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Sample records for atp-dependent nucleosome translocation

  1. Multiple aspects of ATP-dependent nucleosome translocation by RSC and Mi-2 are directed by the underlying DNA sequence.

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    Joke J F A van Vugt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chromosome structure, DNA metabolic processes and cell type identity can all be affected by changing the positions of nucleosomes along chromosomal DNA, a reaction that is catalysed by SNF2-type ATP-driven chromatin remodelers. Recently it was suggested that in vivo, more than 50% of the nucleosome positions can be predicted simply by DNA sequence, especially within promoter regions. This seemingly contrasts with remodeler induced nucleosome mobility. The ability of remodeling enzymes to mobilise nucleosomes over short DNA distances is well documented. However, the nucleosome translocation processivity along DNA remains elusive. Furthermore, it is unknown what determines the initial direction of movement and how new nucleosome positions are adopted. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have used AFM imaging and high resolution PAGE of mononucleosomes on 600 and 2500 bp DNA molecules to analyze ATP-dependent nucleosome repositioning by native and recombinant SNF2-type enzymes. We report that the underlying DNA sequence can control the initial direction of translocation, translocation distance, as well as the new positions adopted by nucleosomes upon enzymatic mobilization. Within a strong nucleosomal positioning sequence both recombinant Drosophila Mi-2 (CHD-type and native RSC from yeast (SWI/SNF-type repositioned the nucleosome at 10 bp intervals, which are intrinsic to the positioning sequence. Furthermore, RSC-catalyzed nucleosome translocation was noticeably more efficient when beyond the influence of this sequence. Interestingly, under limiting ATP conditions RSC preferred to position the nucleosome with 20 bp intervals within the positioning sequence, suggesting that native RSC preferentially translocates nucleosomes with 15 to 25 bp DNA steps. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Nucleosome repositioning thus appears to be influenced by both remodeler intrinsic and DNA sequence specific properties that interplay to define ATPase

  2. ATP-Dependent Chromatin Remodeling Factors and Their Roles in Affecting Nucleosome Fiber Composition

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    Alexandra Lusser

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors of the SNF2 family are key components of the cellular machineries that shape and regulate chromatin structure and function. Members of this group of proteins have broad and heterogeneous functions ranging from controlling gene activity, facilitating DNA damage repair, promoting homologous recombination to maintaining genomic stability. Several chromatin remodeling factors are critical components of nucleosome assembly processes, and recent reports have identified specific functions of distinct chromatin remodeling factors in the assembly of variant histones into chromatin. In this review we will discuss the specific roles of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors in determining nucleosome composition and, thus, chromatin fiber properties.

  3. The ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes CHD6, CHD7, and CHD8 exhibit distinct nucleosome binding and remodeling activities.

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    Manning, Benjamin J; Yusufzai, Timur

    2017-07-14

    Proper chromatin regulation is central to genome function and maintenance. The group III chromodomain-helicase-DNA-binding (CHD) family of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes, comprising CHD6, CHD7, CHD8, and CHD9, has well-documented roles in transcription regulation, impacting both organism development and disease etiology. These four enzymes are similar in their constituent domains, but they fill surprisingly non-redundant roles in the cell, with deficiencies in individual enzymes leading to dissimilar disease states such as CHARGE syndrome or autism spectrum disorders. The mechanisms explaining their divergent, non-overlapping functions are unclear. In this study, we performed an in-depth biochemical analysis of purified CHD6, CHD7, and CHD8 and discovered distinct differences in chromatin remodeling specificities and activities among them. We report that CHD6 and CHD7 both bind with high affinity to short linker DNA, whereas CHD8 requires longer DNA for binding. As a result, CHD8 slides nucleosomes into positions with more flanking linker DNA than CHD7. Moreover, we found that, although CHD7 and CHD8 slide nucleosomes, CHD6 disrupts nucleosomes in a distinct non-sliding manner. The different activities of these enzymes likely lead to differences in chromatin structure and, thereby, transcriptional control, at the enhancer and promoter loci where these enzymes bind. Overall, our work provides a mechanistic basis for both the non-redundant roles and the diverse mutant disease states of these enzymes in vivo. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. ISWI chromatin remodellers sense nucleosome modifications to determine substrate preference

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    Dann, Geoffrey P; Liszczak, Glen P; Bagert, John D

    2017-01-01

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodellers regulate access to genetic information by controlling nucleosome positions in vivo. However, the mechanism by which remodellers discriminate between different nucleosome substrates is poorly understood. Many chromatin remodelling proteins possess conserved...... activity of all ISWI remodellers evaluated. This dependence also extends to CHD and SWI/SNF family remodellers, suggesting that the acidic patch may be generally required for chromatin remodelling. Critically, remodelling activity can be regulated by modifications neighbouring the acidic patch, signifying...... that it may act as a tunable interaction hotspot for ATP-dependent chromatin remodellers and, by extension, many other chromatin effectors that engage this region of the nucleosome surface....

  5. NAP1L1 accelerates activation and decreases pausing to enhance nucleosome remodeling by CSB.

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    Lee, Ju Yeon; Lake, Robert J; Kirk, Jaewon; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Fan, Hua-Ying; Hohng, Sungchul

    2017-05-05

    Cockayne syndrome protein B (CSB) belongs to the SWI2/SNF2 ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler family, and CSB is the only ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler essential for transcription-coupled nucleotide excision DNA repair. CSB alone remodels nucleosomes ∼10-fold slower than the ACF remodeling complex. Strikingly, NAP1-like histone chaperones interact with CSB and greatly enhance CSB-mediated chromatin remodeling. While chromatin remodeling by CSB and NAP1-like proteins is crucial for efficient transcription-coupled DNA repair, the mechanism by which NAP1-like proteins enhance chromatin remodeling by CSB remains unknown. Here we studied CSB's DNA-binding and nucleosome-remodeling activities at the single molecule level in real time. We also determined how the NAP1L1 chaperone modulates these activities. We found that CSB interacts with DNA in two principle ways: by simple binding and a more complex association that involves gross DNA distortion. Remarkably, NAP1L1 suppresses both these interactions. Additionally, we demonstrate that nucleosome remodeling by CSB consists of three distinct phases: activation, translocation and pausing, similar to ACF. Importantly, we found that NAP1L1 promotes CSB-mediated remodeling by accelerating both activation and translocation. Additionally, NAP1L1 increases CSB processivity by decreasing the pausing probability during translocation. Our study, therefore, uncovers the different steps of CSB-mediated chromatin remodeling that can be regulated by NAP1L1. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling in the DNA-damage response

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    Lans Hannes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The integrity of DNA is continuously challenged by metabolism-derived and environmental genotoxic agents that cause a variety of DNA lesions, including base alterations and breaks. DNA damage interferes with vital processes such as transcription and replication, and if not repaired properly, can ultimately lead to premature aging and cancer. Multiple DNA pathways signaling for DNA repair and DNA damage collectively safeguard the integrity of DNA. Chromatin plays a pivotal role in regulating DNA-associated processes, and is itself subject to regulation by the DNA-damage response. Chromatin influences access to DNA, and often serves as a docking or signaling site for repair and signaling proteins. Its structure can be adapted by post-translational histone modifications and nucleosome remodeling, catalyzed by the activity of ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes. In recent years, accumulating evidence has suggested that ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes play important, although poorly characterized, roles in facilitating the effectiveness of the DNA-damage response. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the involvement of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling in three major DNA repair pathways: nucleotide excision repair, homologous recombination, and non-homologous end-joining. This shows that a surprisingly large number of different remodeling complexes display pleiotropic functions during different stages of the DNA-damage response. Moreover, several complexes seem to have multiple functions, and are implicated in various mechanistically distinct repair pathways.

  7. Nucleosomes protect DNA from DNA methylation in vivo and in vitro

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    Felle, Max; Hoffmeister, Helen; Rothammer, Julia; Fuchs, Andreas; Exler, Josef H.; Längst, Gernot

    2011-01-01

    Positioned nucleosomes limit the access of proteins to DNA. However, the impact of nucleosomes on DNA methylation in vitro and in vivo is poorly understood. Here, we performed a detailed analysis of nucleosome binding and nucleosomal DNA methylation by the de novo methyltransferases. We show that compared to linker DNA, nucleosomal DNA is largely devoid of CpG methylation. ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling frees nucleosomal CpG dinucleotides and renders the remodelled nucleosome a 2-fold better substrate for Dnmt3a methyltransferase compared to free DNA. These results reflect the situation in vivo, as quantification of nucleosomal DNA methylation levels in HeLa cells shows a 2-fold decrease of nucleosomal DNA methylation levels compared to linker DNA. Our findings suggest that nucleosomal positions are stably maintained in vivo and nucleosomal occupancy is a major determinant of global DNA methylation patterns in vivo. PMID:21622955

  8. A physical analysis of nucleosome positioning

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    Gerland, Ulrich

    2015-03-01

    The first level of genome packaging in eukaryotic cells involves the formation of dense nucleosome arrays, with DNA coverage near 90% in yeasts. A high nucleosome coverage is essential for cells, e.g. to prevent cryptic transcription, and the local positions of specific nucleosomes can play an important role in gene regulation. It is known that in vivo nucleosome positions are affected by a complex mix of passive and active mechanisms, including sequence-specific histone-DNA binding, nucleosome-nucleosome interactions, ATP-dependent remodeling enzymes, transcription, and DNA replication. Yet, the statistical distribution of nucleosome positions is extremely well described by simple physical models that treat the chromatin fiber as an interacting one-dimensional gas. I will discuss how can we interpret this surprising observation from a mechanistic perspective. I will also discuss the kinetics of the interacting gas model, which is pertinent to the question of how cells achieve the high nucleosome coverage within a short time, e.g. after DNA replication.

  9. Differential expression of ATP-dependent RNA helicase gene in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJL

    2012-02-07

    Feb 7, 2012 ... lysogeny broth (LB) medium at 4°C was induced for VBNC state; activated genes were detected using. mRNA differential display .... 191 amino acids. This cDNA sequence had a homology of 95 to 100% to the nucleotide of adenosine tripho- sphate (ATP)-dependent RNA helicase rh1B gene in different ...

  10. Dynamic nucleosome organization at hox promoters during zebrafish embryogenesis.

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    Steven E Weicksel

    Full Text Available Nucleosome organization at promoter regions plays an important role in regulating gene activity. Genome-wide studies in yeast, flies, worms, mammalian embryonic stem cells and transformed cell lines have found well-positioned nucleosomes flanking a nucleosome depleted region (NDR at transcription start sites. This nucleosome arrangement depends on DNA sequence (cis-elements as well as DNA binding factors and ATP-dependent chromatin modifiers (trans-factors. However, little is understood about how the nascent embryonic genome positions nucleosomes during development. This is particularly intriguing since the embryonic genome must undergo a broad reprogramming event upon fusion of sperm and oocyte. Using four stages of early embryonic zebrafish development, we map nucleosome positions at the promoter region of 37 zebrafish hox genes. We find that nucleosome arrangement at the hox promoters is a progressive process that takes place over several stages. At stages immediately after fertilization, nucleosomes appear to be largely disordered at hox promoter regions. At stages after activation of the embryonic genome, nucleosomes are detectable at hox promoters, with positions becoming more uniform and more highly occupied. Since the genomic sequence is invariant during embryogenesis, this progressive change in nucleosome arrangement suggests that trans-factors play an important role in organizing nucleosomes during embryogenesis. Separating hox genes into expressed and non-expressed groups shows that expressed promoters have better positioned and occupied nucleosomes, as well as distinct NDRs, than non-expressed promoters. Finally, by blocking the retinoic acid-signaling pathway, we disrupt early hox gene transcription, but observe no effect on nucleosome positions, suggesting that active hox transcription is not a driving force behind the arrangement of nucleosomes at the promoters of hox genes during early development.

  11. ATP-independent cooperative binding of yeast Isw1a to bare and nucleosomal DNA.

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    Anne De Cian

    Full Text Available Among chromatin remodeling factors, the ISWI family displays a nucleosome-enhanced ATPase activity coupled to DNA translocation. While these enzymes are known to bind to DNA, their activity has not been fully characterized. Here we use TEM imaging and single molecule manipulation to investigate the interaction between DNA and yeast Isw1a. We show that Isw1a displays a highly cooperative ATP-independent binding to and bridging between DNA segments. Under appropriate tension, rare single nucleation events can sometimes be observed and loop DNA with a regular step. These nucleation events are often followed by binding of successive complexes bridging between nearby DNA segments in a zipper-like fashion, as confirmed by TEM observations. On nucleosomal substrates, we show that the specific ATP-dependent remodeling activity occurs in the context of cooperative Isw1a complexes bridging extranucleosomal DNA. Our results are interpreted in the context of the recently published partial structure of Isw1a and support its acting as a "protein ruler" (with possibly more than one tick.

  12. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling by Cockayne syndrome protein B and NAP1-like histone chaperones is required for efficient transcription-coupled DNA repair.

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    Cho, Iltaeg; Tsai, Pei-Fang; Lake, Robert J; Basheer, Asjad; Fan, Hua-Ying

    2013-04-01

    The Cockayne syndrome complementation group B (CSB) protein is essential for transcription-coupled DNA repair, and mutations in CSB are associated with Cockayne syndrome--a devastating disease with complex clinical features, including the appearance of premature aging, sun sensitivity, and numerous neurological and developmental defects. CSB belongs to the SWI2/SNF2 ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler family, but the extent to which CSB remodels chromatin and whether this activity is utilized in DNA repair is unknown. Here, we show that CSB repositions nucleosomes in an ATP-dependent manner in vitro and that this activity is greatly enhanced by the NAP1-like histone chaperones, which we identify as new CSB-binding partners. By mapping functional domains and analyzing CSB derivatives, we demonstrate that chromatin remodeling by the combined activities of CSB and the NAP1-like chaperones is required for efficient transcription-coupled DNA repair. Moreover, we show that chromatin remodeling and repair protein recruitment mediated by CSB are separable activities. The collaboration that we observed between CSB and the NAP1-like histone chaperones adds a new dimension to our understanding of the ways in which ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers and histone chaperones can regulate chromatin structure. Taken together, the results of this study offer new insights into the functions of chromatin remodeling by CSB in transcription-coupled DNA repair as well as the underlying mechanisms of Cockayne syndrome.

  13. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling by Cockayne syndrome protein B and NAP1-like histone chaperones is required for efficient transcription-coupled DNA repair.

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    Iltaeg Cho

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Cockayne syndrome complementation group B (CSB protein is essential for transcription-coupled DNA repair, and mutations in CSB are associated with Cockayne syndrome--a devastating disease with complex clinical features, including the appearance of premature aging, sun sensitivity, and numerous neurological and developmental defects. CSB belongs to the SWI2/SNF2 ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler family, but the extent to which CSB remodels chromatin and whether this activity is utilized in DNA repair is unknown. Here, we show that CSB repositions nucleosomes in an ATP-dependent manner in vitro and that this activity is greatly enhanced by the NAP1-like histone chaperones, which we identify as new CSB-binding partners. By mapping functional domains and analyzing CSB derivatives, we demonstrate that chromatin remodeling by the combined activities of CSB and the NAP1-like chaperones is required for efficient transcription-coupled DNA repair. Moreover, we show that chromatin remodeling and repair protein recruitment mediated by CSB are separable activities. The collaboration that we observed between CSB and the NAP1-like histone chaperones adds a new dimension to our understanding of the ways in which ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers and histone chaperones can regulate chromatin structure. Taken together, the results of this study offer new insights into the functions of chromatin remodeling by CSB in transcription-coupled DNA repair as well as the underlying mechanisms of Cockayne syndrome.

  14. The intranuclear mobility of messenger RNA binding proteins is ATP dependent and temperature sensitive.

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    Calapez, Alexandre; Pereira, Henrique M; Calado, Angelo; Braga, José; Rino, José; Carvalho, Célia; Tavanez, João Paulo; Wahle, Elmar; Rosa, Agostinho C; Carmo-Fonseca, Maria

    2002-12-09

    After being released from transcription sites, messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs) must reach the nuclear pore complexes in order to be translocated to the cytoplasm. Whether the intranuclear movement of mRNPs results largely from Brownian motion or involves molecular motors remains unknown. Here we have used quantitative photobleaching techniques to monitor the intranuclear mobility of protein components of mRNPs tagged with GFP. The results show that the diffusion coefficients of the poly(A)-binding protein II (PABP2) and the export factor TAP are significantly reduced when these proteins are bound to mRNP complexes, as compared with nonbound proteins. The data further show that the mobility of wild-type PABP2 and TAP, but not of a point mutant variant of PABP2 that fails to bind to RNA, is significantly reduced when cells are ATP depleted or incubated at 22 degrees C. Energy depletion has only minor effects on the intranuclear mobility of a 2,000-kD dextran (which corresponds approximately in size to 40S mRNP particles), suggesting that the reduced mobility of PABP2 and TAP is not caused by a general alteration of the nuclear environment. Taken together, the data suggest that the mobility of mRNPs in the living cell nucleus involves a combination of passive diffusion and ATP-dependent processes.

  15. CgII cleaves DNA using a mechanism distinct from other ATP-dependent restriction endonucleases.

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    Toliusis, Paulius; Zaremba, Mindaugas; Silanskas, Arunas; Szczelkun, Mark D; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2017-08-21

    The restriction endonuclease CglI from Corynebacterium glutamicum recognizes an asymmetric 5'-GCCGC-3' site and cleaves the DNA 7 and 6/7 nucleotides downstream on the top and bottom DNA strands, respectively, in an NTP-hydrolysis dependent reaction. CglI is composed of two different proteins: an endonuclease (R.CglI) and a DEAD-family helicase-like ATPase (H.CglI). These subunits form a heterotetrameric complex with R2H2 stoichiometry. However, the R2H2·CglI complex has only one nuclease active site sufficient to cut one DNA strand suggesting that two complexes are required to introduce a double strand break. Here, we report studies to evaluate the DNA cleavage mechanism of CglI. Using one- and two-site circular DNA substrates we show that CglI does not require two sites on the same DNA for optimal catalytic activity. However, one-site linear DNA is a poor substrate, supporting a mechanism where CglI complexes must communicate along the one-dimensional DNA contour before cleavage is activated. Based on experimental data, we propose that adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis by CglI produces translocation on DNA preferentially in a downstream direction from the target, although upstream translocation is also possible. Our results are consistent with a mechanism of CglI action that is distinct from that of other ATP-dependent restriction-modification enzymes. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. Role of nucleosome remodeling in neurodevelopmental and intellectual disability disorders

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    Alberto J Lopez

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available It is becoming increasingly important to understand how epigenetic mechanisms control gene expression during neurodevelopment. Two epigenetic mechanisms that have received considerable attention are DNA methylation and histone acetylation. Human exome sequencing and genome-wide association studies have linked several neurobiological disorders to genes whose products actively regulate DNA methylation and histone acetylation. More recently, a third major epigenetic mechanism, nucleosome remodeling, has been implicated in human developmental and intellectual disability disorders. Nucleosome remodeling is driven primarily through nucleosome remodeling complexes with specialized ATP-dependent enzymes. These enzymes directly interact with DNA or chromatin structure, as well as histone subunits, to restructure the shape and organization of nucleosome positioning to ultimately regulate gene expression. Of particular interest is the neuron-specific Brg1/hBrm Associated Factor (nBAF complex. Mutations in nBAF subunit genes have so far been linked to Coffin-Siris syndrome, Nicolaides-Baraitser syndrome, schizophrenia, and Autism Spectrum Disorder. Together, these human developmental and intellectual disability disorders are powerful examples of the impact of epigenetic modulation on gene expression. This review focuses on the new and emerging role of nucleosome remodeling in neurodevelopmental and intellectual disability disorders and whether nucleosome remodeling affects gene expression required for cognition independently of its role in regulating gene expression required for development.

  17. Nucleosome Positioning and Epigenetics

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    Schwab, David; Bruinsma, Robijn

    2008-03-01

    The role of chromatin structure in gene regulation has recently taken center stage in the field of epigenetics, phenomena that change the phenotype without changing the DNA sequence. Recent work has also shown that nucleosomes, a complex of DNA wrapped around a histone octamer, experience a sequence dependent energy landscape due to the variation in DNA bend stiffness with sequence composition. In this talk, we consider the role nucleosome positioning might play in the formation of heterochromatin, a compact form of DNA generically responsible for gene silencing. In particular, we discuss how different patterns of nucleosome positions, periodic or random, could either facilitate or suppress heterochromatin stability and formation.

  18. Nucleosome Packaging and Nucleosome Positioning of Genomic DNA

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    Lowary, P. T.; Widom, J.

    1997-02-01

    The goals of this study were to assess the extent to which bulk genomic DNA sequences contribute to their own packaging in nucleosomes and to reveal the relationship between nucleosome packaging and positioning. Using a competitive nucleosome reconstitution assay, we found that at least 95% of bulk DNA sequences have an affinity for histone octamer in nucleosomes that is similar to that of randomly synthesized DNA; they contribute little to their own packaging at the level of individual nucleosomes. An equation was developed that relates the measured free energy to the fractional occupancy of specific nucleosome positions. Evidently, the bulk of eukaryotic genomic DNA is also not evolved or constrained for significant sequence-directed nucleosome positioning at the level of individual nucleosomes. Implications for gene regulation in vivo are discussed.

  19. Nucleosome packaging and nucleosome positioning of genomic DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Lowary, P. T.; Widom, J

    1997-01-01

    The goals of this study were to assess the extent to which bulk genomic DNA sequences contribute to their own packaging in nucleosomes and to reveal the relationship between nucleosome packaging and positioning. Using a competitive nucleosome reconstitution assay, we found that at least 95% of bulk DNA sequences have an affinity for histone octamer in nucleosomes that is similar to that of randomly synthesized DNA; they contribute little to their own packaging at the level of individual nucle...

  20. Mechanistic Basis for ATP-Dependent Inhibition of Glutamine Synthetase by Tabtoxinine-β-lactam.

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    Patrick, Garrett J; Fang, Luting; Schaefer, Jacob; Singh, Sukrit; Bowman, Gregory R; Wencewicz, Timothy A

    2018-01-09

    Tabtoxinine-β-lactam (TβL), also known as wildfire toxin, is a time- and ATP-dependent inhibitor of glutamine synthetase produced by plant pathogenic strains of Pseudomonas syringae. Here we demonstrate that recombinant glutamine synthetase from Escherichia coli phosphorylates the C3-hydroxyl group of the TβL 3-(S)-hydroxy-β-lactam (3-HβL) warhead. Phosphorylation of TβL generates a stable, noncovalent enzyme-ADP-inhibitor complex that resembles the glutamine synthetase tetrahedral transition state. The TβL β-lactam ring remains intact during enzyme inhibition, making TβL mechanistically distinct from traditional β-lactam antibiotics such as penicillin. Our findings could enable the design of new 3-HβL transition state inhibitors targeting enzymes in the ATP-dependent carboxylate-amine ligase superfamily with broad therapeutic potential in many disease areas.

  1. Transfer RNA is an essential component of the ubiquitin- and ATP-dependent proteolytic system

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    Ciechanover, A.; Wolin, S.L.. Steitz, J.A.; Lodish, H.F.

    1985-03-01

    Protein degradation via the nonlysosomal ATP-dependent pathway in rabbit reticulocytes involves a number of components. In the initial event, ubiquitin, an abundant 76-residue polypeptide, becomes covalently linked to the protein substrate in an ATP-requiring reaction. Once marked in this way, the conjugated protein is proteolyzed in a reaction that also requires ATP. Here the authors show that tRNA is another essential component of the system. Ribonucleases strongly inhibit the ubiquitin- and ATP-dependent degradation of /sup 125/I-labeled bovine serum albumin in the reticulocyte system in vitro. RNAs extracted from fractions of the reticulocyte extract or from mouse cells restore proteolytic activity. When the RNA is fractionated by gel electrophoresis, only the tRNA fraction is active in restoring proteolysis. Furthermore, pure mouse tRNA/sup His/, isolated by immunoprecipitation with patient autoimmune sera, restores the proteolytic activity. The possibility that the level of uncharged tRNA in mammalian cells regulates the ubiquitin- and ATP-dependent proteolytic system is discussed.

  2. Temperature dependence of unitary properties of an ATP-dependent potassium channel in cardiac myocytes.

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    McLarnon, J G; Hamman, B.N.; Tibbits, G.F.

    1993-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the properties of unitary currents in cultured rat ventricular myocytes has been studied. Currents flowing through an ATP-dependent K+ channel were recorded from inside-out patches with the bath temperature varied from 10 degrees to 30 degrees C. The channel conductance was 56 pS at room temperature (22 degrees C), and the amplitudes of unitary currents and the channel conductance exhibited a relatively weak (Q10 from 1.4 to 1.6) dependence on temperature. The te...

  3. Dietary protein deficiency reduces lysosomal and nonlysosomal ATP-dependent proteolysis in muscle

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    Tawa, N. E. Jr; Kettelhut, I. C.; Goldberg, A. L.

    1992-01-01

    When rats are fed a protein deficient (PD) diet for 7 days, rates of proteolysis in skeletal muscle decrease by 40-50% (N. E. Tawa, Jr., and A. L. Goldberg. Am. J. Physiol. 263 (Endocrinol. Metab. 26): E317-325, 1992). To identify the underlying biochemical adaptations, we measured different proteolytic processes in incubated muscles. The capacity for intralysosomal proteolysis, as shown by sensitivity to methylamine or lysosomal protease inhibitors, fell 55-75% in muscles from PD rats. Furthermore, extracts of muscles of PD rats showed 30-70% lower activity of many lysosomal proteases, including cathepsins B, H, and C, and carboxypeptidases A and C, as well as other lysosomal hydrolases. The fall in cathepsin B and proteolysis was evident by 3 days on the PD diet, and both returned to control levels 3 days after refeeding of the normal diet. In muscles maintained under optimal conditions, 80-90% of protein breakdown occurs by nonlysosomal pathways. In muscles of PD rats, this ATP-dependent process was also 40-60% slower. Even though overall proteolysis decreased in muscles of PD rats, their capacity for Ca(2+)-dependent proteolysis increased (by 66%), as did the activity of the calpains (+150-250%). Thus the lysosomal and the ATP-dependent processes decrease coordinately and contribute to the fall in muscle proteolysis in PD animals.

  4. The size of the nucleosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Jakob; Olsen, Kasper

    2011-01-01

    The structural origin of the size of the 11 nm nucleosomal disc is addressed. On the nanometer length-scale the organization of DNA as chromatin in the chromosomes involves a coiling of DNA around the histone core of the nucleosome. We suggest that the size of the nucleosome core particle...... is dictated by the fulfillment of two criteria: One is optimizing the volume fraction of the DNA double helix; this requirement for close-packing has its root in optimizing atomic and molecular interactions. The other criterion being that of having a zero strain-twist coupling; being a zero-twist structure......-pairs of the linker-DNA is included the estimate of the size of an ideal nucleosome is in close agreement with the experimental numbers. Interestingly, the size of the nucleosome is shown to be a consequence of intrinsic properties of the DNA double helix....

  5. Antispasmodic activity of Symplocos paniculata is mediated through opening of ATP-dependent K+ channel

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    Khalid Hussain Janbaz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Symplocos paniculata is a medicinal plant used by native healers to manage gastrointestinal ailments. The crude methanolic extract of S. paniculata was screened pharmacologically both in vitro and in vivo for the validation of its therapeutic potential. It suppressed the spontaneous activity of isolated rabbit jejunum preparations and also caused inhibition of the low K+ (20 mM- induced spastic contractions in isolated rabbit jejunum preparations in a manner comparable to cromakalim. The relaxant effect was found to be blocked following glibenclamide exposure of the isolated tissue preparations similar to cromakalim, suggesting that observed response was likely to be mediated through opening of ATP dependent K+ channels. Following oral administration to mice provided protection against castor oil-induced diarrhea in a manner similar to loperamide. The plant material was found safe in toxicity study up to oral dose of 8 g/kg in mice. Hence, present study provides a scientific basis for the vernacular use of S. paniculata in gastro-intestinal system.

  6. Multitasking in the mitochondrion by the ATP-dependent Lon protease.

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    Venkatesh, Sundararajan; Lee, Jae; Singh, Kamalendra; Lee, Irene; Suzuki, Carolyn K

    2012-01-01

    The AAA(+) Lon protease is a soluble single-ringed homo-oligomer, which represents the most streamlined operational unit mediating ATP-dependent proteolysis. Despite its simplicity, the architecture of Lon proteases exhibits a species-specific diversity. Homology modeling provides insights into the structural features that distinguish bacterial and human Lon proteases as hexameric complexes from yeast Lon, which is uniquely heptameric. The best-understood functions of mitochondrial Lon are linked to maintaining proteostasis under normal metabolic conditions, and preventing proteotoxicity during environmental and cellular stress. An intriguing property of human Lon is its specific binding to G-quadruplex DNA, and its association with the mitochondrial genome in cultured cells. A fraction of Lon preferentially binds to the control region of mitochondrial DNA where transcription and replication are initiated. Here, we present an overview of the diverse functions of mitochondrial Lon, as well as speculative perspectives on its role in protein and mtDNA quality control. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Multidrug resistance in Lactococcus lactis : Evidence for ATP-dependent drug extrusion from the inner leaflet of the cytoplasmic membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolhuis, H; van Veen, H.W.; Molenaar, D.; Poolman, B.; Driessen, A.J.M.; Konings, W.N

    1996-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis possesses an ATP-dependent drug extrusion system which shares functional properties with the mammalian multidrug resistance (MDR) transporter P-glycoprotein, One of the intriguing aspects of both transporters is their ability to interact with a broad range of structurally

  8. Recombination in Escherichia coli V. Genetic analysis of recombinants from crosses with recipients deficient in ATP-dependent exonuclease activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haan, P.G. de; Hoekstra, W.P.M.; Verhoef, C.

    A genetic analysis of recombinants from crosses with recombination-deficient recipients, lacking the ATP-dependent exonuclease activity, demonstrated differences in the inheritance pattern of donor markers compared with a Rec+ recipient. In particular the donor markers proximal to the transfer

  9. Nucleosome loss leads to global transcriptional up-regulation and genomic instability during yeast aging.

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    Hu, Zheng; Chen, Kaifu; Xia, Zheng; Chavez, Myrriah; Pal, Sangita; Seol, Ja-Hwan; Chen, Chin-Chuan; Li, Wei; Tyler, Jessica K

    2014-02-15

    All eukaryotic cells divide a finite number of times, although the mechanistic basis of this replicative aging remains unclear. Replicative aging is accompanied by a reduction in histone protein levels, and this is a cause of aging in budding yeast. Here we show that nucleosome occupancy decreased by 50% across the whole genome during replicative aging using spike-in controlled micrococcal nuclease digestion followed by sequencing. Furthermore, nucleosomes became less well positioned or moved to sequences predicted to better accommodate histone octamers. The loss of histones during aging led to transcriptional induction of all yeast genes. Genes that are normally repressed by promoter nucleosomes were most induced, accompanied by preferential nucleosome loss from their promoters. We also found elevated levels of DNA strand breaks, mitochondrial DNA transfer to the nuclear genome, large-scale chromosomal alterations, translocations, and retrotransposition during aging.

  10. Nucleosome Organization in Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puya G Yazdi

    Full Text Available The fundamental repeating unit of eukaryotic chromatin is the nucleosome. Besides being involved in packaging DNA, nucleosome organization plays an important role in transcriptional regulation and cellular identity. Currently, there is much debate about the major determinants of the nucleosome architecture of a genome and its significance with little being known about its role in stem cells. To address these questions, we performed ultra-deep sequencing of nucleosomal DNA in two human embryonic stem cell lines and integrated our data with numerous epigenomic maps. Our analyses have revealed that the genome is a determinant of nucleosome organization with transcriptionally inactive regions characterized by a "ground state" of nucleosome profiles driven by underlying DNA sequences. DNA sequence preferences are associated with heterogeneous chromatin organization around transcription start sites. Transcription, histone modifications, and DNA methylation alter this "ground state" by having distinct effects on both nucleosome positioning and occupancy. As the transcriptional rate increases, nucleosomes become better positioned. Exons transcribed and included in the final spliced mRNA have distinct nucleosome profiles in comparison to exons not included at exon-exon junctions. Genes marked by the active modification H3K4m3 are characterized by lower nucleosome occupancy before the transcription start site compared to genes marked by the inactive modification H3K27m3, while bivalent domains, genes associated with both marks, lie exactly in the middle. Combinatorial patterns of epigenetic marks (chromatin states are associated with unique nucleosome profiles. Nucleosome organization varies around transcription factor binding in enhancers versus promoters. DNA methylation is associated with increasing nucleosome occupancy and different types of methylations have distinct location preferences within the nucleosome core particle. Finally, computational

  11. The structure of DNA in a nucleosome.

    OpenAIRE

    Hayes, J J; Tullius, T D; Wolffe, A P

    1990-01-01

    We describe the application of the hydroxyl radical footprinting technique to examine the histone-DNA interactions of a nucleosome that includes part of the 5S ribosomal RNA gene of Xenopus borealis. We establish that two distinct regions of DNA with different helical periodicities exist within the nucleosome and demonstrate a change in the helical periodicity of this DNA upon nucleosome formation. In particular, we find that on average the helical periodicity of DNA in this nucleosome is 10....

  12. Relationship between nucleosome positioning and DNA methylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodavarapu, Ramakrishna K.; Feng, Suhua; Bernatavichute, Yana V.; Chen, Pao-Yang; Stroud, Hume; Yu, Yanchun; Hetzel, Jonathan; Kuo, Frank; Kim, Jin; Cokus, Shawn J.; Casero, David; Bernal, Maria; Huijser, Peter; Clark, Amander T.; Krämer, Ute; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Jacobsen, Steven E.; Pellegrini, Matteo

    2010-01-01

    Nucleosomes compact and regulate access to DNA in the nucleus, and are composed of approximately 147 bases of DNA wrapped around a histone octamer1, 2. Here we report a genome-wide nucleosome positioning analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana utilizing massively parallel sequencing of mononucleosomes. By combining this data with profiles of DNA methylation at single base resolution, we identified ten base periodicities in the DNA methylation status of nucleosome-bound DNA and found that nucleosomal DNA was more highly methylated than flanking DNA. These results suggest that nucleosome positioning strongly influences DNA methylation patterning throughout the genome and that DNA methyltransferases preferentially target nucleosome-bound DNA. We also observed similar trends in human nucleosomal DNA suggesting that the relationships between nucleosomes and DNA methyltransferases are conserved. Finally, as has been observed in animals, nucleosomes were highly enriched on exons, and preferentially positioned at intron-exon and exon-intron boundaries. RNA Pol II was also enriched on exons relative to introns, consistent with the hypothesis that nucleosome positioning regulates Pol II processivity. DNA methylation is enriched on exons, consistent with the targeting of DNA methylation to nucleosomes, and suggesting a role for DNA methylation in exon definition. PMID:20512117

  13. Physics behind the mechanical nucleosome positioning code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuiddam, Martijn; Everaers, Ralf; Schiessel, Helmut

    2017-11-01

    The positions along DNA molecules of nucleosomes, the most abundant DNA-protein complexes in cells, are influenced by the sequence-dependent DNA mechanics and geometry. This leads to the "nucleosome positioning code", a preference of nucleosomes for certain sequence motives. Here we introduce a simplified model of the nucleosome where a coarse-grained DNA molecule is frozen into an idealized superhelical shape. We calculate the exact sequence preferences of our nucleosome model and find it to reproduce qualitatively all the main features known to influence nucleosome positions. Moreover, using well-controlled approximations to this model allows us to come to a detailed understanding of the physics behind the sequence preferences of nucleosomes.

  14. A systematic analysis of nucleosome core particle and nucleosome-nucleosome stacking structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolev, Nikolay; Lyubartsev, Alexander P; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2018-01-24

    Chromatin condensation is driven by the energetically favourable interaction between nucleosome core particles (NCPs). The close NCP-NCP contact, stacking, is a primary structural element of all condensed states of chromatin in vitro and in vivo. However, the molecular structure of stacked nucleosomes as well as the nature of the interactions involved in its formation have not yet been systematically studied. Here we undertake an investigation of both the structural and physico-chemical features of NCP structure and the NCP-NCP stacking. We introduce an "NCP-centred" set of parameters (NCP-NCP distance, shift, rise, tilt, and others) that allows numerical characterisation of the mutual positions of the NCPs in the stacking and in any other structures formed by the NCP. NCP stacking in more than 140 published NCP crystal structures were analysed. In addition, coarse grained (CG) MD simulations modelling NCP condensation was carried out. The CG model takes into account details of the nucleosome structure and adequately describes the long range electrostatic forces as well as excluded volume effects acting in chromatin. The CG simulations showed good agreement with experimental data and revealed the importance of the H2A and H4 N-terminal tail bridging and screening as well as tail-tail correlations in the stacked nucleosomes.

  15. Structure and function of a novel type of ATP-dependent Clp protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Fredrik I; Tryggvesson, Anders; Sharon, Michal; Diemand, Alexander V; Classen, Mirjam; Best, Christoph; Schmidt, Ronny; Schelin, Jenny; Stanne, Tara M; Bukau, Bernd; Robinson, Carol V; Witt, Susanne; Mogk, Axel; Clarke, Adrian K

    2009-05-15

    The Clp protease is conserved among eubacteria and most eukaryotes, and uses ATP to drive protein substrate unfolding and translocation into a chamber of sequestered proteolytic active sites. The main constitutive Clp protease in photosynthetic organisms has evolved into a functionally essential and structurally intricate enzyme. The model Clp protease from the cyanobacterium Synechococcus consists of the HSP100 molecular chaperone ClpC and a mixed proteolytic core comprised of two distinct subunits, ClpP3 and ClpR. We have purified the ClpP3/R complex, the first for a Clp proteolytic core comprised of heterologous subunits. The ClpP3/R complex has unique functional and structural features, consisting of twin heptameric rings each with an identical ClpP3(3)ClpR(4) configuration. As predicted by its lack of an obvious catalytic triad, the ClpR subunit is shown to be proteolytically inactive. Interestingly, extensive modification to ClpR to restore proteolytic activity to this subunit showed that its presence in the core complex is not rate-limiting for the overall proteolytic activity of the ClpCP3/R protease. Altogether, the ClpP3/R complex shows remarkable similarities to the 20 S core of the proteasome, revealing a far greater degree of convergent evolution than previously thought between the development of the Clp protease in photosynthetic organisms and that of the eukaryotic 26 S proteasome.

  16. The Drosophila nucleosome remodeling factor NURF is required for Ecdysteroid signaling and metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badenhorst, Paul; Xiao, Hua; Cherbas, Lucy; Kwon, So Yeon; Voas, Matt; Rebay, Ilaria; Cherbas, Peter; Wu, Carl

    2005-11-01

    Drosophila NURF is an ISWI-containing ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complex that regulates transcription by catalyzing nucleosome sliding. To determine in vivo gene targets of NURF, we performed whole genome expression analysis on mutants lacking the NURF-specific subunit NURF301. Strikingly, a large set of ecdysone-responsive targets is included among several hundred NURF-regulated genes. Null Nurf301 mutants do not undergo larval to pupal metamorphosis, and also enhance dominant-negative mutations in ecdysone receptor. Moreover, purified NURF binds EcR in an ecdysone-dependent manner, suggesting it is a direct effector of nuclear receptor activity. The conservation of NURF in mammals has broad implications for steroid signaling.

  17. Cloning, expression, and characterization of the first archaeal ATP-dependent glucokinase from aerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Mitani, Yuri; Goda, Shuichiro; Kawarabayasi, Yutaka; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2003-02-01

    The gene encoding the ATP-dependent glucokinase of hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix was identified, cloned, and functionally expressed in Escherichia coli. The deduced amino acid sequence showed 40% identity to that of the putative glucokinase from hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobacurum aerophilum. The purified recombinant enzyme was a monomer with a molecular mass of 35 kDa. The enzyme retained its full activity on heating at 70 degrees C for 10 min and retained 65% of the activity after 10-min incubation at 100 degrees C. The enzyme exclusively catalyzed the phosphorylation of D-glucose using ATP as a phosphoryl donor. ITP was accepted in addition to ATP. The rate dependence with both glucose and ATP followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics, with apparent K(m) values of 0.054 and 0.50 mM, respectively. The enzyme activity required divalent cations; Mg(2+), which was most effective, could partially be replaced by Mn(2+) or Ca(2+). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the glucokinase from A. pernix does not belong to the clusters of enzymes found in bacteria and eukarya. This is the first description of the characteristics of an ATP-dependent glucokinase from an archaeon.

  18. Nucleosomal promoter variation generates gene expression noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Christopher R; Boeger, Hinrich

    2014-12-16

    Gene product molecule numbers fluctuate over time and between cells, confounding deterministic expectations. The molecular origins of this noise of gene expression remain unknown. Recent EM analysis of single PHO5 gene molecules of yeast indicated that promoter molecules stochastically assume alternative nucleosome configurations at steady state, including the fully nucleosomal and nucleosome-free configuration. Given that distinct configurations are unequally conducive to transcription, the nucleosomal variation of promoter molecules may constitute a source of gene expression noise. This notion, however, implies an untested conjecture, namely that the nucleosomal variation arises de novo or intrinsically (i.e., that it cannot be explained as the result of the promoter's deterministic response to variation in its molecular surroundings). Here, we show--by microscopically analyzing the nucleosome configurations of two juxtaposed physically linked PHO5 promoter copies--that the configurational variation, indeed, is intrinsically stochastic and thus, a cause of gene expression noise rather than its effect.

  19. Genetic identification of a network of factors that functionally interact with the nucleosome remodeling ATPase ISWI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giosalba Burgio

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Nucleosome remodeling and covalent modifications of histones play fundamental roles in chromatin structure and function. However, much remains to be learned about how the action of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors and histone-modifying enzymes is coordinated to modulate chromatin organization and transcription. The evolutionarily conserved ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling factor ISWI plays essential roles in chromosome organization, DNA replication, and transcription regulation. To gain insight into regulation and mechanism of action of ISWI, we conducted an unbiased genetic screen to identify factors with which it interacts in vivo. We found that ISWI interacts with a network of factors that escaped detection in previous biochemical analyses, including the Sin3A gene. The Sin3A protein and the histone deacetylase Rpd3 are part of a conserved histone deacetylase complex involved in transcriptional repression. ISWI and the Sin3A/Rpd3 complex co-localize at specific chromosome domains. Loss of ISWI activity causes a reduction in the binding of the Sin3A/Rpd3 complex to chromatin. Biochemical analysis showed that the ISWI physically interacts with the histone deacetylase activity of the Sin3A/Rpd3 complex. Consistent with these findings, the acetylation of histone H4 is altered when ISWI activity is perturbed in vivo. These findings suggest that ISWI associates with the Sin3A/Rpd3 complex to support its function in vivo.

  20. Polymer reptation and nucleosome repositioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiessel, H; Widom, J; Bruinsma, R F; Gelbart, W M

    2001-05-07

    We consider how beads can diffuse along a chain that wraps them, without becoming displaced from the chain; our proposed mechanism is analogous to the reptation of "stored length" in more familiar situations of polymer dynamics. The problem arises in the case of globular aggregates of proteins (histones) that are wound by DNA in the chromosomes of plants and animals; these beads (nucleosomes) are multiply wrapped and yet are able to reposition themselves over long distances, while remaining bound by the DNA chain.

  1. Archaeal Nucleosome Positioning by CTG Repeats

    OpenAIRE

    Sandman, Kathleen; Reeve, John N.

    1999-01-01

    DNA shape recognition determines the preferred binding sites for sequence-independent DNA binding proteins, and here we document that archaeal histones assemble archaeal nucleosomes in vitro centered preferentially within (CTG)6 and (CTG)8 repeats, close to junctions with flanking mixed-sequence DNA. Archaeal nucleosomes were not positioned by (CTG)4-, (CTG)5-, or (CTG)3AA(CTG)3-containing DNA sequences. The features of CTG repeat-containing sequences that direct eucaryal nucleosome positioni...

  2. On the role of inter-nucleosomal interactions and intrinsic nucleosome dynamics in chromatin function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wladyslaw A. Krajewski

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Evidence is emerging that many diseases result from defects in gene functions, which, in turn, depend on the local chromatin environment of a gene. However, it still remains not fully clear how chromatin activity code is ‘translated’ to the particular ‘activating’ or ‘repressing’ chromatin structural transition. Commonly, chromatin remodeling in vitro was studied using mononucleosomes as a model. However, recent data suggest that structural reorganization of a single mononucleosome is not equal to remodeling of a nucleosome particle under multinucleosomal content – such as, interaction of nucleosomes via flexible histone termini could significantly alter the mode (and the resulting products of nucleosome structural transitions. It is becoming evident that a nucleosome array does not constitute just a ‘polymer’ of individual ‘canonical’ nucleosomes due to multiple inter-nucleosomal interactions which affect nucleosome dynamics and structure. It could be hypothesized, that inter-nucleosomal interactions could act in cooperation with nucleosome inherent dynamics to orchestrate DNA-based processes and promote formation and stabilization of highly-dynamic, accessible structure of a nucleosome array. In the proposed paper we would like to discuss the nucleosome dynamics within the chromatin fiber mainly as it pertains to the roles of the structural changes mediated by inter-nucleosomal interactions.

  3. spFRET studies of nucleosome dynamics modulated by histone modifications, histone variants and neighboring nucleosomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buning, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    At the basis of the regulation of the genetic code (DNA) in eukaryotes is its organization into nucleosomes. Nucleosomes modulate DNA accessibility through conformational dynamics like DNA breathing - the transient unwrapping of DNA from the nucleosome. Single-pair Fluorescence Resonance Energy

  4. A conserved residue cluster that governs kinetics of ATP-dependent gating of Kir6.2 potassium channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Roger S; Wright, Jordan; Pless, Stephan Alexander

    2015-01-01

    elements that control the kinetics of ATP-dependent regulation of KATP (Kir6.2 + SUR1) channels using rapid concentration jumps. WT Kir6.2 channels re-open after rapid washout of ATP with a time constant of approximately 60 ms. Extending similar kinetic measurements to numerous mutants revealed fairly...... modest effects on gating kinetics despite significant changes in ATP sensitivity and open probability. However, we identified a pair of highly conserved neighboring amino acids (Trp68, Lys170) that control the rate of channel opening and inhibition in response to ATP. Paradoxically, mutations of Trp68...... or Lys170 markedly slow the kinetics of channel opening (500 ms and 700 ms for Trp68Leu and Lys170Asn, respectively), while increasing channel open probability. Examining the functional effects of these residues using phi-value analysis revealed a steep negative slope. This finding implies...

  5. ATP-dependent regulation of actin monomer-filament equilibrium by cyclase-associated protein and ADF/cofilin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Kazumi; Ono, Shoichiro

    2013-07-15

    CAP (cyclase-associated protein) is a conserved regulator of actin filament dynamics. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, CAS-1 is an isoform of CAP that is expressed in striated muscle and regulates sarcomeric actin assembly. In the present study, we report that CAS-2, a second CAP isoform in C. elegans, attenuates the actin-monomer-sequestering effect of ADF (actin depolymerizing factor)/cofilin to increase the steady-state levels of actin filaments in an ATP-dependent manner. CAS-2 binds to actin monomers without a strong preference for either ATP- or ADP-actin. CAS-2 strongly enhances the exchange of actin-bound nucleotides even in the presence of UNC-60A, a C. elegans ADF/cofilin that inhibits nucleotide exchange. UNC-60A induces the depolymerization of actin filaments and sequesters actin monomers, whereas CAS-2 reverses the monomer-sequestering effect of UNC-60A in the presence of ATP, but not in the presence of only ADP or the absence of ATP or ADP. A 1:100 molar ratio of CAS-2 to UNC-60A is sufficient to increase actin filaments. CAS-2 has two independent actin-binding sites in its N- and C-terminal halves, and the C-terminal half is necessary and sufficient for the observed activities of the full-length CAS-2. These results suggest that CAS-2 (CAP) and UNC-60A (ADF/cofilin) are important in the ATP-dependent regulation of the actin monomer-filament equilibrium.

  6. Acetylated histone H3 increases nucleosome dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Marek; Manohar, Mridula; Ottesen, Jennifer; Poirier, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Chromatin's basic unit structure is the nucleosome, i.e. genomic DNA wrapped around a particular class of proteins -- histones -- which due to their physical hindrance, block vital biological processes, such as DNA repair, DNA replication, and RNA transcription. Histone post-translational modifications, which are known to exist in vivo, are hypothesized to regulate these biological processes by directly altering DNA-histone interactions and thus nucleosome structure and stability. Using magnetic tweezers technique we studied the acetylation of histone H3 in the dyad region, i.e. at K115 and K122, on reconstituted arrays of nucleosomes under constant external force. Based on the measured increase in the probability of dissociation of modified nucleosomes, we infer that this double modification could facilitate histone chaperone mediated nucleosome disassembly in vivo.

  7. Characterization of Dnmt1 Binding and DNA Methylation on Nucleosomes and Nucleosomal Arrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Schrader

    Full Text Available The packaging of DNA into nucleosomes and the organisation into higher order structures of chromatin limits the access of sequence specific DNA binding factors to DNA. In cells, DNA methylation is preferentially occuring in the linker region of nucleosomes, suggesting a structural impact of chromatin on DNA methylation. These observations raise the question whether DNA methyltransferases are capable to recognize the nucleosomal substrates and to modify the packaged DNA. Here, we performed a detailed analysis of nucleosome binding and nucleosomal DNA methylation by the maintenance DNA methyltransferase Dnmt1. Our binding studies show that Dnmt1 has a DNA length sensing activity, binding cooperatively to DNA, and requiring a minimal DNA length of 20 bp. Dnmt1 needs linker DNA to bind to nucleosomes and most efficiently recognizes nucleosomes with symmetric DNA linkers. Footprinting experiments reveal that Dnmt1 binds to both DNA linkers exiting the nucleosome core. The binding pattern correlates with the efficient methylation of DNA linkers. However, the enzyme lacks the ability to methylate nucleosomal CpG sites on mononucleosomes and nucleosomal arrays, unless chromatin remodeling enzymes create a dynamic chromatin state. In addition, our results show that Dnmt1 functionally interacts with specific chromatin remodeling enzymes to enable complete methylation of hemi-methylated DNA in chromatin.

  8. Assembly of the chloroplast ATP-dependent Clp protease in Arabidopsis is regulated by the ClpT accessory proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjögren, Lars L E; Clarke, Adrian K

    2011-01-01

    The ATP-dependent caseinolytic protease (Clp) is an essential housekeeping enzyme in plant chloroplasts. It is by far the most complex of all known Clp proteases, with a proteolytic core consisting of multiple catalytic ClpP and noncatalytic ClpR subunits. It also includes a unique form of Clp protein of unknown function designated ClpT, two of which exist in the model species Arabidopsis thaliana. Inactivation of ClpT1 or ClpT2 significantly reduces the amount of Clp proteolytic core, whereas loss of both proves seedling lethal under autotrophic conditions. During assembly of the Clp proteolytic core, ClpT1 first binds to the P-ring (consisting of ClpP3-6 subunits) followed by ClpT2, and only then does the P-ring combine with the R-ring (ClpP1, ClpR1-4 subunits). Most of the ClpT proteins in chloroplasts exist in vivo as homodimers, which then apparently monomerize prior to association with the P-ring. Despite their relative abundance, however, the availability of both ClpT proteins is rate limiting for the core assembly, with the addition of recombinant ClpT1 and ClpT2 increasing core content up to fourfold. Overall, ClpT appears to regulate the assembly of the chloroplast Clp protease, revealing a new and sophisticated control mechanism on the activity of this vital protease in plants.

