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Sample records for atrial fibrillation ablation

  1. Cryoballoon Catheter Ablation in Atrial Fibrillation

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    Cevher Ozcan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary vein isolation with catheter ablation is an effective treatment in patients with symptomatic atrial fibrillation refractory or intolerant to antiarrhythmic medications. The cryoballoon catheter was recently approved for this procedure. In this paper, the basics of cryothermal energy ablation are reviewed including its ability of creating homogenous lesion formation, minimal destruction to surrounding vasculature, preserved tissue integrity, and lower risk of thrombus formation. Also summarized here are the publications describing the clinical experience with the cryoballoon catheter ablation in both paroxysmal and persistent atrial fibrillation, its safety and efficacy, and discussions on the technical aspect of the cryoballoon ablation procedure.

  2. Attitudes Towards Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vadmann, Henrik; Pedersen, Susanne S; Nielsen, Jens Cosedis

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF) is an important but expensive procedure that is the subject of some debate. Physicians´ attitudes towards catheter ablation may influence promotion and patient acceptance. This is the first study to examine the attitudes of Danish...... cardiologists towards catheter ablation for AF, using a nationwide survey. METHODS AND RESULTS: We developed a purpose-designed questionnaire to evaluate attitudes towards catheter ablation for AF that was sent to all Danish cardiologists (n = 401; response n = 272 (67.8%)). There was no association between...... attitudes towards ablation and the experience or age of the cardiologist with respect to patients with recurrent AF episodes with a duration of 7 days and/or need for cardioversion. The majority (69%) expected a recurrence of AF after catheter ablation in more than 30% of the cases...

  3. Hybrid ablation for atrial fibrillation: current approaches and future directions.

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    Bisleri, Gianluigi; Glover, Benedict

    2017-01-01

    Catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation has rapidly evolved during the past decade: although the treatment of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation via a transcatheter approach has been consistently successful, persistent and long-standing atrial fibrillation still represents a major clinical challenge with less favorable outcomes to date. Because novel, minimally invasive surgical approaches have been developed for atrial fibrillation ablation, the aim of the present review is to analyze the current evidence surrounding the integration of surgical and transcatheter strategies in a hybrid fashion for the treatment of atrial fibrillation. Long-standing persistent, atrial fibrillation requires further understanding. Wide antral circumferential ablation of the pulmonary veins represents the cornerstone of any ablation therapy. Additional linear lesions and/or targeting complex fractionated atrial electrograms may also be considered. One of the limitations is achieving a transmural lesion. The combined endocardial and epicardial approach may represent a superior approach. Hybrid ablation of atrial fibrillation represents a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of complex scenarios, such as long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation. A specialized team including dedicated surgeons and cardiologists appears to be crucial in order to achieve durable and satisfactory outcomes following hybrid ablation of atrial fibrillation.

  4. Radiofrequency ablation as initial therapy in paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cosedis Nielsen, Jens; Johannessen, Arne; Raatikainen, Pekka

    2012-01-01

    There are limited data comparing radiofrequency catheter ablation with antiarrhythmic drug therapy as first-line treatment in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.......There are limited data comparing radiofrequency catheter ablation with antiarrhythmic drug therapy as first-line treatment in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation....

  5. Advances in Imaging for Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

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    Andrew D'Silva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last fifteen years, our understanding of the pathophysiology of atrial fibrillation (AF has paved the way for ablation to be utilized as an effective treatment option. With the aim of gaining more detailed anatomical representation, advances have been made using various imaging modalities, both before and during the ablation procedure, in planning and execution. Options have flourished from procedural fluoroscopy, electroanatomic mapping systems, preprocedural computed tomography (CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, ultrasound, and combinations of these technologies. Exciting work is underway in an effort to allow the electrophysiologist to assess scar formation in real time. One advantage would be to lessen the learning curve for what are very complex procedures. The hope of these developments is to improve the likelihood of a successful ablation procedure and to allow more patients access to this treatment.

  6. Imaging in percutaneous ablation for atrial fibrillation

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    Maksimovic, Ruzica [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Radiology, GD Rotterdam (Netherlands); Institute for Cardiovascular Diseases of the University Medical Center, Belgrade (Czechoslovakia); Dill, Thorsten [Kerckhoff-Heart Center, Department of Cardiology, Bad Nauheim (Germany); Ristic, Arsen D.; Seferovic, Petar M. [Institute for Cardiovascular Diseases of the University Medical Center, Belgrade (Czechoslovakia)

    2006-11-15

    Percutaneous ablation for electrical disconnection of the arrhythmogenic foci using various forms of energy has become a well-established technique for treating atrial fibrillation (AF). Success rate in preventing recurrence of AF episodes is high although associated with a significant incidence of pulmonary vein (PV) stenosis and other rare complications. Clinical workup of AF patients includes imaging before and after ablative treatment using different noninvasive and invasive techniques such as conventional angiography, transoesophageal and intracardiac echocardiography, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which offer different information with variable diagnostic accuracy. Evaluation before percutaneous ablation involves assessment of PVs (PV pattern, branching pattern, orientation and ostial size) to facilitate position and size of catheters and reduce procedure time as well as examining the left atrium (presence of thrombi, dimensions and volumes). Imaging after the percutaneous ablation is important for assessment of overall success of the procedure and revealing potential complications. Therefore, imaging methods enable depiction of PVs and the anatomy of surrounding structures essential for preprocedural management and early detection of PV stenosis and other ablation-related procedures, as well as long-term follow-up of these patients. (orig.)

  7. Catheter ablation for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation: segmental pulmonary vein ostial ablation versus left atrial ablation.

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    Oral, Hakan; Scharf, Christoph; Chugh, Aman; Hall, Burr; Cheung, Peter; Good, Eric; Veerareddy, Srikar; Pelosi, Frank; Morady, Fred

    2003-11-11

    Segmental ostial catheter ablation (SOCA) to isolate the pulmonary veins (PVs) and left atrial catheter ablation (LACA) to encircle the PVs both may eliminate paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF). The relative efficacy of these 2 techniques has not been directly compared. Of 80 consecutive patients with symptomatic PAF (age, 52+/-10 years), 40 patients underwent PV isolation by SOCA and 40 patients underwent LACA to encircle the PVs. During SOCA, ostial PV potentials recorded with a ring catheter were targeted. LACA was performed by encircling the left- and right-sided PVs 1 to 2 cm from the ostia and was guided by an electroanatomic mapping system; ablation lines also were created in the mitral isthmus and posterior left atrium. The mean procedure and fluoroscopy times were 156+/-45 and 50+/-17 minutes for SOCA and 149+/-33 and 39+/-12 minutes for LACA, respectively. At 6 months, 67% of patients who underwent SOCA and 88% of patients who underwent LACA were free of symptomatic PAF when not taking antiarrhythmic drug therapy (P=0.02). Among the variables of age, sex, duration and frequency of PAF, ejection fraction, left atrial size, structural heart disease, and the ablation technique, only an increased left atrial size and the SOCA technique were independent predictors of recurrent PAF. The only complication was left atrial flutter in a patient who underwent LACA. In patients undergoing catheter ablation for PAF, LACA to encircle the PVs is more effective than SOCA.

  8. Left Atrial Linear Ablation of Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation Guided by Three-dimensional Electroanatomical System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Dai-Fu; Li, Ying; Qi, Wei-Gang

    2005-01-01

    Objective To investigate the safety and efficacy of Left atrial linear ablation of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation guided by three-dimensional electroanatomical system. Methods 29 patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation in this study. A nonfluoroscopic mapping system was used to generate a 3D......±15. After a follow-up of 6.0 months, 24 patients maintained sinus rhythm. 3 patients suffered from less frequent paroxysmal atrial fibrillation during the first 3.0 months after the ablation and remained Af free after 6 months. I patient had atrial fibrillation episodes and I patient had atrial fibrillation...... attacks unchanged. No pulmonary vein narrowing was observed. Conclusion Left atrial linear ablation of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation guided by three-dimensional electroanatomical system was safe and effective....

  9. Cryoballoon ablation versus radiofrequency ablation for atrial fibrillation.

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    Reissmann, Bruno; Metzner, Andreas; Kuck, Karl-Heinz

    2017-05-01

    Catheter ablation (CA) provides the most effective treatment option for patients suffering from symptomatic atrial fibrillation (AF). The procedural cornerstone of all ablation strategies and for all entities of AF is the electrical isolation of the pulmonary veins (PV). CA with the use of radiofrequency (RF) in conjunction with a 3-dimensional electroanatomical mapping system is the most established ablation approach, but it demands a long learning curve and recurrences of AF are commonly the result of recovered PV conduction. As a consequence, novel ablation systems such as the Cryoballoon (CB) have been evolved aiming at facilitation and increased efficacy of pulmonary vein isolation (PVI). CB ablation is characterized by a short learning curve as well as short procedure times and demonstrated non-inferiority with regard to safety and efficacy when being directly compared to RF ablation for treatment of paroxysmal AF. However, RF ablation is first choice for treatment of persistent AF, in particular when expanded ablation strategies beyond PVI are intended in order to improve clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Radiofrequency ablation as initial therapy in paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walfridsson, H; Walfridsson, U; Nielsen, J Cosedis

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: The Medical ANtiarrhythmic Treatment or Radiofrequency Ablation in Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation (MANTRA-PAF) trial assessed the long-term efficacy of an initial strategy of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) vs. antiarrhythmic drug therapy (AAD) as first-line treatment for patients with PAF...

  11. Radiofrequency catheter ablation maintains its efficacy better than antiarrhythmic medication in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raatikainen, M J Pekka; Hakalahti, Antti; Uusimaa, Paavo

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Medical ANtiarrhythmic Treatment or Radiofrequency Ablation in Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation (MANTRA-PAF) is a randomized trial comparing radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA) to antiarrhythmic drugs (AADs) as first-line treatment of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF). In order...

  12. Long-term efficacy of catheter ablation as first-line therapy for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Cosedis; Johannessen, Arne; Raatikainen, Pekka

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The Medical ANtiarrhythmic Treatment or Radiofrequency Ablation in Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation (MANTRA-PAF) trial compared radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA) with antiarrhythmic drug therapy (AAD) as first-line treatment for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF). Endpoint...

  13. Surgical Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation Using Energy Sources.

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    Brick, Alexandre Visconti; Braile, Domingo Marcolino

    2015-01-01

    Surgical ablation, concomitant with other operations, is an option for treatment in patients with chronic atrial fibrillation. The aim of this study is to present a literature review on surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing cardiac surgery, considering energy sources and return to sinus rhythm. A comprehensive survey was performed in the literature on surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation considering energy sources, sample size, study type, outcome (early and late), and return to sinus rhythm. Analyzing studies with immediate results (n=5), the percentage of return to sinus rhythm ranged from 73% to 96%, while those with long-term results (n=20) (from 12 months on) ranged from 62% to 97.7%. In both of them, there was subsequent clinical improvement of patients who underwent ablation, regardless of the energy source used. Surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation is essential for the treatment of this arrhythmia. With current technology, it may be minimally invasive, making it mandatory to perform a procedure in an attempt to revert to sinus rhythm in patients requiring heart surgery.

  14. Ablation for atrial fibrillation: an evidence-based analysis.

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    2006-01-01

    To review the effectiveness, safety, and costing of ablation methods to manage atrial fibrillation (AF). The ablation methods reviewed were catheter ablation and surgical ablation. Atrial fibrillation is characterized by an irregular, usually rapid, heart rate that limits the ability of the atria to pump blood effectively to the ventricles. Atrial fibrillation can be a primary diagnosis or it may be associated with other diseases, such as high blood pressure, abnormal heart muscle function, chronic lung diseases, and coronary heart disease. The most common symptom of AF is palpitations. Symptoms caused by decreased blood flow include dizziness, fatigue, and shortness of breath. Some patients with AF do not experience any symptoms. According to United States data, the incidence of AF increases with age, with a prevalence of 1 per 200 people aged between 50 and 60 years, and 1 per 10 people aged over 80 years. In 2004, the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES) estimated that the rate of hospitalization for AF in Canada was 582.7 per 100,000 population. They also reported that of the patients discharged alive, 2.7% were readmitted within 1 year for stroke. One United States prevalence study of AF indicated that the overall prevalence of AF was 0.95%. When the results of this study were extrapolated to the population of Ontario, the prevalence of AF in Ontario is 98,758 for residents aged over 20 years. Currently, the first-line therapy for AF is medical therapy with antiarrhythmic drugs (AADs). There are several AADs available, because there is no one AAD that is effective for all patients. The AADs have critical adverse effects that can aggravate existing arrhythmias. The drug selection process frequently involves trial and error until the patient's symptoms subside. Ablation has been frequently described as a "cure" for AF, compared with drug therapy, which controls AF but does not cure it. Ablation involves directing an energy source at cardiac tissue

  15. Active Atrial Function and Atrial Scar Burden After Multiple Catheter Ablations of Persistent Atrial Fibrillation.

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    Nührich, Jana M; Geisler, Anne C; Steven, Daniel; Hoffmann, Boris A; Schäffer, Benjamin; Lund, Gunnar; Stehning, Christian; Radunski, Ulf K; Sultan, Arian; Schwarzl, Michael; Adam, Gerhard; Willems, Stephan; Muellerleile, Kai

    2017-02-01

    Extensive and repeated substrate modification (SM) is frequently performed as an ablation strategy in persistent atrial fibrillation (persAF). The effect of these extended ablation strategies on atrial function has not been investigated sufficiently so far. The purpose was to assess atrial function by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) and its association with left atrial (LA) scar burden by electroanatomical voltage-mapping after multiple persAF ablation procedures. We included 16 persAF patients who had ≥2 SM procedures and a control group (CG) of 21 persAF patients without prior ablation. CMR was performed in sinus rhythm at least 4 weeks after the last cardioversion. Active left and right (RA) atrial emptying fractions (AEF) as well as peak active left atrial appendage (LAA) emptying velocities were obtained by CMR flow measurements. Furthermore, LA scar burden was quantified on electroanatomical voltage maps by the portion of points with local voltage amplitude scar burden to be higher (40 [20-68] vs nine [3-18] %, P scar burden after multiple extensive persAF ablations. ©2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Complications associated with catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation.

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    Dhruvakumar, S; Gerstenfeld, E P

    2007-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common clinical arrhythmia, affecting millions of people worldwide and utilizing billions of dollars annually in heath care costs associated with the disease. Catheter based ablation, centering around the electrical isolation of the pulmonary veins, has emerged as a viable treatment option for patients with symptomatic paroxysmal or persistent atrial fibrillation. Because of the complex nature of the procedure, there are a number of potential complications which can occur which are related to problems with vascular access, mechanical complications resulting from catheter manipulation within the heart, cardioembolic complications, and complications arising from the effects of radiofrequency ablations in the left atrium. The most frequent complications arise from pseudoaneurysms, arterio-venous fistulas, hematomas, neurologic events (stroke and transient ischemic attacks), and pericardial effusion/tamponade. An evolving understanding of the risks of the procedure have helped to minimize complications by changing ablation strategies to avoid lesion delivery within the veins, emphasizing careful attention during the procedure to anticoagulation, utilizing intracardiac ultrasound and electroanatomic mapping systems for better visualization of intracardiac structures, and recognizing complications promptly during and after the procedure. Hopefully, improved techniques in the future will help to further improve the safety of catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation to allow for continued growth of this procedure.

  17. The definition of success in atrial fibrillation ablation surgery

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    Hunter, Steven

    2014-01-01

    In spite of recent attempts to define and clarify the treatment endpoints in atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation surgery, the definition of success has remained blurred. It is of importance to address the burden of AF in the non-symptomatic population. Thromboembolic events invariably blight the outcomes, therefore freedom from stroke must be incorporated into any definition of success and guidelines. It is essential to meticulously study the long-term outcomes of an unsuccessful treatment as a...

  18. Remote magnetic catheter navigation versus conventional ablation in atrial fibrillation ablation: Fluoroscopy reduction

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    Paul Chun Yih Lim

    2017-06-01

    Conclusions: In radiofrequency ablation of atrial fibrillation, RMN appears to significantly reduce fluoroscopy time compared with conventional MAN ablation, though at a cost of increased total procedural time, with comparable acute success rates and safety profile. A reduction in procedure and fluoroscopy times is possible with gaining experience.

  19. Intracardiac Echocardiography during Catheter-Based Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation.

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    Biermann, Jürgen; Bode, Christoph; Asbach, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Accurate delineation of the variable left atrial anatomy is of utmost importance during anatomically based ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation targeting the pulmonary veins and possibly other structures of the atria. Intracardiac echocardiography allows real-time visualisation of the left atrium and adjacent structures and thus facilitates precise guidance of catheter-based ablation of atrial fibrillation. In patients with abnormal anatomy of the atria and/or the interatrial septum, intracardiac ultrasound might be especially valuable to guide transseptal access. Software algorithms like CARTOSound (Biosense Webster, Diamond Bar, USA) offer the opportunity to reconstruct multiple two-dimensional ultrasound fans generated by intracardiac echocardiography to a three-dimensional object which can be merged to a computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging reconstruction of the left atrium. Intracardiac ultrasound reduces dwell time of catheters in the left atrium, fluoroscopy, and procedural time and is invaluable concerning early identification of potential adverse events. The application of intracardiac echocardiography has the great capability to improve success rates of catheter-based ablation procedures.

  20. Intracardiac Echocardiography during Catheter-Based Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation

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    Jürgen Biermann

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate delineation of the variable left atrial anatomy is of utmost importance during anatomically based ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation targeting the pulmonary veins and possibly other structures of the atria. Intracardiac echocardiography allows real-time visualisation of the left atrium and adjacent structures and thus facilitates precise guidance of catheter-based ablation of atrial fibrillation. In patients with abnormal anatomy of the atria and/or the interatrial septum, intracardiac ultrasound might be especially valuable to guide transseptal access. Software algorithms like CARTOSound (Biosense Webster, Diamond Bar, USA offer the opportunity to reconstruct multiple two-dimensional ultrasound fans generated by intracardiac echocardiography to a three-dimensional object which can be merged to a computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging reconstruction of the left atrium. Intracardiac ultrasound reduces dwell time of catheters in the left atrium, fluoroscopy, and procedural time and is invaluable concerning early identification of potential adverse events. The application of intracardiac echocardiography has the great capability to improve success rates of catheter-based ablation procedures.

  1. Atrial Fibrillation Ablation in Systolic Dysfunction: Clinical and Echocardiographic Outcomes

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    Tasso Julio Lobo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Heart failure and atrial fibrillation (AF often coexist in a deleterious cycle. Objective: To evaluate the clinical and echocardiographic outcomes of patients with ventricular systolic dysfunction and AF treated with radiofrequency (RF ablation. Methods: Patients with ventricular systolic dysfunction [ejection fraction (EF <50%] and AF refractory to drug therapy underwent stepwise RF ablation in the same session with pulmonary vein isolation, ablation of AF nests and of residual atrial tachycardia, named "background tachycardia". Clinical (NYHA functional class and echocardiographic (EF, left atrial diameter data were compared (McNemar test and t test before and after ablation. Results: 31 patients (6 women, 25 men, aged 37 to 77 years (mean, 59.8±10.6, underwent RF ablation. The etiology was mainly idiopathic (19 p, 61%. During a mean follow-up of 20.3±17 months, 24 patients (77% were in sinus rhythm, 11 (35% being on amiodarone. Eight patients (26% underwent more than one procedure (6 underwent 2 procedures, and 2 underwent 3 procedures. Significant NYHA functional class improvement was observed (pre-ablation: 2.23±0.56; postablation: 1.13±0.35; p<0.0001. The echocardiographic outcome also showed significant ventricular function improvement (EF pre: 44.68%±6.02%, post: 59%±13.2%, p=0.0005 and a significant left atrial diameter reduction (pre: 46.61±7.3 mm; post: 43.59±6.6 mm; p=0.026. No major complications occurred. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that AF ablation in patients with ventricular systolic dysfunction is a safe and highly effective procedure. Arrhythmia control has a great impact on ventricular function recovery and functional class improvement.

  2. Atrial Fibrillation Ablation in Systolic Dysfunction: Clinical and Echocardiographic Outcomes

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    Lobo, Tasso Julio; Pachon, Carlos Thiene; Pachon, Jose Carlos; Pachon, Enrique Indalecio; Pachon, Maria Zelia; Pachon, Juan Carlos; Santillana, Tomas Guillermo; Zerpa, Juan Carlos; Albornoz, Remy Nelson; Jatene, Adib Domingos

    2015-01-01

    Background Heart failure and atrial fibrillation (AF) often coexist in a deleterious cycle. Objective To evaluate the clinical and echocardiographic outcomes of patients with ventricular systolic dysfunction and AF treated with radiofrequency (RF) ablation. Methods Patients with ventricular systolic dysfunction [ejection fraction (EF) <50%] and AF refractory to drug therapy underwent stepwise RF ablation in the same session with pulmonary vein isolation, ablation of AF nests and of residual atrial tachycardia, named "background tachycardia". Clinical (NYHA functional class) and echocardiographic (EF, left atrial diameter) data were compared (McNemar test and t test) before and after ablation. Results 31 patients (6 women, 25 men), aged 37 to 77 years (mean, 59.8±10.6), underwent RF ablation. The etiology was mainly idiopathic (19 p, 61%). During a mean follow-up of 20.3±17 months, 24 patients (77%) were in sinus rhythm, 11 (35%) being on amiodarone. Eight patients (26%) underwent more than one procedure (6 underwent 2 procedures, and 2 underwent 3 procedures). Significant NYHA functional class improvement was observed (pre-ablation: 2.23±0.56; postablation: 1.13±0.35; p<0.0001). The echocardiographic outcome also showed significant ventricular function improvement (EF pre: 44.68%±6.02%, post: 59%±13.2%, p=0.0005) and a significant left atrial diameter reduction (pre: 46.61±7.3 mm; post: 43.59±6.6 mm; p=0.026). No major complications occurred. Conclusion Our findings suggest that AF ablation in patients with ventricular systolic dysfunction is a safe and highly effective procedure. Arrhythmia control has a great impact on ventricular function recovery and functional class improvement. PMID:25387404

  3. Atrial Tachycardias Arising from Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation: A Proarrhythmic Bump or an Antiarrhythmic Turn?

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    Ashok J. Shah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of atrial tachycardias (AT is a direct function of the volume of atrial tissue ablated in the patients with atrial fibrillation (AF. Thus, the incidence of AT is highest in persistent AF patients undergoing stepwise ablation using the strategic combination of pulmonary vein isolation, electrogram based ablation and left atrial linear ablation. Using deductive mapping strategy, AT can be divided into three clinical categories viz. the macroreentry, the focal and the newly described localized reentry all of which are amenable to catheter ablation with success rate of 95%. Perimitral, roof dependent and cavotricuspid isthmus dependent AT involve large reentrant circuits which can be successfully ablated at the left mitral isthmus, left atrial roof and tricuspid isthmus respectively. Complete bidirectional block across the sites of linear ablation is a necessary endpoint. Focal and localized reentrant AT commonly originate from but are not limited to the septum, posteroinferior left atrium, venous ostia, base of the left atrial appendage and left mitral isthmus and they respond quickly to focal ablation. AT not only represents ablation-induced proarrhythmia but also forms a bridge between AF and sinus rhythm in longstanding AF patients treated successfully with catheter ablation.

  4. Phrenic Nerve Injury After Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation

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    Jacques Clementy

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Phrenic Nerve Injury (PNI has been well studied by cardiac surgeons. More recently it has been recognized as a potential complication of catheter ablation with a prevalence of 0.11 to 0.48 % after atrial fibrillation (AF ablation. This review will focus on PNI after AF ablation. Anatomical studies have shown a close relationship between the right phrenic nerve and it's proximity to the superior vena cava (SVC, and the antero-inferior part of the right superior pulmonary vein (RSPV. In addition, the proximity of the left phrenic nerve to the left atrial appendage has been well established. Independent of the type of ablation catheter (4mm, 8 mm, irrigated tip, balloon or energy source used (radiofrequency (RF, ultrasound, cryothermia, and laser; the risk of PNI exists during ablation at the critical areas listed above. Although up to thirty-one percent of patients with PNI after AF ablation remain asymptomatic, dyspnea remain the cardinal symptom and is present in all symptomatic patients. Despite the theoretical risk for significant adverse effect on functional status and quality of life, short-term outcomes from published studies appear favorable with 81% of patients with PNI having a complete recovery after 7 ± 7 months.Conclusion: Existing studies have described PNI as an uncommon but avoidable complication in patients undergoing pulmonary vein isolation for AF. Prior to ablation at the SVC, antero-inferior RSPV ostium or the left atrial appendage, pacing should be performed before energy delivery. If phrenic nerve capture is documented, energy delivery should be avoided at this site. Electrophysiologist's vigilance as well as pacing prior to ablation at high risk sites in close proximity to the phrenic nerve are the currently available tools to avoid the complication of PNI.

  5. Atrial fibrillation ablation using simultaneous multielectrode application of radiofrequeney energy.

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    Almeida, Sofia; Cavaco, Diogo; Adragao, Pedro; Candeias, Rui; Vieira, António Pinheiro; Santos, Katya Reis; Morgado, Francisco; Calé, Rita; Roque, Carla; Dionísio, Teresa; Bernardo, Ricardo; Silva, J Aniceto

    2010-01-01

    Despite technological advances in equipment for ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF), conventional pulmonary vein (PV) isolation with point-by-point radiofrequency application encircling the PV ostia remains a complex procedure requiring a high degree of operator skill and experience. Novel multielectrode catheters have been developed that deliver duty-cycled bipolar and unipolar radiofrequency energy, designed for PV electrical isolation and for ablation of complex fractionated electrograms in the left atrium. Initial studies suggest good results, reducing procedure time and with safety and efficacy equivalent to the conventional method. We describe the first four cases of AF ablation in our center using this method, with acute success in two patients: one with paroxysmal AF and the other with chronic AF.

  6. The Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Pilot Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arbelo, Elena; Brugada, Josep; Hindricks, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    . A web-based case report form captured information on pre-procedural, procedural, and 1-year follow-up data. Between October 2010 and May 2011, 1410 patients were included and 1391 underwent an AFib ablation (98.7%). A total of 1300 patients (93.5%) completed a follow-up control 367 ± 42 days after...... the procedure. Arrhythmia documentation was done by an electrocardiogram in 76%, Holter-monitoring in 52%, transtelephonic monitoring in 8%, and/or implanted systems in 4.5%. Over 50% became asymptomatic. Twenty-one per cent were re-admitted due to post-ablation arrhythmias. Success without antiarrhythmic drugs...

  7. Catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation without the use of fluoroscopy.

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    Reddy, Vivek Y; Morales, Gustavo; Ahmed, Humera; Neuzil, Petr; Dukkipati, Srinivas; Kim, Steve; Clemens, Janet; D'Avila, Andre

    2010-11-01

    In performing catheter ablation of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF), the advent of electroanatomical mapping (EAM) has significantly reduced fluoroscopy time. Recent advances in the ability of EAM systems to simultaneously visualize multiple catheters have allowed some operators to perform certain procedures, such as catheter ablation of supraventricular tachycardias, with zero fluoroscopy use. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of pulmonary vein (PV) isolation with zero fluoroscopy use, using a combination of three-dimensional EAM and intracardiac echocardiography (ICE). Using the NavX EAM system, the right atrial (RA) and coronary sinus (CS) geometries were created without fluoroscopy. Fluoroless transseptal puncture was performed under ICE guidance. Using a deflectable sheath and a multipolar catheter, the left atrial (LA) and PV anatomies were rendered and, in select cases, integrated with a three-dimensional computed tomography (CT) image. Irrigated radiofrequency ablation was performed to encircle each pair of ipsilateral PVs. This series included 20 consecutive PAF patients. RA/CS mapping required 5.5 ± 2.6 minutes. In all patients, single (n = 18) or dual (n = 2) transseptal access was successfully achieved. The LA-PV anatomy was rendered using either a circular (14 patients) or penta-array (six patients) catheter in 22 ± 10 minutes; CT image integration was used in 11 patients. Using 49 ± 18 ablation lesions/patient, electrical isolation was achieved in 38/39 ipsilateral PV isolating lesion sets (97%). The procedure time was 244 ± 75 minutes. There were no complications. Completely fluoroless catheter ablation of paroxysmal AF is safely feasible using a combination of ICE and EAM. Copyright © 2010 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Critical phase transitions during ablation of atrial fibrillation

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    Iravanian, Shahriar; Langberg, Jonathan J.

    2017-09-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia with significant morbidity and mortality. Pharmacological agents are not very effective in the management of AF. Therefore, ablation procedures have become the mainstay of AF management. The irregular and seemingly chaotic atrial activity in AF is caused by one or more meandering spiral waves. Previously, we have shown the presence of sudden rhythm organization during ablation of persistent AF. We hypothesize that the observed transitions from a disorganized to an organized rhythm is a critical phase transition. Here, we explore this hypothesis by simulating ablation in an anatomically-correct 3D AF model. In 722 out of 2160 simulated ablation, at least one sudden transition from AF to an organized rhythm (flutter) was noted (33%). They were marked by a sudden decrease in the cycle length entropy and increase in the mean cycle length. At the same time, the number of reentrant wavelets decreased from 2.99 ± 0.06 in AF to 1.76 ± 0.05 during flutter, and the correlation length scale increased from 13.3 ± 1.0 mm to 196.5 ± 86.6 mm (both P < 0.0001). These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that transitions from AF to an anatomical flutter behave as phase transitions in complex non-equilibrium dynamical systems with flutter acting as an absorbing state. Clinically, the facilitation of phase transition should be considered a novel mechanism of ablation and may help to design effective ablation strategies.

  9. Could successful cryoballoon ablation of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation prevent progressive left atrial remodeling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdei, Tamás; Dénes, Mónika; Kardos, Attila; Mihálcz, Attila; Földesi, Csaba; Temesvári, András; Lengyel, Mária

    2012-03-19

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) has been proved to be effective and to prevent progressive left atrial (LA) remodeling. Cryoballoon catheter ablation (CCA), using a different energy source, was developed to simplify the ablation procedure. Our hypothesis was that successful CCA can also prevent progressive LA remodeling. 36 patients selected for their first CCA because of nonvalvular paroxysmal AF had echocardiography before and 3, 6 and 12 months after CCA. LA diameters, volumes (LAV) and LA volume index (LAVI) were evaluated. LA function was assessed by: early diastolic velocities of the mitral annulus (Aa(sept), Aa(lat)), LA filling fraction (LAFF), LA emptying fraction (LAEF) and the systolic fraction of pulmonary venous flow (PVSF). Detailed left ventricular diastolic function assessment was also performed. Excluding recurrences in the first 3-month blanking period, the clinical success rate was 64%. During one-year of follow-up, recurrent atrial arrhythmia was found in 21 patients (58%). In the recurrent group at 12 months after ablation, minimal LAV (38 ± 19 to 44 ± 20 ml; p < 0.05), maximal LAV (73 ± 23 to 81 ± 24 ml; p < 0.05), LAVI (35 ± 10 to 39 ± 11 ml/m2; p = 0.01) and the maximal LA longitudinal diameter (55 ± 5 to 59 ± 6 mm; p < 0.01) had all increased. PVSF (58 ± 9 to 50 ± 10%; p = 0.01) and LAFF (36 ± 7 to 33 ± 8%; p = 0.03) had decreased. In contrast, after successful cryoballoon ablation LA size had not increased and LA function had not declined. In the recurrent group LAEF was significantly lower at baseline and at follow-up visits. In patients whose paroxysmal atrial fibrillation recurred within one year after cryoballoon catheter ablation left atrial size had increased and left atrial function had declined. In contrast, successful cryoballoon catheter ablation prevented progressive left atrial remodeling.

  10. Could successful cryoballoon ablation of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation prevent progressive left atrial remodeling?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdei Tamás

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiofrequency catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF has been proved to be effective and to prevent progressive left atrial (LA remodeling. Cryoballoon catheter ablation (CCA, using a different energy source, was developed to simplify the ablation procedure. Our hypothesis was that successful CCA can also prevent progressive LA remodeling. Methods 36 patients selected for their first CCA because of nonvalvular paroxysmal AF had echocardiography before and 3, 6 and 12 months after CCA. LA diameters, volumes (LAV and LA volume index (LAVI were evaluated. LA function was assessed by: early diastolic velocities of the mitral annulus (Aasept, Aalat, LA filling fraction (LAFF, LA emptying fraction (LAEF and the systolic fraction of pulmonary venous flow (PVSF. Detailed left ventricular diastolic function assessment was also performed. Results Excluding recurrences in the first 3-month blanking period, the clinical success rate was 64%. During one-year of follow-up, recurrent atrial arrhythmia was found in 21 patients (58%. In the recurrent group at 12 months after ablation, minimal LAV (38 ± 19 to 44 ± 20 ml; p p 2; p = 0.01 and the maximal LA longitudinal diameter (55 ± 5 to 59 ± 6 mm; p p = 0.01 and LAFF (36 ± 7 to 33 ± 8%; p = 0.03 had decreased. In contrast, after successful cryoballoon ablation LA size had not increased and LA function had not declined. In the recurrent group LAEF was significantly lower at baseline and at follow-up visits. Conclusions In patients whose paroxysmal atrial fibrillation recurred within one year after cryoballoon catheter ablation left atrial size had increased and left atrial function had declined. In contrast, successful cryoballoon catheter ablation prevented progressive left atrial remodeling.

  11. Treatment of atrial fibrillation with radiofrequency ablation and simultaneous multipolar mapping of the pulmonary veins

    OpenAIRE

    Rocha Neto Almino C.; Farias Roberto Lima; Paola Angelo A. V. de

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate the feasibility and safety of simultaneous catheterization and mapping of the 4 pulmonary veins for ablation of atrial fibrillation. METHODS: Ten patients, 8 with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and 2 with persistent atrial fibrillation, refractory to at least 2 antiarrhythmic drugs and without structural cardiopathy, were consecutively studied. Through the transseptal insertion of 2 long sheaths, 4 pulmonary veins were simultaneously catheterized with octapolar micro...

  12. Atrial mapping and radiofrequency catheter ablation in patients with idiopathic atrial fibrillation. Electrophysiological findings and ablation results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaita, F; Riccardi, R; Calò, L; Scaglione, M; Garberoglio, L; Antolini, R; Kirchner, M; Lamberti, F; Richiardi, E

    1998-06-02

    Knowledge of the electrophysiological substrates and the cure of atrial fibrillation (AF) is still unsatisfactory. The goal of this study was to evaluate the electrophysiological features of idiopathic AF and their relationship to the results of radiofrequency (RF) catheter ablation of AF and the safety and effectiveness of this procedure. Sixteen patients with idiopathic AF underwent atrial mapping during AF and then RF ablation in the right atrium. The atrial activation was simultaneously recorded in four regions in the right atrium: high lateral wall (HL), low lateral wall (LL), high septum (HS), and low septum (LS) and in the left atrium through the coronary sinus (CS). In these regions, we evaluated the atrial fibrillation intervals (FF) and the morphological features of AF recordings by Wells' classification. No complications occurred during RF ablation. Of the 16 patients, 9 (56%) without AF recurrences during the follow-up (11 +/- 4 months) were considered successfully ablated. These patients showed a significantly shorter mean FF interval in the HS and the LS (122 +/- 32 and 126 +/- 28 ms, respectively), than in the HL and LL (159 +/- 24 and 156 +/- 28 ms, respectively). Moreover, the septum had more irregular electrical activity with greater beat-to-beat changes in FF and a higher prevalence of type III AF than the lateral region. The CS had similar behavior to the septum. Conversely, patients with unsuccessful ablation had an irregular atrial activity in the lateral wall, septum, and CS with no significant differences between the different sites. Right atrial endocardial catheter ablation of AF is a safe procedure and may be effective in some patients with idiopathic AF. The atrial mapping during AF showed a more disorganized right atrial activation in the septum than in the lateral wall in patients with successful ablation.

  13. Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Guided by a Novel Nonfluoroscopic Navigation System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros, Gabriel; Ramos, Pablo; Neglia, Renzo; Menéndez, Diego; García-Bolao, Ignacio

    2017-09-01

    Rhythmia is a new nonfluoroscopic navigation system that is able to create high-density electroanatomic maps. The aim of this study was to describe the acute outcomes of atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation guided by this system, to analyze the volume provided by its electroanatomic map, and to describe its ability to locate pulmonary vein (PV) reconnection gaps in redo procedures. This observational study included 62 patients who underwent AF ablation with Rhythmia compared with a retrospective cohort who underwent AF ablation with a conventional nonfluoroscopic navigation system (Ensite Velocity). The number of surface electrograms per map was significantly higher in Rhythmia procedures (12 125 ± 2826 vs 133 ± 21 with Velocity; P mapping in 99.5% of PV (95.61% in the control group with a conventional circular mapping catheter; P = .04). There were no significant differences in the percentage of PV isolation between the 2 groups. In redo procedures, an ablation gap could be identified on the activation map in 67% of the reconnected PV (40% in the control group; P = .042). The measured left atrial volume was lower than that calculated by computed tomography (109.3 v 15.2 and 129.9 ± 13.2 mL, respectively; P navigation systems. In redo procedures, it appears to be more effective in identifying reconnected PV conduction gaps. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Cost-effectiveness of radiofrequency catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Paul S; Vijan, Sandeep; Morady, Fred; Oral, Hakan

    2006-06-20

    We sought to compare the cost-effectiveness of left atrial catheter ablation (LACA), amiodarone, and rate control therapy in the management of atrial fibrillation (AF). Left atrial catheter ablation has been performed to eliminate AF, but its cost-effectiveness is unknown. We developed a decision-analytic model to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of LACA in 55- and 65-year-old cohorts with AF at moderate and low stroke risk. Costs, health utilities, and transition probabilities were derived from published literature and Medicare data. We performed primary threshold analyses to determine the minimum level of LACA efficacy and stroke risk reduction needed to make LACA cost-effective at 50,000 dollars and 100,000 dollars per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) thresholds. In 65-year-old subjects with AF at moderate stroke risk, relative reduction in stroke risk with an 80% LACA efficacy rate for sinus rhythm restoration would need to be > or =42% and > or =11% to yield incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) LACA efficacy rates would require correspondingly lower and higher stroke risk reduction for equivalent ICER thresholds. In the 55-year-old moderate stroke risk cohort, lower LACA efficacy rates or stroke risk reduction would be needed for the same ICER thresholds. In patients at low stroke risk, LACA was unlikely to be cost-effective. The use of LACA may be cost-effective in patients with AF at moderate risk for stroke, but it is not cost-effective in low-risk patients. Our threshold analyses may provide a framework for the design of future clinical trials by providing effect size estimates for LACA efficacy needed.

  15. Permanent atrial fibrillation ablation surgery in patients with advanced age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Geidel

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Even if permanent atrial fibrillation (pAF is a frequent concomitant problem in patients undergoing open heart surgery and particularly in those with advanced age, data of pAF ablation surgery in older aged patients are scarce. This study was performed to assess early and late results of combined open heart surgery and pAF ablation procedures in patients with advanced aged, compared to young patients. Material and Methods: A selective group of 126 patients (Group A: age ≥70 [76.4±4.8] years, n=70; Group B: age <70 [62.0±6.2] years: n=56 with pAF (≥6 months underwent either monopolar (Group A, B: n=51 vs. n=44 or bipolar (Group A, B: n=19 vs. n=12 radiofrequency (RF ablation procedures concomitant to open heart surgery. Regular follow-up was performed 3 to 36 months after surgery to assess survival, New York Heart Association (NYHA class and conversion rate to stable sinus rhythm (SR. Results: Early mortality (<30 days was 2.9% in Group A (Group B: 0%, cumulative survival at long-term follow up was 0.78 vs. 0.98 (p=0.03 and NYHA-class improved significantly in both groups, particularly in cases with stable SR. At 12-months follow-up 73% of Group A patients were in stable SR (Group B 78%. Conclusions: Concomitant mono- and bipolar RF ablation surgery represents a safe option to cure pAF during open heart surgery with a very low risk, even in patients with advanced age.

  16. Surgical Radiofrequency MAZE III Ablation for Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation During Open Heart Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariborz Akbarzadeh

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Atrial fibrillation is a common arrhythmia in patients with rheumatic mitral and other valve diseases who are candidates for valve repair surgeries. Conversion of rhythm to sinus has positive effects on quality of life and lower use of medications. The aim of this clinical study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the radiofrequency ablation Maze III procedure in the treatment of atrial fibrillation associated with rheumatic heart valve disease. Methods: We applied a modified Cox III Maze procedure using radiofrequency ablation in the treatment of atrial fibrillation associated with rheumatic heart valve disease and evaluated the outcome of 20 patients of atrial fibrillation associated rheumatic valve disease who underwent radiofrequency ablation Maze III procedure plus heart valve surgery. Demographic, echocardiographic, Electrocardiographic and Doppler study data were calculated before surgery, six month and one year after surgery.. Results: No perioperative deaths occurred in the study group. Duration of additional time for doing radiofrequency ablation was about 22 minutes. Freedom from atrial fibrillation was 85% and 75% at six months and one year follow-up respectively... Conclusions: The addition of the radiofrequency ablation Maze procedure to heart valve surgery is safe and effective in the treatment of atrial fibrillation associated with rheumatic heart valve disease.

  17. [New method for the treatment of atrial fibrillation: circumferential cryoballoon ablation of the pulmonary vein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Földesi, Csaba; Kardos, Attila; Mihálcz, Attila; Som, Zoltán; Hódi, Gabriella; Andréka, Péter; Szili-Török, Tamás

    2008-09-21

    Atrial fibrillation is the most frequent arrhythmia with increasing prevalence. Given a limited success rate of drug therapy for atrial fibrillation, interventional treatment options have been developed during the last years. Catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (until recently the mostly used energy source was radiofrequency energy) has been established as an important therapeutic alternative. Depending on interpersonal (both on patient and operator side) and technical variabilities using radiofrequency energy potentially life-threatening complications such as pulmonary vein stenosis or atrio-esophageal fistulas may occur. Cryoenergy is a novel energy source for transcatheter ablation eliminating the arrhythmia substrate by freezing. The cornerstone of catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation is electrical isolation of the pulmonary veins. During cryoballoon ablation the targeted pulmonary vein transiently occluded by the inflated balloon catheter and using this method a circumferential lesion is created. The success rate of cryoballoon ablation is comparable with the radiofrequency ablation with increased safety. We performed the first cryoballoon ablations for patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation in Hungary. On this occasion we review the potential advantages of this technique which may serve as basis for its widespread use in the future.

  18. Ablation Surgery for Atrial Fibrillation: "Freeze it or Buzz it; Just do it and Cure it"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patwardhan AM

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Patients in normal sinus rhythm have lesser stroke rate, better functional class and quality of life than those in atrial fibrillation. Adding a surgical procedure to cure atrial fibrillation in patients needing correction of structural heart disease has been shown to be a safe option, which benefits the majority in restoration of sinus rhythm. Age is no bar to implement this option. The same does not hold true for lone atrial fibrillation. The affirm trial has shown that there is need for improved treatment strategies for patients in atrial fibrillation, although young patients were not represented in sizable proportion. There is need to develop curative treatment for patients with lone atrial fibrillation. And there are technological advances in the form of ablative energy sources and hardware for applying these with minimal invasion. “Between tomorrow’s dream and yesterday’s regret is today’s opportunity”. Let’s make the best of it!

  19. Cardiac rehabilitation versus usual care for patients treated with catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risom, Signe S; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Rasmussen, Trine Bernholdt

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To assess the effects of comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation compared with usual care on physical activity and mental health for patients treated with catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation. METHODS: The patients were randomized 1:1 stratified by paroxysmal or persistent atrial...... questionnaire. Exploratory outcomes were collected. RESULTS: 210 patients were included (mean age: 59 years, 74% men), 72% had paroxysmal atrial fibrillation prior to ablation. Compared with usual care, the cardiac rehabilitation group had a beneficial effect on Vo2 peak at four months (24.3mL kg(-1) min(-1...

  20. Attitudes toward catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation : A nationwide survey among Danish cardiologists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vadmann, Henrik; Pedersen, S.S.; Nielsen, Jens Cosedis; Rodrigo-Domingo, Maria; Pehrson, Steen; Johannessen, Arne; Hansen, Peter Steen; Johansen, Jens Brock; Riahi, Sam

    2015-01-01

    BackgroundCatheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF) is an important but expensive procedure that is the subject of some debate. Physicians' attitudes toward catheter ablation may influence promotion and patient acceptance. This is the first study to examine the attitudes of Danish cardiologists

  1. Catheter ablation of persistent atrial fibrillation in a patient with dextrocardia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zeng-Ming; Sang, Cai-Hua; Dong, Jian-Zeng; Ma, Chang-Sheng

    2012-05-01

    Dextrocardia is a rare anomaly where the heart is located on the right side of the chest instead of the normal left side. Ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) with such an inverted anatomy may be challenging for the manipulation of the catheters. Here we report a case of dextrocardia who underwent ablation for persistent AF guided by image integration system.

  2. Reliable temperature probe monitoring - Favorable esophageal motion for consistent probe contact during atrial fibrillation catheter ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Esato

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Left atrial-esophageal (LA-Eso fistula is now a well-recognized and fatal complication of percutaneous catheter ablation performed using radiofrequency energy for atrial fibrillation (AF. We noted an important esophageal motion during temperature monitoring by a multipolar sensing probe, which could resolve several potential concerns of accurate esophageal temperature measurement and could consequently minimize esophageal injuries including LA-Eso fistulas during catheter ablation for AF.

  3. Atrial tachycardias: Cause or effect with ablation of persistent atrial fibrillation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Seigo; Hooks, Darren A; Shah, Ashok; Relan, Jatin; Cheniti, Ghassen; Kitamura, Takeshi; Berte, Benjamin; Mahida, Saagar; Sellal, Jean-Marc; Jefairi, Nora Al; Frontera, Antonio; Amraoui, Sana; Collotand, Florent; Denis, Arnaud; Derval, Nicolas; Sacher, Frédéric; Cochet, Hubert; Dubois, Rémi; Hocini, Mélèze; Haïssaguerre, Michel; Klein, George; Jaïs, Pierre

    2018-02-01

    It is largely believed that atrial tachycardias (ATs) encountered during ablation of persistent atrial fibrillation (PsAF) are a byproduct of ablative lesions. We aimed to explore the alternative hypothesis that they may be a priori drivers of AF remaining masked until other AF sources are reduced or eliminated. Radiofrequency ablation of fibrillatory drivers mapped by electrocardiographic imaging (ECGI; ECVUE™, Cardioinsight Technologies, Cleveland, OH, USA) terminated PsAF in 198 (73%) out of 270 patients (61 ± 10 years, 9 ± 9 m). Two hundred and six ATs in 158 patients were subsequently mapped. Their anatomic relationship to the fibrillatory drivers prospectively identified by ECGI was then established. There were 26 (13%), 52 (25%), and 128 (62%) focal, localized, and macrore-entrant ATs, respectively. In focal/localized re-entrant ATs, 64 (82%) were terminated within an AF-driver region, in which 26 (81%) among 32 focal/localized ATs analyzed with 3-D-mapping system merged to driver map occurred from AF-driver regions in 1.0 ± 1.0 cm distance from the driver core. Importantly, there was no attempt at ablation of the associated AF-driver region in 25 of 64 (39%) of focal/localized re-entrant ATs. The sites of ATs origin generally had low-voltage, fractionated, and long-duration electrograms in AF. All but two focal/localized re-entrant ATs were successfully ablated. The majority of post-AF-ablation focal and localized re-entrant ATs originate from the region of prospectively established AF-driver regions. A third of these are localized to regions not subsequently submitted to ablation. These data suggest that many ATs exist, although not necessarily manifest independently, prior to ablation. They may have a role in the maintenance of PsAF in these individuals. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Visualisation during ablation of atrial fibrillation - stimulating the patient's own resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Marianne W.; Pedersen, Preben Ulrich; Bjerrum, Merete

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Going through ablation of atrial fibrillation can be accompanied by pain and discomfort when a light, conscious sedation is used. Visualisation has been shown to reduce the patients' perception of pain and anxiety during invasive procedures, when it is used together with the usual pain...... management. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate patients' experiences with visualisation in relation to pain and anxiety during an intervention consisting of visualisation, when undergoing ablation of atrial fibrillation. METHODS: Qualitative interviews were conducted with 14 patients from...... of managing anxiety' and 'benefits of visualisation'. The transversal analyses revealed two overall themes which highlight the experiences of being guided in visualisation during ablation of atrial fibrillation: 'stimulation of the patients' own resources' and 'being satisfied without complete analgesia...

  5. Atrial Ectopics Precipitating Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Francis

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Holter monitor tracing showing blocked atrial ectopics and atrial ectopic precipitating atrial fibrillation is being demonstrated. Initially it was coarse atrial fibrillation, which rapidly degenerated into fine atrial fibrillation.

  6. Predictors of recurrence following catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation using an irrigated-tip ablation catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasamreddy, Chandrasekhar R; Lickfett, Lars; Jayam, Vinod K; Nasir, Khurram; Bradley, David J; Eldadah, Zayd; Dickfeld, Timm; Berger, Ronald; Calkins, Hugh

    2004-06-01

    The aims of this study were to identify predictors of recurrence after catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) and to report the safety and efficacy of catheter ablation of AF using an irrigated-tip ablation catheter. Seventy-five consecutive patients (51 men [68%]; age 54 +/- 13 years) with symptomatic drug-refractory paroxysmal (42 patients), persistent (21 patients), or permanent (12 patients) AF underwent catheter ablation of AF using an irrigated-tip ablation catheter and a standard ablation strategy, which involved electrical isolation of all pulmonary veins (PVs) and creation of a cavotricuspid linear lesion. At 10.5 +/- 7.5 months of follow-up following a single (n = 75) or redo ablation procedure (n = 11), 39 (52%) of the 75 patients were free of AF, 10 were improved (13%), and 26 had experienced no benefit from the ablation procedure (35%). Seventy-six percent of patients with paroxysmal AF were free from recurrent AF. The most significant complications were two episodes of pericardial tamponade, mitral valve injury in one patient, two strokes, and complete but asymptomatic PV stenosis in one patient. Cox proportional hazards multivariate regression analysis identified the presence of persistent AF, permanent AF, and age >50 years prior to the ablation are the only independent predictors of AF recurrence after the first PV isolation procedure. Catheter ablation of AF using a strategy involving isolation of all PVs and creation of a linear lesion in the cavotricuspid isthmus using cooled radiofrequency energy is associated with moderate efficacy and an important risk for complications. The best results of this procedure are achieved in the subset of patients who are younger than 50 years and have only paroxysmal AF.

  7. Safety of pulmonary vein isolation and left atrial complex fractionated atrial electrograms ablation for atrial fibrillation with phased radiofrequency energy and multi-electrode catheters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, A.A.W.; Balt, J.C.; Wijffels, M.C.; Wever, E.F.; Boersma, L.V.

    2012-01-01

    AIMS: Recently, a multi-electrode catheter system using phased radiofrequency (RF) energy was developed specifically for atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation: the pulmonary vein ablation catheter (PVAC), the multi-array septal catheter (MASC), and the multi-array ablation catheter (MAAC). Initial

  8. Atrial fibrillation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABEOLUGBENGAS

    Objective: Atrial fibrillation is the commonest chronic arrhythmia and the etiology is widely varied. The aim of this study was to determine the etiology, clinical characteristics and treatment offered to adult patients with atrial fibrillation managed in a referral hospital in Port Harcourt, southern Nigeria. Methods:A retrospective ...

  9. Cryoballoon ablation of atrial fibrillation: state of the art 10 years after its invention.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorgente, A.; Chierchia, G.B.; Asmundis, C. de; Capulzini, L.; Sarkozy, A.; Brugada, P.

    2010-01-01

    The present review will discuss the technical aspects of a new patent invented in 1999 which allows cryoballoon ablation, an emerging technology used for the non pharmacological treatment of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. A general evaluation of the safety and the reliability of the technique will

  10. Treatment of atrial fibrillation with radiofrequency ablation and simultaneous multipolar mapping of the pulmonary veins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha Neto, A C; Farias, R L; de Paola, A A

    2001-11-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility and safety of simultaneous catheterization and mapping of the 4 pulmonary veins for ablation of atrial fibrillation. Ten patients, 8 with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and 2 with persistent atrial fibrillation, refractory to at least 2 antiarrhythmic drugs and without structural cardiopathy, were consecutively studied. Through the transseptal insertion of 2 long sheaths, 4 pulmonary veins were simultaneously catheterized with octapolar microcatheters. After identification of arrhythmogenic foci radiofrequency was applied under angiographic or ultrasonographic control. During 17 procedures, 40 pulmonary veins were mapped, 16 of which had local ectopic activity, related or not with the triggering of atrial fibrillation paroxysms. At the end of each procedure, suppression of arrhythmias was obtained in 8 patients, and elimination of pulmonary vein potentials was accomplished in 4. During the clinical follow-up of 9.6+/-3 months, 7 patients remained in sinus rhythm, 5 of whom were using antiarrhythmic drugs that had previously been ineffective. None of the patients had pulmonary hypertension or evidence of stenosis in the pulmonary veins. Selective and simultaneous catheterization of the 4 pulmonary veins with microcatheters for simultaneous recording of their electrical activity is a feasible and safe procedure that may help ablation of atrial fibrillation.

  11. Treatment of atrial fibrillation with radiofrequency ablation and simultaneous multipolar mapping of the pulmonary veins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocha Neto Almino C.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate the feasibility and safety of simultaneous catheterization and mapping of the 4 pulmonary veins for ablation of atrial fibrillation. METHODS: Ten patients, 8 with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and 2 with persistent atrial fibrillation, refractory to at least 2 antiarrhythmic drugs and without structural cardiopathy, were consecutively studied. Through the transseptal insertion of 2 long sheaths, 4 pulmonary veins were simultaneously catheterized with octapolar microcatheters. After identification of arrhythmogenic foci radiofrequency was applied under angiographic or ultrasonographic control. RESULTS: During 17 procedures, 40 pulmonary veins were mapped, 16 of which had local ectopic activity, related or not with the triggering of atrial fibrillation paroxysms. At the end of each procedure, suppression of arrhythmias was obtained in 8 patients, and elimination of pulmonary vein potentials was accomplished in 4. During the clinical follow-up of 9.6±3 months, 7 patients remained in sinus rhythm, 5 of whom were using antiarrhythmic drugs that had previously been ineffective. None of the patients had pulmonary hypertension or evidence of stenosis in the pulmonary veins. CONCLUSION: Selective and simultaneous catheterization of the 4 pulmonary veins with microcatheters for simultaneous recording of their electrical activity is a feasible and safe procedure that may help ablation of atrial fibrillation.

  12. Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation in Patients with Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refaat, Marwan M; Ballout, Jad; Mansour, Moussa

    2017-12-01

    With improved surgical techniques and medical management for patients with congenital heart diseases, more patients are living longer and well into adulthood. This improved survival comes with a price of increased morbidity, mainly secondary to increased risk of tachyarrhythmias. One of the major arrhythmias commonly encountered in this subset of cardiac patients is AF. Similar to the general population, the risk of AF increases with advancing age, and is mainly secondary to the abnormal anatomy, abnormal pressure and volume parameters in the hearts of these patients and to the increased scarring and inflammation seen in the left atrium following multiple surgical procedures. Catheter ablation for AF has been shown to be a very effective treatment modality in patients with refractory AF. However, data and guidelines regarding catheter ablation in patients with congenital heart disease are not well established. This review will shed light on the procedural techniques, success rates and complications of AF catheter ablation in patients with different types of CHD, including atrial septal defects, tetralogy of Fallot, persistent left superior vena cava, heterotaxy syndrome and atrial isomerism, and Ebstein anomaly.

  13. Chronic Atrial Fibrillation Ablation with Harmonic Scalpel during Mitral Valve Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Visconti Brick

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To evaluate surgical treatment of chronic atrial fibrillation with ultrasound in patients with mitral valve disease, considering preoperative clinical characteristics of patients undergoing surgical procedure and follow-up in the immediate postoperative period, in hospital and up to 60 months after discharge. Methods: We studied 100 patients with chronic atrial fibrillation and mitral valve disease who underwent surgical treatment using ultrasound ablation. Patient data were reviewed by consulting the control reports, including signs and symptoms, underlying disease, functional class, hospital stay, surgical procedure time, ablation time, immediate complications, and complications at discharged and up to 60 months later. Actuarial curve (Kaplan-Meier was used for the study of permanence without recurrence after 12, 24, 36, 48 and 60 months. Results: 86% of the patients had rheumatic mitral valve disease, 14% had degeneration of the mitral valve, 40% had mitral regurgitation, and 36% had mitral stenosis. Main symptoms included palpitations related to tachycardia by chronic atrial fibrillation (70%, congestive heart failure (70%, and previous episodes of acute pulmonary edema (27%. Early results showed that 94% of the patients undergoing ultrasound ablation reversed the rate of chronic atrial fibrillation, 86% being in sinus rhythm and 8% in atrioventricular block. At hospital discharge, maintenance of sinus rhythm was observed in 86% of patients and there was recurrence of chronic atrial fibrillation in 8% of patients. At follow-up after 60 months, 83.8% of patients maintained the sinus rhythm. Conclusion: Surgical treatment of chronic atrial fibrillation with ultrasound concomitant with mitral valve surgery is feasible and satisfactory, with maintenance of sinus rhythm in most patients (83.8% after 60 months of follow-up.

  14. Predictive value of various Doppler-derived parameters of atrial conduction time for successful atrial fibrillation ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, Miriam; Valtuille, Lucas; Choy, Jonathan B; Becher, Harald

    2015-12-01

    Various Doppler-derived parameters of left atrial electrical remodeling have been demonstrated to predict recurrence of atrial fibrillation (AF) after AF ablation. The aim of this study was to compare three Doppler-derived measures of atrial conduction time in patients undergoing AF ablation, and to investigate their predictive value for successful procedure. In 32 prospectively enrolled patients undergoing the first AF ablation, atrial conduction time was estimated by measuring the time delay between the onset of P-wave on the surface ECG to the peak of the a'-wave on the pulsed-wave Doppler and color-coded tissue Doppler imaging of the left atrial lateral wall, and to the peak of the A-wave on the pulsed-wave Doppler of the mitral inflow. There was a significant difference in the baseline atrial conduction time measured by different echocardiographic techniques. Most (88%) patients had normal or only mildly dilated left atrium. At 6 months, 12 patients (38%) had recurrent AF/atrial tachycardia. The duration of history of AF was the only predictor of AF/atrial tachycardia recurrence following the first AF ablation (P=0.024; OR 1.023, CI 1.003-1.044). A combination of normal left atrial volume and history of paroxysmal AF of ≤48 months was associated with the best outcome. Predictive value of the Doppler derived parameters of atrial conduction time may be reduced in the early stages of left atrial remodeling. Future studies may determine which echocardiographic parameter correlates best with the extent of left atrial remodeling and is most predictive of successful AF ablation.

  15. Concomitant ablation for atrial fibrillation during septal myectomy in patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogachev-Prokophiev, Alexander V; Afanasyev, Alexander V; Zheleznev, Sergei I; Pivkin, Alexei N; Fomenko, Michael S; Sharifulin, Ravil M; Karaskov, Alexander M

    2017-09-01

    The appearance of atrial fibrillation is associated with significant clinical deterioration in patients with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy; therefore, maintenance of sinus rhythm is desirable. Guidelines and most articles have reported the results of catheter ablation and pharmacologic atrial fibrillation treatment; nevertheless, data regarding concomitant procedures during septal myectomy are limited. The aim of this study was to assess the outcomes of concomitant atrial fibrillation treatment in patients with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Between 2010 and 2013 in our clinic, 187 patients with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy underwent extended myectomy. In 45 cases, concomitant Cox-Maze IV procedure was performed; however, obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was the primary indication for surgery. Atrial fibrillation was paroxysmal in 26 patients (58%) and nonparoxysmal in 19 patients (42%). The mean age of patients was 52.8 ± 14.2 years (range, 22-74 years). Mean peak gradient was 90.7 ± 24.2 mm Hg, and interventricular septum thickness was 26.1 ± 4.3 mm. Mean atrial fibrillation duration was 17.3 ± 8.5 months. There were no early deaths. No procedure-related complications occurred with regard to ablation procedure. Complete atrioventricular block was achieved in 2 patients (4.0%). Mean crossclamping time was 61 ± 36 minutes. Peak left ventricular outflow tract gradient was 12.6 ± 5.5 mm Hg based on transesophageal echocardiography. The Maze IV procedure was used for ablation in all patients (radiofrequency ablation with bipolar clamp + cryolesion for mitral and tricuspid lines). Because of the atrial wall thickness (5-6 mm), applications were performed 8 to 10 times on each line. There were no cases of pacemaker implantation due to sinus node dysfunction. All patients were discharged in stable sinus rhythm. Mean follow-up was 23.7 ± 1.3 months. The rate of atrial fibrillation freedom was 100% (45

  16. [Electrophysiological findings and ablation strategies in patients with atrial tachyarrhythmias after left atrial circumferential ablation in the treatment of atrial fibrillation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-long; Yang, Bing; Xu, Dong-jie; Zou, Jian-gang; Shan, Qi-jun; Chen, Chun; Chen, Hong-wu; Li, Wen-qi; Cao, Ke-jiang

    2007-02-01

    To report the electrophysiological findings and the ablation strategies in patients with atrial tachyarrhythmias (ATAs) or atrial fibrillation (AF) recurrence after left atrial circumferential ablation (LACA) in the treatment of AF. 91 patients with AF had LACA procedure from April 2004 to May 2006, 19 of which accepted the second ablation procedure due to ATAs or AF recurrence. In all the 19 patients [17 male, 2 female, age 25 - 65 (53 +/- 12) years], 11 presented with paroxysmal AF before the first ablation procedure, 2 with persistent AF and 6 with permanent AF. Pulmonary vein potentials (PVP) were investigated in both sides in all the patients. Delayed PVP was identified inside the left circular line in 5 patients, in the right in 1 and both in 2 during sinus rhythm. "Gap" conduction was found and successfully closed guided by circular mapping catheter. In 3 cases, irregular left atrial tachycardia was caused by fibrillation rhythm inside the left ring via decremental "gap" conduction. Reisolation was done successfully again guided by 3-D mapping and made the left atrium in sinus rhythm but the fibrillation rhythm was still inside the left ring. Pulmonary vein tachycardia with 1:1 conduction to the left atrium presented in one case and reisolation stopped the tachycardia. No PVP was discovered in both sides in 4 patients but other tachycardias could be induced, including two right atrial scar related tachycardias, two supraventricular tachycardias mediated by concealed accessory pathway, one cavo-tricuspid isthmus dependent atrial flutter and one focal atrial tachycardia near the coronary sinus ostium. All the tachycardias in these 4 patients were successfully ablated with the help of routine and 3-D mapping techniques. In the rest 3, which were in AF rhythm, LACA was successfully done again. After a mean follow-up of 4 - 26 (11.5 +/- 8.5) months, 16 patients were symptom free without anti-arrhythmic drug therapy; 1 of them had frequent palpitation attack with

  17. Impact of Atrial Fibrillation Ablation on Left Ventricular Filling Pressure and Left Atrial Remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Nascimento dos Santos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Left ventricular (LV diastolic dysfunction is associated with new-onset atrial fibrillation (AF, and the estimation of elevated LV filling pressures by E/e' ratio is related to worse outcomes in patients with AF. However, it is unknown if restoring sinus rhythm reverses this process. Objective: To evaluate the impact of AF ablation on estimated LV filling pressure. Methods: A total of 141 patients underwent radiofrequency (RF ablation to treat drug-refractory AF. Transthoracic echocardiography was performed 30 days before and 12 months after ablation. LV functional parameters, left atrial volume index (LAVind, and transmitral pulsed and mitral annulus tissue Doppler (e' and E/e' were assessed. Paroxysmal AF was present in 18 patients, persistent AF was present in 102 patients, and long-standing persistent AF in 21 patients. Follow-up included electrocardiographic examination and 24-h Holter monitoring at 3, 6, and 12 months after ablation. Results: One hundred seventeen patients (82.9% were free of AF during the follow-up (average, 18 ± 5 months. LAVind reduced in the successful group (30.2 mL/m2 ± 10.6 mL/m2 to 22.6 mL/m2 ± 1.1 mL/m2, p < 0.001 compared to the non-successful group (37.7 mL/m2 ± 14.3 mL/m2 to 37.5 mL/m2 ± 14.5 mL/m2, p = ns. Improvement of LV filling pressure assessed by a reduction in the E/e' ratio was observed only after successful ablation (11.5 ± 4.5 vs. 7.1 ± 3.7, p < 0.001 but not in patients with recurrent AF (12.7 ± 4.4 vs. 12 ± 3.3, p = ns. The success rate was lower in the long-standing persistent AF patient group (57% vs. 87%, p = 0.001. Conclusion: Successful AF ablation is associated with LA reverse remodeling and an improvement in LV filling pressure.

  18. Impact of Atrial Fibrillation Ablation on Left Ventricular Filling Pressure and Left Atrial Remodeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Simone Nascimento dos, E-mail: simonens@cardiol.br [Instituto Brasília de Arritmia- Universidade de Brasília, DF (Brazil); Faculdade de Medicina (UnB), Brasília, DF (Brazil); Henz, Benhur Davi; Zanatta, André Rodrigues; Barreto, José Roberto; Loureiro, Kelly Bianca; Novakoski, Clarissa; Santos, Marcus Vinícius Nascimento dos; Giuseppin, Fabio F.; Oliveira, Edna Maria; Leite, Luiz Roberto [Instituto Brasília de Arritmia- Universidade de Brasília, DF (Brazil)

    2014-12-15

    Left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction is associated with new-onset atrial fibrillation (AF), and the estimation of elevated LV filling pressures by E/e' ratio is related to worse outcomes in patients with AF. However, it is unknown if restoring sinus rhythm reverses this process. To evaluate the impact of AF ablation on estimated LV filling pressure. A total of 141 patients underwent radiofrequency (RF) ablation to treat drug-refractory AF. Transthoracic echocardiography was performed 30 days before and 12 months after ablation. LV functional parameters, left atrial volume index (LAVind), and transmitral pulsed and mitral annulus tissue Doppler (e' and E/e') were assessed. Paroxysmal AF was present in 18 patients, persistent AF was present in 102 patients, and long-standing persistent AF in 21 patients. Follow-up included electrocardiographic examination and 24-h Holter monitoring at 3, 6, and 12 months after ablation. One hundred seventeen patients (82.9%) were free of AF during the follow-up (average, 18 ± 5 months). LAVind reduced in the successful group (30.2 mL/m{sup 2} ± 10.6 mL/m{sup 2} to 22.6 mL/m{sup 2} ± 1.1 mL/m{sup 2}, p < 0.001) compared to the non-successful group (37.7 mL/m{sup 2} ± 14.3 mL/m{sup 2} to 37.5 mL/m{sup 2} ± 14.5 mL/m{sup 2}, p = ns). Improvement of LV filling pressure assessed by a reduction in the E/e' ratio was observed only after successful ablation (11.5 ± 4.5 vs. 7.1 ± 3.7, p < 0.001) but not in patients with recurrent AF (12.7 ± 4.4 vs. 12 ± 3.3, p = ns). The success rate was lower in the long-standing persistent AF patient group (57% vs. 87%, p = 0.001). Successful AF ablation is associated with LA reverse remodeling and an improvement in LV filling pressure.

  19. Randomized, Controlled Trial of the Safety and Effectiveness of a Contact Force-Sensing Irrigated Catheter for Ablation of Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation: Results of the TactiCath Contact Force Ablation Catheter Study for Atrial Fibrillation (TOCCASTAR) Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reddy, Vivek Y; Dukkipati, Srinivas R; Neuzil, Petr; Natale, Andrea; Albenque, Jean-Paul; Kautzner, Josef; Shah, Dipen; Michaud, Gregory; Wharton, Marcus; Harari, David; Mahapatra, Srijoy; Lambert, Hendrik; Mansour, Moussa

    2015-01-01

    .... This study sought to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a novel irrigated radiofrequency ablation catheter that measures real-time CF in the treatment of patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation...

  20. Clinical experience with a novel, irrigated, flexible tip ablation catheter in atrial fibrillation ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzulich, B; Taralli, S; Villata, G; Sori, P

    2015-04-01

    This paper aimed at assessing clinical efficacy and safety of a new fully irrigated and flexible tip catheter (Therapy™ Cool Flex™, St Jude Medical, St. Paul, MN, USA) in ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF). The study enrolled 117 consecutive patients with symptomatic AF who underwent for the first time a circumferential pulmonary vein isolation with a new irrigated and flexible tip catheter. All patients underwent successful pulmonary vein circumferential ablation. The mean procedure duration was 100 ± 27 min, total fluoroscopy time was 7.4 ± 5 min. The mean number of RF lesion was 139 ± 43 and the mean total RF time was 22.45 ± 3.9 min. Median follow-up was 665 ± 241 days. Through Kaplan-Meier analysis, overall event-free survival was 79.7%. In details, arrhythmia free survival was 85.4% in patients with persistent AF, 76% in paroxysmal AF and 75% in chronic AF. Three patients (2.5%) suffered from minor vascular complication (groin hematoma). Two patients (1.7%) suffered from pericardial effusion, treated with pericardiocentesis and with no sequelae. We did not observe any atrioesophageal fistula or pulmonary vein stenosis. The present study represents the largest cohort of patients receiving AF ablation with this new tip-flexible catheter. It demonstrated comparable efficacy to that previously reported, with a very low complication rate and procedural time. A head-to-head clinical trial would be necessary to address the relative efficacy of catheter type.

  1. Temporal trends in atrial fibrillation recurrence rates after ablation between 2005 and 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallisgaard, Jannik Langtved; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar; Hansen, Jim

    2017-01-01

    Aims: During the last decade, ablation has increasingly been used in rhythm control management of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Over time, experience and techniques have improved and indications for ablation have expanded. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the recurre......Aims: During the last decade, ablation has increasingly been used in rhythm control management of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Over time, experience and techniques have improved and indications for ablation have expanded. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether...... the recurrence rate of AF following ablation has improved during last decade. Methods and results: Through Danish nationwide registers, all patients with first-time AF ablation, between 2005 and 2014 in Denmark were identified. Recurrent AF after ablation was identified with 1 year follow-up. A total of 5425...... patients undergoing first-time ablation were included. While patient median age increased over time the median AF duration prior to ablation decreased. The rates of recurrent AF decreased from 45% in 2005-2006 to 31% 2013-2014 with the relative risk of recurrent AF almost halved with an odds ratio of 0...

  2. Pulmonary vein isolation as an end point for left atrial circumferential ablation of atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemola, Kristina; Oral, Hakan; Chugh, Aman; Hall, Burr; Cheung, Peter; Han, Jihn; Tamirisa, Kamala; Good, Eric; Bogun, Frank; Pelosi, Frank; Morady, Fred

    2005-09-20

    We sought to determine whether elimination of pulmonary vein (PV) arrhythmogenicity is necessary for the efficacy of left atrial circumferential ablation (LACA) for atrial fibrillation (AF). The PVs often provide triggers or drivers of AF. It has been shown that LACA is more effective than PV isolation in eliminating paroxysmal AF. However, it is not clear whether complete PV isolation is necessary for the efficacy of LACA. In 60 consecutive patients with paroxysmal (n = 39) or chronic (n = 21) AF (mean age 53 +/- 12 years), LACA to encircle the left- and right-sided PVs, with additional lines in the posterior left atrium and along the mitral isthmus, was performed under the guidance of an electroanatomic navigation system. The PVs were mapped with a decapolar ring catheter before and after LACA. If PV isolation was incomplete, no attempts at complete isolation were made. After LACA, there was incomplete electrical isolation of one or more PVs in 48 (80%) of the 60 patients. The prevalence of PV tachycardias was 82% before and 8% after LACA (p LACA.

  3. Atrial Fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders ... heart's two upper chambers—called the atria (AY-tree-uh)—to fibrillate. The ... a difficult decision concerning surgery for patients with atrial fibrillation, the ...

  4. Poor scar formation after ablation is associated with atrial fibrillation recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Bhrigu R; Jarrett, Tyler R; Kholmovski, Eugene G; Hu, Nan; Parker, Dennis; MacLeod, Rob S; Marrouche, Nassir F; Ranjan, Ravi

    2015-12-01

    Patients routinely undergo ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF) but the recurrence rate remains high. We explored in this study whether poor scar formation as seen on late-gadolinium enhancement magnetic resonance imaging (LGE-MRI) correlates with AF recurrence following ablation. We retrospectively identified 94 consecutive patients who underwent their initial ablation for AF at our institution and had pre-procedural magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) merged with left atrial (LA) anatomy in an electroanatomic mapping (EAM) system, ablated areas marked intraprocedurally in EAM, 3-month post-ablation LGE-MRI for assessment of scar, and minimum of 3-months of clinical follow-up. Ablated area was quantified retrospectively in EAM and scarred area was quantified in the 3-month post-ablation LGE-MRI. With the mean follow-up of 336 days, 26 out of 94 patients had AF recurrence. Age, hypertension, and heart failure were not associated with AF recurrence, but LA size and difference between EAM ablated area and LGE-MRI scar area was associated with higher AF recurrence. For each percent higher difference between EAM ablated area and LGE-MRI scar area, there was a 7-9% higher AF recurrence (p values 0.001-0.003) depending on the multivariate analysis. In AF ablation, poor scar formation as seen on LGE-MRI was associated with AF recurrence. Improved mapping and ablation techniques are necessary to achieve the desired LA scar and reduce AF recurrence.

  5. Cryoballoon ablation for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation in the presence of an Amplatzer Septal Occluder device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jubran A. Rind

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cryoballoon ablation of the pulmonary veins (CAPV has been demonstrated to be non-inferior to radiofrequency (RF ablation for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AFib. As CAPV requires a larger transseptal sheath than RF ablation, it can be challenging in the presence of an Amplatzer™ Septal Occluder (ASO device. Real-time three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography (RT3DTEE provides enhanced visualization of various complex cardiac defects and has revolutionized interventional procedures by guiding catheter positioning. We describe successful RT3DTEE guided transseptal puncture for CAPV of paroxysmal AFib in the presence of an ASO in a 53-year-old male.

