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Sample records for atp-dependent nucleosome translocation

  1. Multiple aspects of atp-dependent nucleosome translocation by rsc and mi-2 are directed by the underlying DNA sequence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vugt, J. van; Jager, M. de; Murawska, M.; Brehm, A.; Noort, J. van; Logie, C.

    2009-01-01

    Background Chromosome structure, DNA metabolic processes and cell type identity can all be affected by changing the positions of nucleosomes along chromosomal DNA, a reaction that is catalysed by SNF2-type ATP-driven chromatin remodelers. Recently it was suggested that in vivo, more than 50% of the

  2. ATP-Dependent Chromatin Remodeling Factors and Their Roles in Affecting Nucleosome Fiber Composition

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    Alexandra Lusser

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors of the SNF2 family are key components of the cellular machineries that shape and regulate chromatin structure and function. Members of this group of proteins have broad and heterogeneous functions ranging from controlling gene activity, facilitating DNA damage repair, promoting homologous recombination to maintaining genomic stability. Several chromatin remodeling factors are critical components of nucleosome assembly processes, and recent reports have identified specific functions of distinct chromatin remodeling factors in the assembly of variant histones into chromatin. In this review we will discuss the specific roles of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors in determining nucleosome composition and, thus, chromatin fiber properties.

  3. Effects of nucleotides on ATP-dependent protein translocation into Escherichia coli membrane vesicles.

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    Chen, L.; Tai, P C

    1986-01-01

    We have shown previously that Escherichia coli can translocate the same protein either co- or posttranslationally and that ATP hydrolysis is essential for the posttranslational translocation of the precursors of alkaline phosphatase and OmpA protein into inverted E. coli membrane vesicles. ATP-dependent protein translocation has now been further characterized. In the absence of exogenous Mg2+, dATP, formycin A-5'-triphosphate, ATP-alpha-S, and N1-oxide-ATP could replace ATP, but many other nu...

  4. Phosphatidylserine translocation to the mitochondrion is an ATP-dependent process in permeabilized animal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells were pulse labeled with [3H]serine, and the synthesis of phosphatidyl[3H]ethanolamine from phosphatidyl[3H]serine during the subsequent chase was used as a measure of lipid translocation to the mitochondria. When the CHO-K1 cells were pulse labeled and subsequently permeabilized with 50 μg of saponin per ml, there was no significant turnover of nascent phosphatidyl[3H]serine to form phosphatidyl[3H]ethanolamine during an ensuring chase. Supplementation of the permeabilized cells with 2 mM ATP resulted in significant phosphatidyl[3H]ethanolamine synthesis (83% of that found in intact cells) from phosphatidyl[3H]serine during a subsequent 2-hr chase. Phosphatidyl[3H]ethanolamine synthesis essentially ceased after 2 hr in the permeabilized cells. The translocation-dependent synthesis of phosphatidyl[3H]ethanolamine was a saturable process with respect to ATP concentration in permeabilized cells. The conversion of phosphatidyl[3H]serine to phosphatidyl[3H]ethanolamine did not occur in saponin-treated cultures supplemented with 2 mM AMP, 2 mM 5'-adenylyl imidodiphosphate, or apyrase plus 2 mM ATP. ATP was the most effective nucleotide, but the addition of GTP, CTP, UTP, and ADP also supported the translocation-dependent synthesis of phosphatidyl[3H]ethanolamine albeit to a lesser extent. These data provide evidence that the interorganelle translocation of phosphatidylserine requires ATP and is largely independent of soluble cytosolic proteins

  5. Phosphatidylserine translocation to the mitochondrion is an ATP-dependent process in permeabilized animal cells

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    Voelker, D.R. (National Jewish Center for Immunology and Respiratory Medicine, Denver, CO (USA))

    1989-12-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells were pulse labeled with ({sup 3}H)serine, and the synthesis of phosphatidyl({sup 3}H)ethanolamine from phosphatidyl({sup 3}H)serine during the subsequent chase was used as a measure of lipid translocation to the mitochondria. When the CHO-K1 cells were pulse labeled and subsequently permeabilized with 50 {mu}g of saponin per ml, there was no significant turnover of nascent phosphatidyl({sup 3}H)serine to form phosphatidyl({sup 3}H)ethanolamine during an ensuring chase. Supplementation of the permeabilized cells with 2 mM ATP resulted in significant phosphatidyl({sup 3}H)ethanolamine synthesis (83% of that found in intact cells) from phosphatidyl({sup 3}H)serine during a subsequent 2-hr chase. Phosphatidyl({sup 3}H)ethanolamine synthesis essentially ceased after 2 hr in the permeabilized cells. The translocation-dependent synthesis of phosphatidyl({sup 3}H)ethanolamine was a saturable process with respect to ATP concentration in permeabilized cells. The conversion of phosphatidyl({sup 3}H)serine to phosphatidyl({sup 3}H)ethanolamine did not occur in saponin-treated cultures supplemented with 2 mM AMP, 2 mM 5{prime}-adenylyl imidodiphosphate, or apyrase plus 2 mM ATP. ATP was the most effective nucleotide, but the addition of GTP, CTP, UTP, and ADP also supported the translocation-dependent synthesis of phosphatidyl({sup 3}H)ethanolamine albeit to a lesser extent. These data provide evidence that the interorganelle translocation of phosphatidylserine requires ATP and is largely independent of soluble cytosolic proteins.

  6. Phosphatidylserine translocation to the mitochondrion is an ATP-dependent process in permeabilized animal cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Voelker, D R

    1989-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells were pulse labeled with [3H]serine, and the synthesis of phosphatidyl[3H]ethanolamine from phosphatidyl[3H]serine during the subsequent chase was used as a measure of lipid translocation to the mitochondria. When the CHO-K1 cells were pulse labeled and subsequently permeabilized with 50 micrograms of saponin per ml, there was no significant turnover of nascent phosphatidyl[3H]serine to form phosphatidyl[3H]ethanolamine during an ensuing chase. Saponin trea...

  7. ATP independent and ATP dependent chromatin remodeling in wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unraveling the biochemistry of chromatin dynamics during DNA replication, repair, recombination as well as transcription is the current challenge in biology. The nucleosomes containing histone octamer are the crucial elements responsible for winding and unwinding eukaryotic DNA. During DNA centric events, these nucleosomes translocate along the DNA with concomitant covalent modifications of histones. We explored these mechanisms in wheat seedlings after irradiation with survivable dose of 60Co-γ radiations. The histones isolated from irradiated seedlings showed that global acetylation of H3 decreased and H4 increased in dose depend manner till 100 grays. Time course of individual modifications showed that for H3K4 and H3K9 acetylation decreased, whereas H3S10, phosphorylation increased. There were fluctuations in acetylation of H4K5, H4K12 and H4K16, whereas H4K8 showed hyperacetylation. We found ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling activity as trans-transfer of the nucleosomes from wheat native donor chromatin on a labeled nucleosome positioning sequence and cis-transfer of the mononucleosomes in vitro. However, there was no significant change in this activity in extracts obtained from irradiated wheat seedlings. This is the first report on, demonstration of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling activity and site specific H3 and H4 modifications in response to exposure to ionizing radiation in case of plants. (author)

  8. Protein targeting to ATP-dependent proteases

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    Inobe, Tomonao; Matouschek, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    ATP-dependent proteases control diverse cellular processes by degrading specific regulatory proteins. Understanding how these regulatory proteins are targeted to ATP-dependent proteases is of central importance to understanding their biological role as regulators. Recent work has shown that protein substrates are specifically transferred to ATP-dependent proteases through different routes. These routes can function in parallel or independently. In all of these targeting mechanisms it can be u...

  9. ATP-dependent protease in maize mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ATP-dependent protease was identified in the matrix of Zea mays L. Sachara mitochondria. 14C-methylated casein has been used as a substrate, and the matrix ATP-dependent protease exhibited similar sensitivity towards specific inhibitors as the Lon protease from E. coli nd analogues from rat liver and yeast mitochondria. Here we report the existence of Lon like ATP-dependent protease in intact mitochondria prepared from 4-days-old epicotyls of Zea mays L. seedling. Enzyme has been purified from Lubrol treated mitochondria using ion exchange chromatography and gel filtration. The enzyme activity has been estimated using 14C-methylated casein as a substrate and sensitivity of the protease towards the specific inhibitors has been tested. ATP-dependent protease from the mitochondrial matrix of maize exhibit similar sensitivity to the above mentioned inhibitors like Lon protease from yeast and rat liver mitochondria as well as from E. coli. (authors)

  10. Baculoviruses and nucleosome management

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    Volkman, Loy E., E-mail: lvolkman@berkeley.edu

    2015-02-15

    Negatively-supercoiled-ds DNA molecules, including the genomes of baculoviruses, spontaneously wrap around cores of histones to form nucleosomes when present within eukaryotic nuclei. Hence, nucleosome management should be essential for baculovirus genome replication and temporal regulation of transcription, but this has not been documented. Nucleosome mobilization is the dominion of ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes. SWI/SNF and INO80, two of the best-studied complexes, as well as chromatin modifier TIP60, all contain actin as a subunit. Retrospective analysis of results of AcMNPV time course experiments wherein actin polymerization was blocked by cytochalasin D drug treatment implicate actin-containing chromatin modifying complexes in decatenating baculovirus genomes, shutting down host transcription, and regulating late and very late phases of viral transcription. Moreover, virus-mediated nuclear localization of actin early during infection may contribute to nucleosome management. - Highlights: • Baculoviruses have negatively-supercoiled, circular ds DNA. • Negatively-supercoiled DNA spontaneously forms nucleosomes in the nucleus. • Nucleosomes must be mobilized for replication and transcription to proceed. • Actin-containing chromatin modifiers participate in baculovirus replication.

  11. Two distinct modes of nucleosome modulation associated with different degrees of dependence of nucleosome positioning on the underlying DNA sequence

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    Wang Jiang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nucleosome is the fundamental unit of eukaryotic genomes. Its positioning plays a central role in diverse cellular processes that rely on access to genomic DNA. Experimental evidence suggests that the genomic DNA sequence is one important determinant of nucleosome positioning. Yet it is less clear whether the role of the underlying DNA sequence in nucleosome positioning varies across different promoters. Whether different determinants of nucleosome positioning have characteristic influences on nucleosome modulation also remains to be elucidated. Results We identified two typical promoter classes in yeast associated with high or low dependence of nucleosome positioning on the underlying DNA sequence, respectively. Importantly, the two classes have low or high intrinsic sequence preferences for nucleosomes, respectively. The two classes are further distinguished by multiple promoter features, including nucleosome occupancy, nucleosome fuzziness, H2A.Z occupancy, changes in nucleosome positions before and after transcriptional perturbation, and gene activity. Both classes have significantly high turnover rates of histone H3, but employ distinct modes of nucleosome modulation: The first class is characterized by hyperacetylation, whereas the second class is highly regulated by ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling. Conclusion Our results, coupled with the known features of nucleosome modulation, suggest that the two distinct modes of nucleosome modulation selectively employed by different genes are linked with the intrinsic sequence preferences for nucleosomes. The difference in modes of nucleosome modulation can account for the difference in the contribution of DNA sequence to nucleosome positioning between both promoter classes.

  12. Nucleosome dynamics during chromatin remodeling in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Srinivas; Henikoff, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Precise positioning of nucleosomes around regulatory sites is achieved by the action of chromatin remodelers, which use the energy of ATP to slide, evict or change the composition of nucleosomes. Chromatin remodelers act to bind nucleosomes, disrupt histone-DNA interactions and translocate the DNA around the histone core to reposition nucleosomes. Hence, remodeling is expected to involve nucleosomal intermediates with a structural organization that is distinct from intact nucleosomes. We describe the identification of a partially unwrapped nucleosome structure using methods that map histone-DNA contacts genome-wide. This alternative nucleosome structure is likely formed as an intermediate or by-product during nucleosome remodeling by the RSC complex. Identification of the loss of histone-DNA contacts during chromatin remodeling by RSC in vivo has implications for the regulation of transcriptional initiation. PMID:26933790

  13. Genome-wide analysis of interactions between ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling and histone modifications

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    Wang Jiang

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling and the covalent modification of histones play central roles in determining chromatin structure and function. Although several specific interactions between these two activities have been elaborated, the global landscape remains to be elucidated. Results In this paper, we have developed a computational method to generate the first genome-wide landscape of interactions between ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling and the covalent modification of histones in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our method succeeds in identifying known interactions and uncovers many previously unknown interactions between these two activities. Analysis of the genome-wide picture revealed that transcription-related modifications tend to interact with more chromatin remodelers. Our results also demonstrate that most chromatin remodeling-modification interactions act via interactions of remodelers with both histone-modifying enzymes and histone residues. We also found that the co-occurrence of both modification and remodeling has significantly different influences on multiple gene features (e.g. nucleosome occupancy compared with the presence of either one. Conclusion We gave the first genome-wide picture of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling-histone modification interactions. We also revealed how these two activities work together to regulate chromatin structure and function. Our results suggest that distinct strategies for regulating chromatin activity are selectively employed by genes with different properties.

  14. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling in the DNA-damage response

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    Lans Hannes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The integrity of DNA is continuously challenged by metabolism-derived and environmental genotoxic agents that cause a variety of DNA lesions, including base alterations and breaks. DNA damage interferes with vital processes such as transcription and replication, and if not repaired properly, can ultimately lead to premature aging and cancer. Multiple DNA pathways signaling for DNA repair and DNA damage collectively safeguard the integrity of DNA. Chromatin plays a pivotal role in regulating DNA-associated processes, and is itself subject to regulation by the DNA-damage response. Chromatin influences access to DNA, and often serves as a docking or signaling site for repair and signaling proteins. Its structure can be adapted by post-translational histone modifications and nucleosome remodeling, catalyzed by the activity of ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes. In recent years, accumulating evidence has suggested that ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes play important, although poorly characterized, roles in facilitating the effectiveness of the DNA-damage response. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the involvement of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling in three major DNA repair pathways: nucleotide excision repair, homologous recombination, and non-homologous end-joining. This shows that a surprisingly large number of different remodeling complexes display pleiotropic functions during different stages of the DNA-damage response. Moreover, several complexes seem to have multiple functions, and are implicated in various mechanistically distinct repair pathways.

  15. Roles of histones and nucleosomes in gene transcription

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews the latest research developments in the field of eukaryotic gene regulation by the structural alterations of chromatin and nucleosomes. The following issues are briefly addressed: (ⅰ) nucleosome and histone modifications by both the ATP-dependent remodel- ing com-plexes and the histone acetyltransferases and their roles in gene activation; (ⅱ) competitive binding of histones and transcription factors on gene promoters, and transcription repression by nucleosomes; and (ⅲ) influences of linker histone H1 on gene regulation. Meanwhile, the significance and impact of these new research progresses, as well as issues worthwhile for further study are commented.

  16. Dynamic nucleosome organization at hox promoters during zebrafish embryogenesis.

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    Steven E Weicksel

    Full Text Available Nucleosome organization at promoter regions plays an important role in regulating gene activity. Genome-wide studies in yeast, flies, worms, mammalian embryonic stem cells and transformed cell lines have found well-positioned nucleosomes flanking a nucleosome depleted region (NDR at transcription start sites. This nucleosome arrangement depends on DNA sequence (cis-elements as well as DNA binding factors and ATP-dependent chromatin modifiers (trans-factors. However, little is understood about how the nascent embryonic genome positions nucleosomes during development. This is particularly intriguing since the embryonic genome must undergo a broad reprogramming event upon fusion of sperm and oocyte. Using four stages of early embryonic zebrafish development, we map nucleosome positions at the promoter region of 37 zebrafish hox genes. We find that nucleosome arrangement at the hox promoters is a progressive process that takes place over several stages. At stages immediately after fertilization, nucleosomes appear to be largely disordered at hox promoter regions. At stages after activation of the embryonic genome, nucleosomes are detectable at hox promoters, with positions becoming more uniform and more highly occupied. Since the genomic sequence is invariant during embryogenesis, this progressive change in nucleosome arrangement suggests that trans-factors play an important role in organizing nucleosomes during embryogenesis. Separating hox genes into expressed and non-expressed groups shows that expressed promoters have better positioned and occupied nucleosomes, as well as distinct NDRs, than non-expressed promoters. Finally, by blocking the retinoic acid-signaling pathway, we disrupt early hox gene transcription, but observe no effect on nucleosome positions, suggesting that active hox transcription is not a driving force behind the arrangement of nucleosomes at the promoters of hox genes during early development.

  17. Structural studies on Helicobacter pylori ATP-dependent protease, FtsH

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    Kim, Sung Hyun; Kang, Gil Bu; Song, Hye-Eun; Park, Sang Jin; Bea, Man-Ho; Eom, Soo Hyun, E-mail: eom@gist.ac.kr [Department of Life Science, Cell Dynamics Research Center, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-01

    The crystal structures of the Helicobacter pylori FtsH ATPase domain in the nucleotide-free state and complexed with ADP have been determined. The ATP-dependent protease, FtsH, degrades misassembled membrane proteins for quality control like SecY, subunit a of FoF1-ATPase, and YccA, and digests short-lived soluble proteins in order to control their cellular regulation, including σ32, LpxC and λcII. The FtsH protein has an N-terminal transmembrane segment and a large cytosolic region that consists of two domains, an ATPase and a protease domain. To provide a structural basis for the nucleotide-dependent domain motions and a better understanding of substrate translocation, the crystal structures of the Helicobacter pylori (Hp) FtsH ATPase domain in the nucleotide-free state and complexed with ADP, were determined. Two different structures of HpFtsH ATPase were observed, with the nucleotide-free state in an asymmetric unit, and these structures reveal the new forms and show other conformational differences between the nucleotide-free and ADP-bound state compared with previous structures. In particular, one HpFtsH Apo structure has a considerable rotation difference compared with the HpFtsH ADP complex, and this large conformational change reveals that FtsH may have the mechanical force needed for substrate translocation.

  18. Structural studies on Helicobacter pylori ATP-dependent protease, FtsH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystal structures of the Helicobacter pylori FtsH ATPase domain in the nucleotide-free state and complexed with ADP have been determined. The ATP-dependent protease, FtsH, degrades misassembled membrane proteins for quality control like SecY, subunit a of FoF1-ATPase, and YccA, and digests short-lived soluble proteins in order to control their cellular regulation, including σ32, LpxC and λcII. The FtsH protein has an N-terminal transmembrane segment and a large cytosolic region that consists of two domains, an ATPase and a protease domain. To provide a structural basis for the nucleotide-dependent domain motions and a better understanding of substrate translocation, the crystal structures of the Helicobacter pylori (Hp) FtsH ATPase domain in the nucleotide-free state and complexed with ADP, were determined. Two different structures of HpFtsH ATPase were observed, with the nucleotide-free state in an asymmetric unit, and these structures reveal the new forms and show other conformational differences between the nucleotide-free and ADP-bound state compared with previous structures. In particular, one HpFtsH Apo structure has a considerable rotation difference compared with the HpFtsH ADP complex, and this large conformational change reveals that FtsH may have the mechanical force needed for substrate translocation

  19. Role of nucleosome remodeling in neurodevelopmental and intellectual disability disorders

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    Alberto J Lopez

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available It is becoming increasingly important to understand how epigenetic mechanisms control gene expression during neurodevelopment. Two epigenetic mechanisms that have received considerable attention are DNA methylation and histone acetylation. Human exome sequencing and genome-wide association studies have linked several neurobiological disorders to genes whose products actively regulate DNA methylation and histone acetylation. More recently, a third major epigenetic mechanism, nucleosome remodeling, has been implicated in human developmental and intellectual disability disorders. Nucleosome remodeling is driven primarily through nucleosome remodeling complexes with specialized ATP-dependent enzymes. These enzymes directly interact with DNA or chromatin structure, as well as histone subunits, to restructure the shape and organization of nucleosome positioning to ultimately regulate gene expression. Of particular interest is the neuron-specific Brg1/hBrm Associated Factor (nBAF complex. Mutations in nBAF subunit genes have so far been linked to Coffin-Siris syndrome, Nicolaides-Baraitser syndrome, schizophrenia, and Autism Spectrum Disorder. Together, these human developmental and intellectual disability disorders are powerful examples of the impact of epigenetic modulation on gene expression. This review focuses on the new and emerging role of nucleosome remodeling in neurodevelopmental and intellectual disability disorders and whether nucleosome remodeling affects gene expression required for cognition independently of its role in regulating gene expression required for development.

  20. Nucleosome dynamics: Sequence matters.

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    Eslami-Mossallam, Behrouz; Schiessel, Helmut; van Noort, John

    2016-06-01

    About three quarter of all eukaryotic DNA is wrapped around protein cylinders, forming nucleosomes. Even though the histone proteins that make up the core of nucleosomes are highly conserved in evolution, nucleosomes can be very different from each other due to posttranslational modifications of the histones. Another crucial factor in making nucleosomes unique has so far been underappreciated: the sequence of their DNA. This review provides an overview of the experimental and theoretical progress that increasingly points to the importance of the nucleosomal base pair sequence. Specifically, we discuss the role of the underlying base pair sequence in nucleosome positioning, sliding, breathing, force-induced unwrapping, dissociation and partial assembly and also how the sequence can influence higher-order structures. A new view emerges: the physical properties of nucleosomes, especially their dynamical properties, are determined to a large extent by the mechanical properties of their DNA, which in turn depends on DNA sequence. PMID:26896338

  1. The influence of ATP-dependent proteases on a variety of nucleoid-associated processes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ambro, L.; Pevala, V.; Bauer, J.; Kutejová, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 179, č. 2 (2012), s. 181-192. ISSN 1047-8477 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : ATP-dependent proteases * Lon * ClpAP Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.361, year: 2012

  2. In vitro association of mitochondrial ATP-dependent protease with mitochondrial heat-shock proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specific antibodies against the mitochondrial ATP-dependent protease and heat-shock proteins were used to study the association of these proteins with an abnormal bacterial protein, CRAG. It was shown that the mitochondrial ATP-dependent protease from rat liver and Zajdela hepatoma bind to the CRAG protein and that this binding was mediated through the heat-shock proteins. It was also demonstrated that the protease associated with heat-shock proteins is capable of degrading large proteins as well as small peptides in an ATP-dependent fashion. Zajdela hepatoma mitochondria, with enhanced mitochondrial proteolysis, were shown to contain more ATP-dependent protease associated with heat-shock proteins. (author)

  3. Nucleosome Positioning and Epigenetics

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    Schwab, David; Bruinsma, Robijn

    2008-03-01

    The role of chromatin structure in gene regulation has recently taken center stage in the field of epigenetics, phenomena that change the phenotype without changing the DNA sequence. Recent work has also shown that nucleosomes, a complex of DNA wrapped around a histone octamer, experience a sequence dependent energy landscape due to the variation in DNA bend stiffness with sequence composition. In this talk, we consider the role nucleosome positioning might play in the formation of heterochromatin, a compact form of DNA generically responsible for gene silencing. In particular, we discuss how different patterns of nucleosome positions, periodic or random, could either facilitate or suppress heterochromatin stability and formation.

  4. Clathrin-coated vesicles contain an ATP-dependent proton pump.

    OpenAIRE

    Forgac, M; Cantley, L; Wiedenmann, B; Altstiel, L; Branton, D

    1983-01-01

    Clathrin-coated vesicles isolated from calf brain contain an ATP-dependent proton pump. Proton movement was monitored by measuring [14C]methylamine distribution. Addition of Mg2+ and ATP to coated vesicles equilibrated with [14C]methylamine resulted in the generation of a 4- to 5-fold concentration gradient, corresponding to a delta pH of 0.6-0.7 units between the medium and the acidic inside of the coated vesicles. ATP-dependent [14C]methylamine uptake was abolished by the proton ionophore c...

  5. Cloning, sequencing, and expression of Bacillus subtilis genes involved in ATP-dependent nuclease synthesis.

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    Kooistra, J; Venema, G

    1991-01-01

    The genes encoding the subunits of the Bacillus subtilis ATP-dependent nuclease (add genes) have been cloned. The genes were located on an 8.8-kb SalI-SmaI chromosomal DNA fragment. Transformants of a recBCD deletion mutant of Escherichia coli with plasmid pGV1 carrying this DNA fragment showed ATP-dependent nuclease activity. Three open reading frames were identified on the 8.8-kb SalI-SmaI fragment, which could encode three proteins with molecular masses of 135 (AddB protein), 141 (AddA pro...

  6. New soluble ATP-dependent protease, Ti, in Escherichia coli that is distinct from protease La

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    E. coli must contain other ATP-requiring proteolytic systems in addition to protease La (the lon gene product). A new ATP-dependent protease was purified from lon cells which lack protease La, as shown by immuno-blotting. This enzyme hydrolyzes [3H]casein to acid-soluble products in the presence of ATP (or dATP) and Mg2+. Nonhydrolyzable ATP analogs, other nucleoside triphosphates and AMP can not replace ATP. Therefore, ATP hydrolysis appears necessary for proteolysis. The enzyme appears to be a serine protease, but also contains essential thiol residues. Unlike protease La, it is not inhibited by vanadate, heparin, or the defective R9 subunit of protease La. On gel filtration, this enzyme has an apparent Mr of 340,000 and is comprised of two components of 190,000D and 130,000D, which can be separated by phosphocellulose chromatography. By themselves, these components do not show ATP-dependent proteolysis, but when mixed, full activity is restored. These finding and similar ones of Maurizi and Gottesman indicate that E. coli contain two soluble ATP-dependent proteases, which function by different mechanisms. This new enzyme may contribute to the rapid breakdown of abnormal polypeptides or of normal proteins during starvation. The authors propose to name it protease Ti

  7. Dysregulation of select ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors in high trait anxiety.

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    Wille, Alexandra; Amort, Thomas; Singewald, Nicolas; Sartori, Simone B; Lusser, Alexandra

    2016-09-15

    Enhanced anxiety is a salient feature of a number of psychiatric disorders including anxiety disorders, trauma-related disorders and depression. Although aberrant expression of various genes has been detected in patients suffering from persistent high anxiety as well as in high anxiety rodent models, the molecular mechanisms responsible for altered transcription regulation have been poorly addressed. Transcription regulation intimately involves the contribution of chromatin modifying processes, such as histone modification and ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling, yet their role in pathological anxiety is not known. Here, we investigated for the first time if altered levels of several ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors (ChRFs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) may be linked to high trait anxiety in mice. While we found protein levels of the ChRFs SNF2H, ATRX, CHD1, CHD3 and CHD5 and of HDACs 1-3 and 6 to be similar in most of the tested brain areas of mice with high (HAB) versus normal (NAB) anxiety-related behavior, we observed distinctly altered regulation of SNF2H in the amygdala, and of CHD3 and CHD5 in the ventral hippocampus. In particular, CHD3 and CHD5 exhibited altered expression of protein but not of mRNA in HAB mice. Since both proteins are components of NuRD-like complexes, these results may indicate an impaired equilibrium between different NuRD-like complexes in the ventral hippocampus. Overall, our data provide novel evidence for localized differences of specific ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors in mice with high trait anxiety that may ultimately contribute to altered transcriptional programs resulting in the manifestation of pathological anxiety. PMID:27208790

  8. Nucleosomes undergo slow spontaneous gaping

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    Ngo, Thuy T.M.; Ha, Taekjip

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotes, DNA is packaged into a basic unit, the nucleosome which consists of 147 bp of DNA wrapped around a histone octamer composed of two copies each of the histones H2A, H2B, H3 and H4. Nucleosome structures are diverse not only by histone variants, histone modifications, histone composition but also through accommodating different conformational states such as DNA breathing and dimer splitting. Variation in nucleosome structures allows it to perform a variety of cellular functions. ...

  9. Centromeric nucleosomes induce positive supercoils

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    Furuyama, Takehito; Henikoff, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Centromeres of higher eukaryotes are epigenetically maintained, however, the mechanism that underlies centromere inheritance is unknown. Centromere identity and inheritance require the assembly of nucleosomes containing the CenH3 histone variant in place of canonical H3. Whereas H3 nucleosomes wrap DNA in a left-handed manner and induce negative supercoils, we show here that CenH3 nucleosomes that are reconstituted from Drosophila histones induce positive supercoils. Furthermore, we show that...

  10. Dietary protein deficiency reduces lysosomal and nonlysosomal ATP-dependent proteolysis in muscle

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    Tawa, N. E. Jr; Kettelhut, I. C.; Goldberg, A. L.

    1992-01-01

    When rats are fed a protein deficient (PD) diet for 7 days, rates of proteolysis in skeletal muscle decrease by 40-50% (N. E. Tawa, Jr., and A. L. Goldberg. Am. J. Physiol. 263 (Endocrinol. Metab. 26): E317-325, 1992). To identify the underlying biochemical adaptations, we measured different proteolytic processes in incubated muscles. The capacity for intralysosomal proteolysis, as shown by sensitivity to methylamine or lysosomal protease inhibitors, fell 55-75% in muscles from PD rats. Furthermore, extracts of muscles of PD rats showed 30-70% lower activity of many lysosomal proteases, including cathepsins B, H, and C, and carboxypeptidases A and C, as well as other lysosomal hydrolases. The fall in cathepsin B and proteolysis was evident by 3 days on the PD diet, and both returned to control levels 3 days after refeeding of the normal diet. In muscles maintained under optimal conditions, 80-90% of protein breakdown occurs by nonlysosomal pathways. In muscles of PD rats, this ATP-dependent process was also 40-60% slower. Even though overall proteolysis decreased in muscles of PD rats, their capacity for Ca(2+)-dependent proteolysis increased (by 66%), as did the activity of the calpains (+150-250%). Thus the lysosomal and the ATP-dependent processes decrease coordinately and contribute to the fall in muscle proteolysis in PD animals.

  11. Escherichia coli contains a soluble ATP-dependent protease (Ti) distinct from protease La

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energy requirement for protein breakdown in Escherichia coli has generally been attributed to the ATP-dependence of protease La, the lon gene product. The authors have partially purified another ATP-dependent protease from lon- cells that lack protease La (as shown by immunoblotting). This enzyme hydrolyzes [3H]methyl-casein to acid-soluble products in the presence of ATP and Mg2+. ATP hydrolysis appears necessary for proteolytic activity. Since this enzyme is inhibited by diisopropyl fluorophosphate, it appears to be a serine protease, but it also contains essential thiol residues. They propose to name this enzyme protease Ti. It differs from protease La in nucleotide specificity, inhibitor sensitivity, and subunit composition. On gel filtration, protease Ti has an apparent molecular weight of 370,000. It can be fractionated by phosphocellulose chromatography or by DEAE chromatography into two components with apparent molecular weights of 260,000 and 140,000. When separated, they do not show preteolytic activity. One of these components, by itself, has ATPase activity and is labile in the absence of ATP. The other contains the diisopropyl fluorophosphate-sensitive proteolytic site. These results and the similar findings of Katayama-Fujimura et al. indicate that E. coli contains two ATP-hydrolyzing proteases, which differ in many biochemical features and probably in their physiological roles

  12. Why Do Nucleosomes Unwrap Asymmetrically?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruin, Lennart; Tompitak, Marco; Eslami-Mossallam, Behrouz; Schiessel, Helmut

    2016-07-01

    Nucleosomes, DNA spools with a protein core, engage about three-quarters of eukaryotic DNA and play a critical role in chromosomal processes, ranging from gene regulation, recombination, and replication to chromosome condensation. For more than a decade, micromanipulation experiments where nucleosomes are put under tension, as well as the theoretical interpretations of these experiments, have deepened our understanding of the stability and dynamics of nucleosomes. Here we give a theoretical explanation for a surprising new experimental finding: nucleosomes wrapped onto the 601 positioning sequence (the sequence used in most laboratories) respond highly asymmetrically to external forces by always unwrapping from the same end. Using a computational nucleosome model, we show that this asymmetry can be explained by differences in the DNA mechanics of two very short stretches on the wrapped DNA portion. Our finding suggests that the physical properties of nucleosomes, here the response to forces, can be tuned locally by the choice of the underlying base-pair sequence. This leads to a new view of nucleosomes: a physically highly varied set of DNA-protein complexes whose properties can be tuned on evolutionary time scales to their specific function in the genomic context. PMID:26991771

  13. GABA transmission via ATP-dependent K+ channels regulates α-synuclein secretion in mouse striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmanouilidou, Evangelia; Minakaki, Georgia; Keramioti, Maria V; Xylaki, Mary; Balafas, Evangelos; Chrysanthou-Piterou, Margarita; Kloukina, Ismini; Vekrellis, Kostas

    2016-03-01

    α-Synuclein is readily released in human and mouse brain parenchyma, even though the normal function of the secreted protein has not been yet elucidated. Under pathological conditions, such as in Parkinson's disease, pathologically relevant species of α-synuclein have been shown to propagate between neurons in a prion-like manner, although the mechanism by which α-synuclein transfer induces degeneration remains to be identified. Due to this evidence extracellular α-synuclein is now considered a critical target to hinder disease progression in Parkinson's disease. Given the importance of extracellular α-synuclein levels, we have now investigated the molecular pathway of α-synuclein secretion in mouse brain. To this end, we have identified a novel synaptic network that regulates α-synuclein release in mouse striatum. In this brain area, the majority of α-synuclein is localized in corticostriatal glutamatergic terminals. Absence of α-synuclein from the lumen of brain-isolated synaptic vesicles suggested that they are unlikely to mediate its release. To dissect the mechanism of α-synuclein release, we have used reverse microdialysis to locally administer reagents that locally target specific cellular pathways. Using this approach, we show that α-synuclein secretion in vivo is a calcium-regulated process that depends on the activation of sulfonylurea receptor 1-sensitive ATP-regulated potassium channels. Sulfonylurea receptor 1 is distributed in the cytoplasm of GABAergic neurons from where the ATP-dependent channel regulates GABA release. Using a combination of specific agonists and antagonists, we were able to show that, in the striatum, modulation of GABA release through the sulfonylurea receptor 1-regulated ATP-dependent potassium channels located on GABAergic neurons controls α-synuclein release from the glutamatergic terminals through activation of the presynaptic GABAB receptors. Considering that sulfonylurea receptors can be selectively targeted, our

  14. ATP-dependent molecular chaperones in plastids--More complex than expected.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trösch, Raphael; Mühlhaus, Timo; Schroda, Michael; Willmund, Felix

    2015-09-01

    Plastids are a class of essential plant cell organelles comprising photosynthetic chloroplasts of green tissues, starch-storing amyloplasts of roots and tubers or the colorful pigment-storing chromoplasts of petals and fruits. They express a few genes encoded on their organellar genome, called plastome, but import most of their proteins from the cytosol. The import into plastids, the folding of freshly-translated or imported proteins, the degradation or renaturation of denatured and entangled proteins, and the quality-control of newly folded proteins all require the action of molecular chaperones. Members of all four major families of ATP-dependent molecular chaperones (chaperonin/Cpn60, Hsp70, Hsp90 and Hsp100 families) have been identified in plastids from unicellular algae to higher plants. This review aims not only at giving an overview of the most current insights into the general and conserved functions of these plastid chaperones, but also into their specific plastid functions. Given that chloroplasts harbor an extreme environment that cycles between reduced and oxidized states, that has to deal with reactive oxygen species and is highly reactive to environmental and developmental signals, it can be presumed that plastid chaperones have evolved a plethora of specific functions some of which are just about to be discovered. Here, the most urgent questions that remain unsolved are discussed, and guidance for future research on plastid chaperones is given. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chloroplast Biogenesis. PMID:25596449

  15. Properties of mutants of haemophilus influenzae deficient in ATP-dependent deoxyribonuclease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setlow, J.K.

    1976-01-01

    Eight isogenic Haemophilus influenzae strains whose extracts lack ATP-dependent deoxyribonuclease activity (Add/sup -/ mutants) form three complementation and genetic linkage groups. Since there are known to be three subunits of the enzyme, these data suggest that each of the three genes specifies a different subunit. Gel electrophoresis of partially purified mutant extracts indicates that the smallest subunit is missing in one of the groups but is present in all the other mutants. The mutants are more sensitive to a variety of chemical agents than the wild type. The most sensitive mutants lack the ATPase activity associated with the enzyme. These strains exhibit aberrant incorporation of tritiated thymidine, which starts up more rapidly and shuts off sooner than in the wild type. An extracellular compound is responsible for most of this effect, in that wild type cells put into medium in which Add/sup -/ cells have been growing show a similar aberrant incorporation. The effect of these media can be mimicked by cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP, although millimolar concentrations are required. It is postulated that the Add/sup -/ mutants are more permeable to many substances than the wild type, partly because of the extracellular compound usually surrounding them, and the increased permeability might be responsible for the mutants' nonviability.

  16. ATP-dependent substrate transport by the ABC transporter MsbA is proton-coupled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Himansha; Velamakanni, Saroj; Deery, Michael J.; Howard, Julie; Wei, Shen L.; van Veen, Hendrik W.

    2016-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporters mediate the transbilayer movement of a vast number of substrates in or out of cells in organisms ranging from bacteria to humans. Current alternating access models for ABC exporters including the multidrug and Lipid A transporter MsbA from Escherichia coli suggest a role for nucleotide as the fundamental source of free energy. These models involve cycling between conformations with inward- and outward-facing substrate-binding sites in response to engagement and hydrolysis of ATP at the nucleotide-binding domains. Here we report that MsbA also utilizes another major energy currency in the cell by coupling substrate transport to a transmembrane electrochemical proton gradient. The dependence of ATP-dependent transport on proton coupling, and the stimulation of MsbA-ATPase by the chemical proton gradient highlight the functional integration of both forms of metabolic energy. These findings introduce ion coupling as a new parameter in the mechanism of this homodimeric ABC transporter. PMID:27499013

  17. A new family of ATP-dependent oligomerization-macrocyclization biocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadi, Nadia; Oves-Costales, Daniel; Barona-Gomez, Francisco; Challis, Gregory L

    2007-10-01

    Oligomerization and macrocyclization reactions are key steps in the biosynthesis of many bioactive natural products. Important macrocycles include the antibiotic daptomycin (1; ref. 1), the immunosuppressant FK-506 (2; ref. 2), the anthelmintic avermectin B1a (3; ref. 3) and the insecticide spinosyn A (4; ref. 4); important oligomeric macrocycles include the siderophores enterobactin (5; ref. 5) and desferrioxamine E (6; ref. 6). Biosynthetic oligomerization and macrocyclization reactions typically involve covalently tethered intermediates and are catalyzed by thioesterase domains of polyketide synthase and nonribosomal peptide synthetase multienzymes. Here we report that the purified recombinant desferrioxamine siderophore synthetase DesD from Streptomyces coelicolor M145 catalyzes ATP-dependent trimerization-macrocyclization of a chemically synthesized 10-aminocarboxylic acid substrate via noncovalently bound intermediates. DesD is dissimilar to other known synthetase families but is similar to other enzymes known or proposed to be required for the biosynthesis of omega-aminocarboxylic acid-derived cyclodimeric siderophores. This suggests that DesD is the first biochemically characterized member of a new family of oligomerizing and macrocyclizing synthetases. PMID:17704771

  18. Regulation of ATP-dependent P-(Ser)-HPr formation in Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus salivarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevenot, T; Brochu, D; Vadeboncoeur, C; Hamilton, I R

    1995-01-01

    Sugar transport via the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) phosphotransferase system involves PEP-dependent phosphorylation of the general phosphotransferase system protein, HPr, at histidine 15. However, gram-positive bacteria can also carry out ATP-dependent phosphorylation of HPr at serine 46 by means of (Ser)HPr kinase. In this study, we demonstrate that (Ser)HPr kinase in crude preparations of Streptococcus mutans Ingbritt and Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 25975 is membrane associated, with pH optima of 7.0 and 7.5, respectively. The latter organism possessed 7- to 27-fold-higher activity than S. mutans NCTC 10449, GS-5, and Ingbritt strains. The enzyme in S. salivarius was activated by fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP) twofold with 0.05 mM ATP, but this intermediate was slightly inhibitory with 1.0 mM ATP at FBP concentrations up to 10 mM. Similar inhibition was observed with the enzyme from S. mutans Ingbritt. A variety of other glycolytic intermediates had no effect on kinase activity under these conditions. The activity and regulation of (Ser)HPr kinase were assessed in vivo by monitoring P-(Ser)-HPr formation in steady-state cells of S. mutans Ingbritt grown in continuous culture with limiting glucose (10 and 50 mM) and with excess glucose (100 and 200 mM). All four forms of HPr [free HPr, P approximately (His)-HPr, P-(Ser)-HPr, and P approximately (His)-P-(Ser)-HPr] could be detected in the cells; however, significant differences in the intracellular levels of the forms were apparent during growth at different glucose concentrations. The total HPr pool increased with increasing concentrations of glucose in the medium, with significant increases in the P-(Ser)-HPr and P approximately HHis)-P-(Ser)-HPr concentrations. For example, while total PEP-dependent phosphorylation [P approximately(His)-HPr plus P approximately (His)-P-(Ser)-HPr] varied only from 21.5 to 52.5 microgram mg of cell protein (-1) in cells grown at the four glucose concentrations, the total ATP-dependent

  19. Nucleosome Organization in Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puya G Yazdi

    Full Text Available The fundamental repeating unit of eukaryotic chromatin is the nucleosome. Besides being involved in packaging DNA, nucleosome organization plays an important role in transcriptional regulation and cellular identity. Currently, there is much debate about the major determinants of the nucleosome architecture of a genome and its significance with little being known about its role in stem cells. To address these questions, we performed ultra-deep sequencing of nucleosomal DNA in two human embryonic stem cell lines and integrated our data with numerous epigenomic maps. Our analyses have revealed that the genome is a determinant of nucleosome organization with transcriptionally inactive regions characterized by a "ground state" of nucleosome profiles driven by underlying DNA sequences. DNA sequence preferences are associated with heterogeneous chromatin organization around transcription start sites. Transcription, histone modifications, and DNA methylation alter this "ground state" by having distinct effects on both nucleosome positioning and occupancy. As the transcriptional rate increases, nucleosomes become better positioned. Exons transcribed and included in the final spliced mRNA have distinct nucleosome profiles in comparison to exons not included at exon-exon junctions. Genes marked by the active modification H3K4m3 are characterized by lower nucleosome occupancy before the transcription start site compared to genes marked by the inactive modification H3K27m3, while bivalent domains, genes associated with both marks, lie exactly in the middle. Combinatorial patterns of epigenetic marks (chromatin states are associated with unique nucleosome profiles. Nucleosome organization varies around transcription factor binding in enhancers versus promoters. DNA methylation is associated with increasing nucleosome occupancy and different types of methylations have distinct location preferences within the nucleosome core particle. Finally, computational

  20. Properties of ATP dependent deoxyribonuclease and its possible role in deoxyribonucleic acid degradation of bacillus cereus irradiated by ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DNA degradation and an increased level of DNAses in the crude extract of irradiated B. cereus culture has been observed. As a result of a more detailed study of ATP dependent DNAse, the optimum pH and ATP dependency, furthermore optimum ATP concentration were established. The enzyme degrades the native DNA at a rate about 4-5 times higher than the thermally denaturated DNA. Samples of the DNA irradiated by increasing doses of U.V.-light were hydrolysed at decreasing rates. The native and U.V. irradiated DNA were degraded at nearly equal rates, on this basis it is supposed that the enzyme preferentially forms a complex with the native rather than with the irradiated DNA

  1. The size of the nucleosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Jakob; Olsen, Kasper

    2011-01-01

    dictated by the fulfillment of two criteria: One is optimizing the volume fraction of the DNA double helix; this requirement for close-packing has its root in optimizing atomic and molecular interactions. The other criterion being that of having a zero strain-twist coupling; being a zero-twist structure is......-pairs of the linker-DNA is included the estimate of the size of an ideal nucleosome is in close agreement with the experimental numbers. Interestingly, the size of the nucleosome is shown to be a consequence of intrinsic properties of the DNA double helix....

  2. Conditions for positioning of nucleosomes on DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Sheinman, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Positioning of nucleosomes along eukaryotic genomes plays an important role in their organization and regulation. There are many different factors affecting the location of nucleosomes. Some can be viewed as preferential binding of a single nucleosome to different locations along the DNA and some as interactions between neighboring nucleosomes. In this study we analyzed how well nucleosomes are positioned along the DNA as a function of strength of the preferential binding, correlation length of the binding energy landscape, interactions between neighboring nucleosomes and others relevant system properties. We analyze different scenarios: designed energy landscapes and generically disordered ones and derive conditions for good positioning. Using analytic and numerical approaches we find that, even if the binding preferences are very weak, synergistic interplay between the interactions and the binding preferences is essential for a good positioning of nucleosomes, especially on correlated energy landscapes. Ana...

  3. Crystal structure of the R-protein of the multisubunit ATP-dependent restriction endonuclease NgoAVII

    OpenAIRE

    Tamulaitiene, Giedre; Silanskas, Arunas; Grazulis, Saulius; Zaremba, Mindaugas; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2014-01-01

    The restriction endonuclease (REase) NgoAVII is composed of two proteins, R.NgoAVII and N.NgoAVII, and shares features of both Type II restriction enzymes and Type I/III ATP-dependent restriction enzymes (see accompanying paper Zaremba et al., 2014). Here we present crystal structures of the R.NgoAVII apo-protein and the R.NgoAVII C-terminal domain bound to a specific DNA. R.NgoAVII is composed of two domains: an N-terminal nucleolytic PLD domain; and a C-terminal B3-like DNA-binding domain i...

  4. Crystal Structure of the R-Protein of the Multisubunit ATP-Dependent Restriction Endonuclease NgoAVII

    OpenAIRE

    Tamulaitiene, G.; Silanskas, A.; Grazulis, S.; Zaremba, M.; Siksnys, V.

    2014-01-01

    The restriction endonuclease (REase) NgoAVII iscomposed of two proteins, R.NgoAVII and N.NgoAVII,and shares features of both Type II restriction en-zymes and Type I/III ATP-dependent restriction en-zymes (see accompanying paper Zaremba et al.,2014). Here we present crystal structures of theR.NgoAVII apo-protein and the R.NgoAVII C-terminaldomain bound to a specific DNA. R.NgoAVII is com-posed of two domains: an N-terminal nucleolytic PLDdomain; and a C-terminal B3-like DNA-binding do-main ide...

  5. Insights into DNA signals for nucleosome positioning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiming DAI; Xianhua DAI; Jihua FENG; Qian XIANG; Yangyang DENG; Jiang WANG

    2008-01-01

    The nucleosome is the fundamental unit of eukaryotic genomes. Its positioning in the promoter region plays a central role in regulating gene transcription. Experimental evidence suggests that the genomic DNA sequence is one important determinant of nucleosome positioning. Several approaches have been developed to predict nucleosome positions based on DNA sequence features, but the results indicate that there is room for improvement. This paper presents a new computational approach to predict genome-wide nucleosome locations in promoter regions. Importantly, the proposed approach outperforms existing approaches in yeast. Further anal-ysis demonstrates that DNA signals for nucleosome posi-tioning vary with species and composition of histones. Analysis of individual genes reveals that the role of the underlying DNA sequence in nucleosome positioning var-ies with genes.

  6. Structure, dynamics, and evolution of centromeric nucleosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Dalal, Yamini; Furuyama, Takehito; Vermaak, Danielle; Henikoff, Steven

    2007-01-01

    Centromeres are defining features of eukaryotic chromosomes, providing sites of attachment for segregation during mitosis and meiosis. The fundamental unit of centromere structure is the centromeric nucleosome, which differs from the conventional nucleosome by the presence of a centromere-specific histone variant (CenH3) in place of canonical H3. We have shown that the CenH3 nucleosome core found in interphase Drosophila cells is a heterotypic tetramer, a “hemisome” consisting of one molecule...

  7. Characterisation of CenH3 nucleosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Miell, Matthew Daniel David

    2013-01-01

    As a centromere-specific protein complex in direct contact with the DNA, CenH3-containing nucleosomes are generally thought to act as the distinguishing epigenetic mark of active centromere location. Confusingly, seemingly disparate models have been proposed for the structure of CenH3 nucleosomes. The most widely supported model is an octameric structure that, like histone H3 nucleosomes, contains two subunits of each histone. Another more contentious, yet persistent model i...

  8. Nucleosomes shape DNA polymorphism and divergence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasha A Langley

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available An estimated 80% of genomic DNA in eukaryotes is packaged as nucleosomes, which, together with the remaining interstitial linker regions, generate higher order chromatin structures [1]. Nucleosome sequences isolated from diverse organisms exhibit ∼10 bp periodic variations in AA, TT and GC dinucleotide frequencies. These sequence elements generate intrinsically curved DNA and help establish the histone-DNA interface. We investigated an important unanswered question concerning the interplay between chromatin organization and genome evolution: do the DNA sequence preferences inherent to the highly conserved histone core exert detectable natural selection on genomic divergence and polymorphism? To address this hypothesis, we isolated nucleosomal DNA sequences from Drosophila melanogaster embryos and examined the underlying genomic variation within and between species. We found that divergence along the D. melanogaster lineage is periodic across nucleosome regions with base changes following preferred nucleotides, providing new evidence for systematic evolutionary forces in the generation and maintenance of nucleosome-associated dinucleotide periodicities. Further, Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP frequency spectra show striking periodicities across nucleosomal regions, paralleling divergence patterns. Preferred alleles occur at higher frequencies in natural populations, consistent with a central role for natural selection. These patterns are stronger for nucleosomes in introns than in intergenic regions, suggesting selection is stronger in transcribed regions where nucleosomes undergo more displacement, remodeling and functional modification. In addition, we observe a large-scale (∼180 bp periodic enrichment of AA/TT dinucleotides associated with nucleosome occupancy, while GC dinucleotide frequency peaks in linker regions. Divergence and polymorphism data also support a role for natural selection in the generation and maintenance of these

  9. UV Damage in DNA Promotes Nucleosome Unwrapping*

    OpenAIRE

    Duan, Ming-Rui; Smerdon, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    The association of DNA with histones in chromatin impedes DNA repair enzymes from accessing DNA lesions. Nucleosomes exist in a dynamic equilibrium in which portions of the DNA molecule spontaneously unwrap, transiently exposing buried DNA sites. Thus, nucleosome dynamics in certain regions of chromatin may provide the exposure time and space needed for efficient repair of buried DNA lesions. We have used FRET and restriction enzyme accessibility to study nucleosome dynamics following DNA dam...

  10. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling facilitates nucleotide excision repair of UV-induced DNA lesions in synthetic dinucleosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Ura, Kiyoe; Araki, Marito; Saeki, Hideaki; Masutani, Chikahide; Ito, Takashi; Iwai, Shigenori; Mizukoshi, Toshimi; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Hanaoka, Fumio

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between chromatin dynamics and nucleotide excision repair (NER), we have examined the effect of chromatin structure on the formation of two major classes of UV-induced DNA lesions in reconstituted dinucleosomes. Furthermore, we have developed a model chromatin-NER system consisting of purified human NER factors and dinucleosome substrates that contain pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidone photoproducts (6-4PPs) either at the center of the nucleosome or in the linker DNA....

  11. A conserved residue cluster that governs kinetics of ATP-dependent gating of Kir6.2 potassium channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Roger S; Wright, Jordan; Pless, Stephan Alexander;

    2015-01-01

    elements that control the kinetics of ATP-dependent regulation of KATP (Kir6.2 + SUR1) channels using rapid concentration jumps. WT Kir6.2 channels re-open after rapid washout of ATP with a time constant of approximately 60 ms. Extending similar kinetic measurements to numerous mutants revealed fairly...... modest effects on gating kinetics despite significant changes in ATP sensitivity and open probability. However, we identified a pair of highly conserved neighboring amino acids (Trp68, Lys170) that control the rate of channel opening and inhibition in response to ATP. Paradoxically, mutations of Trp68 or...... Lys170 markedly slow the kinetics of channel opening (500 ms and 700 ms for Trp68Leu and Lys170Asn, respectively), while increasing channel open probability. Examining the functional effects of these residues using phi-value analysis revealed a steep negative slope. This finding implies that these...

  12. ATP-dependent removal of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeger, Lisa K; Margot, Nicolas A; Miller, Michael D

    2002-07-01

    Removal of nucleoside chain terminator inhibitors mediated by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) reverse transcriptase (RT) using ATP as an acceptor molecule has been proposed as a novel mechanism of HIV resistance. Recombinant wild-type and mutant HIV type 1 (HIV-1) RT enzymes with thymidine analog resistance mutations D67N, K70R, and T215Y were analyzed for their ability to remove eight nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors in the presence of physiological concentrations of ATP. The order for the rate of removal of the eight inhibitors by the mutant RT enzyme was zidovudine (AZT) > stavudine (d4T) > zalcitabine (ddC) > abacavir > amdoxovir (DAPD) > lamivudine (3TC) > didanosine (ddI) > tenofovir. Thymidine analogs AZT and d4T were the most significantly removed by the mutant enzyme, suggesting that removal of these inhibitors by the ATP-dependent removal mechanism contributes to the AZT and d4T resistance observed in patients with HIV expressing thymidine analog resistance mutations. ATP-dependent removal of tenofovir was 22- to 35-fold less efficient than removal of d4T and AZT, respectively. The addition of ATP and the next complementary deoxynucleoside triphosphate caused a reduction of ATP-mediated removal of d4T, ddC, and DAPD, while AZT and abacavir removal was unaffected. The reduction of d4T, ddC, and DAPD removal in the presence of the deoxynucleoside triphosphate could explain the minor changes in susceptibility to these drugs observed in conventional in vitro phenotypic assays using cells that have higher deoxynucleoside triphosphate pools. The minimal removal of abacavir, ddC, DAPD, 3TC, ddI, and tenofovir is consistent with the minor changes in susceptibility to these drugs observed for HIV mutants with thymidine analog resistance mutations. PMID:12069972

  13. Characterization of Dnmt1 Binding and DNA Methylation on Nucleosomes and Nucleosomal Arrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Schrader

    Full Text Available The packaging of DNA into nucleosomes and the organisation into higher order structures of chromatin limits the access of sequence specific DNA binding factors to DNA. In cells, DNA methylation is preferentially occuring in the linker region of nucleosomes, suggesting a structural impact of chromatin on DNA methylation. These observations raise the question whether DNA methyltransferases are capable to recognize the nucleosomal substrates and to modify the packaged DNA. Here, we performed a detailed analysis of nucleosome binding and nucleosomal DNA methylation by the maintenance DNA methyltransferase Dnmt1. Our binding studies show that Dnmt1 has a DNA length sensing activity, binding cooperatively to DNA, and requiring a minimal DNA length of 20 bp. Dnmt1 needs linker DNA to bind to nucleosomes and most efficiently recognizes nucleosomes with symmetric DNA linkers. Footprinting experiments reveal that Dnmt1 binds to both DNA linkers exiting the nucleosome core. The binding pattern correlates with the efficient methylation of DNA linkers. However, the enzyme lacks the ability to methylate nucleosomal CpG sites on mononucleosomes and nucleosomal arrays, unless chromatin remodeling enzymes create a dynamic chromatin state. In addition, our results show that Dnmt1 functionally interacts with specific chromatin remodeling enzymes to enable complete methylation of hemi-methylated DNA in chromatin.

  14. Relating periodicity of nucleosome organization and gene regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Wan, Jun; Lin, Jimmy; Zack, Donald J.; Qian, Jiang

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: The relationship between nucleosome positioning and gene regulation is fundamental yet complex. Previous studies on genomic nucleosome positions have revealed a correlation between nucleosome occupancy on promoters and gene expression levels. Many of these studies focused on individual nucleosomes, especially those proximal to transcription start sites. To study the collective effect of multiple nucleosomes on the gene expression, we developed a mathematical approach based on auto...

  15. The unconventional structure of centromeric nucleosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Henikoff, Steven; Furuyama, Takehito

    2012-01-01

    The centromere is a defining feature of the eukaryotic chromosome, required for attachment to spindle microtubules and segregation to the poles at both mitosis and meiosis. The fundamental unit of centromere identity is the centromere-specific nucleosome, in which the centromeric histone 3 (cenH3) variant takes the place of H3. The structure of the cenH3 nucleosome has been the subject of controversy, as mutually exclusive models have been proposed, including conventional and unconventional l...

  16. OVERPRODUCTION OF THE ATP-DEPENDENT NUCLEASE ADDAB IMPROVES THE STRUCTURAL STABILITY OF A MODEL PLASMID SYSTEM IN BACILLUS-SUBTILIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MEIMA, R; HAIJEMA, BJ; VENEMA, G; BRON, S

    1995-01-01

    The effect of the ATP-dependent exonuclease AddAB complex on the structural stability of plasmid pGP1 in Bacillus subtilis was studied. Using deletion mutagenesis and gene amplification techniques, B. subtilis strains were constructed either lacking or overproducing the AddAB complex, a key enzyme i

  17. ATP-Dependent C–F Bond Cleavage Allows the Complete Degradation of 4-Fluoroaromatics without Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiedt, Oliver; Mergelsberg, Mario; Boll, Kerstin; Müller, Michael; Adrian, Lorenz; Jehmlich, Nico; von Bergen, Martin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Complete biodegradation of the abundant and persistent fluoroaromatics requires enzymatic cleavage of an arylic C–F bond, probably the most stable single bond of a biodegradable organic molecule. While in aerobic microorganisms defluorination of fluoroaromatics is initiated by oxygenases, arylic C–F bond cleavage has never been observed in the absence of oxygen. Here, an oxygen-independent enzymatic aryl fluoride bond cleavage is described during the complete degradation of 4-fluorobenzoate or 4-fluorotoluene to CO2 and HF in the denitrifying Thauera aromatica: the ATP-dependent defluorination of 4-fluorobenzoyl-coenzyme A (4-F-BzCoA) to benzoyl-coenzyme A (BzCoA) and HF, catalyzed by class I BzCoA reductase (BCR). Adaptation to growth with the fluoroaromatics was accomplished by the downregulation of a promiscuous benzoate-CoA ligase and the concomitant upregulation of 4-F-BzCoA-defluorinating/dearomatizing BCR on the transcriptional level. We propose an unprecedented mechanism for reductive arylic C–F bond cleavage via a Birch reduction-like mechanism resulting in a formal nucleophilic aromatic substitution. In the proposed anionic 4-fluorodienoyl-CoA transition state, fluoride elimination to BzCoA is favored over protonation to a fluorinated cyclic dienoyl-CoA. PMID:27507824

  18. Trajectories of microsecond molecular dynamics simulations of nucleosomes and nucleosome core particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey K. Shaytan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We present here raw trajectories of molecular dynamics simulations for nucleosome with linker DNA strands as well as minimalistic nucleosome core particle model. The simulations were done in explicit solvent using CHARMM36 force field. We used this data in the research article Shaytan et al., 2016 [1]. The trajectory files are supplemented by TCL scripts providing advanced visualization capabilities.

  19. Trajectories of microsecond molecular dynamics simulations of nucleosomes and nucleosome core particles

    OpenAIRE

    Shaytan, Alexey K.; Armeev, Grigoriy A.; Goncearenco, Alexander; Zhurkin, Victor B.; Landsman, David; Panchenko, Anna R

    2016-01-01

    We present here raw trajectories of molecular dynamics simulations for nucleosome with linker DNA strands as well as minimalistic nucleosome core particle model. The simulations were done in explicit solvent using CHARMM36 force field. We used this data in the research article Shaytan et al., 2016 [1]. The trajectory files are supplemented by TCL scripts providing advanced visualization capabilities.

  20. Trajectories of microsecond molecular dynamics simulations of nucleosomes and nucleosome core particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaytan, Alexey K; Armeev, Grigoriy A; Goncearenco, Alexander; Zhurkin, Victor B; Landsman, David; Panchenko, Anna R

    2016-06-01

    We present here raw trajectories of molecular dynamics simulations for nucleosome with linker DNA strands as well as minimalistic nucleosome core particle model. The simulations were done in explicit solvent using CHARMM36 force field. We used this data in the research article Shaytan et al., 2016 [1]. The trajectory files are supplemented by TCL scripts providing advanced visualization capabilities. PMID:27222871

  1. Insights into distinct regulatory modes of nucleosome positioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Jihua

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nucleosome is the fundamental unit of eukaryotic genomes. Experimental evidence suggests that the genomic DNA sequence and a variety of protein factors contribute to nucleosome positioning in vivo. However, how nucleosome positioning is determined locally is still largely unknown. Results We found that transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs with particular nucleosomal contexts show a preference to reside on specific chromosomes. We identified four typical gene classes associated with distinct regulatory modes of nucleosome positioning, and further showed that they are distinguished by transcriptional regulation patterns. The first mode involves the cooperativity between chromatin remodeling and stable transcription factor (TF-DNA binding that is linked to high intrinsic DNA binding affinities, evicting nucleosomes from favorable DNA sequences. The second is the DNA-encoded low nucleosome occupancy that is associated with high gene activity. The third is through chromatin remodeling and histone acetylation, sliding nucleosomes along DNA. This mode is linked to more cryptic sites for TF binding. The last consists of the nucleosome-enriched organization driven by other factors that overrides nucleosome sequence preferences. In addition, we showed that high polymerase II (Pol II occupancy is associated with high nucleosome occupancy around the transcription start site (TSS. Conclusions We identified four different regulatory modes of nucleosome positioning and gave insights into mechanisms that specify promoter nucleosome location. We suggest two distinct modes of recruitment of Pol II, which are selectively employed by different genes.