  9. Tetrahydroisoquinolines affect the whole-cell phenotype of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by inhibiting the ATP-dependent MurE ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Juan D; Pesnot, Thomas; Barrera, Diana A; Davies, Heledd M; McMahon, Eleanor; Evangelopoulos, Dimitrios; Mortazavi, Parisa N; Munshi, Tulika; Maitra, Arundhati; Lamming, Eleanor D; Angell, Richard; Gershater, Markus C; Redmond, Joanna M; Needham, Deborah; Ward, John M; Cuca, Luis E; Hailes, Helen C; Bhakta, Sanjib

    2015-01-01

    (S)-Leucoxine, isolated from the Colombian Lauraceae tree Rhodostemonodaphne crenaticupula Madriñan, was found to inhibit the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. A biomimetic approach for the chemical synthesis of a wide array of 1-substituted tetrahydroisoquinolines was undertaken with the aim of elucidating a common pharmacophore for these compounds with novel mode(s) of anti-TB action. Biomimetic Pictet-Spengler or Bischler-Napieralski synthetic routes were employed followed by an evaluation of the biological activity of the synthesized compounds. In this work, the synthesized tetrahydroisoquinolines were found to inhibit the growth of M. tuberculosis H37Rv and affect its whole-cell phenotype as well as the activity of the ATP-dependent MurE ligase, a key enzyme involved in the early stage of cell wall peptidoglycan biosynthesis. As the correlation between the MIC and the half-inhibitory enzymatic concentration was not particularly strong, there is a credible possibility that these compounds have pleiotropic mechanism(s) of action in M. tuberculosis. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

  10. An Arabidopsis ATP-dependent, DEAD-box RNA helicase loses activity upon iosAsp formation but is restored by Protein Isoaspartyl Methltransferase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabidopsis thaliana PLANT RNA HELICASE75 (AtPRH75) demonstrated an ATP-dependent, RNA duplex unwinding capacity and an ATP-independent, RNA duplex reforming ability. It is known to accumulate isoAsp, but the consequences of isoAsp formation in AtPRH75 are unknown. Duplex unwinding was abolished by ...

  11. Influence of histone tails and H4 tail acetylations on nucleosome-nucleosome interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Lu, Chenning; Yang, Ye; Fan, Yanping; Yang, Renliang; Liu, Chuan-Fa; Korolev, Nikolay; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2011-12-16

    Nucleosome-nucleosome interaction plays a fundamental role in chromatin folding and self-association. The cation-induced condensation of nucleosome core particles (NCPs) displays properties similar to those of chromatin fibers, with important contributions from the N-terminal histone tails. We study the self-association induced by addition of cations [Mg(2+), Ca(2+), cobalt(III)hexammine(3+), spermidine(3+) and spermine(4)(+)] for NCPs reconstituted with wild-type unmodified histones and with globular tailless histones and for NCPs with the H4 histone tail having lysine (K) acetylations or lysine-to-glutamine mutations at positions K5, K8, K12 and K16. In addition, the histone construct with the single H4K16 acetylation was investigated. Acetylated histones were prepared by a semisynthetic native chemical ligation method. The aggregation behavior of NCPs shows a general cation-dependent behavior similar to that of the self-association of nucleosome arrays. Unlike nucleosome array self-association, NCP aggregation is sensitive to position and nature of the H4 tail modification. The tetra-acetylation in the H4 tail significantly weakens the nucleosome-nucleosome interaction, while the H4 K→Q tetra-mutation displays a more modest effect. The single H4K16 acetylation also weakens the self-association of NCPs, which reflects the specific role of H4K16 in the nucleosome-nucleosome stacking. Tailless NCPs can aggregate in the presence of oligocations, which indicates that attraction also occurs by tail-independent nucleosome-nucleosome stacking and DNA-DNA attraction in the presence of cations. The experimental data were compared with the results of coarse-grained computer modeling for NCP solutions with explicit presence of mobile ions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Identification of new protein substrates for the chloroplast ATP-dependent Clp protease supports its constitutive role in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanne, Tara M; Sjögren, Lars L E; Koussevitzky, Shai; Clarke, Adrian K

    2009-01-01

    The ATP-dependent Clp protease in plant chloroplasts consists of a heterogeneous proteolytic core containing multiple ClpP and ClpR paralogues. In this study, we have examined in detail the only viable knockout mutant to date of one of these subunits in Arabidopsis thaliana, ClpR1. Loss of ClpR1 caused a slow-growth phenotype, with chlorotic leaves during early development that later partially recovered upon maturity. Analysis of the Clp proteolytic core in the clpR1 mutant (clpR1-1) revealed approx. 10% of the wild-type levels remaining, probably due to a relative increase in the closely related ClpR3 protein and its partial substitution of ClpR1 in the core complex. A proteomic approach using an in organello proteolytic assay revealed 19 new potential substrates for the chloroplast Clp protease. Many of these substrates were constitutive enzymes involved in different metabolic pathways, including photosynthetic carbon fixation, nitrogen metabolism and chlorophyll/haem biosynthesis, whereas others function in housekeeping roles such as RNA maturation, protein synthesis and maturation, and recycling processes. In contrast, degradation of the stress-related chloroplast proteins Hsp21 (heat-shock protein 21) and lipoxygenase 2 was unaffected in the clpR1-1 line and thus not facilitated by the Clp protease. Overall, we show that the chloroplast Clp protease is principally a constitutive enzyme that degrades numerous stromal proteins, a feature that almost certainly underlies its vital importance for chloroplast function and plant viability.

  13. Rational design of substrate binding pockets in polyphosphate kinase for use in cost-effective ATP-dependent cascade reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hao; Nie, Kaili; Li, Chengcheng; Xu, Haijun; Wang, Fang; Tan, Tianwei; Liu, Luo

    2017-07-01

    Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) is the energy equivalent of the living system. Polyphosphate (polyP) is the ancient energy storage equivalent of organisms. Polyphosphate kinases (PPKs) catalyze the polyP formation or ATP formation, to store energy or to regenerate ATP, respectively. However, most PPKs are active only in the presence of long polyPs, which are more difficult and more expensive to generate than the short polyPs. We investigated the PPK preference towards polyPs by site-directed mutagenesis and computational simulation, to understand the mechanism and further design enzymes for effective ATP regeneration using short polyPs for in vitro cascade reactions, which are highly desired for research and applications. The results suggest that the short polyPs inhibit PPK by blocking the ADP-binding pocket. Structural comparison between PPK (Corynebacterium glutamicum) and PPK (Sinorhizobium meliloti) indicates that three amino acid residues, i.e., lysine, glutamate, and threonine, are involved in the activity towards short polyP by fixing the adenosine group of ADP in between the subunits of the dimer, while the terminal phosphate group of ADP still offers an active site, which presents a binding pocket for ADP. A proposed triple mutant PPK (SMc02148-KET) demonstrates significant activity towards short polyP to form ATP from ADP. The obtained high glutathione titer (38.79 mM) and glucose-6-phosphate titer (87.35 mM) in cascade reactions with ATP regeneration using the triple mutant PPK (SMc02148-KET) reveal that the tailored PPK establishes the effective ATP regeneration system for ATP-dependent reactions.

  14. Initial rate and equilibrium isotope exchange studies on the ATP-dependent activity of polyphosphate Glucokinase from Propionibacterium shermanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, T H; Horn, P J; Pan, W H; Phillips, N F

    1996-05-28

    Polyphosphate glucokinase [EC 2.7.1.63] catalyzes the phosphorylation of glucose using either inorganic polyphosphate [poly(P)] or ATP as the phosphoryl donor. Both activities purified from Propionibacterium shermanii are the functional properties of a single enzyme with separate binding sites for the two phosphoryl donor substrates. The enzyme was found to utilize poly(P) much more efficiently than it does ATP, with a kcat/Kpoly(P) to kcat/KATP ratio of 2800. The catalytic constant for poly(P) is about 2-fold higher than for ATP. Other nucleotides like GTP and dATP also served as substrates with good efficiencies. The ATP-dependent reaction was analyzed using steady-state kinetics and isotopic exchange kinetics at chemical equilibrium. Intersecting initial velocity patterns for both glucose and ATP indicate sequential addition of substrates. Product inhibition studies resulted in two competitive and two noncompetitive patterns, which is characteristic of a Theorell-Chance mechanism or a random mechanism with two dead-end complexes. Results of isotope exchange experiments, however, rule out a Theorell-Chance mechanism, as well as a truly random mechanism. They are not consistent with a partially random mechanism (although a kinetically compulsory order of substrate binding is not excluded), where glucose is preferentially bound to free enzyme before ATP, and ADP is preferentially released as the first product, followed by glucose 6-phosphate. Dead-end inhibition analysis confirms this order of substrate binding. Competitive inhibition of ADP vs ATP is explained as resulting primarily from binding as a dead-end inhibitor (E.Glc.ADP) and not as a product. Another weaker abortive complex, E.ATP.G6P, is also formed. The chemical transformation or the release of ADP is the rate-limiting step in ATP utilization.

  15. Engineering an ATP-dependent D-Ala:D-Ala ligase for synthesizing amino acid amides from amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, Yuta; Okazaki, Seiji; Asano, Yasuhisa

    2017-05-01

    We successfully engineered a new enzyme that catalyzes the formation of D-Ala amide (D-AlaNH2) from D-Ala by modifying ATP-dependent D-Ala:D-Ala ligase (EC 6.3.2.4) from Thermus thermophilus, which catalyzes the formation of D-Ala-D-Ala from two molecules of D-Ala. The new enzyme was created by the replacement of the Ser293 residue with acidic amino acids, as it was speculated to bind to the second D-Ala of D-Ala-D-Ala. In addition, a replacement of the position with Glu performed better than that with Asp with regards to specificity for D-AlaNH2 production. The S293E variant, which was selected as the best enzyme for D-AlaNH2 production, exhibited an optimal activity at pH 9.0 and 40 °C for D-AlaNH2 production. The apparent K m values of this variant for D-Ala and NH3 were 7.35 mM and 1.58 M, respectively. The S293E variant could catalyze the synthesis of 9.3 and 35.7 mM of D-AlaNH2 from 10 and 50 mM D-Ala and 3 M NH4Cl with conversion yields of 93 and 71.4 %, respectively. This is the first report showing the enzymatic formation of amino acid amides from amino acids.

  16. Crystal structure of the R-protein of the multisubunit ATP-dependent restriction endonuclease NgoAVII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamulaitiene, Giedre; Silanskas, Arunas; Grazulis, Saulius; Zaremba, Mindaugas; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2014-12-16

    The restriction endonuclease (REase) NgoAVII is composed of two proteins, R.NgoAVII and N.NgoAVII, and shares features of both Type II restriction enzymes and Type I/III ATP-dependent restriction enzymes (see accompanying paper Zaremba et al., 2014). Here we present crystal structures of the R.NgoAVII apo-protein and the R.NgoAVII C-terminal domain bound to a specific DNA. R.NgoAVII is composed of two domains: an N-terminal nucleolytic PLD domain; and a C-terminal B3-like DNA-binding domain identified previously in BfiI and EcoRII REases, and in plant transcription factors. Structural comparison of the B3-like domains of R.NgoAVII, EcoRII, BfiI and the plant transcription factors revealed a conserved DNA-binding surface comprised of N- and C-arms that together grip the DNA. The C-arms of R.NgoAVII, EcoRII, BfiI and plant B3 domains are similar in size, but the R.NgoAVII N-arm which makes the majority of the contacts to the target site is much longer. The overall structures of R.NgoAVII and BfiI are similar; however, whilst BfiI has stand-alone catalytic activity, R.NgoAVII requires an auxiliary cognate N.NgoAVII protein and ATP hydrolysis in order to cleave DNA at the target site. The structures we present will help formulate future experiments to explore the molecular mechanisms of intersubunit crosstalk that control DNA cleavage by R.NgoAVII and related endonucleases. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. Ammonium ion substitutes for K/sup +/ in ATP-dependent Na/sup +/ transport by basolateral membrane vesicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Towle, D.W.; Hoelleland, T.

    1987-03-01

    Ion-transporting cells from posterior gills of blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) acclimated to low salinity were used as starting material for the preparation of microsomal membrane vesicles by density gradient centrifugation. The Na/sup +/-K/sup +/-adenosinetriphosphatase (ATPase)-enriched basolateral vesicles were loaded with KCl- or NH/sub 4//sup +/-containing medium by dilution and centrifugation, and initial rates of /sup 22/Na/sup +/ uptake into the vesicles were measured by a rapid filtration procedure. Varying the extravesicular sucrose concentration altered equilibrium uptake of /sup 22/Na/sup +/, indicating the existence of osmotically sensitive vesicles. Monensin, a sodium-specific ionophore, enhanced passive uptake of /sup 22/Na/sup +/ across the vesicle membrane in the absence of ATP. With 100 mM KCl in the intravesicular medium, addition of ATP to the extravesicular medium increased initial rates of /sup 22/Na/sup +/ uptake 10- to 20-fold over levels measured without ATP. A nonhydrolyzable ATP analog failed to stimulate /sup 22/Na/sup +/ uptake. Intravesicular K/sup +/ could be replaced by NH/sub 4//sup +/ but not by choline. With NH/sub 4//sup +/ as counterion, Na/sup +/ transport was inhibited by digitoxin, but valinomycin had no effect. A study of the kinetic effects of intravesicular K/sup +/ and NH/sub 4//sup +/ on initial rates of /sup 22/Na/sup +/ uptake indicated the existence of two classes of binding sites, one responding to counterion concentrations in the millimolar range and a second class responding to counterion concentrations over 50 mM. The results indicate that ATP-dependent /sup 22/Na/sup +/ uptake by membrane vesicles from Callinectes sapidus gill, mediated by Na/sup +/-K/sup +/-ATPase, can utilize either K/sup +/ or NH/sub 4//sup +/ as counterion.

  18. Genome-Wide Mapping Targets of the Metazoan Chromatin Remodeling Factor NURF Reveals Nucleosome Remodeling at Enhancers, Core Promoters and Gene Insulators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Yeon Kwon

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available NURF is a conserved higher eukaryotic ISWI-containing chromatin remodeling complex that catalyzes ATP-dependent nucleosome sliding. By sliding nucleosomes, NURF is able to alter chromatin dynamics to control transcription and genome organization. Previous biochemical and genetic analysis of the specificity-subunit of Drosophila NURF (Nurf301/Enhancer of Bithorax (E(bx has defined NURF as a critical regulator of homeotic, heat-shock and steroid-responsive gene transcription. It has been speculated that NURF controls pathway specific transcription by co-operating with sequence-specific transcription factors to remodel chromatin at dedicated enhancers. However, conclusive in vivo demonstration of this is lacking and precise regulatory elements targeted by NURF are poorly defined. To address this, we have generated a comprehensive map of in vivo NURF activity, using MNase-sequencing to determine at base pair resolution NURF target nucleosomes, and ChIP-sequencing to define sites of NURF recruitment. Our data show that, besides anticipated roles at enhancers, NURF interacts physically and functionally with the TRF2/DREF basal transcription factor to organize nucleosomes downstream of active promoters. Moreover, we detect NURF remodeling and recruitment at distal insulator sites, where NURF functionally interacts with and co-localizes with DREF and insulator proteins including CP190 to establish nucleosome-depleted domains. This insulator function of NURF is most apparent at subclasses of insulators that mark the boundaries of chromatin domains, where multiple insulator proteins co-associate. By visualizing the complete repertoire of in vivo NURF chromatin targets, our data provide new insights into how chromatin remodeling can control genome organization and regulatory interactions.

  19. ATP-Dependent Chromatin Remodeling Is Required for Base Excision Repair in Conventional but Not in Variant H2A.Bbd Nucleosomes▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menoni, Hervé; Gasparutto, Didier; Hamiche, Ali; Cadet, Jean; Dimitrov, Stefan; Bouvet, Philippe; Angelov, Dimitar

    2007-01-01

    In eukaryotes, base excision repair (BER) is responsible for the repair of oxidatively generated lesions. The mechanism of BER on naked DNA substrates has been studied in detail, but how it operates on chromatin remains unclear. Here we have studied the mechanism of BER by introducing a single 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG) lesion in the DNA of reconstituted positioned conventional and histone variant H2A.Bbd nucleosomes. We found that 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase, apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease, and polymerase β activities were strongly reduced in both types of nucleosomes. In conventional nucleosomes SWI/SNF stimulated the processing of 8-oxoG by each one of the three BER repair factors to efficiencies similar to those for naked DNA. Interestingly, SWI/SNF-induced remodeling, but not mobilization of conventional nucleosomes, was required to achieve this effect. A very weak effect of SWI/SNF on the 8-oxoG BER removal in H2A.Bbd histone variant nucleosomes was observed. The possible implications of our data for the understanding of in vivo mechanisms of BER are discussed. PMID:17591702

  20. A positioned +1 nucleosome enhances promoter-proximal pausing

    OpenAIRE

    Jimeno-Gonz?lez, Silvia; Ceballos-Ch?vez, Mar?a; Reyes, Jos? C.

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin distribution is not uniform along the human genome. In most genes there is a promoter-associated nucleosome free region (NFR) followed by an array of nucleosomes towards the gene body in which the first (+1) nucleosome is strongly positioned. The function of this characteristic chromatin distribution in transcription is not fully understood. Here we show in vivo that the +1 nucleosome plays a role in modulating RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) promoter-proximal pausing. When a +1 nucleoso...

  1. Robertsonian translocations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 27, describes the occurrence of Robertsonian translocations (RTs), which refer to the recombination of whole chromosome arms, in both monocentric and dicentric chromosomes. The nonrandom participation of acrocentric chromosomes in RTs is documented by various methods, including unbiased ascertainment and ascertainment through trisomy, infertility, unspecified mental retardation, and Prader-Willi syndrome. Causes of nonrandom participation of chromosomes in RTs is presented, as are the following topics: segregation in carriers of RTs and segregation in sperm cells of RT carriers, interchromosomal effects and conclusions. 48 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Nucleosomes Inhibit Cas9 Endonuclease Activity in Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, John M; Laughery, Marian F; Wyrick, John J

    2015-12-08

    During Cas9 genome editing in eukaryotic cells, the bacterial Cas9 enzyme cleaves DNA targets within chromatin. To understand how chromatin affects Cas9 targeting, we characterized Cas9 activity on nucleosome substrates in vitro. We find that Cas9 endonuclease activity is strongly inhibited when its target site is located within the nucleosome core. In contrast, the nucleosome structure does not affect Cas9 activity at a target site within the adjacent linker DNA. Analysis of target sites that partially overlap with the nucleosome edge indicates that the accessibility of the protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM) is the critical determinant of Cas9 activity on a nucleosome.

  3. Human nucleosomes: special role of CG dinucleotides and Alu-nucleosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trifonov Edward N

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The periodical occurrence of dinucleotides with a period of 10.4 bases now is undeniably a hallmark of nucleosome positioning. Whereas many eukaryotic genomes contain visible and even strong signals for periodic distribution of dinucleotides, the human genome is rather featureless in this respect. The exact sequence features in the human genome that govern the nucleosome positioning remain largely unknown. Results When analyzing the human genome sequence with the positional autocorrelation method, we found that only the dinucleotide CG shows the 10.4 base periodicity, which is indicative of the presence of nucleosomes. There is a high occurrence of CG dinucleotides that are either 31 (10.4 × 3 or 62 (10.4 × 6 base pairs apart from one another - a sequence bias known to be characteristic of Alu-sequences. In a similar analysis with repetitive sequences removed, peaks of repeating CG motifs can be seen at positions 10, 21 and 31, the nearest integers of multiples of 10.4. Conclusions Although the CG dinucleotides are dominant, other elements of the standard nucleosome positioning pattern are present in the human genome as well. The positional autocorrelation analysis of the human genome demonstrates that the CG dinucleotide is, indeed, one visible element of the human nucleosome positioning pattern, which appears both in Alu sequences and in sequences without repeats. The dominant role that CG dinucleotides play in organizing human chromatin is to indicate the involvement of human nucleosomes in tuning the regulation of gene expression and chromatin structure, which is very likely due to cytosine-methylation/-demethylation in CG dinucleotides contained in the human nucleosomes. This is further confirmed by the positions of CG-periodical nucleosomes on Alu sequences. Alu repeats appear as monomers, dimers and trimers, harboring two to six nucleosomes in a run. Considering the exceptional role CG dinucleotides play in the

  4. Plasmodium falciparum Nucleosomes Exhibit Reduced Stability and Lost Sequence Dependent Nucleosome Positioning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Silberhorn

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The packaging and organization of genomic DNA into chromatin represents an additional regulatory layer of gene expression, with specific nucleosome positions that restrict the accessibility of regulatory DNA elements. The mechanisms that position nucleosomes in vivo are thought to depend on the biophysical properties of the histones, sequence patterns, like phased di-nucleotide repeats and the architecture of the histone octamer that folds DNA in 1.65 tight turns. Comparative studies of human and P. falciparum histones reveal that the latter have a strongly reduced ability to recognize internal sequence dependent nucleosome positioning signals. In contrast, the nucleosomes are positioned by AT-repeat sequences flanking nucleosomes in vivo and in vitro. Further, the strong sequence variations in the plasmodium histones, compared to other mammalian histones, do not present adaptations to its AT-rich genome. Human and parasite histones bind with higher affinity to GC-rich DNA and with lower affinity to AT-rich DNA. However, the plasmodium nucleosomes are overall less stable, with increased temperature induced mobility, decreased salt stability of the histones H2A and H2B and considerable reduced binding affinity to GC-rich DNA, as compared with the human nucleosomes. In addition, we show that plasmodium histone octamers form the shortest known nucleosome repeat length (155bp in vitro and in vivo. Our data suggest that the biochemical properties of the parasite histones are distinct from the typical characteristics of other eukaryotic histones and these properties reflect the increased accessibility of the P. falciparum genome.

  5. Plasmodium falciparum Nucleosomes Exhibit Reduced Stability and Lost Sequence Dependent Nucleosome Positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberhorn, Elisabeth; Schwartz, Uwe; Symelka, Anne; de Koning-Ward, Tania; Längst, Gernot

    2016-01-01

    The packaging and organization of genomic DNA into chromatin represents an additional regulatory layer of gene expression, with specific nucleosome positions that restrict the accessibility of regulatory DNA elements. The mechanisms that position nucleosomes in vivo are thought to depend on the biophysical properties of the histones, sequence patterns, like phased di-nucleotide repeats and the architecture of the histone octamer that folds DNA in 1.65 tight turns. Comparative studies of human and P. falciparum histones reveal that the latter have a strongly reduced ability to recognize internal sequence dependent nucleosome positioning signals. In contrast, the nucleosomes are positioned by AT-repeat sequences flanking nucleosomes in vivo and in vitro. Further, the strong sequence variations in the plasmodium histones, compared to other mammalian histones, do not present adaptations to its AT-rich genome. Human and parasite histones bind with higher affinity to GC-rich DNA and with lower affinity to AT-rich DNA. However, the plasmodium nucleosomes are overall less stable, with increased temperature induced mobility, decreased salt stability of the histones H2A and H2B and considerable reduced binding affinity to GC-rich DNA, as compared with the human nucleosomes. In addition, we show that plasmodium histone octamers form the shortest known nucleosome repeat length (155bp) in vitro and in vivo. Our data suggest that the biochemical properties of the parasite histones are distinct from the typical characteristics of other eukaryotic histones and these properties reflect the increased accessibility of the P. falciparum genome. PMID:28033404

  6. Tension-dependent Free Energies of Nucleosome Unwrapping

    CERN Document Server

    Lequieu, Joshua; Schwartz, David C; de Pablo, Juan J

    2016-01-01

    Nucleosomes form the basic unit of compaction within eukaryotic genomes and their locations represent an important, yet poorly understood, mechanism of genetic regulation. Quantifying the strength of interactions within the nucleosome is a central problem in biophysics and is critical to understanding how nucleosome positions influence gene expression. By comparing to single-molecule experiments, we demonstrate that a coarse-grained molecular model of the nucleosome can reproduce key aspects of nucleosome unwrapping. Using detailed simulations of DNA and histone proteins, we calculate the tension-dependent free energy surface corresponding to the unwrapping process. The model reproduces quantitatively the forces required to unwrap the nucleosome, and reveals the role played by electrostatic interactions during this process. We then demonstrate that histone modifications and DNA sequence can have significant effects on the energies of nucleosome formation. Most notably, we show that histone tails are crucial f...

  7. Stabilization of the promoter nucleosomes in nucleosome-free regions by the yeast Cyc8–Tup1 corepressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kaifu; Wilson, Marenda A.; Hirsch, Calley; Watson, Anjanette; Liang, Shoudan; Lu, Yue; Li, Wei; Dent, Sharon Y.R.

    2013-01-01

    The yeast Cyc8 (also known as Ssn6)–Tup1 complex regulates gene expression through a variety of mechanisms, including positioning of nucleosomes over promoters of some target genes to limit accessibility to the transcription machinery. To further define the functions of Cyc8–Tup1 in gene regulation and chromatin remodeling, we performed genome-wide profiling of changes in nucleosome organization and gene expression that occur upon loss of CYC8 or TUP1 and observed extensive nucleosome alterations in both promoters and gene bodies of derepressed genes. Our improved nucleosome profiling and analysis approaches revealed low-occupancy promoter nucleosomes (P nucleosomes) at locations previously defined as nucleosome-free regions. In the absence of CYC8 or TUP1, this P nucleosome is frequently lost, whereas nucleosomes are gained at −1 and +1 positions, accompanying up-regulation of downstream genes. Our analysis of public ChIP-seq data revealed that Cyc8 and Tup1 preferentially bind TATA-containing promoters, which are also enriched in genes derepressed upon loss of CYC8 or TUP1. These results suggest that stabilization of the P nucleosome on TATA-containing promoters may be a central feature of the repressive chromatin architecture created by the Cyc8–Tup1 corepressor, and that releasing the P nucleosome contributes to gene activation. PMID:23124522

  8. Nucleosome-coupled expression differences in closely-related species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gebbia Marinella

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-wide nucleosome occupancy is negatively related to the average level of transcription factor motif binding based on studies in yeast and several other model organisms. The degree to which nucleosome-motif interactions relate to phenotypic changes across species is, however, unknown. Results We address this challenge by generating nucleosome positioning and cell cycle expression data for Saccharomyces bayanus and show that differences in nucleosome occupancy reflect cell cycle expression divergence between two yeast species, S. bayanus and S. cerevisiae. Specifically, genes with nucleosome-depleted MBP1 motifs upstream of their coding sequence show periodic expression during the cell cycle, whereas genes with nucleosome-shielded motifs do not. In addition, conserved cell cycle regulatory motifs across these two species are more nucleosome-depleted compared to those that are not conserved, suggesting that the degree of conservation of regulatory sites varies, and is reflected by nucleosome occupancy patterns. Finally, many changes in cell cycle gene expression patterns across species can be correlated to changes in nucleosome occupancy on motifs (rather than to the presence or absence of motifs. Conclusions Our observations suggest that alteration of nucleosome occupancy is a previously uncharacterized feature related to the divergence of cell cycle expression between species.

  9. Exploring the Link between Nucleosome Occupancy and DNA Methylation

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    Cecilia Lövkvist

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Near promoters, both nucleosomes and CpG sites form characteristic spatial patterns. Previously, nucleosome depleted regions were observed upstream of transcription start sites and nucleosome occupancy was reported to correlate both with CpG density and the level of CpG methylation. Several studies imply a causal link where CpG methylation might induce nucleosome formation, whereas others argue the opposite, i.e., that nucleosome occupancy might influence CpG methylation. Correlations are indeed evident between nucleosomes, CpG density and CpG methylation—at least near promoter sites. It is however less established whether there is an immediate causal relation between nucleosome occupancy and the presence of CpG sites—or if nucleosome occupancy could be influenced by other factors. In this work, we test for such causality in human genomes by analyzing the three quantities both near and away from promoter sites. For data from the human genome we compare promoter regions with given CpG densities with genomic regions without promoters but of similar CpG densities. We find the observed correlation between nucleosome occupancy and CpG density, respectively CpG methylation, to be specific to promoter regions. In other regions along the genome nucleosome occupancy is statistically independent of the positioning of CpGs or their methylation levels. Anti-correlation between CpG density and methylation level is however similarly strong in both regions. On promoters, nucleosome occupancy is more strongly affected by the level of gene expression than CpG density or CpG methylation—calling into question any direct causal relation between nucleosome occupancy and CpG organization. Rather, our results suggest that for organisms with cytosine methylation nucleosome occupancy might be primarily linked to gene expression, with no strong impact on methylation.

  10. Acetone and Butanone Metabolism of the Denitrifying Bacterium “Aromatoleum aromaticum” Demonstrates Novel Biochemical Properties of an ATP-Dependent Aliphatic Ketone Carboxylase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schühle, Karola

    2012-01-01

    The anaerobic and aerobic metabolism of acetone and butanone in the betaproteobacterium “Aromatoleum aromaticum” is initiated by their ATP-dependent carboxylation to acetoacetate and 3-oxopentanoic acid, respectively. Both reactions are catalyzed by the same enzyme, acetone carboxylase, which was purified and characterized. Acetone carboxylase is highly induced under growth on acetone or butanone and accounts for at least 5.5% of total cell protein. The enzyme consists of three subunits of 85, 75, and 20 kDa, respectively, in a (αβγ)2 composition and contains 1 Zn and 2 Fe per heterohexamer but no organic cofactors. Chromatographic analysis of the ATP hydrolysis products indicated that ATP was exclusively cleaved to AMP and 2 Pi. The stoichiometry was determined to be 2 ATP consumed per acetone carboxylated. Purified acetone carboxylase from A. aromaticum catalyzes the carboxylation of acetone and butanone as the only substrates. However, the enzyme shows induced (uncoupled) ATPase activity with many other substrates that were not carboxylated. Acetone carboxylase is a member of a protein family that also contains acetone carboxylases of various other organisms, acetophenone carboxylase of A. aromaticum, and ATP-dependent hydantoinases/oxoprolinases. While the members of this family share several characteristic features, they differ with respect to the products of ATP hydrolysis, subunit composition, and metal content. PMID:22020645

  11. Nucleosome breathing and remodeling constrain CRISPR-Cas9 function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, R Stefan; Jiang, Fuguo; Doudna, Jennifer A; Lim, Wendell A; Narlikar, Geeta J; Almeida, Ricardo

    2016-04-28

    The CRISPR-Cas9 bacterial surveillance system has become a versatile tool for genome editing and gene regulation in eukaryotic cells, yet how CRISPR-Cas9 contends with the barriers presented by eukaryotic chromatin is poorly understood. Here we investigate how the smallest unit of chromatin, a nucleosome, constrains the activity of the CRISPR-Cas9 system. We find that nucleosomes assembled on native DNA sequences are permissive to Cas9 action. However, the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA to Cas9 is variable over several orders of magnitude depending on dynamic properties of the DNA sequence and the distance of the PAM site from the nucleosome dyad. We further find that chromatin remodeling enzymes stimulate Cas9 activity on nucleosomal templates. Our findings imply that the spontaneous breathing of nucleosomal DNA together with the action of chromatin remodelers allow Cas9 to effectively act on chromatin in vivo.

  12. Enhancement of the nucleosomal pattern in sequences of lower complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolshoy, Alexander; Shapiro, Kevin; Trifonov, Edward N.

    1997-01-01

    of a nucleosome database separated according to linguistic complexity. The pattern extracted from the subset of the simpler nucleosome sequences not only possesses all major attributes of the known nucleosomal pattern, but is substantially stronger with respect to amplitude in comparison with the total database......Intuitively, the complexity of a given DNA sequence is related to the number of various superimposed biological messages it contains. Here we assess the expectation that in nucleosome DNA sequences of lower linguistic complexity, the nucleosome DNA positioning pattern would be more pronounced than...... in those of higher linguistic complexity. The nucleosome DNA positioning pattern is one of the weakest (highly degenerate) sequence patterns. It has been extracted recently by specially designed multiple alignment procedures. We applied the most sensitive of these procedures to nearly equal subsets...

  13. Nucleosome DNA sequence structure of isochores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trifonov Edward N

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Significant differences in G+C content between different isochore types suggest that the nucleosome positioning patterns in DNA of the isochores should be different as well. Results Extraction of the patterns from the isochore DNA sequences by Shannon N-gram extension reveals that while the general motif YRRRRRYYYYYR is characteristic for all isochore types, the dominant positioning patterns of the isochores vary between TAAAAATTTTTA and CGGGGGCCCCCG due to the large differences in G+C composition. This is observed in human, mouse and chicken isochores, demonstrating that the variations of the positioning patterns are largely G+C dependent rather than species-specific. The species-specificity of nucleosome positioning patterns is revealed by dinucleotide periodicity analyses in isochore sequences. While human sequences are showing CG periodicity, chicken isochores display AG (CT periodicity. Mouse isochores show very weak CG periodicity only. Conclusions Nucleosome positioning pattern as revealed by Shannon N-gram extension is strongly dependent on G+C content and different in different isochores. Species-specificity of the pattern is subtle. It is reflected in the choice of preferentially periodical dinucleotides.

  14. Nucleosomes Selectively Inhibit Cas9 Off-target Activity at a Site Located at the Nucleosome Edge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, John M; Laughery, Marian F; Wyrick, John J

    2016-11-25

    Nucleosomes affect Cas9 binding and activity at on-target sites, but their impact at off-target sites is unknown. To investigate how nucleosomes affect Cas9 cleavage at off-target sites in vitro, we used a single guide RNA (sgRNA) that has been previously shown to efficiently direct Cas9 cleavage at the edge of the strongly positioned 601 nucleosome. Our data indicate that single mismatches between the sgRNA and DNA target have relatively little effect on Cas9 cleavage of naked DNA substrates, but strongly inhibit cleavage of nucleosome substrates, particularly when the mismatch is in the sgRNA "seed" region. These findings indicate that nucleosomes may enhance Cas9 specificity by inhibiting cleavage of off-target sites at the nucleosome edge. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. The First Archaeal ATP-Dependent Glucokinase, from the Hyperthermophilic Crenarchaeon Aeropyrum pernix, Represents a Monomeric, Extremely Thermophilic ROK Glucokinase with Broad Hexose Specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Thomas; Reichstein, Bianca; Schmid, Roland; Schönheit, Peter

    2002-01-01

    An ATP-dependent glucokinase of the hyperthermophilic aerobic crenarchaeon Aeropyrum pernix was purified 230-fold to homogeneity. The enzyme is a monomeric protein with an apparent molecular mass of about 36 kDa. The apparent Km values for ATP and glucose (at 90°C and pH 6.2) were 0.42 and 0.044 mM, respectively; the apparent Vmax was about 35 U/mg. The enzyme was specific for ATP as a phosphoryl donor, but showed a broad spectrum for phosphoryl acceptors: in addition to glucose, which showed the highest catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km), the enzyme also phosphorylates glucosamin, fructose, mannose, and 2-deoxyglucose. Divalent cations were required for maximal activity: Mg2+, which was most effective, could partially be replaced with Co2+, Mn2+, and Ni2+. The enzyme had a temperature optimum of at least 100°C and showed significant thermostability up to 100°C. The coding function of open reading frame (ORF) APE2091 (Y. Kawarabayasi, Y. Hino, H. Horikawa, S. Yamazaki, Y. Haikawa, K. Jin-no, M. Takahashi, M. Sekine, S. Baba, A. Ankai, H. Kosugi, A. Hosoyama, S. Fukui, Y. Nagai, K. Nishijima, H. Nakazawa, M. Takamiya, S. Masuda, T. Funahashi, T. Tanaka, Y. Kudoh, J. Yamazaki, N. Kushida, A. Oguchi, and H. Kikuchi, DNA Res. 6:83-101, 145-152, 1999), previously annotated as gene glk, coding for ATP-glucokinase of A. pernix, was proved by functional expression in Escherichia coli. The purified recombinant ATP-dependent glucokinase showed a 5-kDa higher molecular mass on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, but almost identical kinetic and thermostability properties in comparison to the native enzyme purified from A. pernix. N-terminal amino acid sequence of the native enzyme revealed that the translation start codon is a GTG 171 bp downstream of the annotated start codon of ORF APE2091. The amino acid sequence deduced from the truncated ORF APE2091 revealed sequence similarity to members of the ROK family, which comprise bacterial sugar kinases and

  16. Identification of novel oxidized protein substrates and physiological partners of the mitochondrial ATP-dependent Lon-like protease Pim1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayot, Aurélien; Gareil, Monique; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2010-01-01

    ATP-dependent proteases are currently emerging as key regulators of mitochondrial functions. Among these proteolytic systems, Pim1, a Lon-like serine protease in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is involved in the control of selective protein turnover in the mitochondrial matrix. In the absence of Pim1......, yeast cells have been shown to accumulate electron-dense inclusion bodies in the matrix space, to lose integrity of mitochondrial genome, and to be respiration-deficient. Because of the severity of phenotypes associated with the depletion of Pim1, this protease appears to be an essential component...... of oxidized protein substrates and physiological partners of Pim1 protease under non-repressing growth conditions. The results presented here supply evidence that Pim1-mediated proteolysis is required for elimination of oxidatively damaged proteins in mitochondria....

  17. Histone Acetylation near the Nucleosome Dyad Axis Enhances Nucleosome Disassembly by RSC and SWI/SNF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Nilanjana; North, Justin A; Dechassa, Mekonnen Lemma; Manohar, Mridula; Prasad, Rashmi; Luger, Karolin; Ottesen, Jennifer J; Poirier, Michael G; Bartholomew, Blaine

    2015-12-01

    Signaling associated with transcription activation occurs through posttranslational modification of histones and is best exemplified by lysine acetylation. Lysines are acetylated in histone tails and the core domain/lateral surface of histone octamers. While acetylated lysines in histone tails are frequently recognized by other factors referred to as "readers," which promote transcription, the mechanistic role of the modifications in the lateral surface of the histone octamer remains unclear. By using X-ray crystallography, we found that acetylated lysines 115 and 122 in histone H3 are solvent accessible, but in biochemical assays they appear not to interact with the bromodomains of SWI/SNF and RSC to enhance recruitment or nucleosome mobilization, as previously shown for acetylated lysines in H3 histone tails. Instead, we found that acetylation of lysines 115 and 122 increases the predisposition of nucleosomes for disassembly by SWI/SNF and RSC up to 7-fold, independent of bromodomains, and only in conjunction with contiguous nucleosomes. Thus, in combination with SWI/SNF and RSC, acetylation of lateral surface lysines in the histone octamer serves as a crucial regulator of nucleosomal dynamics distinct from the histone code readers and writers. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Theoretical analysis of epigenetic cell memory by nucleosome modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dodd, Ian B; Micheelsen, Mille A; Sneppen, Kim

    2007-01-01

    strong bistability that is resistant both to high noise due to random gain or loss of nucleosome modifications and to random partitioning upon DNA replication. However, robust bistability required: (1) cooperativity, the activity of more than one modified nucleosome, in the modification reactions and (2...

  19. Analysis of Nucleosome Transcription Using Single-Particle FRET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feofanov, Alexey V.; Kudryashova, Kseniya S.; Chertkov, Oleg V.; Nikitin, Dmitry V.; Pestov, Nikolai A.; Kulaeva, Olga I.; Studitsky, Vasily M.; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P.

    Many biological reactions including transcription of a gene are too complex and heterogeneous to be understood by studying ensembles of interacting molecules. In these cases analysis of single complexes can clarify structural and dynamic aspects of these processes. Here we report that single-particle Förster resonance energy transfer (spFRET ) microscopy is applicable to investigation of transcription through nucleosomes by an RNA polymerase . Mononucleosomes that support transcription were assembled from core histones and short DNA containing the T7A1 promoter and strong 603 nucleosome-positioning sequence. Fluorophores (Cy3 and Cy5) were introduced in the neighboring coils of nucleosome DNA in spatially close positions without disturbance of nucleosomal structure or transcription. Such labeling allows the changes in the Cy3-Cy5 distance caused by DNA uncoiling from the octamer or DNA looping to be monitored as changes in FRET efficiency. spFRET measurements for freely diffusing single nucleosomes were conducted using a laser scanning confocal microscope equipped with avalanche photodiodes. Nucleosome subpopulations that differ in FRET efficiency (i.e. in nucleosome structure) were revealed. RNA polymerase was stalled in distinct positions on the nucleosomal DNA during transcription, and the structures of these complexes were characterized with spFRET microscopy.

  20. Hydroxymethylation of DNA influences nucleosomal conformation and stability in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonca, Agnes; Chang, En Hyung; Liu, Wenjie; Yuan, Chongli

    2014-11-01

    Hydroxymethylation of DNA at the C5 position of cytosine (5hmC) is recognized as an important epigenetic mark. The molecular role of 5hmC in gene regulation, however, is not well understood. We studied the effects of 5-hydroxymethylation (5hmC) on nucleosome properties in vitro using a combination of biochemical and fluorescence assays. Competitive reconstitution was used to evaluate the effect of 5hmC on nucleosome formation. The effects of 5hmC on nucleosome compactness and stability were characterized using FRET assays. These findings have also been compared with another important epigenetic mark, the cytosine methylation (5mC) of DNA. We observed that hydroxymethylation increases the binding affinity of DNA for the histone octamer. The formed nucleosome exhibits slightly different conformations based on the sequence and epigenetic context of DNA. DNA hydroxymethylation decreases the stability of formed nucleosomes in salt-induced dissociation processes. DNA containing 5hmC is more likely to be incorporated into nucleosomes. Once formed, the 5hmC nucleosomes might be in an open and transcriptionally active state due to the weakened interaction of hydroxymethylated DNA with the H2A-H2B dimers. Our results reveal the effect of 5hmC on regulating nucleosome compactness and stability in vitro. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Uncovering the forces between nucleosomes using DNA origami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funke, Jonas J; Ketterer, Philip; Lieleg, Corinna; Schunter, Sarah; Korber, Philipp; Dietz, Hendrik

    2016-11-01

    Revealing the energy landscape for nucleosome association may contribute to the understanding of higher-order chromatin structures and their impact on genome regulation. We accomplish this in a direct measurement by integrating two nucleosomes into a DNA origami-based force spectrometer, which enabled subnanometer-resolution measurements of nucleosome-nucleosome distance frequencies via single-particle electron microscopy imaging. From the data, we derived the Boltzmann-weighted distance-dependent energy landscape for nucleosome pair interactions. We find a shallow but long-range (~6 nm) attractive nucleosome pair potential with a minimum of -1.6 kcal/mol close to direct contact distances. The relative nucleosome orientation had little influence, but histone H4 acetylation or removal of histone tails drastically decreased the interaction strength. Because of the weak and shallow pair potential, higher-order nucleosome assemblies will be compliant and experience dynamic shape fluctuations in the absence of additional cofactors. Our results contribute to a more accurate description of chromatin and our force spectrometer provides a powerful tool for the direct and high-resolution study of molecular interactions using imaging techniques.

  2. Sequence signatures of nucleosome positioning in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kaifu; Wang, Lei; Yang, Meng; Liu, Jiucheng; Xin, Chengqi; Hu, Songnian; Yu, Jun

    2010-06-01

    Our recent investigation in the protist Trichomonas vaginalis suggested a DNA sequence periodicity with a unit length of 120.9 nt, which represents a sequence signature for nucleosome positioning. We now extended our observation in higher eukaryotes and identified a similar periodicity of 175 nt in length in Caenorhabditis elegans. In the process of defining the sequence compositional characteristics, we found that the 10.5-nt periodicity, the sequence signature of DNA double helix, may not be sufficient for cross-nucleosome positioning but provides essential guiding rails to facilitate positioning. We further dissected nucleosome-protected sequences and identified a strong positive purine (AG) gradient from the 5'-end to the 3'-end, and also learnt that the nucleosome-enriched regions are GC-rich as compared to the nucleosome-free sequences as purine content is positively correlated with GC content. Sequence characterization allowed us to develop a hidden Markov model (HMM) algorithm for decoding nucleosome positioning computationally, and based on a set of training data from the fifth chromosome of C. elegans, our algorithm predicted 60%-70% of the well-positioned nucleosomes, which is 15%-20% higher than random positioning. We concluded that nucleosomes are not randomly positioned on DNA sequences and yet bind to different genome regions with variable stability, well-positioned nucleosomes leave sequence signatures on DNA, and statistical positioning of nucleosomes across genome can be decoded computationally based on these sequence signatures. Copyright 2010 Beijing Genomics Institute. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Dynamics of Nucleosome Positioning Maturation following Genomic Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Vasseur

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin is thought to carry epigenetic information from one generation to the next, although it is unclear how such information survives the disruptions of nucleosomal architecture occurring during genomic replication. Here, we measure a key aspect of chromatin structure dynamics during replication—how rapidly nucleosome positions are established on the newly replicated daughter genomes. By isolating newly synthesized DNA marked with 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU, we characterize nucleosome positions on both daughter genomes of S. cerevisiae during chromatin maturation. We find that nucleosomes rapidly adopt their mid-log positions at highly transcribed genes, which is consistent with a role for transcription in positioning nucleosomes in vivo. Additionally, experiments in hir1Δ mutants reveal a role for HIR in nucleosome spacing. We also characterized nucleosome positions on the leading and lagging strands, uncovering differences in chromatin maturation dynamics at hundreds of genes. Our data define the maturation dynamics of newly replicated chromatin and support a role for transcription in sculpting the chromatin template.

  4. Dbp6p Is an Essential Putative ATP-Dependent RNA Helicase Required for 60S-Ribosomal-Subunit Assembly in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kressler, Dieter; de la Cruz, Jesús; Rojo, Manuel; Linder, Patrick

    1998-01-01

    A previously uncharacterized Saccharomyces cerevisiae open reading frame, YNR038W, was analyzed in the context of the European Functional Analysis Network. YNR038W encodes a putative ATP-dependent RNA helicase of the DEAD-box protein family and was therefore named DBP6 (DEAD-box protein 6). Dbp6p is essential for cell viability. In vivo depletion of Dbp6p results in a deficit in 60S ribosomal subunits and the appearance of half-mer polysomes. Pulse-chase labeling of pre-rRNA and steady-state analysis of pre-rRNA and mature rRNA by Northern hybridization and primer extension show that Dbp6p depletion leads to decreased production of the 27S and 7S precursors, resulting in a depletion of the mature 25S and 5.8S rRNAs. Furthermore, hemagglutinin epitope-tagged Dbp6p is detected exclusively within the nucleolus. We propose that Dbp6p is required for the proper assembly of preribosomal particles during the biogenesis of 60S ribosomal subunits, probably by acting as an rRNA helicase. PMID:9528757

  5. Repertoires of the nucleosome-positioning dinucleotides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Bettecken

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that the organization of eukaryotic DNA into chromatin is strongly governed by a code inherent in the genomic DNA sequence. This code, as well as other codes, is superposed on the triplets coding for amino acids. The history of the chromatin code started three decades ago with the discovery of the periodic appearance of certain dinucleotides, with AA/TT and RR/YY giving the strongest signals, all with a period of 10.4 bases. Every base-pair stack in the DNA duplex has specific deformation properties, thus favoring DNA bending in a specific direction. The appearance of the corresponding dinucleotide at the distance 10.4 xn bases will facilitate DNA bending in that direction, which corresponds to the minimum energy of DNA folding in the nucleosome. We have analyzed the periodic appearances of all 16 dinucleotides in the genomes of thirteen different eukaryotic organisms. Our data show that a large variety of dinucleotides (if not all are, apparently, contributing to the nucleosome positioning code. The choice of the periodical dinucleotides differs considerably from one organism to another. Among other 10.4 base periodicities, a strong and very regular 10.4 base signal was observed for CG dinucleotides in the genome of the honey bee A. mellifera. Also, the dinucleotide CG appears as the only periodical component in the human genome. This observation seems especially relevant since CpG methylation is well known to modulate chromatin packing and regularity. Thus, the selection of the dinucleotides contributing to the chromatin code is species specific, and may differ from region to region, depending on the sequence context.

  6. DNase I footprinting of the nucleosome in whole nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staynov, D Z

    2008-07-18

    DNase I was used to footprint the 147 bp DNA fragment of the nucleosome in whole chicken erythrocyte nuclei. It was found that the higher-order structure imposes an additional protection on nucleosomes at sites close to the entry and exit points of the linker DNA, around the dyad axis (site S 0). The observed protection is extended up to 20 bp on either side of S 0. It is partial (approximately 50%) and most probably reflects a full protection of different regions in alternatively oriented nucleosomes. These are the same regions which interact with linker histones. The results strongly support the findings by simulation of DNase I digests of unlabelled oligonucleosome fragments in the 30 nm fibre that in all nucleosomes sites S -5 to S -3 and S +3 to S +5 ara on the outside of the fibre exposed to DNase I.

  7. Nucleosome Positioning and NDR Structure at RNA Polymerase III Promoters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbo, Alexandra Søgaard; Lay, Fides D; Jones, Peter A

    2017-01-01

    Chromatin is structurally involved in the transcriptional regulation of all genes. While the nucleosome positioning at RNA polymerase II (pol II) promoters has been extensively studied, less is known about the chromatin structure at pol III promoters in human cells. We use a high......-resolution analysis to show substantial differences in chromatin structure of pol II and pol III promoters, and between subtypes of pol III genes. Notably, the nucleosome depleted region at the transcription start site of pol III genes extends past the termination sequences, resulting in nucleosome free gene bodies...... the first high-resolution map of nucleosome positioning and occupancy at human pol III promoters at specific loci and genome wide....

  8. Hidden Markov Analysis of Nucleosome Unwrapping Under Force

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kruithof, M; van Noort, J

    2009-01-01

    .... Here we measured the force-induced unwrapping of DNA from a single nucleosome and show that hidden Markov analysis, adopted for the nonlinear force-extension of DNA, can readily resolve unwrapping...

