients. In the OFF condition, subjective and objective pain thresholds were significantly lower in Multiple System Atrophy patients than in healthy controls (43.8 °C ± 1.3 vs 45.7 °C ± 0.8; p = 0.0005 and 7.4 mA ± 3.8 vs 13.7 mA ± 2.8; p = 0.002, respectively). They were also significantly reduced in Multiple System Atrophy compared to Parkinson's disease patients. No significant difference was found in pain tolerance for the 3 groups and in the effect of l-DOPA on pain thresholds in Multiple System Atrophy and Parkinson's disease patients. In the ON condition, pain tolerance tended to be reduced in Multiple System Atrophy versus Parkinson's disease patients (p = 0.05). Multiple System Atrophy patients had an increase in pain perception compared to Parkinson's disease patients and healthy controls. The l-DOPA effect was similar for pain thresholds in Multiple System Atrophy and Parkinson's disease patients, but tended to worsen pain tolerance in Multiple System Atrophy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of muscle atrophy on motor control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, D. G.

    1985-01-01

    As a biological tissue, muscle adapts to the demands of usage. One traditional way of assessing the extent of this adaptation has been to examine the effects of an altered-activity protocol on the physiological properties of muscles. However, in order to accurately interpret the changes associated with an activity pattern, it is necessary to employ an appropriate control model. A substantial literature exists which reports altered-use effects by comparing experimental observations with those from animals raised in small laboratory cages. Some evidence suggests that small-cage-reared animals actually represent a model of reduced use. For example, laboratory animals subjected to limited physical activity have shown resistance to insulin-induced glucose uptake which can be altered by exercise training. This project concerned itself with the basic mechanisms underlying muscle atrophy. Specifically, the project addressed the issue of the appropriateness of rats raised in conventional-sized cages as experimental models to examine this phenomenon. The project hypothesis was that rats raised in small cages are inappropriate models for the study of muscle atrophy. The experimental protocol involved: 1) raising two populations of rats, one group in conventional (small)-sized cages and the other group in a much larger (133x) cage, from weanling age (21 days) through to young adulthood (125 days); 2) comparison of size- and force-related characteristics of selected test muscles in an acute terminal paradigm.

  7. Bringing CLARITY to Gray Matter Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Rory D.; Kurth, Florian; Itoh, Noriko; Mongerson, Chandler R.L.; Wailes, Shannon H.; Peng, Mavis S.; MacKenzie-Graham, Allan J.

    2015-01-01

    Gray matter atrophy has been shown to be a strong correlate to clinical disability in multiple sclerosis (MS) and its most commonly used animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). However, the relationship between gray mater atrophy and the spinal cord pathology often observed in EAE has never been established. Here EAE was induced in Thy1.1-YFP mice and their brains imaged using in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The brains and spinal cords were subsequently optically cleared using Clear Lipid-exchanged Acrylamide-hybridized Rigid Imaging-compatible Tissue-hYdrogel (CLARITY). Axons were followed 5 mm longitudinally in three dimensions in intact spinal cords revealing that 61% of the axons exhibited a mean of 22 axonal ovoids and 8% of the axons terminating in axonal end bulbs. In the cerebral cortex, we observed a decrease in the mean number of layer V pyramidal neurons and a decrease in the mean length of the apical dendrites of the remaining neurons, compared to healthy controls. MRI analysis demonstrated decreased cortical volumes in EAE. Cross-modality correlations revealed a direct relationship between cortical volume loss and axonal end bulb number in the spinal cord, but not ovoid number. This is the first report of the use of CLARITY in an animal model of disease and the first report of the use of both CLARITY and MRI. PMID:25038439

  8. Oats induced villous atrophy in coeliac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, K E A; Nilsen, E M; Scott, H G; Løberg, E M; Gjøen, A; Bratlie, J; Skar, V; Mendez, E; Løvik, A; Kett, K

    2003-01-01

    The current trend is to allow coeliac disease (CD) patients to introduce oats to their gluten free diet. We sought further data from the clinical setting with regards to oats consumption by coeliac patients. Several oat products were tested for wheat contamination using a commercial enzyme linked immunoassay (ELISA) kit, and six samples were examined by an ELISA using a cocktail of monoclonal antibodies, mass spectrometry, and western blot analysis. Nineteen adult CD patients on a gluten free diet were challenged with 50 g of oats per day for 12 weeks. Serological testing and gastroduodenoscopy was performed before and after the challenge. Biopsies were scored histologically and levels of mRNA specific for interferon γ were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis. Oats were well tolerated by most patients but several reported initial abdominal discomfort and bloating. One of the patients developed partial villous atrophy and a rash during the first oats challenge. She subsequently improved on an oats free diet but developed subtotal villous atrophy and dramatic dermatitis during a second challenge. Five of the patients showed positive levels of interferon γ mRNA after challenge. Some concerns therefore remain with respect to the safety of oats for coeliacs. PMID:14570737

  9. MRI patterns of atrophy and hypoperfusion associations across brain regions in frontotemporal dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosun, Duygu; Rosen, Howard; Miller, Bruce L; Weiner, Michael W; Schuff, Norbert

    2012-02-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) provides various imaging modes to study the brain. We tested the benefits of a joint analysis of multimodality MRI data in combination with a large-scale analysis that involved simultaneously all image voxels using joint independent components analysis (jICA) and compared the outcome to results using conventional voxel-by-voxel unimodality tests. Specifically, we designed a jICA to decompose multimodality MRI data into independent components that explain joint variations between the image modalities as well as variations across brain regions. We tested the jICA design on structural and perfusion-weighted MRI data from 12 patients diagnosed with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) and 12 cognitively normal elderly individuals. While unimodality analyses showed widespread brain atrophy and hypoperfusion in the patients, jICA further revealed two significant joint components of variations between atrophy and hypoperfusion across brain regions. The 1st joint component revealed associated brain atrophy and hypoperfusion predominantly in the right brain hemisphere in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia, and the 2nd joint component revealed greater atrophy relative to hypoperfusion affecting predominantly the left hemisphere in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia. The patterns are consistent with the clinical symptoms of behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia that relate to asymmetric compromises of the left and right brain hemispheres. The joint components also revealed that that structural alterations can be associated with physiological alterations in spatially separated but potentially connected brain regions. Finally, jICA outperformed voxel-by-voxel unimodal tests significantly in terms of an effect size, separating the behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia patients from the controls. Taken together, the results demonstrate the benefit of multimodality MRI in conjunction with jICA for mapping

  10. A quantitative evaluation of pontine atrophy by MR imaging in patients with spinocerebellar degeneration

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    Takeda, Hirotomo; Tsukamoto, Hiroshi; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi [St. Marianna Univ., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate if pontine measurement on MR images is capable of diagnosing spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD). The study population consists of 68 cases with SCD (34 males and 34 females with a mean age of 57.8 years ranging from 28 to 82 years) and 240 controls (120 males and 120 females with a mean age of 49.3 years ranging from 20 to 78 years). Patients with SCD were classified into three groups. Type I includes 23 cases with olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA), 7 with spinocerebellar ataxia 2 (SCA2), one with SCA3, 3 with multiple system atrophy (MSA), and one with dentate-rubro-pallido-luysian atrophy (DRPLA) (total of 35 cases). Type II consists of 12 cases with late cortical cerebellar atrophy (LCCA) and 3 with SCA6 (total of 15 cases). The last group includes 18 cases with unclassified SCD. The pontine index was calculated using the following equation; transverse distance between bilateral trigeminal nerve root x AP distance of the pons between the pontine basilar sulcus and the median sulcus of the fourth ventricle. Measurement was performed at the level of the trigeminal nerve root on axial T1-weighted images. Pontine indexes were 699{+-}77.19 for the controls and 455{+-}134.23 for SCD groups (pERROR [Basic syntax error] in: <0ERROR [Basic syntax error] in:.0001; t-test). For SCD patients the pontine indexes were significantly Small for Type I in contrast to Type II (pERROR [Basic syntax error] in:<0ERROR [Basic syntax error] in:.001; t-test). Sensitivity of the Pontine indexes for SCD was 70.6% with a cutoff value of 540 (mean-2SD of controls). In agreement with the findings of the study it is proposed that the pontine index may be useful in diagnosis of SCD and OPCA in particular. (author)

  11. IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF ORAL MUCOSA LEUKOPLAKIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. G. KOLENKO

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, substantial changes have occurred in the structure of oral mucosa diseases, in particular an increased ratio of precancerous diseases, so that an effective non-invasive detection of any sign of malignancy appears as an urgent and most actual task of dentistry. Aim: To study the proliferative activity of epithelial cells in Ki-67 antigenin patients with leukoplakia of the oral mucosa. Materials and method: A complex clinical and laboratory examination was performed on 155 patients with oral leukoplakia, who addressed the Operative Dentistry Department of the “A.A.Bogomolets” National Medical University of Kiev between 2010 and 2014. All patients have been subjected to a careful clinical examination, which included: dental anamnesis, visual inspection, oral examination and digital palpation of oral mucosa and tongue mucosa, biopsy of leukoplakia lesions for cytological and histological examination. Results: Histological evaluation of the material has been performed according to the WHO (2005 classification of leukoplakia. 10 (14% sites of unaltered mucosa, 10 (14% samples of hyperkeratosis without atypia, 14 (19% biopsy specimens of hyperkeratosis SIN1, 15 (21% – hyperkeratosis SIN2, 10 (14% - SIN3 and 13 (18% cases of squamous cell carcinoma were evidenced. Immunohistochemical investigation evidenced the presence of protein Ki-67 in the nuclei of epithelial cells. In the unmodified epithelium of the oral mucosa, all epithelial cells with stained nuclei are virtually located in the basal layer. Conclusion: Against the general increase of the proliferative activity of epithelial cells with increasing SIN, a characteristic distribution of proliferating cells in the thickness of the epithelium was revealed for each studied group, as follows: in the control group and in leukoplakia without atypia, immunopositive cells are located in the basal layer, in leukoplakia (SIN1, SIN2 and SIN3 – in parabasal position while, in squamous

  12. Xp11.2 translocation renal cell carcinoma diagnosed by immunohistochemistry and cytogenetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswajit Dey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Xp11.2 translocation renal cell carcinomas (TRCCs are a group of neoplasms with distinct clinical, histopathological appearance, immunohistochemical, and cytogenetic profile. We report a case of Xp11.2 translocation TRCC in an 11-year-old male diagnosed based on immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization.

  13. Corpus callosum atrophy in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Kristian Steen; Garde, Ellen; Skimminge, Arnold

    2011-01-01

    Several studies have found atrophy of the corpus callosum (CC) in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, it remains unclear whether callosal atrophy is already present in the early stages of AD, and to what extent it may be associated with other structural changes in the brain, such as ...

  14. Carrier screening for spinal muscular atrophy in Italian population

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal-recessive neuromuscular disorder characterized by motor neuron degeneration in the anterior horn of the spinal cord and brain stem, resulting in progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. The responsible survival motor neuron gene (SMN1; HGNC: 11117) is localized in ...

  15. A case of spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 mimicking olivopontocerebellar atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, N.; Katayama, T.; Makita, Y.; Kuroda, K.; Aizawa, H.; Kikuchi, K. [First Dept. of Internal Medicine, Asahikawa Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) is an autosomal dominant, slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia without multisystem involvement. We report a 57-year-old woman with genetically confirmed SCA6 who showed clinical features of olivopontocerebellar atrophy. Conventional T2-weighted and FLAIR MRI demonstrated high signal in the middle cerebellar peduncles, in addition to mild atrophy of the pons and cerebellum. (orig.)

  16. Variations in immunohistochemical preservation of proteins in a mummification model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Metcalfe, Ryan; Freemont, Tony

    2012-01-01

    ... and thereby improve confidence that the results are genuine. A mouse model of Egyptian mummification has been used to demonstrate that the survival of proteins, judged by the retention of immunohistochemical staining, varies markedly...

  17. Immunohistochemical localization of epidermal growth factor in rat and man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Steen Seier; Nexø, Ebba

    1986-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a peptide which stimulates cell mitotic activity and differentiation, has a cytoprotective effect on the gastroduodenal mucosa, and inhibits gastric acid secretion. The immunohistochemical localization of EGF in the Brunner's glands and the submandibular glands...

  18. Osteoclastic giant cell tumor of the pancreas: an immunohistochemical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dizon, M A; Multhaupt, H A; Paskin, D L

    1996-01-01

    A case of an osteoclastic giant cell tumor of the pancreas is presented. Immunohistochemical studies were performed, which showed keratin (CAM, AE1) and epithelial membrane antigen positivity in the tumor cells. The findings support an epithelial origin for this tumor.......A case of an osteoclastic giant cell tumor of the pancreas is presented. Immunohistochemical studies were performed, which showed keratin (CAM, AE1) and epithelial membrane antigen positivity in the tumor cells. The findings support an epithelial origin for this tumor....

  19. Quantitative assessment of gastric atrophy using the syntactic structure analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitoun, A M; al Mardini, H; Record, C O

    1998-12-01

    To assess the topographical relation between gastric glands, using the minimum spanning tree (MST), to derive both a model of neighbourhood and quantitative representation of the tissue's architecture, to assess the characteristic features of gastric atrophy, and to assess the grades of gastric atrophy. Haematoxylin and eosin stained sections from corporal and antral biopsy specimens (n = 139) from normal patients and from patients with nonatrophic gastritis and atrophic gastritis of grades 1, 2, and 3 (Sydney system) were assessed by image analysis system (Prodit 5.2) and 11 syntactic structure features were derived. These included both line and connectivity features. Syntactic structure analysis was correlated with the semiquantitative grading system of gastric atrophy. The study showed significant reductions in the number of points and the length of MST in both body and antrum. The standard deviation of the length of MST was significantly increased in all grades of atrophy. The connectivity to two glands was the highest and most affected by the increased grade of atrophy. The reciprocal values of the Wiener, Randic, and Balaban indices showed significant changes in the volume of gland, abnormality in the shape of glands, and changes in irregularity and branching of the glands in both types of gastric mucosa. There was a complete separation in the MST, connectivity, and index values between low grade and high grade gastric atrophy. (1) Gastric atrophy was characterised by loss of the gland, variation in the volume, reduction in the neighbourhood, irregularity in spacing, and abnormality in the shape of the glands. (2) Syntactic structure analysis significantly differentiated minor changes in gastric gland (low grade atrophy) from high grade atrophy of clinical significance. (3) Syntactic structure analysis is a simple, fast, and highly reproducible technique and appears a promising method for quantitative assessment of atrophy.

  20. Teres minor innervation in the context of isolated muscle atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, Jikol; Francis, Sarah; McCulloch, Jane; Ecker, Jeff; Breidahl, William; McMenamin, Paul

    2010-03-01

    Teres minor atrophy occurs either in isolation, associated with other rotator cuff muscle pathologies or in quadrilateral space syndrome. In the latter condition, compression of the axillary nerve is the likely cause; however, the anatomy of the nerve to teres minor and how this may relate to isolated teres minor atrophy have not been extensively investigated. In light of the significance of teres minor atrophy in shoulder pathology, we performed a combined radiological and anatomical study of teres minor and its nerve supply. Cadaveric dissection of nine shoulder specimens from eight cadavers was performed to investigate the anatomical variability in course, length and branching pattern of both the teres minor nerve and the axillary nerve. Radiological imaging and reports were analysed on all shoulder magnetic resonance images performed over a 1-week period at four radiology clinic locations in an attempt to identify the incidence of isolated teres minor atrophy and review teres minor atrophy in association with other shoulder pathology. Finally, we studied a case of isolated teres minor atrophy identified during a routine undergraduate dissection class. Considerable anatomical variation was noticed in cadaver dissections in the nerve(s) supplying teres minor muscle revealing several various points where it may be vulnerable to impingement or injury at along its course. Analysis of 61 shoulder MR images revealed two patients with shoulder complaints that had isolated teres minor atrophy. Case-based study of these two male patients revealed other associated shoulder injury but the presentation was markedly different and clinically distinct from quadrilateral space syndrome. Isolated teres minor atrophy is a relatively common shoulder pathology which appears to be clinically distinct from other syndromes with rotator cuff muscle atrophy including quadrilateral space syndrome. The exact aetiology is unknown but cadaveric dissection in this study suggests the

  1. Posterior cerebral atrophy in the absence of medial temporal lobe atrophy in pathologically-confirmed Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehmann, M.; Koedam, E.L.G.E.; Barnes, J.; Bartlett, J.W.; Ryan, N.S.; Pijnenburg, Y.A.L.; Barkhof, F.; Wattjes, M.P.; Scheltens, P.; Fox, N.C.

    2012-01-01

    Medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA) is a recognized marker of Alzheimer's disease (AD), however, it can be prominent in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). There is an increasing awareness that posterior atrophy (PA) is important in AD and may aid the differentiation of AD from FTLD. Visual

  2. How Is Atherosclerosis Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease. Your risk for atherosclerosis increases if your father or a brother was diagnosed with heart disease ... This may be an early sign of CHD. Stress Testing During stress testing , you exercise to make ...

  3. How Is Cardiomyopathy Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... extra or unusual sounds heard during a heartbeat.) Diagnosis Your doctor will diagnose cardiomyopathy based on your medical and family histories, a ... 03, 2013 | News Release Risk factors identified at diagnosis help predict outcomes for ... Cardiomyopathy ...

  4. Cortical atrophy rates in Alzheimer's patients and subjects with mild cognitive impairment from the AddNeuroMed data collection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Simon Fristed; Westman, Eric; Gwadry-Sridhar, Femida

    Background: The AddNeuroMed project is a multi-centre European project which aims to identify biomarkers in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study we measured the rate of cortical atrophy in AD patients, subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and healthy controls (HC) using MRI. Methods......: High resolution sagittal 3D T1w MP-RAGE scans were acquired from patients diagnosed with AD (n = 58,MMSE:21.6 ± 4.4), MCI subjects (n = 85,MMSE:27.2 ± 1.6), and HC (n = 75,MMSE:29.0 ± 1.3) at baseline, and at three and 12 months follow-up. Only subjects with three completed scans which all passed...... rates can be found in AD patients compared to HC and MCI. Even three months after baseline accelerated atrophy can be observed in AD compared to HC, however, the results indicate that three months is too short a period to distinguish the atrophy rates in AD and MCI. The results suggest that atrophy...

  5. Muscle Atrophy Reversed by Growth Factor Activation of Satellite Cells in a Mouse Muscle Atrophy Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauerslev, Simon; Vissing, John; Krag, Thomas O

    2014-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies comprise a large group of inherited disorders that lead to progressive muscle wasting. We wanted to investigate if targeting satellite cells can enhance muscle regeneration and thus increase muscle mass. We treated mice with hepatocyte growth factor and leukemia inhibitory...... factor under three conditions: normoxia, hypoxia and during myostatin deficiency. We found that hepatocyte growth factor treatment led to activation of the Akt/mTOR/p70S6K protein synthesis pathway, up-regulation of the myognic transcription factors MyoD and myogenin, and subsequently the negative growth...... control factor, myostatin and atrophy markers MAFbx and MuRF1. Hypoxia-induced atrophy was partially restored by hepatocyte growth factor combined with leukemia inhibitory factor treatment. Dividing satellite cells were three-fold increased in the treatment group compared to control. Finally, we...

  6. Fluid biomarkers in multiple system atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurens, Brice; Constantinescu, Radu; Freeman, Roy

    2015-01-01

    Despite growing research efforts, no reliable biomarker currently exists for the diagnosis and prognosis of multiple system atrophy (MSA). Such biomarkers are urgently needed to improve diagnostic accuracy, prognostic guidance and also to serve as efficacy measures or surrogates of target...... engagement for future clinical trials. We here review candidate fluid biomarkers for MSA and provide considerations for further developments and harmonization of standard operating procedures. A PubMed search was performed until April 24, 2015 to review the literature with regard to candidate blood...... and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers for MSA. Abstracts of 1760 studies were retrieved and screened for eligibility. The final list included 60 studies assessing fluid biomarkers in patients with MSA. Most studies have focused on alpha-synuclein, markers of axonal degeneration or catecholamines. Their results...

  7. Visual Dysfunction in Posterior Cortical Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia da Silva, Mari N.; Millington, Rebecca S.; Bridge, Holly; James-Galton, Merle; Plant, Gordon T.

    2017-01-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a syndromic diagnosis. It is characterized by progressive impairment of higher (cortical) visual function with imaging evidence of degeneration affecting the occipital, parietal, and posterior temporal lobes bilaterally. Most cases will prove to have Alzheimer pathology. The aim of this review is to summarize the development of the concept of this disorder since it was first introduced. A critical discussion of the evolving diagnostic criteria is presented and the differential diagnosis with regard to the underlying pathology is reviewed. Emphasis is given to the visual dysfunction that defines the disorder, and the classical deficits, such as simultanagnosia and visual agnosia, as well as the more recently recognized visual field defects, are reviewed, along with the evidence on their neural correlates. The latest developments on the imaging of PCA are summarized, with special attention to its role on the differential diagnosis with related conditions. PMID:28861031

  8. New therapeutic approaches to spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewelt, Aga; Newcomb, Tara M; Swoboda, Kathryn J

    2012-02-01

    Bench to bedside progress has been widely anticipated for a growing number of neurodegenerative disorders. Of these, spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is perhaps the best poised to capitalize on advances in targeted therapeutics development over the next few years. Several laboratories have achieved compelling success in SMA animal models using sophisticated methods for targeted delivery, repair, or increased expression of the survival motor neuron protein, SMN. The clinical community is actively collaborating to identify, develop, and validate outcome measures and biomarkers in parallel with laboratory efforts. Innovative trial design and synergistic approaches to maximize proactive care in conjunction with treatment with one or more of the promising pharmacologic and biologic therapies currently in the pipeline will maximize our chances to achieve meaningful outcomes for patients. This review highlights recent promising scientific and clinical advances bringing us ever closer to effective treatment(s) for our patients with SMA.

  9. Visual Dysfunction in Posterior Cortical Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia da Silva, Mari N; Millington, Rebecca S; Bridge, Holly; James-Galton, Merle; Plant, Gordon T

    2017-01-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a syndromic diagnosis. It is characterized by progressive impairment of higher (cortical) visual function with imaging evidence of degeneration affecting the occipital, parietal, and posterior temporal lobes bilaterally. Most cases will prove to have Alzheimer pathology. The aim of this review is to summarize the development of the concept of this disorder since it was first introduced. A critical discussion of the evolving diagnostic criteria is presented and the differential diagnosis with regard to the underlying pathology is reviewed. Emphasis is given to the visual dysfunction that defines the disorder, and the classical deficits, such as simultanagnosia and visual agnosia, as well as the more recently recognized visual field defects, are reviewed, along with the evidence on their neural correlates. The latest developments on the imaging of PCA are summarized, with special attention to its role on the differential diagnosis with related conditions.

  10. Visual Dysfunction in Posterior Cortical Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari N. Maia da Silva

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA is a syndromic diagnosis. It is characterized by progressive impairment of higher (cortical visual function with imaging evidence of degeneration affecting the occipital, parietal, and posterior temporal lobes bilaterally. Most cases will prove to have Alzheimer pathology. The aim of this review is to summarize the development of the concept of this disorder since it was first introduced. A critical discussion of the evolving diagnostic criteria is presented and the differential diagnosis with regard to the underlying pathology is reviewed. Emphasis is given to the visual dysfunction that defines the disorder, and the classical deficits, such as simultanagnosia and visual agnosia, as well as the more recently recognized visual field defects, are reviewed, along with the evidence on their neural correlates. The latest developments on the imaging of PCA are summarized, with special attention to its role on the differential diagnosis with related conditions.

  11. Valproate and spinal muscular atrophy (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natasha, Gemma; Brandom, Kevin G; Young, Elizabeth C; Young, Philip J

    2008-01-01

    Childhood spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the survival motor neuron (SMN) gene. The severity of the disease is dictated by the copy number of a second copy of the gene, known as SMN2, with higher copy numbers associated with milder forms of SMA. This is because the level of SMN protein produced by patients dictates the severity of the disease. As all patients retain at least one copy of the SMN2 gene, therapeutic strategies are geared towards increasing full-length SMN protein expression from SMN2. One of the identified therapeutic compounds is valproic acid, or valproate (VPA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACI) that has been used since the 1970s as an anti-convulsant. Here, we discuss VPA's modes of action and potential side effects in the treatment of SMA.

  12. Different atrophy-hypertrophy transcription pathways in muscles affected by severe and mild spinal muscular atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millino Caterina

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a neurodegenerative disorder associated with mutations of the survival motor neuron gene SMN and is characterized by muscle weakness and atrophy caused by degeneration of spinal motor neurons. SMN has a role in neurons but its deficiency may have a direct effect on muscle tissue. Methods We applied microarray and quantitative real-time PCR to study at transcriptional level the effects of a defective SMN gene in skeletal muscles affected by the two forms of SMA: the most severe type I and the mild type III. Results The two forms of SMA generated distinct expression signatures: the SMA III muscle transcriptome is close to that found under normal conditions, whereas in SMA I there is strong alteration of gene expression. Genes implicated in signal transduction were up-regulated in SMA III whereas those of energy metabolism and muscle contraction were consistently down-regulated in SMA I. The expression pattern of gene networks involved in atrophy signaling was completed by qRT-PCR, showing that specific pathways are involved, namely IGF/PI3K/Akt, TNF-α/p38 MAPK and Ras/ERK pathways. Conclusion Our study suggests a different picture of atrophy pathways in each of the two forms of SMA. In particular, p38 may be the regulator of protein synthesis in SMA I. The SMA III profile appears as the result of the concurrent presence of atrophic and hypertrophic fibers. This more favorable condition might be due to the over-expression of MTOR that, given its role in the activation of protein synthesis, could lead to compensatory hypertrophy in SMA III muscle fibers.

  13. Types of SMA (Spinal Muscular Atrophy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Publications Spinraza Support & Care For Newly Diagnosed Care Packages Information Packets Equipment Pool Living With SMA Medical Issues Palliative Breathing Orthopedics Nutrition Equipment Daily Life At School At Home Adults With SMA Play Travel Grief & Loss Community & ...

  14. A Definitive Diagnosis of Primary Hodgkin Lymphoma on Endoscopic Biopsy Material Utilizing in-Depth Immunohistochemical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garnet Horne

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The esophagus and stomach can be primary sites for Hodgkin lymphoma (HL. The pathognomonic feature of HL is the Reed-Sternberg cell. Because these cells can be rare in HL tumours, biopsies obtained via endoscopy are usually inadequate for establishing a definitive diagnosis. A case of a gastroesophageal junction primary HL is presented that was diagnosed on endoscopic biopsy material with the assistance of the immunohistochemical stains PAX5 and MUM1 which verified the presence of Reed-Sternberg cells. The patient was effectively treated for HL and avoided traditional laparotomy or thoracotomy procedures to obtain the diagnosis. This advanced immunohistochemical approach should be the standard in the diagnosis of primary gastrointestinal HL. An endoscopy-based approach should obviate more invasive, open biopsy procedures for establishing HL diagnosis.

  15. A new mouse allele of glutamate receptor delta 2 with cerebellar atrophy and progressive ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Yuka; Yoshioka, Yoshichika; Suzuki, Kinuko; Miyazaki, Taisuke; Koura, Minako; Saigoh, Kazumasa; Kajimura, Naoko; Monobe, Yoko; Kusunoki, Susumu; Matsuda, Junichiro; Watanabe, Masahiko; Hayasaka, Naoto

    2014-01-01

    Spinocerebellar degenerations (SCDs) are a large class of sporadic or hereditary neurodegenerative disorders characterized by progressive motion defects and degenerative changes in the cerebellum and other parts of the CNS. Here we report the identification and establishment from a C57BL/6J mouse colony of a novel mouse line developing spontaneous progressive ataxia, which we refer to as ts3. Frequency of the phenotypic expression was consistent with an autosomal recessive Mendelian trait of inheritance, suggesting that a single gene mutation is responsible for the ataxic phenotype of this line. The onset of ataxia was observed at about three weeks of age, which slowly progressed until the hind limbs became entirely paralyzed in many cases. Micro-MRI study revealed significant cerebellar atrophy in all the ataxic mice, although individual variations were observed. Detailed histological analyses demonstrated significant atrophy of the anterior folia with reduced granule cells (GC) and abnormal morphology of cerebellar Purkinje cells (PC). Study by ultra-high voltage electron microscopy (UHVEM) further indicated aberrant morphology of PC dendrites and their spines, suggesting both morphological and functional abnormalities of the PC in the mutants. Immunohistochemical studies also revealed defects in parallel fiber (PF)-PC synapse formation and abnormal distal extension of climbing fibers (CF). Based on the phenotypic similarities of the ts3 mutant with other known ataxic mutants, we performed immunohistological analyses and found that expression levels of two genes and their products, glutamate receptor delta2 (grid2) and its ligand, cerebellin1 (Cbln1), are significantly reduced or undetectable. Finally, we sequenced the candidate genes and detected a large deletion in the coding region of the grid2 gene. Our present study suggests that ts3 is a new allele of the grid2 gene, which causes similar but different phenotypes as compared to other grid2 mutants.

  16. Orbital hydrocephalus: a proven cause for optic atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Towbin, R.; Garcia-Revillo, J.; Fitz, C. [Department of Radiology, Children`s Hospital of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1998-12-01

    A 4-year-old boy with bilateral optic sheath enlargement and progressive optic atrophy and blindness is presented. Computed tomography demonstrated hydrocephalus and enlargement of the optic nerve sheath complex. The child died during an attempted repair of hypoplastic atrioventricular valves. Autopsy demonstrated a patulous perioptic subarachnoid space and optic atrophy. This condition has been described in the literature but has not had radiologic-pathologic correlation. With the availability of magnetic resonance imaging, this diagnosis may be made prospectively, thus, it is important for the radiologist to be aware of this entity because optic atrophy and blindness may be prevented by early diagnosis and surgery. (orig.) With 3 figs., 10 refs.

  17. Brain atrophy in multiple sclerosis: therapeutic, cognitive and clinical impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Ignacio Rojas

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Multiple sclerosis (MS was always considered as a white matter inflammatory disease. Today, there is an important body of evidence that supports the hypothesis that gray matter involvement and the neurodegenerative mechanism are at least partially independent from inflammation. Gray matter atrophy develops faster than white matter atrophy, and predominates in the initial stages of the disease. The neurodegenerative mechanism creates permanent damage and correlates with physical and cognitive disability. In this review we describe the current available evidence regarding brain atrophy and its consequence in MS patients.

  18. Deformation-Based Atrophy Estimation for Alzheimer’s Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pai, Akshay Sadananda Uppinakudru

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) - the most common form of dementia, is a term used for accelerated memory loss and cognitive abilities enough to severely hamper day-to-day activities. One of the most globally accepted markers for AD is atrophy, in mainly the brain parenchyma. The goal of the PhD project...... and a new way to estimate atrophy from a deformation field. We demonstrate the performance of the proposed solution but applying it on the publicly available Alzheimer’s disease neuroimaging data (ADNI) initiative and compare to existing state-of-art atrophy estimation methods....

  19. Acoustic Characteristics of Stridor in Multiple System Atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae Lim Koo

    Full Text Available Nocturnal stridor is a breathing disorder prevalent in patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA. An improved understanding of this breathing disorder is essential since nocturnal stridor carries a poor prognosis (an increased risk of sudden death. In this study, we aimed to classify types of stridor by sound analysis and to reveal their clinical significance. Patients who met the criteria for probable MSA and had undergone polysomnography (PSG were recruited. Patients were then assessed clinically with sleep questionnaires, including the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and the Hoehn and Yahr scale. Nocturnal stridor and snoring were analyzed with the Multi-Dimensional Voice Program. Nocturnal stridor was recorded in 22 patients and snoring in 18 patients using the PSG. Waveforms of stridors were classified into rhythmic or semirhythmic after analysis of the oscillogram. Formants and harmonics were observed in both types of stridor, but not in snoring. Of the 22 patients diagnosed with stridor during the present study, fifteen have subsequently died, with the time to death after the PSG study being 1.9 ± 1.4 years (range 0.8 to 5.0 years. The rhythmic waveform group presented higher scores on the Hoehn and Yahr scale and the survival outcome of this group was lower compared to the semirhythmic waveform group (p = 0.030, p = 0.014. In the Kaplan Meier's survival curve, the outcome of patients with rhythmic waveform was significantly less favorable than the outcome of patients with semirhythmic waveform (log-rank test, p < 0.001. Stridor in MSA can be classified into rhythmic and semirhythmic types and the rhythmic component signifies a poorer outcome.

  20. A cross-sectional multicenter study of cognitive and behavioural features in multiple system atrophy patients of the parkinsonian and cerebellar type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siri, C; Duerr, S; Canesi, M; Delazer, M; Esselink, R; Bloem, B R; Gurevich, T; Balas, M; Giladi, N; Santacruz, P; Marti, F; Tolosa, E; Rubino, A; Meco, G; Poewe, W; Pezzoli, G; Wenning, G; Antonini, A

    2013-04-01

    Imaging and neuropathology studies have demonstrated significant abnormalities not only in subcortical, but also in cortical regions of patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA). This raises the possibility that cognitive dysfunction may contribute to the clinical spectrum of this disorder to a greater extent than it is currently not widely appreciated. In this cross-sectional multicenter study from the European multiple system atrophy study group ( http://www.emsa-sg.org ), we applied an extensive neuropsychological test battery in a series of 61 clinically diagnosed probable MSA patients. The results demonstrated that general cognitive decline as assessed by MMSE was uncommon (2 out of 61 patients system atrophy and this involves primarily frontal-executive functions. Their contribution to clinical disability and disease progression needs to be addressed in larger prospective studies.

  1. Immunohistochemical Detection of Lipocalin 2 Specific Receptor in Psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamide Sayar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Serum Lipocalin 2 (LCN2 levels are a general indicator for increased inflammation in the patients with psoriasis. In this study, we aimed to investigate the receptor levels of LCN2 in psoriatic lesions. Methods: Immunohistochemical expression of LCN2 was investigated in 31 skin biopsy samples of patients with psoriasis and 31 skin biopsies of control group and the results were compared between the groups. Results: Among patient group, 19 patients (61.3% had plaque psoriasis and in all of these, medium to strong staining intensity of LCN2 immunohistochemical expression was detected in the upper epidermal layer. In remaining 12 patients (38.7% with pathologically early stage psoriatic lesions and control group epidermal LCN2 immunohistochemical expression was not observed. LCN2 immunohistochemical expression was detected in the inner root sheath of the hair follicles in both groups without any statistically difference (p=1.00. Conclusion: In our study, medium to strong staining of LCN2 receptor was detected in the superficial epidermis of the psoriatic plaques. But LCN2 immunohistochemical staining was not observed in control skin biopsies. These findings may point out the significance of LCN2 in pathogenesis of psoriasis. On the other hand, absence of expression in patients with early psoriatic lesions imply that LCN2 may be active at the later stages of the pathology.

  2. Mechanisms of cisplatin-induced muscle atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Hiroyasu, E-mail: sakai@hoshi.ac.jp [Department of Pharmacology, Hoshi University, 2-4-41 Ebara, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 1428501 (Japan); Division of Pharmacy Professional Development and Research, Hoshi University, 2-4-41 Ebara, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 1428501 (Japan); Sagara, Atsunobu; Arakawa, Kazuhiko; Sugiyama, Ryoto; Hirosaki, Akiko; Takase, Kazuhide; Jo, Ara [Department of Pharmacology, Hoshi University, 2-4-41 Ebara, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 1428501 (Japan); Sato, Ken [Department of Pharmacology, Hoshi University, 2-4-41 Ebara, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 1428501 (Japan); Division of Pharmacy Professional Development and Research, Hoshi University, 2-4-41 Ebara, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 1428501 (Japan); Chiba, Yoshihiko [Department of Biology, Hoshi University, 2-4-41 Ebara, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 1428501 (Japan); Yamazaki, Mitsuaki [Department of Anesthesiology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama-shi, Toyama 9300194 (Japan); Matoba, Motohiro [Department of Palliative Medicine and Psychooncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 1040045 (Japan); Narita, Minoru, E-mail: narita@hoshi.ac.jp [Department of Pharmacology, Hoshi University, 2-4-41 Ebara, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 1428501 (Japan)

    2014-07-15

    Fatigue is the most common side effect of chemotherapy. However, the mechanisms of “muscle fatigue” induced by anti-cancer drugs are not fully understood. We therefore investigated the muscle-atrophic effect of cisplatin, a platinum-based anti-cancer drug, in mice. C57BL/6J mice were treated with cisplatin (3 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline for 4 consecutive days. On Day 5, hindlimb and quadriceps muscles were isolated from mice. The loss of body weight and food intake under the administration of cisplatin was the same as those in a dietary restriction (DR) group. Under the present conditions, the administration of cisplatin significantly decreased not only the muscle mass of the hindlimb and quadriceps but also the myofiber diameter, compared to those in the DR group. The mRNA expression levels of muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx), muscle RING finger-1 (MuRF1) and forkhead box O3 (FOXO3) were significantly and further increased by cisplatin treated group, compared to DR. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of myostatin and p21 were significantly upregulated by the administration of cisplatin, compared to DR. On the other hand, the phosphorylation of Akt and FOXO3a, which leads to the blockade of the upregulation of MuRF1 and MAFbx, was significantly and dramatically decreased by cisplatin. These findings suggest that the administration of cisplatin increases atrophic gene expression, and may lead to an imbalance between protein synthesis and protein degradation pathways, which would lead to muscle atrophy. This phenomenon could, at least in part, explain the mechanism of cisplatin-induced muscle fatigue. - Highlights: • Cisplatin decreased mass and myofiber diameter in quadriceps muscle. • The mRNA of MAFbx, MuRF1 and FOXO3 were increased by the cisplatin. • The mRNA of myostatin and p21 were upregulated by cisplatin. • The phosphorylation of Akt and FOXO3a was decreased by cisplatin.

  3. Giant cavernous hemangioma coexistent with diffuse hepatic hemangiomatosis presenting as portal vein thrombosis and hepatic lobar atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Bo Reum; Han, Hyun Young; Choi, So Young; Kim, Joo Heun [Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon(Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    A combination of giant hepatic hemangioma and diffuse hemangiomatosis is extremely rare in adults. Even when they are large, hemangiomas are soft and rarely compress adjacent structures. A 78-year-old man presented with abdominal pain and distension. Ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a large expansile mass replacing the medial segment and caudate lobe with diffusely scattered nodules in the entire liver. The large hilar mass contained a central nonenhancing area and had a mass effect, leading to left portal vein occlusion. The image findings also revealed two unprecedented findings: left lateral segmental atrophy of the liver and recent portomesenteric vein thrombosis. The hepatic lesions were confirmed with hemangiomas by ultrasonography-guided biopsy. We diagnosed intrahepatic portal vein obstruction caused by a mass effect of giant hepatic hemangioma coexistent with diffuse hemangiomatosis, resulting in hepatic segmental atrophy and extrahepatic portal vein thrombosis.

  4. Giant cavernous hemangioma coexistent with diffuse hepatic hemangiomatosis presenting as portal vein thrombosis and hepatic lobar atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Reum Yoo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available

    A combination of giant hepatic hemangioma and diffuse hemangiomatosis is extremely rare in adults. Even when they are large, hemangiomas are soft and rarely compress adjacent structures. A 78-year-old man presented with abdominal pain and distension. Ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a large expansile mass replacing the medial segment and caudate lobe with diffusely scattered nodules in the entire liver. The large hilar mass contained a central nonenhancing area and had a mass effect, leading to left portal vein occlusion. The image findings also revealed two unprecedented findings: left lateral segmental atrophy of the liver and recent portomesenteric vein thrombosis. The hepatic lesions were confirmed with hemangiomas by ultrasonography-guided biopsy. We diagnosed intrahepatic portal vein obstruction caused by a mass effect of giant hepatic hemangioma coexistent with diffuse hemangiomatosis, resulting in hepatic segmental atrophy and extrahepatic portal vein thrombosis.

  5. Giant cavernous hemangioma coexistent with diffuse hepatic hemangiomatosis presenting as portal vein thrombosis and hepatic lobar atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    A combination of giant hepatic hemangioma and diffuse hemangiomatosis is extremely rare in adults. Even when they are large, hemangiomas are soft and rarely compress adjacent structures. A 78-year-old man presented with abdominal pain and distension. Ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a large expansile mass replacing the medial segment and caudate lobe with diffusely scattered nodules in the entire liver. The large hilar mass contained a central nonenhancing area and had a mass effect, leading to left portal vein occlusion. The image findings also revealed two unprecedented findings: left lateral segmental atrophy of the liver and recent portomesenteric vein thrombosis. The hepatic lesions were confirmed with hemangiomas by ultrasonography-guided biopsy. We diagnosed intrahepatic portal vein obstruction caused by a mass effect of giant hepatic hemangioma coexistent with diffuse hemangiomatosis, resulting in hepatic segmental atrophy and extrahepatic portal vein thrombosis. PMID:24936497

  6. How a Stroke Is Diagnosed

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Patients & Families About Stroke Stroke Diagnosis Stroke ... Diagnosis » How a Stroke is Diagnosed How a Stroke is Diagnosed How a Stroke is Diagnosed Lab ...

  7. Diagnosing and Treating Acute Bronchitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lung Disease Lookup > Acute Bronchitis Diagnosing and Treating Acute Bronchitis Questions to Ask Your Doctor about Acute Bronchitis ... Symptoms that last a few weeks How Is Acute Bronchitis Diagnosed? Healthcare providers diagnose acute bronchitis by asking ...

  8. How Are Genetic Conditions Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consultation How are genetic conditions diagnosed? How are genetic conditions diagnosed? A doctor may suspect a diagnosis ... and advocacy resources. For more information about diagnosing genetic conditions: Genetics Home Reference provides information about genetic ...

  9. Diagnosing ADHD in Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibley, Margaret H.; Pelham, William E., Jr.; Molina, Brooke S. G.; Gnagy, Elizabeth M.; Waschbusch, Daniel A.; Garefino, Allison C.; Kuriyan, Aparajita B.; Babinski, Dara E.; Karch, Kathryn M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study examines adolescent-specific practical problems associated with current practice parameters for diagnosing attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to inform recommendations for the diagnosis of ADHD in adolescents. Specifically, issues surrounding the use of self- versus informant ratings, diagnostic threshold, and…

  10. Diagnosing plant problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheryl A. Smith

    2008-01-01

    Diagnosing Christmas tree problems can be a challenge, requiring a basic knowledge of plant culture and physiology, the effect of environmental influences on plant health, and the ability to identify the possible causes of plant problems. Developing a solution or remedy to the problem depends on a proper diagnosis, a process that requires recognition of a problem and...

  11. Being publicly diagnosed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konradsen, Hanne; Lillebaek, Troels; Wilcke, Torgny

    2014-01-01

    . METHOD: A grounded theory design with field studies and qualitative interviews, following the recommendations from Glaser and Strauss. RESULT: A process of being publicly diagnosed was identified, which developed during the patient's trajectory from being on the way to becoming a patient, becoming...

  12. [Immunohistochemical presentation of fibromodulin during wound healing of periodontal cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Hong; Huang, Qun; Xiao, Yin

    2010-04-01

    To investigate immunohistochemical presentation of fibromodulin in vitro during wound healing of three types of periodontal cells and discuss the role of fibromodulin. Cultured periodontal cells were wounded and followed by observation up to 7 days. The immunohistochemical expression of fibromodulin in periodontal cells was observed. Immunohistochemical localization of fibromodulin during cellular wound healing showed that newly migrating periodontal cells toward the wound area were expressed strongly for fibromodulin at day 1 after wounding; thereafter, fibromodulin expression was noted stronger in newly migrating periodontal cells localized in the central part of the wound area than those around the wound area. These data suggest that fibromodulin may be involved in the early events of wound healing for periodontal cells.

  13. Perspectives on Clinical Trials in Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swoboda, Kathryn J.; Kissel, John T.; Crawford, Thomas O.; Bromberg, Mark B.; Acsadi, Gyula; D'Anjou, Guy; Krosschell, Kristin J.; Reyna, Sandra P.; Schroth, Mary K.; Scott, Charles B.; Simard, Louise R.

    2011-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy is one of the most heterogeneous of the single-gene neuromuscular disorders. The broad spectrum of severity, with onset from the prenatal period to adulthood, presents unique challenges in the design and implementation of clinical trials. The clinical classification of subjects into severe (type 1), intermediate (type 2), and mild (type 3) subtypes has proved useful both in enhancing communication among clinicians internationally and in forging the collaborative development of outcome measures for clinical trials. Ideally, clinical trial design in spinal muscular atrophy must take into account the spinal muscular atrophy type, patient age, severity-of-affection status, nature of the therapeutic approach, timing of the proposed intervention relative to disease progression, and relative homogeneity of the cohort to be studied. Following is an overview of the challenges and opportunities, current and future therapeutic strategies, and progress to date in clinical trials in spinal muscular atrophy. PMID:17761650

  14. Redox homeostasis, oxidative stress and disuse muscle atrophy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pellegrino, Maria Antonietta; Desaphy, Jean‐François; Brocca, Lorenza; Pierno, Sabata; Camerino, Diana Conte; Bottinelli, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Abstract  A pivotal role has been ascribed to oxidative stress in determining the imbalance between protein synthesis and degradation leading to muscle atrophy in many pathological conditions and in disuse...

  15. Acquired alopecia, mental retardation, short stature, microcephaly, and optic atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hennekam, R. C.; Renckens-Wennen, E. G.

    1990-01-01

    We report on a female patient who had acquired total alopecia, short stature, microcephaly, optic atrophy, severe myopia, and mental retardation. A survey of published reports failed to show an identical patient, despite various similar cases

  16. Mechanisms of muscle growth and atrophy in mammals and Drosophila

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Piccirillo, Rosanna; Demontis, Fabio; Perrimon, Norbert; Goldberg, Alfred L

    2014-01-01

    .... Although the pathogenesis of this condition has been primarily studied in mammals, Drosophila is emerging as an attractive system to investigate some of the mechanisms involved in muscle growth and atrophy. Results...

  17. Biochemical adaptations of antigravity muscle fibers to disuse atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, F. W.

    1978-01-01

    Studies are presented in four parts of this report. The four parts include; (1) studies to gain information on the molecular basis of atrophy by antigravity muscle; (2) studies on the work capacity of antigravity muscles during atrophy and during recovery from atrophy; (3) studies on recovery of degenerated antigravity fibers after removal of hind-limb casts; and (4) studies on the atrophy and recovery of bone. The philosophy of these studies was to identify the time sequence of events in the soleus muscle of the rat following immobilization of the hind limbs, so that the length of the soleus muscle within the fixed limb is less than its resting length. In two separate studies, no decline in the weight of the soleus muscle could be detected during the first 72 hours of limb immobilization.

  18. Disease-Induced Skeletal Muscle Atrophy and Fatigue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Powers, Scott K.; Lynch, Gordon S.; Murphy, Kate T.; Reid, Michael B.; Zijdewind, Inge

    2016-01-01

    Numerous health problems including acute critical illness, cancer, diseases associated with chronic inflammation, and neurological disorders often result in skeletal muscle weakness and fatigue. Disease-related muscle atrophy and fatigue is an important clinical problem because acquired skeletal

  19. Quantitative study of the physiological cerebral atrophy with aging. A statistical analysis of the normal range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, K.; Basugi, N.; Fukushima, T.; Tango, T.; Suzuki, I.; Kaminuma, T.; Kurashina, S.

    1987-07-01

    A new method of discriminating pathological cerebral atrophy from physiological atrophy during aging is reported. The authors advocate a pixel counting method using a minicomputer for the quantitative measurement of cerebral atrophy. Five hundred cases were studied with this quantitative method and the normal range of the physiological atrophy was determined statistically. In order to estimate the degree of cerebral atrophy easily, the conventional linear measurement methods were compared with the pixel counting method using multivariant analysis, and a simple formula for the calculation of the degree of cerebral atrophy is proposed. Using this formula and the normal range, pathological cerebral atrophy is easily detectable.

  20. Facilitating text reading in posterior cortical atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Keir X X; Rajdev, Kishan; Shakespeare, Timothy J; Leff, Alexander P; Crutch, Sebastian J

    2015-07-28

    We report (1) the quantitative investigation of text reading in posterior cortical atrophy (PCA), and (2) the effects of 2 novel software-based reading aids that result in dramatic improvements in the reading ability of patients with PCA. Reading performance, eye movements, and fixations were assessed in patients with PCA and typical Alzheimer disease and in healthy controls (experiment 1). Two reading aids (single- and double-word) were evaluated based on the notion that reducing the spatial and oculomotor demands of text reading might support reading in PCA (experiment 2). Mean reading accuracy in patients with PCA was significantly worse (57%) compared with both patients with typical Alzheimer disease (98%) and healthy controls (99%); spatial aspects of passages were the primary determinants of text reading ability in PCA. Both aids led to considerable gains in reading accuracy (PCA mean reading accuracy: single-word reading aid = 96%; individual patient improvement range: 6%-270%) and self-rated measures of reading. Data suggest a greater efficiency of fixations and eye movements under the single-word reading aid in patients with PCA. These findings demonstrate how neurologic characterization of a neurodegenerative syndrome (PCA) and detailed cognitive analysis of an important everyday skill (reading) can combine to yield aids capable of supporting important everyday functional abilities. This study provides Class III evidence that for patients with PCA, 2 software-based reading aids (single-word and double-word) improve reading accuracy. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  1. Forced oscillation technique in spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauld, Leanne M; Keeling, Lucy A; Shackleton, Claire E; Sly, Peter D

    2014-09-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) causes respiratory compromise that is difficult to assess in young children. The forced oscillation technique (FOT) is commercially available for children as young as 2 years of age and is nonvolitional. The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of FOT in young children with SMA. Children with SMA aged resistance at 8 Hz (Rrs8) (mean z score, +0.66; SD, 1.34; P = .12) were abnormal. Four children performed spirometry. Linear relationships to Xrs8 exist: FVC (R2, 0.54), unassisted PCF (R2, 0.33), assisted PCF (R2, 0.43), and AHI (R2, 0.32). Over 12 months, Xrs8z score worsened (rate of change of +1.08, P change +0.51, P .05) was found between clinical characteristics and FOT values. FOT is feasible in young children with SMA, with abnormal values of reactance and resistance on grouped data, worsening over 12 months. Xrs8 is related to respiratory tests used to monitor progress in SMA (FVC, PCF, AHI). Further research on the value of FOT in managing individuals is warranted.

  2. Photoreceptor atrophy in acute zonal occult outer retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zibrandtsen, N.; Munch, I.C.; Klemp, K.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To assess retinal morphology in acute zonal occult outer retinopathy (AZOOR). Methods: Three patients with a normal ophthalmoscopic fundus appearance, a history of photopsia, and visual field loss compatible with AZOOR were examined using optical coherence tomography, automated perimetry...... and multifocal electroretinography. Results: All three patients demonstrated partial or complete photoreceptor atrophy corresponding to partial or complete scotomata of retinal origin. Conclusion: Photoreceptor atrophy can be demonstrated early in the course of AZOOR, before ophthalmoscopically visible changes...

  3. Steroid-induced Kager's fat pad atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taneja, Atul K. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Musculoskeletal Radiology Division, Imaging Department, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Musculoskeletal Imaging, Diagnostic Center, Hospital do Coracao (HCor) and Teleimagem, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Santos, Durval C.B. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Musculoskeletal Radiology Division, Imaging Department, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    We report a rare case of Kager's fat pad atrophy and fibrosis in a 60-year-old woman 1 year after a steroid injection for Achilles tendinopathy. There are few published reports of steroid-induced atrophy affecting deeper layers of fat tissue. To our knowledge, this case report is the first to illustrate its features using magnetic resonance imaging. A review of the scientific literature is also presented. (orig.)