  2. Genome-Wide Mapping Targets of the Metazoan Chromatin Remodeling Factor NURF Reveals Nucleosome Remodeling at Enhancers, Core Promoters and Gene Insulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, So Yeon; Grisan, Valentina; Jang, Boyun; Herbert, John; Badenhorst, Paul

    2016-04-01

    NURF is a conserved higher eukaryotic ISWI-containing chromatin remodeling complex that catalyzes ATP-dependent nucleosome sliding. By sliding nucleosomes, NURF is able to alter chromatin dynamics to control transcription and genome organization. Previous biochemical and genetic analysis of the specificity-subunit of Drosophila NURF (Nurf301/Enhancer of Bithorax (E(bx)) has defined NURF as a critical regulator of homeotic, heat-shock and steroid-responsive gene transcription. It has been speculated that NURF controls pathway specific transcription by co-operating with sequence-specific transcription factors to remodel chromatin at dedicated enhancers. However, conclusive in vivo demonstration of this is lacking and precise regulatory elements targeted by NURF are poorly defined. To address this, we have generated a comprehensive map of in vivo NURF activity, using MNase-sequencing to determine at base pair resolution NURF target nucleosomes, and ChIP-sequencing to define sites of NURF recruitment. Our data show that, besides anticipated roles at enhancers, NURF interacts physically and functionally with the TRF2/DREF basal transcription factor to organize nucleosomes downstream of active promoters. Moreover, we detect NURF remodeling and recruitment at distal insulator sites, where NURF functionally interacts with and co-localizes with DREF and insulator proteins including CP190 to establish nucleosome-depleted domains. This insulator function of NURF is most apparent at subclasses of insulators that mark the boundaries of chromatin domains, where multiple insulator proteins co-associate. By visualizing the complete repertoire of in vivo NURF chromatin targets, our data provide new insights into how chromatin remodeling can control genome organization and regulatory interactions. PMID:27046080

  3. Genome-Wide Mapping Targets of the Metazoan Chromatin Remodeling Factor NURF Reveals Nucleosome Remodeling at Enhancers, Core Promoters and Gene Insulators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Yeon Kwon

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available NURF is a conserved higher eukaryotic ISWI-containing chromatin remodeling complex that catalyzes ATP-dependent nucleosome sliding. By sliding nucleosomes, NURF is able to alter chromatin dynamics to control transcription and genome organization. Previous biochemical and genetic analysis of the specificity-subunit of Drosophila NURF (Nurf301/Enhancer of Bithorax (E(bx has defined NURF as a critical regulator of homeotic, heat-shock and steroid-responsive gene transcription. It has been speculated that NURF controls pathway specific transcription by co-operating with sequence-specific transcription factors to remodel chromatin at dedicated enhancers. However, conclusive in vivo demonstration of this is lacking and precise regulatory elements targeted by NURF are poorly defined. To address this, we have generated a comprehensive map of in vivo NURF activity, using MNase-sequencing to determine at base pair resolution NURF target nucleosomes, and ChIP-sequencing to define sites of NURF recruitment. Our data show that, besides anticipated roles at enhancers, NURF interacts physically and functionally with the TRF2/DREF basal transcription factor to organize nucleosomes downstream of active promoters. Moreover, we detect NURF remodeling and recruitment at distal insulator sites, where NURF functionally interacts with and co-localizes with DREF and insulator proteins including CP190 to establish nucleosome-depleted domains. This insulator function of NURF is most apparent at subclasses of insulators that mark the boundaries of chromatin domains, where multiple insulator proteins co-associate. By visualizing the complete repertoire of in vivo NURF chromatin targets, our data provide new insights into how chromatin remodeling can control genome organization and regulatory interactions.

  4. Proteins interacting with mitochondrial ATP-dependent Lon protease (MAP1) in Magnaporthe oryzae are involved in rice blast disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiao; Wei, Yi; Wang, Yu-Han; Li, Jian; Wong, Fuk-Ling; Zheng, Ya-Jie; Yan, Hai; Liu, Shao-Shuai; Liu, Jin-Liang; Jia, Bao-Lei; Zhang, Shi-Hong

    2015-10-01

    The ATP-dependent Lon protease is involved in many physiological processes. In bacteria, Lon regulates pathogenesis and, in yeast, Lon protects mitochondia from oxidative damage. However, little is known about Lon in fungal phytopathogens. MAP1, a homologue of Lon in Magnaporthe oryzae, was recently identified to be important for stress resistance and pathogenesis. Here, we focus on a novel pathogenic pathway mediated by MAP1. Based on an interaction system between rice and a tandem affinity purification (TAP)-tagged MAP1 complementation strain, we identified 23 novel fungal proteins from infected leaves using a TAP approach with mass spectrometry, and confirmed that 14 of these proteins physically interact with MAP1 in vivo. Among these 14 proteins, 11 candidates, presumably localized to the mitochondria, were biochemically determined to be substrates of MAP1 hydrolysis. Deletion mutants were created and functionally analysed to further confirm the involvement of these proteins in pathogenesis. The results indicated that all mutants showed reduced conidiation and sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide. Appressorial formations were not affected, although conidia from certain mutants were morphologically altered. In addition, virulence was reduced in four mutants, enhanced (with lesions forming earlier) in two mutants and remained unchanged in one mutant. Together with the known virulence-related proteins alternative oxidase and enoyl-CoA hydratase, we propose that most of the Lon-interacting proteins are involved in the pathogenic regulation pathway mediated by MAP1 in M. oryzae. Perturbation of this pathway may represent an effective approach for the inhibition of rice blast disease. PMID:25605006

  5. Phosphorylation of inhibitor-2 and activation of MgATP-dependent protein phosphatase by rat skeletal muscle glycogen synthase kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rat skeletal muscle contains a glycogen synthase kinase (GSK-M) which is not stimulated by Ca2+ or cAMP. This kinase has an apparent Mr of 62,000 and uses ATP but not GTP as a phosphoryl donor. GSK-M phosphorylated glycogen synthase at sites 2 and 3. It phosphorylated ATP-citrate lyase and activated MgATP-dependent phosphatase in the presence of ATP but not GTP. As expected, the kinase also phosphorylated phosphatase inhibitor 2 (I-2). Phosphatase incorporation reached approximately 0.3 mol/mol of I-2. Phosphopeptide maps were obtained by digesting 32P-labeled I-2 with trypsin and separating the peptides by reversed phase HPLC. Two partially separated 32P-labeled peaks were obtained when I-2 was phosphorylated with either GSK-M or glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) and these peptides were different from those obtained when I-2 was phosphorylated with the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (CSU) or casein kinase II (CK-II). When I-2 was phosphorylated with GSK-M or GSK-3 and cleaved by CNBr, a single radioactive peak was obtained. Phosphoamino acid analysis showed that I-2 was phosphorylated by GSK-M or GSK-3 predominately in Thr whereas CSU and CK-II phosphorylated I-2 exclusively in Ser. These results indicate that GSK-M is similar to GSK-3 and to ATP-citrate lyase kinase. However, it appears to differ in Mr from ATP-citrate lyase kinase and it differs from GSK-3 in that it phosphorylates glycogen synthase at site 2 and it does not use GTP as a phosphoryl donor

  6. Phosphorylation of inhibitor-2 and activation of MgATP-dependent protein phosphatase by rat skeletal muscle glycogen synthase kinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hegazy, M.G.; Reimann, E.M.; Thysseril, T.J.; Schlender, K.K.

    1986-05-01

    Rat skeletal muscle contains a glycogen synthase kinase (GSK-M) which is not stimulated by Ca/sup 2 +/ or cAMP. This kinase has an apparent Mr of 62,000 and uses ATP but not GTP as a phosphoryl donor. GSK-M phosphorylated glycogen synthase at sites 2 and 3. It phosphorylated ATP-citrate lyase and activated MgATP-dependent phosphatase in the presence of ATP but not GTP. As expected, the kinase also phosphorylated phosphatase inhibitor 2 (I-2). Phosphatase incorporation reached approximately 0.3 mol/mol of I-2. Phosphopeptide maps were obtained by digesting /sup 32/P-labeled I-2 with trypsin and separating the peptides by reversed phase HPLC. Two partially separated /sup 32/P-labeled peaks were obtained when I-2 was phosphorylated with either GSK-M or glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) and these peptides were different from those obtained when I-2 was phosphorylated with the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (CSU) or casein kinase II (CK-II). When I-2 was phosphorylated with GSK-M or GSK-3 and cleaved by CNBr, a single radioactive peak was obtained. Phosphoamino acid analysis showed that I-2 was phosphorylated by GSK-M or GSK-3 predominately in Thr whereas CSU and CK-II phosphorylated I-2 exclusively in Ser. These results indicate that GSK-M is similar to GSK-3 and to ATP-citrate lyase kinase. However, it appears to differ in Mr from ATP-citrate lyase kinase and it differs from GSK-3 in that it phosphorylates glycogen synthase at site 2 and it does not use GTP as a phosphoryl donor.

  7. period-1 encodes an ATP-dependent RNA helicase that influences nutritional compensation of the Neurospora circadian clock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emerson, Jillian M.; Bartholomai, Bradley M.; Ringelberg, Carol; Baker, Scott E.; Loros, Jennifer J.; Dunlap, Jay C.

    2015-12-22

    Mutants in the period-1 (prd-1) gene, characterized by a recessive allele, display a reduced growth rate and period lengthening of the developmental cycle controlled by the circadian clock. We refined the genetic location of prd-1 and used whole genome sequencing to find the mutation defining it, confirming the identity of prd-1 by rescuing the mutant circadian phenotype via transformation. PRD-1 is an RNA helicase whose orthologs, DDX5 and DDX17 in humans and Dbp2p in yeast, are implicated in various processes including transcriptional regulation, elongation, and termination, 23 ribosome biogenesis, and RNA decay. Although prdi-1smutantssiois an ATP-dependent RNA helicase, member of a sub-family display a long period (~25 hrs) circadian developmental cycle, they interestingly display a wild type period when the core circadian oscillator is tracked using a frq-luciferase transcriptional fusion under conditions of limiting nutritional carbon; the core oscillator runs with a long period under glucose-sufficient conditions. Thus PRD-1 clearly impacts the circadian oscillator and is not only part of a metabolic oscillator ancillary to the core clock. PRD-1 is an essential protein and its expression is neither light-regulated nor clock-regulated. However, it is transiently induced by glucose; in the presence of sufficient glucose PRD-1 is in the nucleus until glucose runs out which elicits its disappearance from the nucleus. Because circadian period length is carbon concentration-dependent, prd­-1 may be formally viewed as clock mutant with defective nutritional compensation of circadian period length.

  8. Theoretical analysis of epigenetic cell memory by nucleosome modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Ian B; Micheelsen, Mille A; Sneppen, Kim; Thon, Geneviève

    2007-05-18

    Chromosomal regions can adopt stable and heritable alternative states resulting in bistable gene expression without changes to the DNA sequence. Such epigenetic control is often associated with alternative covalent modifications of histones. The stability and heritability of the states are thought to involve positive feedback where modified nucleosomes recruit enzymes that similarly modify nearby nucleosomes. We developed a simplified stochastic model for dynamic nucleosome modification based on the silent mating-type region of the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We show that the mechanism can give strong bistability that is resistant both to high noise due to random gain or loss of nucleosome modifications and to random partitioning upon DNA replication. However, robust bistability required: (1) cooperativity, the activity of more than one modified nucleosome, in the modification reactions and (2) that nucleosomes occasionally stimulate modification beyond their neighbor nucleosomes, arguing against a simple continuous spreading of nucleosome modification. PMID:17512413

  9. Electrostatic mechanism of nucleosomal array folding revealed by computer simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Jian; Zhang, Qing; Schlick, Tamar

    2005-01-01

    Although numerous experiments indicate that the chromatin fiber displays salt-dependent conformations, the associated molecular mechanism remains unclear. Here, we apply an irregular Discrete Surface Charge Optimization (DiSCO) model of the nucleosome with all histone tails incorporated to describe by Monte Carlo simulations salt-dependent rearrangements of a nucleosomal array with 12 nucleosomes. The ensemble of nucleosomal array conformations display salt-dependent condensation in good agre...

  10. Nucleosome disassembly during human non-homologous end joining followed by concerted HIRA- and CAF-1-dependent reassembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuan; Tyler, Jessica K

    2016-01-01

    The cell achieves DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair in the context of chromatin structure. However, the mechanisms used to expose DSBs to the repair machinery and to restore the chromatin organization after repair remain elusive. Here we show that induction of a DSB in human cells causes local nucleosome disassembly, apparently independently from DNA end resection. This efficient removal of histone H3 from the genome during non-homologous end joining was promoted by both ATM and the ATP-dependent nucleosome remodeler INO80. Chromatin reassembly during DSB repair was dependent on the HIRA histone chaperone that is specific to the replication-independent histone variant H3.3 and on CAF-1 that is specific to the replication-dependent canonical histones H3.1/H3.2. Our data suggest that the epigenetic information is re-established after DSB repair by the concerted and interdependent action of replication-independent and replication-dependent chromatin assembly pathways. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15129.001 PMID:27269284

  11. Monitoring Conformational Dynamics with Single-Molecule Fluorescence Energy Transfer: Applications in Nucleosome Remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deindl, Sebastian; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    Due to its ability to track distance changes within individual molecules or molecular complexes on the nanometer scale and in real time, single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (single-molecule FRET) is a powerful tool to tackle a wide range of important biological questions. Using our recently developed single-molecule FRET assay to monitor nucleosome translocation as an illustrative example, we describe here in detail how to set up, carry out, and analyze single-molecule FRET experiments that provide time-dependent information on biomolecular processes. PMID:22929765

  12. Human nucleosomes: special role of CG dinucleotides and Alu-nucleosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trifonov Edward N

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The periodical occurrence of dinucleotides with a period of 10.4 bases now is undeniably a hallmark of nucleosome positioning. Whereas many eukaryotic genomes contain visible and even strong signals for periodic distribution of dinucleotides, the human genome is rather featureless in this respect. The exact sequence features in the human genome that govern the nucleosome positioning remain largely unknown. Results When analyzing the human genome sequence with the positional autocorrelation method, we found that only the dinucleotide CG shows the 10.4 base periodicity, which is indicative of the presence of nucleosomes. There is a high occurrence of CG dinucleotides that are either 31 (10.4 × 3 or 62 (10.4 × 6 base pairs apart from one another - a sequence bias known to be characteristic of Alu-sequences. In a similar analysis with repetitive sequences removed, peaks of repeating CG motifs can be seen at positions 10, 21 and 31, the nearest integers of multiples of 10.4. Conclusions Although the CG dinucleotides are dominant, other elements of the standard nucleosome positioning pattern are present in the human genome as well. The positional autocorrelation analysis of the human genome demonstrates that the CG dinucleotide is, indeed, one visible element of the human nucleosome positioning pattern, which appears both in Alu sequences and in sequences without repeats. The dominant role that CG dinucleotides play in organizing human chromatin is to indicate the involvement of human nucleosomes in tuning the regulation of gene expression and chromatin structure, which is very likely due to cytosine-methylation/-demethylation in CG dinucleotides contained in the human nucleosomes. This is further confirmed by the positions of CG-periodical nucleosomes on Alu sequences. Alu repeats appear as monomers, dimers and trimers, harboring two to six nucleosomes in a run. Considering the exceptional role CG dinucleotides play in the

  13. Tension-dependent Free Energies of Nucleosome Unwrapping

    CERN Document Server

    Lequieu, Joshua; Schwartz, David C; de Pablo, Juan J

    2016-01-01

    Nucleosomes form the basic unit of compaction within eukaryotic genomes and their locations represent an important, yet poorly understood, mechanism of genetic regulation. Quantifying the strength of interactions within the nucleosome is a central problem in biophysics and is critical to understanding how nucleosome positions influence gene expression. By comparing to single-molecule experiments, we demonstrate that a coarse-grained molecular model of the nucleosome can reproduce key aspects of nucleosome unwrapping. Using detailed simulations of DNA and histone proteins, we calculate the tension-dependent free energy surface corresponding to the unwrapping process. The model reproduces quantitatively the forces required to unwrap the nucleosome, and reveals the role played by electrostatic interactions during this process. We then demonstrate that histone modifications and DNA sequence can have significant effects on the energies of nucleosome formation. Most notably, we show that histone tails are crucial f...

  14. Nucleosome positioning and composition modulate in silico chromatin flexibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauvelin, N.; Lo, P.; Kulaeva, O. I.; Nizovtseva, E. V.; Diaz-Montes, J.; Zola, J.; Parashar, M.; Studitsky, V. M.; Olson, W. K.

    2015-02-01

    The dynamic organization of chromatin plays an essential role in the regulation of gene expression and in other fundamental cellular processes. The underlying physical basis of these activities lies in the sequential positioning, chemical composition, and intermolecular interactions of the nucleosomes—the familiar assemblies of ˜150 DNA base pairs and eight histone proteins—found on chromatin fibers. Here we introduce a mesoscale model of short nucleosomal arrays and a computational framework that make it possible to incorporate detailed structural features of DNA and histones in simulations of short chromatin constructs. We explore the effects of nucleosome positioning and the presence or absence of cationic N-terminal histone tails on the ‘local’ inter-nucleosomal interactions and the global deformations of the simulated chains. The correspondence between the predicted and observed effects of nucleosome composition and numbers on the long-range communication between the ends of designed nucleosome arrays lends credence to the model and to the molecular insights gleaned from the simulated structures. We also extract effective nucleosome-nucleosome potentials from the simulations and implement the potentials in a larger-scale computational treatment of regularly repeating chromatin fibers. Our results reveal a remarkable effect of nucleosome spacing on chromatin flexibility, with small changes in DNA linker length significantly altering the interactions of nucleosomes and the dimensions of the fiber as a whole. In addition, we find that these changes in nucleosome positioning influence the statistical properties of long chromatin constructs. That is, simulated chromatin fibers with the same number of nucleosomes exhibit polymeric behaviors ranging from Gaussian to worm-like, depending upon nucleosome spacing. These findings suggest that the physical and mechanical properties of chromatin can span a wide range of behaviors, depending on nucleosome

  15. Proton-motive force stimulates the proteolytic activity of FtsH, a membrane-bound ATP- dependent protease in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Akiyama, Yoshinori

    2002-01-01

    FtsH is a membrane-bound, ATP-dependent metalloprotease in Escherichia coli that degrades some integral membrane proteins and cytoplasmic proteins. In this study, we show that FtsH-dependent degradation of both membrane-bound and soluble proteins is retarded when cells are treated with carbonyl cyanide-3-chlorophenylhydrazone or 2,4-dinitrophenol uncouplers, which dissipate the proton-motive force. In vitro casein degradation by membrane-integrated FtsH was stimulated by succinate, a respirat...

  16. Substantial histone reduction modulates genomewide nucleosomal occupancy and global transcriptional output.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Celona

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The basic unit of genome packaging is the nucleosome, and nucleosomes have long been proposed to restrict DNA accessibility both to damage and to transcription. Nucleosome number in cells was considered fixed, but recently aging yeast and mammalian cells were shown to contain fewer nucleosomes. We show here that mammalian cells lacking High Mobility Group Box 1 protein (HMGB1 contain a reduced amount of core, linker, and variant histones, and a correspondingly reduced number of nucleosomes, possibly because HMGB1 facilitates nucleosome assembly. Yeast nhp6 mutants lacking Nhp6a and -b proteins, which are related to HMGB1, also have a reduced amount of histones and fewer nucleosomes. Nucleosome limitation in both mammalian and yeast cells increases the sensitivity of DNA to damage, increases transcription globally, and affects the relative expression of about 10% of genes. In yeast nhp6 cells the loss of more than one nucleosome in four does not affect the location of nucleosomes and their spacing, but nucleosomal occupancy. The decrease in nucleosomal occupancy is non-uniform and can be modelled assuming that different nucleosomal sites compete for available histones. Sites with a high propensity to occupation are almost always packaged into nucleosomes both in wild type and nucleosome-depleted cells; nucleosomes on sites with low propensity to occupation are disproportionately lost in nucleosome-depleted cells. We suggest that variation in nucleosome number, by affecting nucleosomal occupancy both genomewide and gene-specifically, constitutes a novel layer of epigenetic regulation.

  17. MNase titration reveals differences between nucleosome occupancy and chromatin accessibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieczkowski, Jakub; Cook, April; Bowman, Sarah K; Mueller, Britta; Alver, Burak H; Kundu, Sharmistha; Deaton, Aimee M; Urban, Jennifer A; Larschan, Erica; Park, Peter J; Kingston, Robert E; Tolstorukov, Michael Y

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin accessibility plays a fundamental role in gene regulation. Nucleosome placement, usually measured by quantifying protection of DNA from enzymatic digestion, can regulate accessibility. We introduce a metric that uses micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion in a novel manner to measure chromatin accessibility by combining information from several digests of increasing depths. This metric, MACC (MNase accessibility), quantifies the inherent heterogeneity of nucleosome accessibility in which some nucleosomes are seen preferentially at high MNase and some at low MNase. MACC interrogates each genomic locus, measuring both nucleosome location and accessibility in the same assay. MACC can be performed either with or without a histone immunoprecipitation step, and thereby compares histone and non-histone protection. We find that changes in accessibility at enhancers, promoters and other regulatory regions do not correlate with changes in nucleosome occupancy. Moreover, high nucleosome occupancy does not necessarily preclude high accessibility, which reveals novel principles of chromatin regulation. PMID:27151365

  18. [The effect of DNA supercoiling DNA on nucleosome structure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivolob, A V; Khrapunov, S N

    1991-01-01

    The circular DNA which contains nucleosomes and additional supercoils has been considered theoretically. The different possible effect of increased negative supercoiling on the nucleosome structure have been studied. According to the model proposed all supercoils in the nucleosome-containing circular DNA are realized as torsional deformations of the double helix. The free energy of both supercoiling (torsional deformations) and nucleosome stabilization have been taken into consideration to obtain the equation for free energy of nucleosome-containing circular DNA. The analysis of this equation and the experimental data by Garner et al. (II Psoc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 1987. P. 2620-2623) about the maximum amount of supercoiling obtained by DNA-topoisomerase II treatment of nucleosome-containing pBR322 plasmid has been performed. It has been shown that two possibilities are consistent with both the equation and experimental data. These are: (1) the increased supercoiling induces the torsional strains not only in linker regions but also in nucleosome DNA and thus supercoiling causes an instability on nucleosome structure; (2) increased supercoiling induces a structural change of nucleosome which is accompanied by nucleosome DNA unwinding and its transition into form with approximately 11 base pairs per turn of double helix. It has been evaluated that in the first case the average torsional rigidity of nucleosome DNA should be approximately 2.5 times as much and in the second case--much more than the rigidity of naked DNA. Both types of nucleosome structural changes may cause its transition to a potentially active state for transcription. It is suggested that increased supercoiling can be a switch mechanism of chromatin activation. PMID:1654518

  19. Nucleosome breathing and remodeling constrain CRISPR-Cas9 function.

    OpenAIRE

    Isaac, RS; Jiang, F; Doudna, JA; Lim, WA; Narlikar, GJ; De Almeida, R

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR-Cas9 bacterial surveillance system has become a versatile tool for genome editing and gene regulation in eukaryotic cells, yet how CRISPR-Cas9 contends with the barriers presented by eukaryotic chromatin is poorly understood. Here we investigate how the smallest unit of chromatin, a nucleosome, constrains the activity of the CRISPR-Cas9 system. We find that nucleosomes assembled on native DNA sequences are permissive to Cas9 action. However, the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA to ...

  20. Nucleosome conformational flexibility in experiments with single chromatin fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Sivolob A. V.

    2010-01-01

    Studies on the chromatin nucleosome organization play an ever increasing role in our comprehension of mechanisms of the gene activity regulation. This minireview describes the results on the nucleosome conformational flexibility, which were obtained using magnetic tweezers to apply torsion to oligonucleosome fibers reconstituted on single DNA molecules. Such an approach revealed a new structural form of the nucleosome, the reversome, in which DNA is wrapped in a right-handed superhelix around...

  1. Tetrameric Structure of Centromeric Nucleosomes in Interphase Drosophila Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Dalal, Yamini; Wang, Hongda; Lindsay, Stuart; Henikoff, Steven

    2007-01-01

    Author Summary The octameric structure of eukaryotic nucleosomes is universally accepted as the basic unit of chromatin. This is certainly the case for the vast bulk of nucleosomes; however, there have been no reports of the in vivo structure of nucleosomes associated with centromeres. Though centromeres make up only a minute fraction of the genomic landscape, their role in segregating chromosomes during mitosis is essential for maintaining genomic integrity. We report the characterization of...

  2. From nucleosome to chromosome: a dynamic organization of genetic information

    OpenAIRE

    Fransz, P.; Jong, de, M.C.M.

    2011-01-01

    Gene activity is controlled at different levels of chromatin organization, which involve genomic sequences, nucleosome structure, chromatin folding and chromosome arrangement. These levels are interconnected and influence each other. At the basic level nucleosomes generally occlude the DNA sequence from interacting with DNA-binding proteins. Evidently, nucleosome positioning is a major factor in gene control and chromatin organization. Understanding the biological rules that govern the deposi...

  3. Identification of a MAP 2-like ATP-binding protein associated with axoplasmic vesicles that translocate on isolated microtubules

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    Axoplasmic vesicles were purified and observed to translocate on isolated microtubules in an ATP-dependent, trypsin-sensitive manner, implying that ATP-binding polypeptides essential for force generation were present on the vesicle surface. To identify these proteins [alpha 32P]8-azidoadenosine 5'-triphosphate ([alpha 32P]8-N3ATP), a photoaffinity analogue of ATP, was used. The results presented here identify and characterize a vesicle-associated polypeptide having a relative molecular mass o...

  4. Analysis of the distribution and evolution of the ATP-dependent DNA ligases of bacteria delineates a distinct phylogenetic group 'Lig E'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Adele; Hjerde, Erik; Kahlke, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Prior to the discovery of a minimal ATP-dependent DNA ligase in Haemophilus influenzae, bacteria were thought to only possess a NAD-dependent ligase, which was involved in sealing of Okazaki fragments. We now know that a diverse range of bacterial species possess up to six of these accessory bacterial ATP-dependent DNA ligases (b-ADLs), which vary in size and enzymatic domain associations. Here we compare the domain structure of different types of b-ADLs and investigate their distribution among the bacterial domain to describe possible evolutionary trajectories that gave rise to the sequence and structural diversity of these enzymes. Previous biochemical and genetic analyses have delineated three main classes of these enzymes: Lig B, Lig C and Lig D, which appear to have descended from a common ancestor within the bacterial domain. In the present study, we delineate a fourth group of b-ADLs, Lig E, which possesses a number of unique features at the primary and tertiary structural levels. The biochemical characteristics, domain structure and inferred extracellular location sets this group apart from the other b-ADLs. The results presented here indicate that the Lig E type ligases were horizontally transferred into bacteria in a separate event from other b-ADLs possibly from a bacteriophage. PMID:26412580

  5. Yeast rad7-rad16 complex, specific for the nucleotide excision repair of the nontranscribed DNA strand, is an ATP-dependent DNA damage sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In eukaryotes, nucleotide excision repair of ultraviolet light-damaged DNA is a highly intricate process that requires a large number of evolutionary conserved protein factors. Genetic studies in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have indicated a specific role of the RAD7 and RAD16 genes in the repair of transcriptionally inactive DNA. Here we show that the RAD7- and RAD16-encoded products exist as a complex of 1:1 stoichiometry, exhibiting an apparent dissociation constant (Kd) of <4 x 10(-10) M. The Rad7-Rad16 complex has been purified to near homogeneity in this study and is shown to bind, in an ATP-dependent manner and with high specificity, to DNA damaged by ultraviolet light. Importantly, inclusion of the Rad7-Rad16 complex in the in vitro nucleotide excision repair system that consists entirely of purified components results in a marked stimulation of damage specific incision. Thus, Rad7-Rad16 complex is the ATP-dependent DNA damage sensor that specifically functions with the ensemble of nucleotide excision repair factor (NEF) 1, NEF2, NEF3, and replication protein A in the repair of transcriptionally inactive DNA. We name this novel complex of Rad7 and Rad16 proteins NEF4. (author)

  6. A deformation energy-based model for predicting nucleosome dyads and occupancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guoqing; Xing, Yongqiang; Zhao, Hongyu; Wang, Jianying; Shang, Yu; Cai, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Nucleosome plays an essential role in various cellular processes, such as DNA replication, recombination, and transcription. Hence, it is important to decode the mechanism of nucleosome positioning and identify nucleosome positions in the genome. In this paper, we present a model for predicting nucleosome positioning based on DNA deformation, in which both bending and shearing of the nucleosomal DNA are considered. The model successfully predicted the dyad positions of nucleosomes assembled in vitro and the in vitro map of nucleosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Applying the model to Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster, we achieved satisfactory results. Our data also show that shearing energy of nucleosomal DNA outperforms bending energy in nucleosome occupancy prediction and the ability to predict nucleosome dyad positions is attributed to bending energy that is associated with rotational positioning of nucleosomes. PMID:27053067

  7. Rigid-body molecular dynamics of DNA inside a nucleosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathizadeh, Arman; Berdy Besya, Azim; Reza Ejtehadi, Mohammad; Schiessel, Helmut

    2013-03-01

    The majority of eukaryotic DNA, about three quarter, is wrapped around histone proteins forming so-called nucleosomes. To study nucleosomal DNA we introduce a coarse-grained molecular dynamics model based on sequence-dependent harmonic rigid base pair step parameters of DNA and nucleosomal binding sites. Mixed parametrization based on all-atom molecular dynamics and crystallographic data of protein-DNA structures is used for the base pair step parameters. The binding site parameters are adjusted by experimental B-factor values of the nucleosome crystal structure. The model is then used to determine the energy cost for placing a twist defect into the nucleosomal DNA which allows us to use Kramers theory to calculate nucleosome sliding caused by such defects. It is shown that the twist defect scenario together with the sequence-dependent elasticity of DNA can explain the slow time scales observed for nucleosome mobility along DNA. With this method we also show how the twist defect mechanism leads to a higher mobility of DNA in the presence of sin mutations near the dyad axis. Finally, by performing simulations on 5s rDNA, 601, and telomeric base pair sequences, it is demonstrated that the current model is a powerful tool to predict nucleosome positioning. PMID:23475204

  8. A Non-uniform Stepping Mechanism for E. coli UvrD Monomer Translocation along Single Stranded DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Tomko, Eric J.; Fischer, Christopher J.; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Lohman, Timothy M.

    2007-01-01

    E. coli UvrD is an SF1 helicase involved in several DNA metabolic processes. Although a UvrD dimer is needed for helicase activity, a monomer can translocate with 3′ to 5′ directionality along single stranded DNA and this ATP-dependent translocation is likely involved in RecA displacement. In order to understand how the monomeric translocase functions, we have combined fluorescence stopped-flow kinetic methods with novel analysis methods to determine the kinetic mechanism, including ATP coupl...

  9. Identification of novel oxidized protein substrates and physiological partners of the mitochondrial ATP-dependent Lon-like protease Pim1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayot, Aurélien; Gareil, Monique; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Roepstorff, Peter; Friguet, Bertrand; Bulteau, Anne-Laure

    2010-01-01

    ATP-dependent proteases are currently emerging as key regulators of mitochondrial functions. Among these proteolytic systems, Pim1, a Lon-like serine protease in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is involved in the control of selective protein turnover in the mitochondrial matrix. In the absence of Pim1......, yeast cells have been shown to accumulate electron-dense inclusion bodies in the matrix space, to lose integrity of mitochondrial genome, and to be respiration-deficient. Because of the severity of phenotypes associated with the depletion of Pim1, this protease appears to be an essential component of...... the protein quality control machinery in mitochondria and to exert crucial functions during the biogenesis of this organelle. Nevertheless, its physiological substrates and partners are not fully characterized. Therefore, we used the combination of different proteomic techniques to assess the nature...

  10. Sequence structure of Lowary/Widom clones forming strong nucleosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifonov, Edward N

    2016-04-01

    Lowary and Widom selected from random sequences those which form exceptionally stable nucleosomes, including clone 601, the current champion of strong nucleosome (SN) sequences. This unique sequence database (LW sequences) carries sequence elements which confer stability on the nucleosomes formed on the sequences, and, thus, may serve as source of information on the structure of "ideal" or close to ideal nucleosome DNA sequence. An important clue is also provided by crystallographic study of Vasudevan and coauthors on clone 601 nucleosomes. It demonstrated that YR·YR dinucleotide stacks (primarily TA·TA) follow one another at distances 10 or 11 bases or multiples thereof, such that they all are located on the interface between DNA and histone octamer. Combining this important information with alignment of the YR-containing 10-mers and 11-mers from LW sequences, the bendability matrices of the stable nucleosome DNA are derived. The matrices suggest that the periodically repeated TA (YR), RR, and YY dinucleotides are the main sequence features of the SNs. This consensus coincides with the one for recently discovered SNs with visibly periodic DNA sequences. Thus, the experimentally observed stable LW nucleosomes and SNs derived computationally appear to represent the same entity - exceptionally stable SNs. PMID:26208855

  11. Nucleosome alterations caused by mutations at modifiable histone residues in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Hongde Liu; Pingyan Wang; Lingjie Liu; Zhu Min; Kun Luo; Yakun Wan

    2015-01-01

    Nucleosome organization exhibits dynamic properties depending on the cell state and environment. Histone proteins, fundamental components of nucleosomes, are subject to chemical modifications on particular residues. We examined the effect of substituting modifiable residues of four core histones with the non-modifiable residue alanine on nucleosome dynamics. We mapped the genome-wide nucleosomes in 22 histone mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and compared the nucleosome alterations relative...

  12. Twist Neutrality and the Diameter of the Nucleosome Core Particle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Jakob; Olsen, Kasper

    2012-01-01

    The diameter of the nucleosome core particle is the same for all the eukaryotes. Here we discuss the possibility that this selectiveness is consistent with a propensity for twist neutrality, in particular, for the double helical DNA to stay rotationally neutral when strained. Reorganization of DNA...... cannot be done without some level of temporal tensile stress, and as a consequence chiral molecules, such as helices, will twist under strain. The requirement that the nucleosome, constituting the nucleosome core particle and linker DNA, has a vanishing strain-twist coupling leads to a requirement for...

  13. Triple helix DNA alters nucleosomal histone-DNA interactions and acts as a nucleosome barrier.

    OpenAIRE

    Westin, L; Blomquist, P.; Milligan, J F; Wrange, O

    1995-01-01

    Oligonucleotides which form triple helical complexes on double-stranded DNA have been previously reported to selectively inhibit transcription both in vitro and in vivo by physically blocking RNA polymerase or transcription factor access to the DNA template. Here we show that a 16mer oligonucleotide, which forms triple helix DNA by binding to a 16 bp homopurine segment, alters the formation of histone-DNA contacts during in vitro nucleosome reconstitution. This effect was DNA sequence-specifi...

  14. DPNuc: Identifying Nucleosome Positions Based on the Dirichlet Process Mixture Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huidong; Guan, Jihong; Zhou, Shuigeng

    2015-01-01

    Nucleosomes and the free linker DNA between them assemble the chromatin. Nucleosome positioning plays an important role in gene transcription regulation, DNA replication and repair, alternative splicing, and so on. With the rapid development of ChIP-seq, it is possible to computationally detect the positions of nucleosomes on chromosomes. However, existing methods cannot provide accurate and detailed information about the detected nucleosomes, especially for the nucleosomes with complex configurations where overlaps and noise exist. Meanwhile, they usually require some prior knowledge of nucleosomes as input, such as the size or the number of the unknown nucleosomes, which may significantly influence the detection results. In this paper, we propose a novel approach DPNuc for identifying nucleosome positions based on the Dirichlet process mixture model. In our method, Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulations are employed to determine the mixture model with no need of prior knowledge about nucleosomes. Compared with three existing methods, our approach can provide more detailed information of the detected nucleosomes and can more reasonably reveal the real configurations of the chromosomes; especially, our approach performs better in the complex overlapping situations. By mapping the detected nucleosomes to a synthetic benchmark nucleosome map and two existing benchmark nucleosome maps, it is shown that our approach achieves a better performance in identifying nucleosome positions and gets a higher F-score. Finally, we show that our approach can more reliably detect the size distribution of nucleosomes. PMID:26671796

  15. Multiscale modelling of nucleosome core particle aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubartsev, Alexander P.; Korolev, Nikolay; Fan, Yanping; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2015-02-01

    The nucleosome core particle (NCP) is the basic building block of chromatin. Under the influence of multivalent cations, isolated mononucleosomes exhibit a rich phase behaviour forming various columnar phases with characteristic NCP-NCP stacking. NCP stacking is also a regular element of chromatin structure in vivo. Understanding the mechanism of nucleosome stacking and the conditions leading to self-assembly of NCPs is still incomplete. Due to the complexity of the system and the need to describe electrostatics properly by including the explicit mobile ions, novel modelling approaches based on coarse-grained (CG) methods at the multiscale level becomes a necessity. In this work we present a multiscale CG computer simulation approach to modelling interactions and self-assembly of solutions of NCPs induced by the presence of multivalent cations. Starting from continuum simulations including explicit three-valent cobalt(III)hexammine (CoHex3+) counterions and 20 NCPs, based on a previously developed advanced CG NCP model with one bead per amino acid and five beads per two DNA base pair unit (Fan et al 2013 PLoS One 8 e54228), we use the inverse Monte Carlo method to calculate effective interaction potentials for a ‘super-CG’ NCP model consisting of seven beads for each NCP. These interaction potentials are used in large-scale simulations of up to 5000 NCPs, modelling self-assembly induced by CoHex3+. The systems of ‘super-CG’ NCPs form a single large cluster of stacked NCPs without long-range order in agreement with experimental data for NCPs precipitated by the three-valent polyamine, spermidine3+.

  16. DNA-Protein interactions in nucleosomes and in Chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crosslinking induced by ultraviolet light irradiation at 254 nm has been utilized to investigate the structure of chromatin and isolated nucleosomes. The results presented here imply that the four core histones, as well as histone H1, have reactive groups within a bond length of the DNA bases. In nucleosomes depleted of H1, all of the core histones react similarly with the DNA and form crosslinks. In chromatin, the rate of crosslinking of all histones to DNA is essentially similar. Comparison of mononucleosomes, dinucleosomes and whole chromatin shows that the rate of crosslinking increase significantly with increasing number of connected nucleosomes. These differences in the rate of crosslinking are interpreted in terms of interactions between neighbouring nucleosomes on the chromatin fiber, which are absent in an isolated mononucleosome. (orig.)

  17. Multiplexing Genetic and Nucleosome Positioning Codes: A Computational Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslami-Mossallam, Behrouz; Schram, Raoul D; Tompitak, Marco; van Noort, John; Schiessel, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic DNA is strongly bent inside fundamental packaging units: the nucleosomes. It is known that their positions are strongly influenced by the mechanical properties of the underlying DNA sequence. Here we discuss the possibility that these mechanical properties and the concomitant nucleosome positions are not just a side product of the given DNA sequence, e.g. that of the genes, but that a mechanical evolution of DNA molecules might have taken place. We first demonstrate the possibility of multiplexing classical and mechanical genetic information using a computational nucleosome model. In a second step we give evidence for genome-wide multiplexing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosacharomyces pombe. This suggests that the exact positions of nucleosomes play crucial roles in chromatin function. PMID:27272176

  18. New GroEL-like chaperonin of bacteriophage OBP Pseudomonas fluorescens suppresses thermal protein aggregation in an ATP-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenyuk, Pavel I; Orlov, Victor N; Sokolova, Olga S; Kurochkina, Lidia P

    2016-08-01

    Recently, we discovered and studied the first virus-encoded chaperonin of bacteriophage EL Pseudomonas aeruginosa, gene product (gp) 146. In the present study, we performed bioinformatics analysis of currently predicted GroEL-like proteins encoded by phage genomes in comparison with cellular and mitochondrial chaperonins. Putative phage chaperonins share a low similarity and do not form a monophyletic group; nevertheless, they are closer to bacterial chaperonins in the phylogenetic tree. Experimental investigation of putative GroEL-like chaperonin proteins has been continued by physicochemical and functional characterization of gp246 encoded by the genome of Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteriophage OBP. Unlike the more usual double-ring architecture of chaperonins, including the EL gp146, the recombinant gp246 produced by Escherichia coli cells has been purified as a single heptameric ring. It possesses ATPase activity and does not require a co-chaperonin for its function. In vitro experiments demonstrated that gp246 is able to suppress the thermal protein inactivation and aggregation in an ATP-dependent manner, thus indicating chaperonin function. Single-particle electron microscopy analysis revealed the different conformational states of OBP chaperonin, depending on the bound nucleotide. PMID:27247423

  19. Polyphosphate/ATP-dependent NAD kinase of Corynebacterium glutamicum: biochemical properties and impact of ppnK overexpression on lysine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Steffen N; Niederholtmeyer, Henrike; Schmitz, Katja; Schoberth, Siegfried M; Wendisch, Volker F

    2010-06-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) is synthesized by phosphorylation of either oxidized or reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD/NADH). Here, the cg1601/ppnK gene product from Corynebacterium glutamicum genome was purified from recombinant Escherichia coli and enzymatic characterization revealed its activity as a polyphosphate (PolyP)/ATP-dependent NAD kinase (PPNK). PPNK from C. glutamicum was shown to be active as homotetramer accepting PolyP, ATP, and even ADP for phosphorylation of NAD. The catalytic efficiency with ATP as phosphate donor for phosphorylation of NAD was higher than with PolyP. With respect to the chain length of PolyP, PPNK was active with short-chain PolyPs. PPNK activity was independent of bivalent cations when using ATP, but was enhanced by manganese and in particular by magnesium ions. When using PolyP, PPNK required bivalent cations, preferably manganese ions, for activity. PPNK was inhibited by NADP and NADH at concentrations below millimolar. Overexpression of ppnK in C. glutamicum wild type slightly reduced growth and ppnK overexpression in the lysine producing strain DM1729 resulted in a lysine product yield on glucose of 0.136 +/- 0.006 mol lysine (mol glucose)(-1), which was 12% higher than that of the empty vector control strain. PMID:20180116

  20. A futile cycle, formed between two ATP-dependant -glutamyl cycle enzymes, -glutamyl cysteine synthetase and 5-oxoprolinase: the cause of cellular ATP depletion in nephrotic cystinosis?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Akhilesh Kumar; Anand Kumar Bachhawat

    2010-03-01

    Cystinosis, an inherited disease caused by a defect in the lysosomal cystine transporter (CTNS), is characterized by renal proximal tubular dysfunction. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion appears to be a key event in the pathophysiology of the disease, even though the manner in which ATP depletion occurs is still a puzzle. We present a model that explains how a futile cycle that is generated between two ATP-utilizing enzymes of the -glutamyl cycle leads to ATP depletion. The enzyme -glutamyl cysteine synthetase (-GCS), in the absence of cysteine, forms 5-oxoproline (instead of the normal substrate, -glutamyl cysteine) and the 5-oxoproline is converted into glutamate by the ATP-dependant enzyme, 5-oxoprolinase. Thus, in cysteine-limiting conditions, glutamate is cycled back into glutamate via 5-oxoproline at the cost of two ATP molecules without production of glutathione and is the cause of the decreased levels of glutathione synthesis, as well as the ATP depletion observed in these cells. The model is also compatible with the differences seen in the human patients and the mouse model of cystinosis, where renal failure is not observed.

  1. Nucleosome alterations caused by mutations at modifiable histone residues in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongde; Wang, Pingyan; Liu, Lingjie; Min, Zhu; Luo, Kun; Wan, Yakun

    2015-01-01

    Nucleosome organization exhibits dynamic properties depending on the cell state and environment. Histone proteins, fundamental components of nucleosomes, are subject to chemical modifications on particular residues. We examined the effect of substituting modifiable residues of four core histones with the non-modifiable residue alanine on nucleosome dynamics. We mapped the genome-wide nucleosomes in 22 histone mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and compared the nucleosome alterations relative to the wild-type strain. Our results indicated that different types of histone mutation resulted in different phenotypes and a distinct reorganization of nucleosomes. Nucleosome occupancy was altered at telomeres, but not at centromeres. The first nucleosomes upstream (−1) and downstream (+1) of the transcription start site (TSS) were more dynamic than other nucleosomes. Mutations in histones affected the nucleosome array downstream of the TSS. Highly expressed genes, such as ribosome genes and genes involved in glycolysis, showed increased nucleosome occupancy in many types of histone mutant. In particular, the H3K56A mutant exhibited a high percentage of dynamic genomic regions, decreased nucleosome occupancy at telomeres, increased occupancy at the +1 and −1 nucleosomes, and a slow growth phenotype under stress conditions. Our findings provide insight into the influence of histone mutations on nucleosome dynamics. PMID:26498326

  2. Nucleosomes determine their own patch size in base excision repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meas, Rithy; Smerdon, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) processes non-helix distorting lesions (e.g., uracils and gaps) and is composed of two subpathways that differ in the number of nucleotides (nts) incorporated during the DNA synthesis step: short patch (SP) repair incorporates 1 nt and long patch (LP) repair incorporates 2-12 nts. This choice for either LP or SP repair has not been analyzed in the context of nucleosomes. Initial studies with uracil located in nucleosome core DNA showed a distinct DNA polymerase extension profile in cell-free extracts that specifically limits extension to 1 nt, suggesting a preference for SP BER. Therefore, we developed an assay to differentiate long and short repair patches in 'designed' nucleosomes containing a single-nucleotide gap at specific locations relative to the dyad center. Using cell-free extracts or purified enzymes, we found that DNA lesions in the nucleosome core are preferentially repaired by DNA polymerase β and there is a significant reduction in BER polymerase extension beyond 1 nt, creating a striking bias for incorporation of short patches into nucleosomal DNA. These results show that nucleosomes control the patch size used by BER. PMID:27265863

  3. The universality of nucleosome organization: from yeast to human

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chereji, Razvan

    The basic units of DNA packaging are called nucleosomes. Their locations on the chromosomes play an essential role in gene regulation. We study nucleosome positioning in yeast, fly, mouse, and human, and build biophysical models in order to explain the genome-wide nucleosome organization. We show that DNA sequence alone is not able to generate the phased arrays of nucleosomes observed in vivo near the transcription start sites. We discuss simple models which can account for the formation of nucleosome depleted regions and nucleosome phasing at the gene promoters. We show that the same principles apply to different organisms. References: [1] RV Chereji, D Tolkunov, G Locke, AV Morozov - Phys. Rev. E 83, 050903 (2011) [2] RV Chereji, AV Morozov - J. Stat. Phys. 144, 379 (2011) [3] RV Chereji, AV Morozov - Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 111, 5236 (2014) [4] RV Chereji, T-W Kan, et al. - Nucleic Acids Res. (2015) doi: 10.1093/nar/gkv978 [5] RV Chereji, AV Morozov - Brief. Funct. Genomics 14, 50 (2015) [6] HA Cole, J Ocampo, JR Iben, RV Chereji, DJ Clark - Nucleic Acids Res. 42, 12512 (2014) [7] D Ganguli, RV Chereji, J Iben, HA Cole, DJ Clark - Genome Res. 24, 1637 (2014)

  4. Multiple distinct stimuli increase measured nucleosome occupancy around human promoters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuong D Pham

    Full Text Available Nucleosomes can block access to transcription factors. Thus the precise localization of nucleosomes relative to transcription start sites and other factor binding sites is expected to be a critical component of transcriptional regulation. Recently developed microarray approaches have allowed the rapid mapping of nucleosome positions over hundreds of kilobases (kb of human genomic DNA, although these approaches have not yet been widely used to measure chromatin changes associated with changes in transcription. Here, we use custom tiling microarrays to reveal changes in nucleosome positions and abundance that occur when hormone-bound glucocorticoid receptor (GR binds to sites near target gene promoters in human osteosarcoma cells. The most striking change is an increase in measured nucleosome occupancy at sites spanning ∼1 kb upstream and downstream of transcription start sites, which occurs one hour after addition of hormone, but is lost at 4 hours. Unexpectedly, this increase was seen both on GR-regulated and GR-non-regulated genes. In addition, the human SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling factor (a GR co-activator was found to be important for increased occupancy upon hormone treatment and also for low nucleosome occupancy without hormone. Most surprisingly, similar increases in nucleosome occupancy were also seen on both regulated and non-regulated promoters during differentiation of human myeloid leukemia cells and upon activation of human CD4+ T-cells. These results indicate that dramatic changes in chromatin structure over ∼2 kb of human promoters may occur genomewide and in response to a variety of stimuli, and suggest novel models for transcriptional regulation.

  5. Leishmania infantum LeIF protein is an ATP-dependent RNA helicase and an eIF4A-like factor that inhibits translation in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barhoumi, Mourad; Tanner, N K; Banroques, Josette; Linder, Patrick; Guizani, Ikram

    2006-11-01

    LeIF, a Leishmania protein similar to the eukaryotic initiation factor eIF4A, which is a prototype of the DEAD box protein family, was originally described as a Th1-type natural adjuvant and as an antigen that induces an IL12-mediated Th1 response in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of leishmaniasis patients. This study aims to characterize this protein by comparative biochemical and genetic analysis with eIF4A in order to assess its potential as a target for drug development. We show that a His-tagged, recombinant, LeIF protein of Leishmania infantum, which was purified from Escherichia coli, is both an RNA-dependent ATPase and an ATP-dependent RNA helicase in vitro, as described previously for other members of the DEAD box helicase protein family. In vivo experiments show that the LeIF gene cannot complement the deletion of the essential TIF1 and TIF2 genes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that encode eIF4A. In contrast, expression of LeIF inhibits yeast growth when endogenous eIF4A is expressed off only one of its two encoding genes. Furthermore, in vitro binding assays show that LeIF interacts with yeast eIF4G. These results show an unproductive interaction of LeIF with translation initiation factors in yeast. Furthermore, the 25 amino terminal residues were shown to enhance the ability of LeIF to interfere with the translation machinery in yeast. PMID:17087726

  6. Integrated molecular mechanism directing nucleosome reorganization by human FACT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunaka, Yasuo; Fujiwara, Yoshie; Oyama, Takuji; Hirose, Susumu; Morikawa, Kosuke

    2016-03-15

    Facilitates chromatin transcription (FACT) plays essential roles in chromatin remodeling during DNA transcription, replication, and repair. Our structural and biochemical studies of human FACT-histone interactions present precise views of nucleosome reorganization, conducted by the FACT-SPT16 (suppressor of Ty 16) Mid domain and its adjacent acidic AID segment. AID accesses the H2B N-terminal basic region exposed by partial unwrapping of the nucleosomal DNA, thereby triggering the invasion of FACT into the nucleosome. The crystal structure of the Mid domain complexed with an H3-H4 tetramer exhibits two separate contact sites; the Mid domain forms a novel intermolecular β structure with H4. At the other site, the Mid-H2A steric collision on the H2A-docking surface of the H3-H4 tetramer within the nucleosome induces H2A-H2B displacement. This integrated mechanism results in disrupting the H3 αN helix, which is essential for retaining the nucleosomal DNA ends, and hence facilitates DNA stripping from histone. PMID:26966247

  7. nuMap: A Web Platform for Accurate Prediction of Nucleosome Positioning

    OpenAIRE

    Alharbi, Bader A.; Alshammari, Thamir H.; Felton, Nathan L.; Zhurkin, Victor B.; Cui, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Nucleosome positioning is critical for gene expression and of major biological interest. The high cost of experimentally mapping nucleosomal arrangement signifies the need for computational approaches to predict nucleosome positions at high resolution. Here, we present a web-based application to fulfill this need by implementing two models, YR and W/S schemes, for the translational and rotational positioning of nucleosomes, respectively. Our methods are based on sequence-dependent anisotropic...

  8. Stimulation of the Drosophila immune system alters genome-wide nucleosome occupancy

    OpenAIRE

    Yingxue Ren; Vera, Daniel L.; Kimberly A. Hughes; Dennis, Jonathan H.

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotes, nucleosomes participate in all DNA-templated events by regulating access to the underlying DNA sequence. However, nucleosome dynamics during a genome response have not been well characterized [1,2]. We stimulated Drosophila S2 cells with heat-killed Gram-negative bacteria Salmonella typhimurium, and mapped genome-wide nucleosome occupancy at high temporal resolution by MNase-seq using Illumina HiSeq 2500. We show widespread nucleosome occupancy change in S2 cells during the imm...

  9. Biophysical Characterization of the Centromere-specific Nucleosome from Budding Yeast*

    OpenAIRE

    Kingston, Isabel J.; Yung, Jasmine S. Y.; Singleton, Martin R

    2010-01-01

    The centromeric DNA of all eukaryotes is assembled upon a specialized nucleosome containing a histone H3 variant known as CenH3. Despite the importance and conserved nature of this protein, the characteristics of the centromeric nucleosome are still poorly understood. In particular, the stoichiometry and DNA-binding properties of the CenH3 nucleosome have been the subject of some debate. We have characterized the budding yeast centromeric nucleosome by biochemical and biophysical methods and ...

  10. Cse4 is Part of an Octameric Nucleosome in Budding Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Camahort, Raymond; Shivaraju, Manjunatha; Mattingly, Mark; Li, Bing; Nakanishi, Shima; Zhu, Dongxiao; Shilatifard, Ali; Workman, Jerry L.; Gerton, Jennifer L.

    2009-01-01

    The budding yeast CenH3 histone variant Cse4 localizes to centromeric nucleosomes and is required for kinetochore assembly and chromosome segregation. The exact composition of centromeric Cse4–containing nucleosomes is a subject of debate. ChIP-chip experiments and high resolution quantitative PCR confirm that there is a single Cse4 nucleosome at each centromere, and additional regions of the genome contain Cse4 nucleosomes at low levels. Using unbiased biochemical, cell biological, and genet...

  11. Structural constraints revealed in consistent nucleosome positions in the genome of S. cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaou Christoforos

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent advances in the field of high-throughput genomics have rendered possible the performance of genome-scale studies to define the nucleosomal landscapes of eukaryote genomes. Such analyses are aimed towards providing a better understanding of the process of nucleosome positioning, for which several models have been suggested. Nevertheless, questions regarding the sequence constraints of nucleosomal DNA and how they may have been shaped through evolution remain open. In this paper, we analyze in detail different experimental nucleosome datasets with the aim of providing a hypothesis for the emergence of nucleosome-forming sequences. Results We compared the complete sets of nucleosome positions for the budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae as defined in the output of two independent experiments with the use of two different experimental techniques. We found that Conclusion Our findings may be combined into a hypothesis for the emergence of a weak nucleosome-positioning code. According to this hypothesis, consistent nucleosomes may be partly guided by nearby nucleosome-free regions through statistical positioning. Once established, a set of well-positioned consistent nucleosomes may impose secondary constraints that further shape the structure of the underlying DNA. We were able to capture these constraints through the application of a recently introduced structural property that is related to the symmetry of DNA curvature. Furthermore, we found that both consistently positioned nucleosomes and their adjacent nucleosome-free regions show an increased tendency towards conservation of this structural feature.

  12. Hierarchical regulation of the genome: global changes in nucleosome organization potentiate genome response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, Brittany S.; Druliner, Brooke R.; Vera, Daniel L.; Avey, Denis; Zhu, Fanxiu; Dennis, Jonathan H.

    2016-01-01

    Nucleosome occupancy is critically important in regulating access to the eukaryotic genome. Few studies in human cells have measured genome-wide nucleosome distributions at high temporal resolution during a response to a common stimulus. We measured nucleosome distributions at high temporal resolution following Kaposi's-sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) reactivation using our newly developed mTSS-seq technology, which maps nucleosome distribution at the transcription start sites (TSS) of all human genes. Nucleosomes underwent widespread changes in organization 24 hours after KSHV reactivation and returned to their basal nucleosomal architecture 48 hours after KSHV reactivation. The widespread changes consisted of an indiscriminate remodeling event resulting in the loss of nucleosome rotational phasing signals. Additionally, one in six TSSs in the human genome possessed nucleosomes that are translationally remodeled. 72% of the loci with translationally remodeled nucleosomes have nucleosomes that moved to positions encoded by the underlying DNA sequence. Finally we demonstrated that these widespread alterations in nucleosomal architecture potentiated regulatory factor binding. These descriptions of nucleosomal architecture changes provide a new framework for understanding the role of chromatin in the genomic response, and have allowed us to propose a hierarchical model for chromatin-based regulation of genome response. PMID:26771136

  13. Reactivity in ELISA with DNA-loaded nucleosomes in patients with proliferative lupus nephritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieker, J.W.; Schlumberger, W.; McHugh, N.; Hamann, P.; Vlag, J. van der; Berden, J.H.M.

    2015-01-01

    Autoantibodies against nucleosomes are considered a hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We compared in patients with proliferative lupus nephritis the diagnostic usefulness of a dsDNA-loaded nucleosome ELISA (anti-dsDNA-NcX) with ELISAs in which dsDNA or nucleosomes alone were coated. Fi

  14. Ionizing Radiation Induces HMGB1 Cytoplasmic Translocation and Extracellular Release

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lili Wang; Li He; Guoqiang Bao; Xin He; Saijun Fan; Haichao Wang

    2016-01-01

    Objective A nucleosomal protein,HMGBI,can be secreted by activated immune cells or passively released by dying cells,thereby amplifying rigorous inflammatory responses.In this study we aimed to test the possibility that radiation similarly induces cytoplasmic HMGB1 translocation and release.Methods Human skin fibroblast (GM0639) and bronchial epithelial (16HBE) cells and rats were exposed to X-ray radiation,and HMGB1 translocation and release were then assessed by immunocytochemistry and immunoassay,respectively.Results At a wide dose range(4.0-12.0 Gy),X-ray radiation induced a dramatic cytoplasmic HMGB1 translocation,and triggered a time-and dose-dependent HMGB1 release both in vitro and in vivo.The radiation-mediated HMGB1 release was also associated with noticeable chromosomal DNA damage and loss of cell viability.Conclusions Radiation induces HMGB1 cytoplasmic translocation and extracellular release through active secretion and passive leakage processes.

  15. Coupling between Histone Conformations and DNA Geometry in Nucleosomes on a Microsecond Timescale: Atomistic Insights into Nucleosome Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaytan, Alexey K; Armeev, Grigoriy A; Goncearenco, Alexander; Zhurkin, Victor B; Landsman, David; Panchenko, Anna R

    2016-01-16

    An octamer of histone proteins wraps about 200bp of DNA into two superhelical turns to form nucleosomes found in chromatin. Although the static structure of the nucleosomal core particle has been solved, details of the dynamic interactions between histones and DNA remain elusive. We performed extensively long unconstrained, all-atom microsecond molecular dynamics simulations of nucleosomes including linker DNA segments and full-length histones in explicit solvent. For the first time, we were able to identify and characterize the rearrangements in nucleosomes on a microsecond timescale including the coupling between the conformation of the histone tails and the DNA geometry. We found that certain histone tail conformations promoted DNA bulging near its entry/exit sites, resulting in the formation of twist defects within the DNA. This led to a reorganization of histone-DNA interactions, suggestive of the formation of initial nucleosome sliding intermediates. We characterized the dynamics of the histone tails upon their condensation on the core and linker DNA and showed that tails may adopt conformationally constrained positions due to the insertion of "anchoring" lysines and arginines into the DNA minor grooves. Potentially, these phenomena affect the accessibility of post-translationally modified histone residues that serve as important sites for epigenetic marks (e.g., at H3K9, H3K27, H4K16), suggesting that interactions of the histone tails with the core and linker DNA modulate the processes of histone tail modifications and binding of the effector proteins. We discuss the implications of the observed results on the nucleosome function and compare our results to different experimental studies. PMID:26699921

  16. The relationship between periodic dinucleotides and the nucleosomal DNA deformation revealed by normal mode analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nucleosomes, which contain DNA and proteins, are the basic unit of eukaryotic chromatins. Polymers such as DNA and proteins are dynamic, and their conformational changes can lead to functional changes. Periodic dinucleotide patterns exist in nucleosomal DNA chains and play an important role in the nucleosome structure. In this paper, we use normal mode analysis to detect significant structural deformations of nucleosomal DNA and investigate the relationship between periodic dinucleotides and DNA motions. We have found that periodic dinucleotides are usually located at the peaks or valleys of DNA and protein motions, revealing that they dominate the nucleosome dynamics. Also, a specific dinucleotide pattern CA/TG appears most frequently

  17. Effect of the Spiroiminodihydantoin Lesion on Nucleosome Stability and Positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norabuena, Erika M; Barnes Williams, Sara; Klureza, Margaret A; Goehring, Liana J; Gruessner, Brian; Radhakrishnan, Mala L; Jamieson, Elizabeth R; Núñez, Megan E

    2016-04-26

    DNA is constantly under attack by oxidants, generating a variety of potentially mutagenic covalently modified species, including oxidized guanine base products. One such product is spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp), a chiral, propeller-shaped lesion that strongly destabilizes the DNA helix in its vicinity. Despite its unusual shape and thermodynamic effect on double-stranded DNA structure, DNA duplexes containing the Sp lesion form stable nucleosomes upon being incubated with histone octamers. Indeed, among six different combinations of lesion location and stereochemistry, only two duplexes display a diminished ability to form nucleosomes, and these only by ∼25%; the other four are statistically indistinguishable from the control. Nonetheless, kinetic factors also play a role: when the histone proteins have less time during assembly of the core particle to sample both lesion-containing and normal DNA strands, they are more likely to bind the Sp lesion DNA than during slower assembly processes that better approximate thermodynamic equilibrium. Using DNase I footprinting and molecular modeling, we discovered that the Sp lesion causes only a small perturbation (±1-2 bp) on the translational position of the DNA within the nucleosome. Each diastereomeric pair of lesions has the same effect on nucleosome positioning, but lesions placed at different locations behave differently, illustrating that the location of the lesion and not its shape serves as the primary determinant of the most stable DNA orientation. PMID:27074396

  18. Role of nucleosome remodeling in neurodevelopmental and intellectual disability disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez, Alberto J.; Wood, Marcelo A.