  9. The universality of nucleosome organization: from yeast to human

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chereji, Razvan

    The basic units of DNA packaging are called nucleosomes. Their locations on the chromosomes play an essential role in gene regulation. We study nucleosome positioning in yeast, fly, mouse, and human, and build biophysical models in order to explain the genome-wide nucleosome organization. We show that DNA sequence alone is not able to generate the phased arrays of nucleosomes observed in vivo near the transcription start sites. We discuss simple models which can account for the formation of nucleosome depleted regions and nucleosome phasing at the gene promoters. We show that the same principles apply to different organisms. References: [1] RV Chereji, D Tolkunov, G Locke, AV Morozov - Phys. Rev. E 83, 050903 (2011) [2] RV Chereji, AV Morozov - J. Stat. Phys. 144, 379 (2011) [3] RV Chereji, AV Morozov - Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 111, 5236 (2014) [4] RV Chereji, T-W Kan, et al. - Nucleic Acids Res. (2015) doi: 10.1093/nar/gkv978 [5] RV Chereji, AV Morozov - Brief. Funct. Genomics 14, 50 (2015) [6] HA Cole, J Ocampo, JR Iben, RV Chereji, DJ Clark - Nucleic Acids Res. 42, 12512 (2014) [7] D Ganguli, RV Chereji, J Iben, HA Cole, DJ Clark - Genome Res. 24, 1637 (2014)

  10. Single-nucleosome mapping of histone modifications in S. cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih Long Liu

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Covalent modification of histone proteins plays a role in virtually every process on eukaryotic DNA, from transcription to DNA repair. Many different residues can be covalently modified, and it has been suggested that these modifications occur in a great number of independent, meaningful combinations. Published low-resolution microarray studies on the combinatorial complexity of histone modification patterns suffer from confounding effects caused by the averaging of modification levels over multiple nucleosomes. To overcome this problem, we used a high-resolution tiled microarray with single-nucleosome resolution to investigate the occurrence of combinations of 12 histone modifications on thousands of nucleosomes in actively growing S. cerevisiae. We found that histone modifications do not occur independently; there are roughly two groups of co-occurring modifications. One group of lysine acetylations shows a sharply defined domain of two hypo-acetylated nucleosomes, adjacent to the transcriptional start site, whose occurrence does not correlate with transcription levels. The other group consists of modifications occurring in gradients through the coding regions of genes in a pattern associated with transcription. We found no evidence for a deterministic code of many discrete states, but instead we saw blended, continuous patterns that distinguish nucleosomes at one location (e.g., promoter nucleosomes from those at another location (e.g., over the 3' ends of coding regions. These results are consistent with the idea of a simple, redundant histone code, in which multiple modifications share the same role.

  11. period -1 encodes an ATP-dependent RNA helicase that influences nutritional compensation of the Neurospora circadian clock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emerson, Jillian M.; Bartholomai, Bradley M.; Ringelberg, Carol S.; Baker, Scott E.; Loros, Jennifer J.; Dunlap, Jay C.

    2015-12-08

    Mutants in the period-1 (prd-1) gene, characterized by a recessive allele, display a reduced growth rate and period lengthening of the developmental cycle controlled by the circadian clock. We refined the genetic location of prd-1 and used whole genome sequencing to find the mutation defining it, confirming the identity of prd-1 by rescuing the mutant circadian phenotype via transformation. PRD-1 is an RNA helicase whose orthologs, DDX5 and DDX17 in humans and Dbp2p in yeast, are implicated in various processes including transcriptional regulation, elongation, and termination, 23 ribosome biogenesis, and RNA decay. Although prdi-1smutantssiois an ATP-dependent RNA helicase, member of a sub-family display a long period (~25 hrs) circadian developmental cycle, they interestingly display a wild type period when the core circadian oscillator is tracked using a frq-luciferase transcriptional fusion under conditions of limiting nutritional carbon; the core oscillator runs with a long period under glucose-sufficient conditions. Thus PRD-1 clearly impacts the circadian oscillator and is not only part of a metabolic oscillator ancillary to the core clock. PRD-1 is an essential protein and its expression is neither light-regulated nor clock-regulated. However, it is transiently induced by glucose; in the presence of sufficient glucose PRD-1 is in the nucleus until glucose runs out which elicits its disappearance from the nucleus. Because circadian period length is carbon concentration-dependent, prd­-1 may be formally viewed as clock mutant with defective nutritional compensation of circadian period length.

  12. Binding of NF-κB to nucleosomes: effect of translational positioning, nucleosome remodeling and linker histone H1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imtiaz Nisar Lone

    Full Text Available NF-κB is a key transcription factor regulating the expression of inflammatory responsive genes. How NF-κB binds to naked DNA templates is well documented, but how it interacts with chromatin is far from being clear. Here we used a combination of UV laser footprinting, hydroxyl footprinting and electrophoretic mobility shift assay to investigate the binding of NF-κB to nucleosomal templates. We show that NF-κB p50 homodimer is able to bind to its recognition sequence, when it is localized at the edge of the core particle, but not when the recognition sequence is at the interior of the nucleosome. Remodeling of the nucleosome by the chromatin remodeling machine RSC was not sufficient to allow binding of NF-κB to its recognition sequence located in the vicinity of the nucleosome dyad, but RSC-induced histone octamer sliding allowed clearly detectable binding of NF-κB with the slid particle. Importantly, nucleosome dilution-driven removal of H2A-H2B dimer led to complete accessibility of the site located close to the dyad to NF-κB. Finally, we found that NF-κB was able to displace histone H1 and prevent its binding to nucleosome. These data provide important insight on the role of chromatin structure in the regulation of transcription of NF-κB dependent genes.

  13. Binding of NF-κB to Nucleosomes: Effect of Translational Positioning, Nucleosome Remodeling and Linker Histone H1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lone, Imtiaz Nisar; Shukla, Manu Shubhdarshan; Charles Richard, John Lalith; Peshev, Zahary Yordanov; Dimitrov, Stefan; Angelov, Dimitar

    2013-01-01

    NF-κB is a key transcription factor regulating the expression of inflammatory responsive genes. How NF-κB binds to naked DNA templates is well documented, but how it interacts with chromatin is far from being clear. Here we used a combination of UV laser footprinting, hydroxyl footprinting and electrophoretic mobility shift assay to investigate the binding of NF-κB to nucleosomal templates. We show that NF-κB p50 homodimer is able to bind to its recognition sequence, when it is localized at the edge of the core particle, but not when the recognition sequence is at the interior of the nucleosome. Remodeling of the nucleosome by the chromatin remodeling machine RSC was not sufficient to allow binding of NF-κB to its recognition sequence located in the vicinity of the nucleosome dyad, but RSC-induced histone octamer sliding allowed clearly detectable binding of NF-κB with the slid particle. Importantly, nucleosome dilution-driven removal of H2A–H2B dimer led to complete accessibility of the site located close to the dyad to NF-κB. Finally, we found that NF-κB was able to displace histone H1 and prevent its binding to nucleosome. These data provide important insight on the role of chromatin structure in the regulation of transcription of NF-κB dependent genes. PMID:24086160

  14. Physiology in conservation translocations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarszisz, Esther; Dickman, Christopher R.; Munn, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    Conservation translocations aim to restore species to their indigenous ranges, protect populations from threats and/or reinstate ecosystem functions. They are particularly important for the conservation and management of rare and threatened species. Despite tremendous efforts and advancement in recent years, animal conservation translocations generally have variable success, and the reasons for this are often uncertain. We suggest that when little is known about the physiology and wellbeing of individuals either before or after release, it will be difficult to determine their likelihood of survival, and this could limit advancements in the science of translocations for conservation. In this regard, we argue that physiology offers novel approaches that could substantially improve translocations and associated practices. As a discipline, it is apparent that physiology may be undervalued, perhaps because of the invasive nature of some physiological measurement techniques (e.g. sampling body fluids, surgical implantation). We examined 232 publications that dealt with translocations of terrestrial vertebrates and aquatic mammals and, defining ‘success’ as high or low, determined how many of these studies explicitly incorporated physiological aspects into their protocols and monitoring. From this review, it is apparent that physiological evaluation before and after animal releases could progress and improve translocation/reintroduction successes. We propose a suite of physiological measures, in addition to animal health indices, for assisting conservation translocations over the short term and also for longer term post-release monitoring. Perhaps most importantly, we argue that the incorporation of physiological assessments of animals at all stages of translocation can have important welfare implications by helping to reduce the total number of animals used. Physiological indicators can also help to refine conservation translocation methods. These approaches fall

  15. Multiple distinct stimuli increase measured nucleosome occupancy around human promoters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuong D Pham

    Full Text Available Nucleosomes can block access to transcription factors. Thus the precise localization of nucleosomes relative to transcription start sites and other factor binding sites is expected to be a critical component of transcriptional regulation. Recently developed microarray approaches have allowed the rapid mapping of nucleosome positions over hundreds of kilobases (kb of human genomic DNA, although these approaches have not yet been widely used to measure chromatin changes associated with changes in transcription. Here, we use custom tiling microarrays to reveal changes in nucleosome positions and abundance that occur when hormone-bound glucocorticoid receptor (GR binds to sites near target gene promoters in human osteosarcoma cells. The most striking change is an increase in measured nucleosome occupancy at sites spanning ∼1 kb upstream and downstream of transcription start sites, which occurs one hour after addition of hormone, but is lost at 4 hours. Unexpectedly, this increase was seen both on GR-regulated and GR-non-regulated genes. In addition, the human SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling factor (a GR co-activator was found to be important for increased occupancy upon hormone treatment and also for low nucleosome occupancy without hormone. Most surprisingly, similar increases in nucleosome occupancy were also seen on both regulated and non-regulated promoters during differentiation of human myeloid leukemia cells and upon activation of human CD4+ T-cells. These results indicate that dramatic changes in chromatin structure over ∼2 kb of human promoters may occur genomewide and in response to a variety of stimuli, and suggest novel models for transcriptional regulation.

  16. Phase diagram of nucleosome core particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangenot, S; Leforestier, A; Durand, D; Livolant, F

    2003-11-07

    We present a phase diagram of the nucleosome core particle (NCP) as a function of the monovalent salt concentration and applied osmotic pressure. Above a critical pressure, NCPs stack on top of each other to form columns that further organize into multiple columnar phases. An isotropic (and in some cases a nematic) phase of columns is observed in the moderate pressure range. Under higher pressure conditions, a lamello-columnar phase and an inverse hexagonal phase form under low salt conditions, whereas a 2D hexagonal phase or a 3D orthorhombic phase is found at higher salt concentration. For intermediate salt concentrations, microphase separation occurs. The richness of the phase diagram originates from the heterogeneous distribution of charges at the surface of the NCP, which makes the particles extremely sensitive to small ionic variations of their environment, with consequences on their interactions and supramolecular organization. We discuss how the polymorphism of NCP supramolecular organization may be involved in chromatin changes in the cellular context.

  17. Identification of critical amino acids in the proximal C-terminal of TREK-2 K+ channel for activation by acidic pHi and ATP-dependent inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Joohan; Jun, Young Keul; Zhang, Yin-Hua; Nam, Joo Hyun; Shin, Dong Hoon; Kim, Sung Joon

    2018-02-01

    TWIK-related two-pore domain K+ channels (TREKs) are regulated by intracellular pH (pHi) and Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2). Previously, Glu306 in proximal C-terminal (pCt) of mouse TREK-1 was identified as the pHi-sensing residue. The direction of PI(4,5)P2 sensitivity is controversial, and we have recently shown that TREKs are inhibited by intracellular ATP via endogenous PI(4,5)P2 formation. Here we investigate the anionic and cationic residues of pCt for the pHi and ATP-sensitivity in human TREK-2 (hTREK-2). In inside-out patch clamp recordings (ITREK-2,i-o), acidic pHi-induced activation was absent in E332A and was partly attenuated in E335A. Neutralization of cationic Lys (K330A) also eliminated the acidic pHi sensitivity of ITREK-2,i-o. Unlike the inhibition of wild-type (WT) ITREK-2,i-o by intracellular ATP, neither E332A nor K330A was sensitive to ATP. Nevertheless, exogenous PI(4,5)P2 (10 μM) abolished ITREK-2 i-o in all the above mutants as well as in WT, indicating unspecific inhibition by exogenous PI(4,5)P2. In whole-cell recordings of TREK-2 (ITREK-2,w-c), K330A and E332A showed higher or fully active basal activity, showing attenuated or insignificant activation by 2-APB, arachidonic acid, or acidic pHe 6.9. ITREK-1,w-c of WT is largely suppressed by pHe 6.9, and the inhibition is slightly attenuated in K312A and E315A. The results show concerted roles of the oppositely charged Lys and Glu in pCt for the ATP-dependent low basal activity and pHi sensitivity.

  18. The ATP-dependent RNA helicase HrpB plays an important role in motility and biofilm formation in Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granato, Laís Moreira; Picchi, Simone Cristina; Andrade, Maxuel de Oliveira; Takita, Marco Aurélio; de Souza, Alessandra Alves; Wang, Nian; Machado, Marcos Antonio

    2016-03-23

    RNA helicases are enzymes that catalyze the separation of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) using the free energy of ATP binding and hydrolysis. DEAD/DEAH families participate in many different aspects of RNA metabolism, including RNA synthesis, RNA folding, RNA-RNA interactions, RNA localization and RNA degradation. Several important bacterial DEAD/DEAH-box RNA helicases have been extensively studied. In this study, we characterize the ATP-dependent RNA helicase encoded by the hrpB (XAC0293) gene using deletion and genetic complementation assays. We provide insights into the function of the hrpB gene in Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri by investigating the roles of hrpB in biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces and host leaves, cell motility, host virulence of the citrus canker bacterium and growth in planta. The hrpB gene is highly conserved in the sequenced strains of Xanthomonas. Mutation of the hrpB gene (∆hrpB) resulted in a significant reduction in biofilms on abiotic surfaces and host leaves. ∆hrpB also exhibited increased cell dispersion on solid medium plates. ∆hrpB showed reduced adhesion on biotic and abiotic surfaces and delayed development in disease symptoms when sprayed on susceptible citrus leaves. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR assays indicated that deletion of hrpB reduced the expression of four type IV pili genes. The transcriptional start site of fimA (XAC3241) was determined using rapid amplification of 5'-cDNA Ends (5'RACE). Based on the results of fimA mRNA structure predictions, the fimA 5' UTR may contain three different loops. HrpB may be involved in alterations to the structure of fimA mRNA that promote the stability of fimA RNA. Our data show that hrpB is involved in adherence of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri to different surfaces. In addition, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that a DEAH RNA helicase has been implicated in the regulation of type IV pili in Xanthomonas.

  19. Structure of the CENP-A nucleosome and its implications for centromeric chromatin architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    Centromeres are dictated by the epigenetic inheritance of the centromeric nucleosome containing the centromere-specific histone H3 variant, CENP-A. The structure of the CENP-A nucleosome has been considered to be the fundamental architecture of the centromeric chromatin. Controversy exists in the literature regarding the CENP-A nucleosome structures, with octasome, hemisome, compact octasome, hexasome, and tetrasome models being reported. Some of these CENP-A nucleosome models may correspond to transient intermediates for the assembly of the mature CENP-A nucleosome; however, their significances are still unclear. Therefore, the structure of the mature CENP-A nucleosome has been eagerly awaited. We reconstituted the human CENP-A nucleosome with its cognate centromeric DNA fragment, and determined its crystal structure. In this review, we describe the structure and the physical properties of the CENP-A nucleosome, and discuss their implications for centromeric chromatin architecture.

  20. Consequences of cisplatin binding on nucleosome structure and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Ryan C; Lippard, Stephen J

    2010-12-22

    The effects of cisplatin binding to DNA were explored at the nucleosome level to incorporate key features of the eukaryotic nuclear environment. An X-ray crystal structure of a site-specifically platinated nucleosome carrying a 1,3-cis-{Pt(NH₃)₂}²+-d(GpTpG) intrastrand cross-link reveals the details of how this adduct dictates the rotational positioning of DNA in the nucleosome. Results from in vitro nucleosome mobility assays indicate that a single platinum adduct interferes with ATP-independent sliding of DNA around the octamer core. Data from in vitro transcription experiments suggest that RNA polymerases can successfully navigate along cisplatin-damaged DNA templates that contain nucleosomes, but stall when the transcription elongation complex physically contacts a platinum cross-link located on the template strand. These results provide information about the effects of cisplatin binding to nuclear DNA and enhance our understanding of the mechanism of transcription inhibition by platinum anticancer compounds. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Structural Mechanisms of Nucleosome Recognition by Linker Histones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bing-Rui; Jiang, Jiansheng; Feng, Hanqiao; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Xiao, T Sam; Bai, Yawen

    2015-08-20

    Linker histones bind to the nucleosome and regulate the structure of chromatin and gene expression. Despite more than three decades of effort, the structural basis of nucleosome recognition by linker histones remains elusive. Here, we report the crystal structure of the globular domain of chicken linker histone H5 in complex with the nucleosome at 3.5 Å resolution, which is validated using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The globular domain sits on the dyad of the nucleosome and interacts with both DNA linkers. Our structure integrates results from mutation analyses and previous cross-linking and fluorescence recovery after photobleach experiments, and it helps resolve the long debate on structural mechanisms of nucleosome recognition by linker histones. The on-dyad binding mode of the H5 globular domain is different from the recently reported off-dyad binding mode of Drosophila linker histone H1. We demonstrate that linker histones with different binding modes could fold chromatin to form distinct higher-order structures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The nucleosome: orchestrating DNA damage signaling and repair within chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Poonam; Miller, Kyle M

    2016-10-01

    DNA damage occurs within the chromatin environment, which ultimately participates in regulating DNA damage response (DDR) pathways and repair of the lesion. DNA damage activates a cascade of signaling events that extensively modulates chromatin structure and organization to coordinate DDR factor recruitment to the break and repair, whilst also promoting the maintenance of normal chromatin functions within the damaged region. For example, DDR pathways must avoid conflicts between other DNA-based processes that function within the context of chromatin, including transcription and replication. The molecular mechanisms governing the recognition, target specificity, and recruitment of DDR factors and enzymes to the fundamental repeating unit of chromatin, i.e., the nucleosome, are poorly understood. Here we present our current view of how chromatin recognition by DDR factors is achieved at the level of the nucleosome. Emerging evidence suggests that the nucleosome surface, including the nucleosome acidic patch, promotes the binding and activity of several DNA damage factors on chromatin. Thus, in addition to interactions with damaged DNA and histone modifications, nucleosome recognition by DDR factors plays a key role in orchestrating the requisite chromatin response to maintain both genome and epigenome integrity.

  3. Chemical map of Schizosaccharomyces pombe reveals species-specific features in nucleosome positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyle-Heyrman, Georgette; Zaichuk, Tetiana; Xi, Liqun; Zhang, Quanwei; Uhlenbeck, Olke C.; Holmgren, Robert; Widom, Jonathan; Wang, Ji-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Using a recently developed chemical approach, we have generated a genome-wide map of nucleosomes in vivo in Schizosaccharomyces pombe (S. pombe) at base pair resolution. The shorter linker length previously identified in S. pombe is due to a preponderance of nucleosomes separated by ∼4/5 bp, placing nucleosomes on opposite faces of the DNA. The periodic dinucleotide feature thought to position nucleosomes is equally strong in exons as in introns, demonstrating that nucleosome positioning information can be superimposed on coding information. Unlike the case in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, A/T-rich sequences are enriched in S. pombe nucleosomes, particularly at ±20 bp around the dyad. This difference in nucleosome binding preference gives rise to a major distinction downstream of the transcription start site, where nucleosome phasing is highly predictable by A/T frequency in S. pombe but not in S. cerevisiae, suggesting that the genomes and DNA binding preferences of nucleosomes have coevolved in different species. The poly (dA-dT) tracts affect but do not deplete nucleosomes in S. pombe, and they prefer special rotational positions within the nucleosome, with longer tracts enriched in the 10- to 30-bp region from the dyad. S. pombe does not have a well-defined nucleosome-depleted region immediately upstream of most transcription start sites; instead, the −1 nucleosome is positioned with the expected spacing relative to the +1 nucleosome, and its occupancy is negatively correlated with gene expression. Although there is generally very good agreement between nucleosome maps generated by chemical cleavage and micrococcal nuclease digestion, the chemical map shows consistently higher nucleosome occupancy on DNA with high A/T content. PMID:24277842

  4. Nature of the Nucleosomal Barrier to RNA Polymerase II | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the cell, RNA polymerase II (pol II) efficiently transcribes DNA packaged into nucleosomes, but in vitro encounters with the nucleosomes induce catalytic inactivation (arrest) of the pol II core enzyme. To determine potential mechanisms making nucleosomes transparent to transcription in vivo, we analyzed the nature of the nucleosome-induced arrest. We found that the arrests have been detected mostly at positions of strong intrinsic pause sites of DNA.

  5. Reactivity in ELISA with DNA-loaded nucleosomes in patients with proliferative lupus nephritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieker, J.W.; Schlumberger, W.; McHugh, N.; Hamann, P.; Vlag, J. van der; Berden, J.H.M.

    2015-01-01

    Autoantibodies against nucleosomes are considered a hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We compared in patients with proliferative lupus nephritis the diagnostic usefulness of a dsDNA-loaded nucleosome ELISA (anti-dsDNA-NcX) with ELISAs in which dsDNA or nucleosomes alone were coated.

  6. SecD and SecF are required for the proton electrochemical gradient stimulation of preprotein translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkowitz, R A; Wickner, W

    1994-02-15

    Mutations in secD and secF show impaired protein translocation across the inner membrane of Escherichia coli. We investigated the effect of SecD and SecF (SecD/F) depletion on preprotein translocation into inverted inner membrane vesicles (IMVs). Both IMVs and cells which were depleted of SecD/F were defective in their ability to maintain a proton electrochemical gradient. The translocation of pre-maltose binding protein (preMBP), which is strongly delta microH+ dependent, showed a 5-fold decreased rate with IMVs lacking SecD/F. In contrast, proteolytic processing of preMBP to MBP by leader peptidase was similar in IMVs containing and lacking SecD/F, consistent with earlier findings that only ATP-dependent translocation is required for the initiation of translocation. In the absence of a delta microH+, with ATP as the sole energy source, preMBP translocation into IMVs which contained or were depleted of SecD/F was identical. Translocation of the precursor of outer membrane protein A (proOmpA) in the presence of subsaturating ATP also required a generated delta microH+ and, under these conditions, proOmpA translocation required SecD/F. With saturating concentrations of ATP, where delta microH+ has little effect on in vitro proOmpA translocation, SecD/F also had little effect on translocation. These results explain why SecD/F effects are precursor protein dependent in vitro.

  7. The Chd1 Chromatin Remodeler Shifts Nucleosomal DNA Bidirectionally as a Monomer

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    Qiu, Yupeng; Levendosky, Robert F.; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Patel, Ashok; Bowman, Gregory D.; Myong, Sua

    2017-10-01

    Chromatin remodelers catalyze dynamic packaging of the genome by carrying out nucleosome assembly/disassembly, histone exchange, and nucleosome repositioning. Remodeling results in evenly spaced nucleosomes, which requires probing both sides of the nucleosome, yet the way remodelers organize sliding activity to achieve this task is not understood. Here, we show that the monomeric Chd1 remodeler shifts DNA back and forth by dynamically alternating between different segments of the nucleosome. During sliding, Chd1 generates unstable remodeling intermediates that spontaneously relax to a pre-remodeled position. We demonstrate that nucleosome sliding is tightly controlled by two regulatory domains: the DNA-binding domain, which interferes with sliding when its range is limited by a truncated linking segment, and the chromodomains, which play a key role in substrate discrimination. We propose that active interplay of the ATPase motor with the regulatory domains may promote dynamic nucleosome structures uniquely suited for histone exchange and chromatin reorganization during transcription.

  8. Dynamics of nucleosome assembly and effects of DNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju Yeon; Lee, Jaehyoun; Yue, Hongjun; Lee, Tae-Hee

    2015-02-13

    The nucleosome is the fundamental packing unit of the eukaryotic genome, and CpG methylation is an epigenetic modification associated with gene repression and silencing. We investigated nucleosome assembly mediated by histone chaperone Nap1 and the effects of CpG methylation based on three-color single molecule FRET measurements, which enabled direct monitoring of histone binding in the context of DNA wrapping. According to our observation, (H3-H4)2 tetramer incorporation must precede H2A-H2B dimer binding, which is independent of DNA termini wrapping. Upon CpG methylation, (H3-H4)2 tetramer incorporation and DNA termini wrapping are facilitated, whereas proper incorporation of H2A-H2B dimers is inhibited. We suggest that these changes are due to rigidified DNA and increased random binding of histones to DNA. According to the results, CpG methylation expedites nucleosome assembly in the presence of abundant DNA and histones, which may help facilitate gene packaging in chromatin. The results also indicate that the slowest steps in nucleosome assembly are DNA termini wrapping and tetramer positioning, both of which are affected heavily by changes in the physical properties of DNA. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Propagation of thrombosis by neutrophils and extracellular nucleosome networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiler, Susanne; Stark, Konstantin; Massberg, Steffen; Engelmann, Bernd

    2017-02-01

    Neutrophils, early mediators of the innate immune defense, are recruited to developing thrombi in different types of thrombosis. They amplify intravascular coagulation by stimulating the tissue factor-dependent extrinsic pathway via inactivation of endogenous anticoagulants, enhancing factor XII activation or decreasing plasmin generation. Neutrophil-dependent prothrombotic mechanisms are supported by the externalization of decondensed nucleosomes and granule proteins that together form neutrophil extracellular traps. These traps, either in intact or fragmented form, are causally involved in various forms of experimental thrombosis as first indicated by their role in the enhancement of both microvascular thrombosis during bacterial infection and carotid artery thrombosis. Neutrophil extracellular traps can be induced by interactions of neutrophils with activated platelets; vice versa, these traps enhance adhesion of platelets via von Willebrand factor. Neutrophil-induced microvascular thrombus formation can restrict the dissemination and survival of blood-borne bacteria and thereby sustain intravascular immunity. Dysregulation of this innate immune pathway may support sepsis-associated coagulopathies. Notably, neutrophils and extracellular nucleosomes, together with platelets, critically promote fibrin formation during flow restriction-induced deep vein thrombosis. Neutrophil extracellular traps/extracellular nucleosomes are increased in thrombi and in the blood of patients with different vaso-occlusive pathologies and could be therapeutically targeted for the prevention of thrombosis. Thus, during infections and in response to blood vessel damage, neutrophils and externalized nucleosomes are major promoters of intravascular blood coagulation and thrombosis. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  10. Transcription and Remodeling Produce Asymmetrically Unwrapped Nucleosomal Intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Srinivas; Ahmad, Kami; Henikoff, Steven

    2017-12-21

    Nucleosomes are disrupted during transcription and other active processes, but the structural intermediates during nucleosome disruption in vivo are unknown. To identify intermediates, we mapped subnucleosomal protections in Drosophila cells using Micrococcal Nuclease followed by sequencing. At the first nucleosome position downstream of the transcription start site, we identified unwrapped intermediates, including hexasomes that lack either proximal or distal contacts. Inhibiting topoisomerases or depleting histone chaperones increased unwrapping, whereas inhibiting release of paused RNAPII or reducing RNAPII elongation decreased unwrapping. Our results indicate that positive torsion generated by elongating RNAPII causes transient loss of histone-DNA contacts. Using this mapping approach, we found that nucleosomes flanking human CTCF insulation sites are similarly disrupted. We also identified diagnostic subnucleosomal particle remnants in cell-free human DNA data as a relic of transcribed genes from apoptosing cells. Thus identification of subnucleosomal fragments from nuclease protection data represents a general strategy for structural epigenomics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparative analysis of methods for genome-wide nucleosome cartography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintales, Luis; Vázquez, Enrique; Antequera, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    Nucleosomes contribute to compacting the genome into the nucleus and regulate the physical access of regulatory proteins to DNA either directly or through the epigenetic modifications of the histone tails. Precise mapping of nucleosome positioning across the genome is, therefore, essential to understanding the genome regulation. In recent years, several experimental protocols have been developed for this purpose that include the enzymatic digestion, chemical cleavage or immunoprecipitation of chromatin followed by next-generation sequencing of the resulting DNA fragments. Here, we compare the performance and resolution of these methods from the initial biochemical steps through the alignment of the millions of short-sequence reads to a reference genome to the final computational analysis to generate genome-wide maps of nucleosome occupancy. Because of the lack of a unified protocol to process data sets obtained through the different approaches, we have developed a new computational tool (NUCwave), which facilitates their analysis, comparison and assessment and will enable researchers to choose the most suitable method for any particular purpose. NUCwave is freely available at http://nucleosome.usal.es/nucwave along with a step-by-step protocol for its use. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Structural features based genome-wide characterization and prediction of nucleosome organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gan Yanglan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nucleosome distribution along chromatin dictates genomic DNA accessibility and thus profoundly influences gene expression. However, the underlying mechanism of nucleosome formation remains elusive. Here, taking a structural perspective, we systematically explored nucleosome formation potential of genomic sequences and the effect on chromatin organization and gene expression in S. cerevisiae. Results We analyzed twelve structural features related to flexibility, curvature and energy of DNA sequences. The results showed that some structural features such as DNA denaturation, DNA-bending stiffness, Stacking energy, Z-DNA, Propeller twist and free energy, were highly correlated with in vitro and in vivo nucleosome occupancy. Specifically, they can be classified into two classes, one positively and the other negatively correlated with nucleosome occupancy. These two kinds of structural features facilitated nucleosome binding in centromere regions and repressed nucleosome formation in the promoter regions of protein-coding genes to mediate transcriptional regulation. Based on these analyses, we integrated all twelve structural features in a model to predict more accurately nucleosome occupancy in vivo than the existing methods that mainly depend on sequence compositional features. Furthermore, we developed a novel approach, named DLaNe, that located nucleosomes by detecting peaks of structural profiles, and built a meta predictor to integrate information from different structural features. As a comparison, we also constructed a hidden Markov model (HMM to locate nucleosomes based on the profiles of these structural features. The result showed that the meta DLaNe and HMM-based method performed better than the existing methods, demonstrating the power of these structural features in predicting nucleosome positions. Conclusions Our analysis revealed that DNA structures significantly contribute to nucleosome organization and influence

  13. Recycling of protein subunits during DNA translocation and cleavage by Type I restriction-modification enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Michelle; Szczelkun, Mark D

    2011-09-01

    The Type I restriction-modification enzymes comprise three protein subunits; HsdS and HsdM that form a methyltransferase (MTase) and HsdR that associates with the MTase and catalyses Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP)-dependent DNA translocation and cleavage. Here, we examine whether the MTase and HsdR components can 'turnover' in vitro, i.e. whether they can catalyse translocation and cleavage events on one DNA molecule, dissociate and then re-bind a second DNA molecule. Translocation termination by both EcoKI and EcoR124I leads to HsdR dissociation from linear DNA but not from circular DNA. Following DNA cleavage, the HsdR subunits appear unable to dissociate even though the DNA is linear, suggesting a tight interaction with the cleaved product. The MTases of EcoKI and EcoAI can dissociate from DNA following either translocation or cleavage and can initiate reactions on new DNA molecules as long as free HsdR molecules are available. In contrast, the MTase of EcoR124I does not turnover and additional cleavage of circular DNA is not observed by inclusion of RecBCD, a helicase-nuclease that degrades the linear DNA product resulting from Type I cleavage. Roles for Type I restriction endonuclease subunit dynamics in restriction alleviation in the cell are discussed.

  14. Oncogene Translocations and NHL

    Science.gov (United States)

    A colloboration with several large population-based cohorts to determine whether the prevalence or level of t14;18 is associated with risk of NHL and to investigate the clonal relationship between translocation-bearing cells and subsequent tumors

  15. Using DNA mechanics to predict intrinsic and extrinsic nucleosome positioning signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, Alexandre

    2008-03-01

    In eukaryotic genomes, nucleosomes function to compact DNA and to regulate access to it both by simple physical occlusion and by providing the substrate for numerous covalent epigenetic tags. While nucleosome positions in vitro are determined by sequence alone, in vivo competition with other DNA-binding factors and action of chromatin remodeling enzymes play a role that needs to be quantified. We developed a biophysical, DNA mechanics-based model for the sequence dependence of DNA bending energies, and validated it against a collection of in vitro free energies of nucleosome formation and a nucleosome crystal structure; we also successfully designed both strong and poor histone binding sequences ab initio. For in vivo data from S.cerevisiae, the strongest positioning signal came from the competition with other factors rather than intrinsic nucleosome sequence preferences. Based on sequence alone, our model predicts that functional transcription factor binding sites tend to be covered by nucleosomes, yet are uncovered in vivo because functional sites cluster within a single nucleosome footprint and thus make transcription factors bind cooperatively. Similarly a weak enhancement of nucleosome binding in the TATA region becomes a strong depletion when the TATA-binding protein is included, in quantitative agreement with experiment. Our model distinguishes multiple ways in which genomic sequence influences nucleosome positions, and thus provides alternative explanations for several genome-wide experimental findings. In the future our approach will be used to rationally alter gene expression levels in model systems through redesign of nucleosome occupancy profiles.

  16. An in vitro-identified high-affinity nucleosome-positioning signal is capable of transiently positioning a nucleosome in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gracey Lia E

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The physiological function of eukaryotic DNA occurs in the context of nucleosomal arrays that can expose or obscure defined segments of the genome. Certain DNA sequences are capable of strongly positioning a nucleosome in vitro, suggesting the possibility that favorable intrinsic signals might reproducibly structure chromatin segments. As high-throughput sequencing analyses of nucleosome coverage in vitro and in vivo have become possible, a vigorous debate has arisen over the degree to which intrinsic DNA:nucleosome affinities orchestrate the in vivo positions of nucleosomes, thereby controlling physical accessibility of specific sequences in DNA. Results We describe here the in vivo consequences of placing a synthetic high-affinity nucleosome-positioning signal, the 601 sequence, into a DNA plasmid vector in mice. Strikingly, the 601 sequence was sufficient to position nucleosomes during an early phase after introduction of the DNA into the mice (when the plasmid vector transgene was active. This positioning capability was transient, with a loss of strong positioning at a later time point when the transgenes had become silent. Conclusions These results demonstrate an ability of DNA sequences selected solely for nucleosome affinity to organize chromatin in vivo, and the ability of other mechanisms to overcome these interactions in a dynamic nuclear environment.

  17. An advanced coarse-grained nucleosome core particle model for computer simulations of nucleosome-nucleosome interactions under varying ionic conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanping Fan

    Full Text Available In the eukaryotic cell nucleus, DNA exists as chromatin, a compact but dynamic complex with histone proteins. The first level of DNA organization is the linear array of nucleosome core particles (NCPs. The NCP is a well-defined complex of 147 bp DNA with an octamer of histones. Interactions between NCPs are of paramount importance for higher levels of chromatin compaction. The polyelectrolyte nature of the NCP implies that nucleosome-nucleosome interactions must exhibit a great influence from both the ionic environment as well as the positively charged and highly flexible N-terminal histone tails, protruding out from the NCP. The large size of the system precludes a modelling analysis of chromatin at an all-atom level and calls for coarse-grained approximations. Here, a model of the NCP that include the globular histone core and the flexible histone tails described by one particle per each amino acid and taking into account their net charge is proposed. DNA wrapped around the histone core was approximated at the level of two base pairs represented by one bead (bases and sugar plus four beads of charged phosphate groups. Computer simulations, using a Langevin thermostat, in a dielectric continuum with explicit monovalent (K(+, divalent (Mg(2+ or trivalent (Co(NH(3(6 (3+ cations were performed for systems with one or ten NCPs. Increase of the counterion charge results in a switch from repulsive NCP-NCP interaction in the presence of K(+, to partial aggregation with Mg(2+ and to strong mutual attraction of all 10 NCPs in the presence of CoHex(3+. The new model reproduced experimental results and the structure of the NCP-NCP contacts is in agreement with available data. Cation screening, ion-ion correlations and tail bridging contribute to the NCP-NCP attraction and the new NCP model accounts for these interactions.

  18. [Structure and dynamic of the nucleosome core particle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertin, Aurélie; Mangenot, Stéphanie

    2008-01-01

    In eukaryotic cell, a few meters of DNA are compacted in nuclear compartment of a few microns. This high level of compaction is an important way to regulate gene expression. In the present paper, we present a description of the organization of DNA into its first level of compaction: the nucleosome core particle. The structure of the nucleosome has been described at an atomic resolution more than 10 years ago, where DNA is wrapped around an octamer of histones. Post-translational modifications affecting histone tails have been shown to regulate the chromatin degree of compaction and thus the gene expression and regulation. The structure of the NCP is far from being frozen and is highly dynamic. Remodeling factors can induce DNA sliding around the histones, DNA transaction processes such as transcription and replication.

  19. BRCA 1-Mediated Histone Monoubiquitylation: Effect on Nucleosome Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-01

    nucleosome positioning sequence from sea urchin 5s rRNA gene; perform and analyze the ubiquitylation reaction (month 4). Done Task 2: Use single... sea urchin 5S rDNA, and oligonucleosomes were reconstituted on the same sequence repeated in tandem (208-12) (Simpson et al., 1985). Isolation of...Center, Columbus, OH 43210), who provided BRCA1/BARD1 protein complex. b. Acquire and perform quality tests on the other components of the

  20. Translation efficiency in yeasts correlates with nucleosome formation in promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matushkin, Yu G; Levitsky, V G; Orlov, Yu L; Likhoshvai, V A; Kolchanov, N A

    2013-01-01

    Elongation efficiency index (EEI) was suggested earlier to estimate gene expression efficiency by nucleotide context of coding sequence in unicellular organisms. We have analyzed association between EEI and nucleosome formation potential (NFP) in 5' regulatory regions upstream translation initiation site (TIS) from two yeast species. Theoretical estimations of NFP based on DNA sequence were obtained by Recon method. Experimental estimation of nucleosome occupancy was obtained by high-throughput sequencing data of nucleosomal DNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae . For the sample of all genes correlation coefficient was calculated between two vectors: vector of NFP values for fixed position relative to TIS and vector of EEI values. Profiles of correlation coefficients of NFP and EEI were counted in (-600; +600) regions relative to TIS for gene sequences extracted from GenBank. We found regions of strong negative dependence between NFP and EEI for all genes as well as for 10% highly expressed genes in Schizosaccharomyces pombe (10% of EEI-highest genes). At the same time, we found positive dependence between NFP and EEI for all genes and for low expressed genes in S. cerevisiae (10% of EEI-lowest genes). The association between NFP and EEI could be explained by evolutionary selection of context characteristics of nucleotide sequences for gene expression optimization.

  1. Cracking the chromatin code: Precise rule of nucleosome positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifonov, Edward N.

    2011-03-01

    Various aspects of packaging DNA in eukaryotic cells are outlined in physical rather than biological terms. The informational and physical nature of packaging instructions encoded in DNA sequences is discussed with the emphasis on signal processing difficulties - very low signal-to-noise ratio and high degeneracy of the nucleosome positioning signal. As the author has been contributing to the field from its very onset in 1980, the review is mostly focused at the works of the author and his colleagues. The leading concept of the overview is the role of deformational properties of DNA in the nucleosome positioning. The target of the studies is to derive the DNA bendability matrix describing where along the DNA various dinucleotide elements should be positioned, to facilitate its bending in the nucleosome. Three different approaches are described leading to derivation of the DNA deformability sequence pattern, which is a simplified linear presentation of the bendability matrix. All three approaches converge to the same unique sequence motif CGRAAATTTYCG or, in binary form, YRRRRRYYYYYR, both representing the chromatin code.

  2. The nucleosome landscape of Plasmodium falciparum reveals chromatin architecture and dynamics of regulatory sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kensche, Philip Reiner; Hoeijmakers, Wieteke Anna Maria; Toenhake, Christa Geeke; Bras, Maaike; Chappell, Lia; Berriman, Matthew; Bártfai, Richárd

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the chromatin architecture has a pivotal role in regulating all DNA-associated processes and it is central to the control of gene expression. For Plasmodium falciparum, a causative agent of human malaria, the nucleosome positioning profile of regulatory regions deserves particular attention because of their extreme AT-content. With the aid of a highly controlled MNase-seq procedure we reveal how positioning of nucleosomes provides a structural and regulatory framework to the transcriptional unit by demarcating landmark sites (transcription/translation start and end sites). In addition, our analysis provides strong indications for the function of positioned nucleosomes in splice site recognition. Transcription start sites (TSSs) are bordered by a small nucleosome-depleted region, but lack the stereotypic downstream nucleosome arrays, highlighting a key difference in chromatin organization compared to model organisms. Furthermore, we observe transcription-coupled eviction of nucleosomes on strong TSSs during intraerythrocytic development and demonstrate that nucleosome positioning and dynamics can be predictive for the functionality of regulatory DNA elements. Collectively, the strong nucleosome positioning over splice sites and surrounding putative transcription factor binding sites highlights the regulatory capacity of the nucleosome landscape in this deadly human pathogen. PMID:26578577

  3. A multi-layer method to study genome-scale positions of nucleosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Gesù, Vito; Lo Bosco, Giosuè; Pinello, Luca; Yuan, Guo-Cheng; Corona, Davide F V

    2009-02-01

    The basic unit of eukaryotic chromatin is the nucleosome, consisting of about 150 bp of DNA wrapped around a protein core made of histone proteins. Nucleosomes position is modulated in vivo to regulate fundamental nuclear processes. To measure nucleosome positions on a genomic scale both theoretical and experimental approaches have been recently reported. We have developed a new method, Multi-Layer Model (MLM), for the analysis of nucleosome position data obtained with microarray-based approach. The MLM is a feature extraction method in which the input data is processed by a classifier to distinguish between several kinds of patterns. We applied our method to simulated-synthetic and experimental nucleosome position data and found that besides a high nucleosome recognition and a strong agreement with standard statistical methods, the MLM can identify distinct classes of nucleosomes, making it an important tool for the genome wide analysis of nucleosome position and function. In conclusion, the MLM allows a better representation of nucleosome position data and a significant reduction in computational time.

  4. H4 Tails Potentially Produce the Diversity in the Orientation of Two Nucleosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Hisashi; Kono, Hidetoshi

    2017-09-05

    Histone tails play an important role in internucleosomal interaction and chromatin compaction. To understand how the H4 tails are involved in the internucleosomal interaction, an adaptively biased molecular dynamics simulation of 63 models of two stacked nucleosomes, each with the H4 tails in different locations, was carried out. This simulation generated a variety of orientations of the separated nucleosomes depending on the formation of the H4 tail bridge between the H4 tails and the DNA of the neighboring nucleosomes. For the models that showed distinctive orientations of the two nucleosomes, the free energies of the separation of the nucleosomes were further investigated using umbrella sampling simulations. The attractive force between the nucleosomes was estimated from the free energies; the force when two H4 tail bridges formed varied from 36 to 63 pN, depending on the formation of the H4 tail-bridge and the interfacial interaction, whereas the force reduced to 15-18 pN after either one of the H4 tail bridges had broken, regardless of the conformation of the H4 tail. Additional simulations of the nucleosomes show that when the H4 tail was truncated, the force between the nucleosomes became repulsive (from-3 to -7 pN). We concluded that the H4 tails potentially produce the diversity in the orientation of the two nucleosomes, which would contribute to the polymorphism of the chromatin structure. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The nucleosome landscape of Plasmodium falciparum reveals chromatin architecture and dynamics of regulatory sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kensche, Philip Reiner; Hoeijmakers, Wieteke Anna Maria; Toenhake, Christa Geeke; Bras, Maaike; Chappell, Lia; Berriman, Matthew; Bártfai, Richárd

    2016-03-18

    In eukaryotes, the chromatin architecture has a pivotal role in regulating all DNA-associated processes and it is central to the control of gene expression. For Plasmodium falciparum, a causative agent of human malaria, the nucleosome positioning profile of regulatory regions deserves particular attention because of their extreme AT-content. With the aid of a highly controlled MNase-seq procedure we reveal how positioning of nucleosomes provides a structural and regulatory framework to the transcriptional unit by demarcating landmark sites (transcription/translation start and end sites). In addition, our analysis provides strong indications for the function of positioned nucleosomes in splice site recognition. Transcription start sites (TSSs) are bordered by a small nucleosome-depleted region, but lack the stereotypic downstream nucleosome arrays, highlighting a key difference in chromatin organization compared to model organisms. Furthermore, we observe transcription-coupled eviction of nucleosomes on strong TSSs during intraerythrocytic development and demonstrate that nucleosome positioning and dynamics can be predictive for the functionality of regulatory DNA elements. Collectively, the strong nucleosome positioning over splice sites and surrounding putative transcription factor binding sites highlights the regulatory capacity of the nucleosome landscape in this deadly human pathogen. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. The role of histone H4 biotinylation in the structure of nucleosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina A Filenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Post-translational modifications of histones play important roles in regulating nucleosome structure and gene transcription. It has been shown that biotinylation of histone H4 at lysine-12 in histone H4 (K12Bio-H4 is associated with repression of a number of genes. We hypothesized that biotinylation modifies the physical structure of nucleosomes, and that biotin-induced conformational changes contribute to gene silencing associated with histone biotinylation.To test this hypothesis we used atomic force microscopy to directly analyze structures of nucleosomes formed with biotin-modified and non-modified H4. The analysis of the AFM images revealed a 13% increase in the length of DNA wrapped around the histone core in nucleosomes with biotinylated H4. This statistically significant (p<0.001 difference between native and biotinylated nucleosomes corresponds to adding approximately 20 bp to the classical 147 bp length of nucleosomal DNA.The increase in nucleosomal DNA length is predicted to stabilize the association of DNA with histones and therefore to prevent nucleosomes from unwrapping. This provides a mechanistic explanation for the gene silencing associated with K12Bio-H4. The proposed single-molecule AFM approach will be instrumental for studying the effects of various epigenetic modifications of nucleosomes, in addition to biotinylation.

  7. Stable complex formation of CENP-B with the CENP-A nucleosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Risa; Otake, Koichiro; Arimura, Yasuhiro; Horikoshi, Naoki; Miya, Yuta; Shiga, Tatsuya; Osakabe, Akihisa; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Ohzeki, Jun-ichirou; Larionov, Vladimir; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    CENP-A and CENP-B are major components of centromeric chromatin. CENP-A is the histone H3 variant, which forms the centromere-specific nucleosome. CENP-B specifically binds to the CENP-B box DNA sequence on the centromere-specific repetitive DNA. In the present study, we found that the CENP-A nucleosome more stably retains human CENP-B than the H3.1 nucleosome in vitro. Specifically, CENP-B forms a stable complex with the CENP-A nucleosome, when the CENP-B box sequence is located at the proximal edge of the nucleosome. Surprisingly, the CENP-B binding was weaker when the CENP-B box sequence was located in the distal linker region of the nucleosome. This difference in CENP-B binding, depending on the CENP-B box location, was not observed with the H3.1 nucleosome. Consistently, we found that the DNA-binding domain of CENP-B specifically interacted with the CENP-A-H4 complex, but not with the H3.1-H4 complex, in vitro. These results suggested that CENP-B forms a more stable complex with the CENP-A nucleosome through specific interactions with CENP-A, if the CENP-B box is located proximal to the CENP-A nucleosome. Our in vivo assay also revealed that CENP-B binding in the vicinity of the CENP-A nucleosome substantially stabilizes the CENP-A nucleosome on alphoid DNA in human cells. PMID:25916850

  8. Linker histone H1 and H3K56 acetylation are antagonistic regulators of nucleosome dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Morgan; Luo, Yi; Nwokelo, Kingsley C; Goodwin, Michelle; Dreher, Sarah J; Zhang, Pei; Parthun, Mark R; Fondufe-Mittendorf, Yvonne; Ottesen, Jennifer J; Poirier, Michael G

    2015-12-09

    H1 linker histones are highly abundant proteins that compact nucleosomes and chromatin to regulate DNA accessibility and transcription. However, the mechanisms that target H1 regulation to specific regions of eukaryotic genomes are unknown. Here we report fluorescence measurements of human H1 regulation of nucleosome dynamics and transcription factor (TF) binding within nucleosomes. H1 does not block TF binding, instead it suppresses nucleosome unwrapping to reduce DNA accessibility within H1-bound nucleosomes. We then investigated H1 regulation by H3K56 and H3K122 acetylation, two transcriptional activating histone post translational modifications (PTMs). Only H3K56 acetylation, which increases nucleosome unwrapping, abolishes H1.0 reduction of TF binding. These findings show that nucleosomes remain dynamic, while H1 is bound and H1 dissociation is not required for TF binding within the nucleosome. Furthermore, our H3K56 acetylation measurements suggest that a single-histone PTM can define regions of the genome that are not regulated by H1.

  9. Nucleosomes are context-specific, H2A.Z-modulated barriers to RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Christopher M; Ramachandran, Srinivas; Henikoff, Steven

    2014-03-06

    Nucleosomes are barriers to transcription in vitro; however, their effects on RNA polymerase in vivo are unknown. Here we describe a simple and general strategy to comprehensively map the positions of elongating and arrested RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) at nucleotide resolution. We find that the entry site of the first (+1) nucleosome is a barrier to RNAPII for essentially all genes, including those undergoing regulated pausing farther upstream. In contrast to the +1 nucleosome, gene body nucleosomes are low barriers and cause RNAPII stalling both at the entry site and near the dyad axis. The extent of the +1 nucleosome barrier correlates with nucleosome occupancy but anticorrelates with enrichment of histone variant H2A.Z. Importantly, depletion of H2A.Z from a nucleosome position results in a higher barrier to RNAPII. Our results suggest that nucleosomes present significant, context-specific barriers to RNAPII in vivo that can be tuned by the incorporation of H2A.Z. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Asymmetric breathing motions of nucleosomal DNA and the role of histone tails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Kaushik; Loverde, Sharon M

    2017-08-14

    The most important packing unit of DNA in the eukaryotic cell is the nucleosome. It undergoes large-scale structural re-arrangements during different cell cycles. For example, the disassembly of the nucleosome is one of the key steps for DNA replication, whereas reassembly occurs after replication. Thus, conformational dynamics of the nucleosome is crucial for different DNA metabolic processes. We perform three different sets of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of the nucleosome core particle at varying degrees of salt conditions for a total of 0.7 μs simulation time. We find that the conformational dynamics of the nucleosomal DNA tails are oppositely correlated from each other during the initial breathing motions. Furthermore, the strength of the interaction of the nucleosomal DNA tail with the neighboring H2A histone tail modulates the conformational state of the nucleosomal DNA tail. With increasing salt concentration, the degree of asymmetry in the conformation of the nucleosomal DNA tails decreases as both tails tend to unwrap. This direct correlation between the asymmetric breathing motions of the DNA tails and the H2A histone tails, and its decrease at higher salt concentrations, may play a significant role in the molecular pathway of unwrapping.

  11. Contributions of histone H3 nucleosome core surface mutations to chromatin structures, silencing and DNA repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Fink

    Full Text Available Histone H3 mutations in residues that cluster in a discrete region on the nucleosome surface around lysine 79 of H3 affect H3-K79 methylation, impair transcriptional silencing in subtelomeric chromatin, and reveal distinct contributions of histone H3 to various DNA-damage response and repair pathways. These residues might act by recruitment of silencing and DNA-damage response factors. Alternatively, their location on the nucleosome surface suggests a possible involvement in nucleosome positioning, stability and nucleosome interactions. Here, we show that the yeast H3 mutants hht2-T80A, hht2-K79E, hht2-L70S, and hht2-E73D show normal nucleosome positioning and stability in minichromosomes. However, loss of silencing in a subtelomeric URA3 gene correlates with a shift of the promoter nucleosome, while nucleosome positions and stability in the coding region are maintained. Moreover, the H3 mutants show normal repair of UV lesions by photolyase and nucleotide excision repair in minichromosomes and slightly enhanced repair in the subtelomeric region. Thus, these results support a role of those residues in the recruitment of silencing proteins and argue against a general role in nucleosome organization.