  4. Immunohistochemical characterization of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mammary tumours of Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pula, Bartosz; Malicka, Iwona; Pawlowska, Katarzyna; Paslawska, Urszula; Cegielski, Marek; Podhorska-Okolow, Marzena; Dziegiel, Piotr; Wozniewski, Marek

    2013-01-01

    Single dose of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) was shown to induce malignant tumours in susceptible rat strains. However, such tumours are not well-characterized. We characterized MNU-induced tumours in Sprague-Dawley rats using ultrasonographic, radiographic and immunohistochemical (IHC) methods. In 27 rats, 41 tumours developed, appearing ultrasonographically as hypodense, non-homogenic areas with signal enhancement at their periphery. Out of these, 39 were of malignant epithelial origin, with an IHC phenotype closely-resembling that of human invasive ductal breast carcinoma. One case was diagnosed as carcinosarcoma. IHC analysis revealed that Ki-67 antigen expression correlated positively with tumour volume (r=0.40, p=0.0079). Moreover, tumours with α-smooth muscle actin in the tumour stroma were characterized by a higher proliferative rate as compared to those without its expression (p<0.05). This rat model of chemical carcinogenesis may be suitable for examining breast cancer development and progression.

  5. Double immunohistochemical staining with laminin 5 (γ2 chain) and collagen IV in colorectal neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiehn, Anne-Marie Kanstrup; Bzorek, Michael; Warnecke, Mads

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancer diagnoses in the Western world. It is outnumbered several times by the precursor stage adenoma. The aim of this study was to describe the expression pattern with a double immunohistochemical staining for laminin 5 (γ2) and collagen IV...... in different colorectal neoplasms. This might be a supplementary tool to morphology in diagnostic dilemmas as microinvasive pT1 tumors and adenomas with pseudoinvasion. Laminin 5 has been shown to stain in invasive tumor cells, while collagen IV highlights the basement membrane (BM). Fifty-seven patients...... intact around normal crypts. In invasive tumors, laminin 5 stained intensely, and the BM was absent or focally discontinuous. The expression in adenomas and in pseudoinvasive areas was less consistent. The study suggests that double immunostaining with collagen IV and laminin 5 might be useful...

  6. Significance of 18 F-FDG PET and immunohistochemical GLUT-1 expression for cardiac myxoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Yukio; Yamada, Sohsuke; Kitada, Shohei; Matsunaga, Iwao; Nogami, Eijirou; Watanabe, Teruo; Sasaguri, Yasuyuki; Honma, Yutaka; Itou, Tsuyoshi

    2014-06-16

    Cardiac tumours are relatively rare and are difficult to diagnose merely with imaging techniques. We demonstrated an unusual case of left atrial myxoma, displaying the successful detection by positron emission tomography using 2-deoxy-2-[18 F] fluoro-D-glucose (18 F-FDG PET), correlated closely to more intense and enhanced immunoreactivity with glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1) in a substantial number of cardiac myxoma cells. Further prospective studies are needed to validate the significance of 18 F-FDG PET findings for cardiac myxoma and the association with immunohistochemical GLUT-1 expression in its tumour cells, after collecting and investigating a larger number of surgical cases examined with both of them. The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/2991481941253449.

  7. Epidemiological, clinical and immunohistochemical aspects of canine lymphoma in the region of Porto Alegre, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa B. Neuwald

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the epidemiological, clinical and immunohistochemical characteristics of canine lymphomas diagnosed in the region of Porto Alegre, Brazil. Thirty dogs were enrolled in the study; most of them were male (60%, mixed-breed (23% and middle-aged or older. The majority (87% of affected dogs showed the multicentric form. The B-cell phenotype was most frequently detected (62%; 37% of the animals were in clinical stage IV, and 83% were classified as sub-stage "b". Lymphadenopathy was observed in 67% of the cases, and dyspnea, prostration, decreased appetite and vomiting were the most common clinical signs encountered. Anemia was a frequently encountered laboratory alteration (57%, as were leukocytosis (40%, thrombocytopenia (33%, lymphopenia (30%, hyperglobulinemia (20% and hypercalcemia (13%. The results of this study indicate that the clinical features of dogs with lymphoma in the region of Porto Alegre are similar to those observed worldwide.

  8. Activity and immunohistochemical localization of porphobilinogen deaminase in rat tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, P E; Erlandsen, E J; Poulsen, Steen Seier

    2000-01-01

    the activity and the immunohistochemical localization of PBGD in the following tissues of wistar female rats: brain, heart, submandibular gland, liver, kidney, pancreas, ovary, stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, colon and musculature. The PBGD activity varied considerably among the tissues. It was highest...... in the liver, 14 pkat/g, and lowest in the jejunum, 0.7 pkat/g. The immunohistochemical localization of PBGD was studied by antibodies raised against a 40 amino acid synthetic peptide that corresponds to a segment in the C-terminal part of PBGD. The study demonstrated that the PBGD immunoreactivity...

  9. Joint Variable Selection and Classification with Immunohistochemical Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debashis Ghosh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine if candidate cancer biomarkers have utility in a clinical setting, validation using immunohistochemical methods is typically done. Most analyses of such data have not incorporated the multivariate nature of the staining profiles. In this article, we consider modelling such data using recently developed ideas from the machine learning community. In particular, we consider the joint goals of feature selection and classification. We develop estimation procedures for the analysis of immunohistochemical profiles using the least absolute selection and shrinkage operator. These lead to novel and flexible models and algorithms for the analysis of compositional data. The techniques are illustrated using data from a cancer biomarker study.

  10. FGFR1 inhibits skeletal muscle atrophy associated with hindlimb suspension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerrard Dave

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Skeletal muscle atrophy can occur under many different conditions, including prolonged disuse or immobilization, cachexia, cushingoid conditions, secondary to surgery, or with advanced age. The mechanisms by which unloading of muscle is sensed and translated into signals controlling tissue reduction remains a major question in the field of musculoskeletal research. While the fibroblast growth factors (FGFs and their receptors are synthesized by, and intimately involved in, embryonic skeletal muscle growth and repair, their role maintaining adult muscle status has not been examined. Methods We examined the effects of ectopic expression of FGFR1 during disuse-mediated skeletal muscle atrophy, utilizing hindlimb suspension and DNA electroporation in mice. Results We found skeletal muscle FGF4 and FGFR1 mRNA expression to be modified by hind limb suspension,. In addition, we found FGFR1 protein localized in muscle fibers within atrophying mouse muscle which appeared to be resistant to atrophy. Electroporation and ectopic expression of FGFR1 significantly inhibited the decrease in muscle fiber area within skeletal muscles of mice undergoing suspension induced muscle atrophy. Ectopic FGFR1 expression in muscle also significantly stimulated protein synthesis in muscle fibers, and increased protein degradation in weight bearing muscle fibers. Conclusion These results support the theory that FGF signaling can play a role in regulation of postnatal skeletal muscle maintenance, and could offer potentially novel and efficient therapeutic options for attenuating muscle atrophy during aging, illness and spaceflight.

  11. Clinicopathological and immunohistochemical features of primary central nervous system germ cell tumors: a 24-years experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuping; Jiang, Jiyao; Liu, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Primary central nervous system (CNS) germ cell tumors (GCTs) are a rare heterogeneous group of lesions, which the clinicopathological features have a marked degree of heterogeneity comparing with that of gonadal GCTs. Accurately diagnosing CNS GCTs might be extremely difficult and requires immunohistochemical verification. This study was to investigate the biological feature of CNS GCTs and diagnostic value of immunohistochemical markers OCT3/4, C-kit, PLAP, and CD30 in CNS GCTs. A retrospective study was performed on 34 patients with CNS germ cell tumors between 1990 and 2014. 34 CNS GCTs account for 9.2% of all primary CNS neoplasms. The sellar region (35.3%) and pineal gland (17.6%) were the most common sites of intracranial GCTs. Hydrocephalus (82.4%) and diplopia (46.9%) were the two most common clinical presentations. The most common histological subtypes were germinoma (67.6%). PLAP, c-kit, OCT3/4 were highly expressed in gernimomas. CD30 and CK AE1/3 stainings were positive in embryonal carcinoma. Yolk sac tumor component showed positive staining for AFP and CK AE1/3. β-HCG staining was positive in choriocarcinoma and STGC. Patients with mature teratomas and germinomas had a better prognosis (a 5-year survival rate) than those with embryonal carcinoma and choriocarcinoma (a 5-year survival rates were 0). Our finding suggest that the incidences of primary CNS GCTs are higher in South China than in the West, but mixed GCTs are uncommon in our study. The judicious use of a panel of selected markers is helpful in diagnosing and predicting the prognosis for CNS GCTs.

  12. Contribution of white matter hyperintensities, medial temporal lobe atrophy and cortical atrophy on outcome, seven to twelve years after ECT in severely depressed geriatric patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudega, M.L.; Dols, A.; Adelerhof, I.; Rozing, M.; Wattjes, M.P.; Comijs, H.C.; Barkhof, F.; Eikelenboom, P.; Stek, M.L.; van Exel, E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Depression and cognitive decline are highly prevalent and often coexisting, however, the association between depression and dementia remains unclear. White matter hyperintensities (WMH), medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA) and global cortical atrophy (GCA) are associated with depression,

  13. Liability for Diagnosing Malingering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Kenneth J; Van Dell, Landon

    2017-09-01

    Malingering is a medical diagnosis, but not a psychiatric disorder. The label imputes that an evaluee has intentionally engaged in false behavior or statements. By diagnosing malingering, psychiatrists pass judgment on truthfulness. Evaluees taking exception to the label may claim that the professional has committed defamation of character (libel or slander) when the diagnosis is wrong and costs the claimant money or benefits. Clinicians may counter by claiming immunity or that the diagnosis was made in good faith. This problem has come into focus in military and veterans' contexts, where diagnoses become thresholds for benefits. Through historical and literary examples, case law, and military/veterans' claims of disability and entitlement, the authors examine the potency of the malingering label and the potential liability for professionals and institutions of making this diagnosis. © 2017 American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law.

  14. Muscle atrophy reversed by growth factor activation of satellite cells in a mouse muscle atrophy model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Hauerslev

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophies comprise a large group of inherited disorders that lead to progressive muscle wasting. We wanted to investigate if targeting satellite cells can enhance muscle regeneration and thus increase muscle mass. We treated mice with hepatocyte growth factor and leukemia inhibitory factor under three conditions: normoxia, hypoxia and during myostatin deficiency. We found that hepatocyte growth factor treatment led to activation of the Akt/mTOR/p70S6K protein synthesis pathway, up-regulation of the myognic transcription factors MyoD and myogenin, and subsequently the negative growth control factor, myostatin and atrophy markers MAFbx and MuRF1. Hypoxia-induced atrophy was partially restored by hepatocyte growth factor combined with leukemia inhibitory factor treatment. Dividing satellite cells were three-fold increased in the treatment group compared to control. Finally, we demonstrated that myostatin regulates satellite cell activation and myogenesis in vivo following treatment, consistent with previous findings in vitro. Our results suggest, not only a novel in vivo pharmacological treatment directed specifically at activating the satellite cells, but also a myostatin dependent mechanism that may contribute to the progressive muscle wasting seen in severely affected patients with muscular dystrophy and significant on-going regeneration. This treatment could potentially be applied to many conditions that feature muscle wasting to increase muscle bulk and strength.

  15. Spinal Muscular Atrophy and Its Molecular Genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabriye Kocaturk Sel

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is one of the most common autosomal recessive diseases, affecting aproximately 1 in 6,000 - 10,000 live births, and with a carrier frequency of aproximately 1 in 40- 60. The childhood SMAs can be classified clinically into three groups. Type I (Werdnig-Hoffmann is the most severe form, with onset at ‹ 6 months of age and with death typically at ‹2 years of age. Type II SMA patients display an intermediate severity, with onset at ‹18 months of age and with an inability to walk. Type III (Kugelberg –Walender individuals are able to walk independently and have a relatively mild phenotype, with onset at ›18 months of age. The gene involved in type I–III SMA has been mapped to 5q12-q13 by linkage analysis, and refined to a region of about 500 kb. The region contains a large inverted duplication consisting of at least four genes, which are present in a telomeric (t and a centromeric (c copy: survival motor neuron gene (SMN1 or SMNt and SMN2 or SMNc; neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein gene (NAIP; basal transcription factor subunit p44 (BTFp44t and BTFp44c; and a novel protein with unknown function H4F5. Although homozygous deletions encompassing all these genes are found in SMA patients, it is now well established that mutations or deletions of SMN1 (MIM#600354 cause the disease. SMN2 (MIM# 601627 gene, however, does not prevent the disease but attenuates disease severity. Therefore, upregulating functional SMN protein level via inducing gene expression and/or restoring splicing is an important therapeutic approach such as use of histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2012; 21(1.000: 1-26

  16. Central odontogenic fibroma: Report of case with immunohistochemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savas Iordanidis

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Our immunohistochemical findings, and especially the positive expression of vimentin from the epithelial cells of COF suggests that these cells are primordial. Last but not least, the presence of a relative small number of myofibroblasts in the stroma justifies the non-aggressive behavior of the neoplasm and supports that a part of stromal collagen of COF is produced by these cells.

  17. Immunohistochemical detection of Her-2/neu overexpression in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Immunohistochemical detection of Her-2/neu overexpression in breast carcinoma in Nigerians: A 5-year retrospective study. ... cases of invasive lobular carcinoma (10.8%), three cases of medullary carcinoma (3.6%), two cases of papillary carcinoma (2.4%), and a case each of mucinous and clear cell carcinoma (1.2%).

  18. Primitive Neuro Ectodermal Tumor (PNET in infant diagnosed by histopathology and immunohistochemistry techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Artha

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Primitive Neuro Ectodermal Tumor (PNET is rare and difficult to diagnose. A case of PNET was diagnosed based on histopathological and immunohistochemical findings. A 4-month-old infant was admitted to the hospital with a tumor on the midline of his chest wall since he was 3 days old. The tumor was fixed on the chest wall and had ill-defined margin, enlarged over time and reached more than 10 cm in diameter when he was brought to a clinician. Two small ulcers were seen on the skin overlying the tumor. It was diagnosed as soft tissue tumor suggestive of a hemangioma. The tumor was 17 x 13 x 5.5 cm in size, white colored and firm to the touch. Microscopic examination revealed malignant small round cells with round to ovoid nuclei, coarse chromatin and scanty cytoplasm. Most cells were arranged in a solid pattern with scattered Homer-Wright rosettes. The mitotic count was 7/10 HPF, and necrosis was minimal (less than 25%. On immunohistochemical examination, the cells showed weak to moderate immunoreactivity to Vimentin and CD99, but showed negative to weak positive reactivity to NSE and Chromogranin. Based on the clinical features, gross findings, histopathologic and immunohistochemical examinations, the case was diagnosed as a malignant small round cell tumor consistent with PNET / ES (Ewing’s Sarcoma. To confirm the diagnosis, cytogenetic examination is suggested. (Med J Indones 2007; 16:108-12 Keywords: PNET, histopathology, immunohistochemistry

  19. Progressive Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Atrophy Associated With Enlarging Peripapillary Pit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun Ji; Kim, Tae-Woo

    2017-02-01

    To report a case in which progressive retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) atrophy was observed along with enlargement of the peripapillary pit. A 34-year-old male was diagnosed with primary open-angle glaucoma and followed up for 4 years with regular ophthalmic examinations. Both eyes were myopic (-10 D, OD and -10.5 D, OS), and untreated intraocular pressures were 18 mm Hg (OD) and 16 mm Hg (OS). A subtle depression of the superotemporal peripapillary area was deepened and emerged as a peripapillary pit during the follow-up period. With the enlargement of the peripapillary pit, a RNFL defect at the location of pit widened and thinned continuously. The enlargement of the pit was documented by the spectral-domain optical coherence tomography posterior pole scanning. Progressive RNFL atrophy was observed with enlargement of the peripapillary pit. The finding suggests that tensile stress derived from the scleral stretching may have significant influence on the integrity of the RNFL.

  20. Sjögren's syndrome and acquired splenic atrophy with septic shock: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Natacha; Silva, Rui; Rodrigues, Joana; Torres-Costa, José

    2014-01-06

    The most frequent causes of adult-onset recurrent infections are human immunodeficiency virus infection, malignancy, and autoimmune diseases, while acquired non-surgical hyposplenism is rare. Although acquired asplenia/hyposplenism have been described in association with celiac disease and, less frequently, with autoimmune diseases such as Sjögren's syndrome, the manifestations in this context are usually only detectable in the laboratory setting, with Howell-Jolly bodies or thrombocytosis. To the best of our knowledge, no previous case of pneumococcal septic shock in a patient with acquired hyposplenism and co-morbid Sjögren's syndrome has been reported. We report a case of a 45-year-old Caucasian woman who developed pneumococcal pneumonia at age 42 years, pneumococcal meningitis at age 44 years and septic shock with Streptococcus agalactiae bacteremia at age 45 years and was subsequently diagnosed with radiological splenic atrophy and functional asplenia, as well as primary Sjögren's syndrome. After appropriate immunizations, the patient has been free from clinically important infections. Hyposplenism should be suspected in patients with adult-onset infections caused by encapsulated bacteria, especially if autoantibodies are present. Early diagnosis can help prevent potentially life-threatening infections. Possible associations between splenic atrophy and Sjögren's syndrome are discussed.

  1. Sjögren’s syndrome and acquired splenic atrophy with septic shock: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The most frequent causes of adult-onset recurrent infections are human immunodeficiency virus infection, malignancy, and autoimmune diseases, while acquired non-surgical hyposplenism is rare. Although acquired asplenia/hyposplenism have been described in association with celiac disease and, less frequently, with autoimmune diseases such as Sjögren’s syndrome, the manifestations in this context are usually only detectable in the laboratory setting, with Howell-Jolly bodies or thrombocytosis. To the best of our knowledge, no previous case of pneumococcal septic shock in a patient with acquired hyposplenism and co-morbid Sjögren’s syndrome has been reported. Case presentation We report a case of a 45-year-old Caucasian woman who developed pneumococcal pneumonia at age 42 years, pneumococcal meningitis at age 44 years and septic shock with Streptococcus agalactiae bacteremia at age 45 years and was subsequently diagnosed with radiological splenic atrophy and functional asplenia, as well as primary Sjögren’s syndrome. After appropriate immunizations, the patient has been free from clinically important infections. Conclusion Hyposplenism should be suspected in patients with adult-onset infections caused by encapsulated bacteria, especially if autoantibodies are present. Early diagnosis can help prevent potentially life-threatening infections. Possible associations between splenic atrophy and Sjögren’s syndrome are discussed. PMID:24393211

  2. Multiple-System Atrophy in Long-Term Professional Painter: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusa Nagai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Multiple system atrophy (MSA is a rare and severe adult-onset, sporadic, and progressive neurodegenerative disorder. Here, we describe an autopsy case of MSA in a long-term professional painter. Although typical glial cytoplasmic inclusion (GCI was not observed in a routine histological examination, strong α-synuclein immunostaining in the nucleus confirmed the diagnosis of MSA. Case Presentation. A 48-year-old Japanese man with a long occupational history of professional painter was sent to the emergency room, where he died of multiple organ failure. The patient had suffered tremors and inarticulateness at age 28, developed diabetes at 42 and was diagnosed with spinocerebellar degeneration at 46. A histopathological examination showed severe neuronal loss, gliosis, and tissue rarefaction in the paleostriatum, striate body of the substantia nigra, the pons, and the olivary nucleus of the upper medulla oblongata, intermediolateral of the spinal gray matter (sacral region. α-synuclein-positive GCI in oligodendroglia was occurred in the cerebral cortex, the midbrain, the medulla oblongata, and the spinal cord. These findings confirmed the presence of multiple-system atrophy (OPCA+SDS. Conclusion. Although the pathogenesis of MSA is still unclear, prolonged, and extensive exposure to organic solvents, together with a hyperglycemic morbidity attributed to diabetes, may have contributed to the onset and clinical course of the present case.

  3. Exercise training reverses skeletal muscle atrophy in an experimental model of VCP disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalbandian, Angèle; Nguyen, Christopher; Katheria, Veeral; Llewellyn, Katrina J; Badadani, Mallikarjun; Caiozzo, Vincent; Kimonis, Virginia E

    2013-01-01

    The therapeutic effects of exercise resistance and endurance training in the alleviation of muscle hypertrophy/atrophy should be considered in the management of patients with advanced neuromuscular diseases. Patients with progressive neuromuscular diseases often experience muscle weakness, which negatively impact independence and quality of life levels. Mutations in the valosin containing protein (VCP) gene lead to Inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget's disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD) and more recently affect 2% of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-diagnosed cases. The present investigation was undertaken to examine the effects of uphill and downhill exercise training on muscle histopathology and the autophagy cascade in an experimental VCP mouse model carrying the R155H mutation. Progressive uphill exercise in VCP(R155H/+) mice revealed significant improvement in muscle strength and performance by grip strength and Rotarod analyses when compared to the sedentary mice. In contrast, mice exercised to run downhill did not show any significant improvement. Histologically, the uphill exercised VCP(R155H/+) mice displayed an improvement in muscle atrophy, and decreased expression levels of ubiquitin, P62/SQSTM1, LC3I/II, and TDP-43 autophagy markers, suggesting an alleviation of disease-induced myopathy phenotypes. There was also an improvement in the Paget-like phenotype. Collectively, our data highlights that uphill exercise training in VCP(R155H/+) mice did not have any detrimental value to the function of muscle, and may offer effective therapeutic options for patients with VCP-associated diseases.

  4. Immunohistochemical changes of maxillary sinus mucosa with underlying adenomatous polyposis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. M. Andreychyn

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In maxillary sinusitis pathogenesis researchers paid much attention to the role of paranasal sinuses, sinus drainage dysfunctions, mucocyliary transport system disorders in cases of damage of sinuses mucous membranes. Pathohistological, immunohistochemical and morphometric studies of mucosa were conducted. However, to evaluate the local inflammatory response in cases of chronic sinusitis and improvement of individual therapy for the patients, the immunohistochemical studies of the composition of inflammatory immunocyte infiltrates of paranasal sinus mucosa and adenoid vegetations bioptate would be reasonable. The aim of the research was to study the immunohistochemical content of immunocyte infiltrates of paranasal sinuses adenomatous polyps in biopsy samples of patients suffering from chronic sinusitis. Materials and Methods. Paranasal sinuses adenomatous polyps removed during surgery of 22 patients suffering from chronic maxillary sinusitis were studied. Immunohistochemical studies of paraffin sections of the removed polyps were performed using appropriate primary antibodies and visualization systems DAKO EnVision+ System (DAKO, Denmark. Results. During microscopic investigation of paranasal sinuses adenomatous polyps of the patients suffering from chronic sinusitis, moderate and severe immunocyte infiltration of polyp stroma sometimes with focal follicular structures was presented. Immunohistochemical investigation of the cellular composition of these infiltrates proved the presence of CD8+ T-killer cells, CD4+ T-helper cells, CD68+ macrophages as well as single plasma cells. The irregularity of these cells markers expression was determined in dependence of the severity of inflammatory cell infiltration. Conclusions. In the patients with chronic maxillary polyp sinusitis with mild and moderate immunocyte infiltration of paranasal sinus mucosa, among immune cells the CD4+ T-lymphocytes occupied the most relative area in polyp stroma, plasma

  5. Fertility Preservation for Children Diagnosed with Cancer

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    Full Text Available ... for Women Diagnosed with Cancer Fertility Preservation for Men Diagnosed with Cancer Fertility Preservation for Children Diagnosed ... for Women Diagnosed with Cancer Fertility Preservation for Men Diagnosed with Cancer Fertility Preservation for Children Diagnosed ...

  6. Effects of baseline CSF α-synuclein on regional brain atrophy rates in healthy elders, mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niklas Mattsson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF α-synuclein is reduced in synucleinopathies, including dementia with Lewy bodies, and some studies have found increased CSF α-synuclein in Alzheimer's disease (AD. No study has explored effects of CSF α-synuclein on brain atrophy. Here we tested if baseline CSF α-synuclein affects brain atrophy rates and if these effects vary across brain regions, and across the cognitive spectrum from healthy elders (NL, to patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI and AD. METHODS: Baseline CSF α-synuclein measurements and longitudinal structural brain magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 74 NL, 118 MCI patients and 55 AD patients. Effects of baseline CSF α-synuclein on regional atrophy rates were tested in 1 four pre-hoc defined regions possibly associated with Lewy body and/or AD pathology (amygdala, caudate, hippocampus, brainstem, and 2 all available regions of interest. Differences across diagnoses were tested by assessing the interaction of CSF α-synuclein and diagnosis (testing NL versus MCI, and NL versus AD. RESULTS: The effects of CSF α-synuclein on longitudinal atrophy rates were not significant after correction for multiple comparisons. There were tendencies for effects in AD in caudate (higher atrophy rates in subjects with higher CSF α-synuclein, P=0.046 and brainstem (higher atrophy rates in subjects with lower CSF α-synuclein, P=0.063. CSF α-synuclein had significantly different effects on atrophy rates in NL and AD in brainstem (P=0.037 and caudate (P=0.006. DISCUSSION: With the possible exception of caudate and brainstem, the overall weak effects of CSF α-synuclein on atrophy rates in NL, MCI and AD argues against CSF α-synuclein as a biomarker related to longitudinal brain atrophy in these diagnostic groups. Any effects of CSF α-synuclein may be attenuated by possible simultaneous occurrence of AD-related neuronal injury and concomitant Lewy body pathology, which may elevate and

  7. Comparative analysis of two and three marker immunohistochemical cocktails in the diagnosis of prostata carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabir, Parag Deepak; Ottosen, Peter; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Comparative analysis of two and three marker immunohistochemical cocktails in the diagnosis of prostata carcinoma......Comparative analysis of two and three marker immunohistochemical cocktails in the diagnosis of prostata carcinoma...

  8. Immunohistochemical Expression of Leptin (Ob-protein) in Experimentally Hypertensive Rat Kidney Tissues

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fikret Gevrek; Meral Oncu; Kanat Gulle; Dilek Bayram; Erdal Karaoz

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Leptin is an ob gene protein which has a 16 kDa weight. The aim of this study is to determine immunohistochemically the correlation between immunohistochemical expression of Leptin and hypertension in rat kidney tissues...

  9. Electrical impedance myography in the assessment of disuse atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarulli, Andrew W; Duggal, Naven; Esper, Gregory J; Garmirian, Lindsay P; Fogerson, Patricia M; Lin, Connie H; Rutkove, Seward B

    2009-10-01

    Tarulli AW, Duggal N, Esper GJ, Garmirian LP, Fogerson PM, Lin CH, Rutkove SB. Electrical impedance myography in the assessment of disuse atrophy. To quantify disuse atrophy using electrical impedance myography (EIM), a noninvasive technique that we have used successfully to study neurogenic and myopathic atrophy. We performed EIM of the tibialis anterior of subjects with disuse atrophy secondary to cast immobilization and in their contralateral normal leg. Subjects were studied shortly after cast removal and again several weeks to months after the cast was removed and normal mobility was restored. Outpatient neurology and orthopedic practices at a tertiary care medical center. Otherwise healthy subjects (N=10) with unilateral leg fracture. Not applicable. Resistance, reactance, and phase measured at 50kHz. The main EIM outcome parameter, phase at 50kHz, was lower in the immobilized leg in 9 of 10 cases. Additionally, when normal mobility was restored, the phase of the casted leg increased relative to its initial measurement in all 10 cases, while it increased inconsistently in the contralateral leg. EIM may be a powerful tool for the assessment of disuse atrophy.

  10. Biochemical and immunohistochemical estrogen and progesterone receptors in adenomatous hyperplasia and endometrial carcinoma: correlations with stage and other clinicopathologic features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyholm, H C; Nielsen, A L; Lyndrup, J

    1992-01-01

    and immunohistochemical analysis were used. The immunohistochemical analysis receptor content was estimated semiquantitatively by a total and a cancer immunohistochemical histologic score. Multiple regression analysis was used in testing independence of established correlations. RESULTS: Estrogen and progesterone...

  11. Global Cerebral Atrophy Detected by Routine Imaging: Relationship with Age, Hippocampal Atrophy, and White Matter Hyperintensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Janabi, Omar M; Panuganti, Pradeep; Abner, Erin L; Bahrani, Ahmed A; Murphy, Ronan; Bardach, Shoshana H; Caban-Holt, Allison; Nelson, Peter T; Gold, Brian T; Smith, Charles D; Wilcock, Donna M; Jicha, Gregory A

    2018-01-05

    Interpreting the clinical significance of moderate-to-severe global cerebral atrophy (GCA) is a conundrum for many clinicians, who visually interpret brain imaging studies in routine clinical practice. GCA may be attributed to normal aging, Alzheimer's disease (AD), or cerebrovascular disease (CVD). Understanding the relationships of GCA with aging, AD, and CVD is important for accurate diagnosis and treatment decisions for cognitive complaints. To elucidate the relative associations of age, moderate-to-severe white matter hyperintensities (WMHs), and moderate-to-severe medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA), with moderate-to-severe GCA, we visually rated clinical brain imaging studies of 325 participants from a community based sample. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to assess the relations of GCA with age, WMH, and MTA. The mean age was 76.2 (±9.6) years, 40.6% were male, and the mean educational attainment was 15.1 (±3.7) years. Logistic regression results demonstrated that while a 1-year increase in age was associated with GCA (OR = 1.04; P = .04), MTA (OR = 3.7; P < .001), and WMH (OR = 8.80; P < .001) were strongly associated with GCA in our study population. Partial correlation analysis showed that the variance of GCA explained by age is less than the variance attributed to MTA and WMH (r = .13, .21, and .43, respectively). Moderate-to-severe GCA is most likely to occur in the presence of AD or CVD and should not be solely attributed to age when evaluating clinical imaging findings in the workup of cognitive complaints. Developing optimal diagnostic and treatment strategies for cognitive decline in the setting of GCA requires an understanding of its risk factors in the aging population. Copyright © 2018 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  12. Quantification of immunohistochemical findings of neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques for a diagnosis of dementia in forensic autopsy cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Mio; Kashiwagi, Masayuki; Matsusue, Aya; Waters, Brian; Hara, Kenji; Ikematsu, Natsuki; Kubo, Shin-Ichi

    2016-09-01

    We report the quantification of immunohistochemical findings for a diagnosis of dementia in autopsy cases among older decedents. Autopsy cases were selected with the following requirements: >65yo; no head injuries, thermal injuries, or heat stroke; no intracranial lesions; and within 48h of death. Among cases that met all requirements, 10 had a clinical diagnosis of dementia were included in dementia group. Non-dementia group consisted of 38 cases without any record of dementia. To compare these groups, immunohistochemically, beta-amyloid, tau protein, gephyrin, and IL-33 were examined in five regions. Quantitative analysis was performed by collecting with image data analyzed using analysis software. Image data on tau-immunopositive neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) and beta-amyloid-positive senile plaques (SP) were photographed. Criteria for dementia were made by counting and measuring NFT and SP from image data using software. Differences in SP and NFT were effective for discriminating between the two groups. These criteria may reveal the presence and progression of dementia. Total of tau-positive NFT in Ammon's horn (AH) may be useful for diagnosing dementia. When the total is more than 41 in approximately 6mm(2) of AH, the possibility of dementia is considered. Total of beta-amyloid-positive SP in the parahippocampal gyrus (PHG) may be useful for diagnosing dementia. When the total in approximately 5mm(2) of PHG is more than 47, the possibility of dementia is considered. Immunohistochemical staining may be more useful for obtaining image data for quantification than conventional staining techniques, such as Bielschowsky-Hirano's silver staining. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. White matter lesions and temporal lobe atrophy related to incidence of both dementia and major depression in 70-year-olds followed over 10 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundsson, P; Olesen, P J; Simoni, M; Pantoni, L; Östling, S; Kern, S; Guo, X; Skoog, I

    2015-05-01

    A number of studies have suggested associations between dementia and depression in older adults. One reason could be that these disorders share structural correlates, such as white matter lesions (WMLs) and cortical atrophy. No study has examined whether these lesions precede both dementia and depression independently of each other in the general population. Whether WMLs and cortical atrophy on computed tomography predict dementia and depression was investigated in a population-based sample of 70-year-olds (n = 380) followed over 10 years. Exclusion criteria were dementia, major depression, history of stroke and a Mini-Mental State Examination score below 26 at baseline in 2000-2001. Dementia was diagnosed according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, third edition, revised, and depression according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition. Primary outcomes included dementia and major depression at 10-year follow-up. Adjusted logistic regression models, including both WMLs and temporal lobe atrophy, showed that moderate to severe WMLs [odds ratio (OR) 3.96, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.23-12.76] and temporal lobe atrophy (OR 2.93, 95% CI 1.13-7.60) predicted dementia during a 10-year follow-up independently of major depression. Similarly, both moderate to severe WMLs (OR 3.84, 95% CI 1.25-11.76) and temporal lobe atrophy (OR 2.52, 95% CI 1.06-5.96) predicted depression even after controlling for incident dementia. White matter lesions and temporal lobe atrophy preceded 10-year incidence of both dementia and depression in 70-year-olds. Shared structural correlates could explain the reported associations between dementia and depression. These brain changes may represent independent and complementary pathways to dementia and depression. Strategies to slow progression of vascular pathology and neurodegeneration could indirectly prevent both dementia and depression in older adults. © 2015 EAN.

  14. Can endurance exercise preconditioning prevention disuse muscle atrophy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Wiggs

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence suggests that exercise training can provide a level of protection against disuse muscle atrophy. Endurance exercise training imposes oxidative, metabolic, and heat stress on skeletal muscle which activates a variety of cellular signaling pathways that ultimately leads to the increased expression of proteins that have been demonstrated to protect muscle from inactivity –induced atrophy. This review will highlight the effect of exercise-induced oxidative stress on endogenous enzymatic antioxidant capacity (i.e., superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase, the role of oxidative and metabolic stress on PGC1-α, and finally highlight the effect heat stress and HSP70 induction. Finally, this review will discuss the supporting scientific evidence that these proteins can attenuate muscle atrophy through exercise preconditioning.

  15. Disease-Induced Skeletal Muscle Atrophy and Fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Scott K; Lynch, Gordon S; Murphy, Kate T; Reid, Michael B; Zijdewind, Inge

    2016-11-01

    Numerous health problems, including acute critical illness, cancer, diseases associated with chronic inflammation, and neurological disorders, often result in skeletal muscle weakness and fatigue. Disease-related muscle atrophy and fatigue is an important clinical problem because acquired skeletal muscle weakness can increase the duration of hospitalization, result in exercise limitation, and contribute to a poor quality of life. Importantly, skeletal muscle atrophy is also associated with increased morbidity and mortality of patients. Therefore, improving our understanding of the mechanism(s) responsible for skeletal muscle weakness and fatigue in patients is a required first step to develop clinical protocols to prevent these skeletal muscle problems. This review will highlight the consequences and potential mechanisms responsible for skeletal muscle atrophy and fatigue in patients experiencing acute critical illness, cancer, chronic inflammatory diseases, and neurological disorders.

  16. Small bowel villous atrophy: celiac disease and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elli, Luca; Branchi, Federica; Sidhu, Reena; Guandalini, Stefano; Assiri, Asaad; Rinawi, Firas; Shamir, Raanan; Das, Prasenjit; Makharia, Govind K

    2017-02-01

    Small bowel villous atrophy can represent a diagnostic challenge for gastroenterologists and pathologists. In Western countries small bowel atrophy and mild non-atrophic alterations are frequently caused by celiac disease. However, other pathology can mimic celiac disease microscopically, widening the differential diagnosis. The several novelties on this topic and the introduction of the device-assisted enteroscopy in the diagnostic flowchart make an update of the literature necessary. Areas covered: In this review, a description of the different clinical scenarios when facing with small bowel mucosal damage, particularly small bowel atrophy, is described. The published literature on this subject has been summarized and reviewed. Expert commentary: When an intestinal mucosal alteration is histologically demonstrated, the pathology report forms part of a more complex workup including serological data, clinical presentation and clinical history. A multidisciplinary team, including pathologists and enteroscopy-devoted endoscopists, is frequently required to manage patients with small bowel alterations, especially in cases of severe malabsorption syndrome.

  17. Disease-Induced Skeletal Muscle Atrophy and Fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Scott K.; Lynch, Gordon S.; Murphy, Kate T.; Reid, Michael B.; Zijdewind, Inge

    2016-01-01

    Numerous health problems including acute critical illness, cancer, diseases associated with chronic inflammation, and neurological disorders often result in skeletal muscle weakness and fatigue. Disease-related muscle atrophy and fatigue is an important clinical problem because acquired skeletal muscle weakness can increase the duration of hospitalization, result in exercise limitation, and contribute to a poor quality of life. Importantly, skeletal muscle atrophy is also associated with increased morbidity and mortality of patients. Therefore, improving our understanding of the mechanism(s) responsible for skeletal muscle weakness and fatigue in patients is a required first step to develop clinical protocols to prevent these skeletal muscle problems. This review will highlight the consequences and potential mechanisms responsible for skeletal muscle atrophy and fatigue in patients suffering from acute critical illness, cancer, chronic inflammatory diseases, and neurological disorders. PMID:27128663

  18. Steroidogenic Factor 1, Pit-1, and Adrenocorticotropic Hormone: A Rational Starting Place for the Immunohistochemical Characterization of Pituitary Adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, William C; Banerji, Nilanjana; McDonald, Kelsey N; Ho, Bridget; Macias, Virgilia; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre

    2017-01-01

    -Pituitary adenoma classification is complex, and diagnostic strategies vary greatly from laboratory to laboratory. No optimal diagnostic algorithm has been defined. -To develop a panel of immunohistochemical (IHC) stains that provides the optimal combination of cost, accuracy, and ease of use. -We examined 136 pituitary adenomas with stains of steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1), Pit-1, anterior pituitary hormones, cytokeratin CAM5.2, and α subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin. Immunohistochemical staining was scored using the Allred system. Adenomas were assigned to a gold standard class based on IHC results and available clinical and serologic information. Correlation and cluster analyses were used to develop an algorithm for parsimoniously classifying adenomas. -The algorithm entailed a 1- or 2-step process: (1) a screening step consisting of IHC stains for SF-1, Pit-1, and adrenocorticotropic hormone; and (2) when screening IHC pattern and clinical history were not clearly gonadotrophic (SF-1 positive only), corticotrophic (adrenocorticotropic hormone positive only), or IHC null cell (negative-screening IHC), we subsequently used IHC for prolactin, growth hormone, thyroid-stimulating hormone, and cytokeratin CAM5.2. -Comparison between diagnoses generated by our algorithm and the gold standard diagnoses showed excellent agreement. When compared with a commonly used panel using 6 IHC for anterior pituitary hormones plus IHC for a low-molecular-weight cytokeratin in certain tumors, our algorithm uses approximately one-third fewer IHC stains and detects gonadotroph adenomas with greater sensitivity.

  19. Diagnosing Musculoskeletal Tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Grimer

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1993 we became aware of a worrying increase in apparent errors in the histopathological diagnosis of musculoskeletal tumours in our Unit. As a result all cases seen over the past 8 years were reviewed by an independent panel. Of the 1996 cases reviewed there was an error in 87. In 54 cases (2.7% this had led to some significant change in the active management of the patient. The main areas where errors arose were in those very cases where clinical and radiological features were not helpful in confirming or refuting the diagnosis. The incidence of errors rose with the passage of time, possibly related to a deterioration in the pathologist’s health. The error rate in diagnosing bone tumours in previously published series ranges from 9 to 40%. To ensure as accurate a rate of diagnosis as possible multidisciplinary working and regular audit are essential.

  20. Associations with Meibomian Gland Atrophy in Daily Contact Lens Wearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucker, Andrew D; Jones-Jordan, Lisa A; Li, Wing; Kwan, Justin T; Lin, Meng C; Sickenberger, Wolfgang; Marx, Sebastian; Srinivasan, Sruthi; Jones, Lyndon W

    2015-09-01

    To determine associations for contact lenses (CLs) and meibomian gland atrophy in a matched-pair study. Contact lens wearers (case) and age- and sex-matched non-contact lens (NCL) wearers with no history of CL use (control) were recruited for a multicenter study. All subjects were administered the Ocular Surface Disease Index questionnaire and a comprehensive battery of clinical tests (e.g., tear breakup time, bulbar and limbal redness, meibography, etc.) were performed. Upper and lower eyelid meibomian gland atrophy were graded with both digital meibography (percent gland atrophy) and visual meiboscore methods. Conditional logistic regression analyses were then used to determine relationships among CL use, meibomian gland atrophy, and ocular surface signs and symptoms. A total of 70 matched pairs were analyzed. The mean (± SD) age of the CL group was 30.6 (± 12.4) years, and that of the NCL group was 30.1 (± 12.2) years. The subjects were 63% female. The association between CL wear and meiboscore was not significant univariately, but the best-fitting multivariate regression model showed that higher meiboscores were associated with being a CL wearer (odds ratio [OR], 2.45) in a model that included eyelid margin erythema (OR, 0.25) and lissamine green staining (OR, 1.25). Percent gland atrophy was not associated with CL wear in regression analysis (p = 0.31). This study determined inconclusive associations with CLs and meibomian gland atrophy. This study also provided a comprehensive assessment of differences between CL and NCL wearers.

  1. Diagnosing Dementia—Positive Signs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Diagnosing Dementia—Positive Signs Past Issues / Fall 2007 Table of ... easy, affordable blood test that could accurately diagnose Alzheimer's disease (AD)—even before symptoms began to show? Researchers ...

  2. How Is Lactose Intolerance Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find a Study Resources and Publications How is lactose intolerance diagnosed? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Many people think that they or their children are lactose intolerant without being tested or diagnosed. ...

  3. Atrophy of the corpus callosum correlates with white matter lesions in patients with cerebral ischaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meguro, K.; Yamadori, A. [Section of Neuropsychology, Division of Disability Science, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1, Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, 980-8575 Sendai (Japan); Constans, J.M.; Courtheoux, P.; Theron, J. [MR Unit, University of Caen School of Medicine, Caen (France); Viader, F. [Department of Neuroradiology, University of Caen School of Medicine, Caen (France)

    2000-06-01

    Many studies of white matter high signal (WMHS) on T2-weighted MRI have disclosed that it is related to cerebral ischaemia and to brain atrophy. Atrophy of the corpus callosum (CC) has also been studied in relation to ischaemia. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that CC atrophy could be due to ischaemia. We therefore assessed CC, WMHS and brain atrophy in patients with risk factors without strokes (the risk factor group) and in those with infarcts (the infarct group), to investigate the relationships between these factors. We studied 30 patients in the infarct group, 14 in the risk factor group, and 29 normal subjects. Using axial T1-weighted MRI, cortical atrophy and ventricular enlargement (brain atrophy) were visually rated. Using axial T2-weighted MRI, WMHS was assessed in three categories: periventricular symmetrical, periventricular asymmetrical and subcortical. Using the mid-sagittal T1-weighted image, the CC was measured in its anterior, posterior, midanterior and midposterior portions. In the normal group, no correlations were noted between parameters. In the infarct group, there were significant correlations between CC and brain atrophy, and between CC atrophy and WMHS. After removing the effects of age, gender and brain atrophy, significant correlations were noted between some CC measures and subcortical WMHS. In the risk factor group, there were significant correlations between CC and brain atrophy and between CC atrophy and WMHS. After allowance for age, gender and brain atrophy, significant correlations between some CC measures and periventricular WMHS remained. The hypothesis that CC atrophy could be due to cerebral ischaemia was supported by other analyses. Namely, for correlations between the extent of infarcts and partial CC atrophy in patients with anterior middle cerebral artery (MCA) and with posterior MCA infarcts, there were significant correlations between the extent of infarct and midanterior CC atrophy in the former, and posterior

  4. Accelerating regional atrophy rates in the progression from normal aging to Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sluimer, Jasper D. [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Alzheimer Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Image Analysis Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Alzheimer Centre, PO Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Flier, Wiesje M. van der; Scheltens, Philip [VU University Medical Centre, Alzheimer Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Department of Neurology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Karas, Giorgos B.; Barkhof, Frederik [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Alzheimer Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Image Analysis Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schijndel, Ronald van [VU University Medical Centre, Image Analysis Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Department of Informatics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Barnes, Josephine; Boyes, Richard G. [UCL, Institute of Neurology, Dementia Research Centre, London (United Kingdom); Cover, Keith S. [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Physics and Medical Technology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Olabarriaga, Silvia D. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Fox, Nick C. [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Neurology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); UCL, Institute of Neurology, Dementia Research Centre, London (United Kingdom); Vrenken, Hugo [VU University Medical Centre, Alzheimer Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Image Analysis Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Department of Physics and Medical Technology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-12-15

    We investigated progression of atrophy in vivo, in Alzheimer's disease (AD), and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We included 64 patients with AD, 44 with MCI and 34 controls with serial MRI examinations (interval 1.8 {+-} 0.7 years). A nonlinear registration algorithm (fluid) was used to calculate atrophy rates in six regions: frontal, medial temporal, temporal (extramedial), parietal, occipital lobes and insular cortex. In MCI, the highest atrophy rate was observed in the medial temporal lobe, comparable with AD. AD patients showed even higher atrophy rates in the extramedial temporal lobe. Additionally, atrophy rates in frontal, parietal and occipital lobes were increased. Cox proportional hazard models showed that all regional atrophy rates predicted conversion to AD. Hazard ratios varied between 2.6 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.1-6.2) for occipital atrophy and 15.8 (95% CI = 3.5-71.8) for medial temporal lobe atrophy. In conclusion, atrophy spreads through the brain with development of AD. MCI is marked by temporal lobe atrophy. In AD, atrophy rate in the extramedial temporal lobe was even higher. Moreover, atrophy rates also accelerated in parietal, frontal, insular and occipital lobes. Finally, in nondemented elderly, medial temporal lobe atrophy was most predictive of progression to AD, demonstrating the involvement of this region in the development of AD. (orig.)

  5. Delineation of Chondroid Lipoma: An Immunohistochemical and Molecular Biological Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald S. A. de Vreeze

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. Chondroid lipoma (CL is a benign tumor that mimics a variety of soft tissue tumors and is characterized by translocation t(11;16. Here, we analyze CL and its histological mimics. Methods. CL (n=4 was compared to a variety of histological mimics (n=83 for morphological aspects and immunohistochemical features including cyclinD1(CCND1. Using FISH analysis, CCND1 and FUS were investigated as potential translocation partners. Results. All CLs were strongly positive for CCND1. One of 4 myoepitheliomas, CCND1, was positive. In well-differentiated lipomatous tumors and in chondrosarcomas, CCND1 was frequently expressed, but all myxoid liposarcomas were negative. FISH analysis did not give support for direct involvement of CCND1 and FUS as translocation partners. Conclusions. Chondroid lipoma is extremely rare and has several and more prevalent histological mimics. The differential diagnosis of chondroid lipomas can be unraveled using immunohistochemical and molecular support.

  6. Immunohistochemical findings after LASIK confirm in vitro LASIK model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priglinger, Siegfried G; May, Christian-Albrecht; Alge, Claudia S; Wolf, Armin; Neubauer, Aljoscha S; Haritoglou, Christos; Kampik, Anselm; Welge-Lussen, Ulrich

    2006-04-01

    To compare immunohistochemical findings in human donor corneas after successful laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) without clinical complications with a recently established human LASIK in vitro model. Donor corneas with prior LASIK treatment were investigated. Cryostat sections were stained immunohistochemically for collagen types I, III, and VI and laminin and fibronectin. With light microscopy, the interface of the LASIK flap could hardly be detected. In all samples, fibronectin was consistently detected along the entire extent of the surgical wound. In contrast, collagen type III and laminin only stained the superficial portion of the LASIK incision site. Staining for collagen types I and VI showed no changes after LASIK. Histologic findings in donor corneas with prior LASIK treatment confirm histologic observations in a recently introduced human organ culture LASIK model. This strengthens the reliability of the latter LASIK model for further studies concerning wound healing after LASIK surgery.

  7. Ileal ganglioneuromatosis in a piglet: histopathological and immunohistochemical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga, M A; Lozada, M I; Madariaga, G; Cappucio, J A; Machuca, M A; Barrales, H; Perez, E M; Perfumo, C J

    2014-11-01

    Ganglioneuromatosis (GNM) is a rare condition characterized by the benign proliferation of ganglion cells, nerve fibres and supporting cells of the enteric nervous system. Necropsy examination of a female piglet weighing 4 kg revealed a well-demarcated 20 cm segment of terminal ileum with thickening of the wall. Microscopically, the lamina propria was infiltrated by enteric glial cells and large ganglion cells. Within the submucosal and muscular layers, aggregates of neurons were interlaced by Schwann cells and enteric glial cells arranged in concentric rings. Immunohistochemically, the neurons were weakly labelled for S-100 and neuron-specific enolase, Schwann cells expressed S-100 and vimentin and enteric glial cells expressed glial fibrillary acidic protein and S-100. Pathological and immunohistochemical findings supported the diagnosis of ileal GNM. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Recommendations for the management of postmenopausal vaginal atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturdee, D W; Panay, N; Ulrich, Lian

    2010-01-01

    for hormone replacement therapy (HRT) over recent years that has suggested an increased risk of breast cancer, heart disease and stroke. But, regardless of whether these scares are justified, local treatment of vaginal atrophy is not associated with these possible risks of systemic HRT. Other reasons...... dryness can be helped by simple lubricants but the best and most logical treatment for urogenital atrophy is to use local estrogen. This is safe, effective and with few contraindications. It is hoped that these guidelines and recommendations, produced to coincide with World Menopause Day 2010, will help...

  9. Dyke–Davidoff–Masson syndrome with crossed cerebellar atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay M. Khaladkar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dyke–Davidoff–Masson syndrome is a rare condition with classical, clinical and radiological changes – mental retardation, hemiparesis, facial asymmetry, seizures and cerebral hemiatrophy with calvarial changes. Contralateral cerebellar atrophy is rare and occurs if insult occurs after 1 month of age. We report a case of a 6-year-old female child presenting with right-sided hemiparesis, convulsions and left cerebral hemiatrophy with an old infarct in left middle cerebral artery (MCA territory, ipsilateral calvarial thickening and right (crossed cerebellar atrophy.

  10. Diagnoses and interventions in podiatry.

    OpenAIRE

    Zuijderduin, W.M.; Dekker, J.

    1996-01-01

    In the present study a quantitative description is given of diagnoses and interventions in podiatry. Data are used from a survey on podiatry practice in The Netherlands. Data have been recorded by 36 podiatrists on 897 patients. Information was gathered on patient characteristics, the medical diagnoses, the podiatry diagnoses (impairments and disabilities), treatment goals derived from these diagnoses, and interventions. Impairments were recorded in nearly all patients. The interrelationship ...

  11. Histochemical and Immunohistochemical Study of Peripolar Cells in Sheep

    OpenAIRE

    Passos Joana; Prada Justina; Bento Lígia; Rodrigues Paula; Pires Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Peripolar cells are granulated cells located in the vascular pole of the renal corpuscle. Even though these cells have already been described, there are still many unknown histological and physiological characteristics. We carried out histochemical and immunohistochemical analyses of peripolar cells in sheep and compared their number in both normal and injured kidneys, discriminating according to the age of the animal. We tested HE, Toluidine Blue, PAS, and Masson's Trichrome stains to selec...