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly important to understand how epigenetic mechanisms control gene expression during neurodevelopment. Two epigenetic mechanisms that have received considerable attention are DNA methylation and histone acetylation. Human exome sequencing and genome-wide association studies have linked several neurobiological disorders to genes whose products actively regulate DNA methylation and histone acetylation. More recently, a third major epigenetic mechanism, nucleosome remodel...

  19. Comparative analysis of methods for genome-wide nucleosome cartography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintales, Luis; Vázquez, Enrique; Antequera, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    Nucleosomes contribute to compacting the genome into the nucleus and regulate the physical access of regulatory proteins to DNA either directly or through the epigenetic modifications of the histone tails. Precise mapping of nucleosome positioning across the genome is, therefore, essential to understanding the genome regulation. In recent years, several experimental protocols have been developed for this purpose that include the enzymatic digestion, chemical cleavage or immunoprecipitation of chromatin followed by next-generation sequencing of the resulting DNA fragments. Here, we compare the performance and resolution of these methods from the initial biochemical steps through the alignment of the millions of short-sequence reads to a reference genome to the final computational analysis to generate genome-wide maps of nucleosome occupancy. Because of the lack of a unified protocol to process data sets obtained through the different approaches, we have developed a new computational tool (NUCwave), which facilitates their analysis, comparison and assessment and will enable researchers to choose the most suitable method for any particular purpose. NUCwave is freely available at http://nucleosome.usal.es/nucwave along with a step-by-step protocol for its use. PMID:25296770

  20. Problem-elephant translocation: Translocating the problem and the elephant?

    OpenAIRE

    Fernando, Prithiviraj; Leimgruber, Peter; Prasad, Tharaka; Pastorini, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Human-elephant conflict (HEC) threatens the survival of endangered Asian elephants (Elephas maximus). Translocating "problem-elephants" is an important HEC mitigation and elephant conservation strategy across elephant range, with hundreds translocated annually. In the first comprehensive assessment of elephant translocation, we monitored 16 translocations in Sri Lanka with GPS collars. All translocated elephants were released into national parks. Two were killed within the parks where they we...

  1. Problem-Elephant Translocation: Translocating the Problem and the Elephant?

    OpenAIRE

    Fernando, Prithiviraj; Leimgruber, Peter; Prasad, Tharaka; Pastorini, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Human-elephant conflict (HEC) threatens the survival of endangered Asian elephants (Elephas maximus). Translocating “problem-elephants” is an important HEC mitigation and elephant conservation strategy across elephant range, with hundreds translocated annually. In the first comprehensive assessment of elephant translocation, we monitored 16 translocations in Sri Lanka with GPS collars. All translocated elephants were released into national parks. Two were killed within the parks where they we...

  2. Structured nucleosome fingerprints enable high-resolution mapping of chromatin architecture within regulatory regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schep, Alicia N; Buenrostro, Jason D; Denny, Sarah K; Schwartz, Katja; Sherlock, Gavin; Greenleaf, William J

    2015-11-01

    Transcription factors canonically bind nucleosome-free DNA, making the positioning of nucleosomes within regulatory regions crucial to the regulation of gene expression. Using the assay of transposase accessible chromatin (ATAC-seq), we observe a highly structured pattern of DNA fragment lengths and positions around nucleosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and use this distinctive two-dimensional nucleosomal "fingerprint" as the basis for a new nucleosome-positioning algorithm called NucleoATAC. We show that NucleoATAC can identify the rotational and translational positions of nucleosomes with up to base-pair resolution and provide quantitative measures of nucleosome occupancy in S. cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and human cells. We demonstrate the application of NucleoATAC to a number of outstanding problems in chromatin biology, including analysis of sequence features underlying nucleosome positioning, promoter chromatin architecture across species, identification of transient changes in nucleosome occupancy and positioning during a dynamic cellular response, and integrated analysis of nucleosome occupancy and transcription factor binding. PMID:26314830

  3. Using DNA mechanics to predict intrinsic and extrinsic nucleosome positioning signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, Alexandre

    2008-03-01

    In eukaryotic genomes, nucleosomes function to compact DNA and to regulate access to it both by simple physical occlusion and by providing the substrate for numerous covalent epigenetic tags. While nucleosome positions in vitro are determined by sequence alone, in vivo competition with other DNA-binding factors and action of chromatin remodeling enzymes play a role that needs to be quantified. We developed a biophysical, DNA mechanics-based model for the sequence dependence of DNA bending energies, and validated it against a collection of in vitro free energies of nucleosome formation and a nucleosome crystal structure; we also successfully designed both strong and poor histone binding sequences ab initio. For in vivo data from S.cerevisiae, the strongest positioning signal came from the competition with other factors rather than intrinsic nucleosome sequence preferences. Based on sequence alone, our model predicts that functional transcription factor binding sites tend to be covered by nucleosomes, yet are uncovered in vivo because functional sites cluster within a single nucleosome footprint and thus make transcription factors bind cooperatively. Similarly a weak enhancement of nucleosome binding in the TATA region becomes a strong depletion when the TATA-binding protein is included, in quantitative agreement with experiment. Our model distinguishes multiple ways in which genomic sequence influences nucleosome positions, and thus provides alternative explanations for several genome-wide experimental findings. In the future our approach will be used to rationally alter gene expression levels in model systems through redesign of nucleosome occupancy profiles.

  4. Dynamics of forced biopolymer translocation

    CERN Document Server

    Lehtola, V V; Kaski, K; 10.1209/0295-5075/85/58006

    2009-01-01

    We present results from our simulations of biopolymer translocation in a solvent which explain the main experimental findings. The forced translocation can be described by simple force balance arguments for the relevant range of pore potentials in experiments and biological systems. Scaling of translocation time with polymer length varies with pore force and friction. Hydrodynamics affects this scaling and significantly reduces translocation times.

  5. An in vitro-identified high-affinity nucleosome-positioning signal is capable of transiently positioning a nucleosome in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gracey Lia E

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The physiological function of eukaryotic DNA occurs in the context of nucleosomal arrays that can expose or obscure defined segments of the genome. Certain DNA sequences are capable of strongly positioning a nucleosome in vitro, suggesting the possibility that favorable intrinsic signals might reproducibly structure chromatin segments. As high-throughput sequencing analyses of nucleosome coverage in vitro and in vivo have become possible, a vigorous debate has arisen over the degree to which intrinsic DNA:nucleosome affinities orchestrate the in vivo positions of nucleosomes, thereby controlling physical accessibility of specific sequences in DNA. Results We describe here the in vivo consequences of placing a synthetic high-affinity nucleosome-positioning signal, the 601 sequence, into a DNA plasmid vector in mice. Strikingly, the 601 sequence was sufficient to position nucleosomes during an early phase after introduction of the DNA into the mice (when the plasmid vector transgene was active. This positioning capability was transient, with a loss of strong positioning at a later time point when the transgenes had become silent. Conclusions These results demonstrate an ability of DNA sequences selected solely for nucleosome affinity to organize chromatin in vivo, and the ability of other mechanisms to overcome these interactions in a dynamic nuclear environment.

  6. An advanced coarse-grained nucleosome core particle model for computer simulations of nucleosome-nucleosome interactions under varying ionic conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanping Fan

    Full Text Available In the eukaryotic cell nucleus, DNA exists as chromatin, a compact but dynamic complex with histone proteins. The first level of DNA organization is the linear array of nucleosome core particles (NCPs. The NCP is a well-defined complex of 147 bp DNA with an octamer of histones. Interactions between NCPs are of paramount importance for higher levels of chromatin compaction. The polyelectrolyte nature of the NCP implies that nucleosome-nucleosome interactions must exhibit a great influence from both the ionic environment as well as the positively charged and highly flexible N-terminal histone tails, protruding out from the NCP. The large size of the system precludes a modelling analysis of chromatin at an all-atom level and calls for coarse-grained approximations. Here, a model of the NCP that include the globular histone core and the flexible histone tails described by one particle per each amino acid and taking into account their net charge is proposed. DNA wrapped around the histone core was approximated at the level of two base pairs represented by one bead (bases and sugar plus four beads of charged phosphate groups. Computer simulations, using a Langevin thermostat, in a dielectric continuum with explicit monovalent (K(+, divalent (Mg(2+ or trivalent (Co(NH(3(6 (3+ cations were performed for systems with one or ten NCPs. Increase of the counterion charge results in a switch from repulsive NCP-NCP interaction in the presence of K(+, to partial aggregation with Mg(2+ and to strong mutual attraction of all 10 NCPs in the presence of CoHex(3+. The new model reproduced experimental results and the structure of the NCP-NCP contacts is in agreement with available data. Cation screening, ion-ion correlations and tail bridging contribute to the NCP-NCP attraction and the new NCP model accounts for these interactions.

  7. DiNuP: a systematic approach to identify regions of differential nucleosome positioning

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Kai; Tang, Qianzi; Feng, Jianxing; Liu, Xiaole Shirley; Zhang, Yong

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: With the rapid development of high-throughput sequencing technologies, the genome-wide profiling of nucleosome positioning has become increasingly affordable. Many future studies will investigate the dynamic behaviour of nucleosome positioning in cells that have different states or that are exposed to different conditions. However, a robust method to effectively identify the regions of differential nucleosome positioning (RDNPs) has not been previously available. Results: We descr...

  8. Preferential Nucleosome Assembly at DNA Triplet Repeats from the Myotonic Dystrophy Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuh-Hwa; Amirhaeri, Sorour; Kang, Seongman; Wells, Robert D.; Griffith, Jack D.

    1994-07-01

    The expansion of CTG repeats in DNA occurs in or near genes involved in several human diseases, including myotonic dystrophy and Huntington's disease. Nucleosomes, the basic structural element of chromosomes, consist of 146 base pairs of DNA coiled about an octamer of histone proteins and mediate general transcriptional repression. Electron microscopy was used to examine in vitro the nucleosome assembly of DNA containing repeating CTG triplets. The efficiency of nucleosome formation increased with expanded triplet blocks, suggesting that such blocks may repress transcription through the creation of stable nucleosomes.

  9. Genome-wide mapping of nucleosome positioning and DNA methylation within individual DNA molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Theresa K.; Liu, Yaping; Lay, Fides D.; Liang, Gangning; Berman, Benjamin P.; Jones, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    DNA methylation and nucleosome positioning work together to generate chromatin structures that regulate gene expression. Nucleosomes are typically mapped using nuclease digestion requiring significant amounts of material and varying enzyme concentrations. We have developed a method (NOMe-seq) that uses a GpC methyltransferase (M.CviPI) and next generation sequencing to generate a high resolution footprint of nucleosome positioning genome-wide using less than 1 million cells while retaining endogenous DNA methylation information from the same DNA strand. Using a novel bioinformatics pipeline, we show a striking anti-correlation between nucleosome occupancy and DNA methylation at CTCF regions that is not present at promoters. We further show that the extent of nucleosome depletion at promoters is directly correlated to expression level and can accommodate multiple nucleosomes and provide genome-wide evidence that expressed non-CpG island promoters are nucleosome-depleted. Importantly, NOMe-seq obtains DNA methylation and nucleosome positioning information from the same DNA molecule, giving the first genome-wide DNA methylation and nucleosome positioning correlation at the single molecule, and thus, single cell level, that can be used to monitor disease progression and response to therapy. PMID:22960375

  10. Divalent Metal- and High Mobility Group N Protein-Dependent Nucleosome Stability and Conformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle S. Ong

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available High mobility group N proteins (HMGNs bind specifically to the nucleosome core and act as chromatin unfolding and activating factors. Using an all-Xenopus system, we found that HMGN1 and HMGN2 binding to nucleosomes results in distinct ion-dependent conformation and stability. HMGN2 association with nucleosome core particle or nucleosomal array in the presence of divalent metal triggers a reversible transition to a species with much reduced electrophoretic mobility, consistent with a less compact state of the nucleosome. Residues outside of the nucleosome binding domain are required for the activity, which is also displayed by an HMGN1 truncation product lacking part of the regulatory domain. In addition, thermal denaturation assays show that the presence of 1 mM Mg2+> or Ca2+ gives a reduction in nucleosome core terminus stability, which is further substantially diminished by the binding of HMGN2 or truncated HMGN1. Our findings emphasize the importance of divalent metals in nucleosome dynamics and suggest that the differential biological activities of HMGNs in chromatin activation may involve different conformational alterations and modulation of nucleosome core stability.

  11. Activator control of nucleosome occupancy in activation and repression of transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gene O Bryant

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between chromatin structure and gene expression is a subject of intense study. The universal transcriptional activator Gal4 removes promoter nucleosomes as it triggers transcription, but how it does so has remained obscure. The reverse process, repression of transcription, has often been correlated with the presence of nucleosomes. But it is not known whether nucleosomes are required for that effect. A new quantitative assay describes, for any given location, the fraction of DNA molecules in the population that bears a nucleosome at any given instant. This allows us to follow the time courses of nucleosome removal and reformation, in wild-type and mutant cells, upon activation (by galactose and repression (by glucose of the GAL genes of yeast. We show that upon being freed of its inhibitor Gal80 by the action of galactose, Gal4 quickly recruits SWI/SNF to the genes, and that nucleosome "remodeler" rapidly removes promoter nucleosomes. In the absence of SWI/SNF, Gal4's action also results in nucleosome removal and the activation of transcription, but both processes are significantly delayed. Addition of glucose to cells growing in galactose represses transcription. But if galactose remains present, Gal4 continues to work, recruiting SWI/SNF and maintaining the promoter nucleosome-free despite it being repressed. This requirement for galactose is obviated in a mutant in which Gal4 works constitutively. These results show how an activator's recruiting function can control chromatin structure both during gene activation and repression. Thus, both under activating and repressing conditions, the activator can recruit an enzymatic machine that removes promoter nucleosomes. Our results show that whereas promoter nucleosome removal invariably accompanies activation, reformation of nucleosomes is not required for repression. The finding that there are two routes to nucleosome removal and activation of transcription-one that requires the

  12. Reactivity in ELISA with DNA-loaded nucleosomes in patients with proliferative lupus nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieker, Jürgen; Schlumberger, Wolfgang; McHugh, Neil; Hamann, Philip; van der Vlag, Johan; Berden, Jo H

    2015-11-01

    Autoantibodies against nucleosomes are considered a hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We compared in patients with proliferative lupus nephritis the diagnostic usefulness of a dsDNA-loaded nucleosome ELISA (anti-dsDNA-NcX) with ELISAs in which dsDNA or nucleosomes alone were coated. First, we analysed whether DNA loading on nucleosomes led to masking of epitopes by using defined monoclonal anti-DNA, anti-histone and nucleosome-specific autoantibodies to evaluate the accessibility of nucleosomal epitopes in the anti-dsDNA-NcX ELISA. Second, autoantibody levels were measured in these 3 ELISAs in 100 patients with proliferative lupus nephritis (LN) before immunosuppressive treatment and in 128 non-SLE disease controls. In patients with LN inter-assay comparisons and associations with clinical and serological parameters were analysed. The panel of monoclonal antibodies revealed that all epitopes were equally accessible in the anti-dsDNA-NcX ELISA as in the two other ELISAs. Patients with proliferative lupus nephritis were positive with dsDNA-loaded nucleosomes in 86%, with DNA in 66% and with nucleosomes in 85%. In the non-lupus disease control group these frequencies were 1.6% (2 out of 128) for both the anti-dsDNA-NcX and the anti-dsDNA ELISA and 0% in the anti-nucleosome ELISA. The levels in the anti-dsDNA-NcX ELISA were high in a group of patients with LN that showed absent reactivity in the anti-DNA or low levels in the anti-nucleosome ELISA. Anti-dsDNA-NcX positivity was associated with higher SLEDAI scores within this group. Within nucleosome-based ELISAs, we propose the anti-dsDNA-NcX ELISA as the preferred test system. PMID:26597199

  13. Causes of oncogenic chromosomal translocation

    OpenAIRE

    Aplan, Peter D.

    2005-01-01

    Non-random chromosomal translocations are frequently associated with a variety of cancers, especially hematologic malignancies and childhood sarcomas In addition to their diagnostic utility, chromosomal translocations are increasingly being used in the clinic to guide therapeutic decisions. However, the mechanisms which cause these translocations remain poorly understood. Illegit...

  14. “Point” Centromeres of Saccharomyces Harbor Single Centromere-Specific Nucleosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Henikoff, Steven; Henikoff, Jorja G.

    2012-01-01

    The “point” centromere of budding yeast is genetically defined by an ∼125-bp sequence. Recent fluorescence measurements of kinetochore clusters have suggested that this sequence specifies multiple centromere histone 3 (CenH3) nucleosomes. However, high-resolution mapping demonstrates that there is only one CenH3 nucleosome per centromere, providing biochemical confirmation of the point centromere model.

  15. Deposition of nucleosomal antigens (histones and DNA) in the epidermal basement membrane in human lupus nephritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootscholten, C.; Bruggen, M.C.J. van; Pijl, J.W. van der; Jong, E.M.G.J. de; Ligtenberg, G.; Derksen, R.H.W.M.; Berden, J.H.M.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Antinuclear autoantibodies complexed to nucleosomes can bind to heparan sulfate (HS) in the glomerular basement membrane. This binding is due to the binding of the positively charged histones to the strongly anionic HS. Nucleosomes and histones have been identified in glomerular deposits

  16. Structure and dynamics of DNA loops on nucleosomes studied with atomistic, microsecond-scale molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasi, Marco; Lavery, Richard

    2016-01-01

    DNA loop formation on nucleosomes is strongly implicated in chromatin remodeling and occurs spontaneously in nucleosomes subjected to superhelical stress. The nature of such loops depends crucially on the balance between DNA deformation and DNA interaction with the nucleosome core. Currently, no high-resolution structural data on these loops exist. Although uniform rod models have been used to study loop size and shape, these models make assumptions concerning DNA mechanics and DNA–core binding. We present here atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulations for two different loop sizes. The results point to the key role of localized DNA kinking within the loops. Kinks enable the relaxation of DNA bending strain to be coupled with improved DNA–core interactions. Kinks lead to small, irregularly shaped loops that are asymmetrically positioned with respect to the nucleosome core. We also find that loop position can influence the dynamics of the DNA segments at the extremities of the nucleosome. PMID:27098037

  17. Stimulation of the Drosophila immune system alters genome-wide nucleosome occupancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingxue Ren

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, nucleosomes participate in all DNA-templated events by regulating access to the underlying DNA sequence. However, nucleosome dynamics during a genome response have not been well characterized [1,2]. We stimulated Drosophila S2 cells with heat-killed Gram-negative bacteria Salmonella typhimurium, and mapped genome-wide nucleosome occupancy at high temporal resolution by MNase-seq using Illumina HiSeq 2500. We show widespread nucleosome occupancy change in S2 cells during the immune response, with the significant nucleosomal loss occurring at 4 h after stimulation. Data have been deposited to the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO database repository with the dataset identifier GSE64507.

  18. RSC remodeling of oligo-nucleosomes: an atomic force microscopy study

    CERN Document Server

    Montel, Fabien; Menoni, Hervé; Angelov, Dimitar; Dimitrov, Stéfan; Faivre-Moskalenko, Cendrine

    2010-01-01

    RSC is an essential chromatin remodeling factor that is required for the control of several processes including transcription, repair and replication. The ability of RSC to relocate centrally positioned mononucleosomes at the end of nucleosomal DNA is firmly established, but the data on RSC action on oligo-nucleosomal templates remains still scarce. By using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) imaging, we have quantitatively studied the RSC- induced mobilization of positioned di- and trinucleosomes as well as the directionality of mobilization on mononucleosomal template labeled at one end with streptavidin. AFM imaging showed only a limited set of distinct configurational states for the remodeling products. No stepwise or preferred directionality of the nucleosome motion was observed. Analysis of the corresponding reaction pathways allows deciphering the mechanistic features of RSC-induced nucleosome relocation. The final outcome of RSC remodeling of oligosome templates is the packing of the nucleosomes at the edg...

  19. Two AAA family peroxins, PpPex1p and PpPex6p, interact with each other in an ATP-dependent manner and are associated with different subcellular membranous structures distinct from peroxisomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, K N; Heyman, J A; Subramani, S

    1998-02-01

    Two peroxins of the AAA family, PpPex1p and PpPex6p, are required for peroxisome biogenesis in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Cells from the corresponding deletion strains (Pp delta pex1 and Pp delta pex6) contain only small vesicular remnants of peroxisomes, the bulk of peroxisomal matrix proteins is mislocalized to the cytosol, and these cells cannot grow in peroxisome-requiring media (J. A. Heyman, E. Monosov, and S. Subramani, J. Cell Biol. 127:1259-1273, 1994; A. P. Spong and S. Subramani, J. Cell Biol. 123:535-548, 1993). We demonstrate that PpPex1p and PpPex6p interact in an ATP-dependent manner. Genetically, the interaction was observed in a suppressor screen with a strain harboring a temperature-sensitive allele of PpPEX1 and in the yeast two-hybrid system. Biochemially, these proteins were coimmunoprecipitated with antibodies raised against either of the proteins, but only in the presence of ATP. The protein complex formed under these conditions was 320 to 400 kDa in size, consistent with the formation of a heterodimeric PpPex1p-PpPex6p complex. Subcellular fractionation revealed PpPex1p and PpPex6p to be predominantly associated with membranous subcellular structures distinct from peroxisomes. Based on their behavior in subcellular fractionation experiments including flotation gradients and on the fact that these structures are also present in a Pp delta pex3 strain in which no morphologically detectable peroxisomal remnants have been observed, we propose that these structures are small vesicles. The identification of vesicle-associated peroxins is novel and implies a role for these vesicles in peroxisome biogenesis. We discuss the possible role of the ATP-dependent interaction between PpPex1p and PpPex6p in regulating peroxisome biogenesis events. PMID:9447990

  20. Distinct influences of tandem repeats and retrotransposons on CENH3 nucleosome positioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gent Jonathan I

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Unique structural characteristics of centromere chromatin enable it to support assembly of the kinetochore and its associated tensions. The histone H3 variant CENH3 (centromeric histone H3 is viewed as the key element of centromere chromatin and its interaction with centromere DNA is epigenetic in that its localization to centromeres is not sequence-dependent. Results In order to investigate what influence the DNA sequence exerts on CENH3 chromatin structure, we examined CENH3 nucleosome footprints on maize centromere DNA. We found a predominant average nucleosome spacing pattern of roughly 190-bp intervals, which was also the dominant arrangement for nucleosomes genome-wide. For CENH3-containing nucleosomes, distinct modes of nucleosome positioning were evident within that general spacing constraint. Over arrays of the major ~156-bp centromeric satellite sequence (tandem repeat CentC, nucleosomes were not positioned in register with CentC monomers but in conformity with a striking ~10-bp periodicity of AA/TT dimers within the sequence. In contrast, nucleosomes on a class of centromeric retrotransposon (CRM2 lacked a detectable AA/TT periodicity but exhibited tightly phased positioning. Conclusions These data support a model in which general chromatin factors independent of both DNA sequence and CENH3 enforce roughly uniform centromeric nucleosome spacing while allowing flexibility in the mode in which nucleosomes are positioned. In the case of tandem repeat DNA, the natural bending effects related to AA/TT periodicity produce an energetically-favourable arrangement consistent with conformationally rigid nucleosomes and stable chromatin at centromeres.

  1. Major translocations in genetic counselling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    József Gábor Joó; Ákos Csaba; Zsanett Szigeti; Judit Nagy Oroszné; János Rigó jr

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To review major chromosome translocation, with special regard to the clinical differences between balanced and unbalanced, as well as de novo and inherited cases.Methods:The authors have included cases of major chromosome translocations detected during a20-year period.Among the28 cases,25 patients carried balanced and3 were affected by unbalanced translocations.Results:In cases of balanced translocation, maternal age ranged between26 and42 years, with a median age value of(30.5±2.67) years, while in unbalanced translocations the values were between24-37 with a median age of(30.5±4.59) years.In three cases(13%) of balanced translocations in the patient’s history previous chromosomal aberrations had been recorded.In nine cases of the same group(39%) previous miscarriages were reported.In cases in which balanced translocation was suspected, karyotyping was done in the16th-23rdgestational weeks.In three cases of unbalanced translocation, karyotyping was performed in weeks18 or19. Among the28 cases examined by us,12 carried reciprocal and16 were affected byRobertsonian translocations.If the involvement of chromosomes in balanced translocations was concerned, chromosome14was found to be overwhelmingly affected.In14 of the25 cases(56%) examined by us, this chromosome was definitely affected by translocation.Frequently occurring translocations in chromosomes1,13 and22 are also worth mentioning.Conclusions:Ultrasonography performed after karyotyping-in the cases of balanced translocations-and the results of fetal echocardiography-if such imaging was done at all-provide important information about the prognosis of the fetus.In case of sonographically normal fetal anatomy the good outcome of pregnancy is probable, while in cases of unbalanced translocations the sonography reconfirms the chances of poor outcome.

  2. New insights into two distinct nucleosome distributions: comparison of cross-platform positioning datasets in the yeast genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Yangyang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, a number of high-resolution genome-wide maps of nucleosome locations in S. cerevisiae have been derived experimentally. However, nucleosome positions are determined in vivo by the combined effects of numerous factors. Consequently, nucleosomes are not simple static units, which may explain the discrepancies in reported nucleosome positions as measured by different experiments. In order to more accurately depict the genome-wide nucleosome distribution, we integrated multiple nucleosomal positioning datasets using a multi-angle analysis strategy. Results To evaluate the contribution of chromatin structure to transcription, we used the vast amount of available nucleosome analyzed data. Analysis of this data allowed for the comprehensive identification of the connections between promoter nucleosome positioning patterns and various transcription-dependent properties. Further, we characterised the function of nucleosome destabilisation in the context of transcription regulation. Our results indicate that genes with similar nucleosome occupancy patterns share general transcription attributes. We identified the local regulatory correlation (LRC regions for two distinct types of nucleosomes and we assessed their regulatory properties. We also estimated the nucleosome reproducibility and measurement accuracy for high-confidence transcripts. We found that by maintaining a distance of ~13 bp between the upstream border of the +1 nucleosome and the transcription start sites (TSSs, the stable +1 nucleosome may form a barrier against the accessibility of the TSS and shape an optimum chromatin conformation for gene regulation. An in-depth analysis of nucleosome positioning in normally growing and heat shock cells suggested that the extent and patterns of nucleosome sliding are associated with gene activation. Conclusions Our results, which combine different types of data, suggest that cross-platform information, including

  3. Molecular dynamics of DNA and nucleosomes in solution studied by fast-scanning atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yuki; Higuchi, Yuji; Hizume, Kohji; Yokokawa, Masatoshi; Yoshimura, Shige H; Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Takeyasu, Kunio

    2010-05-01

    Nucleosome is a fundamental structural unit of chromatin, and the exposure from or occlusion into chromatin of genomic DNA is closely related to the regulation of gene expression. In this study, we analyzed the molecular dynamics of poly-nucleosomal arrays in solution by fast-scanning atomic force microscopy (AFM) to obtain a visual glimpse of nucleosome dynamics on chromatin fiber at single molecule level. The influence of the high-speed scanning probe on nucleosome dynamics can be neglected since bending elastic energy of DNA molecule showed similar probability distributions at different scan rates. In the sequential images of poly-nucleosomal arrays, the sliding of the nucleosome core particle and the dissociation of histone particle were visualized. The sliding showed limited fluctuation within approximately 50nm along the DNA strand. The histone dissociation occurs by at least two distinct ways: a dissociation of histone octamer or sequential dissociations of tetramers. These observations help us to develop the molecular mechanisms of nucleosome dynamics and also demonstrate the ability of fast-scanning AFM for the analysis of dynamic protein-DNA interaction in sub-seconds time scale. PMID:20236766

  4. Shearing of the CENP-A dimerization interface mediates plasticity in the octameric centromeric nucleosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winogradoff, David; Zhao, Haiqing; Dalal, Yamini; Papoian, Garegin A.

    2015-11-01

    The centromeric nucleosome is a key epigenetic determinant of centromere identity and function. Consequently, deciphering how CENP-A containing nucleosomes contribute structurally to centromere function is a fundamental question in chromosome biology. Here, we performed microsecond timescale all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of CENP-A and H3 nucleosomes, and report that the octameric CENP-A core particles and nucleosomes display different dynamics from their canonical H3-containing counterparts. The most significant motion observed is within key interactions at the heart of the CENP-A octameric core, wherein shearing of contacts within the CENP-A:CENP-A’ dimerization interface results in a weaker four helix bundle, and an extrusion of 10-30 bp of DNA near the pseudo-dyad. Coupled to other local and global fluctuations, the CENP-A nucleosome occupies a more rugged free energy landscape than the canonical H3 nucleosome. Taken together, our data suggest that CENP-A encodes enhanced distortability to the octameric nucleosome, which may allow for enhanced flexing of the histone core in vivo.

  5. A high-resolution map of nucleosome positioning on a fission yeast centromere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jun S; Liu, Xingkun; Liu, X Shirley; He, Xiangwei

    2008-07-01

    A key element for defining the centromere identity is the incorporation of a specific histone H3, CENPA, known as Cnp1p in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Previous studies have suggested that functional S. pombe centromeres lack regularly positioned nucleosomes and may involve chromatin remodeling as a key step of kinetochore assembly. We used tiling microarrays to show that nucleosomes are, in fact, positioned in regular intervals in the core of centromere 2, providing the first high-resolution map of regional centromere chromatin. Nucleosome locations are not disrupted by mutations in kinetochore protein genes cnp1, mis18, mis12, nuf2, mal2; overexpression of cnp1; or the deletion of ams2, which encodes a GATA-like factor participating in CENPA incorporation. Bioinformatics analysis of the centromere sequence indicates certain enriched motifs in linker regions between nucleosomes and reveals a sequence bias in nucleosome positioning. In addition, sequence analysis of nucleosome-free regions identifies novel binding sites of Ams2p. We conclude that centromeric nucleosome positions are stable and may be derived from the underlying DNA sequence. PMID:18411404

  6. Genome-wide chromatin remodeling identified at GC-rich long nucleosome-free regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Schwarzbauer

    Full Text Available To gain deeper insights into principles of cell biology, it is essential to understand how cells reorganize their genomes by chromatin remodeling. We analyzed chromatin remodeling on next generation sequencing data from resting and activated T cells to determine a whole-genome chromatin remodeling landscape. We consider chromatin remodeling in terms of nucleosome repositioning which can be observed most robustly in long nucleosome-free regions (LNFRs that are occupied by nucleosomes in another cell state. We found that LNFR sequences are either AT-rich or GC-rich, where nucleosome repositioning was observed much more prominently in GC-rich LNFRs - a considerable proportion of them outside promoter regions. Using support vector machines with string kernels, we identified a GC-rich DNA sequence pattern indicating loci of nucleosome repositioning in resting T cells. This pattern appears to be also typical for CpG islands. We found out that nucleosome repositioning in GC-rich LNFRs is indeed associated with CpG islands and with binding sites of the CpG-island-binding ZF-CXXC proteins KDM2A and CFP1. That this association occurs prominently inside and also prominently outside of promoter regions hints at a mechanism governing nucleosome repositioning that acts on a whole-genome scale.

  7. Studies of Experimental Bacterial Translocation

    OpenAIRE

    Stenbäck, Anders

    2005-01-01

    One of the main obstacles to maintaining patients with short bowel syndrome on parenteral nutrition, or successfully transplanting these patients with a small bowel graft, is the many severe infections that occur. Evidence is accumulating that translocating bacteria from the patient’s bowel causes a significant part of these infections. In this thesis bacterial translocation is studied in a Thiry-Vella loop of defunctionalised small bowel in the rat. Bacterial translocation to the mesenteric ...

  8. Association of a centromere specific nucleosome with the yeast plasmid partitioning locus: Implications beyond plasmid partitioning

    OpenAIRE

    Jayaram, Makkuni

    2011-01-01

    The genetically defined point centromeres of budding yeasts and the epigenetically specified regional centromeres of all other eukaryotes harbor a common epigenetic mark in the form of a non-standard nucleosome. Although, the composition of the protein core of the centromere specific nucleosome and the nature of the DNA wrap around it are at present controversial, there is no doubt that this specialized nucleosome harbors a variant of the standard histone H3 (cenH3). The association of cenH3,...

  9. The centromeric nucleosome of budding yeast is perfectly positioned and covers the entire centromere

    OpenAIRE

    Cole, Hope A.; Howard, Bruce H.; David J Clark

    2011-01-01

    The centromeres of budding yeast are ∼120 bp in size and contain three functional elements: an AT-rich region flanked by binding sites for Cbf1 and CBF3. A specialized nucleosome containing the H3 variant Cse4 (CenH3) is formed at the centromere. Our genome-wide paired-end sequencing of nucleosomal DNA reveals that the centromeric nucleosome contains a micrococcal nuclease-resistant kernel of 123–135 bp, depending on the centromere, and is therefore significantly shorter than the canonical nu...

  10. Nucleosome structure of the yeast CHA1 promoter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreira, José Manuel Alfonso; Holmberg, S

    1998-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae CHA1 gene encodes the catabolic L-serine (L-threonine) dehydratase. We have previously shown that the transcriptional activator protein Cha4p mediates serine/threonine induction of CHA1 expression. We used accessibility to micrococcal nuclease and DNase I to determine...... the in vivo chromatin structure of the CHA1 chromosomal locus, both in the non-induced state and upon induction. Upon activation, a precisely positioned nucleosome (nuc-1) occluding the TATA box and the transcription start site is removed. A strain devoid of Cha4p showed no chromatin alteration under....... Interestingly, in a sir4 deletion strain, repression of CHA1 is partly lost and activator-independent remodeling of nuc-1 is observed. We propose a model for CHA1 activation based on promoter remodeling through interactions of Cha4p with chromatin components other than basal factors and associated proteins....

  11. AFM Imaging of SWI/SNF action: mapping the nucleosome remodeling and sliding

    CERN Document Server

    Montel, Fabien; Saint-Jean, Philippe; Castelnovo, Martin; Moskalenko-Faivre, Cendrine

    2007-01-01

    We propose a combined experimental (Atomic Force Microscopy) and theoretical study of the structural and dynamical properties of nucleosomes. In contrast to biochemical approaches, this method allows to determine simultaneously the DNA complexed length distribution and nucleosome position in various contexts. First, we show that differences in the nucleo-proteic structure observed between conventional H2A and H2A.Bbd variant nucleosomes induce quantitative changes in the in the length distribution of DNA complexed with histones. Then, the sliding action of remodeling complex SWI/SNF is characterized through the evolution of the nucleosome position and wrapped DNA length mapping. Using a linear energetic model for the distribution of DNA complexed length, we extract the net wrapping energy of DNA onto the histone octamer, and compare it to previous studies.

  12. nuMap: a web platform for accurate prediction of nucleosome positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharbi, Bader A; Alshammari, Thamir H; Felton, Nathan L; Zhurkin, Victor B; Cui, Feng

    2014-10-01

    Nucleosome positioning is critical for gene expression and of major biological interest. The high cost of experimentally mapping nucleosomal arrangement signifies the need for computational approaches to predict nucleosome positions at high resolution. Here, we present a web-based application to fulfill this need by implementing two models, YR and W/S schemes, for the translational and rotational positioning of nucleosomes, respectively. Our methods are based on sequence-dependent anisotropic bending that dictates how DNA is wrapped around a histone octamer. This application allows users to specify a number of options such as schemes and parameters for threading calculation and provides multiple layout formats. The nuMap is implemented in Java/Perl/MySQL and is freely available for public use at http://numap.rit.edu. The user manual, implementation notes, description of the methodology and examples are available at the site. PMID:25220945

  13. nuMap:A Web Platform for Accurate Prediction of Nucleosome Positioning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bader A Alharbi; Thamir H Alshammari; Nathan L Felton; Victor B Zhurkin; Feng Cui

    2014-01-01

    Nucleosome positioning is critical for gene expression and of major biological interest. The high cost of experimentally mapping nucleosomal arrangement signifies the need for computational approaches to predict nucleosome positions at high resolution. Here, we present a web-based application to fulfill this need by implementing two models, YR and W/S schemes, for the translational and rotational positioning of nucleosomes, respectively. Our methods are based on sequence-dependent anisotropic bending that dictates how DNA is wrapped around a histone octamer. This application allows users to specify a number of options such as schemes and param-eters for threading calculation and provides multiple layout formats. The nuMap is implemented in Java/Perl/MySQL and is freely available for public use at http://numap.rit.edu. The user manual, implementation notes, description of the methodology and examples are available at the site.

  14. Regulation of nucleosome landscape and transcription factor targeting at tissue-specific enhancers by BRG1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Gangqing; Schones, Dustin E.; Cui, Kairong; Ybarra, River; Northrup, Daniel; Tang, Qingsong; Gattinoni, Luca; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Huang, Suming; Zhao, Keji

    2011-01-01

    Enhancers of transcription activate transcription via binding of sequence-specific transcription factors to their target sites in chromatin. In this report, we identify GATA1-bound distal sites genome-wide and find a global reorganization of the nucleosomes at these potential enhancers during differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to erythrocytes. We show that the catalytic subunit BRG1 of BAF complexes localizes to these distal sites during differentiation and generates a longer nucleosome linker region surrounding the GATA1 sites by shifting the flanking nucleosomes away. Intriguingly, we find that the nucleosome shifting specifically facilitates binding of TAL1 but not GATA1 and is linked to subsequent transcriptional regulation of target genes. PMID:21795385

  15. Understanding the connection between epigenetic DNA methylation and nucleosome positioning from computer simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillem Portella

    Full Text Available Cytosine methylation is one of the most important epigenetic marks that regulate the process of gene expression. Here, we have examined the effect of epigenetic DNA methylation on nucleosomal stability using molecular dynamics simulations and elastic deformation models. We found that methylation of CpG steps destabilizes nucleosomes, especially when these are placed in sites where the DNA minor groove faces the histone core. The larger stiffness of methylated CpG steps is a crucial factor behind the decrease in nucleosome stability. Methylation changes the positioning and phasing of the nucleosomal DNA, altering the accessibility of DNA to regulatory proteins, and accordingly gene functionality. Our theoretical calculations highlight a simple physical-based explanation on the foundations of epigenetic signaling.

  16. Electochemical detection of chromosome translocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwasny, Dorota; Dimaki, Maria; Silahtaroglu, Asli;

    2014-01-01

    Cytogenetics is a study of the cell structure with a main focus on chromosomes content and their structure. Chromosome abnormalities, such as translocations may cause various genetic disorders and heametological malignancies. Chromosome translocations are structural rearrangements of two...... hybridization approach developed for label-free detection of the chromosome translocations. For specific translocation detection it is necessary to determine that the two DNA sequences forming a derivative chromosome are connected, which is achieved by two subsequent hybridization steps. The electrochemical...... impedance spectroscopy was selected as the sensing method on a microfabricated chip with array of 12 electrode sets. Two independent chips (Chip1 and Chip2) were used for targeting the chromosomal fragments involved in the translocation. Each chip was differentially functionalized with DNA probes matching...

  17. Serum nucleosomes during neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with cervical cancer. Predictive and prognostic significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cetina Lucely

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been shown that free DNA circulates in serum plasma of patients with cancer and that at least part is present in the form of oligo- and monucleosomes, a marker of cell death. Preliminary data has shown a good correlation between decrease of nucleosomes with response and prognosis. Here, we performed pre- and post-chemotherapy determinations of serum nucleosomes with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA method in a group of patients with cervical cancer receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Methods From December 2000 to June 2001, 41 patients with cervical cancer staged as FIGO stages IB2-IIIB received three 21-day courses of carboplatin and paclitaxel, both administered at day 1; then, patients underwent radical hysterectomy. Nucleosomes were measured the day before (baseline, at day seven of the first course and day seven of the third course of chemotherapy. Values of nucleosomes were analyzed with regard to pathologic response and to time to progression-free and overall survival. Results All patients completed chemotherapy, were evaluable for pathologic response, and had nucleosome levels determined. At a mean follow-up of 23 months (range, 7–26 months, projected progression time and overall survival were 80.3 and 80.4%, respectively. Mean differential values of nucleosomes were lower in the third course as compared with the first course (p >0.001. The decrease in the third course correlated with pathologic response (p = 0.041. Survival analysis showed a statistically significant, better progression-free and survival time in patients who showed lower levels at the third course (p = 0.0243 and p = 0.0260, respectively. Cox regression analysis demonstrated that nucleosome increase in the third course increased risk of death to 6.86 (95% confidence interval [CI 95%], 0.84–56.0. Conclusion Serum nucleosomes may have a predictive role for response and prognostic significance in patients with cervical cancer

  18. A high-resolution map of nucleosome positioning on a fission yeast centromere

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Jun S.; Liu, Xingkun; Liu, X. Shirley; He, Xiangwei

    2008-01-01

    A key element for defining the centromere identity is the incorporation of a specific histone H3, CENPA, known as Cnp1p in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Previous studies have suggested that functional S. pombe centromeres lack regularly positioned nucleosomes and may involve chromatin remodeling as a key step of kinetochore assembly. We used tiling microarrays to show that nucleosomes are, in fact, positioned in regular intervals in the core of centromere 2, providing the first high-resolution m...

  19. A molecule that detects the length of DNA by using chain fluctuation

    CERN Document Server

    Iwasa, Kuni H

    2015-01-01

    A class of nucleosome remodeling motors translocate nucleosomes, to which they are attached, toward the middle of DNA chain in the presence of ATP during in vitro experiments. Such a biological activity is likely be based on a physical mechanism for detecting and comparing the lengths of the flanking polymer chains. Here we propose that a pivoting mode of DNA fluctuation near the surface of the nucleosome coupled with binding reaction with a DNA binding site of the motor provides a physical basis for length detection. Since the mean frequency of fluctuation is higher for a shorter chain than a longer one due to its lower drag coefficient, a shorter chain has a higher rate of receptor binding, which triggers the ATP-dependent activity of the remodeling motor. Dimerization of such units allows the motor to compare the length of the flanking DNA chains, enabling the translocation of the nucleosome toward the center of the DNA.

  20. Nucleosome Repositioning: A Novel Mechanism for Nicotine- and Cocaine-Induced Epigenetic Changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber N Brown

    Full Text Available Drugs of abuse modify behavior by altering gene expression in the brain. Gene expression can be regulated by changes in DNA methylation as well as by histone modifications, which alter chromatin structure, DNA compaction and DNA accessibility. In order to better understand the molecular mechanisms directing drug-induced changes in chromatin structure, we examined DNA-nucleosome interactions within promoter regions of 858 genes in human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y exposed to nicotine or cocaine. Widespread, drug- and time-resolved repositioning of nucleosomes was identified at the transcription start site and promoter region of multiple genes. Nicotine and cocaine produced unique and shared changes in terms of the numbers and types of genes affected, as well as repositioning of nucleosomes at sites which could increase or decrease the probability of gene expression based on DNA accessibility. Half of the drug-induced nucleosome positions approximated a theoretical model of nucleosome occupancy based on physical and chemical characteristics of the DNA sequence, whereas the basal or drug naïve positions were generally DNA sequence independent. Thus we suggest that nucleosome repositioning represents an initial dynamic genome-wide alteration of the transcriptional landscape preceding more selective downstream transcriptional reprogramming, which ultimately characterizes the cell- and tissue-specific responses to drugs of abuse.

  1. Nucleosome Repositioning: A Novel Mechanism for Nicotine- and Cocaine-Induced Epigenetic Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Amber N; Vied, Cynthia; Dennis, Jonathan H; Bhide, Pradeep G

    2015-01-01

    Drugs of abuse modify behavior by altering gene expression in the brain. Gene expression can be regulated by changes in DNA methylation as well as by histone modifications, which alter chromatin structure, DNA compaction and DNA accessibility. In order to better understand the molecular mechanisms directing drug-induced changes in chromatin structure, we examined DNA-nucleosome interactions within promoter regions of 858 genes in human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y) exposed to nicotine or cocaine. Widespread, drug- and time-resolved repositioning of nucleosomes was identified at the transcription start site and promoter region of multiple genes. Nicotine and cocaine produced unique and shared changes in terms of the numbers and types of genes affected, as well as repositioning of nucleosomes at sites which could increase or decrease the probability of gene expression based on DNA accessibility. Half of the drug-induced nucleosome positions approximated a theoretical model of nucleosome occupancy based on physical and chemical characteristics of the DNA sequence, whereas the basal or drug naïve positions were generally DNA sequence independent. Thus we suggest that nucleosome repositioning represents an initial dynamic genome-wide alteration of the transcriptional landscape preceding more selective downstream transcriptional reprogramming, which ultimately characterizes the cell- and tissue-specific responses to drugs of abuse. PMID:26414157

  2. Barriers and silencers: a theoretical toolkit for control and containment of nucleosome-based epigenetic states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Ian B; Sneppen, Kim

    2011-12-01

    Positive feedback in nucleosome modification has been proposed to allow large chromatin regions to exist stably and heritably in distinct expression states. However, modeling has shown that such epigenetic bistability requires that modifying enzymes recruited by nucleosomes are active on distant nucleosomes, potentially allowing uncontrollable spreading of modification. By modeling the silencing of mating-type loci in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we show that a modification reaction that combines a long-range component and a locally acting component can provide bistability and can be blocked by simple barriers that interrupt the nucleosome chain. We find that robust containment of the silenced region could be achieved by the presence of a number of weak simple barriers in the surrounding chromatin and a limited capacity of the positive feedback reaction. In addition, we show that the state of the silenced region can be regulated by silencer elements acting only on neighboring nucleosomes. Thus, a relatively simple set of nucleosome-modifying enzymes and recognition domains is all that is needed to make chromatin-based epigenetics useful and safe. PMID:22037584

  3. A 1-dimensional statistical mechanics model for nucleosome positioning on genomic DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Tesoro, S; Morozov, A N; Sulaiman, N; Marenduzzo, D

    2015-01-01

    The first level of folding of DNA in eukaryotes is provided by the so called '10nm chromatin fibre', where DNA wraps around histone proteins (approx. 10 nm in size) to form nucleosomes, which go on to create a zig zagging 'bead on a string' structure. In this work we present a one dimensional statistical mechanics model to study nucleosome positioning within one such 10 nm fibre. We consider both the case of homogeneous DNA, where the problem can be mapped to a Tonks gas, and that of genomic sheep DNA, where our modelling is informed by high-resolution nucleosome positioning data. First, we consider the simple, analytically solvable, case where nucleosomes are assumed to be point like. Then, we perform numerical simulations to gauge the effect of their finite size on the nucleosomal distribution probabilities. Finally, we compare nucleosome distributions and simulated nuclease digestion patterns for the two cases (homogeneous and sheep DNA), thereby providing testable predictions of the effect of sequence on ...

  4. Organisation of nucleosomal arrays reconstituted with repetitive African green monkey α-satellite DNA as analysed by atomic force microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Bussiek, Malte; Müller, Gabriele; Waldeck, Waldemar; Diekmann, Stephan; Langowski, Jörg

    2007-01-01

    Alpha-satellite DNA (AS) is part of centromeric DNA and could be relevant for centromeric chromatin structure: its repetitive character may generate a specifically ordered nucleosomal arrangement and thereby facilitate kinetochore protein binding and chromatin condensation. Although nucleosomal positioning on some satellite sequences had been shown, including AS from African green monkey (AGM), the sequence-dependent nucleosomal organisation of repetitive AS of this species has so far not bee...

  5. Nucleosome transactions on the Hypocrea jecorina (Trichoderma reesei) cellulase promoter cbh2 associated with cellulase induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeilinger, S; Schmoll, M; Pail, M; Mach, R L; Kubicek, C P

    2003-10-01

    The 5' regulatory region of the cbh2 gene of Hypocrea jecorina contains the cbh2 activating element (CAE) which is essential for induction of cbh2 gene expression by sophorose and cellulose. The CAE consists of two motifs, a CCAAT box on the template strand and a GTAATA box on the coding strand, which cooperate during induction. Northern analyses of cbh2 gene expression has revealed an absolute dependence on induction, but no direct effect of Cre1-mediated carbon catabolite repression. Investigation of the chromatin structure in the wild-type strain showed that, under repressing conditions, there is a nucleosome free region (nfr) around the CAE, which is flanked by strictly positioned nucleosomes. Induction results in a loss of positioning of nucleosomes -1 and -2 downstream of the CAE, thus making the TATA box accessible. Simultaneous mutation of both motifs of the CAE, or of the CCAAT-box alone, also leads to shifting of nucleosome -1, which normally covers the TATA-box under repressing conditions, whereas mutation of the GTAATA element results in a narrowing of the nfr, indicating that the proteins that bind to both motifs in the CAE interact with chromatin, although in different ways. A cellulase-negative mutant strain, which has previously been shown to be altered in protein binding to the CAE, still displayed the induction-specific changes in nucleosome structure, indicating that none of the proteins that directly interact with CAE are affected, and that nucleosome rearrangement and induction of cbh2 expression are uncoupled. Interestingly, the carbon catabolite repressor Cre1 is essential for strict nucleosome positioning in the 5' regulatory sequences of cbh2 under all of the conditions tested, and induction can occur in a promoter that lacks positioned nucleosomes. These data suggest that Cre1, the Hap2/3/5 complex and the GTAATA-binding protein are all involved in nucleosome assembly on the cbh2 promoter, and that the latter two respond to inducing

  6. Abdominal radiation causes bacterial translocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a single dose of radiation to the rat abdomen leads to bacterial translocation into the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN). A second issue addressed was whether translocation correlates with anatomic damage to the mucosa. The radiated group (1100 cGy) which received anesthesia also was compared with a control group and a third group which received anesthesia alone but no abdominal radiation. Abdominal radiation lead to 100% positive cultures of MLN between 12 hr and 4 days postradiation. Bacterial translocation was almost nonexistent in the control and anesthesia group. Signs of inflammation and ulceration of the intestinal mucosa were not seen until Day 3 postradiation. Mucosal damage was maximal by Day 4. Bacterial translocation onto the MLN after a single dose of abdominal radiation was not apparently dependent on anatomical, histologic damage of the mucosa

  7. iNuc-PhysChem: a sequence-based predictor for identifying nucleosomes via physicochemical properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chen

    Full Text Available Nucleosome positioning has important roles in key cellular processes. Although intensive efforts have been made in this area, the rules defining nucleosome positioning is still elusive and debated. In this study, we carried out a systematic comparison among the profiles of twelve DNA physicochemical features between the nucleosomal and linker sequences in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. We found that nucleosomal sequences have some position-specific physicochemical features, which can be used for in-depth studying nucleosomes. Meanwhile, a new predictor, called iNuc-PhysChem, was developed for identification of nucleosomal sequences by incorporating these physicochemical properties into a 1788-D (dimensional feature vector, which was further reduced to a 884-D vector via the IFS (incremental feature selection procedure to optimize the feature set. It was observed by a cross-validation test on a benchmark dataset that the overall success rate achieved by iNuc-PhysChem was over 96% in identifying nucleosomal or linker sequences. As a web-server, iNuc-PhysChem is freely accessible to the public at http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/iNuc-PhysChem. For the convenience of the vast majority of experimental scientists, a step-by-step guide is provided on how to use the web-server to get the desired results without the need to follow the complicated mathematics that were presented just for the integrity in developing the predictor. Meanwhile, for those who prefer to run predictions in their own computers, the predictor's code can be easily downloaded from the web-server. It is anticipated that iNuc-PhysChem may become a useful high throughput tool for both basic research and drug design.

  8. Structural insights into ribosome translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Clarence; Ermolenko, Dmitri N

    2016-09-01

    During protein synthesis, tRNA and mRNA are translocated from the A to P to E sites of the ribosome thus enabling the ribosome to translate one codon of mRNA after the other. Ribosome translocation along mRNA is induced by the universally conserved ribosome GTPase, elongation factor G (EF-G) in bacteria and elongation factor 2 (EF-2) in eukaryotes. Recent structural and single-molecule studies revealed that tRNA and mRNA translocation within the ribosome is accompanied by cyclic forward and reverse rotations between the large and small ribosomal subunits parallel to the plane of the intersubunit interface. In addition, during ribosome translocation, the 'head' domain of small ribosomal subunit undergoes forward- and back-swiveling motions relative to the rest of the small ribosomal subunit around the axis that is orthogonal to the axis of intersubunit rotation. tRNA/mRNA translocation is also coupled to the docking of domain IV of EF-G into the A site of the small ribosomal subunit that converts the thermally driven motions of the ribosome and tRNA into the forward translocation of tRNA/mRNA inside the ribosome. Despite recent and enormous progress made in the understanding of the molecular mechanism of ribosome translocation, the sequence of structural rearrangements of the ribosome, EF-G and tRNA during translocation is still not fully established and awaits further investigation. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:620-636. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1354 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27117863

  9. Translocation of ProOmpA possessing an intramolecular disulfide bridge into membrane vesicles of Escherichia coli. Effect of membrane energization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the absence of delta mu H+, the in vitro translocation of proOmpA resulted in the stable accumulation of a possible translocation intermediate in addition to a transiently accumulating one. The stable intermediate was detected on a polyacrylamide gel as two proteinase K-resistant bands corresponding to a molecular weight of about 28,000. The appearance of the bands was appreciably enhanced when proOmpA was oxidized with ferricyanide. No mature OmpA appeared. When proOmpA reduced with dithiothreitol was used, on the other hand, the bands did not appear at all. Upon the replacement of Cys302 of OmpA with Gly, the intermediate accumulation was abolished. The proOmpA treated with dithiothreitol was labeled with N-[3H]-ethylmaleimide, whereas that treated with ferricyanide was not. The ferricyanide-treated proOmpA was translocated into membrane vesicles in the presence of delta mu H+. The mature OmpA thus translocated and processed was not labeled with N-[3H]ethylmaleimide. It is concluded that proOmpA possessing the Cys290-Cys302 disulfide bridge can be translocated without cleavage of the bridge, when delta mu H+ is imposed. The accumulation of the disulfide bridge-containing intermediate was ATP-dependent, whereas its conversion to the translocated mature form was not blocked in the presence of adenosine 5'-(beta, gamma-imino)triphosphate. It is concluded that the early and late stages of the translocation reaction require ATP and delta mu H+ differently

  10. Nucleosome Assembly Dynamics Involve Spontaneous Fluctuations in the Handedness of Tetrasomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rifka Vlijm

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA wrapping around histone octamers generates nucleosomes, the basic compaction unit of eukaryotic chromatin. Nucleosome stability is carefully tuned to maintain DNA accessibility in transcription, replication, and repair. Using freely orbiting magnetic tweezers, which measure the twist and length of single DNA molecules, we monitor the real-time loading of tetramers or complete histone octamers onto DNA by Nucleosome Assembly Protein-1 (NAP1. Remarkably, we find that tetrasomes exhibit spontaneous flipping between a preferentially occupied left-handed state (ΔLk = −0.73 and a right-handed state (ΔLk = +1.0, separated by a free energy difference of 2.3 kBT (1.5 kcal/mol. This flipping occurs without concomitant changes in DNA end-to-end length. The application of weak positive torque converts left-handed tetrasomes into right-handed tetrasomes, whereas nucleosomes display more gradual conformational changes. Our findings reveal unexpected dynamical rearrangements of the nucleosomal structure, suggesting that chromatin can serve as a “twist reservoir,” offering a mechanistic explanation for the regulation of DNA supercoiling in chromatin.

  11. A one-dimensional statistical mechanics model for nucleosome positioning on genomic DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesoro, S.; Ali, I.; Morozov, A. N.; Sulaiman, N.; Marenduzzo, D.

    2016-02-01

    The first level of folding of DNA in eukaryotes is provided by the so-called ‘10 nm chromatin fibre’, where DNA wraps around histone proteins (∼10 nm in size) to form nucleosomes, which go on to create a zig-zagging bead-on-a-string structure. In this work we present a one-dimensional statistical mechanics model to study nucleosome positioning within one such 10 nm fibre. We focus on the case of genomic sheep DNA, and we start from effective potentials valid at infinite dilution and determined from high-resolution in vitro salt dialysis experiments. We study positioning within a polynucleosome chain, and compare the results for genomic DNA to that obtained in the simplest case of homogeneous DNA, where the problem can be mapped to a Tonks gas [1]. First, we consider the simple, analytically solvable, case where nucleosomes are assumed to be point-like. Then, we perform numerical simulations to gauge the effect of their finite size on the nucleosomal distribution probabilities. Finally we compare nucleosome distributions and simulated nuclease digestion patterns for the two cases (homogeneous and sheep DNA), thereby providing testable predictions of the effect of sequence on experimentally observable quantities in experiments on polynucleosome chromatin fibres reconstituted in vitro.

  12. Physical properties of naked DNA influence nucleosome positioning and correlate with transcription start and termination sites in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soler-López Montserrat

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In eukaryotic organisms, DNA is packaged into chromatin structure, where most of DNA is wrapped into nucleosomes. DNA compaction and nucleosome positioning have clear functional implications, since they modulate the accessibility of genomic regions to regulatory proteins. Despite the intensive research effort focused in this area, the rules defining nucleosome positioning and the location of DNA regulatory regions still remain elusive. Results Naked (histone-free and nucleosomal DNA from yeast were digested by microccocal nuclease (MNase and sequenced genome-wide. MNase cutting preferences were determined for both naked and nucleosomal DNAs. Integration of their sequencing profiles with DNA conformational descriptors derived from atomistic molecular dynamic simulations enabled us to extract the physical properties of DNA on a genomic scale and to correlate them with chromatin structure and gene regulation. The local structure of DNA around regulatory regions was found to be unusually flexible and to display a unique pattern of nucleosome positioning. Ab initio physical descriptors derived from molecular dynamics were used to develop a computational method that accurately predicts nucleosome enriched and depleted regions. Conclusions Our experimental and computational analyses jointly demonstrate a clear correlation between sequence-dependent physical properties of naked DNA and regulatory signals in the chromatin structure. These results demonstrate that nucleosome positioning around TSS (Transcription Start Site and TTS (Transcription Termination Site (at least in yeast is strongly dependent on DNA physical properties, which can define a basal regulatory mechanism of gene expression.