  12. Differential Nucleosome Occupancies across Oct4-Sox2 Binding Sites in Murine Embryonic Stem Cells.

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    Amy Sebeson

    Full Text Available The binding sequence for any transcription factor can be found millions of times within a genome, yet only a small fraction of these sequences encode functional transcription factor binding sites. One of the reasons for this dichotomy is that many other factors, such as nucleosomes, compete for binding. To study how the competition between nucleosomes and transcription factors helps determine a functional transcription factor site from a predicted transcription factor site, we compared experimentally-generated in vitro nucleosome occupancy with in vivo nucleosome occupancy and transcription factor binding in murine embryonic stem cells. Using a solution hybridization enrichment technique, we generated a high-resolution nucleosome map from targeted regions of the genome containing predicted sites and functional sites of Oct4/Sox2 regulation. We found that at Pax6 and Nes, which are bivalently poised in stem cells, functional Oct4 and Sox2 sites show high amounts of in vivo nucleosome displacement compared to in vitro. Oct4 and Sox2, which are active, show no significant displacement of in vivo nucleosomes at functional sites, similar to nonfunctional Oct4/Sox2 binding. This study highlights a complex interplay between Oct4 and Sox2 transcription factors and nucleosomes among different target genes, which may result in distinct patterns of stem cell gene regulation.

  13. Asymmetric breathing motions of nucleosomal DNA and the role of histone tails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Kaushik; Loverde, Sharon M.

    2017-08-01

    The most important packing unit of DNA in the eukaryotic cell is the nucleosome. It undergoes large-scale structural re-arrangements during different cell cycles. For example, the disassembly of the nucleosome is one of the key steps for DNA replication, whereas reassembly occurs after replication. Thus, conformational dynamics of the nucleosome is crucial for different DNA metabolic processes. We perform three different sets of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of the nucleosome core particle at varying degrees of salt conditions for a total of 0.7 μs simulation time. We find that the conformational dynamics of the nucleosomal DNA tails are oppositely correlated from each other during the initial breathing motions. Furthermore, the strength of the interaction of the nucleosomal DNA tail with the neighboring H2A histone tail modulates the conformational state of the nucleosomal DNA tail. With increasing salt concentration, the degree of asymmetry in the conformation of the nucleosomal DNA tails decreases as both tails tend to unwrap. This direct correlation between the asymmetric breathing motions of the DNA tails and the H2A histone tails, and its decrease at higher salt concentrations, may play a significant role in the molecular pathway of unwrapping.

  14. Dynamic Nucleosome Movement Provides Structural Information of Topological Chromatin Domains in Living Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinkai, Soya; Nozaki, Tadasu; Maeshima, Kazuhiro; Togashi, Yuichi

    2016-10-01

    The mammalian genome is organized into submegabase-sized chromatin domains (CDs) including topologically associating domains, which have been identified using chromosome conformation capture-based methods. Single-nucleosome imaging in living mammalian cells has revealed subdiffusively dynamic nucleosome movement. It is unclear how single nucleosomes within CDs fluctuate and how the CD structure reflects the nucleosome movement. Here, we present a polymer model wherein CDs are characterized by fractal dimensions and the nucleosome fibers fluctuate in a viscoelastic medium with memory. We analytically show that the mean-squared displacement (MSD) of nucleosome fluctuations within CDs is subdiffusive. The diffusion coefficient and the subdiffusive exponent depend on the structural information of CDs. This analytical result enabled us to extract information from the single-nucleosome imaging data for HeLa cells. Our observation that the MSD is lower at the nuclear periphery region than the interior region indicates that CDs in the heterochromatin-rich nuclear periphery region are more compact than those in the euchromatin-rich interior region with respect to the fractal dimensions as well as the size. Finally, we evaluated that the average size of CDs is in the range of 100-500 nm and that the relaxation time of nucleosome movement within CDs is a few seconds. Our results provide physical and dynamic insights into the genome architecture in living cells.

  15. Nanopores suggest a negligible influence of CpG methylation on nucleosome packaging and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langecker, Martin; Ivankin, Andrey; Carson, Spencer; Kinney, Shannon R M; Simmel, Friedrich C; Wanunu, Meni

    2015-01-14

    Nucleosomes are the fundamental repeating units of chromatin, and dynamic regulation of their positioning along DNA governs gene accessibility in eukaryotes. Although epigenetic factors have been shown to influence nucleosome structure and dynamics, the impact of DNA methylation on nucleosome packaging remains controversial. Further, all measurements to date have been carried out under zero-force conditions. In this paper, we present the first automated force measurements that probe the impact of CpG DNA methylation on nucleosome stability. In solid-state nanopore force spectroscopy, a nucleosomal DNA tail is captured into a pore and pulled on with a time-varying electrophoretic force until unraveling is detected. This is automatically repeated for hundreds of nucleosomes, yielding statistics of nucleosome lifetime vs electrophoretic force. The force geometry, which is similar to displacement forces exerted by DNA polymerases and helicases, reveals that nucleosome stability is sensitive to DNA sequence yet insensitive to CpG methylation. Our label-free method provides high-throughput data that favorably compares with other force spectroscopy experiments and is suitable for studying a variety of DNA-protein complexes.

  16. Characterization of the Nucleosome Landscape by Micrococcal Nuclease-Sequencing (MNase-seq).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeijmakers, Wieteke Anna Maria; Bártfai, Richárd

    2018-01-01

    MNase-seq allows the genome-wide examination of the nucleosome landscape by determination of nucleosome positioning and occupancy. Typically, native or formaldehyde fixed chromatin is subjected to digestion by micrococcal nuclease (MNase), which degrades linker DNA and yields mainly mono-nucleosomes. The resulting material can be processed directly or can be subjected to an optional chromatin immunoprecipitation step (MNase-ChIP-seq). De-crosslinked and purified DNA is then subjected to next-generation sequencing. The protocol presented here has been tailored for the analysis of nucleosome landscape in the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, but most steps are directly applicable to other cell types. We also discuss general considerations for experimental design and computational analysis, which are crucial for accurate investigation of the nucleosome landscape.

  17. No need for a power stroke in ISWI-mediated nucleosome sliding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwigsen, Johanna; Klinker, Henrike; Mueller-Planitz, Felix

    2013-01-01

    Nucleosome remodelling enzymes of the ISWI family reposition nucleosomes in eukaryotes. ISWI contains an ATPase and a HAND-SANT-SLIDE (HSS) domain. Conformational changes between these domains have been proposed to be critical for nucleosome repositioning by pulling flanking DNA into the nucleosome. We inserted flexible linkers at strategic sites in ISWI to disrupt this putative power stroke and assess its functional importance by quantitative biochemical assays. Notably, the flexible linkers did not disrupt catalysis. Instead of engaging in a power stroke, the HSS module might therefore assist DNA to ratchet into the nucleosome. Our results clarify the roles had by the domains and suggest that the HSS domain evolved to optimize a rudimentary remodelling engine. PMID:24113208

  18. Stimulation of the Drosophila immune system alters genome-wide nucleosome occupancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingxue Ren

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, nucleosomes participate in all DNA-templated events by regulating access to the underlying DNA sequence. However, nucleosome dynamics during a genome response have not been well characterized [1,2]. We stimulated Drosophila S2 cells with heat-killed Gram-negative bacteria Salmonella typhimurium, and mapped genome-wide nucleosome occupancy at high temporal resolution by MNase-seq using Illumina HiSeq 2500. We show widespread nucleosome occupancy change in S2 cells during the immune response, with the significant nucleosomal loss occurring at 4 h after stimulation. Data have been deposited to the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO database repository with the dataset identifier GSE64507.

  19. RPA binds histone H3-H4 and functions in DNA replication-coupled nucleosome assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shaofeng; Xu, Zhiyun; Leng, He; Zheng, Pu; Yang, Jiayi; Chen, Kaifu; Feng, Jianxun; Li, Qing

    2017-01-27

    DNA replication-coupled nucleosome assembly is essential to maintain genome integrity and retain epigenetic information. Multiple involved histone chaperones have been identified, but how nucleosome assembly is coupled to DNA replication remains elusive. Here we show that replication protein A (RPA), an essential replisome component that binds single-stranded DNA, has a role in replication-coupled nucleosome assembly. RPA directly binds free H3-H4. Assays using a synthetic sequence that mimics freshly unwound single-stranded DNA at replication fork showed that RPA promotes DNA-(H3-H4) complex formation immediately adjacent to double-stranded DNA. Further, an RPA mutant defective in H3-H4 binding exhibited attenuated nucleosome assembly on nascent chromatin. Thus, we propose that RPA functions as a platform for targeting histone deposition to replication fork, through which RPA couples nucleosome assembly with ongoing DNA replication. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  20. Naturally occuring nucleosome positioning signals in human exons and introns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldi, Pierre; Brunak, Søren; Chauvin, Yves

    1996-01-01

    We describe the structural implications of a periodic pattern found in human exons and introns by hidden Markov models. We show that exons (besides the reading frame) have a specific sequential structure in the form of a pattern with triplet consensus non-T(A/T)G, and a minimal periodicity...... faces inward and is compressed. The in-phase triplets are located adjacent to GCC/GGC triplets known to have the strongest bias in their positioning on the nucleosome. Analysis of mRNA sequences encoding proteins with known tertiary structure exclude the possibility that the pattern is a consequence...

  1. Distinct influences of tandem repeats and retrotransposons on CENH3 nucleosome positioning

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    Gent Jonathan I

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Unique structural characteristics of centromere chromatin enable it to support assembly of the kinetochore and its associated tensions. The histone H3 variant CENH3 (centromeric histone H3 is viewed as the key element of centromere chromatin and its interaction with centromere DNA is epigenetic in that its localization to centromeres is not sequence-dependent. Results In order to investigate what influence the DNA sequence exerts on CENH3 chromatin structure, we examined CENH3 nucleosome footprints on maize centromere DNA. We found a predominant average nucleosome spacing pattern of roughly 190-bp intervals, which was also the dominant arrangement for nucleosomes genome-wide. For CENH3-containing nucleosomes, distinct modes of nucleosome positioning were evident within that general spacing constraint. Over arrays of the major ~156-bp centromeric satellite sequence (tandem repeat CentC, nucleosomes were not positioned in register with CentC monomers but in conformity with a striking ~10-bp periodicity of AA/TT dimers within the sequence. In contrast, nucleosomes on a class of centromeric retrotransposon (CRM2 lacked a detectable AA/TT periodicity but exhibited tightly phased positioning. Conclusions These data support a model in which general chromatin factors independent of both DNA sequence and CENH3 enforce roughly uniform centromeric nucleosome spacing while allowing flexibility in the mode in which nucleosomes are positioned. In the case of tandem repeat DNA, the natural bending effects related to AA/TT periodicity produce an energetically-favourable arrangement consistent with conformationally rigid nucleosomes and stable chromatin at centromeres.

  2. Enhanced targeted integration mediated by translocated I-SceI during the Agrobacterium mediated transformation of yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolloos, Martijn; Hooykaas, Paul J J; van der Zaal, Bert J

    2015-02-09

    Agrobacterium mediated transformation (AMT) has been embraced by biotechnologists as the technology of choice to introduce or alter genetic traits of plants. However, in plants it is virtually impossible to predetermine the integration site of the transferred T-strand unless one is able to generate a double stranded break (DSB) in the DNA at the site of interest. In this study, we used the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae to investigate whether the Agrobacterium mediated translocation of site-specific endonucleases via the type IV secretion system (T4SS), concomitantly with T-DNA transfer is possible and whether this can improve the gene targeting efficiency. In addition to that, the effect of different chromatin states on targeted integration, was investigated. It was found that Agrobacterium mediated translocation of the homing endonuclease I-SceI has a positive effect on the integration of T-DNA via the homologous repair (HR) pathway. Furthermore, we obtained evidence that nucleosome removal has a positive effect on I-SceI facilitated T-DNA integration by HR. Reversely; inducing nucleosome formation at the site of integration removes the positive effect of translocated I-SceI on T-DNA integration.

  3. In silico evidence for sequence-dependent nucleosome sliding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lequieu, Joshua; Schwartz, David C.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2017-10-18

    Nucleosomes represent the basic building block of chromatin and provide an important mechanism by which cellular processes are controlled. The locations of nucleosomes across the genome are not random but instead depend on both the underlying DNA sequence and the dynamic action of other proteins within the nucleus. These processes are central to cellular function, and the molecular details of the interplay between DNA sequence and nudeosome dynamics remain poorly understood. In this work, we investigate this interplay in detail by relying on a molecular model, which permits development of a comprehensive picture of the underlying free energy surfaces and the corresponding dynamics of nudeosome repositioning. The mechanism of nudeosome repositioning is shown to be strongly linked to DNA sequence and directly related to the binding energy of a given DNA sequence to the histone core. It is also demonstrated that chromatin remodelers can override DNA-sequence preferences by exerting torque, and the histone H4 tail is then identified as a key component by which DNA-sequence, histone modifications, and chromatin remodelers could in fact be coupled.

  4. FSAP-mediated nucleosome release from late apoptotic cells is inhibited by autoantibodies present in SLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsman, Gerben; Stephan, Femke; de Leeuw, Karina; Bulder, Ingrid; Ruinard, Jessica T; de Jong, Jan; Westra, Johanna; Bultink, Irene E M; Voskuyl, Alexandre E; Aarden, Lucien A; Luken, Brenda M; Kallenberg, Cees G M; Zeerleder, Sacha

    2016-03-01

    Inefficient clearance of apoptotic cells and the subsequent exposure of the immune system to nuclear contents are crucially involved in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Factor VII-activating protease (FSAP) is activated in serum upon contact with dead cells, and releases nucleosomes from late apoptotic cells into the extracellular environment. We investigated whether FSAP-mediated nucleosome release from late apoptotic cells is affected in SLE patients. Nucleosome release in sera of 27 SLE patients and 30 healthy controls was investigated by incubating late apoptotic Jurkat cells with serum and analyzing the remaining DNA content by flow cytometry. We found that nucleosome release in sera of SLE patients with high disease activity was significantly decreased when compared with that in SLE sera obtained during low disease activity or from healthy individuals. Upon removal of IgG/IgM antibodies from SLE sera, nucleosome release was restored. Similarly, monoclonal antinuclear antibodies inhibited nucleosome release in healthy donor serum or by plasma-purified FSAP. This inhibition was lost when Fab fragments were used, suggesting that antigen cross-linking is involved. In conclusion, FSAP-mediated nucleosome release from late apoptotic cells is greatly impaired in SLE patient sera, possibly hampering the clearance of these cells and thereby propagating inflammation. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Investigation of the interaction between berberine and nucleosomes in solution: Spectroscopic and equilibrium dialysis approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbani-Chadegani, Azra; Mollaei, Hossein; Sargolzaei, Javad

    2017-02-01

    Berberine is a natural plant alkaloid with high pharmacological potential. Although its interaction with free DNA has been the subject of several reports, to date there is no work concerning the effect of berberine on nucleoprotein structure of DNA, the nucleosomes. The present study focuses on the binding affinity of berberine to nucleosomes and histone H1 employing various spectroscopic techniques, fluorescence, circular dichroism, thermal denaturation as well as equilibrium dialysis. The results showed that the binding of berberine to nucleosomes is positive cooperative with Ka = 5.57 × 103 M- 1. Berberine quenched with the chromophores of protein moiety of nucleosomes and reduced fluorescence emission intensity at 335 nm with Ksv value of 0.135. Binding of berberine to nucleosomes decreased the absorbance at 210 and 260 nm, produced hypochromicity in thermal denaturation profiles and its affinity to nucleoprotein structure of nucleosomes was much higher than to free DNA. Berberine also exhibited high affinity to histone H1 in solution and the binding was positive cooperative with. Ka = 3.61 × 103 M- 1. Moreover berberine decreased fluorescence emission intensity of H1 by quenching with tyrosine residue in its globular core domain. The circular dichroism profiles demonstrated that the binding of drug induced secondary structural changes in both DNA stacking and histone H1. It is concluded that berberine is genotoxic drug, interacts with nucleosomes and in this process histone H1 is involved to exert its anticancer activity.

  6. Unbiased chromatin accessibility profiling by RED-seq uncovers unique features of nucleosome variants in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Poshen B; Zhu, Lihua J; Hainer, Sarah J; McCannell, Kurtis N; Fazzio, Thomas G

    2014-12-15

    Differential accessibility of DNA to nuclear proteins underlies the regulation of numerous cellular processes. Although DNA accessibility is primarily determined by the presence or absence of nucleosomes, differences in nucleosome composition or dynamics may also regulate accessibility. Methods for mapping nucleosome positions and occupancies genome-wide (MNase-seq) have uncovered the nucleosome landscapes of many different cell types and organisms. Conversely, methods specialized for the detection of large nucleosome-free regions of chromatin (DNase-seq, FAIRE-seq) have uncovered numerous gene regulatory elements. However, these methods are less successful in measuring the accessibility of DNA sequences within nucelosome arrays. Here we probe the genome-wide accessibility of multiple cell types in an unbiased manner using restriction endonuclease digestion of chromatin coupled to deep sequencing (RED-seq). Using this method, we identified differences in chromatin accessibility between populations of cells, not only in nucleosome-depleted regions of the genome (e.g., enhancers and promoters), but also within the majority of the genome that is packaged into nucleosome arrays. Furthermore, we identified both large differences in chromatin accessibility in distinct cell lineages and subtle but significant changes during differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Most significantly, using RED-seq, we identified differences in accessibility among nucleosomes harboring well-studied histone variants, and show that these differences depend on factors required for their deposition. Using an unbiased method to probe chromatin accessibility genome-wide, we uncover unique features of chromatin structure that are not observed using more widely-utilized methods. We demonstrate that different types of nucleosomes within mammalian cells exhibit different degrees of accessibility. These findings provide significant insight into the regulation of DNA accessibility.

  7. TRF2 controls telomeric nucleosome organization in a cell cycle phase-dependent manner.

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    Alessandra Galati

    Full Text Available Mammalian telomeres stabilize chromosome ends as a result of their assembly into a peculiar form of chromatin comprising a complex of non-histone proteins named shelterin. TRF2, one of the shelterin components, binds to the duplex part of telomeric DNA and is essential to fold the telomeric chromatin into a protective cap. Although most of the human telomeric DNA is organized into tightly spaced nucleosomes, their role in telomere protection and how they interplay with telomere-specific factors in telomere organization is still unclear. In this study we investigated whether TRF2 can regulate nucleosome assembly at telomeres.By means of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP and Micrococcal Nuclease (MNase mapping assay, we found that the density of telomeric nucleosomes in human cells was inversely proportional to the dosage of TRF2 at telomeres. This effect was not observed in the G1 phase of the cell cycle but appeared coincident of late or post-replicative events. Moreover, we showed that TRF2 overexpression altered nucleosome spacing at telomeres increasing internucleosomal distance. By means of an in vitro nucleosome assembly system containing purified histones and remodeling factors, we reproduced the short nucleosome spacing found in telomeric chromatin. Importantly, when in vitro assembly was performed in the presence of purified TRF2, nucleosome spacing on a telomeric DNA template increased, in agreement with in vivo MNase mapping.Our results demonstrate that TRF2 negatively regulates the number of nucleosomes at human telomeres by a cell cycle-dependent mechanism that alters internucleosomal distance. These findings raise the intriguing possibility that telomere protection is mediated, at least in part, by the TRF2-dependent regulation of nucleosome organization.

  8. TRF2 controls telomeric nucleosome organization in a cell cycle phase-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galati, Alessandra; Magdinier, Frédérique; Colasanti, Valentina; Bauwens, Serge; Pinte, Sébastien; Ricordy, Ruggero; Giraud-Panis, Marie-Josèphe; Pusch, Miriam Caroline; Savino, Maria; Cacchione, Stefano; Gilson, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian telomeres stabilize chromosome ends as a result of their assembly into a peculiar form of chromatin comprising a complex of non-histone proteins named shelterin. TRF2, one of the shelterin components, binds to the duplex part of telomeric DNA and is essential to fold the telomeric chromatin into a protective cap. Although most of the human telomeric DNA is organized into tightly spaced nucleosomes, their role in telomere protection and how they interplay with telomere-specific factors in telomere organization is still unclear. In this study we investigated whether TRF2 can regulate nucleosome assembly at telomeres.By means of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and Micrococcal Nuclease (MNase) mapping assay, we found that the density of telomeric nucleosomes in human cells was inversely proportional to the dosage of TRF2 at telomeres. This effect was not observed in the G1 phase of the cell cycle but appeared coincident of late or post-replicative events. Moreover, we showed that TRF2 overexpression altered nucleosome spacing at telomeres increasing internucleosomal distance. By means of an in vitro nucleosome assembly system containing purified histones and remodeling factors, we reproduced the short nucleosome spacing found in telomeric chromatin. Importantly, when in vitro assembly was performed in the presence of purified TRF2, nucleosome spacing on a telomeric DNA template increased, in agreement with in vivo MNase mapping.Our results demonstrate that TRF2 negatively regulates the number of nucleosomes at human telomeres by a cell cycle-dependent mechanism that alters internucleosomal distance. These findings raise the intriguing possibility that telomere protection is mediated, at least in part, by the TRF2-dependent regulation of nucleosome organization.

  9. Electochemical detection of chromosome translocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwasny, Dorota; Dimaki, Maria; Silahtaroglu, Asli

    2014-01-01

    Cytogenetics is a study of the cell structure with a main focus on chromosomes content and their structure. Chromosome abnormalities, such as translocations may cause various genetic disorders and heametological malignancies. Chromosome translocations are structural rearrangements of two...... chromosomes that results in formation of derivative chromosomes with a mixed DNA sequence. The method currently used for their detection is Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization, which requires a use of expensive, fluorescently labeled probes that target the derivative chromosomes. We present here a double...... hybridization approach developed for label-free detection of the chromosome translocations. For specific translocation detection it is necessary to determine that the two DNA sequences forming a derivative chromosome are connected, which is achieved by two subsequent hybridization steps. The electrochemical...

  10. Structural insights into ribosome translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Clarence; Ermolenko, Dmitri N

    2016-09-01

    During protein synthesis, tRNA and mRNA are translocated from the A to P to E sites of the ribosome thus enabling the ribosome to translate one codon of mRNA after the other. Ribosome translocation along mRNA is induced by the universally conserved ribosome GTPase, elongation factor G (EF-G) in bacteria and elongation factor 2 (EF-2) in eukaryotes. Recent structural and single-molecule studies revealed that tRNA and mRNA translocation within the ribosome is accompanied by cyclic forward and reverse rotations between the large and small ribosomal subunits parallel to the plane of the intersubunit interface. In addition, during ribosome translocation, the 'head' domain of small ribosomal subunit undergoes forward- and back-swiveling motions relative to the rest of the small ribosomal subunit around the axis that is orthogonal to the axis of intersubunit rotation. tRNA/mRNA translocation is also coupled to the docking of domain IV of EF-G into the A site of the small ribosomal subunit that converts the thermally driven motions of the ribosome and tRNA into the forward translocation of tRNA/mRNA inside the ribosome. Despite recent and enormous progress made in the understanding of the molecular mechanism of ribosome translocation, the sequence of structural rearrangements of the ribosome, EF-G and tRNA during translocation is still not fully established and awaits further investigation. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:620-636. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1354 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2016 The Authors. WIREs RNA published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Partially Assembled Nucleosome Structures at Atomic Detail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rychkov, Georgy N; Ilatovskiy, Andrey V; Nazarov, Igor B; Shvetsov, Alexey V; Lebedev, Dmitry V; Konev, Alexander Y; Isaev-Ivanov, Vladimir V; Onufriev, Alexey V

    2017-02-07

    The evidence is now overwhelming that partially assembled nucleosome states (PANS) are as important as the canonical nucleosome structure for the understanding of how accessibility to genomic DNA is regulated in cells. We use a combination of molecular dynamics simulation and atomic force microscopy to deliver, in atomic detail, structural models of three key PANS: the hexasome (H2A·H2B)·(H3·H4)2, the tetrasome (H3·H4)2, and the disome (H3·H4). Despite fluctuations of the conformation of the free DNA in these structures, regions of protected DNA in close contact with the histone core remain stable, thus establishing the basis for the understanding of the role of PANS in DNA accessibility regulation. On average, the length of protected DNA in each structure is roughly 18 basepairs per histone protein. Atomistically detailed PANS are used to explain experimental observations; specifically, we discuss interpretation of atomic force microscopy, Förster resonance energy transfer, and small-angle x-ray scattering data obtained under conditions when PANS are expected to exist. Further, we suggest an alternative interpretation of a recent genome-wide study of DNA protection in active chromatin of fruit fly, leading to a conclusion that the three PANS are present in actively transcribing regions in a substantial amount. The presence of PANS may not only be a consequence, but also a prerequisite for fast transcription in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The supercoiling state of DNA determines the handedness of both H3 and CENP-A nucleosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlijm, R; Kim, S H; De Zwart, P L; Dalal, Y; Dekker, C

    2017-02-02

    Nucleosomes form the unit structure of the genome in eukaryotes, thereby constituting a fundamental tenet of chromatin biology. In canonical nucleosomes, DNA wraps around the histone octamer in a left-handed toroidal ramp. Here, in single-molecule magnetic tweezers studies of chaperone-assisted nucleosome assembly, we show that the handedness of the DNA wrapping around the nucleosome core is intrinsically ambidextrous, and depends on the pre-assembly supercoiling state of the DNA, i.e., it is not uniquely determined by the octameric histone core. Nucleosomes assembled onto negatively supercoiled DNA are found to exhibit a left-handed conformation, whereas assembly onto positively supercoiled DNA results in right-handed nucleosomes. This intrinsic flexibility to adopt both chiralities is observed both for canonical H3 nucleosomes, and for centromere-specific variant CENP-A nucleosomes. These data support recent advances suggesting an intrinsic adaptability of the nucleosome, and provide insights into how nucleosomes might rapidly re-assemble after cellular processes that generate positive supercoiling in vivo.

  13. Sequence-dependent nucleosome sliding in rotation-coupled and uncoupled modes revealed by molecular simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niina, Toru; Brandani, Giovanni B; Tan, Cheng; Takada, Shoji

    2017-12-01

    While nucleosome positioning on eukaryotic genome play important roles for genetic regulation, molecular mechanisms of nucleosome positioning and sliding along DNA are not well understood. Here we investigated thermally-activated spontaneous nucleosome sliding mechanisms developing and applying a coarse-grained molecular simulation method that incorporates both long-range electrostatic and short-range hydrogen-bond interactions between histone octamer and DNA. The simulations revealed two distinct sliding modes depending on the nucleosomal DNA sequence. A uniform DNA sequence showed frequent sliding with one base pair step in a rotation-coupled manner, akin to screw-like motions. On the contrary, a strong positioning sequence, the so-called 601 sequence, exhibits rare, abrupt transitions of five and ten base pair steps without rotation. Moreover, we evaluated the importance of hydrogen bond interactions on the sliding mode, finding that strong and weak bonds favor respectively the rotation-coupled and -uncoupled sliding movements.

  14. Generation of Native Chromatin Immunoprecipitation Sequencing Libraries for Nucleosome Density Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorzadeh, Alireza; Lopez Gutierrez, Rodrigo; Jackson, Linda; Moksa, Michelle; Hirst, Martin

    2017-12-12

    We present a modified native chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) experimental protocol compatible with a Gaussian mixture distribution based analysis methodology (nucleosome density ChIP-seq; ndChIP-seq) that enables the generation of combined measurements of micrococcal nuclease (MNase) accessibility with histone modification genome-wide. Nucleosome position and local density, and the posttranslational modification of their histone subunits, act in concert to regulate local transcription states. Combinatorial measurements of nucleosome accessibility with histone modification generated by ndChIP-seq allows for the simultaneous interrogation of these features. The ndChIP-seq methodology is applicable to small numbers of primary cells inaccessible to cross-linking based ChIP-seq protocols. Taken together, ndChIP-seq enables the measurement of histone modification in combination with local nucleosome density to obtain new insights into shared mechanisms that regulate RNA transcription within rare primary cell populations.

  15. Using DNA mechanics to predict in vitro nucleosome positions and formation energies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morozov, Alexandre V; Fortney, Karissa; Gaykalova, Daria A; Studitsky, Vasily M; Widom, Jonathan; Siggia, Eric D

    2009-01-01

    ... exclusion and sequence alone. We have developed a biophysical model, DNABEND, for the sequence dependence of DNA bending energies, and validated it against a collection of in vitro free energies of nucleosome formation and a set...

  16. Genome-wide nucleosome occupancy and DNA methylation profiling of four human cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron L. Statham

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available DNA methylation and nucleosome positioning are two key mechanisms that contribute to the epigenetic control of gene expression. During carcinogenesis, the expression of many genes is altered alongside extensive changes in the epigenome, with repressed genes often being associated with local DNA hypermethylation and gain of nucleosomes at their promoters. However the spectrum of alterations that occur at distal regulatory regions has not been extensively studied. To address this we used Nucleosome Occupancy and Methylation sequencing (NOMe-seq to compare the genome-wide DNA methylation and nucleosome occupancy profiles between normal and cancer cell line models of the breast and prostate. Here we describe the bioinformatic pipeline and methods that we developed for the processing and analysis of the NOMe-seq data published by (Taberlay et al., 2014 [1] and deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus with accession GSE57498.

  17. Understanding the connection between epigenetic DNA methylation and nucleosome positioning from computer simulations.

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    Guillem Portella

    Full Text Available Cytosine methylation is one of the most important epigenetic marks that regulate the process of gene expression. Here, we have examined the effect of epigenetic DNA methylation on nucleosomal stability using molecular dynamics simulations and elastic deformation models. We found that methylation of CpG steps destabilizes nucleosomes, especially when these are placed in sites where the DNA minor groove faces the histone core. The larger stiffness of methylated CpG steps is a crucial factor behind the decrease in nucleosome stability. Methylation changes the positioning and phasing of the nucleosomal DNA, altering the accessibility of DNA to regulatory proteins, and accordingly gene functionality. Our theoretical calculations highlight a simple physical-based explanation on the foundations of epigenetic signaling.

  18. Soft skills turned into hard facts: nucleosome remodelling at developmental switches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chioda, M; Becker, P B

    2010-07-01

    Nucleosome remodelling factors are regulators of DNA accessibility in chromatin and lubricators of all major functions of eukaryotic genomes. Their action is transient and reversible, yet can be decisive for irreversible cell-fate decisions during development. In addition to the well-known local actions of nucleosome remodelling factors during transcription initiation, more global and fundamental roles for remodelling complexes in shaping the epigenome during development are emerging.

  19. Serum nucleosomes during neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with cervical cancer. Predictive and prognostic significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cetina Lucely

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been shown that free DNA circulates in serum plasma of patients with cancer and that at least part is present in the form of oligo- and monucleosomes, a marker of cell death. Preliminary data has shown a good correlation between decrease of nucleosomes with response and prognosis. Here, we performed pre- and post-chemotherapy determinations of serum nucleosomes with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA method in a group of patients with cervical cancer receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Methods From December 2000 to June 2001, 41 patients with cervical cancer staged as FIGO stages IB2-IIIB received three 21-day courses of carboplatin and paclitaxel, both administered at day 1; then, patients underwent radical hysterectomy. Nucleosomes were measured the day before (baseline, at day seven of the first course and day seven of the third course of chemotherapy. Values of nucleosomes were analyzed with regard to pathologic response and to time to progression-free and overall survival. Results All patients completed chemotherapy, were evaluable for pathologic response, and had nucleosome levels determined. At a mean follow-up of 23 months (range, 7–26 months, projected progression time and overall survival were 80.3 and 80.4%, respectively. Mean differential values of nucleosomes were lower in the third course as compared with the first course (p >0.001. The decrease in the third course correlated with pathologic response (p = 0.041. Survival analysis showed a statistically significant, better progression-free and survival time in patients who showed lower levels at the third course (p = 0.0243 and p = 0.0260, respectively. Cox regression analysis demonstrated that nucleosome increase in the third course increased risk of death to 6.86 (95% confidence interval [CI 95%], 0.84–56.0. Conclusion Serum nucleosomes may have a predictive role for response and prognostic significance in patients with cervical cancer

  20. Anti-nucleosome antibodies as a disease activity marker in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleiman, Suleiman; Kamaliah, Daud; Nadeem, Afzal; Naing, Nyi Nyi; Che Maraina, Che Hussin

    2009-07-01

    To measure the level of anti-nucleosome antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, to determine the sensitivity and the specificity of these antibodies in the diagnosis of the disease and to evaluate the relationship between the levels of anti-nucleosome antibodies, anti-dsDNA (double-stranded DNA) and SLE disease activity. A cross-sectional study was conducted. All patients attended either a medical specialist clinic or were admitted to the medical wards of Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia with the diagnosis of SLE (n = 90), other connective tissue diseases (n = 45) or were normal controls (n = 90) within the period from July 2004 until September 2005. They were tested for anti-nucleosome antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and anti-DNA antibodies by immunofluorescence. SLE disease activity was evaluated by SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI) score. Out of 90 SLE patients, anti-nucleosome antibodies were positive in 47 (52.2%) patients, whereas these antibodies were positive in three (6.7%) patients with other connective tissue diseases. Anti-dsDNA antibodies were positive in 33 (36.7%) SLE patients, whereas these antibodies were positive in four (8.9%) patients with other connective tissue diseases. Anti-nucleosome antibodies were positive in 40 (97.6%) patients with active SLE, whereas these antibodies were positive in seven (14.3%) patients with inactive SLE. Anti-nucleosome antibodies had a stronger correlation than anti-dsDNA antibodies with SLEDAI score. There was a significant association between anti-nucleosome antibodies and disease activity. Anti-nucleosome antibodies test is highly sensitive and specific for the diagnosis of SLE, especially when the anti-dsDNA antibodies are absent. They are additional disease activity markers in the assessment of SLE disease activity.

  1. A quantitative investigation of linker histone interactions with nucleosomes and chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Alison E.; Hieb, Aaron R.; Luger, Karolin

    2016-01-01

    Linker histones such as H1 are abundant basic proteins that bind tightly to nucleosomes, thereby acting as key organizers of chromatin structure. The molecular details of linker histone interactions with the nucleosome, and in particular the contributions of linker DNA and of the basic C-terminal tail of H1, are controversial. Here we combine rigorous solution-state binding assays with native gel electrophoresis and Atomic Force Microscopy, to quantify the interaction of H1 with chromatin. We find that H1 binds nucleosomes and nucleosomal arrays with very tight affinity by recognizing a specific DNA geometry minimally consisting of a solitary nucleosome with a single ~18 base pair DNA linker arm. The association of H1 alters the conformation of trinucleosomes so that only one H1 can bind to the two available linker DNA regions. Neither incorporation of the histone variant H2A.Z, nor the presence of neighboring nucleosomes affects H1 affinity. Our data provide a comprehensive thermodynamic framework for this ubiquitous chromatin architectural protein. PMID:26750377

  2. Inducible nucleosome depletion at OREBP-binding-sites by hypertonic stress.

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    Edith H Y Tong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Osmotic Response Element-Binding Protein (OREBP, also known as TonEBP or NFAT5, is a unique transcription factor. It is hitherto the only known mammalian transcription factor that regulates hypertonic stress-induced gene transcription. In addition, unlike other monomeric members of the NFAT family, OREBP exists as a homodimer and it is the only transcription factor known to bind naked DNA targets by complete encirclement in vitro. Nevertheless, how OREBP interacts with target DNA, also known as ORE/TonE, and how it elicits gene transcription in vivo, remains unknown. METHODOLOGY: Using hypertonic induction of the aldose reductase (AR gene activation as a model, we showed that OREs contained dynamic nucleosomes. Hypertonic stress induced a rapid and reversible loss of nucleosome(s around the OREs. The loss of nucleosome(s was found to be initiated by an OREBP-independent mechanism, but was significantly potentiated in the presence of OREBP. Furthermore, hypertonic induction of AR gene was associated with an OREBP-dependent hyperacetylation of histones that spanned the 5' upstream sequences and at least some exons of the gene. Nevertheless, nucleosome loss was not regulated by the acetylation status of histone. SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings offer novel insights into the mechanism of OREBP-dependent transcriptional regulation and provide a basis for understanding how histone eviction and transcription factor recruitment are coupled.

  3. Charge State of the Globular Histone Core Controls Stability of the Nucleosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenley, Andrew T.; Adams, David A.; Onufriev, Alexey V.

    2010-01-01

    Presented here is a quantitative model of the wrapping and unwrapping of the DNA around the histone core of the nucleosome that suggests a mechanism by which this transition can be controlled: alteration of the charge state of the globular histone core. The mechanism is relevant to several classes of posttranslational modifications such as histone acetylation and phosphorylation; several specific scenarios consistent with recent in vivo experiments are considered. The model integrates a description based on an idealized geometry with one based on the atomistic structure of the nucleosome, and the model consistently accounts for both the electrostatic and nonelectrostatic contributions to the nucleosome free energy. Under physiological conditions, isolated nucleosomes are predicted to be very stable (38 ± 7 kcal/mol). However, a decrease in the charge of the globular histone core by one unit charge, for example due to acetylation of a single lysine residue, can lead to a significant decrease in the strength of association with its DNA. In contrast to the globular histone core, comparable changes in the charge state of the histone tail regions have relatively little effect on the nucleosome's stability. The combination of high stability and sensitivity explains how the nucleosome is able to satisfy the seemingly contradictory requirements for thermodynamic stability while allowing quick access to its DNA informational content when needed by specific cellular processes such as transcription. PMID:20816070

  4. Nucleosome Repositioning: A Novel Mechanism for Nicotine- and Cocaine-Induced Epigenetic Changes.

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    Amber N Brown

    Full Text Available Drugs of abuse modify behavior by altering gene expression in the brain. Gene expression can be regulated by changes in DNA methylation as well as by histone modifications, which alter chromatin structure, DNA compaction and DNA accessibility. In order to better understand the molecular mechanisms directing drug-induced changes in chromatin structure, we examined DNA-nucleosome interactions within promoter regions of 858 genes in human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y exposed to nicotine or cocaine. Widespread, drug- and time-resolved repositioning of nucleosomes was identified at the transcription start site and promoter region of multiple genes. Nicotine and cocaine produced unique and shared changes in terms of the numbers and types of genes affected, as well as repositioning of nucleosomes at sites which could increase or decrease the probability of gene expression based on DNA accessibility. Half of the drug-induced nucleosome positions approximated a theoretical model of nucleosome occupancy based on physical and chemical characteristics of the DNA sequence, whereas the basal or drug naïve positions were generally DNA sequence independent. Thus we suggest that nucleosome repositioning represents an initial dynamic genome-wide alteration of the transcriptional landscape preceding more selective downstream transcriptional reprogramming, which ultimately characterizes the cell- and tissue-specific responses to drugs of abuse.

  5. Nucleosome occupancy as a novel chromatin parameter for replication origin functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Jairo; Lee, Laura; Lynch, Bryony; Tsukiyama, Toshio

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic DNA replication initiates from multiple discrete sites in the genome, termed origins of replication (origins). Prior to S phase, multiple origins are poised to initiate replication by recruitment of the pre-replicative complex (pre-RC). For proper replication to occur, origin activation must be tightly regulated. At the population level, each origin has a distinct firing time and frequency of activation within S phase. Many studies have shown that chromatin can strongly influence initiation of DNA replication. However, the chromatin parameters that affect properties of origins have not been thoroughly established. We found that nucleosome occupancy in G1 varies greatly around origins across the S. cerevisiae genome, and nucleosome occupancy around origins significantly correlates with the activation time and efficiency of origins, as well as pre-RC formation. We further demonstrate that nucleosome occupancy around origins in G1 is established during transition from G2/M to G1 in a pre-RC-dependent manner. Importantly, the diminished cell-cycle changes in nucleosome occupancy around origins in the orc1-161 mutant are associated with an abnormal global origin usage profile, suggesting that proper establishment of nucleosome occupancy around origins is a critical step for regulation of global origin activities. Our work thus establishes nucleosome occupancy as a novel and key chromatin parameter for proper origin regulation. PMID:27895110

  6. GAA triplet-repeats cause nucleosome depletion in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongyu; Xing, Yongqiang; Liu, Guoqing; Chen, Ping; Zhao, Xiujuan; Li, Guohong; Cai, Lu

    2015-08-01

    Although there have been many investigations into how trinucleotide repeats affect nucleosome formation and local chromatin structure, the nucleosome positioning of GAA triplet-repeats in the human genome has remained elusive. In this work, the nucleosome occupancy around GAA triplet-repeats across the human genome was computed statistically. The results showed a nucleosome-depleted region in the vicinity of GAA triplet-repeats in activated and resting CD4(+) T cells. Furthermore, the A-tract was frequently adjacent to the upstream region of GAA triplet-repeats and could enhance the depletion surrounding GAA triplet-repeats. In vitro chromatin reconstitution assays with GAA-containing plasmids also demonstrated that the inserted GAA triplet-repeats destabilized the ability of recombinant plasmids to assemble nucleosomes. Our results suggested that GAA triplet-repeats have lower affinity to histones and can change local nucleosome positioning. These findings may be helpful for understanding the mechanism of Friedreich's ataxia, which is associated with GAA triplet-repeats at the chromatin level. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Crystal structure of the nucleosome containing ultraviolet light-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikoshi, Naoki; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Kagawa, Wataru; Osakabe, Akihisa; Matsumoto, Syota; Iwai, Shigenori; Sugasawa, Kaoru; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2016-02-26

    The cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) is induced in genomic DNA by ultraviolet (UV) light. In mammals, this photolesion is primarily induced within nucleosomal DNA, and repaired exclusively by the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. However, the mechanism by which the CPD is accommodated within the nucleosome has remained unknown. We now report the crystal structure of a nucleosome containing CPDs. In the nucleosome, the CPD induces only limited local backbone distortion, and the affected bases are accommodated within the duplex. Interestingly, one of the affected thymine bases is located within 3.0 Å from the undamaged complementary adenine base, suggesting the formation of complementary hydrogen bonds in the nucleosome. We also found that UV-DDB, which binds the CPD at the initial stage of the NER pathway, also efficiently binds to the nucleosomal CPD. These results provide important structural and biochemical information for understanding how the CPD is accommodated and recognized in chromatin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. In silico exploration of the fructose-6-phosphate phosphorylation step in glycolysis: genomic evidence of the coexistence of an atypical ATP-dependent along with a PPi-dependent phosphofructokinase in Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meurice, Guillaume; Deborde, Catherine; Jacob, Daniel; Falentin, Hélène; Boyaval, Patrick; Dimova, Diliana

    2004-01-01

    We performed a detailed bioinformatic study of the catalytic step of fructose-6-phosphate phosphorylation in glycolysis based on the raw genomic draft of Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii (P. shermanii) ATCC9614 [Meurice et al., 2004]. Our results provide the first in silico evidence of the coexistence of genes coding for an ATP-dependent phosphofructokinase (ATP-PFK) and a PPi-dependent phosphofructokinase (PPi-PFK), whereas the fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBP) and ADP-dependent phosphofructokinase (ADP-PFK) are absent. The deduced amino acid sequence corresponding to the PPi-PFK (AJ508922) shares 100% similarity with the already characterised propionibacterial protein (P29495; Ladror et al., 1991]. The unexpected ATP-PFK gene (AJ509827) encodes a protein of 373 aa which is highly similar (50% positive residues) along at least 95% of its sequence length to different well-characterised ATP-PFKs. The characteristic PROSITE pattern important for the enzyme function of ATP-PFKs (PS00433) was conserved in the putative ATP-PFK sequence: 8 out of 9 amino acid residues. According to the recent evolutionary study of PFK proteins with different phosphate donors [Bapteste et al., 2003], the propionibacterial ATP-PFK harbours a G104-K124 residue combination, which strongly suggested that this enzyme belongs to the group of atypical ATP-PFKs. According to our phylogenetic analyses the amino acid sequence of the ATP-PFK is clustered with the atypical ATP-PFKs from group III of the Siebers classification [Siebers et al., 1998], whereas the expected PPi-PFK protein is closer to the PPi-PFKs from clade P [Müller et al., 2001]. The possible significance of the co-existence of these two PFKs and their importance for the regulation of glycolytic pathway flux in P. shermanii is discussed.

  9. A bromodomain–DNA interaction facilitates acetylation-dependent bivalent nucleosome recognition by the BET protein BRDT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Thomas C. R.; Simon, Bernd; Rybin, Vladimir; Grötsch, Helga; Curtet, Sandrine; Khochbin, Saadi; Carlomagno, Teresa; Müller, Christoph W.

    2016-01-01

    Bromodomains are critical components of many chromatin modifying/remodelling proteins and are emerging therapeutic targets, yet how they interact with nucleosomes, rather than acetylated peptides, remains unclear. Using BRDT as a model, we characterized how the BET family of bromodomains interacts with site-specifically acetylated nucleosomes. Here we report that BRDT interacts with nucleosomes through its first (BD1), but not second (BD2) bromodomain, and that acetylated histone recognition by BD1 is complemented by a bromodomain–DNA interaction. Simultaneous DNA and histone recognition enhances BRDT's nucleosome binding affinity and specificity, and its ability to localize to acetylated chromatin in cells. Conservation of DNA binding in bromodomains of BRD2, BRD3 and BRD4, indicates that bivalent nucleosome recognition is a key feature of these bromodomains and possibly others. Our results elucidate the molecular mechanism of BRDT association with nucleosomes and identify structural features of the BET bromodomains that may be targeted for therapeutic inhibition. PMID:27991587

  10. Increased Nucleosomes and Neutrophil Activation Link to Disease Progression in Patients with Scrub Typhus but Not Murine Typhus in Laos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel H Paris

    Full Text Available Cell-mediated immunity is essential in protection against rickettsial illnesses, but the role of neutrophils in these intracellular vasculotropic infections remains unclear. This study analyzed the plasma levels of nucleosomes, FSAP-activation (nucleosome-releasing factor, and neutrophil activation, as evidenced by neutrophil-elastase (ELA complexes, in sympatric Lao patients with scrub typhus and murine typhus. In acute scrub typhus elevated nucleosome levels correlated with lower GCS scores, raised respiratory rate, jaundice and impaired liver function, whereas neutrophil activation correlated with fibrinolysis and high IL-8 plasma levels, a recently identified predictor of severe disease and mortality. Nucleosome and ELA complex levels were associated with a 4.8-fold and 4-fold increased risk of developing severe scrub typhus, beyond cut off values of 1,040 U/ml for nucleosomes and 275 U/ml for ELA complexes respectively. In murine typhus, nucleosome levels associated with pro-inflammatory cytokines and the duration of illness, while ELA complexes correlated strongly with inflammation markers, jaundice and increased respiratory rates. This study found strong correlations between circulating nucleosomes and neutrophil activation in patients with scrub typhus, but not murine typhus, providing indirect evidence that nucleosomes could originate from neutrophil extracellular trap (NET degradation. High circulating plasma nucleosomes and ELA complexes represent independent risk factors for developing severe complications in scrub typhus. As nucleosomes and histones exposed on NETs are highly cytotoxic to endothelial cells and are strongly pro-coagulant, neutrophil-derived nucleosomes could contribute to vascular damage, the pro-coagulant state and exacerbation of disease in scrub typhus, thus indicating a detrimental role of neutrophil activation. The data suggest that increased neutrophil activation relates to disease progression and severe

  11. PuFFIN--a parameter-free method to build nucleosome maps from paired-end reads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polishko, Anton; Bunnik, Evelien M; Le Roch, Karine G; Lonardi, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a novel method, called PuFFIN, that takes advantage of paired-end short reads to build genome-wide nucleosome maps with larger numbers of detected nucleosomes and higher accuracy than existing tools. In contrast to other approaches that require users to optimize several parameters according to their data (e.g., the maximum allowed nucleosome overlap or legal ranges for the fragment sizes) our algorithm can accurately determine a genome-wide set of non-overlapping nucleosomes without any user-defined parameter. This feature makes PuFFIN significantly easier to use and prevents users from choosing the "wrong" parameters and obtain sub-optimal nucleosome maps. PuFFIN builds genome-wide nucleosome maps using a multi-scale (or multi-resolution) approach. Our algorithm relies on a set of nucleosome "landscape" functions at different resolution levels: each function represents the likelihood of each genomic location to be occupied by a nucleosome for a particular value of the smoothing parameter. After a set of candidate nucleosomes is computed for each function, PuFFIN produces a consensus set that satisfies non-overlapping constraints and maximizes the number of nucleosomes. We report comprehensive experimental results that compares PuFFIN with recently published tools (NOrMAL, TEMPLATE FILTERING, and NucPosSimulator) on several synthetic datasets as well as real data for S. cerevisiae and P. falciparum. Experimental results show that our approach produces more accurate nucleosome maps with a higher number of non-overlapping nucleosomes than other tools.

  12. Increasing Nucleosome Occupancy Is Correlated with an Increasing Mutation Rate so Long as DNA Repair Machinery Is Intact.

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    Puya G Yazdi

    Full Text Available Deciphering the multitude of epigenomic and genomic factors that influence the mutation rate is an area of great interest in modern biology. Recently, chromatin has been shown to play a part in this process. To elucidate this relationship further, we integrated our own ultra-deep sequenced human nucleosomal DNA data set with a host of published human genomic and cancer genomic data sets. Our results revealed, that differences in nucleosome occupancy are associated with changes in base-specific mutation rates. Increasing nucleosome occupancy is associated with an increasing transition to transversion ratio and an increased germline mutation rate within the human genome. Additionally, cancer single nucleotide variants and microindels are enriched within nucleosomes and both the coding and non-coding cancer mutation rate increases with increasing nucleosome occupancy. There is an enrichment of cancer indels at the theoretical start (74 bp and end (115 bp of linker DNA between two nucleosomes. We then hypothesized that increasing nucleosome occupancy decreases access to DNA by DNA repair machinery and could account for the increasing mutation rate. Such a relationship should not exist in DNA repair knockouts, and we thus repeated our analysis in DNA repair machinery knockouts to test our hypothesis. Indeed, our results revealed no correlation between increasing nucleosome occupancy and increasing mutation rate in DNA repair knockouts. Our findings emphasize the linkage of the genome and epigenome through the nucleosome whose properties can affect genome evolution and genetic aberrations such as cancer.