  6. Clinical Benefit of Ablating Localized Sources for Human Atrial Fibrillation: The Indiana University FIRM Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, John M; Kalra, Vikas; Das, Mithilesh K; Jain, Rahul; Garlie, Jason B; Brewster, Jordan A; Dandamudi, Gopi

    2017-03-14

    Mounting evidence shows that localized sources maintain atrial fibrillation (AF). However, it is unclear in unselected "real-world" patients if sources drive persistent atrial fibrillation (PeAF), long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation (LPeAF), or paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF); if right atrial sites are important; and what the long-term success of source ablation is. The aim of this study was to analyze the role of rotors and focal sources in a large academic registry of consecutive patients undergoing source mapping for AF. One hundred seventy consecutive patients (mean age 59 ± 12 years, 79% men) with PAF (37%), PeAF (31%), or LPeAF (32%). Of these, 73 (43%) had undergone at least 1 prior ablation attempt (mean 1.9 ± 0.8; range: 1 to 4). Focal impulse and rotor modulation (FIRM) with an endocardial basket catheter was used in all cases. FIRM analysis revealed sources in the right atrium in 85% of patients (1.8 ± 1.3) and in the left atrium in 90% of patients (2.0 ± 1.3). FIRM ablation terminated AF to sinus rhythm or atrial flutter or tachycardia in 59% (PAF), 37% (PeAF), and 19% (LPeAF) of patients, with 15 of 67 terminations due to right atrial ablation. On follow-up, freedom from AF after a single FIRM procedure for the entire series was 95% (PAF), 83% (PeAF), and 82% (LPeAF) at 1 year and freedom from all atrial arrhythmias was 77% (PAF), 75% (PeAF), and 57% (LPeAF). In the Indiana University FIRM registry, FIRM-guided ablation produced high single-procedure success, mostly in patients with nonparoxysmal AF. Data from mapping, acute terminations, and outcomes strongly support the mechanistic role of biatrial rotors and focal sources in maintaining AF in diverse populations. Randomized trials of FIRM-guided ablation and mechanistic studies to determine how rotors form, progress, and regress are needed. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Higher burden of supraventricular ectopic complexes early after catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation is associated with increased risk of recurrent atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Christina; Johannessen, Arne; Dixen, Ulrik

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: Early identification of patients who could benefit from early re-intervention after catheter ablation is highly warranted. Our aim was to investigate the association between post-procedural burden of supraventricular ectopic complexes (SVEC) and the risk of long-term atrial fibrillation (AF...

  8. Right atrial mass following transcatheter radiofrequency ablation for recurrent atrial fibrillation: thrombus, endocarditis or mixoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancona, Roberta; Comenale Pinto, Salvatore; Caso, Pio; Di Palma, Vito; Pisacane, Francesca; Martiniello, Alfonso Roberto; Quarto, Cesare; De Rosa, Nicla; Pisacane, Carlo; Calabrò, Raffaele

    2009-03-01

    We report a case of an asymptomatic patient in whom a right atrial mass was fortuitously documented by echocardiography few months after a transcatheter radiofrequency catheter ablation for recurrent AF. No masses were seen in the cardiac chambers before the ablative procedure, raising important diagnostic and decision-making issues. The patient was referred to the surgeon and a diagnosis of right atrial myxoma was made.

  9. Left-sided approach of AV junction ablation for drug refractory atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoga Yuniadi

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available AV junction ablation has been proven effective to treat symptomatic atrial fibrillation refractory to antiarrhythmias or fail of pulmonary vein isolation. However, about 15% of conventional right-sided approach AV junction ablation failed to produce complete heart block. This study aimed to characterize His bundle potential at ablation site during conventional or left-sided approach of AV junction ablation. Twenty symptomatic AF patient (age of 60.5 ± 9.28 and 11 are females underwent conventional AV junction ablation. If 10 applications of radiofrequency energy are failed, then the ablation was performed by left-sided approach. Seventeen patients are successfully ablated by conventional approach. In 3 patients, conventional was failed but successfully ablated by left-sided approach. The His bundle amplitude at ablation site was significantly larger in left-sided than correspondence right-sided (16.0 ± 4.99 mm vs. 6.9 ± 4.02 mm respectively, p = 0.001, 95% CI -14.0 to -4.3. ROC analysis of His bundle potential amplitude recorded from right-sided revealed that cut off point of > 4.87 mm given the sensitivity of 81.3% and specificity of 53.8% for successful right-sided approach of AV junction ablation. In case of failed conventional approach, the left-sided approach is effective for AV junction ablation. An early switch to the left-sided approach may avoid multiple RF applications in patients with a low amplitude His-bundle potential (< 4.87 mm. (Med J Indones 2006; 15:109-14Keywords: Atrial fibrillation, AV junction ablation, left-sided approach

  10. Restoring sinus rhythm in patients with previous pacemaker implantation submitted to cardiac surgery and concomitant surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Marta P; Melo, João Q; Knaut, Michel; Alfieri, Ottavio; Benussi, Stefano; Williams, Mathew R; Hornero, Fernando

    2008-04-01

    Some patients submitted to cardiac surgery have concomitant atrial fibrillation and a previously implanted pacemaker. Because it is unknown if there is any potential for these patients to reassume a regular rate sinus rhythm after ablation of atrial fibrillation, we reviewed the results of all patients with pacemaker enrolled in the Registry of Atrial Fibrillation. Thirty-six patients were included in this study. Twenty-six had valve disease, seven had coronary disease and three had congenital heart disease. They were submitted concomitantly to ablation of atrial fibrillation using biatrial approaches (seven patients), left sided (27), or right sided (three patients). Thirty-three hospital survivors had a mean follow-up of 18 months, and a maximum of 25 months. At 1 year (n=21), patients' rhythm was sinus non-pacing dependent (52%), sinus pacing-dependent (14%), and atrial fibrillation (14%). At 2 years (n=14), patients' rhythm was sinus non-pacing dependent (57%) and atrial fibrillation (43%). The only factor that may have had impact on the recovery of sinus rhythm at 1 year was the small size of the left atrium (p=0.05). We conclude that in a significant number of patients, having a pacemaker before surgery does not preclude sinus rhythm recovery after a cardiac operation and ablation for concomitant atrial fibrillation.

  11. Left atrial ejection force predicts the outcome after catheter ablation for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishima, Hideyuki; Mine, Takanao; Takahashi, Satoshi; Ashida, Kenki; Ishihara, Masaharu; Masuyama, Tohru

    2018-02-01

    Left atrium (LA) systolic dysfunction is observed in the early stages of atrial fibrillation (AF) prior to LA anatomical change. We investigated whether LA systolic dysfunction predicts recurrent AF after catheter ablation (CA) in patients with paroxysmal AF. We studied 106 patients who underwent CA for paroxysmal AF. LA systolic function was assessed with the LA emptying volume = Maximum LA volume (LAV max ) - Minimum LA volume (LAV min ), LA emptying fraction = [(LAV max - LAV min )/LAV max ] × 100, and LA ejection force calculated with Manning's method [LA ejection force = (0.5 × ρ × mitral valve area × A 2 )], where ρ is the blood density and A is the late-diastolic mitral inflow velocity. Recurrent AF was detected in 35/106 (33%) during 14.6 ± 9.1 months. Univariate analysis revealed reduced LA ejection force, decreased LA emptying fraction, larger LA diameter, and elevated brain natriuretic peptide as significant variables. On multivariate analysis, reduced LA ejection force and larger LA diameter were independently associated with recurrent AF. Moreover, patients with reduced LA ejection force and larger LA diameter had a higher risk of recurrent AF than preserved LA ejection force (log-rank P = 0.0004). Reduced LA ejection force and larger LA diameter were associated with poor outcome after CA for paroxysmal AF, and could be a new index to predict recurrent AF. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Left atrial appendage thrombus with resulting stroke post-RF ablation for atrial fibrillation in a patient on dabigatran.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lobo, R

    2015-11-01

    Dabigatran etexilate is licensed for use in prevention of deep venous thromboembolism and in prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF). It has also been used in patients for other indications as a substitute for warfarin therapy because it requires no monitoring; one group being patients undergoing radiofrequency (RF), ablation for AF, although there have been no consensus guidelines with regards to dosage and timing of dose. We report the case of a patient with documentary evidence of left atrial appendage (LAA) thrombus formation and neurological sequelae post-RF ablation despite being on dabigatran. This case highlights the concern that periprocedural dabigatran may not provide adequate protection from development of LAA thrombus and that a standardised protocol will need to be developed and undergo large multicentre trials before dabigatran can be safely used for patients undergoing RF-ablation.

  13. Amiodarone after surgical ablation for atrial fibrillation: Is it really necessary? A prospective randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ad, Niv; Holmes, Sari D; Shuman, Deborah J; Pritchard, Graciela; Miller, Casey E

    2016-03-01

    Prophylactic antiarrhythmic drug (AAD) treatment is a well-established practice after catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF), but it is controversial after surgical ablation. This prospective randomized controlled trial examined whether amiodarone after surgical ablation reduced atrial arrhythmia recurrence within the first 3 months after surgery. Ninety patients were randomized to receive (n = 45) or not receive (n = 45) amiodarone after surgical ablation. Rhythm status was ascertained via clinical follow-up and 72-hour continuous monitoring at 6 and 12 weeks, using Heart Rhythm Society guidelines. Primary outcome was defined as atrial arrhythmia recurrence, cardioversion, ablation, or crossover from no-amiodarone to amiodarone as a result of atrial arrhythmia during follow-up. An intention-to-treat approach was used. The 2 study groups were similar in traditional predictors for failure, including left atrium size (5.0 vs 5.1 cm, P = .734), median AF duration (23 vs 20 months, P = .513), and long-standing persistent AF (44% vs 33%, P = .280). The primary outcome occurred in 52% of the no-amiodarone group (23 of 44) and 19% of the amiodarone group (8 of 43; P = .001). Cumulative freedom from primary outcome was greater in the amiodarone group (81.4% vs 47.7%, P Amiodarone was discontinued in 18 patients randomized to amiodarone for side effects, bradycardia, or noncompliance. Prophylactic amiodarone reduced early atrial arrhythmia recurrence. These results are consistent with catheter AF ablation findings and should inform recommendations for prophylactic class I/III AAD after surgical AF ablation, regardless of discharge rhythm status. As previously recommended, monitoring for side effects and amiodarone discontinuation by 3 months, for patients in sinus rhythm, is warranted. NCT01416935. Copyright © 2016 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Designing comparative effectiveness trials of surgical ablation for atrial fibrillation: experience of the Cardiothoracic Surgical Trials Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillinov, A Marc; Argenziano, Michael; Blackstone, Eugene H; Iribarne, Alexander; DeRose, Joseph J; Ailawadi, Gorav; Russo, Mark J; Ascheim, Deborah D; Parides, Michael K; Rodriguez, Evelio; Bouchard, Denis; Taddei-Peters, Wendy C; Geller, Nancy L; Acker, Michael A; Gelijns, Annetine C

    2011-08-01

    Since the introduction of the cut-and-sew Cox maze procedure for atrial fibrillation, there has been substantial innovation in techniques for ablation. Use of alternative energy sources for ablation simplified the procedure and has resulted in dramatic increase in the number of patients with atrial fibrillation treated by surgical ablation. Despite its increasingly widespread adoption, there is lack of rigorous clinical evidence to establish this procedure as an effective clinical therapy. This article describes a comparative effectiveness randomized trial, supported by the Cardiothoracic Surgical Clinical Trials Network, of surgical ablation with left atrial appendage closure versus left atrial appendage closure alone in patients with persistent and long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation undergoing mitral valve surgery. Nested within this trial is a further randomized comparison of 2 different lesions sets: pulmonary vein isolation and the full maze lesion set. This article addresses trial design challenges, including how best to characterize the target population, operationalize freedom from atrial fibrillation as a primary end point, account for the impact of antiarrhythmic drugs, and measure and analyze secondary end points, such as postoperative atrial fibrillation load. This article concludes by discussing how insights that emerge from this trial may affect surgical practice and guide future research in this area. Copyright © 2011. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  15. Contact force sensing for ablation of persistent atrial fibrillation: A randomized, multicenter trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Sergio; Weerasooriya, Rukshen; Novak, Paul; Champagne, Jean; Lim, Hong Euy; Macle, Laurent; Khaykin, Yaariv; Pantano, Alfredo; Verma, Atul

    2018-02-01

    Impact of contact force sensing (CFS) on ablation of persistent atrial fibrillation (PeAF) is unknown. The purpose of the TOUCH AF (Therapeutic Outcomes Using Contact force Handling during Ablation of Persistent Atrial Fibrillation) randomized trial was to compare CFS-guided ablation to a CFS-blinded strategy. Patients (n = 128) undergoing first-time ablation for persistent AF were randomized to a CFS-guided vs CFS-blinded strategy. In the CFS-guided procedure, operators visualized real-time force data. In the blinded procedure, force data were hidden. Wide antral pulmonary vein isolation plus a roof line were performed. Patients were followed at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months with clinical visit, ECG, and 48-hour Holter monitoring. The primary endpoint was cumulative radiofrequency (RF) time for all procedures. Atrial arrhythmia >30 seconds after 3 months was a recurrence. PeAF was continuous for 26 weeks (interquartile range [IQR] 13-52), and left atrial size was 45 ± 5 mm. Force in the CFS-blinded and CFS-guided arms was 12 g [IQR 6-20] and 14 g [IQR 9-20] (P = .10), respectively. Total RF time did not differ between CFS-guided and CFS-blinded groups (49 ± 14 min vs 50 ± 20 min, respectively; P = .70). Single procedure freedom from atrial arrhythmia was 60% in the CFS-guided arm and 63% in the CFS-blinded arm off drugs. Lesions with gaps were associated with significantly less force (11.4 g [IQR 6-19] vs 13.2 g [IQR 8-20], respectively; P = .0007) and less force-time integral (174 gs [IQR 91-330] vs 210 gs [IQR 113-388], respectively; P force/force-time integral was associated with significantly more gaps. Copyright © 2017 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Antiarrhythmics after ablation of atrial fibrillation (5A Study): six-month follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong-Sit, Peter; Roux, Jean-Francois; Zado, Erica; Callans, David J; Garcia, Fermin; Lin, David; Marchlinski, Francis E; Bala, Rupa; Dixit, Sanjay; Riley, Michael; Hutchinson, Mathew D; Cooper, Joshua; Russo, Andrea M; Verdino, Ralph; Gerstenfeld, Edward P

    2011-02-01

    We previously demonstrated that treatment with antiarrhythmic drugs (AADs) during the first 6 weeks after atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation reduces the incidence of clinically significant atrial arrhythmias and need for cardioversion or hospitalization for arrhythmia management. Whether early rhythm suppression decreases longer-term arrhythmia recurrence is unknown. We now report the 6-month follow-up data from this study. The Antiarrhythmics After Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation study prospectively randomized patients with paroxysmal AF undergoing ablation to either receive (AAD group) or not receive (no-AAD group) AAD treatment for the first 6 weeks after ablation; all patients received atrioventricular nodal blockers. Physicians were encouraged to stop the AADs after the 6-week treatment period. All patients underwent 4 weeks of transtelephonic monitoring to document asymptomatic AF and an evaluation at 6 weeks and 6 months. A total of 110 patients (71% men) aged 55±9 years were randomized, with 53 to AAD and 57 to no AAD. At 6 months, there was no difference in freedom from AF between the early AAD and no-AAD groups (38/53 [72%] versus 39/57 [68%]; P=0.84). Lack of early AF recurrence during the initial 6-week period was the only independent predictor of 6-month freedom from AF (64/76 [84%] without early recurrence versus 13/34 [38%] with early recurrence; P=0.0001). Although short-term use of AADs after AF ablation decreases early recurrence of atrial arrhythmias, early use of AADs does not prevent arrhythmia recurrence at 6 months. Early AF recurrence on or off AADs during the initial 6-week blanking period is a strong independent predictor of long-term AF recurrence.

  17. Efficacy and Safety of Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Using Remote Magnetic Navigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Q I; Pehrson, Steen; Jacobsen, Peter Karl

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to assess the procedural outcomes of catheter ablation guided by remote magnetic navigation (RMN) in a large cohort of patients with paroxysmal trial fibrillation (PAF) and persistent AF (PerAF). METHODS: A total of 726 patients (547 male, age: 58.5 ± 10.......3 years) with symptomatic AF (61% PAF) were analyzed from a prospective ablation registry. Procedural parameters including pulmonary venous (PV) anatomy, left atrial (LA) volume, procedural time, ablation time, fluoroscopy time, total X-ray dose, and complications were assessed. RESULTS: One thousand......, respectively. The mean fluoroscopy time was 5.4 ± 3.7 minutes. Compared to PAF patients, procedural time and ablation time were significantly increased in patients with PerAF by 10% (P PAF vs. 5.6 ± 4...

  18. [Intraoperative treatment for atrial fibrillation using bi-polar radiofrequency ablation system: a clinical report of 91 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yong-qiang; Meng, Xu; Li, Yan; Wang, Jian-gang; Zeng, Wen; Gao, Feng; Xu, Chun-lei

    2009-04-01

    To observe the short and mid-term therapeutic effects of Bi-polar ablation systems for intraoperative treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF). From March 2005 to January 2007, 91 patients received intraoperative treatment of atrial fibrillation with Bi-polar ablation systems, including 5 cases of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and 86 persistent/permanent cases. The main concomitant heart diseases were rheumatic mitral valve diseases. Atricure Dry Ablation System was used for 37 cases and Cardioblate Irrigated Ablation System for 54 cases. The ablation lesion patterns included Cox-maze III, Modified Cox Mini-maze and Left-sided Maze. Mean ablation time was (14.1+/-6.7) min. No ablation-related complications occurred. Three patients died perioperatively. Two patients had permanent pacemaker implantation 3 months after operation. One case suffered from stroke and lower limb thrombosis 2.5 years after operation. Follow-up lasted for 6 to 29 months. The none-AF rhythm were 62.5%, 85.2%, 79.0% and 74.5% at discharge, 3 months, 6 months, and>or=12 months respectively. Compared to Uni-polar Ablation therapy group, the restoration of sinus rhythm in Bi-polar group were significantly higher at 6 months and>or=12 months postoperatively. The latest follow-up results indicated that 100% of preoperative paroxysmal atrial fibrillation patients restored sinus rhythm and 75.3% of persistent/permanent patients were free from atrial fibrillation. The none-AF rhythm of Atricure group (81.1%) showed no difference from the Cardioblate (77.5%). Meanwhile there were no significant differences among the three ablation lesion groups. Intraoperative radiofrequency ablation with Bi-polar systems is a feasible, safe and highly effective surgical option compared to the Uni-polar ablation technique.

  19. Impact of Additional Transthoracic Electrical Cardioversion on Cardiac Function and Atrial Fibrillation Recurrence in Patients with Persistent Atrial Fibrillation Who Underwent Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deguo Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Backgrounds and Objective. During the procession of radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA in persistent atrial fibrillation (AF, transthoracic electrical cardioversion (ECV is required to terminate AF. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of additional ECV on cardiac function and recurrence of AF. Methods and Results. Persistent AF patients received extensive encircling pulmonary vein isolation (PVI and additional line ablation. Patients were divided into two groups based on whether they need transthoracic electrical cardioversion to terminate AF: electrical cardioversion (ECV group and nonelectrical cardioversion (NECV group. Among 111 subjects, 35 patients were returned to sinus rhythm after ablation by ECV (ECV group and 76 patients had AF termination after the ablation processions (NECV group. During the 12-month follow-ups, the recurrence ratio of patients was comparable in ECV group (15/35 and NECV group (34/76 (44.14% versus 44.74%, P=0.853. Although left atrial diameters (LAD decreased significantly in both groups, there were no significant differences in LAD and left ventricular cardiac function between ECV group and NECV group. Conclusions. This study revealed that ECV has no significant impact on the maintenance of SR and the recovery of cardiac function. Therefore, ECV could be applied safely to recover SR during the procedure of catheter ablation of persistent atrial fibrillation.

  20. Pulmonary vein region ablation in experimental vagal atrial fibrillation: role of pulmonary veins versus autonomic ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemola, Kristina; Chartier, Denis; Yeh, Yung-Hsin; Dubuc, Marc; Cartier, Raymond; Armour, Andrew; Ting, Michael; Sakabe, Masao; Shiroshita-Takeshita, Akiko; Comtois, Philippe; Nattel, Stanley

    2008-01-29

    Pulmonary vein (PV) -encircling radiofrequency ablation frequently is effective in vagal atrial fibrillation (AF), and there is evidence that PVs may be particularly prone to cholinergically induced arrhythmia mechanisms. However, PV ablation procedures also can affect intracardiac autonomic ganglia. The present study examined the relative role of PVs versus peri-PV autonomic ganglia in an experimental vagal AF model. Cholinergic AF was studied under carbachol infusion in coronary perfused canine left atrial PV preparations in vitro and with cervical vagal stimulation in vivo. Carbachol caused dose-dependent AF promotion in vitro, which was not affected by excision of all PVs. Sustained AF could be induced easily in all dogs during vagal nerve stimulation in vivo both before and after isolation of all PVs with encircling lesions created by a bipolar radiofrequency ablation clamp device. PV elimination had no effect on atrial effective refractory period or its responses to cholinergic stimulation. Autonomic ganglia were identified by bradycardic and/or tachycardic responses to high-frequency subthreshold local stimulation. Ablation of the autonomic ganglia overlying all PV ostia suppressed the effective refractory period-abbreviating and AF-promoting effects of cervical vagal stimulation, whereas ablation of only left- or right-sided PV ostial ganglia failed to suppress AF. Dominant-frequency analysis suggested that the success of ablation in suppressing vagal AF depended on the elimination of high-frequency driver regions. Intact PVs are not needed for maintenance of experimental cholinergic AF. Ablation of the autonomic ganglia at the base of the PVs suppresses vagal responses and may contribute to the effectiveness of PV-directed ablation procedures in vagal AF.

  1. Radiofrequency Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Technique in Patients with Mitral Valve Surgery and Left Atrial Reduction Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pouya Nezafati1

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: About half of all patients who undergo mitral valve surgery suffer from atrial fibrillation (AF. Cox described the surgical cut-and-sew Maze procedure, which is an effective surgical method but has some complications. This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of a substitution method of radiofrequency ablation (RFA for patients undergoing mitral valve surgery with AF.Methods: We evaluated 50 patients, comprising 40 men and 10 women at a mean age of 61.8 ± 7.5 years, who underwent mitral valve surgery with RFA between March 2010 and August 2013. All the patients had permanent AF with an enlarged left atrium (LA. The first indication for surgery was underlying organic lesions. Mitral valve replacement or repair was performed in the patients as a single procedure or in combination with aortic valve replacement or coronary artery bypass grafting. Radiofrequency energy was used to create continuous endocardial lesions mimicking most incisions and sutures. We evaluated the pre- and postoperative LA size, duration of aortic cross-clamping, cardiopulmonary bypass time, intensive care unit stay, and total hospital stay.Results: The mean preoperative and postoperative LA sizes were 7.5 ± 1.4 cm and 4.3 ± 0.7 cm (p value = 0.0001, respectively. The mean cardiopulmonary bypass time and the aortic cross-clamping time were 134.3 ± 33.7 minand 109.0 ± 28.4 min, respectively. The average stay at the intensive care unit was 2.1 ± 1.2 days, and the total hospital stay was 8.3 ± 2.4 days. Rebleeding was the only complication, found in one patient. There was no early or late mortality. Eighty-two percent of the patients were discharged in normal sinus rhythm. Five other patients had normal sinus rhythm at 6months' follow-up, and the remaining 4 patients did not have a normal sinus rhythm after 6 months.Conclusion: Radiofrequency ablation, combined with LA reduction, is an effective option for the treatment of permanent AF concomitant with

  2. State-of-the-art and emerging technologies for atrial fibrillation ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewire, Jane; Calkins, Hugh

    2010-03-01

    Catheter ablation is an important treatment modality for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Although the superiority of catheter ablation over antiarrhythmic drug therapy has been demonstrated in middle-aged patients with paroxysmal AF, the role the procedure in other patient subgroups-particularly those with long-standing persistent AF-has not been well defined. Furthermore, although AF ablation can be performed with reasonable efficacy and safety by experienced operators, long-term success rates for single procedures are suboptimal. Fortunately, extensive ongoing research will improve our understanding of the mechanisms of AF, and considerable funds are being invested in developing new ablation technologies to improve patient outcomes. These technologies include ablation catheters designed to electrically isolate the pulmonary veins with improved safety, efficacy, and speed, catheters designed to deliver radiofrequency energy with improved precision, robotic systems to address the technological demands of the procedure, improved imaging and electrical mapping systems, and MRI-guided ablation strategies. The tools, technologies, and techniques that will ultimately stand the test of time and become the standard approach to AF ablation in the future remain unclear. However, technological advances are sure to result in the necessary improvements in the safety and efficacy of AF ablation procedures.

  3. Double-contrast, single-phase computed tomography angiography for ruling out left atrial appendage thrombus prior to atrial fibrillation ablation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunissen, Cas; Habets, Jesse; Velthuis, BK; Cramer, Maarten J; Loh, KP

    Prior to atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation, computed tomography angiography (CTA) is increasingly used for left atrial appendage (LAA) thrombus detection. LAA filling defects on CTA may represent thrombus or incomplete contrast mixing with blood. A pre-bolus of contrast material with delay before

  4. Local Electrical Dyssynchrony during Atrial Fibrillation: Theoretical Considerations and Initial Catheter Ablation Results.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Kuklik

    Full Text Available Electrogram-based identification of the regions maintaining persistent Atrial Fibrillation (AF is a subject of ongoing debate. Here, we explore the concept of local electrical dyssynchrony to identify AF drivers.Local electrical dyssynchrony was calculated using mean phase coherence. High-density epicardial mapping along with mathematical model were used to explore the link between local dyssynchrony and properties of wave conduction. High-density mapping showed a positive correlation between the dyssynchrony and number of fibrillatory waves (R2 = 0.68, p<0.001. In the mathematical model, virtual ablation at high dyssynchrony regions resulted in conduction regularization. The clinical study consisted of eighteen patients undergoing catheter ablation of persistent AF. High-density maps of left atrial (LA were constructed using a circular mapping catheter. After pulmonary vein isolation, regions with the top 10% of the highest dyssynchrony in LA were targeted during ablation and followed with ablation of complex atrial electrograms. Catheter ablation resulted in termination during ablation at high dyssynchrony regions in 7 (41% patients. In another 4 (24% patients, transient organization was observed. In 6 (35% there was no clear effect. Long-term follow-up showed 65% AF freedom at 1 year and 22% at 2 years.Local electrical dyssynchrony provides a reasonable estimator of regional AF complexity defined as the number of fibrillatory waves. Additionally, it points to regions of dynamical instability related with action potential alternans. However, despite those characteristics, its utility in guiding catheter ablation of AF is limited suggesting other factors are responsible for AF persistence.

  5. Visualization and Attentive Behavior for Pain Reduction during Radiofrequency Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Marianne W; Werner, Anette; Abrahamsen, Randi

    2013-01-01

    pain, the amount of analgesics, anxiety, and adverse events. METHODS: A clinical controlled study with 71 patients in a control group (CG), receiving conventional care and treatment, and 76 patients in an intervention group (IG), receiving relaxation and visualization, combined with a structured......BACKGROUND: Radiofrequency (RF) ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) can be accompanied by pain and anxiety when light conscious sedation is used. We sought to determine how visualization and structured attentive behavior during ablation of AF could reduce pain intensity, spontaneously expressed...... of anxiety, mean anxiety: CG (0.10-1.84), IG (0.9-2.03)(NS), and the number of adverse events (P = 0.241). CONCLUSION: Visualization and structured attentive behavior was shown to reduce the amount of analgesics during the RF ablation of AF. There was no difference in perception of pain intensity...

  6. High-Resolution Infrared Thermography of Esophageal Temperature During Radiofrequency Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Matthew G; Melton, Iain; Roper, Graham; Lim, Gary; Crozier, Ian G

    2018-02-01

    Catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation has potential to cause esophageal thermal injury. Esophageal temperature monitoring during ablation is commonly used; however, it has not eliminated thermal injuries, possibly because conventional sensors have poor spatial sampling and response characteristics. To enhance understanding of temperature dynamics that may underlie esophageal injury, we tested a high-resolution, intrabody, infrared thermography catheter to continuously image esophageal temperatures during ablation. Atrial fibrillation ablation patients were instrumented with a flexible, 9F infrared temperature catheter inserted nasally (n=8) or orally (n=8) into the esophagus adjacent to the left atrium. Ablation was performed while the infrared catheter continuously recorded surface temperatures from 7680 points per second circumferentially over a 6-cm length of esophagus. Physicians were blinded to temperature data. Endoscopy was performed within 24 hours to document esophageal injury. Thermal imaging showed that most patients (10/16) experienced ≥1 events where peak esophageal temperature was >40°C. Three patients experienced temperatures >50°C; and 1 experienced >60°C. Analysis of temperature data for each subject's maximum thermal event revealed high gradients (2.3±1.4°C/mm) and rates of change (1.5±1.3°C/s) with an average length of esophageal involvement of 11.0±5.4 mm. Endoscopy identified 3 distinct thermal lesions, all in patients with temperatures >50°C; all resolved within 2 weeks. Infrared thermography provided dynamic, high-resolution mapping of esophageal temperatures during cardiac ablation. Esophageal thermal injury occurred with temperatures >50°C and was associated with large spatiotemporal gradients. Additional studies are warranted to determine the relationships between thermal parameters and esophageal injury. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Temporary esophageal stenting allows healing of esophageal perforations following atrial fibrillation ablation procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunch, T Jared; Nelson, Jennifer; Foley, Tom; Allison, Scott; Crandall, Brian G; Osborn, Jeffrey S; Weiss, J Peter; Anderson, Jeffrey L; Nielsen, Peter; Anderson, Lars; Lappe, Donald L; Day, John D

    2006-04-01

    Left atrial catheter ablation (LACA) has emerged as a successful method to eliminate atrial fibrillation (AF). Recent reports have described atrio-esophageal fistulas, often resulting in death, from this procedure. Temporary esophageal stenting is an established therapy for malignant esophageal disease. We describe the first case of successful temporary esophageal stenting for an esophageal perforation following LACA. A 48-year-old man with symptomatic drug refractory lone AF underwent an uneventful LACA. Fifty-nine ablations with an 8-mm tip ablation catheter (30 seconds, 70 Watts, 55 degrees C), as guided by 3-D NavX mapping, were performed in the left atrium to isolate the pulmonary veins as well as a left atrial flutter and roof ablation line. In addition, complex atrial electrograms in AF and sites of vagal innervation were ablated. Two weeks later, he presented with sub-sternal chest pain, fever, and dysphagia. A chest CT showed a 3-mm esophageal perforation at the level of the left atrium with mediastinal soiling and no pericardial effusion. An urgent upper endoscopy with placement of a PolyFlex removable esophageal stent to seal off the esophago-mediastinal fistula was performed. After 3 weeks of i.v. antibiotics, naso-jejunal tube feedings, and esophageal stenting, the perforation resolved and the stent was removed. Over 18 months of follow-up, there have been no other complications, and he has returned to a physically active life and remains free from AF on previously ineffective anti-arrhythmic drugs. Early diagnosis of esophageal perforations following LACA may allow temporary esophageal stenting with successful esophageal healing. Prompt chest CT scans with oral and i.v. contrast should be considered in any patient with sub-sternal chest pain or dysphagia following LACA.

  8. Prognostic impact of hs-CRP and IL-6 in patients undergoing radiofrequency catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Kristoffer Mads Aaris; Nilsson, Brian; Bruunsgaard, Helle

    2008-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this study was to assess the predictive value of inflammatory markers in patients with paroxysmal/ persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) treated with radiofrequency (RF) catheter ablation. Methods. Forty-six consecutive patients, mean age 55 years (range 31 - 81 yrs), with paroxysmal...... of paroxysmal or persistent AF treated with RF catheter ablation, elevated levels of IL-6 and hs-CRP before ablation are independent predictors of recurrence of AF Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12/31...

  9. Atrial fibrillation therapy now and in the future: drugs, biologicals, and ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Christopher E; Olgin, Jeffrey

    2014-04-25

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a complex disease with multiple inter-relating causes culminating in rapid, seemingly disorganized atrial activation. Therapy targeting AF is rapidly changing and improving. The purpose of this review is to summarize current state-of-the-art diagnostic and therapeutic modalities for treatment of AF. The review focuses on reviewing treatment as it relates to the pathophysiological basis of disease and reviews preclinical and clinical evidence for potential new diagnostic and therapeutic modalities, including imaging, biomarkers, pharmacological therapy, and ablative strategies for AF. Current ablation and drug therapy approaches to treating AF are largely based on treating the arrhythmia once the substrate occurs and is more effective in paroxysmal AF rather than persistent or permanent AF. However, there is much research aimed at prevention strategies, targeting AF substrate, so-called upstream therapy. Improved diagnostics, using imaging, genetics, and biomarkers, are needed to better identify subtypes of AF based on underlying substrate/mechanism to allow more directed therapeutic approaches. In addition, novel antiarrhythmics with more atrial specific effects may reduce limiting proarrhythmic side effects. Advances in ablation therapy are aimed at improving technology to reduce procedure time and in mechanism-targeted approaches.

  10. Catheter ablation vs electrophysiologically guided thoracoscopic surgical ablation in long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation: The CASA-AF Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldar, Shouvik K; Jones, David G; Bahrami, Toufan; De Souza, Anthony; Panikker, Sandeep; Butcher, Charlie; Khan, Habib; Yahdav, Rashmi; Jarman, Julian; Mantziari, Lilian; Nyktari, Eva; Mohiaddin, Raad; Hussain, Wajid; Markides, Vias; Wong, Tom

    2017-11-01

    Catheter ablation (CA) outcomes for long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation (LSPAF) remain suboptimal. Thoracoscopic surgical ablation (SA) provides an alternative approach in this difficult to treat cohort. To compare electrophysiological (EP) guided thoracoscopic SA with percutaneous CA as the first-line strategy in the treatment of LSPAF. Fifty-one patients with de novo symptomatic LSPAF were recruited. Twenty-six patients underwent electrophysiologically guided thoracoscopic SA. Conduction block was tested for all lesions intraoperatively by an independent electrophysiologist. In the CA group, 25 consecutive patients underwent stepwise left atrial (LA) ablation. The primary end point was single-procedure freedom from atrial fibrillation (AF) and atrial tachycardia (AT) lasting >30 seconds without antiarrhythmic drugs at 12 months. Single- and multiprocedure freedom from AF/AT was higher in the SA group than in the CA group: 19 of 26 patients (73%) vs 8 of 25 patients (32%) (P = .003) and 20 of 26 patients (77%) vs 15 of 25 patients (60%) (P = .19), respectively. Testing of the SA lesion set by an electrophysiologist increased the success rate in achieving acute conduction block by 19%. In the SA group, complications were experienced by 7 of 26 patients (27%) vs 2 of 25 patients (8%) in the CA group (P = .07). In LSPAF, meticulous electrophysiologically guided thoracoscopic SA as a first-line strategy may provide excellent single-procedure success rates as compared with those of CA, but there is an increased up-front risk of nonfatal complications. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Minimally invasive fibrillating heart surgery: a safe and effective approach for mitral valve and surgical ablation for atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massimiano, Paul S; Yanagawa, Bobby; Henry, Linda; Holmes, Sari D; Pritchard, Graciela; Ad, Niv

    2013-08-01

    Minimally invasive (MI) approaches to mitral valve surgery (MVS) and surgical ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF) are now performed routinely, and avoidance of aortic manipulation and cardioplegic arrest may further simplify the procedure. We present our experience with MI fibrillatory cardiac operations without aortic cross-clamping for MVS and AF ablation. Between January 2007 and August 2012, 292 consecutive patients underwent MVS (n = 177), surgical ablation (n = 81), or both (n= 34), with fibrillating heart through a right minithoracotomy. Baseline characteristics, perioperative outcomes, and long-term survival were evaluated. The mean age was 56.8 years (range, 20-83 years). Reoperations were performed in 25 patients (9%). The overall MV repair rate was 93.4% (198/211), including 13.1% (26/198) with anterior leaflet repair. Repair was performed in 100% of patients with myxomatous MV disease. Of isolated posterior mitral valve repairs, 60.5% underwent repair with neochords (W.L. Gore and Associates, Flagstaff, AZ), and 29.7% underwent triangular resection. There was 1 operative mortality (0.3%), no intraoperative conversions to sternotomy, 4 reoperations (1.4%), 1 stroke (0.3%), and 1 transient ischemic attack (0.3%). The 12-month return to sinus rhythm was 93%, and sinus rhythm without class I and class III antiarrhythmic medication was 85%. One- and 2-year cumulative survival was 98.5% and 97.8%, respectively. At mean follow-up of 27.3 months, our outcomes compared favorably with the 2011 Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) nationally reported outcomes. We demonstrated that low operative mortality and low stroke rate with MI fibrillating cardiac operations without cross-clamping allows for MVS and AF ablation. Our results suggest that the MI fibrillating heart approach is safe and effective. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Gender, Race, and Health Insurance Status in Patients Undergoing Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nileshkumar; Deshmukh, Abhishek; Thakkar, Badal; Coffey, James O; Agnihotri, Kanishk; Patel, Achint; Ainani, Nitesh; Nalluri, Nikhil; Patel, Nilay; Patel, Nish; Patel, Neil; Badheka, Apurva O; Kowalski, Marcin; Hendel, Robert; Viles-Gonzalez, Juan; Noseworthy, Peter A; Asirvatham, Samuel; Lo, Kaming; Myerburg, Robert J; Mitrani, Raul D

    2016-04-01

    Catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF) has emerged as a popular procedure. The purpose of this study was to examine whether there exist differences or disparities in ablation utilization across gender, socioeconomic class, insurance, or race. Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (2000 to 2012), we identified adults hospitalized with a principal diagnosis of AF by ICD 9 code 427.31 who had catheter ablation (ICD 9 code-37.34). We stratified patients by race, insurance status, age, gender, and hospital characteristics. A hierarchical multivariate mixed-effect model was created to identify the independent predictors of AF ablation. Among an estimated total of 3,508,122 patients (extrapolated from 20% Nationwide Inpatient Sample) hospitalized with a diagnosis of AF in the United States from the year 2000 to 2012, 102,469 patients (2.9%) underwent catheter ablations. The number of ablations was increased by 940%, from 1,439 in 2000 to 15,090 in 2012. There were significant differences according to gender, race, and health insurance status, which persisted even after adjustment for other risk factors. Female gender (0.83 [95% CI 0.79 to 0.87; p race (0.64 [95% CI 0.56 to 0.72; p gender, race, and insurance status that persisted over time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Atrioesophageal Fistula after Minimally Invasive Video-Assisted Epicardial Ablation for Lone Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kik, Charles; van Valen, Richard; Mokhles, Mostafa M; Bekkers, Jos A; Bogers, Ad J J C

    2017-09-01

    Minimally invasive video-assisted epicardial beating heart ablation for lone atrial fibrillation claims to be safe and effective. We, however, report on three patients with an atrioesophageal fistula after this procedure. The exact pathogenesis of this complication is unknown. All patients presented around 6 weeks after surgery with either fever or neurological deficits. Diagnosis can be made by computed tomography scan. We advocate an aggressive surgical approach with closure of the atrial defect on cardiopulmonary bypass and closure and reinforcement of the esophagus with an intercostal muscle flap in a single-stage surgery. Some caution as to the low-risk character of this procedure seems to be realistic. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Minimally invasive hybrid ablation procedure for the treatment of persistent atrial fibrillation: one year results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zembala, Michał; Filipiak, Krzysztof; Kowalski, Oskar; Boidol, Joanna; Sokal, Adam; Lenarczyk, Radosław; Niklewski, Tomasz; Garbacz, Marcin; Nadziakiewicz, Paweł; Kalarus, Zbigniew; Zembala, Marian

    2012-01-01

    The concept of a hybrid approach, combining the most effective techniques of surgical and endocardial catheter ablation has resulted in the creation of the convergent ablation procedure. This novel, pericardioscopic, hybrid approach can be an effective option for highly symptomatic patients with persistent atrial fibrillation (PSAF) and longstanding persistent atrial fibrillation (LSPAF) for whom standalone surgical or endocardial ablation procedures offer sometimes unsatisfactory outcomes. To assess the safety, efficacy and effectiveness of a hybrid epicardial and endocardial radiofrequency ablation for the treatment of PSAF and LSPAF. Single-centre, prospective, non-randomised clinical study. Between August 2009 and December 2011, 27 patients with PSAF (n = 5) and LSPAF (n = 22) underwent hybrid ablation (HABL). Mean age was 52.52 ± 11.27 years, and the mean EHRA class was 2.5; 14 (51.8%) patients had a history of electrical cardioversion (n = 6) or catheter ablation (n = 8). Five patients had left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) of less than 35%. Mean AF duration for all patients was 3.46 ± 2.5 years. All patients were on antiarrhythmic drugs (AAD) and oral anticoagulation. Patients were scheduled for three, six and 12 month follow-up with seven day Holters, REVEAL® XT and ECHO measurements. The HABL procedure was feasible in all patients. At six months post procedure, 72.2% (13/18) of patients were in SR, and 66.5% (12/18) were off class I/III AADs. Four patients were in AF and one patient developed right atrial flutter. At one year post procedure, 80% (8/10) of patients were in SR and off class I/III AADs. At two year post procedure, 100% (6/6) of patients were in SR and off class I/III AADs. Rapid change in left ventricular function was noted in patients with low LVEF (≤ 35%) prior to the procedure. Patients with LVEF +40% had less apparent improvement. Hybrid, epicardial and endocardial, radiofrequency ablation is feasible and safe, effectively

  15. Nursing and quality of life in patients with atrial fibrillation before and after radiofrequency ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavelková, Zdeňka; Bulava, Alan

    2014-01-01

    The importance of nursing and patient quality of life is a top concern for medical professionals. Therefore, participation by medical professionals in raising awareness and continuously supporting improvements in nursing care is an essential part of improving patient quality of life. Modern medical techniques and procedures are changing rapidly, particularly in the field of cardiology. This has resulted in changing roles and increased responsibility for nurses and confirms the necessity for changing the perception of nurses relative to their role in the medical environment and to patient care. This paper presents the results from the first phase of a research project and focuses on quality of life and problematic areas associated with the needs of patients with atrial fibrillation before and after radiofrequency catheter ablation. Atrial fibrillation is one of the most common supraventricular arrhythmias. Its incidence in the general population has risen significantly over the last twenty years. The objective of this research was to assess those areas, which are considered by patients to be problematic before therapeutic intervention. The research was realized through a quantitative survey using a modified questionnaire. Results showed that AF reduced the quality of life both physically and psychologically (i.e. increased levels of anxiety and depression). Results also showed that radiofrequency catheter ablation was able to alleviate symptoms associated with AF and was also able to increase patient quality of life.

  16. [Radiofrequency ablation of long standing persistent atrial fibrillation and post-incisional macroreentrant right atrial tachycardia in patient with advanced biventricular heart failure--case raport].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrzewska, Joanna; Derejko, Paweł; Szufladowicz, Ewa; Bodalski, Robert; Orczykowski, Michał; Przybylski, Andrzej; Szumowski, Lukasz; Michałek, Piotr; Walczak, Franciszek

    2008-11-01

    We present a case of a 54 year old male with a long-standing atrial fibrillation (AF) who was scheduled for cardiac transplantation due to the progression of heart failure. Previous treatment included pacemaker implantation, mitral valvuloplasty, a-v node modification using RF ablation, and pharmacological therapy. This time the patient underwent complex AF ablation which consisted of pulmonary vein isolation, mitral and left atrial roof line creation, cavo-tricuspid isthmus ablation and ablation of complex fractionated atrial electrograms, which resulted in restoration of sinus rhythm. Because of the right atrial post-incisional tachycardia the patient underwent second ablation session. This complex invasive approach occurred successful. The patient remains in sinus rhythm with improved left ventricular function and better NYHA class over a 12-month follow-up.

  17. Short-term amiodarone treatment for atrial fibrillation after catheter ablation induces a transient thyroid dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Søren Zöga; Darkner, Stine; Chen, Xu

    2016-01-01

    ablation in a randomised, double-blind clinical trial. METHODS: 212 patients referred for AF ablation at two centres were randomized to 8weeks of oral amiodarone or placebo. Thyroid function tests (TSH, thyroid stimulating hormone; T4, thyroxine; T3, triiodothyronine; fT4, free T4; fT3, free T3) were......BACKGROUND: Amiodarone is known to affect the thyroid, but little is known about thyroid recovery after short-term amiodarone treatment. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to evaluate the impact of 8weeks of amiodarone treatment on thyroid function in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) undergoing catheter...... performed at baseline and 1, 3 and 6months. RESULTS: Study drug was discontinued due to mild thyroid dysfunction in 1 patient in the placebo vs. 3 in the amiodarone group (p=0.6). In linear mixed models there were significant effects of amiodarone on thyroid function tests, modified by follow-up visit (p

  18. Association Between Local Bipolar Voltage and Conduction Gap Along the Left Atrial Linear Ablation Lesion in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Masaharu; Fujita, Masashi; Iida, Osamu; Okamoto, Shin; Ishihara, Takayuki; Nanto, Kiyonori; Kanda, Takashi; Sunaga, Akihiro; Tsujimura, Takuya; Matsuda, Yasuhiro; Mano, Toshiaki

    2017-08-01

    A bipolar voltage reflects a thick musculature where formation of a transmural lesion may be hard to achieve. The purpose of this study was to explore the association between local bipolar voltage and conduction gap in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) who underwent atrial roof or septal linear ablation. This prospective observational study included 42 and 36 consecutive patients with persistent AF who underwent roof or septal linear ablations, respectively. After pulmonary vein isolation, left atrial linear ablations were performed, and conduction gap sites were identified and ablated after first-touch radiofrequency application. Conduction gap(s) after the first-touch roof and septal linear ablation were observed in 13 (32%) and 19 patients (53%), respectively. Roof and septal area voltages were higher in patients with conduction gap(s) than in those without (roof, 1.23 ± 0.77 vs 0.73 ± 0.42 mV, p = 0.010; septal, 0.96 ± 0.43 vs 0.54 ± 0.18 mV, p = 0.001). Trisected regional analyses revealed that the voltage was higher at the region with a conduction gap than at the region without. Complete conduction block across the roof and septal lines was not achieved in 3 (7%) and 6 patients (17%), respectively. Patients in whom a linear conduction block could not be achieved demonstrated higher ablation area voltage than those with a successful conduction block (roof, 1.91 ± 0.74 vs 0.81 ± 0.51 mV, p = 0.001; septal, 1.15 ± 0.56 vs 0.69 ± 0.31 mV, p = 0.006). In conclusion, a high regional bipolar voltage predicts failure to achieve conduction block after left atrial roof or septal linear ablation. In addition, the conduction gap was located at the preserved voltage area. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Atrial fibrillation and female sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmino, Matteo; Battaglia, Alberto; Gallo, Cristina; Gili, Sebastiano; Matta, Mario; Castagno, Davide; Ferraris, Federico; Giustetto, Carla; Gaita, Fiorenzo

    2015-12-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common supraventricular arrhythmia. Its prevalence increases with age and preferentially affects male patients. Over 75 years of age, however, female patients being more prevalent, the absolute number of patients affected is similar between sexes. Despite this, few data are available in the literature concerning sex-related differences in atrial fibrillation patients. The present systematic review therefore considers comorbidities, referring symptoms, quality of life, pharmacological approaches and trans-catheter ablation in female rather than in male atrial fibrillation patients in search of parameters that may have an impact on the treatment outcome. In brief, female atrial fibrillation patients more commonly present comorbidities, leading to a higher prevalence of persistent atrial fibrillation; moreover, they refer to hospital care later and with a longer disease history. Atrial fibrillation symptoms relate to low quality of life in female patients; in fact, atrial fibrillation paroxysm usually presents higher heart rate, leading to preferentially adopt a rate rather than a rhythm-control strategy. Female atrial fibrillation patients present an increased risk of stroke, worsened by the lower oral anticoagulant prescription rate related to the concomitant higher haemorrhagic risk profile. Trans-catheter ablation is under-used in female patients and, on the contrary, they are more commonly affected by anti-arrhythmic drug side effects.

  20. Assessments of pulmonary vein and left atrial anatomical variants in atrial fibrillation patients for catheter ablation with cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jing; Yang, Zhi-Gang; Xu, Hua-Yan; Shi, Ke; Long, Qi-Hua [Sichuan University, Department of Radiology, West China Hospital, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); Guo, Ying-Kun [Sichuan University, Department of Radiology, West China Second University Hospital, Chengdu (China)

    2017-02-15

    To provide a road map of pulmonary vein (PV) and left atrial (LA) variants in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) before catheter ablation procedure using cardiac CT. Cardiac CT was performed in 1420 subjects for accurate anatomical information, including 710 patients with AF and 710 matched controls without AF. PV variants, PV ostia and spatial orientation, LA enlargement, and left atrial diverticulum (LAD) were measured, respectively. Differences between these two groups were also respectively compared. Some risk factors for the occurrence of LAD were analyzed. In total, PV variants were observed in 202 (28.5 %) patients with AF patients and 206 (29.0 %) controls without AF (p = 0.8153). The ostial sizes of all accessory veins were generally smaller than those of the typical four PVs (p = 0.0153 to 0.3958). There was a significant difference of LA enlargement between the AF and control groups (36.3 % vs. 12.5 %, p < 0.0001), while the prevalence of LAD was similar in these two groups (43.2 % vs. 41.9 %, p = 0.6293). PV variants are common. Detailed knowledge of PVs and LA variants are helpful for providing anatomical road map to determine ablation strategy. (orig.)

  1. Intra-cardiac and peripheral levels of biochemical markers of fibrosis in patients undergoing catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Begg, Gordon A; Karim, Rashed; Oesterlein, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    ) have all been suggested as possible biomarkers for this indication, but studies assessing whether peripheral levels reflect intra-cardiac levels are scarce. Methods and results: We studied 93 patients undergoing ablation for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) (n = 63) or non-paroxysmal AF (n = 30...

  2. Prognosis of high sinus heart rate after catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hee Tae; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Uhm, Jae-Sun; Kim, Jong-Youn; Joung, Boyoung; Lee, Moon-Hyoung; Pak, Hui-Nam

    2017-07-01

    Although atrial fibrillation (AF) catheter ablation increases sinus heart rate (HR), its mechanism and prognosis have not yet been clearly elucidated. We hypothesize that post-AF ablation high sinus HR (PA-HSR) is associated with a better clinical outcome of AF ablation without adverse cardiac effects. We studied 991 AF patients (75% male, 58 ± 11 years old, 70% paroxysmal AF) with HR variability (HRV) at 3 months and 1 year after catheter ablation, and pre- and post-1-year echocardiograms. Post-AF ablation high sinus HR was defined as an average HR greater than 2 SD (≥92 bpm) as measured by 24 h Holter. (1) Average HR increased significantly (Phigh sinus HR was independently associated with pre-procedural high average HR (OR 1.097; 95% CI 1.029-1.169, P= 0.005), high left atrium (LA) electrogram voltage (OR 3.545; 95% CI 1.183-10.618, P= 0.024), and reduced root mean square of differences between successive NN intervals (rMSSD) at 3 months HRV (OR 0.959; 95% CI 0.919-0.999, P= 0.047). (3) At 1 year echocardiography, size reduction of LA (P= 0.055) or LV (P= 0.372) and the improvement in ejection fraction (P= 0.529) were not significantly different between patients with PA-HSR and those without. (4) Throughout 27 ± 17 months of follow-up, patients with PA-HSR showed significantly lower clinical recurrence than those without (log rank, P= 0.020). Post-AF ablation high sinus HR was observed in patients with smaller LA size and higher LA electrogram voltage and significant vagal modulation without adverse cardiac effects. Post-AF ablation high sinus HR was associated with a significantly lower clinical recurrence of AF after catheter ablation.

  3. Modified phased radiofrequency ablation of atrial fibrillation reduces the number of cerebral microembolic signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellerhoff, Stephan; Ritter, Martin A; Kochhäuser, Simon; Dittrich, Ralf; Köbe, Julia; Milberg, Peter; Korsukewitz, Catharina; Dechering, Dirk G; Pott, Christian; Wasmer, Kristina; Leitz, Patrick; Güner, Fatih; Eckardt, Lars; Mönnig, Gerold

    2014-03-01

    Phased radiofrequency (RF) ablation for atrial fibrillation is associated with an increased number of silent cerebral lesions on magnetic resonance imaging and cerebral microembolic signals (MESs) on transcranial Doppler ultrasound imaging compared with irrigated RF. The increased rate of embolic events may be due to a specific electrical interference of ablation electrodes attributed to the catheter design. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the effect of deactivating the culprit electrodes on cerebral MESs. Twenty-nine consecutive patients (60 ± 11 years, 10 female) underwent their first pulmonary vein isolation using phased RF energy. Electrode pairs 1 or 5 were deactivated to avoid electrical interference between electrodes 1 and 10 ('modified'). Detection of MESs by transcranial Doppler ultrasound was performed throughout the procedure to assess cerebral microembolism. Results were compared with the numbers of MESs in 31 patients ablated using all available electrodes ('conventional') and to 30 patients undergoing irrigated RF ablation of a previous randomized study. Ablation with 'modified' phased RF was associated with a marked decrease in MESs when compared with 'conventional' phased RF (566 ± 332 vs. 1530 ± 980; P ablation (646 ± 449; P = 0.7). Total procedure duration as well as time of RF delivery was comparable between phased RF groups. Both times, however, were significantly shorter compared with the irrigated RF group (123 ± 28 vs. 195 ± 38; 15 ± 4 vs. 30 ± 9; P ablation impulses, supporting the significance of electrical interference between ablation electrodes 1 and 10. Deactivation of electrode pairs 1 or 5 might increase the safety of this approach without an increase in procedure duration or RF delivery time.

  4. Atrial fibrillation ablation in Brazil: results of the registry of the Brazilian Society of Cardiac Arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenelon, Guilherme; Scanavacca, Maurício; Atié, Jacob; Zimerman, Leandro; Magalhães, Luiz Pereira de; Lorga Filho, Adalberto; Maia, Henrique; Martinelli Filho, Martino

    2007-11-01

    Aiming to define the profile of curative atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation in Brazil, the Brazilian Cardiac Arrhythmia Society [Sociedade Brasileira de Arritmias Cardíacas] (SOBRAC) created the Brazilian Registry of AF Ablation [Registro Brasileiro de Ablação da FA]. To describe the results of this registry. A questionnaire was sent to SOBRAC members asking about data on patients submitted to AF ablation between September 2005 and November, 2006. A total of 29 groups from 13 states completed the forms. Of these, 22 (76%) had performed AF ablations. Between 1998 and 2001, 7 groups (32%) initiated AF ablations and between 2002 and 2006, 15 groups began to perform them (68%). From 1998 to 2006, 2,374 patients were submitted to ablation, 755 (32%) of them during the registry period. Most (70%) were males and 89% presented with paroxysmal or persistent AF. Ancillary imaging methods (intracardiac echocardiography and electroanatomic mapping) were used by 9 groups (41%). During an average five-month follow-up period, total success was 82% and success without use of antiarrhythmic agents was 57%. Nevertheless, 35% of the patients required two or more procedures. There were 111 complications (14.7%) and 2 deaths (0.26%). Curative AF ablation has been increasing significantly in our country, with success rates comparable to international indexes, but often more than one procedure is necessary. Despite promising results, AF ablation still results in significant morbidity. Supplementary imaging methods have been used more and more in an effort to increase efficacy and safety of the procedure. These findings should be considered by public and private funding agencies.

  5. Ablation as targeted perturbation to rewire communication network of persistent atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Susumu; Way, Samuel F; Garland, Joshua; Chrispin, Jonathan; Ciuffo, Luisa A; Balouch, Muhammad A; Nazarian, Saman; Spragg, David D; Marine, Joseph E; Berger, Ronald D; Calkins, Hugh; Ashikaga, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) can be viewed as disintegrated patterns of information transmission by action potential across the communication network consisting of nodes linked by functional connectivity. To test the hypothesis that ablation of persistent AF is associated with improvement in both local and global connectivity within the communication networks, we analyzed multi-electrode basket catheter electrograms of 22 consecutive patients (63.5 ± 9.7 years, 78% male) during persistent AF before and after the focal impulse and rotor modulation-guided ablation. Eight patients (36%) developed recurrence within 6 months after ablation. We defined communication networks of AF by nodes (cardiac tissue adjacent to each electrode) and edges (mutual information between pairs of nodes). To evaluate patient-specific parameters of communication, thresholds of mutual information were applied to preserve 10% to 30% of the strongest edges. There was no significant difference in network parameters between both atria at baseline. Ablation effectively rewired the communication network of persistent AF to improve the overall connectivity. In addition, successful ablation improved local connectivity by increasing the average clustering coefficient, and also improved global connectivity by decreasing the characteristic path length. As a result, successful ablation improved the efficiency and robustness of the communication network by increasing the small-world index. These changes were not observed in patients with AF recurrence. Furthermore, a significant increase in the small-world index after ablation was associated with synchronization of the rhythm by acute AF termination. In conclusion, successful ablation rewires communication networks during persistent AF, making it more robust, efficient, and easier to synchronize. Quantitative analysis of communication networks provides not only a mechanistic insight that AF may be sustained by spatially localized sources and

  6. The Mid-Term Results of Patients who Underwent Radiofrequency Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Together with Mitral Valve Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdurrahim Çolak

    Full Text Available Abstract Objetive: Saline-irrigated radiofrequency ablation, which has been widely used for surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation in recent years, is 80-90% successful in achieving sinus rhythm. In our study, our surgical experience and mid-term results in patients who underwent mitral valve surgery and left atrial radiofrequency ablation were analyzed. Methods: Forty patients (15 males, 25 females; mean age 52.05±9.9 years; range 32-74 underwent surgery for atrial fibrillation associated with mitral valvular disease. All patients manifested atrial fibrillation, which started at least six months before the surgical intervention. The majority of patients (36 patients, 90% were in NYHA class III; 34 (85% patients had rheumatic heart disease. In addition to mitral valve surgery and radiofrequency ablation, coronary artery bypass, DeVega tricuspid annuloplasty, left ventricular aneurysm repair, and left atrial thrombus excision were performed. Following discharge from the hospital, patients' follow-up was performed as outpatient clinic examinations and the average follow-up period of patients was 18±3 months. Results: While the incidence of sinus rhythm was 85.3% on the first postoperative day, it was 80% during discharge and 71% in the 1st year follow-up examination. Conclusion: Radiofrequency ablation is an effective method when it is performed by appropriate surgical technique. Its rate for returning to sinus rhythm is as high as the rate of conventional surgical procedure.

  7. Temperature-Controlled Radiofrequency Ablation for Pulmonary Vein Isolation in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasawa, Jin; Koruth, Jacob S; Petru, Jan; Dujka, Libor; Kralovec, Stepan; Mzourkova, Katerina; Dukkipati, Srinivas R; Neuzil, Petr; Reddy, Vivek Y

    2017-08-01

    Saline irrigation improved the safety of radiofrequency (RF) ablation, but the thermal feedback for energy titration is absent. To allow temperature-controlled irrigated ablation, a novel irrigated RF catheter was designed with a diamond-embedded tip (for rapid cooling) and 6 surface thermocouples to reflect tissue temperature. High-resolution electrograms (EGMs) from the split-tip electrode allowed rapid lesion assessment. The authors evaluated the preclinical and clinical performance of this catheter for pulmonary vein (PV) isolation. Using the DiamondTemp (DT) catheter, pigs (n = 6) underwent discrete atrial ablation in a temperature control mode (60°C/50 W) until there was ∼80% EGM amplitude reduction. In a single-center clinical feasibility study, 35 patients underwent PV isolation with the DT catheter (study group); patients were planned for PV remapping after 3 months, regardless of symptomatology. A control group included 35 patients who underwent PV isolation with a standard force-sensing catheter. Porcine lesion histology revealed transmurality in 51 of 55 lesions (92.7%). In patients, all PVs were successfully isolated; no char or thrombus formation was observed. Compared with the control group, the study cohort had shorter mean RF application duration (26.3 ± 5.2 min vs. 89.2 ± 27.2 min; p PV reconduction (0 of 35 vs. 5 of 35; p = 0.024). At 3 months, 23 patients underwent remapping: 39 of 46 PV pairs (84.8%) remained durably isolated in 17 of these patients (73.9%). This first-in-human series demonstrated that temperature-controlled irrigated ablation produced rapid, efficient, and durable PV isolation. (ACT DiamondTemp Temperature-Controlled and Contact Sensing RF Ablation Clinical Trial for Atrial Fibrillation [TRAC-AF]; NCT02821351). Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The impact of body mass index on the efficacy and safety of catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letsas, Konstantinos P; Siklódy, Claudia Herrera; Korantzopoulos, Panagiotis; Weber, Reinhold; Bürkle, Gerd; Mihas, Constantinos C; Kalusche, Dietrich; Arentz, Thomas

    2013-03-20

    Obesity is a well established risk factor for atrial fibrillation (AF) development. Our purpose was to determine the impact of body mass index (BMI) on the safety and efficacy of radiofrequency catheter ablation of AF. Two hundred and twenty-six consecutive patients with symptomatic, drug-refractory paroxysmal (59.3%) and persistent (40.7%) AF underwent wide circumferential electrical pulmonary vein isolation. Patients were classified according to BMI as normal (ablation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Virtual ablation for atrial fibrillation in personalized in-silico three-dimensional left atrial modeling: comparison with clinical catheter ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Minki; Kwon, Soon-Sung; Wi, Jin; Park, Mijin; Lee, Hyun-Seung; Park, Jin-Seo; Lee, Young-Seon; Shim, Eun Bo; Pak, Hui-Nam

    2014-09-01

    Although catheter ablation is an effective rhythm control strategy for atrial fibrillation (AF), empirically-based ablation has a substantial recurrence rate. The purposes of this study were to develop a computational platform for patient-specific virtual AF ablation and to compare the anti-fibrillatory effects of 5 different virtual ablation protocols with empirically chosen clinical ablations. We included 20 patients with AF (65% male, 60.1 ± 10.5 years old, 80% persistent AF [PeAF]) who had undergone empirically-based catheter ablation: circumferential pulmonary vein isolation (CPVI) for paroxysmal AF (PAF) and additional posterior box lesion (L1) and anterior line (L2) for PeAF. Using patient-specific three-dimensional left atrial (LA) geometry, we generated a finite element model and tested the AF termination rate after 5 different virtual ablations: CPVI alone, CPVI + L1, CPVI + L1,2, CPVI with complex fractionated atrial electrogram (CFAE) ablation, and CFAE ablation alone. 1. Virtual CPVI + L1,2 ablation showed the highest AF termination rate in overall patients (55%) and PeAF patients (n = 16, 62.5%). 2. The virtual AF maintenance duration was shortest in the case of virtual CPVI + L1,2 ablation in overall patients (2.19 ± 1.28 vs. 2.91 ± 1.04 s, p = 0.009) and in patients with PeAF (2.05 ± 1.23 vs. 2.93 ± 10.2 s, p = 0.004) compared with other protocols. Virtual AF ablation using personalized in-silico model of LA is feasible. Virtual ablation with CPVI + L1,2 shows the highest antifibrillatory effect, concordant with the empirical ablation protocol in patients with PeAF. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Factors impacting complication rates for catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation from 2003 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Eunice; Ipek, Esra Gucuk; Balouch, Muhammad; Mints, Yuliya; Chrispin, Jonathan; Marine, Joseph E; Berger, Ronald D; Ashikaga, Hiroshi; Rickard, Jack; Calkins, Hugh; Nazarian, Saman; Spragg, David D

    2017-02-01

    Complications from catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF) are well described. Changing aspects of AF ablation including patient populations referred, institutional experience, and emerging catheter and pharmacological options may impact complication rates. We assessed procedural complication trends in AF ablation patients from 2003–2015 to identify what factors affect adverse event rates. We evaluated consecutively enrolled patients undergoing initial AF ablation from 2003 through 2015. Statistical analyses were performed to identify predictors of increased risk for major complications, which were defined as death, stroke, atrio-oesophageal fistula, phrenic nerve injury, cardiovascular events requiring blood transfusions or procedural interventions, or non-cardiovascular events requiring intervention. A total of 1475 patients (mean age 59.5 ± 10.5, 82% male) were evaluated. Major complications occurred in 3.9% (n = 58) of cases, including vascular access-site haematoma (1.3%), cardiac tamponade (1.1%), and cerebrovascular accident (CVA) (0.9%). Univariate analysis revealed increased risk of complications associated with hypertension (P = 0.048), CHA2DS2VASc score ≥1 (P = 0.015), and early institutional experience (P = 0.003). Populations with higher CHA2DS2VASc scores underwent AF ablation more frequently over time (P catheters and anticoagulants did not appreciably affect complication rates. Multivariate analysis adjusting for hypertension, CHA2DS2VASc score, and institutional experience showed that higher CHA2DS2VASc score and early institutional experience were independent predictors of adverse events. Patient characteristics reflected in CHA2DS2VASc scoring and early institutional experience predict increased complication rates following AF ablation. Despite more patients with higher CHA2DS2VASc scores undergoing AF ablation, complication rates fell over time as institutional experience increased.

  11. Impact of esophageal temperature monitoring guided atrial fibrillation ablation on preventing asymptomatic excessive transmural injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiuchi, Kunihiko; Okajima, Katsunori; Shimane, Akira; Kanda, Gaku; Yokoi, Kiminobu; Teranishi, Jin; Aoki, Kousuke; Chimura, Misato; Toba, Takayoshi; Oishi, Shogo; Sawada, Takahiro; Tsukishiro, Yasue; Onishi, Tetsuari; Kobayashi, Seiichi; Taniguchi, Yasuyo; Yamada, Shinichiro; Yasaka, Yoshinori; Kawai, Hiroya; Yoshida, Akihiro; Fukuzawa, Koji; Itoh, Mitsuaki; Imamura, Kimitake; Fujiwara, Ryudo; Suzuki, Atsushi; Nakanishi, Tomoyuki; Yamashita, Soichiro; Hirata, Ken-ichi; Tada, Hiroshi; Yamasaki, Hiro; Naruse, Yoshihisa; Igarashi, Miyako; Aonuma, Kazutaka

    2015-01-01

    Background Even with the use of a reduced energy setting (20–25 W), excessive transmural injury (ETI) following catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) is reported to develop in 10% of patients. However, the incidence of ETI depends on the pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) method and its esophageal temperature monitor setting. Data comparing the incidence of ETI following AF ablation with and without esophageal temperature monitoring (ETM) are still lacking. Methods This study was comprised of 160 patients with AF (54% paroxysmal, mean: 24.0±2.9 kg/m2). Eighty patients underwent ablation accompanied by ETM. The primary endpoint was defined as the occurrence of ETI assessed by endoscopy within 5 d after the AF ablation. The secondary endpoint was defined as AF recurrence after a single procedure. If the esophageal temperature probe registered >39 °C, the radiofrequency (RF) application was stopped immediately. RF applications could be performed in a point-by-point manner for a maximum of 20 s and 20 W. ETI was defined as any injury that resulted from AF ablation, including esophageal injury or periesophageal nerve injury (peri-ENI). Results The incidence of esophageal injury was significantly lower in patients whose AF ablation included ETM compared with patients without ETM (0 [0%] vs. 6 [7.5%], p=0.028), but not the incidence of peri-ENI (2 [2.5%] vs. 3 [3.8%], p=1.0). AF recurrence 12 months after the procedure was similar between the groups (20 [25%] in the ETM group vs. 19 [24%] in the non-ETM group, p=1.00). Conclusions Catheter ablation using ETM may reduce the incidence of esophageal injury without increasing the incidence of AF recurrence but not the incidence of peri-ENI. PMID:26949429

  12. Pulmonary vein reconnection predicts good clinical outcome after second catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Hoon; Park, Junbeom; Uhm, Jae-Sun; Joung, Boyoung; Lee, Moon-Hyoung; Pak, Hui-Nam

    2017-06-01

    Although electrically reconnected pulmonary veins (PV) are the main mechanism of atrial fibrillation (AF) recurrence, PV isolation (PVI) is well-preserved in certain patients who undergo a repeat procedure. We explored the association between PV reconnection and clinical outcomes after a second ablation. This observational cohort study included 143 patients (79.0% male, 56.1 ± 10.0 years old, 65.0% paroxysmal AF) who underwent a second procedure. Pulmonary vein isolation was well-maintained in 52 patients (PVP- group, 36.4%), although the remaining 91 patients showed PV reconnection (PVP+ group). After confirming PVI, we mapped non-PV triggers and conducted trigger ablation or additional linear ablation at redo-procedures. The proportion of females was higher (P = 0.030), and redo-ablation timing after the de novo procedure was later (P = 0.039) in the PVP- group than in the PVP+ group. Additional linear ablations were more likely to be performed in the PVP- group (90.4 vs. 61.5%, P PVP+ group showed a lower clinical recurrence rate than the PVP- group (log-rank P = 0.011). The number of reconnected PVs was independently associated with a lower recurrence of AF after the redo-ablation in the total study population (HR 0.56, 95% CI 0.34-0.95, P = 0.032), particularly for patients with paroxysmal AF (HR 0.41, 95% CI 0.19-0.87, P = 0.021). Among patients who underwent redo-AF ablation, those with more PV reconnections showed better clinical outcomes than those with fewer PV reconnections. The mechanism of AF recurrence might be different in patients with lower numbers of PV reconnections during redo-procedures.

  13. Early Heparin Administration Reduces Risk for Left Atrial Thrombus Formation during Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Asbach

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Despite the use of anticoagulation during left atrial (LA ablation procedures, ischemic cerebrovascular accidents (CVAs are recognized as a serious complication. Heparin is usually given after safe transseptal access has been obtained, resulting in a short unprotected dwell time of catheters within the LA, which may account for CVAs. We investigated the frequency of CVAs and LA thrombus formation as detected by intracardiac ultrasound (ICE depending on the timing of heparin administration. Methods and Results. Sixty LA ablation procedures with the use of ICE were performed in 55 patients. Patients were grouped by heparin administration after (Group I, =13 and before (Group II, =47 transseptal access. Group I patients were younger (56.6±13.7 versus 65.9±9.9 years, =.01; other clinical and echocardiographic characteristics did not differ between groups. Early thrombus formation was observed in 2 (15.4% of group I patients as compared to 0% of group II patients (=.04. One CVA (2.1% occurred in one group II patient without prior thrombus detection, and none occurred in group I patients (=ns. Conclusion. Early administration of heparin reduces the risk of early intracardiac thrombus formation during LA ablation procedures. This did not result in reduced rate of CVAs.

  14. Efficacy and safety of novel epicardial circumferential left atrial ablation with pulmonary vein isolation in sustained atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhaolei; Yin, Hang; He, Yi; Ma, Nan; Tang, Min; Liu, Hao; Ding, Fangbao; Mei, Ju

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the efficacy and safety of this novel epicardial circumferential left atrial ablation (CLAA) with pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) in sustained atrial fibrillation (AF). Thirty domestic pigs were divided equally into 3 groups: AF without ablation (AF group), AF with PVI (PVI group), and AF with CLAA and PVI (CLAA + PVI group). AF was induced by rapid atrial pacing. After AF was induced, CLAA and PVI were performed for pigs in CLAA + PVI group, and PVI was performed for pigs in PVI group. AF vulnerability, AF duration, and histology were performed in all groups. All pigs developed sustained AF after 6.27 ± 0.69 weeks of rapid atrial pacing. All pigs successfully underwent isolated PVI or CLAA with PVI on the beating heart in PVI group or CLAA + PVI group. Isolated PVI terminated AF in 3 of 20 pigs (15 %), and CLAA with PVI terminated AF in 5 of 8 pigs (62.5 %, P = 0.022). Compared with AF group (10/10), the incidence of sustained AF by burst pacing was significantly decreased in PVI group (3/10, P = 0.003) or CLAA + PVI group (0/10, P CLAA + PVI group (P = 0.211). AF duration was significantly decreased in CLAA + PVI group (734.70 ± 177.81 s, 95 % CI 607.51-861.89) compared with PVI group (1217.90 ± 444.10 s, 95 % CI 900.21-1535.59, P = 0.008). Also, AF duration was significantly decreased in PVI group (P = 0.003) or CLAA + PVI group (P CLAA could ablate the left atrial roof and posterior wall together safely and reliably. Compared with PVI alone, CLAA with PVI may be able to improve the rate of acute termination of persistent AF. It may be useful in selecting the best ablation approaches for patients with persistent AF.

  15. Updated worldwide survey on the methods, efficacy, and safety of catheter ablation for human atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappato, Riccardo; Calkins, Hugh; Chen, Shih-Ann; Davies, Wyn; Iesaka, Yoshito; Kalman, Jonathan; Kim, You-Ho; Klein, George; Natale, Andrea; Packer, Douglas; Skanes, Allan; Ambrogi, Federico; Biganzoli, Elia

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide an updated worldwide report on the methods, efficacy, and safety of catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF). A questionnaire with 46 questions was sent to 521 centers from 24 countries in 4 continents. Complete interviews were collected from 182 centers, of which 85 reported to have performed 20,825 catheter ablation procedures on 16,309 patients with AF between 2003 and 2006. The median number of procedures per center was 245 (range, 2 to 2715). All centers included paroxysmal AF, 85.9% also included persistent and 47.1% also included long-lasting AF. Carto-guided left atrial circumferential ablation (48.2% of patients) and Lasso-guided ostial electric disconnection (27.4%) were the most commonly used techniques. Efficacy data were analyzed with centers representing the unit of analysis. Of 16,309 patients with full disclosure of outcome data, 10 488 (median, 70.0%; interquartile range, 57.7% to 75.4%) became asymptomatic without antiarrhythmic drugs and another 2047 (10.0%; 0.5% to 17.1%) became asymptomatic in the presence of previously ineffective antiarrhythmic drugs over 18 (range, 3 to 24) months of follow-up. Success rates free of antiarrhythmic drugs and overall success rates were significantly larger in 9590 patients with paroxysmal AF (74.9% and 83.2%) than in 2800 patients with persistent AF (64.8% and 75.0%) and 1108 patients with long-lasting AF (63.1% and 72.3%) (P<0.0001). Major complications were reported in 741 patients (4.5%). When analyzed in a large number of electrophysiology laboratories worldwide, catheter ablation of AF shows to be effective in approximately 80% of patients after 1.3 procedures per patient, with approximately 70% of them not requiring further antiarrhythmic drugs during intermediate follow-up.