  12. Canine aural cholesteatoma: a histological and immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banco, Barbara; Grieco, Valeria; Di Giancamillo, Mauro; Greci, Valentina; Travetti, Olga; Martino, Pieranna; Mortellaro, Carlo M; Giudice, Chiara

    2014-06-01

    Canine aural cholesteatoma is an epidermoid cyst that forms in the middle ear cavity as a rare complication of otitis media but the aetiopathogenesis remains controversial. In the present study, 13 cases of canine aural cholesteatoma were investigated histologically and immunohistochemically and compared with cases of chronic otitis. The immunohistochemical investigation was performed using the following monoclonal antibodies: anti-cytokeratins (CK) 14, 16, 8/18, and 19, and anti-Ki67. The proliferative indexes (PIs) of cholesteatomata and otitis epithelium were calculated as the percentage of Ki67 positive nuclei/total nuclei. Histologically, the cholesteatomata were composed of a hyperplastic, hyperkeratotic epithelium (matrix) resting on a fibrous perimatrix, infiltrated by inflammatory cells and devoid of cutaneous adnexa. Immunohistochemically, the cholesteatoma epithelium was CK14- and CK16-positive, and CK8/18- and CK19-negative. A similar pattern of CK expression was found in otitis externa. In otitis media, ciliated epithelium stained CK8/18- and CK19-positive in all layers, CK14-positive in the basal layers, and CK16-negative. The mean PIs in cholesteatomata and otitides were 18.8 and 17.8, respectively. The immunohistochemical pattern of CK expression in cholesteatomata, when compared with chronic otitis, was suggestive of hyperproliferative epithelium, but its origin could not be demonstrated. Comparable PI values were obtained in cholesteatoma and in chronic otitis, which confirmed that Ki67 is a valuable indicator of a hyperproliferative state, but not a predictor of aggressiveness. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A simplified immunohistochemical classification of skeletal muscle fibres in mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Kammoun, M.; Cassar-malek, I.; Meunier, B; Picard, B.

    2014-01-01

    The classification of muscle fibres is of particular interest for the study of the skeletal muscle properties in a wide range of scientific fields, especially animal phenotyping. It is therefore important to define a reliable method for classifying fibre types. The aim of this study was to establish a simplified method for the immunohistochemical classification of fibres in mouse. To carry it out, we first tested a combination of several anti myosin heavy chain (MyHC) antibodies in order to c...

  14. Clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical profile of ovarian metastases from colorectal carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Kir, Gozde; Gurbuz, Ayse; Karateke, Ates; Kir, Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    Metastasis of colorectal adenocarcinoma of the ovary is not an uncommon occurrence and ovarian metastases from colorectal carcinoma frequently mimic endometrioid and mucinous primary ovarian carcinoma. The clinical and pathologic features of metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma involving the ovary is reviewed with particular focus on the diagnostic challenge of distinguishing these secondary ovarian tumors from primary ovarian neoplasm. Immunohistochemical stains that may be useful in the dif...

  15. Effect of the cognitive rehabilitation in patients with mild cognitive impairment and identified brain atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Nilius

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The main objective of this study was to analyse the development of cognitive functions and effect of cognitive rehabilitation on patients diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI, as a result of brain atrophy. Design: A quantitative non-randomized intervention study on a control sample of patients. Methods: The effect was observed in a group of patients ranging 59-91 years of age (N = 36. Only patients fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of mild cognitive disorder diagnosed by tomography (CT that had undergone 22 sessions, were involved in the clinical sample (n = 21. The control sample (n = 15 consisted of patients without any neurological diagnosis and who did not undergo cognitive sessions. Results: The effect of cognitive rehabilitation was measured by Addenbrooke's cognitive test, revised in 2010 (ACE-R; affective changes were measured by Beck´s scale of depression BDI-2 and by a scale used to detect anxiety and depression: the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS. Subjective change and improvement were observed using the Clinical Global Impression (CGI psychiatric scale. Changes in the functional state of patients were measured by means of the activities of daily living scale (ADL, including the instrumental version (IADL. The effect was examined in the form of entry and output tests, which were verified by statistical analysis, a significant level being p > 0.05. Conclusions: Significant differences in verbal tests and ACE-R were observed in the clinical sample of patients. Some significant changes were observed in the field of affective symptoms, according to the HADS and BDI-2. The clinical sample showed a significant improvement in subjective clinical state (CGI. The ADL and IADL questionnaires seem to have been inadequate for purpose due to their low sensitivity. The effect of cognitive rehabilitation in patients diagnosed with mild cognitive disorder can be seen and verified in comparison with the control sample

  16. A simplified immunohistochemical classification of skeletal muscle fibres in mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kammoun

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The classification of muscle fibres is of particular interest for the study of the skeletal muscle properties in a wide range of scientific fields, especially animal phenotyping. It is therefore important to define a reliable method for classifying fibre types. The aim of this study was to establish a simplified method for the immunohistochemical classification of fibres in mouse. To carry it out, we first tested a combination of several anti myosin heavy chain (MyHC antibodies in order to choose a minimum number of antibodies to implement a semi-automatic classification. Then, we compared the classification of fibres to the MyHC electrophoretic pattern on the same samples. Only two anti MyHC antibodies on serial sections with the fluorescent labeling of the Laminin were necessary to classify properly fibre types in Tibialis Anterior and Soleus mouse muscles in normal physiological conditions. This classification was virtually identical to the classification realized by the electrophoretic separation of MyHC. This immunohistochemical classification can be applied to the total area of Tibialis Anterior and Soleus mouse muscles. Thus, we provide here a useful, simple and time-efficient method for immunohistochemical classification of fibres, applicable for research in mouse

  17. Reduced immunohistochemical expression of adhesion molecules in vitiligo skin biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert Faria, Adriane; Jung, Juliana Elizabeth; Silva de Castro, Caio César; de Noronha, Lucia

    2017-03-01

    Because defects in adhesion impairment seem to be involved in the etiopathogenesis of vitiligo, this study aimed to compare the immunohistochemical expression of several adhesion molecules in the epidermis of vitiligo and non lesional vitiligo skin. Sixty-six specimens of lesional and non lesional skin from 33 volunteers with vitiligo were evaluated by immunohistochemistry using anti-beta-catenin, anti-E-cadherin, anti-laminin, anti-beta1 integrin, anti-collagen IV, anti-ICAM-1 and anti-VCAM-1 antibodies. Biopsies of vitiligo skin demonstrated a significant reduction in the expression of laminin and integrin. The average value of the immunohistochemically positive reaction area of the vitiligo specimens was 3053.2μm2, compared with the observed value of 3431.8μm2 in non vitiligo skin (p=0.003) for laminin. The immuno-positive area was 7174.6μm2 (vitiligo) and 8966.7μm2 (non lesional skin) for integrin (p=0.042). A reduction in ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression in the basal layer of the epidermis in vitiligo samples was also observed (p=0.001 and pvitiligo and non lesional skin. Our results suggest that an impairment in adhesion exists in vitiligo skin, which is supported by the diminished immunohistochemical expression of laminin, beta1 integrin, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. A simplified immunohistochemical classification of skeletal muscle fibres in mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammoun, M; Cassar-Malek, I; Meunier, B; Picard, B

    2014-06-24

    The classification of muscle fibres is of particular interest for the study of the skeletal muscle properties in a wide range of scientific fields, especially animal phenotyping. It is therefore important to define a reliable method for classifying fibre types. The aim of this study was to establish a simplified method for the immunohistochemical classification of fibres in mouse. To carry it out, we first tested a combination of several anti myosin heavy chain (MyHC) antibodies in order to choose a minimum number of antibodies to implement a semi-automatic classification. Then, we compared the classification of fibres to the MyHC electrophoretic pattern on the same samples. Only two anti MyHC antibodies on serial sections with the fluorescent labeling of the Laminin were necessary to classify properly fibre types in Tibialis Anterior and Soleus mouse muscles in normal physiological conditions. This classification was virtually identical to the classification realized by the electrophoretic separation of MyHC. This immunohistochemical classification can be applied to the total area of Tibialis Anterior and Soleus mouse muscles. Thus, we provide here a useful, simple and time-efficient method for immunohistochemical classification of fibres, applicable for research in mouse.

  19. Systematic immunohistochemical screening for Lynch syndrome in colorectal cancer: a single centre experience of 486 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumstein, Valentin; Vinzens, Fabrizio; Zettl, Andreas; Heinimann, Karl; Koeberle, Dieter; von Flüe, Markus; Bolli, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 cause autosomal dominantly inherited Lynch syndrome. Lynch syndrome patients and their families benefit from life-saving intensive cancer surveillance. Approximately one in 30 colorectal cancers arises in the setting of Lynch syndrome. The aim of this study was to assess the detection rate of Lynch syndrome at our institution after introduction of systematic immunohistochemical screening for MMR deficiency in colorectal cancers from 2011 to 2015. Following the recommendations by the Evaluation of Genomic Applications in Practice and Prevention working group all colorectal cancers were immunohistochemically stained for the presence of MMR proteins MLH1, PMS2, MSH2 and MSH6, independent of clinical criteria. In the case of loss of MLH1, the somatic BRAF mutation V600E was assessed with molecular testing and/or immunohistochemistry. Clinical follow-up of potential Lynch syndrome carriers (patients with tumours showing loss of MLH1 expression with absence of BRAFV600E, loss of PMS2, MSH2 or MSH6) was evaluated. Of all patients (n = 486), loss of MMR protein expression was found in 73 (15.0%) tumours. Twenty-eight (6.0%) were classified as potential Lynch syndrome carriers. Of the genetically tested potential Lynch syndrome carriers (10 out of 28 patients), 40% were first diagnosed with Lynch syndrome. Implementation of systematic immunohistochemistry screening for Lynch syndrome showed that 6% of colorectal cancers were potentially Lynch-syndrome related. Tumour board protocols should systematically contain information on MMR status of all colorectal cancers and, in MMR deficient cases, include clear recommendations for genetic counselling for all potential Lynch syndrome patients.

  20. Salivary Duct Carcinoma and Invasive Ductal Carcinoma of the Breast: A Comparative Immunohistochemical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalaly, Jalal B; Sanati, Souzan; Chernock, Rebecca D; Dibe, Dikson G; El-Mofty, Samir K

    2018-01-04

    Salivary duct carcinoma (SDC) is a high-grade salivary gland malignancy with great morphological resemblance to invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) of the breast. Rarely, female patients may have a past history of both SDC and IDC. When these patients present with distant metastasis, accurate identification of the primary tumor is particularly difficult. Additionally, rare metastasis of SDC to the breast and IDC to the salivary (parotid) gland can also present a diagnostic challenge. Our aim was to develop an immunohistochemical panel that reliably distinguishes SDC from IDC. We included all SDCs diagnosed from 1989 to 2016 (23 cases) and 29 treatment naïve and histologically similar IDCs. All cases were stained with androgen receptor (AR), estrogen receptor-alpha (ER-α), progesterone receptor (PR), HER-2, CK5/6, p63, and beta-catenin. The great majority (> 90%) of both SDCs and IDCs reacted positively to AR. The main discrepancy in the immunohistochemical profiles was a distinctly different reactivity to ER-α, PR and HER-2. While 28 IDCs (96.6%) reacted positively to ER-α and/or PR, the majority expressing both (82.8%) with a moderate to strong staining intensity, only 2 SDCs expressed ER-α (8.7%) and 5 others expressed PR (21.7%) with only one case expressing both (P value SDC (34.8%) were positive for HER-2 while none of the IDCs were positive (P value SDC from IDC. Positive reactivity to ER-α, PR or both and negative HER-2 favors a diagnosis of IDC while ER-α, PR negative, HER-2 positive tumors are more likely SDC.

  1. Immunohistochemical analysis of retinoblastoma cell phenotype using neuronal and glial cell markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Eugenia Orellana

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: The cellular origin of retinoblastoma is uncertain as constituent tumor cells heterogeneously express markers of both immature and mature retinal cells. An immunohistochemical analysis of cellular origin may yield valuable insights into disease progression and treatment options. This study aimed to determine the cellular origin of retinoblastoma in a large case series and correlate these findings with histopathological prognostic factors. Methods: Thirty-nine retinoblastoma cases were histopathologically diagnosed and analyzed by immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibodies against the immature neural cell marker SRY-box containing gene 2 (SOX-2, the mature neuronal cell marker microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2, and the mature glial cell marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP. Histopathological features were also evaluated, including patterns of growth, differentiation, vitreous seeding, and choroidal/scleral, optic nerve, and anterior chamber invasion. Two retinoblastoma cell lines, WERI-1 and Y79, were studied by immunocytochemistry using the same antibodies. Results: Expression of SOX-2 was strong in 97.4% of retinoblastoma cases, while MAP-2 was expressed in 59% of cases. Immunostaining for GFAP was positive only in reactive stromal astrocytes interspersed amongst tumor cells and in peritumoral tissue. There was no correlation between histopathological prognostic factors and immunohistochemical markers. Retinoblastoma cell lines showed strong positivity for SOX2 (90% of WERI-1 cells and 70% of Y79 cells and MAP2 (90% of cells in both lines. GFAP was completely negative in both cell lines. Conclusion: The majority of retinoblastomas and both RB cell lines expressed an immature neural and/or a mature neuronal cell marker, but not a glial marker. These results indicate a typical neuroblast or neuronal origin and eliminate astrocyte differentiation from neural stem cells as the source of retinoblastoma.

  2. Histopathologic and Immunohistochemical Correlates of Confocal Descriptors in Pigmented Facial Macules on Photodamaged Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Martín, Ignacio; Moreno, Sara; Andrades-López, Evelyn; Hernández-Muñoz, Inma; Gallardo, Fernando; Barranco, Carlos; Pujol, Ramon M; Segura, Sonia

    2017-08-01

    Pigmented facial macules on photodamaged skin are a clinical, dermoscopic, and histopathologic challenge. To clinically and dermoscopically characterize, by means of reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM), ambiguous pigmented facial macules and establish a correlation between RCM, histopathologic, and immunohistochemical findings. A prospective study of ambiguous pigmented facial macules on photodamaged skin was conducted in a tertiary referral center for dermatology between January 1, 2009, and December 31, 2015. Sixty-one patients with 63 ambiguous pigmented facial macules and 12 control photodamaged facial areas were included in the study. Melanocyte density in 1-mm basal layers was determined in skin biopsy specimens from all lesions stained with hematoxylin-eosin and immunohistochemical markers (melan-A, microphthalmia-associated transcription factor, and SRY-related HMG-box gene 10). Dermoscopic, RCM images, and histopathologic preparations were systematically evaluated for the presence of lentigo maligna (LM) criteria. Confocal evaluation was blinded to clinical and dermoscopic diagnosis. Sensitivity and specificity of RCM for LM diagnosis and κ value to establish correlations between dermoscopy, RCM, and histopathology were performed. Sensitivity and specificity of RCM for LM diagnosis. Of the 61 patients included in the study, 31 (51%) were women; mean (SD) age was 71.8 (13.1) years. Twenty-four of the 63 (38%) lesions were diagnosed as LM or LM melanoma (LMM) and 39 (62%) as benign pigmented lesions. Reflectance confocal microscopy enhanced the diagnosis of pigmented facial macules with 91.7% sensitivity and 86.8% specificity. Multivariate analysis showed 2 dermoscopic and 2 confocal features associated with LM or LMM: (1) asymmetric follicular pigmentation and targetlike structures, and (2) round, large pagetoid cells and follicular localization of atypical cells, respectively. Continuous proliferation of atypical melanocytes was found in 21 (88%) LM or

  3. Immunohistochemical evaluation of epithelial antigen Ber-Ep4 and CD10: new markers for endometriosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capobianco, G; Wenger, J M; Marras, V; Cosmi, E; Ambrosini, G; Dessole, M; Cherchi, P L

    2013-01-01

    Early and certain diagnoses of endometriosis are mandatory to begin the correct treatment and to exclude the risk of endometriosis-associated ovarian carcinoma (EOC) and endometrial stromal sarcoma (ESS). To assess the immunohistochemical expression of Ber-Ep4, an epithelial antigen, and CD10 in endometriosis. Forty-eight women underwent laparoscopic surgery for endometriosis and endometriotic samples were recovered for histology. In all surgical specimens Ber-Ep4 and CD10 were searched by an immnohistochemical method. The authors evaluated the correlations among the immunohistochemical positivity and the location of endometriosis. Most cases (40/48 83.34%) were represented by ovarian endometriotic cyst. Among the eight remaining cases, three (3/48, 6.25%) were pelvic endometriotic lesions, two (2/48, 4.17%) peritoneum of vesico-uterine pouch, one vaginal lesion (2.08%), one salpinx lesion (2.08%), and one inguinal location (2.08%). Ber-Ep4 and CD10 were expressed in 90% and in 100% of the ovarian lesions, respectively. In pelvic lesions Ber-Ep4 and CD10 showed both 66.67% of positivity and had the same pattern in peritoneal, salpinx, vaginal, and inguinal lesions (50%, 100%, 100%, 100%, respectively). Ber-Ep4 was negative in 6/48 (12.5%) cases whereas CDO10 was negative in 2/48 (4.17%) cases of endometriosis. The sensitivity of Ber-Ep4 and CD10 for endometriosis diagnosis were 87.50% and 95.83%, respectively. Immunohistochemistry for Ber-Ep4 showed positivity in all cases of endometriosis with typical cubic epithelium, whereas CD10 was positive in 1/2 (50%) atypical case. Immunohistochemical expression of Ber-Ep4 and CD10 was positive in most cases of endometriosis and was useful in differential diagnosis with mesothelial cysts. Ber-Ep4 was negative in cases of hyperplastic epithelium or cytological atypia; these cases are not well-differentiated and could be optimally treated by surgery and not by hormonal therapy because of the risk of cancer degeneration.

  4. A Mouse Model Study for the Villous Atrophy of the Early Weaning Piglets

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    TSUKAHARA, Takamitsu; INOUE, Ryo; YAMADA, Kaori; YAJIMA, Takaji

    2010-01-01

    Early weaning induces villous atrophy in the small intestine of piglets. We evaluated an influence of early weaning at 16 days old in mice for the use of villous atrophy model observed in early-weaned piglets...

  5. Quantitative assessment of gastric antrum atrophy shows restitution to normal histology after Helicobacter pylori eradication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Grieken, Nicole C. T.; Meijer, Gerrit A.; Kale, Ilse; Bloemena, Elisabeth; Lindeman, Jan; Offerhaus, G. Johan A.; Meuwissen, Stefan G. M.; Baak, Jan P. A.; Kuipers, Ernst J.

    2004-01-01

    Background/Aims: Grading gastric mucosal atrophy in antrum biopsy specimens remains a controversial subject because of limitations in interobserver agreement. We previously described a reliable, quantitative method for grading atrophy of the corpus mucosa with excellent reproducibility and good

  6. Brain atrophy and lesion load predict long term disability in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popescu, Veronica; Agosta, Federica; Hulst, Hanneke E

    2013-01-01

    To determine whether brain atrophy and lesion volumes predict subsequent 10 year clinical evolution in multiple sclerosis (MS).......To determine whether brain atrophy and lesion volumes predict subsequent 10 year clinical evolution in multiple sclerosis (MS)....

  7. Causative mutations for progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) in the dog

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dostál, Jaromír; Horák, Pavel; Bechyňová, Renata; Přibáňová, M.; Stratil, Antonín; Schröffelová, D.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 1 (2008), s. 55-58 ISSN 1803-4403. [Genetické dny /23./. České Budějovice, 10.09.2008-12.09.2008] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : progressive retinal atrophy * dog Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  8. Frontal Cortical Atrophy as a Predictor of Poststroke Apathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalov, Ján; Mikula, Peter; Budiš, Jaroslav; Valkovič, Peter

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to identify associations between the symptoms of poststroke apathy and sociodemographic, stroke-related (severity of stroke, degree of disability, and performance in activities of daily living), and radiological correlates. We determined the degree of cortical and subcortical brain atrophy, the severity of white matter and basal ganglia lesions on baseline computed tomography (CT) scans, and the localization of acute ischemia on control CT or magnetic resonance imaging scans in subacute stages of stroke. During follow-up examinations, in addition to the assessment of apathy symptoms using the Apathy Scale, we also evaluated symptoms of depression and anxiety using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. The study included 47 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke. Correlates significantly associated with apathy, determined at baseline and during follow-up, were entered into the "predictive" and "associative" multiple regression models, respectively. Frontal cortical atrophy and symptoms of depression were most strongly associated with poststroke apathy symptoms. In order to model an interrelation between both cortical atrophy and white matter lesions and aging, we supplemented 2 additional "predictive" models using interaction variables, whereby we confirmed the role of frontal cortical atrophy as a predictor of poststroke apathy also as a function of the increasing age of patients. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Rapid quantitative assessment of gastric corpus atrophy in tissue sections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Grieken, N. C.; Weiss, M. M.; Meijer, G. A.; Bloemena, E.; Lindeman, J.; Offerhaus, G. J.; Meuwissen, S. G.; Baak, J. P.; Kuipers, E. J.

    2001-01-01

    Grading of Helicobacter pylori induced atrophic gastritis using the updated Sydney system is severely limited by high interobserver variability. The aim of this study was to set up a quantitative test of gastric corpus mucosal atrophy in tissue sections and test its reproducibility and correlation

  10. Skeletal muscle training for spinal muscular atrophy type 3 (Protocol).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, B.; Montes, J.; Pol, W.L. van der; Groot, J.F. de

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease caused by a genetic mutation in the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene (5q11.2-q13.3) (Lefebvre 1995). With an incidence of one in 10,000 live births, it is the leading genetic cause of infant death (Lunn 2008;

  11. Atrophy of the parietal lobe in preclinical dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, H.I.L.; van Boxtel, M.P.J.; Uylings, H.B.M.; Gronenschild, E.H.B.M.; Verhey, F.R.; Jolles, J.

    2011-01-01

    Cortical grey matter atrophy patterns have been reported in healthy ageing and Alzheimer disease (AD), but less consistently in the parietal regions of the brain. We investigated cortical grey matter volume patterns in parietal areas. The grey matter of the somatosensory cortex, superior and

  12. Progressive cerebellar atrophy: hereditary ataxias and disorders with spinocerebellar degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, N.I.; Koenig, M.; Dulac, O.L.M.; Sarnat, H.B.

    2013-01-01

    The hereditary ataxias with onset in childhood are a group of heterogeneous disorders, usually with autosomal recessive inheritance. In many of them, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) shows cerebellar atrophy. The most prominent exception to this is Friedreich's ataxia, where MRI shows normal

  13. Physical complaints in ageing persons with spinal muscular atrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, I.J.M. de; Witte, L.P de

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: While life expectancy is improving for persons with spinal muscular atrophy, new physical complaints may arise. To investigate this, we studied persons with a long duration and severe course (high functional limitations) of the disease. DESIGN: Cross-sectional descriptive study.

  14. Anaesthetic management of a patient with multiple system atrophy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a rare adult-onset neurodegenerative disease. Symptoms vary from autonomic dysfunction to Parkinsonism and cerebellar ataxia, in any combination. MSA affects many organ systems with many possible complications and makes perioperative management of a patient with this condition ...

  15. Ataxia-telangiectasia: the pattern of cerebellar atrophy on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavani, F. [Department of Radiology, University of Modena (Italy); Zimmerman, R.A.; Gatti, R.; Bingham, P. [Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard, PA 19104, Philadelphia (United States); Berry, G.T. [Department of Endocrinology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard, PA 19104, Philadelphia (United States); Sullivan, K. [Department of Immunology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard, PA 19104, Philadelphia (United States)

    2003-05-01

    We describe MRI of the brain in 19 patients with ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) and correlate the appearances with the degree of neurologic deficit. We examined 10 male and nine female patients; 17 were aged between 2 and 12 years (mean 8 years) but a woman and her brother were 35 and 38 years old, and had a variant of AT. Ataxia was the first recognized sign of the disease in every patient. We detected the following patterns of cerebellar atrophy: in the youngest patient, aged 2 years, the study was normal; in the five next youngest patients 3-7 years of age, the lateral cerebellum and superior vermis showed the earliest changes of atrophy; and all but one of the other patients had moderate to marked diffuse atrophy of vermis and cerebellar hemispheres. There were 12 patients aged 9 years and above; one, who was normal, was 9 years old. The five patients who at the time of examination were unable to walk all had diffuse atrophy involving both vermis and cerebellar hemispheres. (orig.)

  16. Clinico-epidemiologic characteristics of spinal muscular atrophy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rabah M. Shawky

    Abstract Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is characterized by progressive hypotonia and muscular weakness because of progressive degeneration of alpha motor neuron from anterior horn cells in the spinal cord. It is inherited by an autosomal recessive pattern. The precise frequency of SMA in Egypt has not been ...

  17. Clinico-epidemiologic characteristics of spinal muscular atrophy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is characterized by progressive hypotonia and muscular weakness because of progressive degeneration of alpha motor neuron from anterior horn cells in the spinal cord. It is inherited by an autosomal recessive pattern. The precise frequency of SMA in Egypt has not been determined.

  18. Photoreceptor atrophy in acute zonal occult outer retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zibrandtsen, N.; Munch, I.C.; Klemp, K.

    2008-01-01

    To assess retinal morphology in acute zonal occult outer retinopathy (AZOOR) without ophthalmoscopically visible fundus changes. Retrospective case series. Two consecutive patients with bilateral AZOOR with photopsia corresponding to areas of visual field loss and a normal fundus appearance were...... loss was more extensive than the area of photoreceptor loss. Photoreceptor atrophy can be demonstrated in AZOOR without ophthalmoscopically visible fundus lesions....

  19. Carrier screening for spinal muscular atrophy in Italian population

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Carrier screening for spinal muscular atrophy in Italian population. Francesco Calì Giuseppa Ruggeri Valeria Chiavetta Carmela Scuderi Sebastiano Bianca Chiara Barone Alda Ragalmuto Pietro Schinocca Girolamo Aurelio Vitello Valentino Romano Sebastiano Musumeci. Research Note Volume 93 Issue 1 April 2014 pp ...

  20. Cardiac pathology in spinal muscular atrophy : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijngaarde, C A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413993779; Blank, A C|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304821578; Stam, M; Wadman, R I|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341753637; van den Berg, L H|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/288255216; van der Pol, W L|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/203721721

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hereditary proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a severe neuromuscular disease of childhood caused by homozygous loss of function of the survival motor neuron (SMN) 1 gene. The presence of a second, nearly identical SMN gene (SMN2) in the human genome ensures production of residual

  1. Anaesthetic Management of Spinal Muscular Atrophy For Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. E. Argyra / Dr. C. Staikou / Dr. G. Polymeneas / Dr. C. M. Markatou

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the anaesthetic management of a female patient with Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA presented for laparoscopic cholecystectomy. In order to avoid prolonged recovery; we chose to use total intravenous anaesthesia (TIVA with propofol and remifentanil. No neuromuscular blocking agent was used.

  2. Epidural anaesthesia in a child with possible spinal muscular atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, A; Molenbuur, B; Richardson, FJ

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a rare lower motor neurone disease in which anaesthetic management is often difficult as a result of muscle weakness and hypersensitivity to neuromuscular blocking agents. Neuraxial anaesthesia is controversial in these patients; however, some cases have been

  3. Best practice guidelines for molecular analysis in spinal muscular atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffer, H; Cobben, JM; Matthijs, G; Wirth, B

    With a prevalence of approximately 1/10 000, and a carrier frequency of 1/40-1/60 the proximal spinal muscular atrophies (SMAs) are among the most frequent autosomal recessive hereditary disorders. Patients can be classified clinically into four groups: acute, intermediate, mild, and adult (SMA

  4. Pigmented paravenous chorioretinal atrophy with Coat′s like response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Tandon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pigmented paravenous chorioretinal atrophy (PPCRA is an uncommon retinal disorder of unknown etiology that is neither well understood nor classified. We report an atypical case of PPCRA, associated with Coat′s like response (CLR in a 64-year-old man of Asian origin. Both the eyes were involved, though asymmetrically.

  5. Axonal loss occurs early in dominant optic atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milea, Dan; Sander, Birgit; Wegener, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study set out to investigate retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) thickness and best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) in relation to age in healthy subjects and patients with OPA1 autosomal dominant optic atrophy (DOA). Methods: We carried out a cross-sectional investigation of RNFL...

  6. Benefits of Laser Therapy in Postmenopausal Vaginal Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brînzan, Daniela; Pǎiuşan, Lucian; Daşcǎu, Voicu; Furǎu, Gheorghe

    2011-08-01

    Maybe the worst aspect of menopause is the decline of the quality of the sexual life. The aim of the study is to demonstrate the beneficial effects of laser therapy in comparison with topical application of estrogen preparations, for the treatment of vaginal atrophy and sexual dysfunctions induced by menopause. A total of 50 menopausal patients were examined during a one year period. The methods used for objectifying vaginal atrophy and sexual dysfunctions were history taking, local clinical exam and PAP smear. From this group, 40 patients had vaginal atrophy with sexual dysfunctions. They have been treated differently, being included in four groups: patients treated with local estrogens, patients treated with intravaginal laser therapy, patients treated with both laser therapy and estrogens, patients treated with estrogens and placebo laser therapy. Therapeutic benefit, improvement of vaginal atrophy and quality of sexual life, were objectified by anamnesis (questionnaire), local and general clinical examination and PAP smear. The best results have been obtained, by far, in the 3rd group, followed by the women treated only with laser. In conclusion, we can say that laser therapy is the best way for solving the sexual inconveniences of menopause.

  7. Excessive daytime sleepiness in multiple system atrophy (SLEEMSA study)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreno-Lopez, C.; Santamaria, J.; Salamero, M.; Del Sorbo, F.; Albanese, A.; Pellecchia, M.T.; Barone, P.; Overeem, S.; Bloem, B.R.; Aarden, W.C.C.A.; Canesi, M.; Antonini, A.; Duerr, S.; Wenning, G.K.; Poewe, W.; Rubino, A.; Meco, G.; Schneider, S.A.; Bhatia, K.P.; Djaldetti, R.; Coelho, M.; Sampaio, C.; Cochen, V.; Hellriegel, H.; Deuschl, G.; Colosimo, C.; Marsili, L.; Gasser, T.; Tolosa, E.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sleep disorders are common in multiple system atrophy (MSA), but the prevalence of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is not well known. OBJECTIVE: To assess the frequency and associations of EDS in MSA. DESIGN: Survey of EDS in consecutive patients with MSA and comparison with patients

  8. Acylated and unacylated ghrelin impair skeletal muscle atrophy in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cachexia is a wasting syndrome associated with cancer, AIDS, multiple sclerosis, and several other disease states. It is characterized by weight loss, fatigue, loss of appetite, and skeletal muscle atrophy and is associated with poor patient prognosis, making it an important treatment target. Ghreli...

  9. Brain atrophy at onset and physical disability in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Ignacio Rojas

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate if brain atrophy in multiple sclerosis (MS patients during the disease onset predicts long term disability. METHODS: MS patients with follow-up time of at least 7 years from disease onset and with baseline and second magnetic resonance 12 months later were included to measure brain atrophy. Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS was categorized in three groups, EDSS=0, EDSS=1 and 2.5 and EDSS>2.5, and used as disability measure. RESULTS: Twenty-six patients were included. Mean atrophy during the first year in patients that reached an EDSS≥3 was -0.76±0.45 %, in patients with an EDSS between 1 and 2.5 was -0.59±0.56, while in patients with an EDSS of 0 it was -0.38±0.42 (p=0.003. DISCUSSION: Brain atrophy rates during the first year of disease were predictive of disease progression in our population.

  10. Spinal Cord Gray Matter Atrophy in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquin, M-Ê; El Mendili, M M; Gros, C; Dupont, S M; Cohen-Adad, J; Pradat, P-F

    2018-01-01

    There is an emerging need for biomarkers to better categorize clinical phenotypes and predict progression in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. This study aimed to quantify cervical spinal gray matter atrophy in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and investigate its association with clinical disability at baseline and after 1 year. Twenty-nine patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and 22 healthy controls were scanned with 3T MR imaging. Standard functional scale was recorded at the time of MR imaging and after 1 year. MR imaging data were processed automatically to measure the spinal cord, gray matter, and white matter cross-sectional areas. A statistical analysis assessed the difference in cross-sectional areas between patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and controls, correlations between spinal cord and gray matter atrophy to clinical disability at baseline and at 1 year, and prediction of clinical disability at 1 year. Gray matter atrophy was more sensitive to discriminate patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis from controls (P = .004) compared with spinal cord atrophy (P = .02). Gray matter and spinal cord cross-sectional areas showed good correlations with clinical scores at baseline (R = 0.56 for gray matter and R = 0.55 for spinal cord; P amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. © 2018 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  11. Characterization of disuse skeletal muscle atrophy and the efficacy of a novel muscle atrophy countermeasure during spaceflight and simulated microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Andrea Marie

    Humans are an integral part of the engineered systems that will enable return to the Moon and eventually travel to Mars. Major advancements in countermeasure development addressing deleterious effects of microgravity and reduced gravity on the musculoskeletal system need to be made to ensure mission safety and success. The primary objectives of this dissertation are to advance the knowledge and understanding of skeletal muscle atrophy, and support development of novel countermeasures for disuse atrophy to enable healthy long-duration human spaceflight. Models simulating microgravity and actual spaceflight were used to examine the musculoskeletal adaptations during periods of unloading. Myostatin inhibition, a novel anti-atrophy drug therapy, and exercise were examined as a means of preventing and recovering from disuse atrophy. A combination of assays was used to quantify adaptation responses to unloading and examine efficacy of the countermeasures. Body and muscle masses were collected to analyze systemic changes due to treatments. Hindlimb strength and individual muscle forces were measured to demonstrate functional adaptations to treatments. Muscle fiber morphology and myosin heavy chain (MHC) expression was examined to identify adaptations at the cellular level. Protein synthesis signals insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), Akt, and p70s6 kinase; and the degradation signals Atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 were examined to identify adaptations at the molecular level that ultimately lead to muscle hypertrophy and atrophy. A time course study provided a thorough characterization of the adaptation of skeletal muscle during unloading in C57BL/6 mice, and baseline data for comparison to and evaluation of subsequent studies. Time points defining the on-set and endpoints of disuse muscle atrophy were identified to enable characterization of rapid vs. long-term responses of skeletal muscle to hindlimb suspension. Unloading-induced atrophy primarily resulted from increased protein

  12. Increasing the Diagnostic Accuracy of Medial Temporal Lobe Atrophy in Alzheimer's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, H. I. L.; van Boxtel, M.P.J.; van der Elst, W.; Burgmans, S.; Smeets, F.; Gronenschild, E.H.B.M.; Verhey, F.R.J.; Uylings, H.B.M.; Jolles, J.

    2011-01-01

    Medial temporal lobe (MTL) atrophy is considered to be one of the most important predictors of Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study investigates whether atrophy in parietal and prefrontal areas increases the predictive value of MTL atrophy in three groups of different cognitive status. Seventy-five

  13. [Liver Atrophy and Failure Associated with Paclitaxel and Bevacizumab Combination Therapy for Metastatic Breast Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Mari; Ikeda, Masahiko; Kubo, Shinichiro; Tsukioki, Takahiro; Nakamoto, Shougo

    2016-07-01

    We managed 6 cases of severe liver atrophy and failure associated with paclitaxel and bevacizumab combination therapy (PB therapy)for HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer. In this case-controlstudy, we examined the records of these 6 patients to investigate past treatment, medication history, and degree of atrophy, and compared their data with that of 67 patients without liver atrophy. The degree of the liver atrophy used SYNAPSE VINCENT®of the image analysis software. The results showed that patients with liver atrophy had a longer pretreatment period than those without liver atrophy(33.5 months vs 15.5 months), and they also experienced a longer median time to treatment failure with PB therapy than other patients(11 months vs 6 months). The ratio of individuals presenting with diffuse liver metastasis among patients with liver metastasis was 80% with liver atrophy, compared to 8% without liver atrophy. The degree of liver atrophy was an average of 67%in terms of volume ratio before/after PB therapy(57-82%). The individualwith the greatest extent of liver atrophy died of liver failure, not as a result of breast cancer progression. The direct causal link between bevacizumab and liver atrophy and failure is unclear, but the individuals in this study had a long previous history of treatment, and diffuse liver metastases may develop in patients undergoing long periods of PB therapy, which may also cause liver atrophy; therefore, the possibility of liver failure should be considered in such cases.

  14. Sebaceous gland carcinoma of the ocular adnexa - variability in clinical and histological appearance with analysis of immunohistochemical staining patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Eva Janine; Herwig-Carl, Martina C; Holz, Frank G; Loeffler, Karin U

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the characteristics of sebaceous gland carcinoma (SGC) of the ocular adnexae, which is due to a high variability in clinical, histological and immunohistochemical characteristics often challenging to diagnose. Records of six patients with SGC were reviewed, who underwent surgical excision and who were histologically diagnosed with SGC. For comparison, there were specimens from four patients with basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and four patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Histological and immunohistochemical analysis included stains for HE, cytokeratins (CKpan, Cam5.2), epithelial membrane antigen (EMA), androgen receptor (AR441), perforin and adipophilin. SGC's were located in the upper (n = 2) or lower (n = 4) eyelid and were associated with various presenting clinical signs including chalazion-like lesions with pyogenic granuloma (n = 1), papillomatous conjunctival tumors (n = 3), a hyperkeratotic exophytic neoplasm (n = 1) and an ulcerating crusted lesion resembling chronic blepharitis (n = 1). The treatment was tumor resection, followed (if necessary) by adjuvant therapy with topical Mitomycin C (n = 2). Histologic characteristics included basophilic pleomorphic cells with vacuolated cytoplasm, prominent nucleoli, mitotic figures and in some cases pagetoid spread (n = 2). CKpan, EMA and Cam5.2 showed strong positive immunoreactivity in all specimens (SGC, BCC, SCC). Perforin immunostaining showed a varying, but overall weak, non-specific cytoplasmatic staining reaction in all lesions. AR441 positivity was noted with variable intensity in almost all lesions and in particular in pagetoid spread in contrast to non-tumor cells. Adipophilin showed an annular staining of lipid granules in immature sebaceous cells in SGC in contrast to a more granular staining pattern in BCC and SCC. SGCs display a variety of clinical signs and may mimic many other lesions. Tumor resection, followed by histological and

  15. Multiple system atrophy and apolipoprotein E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogaki, Kotaro; Martens, Yuka A; Heckman, Michael G; Koga, Shunsuke; Labbé, Catherine; Lorenzo-Betancor, Oswaldo; Wernick, Anna I; Walton, Ronald L; Soto, Alexandra I; Vargas, Emily R; Nielsen, Henrietta M; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Kanekiyo, Takahisa; Uitti, Ryan J; van Gerpen, Jay A; Cheshire, William P; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Low, Phillip A; Singer, Wolfgang; Dickson, Dennis W; Bu, Guojun; Ross, Owen A

    2018-02-14

    Dysregulation of the specialized lipid metabolism involved in myelin synthesis and maintenance by oligodendrocytes has been associated with the unique neuropathology of MSA. We hypothesized that apolipoprotein E, which is associated with neurodegeneration, may also play a role in the pathogenesis of MSA. This study evaluated genetic associations of Apolipoprotein E alleles with risk of MSA and α-synuclein pathology, and also examined whether apolipoprotein E isoforms differentially affect α-synuclein uptake in a oligodendrocyte cell. One hundred sixty-eight pathologically confirmed MSA patients, 89 clinically diagnosed MSA patients, and 1,277 control subjects were genotyped for Apolipoprotein E. Human oligodendrocyte cell lines were incubated with α-synuclein and recombinant human apolipoprotein E, with internalized α-synuclein imaged by confocal microscopy and cells analyzed by flow cytometry. No significant association with risk of MSA or was observed for either Apolipoprotein E ɛ2 or ɛ4. α-Synuclein burden was also not associated with Apolipoprotein E alleles in the pathologically confirmed patients. Interestingly, in our cell assays, apolipoprotein E ɛ4 significantly reduced α-synuclein uptake in the oligodendrocytic cell line. Despite differential effects of apolipoprotein E isoforms on α-synuclein uptake in a human oligodendrocytic cell, we did not observe a significant association at the Apolipoprotein E locus with risk of MSA or α-synuclein pathology. © 2018 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2018 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  16. Myeloid sarcomas: a histologic, immunohistochemical, and cytogenetic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodgers William H

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Context. - Myeloid sarcoma (MS is a neoplasm of immature granulocytes, monocytes, or both involving any extramedullary site. The correct diagnosis of MS is important for adequate therapy, which is often delayed because of a high misdiagnosis rate. Objective. - To evaluate the lineage differentiation of neoplastic cells in MS by immunohistochemistry, and to correlate the results with clinicopathologic findings and cytogenetic studies. Design. - Histologic and immunohistochemical examinations were performed on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples from 13 cases of MS. They were classified according to the World Health Organization criteria. Chromosomal analysis data were available in 11 cases. Clinical, pathological, and cytogenetic findings were analyzed. Results. - The study included six male and seven female patients with an age range of 25 to 72 years (mean, 49.3 years and a male to female ratio of 1:1.2. MS de novo occurred in 4/13 (31% of cases examined. The most sensitive immunohistochemical markers were CD43 and lysozyme present in all cases with MS (13/13, 100%. All de novo MS showed a normal karyotype, monoblastic differentiation, and lack of CD34. The most common chromosomal abnormalities in MS associated with a hematopoietic disorder were trisomy 8 and inv(16 (2/11, 18%. Conclusion. - An immunohistochemical panel including CD43, lysozyme, myeloperoxidase (MPO, CD68 (or CD163, CD117, CD3 and CD20 can successfully identify the vast majority of MS variants in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections. The present report expands the spectrum of our knowledge showing that de novo MS has frequent monoblastic differentiation and frequently carries a normal karyotype.

  17. Clinicopathologic, Immunohistochemical, and Molecular Features of Histiocytoid Sweet Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegría-Landa, Victoria; Rodríguez-Pinilla, Socorro María; Santos-Briz, Angel; Rodríguez-Peralto, José Luis; Alegre, Victor; Cerroni, Lorenzo; Kutzner, Heinz; Requena, Luis

    2017-07-01

    Histiocytoid Sweet syndrome is a rare histopathologic variant of Sweet syndrome. The nature of the histiocytoid infiltrate has generated considerable controversy in the literature. The main goal of this study was to conduct a comprehensive overview of the immunohistochemical phenotype of the infiltrate in histiocytoid Sweet syndrome. We also analyze whether this variant of Sweet syndrome is more frequently associated with hematologic malignancies than classic Sweet syndrome. This is a retrospective case series study of the clinicopathologic, immunohistochemical, and molecular features of 33 patients with a clinicopathologic diagnosis of histiocytoid Sweet syndrome was conducted in the dermatology departments of 5 university hospitals and a private laboratory of dermatopathology. The clinical, histopathological, immunohistochemical, and follow-up features of 33 patients with histiocytoid Sweet syndrome were analyzed. In some cases, cytogenetic studies of the dermal infiltrate were also performed. We compare our findings with those of the literature. The dermal infiltrate from the 33 study patients (20 female; median age, 49 years; age range, 5-93 years; and 13 male; median age, 42 years; age range, 4-76 years) was mainly composed of myeloperoxidase-positive immature myelomonocytic cells with histiocytoid morphology. No cytogenetic anomalies were found in the infiltrate except in 1 case in which neoplastic cells of chronic myelogenous leukemia were intermingled with the cells of histiocytoid Sweet syndrome. Authentic histiocytes were also found in most cases, with a mature immunoprofile, but they appeared to be a minor component of the infiltrate. Histiocytoid Sweet syndrome was not more frequently related with hematologic malignancies than classic neutrophilic Sweet syndrome. The dermal infiltrate of cutaneous lesions of histiocytoid Sweet syndrome is composed mostly of immature cells of myeloid lineage. This infiltrate should not be interpreted as leukemia cutis.

  18. Factors Associated with Changes in Brain Atrophy during a Three-Year Observation in Elderly Diabetic Patients: Effect of Renal Impairment on Hippocampal Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiko Kawamura

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: We conducted a 3-year longitudinal study concerning factors associated with changes in brain atrophy in elderly diabetic patients. Methods: We evaluated hippocampal and global brain atrophy using automatic voxel-based morphometry of structural magnetic resonance images, 4 cognitive function tests, and cerebral small vessel disease (SVD in 66 diabetic patients. Results: During the 3-year follow-up, hippocampal and global brain atrophy advanced, and cognitive functions worsened. For changes in hippocampal atrophy, changes in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, albuminuria, and being an ApoE ε4 carrier were independent factors; change in the number of silent brain infarctions was an independent factor for changes in global brain atrophy. A significant association of changes in eGFR and albuminuria with hippocampal atrophy remained after adjusting for confounders including SVD. Both types of brain atrophy at baseline were significantly correlated with cognitive impairment at baseline and especially associated with changes in delayed word recall during the follow-up after adjusting for confounders. Conclusion: Changes in eGFR and albuminuria during follow-up were independent risk factors for hippocampal atrophy, which was associated with decline in delayed word recall, suggesting that management of chronic kidney disease may prevent the progression of hippocampal atrophy.

  19. Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy: a molecular and immunohistochemical approach Distrofia muscular de Duchenne e Becker: abordagem molecular e imuno-histoquímica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Andrade Freund

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD are caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. We studied 106 patients with a diagnosis of probable DMD/BMD by analyzing 20 exons of the dystrophin gene in their blood and, in some of the cases, by immunohistochemical assays for dystrophin in muscle biopsies. In 71.7% of the patients, deletions were found in at least one of the exons; 68% of these deletions were in the hot-spot 3' region. Deletions were found in 81.5% of the DMD cases and in all the BMD cases. The cases without deletions, which included the only woman in the study with DMD, had dystrophin deficiency. The symptomatic female carriers had no deletions but had abnormal dystrophin distribution in the sarcolemma (discontinuous immunostains. The following diagnoses were made for the remaining cases without deletions with the aid of a muscle biopsy: spinal muscular atrophy, congenital myopathy; sarcoglycan deficiency and unclassified limb-girdle muscular dystrophy. Dystrophin analysis by immunohistochemistry continues to be the most specific method for diagnosis of DMD/BMD and should be used when no exon deletions are found in the dystrophin gene in the blood.As distrofias musculares de Duchenne (DMD e de Becker (DMB são doenças causadas por mutação no gene da distrofina. Foram estudados 106 casos com a suspeita diagnóstica de DMD/BMD com a analise de 20 exons do gene da distrofina no sangue e biópsia muscular com imuno-histoquímica para distrofina em alguns casos. Em 71,7% dos casos foi encontrada deleção em pelo menos um dos exons, sendo que 68% das deleções localizam-se na região 3' hot spot. Foram encontradas deleções em 81,5% dos DMD e em todos os BMD, sendo que os sem deleção tinham deficiência de distrofina, incluindo a mulher com DMD. As portadoras sintomáticas não tinham deleções mas anormalidades na distribuição da distrofina no sarcolema. Os outros casos sem deleção, com auxilio da

  20. Calcifying Odontogenic Cyst with Complex Odontoma: Histological and Immunohistochemical Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Merati

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC is a rare odontogenic cyst. Only 2% of all odontogenic cysts and tumors are COC. COC associated with odontoma (COCaO reported in 24% of COCs. COCaO presents a greater incidence in female, with a ratio of 2 to 1. The highest incidence of COCaO occurs during the second decade with a mean age of 16 years, most frequently occurring in the maxilla (61.5%. Here, we describe a classic case of COCaO of the maxillary incisor-canine region in 17-year-old girl, and discuss the clinicopathological features and immunohistochemical finding of this tumor.

  1. Calcifying Odontogenic Cyst with Complex Odontoma: Histological and Immunohistochemical Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nooshin Mohtasham

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC is a rare odontogenic cyst. Only 2% of all odontogenic cysts and tumors are COC. COC associated with odontoma (COCaO reported in 24% of COCs. COCaO presents a greater incidence in female, with a ratio of 2 to 1. The highest incidence of COCaO occurs during the second decade with a mean age of 16 years, most frequently occurring in the maxilla (61.5%. Here, we describe a classic case of COCaO of the maxillary incisor-canine region in 17-year-old girl, and discuss the clinicopathological features and immunohistochemical finding of this tumor.

  2. Immunohistochemical studies of the periodontal membrane in primary teeth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Marie-Louise Bastholm; Nolting, Dorrit; Kjær, Inger

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. To describe the periodontal membrane of human primary teeth immunohistochemically, while focusing on the epithelial layer of Malassez, fibers, and peripheral nerves, and to compare the findings with those of a previous study of human permanent teeth. Material and methods. Nineteen human...... could be identical to those in regions with no resorption. Conclusion. In regions without resorption, spatial organization of the periodontal membrane of primary teeth was similar to that of permanent teeth, although the number and distribution of epithelial cells and fibers differed. In regions...

  3. Delayed Diagnoses: Nonspecific Findings and Diagnostic Challenges in Eating Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Schwarz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Eating disorders commonly present with nonspecific findings, masquerading as other, more common etiologies of malnutrition and wasting. In low-prevalence populations, these ambiguities can complicate clinicians’ diagnostic reasoning, resulting in delayed or missed diagnoses. Method. We report the atypical case of a 51-year-old male with a five-year history of unexplained weight loss despite extensive past medical evaluation. Previous documentation of profound lymphopenia and bone marrow atrophy had not been linked to a known association with eating disorders. Results. Evaluation for medical etiologies of wasting was negative. Following psychiatric evaluation, the patient was diagnosed with an eating disorder, not otherwise specified, and admitted to a specialized nutritional rehabilitation program. Conclusion. The nonspecific clinical history, physical exam, and laboratory abnormalities of eating disorders can make these diagnoses challenging and delay appropriate treatment. Clinicians should consider eating disorders in patients with malnutrition, severe lymphopenias, and gelatinous marrow transformation early in their workup, so as to avoid potentially negative outcomes.

  4. Brain Atrophy of Secondary REM-Sleep Behavior Disorder in Neurodegenerative Disease.

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    Kim, Hee-Jin; Im, Hyung Kyun; Kim, Juhan; Han, Jee-Young; de Leon, Mony; Deshpande, Anup; Moon, Won-Jin

    2016-04-05

    Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD) may present as an early manifestation of an evolving neurodegenerative disorder with alpha-synucleinopathy. We investigated that dementia with RBD might show distinctive cortical atrophic patterns. A total of 31 patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD), 23 with clinically probable Alzheimer's disease (AD), and 36 healthy controls participated in this study. Patients with AD and IPD were divided into two groups according to results of polysomnography and rated with a validated Korean version of the RBD screening questionnaire (RBDSQ-K), which covers the clinical features of RBD. Voxel-based morphometry was adapted for detection of regional brain atrophy among groups of subjects. Scores on RBDSQ-K were higher in the IPD group (3.54 ± 2.8) than in any other group (AD, 2.94 ± 2.4; healthy controls, 2.31 ± 1.9). Atrophic changes according to RBDSQ-K scores were characteristically in the posterior part of the brain and brain stem, including the hypothalamus and posterior temporal region including the hippocampus and bilateral occipital lobe. AD patients with RBD showed more specialized atrophic patterns distributed in the posterior and inferior parts of the brain including the bilateral temporal and occipital cortices compared to groups without RBD. The IPD group with RBD showed right temporal cortical atrophic changes. The group of patients with neurodegenerative diseases and RBD showed distinctive brain atrophy patterns, especially in the posterior and inferior cortices. These results suggest that patients diagnosed with clinically probable AD or IPD might have mixed pathologies including α-synucleinopathy.