  13. Sequence-directed nucleosome-depletion is sufficient to activate transcription from a yeast core promoter in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Yuichi; Morohashi, Nobuyuki; Tomita, Nobuyuki; Mitchell, Aaron P; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Shimizu, Mitsuhiro

    2016-07-22

    Nucleosome-depleted regions (NDRs) (also called nucleosome-free regions or NFRs) are often found in the promoter regions of many yeast genes, and are formed by multiple mechanisms, including the binding of activators and enhancers, the actions of chromatin remodeling complexes, and the specific DNA sequences themselves. However, it remains unclear whether NDR formation per se is essential for transcriptional activation. Here, we examined the relationship between nucleosome organization and gene expression using a defined yeast reporter system, consisting of the CYC1 minimal core promoter and the lacZ gene. We introduced simple repeated sequences that should be either incorporated in nucleosomes or excluded from nucleosomes in the site upstream of the TATA boxes. The (CTG)12, (GAA)12 and (TGTAGG)6 inserts were incorporated into a positioned nucleosome in the core promoter region, and did not affect the reporter gene expression. In contrast, the insertion of (CGG)12, (TTAGGG)6, (A)34 or (CG)8 induced lacZ expression by 10-20 fold. Nucleosome mapping analyses revealed that the inserts that induced the reporter gene expression prevented nucleosome formation, and created an NDR upstream of the TATA boxes. Thus, our results demonstrated that NDR formation dictated by DNA sequences is sufficient for transcriptional activation from the core promoter in vivo. PMID:27208777

  14. RNF4 interacts with both SUMO and nucleosomes to promote the DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groocock, Lynda M; Nie, Minghua; Prudden, John; Moiani, Davide; Wang, Tao; Cheltsov, Anton; Rambo, Robert P; Arvai, Andrew S; Hitomi, Chiharu; Tainer, John A; Luger, Karolin; Perry, J Jefferson P; Lazzerini-Denchi, Eros; Boddy, Michael N

    2014-05-01

    The post-translational modification of DNA repair and checkpoint proteins by ubiquitin and small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) critically orchestrates the DNA damage response (DDR). The ubiquitin ligase RNF4 integrates signaling by SUMO and ubiquitin, through its selective recognition and ubiquitination of SUMO-modified proteins. Here, we define a key new determinant for target discrimination by RNF4, in addition to interaction with SUMO. We identify a nucleosome-targeting motif within the RNF4 RING domain that can bind DNA and thereby enables RNF4 to selectively ubiquitinate nucleosomal histones. Furthermore, RNF4 nucleosome-targeting is crucially required for the repair of TRF2-depleted dysfunctional telomeres by 53BP1-mediated non-homologous end joining. PMID:24714598

  15. Nucleosome Binding Alters the Substrate Bonding Environment of Histone H3 Lysine 36 Methyltransferase NSD2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, Myles B; Schneck, Jessica L; Matico, Rosalie E; Hou, Wangfang; McDevitt, Patrick J; Holbert, Marc; Schramm, Vern L

    2016-06-01

    Nuclear receptor-binding SET domain protein 2 (NSD2) is a histone H3 lysine 36 (H3K36)-specific methyltransferase enzyme that is overexpressed in a number of cancers, including multiple myeloma. NSD2 binds to S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) and nucleosome substrates to catalyze the transfer of a methyl group from SAM to the ε-amino group of histone H3K36. Equilibrium binding isotope effects and density functional theory calculations indicate that the SAM methyl group is sterically constrained in complex with NSD2, and that this steric constraint is released upon nucleosome binding. Together, these results show that nucleosome binding to NSD2 induces a significant change in the chemical environment of enzyme-bound SAM. PMID:27183271

  16. Nucleosomal organization of chromatin in sperm nuclei of the bivalve mollusc Aulacomya ater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, C; Ruiz, S

    1991-03-13

    The sperm nuclei of Aulacomya ater, family Mitylidae, contain three proteins (X, Aa5 and Aa6) which are specific to this cell type coexisting with a set of five somatic-type histones. Information about the chromatin structure resulting from this kind of association is scarce. Therefore, we have probed the structure of this sperm chromatin through digestion with micrococcal nuclease in combination with salt fractionation. The data obtained have allowed us to propose a nucleosomal arrangement for this chromatin. However, two types of nucleosomes would be present in agreement with their protein components. PMID:1861676

  17. Partners with reciprocal translocations: genetic counseling for the 'double translocation'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, L; Hartsfield, J K; Vance, G H

    1998-05-01

    SV at age 2 years presented with multiple congenital anomalies including an absent left kidney, anal stenosis, vertebral abnormalities, partial sacral agenesis, microcephaly, dysmorphic facial features, growth deficiency, and developmental delay. She was found to have a complex chromosomal rearrangement derived from balanced translocations in each parent. PMID:9660061

  18. Comparative studies of genome-wide maps of nucleosomes between deletion mutants of elp3 and hos2 genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Matsumoto

    Full Text Available In order to elucidate the influence of histone acetylation upon nucleosomal DNA length and nucleosome position, we compared nucleosome maps of the following three yeast strains; strain BY4741 (control, the elp3 (one of histone acetyltransferase genes deletion mutant, and the hos2 (one of histone deactylase genes deletion mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We sequenced mononucleosomal DNA fragments after treatment with micrococcal nuclease. After mapping the DNA fragments to the genome, we identified the nucleosome positions. We showed that the distributions of the nucleosomal DNA lengths of the control and the hos2 disruptant were similar. On the other hand, the distribution of the nucleosomal DNA lengths of the elp3 disruptant shifted toward shorter than that of the control. It strongly suggests that inhibition of Elp3-induced histone acetylation causes the nucleosomal DNA length reduction. Next, we compared the profiles of nucleosome mapping numbers in gene promoter regions between the control and the disruptant. We detected 24 genes with low conservation level of nucleosome positions in promoters between the control and the elp3 disruptant as well as between the control and the hos2 disruptant. It indicates that both Elp3-induced acetylation and Hos2-induced deacetylation influence the nucleosome positions in the promoters of those 24 genes. Interestingly, in 19 of the 24 genes, the profiles of nucleosome mapping numbers were similar between the two disruptants.

  19. Organisation of nucleosomal arrays reconstituted with repetitive African green monkey α-satellite DNA as analysed by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussiek, Malte; Müller, Gabriele; Waldeck, Waldemar; Diekmann, Stephan

    2007-01-01

    Alpha-satellite DNA (AS) is part of centromeric DNA and could be relevant for centromeric chromatin structure: its repetitive character may generate a specifically ordered nucleosomal arrangement and thereby facilitate kinetochore protein binding and chromatin condensation. Although nucleosomal positioning on some satellite sequences had been shown, including AS from African green monkey (AGM), the sequence-dependent nucleosomal organisation of repetitive AS of this species has so far not been analysed. We therefore studied the positioning of reconstituted nucleosomes on AGM AS tandemly repeated DNA. Enzymatic analysis of nucleosome arrays formed on an AS heptamer as well as the localisation of mononucleosomes on an AS dimer by atomic force microscopy (AFM) showed one major positioning frame, in agreement with earlier results. The occupancy of this site was in the range of 45–50%, in quite good agreement with published in vivo observations. AFM measurements of internucleosomal distances formed on the heptamer indicated that the nucleosomal arrangement is governed by sequence-specific DNA-histone interactions yielding defined internucleosomal distances, which, nevertheless, are not compatible with a uniform phasing of the nucleosomes with the AGM AS repeats. PMID:17503032

  20. Global analysis of core histones reveals nucleosomal surfaces required for chromosome bi-orientation

    OpenAIRE

    Kawashima, Satoshi; Nakabayashi, Yu; Matsubara, Kazuko; Sano, Norihiko; Enomoto, Takemi; Tanaka, Kozo; Seki, Masayuki; Horikoshi, Masami

    2011-01-01

    Kinetochore assembly requires centromere-specific nucleosomes that contain the histone H3 variant CenH3, but less is known about the role of canonical histones in this process. This study reports on the function of histones H2A, H2B, H3, and H4 in chromosome segregation.

  1. Small-Activating RNA Can Change Nucleosome Positioning in Human Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Sun, Jing; Shi, Jiandong; Guo, Qing; Tong, Xiangrong; Zhang, Jin; Hu, Ningzhu; Hu, YunZhang

    2016-07-01

    RNA activation (RNAa) is a mechanism of positive gene expression regulation mediated by small-activating RNAs (saRNAs), which target gene promoters and have been used as tools to manipulate gene expression. Studies have shown that RNAa is associated with epigenetic modifications at promoter regions; however, it is unclear whether these modifications are the cause or a consequence of RNAa. In this study, we examined changes in nucleosome repositioning and the involvement of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) in this process. We screened saRNAs for OCT4 (POU5F1), SOX2, and NANOG, and identified several novel saRNAs. We found that nucleosome positioning was altered after saRNA treatment and that the formation of nucleosome-depleted regions (NDRs) contributed to RNAa at sites of RNAPII binding, such as the TATA box, CpG islands (CGIs), proximal enhancers, and proximal promoters. Moreover, RNAPII appeared to be bound specifically to NDRs. These results suggested that changes in nucleosome positions resulted from RNAa. We thus propose a hypothesis that targeting promoter regions using exogenous saRNAs can induce the formation of NDRs, exposing regulatory binding sites to recruit RNAPII, a key component of preinitiation complex, and leading to increased initiation of transcription. PMID:26993320

  2. Autoantibodies to histone, DNA and nucleosome antigens in canine systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monestier, M; Novick, K E; Karam, E T; Chabanne, L; Monier, J C; Rigal, D

    1995-01-01

    Dogs can develop systemic lupus erythematosus syndromes that are clinically similar to those seen in humans. In contrast, previous observations suggest differences in their autoantibody reactivity patterns against histones and DNA which are components of the nucleosome in chromatin. The objective of this study was to assess comprehensively the levels of autoantibodies against histone, DNA and nucleosome antigens in a population of lupus dogs. The specificities of antibodies in lupus and control dog sera were determined using IgM- and IgG-specific reagents in an ELISA against a variety of chromatin antigens. When compared with control sera, IgG antibodies to individual histones H1, H2A, H3 and H4 were significantly higher in the lupus group. In contrast, we did not detect IgG antibodies specific for H2B, H2A-H2B, DNA, H2A-H2B-DNA or nucleosome in lupus dogs. There was no significant increase in any of the IgM specificities tested. Therefore, the reactivity pattern to nucleosome antigens in canine lupus is restricted to IgG antibodies against individual histones H1, H2A, H3 and H4. This stands in contrast with human and murine lupus, where autoantibodies are directed against a wide variety of nucleosomal determinants, suggesting that unique mechanisms lead to the expansion of anti-histone antibody clones in canine lupus. The high incidence of glomerulonephritis in dog lupus suggests that anti-DNA antibodies are not required for the development of this complication, whereas IgG anti-histone antibodies may be relevant to its pathogenesis. PMID:7529150

  3. DNA Translocation through Graphene Nanopores

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, Grégory F; Calado, Victor E; Pandraud, Grégory; Zandbergen, Henny W; Vandersypen, Lieven M K; Dekker, Cees

    2010-01-01

    Nanopores -- nanosized holes that can transport ions and molecules -- are very promising devices for genomic screening, in particular DNA sequencing. Both solid-state and biological pores suffer from the drawback, however, that the channel constituting the pore is long, viz. 10-100 times the distance between two bases in a DNA molecule (0.5 nm for single-stranded DNA). Here, we demonstrate that it is possible to realize and use ultrathin nanopores fabricated in graphene monolayers for single-molecule DNA translocation. The pores are obtained by placing a graphene flake over a microsize hole in a silicon nitride membrane and drilling a nanosize hole in the graphene using an electron beam. As individual DNA molecules translocate through the pore, characteristic temporary conductance changes are observed in the ionic current through the nanopore, setting the stage for future genomic screening.

  4. Suitability of amphibians and reptiles for translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germano, Jennifer M; Bishop, Phillip J

    2009-02-01

    Translocations are important tools in the field of conservation. Despite increased use over the last few decades, the appropriateness of translocations for amphibians and reptiles has been debated widely over the past 20 years. To provide a comprehensive evaluation of the suitability of amphibians and reptiles for translocation, we reviewed the results of amphibian and reptile translocation projects published between 1991 and 2006. The success rate of amphibian and reptile translocations reported over this period was twice that reported in an earlier review in 1991. Success and failure rates were independent of the taxonomic class (Amphibia or Reptilia) released. Reptile translocations driven by human-wildlife conflict mitigation had a higher failure rate than those motivated by conservation, and more recent projects of reptile translocations had unknown outcomes. The outcomes of amphibian translocations were significantly related to the number of animals released, with projects releasing over 1000 individuals being most successful. The most common reported causes of translocation failure were homing and migration of introduced individuals out of release sites and poor habitat. The increased success of amphibian and reptile translocations reviewed in this study compared with the 1991 review is encouraging for future conservation projects. Nevertheless, more preparation, monitoring, reporting of results, and experimental testing of techniques and reintroduction questions need to occur to improve translocations of amphibians and reptiles as a whole. PMID:19143783

  5. Bacterial translocation: impact of probiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Jeppsson, Bengt; Mangell, Peter; Adawi, Diya; Molin, Göran

    2004-01-01

    There is a considerable amount of data in humans showing that patients who cannot take in nutrients enterally have more organ failure in the intensive care unit, a less favourable prognosis, and a higher frequency of septicaemia, in particular involving bacterial species from the intestinal tract. However, there is little evidence that this is connected with translocation of bacterial species in humans. Animal data more uniformly imply the existence of such a connection. The main focus of thi...

  6. Markovian description of unbiased polymer translocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We perform, with the help of cloud computing resources, extensive Langevin simulations which provide compelling evidence in favor of a general Markovian framework for unbiased three-dimensional polymer translocation. Our statistical analysis consists of careful evaluations of (i) two-point correlation functions of the translocation coordinate and (ii) the empirical probabilities of complete polymer translocation (taken as a function of the initial number of monomers on a given side of the membrane). We find good agreement with predictions derived from the Markov chain approach recently addressed in the literature by the present authors. -- Highlights: ► We investigate unbiased polymer translocation through membrane pores. ► Large statistical ensembles have been produced with the help of cloud computing resources. ► We evaluate the two-point correlation function of the translocation coordinate. ► We evaluate empirical probabilities for complete polymer translocation. ► Unbiased polymer translocation is described as a Markov stochastic process.

  7. A Chemical Biology Approach to Reveal Sirt6-targeted Histone H3 Sites in Nucleosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wesley Wei; Zeng, Yu; Wu, Bo; Deiters, Alexander; Liu, Wenshe R

    2016-07-15

    As a member of a highly conserved family of NAD(+)-dependent histone deacetylases, Sirt6 is a key regulator of mammalian genome stability, metabolism, and life span. Previous studies indicated that Sirt6 is hardwired to remove histone acetylation at H3K9 and H3K56. However, how Sirt6 recognizes its nucleosome substrates has been elusive due to the difficulty of accessing homogeneous acetyl-nucleosomes and the low activity of Sirt6 toward peptide substrates. Based on the fact that Sirt6 has an enhanced activity to remove long chain fatty acylation from lysine, we developed an approach to recombinantly synthesize histone H3 with a fatty acylated lysine, N(ε)-(7-octenoyl)-lysine (OcK), installed at a number of lysine sites and used these acyl-H3 proteins to assemble acyl-nucleosomes as active Sirt6 substrates. A chemical biology approach that visualizes OcK in nucleosomes and therefore allows direct sensitization of Sirt6 activities on its acyl-nucleosome substrates was also formulated. By combining these two approaches, we showed that Sirt6 actively removes acylation from H3K9, H3K18, and H3K27; has relatively low activities toward H3K4 and K3K23; but sluggishly removes acylation at H3K14, H3K36, H3K56, and H3K79. Overexpressing Sirt6 in 293T cells led to downregulated acetylation at H3K18 and K3K27, confirming these two novel Sirt6-targeted nucleosome lysine sites in cells. Given that downregulation of H3K18 acetylation is correlated with a poor prognosis of several cancer types and H3K27 acetylation antagonizes repressive gene regulation by di- and trimethylation at H3K27, our current study implies that Sirt6 may serve as a target for cancer intervention and regulatory pathway investigation in cells. PMID:27152839

  8. Effect of glycerol on the separation of nucleosomes and bent DNA in low ionic strength polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

    OpenAIRE

    Pennings, S; Meersseman, G; Bradbury, E M

    1992-01-01

    We report that glycerol changes the separation characteristics of polyacrylamide nucleoprotein gels in which it is included as a stabilizing agent. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis fractionates DNA and nucleosomes according to net negative charge, mass and conformation. With glycerol included, fractionation seems to be largely based on particle mass and charge. The conformation factor in separation is progressively lost with increasing glycerol concentrations. Nucleosome positions on the sa...

  9. Fresh-frozen plasma resuscitation after traumatic brain injury and shock attenuates extracellular nucleosome levels and deoxyribonuclease 1 depletion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, Martin; Jin, Guang; Oklu, Rahmi; Albadawi, Hassan; Imam, Ayesha M; Jepsen, Cecilie H; Hwabejire, John O; Ostrowski, Sisse R; Johansson, Pär I; Rasmussen, Lars S; Alam, Hasan B

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury and shock are among the leading causes of trauma-related mortality. We have previously shown that fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) resuscitation reduces the size of brain lesion and associated swelling compared with crystalloids. We hypothesized that this effect would be associate...... with an attenuation of circulating nucleosome levels, a biomarker of injury with cytotoxic potential, through reconstitution of circulating deoxyribonuclease-1 (DNAse1), an enzyme identified as critical in nucleosome clearance from the circulation....

  10. Problems with mitigation translocation of herpetofauna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Brian K; Nowak, Erika M; Kwiatkowski, Matthew A

    2015-02-01

    Mitigation translocation of nuisance animals is a commonly used management practice aimed at resolution of human-animal conflict by removal and release of an individual animal. Long considered a reasonable undertaking, especially by the general public, it is now known that translocated subjects are negatively affected by the practice. Mitigation translocation is typically undertaken with individual adult organisms and has a much lower success rate than the more widely practiced conservation translocation of threatened and endangered species. Nonetheless, the public and many conservation practitioners believe that because population-level conservation translocations have been successful that mitigation translocation can be satisfactorily applied to a wide variety of human-wildlife conflict situations. We reviewed mitigation translocations of reptiles, including our own work with 3 long-lived species (Gila monsters [Heloderma suspectum], Sonoran desert tortoises [Gopherus morafkai], and western diamond-backed rattlesnakes [Crotalus atrox]). Overall, mitigation translocation had a low success rate when judged either by effects on individuals (in all studies reviewed they exhibited increased movement or increased mortality) or by the success of the resolution of the human-animal conflict (translocated individuals often returned to the capture site). Careful planning and identification of knowledge gaps are critical to increasing success rates in mitigation translocations in the face of increasing pressure to find solutions for species threatened by diverse anthropogenic factors, including climate change and exurban and energy development. PMID:25040040

  11. Nucleosome adaptability conferred by sequence and structural variations in histone H2A-H2B dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaytan, Alexey K; Landsman, David; Panchenko, Anna R

    2015-06-01

    Nucleosome variability is essential for their functions in compacting the chromatin structure and regulation of transcription, replication and cell reprogramming. The DNA molecule in nucleosomes is wrapped around an octamer composed of four types of core histones (H3, H4, H2A, H2B). Nucleosomes represent dynamic entities and may change their conformation, stability and binding properties by employing different sets of histone variants or by becoming post-translationally modified. There are many variants of histones H2A and H2B. Specific H2A and H2B variants may preferentially associate with each other resulting in different combinations of variants and leading to the increased combinatorial complexity of nucleosomes. In addition, the H2A-H2B dimer can be recognized and substituted by chaperones/remodelers as a distinct unit, can assemble independently and is stable during nucleosome unwinding. In this review we discuss how sequence and structural variations in H2A-H2B dimers may provide necessary complexity and confer the nucleosome functional variability. PMID:25731851

  12. In vitro molecular magnetic resonance imaging detection and measurement of apoptosis using superparamagnetic iron oxide + antibody as ligands for nucleosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent research in cell biology as well as oncology research has focused on apoptosis or programmed cell death as a means of quantifying the induced effects of treatment. A hallmark of late-stage apoptosis is nuclear fragmentation in which DNA is degraded to release nucleosomes with their associated histones. In this work, a method was developed for detecting and measuring nucleosome concentration in vitro with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The indirect procedure used a commercially available secondary antibody-superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) particle complex as a contrast agent that bound to primary antibodies against nucleosomal histones H4, H2A and H2B. Using a multiple-echo spin-echo sequence on a 1.5 T clinical MRI scanner, significant T2 relaxation enhancement as a function of in vitro nucleosomal concentration was measured. In addition, clustering or aggregation of the contrast agent was demonstrated with its associated enhancement in T2 effects. The T2 clustering enhancement showed a complex dependence on relative concentrations of nucleosomes, primary antibody and secondary antibody + SPIO. The technique supports the feasibility of using MRI measurements of nucleosome concentration in blood as a diagnostic, prognostic and predictive tool in the management of cancer. (paper)

  13. How does DNA break during chromosomal translocations?

    OpenAIRE

    Nambiar, Mridula; Raghavan, Sathees C.

    2011-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations are one of the most common types of genetic rearrangements and are molecular signatures for many types of cancers. They are considered as primary causes for cancers, especially lymphoma and leukemia. Although many translocations have been reported in the last four decades, the mechanism by which chromosomes break during a translocation remains largely unknown. In this review, we summarize recent advances made in understanding the molecular mechanism of chromosomal t...

  14. Reciprocal Translocations in Cattle: frequency estimation

    OpenAIRE

    De Lorenzi, Lisa; Morando, Paola; Planas Cuchi, Jordi; Zannotti, Michele; Molteni, Luciano; Parma, Pietro

    2010-01-01

    Chromosomal anomalies, like Robertsonian and reciprocal translocations represent a big problem in cattle breeding as their presence induces, in the carrier subjects, a well documented fertility reduction. In cattle reciprocal translocations (RCPs, a chromosome abnormality caused by an exchange of material between nonhomologous chromosomes) are considered rare as to date only 19 reciprocal translocations have been described. In cattle it is common knowledge that the Robertson...

  15. Microbiology of bacterial translocation in humans

    OpenAIRE

    O'Boyle, C; MacFie, J; Mitchell, C.; Johnstone, D.; Sagar, P; Sedman, P

    1998-01-01

    Background—Gut translocation of bacteria has been shown in both animal and human studies. Evidence from animal studies that links bacterial translocation to the development of postoperative sepsis and multiple organ failure has yet to be confirmed in humans. 
Aims—To examine the spectrum of bacteria involved in translocation in surgical patients undergoing laparotomy and to determine the relation between nodal migration of bacteria and the development of postoperative septic co...

  16. Translocation of DNA across bacterial membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Dreiseikelmann, Brigitte

    1994-01-01

    DNA translocation across bacterial membranes occurs during the biological processes of infection by bacteriophages, conjugative DNA transfer of plasmids, T-DNA transfer, and genetic transformation. The mechanism of DNA translocation in these systems is not fully understood, but during the last few years extensive data about genes and gene products involved in the translocation processes have accumulated. One reason for the increasing interest in this topic is the discussion about horizontal g...

  17. Rapid accessibility of nucleosomal DNA in yeast on a second time scale

    OpenAIRE

    Bucceri, Andrea; Kapitza, Kristin; Thoma, Fritz

    2006-01-01

    Packaging DNA in nucleosomes and higher-order chromatin structures restricts its accessibility and constitutes a barrier for all DNA transactions including gene regulation and DNA repair. How and how fast proteins find access to DNA buried in chromatin of living cells is poorly understood. To address this question in a real time in vivo approach, we investigated DNA repair by photolyase in yeast. We show that overexpressed photolyase, a light-dependent DNA-repair enzyme, recognizes and repair...

  18. Theory of Nucleosome Corkscrew Sliding in the Presence of Synthetic DNA Ligands

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad-Rafiee, Farshid; Kulic, Igor M.; Schiessel, H.

    2004-01-01

    Histone octamers show a heat-induced mobility along DNA. Recent theoretical studies have established two mechanisms that are qualitatively and quantitatively compatible with in vitro experiments on nucleosome sliding: Octamer repositiong through one-basepair twist defects and through ten-basepair bulge defects. A recent experiment demonstrated that the repositioning is strongly suppressed in the presence of minor-groove binding DNA ligands. In the present study we give a quantitative theory f...

  19. Charge State of the Globular Histone Core Controls Stability of the Nucleosome

    OpenAIRE

    Fenley, Andrew T.; Adams, David A.; Onufriev, Alexey V.

    2010-01-01

    Presented here is a quantitative model of the wrapping and unwrapping of the DNA around the histone core of the nucleosome that suggests a mechanism by which this transition can be controlled: alteration of the charge state of the globular histone core. The mechanism is relevant to several classes of posttranslational modifications such as histone acetylation and phosphorylation; several specific scenarios consistent with recent in vivo experiments are considered. The model integrates a descr...

  20. Charge State of the Globular Histone Core Controls Stability of the Nucleosome

    OpenAIRE

    Fenley, Andrew T.; Adams, D. A.; Onufriev, Alexey V.

    2010-01-01

    Presented here is a quantitative model of the wrapping and unwrapping of the DNA around the histone core of the nucleosome that suggests a mechanism by which this transition can be controlled: alteration of the charge state of the globular histone core. The mechanism is relevant to several classes of posttranslational modifications such as histone acetylation and phosphorylation; several specific scenarios consistent with recent in vivo experiments are considered. The model integrates a descr...

  1. Nucleosome Repositioning: A Novel Mechanism for Nicotine- and Cocaine-Induced Epigenetic Changes

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Amber N.; Vied, Cynthia; Dennis, Jonathan H.; Bhide, Pradeep G

    2015-01-01

    Drugs of abuse modify behavior by altering gene expression in the brain. Gene expression can be regulated by changes in DNA methylation as well as by histone modifications, which alter chromatin structure, DNA compaction and DNA accessibility. In order to better understand the molecular mechanisms directing drug-induced changes in chromatin structure, we examined DNA-nucleosome interactions within promoter regions of 858 genes in human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y) exposed to nicotine or coca...

  2. Whole genome nucleosome sequencing identifies novel types of forensic markers in degraded DNA samples

    OpenAIRE

    Chun-nan Dong; Ya-dong Yang; Shu-jin Li; Ya-ran Yang; Xiao-jing Zhang; Xiang-dong Fang; Jiang-wei Yan; Bin Cong

    2016-01-01

    In the case of mass disasters, missing persons and forensic caseworks, highly degraded biological samples are often encountered. It can be a challenge to analyze and interpret the DNA profiles from these samples. Here we provide a new strategy to solve the problem by taking advantage of the intrinsic structural properties of DNA. We have assessed the in vivo positions of more than 35 million putative nucleosome cores in human leukocytes using high-throughput whole genome sequencing, and ident...

  3. Single-molecule imaging of DNA curtains reveals intrinsic energy landscapes for nucleosome deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Visnapuu, Mari-Liis; Greene, Eric C.

    2009-01-01

    Here we use single-molecule imaging to determine coarse-grained intrinsic energy landscapes for nucleosome deposition on model DNA substrates. Our results reveal distributions that are correlated with recent in silico predictions, reinforcing the hypothesis that DNA contains some intrinsic positioning information. We also show that cis-regulatory sequences in human DNA coincide with peaks in the intrinsic landscape, whereas valleys correspond to non-regulatory regions, and we present evidence...

  4. Chromatin Remodeling around Nucleosome-Free Regions Leads to Repression of Noncoding RNA Transcription ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Yadon, Adam N.; Mark, Daniel; Basom, Ryan; Delrow, Jeffrey; Whitehouse, Iestyn; Tsukiyama, Toshio

    2010-01-01

    Nucleosome-free regions (NFRs) at the 5′ and 3′ ends of genes are general sites of transcription initiation for mRNA and noncoding RNA (ncRNA). The presence of NFRs within transcriptional regulatory regions and the conserved location of transcription start sites at NFRs strongly suggest that the regulation of NFRs profoundly affects transcription initiation. To date, multiple factors are known to facilitate transcription initiation by positively regulating the formation and/or size of NFRs in...

  5. Regulation of nucleosome landscape and transcription factor targeting at tissue-specific enhancers by BRG1

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Gangqing; Dustin E Schones; Cui, Kairong; Ybarra, River; Northrup, Daniel; Tang, Qingsong; Gattinoni, Luca; Restifo, Nicholas P; Huang, Suming; Zhao, Keji

    2011-01-01

    Enhancers of transcription activate transcription via binding of sequence-specific transcription factors to their target sites in chromatin. In this report, we identify GATA1-bound distal sites genome-wide and find a global reorganization of the nucleosomes at these potential enhancers during differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to erythrocytes. We show that the catalytic subunit BRG1 of BAF complexes localizes to these distal sites during differentiation and generates a longer ...

  6. Attenuation of DNA charge transport by compaction into a nucleosome core particle

    OpenAIRE

    Bjorklund, Chad C.; Davis, William B.

    2006-01-01

    The nucleosome core particle (NCP) is the fundamental building block of chromatin which compacts ∼146 bp of DNA around a core histone protein octamer. The effects of NCP packaging on long-range DNA charge transport reactions have not been adequately assessed to date. Here we study DNA hole transport reactions in a 157 bp DNA duplex (AQ-157TG) incorporating multiple repeats of the DNA TG-motif, a strong NCP positioning sequence and a covalently attached Anthraquinone photooxidant. Following a ...

  7. Translocations affecting human immunoglobulin heavy chain locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sklyar I. V.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Translocations involving human immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH locus are implicated in different leukaemias and lymphomas, including multiple myeloma, mantle cell lymphoma, Burkitt’s lymphoma and diffuse large B cell lymphoma. We have analysed published data and identified eleven breakpoint cluster regions (bcr related to these cancers within the IgH locus. These ~1 kbp bcrs are specific for one or several types of blood cancer. Our findings could help devise PCR-based assays to detect cancer-related translocations, to identify the mechanisms of translocations and to help in the research of potential translocation partners of the immunoglobulin locus at different stages of B-cell differentiation.

  8. Two distinct promoter architectures centered on dynamic nucleosomes control ribosomal protein gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Britta; Kubik, Slawomir; Ghosh, Bhaswar; Bruzzone, Maria Jessica; Geertz, Marcel; Martin, Victoria; Dénervaud, Nicolas; Jacquet, Philippe; Ozkan, Burak; Rougemont, Jacques; Maerkl, Sebastian J; Naef, Félix; Shore, David

    2014-08-01

    In yeast, ribosome production is controlled transcriptionally by tight coregulation of the 138 ribosomal protein genes (RPGs). RPG promoters display limited sequence homology, and the molecular basis for their coregulation remains largely unknown. Here we identify two prevalent RPG promoter types, both characterized by upstream binding of the general transcription factor (TF) Rap1 followed by the RPG-specific Fhl1/Ifh1 pair, with one type also binding the HMG-B protein Hmo1. We show that the regulatory properties of the two promoter types are remarkably similar, suggesting that they are determined to a large extent by Rap1 and the Fhl1/Ifh1 pair. Rapid depletion experiments allowed us to define a hierarchy of TF binding in which Rap1 acts as a pioneer factor required for binding of all other TFs. We also uncovered unexpected features underlying recruitment of Fhl1, whose forkhead DNA-binding domain is not required for binding at most promoters, and Hmo1, whose binding is supported by repeated motifs. Finally, we describe unusually micrococcal nuclease (MNase)-sensitive nucleosomes at all RPG promoters, located between the canonical +1 and -1 nucleosomes, which coincide with sites of Fhl1/Ifh1 and Hmo1 binding. We speculate that these "fragile" nucleosomes play an important role in regulating RPG transcriptional output. PMID:25085421

  9. Whole genome nucleosome sequencing identifies novel types of forensic markers in degraded DNA samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chun-Nan; Yang, Ya-Dong; Li, Shu-Jin; Yang, Ya-Ran; Zhang, Xiao-Jing; Fang, Xiang-Dong; Yan, Jiang-Wei; Cong, Bin

    2016-01-01

    In the case of mass disasters, missing persons and forensic caseworks, highly degraded biological samples are often encountered. It can be a challenge to analyze and interpret the DNA profiles from these samples. Here we provide a new strategy to solve the problem by taking advantage of the intrinsic structural properties of DNA. We have assessed the in vivo positions of more than 35 million putative nucleosome cores in human leukocytes using high-throughput whole genome sequencing, and identified 2,462 single nucleotide variations (SNVs), 128 insertion-deletion polymorphisms (indels). After comparing the sequence reads with 44 STR loci commonly used in forensics, five STRs (TH01, TPOX, D18S51, DYS391, and D10S1248)were matched. We compared these "nucleosome protected STRs" (NPSTRs) with five other non-NPSTRs using mini-STR primer design, real-time PCR, and capillary gel electrophoresis on artificially degraded DNA. Moreover, genotyping performance of the five NPSTRs and five non-NPSTRs was also tested with real casework samples. All results show that loci located in nucleosomes are more likely to be successfully genotyped in degraded samples. In conclusion, after further strict validation, these markers could be incorporated into future forensic and paleontology identification kits, resulting in higher discriminatory power for certain degraded sample types. PMID:27189082

  10. Dynamic Conformations of Nucleosome Arrays in Solution from Small-Angle X-ray Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Steven C.

    Chromatin conformation and dynamics remains unsolved despite the critical role of the chromatin in fundamental genetic functions such as transcription, replication, and repair. At the molecular level, chromatin can be viewed as a linear array of nucleosomes, each consisting of 147 base pairs (bp) of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) wrapped around a protein core and connected by 10 to 90 bp of linker dsDNA. Using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), we investigated how the conformations of model nucleosome arrays in solution are modulated by ionic condition as well as the effect of linker histone proteins. To facilitate ensemble modeling of these SAXS measurements, we developed a simulation method that treats coarse-grained DNA as a Markov chain, then explores possible DNA conformations using Metropolis Monte Carlo (MC) sampling. This algorithm extends the functionality of SASSIE, a program used to model intrinsically disordered biological molecules, adding to the previous methods for simulating protein, carbohydrates, and single-stranded DNA. Our SAXS measurements of various nucleosome arrays together with the MC generated models provide valuable solution structure information identifying specific differences from the structure of crystallized arrays.

  11. Whole genome nucleosome sequencing identifies novel types of forensic markers in degraded DNA samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chun-nan; Yang, Ya-dong; Li, Shu-jin; Yang, Ya-ran; Zhang, Xiao-jing; Fang, Xiang-dong; Yan, Jiang-wei; Cong, Bin

    2016-01-01

    In the case of mass disasters, missing persons and forensic caseworks, highly degraded biological samples are often encountered. It can be a challenge to analyze and interpret the DNA profiles from these samples. Here we provide a new strategy to solve the problem by taking advantage of the intrinsic structural properties of DNA. We have assessed the in vivo positions of more than 35 million putative nucleosome cores in human leukocytes using high-throughput whole genome sequencing, and identified 2,462 single nucleotide variations (SNVs), 128 insertion-deletion polymorphisms (indels). After comparing the sequence reads with 44 STR loci commonly used in forensics, five STRs (TH01, TPOX, D18S51, DYS391, and D10S1248)were matched. We compared these “nucleosome protected STRs” (NPSTRs) with five other non-NPSTRs using mini-STR primer design, real-time PCR, and capillary gel electrophoresis on artificially degraded DNA. Moreover, genotyping performance of the five NPSTRs and five non-NPSTRs was also tested with real casework samples. All results show that loci located in nucleosomes are more likely to be successfully genotyped in degraded samples. In conclusion, after further strict validation, these markers could be incorporated into future forensic and paleontology identification kits, resulting in higher discriminatory power for certain degraded sample types. PMID:27189082

  12. Binding of the transcription factor Atf1 to promoters serves as a barrier to phase nucleosome arrays and avoid cryptic transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Patricia; Paulo, Esther; Gao, Jun; Wahls, Wayne P.; Ayté, José; Lowy, Ernesto; Hidalgo, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe displays a large transcriptional response common to several stress conditions, regulated primarily by the transcription factor Atf1. Atf1-dependent promoters contain especially broad nucleosome depleted regions (NDRs) prior to stress imposition. We show here that basal binding of Atf1 to these promoters competes with histones to create wider NDRs at stress genes. Moreover, deletion of atf1 results in nucleosome disorganization specifically at stress coding regions and derepresses antisense transcription. Our data indicate that the transcription factor binding to promoters acts as an effective barrier to fix the +1 nucleosome and phase downstream nucleosome arrays to prevent cryptic transcription. PMID:25122751

  13. Haloarchaeal Protein Translocation via the Twin Arginine Translocation Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohlschroder Mechthild

    2009-02-03

    Protein transport across hydrophobic membranes that partition cellular compartments is essential in all cells. The twin arginine translocation (Tat) pathway transports proteins across the prokaryotic cytoplasmic membranes. Distinct from the universally conserved Sec pathway, which secretes unfolded proteins, the Tat machinery is unique in that it secretes proteins in a folded conformation, making it an attractive pathway for the transport and secretion of heterologously expressed proteins that are Sec-incompatible. During the past 7 years, the DOE-supported project has focused on the characterization of the diversity of bacterial and archaeal Tat substrates as well as on the characterization of the Tat pathway of a model archaeon, Haloferax volcanii, a member of the haloarchaea. We have demonstrated that H. volcanii uses this pathway to transport most of its secretome.

  14. Relevance of circulating nucleosomes and oncological biomarkers for predicting response to transarterial chemoembolization therapy in liver cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durner Jürgen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE therapy is an effective locoregional treatment in hepatocellular cancer (HCC patients. For early modification of therapy, markers predicting therapy response are urgently required. Methods Here, sera of 50 prospectively and consecutively included HCC patients undergoing 71 TACE therapies were taken before and 3 h, 6 h and 24 h after TACE application to analyze concentrations of circulating nucleosomes, cytokeratin-19 fragments (CYFRA 21-1, alpha fetoprotein (AFP, C-reactive protein (CRP and several liver biomarkers, and to compare these with radiological response to therapy. Results While nucleosomes, CYFRA 21-1, CRP and some liver biomarkers increased already 24 h after TACE, percental changes of nucleosome concentrations before and 24 h after TACE and pre- and posttherapeutic values of AFP, gamma-glutamyl-transferase (GGT and alkaline phosphatase (AP significantly indicated the later therapy response (39 progression versus 32 no progression. In multivariate analysis, nucleosomes (24 h, AP (24 h and TACE number were independent predictive markers. The risk score of this combination model achieved an AUC of 81.8% in receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves and a sensitivity for prediction of non-response to therapy of 41% at 97% specificity, and of 72% at 78% specificity. Conclusion Circulating nucleosomes and liver markers are valuable tools for early estimation of the efficacy of TACE therapy in HCC patients.

  15. Cell-free DNA Comprises an In Vivo Nucleosome Footprint that Informs Its Tissues-Of-Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Matthew W; Kircher, Martin; Hill, Andrew J; Daza, Riza M; Shendure, Jay

    2016-01-14

    Nucleosome positioning varies between cell types. By deep sequencing cell-free DNA (cfDNA), isolated from circulating blood plasma, we generated maps of genome-wide in vivo nucleosome occupancy and found that short cfDNA fragments harbor footprints of transcription factors. The cfDNA nucleosome occupancies correlate well with the nuclear architecture, gene structure, and expression observed in cells, suggesting that they could inform the cell type of origin. Nucleosome spacing inferred from cfDNA in healthy individuals correlates most strongly with epigenetic features of lymphoid and myeloid cells, consistent with hematopoietic cell death as the normal source of cfDNA. We build on this observation to show how nucleosome footprints can be used to infer cell types contributing to cfDNA in pathological states such as cancer. Since this strategy does not rely on genetic differences to distinguish between contributing tissues, it may enable the noninvasive monitoring of a much broader set of clinical conditions than currently possible. PMID:26771485

  16. Relevance of circulating nucleosomes and oncological biomarkers for predicting response to transarterial chemoembolization therapy in liver cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) therapy is an effective locoregional treatment in hepatocellular cancer (HCC) patients. For early modification of therapy, markers predicting therapy response are urgently required. Here, sera of 50 prospectively and consecutively included HCC patients undergoing 71 TACE therapies were taken before and 3 h, 6 h and 24 h after TACE application to analyze concentrations of circulating nucleosomes, cytokeratin-19 fragments (CYFRA 21-1), alpha fetoprotein (AFP), C-reactive protein (CRP) and several liver biomarkers, and to compare these with radiological response to therapy. While nucleosomes, CYFRA 21-1, CRP and some liver biomarkers increased already 24 h after TACE, percental changes of nucleosome concentrations before and 24 h after TACE and pre- and posttherapeutic values of AFP, gamma-glutamyl-transferase (GGT) and alkaline phosphatase (AP) significantly indicated the later therapy response (39 progression versus 32 no progression). In multivariate analysis, nucleosomes (24 h), AP (24 h) and TACE number were independent predictive markers. The risk score of this combination model achieved an AUC of 81.8% in receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and a sensitivity for prediction of non-response to therapy of 41% at 97% specificity, and of 72% at 78% specificity. Circulating nucleosomes and liver markers are valuable tools for early estimation of the efficacy of TACE therapy in HCC patients

  17. Topological diversity of chromatin fibers: Interplay between nucleosome repeat length, DNA linking number and the level of transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davood Norouzi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The spatial organization of nucleosomes in 30-nm fibers remains unknown in detail. To tackle this problem, we analyzed all stereochemically possible configurations of two-start chromatin fibers with DNA linkers L = 10-70 bp (nucleosome repeat length NRL = 157-217 bp. In our model, the energy of a fiber is a sum of the elastic energy of the linker DNA, steric repulsion, electrostatics, and the H4 tail-acidic patch interaction between two stacked nucleosomes. We found two families of energetically feasible conformations of the fibers—one observed earlier, and the other novel. The fibers from the two families are characterized by different DNA linking numbers—that is, they are topologically different. Remarkably, the optimal geometry of a fiber and its topology depend on the linker length: the fibers with linkers L = 10n and 10n + 5 bp have DNA linking numbers per nucleosome DLk >>-1.5 and -1.0, respectively. In other words, the level of DNA supercoiling is directly related to the length of the inter-nucleosome linker in the chromatin fiber (and therefore, to NRL. We hypothesize that this topological polymorphism of chromatin fibers may play a role in the process of transcription, which is known to generate different levels of DNA supercoiling upstream and downstream from RNA polymerase. A genome-wide analysis of the NRL distribution in active and silent yeast genes yielded results consistent with this assumption.

  18. The Pam18/Tim14–Pam16/Tim16 complex of the mitochondrial translocation motor: The formation of a stable complex from marginally stable proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iosefson, Ohad; Levy, Ran; Marom, Milit; Slutsky-Leiderman, Olga; Azem, Abdussalam

    2007-01-01

    The vast majority of mitochondrial proteins are imported from the cytosol. For matrix-localized proteins, the final step of translocation across the inner membrane is mediated by the mitochondrial translocation motor, of which mhsp70 is a key component. The ATP-dependent function of mhsp70 is regulated by a complex, composed of a J-protein (called Pam18 or Tim14) and a J-like protein (called Pam16 or Tim16), and the nucleotide exchange factor Mge1. In this study, we investigated the structural properties of a recombinant purified Pam18/Tim14–Pam16/Tim16 complex using cross-linking with the bifunctional reagent DSS and CD-spectroscopy. The results of the study show that both Pam18/Tim14 and Pam16/Tim16 are thermally unstable proteins that unfold at very low temperatures (Tm values of 16.5°C and 29°C, respectively). Upon mixing the proteins in vitro, or when both proteins are co-overexpressed in bacteria, Pam18/Tim14 and Pam16/Tim16 form a heterodimer that is thermally more stable than the individual proteins (Tm = 41°C). Analysis of the properties of the complex in GdnHCl shows that dissociation of the heterodimer is the limiting step in achieving full denaturation. PMID:17242434

  19. The Pam18/Tim14-Pam16/Tim16 complex of the mitochondrial translocation motor: the formation of a stable complex from marginally stable proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iosefson, Ohad; Levy, Ran; Marom, Milit; Slutsky-Leiderman, Olga; Azem, Abdussalam

    2007-02-01

    The vast majority of mitochondrial proteins are imported from the cytosol. For matrix-localized proteins, the final step of translocation across the inner membrane is mediated by the mitochondrial translocation motor, of which mhsp70 is a key component. The ATP-dependent function of mhsp70 is regulated by a complex, composed of a J-protein (called Pam18 or Tim14) and a J-like protein (called Pam16 or Tim16), and the nucleotide exchange factor Mge1. In this study, we investigated the structural properties of a recombinant purified Pam18/Tim14-Pam16/Tim16 complex using cross-linking with the bifunctional reagent DSS and CD-spectroscopy. The results of the study show that both Pam18/Tim14 and Pam16/Tim16 are thermally unstable proteins that unfold at very low temperatures (T(m) values of 16.5 degrees C and 29 degrees C, respectively). Upon mixing the proteins in vitro, or when both proteins are co-overexpressed in bacteria, Pam18/Tim14 and Pam16/Tim16 form a heterodimer that is thermally more stable than the individual proteins (T(m) = 41 degrees C). Analysis of the properties of the complex in GdnHCl shows that dissociation of the heterodimer is the limiting step in achieving full denaturation. PMID:17242434

  20. Functional reconstitution of bacterial Tat translocation in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Yahr, Timothy L.; Wickner, William T.

    2001-01-01

    The Tat (twin-arginine translocation) pathway is a Sec-independent mechanism for translocating folded preproteins across or into the inner membrane of Escherichia coli. To study Tat translocation, we sought an in vitro translocation assay using purified inner membrane vesicles and in vitro synthesized substrate protein. While membrane vesicles derived from wild-type cells translocate the Sec-dependent substrate proOmpA, translocation of a Tat-dependent substrate, SufI, was not detected. We es...

  1. The disequilibrium of nucleosomes distribution along chromosomes plays a functional and evolutionarily role in regulating gene expression

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Peng

    2011-08-19

    To further understand the relationship between nucleosome-space occupancy (NO) and global transcriptional activity in mammals, we acquired a set of genome-wide nucleosome distribution and transcriptome data from the mouse cerebrum and testis based on ChIP (H3)-seq and RNA-seq, respectively. We identified a nearly consistent NO patterns among three mouse tissues-cerebrum, testis, and ESCs-and found, through clustering analysis for transcriptional activation, that the NO variations among chromosomes are closely associated with distinct expression levels between house-keeping (HK) genes and tissue-specific (TS) genes. Both TS and HK genes form clusters albeit the obvious majority. This feature implies that NO patterns, i.e. nucleosome binding and clustering, are coupled with gene clustering that may be functionally and evolutionarily conserved in regulating gene expression among different cell types. © 2011 Cui et al.

  2. Genome-wide nucleosome map and cytosine methylation levels of an ancient human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Valen, Eivind; Velazquez, Amhed Missael Vargas;

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic information is available from contemporary organisms, but is difficult to track back in evolutionary time. Here, we show that genome-wide epigenetic information can be gathered directly from next-generation sequence reads of DNA isolated from ancient remains. Using the genome sequence...... expected signals at promoter regions, exon/intron boundaries, and CTCF sites. The top-scoring nucleosome calls revealed distinct DNA positioning biases, attesting to nucleotide-level accuracy. The ancient methylation levels exhibited high conservation over time, clustering closely with modern hair tissues...

  3. Inferring coarse-grain histone-DNA interaction potentials from high-resolution structures of the nucleosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Sam; Everaers, Ralf

    2015-02-01

    The histone-DNA interaction in the nucleosome is a fundamental mechanism of genomic compaction and regulation, which remains largely unknown despite increasing structural knowledge of the complex. In this paper, we propose a framework for the extraction of a nanoscale histone-DNA force-field from a collection of high-resolution structures, which may be adapted to a larger class of protein-DNA complexes. We applied the procedure to a large crystallographic database extended by snapshots from molecular dynamics simulations. The comparison of the structural models first shows that, at histone-DNA contact sites, the DNA base-pairs are shifted outwards locally, consistent with locally repulsive forces exerted by the histones. The second step shows that the various force profiles of the structures under analysis derive locally from a unique, sequence-independent, quadratic repulsive force-field, while the sequence preferences are entirely due to internal DNA mechanics. We have thus obtained the first knowledge-derived nanoscale interaction potential for histone-DNA in the nucleosome. The conformations obtained by relaxation of nucleosomal DNA with high-affinity sequences in this potential accurately reproduce the experimental values of binding preferences. Finally we address the more generic binding mechanisms relevant to the 80% genomic sequences incorporated in nucleosomes, by computing the conformation of nucleosomal DNA with sequence-averaged properties. This conformation differs from those found in crystals, and the analysis suggests that repulsive histone forces are related to local stretch tension in nucleosomal DNA, mostly between adjacent contact points. This tension could play a role in the stability of the complex.

  4. Defining chromosomal translocation risks in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Marc A Hogenbirk; Heideman, Marinus R.; de Rink, Iris; Velds, Arno; Kerkhoven, Ron M.; Wessels, Lodewyk F. A.; Jacobs, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Applying innovative integrative analyses of multifactorial genome-wide data, we now demonstrate that an open chromatin configuration, which is generically enriched promoter-proximal but not promoter-specific, is the common denominator and key translocation risk-determinant of active chromatin. The finding that gene size directly correlated with its translocation risk, in both mice and cancer patients, independently emphasized the generic irrelevance of any promoter-specific activity. These da...

  5. Bacterial translocation: the influence of dietary variables.

    OpenAIRE

    Deitch, E A

    1994-01-01

    Transmucosal passage of bacteria in critically ill patients may lead to a significant incidence of systemic sepsis. This has attracted much clinical interest, as it has been shown that malnutrition in itself, impairs various aspects of barrier function. Bacterial translocation is increased in animal models where nutrients are given by the parenteral route, while enteral feeding reverses this. Translocation is also considerably increased in response to a non-lethal endotoxin challenge, if ther...

  6. DNA transposon Hermes inserts into DNA in nucleosome-free regions in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangadharan, Sunil; Mularoni, Loris; Fain-Thornton, Jennifer; Wheelan, Sarah J; Craig, Nancy L

    2010-12-21

    Transposons are mobile genetic elements that are an important source of genetic variation and are useful tools for genome engineering, mutagenesis screens, and vectors for transgenesis including gene therapy. We have used second-generation sequencing to analyze ≈2 × 10(5) unique de novo transposon insertion sites of the transposon Hermes in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome from both in vitro transposition reactions by using purified yeast genomic DNA, to better characterize intrinsic sequence specificity, and sites recovered from in vivo transposition events, to characterize the effect of intracellular factors such as chromatin on target site selection. We find that Hermes transposon targeting in vivo is profoundly affected by chromatin structure: The subset of genome-wide target sites used in vivo is strongly associated (P < 2e-16 by Fisher's exact test) with nucleosome-free chromatin. Our characterization of the insertion site preferences of Hermes not only assists in the future use of this transposon as a molecular biology tool but also establishes methods to more fully determine targeting mechanisms of other transposons. We have also discovered a long-range sequence motif that defines S. cerevisiae nucleosome-free regions. PMID:21131571

  7. Vaccination with L. infantum chagasi nucleosomal histones confers protection against new world cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania braziliensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia W Carneiro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nucleosomal histones are intracellular proteins that are highly conserved among Leishmania species. After parasite destruction or spontaneous lysis, exposure to these proteins elicits a strong host immune response. In the present study, we analyzed the protective capability of Leishmania infantum chagasi nucleosomal histones against L. braziliensis infection using different immunization strategies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: BALB/c mice were immunized with either a plasmid DNA cocktail (DNA containing four Leishmania nucleosomal histones or with the DNA cocktail followed by the corresponding recombinant proteins plus CpG (DNA/Protein. Mice were later challenged with L. braziliensis, in the presence of sand fly saliva. Lesion development, parasite load and the cellular immune response were analyzed five weeks after challenge. Immunization with either DNA alone or with DNA/Protein was able to inhibit lesion development. This finding was highlighted by the absence of infected macrophages in tissue sections. Further, parasite load at the infection site and in the draining lymph nodes was also significantly lower in vaccinated animals. This outcome was associated with increased expression of IFN-γ and down regulation of IL-4 at the infection site. CONCLUSION: The data presented here demonstrate the potential use of L. infantum chagasi nucleosomal histones as targets for the development of vaccines against infection with L. braziliensis, as shown by the significant inhibition of disease development following a live challenge.

  8. The interactions of yeast SWI/SNF and RSC with the nucleosome before and after chromatin remodeling.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sengupta, S.M.; Kanegan, M. van; Persinger, J.; Logie, C.; Cairns, B.R.; Peterson, C.L.; Bartholomew, B.

    2001-01-01

    Interactions of the yeast chromatin-remodeling complexes SWI/SNF and RSC with nucleosomes were probed using site-specific DNA photoaffinity labeling. 5 S rDNA was engineered with photoreactive nucleotides incorporated at different sites in DNA to scan for the subunits of SWI/SNF in close proximity t

  9. Stochastic resonance during a polymer translocation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Debasish; Muthukumar, M.

    2016-04-01

    We have studied the occurrence of stochastic resonance when a flexible polymer chain undergoes a single-file translocation through a nano-pore separating two spherical cavities, under a time-periodic external driving force. The translocation of the chain is controlled by a free energy barrier determined by chain length, pore length, pore-polymer interaction, and confinement inside the donor and receiver cavities. The external driving force is characterized by a frequency and amplitude. By combining the Fokker-Planck formalism for polymer translocation and a two-state model for stochastic resonance, we have derived analytical formulas for criteria for emergence of stochastic resonance during polymer translocation. We show that no stochastic resonance is possible if the free energy barrier for polymer translocation is purely entropic in nature. The polymer chain exhibits stochastic resonance only in the presence of an energy threshold in terms of polymer-pore interactions. Once stochastic resonance is feasible, the chain entropy controls the optimal synchronization conditions significantly.

  10. Stochastic resonance during a polymer translocation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Debasish; Muthukumar, M

    2016-04-14

    We have studied the occurrence of stochastic resonance when a flexible polymer chain undergoes a single-file translocation through a nano-pore separating two spherical cavities, under a time-periodic external driving force. The translocation of the chain is controlled by a free energy barrier determined by chain length, pore length, pore-polymer interaction, and confinement inside the donor and receiver cavities. The external driving force is characterized by a frequency and amplitude. By combining the Fokker-Planck formalism for polymer translocation and a two-state model for stochastic resonance, we have derived analytical formulas for criteria for emergence of stochastic resonance during polymer translocation. We show that no stochastic resonance is possible if the free energy barrier for polymer translocation is purely entropic in nature. The polymer chain exhibits stochastic resonance only in the presence of an energy threshold in terms of polymer-pore interactions. Once stochastic resonance is feasible, the chain entropy controls the optimal synchronization conditions significantly. PMID:27083746

  11. Translocation pathways for inhaled asbestos fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantegazza F

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We discuss the translocation of inhaled asbestos fibers based on pulmonary and pleuro-pulmonary interstitial fluid dynamics. Fibers can pass the alveolar barrier and reach the lung interstitium via the paracellular route down a mass water flow due to combined osmotic (active Na+ absorption and hydraulic (interstitial pressure is subatmospheric pressure gradient. Fibers can be dragged from the lung interstitium by pulmonary lymph flow (primary translocation wherefrom they can reach the blood stream and subsequently distribute to the whole body (secondary translocation. Primary translocation across the visceral pleura and towards pulmonary capillaries may also occur if the asbestos-induced lung inflammation increases pulmonary interstitial pressure so as to reverse the trans-mesothelial and trans-endothelial pressure gradients. Secondary translocation to the pleural space may occur via the physiological route of pleural fluid formation across the parietal pleura; fibers accumulation in parietal pleura stomata (black spots reflects the role of parietal lymphatics in draining pleural fluid. Asbestos fibers are found in all organs of subjects either occupationally exposed or not exposed to asbestos. Fibers concentration correlates with specific conditions of interstitial fluid dynamics, in line with the notion that in all organs microvascular filtration occurs from capillaries to the extravascular spaces. Concentration is high in the kidney (reflecting high perfusion pressure and flow and in the liver (reflecting high microvascular permeability while it is relatively low in the brain (due to low permeability of blood-brain barrier. Ultrafine fibers (length

  12. Liver Cirrhosis and Intestinal Bacterial Translocation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal barrier dysfunction, facilitating translocation of bacteria and bacterial products, plays an important role in the pathophysiology of liver cirrhosis and its complications. Intestinal defense system including microbial barrier, immunologic barrier, mechanical barrier, chemical barrier, plays an important role in the maintenance of intestinal function. Under normal circumstances, the intestinal barrier can prevent intestinal bacteria through the intestinal wall from spreading to the body. Severe infection, trauma, shock, cirrhosis, malnutrition, immune suppression conditions, intestinal bacteria and endotoxin translocation, can lead to multiple organ dysfunction. The intestinal microlfora is not only involved in the digestion of nutrients, but also in local immunity, forming a barrier against pathogenic microorganisms. The derangement of the gut microlfora may lead to microbial translocation, deifned as the passage of viable microorganisms or bacterial products from the intestinal lumen to the mesenteric lymph nodes and other extraintestinal sites. In patients with cirrhosis, primary and intestinal lfora imbalance, intestinal bacterial overgrowth, intestinal mucosal barrier dysfunction, endotoxemia is associated with weakened immunity.

  13. Nuclear translocation and retention of growth hormone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mertani, Hichem C; Raccurt, Mireille; Abbate, Aude;

    2003-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that GH is subject to rapid receptor-dependent nuclear translocation. Here, we examine the importance of ligand activation of the GH-receptor (GHR)-associated Janus kinase (JAK) 2 and receptor dimerization for hormone internalization and nuclear translocation by use...... of cells stably transfected with cDNA for the GHR. Staurosporine and herbimycin A treatment of cells did not affect the ability of GH to internalize but resulted in increased nuclear accumulation of hormone. Similarly, receptor mutations, which prevent the association and activation of JAK2, did not...... affect the ability of the hormone to internalize or translocate to the nucleus but resulted in increased nuclear accumulation of GH. These results were observed both by nuclear isolation and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Staurosporine treatment of cells in which human GH (hGH) was targeted to the...

  14. Translocation of organic compounds in sunflower, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The apical portions of intact sunflower leaves were infiltrated with 14C-glucose, 14C-fructose or 3-O-methyl-14C-glucose and the basal portions were treated with inhibitors. The effects of oligomycin, ouabain and phlorizin on translocation were studied. Inhibition of translocation from the basal portion of the leaf to the stem was determined by experiments using oligomycin. In other experiments, each leaf was divided into three parts. The apical portion was fed with 14C-glucose and the basal part treated with oligomycin. The effects of oligomycin on the distribution of 14C-glucose, 14C-sucrose, 14C-fructose and 14C-sugar phosphate along the three parts of the leaf were investigated. Inhibition of sucrose synthesis in the leaves treated with oligomycin was observed. Oligomycin inhibited 14C translocation from the leaf. (author)

  15. Rearrangement of nucleosome structure during excision repair in xeroderma pigmentosum (group A) human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rearrangements of chromatic structure during excision repair were examined in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP; complementation group A) human fibroblasts treated with the small-molecule alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). We observed normal levels of repair synthesis in these cells during the first 12 h after exposure to MMS, in contrast to the near zero incorporation of repair patches following exposure to u.v. light. Our results indicate that the relative nuclease sensitivity of newly repaired regions in MMS-treated XP (group A) cells is quantitatively similar to that of newly repaired regions in MMS-treated normal human fibroblasts. This enhanced sensitivity is accompanied by a marked under-representation of repair-incorporated nucleotides in isolated nucleosome core DNA. Pulse-chase experiments demonstrated that these regions rapidly undergo rearrangements in chromatin structure, and both the rate and extent of these rearrangements are similar to those observed in normal cells. (author)

  16. Genome-wide nucleosome map and cytosine methylation levels of an ancient human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Valen, Eivind; Velazquez, Amhed M Vargas; Parker, Brian J; Rasmussen, Morten; Lindgreen, Stinus; Lilje, Berit; Tobin, Desmond J; Kelly, Theresa K; Vang, Søren; Andersson, Robin; Jones, Peter A; Hoover, Cindi A; Tikhonov, Alexei; Prokhortchouk, Egor; Rubin, Edward M; Sandelin, Albin; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Krogh, Anders; Willerslev, Eske; Orlando, Ludovic

    2014-01-01

    expected signals at promoter regions, exon/intron boundaries, and CTCF sites. The top-scoring nucleosome calls revealed distinct DNA positioning biases, attesting to nucleotide-level accuracy. The ancient methylation levels exhibited high conservation over time, clustering closely with modern hair tissues......Epigenetic information is available from contemporary organisms, but is difficult to track back in evolutionary time. Here, we show that genome-wide epigenetic information can be gathered directly from next-generation sequence reads of DNA isolated from ancient remains. Using the genome sequence...... the contention that ancient epigenomic information can be reconstructed from a deep past. Our findings lay the foundation for extracting epigenomic information from ancient samples, allowing shifts in epialleles to be tracked through evolutionary time, as well as providing an original window into...

  17. Towards the theoretical bases of the folding of the 100-A nucleosome filament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We attempt to model DNA packaging at the various stages of ever increasing DNA folding from the 100-A nucleosome filament to various further stages leading up to the metaphase chromosome. We have assumed that a phase transition has induced chromatin into a condensed mode. The mean-field model allows the simultaneous discussion of chromatin with packaging ration η and DNA replication at various stages of folding. We derive a formula correlating (during the S phase of the cell cycle) the DNA polymerase velocity rf (measured in nucleotides per minute) in a relation of inverse proportionality with the degree of DNA packaging: rf = λη-1/2, where the dimensional constant λ has been determined. This model suggests that in the heterochromatic regions of chromatin there is reduced activity of DNA polymerases. We discuss the possible relevance of our model to late replicating telomeres in yeast and several higher eukaryotes. (author). 28 refs, 3 tabs

  18. Possible role of Cl ions in DNA-protein interactions in the nucleosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bende, Attila; Bogár, Ferenc; Ladik, János

    2012-02-01

    The interactions of the PO4- groups of DNA and the positive parts of lysine/arginine were calculated in the nucleosomes using the ONIOM method. For the model system (3HO,K ion, PO4- group, positive side chains of lysine, arginine, resp., Cl) a triple-ζ basis set with polarization functions was applied both at the HF and MP2 levels. For the real system two dezoxyriboses and two guanines were added, the calculations were performed with a double-ζ basis set at the HF level. The direct PO4-⋯Lys/Arg bonds are ˜5 eV strong. These decrease by ˜4 eV due to the Cl ions. The water-mediated PO4-⋯HO⋯Lys/Arg bonds are ˜1 eV strong and the Cl-s hardly change their strength.

  19. PARP3 is a sensor of nicked nucleosomes and monoribosylates histone H2BGlu2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundy, Gabrielle J.; Polo, Luis M.; Zeng, Zhihong; Rulten, Stuart L.; Hoch, Nicolas C.; Paomephan, Pathompong; Xu, Yingqi; Sweet, Steve M.; Thorne, Alan W.; Oliver, Antony W.; Matthews, Steve J.; Pearl, Laurence H.; Caldecott, Keith W.