  16. Stroke risk associated with balloon based catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation: Rationale and design of the MACPAF Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeusler, Karl Georg; Koch, Lydia; Ueberreiter, Juliane; Endres, Matthias; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Heuschmann, Peter U; Schirdewan, Alexander; Fiebach, Jochen B

    2010-07-21

    Catheter ablation of the pulmonary veins has become accepted as a standard therapeutic approach for symptomatic paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF). However, there is some evidence for an ablation associated (silent) stroke risk, lowering the hope to limit the stroke risk by restoration of rhythm over rate control in AF. The purpose of the prospective randomized single-center study "Mesh Ablator versus Cryoballoon Pulmonary Vein Ablation of Symptomatic Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation" (MACPAF) is to compare the efficacy and safety of two balloon based pulmonary vein ablation systems in patients with symptomatic paroxysmal AF. Patients are randomized 1:1 for the Arctic Front(R) or the HD Mesh Ablator(R) catheter for left atrial catheter ablation (LACA). The predefined endpoints will be assessed by brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), neuro(psycho)logical tests and a subcutaneously implanted reveal recorder for AF detection. According to statistics 108 patients will be enrolled. Findings from the MACPAF trial will help to balance the benefits and risks of LACA for symptomatic paroxysmal AF. Using serial brain MRIs might help to identify patients at risk for LACA-associated cerebral thromboembolism. Potential limitations of the study are the single-center design, the existence of a variety of LACA-catheters, the missing placebo-group and the impossibility to assess the primary endpoint in a blinded fashion. clinicaltrials.gov NCT01061931.

  17. Stroke risk associated with balloon based catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation: Rationale and design of the MACPAF Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schultheiss Heinz-Peter

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Catheter ablation of the pulmonary veins has become accepted as a standard therapeutic approach for symptomatic paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF. However, there is some evidence for an ablation associated (silent stroke risk, lowering the hope to limit the stroke risk by restoration of rhythm over rate control in AF. The purpose of the prospective randomized single-center study "Mesh Ablator versus Cryoballoon Pulmonary Vein Ablation of Symptomatic Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation" (MACPAF is to compare the efficacy and safety of two balloon based pulmonary vein ablation systems in patients with symptomatic paroxysmal AF. Methods/Design Patients are randomized 1:1 for the Arctic Front® or the HD Mesh Ablator® catheter for left atrial catheter ablation (LACA. The predefined endpoints will be assessed by brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, neuro(psychological tests and a subcutaneously implanted reveal recorder for AF detection. According to statistics 108 patients will be enrolled. Discussion Findings from the MACPAF trial will help to balance the benefits and risks of LACA for symptomatic paroxysmal AF. Using serial brain MRIs might help to identify patients at risk for LACA-associated cerebral thromboembolism. Potential limitations of the study are the single-center design, the existence of a variety of LACA-catheters, the missing placebo-group and the impossibility to assess the primary endpoint in a blinded fashion. Trial registration clinicaltrials.gov NCT01061931

  18. Postcardiac injury syndrome following vascular interventional radiofrequency ablation for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shungo Yukumi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Postcardiac injury syndrome (PCIS occurs following a pericardial or myocardial injury. On the other hand, PCIS following cardiac catheter intervention is rare and can be difficult to diagnose because of its delayed onset. A 24-year-old man underwent radiofrequency ablation (RFA for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and suffered from general fatigue and left-sided pleural effusion three months after the procedure. His symptoms and effusion were effectively treated within a month by administrating nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. However, seven months later, he developed left-sided chest pain and low-grade fever. Computed tomography showed a thickening of the parietal pleura and reccurence of the pleural effusion. Pleural biopsy by video-assisted thoracoscopy demonstrated chronic pleuritis with a non-necrotizing granulomatous reaction. Given the previous RFA, and in the absence of infection or malignant disease, he was diagnosed with PCIS and treated with colchicine.

  19. The cost-effectiveness of radiofrequency catheter ablation as first-line treatment for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aronsson, Mattias; Walfridsson, Håkan; Janzon, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this prospective substudy was to estimate the cost-effectiveness of treating paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) with radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA) compared with antiarrhythmic drugs (AADs) as first-line treatment. METHODS AND RESULTS: A decision-analytic Markov model......, based on MANTRA-PAF (Medical Antiarrhythmic Treatment or Radiofrequency Ablation in Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation) study data, was developed to study long-term effects and costs of RFA compared with AADs as first-line treatment. Positive clinical effects were found in the overall population, a gain......-effectiveness ratio of €3434/QALY in ≤50-year-old patients respectively €108 937/QALY in >50-year-old patients. CONCLUSION: Radiofrequency catheter ablation as first-line treatment is a cost-effective strategy for younger patients with paroxysmal AF. However, the cost-effectiveness of using RFA as first-line therapy...

  20. Left atrial strain assessed by three-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography predicts atrial fibrillation recurrence after catheter ablation in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Atsushi; Yuda, Satoshi; Fujito, Takefumi; Kawamukai, Mina; Muranaka, Atsuko; Nagahara, Daigo; Shimoshige, Shinya; Hashimoto, Akiyoshi; Miura, Tetsuji

    2017-06-01

    Several studies have shown the utility of left atrial (LA) function determined by two-dimensional or three-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography (2D- or 3D-STE) for identifying patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF). However, whether 3D-STE is applicable for prediction of the recurrence of AF after catheter ablation (CA) remains unknown. We examined whether any 3D-STE parameters are better than 2D-STE parameters for the prediction of AF recurrence. Forty-two patients with paroxysmal AF (58 ± 10 years old, 69% male) underwent 2D- and 3D-STE within 3 days before first-time CA. The global peak LA longitudinal, circumferential, and area strains during systole (3D-GLSs, -GCSs, and -GASs, respectively) and those just before atrial contraction (3D-GLSa, -GCSa, and -GASa, respectively) were determined by 3D-STE and standard deviations of times to peaks of regional LA strains were calculated as indices of LA dyssynchrony. In 2D-STE, global LA longitudinal strains during systole and just before atrial contraction (2D-GLSs and -GLSa) were determined. During follow-up of 441 ± 221 days, 12 patients (29%) had AF recurrence. In the univariate Cox proportional hazard analysis, age [hazard ratio (HR): 1.08, p = 0.04], 3D-GCSs (HR: 0.91, p = 0.03), and 3D-GASs (HR: 0.95, p = 0.01) were predictors of AF recurrence, though associations of recurrence with 2D-STE parameters, indices of LA synchrony, and LA volume were not significant. Multivariable analysis showed that 3D-GASs was an independent predictor of AF recurrence (HR: 0.96, p = 0.048). LA strain determined by 3D-STE is a novel and better predictor of AF recurrence after CA than that determined by 2D-STE or other known predictors.

  1. Minimally invasive atrial fibrillation ablation combined with a new technique for thoracoscopic stapling of the left atrial appendage: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkhy, Husam H; Chapman, Peter D; Arnsdorf, Susan E

    2004-01-01

    Surgical therapy for atrial fibrillation (AF) is becoming increasingly popular in the concomitant setting. Minimally invasive techniques are being developed for management of the patient with stand-alone AF. We report on our first case of a patient undergoing thoracoscopic microwave epicardial AF ablation combined with the incorporation of a new device for left atrial appendage (LAA) exclusion. The patient is a 62-year-old man with a 10-year history of drug-resistant paroxysmal AF. He had failed multiple electrical cardioversions, as well as a percutaneous attempt at left and right superior pulmonary vein (PV) isolation. On October 8, 2003, he was admitted to undergo an off-pump thoracoscopic epicardial microwave ablation. While the patient was under general anesthesia, 3 thoracoscopic access ports were created in the right chest. The pericardium was widely opened. Red rubber catheters were positioned in the transverse and oblique sinuses. The 2 catheters were retrieved on the left side and tied together, forming a guide to the Flex 10 microwave ablation probe (Guidant Corporation, Fremont, CA, USA). The Flex 10 sheath was positioned to encircle all 4 pulmonary veins. The position of the ablation catheter was confirmed visually to be behind the LAA. Sequential ablation was then performed in the segments of the Flex 10 to create a continuous ablation line around the PVs. A connecting lesion to the base of the LAA was then performed. The LAA was then stapled using the SurgASSIST computer-mediated thoracoscopic stapling system (Power Medical Intervention, New Hope, PA, USA). The procedure was uneventful and lasted for a total of 2.5 hours. The patient was discharged home on postoperative day 2 in rate-controlled AF. He was successfully electrically cardioverted to normal sinus rhythm (NSR). At latest follow-up he remained in NSR and continued to take dofetilide (Tikosyn). Thoracoscopic epicardial microwave ablation of AF is a technically feasible procedure with

  2. Substrate and Trigger Ablation for Reduction of Atrial Fibrillation (STAR AF): a randomized, multicentre, international trial†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Atul; Mantovan, Roberto; Macle, Laurent; De Martino, Guiseppe; Chen, Jian; Morillo, Carlos A.; Novak, Paul; Calzolari, Vittorio; Guerra, Peter G.; Nair, Girish; Torrecilla, Esteban G.; Khaykin, Yaariv

    2010-01-01

    Aims This multicentre, randomized trial compared three strategies of AF ablation: ablation of complex fractionated electrograms (CFE) alone, pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) alone, and combined PVI + CFE ablation, using standardized automated mapping software. Methods and results Patients with drug-refractory, high-burden paroxysmal (episodes >6 h, >4 in 6 months) or persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) were enrolled at eight centres. Patients (n = 100) were randomized to one of three arms. For CFE alone (n = 34), spontaneous/induced AF was mapped using validated, automated CFE software and all sites 30 s at 1 year. Patients (age 57 ± 10 years, LA size 42 ± 6 mm) were 35% persistent AF. In CFE, ablation terminated AF in 68%. Only 0.4 PVs per patient were isolated as a result of CFE. In PVI, 94% had all four PVs successfully isolated. In PVI + CFE, 94% had all four PVs isolated, 76% had inducible AF with additional CFE ablation, with 73% termination of AF. There were significantly more repeat procedures in the CFE arm (47%) vs. PVI (31%) or PVI + CFE (15%) (P = 0.01). After one procedure, PVI + CFE had a significantly higher freedom from AF (74%) compared with PVI (48%) and CFE (29%) (P = 0.004). After two procedures, PVI + CFE still had the highest success (88%) compared with PVI (68%) and CFE (38%) (P = 0.001). Ninety-six percent of these patients were off anti-arrhythmics. Complications were two tamponades, no PV stenosis, and no mortality. Conclusion In high-burden paroxysmal/persistent AF, PVI + CFE has the highest freedom from AF vs. PVI or CFE alone after one or two procedures. Complex fractionated electrogram alone has the lowest one and two procedure success rates with a higher incidence of repeat procedures. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier number NCT00367757. PMID:20215126

  3. Catheter ablation versus standard conventional treatment in patients with left ventricular dysfunction and atrial fibrillation (CASTLE-AF) - study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrouche, Nassir F; Brachmann, Johannes

    2009-08-01

    Electrical isolation of the pulmonary veins by catheter ablation is an emerging treatment modality for the treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) and is increasingly used in patients with heart failure. The catheter ablation versus standard conventional treatment in patients with left ventricular dysfunction and atrial fibrillation trial (CASTLE-AF) is a randomized evaluation of ablative treatment of atrial fibrillation in patients with left ventricular dysfunction. The primary endpoint is the composite of all-cause mortality or worsening of heart failure requiring unplanned hospitalization using a time to first event analysis. Secondary endpoints are all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, cerebrovascular accidents, worsening of heart failure requiring unplanned hospitalization, unplanned hospitalization due to cardiovascular reason, all-cause hospitalization, quality of life, number of therapies (shock and antitachycardia pacing) delivered by the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD), time to first ICD therapy, number of device-detected ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation episodes, AF burden, AF free interval, left ventricular function, exercise tolerance, and percentage of right ventricular pacing. CASTLE-AF will randomize 420 patients for a minimum of 3 years at 48 sites in the United States, Europe, Australia, and South America.

  4. Left atrial reverse remodeling and prevention of progression of atrial fibrillation with atrial resynchronization device therapy utilizing dual-site right atrial pacing in patients with atrial fibrillation refractory to antiarrhythmic drugs or catheter ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarakanti, Rangadham; Slee, April; Saksena, Sanjeev

    2014-09-01

    Dual-site right atrial pacing (DAP) produces electrical atrial resynchronization but its long-term effect on the atrial mechanical function in patients with refractory atrial fibrillation (AF) has not been studied. Drug-refractory paroxysmal (PAF) and persistent AF (PRAF) patients previously implanted with a dual-site right atrial pacemaker (DAP) with minimal ventricular pacing modes (AAIR or DDDR mode with long AV delay) were studied. Echocardiographic structural (left atrial diameter [LAD] and left ventricular [LV] end diastolic diameter [EDD], end systolic diameter [ESD]) and functional (ejection fraction [EF]) parameters were serially assessed prior to, after medium-term (n = 39) and long-term (n = 34) exposure to DAP. During medium-term follow-up (n = 4.5 months), there was improvement in left atrial function. Mean peak A wave flow velocity increased with DAP as compared to baseline (75 ± 19 vs. 63 ± 23 cm/s, p = 0.003). The long-term impact of DAP was studied with baseline findings being compared with last follow-up data with a mean interval of 37 ± 25 (range 7-145) months. Mean LAD declined from 45 ± 5 mm at baseline to 42 ± 7 mm (p = 0.003). Mean LVEF was unchanged from 52 ± 9 % at baseline and 54 ± 6 % at last follow-up (p = 0.3). There was no significant change in LV dimensions with mean LVEDD being 51 ± 6 mm at baseline and 53 ± 5 mm at last follow-up (p = 0.3). Mean LVESD also remained unchanged from 35 ± 6 mm at baseline to 33 ± 6 mm at last follow-up (p = 0.47). During long-term follow-up, 30 patients (89 %) remained in sinus or atrial paced rhythm as assessed by device diagnostics at 3 years. DAP can achieve long-term atrial reverse remodeling and preserve LV systolic function. DAP when added to antiarrhythmic drug (AAD) and/or catheter ablation (ABL) maintains long-term rhythm control and prevents AF progression in elderly refractory AF patients

  5. Randomized, Controlled Trial of the Safety and Effectiveness of a Contact Force-Sensing Irrigated Catheter for Ablation of Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation: Results of the TactiCath Contact Force Ablation Catheter Study for Atrial Fibrillation (TOCCASTAR) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Vivek Y; Dukkipati, Srinivas R; Neuzil, Petr; Natale, Andrea; Albenque, Jean-Paul; Kautzner, Josef; Shah, Dipen; Michaud, Gregory; Wharton, Marcus; Harari, David; Mahapatra, Srijoy; Lambert, Hendrik; Mansour, Moussa

    2015-09-08

    Contact force (CF) is a major determinant of lesion size and transmurality and has the potential to improve efficacy of atrial fibrillation ablation. This study sought to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a novel irrigated radiofrequency ablation catheter that measures real-time CF in the treatment of patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. A total of 300 patients with symptomatic, drug-refractory, paroxysmal atrial fibrillation were enrolled in a prospective, multicenter, randomized, controlled trial and randomized to radiofrequency ablation with either a novel CF-sensing catheter or a non-CF catheter (control). The primary effectiveness end point consisted of acute electrical isolation of all pulmonary veins and freedom from recurrent symptomatic atrial arrhythmia off all antiarrhythmic drugs at 12 months. The primary safety end point included device-related serious adverse events. End points were powered to show noninferiority. All pulmonary veins were isolated in both groups. Effectiveness was achieved in 67.8% and 69.4% of subjects in the CF and control arms, respectively (absolute difference, -1.6%; lower limit of 1-sided 95% confidence interval, -10.7%; P=0.0073 for noninferiority). When the CF arm was stratified into optimal CF (≥90% ablations with ≥10 g) and nonoptimal CF groups, effectiveness was achieved in 75.9% versus 58.1%, respectively (P=0.018). The primary safety end point occurred in 1.97% and 1.40% of CF patients and control subjects, respectively (absolute difference, 0.57%; upper limit of 1-sided 95% confidence interval, 3.61%; P=0.0004 for noninferiority). The CF ablation catheter met the primary safety and effectiveness end points. Additionally, optimal CF was associated with improved effectiveness. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01278953. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Early experience with robotic navigation for catheter ablation of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kautzner, Josef; Peichl, Petr; Cihák, Robert; Wichterle, Dan; Mlcochová, Hanka

    2009-03-01

    Pulmonary venous antra isolation (PVAI) is the cornerstone of catheter ablation procedure for drug refractory paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF). However, the procedure is technically challenging. Robotic navigation has a potential to expedite and facilitate the procedure. A robotic catheter control system was used for remote navigation-supported PVAI in 22 patients (mean age = 55 +/- 9 years, 16 males, study group). An irrigated-tip catheter with estimate of catheter force on the tissue was used. This was compared in nonrandomized fashion with conventional hand-controlled catheter ablation in 16 patients (mean age = 55 +/- 9 years, 13 males, control group). The procedures were performed under guidance of Ensite NavX navigation system (St. Jude Medical, St. Paul, MN, USA) and intracardiac echocardiography. Robotic navigation was associated with significantly shorter overall duration of radiofrequency delivery (1,641 +/- 609 vs 2,188 +/- 865 seconds, P robotic catheter navigation was effective, safe, and associated with shorter procedural and fluoroscopic times than conventional PVAI.

  7. Contact force technology integrated with 3D navigation system for atrial fibrillation ablation: improving results?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rordorf, Roberto; Sanzo, Antonio; Gionti, Vincenzo

    2017-06-01

    Pulmonary veins isolation (PVI) by radiofrequency (RF) ablation is currently an established treatment for symptomatic, drug-resistant paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Although the effectiveness of the therapy has been clearly demonstrated, success rate after a single procedure is still sub-optimal. The main reason for recurrences after PVI is electrical pulmonary vein-atrium reconnection. In order to increase the likelihood of permanent PVI, the creation of a transmural, durable lesion is mandatory. The main determinants of lesion size and transmurality are power, stability, duration and contact-force during RF application. In recent times, catheters with contact-force sensors have been developed and released for clinical use. Areas covered: The present review summarizes rational and clinical evidences for efficacy and safety of contact force (CF) technology integrated into 3D navigation systems for AF ablation. Expert commentary Although CF technology has a strong rational, clinical data on the superior safety and efficacy of CF technology over traditional non-CF catheters are still conflicting. The reason for that is very likely to rely on the lack of definite data on how to optimize CF parameters and how to integrate CF data with power, duration of RF applications and information on catheter stability.

  8. Task-Space Motion Planning of MRI-Actuated Catheters for Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greigarn, Tipakorn; Cavuşoğlu, M Cenk

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a motion planning algorithm for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) actuated catheters for catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation. The MRI-actuated catheters is a new robotic catheter concept which utilizes MRI for remote steering and guidance. Magnetic moments generated by a set of coils wound near the tip are used to steer the catheter under MRI scanner magnetic field. The catheter during an ablation procedure is modeled as a constrained robotic manipulator with flexible joints, and the proposed motion-planning algorithm calculates a sequence of magnetic moments based on the manipulator model to move the tip of the catheter along a predefined trajectory on the surface of the left atrium. The difficulties in motion planning of the catheter are due to kinematic redundancy and underactuation. The proposed motion planning algorithm overcomes the challenges by operating in the task space instead of the configuration space. The catheter is then regulated around this nominal trajectory using feedback control to reduce the effect of uncertainties.

  9. Impact of Alcohol Consumption on Substrate Remodeling and Ablation Outcome of Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Yu; Shi, Rui; Hou, Bingbo; Wu, Lingmin; Zheng, Lihui; Ding, Ligang; Chen, Gang; Zhang, Shu; Yao, Yan

    2015-11-09

    The effect of alcohol consumption on substrate remodeling and ablation outcome of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF) remains unknown. We performed circumferential pulmonary vein isolation (CPVI) and voltage mapping of left atrium (LA) during sinus rhythm in 122 consecutive patients with symptomatic PAF (age, 55.4±9.4 years; 73.8% men). Low-voltage zones (LVZs) were semiquantitatively estimated and presented as low-voltage index (LVI). Each patient's daily alcohol consumption history was recorded at baseline and classified into alcohol abstainers, moderate drinkers, and heavy drinkers based on the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism definition. Follow-up was ≥12 months for AF recurrence. Alcohol abstainers and moderate and heavy drinkers were 70 (57.4%), 13 (10.6%), and 39 (32.0%), respectively. In total, LVZs were observed in 44 patients (36.1%). Daily alcohol consumption independently predicted presence of LVZs (odds ratio [OR], 1.097; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.001-1.203; P=0.047). During mean follow-up of 20.9±5.9 months, 40 patients (35.1%) experienced AF recurrence. Success rate was 81.3%, 69.2%, and 35.1% in alcohol abstainers, moderate drinkers, and heavy drinkers, respectively (overall log rank, Palcohol consumption and LVI were independent predictors of AF recurrence (hazard ratio [HR], 1.579; 95% CI, 1.085-2.298; P=0.017; HR, 2.188; 95% CI, 1.582-3.026; Palcohol consumption on AF ablation outcomes. Daily alcohol consumption was associated with atrial remodelling, and heavy drinkers have substantial risk for AF recurrence after CPVI. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  10. Differentiation of pre-ablation and post-ablation late gadolinium-enhanced cardiac MRI scans of longstanding persistent atrial fibrillation patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang; Zhuang, Xiahai; Khan, Habib; Haldar, Shouvik; Nyktari, Eva; Li, Lei; Ye, Xujiong; Slabaugh, Greg; Wong, Tom; Mohiaddin, Raad; Keegan, Jennifer; Firmin, David

    2017-03-01

    Late Gadolinium-Enhanced Cardiac MRI (LGE CMRI) is an emerging non-invasive technique to image and quantify preablation native and post-ablation atrial scarring. Previous studies have reported that enhanced image intensities of the atrial scarring in the LGE CMRI inversely correlate with the left atrial endocardial voltage invasively obtained by electro-anatomical mapping. However, the reported reproducibility of using LGE CMRI to identify and quantify atrial scarring is variable. This may be due to two reasons: first, delineation of the left atrium (LA) and pulmonary veins (PVs) anatomy generally relies on manual operation that is highly subjective, and this could substantially affect the subsequent atrial scarring segmentation; second, simple intensity based image features may not be good enough to detect subtle changes in atrial scarring. In this study, we hypothesized that texture analysis can provide reliable image features for the LGE CMRI images subject to accurate and objective delineation of the heart anatomy based on a fully-automated whole heart segmentation (WHS) method. We tested the extracted texture features to differentiate between pre-ablation and post-ablation LGE CMRI studies in longstanding persistent atrial fibrillation patients. These patients often have extensive native scarring and differentiation from post-ablation scarring can be difficult. Quantification results showed that our method is capable of solving this classification task, and we can envisage further deployment of this texture analysis based method for other clinical problems using LGE CMRI.

  11. The quest for durable lesions in catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation - technological advances in radiofrequency catheters and balloon devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Tilman; Kuck, Karl-Heinz

    2017-08-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common cardiac arrhythmia and represents a growing clinical, social and economic challenge. Catheter ablation for symptomatic atrial fibrillation has evolved from an experimental procedure into a widespread therapy and offers a safe and effective treatment option. A prerequisite for durable PVI are transmural and contiguous circumferential lesions around the pulmonary veins. However, electrical reconnection of initially isolated pulmonary veins remains a primary concern and is a dominant factor for arrhythmia recurrence during long-term follow up. Areas covered: This article discusses the physiology of lesion formation using radiofrequency-, cryo- or laser- energy for pulmonary vein isolation and provides a detailed review of recent technological advancements in the field of radiofrequency catheters and balloon devices. Finally, future directions and upcoming developments for the interventional treatment of atrial fibrillation are discussed. Expert commentary: Durable conduction block across deployed myocardial lesions is mandatory not only for PVI but for any other cardiac ablation strategy as well. A major improvement urgently expected is the intraprocedural real-time distinction of durable lesions from interposed gaps with only transiently impaired electrical conduction. Furthermore, a simplification of ablation tools used for PVI is required to reduce the high technical complexity of the procedure.

  12. Staged hybrid ablation for persistent and longstanding persistent atrial fibrillation effectively restores sinus rhythm in long-term observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zembala, Michal; Filipiak, Krzysztof; Kowalski, Oskar; Buchta, Piotr; Niklewski, Tomasz; Nadziakiewicz, Pawel; Koba, Rafał; Gąsior, Mariusz; Kalarus, Zbigniew; Zembala, Marian

    2017-02-01

    Hybrid ablation (HABL) of atrial fibrillation combining endoscopic, minimally invasive, closed chest epicardial ablation with endocardial CARTO-guided accuracy was introduced to overcome the limitations of current therapeutic options for patients with persistent (PSAF) and longstanding persistent atrial fibrillation (LSPAF). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the procedural safety and feasibility as well as effectiveness of HABL in patients with PSAF and LSPAF 1 year after the procedure. The study is a single-center, prospective clinical registry. From 07/2009 to 12.2014, 90 patients with PSAF (n = 39) and LSPAF (n = 51), at the mean age of 54.8 ±9.8, in mean EHRA class 2.6, underwent HABL. 64.4% of patients had a history of prior cardioversion or catheter ablation. Thirteen patients had LVEF less than 35%. Mean AF duration was 4.5 ±3.7 years. Patients were scheduled for 3-, 6- and 12-month follow-up with 7-day Holter monitoring. At 6 months after the procedure 78% (54/69) of patients were in SR. At 12 months after the procedure 86% (59/69) were in SR and 62.3% (43/69) in SR and off class I/III antiarrhythmic drugs (AADs). Only 1% (1/69) of patients required a repeat ablation for atrial flutter. A significant decrease in LA dimension and an increase in LVEF were noted. A combination of epicardial and endocardial RF ablation should be considered as a treatment option for patients with persistent and long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation as it is safe and effective in restoring sinus rhythm.

  13. Safety of atrial fibrillation ablation with novel multi-electrode array catheters on uninterrupted anticoagulation-a single-center experience.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hayes, Christopher Ruslan

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: A recent single-center report indicated that the performance of atrial fibrillation ablation in patients on uninterrupted warfarin using a conventional deflectable tip electrode ablation catheter may be as safe as periprocedural discontinuation of warfarin and bridging with heparin. Novel multi-electrode array catheters for atrial fibrillation ablation are currently undergoing clinical evaluation. While offering the possibility of more rapid atrial fibrillation ablation, they are stiffer and necessitate the deployment of larger deflectable transseptal sheaths, and it remains to be determined if they increase the risk of cardiac perforation and vascular injury. Such potential risks would have implications for a strategy of uninterrupted periprocedural anticoagulation. METHOD AND RESULTS: We audited the safety outcomes of our atrial fibrillation ablation procedures using multi-electrode array ablation catheters in patients on uninterrupted warfarin (CHADS2 score>or=2) and in patients not on warfarin (uninterrupted aspirin). Two bleeding complications occurred in 49 patients on uninterrupted warfarin, both of which were managed successfully without longterm sequelae, and no bleeding complication occurred in 32 patients not on warfarin (uninterrupted aspirin). There were no thromboembolic events or other complication with either anticoagulant regimen. CONCLUSION: Despite the larger diameter and increased stiffness of multi-electrode array catheters and their deflectable transseptal sheaths, their use for catheter ablation in patients with atrial fibrillation on uninterrupted warfarin in this single-center experience does not appear to be unsafe, and thus, an adequately powered multicenter prospective randomized controlled trial should be considered.

  14. Initial experience of a novel mapping system combined with remote magnetic navigation in the catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Changjian; Pehrson, Steen; Jacobsen, Peter Karl

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There have been advancements of sophisticated mapping systems used for ablation procedures over the last decade. Utilization of these novel mapping systems in combination with remote magnetic navigation (RMN) needs to be established. We investigated the new EnSite Precision mapping...... of a novel 3D mapping system (EnSite Precision mapping system) combined with RMN (Niobe ES, Stereotaxis, Inc., St. Louis, MO, USA) for atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation. METHODS: In this prospective nonrandomized study, two groups of patients were treated in our center for drug refractory AF. Patients were...

  15. Efficacy of a novel bipolar radiofrequency ablation device on the beating heart for atrial fibrillation ablation: a long-term porcine study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voeller, Rochus K; Zierer, Andreas; Lall, Shelly C; Sakamoto, Shun-ichiro; Schuessler, Richard B; Damiano, Ralph J

    2010-07-01

    Over recent years, a variety of energy sources have been used to replace the traditional incisions of the Cox maze procedure for the surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation. This study evaluated the safety and efficacy of a new bipolar radiofrequency ablation device for atrial ablation in a long-term porcine model. Six pigs underwent a Cox maze IV procedure on a beating heart off cardiopulmonary bypass using the AtriCure Isolator II bipolar ablation device (AtriCure, Inc, Cincinnati, Ohio). In addition, 6 pigs underwent median sternotomy and pericardiotomy alone to serve as a control group. All animals were allowed to survive for 30 days. Each pig underwent induction of atrial fibrillation and was then humanely killed to remove the heart en bloc for histologic assessment. Magnetic resonance imaging scans were also obtained preoperatively and postoperatively to assess atrial and ventricular function, pulmonary vein anatomy, valve function, and coronary artery patency. All animals survived the operation. Electrical isolation of the left atrial appendage and the pulmonary veins was documented by pacing acutely and at 30 days in all animals. No animal that underwent the Cox maze IV procedure was able to be induced into atrial fibrillation at 30 days postoperatively, compared with all the sham animals. All 257 ablations examined were discrete, linear, and transmural, with a mean lesion width of 2.2 +/- 1.1 mm and a mean lesion depth of 5.3 +/- 3.0 mm. The AtriCure Isolator II device was able to create reliable long-term transmural lesions of the modified Cox maze procedure on a beating heart without cardiopulmonary bypass 100% of the time. There were no discernible effects on ventricular or valvular function. 2010 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Plasma YKL-40 is elevated in patients with recurrent atrial fibrillation after catheter ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Kristoffer Mads; Nilsson, Brian; Johansen, Julia S

    2010-01-01

    -81) with paroxysmal/persistent AF were treated with RF catheter ablation; Holter monitoring for 14 days was performed before ablation and after 3 months. Recurrent symptomatic AF or atrial tachycardia >10 min was considered failure, and the patients were offered a second ablation session. YKL-40 was determined...... to ablation compared to patients with recurrence of AF (31 vs. 62 microg/l, P = 0.029). Plasma YKL-40 was not an independent predictor of recurrence of AF after ablation. No significant changes in plasma YKL-40 levels were seen from baseline to follow-up at 12 months. CONCLUSION: In patients with paroxysmal...

  17. Time-related prevalence of postoperative atrial fibrillation after stand-alone minimally invasive radiofrequency ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Meir, Mark; Gelsomino, Sandro; Luca, Fabiana; Pison, Laurent; Chambille, Pol; Parise, Orlando; Crijns, Harry J; Maessen, Jos G

    2011-07-01

    We present our results with minimally invasive surgical treatment of lone atrial fibrillation (LAF) employing a radiofrequency (RF) source through a bilateral thoracoscopy. Between January 2007 and January 2011, 28 consecutive patients (85.7% male, mean age 67.1 ± 9.1 years) with LAF underwent video-assisted bilateral RF ablation. Fourteen patients (50%) had paroxysmal, five (17.8%) persistent, and nine (32.2%) long-persistent LAF. All patients were followed-up according to the Heart Rhythm Society/ European Heart Rhythm Association/European Cardiac Arrhythmia Society (HRS/EHRA/ECA) and success/failure was reported as suggested by Society of Thoracic Surgeon (STS) guidelines. Mean follow-up was 27.8 ± 8.6 months. Time-related prevalence of postoperative AF was 4.5% at 36 months. Success was much more likely in subjects with paroxysmal (3-year prevalence, 0%) or persistent (3-year prevalence, 0%) than long-standing persistent LAF (3-year prevalence, 8.3%). At 36 months the estimated prevalence of antiarrhythmic drugs was 11.3% (8.8 to 13.7). No major thromboembolic events were detected during the follow-up period and 36-month prevalence of Warfarin use was 15.2% (11.5 to 18.1). Finally, no patient underwent electrical cardioversion. This approach yielded satisfactory results with a high degree of safety. Further larger studies are necessary to confirm our findings.  © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Efficiency of radiofrequency ablation of pulmonary vein ostium for patients with atrial fibrillation and metabolics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Zaslavskaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is determination of predictors of efficiency of radiofrequency ablation (RFA in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF and metabolic syndrome (MS. Material and methods. 98 patients with AF (78 patients with AF and MS (IDF, 2005 and 20 patients without MS have been examined. Comparison groups included 50 patients with MS without arrhythmia and 50 practically healthy subjects. RFA was performed with Carto 3 navigation system. Follow-up period after RFA was 12 months. Epicardial fat thickness (EFT was measured with help of echo-cardiography. Results: patients with AF relapse had more MS components than those with effective procedure (3.21±1.18 and 1.73±1.14, accordingly, p<0.001. Initially, EFT of patients with AF relapse after RFA was larger that in patients without arrhythmia after exposure. EFT in patients with AF more than3.5 mmincreases probability of arrhythmia relapse in 1.87 times (OR: 1.87, 95 % CI 1.03 — 3.41, р = 0.04. Conclusion: determination of EFT with echo-cardiogaphy can be used in estimation of AF relapse risk after RFA.

  19. Impact of epicardial ablation of concomitant atrial fibrillation on atrial natriuretic peptide levels and atrial function in 6 months follow-up: does preoperative ANP level predict outcome of ablation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizon, Marek; Friedel, Norbert; Pizon, Monika; Freundt, Miriam; Weyand, Michael; Feyrer, Richard

    2013-11-28

    Epicardial ablation concomitant to cardiac surgery is an easy and safe approach to treat atrial fibrillation (AF), but its efficacy in longstanding persistent (LsPe) AF remains intermediate. Although larger left atrial size has been associated with worse outcome after ablation, biochemical predictors of success are not well established. The aim of this study was to evaluate relationship between biochemical marker, echo-characteristic and cardiac rhythm in 6 months follow-up after epicardial ultrasound (HIFU) ablation. We included 78 consecutive patients, who underwent elective cardiac surgery. 42 patients with AF (11.9% paroxysmal, 23.8% persistent, 64.3% LsPeAF) underwent concomitant HIFU ablation (AF ablation group), 16 with AF underwent cardiac surgery without ablation (AF control) and 20 had preoperatively normal sinus rhythm (SR control). We measured plasma ANP secretion before, on postoperative day (POD) 1, POD 7 as well as 3 and 6 months after surgery. Moreover, we estimated cardiac rhythm and atrial mechanical function by Atrial Filling Fraction (AFF) and A-wave velocity in follow-up. Baseline ANP levels were higher in patients with LsPeAF, as compared to the paroxysmal and permanent AF and to the SR control group. Patients with LsPeAF (n = 27) who converted to SR had preoperatively smaller left atrial diameter (LAD) and LA area (p ANP level (p = 0.009) than those who remained in AF at 6 months after ablation. Multivariate regression analysis revealed that only preoperative ANP level was an independent predictor of cardiac rhythm after ablation. Patients with LsPeAF and preoperative ANP >7.5 nmol/l presented with SR in 80%, in contrast to those with ANP ANP levels were increased on POD 1 in ablation group (p ANP levels may be a new biochemical predictor of successful epicardial ablation in patients with concomitant LsPeAF. HIFU ablation caused a significant improvement of atrial mechanical function and gradual increase of AFF and did not associate with

  20. Meta-Analysis of Risk of Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack With Dabigatran for Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sardar, Partha; Nairooz, Ramez; Chatterjee, Saurav

    2014-01-01

    Dabigatran is a novel oral anticoagulant and may be useful during atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation for prevention of thromboembolic events. However, the benefits and adverse effects of periprocedural dabigatran therapy have not been thoroughly evaluated. A meta-analysis was performed to evaluate...... the efficacy and safety of dabigatran for anticoagulation in AF ablation. PubMed, The Cochrane Library, EMBASE, Web of Science, and CINAHL databases were searched from January 01, 2001 through July 30, 2013. Two reviewers reviewed the studies for inclusion and extracted data from studies comparing dabigatran...... with warfarin for AF ablation. A total of 5,513 patients undergoing catheter ablation were included in 17 observational studies and 1 randomized trial. Fourteen events of stroke or transient ischemic attacks were reported in the dabigatran group and 4 in the warfarin group (Peto's odds ratio 3.94, 95...

  1. Safety of pulmonary vein isolation and left atrial complex fractionated atrial electrograms ablation for atrial fibrillation with phased radiofrequency energy and multi-electrode catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Anton A W; Balt, Jippe C; Wijffels, Maurits C E F; Wever, Eric F D; Boersma, Lucas V A

    2012-10-01

    Recently, a multi-electrode catheter system using phased radiofrequency (RF) energy was developed specifically for atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation: the pulmonary vein ablation catheter (PVAC), the multi-array septal catheter (MASC), and the multi-array ablation catheter (MAAC). Initial results of small trials have been promising: shorter procedure times and low adverse event rates. In a large single-centre registry, we evaluated the adverse events associated with multi-electrode ablation catheter procedures with PVAC alone, or combined with MASC and MAAC. In all, 634 consecutive patients with AF had 663 procedures with multi-electrode ablation catheters, 502 patients with the PVAC alone, 128 patients with PVAC/MASC/MAAC, 29 redo procedures with the PVAC or PVAC/MASC/MAAC, and 4 patients had a complicated transseptal puncture. Major and minor adverse events during 6 month follow-up were registered. In 15 cases (2.3%), major adverse events were seen within the first month after the procedure. These included complicated transseptal puncture (4), stroke (2), transient ischaemic attack (5), acute coronary syndrome (2), femoral pseudoaneurysm (1), and arteriovenous fistulae (1). Minor adverse events were seen in 10.7% at 6 months, mostly due to femoral haematoma (3.9%), and non-significant PV stenosis (5.2%). There was no difference in the occurrence of major adverse events between PVAC alone, or PVAC/MASC/MAAC ablation. Ablation with phased RF and multi-electrode catheters is accompanied by a major adverse event rate of 2.3% within 1 month and a minor event rate of 10.7% at 6 months.

  2. Deglutition induced atrial tachycardia and atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanjwal, Yousuf; Imran, Naser; Grubb, Blair

    2007-12-01

    Deglutition induced supraventricular tachycardia is an uncommon condition postulated to be a vagally mediated phenomenon due to mechanical stimulation. Patients usually present with mild symptoms or may have severe debilitating symptoms. Treatment with Class I agents, beta blockers, calcium channel blockers, amiodarone and radiofrquency catheter ablation has shown to be successful in the majority of reported cases. We report the case of a 46-year-old healthy woman presenting with palpitations on swallowing that was documented to be transient atrial tachycardia with aberrant ventricular conduction as well as transient atrial fibrillation. She was successfully treated with propafenone with no induction of swallowing-induced tachycardia after treatment. This is also the first case to show swallowing-induced atrial tachycardia and atrial fibrillation in the same patient.

  3. Single-center experience of catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation using multi-electrode mapping and ablation catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeb, Mehmood; Yue, Arthur; Scott, Paul Andrew; Roberts, Paul R; Morgan, John M

    2011-10-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is an established therapy for the treatment of paroxysmal and persistent atrial fibrillation (AF). Many techniques have been reported to achieve RFA. We report a single-center experience of RFA using three multi-electrode catheters. We collected data of the patients who had RFA for AF using custom-designed multi-electrode mapping and ablation catheters between May 2007 and November 2009 at this center. A total of 105 patients aged 56 ± 9.6 years underwent RFA using three multi-electrode catheters. Eighty-seven patients were new and 18 patients had re-do AF ablation using the multi-electrode mapping and ablation catheters. In the new patients, the mean procedure duration was 141 ± 38 minutes and fluoroscopy time was 38 ± 4 minutes. The mean duration of follow-up was 15.8 ± 6.4 months. Symptomatic improvement was achieved in 75 patients (86%), 48 patients (55%) remained in sinus rhythm (SR) after the first procedure, while 7 (8%) had multiple procedures and remained in SR without antiarrhythmic drugs (AAD). Fourteen patients (16%) required AAD following a single procedure and 1 patient (1.1%) after multiple procedures to remain in SR. Seven patients (8%) had reduced burden of symptoms. No improvement occurred in 12 patients (13.7%). In the 18 re-do patients, 15 (83.3%) had symptom improvement. Four patients (22.2%) remained in SR after a single procedure and 4 patients (22.2%) required multiple procedures to remain in SR without AAD. One patient (5.5%) remained in SR on AAD following a single procedure and 1 patient (5.5%) remained in SR on AAD following multiple procedures. Five patients (27%) had reduced burden of symptoms and 3 patients (16.6%) had no improvement. PVI using multi-electrode mapping and ablation catheters is an effective treatment of paroxysmal and persistent AF with a complication rate equivalent to published data.

  4. Personalized management of atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchhof, Paulus; Breithardt, Günter; Aliot, Etienne

    2013-01-01

    The management of atrial fibrillation (AF) has seen marked changes in past years, with the introduction of new oral anticoagulants, new antiarrhythmic drugs, and the emergence of catheter ablation as a common intervention for rhythm control. Furthermore, new technologies enhance our ability to de...

  5. Visualisation during ablation of atrial fibrillation - stimulating the patient's own resources: Patients' experiences in relation to pain and anxiety during an intervention of visualisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nørgaard, Marianne W; Pedersen, Preben U; Bjerrum, Merete

    2015-12-01

    Going through ablation of atrial fibrillation can be accompanied by pain and discomfort when a light, conscious sedation is used. Visualisation has been shown to reduce the patients' perception of pain and anxiety during invasive procedures, when it is used together with the usual pain management. The purpose of this study was to investigate patients' experiences with visualisation in relation to pain and anxiety during an intervention consisting of visualisation, when undergoing ablation of atrial fibrillation. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 14 patients from a study population of a clinical controlled study with 147 patients. The transcribed interviews were analysed according to qualitative methodology of inductive content analysis. Four categories emerged from the interviews: 'approach to visualisation'; 'strategies of managing pain'; 'strategies of managing anxiety' and 'benefits of visualisation'. The transversal analyses revealed two overall themes which highlight the experiences of being guided in visualisation during ablation of atrial fibrillation: 'stimulation of the patients' own resources' and 'being satisfied without complete analgesia' Visualisation used during ablation of atrial fibrillation was reported as a positive experience with no serious inconvenience: It seemed that visualisation did not produce complete analgesia but the patients expressed that it provided some pain relief and supported their individual strategies in managing pain and anxiety. Our findings indicate that visualisation for acute pain during ablation of atrial fibrillation was associated not only with a decrease in experience of pain but also with high levels of treatment satisfaction and other non-pain-related benefits. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014.

  6. Relationship between clinical outcomes and unintentional pulmonary vein isolation during substrate ablation of atrial fibrillation guided solely by complex fractionated atrial electrogram mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriki, Yasuhisa; Ishida, Sanemasa; Oketani, Naoya; Ichiki, Hitoshi; Okui, Hideki; Ninomiya, Yuichi; Maenosono, Ryuichi; Matsushita, Takehiko; Miyata, Masaaki; Hamasaki, Shuichi; Tei, Chuwa

    2011-11-01

    Controversy exists as to whether atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation guided solely by complex fractionated atrial electrogram (CFAE) has a good outcome despite not requiring pulmonary vein isolation (PVI). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of AF ablation guided solely by targeting CFAE areas, and to determine whether its clinical efficacy has any relationship with unintentionally isolating the PV. We studied 100 consecutive patients (ages 59 ± 11 years; 54 with paroxysmal, 35 persistent, and 11 long-standing persistent AF), who underwent CFAE-ablation. PV potential (PVP) was recorded before and after ablation. After excluding 39 patients in whom sinus rhythm could not be maintained before ablation by internal cardioversion and/or who had a history of PVI(s), PVPs were analyzed. AF was terminated during ablation in 98% of paroxysmal, 80% of persistent, and 55% of long-standing persistent AF patients. Nifekalant (0.3-0.6 mg/kg) was administered in 30%, 57%, and 83%, respectively. The common areas of CFAE around the PVs were anterior to the right PVs, posterior to the left PVs, and at the ridge of the left atrial appendage. Among 215 PVs in 61 patients (42 paroxysmal, 19 persistent), only 17 PVs (8%) were unintentionally isolated. The atrial potential to PVP was prolonged (>30 ms) in 13% of PVs. After at least 12 months of follow-up (23 ± 5 months), 65% of paroxysmal (11% with drug), 54% of persistent (37% with drug), and 45% of long-standing (60% with drug) AF patients were free from atrial arrhythmia after one session. CFAE-ablation terminates AF without isolating PVs in a high percentage of patients, and yields excellent clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2011 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Outcomes after cardioversion and atrial fibrillation ablation in patients treated with rivaroxaban and warfarin in the ROCKET AF trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccini, Jonathan P; Stevens, Susanna R; Lokhnygina, Yuliya; Patel, Manesh R; Halperin, Jonathan L; Singer, Daniel E; Hankey, Graeme J; Hacke, Werner; Becker, Richard C; Nessel, Christopher C; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Fox, Keith A A; Califf, Robert M; Breithardt, Günter

    2013-05-14

    This study sought to investigate the outcomes following cardioversion or catheter ablation in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) treated with warfarin or rivaroxaban. There are limited data on outcomes following cardioversion or catheter ablation in AF patients treated with factor Xa inhibitors. We compared the incidence of electrical cardioversion (ECV), pharmacologic cardioversion (PCV), or AF ablation and subsequent outcomes in patients in a post hoc analysis of the ROCKET AF (Efficacy and Safety Study of Rivaroxaban With Warfarin for the Prevention of Stroke and Non-Central Nervous System Systemic Embolism in Patients With Non-Valvular Atrial Fibrillation) trial. Over a median follow-up of 2.1 years, 143 patients underwent ECV, 142 underwent PCV, and 79 underwent catheter ablation. The overall incidence of ECV, PCV, or AF ablation was 1.45 per 100 patient-years (n = 321; 1.44 [n = 161] in the warfarin arm, 1.46 [n = 160] in the rivaroxaban arm). The crude rates of stroke and death increased in the first 30 days after cardioversion or ablation. After adjustment for baseline differences, the long-term incidence of stroke or systemic embolism (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.38; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.61 to 3.11), cardiovascular death (HR: 1.57; 95% CI: 0.69 to 3.55), and death from all causes (HR: 1.75; 95% CI: 0.90 to 3.42) were not different before and after cardioversion or AF ablation. Hospitalization increased after cardioversion or AF ablation (HR: 2.01; 95% CI: 1.51 to 2.68), but there was no evidence of a differential effect by randomized treatment (p value for interaction = 0.58). The incidence of stroke or systemic embolism (1.88% vs. 1.86%) and death (1.88% vs. 3.73%) were similar in the rivaroxaban-treated and warfarin-treated groups. Despite an increase in hospitalization, there were no differences in long-term stroke rates or survival following cardioversion or AF ablation. Outcomes were similar in patients treated with rivaroxaban or warfarin

  8. Acute fatal pulmonary vein occlusion after catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Brian; Chen, Xu; Pehrson, Steen

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) catheter radiofrequency isolation of the pulmonary veins (PVs) has proved to be highly successful. There have been several case reports regarding PV stenosis, however none of these have reported a fatal outcome. METHODS AND RESULTS: A 31-year-o...

  9. Theoretical and experimental analysis of amplitude control ablation and bipolar ablation in creating linear lesion and discrete lesions for treating atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shengjie; Wu, Xiaomei; Wang, Weiqi

    2017-09-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) energy is often used to create a linear lesion or discrete lesions for blocking the accessory conduction pathways for treating atrial fibrillation. By using finite element analysis, we study the ablation effect of amplitude control ablation mode (AcM) and bipolar ablation mode (BiM) in creating a linear lesion and discrete lesions in a 5-mm-thick atrial wall; particularly, the characteristic of lesion shape has been investigated in amplitude control ablation. Computer models of multipolar catheter were developed to study the lesion dimensions in atrial walls created through AcM, BiM and special electrodes activated ablation methods in AcM and BiM. To validate the theoretical results in this study, an in vitro experiment with porcine cardiac tissue was performed. At 40 V/20 V root mean squared (RMS) of the RF voltage for AcM, the continuous and transmural lesion was created by AcM-15s, AcM-5s and AcM-ad-20V ablation in 5-mm-thick atrial wall. At 20 V RMS for BiM, the continuous but not transmural lesion was created. AcM ablation yielded asymmetrical and discrete lesions shape, whereas the lesion shape turned to more symmetrical and continuous as the electrodes alternative activated period decreased from 15 s to 5 s. Two discrete lesions were created when using AcM, AcM-ad-40V, BiM-ad-20V and BiM-ad-40V. The experimental and computational thermal lesion shapes created in cardiac tissue were in agreement. Amplitude control ablation technology and bipolar ablation technology are feasible methods to create continuous lesion or discrete for pulmonary veins isolation.

  10. Recurrence of arrhythmia following short-term oral AMIOdarone after CATheter ablation for atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darkner, Stine; Chen, Xu; Hansen, Jim

    2014-01-01

    later recurrence. METHODS AND RESULTS: In a two-centre, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, we randomized a total of 212 patients undergoing AF ablation. Patients were stratified according to type of AF (paroxysmal/persistent) and history of previous AF ablation and randomly assigned...... to 8 weeks of oral amiodarone therapy or matched placebo following catheter ablation. Patients were followed for 6 months. Analyses were performed according to the intention-to-treat principle. Of 212 enrolled patients [median age 61 (inter-quartile range 54-66), 83% male, 50% paroxysmal, 29...... period. CONCLUSION: Short-term oral amiodarone treatment following ablation for paroxysmal or persistent AF did not significantly reduce recurrence of atrial tachyarrhythmias at the 6-month follow-up, but it more than halved atrial arrhythmia related hospitalization and cardioversion rates during...

  11. A prospective multicenter trial of bipolar radiofrequency ablation for atrial fibrillation: early results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokadam, Nahush A; McCarthy, Patrick M; Gillinov, A Marc; Ryan, William H; Moon, Marc R; Mack, Michael J; Gaynor, Sydney L; Prasad, Sunil M; Wickline, Samuel A; Bailey, Marci S; Damiano, Nicholas R; Ishii, Yosuke; Schuessler, Richard B; Damiano, Ralph J

    2004-11-01

    The Cox-Maze III remains the gold standard for the surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation. However, the "cut-and-sew" technique is time consuming and technically challenging. The pulmonary veins are the source of ectopy in the majority of patients with atrial fibrillation. The safety and efficacy of bipolar radiofrequency to electrically isolate the pulmonary veins was evaluated in a prospective multi-center trial. Beginning in January 2002, 30 patients at three medical centers underwent pulmonary vein isolation using bipolar radiofrequency and were followed for 6 months. Twenty-four of the patients also underwent a modified Cox-Maze III. Electrical isolation of the pulmonary veins was confirmed with intraoperative pacing. Pulmonary vein patency was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging or three-dimensional computed tomography in 15 patients at 1 month. Mean age was 60.9 +/- 11.7 years. Nineteen patients had paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. All pulmonary veins were isolated in every patient. The left pulmonary veins underwent 3.0 +/- 1.4 applications for a total of 26.4 +/- 10.5 seconds. The right pulmonary veins underwent 2.8 +/- 1.1 applications for a total of 26.3 +/- 12.6 seconds. There was no operative mortality. At 1 month, imaging revealed no evidence of pulmonary vein stenosis. At 6 months, 96% of patients were in normal sinus rhythm. The use of bipolar radiofrequency for electrical isolation of pulmonary veins and to replace other Cox-Maze III incisions is safe and effective at controlling atrial fibrillation. This emerging technology may shorten and simplify the surgical management of atrial fibrillation.

  12. First experience with edoxaban and atrial fibrillation ablation - Insights from the ENGAGE AF-TIMI 48 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffel, Jan; Ruff, Christian T; Hamershock, Rose A; Murphy, Sabina A; Senior, Roxy; Roy, Denis; Lanz, Hans-Joachim; Mercuri, Michele F; Antman, Elliott M; Giugliano, Robert P

    2017-10-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation procedures are increasingly being performed in patients receiving direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs). Experience regarding the safety of edoxaban in this context is limited. In an exploratory analysis we therefore investigated the outcome of patients undergoing transcatheter AF ablation in the ENGAGE AF-TIMI 48 trial. During the trial, 193 transcatheter AF ablation procedures were performed in 169 patients. For the majority of ablations (n=157, 81%), study drug was interrupted >3days (median time of interruption: 18days, interquartile range 3-30days); 86 ablations were performed with ≤10days, and 36 ablations with ≤3days study drug interruption. During the first 30days after the ablation, one ischemic stroke was observed in the warfarin group and none in the higher-dose edoxaban regimen (HDER) or lower-dose edoxaban regimen (LDER) group. Three clinically relevant non-major (CRNM) bleeding events were observed in the warfarin group; one major bleed was seen in the HDER group; one minor bleed occurred in the LDER group. All bleeding events occurred among the patients with ≤10days study drug interruption; in contrast, no ischemic events or deaths were observed in these patients. In this pilot evaluation of the ENGAGE AF-TIMI 48 trial, treatment with edoxaban was associated with a low risk of ischemic and bleeding events during the first 30days post ablation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Impact of catheter ablation with remote magnetic navigation on procedural outcomes in patients with persistent and long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Qi; Pehrson, Steen; Jacobsen, Peter Karl

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The objectives of this study were to assess the procedural outcomes of persistent and long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation (PsAF and L-PsAF) ablation guided by remote magnetic navigation (RMN), and to detect factors predicting acute restoration of sinus rhythm (SR) by ablation...... with RMN. METHODS: A total of 313 patients (275 male, age 59 ± 9.5 years) with PsAF (187/313) or L-PsAF (126/313) undergoing ablation using RMN were included. Patients' disease history, pulmonary venous anatomy, left atrial (LA) volume, procedure time, mapping plus ablation time, radiofrequency (RF...

  14. The impact of image integration on catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation using electroanatomic mapping: a prospective randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistler, Peter M; Rajappan, Kim; Harris, Stuart; Earley, Mark J; Richmond, Laura; Sporton, Simon C; Schilling, Richard J

    2008-12-01

    A detailed appreciation of the left atrial/pulmonary venous (LA/PV) anatomy may be important in improving the safety and success of catheter ablation for AF. The aim of this randomized study was to determine the impact of computed tomographic (CT) integration into an electroanatomic mapping (EAM) system on clinical outcome in patients undergoing catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF). Eighty patients with AF were randomized to undergo first-time wide encirclement of ipsilateral PV pairs using EAM alone (40 patients) or with CT (40 patients, Cartomerge). Wide encirclement of the pulmonary veins was performed using irrigated radiofrequency ablation with the electrophysiological endpoint of electrical isolation (EI). The primary endpoint was single-procedure success at 6 month follow up. Acute and long-term procedural outcomes were also determined. There was no significant difference in single procedure success between EAM (56%) and cavotricuspid isthmus image (CTI) (50%) groups (P = 0.9). Acute procedural outcomes (EI, PV reconnection, sinus rhythm restored by ablation in persistent AF), fluoroscopy, and procedure durations (EI of right PVs, EI of left PVs, total) did not differ significantly between EAM and CTI groups. Image integration to guide catheter ablation for AF did not significantly improve the clinical outcome. Achieving PV EI is the critical determinant of procedural success rather than the mapping tools used to achieve it.

  15. The impact of CT image integration into an electroanatomic mapping system on clinical outcomes of catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistler, Peter M; Rajappan, Kim; Jahngir, Mohammed; Earley, Mark J; Harris, Stuart; Abrams, Dominic; Gupta, Dhiraj; Liew, Reginald; Ellis, Stephen; Sporton, Simon C; Schilling, Richard J

    2006-10-01

    A detailed appreciation of left atrial/pulmonary vein (LA/PV) anatomy may be important in improving the safety and success of catheter ablation (CA) for atrial fibrillation (AF). The aim of this nonrandomized study was to determine the impact of computerized tomography (CT) image integration into a 3-dimensional (3D) mapping system on the clinical outcome of patients undergoing CA for AF. Ninety-four patients (age: 56 +/- 10 years) with AF (paroxysmal 46, persistent 48) underwent wide encirclement of ipsilateral PV pairs using irrigated radiofrequency ablation with the endpoint of electrical isolation. Ablation was guided by 3D mapping alone (electroanatomic 24, noncontact 23) in 47 (3DM group) patients and by CT image integration (Cartomerge) in 47 (CT group). In persistent AF, a combination of linear ablation and targeted ablation of complex fractionated electrograms was also performed. Successful PV electrical isolation did not differ between the two groups. A significant reduction in fluoroscopy times was demonstrated in the CT group (49 +/- 27 minutes vs 3DM group 62 +/- 26 minutes, P = 0.03). Arrhythmia recurrence was reduced in the CT group (32% vs 51% in the 3DM group, P safety and success of CA for AF.

  16. Multielectrode Pulmonary Vein Isolation Versus Single Tip Wide Area Catheter Ablation for Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation: A Multinational Multicenter Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boersma, Lucas V; van der Voort, Pepijn; Debruyne, Pilippe; Dekker, Lukas; Simmers, Tim; Rossenbacker, Tom; Balt, Jippe; Wijffels, Maurits; Degreef, Yves

    2016-04-01

    Single-shot ablation techniques may facilitate safe and simple pulmonary vein isolation to treat paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Multielectrode pulmonary vein isolation versus single tip wide area catheter ablation-paroxysmal atrial fibrillation is the first multinational, multicenter, prospective, noninferiority randomized clinical trial comparing multielectrode-phased radiofrequency ablation (MEA) to standard focal irrigated radiofrequency ablation (STA) using 3-dimensional navigation. Patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation were randomized to MEA (61 patients) or STA (59 patients). Preprocedure transesophageal echocardiogram and computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (also 6-month postprocedure) were performed. Mean age was 57 years, 25% female sex, BMI was 28, CHA2DS2-VASc score was 0 to 1 in 82%, 8% had previous right atrial ablation, whereas all had at least 1 antiarrhythmic drug failure. The MEA group had significantly shorter mean procedure time (96±36 versus 166±46 minutes, P50%. Freedom of atrial fibrillation for MEA and STA was 86.4% and 89.7% at 6 months, dropping to 76.3% and 81.0% at 12 months. In this multicenter, randomized clinical trial, MEA and STA had similar rates of single-procedure acute pulmonary vein isolation without serious adverse events in the first 30 days. MEA had slightly lower long-term arrhythmia freedom, but showed marked and significantly shorter procedure, fluoroscopy, and radiofrequency energy times. URL: www.clinicaltrials.gov; Unique identifier: NCT01696136. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. [Atrial fibrillation and stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aamodt, Anne Hege; Sandset, Per Morten; Atar, Dan; Tveit, Arnljot; Russell, David

    2013-08-06

    More than 70,000 Norwegians have atrial fibrillation, which is a major risk factor for ischemic stroke. A large proportion of ischemic strokes caused by atrial fibrillation could be prevented if patients receive optimal prophylactic treatment. This article describes the risk for ischemic stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation, and discusses who should receive prophylactic treatment and which therapy provides the best prevention. The article is based on recently published European, American and Canadian guidelines, a search in PubMed and the authors' own clinical experience. The new risk score CHA2DS2-VASc is better than the CHADS2 score for identifying patients with atrial fibrillation who have a truly low risk of ischemic stroke and are not in need of antithrombotic treatment. Oral anticoagulation therapy is recommended for patients with two or more risk factors for thromboembolism in addition to atrial fibrillation (CHA2DS2-VASc ≥ 2). Patients with atrial fibrillation and a single additional risk factor (CHA2DS2-VASc =1) an individual assessment should be made as to who should receive oral anticoagulants, and for patients with CHA2DS2-VASc = 0 antithrombotic treatment is not recommended. New oral anticoagulants are at least as effective as warfarin for preventing ischemic stroke in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, they carry a lower risk of cerebral haemorrhage, especially intracranial haemorrhage and are more practical in use. Platelet inhibitors have a minimal role in stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation. Risks stratifying patients using the CHA2DS2-VASc score is a better method for assessing which patients with atrial fibrillation who should receive oral anticoagulation. The introduction of new oral anticoagulants will simplify preventive treatment and hopefully lead to a more efficient anticoagulation treatment in a larger number of patients with atrial fibrillation.

  18. Improvement in estimated glomerular filtration rate in patients with chronic kidney disease undergoing catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navaravong, Leenhapong; Barakat, Michel; Burgon, Nathan; Mahnkopf, Christian; Koopmann, Matthias; Ranjan, Ravi; Kholmovski, Eugene; Marrouche, Nassir; Akoum, Nazem

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and atrial fibrillation (AF) often coexist. We studied the association of CKD with atrial fibrosis and the effect of AF ablation on kidney function. AF patients who had a pre- and postablation serum creatinine and who completed a late gadolinium enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; LGE-MRI) prior to ablation were included. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated and CKD was staged using the National Kidney Foundation guidelines. Patients with eGFR disease. Atrial fibrosis was not significant different between included CKD stages: 15.8 ± 8.8%, 16.6 ± 12.1%, 17.1 ± 10.4%, and 16.5 ± 8.4% for CKD stage 1, 2, 3A, and 3B, respectively (P = 0.476). At a median of 115 days following ablation, eGFR increased significantly in CKD stage 2 (74 ± 9 to 80 ± 23; P = 0.04), 3A (53 ± 5 to 69 ± 24; P chronic kidney disease. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Robotic navigation in catheter ablation for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation: midterm efficacy and predictors of postablation arrhythmia recurrences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlivák, Peter; Mlčochová, Hanka; Peichl, Petr; Cihák, Robert; Wichterle, Dan; Kautzner, Josef

    2011-05-01

    Remote navigation systems represent a novel strategy for catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF). The goal of this study is to describe a single-center experience with the electromechanical robotic system (Sensei, Hansen Medical) in treatment of patients with paroxysmal AF. Out of 200 patients who underwent robotically guided ablation for AF between 2007 and 2009 at our institute, 100 patients (29 women, age 56.5 ± 10 years) had paroxysmal AF refractory to antiarrhythmic drugs. Electroanatomic mapping using NavX system (St. Jude Medical) provided anatomical shell for subsequent circumferential ablation with robotic catheter (Artisan) loaded with a 3.5-mm, open-irrigation, cooled-tip ablation catheter. A mean of 69 radiofrequency current applications (duration 2082 ± 812 seconds) were delivered to achieve circumferential electrical isolation of pulmonary venous antra. Total procedural time reached 222 ± 54 minutes. The mean fluoroscopic time was 11.9 ± 7.8 minutes. There were no major procedure-related complications. After a median follow-up of 15 months (range 3-28 months), 63% of the patients were free from any atrial arrhythmias ≥ 30 seconds after the single procedure. Success rate increased to 86% after 1.2 procedures. Multivariate analysis revealed that only predictor of recurrent AF/AT was shorter overall procedural time (207 ± 36 vs 236 ± 64 minutes in patients with and without recurrences, respectively, P = 0.0068). This study demonstrates feasibility and safety of robotic navigation in catheter ablation for paroxysmal AF. Midterm follow-up documents success rate comparable to other technologies and potential for improvement in more extensive ablation along the ridges with thicker myocardium. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Efficacy of multi-electrode duty-cycled radiofrequency ablation in patients with paroxysmal and persistent atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koźluk, Edward; Balsam, Paweł; Peller, Michał; Kiliszek, Marek; Lodziński, Piotr; Piątkowska, Agnieszka; Małkowska, Sylwia; Rodkiewicz, Dariusz; Kochanowski, Janusz; Opolski, Grzegorz

    2013-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) catheter ablation is a first-line therapy for patients withdrug-refractory atrial fibrillation (AF). Complete isolation of electrical potentials at the ostium of pulmonary vein (PV) is a challenging procedure. There are different techniques and devicesused for PV isolation (PVI). The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of PV ablation catheter (PVAC). A total of 67 consecutive patients with paroxysmal and persistent AF were treated with the PVAC. The patients' information were obtained from clinical charts. Follow-up was obtained by one day Holter monitoring at 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 months after ablation and ECG registration if any symptoms or arrhythmia occurred. The median follow-up duration was 16 months (IQR: 12-20 months). In the population which was available at follow-up (n = 60), 22 (36.7%) patients were in sustained sinus rhythm (SR) without anti-arrhythmic drugs (AAD). Overall 26 (43.3%) patients were in sustained SR with and without AAD. In the paroxysmal AF group, after a single PVAC ablation procedure (n = 39), 19 (48.7%) patients had sustained SR without AAD. In the persistent AF group (n = 15), after the single PVAC ablation, 2 (13.3%) patients had sustained SR without AAD. PVI with PVAC is a safe procedure with 48.7% efficacy in patients with paroxysmal AF. The efficacy of PVAC in patients with persistent or long-standing persistent AF is not acceptable.

  1. Atrial Fibrillation and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... faulty heart valves, lung disease, and stimulant or alcohol abuse. Some people will have no identifiable cause for their AF. × Definition Atrial fibrillation (AF) describes the rapid, irregular beating ...

  2. History of hyperthyroidism and long-term outcome of catheter ablation of drug-refractory atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongcharoen, Wanwarang; Lin, Yenn-Jiang; Chang, Shih-Lin; Lo, Li-Wei; Hu, Yu-Feng; Chung, Fa-Po; Chong, Eric; Chao, Tze-Fan; Tuan, Ta-Chuan; Chang, Yao-Ting; Lin, Chin-Yu; Liao, Jo-Nan; Lin, Yi-Chun; Chen, Yun-Yu; Chen, Shih-Ann

    2015-09-01

    Hyperthyroidism is a known reversible cause of atrial fibrillation (AF). However, some patients remain in AF despite restoration of euthyroid status. The purpose of this study was to compare the electrophysiologic characteristics and long-term ablation outcome in AF patients with and without history of hyperthyroidism. The study enrolled 717 consecutive patients with AF who underwent first AF ablation, which involved pulmonary vein (PV) isolation in paroxysmal AF and additional substrate modification in nonparoxysmal AF patients. Eighty-four patients (12%) with hyperthyroidism history were compared to those without. Euthyroid status was achieved for ≥3 months before ablation in hyperthyroid patients. Patients with hyperthyroid history were associated with older age, more female gender, lower mean right atrial voltage, higher number of PV ectopic foci (1.3 ± 0.4 vs 1.0 ± 0.2, P hyperthyroid patients (7.1% vs 1.6%, P hyperthyroidism was an independent predictor of AF recurrence after single procedure (hazard ratio 2.07, 95% confidence interval 1.27-3.38). AF recurrence rates after multiple procedures were not different between patients with and those without hyperthyroid history. Patients with hyperthyroid history had a significantly higher number of PV ectopies and higher prevalence of non-PV ectopic foci compared to euthyroid patients, which resulted in a higher AF recurrence rate after a single procedure. Copyright © 2015 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Atrial Fibrillation and Hyperthyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayaprasad N

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation occurs in 10 – 15% of patients with hyperthyroidism. Low serum thyrotropin concentration is an independent risk factor for atrial fibrillation. Thyroid hormone contributes to arrythmogenic activity by altering the electrophysiological characteristics of atrial myocytes by shortening the action potential duration, enhancing automaticity and triggered activity in the pulmonary vein cardio myocytes. Hyperthyroidism results in excess mortality from increased incidence of circulatory diseases and dysrhythmias. Incidence of cerebral embolism is more in hyperthyroid patients with atrial fibrillation, especially in the elderly and anti-coagulation is indicated in them. Treatment of hyperthyroidism results in conversion to sinus rhythm in up to two-third of patients. Beta-blockers reduce left ventricular hypertrophy and atrial and ventricular arrhythmias in patients with hyperthyroidism. Treatment of sub clinical hyperthyroidism is controversial. Optimizing dose of thyroxine treatment in those with replacement therapy and beta-blockers is useful in exogenous subclinical hyperthyroidism.

  4. The Effect of Catheter Ablation on Left Atrial Size and Function for Patients with Atrial Fibrillation: An Updated Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Xiong

    Full Text Available Catheter ablation (CA for atrial fibrillation (AF is now an important therapeutic modality for patients with AF. However, data regarding changes in left atrial (LA function after CA have indicated conflicting results depending on the AF types, follow-up period, and the analytical imaging tools. The objective of this review was to analyze the effect of CA on the LA size and function for patients with AF.We searched for studies regarding LA size and function pre- and post-ablation in PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library, and Web of Knowledge through May 2014. LA function was measured by LA ejective fraction (LAEF, LA active ejective fraction (LAAEF, or both. Total and subgroup analyses were implemented using Cochrane Review Manager Version 5.2. Weighted mean differences with 95% confidence intervals were used to express the results of continuous outcomes using fixed or random effect models. I2 was used to calculate heterogeneity. To assess publication bias, Egger's test and Begg's funnel plot were performed using Stata 12.0.Twenty-five studies (2040 enrolled patients were selected for this meta-analysis. The LA diameter (LAD, maximum LA volume, and minimal LA volume were significantly decreased post-ablation, as compared with those at a pre-ablation visit. Compared with the pre-ablation outcomes, we found no significant differences in LAEF/LAAEF at a post-ablation follow-up. Decreases in LA volume and LAEF remained significant post-ablation for paroxysmal AF (PAF; however, the LAEF was insignificant changes in persistent AF (PeAF. Heterogeneity was significant in spite which individual study was excluded. A publication bias was not found. In a meta-regression analysis, we did not find any factor that contributed to the heterogeneity.With CA, LA volumes and LAD were decreased significantly in patients with AF; LAEF was not significant changes in patients with PeAF but decreased in those with PAF.

  5. Rapid hemostasis at the femoral venous access site using a novel hemostatic pad containing kaolin after atrial fibrillation ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sairaku, Akinori; Nakano, Yukiko; Oda, Noboru; Makita, Yuko; Kajihara, Kenta; Tokuyama, Takehito; Kihara, Yasuki

    2011-08-01

    Hemostasis at the femoral venous access site after atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation is often prolonged because of aggressive anticoagulation and the use of several large-sized sheaths. A newly developed hemostatic pad containing a natural mineral called kaolin causes blood to clot quickly. We evaluated the efficacy of this pad for hemostasis at the venous access site after AF ablation. Patients who were scheduled to undergo AF ablation were randomized to be treated with manual compression with (n = 59) or without kaolin-impregnated pads (n = 59) as hemostatic approaches at the femoral venous access site following sheath removal. Hemostasis time, rebleeding frequency, massive hematoma, device-related complications, and deep venous thrombosis (DVT) were compared between the two groups. Hemostasis time in the patients treated with kaolin-impregnated pads was significantly shorter than in those treated without (6.1 ± 2.3 vs. 14.5 ± 4.0 min; p pads was the only independent variable reducing hemostasis time (β = -0.78; p pads; p = 0.35). Only one patient had a massive groin hematoma, and no patient had device-related complications or DVT. Kaolin-impregnated hemostatic pads safely and effectively decreased hemostasis time for the femoral venous access site in patients undergoing AF ablation. However, whether its use allows earlier postprocedural ambulation is difficult to predict.

  6. [Anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation - an update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antz, Matthias; Hullmann, Bettina; Neufert, Christian; Vocke, Wolfgang

    2008-12-01

    The correct anticoagulation regimen for prevention of thromboembolic events is essential in patients with atrial fibrillation. However, only a minority of patients receives anticoagulation according to the guidelines. The current guidelines are intended to make the indication for anticoagulation more simple and are summarized in the present article. This includes recommendations for chronic anticoagulation, prevention of thromboembolic events after cardioversion and in ablation of atrial fibrillation.