  5. Choroidal atrophy in a patient with paraneoplastic retinopathy and anti-TRPM1 antibody

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    Ueno S

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Shinji Ueno,1 Yasuki Ito,1 Ruka Maruko,1 Mineo Kondo,2 Hiroko Terasaki1 1Department of Ophthalmology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, 2Department of Ophthalmology, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsu, Japan Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to report choroidal atrophy in a patient with cancer-associated retinopathy who had autoantibodies against the transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 1 (TRPM1. A 69-year-old man visited our clinic in July 2010 with complaints of blurred vision and night blindness in both eyes. The full-field electroretinograms were negative type, indicating ON bipolar cell dysfunction. General physical examination revealed small cell carcinoma of the lung, and Western blot of the patient's serum showed autoantibodies against TRPM1. We diagnosed this patient with cancer-associated retinopathy and retinal ON bipolar dysfunction due to anti-TRPM1 autoantibody. We followed him for more than 2 years from the initial visit and his symptoms have not changed. However, consistent with the choroidal hypopigmentation of the fundus, spectral domain optical coherence tomography showed a decrease in choroidal thickness of about one third over a 2-year follow-up period. We suggest that this case of gradually progressive choroidal atrophy was caused by the autoantibody against TRPM1 directly, because TRPM1 is expressed not only on ON bipolar cells but also on melanocytes. These findings indicate that we should be aware of choroidal thickness in patients with paraneoplastic retinopathy who have retinal ON bipolar dysfunction with the anti-TRPM1 antibody. Keywords: choroidal thickness, melanocyte, TRPM1, cancer-associated retinopathy, paraneoplastic retinopathy

  6. Exercise training reverses skeletal muscle atrophy in an experimental model of VCP disease.

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    Angèle Nalbandian

    Full Text Available The therapeutic effects of exercise resistance and endurance training in the alleviation of muscle hypertrophy/atrophy should be considered in the management of patients with advanced neuromuscular diseases. Patients with progressive neuromuscular diseases often experience muscle weakness, which negatively impact independence and quality of life levels. Mutations in the valosin containing protein (VCP gene lead to Inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget's disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD and more recently affect 2% of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS-diagnosed cases.The present investigation was undertaken to examine the effects of uphill and downhill exercise training on muscle histopathology and the autophagy cascade in an experimental VCP mouse model carrying the R155H mutation. Progressive uphill exercise in VCP(R155H/+ mice revealed significant improvement in muscle strength and performance by grip strength and Rotarod analyses when compared to the sedentary mice. In contrast, mice exercised to run downhill did not show any significant improvement. Histologically, the uphill exercised VCP(R155H/+ mice displayed an improvement in muscle atrophy, and decreased expression levels of ubiquitin, P62/SQSTM1, LC3I/II, and TDP-43 autophagy markers, suggesting an alleviation of disease-induced myopathy phenotypes. There was also an improvement in the Paget-like phenotype.Collectively, our data highlights that uphill exercise training in VCP(R155H/+ mice did not have any detrimental value to the function of muscle, and may offer effective therapeutic options for patients with VCP-associated diseases.

  7. Pharmacological Inhibitors of the Proteosome in Atrophying Muscles

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    Goldberg, Alfred

    1999-01-01

    It is now clear that the marked loss of muscle mass that occurs with disuse, denervation or in many systemic diseases (cancer cachexia, sepsis, acidosis, various endocrine disorders) is due primarily to accelerated degradation of muscle proteins, especially myofibrillar components. Recent work primarily in Dr. Goldberg's laboratory had suggested that in these diverse conditions, the enhancement of muscle proteolysis results mainly from activation of the Ub-proteasome degradative pathway. In various experimental models of atrophy, rat muscles show a common series of changes indicative of activation of this pathway, including increases in MRNA for Ub and proteasome subunits, content of ubiquitinated proteins, and sensitivity to inhibitors of the proteasome. In order to understand the muscle atrophy seen in weightlessness, Dr. Goldberg's laboratory is collaborating with Dr. Baldwin in studies to define the changes in these parameters upon hind-limb suspension. Related experiments will explore the effects on this degradative system of exercise regimens and also of glucocorticoids, which are known to rise in space personnel and to promote muscle, especially in inactive muscles. The main goals will be: (A) to define the enzymatic changes leading to enhanced activity of the Ub-proteasome pathway in inactive muscles upon hind-limb suspension, and the effects on this system of exposure to glucocorticoids or exercise; and (B) to learn whether inhibitors of the Ub-proteasome pathway may be useful in retarding the excessive proteolysis in atrophying muscles. Using muscle extracts, Dr. Goldberg's group hopes to define the rate-limiting, enzymatic changes that lead to the accelerated Ub-conjugation and protein degradation. They have recently developed cell-free preparations from atrophying rat muscles, in which Ub-conjugation to muscle proteins is increased above control levels. Because these new preparations seem to reproduce the changes occurring in vivo, they will analyze in

  8. Prevalence of brain atrophy in dogs submitted to cranial tomography in FMVZ - UNESP Botucatu: retrospective study; Prevalencia de atrofia cerebral em caes submetidos a tomografia craniana na FMVZ - UNESP Botucatu: estudo retrospectivo

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    Babicsak, Viviam Rocco; Belotta, Alexandra Frey; Oliveira, Hugo Salvador de; Zardo, Karen Maciel; Santos, Debora Rodrigues dos; Mamprim, Maria Jaqueline; Machado, Vania Maria de Vasconcelos; Vulcano, Luiz Carlos, E-mail: viviam.babicsak@gmail.com [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (FMVZ/UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria e Zootecnia . Dept. de Reproducao Animal e Radiologia Veterinaria

    2012-07-01

    Brain atrophy is diagnosed by imaging methods that allow the verification of the widening of cerebral sulci and ventricular dilatation. In this retrospective study, in which the cranial CT scans of 150 dogs were evaluated, brain atrophy was identified in 16 animals. Mixed breed dogs were the most affected, followed by poodles, maltese, dachshunds, yorkshires, pinschers and cockers. Brain atrophy was observed in animals of all age groups, being more prevalent in middle aged dogs followed by elderly animals, in which this alteration can be commonly found. The identification of reduced brain volume, however, may not be the cause of neurological signs expressed by animals since in some dogs of this study it was considered a finding. (author)

  9. Immunohistochemical Characterization of Fumarate Hydratase (FH) and Succinate Dehydrogenase (SDH) in Cutaneous Leiomyomas for Detection of Familial Cancer Syndromes.

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    Carter, Cody S; Skala, Stephanie L; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; McHugh, Jonathan B; Siddiqui, Javed; Cao, Xuhong; Dhanasekaran, Saravana M; Fullen, Douglas R; Lagstein, Amir; Chan, May P; Mehra, Rohit

    2017-06-01

    Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma (HLRCC) is caused by germline mutations in the FH gene, and is associated with increased incidence of leiomyomas and a potentially aggressive variant of renal cell carcinoma (HLRCC-associated RCC). Absent immunohistochemical expression of fumarate hydratase (FH) has previously been used to diagnose HLRCC-associated RCC, but immunohistochemical staining of leiomyomas is not standard practice. We performed immunohistochemistry (IHC) on whole sections from consecutive cutaneous leiomyomas from our archives to evaluate for both FH and succinate dehydrogenase B expression, in addition to clinicopathologic data collection and review of all hematoxylin and eosin-stained slides for blinded morphologic evaluation of features reported to be seen in HLRCC-associated uterine leiomyomas. Ninety-six cutaneous leiomyomas from 87 patients were identified; 12 of these specimens were from 7 patients with documented HLRCC. FH expression by IHC was absent in 9 specimens and retained in 85 specimens; 2 cases were equivocal with minimal FH expression. Seven of the 9 absent expression specimens were from patients with HLRCC, as were both of the equivocal specimens. The overall sensitivity and specificity of absent FH expression in leiomyomas for detection of patients with HLRCC were 70.0% and 97.6%, respectively. Inclusion of cases classified as equivocal increased sensitivity to 75.0%. Succinate dehydrogenase B expression was retained in 95 specimens and equivocal in 1 specimen. None of the evaluated morphologic features showed any association with leiomyomas in HLRCC. Loss of FH immunohistochemical expression in cutaneous leiomyomas is a sensitive and specific marker for detection of HLRCC, thus suggesting a role for prospective FH IHC in patients with these tumors to screen for HLRCC.

  10. A novel method of quantifying brain atrophy associated with age-related hearing loss

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    Z. Jason Qian

    2017-01-01

    Audiometric evaluations and mini-mental state exams were obtained in 34 subjects over the age of 80 who have had brain MRIs in the past 6 years. CSF and parenchymal brain volumes (whole brain and by lobe were obtained through a novel, fully automated algorithm. Atrophy was calculated by taking the ratio of CSF to parenchyma. High frequency hearing loss was associated with disproportional temporal lobe atrophy relative to whole brain atrophy independent of age (r = 0.471, p = 0.005. Mental state was associated with frontoparietal atrophy but not to temporal lobe atrophy, which is consistent with known results. Our method demonstrates that hearing loss is associated with temporal lobe atrophy and generalized whole brain atrophy. Our algorithm is efficient, fully automated, and able to detect significant associations in a small cohort.

  11. Automated quantification of nuclear immunohistochemical markers with different complexity.

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    López, Carlos; Lejeune, Marylène; Salvadó, María Teresa; Escrivà, Patricia; Bosch, Ramón; Pons, Lluis E; Alvaro, Tomás; Roig, Jordi; Cugat, Xavier; Baucells, Jordi; Jaén, Joaquín

    2008-03-01

    Manual quantification of immunohistochemically stained nuclear markers is still laborious and subjective and the use of computerized systems for digital image analysis have not yet resolved the problems of nuclear clustering. In this study, we designed a new automatic procedure for quantifying various immunohistochemical nuclear markers with variable clustering complexity. This procedure consisted of two combined macros. The first, developed with a commercial software, enabled the analysis of the digital images using color and morphological segmentation including a masking process. All information extracted with this first macro was automatically exported to an Excel datasheet, where a second macro composed of four different algorithms analyzed all the information and calculated the definitive number of positive nuclei for each image. One hundred and eighteen images with different levels of clustering complexity was analyzed and compared with the manual quantification obtained by a trained observer. Statistical analysis indicated a great reliability (intra-class correlation coefficient > 0.950) and no significant differences between the two methods. Bland-Altman plot and Kaplan-Meier curves indicated that the results of both methods were concordant around 90% of analyzed images. In conclusion, this new automated procedure is an objective, faster and reproducible method that has an excellent level of accuracy, even with digital images with a high complexity.

  12. Low-grade fibromyxoid sarcoma: case report and immunohistochemical study.

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    Nichols, G E; Cooper, P H

    1994-08-01

    A case is presented of low-grade fibromyxoid sarcoma involving the arm of a 52-year-old man. Low-grade fibromyxoid sarcoma is a recently described neoplasm of the deep and subcutaneous soft tissue which demonstrates a spectrum of histologic images. The current case demonstrated the typical patterns of intermixed, sweeping bands of fibrous and myxoid tissue, homogeneous foci of fibrous and myxoid tissue, focal areas of storiforming, and concentric perivascular cuffs of slender spindle cells, all lacking the nuclear anaplasia, mitotic activity, and necrosis generally associated with sarcoma. Immunohistochemical analysis performed on paraffin-embedded sections demonstrated strong labeling of the tumor cells by anti-CD34 antibody, moderate labeling for vimentin, and rare, focal positivity for muscle-specific actin. Tumor cells were negative for markers of epithelial, muscular, neural, histiocytic, melanocytic, and vascular differentiation. The constellation of histopathologic features described in this and previous reports is characteristic of low-grade fibromyxoid sarcoma. Based on this case, it appears that the immunohistochemical features of low-grade fibromyxoid sarcoma can help to exclude many cutaneous and deep soft tissue tumors from the differential diagnosis. The findings support the interpretation that the neoplasm is essentially fibroblastic in nature.

  13. Amelogenin in odontogenic cysts and tumors: An immunohistochemical study

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    Anigol, Praveen; Kamath, Venkatesh V.; Satelur, Krishnanand; Anand, Nagaraja; Yerlagudda, Komali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Amelogenins are the major enamel proteins that play a major role in the biomineralization and structural organization of enamel. Aberrations of enamel-related proteins are thought to be involved in oncogenesis of odontogenic epithelium. The expression of amelogenin is possibly an indicator of differentiation of epithelial cells in the odontogenic lesions. Aims and Objectives: The present study aimed to observe the expression of amelogenin immunohistochemically in various odontogenic lesions. Materials and Methods: Paraffin sections of 40 odontogenic lesions were stained immunohistochemically with amelogenin antibodies. The positivity, pattern and intensity of expression of the amelogenin antibody were assessed, graded and statistically compared between groups of odontogenic cysts and tumors. Results: Almost all the odontogenic lesions expressed amelogenin in the epithelial component with the exception of an ameloblastic carcinoma. Differing grades of intensity and pattern were seen between the cysts and tumors. Intensity of expression was uniformly prominent in all odontogenic lesions with hard tissue formation. Statistical analysis however did not indicate significant differences between the two groups. Conclusion: The expression of amelogenin antibody is ubiquitous in odontogenic tissues and can be used as a definitive marker for identification of odontogenic epithelium. PMID:25937729

  14. Histochemical and Immunohistochemical Study of Peripolar Cells in Sheep

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    Passos Joana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripolar cells are granulated cells located in the vascular pole of the renal corpuscle. Even though these cells have already been described, there are still many unknown histological and physiological characteristics. We carried out histochemical and immunohistochemical analyses of peripolar cells in sheep and compared their number in both normal and injured kidneys, discriminating according to the age of the animal. We tested HE, Toluidine Blue, PAS, and Masson's Trichrome stains to select the best stain for identification and quantification. Masson Trichrome yielded the best results and was selected for this purpose. We identified the cells by the presence of cytoplasmatic granules and by their position in the vascular pole. We found no statistically significant association between the number of peripolar cells and the age of the animal or the occurrence of lesions. In the immunohistochemical analysis, we found that the cells were positive to α-smooth muscle actin and less consistently positive to NSE and S100 protein. Chromogranin A, cyclooxygenase-2, AE1/AE3, and Wide Spectrum Cytokeratin and desmin yielded negative results. We conclude that although there was evidence of a contractile function, there was no evidence to support that peripolar cells have either a neuroendocrine or an epithelial nature.

  15. System-wide immunohistochemical analysis of protein co-localization.

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    Minjung Kim

    Full Text Available The analysis of co-localized protein expression in a tissue section is often conducted with immunofluorescence histochemical staining which is typically visualized in localized regions. On the other hand, chromogenic immunohistochemical staining, in general, is not suitable for the detection of protein co-localization. Here, we developed a new protocol, based on chromogenic immunohistochemical stain, for system-wide detection of protein co-localization and differential expression.In combination with a removable chromogenic stain, an efficient antibody stripping method was developed to enable sequential immunostaining with different primary antibodies regardless of antibody's host species. Sections were scanned after each staining, and the images were superimposed together for the detection of protein co-localization and differential expression. As a proof of principle, differential expression and co-localization of glutamic acid decarboxylase67 (GAD67 and parvalbumin proteins was examined in mouse cortex.All parvalbumin-containing neurons express GAD67 protein, and GAD67-positive neurons that do not express parvalbumin were readily visualized from thousands of other neurons across mouse cortex. The method provided a global view of protein co-localization as well as differential expression across an entire tissue section. Repeated use of the same section could combine assessments of co-localization and differential expression of multiple proteins.

  16. Molecular and immunohistochemical distinction of equine sarcoid from schwannoma.

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    Bogaert, L; Heerden, M Van; Cock, H E V De; Martens, A; Chiers, K

    2011-05-01

    Ten equine skin tumors that had been classified as schwannomas on routine histological examination were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction for bovine papillomavirus DNA. All 10 were positive for bovine papillomavirus 1 or 2, and all 10 were immunohistochemically negative for S-100 protein and strongly positive for vimentin. Nine tumors were moderately positive for laminin and 8, for smooth muscle actin. Five tumors were variably and weakly positive for type IV collagen. The lack of S-100 protein expression made Schwann cells an unlikely cell of origin, as opposed to peripheral nerve sheath tumors, which typically express S-100 protein, at least in some neoplastic cells. The immunohistochemical reactivity is consistent with myofibroblastic origin of the neoplastic cells, although smooth muscle cell or pericyte origin cannot be ruled out. These tumors represent an atypical form of equine sarcoid. Polymerase chain reaction for bovine papillomavirus and S-100 immunohistochemistry are strongly recommended for all equine skin tumors with histological characteristics typical of schwannoma or peripheral nerve sheath tumor.

  17. Immunohistochemical and molecular characterization of the human periosteum.

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    Frey, Sönke Percy; Jansen, Hendrik; Doht, Stefanie; Filgueira, Luis; Zellweger, Rene

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterize the cell of the human periosteum using immunohistological and molecular methods. Phenotypic properties and the distribution of the cells within the different layers were investigated with immunohistochemical staining techniques and RT-PCR, focussing on markers for stromal stem cells, osteoblasts, osteoclasts and immune cells. Immunohistochemical results revealed that all stained cells were located in the cambium layer and that most cells were positive for vimentin. The majority of cells consisted of stromal stem cells and osteoblastic precursor cells. The density increased towards the deeper layers of the cambium. In addition, cells positive for markers of the osteoblast, chondrocyte, and osteoclast lineages were found. Interestingly, there were MHC class II-expressing immune cells suggesting the presence of dendritic cells. Using lineage-specific primer pairs RT-PCR confirmed the immunofluorescence microscopy results, supporting that human periosteum serves as a reservoir of stromal stem cells, as well as cells of the osteoblastic, and the chondroblastic lineage, osteoclasts, and dendritic cells. Our work elucidates the role of periosteum as a source of cells with a high regenerative capacity. Undifferentiated stromal stem cells as well as osteoblastic precursor cells are dominating in the cambium layer. A new outlook is given towards an immune response coming from the periosteum as MHC II positive immune cells were detected.

  18. Analysis of the presence or absence of atrophy of the subgenual and subcallosal cingulate cortices using voxel-based morphometry on MRI is useful to select prescriptions for patients with depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niida, Akira; Niida, Richi; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Motomura, Makoto; Uechi, Akihiko

    2014-01-01

    We objectively evaluated the presence or absence of atrophy of the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC) and the subcallosal anterior cingulate cortex (scACC), using new voxel-based morphometry (VBM) software employing Statistical Parametric Mapping software v8 and diffeomorphic anatomic registration through an exponentiated lie algebra. We prepared a database covering young-mature adulthood and investigated the clinical usefulness of the evaluation. One hundred seven patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), 74 patients with bipolar disorder (BD), and 240 healthy control subjects underwent 1.5T magnetic resonance imaging scanning. Using new VBM software and databases covering young-mature adults and the elderly, target volumes of interest were set in the sgACC and scACC, four indicators (severity, extent, ratio, and whole-brain extent) were determined, and the presence or absence of atrophy of the sgACC and scACC was evaluated on the basis of the indicators. In addition, the relationships between the presence or absence of atrophy of the sgACC and scACC and performance of diagnosing MDD and BD and therapeutic drugs were investigated. It was clarified that the disease is likely to be MDD when atrophy is detected in the sgACC, and likely to be BD when no atrophy is detected in the sgACC but is detected in the scACC. Regarding the relationship with therapeutic drugs, it was clarified that, when atrophy is detected in both the sgACC and the scACC, concomitant administration of mood stabilizers and atypical antipsychotics acting as dopamine-system stabilizers is necessary in many cases. VBM on magnetic resonance imaging enabled automatic analysis of atrophy in the sgACC and scACC, and findings obtained by this procedure are useful not only for differentiation of MDD and BD patients but also for selection of prescriptions.

  19. TP53 Staining in Tissue Samples of Chronic Lymphocytic Lymphoma Cases: An Immunohistochemical Survey of 51 Cases

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    İbrahim Kulaç

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL is the most common lymphoproliferative disease in adults. The aim of this study is to find out if the extent of proliferation centers or the immunohistochemical expression of p53 is related to disease prognosis. Materials and Methods: In the scope of this study, 54 biopsy specimens from 51 patients (50 of lymph nodes; the others of spleen, tonsil, orbit, and liver diagnosed with CLL at the Hacettepe University Department of Pathology in 2000-2013 were reevaluated. The clinical and demographic data of the patients were obtained from our patient database. Biopsy samples were assessed semi-quantitatively for the percentage of proliferation center/total biopsy area (PC/TBA and an immunohistochemical study was performed on representative blocks of tissues for p53 expression. Results: When the patients were divided into two categories according to Rai stage as high and low (stages 0, 1, and 2 vs. stages 3 and 4, it was seen that patients with low Rai stage had a better prognosis than those with high stages (p=0.030. However, there was no statistically significant correlation between overall survival and PC/TBA ratio or p53 expression levels. Conclusion: In our cohort, PC/TBA ratio and immunopositivity of p53 did not show correlations with overall survival.

  20. Retinal structure, function, and molecular pathologic features in gyrate atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergouniotis, Panagiotis I; Davidson, Alice E; Lenassi, Eva; Devery, Sophie R; Moore, Anthony T; Webster, Andrew R

    2012-03-01

    To describe phenotypic variability and to report novel mutational data in patients with gyrate atrophy. Retrospective case series. Seven unrelated patients (10 to 52 years of age) with clinical and biochemical evidence of gyrate atrophy. Detailed ophthalmologic examination, fundus photography, fundus autofluorescence (FAF) imaging, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, and microperimetry testing were performed. The coding region and intron-exon boundaries of ornithine aminotransferase (OAT) were analyzed. OAT mRNA was isolated from peripheral blood leucocytes of 1 patient and analyzed. OAT mutation status and resultant clinical, structural, and functional characteristics. Funduscopy revealed circular areas of chorioretinal atrophy, and FAF imaging showed sharply demarcated areas of increased or preserved signal in all 7 patients. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography revealed multiple intraretinal cystic spaces and hyperreflective deposit in the ganglion cell layer of all study subjects. Round tubular, rosette-like structures located in the outer nuclear layer of the retinae of the 4 older patients were observed (termed outer retinal tubulation). Thickening was evident in the foveolae of younger patients, despite the posterior pole appearing relatively preserved. Macular function, assessed by microperimetry, was preserved over areas of normal or increased autofluorescence. However, sensitivity was reduced even in structurally intact parts of the retina. The molecular pathologic features were determined in all study subjects: 9 mutations, 4 novel, were detected in the OAT gene. OAT mRNA was isolated from blood leukocytes, and monoallelic expression of a mutated allele was demonstrated in 1 patient. Fundus autofluorescence imaging can reveal the extent of neurosensory dysfunction in gyrate atrophy patients. Macular edema is a uniform finding; the fovea is relatively thick in early stages of disease and retinal tubulation is present in advanced disease

  1. Olmesartan-Induced Enteropathy: An Unusual Cause of Villous Atrophy

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    Marta Eusébio

    2016-03-01

    Olmesartan is an angiotensin receptor blocker commonly prescribed for the management of hypertension. Spruelike enteropathy associated with this drug is a recently described entity with few cases reported. It presents with chronic diarrhea and intestinal villous atrophy and should be included in its differential diagnosis. This case intends to alert clinicians for the possibility of this event in a patient on treatment with this drug.

  2. Masticatory muscles of mouse do not undergo atrophy in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippou, Anastassios; Minozzo, Fabio C.; Spinazzola, Janelle M.; Smith, Lucas R.; Lei, Hanqin; Rassier, Dilson E.; Barton, Elisabeth R.

    2015-01-01

    Muscle loading is important for maintaining muscle mass; when load is removed, atrophy is inevitable. However, in clinical situations such as critical care myopathy, masticatory muscles do not lose mass. Thus, their properties may be harnessed to preserve mass. We compared masticatory and appendicular muscles responses to microgravity, using mice aboard the space shuttle Space Transportation System-135. Age- and sex-matched controls remained on the ground. After 13 days of space flight, 1 masseter (MA) and tibialis anterior (TA) were frozen rapidly for biochemical and functional measurements, and the contralateral MA was processed for morphologic measurements. Flight TA muscles exhibited 20 ± 3% decreased muscle mass, 2-fold decreased phosphorylated (P)-Akt, and 4- to 12-fold increased atrogene expression. In contrast, MAs had no significant change in mass but a 3-fold increase in P-focal adhesion kinase, 1.5-fold increase in P-Akt, and 50–90% lower atrogene expression compared with limb muscles, which were unaltered in microgravity. Myofibril force measurements revealed that microgravity caused a 3-fold decrease in specific force and maximal shortening velocity in TA muscles. It is surprising that myofibril-specific force from both control and flight MAs were similar to flight TA muscles, yet power was compromised by 40% following flight. Continued loading in microgravity prevents atrophy, but masticatory muscles have a different set point that mimics disuse atrophy in the appendicular muscle.—Philippou, A., Minozzo, F. C., Spinazzola, J. M., Smith, L. R., Lei, H., Rassier, D. E., Barton, E. R. Masticatory muscles of mouse do not undergo atrophy in space. PMID:25795455

  3. Potential role of lampalizumab for treatment of geographic atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoades, William; Dickson, Drew; Do, Diana V

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the pathways underlying age-related macular degeneration and potential therapeutic targets, focusing on the complement pathway and the recent MAHALO Phase II trial of the investigational drug lampalizumab. This trial was the first to have shown positive results for the treatment of geographic atrophy in age-related macular degeneration. It has potential as a future treatment, and is currently undergoing a Phase III trial.

  4. Subretinal Glial Membranes in Eyes With Geographic Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Malia M; McLeod, D Scott; Bhutto, Imran A; Grebe, Rhonda; Duffy, Maeve; Lutty, Gerard A

    2017-03-01

    Müller cells create the external limiting membrane (ELM) by forming junctions with photoreceptor cells. This study evaluated the relationship between focal photoreceptors and RPE loss in geographic atrophy (GA) and Müller cell extension into the subretinal space. Human donor eyes with no retinal disease or geographic atrophy (GA) were fixed and the eye cups imaged. The retinal posterior pole was stained for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP; astrocytes and activated Müller cells) and vimentin (Müller cells) while the submacular choroids were labeled with Ulex Europaeus Agglutinin lectin (blood vessels). Choroids and retinas were imaged using a Zeiss 710 confocal microscope. Additional eyes were cryopreserved or processed for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to better visualize the Müller cells. Vimentin staining of aged control retinas (n = 4) revealed a panretinal cobblestone-like ELM. While this pattern was also observed in the GA retinas (n = 7), each also had a distinct area in which vimentin+ and vimentin+/GFAP+ processes created a subretinal membrane. Subretinal glial membranes closely matched areas of RPE atrophy in the gross photos. Choroidal vascular loss was also evident in these atrophic areas. Smaller glial projections were noted, which correlated with drusen in gross photos. The presence of glia in the subretinal space was confirmed by TEM and cross cross-section immunohistochemistry. In eyes with GA, subretinal Müller cell membranes present in areas of RPE atrophy may be a Müller cell attempt to replace the ELM. These membranes could interfere with treatments such as stem cell therapy.

  5. Quantification of spinal cord atrophy in magnetic resonance images

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    Pezold, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Quantifying the volume of the spinal cord is of vital interest for studying and understanding diseases of the central nervous system such as multiple sclerosis (MS). In this thesis, which is motivated by MS research, we propose methods for measuring the spinal cord cross-sectional area and volume in magnetic resonance (MR) images. These measurements are used for determining neural atrophy and for performing both longitudinal and cross-sectional comparisons in clinical trials. We present th...

  6. Vascular perfusion abnormalities in infants with spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Alexandra prufer de Queiroz Campos; Araujo, Mario; Swoboda, Kathryn J

    2009-08-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an important cause of death in children and SMA type I, also known as Werdnig-Hoffman disease, is the most severe form of this disease. We report 2 cases of infants with SMA I in whom a distal necrosis developed, a feature not previously reported. Poor perfusion, autonomic dysfunction, and position-dependent factors may all play a role in the development of this complication.

  7. Brain atrophy in clinically early relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chard, D T; Griffin, C M; Parker, G J M; Kapoor, R; Thompson, A J; Miller, D H

    2002-02-01

    Brain atrophy measured by MRI is a potentially useful tool for monitoring disease progression in multiple sclerosis. The location, extent and mechanisms of brain atrophy in early disease are not well documented. Using quantitative MRI, this study investigated whole brain, grey and white matter atrophy in clinically early relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis and its relationship to lesion measures. Data came from 27 normal control subjects (14 females and 13 males, mean age 36.1 years) and 26 subjects with clinically definite multiple sclerosis (18 females and eight males, mean age 35.1 years, mean delay from first symptom to scan 1.8 years, median Expanded Disability Status Scale score 1.0). All had three-dimensional fast spoiled gradient recall (3D FSPGR), T(1)-weighted pre- and post-gadolinium-enhanced and T(2)-weighted scans. The 3D FSPGR images were automatically segmented into grey and white matter and cerebrospinal fluid using SPM99. 3D FSPGR hypo-intense, T(2) hyper-intense, T(1) hypo-intense and T(1) post-gadolinium-enhancing lesion volumes were determined by semi-automatic lesion segmentation. The SPM99 output was combined with the 3D FSPGR lesion segmentations to quantify tissue volumes as fractions of total intracranial volumes, producing values for the brain parenchymal fraction (BPF), white matter fraction (WMF) and grey matter fraction (GMF). Comparing multiple sclerosis with control subjects, BPF, GMF and WMF were significantly reduced (P lesion volumes were inversely related to BPF (T(2) r = -0.78, P lesion volumes were not correlated with any fractional volumes. These results indicate that significant brain atrophy, affecting both grey and white matter, occurs early in the clinical course of multiple sclerosis. The lack of correlation between lesion load measures and WMF suggests that pathological changes in white matter may occur by mechanisms which are at least partly independent from overt lesion genesis in early multiple sclerosis.

  8. Photoreceptor atrophy in acute zonal occult outer retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zibrandtsen, N.; Munch, I.C.; Klemp, K.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess retinal morphology in acute zonal occult outer retinopathy (AZOOR) without ophthalmoscopically visible fundus changes. METHODS: Retrospective case series. Two consecutive patients with bilateral AZOOR with photopsia corresponding to areas of visual field loss and a normal fundus...... dysfunction. The field loss was more extensive than the area of photoreceptor loss. CONCLUSION: Photoreceptor atrophy can be demonstrated in AZOOR without ophthalmoscopically visible fundus lesions Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12...

  9. Serological assessment of gastric mucosal atrophy in gastric cancer

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    Bornschein Jan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-invasive tools for gastric cancer screening and diagnosis are lacking. Serological testing with the detection of pepsinogen 1 (PG1, pepsinogen 2 (PG2 and gastrin 17 (G17 offers the possibility to detect preneoplastic gastric mucosal conditions. Aim of this study was to assess the performance of these serological tests in the presence of gastric neoplasia. Methods Histological and serological samples of 118 patients with gastric cancer have been assessed for tumor specific characteristics (Laurén type, localisation, degree of mucosal abnormalities (intestinal metaplasia, atrophy and serological parameters (PG1, PG2, PG1/2-ratio, G17, H. pylori IgG, CagA status. Association of the general factors to the different serological values have been statistically analyzed. Results Patients with intestinal type gastric cancer had lower PG1 levels and a lower PG1/2-ratio compared to those with diffuse type cancer (p = 0.003. The serum levels of PG2 itself and G17 were not significantly altered. H. pylori infection in general had no influence on the levels of PG1, PG2 and G17 in the serum of gastric cancer patients. There was a trend towards lower PG1 levels in case of positive CagA-status (p = 0.058. The degree of both intestinal metaplasia and atrophy correlated inversely with serum levels for PG1 and the PG1/2-ratio (p Conclusions Glandular atrophy and a positive CagA status are determinant factors for decreased pepsinogen 1 levels in the serum of patients with gastric cancer. The serological assessment of gastric atrophy by analysis of serum pepsinogen is only adequate for patients with intestinal type cancer.

  10. Clinical, FDG and amyloid PET imaging in posterior cortical atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Tarun D.; Josephs, Keith A.; Machulda, Mary M.; Drubach, Daniel A.; Apostolova, Liana G.; Lowe, Val J.; Whitwell, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the clinical, [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and amyloid-PET findings in a large cohort of posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) patients, to examine the neural correlates of the classic features of PCA, and to better understand the features associated with early PCA. We prospectively recruited 25 patients who presented to the Mayo Clinic between March 2013 and August 2014 and met diagnostic criteria for PCA. All patients u...

  11. Identification of risk factors of prostate adenocarcinoma recurrence after HIFU therapy using immunohistochemical markers

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    Popkov V.M.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors for recurrence of prostate adenocarcinoma after HIFU therapy. Material and methods: Material for the study was obtained from patients diagnosed with adenocarcinoma before and after HIFU treatment. Morphological study was conducted using a standard staining, and immunohistochemical markers: PCNA, Amacr, E-cadherin, Bel2, Andr, Estr, VEGF, P53, PCNA. Results: After treatment in 89% of patients with initial prostate volume greater than 50 cc the signs of recurrence of adenocarcinoma were showed. At low risk for D'Amico after treatment the expression of proliferation markers, VEGF, Amacr significantly decreased. With a high degree of risk — increased expression of Bel2. After treatment the expression of the following markers: PCNA, Amacr, VEGF significantly increased in the group of patients with the presence of invasion. Conclusion: Patients with initial prostate volume less than 50 cc, low risk to D'Amico, the lack of perineural and perivascular invasion have a low risk of recurrence after HIFU therapy; patients at high risk for D'Amico, the presence of perineural and perivascular invasion initial and prostate volume greater than 50 cc, low-grade cribriform form of adenocarcinoma have a high risk of recurrence of adenocarcinoma. Recurrence of adenocarcinoma develops independently of the period after HIFU therapy.

  12. Expression of Selected Markers in Immunohistochemical Diagnosis of Canine and Human Testicular Tumours

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    Ciaputa Rafał

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Immunohistochemical profiles of the most common canine testicular tumours, including the Leydig cell tumours, seminomas, and Sertoli cell tumours were analysed, and the results were compared with those obtained in the corresponding types of human testicular neoplasms. The expressions of vimentin, von Willebrand factor (FVIII, chromogranin A, synaptophysin, and MCM3 were quantified. In the case of Sertoli cell tumours, only canine ones were analysed, since this type of tumour is very rarely diagnosed in men. The expression of the analysed proteins in the testicular tumours was similar. The von Willebrand factor exhibited the strongest expression in Leydig cell tumours in dogs and men, while vimentin was expressed more strongly in dogs (96.7% had an intensity at +++ than in men (62.5% had +++ in the Leydigioma. The immunoexpression of MCM3 in seminomas was high in both men and dogs – 90% +++ and 100% +++ respectively. The lack of chromogranin A and synaptophysin was observed in almost 100% of seminomas in men and dogs. This differed from the results obtained for Leydigioma, where chromogranin A was expressed in 70% of dogs at +++ and in 100% of men at ++++. The results may indicate that the antibodies were selected correctly. Their analysis and interpretation provides valuable information concerning the nature of the studied tumours.

  13. Immunohistochemical evaluation of p63 and cyclin D1 in oral squamous cell carcinoma and leukoplakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sunit B; Manjunatha, Bhari S; Shah, Vandana; Soni, Nishit; Sutariya, Rakesh

    2017-10-01

    There are only a limited number of studies on cyclin D1 and p63 expression in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and leukoplakia. This study compared cyclin D1 and p63 expression in leukoplakia and OSCC to investigate the possible correlation of both markers with grade of dysplasia and histological grade of OSCC. The study included a total of 60 cases, of which 30 were diagnosed with OSCC and 30 with leukoplakia, that were evaluated immunohistochemically for p63 and cyclin D1 expression. Protein expression was correlated based on grades of dysplasia and OSCC. Out of 30 cases of OSCC, 23 cases (76.7%) were cyclin D1 positive and 30 cases (100%) were p63 positive. Out of 30 cases of leukoplakia, 21 cases (70.0%) were cyclin D1 positive and 30 (100%) were p63 positive (Pleukoplakia. Based on these results cyclin D1 and p63 products can be a useful tool for improved leukoplakia prognosis.

  14. Validation of an immunohistochemical assay for bovine cysticercosis, with comparison to a standard histological method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scandrett, W Brad; Haines, Deborah M; Parker, Sarah E; Robinson, Yves; Forbes, Lorry B; Brandt, Jef; Geerts, Stanny; Dorny, Pierre; Gajadhar, Alvin A

    2012-05-25

    The larval stage (syn Cysticercus bovis) of the human tapeworm Taenia saginata causes cysticercosis in cattle, which has both aesthetic and food safety implications to consumers of beef. A monoclonal antibody-based immunohistochemical (IHC) assay developed to improve postmortem diagnosis of this parasite and a standard histological method were assessed to determine their fitness for intended use. Sections from 169 known-positive specimens of T. saginata from experimentally or naturally infected cattle, and from 30 known-negative specimens and lesions of various etiologies from non-infected cattle, were tested. The IHC assay identified significantly more known positive bovine cysticerci than the histological method (91.7% and 38.5%, respectively). Positive IHC staining occurred on sections from other cestode species, but should not affect the diagnostic specificity of this assay for bovine cysticercosis, due to the different host and/or tissue preferences amongst these parasites. Use of the IHC assay should improve the reliability of diagnosing lesions caused by degenerated cysticerci, facilitating more effective and efficient control of bovine cysticercosis. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Immunohistochemical study of rabies virus within the central nervous system of domestic and wildlife species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, L T; Rech, R R; Harrison, L; Brown, C C

    2010-07-01

    Immunohistochemistry using a commercial polyclonal antibody for lyssavirus was applied to 39 archival cases of rabies. Paraffin blocks from 13 different species were available, including 3 dogs, 4 cats, 1 pig, 6 cattle, 4 horses, 1 llama, 7 skunks (Mephitis mephitis), 7 raccoons (Procyon lotor), 1 bat (Myotis species), 1 white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), 1 bobcat (Lynx rufus), 2 gray foxes (Urocyon cinereoargenteus), and 1 red fox (Vulpes vulpes). All cases had previously been diagnosed as rabies using histopathology and/or fluorescent antibody testing. The immunohistochemistry technique successfully detected lyssavirus antigen in all cases. In species for which 3 or more samples were available, distributional trends were seen in 4 main brain regions: brainstem, cerebellum, hippocampus, and cerebrum. The best site for rabies virus detection in dogs and cats was the hippocampus. For cattle, viral antigen was most prominent in the brainstem, followed by the cerebellum. In horses, the cervical spinal cord and adjacent brainstem were the optimal sites for detecting rabies virus antigen. In raccoons and skunks, positive labeling was widely dispersed, so selection might be less important for these wildlife reservoir species. Immunohistochemistry should prove useful in enhancing the accuracy of rabies diagnosis through informed selection of brain sampling sites when composite sampling is not feasible. This immunohistochemical technique could provide reliable virus detection in formalin-fixed tissues in any potentially infected species.

  16. Immunohistochemical and morphological features of a small bowel leiomyoma in a black crested macaque (Macaca nigra

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    Aristizabal-Arbelaez Mónica

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spontaneous gastrointestinal neoplasms in non-human primates are commonly seen in aged individuals. Due to genetic similarities between human and non-human primates, scientists have shown increasing interest in terms of comparative oncology studies. Case presentation The present study is related to a case of an intestinal leiomyoma in a black crested macaque (Macaca nigra, kept on captivity by Matecaña Zoo, Pereira City, Colombia. The animal had abdominal distension, anorexia, vomiting, diarrhea and behavioral changes. Clinical examination showed an increased volume in the upper right abdominal quadrant caused by a neoplastic mass. The patient died during the surgical procedure. Necropsy revealed several small nodules in the peritoneum with adhesion to different portions of the small and large intestines, liver, stomach and diaphragm. Tissue samples were collected, routinely processed and stained by H&E. Microscopic examination revealed a mesenchymal tumor limited to tunica muscularis, resembling normal smooth muscle cells. Neoplastic cells were positive for alpha-smooth muscle actin and vimentin, and negative for cytokeratin AE1/AE3 by immunohistochemistry. Those morphological and immunohistochemical findings allowed to diagnose the intestinal leiomyoma referred above. Conclusion Neoplastic diseases in primates have multifaceted causes. Their manifestations are understudied, leading to a greater difficulty in detection and measurement of the real impact provides by this disease.

  17. Prognostic significance of new immunohistochemical markers in refractory classical Hodgkin lymphoma: a study of 59 cases.

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    Danielle Canioni

    Full Text Available Although most classical Hodgkin lymphoma patients are cured, a significant minority fail after primary therapy and may die as result of their disease. To date, there is no consensus on biological markers that add value to usual parameters (which comprise the International Prognostic Score used at diagnosis to predict outcome. We evaluated 59 patients (18 with primary refractory or early relapse disease and 41 responders for bcl2, Ki67, CD20, TiA1 and c-kit expression by semi-quantitative immunohistochemical study and correlated the results with the response to treatment.The results showed that expression of bcl2 and CD20 in Hodgkin and Reed Sternberg cells, and expression of TiA1 in micro-environmental lymphocytes, and c-kit positive mast cells in microenvironment, were independent prognostic markers. These novel cHL markers could be used in association with clinical parameters to identify newly diagnosed patients with favorable or unfavorable prognosis and to better tailor treatment for different risk groups.

  18. Prostatic stromal tumor with fatal outcome in a young man: histopathological and immunohistochemical case presentation

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    Massimo Roncalli

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Stromal tumors of the prostate are rare and only a few cases have been described in the literature, including exceptional cases of stromal tumors with unknown malignant potential (STUMP and a fatal outcome in young patients. Morphologically distinguishing a STUMP from a stromal sarcoma of the prostate (PSS is still a challenge. We describe the histopathological and immunohistochemical findings in a 34-year-old man with a malignant specialized cell stromal tumor of the prostate that was diagnosed initially as STUMP, and he developed lung metastases within a few months. The patient attended our hospital because of lower urinary tract symptoms, after having excreted tissue through the urethra a few months before. Ultrasonography and urethrocystoscopy examinations showed a mass arising from the verumontanum, and a transurethral resection (TUR revealed a high-grade spindle cell sarcoma reminiscent of a phyllode tumor of the breast. The tumor cells were immunoreactive for vimentin, progesterone receptor and, focally, CD34. The preliminary histo­logical findings were subsequently confirmed after radical prostatectomy. The patient developed bilateral lung metastases and died 25 months after the initial diagnosis. Although rare in young patients, the challenging differential diagnosis of STUMP and PSS means that a prostate STUMP diagnosis made on the basis of biopsy or TUR specimens also requires urethrocystoscopic monitoring for the early detection of any progression to PSS. Radical prostatectomy should also be carefully considered.

  19. Incorporating Direct Rapid Immunohistochemical Testing into Large-Scale Wildlife Rabies Surveillance

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    Kevin Middel

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Following an incursion of the mid-Atlantic raccoon variant of the rabies virus into southern Ontario, Canada, in late 2015, the direct rapid immunohistochemical test for rabies (dRIT was employed on a large scale to establish the outbreak perimeter and to diagnose specific cases to inform rabies control management actions. In a 17-month period, 5800 wildlife carcasses were tested using the dRIT, of which 307 were identified as rabid. When compared with the gold standard fluorescent antibody test (FAT, the dRIT was found to have a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 98.2%. Positive and negative test agreement was shown to be 98.3% and 99.1%, respectively, with an overall test agreement of 98.8%. The average cost to test a sample was $3.13 CAD for materials, and hands-on technical time to complete the test is estimated at 0.55 h. The dRIT procedure was found to be accurate, fast, inexpensive, easy to learn and perform, and an excellent tool for monitoring the progression of a wildlife rabies incursion.

  20. Histomorphological and immunohistochemical characterization of 172 cutaneous round cell tumours in dogs

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    Marina Rios Araújo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the use of a panel of antibodies (CD117, CD3, CD79a, CD45, cytokeratin, vimentin and E-cadherin on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of canine cutaneous round cell tumours. Neoplastic tumours were diagnosed by histology and histochemical stains and included 107 mast cell tumours, 31 cutaneous histiocytomas, two localized histiocytic sarcomas, 21 cutaneous lymphomas, three plasma cell tumours, one transmissible venereal tumour and seven unclassified round cell tumours. The histologic diagnosis was modified in 39.5% of the total 172 neoplasms. The staining for CD45 and Ecadherin were variable, and therefore, the final diagnoses of cutaneous histiocytoma and localized histiocytic sarcoma were made based on histology in association with negative results for CD3, CD79a, CD117 and cytokeratin. The cellular origin of unclassified round cell tumours was defined in all cases. Cutaneous B-cell lymphoma and plasma cell tumours were CD79a-positive and could be distinguished from each other by the morphological characteristics. Mast cell tumours and T cell lymphoma were CD117 and CD3 positive, respectively. The positive staining for vimentin and the negative staining for CD3, CD79a, CD117 and cytokeratin favoured the diagnosis of transmissible venereal tumours. Thus, the final diagnosis of cutaneous round cell tumours should be based on the interpretation of immunohistochemical results together with the cellular morphology observed by histology. Therefore, more studies to optimize the specific markers in formalin-fixed, paraffinembedded tissues (especially for histiocytes are required for definitive diagnosis of round cell tumours in dogs.

  1. [Posterior cortical atrophy with incomplete Bálint's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizuka, O; Soma, Y; Otsuki, M; Endo, K; Tanno, Y; Tsuji, S

    1997-09-01

    We report a patient of posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) with progressive memory disturbance and incomplete Bálint's syndrome consisting of optic ataxie (ataxie optique type) and visual inattention without psychic paralysis of fixation of gaze. The patients is a 58-year-old woman who noticed memory disturbance at 53 years old. Neurological deficit at 54 years old was detected only in the domain of memory, and mild diffuse brain atrophy was revealed on MRI. Memory disturbance progressed gradually, and at the age of 58 she was noticed to have visual disorder. Neuropsychological examination revealed severe memory disorder, incomplete Bálint's syndrome, transcortical sensory aphasia, mild ideational apraxia, and severe constructional apraxia. Visual inattention was too severe to evaluate visual acuity and visual field. MRI showed moderate dilatation of bilateral lateral ventricles, especially in their posterior horns, with atrophy of bilateral temporo-parieto-occipital lobes and hippocampus. IMP-SPECT revealed a diffuse decrease of cerebral blood flow in the bilateral temporo-parieto-occipital region, predominantly in the parietal regions. We believe that she is still in the early phase of PCA, and that psychic paralysis of fixation of gaze, visual agnosia will be noted in several years. Our patient represents an example of early stage PCA from neuropsychological and MRI findings.

  2. Preprosthetic and implantological surgery in patients with severe maxillary atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-García, Raúl; Naval-Gías, Luís; Muñoz-Guerra, Mario Fernando; Sastre-Pérez, Jesús; Rodríguez-Campo, Francisco José; Gil-Díez-Usandizaga, José Luís

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the success of the osseointegration of dental implants in patients with severe maxillary atrophy after sinus lift augmentation and onlay graft surgery with autologous bone grafts. A descriptive and analytic study of 27 patients with severe maxillary atrophy and partial or total edentulism, after 4 years follow-up. All cases underwent to autologous bone graft sinus lift augmentation with or without onlay grafts in the anterior maxillae. After this, reconstruction with osseointegrated implants was performed. After the follow-up period, 89.1% of implants were osseointegrated and loaded. Anterior iliac crest bone graft provides good results with respect to implant osseointegration. The achievement of two surgical procedures for bone grafts surgery and implants surgery, separated 2 or more months, provides better results for osseointegration in comparison to a sole surgical procedure (p<0.01). Implants survival predictability is greater when a second surgical procedure is performed, once bone grafts have experimented an appropriate consolidation. The use of onlay graft and sinus lift augmentation techniques is useful in the resolution of complex problems such as the severe maxillary atrophy.

  3. Counteracting Muscle Atrophy using Galvanic Stimulation of the Vestibular System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Robert A.; Polyakov, Igor

    1999-01-01

    The unloading of weight bearing from antigravity muscles during space flight produces significant muscle atrophy and is one of the most serious health problems facing the space program. Various exercise regimens have been developed and used either alone or in combination with pharmacological techniques to ameliorate this atrophy, but no effective countermeasure exists for this problem. The research in this project was conducted to evaluate the potential use of vestibular galvanic stimulation (VGS) to prevent muscle atrophy resulting from unloading of weight bearing from antigravity muscles. This approach was developed based on two concepts related to the process of maintaining the status of the anti-gravity neuromuscular system. These two premises are: (1) The "tone," or bias on spinal motorneurons is affected by vestibular projections that contribute importantly to maintaining muscle health and status. (2) VGS can be used to modify the excitability, or 'tone' of motorneuron of antigravity muscles. Thus, the strategy is to use VGS to modify the gain of vestibular projections to antigravity muscles and thereby change the general status of these muscles.

  4. Redox homeostasis, oxidative stress and disuse muscle atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrino, Maria Antonietta; Desaphy, Jean-François; Brocca, Lorenza; Pierno, Sabata; Camerino, Diana Conte; Bottinelli, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A pivotal role has been ascribed to oxidative stress in determining the imbalance between protein synthesis and degradation leading to muscle atrophy in many pathological conditions and in disuse. However, a large variability in disuse-induced alteration of redox homeostasis through muscles, models and species emerges from the literature. Whereas the causal role of oxidative stress appears well established in the mechanical ventilation model, findings are less compelling in the hindlimb unloaded mice and very limited in humans. The mere coexistence of muscle atrophy, indirect indexes of increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and impairment of antioxidant defence systems, in fact, does not unequivocally support a causal role of oxidative stress in the phenomenon. We hypothesise that in some muscles, models and species only, due to a large redox imbalance, the leading phenomena are activation of proteolysis and massive oxidation of proteins, which would become more susceptible to degradation. In other conditions, due to a lower extent and variable time course of ROS production, different ROS-dependent, but also -independent intracellular pathways might dominate determining the variable extent of atrophy and even dispensable protein oxidation. The ROS production and removal are complex and finely tuned phenomena. They are indeed important intracellular signals and redox balance maintains normal muscle homeostasis and can underlie either positive or negative adaptations to exercise. A precise approach to determine the levels of ROS in living cells in various conditions appears to be of paramount importance to define and support such hypotheses. PMID:21320887

  5. Clinical case of dentato-rubro-pallido-luysian atrophy (DRPLA)

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    Katsube, Tomoko; Kobayashi, Shotai; Yamaguchi, Shuhei; Tsunematsu, Tokugoro; Shimada, Yasuo

    1987-06-01

    Dentato-rubro-pallido-luysian atrophy (DRPLA) has been described as an atypical type of spino-cerebellar degeneration by J.K. Smith (1958). Choreo-athetoid movement characterizes the DRPLA. We here report a case of DRPLA that was suspected from clinical symptoms and CT brain examinations. Case report: A 36-year-old man was admitted to the hospital because of involuntary movements of the extremities in July, 1978. He had epileptic seizures since the age of 25. Since then, his intelligence had gradually been getting worse. At the same time, dysarthria (slow and slurred speech) also appeared. The neurological examination on admission revealed choreo-athetoid movements, with ataxia of the extremities, trancal ataxia, ataxic speech, moderate dementia, and a disturbance of the smooth-pursuit eye movements. He could not maintain his eye position in a steady gaze, but nystagmus was absent. A brain CT scan revealed a marked atrophy of the upper brain stem and cerebellar peduncle. The cerebral atrophy was mild, and caudate nuclei were spared. The electroencephalograph showed a slow, diffuse, high-voltage wave, with an associated spike and waves. The cerebrospinal fluid examination was normal. An electrophysiological examination revealed no myoclonus in the extremities. These clinical findings suggested that this case is a pseudo-Huntington form of DRPLA.