    2016-01-01

    PARP3 is a member of the ADP-ribosyl transferase superfamily that we show accelerates the repair of chromosomal DNA single-strand breaks in avian DT40 cells. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance experiments reveal that PARP3 employs a conserved DNA-binding interface to detect and stably bind DNA breaks and to accumulate at sites of chromosome damage. PARP3 preferentially binds to and is activated by mononucleosomes containing nicked DNA and which target PARP3 trans-ribosylation activity to a single-histone substrate. Although nicks in naked DNA stimulate PARP3 autoribosylation, nicks in mononucleosomes promote the trans-ribosylation of histone H2B specifically at Glu2. These data identify PARP3 as a molecular sensor of nicked nucleosomes and demonstrate, for the first time, the ribosylation of chromatin at a site-specific DNA single-strand break. PMID:27530147

  20. A role for tuned levels of nucleosome remodeler subunit ACF1 during Drosophila oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börner, Kenneth; Jain, Dhawal; Vazquez-Pianzola, Paula; Vengadasalam, Sandra; Steffen, Natascha; Fyodorov, Dmitry V; Tomancak, Pavel; Konev, Alexander; Suter, Beat; Becker, Peter B

    2016-03-15

    The Chromatin Accessibility Complex (CHRAC) consists of the ATPase ISWI, the large ACF1 subunit and a pair of small histone-like proteins, CHRAC-14/16. CHRAC is a prototypical nucleosome sliding factor that mobilizes nucleosomes to improve the regularity and integrity of the chromatin fiber. This may facilitate the formation of repressive chromatin. Expression of the signature subunit ACF1 is restricted during embryonic development, but remains high in primordial germ cells. Therefore, we explored roles for ACF1 during Drosophila oogenesis. ACF1 is expressed in somatic and germline cells, with notable enrichment in germline stem cells and oocytes. The asymmetrical localization of ACF1 to these cells depends on the transport of the Acf1 mRNA by the Bicaudal-D/Egalitarian complex. Loss of ACF1 function in the novel Acf1(7) allele leads to defective egg chambers and their elimination through apoptosis. In addition, we find a variety of unusual 16-cell cyst packaging phenotypes in the previously known Acf1(1) allele, with a striking prevalence of egg chambers with two functional oocytes at opposite poles. Surprisingly, we found that the Acf1(1) deletion - despite disruption of the Acf1 reading frame - expresses low levels of a PHD-bromodomain module from the C-terminus of ACF1 that becomes enriched in oocytes. Expression of this module from the Acf1 genomic locus leads to packaging defects in the absence of functional ACF1, suggesting competitive interactions with unknown target molecules. Remarkably, a two-fold overexpression of CHRAC (ACF1 and CHRAC-16) leads to increased apoptosis and packaging defects. Evidently, finely tuned CHRAC levels are required for proper oogenesis. PMID:26851213

  1. An all-atom model of the chromatin fiber containing linker histones reveals a versatile structure tuned by the nucleosomal repeat length.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Wong

    Full Text Available In the nucleus of eukaryotic cells, histone proteins organize the linear genome into a functional and hierarchical architecture. In this paper, we use the crystal structures of the nucleosome core particle, B-DNA and the globular domain of H5 linker histone to build the first all-atom model of compact chromatin fibers. In this 3D jigsaw puzzle, DNA bending is achieved by solving an inverse kinematics problem. Our model is based on recent electron microscopy measurements of reconstituted fiber dimensions. Strikingly, we find that the chromatin fiber containing linker histones is a polymorphic structure. We show that different fiber conformations are obtained by tuning the linker histone orientation at the nucleosomes entry/exit according to the nucleosomal repeat length. We propose that the observed in vivo quantization of nucleosomal repeat length could reflect nature's ability to use the DNA molecule's helical geometry in order to give chromatin versatile topological and mechanical properties.

  2. Tissue Nitrogen and Fructan Translocation in Bread Wheat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU You-liang; L.O'Brien; ZHONG Gai-rong

    2002-01-01

    Translocation of previously accumulated nitrogen and carbohydrates from vegetative tissue of the wheat plant is a major assimilate source for grain filling. This study was conducted to examine genotype differences in nitrogen and fructan translocation and their relationships to grain yield and protein content. Effects indicated that significant genotype differences existed for nitrogen accumulation at anthesis and fructan at milk stage and their translocation. Two high protein genotypes, Cunningham and PST90-19, accumulated more nitrogen before anthesis and had greater nitrogen translocation, but lower post-anthesis nitrogen uptake,than two low protein genotypes, SUN109A and TM56. Among plant parts, leaves were the major storage for tissue nitrogen and provided the overwhelming proportion of the total nitrogen translocation, whereas for fructan accumulation and translocation it was the stems. The two high protein genotypes had a higher percentage of their grain nitrogen derived from nitrogen translocation, while for the two low protein ones, it was from postanthesis nitrogen uptake and assimilation. Increasing nitrogen application increased nitrogen accumulation and translocation, but decreased fructan accumulation and translocation. High grain protein content was associated with high nitrogen translocation from leaves, stems and the total plant, while high grain yield was related to high fructan translocation from stems and the total plant. Fructan translocation was negatively correlated to grain protein content. Nitrogen and fructan translocation were not correlated with each other.

  3. Structure and mechanism of ATP-dependent phospholipid transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez Marques, Rosa Laura; Poulsen, Lisbeth Rosager; Bailly, Aurélien;

    2015-01-01

    Background ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters and P4-ATPases are two large and seemingly unrelated families of primary active pumps involved in moving phospholipids from one leaflet of a biological membrane to the other. Scope of review This review aims to identify common mechanistic features...... in the way phospholipid flipping is carried out by two evolutionarily unrelated families of transporters. Major conclusions Both protein families hydrolyze ATP, although they employ different mechanisms to use it, and have a comparable size with twelve transmembrane segments in the functional unit...

  4. Phenomenological analysis of ATP dependence of motor protein

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yunxin

    2011-01-01

    In this study, through phenomenological comparison of the velocity-force data of processive motor proteins, including conventional kinesin, cytoplasmic dynein and myosin V, we found that, the ratio between motor velocities of two different ATP concentrations is almost invariant for any substall, superstall or negative external loads. Therefore, the velocity of motor can be well approximated by a Michaelis-Menten like formula $V=\\atp k(F)L/(\\atp +K_M)$, with $L$ the step size, and $k(F)$ the external load $F$ dependent rate of one mechanochemical cycle of motor motion in saturated ATP solution. The difference of Michaelis-Menten constant $K_M$ for substall, superstall and negative external load indicates, the ATP molecule affinity of motor head for these three cases are different, though the expression of $k(F)$ as a function of $F$ might be unchanged for any external load $F$. Verifications of this Michaelis-Menten like formula has also been done by fitting to the recent experimental data.

  5. Nitrogen uptake and translocation by Chara

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer, C.P.; Escher, M.; Portielje, R.; Klein, de J.J.M.

    2003-01-01

    The potential for above-ground and below-ground uptake and subsequent internal translocation of ammonium (NH4+) and nitrate (NO3-) by the macroalga Chara spp. was investigated. In a two compartment experimental set-up separating above-ground and below-ground algal parts, the charophytes were exposed

  6. Meiotic behaviour of two human reciprocal translocations.

    OpenAIRE

    Egozcue, J; S Marina; Templado, C

    1981-01-01

    The meiotic behaviour of two male human reciprocal translocations is described. One patient had an unbalanced son and a chain configuration. The second had a stillborn child and a ring corresponding to an adjacent I segregation. The meiotic behaviour of chromosomal rearrangements must be investigated for proper genetic counselling.

  7. Using informative Multinomial-Dirichlet prior in a t-mixture with reversible jump estimation of nucleosome positions for genome-wide profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samb, Rawane; Khadraoui, Khader; Belleau, Pascal; Deschênes, Astrid; Lakhal-Chaieb, Lajmi; Droit, Arnaud

    2015-12-01

    Genome-wide mapping of nucleosomes has revealed a great deal about the relationships between chromatin structure and control of gene expression. Recent next generation CHIP-chip and CHIP-Seq technologies have accelerated our understanding of basic principles of chromatin organization. These technologies have taught us that nucleosomes play a crucial role in gene regulation by allowing physical access to transcription factors. Recent methods and experimental advancements allow the determination of nucleosome positions for a given genome area. However, most of these methods estimate the number of nucleosomes either by an EM algorithm using a BIC criterion or an effective heuristic strategy. Here, we introduce a Bayesian method for identifying nucleosome positions. The proposed model is based on a Multinomial-Dirichlet classification and a hierarchical mixture distributions. The number and the positions of nucleosomes are estimated using a reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation technique. We compare the performance of our method on simulated data and MNase-Seq data from Saccharomyces cerevisiae against PING and NOrMAL methods. PMID:26656614

  8. Translocation Renal Cell Carcinomas in Adults: A Single Institution Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong, Minghao; De Angelo, Patricia; Osborne, Lisa; Mondolfi, Paniz; Geller, Matthew; Yang, Youfeng; Linehan, W. Marston; Merino, Maria J.; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Cai, Dongming

    2012-01-01

    Translocation renal cell carcinoma is a newly recognized subtype of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with chromosomal translocations involving TFE3 (Xp11.2) or, less frequently, TFEB (6p21). Xp11 translocation RCC was originally described as a pediatric neoplasm representing 20–40% of pediatric RCCs with a much lower frequency in the adult population. TFEB translocation RCC is very rare, with approximately 10 cases reported in the literature. Here, we describe the clinicopathological features of ad...

  9. A novel selection system for chromosome translocations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Tennyson, Rachel B; Ebran, Nathalie; Herrera, Anissa E; Lindsley, Janet E.

    2002-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations are common genetic abnormalities found in both leukemias and solid tumors. While much has been learned about the effects of specific translocations on cell proliferation, much less is known about what causes these chromosome rearrangements. This article describes the development and use of a system that genetically selects for rare translocation events using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A translocation YAC was created that contains the breakpoint cluster regi...

  10. Does Gene Translocation Accelerate the Evolution of Laterally Transferred Genes?

    OpenAIRE

    Hao, Weilong; Golding, G. Brian

    2009-01-01

    Lateral gene transfer (LGT) and gene rearrangement are essential for shaping bacterial genomes during evolution. Separate attention has been focused on understanding the process of lateral gene transfer and the process of gene translocation. However, little is known about how gene translocation affects laterally transferred genes. Here we have examined gene translocations and lateral gene transfers in closely related genome pairs. The results reveal that translocated genes undergo elevated ra...

  11. Investigating binding particles distribution effects on polymer translocation through nanopore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji Abdolvahab, Rouhollah

    2016-03-01

    Chaperone driven polymer translocation is an important model for biopolymer's translocation in vivo. Binding proteins spatial distribution is a significant factor in calculating the translocation time of the polymer in this type of translocation. Here using a dynamical Monte Carlo simulation we compare the results of the usual uniform distribution with the exponential distribution of different rates for a stiff polymer. Our simulation results show that just by changing the chaperones spatial distribution the translocation time of the biopolymer will change by as large as an order. It can change the translocation regime of the polymer completely from a diffusive to a ballistic one. Although generally increasing the exponential rate and the background concentration will increase the translocation velocity, it is not always true and one should consider both the sequence and the background concentration. We show that the results depend on the sequence and changing the distribution rates for increasing the translocation velocity will change the whole Probability Density Function (PDF) of the polymer translocation time accordance to its sequence. The translocation time sequence dependency will change in the extreme cases e.g. in the high exponential rate. Investigating the binding protein size, λ, also shows the importance of the so called parking lot effect in distribution dependency of the translocation velocity. Although there is not any important dependency for λ = 1, translocation time depends clearly on the chaperone spatial distribution for the case of λ ≥ 2.

  12. Binding of NF1 to the MMTV promoter in nucleosomes: influence of rotational phasing, translational positioning and histone H1.

    OpenAIRE

    Eisfeld, K; Candau, R; Truss, M; Beato, M

    1997-01-01

    To analyse the role of rotational orientation and translational positioning of nucleosomal DNA on transcription factor binding we have generated a series of mutant MMTV promoters containing insertions of various lengths between the hormone-responsive region and the binding site for NF1. These various MMTV promoter fragments were assembled in mononucleosomes and used for structural studies and binding experiments. We show that the insertions change the rotational phase and translational positi...

  13. Rapid deamination of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photoproducts at TCG sites in a translationally and rotationally positioned nucleosome in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannistraro, Vincent J; Pondugula, Santhi; Song, Qian; Taylor, John-Stephen

    2015-10-30

    Sunlight-induced C to T mutation hot spots in skin cancers occur primarily at methylated CpG sites that coincide with sites of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) formation. The C and 5-methyl-C in CPDs are not stable and deaminate to U and T, respectively, which leads to the insertion of A by the DNA damage bypass polymerase η, thereby defining a probable mechanism for the origin of UV-induced C to T mutations. Deamination rates for T(m)CG CPDs have been found to vary 12-fold with rotational position in a nucleosome in vitro. To determine the influence of nucleosome structure on deamination rates in vivo, we determined the deamination rates of CPDs at TCG sites in a stably positioned nucleosome within the FOS promoter in HeLa cells. A procedure for in vivo hydroxyl radical footprinting with Fe-EDTA was developed, and, together with results from a cytosine methylation protection assay, we determined the translational and rotational positions of the TCG sites. Consistent with the in vitro observations, deamination was slower for one CPD located at an intermediate rotational position compared with two other sites located at outside positions, and all were much faster than for CPDs at non-TCG sites. Photoproduct formation was also highly suppressed at one site, possibly due to its interaction with a histone tail. Thus, it was shown that CPDs of TCG sites deaminate the fastest in vivo and that nucleosomes can modulate both their formation and deamination, which could contribute to the UV mutation hot spots and cold spots. PMID:26354431

  14. The conformational state of the nucleosome entry–exit site modulates TATA box-specific TBP binding

    OpenAIRE

    Aaron R Hieb; Gansen, Alexander; Böhm, Vera; Langowski, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    The TATA binding protein (TBP) is a critical transcription factor used for nucleating assembly of the RNA polymerase II machinery. TBP binds TATA box elements with high affinity and kinetic stability and in vivo is correlated with high levels of transcription activation. However, since most promoters use less stable TATA-less or TATA-like elements, while also competing with nucleosome occupancy, further mechanistic insight into TBP's DNA binding properties and ability to access chromatin is n...

  15. Translocation strategies for multiple species depend on interspecific interaction type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plein, Michaela; Bode, Michael; Moir, Melinda L; Vesk, Peter A

    2016-06-01

    Conservation translocations, anthropogenic movements of species to prevent their extinction, have increased substantially over the last few decades. Although multiple species are frequently moved to the same location, current translocation guidelines consider species in isolation. This practice ignores important interspecific interactions and thereby risks translocation failure. We model three different two-species systems to illustrate the inherent complexity of multispecies translocations and to assess the influence of different interaction types (consumer-resource, mutualism, and competition) on translocation strategies. We focus on how these different interaction types influence the optimal founder population sizes for successful translocations and the order in which the species are moved (simultaneous or sequential). Further, we assess the effect of interaction strength in simultaneous translocations and the time delay between translocations when moving two species sequentially. Our results show that translocation decisions need to reflect the type of interaction. While all translocations of interacting species require a minimum founder population size, which is demarked by an extinction boundary, consumer-resource translocations also have a maximum founder population limit. Above the minimum founder size, increasing the number of translocated individuals leads to a substantial increase in the extinction boundary of competitors and consumers, but not of mutualists. Competitive and consumer-resource systems benefit from sequential translocations, but the order of translocations does not change the outcomes for mutualistic interaction partners noticeably. Interspecific interactions are important processes that shape population dynamics and should therefore be incorporated into the quantitative planning of multispecies translocations. Our findings apply whenever interacting species are moved, for example, in reintroductions, conservation introductions, biological

  16. Quantized biopolymer translocation through nanopores: departure from simple scaling

    CERN Document Server

    Melchionna, Simone; Fyta, Maria; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Succi, Sauro

    2009-01-01

    We discuss multiscale simulations of long biopolymer translocation through wide nanopores that can accommodate multiple polymer strands. The simulations provide clear evidence of folding quantization, namely, the translocation proceeds through multi-folded configurations characterized by a well-defined integer number of folds. As a consequence, the translocation time acquires a dependence on the average folding number, which results in a deviation from the single-exponent power-law characterizing single-file translocation through narrow pores. The mechanism of folding quantization allows polymers above a threshold length (approximately $1,000$ persistence lengths for double-stranded DNA) to exhibit cooperative behavior and as a result to translocate noticeably faster.

  17. Origin of translocation barriers for polyelectrolyte chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajeev; Muthukumar, M

    2009-11-21

    For single-file translocations of a charged macromolecule through a narrow pore, the crucial step of arrival of an end at the pore suffers from free energy barriers, arising from changes in intrachain electrostatic interaction, distribution of ionic clouds and solvent molecules, and conformational entropy of the chain. All contributing factors to the barrier in the initial stage of translocation are evaluated by using the self-consistent field theory for the polyelectrolyte and the coupled Poisson-Boltzmann description for ions without radial symmetry. The barrier is found to be essentially entropic due to conformational changes. For moderate and high salt concentrations, the barriers for the polyelectrolyte chain are quantitatively equivalent to that of uncharged self-avoiding walks. Electrostatic effects are shown to increase the free energy barriers, but only slightly. The degree of ionization, electrostatic interaction strength, decreasing salt concentration, and the solvent quality all result in increases in the barrier. PMID:19929072

  18. Possible involvement of ATP-dependent K-channel related mechanisms in the antihypertensive and cough suppressant effects of the novel ACE inhibitor (2S, 3aS, 7aS)-1-(N2-nicotinoyl-L-lysyl-gamma-D-glutamyl)octahydro-1H- indole-2-carboxylic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, S; Takeyama, K; Hosoki, K; Karasawa, T

    1997-06-01

    The antihypertensive and cough suppressant mechanisms of DU-1777 ((2S,3aS,7aS)-1-(N2-nicotinoyl-L-lsyl-gamma-D-glutamyl )octahydro-1H-indole-2 -carboxylic acid, CAS 116662-73-8), a new long-acting angiotensin-1-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, were investigated in vivo and in vitro. The antihypertensive effects of DU-1777 at 10 mg/kg p.o. and cromakalim at 0.3 mg/kg p.o. were partially (about 60%) or fully antagonized by glibenclamide at 10 mg/kg i.v. in 2-kidney, 1-clip renal hypertensive rats (2K-1C RHR). The antihypertensive effects of a Ca blocker (nifedipine) and other ACE inhibitors (captopril, alacepril, enalapril, lisinopril, imidapril and quanapril) were not antagonized by glibenclamide. In deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt hypertensive rats (DOCA-HR), the antihypertensive effects of DU-1777 at 3-30 mg/kg p.o. were fully antagonized by glibenclamide. However, in vitro, DU-1777 (10(-6)-10(-3) mol/l) did not affect aortic ring contractions induced by high K (30 mmol/l). In guinea pig, citric acid induced cough was increased by ACE inhibitors, captopril, alacepril, enalapril and lisinopril (10 and 30 mg/kg p.o.). DU-1777 had a tendency to decrease citric acid induced cough and the effect was antagonized by glibenclamide. These results suggest that while DU-1777 itself does not open ATP-dependent K channel, it indirectly produces these effects through unknown mechanisms in vivo. Moreover, these effects contributed to the antihypertensive effect in DOCA-HR and cough suppressant effect in guinea pigs. PMID:9239450

  19. Unforced polymer translocation compared to the forced case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtola, V V; Linna, R P; Kaski, K

    2010-03-01

    We present results for unforced polymer translocation from simulations using Langevin dynamics in two dimensions (2D) to four dimensions and stochastic rotation dynamics supporting hydrodynamic modes in three dimensions (3D). We compare our results to forced translocation and a simplified model where the polymer escapes from an infinite pore. The simple model shows that the scaling behavior of unforced translocation is independent of the dimension of the side to which the polymer is translocating. We find that, unlike its forced counterpart, unforced translocation dynamics is insensitive to pore design. Hydrodynamics is seen to markedly speed up the unforced translocation process but not to affect the scaling relations. Average mean-squared displacement shows scaling with average transition time in unforced but not in forced translocation. The waiting-time distribution in unforced translocation follows closely Poissonian distribution. Our measured transfer probabilities align well with those obtained from an equilibrium theory in 3D, but somewhat worse in 2D, where a polymer's relaxation toward equilibrium with respect to its translocation time is slower. Consequently, in stark contrast to forced translocation, unforced translocation is seen to remain close to equilibrium and shows clear universality. PMID:20365761

  20. Photosynthesis/translocation studies in terrestrial ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this chapter, the basic methods of 14C use in plant science are presented with three examples of applications in the field of plant physiology and ecology. Since environmental factors play a major role in the rates of photosynthesis and translocation processes, a majority of the chapter is devoted to the description of methods and technologies involved to maintain normal growth conditions for the plants used for 14C experiments

  1. Two phase picture in driven polymer translocation

    OpenAIRE

    Saito, Takuya; Sakaue, Takahiro

    2012-01-01

    Two phase picture is a simple and effective methodology to capture the nonequilibrium dynamics of polymer associated with tension propagation. When applying it to the driven translocation process, there is a point to be noted, as briefly discussed in our recent article [Phys. Rev. E 85, 061803 (2012)]. In this article, we address this issue in detail and modify our previous prediction [Euro. Phys. J. E 34, 135 (2011)] by adopting an alternative steady-state ansatz. The modified scaling predic...

  2. The role of anti-nucleosome antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus. Results of a study of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and other connective tissue diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Tigano

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of our study was to investigate the prevalence and the disease specificity of anti-nucleosome antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus and their association with disease activity and renal involvement. Methods: Anti-nucleosome antibodies were measured by ELISA in the sera of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE (47, rheumatoid arthritis (RA (22, mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD (19, systemic sclerosis (SSc (11 and Siögren’s syndrome (SS (10. Anti-dsDNA antibodies were measured by IIF on Chritidia luciliae. In the patients with SLE serum levels of C3 and C4 complement components were also measured. Sera of 22 healthy individuals were assayed as controls. SLE activity was evaluated by the ECLAM score. Results: Anti-nucleosome antibodies were found in 40 patients with SLE (85.1%, in 10 with RA (45.4%, in 8 with MCTD (42.1%, in 4 with SSc (36.3%, in 1 with SS (10% and in none of the healthy controls. Anti-dsDNA antibodies were found in 23 patients with SLE and were absent in the patients with other CTD and in controls. All the patients with SLE and renal involvement were positive both for anti-dsDNA antibodies and anti-nucleosome antibodies. No significant correlation was observed between anti-nucleosome antibodies and disease activity and renal involvement. Conclusion: Anti-nucleosome antibodies are present in a high percentage of the patients with SLE but they don’t seem to be specific markers of the desease. Our data don’t support a clear correlation between anti-nucleosome antibodies and disease activity and renal involvement.

  3. Apoptosis-related deregulation of proteolytic activities and high serum levels of circulating nucleosomes and DNA in blood correlate with breast cancer progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As cell-free circulating DNA exists predominantly as mono- and oligonucleosomes, the focus of the current study was to examine the interplay of circulating nucleosomes, DNA, proteases and caspases in blood of patients with benign and malignant breast diseases. The concentrations of cell-free DNA and nucleosomes as well as the protease and caspase activities were measured in serum of patients with benign breast disease (n = 20), primary breast cancer (M0, n = 31), metastatic breast cancer (M1, n = 32), and healthy individuals (n = 28) by PicoGreen, Cell Death Detection ELISA, Protease Fluorescent Detection Kit and Caspase-Glo®3/7 Assay, respectively. Patients with benign and malignant tumors had significantly higher levels of circulating nucleic acids in their blood than healthy individuals (p = 0.001, p = 0.0001), whereas these levels could not discriminate between benign and malignant lesions. Our analyses of all serum samples revealed significant correlations of circulating nucleosome with DNA concentrations (p = 0.001), nucleosome concentrations with caspase activities (p = 0.008), and caspase with protease activities (p = 0.0001). High serum levels of protease and caspase activities associated with advanced tumor stages (p = 0.009). Patients with lymph node-positive breast cancer had significantly higher nucleosome levels in their blood than node-negative patients (p = 0.004). The presence of distant metastases associated with a significant increase in serum nucleosome (p = 0.01) and DNA levels (p = 0.04), and protease activities (p = 0.008). Our findings demonstrate that high circulating nucleic acid concentrations in blood are no indicators of a malignant breast tumor. However, the observed changes in apoptosis-related deregulation of proteolytic activities along with the elevated serum levels of nucleosomes and DNA in blood are linked to breast cancer progression

  4. Financial costs of large carnivore translocations--accounting for conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weise, Florian J; Stratford, Ken J; van Vuuren, Rudolf J

    2014-01-01

    Human-carnivore conflict continues to present a major conservation challenge around the world. Translocation of large carnivores is widely implemented but remains strongly debated, in part because of a lack of cost transparency. We report detailed translocation costs for three large carnivore species in Namibia and across different translocation scenarios. We consider the effect of various parameters and factors on costs and translocation success. Total translocation cost for 30 individuals in 22 events was $80,681 (US Dollars). Median translocation cost per individual was $2,393, and $2,669 per event. Median cost per cheetah was $2,760 (n = 23), and $2,108 per leopard (n = 6). One hyaena was translocated at a cost of $1,672. Tracking technology was the single biggest cost element (56%), followed by captive holding and feeding. Soft releases, prolonged captivity and orphaned individuals also increased case-specific costs. A substantial proportion (65.4%) of the total translocation cost was successfully recovered from public interest groups. Less than half the translocations were confirmed successes (44.4%, 3 unknown) with a strong species bias. Four leopards (66.7%) were successfully translocated but only eight of the 20 cheetahs (40.0%) with known outcome met these strict criteria. None of the five habituated cheetahs was translocated successfully, nor was the hyaena. We introduce the concept of Individual Conservation Cost (ICC) and define it as the cost of one successfully translocated individual adjusted by costs of unsuccessful events of the same species. The median ICC for cheetah was $6,898 and $3,140 for leopard. Translocations are costly, but we demonstrate that they are not inherently more expensive than other strategies currently employed in non-lethal carnivore conflict management. We conclude that translocation should be one available option for conserving large carnivores, but needs to be critically evaluated on a case-by-case basis. PMID

  5. Measurement of background translocation frequencies in individuals with clones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wade, M.J.

    1996-08-01

    In the leukemia case the unseparated B and T lymphocytes had a high translocation frequency even after 0.0014, respectively. After purging all clones from the data, the translocation frequencies for Bio 8 and Bio 23 were 0.00750.0014 and 0.0073 metaphases were scored for chromosomal aberrations,, specifically reciprocal translocations, using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Metaphase spreads were used from two healthy, unexposed individuals (not exposed to radiation, chemotherapy or radiotherapy) and one early B- precursor acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) patient (metaphase spreads from both separated T lymphocytes and unseparated B and T lymphocytes were scored). All three individuals had an abnormally high translocation frequency. The high translocation frequencies resulted from clonal expansion of specific translocated chromosomes. I show in this thesis that by purging (discounting or removing) clones from the data of unexposed individuals, one can obtain true background translocation frequencies. In two cases, Bio 8 and Bio 23, the measured translocation frequency for chromosomes 1, 2 and 4 was 0.0124 purging all of the clones from the data. This high translocation frequency may be due to a low frequency of some clones and may not be recognized. The separated T lymphocytes had a higher translocation frequency than expected.

  6. Nucleosome acidic patch promotes RNF168- and RING1B/BMI1-dependent H2AX and H2A ubiquitination and DNA damage signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin W Leung

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Histone ubiquitinations are critical for the activation of the DNA damage response (DDR. In particular, RNF168 and RING1B/BMI1 function in the DDR by ubiquitinating H2A/H2AX on Lys-13/15 and Lys-118/119, respectively. However, it remains to be defined how the ubiquitin pathway engages chromatin to provide regulation of ubiquitin targeting of specific histone residues. Here we identify the nucleosome acid patch as a critical chromatin mediator of H2A/H2AX ubiquitination (ub. The acidic patch is required for RNF168- and RING1B/BMI1-dependent H2A/H2AXub in vivo. The acidic patch functions within the nucleosome as nucleosomes containing a mutated acidic patch exhibit defective H2A/H2AXub by RNF168 and RING1B/BMI1 in vitro. Furthermore, direct perturbation of the nucleosome acidic patch in vivo by the expression of an engineered acidic patch interacting viral peptide, LANA, results in defective H2AXub and RNF168-dependent DNA damage responses including 53BP1 and BRCA1 recruitment to DNA damage. The acidic patch therefore is a critical nucleosome feature that may serve as a scaffold to integrate multiple ubiquitin signals on chromatin to compose selective ubiquitinations on histones for DNA damage signaling.

  7. Methylation of Lysine 9 in Histone H3 Directs Alternative Modes of Highly Dynamic Interaction of Heterochromatin Protein hHP1β with the Nucleosome*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munari, Francesca; Soeroes, Szabolcs; Zenn, Hans Michael; Schomburg, Adrian; Kost, Nils; Schröder, Sabrina; Klingberg, Rebecca; Rezaei-Ghaleh, Nasrollah; Stützer, Alexandra; Gelato, Kathy Ann; Walla, Peter Jomo; Becker, Stefan; Schwarzer, Dirk; Zimmermann, Bastian; Fischle, Wolfgang; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Binding of heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) to the histone H3 lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) mark is a hallmark of establishment and maintenance of heterochromatin. Although genetic and cell biological aspects have been elucidated, the molecular details of HP1 binding to H3K9me3 nucleosomes are unknown. Using a combination of NMR spectroscopy and biophysical measurements on fully defined recombinant experimental systems, we demonstrate that H3K9me3 works as an on/off switch regulating distinct binding modes of hHP1β to the nucleosome. The methyl-mark determines a highly flexible and very dynamic interaction of the chromodomain of hHP1β with the H3-tail. There are no other constraints of interaction or additional multimerization interfaces. In contrast, in the absence of methylation, the hinge region and the N-terminal tail form weak nucleosome contacts mainly with DNA. In agreement with the high flexibility within the hHP1β-H3K9me3 nucleosome complex, the chromoshadow domain does not provide a direct binding interface. Our results report the first detailed structural analysis of a dynamic protein-nucleosome complex directed by a histone modification and provide a conceptual framework for understanding similar interactions in the context of chromatin. PMID:22815475

  8. Methylation of lysine 9 in histone H3 directs alternative modes of highly dynamic interaction of heterochromatin protein hHP1β with the nucleosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munari, Francesca; Soeroes, Szabolcs; Zenn, Hans Michael; Schomburg, Adrian; Kost, Nils; Schröder, Sabrina; Klingberg, Rebecca; Rezaei-Ghaleh, Nasrollah; Stützer, Alexandra; Gelato, Kathy Ann; Walla, Peter Jomo; Becker, Stefan; Schwarzer, Dirk; Zimmermann, Bastian; Fischle, Wolfgang; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2012-09-28

    Binding of heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) to the histone H3 lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) mark is a hallmark of establishment and maintenance of heterochromatin. Although genetic and cell biological aspects have been elucidated, the molecular details of HP1 binding to H3K9me3 nucleosomes are unknown. Using a combination of NMR spectroscopy and biophysical measurements on fully defined recombinant experimental systems, we demonstrate that H3K9me3 works as an on/off switch regulating distinct binding modes of hHP1β to the nucleosome. The methyl-mark determines a highly flexible and very dynamic interaction of the chromodomain of hHP1β with the H3-tail. There are no other constraints of interaction or additional multimerization interfaces. In contrast, in the absence of methylation, the hinge region and the N-terminal tail form weak nucleosome contacts mainly with DNA. In agreement with the high flexibility within the hHP1β-H3K9me3 nucleosome complex, the chromoshadow domain does not provide a direct binding interface. Our results report the first detailed structural analysis of a dynamic protein-nucleosome complex directed by a histone modification and provide a conceptual framework for understanding similar interactions in the context of chromatin. PMID:22815475

  9. The role of the Philadelphia translocation in chronic myeloid leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Geurts Van Kessel, Ad

    1983-01-01

    textabstractDuring the last two decades evidence for a close association between the presence of specific chromosomal abnormalities and the occurrence of several types of cancers and leukemias has accumulated. The Philadelphia (Ph 1) translocation, present in about 90% of the patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), is one of the most typical and best documented examples of such an aberration. Usually this translocation involves chromosome 9 and 22: t(9;22)(q34;q11). The translocation pr...

  10. Mapping RFLP Loci in Maize Using B-a Translocations

    OpenAIRE

    Weber, D.; Helentjaris, T

    1989-01-01

    Plants hypoploid for specific segments of each of the maize (Zea mays L.) chromosomes were generated using 24 different B-A translocations. Plants carrying each of the B-A translocations were crossed as male parents to inbreds, and sibling progeny hypoploid or not hypoploid for specific chromosomal segments were recovered. Genomic DNAs from the parents, hypoploid progeny, and nonhypoploid (euploid or hyperploid) progeny for each of these B-A translocations were digested with restriction enzym...

  11. Dithiothreitol and the translocation of preprolactin across mammalian endoplasmic reticulum

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    The translocation mode of preprolactin (pPL) across mammalian endoplasmic reticulum was reinvestigated in light of recent findings that nascent secretory polypeptides synthesized in the presence of a highly reducing environment could be translocated posttranslationally and independently of their attachment to the ribosome (Maher, P. A., and S. J. Singer, 1986, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 83:9001-9005). The effects of the reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT) on pPL synthesis and translocation w...

  12. Microbial translocation and cardiometabolic risk factors in HIV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trøseid, Marius; Manner, Ingjerd W; Pedersen, Karin K; Haissman, Judith M; Kvale, Dag; Nielsen, Susanne D

    2014-01-01

    crucial in order to tailor novel strategies for prophylaxis and treatment. This review will focus on advances in the field that possibly link HIV-induced alterations of the gut mucosa and consequent microbial translocation to cardiometabolic risk factors in HIV infection. Recent work suggests that markers...... translocation and cardiovascular risk factors will translate into increased risk of acute events, and whether strategies to target gut microbiota and microbial translocation might reduce such a risk....

  13. Bacterial translocation and gut microflora in obstructive jaundice.

    OpenAIRE

    Parks, R W; Clements, W D; Pope, C; Halliday, M I; Rowlands, B J; Diamond, T.

    1996-01-01

    Bacterial translocation from the gut is implicated in the pathophysiology of complications associated with obstructive jaundice. Absence of intraluminal bile salts and their antiendotoxic effects may result in overgrowth of bacteria, promoting bacterial translocation. The large bowel is the largest source of gram negative bacteria but the small bowel is more permeable. This study investigated the effect of obstructive jaundice on bacterial translocation and on the indigenous luminal microflor...

  14. Nonabsorbable Antibiotics Reduce Bacterial and Endotoxin Translocation in Hepatectomised Rats

    OpenAIRE

    S. K. Kakkos; Kirkilesis, J.; Scopa, C D; Arvaniti, A.; Alexandrides, T.; Vagianos, C. E.

    1997-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that septic complications, occurring after major hepatectomies, may be caused by gram negative bacteria, translocating from the gut. We investigated in rats, the effect of extended hepatectomy on the structure and morphology of the intestinal mucosa as well as on the translocation of intestinal bacteria and endotoxins. We also examined the effect of nonabsorbable antibiotics on reducing the intestinal flora and consequently the phenomenon of translocation by admin...

  15. The protein translocation machinery of the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, P; Gilmore, R; Müller, M; Blobel, G

    1982-12-24

    The rough endoplasmic reticulum (r.e.r.) has been postulated to possess a single translation-coupled translocation system (in multiple copies) that effects signal sequence-mediated translocation of all secretory and lysosomal proteins and integration of all integral membrane proteins whose port of entry is the rough endoplasmic reticulum (G. Blobel 1980 Proc. natn. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77, 1496-1500). Two proteins have been isolated that are components of the r.e.r. translocation system. Their properties and function in protein translocation across and integration into membranes are discussed. PMID:6131460

  16. Obstacle Effects on One-Dimensional Translocation of ATPase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xian-Ju; AI Bao-Quan; LIU Liang-Gang

    2002-01-01

    We apply a general random walk model to the study of the ATPase's one-dimensional translocation along obstacle biological environment, and show the effects of random obstacles on the ATPase translocation along single stranded DNA. We find that the obstacle environment can reduce the lifetime of ATPase lattice-bound state which results in the inhibition of ATPase activity. We also carry out the ranges of rate constant of ATPase unidirectonal translocation and bidirectional translocation. Our results are consistent with the experiments and relevant theoretical consideration, and can be used to explain some physiological phenomena.

  17. Chaperone-assisted translocation of flexible polymers in three dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhonen, P. M.; Linna, R. P.

    2016-01-01

    Polymer translocation through a nanometer-scale pore assisted by chaperones binding to the polymer is a process encountered in vivo for proteins. Studying the relevant models by computer simulations is computationally demanding. Accordingly, previous studies are either for stiff polymers in three dimensions or flexible polymers in two dimensions. Here, we study chaperone-assisted translocation of flexible polymers in three dimensions using Langevin dynamics. We show that differences in binding mechanisms, more specifically, whether a chaperone can bind to a single site or multiple sites on the polymer, lead to substantial differences in translocation dynamics in three dimensions. We show that the single-binding mode leads to dynamics that is very much like that in the constant-force driven translocation and accordingly mainly determined by tension propagation on the cis side. We obtain β ≈1.26 for the exponent for the scaling of the translocation time with polymer length. This fairly low value can be explained by the additional friction due to binding particles. The multiple-site binding leads to translocation the dynamics of which is mainly determined by the trans side. For this process we obtain β ≈1.36 . This value can be explained by our derivation of β =4 /3 for constant-bias translocation, where translocated polymer segments form a globule on the trans side. Our results pave the way for understanding and utilizing chaperone-assisted translocation where variations in microscopic details lead to rich variations in the emerging dynamics.

  18. The CentO satellite confers translational and rotational phasing on cenH3 nucleosomes in rice centromeres

    OpenAIRE

    Tao ZHANG; Talbert, Paul B; Zhang, Wenli; Wu, Yufeng; Yang, Zujun; Henikoff, Jorja G.; Henikoff, Steven; Jiang, Jiming

    2013-01-01

    Centromeres are sites on chromosomes that mediate attachment to microtubules for chromosome segregation and often comprise tandemly repeated “satellite” sequences. The function of these repeats is unclear because centromeres can be formed on single-copy DNA by the presence of nucleosomes containing a centromere-specific variant of histone H3 (cenH3). Rice has centromeres composed of both the 155-bp CentO satellite repeat and single-copy non-CentO sequences. This study shows that rice cenH3 nu...

  19. Multistep protein unfolding during nanopore translocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Larrea, David; Bayley, Hagan

    2013-04-01

    Cells are divided into compartments and separated from the environment by lipid bilayer membranes. Essential molecules are transported back and forth across the membranes. We have investigated how folded proteins use narrow transmembrane pores to move between compartments. During this process, the proteins must unfold. To examine co-translocational unfolding of individual molecules, we tagged protein substrates with oligonucleotides to enable potential-driven unidirectional movement through a model protein nanopore, a process that differs fundamentally from extension during force spectroscopy measurements. Our findings support a four-step translocation mechanism for model thioredoxin substrates. First, the DNA tag is captured by the pore. Second, the oligonucleotide is pulled through the pore, causing local unfolding of the C terminus of the thioredoxin adjacent to the pore entrance. Third, the remainder of the protein unfolds spontaneously. Finally, the unfolded polypeptide diffuses through the pore into the recipient compartment. The unfolding pathway elucidated here differs from those revealed by denaturation experiments in solution, for which two-state mechanisms have been proposed.

  20. Another reptile translocation to a national park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.R. Branch

    1990-10-01

    Full Text Available On 4 May 1988 a sub-adult (50 mm snout-vent length, 42 mm tail Jones' girdled lizard Cordylus tropidosternum jonesi was collected in a pile of wood being off-loaded at the new restcamp in the Karoo National Park, Beaufort West. The wood had been transported by lorry from the Kruger National Park. The specimen is deposited in the herpetological collection of the Port Elizabeth Museum (PEM R 4584. Jones' girdled lizard is a small, arboreal cordylid that shelters under tree bark and in hollow logs. It is common and widely-distributed in the Kruger National Park (Pienaar, Haacke & Jacobsen 1983, The Reptiles of the Kruger National Park, 3rd edition. Pretoria: National Parks Board and adjacent lowveld, being replaced in northern Zimbabwe and East Africa by the nominate race. Hewitt & Power (1913, Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 3: 147-176, 1913 reported a similar translocation of the species to Kimberley in association with timber brought to the diamond mining camps. One of us noted recently the ease and danger of the unwitting spread of commensal reptile species into conservation areas (Branch 1978, Koedoe 30: 165, and this is confirmed by this additional example. We recommend that should similar shipments of wood be considered essential, then they be fumigated to prevent the translocation of other alien organisms that may potentially have more dangerous consequences.

  1. Sequence-dependent nucleosome structural and dynamic polymorphism. Potential involvement of histone H2B N-terminal tail proximal domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivolob, Andrei; Lavelle, Christophe; Prunell, Ariel

    2003-02-01

    Relaxation of nucleosomes on an homologous series (pBR) of ca 350-370 bp DNA minicircles originating from plasmid pBR322 was recently used as a tool to study their structure and dynamics. These nucleosomes thermally fluctuated between three distinct DNA conformations within a histone N-terminal tail-modulated equilibrium: one conformation was canonical, with 1.75 turn wrapping and negatively crossed entering and exiting DNAs; another was also "closed", but with these DNAs positively crossed; and the third was "open", with a lower than 1.5 turn wrapping and uncrossed DNAs. In this work, a new minicircle series (5S) of similar size was used, which contained the 5S nucleosome positioning sequence. Results showed that DNA in pBR nucleosomes was untwisted by approximately 0.2 turn relative to 5S nucleosomes, which DNase I footprinting confirmed in revealing a approximately 1 bp untwisting at each of the two dyad-distal sites where H2B N-terminal tails pass between the two gyres. In contrast, both nucleosomes showed untwistings at the dyad-proximal sites, i.e. on the other gyre, which were also observed in the high-resolution crystal structure. 5S nucleosomes also differ with respect to their dynamics: they hardly accessed the positively crossed conformation, but had an easier access to the negatively crossed conformation. Simulation showed that such reverse effects on the conformational free energies could be simply achieved by slightly altering the trajectories of entering and exiting DNAs. We propose that this is accomplished by H2B tail untwisting at the distal sites through action at a distance ( approximately 20 bp) on H3-tail interactions with the small groove at the nucleosome entry-exit. These results may help to gain a first glimpse into the two perhaps most intriguing features of the high-resolution structure: the alignment of the grooves on the two gyres and the passage of H2B and H3 N-terminal tails between them. PMID:12547190

  2. Ubiquitous human ‘master’ origins of replication are encoded in the DNA sequence via a local enrichment in nucleosome excluding energy barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drillon, Guénola; Audit, Benjamin; Argoul, Françoise; Arneodo, Alain

    2015-02-01

    As the elementary building block of eukaryotic chromatin, the nucleosome is at the heart of the compromise between the necessity of compacting DNA in the cell nucleus and the required accessibility to regulatory proteins. The recent availability of genome-wide experimental maps of nucleosome positions for many different organisms and cell types has provided an unprecedented opportunity to elucidate to what extent the DNA sequence conditions the primary structure of chromatin and in turn participates in the chromatin-mediated regulation of nuclear functions, such as gene expression and DNA replication. In this study, we use in vivo and in vitro genome-wide nucleosome occupancy data together with the set of nucleosome-free regions (NFRs) predicted by a physical model of nucleosome formation based on sequence-dependent bending properties of the DNA double-helix, to investigate the role of intrinsic nucleosome occupancy in the regulation of the replication spatio-temporal programme in human. We focus our analysis on the so-called replication U/N-domains that were shown to cover about half of the human genome in the germline (skew-N domains) as well as in embryonic stem cells, somatic and HeLa cells (mean replication timing U-domains). The ‘master’ origins of replication (MaOris) that border these megabase-sized U/N-domains were found to be specified by a few hundred kb wide regions that are hyper-sensitive to DNase I cleavage, hypomethylated, and enriched in epigenetic marks involved in transcription regulation, the hallmarks of localized open chromatin structures. Here we show that replication U/N-domain borders that are conserved in all considered cell lines have an environment highly enriched in nucleosome-excluding-energy barriers, suggesting that these ubiquitous MaOris have been selected during evolution. In contrast, MaOris that are cell-type-specific are mainly regulated epigenetically and are no longer favoured by a local abundance of intrinsic NFRs

  3. lncRNA-Induced Nucleosome Repositioning Reinforces Transcriptional Repression of rRNA Genes upon Hypotonic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongliang Zhao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The activity of rRNA genes (rDNA is regulated by pathways that target the transcription machinery or alter the epigenetic state of rDNA. Previous work has established that downregulation of rRNA synthesis in quiescent cells is accompanied by upregulation of PAPAS, a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA that recruits the histone methyltransferase Suv4-20h2 to rDNA, thus triggering trimethylation of H4K20 (H4K20me3 and chromatin compaction. Here, we show that upregulation of PAPAS in response to hypoosmotic stress does not increase H4K20me3 because of Nedd4-dependent ubiquitinylation and proteasomal degradation of Suv4-20h2. Loss of Suv4-20h2 enables PAPAS to interact with CHD4, a subunit of the chromatin remodeling complex NuRD, which shifts the promoter-bound nucleosome into the transcriptional “off” position. Thus, PAPAS exerts a “stress-tailored” dual function in rDNA silencing, facilitating either Suv4-20h2-dependent chromatin compaction or NuRD-dependent changes in nucleosome positioning.

  4. 14q12 translocation in a non-Burkitt lymphoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyamoto,Kanji

    1981-10-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome analysis was performed on cells from a patient of null cell lymphoma, well-differentiated type. A 14q12 translocation was observed in all the banded cells. In addition, there were multiple chromosome abnormalities. This case will be useful in considering the significance of the 14q1(1-3 translocation in malignant lymphoma disease.

  5. Adsorption-driven translocation of polymer chain into nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuang; Neimark, Alexander V.

    2012-06-01

    The polymer translocation into nanopores is generally facilitated by external driving forces, such as electric or hydrodynamic fields, to compensate for entropic restrictions imposed by the confinement. We investigate the dynamics of translocation driven by polymer adsorption to the confining walls that is relevant to chromatographic separation of macromolecules. By using the self-consistent field theory, we study the passage of a chain trough a small opening from cis to trans compartments of spherical shape with adsorption potential applied in the trans compartment. The chain transfer is modeled as the Fokker-Plank diffusion along the free energy landscape of the translocation pass represented as a sum of the free energies of cis and trans parts of the chain tethered to the pore opening. We investigate how the chain length, the size of trans compartment, the magnitude of adsorption potential, and the extent of excluded volume interactions affect the translocation time and its distribution. Interplay of these factors brings about a variety of different translocation regimes. We show that excluded volume interactions within a certain range of adsorption potentials can cause a local minimum on the free energy landscape, which is absent for ideal chains. The adsorption potential always leads to the decrease of the free energy barrier, increasing the probability of successful translocation. However, the translocation time depends non-monotonically of the magnitude of adsorption potential. Our calculations predict the existence of the critical magnitude of adsorption potential, which separates favorable and unfavorable regimes of translocation.

  6. Label Free Chromosome Translocation Detection with Silicon nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwasny, Dorota; Andersen, Karsten Brandt; Frøhling, Kasper Bayer;

    HROMOSOME translocation, which is a rearrangement of arms between two chromosomes, is a major group of chromosome abnormalities leading to cancer. As a result, two derivative chromosomes with sequences coming from both chromosomes are formed. The current translocation detection method is a Fluore...

  7. Inducement of chromosome translocation with small alien segments by irradiating mature female gametes of the whole arm translocation line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Haynaldia villosa Schur. (syn. Dasypyrum villosum Candargy, 2n=14, VV) has been proved to be an important genetic resource for wheat improvement. The development of translocation with small alien chromosome segments, especially interstitial translocation, will be helpful for better utilization of its useful genes. Up to now, most of the reported Triticum aestivum – H. villosa translocation lines are involved in a whole arm or large alien fragments. In this paper, we report a highly efficient approach for the creation of small chromosome segment translocation lines. Before flowering, the female gametes of wheat-H. villosa 6VS/6AL translocation line were irradiated by 60CO-γ ray at 160 Rad/M dosage rate and three dosages (1600, 1920, 2240 Rad). Anthers were removed from the irradiated florets on the same day and the florets were pollinated with normal fresh pollens of T. aestivum cv. Chinese Spring after 2-3 days. Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) at mitosis metaphase of root-tip cell of M1 plants was used to detect the chromosome structural changes involving 6VS of H. villosa. Among the 534 M1 plants screened, 97 plants contained small segment chromosome structural changes of 6VS, including 80 interstitial translocation chromosomes, 57 terminal translocation chromosomes and 55 deletion chromosomes. For the 2240 Rad dosage treatment, the inducement frequencies of interstitial translo-cation, terminal translocation and deletion were 21.02%, 14.01%, and 14.65%, respectively, which were much higher than those previously reported. The M2 seeds were obtained by backcrossing of 74 M1 plants involving 146 chromosomes structural changes of 6VS, and it was found that the structural aberrations in the M1 plants could be transmitted to their progenies. Irradiating mature female gametes of whole arm translocation is a new and highly efficient approach for creation of small segment chromosome struc-tural changes, especially for interstitial translocations.

  8. Pb distribution and translocation in Jiaozhou Bay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The trends of distribution, translocation and seasonal change of heavy metal Pb were studied based on the surface and bottom water sampling in Jiaozhou Bay in 1979, and compared with those in 1990's. The results showed that the source of Pb in the bay was from wastewater and sewage in the east of Jiaozhou Bay from ocean vessels. Pb concentration was higher in spring and lower in summer and autumn, and remained stable through sedimentation in the bottom layer. The overall water quality was good in 1970's. Compared with the environmental monitoring data of 1995-1999, Pb pollution had become serious. Therefore, more efforts should be made to protect the bay from Pb pollution.

  9. Multistep Current Signal in Protein Translocation through Graphene Nanopores

    KAUST Repository

    Bonome, Emma Letizia

    2015-05-07

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. In nanopore sensing experiments, the properties of molecules are probed by the variation of ionic currents flowing through the nanopore. In this context, the electronic properties and the single-layer thickness of graphene constitute a major advantage for molecule characterization. Here we analyze the translocation pathway of the thioredoxin protein across a graphene nanopore, and the related ionic currents, by integrating two nonequilibrium molecular dynamics methods with a bioinformatic structural analysis. To obtain a qualitative picture of the translocation process and to identify salient features we performed unsupervised structural clustering on translocation conformations. This allowed us to identify some specific and robust translocation intermediates, characterized by significantly different ionic current flows. We found that the ion current strictly anticorrelates with the amount of pore occupancy by thioredoxin residues, providing a putative explanation of the multilevel current scenario observed in recently published translocation experiments.

  10. Chaperone-assisted translocation of flexible polymers in three dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Suhonen, P M

    2016-01-01

    Polymer translocation through a nanometer-scale pore assisted by chaperones binding to the polymer is a process encountered in vivo for proteins. Studying the relevant models by computer simulations is computationally demanding. Accordingly, previous studies are either for stiff polymers in three dimensions or flexible polymers in two dimensions. Here, we study chaperone-assisted translocation of flexible polymers in three dimensions using Langevin dynamics. We show that differences in binding mechanisms, more specifically, whether a chaperone can bind to a single or multiple sites on the polymer, lead to substantial differences in translocation dynamics in three dimensions. We show that the single-binding mode leads to dynamics that is very much like that in the constant-force driven translocation and accordingly mainly determined by tension propagation on the cis side. We obtain $\\beta \\approx 1.26$ for the exponent for the scaling of the translocation time with polymer length. This fairly low value can be ...

  11. Centrifugally driven microfluidic disc for detection of chromosomal translocations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøgger, Anna Line; Kwasny, Dorota; Bosco, Filippo G.;

    2012-01-01

    Chromosome translocations are a common cause of congenital disorders and cancer. Current detection methods require use of expensive and highly specialized techniques to identify the chromosome regions involved in a translocation. There is a need for rapid yet specific detection for diagnosis and...... prognosis of patients. In this work we demonstrate a novel, centrifugally-driven microfluidic system for controlled manipulation of oligonucleotides and subsequent detection of chromosomal translocations. The device is fabricated in the form of a disc with capillary burst microvalves employed to control the...... fluid flow. The microvalves in series are designed to enable fluid movement from the center towards the periphery of the disc to handle DNA sequences representing translocation between chromosome 3 and 9. The translocation detection is performed in two hybridization steps in separate sorting and...

  12. Range-wide success of red-cockaded woodpecker translocations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, John W.; Costa, Ralph

    2004-12-31

    Edwards, John W.; Costa, Ralph. 2004. Range-wide success of red-cockaded woodpecker translocations. In: Red-cockaded woodpecker; Road to Recovery. Proceedings of the 4th Red-cockaded woodpecker Symposium. Ralph Costa and Susan J. Daniels, eds. Savannah, Georgia. January, 2003. Chapter 6. Translocation. Pp 307-311. Abstract: Red-cockaded woodpeckers (Picoides borealis) have declined range-wide during the past century, suffering from habitat loss and the effects of fire exclusion in older southern pine forests. Red-cockaded woodpecker translocations are a potentially important tool in conservation efforts to reestablish red-cockaded woodpeckers in areas from which they have been extirpated. Currently, translocations are critical in ongoing efforts to save and restore the many existing small populations. We examined the effects of demographic and environmental factors on the range-wide success of translocations between 1989 and 1995.

  13. Bacterial Translocation and Change in Intestinal Permeability in Patients after Abdominal Surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi QIAO; Zhanliang LI; Jiye LI; Lianrong LU; Yi LV; Junyou LI

    2009-01-01

    sely related with bacterial translocation. Intestinal bacterial translocation (most commonly E. coli) might occur at early stage (2 h) after ab-dominal surgery. Postoperative SIRS and infection might bear a close relationship with bacterial translocation.

  14. Translocations of amphibians: Proven management method or experimental technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seigel, Richard A.; Dodd, C. Kenneth, Jr.

    2002-01-01

    In an otherwise excellent review of metapopulation dynamics in amphibians, Marsh and Trenham (2001) make the following provocative statements (emphasis added): If isolation effects occur primarily in highly disturbed habitats, species translocations may be necessary to promote local and regional population persistence. Because most amphibians lack parental care, they areprime candidates for egg and larval translocations. Indeed, translocations have already proven successful for several species of amphibians. Where populations are severely isolated, translocations into extinct subpopulations may be the best strategy to promote regional population persistence. We take issue with these statements for a number of reasons. First, the authors fail to cite much of the relevant literature on species translocations in general and for amphibians in particular. Second, to those unfamiliar with current research in amphibian conservation biology, these comments might suggest that translocations are a proven management method. This is not the case, at least in most instances where translocations have been evaluated for an appropriate period of time. Finally, the authors fail to point out some of the negative aspects of species translocation as a management method. We realize that Marsh and Trenham's paper was not concerned primarily with translocations. However, because Marsh and Trenham (2001) made specific recommendations for conservation planners and managers (many of whom are not herpetologists or may not be familiar with the pertinent literature on amphibians), we believe that it is essential to point out that not all amphibian biologists are as comfortable with translocations as these authors appear to be. We especially urge caution about advocating potentially unproven techniques without a thorough review of available options.

  15. Mechanisms underlying stage-1 TRPL channel translocation in Drosophila photoreceptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minh-Ha Lieu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: TRP channels function as key mediators of sensory transduction and other cellular signaling pathways. In Drosophila, TRP and TRPL are the light-activated channels in photoreceptors. While TRP is statically localized in the signaling compartment of the cell (the rhabdomere, TRPL localization is regulated by light. TRPL channels translocate out of the rhabdomere in two distinct stages, returning to the rhabdomere with dark-incubation. Translocation of TRPL channels regulates their availability, and thereby the gain of the signal. Little, however, is known about the mechanisms underlying this trafficking of TRPL channels. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We first examine the involvement of de novo protein synthesis in TRPL translocation. We feed flies cycloheximide, verify inhibition of protein synthesis, and test for TRPL translocation in photoreceptors. We find that protein synthesis is not involved in either stage of TRPL translocation out of the rhabdomere, but that re-localization to the rhabdomere from stage-1, but not stage-2, depends on protein synthesis. We also characterize an ex vivo eye preparation that is amenable to biochemical and genetic manipulation. We use this preparation to examine mechanisms of stage-1 TRPL translocation. We find that stage-1 translocation is: induced with ATP depletion, unaltered with perturbation of the actin cytoskeleton or inhibition of endocytosis, and slowed with increased membrane sterol content. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that translocation of TRPL out of the rhabdomere is likely due to protein transport, and not degradation/re-synthesis. Re-localization from each stage to the rhabdomere likely involves different strategies. Since TRPL channels can translocate to stage-1 in the absence of ATP, with no major requirement of the cytoskeleton, we suggest that stage-1 translocation involves simple diffusion through the apical membrane, which may be regulated by release of a

  16. Dynamic recruitment of Ets1 to both nucleosome-occupied and -depleted enhancer regions mediates a transcriptional program switch during early T-cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauchy, Pierre; Maqbool, Muhammad A; Zacarias-Cabeza, Joaquin; Vanhille, Laurent; Koch, Frederic; Fenouil, Romain; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo; Santana, Maria A; Griffon, Aurélien; Imbert, Jean; Moraes-Cabé, Carolina; Bories, Jean-Christophe; Ferrier, Pierre; Spicuglia, Salvatore; Andrau, Jean-Christophe

    2016-05-01

    Ets1 is a sequence-specific transcription factor that plays an important role during hematopoiesis, and is essential for the transition of CD4(-)/CD8(-) double negative (DN) to CD4(+)/CD8(+) double positive (DP) thymocytes. Using genome-wide and functional approaches, we investigated the binding properties, transcriptional role and chromatin environment of Ets1 during this transition. We found that while Ets1 binding at distal sites was associated with active genes at both DN and DP stages, its enhancer activity was attained at the DP stage, as reflected by levels of the core transcriptional hallmarks H3K4me1/3, RNA Polymerase II and eRNA. This dual, stage-specific ability reflected a switch from non-T hematopoietic toward T-cell specific gene expression programs during the DN-to-DP transition, as indicated by transcriptome analyses of Ets1(-/-) thymic cells. Coincidentally, Ets1 associates more specifically with Runx1 in DN and with TCF1 in DP cells. We also provide evidence that Ets1 predominantly binds distal nucleosome-occupied regions in DN and nucleosome-depleted regions in DP. Finally and importantly, we demonstrate that Ets1 induces chromatin remodeling by displacing H3K4me1-marked nucleosomes. Our results thus provide an original model whereby the ability of a transcription factor to bind nucleosomal DNA changes during differentiation with consequences on its cognate enhancer activity. PMID:26673693

  17. Variant histone H2A.Z is globally localized to the promoters of inactive yeast genes and regulates nucleosome positioning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available H2A.Z is an evolutionary conserved histone variant involved in transcriptional regulation, antisilencing, silencing, and genome stability. The mechanism(s by which H2A.Z regulates these various biological functions remains poorly defined, in part due to the lack of knowledge regarding its physical location along chromosomes and the bearing it has in regulating chromatin structure. Here we mapped H2A.Z across the yeast genome at an approximately 300-bp resolution, using chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with tiling microarrays. We have identified 4,862 small regions--typically one or two nucleosomes wide--decorated with H2A.Z. Those "Z loci" are predominantly found within specific nucleosomes in the promoter of inactive genes all across the genome. Furthermore, we have shown that H2A.Z can regulate nucleosome positioning at the GAL1 promoter. Within HZAD domains, the regions where H2A.Z shows an antisilencing function, H2A.Z is localized in a wider pattern, suggesting that the variant histone regulates a silencing and transcriptional activation via different mechanisms. Our data suggest that the incorporation of H2A.Z into specific promoter-bound nucleosomes configures chromatin structure to poise genes for transcriptional activation. The relevance of these findings to higher eukaryotes is discussed.

  18. Plasticity and epigenetic inheritance of centromere-specific histone H3 (CENP-A)-containing nucleosome positioning in the fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jianhui; Liu, Xingkun; Sakuno, Takeshi; Li, Wenzhu; Xi, Yuanxin; Aravamudhan, Pavithra; Joglekar, Ajit; Li, Wei; Watanabe, Yoshinori; He, Xiangwei

    2013-06-28

    Nucleosomes containing the specific histone H3 variant CENP-A mark the centromere locus on each chromatin and initiate kinetochore assembly. For the common type of regional centromeres, little is known in molecular detail of centromeric chromatin organization, its propagation through cell division, and how distinct organization patterns may facilitate kinetochore assembly. Here, we show that in the fission yeast S. pombe, a relatively small number of CENP-A/Cnp1 nucleosomes are found within the centromeric core and that their positioning relative to underlying DNA varies among genetically homogenous cells. Consistent with the flexible positioning of Cnp1 nucleosomes, a large portion of the endogenous centromere is dispensable for its essential activity in mediating chromosome segregation. We present biochemical evidence that Cnp1 occupancy directly correlates with silencing of the underlying reporter genes. Furthermore, using a newly developed pedigree analysis assay, we demonstrated the epigenetic inheritance of Cnp1 positioning and quantified the rate of occasional repositioning of Cnp1 nucleosomes throughout cell generations. Together, our results reveal the plasticity and the epigenetically inheritable nature of centromeric chromatin organization. PMID:23661703

  19. Pre-analytical variables of circulating cell-free nucleosomes containing 5-methylcytosine DNA or histone modification H3K9Me3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Louise; Herzog, Marielle; Aastrup rømer, Eva Christine;

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate pre-analytical variables of circulating cell-free nucleosomes containing 5-methylcytosine DNA (5mC) or histone modification H3K9Me3 (H3K9Me3). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Six studies were designed to assess the possible influence of pre-analytical variables. Study 1: influence of stasis...