  7. The Impact of Transforming Growth Factor-β1 Level on Outcome After Catheter Ablation in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishima, Hideyuki; Mine, Takanao; Takahashi, Satoshi; Ashida, Kenki; Ishihara, Masaharu; Masuyama, Tohru

    2017-04-01

    Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1 ) is an important factor that induces atrial fibrosis and atrial fibrillation (AF). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between TGF-β1 level and clinical factors before catheter ablation (CA), and to investigate the impact of TGF-β1 level on the outcome after CA for AF. This prospective study included 151 patients (persistent AF group: n = 59, paroxysmal AF [PAF] group: n = 54, and control group: n = 38). All patients who underwent CA for AF were followed up for 12 months. The PAF group had the highest TGF-β1 levels in all patients. An early recurrence of AF (ERAF: defined as episodes of atrial tachyarrhythmia within a 3-month blanking period) was detected in 60 patients (53%). Recurrent AF after the blanking period was detected in 36 patients (32%). On multivariate analysis, low TGF-β1 level was the only independent factor associated with recurrent AF. Moreover, the AF recurrence ratio was higher in the low TGF-β1 group (< 12.56 ng/mL) than in the high TGF-β1 group (16 of 29 patients, 55% vs. 20 of 84 patients, 24%, P = 0.002 by log-rank test). PAF was associated with a higher TGF-β1 level. Moreover, lower TGF-β1 level in AF patients could be a cause of recurrent AF after CA. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Short-term Antiarrhythmic Drugs After Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Buyun; Peng, Fang; Tang, Weiliang; Du, Ye; Guo, Hangyuan

    2016-09-01

    The incidence of recurrent arrhythmia after catheter ablation (CA) for atrial fibrillation (AF) is unacceptable. Short-term antiarrhythmic drug (AAD) treatment following CA was presumed to be effective in reducing recurrent arrhythmia. To fully evaluate the efficacy of short-term use of AADs following CA for AF in preventing recurrence of atrial tachyarrhythmias. PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, and ClinicalTrials.gov were searched up until May 1, 2016. We enrolled randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that evaluated the efficacy of short-term use of AADs following CA for AF in preventing early and/or late recurrence of atrial tachyarrhythmias. The statistical analyses were performed using Review Manager Version 5.3. Six RCTs were included in this analysis, involving a total of 2764 patients. The frequency of early recurrence of atrial tachyarrhythmias was 39.5% in the AAD group (556 of 1407) and 47.2% (640 of 1357) in the control group. The pooled risk ratio of the AAD group to the control group was 0.78 (95% CI = 0.62-0.98). Regarding late recurrence of AF (LRAF), the incidence in the AAD group and the control group was 32.5% (420 of 1293) and 34.6% (450 of 1300), respectively. No significant difference was identified between the 2 groups (relative risk = 0.94, 95% CI = 0.85-1.05). Short-term use of AADs following CA for AF reduced the incidence of early recurrent atrial tachyarrhythmias but did not prevent LRAF. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Five-year impact of catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation in patients with a prior history of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunch, T Jared; May, Heidi T; Bair, Tami L; Crandall, Brian G; Cutler, Michael J; Day, John D; Jacobs, Victoria; Mallender, Charles; Osborn, Jeffrey S; Weiss, J Peter

    2017-11-13

    Catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation(AF) is an established therapeutic rhythm approach. Patients with a prior history of a stroke(CVA) represent a unique high-risk population for recurrent thromboembolic events. The role of antiarrhythmic treatment on the natural history of stroke recurrence in these patients is not fully understood. Three patient groups with a prior CVA and 5 years of follow-up were matched 1:3:3 by propensity score(±0.01): AF ablation patients receiving their first ablation(n = 139), AF patients that did not receive an ablation(n = 416), and CVA patients without clinical AF(n = 416). Prior CVA was determined by medical chart review. Patients were followed for outcomes of recurrent CVA, heart failure, death. The average age of the population was 69±11 years and 51% male. AF ablation patients had higher rates of hypertension and heart failure (p < 0.0001), but diabetes prevalence was similar between the groups(p = 0.5). 5-year risk of CVA(HR = 2.26, p < 0.0001) and death(HR = 2.43, p < 0.0001) were higher in the AF, no ablation group compared those that were ablated. When comparing AF, ablation to no AF patients, there was not a significant difference in 5-year risk of for CVA(HR = 0.82, p = 0.39) and death (HR = 0.92, p = 0.70), however heart failure risk was increased(HR = 3.08, p = 0.001). In patients with AF and a prior CVA, patients undergoing ablation have lower rates of recurrent stroke compared to AF patients not ablated. Although the full mechanisms of benefit are unknown, as CVA rates are similar to patients without AF these data are suggestive of a potential altering of the natural history of disease progression. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Progression of atrial fibrillation after catheter ablation procedure and antiarrhythmic drug therapy in patients with paroxysmal AF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. А. Симонян

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim. This prospective randomized study was aimed to assess the progression of atrial fibrillation (AF after ablation procedure and antiarrhythmic drug therapy (AAD in patients with paroxysmal AF by means of implantable cardiac monitors (ICM. Methods. The study enrolled 92 patients with paroxysmal AF, who were eligible either for catheter ablation or AAD. The patients were randomized into two groups: 1 AAD + ICM implantation (group I; n=46, and 2 AF catheter ablation (CA + ICM implantation (group II; n=46, and 2. The primary endpoint was AF progression according to ICM data. The AF progression was defined as AF burden > 30%. A complication rate after ablation procedure and side effects of AAD were determined as the secondary endpoints. The follow up of this study was 24 months. Results. By the end of the follow-up period, AF progression was observed in 27 (58.7% patients in the AAD group and 10 (21.7% patients in the CA group (р=0.0003; HR 0.37, 95% CI [0.17-0.76], р=0.007, Cox regression. 13 (28,3% patients in the AAD group and 2 (4.3% in the CA group (р=0.002 developed persistent AF. The complication rate in the AAD group was 24% (11 patients and 6.5 % (3 patients in the CA group (р=0.02.Conclusion. Radiofrequency ablation of AF leads to a significant decrease in AF progression when compared with antiarrhythmic drug therapy in patients with paroxysmal AF, which was confirmed by implantable cardiac monitors data.Received 12 July 2016. Accepted 22 August 2016.Funding: The study had no sponsorship.Conflict of interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.

  11. Virtual In-Silico Modeling Guided Catheter Ablation Predicts Effective Linear Ablation Lesion Set for Longstanding Persistent Atrial Fibrillation: Multicenter Prospective Randomized Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaemin Shim

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Radiofrequency catheter ablation for persistent atrial fibrillation (PeAF still has a substantial recurrence rate. This study aims to investigate whether an AF ablation lesion set chosen using in-silico ablation (V-ABL is clinically feasible and more effective than an empirically chosen ablation lesion set (Em-ABL in patients with PeAF.Methods: We prospectively included 108 patients with antiarrhythmic drug-resistant PeAF (77.8% men, age 60.8 ± 9.9 years, and randomly assigned them to the V-ABL (n = 53 and Em-ABL (n = 55 groups. Five different in-silico ablation lesion sets [1 pulmonary vein isolation (PVI, 3 linear ablations, and 1 electrogram-guided ablation] were compared using heart-CT integrated AF modeling. We evaluated the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of V-ABL compared with that of Em-ABL.Results: The pre-procedural computing time for five different ablation strategies was 166 ± 11 min. In the Em-ABL group, the earliest terminating blinded in-silico lesion set matched with the Em-ABL lesion set in 21.8%. V-ABL was not inferior to Em-ABL in terms of procedure time (p = 0.403, ablation time (p = 0.510, and major complication rate (p = 0.900. During 12.6 ± 3.8 months of follow-up, the clinical recurrence rate was 14.0% in the V-ABL group and 18.9% in the Em-ABL group (p = 0.538. In Em-ABL group, clinical recurrence rate was significantly lower after PVI+posterior box+anterior linear ablation, which showed the most frequent termination during in-silico ablation (log-rank p = 0.027.Conclusions: V-ABL was feasible in clinical practice, not inferior to Em-ABL, and predicts the most effective ablation lesion set in patients who underwent PeAF ablation.

  12. Association of pre-ablation level of potential blood markers with atrial fibrillation recurrence after catheter ablation: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hui; Wang, Weizong; Wang, Cong; Xie, Xinxing; Hou, Yinglong

    2017-03-01

    The meta-analysis was aimed to search for candidate blood markers whose pre-ablation level was associated with atrial fibrillation (AF) recurrence after radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA). A systematic literature search of PubMed, EMBASE, Springer Link, Web of Science, Wiley-Cochrane library, and supplemented with Google scholar search engine was performed. Thirty-six studies covering 11 blood markers were qualified for this meta-analysis. Compared with the nonrecurrence group, the recurrence group had increased pre-ablation level of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein, low density lipoprotein (LDL), and tissue inhibitor of metal loproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) [standardized mean difference (95% confidence interval): 0.37 (0.13-0.61), 0.77 (0.40-1.14), 1.25 (0.64-1.87), 0.37 (0.21-0.52), 0.35 (0.10-0.60), 0.24 (0.07-0.42), 0.17 (0.00-0.34), respectively], while no statistical difference of pre-ablation level of white blood cell, total cholesterol, triglyceride, and transforming growth factor-β1 was found. Subgroup analysis demonstrated that ANP was associated with AF recurrence in participants who had no concomitant structural heart diseases (SHD); however, not in participants who had SHD, C-reactive protein was associated with AF recurrence in Asian studies, whereas not in European studies. Increased pre-ablation level of ANP, BNP, NT-pro-BNP, IL-6, C-reactive protein, LDL, and TIMP-2 was associated with greater risk of AF recurrence after RFCA.

  13. A simulation study to compare the phase-shift angle radiofrequency ablation mode with bipolar and unipolar modes in creating linear lesions for atrial fibrillation ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shengjie; Wu, Xiaomei; Wang, Weiqi

    2016-05-01

    Purpose In pulmonary veins (PVs) isolation (PVI), radiofrequency (RF) energy is often used to create a linear lesion for blocking the accessory conduction pathways around PVs. By using transient finite element analysis, this study compared the effectiveness of phase-shift mode (PsM) ablation with bipolar mode (BiM) and unipolar mode (UiM) in creating a continuous lesion and lesion depth in a 5-mm thick atrial wall. Materials and methods Computer models were developed to study the temperature distributions and lesion dimensions in atrial walls created through PsM, BiM, and UiM. Four phase-shift angles - 45°, 90°, 135°, and 180° - were considered in PsM ablation (hereafter, PsM-45°, PsM-90°, PsM-135°, and PsM-180°, respectively). Results At 60 s/30 V peak value of RF voltage, UiM and PsM-45° did not create an effective lesion, whereas BiM created a lesion of maximum depth and width approximately 1.01 and 1.62 mm, respectively. PsM-135° and PsM-180° not only created transmural lesions in 5-mm thick atrial walls but also created continuous lesions between electrodes spaced 4 mm apart; similarly, PsM-90° created a continuous lesion with a maximum depth and width of nearly 4.09 and 6.12 mm. Conclusions Compared with UiM and BiM, PsM-90°, PsM-135° and PsM-180° created continuous and larger lesions in a single ablation procedure and at 60 s/30 V peak value of RF voltage. Therefore, the proposed PsM ablation method is suitable for PVI and linear isolation at the left atrial roof for treating atrial fibrillation.

  14. Management and prognosis of atrial fibrillation in the diabetic patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallisgaard, Jannik Langtved; Lindhardt, Tommi Bo; Olesen, Jonas Bjerring

    2015-01-01

    The global burden of atrial fibrillation and diabetes mellitus (diabetes) is considerable, and prevalence rates are increasing. Diabetes is associated with an increased risk of developing atrial fibrillation; however, diabetes also influences the management and prognosis of atrial fibrillation...... and outcomes of heart failure and the success rates of both ablation and cardioversion in atrial fibrillation patients with diabetes. Finally, this article describes the association of HbA1c levels with the management and prognosis of atrial fibrillation patients........ In the following article, the authors describe the association between diabetes and atrial fibrillation; specifically, the significance of diabetes on the risk of atrial fibrillation, ischemic stroke and bleeding complications associated with anticoagulation. In addition, the authors evaluate the risks...

  15. High-voltage zones within the pulmonary vein antra: Major determinants of acute pulmonary vein reconnections after atrial fibrillation ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Koichi; Watanabe, Ichiro; Okumura, Yasuo; Iso, Kazuki; Takahashi, Keiko; Watanabe, Ryuta; Arai, Masaru; Kurokawa, Sayaka; Nakai, Toshiko; Ohkubo, Kimie; Yoda, Shunichi; Hirayama, Atsushi

    2017-08-01

    Recurrence of atrial fibrillation (AF) after pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) is mainly due to PV reconnections. Patient-specific tissue characteristics that may contribute remain unidentified. This study aimed to assess the relationship between the bipolar electrogram voltage amplitudes recorded from the PV-left atrial (LA) junction and acute PV reconnection sites. Three-dimensional LA voltage maps created before an extensive encircling PVI in 47 AF patients (31 men; mean age 62 ± 11 years) were examined for an association between the EGM voltage amplitude recorded from the PV-LA junction and acute post-PVI PV reconnections (spontaneous PV reconnections and/or ATP-provoked dormant PV conduction). Acute PV reconnections were observed in 17 patients (36%) and in 24 (3%) of the 748 PV segments (16 segments per patient) and were associated with relatively high bipolar voltage amplitudes (3.26 ± 0.85 vs. 1.79 ± 1.15 mV, p voltage (137 [106, 166] vs. 295 [193, 498] gs/mV, p voltage and FTI/PV-LA bipolar voltage for acute PV reconnections (areas under the curve: 0.86 and 0.89, respectively); the best cutoff values were >2.12 mV and ≤183 gs/mV, respectively. The PV-LA voltage on the PV-encircling ablation line and FTI/PV-LA voltage were related to the acute post-PVI PV reconnections. A more durable ablation strategy is warranted for high-voltage zones.

  16. Intracardiac echo-guided radiofrequency catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation in patients with atrial septal defect or patent foramen ovale repair: a feasibility, safety, and efficacy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakkireddy, Dhanunjaya; Rangisetty, Umamahesh; Prasad, Subramanya; Verma, Atul; Biria, Mazda; Berenbom, Loren; Pimentel, Rhea; Emert, Martin; Rosamond, Thomas; Fahmy, Tamer; Patel, Dimpi; Di Biase, Luigi; Schweikert, Robert; Burkhardt, David; Natale, Andrea

    2008-11-01

    Intracardiac Echo-Guided Radiofrequency Catheter. Patients with atrial septal defect (ASD) are at higher risk for atrial fibrillation (AF) even after repair. Transseptal access in these patients is perceived to be difficult. We describe the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of pulmonary vein antral isolation (PVAI) in these patients. We prospectively compared post-ASD/patent foramen ovale (PFO) repair patients (group I, n = 45) with age-gender-AF type matched controls (group II, n = 45). All the patients underwent PVAI through a double transseptal puncture with a roving circular mapping catheter technique guided by intracardiac echocardiography (ICE). The short-term (3 months) and long-term (12 month) failure rates were assessed. In group I, 23 (51%) had percutaneous closure devices and 22 (49%) had a surgical closure. There was no significant difference between group I and II in the baseline characteristics. Intracardiac echo-guided double transseptal access was obtained in 98% of patients in group I and in 100% of patients in group II. PVAI was performed in all patients, with right atrial flutter ablation in 7 patients in group I and in 4 patients in group II. Over a mean follow-up of 15 +/- 4 months, group I had higher short-term (18% vs 13%, P = 0.77) and long-term recurrence (24% vs 18%, P = 0.6) than group II. There was no significant difference in the perioperative complications between the two groups. Echocardiography at 3 months showed interatrial communication in 2 patients in group I and 1 patient in group II, which resolved at 12 months. Percutaneous AF ablation using double transseptal access is feasible, safe, and efficacious in patients with ASD and PFO repairs.

  17. Association between success rate and citation count of studies of radiofrequency catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation: possible evidence of citation bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perino, Alexander C; Hoang, Donald D; Holmes, Tyson H; Santangeli, Pasquale; Heidenreich, Paul A; Perez, Marco V; Wang, Paul J; Turakhia, Mintu P

    2014-09-01

    The preferential citation of studies with the highest success rates could exaggerate perceived effectiveness, particularly for treatments with widely varying published success rates such as radiofrequency catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation. We systematically identified observational studies and clinical trials of radiofrequency catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation between 1990 and 2012. Generalized Poisson regression was used to estimate association between study success rate and total citation count, adjusting for sample size, journal impact factor, time since publication, study design, and whether first or last author was a consensus-defined pre-eminent expert. We identified 174 articles meeting our inclusion criteria (36 289 subjects). After adjustment only for time since publication, a 10-point increase above the mean in pooled reported success rates was associated with a 17.8% increase in citation count at 5 years postpublication (95% confidence interval, 7.1-28.4%; Pcitation count; 95% confidence interval, 7.6-29.6%; Pcitation count, which may indicate citation bias. To readers of the literature, radiofrequency catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation could be perceived to be more effective than the data supports. These findings may have implications for a wide variety of novel cardiovascular therapies. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Assessment of atrial fibrillation ablation outcomes with clinic ECG, monthly 24-h Holter ECG, and twice-daily telemonitoring ECG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Takehiro; Aizawa, Yoshiyasu; Kurata, Naomi; Nakajima, Kazuaki; Kashimura, Shin; Kunitomi, Akira; Nishiyama, Takahiko; Katsumata, Yoshinori; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Fukumoto, Kotaro; Tanimoto, Yoko; Fukuda, Keiichi; Takatsuki, Seiji

    2017-03-01

    Differences in the methodologies for evaluating atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation outcomes should be evaluated. In the present study, we compared the AF ablation outcomes among periodic clinic electrocardiography (ECG), 24-h Holter ECG, and telemonitoring ECG to evaluate the differences among these methods. In addition, we evaluated the AF-free survival rate for each method with different durations of the blanking period. A total of 30 AF patients were followed up for 6 months after initial catheter ablation, with clinic ECG on every clinic visit, monthly 24-h Holter ECG, and telemonitoring ECG twice daily and upon symptoms. AF relapse was defined as AF or atrial tachycardia detected with any of the methods. Two patients dropped out of the study, and 28 patients were followed up for 8.8 ± 2.7 months. Patients underwent 3.6 ± 0.8 clinic ECG, 5.1 ± 0.8 Holter ECG, and 273 ± 68 telemonitoring ECG examinations. During the first, second, third, fourth, fifth, and sixth months of follow-up, Holter ECG detected relapses in 11.1, 8.3, 11.5, 15.4, 4.2, and 4.8 % of patients and telemonitoring ECG detected relapses in 32.1, 25.0, 25.0, 17.9, 28.6, and 17.9 % of patients, respectively. When no duration was set for the blanking period, the AF-free survival rate was significantly lower with telemonitoring ECG (46.4 %) than with Holter ECG (78.6 %, P = 0.013) or clinic ECG (85.7 %, P = 0.002). In addition, when the duration of the blanking period was set to 3 months, the AF-free survival rate was significantly lower with telemonitoring ECG than with clinic ECG (92.9 vs. 71.4 %, P = 0.041). The AF ablation outcomes with twice-daily telemonitoring ECG might differ from those with clinic ECG when the duration of the blanking period is 0-3 months. A follow-up based solely on clinic ECG might underestimate AF recurrence.

  19. Direct or coincidental elimination of stable rotors or focal sources may explain successful atrial fibrillation ablation: on-treatment analysis of the CONFIRM trial (Conventional ablation for AF with or without focal impulse and rotor modulation).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Sanjiv M; Krummen, David E; Clopton, Paul; Shivkumar, Kalyanam; Miller, John M

    2013-07-09

    This study sought to determine whether ablation of recently described stable atrial fibrillation (AF) sources, either directly by Focal Impulse and Rotor Modulation (FIRM) or coincidentally when anatomic ablation passes through AF sources, may explain long-term freedom from AF. It is unclear why conventional anatomic AF ablation can be effective in some patients yet ineffective in others with similar profiles. The CONFIRM (Conventional Ablation for AF With or Without Focal Impulse and Rotor Modulation) trial prospectively revealed stable AF rotors or focal sources in 98 of 101 subjects with AF at 107 consecutive ablation cases. In 1:2 fashion, subjects received targeted source ablation (FIRM) followed by conventional ablation, or conventional ablation alone. We determined whether ablation lesions on electroanatomic maps passed through AF sources on FIRM maps. Subjects who completed follow-up (n = 94; 71.2% with persistent AF) showed 2.3 ± 1.1 concurrent AF rotors or focal sources that lay near pulmonary veins (22.8%), left atrial roof (16.0%), and elsewhere in the left (28.2%) and right (33.0%) atria. AF sources were ablated directly in 100% of FIRM cases and coincidentally (e.g., left atrial roof) in 45% of conventional cases (p sources were ablated but in only 18.2% of patients if sources were missed (p sources were ablated, intermediate if some sources were ablated, and lowest if no sources were ablated (p sources may explain freedom from AF after diverse approaches to ablation. Patient-specific AF source distributions are consistent with the reported success of specific anatomic lesion sets and of widespread ablation. These results support targeting AF sources to reduce unnecessary ablation, and motivate studies on FIRM-only ablation. Copyright © 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. HYPERTHYROIDISM AND ATRIAL FIBRILLATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Marusenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Review on a problem of the development of atrial fibrillation in patients with thyrotoxicosis is presented. Thyrotoxicosis is one of the most frequent endocrine diseases, conceding only to a diabetes mellitus. The most frequent reasons of hyperthyroidism are Graves’ disease and functional thyroid autonomy. The authors give an analysis of data on the cardiac effects of thyrotoxicosis, features of heart remodeling under the influence of thyroid hyperfunction, prevalence of atrial fibrillation in thyrotoxicosis, depending on age, as well as the possibility of restoring sinus rhythm in the combination of these diseases. Particular attention is paid to the effect on the heart of subclinical thyrotoxicosis, which is defined as a dysfunction of the thyroid gland, characterized by low serum concentration of thyrotropin, normal values of free thyroxine and free triiodothyronine. Subclinical hyperthyroidism is also capable of causing heart remodeling and diastolic dysfunction.Prevalence of thyrotoxicosis in elderly people is higher in areas of iodine deficiency; it is relevant for our country due to the large territory of iodine deficiency. In elderly patients, the cardiac effects of thyrotoxicosis prevail in the clinical picture, that makes it difficult to diagnose endocrine disorders, and correction of thyrotoxicosis is critically important for the successful control of the heart rhythm. The article also discusses the problem of thyrotoxic cardiomyopathy, caused by the toxic effect of excess thyroid hormones: features of this heart disorder, factors affecting its formation, clinical significance and contribution to the development of rhythm disturbances. The greatest significance is the development of atrial fibrillation as a result of thyrotox-icosis in older patients who already have various cardiovascular diseases.Atrial fibrillation is the most frequent heart rhythm disorder in thyrotoxicosis. The main cause of arrhythmia in hyperthyroidism is the

  1. The ratio of early transmitral flow velocity (E) to early mitral annular velocity (Em) predicts improvement in left ventricular systolic and diastolic function 1 year after catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, In-Soo; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Shim, Chi-Young; Mun, Hee-Sun; Uhm, Jae Sun; Joung, Boyoung; Hong, Geu-Ru; Lee, Moon-Hyoung; Pak, Hui-Nam

    2015-07-01

    Successful rhythm control after atrial fibrillation catheter ablation is known to induce left atrial reverse remodelling and improve left ventricular (LV) function. We explored the clinical factors affecting LV systolic and diastolic function 1-year after catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation. We compared pre-procedural and 1-year follow-up echocardiograms in 521 patients with atrial fibrillation who underwent catheter ablation. Left ventricular systolic function was estimated by the ejection fraction (EF); diastolic function was estimated by the ratio of early transmitral flow velocity (E) to early mitral annular velocity (Em). (i) Catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation significantly reduced left atrium volume index (P Em Em was significantly reduced in patients with pre-procedural E/Em ≥ 15 (n = 67, P = 0.008). (iii) Baseline E/Em Em ≥ 15 (β = 4.896, 95% CI 3.45 to 6.34, P Em. Pre-procedural E/Em predicted improvement in LV systolic and diastolic functions 1 year after catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation. Low baseline E/Em was independently associated with improved EF, while high E/Em predicted improvement in LV diastolic function. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. An Aggressive Strategy for Maintenance of Sinus Rhythm Including a Combination of Catheter Ablation and Antiarrhythmic Drug Therapy Benefits Patients with Chronic Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Haruna, MD

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of restoration and maintenance of sinus rhythm by a combination of catheter ablation and antiarrhythmic drugs (AADs on atrial function in patients with chronic atrial fibrillation (AF remain unknown. In 15 patients with chronic AF (>1 year, we attempted to restore and maintain sinus rhythm by ablation targeting complex fractionated atrial electrocardiograms (CFAEs combined with pulmonary vein isolation with or without AADs. Sinus rhythm was restored in all patients. At 17:7 ± 7:2 months after AF ablation, maintenance of sinus rhythm was achieved in 20% of patients without AADs and in 73.3% of patients with AADs. The left atrial diameter decreased significantly by 9:5 ± 8:1% (P < 0:05 during the 12-month followup. AADs did not have any adverse effects. The aggressive strategy for maintenance of sinus rhythm involving AF ablation and AADs potentially led to recovery of structural changes in the LA in patients with chronic AF.

  3. Administration of antiarrhythmic drugs to maintain sinus rhythm after catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiuli; Alida, Choumi T; Yu, Bo

    2015-08-01

    Whether the short-term administration of antiarrhythmic drugs (AADs) to maintain sinus rhythm following catheter ablation (CA) for atrial fibrillation (AF) can prevent the recurrence of AF is still a matter of debate. We searched the PubMed database and the Cochrane Library, and compiled a list of retrieved articles. We included only randomised controlled trials(RCTs) that compared any AADs against control (placebo or no treatment) or other AADs following CA for AF. Statistical analysis of the odds ratio (OR) and corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) were used to determine the overall effect of both outcomes. The Mantel-Haenszel method was used to pool data of the outcomes of AF recurrence into fixed effect model meta-analyses. We performed a systematic review to determine the effectiveness of short-term treatment with AADs on the recurrence of AF after CA. Six RCTs were included in this study, with a total of 814 patients. Post-procedural temporary administration of AADs in patients after CA for AF reduced the early recurrence of AF (antiarrhythmic drug 103 patients [25.3%], control 162 patients [39.8%]; OR 0.47 [95% CI 0.34-0.64]; χ(2)  = 3.77; P = 0.58; I(2)  = 0%). No significant difference in patients after CA for AF in the late recurrence of AF (antiarrhythmic drug 148 patients [36.5%], control 171 patients [42.5%]; OR 0.77 [95% CI 0.57-1.03]; χ(2)  = 3.15; P = 0.68; I(2)  = 0%). The heterogeneity was zero in both analyses. Although the continued administration of AADs after CA for AF can decrease early atrial tachycardias (ATa), this treatment does not prevent late ATa. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Increased epicardial fat is independently associated with the presence and chronicity of atrial fibrillation and radiofrequency ablation outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stojanovska, Jadranka; Kazerooni, Ella A.; Gross, Barry H.; Patel, Smita [University of Michigan Health System, Department of Radiology, Division of Cardiothoracic Radiology, UH B1-132 Taubman/Box 0302, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Sinno, Mohamad; Oral, Hakan [University of Michigan Health System, Department of Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Medicine, Electrophysiology Laboratory, Cardiovascular Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Watcharotone, Kuanwong [University of Michigan, Michigan Institute for Clinical and Health Research (MICHR), Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Jacobson, Jon A. [University of Michigan Health System, Department of Radiology, Division of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-08-15

    To determine whether intrathoracic fat volumes are associated with presence and chronicity of atrial fibrillation (AF) and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) treatment outcome. IRB approval was obtained and patient consent was waived for this HIPAA-compliant retrospective study. 169 patients with AF (75 non-paroxysmal and 94 paroxysmal) and 62 control patients underwent cardiac CT examination. Extrapericardial (EPFV) and epicardial fat volumes (EFV) were measured on CT, the sum of which is the total intrathoracic fat volume. Associations between these three fat volumes and presence and chronicity of AF, and outcome after RFA, were evaluated using logistic regression analysis. EFV was significantly associated with presence [OR 1.01 (95 % CI 1.003-1.03), p = 0.01], chronicity of AF [1.008 (1.001-1.020), p = 0.03] and AF recurrence after RFA [1.009 (1.001-1.01), p = 0.02] after adjustment for age, gender and BMI. Patients with a larger EFV had a shorter time to AF recurrence (p = 0.017) and a higher rate of recurrence (54 % vs 46 %) (p = 0.002) after RFA. EPFV had no significant associations. Increased epicardial fat is associated with the presence and chronicity of AF, a higher probability of AF recurrence after RFA and a shorter AF-free interval. (orig.)

  5. The influence of residual apixaban on bleeding complications during and after catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaro Mukai

    2017-10-01

    Conclusions: Low residual plasma apixaban is associated with a higher incidence of bleeding complications during/after AF ablation, potentially because of a greater heparin requirement during AF ablation.

  6. Efficacy and effects on cardiac function of radiofrequency catheter ablation vs. direct current cardioversion of persistent atrial fibrillation with left ventricular systolic dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maojing Wang

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effect of catheter ablation vs. direct current synchronized cardioversion (DCC in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation (AF and left ventricular systolic dysfunction, and to define baseline features of patients that will get more benefit from ablation.From July 2013 to October 2014, 97 consecutive single-center patients with persistent AF and symptomatic heart failure (left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF 20% or to over 55% in 31 (54.39% patients with worse baseline cardiac function and ventricular rate control.Catheter ablation relative to cardioversion of persistent AF with symptomatic heart failure yielded better 12-month SR maintenance and cardiac function. Compared with non-responders, patients with improved LVEF post-ablation had poorer ventricular rate control and cardiac function at baseline, suggesting a significant component of tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy in this group.

  7. Pharmacological Treatment for Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaoru Sugi, MD PhD

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacological treatment for atrial fibrillation has a variety of purposes, such as pharmacological defibrillation, maintenance of sinus rhythm, heart rate control to prevent congestive heart failure and prevention of both cerebral infarction and atrial remodeling. Sodium channel blockers are superior to potassium channel blockers for atrial defibrillation, while both sodium and potassium channel blockers are effective in the maintenance of sinus rhythm. In general, digitalis or Ca antagonists are used to control heart rate during atrial fibrillation to prevent congestive heart failure, while amiodarone or bepridil also reduce heart rates during atrial fibrillation. Anticoagulant therapy with warfarin is recommended to prevent cerebral infarction and angiotensin converting enzyme antagonists or angiotensin II receptor blockers are also used to prevent atrial remodeling. One should select appropriate drugs for treatment of atrial fibrillation according to the patient's condition.

  8. Assessment of concomitant paroxysmal atrial fibrillation ablation in mitral valve surgery patients based on continuous monitoring: does a different lesion set matter?†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogachev-Prokophiev, Alexandr; Zheleznev, Sergey; Pivkin, Alexey; Pokushalov, Evgeny; Romanov, Alexander; Nazarov, Vladimir; Karaskov, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The efficacy of concomitant ablation techniques in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) undergoing mitral valve surgery remains under debate. The aim of this prospective, randomized, single-centre study was to compare pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) only versus a left atrial maze (LAM) procedure in patients with paroxysmal AF during mitral valve surgery. METHODS Between February 2009 and June 2011, 52 patients with a mean age of 54.2 (standard deviation 7.2 years) underwent mitral valve surgery and concomitant bipolar radiofrequency ablation for paroxysmal AF. Patients were randomized into the PVI group (n = 27) and the LAM group (n = 25). After surgery, an implantable loop recorder for continuous electrocardiography (ECG) monitoring was implanted. Patients with an AF burden (AF%) of paroxysm recurrence was significantly higher in the PVI group than in the LAM group (62.9 vs 24.0%, P paroxysmal AF who underwent mitral valve surgery. PMID:24254537

  9. Assessment of concomitant paroxysmal atrial fibrillation ablation in mitral valve surgery patients based on continuous monitoring: does a different lesion set matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogachev-Prokophiev, Alexandr; Zheleznev, Sergey; Pivkin, Alexey; Pokushalov, Evgeny; Romanov, Alexander; Nazarov, Vladimir; Karaskov, Alexander

    2014-02-01

    The efficacy of concomitant ablation techniques in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) undergoing mitral valve surgery remains under debate. The aim of this prospective, randomized, single-centre study was to compare pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) only versus a left atrial maze (LAM) procedure in patients with paroxysmal AF during mitral valve surgery. Between February 2009 and June 2011, 52 patients with a mean age of 54.2 (standard deviation 7.2 years) underwent mitral valve surgery and concomitant bipolar radiofrequency ablation for paroxysmal AF. Patients were randomized into the PVI group (n = 27) and the LAM group (n = 25). After surgery, an implantable loop recorder for continuous electrocardiography (ECG) monitoring was implanted. Patients with an AF burden (AF%) of paroxysm recurrence was significantly higher in the PVI group than in the LAM group (62.9 vs 24.0%, P paroxysmal AF who underwent mitral valve surgery.

  10. Atrial fibrillation: inflammation in disguise?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lappegard, K.T.; Hovland, A.; Pop, G.A.M.; Mollnes, T.E.

    2013-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is highly prevalent, and affected patients are at an increased risk of a number of complications, including heart failure and thrombo-embolism. Over the past years, there has been increasing interest in the role of inflammatory processes in atrial fibrillation, from the first

  11. Multimorbidity in Older Adults with Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Michael A

    2016-05-01

    Older adults with atrial fibrillation often have multiple comorbid conditions, including common geriatric syndromes. Pharmacologic therapy, whether for rate control or rhythm control, can result in complications related to polypharmacy in patients who are often on multiple medications for other conditions. Because of uncertainty about the relative risks and benefits of rate versus rhythm control (including antiarrhythmic or ablation therapy), anticoagulation, and procedural treatments (eg, ablation, left atrial appendage closure, pacemaker placement) in older patients with multimorbidity, shared decision-making is essential. However, this may be challenging in patients with cognitive dysfunction, high fall risk, or advanced comorbidity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Dementia and Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pastori, Daniele; Miyazawa, Kazuo; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2018-01-01

    The risk of developing dementia is increased in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), with the incidence of both conditions increasing with aging. Patients with dementia frequently do not receiving adequate thrombo-prophylaxis, because of the inability to monitor INR and/or to achieve...... in therapeutic range during VKAs therapy, the assessment of cognitive impairment may help identify those patients who may benefit from switching to NOACs. In conclusion, patients with AF and dementia benefit from anticoagulation and should not be denied receiving adequate stroke prevention. Cognitive function...

  13. Does isolation of the left atrial posterior wall improve clinical outcomes after radiofrequency catheter ablation for persistent atrial fibrillation?: A prospective randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Seok; Shin, Seung Yong; Na, Jin Oh; Choi, Cheol Ung; Kim, Seong Hwan; Kim, Jin Won; Kim, Eung Ju; Rha, Seung-Woon; Park, Chang Gyu; Seo, Hong Seog; Oh, Dong Joo; Hwang, Chun; Lim, Hong Euy

    2015-02-15

    Although posterior wall of left atrium (LA) is known to be arrhythmogenic focus, little is known about the effect of posterior wall isolation (PWI) in patients who undergo radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) for persistent atrial fibrillation (PeAF). We randomly assigned 120 consecutive PeAF patients to additional PWI [PWI (+), n=60] or control [PWI (-), n=60] groups. In all patients, linear ablation was performed after circumferential pulmonary vein isolation (PVI). Linear lesions included roof, anterior perimitral, and cavotricuspid isthmus lines with conduction block. In PWI (+) group, posterior inferior linear lesion was also conducted. Creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB) and troponin-T levels were measured 1day after RFCA. LA emptying fraction (LAEF) was assessed before and 12 months after RFCA. A total of 120 subjects were followed for 12 months after RFCA. There were no significant differences between two groups in baseline demographics and LA volume (LAV). The levels of CK-MB and troponin-T and procedure time were not significantly different between the groups. AF termination during RFCA was more frequently observed in PWI (+) than control (P=0.035). During follow-up period, recurrence occurred in 10 (16.7%) patients in PWI (+) and 22 (36.7%) in control (P=0.02). The change in LAEF was not significantly different between the groups. On multivariate analysis, smaller LAV and additional PWI were independently associated with procedure outcome. PWI in addition to PVI plus linear lesions was an efficient strategy without deterioration of LA pump function in patients who underwent RFCA for PeAF. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Ablation of atrial fibrillation with the Epicor system: a prospective observational trial to evaluate safety and efficacy and predictors of success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diez Claudius

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU energy has evolved as a new surgical tool to treat atrial fibrillation (AF. We evaluated safety and efficacy of AF ablation with HIFU and analyzed predictors of success in a prospective clinical study. Methods From January 2007 to June 2008, 110 patients with AF and concomitant open heart surgery were enrolled into the study. Main underlying heart diseases were aortic valve disease (50%, ischemic heart disease (48%, and mitral valve disease (18%. AF was paroxysmal in 29%, persistent in 31%, and long standing persistent in 40% of patients, lasting for 1 to 240 months (mean 24 months. Mean left atrial diameter was 50 ± 7 mm. Each patient underwent left atrial ablation with the Epicor system prior to open heart surgery. After surgery, the patients were treated with amiodarone and coumadin for 6 months. Follow-up studies including resting ECG, 24 h Holter ECG, and echocardiography were obtained at 6 and 12 months. Results All patients had successful application of the system on the beating heart prior to initiation of extracorporeal circulation. On average, 11 ± 1 ultrasound transducer elements were used to create the box lesion. The hand-held probe for additional linear lesions was employed in 83 cases. No device-related deaths occurred. Postoperative pacemaker insertion was necessary in 4 patients. At 6 months, 62% of patients presented with sinus rhythm. No significant changes were noted at 12 months. Type of AF and a left atrial diameter > 50 mm were predictors for failure of AF ablation. Conclusion AF ablation with the Epicor system as a concomitant procedure during open heart surgery is safe and acceptably effective. Our overall conversion rate was lower than in previously published reports, which may be related to the lower proportion of isolated mitral valve disease in our study population. Left atrial size may be useful to determine patients who are most likely to benefit from

  15. Comparing energy sources for surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation: a Bayesian network meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Kevin; Xie, Ashleigh; Kumar, Narendra; Wong, Sophia; Medi, Caroline; La Meir, Mark; Yan, Tristan D

    2015-08-01

    Simplified maze procedures involving radiofrequency, cryoenergy and microwave energy sources have been increasingly utilized for surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation as an alternative to the traditional cut-and-sew approach. In the absence of direct comparisons, a Bayesian network meta-analysis is another alternative to assess the relative effect of different treatments, using indirect evidence. A Bayesian meta-analysis of indirect evidence was performed using 16 published randomized trials identified from 6 databases. Rank probability analysis was used to rank each intervention in terms of their probability of having the best outcome. Sinus rhythm prevalence beyond the 12-month follow-up was similar between the cut-and-sew, microwave and radiofrequency approaches, which were all ranked better than cryoablation (respectively, 39, 36, and 25 vs 1%). The cut-and-sew maze was ranked worst in terms of mortality outcomes compared with microwave, radiofrequency and cryoenergy (2 vs 19, 34, and 24%, respectively). The cut-and-sew maze procedure was associated with significantly lower stroke rates compared with microwave ablation [odds ratio <0.01; 95% confidence interval 0.00, 0.82], and ranked the best in terms of pacemaker requirements compared with microwave, radiofrequency and cryoenergy (81 vs 14, and 1, <0.01% respectively). Bayesian rank probability analysis shows that the cut-and-sew approach is associated with the best outcomes in terms of sinus rhythm prevalence and stroke outcomes, and remains the gold standard approach for AF treatment. Given the limitations of indirect comparison analysis, these results should be viewed with caution and not over-interpreted. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  16. Benefits of Permanent His Bundle Pacing Combined With Atrioventricular Node Ablation in Atrial Fibrillation Patients With Heart Failure With Both Preserved and Reduced Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weijian; Su, Lan; Wu, Shengjie; Xu, Lei; Xiao, Fangyi; Zhou, Xiaohong; Ellenbogen, Kenneth A

    2017-04-01

    Clinical benefits from His bundle pacing (HBP) in heart failure patients with preserved and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction are still inconclusive. This study evaluated clinical outcomes of permanent HBP in atrial fibrillation patients with narrow QRS who underwent atrioventricular node ablation for heart failure symptoms despite rate control by medication. The study enrolled 52 consecutive heart failure patients who underwent attempted atrioventricular node ablation and HBP for symptomatic atrial fibrillation. Echocardiographic left ventricular ejection fraction and left ventricular end-diastolic dimension, New York Heart Association classification and use of diuretics for heart failure were assessed during follow-up visits after permanent HBP. Of 52 patients, 42 patients (80.8%) received permanent HBP and atrioventricular node ablation with a median 20-month follow-up. There was no significant change between native and paced QRS duration (107.1±25.8 versus 105.3±23.9 milliseconds, P =0.07). Left ventricular end-diastolic dimension decreased from the baseline ( P heart failure with reduced ejection fraction patients (N=20) than in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction patients (N=22). New York Heart Association classification improved from a baseline 2.9±0.6 to 1.4±0.4 after HBP in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction patients and from a baseline 2.7±0.6 to 1.4±0.5 after HBP in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction patients. After 1 year of HBP, the numbers of patients who used diuretics for heart failure decreased significantly ( P Heart Association classification and reduced diuretics use for heart failure management in atrial fibrillation patients with narrow QRS who suffered from heart failure with preserved or reduced ejection fraction. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  17. Aortic stiffness in lone atrial fibrillation: a novel risk factor for arrhythmia recurrence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis H Lau

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent community-based research has linked aortic stiffness to the development of atrial fibrillation. We posit that aortic stiffness contributes to adverse atrial remodeling leading to the persistence of atrial fibrillation following catheter ablation in lone atrial fibrillation patients, despite the absence of apparent structural heart disease. Here, we aim to evaluate aortic stiffness in lone atrial fibrillation patients and determine its association with arrhythmia recurrence following radio-frequency catheter ablation. METHODS: We studied 68 consecutive lone atrial fibrillation patients who underwent catheter ablation procedure for atrial fibrillation and 50 healthy age- and sex-matched community controls. We performed radial artery applanation tonometry to obtain central measures of aortic stiffness: pulse pressure, augmentation pressure and augmentation index. Following ablation, arrhythmia recurrence was monitored at months 3, 6, 9, 12 and 6 monthly thereafter. RESULTS: Compared to healthy controls, lone atrial fibrillation patients had significantly elevated peripheral pulse pressure, central pulse pressure, augmentation pressure and larger left atrial dimensions (all P<0.05. During a mean follow-up of 2.9±1.4 years, 38 of the 68 lone atrial fibrillation patients had atrial fibrillation recurrence after initial catheter ablation procedure. Neither blood pressure nor aortic stiffness indices differed between patients with and without atrial fibrillation recurrence. However, patients with highest levels (≥75(th percentile of peripheral pulse pressure, central pulse pressure and augmentation pressure had higher atrial fibrillation recurrence rates (all P<0.05. Only central aortic stiffness indices were associated with lower survival free from atrial fibrillation using Kaplan-Meier analysis. CONCLUSION: Aortic stiffness is an important risk factor in patients with lone atrial fibrillation and contributes to higher atrial

  18. Predictors of hospitalization for heart failure and of all-cause mortality after atrioventricular nodal ablation and right ventricular pacing for atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björkenheim, Anna; Brandes, Axel; Andersson, Tommy

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: Atrioventricular junction ablation (AVJA) is a highly effective treatment in patients with therapy refractory atrial fibrillation (AF) but renders the patient pacemaker dependent. We aimed to analyse the long-term incidence of hospitalization for heart failure (HF) and all-cause mortality...... hypertension and previous HF were independent predictors of death. CONCLUSION: The long-term hospitalization rate for HF and all-cause mortality was low, which implies that long-term ventricular pacing was not harmful in this patient population, including patients with unsuccessful repeated PVI....

  19. Can catheter ablation reduce the incidence of thromboembolic events in patients with atrial fibrillation?: Protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Menghui; Wang, Yuanping; Chen, Xiaohong; Li, Xiaohui; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Wang, Lichun

    2017-12-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF), the most common cardiac arrhythmia, is a major risk factor for thromboembolic events, especially ischemic stroke. Catheter ablation is an effective method to maintain sinus rhythm in patients with AF. Although some observational studies have shown a relatively lower stroke rate after catheter ablation, whether catheter ablation can reduce the thromboembolic risk in patients with AF remains unclear. We aim to perform a systematic review to determine whether catheter ablation can prevent thromboembolism in patients with AF.PubMed, Embase, the Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library will be searched from January 2000 to the present for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and non-randomized studies on catheter ablation in patients with AF. Other relevant sources, such as the references and conference proceedings, will also be manually retrieved. All studies will be limited to publication in English. The primary outcome will be thromboembolic events, including stroke, transient ischemic attack, and systemic embolic events. Study screening, data collection, and study quality assessment will be independently performed by 2 researchers. Disagreements will be resolved through team discussion or consultation with a third arbitrator. The risk of bias will be appraised using the Cochrane Collaboration tool and the Newcastle-Ottawa scale according to the different study designs, and a meta-analysis will be performed using RevMan V.5.3 software. The results will be presented as risk ratios and 95% confidence intervals for dichotomous data and continuous outcomes.Catheter ablation is an effective method to cure atrial fibrillation and maintain sinus rhythm. Although it is intuitive that if AF is eliminated, the thromboembolism in the heart would be abolished, and sequently the incidence of thromboembolic events would be decreased, this in fact has not yet been clarified. This systematic review and meta-analysis will be performed with the aim of

  20. 78 FR 11207 - Clinical Study Designs for Surgical Ablation Devices for Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Clinical Study Designs for Surgical Ablation Devices for....115). The guidance represents the Agency's current thinking on clinical study designs for surgical...) is announcing the availability of the guidance entitled ``Clinical Study Designs for Surgical...

  1. Increased resting heart rate following radiofrequency catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Brian; Chen, Xu; Pehrson, Steen

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Sinus tachycardia has been observed following radiofrequency (RF) catheter ablation for various kinds of supraventricular tachycardia. This study is aimed at determining the occurrence of changes in sinus-rhythm heart rate (HR) after pulmonary vein (PV) isolation in patients with paroxysmal...

  2. Automatic segmentation of rotational x-ray images for anatomic intra-procedural surface generation in atrial fibrillation ablation procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzke, Robert; Meyer, Carsten; Ecabert, Olivier; Peters, Jochen; Noordhoek, Niels J; Thiagalingam, Aravinda; Reddy, Vivek Y; Chan, Raymond C; Weese, Jürgen

    2010-02-01

    Since the introduction of 3-D rotational X-ray imaging, protocols for 3-D rotational coronary artery imaging have become widely available in routine clinical practice. Intra-procedural cardiac imaging in a computed tomography (CT)-like fashion has been particularly compelling due to the reduction of clinical overhead and ability to characterize anatomy at the time of intervention. We previously introduced a clinically feasible approach for imaging the left atrium and pulmonary veins (LAPVs) with short contrast bolus injections and scan times of approximately 4 -10 s. The resulting data have sufficient image quality for intra-procedural use during electro-anatomic mapping (EAM) and interventional guidance in atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation procedures. In this paper, we present a novel technique to intra-procedural surface generation which integrates fully-automated segmentation of the LAPVs for guidance in AF ablation interventions. Contrast-enhanced rotational X-ray angiography (3-D RA) acquisitions in combination with filtered-back-projection-based reconstruction allows for volumetric interrogation of LAPV anatomy in near-real-time. An automatic model-based segmentation algorithm allows for fast and accurate LAPV mesh generation despite the challenges posed by image quality; relative to pre-procedural cardiac CT/MR, 3-D RA images suffer from more artifacts and reduced signal-to-noise. We validate our integrated method by comparing 1) automatic and manual segmentations of intra-procedural 3-D RA data, 2) automatic segmentations of intra-procedural 3-D RA and pre-procedural CT/MR data, and 3) intra-procedural EAM point cloud data with automatic segmentations of 3-D RA and CT/MR data. Our validation results for automatically segmented intra-procedural 3-D RA data show average segmentation errors of 1) approximately 1.3 mm compared with manual 3-D RA segmentations 2) approximately 2.3 mm compared with automatic segmentation of pre-procedural CT/MR data and 3

  3. The impact of B-type natriuretic peptide levels on the suppression of accompanying atrial fibrillation in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome patients after accessory pathway ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Mihoko; Goya, Masahiko; Takagi, Takamitsu; Yamashita, Shu; Iwai, Shinsuke; Suzuki, Masahito; Takamiya, Tomomasa; Nakamura, Tomofumi; Hayashi, Tatsuya; Yagishita, Atsuhiko; Sasaki, Takeshi; Takahashi, Yoshihide; Ono, Yuhichi; Hachiya, Hitoshi; Yamauchi, Yasuteru; Otomo, Kenichiro; Nitta, Junichi; Okishige, Kaoru; Nishizaki, Mitsuhiro; Iesaka, Yoshito; Isobe, Mitsuaki; Hirao, Kenzo

    2016-12-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) often coexists with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome. We compared the efficacy of Kent bundle ablation alone and additional AF ablation on accompanying AF, and examined which patients would still have a risk of AF after successful Kent bundle ablation. This retrospective multicenter study included 96 patients (56±15 years, 72 male) with WPW syndrome and AF undergoing Kent bundle ablation. Some patients underwent simultaneous pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) for AF. The incidence of post-procedural AF was examined. Sixty-four patients underwent only Kent bundle ablation (Kent-only group) and 32 also underwent PVI (+PVI group). There was no significant difference in the basic patient characteristics between the groups. Additional PVI did not improve the freedom from residual AF compared to Kent bundle ablation alone (p=0.53). In the Kent-only group, AF episodes remained in 25.0% during the follow-up (709 days). A univariate analysis showed that age ≥60 years, left atrial dimension ≥38mm, B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) ≥40pg/ml, and concomitant hypertension were predictive factors for residual AF. However, in the multivariate analysis, only BNP ≥40pg/ml remained as an independent predictive factor (HR=17.1 and CI: 2.3-128.2; p=0.006). Among patients with WPW syndrome and AF, Kent bundle ablation alone may have a sufficient clinical impact of preventing recurrence of AF in select patients. Screening the BNP level would help decide the strategy to manage those patients. Copyright © 2016 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Screening for Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freedman, Ben; Camm, A. John; Calkins, Hugh

    2017-01-01

    in September 2015 to promote discussion and research about AF screening as a strategy to reduce stroke and death and to provide advocacy for implementation of country-specific AF screening programs. During 2016, 60 expert members of AF-SCREEN, including physicians, nurses, allied health professionals, health......Approximately 10% of ischemic strokes are associated with atrial fibrillation (AF) first diagnosed at the time of stroke. Detecting asymptomatic AF would provide an opportunity to prevent these strokes by instituting appropriate anticoagulation. The AF-SCREEN international collaboration was formed...... or by intermittent ECG recordings over 2 weeks is not a benign condition and, with additional stroke factors, carries sufficient risk of stroke to justify consideration of anticoagulation. With regard to the methods of mass screening, handheld ECG devices have the advantage of providing a verifiable ECG trace...

  5. Pulmonary vein re-mapping after cryoballoon ablation for atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Kenichi; Tokuda, Michifumi; Matsuo, Seiichiro; Isogai, Ryota; Tokutake, Kenichi; Kato, Mika; Narui, Ryohsuke; Tanigawa, Shinichi; Yamashita, Seigo; Inada, Keiichi; Yoshimura, Michihiro; Yamane, Teiichi

    2017-08-01

    Establishment of pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) during cryoballoon (CB) ablation is generally confirmed by use of an octapolar inner-lumen mapping catheter (Achieve®). The aim of this study is to evaluate the residual PV potential (PVP) using the conventional circular catheter after CB-PVI. A total of 105 consecutive patients (418 PVs) with paroxysmal AF who underwent the initial CB-PVI were prospectively included in this study. Of those, 305 (73%) PVs with real-time recordings of PVP elimination by Achieve® catheter during successful PVI were included. After isolation of all 4 PVs, PV antral remapping by conventional circular mapping catheter was performed. After CB-PVI, residual PVP was detected in 4.3% (13/305) of PVs (1.2% of left-superior PV, 2.5% of left-inferior PV, none of right-superior PV, and 20% of right-inferior PV). Almost 60% of residual PV potential was located around the bottom portion of the right-inferior PV. In PVs with residual potential, PV trunk was shorter (12.7 ± 5.7 mm vs. 18.7 ± 7.9, P = 0.001), minimal balloon temperature was higher (-46.6 ± 5.9 °C vs. -50.9 ± 8.2, P = 0.02), and balloon warming time was shorter (35.6 ± 17.8 s vs. 50.0 ± 22.8, P = 0.006) than those without. All residual potentials were eliminated by additional touch up ablation. After the initial ablation procedure, 1-year AF-free rate was 79.5%. PV remapping after CB-PVI revealed residual antral PVP in 4.3% of PVs and in 20% of RIPVs in particular. The Achieve® catheter sometimes fails to detect complete PV antral isolation.

  6. Radiofrequency catheter ablation maintains its efficacy better than antiarrhythmic medication in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation: On-treatment analysis of the randomized controlled MANTRA-PAF trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raatikainen, M J Pekka; Hakalahti, Antti; Uusimaa, Paavo; Nielsen, Jens Cosedis; Johannessen, Arne; Hindricks, Gerhard; Walfridsson, Håkan; Pehrson, Steen; Englund, Anders; Hartikainen, Juha; Kongstad, Ole; Mortensen, Leif Spange; Hansen, Peter Steen

    2015-11-01

    The Medical ANtiarrhythmic Treatment or Radiofrequency Ablation in Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation (MANTRA-PAF) is a randomized trial comparing radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA) to antiarrhythmic drugs (AADs) as first-line treatment of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF). In order to eliminate the clouding effect of crossover we performed an on-treatment analysis of the data. Patients (n=294) were divided into three groups: those receiving only the assigned therapy (RFA and AAD groups) and those receiving both therapies (crossover group). The primary end points were AF burden in 7-day Holter recordings at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months and cumulative AF burden in all recordings. At 24 months, AF burden was significantly lower in the RFA (n=110) than in the AAD (n=92) and the crossover (n=84) groups (90th percentile 1% vs. 10% vs. 16%, P=0.007), and more patients were free from any AF (89% vs. 73% vs. 74%, P=0.006). In the RFA, AAD and the crossover groups 63%, 59% and 21% (PPAF long-term efficacy of RFA was superior to AAD therapy. Thus, it is reasonable to offer RFA as first-line treatment for highly symptomatic patients who accept the risks of the procedure and are aware of frequent need for reablation(s). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cryoballoon versus radiofrequency for pulmonary vein re-isolation after a failed initial ablation procedure in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokushalov, Evgeny; Romanov, Alexander; Artyomenko, Sergey; Baranova, Vera; Losik, Denis; Bairamova, Sevda; Karaskov, Alexander; Mittal, Suneet; Steinberg, Jonathan S

    2013-03-01

    Catheter ablation of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF) is associated with an important risk of early and late recurrence, necessitating repeat ablation procedures. The aim of this prospective randomized patient-blind study was to compare the efficacy and safety of cryoballoon (Cryo) versus radiofrequency (RF) ablation of PAF after failed initial RF ablation procedure. Patients with a history of symptomatic PAF after a previous failed first RF ablation procedure were eligible for this study. Patients were randomized to Cryo or RF redo ablation. The primary endpoint of the study was recurrence of atrial tachyarrhythmia, including AF and left atrial flutter/tachycardia, after a second ablation procedure at 1 year of follow-up. All patients were implanted with a cardiac monitor (Reveal XT, Medtronic) to continuously track the cardiac rhythm. Patients with an AF burden (AF%) ≤ 0.5% were considered AF-free (Responders), while those with an AF% > 0.5% were classified as patients with AF recurrences (non-Responders). Eighty patients with AF recurrences after a first RF pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) were randomized to Cryo (N = 40) or to RF (N = 40). Electrical potentials were recorded in 77 mapped PVs (1.9 ± 0.8 per patient) in Cryo Group and 72 PVs (1.7 ± 0.8 per patient) in RF Group (P = 0.62), all of which were targeted. In Cryo group, 68 (88%) of the 77 PVs were re-isolated using only Cryo technique; the remaining 9 PVs were re-isolated using RF. In RF group, all 72 PVs were successfully re-isolated (P = 0.003 vs Cryo). By intention-to-treat, 23 (58%) RF patients were AF-free vs 17 (43%) Cryo patients on no antiarrhythmic drugs at 1 year (P = 0.06). Three patients had temporary phrenic nerve paralysis in the Cryo group; the RF group had no complications. Of the 29 patients who had only Cryo PVI without any RF ablation, 11 (38%) were AF-free vs 20 (59%) of the 34 patients who had RF only (P = 0.021). When patients require a redo pulmonary vein isolation ablation

  8. Validation of a novel CARTOSEG™ segmentation module software for contrast-enhanced computed tomography-guided radiofrequency ablation in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imanli, Hasan; Bhatty, Shaun; Jeudy, Jean; Ghzally, Yousra; Ume, Kiddy; Vunnam, Rama; Itah, Refael; Amit, Mati; Duell, John; See, Vincent; Shorofsky, Stephen; Dickfeld, Timm M

    2017-11-01

    Visualization of left atrial (LA) anatomy using image integration modules has been associated with decreased radiation exposure and improved procedural outcome when used for guidance of pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) in atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation. We evaluated the CARTOSEG™ CT Segmentation Module (Biosense Webster, Inc.) that offers a new CT-specific semiautomatic reconstruction of the atrial endocardium. The CARTOSEG™ CT Segmentation Module software was assessed prospectively in 80 patients undergoing AF ablation. Using preprocedural contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT), cardiac chambers, coronary sinus (CS), and esophagus were semiautomatically segmented. Segmentation quality was assessed from 1 (poor) to 4 (excellent). The reconstructed structures were registered with the electroanatomic map (EAM). PVI was performed using the registered 3D images. Semiautomatic reconstruction of the heart chambers was successfully performed in all 80 patients with AF. CE-CT DICOM file import, semiautomatic segmentation of cardiac chambers, esophagus, and CS was performed in 185 ± 105, 18 ± 5, 119 ± 47, and 69 ± 19 seconds, respectively. Average segmentation quality was 3.9 ± 0.2, 3.8 ± 0.3, and 3.8 ± 0.2 for LA, esophagus, and CS, respectively. Registration accuracy between the EAM and CE-CT-derived segmentation was 4.2 ± 0.9 mm. Complications consisted of one perforation (1%) which required pericardiocentesis, one increased pericardial effusion treated conservatively (1%), and one early termination of ablation due to thrombus formation on the ablation sheath without TIA/stroke (1%). All targeted PVs (n  =  309) were successfully isolated. The novel CT- CARTOSEG™ CT Segmentation Module enables a rapid and reliable semiautomatic 3D reconstruction of cardiac chambers and adjacent anatomy, which facilitates successful and safe PVI. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Atrial fibrillation in KCNE1-null mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Temple, Joel; Frias, Patricio; Rottman, Jeffrey; Yang, Tao; Wu, Yuejin; Verheijck, E. Etienne; Zhang, Wei; Siprachanh, Chanthaphaychith; Kanki, Hideaki; Atkinson, James B.; King, Paul; Anderson, Mark E.; Kupershmidt, Sabina; Roden, Dan M.

    2005-01-01

    Although atrial fibrillation is the most common serious cardiac arrhythmia, the fundamental molecular pathways remain undefined. Mutations in KCNQ1, one component of a sympathetically activated cardiac potassium channel complex, cause familial atrial fibrillation, although the mechanisms in vivo are

  10. Cardiac ablation procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catheter ablation; Radiofrequency catheter ablation; Cryoablation - cardiac ablation; AV nodal reentrant tachycardia - cardiac ablation; AVNRT - cardiac ablation; Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome - cardiac ablation; Atrial fibrillation - cardiac ablation; Atrial flutter - ...

  11. [A multicenter prospective controlled study of catheter ablation for patients with persistent atrial fibrillation using domestic 3D cardiac electrophysiological mapping system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, R B; Wang, Z L; Yin, Y H; Zhang, Z H; Li, Z Q; Cao, J; Cao, K J; Yang, Y Z; Jiang, H; Yang, P Z; He, B; Liu, X; Sun, Y X; Ma, C S

    2016-05-24

    To verify the safety and efficacy of the domestic 3D cardiac electrophysiological mapping system for catheter ablation of persistent atrial fibrillation (AF). From December 2011 to April 2014, 255 patients (184 male) with persistent AF in 13 centers were enrolled in this multicenter prospective controlled study.The patients were allocated to catheter ablation group (experiment group) and antiarrhythmics drugs cardioversion group (control group) with the ratio 2∶1 according to the patients' intention. Left atria were constructed with 3D cardiac electrophysiology mapping system, magnetic sensored saline irrigated radiofrequency ablation catheter (FireMagic™ Cool 3D) and surface reference (Columbus™). Pulmonary vein isolation and left atrial roof line, mitral annulus isthmus line, three tricuspid annulus isthmus line, superior vena cava, the coronary sinus and complex atrial fragmented potentials were targeted if necessary under the guidance of the 3D mapping system. Antiarrhythmics drugs (except amiodarone) were applied to patients for 2 to 3 months after ablation. The patients were followed up for 9 months after 3 months blanking period. The patients in the control group underwent cardioversion with amiodarone and electrical cardioversion if needed. Patients in the control group were also followed up for 9 months. Of the 255 patients, 167 cases were in the experiment group and 88 cases were in the control group. In per protocol set (PPS), 155 cases were in the experiment group, 79 cases in the control group. Catheter ablation was successful for all patients in the experiment group under the guidance of the 3D cardiac electrophysiological mapping system. Pumononary veins isolation was achieved in all patients. After 9 months follow-up beyond blanking period, in full analysis set, the success rate was 66.5% (111/167) in the experiment group, which was significantly higher than that in the control group (21.6% (19/88), Pablation included 1 case of left subclavian

  12. Effect of the electrograms density in detecting and ablating the tip of the rotor during chronic atrial fibrillation: an in silico study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugarte, Juan P; Tobón, Catalina; Orozco-Duque, Andrés; Becerra, Miguel A; Bustamante, John

    2015-10-01

    Identification in situ of arrhythmogenic mechanisms could improve the rate of ablation success in atrial fibrillation (AF). Our research group reported that rotors could be located through dynamic approximate entropy (DApEn) maps. However, it is unknown how much the spatial resolution of catheter electrodes could affect substrates localization. The present work looked for assessing the electrograms (EGMs) spatial resolution needed to locate the rotor tip using DApEn maps. A stable rotor in a two-dimensional computational model of human atrial tissue was simulated using the Courtemanche electrophysiological model and implementing chronic AF features. The spatial resolution is 0.4 mm (150 × 150 EGM). Six different lower resolution arrays were obtained from the initial mesh. For each array, DApEn maps were constructed using the inverse distance weighting (IDW) algorithm. Three simple ablation patterns were applied. The full DApEn map detected the rotor tip and was able to follow the small meander of the tip through the shape of the area containing the tip. Inverse distance weighting was able to reconstruct DApEn maps after applying different spatial resolutions. These results show that spatial resolutions from 0.4 to 4 mm accurately detect the rotor tip position. An ablation line terminates the rotor only if it crosses the tip and ends at a tissue boundary. A previous work has shown that DApEn maps successfully detected simulated rotor tips using a high spatial resolution. In this work, it was evinced that DApEn maps could be applied using a spatial resolution similar to that available in commercial catheters, by adding an interpolation stage. This is the first step to translate this tool into medical practice with a view to the detection of ablation targets. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Non-invasive prediction of catheter ablation outcome in persistent atrial fibrillation by fibrillatory wave amplitude computation in multiple electrocardiogram leads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarzoso, Vicente; Latcu, Decebal G; Hidalgo-Muñoz, Antonio R; Meo, Marianna; Meste, Olivier; Popescu, Irina; Saoudi, Nadir

    2016-12-01

    Catheter ablation (CA) of persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) is challenging, and reported results are capable of improvement. A better patient selection for the procedure could enhance its success rate while avoiding the risks associated with ablation, especially for patients with low odds of favorable outcome. CA outcome can be predicted non-invasively by atrial fibrillatory wave (f-wave) amplitude, but previous works focused mostly on manual measures in single electrocardiogram (ECG) leads only. To assess the long-term prediction ability of f-wave amplitude when computed in multiple ECG leads. Sixty-two patients with persistent AF (52 men; mean age 61.5±10.4years) referred for CA were enrolled. A standard 1-minute 12-lead ECG was acquired before the ablation procedure for each patient. F-wave amplitudes in different ECG leads were computed by a non-invasive signal processing algorithm, and combined into a mutivariate prediction model based on logistic regression. During an average follow-up of 13.9±8.3months, 47 patients had no AF recurrence after ablation. A lead selection approach relying on the Wald index pointed to I, V1, V2 and V5 as the most relevant ECG leads to predict jointly CA outcome using f-wave amplitudes, reaching an area under the curve of 0.854, and improving on single-lead amplitude-based predictors. Analysing the f-wave amplitude in several ECG leads simultaneously can significantly improve CA long-term outcome prediction in persistent AF compared with predictors based on single-lead measures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of optimal treatment approach in patients with early recurrence of atrial fibrillation after the first ablation procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. В. Шабанов

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available 182 patients with paroxysmal AF underwent ablation (circumferential pulmonary vein isolation with linear lesions and were monitored with an implantable cardiac monitor (Reveal XT, Medtronic. Patients were randomly assigned to group 1 or group 2. Group 1 patients were treated only with antiarrhythmic drugs for 6 weeks, with no early reablation during the 3-month postablation period. In the case of AF recurrence after the 3-month postablation period, patients underwent reablation. Group 2 patients were treated according to the onset mechanism of AF recurrences, as detected and stored by the implantable cardiac monitor: antiarrhythmic drug therapy, but no reablation if AF was not preceded by triggers; early reablation if premature atrial beats or atrial tachycardias or flutter triggered AF. All patients were followed up for 1 year to assess the sinus rhythm maintenance in each group. On 12-month follow-up examination, 67 patients (76% out of 88 in group 1 and 78 patients (92% out of 89 in group 2 had no AF recurrences (P<0,009 versus group 1. The patients with AF recurrences caused by a trigger mechanism after the first ablation demonstrated high long-term efficacy after early reablation.

  15. Hybrid therapy in the management of atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starek, Zdenk; Lehar, Frantisek; Jez, Jiri; Wolf, Jiri; Novák, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common sustained arrhythmia. Because of the sub-optimal outcomes and associated risks of medical therapy as well as the recent advances in non-pharmacologic strategies, a multitude of combined (hybrid) algorithms have been introduced that improve efficacy of standalone therapies while maintaining a high safety profile. Antiarrhythmic administration enhances success rate of electrical cardioversion. Catheter ablation of antiarrhythmic drug-induced typical atrial flutter may prevent recurrent atrial fibrillation. Through simple ablation in the right atrium, suppression of atrial fibrillation may be achieved in patients with previously ineffective antiarrhythmic therapy. Efficacy of complex catheter ablation in the left atrium is improved with antiarrhythmic drugs. Catheter ablation followed by permanent pacemaker implantation is an effective and safe treatment option for selected patients. Additional strategies include pacing therapies such as atrial pacing with permanent pacemakers, preventive pacing algorithms, and/or implantable dual-chamber defibrillators are available. Modern hybrid strategies combining both epicardial and endocardial approaches in order to create a complex set of radiofrequency lesions in the left atrium have demonstrated a high rate of success and warrant further research. Hybrid therapy for atrial fibrillation reviews history of development of non-pharmacological treatment strategies and outlines avenues of ongoing research in this field.

  16. Efficacy of Short-Term Antiarrhythmic Drugs Use after Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation-A Systematic Review with Meta-Analyses and Trial Sequential Analyses of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weijie; Liu, Hang; Ling, Zhiyu; Xu, Yanping; Fan, Jinqi; Du, Huaan; Xiao, Peilin; Su, Li; Liu, Zengzhang; Lan, Xianbin; Zrenner, Bernhard; Yin, Yuehui

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of short-term antiarrhythmic drugs (AADs) use compared with no-AADs prescription after catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) in preventing atrial arrhythmia recurrence is uncertain. We searched PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library through December 2015 to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) which evaluated the efficacy of short-term AADs use compared with no-AADs prescription after AF ablation in preventing atrial arrhythmia recurrence. The primary outcome was labeled as early atrial arrhythmia recurrence within 3 months after ablation. Secondary outcome was defined as late recurrence after 3 months of ablation. Random-effects model or fixed-effects model was used to estimate relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Six RCTs with 2,667 patients were included into this meta-analysis. Compared with no-AADs administration after AF ablation, short-term AADs use was associated with significant reduction of early atrial arrhythmia recurrence (RR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.52-0.87; p = 0.003). Trial sequential analysis (TSA) showed that the cumulative Z-curve crossed the trial sequential monitoring boundary for benefit, establishing sufficient and conclusive evidence. However, compared with no-AADs prescription, short-term AADs use after AF ablation didn't significantly reduce the risk of late atrial arrhythmia recurrence (RR, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.83-1.03; p = 0.15). TSA supported this result; meanwhile the estimated required information size (1,486 patients) was also met. Short-term use of AADs after AF ablation can significantly decrease the risk of early atrial arrhythmia recurrence but not lead to corresponding reduction in risk of late atrial arrhythmia recurrence.

  17. Atrial natriuretic peptide in patients with heart failure and chronic atrial fibrillation : Role of duration of at atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Den Berg, MP; Crijns, HJGM; Van Veldhuisen, DJ; Van Gelder, IC; De Kam, PJ; Lie, KI

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the determinants of atrial natriuretic peptide level in patients with congestive heart failure and atrial fibrillation. In particular, the duration of atrial fibrillation was analyzed because atrial fibrillation per se might have a specific effect on atrial

  18. Effects of Alpha Lipoic Acid on Multiple Cytokines and Biomarkers and Recurrence of Atrial Fibrillation Within 1 Year of Catheter Ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardu, Celestino; Santulli, Gaetano; Santamaria, Matteo; Barbieri, Michelangela; Sacra, Cosimo; Paolisso, Pasquale; D'Amico, Fabio; Testa, Nicola; Caporaso, Igor; Paolisso, Giuseppe; Marfella, Raffaele; Rizzo, Maria Rosaria

    2017-05-01

    Catheter ablation (CA) is a procedure commonly used to restore sinus rhythm in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). However, AF recurrence after CA remains a relevant clinical issue. We tested the effects of an oral antioxidant treatment (alpha lipoic acid [ALA]) on AF recurrence post-CA. Patients with paroxysmal AF have been enrolled in a randomized, prospective, double-blind, controlled placebo trial. After CA, patients have been randomly assigned to receive ALA oral supplementation (ALA group) or placebo (control group) and evaluated at baseline and after a 12-month follow-up: 73 patients completed the 12-month follow-up (ALA: 33 and control: 40). No significant difference has been detected between the 2 groups at baseline. Strikingly, 1 year after CA, ALA therapy significantly reduced serum markers of inflammation. However, there was no significant difference in AF recurrence events at follow-up comparing ALA with placebo group. Multivariate analysis revealed that the only independent prognostic risk factor for AF recurrence after CA is age. In conclusion, ALA therapy reduces serum levels of common markers of inflammation in ablated patients. Nevertheless, ALA does not prevent AF recurrence after an ablative treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Atrial fibrillation and delayed gastric emptying.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isadora C Botwinick

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation and delayed gastric emptying (DGE are common after pancreaticoduodenectomy. Our aim was to investigate a potential relationship between atrial fibrillation and DGE, which we defined as failure to tolerate a regular diet by the 7(th postoperative day. METHODS: We performed a retrospective chart review of 249 patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy at our institution between 2000 and 2009. Data was analyzed with Fisher exact test for categorical variables and Mann-Whitney U or unpaired T-test for continuous variables. RESULTS: Approximately 5% of the 249 patients included in the analysis experienced at least one episode of postoperative atrial fibrillation. Median age of patients with atrial fibrillation was 74 years, compared with 66 years in patients without atrial fibrillation (p = 0.0005. Patients with atrial fibrillation were more likely to have a history of atrial fibrillation (p = 0.03. 92% of the patients with atrial fibrillation suffered from DGE, compared to 46% of patients without atrial fibrillation (p = 0.0007. This association held true when controlling for age. CONCLUSION: Patients with postoperative atrial fibrillation are more likely to experience delayed gastric emptying. Interventions to manage delayed gastric function might be prudent in patients at high risk for postoperative atrial fibrillation.

  20. Genetic aspects of atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiesfeld, ACP; Hemels, MEW; Van Tintelen, JP; Van den Berg, MP; Van Veldhuisen, DJ; Van Gelder, IC

    2005-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) occurs predominantly in the elderly and is commonly associated with underlying cardiac diseases. A significant number of patients, however, have early onset AF that is not associated with any underlying disease. At present, it is unknown how often this form of AF is familial

  1. Deglutition-Induced Atrial Fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Amyn; Ali, Syed Sohail; Rahmatullah, Amin

    2005-01-01

    We present the case of 38-year-old woman who experienced palpitations on swallowing, which were later found to be atrial fibrillation. Her symptoms improved on treatment with disopyramide and verapamil. Within 9 months, she was weaned from both medications without recurrence of symptoms. PMID:16429915

  2. Efficacy of Catheter Ablation for Persistent Atrial Fibrillation: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Evidence From Randomized and Nonrandomized Controlled Trials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wynn, Gareth J; Das, Moloy; Bonnett, Laura J; Panikker, Sandeep; Wong, Tom; Gupta, Dhiraj

    2014-01-01

    .... METHODS AND RESULTS—We systematically searched PubMed, EMBASE, CENTRAL, OpenGrey, and clinicaltrials.gov for RCTs and non-RCTs reporting clinical outcomes after CA for persistent atrial fibrillation...