  6. The pathogenesis and treatment of cardiac atrophy in cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kate T

    2016-02-15

    Cancer cachexia is a multifactorial syndrome characterized by a progressive loss of skeletal muscle mass associated with significant functional impairment. In addition to a loss of skeletal muscle mass and function, many patients with cancer cachexia also experience cardiac atrophy, remodeling, and dysfunction, which in the field of cancer cachexia is described as cardiac cachexia. The cardiac alterations may be due to underlying heart disease, the cancer itself, or problems initiated by the cancer treatment and, unfortunately, remains largely underappreciated by clinicians and basic scientists. Despite recent major advances in the treatment of cancer, little progress has been made in the treatment of cardiac cachexia in cancer, and much of this is due to lack of information regarding the mechanisms. This review focuses on the cardiac atrophy associated with cancer cachexia, describing some of the known mechanisms and discussing the current and future therapeutic strategies to treat this condition. Above all else, improved awareness of the condition and an increased focus on identification of mechanisms and therapeutic targets will facilitate the eventual development of an effective treatment for cardiac atrophy in cancer cachexia. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Excessive fatty acid oxidation induces muscle atrophy in cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukawa, Tomoya; Yan-Jiang, Benjamin Chua; Min-Wen, Jason Chua; Jun-Hao, Elwin Tan; Huang, Dan; Qian, Chao-Nan; Ong, Pauline; Li, Zhimei; Chen, Shuwen; Mak, Shi Ya; Lim, Wan Jun; Kanayama, Hiro-Omi; Mohan, Rosmin Elsa; Wang, Ruiqi Rachel; Lai, Jiunn Herng; Chua, Clarinda; Ong, Hock Soo; Tan, Ker-Kan; Ho, Ying Swan; Tan, Iain Beehuat; Teh, Bin Tean; Shyh-Chang, Ng

    2016-06-01

    Cachexia is a devastating muscle-wasting syndrome that occurs in patients who have chronic diseases. It is most commonly observed in individuals with advanced cancer, presenting in 80% of these patients, and it is one of the primary causes of morbidity and mortality associated with cancer. Additionally, although many people with cachexia show hypermetabolism, the causative role of metabolism in muscle atrophy has been unclear. To understand the molecular basis of cachexia-associated muscle atrophy, it is necessary to develop accurate models of the condition. By using transcriptomics and cytokine profiling of human muscle stem cell-based models and human cancer-induced cachexia models in mice, we found that cachectic cancer cells secreted many inflammatory factors that rapidly led to high levels of fatty acid metabolism and to the activation of a p38 stress-response signature in skeletal muscles, before manifestation of cachectic muscle atrophy occurred. Metabolomics profiling revealed that factors secreted by cachectic cancer cells rapidly induce excessive fatty acid oxidation in human myotubes, which leads to oxidative stress, p38 activation and impaired muscle growth. Pharmacological blockade of fatty acid oxidation not only rescued human myotubes, but also improved muscle mass and body weight in cancer cachexia models in vivo. Therefore, fatty acid-induced oxidative stress could be targeted to prevent cancer-induced cachexia.

  8. Religious factors and hippocampal atrophy in late life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy D Owen

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite a growing interest in the ways spiritual beliefs and practices are reflected in brain activity, there have been relatively few studies using neuroimaging data to assess potential relationships between religious factors and structural neuroanatomy. This study examined prospective relationships between religious factors and hippocampal volume change using high-resolution MRI data of a sample of 268 older adults. Religious factors assessed included life-changing religious experiences, spiritual practices, and religious group membership. Hippocampal volumes were analyzed using the GRID program, which is based on a manual point-counting method and allows for semi-automated determination of region of interest volumes. Significantly greater hippocampal atrophy was observed for participants reporting a life-changing religious experience. Significantly greater hippocampal atrophy was also observed from baseline to final assessment among born-again Protestants, Catholics, and those with no religious affiliation, compared with Protestants not identifying as born-again. These associations were not explained by psychosocial or demographic factors, or baseline cerebral volume. Hippocampal volume has been linked to clinical outcomes, such as depression, dementia, and Alzheimer's Disease. The findings of this study indicate that hippocampal atrophy in late life may be uniquely influenced by certain types of religious factors.

  9. Expression of bone morphogenetic proteins 4, 6 and 7 is downregulated in kidney allografts with interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furic-Cunko, Vesna; Kes, Petar; Coric, Marijana; Hudolin, Tvrtko; Kastelan, Zeljko; Basic-Jukic, Nikolina

    2015-07-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are pleiotropic growth factors. This paper investigates the connection between the expression pattern of BMPs in kidney allograft tissue versus the cause of allograft dysfunction. The expression pattern of BMP2, BMP4, BMP6 and BMP7 in 50 kidney allografts obtained by transplant nephrectomy is investigated. Immunohistochemical staining is semiquantitatively evaluated for intensity to identify the expression pattern of BMPs in normal and allograft kidney tissues. The expression of BMP4 is unique between different tubular cell types in grafts without signs of fibrosis. This effect is not found in specimens with high grades of interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy (IFTA). In samples with IFTA grades II and III, the BMP7 expression is reduced in a significant fraction of specimens relative to those without signs of IFTA. The expression pattern of BMP6 indicates that its activation may be triggered by the act of transplantation and subsequent reperfusion injury. The expression of BMP2 is strong in all types of tubular epithelial cells and does not differ between the compared allografts and control kidney specimens. The intensity and expression pattern of BMP4, BMP6 and BMP7 in transplanted kidney tissue are found to be dependent upon the length of the transplanted period, the clinical indication for transplant nephrectomy and signs of IFTA in kidney tissue.

  10. Muscle Atrophy at Presentation of Cubital Tunnel Syndrome: Demographics and Duration of Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Matthew L; Hensley, Dana T; Chen, Wei C; Taylor, Kenneth F

    2017-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study is to describe the demographics and duration of symptoms of patients with cubital tunnel syndrome who present with muscle atrophy. Methods: We identified 146 patients who presented to the hand surgery clinic at a single institution over a 5-year period with an initial diagnosis of cubital tunnel syndrome based on history and physical examination. Medical records were retrospectively reviewed to determine if there was a difference in demographic data, physical examination findings, and duration of symptoms in patients who presented with muscle atrophy from those with sensory complaints alone. Results: A total of 17/146 (11.6%) of patients presented with muscle atrophy, all of which were men. In all, 17.2% of men presented with atrophy. Age by itself was not a predictor of presentation with atrophy; however, younger patients with atrophy presented with significantly shorter duration of symptoms. Patients under the age of 29 years presenting with muscle atrophy on average had symptoms for 2.4 months compared with 16.2 months of symptoms for those over 55 years of age. Conclusions: Men with cubital tunnel syndrome are more likely to present with muscle atrophy than women. Age is not necessarily a predictor of presentation with atrophy. There is a subset population of younger patients who presents with extremely short duration of symptoms that rapidly develops muscle atrophy.

  11. HISTOLOGIC, IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL, AND ELECTRON MICROSCOPIC CHARACTERIZATION OF A MALIGNANT IRIDOPHOROMA IN A DWARF BEARDED DRAGON (POGONA HENRYLAWSONI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Brot, Simone; Sydler, Titus; Nufer, Lisbeth; Ruetten, Maja

    2015-09-01

    A dwarf bearded dragon (Pogona henrylawsoni) was presented with a white subcutaneous mandibular mass and multiple nodules in the oral mucosa, heart, liver, kidney, intestine, and visceral fat. Histologically, the tumor consisted of densely packed spindle-shaped cells with brow intracytoplasmic pigment that exhibited white-blue birefringence with polarized light. Immunohistochemical staining was negative for S-100 and weakly positive with melan A. Electron microscopic examination revealed cytoplasmic irregular and oblong empty spaces, laminated and often arranged into short stacks, compatible with reflecting platelet profiles typically seen in iridophores. However, in unstained ultrathin sections, electron-dense crystalline material was present, which filled the empty spaces described for stained sections before. Based on histology, immunohistochemistry, and biologic behavior, a malignant iridophoroma was diagnosed. To the authors' knowledge, iridophoromas in lizards have rarely been characterized by using electronic microscopy. Moreover, this is the first description of an iridophoroma in a dwarf bearded dragon.

  12. Feasibility of the Medial Temporal lobe Atrophy index (MTAi and derived methods for measuring atrophy of the medial temporal lobe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco eConejo Bayón

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: the Medial Temporal-lobe Atrophy index (MTAi, 2D-Medial Temporal Atrophy (2D-MTA, yearly rate of MTA (yrRMTA and yearly rate of relative MTA (yrRMTA are simple protocols for measuring the relative extent of atrophy in the MTL in relation to the global brain atrophy. Albeit preliminary studies showed interest of these methods in the diagnosis of AD, FTLD and correlation with cognitive impairment in PD, formal feasibility and validity studies remained pending. As a first step, we aimed to assess the feasibility. Mainly, we aimed to assess the reproducibility of measuring the areas needed to compute these indices. We also aimed to assess the efforts needed to start using these methods correctly. Methods: a series of 290 1.5T-MRI studies from 230 subjects ranging 65-85 years old who had been studied for cognitive impairment were used in this study. Six inexperienced tracers (IT plus one experienced tracer (ET traced the three areas needed to compute the indices. Finally, tracers underwent a short survey on their experience learning to compute the MTAi and experience of usage, including items relative to training time needed to understand and apply the MTAi, time to perform a study after training and overall satisfaction. Results: learning to trace the areas needed to compute the MTAi and derived methods is quick and easy. Results indicate very good intrarater ICC for the MTAi, good intrarater ICC for the 2D-MTA, yrMTA and yrRMTA and also good interrater ICC for the MTAi, 2D-MTA, yrMTA and yrRMTA.Conclusion: our data support that MTAi and derived methods (2D-MTA, yrMTA and yrRTMA have good to very good intrarater and interrater reproducibility and may be easily implemented in clinical practice even if new users have no experience tracing the area of regions of interest.

  13. Inflammatory atrophy on prostate needle biopsies: is there topographic relationship to cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanase Billis

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Chronic inflammation of longstanding duration has been linked to the development of carcinoma in several organ systems. It is controversial whether there is any relationship of inflammatory atrophy to prostate cancer. It has been suggested that the proliferative epithelium in inflammatory atrophy may progress to high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and/or adenocarcinoma. The objective of our study is to compare on needle prostate biopsies of patients showing cancer the topographical relation of inflammatory atrophy and atrophy with no inflammation to adenocarcinoma. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The frequency and extent of the lesions were studied on 172 needle biopsies of patients with prostate cancer. In cores showing both lesions, the foci of atrophy were counted. Clinicopathological features were compared according to presence or absence of inflammation. RESULTS: Considering only cores showing adenocarcinoma, atrophy was seen in 116/172 (67.44% biopsies; 70/116 (60.34% biopsies showed atrophy and no inflammation and 46/116 (39.66% biopsies showed inflammatory atrophy. From a total of 481 cores in 72 biopsies with inflammatory atrophy 184/481 (38.25% cores showed no atrophy; 166/481 (34.51% cores showed atrophy and no inflammation; 111/481 (23.08% cores showed both lesions; and 20/481 (4.16% showed only inflammatory atrophy. There was no statistically significant difference for the clinicopathological features studied. CONCLUSION: The result of our study seems not to favor the model of prostatic carcinogenesis in which there is a topographical relation of inflammatory atrophy to adenocarcinoma.

  14. Correlation between intervertebral disc degeneration, paraspinal muscle atrophy, and lumbar facet joints degeneration in patients with lumbar disc herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dong; Liu, Peng; Cheng, Jie; Ma, Zikun; Liu, Jingpei; Qin, Tingzheng

    2017-04-20

    To assess the correlation between lumbar disc degeneration (LDD), multifidus muscle atrophy (LMA), and facet joints degeneration in patients with L4-L5 lumbar disc herniation (LDH). Sixty patients with L4-L5 LDH diagnosed by a 1.5 T MRI scanner were enrolled in the study group and another 60 patients with non-specific back pain were enrolled in the control group. LDD, LMA, and facet joints degeneration were examined and analyzed independently by two independent orthopedic surgeons using T2-weighted images. Wilcoxon test was used for analyzing the difference of LDD and facet joints degeneration between L3-L4 and L5-S1 and difference of LMA between the herniated and control groups. Correlation analysis of the three degeneration grades at the same level was determined by Spearman rank correlation test. In the herniated group, most LMA at L3-L4 level was grade 1 (42, 70.0%); grade 2 (33, 55.0%) at L4-L5 level; and grade 3 (27, 45.0%) at L5-S1 level. LMA and LDD grading were significantly different between L3-L4 and L5-S1 levels (P herniation group, the Spearman value for LDD and LMA grading were 0.352 (P  0.05) at the L5-S1 level. The differences in LMA between the herniated and control groups at the three levels were significant (P Disc degeneration and multifidus muscles atrophy were positively correlated at the L3-L4 disc level. A lumbar extension muscle strengthening program could be helpful in preventing muscle atrophy and lumbar spinal degeneration.

  15. Pharmacologically induced mouse model of adult spinal muscular atrophy to evaluate effectiveness of therapeutics after disease onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhihua; Ling, Karen K Y; Zhao, Xin; Zhou, Chunyi; Karp, Gary; Welch, Ellen M; Naryshkin, Nikolai; Ratni, Hasane; Chen, Karen S; Metzger, Friedrich; Paushkin, Sergey; Weetall, Marla; Ko, Chien-Ping

    2016-03-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a genetic disease characterized by atrophy of muscle and loss of spinal motor neurons. SMA is caused by deletion or mutation of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene, and the nearly identical SMN2 gene fails to generate adequate levels of functional SMN protein due to a splicing defect. Currently, several therapeutics targeted to increase SMN protein are in clinical trials. An outstanding issue in the field is whether initiating treatment in symptomatic older patients would confer a therapeutic benefit, an important consideration as the majority of patients with milder forms of SMA are diagnosed at an older age. An SMA mouse model that recapitulates the disease phenotype observed in adolescent and adult SMA patients is needed to address this important question. We demonstrate here that Δ7 mice, a model of severe SMA, treated with a suboptimal dose of an SMN2 splicing modifier show increased SMN protein, survive into adulthood and display SMA disease-relevant pathologies. Increasing the dose of the splicing modifier after the disease symptoms are apparent further mitigates SMA histopathological features in suboptimally dosed adult Δ7 mice. In addition, inhibiting myostatin using intramuscular injection of AAV1-follistatin ameliorates muscle atrophy in suboptimally dosed Δ7 mice. Taken together, we have developed a new murine model of symptomatic SMA in adolescents and adult mice that is induced pharmacologically from a more severe model and demonstrated efficacy of both SMN2 splicing modifiers and a myostatin inhibitor in mice at later disease stages. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Transcultural Nursing and Nursing Diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, Elaine M.

    1991-01-01

    Points out the inadequacies of the nursing diagnoses officially sanctioned by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association for use with culturally diverse patients. Looks at the changes needed to make the defining characteristics more congruent with transcultural nursing. (JOW)

  17. How Is Polycythemia Vera Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PV. These tests include a complete blood count (CBC) and other tests, if necessary. Complete Blood Count ... first test used to diagnose PV is a CBC. The CBC measures many parts of your blood. ...

  18. How to diagnose cardiac tamponade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Steijn, JHM; Sleijfer, DT; van der Graaf, WTA; van der Sluis, A; Nieboer, P

    Malignant pericardial effusion is a potentially fatal complication of malignancy unless recognised and treated promptly. Patients with this condition are often difficult to diagnose. Physical examination, chest radiography and electrocardiography have poor diagnostic values in identification of

  19. Parachordoma of the buttock: an immunohistochemical case study and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirokawa, M; Manabe, T; Sugihara, K

    1994-12-01

    We report a case of parachordoma occurring in the buttock of a 43-year-old man, and review 20 cases of parachordoma reported in the English literature. The tumor in our case was grossly 3 cm in dimension, solid, lobulated and grayish-white in color. Microscopically, the tumor consisted of epithelioid and spindle cells, and fibromyxoid stroma. The epithelioid cells were immunohistochemically positive for vimentin, S-100 protein, neuron-specific enolase, keratin, carcinoembryonic antigen and epithelial membrane antigen, and negative for HMB45. These findings are similar to those for chordoma rather than extraskeletal myxoid chrondrosarcoma. Although the etiopathogenesis of parachordoma remains obscure, Schwann cells or some other neuron-related cell origin are suspected.

  20. Immunohistochemical evidence of specific iris involvement in Blau syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paparizos, Stella C; Goldstein, Debra A; Bouhenni, Rachida A; Steiner, Scott; Dunmire, Jeffrey J; Edward, Deepak P

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate iris involvement in Blau syndrome using histology and immunohistochemistry. Iridectomy specimen of a patient with treated Blau syndrome and a normal control were evaluated by light microscopy and immunohistochemistry using antibodies against CD4(+), CD8(+), HLA-DR, CD68(+), NF-κB and IL-17. Blau iris tissue demonstrated increased numbers of CD4(+) lymphocytes and CD68 negative, HLA-DR positive spindle shaped cells compared to normal iris tissue. Blau iris tissue also demonstrated elevated CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratio and IL-17 and NF-κB immunolabeling. No macrophages, epithelioid cells, or granulomas were noted in the Blau specimen. The persistent immunolocalization of inflammatory markers in an iris specimen from an aggresively treated patient with proven Blau syndrome suggests that further pathologic and immunohistochemical investigation of Blau ocular tissue is necessary to better understand the complexities of NOD2 activating mutations in the eye.

  1. Ebola Virus Disease in Pregnancy: Clinical, Histopathologic, and Immunohistochemical Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehlenbachs, Atis; de la Rosa Vázquez, Olimpia; Bausch, Daniel G; Schafer, Ilana J; Paddock, Christopher D; Nyakio, Jean Paul; Lame, Papys; Bergeron, Eric; McCollum, Andrea M; Goldsmith, Cynthia S; Bollweg, Brigid C; Prieto, Miriam Alía; Lushima, Robert Shongo; Ilunga, Benoit Kebela; Nichol, Stuart T; Shieh, Wun-Ju; Ströher, Ute; Rollin, Pierre E; Zaki, Sherif R

    2017-01-01

    Here we describe clinicopathologic features of Ebola virus disease in pregnancy. One woman infected with Sudan virus in Gulu, Uganda, in 2000 had a stillbirth and survived, and another woman infected with Bundibugyo virus had a live birth with maternal and infant death in Isiro, the Democratic Republic of the Congo in 2012. Ebolavirus antigen was seen in the syncytiotrophoblast and placental maternal mononuclear cells by immunohistochemical analysis, and no antigen was seen in fetal placental stromal cells or fetal organs. In the Gulu case, ebolavirus antigen localized to malarial parasite pigment-laden macrophages. These data suggest that trophoblast infection may be a mechanism of transplacental ebolavirus transmission. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  2. Immunohistochemical Assessment of HER3 Expression in Odontogenic Cysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honarmand, Marieh; Saravani, Shirin; Kamyab, Nazanin; Jahantigh, Mehdi; Torabi Parizi, Molouk

    2015-01-01

    Background: It has been demonstrated that HER3 plays an important role in some human cancers and the HER3 expression is associated with worse survival in solid tumors. Objectives: This study was conducted to compare HER3 expression in epithelial lining of radicular cysts (RCs), dentigerous cysts (DCs) and odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs). Materials and Methods: This was a descriptive-analytical study, which assessed all 57 paraffin blocks of RCs, DCs and OKCs (21 RCs, 16 DCs, 20 OKC) from pathological archive of Dentistry College of Zahedan, Iran. The HER3 expression in cytoplasm and membrane was examined by immunohistochemical method. The data collected was analyzed using SPSS16 by ANOVA and Chi-square. P cysts was higher than that in inflammatory odontogenic cysts. The higher rate of HER3 expression in OKC may justify inherent growth potential, stimulation-independent proliferation capability, invasive growth and high recurrence rate of the cyst accepted today as a tumor. PMID:26734469

  3. Immunohistochemical study of Metallothionein in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez-Rebollar, Daniel; Alonso-Vanegas, Mario; Nava-Ruíz, Concepción; Buentello-García, Masao; Yescas-Gómez, Petra; Díaz-Ruíz, Araceli; Rios, Camilo; Méndez-Armenta, Marisela

    2017-05-01

    Epilepsy is characterized by spontaneous recurrent seizures and temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common serious neurological example of acquired and frequent epilepsy. Oxidative stress is recognized as playing a contributing role in several neurological disorders, and most recently have been implicated in acquired epilepsies. The MTs occur in several brain regions and may serve as neuroprotective proteins against reactive oxygen species causing oxidative damage and stress. The main aim of this work was to describe the immunohistochemical localization of MT in the specimens derived from the patients affected by TLE. Histopathological examination showed NeuN, GFAP and MT immunopositive cells that were analyzed for determinate in hippocampal and parietal cortex samples. An increase in the reactive gliosis associated with increased MT expression was observed in patients with TLE. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Antigenic heterogeneity in granular cell ameloblastoma: an immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramya, Ramadoss; Sudheerkanth, Peddanna Kondamari; Eapen, Cherian; Alex, Varghese Kumaranthara; Rajkumar, Krishnan; Rajashree, Padmanaban

    2015-03-01

    Nature of granular cells in granular cell ameloblastoma (GCA) has always invoked considerable interest. The present study aims at antigenic characterization in five such cases with a panel of markers. Tissue specimens of five patients with GCA were fixed in buffered formalin and later embedded in paraffin wax. Blocks were sliced into 3 µ thick sections for immunohistochemical analysis using a panel of markers CD68, Bcl2, S100, p53, cytokeratin (AE1/AE3), vimentin and desmin. All five cases were strongly positive for cytokeratin and CD68. S100 was negative in three cases and showed a mild positivity in two cases. Bcl2, p53, vimentin and desmin were negative in all the five cases. This study presents a heterogenous nature of the granular cells; however, further validation is required with a larger sample size.

  5. The dark side of the immunohistochemical moon: industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyuzhny, Alexander E

    2009-12-01

    Modern biological research is dependent on tools developed and provided by commercial suppliers, and antibodies for immunohistochemistry are among the most frequently used of these tools. Not all commercial antibodies perform as expected, however; this problem leads researchers to waste time and money when using antibodies that perform inadequately. Different commercial suppliers offer antibodies of varying degrees of quality and, in some cases, are unable to provide expert technical support for the immunohistochemical use of their antibodies. This article briefly describes the production of commercial antibodies from the manufacturer's perspective and presents some guidelines for choosing appropriate commercial antibodies for immunohistochemistry. Additionally, the article suggests steps to establish mutually beneficial relationships between commercial antibody suppliers and researchers who use them.

  6. Microfluidics for rapid cytokeratin immunohistochemical staining in frozen sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brajkovic, Saska; Dupouy, Diego G; de Leval, Laurence; Gijs, Martin Am

    2017-08-01

    Frozen sections (FS) of tumor samples represent a cornerstone of pathological intraoperative consultation and have an important role in the microscopic analysis of specimens during surgery. So far, immunohistochemical (IHC) stainings on FS have been demonstrated for a few markers using manual methods. Microfluidic technologies have proven to bring substantial improvement in many fields of diagnostics, though only a few microfluidic devices have been designed to improve the performance of IHC assays. In this work, we show optimization of a complete pan-cytokeratin chromogenic immunostaining protocol on FS using a microfluidic tissue processor into a protocol taking <12 min. Our results showed specificity and low levels of background. The dimensions of the microfluidic prototype device are compatible with the space constraints of an intraoperative pathology laboratory. We therefore anticipate that the adoption of microfluidic technologies in the field of surgical pathology can significantly improve the way FSs influence surgical procedures.

  7. Immunohistochemical characterization of neoplastic cells of breast origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriega MariadelasMercedes

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After skin cancer, breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women. Tumors of unknown origin account for 5-15% of malignant neoplasms, with 1.5% being breast cancer. An immunohistochemical panel with conventional and newer markers, such as mammaglobin, was selected for the detection of neoplastic cells of breast origin. The specific objectives are: 1 to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the panel, with a special emphasis on the inclusion of the mammaglobin marker, and 2 to compare immunohistochemistry performed on whole tissue sections and on Tissue Micro-Array. Methods Twenty-nine metastatic breast tumors were included and assumed as tumors of unknown origin. Other 48 biopsies of diverse tissues were selected and assumed as negative controls. Tissue Micro-Array was performed. Immunohistochemistry for mammaglobin, gross cystic disease fluid protein-15, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and cytokeratin 7 was done. Results Mammaglobin positive staining was observed in 10/29 cases, in 13/29 cases for gross cystic disease fluid protein-15, in 20/29 cases for estrogen receptor, in 9/29 cases for progesterone receptor, and in 25/29 cases for cytokeratin 7. Among the negative controls, mammaglobin was positive in 2/48, and gross cystic disease fluid protein-15 in 4/48. Conclusions The inclusion of MAG antibody in the immunohistochemical panel for the detection of tumors of unknown origin contributed to the detection of metastasis of breast cancer. The diagnostic strategy with the highest positive predictive value (88% included hormone receptors and mammaglobin in serial manner. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1366310812718988

  8. Morphological and immunohistochemical characterisation of seminomas in Norwegian dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorvaldsen Tor

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Seminomas in the dog have traditionally been assumed to resemble human spermatocytic seminomas, based on their low malignancy and high occurrence in old individuals. However, recently published studies indicate that canine seminomas can be classified as classical and spermatocytic seminomas in a similar way as in man, and that classical seminomas comprise a substantial proportion of seminomas in the dog. These two factors both contribute to increasing the potential of canine seminoma as a relevant model for human testicular cancer. The aim of the present study was to characterise seminoma in Norwegian dogs using morphology and immunohistochemistry, and determine whether these tumours are comparable with human classical seminoma. Methods By applying diagnostic criteria from human pathology, 45 seminomas from the Norwegian Canine Cancer Register were examined histologically with hematoxylin and eosin (HE and periodic acid-Schiff (PAS stains. All sections were stained immunohistochemically with antibodies against human placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP and the transmembrane receptor c-KIT. Results Although two of the seminomas showed immunohistochemical staining characteristics indicative of classical seminoma (PLAP+/c-KIT+, all 45 examined seminomas were morphologically consistent with spermatocytic seminoma. Conclusions The value of canine seminoma as a model for SE in man remains unclear. Among the 45 investigated tumours from Norwegian dogs, none were classified as classical seminoma based on morphological criteria consistent with human seminomas. Regional or breed differences in the occurrence of classical seminoma in the dog, as well as the lack of uniform diagnostic criteria, might explain the discrepancy between the findings in the current study and the results presented by other authors.

  9. Transforming growth factor β2 (TGF-β2 in pathogenesis of oral submucous fibrosis: An immunohistochemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesh V Kamath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Oral Submucous Fibrosis (OSF is a potentially malignant oral disorder causing fibrosis of the oral mucosa. Commonly associated with the habit of chewing areca nut in its raw or refined forms, the progressive fibrosis causes intense debility and probable malignant transformation. Arecoline, flavinoids and tannins in the areca nut may activate pro-fibrotic cytokines like transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β leading to fibrosis. TGF-β and its isoforms probably represent the major pathway in the deposition of collagen fibers in this condition. Very little is known of the role of TGF-β2, as compared withTGF-β1, in OSF. The present study aims to evaluate TGF-β2 immunohistochemically in OSF with a view to understanding its role in the pathogenesis. Materials and Methods: TGF-β2 antibody was detected immunohistochemically on archival paraffin sections of 70 cases of various grades of OSF, 10 cases of normal oral mucosa and five cases of scar tissue. The presence and distribution of the antibody was noted and a quantification of the positive areas was also done using image analyses software and correlated in proportion to the rest of the tissue. Results: Expression of TGF-β2 was more in all grades of OSF when compared with that of normal oral mucosa but less than that expressed in scar tissue. The antibody was detected in epithelium, around the blood vessels, in areas of inflammatory infiltrate, fibroblasts and in muscles. The intensity and proportion of expression paralleled increasing grades of OSF. There was increased expression of the antibody in the epithelium, which is probably the source, but no correlation to epithelial changes (hyperplasia, atrophy or dysplasia was noted. Conclusion: TGF-β2 is a prominent cytokine in the TGF-β induced pathway of fibrosis but probably plays a contributory role to the main isoform TGF-β1. Its role as a marker of malignant transformation, as seen in other systemic malignant

  10. Cerebral blood flow and brain atrophy correlated by xenon contrast CT scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitagawa, Y.; Meyer, J.S.; Tanahashi, N.; Rogers, R.L.; Tachibana, H.; Kandula, P.; Dowell, R.E.; Mortel, K.F.

    1985-11-01

    Correlations between cerebral blood flow (CBF) measured during stable xenon contrast CT scanning and standard CT indices of brain atrophy were investigated in the patients with senile dementia of Alzheimer type, multi-infarct dementia and idiopathic Parkinson's disease. Compared to age-matched normal volunteers, significant correlations were found in patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease between cortical and subcortical gray matter blood flow and brain atrophy estimated by the ventricular body ratio, and mild to moderate brain atrophy were correlated with stepwise CBF reductions. However, in patients with senile dementia of Alzheimer type and multi-infarct dementia, brain atrophy was not associated with stepwise CBF reductions. Overall correlations between brain atrophy and reduced CBF were weak. Mild degrees of brain atrophy are not always associated with reduced CBF.

  11. Pituitary carcinoma diagnosed on fine needle aspiration: Report of a case and review of pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakoushina Tatiana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary carcinoma (PC is a very rare entity (0.2% of all pituitary tumors, with only about 140 cases reported in English literature. There are no reliable histological, immunohistochemical or ultrastructural features distinguishing pituitary adenoma (PA from PC. By definition, a diagnosis of PC is made after a patient with PA develops non-contiguous central nervous system (CNS or systemic metastases. To date, only three cases of PC have been reportedly diagnosed on fine needle aspiration (FNA. Two of the reported cases were diagnosed on FNA of the cervical lymph nodes and one on FNA of the vertebral bone lesion. Herein, we present a case of PC, diagnosed on FNA of the liver lesion. In this case, we describe cytologic features of PC and compare them to histologic features of the tumor in the pituitary. Clinical behavior of tumor, pathogenesis of metastasis and immunochemical and prognostic markers will also be described.

  12. Oleate Prevents Palmitate-Induced Atrophy via Modulation of Mitochondrial ROS Production in Skeletal Myotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hojun; Lim, Jae-Young; Choi, Seung-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Accumulation of saturated fatty acids contributes to lipotoxicity-related insulin resistance and atrophy in skeletal muscle. Conversely, unsaturated fatty acids like docosahexaenoic acid were proven to preserve muscle mass. However, it is not known if the most common unsaturated oleate will protect skeletal myotubes against palmitate-mediated atrophy, and its specific mechanism remains to be elucidated. Therefore, we investigated the effects of oleate on atrophy-related factors in palmitate-c...

  13. Progressive transcortical sensory aphasia and progressive ideational apraxia owing to temporoparietal cortical atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Funayama, Michitaka; NAKAJIMA, Asuka

    2015-01-01

    Background In contrast to frontotemporal lobar degeneration, atrophy of the focal posterior lateral cortex has not been thoroughly studied. Three clinical types of focal cortical atrophy have been described: 1) logopenic variant of primary progressive aphasia, which presents with impaired repetition despite normal articulation; 2) posterior cortical atrophy, which presents with prominent visuospatial deficits; and 3) primary progressive apraxia. All three clinical types are characterized by s...

  14. Cortical atrophy in patients with cerebral amyloid angiopathy: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotiadis, Panagiotis; van Rooden, Sanneke; van der Grond, Jeroen; Schultz, Aaron; Martinez-Ramirez, Sergi; Auriel, Eitan; Reijmer, Yael; van Opstal, Anna M; Ayres, Alison; Schwab, Kristin M; Hedden, Trey; Rosand, Jonathan; Viswanathan, Anand; Wermer, Marieke; Terwindt, Gisela; Sperling, Reisa A; Polimeni, Jonathan R; Johnson, Keith A; van Buchem, Mark A; Greenberg, Steven M; Gurol, M Edip

    2016-07-01

    cohorts with 63 and 126 individuals; and 63 patients with Alzheimer's disease). The 26 patients with HCHWA-D had thinner cortices (2·31 mm [SD 0·18]) than the 28 healthy controls (mean difference -0·112 mm, 95% CI -0·190 to -0·034, p=0·006). The 63 patients with sporadic CAA without dementia had thinner cortices (2·17 mm [SD 0·11]) than the two healthy control cohorts (n=63, mean difference -0·14 mm, 95% CI -0·17 to -0·10, paccounting for 63% of the total effect. The appearance of cortical thinning in patients with HCHWA-D indicates that vascular amyloid is an independent contributor to cortical atrophy. These results were reproduced in patients with the more common sporadic CAA. Our findings also suggest that CAA-related cortical atrophy is at least partly mediated by vascular dysfunction. Our results also support the view that small vessel diseases such as CAA can cause cortical atrophy even in the absence of Alzheimer's disease, a conclusion that can help radiologists, neurologists, and other clinicians who diagnose these common geriatric conditions. National Institutes of Health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Role of Ca2+ signaling in skeletal muscle hypertrophy and atrophy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ito, Naoki; Takeda, Shin’ichi

    2015-01-01

    .... Although intracellular signaling molecules and pathways underlying the regulation of protein synthesis/degradation and subsequent muscle hypertrophy/atrophy are well studied, upstream regulators are largely unknown...

  16. Fronto-striatal atrophy correlates of neuropsychiatric dysfunction in frontotemporal dementia (FTD and Alzheimer's disease (AD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Seok Yi

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Behavioural disturbances in frontotemporal dementia (FTD are thought to reflect mainly atrophy of cortical regions. Recent studies suggest that subcortical brain regions, in particular the striatum, are also significantly affected and this pathology might play a role in the generation of behavioural symptoms. Objective: To investigate prefrontal cortical and striatal atrophy contributions to behavioural symptoms in FTD. Methods: One hundred and eighty-two participants (87 FTD patients, 39 AD patients and 56 controls were included. Behavioural profiles were established using the Cambridge Behavioural Inventory Revised (CBI-R and Frontal System Behaviour Scale (FrSBe. Atrophy in prefrontal (VMPFC, DLPFC and striatal (caudate, putamen regions was established via a 5-point visual rating scale of the MRI scans. Behavioural scores were correlated with atrophy rating scores. Results: Behavioural and atrophy ratings demonstrated that patients were significantly impaired compared to controls, with bvFTD being most severely affected. Behavioural-anatomical correlations revealed that VMPFC atrophy was closely related to abnormal behaviour and motivation disturbances. Stereotypical behaviours were associated with both VMPFC and striatal atrophy. By contrast, disturbance of eating was found to be related to striatal atrophy only. Conclusion: Frontal and striatal atrophy contributed to the behavioural disturbances seen in FTD, with some behaviours related to frontal, striatal or combined fronto-striatal pathology. Consideration of striatal contributions to the generation of behavioural disturbances should be taken into account when assessing patients with potential FTD.

  17. The effect of theophylline on the prevention of mechanical ventilation-induced diaphragm atrophy in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Nihal Bakirkalay; Teke, Turgut; Toy, Hatice; Uzun, Kursat

    2014-01-01

    Movement disorders and atrophy occur in the diaphragm, the most important muscle of respiration, because of mechanical ventilation (MV). In this animal model, we aimed to evaluate the effect of intravenous theophylline administration on the prevention of mechanical ventilation-induced diaphragmatic atrophy. In our study, 30 healthy male Sprague-dawley rats were used. They were divided into 3 equal groups. Group 1: the control group (no MV); group 2: the placebo group that received MV; Group 3: the theophylline group composed of rats that received both MV and theophylline therapy. In all 3 groups, the diaphragmatic atrophy was evaluated histopathologically. In the histopathological examination, no macroscopic thickening and microscopic atrophy were observed in the diaphragm in the control group. In the placebo group (group 2), macroscopically definite thickening was observed in all rats, and microscopically, heavy (+++) atrophy was observed. In the theophylline group (group 3), there was no atrophy in one rat. In 8 rats, light (+), and in 1 rat medium (++) atrophy was observed. In our study, it was shown that atrophy occurred in the diaphragms of rats after MV, and the atrophy was decreased after theophylline administration.

  18. Abdominal rectus muscle atrophy and midline shift after colostomy creation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Lucas; Deerenberg, Eva B; van Dijk, Sven M; Lamme, Bas; Koning, Anton H; Kleinrensink, Gert-Jan; Jeekel, Johannes; Lange, Johan F

    2014-04-01

    Incisional hernia (IH) can be attributed to multiple factors. The presence of a parastomal hernia has shown to be a risk factor for IH after midline laparotomy. Our hypothesis is that this increased risk of IH may be caused by changes in biomechanical forces, such as midline shift to the contralateral side of the colostomy owing to decreased restraining forces at the site of the colostomy, and left abdominal rectus muscle (ARM) atrophy owing to intercostal nerve damage. Patients were selected if they underwent end-colostomy via open operation between 2004 and 2011. Patients were eligible if computed tomography (CT) had been performed postoperatively. If available, preoperative CTs were collected for case-control analyses. Midline shift was measured using V-scope application in the I-space, a CAVE-like virtual reality system. For the ARM atrophy hypothesis, measurements of ARM were performed at the level of colostomy, and 3 and 8 cm cranial and caudal of the colostomy. Postoperative CT were available for 77 patients; of these patients, 30 also had a preoperative CT. Median follow-up was 19 months. A mean shift to the right side was identified after preoperative and postoperative comparison; from -1.3 ± 4.6 to 2.1 ± 9.3 (P = .043). Furthermore, during rectus muscle measurements, a thinner left ARM was observed below the level of colostomy. Creation of a colostomy alters the abdominal wall. Atrophy of the left ARM was seen caudal to the level of the colostomy, and a midline shift to the right side was evident on CT. These changes may explain the increased rate of IH after colostomy creation. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Diagnostic value of 18F-FDG PET and 11C-PIB PET on early stage posterior cortical atrophy

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    Shuai LIU

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background  Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA is a kind of progressive neurodegenerative disease with cortical visual impairment as the first symptom. Because of rare clinical incidence, early onset age, special clinical symptoms and unobvious MRI abnormality, the definitive diagnosis of PCA is difficult. This study used 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG PET and 11C-Pittsburgh compound B (11C-PIB PET for PCA patients with unobvious MRI abnormality, so as to discuss the value of PET in the early diagnosis of PCA.  Methods  Five patients diagnosed as PCA in our hospital between April 2012 and March 2015 were enrolled in this study. Cognitive function was measured by Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE, Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA, Activities of Daily Living (ADL and Clock Drawing Test (CDT. Brain MRI, 18F-FDG PET and 11C-PIB PET were performed to analyze glucose metabolism and perfusion of posterior cortex.  Results Neuropsychological tests revealed that the ability of writing, calculating, visuospatial and executive function of all these patients were impaired. Color vision tests showed abnormal results. MRI showed that the posterior atrophy (PA scores were 0-2 (average 1 on the left side and 0-1 (average 0.80 on the right side. The medial temporal atrophy (MTA scores were 1-3 (average 1.80 on the left side and 1-4 (average 2 on the right side. The ventricular enlargement (VE scores were 1-2 (average 1.80 on the left side and 1-2 (average 1.60 on the right side. 18F-FDG PET showed glucose metabolism decreased obviously on bilateral temporo-parieto-occipital cortex, precuneus and cingulate gyrus, and slightly on frontal lobes and subcortical structure. 11C-PIB PET showed radioactive 11C-PIB deposition on bilateral frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital cortex, and the outline of cerebellar cortex was clear.  Conclusions  For PCA patients whose parietal and occipital cortical atrophy is not obvious on MRI, 18F-FDG PET

  20. The research progress of clinical diagnosis of spinal muscular atrophy

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    WANG Ning

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a common autosomal recessive neuromuscular disease caused by degeneration of anterior horn cell in spinal cord. The clinical feature is characterized by progressive symmetrical myasthenia and amyotrophia. The disease is caused by mutation of survival motor neuron (SMN1 gene. Four clinical types are defined for SMA: type Ⅰ, Ⅱ, Ⅲ and Ⅳ. The diagnosis depends on clinical manifestation, inherited history, laboratory test and genetic analysis. To date, there is no effective treatment for SMA, so prenatal diagnosis and carrier screening are important for the prevention of this disease.

  1. Chorioretinal Atrophy after Spontaneous Resolution of Myopic Foveoschisis

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    Antonio García-Ben

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Myopic foveoschisis is one of the major complications of pathologic myopia, and it was most recently identified by new imaging modalities. During the natural evolution of this complication, anatomical and visual improvement without surgical intervention is an unusual course, and most of these eyes remain stable or progressively worsen. The authors report a case of a highly myopic eye that developed patchy chorioretinal atrophy after spontaneous resolution of myopic foveoschisis, which to the best of our knowledge has not been reported previously in the medical literature.

  2. Exercise Therapy in Spinobulbar Muscular Atrophy and Other Neuromuscular Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlqvist, Julia Rebecka; Vissing, John

    2016-01-01

    There is no curative treatment for most neuromuscular disorders. Exercise, as a treatment for these diseases, has therefore received growing attention. When executed properly, exercise can maintain and improve health and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, obesity, and diabetes. In persons...... in patients with neuromuscular diseases associated with weakness and wasting. We review studies that have investigated different types of exercise in both myopathies and motor neuron diseases, with particular emphasis on training of persons affected by spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA). Finally, we provide...

  3. Atrophy rates in asymptomatic amyloidosis: implications for Alzheimer prevention trials.

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    K Abigail Andrews

    Full Text Available There is considerable interest in designing therapeutic studies of individuals at risk of Alzheimer disease (AD to prevent the onset of symptoms. Cortical β-amyloid plaques, the first stage of AD pathology, can be detected in vivo using positron emission tomography (PET, and several studies have shown that ~1/3 of healthy elderly have significant β-amyloid deposition. Here we assessed whether asymptomatic amyloid-PET-positive controls have increased rates of brain atrophy, which could be harnessed as an outcome measure for AD prevention trials. We assessed 66 control subjects (age = 73.5±7.3 yrs; MMSE = 29±1.3 from the Australian Imaging Biomarkers & Lifestyle study who had a baseline Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB PET scan and two 3T MRI scans ~18-months apart. We calculated PET standard uptake value ratios (SUVR, and classified individuals as amyloid-positive/negative. Baseline and 18-month MRI scans were registered, and brain, hippocampal, and ventricular volumes and annualized volume changes calculated. Increasing baseline PiB-PET measures of β-amyloid load correlated with hippocampal atrophy rate independent of age (p = 0.014. Twenty-two (1/3 were PiB-positive (SUVR>1.40, the remaining 44 PiB-negative (SUVR≤1.31. Compared to PiB-negatives, PiB-positive individuals were older (76.8±7.5 vs. 71.7±7.5, p<0.05 and more were APOE4 positive (63.6% vs. 19.2%, p<0.01 but there were no differences in baseline brain, ventricle or hippocampal volumes, either with or without correction for total intracranial volume, once age and gender were accounted for. The PiB-positive group had greater total hippocampal loss (0.06±0.08 vs. 0.02±0.05 ml/yr, p = 0.02, independent of age and gender, with non-significantly higher rates of whole brain (7.1±9.4 vs. 4.7±5.5 ml/yr and ventricular (2.0±3.0 vs. 1.1±1.0 ml/yr change. Based on the observed effect size, recruiting 384 (95%CI 195-1080 amyloid-positive subjects/arm will provide 80% power to detect 25

  4. Duodenal villous atrophy: a cause of chronic diarrhea after solid-organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weclawiak, H; Ould-Mohamed, A; Bournet, B; Guilbeau-Frugier, C; Fortenfant, F; Muscari, F; Sallusto, F; Dambrin, C; Esposito, L; Guitard, J; Abbal, M; Rostaing, L; Kamar, N

    2011-03-01

    Persistent diarrhea is commonly observed after solid organ transplantation (SOT). A few cases of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF)-induced duodenal villous atrophy (DVA) have been previously reported in kidney-transplant patients with chronic diarrhea. Herein, we report on the incidence and characteristics of DVA in SOT patients with chronic diarrhea. One hundred thirty-two SOT patients with chronic diarrhea underwent an oesophago-gastroduodenoscopy (OGD) and a duodenal biopsy after classical causes of diarrhea have been ruled out. DVA was diagnosed in 21 patients (15.9%). It was attributed to mycophenolic acid (MPA) therapy in 18 patients (85.7%) (MMF [n = 14] and enteric-coated mycophenolate sodium [n = 4]). MPA withdrawal or dose reduction resulted in diarrhea cessation. The incidence of DVA was significantly higher in patients with chronic diarrhea receiving MPA compared to those who did not (24.6% vs. 5.1%, p = 0.003). DVA was attributed to a Giardia lamblia parasitic infection in two patients (9.5%) and the remaining case was attributed to azathioprine. In these three patients, diarrhea ceased after metronidazole therapy or azathioprine dose reduction. In conclusion, DVA is a frequent cause of chronic diarrhea in SOT recipients. MPA therapy is the most frequent cause of DVA. An OGD should be proposed to all transplant recipients who present with persistent diarrhea. ©2011 The Authors Journal compilation©2011 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  5. Clinical Features in a Danish Population-Based Cohort of Probable Multiple System Atrophy Patients.

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    Starhof, Charlotte; Korbo, Lise; Lassen, Christina Funch; Winge, Kristian; Friis, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a rare, sporadic and progressive neurodegenerative disorder. We aimed to describe the clinical features of Danish probable MSA patients, evaluate their initial response to dopaminergic therapy and examine mortality. From the Danish National Patient Registry, we identified 782 patients diagnosed with conditions potentially compatible with probable MSA (International Classification of Diseases, version 10 (ICD-10) codes G23.2, G23.8 and G23.9) during 1994-2009. Through medical record review, we narrowed our sample to 115 patients who fulfilled the criteria for probable MSA. We recorded clinical features, examined differences by MSA subtype and used Kaplan-Meier survival analysis to examine mortality. The mean age at onset of patients with probable MSA was 60.2 years (range 36-75 years) and mean time to wheelchair dependency was 4.7 years (range 0-15 years). One-third of patients experienced a transient improvement in motor symptoms with use of levodopa. Median survival from disease onset was 6.9 years (range 1-16 years, 95% CI 6.3-7.5) with no apparent variation according to gender or subtype. Our nationwide approach corroborated that MSA is associated with diverse and grave symptoms, only limited response to levodopa, and poor prognosis. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Multimodal Discrimination of Alzheimer's Disease Based on Regional Cortical Atrophy and Hypometabolism.

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    Yun, Hyuk Jin; Kwak, Kichang; Lee, Jong-Min

    2015-01-01

    Structural MR image (MRI) and 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) have been widely employed in diagnosis of both Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) pathology, which has led to the development of methods to distinguish AD and MCI from normal controls (NC). Synaptic dysfunction leads to a reduction in the rate of metabolism of glucose in the brain and is thought to represent AD progression. FDG-PET has the unique ability to estimate glucose metabolism, providing information on the distribution of hypometabolism. In addition, patients with AD exhibit significant neuronal loss in cerebral regions, and previous AD research has shown that structural MRI can be used to sensitively measure cortical atrophy. In this paper, we introduced a new method to discriminate AD from NC based on complementary information obtained by FDG and MRI. For accurate classification, surface-based features were employed and 12 predefined regions were selected from previous studies based on both MRI and FDG-PET. Partial least square linear discriminant analysis was employed for making diagnoses. We obtained 93.6% classification accuracy, 90.1% sensitivity, and 96.5% specificity in discriminating AD from NC. The classification scheme had an accuracy of 76.5% and sensitivity and specificity of 46.5% and 89.6%, respectively, for discriminating MCI from AD. Our method exhibited a superior classification performance compared with single modal approaches and yielded parallel accuracy to previous multimodal classification studies using MRI and FDG-PET.

  7. Reproducibility of qualitative assessments of temporal lobe atrophy in MRI studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarria-Estrada, S; Acevedo, C; Mitjana, R; Frascheri, L; Siurana, S; Auger, C; Rovira, A

    2015-01-01

    To determine the reproducibility of the Scheltens visual rating scale in establishing atrophy of the medial temporal lobe. We used coronal T1-weighted inversion recovery sequences on a 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner to study 25 patients with clinically diagnosed Alzheimer's disease or mild cognitive decline and 25 subjects without cognitive decline. Five neuroradiologists trained to apply the Scheltens visual rating scale analyzed the images. We used the interclass correlation coefficient to evaluate interrater and intrarater agreement. Raters scored 20 (80%) of the 25 patients with mild cognitive decline or Alzheimer's disease between 2 and 4; by contrast, they scored 21 (84%) of the 25 subjects without cognitive decline between 0 and 1. The interrater agreement was consistently greater than 0.82, with a 95% confidence interval of (0.7-0.9). The intrarater agreement ranged from 0.82 to 0.87, with a 95% confidence interval of (0.56-0.93). The Scheltens visual rating scale is reproducible among observers, and this finding supports its use in clinical practice. Copyright © 2013 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Sensorimotor Control of the Shoulder in Professional Volleyball Players with Isolated Infraspinatus Muscle Atrophy.

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    Contemori, Samuele; Biscarini, Andrea; Botti, Fabio Massimo; Busti, Daniele; Panichi, Roberto; Pettorossi, Vito Enrico

    2017-06-12

    Isolated infraspinatus muscle atrophy (IIMA) only affects the hitting shoulder of overhead-activity athletes, and is caused by suprascapular nerve neuropathy. No study has assessed the static and dynamic stability of the shoulder in overhead professional athletes with IIMA to reveal possible shoulder sensorimotor alterations. To assess the shoulder static stability, dynamic stability, and strength in professional volleyball players with IIMA and in healthy control players. Cross-sectional study. Research laboratory. Twenty-four male professional volleyball players (12 players with diagnosed IIMA and 12 healthy players) recruited from local volleyball teams. Static stability was evaluated with two independent force platforms and dynamic stability was assessed with the "Upper Quarter Y Balance Test". The static stability assessment was conducted in different support (single hand and both hand) and vision (open and closed eyes) conditions. Data from each test were analyzed with ANOVA and paired t-test models, to highlight statistical differences within and between groups. In addition to reduced abduction and external rotation strength, athletes with IIMA consistently demonstrated significant less static (P strength deficits. This condition could yield subtle alteration in the functional use of the shoulder and predispose it to acute or overuse injuries. The results of this study may help athletic trainers and physical/physiotherapists to prevent shoulder injuries and create specific proprioceptive and neuromuscular training programs.

  9. International Referral and Elderly Care—A Case of Atypical Parkinsonism and Cerebellar Atrophy

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    Ying-Hua Shieh

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A 66-year-old male patient had a history of hepatitis B, was a hepatitis C carrier, and had hypertension. He was referred to our family medicine international clinic by the Canadian Physician's Referral Service. He had had progressive general weakness over 2 years, and the symptom had recently exacerbated. He also had slurred speech, difficulty in swallowing with occasional choking, constipation, and urinary incontinence. He was diagnosed as having Parkinson disease, but his symptoms worsened despite treatment with levodopa 250mg four times daily for 2 years. He had sought medical help in many clinics in Taiwan and Canada and was referred to our outpatient clinic by his Canadian family physician. The neurologist suggested that the diagnosis was multiple system atrophy (MSA after history taking and neurologic examination. Rehabilitation programs, including physical therapy, occupational therapy and speech therapy, were arranged for him. Many Taiwanese immigrants prefer to come back to Taiwan for medical treatment. If we can integrate medical resources not only between different hospitals but also between different countries, many unnecessary medical expenses could be avoided. In this case, we summarized the case history and provided him with a CD of the images. This will be helpful in further care by a Canadian physician.

  10. Nursing diagnoses in overweight adolescents

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    Raphaela Santos do Nascimento Rodrigues

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify nursing diagnoses in overweight adolescents from public schools, according to the International Classification for Nursing Practice. A population-based cross-sectional study that investigated the socio-demographic, behavioural and psychological characteristics of adolescents aged from 10 to 14 years. 11 nursing diagnoses were identified: "Risk of overweight", "Risk of impaired adolescent development", "Risk of insecurity in parental role performance", "Risk of the family impaired ability to manage diet regime", "Risk of impaired ability to manage diet regime", "Risk of lack of knowledge of dietary regime", "Risk of excess food intake", "Risk of negative self-image", "Risk of low self-esteem", "Risk of impaired social well-being" and "Impaired exercise pattern". These diagnoses reflect the multifactorial nature of obesity, highlighting the need for interdisciplinary and intersectoral articulation of nursing interventions for prevention and control of overweight.

  11. Immunological methods for diagnosing neurocysticercosis

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    Kuhn, R.E.; Estrada, J.J.; Grogl, M.

    1989-01-31

    A method is described for diagnosing active human neurocysticercosis by detecting the presence of at least one Taenia solium larval antigen in cerebrospinal fluid, which comprises: contacting cerebrospinal fluid from a human to be diagnosed with a solid support, wherein the support binds with a Taenia solium larval antigen if present, contacting the support with a first antibody, wherein the first antibody binds with a larval Taenia solium antigen if present in the cerebrospinal fluid, contacting the solid support with a detectable second antibody which will bind with the first antibody, and detecting the second antibody bound to the support.