  20. Effects of macroH2A and H2A.Z on nucleosome structure and dynamics as elucidated by molecular dynamics simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Bowerman, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotes tune the transcriptional activity of their genome by altering the nucleosome core particle through multiple chemical processes. In particular, replacement of the canonical H2A histone with the variants macroH2A and H2A.Z has been shown to affect DNA accessibility and nucleosome stability; however, the processes by which this occurs remain poorly understood. Here, we elucidate the molecular mechanisms of these variants with an extensive molecular dynamics study of the canonical nucleosome along with three variant-containing structures: H2A.Z, macroH2A, and an H2A mutant with macroH2A-like L1 loops. Simulation results show that variant L1 loops play a pivotal role in stabilizing DNA binding to the octamer through direct interactions, core structural rearrangements, and altered allosteric networks in the nucleosome. All variants influence dynamics; however, macroH2A-like systems have the largest effect on energetics. In addition, we provide a comprehensive analysis of allosteric networks in the nucleo...

  1. Protein Translocation by Bacterial Toxin Channels: A Comparison of Diphtheria Toxin and Colicin Ia

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Zhengyan; Jakes, Karen S.; Samelson-Jones, Ben S.; Lai, Bing; Zhao, Gang; London, Erwin; Finkelstein, Alan

    2006-01-01

    Regions of both colicin Ia and diphtheria toxin N-terminal to the channel-forming domains can be translocated across planar phospholipid bilayer membranes. In this article we show that the translocation pathway of diphtheria toxin allows much larger molecules to be translocated than does the translocation pathway of colicin Ia. In particular, the folded A chain of diphtheria toxin is readily translocated by that toxin but is not translocated by colicin Ia. This difference cannot be attributed...

  2. Inducement of chromosome translocation with small alien segments by irradiating mature female gametes of the whole arm translocation line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN ShengWei; CHEN PeiDu; WANG XiuE

    2008-01-01

    Haynaldia villosa Schur. (syn. Dasypyrum villosum Candargy, 2n=14, VV) has been proved to be an Important genetic resource for wheat improvement. The development of translocation with small alien chromosome segments, especially interstitial translocation, will be helpful for better utilization of its useful genes. Up to now, most of the reported Triticum aestivum - H. villosa translocation lines are involved in a whole arm or large alien fragments. In this paper, we report a highly efficient approach for the creation of small chromosome segment translocation lines. Before flowering, the female gametes of wheat-H, villosa 6VS/6AL trsnslocation line were irradiated by 60Co-γ ray at 160 Rad/M dosage rate and three dosages (1600, 1920, 2240 Rad). Anthers were removed from the irradiated florets on the same day and the florets were pollinated with normal fresh pollens of T. aestivum cv. Chinese Spring after 2-3 days. Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) at mitosis metaphase of root-tip cell of M1 plants was used to detect the chromosome structural changes involving 6VS of H. villosa. Among the 534 M1 plants screened, 97 plants contained small segment chromosome structural changes of 6VS, including 80 interstitial translocation chromosomes, 57 terminal translocation chromosomes and 55 deletion chromosomes. For the 2240 Rad dosage treatment, the inducement frequencies of interstitial translocation, terminal translocation and deletion were 21.02%, 14.01%, and 14.65%, respectively, which were much higher than those previously reported. The M2 seeds were obtained by bsckcrossing of 74 M1 plants involving 146 chromosomes structural changes of 6VS, and it was found that the structural aberrations in the M1 plants could be transmitted to their progenies. Irradiating mature female gametes of whole arm translocation is a new and highly efficient approach for creation of small segment chromosome structural changes, especially for interstitial translocations.

  3. Predictive and prognostic value of circulating nucleosomes and serum biomarkers in patients with metastasized colorectal cancer undergoing Selective Internal Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT) is a new and effective locoregional anticancer therapy for colorectal cancer patients with liver metastases. Markers for prediction of therapy response and prognosis are needed for the individual management of those patients undergoing SIRT. Blood samples were prospectively and consecutively taken from 49 colorectal cancer patients with extensive hepatic metastases before, three, six, 24 and 48 h after SIRT to analyze the concentrations of nucleosomes and further laboratory parameters, and to compare them with the response to therapy regularly determined 3 months after therapy and with overall survival. Circulating nucleosomes, cytokeratin-19 fragments (CYFRA 21-1), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), C-reactive protein (CRP) and various liver markers increased already 24 h after SIRT. Pretherapeutical levels of CYFRA 21-1, CEA, cancer antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9), asparate-aminotransferase (AST) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) as well as 24 h values of nucleosomes were significantly higher in patients suffering from disease progression (N = 35) than in non-progressive patients (N = 14). Concerning overall survival, CEA, CA 19-9, CYFRA 21-1, CRP, LDH, AST, choline esterase (CHE), gamma-glutamyl-transferase, alkaline phosphatase, and amylase (all 0 h, 24 h) and nucleosomes (24 h) were found to be prognostic relevant markers in univariate analyses. In multivariate Cox-Regression analysis, the best prognostic model was obtained for the combination of CRP and AST. When 24 h values were additionally included, nucleosomes (24 h) further improved the existing model. Panels of biochemical markers are helpful to stratify pretherapeutically colorectal cancer patients for SIR-therapy and to early estimate the response to SIR-therapy

  4. Does translocation influence physiological stress in the desert tortoise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, K.K.; Nussear, K.E.; Esque, T.C.; Barber, A.M.; Vittum, K.M.; Medica, P.A.; Tracy, C.R.; Hunter, K.W.

    2012-01-01

    Wildlife translocation is increasingly used to mitigate disturbances to animals or habitat due to human activities, yet little is known about the extent to which translocating animals causes stress. To understand the relationship between physiological stress and translocation, we conducted a multiyear study (2007–2009) using a population of desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) near Fort Irwin, California. Blood samples were collected from adult tortoises in three treatment groups (resident, translocated and control) for 1 year prior to and 2 years after translocation. Samples were analyzed by radioimmunoassay for plasma total corticosterone (CORT), a glucocorticoid hormone commonly associated with stress responses in reptiles. CORT values were analyzed in relation to potential covariates (animal sex, date, behavior, treatment, handling time, air temperature, home-range size, precipitation and annual plant production) among seasons and years. CORT values in males were higher than in females, and values for both varied monthly throughout the activity season and among years. Year and sex were strong predictors of CORT, and translocation explained little in terms of CORT. Based on these results, we conclude that translocation does not elicit a physiological stress response in desert tortoises.

  5. Reciprocal translocations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae formed by nonhomologous end joining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xin; Gabriel, Abram

    2004-02-01

    Reciprocal translocations are common in cancer cells, but their creation is poorly understood. We have developed an assay system in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to study reciprocal translocation formation in the absence of homology. We induce two specific double-strand breaks (DSBs) simultaneously on separate chromosomes with HO endonuclease and analyze the subsequent chromosomal rearrangements among surviving cells. Under these conditions, reciprocal translocations via nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) occur at frequencies of approximately 2-7 x 10(-5)/cell exposed to the DSBs. Yku80p is a component of the cell's NHEJ machinery. In its absence, reciprocal translocations still occur, but the junctions are associated with deletions and extended overlapping sequences. After induction of a single DSB, translocations and inversions are recovered in wild-type and rad52 strains. In these rearrangements, a nonrandom assortment of sites have fused to the DSB, and their junctions show typical signs of NHEJ. The sites tend to be between open reading frames or within Ty1 LTRs. In some cases the translocation partner is formed by a break at a cryptic HO recognition site. Our results demonstrate that NHEJ-mediated reciprocal translocations can form in S. cerevisiae as a consequence of DSB repair. PMID:15020464

  6. Genetic outcomes from the translocations of the critically endangered woylie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo PACIONI, Adrian F.WAYNE, Peter B.S.SPENCER

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Translocations are an important conservation strategy for many species. However simply observing demographic growth of a translocated population is not sufficient to infer species recovery. Adequate genetic representation of the source population(s and their long-term viability should also be considered. The woylie Bettongia penicillata ogilbyi has been subject to more formal translocations for conservation than any other marsupial that, up until recently, has resulted in one of the most successful species recoveries in Australia. We used mitochondrial and nuclear DNA markers to assess the genetic outcomes of translocated woylie populations. These populations have lost genetic variability, differentiated from their source population and the supplementation program on two island populations appears to have failed. We discuss the conservation implications that our results have for managing threatened species, outline some general recommendations for the management of present and future translocations and discuss the appropriate sampling design for the establishment of new populations or captive breeding programs that may mitigate the genetic ‘erosion’ seen in our study species. This research provides some practical outcomes and a pragmatic understanding of translocation biology. The findings are directly applicable to other translocation programs [Current Zoology 59 (3: 294-310, 2013].

  7. Genetic outcomes from the translocations of the critically endangered woylie

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carlo PACIONI; Adrian F.WAYNE; Peter B.S.SPENCER

    2013-01-01

    Translocations are an important conservation strategy for many species.However simply observing demographic growth of a translocated population is not sufficient to infer species recovery.Adequate genetic representation of the source population(s) and their long-term viability should also be considered.The woylie Bettongiapenicillata ogilbyi has been subject to more formal translocations for conservation than any other marsupial that,up until recently,has resulted in one of the most successful species recoveries in Australia.We used mitochondrial and nuclear DNA markers to assess the genetic outcomes of translocated woylie populations.These populations have lost genetic variability,differentiated from their source population and the supplementation program on two island populations appears to have failed.We discuss the conservation implications that our results have for managing threatened species,outline some general recommendations for the management of present and future translocations and discuss the appropriate sampling design for the establishment of new populations or captive breeding programs that may mitigate the genetic ‘erosion' seen in our study species.This research provides some practical outcomes and a pmgrnatic understanding of translocation biology.The findings are directly applicable to other translocation programs.

  8. Chaperone-assisted translocation of flexible polymers in three dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhonen, P M; Linna, R P

    2016-01-01

    Polymer translocation through a nanometer-scale pore assisted by chaperones binding to the polymer is a process encountered in vivo for proteins. Studying the relevant models by computer simulations is computationally demanding. Accordingly, previous studies are either for stiff polymers in three dimensions or flexible polymers in two dimensions. Here, we study chaperone-assisted translocation of flexible polymers in three dimensions using Langevin dynamics. We show that differences in binding mechanisms, more specifically, whether a chaperone can bind to a single site or multiple sites on the polymer, lead to substantial differences in translocation dynamics in three dimensions. We show that the single-binding mode leads to dynamics that is very much like that in the constant-force driven translocation and accordingly mainly determined by tension propagation on the cis side. We obtain β≈1.26 for the exponent for the scaling of the translocation time with polymer length. This fairly low value can be explained by the additional friction due to binding particles. The multiple-site binding leads to translocation the dynamics of which is mainly determined by the trans side. For this process we obtain β≈1.36. This value can be explained by our derivation of β=4/3 for constant-bias translocation, where translocated polymer segments form a globule on the trans side. Our results pave the way for understanding and utilizing chaperone-assisted translocation where variations in microscopic details lead to rich variations in the emerging dynamics. PMID:26871100

  9. Mode of ATM-dependent suppression of chromosome translocation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamauchi, Motohiro, E-mail: motoyama@nagasaki-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Suzuki, Keiji; Oka, Yasuyoshi; Suzuki, Masatoshi; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Yamashita, Shunichi [Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan)

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We addressed how ATM suppresses frequency of chromosome translocation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found ATM/p53-dependent G1 checkpoint suppresses translocation frequency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found ATM and DNA-PKcs function in a common pathway to suppress translocation. -- Abstract: It is well documented that deficiency in ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein leads to elevated frequency of chromosome translocation, however, it remains poorly understood how ATM suppresses translocation frequency. In the present study, we addressed the mechanism of ATM-dependent suppression of translocation frequency. To know frequency of translocation events in a whole genome at once, we performed centromere/telomere FISH and scored dicentric chromosomes, because dicentric and translocation occur with equal frequency and by identical mechanism. By centromere/telomere FISH analysis, we confirmed that chemical inhibition or RNAi-mediated knockdown of ATM causes 2 to 2.5-fold increase in dicentric frequency at first mitosis after 2 Gy of gamma-irradiation in G0/G1. The FISH analysis revealed that ATM/p53-dependent G1 checkpoint suppresses dicentric frequency, since RNAi-mediated knockdown of p53 elevated dicentric frequency by 1.5-fold. We found ATM also suppresses dicentric occurrence independently of its checkpoint role, as ATM inhibitor showed additional effect on dicentric frequency in the context of p53 depletion and Chk1/2 inactivation. Epistasis analysis using chemical inhibitors revealed that ATM kinase functions in the same pathway that requires kinase activity of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) to suppress dicentric frequency. From the results in the present study, we conclude that ATM minimizes translocation frequency through its commitment to G1 checkpoint and DNA double-strand break repair pathway that requires kinase activity of DNA-PKcs.

  10. Can hunting of translocated nuisance Canada geese reduce local conflicts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holevinski, R.A.; Malecki, R.A.; Curtis, P.D.

    2006-01-01

    Resident Canada geese (Branta canadensis) nest or reside in the temperate latitudes of North America. In past years, translocation-the capture and subsequent release of geese at distant locations-has been used to establish resident goose populations and to reduce nuisance problems. However, with new special hunting seasons designed to target resident Canada geese, we can now evaluate translocation as a management tool when hunting is allowed at release sites. We selected 2 study sites, representative of urban and suburban locations with nuisance resident geese, in central and western New York, USA. In June 2003, we translocated 80 neck-banded adult geese, 14 radiomarked adult females, and 83 juveniles 150 km east and southwest from urban and suburban problem sites in western New York to state-owned Wildlife Management Areas. At these same capture sites, we used 151 neck-banded adult geese, 12 radiomarked females, and 100 juveniles as controls to compare dispersal movements and harvest vulnerability to translocated geese. All observations (n = 45) of translocated radiomarked geese were hunting was permitted. Only 25 of 538 observations (4.6%) of radiomarked geese at control sites were in areas open to hunting. The remainder of observations occurred at nonhunting locations within 10 km of control sites. More translocated adult geese (23.8%) were harvested than control geese (6.6%; ??2 = 72.98, P = 0.0009). More translocated juvenile geese were harvested (22.9%) than juvenile controls (5.0%; ??2 = 72.30, P = 0.0005). Only 7 (8.8%) translocated adult geese returned to the original capture sites during Canada goose hunting seasons. Translocation of adult and juvenile geese in family groups may alleviate nuisance problems at conflict sites through increased harvest, reducing the number of birds returning in subsequent years.

  11. The nucleosome (histone-DNA complex is the TLR9-specific immunostimulatory component of Plasmodium falciparum that activates DCs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraj M Gowda

    Full Text Available The systemic clinical symptoms of Plasmodium falciparum infection such as fever and chills correspond to the proinflammatory cytokines produced in response to the parasite components released during the synchronized rupture of schizonts. We recently demonstrated that, among the schizont-released products, merozoites are the predominant components that activate dendritic cells (DCs by TLR9-specific recognition to induce the maturation of cells and to produce proinflammatory cytokines. We also demonstrated that DNA is the active constituent and that formation of a DNA-protein complex is essential for the entry of parasite DNA into cells for recognition by TLR9. However, the nature of endogenous protein-DNA complex in the parasite is not known. In this study, we show that parasite nucleosome constitute the major protein-DNA complex involved in the activation of DCs by parasite nuclear material. The parasite components were fractionated into the nuclear and non-nuclear materials. The nuclear material was further fractionated into chromatin and the proteins loosely bound to chromatin. Polynucleosomes and oligonucleosomes were prepared from the chromatin. These were tested for their ability to activate DCs obtained by the FLT3 ligand differentiation of bone marrow cells from the wild type, and TLR2(-/-, TLR9(-/- and MyD88(-/- mice. DCs stimulated with the nuclear material and polynucleosomes as well as mono- and oligonucleosomes efficiently induced the production of proinflammatory cytokines in a TLR9-dependent manner, demonstrating that nucleosomes (histone-DNA complex represent the major TLR9-specific DC-immunostimulatory component of the malaria parasite nuclear material. Thus, our data provide a significant insight into the activation of DCs by malaria parasites and have important implications for malaria vaccine development.

  12. Fragility in the 14q21q translocation region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacy R. Denison

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Aphidicolin (APC-induced chromosomal breakage was analyzed for women representing three generations of a single family and carrying a Robertsonian translocation rob(14q21q. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH analysis confirmed the dicentric constitution of the derived chromosome and indicated the absence of beta-satellite signal at the translocation region. Per-individual analysis of metaphases from APC-treated peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures identified significantly nonrandom chromosomal breakage at the translocation region in all three individuals examined. The APC-inducible fragility at the 14q21q translocation region suggests that this rearrangement was the result of chromosomal mutation at fragile site(s in the progenitor chromosomes, or that this fragility was the result of the fusion of nonfragile progenitor chromosomes.

  13. Mechanism for translocation of fluoroquinolones across lipid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cramariuc, O.; Rog, T.; Javanainen, M.;

    2012-01-01

    Classical atom-scale molecular dynamics simulations, constrained free energy calculations, and quantum mechanical (QM) calculations are employed to study the diffusive translocation of ciprofloxacin (CPFX) across lipid membranes. CPFX is considered here as a representative of the fluoroquinolone...

  14. Translocation of an Incompressible Vesicle through a Pore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaei, Hamid R; Muthukumar, Murugappan

    2016-07-01

    We have derived the free energy landscape for the translocation of a single vesicle through a narrow pore by accounting for bending and stretching of the vesicle, and the deformation of the vesicle by the pore. Emergence of a free energy barrier for translocation is a general result, and the magnitude of the barrier is calculated in terms of the various material parameters. The extent of the reduction in the barrier by the presence of an external constant force is calculated. Using the Fokker-Planck formalism, we have calculated the average translocation time corresponding to the various free energy landscapes representing different parameter sets. The dependencies of the average translocation time on the strength of the external force, vesicle size, bending and stretching moduli of the vesicle, and radius and length of the pore are derived, and the computed results are discussed. PMID:27089012

  15. Fragility in the 14q21q translocation region

    OpenAIRE

    Stacy R. Denison; Multani, Asha S.; Sen Pathak; Ira F. Greenbaum

    2002-01-01

    Aphidicolin (APC)-induced chromosomal breakage was analyzed for women representing three generations of a single family and carrying a Robertsonian translocation rob(14q21q). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis confirmed the dicentric constitution of the derived chromosome and indicated the absence of beta-satellite signal at the translocation region. Per-individual analysis of metaphases from APC-treated peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures identified significantly nonrandom c...

  16. Translocation frequencies in lymphocytes of long term radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Translocation frequencies in peripheral blood lymphocytes were determined in two groups of healthy radiation workers and a group of similarly aged controls with no known occupational or medical exposure to clastogens. By restricting the analysis to the non-smokers a dose response was obtained in line with in vitro dose response data thus providing support for the use of translocation frequencies as a method for assessing the extent of chronic or past exposures. (author)

  17. Electrostatics of polymer translocation events in electrolyte solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Buyukdagli, Sahin; Ala-Nissila, T.

    2016-01-01

    We develop an analytical theory that accounts for the image and surface charge interactions between a charged dielectric membrane and a DNA molecule translocating through the membrane. Translocation events through neutral carbon-based membranes are driven by a competition between the repulsive DNA-image-charge interactions and the attractive coupling between the DNA segments on the trans and the cis sides of the membrane. The latter effect is induced by the reduction of the coupling by the di...

  18. RNase A Does Not Translocate the Alpha-Hemolysin Pore

    OpenAIRE

    Besnik Krasniqi; Lee, Jeremy S

    2014-01-01

    The application of nanopore sensing utilizing the α-hemolysin pore to probe proteins at single-molecule resolution has expanded rapidly. In some studies protein translocation through the α-hemolysin has been reported. However, there is no direct evidence, as yet, that proteins can translocate the α-hemolysin pore. The biggest challenge to obtaining direct evidence is the lack of a highly sensitive assay to detect very low numbers of protein molecules. Furthermore, if an activity based assay i...

  19. Elongation factor G initiates translocation through a power stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunlai; Cui, Xiaonan; Beausang, John F; Zhang, Haibo; Farrell, Ian; Cooperman, Barry S; Goldman, Yale E

    2016-07-01

    During the translocation step of prokaryotic protein synthesis, elongation factor G (EF-G), a guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase), binds to the ribosomal PRE-translocation (PRE) complex and facilitates movement of transfer RNAs (tRNAs) and messenger RNA (mRNA) by one codon. Energy liberated by EF-G's GTPase activity is necessary for EF-G to catalyze rapid and precise translocation. Whether this energy is used mainly to drive movements of the tRNAs and mRNA or to foster EF-G dissociation from the ribosome after translocation has been a long-lasting debate. Free EF-G, not bound to the ribosome, adopts quite different structures in its GTP and GDP forms. Structures of EF-G on the ribosome have been visualized at various intermediate steps along the translocation pathway, using antibiotics and nonhydolyzable GTP analogs to block translocation and to prolong the dwell time of EF-G on the ribosome. However, the structural dynamics of EF-G bound to the ribosome have not yet been described during normal, uninhibited translocation. Here, we report the rotational motions of EF-G domains during normal translocation detected by single-molecule polarized total internal reflection fluorescence (polTIRF) microscopy. Our study shows that EF-G has a small (∼10°) global rotational motion relative to the ribosome after GTP hydrolysis that exerts a force to unlock the ribosome. This is followed by a larger rotation within domain III of EF-G before its dissociation from the ribosome. PMID:27313204

  20. Translocation of gut flora and its role in sepsis

    OpenAIRE

    Vaishnavi, C

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial translocation is the invasion of indigenous intestinal bacteria through the gut mucosa to normally sterile tissues and the internal organs. Sometimes instead of bacteria, inflammatory compounds are responsible for clinical symptoms as in systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). The difference between sepsis and SIRS is that pathogenic bacteria are isolated from patients with sepsis but not with those of SIRS. Bacterial translocation occurs more frequently in patients with int...

  1. Inhibition of Vitamin D Receptor Translocation by Cigarette Smoking Extracts

    OpenAIRE

    Uh, Soo-Taek; Koo, So-My; Kim, Yang Ki; Kim, Ki Up; Park, Sung Woo; Jang, An Soo; Kim, Do Jin; Kim, Yong Hoon; Park, Choon Sik

    2012-01-01

    Background Vitamin D can translocate a vitamin D receptor (VDR) from the nucleus to the cell membranes. The meaning of this translocation is not elucidated in terms of a role in pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) till now. VDR deficient mice are prone to develop emphysema, suggesting that abnormal function of VDR might influence a generation of COPD. The blood levels of vitamin D have known to be well correlated with that of lung function in patients with COPD, and s...

  2. Slowing DNA Translocation in a Nanofluidic Field-Effect Transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yifan; Yobas, Levent

    2016-04-26

    Here, we present an experimental demonstration of slowing DNA translocation across a nanochannel by modulating the channel surface charge through an externally applied gate bias. The experiments were performed on a nanofluidic field-effect transistor, which is a monolithic integrated platform featuring a 50 nm-diameter in-plane alumina nanocapillary whose entire length is surrounded by a gate electrode. The field-effect transistor behavior was validated on the gating of ionic conductance and protein transport. The gating of DNA translocation was subsequently studied by measuring discrete current dips associated with single λ-DNA translocation events under a source-to-drain bias of 1 V. The translocation speeds under various gate bias conditions were extracted by fitting event histograms of the measured translocation time to the first passage time distributions obtained from a simple 1D biased diffusion model. A positive gate bias was observed to slow the translocation of single λ-DNA chains markedly; the translocation speed was reduced by an order of magnitude from 18.4 mm/s obtained under a floating gate down to 1.33 mm/s under a positive gate bias of 9 V. Therefore, a dynamic and flexible regulation of the DNA translocation speed, which is vital for single-molecule sequencing, can be achieved on this device by simply tuning the gate bias. The device is realized in a conventional semiconductor microfabrication process without the requirement of advanced lithography, and can be potentially further developed into a compact electronic single-molecule sequencer. PMID:27019102

  3. Reaction sequence and molecular mass of a Cl(-)-translocating P-type ATPase.

    OpenAIRE

    Gerencser, G A; Zelezna, B

    1993-01-01

    The basolateral membranes of Aplysia californica foregut absorptive cells contain both Cl(-)-stimulated ATPase and ATP-dependent Cl- transport activities, and each was inhibited by orthovanadate. Both of these orthovanadate-sensitive activities were reconstituted into proteoliposomes. The reaction sequence kinetics were determined by [gamma-32P]ATP-induced phosphorylation of the reconstituted Cl- pump. Rapid phosphorylation and dephosphorylation kinetics of acyl phosphate bonding were confirm...

  4. A family with Robertsonian translocation: a potential mechanism of speciation in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Jieping; LI, XI; Sun, Lei; Xu, Shuqin; Liu, Nian; Yao, Yanyi; LIU, ZHI; Wang, Weipeng; Rong, Han; Wang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Background Robertsonian translocations occur in approximately one in every 1000 newborns. Although most Robertsonian translocation carriers are healthy and have a normal lifespan, they are at increased risk of spontaneous abortions and risk of producing unbalanced gametes and, therefore unbalanced offspring. Here we reported a previously undescribed Robertsonian translocation. Case Presentation We identified three Robertsonian translocation carriers in this family. Two were heterozygous trans...

  5. Conflict bear translocation: investigating population genetics and fate of bear translocation in Dachigam National Park, Jammu and Kashmir, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukesh; Sharma, Lalit Kumar; Charoo, Samina Amin; Sathyakumar, Sambandam

    2015-01-01

    The Asiatic black bear population in Dachigam landscape, Jammu and Kashmir is well recognized as one of the highest density bear populations in India. Increasing incidences of bear-human interactions and the resultant retaliatory killings by locals have become a serious threat to the survivorship of black bears in the Dachigam landscape. The Department of Wildlife Protection in Jammu and Kashmir has been translocating bears involved in conflicts, henceforth 'conflict bears' from different sites in Dachigam landscape to Dachigam National Park as a flagship activity to mitigate conflicts. We undertook this study to investigate the population genetics and the fate of bear translocation in Dachigam National Park. We identified 109 unique genotypes in an area of ca. 650 km2 and observed bear population under panmixia that showed sound genetic variability. Molecular tracking of translocated bears revealed that mostly bears (7 out of 11 bears) returned to their capture sites, possibly due to homing instincts or habituation to the high quality food available in agricultural croplands and orchards, while only four bears remained in Dachigam National Park after translocation. Results indicated that translocation success was most likely to be season dependent as bears translocated during spring and late autumn returned to their capture sites, perhaps due to the scarcity of food inside Dachigam National Park while bears translocated in summer remained in Dachigam National Park due to availability of surplus food resources. Thus, the current management practices of translocating conflict bears, without taking into account spatio-temporal variability of food resources in Dachigam landscape seemed to be ineffective in mitigating conflicts on a long-term basis. However, the study highlighted the importance of molecular tracking of bears to understand their movement patterns and socio-biology in tough terrains like Dachigam landscape. PMID:26267280

  6. Conflict bear translocation: investigating population genetics and fate of bear translocation in Dachigam National Park, Jammu and Kashmir, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh

    Full Text Available The Asiatic black bear population in Dachigam landscape, Jammu and Kashmir is well recognized as one of the highest density bear populations in India. Increasing incidences of bear-human interactions and the resultant retaliatory killings by locals have become a serious threat to the survivorship of black bears in the Dachigam landscape. The Department of Wildlife Protection in Jammu and Kashmir has been translocating bears involved in conflicts, henceforth 'conflict bears' from different sites in Dachigam landscape to Dachigam National Park as a flagship activity to mitigate conflicts. We undertook this study to investigate the population genetics and the fate of bear translocation in Dachigam National Park. We identified 109 unique genotypes in an area of ca. 650 km2 and observed bear population under panmixia that showed sound genetic variability. Molecular tracking of translocated bears revealed that mostly bears (7 out of 11 bears returned to their capture sites, possibly due to homing instincts or habituation to the high quality food available in agricultural croplands and orchards, while only four bears remained in Dachigam National Park after translocation. Results indicated that translocation success was most likely to be season dependent as bears translocated during spring and late autumn returned to their capture sites, perhaps due to the scarcity of food inside Dachigam National Park while bears translocated in summer remained in Dachigam National Park due to availability of surplus food resources. Thus, the current management practices of translocating conflict bears, without taking into account spatio-temporal variability of food resources in Dachigam landscape seemed to be ineffective in mitigating conflicts on a long-term basis. However, the study highlighted the importance of molecular tracking of bears to understand their movement patterns and socio-biology in tough terrains like Dachigam landscape.

  7. Immunogenic DNA-related factors. Nucleosomes spontaneously released from normal murine lymphoid cells stimulate proliferation and immunoglobulin synthesis of normal mouse lymphocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, D. A.; Morrison, B; VandenBygaart, P

    1990-01-01

    The cell-free supernatants of normal spleen and thymus lymphocytes in short-term culture release low molecular weight (LMW) DNA protein molecules that have an immunoproliferative effect (polyclonal B cell activation) in vitro. We have determined that the protein-LMW DNA complexes responsible for these effects are nucleosomal constituents of chromatin, since the mitogenically active fractions of these cell-free supernatants contain the constituents of core histones (H3, H2A, H2B, H4) together ...

  8. Nondriven Polymer Translocation Through a Nanopore:Scaling for Translocation Time with Chain Length

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hui; ZHANG Jing; LIU Hong; SUN Chia-chung

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the dynamics of the passage for a polymer chain through a nanopore in the absence of any external driving force with Weeks-Chandler-Andersen potential in two-dimensional simulations,in particular,focused our attention on the scaling law of the mean translocation time.We found that the effect of hydrodynamic interactions is the major factor in determining the scaling exponents with increasing pore size.The scaling close to N1+2v was observed when the hydrodynamic interactions were screened in the cases of small pore sizes,while the scaling close to N3v was obtained when the hydrodynamic interactions were present in the cases of large pore sizes.

  9. Hmo1 directs pre-initiation complex assembly to an appropriate site on its target gene promoters by masking a nucleosome-free region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, Koji; Ohyama, Yoshifumi; Kokubo, Tetsuro

    2011-05-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae Hmo1 binds to the promoters of ∼ 70% of ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) at high occupancy, but is observed at lower occupancy on the remaining RPG promoters. In Δhmo1 cells, the transcription start site (TSS) of the Hmo1-enriched RPS5 promoter shifted upstream, while the TSS of the Hmo1-limited RPL10 promoter did not shift. Analyses of chimeric RPS5/RPL10 promoters revealed a region between the RPS5 upstream activating sequence (UAS) and core promoter, termed the intervening region (IVR), responsible for strong Hmo1 binding and an upstream TSS shift in Δhmo1 cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses showed that the RPS5-IVR resides within a nucleosome-free region and that pre-initiation complex (PIC) assembly occurs at a site between the IVR and a nucleosome overlapping the TSS (+1 nucleosome). The PIC assembly site was shifted upstream in Δhmo1 cells on this promoter, indicating that Hmo1 normally masks the RPS5-IVR to prevent PIC assembly at inappropriate site(s). This novel mechanism ensures accurate transcriptional initiation by delineating the 5'- and 3'-boundaries of the PIC assembly zone. PMID:21288884

  10. Lysine methyltransferase G9a is not required for DNMT3A/3B anchoring to methylated nucleosomes and maintenance of DNA methylation in somatic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Shikhar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA methylation, histone modifications and nucleosome occupancy act in concert for regulation of gene expression patterns in mammalian cells. Recently, G9a, a H3K9 methyltransferase, has been shown to play a role in establishment of DNA methylation at embryonic gene targets in ES cells through recruitment of de novo DNMT3A/3B enzymes. However, whether G9a plays a similar role in maintenance of DNA methylation in somatic cells is still unclear. Results Here we show that G9a is not essential for maintenance of DNA methylation in somatic cells. Knockdown of G9a has no measurable effect on DNA methylation levels at G9a-target loci. DNMT3A/3B remain stably anchored to nucleosomes containing methylated DNA even in the absence of G9a, ensuring faithful propagation of methylated states in cooperation with DNMT1 through somatic divisions. Moreover, G9a also associates with nucleosomes in a DNMT3A/3B and DNA methylation-independent manner. However, G9a knockdown synergizes with pharmacologic inhibition of DNMTs resulting in increased hypomethylation and inhibition of cell proliferation. Conclusions Taken together, these data suggest that G9a is not involved in maintenance of DNA methylation in somatic cells but might play a role in re-initiation of de novo methylation after treatment with hypomethylating drugs, thus serving as a potential target for combinatorial treatments strategies involving DNMTs inhibitors.

  11. Electrostatics of polymer translocation events in electrolyte solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyukdagli, Sahin; Ala-Nissila, T

    2016-07-01

    We develop an analytical theory that accounts for the image and surface charge interactions between a charged dielectric membrane and a DNA molecule translocating through the membrane. Translocation events through neutral carbon-based membranes are driven by a competition between the repulsive DNA-image-charge interactions and the attractive coupling between the DNA segments on the trans and the cis sides of the membrane. The latter effect is induced by the reduction of the coupling by the dielectric membrane. In strong salt solutions where the repulsive image-charge effects dominate the attractive trans-cis coupling, the DNA molecule encounters a translocation barrier of ≈10 kBT. In dilute electrolytes, the trans-cis coupling takes over image-charge forces and the membrane becomes a metastable attraction point that can trap translocating polymers over long time intervals. This mechanism can be used in translocation experiments in order to control DNA motion by tuning the salt concentration of the solution. PMID:27394120

  12. Nonabsorbable Antibiotics Reduce Bacterial and Endotoxin Translocation in Hepatectomised Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Kakkos

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence that septic complications, occurring after major hepatectomies, may be caused by gram negative bacteria, translocating from the gut. We investigated in rats, the effect of extended hepatectomy on the structure and morphology of the intestinal mucosa as well as on the translocation of intestinal bacteria and endotoxins. We also examined the effect of nonabsorbable antibiotics on reducing the intestinal flora and consequently the phenomenon of translocation by administering neomycin sulphate and cefazoline. Hepatectomy was found to increase translocation, while administration of nonabsorbable antibiotics decreased it significantly. In addition, hepatectomy increased the aerobic cecal bacterial population, which normalised in the group receiving antibiotics. Among the histological parameters evaluated, villus height demonstrated a significant reduction after hepatectomy, while the number of villi per cm and the number of mitoses per crypt, remained unchanged. Our results indicate that administration of nonabsorbable antibiotics presents a positive effect on bacterial and endotoxin translocation after extended hepatectomy, and this may be related to reduction of colonic bacterial load as an intraluminal effect of antibiotics.

  13. Obstructed Bile Duct as a Trigger for Microbe's Translocation?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    To assess the potential mechanisms of bacterial translocation in a murine model of obstructive jaundice. Methods: Adult rats were randomized to be operated on for ligation or sham-ligation of the common bile duct. Bacterial translocation to the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs), liver, spleen, portal blood and systemic circulation and bacterial population levels in the ceca were quantitated after 7 and 14 days. The terminal ilea were histologically examined by light and transmission electron microscopy. Results: Bacterial translocation to the MNLs was seen in both 7 (10/17) and 14 (11/18) day ligated animals, but not found in their corresponding controls (both 0/8). No significant difference in the cecal bacterial population levels was found between the ligated groups and their corresponding control groups, also between the two subgroups that were set up within each ligated group according to the presence or absence of bacteria in the MLNs. In the ligated rats, light microscopy demonstrated subepithelial edema in association with infiltration of flammatory cells and, transmission electron microscopy showed that the enterocytes were injured with abnormal microvilli, swollen mitochondria, unclear endoplasmic reticulum and cytoplasm with bubble degeneration. However, the ilea from the controls appeared normal. Conclusions: Obstructive jaundice promotes bacterial translocation in rats. The gut mucosal damage rather than the intestinal bacterial overgrowth may play a crucial role in bacterial translocation.

  14. Electrostatics of polymer translocation events in electrolyte solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyukdagli, Sahin; Ala-Nissila, T.

    2016-07-01

    We develop an analytical theory that accounts for the image and surface charge interactions between a charged dielectric membrane and a DNA molecule translocating through the membrane. Translocation events through neutral carbon-based membranes are driven by a competition between the repulsive DNA-image-charge interactions and the attractive coupling between the DNA segments on the trans and the cis sides of the membrane. The latter effect is induced by the reduction of the coupling by the dielectric membrane. In strong salt solutions where the repulsive image-charge effects dominate the attractive trans-cis coupling, the DNA molecule encounters a translocation barrier of ≈10 kBT. In dilute electrolytes, the trans-cis coupling takes over image-charge forces and the membrane becomes a metastable attraction point that can trap translocating polymers over long time intervals. This mechanism can be used in translocation experiments in order to control DNA motion by tuning the salt concentration of the solution.

  15. MYC translocation partner gene determines survival of patients with large B-cell lymphoma with MYC- or double-hit MYC/BCL2 translocations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mette Ø; Gang, Anne O; Poulsen, Tim S;

    2014-01-01

    In large B-cell lymphoma (LBCL) MYC- and MYC/BCL2 double-hit (DH) translocations have been associated with inferior survival. We hypothesised that the negative prognostic impact of MYC translocation was determined by an immunoglobulin MYC translocation partner gene (IG-MYC), as opposed to a non......-immunoglobulin partner gene (nonIG-MYC). In a prospective, unselected cohort of 237 LBCL patients MYC and BCL2 translocations were identified by fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) with split probes. MYC translocation partner gene was identified by IGH/MYC fusion probes and/or kappa/lambda split probes. Clinical...

  16. Translocation techniques used to establish pen farmed Alaskan reindeer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Dieterich

    1990-09-01

    Full Text Available Small herds of reindeer (Rangifer tarandus frequently have been needed to be established in fenced holding pens for research or commercial reasons in Alaska and other areas. Native ranges of reindeer in Alaska were not on road systems, and the diet of the native reindeer had to be changed when they were translocated to small pens. Economics of transportation and feeding played an important role in the feasibility of translocation. Gathering and holding of reindeer for shipment, transport methods, adjustment of free-ranging reindeer to confinement, and a new diet were primary considerations to insure survival. Minimal psychologic stress of short duration, thermoregulation, and physical comfort were extremely important in carrying out a successful translocation. Receiving facilities, feed, and personnel were equally important. A minimum of one month was required to adjust reindeer to confinement and diet change.

  17. Multiscale modeling of biopolymer translocation through a nanopore

    CERN Document Server

    Fyta, M G; Kaxiras, E; Succi, S; Fyta, Maria; Melchionna, Simone; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Succi, Sauro

    2007-01-01

    We employ a multiscale approach to model the translocation of biopolymers through nanometer size pores. Our computational scheme combines microscopic Langevin molecular dynamics (MD) with a mesoscopic lattice Boltzmann (LB) method for the solvent dynamics, explicitly taking into account the interactions of the molecule with the surrounding fluid. Both dynamical and statistical aspects of the translocation process were investigated, by simulating polymers of various initial configurations and lengths. For a representative molecule size, we explore the effects of important parameters that enter in the simulation, paying particular attention to the strength of the molecule-solvent coupling and of the external electric field which drives the translocation process. Finally, we explore the connection between the generic polymers modeled in the simulation and DNA, for which interesting recent experimental results are available.

  18. Markers of immunity and bacterial translocation in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial translocation (BT), the migration of enteric bacteria to extraintestinal sites, is related to immune stimulation and haemodynamic changes in experimental cirrhosis. These changes may be highly relevant to patients with cirrhosis, where changes in the circulation cause serious complicati......Bacterial translocation (BT), the migration of enteric bacteria to extraintestinal sites, is related to immune stimulation and haemodynamic changes in experimental cirrhosis. These changes may be highly relevant to patients with cirrhosis, where changes in the circulation cause serious......, in 38 patients with ascites, we found no association between bDNA and immunity, in contrast to some previous findings. In the final paper, exploring one possible translocation route, we hypothesized a difference in bDNA levels between the blood from the veins draining the gut on one hand and the...

  19. Scintigraphic visualization of bacterial translocation in experimental strangulated intestinal obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to obtain scintigraphic images depicting translocation of 99mTc-labelled Escherichia coli bacteria through the intestinal barrier and to quantify this process using methods of nuclear medicine. Thirty male Wistar rats (including 20 rats with modelled strangulated intestinal obstruction and 10 healthy rats) were used for bacterial scintigraphy. 99mTc-labelled E. coli bacteria (99mTs-E. coli) with an activity of 7.4-11.1 MBq were administered into a section of the small intestine. Scintigraphic visualization of bacterial translocation into organs and tissues of laboratory animals was recorded in dynamic (240 min) and static (15 min) modes. The number of labelled bacteria, which migrated through the intestinal barrier, was quantified by calculating the translocation index (TI). Control indicated no translocation of 99mTs-E. coli administered into the intestine through the parietes of the small intestine's distal part in healthy animals. Animals with strangulated obstruction demonstrated different migration strength and routes of labelled bacteria from strangulated and superior to strangulation sections of the small intestine. 99mTs-E. coli migrated from the strangulated loop into the peritoneal cavity later causing systemic bacteraemia through peritoneal resorption. The section of the small intestine, which was superior to the strangulation, demonstrated migration of labelled bacteria first into the portal and then into the systemic circulation. The strangulated section of the small intestine was the main source of bacteria dissemination since the number of labelled bacteria, which migrated from this section significantly, exceeded that of the area superior to the strangulation section of the small intestine (p = 0.0003). Bacterial scintigraphy demonstrated the possibility of visualizing migration routes of labelled bacteria and quantifying their translocation through the intestinal barrier. This approach to study bacterial translocation

  20. The action spectrum in chloroplast translocation in multilayer leaf cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Lechowski

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available By measurement of light transmittance through a leaf as criterion of chloroplast translocation, the action spectrum of Ajuga reptans was established. In the spectrum obtained, a correction was introduced for leaf autoabsorption calculated on the basis of the Beer-Lambert law. The action spectrum has two maxima: at λ= 375 nm and λ= 481 nm. The range above 502 nm has no significant effect on chloroplast translocation. Comparison with other objects examined demonstrated that in multilayer leaf cells riboflavin seems also to be a photoreceptor active in this process.

  1. Hard Sphere Diffusion Behaviour of Polymer Translocating through Interacting Pores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The translocation of polymer chain through a small pore from a high concentration side (cis side) to a low concentration side (trans side) is simulated by using Monte Carlo technique. The effect of the polymer-pore interaction on the translocation is studied. We find a special interaction at which the decay of the number of polymer chain, N, at the cis side obeys Fick's law, i.e. N decreases exponentially with time. The behaviour is analogous to the diffusion of hard sphere. (fundamental areas of phenomenology(including applications))

  2. Elastic line deformed on a surface by an external field: Intrinsic formulation and preliminary application to nucleosome energetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    If an elastically resilient thin rod (elastic line) is subjected to a static force field, it adopts a trajectory that minimizes the sum of its elastic energy and its energy of interaction with the field. Using ''intrinsic'' methods of differential geometry and variational calculus, we formulate and solve this problem for an elastic line confined to a general surface. The biological structure known as the nucleosome core particle provides motivation to apply the solution to an elastic line (DNA) subject to a centrosymmetric force emanating from a circle. In this case the surface is a plane (although the surface will be curved in a more accurate model). In preliminary numerical work we are able to represent the angular deviation of the elastic line to fifth order in powers of arc length. The result of greatest interest may be that the equilibrium trajectory appears not to approach the circle progressively with increasing strength of the attraction between line and circle. Instead, the line approaches a ''barrier'' trajectory and, as it does, becomes unstable relative to the circular arc

  3. The Nucleosome Remodeling and Deacetylase Complex NuRD Is Built from Preformed Catalytically Active Sub-modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W; Aubert, A; Gomez de Segura, J M; Karuppasamy, M; Basu, S; Murthy, A S; Diamante, A; Drury, T A; Balmer, J; Cramard, J; Watson, A A; Lando, D; Lee, S F; Palayret, M; Kloet, S L; Smits, A H; Deery, M J; Vermeulen, M; Hendrich, B; Klenerman, D; Schaffitzel, C; Berger, I; Laue, E D

    2016-07-17

    The nucleosome remodeling deacetylase (NuRD) complex is a highly conserved regulator of chromatin structure and transcription. Structural studies have shed light on this and other chromatin modifying machines, but much less is known about how they assemble and whether stable and functional sub-modules exist that retain enzymatic activity. Purification of the endogenous Drosophila NuRD complex shows that it consists of a stable core of subunits, while others, in particular the chromatin remodeler CHD4, associate transiently. To dissect the assembly and activity of NuRD, we systematically produced all possible combinations of different components using the MultiBac system, and determined their activity and biophysical properties. We carried out single-molecule imaging of CHD4 in live mouse embryonic stem cells, in the presence and absence of one of core components (MBD3), to show how the core deacetylase and chromatin-remodeling sub-modules associate in vivo. Our experiments suggest a pathway for the assembly of NuRD via preformed and active sub-modules. These retain enzymatic activity and are present in both the nucleus and the cytosol, an outcome with important implications for understanding NuRD function. PMID:27117189

  4. Silver Nanoscale Hexagonal Column Chips for Detecting Cell-free DNA and Circulating Nucleosomes in Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hiroaki; Hasegawa, Katsuyuki; Hasegawa, Yuuki; Nishimaki, Tadashi; Hosomichi, Kazuyoshi; Kimura, Satoshi; Ohba, Motoi; Yao, Hiroshi; Onimaru, Manabu; Inoue, Ituro; Inoue, Haruhiro

    2015-01-01

    Blood tests, which are commonly used for cancer screening, generally have low sensitivity. Here, we developed a novel rapid and simple method to generate silver nanoscale hexagonal columns (NHCs) for use in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). We reported that the intensity of SERS spectra of clinical serum samples obtained from gastrointestinal cancer patients is was significantly higher than that of SERS spectra of clinical serum samples obtained from non-cancer patients. We estimated the combined constituents on silver NHCs by using a field emission-type scanning electron microscope, Raman microscopes, and a 3D laser scanning confocal microscope. We obtained the Raman scattering spectra of samples of physically fractured cells and clinical serum. No spectra were obtained for chemically lysed cultured cells and DNA, RNA, and protein extracted from cultured cells. We believe that our method, which uses SERS with silver NHCs to detect circulating nucleosomes bound by methylated cell-free DNA, may be successfully implemented in blood tests for cancer screening. PMID:25994878

  5. PGC1α -1 Nucleosome Position and Splice Variant Expression and Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Overweight and Obese Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henagan, Tara M; Stewart, Laura K; Forney, Laura A; Sparks, Lauren M; Johannsen, Neil; Church, Timothy S

    2014-01-01

    PGC1α, a transcriptional coactivator, interacts with PPARs and others to regulate skeletal muscle metabolism. PGC1α undergoes splicing to produce several mRNA variants, with the NTPGC1α variant having a similar biological function to the full length PGC1α (FLPGC1α). CVD is associated with obesity and T2D and a lower percentage of type 1 oxidative fibers and impaired mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle, characteristics determined by PGC1α expression. PGC1α expression is epigenetically regulated in skeletal muscle to determine mitochondrial adaptations, and epigenetic modifications may regulate mRNA splicing. We report in this paper that skeletal muscle PGC1α  -1 nucleosome (-1N) position is associated with splice variant NTPGC1α but not FLPGC1α expression. Division of participants based on the -1N position revealed that those individuals with a -1N phased further upstream from the transcriptional start site (UP) expressed lower levels of NTPGC1α than those with the -1N more proximal to TSS (DN). UP showed an increase in body fat percentage and serum total and LDL cholesterol. These findings suggest that the -1N may be a potential epigenetic regulator of NTPGC1α splice variant expression, and -1N position and NTPGC1α variant expression in skeletal muscle are linked to CVD risk. This trial is registered with clinicaltrials.gov, identifier NCT00458133. PMID:25614734

  6. Inferring coarse-grain histone-DNA interaction potentials from high-resolution structures of the nucleosome

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, Sam

    2014-01-01

    The histone-DNA interaction in the nucleosome is a fundamental mechanism of genomic compaction and regulation, which remains largely unkown despite a growing structural knowledge of the complex. Here, we propose a framework for the extraction of a nanoscale histone-DNA force-field from a collection of high-resolution structures, which may be adapted to a larger class of protein-DNA complexes. We apply the procedure on a large crystallographic database extended by snapshots from molecular dynamics simulations. The comparison of the structural models first shows that, at the sites of histone-DNA contact, the DNA base-pairs are locally shifted outwards, consistent with locally repulsive forces exerted by the histones. In a second step, we show that the various force profiles of the analyzed structures derive locally from a unique, sequence-independent, quadratic repulsive force field, while the sequence preferences are entirely due to the internal DNA mechanics. We thus obtain the first knowledge-derived nanosca...

  7. PGC1α −1 Nucleosome Position and Splice Variant Expression and Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Overweight and Obese Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara M. Henagan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available PGC1α, a transcriptional coactivator, interacts with PPARs and others to regulate skeletal muscle metabolism. PGC1α undergoes splicing to produce several mRNA variants, with the NTPGC1α variant having a similar biological function to the full length PGC1α (FLPGC1α. CVD is associated with obesity and T2D and a lower percentage of type 1 oxidative fibers and impaired mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle, characteristics determined by PGC1α expression. PGC1α expression is epigenetically regulated in skeletal muscle to determine mitochondrial adaptations, and epigenetic modifications may regulate mRNA splicing. We report in this paper that skeletal muscle PGC1α  −1 nucleosome (−1N position is associated with splice variant NTPGC1α but not FLPGC1α expression. Division of participants based on the −1N position revealed that those individuals with a −1N phased further upstream from the transcriptional start site (UP expressed lower levels of NTPGC1α than those with the −1N more proximal to TSS (DN. UP showed an increase in body fat percentage and serum total and LDL cholesterol. These findings suggest that the −1N may be a potential epigenetic regulator of NTPGC1α splice variant expression, and −1N position and NTPGC1α variant expression in skeletal muscle are linked to CVD risk. This trial is registered with clinicaltrials.gov, identifier NCT00458133.

  8. Mass Production of Intergeneric Chromosomal Translocations through Pollen Irradiation of Triticum durum-Haynaldia villosa Amphiploid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Haynaldia villosa possesses a lot of important agronomic traits and has been a powerful gene resource for wheat improvement. However,only several wheat-H. Villosa translocation lines have been reported so far.In this study,we attempted to develop an efficient method for inducing wheat-H. Villosa chromosomal translocations.Triticum durum-Haynaldia villosa amphiploid pollen treated with 1200 rad 60Co-γ-rays was pollinated to Triticum aestivum cv.'Chinese Spring'.Ninety-eight intergeneric translocated chromosomes between T. Durum and H.villosa were detected by genomic In situ hybridization in 44 of 61 M1 plants,indicating a translocation occurrence frequency of 72.1%;much higher than ever reported.There were 26,62 and 10 translocated chromosomes involving whole arm translocations,terminal translocations,and intercarlary translocations,respectively.Of the total 108 breakage-fusion events,79 involved interstitial regions and 29 involved centric regions.The ratio of small segment terminal translocations(W·W-V) was much higher than that of large segment terminal translocations (W-V·V).All of the M1 plants were self-sterile,and their backcross progeny was all obtained with Chinese Spring as pollen donors.Transmission analysis showed that most of the translocations were transmittable.This study provides a new strategy for rapid mass production of wheat-alien chromosomal translocations.especially terminal translocations that will be more significant for wheat improvement.

  9. 8-14 translocation in a Japanese Burkitt's lymphoma.

    OpenAIRE

    Miyamoto,Kanji; Sato, Jiro; Miyoshi, Isao; Nishihara,Ryuji; Terao, Seiya; Hara, Masamichi; Kimura,Ikuro

    1980-01-01

    Chromosome analysis was performed on cells obtained from the pleural effusion of a Japanese patient with Burkitt's lymphoma. Two modal chromosomal numbers were found: 45 and 46. Five different karyotypes were present, all having a t (8q-;14q+) translocation. This case illustrates that Burkitt's lymphomas of Japanese are no exception to the frequent association of this chromosomal abnormality with Burkitt's lymphomas.

  10. The role of the Philadelphia translocation in chronic myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.H.M. Geurts van Kessel (Ad)

    1983-01-01

    textabstractDuring the last two decades evidence for a close association between the presence of specific chromosomal abnormalities and the occurrence of several types of cancers and leukemias has accumulated. The Philadelphia (Ph 1) translocation, present in about 90% of the patients with chronic m

  11. Functional nanoparticles translocation into cell and adhesion force curve analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Haisung; Veerapandian, Murugan; Kim, Byung Tae; Yun, Kyusik; Seo, Soo-Won

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this research is to investigate the cell translocation of two functional nanoparticles (barium sulfate (BaSO4NPs), europium (III) doped gadolinium oxide nanoparticles (Gd2O3@EuNPs)) into A549 cells by Bio-Atomic Force Microscopy (Bio-AFM). Successful cell translocation of these two nanoparticles are ensured from the measurement of changes in the cell surface roughness and interaction (extension), retraction forces from the vertical deflection of tip towards substrate surfaces through force-distance curve slope analysis. Measurement of typical adhesion forces (i.e., extension and retraction) between the tip-substrate (0.0963 and 1.155 nN), tip-A549 cell substrate (0.1177 and 2.468 nN), tip-Gd2O3@EuNPs/A549 substrate (0.0785 and 0.4276 nN) and tip-BaSO4NPs/A549 substrate (0.518 and 6.838 nN) confirms the successful cell translocation of functional nanoparticles into A549 cells. Further the nanoscale resolution of topographical height and 3D images evinces the surface characteristics of normal A549 cells and nanoparticles translocated A549 cells. PMID:23421137

  12. Observing cellulose biosynthesis and membrane translocation in crystallo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Jacob L W; McNamara, Joshua T; Fischer, Michael; Rich, Jamie; Chen, Hong-Ming; Withers, Stephen G; Zimmer, Jochen

    2016-03-17

    Many biopolymers, including polysaccharides, must be translocated across at least one membrane to reach their site of biological function. Cellulose is a linear glucose polymer synthesized and secreted by a membrane-integrated cellulose synthase. Here, in crystallo enzymology with the catalytically active bacterial cellulose synthase BcsA-BcsB complex reveals structural snapshots of a complete cellulose biosynthesis cycle, from substrate binding to polymer translocation. Substrate- and product-bound structures of BcsA provide the basis for substrate recognition and demonstrate the stepwise elongation of cellulose. Furthermore, the structural snapshots show that BcsA translocates cellulose via a ratcheting mechanism involving a 'finger helix' that contacts the polymer's terminal glucose. Cooperating with BcsA's gating loop, the finger helix moves 'up' and 'down' in response to substrate binding and polymer elongation, respectively, thereby pushing the elongated polymer into BcsA's transmembrane channel. This mechanism is validated experimentally by tethering BcsA's finger helix, which inhibits polymer translocation but not elongation. PMID:26958837

  13. DNA translocating through a carbon nanotube can increase ionic current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Translocation of DNA through a narrow, single-walled carbon nanotube can be accompanied by large increases in ion current, recently observed in contrast to the ion current blockade. We use molecular dynamics simulations to show that large electro-osmotic flow can be turned into a large net current via ion-selective filtering by a DNA molecule inside the carbon nanotube. (paper)

  14. Successive Translocation of the Rings in a [3]Rotaxane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagesar, Dhiredj C; Wiering, Piet G; Kay, Euan R; Leigh, David A; Brouwer, Albert M

    2016-06-17

    A [2]rotaxane, a [3]rotaxane and the corresponding thread containing two succinamide (succ) binding stations and a central redox-active pyromellitimide (pmi) station were studied. Infrared spectroelectrochemical experiments revealed the translocation of the macrocycle between the succinamide station and the electrochemically reduced pmi station (radical anion and dianion). Remarkably, in the [3]rotaxane, the rings can be selectively translocated. One-electron reduction leads to the translocation of one of the two macrocycles from the succinamide to the pyromellitimide station, whereas activation of the shuttle through two-electron reduction results in the translocation of both macrocycles: the dianion, due to its higher electron density and hence greater hydrogen-bond accepting affinity, is hydrogen bonded to both macrocycles. Systems with such an on-command contraction are known as molecular muscles. The relative strengths of the binding between the macrocycle and the imide anions could be estimated from the hydrogen-bond-induced shifts in the C=O stretching frequencies of hydrogen-bond accepting amide groups of the macrocycle. PMID:26918870

  15. Driven translocation of a polymer: Fluctuations at work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubbeldam, J.L.A.; Rostiashvii, V.G.; Milchev, A.; Vilgis, T.A.

    2013-01-01

    The impact of thermal fluctuations on the translocation dynamics of a polymer chain driven through a narrow pore has been investigated theoretically and by means of extensive molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The theoretical consideration is based on the so-called velocity Langevin (V-Langevin) eq

  16. Movement of micronutrients to plant roots, their uptake and translocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nutritional deficiency as related to movement of micronutrients through soil, plant uptake and translocation is reviewed. The type of research required at this stage, including the selection and development of plant species and cultivars which can efficiently extract micronutrients from deficient (and particularly from zinc-deficient) soils is stressed. The usefulness of radioisotopes is considered

  17. Polymer translocation into and out of an ellipsoidal cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polson, James M

    2015-05-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are used to study the translocation of a polymer into and out of an ellipsoidal cavity through a narrow pore. We measure the polymer free energy F as a function of a translocation coordinate, s, defined to be the number of bonds that have entered the cavity. To study polymer insertion, we consider the case of a driving force acting on monomers inside the pore, as well as monomer attraction to the cavity wall. We examine the changes to F(s) upon variation in the shape anisometry and volume of the cavity, the polymer length, and the strength of the interactions driving the insertion. For athermal systems, the free energy functions are analyzed using a scaling approach, where we treat the confined portion of the polymer to be in the semi-dilute regime. The free energy functions are used with the Fokker-Planck (FP) equation to calculate mean translocation times, as well as translocation time distributions. We find that both polymer ejection and insertion are faster for ellipsoidal cavities than for spherical cavities. The results are in qualitative agreement with those of a Langevin dynamics study in the case of ejection but not for insertion. The discrepancy is likely due to out-of-equilibrium conformational behaviour that is not accounted for in the FP approach. PMID:25956116

  18. Genetic counseling in carriers of reciprocal translocations involving two autosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahareh Pourjafari

    2012-01-01

    Couples in which one partner is the carrier of such balanced translocation have increased risks of infertility, recurrent abortion, and delivery of chromosomally abnormal offspring. Genetic counseling of such couples, therefore, presents a unique challenge and should be considered in dealing with such families.

  19. Criteria for minimal model of driven polymer translocation

    CERN Document Server

    Suhonen, P M; Linna, R P

    2014-01-01

    While the characteristics of the driven translocation for asymptotically long polymers are well understood, this is not the case for finite-sized polymers, which are relevant for real-world experiments and simulation studies. Most notably, the behavior of the exponent $\\alpha$, which describes the scaling of the translocation time with polymer length, when the driving force $f_p$ in the pore is changed, is under debate. By Langevin dynamics simulations of regular and modified translocation models we find that an incomplete model, where the trans side is excluded, gives rise to characteristics that are in stark contradiction with those of the complete model, for which $\\alpha$ increases with $f_p$. Our results suggest that contribution due to fluctuations is important. We construct a minimal model where dynamics is completely excluded to show that close alignment with a full translocation model can be achieved. Our findings set very stringent requirements for a minimal model that is supposed to describe the dr...

  20. Single Molecule Fluorescence Measurements of Ribosomal Translocation Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunlai; Stevens, Benjamin; Kaur, Jaskarin; Cabral, Diana; Liu, Hanqing; Wang, Yuhong; Zhang, Haibo; Rosenblum, Gabriel; Smilansky, Zeev; Goldman, Yale E.; Cooperman, Barry S.

    2011-01-01

    We employ single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) to study structural dynamics over the first two elongation cycles of protein synthesis, using ribosomes containing either Cy3-labeled ribosomal protein L11 and A- or P-site Cy5-labeled tRNA or Cy3 and Cy5 labeled tRNAs. Pre-translocation (PRE) complexes demonstrate fluctuations between classical and hybrid forms, with concerted motions of tRNAs away from L11 and from each other when classical complex converts to hybrid complex. EF-G·GTP binding to both hybrid and classical PRE complexes halts these fluctuations prior to catalyzing translocation to form the post-translocation (POST) complex. EF-G dependent translocation from the classical PRE complex proceeds via transient formation of a short-lived hybrid intermediate. A-site binding of either EF-G to the PRE complex or of aminoacyl-tRNA·EF-Tu ternary complex to the POST complex markedly suppresses ribosome conformational lability. PMID:21549313

  1. Bacterial translocation and immunohistochemical measurement of gut immune function

    OpenAIRE

    Woodcock, N.; Robertson, J; Morgan, D; Gregg, K; Mitchell, C.; MacFie, J

    2001-01-01

    Aims—The local immune response in the small bowel mucosa might play a role in bacterial translocation (BT). The aim of this study was to quantify immune cells and secretory antibodies in the small bowel mucosa, and relate this to BT as assessed by culture of a mesenteric lymph node.