  3. Renal function and risk of stroke and bleeding in patients undergoing catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation: Comparison between uninterrupted direct oral anticoagulants and warfarin administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Satoshi; Inden, Yasuya; Fujii, Aya; Ando, Monami; Funabiki, Junya; Murase, Yosuke; Takenaka, Masaki; Otake, Noriaki; Ikai, Yoshihiro; Sakamoto, Yusuke; Shibata, Rei; Murohara, Toyoaki

    2018-03-01

    The effect of uninterrupted oral anticoagulant use in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) during catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF) is not fully understood. The present study aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of periprocedural uninterrupted direct oral anticoagulant (DOAC) use compared with those of uninterrupted warfarin use in patients undergoing catheter ablation for AF stratified by various renal function groups. A total of 2091 patients were retrospectively included in this study. The study population was divided into 4 groups: creatinine clearance level ≥80 mL/min (n = 1086), 50-79 mL/min (n = 774), 15-49 mL/min (n = 209), and <15 mL/min (n = 22). We investigated periprocedural complications and compared them between uninterrupted DOAC and warfarin groups. There was no significant difference in thromboembolic events among the 4 groups (0.6%, 0.6%, 1.0%, and 0%, respectively; P = .792). However, major bleeding events (0.9%, 1.4%, 4.8%, and 4.5%; P < .001) and minor bleeding events (4.1%, 6.1%, 11.5%, and 13.6%; P < .001) primarily occurred in patients with CKD. The rate of periprocedural complications in the DOAC group was similar to that in the warfarin group for each renal function category. Adverse events did not differ after adjustment using propensity score-matched analysis. Multivariate analysis showed that lower body weight, antiplatelet drug use, initial ablation session, and CKD were independent predictors of adverse events. The periprocedural bleeding risk was increased in patients with CKD. Uninterrupted DOAC and warfarin administration during catheter ablation for AF in patients with CKD is feasible and effective. Copyright © 2017 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Organized Sources Are Spatially Conserved in Recurrent Compared to Pre-Ablation Atrial Fibrillation: Further Evidence for Non-Random Electrical Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalani, Gautam G; Coysh, Thomas; Baykaner, Tina; Zaman, Junaid; Hopper, Kenneth; Schricker, Amir A; Trikha, Rishi; Clopton, Paul; Krummen, David E; Narayan, Sanjiv M

    2016-06-01

    Recurrent atrial fibrillation (AF) after ablation is associated with reconnection of initially isolated pulmonary vein (PV) trigger sites. Substrates are often targeted in addition to PVI, but it is unclear how substrates progress over time. We studied if substrates in recurrent AF are conserved or have developed de novo from pre-ablation AF. Of 137 patients undergoing Focal Impulse and Rotor Mapping (FIRM) at their index procedure for AF, 29 consecutive patients (60 ± 8 years, 79% persistent) recurred and were also mapped at repeat procedure (21 ± 20 months later) using carefully placed 64-pole baskets and RhythmView(TM) (Topera, Menlo Park, CA, USA) to identify AF sources and disorganized zones. Compared to index AF, recurrent AF had a longer cycle length (177 ± 21 vs. 167 ± 19 milliseconds, P = 0.01). All patients (100%) had 1 or more conserved AF rotors between procedures with surrounding disorganization. The number of sources was similar for recurrent AF post-PVI versus index AF (3.2 ± 1.4 vs. 3.1 ± 1.0, P = 0.79), but was lower for recurrent AF after FIRM+PVI versus index AF (4.4 ± 1.4 vs. 2.9 ± 1.7, P = 0.03). Overall, 81% (61/75) of AF sources lay in conserved regions, while 19% (14/75) were detected de novo. Electrical propagation patterns for recurrent AF after unsuccessful ablation are similar in individual patients to their index AF. These data support temporospatial stability of AF substrates over 1-2 years. Trials should determine the relative benefit of adding substrate mapping and ablation to PVI for recurrent AF. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Atrial fibrillation - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auricular fibrillation - discharge; A-fib - discharge; AF - discharge; Afib - discharge ... Avoid salty and fatty foods. Stay away from fast-food restaurants. ... how to check your pulse, and check it every day. It is better ...

  6. A cost-utility analysis for catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation in combination with warfarin and dabigatran based on the CHADS2 score in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Takehiro; Igarashi, Ataru; Ikeda, Shunya; Nakajima, Kazuaki; Kashimura, Shin; Kunitomi, Akira; Katsumata, Yoshinori; Nishiyama, Takahiko; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Fukumoto, Kotaro; Tanimoto, Yoko; Aizawa, Yoshiyasu; Fukuda, Keiichi; Takatsuki, Seiji

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to clarify the cost-effectiveness of an expensive combination therapy for atrial fibrillation (AF) using both catheter ablation and dabigatran compared with warfarin at each CHADS2 score for patients in Japan. A Markov model was constructed to analyze costs and quality-adjusted life years associated with AF therapeutic options with a time horizon of 10 years. The target population was 60-year-old patients with paroxysmal AF. The indication for anticoagulation was determined according to the Japanese guideline. Anticoagulation-related data were derived from the RE-LY study and the AF recurrence rate was set at 2.7% per month during the first 12 months and at 0.40% per month afterwards. Stroke risk was determined according to AF recurrence, anticoagulation, and CHADS2 score. The risks for stroke recurrence and stroke death were also considered. Costs were calculated from the healthcare payer's perspective, and only direct medical costs were included. Warfarin was the most preferred option for patients with a CHADS2 score of 0 from a health economics aspect. Ablation under warfarin was preferred for a CHADS2 score of 1-3, while ablation under dabigatran was preferred for a CHADS2 score ≥4. The quality of life score for AF had the largest impact on the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios in the analysis between the anticoagulation arm and the anticoagulation+ablation arm for a CHADS2 score of 2. Within the range of the Japanese willingness-to-pay threshold (¥5,000,000), the ablation+warfarin arm became the best option with its probability of 81.7% for a CHADS2 score of 2; the dabigatran+ablation arm was the most preferred option with its probability of 56.1% for a CHADS2 score of 4. Ablation under dabigatran therapy is an expensive therapeutic option, but it might benefit patients with a low quality of life and a high CHADS2 score. Copyright © 2016 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Atrial fibrillation in elite athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlanello, F; Bertoldi, A; Dallago, M; Galassi, A; Fernando, F; Biffi, A; Mazzone, P; Pappone, C; Chierchia, S

    1998-08-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a rare event in people younger than 25 years of age, but is probably more frequent in competitive athletes. We analyzed the presence of AF, paroxysmal or chronic, in a population of young elite athletes, including previous Olympic and World champions, who were studied for arrhythmias that endangered their athletic careers. From 1974 to June 1977, 1,772 athletes identified with arrhythmias (1,464 males and 308 females; mean age 21 years) underwent individualized work-ups. Among these, 146 (122 males and 24 females; mean age 24 years) were young elite athletes. They were studied from 1985 to 1997, with a mean follow-up of 62 months. Of the 146 young elite athletes, 13 (9%) had AF (paroxysmal in 11 and chronic in 2); all were male. The paroxysmal AF occurred during effort (n = 7), after effort (n = 1), or at rest (n = 3) and was reinduced by transesophageal pacing or endocavitary electrophysiologic testing under the same clinical circumstances. AF was the cause of symptoms in 13 (40%) of 22 young elite athletes with long-lasting palpitations. Five young elite athletes had a substrate for AF: Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (WPW) in 3, arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD) in 1, healed myocarditis in 1, and was considered idiopathic in 8. All elite athletes are alive with a mean follow-up of 62 months and 7 continue in their sports: 3 after radiofrequency catheter ablation (of WPW in 2 and AF with maze-type nonfluoroscopic approach in 1) and 4 after a period of de-training. AF, occurring in young elite athletes and affecting only males, is one of the most frequent causes of prolonged palpitations and is reproduced easily by transesophageal atrial pacing or electrophysiologic testing. AF may be a cause of disqualification from sports eligibility, but may disappear if the athletic activity is stopped for an adequate period of time, if trigger mechanisms are corrected (i.e., WPW), or if the substrate is modified.

  8. Integration of intracardiac echocardiography and computed tomography during atrial fibrillation ablation: Combining ultrasound contours obtained from the right atrium and ventricular outflow tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kohki; Naito, Shigeto; Kaseno, Kenichi; Nakatani, Yosuke; Sasaki, Takehito; Anjo, Naofumi; Yamashita, Eiji; Kumagai, Koji; Funabashi, Nobusada; Kobayashi, Yoshio; Oshima, Shigeru

    2017-02-01

    We aimed to optimize the acquisition of the left atrial (LA) and pulmonary vein (PV) ultrasound contours for more accurate integration of intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) and computed tomography (CT) using the CARTO® 3 system during atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation. Eighty-five AF patients underwent integration of ICE and CT using (1) the LA roof and posterior wall contours acquired from the right atrium (RA), (2) all LA/PV contours from the RA (Whole-RA-integration), (3) the LA roof/posterior wall contours from the RA and right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) (Posterior-RA/RV-integration), and (4) all LA/PV contours from the RA and RVOT (Whole-RA/RV-integration). The integration accuracy was compared using the (1) surface registration error, (2) distances between the three-dimensional CT and eight specific sites on the anterior, posterior, superior, and inferior aspects of the right and left circumferential PV isolation lines, and (3) registration score: a score of 0 or 1 was assigned for whether or not each specific site was visually aligned with the CT, and summed for each method (0 best, 8 worst). Posterior-RA/RV-integration revealed a significantly lower surface registration error (1.30±0.15mm) than Whole-RA- and Whole-RA/RV-integration (pintegration (median 1.26mm and 2, respectively) were significantly smaller than those for the other integration approaches (pintegration with the LA roof and posterior wall contours acquired from the RA and RVOT may provide greater accuracy for catheter navigation with three-dimensional CT during AF ablation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Hybrid Therapy in the Management of Atrial Fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    St?rek, Zden?k; Lehar, Franti?ek; Je?, Ji??; Wolf, Ji??; Nov?k, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common sustained arrhythmia. Because of the sub-optimal outcomes and associated risks of medical therapy as well as the recent advances in non-pharmacologic strategies, a multitude of combined (hybrid) algorithms have been introduced that improve efficacy of standalone therapies while maintaining a high safety profile. Antiarrhythmic administration enhances success rate of electrical cardioversion. Catheter ablation of antiarrhythmic drug-induced typical atrial...

  10. Extremely low-frame-rate digital fluoroscopy in catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation: A comparison of 2 versus 4 frame rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Kim, Jun; Kim, Minsu; Hwang, Jongmin; Hwang, You Mi; Kang, Joon-Won; Nam, Gi-Byoung; Choi, Kee-Joon; Kim, You-Ho

    2017-06-01

    Despite the technological advance in 3-dimensional (3D) mapping, radiation exposure during catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) continues to be a major concern in both patients and physicians. Previous studies reported substantial radiation exposure (7369-8690 cGy cm) during AF catheter ablation with fluoroscopic settings of 7.5 frames per second (FPS) under 3D mapping system guidance. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of a low-frame-rate fluoroscopy protocol for catheter ablation for AF.Retrospective analysis of data on 133 patients who underwent AF catheter ablation with 3-D electro-anatomic mapping at our institute from January 2014 to May 2015 was performed. Since January 2014, fluoroscopy frame rate of 4-FPS was implemented at our institute, which was further decreased to 2-FPS in September 2014. We compared the radiation exposure quantified as dose area product (DAP) and effective dose (ED) between the 4-FPS (n = 57) and 2-FPS (n = 76) groups.The 4-FPS group showed higher median DAP (599.9 cGy cm; interquartile range [IR], 371.4-1337.5 cGy cm vs. 392.0 cGy cm; IR, 289.7-591.4 cGy cm; P higher median ED (1.1 mSv; IR, 0.7-2.5 mSv vs. 0.7 mSv; IR, 0.6-1.1 mSv; P < .01) compared with the 2-FPS group. No major procedure-related complications such as cardiac tamponade were observed in either group. Over follow-up durations of 331 ± 197 days, atrial tachyarrhythmia recurred in 20 patients (35.1%) in the 4-FPS group and in 27 patients (35.5%) in the 2-FPS group (P = .96). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed no significant different between the 2 groups (log rank, P = .25).In conclusion, both the 4-FPS and 2-FPS settings were feasible and emitted a relatively low level of radiation compared with that historically reported for DAP in a conventional fluoroscopy setting.

  11. Increased amount of atrial fibrosis in patients with atrial fibrillation secondary to mitral valve disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geuzebroek, Guillaume S. C.; van Amersfoorth, Shirley C. M.; Hoogendijk, Mark G.; Kelder, Johannes C.; van Hemel, Norbert M.; de Bakker, Jacques M. T.; Coronel, Ruben

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Atrial fibrosis is related to atrial fibrillation but may differ in patients with mitral valve disease or lone atrial fibrillation. Therefore, we studied atrial fibrosis in patients with atrial fibrillation + mitral valve disease or with lone atrial fibrillation and compared it with

  12. Substrate modification combined with pulmonary vein isolation improves outcome of catheter ablation in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation: a prospective randomized comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Stephan; Klemm, Hanno; Rostock, Thomas; Brandstrup, Benedikt; Ventura, Rodolfo; Steven, Daniel; Risius, Tim; Lutomsky, Boris; Meinertz, Thomas

    2006-12-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of additional substrate modification (SM) by left atrial (LA) linear lesions as compared with pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) alone in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) in a prospective randomized study. Percutaneous PVI has evolved as an accepted treatment for paroxysmal AF but seemed to be less effective in patients with persistent AF. The benefit of PVI alone and additional linear lesions has not been validated in a randomized study so far. Sixty-two patients with persistent AF (median duration 7, range 1-18 months) were randomly assigned to either PVI alone (n = 30) or additional SM (n =32) consisting of a roof line connecting both left superior and right superior PV and LA isthmus ablation between left inferior PV and mitral annulus. Procedures including SM were performed using a three-dimensional mapping system (EnSite NavX, St Jude Medical, St Paul, MN, USA). Anti-arrhythmic drugs were discontinued within 8 weeks after ablation in both groups. Follow-up included daily trans-telephonic ECG transmitted irrespective of the patient's symptoms. PVI was successful in 98% of all targeted veins in both groups. Additional SM did not increase fluoroscopy time (72.1+/-18.7 vs. 72.9+/-17.3 min, P=0.92) because of the use of three-dimensional navigation in the PVI+SM group. AF recurrences within the first 4 weeks following ablation were more common after PVI alone (77%) than additional SM (44%, P=0.002). After a follow-up time of 487 (429-570) days, only 20% of patients undergoing stand alone PVI remained in sinus rhythm when compared with 69% following PVI combined with SM (P=0.0001). Two patients assigned to PVI+SM experienced procedure-related complications (cardiac tamponade and minor stroke) which resolved without sequelae. PVI alone is insufficient in the treatment of persistent AF. However, additional left linear lesions increase the success rate significantly. Early AF-relapses are associated with a negative outcome

  13. 'What else can I do?': Insights from atrial fibrillation patient communication online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redman, Kirsten; Thorne, Sally; Lauck, Sandra B; Taverner, Tarnia

    2017-03-01

    Many patients with atrial fibrillation experience uncertainty and psychological distress. Internet support groups for atrial fibrillation have yet to be studied. To determine the content and dialogue on an online message board for atrial fibrillation with the purpose of elucidating information and support needs from patient perspectives. Interpretative description methodology was undertaken to explore conversation from a publicly available website for atrial fibrillation over a 3-month period. Individuals interacted with the message board to make sense of their atrial fibrillation events by sharing experiences with medications, complementary and alternative medicine, trigger avoidance and ablation. The opinions of lay experts on the message board, anecdotal stories and hyperlinked Internet data were all highly valued sources of information in the messages. Using the learning gained from the board, individuals proceeded with strategies to treat their atrial fibrillation, often in a trial and error fashion. Throughout the process, individuals came back to the board, to update on their progress and gain assistance from others. The studied atrial fibrillation population had unmet needs for education regarding non-pharmacological approaches to treat atrial fibrillation. In the absence of opportunity to discuss these needs with healthcare professionals, patients may be vulnerable to unproved approaches advocated by Internet peers. Further research is suggested to examine the prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine use in the atrial fibrillation population and to understand better how social media can be utilised to support atrial fibrillation patients.

  14. Value of multislice computed tomography angiography of the thorax in preparation for catheter ablation for the treatment of atrial fibrillation: The impact of unexpected cardiac and extracardiac findings on patient care

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wissner, Erik; Wellnitz, Clinton V.; Srivathsan, Komandoor; Scott, Luis R. [Mayo Clinic Arizona - Mayo Clinic Hospital, Cardiovascular Diseases, 5777 East Mayo Boulevard, Phoenix, AZ 85054 (United States); Altemose, Gregory T. [Mayo Clinic Arizona - Mayo Clinic Hospital, Cardiovascular Diseases, 5777 East Mayo Boulevard, Phoenix, AZ 85054 (United States)], E-mail: altemose.gregory@mayo.edu

    2009-11-15

    Objective: In patients referred for catheter ablation for the treatment of atrial fibrillation, multislice computed tomography angiography of the thorax is routinely performed to assess pulmonary vein anatomy. We sought to investigate the incidence of unexpected cardiac and extracardiac findings in this select patient population and to establish how these findings influence subsequent patient care. Methods: Ninety-five patients (mean age 62 {+-} 10 years, 35% female) referred to our institution for ablation therapy for atrial fibrillation between July 2003 and October 2007 underwent multislice computed tomography angiography of the thorax. Radiologists interpreted all images. Need for additional testing, consultation and eventual diagnosis were assessed by electronic record review. Results: A total of 83 (5 cardiac, 78 extracardiac) unexpected findings were observed in 50/95 (53%) of patients. The findings prompted 23 additional tests (5 cardiac, 18 noncardiac) in 15/95 (16%) of patients and 8 subsequent referrals in 7/95 (7%) patients. In 6 patients the findings significantly altered future patient care and resulted in postponement of ablation therapy in 4 patients. In 2 patients, extracardiac findings (pulmonary emboli and adenocarcinoma of the lung) were of potentially life-saving consequence. Conclusions: In patients undergoing multislice computed tomography angiography of the thorax in anticipation of planned catheter ablation therapy for the treatment of atrial fibrillation, unexpected findings are common and of potentially significant value. In comparison, there is a higher prevalence of unexpected extracardiac, rather than cardiac findings. Further investigation of these findings may lead to postponement of ablation therapy, but may also be of potentially lifesaving consequence.

  15. Left atrial catheter ablation and ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeusler, Karl Georg; Kirchhof, Paulus; Endres, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Left atrial catheter ablation (LACA) has become an established therapy to abolish drug-refractory symptomatic paroxysmal and persistent atrial fibrillation. Restoring sinus rhythm by LACA may help to prevent atrial fibrillation-related strokes, but presently there is no evidence from randomized clinical trials to support this notion. This review summarizes the current knowledge and uncertainties regarding LACA and procedure-related ischemic stroke. In fact, most patients who undergo LACA have a rather low annual stroke risk even when left untreated, whereas LACA imposes a risk of procedure-related stroke of ≈0.5% to 1%. In addition, LACA may cause cerebral microemboli, resulting in ischemic lesions. These cerebral lesions, detectable by high-resolution MRI, could contribute to neuropsychological deficits and cognitive dysfunction. Furthermore, recurrent atrial fibrillaton episodes can be detected up to years after LACA and might cause ischemic strokes, especially in those patients in whom therapeutic anticoagulation was discontinued. Further prospective multicenter trials are needed to identify procedure-dependent risk factors for stroke and to optimize postprocedural anticoagulation management.

  16. Atrial fibrillation in patients with ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Sandra Kruchov; Frost, Lars; Eagle, Kim A

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation is a major risk factor for ischemic stroke. However, the prognostic impact of atrial fibrillation among patients with stroke is not fully clarified. We compared patient characteristics, including severity of stroke and comorbidity, quality of in-hospital care and o...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: familial atrial fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to be associated with familial atrial fibrillation was KCNQ1 , which provides instructions for making a channel that ... atrial fibrillation ABCC9 GJA5 KCNA5 KCNE2 KCNH2 KCNJ2 KCNQ1 LMNA MYL4 NKX2-5 NPPA NUP155 PRKAG2 RYR2 ...

  18. Ultrasound-guided versus conventional femoral venipuncture for catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation: a multicentre randomized efficacy and safety trial (ULTRA-FAST trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagata, Kenichiro; Wichterle, Dan; Roubícek, Tomáš; Jarkovský, Patrik; Sato, Yuriko; Kogure, Takamichi; Peichl, Petr; Konecný, Petr; Jansová, Helena; Kucera, Pavel; Aldhoon, Bashar; Cihák, Robert; Sugimura, Yoichi; Kautzner, Josef

    2017-05-30

    Complications of catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF) are frequently related to vascular access. We hypothesized that ultrasound-guided (USG) venipuncture may facilitate the procedure and reduce complication rates. We conducted a multicentre, randomized trial in patients undergoing catheter ablation for AF on uninterrupted anticoagulation therapy. The study enrolled consecutive 320 patients (age: 63 ± 8 years; male: 62%) and were randomized to USG or conventional venipuncture in 1:1 fashion. It was prematurely terminated due to substantially lower-than-expected complication rates, which doubled the population size needed to maintain statistical power. While the complication rates did not differ between two study arms (0.6% vs. 1.9%, P = 0.62), intra-procedural outcome measures were in favour of the USG approach (puncture time, 288 vs. 369 s, P < 0.001; first pass success, 74% vs. 20%, P < 0.001; extra puncture attempts 0.5 vs. 2.1, P < 0.001; inadvertent arterial puncture 0.07 vs. 0.25, P < 0.001; unsuccessful cannulation 0.6% vs. 14%, P < 0.001). Though these measures varied between trainees (49% of procedures) and expert operators, between-arm differences (except for unsuccessful cannulation) were comparably significant in favour of USG approach for both subgroups. Ultrasound-guided puncture of femoral veins was associated with preferable intra-procedural outcomes, though the major complication rates were not reduced. Both trainees and expert operators benefited from the USG strategy. (www.clinicaltrials.gov ID: NCT02834221).

  19. Radiofrequency ablation as initial therapy in paroxysmal atrial fibrillation: results on health-related quality of life and symptom burden. The MANTRA-PAF trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walfridsson, H; Walfridsson, U; Nielsen, J Cosedis; Johannessen, A; Raatikainen, P; Janzon, M; Levin, L A; Aronsson, M; Hindricks, G; Kongstad, O; Pehrson, S; Englund, A; Hartikainen, J; Mortensen, L S; Hansen, P S

    2015-02-01

    The Medical ANtiarrhythmic Treatment or Radiofrequency Ablation in Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation (MANTRA-PAF) trial assessed the long-term efficacy of an initial strategy of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) vs. antiarrhythmic drug therapy (AAD) as first-line treatment for patients with PAF. In this substudy, we evaluated the effect of these treatment modalities on the Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) and symptom burden of patients at 12 and 24 months. During the study period, 294 patients were enrolled in the MANTRA-PAF trial and randomized to receive AAD (N = 148) or RFA (N = 146). Two generic questionnaires were used to assess the HRQoL [Short Form-36 (SF-36) and EuroQol-five dimensions (EQ-5D)], and the Arrhythmia-Specific questionnaire in Tachycardia and Arrhythmia (ASTA) was used to evaluate the symptoms appearing during the trial. All comparisons were made on an intention-to-treat basis. Both randomization groups showed significant improvements in assessments with both SF-36 and EQ-5D, at 24 months. Patients randomized to RFA showed significantly greater improvement in four physically related scales of the SF-36. The three most frequently reported symptoms were breathlessness during activity, pronounced tiredness, and worry/anxiety. In both groups, there was a significant reduction in ASTA symptom index and in the severity of seven of the eight symptoms over time. Both AAD and RFA as first-line treatment resulted in substantial improvement of HRQoL and symptom burden in patients with PAF. Patients randomized to RFA showed greater improvement in physical scales (SF-36) and the EQ-visual analogue scale. URL http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00133211. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Short-term amiodarone treatment for atrial fibrillation after catheter ablation induces a transient thyroid dysfunction: Results from the placebo-controlled, randomized AMIO-CAT trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diederichsen, Søren Zöga; Darkner, Stine; Chen, Xu; Johannesen, Arne; Pehrson, Steen; Hansen, Jim; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup

    2016-09-01

    Amiodarone is known to affect the thyroid, but little is known about thyroid recovery after short-term amiodarone treatment. We aimed to evaluate the impact of 8weeks of amiodarone treatment on thyroid function in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) undergoing catheter ablation in a randomised, double-blind clinical trial. 212 patients referred for AF ablation at two centres were randomized to 8weeks of oral amiodarone or placebo. Thyroid function tests (TSH, thyroid stimulating hormone; T4, thyroxine; T3, triiodothyronine; fT4, free T4; fT3, free T3) were performed at baseline and 1, 3 and 6months. Study drug was discontinued due to mild thyroid dysfunction in 1 patient in the placebo vs. 3 in the amiodarone group (p=0.6). In linear mixed models there were significant effects of amiodarone on thyroid function tests, modified by follow-up visit (pamiodarone group had higher TSH, fT4 and T4 after 1 and 3months compared to placebo, whereas T3 and fT3 were lower. In all cases, the amiodarone-induced thyroid dysfunction was largest at 1month, declining at 3months, and with no differences at 6months, compared to baseline. We found amiodarone to have a significant impact on thyroid function after only 1month, but with a fast recovery of thyroid function after amiodarone discontinuation. Our study indicates that short-term amiodarone can be considered safe in patients without prior thyroid dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Influence of steroid therapy on the incidence of pericarditis and atrial fibrillation after percutaneous epicardial mapping and ablation for ventricular tachycardia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyrda, Katia; Piers, Sebastiaan R D; van Huls van Taxis, Carine F; Schalij, Martin J; Zeppenfeld, Katja

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluates the influence of 3 therapeutic approaches on the incidence of pericarditis and atrial fibrillation (AF) after percutaneous epicardial mapping and ablation for ventricular tachycardia. Eighty-five consecutive procedures (2006-2011) were retrospectively reviewed. After the first 17 procedures (20.0%), no steroids were administered. For the subsequent 30 procedures (35.3%), systemic steroids were administered intravenously or orally, whereas the last 38 procedures (44.7%) were followed by intrapericardial steroid injection. Compared with no steroids, the incidence of pericarditic chest pain was significantly reduced by intrapericardial steroids (58.8% versus 21.1%; P=0.006) but not by intravenous or oral steroids (58.8% versus 43.4%; P=0.31). There was no significant difference in the incidence of pericarditic ECG with steroids (36.8%, 30.0%, and 41.2% for intrapericardial, intravenous or oral, and none, respectively). There was a nonsignificant reduced incidence of chest pain with ECG changes with steroids (13.2%, 10.0%, and 29.4% for intrapericardial, intravenous or oral, and none, respectively). Radiofrequency applications (65.9% of procedures) did not affect the incidence of pericarditic ECG changes, pericarditic chest pain, or pericarditis (all P>0.05). In 7 (8.3%) patients with no prior history of AF, AF was documented a median 36 hours after procedure. Patients with pericarditic ECG tended to be at greater risk of AF (16.7 versus 3.6%; P=0.091). There is a high incidence of pericarditic chest pain and ECG changes after epicardial ventricular tachycardia mapping and ablation. Pericarditic chest pain is significantly decreased by intrapericardial steroids. Procedure-related AF is relatively frequent and tends to occur more commonly with pericarditic ECG changes. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Novel Anti-arrhythmic Medications in the Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Saklani, Pradyot; Skanes, Allan

    2012-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a prevalent condition particularly amongst the elderly, which contributes to both morbidity and mortality. The burden of disease has lead to significant increases in health care utilization and cost in recent years. Treatment of Atrial fibrillation consists of either a rate or rhythm control strategy. Rhythm control is achieved using medical management and/or catheter ablation. In spite of major strides in catheter ablation, this procedure remains a second line tre...

  3. Cetirizine-Induced atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altuğ Osken

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most common observed arrhythmia in clinical practice. In the literature, AF events associated with drug induction are available. Cetirizine is a second-generation histamine antagonist used in the treatment of allergies, angioedema, and urticaria. We wish to present an atypical case who took cetirizine medication for relieving symptoms of upper tract respiratory system infection, experienced rapid ventricular response AF and treated successfully. To best of our knowledge, this is the first case of cetirizine-induced AF.

  4. Atrial Fibrillation after Robotic Cardiac Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    LEONARDO CANALE; STEPHANIE MICK; RAVI NAIR; TOMISLAV MIHALJEVIC; JOHANNES BONATTI

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is a common arrhythmia after conventional open heart surgery. A minimally invasive robotic approach has the potential to lower its occurrence. We sought to review the literature on the incidence of post operative atrial fibrillation in robotic heart surgery and compare it to the incidence in conventional cardiac surgery. The types of operation investigated were: coronary artery bypass surgery, mitral valve repair, atrial septal defect closure and myxoma excision. Operation...

  5. Effects of beta-blockade on atrial and atrioventricular nodal refractoriness, and atrial fibrillatory rate during atrial fibrillation in pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, MP; van de Ven, LLM; Witting, W; Crijns, JGM; Haaksma, J; Bel, KJ; de Langen, CDJ; Lie, KI

    1997-01-01

    Despite their widespread use in atrial fibrillation, the effects of beta-adrenoceptor blockers on atrial and atrioventricular (AV) nodal refractoriness, and atrial fibrillatory rate during atrial fibrillation have been incompletely characterised. In particular, it is unknown whether additional

  6. Unilateral atrial fibrillation - how common is atrial divorce?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ker, J

    2017-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common pathologic supraventricular tachycardia. It has many causes, is an expensive disease, impairs quality of life and leads to an increased risk of death. Atrial dissociation is characterised by the presence of two independent sets of P-waves. This peculiar abnormality may give rise to the scenario where one atrium is in atrial fibrillation while the other is in sinus rhythm. This is the first published case of atrial dissociation where the phenomenon is demonstrated by transmitral and transtricuspid pulsed wave Doppler.

  7. The impact of supraventricular ectopic complexes in different age groups and risk of recurrent atrial fibrillation after antiarrhythmic medication or catheter ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhede, Christina; Lauridsen, Trine K; Johannessen, Arne; Dixen, Ulrik; Jensen, Jan S; Raatikainen, Pekka; Hindricks, Gerhard; Walfridsson, Haakan; Kongstad, Ole; Pehrson, Steen; Englund, Anders; Hartikainen, Juha; Hansen, Peter S; Nielsen, Jens C; Jons, Christian

    2018-01-01

    Supraventricular ectopic complexes (SVEC) are known risk factors of recurrent atrial fibrillation (AF). However, the impact of SVEC in different age groups is unknown. We aimed to investigate the risk of AF recurrence with higher SVEC burden in patients ±57years, respectively, after treatment with antiarrhythmic medication (AAD) or catheter ablation (CA). In total, 260 patients with LVEF >40% and age ≤70 years were randomized to AAD (N=132) or CA (N=128) as first-line treatment for paroxysmal AF. All patients underwent 7-day Holter monitoring at baseline, and after 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24months and were categorized according to median age ±57years. We used multivariate Cox regression analyses and we defined high SVEC burden at 3months of follow-up as the upper 75th percentile >195SVEC/day. AF recurrence was defined as AF ≥1min, AF-related cardioversion or hospitalization. Age >57years were significantly associated with higher AF recurrence rate after CA (58% vs 36%, p=0.02). After CA, we observed a higher SVEC burden during follow-up in patients >57years which was not observed in the younger age group treated with CA (p=0.006). High SVEC burden at 3months after CA was associated with AF recurrence in older patients but not in younger patients (>57years: HR 3.4 [1.4-7.9], p=0.005). We did not find any age-related differences after AAD. We found that younger and older patients respond differently to CA and that SVEC burden was only associated with AF recurrence in older patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Rotational X-ray angiography: a method for intra-operative volume imaging of the left-atrium and pulmonary veins for atrial fibrillation ablation guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzke, R.; Zagorchev, L.; d'Avila, A.; Thiagalingam, A.; Reddy, V. Y.; Chan, R. C.

    2007-03-01

    Catheter-based ablation in the left atrium and pulmonary veins (LAPV) for treatment of atrial fibrillation in cardiac electrophysiology (EP) are complex and require knowledge of heart chamber anatomy. Electroanatomical mapping (EAM) is typically used to define cardiac structures by combining electromagnetic spatial catheter localization with surface models which interpolate the anatomy between EAM point locations in 3D. Recently, the incorporation of pre-operative volumetric CT or MR data sets has allowed for more detailed maps of LAPV anatomy to be used intra-operatively. Preoperative data sets are however a rough guide since they can be acquired several days to weeks prior to EP intervention. Due to positional and physiological changes, the intra-operative cardiac anatomy can be different from that depicted in the pre-operative data. We present an application of contrast-enhanced rotational X-ray imaging for CT-like reconstruction of 3D LAPV anatomy during the intervention itself. Depending on the heart size a single or two selective contrastenhanced rotational acquisitions are performed and CT-like volumes are reconstructed with 3D filtered back projection. In case of dual injection, the two volumes depicting the left and right portions of the LAPV are registered and fused. The data sets are visualized and segmented intra-procedurally to provide anatomical data and surface models for intervention guidance. Our results from animal and human experiments indicate that the anatomical information from intra-operative CT-like reconstructions compares favorably with preacquired imaging data and can be of sufficient quality for intra-operative guidance.

  9. Estimating Effective Dose from Phantom Dose Measurements in Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Procedures and Comparison of MOSFET and TLD Detectors in a Small Animal Dosimetry Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson-Evans, Colin David

    Two different studies will be presented in this work. The first involves the calculation of effective dose from a phantom study which simulates an atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation procedure. The second involves the validation of metal-oxide semiconducting field effect transistors (MOSFET) for small animal dosimetry applications as well as improved characterization of the animal irradiators on Duke University's campus. Atrial Fibrillation is an ever increasing health risk in the United States. The most common type of cardiac arrhythmia, AF is associated with increased mortality and ischemic cerebrovascular events. Managing AF can include, among other treatments, an interventional procedure called catheter ablation. The procedure involves the use of biplane fluoroscopy during which a patient can be exposed to radiation for as much as two hours or more. The deleterious effects of radiation become a concern when dealing with long fluoroscopy times, and because the AF ablation procedure is elective, it makes relating the risks of radiation ever more essential. This study hopes to quantify the risk through the derivation of dose conversion coefficients (DCCs) from the dose-area product (DAP) with the intent that DCCs can be used to provide estimates of effective dose (ED) for typical AF ablation procedures. A bi-plane fluoroscopic and angiographic system was used for the simulated AF ablation procedures. For acquisition of organ dose measurements, 20 diagnostic MOSFET detectors were placed at selected organs in a male anthropomorphic phantom, and these detectors were attached to 4 bias supplies to obtain organ dose readings. The DAP was recorded from the system console and independently validated with an ionization chamber and radiochromic film. Bi-plane fluoroscopy was performed on the phantom for 10 minutes to acquire the dose rate for each organ, and the average clinical procedure time was multiplied by each organ dose rate to obtain individual organ doses. The

  10. Rhythm Control and Its Relation to Symptoms during the First Two Years after Radiofrequency Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björkenheim, Anna; Brandes, Axel; Chemnitz, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    the electrocardiogram (ECG), has an automatic AF detection algorithm, and has a possibility for patients to activate an ECG recording during symptoms. METHODS: Fifty-seven patients (mean age 57 ± 9 years, 60% male, 88% paroxysmal AF) underwent AF ablation following ILR implantation. Device data were downloaded...

  11. Cryoballoon ablation for atrial fibrillation guided by real-time three-dimensional transoesophageal echocardiography: a feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ottaviano, L.; Chierchia, G.B.; Bregasi, A.; Bruno, N.; Antonelli, A.; Alsheraei, A.T.; Porrini, A.M.; Gronda, E.; Donatelli, F.; Duijnhower, A.L.; Brugada, P.; Montenero, A.S.

    2013-01-01

    AIMS: Cryoballoon ablation (CBA; Arctic Front, Medtronic) has proven very effective in achieving pulmonary vein isolation. Real-time three-dimensional transoesophageal echocardiography (RT 3D TEE) is a novel technology, which permits detailed visualization of cardiac structures in a 3D perspective.

  12. Safety and Efficacy of Under-dosing Non-vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants in Patients Undergoing Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaji, Hirosuke; Murakami, Takashi; Hina, Kazuyoshi; Higashiya, Shunichi; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Murakami, Masaaki; Kamikawa, Shigeshi; Komatsubara, Issei; Kusachi, Shozo

    2016-11-22

    Some patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) received under-doses of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) in the real world. Under-dosing is defined as administration of a dose lower than the manufacturer recommended dose. To identify the efficacy and safety of under-dosing NOACs as perioperative anticoagulation for AF ablation. We retrospectively analyzed patients who received rivaroxaban or dabigatran etexilate according to dosage: adjusted low-dosage (reduced by disturbed renal function; n = 30), under-dosage (n = 307), or standard-dosage (n = 683). NOACs and dosing decisions were at the discretion of treating cardiologists. Patients who received under-dosed NOACs were older, more often female, and had lower body weight, and lower renal function than those who received standard-dosages. Activated clotting time at baseline in patients who received adjusted low- or under-dosages was slightly longer than that in patients receiving standard-dosages (156 ± 23, 151 ± 224, and 147 ± 24 seconds, respectively). Meaningful differences were not observed in other coagulation parameters. Adjusted low-, under-, and standard-dosing regimens did not differ in perioperative thromboembolic complications (0/30, 0.0%; 1/307, 0.3%; and 0/683, 0%, respectively), or major (0/30, 0.0%; 2/307, 0.6%; 3/683, 0.4%) and minor (1/30, 3.3%; 13/307, 4.2%; 25/683, 3.6%) bleeding episodes. When comparisons were performed for each NOAC, similar results were observed. With consideration of patient condition, age, sex, body weight, body mass index, and renal function, under-dosing NOACs was effective and safe as a perioperative anticoagulation therapy for AF ablation. The therapeutic range of NOACs is potentially wider than manufacturer recommendations.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND) , where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly

  13. Psychosomatic correlations in atrial fibrillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Ernstovich Medvedev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with atrial fibrillations (AF and comorbid mental disorders were examined. Two patient groups differing in the structure of psychosomatic ratios were identified. Group 1 comprised patients with AF and signs of reactivity lability that manifested itself as psychopathological reactions to the primary manifestations of AF; Group 2 included those who had developed mental disorders mainly in end-stage cardiovascular disease (predominantly a permanent form of AF in the presence of such events as chronic heart failure (CHF. The results of the study suggest that the patients with AF have frequently anxiety and hypochondriacal disorders, which agrees with the data available in the literature. In addition, end-stage AF is marked by depressive syndromes caused by the severe course of cardiovascular diseases resulting in CHF.

  14. Dronedarone for atrial fibrillation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzocchi, Michele; Lombardi, Federico

    2011-06-01

    Dronedarone is a new benzofuran derivative that has been developed as an antiarrhythmic agent on the basis of the amiodarone molecular structure with the intent of maintaining the same pharmacological effects while reducing thyroid and pulmonary toxicity. The drug is a multichannel blocker with antiadrenergic properties: it reduces heart rate and prolongs the action potential duration. Dronedarone is primarily metabolized by cytochrome P450; its half-life is much shorter than that of amiodarone because of a lower lipophilicity. As a consequence, only 7 days are needed to reach steady-state plasma levels. It has been tested in clinical trials both for rate and rhythm control and, even if its antiarrhythmic efficacy seems to be somehow lower than that of amiodarone, dronedarone is less often discontinued due to adverse reactions or organic toxicity. For these reasons, dronedarone can be very useful in long-term treatment of atrial fibrillation, by reducing hospitalizations and mortality.

  15. Alcohol consumption and risk of atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolstrup, Janne Schurmann; Wium-Andersen, Marie Kim; Ørsted, David Dynnes

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that alcohol consumption, both observational (self-reported) and estimated by genetic instruments, is associated with a risk of atrial fibrillation and to determine whether people with high cardiovascular risk are more sensitive towards...... register. As a measure of alcohol exposure, both self-reported consumption and genetic variations in alcohol metabolizing genes (ADH1B/ADH1C) were used as instrumental variables. The endpoint was admission to hospital for atrial fibrillation as recorded in a validated hospital register. RESULTS: A total...... of 3493 cases of atrial fibrillation occurred during follow-up. High alcohol consumption was associated with a risk of atrial fibrillation among men, but not among women. Among the men who drank 28-35 and 35+ drinks/week, the hazards ratios were 1.40 (95% confidence interval 1.09-1.80) and 1.62 (95...

  16. Ablação curativa da fibrilação atrial: comparação entre sedação profunda e anestesia geral Curative ablation of atrial fibrillation: comparison between deep sedation and general anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Bessadas Penna Firme

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar sedação profunda com anestesia geral para ablação curativa de fibrilação atrial. MÉTODOS: Estudo prospectivo, aleatório, com 32 pacientes, idades entre 18 e 65 anos, ASA 2 e 3, IMC d" 30kg/m², distribuídos em dois grupos: sedação profunda (G1 e anestesia geral (G2. Todos receberam midazolan (0,5mg/kg venoso. O G1 recebeu propofol (1mg/kg e máscara facial de O2, seguido da infusão contínua de propofol (25-50mg/kg/min e remifentanil (0,01-0,05µg/kg/min. O G2 recebeu propofol (2mg/kg e máscara laríngea com tubo de drenagem, seguido da infusão contínua de propofol (60-100mg/kg/min e remifentanil (0,06-0,1µg/kg/min. Foram comparados: frequência cardíaca, pressão arterial invasiva, complicações, recidiva (desfecho em três meses e gasometrias. RESULTADOS: Os pacientes do G1 apresentaram gasometrias arteriais com níveis de PaCO2 maiores e pH menores (p=0,001 e maior incidência de tosse. Ocorreu diminuição da PAM e FC no G2. Exceto a tosse, as complicações e recidivas foram semelhantes em ambos os grupos. CONCLUSÃO: Ambas as técnicas podem ser utilizadas para a ablação curativa da fibrilação atrial. A anestesia geral proporcionou menores alterações respiratórias e maior imobilidade do paciente.OBJECTIVE: To compare deep sedation with general anesthesia for curative ablation of atrial fibrillation. METHODS: We conducted a prospective, randomized study with 32 patients, aged between 18 and 65 years, ASA 2 and 3, BMI d" 30kg/m2, divided into two groups: deep sedation (G1 and general anesthesia (G2. All patients received intravenous midazolam (0.5 mg / kg. G1 received propofol (1mg/kg and O2 by facemask, followed by continuous infusion of propofol (25-50mg/kg/min and remifentanil (0.01-0.05 mg / kg / min. G2 received propofol (2mg/kg and laryngeal mask with built-in drain tube, followed by continuous infusion of propofol (60-100mg/kg/min and remifentanil (0.06 to 0.1g/kg/min. We compared heart rate

  17. Conduction recovery in patients with recurrent atrial fibrillation after pulmonary vein isolation using multi-electrode duty cycled radiofrequency ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balt, J C; Karadavut, S; Mulder, A A W; Luermans, J G L M; Wijffels, M C E F; Boersma, L V A

    2013-08-01

    The pulmonary vein ablation catheter (PVAC) is designed for pulmonary vein isolation (PVI). Electrical reconnection of pulmonary veins is believed to result in AF recurrence. The purpose of this study was to establish the location and extent of PV reconnection after PVI with the PVAC catheter. Eighty-two patients (79 % male, age 60 ± 9 years) that underwent a redo procedure for recurrent AF after PVAC ablation were assessed for prevalence and location of reconnection. The number of reconnected PV's was 0, 1, 2, 3, or 4 in 2 (2.4 %), 14 (17 %), 23 (28 %), 28 (34 %), and 15 (18 %) patients, respectively. Reconnection of left superior, left inferior, left common, right superior, and right inferior PV's was found in 66, 63, 83, 57, and 67 %, respectively (p = 0.48). In the left PV's, reconnection was located significantly more anterior than posterior; LSPV anterior 32/70 vs posterior 13/70 (p < 0.01), LIPV anterior 26/70 vs posterior 9/70 (p < 0.01). In the right PV's reconnection was distributed equally in all quadrants. Different modes of RF delivery during PVAC ablation (bipolar/unipolar 2:1 [n = 35] vs. 4:1 [n = 47]) yielded comparable rates of PV reconnection. During follow-up (median 296 days) no AF/AT was documented in 57 patients (70 %). Almost all patients (98 %) with AF after PVAC ablation show reconnection of at least one PV. All PV's are equally likely to show reconnection. In the left PV's, reconnection was found more often anteriorly than posteriorly. During pulmonary vein isolation with the PVAC catheter, prevalent sites of reconnection deserve close attention to increase success.

  18. Increased NT-pro-B-type natriuretic peptide independently predicts outcome following catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Brian; Goetze, Jens Peter; Chen, Xu

    2009-01-01

    and 22.2) compared to 22.0 pmol/L (quartiles: 12.0 and 34.5) in patients with ablation failure, p = 0.02. With respect to exercise testing, a trend towards a higher increases during exercise were seen in patients with recurrent AF compared to patients without: 2.0 pmol/L (quartiles 1.9 and 7.0) vs. 1...... and after exercise test), and repeated at 1, 3, and 12 months after the final procedure. RESULTS: A total of 51 patients were included. At study entry, the median NT-proBNP concentration was 14.0 pmol/L (quartiles: 8.0 and 27.0). After the exercise test, the mean NT-proBNP value increased from 13.0 pmol....../L (quartiles: 7.5 and 26.0) to 15.0 pmol/L (quartiles: 9.0 and 34.0), p 0.001. Following a maximum of two ablations, 22 patients were free of AF while 29 patients experienced recurrent AF. In patients with successful ablation, the mean NT-proBNP concentration at baseline was 10.0 pmol/L (quartiles: 7.0...

  19. Occlusion of left atrial appendage in patients with atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. Н. Ганеева

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The article reviews a new method of prophylaxis of thromboembolitic complications, specifically occlusion of left atrial appendage, in patients with atrial fibrillation. Indications and contraindications for the procedure, as well as a step-by-step process of the intervention itself are described. Special emphasis is placed on the up-to-date evidence and the review of clinical trials.

  20. RR-Interval variance of electrocardiogram for atrial fibrillation detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuryani, N.; Solikhah, M.; Nugoho, A. S.; Afdala, A.; Anzihory, E.

    2016-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation is a serious heart problem originated from the upper chamber of the heart. The common indication of atrial fibrillation is irregularity of R peak-to-R-peak time interval, which is shortly called RR interval. The irregularity could be represented using variance or spread of RR interval. This article presents a system to detect atrial fibrillation using variances. Using clinical data of patients with atrial fibrillation attack, it is shown that the variance of electrocardiographic RR interval are higher during atrial fibrillation, compared to the normal one. Utilizing a simple detection technique and variances of RR intervals, we find a good performance of atrial fibrillation detection.

  1. Ablação da fibrilação atrial por cateter com radiofreqüência guiada por mapeamento espectral endocárdico dos "ninhos de FA" em ritmo sinusal Radiofrequency catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation guided by spectral mapping of atrial fibrillation nests in sinus rhythm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Pachón Mateos

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: Através de mapeamento espectral-(ME endocárdico em ritmo sinusal, observam-se dois tipos de miocárdio atrial: o compacto de espectro liso e o fibrilar de espectro segmentado ("Ninho de FA" [NFA]. Durante a FA o compacto tem ativação organizada e baixa freqüência (passivo enquanto o fibrilar apresenta ativação bastante desorganizada e alta freqüência (ativo/ressonante sendo ambos ativados por uma taquicardia protegida de alta freqüência, taquicardia de background (TB. OBJETIVO: Descrever o tratamento da FA pela ablação dos NFA e da TB. MÉTODOS: 1 Ablação por cateter-RF [4/8mm-60º/30-40J/30s] dos NFA guiada por ME em ritmo sinusal, fora das veias pulmonares; 2 Estimulação atrial-300ppm; 3 Ablação adicional de NFA se induzida FA; 4 Ablação focal se induzida TB e/ou Flutter; 5 Seguimento clínico+ECG+Holter. RESULTADOS: Foram tratados 50±18 NFA/paciente. Após 11,3±8m 81p (88% estavam sem FA (28,3% com antiarrítmico. Após a ablação dos NFA: a FA não foi reinduzida em 61p(71%; TB foi induzida e tratada em 24p(26%. Ocorreram 2 sangramentos pericárdicos (1 tratado clinicamente e 1 cirurgicamente ocasionados por bainhas não mais utilizadas. CONCLUSÃO: O ME em ritmo sinusal ablaciona os NFA. Durante a FA os NFA apresentam um padrão reativo-ressonante e o miocárdio compacto apresenta-se passivo, estimulados pela alta freqüência da TB. Após a ablação dos NFA e da TB não foi possível reinduzir FA sustentada. A ablação dos NFA fora das VP se mostrou segura e altamente eficiente para a cura e/ou o controle clínico da FA.BACKGROUND: Two types of myocardia can be observed through the endocardial spectral mapping (SM in sinus rhythm: the compact type with a smooth spectrum and the fibrillar type with a segmented spectrum (atrial fibrillation nests. During the atrial fibrillation (AF, the compact type has an organized activation and low frequency (passive, whereas the fibrillar type has a rather

  2. POSTOPERATIVE ATRIAL FIBRILLATION – AN UPDATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Francis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation is the most common perioperative cardiac arrhythmia. Sympathetic overactivity, inflammatory state and oxidative stress are important contributors to the genesis of postoperative atrial fibrillation. Advancing age and mitral valve disease along with left atrial size are important parameters in noted in multivariate prediction model. Genetic predisposition has also been noted. Preventive strategies tried include beta blockers, statins, posterior pericardiotomy, carperitide infusion and thoracic epidural analgesia. Treatment options include rate and rhythm control along with anticoagulation if it persists more than 48 hours with high CHADS2 score. Some of the therapeutic modalities which have been found to be NOT useful in preventing post operative atrial fibrillation are dexamethasone, magnesium infusion and concomitant pulmonary vein isolation.

  3. Risk of atrial fibrillation and stroke in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardsen, Jesper; Ahlehoff, Ole; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar

    2012-01-01

    To determine if patients with rheumatoid arthritis have increased risk of atrial fibrillation and stroke.......To determine if patients with rheumatoid arthritis have increased risk of atrial fibrillation and stroke....

  4. Atrial ectopy predicts late recurrence of atrial fibrillation after pulmonary vein isolation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gang, Uffe J O; Nalliah, Chrishan J; Lim, Toon Wei

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Late recurrence of atrial fibrillation (AF) after radiofrequency ablation remains significant. Asymptomatic recurrence poses a difficult clinical problem as it is associated with an equally increased risk of stroke and death compared with symptomatic AF events. Meta-analyses reveal th...... with a significantly increased risk of late AF recurrence. These results could have important clinical implications for the design of post-PVI follow-up. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: http://www.anzctr.org.au. Unique identifier: ACRTN12606000467538....

  5. Management of atrial fibrillation in heart failure in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abi Nasr, Imad; Mansencal, Nicolas; Dubourg, Olivier

    2008-04-10

    In elderly patients, atrial fibrillation prevalence exceeds 10% and is commonly associated with heart failure rendering their management even more challenging. Therapies to be considered for heart failure related atrial fibrillation include appropriate treatment of underlying disease, prevention of thromboembolism, rate or rhythm control. The debate regarding rate versus rhythm control in the management of this group of patients has yet to be resolved. For old patients, the management requires an individual approach, which largely depends on comorbid conditions, underlying cardiac disease, and patient and physician preferences. Use of antiarrhythmic drug therapy for maintenance of sinus rhythm carries concerns of risk and limited efficacy. Catheter ablation for rhythm control is feasible for some patients, but further studies are needed to define the risks and benefits especially in older patients. Atrioventricular nodal ablation associated with pacing therapy is an effective non-pharmacological therapy in selected patients with medically refractory permanent high heart rate atrial fibrillation and heart failure. Several studies are ongoing and will provide more insight into the management of such patients.

  6. Increased left atrial pressure in non-heart failure patients with subclinical hypothyroidism and atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinori Sairaku

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background The impact of subclinical hypothyroidism on the cardiovascular risk is still debated. We aimed to measure the relationship between subclinical hypothyroidism and the left atrial (LA pressure. Methods The LA pressures and thyroid function were measured in consecutive patients undergoing atrial fibrillation (AF ablation, who did not have any known heart failure, structural heart disease, or overt thyroid disease. Results Subclinical hypothyroidism (4.5≤ thyroid-stimulating hormone 18 mmHg (odds ratio 3.94, 95% CI 1.28 11.2; P = 0.02. Conclusions Subclinical hypothyroidism may increase the LA pressure in AF patients.

  7. INTRAOPERATIVE RADIOFREQUENCY AND CRYOABLATION FOR ATRIAL FIBRILLATION IN PATIENTS WITH VALVULAR HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Maghamipour N. Safaie

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Patients with valvular heart disease and suffering atrial fibrillation of more than 12 months duration have a low probability of remaining in sinus rhythm after valve surgery alone. We performed intra-operative radiofrequency ablation or cryoablation as an alternative to surgical maze ІІІ procedure to create linear lesion lines for conversion of this arrhythmia to sinus rhythm. A total of 30 patients with valvular heart disease and chronic persistent atrial fibrillation underwent different combinations of valve surgery and concomitant maze procedure with radiofrequency or cryo probes. These patients aged 48.10 ± 9.84 years in radiofrequency ablation group and 51.10 ± 13.93 years in cryoablation group. Both atrial ablation with radiofrequency probes, needed 26.15 ± 3.67 min extra ischemic time and ablation by mean of cryo-probes needed an extra ischemic time of 29.62 ± 4.27 min. There was one in hospital death postoperatively because of respiratory failure but no other complication. 6 months after the operation, among 30 patients with both atrial ablations, 25 patients were in sinus rhythm, no patient had junctional rhythm and 5 patients had persistent atrial fibrillation. At 12 months follow up, freedom from atrial fibrillation was 85% in radiofrequency group and 80% in cryo group. Doppler echocardiography in these patients demonstrated atrial contractility in 70% of the patients. Intraoperative radiofrequency or cryo-ablation of both atriums are effective and less invasive alternatives for the original maze procedure to eliminate the atrial fibrillation, and can be done in patients with valvular heart disease without increasing the risk of operation.

  8. Effect of age on stroke prevention therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation: the atrial fibrillation investigators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Walraven, Carl; Hart, Robert G; Connolly, Stuart

    2009-01-01

    on the relative efficacy of oral anticoagulants (OAC) and antiplatelet (AP) therapy (including acetylsalicylic acid and triflusal) on ischemic stroke, serious bleeding, and vascular events in patients with atrial fibrillation. METHODS: This is an analysis of the Atrial Fibrillation Investigators database, which...... contains patient level-data from randomized trials of stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation. We used Cox regression models with age as a continuous variable that controlled for sex, year of randomization, and history of cerebrovascular disease, diabetes, hypertension, and congestive heart failure...

  9. Antihypertensive treatment and risk of atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marott, Sarah C W; Nielsen, Sune F; Benn, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: To examine the associations between antihypertensive treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEis) or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), β-blockers, diuretics, or calcium-antagonists, and risk of atrial fibrillation. We examined these associations using the entire Danish......, and hyperthyroidism at baseline and none received any other antihypertensive medication. We studied risk of atrial fibrillation, and used risk of stroke, influenced by lowering blood pressure rather than renin-angiotensin system blockade per se, as an indicator of the importance of blood pressure lowering per se...... of stroke did not differ among the five antihypertensive medications. CONCLUSION: Use of ACEis and ARBs compared with β-blockers and diuretics associates with a reduced risk of atrial fibrillation, but not stroke, within the limitations of a retrospective study reporting associations. This suggests...

  10. Atrioverter : An implantable device for the treatment of atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wellens, HJJ; Lau, CP; Luderitz, B; Akhtar, M; Waldo, AL; Camm, AJ; Timmermans, C; Tse, HF; Jung, W; Jordaens, L; Ayers, G

    1998-01-01

    Background-During atrial fibrillation, electrophysiological changes occur in atrial tissue that favor the maintenance of the arrhythmia and facilitate recurrence after conversion to sinus rhythm. An implantable defibrillator connected to right atrial and coronary sinus defibrillation leads allows

  11. Impact of left atrial size reduction on chronic atrial fibrillation in mitral valve surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Mirela; Dzemali, Omer; Aybek, Tayfun; Wimmer-Greinecker, Gerhard; Moritz, Anton

    2003-07-01

    Left atrial enlargement is a risk factor for the development of atrial fibrillation (AF). Large atrial size increases thromboembolic risk and reduces the success rate of cardioversion. The study aim was to evaluate if left atrial size reduction affects cardiac rhythm in patients with chronic AF undergoing mitral valve surgery. Twenty-seven patients were analyzed prospectively. The left atrial incision was extended to the left inferior pulmonary vein. Left atrial size reduction was achieved by closure of the left atrial appendage from inside with a double running suture. The same suture plicated the left lateral atrial wall to the roof of the left pulmonary vein inflow and the inferior atrial wall. The atrial septum was plicated by placing stitches of the closing suture line across the fossa ovalis. Rhythm, neurological complications, cardioversion, anticoagulation and anti-arrhythmic medication were evaluated at one year postoperatively and at recent follow up (mean 40 +/- 15 months). At discharge, five patients (19%) were in sinus rhythm (SR). At one year postoperatively, SR was restored in 17 patients (63%), but five (19%) reported episodes of arrhythmia and AF persisted in 10 (37%). At recent follow up, four patients had died and three were lost to follow up. Among 20 patients examined, 13 (65%) had SR but six reported episodes of arrhythmia and AF persisted in seven (35%). LA diameter was significantly reduced, from 60.2 +/- 9.8 mm preoperatively to 44.5 +/- 7.0 mm at one year after surgery. The addition of left atrial size reduction to mitral valve surgery is technically simple, and was effective in 63% of patients with chronic AF, restoring predominant SR. In order to influence pathogenetic factors other than size, additional ablative steps may further increase the SR conversion rate. Size reduction may also improve the outcome of other ablative approaches.

  12. Cirurgia vídeo-assistida para a ablação da fibrilação atrial isolada por radiofrequência bipolar Cirugía videoasistida para ablación de fibrilación atrial aislada por radiofrecuencia bipolar Videothoracoscopy for isolated atrial fibrillation ablation through bipolar radiofrequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Siciliano Colafranceschi

    2009-10-01

    fibrilación atrial (50% paroxística sintomática y refractaria a la terapia medicamentosa, sin enfermedad cardíaca que requiriera cirugía concomitante, fueron sometidos a la ablación de la arritmia guiada por toracoscopía en el período de mayor de 2007 a mayo de 2008. Variables clínicas, de laboratorio y de imagina se recolectaron prospectivamente antes, durante y en el seguimiento postoperatorio. RESULTADOS: La cirugía se realizó conforme lo planeado en todos los pacientes. No hubo lesión iatrogénica de estructuras intratorácicas u óbitos. En el seguimiento medio de seis meses, el 80% de los pacientes están libres de fibrilación atrial. Hubo mejora significativa de los síntomas de insuficiencia cardíaca clase funcional New York Heart Association (2,4 ± 0,5 para 1,6 ± 0,7; p = 0,011. No hubo evidencia de estenosis de venas pulmonares a la angiotomografía en esta serie. CONCLUSIÓN: La cirugía videoasistida para el tratamiento de la fibrilación atrial es reproducible y segura. Hay mejora evolutiva de los síntomas de insuficiencia cardíaca después de la cirugía.BACKGROUND: The prevalence of atrial fibrillation, expenses with the healthcare system and the associated high morbidity and mortality have justified the search for new therapeutic approaches. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the reproducibility of the surgical technique, its safety and the initial outcome of the video-assisted surgery for the isolated atrial fibrillation ablation with bipolar radiofrequency. METHODS: Ten patients (90% men with symptomatic atrial fibrillation (50% paroxystic type that was refractory to drug therapy, with no heart disease that required concomitant surgical treatment, were submitted to arrhythmia ablation guided by thoracoscopy from May 2007 to May 2008. Clinical, laboratory and image variables were prospectively collected before, during surgery and at the postoperative follow-up. RESULTS: The surgery was carried out as planned in all patients. There was no intra

  13. New risk factors for atrial fibrillation : causes of 'not-so-lone atrial fibrillation'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonderwoerd, Bas A.; Smit, Marcelle D.; Pen, Lucas; Van Gelder, Isabelle C.

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a prevalent arrhythmia in patients with cardiovascular disease. The classical risk factors for developing AF include hypertension, valvular disease, (ischaemic) cardiomyopathy, diabetes mellitus, and thyroid disease. In some patients with AF, no underlying

  14. Surgical Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation in Patients with Rheumatic Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Ernesto Koehler; Colafranceschi, Alexandre Siciliano; Monteiro, Andrey José de Oliveira; Canale, Leonardo Secchin; Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Weksler, Clara; Barbosa, Odilon Nogueira; Oliveira, Anderson

    2017-01-01

    Objective To assess heart rhythm and predictive factors associated with sinus rhythm after one year in patients with rheumatic valve disease undergoing concomitant surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation. Operative mortality, survival and occurrence of stroke after one year were also evaluated. Methods Retrospective longitudinal observational study of 103 patients undergoing rheumatic mitral valve surgery and ablation of atrial fibrillation using uni- or bipolar radiofrequency between January 2013 and December 2014. Age, gender, functional class (NYHA), type of atrial fibrillation, EuroSCORE, duration of atrial fibrillation, stroke, left atrial size, left ventricular ejection fraction, cardiopulmonary bypass time, myocardial ischemia time and type of radiofrequency were investigated. Results After one year, 66.3% of patients were in sinus rhythm. Sinus rhythm at hospital discharge, lower left atrial size in the preoperative period and bipolar radiofrequency were associated with a greater chance of sinus rhythm after one year. Operative mortality was 7.7%. Survival rate after one year was 92.3% and occurrence of stroke was 1%. Conclusion Atrial fibrillation ablation surgery with surgical approach of rheumatic mitral valve resulted in 63.1% patients in sinus rhythm after one year. Discharge from hospital in sinus rhythm was a predictor of maintenance of this rhythm. Increased left atrium and use of unipolar radiofrequency were associated with lower chance of sinus rhythm. Operative mortality rate of 7.7% and survival and stroke-free survival contribute to excellent care results for this approach. PMID:28832799

  15. Surgical Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation in Patients with Rheumatic Valve Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Koehler Chavez

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To assess heart rhythm and predictive factors associated with sinus rhythm after one year in patients with rheumatic valve disease undergoing concomitant surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation. Operative mortality, survival and occurrence of stroke after one year were also evaluated. Methods: Retrospective longitudinal observational study of 103 patients undergoing rheumatic mitral valve surgery and ablation of atrial fibrillation using uni- or bipolar radiofrequency between January 2013 and December 2014. Age, gender, functional class (NYHA, type of atrial fibrillation, EuroSCORE, duration of atrial fibrillation, stroke, left atrial size, left ventricular ejection fraction, cardiopulmonary bypass time, myocardial ischemia time and type of radiofrequency were investigated. Results: After one year, 66.3% of patients were in sinus rhythm. Sinus rhythm at hospital discharge, lower left atrial size in the preoperative period and bipolar radiofrequency were associated with a greater chance of sinus rhythm after one year. Operative mortality was 7.7%. Survival rate after one year was 92.3% and occurrence of stroke was 1%. Conclusion: Atrial fibrillation ablation surgery with surgical approach of rheumatic mitral valve resulted in 63.1% patients in sinus rhythm after one year. Discharge from hospital in sinus rhythm was a predictor of maintenance of this rhythm. Increased left atrium and use of unipolar radiofrequency were associated with lower chance of sinus rhythm. Operative mortality rate of 7.7% and survival and stroke-free survival contribute to excellent care results for this approach.

  16. [ESC guidelines on atrial fibrillation 2016 : Summary of the most relevant recommendations and modifications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckardt, L; Häusler, K G; Ravens, U; Borggrefe, M; Kirchhof, P

    2016-12-01

    The first European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines on atrial fibrillation (AF) developed in collaboration with the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery (EACTS) were published in August 2016. These guidelines replace the revised guidelines from 2012 and contain some interesting new aspects. The topics range from the pathophysiology through diagnostics, therapy and stroke prevention up to special clinical situations, such as atrial fibrillation in cardiopathy, sport and pregnancy. Early screening, patient informed consent, individualized therapy and the modification of factors promoting atrial fibrillation are of particular importance. The guidelines recommend the establishment of AF heart teams, containing specialists from various disciplines. The guidelines also underline the importance of non-vitamin K‑dependent oral anticoagulants (NOAC) for stroke prevention compared to standard anticoagulants with vitamin K antagonists. For symptomatic and especially paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, the guidelines emphasize the importance of an antiarrhythmic treatment with catheter ablation and/or pharmaceutical antiarrhythmic therapy in addition to a frequency regulating therapy.

  17. A Simple Model for Identifying Critical Structures in Atrial Fibrillation

    CERN Document Server

    Christensen, Kim; Peters, Nicholas S

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common abnormal heart rhythm and the single biggest cause of stroke. Ablation, destroying regions of the atria, is applied largely empirically and can be curative but with a disappointing clinical success rate. We design a simple model of activation wavefront propagation on a structure mimicking the branching network architecture of heart muscle and show how AF emerges spontaneously as age-related parameters change. We identify regions responsible for the initiation and maintenance of AF, the ablation of which terminates AF. The simplicity of the model allows us to calculate analytically the risk of arrhythmia. This analytical result allows us to locate the transition in parameter space and highlights that the transition from regular to fibrillatory behaviour is a finite-size effect present in systems of any size. These clinically testable predictions might inform ablation therapies and arrhythmic risk assessment.

  18. Genetic aspects of lone atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Laura; Nielsen, Jonas B; Olesen, Morten S

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia. A subgroup of patients presents with AF without traditional risk factors and is diagnosed before the age of 60 years. Such patients are commonly referred as having "lone AF" and comprise 10-20% of all cases. A number of studies have ...

  19. Genetic Risk Prediction of Atrial Fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubitz, Steven A; Yin, Xiaoyan; Lin, Henry; Kolek, Matthew; Smith, J Gustav; Trompet, Stella; Rienstra, Michiel; Rost, Natalia S; Teixeira, Pedro; Almgren, Peter; Anderson, Christopher D; Chen, Lin Y; Engström, Gunnar; Ford, Ian; Furie, Karen L; Guo, Xiuqing; Larson, Martin G; Lunetta, Kathryn; Macfarlane, Peter W; Psaty, Bruce M; Soliman, Elsayed Z; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Stott, David J; Taylor, Kent D; Weng, Lu-Chen; Yao, Jie; Geelhoed, Bastiaan; Verweij, Niek; Siland, Joylene E; Kathiresan, Sekar; Roselli, Carolina; Roden, Dan M; van der Harst, Pim; Darbar, Dawood; Jukema, J Wouter; Melander, Olle; Rosand, Jonathan; Rotter, Jerome I; Heckbert, Susan R; Ellinor, Patrick T; Alonso, Alvaro; Benjamin, Emelia J

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation (AF) has a substantial genetic basis. Identification of individuals at greatest AF risk could minimize the incidence of cardioembolic stroke. METHODS: To determine whether genetic data can stratify risk for development of AF, we examined associations between AF

  20. Risk of atrial fibrillation in diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallisgaard, Jannik L; Schjerning, Anne-Marie; Lindhardt, Tommi B

    2016-01-01

    .81-8.98) and 20.0 (19.9-20.2) in the background population and 0.13 (0.09-0.20), 2.10 (2.00-2.20), 8.41 (8.10-8.74) and 20.1 (19.4-20.8) in the diabetes group, respectively. The adjusted incidence rate ratios in the diabetes group with the background population as reference were 2.34 (1.52-3.60), 1.52 (1......AIM: Diabetes has been associated with atrial fibrillation but the current evidence is conflicting. In particular knowledge regarding young diabetes patients and the risk of developing atrial fibrillation is sparse. The aim of our study was to investigate the risk of atrial fibrillation in patients...... with diabetes compared to the background population in Denmark. METHODS AND RESULTS: Through Danish nationwide registries we included persons above 18 years of age and without prior atrial fibrillation and/or diabetes from 1996 to 2012. The study cohort was divided into a background population without diabetes...

  1. Atrial fibrillation: non cardiologist physicians approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forero-Gómez, Julián Eduardo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation is the most frequent arrhythmia. Its classification according to pattern and clinical type allows to decide the therapeutic strategy to use, that most include control of symptoms and prevention of cardioembolic events. The election of the treatment depends on the presence of triggering events, risk factors for thromboembolism, risk factors for bleeding, cardiac function, patient funcionality, medication costoefectiveness and health care access. The type of anticoagulant has to be supported on the type of atrial fibrillation and the presence of contraindications, documented ineffective anticoagulation or high risk of failure to warfarin. In case of contraindications for anticoagulation this could still be used in high bleeding risk patients, when risk factors are controllable or corrected; leaving left atrial appendage closure as an option for patients that remain in high risk for bleeding events.

  2. Managing atrial fibrillation in active patients and athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, R A

    1999-03-01

    Atrial fibrillation in young or middle-aged active patients can often be managed with medication. Evaluation should address associated conditions and predisposing factors such as idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis, Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, congenital heart disease, hyperthyroidism, excess alcohol or other drug use, and exercise-induced catecholamine release. Diagnostic studies may include an ECG, 24-hour Holter or event monitoring, exercise treadmill testing, stress echocardiography, electrophysiologic studies, and laboratory testing. Electrocardioversion provides rapid, predictable treatment, but ablation therapy is sometimes needed.

  3. Tratamiento quirúrgico curativo de la fibrilación atrial mediante técnica de ablación con radiofrecuencia monopolar irrigada: resultados a corto y mediano plazo Surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation through irrigated ablation with monopolar radiofrequency: results to short and midterm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Franco

    2007-02-01

    irrigated monopolar radiofrequency to short and midterm, through clinical follow-up, electrocardiogram and echocardiogram. Methods: 70 patients with diagnosis of atrial fibrillation and some other heart pathology that required surgery were evaluated between September 2003 and October 2005, in a prospective way. An ablation though monopolar radiofrequency (Cardioblate® Medtronic, Inc was performed. Results were analyzed with the SPSS version 11, 0 statistical package. Results: 70 patients, 52% females and 48% males with mean age 54 years and preoperatory ejection fraction of 47% had mitral insufficiency (49% and mitral stenosis (26% as their main cause for primary heart surgery. 87% patients were evaluated at 18 months (3 to 25 months. Sinus rhythm was achieved in 88%. Residual arrhythmias in this group were atrial fibrillation (6% and atrial flutter (6%. 80% of post-operatory arrhythmias were found in the first 15 days after surgery, being atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter the most common ones. Anticoagulation and anti-arrhythmic medication was suspended in 89% and 90% of the patients, respectively. The surgical technique had no inherent complications. Conclusions: this investigation demonstrated that the surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation with irrigated monopolar radiofrequency is easily reproducible, highly effective and safe for the patient.

  4. Stroke as the First Manifestation of Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaakkola, Jussi; Mustonen, Pirjo; Kiviniemi, Tuomas; Hartikainen, Juha E K; Palomäki, Antti; Hartikainen, Päivi; Nuotio, Ilpo; Ylitalo, Antti; Airaksinen, K E Juhani

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation may remain undiagnosed until an ischemic stroke occurs. In this retrospective cohort study we assessed the prevalence of ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack as the first manifestation of atrial fibrillation in 3,623 patients treated for their first ever stroke or transient ischemic attack during 2003-2012. Two groups were formed: patients with a history of atrial fibrillation and patients with new atrial fibrillation diagnosed during hospitalization for stroke or transient ischemic attack. A control group of 781 patients with intracranial hemorrhage was compiled similarly to explore causality between new atrial fibrillation and stroke. The median age of the patients was 78.3 [13.0] years and 2,009 (55.5%) were women. New atrial fibrillation was diagnosed in 753 (20.8%) patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack, compared to 15 (1.9%) with intracranial hemorrhage. Younger age and no history of coronary artery disease or other vascular diseases, heart failure, or hypertension were the independent predictors of new atrial fibrillation detected concomitantly with an ischemic event. Thus, ischemic stroke was the first clinical manifestation of atrial fibrillation in 37% of younger (<75 years) patients with no history of cardiovascular diseases. In conclusion, atrial fibrillation is too often diagnosed only after an ischemic stroke has occurred, especially in middle-aged healthy individuals. New atrial fibrillation seems to be predominantly the cause of the ischemic stroke and not triggered by the acute cerebrovascular event.

  5. Prevalence and characteristics of left atrial tachycardia following left atrial catheter ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Toru; Tada, Hiroshi; Naito, Shigeto; Miyaji, Kohei; Yamada, Minoru; Tadokoro, Kazuyoshi; Kaseno, Kenichi; Oshima, Shigeru; Taniguchi, Koichi

    2007-01-01

    Left atrial tachycardia (AT) is a complication of left atrial catheter ablation (LACA) of atrial fibrillation (AF). However, its prevalence and characteristics have not been sufficiently clarified. We divided 121 patients who underwent LACA into 2 groups based on the results of AT occurrence after LACA (follow-up period; 12 +/- 7 months): an AT+ group and AT- group. New-onset left AT occurred in 30 patients (25%) 31 +/- 51 days after LACA. Among the 26 patients with an early onset of AT, 4 underwent a second ablation for AT, and 21 became free of AT within 6 months without a repeat ablation procedure. Among the 4 patients with a late onset of AT (> 2 months after the LACA), the tachycardia remitted without a repeat ablation procedure in a single patient within 6 months. Among 71 patients who underwent LACA with additional ablation lines, 22 (31%) developed new-onset left AT. Among 50 patients who underwent LACA alone, 8 (16%) developed new-onset left AT (P = 0.02). New-onset left AT is a frequent complication of LACA for AF, especially in men and in patients with a low left ventricular ejection fraction. Early (< 2 months) onset AT does not require a repeat ablation because it often represents a transient phenomenon and disappears spontaneously.