  12. FKBP51 Immunohistochemical Expression: A New Prognostic Biomarker for OSCC?

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    Daniela Russo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Up-to-date, several molecular markers of prognosis have been studied in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC, but none entered in the clinical setting. Therapy of OSCC tumors mainly relies on surgery, radiotherapy and partially on chemotherapy; there is an urgent need for biomarkers able to better stratify OSCC patients’ risk to address targeted therapeutic strategies. The role of immune response in the pathogenesis and biological behavior of OSCC has been investigated by several authors, and promising results have been obtained with immune checkpoint inhibitors. We already investigated the role of the immune modulator FK506-binding protein 51 (FKBP51, a FK506-binding immunophilin, in cutaneous melanoma biology, and its expression in several human solid tumors. In the present study, we aimed to assess the value of FKBP51 expression in OSCC tumor cells as a marker of outcome. We collected clinical data from 72 patients who underwent surgery for Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC of the tongue, floor, lips and palate. FKBP51 expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry on paraffin-embedded tumor tissues. In addition, we evaluated the human papillomavirus (HPV status of primary tumors by immunohistochemistry, viral subtyping and In Situ Hybridization (ISH assay. We found that high FKBP51-expressing tumors characterized the OSCCs with the worst prognosis: the high immunohistochemical expression of FKBP51 associated with death occurring within five years from the diagnosis with a sensitivity of 88.46% and a specificity of 91.67%. The estimated positive predictive value of the test was 88.45% and negative predictive value 91.67%. We tested FKBP51 mRNA presence, by RT-PCR assay, in a selected series of OSCC tumors, and we found that mRNA correlated well to the protein expression and to the clinical outcome. Applying the Bayes formula, we estimated an 88% probability of dying within five years from the diagnosis of OSCC patients with a high FKBP51

  13. How common is pelvic floor muscle atrophy after vaginal childbirth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, P; Shek, K L; Dietz, H P

    2014-01-01

    To determine if there is evidence of levator ani atrophy in primiparous women. This was a prospective observational cohort study of 202 primiparous women recruited between November 2006 and March 2008. Translabial ultrasound volumes were obtained at 36-38 weeks' gestation and at a mean of 4.5 months postpartum. Peripartum changes in bladder neck elevation and reduction of anteroposterior hiatal diameter on pelvic floor muscle contraction (PFMC) and changes in muscle thickness were analyzed. Of the 202 participants enrolled, 158 (78%) completed the study. There was a significant reduction in bladder neck elevation (P = 0.001) and change in anteroposterior hiatal diameter (P = 0.03) on PFMC when comparing antenatal and postnatal results, the latter being significantly associated with delivery mode (P = 0.013). No significant changes were detected in muscle thickness (P = 0.76). There is a reduction in sonographic measures of pelvic floor function after childbirth, but muscle atrophy is unlikely to be a significant factor. Copyright © 2013 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy: study of the Wolfram syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas-Gómez, Bernardette; Reza-Albarrán, Alfredo Adolfo

    2017-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WS), also known by the acronym DIDMOAD, is a rare and progresive hereditary disease of autosomal recessive inheritance which minimum ascertainment diagnostic criteria are the occurrence together of diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy before 15 years of age. To describe the clinical, biochemical and molecular profile of WS in a tertiary care hospital in Mexico. We reviewed patients records who fulfill the minimum ascertainment diagnostic criteria of WS presenting between January 1987 and May 2015 in a tertiary care hospital in Mexico. Five patients fulfill the inclusion criteria (three male and two female). Diabetes mellitus was the first manifestation of the syndrome in all of them, with a mean age at diagnosis of 5.8 ± 2.71 years, while the WS diagnosis was established at a mean age of 15.8 ± 8.37 years. All the patients had optic atrophy and two of them presented with the complete DIDMOAD spectrum. We found new associations with autoimmune hepatitis and testicular cancer. This study shows the variability of clinical presentation of WS, as well as two new associations.

  15. Periorbital muscle atrophy associated with topical bimatoprost therapy

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    Wang PX

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Priscilla Xinhui Wang, Victor Teck Chang Koh, Jin Fong ChengDepartment of Ophthalmology, National University Health System, SingaporeAbstract: Topical Bimatoprost is a common and popular prostaglandin analog used as an ocular hypotensive agent in the treatment of glaucoma. Side effects include ocular hyperaemia, ocular pruritus, and periocular and iris pigmentary changes. Perioribital lipodystrophy is another well-documented outcome associated with chronic use of topical bimatoprost, which results in periorbital hallowing, upper eyelid sulcus deepening, eyelid retraction and enophthalmos. We report an unusual case of periocular muscle atrophy and weakness from unilateral topical bimatoprost use. Our patient had primary angle closure and experienced a right upper eyelid ptosis 2 months after she started to use topical bimatoprost in that eye. Clinical measurements of her eyelids clearly showed reduction in the function of her right levator muscle, suggesting that effects of topical bimatoprost may not be limited to periorbital fat. She was advised to stop topical bimatoprost and right ptosis correction surgery with levator muscle advancement was performed successfully. Ophthalmologists and patients should be aware of this potential rare side effect of topical bimatoprost, as it may be potentially disfiguring, especially with monocular use. However, its exact mechanism of action needs to be clarified further.Keywords: prostaglandin analog, levator, muscle atrophy, muscle weakness, ptosis, side effects

  16. Development and Translation of Therapies for Spinal Muscular Atrophy

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    Hannah K. Shorrock

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder characterised by widespread loss of lower motor neurons from the spinal cord, leading to progressive weakness and muscle atrophy. SMA is largely caused by homozygous loss of the survival motor neuron (SMN 1 gene, resulting in reduced levels of full-length SMN protein. Although no approved treatment is currently available for SMA, several clinical trials investigating different approaches to increase SMN levels are showing promising early results. Trials investigating the use of therapies targeting muscle strength and neuroprotective pathways are also in progress, generating the possibility of delivering combination therapies utilising both SMN-dependent and SMN-independent targets. Due to an increased understanding of the cellular and molecular consequences of SMN depletion, a second wave of therapies targeted at pathways downstream of SMN are currently undergoing preclinical development. As these therapies move forward towards the clinic, new treatment options are likely to become available, raising the potential to generate an effective ‘cure’ for SMA.

  17. Molecular Mechanisms of Neurodegeneration in Spinal Muscular Atrophy

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    Saif Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is an autosomal recessive motor neuron disease with a high incidence and is the most common genetic cause of infant mortality. SMA is primarily characterized by degeneration of the spinal motor neurons that leads to skeletal muscle atrophy followed by symmetric limb paralysis, respiratory failure, and death. In humans, mutation of the Survival Motor Neuron 1 (SMN1 gene shifts the load of expression of SMN protein to the SMN2 gene that produces low levels of full-length SMN protein because of alternative splicing, which are sufficient for embryonic development and survival but result in SMA. The molecular mechanisms of the (a regulation of SMN gene expression and (b degeneration of motor neurons caused by low levels of SMN are unclear. However, some progress has been made in recent years that have provided new insights into understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of SMA pathogenesis. In this review, we have briefly summarized recent advances toward understanding of the molecular mechanisms of regulation of SMN levels and signaling mechanisms that mediate neurodegeneration in SMA.

  18. Therapy Development for Spinal Muscular Atrophy in SMN Independent Targets

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    Li-Kai Tsai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder, leading to progressive muscle weakness, atrophy, and sometimes premature death. SMA is caused by mutation or deletion of the survival motor neuron-1 (SMN1 gene. An effective treatment does not presently exist. Since the severity of the SMA phenotype is inversely correlated with expression levels of SMN, the SMN-encoded protein, SMN is the most important therapeutic target for development of an effective treatment for SMA. In recent years, numerous SMN independent targets and therapeutic strategies have been demonstrated to have potential roles in SMA treatment. For example, some neurotrophic, antiapoptotic, and myotrophic factors are able to promote survival of motor neurons or improve muscle strength shown in SMA mouse models or clinical trials. Plastin-3, cpg15, and a Rho-kinase inhibitor regulate axonal dynamics and might reduce the influences of SMN depletion in disarrangement of neuromuscular junction. Stem cell transplantation in SMA model mice resulted in improvement of motor behaviors and extension of survival, likely from trophic support. Although most therapies are still under investigation, these nonclassical treatments might provide an adjunctive method for future SMA therapy.

  19. No evidence of genetic heterogeneity in dominant optic atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonneau, D; Souied, E; Gerber, S; Rozet, J M; D'Haens, E; Journel, H; Plessis, G; Weissenbach, J; Munnich, A; Kaplan, J

    1995-01-01

    Autosomal dominant optic atrophy (OPA, MIM 165500) is an eye disease causing a variable reduction of visual acuity with an insidious onset in the first six years of life. It is associated with a central scotoma and an acquired blue-yellow dyschromatopsia. A gene for dominant optic atrophy (OPA1) has recently been mapped to chromosome 3q in three large Danish pedigrees. Here, we confirm the mapping of OPA1 to chromosome 3q28-qter by showing close linkage of the disease locus to three recently reported microsatellite DNA markers in the interval defined by loci D3S1314 and D3S1265 in four French families (Zmax = 5.13 at theta = 0 for probe AFM 308yf1 at locus D3S1601). Multipoint analysis supports the mapping of the disease gene to the genetic interval defined by loci D3S1314 and D3S1265. The present study provides three new markers closely linked to the disease gene for future genetic studies in OPA. PMID:8825922

  20. Visual signs and symptoms of multiple system atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Richard A

    2014-11-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a rare movement disorder and a member of the 'parkinsonian syndromes', which also include Parkinson's disease (PD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and corticobasal degeneration (CBD). Multiple system atrophy is a complex syndrome, in which patients exhibit a variety of signs and symptoms, including parkinsonism, ataxia and autonomic dysfunction. It can be difficult to separate MSA from the other parkinsonian syndromes but if ocular signs and symptoms are present, they may aid differential diagnosis. Typical ocular features of MSA include blepharospasm, excessive square-wave jerks, mild to moderate hypometria of saccades, impaired vestibular-ocular reflex (VOR), nystagmus and impaired event-related evoked potentials. Less typical features include slowing of saccadic eye movements, the presence of vertical gaze palsy, visual hallucinations and an impaired electroretinogram (ERG). Aspects of primary vision such as visual acuity, colour vision or visual fields are usually unaffected. Management of the disease to deal with problems of walking, movement, daily tasks and speech problems is important in MSA. Optometrists can work in collaboration with the patient and health-care providers to identify and manage the patient's visual deficits. A more specific role for the optometrist is to correct vision to prevent falls and to monitor the anterior eye to prevent dry eye and control blepharospasm. © 2014 The Author. Clinical and Experimental Optometry © 2014 Optometrists Association Australia.

  1. Current Status of Treatment of Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumiaki Tanaka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA is the first member identified among polyglutamine diseases characterized by slowly progressive muscle weakness and atrophy of the bulbar, facial, and limb muscles pathologically associated with motor neuron loss in the spinal cord and brainstem. Androgen receptor (AR, a disease-causing protein of SBMA, is a well-characterized ligand-activated transcription factor, and androgen binding induces nuclear translocation, conformational change and recruitment of coregulators for transactivation of AR target genes. Some therapeutic strategies for SBMA are based on these native functions of AR. Since ligand-induced nuclear translocation of mutant AR has been shown to be a critical step in motor neuron degeneration in SBMA, androgen deprivation therapies using leuprorelin and dutasteride have been developed and translated into clinical trials. Although the results of these trials are inconclusive, renewed clinical trials with more sophisticated design might prove the effectiveness of hormonal intervention in the near future. Furthermore, based on the normal function of AR, therapies targeted for conformational changes of AR including amino-terminal (N and carboxy-terminal (C (N/C interaction and transcriptional coregulators might be promising. Other treatments targeted for mitochondrial function, ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS, and autophagy could be applicable for all types of polyglutamine diseases.

  2. The evolution of alexia and simultanagnosia in posterior cortical atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, M F; Cherrier, M M

    1998-04-01

    Early alexia and higher visual impairments characterize Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA), a progressive dementing syndrome most often caused by Alzheimer disease. Posterior cortical atrophy is rare, and the nature of the visual impairments in PCA are unclear. The authors observed two patients who had an insidiously progressive reading difficulty characterized by letter-by-letter reading and otherwise intact cognitive functions. Over time, these patients developed "ventral simultanagnosia" with preserved detection of multiple stimuli but inability to interpret whole scenes. Subsequently, they progressed to Balint syndrome with "dorsal simultanagnosia," optic ataxia, and oculomotor apraxia. Structural imaging was normal, but functional imaging revealed posterior cortical dysfunction. On a letter reading task, both patients had a word superiority effect, and on a whole word reading task, they could not read most words with missing or crosshatched letters. An inability to assess whole scenes progressed to an inability to detect more than one stimulus in an array. These findings suggest an evolution of PCA with progressive difficulty in visual integration beginning with letters, progressing to whole scenes, and culminating in Balint syndrome. These changes may reflect an extension of the pathophysiology of PCA from the extrastriate visual cortex to its occipitotemporal and occipitoparietal connections.

  3. Aldosterone-producing adrenocortical carcinoma with prominent hepatic metastasis diagnosed by liver biopsy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Kennosuke; Hayashi, Takeshi; Sakamoto, Masaya; Iuchi, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Hirofumi; Ebisawa, Takanori; Tojo, Katsuyoshi; Sasano, Hironobu; Utsunomiya, Kazunori

    2016-01-16

    Aldosterone-producing adrenocortical carcinoma is a rare malignancy, which is usually diagnosed by histopathological examination of the excised tumor. In inoperable cases, aldosterone-producing ACC diagnosed by immunohistochemical staining of the metastatic tumor for Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 11β has not previously been reported and even in that case staining for adrenocortical-specific adrenal 4 binding protein/steroidogenic factor1 (Ad4BP/SF1) and steroidogenic enzymes has not been reported. We report the case of a 67-year-old Japanese woman with aldosterone-producing adrenocortical carcinoma. Laboratory findings showed severe hypopotassemia. Endocrinological examination revealed an increased plasma aldosterone concentration and suppressed plasma renin activity. Plasma dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) was elevated. Diurnal variation in serum cortisol was lost and administration of 1 mg and 8 mg dexamethasone did not suppress serum cortisol levels. From the 24-h urine collection sample, urine aldosterone and urine cortisol levels were greatly increased. Therefore, autonomous excess production was observed for the three adrenal cortex hormones. Abdominal computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed a right adrenal tumor and a huge liver tumor. Adrenocortical carcinoma with metastatic liver cancer was strongly suggested, however surgery could not be considered due to stage IV disease: the liver tumor was too large and cardiac ultrasonography indicated that her cardiac function was poor. Therefore, a liver biopsy was taken to properly determine the diagnosis. Immunohistochemical stains for Ad4BP/SF1 and steroidogenic enzymes were positive. Ad4BP/SF-1 was originally identified as a steroidogenic, tissue-specific transcription factor implicated in the expression of the steroidogenic CYP gene encoding cytochrome P450s. Hence we could diagnose the patient as having adrenocortical carcinoma with metastatic liver cancer. This rare case had severe

  4. How Is Pulmonary Hypertension Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ankles A bluish color on your lips and skin Diagnosis Your doctor will diagnose pulmonary hypertension (PH) based ... and legs for swelling and your lips and skin for a bluish color. These are signs of ... and procedures to confirm a diagnosis of PH and to look for its underlying ...

  5. Diagnoses and interventions in podiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuijderduin, W M; Dekker, J

    1996-01-01

    In the present study a quantitative description is given of diagnoses and interventions in podiatry. Data are used from a survey on podiatry practice in The Netherlands. Data have been recorded by 36 podiatrists on 897 patients. Information was gathered on patient characteristics, the medical diagnoses, the podiatry diagnoses (impairments and disabilities), treatment goals derived from these diagnoses, and interventions. Impairments were recorded in nearly all patients. The interrelationship among impairments was analysed. Four dimensions of highly interrelated impairments were found. Disabilities were recorded in about one-third of the patients. Only one dimension of interrelated disabilities was identified. Podiatric soles were applied in the treatment of two-thirds of the patients, silicone devices in one-fifth of the patients and nail braces in only a few patients. Advice, instruction and exercise was given in one-third of the patients, while basic foot care was given in a quarter of the patients. Significant relationships between treatment goals and the application of interventions were found. The main conclusions from this study are: (1) the podiatry diagnosis is primarily at the level of impairments; (2) treatment goals derived from impairments determine which interventions are applied. The implications of these findings with regard to the further development of the podiatry diagnosis and the design of studies on the outcome of podiatric interventions are discussed.

  6. Diagnoses and interventions in podiatry.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuijderduin, W.M.; Dekker, J.

    1996-01-01

    In the present study a quantitative description is given of diagnoses and interventions in podiatry. Data are used from a survey on podiatry practice in The Netherlands. Data have been recorded by 36 podiatrists on 897 patients. Information was gathered on patient characteristics, the medical

  7. Apoptosis Activation in Human Carious Dentin. An Immunohistochemical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loreto, C.; Psaila, A.; Musumeci, G.; Castorina, S.; Leonardi, R.

    2015-01-01

    The exact mechanisms and enzymes involved in caries progression are largely unclear. Apoptosis plays a key role in dentin remodelling related to damage repair; however, it is unclear whether apoptosis in decayed teeth is activated through the extrinsic or the intrinsic pathway. This ex vivo immunohistochemical study explored the localization of TRAIL, DR5, Bcl-2 and Bax, the main proteins involved in apoptosis, in teeth with advanced caries. To evaluate TRAIL, DR5, Bcl-2 and Bax immunoexpressions twelve permanent carious premolars were embedded in paraffin and processed for immunohistochemistry. The results showed that TRAIL and DR5 were overexpressed in dentin and in pulp vessels and mononuclear cells; strong Bax immunostaining was detected in dilated dentinal tubules close to the lesion, and Bcl-2 staining was weak in some dentin areas under the cavity or altogether absent. These findings suggest that both apoptosis pathways are activated in dental caries. Further studies are required to gain insights into its biomolecular mechanisms. PMID:26428882

  8. Variations in immunohistochemical preservation of proteins in a mummification model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Ryan; Freemont, Tony

    2012-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry is an important tool in the investigation of ancient mummified remains because of its ability not only to detect proteins but also to isolate their location to specific tissues and thereby improve confidence that the results are genuine. A mouse model of Egyptian mummification has been used to demonstrate that the survival of proteins, judged by the retention of immunohistochemical staining, varies markedly. Some survive the process well, whereas others become barely detectable despite the morphology of the tissue being excellently preserved. The results obtained show that protein preservation is multi-factorial, with tissue type and degradation, and the properties of the protein itself all having significant effects. Proteins forming large, multi-subunit complexes such as collagen IV appear to be more resistant to degradation than those that do not, such as S-100. Although modern modelling studies cannot replicate the full extent of degradative processes and taphonomic changes experienced by real mummies, the results obtained can be useful for guiding research that requires ancient tissues. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Anatomy © 2011 Anatomical Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

  9. Pathological and immunohistochemical study of lethal primary brain stem injuries

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    Rongchao Sun

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many of the deaths that occur shortly after injury or in hospitals are caused by mild trauma. Slight morphological changes are often found in the brain stems of these patients during autopsy. The purpose of this study is to investigate the histopathological changes involved in primary brain stem injuries (PBSI and their diagnostic significance. Methods A total of 65 patients who had died of PBSI and other conditions were randomly selected. They were divided into 2 groups, an injury group (25 cases and a control group (20 cases. Slides of each patient’s midbrain, pons, and medulla oblongata were prepared and stained with HE, argentaffin, and immunohistochemical agents (GFAP, NF, amyloid-ß, MBP. Under low power (×100 and NF staining, the diameter of the thickest longitudinal axon was measured at its widest point. Ten such diameters were collected for each part of the brain (midbrain, pons, and medulla oblongata. Data were recorded and analyzed statistically. Results Brain stem contusions, astrocyte activity, edema, and pathological changes in the neurons were visibly different in the injury and control groups (P P  Conclusions These histopathological changes may prove beneficial to the pathological diagnosis of PBSI during autopsy. The measurement of axon diameters provides a referent quantitative index for the diagnosis of the specific causes of death involved in PBSI. Virtual Slides The virtual slide(s for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1345298818712204

  10. Immunohistochemical expression of CD56 in dog (Canis familiaris) odontogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nel, Sulette; van Heerden, Marlene; van Heerden, Willie

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the expression of CD56 in dog odontogenesis in order to elucidate the expression found in ameloblastomas. Immunohistochemical analysis of CD56 expression of developing dog teeth in the bud, cap and bell stages including the remnants of the dental lamina. Weak CD56 expression was observed in the dental epithelium during the bud stage with intense staining of certain peripheral epithelial cells. Positive staining of epithelial cells was also observed in the cap stage with intense staining of the inner enamel epithelium at this stage. During the bell stage the staining was concentrated on the cervical loop areas. The dental papilla revealed positive staining throughout the cap and bell stages while the dental follicle stained intensely positive throughout all the phases examined. The dental lamina and Serres rests also stained positive for CD56. The expression of CD56 in dog odontogenic tissue varies according to the stage of tooth development. There is a positive correlation between the positive staining observed in ameloblastomas and their odontogenic cells of origin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Ulcerative Granular Cell Tumor: A Clinicopathological and Immunohistochemical Study

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    Mohamed El-Khalawany

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Granular cell tumor (GCT is uncommonly presented with cutaneous ulcer. We examined the clinicopathological and immunohistochemical features of this ulcerative form in fourteen cases that may raise the awareness of this variant. The study included 11 males and 3 females with a mean age 31.5 ± 7.42 years. All cases were presented with large solitary ulcer with indurated base, elevated border, skin colored margin, and necrotic floor. Twelve lesions were located on the extremities and two lesions on the genital region. Histologically, the lesions showed dermal infiltrate composed of large polygonal cells with granular cytoplasm and characteristic infiltration of the dermal muscles in all cases. Immunostaining showed positive reaction for S100 (14/14, NSE (14/14, CD68 (5/14, and Vimentin (7/14 while HMB45, CK, EMA, and Desmin were negative. We hope that this paper increases the awareness of ulcerative GCT and consider it in the differential diagnosis of ulcerative lesions.

  12. Immunohistochemical evaluation of myofibroblast density in odontogenic cysts and tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouhsoltani, Maryam; Halimi, Monireh; Jabbari, Golchin

    2016-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to investigate myofibroblast (MF) density in a broad spectrum of odontogenic cysts and tumors and the relation between the density of MFs and the clinical behavior of these lesions. Methods. A total of 105 cases of odontogenic lesions, including unicystic ameloblastoma (UAM), solid ameloblastoma (SA), odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), dentigerous cyst (DC), radicular cyst (RC) (15 for each category), and odontogenic myxoma (OM), adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT), calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) (10 for each category), were immunohistochemically stained with anti-α-smooth muscle actin antibody. The mean percentage of positive cells in 10 high-power fields was considered as MF density for each case. Results. A statistically significant difference was observed in the mean scores between the study groups (P odontogenic tumors compared to odontogenic cysts (P odontogenic tumors, except between UAM and OM (P = 0.041). The difference between OKC and odontogenic tumors was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). The number of MFs was significantly higher in OKC and lower in COC compared to other odontogenic cysts (P = 0.007 and P = 0.045, respectively). Conclusion. The results of the present study suggest a role for MFs in the aggressive behavior of odontogenic lesions. MFs may represent an important target of therapy, especially for aggressive odontogenic lesions. Our findings support the classification of OKC in the category of odontogenic tumors.

  13. Immunohistochemical Analysis of P63 Expression in Odontogenic Lesions

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    Saede Atarbashi Moghadam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available P63 may have a role in tumorigenesis and cytodifferentiation of odontogenic lesions. We investigated the immunohistochemical expression of P63 in a total of 30 cases of odontogenic cysts and tumors. The percentage of positive cells was calculated in the lining of odontogenic cysts and islands of ameloblastoma. P63 expression was evident in all types of odontogenic lesions. P63 was expressed throughout the lining epithelium of odontogenic keratocyst except surface parakeratinized layer. In addition, calcifying odontogenic cyst showed P63 expression in all layers. In almost all radicular and dentigerous cysts, the basal and parabasal layers were immunoreactive. Peripheral cells of ameloblastoma expressed P63; however, stellate reticulum had weaker immunostaining. No significant difference in P63 expression was observed between studied lesions (. Expression of P63 in odontogenic lesions suggests that this protein is important in differentiation and proliferation of odontogenic epithelial cells. However, it seems that it could not be a useful marker to differentiate between aggressive and nonaggressive lesions. P63 also represents a progenitor or basal cell marker, and it is not expressed in mature differentiated cells.

  14. Immunohistochemical Distribution of a Breast Cancer-Associated Glycoprotein

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    P. D. Rye

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The tissue distribution and specificity of a glycoprotein of Mr 230 OOOkDa which has previously been identified from breast carcinomas in culture and shown to be tumour-associated, has been assessed using a polyclonal antiserum. A wide range of tissues has been examined immunohistochemically. The tissue distribution of the glycoprotein show differences between normal, benign and malignant breast and other epithelial tissues, and are clearly specific for epithelial cells. This glycoprotein as detected by the polyclonal antiserum P5252-2, was either absent or showed a minimal presence in normal breast tissues. Evidence of the expression of the glycoprotein in hyperplastic breast was observed but was considerably less than that seen for carcinomas, for which 70% had greater than 50% of cells exhibiting reactivity with P5252-2. There was no relationship with grade or node status. Similar striking differences in glycoprotein expression between non-neoplastic and neoplastic tissue were observed for stomach, large intestine, thyroid and to lesser extent ovary. The di fferences in the expression of this glycoprotein between normal and malignant tissues is of obvious clinical and pathological potential.

  15. Immunohistochemical detection of P53 and Mdm2 in vitiligo

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    Ola A Bakry

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vitiligo is a common depigmented skin disorder that is caused by selective destruction of melanocytes. It is generally accepted that the main function of melanin resides in the protection of skin cells against the deleterious effect of ultraviolet rays (UVRs. Association of vitiligo and skin cancer has been a subject of controversy. Occurrence of skin cancer in long-lasting vitiligo is rare despite multiple evidences of DNA damage in vitiliginous skin. Aim: To detect the expression of P53 and Mdm2 proteins in both depigmented and normally pigmented skin of vitiligo patients and to compare it to control subjects suffering from nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC. Materials and Methods: Thirty-four patients with vitiligo and 30 age and sex-matched patients with nodulo-ulcerative basal cell carcinoma (BCC as a control group were selected. Both patients and control subjects had outdoor occupations. Skin biopsies were taken from each case and control subjects. Histopathological examination of Hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections was done. Expression of P53 and Mdm2 proteins were examined immunohistochemically. Results: Both P53 and Mdm2 were strongly expressed in depigmented as well as normally pigmented skin of vitiligo patients. This expression involved the epidermis, skin adnexa and blood vessels with significant differences between cases and controls. Conclusions: The overexpression of P53 and Mdm2 proteins in both normally pigmented and depigmented skin of patients with vitiligo could contribute to the decreased occurrence of actinic damage and NMSC in these patients.

  16. Hidradenoma Papilliferum With Oncocytic Metaplasia: A Histopathological and Immunohistochemical Study.

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    Elbendary, Amira; Cochran, Eric; Xie, Qiang; Kabigting, Filamer; Pereira, Leanne; Elston, Dirk M; Heilman, Edward

    2016-06-01

    Hidradenoma papilliferum is a benign cutaneous adnexal neoplasm, commonly occurring in the vulva and perianal region of adult women. It has characteristic histopathological features composed of anastomosing and branching tubules, lined by columnar cells, and a basal layer of myoepithelial cells. A 39-year-old woman was evaluated for 2 asymptomatic labial masses. The histopathological examination revealed a Bartholin's cyst and a hidradenoma papilliferum. The latter contains a distinct area of oncocytic/oxyphilic metaplasia. Immunohistochemical stains revealed positive staining for gross cystic disease fluid protein (GCDFP)-15 and androgen receptor. GATA-3, a protein expressed in sweat glands, highlights a similar positive staining pattern with weaker staining in areas of oncocytic metaplasia. P63 highlighted the myoepithelial differentiation. In situ hybridization for Human Papilloma Virus 6, 11, 16, and 18 was negative. P53 was negative and Ki-67 was low, confirming its benign nature. Oncocytes are enlarged epithelial cells with voluminous eosinophilic granular cytoplasm resulting from staining of nonribosomal cytoplasmic components. Few reports documented it in hidradenoma papilliferum. Our case demonstrated a florid distinct appearance of this metaplasia. The immunoprofiles of this oncocytic metaplasia such as p53 negativity and positivity for androgen receptor and GCDFP-15 demonstrates similarity to apocrine metaplasia in the breast. The authors' case demonstrates the benign nature of oncocytic metaplasia and supports the common origin of oncocytic cells and columnar cells in hidradenoma papilliferum.

  17. Meningeal Hemangiopericytomas and Meningomas: a Comparative Immunohistochemical and Genetic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabelsi, Saoussen; Mama, Nadia; Chourabi, Maroua; Mastouri, Maroua Haddaji; Ladib, Mohamed; Popov, Sergey; Burford, Anna; Mokni, Moncef; Tlili, Kalthoum; Krifa, Hedi; Jones, Chris; Yacoubi, Mohamed Tahar; Saad, Ali; Brahim, Dorra H'mida-Ben

    2015-01-01

    The meningeal hemangiopericytoma (MHPC) is a vascular tumor arising from pericytes. Most intracranial MHPCs resemble meningiomas (MNGs) in their clinical presentation and histological features and may therefore be misdiagnosed, despite important differences in prognosis. We report 8 cases of MHPC and 5 cases of MNG collected from 2007 to 2011 from the Neuro-Surgery and Histopathology departments. All 13 samples were re reviewed by two independent pathologists and investigated by immunohistochemistry (IHC) using mesenchymal, epithelial and neuro-glial markers. Additionally, we screened all tumors for a large panel of chromosomal alterations using multiplex ligation probe amplification (MLPA). Presence of the NAB2-STAT6 fusion gene was inferred by immunohistochemical staining for STAT6. Compared with MNG, MHPCs showed strong VIM (100% of cases), CD99 (62%), bcl-2 (87%), and p16 (75%) staining but only focal positivity with EMA (33%) and NSE (37%). The p21 antibody was positive in 62% of MHPC and less than 1% in all MNGs. MLPA data did not distinguish HPC from MNG, with PTEN loss and ERBB2 gain found in both. By contrast, STAT6 nuclear staining was observed in 3 MHPC cases and was absent from MNG. MNG and MHPC comprise a spectrum of tumors that cannot be easily differentiated based on histopathology. The presence of STAT6 nuclear positivity may however be a useful diagnostic marker.

  18. Immunohistochemical evaluation of myofibroblast density in odontogenic cysts and tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouhsoltani, Maryam; Halimi, Monireh; Jabbari, Golchin

    2016-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to investigate myofibroblast (MF) density in a broad spectrum of odontogenic cysts and tumors and the relation between the density of MFs and the clinical behavior of these lesions. Methods. A total of 105 cases of odontogenic lesions, including unicystic ameloblastoma (UAM), solid ameloblastoma (SA), odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), dentigerous cyst (DC), radicular cyst (RC) (15 for each category), and odontogenic myxoma (OM), adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT), calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) (10 for each category), were immunohistochemically stained with anti-α-smooth muscle actin antibody. The mean percentage of positive cells in 10 high-power fields was considered as MF density for each case. Results. A statistically significant difference was observed in the mean scores between the study groups (P cysts (P 0.05). The number of MFs was significantly higher in OKC and lower in COC compared to other odontogenic cysts (P = 0.007 and P = 0.045, respectively). Conclusion. The results of the present study suggest a role for MFs in the aggressive behavior of odontogenic lesions. MFs may represent an important target of therapy, especially for aggressive odontogenic lesions. Our findings support the classification of OKC in the category of odontogenic tumors. PMID:27092213

  19. Immunohistochemical Analysis of Vimentin in Oral Submucous Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Meghanand T.; Singh, Anjali; Desai, Rajiv S.; Vanaki, S. S.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Oral submucous fibrosis (OSF), a precancerous condition, is characterized by abnormal accumulation of collagen fibers in oral submucosa. Vimentin is a Class 2 intermediate filament (IF) and primarily expressed in cells of mesenchymal origin. Vimentin is also found to be involved in cell growth, cell cycling, and tumour differentiation. Objective. The purpose of the study was to compare the expression of vimentin in various histological grades of OSF. Materials and Methods. To assess the immunohistochemical expression of vimentin in 20 mild cases of OSF, 20 severe cases of OSF, and ten cases of normal oral buccal mucosa. Results. The overall staining intensity of vimentin significantly increased statistically (P < 0.01) in OSF cases over normal control. A significant increase in the staining intensity of vimentin was also noted in the fibroblasts of severe cases of OSF (P = 0.03). Conclusion. Considering the marked vimentin expression in the present study, future studies should include cytoskeleton IF and other filaments in the fibroblasts of OSF. PMID:23840210

  20. Immunohistochemical Analysis of Vimentin in Oral Submucous Fibrosis

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    Meghanand T. Nayak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Oral submucous fibrosis (OSF, a precancerous condition, is characterized by abnormal accumulation of collagen fibers in oral submucosa. Vimentin is a Class 2 intermediate filament (IF and primarily expressed in cells of mesenchymal origin. Vimentin is also found to be involved in cell growth, cell cycling, and tumour differentiation. Objective. The purpose of the study was to compare the expression of vimentin in various histological grades of OSF. Materials and Methods. To assess the immunohistochemical expression of vimentin in 20 mild cases of OSF, 20 severe cases of OSF, and ten cases of normal oral buccal mucosa. Results. The overall staining intensity of vimentin significantly increased statistically (P<0.01 in OSF cases over normal control. A significant increase in the staining intensity of vimentin was also noted in the fibroblasts of severe cases of OSF (P=0.03. Conclusion. Considering the marked vimentin expression in the present study, future studies should include cytoskeleton IF and other filaments in the fibroblasts of OSF.

  1. Immunohistochemical analysis of PDK1 expression in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenic, Ruza

    2014-04-16

    3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1) functions downstream of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PIK3) and activates members of the AGC family of protein kinases that are known to play crucial roles in physiological processes associated with cell metabolism, growth, proliferation and survival. Changes in the expression and activity of PDK1 and several AGC kinases have been linked to human disease, including cancer. We used immunohistochemical analysis to determine PDK1 expression in 241 tumors from patients with breast cancer in which we had previously analyzed PIK3CA mutation status. Moderate or high expression of PDK1 was observed in 213 of the 241 cases (88%). There was no correlation between PIK3CA mutation status and PDK1 overexpression. Our findings indicate that PDK1 is independently activated in breast cancer and not only as part of the PIK3CA pathway, suggesting that PDK1 plays a specific and distinct role from the canonical PIK3/Akt pathway and promotes oncogenesis independently of AKT. Our data implicate PDK-1 and downstream components of the PDK-1 signaling pathway as promising therapeutic targets for the treatment of breast cancer.

  2. HURTLE CELLS IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL ACTIVITIES IN HASHIMOTO THYROIDITIS PARENCHYMA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsagareli, Z; Kvachadze, T; Melikadze, E; Metreveli, L; Nikobadze, E; Gogiashvili, L

    2016-11-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the participation and utility of Hǘrtle cells morphological requirment and transformation under Hashimoto autoimmune thyroiditis versus Riedel´s struma. Several markers have been evaluated to detect induced activities of Hǘrtle cells. Study subject - specimens (tissue fragments) collected from TG surgery (thyroidectomy) for mollecular (receptor) diagnosis of Hǘrtle cells activities using routine histological and immunohistochemical samples. 89 cases were selected in Hashimoto thyroiditis diagnosis with Hǘrtle cells history (adenoma and adenomatous grouth of oncocytes). Markers as: TSH receptors, TTF-1, S-100 protein, also anti-TPO and anti-TG levels in blood plasm were detected. It was shown that solid cell claster-nests like agregation of oncocytes and adenomatous growth foci in parafollicular areas with anti-TPO and anti-TG antibodies levels arising while Riedel´s struma shown only large intra- and extra glandular inflammatory proliferative fibrosing process. Large positive expression of TTF-1 and S-100 protein and the negative reaction of TSH receptor factor suggest that Thyroid parenchyma disorganization and mollecular biological atypia with Hǘrtle cells are proceses due to hypothyreoidismus, as well as neuroectodermal cells prominent activities in 70% of Hashimoto cases.

  3. Protozoal Meningoencephalitis in Sea Otters (Enhydra lutris): a Histopathological and Immunohistochemical Study of Naturally Occuring Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, N.J.; Dubey, J.P.; Lindsay, D.S.; Cole, R.A.; Meteyer, C.U.

    2007-01-01

    Protozoal meningoencephalitis is considered to be an important cause of mortality in the California sea otter (Enhydra lutris). Thirty nine of 344 (11.3%) California (CA) and Washington state (WA) sea otters examined from 1985 to 2004 had histopathological evidence of significant protozoal meningoencephalitis. The aetiological agents and histopathological changes associated with these protozoal infections are described. The morphology of the actively multiplicative life stages of the organisms (tachyzoites for Toxoplasma gondii and merozoites for Sarcocystis neurona) and immunohistochemical labelling were used to identify infection with S. neurona (n=22, 56.4%), T. gondii (n=5, 12.8%) or dual infection with both organisms (n=12, 30.8%). Active S. neurona was present in all dual infections, while most had only the latent form of T. gondii. In S. neurona meningoencephalitis, multifocal to diffuse gliosis was widespread in grey matter and consistently present in the molecular layer of the cerebellum. In T. gondii meningoencephalitis, discrete foci of gliosis and malacia were more widely separated, sometimes incorporated pigment-laden macrophages and mineral, and were found predominantly in the cerebral cortex. Quiescent tissue cysts of T. gondii were considered to be incidental and not a cause of clinical disease and mortality. Protozoal meningoencephalitis was diagnosed more frequently in the expanding population of WA sea otters (10 of 31, 32.3%) than in the declining CA population (29 of 313, 9.3%). Among sea otters with protozoal meningoencephalitis, those that had displayed neurological signs prior to death had active S. neurona encephalitis, supporting the conclusion that S. neurona is the most significant protozoal pathogen in the central nervous system of sea otters.

  4. Effectiveness of an immunohistochemical protocol for Leishmania detection in different clinical forms of American tegumentary leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Fernanda A; Soares, Rodrigo P; Almeida, Gregório G; Souza, Carolina C; Melo, Maria N; Pinto, Sebastião A; Quixabeira, Valeria B; Pereira, Ledice I; Dorta, Miriam L; Ribeiro-Dias, Fatima; Silveira, Fernando T; Silva, Sydnei M; Gontijo, Celia M; Tafuri, Wagner L

    2017-02-01

    American tegumentary leishmaniasis (ATL) is a neglected disease widely distributed in Latin America. In Brazil, it is caused by different Leishmania species belonging to the Subgenera Viannia and Leishmania. ATL diagnosis is routinely based on clinical, epidemiological, parasitological and immunological (delayed-type hypersensitivity skin test-DTH) evidences. The main objective of this work was to determine the efficacy of a previous immunohistochemical (IHC) method developed by our group. Seventy eight skin biopsies from patients with different ATL clinical forms and origins were evaluated. The method was previously standardized in ATL patients from the municipality of Caratinga, Minas Gerais, Brazil, all infected with Leishmania (V.) braziliensis. Here, it is evaluated in patients from the North, Southeast and Midwest regions of Brazil. Clinical, parasitological (biopsy PCR) and immunological (Montenegro skin test-MST) diagnosis were performed prior to IHC procedure. The IHC procedure detected 70.5% of the cases having a high agreement with MST diagnosis (kappa=0.84). A distinguished contribution of this work is that IHC succeed in diagnosing some negative DTH patients. Those were infected with Leishmania (L.) amazonensis, commonly causing the anergic form of the disease. In conclusion, IHC succeed in detecting ATL caused by different Leishmania species from various geographic regions and clinical status. Although it was not able to detect ATL in all patients, it was better than MST providing an additional tool for the diagnosis of ATL patients. There was no significant correlation between clinical forms and histological features including the presence of necrosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Histopathological and immunohistochemical approaches for the diagnosis of Pasteurellosis in swine population of Punjab

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    Payal Bhat

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Infectious porcine bronchopneumonia, caused by Pasteurella multocida, is a widespread disease of major economic significance. Thus, the aim of the present study was to diagnose swine Pasteurellosis using gross, histopathological, and immunopathological approaches in the swine population of Punjab and to compare the efficacy of immunohistochemical (IHC techniques with conventional diagnostic techniques. Materials and Methods: A total of 71 adult swine lung samples showing gross pneumonic changes were collected along with the associated lymph nodes to carry out the study. The collected samples were then processed for histopathological and IHC studies. Results: Out of the total 71 lung samples, 26 samples were found to be suspected for Pasteurellosis as per the microscopic changes observed, and out of these 26 samples, 16 cases were confirmed to be positive for Pasteurellosis by IHC. Varied macroscopic changes noted in lungs were pneumonic patches with consolidation of many lobes, congestion, and focal hemorrhages. Main lesions associated with lymph nodes were its enlargement and hemorrhages. Histologically, the lung showed fibrinous and suppurative bronchopneumonia, multifocal suppuration, thickening of septa with fibrin combined with cellular infiltration and edema. The higher IHC expression of P. multocida was seen in the bronchial epithelium besides in alveolar and bronchial exudate. Moreover, on comparing the histopathological and IHC scores which were calculated on the basis of characteristic microscopic lesions and number of antigen positive cells, respectively, a significant positive correlation (r=0.4234 was found. Conclusion: It was concluded that swine population of Punjab is having P. multocida infection. The gross and histopathological lesions can be helpful in the preliminary diagnosis of Pasteurellosis but needs to be supplemented by other immunodiagnostic tests. Moreover, IHC technique proved to be a specific, reliable, precise

  6. MRI derived brain atrophy in PSP and MSA-P. Determining sample size to detect treatment effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paviour, Dominic C; Price, Shona L; Lees, Andrew J; Fox, Nick C

    2007-04-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and multiple system (MSA) atrophy are associated with progressive brain atrophy. Serial MRI can be applied in order to measure this change in brain volume and to calculate atrophy rates. We evaluated MRI derived whole brain and regional atrophy rates as potential markers of progression in PSP and the Parkinsonian variant of multiple system atrophy (MSA-P). 17 patients with PSP, 9 with MSA-P and 18 healthy controls underwent two MRI brain scans. MRI scans were registered, and brain and regional atrophy rates (midbrain, pons, cerebellum, third and lateral ventricles) measured. Sample sizes required to detect the effect of a proposed disease-modifying treatment were estimated. The effect of scan interval on the variance of the atrophy rates and sample size was assessed. Based on the calculated yearly rates of atrophy, for a drug effect equivalent to a 30% reduction in atrophy, fewer PSP subjects are required in each treatment arm when using midbrain rather than whole brain atrophy rates (183 cf. 499). Fewer MSA-P subjects are required, using pontine/cerebellar, rather than whole brain atrophy rates (164/129 cf. 794). A reduction in the variance of measured atrophy rates was observed with a longer scan interval. Regional rather than whole brain atrophy rates calculated from volumetric serial MRI brain scans in PSP and MSA-P provide a more practical and powerful means of monitoring disease progression in clinical trials.

  7. Luminal B tumors are the most frequent molecular subtype in breast cancer of North African women: an immunohistochemical profile study from Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Breast cancer may be classified into luminal A, luminal B, HER2+/ER-, basal-like and normal-like subtypes based on gene expression profiling or immunohistochemical (IHC) characteristics. The aim of our study is to show the molecular profile characteristic of breast cancer in the North African population of Morocco. This work showed preliminary results and correlations with clinicopathological and histological parameters. Three hundred and ninety primary breast carcinomas tumor tissues were immunostained for ER, PR, HER2, CK5/6, CK8/18 and Ki67 using paraffin tissue. Methods We reviewed 390 cases of breast cancer diagnosed on January 2008 to December 2011 at the Department of pathology, Hassan II teaching hospital, Fez, Morocco. Age, size tumor, metastatic profile, node involvement profile, histological type and immunohistochemical profile were studied. Results The average age was 46 years; our patients were diagnosed late with a high average tumor size. Luminal B subtype was more prevalent (41.8%), followed by luminal A (30.5%), basal-like (13, 6%), Her2-overexpressing (9, 2%), and unclassified subtype (4.9%). Conclusion This study showed that molecular classification and biological profile may be different according to geographical distribution, to encourage further studies to know the genomic profile of tumors and the environment. Virtual slide http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1675272504826544 PMID:23216981

  8. Luminal B tumors are the most frequent molecular subtype in breast cancer of North African women: an immunohistochemical profile study from Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Fatemi Hinde

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer may be classified into luminal A, luminal B, HER2+/ER-, basal-like and normal-like subtypes based on gene expression profiling or immunohistochemical (IHC characteristics. The aim of our study is to show the molecular profile characteristic of breast cancer in the North African population of Morocco. This work showed preliminary results and correlations with clinicopathological and histological parameters. Three hundred and ninety primary breast carcinomas tumor tissues were immunostained for ER, PR, HER2, CK5/6, CK8/18 and Ki67 using paraffin tissue. Methods We reviewed 390 cases of breast cancer diagnosed on January 2008 to December 2011 at the Department of pathology, Hassan II teaching hospital, Fez, Morocco. Age, size tumor, metastatic profile, node involvement profile, histological type and immunohistochemical profile were studied. Results The average age was 46 years; our patients were diagnosed late with a high average tumor size. Luminal B subtype was more prevalent (41.8%, followed by luminal A (30.5%, basal-like (13, 6%, Her2-overexpressing (9, 2%, and unclassified subtype (4.9%. Conclusion This study showed that molecular classification and biological profile may be different according to geographical distribution, to encourage further studies to know the genomic profile of tumors and the environment. Virtual slide http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1675272504826544

  9. Management of symptomatic vulvovaginal atrophy: 2013 position statement of The North American Menopause Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    To update and expand the previous position statement of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) on the management of symptomatic vulvovaginal atrophy (VVA) in postmenopausal women. NAMS searched PubMed for medical literature on VVA published since their 2007 position statement on the role of local vaginal estrogen for treatment of vaginal atrophy in postmenopausal women. A panel of acknowledged experts in the field of genitourinary health reviewed the literature to evaluate new evidence on local estrogen as well as on other management options available or in development for symptomatic VVA. The panel's conclusions and recommendations were reviewed and approved by the NAMS Board of Trustees. Symptomatic VVA can significantly impair the quality of life (QOL) of postmenopausal women and may be underdiagnosed. In most cases, it can be managed successfully. A number of over-the-counter and government-approved prescription therapies available in the United States and Canada demonstrate effectiveness, depending on the severity of VVA symptoms. These include vaginal lubricants and moisturizers, vaginal estrogen, hormone therapy, and the selective estrogen-receptor modulator ospemifene (indicated for dyspareunia). Long-term studies on the endometrial safety of local estrogen and ospemifene are lacking. Changes in the vaginal microbiome have various effects on symptoms. Clinicians can improve the sexual health and QOL of postmenopausal women by educating women about, diagnosing, and appropriately managing symptomatic VVA. Choice of therapy depends on the severity of symptoms, the effectiveness and safety of therapy for the individual patient, and patient preference. Estrogen therapy is the most effective treatment for moderate to severe symptoms, although a direct comparison of estrogen and ospemifene is not available. Nonhormonal therapies available without a prescription provide sufficient relief for most women with mild symptoms. When low-dose estrogen is administered

  10. Correlation between immunohistochemical staining of CEACAM1 and clinicopathological findings in oral pre-neoplastic lesions and squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonetti, Oriana; Lucarini, Guendalina; Rubini, Corrado; Zizzi, Antonio; Aspriello, Simone Domenico; Di Primio, Roberto; Offidani, Anna Maria

    2017-09-08

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity represents the sixth most common cancer worldwide and it is often preceded by pre-neoplastic lesions. Sometimes it is still difficult for pathologists to make objective differential diagnoses only on histological characteristics. Tumorigenesis is accompanied by altered expression of cell adhesion molecules, like carcinoembryonic antigen cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM)1. We wanted to investigative CEACAM1 in oral dysplastic lesions, carcinoma in situ (CIS) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). We examined immunohistochemical CEACAM1 expression in 50 OSCC, 30 oral CIS and 40 pre-neoplastic lesions and assessed its correlation with clinical and pathological parameters. CEACAM1 was not expressed in normal mucosa, significantly expressed in CIS while it was negative in all the dysplastic lesions. In OSCC, high CEACAM1 expression was associated with tumor grade and inversely correlated with both overall and disease-specific 5-year survival. We showed that CEACAM1 expression is very dynamic: absent in dysplastic lesions, up-regulated in CIS and OSCC. We suggest that CEACAM1 could be a prognostic marker of OSCC and oral CIS. Our most important finding was that it could help pathologists diagnosing oral carcinoma in situ.

  11. Fertility Preservation for Children Diagnosed with Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home » Patients Fertility Preservation for Children Diagnosed with Cancer Fertility Preservation for Children Diagnosed with Cancer Ask Your Doctor Information for Patients Many adult ...

  12. Association between radiculopathy and lumbar multifidus atrophy in magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Ji Hye; Choi, Hyun Sook; Ihl Rhee, Won; Lee, Jong In

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have evaluated factors related to lumbar multifidus (MF) muscle atrophy. However, few studies have investigated radiculopathy and the MF muscle. In this study, the association between radiculopathy and lumbar MF muscle atrophy in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was evaluated. In total, 100 patients with low back pain or radiating leg pain were examined. Their lumbar MRIs were visually analyzed semi-quantitatively for signs of lumbar MF muscle atrophy. The severity and extent of MF atrophy were compared between non-radiculopathy (Non-rad) and radiculopathy (Rad) groups. Asymmetry of MF atrophy was also compared between unilateral radiculopathy (UniR) and bilateral radiculopathy (BiR) groups. Significantly more severe and extensive MF atrophy was observed in the Rad group than in the Non-rad group (p 0.05). More severe and extensive atrophy in the lumbar MF muscle was associated with radiculopathy. Thus, we might consider the presence of radiculopathy when severe and extensive multi-level involvement of MF atrophy is seen in MRI.

  13. Focal foveal atrophy of unknown etiology: Clinical pictures and possible underlying causes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Yun Kao

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: This is the first report of clinical presentations for patients with focal foveal atrophy of unknown etiology. OCT aided in the diagnosis and assessment of the degree of retinal structural abnormalities, but the real etiology of foveal atrophy remains unclear.

  14. Intellectual enrichment lessens the effect of brain atrophy on learning and memory in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumowski, James F; Wylie, Glenn R; Chiaravalloti, Nancy; DeLuca, John

    2010-06-15

    Learning and memory impairments are prevalent among persons with multiple sclerosis (MS); however, such deficits are only weakly associated with MS disease severity (brain atrophy). The cognitive reserve hypothesis states that greater lifetime intellectual enrichment lessens the negative impact of brain disease on cognition, thereby helping to explain the incomplete relationship between brain disease and cognitive status in neurologic populations. The literature on cognitive reserve has focused mainly on Alzheimer disease. The current research examines whether greater intellectual enrichment lessens the negative effect of brain atrophy on learning and memory in patients with MS. Forty-four persons with MS completed neuropsychological measures of verbal learning and memory, and a vocabulary-based estimate of lifetime intellectual enrichment. Brain atrophy was estimated with third ventricle width measured from 3-T magnetization-prepared rapid gradient echo MRIs. Hierarchical regression was used to predict learning and memory with brain atrophy, intellectual enrichment, and the interaction between brain atrophy and intellectual enrichment. Brain atrophy predicted worse learning and memory, and intellectual enrichment predicted better learning; however, these effects were moderated by interactions between brain atrophy and intellectual enrichment. Specifically, higher intellectual enrichment lessened the negative impact of brain atrophy on both learning and memory. These findings help to explain the incomplete relationship between multiple sclerosis disease severity and cognition, as the effect of disease on cognition is attenuated among patients with higher intellectual enrichment. As such, intellectual enrichment is supported as a protective factor against disease-related cognitive impairment in persons with multiple sclerosis.