  13. Friedreich's ataxia GAA.TTC duplex and GAA.GAA.TTC triplex structures exclude nucleosome assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Haihe; Wang, Yuh-Hwa

    2008-11-07

    Both chromatin structure and formation of triplex DNA at expanded GAA TTC repeats have been shown to regulate the FXN gene silencing, which causes Friedreich's ataxia. Recent studies have suggested that the presence of heterochromatin at the long expanded GAA TTC repeats, which is enriched in hypoacetylated histones, deters the transcription of the FXN gene. However, neither direct histone binding nor the effect of histone acetylation on the GAA TTC duplex or the GAA GAA TTC triplex has been measured in vitro. In this study, GAA TTC repeating DNAs derived from the human FXN gene, and the GAA GAA TTC triplex, were examined for their ability to assemble single nucleosomes and nucleosome arrays. Competitive nucleosome reconstitution assays demonstrated that the GAA TTC duplex excludes nucleosomes (53% decrease compared to the pUC control DNA) and that the GAA GAA TTC triplex further lowers the nucleosome assembly efficiency (82% decrease compared to the duplex DNA). The difference in assembly efficiency is amplified more significantly when hypoacetylated histones are used, compared to assembly with hyperacetylated histones. By analyzing the formation of nucleosome arrays on GAA TTC-containing plasmids, the triplex structure was shown to destabilize the ability of adjacent sequences to assemble nucleosomes. These results provide the first direct binding measurements for the GAA TTC duplex and the GAA GAA TTC triplex, and on the effect of histone acetylation, towards dissecting the role of chromatin structure in silencing of the FXN gene. These findings suggest that these sequences could profoundly alter local chromatin structure, and the discrepancy between in vivo and in vitro results supports recent studies showing that, in addition to DNA sequences, other factors such as epigenetic marks could be involved in the mechanism for inhibition of FXN gene expression.

  14. Transport of nucleosome core particles in semidilute DNA solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangenot, Stéphanie; Keller, Simon; Rädler, Joachim

    2003-09-01

    We studied the diffusion of native and trypsinized nucleosome core particles (NCPs), in aqueous solution and in concentrated DNA solutions (0.25-100 mg/ml) using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). The highest DNA concentrations studied mimic the DNA density inside the cell nucleus. The diffusion coefficient of freely diffusing NCPs depends on the presence or absence of histone tails and is affected by the salt concentration due to the relaxation effect of counterions. NCPs placed in a network of long DNA molecules (30-50 kbp) reveal anomalous diffusion. We demonstrate that NCPs diffusion is in agreement with known particle transport in entangled macromolecular solutions as long as the histone tails are folded onto the particles. In contrast, when these tails are unfolded, the reversible adsorption of NCPs onto the DNA network has to be taken into account. This is confirmed by the fact that removal of the tails leads to reduction of the interaction between NCPs and the DNA network. The findings suggest that histone tail bridging plays an important role in chromatin dynamics.

  15. Structure of centromere chromatin: from nucleosome to chromosomal architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalch, Thomas; Steiner, Florian A

    2017-08-01

    The centromere is essential for the segregation of chromosomes, as it serves as attachment site for microtubules to mediate chromosome segregation during mitosis and meiosis. In most organisms, the centromere is restricted to one chromosomal region that appears as primary constriction on the condensed chromosome and is partitioned into two chromatin domains: The centromere core is characterized by the centromere-specific histone H3 variant CENP-A (also called cenH3) and is required for specifying the centromere and for building the kinetochore complex during mitosis. This core region is generally flanked by pericentric heterochromatin, characterized by nucleosomes containing H3 methylated on lysine 9 (H3K9me) that are bound by heterochromatin proteins. During mitosis, these two domains together form a three-dimensional structure that exposes CENP-A-containing chromatin to the surface for interaction with the kinetochore and microtubules. At the same time, this structure supports the tension generated during the segregation of sister chromatids to opposite poles. In this review, we discuss recent insight into the characteristics of the centromere, from the specialized chromatin structures at the centromere core and the pericentromere to the three-dimensional organization of these regions that make up the functional centromere.

  16. Molecular Shapes From Rotational Diffusion: Dye Molecules, Proteins And Nucleosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Enoch W.; Libertini, Louis J.; Small, Jeanne R.

    1988-06-01

    This paper examines the shape information available from measurements of fluorescence anisotropy decays. We report anisotropy decays for three systems and examine the kinds of information which may be obtained. Results for the dye rose bengal (~1000 dal-tons) suggest that an approximation used in rotational diffusion theory, that the solvent molecules are very small compared to the solute, is valid even for this relatively small molecule. Second, we examine the effects of calcium concentration on rotational diffusion of the protein calmodulin (~17,000 daltons) derivatized by crosslinking to form a dityrosine fluorophore. In the presence of sufficiently high calcium ion concentration, this crosslinked calmodulin shows a single exponential anisotropy decay which indicates rotational diffusion consistent with the extended dumbbell structure found for calmodulin by x-ray crystal-lography. At low calcium concentrations, th e crosslinked calmodulin rotates considerably faster, suggesting a much more compact shape; also, this anisotropy decay includes considerably shorter correlation times which are interpreted as arising from a segmental flexibility not evident for crosslinked calmodulin at high calcium concentration. Finally, we examine a transition which is observed at very low salt concentrations for nucleosome core particles, relatively large complexes (~200,000 daltons) derived from chromatin and comprised of eight histone molecules and 145 base pairs of DNA. The anisotropy decay of ethidium bound to the DNA indicates that core particles exposed to low ionic strength are considerably elongated relative to the shape at higher ionic strength.

  17. Histone h3 glutathionylation in proliferating mammalian cells destabilizes nucleosomal structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Giménez, José Luis; Òlaso, Gloria; Hake, Sandra B; Bönisch, Clemens; Wiedemann, Sonja M; Markovic, Jelena; Dasí, Francisco; Gimeno, Amparo; Pérez-Quilis, Carme; Palacios, Oscar; Capdevila, Mercè; Viña, José; Pallardó, Federico V

    2013-10-20

    Here we report that chromatin, the complex and dynamic eukaryotic DNA packaging structure, is able to sense cellular redox changes. Histone H3, the only nucleosomal protein that possesses cysteine(s), can be modified by glutathione (GSH). Using Biotin labeled glutathione ethyl ester (BioGEE) treatment of nucleosomes in vitro, we show that GSH, the most abundant antioxidant in mammals, binds to histone H3. BioGEE treatment of NIH3T3 cells indicates that glutathionylation of H3 is maximal in fast proliferating cells, correlating well with enhanced levels of H3 glutathionylation in different tumor cell lines. Furthermore, glutathionylation of H3 in vivo decreases in livers from aged SAMP8 and C57BL/6J mice. We demonstrate biochemically and by mass spectrometry that histone variants H3.2/H3.3 are glutathionylated on their cysteine residue 110. Furthermore, circular dichroism, thermal denaturation of reconstituted nucleosomes, and molecular modeling indicate that glutathionylation of histone H3 produces structural changes affecting nucleosomal stability. We characterize the implications of histone H3 glutathionylation in cell physiology and the modulation of core histone proteins structure affected by this modification. Histone H3 senses cellular redox changes through glutathionylation of Cys, which increases during cell proliferation and decreases during aging. Glutathionylation of histone H3 affects nucleosome stability structure leading to a more open chromatin structure.

  18. Crystal structure of the PRC1 ubiquitylation module bound to the nucleosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinty, Robert K; Henrici, Ryan C; Tan, Song

    2014-10-30

    The Polycomb group of epigenetic enzymes represses expression of developmentally regulated genes in many eukaryotes. This group includes the Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1), which ubiquitylates nucleosomal histone H2A Lys 119 using its E3 ubiquitin ligase subunits, Ring1B and Bmi1, together with an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, UbcH5c. However, the molecular mechanism of nucleosome substrate recognition by PRC1 or other chromatin enzymes is unclear. Here we present the crystal structure of the human Ring1B-Bmi1-UbcH5c E3-E2 complex (the PRC1 ubiquitylation module) bound to its nucleosome core particle substrate. The structure shows how a chromatin enzyme achieves substrate specificity by interacting with several nucleosome surfaces spatially distinct from the site of catalysis. Our structure further reveals an unexpected role for the ubiquitin E2 enzyme in substrate recognition, and provides insight into how the related histone H2A E3 ligase, BRCA1, interacts with and ubiquitylates the nucleosome.

  19. Nucleosome assembly protein-1 is a linker histone chaperone in Xenopus eggs.

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    Shintomi, Keishi; Iwabuchi, Mari; Saeki, Hideaki; Ura, Kiyoe; Kishimoto, Takeo; Ohsumi, Keita

    2005-06-07

    In eukaryotic cells, genomic DNA is primarily packaged into nucleosomes through sequential ordered binding of the core and linker histone proteins. The acidic proteins termed histone chaperones are known to bind to core histones to neutralize their positive charges, thereby facilitating their proper deposition onto DNA to assemble the core of nucleosomes. For linker histones, however, little has been known about the regulatory mechanism for deposition of linker histones onto the linker DNA. Here we report that, in Xenopus eggs, the linker histone is associated with the Xenopus homologue of nucleosome assembly protein-1 (NAP-1), which is known to be a chaperone for the core histones H2A and H2B in Drosophila and mammalian cells [Ito, T., Bulger, M., Kobayashi, R. & Kadonaga, J. T. (1996) Mol. Cell Biol. 16, 3112-3124; Chang, L., Loranger, S. S., Mizzen, C., Ernst, S. G., Allis, C. D. & Annunziato, A. T. (1997) Biochemistry 36, 469-480]. We show that NAP-1 acts as the chaperone for the linker histone in both sperm chromatin remodeling into nucleosomes and linker histone binding to nucleosome core dimers. In the presence of NAP-1, the linker histone is properly deposited onto linker DNA at physiological ionic strength, without formation of nonspecific aggregates. These results strongly suggest that NAP-1 functions as a chaperone for the linker histone in Xenopus eggs.

  20. Nucleosome Assembly Dynamics Involve Spontaneous Fluctuations in the Handedness of Tetrasomes

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    Rifka Vlijm

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA wrapping around histone octamers generates nucleosomes, the basic compaction unit of eukaryotic chromatin. Nucleosome stability is carefully tuned to maintain DNA accessibility in transcription, replication, and repair. Using freely orbiting magnetic tweezers, which measure the twist and length of single DNA molecules, we monitor the real-time loading of tetramers or complete histone octamers onto DNA by Nucleosome Assembly Protein-1 (NAP1. Remarkably, we find that tetrasomes exhibit spontaneous flipping between a preferentially occupied left-handed state (ΔLk = −0.73 and a right-handed state (ΔLk = +1.0, separated by a free energy difference of 2.3 kBT (1.5 kcal/mol. This flipping occurs without concomitant changes in DNA end-to-end length. The application of weak positive torque converts left-handed tetrasomes into right-handed tetrasomes, whereas nucleosomes display more gradual conformational changes. Our findings reveal unexpected dynamical rearrangements of the nucleosomal structure, suggesting that chromatin can serve as a “twist reservoir,” offering a mechanistic explanation for the regulation of DNA supercoiling in chromatin.

  1. Distinct Roles of Histone H3 and H2A Tails in Nucleosome Stability

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    Li, Zhenhai; Kono, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    Nucleosome breathing potentially increases the DNA exposure, which in turn recruits DNA-binding protein and regulates gene transcription. Numerous studies have shown the critical roles of N-terminal tails of histones H3 and H4 in gene expression; however, few studies have focused on the H2A C-terminal tail. Here we present thorough computational studies on a single nucleosome particle showing the linker DNA closing and opening, which is thought to be nucleosome breathing. With our simulation, the H2A C-terminal and H3 N-terminal tails were found to modulate the nucleosome conformation differently. The H2A C-terminal tail regulates nucleosome conformation by binding to linker DNA at different locations, whereas the H3 N-terminal tail regulates linker DNA by binding to it in different patterns. Further MD simulation on tail truncated structures corroborates this analysis. These findings replenish our understanding of the histone tail regulation mechanism on atomic level. PMID:27527579

  2. The dynamics of individual nucleosomes controls the chromatin condensation pathway: direct atomic force microscopy visualization of variant chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montel, Fabien; Menoni, Hervé; Castelnovo, Martin; Bednar, Jan; Dimitrov, Stefan; Angelov, Dimitar; Faivre-Moskalenko, Cendrine

    2009-07-22

    Chromatin organization and dynamics is studied at scales ranging from single nucleosome to nucleosomal array by using a unique combination of biochemical assays, single molecule imaging technique, and numerical modeling. We show that a subtle modification in the nucleosome structure induced by the histone variant H2A.Bbd drastically modifies the higher order organization of the nucleosomal arrays. Importantly, as directly visualized by atomic force microscopy, conventional H2A nucleosomal arrays exhibit specific local organization, in contrast to H2A.Bbd arrays, which show "beads on a string" structure. The combination of systematic image analysis and theoretical modeling allows a quantitative description relating the observed gross structural changes of the arrays to their local organization. Our results suggest strongly that higher-order organization of H1-free nucleosomal arrays is determined mainly by the fluctuation properties of individual nucleosomes. Moreover, numerical simulations suggest the existence of attractive interactions between nucleosomes to provide the degree of compaction observed for conventional chromatin fibers.

  3. Time between onset of apoptosis and release of nucleosomes from apoptotic cells: putative implications for systemic lupus erythematosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nieuwenhuijze, A. E. M.; van Lopik, T.; Smeenk, R. J. T.; Aarden, L. A.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the kinetics of nucleosome leakage from apoptotic cells in an in vitro system and extrapolate the results to autoimmune disease, in particular systemic lupus erythematosus. METHODS: A sensitive nucleosome enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed, using a

  4. Physical properties of naked DNA influence nucleosome positioning and correlate with transcription start and termination sites in yeast

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    Soler-López Montserrat

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In eukaryotic organisms, DNA is packaged into chromatin structure, where most of DNA is wrapped into nucleosomes. DNA compaction and nucleosome positioning have clear functional implications, since they modulate the accessibility of genomic regions to regulatory proteins. Despite the intensive research effort focused in this area, the rules defining nucleosome positioning and the location of DNA regulatory regions still remain elusive. Results Naked (histone-free and nucleosomal DNA from yeast were digested by microccocal nuclease (MNase and sequenced genome-wide. MNase cutting preferences were determined for both naked and nucleosomal DNAs. Integration of their sequencing profiles with DNA conformational descriptors derived from atomistic molecular dynamic simulations enabled us to extract the physical properties of DNA on a genomic scale and to correlate them with chromatin structure and gene regulation. The local structure of DNA around regulatory regions was found to be unusually flexible and to display a unique pattern of nucleosome positioning. Ab initio physical descriptors derived from molecular dynamics were used to develop a computational method that accurately predicts nucleosome enriched and depleted regions. Conclusions Our experimental and computational analyses jointly demonstrate a clear correlation between sequence-dependent physical properties of naked DNA and regulatory signals in the chromatin structure. These results demonstrate that nucleosome positioning around TSS (Transcription Start Site and TTS (Transcription Termination Site (at least in yeast is strongly dependent on DNA physical properties, which can define a basal regulatory mechanism of gene expression.

  5. Nucleosome Binding Alters the Substrate Bonding Environment of Histone H3 Lysine 36 Methyltransferase NSD2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, Myles B; Schneck, Jessica L; Matico, Rosalie E; Hou, Wangfang; McDevitt, Patrick J; Holbert, Marc; Schramm, Vern L

    2016-06-01

    Nuclear receptor-binding SET domain protein 2 (NSD2) is a histone H3 lysine 36 (H3K36)-specific methyltransferase enzyme that is overexpressed in a number of cancers, including multiple myeloma. NSD2 binds to S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) and nucleosome substrates to catalyze the transfer of a methyl group from SAM to the ε-amino group of histone H3K36. Equilibrium binding isotope effects and density functional theory calculations indicate that the SAM methyl group is sterically constrained in complex with NSD2, and that this steric constraint is released upon nucleosome binding. Together, these results show that nucleosome binding to NSD2 induces a significant change in the chemical environment of enzyme-bound SAM.

  6. Extra views on structure and dynamics of DNA loops on nucleosomes studied with molecular simulations.

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    Pasi, Marco; Angelov, Dimitar; Bednar, Jan; Dimitrov, Stefan; Lavery, Richard

    2016-11-01

    It has been shown experimentally that the action of the RSC chromatin remodeler leads to the formation of an irregular, partially remodeled nucleosome, termed a remosome. The remosome contains an extra 30-40 base pairs of DNA compared to a canonical nucleosome. Large-scale molecular simulations have provided information on the probable structure of remosomes and have explained why they remain stable in the absence of RSC. Here we explain how these simulations were carried out and what the resulting remosome models imply in terms of the mechanism of action of RSC. We notably show that local kinks within DNA are key in explaining how extra DNA can be in added to nucleosomes without unduly disturbing DNA-histone binding.

  7. a Multi-Layer Model to Study Genome-Scale Positions of Nucleosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Gesú, Vito; Lo Bosco, Giosué; Pinello, Luca; Corona, Davide; Collesano, Marianna; Yuan, Guo-Cheng

    2007-12-01

    The positioning of nucleosomes along chromatin has been implicated in the regulation of gene expression in eukaryotic cells, because packaging DNA into nucleosomes affects sequence accessibility. In this paper we propose a new model (called MLM) for the identification of nucleosomes and linker regions across DNA, consisting in a thresholding technique based on cut-set conditions. For this purpose we have defined a method to generate synthetic microarray data fully inspired from the approach that has been used by Yuan et al. [3]. Results have shown a good recognition rate on synthetic data, moreover, the MLM shows a good agreement with the recently published method based on Hidden Markov Model when tested on the Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosomes microarray data.

  8. Role of histone tails in the conformation and interactions of nucleosome core particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertin, Aurélie; Leforestier, Amélie; Durand, Dominique; Livolant, Françoise

    2004-04-27

    The goal of this work was to test the role of the histone tails in the emergence of attractive interactions between nucleosomes above a critical salt concentration that corresponds to the complete tail extension outside the nucleosome [Mangenot, S., et al (2002) Biophys. J. 82, 345-356; Mangenot, S., et al (2002) Eur. Phys. J. E 7, 221-231]. Small angle X-ray scattering experiments were performed in parallel with intact and trypsin tail-deleted nucleosomes with 146 +/- 3 bp DNA. We varied the monovalent salt concentration from 10 to 300 monovalent salt concentration and followed the evolution of (i) the second virial coefficient that characterizes the interactions between particles and (ii) the conformation of the particle. The attractive interactions do not emerge in the absence of the tails, which validates the proposed hypothesis.

  9. New insights into nucleosome and chromatin structure: an ordered state or a disordered affair?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luger, Karolin; Dechassa, Mekonnen L.; Tremethick, David J.

    2012-01-01

    The compaction of genomic DNA into chromatin has profound implications for the regulation of key processes such as transcription, replication and DNA repair. Nucleosomes, the repeating building blocks of chromatin, vary in the composition of their histone protein components. This is the result of the incorporation of variant histones and post-translational modifications of histone amino acid side chains. The resulting changes in nucleosome structure, stability and dynamics affect the compaction of nucleosomal arrays into higher-order structures. It is becoming clear that chromatin structures are not nearly as uniform and regular as previously assumed. This implies that chromatin structure must also be viewed in the context of specific biological functions. PMID:22722606

  10. The mechanism of nucleosome traversal by RNA polymerase II: roles for template uncoiling and transcript elongation factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luse, Donal S; Studitsky, Vasily M

    2011-01-01

    RNA polymerase II traverses nucleosomes rapidly and efficiently in the cell but it has not been possible to duplicate this process in the test tube. A single nucleosome has generally been found to provide a strong barrier to transcript elongation in vitro. Recent studies have shown that effective transcript elongation can occur on nucleosomal templates in vitro, but this depends on both facilitated uncoiling of DNA from the octamer surface and the presence of transcription factors that maintain polymerase in the transcriptionally competent state. These findings indicate that the efficiency and rate of transcription through chromatin could be regulated through controlled DNA uncoiling. These studies also demonstrate that nucleosome traversal need not result in nucleosome displacement.

  11. Characterization and partial purification of a proton translocating ATPase from corn coleoptile tonoplasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandala, S.M.

    1985-01-01

    ATP-dependent proton translocating activity in microsomal membranes from corn coleoptiles was characterized. Proton pumping activity, detected by either /sup 14/C-methylamine uptake or quinacrine fluorescence quenching, had a broad optimum at pH 7.5, and was substrate specific for MgATP. N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, diethylstilbestrol, 7-chloro-4-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole, and protonophores were found to inhibit proton transport, while vanadate and oligomycin had little effect. Proton pumping activity was stimulated 10 fold with Cl/sup -/ but was almost completely inhibited by 50 mM, KNO/sub 3/. Uptake studies with /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ indicated the Cl/sup -/ was transported into the microsomal vesicles in response to the pH gradient. ATP-stimulated proton pumping activity was localized on linear density gradients. On sucrose gradients, the activity cosedimented with the marker for endoplasmic reticulum at 1.11 g/cc. Sucrose gradients prepared in the presence of MgCl/sub 2/ were used to shift the ER marker to a heavier density, away from proton pumping activity. Linear dextran gradients also resulted in a clear separation of ATP-stimulated methylamine, thiocyanate, and /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ uptake, from markers for ER, Golgi, mitochondria, and plasma membranes. The tonoplast ATPase was solubilized with octylglucoside and partially purified on linear sucrose gradients. The specific activity of the KNO/sub 3/-sensitive ATPase increased 30-fold during purification.

  12. Suitability of amphibians and reptiles for translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germano, Jennifer M; Bishop, Phillip J

    2009-02-01

    Translocations are important tools in the field of conservation. Despite increased use over the last few decades, the appropriateness of translocations for amphibians and reptiles has been debated widely over the past 20 years. To provide a comprehensive evaluation of the suitability of amphibians and reptiles for translocation, we reviewed the results of amphibian and reptile translocation projects published between 1991 and 2006. The success rate of amphibian and reptile translocations reported over this period was twice that reported in an earlier review in 1991. Success and failure rates were independent of the taxonomic class (Amphibia or Reptilia) released. Reptile translocations driven by human-wildlife conflict mitigation had a higher failure rate than those motivated by conservation, and more recent projects of reptile translocations had unknown outcomes. The outcomes of amphibian translocations were significantly related to the number of animals released, with projects releasing over 1000 individuals being most successful. The most common reported causes of translocation failure were homing and migration of introduced individuals out of release sites and poor habitat. The increased success of amphibian and reptile translocations reviewed in this study compared with the 1991 review is encouraging for future conservation projects. Nevertheless, more preparation, monitoring, reporting of results, and experimental testing of techniques and reintroduction questions need to occur to improve translocations of amphibians and reptiles as a whole.

  13. Translocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins JA. Diseases of white blood cells, lymph nodes, spleen, and thymus. In: Kumar V, Abbas AK, Aster JC, eds. Robbins and Cotran Pathologic Basis of Disease . 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 13.

  14. Problems with mitigation translocation of herpetofauna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Brian K; Nowak, Erika M; Kwiatkowski, Matthew A

    2015-02-01

    Mitigation translocation of nuisance animals is a commonly used management practice aimed at resolution of human-animal conflict by removal and release of an individual animal. Long considered a reasonable undertaking, especially by the general public, it is now known that translocated subjects are negatively affected by the practice. Mitigation translocation is typically undertaken with individual adult organisms and has a much lower success rate than the more widely practiced conservation translocation of threatened and endangered species. Nonetheless, the public and many conservation practitioners believe that because population-level conservation translocations have been successful that mitigation translocation can be satisfactorily applied to a wide variety of human-wildlife conflict situations. We reviewed mitigation translocations of reptiles, including our own work with 3 long-lived species (Gila monsters [Heloderma suspectum], Sonoran desert tortoises [Gopherus morafkai], and western diamond-backed rattlesnakes [Crotalus atrox]). Overall, mitigation translocation had a low success rate when judged either by effects on individuals (in all studies reviewed they exhibited increased movement or increased mortality) or by the success of the resolution of the human-animal conflict (translocated individuals often returned to the capture site). Careful planning and identification of knowledge gaps are critical to increasing success rates in mitigation translocations in the face of increasing pressure to find solutions for species threatened by diverse anthropogenic factors, including climate change and exurban and energy development. © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  15. Recent insights from single-molecule studies into nucleosome structure and dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ordu, O.; Lusser, A; Dekker, N.H.

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic DNA is tightly packed into a hierarchically ordered structure called chromatin in order to fit into the micron-scaled nucleus. The basic unit of chromatin is the nucleosome, which consists of a short piece of DNA wrapped around a core of eight histone proteins. In addition to their role

  16. Dynamic Conformations of Nucleosome Arrays in Solution from Small-Angle X-ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howell, Steven C. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-01-31

    We set out to determine quantitative information regarding the dynamic conformation of nucleosome arrays in solution using experimental SAXS. Toward this end, we developed a CG simulation algorithm for dsDNA which rapidly generates ensembles of structures through Metropolis MC sampling of a Markov chain.

  17. Contribution of histone N-terminal tails to the structure and stability of nucleosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Wakana; Miya, Yuta; Horikoshi, Naoki; Osakabe, Akihisa; Taguchi, Hiroyuki; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Shibata, Takehiko; Kagawa, Wataru; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    Histones are the protein components of the nucleosome, which forms the basic architecture of eukaryotic chromatin. Histones H2A, H2B, H3, and H4 are composed of two common regions, the "histone fold" and the "histone tail". Many efforts have been focused on the mechanisms by which the post-translational modifications of histone tails regulate the higher-order chromatin architecture. On the other hand, previous biochemical studies have suggested that histone tails also affect the structure and stability of the nucleosome core particle itself. However, the precise contributions of each histone tail are unclear. In the present study, we determined the crystal structures of four mutant nucleosomes, in which one of the four histones, H2A, H2B, H3, or H4, lacked the N-terminal tail. We found that the deletion of the H2B or H3 N-terminal tail affected histone-DNA interactions and substantially decreased nucleosome stability. These findings provide important information for understanding the complex roles of histone tails in regulating chromatin structure.

  18. In vitro reconstitution and biochemical analyses of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe nucleosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Masako; Nagakura, Wataru; Tanaka, Hiroki; Kujirai, Tomoya; Chikashige, Yuji; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2017-01-22

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe, which has a small genome but shares many physiological functions with higher eukaryotes, is a useful single-cell, model eukaryotic organism. In particular, many features concerning chromatin structure and dynamics, including heterochromatin, centromeres, telomeres, and DNA replication origins, are well conserved between S. pombe and higher eukaryotes. However, the S. pombe nucleosome, the fundamental structural unit of chromatin, has not been reconstituted in vitro. In the present study, we established the method to purify S. pombe histones H2A, H2B, H3, and H4, and successfully reconstituted the S. pombe nucleosome in vitro. Our thermal stability assay and micrococcal nuclease treatment assay revealed that the S. pombe nucleosome is markedly unstable and its DNA ends are quite accessible, as compared to the canonical human nucleosome. These findings are important to understand the mechanisms of epigenetic genomic DNA regulation in fission yeast. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The p400 ATPase regulates nucleosome stability and chromatin ubiquitination during DNA repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ye; Sun, Yingli; Jiang, Xiaofeng; Ayrapetov, Marina K.; Moskwa, Patryk; Yang, Shenghong; Weinstock, David M.

    2010-01-01

    The complexity of chromatin architecture presents a significant barrier to the ability of the DNA repair machinery to access and repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Consequently, remodeling of the chromatin landscape adjacent to DSBs is vital for efficient DNA repair. Here, we demonstrate that DNA damage destabilizes nucleosomes within chromatin regions that correspond to the γ-H2AX domains surrounding DSBs. This nucleosome destabilization is an active process requiring the ATPase activity of the p400 SWI/SNF ATPase and histone acetylation by the Tip60 acetyltransferase. p400 is recruited to DSBs by a mechanism that is independent of ATM but requires mdc1. Further, the destabilization of nucleosomes by p400 is required for the RNF8-dependent ubiquitination of chromatin, and for the subsequent recruitment of brca1 and 53BP1 to DSBs. These results identify p400 as a novel DNA damage response protein and demonstrate that p400-mediated alterations in nucleosome and chromatin structure promote both chromatin ubiquitination and the accumulation of brca1 and 53BP1 at sites of DNA damage. PMID:20876283

  20. Are liquid crystalline properties of nucleosomes involved in chromosome structure and dynamics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livolant, Françoise; Mangenot, Stéphanie; Leforestier, Amélie; Bertin, Aurélie; Frutos, Marta de; Raspaud, Eric; Durand, Dominique

    2006-10-15

    Nucleosome core particles correspond to the structural units of eukaryotic chromatin. They are charged colloids, 101 Angstrom in diameter and 55 Angstrom in length, formed by the coiling of a 146/147 bp DNA fragment (50 nm) around the histone protein octamer. Solutions of these particles can be concentrated, under osmotic pressure, up to the concentrations found in the nuclei of living cells. In the presence of monovalent cations (Na(+)), nucleosomes self-assemble into crystalline or liquid crystalline phases. A lamello-columnar phase is observed at 'low salt' concentrations, while a two-dimensional hexagonal phase and a three-dimensional quasi-hexagonal phase form at 'high salt' concentrations. We followed the formation of these phases from the dilute isotropic solutions to the ordered phases by combining cryoelectron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses. The phase diagram is presented as a function of the monovalent salt concentration and applied osmotic pressure. An alternative method to condense nucleosomes is to induce their aggregation upon addition of divalent or multivalent cations (Mg(2+), spermidine(3+) and spermine(4+)). Ordered phases are also found in the aggregates. We also discuss whether these condensed phases of nucleosomes may be relevant from a biological point of view.

  1. Nucleosome exclusion from the interspecies-conserved central AT-rich region of the Ars insulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Haruna; Inai, Yuta; Watanabe, Shun-ichiro; Tatemoto, Sayuri; Yajima, Mamiko; Akasaka, Koji; Yamamoto, Takashi; Sakamoto, Naoaki

    2012-01-01

    The Ars insulator is a boundary element identified in the upstream region of the arylsulfatase (HpArs) gene in the sea urchin, Hemicentrotus pulcherrimus, and possesses the ability to both block enhancer-promoter communications and protect transgenes from silent chromatin. To understand the molecular mechanism of the Ars insulator, we investigated the correlation between chromatin structure, DNA structure and insulator activity. Nuclease digestion of nuclei isolated from sea urchin embryos revealed the presence of a nuclease-hypersensitive site within the Ars insulator. Analysis of micrococcal nuclease-sensitive sites in the Ars insulator, reconstituted with nucleosomes, showed the exclusion of nucleosomes from the central AT-rich region. Furthermore, the central AT-rich region in naked DNA was sensitive to nucleotide base modification by diethylpyrocarbonate (DEPC). These observations suggest that non-B-DNA structures in the central AT-rich region may inhibit nucleosomal formation, which leads to nuclease hypersensitivity. Furthermore, comparison of nucleotide sequences between the HpArs gene and its ortholog in Strongylocentrotus purpuratus revealed that the central AT-rich region of the Ars insulator is conserved, and this conserved region showed significant enhancer blocking activity. These results suggest that the central AT-rich nucleosome-free region plays an important role in the function of the Ars insulator.

  2. Nucleosome-releasing factor: a new role for factor VII-activating protease (FSAP)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeerleder, Sacha; Zwart, Bas; te Velthuis, Henk; Stephan, Femke; Manoe, Rishi; Rensink, Irma; Aarden, Lucien A.

    2008-01-01

    Plasma proteins such as early complement components and IgM are involved in the removal of late apoptotic or secondary necrotic (sn) cells. We have recently described how a plasma protease that could be inhibited by the protease inhibitor aprotinin was essential to remove nucleosomes from sn cells.

  3. TRF1 and TRF2 binding to telomeres is modulated by nucleosomal organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galati, Alessandra; Micheli, Emanuela; Alicata, Claudia; Ingegnere, Tiziano; Cicconi, Alessandro; Pusch, Miriam Caroline; Giraud-Panis, Marie-Josèphe; Gilson, Eric; Cacchione, Stefano

    2015-07-13

    The ends of eukaryotic chromosomes need to be protected from the activation of a DNA damage response that leads the cell to replicative senescence or apoptosis. In mammals, protection is accomplished by a six-factor complex named shelterin, which organizes the terminal TTAGGG repeats in a still ill-defined structure, the telomere. The stable interaction of shelterin with telomeres mainly depends on the binding of two of its components, TRF1 and TRF2, to double-stranded telomeric repeats. Tethering of TRF proteins to telomeres occurs in a chromatin environment characterized by a very compact nucleosomal organization. In this work we show that binding of TRF1 and TRF2 to telomeric sequences is modulated by the histone octamer. By means of in vitro models, we found that TRF2 binding is strongly hampered by the presence of telomeric nucleosomes, whereas TRF1 binds efficiently to telomeric DNA in a nucleosomal context and is able to remodel telomeric nucleosomal arrays. Our results indicate that the different behavior of TRF proteins partly depends on the interaction with histone tails of their divergent N-terminal domains. We propose that the interplay between the histone octamer and TRF proteins plays a role in the steps leading to telomere deprotection. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. Chromatin modification by PSC occurs at one PSC per nucleosome and does not require the acidic patch of histone H2A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley M Lo

    Full Text Available Chromatin architecture is regulated through both enzymatic and non-enzymatic activities. For example, the Polycomb Group (PcG proteins maintain developmental gene silencing using an array of chromatin-based mechanisms. The essential Drosophila PcG protein, Posterior Sex Combs (PSC, compacts chromatin and inhibits chromatin remodeling and transcription through a non-enzymatic mechanism involving nucleosome bridging. Nucleosome bridging is achieved through a combination of nucleosome binding and self-interaction. Precisely how PSC interacts with chromatin to bridge nucleosomes is not known and is the subject of this work. We determine the stoichiometry of PSC-chromatin interactions in compact chromatin (in which nucleosomes are bridged using Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM. We find that full compaction occurs with one PSC per nucleosome. In addition to compacting chromatin, we show that PSC oligomerizes nucleosome arrays. PSC-mediated oligomerization of chromatin occurs at similar stoichiometry as compaction suggesting it may also involve nucleosome bridging. Interactions between the tail of histone H4 and the acidic patch of histone H2A are important for chromatin folding and oligomerization, and several chromatin proteins bind the histone H2A acidic patch. However, mutation of the acidic patch of histone H2A does not affect PSC's ability to inhibit chromatin remodeling or bridge nucleosomes. In fact, PSC does not require nucleosomes for bridging activity but can bridge naked DNA segments. PSC clusters nucleosomes on sparsely assembled templates, suggesting it interacts preferentially with nucleosomes over bare DNA. This may be due to the ability of PSC to bind free histones. Our data are consistent with a model in which each PSC binds a nucleosome and at least one other PSC to directly bridge nucleosomes and compact chromatin, but also suggest that naked DNA can be included in compacted structures. We discuss how our data

  5. The WD40 Domain of HIRA Is Essential for RI-nucleosome Assembly in Xenopus Egg Extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ruibin; Iwabuchi, Mari; Ohsumi, Keita

    2017-01-01

    Histone chaperones are a group of histone-binding proteins that facilitate the assembly of nucleosomes, the fundamental structural units of chromatin in eukaryotes. In nucleosome assembly, deposition of a histone H3-H4 tetramer onto DNA is the first and critical step, which is mediated by the histone chaperones HIRA and CAF-1. HIRA and CAF-1 are reportedly involved in DNA replication independent (RI) and replication coupled nucleosome assembly, respectively. However, the mechanisms by which they mediate histone deposition remain unclear. In this study, we focused on the mechanism by which HIRA induces RI-nucleosome assembly. We looked for HIRA domains that are required for nucleosome assembly and its localization to chromatin. We used cell-free extracts from Xenopus eggs that carry out RI-nucleosome assembly of plasmid DNA. We confirmed that HIRA formed stable complexes with Asf1, another histone H3-H4 chaperone, and the HIRA-Asf1 complex was solely responsible for RI-nucleosome assembly in egg extracts. We further demonstrated that the HIRA N-terminus containing the WD40 domain, which comprises seven WD40 repeats, and the B domain, to which Asf1 binds, were essential for RI-nucleosome assembly; the three WD40 repeats from the N-terminus were especially critical. Using egg extracts that reproduce nuclear formation accompanying the duplication of chromatin, we also demonstrated that the Hir domain was indispensable for the binding of HIRA to chromatin. Thus, the WD40 and B domains are the core elements for inducing RI-nucleosome assembly. Hir domain regulates the binding to chromatin. Based on these findings, similarities and differences between HIRA and CAF-1 are discussed.

  6. Changes in nucleosome position at transcriptional start sites of specific genes in Zea mays mediator of paramutation1 mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labonne, Jonathan D J; Dorweiler, Jane E; McGinnis, Karen M

    2013-04-01

    Nucleosomes facilitate compaction of DNA within the confines of the eukaryotic nucleus. This packaging of DNA and histone proteins must accommodate cellular processes, such as transcription and DNA replication. The repositioning of nucleosomes to facilitate cellular processes is likely regulated by several factors. In Zea mays, Mediator of paramutation1 (MOP1) has been demonstrated to be an epigenetic regulator of gene expression. Based on sequence orthology and mutant phenotypes, MOP1 is likely to function in an RNA-dependent pathway to mediate changes to chromatin. High-resolution microarrays were used to assay the distribution of nucleosomes across the transcription start sites (TSSs) of ~400 maize genes in wild type and mutant mop1-1 tissues. Analysis of nucleosome distribution in leaf, immature tassel and ear shoot tissues resulted in the identification of three genes showing consistent differences in nucleosome positioning and occupancy between wild type and mutant mop1-1. These specific changes in nucleosome distribution were located upstream as well as downstream of the TSS. No direct relationship between the specific changes in nucleosome distribution and transcription were observed through quantitative expression analysis in these tissues. In silico prediction suggests that nucleosome positioning is not dictated by intrinsic DNA sequence signals in the TSSs of two of the identified genes, suggesting a role for chromatin remodeling proteins in MOP1-mediated pathways. These results also indicate that MOP1 contributions to nucleosome position may be either separate from changes in gene expression, or cooperative with development and other levels of regulation in coordinating gene expression.

  7. Staphylococcus aureus protease: a probe of exposed, non-basic histone sequences in nucleosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rill, R.L.; Oosterhof, D.K.

    1980-01-01

    The digestion of histones in chicken erythrocyte nucleosome cores and chromatin by Staphylococcus aureus protease was examined. This protease cleaves specifically at acidic residues and prefers glu-X bonds under the conditions used. Only 1 of 24 glutamic and 2 of 13 aspartic acids among all four core histones are located in basic, amino-terminal tails, hence staph. protease is a highly specific probe of exposed non-basic sequences. Staph. protease readily degraded H1, H5, and H3; moderately degraded H2b, and only slightly degraded H2a and H4 in nucleosomes and nucleosome cores. Electrophoresis of core histone fragments from limited digests showed that most glutamic acids were inaccessible, but at least five sites in non-basic sequences were readily cleaved. Tentative assignments of these fragments based on comparisons with products from limited digests of pure histones suggested that most accessible sites in nucleosome cores occur in H3. The most probable sites of H3 cutting are glutamic acids at positions 51, 60, 73, 94, and 97. At least one site in H2b, probably the equivalent of glu-105 in the calf H2b sequence, was accessible. No sites in H2a and H4 appeared highly accessible. H5 was readily cleaved at a site near the amino-terminus. These data substantiate the other evidence that non-basic core histone sequences are located primarily in the nucleosome interior, but that H3 binds to the ends of core DNA and thereby is partly exposed as the upper and lower surfaces of the disk-shaped core.

  8. Balanced Reciprocal Translocations Detected at Amniocentesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2010-12-01

    Conclusion: Balanced reciprocal translocations detected at amniocentesis may be associated with fetal anomalies in cases of concomitant aneuploidy, de novo X-autosome translocation or de novo CCR. Genetic counseling of a de novo simple reciprocal translocation at amniocentesis remains difficult because approximately one-fourth of the parents opt for termination of the pregnancy, and detailed ultrasonography and array comparative genomic hybridization are helpful for parental counseling under such circumstances.

  9. Thymine dimer formation as a probe of the path of DNA in and between nucleosomes in intact chromatin.

    OpenAIRE

    Pehrson, J R

    1989-01-01

    Photo-induced thymine dimer formation was used to probe nucleosome structure in nuclei. The distribution of thymine dimers in the nucleosome and recent studies of the structure of thymine dimer-containing DNA suggest that the rate of thymine dimer formation is affected by the direction and degree of DNA bending. This premise was used to construct a model of the path of DNA in the nucleosome, which has the following features. (i) There are four regions of sharp bending, two which have been see...

  10. Polymer translocation through nanopore into active bath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Mingfeng; Jiang, Huijun; Hou, Zhonghuai

    2016-11-01

    Polymer translocation through nanopores into a crowded environment is of ubiquitous importance in many biological processes. Here we investigate polymer translocation through a nanopore into an active bath of self-propelled particles in two-dimensional space using Langevin dynamics simulations. Interestingly, we find that the mean translocation time can show a bell-shape dependence on the particle activity Fa at a fixed volume fraction ϕ, indicating that the translocation process may become slower for small activity compared to the case of the passive media, and only when the particle activity becomes large enough can the translocation process be accelerated. In addition, we also find that can show a minimum as a function of ϕ if the particle activity is large enough, implying that an intermediate volume fraction of active particles is most favorable for the polymer translocation. Detailed analysis reveals that such nontrivial behaviors result from the two-fold effect of active bath: one that active particles tend to accumulate near the pore, providing an extra pressure hindering the translocation, and the other that they also aggregate along the polymer chain, generating an effective pulling force accelerating the translocation. Such results demonstrate that active bath plays rather subtle roles on the polymer translocation process.

  11. Translocations affecting human immunoglobulin heavy chain locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sklyar I. V.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Translocations involving human immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH locus are implicated in different leukaemias and lymphomas, including multiple myeloma, mantle cell lymphoma, Burkitt’s lymphoma and diffuse large B cell lymphoma. We have analysed published data and identified eleven breakpoint cluster regions (bcr related to these cancers within the IgH locus. These ~1 kbp bcrs are specific for one or several types of blood cancer. Our findings could help devise PCR-based assays to detect cancer-related translocations, to identify the mechanisms of translocations and to help in the research of potential translocation partners of the immunoglobulin locus at different stages of B-cell differentiation.

  12. Haloarchaeal Protein Translocation via the Twin Arginine Translocation Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohlschroder Mechthild

    2009-02-03

    Protein transport across hydrophobic membranes that partition cellular compartments is essential in all cells. The twin arginine translocation (Tat) pathway transports proteins across the prokaryotic cytoplasmic membranes. Distinct from the universally conserved Sec pathway, which secretes unfolded proteins, the Tat machinery is unique in that it secretes proteins in a folded conformation, making it an attractive pathway for the transport and secretion of heterologously expressed proteins that are Sec-incompatible. During the past 7 years, the DOE-supported project has focused on the characterization of the diversity of bacterial and archaeal Tat substrates as well as on the characterization of the Tat pathway of a model archaeon, Haloferax volcanii, a member of the haloarchaea. We have demonstrated that H. volcanii uses this pathway to transport most of its secretome.

  13. An ensemble of B-DNA dinucleotide geometries lead to characteristic nucleosomal DNA structure and provide plasticity required for gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background A nucleosome is the fundamental repeating unit of the eukaryotic chromosome. It has been shown that the positioning of a majority of nucleosomes is primarily controlled by factors other than the intrinsic preference of the DNA sequence. One of the key questions in this context is the role, if any, that can be played by the variability of nucleosomal DNA structure. Results In this study, we have addressed this question by analysing the variability at the dinucleotide and trinucleotide as well as longer length scales in a dataset of nucleosome X-ray crystal structures. We observe that the nucleosome structure displays remarkable local level structural versatility within the B-DNA family. The nucleosomal DNA also incorporates a large number of kinks. Conclusions Based on our results, we propose that the local and global level versatility of B-DNA structure may be a significant factor modulating the formation of nucleosomes in the vicinity of high-plasticity genes, and in varying the probability of binding by regulatory proteins. Hence, these factors should be incorporated in the prediction algorithms and there may not be a unique 'template' for predicting putative nucleosome sequences. In addition, the multimodal distribution of dinucleotide parameters for some steps and the presence of a large number of kinks in the nucleosomal DNA structure indicate that the linear elastic model, used by several algorithms to predict the energetic cost of nucleosome formation, may lead to incorrect results. PMID:21208404

  14. Translocality in Global Software Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Pernille; Søderberg, Anne-Marie; Krishna, S.

    2017-01-01

    What happens when agile methods are introduced in global outsourcing set-ups? Agile methods are designed to empower IT developers in decision-making through self-managing collocated teams. We studied how agile methods were introduced into global outsourcing from the Indian IT vendor’s perspective....... We explored how agile processes in global outsourcing impacts work conditions of the Indian IT developers, and were surprised to find that agile methodologies, even after 3 years of implementation, created a stressful and inflexible work environment negatively impacting their personal lives. Many...... of the negative aspects of work, which agile methodologies were developed to reduce, were evident in the global agile outsourcing set-up. We propose translocality to repudiate the dichotomy of global/local reminding us that methodologies and technologies must be understood as immediately localized and situated...

  15. Reconfiguration of nucleosome-depleted regions at distal regulatory elements accompanies DNA methylation of enhancers and insulators in cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Taberlay, Phillippa C; Statham, Aaron L; Kelly, Theresa K; Clark, Susan J; Jones, Peter A

    2014-01-01

    .... Here, we evaluate the scope of global epigenetic alterations at enhancers and insulator elements in prostate and breast cancer cells using simultaneous genome-wide mapping of DNA methylation and nucleosome occupancy (NOMe-seq...

  16. Translocations used to generate chromosome segment duplications ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Supplementary figure 1. (a–i) Putative novel genes created by the breakpoints. Translocation chromosomes are shown with the translocated segment indicated in red and the untranslocated segments in black or blue. Purple arrows indicate whether the chromosome is a donor (arrow pointing up) or a recipient (arrow ...

  17. Translocations used to generate chromosome segment duplications ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    progeny bearing a duplication (Dp) of the translocated chromosome segment. Here, 30 ... [Singh P K, Iyer V S, Sowjanya T N, Raj B K and Kasbekar D P 2010 Translocations used to generate chromosome segment duplications in. Neurospora can ... of this work, namely, the definition of breakpoint junction sequences of 12 ...

  18. RNA polymerase stalls in a post-translocated register and can hyper-translocate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedialkov, Yuri A; Nudler, Evgeny; Burton, Zachary F

    2012-01-01

    Exonuclease (Exo) III was used to probe translocation states of RNA polymerase (RNAP) ternary elongation complexes (TECs). Escherichia coli RNAP stalls primarily in a post-translocation register that makes relatively slow excursions to a hyper-translocated state or to a pre-translocated state. Tagetitoxin (TGT) strongly inhibits hyper-translocation and inhibits backtracking, so, as indicated by Exo III mapping, TGT appears to stabilize both the pre- and probably a partially post-translocation state of RNAP. Because the pre-translocated to post-translocated transition is slow at many template positions, these studies appear inconsistent with a model in which RNAP makes frequent and rapid (i.e., millisecond phase) oscillations between pre- and post-translocation states. Nine nucleotides (9-nt) and 10-nt TECs, and TECs with longer nascent RNAs, have distinct translocation properties consistent with a 9-10 nt RNA/DNA hybrid. RNAP mutant proteins in the bridge helix and trigger loop are identified that inhibit or stimulate forward and backward translocation.

  19. Hydroxyl-radical footprinting combined with molecular modeling identifies unique features of DNA conformation and nucleosome positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaytan, Alexey K; Xiao, Hua; Armeev, Grigoriy A; Wu, Carl; Landsman, David; Panchenko, Anna R

    2017-09-19

    Nucleosomes are the most abundant protein-DNA complexes in eukaryotes that provide compaction of genomic DNA and are implicated in regulation of transcription, DNA replication and repair. The details of DNA positioning on the nucleosome and the DNA conformation can provide key regulatory signals. Hydroxyl-radical footprinting (HRF) of protein-DNA complexes is a chemical technique that probes nucleosome organization in solution with a high precision unattainable by other methods. In this work we propose an integrative modeling method for constructing high-resolution atomistic models of nucleosomes based on HRF experiments. Our method precisely identifies DNA positioning on nucleosome by combining HRF data for both DNA strands with the pseudo-symmetry constraints. We performed high-resolution HRF for Saccharomyces cerevisiae centromeric nucleosome of unknown structure and characterized it using our integrative modeling approach. Our model provides the basis for further understanding the cooperative engagement and interplay between Cse4p protein and the A-tracts important for centromere function. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research 2017.

  20. Dynamic Nucleosome-Depleted Regions at Androgen Receptor Enhancers in the Absence of Ligand in Prostate Cancer Cells ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu-Vieyra, Claudia; Lai, John; Berman, Benjamin P.; Frenkel, Baruch; Jia, Li; Jones, Peter A.; Coetzee, Gerhard A.

    2011-01-01

    Nucleosome positioning at transcription start sites is known to regulate gene expression by altering DNA accessibility to transcription factors; however, its role at enhancers is poorly understood. We investigated nucleosome positioning at the androgen receptor (AR) enhancers of TMPRSS2, KLK2, and KLK3/PSA in prostate cancer cells. Surprisingly, a population of enhancer modules in androgen-deprived cultures showed nucleosome-depleted regions (NDRs) in all three loci. Under androgen-deprived conditions, NDRs at the TMPRSS2 enhancer were maintained by the pioneer AR transcriptional collaborator GATA-2. Androgen treatment resulted in AR occupancy, an increased number of enhancer modules with NDRs without changes in footprint width, increased levels of histone H3 acetylation (AcH3), and dimethylation (H3K4me2) at nucleosomes flanking the NDRs. Our data suggest that, in the absence of ligand, AR enhancers exist in an equilibrium in which a percentage of modules are occupied by nucleosomes while others display NDRs. We propose that androgen treatment leads to the disruption of the equilibrium toward a nucleosome-depleted state, rather than to enhancer de novo “remodeling.” This allows the recruitment of histone modifiers, chromatin remodelers, and ultimately gene activation. The “receptive” state described here could help explain AR signaling activation under very low ligand concentrations. PMID:21969603

  1. Habitat drives dispersal and survival of translocated juvenile desert tortoises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafus, Melia G.; Esque, Todd C.; Averill-Murray, Roy C.; Nussear, Kenneth E.; Swaisgood, Ronald R.

    2017-01-01

    1.In spite of growing reliance on translocations in wildlife conservation, translocation efficacy remains inconsistent. One factor that can contribute to failed translocations is releasing animals into poor quality or otherwise inadequate habitat.

  2. nucleR: a package for non-parametric nucleosome positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Oscar; Orozco, Modesto

    2011-08-01

    nucleR is an R/Bioconductor package for a flexible and fast recognition of nucleosome positioning from next generation sequencing and tiling arrays experiments. The software is integrated with standard high-throughput genomics R packages and allows for in situ visualization as well as to export results to common genome browser formats. Additional information and methodological details can be found at http://mmb.pcb.ub.es/nucleR

  3. The HIR corepressor complex binds to nucleosomes generating a distinct protein/DNA complex resistant to remodeling by SWI/SNF

    OpenAIRE

    Prochasson, Philippe; Florens, Laurence; Swanson, Selene K.; Washburn, Michael P.; Workman, Jerry L.

    2005-01-01

    The histone regulatory (HIR) and histone promoter control (HPC) repressor proteins regulate three of the four histone gene loci during the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell cycle. Here, we demonstrate that Hir1, Hir2, Hir3, and Hpc2 proteins form a stable HIR repressor complex. The HIR complex promotes histone deposition onto DNA in vitro and constitutes a novel nucleosome assembly complex. The HIR complex stably binds to DNA and nucleosomes. Furthermore, HIR complex binding to nucleosomes forms ...