  6. Novel Percutaneous Epicardial Autonomic Modulation in the Canine for Atrial Fibrillation: Results of an Efficacy and Safety Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavan, Malini; Venkatachalam, K. L.; Swale, Matthew J.; DeSimone, Christopher V.; Gard, Joseph J.; Johnson, Susan B.; Suddendorf, Scott H.; Mikell, Susan B.; Ladewig, Dorothy J.; Nosbush, Toni Grabinger; Danielsen, Andrew J.; Knudson, Mark; Asirvatham, Samuel J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Endocardial ablation of atrial ganglionated plexi (GP) has been described for treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF). Our objective in this study was to develop percutaneous epicardial GP ablation in a canine model using novel energy sources and catheters. Methods Phase 1: The efficacy of several modalities to ablate the GP was tested in an open chest canine model (n=10). Phase 2: Percutaneous epicardial ablation of GP was done in 6 dogs using the most efficacious modality identified in phase 1 using 2 novel catheters. Results Phase 1: DC in varying doses [blocking (7 -12μA), electroporation (300-500μA), ablation (3000- 7500μA)], radiofrequency ablation (25–50 W), ultrasound (1.5MHz), and alcohol (2-5ml) injection were successful at 0/8, 4/12, 5/7, 3/8, 1/5 and 5/7 GP sites. DC (500–5000μA) along with alcohol irrigation was tested in phase 2. Phase 2: Percutaneous epicardial ablation of the right atrium, oblique sinus, vein of Marshall, and transverse sinus GP was successful in 5/6 dogs. One dog died of ventricular fibrillation (VF) during DC ablation at 5000 μA. Programmed stimulation induced AF in 6 dogs pre-ablation and no atrial arrhythmia in 3, flutter in 1 and AF in 1 post-ablation. Heart rate, blood pressure, effective atrial refractory period and local atrial electrogram amplitude did not change significantly post-ablation. Microscopic examination showed elimination of GP, and minimal injury to atrial myocardium. Conclusion Percutaneous epicardial ablation of GP using direct current and novel catheters is safe and feasible and may be used as an adjunct to pulmonary vein isolation in the treatment of atrial fibrillation in order to minimize additional atrial myocardial ablation. PMID:26854009

  7. Two-staged hybrid treatment of persistent atrial fibrillation: short-term single-centre results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurfirst, Vojtěch; Mokraček, Aleš; Bulava, Alan; Čanadyova, Júlia; Haniš, Jiři; Pešl, Ladislav

    2014-04-01

    The treatment of persistent and long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) has unsatisfactory results using both medical therapy and/or catheter ablation, where incomplete ablation lines remain a significant problem. This study evaluates the feasibility, efficacy and safety of the sequential, two-staged hybrid treatment combining thoracoscopic surgical and transvenous catheter AF ablation. Thirty patients with persistent and long-standing persistent AF underwent surgical thoracoscopic radiofrequency (RF) ablation procedure using a predefined protocol (pulmonary veins isolation, box lesion, isthmus line lesion, dissection of the ligament of Marshall, left atrial appendage exclusion with an epicardial clip and ganglionated plexi ablation) followed by diagnostic catheterization and RF ablation 3 months later. In this session, electrical mapping of the left atrium was performed and any incomplete isolation lines were completed. Mitral and cavotricuspid isthmus ablation lines were performed during this session as well. The preoperative mean duration time of AF was 33 ± 27 months with 17% patients with persistent and 83% patients with long-standing persistent AF. The mean size of the left atrium was 48 ± 5 mm. The complete surgical ablation protocol was achieved in 97% of patients, with no death, and no early stroke or pacemaker implantation in the early postoperative period. In 63% of patients, the left atrial appendage was excluded with an epicardial clip. An endocardial touch-up for achievement of bidirectional block of pulmonary veins was necessary in 10 patients (33%) and on the box, (roof and floor) lesions in 20 patients (67%). Freedom from atrial fibrillation was 77% after surgical ablation and 93% after the completed hybrid procedure. The sequential, two-staged hybrid strategy (surgical thoracoscopic followed by catheter ablation) is feasible and safe with a high post-procedural success and seems to represent the optimal treatment with low risk load and

  8. Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation: Current Strategies and Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald V. Naccarelli, MD

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is the most common complication of atrial fibrillation (AF. Guidelines recommend anticoagulant treatment in patients with CHA2DS2VASc scores of >2. Registry data suggests that almost half of patients who should be on therapeutic anticoagulation for stroke prevention in AF (SPAF are not. Warfarin and more recently developed agents, the “novel anticoagulants” (NOACs reduce the risk of embolic strokes. In addition, the NOACs also reduce intracranial hemorrhage (ICH by over 50% compared to warfarin. Anticoagulation and bridging strategies involving cardioversion, catheter ablation, and invasive/surgical procedures are reviewed. The development of reversal agents for NOACs and the introduction of left atrial appendage occluding devices will evolve the use of newer strategies for preventing stroke in high risk AF patients.

  9. Strategies in the Surgical Management of Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leanne Harling

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is associated with substantial morbidity, mortality, and economic burden and confers a lifetime risk of up to 25%. Current medical management involves thromboembolism prevention, rate, and rhythm control. An increased understanding of AF pathophysiology has led to enhanced pharmacological and medical therapies; however this is often limited by toxicity, variable symptom control, and inability to modulate the atrial substrate. Surgical AF ablation has been available since the original description of the Cox Maze procedure, either as a standalone or concomitant intervention. Advances in novel energy delivery systems have allowed the development of less technically demanding procedures potentially eliminating the need for median sternotomy and cardiopulmonary bypass. Variations in the definition, duration, and reporting of AF have produced methodological limitations impacting on the validity of interstudy comparisons. Standardization of these parameters may, in future, allow us to further evaluate clinical endpoints and establish the efficacy of these techniques.

  10. The clinical efficacy of dabigatran etexilate for preventing stroke in atrial fibrillation patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellis CR

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Christopher R Ellis, Daniel W KaiserVanderbilt Heart and Vascular Institute, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: The use of novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs for stroke and systemic embolism prevention in the setting of specifically non valvular atrial fibrillation has provided clinicians with a realistic treatment alternative to the traditional dose-adjusted, warfarin-based anticoagulation that is targeted to a therapeutic international normalized ratio range of 2.0–3.0. We discuss the use of dabigatran in the setting of mechanical heart valves, atrial fibrillation or left atrial catheter ablation procedures, reversal of the drug in the setting of adverse bleeding events, and background on the molecular biology and development of this novel treatment for stroke reduction.Keywords: NOACs, systemic embolism, atrial fibrillation, stroke, dabigatran etexilate

  11. Multi-sensor esophageal temperature probe used during radiofrequency ablation for atrial fibrillation is associated with increased intraluminal temperature detection and increased risk of esophageal injury compared to single-sensor probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Brett J; Contreras-Valdes, Fernando M; Heist, E Kevin; Barrett, Conor D; Danik, Stephan B; Ruskin, Jeremy N; Mansour, Moussa

    2013-09-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) ablation in the posterior left atrium has risk of thermal injury to the adjacent esophagus. Increased intraluminal esophageal temperature has been correlated with risk of esophageal injury. The objective of this study was to compare esophageal temperature monitoring (ETM) using a multi-sensor temperature probe with 12 sensors to a single-sensor probe during catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF). We compared the detection of intraluminal esophageal temperature rises in 543 patients undergoing RF ablation for AF with ETM. Esophageal endoscopy (EGD) was performed on all patients with maximum esophageal temperature ≥ 39°C. Esophageal lesions were classified by severity as mild or severe ulcerations. Four hundred fifty-five patients underwent RF ablation with single-sensor ETM and 88 patients with multi-sensor ETM. Thirty-nine percent of patients with single-sensor versus 75% with multi-sensor ETM reached a maximum detected esophageal temperature ≥ 39°C (P temperature ≥ 39°C by single-sensor versus 46% of patients with multi-sensor ETM (P = 0.021). Thirty-nine percent of patients with lesions in the single-sensor probe group had severe ulcerations compared to 33% of patients in the multi-sensor probe group (P = 0.641). Intraluminal esophageal temperature ≥ 39°C is detected more frequently by the multi-sensor temperature probe versus the single-sensor probe, with more frequent esophageal injury and with comparable severity of injury. Despite detecting esophageal temperature rises in more patients, the multi-sensor probe may not have any measurable benefit compared to a single-sensor probe. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Left atrial and left atrial appendage function in paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdei, T; Erdei, Tamás; Dénes, M; Kardos, A; Földesi, C; Földesi, A; Temesvári, A; Temesvári, M; Lengyel, M

    2011-06-01

    In patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF) little information is available about left atrial (LA)function, and there is less information about LA appendage (LAA) function, and about their relations. 46 patients were selected for catheter ablation (CA) because of nonvalvular PAF.Transthoracic, tissue Doppler and transoesophageal echocardiography was performed before CA. LA volumes and volume index (LAVI) were calculated. LA function was assessed by LA filling fraction (LAFF), LA emptying fraction (LAEF), systolic fraction of pulmonary venous flow (PVSF) and late diastolic velocities of mitral annulus(Aa,, A5at) LAA function was assessed by peak LAA emptying flow velocity (PLAAEFV). Diastolic dysfunction(DD) was also assessed. Dilated LAVI in 32, LA dysfunction in 20, DD with elevated LV filling pressure in 19 patients was found. Aa,at and Aa,p correlated with LAFF (r:0.53; p<0.001 and r:0.43; p<0.05), LAEF (r:0.51;p<0.001 and r:0.63; p<0.001), PVSF (r:0.49; p<0.001 and r:0.46; p<0.005) and PLAAEFV (r:0.58; p<0.001 and r:0.45; p<0.01). In PAF patients Aa velocity is useful to assess LA function and correlates positively with other TTE derived LA functional parameters and LAA function by TEE derived PLAAEFV.

  13. Atrial Fibrillation During an Exploration Class Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipset, Mark A.; Lemery, Jay; Polk, J. D.; Hamilton, Douglas R.

    2010-01-01

    Background: A long-duration exploration class mission is fraught with numerous medical contingency plans. Herein, we explore the challenges of symptomatic atrial fibrillation (AF) occurring during an exploration class mission. The actions and resources required to ameliorate the situation, including the availability of appropriate pharmaceuticals, monitoring devices, treatment modalities, and communication protocols will be investigated. Challenges of Atrial Fibrillation during an Exploration Mission: Numerous etiologies are responsible for the initiation of AF. On Earth, we have the time and medical resources to evaluate and determine the causative situation for most cases of AF and initiate therapy accordingly. During a long-duration exploration class mission resources will be severely restricted. How is one to determine if new onset AF is due to recent myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism, fluid overload, thyrotoxicosis, cardiac structural abnormalities, or CO poisoning? Which pharmaceutical therapy should be initiated and what potential side effects can be expected? Should anti-coagulation therapy be initiated? How would one monitor the therapeutic treatment of AF in microgravity? What training would medical officers require, and which communication strategies should be developed to enable the best, safest therapeutic options for treatment of AF during a long-duration exploration class mission? Summary: These questions will be investigated with expert opinion on disease elucidation, efficient pharmacology, therapeutic monitoring, telecommunication strategies, and mission cost parameters with emphasis on atrial fibrillation being just one illustration of the tremendous challenges that face a long-duration exploration mission. The limited crew training time, medical hardware, and drugs manifested to deal with such an event predicate that aggressive primary and secondary prevention strategies be developed to protect a multibillion-dollar asset like the

  14. Acute atrial fibrillation during dengue hemorrhagic fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veloso Henrique Horta

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue fever is a viral infection transmitted by the mosquito, Aedes aegypti. Cardiac rhythm disorders, such as atrioventricular blocks and ventricular ectopic beats, appear during infection and are attributed to viral myocarditis. However, supraventricular arrhythmias have not been reported. We present a case of acute atrial fibrillation, with a rapid ventricular rate, successfully treated with intravenous amiodarone, in a 62-year-old man with dengue hemorrhagic fever, who had no structural heart disease.

  15. Profound sedation with propofol modifies atrial fibrillation dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervigón, Raquel; Moreno, Javier; Pérez-Villacastín, Julián; Castells, Francisco

    2013-09-01

    During atrial fibrillation (AF), multiple wandering propagation wavelets at high rates drift around both atria under controversial hierarchical models. Antiarrhythmic drugs modify the cardiac ionic currents supporting the fibrillation process within the atria, and can alter AF propagation dynamics and even terminate the arrhythmia. However, some other drugs, theoretically nonantiarrhythmic, may slightly block particular cardiac ionic currents through uncertain mechanisms in such a subtle way at regular heart rates that may have been pharmacologically overlooked. These potential effects might be better exposed at much higher activation rates as in AF, where atrial cells depolarize over 400 times per second. In this review, we aimed to compile and discuss results from several studies evaluating the net effect of profound sedation with propofol on atrial cells and atrioventricular (AV) conduction. Propofol is a very commonly used anesthetic agent, and its possible effect on AF dynamics has systematically not been taken into account in the myriad of clinical studies dealing with AF intracardiac recordings. The possible effect of sedation with propofol on AF was evaluated through the analysis of AF propagation patterns before and after its infusion in a series of patients submitted to pulmonary vein ablation. Effect on AV conduction will be discussed as well. ©2013, The Authors. Journal compilation ©2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. The use of warfarin in veterans with atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenbeck Karen

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Warfarin therapy is effective for the prevention of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. However, warfarin therapy is underutilized even among ideal anticoagulation candidates. The purpose of this study was to examine the use of warfarin in both inpatients and outpatients with atrial fibrillation within a Veterans Affairs (VA hospital system. Methods This retrospective medical record review included outpatients and inpatients with atrial fibrillation. The outpatient cohort included all patients seen in the outpatient clinics of the VA Connecticut Healthcare System during June 2000 with a diagnosis of atrial fibrillation. The inpatient cohort included all patients discharged from the VA Connecticut Healthcare System West Haven Medical Center with a diagnosis of atrial fibrillation during October 1999 – March 2000. The outcome measure was the rate of warfarin prescription in patients with atrial fibrillation. Results A total of 538 outpatients had a diagnosis of atrial fibrillation and 73 of these had a documented contraindication to anticoagulation. Among the 465 eligible outpatients, 455 (98% were prescribed warfarin. For the inpatients, a total of 212 individual patients were discharged with a diagnosis of atrial fibrillation and 97 were not eligible for warfarin therapy. Among the 115 eligible inpatients, 106 (92% were discharged on warfarin. Conclusions Ideal anticoagulation candidates with atrial fibrillation are being prescribed warfarin at very high rates within one VA system, in both the inpatient and outpatient settings; we found warfarin use within our VA was much higher than that observed for Medicare beneficiaries in our state.

  17. Atrial Fibrillation in Eight New World Camelids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozorgmanesh, R; Magdesian, K G; Estell, K E; Stern, J A; Swain, E A; Griffiths, L G

    2016-01-01

    There is limited information on the incidence of clinical signs, concurrent illness and treatment options for atrial fibrillation (AF) in New World Camelids (NWC). Describe clinical signs and outcome of AF in NWC. Eight New World Camelids admitted with AF. A retrospective observational study of camelids diagnosed with AF based on characteristic findings on electrocardiogram (ECG). All animals had an irregularly irregular heart rhythm detected on physical examination and 4 cases had obtunded mentation on admission. Three camelids were diagnosed with AF secondary to oleander intoxication, 3 animals had underlying cardiovascular disease, 1 was diagnosed with lone AF and 1 had AF diagnosed on examination for a urethral obstruction. Five of eight animals survived to discharge and nonsurvivors consisted of animals which died or were euthanized as a result of cardiovascular disease (2/8) or extra-cardiac disease unrelated to the AF (1/8). Atrial fibrillation occurs in NWC in association with cardiovascular disease, extra-cardiac disease or as lone AF. Amiodarone and transthoracic cardioversion were attempted in one llama with lone AF, but were unsuccessful. Atrial fibrillation was recorded in 0.1% of admissions. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  18. The impact of supraventricular ectopic complexes in different age groups and risk of recurrent atrial fibrillation after antiarrhythmic medication or catheter ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Christina; Lauridsen, Trine K; Johannessen, Arne

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Supraventricular ectopic complexes (SVEC) are known risk factors of recurrent atrial fibrillation (AF). However, the impact of SVEC in different age groups is unknown. We aimed to investigate the risk of AF recurrence with higher SVEC burden in patients ±57years, respectively, after....... RESULTS: Age >57years were significantly associated with higher AF recurrence rate after CA (58% vs 36%, p=0.02). After CA, we observed a higher SVEC burden during follow-up in patients >57years which was not observed in the younger age group treated with CA (p=0.006). High SVEC burden at 3months after CA...... was associated with AF recurrence in older patients but not in younger patients (>57years: HR 3.4 [1.4-7.9], p=0.005). We did not find any age-related differences after AAD. CONCLUSION: We found that younger and older patients respond differently to CA and that SVEC burden was only associated with AF recurrence...

  19. Potassium channel gene mutations rarely cause atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam Edwin G

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in several potassium channel subunits have been associated with rare forms of atrial fibrillation. In order to explore the role of potassium channels in inherited typical forms of the arrhythmia, we have screened a cohort of patients from a referral clinic for mutations in the channel subunit genes implicated in the arrhythmia. We sought to determine if mutations in KCNJ2 and KCNE1-5 are a common cause of atrial fibrillation. Methods Serial patients with lone atrial fibrillation or atrial fibrillation with hypertension were enrolled between June 1, 2001 and January 6, 2005. Each patient underwent a standardized interview and physical examination. An electrocardiogram, echocardiogram and blood sample for genetic analysis were also obtained. Patients with a family history of AF were screened for mutations in KCNJ2 and KCNE1-5 using automated sequencing. Results 96 patients with familial atrial fibrillation were enrolled. Eighty-three patients had lone atrial fibrillation and 13 had atrial fibrillation and hypertension. Patients had a mean age of 56 years at enrollment and 46 years at onset of atrial fibrillation. Eighty-one percent of patients had paroxysmal atrial fibrillation at enrollment. Unlike patients with an activating mutation in KCNQ1, the patients had a normal QTc interval with a mean of 412 ± 42 ms. Echocardiography revealed a normal mean ejection fraction of 62.0 ± 7.2 % and mean left atrial dimension of 39.9 ± 7.0 mm. A number of common polymorphisms in KCNJ2 and KCNE1-5 were identified, but no mutations were detected. Conclusion Mutations in KCNJ2 and KCNE1-5 rarely cause typical atrial fibrillation in a referral clinic population.

  20. Atrial fibrillation in an adolescent--the agony of ecstasy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhok, Ashish; Boxer, Robert; Chowdhury, Devyani

    2003-10-01

    Ecstasy (MDMA), a popular drug of abuse among teenagers, is thought to be "relatively" safe. A case of atrial fibrillation following the ingestion of ecstasy in a previously well adolescent is presented. Emergency room physicians should consider ecstasy abuse in the differential diagnosis of young patients presenting with atrial fibrillation.

  1. Oral antiarrhythmic drugs in converting recent onset atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deneer, Vera H. M.; Borgh, Marieke B. I.; Kingma, J. Herre; Lie-A-Huen, Loraine; Brouwers, Jacobus R. B. J.

    2004-01-01

    AIM: This article reviews clinical studies on oral antiarrhythmic drugs in converting recent onset atrial fibrillation. An oral loading dose of an antiarrhythmic drug for cardioversion of atrial fibrillation could be an option, due to its simplicity, both for patients admitted to outpatient

  2. Does Myocardial Infarction Beget Atrial Fibrillation and Atrial Fibrillation Beget Myocardial Infarction?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermond, Rob A.; Van Gelder, Isabelle C.; Crijns, Harry J.; Rienstra, Michiel

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) affects millions of people worldwide.(1) It is already known several decades that AF is not a benign condition, and it's associated with a 5-fold increased risk of stroke, 3-fold increased risk of heart failure, and doubling of risk of dementia and death.(2-4) Myocardial

  3. Strategy and Outcome of Catheter Ablation for Persistent Atrial Fibrillation - Impact of Progress in the Mapping and Ablation Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamatsu, Hideharu; Okumura, Ken

    2017-11-30

    Pulmonary vein (PV) antrum isolation (PVAI) is effective in treating paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) but is less so for persistent AF. A recent randomized study on the ablation strategies for persistent AF demonstrated that 2 common atrial substrate modifications, creation of linear lesions in the left atrium and ablation of complex fractionated electrogram sites, in addition to PVAI did not improve the outcome compared with stand-alone PVAI, suggesting the necessity of a more individualized, selective approach to persistent AF. There are emerging technologies, including high-resolution mapping with the use of multi-electrode catheter and auto mapping system and contact force (CF) guide ablation; the former allows rapid and accurate confirmation of the completeness of PVAI, and the latter enhances the achievement of durable ablation lesions more securely. Ablation for fibrotic area(s) has been proposed as a new approach for substrate modification, and high-resolution mapping is useful to define the area with low-voltage electrograms, a surrogate marker for atrial fibrosis. Ablation for non-PV triggers in addition to PVAI improves the outcome of persistent AF. Further, durable isolation of the left atrial posterior wall may reduce AF recurrence. These ablation strategies with concomitant use of the emerging technologies are strongly expected to enhance the effectiveness of catheter ablation for persistent AF.

  4. A comparison of ventricular function during high right ventricular septal and apical pacing after his-bundle ablation for refractory atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mera, F; DeLurgio, D B; Patterson, R E; Merlino, J D; Wade, M E; León, A R

    1999-08-01

    This study compares LV performance during high right ventricular septal (RVS) and apical (RVA) pacing in patients with LV dysfunction who underwent His-bundle ablation for chronic AF. We inserted a passive fixation pacing electrode into the RVA and an active fixation electrode in the RVS. A dual chamber, rate responsive pulse generator stimulated the RVA through the ventricular port and the RVS via the atrial port. Patients were randomized to initial RVA (VVIR) or RVS (AAIR) pacing for 2 months. The pacing site was reversed during the next 2 months. At the 2 and 4 month follow-up visit, each patient underwent a transthoracic echocardiographical study and a rest/exercise first pass radionuclide ventriculogram. We studied nine men and three women (mean age of 68 +/- 7 years) with congestive heart failure functional Class (NYHA Classification): I (3 patients), II (7 patients), and III (2 patients). The QRS duration was shorter during RVS stimulation (158 +/- 10 vs 170 +/- 11 ms, P < 0.001). Chronic capture threshold and lead impedance did not significantly differ. LV fractional shortening improved during RVS pacing (0.31 +/- 0.05 vs 0.26 +/- 0.07, P < 0.01). RVS activation increased the resting first pass LV ejection fraction (0.51 +/- 0.14 vs 0.43 +/- 0.10, P < 0.01). No significant difference was observed during RVS and RVA pacing in the exercise time (5.6 +/- 3.2 vs 5.4 +/- 3.1, P = 0.6) or the exercise first pass LV ejection fraction (0.58 +/- 0.15 vs 0.55 +/- 0.16, P = 0.2). The relative changes in QRS duration and LV ejection fraction at both pacing sites showed a significant correlation (P < 0.01). We conclude that RVS pacing produces shorter QRS duration and better chronic LV function than RVA pacing in patients with mild to moderate LV dysfunction and chronic AF after His-bundle ablation.

  5. Emergency bypass post percutaneous atrial ablation: a case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hargrove, M

    2010-11-01

    A 34-year-old male undergoing percutaneous atrial ablation procedure for paroxysmal fibrillation required emergency sternotomy for cardiac tamponade. The patient had been anticoagulated and had received plavix and aspirin prior to and during the ablation procedure. Seven units of red cell concentrate had been transfused in the cardiac catherisation laboratory. On arrival in theatre, the patient was hypotensive, but was awake on induction of anaesthesia. No recordable blood pressure with non-invasive monitoring was observed. A sternotomy was immediately performed and, on evacuation of the pericardium, a bleeding site was not visible. The patient was commenced on cardiopulmonary bypass. Bleeding site was identified and the defect closed. The patient was weaned from cardiopulmonary bypass with minimal inotropic support and made an uneventful recovery. Bypass time was 38 minutes. A literature review showed a 1% incidence of post-ablation bleeding(1). The incidence of reverting to bypass for such an event has not been reported previously. During these procedures, it might be wise to have the cardiothoracic team notified while atrial ablation procedures are being performed in the cardiac catheterization laboratory.

  6. Atrial fibrillation and vascular disease-a bad combination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerring Olesen, Jonas; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2012-01-01

    This article provides an overview of (i) the risk of stroke associated with vascular disease (acute coronary syndromes and peripheral artery disease) in patients with atrial fibrillation, (ii) the frequent coexistence of vascular disease in patients with atrial fibrillation and, (iii......) the cardiovascular risk associated with the coexisting of the two diseases. The literature on this topic is relatively sparse, and we discuss results from both clinical trials and observational studies. There is a clear indication of an increased stroke risk associated with vascular disease in patients with atrial...... fibrillation. Indeed, patients with atrial fibrillation often had coexisting vascular disease (around 18%), and the combination of the two diseases substantially increases the risk of future cardiovascular events. The increased risk associated with peripheral artery disease in atrial fibrillation is even more...

  7. Trends in quantitative methods used for atrial fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward J. Ciaccio

    Full Text Available Background: Improved quantitative and computational research efforts would be useful for better and more accurate analysis of heart arrhythmias, and to target catheter ablation sites. To pinpoint useful and leading-edge quantitative methods, research trends of articles published in peer-reviewed journals were identified. Methods: The MEDLINE search tool and an in-house developed software program were used to detect quantitative trends in arrhythmia research. The main keywords used were ‘atrial fibrillation’ and ‘ventricular tachycardia’, which were searched in combination with commonly associated quantitative keywords for signal and imaging data. The search period used was 1960–2013. The linear regression trend over the search period was calculated, and the slope and regression coefficient was tabulated along with the onset year of the trend. Results: In 1960, ‘atrial fibrillation’ and ‘ventricular tachycardia’ appeared in the title or abstract of less than 20 peer-reviewed articles each. A sharp increase in ventricular tachycardia publications occurred from 1975 to 1992 to a peak of over 600 publications; since 1992 the number of ventricular tachycardia studies has leveled. However, the number of atrial fibrillation papers has increased sharply since 1978, surpassing ventricular tachycardia studies in 1993, to over 3500 studies in 2013. From 1960 to 2013, the fraction of ventricular tachycardia papers associated with any particular quantitative keyword, versus the total number of ventricular tachycardia publications, was often greater than the fraction of atrial fibrillation papers associated with the same quantitative keyword, versus the total number of atrial fibrillation publications. Studies published in the bioengineering and bioinformatics literature comprise approximately 10% of all quantitative biomedical studies published on atrial fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia. Conclusions: The

  8. Pathogenic Mechanisms of Atrial Fibrillation in Obesity

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    O. M. Drapkina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is one of the most common arrhythmias. It reduces quality of life and its duration due to thromboembolic complications. Obesity contributes to the structural and electrical remodeling of atrial myocardium. This leads to occurrence of ectopic foci in the mouths of the pulmonary veins and the disruption of normal electrical conduction in the atria. Systemic inflammation, myocardial fibrosis, cardiomyocyte overload by Na+ and Ca2+ ions, accumulation in the cells of unoxidized metabolic products, imbalance of the autonomic regulation are considered as the main mechanisms of arrhythmogenic substrate formation. Hypertension, insulin resistance, and obstructive sleep apnea, associated with obesity, increase the risk of development and progression of the arrhythmia. Study of pathogenetic mechanisms of AF in obesity is necessary to develop new strategies for its prevention and the creation of more effective methods of treatment of these patients.

  9. Progression of atrial fibrillation in the REgistry on Cardiac rhythm disORDers assessing the control of Atrial Fibrillation cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Vos, Cees B; Breithardt, Günter; Camm, A John

    2012-01-01

    Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) may progress to persistent AF. We studied the clinical correlates and the effect of rhythm-control strategy on AF progression.......Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) may progress to persistent AF. We studied the clinical correlates and the effect of rhythm-control strategy on AF progression....

  10. Integrating new approaches to atrial fibrillation management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotecha, Dipak; Breithardt, Günter; Camm, A John

    2018-01-01

    cardiovascular events. New approaches to AF management, including the use of novel technologies and structured, integrated care, have the potential to enhance clinical phenotyping or result in better treatment selection and stratified therapy. Here, we report the outcomes of the 6th Consensus Conference...... of the Atrial Fibrillation Network (AFNET) and the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA), held at the European Society of Cardiology Heart House in Sophia Antipolis, France, 17-19 January 2017. Sixty-two global specialists in AF and 13 industry partners met to develop innovative solutions based on new...

  11. Concomitant atrial fibrillation surgery: worth the effort?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nashef, Samer A M; Abu-Omar, Yasir

    2017-12-08

    Concomitant surgery for atrial fibrillation is a conceptually and clinically difficult area of cardiac surgical decision making. This review introduces the pathophysiological background, provides insight and guidance for cardiac surgeons on some of the conflicting evidence and claims, and explores the fields in which further research may help elucidate a cardiac surgical clinical strategy for tackling this common and potentially lethal form of arrhythmia. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  12. Current approaches in atrial fibrillation treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cenk Sarı

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most common sustained arrhythmia encountered in clinical practice. Its incidence increases with age. AF is classified into subtypes according to the duration and/or able to provide sinus rhytym. İnitially, patients should be evaluated for rhythm or rate control for appropriate treatment. Second stage of strategy aimed to investigate the feasibility of anticoagulation therapy. Recently, due to the progress made in treatment with rhythm control and anticoagulation therapy, either American or European guidelines have been renovated. These developments have taken place in the newly published guide. In this article, the current change in the management of AF is discussed.

  13. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and atrial fibrillation: An unknown relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudis, Christos A

    2017-05-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is independently associated with atrial fibrillation (AF). Decreased oxygenation, hypercapnia, pulmonary hypertension, diastolic dysfunction, oxidative stress, inflammation, changes in atrial size by altered respiratory physiology, increased arrhythmogenicity from nonpulmonary vein foci commonly located in the right atrium, and respiratory drugs have been implicated in the pathogenesis of AF in COPD. The understanding of the relationship between COPD and AF is of particular importance, as the presence of the arrhythmia has significant impact on mortality, especially in COPD exacerbations. On the other hand, COPD in AF is associated with AF progression, success of cardioversion, recurrence of AF after catheter ablation, and increased cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. Treatment of the underlying pulmonary disease and correction of hypoxia and acid-base imbalance represents first-line therapy for COPD patients who develop AF. Cardioselective β-blockers are safe and can be routinely used in COPD. In addition, AF ablation was proved to be efficient and safe, and improves quality of life in these patients. This review presents the association between COPD and AF, describes the pathophysiological mechanisms implicated in AF development in COPD, underlines the prognostic significance of AF in COPD patients and vice versa, and highlights emerging therapeutic approaches in this setting. Copyright © 2017 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Atrial fibrillation in heart failure: The sword of Damocles revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad A; Ahmed, Fozia; Neyses, Ludwig; Mamas, Mamas A

    2013-07-26

    Heart failure (HF) and atrial fibrillation (AF) frequently coexist and have emerged as major cardiovascular epidemics. There is growing evidence that AF is an independent prognostic marker in HF and affects patients with both reduced as well as preserved LV systolic function. There has been a general move in clinical practice from a rhythm control to a rate control strategy in HF patients with AF, although recent data suggests that rhythm control strategies may provide better outcomes in selected subgroups of HF patients. Furthermore, various therapeutic modalities including pace and ablate strategies with cardiac resynchronisation or radiofrequency ablation have become increasingly adopted, although their role in the management of AF in patients with HF remains uncertain. This article presents an overview of the multidimensional impact of AF in patients with HF. Relevant literature is highlighted and the effect of various therapeutic modalities on prognosis is discussed. Finally, while novel anticoagulants usher in a new era in thromboprophylaxis, research continues in a variety of new pathways including selective atrial anti-arrhythmic agents and genomic polymorphisms in AF with HF.

  15. Atrial remodeling and atrial fibrillation: recent advances and translational perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nattel, Stanley; Harada, Masahide

    2014-06-10

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia in clinical practice. AF and its complications are responsible for important population morbidity and mortality. Presently available therapeutic approaches have limited efficacy and nontrivial potential to cause adverse effects. Thus, new mechanistic knowledge is essential for therapeutic innovation. Atrial arrhythmogenic remodeling, defined as any change in atrial structure or function that promotes atrial arrhythmias, is central to AF. Remodeling can be due to underlying cardiac conditions, systemic processes and conditions such as aging, or AF itself. Recent work has underlined the importance of remodeling in AF, provided new insights into basic mechanisms, and identified new biomarker/imaging approaches to follow remodeling processes. The importance of intracellular Ca(2+) handling abnormalities has been highlighted, both for the induction of triggered ectopic activity and for the activation of Ca(2+)-related cell signaling that mediates profibrillatory remodeling. The importance of microRNAs, which are a new class of small noncoding sequences that regulate gene expression, has emerged in both electrical and structural remodeling. Remodeling related to aging, cardiac disease, and AF itself is believed to underlie the progressive nature of the arrhythmia, which contributes to the complexities of long-term management. New tools that are being developed to quantify remodeling processes and monitor their progression include novel biomarkers, imaging modalities to quantify/localize fibrosis, and noninvasive monitoring/mapping to better characterize the burden of AF and identify arrhythmic sources. This report reviews recent advances in the understanding of the basic pathophysiology of atrial remodeling and potential therapeutic implications. Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Granger Causality and Jensen–Shannon Divergence to Determine Dominant Atrial Area in Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Cervigón

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is already the most commonly occurring arrhythmia. Catheter pulmonary vein ablation has emerged as a treatment that is able to make the arrhythmia disappear; nevertheless, recurrence to arrhythmia is very frequent. In this study, it is proposed to perform an analysis of the electrical signals recorded from bipolar catheters at three locations, pulmonary veins and the right and left atria, before to and during the ablation procedure. Principal Component Analysis (PCA was applied to reduce data dimension and Granger causality and divergence techniques were applied to analyse connectivity along the atria, in three main regions: pulmonary veins, left atrium (LA and right atrium (RA. The results showed that, before the procedure, patients with recurrence in the arrhythmia had greater connectivity between atrial areas. Moreover, during the ablation procedure, in patients with recurrence in the arrhythmial both atria were more connected than in patients that maintained sinus rhythms. These results can be helpful for procedures designing to end AF.

  17. [Identification of patients with atrial fibrillation using HRV parameters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikillus, Nicole; Hammer, Gerd; Bolz, Armin

    2008-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common sustained cardiac rhythm disturbance. One of the most drastic complications is embolism, particularly stroke. Patients with atrial fibrillation have to be identified. This can lead to early therapy and thus avoiding strokes. The algorithm presented here detects atrial fibrillation securely and reliably. It is based on a single-channel ECG, which takes 60 min. First, the R-peaks are detected from the ECG and the RR interval is calculated. To be independent from pulse variations, the RR interval is normalized to 60 bpm. A parameter of heart rate variability is calculated in time domain (SDSD) and the so-called Poincaré plot is generated. The image analysis of the figures of the Poincaré plot is made automatically. The results from analysis in time domain, as well as image analysis, yield a risk level, which indicates the probability for the occurrence of atrial fibrillation. Even if there is no atrial fibrillation in the ECG while analyzing, it is possible to identify patients with atrial fibrillation. The sensitivity depends on the burden of atrial fibrillation. Even if a burden of 0% is assumed, the results still prove satisfactory (sensitivity of nearly 83%).

  18. The mechanisms of atrial fibrillation in hyperthyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bielecka-Dabrowa Agata

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Atrial fibrillation (AF is a complex condition with several possible contributing factors. The rapid and irregular heartbeat produced by AF increases the risk of blood clot formation inside the heart. These clots may eventually become dislodged, causing embolism, stroke and other disorders. AF occurs in up to 15% of patients with hyperthyroidism compared to 4% of people in the general population and is more common in men and in patients with triiodothyronine (T3 toxicosis. The incidence of AF increases with advancing age. Also, subclinical hyperthyroidism is a risk factor associated with a 3-fold increase in development of AF. Thyrotoxicosis exerts marked influences on electrical impulse generation (chronotropic effect and conduction (dromotropic effect. Several potential mechanisms could be invoked for the effect of thyroid hormones on AF risk, including elevation of left atrial pressure secondary to increased left ventricular mass and impaired ventricular relaxation, ischemia resulting from increased resting heart rate, and increased atrial eopic activity. Reentry has been postulated as one of the main mechanisms leading to AF. AF is more likely if effective refractory periods are short and conduction is slow. Hyperthyroidism is associated with shortening of action potential duration which may also contribute to AF.

  19. Clinical characteristics, management, and control of permanent vs. nonpermanent atrial fibrillation: insights from the RealiseAF survey.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murin, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation can be categorized into nonpermanent and permanent atrial fibrillation. There is less information on permanent than on nonpermanent atrial fibrillation patients. This analysis aimed to describe the characteristics and current management, including the proportion of patients with successful atrial fibrillation control, of these atrial fibrillation subsets in a large, geographically diverse contemporary sample.

  20. A roadmap to improve the quality of atrial fibrillation management : proceedings from the fifth Atrial Fibrillation Network/European Heart Rhythm Association consensus conference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirchhof, Paulus; Breithardt, Guenter; Bax, Jeroen; Benninger, Gerlinde; Blomstrom-Lundqvist, Carina; Boriani, Giuseppe; Brandes, Axel; Brown, Helen; Brueckmann, Martina; Calkins, Hugh; Calvert, Melanie; Christoffels, Vincent; Crijns, Harry; Dobrev, Dobromir; Ellinor, Patrick; Fabritz, Larissa; Fetsch, Thomas; Freedman, S. Ben; Gerth, Andrea; Goette, Andreas; Guasch, Eduard; Hack, Guido; Haegeli, Laurent; Hatem, Stephane; Haeusler, Karl Georg; Heidbuechel, Hein; Heinrich-Nols, Jutta; Hidden-Lucet, Francoise; Hindricks, Gerd; Juul-Moeller, Steen; Kaeaeb, Stefan; Kappenberger, Lukas; Kespohl, Stefanie; Kotecha, Dipak; Lane, Deirdre A.; Leute, Angelika; Lewalter, Thorsten; Meyer, Ralf; Mont, Lluis; Muenzel, Felix; Nabauer, Michael; Nielsen, Jens C.; Oeff, Michael; Oldgren, Jonas; Oto, Ali; Piccini, Jonathan P.; Pilmeyer, Art; Potpara, Tatjana; Ravens, Ursula; Reinecke, Holger; Rostock, Thomas; Rustige, Joerg; Savelieva, Irene; Schnabel, Renate; Schotten, Ulrich; Schwichtenberg, Lars; Sinner, Moritz F.; Steinbeck, Gerhard; Stoll, Monika; Tavazzi, Luigi; Themistoclakis, Sakis; Tse, Hung Fat; Van Gelder, Isabelle C.; Vardas, Panagiotis E.; Varpula, Timo; Vincent, Alphons; Werring, David; Willems, Stephan; Ziegler, Andre; Lip, Gregory Y. H.; Camm, A. John

    2016-01-01

    At least 30 million people worldwide carry a diagnosis of atrial fibrillation (AF), and many more suffer from undiagnosed, subclinical, or 'silent' AF. Atrial fibrillation-related cardiovascular mortality and morbidity, including cardiovascular deaths, heart failure, stroke, and hospitalizations,

  1. Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation occurs often in cryptogenic ischaemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, L M; Krieger, D W; Højberg, S

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Atrial fibrillation (AF) increases the risk of stroke fourfold and is associated with a poor clinical outcome. Despite work-up in compliance with guidelines, up to one-third of patients have cryptogenic stroke (CS). The prevalence of asymptomatic paroxysmal atrial fibrilla......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Atrial fibrillation (AF) increases the risk of stroke fourfold and is associated with a poor clinical outcome. Despite work-up in compliance with guidelines, up to one-third of patients have cryptogenic stroke (CS). The prevalence of asymptomatic paroxysmal atrial...

  2. Atrial Fibrillation In Heart Failure: New Directions In Diagnosis, Risk Assessment And Risk Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Till, Richard J A; Cowie, Martin R

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure and atrial fibrillation are common conditions which frequently co-exist. In patients with established systolic and diastolic dysfunction, atrial fibrillation increases the risk of stroke, mortality and reduces quality of life. Recent advances in implantable device technology have improved the detection of atrial fibrillation and reduced the time to intervention. Rate control remains the mainstay of treatment to improve symptoms in patients with heart failure. Currently evidence does not suggest that the routing use of a rhythm control strategy is beneficial, other than improving symptoms in patients resistant to or intolerant of rate control medications. Atrial fibrillation ablation in heart failure is safe and may be effective in maintaining sinus rhythm. Patients with AF and heart failure have more severe strokes and require longer hospital admissions. Warfarin has traditionally been the drug of choice to reduce the risk of stroke in patients with AF and heart failure, although it use is no longer recommended in patients with heart failure and sinus rhythm. Newer oral anticoagulants offer improved stroke prevention in patients with heart failure albeit at a higher drug cost. Alternative methods of stroke reduction such as left atrial appendage occlusion are emerging, although evidence for their benefit in patients with heart failure has not yet been published.

  3. Safe, effective and durable epicardial left atrial appendage clip occlusion in patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing cardiac surgery: first long-term results from a prospective device trial

    OpenAIRE

    Emmert, Maximilian Y.; Puippe, Gilbert; Baumüller, Stephan; Alkadhi, Hatem; Landmesser, Ulf; Plass, Andre; Bettex, Dominique; Scherman, Jacques; Grünenfelder, Jürg; Genoni, Michele; Falk, Volkmar; Salzberg, Sacha P.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a significant risk factor for embolic stroke originating from the left atrial appendage (LAA). This is the first report of long-term safety and efficacy data on LAA closure using a novel epicardial LAA clip device in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. METHODS Forty patients with AF were enrolled in this prospective ‘first-in-man' trial. The inclusion criterion was elective cardiac surgery in adult patients with AF for which a concomitant ablation proce...

  4. Dronedarone for the treatment of atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maund, E; McKenna, C; Sarowar, M; Fox, D; Stevenson, M; Pepper, C; Palmer, S; Woolacott, N

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents a summary of the evidence review group (ERG) report on the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of dronedarone for the treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) or atrial flutter based upon a review of the manufacturer's submission to the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) as part of the single technology appraisal process. The population considered in the submission were adult clinically stable patients with a recent history of or current non-permanent AF. Comparators were the current available anti-arrhythmic drugs: class 1c agents (flecainide and propafenone), sotalol and amiodarone. Outcomes were AF recurrence, all-cause mortality, stroke, treatment discontinuations (due to any cause or due to adverse events) and serious adverse events. The main evidence came from four phase III randomised controlled trials, direct and indirect meta-analyses from a systematic review, and a synthesis of the direct and indirect evidence using a mixed-treatment comparison. Overall, the results from the different synthesis approaches showed that the odds of AF recurrence appeared statistically significantly lower with dronedarone and other anti-arrhythmic drugs than with non-active control, and that the odds of AF recurrence are statistically significantly higher for dronedarone than for amiodarone. However, the results for outcomes of all-cause mortality, stroke and treatment discontinuations and serious adverse events were all uncertain. A discrete event simulation model was used to evaluate dronedarone versus antiarrhythmic drugs and standard therapy alone. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of dronedarone was relatively robust and less than 20,000 pounds per quality-adjusted life-year. Exploratory work undertaken by the ERG identified that the main drivers of cost-effectiveness were the benefits assigned to dronedarone for all-cause mortality and stroke. Dronedarone is not cost-effective relative to its comparators when

  5. Atrial defibrillation threshold in humans minutes after atrial fibrillation induction; "A stitch in time saves nine".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardas, P E; Manios, E G; Kanoupakis, E M; Dermitzaki, D N; Mavrakis, H E; Kallergis, E M

    2001-09-01

    To assess the effects of atrial fibrillation duration on the defibrillation threshold in atrial fibrillation patients seconds or minutes after initiation of the arrhythmia. Nineteen patients with recurrent symptomatic atrial fibrillation were evaluated. After programmed induction of atrial fibrillation, the defibrillation threshold was assessed after two sequential periods of arrhythmia in the same patient: an "ultrashort" period of 30 s duration and a "short" period, which lasted 10 min. After the specified period, internal cardioversion was attempted using a balloon-guided catheter that allows the delivery of biphasic shocks between one electrode array placed in the left pulmonary artery and a proximal electrode array on the lateral right atrial wall. The defibrillation threshold was assessed with energy steps of 0.5 J with a starting level of 0.5 J. Mean time from induction to successful defibrillation was 92+/-30 s after the "ultrashort" period of atrial fibrillation and 910+/-86 s after the short period. The defibrillation threshold was significantly greater after 10 min of atrial fibrillation than after 30 s of arrhythmia (2.32+/-0.61 J vs 1.31+/-0.66 J, Pdefibrillation threshold. Prolongation of atrial fibrillation over minutes in patients with paroxysmal arrhythmia increases the energy requirements for successful defibrillation. Copyright 2001 The European Society of Cardiology.

  6. Lung Infarction due to Pulmonary Vein Stenosis after Ablation Therapy for Atrial Fibrillation Misdiagnosed as Organizing Pneumonia: Sequential Changes on CT in Two Cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Mi Ri; Lee, Ho Yun; Cho, Jong Ho; Um, Sang Won [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Pulmonary vein (PV) stenosis is a complication of ablation therapy for arrhythmias. We report two cases with chronic lung parenchymal abnormalities showing no improvement and waxing and waning features, which were initially diagnosed as nonspecific pneumonias, and finally confirmed as PV stenosis. When a patient presents for nonspecific respiratory symptoms without evidence of infection after ablation therapy and image findings show chronic and repetitive parenchymal abnormalities confined in localized portion, the possibility of PV stenosis should be considered.

  7. Dronedarone in high-risk permanent atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connolly, Stuart J; Camm, A John; Halperin, Jonathan L

    2011-01-01

    Dronedarone restores sinus rhythm and reduces hospitalization or death in intermittent atrial fibrillation. It also lowers heart rate and blood pressure and has antiadrenergic and potential ventricular antiarrhythmic effects. We hypothesized that dronedarone would reduce major vascular events in ...

  8. Electrophysiology of the electrocardiographic changes of atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childers, Rory

    2006-10-01

    The history of atrial fibrillation is described in terms of its electrocardiographic delineation, characteristics and clinical associations. The variant configurations are described and their relationship to rhythm duration and cardioversion success. The inter-relationship of fibrillation with flutter and their diagnostic differences are reviewed. The electrophysiologic basis of atrial remodeling is exemplified, together with its relationship to failure of rate adaptation of the atrial refractory period. Electric countershock causes an acute abbreviation of the atrial refractory period as does the induction of hyperthyroidism in the experimental animal. Current theories of the mechanism of fibrillation and the issue of originating pulmonary venous foci are reviewed. The lack of protection from ventricular fibrillation that exists with preexcitation via an accessory pathway is discussed in terms of the teleological role of orthograde downstream refractory periods.

  9. Caffeine and risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, Lars; Vestergaard, Peter

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is not known whether the consumption of caffeine is associated with excess risk of atrial fibrillation. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter in association with daily consumption of caffeine from coffee, tea, cola, cocoa, and chocolate. DESIGN: We...... prospectively examined the association between the amount of caffeine consumed per day and the risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter among 47 949 participants (x age: 56 y) in the Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health Study. Subjects were followed in the Danish National Registry of Patients and in the Danish Civil...... Registration System. The consumption of caffeine was analyzed by quintiles with Cox proportional-hazard models. RESULTS: During follow-up (x: 5.7 y), atrial fibrillation or flutter developed in 555 subjects (373 men and 182 women). When the lowest quintile of caffeine consumption was used as a reference...

  10. Dabigatran use in Danish atrial fibrillation patients in 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rikke; Gislason, Gunnar; Torp-Pedersen, Christian Tobias

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Dabigatran was recently approved for anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF); data regarding real-world use, comparative effectiveness and safety are sparse. Design: Pharmacoepidemiological cohort study. Methods/settings: From nationwide registers, we identified patie...

  11. Dronedarone in high-risk permanent atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connolly, Stuart J; Camm, A John; Halperin, Jonathan L

    2011-01-01

    Dronedarone restores sinus rhythm and reduces hospitalization or death in intermittent atrial fibrillation. It also lowers heart rate and blood pressure and has antiadrenergic and potential ventricular antiarrhythmic effects. We hypothesized that dronedarone would reduce major vascular events...

  12. Who Is at Risk for Atrial Fibrillation (AF or AFib)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Anyone with heart disease, including valve problems , hypertrophic cardiomyopathy , acute coronary syndrome , Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome and history of heart attack . Additionally, atrial fibrillation is the most common complication after heart surgery. Drinking alcohol Binge drinking (having ...

  13. YKL-40 levels and atrial fibrillation in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marott, Sarah C W; Benn, Marianne; Johansen, Julia S

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation is associated with inflammation. In contrast to inflammatory markers like C-reactive protein (CRP) and fibrinogen produced in the liver, YKL-40 is produced at the site of inflammation including in the myocardium. We hypothesized that elevated plasma YKL-40 levels a...... individuals from the cross-sectional Copenhagen General Population Study including 337 cases with atrial fibrillation. A YKL-40 level >95% percentile (>204μg/L) versus 95% percentile versus...... associate with increased risk of atrial fibrillation. METHOD AND RESULTS: We measured plasma YKL-40 in 8731 participants from the prospective Copenhagen City Heart Study including 896 individuals who developed atrial fibrillation during up to 18years of follow-up. Additionally, we measured YKL-40 in 6621...

  14. Postoperative atrial fibrillation in patients with left atrial myxoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Muslum; Tigen, Kursat; Dundar, Cihan; Ozben, Beste; Alici, Gokhan; Demir, Serdar; Kalkan, Mehmet Emin; Ozkan, Birol

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the factors associated with postoperative atrial fibrillation (AF) in patients with left atrial (LA) myxoma. Thirty-six consecutive patients with LA myxoma (10 men, mean age: 49.3 ± 15.7 years), who were operated on between March 2010 and July 2012, were included in this retrospective study. Pre-operative electrocardiograms and echocardiographic examinations of each patient were reviewed. Postoperative AF developed in 10 patients, whereas there was no evidence of paroxysmal AF after resection of the LA myxoma in the remaining 26 patients. The patients who developed AF postoperatively were significantly older than those who did not develop AF (median: 61.5 vs 46 years; p = 0.009). Among the electrocardiographic parameters, only P-wave dispersion differed significantly between postoperative AF and non-AF patients (median: 57.6 vs 39.8 ms, p = 0.004). Logistic regression analysis revealed P- wave dispersion (OR: 1.11, 95% CI: 1.003-1.224, p = 0.043) and age (OR: 1.13, 95% CI: 1.001-1.278, p = 0.048) as independent predictors of postoperative AF in our cohort of patients. P-wave dispersion is a simple and useful parameter for the prediction of postoperative AF in patients with LA myxoma.

  15. Selective CFAE targeting for atrial fibrillation study (SELECT AF): clinical rationale, design, and implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Atul; Sanders, Prashanthan; Macle, Laurent; Champagne, Jean; Nair, Girish M; Calkins, Hugh; Wilber, David J

    2011-05-01

    Adjuvant ablation of complex fractionated atrial electrograms (CFAE) in addition to pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) likely improves procedural outcome compared to PVI alone, particularly in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation (AF). However, CFAE regions can be extensive, occasionally requiring a large amount of extra ablation. Some CFAE regions may also represent passive wavefront collision and may not require ablation. Thus, there is interest in identifying more selective CFAE sites that are critical to AF perpetuation, minimizing the amount of adjuvant ablation that must be performed. The SELECT AF study is a prospective, multicenter, randomized trial comparing a strategy of PVI plus generalized CFAE ablation versus a strategy of PVI plus selective CFAE ablation, focusing on regions of continuous electrical activity (CEA). The primary efficacy endpoint is freedom from atrial arrhythmia at 1 year and the primary safety endpoint is total radiofrequency (RF) delivery time per procedure. Patients undergoing a first time ablation procedure for symptomatic persistent AF will be included. Patients with permanent AF or with left atrial size ≥55 mm will be excluded. Patients will all receive PVI at the time of their ablation, but will be randomized 1:1 to receive adjuvant CFAE ablation using the traditional "generalized" approach, or a "selective" approach targeting only CEA regions. Both strategies will be guided by automated mapping algorithms. This study will enroll a minimum of 80 evaluable subjects; 40 in each randomization group. SELECT AF is a randomized trial in patients with persistent AF to evaluate the efficacy of selective versus generalized CFAE ablation in addition to traditional PVI. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Impact of controlling atrial fibrillation on outcomes relevant to the patient: focus on dronedarone

    OpenAIRE

    Chahal CAA; Ali O; Hunter RJ; RJ, Schilling

    2012-01-01

    C Anwar A Chahal, Omer Ali, Ross J Hunter, Richard J SchillingDepartment of Cardiology Research, St Bartholomew's Hospital, London, United KingdomAbstract: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a substantial cause of mortality and morbidity in the Western world. It is a massive burden on health care systems, and its prevalence is expected to double over the next 20 years. Trials evaluating antiarrhythmic drugs or catheter ablation have focused on recurrence of arrhythmia, perhaps neglecting out...

  17. STRATEGIES OF PROPHYLAXIS AND MANAGEMENT OF POSTOPERATIVE ATRIAL FIBRILLATION

    OpenAIRE

    Dembele, A.; Pastukhova, N.C.

    2016-01-01

    This article analyses different strategies of prophylaxis and management of postoperative atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) at different periods after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). It examines the efficacy of early administration of beta-adrenergic blocking agents (metoprolol) and amiodarone (in prophylactic doses) in the diminution of the risk of postoperative atrial fibrillation in different groups of patients. The article also discerns t...

  18. Vascular disease and stroke risk in atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jonas Bjerring; Lip, Gregory Y.H.; Lane, Deirdre A

    2012-01-01

    Vascular disease (including myocardial infarction and peripheral artery disease) has been proposed as a less well-validated risk factor for stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. We investigated whether vascular disease is an independent risk factor of stroke/thromboembolism in atrial fibri...... fibrillation and whether adding vascular disease improves Congestive heart failure, Hypertension, Age 75 years, Diabetes, previous Stroke (CHADS(2)) risk stratification....

  19. Stroke and bleeding in atrial fibrillation with chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jonas Bjerring; Lip, Gregory Y.H.; Kamper, Anne-Lise

    2012-01-01

    Both atrial fibrillation and chronic kidney disease increase the risk of stroke and systemic thromboembolism. However, these risks, and the effects of antithrombotic treatment, have not been thoroughly investigated in patients with both conditions.......Both atrial fibrillation and chronic kidney disease increase the risk of stroke and systemic thromboembolism. However, these risks, and the effects of antithrombotic treatment, have not been thoroughly investigated in patients with both conditions....

  20. Comparative study of atrial fibrillation and AV conduction in mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Meijler, F L; van der Tweel, I

    1987-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is one ofthe most common cardiac arrhythmias in humans. It a1so occurs quite frequent1y in dogs and horses. Comparative study of this arrhythmia may contribute to better understanding of the pathophysiologica1 mechanisms involved. In this study, we present a quantitative analysis of atrial fibrillation in humans, dogs, horses, and in a kangaroo, making use of histograms and serial autocorrelograms of the ventricular rhythm with and without digitalis medication. Increase in...

  1. ANTITHROMBOTIC THERAPY IN ATRIAL FIBRILLATION: NEW DATA AND NEW HORIZONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yu. Gilyarov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available New data and perspectives of antithrombotic therapy are highlighted in patients with atrial fibrillation. Factors of warfarin therapy efficacy, as well as the possibility of new antithrombotic drugs are considered. Special attention are paid to the direct thrombin inhibitors — dabigatran. Possibilities and usage prospects of dabigatran in patients with atrial fibrillation are discussed in detail in the light of new results of RE-LY trial.

  2. ANTITHROMBOTIC THERAPY IN ATRIAL FIBRILLATION: NEW DATA AND NEW HORIZONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yu. Gilyarov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available New data and perspectives of antithrombotic therapy are highlighted in patients with atrial fibrillation. Factors of warfarin therapy efficacy, as well as the possibility of new antithrombotic drugs are considered. Special attention are paid to the direct thrombin inhibitors — dabigatran. Possibilities and usage prospects of dabigatran in patients with atrial fibrillation are discussed in detail in the light of new results of RE-LY trial.

  3. Echocardiographically guided left atrial ablation: characterization of a new technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartzman, David; Nosbisch, John; Housel, Debra

    2006-08-01

    Several techniques for percutaneous catheter-based radiofrequency ablation of left atrial myocardium have been described. Each is potentially limited by anatomic inaccuracy, radiation requirement, cardiac/extracardiac collateral damage, proarrhythmia, lesion impermanence, or unclear procedural endpoint. The purpose of this study was to describe a new technique that may address some of these limitations. In 200 consecutive patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), complete ablative encircling of right and left pulmonary venous vestibules was performed using radiofrequency energy applied via a standard ablation electrode. Lesions were guided by a collaborative nonfluoroscopic imaging strategy involving intra-left atrial echocardiography and CARTO. A discrete procedural endpoint was sought: complete electrical isolation of all myocardium subtended by the encircling lesions. After a procedure in which the total fluoroscopy time averaged 6 minutes, isolation was achieved on the left and right sides in 198 and 199 patients, respectively. In addition to the vestibule-encircling lesions, isolation required one or more additional focal lesions within the subtended myocardial territory in the majority of left vestibules and in a minority of right vestibules. Significant procedural morbidity was observed, including cerebroembolism resulting in death and mesenteric embolism resulting in hemicolectomy. Procedural success, defined at 2 years after the initial procedure and requiring no interim procedure, antiarrhythmic drug therapy, or apparent arrhythmia burden, was observed in a significantly greater proportion of patients with a paroxysmal (87%) than persistent AF (60%) syndrome. Only a small proportion of patients with recurrent AF had recurrence of conduction in previously isolated zones. This technique may have advantages over those previously reported, including improved anatomic accuracy, improved lesion safety and efficacy, and diminished radiation exposure.

  4. Relation of porphyria to atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhoble, Abhijeet; Patel, Mehul B; Abdelmoneim, Sahar S; Puttarajappa, Chethan; Abela, George S; Bhatt, Deepak L; Thakur, Ranjan K

    2009-08-01

    Porphyrias are a group of inherited disorders affecting enzymes in the heme biosynthesis pathway, leading to overproduction and/or accumulation of porphyrin or its precursors. Porphyrias have been associated with autonomic dysfunction, which in turn can develop atrial fibrillation (AF). The purpose of this study was to characterize the prevalence of AF and atrial flutter (AFl) in patients with porphyrias. A single-center retrospective cohort study was designed using data from chart reviews of patients who were admitted to the hospital from January 2000 to June 2008. Fifty-six distinct cases were found with a discharge diagnosis of porphyria including all its subtypes. From the same database, age- and gender-matched controls were identified using computer-generated random numbers. We selected 1 age- and gender-matched control for each case. Electrocardiograms and echocardiograms were reviewed by 2 independent reviewers. Only patients with available 12-lead electrocardiograms that showed AF/AFl were labeled with that diagnosis. All patients with a diagnosis of porphyria were included in the study irrespective of their age. Seven of 56 patients with porphyria met inclusion criteria, yielding a prevalence of AF/AFl of 12.5%. This association was significant (p = 0.028, relative risk 7.45, 95% confidence interval 1.01 to 66.14) compared with the age- and gender-matched control group (2%). In conclusion, our observations suggest that porphyria may be significantly associated with AF/AFl.

  5. Atrial Fibrillation Predictors: Importance of the Electrocardiogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, David M; Kabir, Muammar M; Dewland, Thomas A; Henrikson, Charles A; Tereshchenko, Larisa G

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia in adults and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Substantial interest has developed in the primary prevention of AF, and thus the identification of individuals at risk for developing AF. The electrocardiogram (ECG) provides a wealth of information, which is of value in predicting incident AF. The PR interval and P wave indices (including P wave duration, P wave terminal force, P wave axis, and other measures of P wave morphology) are discussed with regard to their ability to predict and characterize AF risk in the general population. The predictive value of the QT interval, ECG criteria for left ventricular hypertrophy, and findings of atrial and ventricular ectopy are also discussed. Efforts are underway to develop models that predict AF incidence in the general population; however, at present, little information from the ECG is included in these models. The ECG provides a great deal of information on AF risk and has the potential to contribute substantially to AF risk estimation, but more research is needed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Application of Traditional Chinese Medicine in Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Dong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most common cardiac arrhythmia, which is related to many cardiac and cerebral vascular diseases, especially stroke. It can therefore increase cardiovascular mortality and all-cause death. The current treatments of AF remain to be western drugs and radiofrequency ablation which are limited by the tolerance of patients, adverse side effects, and high recurrence rate, especially for the elderly. On the contrary, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM with long history of use involves various treatment methods, including Chinese herbal medicines (CHMs or bioactive ingredients, Chinese patent medicines, acupuncture, Qigong, and Tai Chi Chuan. With more and more researches reported, the active roles of TCM in AF management have been discovered. Then it is likely that TCM would be effective preventive means and valuable additional remedy for AF. The potential mechanisms further found by numerous experimental studies showed the distinct characteristics of TCM. Some CHMs or bioactive ingredients are atrial-selective, while others are multichannel and multifunctional. Therefore, in this review we summarized the treatment strategies reported in TCM, with the purpose of providing novel ideas and directions for AF management.

  7. Practical regimen for amiodarone use in preventing postoperative atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebis, Lars R; Christensen, Thomas D; Thomsen, Henrik F; Mikkelsen, Martin M; Folkersen, Lars; Sørensen, Henrik T; Hjortdal, Vibeke E

    2007-04-01

    Postoperative atrial fibrillation occurs in 5% to 65% of patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Although postoperative atrial fibrillation is often regarded as a temporary, benign, operation-related problem, it is associated with a twofold to threefold increase in risk of adverse events, including permanent or transient stroke, acute myocardial infarction, and death. This randomized, controlled, double-blinded trial included 250 eligible consecutively enrolled patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). They received 300 mg of amiodarone/placebo administered intravenously over 20 minutes on the first postoperative day and an oral dose of 600 mg of amiodarone or placebo twice daily for the first 5 postoperative days. The patients in amiodarone prophylaxis experienced a reduction in risk of atrial fibrillation of 14% (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.0% to 24%), with the number needed to treat at 6.9 (95% CI, 4.2 to 20), and the results for symptomatic atrial fibrillation showed a risk reduction of 18% (95% CI, 9.4% to 26), with the number needed to treat at 5.7 (95% CI, 3.9 to 11). Of the patients who developed atrial fibrillation in the placebo group, 84% experienced a symptomatic attack versus only 43% in the amiodarone group. Postoperative prophylaxis with a high dose of oral amiodarone after an intravenous bolus infusion is a safe, practical, feasible, and effective regimen for CABG patients. It significantly diminishes the occurrence of postoperative atrial fibrillation.

  8. Atrial fibrillation decision support tool: Population perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckman, Mark H; Costea, Alexandru; Attari, Mehran; Munjal, Jitender; Wise, Ruth E; Knochelmann, Carol; Flaherty, Matthew L; Baker, Pete; Ireton, Robert; Harnett, Brett M; Leonard, Anthony C; Steen, Dylan; Rose, Adam; Kues, John

    2017-12-01

    Appropriate thromboprophylaxis for patients with atrial fibrillation or atrial flutter (AF) remains a national challenge. The recent availability of direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) with comparable efficacy and improved safety compared with warfarin alters the balance between risk factors for stroke and benefit of anticoagulation. Our objective was to examine the impact of DOACs as an alternative to warfarin on the net benefit of oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT) in a real-world population of AF patients. This is a retrospective cohort study of patients with paroxysmal or persistent nonvalvular AF. We updated an Atrial Fibrillation Decision Support Tool (AFDST) to include DOACs as treatment options. The tool generates patient-specific recommendations based upon individual patient risk factor profiles for stroke and major bleeding using quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) calculated for each treatment strategy by a decision analytic model. The setting included inpatient and ambulatory sites in an academic health center in the midwestern United States. The study involved 5,121 adults with nonvalvular AF seen for any ambulatory visit or inpatient hospitalization over the 1-year period (January through December 2016). Outcome measure was net clinical benefit in QALYs. When DOACs are a therapeutic option, the AFDST recommends OAT for 4,134 (81%) patients and no antithrombotic therapy or aspirin for 489 (9%). A strong recommendation for OAT could not be made in 498 (10%) patients. When warfarin is the only option, OAT is recommended for 3,228 (63%) patients and no antithrombotic therapy or aspirin for 973 (19%). A strong recommendation for OAT could not be made in 920 (18%) patients. In total, 1,508 QALYs could be gained if treatment were changed to that recommended by the AFDST. Availability of DOACs increases the proportion of patients for whom oral anticoagulation therapy is recommended in a real-world cohort of AF patients and increased projected QALYs by more than

  9. Atrial Conduction Slows Immediately Before the Onset of Human Atrial Fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalani, Gautam G.; Schricker, Amir; Gibson, Michael; Rostamian, Armand; Krummen, David E.; Narayan, Sanjiv M.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to determine whether onset sites of human atrial fibrillation (AF) exhibit conduction slowing, reduced amplitude, and/or prolonged duration of signals (i.e., fractionation) immediately before AF onset. Background Few studies have identified functional determinants of AF initiation. Because conduction slowing is required for reentry, we hypothesized that AF from pulmonary vein triggers might initiate at sites exhibiting rate-dependent slowing in conduction velocity (CV restitution) or local slowing evidenced by signal fractionation. Methods In 28 patients with AF (left atrial size 43 ± 5 mm; n = 13 persistent) and 3 control subjects (no AF) at electrophysiological study, we measured bi-atrial conduction time (CT) electrogram fractionation at 64 or 128 electrodes with baskets in left (n = 17) or both (n = 14) atria during superior pulmonary vein pacing at cycle lengths (CL) accelerating from 500 ms (120 beats/min) to AF onset. Results Atrial fibrillation initiated in 19 of 28 AF patients and no control subjects. During rate acceleration, conduction slowed in 23 of 28 AF patients (vs. no control subjects, p = 0.01) at the site of AF initiation (15 of 19) or latest activated site (20 of 28). The CT lengthened from 79 ± 23 ms to 107 ± 39 ms (p < 0.001) on acceleration, in a spectrum from persistent AF (greatest slowing) to control subjects (least slowing; p < 0.05). Three patterns of CV restitution were observed: 1) broad (gradual CT prolongation, 37% patients); 2) steep (abrupt prolongation, at CL 266 ± 62 ms, 42%); and 3) flat (no prolongation, 21% AF patients, all control subjects). The AF initiation was more prevalent in patients with CV restitution (17 of 23 vs. 2 of 8; p = 0.03) and immediately followed abrupt reorientation of the activation vector in patients with broad but not steep CV restitution (p < 0.01). Patients with broad CV restitution had larger atria (p = 0.03) and were more likely to have persistent AF (p = 0

  10. Cardiac ion channels and mechanisms for protection against atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunnet, Morten; Bentzen, Bo Hjorth; Sørensen, Ulrik S

    2011-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is recognised as the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia in clinical practice. Ongoing drug development is aiming at obtaining atrial specific effects in order to prevent pro-arrhythmic, devastating ventricular effects. In principle, this is possible due to a different...