  15. Diabetes mellitus, hypertension and medial temporal lobe atrophy: the LADIS study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korf, E.S.; Straaten, E.C. van; Leeuw, F.E. de; Flier, W.M.; Barkhof, F.; Pantoni, L.; Basile, A.M.; Inzitari, D.; Erkinjuntti, T.; Wahlund, L.O.; Rostrup, E.; Schmidt, R.; Fazekas, F.; Scheltens, P.

    2007-01-01

    HYPOTHESIS: Based on recent findings on the association between vascular risk factors and hippocampal atrophy, we hypothesized that hypertension and diabetes mellitus (DM) are associated with medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA) in subjects without disability, independent of the severity of white

  16. Senile macular degeneration and geographic atrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willerson, D.; Aaberg, T. M.

    1978-01-01

    The case is reported of a man who had oval areas of atrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium in paracentral areas which previously had heavy concentrations of drusen OU. This supports the suggestion by others that atrophy of the RPE in senile macular disease may in some cases occur in the absence of previous serous detachment of the RPE. Images PMID:687554

  17. Association between blood pressure levels over time and brain atrophy in the elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Heijer, T; Skoog, [No Value; Oudkerk, M; de Leeuw, FE; de Groot, JC; Hofman, A; Breteler, MMB

    2003-01-01

    The relation between blood pressure level and degree of global brain atrophy is equivocal. We evaluated past and present blood pressure levels and change in blood pressure over 20 years in relation to the degree of cortical atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In 1995-1996, we measured blood

  18. Association between blood pressure levels over time and brain atrophy in the elderly.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijer, T.; Skoog, I.; Oudkerk, M.; Leeuw, H.F. de; Groot, J.C. de; Hofman, A.W.I.M.; Breteler, M.H.M.

    2003-01-01

    The relation between blood pressure level and degree of global brain atrophy is equivocal. We evaluated past and present blood pressure levels and change in blood pressure over 20 years in relation to the degree of cortical atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In 1995-1996, we measured blood

  19. Cerebrospinal fluid volumetric MRI mapping as a simple measurement for evaluating brain atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vis, J B|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/39133378X; Zwanenburg, J J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/290473683; van der Kleij, L A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413752291; Spijkerman, J M; Biessels, G J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/165576367; Hendrikse, J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/266590268; Petersen, E T

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess whether volumetric cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) MRI can be used as a surrogate for brain atrophy assessment and to evaluate how the T2 of the CSF relates to brain atrophy. METHODS: Twenty-eight subjects [mean age 64 (sd 2) years] were included; T1-weighted and CSF MRI were

  20. Endometrial safety of ultra-low-dose Vagifem 10 microg in postmenopausal women with vaginal atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich, L S G; Naessen, T; Elia, D

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the endometrial safety of a 10 microg estradiol vaginal tablet in the treatment of vaginal atrophy in postmenopausal women.......The objective of the study was to evaluate the endometrial safety of a 10 microg estradiol vaginal tablet in the treatment of vaginal atrophy in postmenopausal women....

  1. Toll-like Receptor 4 Signaling in Ventilator-induced Diaphragm Atrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, W.J.M.; Hees, H.W.H. van; Vaneker, M.; Linkels, M.; Dekhuijzen, P.N.R.; Scheffer, G.J.; Hoeven, J.G. van der; Heunks, L.M.A.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND:: Mechanical ventilation induces diaphragm muscle atrophy, which plays a key role in difficult weaning from mechanical ventilation. The signaling pathways involved in ventilator-induced diaphragm atrophy are poorly understood. The current study investigated the role of Toll-like receptor

  2. Preservation of deep inferior epigastric artery at kidney transplantation prevents atrophy of lower rectus abdominis muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwami, Daiki; Harada, Hiroshi; Morita, Ken; Oba, Koji; Fukuzawa, Nobuyuki; Hotta, Kiyohiko; Sasaki, Hajime; Miyazaki, Chihoko; Nonomura, Katsuya

    2012-05-27

    The deep inferior epigastric artery (DIEA), which feeds the lower rectus abdominis muscle (lower RAM), is usually transected in kidney transplantation. In this study, we investigated whether preservation of DIEA can prevent lower RAM atrophy. Two hundred and forty-five kidney transplant recipients (150 men and 95 women) were enrolled in the study (mean age 39.9 years) and were divided into two groups according to whether DIEA was transected (group A, n = 175) or preserved (group B, n = 70). The extent of lower RAM atrophy calculated in computed tomography (performed 1 year after transplantation) and incidence of lower RAM atrophy were compared between the two groups. The most predictive factors for lower RAM atrophy were assessed using a multivariate logistic regression model. The extent of lower RAM atrophy was significantly lower in group B (15.0 ± 18.5%) than that in group A (38.9 ± 25.4%, P = 0.003). The incidence of lower RAM atrophy was less prevalent in group B (20.0%) compared with that in group A (62.9%, P DIEA was the only independent predictive factor for lower RAM atrophy (P DIEA during kidney transplant can prevent lower RAM atrophy.

  3. Anterior temporal atrophy and posterior progression in patients with Parkinson’s disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potgieser, Adriaan R.E.; van der Hoorn, Anouk; Meppelink, Anne Marthe; Teune, Laura K.; Koerts, Janneke; de Jong, Bauke M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by specific motor and nonmotor impairments. This suggests that PD is characterized by disease-specific regional cortical atrophy. Given the change of symptoms over time, a concurrent increase in regional atrophy may further be assumed to reflect

  4. Parapapillary atrophy and optic disc region assessment (PANDORA): retinal imaging tool for assessment of the optic disc and parapapillary atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Cheng-Kai; Tang, Tong Boon; Laude, Augustinus; Dhillon, Baljean; Murray, Alan F

    2012-10-01

    We describe a computer-aided measuring tool, named parapapillary atrophy and optic disc region assessment (PANDORA), for automated detection and quantification of both the parapapillary atrophy (PPA) and the optic disc (OD) regions in two-dimensional color retinal fundus images. The OD region is segmented using a combination of edge detection and ellipse fitting methods. The PPA region is identified by the presence of bright pixels in the temporal zone of the OD, and it is segmented using a sequence of techniques, including a modified Chan-Vese approach, thresholding, scanning filter, and multiseed region growing. PANDORA has been tested with 133 color retinal images (82 with PPA; 51 without PPA) drawn randomly from the Lothian Birth Cohort (LBC) database, together with a "ground truth" estimate from an ophthalmologist. The PPA detection rate is 89.47% with a sensitivity of 0.83 and a specificity of 1. The mean accuracy in defining the OD region is 81.31% (SD=10.45) when PPA is present and 95.32% (SD=4.36) when PPA is absent. The mean accuracy in defining the PPA region is 73.57% (SD=11.62). PANDORA demonstrates for the first time how to quantify the OD and PPA regions using two-dimensional fundus images, enabling ophthalmologists to study ocular diseases related to PPA using a standard fundus camera.

  5. Clinical features and autonomic testing predict survival in multiple system atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coon, Elizabeth A; Sletten, David M; Suarez, Mariana D; Mandrekar, Jay N; Ahlskog, J Eric; Bower, James H; Matsumoto, Joseph Y; Silber, Michael H; Benarroch, Eduardo E; Fealey, Robert D; Sandroni, Paola; Low, Phillip A; Singer, Wolfgang

    2015-12-01

    Multiple system atrophy is characterized by autonomic failure along with motor symptoms of parkinsonism and/or cerebellar ataxia. There are differing reports on the influence of certain clinical features, including motor subtype (multiple system atrophy-parkinsonism versus multiple system atrophy-cerebellar ataxia), age of onset, gender, and early autonomic symptoms, on the survival in patients with multiple system atrophy. We sought to evaluate overall survival and predictors of survival in a large cohort of patients with multiple system atrophy seen at a single referral centre where objective autonomic testing is routinely performed for this indication. All cases of multiple system atrophy evaluated at Mayo Clinic, Rochester and assessed with an autonomic reflex screen between January 1998 and December 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 685 patients were identified; 594 met criteria for probable multiple system atrophy, and 91 for possible multiple system atrophy. Multiple system atrophy-parkinsonism was the predominant subtype in 430 patients (63%). Average age of onset was earlier in multiple system atrophy-cerebellar ataxia (58.4 years) compared to multiple system atrophy-parkinsonism (62.3 years; P system atrophy (P = 0.232). An initial motor symptom was most common (61%) followed by autonomic onset (28%) and combined motor and autonomic symptoms (11%). The initial onset of either motor or autonomic symptoms did not influence length of survival. However, a number of clinical and autonomic laboratory features predicted unfavourable survival in a univariate analysis. A multivariate model retained the following unfavourable predictors of survival: (i) falls within 3 years of onset (hazard ratio 2.31, P features can be used to predict survival in patients with multiple system atrophy. Autonomic testing adds an additional, independent predictor of survival, demonstrating its value not only in the diagnosis of multiple system atrophy but also as

  6. Investigation of telomerase activity and apoptosis on invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast using immunohistochemical and Western blot methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simsek, B C; Turk, B A; Ozen, F; Tuzcu, M; Kanter, M

    2015-08-01

    Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) comprises the largest group of breast cancers. This study aimed to investigate telomerase activity and apoptosis using immunohistochemical and Western blot methods. In total, 75 cases that had been diagnosed as IDC and 20 cases that had undergone a freezing procedure were included. The histological sections were stained with Bax, Bcl-2, hTERT and BNIP3. The ages of the patients, as well as their hormonal status and tumour sizes and grades were evaluated, as well as the staining characteristics of the antibodies in question. A decrease in Bcl-2 positivity and an increase in Bax positivity were found immunohistochemically with increasing tumour grades. The data obtained by western blot method showed that Bcl-2 was highest in grade 1 tumours although these results were not statistically significant. The relationship between estrogen and progesterone receptor positivity and Bcl-2 was statistically significant, suggesting there is hormonal control through apoptosis. BNIP3 was found to be decreased with increasing tumour grades. Similarly, BNIP3 was found to be having the lowest value in grade 3 tumours by western blot method. Furthermore, hTERT was found to be increased with increasing tumour grades. In the western blot method, hTERT increased nearly four-fold compared to the control. In addition, hTERT, which was seen in very high levels in tumours, may be a helpful cancer marker. Both hTERT and BNIP3 are important markers that can provide information about prognosis. Big improvements can be achieved in tumour progression control with new treatment modalities that stop telomerase activity and hypoxic cell death.

  7. Immunohistochemical detection of dopamine D2 receptors in neuroendocrine tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlikowski, Marek; Pisarek, Hanna; Winczyk, Katarzyna

    2011-01-01

    Recently, dopamine D2 receptors (RD2) have been found to be expressed in neuroendocrine tumours (NET), the tumours which arise from the diffuse neuroendocrine cells. Moreover, successful trials of the treatment of NET with cabergoline - D2 agonist, have been reported. These findings increase the interest of investigating RD2 expression in NET. The expression of RD2 was investigated immunohistochemically using the antibody which recognises both short (S) and long (L) isoforms of the receptor in 17 NET samples taken from 15 patients. In 17 NET samples, a positive reaction with the anti-RD2 antibody occurred in 11 cases. In six cases, the localisation of the immunostaining was cytoplasmic and in nine cases it was nuclear. Only in one case was the receptor cell membrane-located, and in two cases the immunoreaction was also localised in the blood vessels walls. The relation between RD2 expression and the grade of malignancy examined by means of Ki-67 antigen expression needs further study. However, preliminary observations indicate that the nuclear localisation of RD2 is linked to higher tumour malignancy. The next investigated question was the co-expression of somatostatin and dopamine receptors. This question seems important because of the perspectives of somatostatin-dopamine chimeras application in NET treatment. In the samples examined by us, RD2 were co-expressed in 5/10 cases with sstr1, in 3/10 with sstr2A, in 2/9 with sstr2B, in 3/10 with sstr3, and in 5/10 with sstr5. Dopamine D2 receptors are revealed by means of immunohistochemistry in the majority of NET. They exhibit cytoplasmic and/or nuclear localisations, the latter being possibly linked to a higher grade of malignancy, and are often co-expressed with somatostatin receptors (mostly with subtypes1 and 5).

  8. Morphological and immunohistochemical profile of pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simtniece, Zane; Vanags, Andrejs; Strumfa, Ilze; Sperga, Maris; Vasko, Ervins; Prieditis, Peteris; Trapencieris, Peteris; Gardovskis, Janis

    2015-06-01

    The study represents a comprehensive retrospective morphological and immunohistochemical profiling of pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PNENs) in order to reveal the associations between morphological and molecular parameters. The local tumour spread (T), presence of metastases in regional lymph nodes (N) and distant organs (M), tumour grade (G) and resection line status (R) by pathology findings (pTNMGR), mitotic activity, perineural, vascular and lymphatic invasion were assessed in 16 surgically resected PNENs. By immunohistochemistry, expression of Ki-67, p53, p27, p21, cyclin D1, Bcl-2, E-cadherin, CD44, vimentin, cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), microvascular density, and cytokeratin (CK) spectrum, along with neuroendocrine, intestinal and squamous markers were detected. Descriptive statistics, Chi-square test, Spearman's rank correlation, Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis methods were applied; p<0.05 was considered significant. Ki-67, CK19, p63, vimentin and COX-2 were significantly up-regulated in PNENs in comparison to benign pancreatic islets. A complex network of morphological and molecular associations was identified. Ki-67 correlated with PNEN size (p=0.022), the World Health Organization 2004 and 2010 classification grades (p=0.021 and p=0.002), stage (p=0.028) and mitotic count (p=0.007) but among molecular markers--with CK19 (p=0.033) and vimentin (p=0.045). CK19 was significantly up-regulated in PNENs, having higher pT (p=0.018), pR (p=0.025), vascular (p=0.020), perineural (p=0.026) and lymphatic invasion (p=0.043). In conclusion, proliferation activity (by Ki-67), E-cadherin, vimentin and CK19 are important molecular characteristics of PNENs due to significant associations with morphological tumour characteristics, pTNMGR and invasive growth.

  9. Dural invasion of meningioma: a histological and immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Goro; Fujimoto, Tsukasa; Suzuki, Ryuta; Asai, Jun-ichiro; Itokawa, Hiroshi; Noda, Masayuki

    2006-04-01

    Meningioma usually grows and expands into the brain, but invasion into the brain parenchyma is relatively rare. Meningioma arises from arachnoid cap cells, and infiltration into dura mater is the main growth pattern of meningiomas. However, little is known about the mechanism of meningioma invasion into the dura mater. In this study, seven specimens, including dural attachments, from seven cases of meningioma were used for immunohistochemical analysis. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, -2, -9, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF), flt-1, E-cadherin, estrogen receptor (EgR), progesterone receptor (PgR), and aquaporin (AQP)-1, -4 were used as primary antibodies. There were several patterns of meningioma invasion into the dura mater: papillary-shaped invasion with destruction of dural structure, infiltration along the fibers of the dura mater, and invasion of several tumor cell units with fibroblast infiltration. Strong immunostaining was obtained with MMP-1, followed by AQP-1 and uPA, within the invading tumor cells. Neovasculature and extravasated erythrocytes, which stained with AQP-1, were also occasionally observed around the invading tumor cells. Simpson grade II removal of meningiomas results in high recurrence rates, and the inhibition of meningioma growth via dural invasion will facilitate improved remission in many cases with meningioma. In this study, MMP-1, AQP-1, and uPA are considered to have some role in the dural infiltration of meningioma cells. The fact that AQP-1 was highly expressed at the dural attachment and invading front of meningioma may indicate that dural invasion of the meningioma may be facilitated by AQP-1-induced water flow and neovascularization.

  10. Diagnosing GORD in respiratory medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris James Timms

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease is increasing in prevalence and is associated with several lung diseases such as asthma and COPD. Current diagnostic methods are imperfect, being insensitive, nonspecific, expensive or invasive. An accurate diagnosis of GORD can aid effective treatment with a significant clinical impact. Novel methods such as exhaled breath condensate analysis and electronic nose technology have the potential to improve the accuracy of diagnosing GORD.

  11. Estrogen and progesterone receptors in endometrial carcinoma: comparison of immunohistochemical and biochemical analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyholm, H C; Nielsen, Anette Lynge; Lyndrup, J

    1993-01-01

    In 159 endometrial carcinomas, estrogen (ER) and progesterone receptors (PR) were determined biochemically by dextran-coated charcoal (DCC) assay and immunohistochemically (ICA) on frozen sections. ICA receptor content was estimated by a total histologic score (HSCORE), including all tissue...

  12. Extent of hippocampal atrophy predicts degree of deficit in recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patai, Eva Zita; Gadian, David G; Cooper, Janine M; Dzieciol, Anna M; Mishkin, Mortimer; Vargha-Khadem, Faraneh

    2015-10-13

    Which specific memory functions are dependent on the hippocampus is still debated. The availability of a large cohort of patients who had sustained relatively selective hippocampal damage early in life enabled us to determine which type of mnemonic deficit showed a correlation with extent of hippocampal injury. We assessed our patient cohort on a test that provides measures of recognition and recall that are equated for difficulty and found that the patients' performance on the recall tests correlated significantly with their hippocampal volumes, whereas their performance on the equally difficult recognition tests did not and, indeed, was largely unaffected regardless of extent of hippocampal atrophy. The results provide new evidence in favor of the view that the hippocampus is essential for recall but not for recognition.

  13. Sphincter electromyography in diabetes mellitus and multiple system atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Fan; Pan, Hua; Zhang, Zaiqiang; Lin, Jinxi; Chen, Na; Zhang, Lei; Wu, Qing; Wang, Han; Wang, Yongjun; Cui, Liying; Tang, Xiaofu

    2015-09-01

    Abnormalities of external anal sphincter electromyography (EAS-EMG) characterize multiple system atrophy (MSA) and focal cauda equina or conus medullaris lesions. This study is designed to determine whether and how diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN) affects EAS as compared to the abnormalities seen in MSA. We conducted multi-motor unit potential (MUP) analysis of EAS in 22 healthy controls, 32 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients without neuropathy, 38 DPN patients, and 68 MSA patients. DPN patients had a significant (P < 0.01) increase in MUP mean duration, mean amplitude, percentage of long duration MUPs, and satellite rate, but to a lesser extent than MSA. Mean duration and satellite rate showed the least overlap among different groups in individual value distributions. Compared with MSA, DPN affects EAS to a lesser degree as judged by neurogenic MUP abnormalities in EMG. Mean duration and satellite rate may serve as the most discriminating aspects in MUP analysis of EAS. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Global brain atrophy and metabolic dysfunction in LGI1 encephalitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szots, Monika; Blaabjerg, Morten; Orsi, Gergely

    2017-01-01

    Background: Chronic cognitive deficits are frequent in leucin-rich glioma-inactivated 1 protein (LGI1) encephalitis. We examined structural and metabolic brain abnormalities following LGI1 encephalitis and correlated findings with acute and follow-up clinical outcomes. Methods: Nine patients...... underwent prospective multimodal 3 Tesla MRI 33.1 ± 18 months after disease onset, including automated volumetry, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Data were compared to 9 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Results: Although extratemporal lesions were not present......: Poor clinical outcome following LGI1 encephalitis is associated with global brain atrophy and disintegration of white matter tracts. The pathological changes affect not only temporomesial structures but also frontal lobes and the cerebellum....

  15. LHON and other optic nerve atrophies: the mitochondrial connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Neil

    2003-01-01

    The clinical, biochemical and genetic features of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) are reviewed. The etiology of LHON is complex, but the primary risk factor is a mutation in one of the seven mitochondrial genes that encode subunits of respiratory chain complex I. The pathogenesis of LHON is not yet understood, but one plausible model is that increased or altered mitochondrial ROS production renders the retinal ganglion cells vulnerable to apoptotic cell death. In addition to LHON, there are a large number of other optic nerve degenerative disorders including autosomal dominant optic atrophy, the toxic/nutritional optic neuropathies and glaucoma. A review of the recent scientific literature suggests that these disorders also involve mitochondrial dysfunction or altered mitochondrial signaling pathways in their pathogenesis. This mitochondrial link provides new avenues of experimental investigation to these major causes of loss of vision.

  16. Spinal muscular atrophy: Factors that modulate motor neurone vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Wen-Yo; Simpson, Julie E; Highley, J Robin; Heath, Paul R

    2017-06-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a leading genetic cause of infant death, is a neurodegenerative disease characterised by the selective loss of particular groups of motor neurones in the anterior horn of the spinal cord with concomitant muscle weakness. To date, no effective treatment is available, however, there are ongoing clinical trials are in place which promise much for the future. However, there remains an ongoing problem in trying to link a single gene loss to motor neurone degeneration. Fortunately, given successful disease models that have been established and intensive studies on SMN functions in the past ten years, we are fast approaching the stage of identifying the underlying mechanisms of SMA pathogenesis Here we discuss potential disease modifying factors on motor neurone vulnerability, in the belief that these factors give insight into the pathological mechanisms of SMA and therefore possible therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Splice-Switching Therapy for Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina E. Meijboom

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a genetic disorder with severity ranging from premature death in infants to restricted motor function in adult life. Despite the genetic cause of this disease being known for over twenty years, only recently has a therapy been approved to treat the most severe form of this disease. Here we discuss the genetic basis of SMA and the subsequent studies that led to the utilization of splice switching oligonucleotides to enhance production of SMN protein, which is absent in patients, through a mechanism of exon inclusion into the mature mRNA. Whilst approval of oligonucleotide-based therapies for SMA should be celebrated, we also discuss some of the limitations of this approach and alternate genetic strategies that are currently underway in clinical trials.

  18. Neocortical Neuronal Loss in Patients with Multiple System Atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salvesen, Lisette; Winge, Kristian; Brudek, Tomasz

    2017-01-01

    with MSA and 11 age- and gender-matched control subjects. The stereological data were supported by cell marker expression analyses in tissue samples from the prefrontal cortex. We found significantly fewer neurons in the frontal and parietal cortex of MSA brains compared with control brains. Significantly......To determine the extent of neocortical involvement in multiple system atrophy (MSA), we used design-based stereological methods to estimate the total numbers of neurons, oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and microglia in the frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital cortex of brains from 11 patients...... more astrocytes and microglia were observed in the frontal, parietal, and temporal cortex of MSA brains, whereas no change in the total number of oligodendrocytes was seen in any of the neocortical regions. There were significantly fewer neurons in the frontal cortex of MSA patients with impaired...

  19. Therapeutic strategies for spinal muscular atrophy: SMN and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Bowerman

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a devastating neuromuscular disorder characterized by loss of motor neurons and muscle atrophy, generally presenting in childhood. SMA is caused by low levels of the survival motor neuron protein (SMN due to inactivating mutations in the encoding gene SMN1. A second duplicated gene, SMN2, produces very little but sufficient functional protein for survival. Therapeutic strategies to increase SMN are in clinical trials, and the first SMN2-directed antisense oligonucleotide (ASO therapy has recently been licensed. However, several factors suggest that complementary strategies may be needed for the long-term maintenance of neuromuscular and other functions in SMA patients. Pre-clinical SMA models demonstrate that the requirement for SMN protein is highest when the structural connections of the neuromuscular system are being established, from late fetal life throughout infancy. Augmenting SMN may not address the slow neurodegenerative process underlying progressive functional decline beyond childhood in less severe types of SMA. Furthermore, individuals receiving SMN-based treatments may be vulnerable to delayed symptoms if rescue of the neuromuscular system is incomplete. Finally, a large number of older patients living with SMA do not fulfill the present criteria for inclusion in gene therapy and ASO clinical trials, and may not benefit from SMN-inducing treatments. Therefore, a comprehensive whole-lifespan approach to SMA therapy is required that includes both SMN-dependent and SMN-independent strategies that treat the CNS and periphery. Here, we review the range of non-SMN pathways implicated in SMA pathophysiology and discuss how various model systems can serve as valuable tools for SMA drug discovery.

  20. Mechanical Ventilation-induced Diaphragm Atrophy Strongly Impacts Clinical Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goligher, Ewan C; Dres, Martin; Fan, Eddy; Rubenfeld, Gordon D; Scales, Damon C; Herridge, Margaret S; Vorona, Stefannie; Sklar, Michael C; Rittayamai, Nuttapol; Lanys, Ashley; Murray, Alistair; Brace, Deborah; Urrea, Cristian; Reid, W Darlene; Tomlinson, George; Slutsky, Arthur S; Kavanagh, Brian P; Brochard, Laurent J; Ferguson, Niall D

    2017-09-20

    Rationale Diaphragm dysfunction worsens outcomes in mechanically ventilated patients but the clinical impact of potentially preventable changes in diaphragm structure and function due to mechanical ventilation is unknown. Objectives To determine whether diaphragm atrophy developing during mechanical ventilation leads to prolonged ventilation. Methods Diaphragm thickness was measured daily by ultrasound in adults requiring invasive mechanical ventilation; inspiratory effort was assessed by thickening fraction. The primary outcome was time to liberation from ventilation. Secondary outcomes included complications (reintubation, tracheostomy, prolonged ventilation, or death). Associations were adjusted for age, severity of illness, sepsis, sedation, neuromuscular blockade, and comorbidity. Measurements and Main Results Of 211 patients enrolled, 191 had two or more diaphragm thickness measurements. Thickness decreased more than 10% in 78 patients (41%) by median day 4 (IQR 3-5). Development of decreased thickness was associated with a lower daily probability of liberation from ventilation (adjusted HR 0.69, 95%CI 0.54-0.87, per 10% decrease), prolonged ICU admission (duration ratio 1.71, 95%CI 1.29-2.27), and a higher risk of complications (OR 3.00, 95%CI 1.34-6.72). Development of increased thickness (n=47, 24%) also predicted prolonged ventilation (duration ratio 1.38, 95%CI 1.00-1.90). Decreasing thickness was related to abnormally low inspiratory effort; increasing thickness was related to excessive effort. Patients with thickening fraction between 15-30% (similar to breathing at rest) during the first 3 days had the shortest duration of ventilation. Conclusions Diaphragm atrophy developing during mechanical ventilation strongly impacts clinical outcomes. Targeting an inspiratory effort level similar to that of healthy subjects at rest might accelerate liberation from ventilation.

  1. Clinical significance of proliferative inflammatory atrophy in prostate biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celma, A; Servián, P; Planas, J; Placer, J; Quilez, M T; Arbós, M A; de Torres, I; Morote, J

    2014-03-01

    Proliferative inflammatory atrophy (PIA) is a frequently observed lesion in prostate biopsies and some authors have postulated its involvement in prostate carcinogenesis. However, the mechanisms that would permit its neoplastic transformation and the clinical significance of its finding in a prostate biopsy is currently not well known. To analyze the characteristics of the PIA lesion, its possible role in prostate carcinogenesis and its relation with the tumor aggressiveness. A systematic review was made of the literature in PubMed with the terms «proliferative inflammatory atrophy» or «PIA» and «prostate.» The most important findings are summarized in accordance with the study objective. PIA seems to be involved in prostate carcinogenesis. This hypothesis is based on its frequent association to cancer lesions (CaP) and on some genetic alterations that are common to the high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN) and to the CaP, fundamentally deficit in GSTP1 expression and overexpression of AGR2. Currently, there are no epidemiological studies that evaluate the incidence of PIA or its association with HGPIN and CaP. Only one study, carried out by our group, has determined the global incidence of PIA in 30% of the prostate biopsies, a lower association to CaP than the HGPIN lesion and an association between PIA and tumors of lower and insignificant grade. PIA shares genetic alterations with HGPIN and CaP. Currently, there is no epidemiologic evidence to consider that the PIA is associated to a greater incidence of CaP and the genetic and epidemiological data available suggest its association to not very aggressive tumors. Copyright © 2013 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Localization of actin in normal human hepatocytes using fluorescent phallotoxins and immunohistochemical amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkoel, L; Brisse, J; Capo, C; Benoliel, A M; Bongrand, P; Garcia, T; Chamlian, A

    1992-07-01

    Two different methods, fluorescent phallotoxins and immunohistochemical amplification systems were used to visualize actin in normal human hepatocytes. With fluorescent phallotoxins (NBD-phallacidin or rhodamine phalloidin), F-actin was distributed along the plasma membranes and at the bile canaliculi. With immunohistochemical methods (biotin-avidin, biotin-streptavidin, silver enhancement), actin was found at the same level, however a cytoplasmic staining was observed and discussed as G-actin localization.

  3. Histopathological and immunohistochemical findings of primary and metastatic medullary thyroid carcinoma in a young dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñeyro, Pablo; Vieson, Miranda D; Ramos-Vara, José A; Moon-Larson, Martha; Saunders, Geoffrey

    2014-01-01

    This report describes the gross, histological, and immunohistochemical features of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) with pulmonary metastases in a young dog. Sheets of pleomorphic cells supported by fibrous stroma characterized the primary mass, while metastatic nodules had a neuroendocrine pattern. Despite differing histologic features, all masses showed marked immunoreactivity against calcitonin and multiple neuroendocrine markers consistent with MTC. Although MTC is a well-recognized entity, it may be difficult to distinguish this mass from other thyroid neoplasms, necessitating immunohistochemical characterization.

  4. Ovarian microcystic stromal tumor: report of a new entity with immunohistochemical and ultrastructural studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mary; Bhattacharjee, Meenakshi B

    2014-08-01

    Microcystic stromal tumor is a recently described rare subtype of ovarian tumor for which there has been no previously reported ultrastructural study. We report a case with the characteristic histological and immunohistochemical features and the first ultrastructural study. The immunohistochemical findings of strong and diffuse nuclear staining for beta catenin and P27 are suggestive of dysregulation of more than one genetic pathway. The ultrastructural findings are supportive of the previous postulation of an ovarian stromal origin of the neoplastic cells.

  5. A pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor diagnosed during the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    necrosis. Immunohistochemically, the tumor showed positivity for synaptophysin and chromogranin A, and the expression of Ki-67 was found to be lower than 1%. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course. At present, he is being followed up by both us and the pediatric oncology department, and has no evidence ...

  6. Deficiency of slow skeletal muscle troponin T causes atrophy of type I slow fibres and decreases tolerance to fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Bin; Lu, Yingru; Jin, J-P

    2014-01-01

    The total loss of slow skeletal muscle troponin T (ssTnT encoded by TNNT1 gene) due to a nonsense mutation in codon Glu180 causes a lethal form of recessively inherited nemaline myopathy (Amish nemaline myopathy, ANM). To investigate the pathogenesis and muscle pathophysiology of ANM, we studied the phenotypes of partial and total loss of ssTnT in Tnnt1 gene targeted mice. An insertion of neomycin resistance cassette in intron 10 of Tnnt1 gene caused an approximately 60% decrease in ssTnT protein expression whereas cre-loxP-mediated deletion of exons 11–13 resulted in total loss of ssTnT, as seen in ANM muscles. In diaphragm and soleus muscles of the knockdown and knockout mouse models, we demonstrated that ssTnT deficiency resulted in significantly decreased levels of other slow fibre-specific myofilament proteins whereas fast fibre-specific myofilament proteins were increased correspondingly. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that ssTnT deficiency produced significantly smaller type I slow fibres and compensatory growth of type II fast fibres. Along with the slow fibre atrophy and the changes in myofilament protein isoform contents, ssTnT deficiency significantly reduced the tolerance to fatigue in soleus muscle. ssTnT-deficient soleus muscle also contains significant numbers of small-sized central nuclei type I fibres, indicating active regeneration. The data provide strong support for the essential role of ssTnT in skeletal muscle function and the causal effect of its loss in the pathology of ANM. This observation further supports the hypothesis that the function of slow fibres can be restored in ANM patients if a therapeutic supplement of ssTnT is achieved. PMID:24445317

  7. Poor sleep quality is associated with increased cortical atrophy in community-dwelling adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, Claire E; Storsve, Andreas B; Walhovd, Kristine B; Johansen-Berg, Heidi; Fjell, Anders M

    2014-09-09

    To examine the relationship between sleep quality and cortical and hippocampal volume and atrophy within a community-based sample, explore the influence of age on results, and assess the possible confounding effects of physical activity levels, body mass index (BMI), and blood pressure. In 147 community-dwelling adults (92 female; age 53.9 ± 15.5 years), sleep quality was measured using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and correlated with cross-sectional measures of volume and longitudinal measures of atrophy derived from MRI scans separated by an average of 3.5 years. Exploratory post hoc analysis compared correlations between different age groups and included physical activity, BMI, and blood pressure as additional covariates. Poor sleep quality was associated with reduced volume within the right superior frontal cortex in cross-sectional analyses, and an increased rate of atrophy within widespread frontal, temporal, and parietal regions in longitudinal analyses. Results were largely driven by correlations within adults over the age of 60, and could not be explained by variation in physical activity, BMI, or blood pressure. Sleep quality was not associated with hippocampal volume or atrophy. We found that longitudinal measures of cortical atrophy were widely correlated with sleep quality. Poor sleep quality may be a cause or a consequence of brain atrophy, and future studies examining the effect of interventions that improve sleep quality on rates of atrophy may hold key insights into the direction of this relationship. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  8. Congenital Bone Fractures in Spinal Muscular Atrophy: Functional Role for SMN Protein in Bone Remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugarajan, Srinivasan; Swoboda, Kathryn J.; Iannaccone, Susan T.; Ries, William L.; Maria, Bernard L.; Reddy, Sakamuri V.

    2009-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy is the second most common fatal childhood disorder. Core clinical features include muscle weakness caused by degenerating lower motor neurons and a high incidence of bone fractures and hypercalcemia. Fractures further compromise quality of life by progression of joint contractures or additional loss of motor function. Recent observations suggest that bone disease in spinal muscular atrophy may not be attributed entirely to lower motor neuron degeneration. The presence of the spinal muscular atrophy disease-determining survival motor neuron gene (SMN), SMN expression, and differential splicing in bone-resorbing osteoclasts was recently discovered. Its ubiquitous expression and the differential expression of splice variants suggest that SMN has specific roles in bone cell function. SMN protein also interacts with osteoclast stimulatory factor. Mouse models of human spinal muscular atrophy disease suggest a potential role of SMN protein in skeletal development. Dual energy x-ray absorptiometry analysis demonstrated a substantial decrease in total bone area and poorly developed caudal vertebra in the mouse model. These mice also had pelvic bone fractures. Studies delineating SMN signaling mechanisms and gene transcription in a cell-specific manner will provide important molecular insights into the pathogenesis of bone disease in children with spinal muscular atrophy. Moreover, understanding bone remodeling in spinal muscular atrophy may lead to novel therapeutic approaches to enhance skeletal health and quality of life. This article reviews the skeletal complications associated with spinal muscular atrophy and describes a functional role for SMN protein in osteoclast development and bone resorption activity. PMID:17761651

  9. Cerebrospinal fluid volumetric MRI mapping as a simple measurement for evaluating brain atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vis, J.B. de; Zwanenburg, J.J.; Kleij, L.A. van der; Spijkerman, J.M.; Hendrikse, J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Biessels, G.J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Neurology, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht (Netherlands); Petersen, E.T. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Hvidovre Hospital, Danish Research Centre for Magnetic Resonance, Hvidovre (Denmark)

    2016-05-15

    To assess whether volumetric cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) MRI can be used as a surrogate for brain atrophy assessment and to evaluate how the T{sub 2} of the CSF relates to brain atrophy. Twenty-eight subjects [mean age 64 (sd 2) years] were included; T{sub 1}-weighted and CSF MRI were performed. The first echo data of the CSF MRI sequence was used to obtain intracranial volume, CSF partial volume was measured voxel-wise to obtain CSF volume (V{sub CSF}) and the T{sub 2} of CSF (T{sub 2,CSF}) was calculated. The correlation between V{sub CSF} / T{sub 2,CSF} and brain atrophy scores [global cortical atrophy (GCA) and medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA)] was evaluated. Relative total, peripheral subarachnoidal, and ventricular V{sub CSF} increased significantly with increased scores on the GCA and MTA (R = 0.83, 0.78 and 0.78 and R = 0.72, 0.62 and 0.86). Total, peripheral subarachnoidal, and ventricular T{sub 2} of the CSF increased significantly with higher scores on the GCA and MTA (R = 0.72, 0.70 and 0.49 and R = 0.60, 0.57 and 0.41). A fast, fully automated CSF MRI volumetric sequence is an alternative for qualitative atrophy scales. The T{sub 2} of the CSF is related to brain atrophy and could thus be a marker of neurodegenerative disease. (orig.)

  10. Neuropathological Comparison of Adult Onset and Juvenile Huntington's Disease with Cerebellar Atrophy: A Report of a Father and Son.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latimer, Caitlin S; Flanagan, Margaret E; Cimino, Patrick J; Jayadev, Suman; Davis, Marie; Hoffer, Zachary S; Montine, Thomas J; Gonzalez-Cuyar, Luis F; Bird, Thomas D; Keene, C Dirk

    2017-10-11

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease caused by a trinucleotide (CAG) repeat expansion in huntingtin (HTT) on chromosome 4. Anticipation can cause longer repeat expansions in children of HD patients. Juvenile Huntington's disease (JHD), defined as HD arising before age 20, accounts for 5-10% of HD cases, with cases arising in the first decade accounting for approximately 1%. Clinically, JHD differs from the predominately choreiform adult onset Huntington's disease (AOHD) with variable presentations, including symptoms such as myoclonus, seizures, Parkinsonism, and cognitive decline. The neuropathologic changes of AOHD are well characterized, but there are fewer reports that describe the neuropathology of JHD. Here we report a case of a six-year-old boy with paternally-inherited JHD caused by 169 CAG trinucleotide repeats who presented at age four with developmental delay, dysarthria, and seizures before dying at age 6. The boy's clinical presentation and neuropathological findings are directly compared to those of his father, who presented with AOHD and 54 repeats. A full autopsy was performed for the JHD case and a brain-only autopsy was performed for the AOHD case. Histochemically- and immunohistochemically-stained slides were prepared from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections. Both cases had neuropathology corresponding to Vonsattel grade 3. The boy also had cerebellar atrophy with huntingtin-positive inclusions in the cerebellum, findings not present in the father. Autopsies of father and son provide a unique opportunity to compare and contrast the neuropathologic findings of juvenile and adult onset HD while also providing the first immunohistochemical evidence of cerebellar involvement in JHD. Additionally this is the first known report to include findings from peripheral tissue in a case of JHD.

  11. Intranasal location and immunohistochemical characterization of the equine olfactory epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Kupke

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The olfactory epithelium (OE is the only body site where neurons contact directly the environment and are therefore exposed to a broad variation of substances and insults. It can serve as portal of entry for neurotropic viruses which spread via the olfactory pathway to the central nervous system (CNS. For horses, it has been proposed and concluded mainly from rodent studies that different viruses, e.g. Borna disease virus (BoDV, equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1, hendra virus, influenza virus, rabies virus, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV can use this route. However, little is yet known about cytoarchitecture, protein expression and the intranasal location of the equine OE. Revealing differences in cytoarchitecture or protein expression pattern in comparison to rodents, canines or humans might help to explain varying susceptibility to certain intranasal virus infections. On the other hand, disclosing similarities especially between rodents and other species, e.g. horses would help to underscore transferability of rodent models. Analysis of the complete noses of 5 adult horses revealed that in the equine OE two epithelial subtypes with distinct marker expression exist, designated as types a and b which resemble those previously described in dogs. Detailed statistical analysis was carried out to confirm the results obtained on the descriptive level. The equine OE was predominantly located in caudodorsal areas of the nasal turbinates with a significant decline in rostroventral direction, especially for type a. Immunohistochemically, olfactory marker protein (OMP and doublecortin (DCX expression was found in more cells of OE type a, whereas expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA and tropomyosin receptor kinase A (TrkA was present in more cells of type b. Accordingly, type a resembles the mature epithelium, in contrast to the more juvenile type b. Protein expression profile was comparable to canine and rodent OE but equine type a and b were

  12. Immunohistochemical study on gastrointestinal endocrine cells of four reptiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xu-Gen; Wu, Xiao-Bing

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To clarify the types, regional distributions and distribution densities as well as morphological features of gastrointestinal (GI) endocrine cells in various parts of the gastrointestinal track (GIT) of four reptiles, Gekko japonicus, Eumeces chinensis, Sphenomorphus indicus and Eumeces elegans. METHODS: Paraffin-embedded sections (5 μm) of seven parts (cardia, fundus, pylorus, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, rectum) of GIT dissected from the four reptiles were prepared. GI endocrine cells were revealed by using immunohistochemical techniques of streptavidin-peroxidase (S-P) method. Seven types of antisera against 5-hydroxy-tryptamine (5-HT), somatostatin (SS), gastrin (GAS), glucagon (GLU), substance P (SP), insulin and pancreatic polypeptide were identified and then GI endocrine cells were photomicrographed and counted. RESULTS: The GI endocrine system of four reptiles was a complex structure containing many endocrine cell types similar in morphology to those found in higher vertebrates. Five types of GI endocrine cells, namely 5-HT, SS, GAS, SP and GLU immunoreactive (IR) cells were identified in the GIT of G. japonicus, E. chinensis and S. indicus; while in the GIT of E. elegans only the former three types of endocrine cells were observed. No PP- and INS- IR cells were found in all four reptiles. 5-HT-IR cells, which were most commonly found in the pylorus or duodenum, distributed throughout the whole GIT of four reptiles. However, their distribution patterns varied from each other. SS-IR cells, which were mainly found in the stomach especially in the pylorus and/or fundus, were demonstrated in the whole GIT of E. chinensis, only showed restricted distribution in the other three species. GAS-IR cells, with a much restricted distribution, were mainly demonstrated in the pylorus and/or the proximal small intestine of four reptiles. GLU-IR cells exhibited a limited and species-dependent variant distribution in the GIT of four reptiles. SP-IR cells were found

  13. How to diagnose acute appendicitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mostbeck, Gerhard; Adam, E Jane; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann

    2016-01-01

    Acute appendicitis (AA) is a common abdominal emergency with a lifetime prevalence of about 7 %. As the clinical diagnosis of AA remains a challenge to emergency physicians and surgeons, imaging modalities have gained major importance in the diagnostic work-up of patients with suspected AA in order...... appendicitis (AA). • Primary US for AA diagnosis will decrease ionizing radiation and cost. • Sensitivity of US to diagnose AA is lower than of CT/MRI. • Non-visualization of the appendix should lead to clinical reassessment. • Complementary MRI or CT may be performed if diagnosis remains unclear....

  14. Prediction of the development of late enophthalmos in pure blowout fractures: delayed orbital tissue atrophy plays a major role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sue Min; Jeong, Yeon Seong; Lee, Il Jae; Park, Myong Chul; Park, Dong Ha

    2017-01-19

    To retrospectively evaluate the risk factors for the development of late enophthalmos in pure blowout fractures. We reviewed 49 cases of pure blowout fractures diagnosed in Ajou University Hospital, South Korea, from January 2005 to June 2015. We assumed that several factors influence the development of late enophthalmos, including bony defect size, volume of displaced soft tissue, number of fracture sites, involvement of floor, soft tissue incarceration through the bony defect, and patient age. Twenty-one patients were diagnosed with late enophthalmos (group 1) while 28 patients were not (group 2). Soft tissue incarceration, presumably causing the soft tissue injury, was the only factor that increased the risk for late enophthalmos in this study (p = 0.04, odds ratio 4.5). In contrast with previous studies, there were no meaningful correlation between bony defect size or volume of displaced soft tissue and development of late enophthalmos. Number of fracture sites, involvement of floor, and patient age did not increase the risk for late enophthalmos. We suggest that the delayed orbital tissue atrophy due to soft tissue injury plays a more important role than other hypotheses in the development of late enophthalmos. It is necessary to overcorrect to some extent if there is soft tissue incarceration through the bony defect in the initial computed tomography, and clinicians should warn patients about the development of late enophthalmos despite orbital reconstructive surgery.

  15. Muscular atrophy in severe cases of cubital tunnel syndrome: prognostic factors and outcome after surgical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruder, Markus; Dützmann, Stephan; Rekkab, Nourdin; Quick, Johanna; Seifert, Volker; Marquardt, Gerhard

    2017-03-01

    Cubital tunnel syndrome (CuTS) is a frequent neuropathy, leading to sensor-motoric dysfunction. Many patients even present with muscular atrophy as a sign for severe and long-lasting nerve impairment, usually suggesting unfavourable outcome. We analysed if those patients benefit from surgical treatment on a long-term basis. Between January 2010 and March 2015, 42 consecutive cases of CuTS with atrophy of the intrinsic hand muscles were surgically treated in our department. Clinical data of the treatment course and postoperative results were collected. Follow-up was prospectively assessed according to McGowen grading and Bishop outcome score. Mean follow-up time was 39.8 (±17.0) months. All patients were treated with in situ decompression; in 33%, submuscular transposition was performed. Forty-five percent showed improvement of sensory deficits and 57% showed improvement of motor deficits 6 months after the operation. Atrophy improved in 76%. At the time of follow-up, 79% were satisfied with the postoperative result and 77% of patients reached good or excellent outcome according to modified Bishop rating scale. Patients with improvement of atrophy had significantly shorter symptom duration period (7 ± 10 months vs 26 ± 33 months; p < 0.05). In the case of intraoperative pseudoneuroma observation, atrophy improvement was less likely (p < 0.05). In severe cases of CuTS with atrophy of the intrinsic hand muscles, surgical treatment enables improvement of sensory function, motor function and atrophy even in cases with muscular atrophy. Atrophy improvement was more likely in cases of short symptom duration and less likely in cases with pseudoneuroma.

  16. The transitional association between β-amyloid pathology and regional brain atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insel, Philip S; Mattsson, Niklas; Donohue, Michael C; Mackin, R Scott; Aisen, Paul S; Jack, Clifford R; Shaw, Leslie M; Trojanowski, John Q; Weiner, Michael W

    2015-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) associated with brain atrophy and cognitive decline. The functional form to model the association between Aβ and regional brain atrophy has not been well defined. To determine the relationship between Aβ and atrophy, we compared the performance of the usual dichotomization of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Aβ to identify subjects as Aβ+ and Aβ- with a trilinear spline model of CSF Aβ. One hundred and eighty-three subjects with mild cognitive impairment and 108 cognitively normal controls with baseline CSF Aβ and up to 4 years of longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative were analyzed using mixed-effects regression. Piecewise-linear splines were used to evaluate the nonlinear nature of the association between CSF Aβ and regional atrophy and to identify points of acceleration of atrophy with respect to Aβ. Several parameterizations of CSF Aβ were compared using likelihood ratio tests and the Akaike information criterion. Periods of acceleration of atrophy in which subjects transition from CSF Aβ negativity to CSF Aβ positivity were estimated from the spline models and tested for significance. Spline models resulted in better fits for many temporal and parietal regions compared with the dichotomous models. The trilinear model showed that periods of acceleration of atrophy varied greatly by region with early changes seen in the insula, amygdala, precuneus, hippocampus, and other temporal regions, occurring before the clinical threshold for CSF Aβ positivity. The use of piecewise-linear splines provides an improved model of the nonlinear association between CSF Aβ and regional atrophy in regions implicated in the progression of AD. The important biological finding of this work is that some brain regions show periods of accelerated volume loss well before the CSF Aβ42 threshold. This implies that signs of brain atrophy

  17. Eyelid Fat Atrophy and Depigmentation After an Intralesional Injection of Triamcinolone Acetonide to Treat Chalazion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jihyun; Chang, Minwook

    2017-05-01

    Two patients with depigmentation and fat atrophy after an intralesional injection of triamcinolone acetonide (TA) to treat chalazion are reported. A 2-year-old girl with chalazion in her right lower eyelid received a subconjunctival injection of TA and developed fat atrophy and depigmentation around the injected area. These changes subsided after 7 months. The second patient was a 5-year-old boy who received a triamcinolone injection into a chalazion through the eyelid skin and also developed fat atrophy and depigmentation but these changes improved after 1 year.

  18. Diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus, optic atrophy, and deafness: A case of Wolfram (DIDMOAD) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Nasrollah; Bashardoust, Bahman; Zakeri, Anahita; Salehifar, Azita; Tavosi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    To report a case of Wolfram syndrome (WS) characterized by diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus, progressive optic atrophy, and deafness. A 19-year-old female patient, a known case of diabetes mellitus type I from six years before, presented with progressive vision loss since four years earlier. On fundoscopic examination, she had bilateral optic atrophy without diabetic retinopathy. The patient also had diabetes insipidus, neurosensory deafness, and neurogenic bladder. WS should be considered a differential diagnosis in patients with diabetes mellitus who present with optic atrophy, and it is necessary to perform a hearing test as well as collecting 24-h urine output.

  19. Late-onset Alzheimer disease genetic variants in posterior cortical atrophy and posterior AD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasquillo, Minerva M; Khan, Qurat ul Ain; Murray, Melissa E; Krishnan, Siddharth; Aakre, Jeremiah; Pankratz, V Shane; Nguyen, Thuy; Ma, Li; Bisceglio, Gina; Petersen, Ronald C; Younkin, Steven G; Dickson, Dennis W; Boeve, Bradley F; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer

    2014-04-22

    To investigate association of genetic risk factors for late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD) with risk of posterior cortical atrophy (PCA), a syndrome of visual impairment with predominant Alzheimer disease (AD) pathology in posterior cortical regions, and with risk of "posterior AD" neuropathology. We assessed 81 participants with PCA diagnosed clinically and 54 with neuropathologic diagnosis of posterior AD vs 2,523 controls for association with 11 significant single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from published LOAD risk genome-wide association studies. There was highly significant association with APOE ε4 and increased risk of PCA (p = 0.0003, odds ratio [OR] = 3.17) and posterior AD (p = 1.11 × 10(-17), OR = 6.43). No other locus was significant after corrections for multiple testing, although rs11136000 near CLU (p = 0.019, OR = 0.60) and rs744373 near BIN1 (p = 0.025, OR = 1. 63) associated nominally significantly with posterior AD, and rs3851179 at the PICALM locus had significant association with PCA (p = 0.0003, OR = 2.84). ABCA7 locus SNP rs3764650, which was also tested under the recessive model because of Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium, also had nominally significant association with PCA risk. The direction of association at APOE, CLU, and BIN1 loci was the same for participants with PCA and posterior AD. The effects for all SNPs, except rs3851179, were consistent with those for LOAD risk. We identified a significant effect for APOE and nominate CLU, BIN1, and ABCA7 as additional risk loci for PCA and posterior AD. Our findings suggest that at least some of the genetic risk factors for LOAD are shared with these atypical conditions and provide effect-size estimates for their future genetic studies.

  20. Multimodal Discrimination of Alzheimer's Disease Based on Regional Cortical Atrophy and Hypometabolism.

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    Hyuk Jin Yun

    Full Text Available Structural MR image (MRI and 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET have been widely employed in diagnosis of both Alzheimer's disease (AD and mild cognitive impairment (MCI pathology, which has led to the development of methods to distinguish AD and MCI from normal controls (NC. Synaptic dysfunction leads to a reduction in the rate of metabolism of glucose in the brain and is thought to represent AD progression. FDG-PET has the unique ability to estimate glucose metabolism, providing information on the distribution of hypometabolism. In addition, patients with AD exhibit significant neuronal loss in cerebral regions, and previous AD research has shown that structural MRI can be used to sensitively measure cortical atrophy. In this paper, we introduced a new method to discriminate AD from NC based on complementary information obtained by FDG and MRI. For accurate classification, surface-based features were employed and 12 predefined regions were selected from previous studies based on both MRI and FDG-PET. Partial least square linear discriminant analysis was employed for making diagnoses. We obtained 93.6% classification accuracy, 90.1% sensitivity, and 96.5% specificity in discriminating AD from NC. The classification scheme had an accuracy of 76.5% and sensitivity and specificity of 46.5% and 89.6%, respectively, for discriminating MCI from AD. Our method exhibited a superior classification performance compared with single modal approaches and yielded parallel accuracy to previous multimodal classification studies using MRI and FDG-PET.