  2. Diphtheria toxin translocation across cellular membranes is regulated by sphingolipids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diphtheria toxin is translocated across cellular membranes when receptor-bound toxin is exposed to low pH. To study the role of sphingolipids for toxin translocation, both a mutant cell line lacking the first enzyme in de novo sphingolipid synthesis, serine palmitoyltransferase, and a specific inhibitor of the same enzyme, myriocin, were used. The serine palmitoyltransferase-deficient cell line (LY-B) was found to be 10-15 times more sensitive to diphtheria toxin than the genetically complemented cell line (LY-B/cLCB1) and the wild-type cell line (CHO-K1), both when toxin translocation directly across the plasma membrane was induced by exposing cells with surface-bound toxin to low pH, and when the toxin followed its normal route via acidified endosomes into the cytosol. Toxin binding was similar in these three cell lines. Furthermore, inhibition of serine palmitoyltransferase activity by addition of myriocin sensitized the two control cell lines (LY-B/cLCB1 and CHO-K1) to diphtheria toxin, whereas, as expected, no effect was observed in cells lacking serine palmitoyltransferase (LY-B). In conclusion, diphtheria toxin translocation is facilitated by depletion of membrane sphingolipids

  3. Trisomy for 8p21→pter owing to a familial translocation

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Elizabeth F.; Hodgkin, William E

    1983-01-01

    A girl with developmental delay and physical abnormalities was trisomic for the segment 8p21→pter owing to a familial translocation t(8;11). The child's father and paternal grandmother carry the same translocation.

  4. Co- and post-translational translocation through the protein-conducting channel : analogous mechanisms at work?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mitra, Kakoli; Frank, Joachim; Driessen, Arnold

    2006-01-01

    Many proteins are translocated across, or integrated into, membranes. Both functions are fulfilled by the 'translocon/translocase', which contains a membrane-embedded proteinconducting channel (PCC) and associated soluble factors that drive translocation and insertion reactions using nucleotide trip

  5. Microbial Translocation in HIV Infection is Associated with Dyslipidemia, Insulin Resistance, and Risk of Myocardial Infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karin Kaereby; Pedersen, Maria; Trøseid, Marius;

    2013-01-01

    Microbial translocation has been suggested to be a driver of immune activation and inflammation. We hypothesized that microbial translocation may be related to dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and the risk of coronary heart disease in HIV-infected individuals....

  6. RNase A does not translocate the alpha-hemolysin pore.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Besnik Krasniqi

    Full Text Available The application of nanopore sensing utilizing the α-hemolysin pore to probe proteins at single-molecule resolution has expanded rapidly. In some studies protein translocation through the α-hemolysin has been reported. However, there is no direct evidence, as yet, that proteins can translocate the α-hemolysin pore. The biggest challenge to obtaining direct evidence is the lack of a highly sensitive assay to detect very low numbers of protein molecules. Furthermore, if an activity based assay is applied then the proteins translocating by unfolding should refold back to an active confirmation for the assay technique to work. To overcome these challenges we selected a model enzyme, ribonuclease A, that readily refolds to an active conformation even after unfolding it with denaturants. In addition we have developed a highly sensitive reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction based activity assay for ribonuclease A. Initially, ribonuclease A, a protein with a positive net charge and dimensions larger than the smallest diameter of the pore, was subjected to nanopore analysis under different experimental conditions. Surprisingly, although the protein was added to the cis chamber (grounded and a positive potential was applied, the interaction of ribonuclease A with α-hemolysin pore induced small and large blockade events in the presence and the absence of a reducing and/or denaturing agent. Upon measuring the zeta potential, it was found that the protein undergoes a charge reversal under the experimental conditions used for nanopore sensing. From the investigation of the effect of voltage on the interaction of ribonuclease A with the α-hemolysin pore, it was impossible to conclude if the events observed were translocations. However, upon testing for ribonuclease A activity on the trans chamber it was found that ribonuclease A does not translocate the α-hemolysin pore.

  7. RNase A Does Not Translocate the Alpha-Hemolysin Pore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasniqi, Besnik; Lee, Jeremy S.

    2014-01-01

    The application of nanopore sensing utilizing the α-hemolysin pore to probe proteins at single-molecule resolution has expanded rapidly. In some studies protein translocation through the α-hemolysin has been reported. However, there is no direct evidence, as yet, that proteins can translocate the α-hemolysin pore. The biggest challenge to obtaining direct evidence is the lack of a highly sensitive assay to detect very low numbers of protein molecules. Furthermore, if an activity based assay is applied then the proteins translocating by unfolding should refold back to an active confirmation for the assay technique to work. To overcome these challenges we selected a model enzyme, ribonuclease A, that readily refolds to an active conformation even after unfolding it with denaturants. In addition we have developed a highly sensitive reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction based activity assay for ribonuclease A. Initially, ribonuclease A, a protein with a positive net charge and dimensions larger than the smallest diameter of the pore, was subjected to nanopore analysis under different experimental conditions. Surprisingly, although the protein was added to the cis chamber (grounded) and a positive potential was applied, the interaction of ribonuclease A with α-hemolysin pore induced small and large blockade events in the presence and the absence of a reducing and/or denaturing agent. Upon measuring the zeta potential, it was found that the protein undergoes a charge reversal under the experimental conditions used for nanopore sensing. From the investigation of the effect of voltage on the interaction of ribonuclease A with the α-hemolysin pore, it was impossible to conclude if the events observed were translocations. However, upon testing for ribonuclease A activity on the trans chamber it was found that ribonuclease A does not translocate the α-hemolysin pore. PMID:24505349

  8. Cold-inhibited phloem translocation in sugar beet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental studies were undertaken on a simplified single source leaf-single sink leaf, or single source leaf-double sink leaf sugar beet system to investigate the responsive nature of the long-distance phloem translocation system to localized cooling perturbations on the source leaf petiole. Experiments were performed by using a steady state [14C]-labelling system for the source leaf, and translocation into the sink leaf (leaves) was monitored with a Geiger-Mueller system. A specially designed Peltier apparatus enabled cooling of the source petiole to 10C (or other desired temperatures) at various positions on the petiole, over different lengths, and at different rates of cooling. Initial experiment were designed to test the predictions of a mathematical recovery model of translocation inhibited by cold. The results did not support the mathematical model, but did suggest that vascular anastomoses may be involved in the recovery response. Selective petiolar incision/excision experiments showed that anastomoses were capable of re-establishing translocation following a disruption of flow. Studies with two monitored sink levels suggested that the inhibition to slow-coolings was not due to reduced translocation through the cooled source petiole region, but rather, was due to a repartitioning of flow among the terminal sinks (sink leaves and hypocotyl/crown region above the heat-girdled root). This repartitioning occurred via a redirection of flow through the vascular connections in the crown region of the plant, and appeared to be promoted by rapid, physical signals originating from the cooled region of the petiole

  9. Genome-Wide Translocation Sequencing Reveals Mechanisms of Chromosome Breaks and Rearrangements in B Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Chiarle, Roberto; Zhang, Yu; Frock, Richard L.; Lewis, Susanna M.; Molinie, Benoit; Ho, Yu-Jui; Myers, Darienne R; Choi, Vivian W.; Compagno, Mara; Malkin, Daniel J.; Neuberg, Donna; Monti, Stefano; Giallourakis, Cosmas C.; Gostissa, Monica; Alt, Frederick W.

    2011-01-01

    While chromosomal translocations are common pathogenetic events in cancer, mechanisms that promote them are poorly understood. To elucidate translocation mechanisms in mammalian cells, we developed high throughput, genome-wide translocation sequencing (HTGTS). We employed HTGTS to identify tens of thousands of independent translocation junctions involving fixed I-SceI meganuclease-generated DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) within the c-myc oncogene or IgH locus of B lymphocytes induced for Act...

  10. Genetic reporter system for oncogenic Igh–Myc translocations in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Takizawa, M.; Kim, JS; Tessarollo, L; McNeil, N; Waldschmidt, TJ; Casellas, R; Ried, T; Janz, S.

    2010-01-01

    The Myc-deregulating chromosomal T(12;15)(Igh–Myc) translocation, the hallmark mutation of inflammation- and interleukin 6-dependent mouse plasmacytoma (PCT), is the premier model of cancer-associated chromosomal translocations because it is the only translocation in mice that occurs spontaneously (B lymphocyte lineage) and with predictably high incidence (~85% of PCT), and has a direct counterpart in humans: Burkitt lymphoma t(8;14)(q24;q32) translocation. Here, we report on the development ...

  11. Human Lymphoid Translocation Fragile Zones Are Hypomethylated and Have Accessible Chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Zhengfei; Lieber, Michael R.; Tsai, Albert G.; Pardo, Carolina E.; Müschen, Markus; Kladde, Michael P.; Hsieh, Chih-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations are a hallmark of hematopoietic malignancies. CG motifs within translocation fragile zones (typically 20 to 600 bp in size) are prone to chromosomal translocation in lymphomas. Here we demonstrate that the CG motifs in human translocation fragile zones are hypomethylated relative to the adjacent DNA. Using a methyltransferase footprinting assay on isolated nuclei (in vitro), we find that the chromatin at these fragile zones is accessible. We also examined in vivo ac...

  12. ATM Modulates the Loading of Recombination Proteins onto a Chromosomal Translocation Breakpoint Hotspot

    OpenAIRE

    Jiying Sun; Yukako Oma; Masahiko Harata; Kazuteru Kono; Hiroki Shima; Aiko Kinomura; Tsuyoshi Ikura; Hidekazu Suzuki; Shuki Mizutani; Roland Kanaar; Satoshi Tashiro

    2010-01-01

    textabstractChromosome translocations induced by DNA damaging agents, such as ionizing radiation and certain chemotherapies, alter genetic information resulting in malignant transformation. Abrogation or loss of the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein, a DNA damage signaling regulator, increases the incidence of chromosome translocations. However, how ATM protects cells from chromosome translocations is still unclear. Chromosome translocations involving the MLL gene on 11q23 are the m...

  13. Induction of Chromosomal Translocations in Mouse and Human Cells Using Site-Specific Endonucleases

    OpenAIRE

    Weinstock, David M.; Brunet, Erika; Jasin, Maria

    2008-01-01

    Reciprocal chromosomal translocations are early and essential events in the malignant transformation of several tumor types, yet the precise mechanisms that mediate translocation formation are poorly understood. We review here the development of approaches to induce and recover translocations between two targeted DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in mammalian chromosomes. Using mouse cells, we find that nonhomologous end-joining readily mediates translocation formation between two DSBs generate...

  14. Prenatal origin of chromosomal translocations in acute childhood leukemia: Implications and future directions

    OpenAIRE

    McHale, C M; Smith, M. T.

    2004-01-01

    We, and others, have demonstrated an in utero origin for translocations associated with childhood leukemia, with latency periods in some cases exceeding 10 years. The mechanism of generation of most of the translocations is thought to be aberrant repair following abortive apoptosis, rather than V(D)J recombination or exposure to topoisomerase II inhibitors. Folate supplementation may prevent some of the chromosome breakage leading to translocation formation. Translocations t(8;21) and t(12;21...

  15. Studies on x-ray induced chromosomal translocations in Anopheles albimanus. II. Laboratory evaluation of sexual competitiveness of translocation males

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Success of a genetic control program in a sexually reproducing species depends largely on the mating competitiveness of the released individuals. The sexual vigor of male Anopheles albimanus mosquitoes carrying a Y-autosome translocation was evaluated in the laboratory and found to be equal to that of wild type males

  16. Genetic characterization of a reciprocal translocation present in a widely grown barley variety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farré, A.; Cuadrado, A.; Lacasa-Benito, I.; Cistué, L.; Schubert, I.; Comadran, J.; Jansen, J.; Romagosa, I.

    2012-01-01

    Artificially induced translocation stocks have been used to physically map the barley genome; however, natural translocations are extremely uncommon in cultivated genotypes. Albacete is a barley variety widely grown in recent decades in Spain and carrying a reciprocal translocation which obviously d

  17. The Use of Double-Monotelodisomics to Identify Translocations in Triticum aestivum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde-Laursen, Ib; Larsen, J.

    1974-01-01

    By analysing metaphase I of double-monotelodisomic hybrids between two varieties of hexaploid wheat differentiated by reciprocal translocations it is possible to establish reliably the chromosomes involved in each translocation. Also the chromosome parts translocated may be identified. The use of...

  18. Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) and Nucleosome-binding Oligomerization Domain (NOD) gene polymorphisms and endometrial cancer risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endometrial cancer is the most common gynaecological malignancy in women of developed countries. Many risk factors implicated in endometrial cancer trigger inflammatory events; therefore, alterations in immune response may predispose an individual to disease. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and nucleosome-binding oligomerization domain (NOD) genes are integral to the recognition of pathogens and are highly polymorphic. For these reasons, the aim of the study was to assess the frequency of polymorphic variants in TLR and NOD genes in an Australian endometrial cancer population. Ten polymorphisms were genotyped in 191 endometrial cancer cases and 291 controls using real-time PCR: NOD1 (rs2075822, rs2907749, rs2907748), NOD2 (rs5743260, rs2066844, rs2066845), TLR2 (rs5743708), TLR4 (rs4986790) and TLR9 (rs5743836, rs187084). Haplotype analysis revealed that the combination of the variant alleles of the two TLR9 polymorphisms, rs5743836 and rs187084, were protective for endometrial cancer risk: OR 0.11, 95% CI (0.03-0.44), p = 0.002. This result remained highly significant after adjustment for endometrial cancer risk factors and Bonferroni correction for multiple testing. There were no other associations observed for the other polymorphisms in TLR2, TLR4, NOD1 and NOD2. The variant 'C' allele of rs5743836 causes greater TLR9 transcriptional activity compared to the 'T' allele, therefore, higher TLR9 activity may be related to efficient removal of microbial pathogens within the endometrium. Clearly, the association of these TLR9 polymorphisms and endometrial cancer risk must be further examined in an independent population. The results point towards the importance of examining immune response in endometrial tumourigenesis to understand new pathways that may be implicated in disease

  19. Dynamic Histone Acetylation of H3K4me3 Nucleosome Regulates MCL1 Pre-mRNA Splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Dilshad H; Gonzalez, Carolina; Tailor, Nikesh; Hamedani, Mohammad K; Leygue, Etienne; Davie, James R

    2016-10-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing is a cotranscriptional process affected by the chromatin architecture along the body of coding genes. Recruited to the pre-mRNA by splicing factors, histone deacetylases (HDACs) and K-acetyltransferases (KATs) catalyze dynamic histone acetylation along the gene. In colon carcinoma HCT 116 cells, HDAC inhibition specifically increased KAT2B occupancy as well as H3 and H4 acetylation of the H3K4 trimethylated (H3K4me3) nucleosome positioned over alternative exon 2 of the MCL1 gene, an event paralleled with the exclusion of exon 2. These results were reproduced in MDA-MB-231, but not in MCF7 breast adenocarcinoma cells. These later cells have much higher levels of demethylase KDM5B than either HCT 116 or MDA-MB-231 cells. We show that H3K4me3 steady-state levels and H3K4me3 occupancy at the end of exon 1 and over exon 2 of the MCL1 gene were lower in MCF7 than in MDA-MB-231 cells. Furthermore, in MCF7 cells, there was minimal effect of HDAC inhibition on H3/H4 acetylation and H3K4me3 levels along the MCL1 gene and no change in pre-mRNA splicing choice. These results show that, upon HDAC inhibition, the H3K4me3 mark plays a critical role in the exclusion of exon 2 from the MCL1 pre-mRNA. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2196-2204, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26864447

  20. Lysine methyltransferase G9a is not required for DNMT3A/3B anchoring to methylated nucleosomes and maintenance of DNA methylation in somatic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma Shikhar; Gerke Daniel S; Han Han F; Jeong Shinwu; Stallcup Michael R; Jones Peter A; Liang Gangning

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background DNA methylation, histone modifications and nucleosome occupancy act in concert for regulation of gene expression patterns in mammalian cells. Recently, G9a, a H3K9 methyltransferase, has been shown to play a role in establishment of DNA methylation at embryonic gene targets in ES cells through recruitment of de novo DNMT3A/3B enzymes. However, whether G9a plays a similar role in maintenance of DNA methylation in somatic cells is still unclear. Results Here we show that G9a...

  1. Methylation of K9 in histone H3 directs alternative modes of highly dynamic interaction of heterochromatin protein hHP1β with the nucleosome.

    OpenAIRE

    Munari, F; Soeroes, S.; Zenn, H.; Schomburg, A.; Kost, N.; Schröder, S.; Klingberg, R.; Rezaei-Ghaleh, N.; Stützer, A.; Gelato, K.; Walla, P; Becker, S.; Schwarzer, D; Zimmermann, B.; Fischle, W

    2012-01-01

    Binding of heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) to the histone H3 lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) mark is a hallmark of establishment and maintenance of heterochromatin. Although genetic and cell biological aspects have been elucidated, the molecular details of HP1 binding to H3K9me3 nucleosomes are unknown. Using a combination of NMR spectroscopy and biophysical measurements on fully defined recombinant experimental systems, we demonstrate that H3K9me3 works as an on/off switch regulating disti...

  2. The Use of Double-Monotelodisomics to Identify Translocations in Triticum aestivum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde-Laursen, Ib; Larsen, J.

    1974-01-01

    By analysing metaphase I of double-monotelodisomic hybrids between two varieties of hexaploid wheat differentiated by reciprocal translocations it is possible to establish reliably the chromosomes involved in each translocation. Also the chromosome parts translocated may be identified. The use of...... the double-monotelodisomic method should be especially valuable when the monosomic method has identified four or more chromosomes participating in multivalent formation in roughly similar frequencies. The method was used to confirm the 5BL-7BL translocation differentiating Cappelle Desprez from...... Chinese Spring and Starke and to show a 7AL-7DS translocation differentiating Starke from Cappelle Desprez and Chinese Spring....

  3. Analysis of photosynthate translocation velocity and measurement of weighted average velocity in transporting pathway of crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The translocation profile pattern of 14C-photosynthate along the transporting pathway in crops were monitored by pulse-labelling a mature leaf with 14CO2. The progressive spreading of translocation profile pattern along the sheath or stem indicates that the translocation of photosynthate along the sheath or stem proceed with a range of velocities rather than with just a single velocity. The method for measuring the weighted average velocity of photosynthate translocation along the sheath or stem was established in living crops. The weighted average velocity and the maximum velocity of photosynthate translocation along the sheath in rice and maize were measured actually. (4 figs., 3 tabs.)

  4. Cross-linked SecA dimers are not functional in protein translocation

    OpenAIRE

    Or, Eran; Rapoport, Tom

    2007-01-01

    The ATPase SecA is involved in post-translational protein translocation through the SecY channel across the bacterial inner membrane. SecA is a dimer that can dissociate into monomers with translocation activity. Here, we have addressed whether dissociation of the SecA dimer is required for translocation. We show that a dimer in which the two subunits are cross-linked by disulfide bridges is inactive in protein translocation, translocation ATPase, and binding to a lipid bilayer. In contrast, ...

  5. The uptake and translocation of phosphorus in dendrobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics of absorption and translocation of phosphorus in dendrobe were revealed by using 32P. The results indicated that each part of dendrobe could absorb phosphorus, and the highest plant total radioactivity was obtained in the treatment of labelled mature leaf. The plant total 32P radioactivity increased with the root uptake time and reached the highest 96 hours after absorption. With the increasing of days after transplanting, plant dry weight increased steadily and 32P was translocated into young stem and young leaf in which dry weight also increased most quickly. The amounts of phosphorus in 25 degree C and 40 degree C treatments were 2.3 and 2.5 times of that in 10 degree C treatment, respectively. The absorbed phosphorus under intermediate light intensity (2 x 104 Lx) and high light intensity (5 x 104 Lx) increased by 74% and 23% compared with low light intensity (5 x 103 Lx), respectively

  6. Metabolism and translocation of C14-trazine in growing corn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Movement, translocation and metabolism of C14-atrazine in corn grown under conventional and no-till management was studied in the agro-ecosystem chamber (150x50x100 cm). C14-atrazine, and commercial atrazine which is aatrex-nie-0 were applied at 14 uCi and 128 mg (a.i) per chamber. After growing, the determination of volatilization, degradation in soil, and translocation into other parts of corn plant have been investigated after application in the certain period of time on 0, 1, 3, 5, 7, 15, 30, 45, 65 and 85 days, respectively. The volatilization was highest just after treatment and then became lower as time increased and as well as residues discovered in the soil. Its metabolites were discovered in both soil and air but C14-conjugated atrazine was found in root, stem, and corn leaves

  7. Gut flora and bacterial translocation in chronic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John Almeida; Sumedha Galhenage; Jennifer Yu; Jelica Kurtovic; Stephen M Riordan

    2006-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that derangement of gut flora is of substantial clinical relevance to patients with cirrhosis. Intestinal bacterial overgrowth and increased bacterial translocation of gut flora from the intestinal lumen, in particular, predispose to an increased potential for bacterial infection in this group. Recent studies suggest that, in addition to their role in the pathogenesis of overt infective episodes and the clinical consequences of sepsis, gut flora contributes to the pro-inflammatory state of cirrhosis even in the absence of overt infection.Furthermore, manipulation of gut flora to augment the intestinal content of lactic acid-type bacteria at the expense of other gut flora species with more pathogenic potential may favourably influence liver function in cirrhotic patients. Here we review current concepts of the various inter-relationships between gut flora, bacterial translocation, bacterial infection, pro-inflammatory cytokine production and liver function in this group.

  8. The Social Construction of Guangzhou as a Translocal Trading Place

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Guangzhou has become a key destination for sub-Saharan African traders. These traders have established multilocal forms of business organisation and, in so doing, have developed diverse practices to overcome geographical, political and cultural boundaries. This paper focuses on these practices, looking at the ways in which the movements, relations and interactions within these organisational formations are produced, transformed and lived. A close ethnographic examination was made of the livelihoods of 33 African traders from 13 sub-Saharan African countries. Through the concept of trans-locality, the organisational formations of these Africans are conceptualised as links between different places on a larger geographical scale; these links then meet on a local scale in the specific place of Guangzhou. Following a relational understanding of spatial constructions in social science, these links are conceptualised as one of the main drivers for the social construction and transformation of the city as a trans-local trading place.

  9. 8-14 translocation in a Japanese Burkitt's lymphoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyamoto,Kanji

    1980-04-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome analysis was performed on cells obtained from the pleural effusion of a Japanese patient with Burkitt's lymphoma. Two modal chromosomal numbers were found: 45 and 46. Five different karyotypes were present, all having a t (8q-;14q+ translocation. This case illustrates that Burkitt's lymphomas of Japanese are no exception to the frequent association of this chromosomal abnormality with Burkitt's lymphomas.

  10. Methoxychalcone Inhibitors of Androgen Receptor Translocation and Function

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Yeong Sang; Kumar, Vineet; Lee, Sunmin; Iwai, Aki; Neckers, Len; Malhotra, Sanjay V.; Trepel, Jane B

    2012-01-01

    Androgen receptor activity drives incurable castrate-resistant prostate cancer. All approved antiandrogens inhibit androgen receptor-driven transcription, and in addition the second-generation antiandrogen MDV3100 inhibits ligand-activated androgen receptor nuclear translocation, via an unknown mechanism. Here, we report methoxychalcones that lock the heat shock protein 90-androgen receptor complex in the cytoplasm in an androgen-non-responsive state, thus demonstrating a novel chemical scaff...

  11. "Translocal Express" juba täna! / Rael Artel

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Artel, Rael, 1980-

    2009-01-01

    27. märtsil algab Kumu Kunstimuuseumis "Public Preparation'i" ("Avalik ettevalmistus") sarja rahvusvaheline seminar "Translocal Express. Golden Age" ("Translokaalne ekspress. Kuldaeg"), kus on kõne all ajalookirjutamise ja kollektiivse mälu roll praegu domineerivas natsionalistlikus diskursuses ja selle käsitlemine kaasaegses kunstis. Seminaril on lähtutud eelkõige kunstnike Martin Krenni (Viin) ja Kristina Normani teoste tutvustamisest

  12. Studying DNA translocation in nanocapillaries using single molecule fluorescence

    CERN Document Server

    Thacker, Vivek V; Hernández-Ainsa, Silvia; Bell, Nicholas A W; Keyser, Ulrich F; 10.1063/1.4768929

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate simultaneous measurements of DNA translocation into glass nanopores using ionic current detection and fluorescent imaging. We verify the correspondence between the passage of a single DNA molecule through the nanopore and the accompanying characteristic ionic current blockage. By tracking the motion of individual DNA molecules in the nanocapillary perpendicular to the optical axis and using a model, we can extract an effective mobility constant for DNA in our geometry under high electric fields.

  13. Evaluating Translocation Gene Fusions by SNP Array Data

    OpenAIRE

    Hong Liu; Asher Zilberstein; Pascal Pannier; Frederic Fleche; Christopher Arendt; Christoph Lengauer; Chang S Hahn

    2011-01-01

    Somatic cell genetic alterations are a hallmark of tumor development and progression. Although various technologies have been developed and utilized to identify genetic aberrations, identifying genetic translocations at the chromosomal level is still a challenging task. High density SNP microarrays are useful to measure DNA copy number variation (CNV) across the genome. Utilizing SNP array data of cancer cell lines and patient samples, we evaluated the CNV and copy number breakpoints for seve...

  14. Logic Gate Operation by DNA Translocation through Biological Nanopores

    OpenAIRE

    Yasuga, Hiroki; Kawano, Ryuji; Takinoue, Masahiro; Tsuji, Yutaro; Osaki, Toshihisa; Kamiya, Koki; Miki, Norihisa; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2016-01-01

    Logical operations using biological molecules, such as DNA computing or programmable diagnosis using DNA, have recently received attention. Challenges remain with respect to the development of such systems, including label-free output detection and the rapidity of operation. Here, we propose integration of biological nanopores with DNA molecules for development of a logical operating system. We configured outputs “1” and “0” as single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) that is or is not translocated throug...

  15. Two translocations of chromosome 15q associated with dyslexia

    OpenAIRE

    Nopola-Hemmi, J.; Taipale, M.; Haltia, T.; Lehesjoki, A; Voutilainen, A.; Kere, J.

    2000-01-01

    Developmental dyslexia is characterised by difficulties in learning to read. As reading is a complex cognitive process, multiple genes are expected to contribute to the pathogenesis of dyslexia. The genetics of dyslexia has been a target of molecular studies during recent years, but so far no genes have been identified. However, a locus for dyslexia on chromosome 15q21 (DYX1) has been established in previous linkage studies. We have identified two families with balanced translocations involvi...

  16. Spatial behaviour and survival of translocated wild brown hares

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, C.; TAGAND, R.

    2012-01-01

    The fragility of many populations of brown hares in Western Europe is a concern for managers, hunters and naturalists. We took advantage of a locally high density population to use wild individuals to restock areas where the species had disappeared or was close to disappearing. The aim of the project was to assess the evolution of the spatial behaviour after release using radio–tracking. Over 150 wild brown hares were translocated, one third of which were fitted with radio collars. In additio...

  17. Effects of uptake and translocation on herbicide phytotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uptake and translocation of 14C labelled acetochlor and EPTC herbicides were followed in experiments with maize (Zea mays L.) and mustard (Sinapis alba L.) in nutrient solutions. Radioactivity data were comparatively evaluated for approaching the origin of the different phytotoxicity of these herbicides to the plants used. Results obtained are in good agreement with the extent and symptoms of herbicide injury on maize and mustard plants grown in acetochlor or EPTC treated sand. (author)

  18. Quarantine lenght and survical of translocated european wild rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Calvete, C.; Angulo, Elena; Estrada, Rosa; Moreno, Sacramento; Villafuerte, Rafael

    2005-01-01

    European wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) are frequently translocated for hunting and conservation purposes. Quarantining these animals prior to release reduces the risk of releasing rabbits incubating field infec- tions of myxomatosis or viral haemorrhagic disease (RHD), and it provides a way to vaccinate these animals against both diseases. However the optimal quarantine period needed to achieve these goals is not known. We therefore assessed the effects of quarantine l...

  19. Quarantine length and survival of translocated European wild rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Calvete, C.; Angulo, Elena; Estrada, Rosa; Moreno, Sacramento; Villafuerte, Rafael

    2005-01-01

    European wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) are frequently translocated for hunting and conservation purposes. Quarantining these animals prior to release reduces the risk of releasing rabbits incubating field infections of myxomatosis or viral haemorrhagic disease (RHD), and it provides a way to vaccinate these animals against both diseases. However the optimal quarantine period needed to achieve these goals is not known. We therefore assessed the effects of quarantine lengths (2, 4, 6, 8 ...

  20. Structural characterization of mRNA-tRNA translocation intermediates

    OpenAIRE

    Agirrezabala, Xabier; Liao, Hstau Y.; Schreiner, Eduard; Fu, Jie; Ortiz-Meoz, Rodrigo F.; Schulten, Klaus; Green, Rachel; Frank, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    Cryo-EM analysis of a wild-type Escherichia coli pretranslocational sample has revealed the presence of previously unseen intermediate substates of the bacterial ribosome during the first phase of translocation, characterized by intermediate intersubunit rotations, L1 stalk positions, and tRNA configurations. Furthermore, we describe the domain rearrangements in quantitative terms, which has allowed us to characterize the processivity and coordination of the conformational reorganization of t...

  1. International study of factors affecting human chromosome translocations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sigurdson, A.J.; Ha, M.; Hauptmann, M.; Bhatti, P.; Šrám, Radim; Beskid, Olena; Tawn, E.J.; Whitehouse, C.A.; Lindholm, C.; Nakano, M.; Kodama, Y.; Nakamura, N.; Vorobtsova, I.; Oestreicher, U.; Stephan, G.; Yong, L.C.; Bauchinger, M.; Schmid, E.; Chung, H.W.; Darroudi, F.; Roy, L.; Voisin, P.; Barquinero, J.F.; Livingston, G.; Blakey, D.; Hayata, I.; Zhang, W.; Wang, Ch.; Benett, L.M.; Littlefield, L.G.; Edwards, A.A.; Kleinerman, R.A.; Tucker, J.D.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 652, č. 2 (2008), s. 112-121. ISSN 1383-5718 R&D Projects: GA MŽP SL/5/160/05; GA MŽP SI/340/2/00; GA MŽP SL/740/5/03 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Chromosome translocations * FISH * Background frequency Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 2.363, year: 2008

  2. Single Nanoparticle Translocation Through Chemically Modified Solid Nanopore

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Shengwei; Wang, Lei; Liu, Hang; Wu, Hongwen; Liu, Quanjun

    2016-01-01

    The nanopore sensor as a high-throughput and low-cost technology can detect single nanoparticle in solution. In the present study, the silicon nitride nanopores were fabricated by focused Ga ion beam (FIB), and the surface was functionalized with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane to change its surface charge density. The positively charged nanopore surface attracted negatively charged nanoparticles when they were in the vicinity of the nanopore. And, nanoparticle translocation speed was slowed dow...

  3. Mitochondrial tRNA gene translocations in highly eusocial bees

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela Silvestre; Maria Cristina Arias

    2006-01-01

    Mitochondrial gene rearrangement events, especially involving tRNA genes, have been described more frequently as more complete mitochondrial genome sequences are becoming available. In the present work, we analyzed mitochondrial tRNA gene rearrangements between two bee species belonging to the tribes Apini and Meliponini within the "corbiculate Apidae". Eleven tRNA genes are in different genome positions or strands. The molecular events responsible for each translocation are explained. Consid...

  4. Particles translocate from the vagina to the oviducts and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wehner, A.P.; Hall, A.S.; Weller, R.E.; Lepel, E.A.; Schirmer, R.E.

    1985-03-01

    To investigate whether particles deposited in the vagina translocate to the oviducts, 0.3 ml of a 4% bone black suspension was deposited in the posterior vaginal fornix of each of five cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) during their mid-menstrual cycle. Simultaneously, each animal received 10 units of oxytocin by intramuscular injection. The oviducts of three animals were removed 1 hr after administration of the bone black, while those of the remaining two animals were removed 72 hr after dosing. The removed oviducts were flushed with Hank's solution and then with collagenase solution. The solutions were collected in clean vials and filtered. The filters were examined for bone black particles by light microscopy, as were filters through which solution blanks (negative controls) had been passed. Particles resembling bone black were found on all filters. There were no appreciable differences in the number or shape of these particles between the solution-blank filters and the oviduct-flush filters. The particles on both the solution-blank filters and on the oviduct-flush filters probably originated from environmental contamination by ubiquitous carbon particles. While these results suggested that no translocation took place, translocation could not be ruled out with certainty in the absence of quantitative analyses. A more definitive pilot study was then conducted with two dosed monkeys and one control, using talc labelled by neutron activation to circumvent the problem of environmental contamination. Gamma-Ray analysis of tissue and peritoneal lavage samples for the radionuclides /sup 46/Sc, /sup 59/Fe and /sup 60/Co indicated that no measurable quantities (i.e. greater than 0.5 micrograms) of talc translocated from the deposition site in the vagina to the uterine cavity and beyond.

  5. The pathological effect of bacterial translocation to the Henssge Nomogram

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanka, Ján

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the results of measurements of the influence of pathological bacterial translocation on the intestinal wall of the area, measured per recta, and its influence on the course of a Henssge Nomogram. The gram-positive /negative bacteria which influence temperature measurements and the subsequent regressive non-stationary temperature data of biological objects when establishing the moment of death are described in a lucid, synoptic form. Based upon forensic praxis, profession...

  6. Translocation of reindeer from South Georgia to the Falkland Islands

    OpenAIRE

    Cameron M. Bell; Robert A. Dieterich

    2010-01-01

    This report describes the first translocation of reindeer Rangifer tarandus from South Georgia to the Falkland Islands, in the South Atlantic Ocean. Reindeer were introduced from Norway to the subantarctic island of South Georgia on three occasions in the early 1900s by Norwegian whalers, and today they exist as two discrete herds, numbering approximately 2600 individuals in total. Because of concerns over the impact on native vegetation, the long-term eradication of reindeer from South Georg...

  7. Unbalanced 13;18 translocation and Williams syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    COLLEY, A.; Thakker, Y; Ward, H.; Donnai, D

    1992-01-01

    A 2 1/2 year old girl is reported with a de novo 13;18 unbalanced translocation and the facial features of Williams syndrome, subaortic stenosis, failure to thrive, and developmental delay. This case provides two candidate locations for the underlying molecular pathology of this sporadic syndrome. Williams syndrome is associated with intellectual and growth retardation, infantile feeding problems which may be associated with hypercalcaemia, cardiovascular abnormalities, a friendly, loquacious...

  8. Unassisted translocation of large polypeptide domains across phospholipid bilayers

    OpenAIRE

    Brambillasca, Silvia; Yabal, Monica; Makarow, Marja; Borgese, Nica

    2006-01-01

    Although transmembrane proteins generally require membrane-embedded machinery for integration, a few can insert spontaneously into liposomes. Previously, we established that the tail-anchored (TA) protein cytochrome b(5) (b5) can posttranslationally translocate 28 residues downstream to its transmembrane domain (TMD) across protein-free bilayers (Brambillasca, S., M. Yabal, P. Soffientini, S. Stefanovic, M. Makarow, R.S. Hegde, and N. Borgese. 2005. EMBO J. 24:2533–2542). In the present study...

  9. Dominant-lethal mutations and heritable translocations in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromosome aberrations are a major component of radiation or chemically induced genetic damage in mammalian germ cells. The types of aberration produced are dependent upon the mutagen used and the germ-cell stage treated. For example, in male meiotic and postmeiotic germ cells certain alkylating chemicals induce both dominant-lethal mutations and heritable translocations while others induce primarily dominant-lethal mutations. Production of these two endpoints appears to be determined by the stability of alkylation products with the chromosomes. If the reaction products are intact in the male chromosomes at the time of sperm entry, they may be repaired in fertilized eggs. If repair is not effected and the alkylation products persist to the time of pronuclear chromosome replication, they lead to chromatid-type aberrations and eventually to dominant-lethality. The production of heritable translocations, on the other hand, requires a transformation of unstable alkylation products into suitable intermediate lesions. The process by which these lesions are converted into chromosome exchange within the male genome takes place after sperm enters the egg but prior to the time of pronuclear chromosome replication (i.e., chromosome-type). Thus, dominant-lethal mutations result from both chromatid- and chromosome-type aberrations while heritable translocations result primarily from the latter type. DNA target sites associated with the production of these two endpoints are discussed

  10. Dominant-lethal mutations and heritable translocations in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Generoso, W.M.

    1983-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations are a major component of radiation or chemically induced genetic damage in mammalian germ cells. The types of aberration produced are dependent upon the mutagen used and the germ-cell stage treated. For example, in male meiotic and postmeiotic germ cells certain alkylating chemicals induce both dominant-lethal mutations and heritable translocations while others induce primarily dominant-lethal mutations. Production of these two endpoints appears to be determined by the stability of alkylation products with the chromosomes. If the reaction products are intact in the male chromosomes at the time of sperm entry, they may be repaired in fertilized eggs. If repair is not effected and the alkylation products persist to the time of pronuclear chromosome replication, they lead to chromatid-type aberrations and eventually to dominant-lethality. The production of heritable translocations, on the other hand, requires a transformation of unstable alkylation products into suitable intermediate lesions. The process by which these lesions are converted into chromosome exchange within the male genome takes place after sperm enters the egg but prior to the time of pronuclear chromosome replication (i.e., chromosome-type). Thus, dominant-lethal mutations result from both chromatid- and chromosome-type aberrations while heritable translocations result primarily from the latter type. DNA target sites associated with the production of these two endpoints are discussed.

  11. Covalently dimerized SecA is functional in protein translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Keyzer, Jeanine; van der Sluis, Eli O; Spelbrink, Robin E J; Nijstad, Niels; de Kruijff, Ben; Nouwen, Nico; van der Does, Chris; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2005-10-21

    The ATPase SecA provides the driving force for the transport of secretory proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane of Escherichia coli. SecA exists as a dimer in solution, but the exact oligomeric state of SecA during membrane binding and preprotein translocation is a topic of debate. To study the requirements of oligomeric changes in SecA during protein translocation, a non-dissociable SecA dimer was formed by oxidation of the carboxyl-terminal cysteines. The cross-linked SecA dimer interacts with the SecYEG complex with a similar stoichiometry as non-cross-linked SecA. Cross-linking reversibly disrupts the SecB binding site on SecA. However, in the absence of SecB, the activity of the disulfide-bonded SecA dimer is indistinguishable from wild-type SecA. Moreover, SecYEG binding stabilizes a cold sodium dodecylsulfate-resistant dimeric state of SecA. The results demonstrate that dissociation of the SecA dimer is not an essential feature of the protein translocation reaction. PMID:16115882

  12. Single long-polymer translocation through a long pore

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ding Ke-Jian; Cai Dong-Qing; Zhan Fu-Ru; Wu Li-Jun; Wu Yue-Jin; Yu Zeng-Liang

    2006-01-01

    This paper theoretically studies the free energy and conformational entropy of a long polymer threading a long nanopore (n0/N ≥0.1) on external electric field. The polymer expanded model is built in this paper, that is, a single long polymer chain with N monomers (each of size a) threading a pore with n0 monomers can be regarded as polymer with N + n0 monomers translocating a 2-dimension hole embedded in membrane. A theoretical approach is presented which explicitly takes into account the nucleation theory. Our calculations imply that, the structure of polymer changes more acutely than other situation, while its leading monomer reaches the second vacuum and its end monomer escapes the first vacuum. And it is also shown that the length scale of polymer and pore play a very important role for polymer translocation dynamics. The present model predicts that the translocation time depends on the chemical potential gradient and the property of the solvent on sides of pore to some extent.

  13. Cerium toxicity, uptake and translocation in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xue; LIN Yousheng; LIU Dongwu; XU Hengjian; LIU Tao; ZHAO Fengyun

    2012-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings were cultivated in 0-500 μmol/L of extraneous cerium (Ce) for 7 d to investigate the toxicity,uptake and translocation of rare earth elements (REEs).The results showed that Ce could be largely absorbed by the roots of A.thaliana and translocated to the shoots.But the uptake rates of Ce by the roots were much higher than the translocation rates from roots to shoots.Ultrastructural analysis revealed that Ce was mainly distributed on the cell wall.At higher concentration,Ce could also enter cell,destroy the ultrastructure of cells and disturb the intrinsic balance of nutrient elements of A.thaliana.Addition of Ce (50-500 μmol/L) to the culture medium significantly inhibited the elongation of primary roots,decreased chlorophyll content,rosette diameter and fresh mass of plants.The damage increased with the increase of Ce concentration in culture medium,although primary root elongation,chlorophyll content,and rosette diameter were stimulated by relatively low concentration (0.5 μmol/L) of Ce.Thus,it is speculated that REEs may become a new type contamination if we don't well control the release of REEs into the environment.

  14. Single Nanoparticle Translocation Through Chemically Modified Solid Nanopore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shengwei; Wang, Lei; Liu, Hang; Wu, Hongwen; Liu, Quanjun

    2016-12-01

    The nanopore sensor as a high-throughput and low-cost technology can detect single nanoparticle in solution. In the present study, the silicon nitride nanopores were fabricated by focused Ga ion beam (FIB), and the surface was functionalized with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane to change its surface charge density. The positively charged nanopore surface attracted negatively charged nanoparticles when they were in the vicinity of the nanopore. And, nanoparticle translocation speed was slowed down to obtain a clear and deterministic signal. Compared with previous studied small nanoparticles, the electrophoretic translocation of negatively charged polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles (diameter ~100 nm) was investigated in solution using the Coulter counter principle in which the time-dependent nanopore current was recorded as the nanoparticles were driven across the nanopore. A linear dependence was found between current drop and biased voltage. An exponentially decaying function (t d   ~ e (-v/v0) ) was found between the duration time and biased voltage. The interaction between the amine-functionalized nanopore wall and PS microspheres was discussed while translating PS microspheres. We explored also translocations of PS microspheres through amine-functionalized solid-state nanopores by varying the solution pH (5.4, 7.0, and 10.0) with 0.02 M potassium chloride (KCl). Surface functionalization showed to provide a useful step to fine-tune the surface property, which can selectively transport molecules or particles. This approach is likely to be applied to gene sequencing. PMID:26831688

  15. Controlling polymer translocation and ion transport via charge correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyukdagli, Sahin; Ala-Nissila, T

    2014-11-01

    We develop a correlation-corrected transport theory in order to predict ionic and polymer transport properties of membrane nanopores under physical conditions where mean-field electrostatics breaks down. The experimentally observed low KCl conductivity of open α-hemolysin pores is quantitatively explained by the presence of surface polarization effects. Upon the penetration of a DNA molecule into the pore, these polarization forces combined with the electroneutrality of DNA sets a lower boundary for the ionic current, explaining the weak salt dependence of blocked pore conductivities at dilute ion concentrations. The addition of multivalent counterions to the solution results in the reversal of the polymer charge and the direction of the electroosmotic flow. With trivalent spermidine or quadrivalent spermine molecules, the charge inversion is strong enough to stop the translocation of the polymer and to reverse its motion. This mechanism can be used efficiently in translocation experiments in order to improve the accuracy of DNA sequencing by minimizing the translocation velocity of the polymer. PMID:25310861

  16. A jumping Robertsonian translocation; a molecular and cytogenetic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, V.M.; Gross, S.J.; Tharapel, A.T. [Univ. of Tennessee, Memphis, TN (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Lejeune et al. were the first to use the term {open_quotes}translocation sauteuse{close_quotes} or jumping translocation to describe mosaicism due to the presence of multiple structural rearrangements. In this study, we report the cytogenetic and molecular analyses of a patient with mosaicism for two different Robertsonian translocations, both involving chromosome 21. The proband`s karyotype based on lymphocyte cultures is 45,XX,t(21q22q)/46,XX,-21,+i(21q21q) (98%/2%). Chromosome analysis of skin fibroblasts showed 100% of cells with a 45,XX,t(21q22q) complement. A high level of mosaicism was seen in an ovarian biopsy, where 1/3 of cells exhibited the unbalanced cell line with the 21/21 rearrangement. The proband`s pregnancy history is consistent with the high proportion of the 21/21 rearrangement in her ovary. She has had spontaneous abortions and two livebirths, both of whom are affected with Down syndrome [46,XX,-21,+i(21q21q) and 46,XY,-21,+i(21q21q)]. Analysis of cord blood cultures showed that the second child exhibits low level mosaicism for a normal cell line, which further suggests instability of the 21/21 rearrangement. FISH with alphoid probes showed that the 21/21 and 21/22 rearrangements are dicentric and that each long arm segment retains its appropriate centromere. Segregation studies using microsatellite polymorphisms indicated that the 21/21 rearrangement is an isochromosome. The same technique was used to establish that the proband`s rearrangements formed de novo from her mother`s chromosome 21. An uncommon chromosome 22p polymorphism is maternally derived and is present in the proband`s unbalanced cell line. However, this 22 is absent in the balanced 45,XX,t(21q22q) cell line of the proband because it is involved in the translocation. Therefore, we propose a model in which the i(21q) was the progenitor rearrangement and participated in subsequent nonreciprocal rearrangements characteristic of a jumping translocation.

  17. iNuc-STNC: a sequence-based predictor for identification of nucleosome positioning in genomes by extending the concept of SAAC and Chou's PseAAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, Muhammad; Hayat, Maqsood

    2016-07-19

    The nucleosome is the fundamental unit of eukaryotic chromatin, which participates in regulating different cellular processes. Owing to the huge exploration of new DNA primary sequences, it is indispensable to develop an automated model. However, identification of novel protein sequences using conventional methods is difficult or sometimes impossible because of vague motifs and the intricate structure of DNA. In this regard, an effective and high throughput automated model "iNuc-STNC" has been proposed in order to identify accurately and reliably nucleosome positioning in genomes. In this proposed model, DNA sequences are expressed into three distinct feature extraction strategies containing dinucleotide composition, trinucleotide composition and split trinucleotide composition (STNC). Various statistical models were utilized as learner hypotheses. Jackknife test was employed to evaluate the success rates of the proposed model. The experiential results expressed that SVM, in combination with STNC, has obtained an outstanding performance on all benchmark datasets. The predicted outcomes of the proposed model "iNuc-STNC" is higher than current state of the art methods in the literature so far. It is ascertained that the "iNuc-STNC" model will provide a rudimentary framework for the pharmaceutical industry in the development of drug design. PMID:27271822

  18. Conflict Bear Translocation: Investigating Population Genetics and Fate of Bear Translocation in Dachigam National Park, Jammu and Kashmir, India

    OpenAIRE

    Mukesh,; Sharma, Lalit Kumar; Charoo, Samina Amin; Sathyakumar, Sambandam

    2015-01-01

    The Asiatic black bear population in Dachigam landscape, Jammu and Kashmir is well recognized as one of the highest density bear populations in India. Increasing incidences of bear-human interactions and the resultant retaliatory killings by locals have become a serious threat to the survivorship of black bears in the Dachigam landscape. The Department of Wildlife Protection in Jammu and Kashmir has been translocating bears involved in conflicts, henceforth ‘conflict bears’ from different sit...

  19. Stable Translocation Intermediates Jam Global Protein Export in Plasmodium falciparum Parasites and Link the PTEX Component EXP2 with Translocation Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesén-Ramírez, Paolo; Reinsch, Ferdinand; Blancke Soares, Alexandra; Bergmann, Bärbel; Ullrich, Ann-Katrin; Tenzer, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Protein export is central for the survival and virulence of intracellular P. falciparum blood stage parasites. To reach the host cell, exported proteins cross the parasite plasma membrane (PPM) and the parasite-enclosing parasitophorous vacuole membrane (PVM), a process that requires unfolding, suggestive of protein translocation. Components of a proposed translocon at the PVM termed PTEX are essential in this phase of export but translocation activity has not been shown for the complex and questions have been raised about its proposed membrane pore component EXP2 for which no functional data is available in P. falciparum. It is also unclear how PTEX mediates trafficking of both, soluble as well as transmembrane proteins. Taking advantage of conditionally foldable domains, we here dissected the translocation events in the parasite periphery, showing that two successive translocation steps are needed for the export of transmembrane proteins, one at the PPM and one at the PVM. Our data provide evidence that, depending on the length of the C-terminus of the exported substrate, these steps occur by transient interaction of the PPM and PVM translocon, similar to the situation for protein transport across the mitochondrial membranes. Remarkably, we obtained constructs of exported proteins that remained arrested in the process of being translocated across the PVM. This clogged the translocation pore, prevented the export of all types of exported proteins and, as a result, inhibited parasite growth. The substrates stuck in translocation were found in a complex with the proposed PTEX membrane pore component EXP2, suggesting a role of this protein in translocation. These data for the first time provide evidence for EXP2 to be part of a translocating entity, suggesting that PTEX has translocation activity and provide a mechanistic framework for the transport of soluble as well as transmembrane proteins from the parasite boundary into the host cell. PMID:27168322

  20. The Incidence and Type of Chromosomal Translocations from Prenatal Diagnosis of 3800 Patients in the Republic of Macedonia

    OpenAIRE

    Vasilevska, M; Ivanovska, E; Kubelka Sabit, K; E. Sukarova-Angelovska; Dimeska, G

    2013-01-01

    Robertsonian and reciprocal chromosomal translocations are the most frequent type of structural chromosomal aberrations in the human population. We report the frequency and type of detected translocations in 10 years of prenatal diagnosis of 3800 prenatal samples. The materials came from amniocentesis and chorionic villus samples (CVS). We detected seven Robertsonian translocations (0.18%), eight autosomal reciprocal translocations (0.21%) and one sex chromosome translocation (0.03%). The ove...

  1. Hyaluronan synthase mediates dye translocation across liposomal membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medina Andria P

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyaluronan (HA is made at the plasma membrane and secreted into the extracellular medium or matrix by phospolipid-dependent hyaluronan synthase (HAS, which is active as a monomer. Since the mechanism by which HA is translocated across membranes is still unresolved, we assessed the presence of an intraprotein pore within HAS by adding purified Streptococcus equisimilis HAS (SeHAS to liposomes preloaded with the fluorophore Cascade Blue (CB. Results CB translocation (efflux was not observed with mock-purified material from empty vector control E. coli membranes, but was induced by SeHAS, purified from membranes, in a time- and dose-dependent manner. CB efflux was eliminated or greatly reduced when purified SeHAS was first treated under conditions that inhibit enzyme activity: heating, oxidization or cysteine modification with N-ethylmaleimide. Reduced CB efflux also occurred with SeHAS K48E or K48F mutants, in which alteration of K48 within membrane domain 2 causes decreased activity and HA product size. The above results used liposomes containing bovine cardiolipin (BCL. An earlier study testing many synthetic lipids found that the best activating lipid for SeHAS is tetraoleoyl cardiolipin (TO-CL and that, in contrast, tetramyristoyl cardiolipin (TM-CL is an inactivating lipid (Weigel et al, J. Biol. Chem. 281, 36542, 2006. Consistent with the effects of these CL species on SeHAS activity, CB efflux was more than 2-fold greater in liposomes made with TO-CL compared to TM-CL. Conclusions The results indicate the presence of an intraprotein pore in HAS and support a model in which HA is translocated to the exterior by HAS itself.

  2. Biopersistence and brain translocation of aluminum adjuvants of vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Kroum Gherardi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum oxyhydroxide (alum is a crystaline compound widely used as an immunologic adjuvant of vaccines. Concerns linked to the use of alum particles emerged following recognition of their causative role in the so-called macrophagic myofasciitis (MMF lesion detected in patients with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue/syndrome. MMF revealed an unexpectedly long-lasting biopersistence of alum within immune cells in presumably susceptible individuals, stressing the previous fundamental misconception of its biodisposition. We previously showed that poorly biodegradable aluminum-coated particles injected into muscle are promptly phagocytozed in muscle and the draining lymph nodes, and can disseminate within phagocytic cells throughout the body and slowly accumulate in brain. This strongly suggests that long-term adjuvant biopersistence within phagocytic cells is a prerequisite for slow brain translocation and delayed neurotoxicity. The understanding of basic mechanisms of particle biopersistence and brain translocation represents a major health challenge, since it could help to define susceptibility factors to develop chronic neurotoxic damage. Biopersistence of alum may be linked to its lysosome-destabilizing effect, which is likely due to direct crystal-induced rupture of phagolysosomal membranes. Macrophages that continuously perceive foreign particles in their cytosol will likely reiterate, with variable interindividual efficiency, a dedicated form of autophagy (xenophagy until they dispose of alien materials. Successful compartmentalization of particles within double membrane autophagosomes and subsequent fusion with repaired and re-acidified lysosomes will expose alum to lysosomal acidic pH, the sole factor that can solubilize alum particles. Brain translocation of alum particles is linked to a Trojan horse mechanism previously described for infectious particles (HIV, HCV, that obeys to CCL2 signaling the major inflammatory monocyte

  3. Modeling the mechanochemistry of the ϕ29 DNA translocation motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Carrasco, R.; Fiasconaro, A.; Falo, F.; Sancho, J. M.

    2013-03-01

    We present a study of the DNA translocation of the bacteriophage ϕ29 packaging molecular motor. From the available experimental information we present a model system based on a stochastic flashing potential, which reproduces the experimental observations such as detailed trajectories, steps and substeps, spatial correlation, and velocity. Moreover, the model allows the evaluation of the power and efficiency of this motor. We have found that the maximum power regime does not correspond with that of the maximum efficiency. This information can stimulate further experiments.

  4. The effect of traffic volume on translocated small mammal movement

    OpenAIRE

    McGregor, Rachelle; Derrane, Sarah; Bender, Darren; Fahrig, Lenore

    2003-01-01

    We investigated whether white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) and eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus) were capable of crossing roads with varying levels of traffic volume. We live-trapped small mammals in 24 “home” patches. We uniquely marked and translocated 197 white-footed mice and 115 eastern chipmunks to nearby forest patches. Recaptured animals were recorded as successful returns. Forty five (22.8%) of the mice and 22 (19.1%) of the chipmunks returned to their home patches within six ...

  5. Single Molecule Fluorescence Measurements of Ribosomal Translocation Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Chunlai; Stevens, Benjamin; Kaur, Jaskarin; Cabral, Diana; Liu, Hanqing; Wang, Yuhong; Zhang, Haibo; Rosenblum, Gabriel; Smilansky, Zeev; Goldman, Yale E.; Cooperman, Barry S.

    2011-01-01

    We employ single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) to study structural dynamics over the first two elongation cycles of protein synthesis, using ribosomes containing either Cy3-labeled ribosomal protein L11 and A- or P-site Cy5-labeled tRNA or Cy3 and Cy5 labeled tRNAs. Pre-translocation (PRE) complexes demonstrate fluctuations between classical and hybrid forms, with concerted motions of tRNAs away from L11 and from each other when classical complex converts to hybrid ...

  6. Induction of site-specific chromosomal translocations in embryonic stem cells by CRISPR/Cas9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Junfeng; Zhang, Li; Zhou, Xingliang; Chen, Xi; Huang, Guanyi; Li, Fengsheng; Wang, Ruizhe; Wu, Nancy; Yan, Youzhen; Tong, Chang; Srivastava, Sankalp; Wang, Yue; Liu, Houqi; Ying, Qi-Long

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal translocation is the most common form of chromosomal abnormality and is often associated with congenital genetic disorders, infertility, and cancers. The lack of cellular and animal models for chromosomal translocations, however, has hampered our ability to understand the underlying disease mechanisms and to develop new therapies. Here, we show that site-specific chromosomal translocations can be generated in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) via CRISPR/Cas9. Mouse ESCs carrying translocated chromosomes can be isolated and expanded to establish stable cell lines. Furthermore, chimeric mice can be generated by injecting these mESCs into host blastocysts. The establishment of ESC-based cellular and animal models of chromosomal translocation by CRISPR/Cas9 provides a powerful platform for understanding the effect of chromosomal translocation and for the development of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:26898344

  7. Salt dependence of DNA translocation dynamics through silicon nanopores detected by ultraviolet excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Shintaro; Yamazaki, Hirohito; Tsukahara, Mutsumi; Esashika, Keiko; Saiki, Toshiharu

    2016-04-01

    DNA translocation through nanopores was observed using ultraviolet excitation to investigate the effect of salt concentration and counterion species on the translocation speed. The translocation of 9.6-kbp DNA molecules was measured in an aqueous solvent containing KCl, NaCl, or LiCl. An increase in the KCl concentration from 0.5 to 2 M increased the DNA translocation time. Maintaining the salt concentration at 1.0 M but replacing KCl with NaCl or LiCl also increased the translocation time. These results suggest that the effective charge on the DNA changed due to the binding of counterions, decreasing the DNA electrophoretic mobility. Significant correlation was observed between the translocation time and the dwell time in the observation volume (time needed to move out of the observation volume), and a possible explanation for this observation is provided.

  8. Conformation-dependent translocation of a star polymer through a nanochannel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhu; Liu, Jiannan; Xiao, Mengying; Wang, Rong; Chen, Yeng-Long

    2014-01-01

    The translocation process of star polymers through a nanochannel is investigated by dissipative particle dynamics simulations. The translocation process is strongly influenced by the star arm arrangement as the polymer enters the channel, and a scaling relation between the translocation time τ and the total number of beads Ntot is obtained. Qualitative agreements are found with predictions of the nucleation and growth model for linear block co-polymer translocation. In the intermediate stage where the center of the star polymer is at the channel entrance, the translocation time is found to have power law-dependence on the number of arms outside the channel and very weakly dependent on the number of arms in the channel. Increasing the total number of star arms also increases the star translocation time. PMID:25332744

  9. Use of chromosome translocations for measuring prior environment exposures in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, J. D.

    1997-05-01

    Recent advances in cytogenetic methodology are beginning to have a major impact upon our ability to provide assessments of environmental exposure in humans. The advent of fluorescent-based techniques for `painting` whole chromosomes has made the analysis of chromosome translocations rapid, specific, sensitive and routine. Chromosome painting has been used to address a wide variety of scientific questions, resulting in an increased understanding of the biological consequences of adverse environmental exposure. This paper describes the use of chromosome translocations as a biological marker of exposure and effect in humans. The relevance of translocations is discussed, as are the advantages and disadvantages of painting compared to classical cytogenetic methods for translocation evaluation. The factors to consider in the use of translocations as a retrospective indicator of exposure are then described. Several theoretical parameters that are important to the use of translocations are provided, and the paper concludes with a vision for the future of cytogenetic methodology.

  10. Driven polymer translocation in good and bad solvent: effects of hydrodynamics and tension propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Moisio, Jaakko E; Linna, Riku P

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the driven polymer translocation through a nanometer-scale pore in the presence and absence of hydrodynamics both in good and bad solvent. We measure tension of the polymer segment on the {\\it cis} side of the pore in the course of translocations simulated using stochastic rotation dynamics, also called multi-particle collision dynamics. We find that in the good solvent the tension propagates similarly whether hydrodynamics is included or not. Only the tensed segment is by a constant factor shorter in the presence of hydrodynamics. The shorter tensed segment and the hydrodynamic interactions contribute to a smaller friction for the translocating polymer when hydrodynamics is included, which shows as smaller waiting times and a smaller exponent in the scaling of the translocation time with the polymer length. Hydrodynamics speeds up translocation in the good solvent, whereas it has a minimal effect on polymer translocation in the bad solvent. Under bad-solvent conditions tension does not spread ...

  11. Translocation junctions in TCF3-PBX1 acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma cluster near transposable elements

    OpenAIRE

    Rodić, Nemanja; Zampella, John G; Toby C Cornish; Sarah J Wheelan; Burns, Kathleen H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Hematolymphoid neoplasms frequently harbor recurrent genetic abnormalities. Some of the most well recognized lesions are chromosomal translocations, and many of these are known to play pivotal roles in pathogenesis. In lymphoid malignancies, some translocations result from erroneous V(D)J-type events. However, other translocation junctions appear randomly positioned and their underlying mechanisms are not understood. Results We tested the hypothesis that genomic repeats, including ...

  12. Chromosomal translocation involving the beta T cell receptor gene in acute leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    DNA spanning a t(7;19) chromosomal translocation breakpoint was isolated from the human T cell line SUP-T7 established from an acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed that the point of crossover on chromosome 7 occurred immediately adjacent to joining segment J beta 1.1 within the TCR-beta gene, suggesting that this translocation resulted from an error in TCR gene rearrangement. On chromosome 19, the translocation occurred within a previously uncharacterized transcri...

  13. Induction of site-specific chromosomal translocations in embryonic stem cells by CRISPR/Cas9

    OpenAIRE

    Junfeng Jiang; Li Zhang; Xingliang Zhou; Xi Chen; Guanyi Huang; Fengsheng Li; Ruizhe Wang; Nancy Wu; Youzhen Yan; Chang Tong; Sankalp Srivastava; Yue Wang; Houqi Liu; Qi-Long Ying

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal translocation is the most common form of chromosomal abnormality and is often associated with congenital genetic disorders, infertility, and cancers. The lack of cellular and animal models for chromosomal translocations, however, has hampered our ability to understand the underlying disease mechanisms and to develop new therapies. Here, we show that site-specific chromosomal translocations can be generated in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) via CRISPR/Cas9. Mouse ESCs carrying ...

  14. Post-Release Dispersal in Animal Translocations: Social Attraction and the “Vacuum Effect”

    OpenAIRE

    Jean-Baptiste Mihoub; Alexandre Robert; Pascaline Le Gouar; François Sarrazin

    2011-01-01

    Animal translocations are human-induced colonizations that can represent opportunities to contribute to the knowledge on the behavioral and demographic processes involved in the establishment of animal populations. Habitat selection behaviors, such as social cueing, have strong implications on dispersal and affect the establishment success of translocations. Using modeling simulations with a two-population network model (a translocated population and a remnant population), we investigated the...