  11. Dabigatran versus warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Connolly, Stuart J.; Ezekowitz, Michael D.; Yusuf, Salim; Eikelboom, John; Oldgren, Jonas; Parekh, Amit; Pogue, Janice; Reilly, Paul A.; Themeles, Ellison; Varrone, Jeanne; Wang, Susan; Alings, Marco; Xavier, Denis; Zhu, Jun; Diaz, Rafael; Lewis, Basil S.; Darius, Harald; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Joyner, Campbell D.; Wallentin, Lars; Connolly, S. J.; Ezekowitz, M. D.; Yusuf, S.; Eikelboom, J.; Oldgren, J.; Parekh, A.; Reilly, P. A.; Themeles, E.; Varrone, J.; Wang, S.; Palmcrantz-Graf, E.; Haehl, M.; Wallentin, L.; Alings, A. M. W.; Amerena, J. V.; Avezum, A.; Baumgartner, I.; Brugada, J.; Budaj, A.; Caicedo, V.; Ceremuzynski, L.; Chen, J. H.; Commerford, P. J.; Dans, A. L.; Darius, H.; Di Pasquale, G.; Diaz, R.; Erol, C.; Ferreira, J.; Flaker, G. C.; Flather, M. D.; Franzosi, M. G.; Gamboa, R.; Golitsyn, S. P.; Gonzalez Hermosillo, J. A.; Halon, D.; Heidbuchel, H.; Hohnloser, S. H.; Hori, M.; Huber, K.; Jansky, P.; Kamensky, G.; Keltai, M.; Kim, S.; Lau, C. P.; Le Heuzey, J. Y. F.; Lewis, B. S.; Liu, L. S.; Nanas, J.; Razali, O.; Pais, P. S.; Parkhomenko, A. N.; Pedersen, K. E.; Piegas, L. S.; Raev, D.; Simmers, T. A.; Smith, P. J.; Talajic, M.; Tan, R. S.; Tanomsup, S.; Toivonen, L.; Vinereanu, D.; Xavier, D.; Zhu, J.; Diener, H. C.; Joyner, C. D.; Diehl, A.; Ford, G.; Robinson, M.; Silva, J.; Sleight, P.; Wyse, D. G.; Collier, J.; de Mets, D.; Hirsh, J.; Lesaffre, E.; Ryden, L.; Sandercock, P.; Anastasiou-Nana, M. I.; Andersen, G.; Annex, B. H.; Atra, M.; Bornstein, N. M.; Boysen, G.; Brouwers, P. J. A. M.; Buerke, M.; Burrell, L. M.; Chan, Y. K.; Chen, W. H.; Cheung, R. T. F.; Divakaramenon, S.; Donnan, G. A.; Duray, G. Z.; Dvorakova, H.; Fiedler, J.; Gardinale, E.; Gates, P. C.; Goshev, E. G.; Goto, S.; Gross, B.; Guimaraes, H. P.; Gulkevych, O.; Haberl, R. L.; Hankey, G.; Hartikainen, J.; Healey, J.; Iliesiu, A. M.; Irkin, O.; Jaxa-Chamiec, T.; Jolly, S.; Kaste, K. A. M.; Kies, B.; Kostov, K. D.; Kristensen, K. S.; Labovitz, A. J.; Lassila, R. P. T.; Lee, K. L. F.; Lutay, Y. M.; Magloire, P.; Mak, K. H.; Meijer, A.; Mihov, L.; Morillo, C. A.; Morillo, L. E.; Nair, G. M.; Norrving, B.; Ntalianis, A.; Ntsekhe, M.; Olah, L.; Pasco, P. M. D.; Peeters, A.; Perovic, V.; Petrov, I.; Pizzolato, G.; Rafti, F.; Rey, N. R.; Ribas, S.; Rokoss, M.; Sarembock, I. J.; Sheth, T.; Shuaib, A.; Sitkei, E.; Sorokin, E.; Srámek, M.; Strozynska, E.; Tanne, D.; Thijs, V. N. S.; Tomek, A.; Turazza, F.; Vanhooren, G.; Vizel, S. A.; Vos, J.; Wahlgren, N.; Weachter, R.; Zaborska, B.; Zaborski, J.; Zimlichman, R.; Cong, J.; Fendt, K.; Muldoon, S.; Bajkor, S.; Grinvalds, A.; Malvaso, M.; Pogue, J.; Simek, K.; Yang, S.; Alzogaray, M. F.; Bono, J. O.; Caccavo, A.; Cartasegna, L.; Casali, W. P.; Cuello, J. L.; Cuneo, C. A.; Elizari, M. V.; Fernandez, A. A.; Ferrari, A. E.; Gabito, A. J.; Goicoechea, R. F.; Gorosito, V. M.; Hirschson, A.; Hominal, M. A.; Hrabar, A. D.; Liberman, A.; Mackinnon, I. J.; Manzano, R. D.; Muratore, C. A.; Nemi, S. A.; Rodriguez, M. A.; Sanchez, A. S.; Secchi, J.; Vogel, D. R.; Colquhoun, D. M.; Crimmins, D. S.; Dart, A. M.; Davis, S. M.; Hand, P. J.; Kubler, P. A.; Lehman, R. G.; McBain, G.; Morrison, H. C.; New, G.; Singh, B. B.; Spence, C. Z.; Waites, J. H.; Auer, J.; Doweik, L.; Freihoff, F.; Gaul, G.; Gazo, F.; Geiger, H.; Giacomini, G.; Huber, G. W.; Jukic, I.; Lamm, G.; Niessner, H.; Podczeck, A.; Schuh, J.; Siostrzonek, P.; Steger, C.; Vogel, B.; Watzak, R.; Weber, H. S.; Weihs, W.; Blankoff, I.; Boland, J. L.; Brike, C.; Carlier, M.; Cools, F.; de Meester, A.; de Raedt, H. J.; de Wolf, L.; Dhooghe, G. M.; Dilling-Boer, D.; Elshot, S. R.; Fasseaux, S.; Goethals, M.; Goethals, P.; Gurne, O.; Hellemans, S.; Ivan, B.; Jottrand, M.; Kersschot, I.; Lecoq, E.; Marcovitch, O.; Melon, D.; Miljoen, H.; Missault, L.; Pierard, L. A.; Provenier, F.; Rousseau, M. F.; Stockman, D.; Tran-Ngoc, E.; van Mieghem, W.; Vandekerckhove, Y.; Vandervoort, P.; Verrostte, J.; Vijgen, J.; Armaganijan, D.; Braga, C.; Braga, J. C. F.; Cipullo, R.; Cunha, C. L. P.; de Paola, A.; Delmonaco, M. I.; Guimaraes, F. V.; Herek, L.; Kerr Saraiva, J. F.; Maia, L. N.; Lorga, A. M.; Lorga-Filho, A. M.; Marino, R. L.; Melo, C. S.; Mouco, O. M.; Pereira, V. C.; Precoma, D. B.; Rabelo, W.; Rassi, S.; Rossi, P. R.; Rossi Neto, J. M.; Silva, F. M.; Vidotti, M. H.; Zimmermann, S. L.; Anev, E. D.; Balabanov, T. A.; Baldjiev, E. S.; Bogusheva, E. S.; Chaneva, M. A.; Filibev, I. G.; Gotcheva, N. N.; Goudev, A. R.; Gruev, I. T.; Guenova, D. T.; Kamenova, Z. A.; Manov, E. I.; Panov, I. A.; Parvanova, Z. I.; Pehlivanova, M. B.; Penchev, P. T.; Penkov, N. Y.; Radoslavov, A. L.; Ramshev, K. N.; Runev, N. M.; Sindzhielieva, M. N.; Spirova, D. A.; Tsanova, V. M.; Tzekova, M. L.; Yaramov, G. K.; Aggarwal, R.; Bakbak, A. I.; Bayly, K.; Berlingieri, J. C.; Blackburn, K.; Bobbie, C.; Booth, A. W.; Borts, D.; Bose, S.; Boucher, P.; Brown, K.; Burstein, J. M.; Butt, J. C.; Carlson, B. D.; Chetty, R.; Chiasson, J. D.; Constance, C.; Costi, P.; Coutu, B.; Deneufbourg, I.; Dion, D.; Dorian, P.; Douketis, J. D.; Farukh, S.; Filipchuk, N. G.; Fox, B. A.; Fox, H. I.; Gailey, C. B.; Gauthier, M.; Glanz, A.; Green, M. S.; Habot, J.; Hink, H.; Kearon, C.; Kouz, S.; Lai, C.; Lai, K.; Lalani, A. V.; Lam, A. S.; Lapointe, L. A.; Leather, R. A.; Ma, P. T. S.; MacKay, E.; Mangat, I.; Mansour, S.; Melton, E.; Mitchell, L. B.; Morris, A. L.; Nisker, W. A.; O'Donnell, M. J.; O'Hara, G.; Omichinski, L. M.; Pandey, A. S.; Parkash, R.; Pesant, Y.; Pilon, C.; Pistawka, K. J.; Powell, C. N.; Price, J. B.; Prieur, S.; Rebane, T. M.; Ricci, A. J.; Roberge, J.; Roy, M.; Sapp, J. L.; Savard, D.; Schulman, S.; Sehl, M. J.; Sestier, F.; Shandera, R.; Shu, D.; Sterns, L. D.; St-Hilaire, R.; Syan, G. S.; Talbot, P.; Teitelbaum, I.; Tytus, R. H.; Winkler, L.; Zadra, R.; Zidel, B. S.; Bai, X. J.; Gao, W.; Gao, X.; Guan, D. M.; He, Z. S.; Hua, Q.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, W. M.; Lu, G. P.; Lv, S.; Meng, K.; Niu, H. Y.; Qi, D. G.; Qi, S. Y.; Qian, F.; Sun, N. L.; Wang, H. Y.; Wang, N. F.; Yang, Y. M.; Zeng, H.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, F. R.; Zhang, L.; Bohorquez, R.; Rosas, J. F.; Saent, L.; Vacca, M.; Velasco, V. M.; Belohlavek, J.; Cernohous, M.; Choura, M.; Dedek, V.; Filipensky, B.; Hemzsky, L.; Karel, I.; Kopeckova, I.; Kovarova, K.; Labrova, R.; Madr, T.; Poklopova, Z.; Rucka, D.; Simon, J.; Skalicka, H.; Smidova, M.; Spinar, J.; Dodt, K. K.; Egstrup, K.; Friberg, J.; Haar, D.; Husted, S.; Jensen, G. V.; Joensen, A. M.; Klarlund, K. K.; Lind Rasmussen, S.; Melchior, T. M.; Olsen, M. E.; Poulsen, M. K.; Ralfkiaer, N.; Rasmussen, L. H.; Skagen, K.; Airaksinen, K. E.; Huikuri, H. V.; Hussi, E. J.; Kettunen, P.; Mänttäri, M.; Melin, J. H.; Mikkelsson, J.; Peuhkurinen, K.; Virtanen, V. K.; Ylitalo, A.; Agraou, B.; Boucher, L.; Bouvier, J. M.; Boye, A.; Boye, B.; Decoulx, E. M.; Defaye, P.; Delay, M.; Desrues, H.; Gacem, K.; Igigabel, P.; Jacon, P.; Leparree, S.; Magnani, C.; Martelet, M.; Movallem, J.; Olive, T.; Poulard, J. E.; Tiam, B.; Appel, K. F.; Appel, S.; Bansemir, L.; Borggrefe, M.; Brachmann, J.; Bulut-Streich, N.; Busch, K.; Dempfle, C. E. H.; Desaga, M.; Desaga, V.; Dormann, A.; Fechner, I.; Genth-Zotz, S.; Haberbosch, W. G.; Harenberg, J.; Haverkamp, W. L.; Henzgen, R.; Heuer, H.; Horacek, T.; Huttner, H. B.; Janssens, U.; Jantke, H. J.; Klauss, V.; Koudonas, D.; Kreuzer, J.; Kuckuck, H.; Maselli, A.; Müegge, A.; Munzel, T. F.; Nitsche, K.; Nledegjen, A.; Parwani, A.; Pluemer-Schmidt, M.; Pollock, B. W.; Salbach, B. I.; Salbach, P. B.; Schaufele, T.; Schoels, W.; Schwab, S.; Siegmund, U.; Veltkamp, R.; Von Hodenberg, E.; Weber, R.; Zechmeister, M.; Anastasopoulous, A. A.; Foulidis, V. O.; Kaldara, E.; Karamitsos, K.; Karantzis, J.; Kirpizidis, H.; Kokkinakis, C.; Krommydas, A.; Lappas, C.; Lappas, G. I.; Manolis, A.; Manolis, A. S.; Orfanidis, Z.; Papamichalis, M.; Peltekis, L.; Savvas, S.; Skoumpourdis, E. A.; Stakos, D. A.; Styliadis, I.; Triposkiadis, F.; Tsounis, D.; Tziakas, D. N.; Zafiridis, T.; Zarifis, J. H.; Chan, G. C. P.; Chan, W. K.; Chan, W. S.; Lau, C. L.; Tse, H. F.; Tsui, P. T.; Yu, C. M.; Yue, C. S.; Fugedi, K.; Garai, B.; Jánosi, A.; Kadar, A.; Karpati, P.; Keltai, K.; Kosa, I.; Kovacs, I.; Laszlo, Z.; Mezei, L.; Rapi, J.; Regos, L. I.; Szakal, I.; Szigyarto, I.; Toth, K.; Zsa'ry, A.; Agarwal, D. K.; Aggarwal, R. K.; Arulvenkatesh, R.; Bharani, A.; Bhuvaneswaran, J. S.; Byrapaneni, R. B.; Chandwani, P.; Chopra, S.; Desai, N.; Deshpande, V.; Golla, N. P.; Gupta, J. B.; Haridas, K. K.; Hiremath, J.; Jain, A. S.; Jain, M.; Jhala, D. A.; Joseph, J.; Kaila, M.; Kannaiyan, A.; Kumar, S.; Kuruvila, P.; Mahorkar, V. K.; Metha, A.; Naik, A. M.; Narayanan, S.; Panwar, R. B.; Reddy, C.; Sawhney, J. P. S.; Shah, S. M.; Sharma, S.; Shetty, G. S.; Sinha, N.; Sontakke, N. N.; Srinivas, A.; Trivedi, M. R.; Vadagenalli, P. S.; Vijayakumar, M.; Ben-Aharon, Y.; Benhorin, J.; Bogomolny, N.; Botwin-Shimko, S.; Bova, I.; Brenner, B.; Burstein, M.; Butnaru, A.; Caspi, A.; Danenberg, H. D.; Dayan, M.; Eldar, M.; Elian, D.; Elias, M.; Elis, A.; Esanu, G.; Genin, I.; Goldstein, L. H.; Grossman, E.; Hamoud, S.; Hayek, T.; Ilani, N.; Ilia, R.; Klainman, E. I.; Leibowitz, A.; Leibowitz, D.; Levin, I.; Lishner, M.; Lotan, C.; Mahagney, A.; Marmor, A.; Motro, M.; Peres, D.; Plaev, T.; Reisen, L. H.; Rogowski, O.; Schwammenthal, E.; Schwammenthal, Y.; Shechter, M.; Shochat, M.; Shotan, A.; Strasberg, B.; Sucher, E.; Telman, G.; Turgeman, Y.; Tzoran, I.; Weiss, A. T.; Weitsman, T.; Weller, B.; Wexler, D. H.; Wolff, R.; Yarnitsky, D.; Zeltser, D.; Argiolas, G.; Arteni, F.; Barbiero, M.; Bazzucco, R.; Bernardi, D.; Bianconi, L.; Bicego, D.; Brandini, R.; Bresciani, B.; Busoni, F.; Carbonieri, E.; Carini, M.; Catalano, A.; Cavallini, C.; D'Angelo, G.; de Caterina, R.; Di Niro, M.; Filigheddu, F.; Fraticelli, A.; Marconi, R.; Mennuni, M.; Moretti, L.; Mos, L.; Pancaldi, L. 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R.; Gordeev, I. G.; Grigoryev, Y. V.; Isaeva, M. U.; Ivleva, A. Y.; Kokorin, V. A.; Komarov, A. L.; Maximenko, O. K.; Maykov, E. B.; Novikova, N.; Novikova, T. N.; Panchenko, E. P.; Poltavskaya, M. G.; Popova, Y. N.; Pronina, S. A.; Revishvili, A. Sh; Shlyakhto, E. V.; Shustov, S. B.; Sidorenko, B. A.; Sinopalnikov, A. I.; Sulimov, V.; Syrkin, A. L.; Titkov, A. Y.; Titkov, Y. S.; Zateyshchikov, D. A.; Zavaritskaya, O. P.; Chia, P. L.; Foo, D.; Sim, K. L.; Bugan, V.; Buganova, I.; Dúbrava, J.; Kaliska, G.; Masarovicova, M.; Mikes, P.; Mikes, Z.; Murin, J.; Pella, D.; Rybar, R.; Sedlák, J.; Skamla, M.; Spurný, P.; Strbova, J.; Uhliar, R.; Disler, L. J.; Engelbrecht, J. M.; Jankelow, D.; King, J.; Klug, E. Q.; Munnick, M.; Okreglicki, A. M.; Routier, R. J.; Snyders, F. A.; Theron, H. D.; Wittmer, H.; Cha, T. J.; Cho, J. G.; Choi, I. S.; Choi, J. I.; Choi, K. J.; Han, K. R.; Heo, J. H.; Jang, S. W.; Kang, T. S.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, K. S.; Kim, S. J.; Kim, S. S.; Kim, Y. H.; Kim, Y. N.; Lee, M. H.; Lee, M. Y.; Nam, G. B.; Oh, D. J.; Park, H. W.; Park, J. S.; Rho, T. H.; Shin, D. G.; Shin, E. K.; Alonso, J. J.; Cano, L.; Castellano, N. P.; Criado-Millan, A. J.; Curcio, A.; Egea, P.; Escudier, J. M.; Grande, A.; Grande, J. M.; Gusi-Tragant, G.; Lozano, I. F.; Martin, A. M.; Martinez-Rubio, A.; Mont, L.; Perez-Villacastin, J.; Sosa, L.; Ali, M.; Andersson, T.; Bandh, S.; Blomstrom Lundqvist, C. M.; Cherfan, P.; Fengsrud, E.; Fluur, C.; Herlitz, J.; Hijazi, Z.; Hoglund, N.; Hojeberg, B.; Jabro, J.; Juhlin, T.; Kjellman, B.; Lonnberg, I.; Maru, F.; Morlid, L.; Nilsson, O. R.; Ronn, F.; Rosenqvist, M.; Walfridsson, H.; Engelter, S. T.; Gallino, A.; Lyrer, P. A.; Moccetti, T.; Petrova, I.; Chang, Y. J.; Chen, C. H.; Chen, M. Y. C.; Cheng, J. J.; Chiang, T. R.; Chung, W. T.; Hsia, C. H.; Hsu, C. Y.; Hu, H. H.; Jeng, J. S.; Lai, W. T.; Lien, L. M.; Lin, K. H.; Liu, C. H.; Lo, H. S.; Peng, G. S.; Po, H. L.; Ryu, S. J.; Tsai, C. D.; Tsai, L. M.; Tseng, C. D.; Wang, J. H.; Wang, S. F.; Yang, S. P.; Kiatchoosakun, S.; Krittayaphong, R.; Kuanprasert, S.; Ngarmukos, T.; Simtharakaew, T.; Sukanandachai, B.; Sukonthasam, A.; Suwanagool, A.; Tatsanavivat, P.; Atmaca, Y.; Baris, N.; Boyaci, B.; Demir, M.; Guneri, S.; Usal, A.; Yalcin, R.; Amosova, K. M.; Beregova, O. P.; Besaga, Y. E. M.; Ikorkin, M. R.; Karapetyan, K.; Karpenko, O. I.; Kononenko, L.; Kuryata, O.; Martynova, L.; Motylevska, T.; Okhryamkina, O.; Pavlyk, S. S.; Perepelytsya, M. V.; Rudenko, L. V.; Skarzhevsky, O. A.; Tkachenko, L. A.; Tseluyko, V.; Usan, N.; Voronkov, L. G.; Yshchenko, K. V.; Zharinov, O. J.; Bryson, V. G.; Butler, R.; Cargill, R. I.; Chahal, N. S.; Cleland, J. G.; Cohen, A. T.; Cruddas, E. M.; Davey, P.; Davies, J.; Ford, S. L.; Griffith, K.; Haynes, R.; Hill, S.; Javed, M.; Kadr, H. H.; Lip, G. H.; Machin, J.; McEneaney, D. J.; McInnes, G. T.; McNeill, A. J.; Moriarty, A. J.; Muir, S.; O'Callaghan, J.; Purvis, J. A.; Pye, M.; Senior, R.; Sutton, D. A.; Thomas, S. H. L.; Wilkinson, P. R.; Wilmott, R.; Wrigley, M. J.; Abadier, R.; Abbud, Z. A.; Adams, K. V.; Adler, S. W.; Agarwal, S.; Ahmed, A. M.; Ahmed, I. S.; Aiuto, M. A.; Albrittun, T. D.; Aliyar, P.; Allan, J. J.; Allen, D. P.; Allen, S. L.; Altschuller, A.; Amin, M.; Anand, I. S.; Antolick, A. B.; Arora, R.; Arouni, A. J.; Arslanian, C. L.; Asinger, R. W.; Aycock, G. R.; Bariciano, R. J.; Baron, S. B.; Barr, M. A.; Bartkowiak, A. J.; Baruch, L.; Basignani, C.; Bass, M. L.; Bean, B.; Bedwell, N. W.; Belber, A. D.; Belew, K.; Bell, Y. C.; Bellinger, R. L.; Bennett, W. T.; Bensimhon, D. R.; Benton, R.; Benton, R. E.; Ben-Yehuda, O.; Bertolet, B. D.; Betkowski, A. S.; Bilazarian, S. D.; Bissette, J. K.; Bobade, M. B.; Bolster, D. E.; Bomba, J.; Book, D. M.; Boscia, J. A.; Bouchard, A.; Bowman, L. M.; Bradley, A. J.; Brandt, H. D.; Bricker, C. R.; Brobyn, T. L.; Brock, R. I.; Broderick, T. M.; Broedlin, K.; Brown, A. M.; Browne, K. F.; Burke, S. W.; Burton, M. E.; Buser, G. A.; Capasso, M. K.; Caplan, W. E.; Cappelli, J.; Cardona, C.; Cardona, F.; Carlson, T.; Carr, K. W.; Casey, T.; Cashion, W. R.; Cass, D. T.; Chandrashekar, Y. S.; Changlani, M.; Chapla, P. G.; Chappell, J. H.; Chen, C.; Chen, Y.; Cho, N. R.; Cieszkowski, J. H.; Clark, D. M.; Clayton, R.; Clogston, C. W.; Cockrell, D. J.; Cohen, A. I.; Cohen, T. J.; Cole, J. F.; Conway, G.; Cook, V. R.; Cornish, A. L.; Cossu, S. F.; Costello, D. L.; Courtade, D. J.; Covelli, H. C.; Crenshaw, B. S.; Crews, L. A.; Crossley, G. H.; Culp, S. C.; Curtis, B. M.; Darrow, K.; de Raad, R. E.; DeGregorio, M.; DelNegro, A. A.; Denny, D. M.; Desai, V. S.; Deumite, N. J.; Dewey, L.; Dharawat, R. N.; Dobbs, B.; Donahue, S. M.; Downey, B.; Downing, J.; Drehobl, M. A.; Drewes, W. A.; Drucker, M. N.; Duff, R.; Duggal, M.; Dunlap, S. H.; Dunning, D. W.; DuThinh, V.; Dykstra, G. T.; East, C.; Eblaghie, M. C.; Edelstein, J.; Edmiston, W. A.; Eisen, H. J.; Eisenberg, S. J.; Ellis, J. R.; Ellison, H. S.; Ellsworth, S.; Elshahawy, M.; Emlein, G.; Entcheva, M.; Essandoh, L. K.; Estrada, A. Q.; Ewing, B.; Faillace, R. T.; Fanelli, A.; Farrell, P. W.; Farris, S. W.; Fattal, P. G.; Feigenblum, D. Y.; Feldman, G. J.; Fialkow, J. A.; Fiddler, K. M.; Fields, R. H.; Finkel, M. S.; Finn, C.; Fischell, T. A.; Fishbach, M.; Fishbein, G. J.; Fisher, M. M.; Fleischhauer, F. J.; Folk, T. G.; Folkerth, S. D.; Fortman, R. R.; Frais, M. A.; Friedman, D. C.; Fuchs, G.; Fuller, F.; Garibian, G.; Gee, F. H.; Gelernt, M. D.; Genovely, H. C.; Gerber, J. R.; Germano, J. J.; Giardina, J. J.; Gilbert, J. M.; Gillespie, E. L.; Gilman, E. M.; Gitler, B.; Givens, D. H.; Glover, R.; Gogia, H. S.; Gohn, D. C.; Goldberg, R. K.; Goldberger, J. J.; Goldscher, D. A.; Goldstein, M.; Goraya, T.; Gordon, D. F.; Gottlieb, D.; Grafner, H. L.; Graham, M.; Graves, M. W.; Graziano, M.; Greco, S. N.; Greenberg, M. L.; Greenspon, A. J.; Greer, G. S.; Griffin, D. D.; Grogan, E. W.; Groo, V. L.; Guarnieri, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, J.; Hack, T. C.; Hall, B.; Hallak, O.; Halpern, S. W.; Hamburg, C.; Hamroff, G. S.; Han, J.; Handel, F.; Hankins, S. R.; Hanovich, G. D.; Hanrahan, J. A.; Haque, I. U.; Hargrove, J. L.; Harnick, P. E.; Harris, J. L.; Hartley, P. A.; Haskel, E. J.; Hatch, D.; Haught, W. H.; Hearne, S.; Hearne, S. E.; Hemphill, J. A.; Henderson, D. A.; Henes, C. H.; Hengerer-Yates, T.; Hermany, P. R.; Herzog, W. R.; Hickey, K.; Hilton, T. C.; Hockstad, E. S.; Hodnett, P.; Hoffmeister, R.; Holland, J.; Hollenweger, L.; Honan, M. B.; Hoopes, D. A.; Hordes, A. R.; Hotchkiss, D. A.; Howard, M. A.; Howard, V. N.; Hulyalkar, A. R.; Hurst, P.; Hutchison, L. C.; Ingram, J.; Isakov, T.; Ison, R. K.; Israel, C. N.; Jackson, B. K.; Jackson, K. N.; Jacobson, A. K.; Jain, S.; Jarmukli, N. F.; Joffe, I.; Johnson, L. E.; Johnson, S. A.; Johnson, S. L.; Jones, A. A.; Joyce, D. B.; Judson, P. L.; Juk, S. S.; Kaatz, S.; Kaddaha, R. M.; Kaplan, K. J.; Karunaratne, H. B.; Kennett, J. D.; Kenton, D. M.; Kettunen, J. A.; Khan, M. A.; Khant, R. N.; Kirkwood, M. D.; Knight, B. P.; Knight, P. O.; Knutson, T. J.; Kobayashi, J. F.; Kogan, A.; Kogan, A. D.; Koren, M. J.; Kosinski, E. J.; Kosolcharoen, P.; Kostis, J. B.; Kramer, J. H.; Kramer, S. D.; Kron, J.; Kuchenrither, C. R.; Kulback, S. J.; Kumar, A.; Kushner, D.; Kutscher, A.; Lai, C. K.; Lam, J. B.; Landau, C.; Landzberg, J. S.; Lang, D. T.; Lang, J. M.; Lanzarotti, C. J.; Lascewski, D. L.; Lau, T. K.; Lee, J. K.; Lee, S.; Leimbach, W. N.; LePine, A. M.; Lesser, M. F.; Leuchak, S. H.; Levy, R. M.; Lewis, W. R.; Lincoln, T. L.; Lingerfelt, W. M.; Liston, M.; Liu, Z. G.; Lloret, R. L.; Lohrbauer, L.; Longoria, D. C.; Lott, B. M.; Louder, D. R.; Loukinen, K. L.; Lovell, J.; Lue, S.; Mackall, J. A.; Maletz, L.; Marlow, L.; Martin, R. C.; Matsumura, M.; McCartney, M. J.; McDuffie, D.; McGough, M. F.; McGrew, F. A.; McGuinn, Wm P.; McMillen, M. D.; McNeff, J.; McPherson, C. A.; Meengs, M. E.; Meengs, W. L.; Meholick, A. W.; Meisner, J. S.; Melucci, M. B.; Mercando, A.; Merlino, J. D.; Meymandi, S. K.; Miele, M. B.; Miller, R. H.; Miller, S. H.; Minor, S. T.; Mitchell, M. R.; Modi, M.; Mody, F. V.; Moeller, C. L.; Moloney, J. F.; Moran, J. E.; Morcos, N. C.; Morgan, A.; Mukherjee, S. K.; Mullinax, K.; Murphy, A. L.; Mustin, A. J.; Myers, G. I.; Naccarelli, G. V.; Nadar, V. K.; Nallasivan, M.; Navas, J. P.; Niazi, I. K.; Nsah, E. N.; Nunamaker, J. L.; Ochalek, T. B.; O'dea, D. J.; Ogilvie, P. D.; Olliff, B.; Omalley, A. K.; O'Neill, P. G.; Onufer, J. R.; Orchard, R. C.; Orihuela, L. A.; Ortiz, E. C.; O'Sullivan, M. T.; Padanilam, B. J.; Pandey, P.; Patel, D. V.; Patel, R. J.; Patel, V. B.; Patlola, R. R.; Pennock, G. D.; Perlman, R.; Peters, P. H.; Petrillo, A. V.; Pezzella, S.; Phillips, D.; Pierre-Louis, J. R.; Pilcher, G.; Pillai, C.; Pollock, S. G.; Pond, M. S.; Porterfield, J. K.; Presant, L.; Pressler, J.; Pribble, A. H.; Promisloff, S. D.; Pudi, K. K.; Putnam, D. L.; Quartner, J.; Quinn, J. C.; Quinnell, C. M.; Raad, G. L.; Rasmussen, L. A.; Ray, C.; Reiffel, J. A.; Reynertson, S.; Richardson, J. W.; Riley, C. P.; Rippy, J. S.; Rittelmeyer, J. T.; Roberts, D. M.; Robertson, R.; Robinson, V. J. B.; Rocco, T. A.; Rosenbaum, D.; Roth, E. M.; Rottman, J. N.; Rough, R. R.; Rubenstein, J. J.; Sakkal, A. M.; Saleem, T.; Salerno, D. M.; Samendinger, M. L.; Sandeno, S.; Santilli, T. M.; Santucci, P.; Sattar, P.; Saxman, K. A.; Schaefer, S.; Schmidt, J.; Schneider, R. M.; Schocken, D. D.; Schrader, M. K.; Schramm, B. A.; Schultz, R. W.; Schussheim, A. E.; Schwarz, E. F.; Seamon, M. C.; Sestero, J. D.; Shah, M. P.; Shah, R.; Shalaby, A.; Shanes, J. G.; Sheftel, G. L.; Sheikh, K. H.; Shein, A. B.; Shemonsky, N. K.; Shepler, A.; Sheridan, E.; Shipwash, T. M.; Shopnick, R. I.; Short, W. G.; Shoukfeh, M. F.; Sibia, R. S.; Siler, T. M.; Silva, J. A.; Simons, G. R.; Simpson, A. G.; Simpson, H. R.; Simpson, V. J.; Singh, B. N.; Singh, N.; Singh, V. N.; Sitz, C. J.; Skatrud, L.; Sklar, J.; Slotwiner, D. J.; Smith, P. F.; Smith, P. N.; Smith, R. H.; Smith, J. E.; Sodowick, B. C.; Solomon, A. J.; Soltero, E. A.; Sonel, A. F.; Sperling, R.; Spiller, C.; Spink, B. Z.; Sprinkle, L. W.; Spyropoulos, A. C.; Stamos, T. D.; Steljes, A. D.; Stillabower, M. E.; Stover, T.; Strain, J. E.; Strickland, T. L.; Suresh, D. P.; Takata, T. S.; Taylor, J. S.; Taylor, M.; Teague, S. M.; Teixeia, J. M.; Telfer, E. A.; Terry, P. S.; Terry, R. W.; Thai, H. M.; Thalin, M.; Thomas, V. N.; Thompson, C. A.; Thompson, M. A.; Thornton, J. W.; Tidman, R. E.; Toler, B. S.; Traina, M. I.; Trippi, J. A.; Ujiiye, D. L.; Usedom, J. E.; van de Graaff, E.; van de Wall, L. R.; Vaughn, J. W.; Ver Steeg, D.; Vicari, R. M.; Vijay, N.; Vitale, C. B.; Vlastaris, A. G.; Voda, J.; Vora, K. N.; Voyles, W. F.; Vranian, R. B.; Vrooman, P. S.; Waack, P.; Waldo, A. L.; Walker, J. L.; Wallace, M. A.; Walsh, E. A.; Walsh, R. L.; Walton, A.; Washam, M.; Wehner, P. S.; Wei, J. Y.; Weiner, S.; Weiss, R. J.; Wells, D. M.; Wera-Archakul, W.; Wertheimer, J. H.; West, S. A.; Whitaker, J. H.; White, M. L.; White, R. H.; Whitehill, J. N.; Wiegman, P. J.; Wiesel, J.; Williams, J.; Williams, L. E.; Williams, M. L.; Williamson, V. K.; Wilson, V. E.; Wilson, W. W.; Woodfield, S. L.; Wulff, C. W.; Yates, S. W.; Yousuf, K. A.; Zakhary, B. G.; Zambrano, R.; Zimetbaum, P.; Zoble, R.; Zopo, A. R.; Zwerner, P. L.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Warfarin reduces the risk of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation but increases the risk of hemorrhage and is difficult to use. Dabigatran is a new oral direct thrombin inhibitor. METHODS: In this noninferiority trial, we randomly assigned 18,113 patients who had atrial

  12. Atrial Fibrillation in Embolic Stroke: Anticoagulant Therapy at UNTH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The decision to commence anticoagulation in a patient with embolic stroke and atrial fibrillation (AF) is often a difficult one for many clinicians. The result can have significant impact on the patient. This study was therefore undertaken to review the use of anticoagulation in embolic stroke in the setting of atrial ...

  13. New antiarrhythmic drugs for treatment of atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrev, Dobromir; Nattel, Stanley

    2010-04-03

    Inadequacies in current therapies for atrial fibrillation have made new drug development crucial. Conventional antiarrhythmic drugs increase the risk of ventricular proarrhythmia. In drug development, the focus has been on favourable multichannel-blocking profiles, atrial-specific ion-channels, and novel non-channel targets (upstream therapy). Molecular modification of the highly effective multichannel blocker, amiodarone, to improve safety and tolerability has produced promising analogues such as dronedarone, although this drug seems less effective than does amiodarone. Vernakalant, an atrial-selective drug with reduced proarrhythmic risk, might be useful for cardioversion in atrial fibrillation. Ranolazine, another atrial-selective agent initially developed as an antianginal, has efficacy for atrial fibrillation and is being tested in prospective clinical trials. So-called upstream therapy with angiotensin-converting enzyme and angiotensin-receptor inhibitors, statins, or omega-3 fatty acids and fish oil that target atrial remodelling could be effective, but need further clinical validation. We focus on the basic and clinical pharmacology of newly emerging antiarrhythmic drugs and non-traditional approaches such as upstream therapy for atrial fibrillation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Natriuretic Propeptides as Markers of Atrial Fibrillation Burden and Recurrence (from the AMIO-CAT Trial)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darkner, Stine; Goetze, Jens Peter; Chen, Xu

    2017-01-01

    Natriuretic peptides are established plasma markers of systolic heart failure, but their usefulness for the evaluation of atrial fibrillation (AF) is unknown. We examined mid-regional pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (MR-proANP) and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) in patients...... for paroxysmal (n = 55) or persistent (n = 47) AF was studied. MR-proANP and NT-proBNP were measured before ablation and at 1, 3, and 6 months' follow-up. Three-day Holter monitoring was performed before ablation, and 6 to 8 weeks and 6 months after ablation. Plasma MR-proANP and NT-proBNP concentrations were...... with plasma concentrations of both MR-proANP (94 pmol/L [55;127] vs 117 pmol/L [88;185] vs 192 pmol/L [127;261], p 

  15. Atrial Na,K-ATPase increase and potassium dysregulation accentuate the risk of postoperative atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Cao Thach; Schmidt, Thomas Andersen; Christensen, John Brochorst

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Postoperative atrial fibrillation is a common complication to cardiac surgery. Na,K-ATPase is of major importance for the resting membrane potential and action potential. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the importance of Na,K-ATPase concentrations in human atrial...... biopsies and plasma potassium concentrations for the development of atrial fibrillation. METHODS: Atrial myocardial biopsies were obtained from 67 patients undergoing open chest cardiac surgery. Na,K-ATPase was quantified using vanadate-facilitated 3H-ouabain binding. Plasma potassium concentration...... with postoperative atrial fibrillation. CONCLUSIONS: The present study supports the increasing evidence of dysregulation of the potassium homeostasis as an important factor in the development of cardiac arrhythmias. High atrial Na,K-ATPase and sudden plasma potassium concentration increase may contribute...

  16. Dynamic approximate entropy electroanatomic maps detect rotors in a simulated atrial fibrillation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugarte, Juan P; Orozco-Duque, Andrés; Tobón, Catalina; Kremen, Vaclav; Novak, Daniel; Saiz, Javier; Oesterlein, Tobias; Schmitt, Clauss; Luik, Armin; Bustamante, John

    2014-01-01

    There is evidence that rotors could be drivers that maintain atrial fibrillation. Complex fractionated atrial electrograms have been located in rotor tip areas. However, the concept of electrogram fractionation, defined using time intervals, is still controversial as a tool for locating target sites for ablation. We hypothesize that the fractionation phenomenon is better described using non-linear dynamic measures, such as approximate entropy, and that this tool could be used for locating the rotor tip. The aim of this work has been to determine the relationship between approximate entropy and fractionated electrograms, and to develop a new tool for rotor mapping based on fractionation levels. Two episodes of chronic atrial fibrillation were simulated in a 3D human atrial model, in which rotors were observed. Dynamic approximate entropy maps were calculated using unipolar electrogram signals generated over the whole surface of the 3D atrial model. In addition, we optimized the approximate entropy calculation using two real multi-center databases of fractionated electrogram signals, labeled in 4 levels of fractionation. We found that the values of approximate entropy and the levels of fractionation are positively correlated. This allows the dynamic approximate entropy maps to localize the tips from stable and meandering rotors. Furthermore, we assessed the optimized approximate entropy using bipolar electrograms generated over a vicinity enclosing a rotor, achieving rotor detection. Our results suggest that high approximate entropy values are able to detect a high level of fractionation and to locate rotor tips in simulated atrial fibrillation episodes. We suggest that dynamic approximate entropy maps could become a tool for atrial fibrillation rotor mapping.

  17. Assessment of pulmonary venous stenosis after radiofrequency catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation by magnetic resonance angiography: a comparison of linear and cross-sectional area measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tintera, Jaroslav; Porod, Vaclav; Rolencova, Eva; Fendrych, Pavel [Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Department of Radiology, Prague 4 (Czech Republic); Cihak, Robert; Mlcochova, Hanka; Kautzner, Josef [Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Prague 4 (Czech Republic)

    2006-12-15

    One of the recognised complications of catheter ablation is pulmonary venous stenosis. The aim of this study was to compare two methods of evaluation of pulmonary venous diameter for follow-up assessment of the above complication: (1) a linear approach evaluating two main diameters of the vein, (2) semiautomatically measured cross-sectional area (CSA). The study population consists of 29 patients. All subjects underwent contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CeMRA) of the pulmonary veins (PVs) before and after the ablation; 14 patients were also scanned 3 months later. PV diameter was evaluated from two-dimensional multiplanar reconstructions by measuring either the linear diameter or CSA. A comparison between pulmonary venous CSA and linear measurements revealed a systematic difference in absolute values. This difference was not significant when comparing the relative change CSA and quadratic approximation using linear extents (linear approach). However, a trend towards over-estimation of calibre reduction was documented for the linear approach. Using CSA assessment, significant PV stenosis was found in ten PVs (8%) shortly after ablation. Less significant PV stenosis, ranging from 20 to 50% was documented in other 18 PVs (15%). CeMRA with CSA assessment of the PVs is suitable method for evaluation of PV diameters. (orig.)

  18. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation for adults with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risom, Signe S.; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Johansen, Pernille P.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation may benefit adults with atrial fibrillation or those who had been treated for atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation is caused by multiple micro re-entry circuits within the atrial tissue, which result in chaotic rapid activity in the atria....... Objectives: To assess the benefits and harms of exercise-based rehabilitation programmes, alone or with another intervention, compared with no-exercise training controls in adults who currently have AF, or have been treated for AF. Search methods: We searched the following electronic databases; CENTRAL...... and the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness (DARE) in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE Ovid, Embase Ovid, PsycINFO Ovid, Web of Science Core Collection Thomson Reuters, CINAHL EBSCO, LILACS Bireme, and three clinical trial registers on 14 July 2016. We also checked the bibliographies of relevant...

  19. Dronedarone: an emerging therapy for atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosei, Enrico Agabiti; Salvetti, Massimo

    2010-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common arrhythmia, with a prevalence ranging from 0.1% to 9.0% at different ages, and is associated with increased cardiovascular events and mortality. A significant increase in the prevalence of the disease is expected to occur in the coming years as a consequence of the aging of the population and advances in the management of coronary artery disease and heart failure. Effective rhythm control may be difficult to obtain in a significant proportion of patients with AF. The limited efficacy and the possible adverse effects of antiarrhythmic drugs has led researchers to focus their attention on new molecules, in a search of compounds with antiarrhythmic efficacy and a more favourable safety profile. Among several new drugs developed for the management of AF, dronedarone, a benzofuran derivative that shares many of the antiarrhythmic properties of amiodarone, but with a more favourable safety profile, seems particularly promising. The drug is noniodinated, has less lipophilicity, reaches therapeutic concentrations over a shorter period of time and has lower tissue accumulation. Dronedarone, similarly to amiodarone, exhibits electrophysiologic characteristics of all 4 Vaughan Williams classes. Clinical studies have shown that dronedarone effectively reduces ventricular rate, may prevent or delay the recurrence of AF, and may reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with AF or atrial flutter. The drug has an overall good safety profile, in particular with low pulmonary and thyroid toxicity. An important exception is represented by patients with unstable haemodynamic conditions, in which the use of dronedarone has been found to be associated with an increase in mortality. Dronedarone has been recently approved for clinical use by the Food and Drug Administration and by the European Medicines Agency. Further results from trials and clinical use will better define the efficacy and safety profile of dronedarone in AF compared

  20. Calcium signalling silencing in atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiser, Maura

    2017-06-15

    Subcellular calcium signalling silencing is a novel and distinct cellular and molecular adaptive response to rapid cardiac activation. Calcium signalling silencing develops during short-term sustained rapid atrial activation as seen clinically during paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF). It is the first 'anti-arrhythmic' adaptive response in the setting of AF and appears to counteract the maladaptive changes that lead to intracellular Ca(2+) signalling instability and Ca(2+) -based arrhythmogenicity. Calcium signalling silencing results in a failed propagation of the [Ca(2+) ]i signal to the myocyte centre both in patients with AF and in a rabbit model. This adaptive mechanism leads to a substantial reduction in the expression levels of calcium release channels (ryanodine receptors, RyR2) in the sarcoplasmic reticulum, and the frequency of Ca(2+) sparks and arrhythmogenic Ca(2+) waves remains low. Less Ca(2+) release per [Ca(2+) ]i transient, increased fast Ca(2+) buffering strength, shortened action potentials and reduced L-type Ca(2+) current contribute to a substantial reduction of intracellular [Na(+) ]. These features of Ca(2+) signalling silencing are distinct and in contrast to the changes attributed to Ca(2+) -based arrhythmogenicity. Some features of Ca(2+) signalling silencing prevail in human AF suggesting that the Ca(2+) signalling 'phenotype' in AF is a sum of Ca(2+) stabilizing (Ca(2+) signalling silencing) and Ca(2+) destabilizing (arrhythmogenic unstable Ca(2+) signalling) factors. Calcium signalling silencing is a part of the mechanisms that contribute to the natural progression of AF and may limit the role of Ca(2+) -based arrhythmogenicity after the onset of AF. © 2017 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2017 The Physiological Society.

  1. The effectiveness of a high output/short duration radiofrequency current application technique in segmental pulmonary vein isolation for atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Brian; Chen, Xu; Pehrson, Steen

    2006-01-01

    AIMS: Segmental pulmonary vein (PV) isolation by radiofrequency (RF) catheter ablation has become a curative therapy for atrial fibrillation (AF). However, the long procedure time limits the wide application of this procedure. The aim of the current study was to compare a novel ablation technique...

  2. Tratamento cirúrgico de fibrilação atrial utilizando ablação com radiofrequência bipolar em doença mitral reumática Surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation using bipolar radiofrequency ablation in rheumatic mitral disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Secchin Canale

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a eficácia do tratamento cirúrgico da fibrilação atrial (FA utilizando ablação com radiofrequência bipolar durante cirurgia cardíaca de procedimentos mitrais de etiologia reumática. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados, retrospectivamente, os prontuários e exames de 53 pacientes submetidos à cirurgia valvar mitral, com ou sem cirurgia tricúspide ou aórtica associada, em que foi realizada ablação de FA utilizando radiofrequência bipolar. Trinta e quatro (64% pacientes eram mulheres e a idade variou de 27 a 72 anos (média: 49,3 anos ± 10,7 anos. O tempo médio de FA relatado foi de 41 meses (variou de 3 a 192 meses. O tipo de FA apresentado foi: paroxística em oito pacientes, persistente em três, permanente em 42. O átrio esquerdo apresentava tamanho médio de 52,9 ± 8,5 mm. As cirurgias realizadas foram: 47 trocas de valva mitral e seis plastias mitrais. O seguimento eletrocardiográfico foi completo em 83% dos pacientes, ao final de 14 meses. Informações adicionais oriundas de Holter 24h foram exploradas. RESULTADOS: Ocorreram sete (13% óbitos per-operatórios e a sobrevida após 14 meses foi de 87%. Os ritmos cardíacos encontrados após um ano de cirurgia foram: sinusal em 25 (66% pacientes, FA em sete (18%, Flutter em cinco (13%, Juncional em um (3%. CONCLUSÃO: O uso de radiofrequência bipolar para tratamento de FA em pacientes submetidos à cirurgia valvar mitral de origem reumática é efetivo no controle da arritmia em 68% dos pacientes, após 14 meses.OBJECTIVE: To analyze the effectiveness of surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF using bipolar radiofrequency ablation during mitral valve procedures of rheumatic etiology in heart surgery. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed medical registries of 53 patients submitted to atrial ablation with bipolar radiofrequency energy during mitral valve surgery. Thirty four (64% patients were women and the age varied from 27 to 72 years old (average: 49.3 ± 10

  3. Long-Term Exposure to Traffic-Related Air Pollution and Risk of Incident Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monrad, Maria; Sajadieh, Ahmad; Christensen, Jeppe Schultz

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation is the most common sustained arrhythmia and associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The few studies conducted on short-term effects of air pollution on episodes of atrial fibrillation indicates a positive association, though not consistently...

  4. Clustering of RR intervals predicts effective electrical cardioversion for atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Berg, MP; Van Noord, T; Brouwer, J; Haaksma, J; Van Veldhuisen, DJ; Crijns, HJGM; Van Gelder, IC

    Electrical Cardioversion for Atrial Fibrillation. Introduction: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is characterized by an irregularly irregular ("random") heart beat. However, controversy exists whether the ventricular rhythm in AF is truly random. We investigated randomness by constructing three-dimensional

  5. ERA OF NEW ANTICOAGULANTS IN THE TREATMENT OF NON-VALVULAR ATRIAL FIBRILLATION: PROSPECTS AND CHALLENGES

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Z. M. Safiullina; S. V. Shalaev

    2013-01-01

    ... (rivaroxaban, apixaban), in the treatment of nonvalvular atrial fibrillation are presented. Effects of these drugs on cardiovascular events in atrial fibrillation are analyzed based on the results of various studies...

  6. ERA OF NEW ANTICOAGULANTS IN THE TREATMENT OF NON-VALVULAR ATRIAL FIBRILLATION: PROSPECTS AND CHALLENGES

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Z. M. Safiullina; S. V. Shalaev

    2015-01-01

    ... (rivaroxaban, apixaban), in the treatment of nonvalvular atrial fibrillation are presented. Effects of these drugs on cardiovascular events in atrial fibrillation are analyzed based on the results of various studies...

  7. Atrial Fibrillation: When the heart is not in rhythm | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... JavaScript on. Feature: Atrial Fibrillation Atrial Fibrillation: When the heart is not in rhythm Past Issues / Winter ... problem. What were your first thoughts upon getting the diagnosis? At first I didn't think there ...

  8. Continuous vs episodic prophylactic treatment with amiodarone for the prevention of atrial fibrillation : a randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed, Sheba; Rienstra, Michiel; Crijns, Harry J. G. M.; Links, Thera P.; Wiesfeld, Ans C. P.; Hillege, Hans L.; Bosker, Hans A.; Lok, Dirk J. A.; Van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Van Gelder, Isabelle C.

    2008-01-01

    Context Amiodarone effectively suppresses atrial fibrillation but causes many adverse events. Objective To compare major events in patients randomized to receive episodic amiodarone treatment with those who received continuous amiodarone treatment while still aiming to prevent atrial fibrillation.

  9. Impaired autonomic function predicts dizziness at onset of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, MP; Hassink, RJ; Tuinenburg, AE; Lefrandt, JD; de Kam, PJ; Crijns, HJGM

    2001-01-01

    Background: Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation is associated with various symptoms, including dizziness, which presumably reflects hemodynamic deterioration. Given the importance of the autonomic nervous system in mitigating the hemodynamic effect of atrial fibrillation, we hypothesized that autonomic

  10. Atrial fibrillation and risk of stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Christine Benn; Gerds, Thomas A.; Olesen, Jonas Bjerring

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Although the relation between stroke risk factors and stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) has been extensively examined, only few studies have explored the association of AF and the risk of ischaemic stroke/systemic thromboembolism/transient ischaemic attack (stroke....../TE/TIA) in the presence of concomitant stroke risk factors. METHODS AND RESULTS: From nationwide registries, all persons who turned 50, 60, 70, or 80 from 1997 to 2011 were identified. Persons receiving warfarin were excluded. The absolute risk of stroke/TE/TIA was reported for a 5-year period, as was the absolute risk...... ratios for AF vs. no AF according to prior stroke and the number of additional risk factors. The study cohort comprised of 3 076 355 persons without AF and 48 189 with AF. For men aged 50 years, with no risk factors, the 5-year risk of stroke was 1.1% (95% confidence interval 1.1-1.1); with AF alone 2...

  11. Ranolazine for the treatment of atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Gian Marco; Dorighi, Ulrico; Ferrero, Simone; Brunacci, Michele; Bertero, Giovanni; Brunelli, Claudio

    2015-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a frequent occurrence with advancing age and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, the currently available AF therapies have a great deal of side effects. In this review, the authors discuss the evidence upon which the use of Ranolazine as an anti-arrhythmic drug is based. Specifically, the authors review the Phase I-III trials that studied ranolazine as potential treatment for AF. They also discuss the efficacy, safety, tolerability and side effects and compare the MERLIN TIMI 36, HARMONY and ROLE trials. Although ranolazine is considered an anti-angina drug, it may also be, according to the available data, used in patients with AF. Ranolazine has anti-AF efficacy, both alone or in combination with other drugs such as amiodarone and dronedarone. Indeed, its efficacy has been demonstrated in various settings such as the termination of paroxysmal AF, the facilitation of AF electrical cardioversion, and postoperative AF prevention. Although there is a great deal of evidence from pioneering experimental studies, the clinical evidence of the AF-suppressing effect of ranolazine is derived from studies with small sample size or from secondary analyses. A better understanding of the role of ranolazine as an anti-AF drug will be obtained through larger, prospective, placebo-controlled clinical trials in different populations.

  12. Red Wine, Resveratrol and Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Siga Stephan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is a common cardiac arrhythmia that is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease and overall mortality. Excessive alcohol intake is a well-known risk factor for AF, but this correlation is less clear with light and moderate drinking. Besides, low doses of red wine may acutely prolong repolarization and slow cardiac conduction. Resveratrol, a bioactive polyphenol found in grapes and red wine, has been linked to antiarrhythmic properties and may act as an inhibitor of both intracellular calcium release and pathological signaling cascades in AF, eliminating calcium overload and preserving the cardiomyocyte contractile function. However, there are still no clinical trials at all that prove that resveratrol supplementation leads to improved outcomes. Besides, no observational study supports a beneficial effect of light or moderate alcohol intake and a lower risk of AF. The purpose of this review is to briefly describe possible beneficial effects of red wine and resveratrol in AF, and also present studies conducted in humans regarding chronic red wine consumption, resveratrol, and AF.

  13. PR Interval Associated Genes, Atrial Remodeling and Rhythm Outcome of Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation—A Gene-Based Analysis of GWAS Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Husser

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: PR interval prolongation has recently been shown to associate with advanced left atrial remodeling and atrial fibrillation (AF recurrence after catheter ablation. While different genome-wide association studies (GWAS have implicated 13 loci to associate with the PR interval as an AF endophenotype their subsequent associations with AF remodeling and response to catheter ablation are unknown. Here, we perform a gene-based analysis of GWAS data to test the hypothesis that PR interval candidate genes also associate with left atrial remodeling and arrhythmia recurrence following AF catheter ablation.Methods and Results: Samples from 660 patients with paroxysmal (n = 370 or persistent AF (n = 290 undergoing AF catheter ablation were genotyped for ~1,000,000 SNPs. Gene-based association was investigated using VEGAS (versatile gene-based association study. Among the 13 candidate genes, SLC8A1, MEIS1, ITGA9, SCN5A, and SOX5 associated with the PR interval. Of those, ITGA9 and SOX5 were significantly associated with left atrial low voltage areas and left atrial diameter and subsequently with AF recurrence after radiofrequency catheter ablation.Conclusion: This study suggests contributions of ITGA9 and SOX5 to AF remodeling expressed as PR interval prolongation, low voltage areas and left atrial dilatation and subsequently to response to catheter ablation. Future and larger studies are necessary to replicate and apply these findings with the aim of designing AF pathophysiology-based multi-locus risk scores.

  14. Excessive supraventricular ectopic activity and increased risk of atrial fibrillation and stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binici, Zeynep; Intzilakis, Theodoros; Wendelboe Nielsen, Olav

    2010-01-01

    Prediction of stroke and atrial fibrillation in healthy individuals is challenging. We examined whether excessive supraventricular ectopic activity (ESVEA) correlates with risk of stroke, death, and atrial fibrillation in subjects without previous stroke or heart disease.......Prediction of stroke and atrial fibrillation in healthy individuals is challenging. We examined whether excessive supraventricular ectopic activity (ESVEA) correlates with risk of stroke, death, and atrial fibrillation in subjects without previous stroke or heart disease....

  15. Newer Anticoagulants for Non-Valvular Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M. Harburger

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Non-valvular atrial fibrillation is a recognized risk factor for stroke and systemic embolism. It has been clearly established that warfarin reduces the risk of stroke and systemic embolism in persons with atrial fibrillation and additional risk factors for stroke. The use of warfarin, however, requires frequent monitoring, and there is great variability in patient response to warfarin. Warfarin interacts with several medications and foods. In addition, warfarin use portends a significant risk of bleeding. For these reasons, warfarin is frequently not prescribed to persons for whom the drug would provide a clear benefit. Over the past decade, attempts have been made to develop drugs that are at least as safe and effective as warfarin for the treatment of atrial fibrillation that do not require monitoring nor have as many interactions. Initial studies of compounds in this regard ultimately failed due to safety concerns, but over the past two years two novel agents have been approved by the United States Food and Drug Association for anticoagulation in non-valvular atrial fibrillation, another drug is under review, and additional compounds are being studied. This article will review the use of warfarin and these new agents in the treatment of non-valvular atrial fibrillation.

  16. Atrial Fibrillation, Neurocognitive Decline and Gene Expression After Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalal, Rahul S; Sabe, Ashraf A; Elmadhun, Nassrene Y; Ramlawi, Basel; Sellke, Frank W

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation and neurocognitive decline are common complications after cardiopulmonary bypass. By utilizing genomic microarrays we investigate whether gene expression is associated with postoperative atrial fibrillation and neurocognitive decline. Twenty one cardiac surgery patients were prospectively matched and underwent neurocognitive assessments pre-operatively and four days postoperatively. The whole blood collected in the pre-cardiopulmonary bypass, 6 hours after-cardiopulmonary bypass, and on the 4th postoperative day was hybridized to Affymetrix Gene Chip U133 Plus 2.0 Microarrays. Gene expression in patients who developed postoperative atrial fibrillation and neurocognitive decline (n=6; POAF+NCD) was compared with gene expression in patients with postoperative atrial fibrillation and normal cognitive function (n=5; POAF+NORM) and patients with sinus rhythm and normal cognitive function (n=10; SR+NORM). Regulated genes were identified using JMP Genomics 4.0 with a false discovery rate of 0.05 and fold change of >1.5 or cardiopulmonary bypass, and 34 named genes four days postoperatively (Pcardiopulmonary bypass may have differential genomic responses compared to normal patients and patients with only postoperative atrial fibrillation, suggesting common pathophysiology for these conditions. Further exploration of these genes may provide insight into the etiology and improvements of these morbid outcomes.

  17. Comparison of Left Atrial Voltage between Sinus Rhythm and Atrial Fibrillation in Association with Electrogram Waveform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Masaharu; Fujita, Masashi; Iida, Osamu; Okamoto, Shin; Ishihara, Takayuki; Nanto, Kiyonori; Kanda, Takashi; Sunaga, Akihiro; Tsujimura, Takuya; Matsuda, Yasuhiro; Ohashi, Takuya; Uematsu, Masaaki

    2017-05-01

    The efficacy of low-voltage-guided ablation in addition to pulmonary vein (PV) isolation for atrial fibrillation (AF) has been reported with voltage mapping being performed during sinus rhythm (SR) or AF. The study aimed to compare the left atrial voltage between SR and AF in association with the electrogram waveform. This prospective observational study included 30 consecutive patients with persistent AF. After completion of PV isolation, electrogram points were taken during both SR and AF at the identical locations evenly throughout the left atrium. Electrograms were divided into two types: normal (sharp electrogram with ≤3 peaks or duration 3 peaks and duration ≥50 ms). During SR, 14 (47%) patients had low-voltage (0.5 mV) substrate with an area of 6.8 ± 4.5 cm 2 . In a total of 1,063 point pairs, 135 (13%) demonstrated a fractionated electrogram during SR and 483 (45%) during AF. The locations with fractionated electrograms during AF more frequently showed fractionation during SR compared to those with normal electrograms during AF (23% vs 5%, P voltage and fractionation degree may exist between SR and AF at the same locations in patients with persistent AF. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Dronedarone: an amiodarone analog for the treatment of atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Krista M; White, C Michael

    2007-04-01

    To review the pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, clinical efficacy, and safety profile of dronedarone for the treatment of atrial fibrillation. A literature search was conducted using the search terms dronedarone, SR 33589, atrial fibrillation, and antiarrhythmic medication in MEDLINE (1966-February 2007), International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1970-February 2007), and EMBASE (1990-February 2007). References from the identified trials and selected review articles were evaluated. Additional information, including abstracts and posters, was obtained from Sanofi-Aventis. Published studies and meeting abstracts evaluating the effects of dronedarone in humans and animals were reviewed. Dronedarone is a novel antiarrhythmic medication to treat atrial fibrillation. Dronedarone has a multifaceted mechanism of action similar to that of amiodarone. Dronedarone works by blocking potassium, sodium, and calcium channels and exhibits antiadrenergic properties. The drug has been evaluated at doses of 400, 600, and 800 mg twice daily. It prolonged the time to atrial fibrillation recurrence to 60-158 days compared with 5-59 days with placebo and decreased heart rate during atrial fibrillation by 12-25 beats/min in clinical trials. Major adverse events include gastrointestinal side effects and risk of proarrhythmia. Dronedarone may increase the risk of mortality in patients with congestive heart failure. Dronedarone is a new antiarrhythmic agent for the treatment of atrial fibrillation. Further studies are needed to better define dronedarone's safety profile and place in therapy.

  19. Efficacy and Safety of Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants versus Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants in Patients Undergoing Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation: A Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Santarpia

    Full Text Available Use of the non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs is endorsed by current guidelines for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF. However efficacy and safety of NOACs in patients undergoing catheter ablation (RFCA of AF has not been well established yet.To perform a meta-analysis of all studies comparing NOACs and vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (VKAs in patients undergoing RFCA.Studies were searched for in PubMed and Google Scholar databases.Studies were considered eligible if: they evaluated the clinical impact of NOACs versus VKAs; they specifically analyzed the use of anticoagulants during periprocedural phase of RFCA; they reported clinical outcome data.25 studies were selected, including 9881 cases. The summary measure used was the risk ratio (RR with 95% confidence interval (CI. The random-effects or the fixed effect model were used to synthesize results from the selected studies.There was no significant difference in thromboembolic complications (RR 1.39; p=0.13. Bleeding complications were significantly lower in the NOACs-treated arm as compared to VKAs (RR=0.67, p<0.001. Interestingly, a larger number of thromboembolic events was found in the VKAs-treated arm in those studies where VKAs had been interrupted during the periprocedural phase (RR=0.68; p=ns. In this same subgroup a significantly higher incidence of both minor (RR=0.54; p=0.002 and major bleeding (RR=0.41; p=0.01 events was recorded. Conversely, the incidence of thromboembolic events in the VKAs-treated arm was significantly lower in those studies with uninterrupted periprocedural anticoagulation treatment (RR=1.89; p=0.02.As with every meta-analysis, no patients-level data were available.The use of NOACs in patients undergoing RFCA is safe, given the lower incidence of bleedings observed with NOACs. On the other side, periprocedural interruption of VKAs and bridging with heparin is associated with a higher bleeding rate with no

  20. Determinants of Left Atrial Volume in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Bossard

    Full Text Available Left atrial (LA enlargement is an important risk factor for incident stroke and a key determinant for the success of rhythm control strategies in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF. However, factors associated with LA volume in AF patients remain poorly understood.Patients with paroxysmal or persistent AF were enrolled in this study. Real time 3-D echocardiography was performed in all participants and analyzed offline in a standardized manner. We performed stepwise backward linear regression analyses using a broad set of clinical parameters to determine independent correlates for 3-D LA volume.We included 210 patients (70.9% male, mean age 61±11years. Paroxysmal and persistent AF were present in 95 (45% and 115 (55% patients, respectively. Overall, 115 (55% had hypertension, 11 (5% had diabetes, and 18 (9% had ischemic heart disease. Mean indexed LA volume was 36±12ml/m2. In multivariable models, significant associations were found for female sex (β coefficient -10.51 (95% confidence interval (CI -17.85;-3.16, p = 0.0053, undergoing cardioversion (β 11.95 (CI 5.15; 18.74, p = 0.0006, diabetes (β 14.23 (CI 2.36; 26.10, p = 0.019, body surface area (BSA (β 34.21 (CI 19.30; 49.12, p<0.0001, glomerular filtration rate (β -0.21 (CI -0.36; -0.06, p = 0.0064 and plasma levels of NT-pro brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP (β 6.79 (CI 4.05; 9.52, p<0.0001, but not age (p = 0.59 or hypertension (p = 0.42. Our final model explained 52% of the LA volume variability.In patients with AF, the most important correlates with LA volume are sex, BSA, diabetes, renal function and NT-proBNP, but not age or hypertension. These results may help to refine rhythm control strategies in AF patients.

  1. [Management of atrial fibrillation, what to know on old and new antiarrhythmics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Heuzey, J-Y

    2010-12-01

    The management of atrial fibrillation, despite the development of ablative techniques, is mainly a pharmacological issue. For the last 25 years, no new oral antiarrhythmic drug has been launched in France. Class I antiarrhythmic drugs are efficient and safe if they are prescribed taking into account their contra-indications, but their therapeutic index is narrow. Class III antiarrhythmic drugs have limits, mainly due to the repolarization prolongation they induce and the risk of torsades de pointes. The mode of action of new antiarrhythmic drugs are based on an IKur blocking approach or on a multichannel blockade approach like that of dronedarone which is the only antiarrhythmic drug, to date, to have demonstrated an interest in terms of morbi-mortality in atrial fibrillation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Longstanding atrial fibrillation causes depletion of atrial natriuretic peptide in patients with advanced congestive heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, MP; de Kam, PJ; Boomsma, F; Crijns, HJGM; van Veldhuisen, DJ

    Background: Congestive heart failure (CHF) is characterized by neurohormonal activation, including increased plasma concentrations of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and N-terminal ANP (N-ANP). Onset of atrial fibrillation (AF) further increases these peptides, but it may be hypothesized that

  3. The effects of rhythm control strategies versus rate control strategies for atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sethi, Naqash J; Feinberg, Joshua; Nielsen, Emil E

    2017-01-01

    strategies versus rate control strategies for atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter. METHODS: We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS, Web of Science, BIOSIS, Google Scholar, clinicaltrials.gov, TRIP, EU-CTR, Chi-CTR, and ICTRP for eligible trials comparing any rhythm control strategy with any rate...

  4. Left Atrial Sphericity Index Predicts Early Recurrence of Atrial Fibrillation After Direct-Current Cardioversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osmanagic, Armin; Möller, Sören; Osmanagic, Azra

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Attempts to achieve rhythm control using direct-current cardioversion (DCC) are common in those with persistent atrial fibrillation (AF). Although often successful, AF recurs within 1 month in as many as 57% of patients. The aim of this study was to assess whether a baseline left atrial...

  5. Exercise-induced vasospastic angina after left atrial catheter ablation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blessberger, Hermann; Kammler, Jürgen; Wichert-Schmitt, Barbara; Steinwender, Clemens

    2013-01-01

    Left atrial catheter ablation (LACA) is routinely used in the management of recurrent atrial fibrillation. We report a patient suffering from vasospastic angina 2 months after a LACA procedure. Typical clinical symptoms, ST-segment changes during exercise test and successful treatment with nicorandil led to the diagnosis. According to our hypothesis, destruction of autonomic ganglia in the left atrium and resulting autonomic nerve tone imbalance might be the main determinants that have caused this phenomenon. Coronary spasms even weeks after LACA should draw attention to a possible association with the procedure. © 2013.

  6. The Left Atrial Appendage: Target for Stroke Reduction in Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramlawi, Basel; Abu Saleh, Walid K; Edgerton, James

    2015-01-01

    A patient with atrial fibrillation (AF) has a greater than 5% annual risk of major stroke, a 5-fold increase compared to the general population. While anticoagulation remains the standard stroke prevention strategy, the nature of lifelong anticoagulation inevitably carries an increased risk of bleeding, increased stroke during periods of interruption, increased cost, and significant lifestyle modification. Many patients with atrial fibrillation have had their left atrial appendage (LAA) ligated or excised by surgeons during cardiac surgery, a decision based largely on intuition and with no clear evidence of efficacy in stroke risk reduction. The observation that 90% of the thrombi found in nonvalvular AF patients and 57% found in valvular AF are in the LAA, triggered significant interest in the LAA as a potential therapeutic target. Until recently, the results were inconsistent, and high rates of incomplete occlusions precluded the medical community from confirming a definite relationship between LAA and stroke. As a result, anticoagulation is still the recommended first-line stroke risk reduction in AF, and the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines recommend LAA exclusion only with surgical ablation of AF or in the context of concomitant mitral valve surgery. A handful of devices have been developed for LAA exclusion. This includes percutaneous options such as WATCHMAN™ Left Atrial Appendage Closure Device (Boston Scientific Corporation, Marlborough, MA), hybrid epicardial devices such as the LARIAT Suture Delivery Device (SentreHEART, Inc., Redwood City, CA), and epicardial surgical devices such as AtriClip® LAA Occlusion System (AtriCure, Inc., West Chester, OH). Studies of the Watchman device have shown noninferiority to Warfarin in stroke prevention and this device has recently gained approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) following lengthy delays due to safety concerns. The Lariat device, which received 510

  7. Epicardial Ablation of Focal Atrial Tachycardia Arising From Left Atrial Appendage in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdhija Hanumandla

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Focal left atrial tachycardia (FLAT although a common cause of supraventricular tachycardia(SVT among children, the one's arising from left atrial appendage (LAA present a unique challenge for successful ablation because of anatomical location. We present two children with FLAT arising from the epicardial LAA, successfully mapped and ablated through percutaneuous epicardial approach.

  8. Distinct increase in hematocrit associated with paroxysm of atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuno, S; Ashida, T; Ebihara, A; Sugiyama, T; Fujii, J

    2000-09-01

    In a previous study we found that hemoconcentration, which was identified by an increase in hematocrit, occured during a paroxysm of atrial fibrillation. In the present study we investigated the changes in hematocrit from sinus rhythm to paroxysm in 10 patients who had multiple paroxysms of atrial fibrillation in order to assess the ranges of the changes in hematocrit among the paroxysms. In these patients hematocrit was measured simultaneously with electrocardiographic recording during 3 or more paroxysms and sinus rhythm just before each paroxysm. The changes in hematocrit varied among the paroxysms. The maximum increase in hematocrit in each patient ranged from 3.5 to 8.0 points with an average of 5.1 points. Such a distinct increase in hematocrit which abruptly develops with a paroxysm of atrial fibrillation may be a potential risk for thrombus formation.

  9. Impact of dronedarone in atrial fibrillation and flutter on stroke reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Christine Benn; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Køber, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Dronedarone has been developed for treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) or atrial flutter (AFL). It is an amiodarone analogue but noniodinized and without the same adverse effects as amiodarone.......Dronedarone has been developed for treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) or atrial flutter (AFL). It is an amiodarone analogue but noniodinized and without the same adverse effects as amiodarone....

  10. Association of left atrial function and left atrial enhancement in patients with atrial fibrillation: cardiac magnetic resonance study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Mohammadali; Lima, Joao A C; Khurram, Irfan M; Zimmerman, Stefan L; Zipunnikov, Vadim; Fukumoto, Kotaro; Spragg, David; Ashikaga, Hiroshi; Rickard, John; Marine, Joseph E; Calkins, Hugh; Nazarian, Saman

    2015-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with left atrial (LA) structural and functional changes. Cardiac magnetic resonance late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) and feature-tracking are capable of noninvasive quantification of LA fibrosis and myocardial motion, respectively. We sought to examine the association of phasic LA function with LA enhancement in patients with AF. LA structure and function was measured in 90 patients with AF (age 61±10 years; 76% men) referred for ablation and 14 healthy volunteers. Peak global longitudinal LA strain, LA systolic strain rate, and early and late diastolic strain rates were measured using cine-cardiac magnetic resonance images acquired during sinus rhythm. The degree of LGE was quantified. Compared with patients with paroxysmal AF (60% of cohort), those with persistent AF had larger maximum LA volume index (56±17 versus 49±13 mL/m(2); P=0.036), and increased LGE (27.1±11.7% versus 36.8±14.8%; Prate, early diastolic strain rate, and late diastolic strain rate) were lower in patients with persistent AF (Prate, early diastolic strain rate, and late diastolic strain rate (Pmeasurement of LA function using feature-tracking cardiac magnetic resonance may add important information about the physiological importance of LA fibrosis. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Increasing Prevalence of Atrial Fibrillation and Permanent Atrial Arrhythmias in Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labombarda, Fabien; Hamilton, Robert; Shohoudi, Azadeh; Aboulhosn, Jamil; Broberg, Craig S; Chaix, Marie A; Cohen, Scott; Cook, Stephen; Dore, Annie; Fernandes, Susan M; Fournier, Anne; Kay, Joseph; Macle, Laurent; Mondésert, Blandine; Mongeon, François-Pierre; Opotowsky, Alexander R; Proietti, Anna; Rivard, Lena; Ting, Jennifer; Thibault, Bernard; Zaidi, Ali; Khairy, Paul

    2017-08-15

    Atrial arrhythmias are the most common complication encountered in the growing and aging population with congenital heart disease. This study sought to assess the types and patterns of atrial arrhythmias, associated factors, and age-related trends. A multicenter cohort study enrolled 482 patients with congenital heart disease and atrial arrhythmias, age 32.0 ± 18.0 years, 45.2% female, from 12 North American centers. Qualifying arrhythmias were classified by a blinded adjudicating committee. The most common presenting arrhythmia was intra-atrial re-entrant tachycardia (IART) (61.6%), followed by atrial fibrillation (28.8%), and focal atrial tachycardia (9.5%). The proportion of arrhythmias due to IART increased with congenital heart disease complexity from 47.2% to 62.1% to 67.0% in patients with simple, moderate, and complex defects, respectively (p = 0.0013). Atrial fibrillation increased with age to surpass IART as the most common arrhythmia in those ≥50 years of age (51.2% vs. 44.2%; p heart disease, with a predominantly paroxysmal pattern. However, atrial fibrillation increases in prevalence and atrial arrhythmias progressively become permanent as the population ages. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Hundred years of atrial fibrillation: Current knowledge and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potpara Tatjana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most common sustained arrhythmia in general population. AF in humans was first described in 1903. Gradually, it has been well appreciated that AF is not just an acceptable alternative for normal rhythm but rather a serious threat, related to increased mortality and cardiovascular morbidity. AF can precipitate or worsen pre-existing heart failure, may cause the development of tachycardiomyopathy and is an independent risk factor for thromboembolic events, most frequently stroke. It has long been believed that rhythm control is the best therapy for AF. Nowadays there is a clear scientific proof that rhythm control offers no benefit over frequency control, at least for older patients, even with advanced left ventricular dysfunction. However, optimal treatment for younger, highly symptomatic, otherwise healthy AF patients has not been designed. Available antiarrhythmics have considerable proarrhythmic potential or organ toxicity, and new safer drugs are under investigation. Nonpharmacological approaches, namely RF-catheter ablation, are rapidly developing. Prevention of thromboembolism is imperative, and new safer oral anticoagulants have been intensively investigated. Recent randomized studies (PIAF, RACE, STAF, AFFIRM, HOT-CAFE did not solve the issue of optimal arrhythmia treatment, but they emphasized the prevention of thromboembolism based on risk factors, and not on AF type, mainly because asymptomatic episodes of AF may not be clinically recognized.

  13. [Hundred years of atrial fibrillation: current knowledge and perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potpara, Tatjana; Grujić, Miodrag

    2010-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia in general population. AF in humans was first described in 1903. Gradually, it has been well appreciated that AF is notjust an acceptable alternative for normal rhythm but rather a serious threat, related to increased mortality and cardiovascular morbidity. AF can precipitate or worsen pre-existing heart failure, may cause the development of tachycardiomyopathy and is an independent risk factor for thromboembolic events, most frequently stroke. It has long been believed that rhythm control is the best therapy for AF. Nowadays there is a clear scientific proof that rhythm control offers no benefit over frequency control, at least for older patients, even with advanced left ventricular dysfunction. However, optimal treatment for younger, highly symptomatic, otherwise healthy AF patients has not been designed. Available antiarrhythmics have considerable proarrhythmic potential or organ toxicity, and new safer drugs are under investigation. Nonpharmacological approaches, namely RF-catheter ablation, are rapidly developing. Prevention of thromboembolism is imperative, and new safer oral anticoagulants have been intensively investigated. Recent randomized studies (PIAF, RACE, STAF, AFFIRM, HOT-CAFE) did not solve the issue of optimal arrhythmia treatment, but they emphasized the prevention of thromboembolism based on risk factors, and not on AF type, mainly because asymptomatic episodes of AF may not be clinically recognised.

  14. Lone atrial fibrillation is associated with pectus excavatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Nicole T; Larry Klein, J; Paul Mounsey, J; Chung, Eugene H; Schwartz, Jennifer D; Pursell, Irion; Gehi, Anil K

    2013-09-01

    Pectus excavatum is a skeletal abnormality that may have cardiac manifestations. To determine whether pectus excavatum is associated with lone atrial fibrillation (AF). The pectus severity index (PSI) is the ratio of the lateral diameter of the chest to the distance between the sternum and the spine on computed tomography scan. A normal PSI is ≤2.5 whereas patients with severe pectus excavatum have a PSI >3.25. We calculated the PSI of 220 consecutive patients with AF who underwent radiofrequency catheter ablation from September 2008 to 2012 and compared this to the PSI of 225 controls without a history of AF undergoing chest computed tomography. Mean PSI was higher in patients with lone AF (2.72 ± 0.07) compared to patients with nonlone AF (2.25 ± 0.03) or controls (2.26 ± 0.03) (P pectus excavatum was higher in patients with lone AF compared to patients with nonlone AF and controls (P pectus excavatum compared to patients with nonlone AF or controls (P pectus excavatum and 17% have severe pectus, which is significantly higher than in patients with nonlone AF or controls. This association suggests a potential genetic or mechanical abnormality may be common to the 2 disorders. Our study may provide insight into the pathogenesis of lone AF. Copyright © 2013 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Sleep, sleep apnea and atrial fibrillation: Questions and answers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Younghoon; Koene, Ryan J; Johnson, Alan D; Lin, Gen-Min; Ferguson, John D

    2017-09-04

    Sleep apnea (SA) is a common sleep disorder increasingly recognized as a risk for cardiovascular disease. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. An increasing number of investigations in recent years have linked SA to AF. In this review, we aim to provide a critical overview of the existing evidence in a question and answer format by addressing the following: What is the prevalent association between the two conditions (separating nocturnally detected AF episodes from AF as a prevalent condition)? Is SA a risk factor for incident AF? Is SA a risk factor for recurrence of AF following cardioversion/catheter-based ablation? What is the association between SA and AF in patients with heart failure? Are there signature electrocardiographic markers of AF found in patients with SA? Are there electrophysiology-based studies supporting the link between SA and AF? What other sleep characteristics (beyond SA) are found in patients with AF? What is the impact of SA treatment on AF? What is the effect of AF treatment on sleep? Finally, we address unsolved questions and suggest future directions to enhance our understanding of the AF-SA relationship. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Role of neural modulation in the pathophysiology of atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailesh Male

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Atrial-fibrillation (AF is the most common clinically encountered arrhythmia affecting over 1 per cent of population in the United States and its prevalence seems to be moving only in forward direction. A recent systemic review estimates global prevalence of AF to be 596.2 and 373.1 per 100,000 population in males and females respectively. Multiple mechanisms have been put forward in the pathogenesis of AF, however; multiple wavelet hypothesis is the most accepted theory so far. Similar to the conduction system of the heart, a neural network exists which surrounds the heart and plays an important role in formation of the substrate of AF and when a trigger is originated, usually from pulmonary vein sleeves, AF occurs. This neural network includes ganglionated plexi (GP located adjacent to pulmonary vein ostia which are under control of higher centers in normal people. When these GP become hyperactive owing to loss of inhibition from higher centers e.g. in elderly, AF can occur. We can control these hyperactive GP either by stimulating higher centers and their connections, e.g. vagus nerve stimulation or simply by ablating these GP. This review provides detailed information about the different proposed mechanisms underlying AF, the exact role of autonomic neural tone in the pathogenesis of AF and the possible role of neural modulation in the treatment of AF.

  17. Atrial fibrillation after taser exposure in a previously healthy adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multerer, Sara; Berkenbosch, John W; Das, Bibhuti; Johnsrude, Christopher

    2009-12-01

    We are reporting a previously healthy adolescent who developed atrial fibrillation after being tased. He has a structurally normal heart on echocardiogram, normal electrolyte level and thyroid function test results, and a urine toxicology screen positive for marijuana. The patient ultimately required external defibrillation to convert his cardiac rhythm to normal sinus rhythm and has had no recurrent arrhythmias since hospital discharge (approximately 1 year). This is the first reported case of atrial fibrillation developing after a Taser shot, occurring in an adolescent without other risk factors. This case illustrates the arrhythmogenic potential of a Taser in otherwise healthy young individuals, and further study of occurrence of Taser-induced arrhythmias is warranted.

  18. Depression in atrial fibrillation in the general population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renate B Schnabel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Initial evidence suggests that depressive symptoms are more frequent in patients with atrial fibrillation. Data from the general population are limited. METHODS AND RESULTS: In 10,000 individuals (mean age 56±11 years, 49.4% women of the population-based Gutenberg Health Study we assessed depression by the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9 and a history of depression in relation to manifest atrial fibrillation (n = 309 cases. The median (25th/75th percentile PHQ-9 score of depressive symptoms was 4 (2/6 in atrial fibrillation individuals versus 3 (2/6 individuals without atrial fibrillation, P(X2-Test = 0.32. Multivariable regression analyses of the severity of depressive symptoms in relation to atrial fibrillation in cardiovascular risk factor adjusted models revealed a relation of PHQ-9 values and atrial fibrillation (odds ratio (OR 1.04, 95% confidence interval (CI 1.01-1.08; P = 0.023. The association was stronger for the somatic symptom dimension of depression (OR 1.08, 95% CI 1.02-1.15; P = 0.0085 than for cognitive symptoms (OR 1.05, 95% CI 0.98-1.11; P = 0.15. Results did not change markedly after additional adjustment for heart failure, partnership status or the inflammatory biomarker C-reactive protein. Both, self-reported physical health status, very good/good versus fair/bad, (OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.41-0.70; P<0.001 and mental health status (OR 0.61 (0.46-0.82; P = 0.0012 were associated with atrial fibrillation in multivariable-adjusted models. CONCLUSIONS: In a population-based sample we observed a higher burden of depressive symptoms driven by somatic symptom dimensions in individuals with atrial fibrillation. Depression was associated with a worse perception of physical or mental health status. Whether screening and treatment of depressive symptoms modulates disease progression and outcome needs to be shown.