  1. New multiplex real-time PCR approach to detect gene mutations for spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhidai; Zhang, Penghui; He, Xiaoyan; Liu, Shan; Tang, Shi; Zhang, Rong; Wang, Xinbin; Tan, Junjie; Peng, Bin; Jiang, Li; Hong, Siqi; Zou, Lin

    2016-08-17

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is the most common autosomal recessive disease in children, and the diagnosis is complicated and difficult, especially at early stage. Early diagnosis of SMA is able to improve the outcome of SMA patients. In our study, Real-time PCR was developed to measure the gene mutation or deletion of key genes for SMA and to further analyse genotype-phenotype correlation. The multiple real-time PCR for detecting the mutations of survival of motor neuron (SMN), apoptosis inhibitory protein (NAIP) and general transcription factor IIH, polypeptide 2 gene (GTF2H2) was established and confirmed by DNA sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). The diagnosis and prognosis of 141 hospitalized children, 100 normal children and further 2000 cases of dry blood spot (DBS) samples were analysed by this multiple real-time PCR. The multiple real-time PCR was established and the accuracy of it to detect the mutations of SMN, NAIP and GTF2H2 was at least 98.8 % comparing with DNA sequencing and MLPA. Among 141 limb movement disorders children, 75 cases were SMA. 71 cases of SMA (94.67 %) were with SMN c.840 mutation, 9 cases (12 %) with NAIP deletion and 3 cases (4 %) with GTF2H2 deletion. The multiple real-time PCR was able to diagnose and predict the prognosis of SMA patients. Simultaneously, the real-time PCR was applied to detect trace DNA from DBS and able to make an early diagnosis of SMA. The clinical and molecular characteristics of SMA in Southwest of China were presented. Our work provides a novel way for detecting SMA in children by using real-time PCR and the potential usage in newborn screening for early diagnosis of SMA.

  2. Slowed Prosaccades and Increased Antisaccade Errors As a Potential Behavioral Biomarker of Multiple System Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah H. Brooks

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Current clinical diagnostic tools are limited in their ability to accurately differentiate idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (PD from multiple system atrophy (MSA and other parkinsonian disorders early in the disease course, but eye movements may stand as objective and sensitive markers of disease differentiation and progression. To assess the use of eye movement performance for uniquely characterizing PD and MSA, subjects diagnosed with PD (N = 21, MSA (N = 11, and age-matched controls (C, N = 20 were tested on the prosaccade and antisaccade tasks using an infrared eye tracker. Twenty of these subjects were retested ~7 months later. Saccade latencies, error rates, and longitudinal changes in saccade latencies were measured. Both PD and MSA patients had greater antisaccade error rates than C subjects, but MSA patients exhibited longer prosaccade latencies than both PD and C patients. With repeated testing, antisaccade latencies improved over time, with benefits in C and PD but not MSA patients. In the prosaccade task, the normal latencies of the PD group show that basic sensorimotor oculomotor function remain intact in mid-stage PD, whereas the impaired latencies of the MSA group suggest additional degeneration earlier in the disease course. Changes in antisaccade latency appeared most sensitive to differences between MSA and PD across short time intervals. Therefore, in these mid-stage patients, increased antisaccade errors combined with slowed prosaccade latencies might serve as a useful marker for early differentiation between PD and MSA, and, antisaccade performance, a measure of MSA progression. Together, our findings suggest that eye movements are promising biomarkers for early differentiation and progression of parkinsonian disorders.

  3. Obsessive compulsive personality disorder in Progressive Supranuclear Palsy, Multiple System Atrophy and Essential Tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoletti, A; Luca, A; Luca, M; Donzuso, G; Mostile, G; Raciti, L; Contrafatto, D; Dibilio, V; Sciacca, G; Cicero, C E; Vasta, R; Petralia, A; Zappia, M

    2016-09-01

    aim of the study was to evaluate the presence of the Obsessive Compulsive Personality Disorder (OCPeD) in Multiple System Atrophy (MSA), Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP) and Essential Tremor (ET) and in a group of healthy subjects. patients affected by MSA, PSP and ET diagnosed according to currently accepted diagnostic criteria and a group of healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Patients with cognitive impairment were excluded from the study. The Structured Clinical Interview for Personality Disorders-II (SCID-II) has been performed to evaluate the presence of personality disorders (PeDs). The diagnosis of OCPeD was confirmed by a psychiatric interview. fifteen MSA patients (8 men and 7 women; aged 62.9 ± 7.6 years), 14 PSP patients (8 men and 6 women; aged 69.8 ± 4.4 years), 16 ET patients (10 men and 6 women; aged 70.4 ± 6.4 years) and 20 healthy subjects (10 men and 10 women; aged 65.5 ± 6.0 years) were enrolled. OCPeD was recorded in 5 (35.7%) PSP patients, 2 (13.3%) MSA patients, 2 (12.5%) ET patient and 2 (10%) controls. a low frequency of OCPeD, close to those recorded in healthy subjects, was recorded in both MSA and ET patients. Conversely an higher frequency of OCPeD, similar to PD was found among PSP patients, supporting the possibility of an impairment of common basal ganglia network possibly involving the orbito-frontal circuits. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Force control deficits in individuals with Parkinson's disease, multiple systems atrophy, and progressive supranuclear palsy.

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    Kristina A Neely

    Full Text Available This study examined grip force and cognition in Parkinson's disease (PD, Parkinsonian variant of multiple system atrophy (MSAp, progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP, and healthy controls. PD is characterized by a slower rate of force increase and decrease and the production of abnormally large grip forces. Early-stage PD has difficulty with the rapid contraction and relaxation of hand muscles required for precision gripping. The first goal was to determine which features of grip force are abnormal in MSAp and PSP. The second goal was to determine whether a single variable or a combination of motor and cognitive measures would distinguish patient groups. Since PSP is more cognitively impaired relative to PD and MSAp, we expected that combining motor and cognitive measures would further distinguish PSP from PD and MSAp.We studied 44 participants: 12 PD, 12 MSAp, 8 PSP, and 12 controls. Patients were diagnosed by a movement disorders neurologist and were tested off anti-Parkinsonian medication. Participants completed a visually guided grip force task wherein force pulses were produced for 2 s, followed by 1 s of rest. We also conducted four cognitive tests.PD, MSAp, and PSP were slower at contracting and relaxing force and produced longer pulse durations compared to controls. PSP produced additional force pulses during the task and were more cognitively impaired relative to other groups. A receiver operator characteristic analysis revealed that the combination of number of pulses and Brief Test of Attention (BTA discriminated PSP from PD, MSAp, and controls with a high degree of sensitivity and specificity.Slowness in contracting and relaxing force represent general features of PD, MSAp, and PSP, whereas producing additional force pulses was specific to PSP. Combining motor and cognitive measures provides a robust method for characterizing behavioral features of PSP compared to MSAp and PD.

  5. Immunohistochemical findings of the granulomatous reaction associated with tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin Karimi

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Detection of TB in tissue slides is still based on the histological pattern of the granuloma, which has several differential diagnoses with different treatments. Presence of mycobacterial antigens and tissue morphology can be evaluated using the IHC technique. Considering the criteria of positive IHC staining of TB granulomatous reactions, this stain not only highlights the presence of mycobacterial antigens for tissue diagnosis, but also could morphologically localize their distribution in different cells. Pathologists must be familiar with adequate staining pattern, elimination of background staining, and type of selected antibody. This method is especially important for application in countries with high prevalence of TB as a technique with early diagnostic value in tissue specimens. Early diagnosis using this technique can reduce related morbidity and mortality and decrease the rate of complications due to misdiagnosis and mistreatment of TB.

  6. Epithelial ovarian tumors: Clinicopathological correlation and immunohistochemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja S Naik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ovarian cancer is the third leading site of cancer among women, trailing behind cervix and breast cancer. Aim: This study was undertaken to analyze the immunohistochemical (IHC profile of estrogen receptors (ER, progesterone receptors (PR, Ki-67, and p53 in various ovarian epithelial tumors and attempt correlation with clinical and histopathological findings. Materials and Methods: The present study was conducted over a period of 4 years. A technique of manual tissue array was employed for cases subjected for IHC. The primary antibodies used were ER, PR, p53, and Ki-67. A correlation was attempted between histopathological and IHC findings. Results were subjected to statistical analysis. Software program "the primer of biostatistics 5.0" was used for calculation of interrelationships between the analyzed ER, PR, p53, and Ki-67 expression and histological factors by Pearson′s Chi-square test. The results were considered to be significant when the P < 0.05. Results: There were 110 cases of surface epithelial ovarian tumors (SEOT encountered over the period of 4 years. The expression of ER was more in malignant tumors (13/16, 81.25% than borderline (9/12, 75% and benign (20/82, 24.39%. As compared to ER, the expression of PR was more in benign (51/82, 62.19% than borderline (8/12, 66.67% and malignant tumors (9/16, 56.25%. The expression of PR was more in benign tumors than borderline and malignant tumors. However, this was not statistically significant (Chi-square = 0.335 with 2 degrees of freedom; P = 0.846. The expression of p53 was less in benign (5/82, 6.1% than borderline (9/12, 75% and malignant tumors (13/16, 81.25%. The expression of Ki-67 was more in malignant (4/82, 4.88% than borderline (10/12, 83.33% and benign tumors (15/16, 93.75%. In all the above cases, the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05. There was statistically significant difference in the expression of ER, PR, p53, and Ki-67 in the patients with

  7. Paraphilic diagnoses in DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Richard B; Kaplan, Meg S

    2012-01-01

    The DSM-5 has been under revision since 1999 and is scheduled for publication in 2013. This article will review the major proposed modifications of the Paraphilias. The information reviewed was obtained from PubMed, PsychInfo, the DSM-5.org website and other sources and reviewed. Pedohebephilia, Hypersexual Disorder and Paraphilic Coercive Disorder are new proposed diagnoses. Paraphilias have been assigned their own chapter in DSM- 5 and a distinction has been made between Paraphilias and Paraphilic Disorders. Victim numbers have been included in diagnosis of paraphilias that involve victims and remission and severity measures have been added to all paraphilias. Transvestic Disorder can apply to males or females, Fetishistic Disorder now includes partialism, and Sexual Masochism Disorder has Asphyxiophilia as a specifier. This study is based on a literature review and influenced by the knowledge and biases of the authors. The Paraphilic Disorders Section of the DSM-5 represents a significant departure from DSMIV-TR.

  8. The yearly rate of Relative Thalamic Atrophy (yrRTA: a simple 2D/3D method for estimating deep gray matter atrophy in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel eMenéndez-González

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite a strong correlation to outcome, the measurement of gray matter (GM atrophy is not being used in daily clinical practice as a prognostic factor and monitor the effect of treatments in Multiple Sclerosis (MS. This is mainly because the volumetric methods available to date are sophisticated and difficult to implement for routine use in most hospitals. In addition, the meaning of raw results from volumetric studies on regions of interest are not always easy to understand. Thus, there is a huge need of a methodology suitable to be applied in daily clinical practice in order to estimate GM atrophy in a convenient and comprehensive way. Given the thalamus is the brain structure found to be more consistently implied in MS both in terms of extent of atrophy and in terms of prognostic value, we propose a solution based in this structure. In particular, we propose to compare the extent of thalamus atrophy (TA with the extent of unspecific, global brain atrophy, represented by ventricular enlargement. We name this ratio the yearly rate of Relative Thalamic Atrophy (yrRTA. In this report we aim to describe the concept of yrRTA and the guidelines for computing it under 2D and 3D approaches and explain the rationale behind this method. We have also conducted a very short crossectional retrospective study to proof the concept of yrRTA. However, we do not seek to describe here the validity of this parameter since these researches are being conducted currently and results will be addressed in future publications.

  9. Ultrawide-field fundus photography of the first reported case of gyrate atrophy from Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloney, Thomas P; O'Hagan, Stephen; Lee, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    Gyrate atrophy of the choroid and retina is a rare chorioretinal dystrophy inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern. We describe the first documented case of gyrate atrophy from Australia in a 56-year-old woman with a history of previous diagnosis of retinitis pigmentosa and worsening night vision in her right eye over several years. She was myopic and bilaterally pseudophakic, and fundus examination revealed pale optic discs and extensive peripheral chorioretinal atrophy exposing bare sclera bilaterally with only small islands of normal-appearing retina at each posterior pole. Visual field testing showed grossly constricted fields, blood testing showed hyperornithinemia, and further questioning revealed consanguinity between the patient's parents. We then used the patient's typical retinal findings of gyrate atrophy to demonstrate the potential use of ultrawide-field fundus photography and angiography in diagnosis and monitoring response in future treatment.

  10. Diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus, optic atrophy, and deafness: A case of Wolfram (DIDMOAD syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrollah Maleki

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: WS should be considered a differential diagnosis in patients with diabetes mellitus who present with optic atrophy, and it is necessary to perform a hearing test as well as collecting 24-h urine output.

  11. Intermittent blood flow restriction does not reduce atrophy following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Iversen

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: In conflict with other studies using a similar protocol, application of blood flow restriction the first 14 days after ACL reconstruction did not reduce quadriceps ACSA muscle atrophy measured by MR in a population of athletes.

  12. Atrophy of sacrospinal muscle groups in patients with chronic, diffusely radiating lumbar back pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laasonen, E.M.

    1984-01-01

    After surgery necessitated by lumbar back pain syndromes, radiolucency verified by CT may appear in the sacrospinal muscle group on the operate side. This radiolucency represents muscular atrophy and is in its most severe form a result of the replacement of muscle tissue with adipose tissue. Such muscular atrophy appeared in the present series in 31 out of all 156 patients (19.9%) and in 29 out of 94 patients operated on because of radiating lumbar back pain (30.9%). The radiological appearance, extent, and HU values of this muscular atrophy are presented in detail. Only weak correlations with the multitude of clinical symptoms and signs were found in this retrospective study. The effects of irreversible muscular atrophy on the indications for surgery and physiotherapy are discussed.

  13. Independent mobility after early introduction of a power wheelchair in spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunaway, Sally; Montes, Jacqueline; O'Hagen, Jessica; Sproule, Douglas M; Vivo, Darryl C De; Kaufmann, Petra

    2013-05-01

    Weakness resulting from spinal muscular atrophy causes severe limitations in functional mobility. The early introduction of power mobility has potential to enhance development and mitigate disability. These outcomes are achieved by simulating normal skill acquisition and by promoting motor learning, visuospatial system development, self-exploration, cognition, and social development. There are few reports on early power mobility in spinal muscular atrophy, and it is typically not prescribed until school age. The authors evaluated 6 children under age 2 years with neuromuscular disease (5 spinal muscular atrophy, 1 congenital muscular dystrophy) for power mobility. Parents recorded the practice hours necessary to achieve independence using the Power Mobility Skills Checklist. Four children achieved independence in all items on the checklist by 7.9 months (range: 73-458 days). Introduction of early power mobility is feasible in spinal muscular atrophy patients under age 2 years and should be introduced in late infancy when children typically acquire locomotor skills.

  14. Robust Identification of Alzheimer’s Disease subtypes based on cortical atrophy patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Yun; Na, Han Kyu; Kim, Sungsoo; Kim, Hyunwook; Kim, Hee Jin; Seo, Sang Won; Na, Duk L.; Han, Cheol E.; Seong, Joon-Kyung; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Trojanowki, John Q.; Toga, Arthur W.; Beckett, Laurel; Green, Robert C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Morris, John; Shaw, Leslie M.; Liu, Enchi; Montine, Tom; Thomas, Ronald G.; Donohue, Michael; Walter, Sarah; Gessert, Devon; Sather, Tamie; Jiminez, Gus; Harvey, Danielle; Bernstein, Matthew; Fox, Nick; Thompson, Paul; Schuff, Norbert; Decarli, Charles; Borowski, Bret; Gunter, Jeff; Senjem, Matt; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Jones, David; Kantarci, Kejal; Ward, Chad; Koeppe, Robert A.; Foster, Norm; Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Mathis, Chet; Landau, Susan; Cairns, Nigel J.; Householder, Erin; Taylor Reinwald, Lisa; Lee, Virginia; Korecka, Magdalena; Figurski, Michal; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Shen, Li; Kelley, Faber; Kim, Sungeun; Nho, Kwangsik; Kachaturian, Zaven; Frank, Richard; Snyder, Peter J.; Molchan, Susan; Kaye, Jeffrey; Quinn, Joseph; Lind, Betty; Carter, Raina; Dolen, Sara; Schneider, Lon S.; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Beccera, Mauricio; Teodoro, Liberty; Spann, Bryan M.; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Fleisher, Adam; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Lord, Joanne L.; Mason, Sara S.; Albers, Colleen S.; Knopman, David; Johnson, Kris; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Rountree, Susan; Dang, Mimi; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Ances, Beau; Carroll, Maria; Leon, Sue; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Oliver, Angela; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Geldmacher, David; Brockington, John; Roberson, Erik; Grossman, Hillel; Mitsis, Effie; de Toledo-Morrell, Leyla; Shah, Raj C.; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Greig, Maria T.; Roberts, Peggy; Albert, Marilyn; Onyike, Chiadi; D'Agostino, Daniel, II; Kielb, Stephanie; Galvin, James E.; Pogorelec, Dana M.; Cerbone, Brittany; Michel, Christina A.; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J.; Glodzik, Lidia; de Santi, Susan; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Wong, Terence Z.; Arnold, Steven E.; Karlawish, Jason H.; Wolk, David; Smith, Charles D.; Jicha, Greg; Hardy, Peter; Sinha, Partha; Oates, Elizabeth; Conrad, Gary; Lopez, Oscar L.; Oakley, Maryann; Simpson, Donna M.; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Goldstein, Bonnie S.; Martin, Kim; Makino, Kelly M.; Ismail, M. Saleem; Brand, Connie; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Thai, Gaby; Mc Adams Ortiz, Catherine; Womack, Kyle; Mathews, Dana; Quiceno, Mary; Diaz Arrastia, Ramon; King, Richard; Weiner, Myron; Martin Cook, Kristen; Devous, Michael; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J.; Cellar, Janet S.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Anderson, Heather S.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Apostolova, Liana; Tingus, Kathleen; Woo, Ellen; Silverman, Daniel H. S.; Lu, Po H.; Bartzokis, George; Graff Radford, Neill R.; Parfitt, Francine; Kendall, Tracy; Johnson, Heather; Farlow, Martin R.; Marie Hake, Ann; Matthews, Brandy R.; Herring, Scott; Hunt, Cynthia; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Carson, Richard E.; Macavoy, Martha G.; Chertkow, Howard; Bergman, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Black, Sandra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Caldwell, Curtis; Robin Hsiung, Ging Yuek; Feldman, Howard; Mudge, Benita; Assaly, Michele; Trost, Dick; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Kerwin, Diana; Marsel Mesulam, Marek; Lipowski, Kristine; Kuo Wu, Chuang; Johnson, Nancy; Sadowsky, Carl; Martinez, Walter; Villena, Teresa; Scott Turner, Raymond; Johnson, Kathleen; Reynolds, Brigid; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Marshall, Gad; Frey, Meghan; Yesavage, Jerome; Taylor, Joy L.; Lane, Barton; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Sabbagh, Marwan N.; Belden, Christine M.; Jacobson, Sandra A.; Sirrel, Sherye A.; Kowall, Neil; Killiany, Ronald; Budson, Andrew E.; Norbash, Alexander; Lynn Johnson, Patricia; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Wolday, Saba; Allard, Joanne; Lerner, Alan; Ogrocki, Paula; Hudson, Leon; Fletcher, Evan; Carmichael, Owen; Olichney, John; Kittur, Smita; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T. Y.; Bartha, Rob; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Tariot, Pierre; Reeder, Stephanie; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Adeli, Anahita; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Santulli, Robert B.; Kitzmiller, Tamar J.; Schwartz, Eben S.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Garg, Pradeep; Watkins, Franklin; Ott, Brian R.; Querfurth, Henry; Tremont, Geoffrey; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Mintzer, Jacobo; Spicer, Kenneth; Bachman, David; Finger, Elizabether; Pasternak, Stephen; Rachinsky, Irina; Rogers, John; Kertesz, Andrew; Pomara, Nunzio; Hernando, Raymundo; Sarrael, Antero; Schultz, Susan K.; Boles Ponto, Laura L.; Shim, Hyungsub; Smith, Karen Elizabeth; Relkin, Norman; Chaing, Gloria; Raudin, Lisa; Smith, Amanda; Fargher, Kristin; Raj, Balebail Ashok

    2017-03-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is heterogenous and can be classified into several subtypes. Here, we propose a robust subtyping method for AD based on cortical atrophy patterns and graph theory. We calculated similarities between subjects in their atrophy patterns throughout the whole brain, and clustered subjects with similar atrophy patterns using the Louvain method for modular organization extraction. We applied our method to AD patients recruited at Samsung Medical Center and externally validated our method by using the AD Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) dataset. Our method categorized very mild AD into three clinically distinct subtypes with high reproducibility (>90%) the parietal-predominant (P), medial temporal-predominant (MT), and diffuse (D) atrophy subtype. The P subtype showed the worst clinical presentation throughout the cognitive domains, while the MT and D subtypes exhibited relatively mild presentation. The MT subtype revealed more impaired language and executive function compared to the D subtype.

  15. CLPB mutations cause 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, progressive brain atrophy, intellectual disability, congenital neutropenia, cataracts, movement disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wortmann, S.B.; Zietkiewicz, S.; Kousi, M.; Szklarczyk, R.J.; Haack, T.B.; Gersting, S.W.; Muntau, A.C.; Rakovic, A.; Renkema, G.H.; Rodenburg, R.J.; Strom, T.M.; Meitinger, T.; Rubio-Gozalbo, M.E.; Chrusciel, E.; Distelmaier, F.; Golzio, C.; Jansen, J.H.; Karnebeek, C. van; Lillquist, Y.; Lucke, T.; Ounap, K.; Zordania, R.; Yaplito-Lee, J.; Bokhoven, H. van; Spelbrink, J.N.; Vaz, F.M.; Pras-Raves, M.; Ploski, R.; Pronicka, E.; Klein, C.; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.; Brouwer, A.P.M. de; Prokisch, H.; Katsanis, N.; Wevers, R.A.

    2015-01-01

    We studied a group of individuals with elevated urinary excretion of 3-methylglutaconic acid, neutropenia that can develop into leukemia, a neurological phenotype ranging from nonprogressive intellectual disability to a prenatal encephalopathy with progressive brain atrophy, movement disorder,

  16. Atrophy and Depigmentation After Pretibial Corticosteroid Injection for Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome: Two Case Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loopik, Miette F; Winters, Marinus; Moen, Maarten H

    2016-12-01

    No reports have been published on the results of corticosteroid injections for medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS). The authors present 2 cases of women with MTSS who showed atrophy and depigmentation of the skin after pretibial corticosteroid injections. Case 1 is an 18-y-old woman presenting with pain in her lower leg for 12 mo. No improvement was noticed after conservative treatment, so she received local injections with corticosteroids. Five months later physical examination showed tissue atrophy and depigmentation around the injection sites. Case 2 is a 22-y-old woman who presented with pain in both lower legs for 24 mo. Several conservative treatment options failed, so she received local injections with corticosteroids. Physical examination revealed tissue atrophy and depigmentation around the injection sites. No positive effect of injections with corticosteroids was found in 2 cases of MTSS. Furthermore, considerable tissue atrophy and hypopigmentation of the skin was observed.

  17. [Munchausen disease diagnosed ten years after debut].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrgan, Monija; Taasti, Lena Merete

    2013-09-02

    Munchausen disease is difficult to diagnose especially because it is often an exclusion diagnosis. We present a case of skin ulcers in a young woman, who was eventually diagnosed with Munchausen disease.

  18. Fertility Preservation for Children Diagnosed with Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... website. Skip to main content SaveMyFertility An Online Fertility Preservation Toolkit for Patients and Their Providers Open ... Diagnosed with Cancer You are here Home » Patients Fertility Preservation for Children Diagnosed with Cancer Fertility Preservation ...

  19. Inheritance of pancreatic acinar atrophy in German Shepherd Dogs.

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    Moeller, E Michael; Steiner, Jörg M; Clark, Leigh Anne; Murphy, Keith E; Famula, Thomas R; Williams, David A; Stankovics, Mary E; Vose, Amy S

    2002-10-01

    To assess the heritability of pancreatic acinar atrophy (PAA) in German Shepherd Dogs (GSDs) in the United States. 135 GSDs belonging to 2 multigenerational pedigrees. Two multigenerational pedigrees of GSDs with family members with PAA were identified. The clinical history of each GSD enrolled in the study was recorded, and serum samples for canine trypsin-like immunoreactivity (cTLI) analysis were collected from 102 dogs. Dogs with a serum cTLI concentration Pedigree I consisted of 59 dogs and pedigree II of 76 dogs. Serum cTLI concentrations were measured in 48 dogs from pedigree I and 54 dogs from pedigree II. A total of 19 dogs (14.1%) were determined to have EPI, 9 in pedigree I (15.3%) and 10 in pedigree II (13.6%). Of the 19 dogs with EPI, 8 were male and 11 were female. Evaluation of data by complex segregation analysis is strongly suggestive of an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance for EPI in GSDs in the United States.

  20. Alexander disease with mild dorsal brainstem atrophy and infantile spasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torisu, Hiroyuki; Yoshikawa, Yoko; Yamaguchi-Takada, Yui; Yano, Tamami; Sanefuji, Masafumi; Ishizaki, Yoshito; Sawaishi, Yukio; Hara, Toshiro

    2013-05-01

    We present the case of a Japanese male infant with Alexander disease who developed infantile spasms at 8 months of age. The patient had a cluster of partial seizures at 4 months of age. He presented with mild general hypotonia and developmental delay. Macrocephaly was not observed. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings fulfilled all MRI-based criteria for the diagnosis of Alexander disease and revealed mild atrophy of the dorsal pons and medulla oblongata with abnormal intensities. DNA analysis disclosed a novel heterozygous missense mutation (c.1154 C>T, p.S385F) in the glial fibrillary acidic protein gene. At 8 months of age, tonic spasms occurred, and electroencephalography (EEG) revealed hypsarrhythmia. Lamotrigine effectively controlled the infantile spasms and improved the abnormal EEG findings. Although most patients with infantile Alexander disease have epilepsy, infantile spasms are rare. This comorbid condition may be associated with the distribution of the brain lesions and the age at onset of Alexander disease. Copyright © 2012 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guber, Robert D; Takyar, Varun; Kokkinis, Angela; Fox, Derrick A; Alao, Hawwa; Kats, Ilona; Bakar, Dara; Remaley, Alan T; Hewitt, Stephen M; Kleiner, David E; Liu, Chia-Ying; Hadigan, Colleen; Fischbeck, Kenneth H; Rotman, Yaron; Grunseich, Christopher

    2017-12-12

    To determine the prevalence and features of fatty liver disease in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA). Two groups of participants with SBMA were evaluated. In the first group, 22 participants with SBMA underwent laboratory analysis and liver imaging. In the second group, 14 participants with SBMA were compared to 13 female carriers and 23 controls. Liver biopsies were done in 4 participants with SBMA. Evidence of fatty liver disease was detected by magnetic resonance spectroscopy in all participants with SBMA in the first group, with an average dome intrahepatic triacylglycerol of 27% (range 6%-66%, ref ≤5.5%). Liver dome magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements were significantly increased in participants with SBMA in the second group relative to age- and sex-matched controls, with average disease and male control measurements of 17% and 3%, respectively. Liver biopsies were consistent with simple steatosis in 2 participants and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in 2 others. We observed evidence of nonalcoholic liver disease in nearly all of the participants with SBMA evaluated. These observations expand the phenotypic spectrum of the disease and provide a potential biomarker that can be monitored in future studies. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  2. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy Pathology in Multiple System Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Shunsuke; Dickson, Dennis W; Bieniek, Kevin F

    2016-10-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder associated with repetitive traumatic brain injury. Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a Parkinsonian disorder that can result in repetitive falls with associated head trauma. We hypothesized that patients with neurodegenerative disorders like MSA could develop CTE pathology. Therefore, we assessed CTE pathology in 139 MSA cases in our brain bank. Sections from convexity cerebral cortices were screened by immunohistochemistry with anti-phospho-tau antibody. For cases with suggestive CTE pathology, further sections of basal forebrain and hippocampus were immunostained. Consensus criteria were used to make the diagnosis of CTE and aging-related tau astrogliopathy (ARTAG) was differentiated from CTE pathology. Pertinent clinical information was derived from the available records and online searches. Of the 139 MSA cases, 8 (6%) had CTE pathology and 10 (8%) had ARTAG pathology. All 8 cases with CTE were male and 4 of them had a documented history of contact sports. The median age at death in MSA with CTE was younger than in MSA without CTE or MSA with ARTAG (60, 67, and 74 years, respectively; p = 0.002). Even without a known history of contact sports or head trauma, a small subset of cases with MSA had CTE pathology. © 2016 American Association of Neuropathologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in autosomal dominant optic atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cline Susan D

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA, a form of progressive bilateral blindness due to loss of retinal ganglion cells and optic nerve deterioration, arises predominantly from mutations in the nuclear gene for the mitochondrial GTPase, OPA1. OPA1 localizes to mitochondrial cristae in the inner membrane where electron transport chain complexes are enriched. While OPA1 has been characterized for its role in mitochondrial cristae structure and organelle fusion, possible effects of OPA1 on mitochondrial function have not been determined. Results Mitochondria from six ADOA patients bearing OPA1 mutations and ten ADOA patients with unidentified gene mutations were studied for respiratory capacity and electron transport complex function. Results suggest that the nuclear DNA mutations that give rise to ADOA in our patient population do not alter mitochondrial electron transport. Conclusion We conclude that the pathophysiology of ADOA likely stems from the role of OPA1 in mitochondrial structure or fusion and not from OPA1 support of oxidative phosphorylation.

  4. Resistance strength training exercise in children with spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewelt, Aga; Krosschell, Kristin J; Stoddard, Gregory J; Weng, Cindy; Xue, Mei; Marcus, Robin L; Gappmaier, Eduard; Viollet, Louis; Johnson, Barbara A; White, Andrea T; Viazzo-Trussell, Donata; Lopes, Philippe; Lane, Robert H; Carey, John C; Swoboda, Kathryn J

    2015-10-01

    Preliminary evidence in adults with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) and in SMA animal models suggests exercise has potential benefits in improving or stabilizing muscle strength and motor function. We evaluated feasibility, safety, and effects on strength and motor function of a home-based, supervised progressive resistance strength training exercise program in children with SMA types II and III. Up to 14 bilateral proximal muscles were exercised 3 times weekly for 12 weeks. Nine children with SMA, aged 10.4 ± 3.8 years, completed the resistance training exercise program. Ninety percent of visits occurred per protocol. Training sessions were pain-free (99.8%), and no study-related adverse events occurred. Trends in improved strength and motor function were observed. A 12-week supervised, home-based, 3-day/week progressive resistance training exercise program is feasible, safe, and well tolerated in children with SMA. These findings can inform future studies of exercise in SMA. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. THE CHEMISTRY OF THE LIVER IN ACUTE YELLOW ATROPHY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, H. Gideon

    1907-01-01

    From the liver of a young man who died of typical, " idiopathic" acute yellow atrophy of the liver, after an illness of six weeks, there were isolated and identified the following amino acids: Histidin, lysin, tyrosin, leucin, glycocoll, alanin, prolin, glutaminic acid, aspartic acid. These were found free in extracts of the liver, and presumably represent products of the autolysis of liver cells, although the amount of soluble non-protein nitrogen present in the extracts was so large as to suggest that there must be some other source for these substances. Small quantities of free proteoses and peptones, and of xanthin and hypoxanthin, were also found in the extracts. In the insoluble proteins of the liver the proportion of diamino acids was decreased slightly as compared with normal livers. The proportion of protein phosphorus was increased, probably because of active regenerative proliferation, while the sulphur was normal in amount. Iron was increased because of the large quantity of blood in the liver and the hematogenous pigmentation of the liver cells. Gelatigenous material was increased both absolutely and relatively, because of the loss of parenchyma and the proliferation of the stroma. The proportion of water to solids was much increased, there having been a loss of over two-thirds of the entire parenchymatous elements of the liver. The amount of fat, lecithin and cholesterin was not far from that normal for the liver. PMID:19867115

  6. Retinal ganglion cell dendritic atrophy in DBA/2J glaucoma.

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    Pete A Williams

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is a complex disease affecting an estimated 70 million people worldwide, characterised by the progressive degeneration of retinal ganglion cells and accompanying visual field loss. The common site of damage to retinal ganglion cells is thought to be at the optic nerve head, however evidence from other optic neuropathies and neurodegenerative disorders suggests that dendritic structures undergo a prolonged period of atrophy that may accompany or even precede soma loss and neuronal cell death. Using the DBA/2J mouse model of glaucoma this investigation aims to elucidate the impact of increasing intraocular pressure on retinal ganglion cell dendrites using DBA/2J mice that express YFP throughout the retinal ganglion cells driven by Thy1 (DBA/2J.Thy1(YFP and DiOlistically labelled retinal ganglion cells in DBA/2J mice. Here we show retinal ganglion cell dendritic degeneration in DiOlistically labelled DBA/2J retinal ganglion cells but not in the DBA/2J.Thy1(YFP retinal ganglion cells suggesting that a potential downregulation of Thy1 allows only 'healthy' retinal ganglion cells to express YFP. These data may highlight alternative pathways to retinal ganglion cell loss in DBA/2J glaucoma.

  7. Electrophysiological ON and OFF Responses in Autosomal Dominant Optic Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morny, Enyam Komla A; Margrain, Tom H; Binns, Alison M; Votruba, Marcela

    2015-12-01

    To assess the effect of autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) on ON and OFF retinal ganglion cell (RGC) function by evaluating the ON and OFF components of the photopic negative response (PhNR). Twelve participants from six families with OPA1 ADOA and 16 age-matched controls were recruited. Electrophysiological assessment involved pattern ERGs (PERGs), focal (20°) and full-field long-duration (250 ms) flash ERGs using a red light-emitting diode flash on a rod-saturating blue background, and full-field brief (300 μs) xenon flash ERGs using a red filter over a continuous rod saturating blue background. Amplitudes and implicit times of the ERG components were analyzed and the diagnostic potential of each electrophysiological technique was determined by generating receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Mean amplitudes of the N95 and all PhNRs, except the full-field PhNRON, were significantly reduced in participants with ADOA (P curve (AUC) for the focal PhNRON (0.92), focal PhNROFF (0.95), and full-field PhNROFF (0.83), were not significantly different from that of the PERG N95 (0.99). In patients with ADOA, the PhNRON and PhNROFF components are nearly symmetrically reduced in the long-duration ERG, suggesting that ON- and OFF-RGC pathways may be equally affected.

  8. Decreased Coenzyme Q10 Levels in Multiple System Atrophy Cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barca, Emanuele; Kleiner, Giulio; Tang, Guomei; Ziosi, Marcello; Tadesse, Saba; Masliah, Eliezer; Louis, Elan D; Faust, Phyllis; Kang, Un J; Torres, Jose; Cortes, Etty P; Vonsattel, Jean-Paul G; Kuo, Sheng-Han; Quinzii, Catarina M

    2016-07-01

    In familial and sporadic multiple system atrophy (MSA) patients, deficiency of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) has been associated with mutations in COQ2, which encodes the second enzyme in the CoQ10 biosynthetic pathway. Cerebellar ataxia is the most common presentation of CoQ10 deficiency, suggesting that the cerebellum might be selectively vulnerable to low levels of CoQ10 To investigate whether CoQ10 deficiency represents a common feature in the brains of MSA patients independent of the presence of COQ2 mutations, we studied CoQ10 levels in postmortem brains of 12 MSA, 9 Parkinson disease (PD), 9 essential tremor (ET) patients, and 12 controls. We also assessed mitochondrial respiratory chain enzyme activities, oxidative stress, mitochondrial mass, and levels of enzymes involved in CoQ biosynthesis. Our studies revealed CoQ10 deficiency in MSA cerebellum, which was associated with impaired CoQ biosynthesis and increased oxidative stress in the absence of COQ2 mutations. The levels of CoQ10 in the cerebella of ET and PD patients were comparable or higher than in controls. These findings suggest that CoQ10 deficiency may contribute to the pathogenesis of MSA. Because no disease modifying therapies are currently available, increasing CoQ10 levels by supplementation or upregulation of its biosynthesis may represent a novel treatment strategy for MSA patients. © 2016 American Association of Neuropathologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Gait assessment with solesound instrumented footwear in spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, Jacqueline; Zanotto, Damiano; Dunaway Young, Sally; Salazar, Rachel; De Vivo, Darryl C; Agrawal, Sunil

    2017-08-01

    Gait impairment is common in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) and is described using clinical assessments and instrumented walkways. Continuous over-ground walking has not been studied. Nine SMA participants completed the 6-minute walk test (6MWT) and 10-meter walk/run wearing instrumented footwear (SoleSound). Data were simultaneously collected using a reference system (GAITRite). The root-mean-square error (RMSE) indicated criterion validity. The decrease in walking speed represented fatigue. Foot loading patterns were evaluated using force sensors. The RMSE for stride time, length, and velocity ranged from 1.3% to 1.7%. Fatigue was 11.6 ± 9.1%, which corresponded to an average deceleration of 0.37 ± 0.28 mm/s2 . Participants spent most of their stance without heel contact. Forefoot contact occurred early in the gait cycle. These results suggest that footwear-based devices are an alternative to specialized equipment for gait assessment. Better understanding of gait disturbances should inform ongoing treatment efforts and provide a more sensitive outcome measure. Muscle Nerve 56: 230-236, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Spinal muscular atrophy due to double gene conversion event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maamouri, Wiéme; Hammer, Monia Benhamed; Bouhlel, Yosr; Souilem, Sihem; Khmiri, Najla; Nehdi, Houda; Hentati, Fayçal; Amouri, Rim

    2011-02-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by degeneration of the anterior horn cells of the spinal cord. The survival motor neuron (SMN) gene has been identified as an SMA-determining gene. SMN exists as two copies in 5q13, and deletions in exons 7 and 8 of the telomeric copy (SMN(T)) occur in 95% of patients, regardless of disease severity. In a minority of patients, exon 7 but not exon 8 of SMN(T) appears deleted. We now report a patient with typical features of SMA type II who carried homozygous deletions of SMN(T) exon 7 and centromeric SMN (SMN(C)) exon 8 but retained SMN(T) exon 8 and SMN(C) exon 7. Sequence analysis demonstrated that SMN(C) exon 7 was adjacent to SMN(T) exon 8 on both SMN copies, indicating a double conversion. We confirm that sequence conversion is a common event in SMA and is associated with the milder form of the disease. The severity, however, can be modified in either positive or negative direction by other factors.

  11. Multiple system atrophy: using clinical pharmacology to reveal pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jens; Shibao, Cyndya; Biaggioni, Italo

    2015-02-01

    Despite similarities in their clinical presentation, patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA) have residual sympathetic tone and intact post-ganglionic noradrenergic fibers, whereas patients with pure autonomic failure (PAF) and Parkinson disease have efferent post-ganglionic autonomic denervation. These differences are apparent biochemically, as well as in neurophysiological testing, with near normal plasma norephrine in MSA but very low levels in PAF. These differences are also reflected in the response patients have to drugs that interact with the autonomic nervous system. For example, the ganglionic blocker trimethaphan reduces residual sympathetic tone and lowers blood pressure in MSA, but less so in PAF. Conversely, the α2-antagonist yohimbine produces a greater increase in blood pressure in MSA compared to PAF, although significant overlap exists. In normal subjects, the norepinephrine reuptake (NET) inhibitor atomoxetine has little effect on blood pressure because the peripheral effects of NET inhibition that result in noradrenergic vasoconstriction are counteracted by the increase in brain norepinephrine, which reduces sympathetic outflow (a clonidine-like effect). In patients with autonomic failure and intact peripheral noradrenergic fibers, only the peripheral vasoconstriction is apparent. This translates to a significant pressor effect of atomoxetine in MSA, but not in PAF patients. Thus, pharmacological probes can be used to understand the pathophysiology of the different forms of autonomic failure, assist in the diagnosis, and aid in the management of orthostatic hypotension.

  12. Biomarkers in Rare Disorders: The Experience with Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Brahe

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder caused by homozygous mutations of the SMN1 gene. Based on clinical severity, three forms of SMA are recognized (type I–III. All patients have at least one (usually 2–4 copies of a highly homologous gene (SMN2 which produces insufficient levels of functional SMN protein, due to alternative splicing of exon7. Recently, evidence has been provided that SMN2 expression can be enhanced by different strategies. The availability of potential candidates to treat SMA has raised a number of issues, including the availability of data on the natural history of the disease, the reliability and sensitivity of outcome measures, the duration of the studies, and the number and clinical homogeneity of participating patients. Equally critical is the availability of reliable biomarkers. So far, different tools have been proposed as biomarkers in SMA, classifiable into two groups: instrumental (the Compound Motor Action Potential, the Motor Unit Number Estimation, and the Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and molecular (SMN gene products dosage, either transcripts or protein. However, none of the biomarkers available so far can be considered the gold standard. Preclinical studies on SMA animal models and double-blind, placebo-controlled studies are crucial to evaluate the appropriateness of biomarkers, on the basis of correlations with clinical outcome.

  13. Optimization of Spinal Muscular Atrophy subject's muscle activity during gait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umat, Gazlia; Rambely, Azmin Sham

    2014-06-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is a hereditary disease related muscle nerve disorder caused by degeneration of the anterior cells of the spinal cord. SMA is divided into four types according to the degree of seriousness. SMA patients show different gait with normal people. Therefore, this study focused on the effects of SMA patient muscle actions and the difference that exists between SMA subjects and normal subjects. Therefore, the electromyography (EMG) test will be used to track the behavior of muscle during walking and optimization methods are used to get the muscle stress that is capable of doing the work while walking. Involved objective function is non-linear function of the quadratic and cubic functions. The study concludes with a comparison of the objective function using the force that sought to use the moment of previous studies and the objective function using the data obtained from EMG. The results shows that the same muscles, peroneus longus and bisepsfemoris, were used during walking activity by SMA subjects and control subjects. Muscle stress force best solution achieved from part D in simulation carried out.

  14. Progressive Retinal Atrophy in the Border Collie: A new XLPRA

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    Thomas Anne

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several forms of progressive retinal atrophy (PRA segregate in more than 100 breeds of dog with each PRA segregating in one or a few breeds. This breed specificity may be accounted for by founder effects and genetic drift, which have reduced the genetic heterogeneity of each breed, thereby facilitating the identification of causal mutations. We report here a new form of PRA segregating in the Border Collie breed. The clinical signs, including the loss of night vision and a progressive loss of day vision, resulting in complete blindness, occur at the age of three to four years and may be detected earlier through systematic ocular fundus examination and electroretinography (ERG. Results Ophthalmic examinations performed on 487 dogs showed that affected dogs present a classical form of PRA. Of those, 274 have been sampled for DNA extraction and 87 could be connected through a large pedigree. Segregation analysis suggested an X-linked mode of transmission; therefore both XLPRA1 and XLPRA2 mutations were excluded through the genetic tests. Conclusion Having excluded these mutations, we suggest that this PRA segregating in Border Collie is a new XLPRA (XLPRA3 and propose it as a potential model for the homologous human disease, X-Linked Retinitis Pigmentosa.

  15. GEMINs: Potential Therapeutic Targets for Spinal Muscular Atrophy?

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    Rebecca eBorg

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The motor neuron degenerative disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA remains one of the most frequently inherited causes of infant mortality. Afflicted patients loose the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1 gene but retain one or more copies of SMN2, a homologue that is incorrectly spliced. Primary treatment strategies for SMA aim at boosting SMN protein levels, which are insufficient in patients. SMN is known to partner with a set of diverse proteins collectively known as GEMINs to form a macromolecular complex. The SMN-GEMINs complex is indispensible for chaperoning the assembly of small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs, which are key for pre-mRNA splicing. Pharmaceutics that alleviate the neuromuscular phenotype by restoring the fundamental function of SMN without augmenting its levels are also crucial in the development of an effective treatment. Their use as an adjunct therapy is predicted to enhance benefit to patients. Inspired by the surprising discovery revealing a premier role for GEMINs in snRNP biogenesis together with in vivo studies documenting their requirement for the correct function of the motor system, this review speculates on whether GEMINs constitute valid targets for SMA therapeutic development.

  16. Dental implants for severely atrophied jaws due to ectodermal dysplasia

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    Preetha Balaji

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to present the successful esthetical and functional rehabilitation of partial anodontia in a case of severe ectodermal dysplasia with complete atrophy of the jaws. A 17-year-old male with Class III malocclusion with partial anodontia sought dental implant treatment. His expectation was that of Class I occlusion. The challenge in the case was to match the expectation, reality, and the clinical possibilities. Ridge augmentation was performed with a combination of rib graft and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2. Simultaneously, 6 implants (Nobel Biocare™ - Tapered Groovy were placed in maxillary arch and 10 in the mandible. Simultaneous placement ensured faster and better osseointegration though a mild compromise of the primary stability was observed initially. After adequate healing, Customized Zirconia Procera™ system was used to build the framework. Zirconia crown was cemented to the framework. Radiological and clinical evidence of osseointegration was observed in all 16 dental implants. Successful conversion of Class III to Class I occlusion was achieved with the combination of preprosthetic alveolar ridge augmentation, Procera™ Implant Bridge system. Abnormal angulations and or placement of dental implants would result in failure of the implant. Hence conversion of Class III to Class I occlusion needs complete and complex treatment planning so that the entire masticatory apparatus is sufficiently remodeled. Planning should consider the resultant vectors that would otherwise result in failure of framework or compromise the secondary stability of the dental implant during function. A successful case of rehabilitation of complex partial anodontia is presented.

  17. Misdirected horizontal saccades in pan-cerebellar atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Aasef G; Ghasia, Fatema F

    2015-08-15

    Saccadic dysmetria is a sensitive marker of cerebellar dysfunction. We discovered misdirected horizontal saccades due to cross-coupled orthogonal (vertical) saccades in siblings with pan-cerebellar atrophy. There was an upward drift in vertical eye position after each cross-coupled downward saccade. Such drifts brought the eyes back to the desired target. Due to strong upward bias, downward compensatory slow movements did not follow cross-coupled upward saccades. There was minimal horizontal cross-coupling associated with vertical saccades. There was a reduced gain of horizontal pursuit causing lag in the horizontal eye movement and subsequent catch-up horizontal saccades. The horizontal catch-up saccades were also associated with vertical cross-coupled eye movements and subsequent drifts. There was no cross-coupling of pursuit eye movements. Our results support the hypothesis emphasizing adaptive cerebellar control of saccade direction. Commands for horizontal saccades trigger not only the activity of the horizontal burst generators, but also the vertical burst neurons. The activity of orthogonal (vertical) burst neurons is canceled by opposing signals under cerebellar supervision. Cerebellar lesions could disrupt such balance between opposing orthogonal signals leading to vertical cross-coupling during horizontal saccade. We speculate that upward drift might result from an imbalance in opposing orthogonal signals at the level of neural integrators. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Cerebral atrophy as outcome measure in short-term phase 2 clinical trials in multiple sclerosis

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    Elskamp, I.J. van den; Boden, B.; Barkhof, F. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, MS Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dattola, V. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, MS Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Messina, Department of Neurosciences, Psychiatric and Anaesthesiological Sciences, Messina (Italy); Knol, D.L. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Filippi, M. [Scientific Institute and University Ospedale San Raffaele, Neuroimaging Research Unit, Milan (Italy); Kappos, L. [University Hospital, University of Basel, Department of Neurology, Basel (Switzerland); Fazekas, F. [Medical University of Graz, Department of Neurology, Graz (Austria); Wagner, K. [Bayer-Schering Pharma, Berlin (Germany); Pohl, C. [Bayer-Schering Pharma, Berlin (Germany); University Hospital Bonn, Department of Neurology, Bonn (Germany); Sandbrink, R. [Bayer-Schering Pharma, Berlin (Germany); Heinrich-Heine-University Dusseldorf, Department of Neurology, Dusseldorf (Germany); Polman, C.H. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, MS Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Uitdehaag, B.M.J. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, MS Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-10-15

    Cerebral atrophy is a compound measure of the neurodegenerative component of multiple sclerosis (MS) and a conceivable outcome measure for clinical trials monitoring the effect of neuroprotective agents. In this study, we evaluate the rate of cerebral atrophy in a 6-month period, investigate the predictive and explanatory value of other magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures in relation to cerebral atrophy, and determine sample sizes for future short-term clinical trials using cerebral atrophy as primary outcome measure. One hundred thirty-five relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients underwent six monthly MRI scans from which the percentage brain volume change (PBVC) and the number and volume of gadolinium (Gd)-enhancing lesions, T2 lesions, and persistent black holes (PBH) were determined. By means of multiple linear regression analysis, the relationship between focal MRI variables and PBVC was assessed. Sample size calculations were performed for all patients and subgroups selected for enhancement or a high T2 lesion load at baseline. A significant atrophy occurred over 6 months (PBVC = -0.33%, SE = 0.061, p < 0.0001). The number of baseline T2 lesions (p = 0.024), the on-study Gd-enhancing lesion volume (p = 0.044), and the number of on-study PBHs (p = 0.003) were associated with an increased rate of atrophy. For a 50% decrease in rate of atrophy, the sample size calculations showed that approximately 283 patients per arm are required in an unselected sampled population and 185 patients per arm are required in a selected population. Within a 6-month period, significant atrophy can be detected and on-study associations of PBVC and PBHs emphasizes axonal loss to be a driving mechanism. Application as primary outcome measure in short-term clinical trials with feasible sample size requires a potent drug to obtain sufficient power. (orig.)

  19. Heterogeneous atrophy occurs within individual lower limb muscles during 60 days of bed rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miokovic, Tanja; Armbrecht, Gabriele; Felsenberg, Dieter; Belavý, Daniel L

    2012-11-01

    To better understand disuse muscle atrophy, via magnetic resonance imaging, we sequentially measured muscle cross-sectional area along the entire length of all individual muscles from the hip to ankle in nine male subjects participating in 60-day head-down tilt bed rest (2nd Berlin BedRest Study; BBR2-2). We hypothesized that individual muscles would not atrophy uniformly along their length such that different regions of an individual muscle would atrophy to different extents. This hypothesis was confirmed for the adductor magnus, vasti, lateral hamstrings, medial hamstrings, rectus femoris, medial gastrocnemius, lateral gastrocnemius, tibialis posterior, flexor hallucis longus, flexor digitorum longus, peroneals, and tibialis anterior muscles (P ≤ 0.004). In contrast, the hypothesis was not confirmed in the soleus, adductor brevis, gracilis, pectineus, and extensor digitorum longus muscles (P ≥ 0.20). The extent of atrophy only weakly correlated (r = -0.30, P muscles (P muscles recovered to their baseline size between 14 and 90 days after bed rest, but flexor hallucis longus, flexor digitorum longus, and lateral gastrocnemius required longer than 90 days before recovery occurred. On the basis of findings of differential atrophy between muscles and evidence in the literature, we interpret our findings of intramuscular atrophy to reflect differential disuse of functionally different muscle regions. The current work represents the first lower-limb wide survey of intramuscular differences in disuse atrophy. We conclude that intramuscular differential atrophy occurs in most, but not all, of the muscles of the lower limb during prolonged bed rest.

  20. Coenzyme Q10 Levels Are Decreased in the Cerebellum of Multiple-System Atrophy Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Schottlaender, Lucia V.; Conceição Bettencourt; Kiely, Aoife P; Annapurna Chalasani; Viruna Neergheen; Holton, Janice L.; Iain Hargreaves; Henry Houlden

    2016-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to evaluate whether the levels of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) in brain tissue of multiple system atrophy (MSA) patients differ from those in elderly controls and in patients with other neurodegenerative diseases. Methods Flash frozen brain tissue of a series of 20 pathologically confirmed MSA patients [9 olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA) type, 6 striatonigral degeneration (SND) type, and 5 mixed type] was used for this study. Elderly controls (n = 37) as ...