  4. Nucleosome–nucleosome interactions via histone tails and linker DNA regulate nuclear rigidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamoto, Yuta; Tamura, Sachiko; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Maeshima, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    Cells, as well as the nuclei inside them, experience significant mechanical stress in diverse biological processes, including contraction, migration, and adhesion. The structural stability of nuclei must therefore be maintained in order to protect genome integrity. Despite extensive knowledge on nuclear architecture and components, however, the underlying physical and molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. We address this by subjecting isolated human cell nuclei to microneedle-based quantitative micromanipulation with a series of biochemical perturbations of the chromatin. We find that the mechanical rigidity of nuclei depends on the continuity of the nucleosomal fiber and interactions between nucleosomes. Disrupting these chromatin features by varying cation concentration, acetylating histone tails, or digesting linker DNA results in loss of nuclear rigidity. In contrast, the levels of key chromatin assembly factors, including cohesin, condensin II, and CTCF, and a major nuclear envelope protein, lamin, are unaffected. Together with in situ evidence using living cells and a simple mechanical model, our findings reveal a chromatin-based regulation of the nuclear mechanical response and provide insight into the significance of local and global chromatin structures, such as those associated with interdigitated or melted nucleosomal fibers. PMID:28428255

  5. A Meier-Gorlin syndrome mutation impairs the ORC1-nucleosome association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Sankaran, Saumya; Gozani, Or; Song, Jikui

    2015-05-15

    Recent studies have identified several genetic mutations within the BAH domain of human Origin Recognition Complex subunit 1 (hORC1BAH), including the R105Q mutation, implicated in Meier-Gorlin Syndrome (MGS). However, the pathological role of the hORC1 R105Q mutation remains unclear. In this study, we have investigated the interactions of the hORC1BAH domain with histone H4K20me2, DNA, and the nucleosome core particle labeled with H4Kc20me2, a chemical analog of H4K20me2. Our study revealed a nucleosomal DNA binding site for hORC1BAH. The R105Q mutation reduces the hORC1BAH-DNA binding affinity, leading to impaired hORC1BAH-nucleosome interaction, which likely influences DNA replication initiation and MGS pathogenesis. This study provides an etiologic link between the hORC1 R105Q mutation and MGS.

  6. Genome-wide nucleosome map and cytosine methylation levels of an ancient human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Valen, Eivind; Velazquez, Amhed M Vargas; Parker, Brian J; Rasmussen, Morten; Lindgreen, Stinus; Lilje, Berit; Tobin, Desmond J; Kelly, Theresa K; Vang, Søren; Andersson, Robin; Jones, Peter A; Hoover, Cindi A; Tikhonov, Alexei; Prokhortchouk, Egor; Rubin, Edward M; Sandelin, Albin; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Krogh, Anders; Willerslev, Eske; Orlando, Ludovic

    2014-03-01

    Epigenetic information is available from contemporary organisms, but is difficult to track back in evolutionary time. Here, we show that genome-wide epigenetic information can be gathered directly from next-generation sequence reads of DNA isolated from ancient remains. Using the genome sequence data generated from hair shafts of a 4000-yr-old Paleo-Eskimo belonging to the Saqqaq culture, we generate the first ancient nucleosome map coupled with a genome-wide survey of cytosine methylation levels. The validity of both nucleosome map and methylation levels were confirmed by the recovery of the expected signals at promoter regions, exon/intron boundaries, and CTCF sites. The top-scoring nucleosome calls revealed distinct DNA positioning biases, attesting to nucleotide-level accuracy. The ancient methylation levels exhibited high conservation over time, clustering closely with modern hair tissues. Using ancient methylation information, we estimated the age at death of the Saqqaq individual and illustrate how epigenetic information can be used to infer ancient gene expression. Similar epigenetic signatures were found in other fossil material, such as 110,000- to 130,000-yr-old bones, supporting the contention that ancient epigenomic information can be reconstructed from a deep past. Our findings lay the foundation for extracting epigenomic information from ancient samples, allowing shifts in epialleles to be tracked through evolutionary time, as well as providing an original window into modern epigenomics.

  7. Histone H2A variants in nucleosomes and chromatin: more or less stable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bönisch, Clemens; Hake, Sandra B.

    2012-01-01

    In eukaryotes, DNA is organized together with histones and non-histone proteins into a highly complex nucleoprotein structure called chromatin, with the nucleosome as its monomeric subunit. Various interconnected mechanisms regulate DNA accessibility, including replacement of canonical histones with specialized histone variants. Histone variant incorporation can lead to profound chromatin structure alterations thereby influencing a multitude of biological processes ranging from transcriptional regulation to genome stability. Among core histones, the H2A family exhibits highest sequence divergence, resulting in the largest number of variants known. Strikingly, H2A variants differ mostly in their C-terminus, including the docking domain, strategically placed at the DNA entry/exit site and implicated in interactions with the (H3–H4)2-tetramer within the nucleosome and in the L1 loop, the interaction interface of H2A–H2B dimers. Moreover, the acidic patch, important for internucleosomal contacts and higher-order chromatin structure, is altered between different H2A variants. Consequently, H2A variant incorporation has the potential to strongly regulate DNA organization on several levels resulting in meaningful biological output. Here, we review experimental evidence pinpointing towards outstanding roles of these highly variable regions of H2A family members, docking domain, L1 loop and acidic patch, and close by discussing their influence on nucleosome and higher-order chromatin structure and stability. PMID:23002134

  8. Colorectal carcinoma: nucleosomes, carcinoembryonic antigen and ca 19-9 as apoptotic markers; a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahgoub Samir S

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal carcinoma is a common and often fatal disease in which methods of early detection and monitoring are essential. The present study was conducted for measuring serum levels of nucleosomes, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA and CA 19-9 in patients newly diagnosed with colorectal carcinoma and confirmed by clinicopathological study. Method Thirty subjects were included in the current study: six normal subjects as a control group with mean age (45.6 ± 7.9 and twenty four colorectal carcinoma patients with mean age (46.9 ± 15.6, which were classified pathologically according to the degree of malignant cell differentiation into well differentiated (group I, moderately differentiated (group II and poorly differentiated (group III. Fasting venous blood samples were collected preoperative. Results The results revealed a significant increase in serum level of nucleosomes in patients with poorly differentiated tumors versus patients with well differentiated tumors (p = 0.041. The levels of CEA and CA19-9 showed no significant increase (p = 0.569 and 0.450, respectively. Conclusion In conclusion, serum level of nucleosomes provides a highly sensitive and specific apoptotic marker for colorectal carcinoma.

  9. Nucleosome Density ChIP-Seq Identifies Distinct Chromatin Modification Signatures Associated with MNase Accessibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorzadeh, Alireza; Bilenky, Misha; Hammond, Colin; Knapp, David J H F; Li, Luolan; Miller, Paul H; Carles, Annaick; Heravi-Moussavi, Alireza; Gakkhar, Sitanshu; Moksa, Michelle; Eaves, Connie J; Hirst, Martin

    2016-11-15

    Nucleosome position, density, and post-translational modification are widely accepted components of mechanisms regulating DNA transcription but still incompletely understood. We present a modified native ChIP-seq method combined with an analytical framework that allows MNase accessibility to be integrated with histone modification profiles. Application of this methodology to the primitive (CD34+) subset of normal human cord blood cells enabled genomic regions enriched in one versus two nucleosomes marked by histone 3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) and/or histone 3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) to be associated with their transcriptional and DNA methylation states. From this analysis, we defined four classes of promoter-specific profiles and demonstrated that a majority of bivalent marked promoters are heterogeneously marked at a single-cell level in this primitive cell type. Interestingly, extension of this approach to human embryonic stem cells revealed an altered relationship between chromatin modification state and nucleosome content at promoters, suggesting developmental stage-specific organization of histone methylation states. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Computer simulations and theory of protein translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, Dmitrii E

    2009-02-17

    The translocation of proteins through pores is central to many biological phenomena, such as mitochondrial protein import, protein degradation, and delivery of protein toxins to their cytosolic targets. Because proteins typically have to pass through constrictions that are too narrow to accommodate folded structures, translocation must be coupled to protein unfolding. The simplest model that accounts for such co-translocational unfolding assumes that both translocation and unfolding are accomplished by pulling on the end of the polypeptide chain mechanically. In this Account, we describe theoretical studies and computer simulations of this model and discuss how the time scales of translocation depend on the pulling force and on the protein structure. Computationally, this is a difficult problem because biologically or experimentally relevant time scales of translocation are typically orders of magnitude slower than those accessible by fully atomistic simulations. For this reason, we explore one-dimensional free energy landscapes along suitably defined translocation coordinates and discuss various approaches to their computation. We argue that the free energy landscape of translocation is often bumpy because confinement partitions the protein's configuration space into distinct basins of attraction separated by large entropic barriers. Favorable protein-pore interactions and nonnative interactions within the protein further contribute to the complexity. Computer simulations and simple scaling estimates show that forces of just 2-6 pN are often sufficient to ensure transport of unstructured polypeptides, whereas much higher forces are typically needed to translocate folded protein domains. The unfolding mechanisms found from simulations of translocation are different from those observed in the much better understood case of atomic force microscopy (AFM) pulling studies, in which proteins are unraveled by stretching them between their N- and C-termini. In contrast to

  11. The HIR corepressor complex binds to nucleosomes generating a distinct protein/DNA complex resistant to remodeling by SWI/SNF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochasson, Philippe; Florens, Laurence; Swanson, Selene K; Washburn, Michael P; Workman, Jerry L

    2005-11-01

    The histone regulatory (HIR) and histone promoter control (HPC) repressor proteins regulate three of the four histone gene loci during the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell cycle. Here, we demonstrate that Hir1, Hir2, Hir3, and Hpc2 proteins form a stable HIR repressor complex. The HIR complex promotes histone deposition onto DNA in vitro and constitutes a novel nucleosome assembly complex. The HIR complex stably binds to DNA and nucleosomes. Furthermore, HIR complex binding to nucleosomes forms a distinct protein/DNA complex resistant to remodeling by SWI/SNF. Thus, the HIR complex is a novel nucleosome assembly complex which functions with SWI/SNF to regulate transcription.

  12. The helical domain of the EcoR124I motor subunit participates in ATPase activity and dsDNA translocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitali Bialevich

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Type I restriction-modification enzymes are multisubunit, multifunctional molecular machines that recognize specific DNA target sequences, and their multisubunit organization underlies their multifunctionality. EcoR124I is the archetype of Type I restriction-modification family IC and is composed of three subunit types: HsdS, HsdM, and HsdR. DNA cleavage and ATP-dependent DNA translocation activities are housed in the distinct domains of the endonuclease/motor subunit HsdR. Because the multiple functions are integrated in this large subunit of 1,038 residues, a large number of interdomain contacts might be expected. The crystal structure of EcoR124I HsdR reveals a surprisingly sparse number of contacts between helicase domain 2 and the C-terminal helical domain that is thought to be involved in assembly with HsdM. Only two potential hydrogen-bonding contacts are found in a very small contact region. In the present work, the relevance of these two potential hydrogen-bonding interactions for the multiple activities of EcoR124I is evaluated by analysing mutant enzymes using in vivo and in vitro experiments. Molecular dynamics simulations are employed to provide structural interpretation of the functional data. The results indicate that the helical C-terminal domain is involved in the DNA translocation, cleavage, and ATPase activities of HsdR, and a role in controlling those activities is suggested.

  13. Dependence of the Linker Histone and Chromatin Condensation on the Nucleosome Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perišić, Ognjen; Schlick, Tamar

    2017-08-24

    The linker histone (LH), an auxiliary protein that can bind to chromatin and interact with the linker DNA to form stem motifs, is a key element of chromatin compaction. By affecting the chromatin condensation level, it also plays an active role in gene expression. However, the presence and variable concentration of LH in chromatin fibers with different DNA linker lengths indicate that its folding and condensation are highly adaptable and dependent on the immediate nucleosome environment. Recent experimental studies revealed that the behavior of LH in mononucleosomes markedly differs from that in small nucleosome arrays, but the associated mechanism is unknown. Here we report a structural analysis of the behavior of LH in mononucleosomes and oligonucleosomes (2-6 nucleosomes) using mesoscale chromatin simulations. We show that the adapted stem configuration heavily depends on the strength of electrostatic interactions between LH and its parental DNA linkers, and that those interactions tend to be asymmetric in small oligonucleosome systems. Namely, LH in oligonucleosomes dominantly interacts with one DNA linker only, as opposed to mononucleosomes where LH has similar interactions with both linkers and forms a highly stable nucleosome stem. Although we show that the LH condensation depends sensitively on the electrostatic interactions with entering and exiting DNA linkers, other interactions, especially by nonparental cores and nonparental linkers, modulate the structural condensation by softening LH and thus making oligonucleosomes more flexible, in comparison to to mono- and dinucleosomes. We also find that the overall LH/chromatin interactions sensitively depend on the linker length because the linker length determines the maximal nucleosome stem length. For mononucleosomes with DNA linkers shorter than LH, LH condenses fully, while for DNA linkers comparable or longer than LH, the LH extension in mononucleosomes strongly follows the length of DNA linkers

  14. Histone-modifying enzymes, histone modifications and histone chaperones in nucleosome assembly: Lessons learned from Rtt109 histone acetyltransferases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Jayme L; Chen, Xiaoyue; Walters, Michael A.; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    During DNA replication, nucleosomes ahead of replication forks are disassembled to accommodate replication machinery. Following DNA replication, nucleosomes are then reassembled onto replicated DNA using both parental and newly synthesized histones. This process, termed DNA replication-coupled nucleosome assembly (RCNA), is critical for maintaining genome integrity and for the propagation of epigenetic information, dysfunctions of which have been implicated in cancers and aging. In recent years, it has been shown that RCNA is carefully orchestrated by a series of histone modifications, histone chaperones and histone-modifying enzymes. Interestingly, many features of RCNA are also found in processes involving DNA replication-independent nucleosome assembly like histone exchange and gene transcription. In yeast, histone H3 lysine K56 acetylation (H3K56ac) is found in newly synthesized histone H3 and is critical for proper nucleosome assembly and for maintaining genomic stability. The histone acetyltransferase (HAT) regulator of Ty1 transposition 109 (Rtt109) is the sole enzyme responsible for H3K56ac in yeast. Much research has centered on this particular histone modification and histone-modifying enzyme. This Critical Review summarizes much of our current understanding of nucleosome assembly and highlights many important insights learned from studying Rtt109 HATs in fungi. We highlight some seminal features in nucleosome assembly conserved in mammalian systems and describe some of the lingering questions in the field. Further studying fungal and mammalian chromatin assembly may have important public health implications, including deeper understandings of human cancers and aging as well as the pursuit of novel anti-fungal therapies. PMID:25365782

  15. DNA nanopore translocation in glutamate solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plesa, C.; Van Loo, N.; Dekker, C.

    2015-01-01

    Nanopore experiments have traditionally been carried out with chloride-based solutions. Here we introduce silver/silver-glutamate-based electrochemistry as an alternative, and study the viscosity, conductivity, and nanopore translocation characteristics of potassium-, sodium-, and lithium-glutamate

  16. Dudleya Variegata Translocation - San Diego [ds654

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — At Mission Trails Regional Park, a translocation project of Dudleya variegata was conducted in efforts to save the population from a private property undergoing...

  17. Translocation of polymers in a lattice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurek, S; Kośmider, M; Drzewiński, A; van Leeuwen, J M J

    2012-06-01

    Voltage-driven polymer translocation is studied by means of a stochastic lattice model. The model incorporates voltage drop over the membrane as a bias in the hopping rate through the pore and exhibits the two main ingredients of the translocation process: driven motion through the pore and diffusive supply of chain length towards the pore on the cis-side and the drift away from the pore on the trans-side. The translocation time is either bias limited or diffusion limited. In the bias-limited regime the translocation time is inversely proportional to the voltage drop over the membrane. In the diffusion-limited regime the translocation time is independent of the applied voltage, but it is rather sensitive to the motion rules of the model. We find that the whole regime is well described by a single curve determined by the initial slope and the saturation value. The dependence of these parameters on the length of the chain, the motion rules and the repton statistics are established. Repulsion of reptons as well as the increase of chain length decrease the throughput of the polymer through the pore. As for free polymers, the inclusion of a mechanism for hernia creations/annihilations leads to the cross-over from Rouse-like behaviour to reptation. For the experimentally most relevant case (Rouse dynamics) the bimodal power law dependence of the translocation time on the chain length is found.

  18. Stress and translocation: alterations in the stress physiology of translocated birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickens, Molly J.; Delehanty, David J.; Romero, L. Michael

    2009-01-01

    Translocation and reintroduction have become major conservation actions in attempts to create self-sustaining wild populations of threatened species. However, avian translocations have a high failure rate and causes for failure are poorly understood. While ‘stress’ is often cited as an important factor in translocation failure, empirical evidence of physiological stress is lacking. Here we show that experimental translocation leads to changes in the physiological stress response in chukar partridge, Alectoris chukar. We found that capture alone significantly decreased the acute glucocorticoid (corticosterone, CORT) response, but adding exposure to captivity and transport further altered the stress response axis (the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis) as evident from a decreased sensitivity of the negative feedback system. Animals that were exposed to the entire translocation procedure, in addition to the reduced acute stress response and disrupted negative feedback, had significantly lower baseline CORT concentrations and significantly reduced body weight. These data indicate that translocation alters stress physiology and that chronic stress is potentially a major factor in translocation failure. Under current practices, the restoration of threatened species through translocation may unwittingly depend on the success of chronically stressed individuals. This conclusion emphasizes the need for understanding and alleviating translocation-induced chronic stress in order to use most effectively this important conservation tool. PMID:19324794

  19. Genome-wide chromatin mapping with size resolution reveals a dynamic sub-nucleosomal landscape in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pass, Daniel Antony; Sornay, Emily; Marchbank, Angela; Crawford, Margaret R; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Kent, Nicholas A; Murray, James A H

    2017-09-01

    All eukaryotic genomes are packaged as chromatin, with DNA interlaced with both regularly patterned nucleosomes and sub-nucleosomal-sized protein structures such as mobile and labile transcription factors (TF) and initiation complexes, together forming a dynamic chromatin landscape. Whilst details of nucleosome position in Arabidopsis have been previously analysed, there is less understanding of their relationship to more dynamic sub-nucleosomal particles (subNSPs) defined as protected regions shorter than the ~150bp typical of nucleosomes. The genome-wide profile of these subNSPs has not been previously analysed in plants and this study investigates the relationship of dynamic bound particles with transcriptional control. Here we combine differential micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion and a modified paired-end sequencing protocol to reveal the chromatin structure landscape of Arabidopsis cells across a wide particle size range. Linking this data to RNAseq expression analysis provides detailed insight into the relationship of identified DNA-bound particles with transcriptional activity. The use of differential digestion reveals sensitive positions, including a labile -1 nucleosome positioned upstream of the transcription start site (TSS) of active genes. We investigated the response of the chromatin landscape to changes in environmental conditions using light and dark growth, given the large transcriptional changes resulting from this simple alteration. The resulting shifts in the suites of expressed and repressed genes show little correspondence to changes in nucleosome positioning, but led to significant alterations in the profile of subNSPs upstream of TSS both globally and locally. We examined previously mapped positions for the TFs PIF3, PIF4 and CCA1, which regulate light responses, and found that changes in subNSPs co-localized with these binding sites. This small particle structure is detected only under low levels of MNase digestion and is lost on more

  20. Cell-free DNA Comprises an In Vivo Nucleosome Footprint that Informs Its Tissues-Of-Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Matthew W; Kircher, Martin; Hill, Andrew J; Daza, Riza M; Shendure, Jay

    2016-01-14

    Nucleosome positioning varies between cell types. By deep sequencing cell-free DNA (cfDNA), isolated from circulating blood plasma, we generated maps of genome-wide in vivo nucleosome occupancy and found that short cfDNA fragments harbor footprints of transcription factors. The cfDNA nucleosome occupancies correlate well with the nuclear architecture, gene structure, and expression observed in cells, suggesting that they could inform the cell type of origin. Nucleosome spacing inferred from cfDNA in healthy individuals correlates most strongly with epigenetic features of lymphoid and myeloid cells, consistent with hematopoietic cell death as the normal source of cfDNA. We build on this observation to show how nucleosome footprints can be used to infer cell types contributing to cfDNA in pathological states such as cancer. Since this strategy does not rely on genetic differences to distinguish between contributing tissues, it may enable the noninvasive monitoring of a much broader set of clinical conditions than currently possible. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Topological diversity of chromatin fibers: Interplay between nucleosome repeat length, DNA linking number and the level of transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davood Norouzi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The spatial organization of nucleosomes in 30-nm fibers remains unknown in detail. To tackle this problem, we analyzed all stereochemically possible configurations of two-start chromatin fibers with DNA linkers L = 10-70 bp (nucleosome repeat length NRL = 157-217 bp. In our model, the energy of a fiber is a sum of the elastic energy of the linker DNA, steric repulsion, electrostatics, and the H4 tail-acidic patch interaction between two stacked nucleosomes. We found two families of energetically feasible conformations of the fibers—one observed earlier, and the other novel. The fibers from the two families are characterized by different DNA linking numbers—that is, they are topologically different. Remarkably, the optimal geometry of a fiber and its topology depend on the linker length: the fibers with linkers L = 10n and 10n + 5 bp have DNA linking numbers per nucleosome DLk >>-1.5 and -1.0, respectively. In other words, the level of DNA supercoiling is directly related to the length of the inter-nucleosome linker in the chromatin fiber (and therefore, to NRL. We hypothesize that this topological polymorphism of chromatin fibers may play a role in the process of transcription, which is known to generate different levels of DNA supercoiling upstream and downstream from RNA polymerase. A genome-wide analysis of the NRL distribution in active and silent yeast genes yielded results consistent with this assumption.

  2. Periodic distribution of a putative nucleosome positioning motif in human, nonhuman primates, and archaea: mutual information analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa, Daniela; Miramontes, Pedro; Li, Wentian; Mireles, Víctor; Bobadilla, Juan R; José, Marco V

    2013-01-01

    Recently, Trifonov's group proposed a 10-mer DNA motif YYYYYRRRRR as a solution of the long-standing problem of sequence-based nucleosome positioning. To test whether this generic decamer represents a biological meaningful signal, we compare the distribution of this motif in primates and Archaea, which are known to contain nucleosomes, and in Eubacteria, which do not possess nucleosomes. The distribution of the motif is analyzed by the mutual information function (MIF) with a shifted version of itself (MIF profile). We found common features in the patterns of this generic decamer on MIF profiles among primate species, and interestingly we found conspicuous but dissimilar MIF profiles for each Archaea tested. The overall MIF profiles for each chromosome in each primate species also follow a similar pattern. Trifonov's generic decamer may be a highly conserved motif for the nucleosome positioning, but we argue that this is not the only motif. The distribution of this generic decamer exhibits previously unidentified periodicities, which are associated to highly repetitive sequences in the genome. Alu repetitive elements contribute to the most fundamental structure of nucleosome positioning in higher Eukaryotes. In some regions of primate chromosomes, the distribution of the decamer shows symmetrical patterns including inverted repeats.

  3. Periodic Distribution of a Putative Nucleosome Positioning Motif in Human, Nonhuman Primates, and Archaea: Mutual Information Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Sosa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, Trifonov's group proposed a 10-mer DNA motif YYYYYRRRRR as a solution of the long-standing problem of sequence-based nucleosome positioning. To test whether this generic decamer represents a biological meaningful signal, we compare the distribution of this motif in primates and Archaea, which are known to contain nucleosomes, and in Eubacteria, which do not possess nucleosomes. The distribution of the motif is analyzed by the mutual information function (MIF with a shifted version of itself (MIF profile. We found common features in the patterns of this generic decamer on MIF profiles among primate species, and interestingly we found conspicuous but dissimilar MIF profiles for each Archaea tested. The overall MIF profiles for each chromosome in each primate species also follow a similar pattern. Trifonov’s generic decamer may be a highly conserved motif for the nucleosome positioning, but we argue that this is not the only motif. The distribution of this generic decamer exhibits previously unidentified periodicities, which are associated to highly repetitive sequences in the genome. Alu repetitive elements contribute to the most fundamental structure of nucleosome positioning in higher Eukaryotes. In some regions of primate chromosomes, the distribution of the decamer shows symmetrical patterns including inverted repeats.

  4. Molecular studies of free and translocation trisomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, W.P.; Bernasconi, F.; Lefort, G. [Univ. of Zuerich (Switzerland)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Twenty cases of trisomy 13 were examined with molecular markers to determine the origin of the extra chromosome. Six cases had translocation trisomy: two de novo rob(13q;14q), one paternally derived rob(13q;14q), two de novo t(13q;13q), and one mosaic de novo t(13q;14q), one paternally derived rob(13q;14q), two de novo t(13q;13q), and one mosaic de novo t(13q;13q)r(13). Eighteen of nineteen informative patients were consistant with a maternal origin of the extra chromosome. Lack of a third allele at any locus in any of the three t(13q;13q) cases indicate that all were most likely isochromosomes of post-meiotic origin. In addition, two free trisomy cases were compatible with a somatic origin. Two mosaic free trisomy-13 cases, however, were both consistent with a maternal meiotic origin. The patient with a paternal inheritance of the translocation chromosome was purely coincidental. Since there is not a significantly increased risk for unbalanced offspring of a t(13;14) carrier and most trisomies are maternal in origin, this result should not be surprising; however it illustrates that one cannot infer the origin of translocation trisomy based on parental origin of the translocation. One balanced (non-trisomic) case with a non-mosaic 45,-13,-13,+t(13;13) karyotype was also investigated and was determined to be a somatic Robertsonian translocation between the maternal and paternal homologs, as has been found for all homologous Robertsonian translocations so far investigated. It is therefore also incorrect to assume in de novo translocation cases that the two involved chromosomes are even from the same parent. We cannot therefore infer anything about the origin of the chromosomes 13 and 14 involved in the two cases with de novo t(13q;14q) plus a maternally derived trisomy 13.

  5. PING 2.0: an R/Bioconductor package for nucleosome positioning using next-generation sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Sangsoon; Zhang, Xuekui; Sauteraud, Renan; Robert, François; Gottardo, Raphael

    2013-08-15

    MNase-Seq and ChIP-Seq have evolved as popular techniques to study chromatin and histone modification. Although many tools have been developed to identify enriched regions, software tools for nucleosome positioning are still limited. We introduce a flexible and powerful open-source R package, PING 2.0, for nucleosome positioning using MNase-Seq data or MNase- or sonicated- ChIP-Seq data combined with either single-end or paired-end sequencing. PING uses a model-based approach, which enables nucleosome predictions even in the presence of low read counts. We illustrate PING using two paired-end datasets from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and compare its performance with nucleR and ChIPseqR. PING 2.0 is available from the Bioconductor website at http://bioconductor.org. It can run on Linux, Mac and Windows.

  6. The disequilibrium of nucleosomes distribution along chromosomes plays a functional and evolutionarily role in regulating gene expression

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Peng

    2011-08-19

    To further understand the relationship between nucleosome-space occupancy (NO) and global transcriptional activity in mammals, we acquired a set of genome-wide nucleosome distribution and transcriptome data from the mouse cerebrum and testis based on ChIP (H3)-seq and RNA-seq, respectively. We identified a nearly consistent NO patterns among three mouse tissues-cerebrum, testis, and ESCs-and found, through clustering analysis for transcriptional activation, that the NO variations among chromosomes are closely associated with distinct expression levels between house-keeping (HK) genes and tissue-specific (TS) genes. Both TS and HK genes form clusters albeit the obvious majority. This feature implies that NO patterns, i.e. nucleosome binding and clustering, are coupled with gene clustering that may be functionally and evolutionarily conserved in regulating gene expression among different cell types. © 2011 Cui et al.

  7. The disequilibrium of nucleosomes distribution along chromosomes plays a functional and evolutionarily role in regulating gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Cui

    Full Text Available To further understand the relationship between nucleosome-space occupancy (NO and global transcriptional activity in mammals, we acquired a set of genome-wide nucleosome distribution and transcriptome data from the mouse cerebrum and testis based on ChIP (H3-seq and RNA-seq, respectively. We identified a nearly consistent NO patterns among three mouse tissues--cerebrum, testis, and ESCs--and found, through clustering analysis for transcriptional activation, that the NO variations among chromosomes are closely associated with distinct expression levels between house-keeping (HK genes and tissue-specific (TS genes. Both TS and HK genes form clusters albeit the obvious majority. This feature implies that NO patterns, i.e. nucleosome binding and clustering, are coupled with gene clustering that may be functionally and evolutionarily conserved in regulating gene expression among different cell types.

  8. The Role of Histone Tails in the Nucleosome: A Computational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erler, Jochen; Zhang, Ruihan; Petridis, Loukas; Cheng, Xiaolin; Smith, Jeremy C.; Langowski, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Histone tails play an important role in gene transcription and expression. We present here a systematic computational study of the role of histone tails in the nucleosome, using replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations with an implicit solvent model and different well-established force fields. We performed simulations for all four histone tails, H4, H3, H2A, and H2B, isolated and with inclusion of the nucleosome. The results confirm predictions of previous theoretical studies for the secondary structure of the isolated tails but show a strong dependence on the force field used. In the presence of the entire nucleosome for all force fields, the secondary structure of the histone tails is destabilized. Specific contacts are found between charged lysine and arginine residues and DNA phosphate groups and other binding sites in the minor and major DNA grooves. Using cluster analysis, we found a single dominant configuration of binding to DNA for the H4 and H2A histone tails, whereas H3 and H2B show multiple binding configurations with an equal probability. The leading stabilizing contribution for those binding configurations is the attractive interaction between the positively charged lysine and arginine residues and the negatively charged phosphate groups, and thus the resulting charge neutralization. Finally, we present results of molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent to confirm our conclusions. Results from both implicit and explicit solvent models show that large portions of the histone tails are not bound to DNA, supporting the complex role of these tails in gene transcription and expression and making them possible candidates for binding sites of transcription factors, enzymes, and other proteins. PMID:25517156

  9. Stochastic resonance during a polymer translocation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Debasish; Muthukumar, M

    2016-04-14

    We have studied the occurrence of stochastic resonance when a flexible polymer chain undergoes a single-file translocation through a nano-pore separating two spherical cavities, under a time-periodic external driving force. The translocation of the chain is controlled by a free energy barrier determined by chain length, pore length, pore-polymer interaction, and confinement inside the donor and receiver cavities. The external driving force is characterized by a frequency and amplitude. By combining the Fokker-Planck formalism for polymer translocation and a two-state model for stochastic resonance, we have derived analytical formulas for criteria for emergence of stochastic resonance during polymer translocation. We show that no stochastic resonance is possible if the free energy barrier for polymer translocation is purely entropic in nature. The polymer chain exhibits stochastic resonance only in the presence of an energy threshold in terms of polymer-pore interactions. Once stochastic resonance is feasible, the chain entropy controls the optimal synchronization conditions significantly.

  10. CAG/CTG repeats alter the affinity for the histone core and the positioning of DNA in the nucleosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volle, Catherine B; Delaney, Sarah

    2012-12-11

    Trinucleotide repeats (TNRs) occur throughout the genome, and their expansion has been linked to several neurodegenerative disorders, including Huntington's disease. TNRs have been studied using both oligonucleotides and plasmids; however, less is know about how repetitive DNA responds to genomic packaging. Here, we investigate the behavior of CAG/CTG repeats incorporated into nucleosome core particles, the most basic unit of chromatin packaging. To assess the general interaction between CAG/CTG repeats and the histone core, we determined the efficiency with which various TNR-containing DNA substrates form nucleosomes, revealing that even short CAG/CTG tracts are robust incorporators. However, the presence of the Huntington gene flanking sequence (htt) decreases the rate of incorporation. Enzymatic and chemical probing revealed repositioning of the DNA in the nucleosome as the number of CAG/CTG repeats increased, regardless of the flanking sequence. Notably, the periodicity of the repeat tract remained unchanged as a function of length and is consistently 10.7 bp per helical turn. In contrast, the periodicity of the nonrepetitive flanking sequence varies and is smaller than the repeat tract at ~10.0-10.5 bp per turn. Furthermore, while the CAG/CTG repeats remain as a canonical duplex in the nucleosome, nucleosome formation causes kinking in a secondary repeat tract in the htt gene, comprised of CCG/CGG repeats. This work highlights the innate ability of CAG/CTG repeats to incorporate and to position in nucleosomes and how that behavior is modulated by the htt flanking sequence. In addition, it illuminates the differences in packaging of healthy and diseased length repeat tracts within the genome.

  11. PING 2.0: an R/Bioconductor package for nucleosome positioning using next-generation sequencing data

    OpenAIRE

    Woo, Sangsoon; Zhang, Xuekui; Sauteraud, Renan; Robert, François; Gottardo, Raphael

    2013-01-01

    Summary: MNase-Seq and ChIP-Seq have evolved as popular techniques to study chromatin and histone modification. Although many tools have been developed to identify enriched regions, software tools for nucleosome positioning are still limited. We introduce a flexible and powerful open-source R package, PING 2.0, for nucleosome positioning using MNase-Seq data or MNase– or sonicated– ChIP-Seq data combined with either single-end or paired-end sequencing. PING uses a model-based approach, which ...

  12. Regulation of Nucleosome Stacking and Chromatin Compaction by the Histone H4 N-Terminal Tail-H2A Acidic Patch Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qinming; Yang, Renliang; Korolev, Nikolay; Liu, Chuan Fa; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2017-06-30

    Chromatin folding and dynamics are critically dependent on nucleosome-nucleosome interactions with important contributions from internucleosome binding of the histone H4 N-terminal tail K16-R23 domain to the surface of the H2A/H2B dimer. The H4 Lys16 plays a pivotal role in this regard. Using in vitro reconstituted 12-mer nucleosome arrays, we have investigated the mechanism of the H4 N-terminal tail in maintaining nucleosome-nucleosome stacking and mediating intra- and inter-array chromatin compaction, with emphasis on the role of K16 and the positive charge region, R17-R23. Analytical ultracentrifugation sedimentation velocity experiments and precipitation assays were employed to analyze effects on chromatin folding and self-association, respectively. Effects on chromatin folding caused by various mutations and modifications at position K16 in the H4 histone were studied. Additionally, using charge-quenching mutations, we characterized the importance of the interaction of the residues within the H4 positive charge region R17-R23 with the H2A acidic patch of the adjacent nucleosome. Furthermore, crosslinking experiments were conducted to establish the proximity of the basic tail region to the acidic patch. Our data indicate that the positive charge and length of the side chain of H4 K16 are important for its access to the adjacent nucleosome in the process of nucleosome-nucleosome stacking and array folding. The location and orientation of the H4 R17-R23 domain on the H2A/H2B dimer surface of the neighboring nucleosome core particle (NCP) in the compacted chromatin fiber were established. The dominance of electrostatic interactions in maintaining intra-array interaction was demonstrated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Rank Modulation for Translocation Error Correction

    CERN Document Server

    Farnoud, Farzad; Milenkovic, Olgica

    2012-01-01

    We consider rank modulation codes for flash memories that allow for handling arbitrary charge drop errors. Unlike classical rank modulation codes used for correcting errors that manifest themselves as swaps of two adjacently ranked elements, the proposed \\emph{translocation rank codes} account for more general forms of errors that arise in storage systems. Translocations represent a natural extension of the notion of adjacent transpositions and as such may be analyzed using related concepts in combinatorics and rank modulation coding. Our results include tight bounds on the capacity of translocation rank codes, construction techniques for asymptotically good codes, as well as simple decoding methods for one class of structured codes. As part of our exposition, we also highlight the close connections between the new code family and permutations with short common subsequences, deletion and insertion error-correcting codes for permutations and permutation arrays.

  14. Nuclear translocation and retention of growth hormone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mertani, Hichem C; Raccurt, Mireille; Abbate, Aude

    2003-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that GH is subject to rapid receptor-dependent nuclear translocation. Here, we examine the importance of ligand activation of the GH-receptor (GHR)-associated Janus kinase (JAK) 2 and receptor dimerization for hormone internalization and nuclear translocation by use...... of cells stably transfected with cDNA for the GHR. Staurosporine and herbimycin A treatment of cells did not affect the ability of GH to internalize but resulted in increased nuclear accumulation of hormone. Similarly, receptor mutations, which prevent the association and activation of JAK2, did not affect...... the ability of the hormone to internalize or translocate to the nucleus but resulted in increased nuclear accumulation of GH. These results were observed both by nuclear isolation and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Staurosporine treatment of cells in which human GH (hGH) was targeted to the cytoplasm...

  15. Streptococcus pyogenes translocates across an epithelial barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumitomo, Tomoko

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a β-hemolytic organism responsible for a wide variety of human diseases that commonly occur as self-limiting purulent diseases of the pharynx and skin. Although the occurrence of invasive infections by S. pyogenes is rare, mortality rates remain high even with progressive medical therapy. As a prerequisite for causing the severe invasive disease, S. pyogenes must invade underlying sterile tissues by translocating across the epithelial barrier. In this study, streptolysin S and SpeB were identified as the novel factors that facilitate bacterial translocation via degradation of intercellular junctions. Furthermore, we found that S. pyogenes exploits host plasminogen for acceleration of bacterial invasion into deeper tissues via tricellular tight junctions. Here, I would like to show our study on bacterial translocation across the epithelial barrier through paracellular route.

  16. Interactions of the CCAAT-binding trimer NF-Y with nucleosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta, M C; Caretti, G; Badaracco, G F; Mantovani, R

    1999-01-15

    NF-Y is a sequence-specific evolutionary conserved activator binding to CCAAT boxes with high affinity and specificity. It is a trimer formed by NF-YA and two putative histone-like subunits, NF-YB and NF-YC, showing similarity to histones H2B and H2A, respectively. We investigated the relationships between NF-Y and chromatin using an Artemia franciscana chromatin assembly system with plasmids containing the Major HistoCompatibility complex class II Ea promoter. The NF-Y trimer, but not single subunits, protects the Y box in the presence of reconstituted chromatin, and it can bind the target sequence during and after assembly. Using reconstitution assays with purified chicken histones, we show that NF-Y associates with preformed nucleosomes. Translational analysis of various Ea fragments of identical length in which the CCAAT box is at different positions indicated that the lateral fragment was slightly more prone to NF-Y binding. In competition experiments, NF-Y is able to prevent formation of nucleosomes significantly. These data support the idea that NF-Y is a gene-specific activator with a built-in capacity to interface with chromatin structures.

  17. The Cac2 subunit is essential for productive histone binding and nucleosome assembly in CAF-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattiroli, Francesca; Gu, Yajie; Balsbaugh, Jeremy L.; Ahn, Natalie G.; Luger, Karolin

    2017-04-18

    Nucleosome assembly following DNA replication controls epigenome maintenance and genome integrity. Chromatin assembly factor 1 (CAF-1) is the histone chaperone responsible for histone (H3-H4)2 deposition following DNA synthesis. Structural and functional details for this chaperone complex and its interaction with histones are slowly emerging. Using hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry, combined with in vitro and in vivo mutagenesis studies, we identified the regions involved in the direct interaction between the yeast CAF-1 subunits, and mapped the CAF-1 domains responsible for H3-H4 binding. The large subunit, Cac1 organizes the assembly of CAF-1. Strikingly, H3-H4 binding is mediated by a composite interface, shaped by Cac1-bound Cac2 and the Cac1 acidic region. Cac2 is indispensable for productive histone binding, while deletion of Cac3 has only moderate effects on H3-H4 binding and nucleosome assembly. These results define direct structural roles for yeast CAF-1 subunits and uncover a previously unknown critical function of the middle subunit in CAF-1.

  18. Effects of cytosine modifications on DNA flexibility and nucleosome mechanical stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Thuy T M; Yoo, Jejoong; Dai, Qing; Zhang, Qiucen; He, Chuan; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Ha, Taekjip

    2016-02-24

    Cytosine can undergo modifications, forming 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) and its oxidized products 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5-fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5-caC). Despite their importance as epigenetic markers and as central players in cellular processes, it is not well understood how these modifications influence physical properties of DNA and chromatin. Here we report a comprehensive survey of the effect of cytosine modifications on DNA flexibility. We find that even a single copy of 5-fC increases DNA flexibility markedly. 5-mC reduces and 5-hmC enhances flexibility, and 5-caC does not have a measurable effect. Molecular dynamics simulations show that these modifications promote or dampen structural fluctuations, likely through competing effects of base polarity and steric hindrance, without changing the average structure. The increase in DNA flexibility increases the mechanical stability of the nucleosome and vice versa, suggesting a gene regulation mechanism where cytosine modifications change the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA through their effects on DNA flexibility.

  19. Groucho-mediated repression may result from a histone deacetylase-dependent increase in nucleosome density.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clint J Winkler

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Groucho (Gro is a Drosophila melanogaster transcriptional corepressor that directly interacts with the histone deacetylase Rpd3. Although previous studies suggest that this interaction is required for repression of Gro-responsive reporters in cultured cells, the in vivo significance of this interaction and the mechanism by which it leads to repression remain largely unexplored. In this study, we show that Gro is partially dependent on Rpd3 for repression, supporting the idea that Rpd3-mediated repression is one mode of Gro-mediated repression. We demonstrate that Gro colocalizes with Rpd3 to the chromatin of a target gene and that this is accompanied by the deacetylation of specific lysines within the N-terminal tails of histones H3 and H4. Gro overexpression leads to wing patterning defects and ectopic repression in the wing disc of transcription directed by the vestigial quadrant enhancer. These effects are reversed by the histone deacetylase inhibitors TSA and HC-Toxin and by the reduction of Rpd3 gene dosage. Furthermore, repression of the vestigial quadrant enhancer is accompanied by a Gro-mediated increase in nucleosome density, an effect that is reversed by histone deacetylase inhibitors. We propose a model in which Gro-mediated histone deacetylation results in increased nucleosome density leading to transcriptional repression.

  20. Groucho-mediated repression may result from a histone deacetylase-dependent increase in nucleosome density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Clint J; Ponce, Alberto; Courey, Albert J

    2010-04-13

    Groucho (Gro) is a Drosophila melanogaster transcriptional corepressor that directly interacts with the histone deacetylase Rpd3. Although previous studies suggest that this interaction is required for repression of Gro-responsive reporters in cultured cells, the in vivo significance of this interaction and the mechanism by which it leads to repression remain largely unexplored. In this study, we show that Gro is partially dependent on Rpd3 for repression, supporting the idea that Rpd3-mediated repression is one mode of Gro-mediated repression. We demonstrate that Gro colocalizes with Rpd3 to the chromatin of a target gene and that this is accompanied by the deacetylation of specific lysines within the N-terminal tails of histones H3 and H4. Gro overexpression leads to wing patterning defects and ectopic repression in the wing disc of transcription directed by the vestigial quadrant enhancer. These effects are reversed by the histone deacetylase inhibitors TSA and HC-Toxin and by the reduction of Rpd3 gene dosage. Furthermore, repression of the vestigial quadrant enhancer is accompanied by a Gro-mediated increase in nucleosome density, an effect that is reversed by histone deacetylase inhibitors. We propose a model in which Gro-mediated histone deacetylation results in increased nucleosome density leading to transcriptional repression.

  1. FACT, the Bur kinase pathway, and the histone co-repressor HirC have overlapping nucleosome-related roles in yeast transcription elongation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer R Stevens

    Full Text Available Gene transcription is constrained by the nucleosomal nature of chromosomal DNA. This nucleosomal barrier is modulated by FACT, a conserved histone-binding heterodimer. FACT mediates transcription-linked nucleosome disassembly and also nucleosome reassembly in the wake of the RNA polymerase II transcription complex, and in this way maintains the repression of 'cryptic' promoters found within some genes. Here we focus on a novel mutant version of the yeast FACT subunit Spt16 that supplies essential Spt16 activities but impairs transcription-linked nucleosome reassembly in dominant fashion. This Spt16 mutant protein also has genetic effects that are recessive, which we used to show that certain Spt16 activities collaborate with histone acetylation and the activities of a Bur-kinase/Spt4-Spt5/Paf1C pathway that facilitate transcription elongation. These collaborating activities were opposed by the actions of Rpd3S, a histone deacetylase that restores a repressive chromatin environment in a transcription-linked manner. Spt16 activity paralleling that of HirC, a co-repressor of histone gene expression, was also found to be opposed by Rpd3S. Our findings suggest that Spt16, the Bur/Spt4-Spt5/Paf1C pathway, and normal histone abundance and/or stoichiometry, in mutually cooperative fashion, facilitate nucleosome disassembly during transcription elongation. The recessive nature of these effects of the mutant Spt16 protein on transcription-linked nucleosome disassembly, contrasted to its dominant negative effect on transcription-linked nucleosome reassembly, indicate that mutant FACT harbouring the mutant Spt16 protein competes poorly with normal FACT at the stage of transcription-linked nucleosome disassembly, but effectively with normal FACT for transcription-linked nucleosome reassembly. This functional difference is consistent with the idea that FACT association with the transcription elongation complex depends on nucleosome disassembly, and that the

  2. Case Report: Extrauterine Translocated Contraceptive Device: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three of the five translocated intraperitoneal devices were recovered by laparotomy and the forth by laparoscopy. The fifth patient, pregnant, defaulted with the device still retained. We are of the opinion that primary iatrogenic uterine perforation occurs occasionally. Other possible translocatory mechanisms include ...

  3. Familial cryptic translocation in Angelman syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weyerts, L.K.; Wiley, J.E.; Loud, K.M. [ECU School of Medicine, Greenville, NC (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The majority of patients with Angelman syndrome have been shown to have a cytogenetic or molecular deletion on the maternally derived chromosome 15. We report on a case of Angelman syndrome in which this deletion occurs as an unbalanced cryptic translocation involving chromosomes 14 and 15. The proband was diagnosed clinically as having Angelman syndrome. Multiple cytogenetic studies were done without detecting any deletion. When DNA probes (Oncor) specific for the Prader Willi/Angelman locus became available, the patient was restudied and found to be deleted for {open_quotes}region A{close_quotes} (D15S11) but not for {open_quotes}region B{close_quotes} (GABRB3). No other abnormality was detected. The proband`s mother was then studied. The chromosome 15 marker probe and D15S11 were detected on different chromosomes. Using alpha-satellite probes, a cryptic 14;15 translocation was uncovered. This balanced translocation was also found to be carried by the sister of the proband. This case, along with a case presented at the 1993 ASHG meeting, illustrates the need for using acrocentric probes when studying Angelman syndrome patients. The proband was studied using additional probes specific for this region and found to be deleted for SNRPN but not for D15S10. The breakpoint of the translocation in this patient delineates the smallest deletion of the Angelman syndrome region reported to date and therefore may represent the specific gene involved.

  4. Nitrated nucleosome levels and neuropsychiatric events in systemic lupus erythematosus; a multi-center retrospective case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, Isabel; Croca, Sara; Raimondo, Maria Gabriella

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) there is no serological test that will reliably distinguish neuropsychiatric (NP) events due to active SLE from those due to other causes. Previously we showed that serum levels of nitrated nucleosomes (NN) were elevated in a small n...

  5. Vaccination with L. infantum chagasi nucleosomal histones confers protection against new world cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania braziliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Marcia W; Santos, Diego M; Fukutani, Kiyoshi F; Clarencio, Jorge; Miranda, Jose Carlos; Brodskyn, Claudia; Barral, Aldina; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Soto, Manuel; de Oliveira, Camila I

    2012-01-01

    Nucleosomal histones are intracellular proteins that are highly conserved among Leishmania species. After parasite destruction or spontaneous lysis, exposure to these proteins elicits a strong host immune response. In the present study, we analyzed the protective capability of Leishmania infantum chagasi nucleosomal histones against L. braziliensis infection using different immunization strategies. BALB/c mice were immunized with either a plasmid DNA cocktail (DNA) containing four Leishmania nucleosomal histones or with the DNA cocktail followed by the corresponding recombinant proteins plus CpG (DNA/Protein). Mice were later challenged with L. braziliensis, in the presence of sand fly saliva. Lesion development, parasite load and the cellular immune response were analyzed five weeks after challenge. Immunization with either DNA alone or with DNA/Protein was able to inhibit lesion development. This finding was highlighted by the absence of infected macrophages in tissue sections. Further, parasite load at the infection site and in the draining lymph nodes was also significantly lower in vaccinated animals. This outcome was associated with increased expression of IFN-γ and down regulation of IL-4 at the infection site. The data presented here demonstrate the potential use of L. infantum chagasi nucleosomal histones as targets for the development of vaccines against infection with L. braziliensis, as shown by the significant inhibition of disease development following a live challenge.

  6. Vaccination with L. infantum chagasi nucleosomal histones confers protection against new world cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania braziliensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia W Carneiro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nucleosomal histones are intracellular proteins that are highly conserved among Leishmania species. After parasite destruction or spontaneous lysis, exposure to these proteins elicits a strong host immune response. In the present study, we analyzed the protective capability of Leishmania infantum chagasi nucleosomal histones against L. braziliensis infection using different immunization strategies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: BALB/c mice were immunized with either a plasmid DNA cocktail (DNA containing four Leishmania nucleosomal histones or with the DNA cocktail followed by the corresponding recombinant proteins plus CpG (DNA/Protein. Mice were later challenged with L. braziliensis, in the presence of sand fly saliva. Lesion development, parasite load and the cellular immune response were analyzed five weeks after challenge. Immunization with either DNA alone or with DNA/Protein was able to inhibit lesion development. This finding was highlighted by the absence of infected macrophages in tissue sections. Further, parasite load at the infection site and in the draining lymph nodes was also significantly lower in vaccinated animals. This outcome was associated with increased expression of IFN-γ and down regulation of IL-4 at the infection site. CONCLUSION: The data presented here demonstrate the potential use of L. infantum chagasi nucleosomal histones as targets for the development of vaccines against infection with L. braziliensis, as shown by the significant inhibition of disease development following a live challenge.

  7. Probing Enhanced Double-Strand Break Formation at Abasic Sites within Clustered Lesions in Nucleosome Core Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Samya; Chakraborty, Supratim; Jacinto, Marco Paolo; Paul, Michael D; Balster, Morgan V; Greenberg, Marc M

    2017-01-10

    DNA is rapidly cleaved under mild alkaline conditions at apyrimidinic/apurinic sites, but the half-life is several weeks in phosphate buffer (pH 7.5). However, abasic sites are ∼100-fold more reactive within nucleosome core particles (NCPs). Histone proteins catalyze the strand scission, and at superhelical location 1.5, the histone H4 tail is largely responsible for the accelerated cleavage. The rate constant for strand scission at an abasic site is enhanced further in a nucleosome core particle when it is part of a bistranded lesion containing a proximal strand break. Cleavage of this form results in a highly deleterious double-strand break. This acceleration is dependent upon the position of the abasic lesion in the NCP and its structure. The enhancement in cleavage rate at an apurinic/apyrimidinic site rapidly drops off as the distance between the strand break and abasic site increases and is negligible once the two forms of damage are separated by 7 bp. However, the enhancement of the rate of double-strand break formation increases when the size of the gap is increased from one to two nucleotides. In contrast, the cleavage rate enhancement at 2-deoxyribonolactone within bistranded lesions is more modest, and it is similar in free DNA and nucleosome core particles. We postulate that the enhanced rate of double-strand break formation at bistranded lesions containing apurinic/apyrimidinic sites within nucleosome core particles is a general phenomenon and is due to increased DNA flexibility.