  19. Managing atrial fibrillation in the elderly: critical appraisal of dronedarone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trigo P

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Paula Trigo, Gregory W FischerDepartment of Anesthesiology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Atrial fibrillation is the most commonly seen arrhythmia in the geriatric population and is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Treatment of the elderly with atrial fibrillation remains challenging for physicians, because this unique subpopulation is characterized by multiple comorbidities requiring chronic use of numerous medications, which can potentially lead to severe drug interactions. Furthermore, age-related changes in the cardiovascular system as well as other physiological changes result in altered drug pharmacokinetics. Dronedarone is a new drug recently approved for the treatment of arrhythmias, such as atrial fibrillation and/or atrial flutter. Dronedarone is a benzofuran amiodarone analog which lacks the iodine moiety and contains a methane sulfonyl group that decreases its lipophilicity. These differences in chemical structure are responsible for making dronedarone less toxic than amiodarone which, in turn, results in fewer side effects. Adverse events for dronedarone include gastrointestinal side effects and rash. No dosage adjustments are required for patients with renal impairment. However, the use of dronedarone is contraindicated in the presence of severe hepatic dysfunction.Keywords: atrial fibrillation, elderly, antiarrhythmic agents, amiodarone, dronedarone

  20. Dronedarone for atrial fibrillation: How does it compare with amiodarone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penugonda, Neelima; Mohmand-Borkowski, Adam; Burke, James F

    2011-03-01

    Dronedarone (Multaq), an analogue of amiodarone (Cordarone), was designed to cause fewer adverse effects than the parent compound. Studies have indeed shown dronedarone to be safer than amiodarone, but less effective. Its official indication is to reduce the risk of hospitalization in patients with paroxysmal or persistent atrial fibrillation or atrial flutter and other cardiovascular risk factors, reflecting the parameters of its effectiveness in clinical trials.

  1. A Multi-Variate Predictability Framework to Assess Invasive Cardiac Activity and Interactions During Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaine, Alejandro; Mase, Michela; Cristoforetti, Alessandro; Ravelli, Flavia; Nollo, Giandomenico; Laguna, Pablo; Martinez, Juan Pablo; Faes, Luca

    2017-05-01

    This study introduces a predictability framework based on the concept of Granger causality (GC), in order to analyze the activity and interactions between different intracardiac sites during atrial fibrillation (AF). GC-based interactions were studied using a three-electrode analysis scheme with multi-variate autoregressive models of the involved preprocessed intracardiac signals. The method was evaluated in different scenarios covering simulations of complex atrial activity as well as endocardial signals acquired from patients. The results illustrate the ability of the method to determine atrial rhythm complexity and to track and map propagation during AF. The proposed framework provides information on the underlying activation and regularity, does not require activation detection or postprocessing algorithms and is applicable for the analysis of any multielectrode catheter. The proposed framework can potentially help to guide catheter ablation interventions of AF.

  2. Katetrová ablace pro fibrilaci síní a spektrální analýza variability srdeční frekvence Catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation and spectral analysis of heart rate variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esseid Gaddur

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Cílem studie bylo zkoumání vlivu katetrové ablace na parametry spektrální analýzy (SA variability srdeční frekvence (HRV. Krátkodobý záznam SA HRV byl snímán u skupiny 22 pacientů s paroxysmální fibrilací síní (FS ve věku 53,69 ± 11,95 let (20 mužů a 2 ženy, u kterých byla provedena cirkumferenční katetrová ablace (KA. Měření probíhalo ve třech polohách (leh-stoj-leh, za standardizovaných podmínek, ráno před KA a jeden den po KA. K vyhodnocení výsledků byla použita jak standardní, tak nová metodika hodnocení SA HRV pomocí komplexních ukazatelů. Po KA pro FS došlo ke zvýšení srdeční frekvence (SF a zhoršení většiny jednotlivých i komplexních ukazatelů. Tento nález svědčí o redukci aktivity obou větví autonomního nervového systému. Protože snížení aktivity vagu je výraznější, posouvá se sympatovagová rovnováha mírně směrem k sympatiku. The results of a short term recording of spectral analysis (SA of heart rate variability (HRV in 22 patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (aged 53.69 ± 11.95; 20 male and 2 female in whom circumferential catheter ablation (CA was done are presented in this article. Measurement was done in the morning before CA and one day after CA. A standard orthoclinostatic test in three positions (supine–standing–supine was used. The influence of catheter ablation on SA HRV was identified by standard and complex parameters (Stejskal, Šlachta, Elfmark, Salinger, &Gaul-Aláčová, 2002. After CA, heart rate increased and almost all individual and complex indexes decreased. This finding gives evidence of reduction of activity in both branches of the autonomous nervous system. Vagal activity reduction was larger, so the sympathovagal balance shifts towards sympathicus.

  3. Effect of Early Direct Current Cardioversion on the Recurrence of Atrial Fibrillation in Patients With Persistent Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osmanagic, Armin; Möller, Sören; Osmanagic, Azra

    2015-01-01

    In patients with persistent atrial fibrillation (AF), the sinus rhythm (SR) can be restored by direct current cardioversion (DCC), although the recurrence of AF after successful DCC is common. We examined whether transesophageal echocardiography (TEE)-guided early DCC, compared with the conventio......In patients with persistent atrial fibrillation (AF), the sinus rhythm (SR) can be restored by direct current cardioversion (DCC), although the recurrence of AF after successful DCC is common. We examined whether transesophageal echocardiography (TEE)-guided early DCC, compared...

  4. Recent advances in the molecular pathophysiology of atrial fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakili, Reza; Voigt, Niels; Kääb, Stefan; Dobrev, Dobromir; Nattel, Stanley

    2011-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an extremely common cardiac rhythm disorder that causes substantial morbidity and contributes to mortality. The mechanisms underlying AF are complex, involving both increased spontaneous ectopic firing of atrial cells and impulse reentry through atrial tissue. Over the past ten years, there has been enormous progress in understanding the underlying molecular pathobiology. This article reviews the basic mechanisms and molecular processes causing AF. We discuss the ways in which cardiac disease states, extracardiac factors, and abnormal genetic control lead to the arrhythmia. We conclude with a discussion of the potential therapeutic implications that might arise from an improved mechanistic understanding. PMID:21804195

  5. Atrial and ventricular volume and function in persistent and permanent atrial fibrillation, a magnetic resonance imaging study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkelsen, Susette Krohn; Groenning, Bjoern Aaris; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup

    2005-01-01

    Left atrial size is independently related to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and atrial fibrillation (AF) is strongly associated with atrial size. Our aims were to report atrial and ventricular dimensions in patients with AF evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to assess t...

  6. Asymmetrical dimethylarginine level in atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengel, Atiye; Sahinarslan, Asife; Biberoğlu, Gursel; Hasanoğlu, Alev; Tavil, Yusuf; Tulmaç, Murat; Ozdemir, Murat

    2008-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is known to be related with increased risk of thromboembolic events. Asymmetrical dimethylarginine (ADMA), which is an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), can cause endothelial dysfunction by decreasing nitric oxide (NO) and lead to increased risk of thrombosis. In the present study our aim was to compare plasma levels of ADMA in patients with acute onset ( 1 year) to determine the risk of thrombosis. 17 patients with the first detected attack of AF within the first 24 hours of presentation (group 1), 25 patients who had permanent chronic AF lasting at least 1 year or more (group II) and 18 healthy persons as the control group (group III) were included in the study. For each patient the plasma ADMA, L-arginine, symmetrical dimethylarginine (SDMA) concentrations were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography in venous blood samples collected before cardioversion. We compared the plasma ADMA, L-arginine and SDMA concentrations between the groups. Plasma L-arginine (78.18 +/- 28.29 vs. 73.14 +/- 14.11 vs. 71.03 +/- 21.31, P = 0.549) and plasma SDMA concentrations (0.38 +/-0.18 vs. 0.42 +/- 0.21 vs. 0.32 +/- 0.24, P = 0.224) were similar in all groups. There was a significant difference between plasma ADMA concentrations (0.76 +/- 0.27 vs. 0.50 +/- 0.26 vs. 0.36 +/- 0.20, P < 0.001) among the groups. When we compared plasma ADMA levels between the subgroups, we also found a significant difference (P = 0.002 when comparing group I and group II, P < 0.001 when comparing of group I and group III, P = 0.042 when compareng of group II and group III). ADMA levels in patients with acute onset AF were significantly increased when compared with patients with chronic AF and the healthy control group indicating the presence of endothelial dysfunction and a prothrombotic state even in a very early phase of AF.

  7. Novel anti-arrhythmic medications in the treatment of atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saklani, Pradyot; Skanes, Allan

    2012-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a prevalent condition particularly amongst the elderly, which contributes to both morbidity and mortality. The burden of disease has lead to significant increases in health care utilization and cost in recent years. Treatment of Atrial fibrillation consists of either a rate or rhythm control strategy. Rhythm control is achieved using medical management and/or catheter ablation. In spite of major strides in catheter ablation, this procedure remains a second line treatment of AF. Anti-arrhythmic medications represent the main treatment modality for the maintenance of sinus rhythm. Amiodarone has been used for decades because of its efficacy and lack of pro-arrhythmia despite numerous extracardiac side effects. Novel agents such as Dronedarone were designed to emulate Amiodarone without the extra-cardiac side effects. Unfortunately recent trials have raised concerns for the safety of this medication in certain patients. Other agents such as Vernakalant and Ranolazine are in development that promise to be more atrial selective in their action, thereby potentially avoiding pro-arrhythmia and heart failure side effects. It remains to be seen however if one or more of these agents achieves the required high efficacy and safety threshold. This review summarizes the main anti-arrhythmic clinical trials, early phase trials involving novel agents and examines the conflicting data relating to Dronedarone.

  8. Apixaban versus warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Granger, C.B.; Alexander, J.H.; McMurray, J.J.; Lopes, R.D.; Hylek, E.M.; Hanna, M.; Al-Khalidi, H.R.; Ansell, J.; Atar, D.; Avezum, A.; Bahit, M.C.; Diaz, R.; Easton, J.D.; Ezekowitz, J.A.; Flaker, G.; Garcia, D.; Geraldes, M.; Gersh, B.J.; Golitsyn, S.; Goto, S.; Hermosillo, A.G.; Hohnloser, S.H.; Horowitz, J.; Mohan, P.; Jansky, P.; Lewis, B.S.; Lopez-Sendon, J.L.; Pais, P.; Parkhomenko, A.; Verheugt, F.W.A.; Zhu, J.; Wallentin, L.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vitamin K antagonists are highly effective in preventing stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation but have several limitations. Apixaban is a novel oral direct factor Xa inhibitor that has been shown to reduce the risk of stroke in a similar population in comparison with aspirin.

  9. Postoperative atrial fibrillation in patients on statins undergoing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Although this meta-analysis suggests that chronic statin therapy did not prevent postoperative AF in unselected valvular heart surgical patients, the heterogeneity indicates that this outcome should be viewed with caution and further research is recommended. Keywords: atrial fibrillation, cardiac surgery, statins ...

  10. Atrial fibrillation after coronary artery bypass surgery: Possibilities of prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obrenović-Kirćanski Biljana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation occurs as a frequent complication after cardiac interventions. It can be found in 5% of all surgical patients, and it is far more common in cardiac (10% - 65% of patients than in non-cardiac procedures. In a number of patients it remains asymptomatic, but may be accompanied by very severe symptoms of hypotension, heart failure, syncope, systemic or pulmonary embolism, perioperative myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular insult and increased operative mortality. Patients whose postoperative course is complicated by atrial fibrillation require longer hospitalization. Possible predisposing factors of this arrhythmia are numerous and are associated with surgery, extensive coronary heart disease and revascularization, and preoperative diseases. According to the recommendations of the European Society of Cardiology orally applied beta-blocker, amiodarone and sotalol can be used for prophylaxis of atrial fibrillation. Following the recommendations, treatment of postoperative atrial fibrillation should include beta-blockers, amiodarone, and in patients with heart failure and left ventricular dysfunction, digoxin. Due to the increased risk of stroke, an anticoagulant protection is necessary. Many studies have been conducted with results supporting the prophylactic use of amiodarone and beta-blockers, while the treatment with new agents such as magnesium, statins, omega-3 fatty acids and inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system is still being investigated.

  11. Lenient versus Strict Rate Control in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Gelder, Isabelle C.; Groenveld, Hessel F.; Crijns, Harry J. G. M.; Tuininga, Ype S.; Tijssen, Jan G. P.; Alings, A. Marco; Hillege, Hans L.; Bergsma-Kadijk, Johanna A.; Cornel, Jan H.; Kamp, Otto; Tukkie, Raymond; Bosker, Hans A.; Van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Van den Berg, Maarten P.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Rate control is often the therapy of choice for atrial fibrillation. Guidelines recommend strict rate control, but this is not based on clinical evidence. We hypothesized that lenient rate control is not inferior to strict rate control for preventing cardiovascular morbidity and

  12. Ventricular rate control of atrial fibrillation in heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rienstra, Michiel; Van Gelder, Isabelle C

    2013-01-01

    In the last few years, there has been a major shift in the treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) in the setting of hear failure (HF), from rhythm to ventricular rate control in most patients with both conditions. In this article, the authors focus on ventricular rate control and discuss the

  13. Atrial fibrillation: An analysis of etiology and management pattern in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hypertensive heart disease was the diagnosis in forty patients [58.82%], dilated cardiomyopathy in thirteen [19.2%], rheumatic heart disease in ten [14.71%], thyrotoxicosis in three [4.41%], one each due to endomyocardial fibrosis [EMF] and Cor pulmonale. Ten patients (14.71%) had valvular atrial fibrillation (AF) while most ...

  14. Comparative study of atrial fibrillation and AV conduction in mammals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijler, F.L.; Tweel, I. van der

    1987-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is one ofthe most common cardiac arrhythmias in humans. It a1so occurs quite frequent1y in dogs and horses. Comparative study of this arrhythmia may contribute to better understanding of the pathophysiologica1 mechanisms involved. In this study, we present a quantitative

  15. Edoxaban versus Warfarin in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giugliano, Robert P.; Ruff, Christian T.; Braunwald, Eugene; Murphy, Sabina A.; Wiviott, Stephen D.; Halperin, Jonathan L.; Waldo, Albert L.; Ezekowitz, Michael D.; Weitz, Jeffrey I.; Špinar, Jindřich; Ruzyllo, Witold; Ruda, Mikhail; Koretsune, Yukihiro; Betcher, Joshua; Shi, Minggao; Grip, Laura T.; Patel, Shirali P.; Patel, Indravadan; Hanyok, James J.; Mercuri, Michele; Antman, Elliott M.; Braunwald, E.; Antman, E. M.; Giugliano, R. P.; Ruff, C. T.; Morin, S. E.; Hoffman, E. B.; Murphy, S. A.; Deenadayalu, N.; Grip, L.; Mercuri, M.; Lanz, H.; Patel, I.; Curt, V.; Duggal, A.; Hanyok, J.; Davé, J.; Morgan, D.; Choi, Y.; Shi, M.; Jin, J.; Xie, J.; Crerand, W.; Kappelhof, J.; Maxwell, W.; Skinner, M.; Patel, S.; Betcher, J.; Selicato, G.; Otto, C.; Reissner, C.; Smith, K.; Ostroske, J.; Ron, A.; Connolly, S.; Camm, J.; Ezekowitz, M.; Halperin, J.; Waldo, A.; Paolasso, E.; Aylward, P.; Heidbuchel, H.; Nicolau, J. C.; Goudev, A.; Roy, D.; Weitz, J.; Corbalán, R.; Yang, Y.; Botero, R.; Bergovec, M.; Ŝpinar, J.; Grande, P.; Hassager, C.; Voitk, J.; Huikuri, H.; Nieminen, M.; Blanc, J. J.; LeHeuzey, J. Y.; Mitrovic, V.; Alexopoulos, D.; Sotomora, G.; Kiss, R.; SomaRaju, B.; Lewis, B.; Merlini, P.; Metra, M.; Koretsune, Y.; Yamashita, T.; García-Castillo, A.; Oude Ophuis, T.; White, H.; Atar, D.; Horna, M.; Babilonia, N.; Ruzyllo, W.; Morais, J.; Dorobantu, M.; Ruda, M.; Ostojic, M.; Duris, T.; Dalby, A.; Chung, N.; Zamorano, J. L.; Juul-Möller, S.; Moccetti, T.; Chen, S. A.; Sritara, P.; Oto, A.; Parkhomenko, A.; Senior, R.; Verheugt, F.; Skene, A.; Anderson, J.; Bauer, K.; Easton, J. D.; Goto, S.; Wiviott, S.; Lowe, C.; Awtry, E.; Berger, C. J.; Croce, K.; Desai, A.; Gelfand, E.; Goessling, W.; Greenberger, N. J.; Ho, C.; Leeman, D. E.; Link, M. S.; Norden, A. D.; Pande, A.; Rost, N.; Ruberg, F.; Silverman, S.; Singhal, A.; Vita, J. A.; Vogelmann, O.; Gonzalez, C.; Ahuad Guerrero, R.; Rodriguez, M.; Albisu, J.; Rosales, E.; Allall, O.; Reguero, M.; Alvarez, C.; Garcia, M.; Ameriso, S.; Ameriso, P.; Amuchastegui, M.; Caceres, M.; Beloscar, J.; Petrucci, J.; Berli, M.; Budassi, N.; Valle, M.; Bustamante Labarta, G.; Saravia, M.; Caccavo, A.; Fracaro, V.; Cartasegna, L.; Novas, V.; Caruso, O.; Zarandon, R. Saa; Colombo, H.; Morandini, M.; Cuello, J.; Rosell, M.; Cuneo, C.; Bocanera, M.; D'Amico, A.; Cendali, G.; Dran, R.; Moreno, V.; Estol, C.; Davolos, M.; Facello, A.; Facello, M.; Falu, E.; Iriarte, M.; Femenia, F.; Arrieta, M.; Fuselli, J.; Zanotti, A.; Gant Lopez, J.; Meiller, F.; Garcia Duran, R.; Perlo, D.; Garrido, M.; Ceirano, C.; Giacomi, G.; Eden, M.; Giannaula, R.; Huerta, M.; Goicoechea, R.; von Wulffen, M.; Hominal, M.; Bianchini, M.; Jure, H.; Jure, D.; Kevorkian, R.; Monaco, F.; Lanternier, G.; Belcuore, M.; Liniado, G.; Iglesias, M.; Litvak, B.; Nigro, A.; Llanos, J.; Vignau, S.; Lorente, C.; Shatsky, K.; Lotti, J.; Raimondi, G.; Mackinnon, I.; Carne, M.; Manuale, O.; Calderon, M.; Marino, J.; Funes, I.; Muntaner, J.; Gandur, H.; Nul, D.; Verdini, E.; Piskorz, D.; Tommasi, A.; Povedano, G.; Casares, E.; Pozzer, D.; Fernandez, E.; Prado, A.; Venturini, C.; Ramos, H.; Navarrete, S.; Alvarez, M.; Sanchez, A.; Bowen, L.; Sanjurjo, M.; Codutti, O.; Saravia Toledo, S.; Formoso, I.; Schmidberg, J.; Goloboulicz, A.; Schygiel, P.; Buzzetti, C.; Severino, P.; Morara, P.; Sosa Liprandi, M.; Teves, M.; Vico, M.; Morell, Y.; Anderson, C.; Paraskevaidis, T.; Arstall, M.; Hoffmann, B.; Colquhoun, D.; Price-Smith, S.; Crimmins, D.; Slattery, A.; Dart, A.; Kay, S.; Davis, S.; Silver, G.; Flecknoe-Brown, S.; Roberts, J.; Gates, P.; Jones, S.; Lehman, R.; Morrison, H.; McKeirnan, M.; Li, J.; Paul, V.; Batta, C.; Purnell, P.; Perrett, L.; Szto, G.; O'Shea, V.; Capiau, L.; Banaeian, F.; de Bleecker, J.; de Koning, K.; de Tollenaere, M.; de Bruyne, L.; Desfontaines, P.; Tincani, G.; Meeusen, K.; Herzet, J.; Malmendier, D.; Mairesse, G.; Raepers, M.; Parqué, J.; Clinckemaille, N.; Scavée, C.; Huyberechts, D.; Stockman, D.; Jacobs, C.; Vandekerckhove, Y.; Derycker, K.; Vanwelden, J.; van Welden, J.; Vervoort, G.; Mestdagh, I.; Vrolix, M.; Beerts, C.; Wollaert, B.; Denie, D.; Amato Vincenzo de Paola, A.; Coutinho, E.; Andrade Lotufo, P.; de Melo, R. Ferreira; Atie, J.; Motta, C.; Augusto Alves da Costa, F.; Ferraz, R. Franchin; Bertolim Precoma, D.; Sehnem, E.; Botelho, R.; Cunha, S.; Brondani, R.; Fleck, N.; Chaves Junior, H.; Silva, J.; Costantini, C.; Barroso, D.; de Patta, M.; Pereira, V.; Duda, N.; Laimer, R.; Dutra, O.; Morgado, S.; Faustino Saporito, W.; Seroqui, M.; Ferreira, L.; Araújo, E.; Finimundi, H.; Daitz, C.; Gagliardi, R.; Pereira, G.; Gomes, M.; Gomes, A.; Guimarães, A.; Ninho, L.; Jaeger, C.; Pereira, L.; Jorge, J.; Cury, C.; Kaiser, S.; Almeida, A.; Kalil, C.; Radaelli, G.; Kunz Sebba Barroso de Souza, W.; Morales, K.; Leaes, P.; Luiz, R. Osorio; Pimenta Almeida, J.; Gozalo, A.; Reis, G.; Avellar, K.; Reis Katz Weiand, L.; Leipelt, J.; Rocha, J.; Barros, R.; Rodrigues, L.; Rocha, M. Rubia; Rodrigues, A.; Rodrigues, D.; Rossi dos Santos, F.; Pagnan, L. Goncalves; Sampaio, R.; do Val, R.; Saraiva, J.; Vicente, C.; Simoes, M.; Carraro, A.; Sobral Filho, D.; Lustosa, E.; Villas Boas, F.; Almeida, M.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, E. 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Retamal; Bugueño, C.; Mondaca, P. Mondaca; Cobos, J.; Obreque, C.; Corbalan, R.; Parada, A.; Florenzano, F.; Diaz, P. Arratia; Lopetegui, M.; Rebolledo, C.; Manriquez, L.; Silva, L. Manríquez; Martinez, D.; Llamas, R. Romero; Opazo, M.; Pérez, M. Carmona; Pincetti, C.; Carrasco, G. Torres; Potthoff, S.; Staub, J. Zapata; Campisto, Y.; Stockins, B.; Lara, C. Lara; Yovaniniz, P.; Azua, M. Grandon; Bai, F.; Xu, G. L.; Chen, J. Z.; Xie, X. D.; Chen, X. P.; Zhang, X.; Dong, Y. G.; Feng, C.; Fu, G. S.; Zhang, P.; Hong, K.; You, Z. G.; Hong, L.; Qiu, Y.; Jiang, X. J.; Qu, Z.; Li, L.; Liu, H.; Li, T. F.; Kong, Y. Q.; Li, W. M.; Liu, B.; Li, Z. Q.; Liu, Y.; Liao, D. N.; Gu, X. J.; Liu, L.; Lu, Z. H.; Ma, S. M.; Yang, Z. Y.; Wang, D. M.; Qi, S. Y.; Wang, G. P.; Shi, X. J.; Wei, M.; Huang, D.; Wu, S. L.; Li, Y. E.; Xu, J. H.; Gu, J. Y.; Xu, Y. M.; Liang, Y. Z.; Yang, K.; Li, A. Y.; Yang, Y. J.; Zheng, X.; Zheng, Y.; Gao, M.; Yin, Y. H.; Xu, Y. P.; Yu, B.; Li, L. L.; Yuan, Z. Y.; Qiang, H.; Zhang, H. Q.; Lin, Y. N.; Zhang, Z.; Kang, H.; Zhao, R. P.; Han, R. J.; Zhao, X. L.; Wang, J. Q.; Zheng, Z. Q.; Li, B. G.; Zhou, S. X.; Zhang, Y. L.; Accini, J.; Accini, M.; Cano, N.; Pineda, L. León; Delgado Restrepo, J.; Arroyave, C.; Fernández Ruiz, R.; Diaz, I. Aldana; Hernandez, H.; Delgado, P.; Jaramillo Muñoz, C.; Builes, A.; Manzur, F.; Rodriguez, E. Rivera; Moncada Corredor, M.; Giraldo, D. Lopez; Orozco Linares, L.; Fonseca, J.; Quintero, A.; Gonzales, C.; Sanchez Vallejo, G.; Mejia, I. Perdomo; Bagatin, J.; Carevic, V.; Car, S.; Jeric, M.; Ciglenecki, N.; Tusek, S.; Ferri Certic, J.; Romic, I.; Francetic, I.; Ausperger, K. Makar; Jelic, V.; Jurinjak, S. Jaksic; Knezevic, A.; Buksa, B.; Samardzic, P.; Lukenda, K. Cvitkusic; Steiner, R.; Kirner, D.; Sutalo, K.; Bakliza, Z.; Vrazic, H.; Lucijanic, T.; Bar, M.; Brodova, P.; Berka, L.; Kunkelova, V.; Brtko, M.; Burianova, H.; Cermak, O.; Elbl, L.; Ferkl, R.; Florian, J.; Francek, L.; Golan, L.; Gregor, P.; Honkova, M.; Hubac, J.; Jandik, J.; Jarkovsky, P.; Jelinek, Z.; Jerabek, O.; Jirmar, R.; Kobza, R.; Kochrt, M.; Kostkova, G.; Kosek, Z.; Kovar, P.; Kuchar, R.; Kvasnicka, J.; Ludka, O.; Machova, V.; Krocova, E.; Melichar, M.; Nechanicky, R.; Olsr, J.; Peterka, K.; Petrova, I.; Havlova, I.; Pisova, J.; Podrazil, P.; Jirsova, E.; Reichert, P.; Slaby, J.; Spacek, R.; Spinar, J.; Labrova, R.; Vodnansky, P.; Samkova, D.; Zidkova, E.; Dodt, K.; Christensen, H.; Christensen, L.; Loof, A.; Ibsen, H.; Madsen, H.; Iversen, H.; Veng-Olsen, T.; Nielsen, H.; Olsen, R.; Overgaard, K.; Petrovic, V.; Raymond, I.; Raae, D.; Sand, N.; Svenningsen, A.; Torp-Pedersen, C.; Jakobsen, U.; Wiggers, H.; Serup-Hansen, K.; Kaik, J.; Stern, A.; Kolk, R.; Laane, E.; Rivis, L.; Paumets, M.; Laheäär, M.; Rosenthal, A.; Rajasalu, R.; Vahula, V.; Ratnik, E.; Kaarleenkaski, S.; Hussi, E.; Valpas, S.; Jäkälä, P.; Lappalainen, T.; Mäenpää, A.; Viitaniemi, J.; Nyman, K.; Sankari, T.; Rasi, H.; Salminen, O.; Virtanen, V.; Nappila, H.; Le Heuzey, J.; Agraou, B.; El Jarroudi, F.; Amarenco, P.; Boursin, P.; Babuty, D.; Boyer, M.; Belhassane, A.; Berbari, H.; Blanc, J.; Dias, P.; Coisne, D.; Berger, N.; Decoulx, E.; El Jarroudi, M.; Dinanian, S.; Arfaoui, M.; Hermida, J.; Deruche, E.; Kacet, S.; Corbut, S.; Poulard, J.; Leparree, S.; Roudaut, R.; Duprat, C.; Al-Zoebi, A.; Wurow, A.; Bernhardt, P.; Dichristin, U.; Berrouschot, J.; Vierbeck, S.; Beyer-Westendorf, J.; Sehr, B.; Bouzo, M.; Schnelzer, P.; Braun, R.; Ladenburger, K.; Buhr, M.; Weihrauch, D.; Contzen, C.; Kara, M.; Daut, W.; Ayasse, D.; Degtyareva, E.; Kranz, P.; Drescher, T.; Herfurth, B.; Faghih, M.; Forck-Boedeker, K.; Schneider, K.; Fuchs, R.; Manuela, W.; Grigat, C.; Otto, A.; Hartmann, A.; Peitz, M.; Heuer, H.; Dieckheuer, U.; Hoffmann, U.; Dorn, S.; Hoffmann, S.; Schuppe, M.; Horacek, T.; Fink, P.; Junggeburth, J.; Schmid, S.; Jungmair, W.; Schoen, B.; Kleinecke-Pohl, U.; Meusel, P.; Koenig, H.; Bauch, F.; Lohrbaecher-Kozak, I.; Grosse, B.; Lueders, S.; Venneklaas, U.; Luttermann, M.; Wulf, M.; Maus, O.; Hoefer, K.; Meissner, G.; Braemer, U.; Meyer-Pannwitt, U.; Frahm, E.; Vogt, S.; Muegge, A.; Barbera, S.; Mueller-Glamann, M.; Raddatz, K.; Piechatzek, R.; Lewinsky, D.; Pohl, W.; Proskynitopoulos, N.; Kuhlmann, M.; Rack, K.; Pilipenko, H.; Rinke, A.; Kühlenborg, A.; Schaefer, A.; Szymanowski, N.; Schellong, S.; Frommhold, R.; Schenkenberger, I.; Finsterbusch, T.; Dreykluft, K.; Schiewe, C.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, M.; Schreckenberg, A.; Hellmers, J.; Seibert, H.; Gold, G.; Sohn, H.; Baylacher, M.; Spitzer, S.; Bonin, K.; Stoehring, R.; Taggeselle, J.; Zarpentin, C.; Veltkamp, R.; Ludwig, I.; Voehringer, N. N.; Buchholz, M.; Weyland, K.; Winkelmann, B.; Buelow-Johansen, B.; Wolde, C.; Winter, K.; Mavronasiou, E.; Bourlios, P.; Tziortziotis, A.; Karamitsos, C.; Exarchou, E.; Kifnidis, K.; Daskalaki, A.; Moschos, N.; Dimitra, K.; Olympios, C.; Kartsagkoulis, E.; Pyrgakis, V.; Korantanis, K.; Ayau Milla, O.; Ramirez, V. de Leon; Guzman Melgar, I.; Jimenez, T.; Ovando Lavagnino, A.; Guevara, S.; Rodas Estrada, M.; Sanchez, M.; Pozuelos, J. Mayen; Sanchez Samayoa, C.; Guerra, L.; Velasquez Camas, L.; Almaraz, S. Padilla; Dioszeghy, P.; Muskoczki, E.; Edes, I.; Szatmari, J.; Fiok, J.; Varga, A.; Kanakaridisz, N.; Kosztyu, M.; Kis, E.; Feil, J. Felfoldine; Jakal, A.; Koczka, M.; Kovacs, I.; Baranyai, M.; Kovacs, Z.; Lupkovics, G.; Karakai, H. Horvathne; Matoltsy, A.; Kiss, T.; Medvegy, M.; Kiss, K.; Merkely, B.; Kolumban, E.; Nagy, A.; Palinkas, A.; Toth, S. Rostasne; Sayour, A.; Bognar, A.; Simor, T.; Ruzsa, D.; Sipos, T.; Szakal, I.; Tomcsanyi, J.; Marosi, A.; Vertes, A.; Kincses, M.; Malhan, S.; Abdullakutty, J.; Agarwal, D.; Ranka, R.; Arneja, J.; Memon, A.; Arora, V.; Shree, R.; Avvaru, G.; Shaikh, A.; Babu, P.; Rao, B.; Babu, R.; Reddy, J.; Banker, D.; Sheth, T.; Benjarge, P.; Surushe, S.; Bharani, A.; Solanki, R.; Bhargava, V.; Rathi, A.; Biniwale, A.; Bhuti, M.; Calambur, N.; Karnwal, N.; Chopda, M.; Mali, N.; Goyal, N.; Saini, A.; Gupta, J.; Singh, P.; Hadan, S.; Savanth, P.; Hardas, S.; Thakor, G.; Hiremath, J.; Ghume, A.; Jain, R.; Pahuja, M.; Joseph, S.; Oommen, D.; Joseph, J.; Thomas, R.; Joshi, H.; Iby, N. N.; Kale, V.; Raut, N.; Kandekar, B.; Kandekar, S.; Kishore, R.; Krishnan, H.; Kotiwale, V.; Kulkarni, R.; Deokar, M.; Kulkarni, G.; Lawande, A.; Kumar, P.; Karpuram, M.; Kumar, A.; Francis, J.; Kumbla, M.; Anthony, A.; Lavhe, P.; Kale, M.; Mardikar, H.; Bhaskarwar, P.; Mathur, A.; Sharma, P.; Menon, J.; Francis, V.; Namjoshi, D.; Shelke, S.; Narendra, J.; Natarajan, S.; Oomaan, A.; Gurusamy, P.; Angel, J.; Purayil, M. Padinhare; Shams, S.; Pandurangi, U.; Sababathi, R.; Parekh, P.; Jasani, B.; Patki, N.; Babbar, A.; Pinto, B.; Kharalkar, H.; Premchand, R.; Jambula, H.; Rao, M.; Vuriya, A.; Ravi Shankar, A.; Reddy, R.; Bekal, S.; Barai, A.; Saha, D.; Gadepalli, R.; Sant, H.; Jadhav, D.; Sarna, M.; Arora, T.; Sawhney, J.; Singh, R.; Sethi, K.; Bansal, N.; Sethia, A.; Sethia, S.; Shetty, G.; Sudheer, R.; Singh, G.; Gupta, R.; Srinivas, A.; Thankaraj, L.; Varma, S.; Kaur, A.; Vinod, M. Vijan; Thakur, B.; Zanwar, I.; Dharmarao, A.; Atar, S.; Lasri, E.; Dicker, D.; Marcoviciu, D.; Elias, M.; Ron, G. Avraham; Francis, A.; Ghantous, R.; Goldhaber, A.; Goldhaber, M.; Gottlieb, S.; Rouwaida, S.; Grossman, E.; Dagan, T.; Hasin, Y.; Roshrosh, M.; Hayek, T.; Majdoub, A.; Klainman, E.; Genin, I.; Lahav, M.; Gilat, T.; Ben Ari, M.; Lishner, M.; Karny, M.; Ouzan, E.; Givoni, H.; Rozenman, Y.; Logvinenko, S.; Schiff, E.; Sterlin, J.; Shochat, M.; Aloni, I.; Swissa, M.; Belatsky, V.; Tsalihin, D.; Kisos, D.; Zeltser, D.; Platner, N.; Berni, A.; Giovannelli, F.; Boriani, G.; Cervi, E.; Comi, G.; Peruzzotti, L.; Cuccia, C.; Forgione, C.; de Caterina, R.; de Pace, D.; de Servi, S.; Mariani, M.; Di Lenarda, A.; Mazzone, C.; Di Pasquale, G.; Di Niro, M.; Fattore, L.; Bosco, B.; Grassia, V.; Murena, E.; Laffi, N. N.; Gaggioli, G.; Lo Pinto, G.; Raggi, F.; Marino, P.; Francalacci, G.; Babbolin, M.; Bulgari, M.; Penco, M.; Lioy, E.; Perrone Filardi, P.; Marciano, C.; Pirelli, S.; Paradiso, G.; Piseddu, G.; Fenu, L.; Raisaro, A.; Granzow, K.; Rasura, M.; Cannoni, S.; Severi, S.; Breschi, M.; Toschi, V.; Gagliano, M.; Zacà, V.; Furiozzi, F.; Hirahara, T.; Akihisa, U.; Masaki, W.; Ajioka, M.; Matsushita, C.; Anzai, T.; Mino, K.; Arakawa, S.; Tsukimine, A.; Endo, H.; Fujiwara, M.; Fujii, K.; Kozeni, S.; Fujii, E.; Kotera, M.; Fujimoto, S.; Omae, K.; Fujimoto, K.; Ichishita, Y.; Fujita, T.; Ito, Y.; Fukamizu, S.; Harada, J.; Fukuda, N.; Fujimoto, C.; Funazaki, T.; Yamaguchi, A.; Furukawa, Y.; Kamitake, C.; Hagiwara, N.; Naganuma, M.; Hara, S.; Kumagai, S.; Harada, K.; Fuki, Y.; Haruna, T.; Nakahara, Y.; Hashimoto, Y.; Shimazu, Y.; Hiasa, Y.; Oga, Y.; Higashikata, T.; Nakagawa, Y.; Hirayama, A.; Kawaguchi, A.; Iesaka, Y.; Miyamoto, C.; Iijima, T.; Higuchi, K.; Ino, H.; Noguchi, H.; Inomata, T.; Nakamura, K.; Ishibashi, Y.; Nozaki, T.; Ishii, Y.; Tomita, H.; Ishimaru, S.; Ise, M.; Itamoto, K.; Ito, T.; Onishi, M.; Iwade, K.; Sakuma, Y.; Iwasaki, T.; Nagatome, H.; Kakinoki, S.; Adachi, C.; Kamakura, S.; Nakahara, F.; Kamijo, M.; Iida, S.; Kamiyama, K.; Fujii, R.; Kato, K.; Ishida, A.; Kazatani, Y.; Ichikawa, Y.; Kitazawa, H.; Igarashi, C.; Kobayashi, Y.; Kikuchi, R.; Kohno, M.; Tamura, S.; Yumoto, I.; Kurabayashi, M.; Koya, E.; Masuyama, T.; Kaneno, Y.; Matsuda, K.; Ebina, E.; Meno, H.; Satake, M.; Mita, T.; Takeda, M.; Miyamoto, N.; Kimizu, T.; Miyauchi, Y.; Sakamoto, S.; Munemasa, M.; Murata, J.; Nagai, Y.; Sakata, Y.; Naito, S.; Oyama, H.; Nishi, Y.; Nagase, T.; Ochiai, J.; Junko, H.; Ogawa, T.; Sugeno, M.; Oguro, H.; Tanabe, M.; Okada, K.; Moriyama, Y.; Okajima, K.; Nakashima, M.; Okazaki, O.; Wada, H.; Okishige, K.; Kitani, S.; Okumura, K.; Narita, Y.; Onaka, H.; Moriyama, H.; Ozaki, Y.; Tanikawa, I.; Sakagami, S.; Nakano, A.; Sakuragi, S.; Hayashi, N.; Sakurai, S.; Ooki, H.; Sasaki, T.; Oosawa, N.; Satoh, A.; Fujimoto, E.; Seino, Y.; Narumi, M.; Shirai, T.; Shigenari, M.; Shoji, Y.; Ueda, J.; Sugi, K.; Miyazaki, E.; Sumii, K.; Asakura, H.; Takagi, M.; Mohri, S.; Takahashi, W.; Yoshida, K.; Takahashi, A.; Kishi, N.; Takahashi, T.; Sakurai, Y.; Takeda, K.; Yahata, A.; Takenaka, T.; Yamagishi, K.; Takeuchi, S.; Watanabe, E.; Tanaka, K.; Uchida, M.; Tanouchi, J.; Nishiya, Y.; Tsuboi, H.; Tsuboi, N.; Terakura, K.; Uematsu, M.; Yasumoto, S.; Ueyama, Y.; Usuda, K.; Sakai, Y.; Yagi, M.; Sato, A.; Yagi, H.; Kuroda, T.; Yamabe, H.; Sakamoto, Y.; Yamada, T.; Yamano, R.; Yamagishi, T.; Sasaki, S.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yamashina, A.; Takiguchi, M.; Yonehara, T.; Yoshino, H.; Nomura, H.; Yoshioka, K.; Fujiwara, Y.; Bayram Llamas, E.; Hurtado, A.; Calvo Vargas, C.; Limon, M. Cedano; Cardona Muñoz, E.; Hernandez, S.; Carrillo, J.; Delgadillo, T.; Cásares Ramirez, M.; Valles, J. Franco; Garcia, N.; Colin, M. Alcantara; Garcia-Castillo, A.; Jaramillo, A.; Leiva-Pons, J.; de la Mora, S.; Llamas Esperón, G.; Grajales, A.; Mendez-Machado, G.; Avila, H.; Ruiz, L. Nevárez; Magallanes, G.; Sánchez Díaz, C.; Ortiz, A.; Sánchez, R. Velasco; Velazquez, E. Moran; Alhakim, M.; van Welsen, I.; Bruning, T.; Jones, A.; Buiks, C.; de Groot, J. [=Joris R.; Radder, I.; de Vos, R.; Hazeleger, R.; Daniels, R.; Kietselaer, B.; Muijs, L.; Mannaerts, H.; Kooiman, E.; Mevissen, H.; van der Heijden, D.; Hofmeyer, H.; Anscombe, R.; O'Meeghan, T.; Kjentjes, M.; Benatar, J.; Borthwick, L.; Doughty, R.; Copley, M.; Fisher, R.; Monkley, R.; Green, B.; Scott, D.; Hamer, A.; Tomlinson, J.; Hart, H.; Turner, A.; Cammell, R.; Troughton, R.; Skelton, L.; Young, C.; Kennett, K.; Claussen, H.; Hofsøy, K.; Melbue, R.; Sandvik, J.; Thunhaug, H.; Tveit, A.; Enger, S.; Bustamante, G.; Guillen, M. Tejada; Cabrera, J.; Mendoza, R. Esteves; Chavez, C.; Luna, C.; Lema, J.; Carrion, A.; Llerena, N.; Bedregal, S. Araoz; Medina Palomino, F.; Rodriguez, J.; Minchola, J.; Bautista, C.; Negron Miguel, S.; Armas, B. Honores; Rodriguez, A.; Romero, N.; Torres, P.; Rodriguez, K. Fernandez; Yanac Chavez, P.; Delgado, S.; Sambaz, C. M.; Barcinas, R.; Zapanta, M.; Coching, R.; Vallenas, M.; Matiga, G.; Enad, C.; Rogelio, G.; Joaquin, F.; Roxas, A.; Gilo, L.; To, R.; Aquino, M.; Villamor, L.; Nario, K.; Adamus, J.; Korzeniowska-Adamus, J.; Baszak, J.; Bronisz, M.; Cieslak, B.; Busz-Papiez, B.; Krzystolik, A.; Cymerman, K.; Dabrowska, M.; Ptak, A.; Derlaga, B.; Laskowska-Derlaga, E.; Domanska, E.; Guziewicz, M.; Gieroba, A.; Zajac, E.; Gniot, J.; Mroczkowski, P.; Januszewicz, A.; Makowiecka-Ciesla, M.; Jazwinska-Tarnawska, E.; Ciezak, P.; Jurowiecki, J.; Kaczmarek, B.; Pacholska, A.; Kaminski, L.; Kania, G.; Tymendorf, K.; Karczmarczyk, A.; Kaliszczak, R.; Konieczny, M.; Benicka, E.; Korzeniak, R.; Borowski, W.; Krzyzanowski, W.; Muzyk-Osikowicz, M.; Kus, W.; Lesnik, J.; Wierzykowski, T.; Lewczuk, J.; Stopyra-Poczatek, M.; Lubinski, A.; Szymanska, K.; Lysek, R.; Jaguszewska, G.; Matyszczak-Toniak, L.; Sznajder, R.; Wnetrzak-Michalska, R.; Kosmaczewska, A.; Mazur, S.; Chmielowski, A.; Miekus, P.; Kosmalska, K.; Mosiewicz, J.; Myslinski, W.; Napora, P.; Biniek, D.; Nessler, J.; Nessler, B.; Niezgoda, K.; Nej, A.; Nowak, J.; Olszewski, M.; Podjacka, D.; Janczewska, D.; Pogorzelska, H.; Polaszewska-Pulkownik, V.; Bojanowska, E.; Raczak, G.; Zienciuk-Krajka, A.; Rewinska, H.; Rozmyslowicz-Szerminska, W.; Ronkowski, R.; Norwa-Otto, B.; Sendrowski, D.; Spyra, J.; Szolkiewicz, M.; Malanska, A.; Turbak, R.; Wrobel, W.; Muzalewski, P.; Wysokinski, A.; Kudlicki, J.; Zarebinski, M.; Krauze, R.; Zielinski, M.; Nawrot, M.; Matias, F.; Correia, J.; Gil, V.; Lopes, S.; Madeira, J.; Maymone, D.; Martins, D.; Neves, E.; Monteiro, P.; Oliveira, D.; Marques, A. Leitao; Castro, C.; Salgado, A.; Gonçalves, A.; Sao Marcos, H.; Santos, O.; Nunes, L. 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Dachs; Villuendas, R.; Astier, L.; Appelros, P.; Åkerberg, A.; Blom, K. Berndtsson; Andersson, R.; Blomström, P.; Persson, L.; Carlsson, T.; Bengtsson, A. Stener; Dettmann, S.; Östberg, S.; Engdahl, J.; Karlsson, L.; Herlitz, J.; Winberg, L.; Jernhed, H.; Koskinen, P.; Håkansson, E.; Kozak, P.; Edlund, M.; Malmqvist, L.; Eriksson, G.; Randers, F.; Moodh, J.; Rautio, A.; Johansson, M.; Rönn, F.; Sundholm, C.; Stenberg, A.; Gunnarsson, A.; Thulin, J.; Broberg, M.; Slater, I. Petrova; Cheng, C. C.; Wu, W. S.; Chiang, C. E.; Yu, W. C.; Chiang, F. T.; Wu, Y. W.; Chiou, C. W.; Yeh, T. C.; Hsia, C. H.; Chen, Y. P.; Huang, J. L.; Chen, Y. F.; Kuo, C. T.; Wang, C. L.; Lai, W. T.; Lin, T. H.; Lee, J. T.; Pai, P. Y.; Lin, K. H.; Shyu, K. G.; Chiu, C. Z.; Tseng, W. K.; Pan, Y. F.; Ueng, K. C.; Lee, S. C.; Wang, J. H.; Tsai, W. C.; Yeh, H. I.; Kuo, J. 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Stagi; Landau, C.; Ferguson, D.; Lang, J.; Simmons, T.; Langevin, E.; Faucett, S.; Ledbetter, L.; Royse, H.; Lentz, M.; Smith, D.; Lesser, M.; Hartley, L.; Lewis, D.; Bonds, C.; Lillestol, M.; Miller, D.; Ling, L.; Murphy, R.; Littlefield, R.; Wofford, E.; Lomnitz, D.; Lone, B.; Davids, M.; Looby, R.; Ault, S.; Lui, H.; Wright, H.; Lurie, M.; Edelstein, J.; Macomber, J.; Bush, D.; Magee, A.; Doctor, A.; Mainigi, S.; Lisiecki, B.; Makam, S.; Casas, R.; Mandviwala, M.; Marar, I.; Rabadi-Marar, D.; Marenberg, M.; Bedenko, E.; Massin, E.; Hicks, T.; McCartney, M.; Stubbs, L.; McGarvey, J.; Schwarz, L.; McGuire, K.; McKenzie, M.; Rodkey, K.; McKnight, T.; Paul, J.; McLaurin, B.; Lack, A.; Mega, J.; Marti, J.; Meholick, A.; Skinner, J.; Mehrle, A.; Wall, J.; Mendelson, R.; Cervellione, K.; Mercado, A.; Cajulis, C.; Michlin, B.; Romero-Colon, J.; Milas, J.; Sanders, D.; Miller, R.; Sanchez, S.; Miller, S.; Gryczan, J.; Mody, F.; Strugatsky, S.; Moran, J.; Garner, S.; Morledge, J.; Bowman, B.; Mouhaffel, A.; Parrott, N.; Mounsey, P.; Schuler, C.; Mowdy, M.; Todd, S.; Mullen, P.; Raziano, S.; Murphy, A.; Oehmann, V.; Nadar, V.; Parker, A.; Naidu, J.; West, M.; Nallasivan, M.; Goza, J.; Nguyen, T.; Nomanee, S.; Nielsen, R.; Wilmot, M.; Oberoi, M.; Thakkar, N.; Oppenheimer, K.; McCormick, J.; Orchard, R.; Garcia, L.; Osborne, J.; Gonzalez, M.; Oza, S.; Joseph, L.; Patnam, S.; Dennison, K.; Pavon, H.; Gorry, N.; Pearlstein, R.; Montayne, S.; Pentz, W.; Duncan, D.; Peters, P.; Chacon, L.; Petruzziello, F.; Morlando, F.; Pettis, K.; Brown, F.; Pezzella, S.; Kirk, D.; Poulathas, A.; Cush, S.; Pratt, R.; Neeper, L.; Pribble, A.; Lowe, K.; Pudi, K.; Sham, L.; Pugeda, J.; Ebert, J.; Quadrel, M.; Rafla, E.; Quinlan, E.; Reed, C.; Quinn, J.; Hemmen, C.; Rama, P.; Domingo, D.; Redondo, V.; Wroblewski, J.; Renzi, M.; Stanley, E.; Richwine, R.; Pazier, P.; Riofrio, K.; Braun, D.; Robinson, J.; Cherrico, M.; Roehll, W.; Hollihan, P.; Rosado, N. N.; Barnhorst, M.; Rosado, J.; Bamhorst, M.; Rosen, R.; Martin, C.; Ross, S.; Freeman, R.; Ruoff, G.; Nelson, T.; Sacco, J.; Ball, E.; Samal, A.; Schomburg, J.; Sandberg, J.; Lafave, J.; Savin, V.; Clifton, R.; Schaefer, S.; Fekete, A.; Schneider, R.; Schneider, W.; Schulman, D.; Mercer, S.; Seals, A.; Ullig, T.; Holt, A.; Seide, H.; Mather, N.; Shah, G.; Witt, P.; Shalaby, A.; Seese, M.; Shanes, J.; Fleets, J.; Shaoulian, E.; Hren, A.; Sheikh, K.; Hengerer, T.; Shih, H.; Browning, J.; Shoukfeh, M.; Stephenson, L.; Siler, T.; Champagne, M.; Simpson, P.; Meyer, R.; Singh, N.; Turner, K.; Singh, V.; Nelson, M.; Skierka, R.; Hughes, B.; Keene, R.; Smith, R.; Hodnett, P.; Spangenthal, S.; Thomason, L.; Sperling, M.; Vasquez, E.; Spivack, E.; McCartney, P.; Staniloae, C.; Liu, M.; Steljes, A.; Cox, C.; Struble, R.; Vittitow, T.; Suresh, D.; Frost, J.; Swerchowsky, V.; Freemyer, D.; Szulawski, I.; Herwehe, S.; Tahirkheli, N.; Springer, K.; Takata, T.; Bruton, T.; Talano, J.; Leo, L.; Tami, L.; Corchado, D.; Tatarko, M.; Swauger, M.; Tawney, K.; Dastoli, K.; Teague, S.; Young, K.; tee, H.; Mitchell, T.; Teixeira, J.; Southam, D.; Torres, M.; Tucker, P.; Salas, L.; Updegrove, J.; Hanna, K.; Val-Mejias, J.; Harrelson, K. Gonzalez; Vemireddy, D.; Cardoza, T.; Verma, S.; Parsons, T.; Vicari, R.; Warren, K.; Vijay, N.; Washam, M.; Vossler, M.; Kilcup, S.; Walsh, R.; Renaud, K.; Ward, S.; Locklear, T.; Waxman, F.; Sanchez, G.; Weiss, R.; St Laurent, B.; Westcott, J.; Williams, D.; Gibson, C.; Williams, R.; Dowling, C.; Willis, J.; VonGerichten, S.; Wood, K.; Capasso-Gulve, E.; Worley, S.; Pointer, S.; Yarows, S.; Sheehan, T.; Yasin, M.; Yi, J.; Dongas, B.; Yousuf, K.; Zakhary, B.; Curtis, S.; Zeig, S.; Mason, T.; Zellner, C.; Harden, M.; Roper, E.; Waseem, M.; Grammer, M.

    2013-01-01

    BackgroundEdoxaban is a direct oral factor Xa inhibitor with proven antithrombotic effects. The long-term efficacy and safety of edoxaban as compared with warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation is not known. MethodsWe conducted a randomized, double-blind, double-dummy trial comparing two

  16. Management of atrial fibrillation in patients with heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neuberger, Hans-Ruprecht; Mewis, Christian; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Schotten, Ulrich; van Gelder, Isabelle C.; Allessie, Maurits A.; Boehm, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Atrial. fibrillation (AF) and chronic heart failure (CHF) are two major and even growing cardiovascular conditions that often coexist. However, few data are available to guide treatment of AF in patients with CHF. This review summarizes current literature concerning the following topics: (i)

  17. Prognostic importance of atrial fibrillation in asymptomatic aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anders; Gerdts, Eva; Boman, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The frequency and prognostic importance of atrial fibrillation (AF) in asymptomatic mild-to-moderate aortic stenosis (AS) has not been well described. METHODS: Clinical examination, electrocardiography and echocardiography were obtained in asymptomatic patients with mild-to-moderate A...

  18. Gene-gene Interaction Analyses for Atrial Fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Lin (Honghuang); M. Mueller-Nurasyid; A.V. Smith (Albert Vernon); D.E. Arking (Dan); J. Barnard (John); T.M. Bartz (Traci M.); K.L. Lunetta (Kathryn); K. Lohman (Kurt); M.E. Kleber (Marcus); S.A. Lubitz (Steven); Geelhoed, B. (Bastiaan); S. Trompet (Stella); M.N. Niemeijer (Maartje); T. Kacprowski (Tim); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); Klarin, D. (Derek); M.F. Sinner (Moritz); M. Waldenberger (Melanie); T. Meitinger (Thomas); T.B. Harris (Tamara); L.J. Launer (Lenore); E.Z. Soliman (Elsayed Z.); L. Chen (Lin); J.D. Smith (Jonathan); D.R. van Wagoner (David); Rotter, J.I. (Jerome I.); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); Xie, Z. (Zhijun); A.E. Hendricks (Audrey E.); Ding, J. (Jingzhong); G.E. Delgado (Graciela E.); N. Verweij (Niek); P. van der Harst (Pim); P.W. MacFarlane (Peter); I. Ford (Ian); A. Hofman (Albert); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); J. Heeringa (Jan); O.H. Franco (Oscar); J.A. Kors (Jan); Weiss, S. (Stefan); H. Völzke (Henry); L.M. Rose (Lynda); Natarajan, P. (Pradeep); S. Kathiresan (Sekar); S. Kääb (Stefan); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); A. Alonso (Alvaro); M.K. Chung (Mina); S.R. Heckbert (Susan); E.J. Benjamin (Emelia); Y. Liu (Yongmei); W. März (Winfried); S.A. Rienstra; J.W. Jukema (Jan Wouter); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno); M. Dörr (Marcus); C.M. Albert (Christine); P.T. Ellinor (Patrick)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractAtrial fibrillation (AF) is a heritable disease that affects more than thirty million individuals worldwide. Extensive efforts have been devoted to the study of genetic determinants of AF. The objective of our study is to examine the effect of gene-gene interaction on AF susceptibility.

  19. Gene-gene Interaction Analyses for Atrial Fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, Honghuang; Mueller-Nurasyid, Martina; Smith, Albert V.; Arking, Dan E.; Barnard, John; Bartz, Traci M.; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Lohman, Kurt; Kleber, Marcus E.; Lubitz, Steven A.; Geelhoed, Bastiaan; Trompet, Stella; Niemeijer, Maartje N.; Kacprowski, Tim; Chasman, Daniel I.; Klarin, Derek; Sinner, Moritz F.; Waldenberger, Melanie; Meitinger, Thomas; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Chen, Lin Y.; Smith, Jonathan D.; Van Wagoner, David R.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Xie, Zhijun; Hendricks, Audrey E.; Ding, Jingzhong; Delgado, Graciela E.; Verweij, Niek; van der Harst, Pim; Macfarlane, Peter W.; Ford, Ian; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre; Heeringa, Jan; Franco, Oscar H.; Kors, Jan A.; Weiss, Stefan; Volzke, Henry; Rose, Lynda M.; Natarajan, Pradeep; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kaab, Stefan; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Alonso, Alvaro; Chung, Mina K.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Liu, Yongmei; Marz, Winfried; Rienstra, Michiel; Jukema, J. Wouter; Stricker, Bruno H.; Dorr, Marcus; Albert, Christine M.; Ellinor, Patrick T.

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a heritable disease that affects more than thirty million individuals worldwide. Extensive efforts have been devoted to the study of genetic determinants of AF. The objective of our study is to examine the effect of gene-gene interaction on AF susceptibility. We performed

  20. Detection of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation in acute stroke patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rizos, T.; Rasch, C.; Jenetzky, E.; Hametner, C.; Kathoefer, S.; Reinhardt, R.; Hepp, T.; Hacke, W.; Veltkamp, R.

    2010-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a frequent cause of stroke, but detecting paroxysmal AF (pAF) poses a challenge. We investigated whether continuous bedside ECG monitoring in a stroke unit detects pAF more sensitively than 24-hour Holter ECG, and tested whether examining RR interval dynamics on

  1. Outcomes Associated With Familial Versus Nonfamilial Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundlund, A.; Olesen, J. B.; Staerk, L.

    2016-01-01

    Background-We examined all-cause mortality and long-term thromboembolic risk (ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack, systemic thromboembolism) in patients with and without familial atrial fibrillation (AF). Methods and Results-Using Danish nationwide registry data, we identified all patients...

  2. MRI screening for chronic anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark eFisher

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Anticoagulation is highly effective in preventing stroke due to atrial fibrillation, but numerous studies have demonstrated low utilization of anticoagulation for these patients. Assessment of clinicians’ attitudes on this topic indicate that fear of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH, rather than appreciation of anticoagulant benefits, largely drives clinical decision-making for treatment with anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation. Risk stratification strategies have been used for anticoagulation benefits and hemorrhage risk, but ICH is not specifically addressed in the commonly used hemorrhage risk stratification systems. Cerebral microbleeds are cerebral microscopic hemorrhages demonstrable by brain MRI, indicative of prior microhemorrhages, and predictive of future risk of ICH. Prevalence of cerebral microbleeds increases with age; and cross-sectional and limited prospective studies generally indicate that microbleeds confer substantial risk of ICH in patients treated with chronic anticoagulation. MRI thus is a readily available and appealing modality that can directly assess risk of future ICH in patients receiving anticoagulants for atrial fibrillation. Incorporation of MRI into routine practice is, however, fraught with difficulties, including the uncertain relationship between number and location of microbleeds and ICH risk, as well as cost-effectiveness of MRI. A proposed algorithm is provided, and relevant advantages and disadvantages are discussed. At present, MRI screening appears most appropriate for a subset of atrial fibrillation patients, such as those with intermediate stroke risk, and may provide reassurance for clinicians whose concerns for ICH tend to outweigh benefits of anticoagulation.

  3. Outcomes Associated With Familial Versus Nonfamilial Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundlund, Anna; Olesen, Jonas Bjerring; Staerk, Laila

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We examined all-cause mortality and long-term thromboembolic risk (ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack, systemic thromboembolism) in patients with and without familial atrial fibrillation (AF). METHODS AND RESULTS: Using Danish nationwide registry data, we identified all patients...

  4. Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, quality of life and neuroticism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Maarten; Ranchor, A.V.; van Sonderen, F.L.; van Gelder, I.C.; van Veldhuisen, D.J.

    Background: Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with significant impairment of quality of life (QoL), which is to a large extent independent of objective measures of disease severity. We sought to investigate the potential role of neuroticism in the impairment of QoL in patients with

  5. Exposure-Based Therapy for Symptom Preoccupation in Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Särnholm, Josefin; Skúladóttir, Helga; Rück, Christian

    2017-01-01

    with symptomatic paroxysmal (intermittent) atrial fibrillation who were assessed pre- and posttreatment and at 6-month follow-up. The CBT lasted 10 weeks and included exposure to physical sensations similar to AF symptoms, exposure to avoided situations or activities, and behavioral activation. We observed large...

  6. Quantifying Time in Atrial Fibrillation and the Need for Anticoagulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miyazawa, Kazuo; Pastori, Daniele; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2017-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is one of the major cardiovascular diseases, and the number of patients with AF is predicted to increase markedly in the coming years. Despite recent advance in management of patients with AF, AF remains one of the main causes of stroke or systemic embolism. Application o...

  7. Antithrombotic therapy in atrial fibrillation associated with valvular heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Collet, Jean Philippe; Caterina, Raffaele de

    2017-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a major worldwide public health problem, and AF in association with valvular heart disease (VHD) is also common. However, management strategies for this group of patients have been less informed by randomized trials, which have largely focused on 'non-valvular AF' pati...

  8. Prevalence and electrophysiological characteristics of typical atrial flutter in patients with atrial fibrillation and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Takekuni; Fukamizu, Seiji; Hojo, Rintaro; Komiyama, Kota; Tanabe, Yasuhiro; Tejima, Tamotsu; Nishizaki, Mitsuhiro; Hiraoka, Masayasu; Ako, Junya; Momomura, Shin-Ichi; Sakurada, Harumizu

    2013-12-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the important underlying diseases of atrial fibrillation (AF). However, the prevalence and electrophysiological characteristics of typical atrial flutter (AFL) in patients with AF and COPD remain unknown. The purpose of the present study was to investigate those characteristics. We investigated 181 consecutive patients who underwent catheter ablation of AF. Twenty-eight patients were diagnosed with COPD according to the Global Initiatives for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) criteria. Forty patients with no lung disease served as a control group. We analysed the electrophysiological characteristics in these groups. Typical AFL was more common in the COPD group (19/28, 68%) than in the non-COPD group (13/40, 33%; P = 0.006). The prevalence of AFL increased with the severity of COPD: 4 (50%) of 8 patients with GOLD1, 13 (72%) of 18 patients with GOLD2, and 2 (100%) of 2 patients with GOLD3. Atrial flutter cycle length and conduction time from the coronary sinus (CS) ostium to the low lateral right atrium (RA) during CS ostium pacing before and after the cavotricuspid isthmus ablation were significantly longer in the COPD group than in the non-COPD group (285 vs. 236, 71 vs. 53, 164 vs. 134 ms; P = 0.009, 0.03, 0.002, respectively). In COPD patients with AF, conduction time of RA was prolonged and typical AFL was commonly observed.

  9. Isolation of the posterior left atrium for patients with persistent atrial fibrillation: routine adenosine challenge for dormant posterior left atrial conduction improves long-term outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, Alex J A; Prabhu, Sandeep; Voskoboinik, Alex; Wong, Michael C G; Walters, Tomos E; Pathik, Bhupesh; Morris, Gwilym M; Nisbet, Ashley; Lee, Geoffrey; Morton, Joseph B; Kalman, Jonathan M; Kistler, Peter M

    2017-12-01

    Catheter ablation to achieve posterior left atrial wall (PW) isolation may be performed as an adjunct to pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation (AF). We aimed to determine whether routine adenosine challenge for dormant posterior wall conduction improved long-term outcome. A total of 161 patients with persistent AF (mean age 59 ± 9 years, AF duration 6 ± 5 years) underwent catheter ablation involving circumferential PVI followed by PW isolation. Posterior left atrial wall isolation was performed with a roof and inferior wall line with the endpoint of bidirectional block. In 54 patients, adenosine 15 mg was sequentially administered to assess reconnection of the pulmonary veins and PW. Sites of transient reconnection were ablated and adenosine was repeated until no further reconnection was present. Holter monitoring was performed at 6 and 12 months to assess for arrhythmia recurrence. Posterior left atrial wall isolation was successfully achieved in 91% of 161 patients (procedure duration 191 ± 49 min, mean RF time 40 ± 19 min). Adenosine-induced reconnection of the PW was demonstrated in 17%. The single procedure freedom from recurrent atrial arrhythmia was superior in the adenosine challenge group (65%) vs. no adenosine challenge (40%, P conduction was associated with an improvement in the success of catheter ablation for persistent AF.

  10. [Left atrial appendage in rheumatic mitral valve disease: The main source of embolism in atrial fibrillation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Villarreal, Ovidio A; Heredia-Delgado, José A

    To demonstrate that surgical removal of the left atrial appendage in patients with rheumatic mitral valve disease and long standing persistent atrial fibrillation decreases the possibility of stroke. This also removes the need for long-term oral anticoagulation after surgery. A descriptive, prospective, observational study was conducted on 27 adult patients with rheumatic mitral valve disease and long standing persistent atrial fibrillation, who had undergone mitral valve surgery and surgical removal of the left atrial appendage. Oral anticoagulation was stopped in the third month after surgery. The end-point was the absence of embolic stroke. An assessment was also made of postoperative embolism formation in the left atrium using transthoracic echocardiography. None of the patients showed embolic stroke after the third post-operative month. Only one patient exhibited transient ischaemic attack on warfarin therapy within the three postoperative months. Left atrial thrombi were also found in 11 (40.7%) cases during surgery. Of these, 6 (54.5%) had had embolic stroke, with no statistical significance (P=.703). This study suggests there might be signs that the left atrial appendage may be the main source of emboli in rheumatic mitral valve disease, and its resection could eliminate the risk of stroke in patients with rheumatic mitral valve disease and long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation. Copyright © 2016 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  11. Cost-effectiveness of a specialized atrial fibrillation clinic vs. usual care in patients with atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, Jeroen; Tomini, Florian; van Asselt, Thea; Crijns, Harry; Vrijhoef, Hubertus

    AIMS: A recent randomized controlled trial demonstrated significant reductions in cardiovascular hospitalizations and deaths with a nurse-led integrated chronic care approach in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) compared with usual care. The aim of the present study is to assess

  12. Cost-effectiveness of a specialized atrial fibrillation clinic vs. usual care in patients with atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, J.M.L.; Tomini, F.; van Asselt, A.D.I.; Crijns, H.J.G.M.; Vrijhoef, H.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Aims A recent randomized controlled trial demonstrated significant reductions in cardiovascular hospitalizations and deaths with a nurse-led integrated chronic care approach in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) compared with usual care. The aim of the present study is to assess

  13. Atrial fibrillation in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Crina; Bruley des Varannes, Stanislas; Muresan, Lucian; Picos, Alina; Dumitrascu, Dan L

    2014-07-28

    To analyze the potential relationship between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and the development of atrial fibrillation (AF). Using the key words "atrial fibrillation and gastroesophageal reflux", "atrial fibrillation and esophagitis, peptic", "atrial fibrillation and hernia, hiatal" the PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, OVIDSP, WILEY databases were screened for relevant publications on GERD and AF in adults between January 1972-December 2013. Studies written in languages other than English or French, studies not performed in humans, reviews, case reports, abstracts, conference presentations, letters to the editor, editorials, comments and opinions were not taken into consideration. Articles treating the subject of radiofrequency ablation of AF and the consecutive development of GERD were also excluded. Two thousand one hundred sixty-one titles were found of which 8 articles met the inclusion criteria. The presence of AF in patients with GERD was reported to be between 0.62%-14%, higher compared to those without GERD. Epidemiological data provided by these observational studies showed that patients with GERD, especially those with more severe GERD-related symptoms, had an increased risk of developing AF compared with those without GERD, but a causal relationship between GERD and AF could not be established based on these studies. The mechanisms of AF as a consequence of GERD remain largely unknown, with inflammation and vagal stimulation playing a possible role in the development of these disorders. Treatment with proton pomp inhibitors may improve symptoms related to AF and facilitate conversion to sinus rhythm. Although links between AF and GERD exist, large randomized clinical studies are required for a better understanding of the relationship between these two entities.

  14. The effect of activation rate on left atrial bipolar voltage in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Steven E; Linton, Nick; O'Neill, Louisa; Harrison, James; Whitaker, John; Mukherjee, Rahul; Rinaldi, Christopher A; Gill, Jaswinder; Niederer, Steven; Wright, Matthew; O'Neill, Mark

    2017-09-01

    Bipolar voltage is used during electroanatomic mapping to define abnormal myocardium, but the effect of activation rate on bipolar voltage is not known. We hypothesized that bipolar voltage may change in response to activation rate. By examining corresponding unipolar signals we sought to determine the mechanisms of such changes. LA extrastimulus mapping was performed during CS pacing in 10 patients undergoing first time paroxysmal atrial fibrillation ablation. Bipolar and unipolar electrograms were recorded using a PentaRay catheter (4-4-4 spacing) and indifferent IVC electrode, respectively. An S1S2 pacing protocol was delivered with extrastimulus coupling interval reducing from 350 to 200 milliseconds. At each recording site (119 ± 37 per LA), bipolar peak-to-peak voltage, unipolar peak to peak voltage and activation delay between unipole pairs was measured. Four patterns of bipolar voltage/extrastimulus coupling interval curves were seen: voltage attenuation with plateau voltage >1 mV (48 ± 15%) or voltage unaffected by coupling interval with plateau voltage >1 mV (17 ± 10%) or voltage attenuation were associated with significantly greater unipolar voltage attenuation at low (25 ± 28 mV/s vs. 9 ± 11 mV/s) and high (23 ± 29 mV/s vs. 6 ± 12 mV/s) plateau voltage sites (P voltage attenuation (P = 0.026). Bipolar electrogram voltage is dependent on activation rate at a significant proportion of sites. Changes in unipolar voltage and timing underlie these effects. These observations have important implications for use of voltage mapping to delineate abnormal atrial substrate. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Structural and functional characteristics of myocard in patients with different forms of atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. I. Vasilyeva

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study structural and functional characteristics of myocard in patients with different forms of atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation is the most prevalent arrhythmia in clinical practice. Atrial fibrillation is a progressive disease: the duration of paroxysms increases over time and paroxysmal atrial fibrillation transforms to persistent, the last one becomes refractory to pharmacological and electrical cardioversion in time and transforms to permanent. So assessment of myocardial remodeling in patients with persistent and permanent atrial fibrillation is very actual. Methods and results. According to the aim of the study 133 patients with persistent atrial fibrillation and 100 patients with permanent atrial fibrillation were included into the study. Echocardiographic parameters of left and right atria function were studied. Conclusion. It was found that patients with persistent and permanent atrial fibrillation are characterized with both left and right atrias remodeling. Remodeling of the atrias is less pronounced in patients with permanent atrial fibrillation in comparison with persistent atrial fibrillation patients and arrhythmia recurrence.

  16. [Low energy transcatheter atrial defibrillation in one patient with refractory atrial fibrillation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asenjo, R; Morris, R; Llancaqueo, M; Lopetegui, M; Marín, G; Morales, P

    1998-03-01

    Most cases of atrial fibrillation are converted with antiarrhythmic medications or external electric defibrillation. However, in some refractory patients, an internal transcatheter defibrillation must be attempted. We report a 50 years old male with an atrial fibrillation of one year duration that was refractory to pharmacological treatment and in whom external cardioversion was unsuccessful. After the application of a bifasic shock of 10 joules between a catheter in the right atrium and another one located at the coronary sinus, the patient was converted to sinus rhythm. At two months of follow up, the patient continues in sinus rhythm.

  17. Time to implement fitness and reduction of fatness in atrial fibrillation therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Gelder, Isabelle C.; Hobbelt, Anne H.; Brugemann, Johan; Rienstra, Michiel

    This editorial refers to ‘Self-reported physical activity and major adverse events in patients with atrial fibrillation: a report from the EURObservational Research Programme Pilot Survey on Atrial Fibrillation (EORP-AF) General Registry’ by M. Proietti et al. , doi:10.1093/europace/euw150. Atrial

  18. Antiarrhythmics for maintaining sinus rhythm after cardioversion of atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafuente-Lafuente, Carmelo; Valembois, Lucie; Bergmann, Jean-François; Belmin, Joël

    2015-03-28

    Atrial fibrillation is the most frequent sustained arrhythmia. Atrial fibrillation frequently recurs after restoration of normal sinus rhythm. Antiarrhythmic drugs have been widely used to prevent recurrence, but the effect of these drugs on mortality and other clinical outcomes is unclear. This is an update of a review previously published in 2008 and 2012. To determine in patients who have recovered sinus rhythm after having atrial fibrillation, the effects of long-term treatment with antiarrhythmic drugs on death, stroke, embolism, drug adverse effects and recurrence of atrial fibrillation. We updated the searches of CENTRAL in The Cochrane Library (2013, Issue 12 of 12), MEDLINE (to January 2014) and EMBASE (to January 2014). The reference lists of retrieved articles, recent reviews and meta-analyses were checked. Two independent authors selected randomised controlled trials comparing any antiarrhythmic drug with a control (no treatment, placebo, drugs for rate control) or with another antiarrhythmic drug in adults who had atrial fibrillation and in whom sinus rhythm was restored. Post-operative atrial fibrillation was excluded. Two authors independently assessed quality and extracted data. Studies were pooled, if appropriate, using Peto odds ratio (OR). All results were calculated at one year of follow-up. In this update three new studies, with 534 patients, were included making a total of 59 included studies comprising 21,305 patients. All included studies were randomised controlled trials. Allocation concealment was adequate in 17 trials, it was unclear in the remaining 42 trials. Risk of bias was assessed in all domains only in the trials included in this update.Compared with controls, class IA drugs quinidine and disopyramide (OR 2.39, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.03 to 5.59, number needed to treat to harm (NNTH) 109, 95% CI 34 to 4985) and sotalol (OR 2.23, 95% CI 1.1 to 4.50, NNTH 169, 95% CI 60 to 2068) were associated with increased all

  19. Very early-onset lone atrial fibrillation patients have a high prevalence of rare variants in genes previously associated with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Morten S; Andreasen, Laura; Jabbari, Javad

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia. Currently, 14 genes important for ion channel function, intercellular signalling, and homeostatic control have been associated with AF.......Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia. Currently, 14 genes important for ion channel function, intercellular signalling, and homeostatic control have been associated with AF....

  20. Rapid growth of left atrial myxoma after radiofrequency ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio Alvarez, José; Martinez de Alegria, Anxo; Sierra Quiroga, Juan; Adrio Nazar, Belen; Rubio Taboada, Carola; Martinez Comendador, José Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Atrial myxoma is the most common benign tumor of the heart, but its appearance after radiofrequency ablation is very rare. We report a case in which an asymptomatic, rapidly growing cardiac myxoma arose in the left atrium after radiofrequency ablation. Two months after the procedure, cardiovascular magnetic resonance, performed to evaluate the right ventricular anatomy, revealed a 10 × 10-mm mass (assumed to be a thrombus) attached to the patient's left atrial septum. Three months later, transthoracic echocardiography revealed a larger mass, and the patient was diagnosed with myxoma. Two days later, a 20 × 20-mm myxoma weighing 37 g was excised. To our knowledge, the appearance of an atrial myxoma after radiofrequency ablation has been reported only once before. Whether tumor development is related to such ablation or is merely a coincidence is uncertain, but myxomas have developed after other instances of cardiac trauma.

  1. Acute Chest Pain and Broad Complex Tachycardia. A Non-typical Case of Pre-excited Atrial Fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Arias, Ramon Suarez; Villanueva, Nuria Perez; Cubero, Gustavo Iglesias; Lopez, Jose Rubin

    2011-01-01

    Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome is a common condition in the emergency department. A case is presented of a 76-year-old patient with acute chest pain and broad complex tachycardia. Despite the fact that previous and post cardioversion ECG tracings in sinus rhythm showed no signs of pre-excitation, the characteristic pattern of pre-excited atrial fibrillation (AF) is recognized and after successful DC cardioversion the patient is referred for cathet