  15. Translocation of bacterial NOD2 agonist and its link with inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Oh Yoen; Monsel, Antoine; Bertrand, Michèle,; Cavaillon, Jean-Marc; Coriat, Pierre; Adib-Conquy, Minou

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The gut is often considered as the motor of critical illness through bacterial translocation, which amplifies the inflammatory response and alters the immune status. However, systemic bacterial translocation was rarely proven and endotoxin measurement only reflects translocation of Gram-negative-derived products. The process could be more frequently identified if peptidoglycan, derived from both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, was measured. Methods We developed a new to...

  16. Translocation of particles deposited in the respiratory system: a systematic review and statistical analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Nakane, Hideo

    2011-01-01

    Many epidemiological studies have demonstrated that ambient particulate matter poses consistent risks for respiratory and cardiovascular disorders. The translocation of inhaled particles is one hypothesis that could explain such systemic effects. The objectives of this study were to conduct a systematic review of previous reports on particle translocation from the respiratory system and to discuss factors important for translocation. A PubMed search was conducted in August 2011 for the period...

  17. The Use of Animal Models to Study Bacterial Translocation During Acute Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Infection of pancreatic necrosis with intestinal flora is accepted to be a main predictor of outcome during severe acute pancreatitis. Bacterial translocation is the process whereby luminal bacteria migrate to extraintestinal sites. Animal models were proven indispensable in detecting three major aspects of bacterial translocation: small bowel bacterial overgrowth, mucosal barrier failure, and disturbed immune responses. Despite the progress made in the knowledge of bacterial translocation, t...

  18. Orally administered bovine lactoferrin inhibits bacterial translocation in mice fed bovine milk.

    OpenAIRE

    Teraguchi, S.; Shin, K.; Ogata, T; Kingaku, M; Kaino, A; Miyauchi, H; Fukuwatari, Y; Shimamura, S

    1995-01-01

    Feeding of bovine milk to mice induced a high incidence of bacterial translocation from the intestines to the mesenteric lymph nodes, and the bacteria involved were mainly members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. Supplementation of the milk diet with bovine lactoferrin or a pepsin-generated hydrolysate of bovine lactoferrin resulted in significant suppression of bacterial translocation. Our findings suggest that this ability of lactoferrin to inhibit bacterial translocation may be due to its...

  19. The use of animal models to study bacterial translocation during acute pancreatitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Minnen, L.P. van; Blom, M.; Timmerman, H; Visser, M. R.; Gooszen, H.G.; Akkermans, L M A

    2007-01-01

    Infection of pancreatic necrosis with intestinal flora is accepted to be a main predictor of outcome during severe acute pancreatitis. Bacterial translocation is the process whereby luminal bacteria migrate to extraintestinal sites. Animal models were proven indispensable in detecting three major aspects of bacterial translocation: small bowel bacterial overgrowth, mucosal barrier failure, and disturbed immune responses. Despite the progress made in the knowledge of bacterial translocation, t...

  20. Synergistic effects of hypoglycaemic sulphonylureas and antibiotic ionophores upon calcium translocation.

    OpenAIRE

    Couturier, E.; Malaisse, W. J.

    1980-01-01

    1 Hypoglycaemic sulphonylureas, such as tolbutamide and gliclazide, provoke the translocation of calcium from an aqueous medium into or across a hydrophobic region. The combined effect of sulphonylureas and antibiotic ionophores upon such a process was investigated. 2 The magnitude of the sulphonylurea-induced translocation of calcium was more marked in the presence than in the absence of A23187. Gliclazide and tolbutamide also enhanced, although less markedly, X537A-mediated calcium transloc...

  1. Translocation of a Polymer through a Nanopore across a Viscosity Gradient

    OpenAIRE

    de Haan, Hendrick W.; Slater, Gary W.

    2012-01-01

    The translocation of a polymer through a pore in a membrane separating fluids of different viscosities is studied via several computational approaches. Starting with the polymer halfway, we find that as a viscosity difference across the pore is introduced, translocation will predominately occur towards one side of the membrane. These results suggest an intrinsic pumping mechanism for translocation across cell walls which could arise whenever the fluid across the membrane is inhomogeneous. Som...

  2. Meiotic behaviour and spermatogenesis in male mice heterozygous for translocation types also occurring in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis a start was made with meiotic observations of mouse translocation types - a Robertsonian translocation and a translocation between a metacentric and an acrocentric chromosome - which also occur in man. As an exogeneous factor of possible influence, the meiotic effects of two types of radiation (fission neutrons and X-rays) administered at relatively low doses 2 and 3 hours before prometaphase-metaphase II (probably during metaphase-anaphase I), were determined in Rb4Bnr/+-males. (Auth.)

  3. Home range and movements of male translocated problem tigers in Sumatra

    OpenAIRE

    Dolly Priatna; Yanto Santosa; Lilik B. Prasetyo; Kartono, Agus P.

    2012-01-01

    The ranging behaviour of translocated problem tigers is poorly understood. The demand for releasing problem tigers back to the wild increases following the increasing the number of problem tigers that needs to be rescued in Sumatra in the last decade. In this study we estimate the home range size and obtain information on daily range of four translocated problem tigers, as well as discussing some potential factors determining the size of home range and their movement. We translocated four ad...

  4. Bacterial protein translocation requires only one copy of the SecY complex in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Eunyong; Rapoport, Tom A.

    2012-01-01

    The transport of proteins across the plasma membrane in bacteria requires a channel formed from the SecY complex, which cooperates with either a translating ribosome in cotranslational translocation or the SecA ATPase in post-translational translocation. Whether translocation requires oligomers of the SecY complex is an important but controversial issue: it determines channel size, how the permeation of small molecules is prevented, and how the channel interacts with the ribosome and SecA. He...

  5. Cre Reporter System To Monitor the Translocation of Type III Secreted Proteins into Host Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Briones, Gabriel; Hofreuter, Dirk; Galán, Jorge E.

    2006-01-01

    Central to the study of type III secretion systems is the availability of reporter systems to monitor bacterial protein translocation into host cells. We report here the development of a bacteriophage P1 Cre recombinase-based system to monitor the translocation of bacterial proteins into mammalian cells. Bacteriophage P1 Cre recombinase fused to the secretion and translocation signals of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium of the type III secreted protein SopE was secreted in a type III s...

  6. Bacterial protein translocation: kinetic and thermodynamic role of ATP and the protonmotive force

    OpenAIRE

    Driessen, Arnold J. M.

    1992-01-01

    The energetic mechanism of preprotein export in Escherichia coli has been a source of controversy for many years. In vitro studies of translocation reactions that use purified soluble and membrane components have now clarified the main features of this mechanism. Translocation occurs through consecutive steps which each have distinct energy requirements. Initiation of translocation requires ATP and the SecA protein. Most of the further steps can be driven by the protonmotive force (Δp).

  7. Relationship between cecal population levels of indigenous bacteria and translocation to the mesenteric lymph nodes.

    OpenAIRE

    Steffen, E K; Berg, R D

    1983-01-01

    Translocation is defined as the passage of viable bacteria from the gastrointestinal tract to the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) and other organs. The extent of translocation of certain indigenous, oxygen-tolerant bacteria from the cecum to the MLN, spleen, liver, kidney, and peritoneal cavity were determined in diassociated or triassociated gnotobiotic mice. Minimal bacterial translocation occurred to the spleen, liver, kidney, or peritoneal cavity. However, most bacterial strains readily tran...

  8. Translocation of cesium in plants after foliar deposition - Experiments and models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The translocation of cesium from the foliage to the edible parts as function of the time period between deposition and harvest has been determined for cereals, potatoes, green beans and carrots. From the results the following conclusions can be drawn: 1. The maximum of the cesium translocation is 40 to 50 and 70 to 90 days before harvest for cereals and potatoes respectively. For green beans a maximum was observed after deposition 15 days before harvest; 2. The variations of the translocation factors are less if the translocation is normalized to the yield; 3. The translocation factors are in good agreement with those of other investigators. The agreement between the experimental series is better for a normalization of the translocation factor on the yield; 4. For cereals and potatoes the translocation can be described with gaussian functions which are consistent with the physiological development of cereals and potatoes. Although the approach in ECOSYS tends to over predict slightly the translocation for barley and potatoes there is a good overall agreement between the experiments and this model; 5. According to the investigations available the translocation of cesium can be predicted within a factor of 3 for cereals and a factor of 4 for potatoes. Sources of the uncertainties besides the biological variability and the inherent experimental error are differences in the development of the plants due to weather conditions, farm management and plant diseases. (9 refs., 5 figs.)

  9. Pore-polymer interaction reveals non-universality in forced polymer translocation

    CERN Document Server

    Lehtola, V V; Linna, R P

    2010-01-01

    We present a numerical study of forced polymer translocation by using two separate pore models. Both of them have been extensively used in previous forced translocation studies. We show that variations in the pore model affect the forced translocation characteristics significantly in the biologically relevant pore force, i.e. driving force, range. Details of the model are shown to change even the obtained scaling relations, which is a strong indication of strongly out-of-equilibrium dynamics in the computational studies which have not yet succeeded in addressing the characteristics of the forced translocation for biopolymers at realistic length scale.

  10. Can Characteristics of Reciprocal Translocations Predict the Chance of Transferable Embryos in PGD Cycles?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsbeth Dul

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Translocation carriers have an increased risk of miscarriage or the birth of a child with congenital anomalies. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD is performed in translocation carriers to select for balanced embryos and, thus, increase the chance of an ongoing pregnancy. However, a common experience is that reciprocal translocation carriers produce a high percentage of unbalanced embryos, which cannot be transferred. Therefore, the pregnancy rates in PGD in this patient group are low. In a cohort of 85 reciprocal translocation carriers undergoing PGD we have searched for cytogenetic characteristics of the translocations that can predict the percentage of balanced embryos. Using shape algorithms, the most likely segregation mode per translocation was determined. Shape algorithm, breakpoint location, and relative chromosome segment sizes proved not to be independent predictors of the percentage of balanced embryos. The ratio of the relative sizes of the translocated segments of both translocation chromosomes can give some insight into the chance of transferable embryos: Very asymmetrical translocations have a higher risk of unbalanced products (p = 0.048. Counseling of the couples on the pros and cons of all their reproductive options remains very important.

  11. Protein translocation without specific quality control in a computational model of the Tat system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The twin-arginine translocation (Tat) system transports folded proteins of various sizes across both bacterial and plant thylakoid membranes. The membrane-associated TatA protein is an essential component of the Tat translocon, and a broad distribution of different sized TatA-clusters is observed in bacterial membranes. We assume that the size dynamics of TatA clusters are affected by substrate binding, unbinding, and translocation to associated TatBC clusters, where clusters with bound translocation substrates favour growth and those without associated substrates favour shrinkage. With a stochastic model of substrate binding and cluster dynamics, we numerically determine the TatA cluster size distribution. We include a proportion of targeted but non-translocatable (NT) substrates, with the simplifying hypothesis that the substrate translocatability does not directly affect cluster dynamical rate constants or substrate binding or unbinding rates. This amounts to a translocation model without specific quality control. Nevertheless, NT substrates will remain associated with TatA clusters until unbound and so will affect cluster sizes and translocation rates. We find that the number of larger TatA clusters depends on the NT fraction f. The translocation rate can be optimized by tuning the rate of spontaneous substrate unbinding, ΓU. We present an analytically solvable three-state model of substrate translocation without cluster size dynamics that follows our computed translocation rates, and that is consistent with in vitro Tat-translocation data in the presence of NT substrates. (paper)

  12. BCR translocation to derivative chromosome 2: a new case of chronic myeloid leukemia with a complex variant translocation and Philadelphia chromosome

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Achkar, Walid; Wafa, Abdulsamad; ALMEDANI, SUHER

    2010-01-01

    The well-known typical fusion gene BCR/ABL is observed in connection with a complex translocation event in 5–8% of cases of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). The present study described an exceptional CML case with complex chromosomal aberrations not previously observed. Aberrations included a translocated BCR to the derivative chromosome 2 [der(2)] that also involved a four-chromosome translocation, implying chromosomal regions 1p32 and 2q21, besides 9q34 and 22q11.2, which were characterized ...

  13. pH sensing by intracellular Salmonella induces effector translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiu-Jun; McGourty, Kieran; Liu, Mei; Unsworth, Kate E; Holden, David W

    2010-05-21

    Salmonella enterica is an important intracellular bacterial pathogen of humans and animals. It replicates within host-cell vacuoles by delivering virulence (effector) proteins through a vacuolar membrane pore made by the Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2) type III secretion system (T3SS). T3SS assembly follows vacuole acidification, but when bacteria are grown at low pH, effector secretion is negligible. We found that effector secretion was activated at low pH from mutant strains lacking a complex of SPI-2-encoded proteins SsaM, SpiC, and SsaL. Exposure of wild-type bacteria to pH 7.2 after growth at pH 5.0 caused dissociation and degradation of SsaM/SpiC/SsaL complexes and effector secretion. In infected cells, loss of the pH 7.2 signal through acidification of host-cell cytosol prevented complex degradation and effector translocation. Thus, intravacuolar Salmonella senses host cytosolic pH, resulting in the degradation of regulatory complex proteins and effector translocation. PMID:20395475

  14. Deconvoluting chain heterogeneity from driven translocation through a nanopore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Ramesh; Bhattacharya, Aniket

    2015-02-01

    We study translocation dynamics of a driven compressible semi-flexible chain consisting of alternate blocks of stiff (S) and flexible (F) segments of size m and n, respectively, for different chain length N in two dimensions (2D). The free parameters in the model are the bending rigidity κb which controls the three-body interaction term, the elastic constant kF in the FENE (bond) potential between successive monomers, as well as the segmental lengths m and n and the repeat unit p (N=m_pn_p) and the solvent viscosity γ. We demonstrate that due to the change in entropic barrier and the inhomogeneous viscous drag on the chain backbone a variety of scenarios are possible, amply manifested in the waiting time distribution of the translocating chain. This information can be deconvoluted to extract the mechanical properties of the chain at various length scales and thus can be used to nanopore based methods to probe bio-molecules, such as DNA, RNA and proteins.

  15. Gamma-rays induced reciprocal translocations in Nigella damascena L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma irradiations (5 kR, 10 kR and 20 kR) of Nigella damascena L. (cultivated variety Miss Jekyl) seeds (with moisture content 13.33%) induced 3 translocation heterozygotes (P-I from 5 kR, P-38 from 5 kR and P- 73 from 20 kR). These exhibited the formation of either a ring or a chain of 4 chromosomes in 30.7% to 68.1% meiocytes. Predominance of rings or equal proportion of rings and chains occurred in translocation heterozygotes P-38 and in P-I and P-73 respectively. The rings showed preponderance of adjacent orientation and the chains demonstrated frequent alternate orientation. Though pollen fertility was 16.5%, 24.8% and 17.1% in P-I, P-38 and P-73 respectively, frequency of viable pollen grains was nil in P-38 and P-73 and it was 5.2% in P-I. Seed sterility was complete in P-38 and P-73 but P-I yielded 2.11% filled seeds per capsule on selfing and 2.56% seeds/capsule on cross pollination. (author)

  16. Molecular determinants of nucleolar translocation of RNA helicase A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RNA helicase A (RHA) is a member of the DEAH-box family of DNA/RNA helicases involved in multiple cellular processes and the life cycles of many viruses. The subcellular localization of RHA is dynamic despite its steady-state concentration in the nucleoplasm. We have previously shown that it shuttles rapidly between the nucleus and the cytoplasm by virtue of a bidirectional nuclear transport domain (NTD) located in its carboxyl terminus. Here, we investigate the molecular determinants for its translocation within the nucleus and, more specifically, its redistribution from the nucleoplasm to nucleolus or the perinucleolar region. We found that low temperature treatment, transcription inhibition or replication of hepatitis C virus caused the intranuclear redistribution of the protein, suggesting that RHA shuttles between the nucleolus and nucleoplasm and becomes trapped in the nucleolus or the perinucleolar region upon blockade of transport to the nucleoplasm. Both the NTD and ATPase activity were essential for RHA's transport to the nucleolus or perinucleolar region. One of the double-stranded RNA binding domains (dsRBD II) was also required for this nucleolar translocation (NoT) phenotype. RNA interference studies revealed that RHA is essential for survival of cultured hepatoma cells and the ATPase activity appears to be important for this critical role

  17. Microarray analysis of unbalanced translocation in Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ying; Yang, Jing; Chen, Yuanyuan; Bao, Liming; Cheng, Qian

    2013-06-01

    Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is caused by deletions involving chromosome region 4p16.3, which is characterized by growth delay, mild-to-severe mental retardation, hypotonia, facial dysmorphisms and shows extensive phenotypic variability include feeding difficulties, epilepsy and congenital anomalies. Variation in the size of the deletion involving chromosome region 4p16.3 may explain the clinical variation. However, previous studies indicate that duplication for another chromosome region due to an unbalanced translocation elucidate approximately 40-45% WHS patients. Therefore, we used whole genomic cytogenetics array to analyze the entire genome at a significantly higher resolution over conventional cytogenetics to characterize the exact subtelomeric aberration region of one patient with developmental delay and several facial characteristics reminiscent Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome. Here we report that our patient had 3.7 Mb deletion at the 4p16.2 and 6.8 Mb duplication at 8p23.1 resulted from the unbalanced translocations der(4)t(4;8)(p16.2;p23.1). We confirmed that our patient with monosomy 4p16.2 which is consistent with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome and trisomy 8p23.1. The combination of the 4p deletion with 8p partial trisomy explains the complex phenotype presented by our patient. PMID:23782367

  18. Stat1 nuclear translocation by nucleolin upon monocyte differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Jerke

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Members of the signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat family of transcription factors traverse the nuclear membrane through a specialized structure, called the nuclear pore complex (NPC, which represents a selective filter for the import of proteins. Karyophilic molecules can bind directly to a subset of proteins of the NPC, collectively called nucleoporins. Alternatively, the transport is mediated via a carrier molecule belonging to the importin/karyopherin superfamily, which transmits the import into the nucleus through the NPC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we provide evidence for an alternative Stat1 nuclear import mechanism, which is mediated by the shuttle protein nucleolin. We observed Stat1-nucleolin association, nuclear translocation and specific binding to the regulatory DNA element GAS. Using expression of nucleolin transgenes, we found that the nuclear localization signal (NLS of nucleolin is responsible for Stat1 nuclear translocation. We show that this mechanism is utilized upon differentiation of myeloid cells and is specific for the differentiation step from monocytes to macrophages. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data add the nucleolin-Stat1 complex as a novel functional partner for the cell differentiation program, which is uniquely poised to regulate the transcription machinery via Stat1 and nuclear metabolism via nucleolin.

  19. Single-molecule fluorescence measurements of ribosomal translocation dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunlai; Stevens, Benjamin; Kaur, Jaskarin; Cabral, Diana; Liu, Hanqing; Wang, Yuhong; Zhang, Haibo; Rosenblum, Gabriel; Smilansky, Zeev; Goldman, Yale E; Cooperman, Barry S

    2011-05-01

    We employ single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) to study structural dynamics over the first two elongation cycles of protein synthesis, using ribosomes containing either Cy3-labeled ribosomal protein L11 and A- or P-site Cy5-labeled tRNA or Cy3- and Cy5-labeled tRNAs. Pretranslocation (PRE) complexes demonstrate fluctuations between classical and hybrid forms, with concerted motions of tRNAs away from L11 and from each other when classical complex converts to hybrid complex. EF-G⋅GTP binding to both hybrid and classical PRE complexes halts these fluctuations prior to catalyzing translocation to form the posttranslocation (POST) complex. EF-G dependent translocation from the classical PRE complex proceeds via transient formation of a short-lived hybrid intermediate. A-site binding of either EF-G to the PRE complex or of aminoacyl-tRNA⋅EF-Tu ternary complex to the POST complex markedly suppresses ribosome conformational lability. PMID:21549313

  20. Translocation of reindeer from South Georgia to the Falkland Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron M. Bell

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This report describes the first translocation of reindeer Rangifer tarandus from South Georgia to the Falkland Islands, in the South Atlantic Ocean. Reindeer were introduced from Norway to the subantarctic island of South Georgia on three occasions in the early 1900s by Norwegian whalers, and today they exist as two discrete herds, numbering approximately 2600 individuals in total. Because of concerns over the impact on native vegetation, the long-term eradication of reindeer from South Georgia has recently been proposed. A translocation of reindeer to the Falkland Islands was undertaken in 2001 by the Falkland Island Government with two objectives: (1 to preserve the genetic resources of at least one of the South Georgia herds; and (2 to facilitate the diversification of the agricultural sector of the Falkland Islands by establishing a commercial reindeer herd. Techniques developed and used in North America for the successful relocation of large numbers of calves were adopted for the translocation. A total of 59 calves (26 females and 33 males were successfully translocated from South Georgia to the Falklands Islands in 2001, and subsequently produced their first offspring in 2003. Good husbandry practices and an understanding of biology and behaviour are essential for the successful translocation of reindeer.Flytting av rein fra Sør-Georgia til FalklandsøyeneAbstract in Norwegian / Sammendrag: Artikkelen beskriver den første overføring av rein Rangifer tarandus fra Sør-Georgia til Falklandsøyene i søratlanteren. Tamrein fra Norge ble flyttet til den subarktiske øya Sør-Georgia ved tre anledninger i perioden 1911 til 1925 i forbindelse med den norske hvalfangsten der. I dag består bestanden av rundt regnet 2600 dyr fordelt på to geografisk atskilte flokker. Av hensyn til den naturlige vegetasjonen på øya er det forslag om å på sikt utrydde reinbestanden på øya. Regjeringen på Falklandsøyene foretok en første overføring av

  1. TFE3-Fusion Variant Analysis Defines Specific Clinicopathologic Associations Among Xp11 Translocation Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argani, Pedram; Zhong, Minghao; Reuter, Victor E; Fallon, John T; Epstein, Jonathan I; Netto, George J; Antonescu, Cristina R

    2016-06-01

    Xp11 translocation cancers include Xp11 translocation renal cell carcinoma (RCC), Xp11 translocation perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa), and melanotic Xp11 translocation renal cancer. In Xp11 translocation cancers, oncogenic activation of TFE3 is driven by the fusion of TFE3 with a number of different gene partners; however, the impact of individual fusion variant on specific clinicopathologic features of Xp11 translocation cancers has not been well defined. In this study, we analyze 60 Xp11 translocation cancers by fluorescence in situ hybridization using custom bacterial artificial chromosome probes to establish their TFE3 fusion gene partner. In 5 cases RNA sequencing was also used to further characterize the fusion transcripts. The 60 Xp11 translocation cancers included 47 Xp11 translocation RCC, 8 Xp11 translocation PEComas, and 5 melanotic Xp11 translocation renal cancers. A fusion partner was identified in 53/60 (88%) cases, including 18 SFPQ (PSF), 16 PRCC, 12 ASPSCR1 (ASPL), 6 NONO, and 1 DVL2. We provide the first morphologic description of the NONO-TFE3 RCC, which frequently demonstrates subnuclear vacuoles leading to distinctive suprabasal nuclear palisading. Similar subnuclear vacuolization was also characteristic of SFPQ-TFE3 RCC, creating overlapping features with clear cell papillary RCC. We also describe the first RCC with a DVL2-TFE3 gene fusion, in addition to an extrarenal pigmented PEComa with a NONO-TFE3 gene fusion. Furthermore, among neoplasms with the SFPQ-TFE3, NONO-TFE3, DVL2-TFE3, and ASPL-TFE3 gene fusions, the RCCs are almost always PAX8 positive, cathepsin K negative by immunohistochemistry, whereas the mesenchymal counterparts (Xp11 translocation PEComas, melanotic Xp11 translocation renal cancers, and alveolar soft part sarcoma) are PAX8 negative, cathepsin K positive. These findings support the concept that despite an identical gene fusion, the RCCs are distinct from the corresponding mesenchymal neoplasms, perhaps due to

  2. Irradiation-Induced Wheat-Alien Translocation Lines and their Application in Wheat Breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wild relatives are rich gene resources for wheat improvement. Transfer of useful alien genes to wheat through development of wheat-alien translocations, especially small alien segment translocations, is important for wheat breeding. Wheat-alien genetic stocks such as amphiploid, addition or substitution lines were irradiated for translocation induction. Mature male or female gametes before flowering on the spikes were irradiated by 60Co-Gamma-rays at doses ranging from 800 to 2240 rad. Chromosome C-banding and genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) was used to identify chromosome translocation. Backcross of M1 plants using normal fresh pollen of common wheat was employed to enhance the transmission rate of various structural changes in their progenies. The results showed that a dose of 800∼1200 rad was suitable for pollen irradiation while 1500∼2000 rad was suitable for female-gamete irradiation. Irradiation treatment just before gamete maturation is advantageous to acquire more M1 hybrids with a high frequency of chromosome structural variation. The frequency of plants with at least one translocation chromosome in M1 could be increased up to 70% through pollen irradiation of Triticum durum-Haynaldia villosa amphiploid. More than 100 translocated chromosomes have been identified in the BC1 and BC2. Translocations with small alien chromosome segments, 57 terminal and 80 intercalary, were induced through female gamete irradiation conducted on T.aestivum-H.villosa 6VS/6AL translocation line. For the 2240 Rad dosage treatment, the induction frequencies of interstitial translocation, terminal translocation and deletion were 21.02%, 14.01%, and 14.65%, respectively, which were much higher than those previously reported. The T.aestivum-H.villosa 6VS/6AL translocation has been used in wheat breeding and many elite cultivars, such as Nannong 9918, Neimai 9, Shimai 14, etc. have been developed and released. (author)

  3. ATP-dependent and independent functions of Rad54 in genome maintenance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Agarwal (Sheba); W.A. van Cappellen (Gert); A. Guénolé (Aude); B. Eppink (Berina); S.E.V. Linsen (Sam); E. Meijering (Erik); A.B. Houtsmuller (Adriaan); R. Kanaar (Roland); J. Essers (Jeroen)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractRad54, a member of the SWI/SNF protein family of DNA-dependent ATPases, repairs DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) through homologous recombination. Here we demonstrate that Rad54 is required for the timely accumulation of the homologous recombination proteins Rad51 and Brca2 at DSBs. Becau

  4. Role of ATP-dependent K channels in the effects of erythropoietin in renal ischaemia injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonguç Utku Yilmaz

    2015-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: Our results showed that the cell proliferative, cytoprotective and anti-apoptotic effects of EPO were associated with KATP channels in the renal tubular cell culture model under hypoxic/normal conditions.

  5. PROTEIN QUALITY CONTROL IN BACTERIAL CELLS: INTEGRATED NETWORKS OF CHAPERONES AND ATP-DEPENDENT PROTEASES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FLANAGAN,J.M.BEWLEY,M.C.

    2002-10-01

    It is generally accepted that the information necessary to specify the native, functional, three-dimensional structure of a protein is encoded entirely within its amino acid sequence; however, efficient reversible folding and unfolding is observed only with a subset of small single-domain proteins. Refolding experiments often lead to the formation of kinetically-trapped, misfolded species that aggregate, even in dilute solution. In the cellular environment, the barriers to efficient protein folding and maintenance of native structure are even larger due to the nature of this process. First, nascent polypeptides must fold in an extremely crowded environment where the concentration of macromolecules approaches 300-400 mg/mL and on average, each ribosome is within its own diameter of another ribosome (1-3). These conditions of severe molecular crowding, coupled with high concentrations of nascent polypeptide chains, favor nonspecific aggregation over productive folding (3). Second, folding of newly-translated polypeptides occurs in the context of their vehtorial synthesis process. Amino acids are added to a growing nascent chain at the rate of {approx}5 residues per set, which means that for a 300 residue protein its N-terminus will be exposed to the cytosol {approx}1 min before its C-terminus and be free to begin the folding process. However, because protein folding is highly cooperative, the nascent polypeptide cannot reach its native state until a complete folding domain (50-250 residues) has emerged from the ribosome. Thus, for a single-domain protein, the final steps in ffolding are only completed post-translationally since {approx}40 residues of a nascent chain are sequestered within the exit channel of the ribosome and are not available for folding (4). A direct consequence of this limitation in cellular folding is that during translation incomplete domains will exist in partially-folded states that tend to expose hydrophobic residues that are prone to aggregation and/or mislfolding. Thus it is not surprising that, in cells, the protein folding process is error prone and organisms have evolved ''editing'' or quality control (QC) systems to assist in the folding, maintenance and, when necessary, selective removal of damaged proteins. In fact, there is growing evidence that failure of these QC-systems contributes to a number of disease states (5-8). This chapter describes our current understanding of the nature and mechanisms of the protein quality control systems in the cytosol of bacteria. Parallel systems are exploited in the cytosol and mitochondria of eukaryotes to prevent the accumulation of misfolded proteins.

  6. PROTEIN QUALITY CONTROL IN BACTERIAL CELLS: INTEGRATED NETWORKS OF CHAPERONES AND ATP-DEPENDENT PROTEASES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FLANAGAN,J.M.; BEWLEY,M.C.

    2001-12-03

    It is generally accepted that the information necessary to specify the native, functional, three-dimensional structure of a protein is encoded entirely within its amino acid sequence; however, efficient reversible folding and unfolding is observed only with a subset of small single-domain proteins. Refolding experiments often lead to the formation of kinetically-trapped, misfolded species that aggregate, even in dilute solution. In the cellular environment, the barriers to efficient protein folding and maintenance of native structure are even larger due to the nature of this process. First, nascent polypeptides must fold in an extremely crowded environment where the concentration of macromolecules approaches 300-400 mg/mL and on average, each ribosome is within its own diameter of another ribosome (1-3). These conditions of severe molecular crowding, coupled with high concentrations of nascent polypeptide chains, favor nonspecific aggregation over productive folding (3). Second, folding of newly-translated polypeptides occurs in the context of their vehtorial synthesis process. Amino acids are added to a growing nascent chain at the rate of -5 residues per set, which means that for a 300 residue protein its N-terminus will be exposed to the cytosol {approx}1 min before its C-terminus and be free to begin the folding process. However, because protein folding is highly cooperative, the nascent polypeptide cannot reach its native state until a complete folding domain (50-250 residues) has emerged from the ribosome. Thus, for a single-domain protein, the final steps in folding are only completed post-translationally since {approx}40 residues of a nascent chain are sequestered within the exit channel of the ribosome and are not available for folding (4). A direct consequence of this limitation in cellular folding is that during translation incomplete domains will exist in partially-folded states that tend to expose hydrophobic residues that are prone to aggregation and/or misfolding. Thus it is not surprising that, in cells, the protein folding process is error prone and organisms have evolved ''editing'' or quality control (QC) systems to assist in the folding, maintenance and, when necessary, selective removal of damaged proteins. In fact, there is growing evidence that failure of these QC-systems contributes to a number of disease states (5-8). This chapter describes our current understanding of the nature and mechanisms of the protein quality control systems in the cytosol of bacteria. Parallel systems are exploited in the cytosol and mitochondria of eukaryotes to prevent the accumulation of misfolded proteins.

  7. Diverse functions of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes in development and cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang I. Wu

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian SWI/SNF like Brg1/Brm associated factors (BAF) chromatin-remodeling complexes are able to use energy derived from adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis to change chromatin structures and regulate nuclear processes such as transcription.BAF complexes contain multiple subunits and the diverse subunit compositions provide functional specificities to BAF complexes.In this review,we summarize the functions of BAF subunits during mammalian development and in progression of various cancers.The mechanisms underlying the functional diversity and specificities of BAF complexes will be discussed.

  8. Arsenic alters ATP-dependent Ca²+ signaling in human airway epithelial cell wound response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Cara L; Lantz, R Clark; Burgess, Jefferey L; Boitano, Scott

    2011-05-01

    Arsenic is a natural metalloid toxicant that is associated with occupational inhalation injury and contaminates drinking water worldwide. Both inhalation of arsenic and consumption of arsenic-tainted water are correlated with malignant and nonmalignant lung diseases. Despite strong links between arsenic and respiratory illness, underlying cell responses to arsenic remain unclear. We hypothesized that arsenic may elicit some of its detrimental effects on the airway through limitation of innate immune function and, specifically, through alteration of paracrine ATP (purinergic) Ca²+ signaling in the airway epithelium. We examined the effects of acute (24 h) exposure with environmentally relevant levels of arsenic (i.e., immune functions (e.g., ciliary beat, salt and water transport, bactericide production, and wound repair). Arsenic-induced compromise of such airway defense mechanisms may be an underlying contributor to chronic lung disease. PMID:21357385

  9. Greater ATP dependence than sodium dependence of radiocalcium efflux in bullfrog ventricle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    45Ca efflux was studied in intact bullfrog ventricles following a 2-h period of loading with radiocalcium-containing Ringer solution. The cannulated ventricle was placed in a closed air-filled container to which were applied rhythmic, electronically timed, positive- and negative-pressure pulsations, which induced ventricular volume excursions. The mechanical arrangement and timing circuitry made it possible for each period to be as short in duration as 15 s. By use of this technique, penetration of the extracellular space by [14C]inulin was found to be complete within 30 s, and recovery of the inulin proceeded with a time constant of 17-24 s, indicating a completeness of recovery of 98% within 90 s. Washout of added 45Ca was quantitatively quite close to that of inulin, and in addition the estimated rate of sequestration of the isotope was slow enough to introduce only a small error into the experimental results. 45Ca efflux was only slightly (15%) sensitive to replacement of extracellular sodium but was profoundly sensitive to the inhibitors of ATP synthesis, cyanide and 2-deoxy-glucose

  10. Mechanism of the ATP-dependent DNA End Resection Machinery from S. cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Niu, Hengyao; Chung, Woo-Hyun; Zhu, Zhu; Kwon, YoungHo; Zhao, Weixing; Chi, Peter; Prakash, Rohit; Seong, Changhyun; Liu, Dongqing; Lu, Lucy; Ira, Gregory; Sung, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    If not properly processed and repaired, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) can give rise to deleterious chromosome rearrangements, which could ultimately lead to the tumor phenotype1,2. DSB ends are resected in a 5′ to 3′ fashion in cells, to yield single-stranded DNA for the recruitment of factors critical for DNA damage checkpoint activation and repair by homologous recombination2. The resection process involves redundant pathways consisting of nucleases, DNA helicases, and associated proteins...

  11. ATP-dependent transport of statins by human and rat MRP2/Mrp2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, Lucy C.J., E-mail: Luc_ellis@yahoo.co.uk [Section of Translational Medicine, Division of Applied Biology, Polwarth Building, Foresterhill, Aberdeen AB25 2ZD (United Kingdom); Hawksworth, Gabrielle M. [Section of Translational Medicine, Division of Applied Biology, Polwarth Building, Foresterhill, Aberdeen AB25 2ZD (United Kingdom); Weaver, Richard J. [Biologie Servier, Drug Safety Research Centre, 905 Route de Saran, 45520 Gidy (France)

    2013-06-01

    Multidrug resistance associated protein-2, MRP2 (human), Mrp2 (rat) are an efflux transporter, responsible for the transport of numerous endogenous and xenobiotic compounds including taurocholate, methotrexate and carboxydichlorofluorescein (CDF). The present study aims to characterise transport of statins by human and rat MRP2/Mrp2 using membrane and vesicle preparations. All statins tested (simvastatin, pravastatin, pitavastatin, fluvastatin, atorvastatin, lovastatin and rosuvastatin) stimulated vanadate-sensitive ATPase activity in membranes expressing human or rat MRP2/Mrp2, suggesting that all statins are substrates of human and rat MRP2/Mrp2. The substrate affinity (Km) of all statins for MRP2/Mrp2 was comparable and no correlation between lipophilicity (logD{sub 7.0}) and Km was seen. All statins also inhibited uptake of the fluorescent Mrp2 substrate, CDF (1 μM) into vesicles expressing human or rat MRP2/Mrp2 with similar IC{sub 50} values. Fitting of the inhibitory data to the hill slope equation, gave hill coefficients (h) of greater than one, suggesting that transport involved more than one binding site for inhibitors of MPR2 and Mrp2. We conclude that statins were transported by both human and rat MRP2/Mrp2 with similar affinity. Statins were also shown to compete with other substrates for transport by MRP2/Mrp2 and that this transport involved more than one binding site on the Mrp2/MRP2 protein. - Highlights: • We characterised MRP2 (human)/Mrp2 (rat)-mediated transport of statins. • We show statins were transported by human and rat MRP2/Mrp2. • Statins competed with a known substrate for transport by MRP2/Mrp2. • Competition involved more than one binding site on the MRP2/Mrp2 protein.

  12. ATP-dependent transport of statins by human and rat MRP2/Mrp2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multidrug resistance associated protein-2, MRP2 (human), Mrp2 (rat) are an efflux transporter, responsible for the transport of numerous endogenous and xenobiotic compounds including taurocholate, methotrexate and carboxydichlorofluorescein (CDF). The present study aims to characterise transport of statins by human and rat MRP2/Mrp2 using membrane and vesicle preparations. All statins tested (simvastatin, pravastatin, pitavastatin, fluvastatin, atorvastatin, lovastatin and rosuvastatin) stimulated vanadate-sensitive ATPase activity in membranes expressing human or rat MRP2/Mrp2, suggesting that all statins are substrates of human and rat MRP2/Mrp2. The substrate affinity (Km) of all statins for MRP2/Mrp2 was comparable and no correlation between lipophilicity (logD7.0) and Km was seen. All statins also inhibited uptake of the fluorescent Mrp2 substrate, CDF (1 μM) into vesicles expressing human or rat MRP2/Mrp2 with similar IC50 values. Fitting of the inhibitory data to the hill slope equation, gave hill coefficients (h) of greater than one, suggesting that transport involved more than one binding site for inhibitors of MPR2 and Mrp2. We conclude that statins were transported by both human and rat MRP2/Mrp2 with similar affinity. Statins were also shown to compete with other substrates for transport by MRP2/Mrp2 and that this transport involved more than one binding site on the Mrp2/MRP2 protein. - Highlights: • We characterised MRP2 (human)/Mrp2 (rat)-mediated transport of statins. • We show statins were transported by human and rat MRP2/Mrp2. • Statins competed with a known substrate for transport by MRP2/Mrp2. • Competition involved more than one binding site on the MRP2/Mrp2 protein

  13. Myogenic MicroRNA Expression Requires ATP-Dependent Chromatin Remodeling Enzyme Function▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Mallappa, Chandrashekara; Nasipak, Brian T.; Etheridge, Letitiah; Androphy, Elliot J.; Jones, Stephen N.; Sagerström, Charles G; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Imbalzano, Anthony N.

    2010-01-01

    Knockdown of the Brg1 ATPase subunit of SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling enzymes in developing zebrafish caused stunted tail formation and altered sarcomeric actin organization, which phenocopies the loss of the microRNA processing enzyme Dicer, or the knockdown of myogenic microRNAs. Furthermore, myogenic microRNA expression and differentiation was blocked in Brg1 conditional myoblasts differentiated ex vivo. The binding of Brg1 upstream of myogenic microRNA sequences correlated with MyoD bindin...

  14. PROTEIN QUALITY CONTROL IN BACTERIAL CELLS: INTEGRATED NETWORKS OF CHAPERONES AND ATP-DEPENDENT PROTEASES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is generally accepted that the information necessary to specify the native, functional, three-dimensional structure of a protein is encoded entirely within its amino acid sequence; however, efficient reversible folding and unfolding is observed only with a subset of small single-domain proteins. Refolding experiments often lead to the formation of kinetically-trapped, misfolded species that aggregate, even in dilute solution. In the cellular environment, the barriers to efficient protein folding and maintenance of native structure are even larger due to the nature of this process. First, nascent polypeptides must fold in an extremely crowded environment where the concentration of macromolecules approaches 300-400 mg/mL and on average, each ribosome is within its own diameter of another ribosome (1-3). These conditions of severe molecular crowding, coupled with high concentrations of nascent polypeptide chains, favor nonspecific aggregation over productive folding (3). Second, folding of newly-translated polypeptides occurs in the context of their vehtorial synthesis process. Amino acids are added to a growing nascent chain at the rate of -5 residues per set, which means that for a 300 residue protein its N-terminus will be exposed to the cytosol(approx)1 min before its C-terminus and be free to begin the folding process. However, because protein folding is highly cooperative, the nascent polypeptide cannot reach its native state until a complete folding domain (50-250 residues) has emerged from the ribosome. Thus, for a single-domain protein, the final steps in folding are only completed post-translationally since(approx)40 residues of a nascent chain are sequestered within the exit channel of the ribosome and are not available for folding (4). A direct consequence of this limitation in cellular folding is that during translation incomplete domains will exist in partially-folded states that tend to expose hydrophobic residues that are prone to aggregation and/or misfolding. Thus it is not surprising that, in cells, the protein folding process is error prone and organisms have evolved ''editing'' or quality control (QC) systems to assist in the folding, maintenance and, when necessary, selective removal of damaged proteins. In fact, there is growing evidence that failure of these QC-systems contributes to a number of disease states (5-8). This chapter describes our current understanding of the nature and mechanisms of the protein quality control systems in the cytosol of bacteria. Parallel systems are exploited in the cytosol and mitochondria of eukaryotes to prevent the accumulation of misfolded proteins

  15. A Human PMS2 Homologue from Aquifex aeolicus Stimulates an ATP-dependent DNA Helicase

    OpenAIRE

    Mauris, Jerome; Evans, Thomas C., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Mismatch repair in Escherichia coli involves a number of proteins including MutL and UvrD. Eukaryotes also possess MutL homologues; however, no UvrD helicase homologues have been identified. The hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus has a MutL protein (Aae MutL) that possesses a latent endonuclease activity similar to eukaryotic, but different from E. coli, MutL proteins. By sequence homology Aq793 is a member of the PcrA/UvrD/Rep helicase subfamily. We expressed Aae MutL and the putat...

  16. A human PMS2 homologue from Aquifex aeolicus stimulates an ATP-dependent DNA helicase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauris, Jerome; Evans, Thomas C

    2010-04-01

    Mismatch repair in Escherichia coli involves a number of proteins including MutL and UvrD. Eukaryotes also possess MutL homologues; however, no UvrD helicase homologues have been identified. The hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus has a MutL protein (Aae MutL) that possesses a latent endonuclease activity similar to eukaryotic, but different from E. coli, MutL proteins. By sequence homology Aq793 is a member of the PcrA/UvrD/Rep helicase subfamily. We expressed Aae MutL and the putative A. aeolicus DNA helicase (Aq793) proteins in E. coli. Using synthetic oligonucleotide substrates, we observed that lower concentrations of Aq793 were required to unwind double-stranded DNA that had a 3'-poly(dT) overhang as compared with double-stranded DNA with a 5'-poly(dT) or lacking a poly(dT) tail. This unwinding activity was stimulated by adding Aae MutL with maximal stimulation observed at an approximately 1.5:1 (MutL:Aq793) stoichiometric ratio. The enhancement of Aq793 helicase activity did not require the Aae MutL protein to retain endonuclease activity. Furthermore, the C-terminal 123 amino acid residues of Aae MutL were sufficient to stimulate Aq793 helicase activity, albeit at a significantly reduced efficacy. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time a human PMS2 homologue has been demonstrated to stimulate a PcrA/UvrD/Rep subfamily helicase, and this finding may further our understanding of the evolution of the mismatch repair pathway. PMID:20129926

  17. Extracellular ATP-dependent activation of plasma membrane Ca2+ pump in HEK-293 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Qi, Z.; Murase, K.; Obata, S.; Sokabe, M

    2000-01-01

    It is well known that extracellular ATP (ATPo) elevates the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) by inducing Ca2+ influx or mobilizing Ca2+ from internal stores via activation of purinoceptors in the plasma membrane. This study shows that ATPo also activates the plasma membrane Ca2+ pumps (PMCPs) to bring the elevated [Ca2+]i back to the resting level in human embryonic kidney-293 (HEK-293) cells.The duration of ATPo-induced intracellular Ca2+ transients was significantly increased by P...

  18. ATP-Dependent Lon Protease Contributes to Helicobacter pylori-Induced Gastric Carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Bin; Wang, Minggang; Hou, Nengyi; Hu, Xiao; Jia, Guiqing; Qin, Xianpeng; Zuo, Xiaofei; Liu, Yang; Luo, Kun; Song, Wei; Wang, Kang; Pang, Minghui

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is the strongest risk factor for development of gastric cancer. Host cellular stress responses, including inflammatory and immune responses, have been reported highly linked to H. pylori-induced carcinogenesis. However, whether mitochondrial regulation and metabolic reprogramming, which are potently associated with various cancers, play a role in H. pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis is largely unknown. Here we revealed that Lon protease (Lonp1), which is a key inductive of mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt) and is required to maintain the mitochondrial quality, was greatly induced in H. pylori infected gastric epithelial cells. Importantly, we uncovered that knockdown of Lonp1 expression significantly diminished the metabolic switch to glycolysis and gastric cell proliferation associated with low multiplicity of H. pylori infection. In addition, Lonp1 overexpression in gastric epithelial cells also promoted glycolytic switch and cell overgrowth, suggesting H. pylori effect is Lonp1 dependent. We further demonstrated that H. pylori induced Lonp1 expression and cell overgrowth, at least partially, via HIF-1α regulation. Collectively, our results concluded the relevance of Lonp1 for cell proliferation and identified Lonp1 as a key regulator of metabolic reprogramming in H. pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:27108387

  19. A label-free electrochemiluminescent sensor for ATP detection based on ATP-dependent ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tingting; Lin, Chunshui; Yao, Qiuhong; Chen, Xi

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we describe a new label-free, sensitive and highly selective strategy for the electrochemiluminescent (ECL) detection of ATP at the picomolar level via ATP-induced ligation. The molecular-beacon like DNA probes (P12 complex) are self-assembled on a gold electrode. The presence of ATP leads to the ligation of P12 complex which blocks the digestion by Exonuclease III (Exo III). The protected P12 complex causes the intercalation of numerous ECL indicators (Ru(phen)3(2+)) into the duplex DNA grooves, resulting in significantly amplified ECL signal output. Since the ligating site of T4 DNA ligase and the nicking site of Exo III are the same, it involves no long time of incubation for conformation change. The proposed strategy combines the amplification power of enzyme and the inherent high sensitivity of the ECL technique and enables picomolar detection of ATP. The developed strategy also shows high selectivity against ATP analogs, which makes our new label-free and highly sensitive ligation-based method a useful addition to the amplified ATP detection arena. PMID:27154705

  20. ATP-dependent proteases of bacteria: recognition logic and operating principles

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, Tania A.; Sauer, Robert T.

    2006-01-01

    ATP-powered AAA+ proteases degrade specific proteins in intracellular environments occupied by thousands of different proteins. These proteases operate as powerful molecular machines that unfold stable native proteins before degradation. Understanding how these enzymes choose the ‘right’ protein substrates at the ‘right’ time is key to understanding their biological function. Recently, proteomic approaches have identified numerous substrates for some bacterial enzymes and the sequence motifs ...

  1. Liver mitochondria contain an ATP-dependent, vanadate-sensitive pathway for the degradation of proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Desautels, M; Goldberg, A L

    1982-01-01

    A large fraction (30-50%) of the various proteins synthesized within isolated rat liver mitochondria were degraded to amino acids within 60 min after synthesis. Incomplete mitochondrial polypeptides resulting from the incorporation of puromycin were degraded even more extensively (80% per hr). Protein breakdown was measured by the appearance of acid-soluble radioactivity and by the disappearance of labeled polypeptides detected on NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The amino acids g...

  2. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling in the DNA-damage response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Lans (Hannes); J.A. Marteijn (Jurgen); W. Vermeulen (Wim)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe integrity of DNA is continuously challenged by metabolism-derived and environmental genotoxic agents that cause a variety of DNA lesions, including base alterations and breaks. DNA damage interferes with vital processes such as transcription and replication, and if not repaired prope

  3. A bacterial ATP-dependent, enhancer binding protein that activates the housekeeping RNA polymerase

    OpenAIRE

    Bowman, William C.; Kranz, Robert G.

    1998-01-01

    A commonly accepted view of gene regulation in bacteria that has emerged over the last decade is that promoters are transcriptionally activated by one of two general mechanisms. The major type involves activator proteins that bind to DNA adjacent to where the RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme binds, usually assisting in recruitment of the RNAP to the promoter. This holoenzyme uses the housekeeping ς70 or a related factor, which directs the core RNAP to the promoter and assists in melting the D...

  4. A bacterial ATP-dependent, enhancer binding protein that activates the housekeeping RNA polymerase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, William C.; Kranz, Robert G.

    1998-01-01

    A commonly accepted view of gene regulation in bacteria that has emerged over the last decade is that promoters are transcriptionally activated by one of two general mechanisms. The major type involves activator proteins that bind to DNA adjacent to where the RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme binds, usually assisting in recruitment of the RNAP to the promoter. This holoenzyme uses the housekeeping ς70 or a related factor, which directs the core RNAP to the promoter and assists in melting the DNA near the RNA start site. A second type of mechanism involves the alternative sigma factor (called ς54 or ςN) that directs RNAP to highly conserved promoters. In these cases, an activator protein with an ATPase function oligomerizes at tandem sites far upstream from the promoter. The nitrogen regulatory protein (NtrC) from enteric bacteria has been the model for this family of activators. Activation of the RNAP/ς54 holoenzyme to form the open complex is mediated by the activator, which is tethered upstream. Hence, this class of protein is sometimes called the enhancer binding protein family or the NtrC class. We describe here a third system that has properties of each of these two types. The NtrC enhancer binding protein from the photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter capsulatus, is shown in vitro to activate the housekeeping RNAP/ς70 holoenzyme. Transcriptional activation by this NtrC requires ATP binding but not hydrolysis. Oligomerization at distant tandem binding sites on a supercoiled template is also necessary. Mechanistic and evolutionary questions of these systems are discussed. PMID:9637689

  5. Prader-Willi syndrome - type 1 deletion, a consequence of an unbalanced translocation of chromosomes 13 and 15, easily to be mixed up with a Robertsonian translocation

    OpenAIRE

    Sheth, Frenny; Liehr, Thomas; Shah, Krati; Sheth, Jayesh

    2015-01-01

    Background Prader-Willi syndrome, due to microdeletion of proximal 15q, is a well-known cause of syndromic obesity. Case characteristics A couple with history of repeated first trimester abortions had a son with balanced Robertsonian translocation of chromosomes 13 and 15 according to cytogenetic banding technique. Results Chromosomal analysis for the couple was performed. A balanced translocation involving BP1-BP3 region of proximal 15q was observed in the father. Discussion Investigations o...

  6. Development and Identification of Triticum aestivum L.-Thinopyrum bessarabicum L(o)ve Chromosome Translocations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUANG Li-fang; QI Zeng-jun; CHEN Pei-du; FENG Yi-gao; LIU Da-jun

    2004-01-01

    With ass7istance of chromosome C-banding and genomic in situ hybridization(GISH)combined with meiotic analysis,five germplasms with homozygous wheat-Th. Bessarabicum chromosome translocations were developed and identified among BC1F5 progenies of the cross between T. Aestivum cv. Chinese Spring and Chinese Spring-Th. Bessarabicum amphiploid. These lines included Tj01 and Tj02(2n=44)containing a pair of wheat-Th. Bessarabicum translocation chromosomes besides a pair of added Th. Bessarabicum chromosomes,Tj03(2n=44)with a pair of added interspecific translocation chromosomes,Tj04(2n=44)containing a pair of interspecific translocation chromosomes besides an added pair of Th. Bessarabicum chromosome arms and Tj05(2n=46)containing a pair of interspecific translocation chromosomes besides two pairs of added intact alien chromosomes. The breakpoints of all the translocations were found to be not around centromere. Meanwhile,all the lines showed normal plant growth,development and fertility,while the translocation chromosomes transmitted regularly. The obtained translocations might be of use for transferring elite genes from Th. Bessarabicum into wheat.

  7. Molecular and classical cytogenetic analyses demonstrate an apomorphic reciprocal chromosomal translocation in Gorilla gorilla

    OpenAIRE

    Stanyon, Roscoe; Wienberg, Johannes; Romagno, D; F. Bigoni; Jauch, Anna; Cremer, Thomas

    1992-01-01

    The existence of an apomorphic reciprocal chromosomal translocation in the gorilla lineage has been asserted or denied by various cytogeneticists. We employed a new molecular cytogenetic strategy (chromosomal in situ suppression hybridization) combined with high-resolution banding, replication sequence analysis, and fluorochrome staining to demonstrate that a reciprocal translocation between ancestral chromosomes homologous to human chromosome 5 and 17 has indeed occurred.

  8. Molecular characterization of translocation (6;9) in acute nonlymphocytic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. von Lindern (Marieke)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractSpecific chromosomal translocations are one of the defects associated with leukemia. Isolation and characterization of genes affected by these translocations may give insight into the processes of both leukemogenesis and normal hematopoiesis. When the experiments described in this thesis

  9. Balanced translocation (14;20) in a mentally handicapped child with cystinuria.

    OpenAIRE

    Sharland, M.; Jones, M.; Bain, M.; Chalmers, R; Hammond, J; Patton, M A

    1992-01-01

    A mentally handicapped 3 year old child with cystinuria is presented. Routine chromosomal analysis showed an apparently balanced de novo translocation in the child with breakpoints 14q22 and 20p13. Family studies suggested that the child is a type I/type II compound heterozygote for cystinuria. This translocation may indicate a possible locus for the gene for cystinuria.

  10. Reciprocal translocation 14q;21q in a patient with the Brachmann-de Lange syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, W G; Kennaugh, J M; Kugler, J P; Wyandt, H E

    1983-01-01

    A patient with the Brachmann-de Lange syndrome was found to have an apparently balanced de novo translocation 14q; 21q. The relationship between this uncommon translocation and the patient's phenotype is unclear. Although most patients with the Brachmann-de Lange syndrome have normal chromosomes, the possibility of aetiological heterogeneity, including some rare chromosomal abnormalities, cannot be dismissed.

  11. CHROMOSOMAL SUBLOCALIZATION OF THE 2 13 TRANSLOCATION BREAKPOINT IN ALVEOLAR RHABDOMYOSARCOMA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SHAPIRO, DN; VALENTINE, MB; SUBLETT, JE; SINCLAIR, AE; TEREBA, AM; SCHEFFER, H; BUYS, CHCM; LOOK, AT

    1992-01-01

    A characteristic balanced reciprocal chromosomal translocation [t(2;13)(q35;q14)] has been identified in more than 50% of alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas. As the first step in characterization of the genes involved in this translocation, we constructed somatic cell hybrids that retained either the deriva

  12. X monosomy and balanced Robertsonian translocation in a girl with Turner Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Lourenço da Silva

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of X monosomy associated with a maternally inherited t(13;14 Robertsonian translocation in a girl with Turner syndrome. The girl's X chromosome was demonstrated to be maternally inherited, ruling out the hypothesis that the translocation exerted an interchromosomal effect on the origin of the monosomy. Chromosomes 13 and 14 showed biparental inheritance.

  13. Familial chromosome translocation t(3;18)(p21;p11).

    OpenAIRE

    Buchinger, G; Wettstein, A; Metze, H

    1981-01-01

    A familial translocation t(3;18)(p21;p11) was observed in a newborn male. He had multiple malformations resulting from partial trisomy 3 and partial monosomy 18. The mother, maternal uncle, and maternal grandmother were found to be balanced translocation carriers. A daughter of the maternal uncle with similar malformations probably had the same unbalanced karyotype as the proband.

  14. ESX-1-mediated translocation to the cytosol controls virulence of mycobacteria

    KAUST Repository

    Houben, Diane

    2012-05-08

    Mycobacterium species, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae, are among the most potent human bacterial pathogens. The discovery of cytosolic mycobacteria challenged the paradigm that these pathogens exclusively localize within the phagosome of host cells. As yet the biological relevance of mycobacterial translocation to the cytosol remained unclear. In this current study we used electron microscopy techniques to establish a clear link between translocation and mycobacterial virulence. Pathogenic, patient-derived mycobacteria species were found to translocate to the cytosol, while non-pathogenic species did not. We were further able to link cytosolic translocation with pathogenicity by introducing the ESX-1 (type VII) secretion system into the non-virulent, exclusively phagolysosomal Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Furthermore, we show that translocation is dependent on the C-terminus of the early-secreted antigen ESAT-6. The C-terminal truncation of ESAT-6 was shown to result in attenuation in mice, again linking translocation to virulence. Together, these data demonstrate the molecular mechanism facilitating translocation of mycobacteria. The ability to translocate from the phagolysosome to the cytosol is with this study proven to be biologically significant as it determines mycobacterial virulence. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Iso-Flux Tension Propagation Theory of Driven Polymer Translocation: The Role of Initial Configurations

    OpenAIRE

    Sarabadani, Jalal; Ikonen, Timo; Ala-Nissila, Tapio

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of pore-driven polymer translocation by theoretical analysis and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Using the tension propagation theory within the constant flux approximation we derive an explicit equation of motion for the tension front. From this we derive a scaling relation for the average translocation time $\\tau$, which captures the asymptotic result $\\tau \\propto N_0^{1+\

  16. Logic Gate Operation by DNA Translocation through Biological Nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuga, Hiroki; Kawano, Ryuji; Takinoue, Masahiro; Tsuji, Yutaro; Osaki, Toshihisa; Kamiya, Koki; Miki, Norihisa; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2016-01-01

    Logical operations using biological molecules, such as DNA computing or programmable diagnosis using DNA, have recently received attention. Challenges remain with respect to the development of such systems, including label-free output detection and the rapidity of operation. Here, we propose integration of biological nanopores with DNA molecules for development of a logical operating system. We configured outputs "1" and "0" as single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) that is or is not translocated through a nanopore; unlabeled DNA was detected electrically. A negative-AND (NAND) operation was successfully conducted within approximately 10 min, which is rapid compared with previous studies using unlabeled DNA. In addition, this operation was executed in a four-droplet network. DNA molecules and associated information were transferred among droplets via biological nanopores. This system would facilitate linking of molecules and electronic interfaces. Thus, it could be applied to molecular robotics, genetic engineering, and even medical diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26890568

  17. Structural characterization of mRNA-tRNA translocation intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agirrezabala, Xabier; Liao, Hstau Y; Schreiner, Eduard; Fu, Jie; Ortiz-Meoz, Rodrigo F; Schulten, Klaus; Green, Rachel; Frank, Joachim

    2012-04-17

    Cryo-EM analysis of a wild-type Escherichia coli pretranslocational sample has revealed the presence of previously unseen intermediate substates of the bacterial ribosome during the first phase of translocation, characterized by intermediate intersubunit rotations, L1 stalk positions, and tRNA configurations. Furthermore, we describe the domain rearrangements in quantitative terms, which has allowed us to characterize the processivity and coordination of the conformational reorganization of the ribosome, along with the associated changes in tRNA ribosome-binding configuration. The results are consistent with the view of the ribosome as a molecular machine employing Brownian motion to reach a functionally productive state via a series of substates with incremental changes in conformation. PMID:22467828

  18. Mitochondrial tRNA gene translocations in highly eusocial bees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Silvestre

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial gene rearrangement events, especially involving tRNA genes, have been described more frequently as more complete mitochondrial genome sequences are becoming available. In the present work, we analyzed mitochondrial tRNA gene rearrangements between two bee species belonging to the tribes Apini and Meliponini within the "corbiculate Apidae". Eleven tRNA genes are in different genome positions or strands. The molecular events responsible for each translocation are explained. Considering the high number of rearrangements observed, the data presented here contradict the general rule of high gene order conservation among closely related organisms, and also represent a powerful molecular tool to help solve questions about phylogeny and evolution in bees.

  19. Periodic forces trigger knot untying during translocation of knotted proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymczak, Piotr

    2016-03-01

    Proteins need to be unfolded when translocated through the pores in mitochondrial and other cellular membranes. Knotted proteins, however, might get stuck during this process, jamming the pore, since the diameter of the pore is smaller than the size of maximally tightened knot. The jamming probability dramatically increases as the magnitude of the driving force exceeds a critical value, Fc. In this numerical study, we show that for deep knots Fc lies below the force range over which molecular import motors operate, which suggest that in these cases the knots will tighten and block the pores. Next, we show how such topological traps might be prevented by using a pulling protocol of a repetitive, on-off character. Such a repetitive pulling is biologically relevant, since the mitochondrial import motor, like other molecular motors transforms chemical energy into directed motions via nucleotide-hydrolysis-mediated conformational changes, which are cyclic in character.

  20. Tailoring particle translocation via dielectrophoresis in pore channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shoji; Tsutsui, Makusu; Theodore, Hu; Yuhui, He; Arima, Akihide; Tsuji, Tetsuro; Doi, Kentaro; Kawano, Satoyuki; Taniguchi, Masateru; Kawai, Tomoji

    2016-01-01

    Understanding and controlling electrophoretic motions of nanoscopic objects in fluidic channels are a central challenge in developing nanopore technology for molecular analyses. Although progress has been made in slowing the translocation velocity to meet the requirement for electrical detections of analytes via picoampere current measurements, there exists no method useful for regulating particle flows in the transverse directions. Here, we report the use of dielectrophoresis to manipulate the single-particle passage through a solid-state pore. We created a trap field by applying AC voltage between electrodes embedded in a low-aspect-ratio micropore. We demonstrated a traffic control of particles to go through center or near side surface via the voltage frequency. We also found enhanced capture efficiency along with faster escaping speed of particles by virtue of the AC-mediated electroosmosis. This method is compatible with nanopore sensing and would be widely applied for reducing off-axis effects to achieve single-molecule identification. PMID:27527126