  8. High-Density Nucleosome Occupancy Map of Human Chromosome 9p21–22 Reveals Chromatin Organization of the Type I Interferon Gene Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freaney, Jonathan E.; Zhang, Quanwei; Yigit, Erbay; Kim, Rebecca; Widom, Jonathan; Wang, Ji-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide investigations have dramatically increased our understanding of nucleosome positioning and the role of chromatin in gene regulation, yet some genomic regions have been poorly represented in human nucleosome maps. One such region is represented by human chromosome 9p21–22, which contains the type I interferon gene cluster that includes 16 interferon alpha genes and the single interferon beta, interferon epsilon, and interferon omega genes. A high-density nucleosome mapping strategy was used to generate locus-wide maps of the nucleosome organization of this biomedically important locus at a steady state and during a time course of infection with Sendai virus, an inducer of interferon gene expression. Detailed statistical and computational analysis illustrates that nucleosomes in this locus exhibit preferences for particular dinucleotide and oligomer DNA sequence motifs in vivo, which are similar to those reported for lower eukaryotic nucleosome–DNA interactions. These data were used to visualize the region's chromatin architecture and reveal features that are common to the organization of all the type I interferon genes, indicating a common nucleosome-mediated gene regulatory paradigm. Additionally, this study clarifies aspects of the dynamic changes that occur with the nucleosome occupying the transcriptional start site of the interferon beta gene after virus infection. PMID:24673249

  9. Monitoring interactions at ATP-dependent drug efflux pumps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendrikse, NH

    2000-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic treatment of cancer patients is often unsuccessful, due to the involvement of various mechanisms, leading to multidrug resistance (MDR). In this review, I describe the mechanisms involved in MDR. Furthermore, results obtained by imaging of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and the multidrug

  10. Phenomenological analysis of ATP dependence of motor protein

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yunxin

    2011-01-01

    In this study, through phenomenological comparison of the velocity-force data of processive motor proteins, including conventional kinesin, cytoplasmic dynein and myosin V, we found that, the ratio between motor velocities of two different ATP concentrations is almost invariant for any substall, superstall or negative external loads. Therefore, the velocity of motor can be well approximated by a Michaelis-Menten like formula $V=\\atp k(F)L/(\\atp +K_M)$, with $L$ the step size, and $k(F)$ the external load $F$ dependent rate of one mechanochemical cycle of motor motion in saturated ATP solution. The difference of Michaelis-Menten constant $K_M$ for substall, superstall and negative external load indicates, the ATP molecule affinity of motor head for these three cases are different, though the expression of $k(F)$ as a function of $F$ might be unchanged for any external load $F$. Verifications of this Michaelis-Menten like formula has also been done by fitting to the recent experimental data.

  11. Structure and mechanism of ATP-dependent phospholipid transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez Marques, Rosa Laura; Poulsen, Lisbeth Rosager; Bailly, Aurélien

    2015-01-01

    , despite differences in overall architecture, both appear to operate by an alternating access mechanism and during transport they might allow access of phospholipids to the internal part of the transmembrane domain. The latter feature is obvious for ABC transporters, but phospholipids and other hydrophobic......Background ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters and P4-ATPases are two large and seemingly unrelated families of primary active pumps involved in moving phospholipids from one leaflet of a biological membrane to the other. Scope of review This review aims to identify common mechanistic features...... in the way phospholipid flipping is carried out by two evolutionarily unrelated families of transporters. Major conclusions Both protein families hydrolyze ATP, although they employ different mechanisms to use it, and have a comparable size with twelve transmembrane segments in the functional unit. Further...

  12. Brownian dynamics simulation of the cross-talking effect among modified histones on conformations of nucleosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Zhao-Wen; Li, Wei; Xie, Ping; Dou, Shuo-Xing; Wang, Peng-Ye

    2010-04-01

    Using Brownian dynamics simulation, we studied the effect of histone modifications on conformations of an array of nucleosomes in a segment of chromatin. The simulation demonstrated that the segment of chromatin shows the dynamic behaviour that its conformation can switch between a state with nearly all of the histones being wrapped by DNA and a state with nearly all of the histones being unwrapped by DNA, thus involving the “cross-talking" interactions among the histones. Each state can stay for a sufficiently long time. These conformational states are essential for gene expression or gene silence. The simulation also shows that these conformational states can be inherited by the daughter DNAs during DNA replication, giving a theoretical explanation of the epigenetic phenomenon.

  13. Interactions between isolated nucleosome core particles: A tail-bridging effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangenot, S.; Raspaud, E.; Tribet, C.; Belloni, L.; Livolant, F.

    2002-03-01

    Interactions between isolated nucleosome core particles are studied as a function of the monovalent salt concentration by osmometry and by electrophoretic mobility measurements. The data are compared to the measurements performed on the protein-free DNA fragments and also analysed using the conventional theoretical approach. At low salt, an electrostatic screening effect accounts for the variation of the second virial coefficient whereas the simple hard-core contribution becomes predominant at high salt. In the intermediate range, an attraction occurs. In the light of previous results (Mangenot et al. , Biophys. J. 82, 345 (2002)), we show that the flexible basic proteic tails are responsible for this attraction. A tail-bridging effect is discussed.

  14. Long-Range Correlations in Genomic DNA: A Signature of the Nucleosomal Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audit, B.; Thermes, C.; Vaillant, C.; D'Aubenton-Carafa, Y.; Muzy, J. F.; Arneodo, A.

    2001-03-01

    We use the ``wavelet transform microscope'' to carry out a comparative statistical analysis of DNA bending profiles and of the corresponding DNA texts. In the three kingdoms, one reveals on both signals a characteristic scale of 100-200 bp that separates two different regimes of power-law correlations (PLC). In the small-scale regime, PLC are observed in eukaryotic, in double-strand DNA viral, and in archaeal genomes, which contrasts with their total absence in the genomes of eubacteria and their viruses. This strongly suggests that small-scale PLC are related to the mechanisms underlying the wrapping of DNA in the nucleosomal structure. We further speculate that the large scale PLC are the signature of the higher-order structure and dynamics of chromatin.

  15. An Assay for Measuring Histone Variant Exchange within Nucleosomes In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laflamme, Liette; Guillemette, Benoit; Gaudreau, Luc

    2017-01-01

    The incorporation of histone variants into specific chromatin regions is a mechanism by which cells can regulate many important biological processes. One such example is H2A.Z, a highly conserved variant of H2A that is incorporated in genomic regulatory regions and contributes to control gene expression. H2A.Z variant exchange involves the removal of H2A-H2B dimers from a preassembled nucleosome and their replacement with H2A.Z-H2B dimers. A specific family of chromatin remodeling complexes, homologous to the yeast Swr1 complex, have been shown to be capable of this histone exchange activity both in vivo and in vitro. Here, we describe an assay to measure the histone H2A.Z exchange activity of recombinant human p400 on immobilized mononucleosomes in vitro. The assay can be adapted to other histone exchange complexes/catalytic subunits purified from any species.

  16. A role for tuned levels of nucleosome remodeler subunit ACF1 during Drosophila oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börner, Kenneth; Jain, Dhawal; Vazquez-Pianzola, Paula; Vengadasalam, Sandra; Steffen, Natascha; Fyodorov, Dmitry V; Tomancak, Pavel; Konev, Alexander; Suter, Beat; Becker, Peter B

    2016-03-15

    The Chromatin Accessibility Complex (CHRAC) consists of the ATPase ISWI, the large ACF1 subunit and a pair of small histone-like proteins, CHRAC-14/16. CHRAC is a prototypical nucleosome sliding factor that mobilizes nucleosomes to improve the regularity and integrity of the chromatin fiber. This may facilitate the formation of repressive chromatin. Expression of the signature subunit ACF1 is restricted during embryonic development, but remains high in primordial germ cells. Therefore, we explored roles for ACF1 during Drosophila oogenesis. ACF1 is expressed in somatic and germline cells, with notable enrichment in germline stem cells and oocytes. The asymmetrical localization of ACF1 to these cells depends on the transport of the Acf1 mRNA by the Bicaudal-D/Egalitarian complex. Loss of ACF1 function in the novel Acf1(7) allele leads to defective egg chambers and their elimination through apoptosis. In addition, we find a variety of unusual 16-cell cyst packaging phenotypes in the previously known Acf1(1) allele, with a striking prevalence of egg chambers with two functional oocytes at opposite poles. Surprisingly, we found that the Acf1(1) deletion--despite disruption of the Acf1 reading frame--expresses low levels of a PHD-bromodomain module from the C-terminus of ACF1 that becomes enriched in oocytes. Expression of this module from the Acf1 genomic locus leads to packaging defects in the absence of functional ACF1, suggesting competitive interactions with unknown target molecules. Remarkably, a two-fold overexpression of CHRAC (ACF1 and CHRAC-16) leads to increased apoptosis and packaging defects. Evidently, finely tuned CHRAC levels are required for proper oogenesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. An all-atom model of the chromatin fiber containing linker histones reveals a versatile structure tuned by the nucleosomal repeat length.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Wong

    Full Text Available In the nucleus of eukaryotic cells, histone proteins organize the linear genome into a functional and hierarchical architecture. In this paper, we use the crystal structures of the nucleosome core particle, B-DNA and the globular domain of H5 linker histone to build the first all-atom model of compact chromatin fibers. In this 3D jigsaw puzzle, DNA bending is achieved by solving an inverse kinematics problem. Our model is based on recent electron microscopy measurements of reconstituted fiber dimensions. Strikingly, we find that the chromatin fiber containing linker histones is a polymorphic structure. We show that different fiber conformations are obtained by tuning the linker histone orientation at the nucleosomes entry/exit according to the nucleosomal repeat length. We propose that the observed in vivo quantization of nucleosomal repeat length could reflect nature's ability to use the DNA molecule's helical geometry in order to give chromatin versatile topological and mechanical properties.

  18. Mimotopes for lupus-derived anti-DNA and nucleosome-specific autoantibodies selected from random peptide phage display libraries: facts and follies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieker, J.W.C.; Sun, Y.J.; Jacobs, C.W.M.; Putterman, C.; Monestier, M.; Muller, S.; Vlag, J. van der; Berden, J.H.M.

    2005-01-01

    Autoantibodies against chromatin are the most characteristic serological feature in SLE patients. Anti-dsDNA and nucleosome-specific antibodies are associated with glomerulonephritis, the most serious manifestation of SLE. Identification of peptides mimicking conformational epitopes (so-called

  19. Financial costs of large carnivore translocations--accounting for conservation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian J Weise

    Full Text Available Human-carnivore conflict continues to present a major conservation challenge around the world. Translocation of large carnivores is widely implemented but remains strongly debated, in part because of a lack of cost transparency. We report detailed translocation costs for three large carnivore species in Namibia and across different translocation scenarios. We consider the effect of various parameters and factors on costs and translocation success. Total translocation cost for 30 individuals in 22 events was $80,681 (US Dollars. Median translocation cost per individual was $2,393, and $2,669 per event. Median cost per cheetah was $2,760 (n = 23, and $2,108 per leopard (n = 6. One hyaena was translocated at a cost of $1,672. Tracking technology was the single biggest cost element (56%, followed by captive holding and feeding. Soft releases, prolonged captivity and orphaned individuals also increased case-specific costs. A substantial proportion (65.4% of the total translocation cost was successfully recovered from public interest groups. Less than half the translocations were confirmed successes (44.4%, 3 unknown with a strong species bias. Four leopards (66.7% were successfully translocated but only eight of the 20 cheetahs (40.0% with known outcome met these strict criteria. None of the five habituated cheetahs was translocated successfully, nor was the hyaena. We introduce the concept of Individual Conservation Cost (ICC and define it as the cost of one successfully translocated individual adjusted by costs of unsuccessful events of the same species. The median ICC for cheetah was $6,898 and $3,140 for leopard. Translocations are costly, but we demonstrate that they are not inherently more expensive than other strategies currently employed in non-lethal carnivore conflict management. We conclude that translocation should be one available option for conserving large carnivores, but needs to be critically evaluated on a case-by-case basis.

  20. Financial costs of large carnivore translocations--accounting for conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weise, Florian J; Stratford, Ken J; van Vuuren, Rudolf J

    2014-01-01

    Human-carnivore conflict continues to present a major conservation challenge around the world. Translocation of large carnivores is widely implemented but remains strongly debated, in part because of a lack of cost transparency. We report detailed translocation costs for three large carnivore species in Namibia and across different translocation scenarios. We consider the effect of various parameters and factors on costs and translocation success. Total translocation cost for 30 individuals in 22 events was $80,681 (US Dollars). Median translocation cost per individual was $2,393, and $2,669 per event. Median cost per cheetah was $2,760 (n = 23), and $2,108 per leopard (n = 6). One hyaena was translocated at a cost of $1,672. Tracking technology was the single biggest cost element (56%), followed by captive holding and feeding. Soft releases, prolonged captivity and orphaned individuals also increased case-specific costs. A substantial proportion (65.4%) of the total translocation cost was successfully recovered from public interest groups. Less than half the translocations were confirmed successes (44.4%, 3 unknown) with a strong species bias. Four leopards (66.7%) were successfully translocated but only eight of the 20 cheetahs (40.0%) with known outcome met these strict criteria. None of the five habituated cheetahs was translocated successfully, nor was the hyaena. We introduce the concept of Individual Conservation Cost (ICC) and define it as the cost of one successfully translocated individual adjusted by costs of unsuccessful events of the same species. The median ICC for cheetah was $6,898 and $3,140 for leopard. Translocations are costly, but we demonstrate that they are not inherently more expensive than other strategies currently employed in non-lethal carnivore conflict management. We conclude that translocation should be one available option for conserving large carnivores, but needs to be critically evaluated on a case-by-case basis.

  1. Chemical Synthesis of K34-Ubiquitylated H2B for Nucleosome Reconstitution and Single-Particle Cryo-Electron Microscopy Structural Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiabin; He, Qiaoqiao; Liu, Yuntao; Liu, Sanling; Tang, Shan; Li, Chengmin; Sun, Demeng; Li, Xiaorun; Zhou, Min; Zhu, Ping; Bi, Guoqiang; Zhou, Zhenghong; Zheng, Ji-Shen; Tian, Changlin

    2017-01-17

    Post-translational modifications (e.g., ubiquitylation) of histones play important roles in dynamic regulation of chromatin. Histone ubiquitylation has been speculated to directly influence the structure and dynamics of nucleosomes. However, structural information for ubiquitylated nucleosomes is still lacking. Here we report an alternative strategy for total chemical synthesis of homogenous histone H2B-K34-ubiquitylation (H2B-K34Ub) by using acid-cleavable auxiliary-mediated ligation of peptide hydrazides for site-specific ubiquitylation. Synthetic H2B-K34Ub was efficiently incorporated into nucleosomes and further used for single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) imaging. The cryo-EM structure of the nucleosome containing H2B-K34Ub suggests that two flexible ubiquitin domains protrude between the DNA chains of the nucleosomes. The DNA chains around the H2B-K34 sites shift and provide more space for ubiquitin to protrude. These analyses indicated local and slight structural influences on the nucleosome with ubiquitylation at the H2B-K34 site. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Footprint traversal by adenosine-triphosphate-dependent chromatin remodeler motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garai, Ashok; Mani, Jesrael; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2012-04-01

    Adenosine-triphosphate (ATP)-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes (CREs) are biomolecular motors in eukaryotic cells. These are driven by a chemical fuel, namely, ATP. CREs actively participate in many cellular processes that require accessibility of specific segments of DNA which are packaged as chromatin. The basic unit of chromatin is a nucleosome where 146 bp ˜ 50 nm of a double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) is wrapped around a spool formed by histone proteins. The helical path of histone-DNA contact on a nucleosome is also called “footprint.” We investigate the mechanism of footprint traversal by a CRE that translocates along the dsDNA. Our two-state model of a CRE captures effectively two distinct chemical (or conformational) states in the mechanochemical cycle of each ATP-dependent CRE. We calculate the mean time of traversal. Our predictions on the ATP dependence of the mean traversal time can be tested by carrying out in vitro experiments on mononucleosomes.

  3. Measurement of background translocation frequencies in individuals with clones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wade, Marcelle J. [California State Univ. (CalState), Hayward, CA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    In the leukemia case the unseparated B and T lymphocytes had a high translocation frequency even after 0.0014, respectively. After purging all clones from the data, the translocation frequencies for Bio 8 and Bio 23 were 0.00750.0014 and 0.0073 metaphases were scored for chromosomal aberrations,, specifically reciprocal translocations, using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Metaphase spreads were used from two healthy, unexposed individuals (not exposed to radiation, chemotherapy or radiotherapy) and one early B- precursor acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) patient (metaphase spreads from both separated T lymphocytes and unseparated B and T lymphocytes were scored). All three individuals had an abnormally high translocation frequency. The high translocation frequencies resulted from clonal expansion of specific translocated chromosomes. I show in this thesis that by purging (discounting or removing) clones from the data of unexposed individuals, one can obtain true background translocation frequencies. In two cases, Bio 8 and Bio 23, the measured translocation frequency for chromosomes 1, 2 and 4 was 0.0124 purging all of the clones from the data. This high translocation frequency may be due to a low frequency of some clones and may not be recognized. The separated T lymphocytes had a higher translocation frequency than expected.

  4. Translocation can drive the unfolding of a preprotein domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkowitz, R A; Joly, J C; Wickner, W

    1993-01-01

    Precursor proteins are believed to have secondary and tertiary structure prior to translocation across the Escherichia coli plasma membrane. We now find that preprotein unfolding during translocation can be driven by the translocation event itself. At certain stages, translocation and unfolding can occur without exogenous energy input. To examine this unfolding reaction, we have prepared proOmpA-Dhfr, a fusion protein of the well studied cytosolic enzyme dihydrofolate reductase (Dhfr) connected to the C-terminus of proOmpA, the precursor form of outer membrane protein A. At an intermediate stage of its in vitro translocation, the N-terminal proOmpA domain has crossed the membrane while the folded Dhfr portion, stabilized by its ligands NADPH and methotrexate, has not. When the ligands are removed from this intermediate, translocation occurs by a two-step process. First, 20-30 amino acid residues of the fusion protein translocate concomitant with unfolding of the Dhfr domain. This reaction requires neither ATP, delta mu H+ nor the SecA subunit of translocase. Strikingly, this translocation accelerates the net unfolding of the Dhfr domain. In a second step, SecA and ATP hydrolysis drive the rapid completion of translocation. Thus energy derived from translocation can drive the unfolding of a substantial protein domain.

  5. Computer Modeling Reveals that Modifications of the Histone Tail Charges Define Salt-Dependent Interaction of the Nucleosome Core Particles

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ye; Lyubartsev, Alexander P.; Korolev, Nikolay; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2009-01-01

    Coarse-grained Langevin molecular dynamics computer simulations were conducted for systems that mimic solutions of nucleosome core particles (NCPs). The NCP was modeled as a negatively charged spherical particle representing the complex of DNA and the globular part of the histones combined with attached strings of connected charged beads modeling the histone tails. The size, charge, and distribution of the tails relative to the core were built to match real NCPs. Three models of NCPs were con...

  6. Microdeletion syndromes, balanced translocations, and gene mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinzel, A

    1988-01-01

    High resolution prometaphase chromosome banding has allowed the detection of discrete chromosome aberrations which escaped earlier metaphase examinations. Consistent tiny deletions have been detected in some well established malformation syndromes: an interstitial deletion in 15q11/12 in the majority of patients with the Prader-Willi syndrome and in a minority of patients with the Angelman (happy puppet) syndrome; a terminal deletion of 17p13.3 in most patients examined with the Miller-Dieker syndrome; an interstitial deletion of 8q23.3/24.1 in a large majority of patients with the Giedion-Langer syndrome; an interstitial deletion of 11p13 in virtually all patients with the WAGR (Wilms' tumour-aniridia-gonadoblastoma-retardation) syndrome; and an interstitial deletion in 22q11 in about one third of patients with the DiGeorge sequence. In addition, a combination of chromosome prometaphase banding and DNA marker studies has allowed the localisation of the genes for retinoblastoma and for Wilms' tumour and the clarification of both the autosomal recessive nature of the mutation and the possible somatic mutations by which the normal allele can be lost in retina and kidney cells. After a number of X linked genes had been mapped, discrete deletions in the X chromosome were detected by prometaphase banding with specific attention paid to the sites of the gene(s) in males who had from one to up to four different X linked disorders plus mental retardation. Furthermore, the detection of balanced translocations in probands with disorders caused by autosomal dominant or X linked genes has allowed a better insight into the localisation of these genes. In some females with X linked disorders, balanced X; autosomal translocations have allowed the localisation of X linked genes at the breakpoint on the X chromosome. Balanced autosome; autosome translocations segregating with autosomal dominant conditions have provided some clues to the gene location of these conditions. In two

  7. The conformational state of the nucleosome entry–exit site modulates TATA box-specific TBP binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieb, Aaron R.; Gansen, Alexander; Böhm, Vera; Langowski, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    The TATA binding protein (TBP) is a critical transcription factor used for nucleating assembly of the RNA polymerase II machinery. TBP binds TATA box elements with high affinity and kinetic stability and in vivo is correlated with high levels of transcription activation. However, since most promoters use less stable TATA-less or TATA-like elements, while also competing with nucleosome occupancy, further mechanistic insight into TBP's DNA binding properties and ability to access chromatin is needed. Using bulk and single-molecule FRET, we find that TBP binds a minimal consensus TATA box as a two-state equilibrium process, showing no evidence for intermediate states. However, upon addition of flanking DNA sequence, we observe non-specific cooperative binding to multiple DNA sites that compete for TATA-box specificity. Thus, we conclude that TBP binding is defined by a branched pathway, wherein TBP initially binds with little sequence specificity and is thermodynamically positioned by its kinetic stability to the TATA box. Furthermore, we observed the real-time access of TBP binding to TATA box DNA located within the DNA entry–exit site of the nucleosome. From these data, we determined salt-dependent changes in the nucleosome conformation regulate TBP's access to the TATA box, where access is highly constrained under physiological conditions, but is alleviated by histone acetylation and TFIIA. PMID:24829456

  8. The conformational state of the nucleosome entry-exit site modulates TATA box-specific TBP binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieb, Aaron R; Gansen, Alexander; Böhm, Vera; Langowski, Jörg

    2014-07-01

    The TATA binding protein (TBP) is a critical transcription factor used for nucleating assembly of the RNA polymerase II machinery. TBP binds TATA box elements with high affinity and kinetic stability and in vivo is correlated with high levels of transcription activation. However, since most promoters use less stable TATA-less or TATA-like elements, while also competing with nucleosome occupancy, further mechanistic insight into TBP's DNA binding properties and ability to access chromatin is needed. Using bulk and single-molecule FRET, we find that TBP binds a minimal consensus TATA box as a two-state equilibrium process, showing no evidence for intermediate states. However, upon addition of flanking DNA sequence, we observe non-specific cooperative binding to multiple DNA sites that compete for TATA-box specificity. Thus, we conclude that TBP binding is defined by a branched pathway, wherein TBP initially binds with little sequence specificity and is thermodynamically positioned by its kinetic stability to the TATA box. Furthermore, we observed the real-time access of TBP binding to TATA box DNA located within the DNA entry-exit site of the nucleosome. From these data, we determined salt-dependent changes in the nucleosome conformation regulate TBP's access to the TATA box, where access is highly constrained under physiological conditions, but is alleviated by histone acetylation and TFIIA. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. In vivo and in vitro footprinting of nucleosomes and transcriptional activators using an infrared-fluorescence DNA sequencer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morohashi, Nobuyuki; Nakajima, Kumiko; Kuwana, Shunsuke; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Shimizu, Mitsuhiro

    2008-02-01

    The analysis of nucleosome positions and transcription factor binding in chromatin is a central issue for understanding the mechanisms of gene expression in eukaryotes. Here, we have developed a footprinting technique, using multi-cycle primer extension with an infrared-fluorescence DNA sequencer, to analyze chromatin structure in isolated yeast nuclei and transcriptional activator binding in living yeast cells. Using this technique, the binding of the yeast activators Hap1 and Hap2/3/4/5 to their cognate sites was detectable as hypersensitive sites by in vivo UV-photofootprinting, and the locations of nucleosomes in yeast minichromosomes were determined by micrococcal nuclease mapping. We also applied this method to determine the position of the nucleosome in the 5S DNA fragment reconstituted in vitro. This technique allowed us to eliminate the use of radioactive materials and to perform experiments on common benches. Thus, the footprinting procedure established in this study will be useful to researchers studying DNA-protein interactions and chromatin structure in vivo and in vitro.

  10. The Evolution of Aerobic Fermentation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe Was Associated with Regulatory Reprogramming but not Nucleosome Reorganization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2011-01-01

    Aerobic fermentation has evolved independently in two yeast lineages, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the Schizosaccharomyces pombe lineages. In the S. cerevisiae lineage, the evolution of aerobic fermentation was shown to be associated with transcriptional reprogramming of the genes involved in respiration and was recently suggested to be linked to changes in nucleosome occupancy pattern in the promoter regions of respiration-related genes. In contrast, little is known about the genetic basis for the evolution of aerobic fermentation in the Sch. pombe lineage. In particular, it is not known whether respiration-related genes in Sch. pombe have undergone a transcriptional reprogramming or changes in nucleosome occupancy pattern in their promoter regions. In this study, we compared genome-wide gene expression profiles of Sch. pombe with those of S. cerevisiae and the aerobic respiration yeast Candida albicans. We found that the expression profile of respiration-related genes in Sch. pombe is similar to that of S. cerevisiae, but different from that of C. albicans, suggesting that their transcriptional regulation has been reprogrammed during the evolution of aerobic fermentation. However, we found no significant nucleosome organization change in the promoter of respiration-related gene in Sch. pombe. PMID:21127171

  11. Mechanism for translocation of fluoroquinolones across lipid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cramariuc, O.; Rog, T.; Javanainen, M.

    2012-01-01

    Classical atom-scale molecular dynamics simulations, constrained free energy calculations, and quantum mechanical (QM) calculations are employed to study the diffusive translocation of ciprofloxacin (CPFX) across lipid membranes. CPFX is considered here as a representative of the fluoroquinolone....... Subsequent QM analysis of the observed molecular stacking shows the important role of partial charge neutralization in the stacks, highlighting how the zwitterionic form of the drug is neutralized for translocation. The findings propose a translocation mechanism in which zwitterionic CPFX molecules approach...

  12. Metallic oxide nanoparticle translocation across the human bronchial epithelial barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Isabelle; Naudin, Grégoire; Boland, Sonja; Mornet, Stéphane; Contremoulins, Vincent; Beugnon, Karine; Martinon, Laurent; Lambert, Olivier; Baeza-Squiban, Armelle

    2015-03-14

    Inhalation is the most frequent route of unintentional exposure to nanoparticles (NPs). Our aim was to quantify the translocation of different metallic NPs across human bronchial epithelial cells and to determine the factors influencing this translocation. Calu-3 cells forming a tight epithelial barrier when grown on a porous membrane in a two compartment chamber were exposed to fluorescently labelled NPs to quantify the NP translocation. NP translocation and uptake by cells were also studied by confocal and transmission electron microscopy. Translocation was characterized according to NP size (16, 50, or 100 nm), surface charge (negative or positive SiO2), composition (SiO2 or TiO2), presence of proteins or phospholipids and in an inflammatory context. Our results showed that NPs can translocate through the Calu-3 monolayer whatever their composition (SiO2 or TiO2), but this translocation was increased for the smallest and negatively charged NPs. Translocation was not associated with an alteration of the integrity of the epithelial monolayer, suggesting a transcytosis of the internalized NPs. By modifying the NP corona, the ability of NPs to cross the epithelial barrier differed depending on their intrinsic properties, making positively charged NPs more prone to translocate. NP translocation can be amplified by using agents known to open tight junctions and to allow paracellular passage. NP translocation was also modulated when mimicking an inflammatory context frequently found in the lungs, altering the epithelial integrity and inducing transient tight junction opening. This in vitro evaluation of NP translocation could be extended to other inhaled NPs to predict their biodistribution.

  13. Longing Itineraries: Building the Translocal Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo López Angel

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Migration has reshaped social practices, the sense of belonging has been rethought, and the membership is renegotiated and contended; this is why strategies for their sustainability have been generated. The translocal community operates through multilocated relationships that reveal the ways in which migrants are adapting to the new demands of the community. We emphasize the emotional impulse of nostalgia as one of the vehicles of sustainability for the community. The community is redefined and understood in a set of socio-cultural relationships its members generate, and where the locality is not central, but the connection. A new dimension of the social community space is not just the community gathered in a specific place, but also that agreements, commitments, and acknowledgments are exhibited and settled in the cyberspace; this cyberspace gives cohesion and brings a dynamic element to preserve the community, despite the fact that it is even less concrete than the spatial notion of territory. Facebook, YouTube and a blog are the web platforms of the virtual space where "neighbors, compatriots and citizens" (categories of ascription from the migration get together, where there is a reproduction of social practices (even the most ancient and fundamental ones, to give a new dimension to a translocal, multilocated and ciberlocated community.

  14. Another reptile translocation to a national park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.R. Branch

    1990-10-01

    Full Text Available On 4 May 1988 a sub-adult (50 mm snout-vent length, 42 mm tail Jones' girdled lizard Cordylus tropidosternum jonesi was collected in a pile of wood being off-loaded at the new restcamp in the Karoo National Park, Beaufort West. The wood had been transported by lorry from the Kruger National Park. The specimen is deposited in the herpetological collection of the Port Elizabeth Museum (PEM R 4584. Jones' girdled lizard is a small, arboreal cordylid that shelters under tree bark and in hollow logs. It is common and widely-distributed in the Kruger National Park (Pienaar, Haacke & Jacobsen 1983, The Reptiles of the Kruger National Park, 3rd edition. Pretoria: National Parks Board and adjacent lowveld, being replaced in northern Zimbabwe and East Africa by the nominate race. Hewitt & Power (1913, Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 3: 147-176, 1913 reported a similar translocation of the species to Kimberley in association with timber brought to the diamond mining camps. One of us noted recently the ease and danger of the unwitting spread of commensal reptile species into conservation areas (Branch 1978, Koedoe 30: 165, and this is confirmed by this additional example. We recommend that should similar shipments of wood be considered essential, then they be fumigated to prevent the translocation of other alien organisms that may potentially have more dangerous consequences.

  15. Chaperone-assisted translocation of flexible polymers in three dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhonen, P. M.; Linna, R. P.

    2016-01-01

    Polymer translocation through a nanometer-scale pore assisted by chaperones binding to the polymer is a process encountered in vivo for proteins. Studying the relevant models by computer simulations is computationally demanding. Accordingly, previous studies are either for stiff polymers in three dimensions or flexible polymers in two dimensions. Here, we study chaperone-assisted translocation of flexible polymers in three dimensions using Langevin dynamics. We show that differences in binding mechanisms, more specifically, whether a chaperone can bind to a single site or multiple sites on the polymer, lead to substantial differences in translocation dynamics in three dimensions. We show that the single-binding mode leads to dynamics that is very much like that in the constant-force driven translocation and accordingly mainly determined by tension propagation on the cis side. We obtain β ≈1.26 for the exponent for the scaling of the translocation time with polymer length. This fairly low value can be explained by the additional friction due to binding particles. The multiple-site binding leads to translocation the dynamics of which is mainly determined by the trans side. For this process we obtain β ≈1.36 . This value can be explained by our derivation of β =4 /3 for constant-bias translocation, where translocated polymer segments form a globule on the trans side. Our results pave the way for understanding and utilizing chaperone-assisted translocation where variations in microscopic details lead to rich variations in the emerging dynamics.

  16. Chromosomal Translocations: Chicken or Egg? | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many tumor cells have abnormal chromosomes. Some of these abnormalities are caused by chromosomal translocations, which occur when two chromosomes break and incorrectly rejoin, resulting in an exchange of genetic material. Translocations can activate oncogenes, silence tumor suppressor genes, or result in the creation of completely new fusion gene products. While there is little doubt that chromosomal translocations can contribute to cancer, there is an active "chicken and the egg" discussion about the role translocations and other chromosomal abnormalities play—do they actually cause cancer or merely occur because of other changes within the cancer cell.  

  17. Nucleosomes, Linker DNA, and Linker Histone form a Unique Structural Motif that Directs the Higher-Order Folding and Compaction of Chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednar, Jan; Horowitz, Rachel A.; Grigoryev, Sergei A.; Carruthers, Lenny M.; Hansen, Jeffrey C.; Koster, Abraham J.; Woodcock, Christopher L.

    1998-11-01

    The compaction level of arrays of nucleosomes may be understood in terms of the balance between the self-repulsion of DNA (principally linker DNA) and countering factors including the ionic strength and composition of the medium, the highly basic N termini of the core histones, and linker histones. However, the structural principles that come into play during the transition from a loose chain of nucleosomes to a compact 30-nm chromatin fiber have been difficult to establish, and the arrangement of nucleosomes and linker DNA in condensed chromatin fibers has never been fully resolved. Based on images of the solution conformation of native chromatin and fully defined chromatin arrays obtained by electron cryomicroscopy, we report a linker histone-dependent architectural motif beyond the level of the nucleosome core particle that takes the form of a stem-like organization of the entering and exiting linker DNA segments. DNA completes ≈ 1.7 turns on the histone octamer in the presence and absence of linker histone. When linker histone is present, the two linker DNA segments become juxtaposed ≈ 8 nm from the nucleosome center and remain apposed for 3-5 nm before diverging. We propose that this stem motif directs the arrangement of nucleosomes and linker DNA within the chromatin fiber, establishing a unique three-dimensional zigzag folding pattern that is conserved during compaction. Such an arrangement with peripherally arranged nucleosomes and internal linker DNA segments is fully consistent with observations in intact nuclei and also allows dramatic changes in compaction level to occur without a concomitant change in topology.

  18. Nucleosome Core Particle Disassembly and Assembly Kinetics Studied Using Single-Molecule Fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazan, Noa Plavner; Tomov, Toma E; Tsukanov, Roman; Liber, Miran; Berger, Yaron; Masoud, Rula; Toth, Katalin; Langowski, Joerg; Nir, Eyal

    2015-10-20

    The stability of the nucleosome core particle (NCP) is believed to play a major role in regulation of gene expression. To understand the mechanisms that influence NCP stability, we studied stability and dissociation and association kinetics under different histone protein (NCP) and NaCl concentrations using single-pair Förster resonance energy transfer and alternating laser excitation techniques. The method enables distinction between folded, unfolded, and intermediate NCP states and enables measurements at picomolar to nanomolar NCP concentrations where dissociation and association reactions can be directly observed. We reproduced the previously observed nonmonotonic dependence of NCP stability on NaCl concentration, and we suggest that this rather unexpected behavior is a result of interplay between repulsive and attractive forces within positively charged histones and between the histones and the negatively charged DNA. Higher NaCl concentrations decrease the attractive force between the histone proteins and the DNA but also stabilize H2A/H2B histone dimers, and possibly (H3/H4)2 tetramers. An intermediate state in which one DNA arm is unwrapped, previously observed at high NaCl concentrations, is also explained by this salt-induced stabilization. The strong dependence of NCP stability on ion and histone concentrations, and possibly on other charged macromolecules, may play a role in chromosomal morphology. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Salt-induced conformation and interaction changes of nucleosome core particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangenot, Stéphanie; Leforestier, Amélie; Vachette, Patrice; Durand, Dominique; Livolant, Françoise

    2002-01-01

    Small angle x-ray scattering was used to follow changes in the conformation and interactions of nucleosome core particles (NCP) as a function of the monovalent salt concentration C(s). The maximal extension (D(max)) of the NCP (145 +/- 3-bp DNA) increases from 137 +/- 5 A to 165 +/- 5 A when C(s) rises from 10 to 50 mM and remains constant with further increases of C(s) up to 200 mM. In view of the very weak increase of the R(g) value in the same C(s) range, we attribute this D(max) variation to tail extension, a proposal confirmed by simulations of the entire I(q) curves, considering an ideal solution of particles with tails either condensed or extended. This tail extension is observed at higher salt values when particles contain longer DNA fragments (165 +/- 10 bp). The maximal extension of the tails always coincides with the screening of repulsive interactions between particles. The second virial coefficient becomes smaller than the hard sphere virial coefficient and eventually becomes negative (net attractive interactions) for NCP(145). Addition of salt simultaneously screens Coulombic repulsive interactions between NCP and Coulombic attractive interactions between tails and DNA inside the NCP. We discuss how the coupling of these two phenomena may be of biological relevance.

  20. X-ray diffraction characterization of the dense phases formed by nucleosome core particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangenot, Stéphanie; Leforestier, Amélie; Durand, Dominique; Livolant, Françoise

    2003-04-01

    Multiple dense phases of nucleosome core particles (NCPs) were formed in controlled ionic conditions (15-160 mM monovalent salt, no divalent ions), under osmotic pressures ranging from 4.7 x 10(5) to 2.35 x 10(6) Pa. We present here the x-ray diffraction analysis of these phases. In the lamello-columnar phase obtained at low salt concentration (50 mM), NCPs order into either a two-dimensional columnar hexagonal phase or into three-dimensional orthorhombic (quasi-hexagonal) crystals. The lamellar and hexagonal (or quasi-hexagonal) organizations coexist in the intermediate salt range; their demixing requires a long time. For an applied pressure P = 4.7 10(5) Pa, the calculated NCPs concentration ranges from approximately 280 to 320 mg/ml in the lamello-columnar phase to 495 to 585 mg/ml in the three-dimensional orthorhombic phase. These concentrations cover the concentration of the living cell.

  1. H2A and H2B tails are essential to properly reconstitute nucleosome core particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertin, Aurélie; Durand, Dominique; Renouard, Madalena; Livolant, Françoise; Mangenot, Stéphanie

    2007-11-01

    The conformation of recombinant Nucleosome Core Particles (NCPs) lacking H2A and H2B histone tails (gH2AgH2B) are studied. The migration of these particles in acrylamide native gels is slowed down compared to intact reconstituted NCPs. gH2AgH2B NCPs are also much more sensitive to nuclease digestion than intact NCPs. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments point out that the absence of H2A and H2B tails produces small but significant conformational changes of the octamers conformation (without wrapped DNA), whereas gH2AgH2B NCP conformations are significantly altered. A separation of about 25-30 bp from the core could account for the experimental curves, but other types of DNA superhelix deformation cannot be excluded. The distorted gH2AgH2B octamer may not allow the correct winding of DNA around the core. The absence of the H2A and H2B tails would further prevent the secondary sliding of the DNA around the core and therefore impedes the stabilisation of the particle. Cryo-electron microscopy on the same particles also shows a detachment of DNA portions from the particle core. The effect is even stronger because the vitrification of the samples worsens the instability of gH2AgH2B NCPs.

  2. Structure and phase diagram of nucleosome core particles aggregated by multivalent cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertin, Aurélie; Mangenot, Stéphanie; Renouard, Madalena; Durand, Dominique; Livolant, Françoise

    2007-11-15

    The degree of compaction of the eukaryotic chromatin in vivo and in vitro is highly sensitive to the ionic environment. We address the question of the effect of multivalent ions on the interactions and mutual organization of the chromatin structural units, the nucleosome core particles (NCPs). Conditions of precipitation of NCPs in the presence of 10 mM Tris buffer and various amounts of either magnesium (Mg(2+)) or spermidine (Spd(3+)) are explored, compared, and discussed in relation to theoretical models. In addition, the structure of the aggregates is analyzed by complementary techniques: freeze-fracture electron microscopy, cryoelectron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction. In Mg(2+)-NCP aggregates, NCPs tend to stack on top of one another to form columns that are not long-range organized. In the presence of Spd(3+), NCPs precipitate to form a dense isotropic phase, a disordered phase of columns, a two-dimensional columnar hexagonal phase, or a three-dimensional crystal. The more ordered phases (two-dimensional or three-dimensional hexagonal) are found close to the precipitation line, where the number of positive charges carried by cations is slightly larger than the number of available negative charges of the NCPs. All ordered phases coexist with the dense isotropic phases. Formation of hexagonal and columnar phases is prevented by an excess of polycations.

  3. Rtt101-Mms1-Mms22 coordinates replication-coupled sister chromatid cohesion and nucleosome assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Shi, Di; Li, Xiaoli; Ding, Lin; Tang, Jun; Liu, Cong; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Cao, Qinhong; Lou, Huiqiang

    2017-08-01

    Two sister chromatids must be held together by a cohesion process from their synthesis during S phase to segregation in anaphase. Despite its pivotal role in accurate chromosome segregation, how cohesion is established remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that yeast Rtt101-Mms1, Cul4 family E3 ubiquitin ligases are stronger dosage suppressors of loss-of-function eco1 mutants than PCNA The essential cohesion reaction, Eco1-catalyzed Smc3 acetylation is reduced in the absence of Rtt101-Mms1. One of the adaptor subunits, Mms22, associates directly with Eco1. Point mutations (L61D/G63D) in Eco1 that abolish the interaction with Mms22 impair Smc3 acetylation. Importantly, an eco1LGpol30A251V double mutant displays additive Smc3ac reduction. Moreover, Smc3 acetylation and cohesion defects also occur in the mutants of other replication-coupled nucleosome assembly (RCNA) factors upstream or downstream of Rtt101-Mms1, indicating unanticipated cross talk between histone modifications and cohesin acetylation. These data suggest that fork-associated Cul4-Ddb1 E3s, together with PCNA, coordinate chromatin reassembly and cohesion establishment on the newly replicated sister chromatids, which are crucial for maintaining genome and chromosome stability. © 2017 The Authors.

  4. DNA Replication Is Required for Circadian Clock Function by Regulating Rhythmic Nucleosome Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao; Dang, Yunkun; Matsu-Ura, Toru; He, Yubo; He, Qun; Hong, Christian I; Liu, Yi

    2017-07-20

    Although the coupling between circadian and cell cycles allows circadian clocks to gate cell division and DNA replication in many organisms, circadian clocks were thought to function independently of cell cycle. Here, we show that DNA replication is required for circadian clock function in Neurospora. Genetic and pharmacological inhibition of DNA replication abolished both overt and molecular rhythmicities by repressing frequency (frq) gene transcription. DNA replication is essential for the rhythmic changes of nucleosome composition at the frq promoter. The FACT complex, known to be involved in histone disassembly/reassembly, is required for clock function and is recruited to the frq promoter in a replication-dependent manner to promote replacement of histone H2A.Z by H2A. Finally, deletion of H2A.Z uncoupled the dependence of the circadian clock on DNA replication. Together, these results establish circadian clock and cell cycle as interdependent coupled oscillators and identify DNA replication as a critical process in the circadian mechanism. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Organization and expression of the Paramecium caudatum gene encoding nucleosome assembly protein 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, N; Sawatsubashi, S; Ishida, M; Yamauchi, K

    2001-12-12

    The complete genomic and partial complementary DNAs encoding the ciliate Paramecium caudatum nucleosome assembly protein 1 (NAP1) have been sequenced. The nap1 gene is situated 1.2 kbp from the hemoglobin (hb) gene, with the 3' end of both genes facing each other. The nap1 gene contains no introns, and encodes a protein of 369 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular weight of 42,627. The P. caudatum NAP1 amino acid sequence shares only 23-27% identity with NAP1 amino acid sequences from other eukaryotes. Although the nap1 transcript was detected in the P. caudatum cells at both the logarithmic and stationary phases, its level increased during the stationary phase. Southern blot analysis and polymerase chain reaction amplification revealed that the P. caudatum macronucleus has a heterogeneous composition at genomic regions around the nap1 gene. The present studies indicate the nap1 and hb genes are closely arranged in the macronucleus with the intergenic region between their sequences heterogeneously composed.

  6. Nucleosome dynamics and maintenance of epigenetic states of CpG islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneppen, Kim; Dodd, Ian B.

    2016-06-01

    Methylation of mammalian DNA occurs primarily at CG dinucleotides. These CpG sites are located nonrandomly in the genome, tending to occur within high density clusters of CpGs (islands) or within large regions of low CpG density. Cluster methylation tends to be bimodal, being dominantly unmethylated or mostly methylated. For CpG clusters near promoters, low methylation is associated with transcriptional activity, while high methylation is associated with gene silencing. Alternative CpG methylation states are thought to be stable and heritable, conferring localized epigenetic memory that allows transient signals to create long-lived gene expression states. Positive feedback where methylated CpG sites recruit enzymes that methylate nearby CpGs, can produce heritable bistability but does not easily explain that as clusters increase in size or density they change from being primarily methylated to primarily unmethylated. Here, we show that an interaction between the methylation state of a cluster and its occupancy by nucleosomes provides a mechanism to generate these features and explain genome wide systematics of CpG islands.

  7. Characteristic arrangement of nucleosomes is predictive of chromatin interactions at kilobase resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Li, Feifei; Jia, Yan; Xu, Bingxiang; Zhang, Yiqun; Li, Xiaoli; Zhang, Zhihua

    2017-12-15

    High-throughput chromosome conformation capture (3C) technologies, such as Hi-C, have made it possible to survey 3D genome structure. However, obtaining 3D profiles at kilobase resolution at low cost remains a major challenge. Therefore, we herein present an algorithm for precise identification of chromatin interaction sites at kilobase resolution from MNase-seq data, termed chromatin interaction site detector (CISD), and a CISD-based chromatin loop predictor (CISD_loop) that predicts chromatin-chromatin interactions (CCIs) from low-resolution Hi-C data. We show that the predictions of CISD and CISD_loop overlap closely with chromatin interaction analysis by paired-end tag sequencing (ChIA-PET) anchors and loops, respectively. The validity of CISD/CISD_loop was further supported by a 3C assay at about 5 kb resolution. Finally, we demonstrate that only modest amounts of MNase-seq and Hi-C data are sufficient to achieve ultrahigh resolution CCI maps. Our results suggest that CCIs may result in characteristic nucleosomes arrangement patterns flanking the interaction sites, and our algorithms may facilitate precise and systematic investigations of CCIs on a larger scale than hitherto have been possible. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Translocation of cell-penetrating peptides into Candida fungal pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zifan; Karlsson, Amy J

    2017-09-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are small peptides capable of crossing cellular membranes while carrying molecular cargo. Although they have been widely studied for their ability to translocate nucleic acids, small molecules, and proteins into mammalian cells, studies of their interaction with fungal cells are limited. In this work, we evaluated the translocation of eleven fluorescently labeled peptides into the important human fungal pathogens Candida albicans and C. glabrata and explored the mechanisms of translocation. Seven of these peptides (cecropin B, penetratin, pVEC, MAP, SynB, (KFF)3 K, and MPG) exhibited substantial translocation (>80% of cells) into both species in a concentration-dependent manner, and an additional peptide (TP-10) exhibiting strong translocation into only C. glabrata. Vacuoles were involved in translocation and intracellular trafficking of the peptides in the fungal cells and, for some peptides, escape from the vacuoles and localization in the cytosol were correlated to toxicity toward the fungal cells. Endocytosis was involved in the translocation of cecropin B, MAP, SynB, MPG, (KFF)3 K, and TP-10, and cecropin B, penetratin, pVEC, and MAP caused membrane permeabilization during translocation. These results indicate the involvement of multiple translocation mechanisms for some CPPs. Although high levels of translocation were typically associated with toxicity of the peptides toward the fungal cells, SynB was translocated efficiently into Candida cells at concentrations that led to minimal toxicity. Our work highlights the potential of CPPs in delivering antifungal molecules and other bioactive cargo to Candida pathogens. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  9. An Updated View of Translocator Protein (TSPO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nunzio Denora

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Decades of study on the role of mitochondria in living cells have evidenced the importance of the 18 kDa mitochondrial translocator protein (TSPO, first discovered in the 1977 as an alternative binding site for the benzodiazepine diazepam in the kidneys. This protein participates in a variety of cellular functions, including cholesterol transport, steroid hormone synthesis, mitochondrial respiration, permeability transition pore opening, apoptosis, and cell proliferation. Thus, TSPO has become an extremely attractive subcellular target for the early detection of disease states that involve the overexpression of this protein and the selective mitochondrial drug delivery. This special issue was programmed with the aim of summarizing the latest findings about the role of TSPO in eukaryotic cells and as a potential subcellular target of diagnostics or therapeutics. A total of 9 papers have been accepted for publication in this issue, in particular, 2 reviews and 7 primary data manuscripts, overall describing the main advances in this field.

  10. The mathematical simulation of carbohydrate translocation in natural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Carbohydrate translocation within plants, in each growth stage, is driven by the ration of the existing mass of given plant parts to the total plant mass. The mass in each plant organ strives to attain an optimal proportion of the total plant mass by means of the translocation of carbohydrate. In each growth stage a maximum ...

  11. Label Free Chromosome Translocation Detection with Silicon nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwasny, Dorota; Andersen, Karsten Brandt; Frøhling, Kasper Bayer

    HROMOSOME translocation, which is a rearrangement of arms between two chromosomes, is a major group of chromosome abnormalities leading to cancer. As a result, two derivative chromosomes with sequences coming from both chromosomes are formed. The current translocation detection method is a Fluore...

  12. Multistep Current Signal in Protein Translocation through Graphene Nanopores

    KAUST Repository

    Bonome, Emma Letizia

    2015-05-07

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. In nanopore sensing experiments, the properties of molecules are probed by the variation of ionic currents flowing through the nanopore. In this context, the electronic properties and the single-layer thickness of graphene constitute a major advantage for molecule characterization. Here we analyze the translocation pathway of the thioredoxin protein across a graphene nanopore, and the related ionic currents, by integrating two nonequilibrium molecular dynamics methods with a bioinformatic structural analysis. To obtain a qualitative picture of the translocation process and to identify salient features we performed unsupervised structural clustering on translocation conformations. This allowed us to identify some specific and robust translocation intermediates, characterized by significantly different ionic current flows. We found that the ion current strictly anticorrelates with the amount of pore occupancy by thioredoxin residues, providing a putative explanation of the multilevel current scenario observed in recently published translocation experiments.

  13. Range-wide success of red-cockaded woodpecker translocations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, John W; Costa, Ralph

    2004-12-31

    Edwards, John W.; Costa, Ralph. 2004. Range-wide success of red-cockaded woodpecker translocations. In: Red-cockaded woodpecker; Road to Recovery. Proceedings of the 4th Red-cockaded woodpecker Symposium. Ralph Costa and Susan J. Daniels, eds. Savannah, Georgia. January, 2003. Chapter 6. Translocation. Pp 307-311. Abstract: Red-cockaded woodpeckers (Picoides borealis) have declined range-wide during the past century, suffering from habitat loss and the effects of fire exclusion in older southern pine forests. Red-cockaded woodpecker translocations are a potentially important tool in conservation efforts to reestablish red-cockaded woodpeckers in areas from which they have been extirpated. Currently, translocations are critical in ongoing efforts to save and restore the many existing small populations. We examined the effects of demographic and environmental factors on the range-wide success of translocations between 1989 and 1995.

  14. MYC translocation partner gene determines survival of patients with large B-cell lymphoma with MYC- or double-hit MYC/BCL2 translocations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mette Ø; Gang, Anne O; Poulsen, Tim S

    2014-01-01

    data were collected from patient files. MYC translocation was identified in 28/225 patients. IG-MYC translocation partner gene was identified in 12/24 patients. DH translocation was identified in 23/228 patients. IG-MYC translocation partner gene was identified in 9/19 DH patients. Neither MYC-nor DH...

  15. Mechanisms underlying stage-1 TRPL channel translocation in Drosophila photoreceptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minh-Ha Lieu

    Full Text Available TRP channels function as key mediators of sensory transduction and other cellular signaling pathways. In Drosophila, TRP and TRPL are the light-activated channels in photoreceptors. While TRP is statically localized in the signaling compartment of the cell (the rhabdomere, TRPL localization is regulated by light. TRPL channels translocate out of the rhabdomere in two distinct stages, returning to the rhabdomere with dark-incubation. Translocation of TRPL channels regulates their availability, and thereby the gain of the signal. Little, however, is known about the mechanisms underlying this trafficking of TRPL channels.We first examine the involvement of de novo protein synthesis in TRPL translocation. We feed flies cycloheximide, verify inhibition of protein synthesis, and test for TRPL translocation in photoreceptors. We find that protein synthesis is not involved in either stage of TRPL translocation out of the rhabdomere, but that re-localization to the rhabdomere from stage-1, but not stage-2, depends on protein synthesis. We also characterize an ex vivo eye preparation that is amenable to biochemical and genetic manipulation. We use this preparation to examine mechanisms of stage-1 TRPL translocation. We find that stage-1 translocation is: induced with ATP depletion, unaltered with perturbation of the actin cytoskeleton or inhibition of endocytosis, and slowed with increased membrane sterol content.Our results indicate that translocation of TRPL out of the rhabdomere is likely due to protein transport, and not degradation/re-synthesis. Re-localization from each stage to the rhabdomere likely involves different strategies. Since TRPL channels can translocate to stage-1 in the absence of ATP, with no major requirement of the cytoskeleton, we suggest that stage-1 translocation involves simple diffusion through the apical membrane, which may be regulated by release of a light-dependent anchor in the rhabdomere.

  16. Minimizing the cost of translocation failure with decision-tree models that predict species' behavioral response in translocation sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Mehregan; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil; Bull, C Michael

    2015-08-01

    The high number of failures is one reason why translocation is often not recommended. Considering how behavior changes during translocations may improve translocation success. To derive decision-tree models for species' translocation, we used data on the short-term responses of an endangered Australian skink in 5 simulated translocations with different release conditions. We used 4 different decision-tree algorithms (decision tree, decision-tree parallel, decision stump, and random forest) with 4 different criteria (gain ratio, information gain, gini index, and accuracy) to investigate how environmental and behavioral parameters may affect the success of a translocation. We assumed behavioral changes that increased dispersal away from a release site would reduce translocation success. The trees became more complex when we included all behavioral parameters as attributes, but these trees yielded more detailed information about why and how dispersal occurred. According to these complex trees, there were positive associations between some behavioral parameters, such as fight and dispersal, that showed there was a higher chance, for example, of dispersal among lizards that fought than among those that did not fight. Decision trees based on parameters related to release conditions were easier to understand and could be used by managers to make translocation decisions under different circumstances. © 2015 Society for Conservation Biology.

  17. Crystal structure and stable property of the cancer-associated heterotypic nucleosome containing CENP-A and H3.3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimura, Yasuhiro; Shirayama, Kazuyoshi; Horikoshi, Naoki; Fujita, Risa; Taguchi, Hiroyuki; Kagawa, Wataru; Fukagawa, Tatsuo; Almouzni, Geneviève; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2014-11-19

    The centromere-specific histone H3 variant, CENP-A, is overexpressed in particular aggressive cancer cells, where it can be mislocalized ectopically in the form of heterotypic nucleosomes containing H3.3. In the present study, we report the crystal structure of the heterotypic CENP-A/H3.3 particle and reveal its "hybrid structure", in which the physical characteristics of CENP-A and H3.3 are conserved independently within the same particle. The CENP-A/H3.3 nucleosome forms an unexpectedly stable structure as compared to the CENP-A nucleosome, and allows the binding of the essential centromeric protein, CENP-C, which is ectopically mislocalized in the chromosomes of CENP-A overexpressing cells.

  18. RNA polymerase II stalling promotes nucleosome occlusion and pTEFb recruitment to drive immortalization by Epstein-Barr virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard D Palermo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV immortalizes resting B-cells and is a key etiologic agent in the development of numerous cancers. The essential EBV-encoded protein EBNA 2 activates the viral C promoter (Cp producing a message of ~120 kb that is differentially spliced to encode all EBNAs required for immortalization. We have previously shown that EBNA 2-activated transcription is dependent on the activity of the RNA polymerase II (pol II C-terminal domain (CTD kinase pTEFb (CDK9/cyclin T1. We now demonstrate that Cp, in contrast to two shorter EBNA 2-activated viral genes (LMP 1 and 2A, displays high levels of promoter-proximally stalled pol II despite being constitutively active. Consistent with pol II stalling, we detect considerable pausing complex (NELF/DSIF association with Cp. Significantly, we observe substantial Cp-specific pTEFb recruitment that stimulates high-level pol II CTD serine 2 phosphorylation at distal regions (up to +75 kb, promoting elongation. We reveal that Cp-specific pol II accumulation is directed by DNA sequences unfavourable for nucleosome assembly that increase TBP access and pol II recruitment. Stalled pol II then maintains Cp nucleosome depletion. Our data indicate that pTEFb is recruited to Cp by the bromodomain protein Brd4, with polymerase stalling facilitating stable association of pTEFb. The Brd4 inhibitor JQ1 and the pTEFb inhibitors DRB and Flavopiridol significantly reduce Cp, but not LMP1 transcript production indicating that Brd4 and pTEFb are required for Cp transcription. Taken together our data indicate that pol II stalling at Cp promotes transcription of essential immortalizing genes during EBV infection by (i preventing promoter-proximal nucleosome assembly and ii necessitating the recruitment of pTEFb thereby maintaining serine 2 CTD phosphorylation at distal regions.

  19. Drosophila Yemanuclein and HIRA cooperate for de novo assembly of H3.3-containing nucleosomes in the male pronucleus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo A Orsi

    Full Text Available The differentiation of post-meiotic spermatids in animals is characterized by a unique reorganization of their nuclear architecture and chromatin composition. In many species, the formation of sperm nuclei involves the massive replacement of nucleosomes with protamines, followed by a phase of extreme nuclear compaction. At fertilization, the reconstitution of a nucleosome-based paternal chromatin after the removal of protamines requires the deposition of maternally provided histones before the first round of DNA replication. This process exclusively uses the histone H3 variant H3.3 and constitutes a unique case of genome-wide replication-independent (RI de novo chromatin assembly. We had previously shown that the histone H3.3 chaperone HIRA plays a central role for paternal chromatin assembly in Drosophila. Although several conserved HIRA-interacting proteins have been identified from yeast to human, their conservation in Drosophila, as well as their actual implication in this highly peculiar RI nucleosome assembly process, is an open question. Here, we show that Yemanuclein (YEM, the Drosophila member of the Hpc2/Ubinuclein family, is essential for histone deposition in the male pronucleus. yem loss of function alleles affect male pronucleus formation in a way remarkably similar to Hira mutants and abolish RI paternal chromatin assembly. In addition, we demonstrate that HIRA and YEM proteins interact and are mutually dependent for their targeting to the decondensing male pronucleus. Finally, we show that the alternative ATRX/XNP-dependent H3.3 deposition pathway is not involved in paternal chromatin assembly, thus underlining the specific implication of the HIRA/YEM complex for this essential step of zygote formation.

  20. Residues in the Nucleosome Acidic Patch Regulate Histone Occupancy and Are Important for FACT Binding in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Amelia J; Gloss, Lisa M; Wyrick, John J

    2017-07-01

    The essential histone chaperone FACT plays a critical role in DNA replication, repair, and transcription, primarily by binding to histone H2A-H2B dimers and regulating their assembly into nucleosomes. While FACT histone chaperone activity has been extensively studied, the exact nature of the H2A and H2B residues important for FACT binding remains controversial. In this study, we characterized the functions of residues in the histone H2A and H2B acidic patch, which is important for binding many chromatin-associated factors. We found that mutations in essential acidic patch residues cause a defect in histone occupancy in yeast, even though most of these histone mutants are expressed normally in yeast and form stable nucleosomes in vitro Instead, we show that two acidic patch residues, H2B L109 and H2A E57, are important for histone binding to FACT in vivo We systematically screened mutants in other H2A and H2B residues previously suspected to be important for FACT binding and confirmed the importance of H2B M62 using an in-vivo FACT-binding assay. Furthermore, we show that, like deletion mutants in FACT subunits, an H2A E57 and H2B M62 double mutant is lethal in yeast. In summary, we show that residues in the nucleosome acidic patch promote histone occupancy and are important for FACT binding to H2A-H2B dimers in yeast. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  1. Does translocation influence physiological stress in the desert tortoise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, K.K.; Nussear, K.E.; Esque, T.C.; Barber, A.M.; Vittum, K.M.; Medica, P.A.; Tracy, C.R.; Hunter, K.W.

    2012-01-01

    Wildlife translocation is increasingly used to mitigate disturbances to animals or habitat due to human activities, yet little is known about the extent to which translocating animals causes stress. To understand the relationship between physiological stress and translocation, we conducted a multiyear study (2007–2009) using a population of desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) near Fort Irwin, California. Blood samples were collected from adult tortoises in three treatment groups (resident, translocated and control) for 1 year prior to and 2 years after translocation. Samples were analyzed by radioimmunoassay for plasma total corticosterone (CORT), a glucocorticoid hormone commonly associated with stress responses in reptiles. CORT values were analyzed in relation to potential covariates (animal sex, date, behavior, treatment, handling time, air temperature, home-range size, precipitation and annual plant production) among seasons and years. CORT values in males were higher than in females, and values for both varied monthly throughout the activity season and among years. Year and sex were strong predictors of CORT, and translocation explained little in terms of CORT. Based on these results, we conclude that translocation does not elicit a physiological stress response in desert tortoises.

  2. Characterizing and controlling intrinsic biases of lambda exonuclease in nascent strand sequencing reveals phasing between nucleosomes and G-quadruplex motifs around a subset of human replication origins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foulk, M. S.; Urban, J. M.; Casella, Cinzia

    2015-01-01

    Nascent strand sequencing (NS-seq) is used to discover DNA replication origins genome-wide, allowing identification of features for their specification. NS-seq depends on the ability of lambda exonuclease (lambda-exo) to efficiently digest parental DNA while leaving RNA-primer protected nascent...... are not general determinants for origin specification but may play a role for a subset. Interestingly, we observed a periodic spacing of G4 motifs and nucleosomes around the peak summits, suggesting that G4s may position nucleosomes at this subset of origins. Finally, we demonstrate that use of Na+ instead of K...

  3. Ubiquitous human 'master' origins of replication are encoded in the DNA sequence via a local enrichment in nucleosome excluding energy barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drillon, Guénola; Audit, Benjamin; Argoul, Françoise; Arneodo, Alain

    2015-02-18

    As the elementary building block of eukaryotic chromatin, the nucleosome is at the heart of the compromise between the necessity of compacting DNA in the cell nucleus and the required accessibility to regulatory proteins. The recent availability of genome-wide experimental maps of nucleosome positions for many different organisms and cell types has provided an unprecedented opportunity to elucidate to what extent the DNA sequence conditions the primary structure of chromatin and in turn participates in the chromatin-mediated regulation of nuclear functions, such as gene expression and DNA replication. In this study, we use in vivo and in vitro genome-wide nucleosome occupancy data together with the set of nucleosome-free regions (NFRs) predicted by a physical model of nucleosome formation based on sequence-dependent bending properties of the DNA double-helix, to investigate the role of intrinsic nucleosome occupancy in the regulation of the replication spatio-temporal programme in human. We focus our analysis on the so-called replication U/N-domains that were shown to cover about half of the human genome in the germline (skew-N domains) as well as in embryonic stem cells, somatic and HeLa cells (mean replication timing U-domains). The 'master' origins of replication (MaOris) that border these megabase-sized U/N-domains were found to be specified by a few hundred kb wide regions that are hyper-sensitive to DNase I cleavage, hypomethylated, and enriched in epigenetic marks involved in transcription regulation, the hallmarks of localized open chromatin structures. Here we show that replication U/N-domain borders that are conserved in all considered cell lines have an environment highly enriched in nucleosome-excluding-energy barriers, suggesting that these ubiquitous MaOris have been selected during evolution. In contrast, MaOris that are cell-type-specific are mainly regulated epigenetically and are no longer favoured by a local abundance of intrinsic NFRs encoded in

  4. Mode of ATM-dependent suppression of chromosome translocation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamauchi, Motohiro, E-mail: motoyama@nagasaki-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Suzuki, Keiji; Oka, Yasuyoshi; Suzuki, Masatoshi; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Yamashita, Shunichi [Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan)

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We addressed how ATM suppresses frequency of chromosome translocation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found ATM/p53-dependent G1 checkpoint suppresses translocation frequency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found ATM and DNA-PKcs function in a common pathway to suppress translocation. -- Abstract: It is well documented that deficiency in ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein leads to elevated frequency of chromosome translocation, however, it remains poorly understood how ATM suppresses translocation frequency. In the present study, we addressed the mechanism of ATM-dependent suppression of translocation frequency. To know frequency of translocation events in a whole genome at once, we performed centromere/telomere FISH and scored dicentric chromosomes, because dicentric and translocation occur with equal frequency and by identical mechanism. By centromere/telomere FISH analysis, we confirmed that chemical inhibition or RNAi-mediated knockdown of ATM causes 2 to 2.5-fold increase in dicentric frequency at first mitosis after 2 Gy of gamma-irradiation in G0/G1. The FISH analysis revealed that ATM/p53-dependent G1 checkpoint suppresses dicentric frequency, since RNAi-mediated knockdown of p53 elevated dicentric frequency by 1.5-fold. We found ATM also suppresses dicentric occurrence independently of its checkpoint role, as ATM inhibitor showed additional effect on dicentric frequency in the context of p53 depletion and Chk1/2 inactivation. Epistasis analysis using chemical inhibitors revealed that ATM kinase functions in the same pathway that requires kinase activity of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) to suppress dicentric frequency. From the results in the present study, we conclude that ATM minimizes translocation frequency through its commitment to G1 checkpoint and DNA double-strand break repair pathway that requires kinase activity of DNA-PKcs.

  5. Translocation of threatened plants as a conservation measure in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong; Ren, Hai; Liu, Qiang; Wen, XiangYing; Maunder, Michael; Gao, JiangYun

    2015-12-01

    We assessed the current status of plant conservation translocation efforts in China, a topic poorly reported in recent scientific literature. We identified 222 conservation translocation cases involving 154 species, of these 87 were Chinese endemic species and 101 (78%) were listed as threatened on the Chinese Species Red List. We categorized the life form of each species and, when possible, determined for each case the translocation type, propagule source, propagule type, and survival and reproductive parameters. A surprisingly large proportion (26%) of the conservation translocations in China were conservation introductions, largely implemented in response to large-scale habitat destruction caused by the Three-Gorge Dam and another hydropower project. Documentation and management of the translocations varied greatly. Less than half the cases had plant survival records. Statistical analyses showed that survival percentages were significantly correlated with plant life form and the type of planting materials. Thirty percent of the cases had records on whether or not individuals flowered or fruited. Results of information theoretic model selection indicated that plant life form, translocation type, propagule type, propagule source, and time since planting significantly influenced the likelihood of flowering and fruiting on the project level. We suggest that the scientific-based application of species conservation translocations should be promoted as part of a commitment to species recovery management. In addition, we recommend that the common practice of within and out of range introductions in nature reserves to be regulated more carefully due to its potential ecological risks. We recommend the establishment of a national office and database to coordinate conservation translocations in China. Our review effort is timely considering the need for a comprehensive national guideline for the newly announced nation-wide conservation program on species with extremely

  6. Microbiome and bacterial translocation in cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Hurtado, Isabel; Such, José; Francés, Rubén

    2016-12-01

    Qualitative and quantitative changes in gut microbiota play a very important role in cirrhosis. Humans harbour around 100 quintillion gut bacteria, thus representing around 10 times more microbial cells than eukaryotic ones. The gastrointestinal tract is the largest surface area in the body and it is subject to constant exposure to these living microorganisms. The existing symbiosis, proven by the lack of proinflammatory response against commensal bacteria, implies the presence of clearly defined communication lines that contribute to the maintenance of homeostasis of the host. Therefore, alterations of gut flora seem to play a role in the pathogenesis and progress of multiple liver and gastrointestinal diseases. This has made its selective modification into an area of high therapeutic interest. Bacterial translocation is defined as the migration of bacteria or bacterial products from the intestines to the mesenteric lymph nodes. It follows that alteration in gut microbiota have shown importance, at least to some extent, in the pathogenesis of several complications arising from terminal liver disease, such as hepatic encephalopathy, portal hypertension and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis. This review sums up, firstly, how liver disease can alter the common composition of gut microbiota, and secondly, how this alteration contributes to the development of complications in cirrhosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U., AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  7. DMS-Seq for In Vivo Genome-wide Mapping of Protein-DNA Interactions and Nucleosome Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taichi Umeyama

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Protein-DNA interactions provide the basis for chromatin structure and gene regulation. Comprehensive identification of protein-occupied sites is thus vital to an in-depth understanding of genome function. Dimethyl sulfate (DMS is a chemical probe that has long been used to detect footprints of DNA-bound proteins in vitro and in vivo. Here, we describe a genomic footprinting method, dimethyl sulfate sequencing (DMS-seq, which exploits the cell-permeable nature of DMS to obviate the need for nuclear isolation. This feature makes DMS-seq simple in practice and removes the potential risk of protein re-localization during nuclear isolation. DMS-seq successfully detects transcription factors bound to cis-regulatory elements and non-canonical chromatin particles in nucleosome-free regions. Furthermore, an unexpected preference of DMS confers on DMS-seq a unique potential to directly detect nucleosome centers without using genetic manipulation. We expect that DMS-seq will serve as a characteristic method for genome-wide interrogation of in vivo protein-DNA interactions.

  8. Footprinting of mammalian promoters: use of a CpG DNA methyltransferase revealing nucleosome positions at a single molecule level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemi, Mehrnaz; Pao, Martha M; Jeong, Shinwu; Gal-Yam, Einav Nili; Egger, Gerda; Weisenberger, Daniel J; Jones, Peter A

    2005-11-27

    Promoters are molecular 'modules', which are controlled as individual entities yet are often analyzed by nuclease digestion methodologies which, a priori, destroy this modularity. About 40% of mammalian genes contain CpG islands in their promoters and exonic regions, which are normally unmethylated. We developed a footprinting strategy to map the chromatin structure at unmethylated CpG islands by treatment of isolated nuclei with the CpG-specific DNA methyltransferase SssI (M.SssI), followed by genomic bisulfite sequencing of individual progeny DNA molecules. This gave single molecule resolution over the promoter region and allowed for the physical linkage between binding sites on individual promoter molecules to be maintained. Comparison of the p16 promoters in two human cell lines, J82 and LD419, expressing the p16 gene at 25-fold different levels showed that the two cell lines contain remarkably different, heterogeneously positioned nucleosomes over the promoter region, which were not distinguishable by standard methods using nucleases. Our high resolution approach gives a 'digitized' visualization of each promoter providing information regarding nucleosome occupancy and may be utilized to define transcription factor binding and chromatin remodeling.

  9. Chromatin compaction under mixed salt conditions: opposite effects of sodium and potassium ions on nucleosome array folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahverdi, Abdollah; Chen, Qinming; Korolev, Nikolay; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2015-02-17

    It is well known that chromatin structure is highly sensitive to the ionic environment. However, the combined effects of a physiologically relevant mixed ionic environment of K(+), Mg(2+) and Na(+), which are the main cations of the cell cytoplasm, has not been systematically investigated. We studied folding and self-association (aggregation) of recombinant 12-mer nucleosome arrays with 177 bp DNA repeat length in solutions of mixtures of K(+) and Mg(2+) or Na(+) and Mg(2+). In the presence of Mg(2+), the addition of sodium ions promotes folding of array into 30-nm fibres, whereas in mixtures of K(+) and Mg(2+), potassium ions abrogate folding. We found that self-association of nucleosome arrays in mixed salt solutions is synergistically promoted by Mg(2+) and monovalent ions, with sodium being slightly more efficient than potassium in amplifying the self-association. The results highlight the importance of a mixed ionic environment for the compaction of chromatin under physiological conditions and demonstrate the complicated nature of the various factors that determine and regulate chromatin compaction in vivo.

  10. lncRNA-Induced Nucleosome Repositioning Reinforces Transcriptional Repression of rRNA Genes upon Hypotonic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongliang Zhao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The activity of rRNA genes (rDNA is regulated by pathways that target the transcription machinery or alter the epigenetic state of rDNA. Previous work has established that downregulation of rRNA synthesis in quiescent cells is accompanied by upregulation of PAPAS, a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA that recruits the histone methyltransferase Suv4-20h2 to rDNA, thus triggering trimethylation of H4K20 (H4K20me3 and chromatin compaction. Here, we show that upregulation of PAPAS in response to hypoosmotic stress does not increase H4K20me3 because of Nedd4-dependent ubiquitinylation and proteasomal degradation of Suv4-20h2. Loss of Suv4-20h2 enables PAPAS to interact with CHD4, a subunit of the chromatin remodeling complex NuRD, which shifts the promoter-bound nucleosome into the transcriptional “off” position. Thus, PAPAS exerts a “stress-tailored” dual function in rDNA silencing, facilitating either Suv4-20h2-dependent chromatin compaction or NuRD-dependent changes in nucleosome positioning.

  11. The histone chaperone complex HIR maintains nucleosome occupancy and counterbalances impaired histone deposition in CAF-1 complex mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duc, Céline; Benoit, Matthias; Le Goff, Samuel; Simon, Lauriane; Poulet, Axel; Cotterell, Sylviane; Tatout, Christophe; Probst, Aline V

    2015-03-01

    Chromatin organization is essential for coordinated gene expression, genome stability, and inheritance of epigenetic information. The main components involved in chromatin assembly are specific complexes such as Chromatin Assembly Factor 1 (CAF-1) and Histone Regulator (HIR), which deposit histones in a DNA synthesis-dependent or -independent manner, respectively. Here, we characterize the role of the plant orthologs Histone Regulator A (HIRA), Ubinuclein (UBN) and Calcineurin Binding protein 1 (CABIN1), which constitute the HIR complex. Arabidopsis loss-of-function mutants for the various subunits of the complex are viable, but hira mutants show reduced fertility. We show that loss of HIRA reduces extractable histone H3 protein levels and decreases nucleosome occupancy at both actively transcribed genes and heterochromatic regions. Concomitantly, HIRA contributes to maintenance of silencing of pericentromeric repeats and certain transposons. A genetic analysis based on crosses between mutants deficient in subunits of the CAF-1 and HIR complexes showed that simultaneous loss of both the CAF-1 and HIR histone H3 chaperone complexes severely affects plant survival, growth and reproductive development. Our results suggest that HIRA partially rescues impaired histone deposition in fas mutants to preserve nucleosome occupancy, implying plasticity in histone variant interaction and deposition. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Site-specific Acetylation of Histone H3 Decreases Polymerase β Activity on Nucleosome Core Particles in Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Yesenia; Hinz, John M; Laughery, Marian F; Wyrick, John J; Smerdon, Michael J

    2016-05-20

    Histone posttranslational modifications have been associated with changes in chromatin structure necessary for transcription, replication, and DNA repair. Acetylation is one of the most studied and best characterized histone posttranslational modifications, but it is not known if histone acetylation modulates base excision repair of DNA lesions in chromatin. To address this question, we generated nucleosome core particles (NCPs) containing site-specifically acetylated H3K14 or H3K56 and measured repair of uracil and single-nucleotide gaps. We find that H3K56Ac and H3K14Ac do not significantly contribute to removal of uracils by uracil DNA glycosylase regardless of the translational or rotational position of the lesions within NCPs. In repair of single-nucleotide gaps, however, the presence of H3K56Ac or H3K14Ac in NCPs decreases the gap-filling activity of DNA polymerase β near the dyad center, with H3K14Ac exhibiting stronger inhibition. To a lesser extent, H3K56Ac induces a similar effect near the DNA ends. Moreover, using restriction enzyme accessibility, we detect no changes in NCP structure or dynamics between H3K14Ac-NCPs and WT-NCPs containing single-nucleotide gaps. Thus, acetylation at H3K56 and H3K14 in nucleosomes may promote alternative gap-filling pathways by inhibiting DNA polymerase β activity. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Fragility in the 14q21q translocation region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacy R. Denison

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Aphidicolin (APC-induced chromosomal breakage was analyzed for women representing three generations of a single family and carrying a Robertsonian translocation rob(14q21q. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH analysis confirmed the dicentric constitution of the derived chromosome and indicated the absence of beta-satellite signal at the translocation region. Per-individual analysis of metaphases from APC-treated peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures identified significantly nonrandom chromosomal breakage at the translocation region in all three individuals examined. The APC-inducible fragility at the 14q21q translocation region suggests that this rearrangement was the result of chromosomal mutation at fragile site(s in the progenitor chromosomes, or that this fragility was the result of the fusion of nonfragile progenitor chromosomes.

  14. TRANSLOCATION OF BACTERIA AND ENDOTOXIN IN ORGAN DONORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goor, Harry; Rosman, C; Kooi, K; Wubbels, GH; Bleichrodt, RP

    1994-01-01

    Objective: To determine if bacterial translocation and endotoxin absorption occur in organ donors with an anatomically intact gastrointestinal tract. Design: Case series. Setting: Intensive care units in general and university hospitals. Patients: Twenty-one (multiple) organ donors. Intervention:

  15. Evaluation of cadmium bioaccumulation and translocation by Hopea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    leaves. In order to evaluate the potential of species selected as phytoremediator, three indicators were used namely, bioconcentration factor (BCF, the metal concentration ratio of plant roots to soil), translocation factor (TF, the metal concentration ...

  16. DNA Translocations through Solid-State Plasmonic Nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Nanopores enable label-free detection and analysis of single biomolecules. Here, we investigate DNA translocations through a novel type of plasmonic nanopore based on a gold bowtie nanoantenna with a solid-state nanopore at the plasmonic hot spot. Plasmonic excitation of the nanopore is found to influence both the sensor signal (nanopore ionic conductance blockade during DNA translocation) and the process that captures DNA into the nanopore, without affecting the duration time of the translocations. Most striking is a strong plasmon-induced enhancement of the rate of DNA translocation events in lithium chloride (LiCl, already 10-fold enhancement at a few mW of laser power). This provides a means to utilize the excellent spatiotemporal resolution of DNA interrogations with nanopores in LiCl buffers, which is known to suffer from low event rates. We propose a mechanism based on plasmon-induced local heating and thermophoresis as explanation of our observations. PMID:25347403

  17. Molecular studies of translocations and trisomy involving chromosome 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, W.P.; Bernasconi, F.; Dutly, F.; Schinzel, A.A. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)] [and others

    1996-01-11

    Twenty-four cases of trisomy 13 and one case with disomy 13, but a de novo dic(13,13)(p12p12) chromosome, were examined with molecular markers to determine the origin of the extra (or rearranged) chromosome. Twenty-one of 23 informative patients were consistent with a maternal origin of the extra chromosome. Lack of a third allele at any locus in both paternal origin cases indicate a somatic duplication of the paternal chromosome occurred. Five cases had translocation trisomy. The patient with a paternal rob(13q14q) had a maternal meiotic origin of the trisomy; thus, the paternal inheritance of the translocation chromosome was purely coincidental. Since there is not a significantly increased risk for unbalanced offspring of a t(13q14q) carrier and most trisomies are maternal in origin, this result should not be surprising; however, it illustrates that one cannot infer the origin of translocation trisomy based on parental origin of the translocation. Lack of a third allele at any locus in one of the three t(13q13q) cases indicates that it was most likely an isochromosome of postmeiotic origin, whereas the other two cases showed evidence of recombination. One balanced (nontrisomic) case with a nonmosaic 45, -13, -13, +t(13;13) karyotype was also investigated and was determined to be a somatic Robertsonian translocation between the maternal and paternal homologues, as has been found for all balanced homologous Robertsonian translocations so far investigated. Thus, it is also incorrect to assume in de novo translocation cases that the two involved chromosomes are even from the same parent. Despite a maternal origin of the trisomy, we cannot therefore infer anything about the parental origin of the chromosomes 13 and 14 involved in the translocation in the de novo t(13q14q) case nor for the two t(13;13) chromosomes showing a meiotic origin of the trisomy. 30 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  18. Role of non-equilibrium conformations on driven polymer translocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katkar, H. H.; Muthukumar, M.

    2018-01-01

    One of the major theoretical methods in understanding polymer translocation through a nanopore is the Fokker-Planck formalism based on the assumption of quasi-equilibrium of polymer conformations. The criterion for applicability of the quasi-equilibrium approximation for polymer translocation is that the average translocation time per Kuhn segment, ⟨τ⟩/NK, is longer than the relaxation time τ0 of the polymer. Toward an understanding of conditions that would satisfy this criterion, we have performed coarse-grained three dimensional Langevin dynamics and multi-particle collision dynamics simulations. We have studied the role of initial conformations of a polyelectrolyte chain (which were artificially generated with a flow field) on the kinetics of its translocation across a nanopore under the action of an externally applied transmembrane voltage V (in the absence of the initial flow field). Stretched (out-of-equilibrium) polyelectrolyte chain conformations are deliberately and systematically generated and used as initial conformations in translocation simulations. Independent simulations are performed to study the relaxation behavior of these stretched chains, and a comparison is made between the relaxation time scale and the mean translocation time (⟨τ⟩). For such artificially stretched initial states, ⟨τ⟩/NK theory of polyelectrolyte dynamics reveals that the Zimm relaxation time (τZimm) is shorter than the mean translocation time for several polymers including single stranded DNA (ssDNA), double stranded DNA (dsDNA), and synthetic polymers. Even when these data are rescaled assuming a constant effective velocity of translocation, it is found that for flexible (ssDNA and synthetic) polymers with NK Kuhn segments, the condition ⟨τ⟩/NK < τZimm is satisfied. We predict that for flexible polymers such as ssDNA, a crossover from quasi-equilibrium to non-equilibrium behavior would occur at NK ˜ O(1000).

  19. Slowing DNA Translocation in a Nanofluidic Field-Effect Transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yifan; Yobas, Levent

    2016-04-26

    Here, we present an experimental demonstration of slowing DNA translocation across a nanochannel by modulating the channel surface charge through an externally applied gate bias. The experiments were performed on a nanofluidic field-effect transistor, which is a monolithic integrated platform featuring a 50 nm-diameter in-plane alumina nanocapillary whose entire length is surrounded by a gate electrode. The field-effect transistor behavior was validated on the gating of ionic conductance and protein transport. The gating of DNA translocation was subsequently studied by measuring discrete current dips associated with single λ-DNA translocation events under a source-to-drain bias of 1 V. The translocation speeds under various gate bias conditions were extracted by fitting event histograms of the measured translocation time to the first passage time distributions obtained from a simple 1D biased diffusion model. A positive gate bias was observed to slow the translocation of single λ-DNA chains markedly; the translocation speed was reduced by an order of magnitude from 18.4 mm/s obtained under a floating gate down to 1.33 mm/s under a positive gate bias of 9 V. Therefore, a dynamic and flexible regulation of the DNA translocation speed, which is vital for single-molecule sequencing, can be achieved on this device by simply tuning the gate bias. The device is realized in a conventional semiconductor microfabrication process without the requirement of advanced lithography, and can be potentially further developed into a compact electronic single-molecule sequencer.

  20. Success of Delayed Translocation of Loggerhead Turtle Nests

    OpenAIRE

    Abella, Elena; Marco, Adolfo; López-Jurado, Luis F.

    2007-01-01

    Sea turtle embryo mortality in natural nests due to environmental and anthropogenic factors can be very high. To increase hatching success of these endangered species, nest translocation to hatcheries immediately after egg-laying is a common management tool. To test the viability of delayed translocation, we moved 50 loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) nests to a beach hatchery after various times (0– 96 hr) after egg-laying at Boavista Island (Republic of Cabo Verde, western Af...

  1. Pre-analytical variables of circulating cell-free nucleosomes containing 5-methylcytosine DNA or histone modification H3K9Me3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Louise; Herzog, Marielle; Rømer, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate pre-analytical variables of circulating cell-free nucleosomes containing 5-methylcytosine DNA (5mC) or histone modification H3K9Me3 (H3K9Me3). Materials and methods: Six studies were designed to assess the possible influence of pre-analytical variables. Study 1: influence of stas...

  2. Variant histone H2A.Z is globally localized to the promoters of inactive yeast genes and regulates nucleosome positioning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Guillemette

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available H2A.Z is an evolutionary conserved histone variant involved in transcriptional regulation, antisilencing, silencing, and genome stability. The mechanism(s by which H2A.Z regulates these various biological functions remains poorly defined, in part due to the lack of knowledge regarding its physical location along chromosomes and the bearing it has in regulating chromatin structure. Here we mapped H2A.Z across the yeast genome at an approximately 300-bp resolution, using chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with tiling microarrays. We have identified 4,862 small regions--typically one or two nucleosomes wide--decorated with H2A.Z. Those "Z loci" are predominantly found within specific nucleosomes in the promoter of inactive genes all across the genome. Furthermore, we have shown that H2A.Z can regulate nucleosome positioning at the GAL1 promoter. Within HZAD domains, the regions where H2A.Z shows an antisilencing function, H2A.Z is localized in a wider pattern, suggesting that the variant histone regulates a silencing and transcriptional activation via different mechanisms. Our data suggest that the incorporation of H2A.Z into specific promoter-bound nucleosomes configures chromatin structure to poise genes for transcriptional activation. The relevance of these findings to higher eukaryotes is discussed.

  3. Effects of macroH2A and H2A.Z on nucleosome structure and dynamics as elucidated by molecular dynamics simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Bowerman, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotes tune the transcriptional activity of their genome by altering the nucleosome core particle through multiple chemical processes. In particular, replacement of the canonical H2A histone with the variants macroH2A and H2A.Z has been shown to affect DNA accessibility and nucleosome stability; however, the processes by which this occurs remain poorly understood. Here, we elucidate the molecular mechanisms of these variants with an extensive molecular dynamics study of the canonical nucleosome along with three variant-containing structures: H2A.Z, macroH2A, and an H2A mutant with macroH2A-like L1 loops. Simulation results show that variant L1 loops play a pivotal role in stabilizing DNA binding to the octamer through direct interactions, core structural rearrangements, and altered allosteric networks in the nucleosome. All variants influence dynamics; however, macroH2A-like systems have the largest effect on energetics. In addition, we provide a comprehensive analysis of allosteric networks in the nucleo...

  4. Ascending the nucleosome face: recognition and function of structured domains in the histone H2A-H2B dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyrick, John J; Kyriss, McKenna N M; Davis, William B

    2012-08-01

    Research over the past decade has greatly expanded our understanding of the nucleosome's role as a dynamic hub that is specifically recognized by many regulatory proteins involved in transcription, silencing, replication, repair, and chromosome segregation. While many of these nucleosome interactions are mediated by post-translational modifications in the disordered histone tails, it is becoming increasingly apparent that structured regions of the nucleosome, including the histone fold domains, are also recognized by numerous regulatory proteins. This review will focus on the recognition of structured domains in the histone H2A-H2B dimer, including the acidic patch, the H2A docking domain, the H2B α3-αC helices, and the HAR/HBR domains, and will survey the known biological functions of histone residues within these domains. Novel post-translational modifications and trans-histone regulatory pathways involving structured regions of the H2A-H2B dimer will be highlighted, along with the role of intrinsic disorder in the recognition of structured nucleosome regions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Conflict bear translocation: investigating population genetics and fate of bear translocation in Dachigam National Park, Jammu and Kashmir, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh

    Full Text Available The Asiatic black bear population in Dachigam landscape, Jammu and Kashmir is well recognized as one of the highest density bear populations in India. Increasing incidences of bear-human interactions and the resultant retaliatory killings by locals have become a serious threat to the survivorship of black bears in the Dachigam landscape. The Department of Wildlife Protection in Jammu and Kashmir has been translocating bears involved in conflicts, henceforth 'conflict bears' from different sites in Dachigam landscape to Dachigam National Park as a flagship activity to mitigate conflicts. We undertook this study to investigate the population genetics and the fate of bear translocation in Dachigam National Park. We identified 109 unique genotypes in an area of ca. 650 km2 and observed bear population under panmixia that showed sound genetic variability. Molecular tracking of translocated bears revealed that mostly bears (7 out of 11 bears returned to their capture sites, possibly due to homing instincts or habituation to the high quality food available in agricultural croplands and orchards, while only four bears remained in Dachigam National Park after translocation. Results indicated that translocation success was most likely to be season dependent as bears translocated during spring and late autumn returned to their capture sites, perhaps due to the scarcity of food inside Dachigam National Park while bears translocated in summer remained in Dachigam National Park due to availability of surplus food resources. Thus, the current management practices of translocating conflict bears, without taking into account spatio-temporal variability of food resources in Dachigam landscape seemed to be ineffective in mitigating conflicts on a long-term basis. However, the study highlighted the importance of molecular tracking of bears to understand their movement patterns and socio-biology in tough terrains like Dachigam landscape.

  6. Conflict bear translocation: investigating population genetics and fate of bear translocation in Dachigam National Park, Jammu and Kashmir, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukesh; Sharma, Lalit Kumar; Charoo, Samina Amin; Sathyakumar, Sambandam

    2015-01-01

    The Asiatic black bear population in Dachigam landscape, Jammu and Kashmir is well recognized as one of the highest density bear populations in India. Increasing incidences of bear-human interactions and the resultant retaliatory killings by locals have become a serious threat to the survivorship of black bears in the Dachigam landscape. The Department of Wildlife Protection in Jammu and Kashmir has been translocating bears involved in conflicts, henceforth 'conflict bears' from different sites in Dachigam landscape to Dachigam National Park as a flagship activity to mitigate conflicts. We undertook this study to investigate the population genetics and the fate of bear translocation in Dachigam National Park. We identified 109 unique genotypes in an area of ca. 650 km2 and observed bear population under panmixia that showed sound genetic variability. Molecular tracking of translocated bears revealed that mostly bears (7 out of 11 bears) returned to their capture sites, possibly due to homing instincts or habituation to the high quality food available in agricultural croplands and orchards, while only four bears remained in Dachigam National Park after translocation. Results indicated that translocation success was most likely to be season dependent as bears translocated during spring and late autumn returned to their capture sites, perhaps due to the scarcity of food inside Dachigam National Park while bears translocated in summer remained in Dachigam National Park due to availability of surplus food resources. Thus, the current management practices of translocating conflict bears, without taking into account spatio-temporal variability of food resources in Dachigam landscape seemed to be ineffective in mitigating conflicts on a long-term basis. However, the study highlighted the importance of molecular tracking of bears to understand their movement patterns and socio-biology in tough terrains like Dachigam landscape.

  7. Predictive and prognostic value of circulating nucleosomes and serum biomarkers in patients with metastasized colorectal cancer undergoing Selective Internal Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahmueller Yvonne

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT is a new and effective locoregional anticancer therapy for colorectal cancer patients with liver metastases. Markers for prediction of therapy response and prognosis are needed for the individual management of those patients undergoing SIRT. Methods Blood samples were prospectively and consecutively taken from 49 colorectal cancer patients with extensive hepatic metastases before, three, six, 24 and 48 h after SIRT to analyze the concentrations of nucleosomes and further laboratory parameters, and to compare them with the response to therapy regularly determined 3 months after therapy and with overall survival. Results Circulating nucleosomes, cytokeratin-19 fragments (CYFRA 21-1, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, C-reactive protein (CRP and various liver markers increased already 24 h after SIRT. Pretherapeutical levels of CYFRA 21-1, CEA, cancer antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9, asparate-aminotransferase (AST and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH as well as 24 h values of nucleosomes were significantly higher in patients suffering from disease progression (N = 35 than in non-progressive patients (N = 14. Concerning overall survival, CEA, CA 19-9, CYFRA 21-1, CRP, LDH, AST, choline esterase (CHE, gamma-glutamyl-transferase, alkaline phosphatase, and amylase (all 0 h, 24 h and nucleosomes (24 h were found to be prognostic relevant markers in univariate analyses. In multivariate Cox-Regression analysis, the best prognostic model was obtained for the combination of CRP and AST. When 24 h values were additionally included, nucleosomes (24 h further improved the existing model. Conclusion Panels of biochemical markers are helpful to stratify pretherapeutically colorectal cancer patients for SIR-therapy and to early estimate the response to SIR-therapy.

  8. Computer simulation of viral-assembly and translocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalik, Jyoti Prakash

    We investigated four different problems using coarse grained computational models : self-assembly of single stranded (ss) DNA virus, ejection dynamics of double stranded(ds) DNA from phages, translocation of ssDNA through MspA protein pore, and segmental dynamics of a polymer translocating through a synthetic nanopore. In the first part of the project, we investigated the self-assembly of a virus with and without its genome. A coarse-grained model was proposed for the viral subunit proteins and its genome (ssDNA). Langevin dynamics simulation, and replica exchange method were used to determine the kinetics and energetics of the self-assembly process, respectively. The self-assembly follows a nucleation-growth kind of mechanism. The ssDNA plays a crucial role in the self-assembly by acting as a template and enhancing the local concentration of the subunits. The presence of the genome does not changes the mechanism of the self-assembly but it reduces the nucleation time and enhances the growth rate by almost an order of magnitude. The second part of the project involves the investigation of the dynamics of the ejection of dsDNA from phages. A coarse-grained model was used for the phage and dsDNA. Langevin dynamics simulation was used to investigate the kinetics of the ejection. The ejection is a stochastic process and a slow intermediate rate kinetics was observed for most ejection trajectories. We discovered that the jamming of the DNA at the pore mouth at high packing fraction and for a disordered system is the reason for the intermediate slow kinetics. The third part of the project involves translocation of ssDNA through MspA protein pore. MspA protein pore has the potential for genome sequencing because of its ability to clearly distinguish the four different nucleotides based on their blockade current, but it is a challenge to use this pore for any practical application because of the very fast traslocation time. We resolved the state of DNA translocation

  9. Identification of chromosomal translocation hotspots via scan statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Israel T; Rosales, Rafael A; Holanda, Adriano J; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Jankovic, Mila

    2014-09-15

    The detection of genomic regions unusually rich in a given pattern is an important undertaking in the analysis of next-generation sequencing data. Recent studies of chromosomal translocations in activated B lymphocytes have identified regions that are frequently translocated to c-myc oncogene. A quantitative method for the identification of translocation hotspots was crucial to this study. Here we improve this analysis by using a simple probabilistic model and the framework provided by scan statistics to define the number and location of translocation breakpoint hotspots. A key feature of our method is that it provides a global chromosome-wide nominal control level to clustering, as opposed to previous methods based on local criteria. While being motivated by a specific application, the detection of unusual clusters is a widespread problem in bioinformatics. We expect our method to be useful in the analysis of data from other experimental approaches such as of ChIP-seq and 4C-seq. The analysis of translocations from B lymphocytes with the method described here reveals the presence of longer hotspots when compared with those defined previously. Further, we show that the hotspot size changes substantially in the absence of DNA repair protein 53BP1. When 53BP1 deficiency is combined with overexpression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase, the hotspot length increases even further. These changes are not detected by previous methods that use local significance criteria for clustering. Our method is also able to identify several exclusive translocation hotspots located in genes of known tumor supressors. The detection of translocation hotspots is done with hot_scan, a program implemented in R and Perl. Source code and documentation are freely available for download at https://github.com/itojal/hot_scan. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Hinge action versus grip in translocation by RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedialkov, Yuri A; Opron, Kristopher; Caudill, Hailey L; Assaf, Fadi; Anderson, Amanda J; Cukier, Robert I; Wei, Guowei; Burton, Zachary F

    2018-01-01

    Based on molecular dynamics simulations and functional studies, a conformational mechanism is posited for forward translocation by RNA polymerase (RNAP). In a simulation of a ternary elongation complex, the clamp and downstream cleft were observed to close. Hinges within the bridge helix and trigger loop supported generation of translocation force against the RNA-DNA hybrid resulting in opening of the furthest upstream i-8 RNA-DNA bp, establishing conditions for RNAP sliding. The β flap tip helix and the most N-terminal β' Zn finger engage the RNA, indicating a path of RNA threading out of the exit channel. Because the β flap tip connects to the RNAP active site through the β subunit double-Ψ-β-barrel and the associated sandwich barrel hybrid motif (also called the flap domain), the RNAP active site is coupled to the RNA exit channel and to the translocation of RNA-DNA. Using an exonuclease III assay to monitor translocation of RNAP elongation complexes, we show that K + and Mg 2+ and also an RNA 3'-OH or a 3'-H 2 affect RNAP sliding. Because RNAP grip to template suggests a sticky translocation mechanism, and because grip is enhanced by increasing K + and Mg 2+ concentration, biochemical assays are consistent with a conformational change that drives forward translocation as observed in simulations. Mutational analysis of the bridge helix indicates that 778-GARKGL-783 (Escherichia coli numbering) is a homeostatic hinge that undergoes multiple bends to compensate for complex conformational dynamics during phosphodiester bond formation and translocation.

  11. Extreme heterogeneous composition of the Paramecium caudatum macronuclear genomic DNA between hemoglobin and nucleosome assembly protein-1 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Norihito; Mikami, Kazuyuki; Matsuoka, Ariki; Ochiai, Takehiko; Yamauchi, Kiyoshi

    2010-02-01

    The intergenic region between the hemoglobin (hb) and nucleosome assembly protein-1 (nap-1) genes in the Paramecium caudatum macronuclear genome was previously found to be heterogeneously composed. Cloning of this intergenic region from the macronuclear genomic DNA identified four unique DNA fragments of different sizes. Sequencing of the cloned fragments revealed extreme heterogeneity and characteristics of both internal eliminated sequence (IES) and imprecise internal deletion sequences (IIDSs) in the intergenic region. Missing sequences were an AT-rich and direct repeats existed in their boundaries. Southern blotting of the total genomic DNA and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the total genomic DNAs indicated that there exist a dozen DNA fragments of different sizes in this intergenic region. It is likely that the heterogeneity found in the P. caudatum macronuclear genome results from the variable removal of an intergenic region.

  12. A somatic origin of homologous Robertsonian translocations and isochromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, W.P.; Bernasconi, F.; Schinzel, A.A. (Univ. of Zurich (Switzerland)); Basaran, S.; Yueksel-Apak, M. (Univ. of Istanbul (Turkey)); Neri, G. (Universita Cattolica, Rome (Italy)); Serville, F. (Hopital d' Enfants Pellegrin, Bordeaux (France)); Balicek, P.; Haluza, R. (Univ. Hospital of Hradeck Kralove, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic)); Farah, L.M.S. (Escuola Paulista de Medicina, Sao Paulo (Brazil)) (and others)

    1994-02-01

    One t(14q 14q), three t(15q 15q), two t(21q21q), and two t(22q22q) nonmosaic, apparently balanced, de novo Robertsonian translocation cases were investigated with polymorphic markers to establish the origin of the translocated chromosomes. Four cases had results indicative of an isochromosome: one t(14q14q) case with mild mental retardation and maternal uniparental disomy (UPD) for chromosome 14, one t(15q15q) case with the Prader-Willi syndrome and UPD(15), a phenotypically normal carrier of t(22q22q) with maternal UPD(22), and a phenotypically normal t(21q21q) case of paternal UPD(21). All UPD cases showed complete homozygosity throughout the involved chromosome, which is supportive of a postmeiotic origin. In the remaining four cases, maternal and paternal inheritance of the involved chromosome was found, which unambiguously implies a somatic origin. One t(15q15q) female had a child with a ring chromosome 15, which was also of probable postmeiotic origin as recombination between grandparental haplotypes had occurred prior to ring formation. UPD might be expected to result from de novo Robertsonian translocations of meiotic origin; however, all de novo homologous translocation cases, so far reported, with UPD of chromosomes 14, 15, 21, or 22 have been isochromosomes. These data provide the first direct evidence that nonmosaic Robertsonian translocations, as well as isochromosomes, are commonly the result of a mitotic exchange. 75 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  13. Electrostatics of polymer translocation events in electrolyte solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyukdagli, Sahin; Ala-Nissila, T

    2016-07-07

    We develop an analytical theory that accounts for the image and surface charge interactions between a charged dielectric membrane and a DNA molecule translocating through the membrane. Translocation events through neutral carbon-based membranes are driven by a competition between the repulsive DNA-image-charge interactions and the attractive coupling between the DNA segments on the trans and the cis sides of the membrane. The latter effect is induced by the reduction of the coupling by the dielectric membrane. In strong salt solutions where the repulsive image-charge effects dominate the attractive trans-cis coupling, the DNA molecule encounters a translocation barrier of ≈10 kBT. In dilute electrolytes, the trans-cis coupling takes over image-charge forces and the membrane becomes a metastable attraction point that can trap translocating polymers over long time intervals. This mechanism can be used in translocation experiments in order to control DNA motion by tuning the salt concentration of the solution.

  14. Nonabsorbable Antibiotics Reduce Bacterial and Endotoxin Translocation in Hepatectomised Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Kakkos

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence that septic complications, occurring after major hepatectomies, may be caused by gram negative bacteria, translocating from the gut. We investigated in rats, the effect of extended hepatectomy on the structure and morphology of the intestinal mucosa as well as on the translocation of intestinal bacteria and endotoxins. We also examined the effect of nonabsorbable antibiotics on reducing the intestinal flora and consequently the phenomenon of translocation by administering neomycin sulphate and cefazoline. Hepatectomy was found to increase translocation, while administration of nonabsorbable antibiotics decreased it significantly. In addition, hepatectomy increased the aerobic cecal bacterial population, which normalised in the group receiving antibiotics. Among the histological parameters evaluated, villus height demonstrated a significant reduction after hepatectomy, while the number of villi per cm and the number of mitoses per crypt, remained unchanged. Our results indicate that administration of nonabsorbable antibiotics presents a positive effect on bacterial and endotoxin translocation after extended hepatectomy, and this may be related to reduction of colonic bacterial load as an intraluminal effect of antibiotics.

  15. The nucleosome (histone-DNA complex is the TLR9-specific immunostimulatory component of Plasmodium falciparum that activates DCs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraj M Gowda

    Full Text Available The systemic clinical symptoms of Plasmodium falciparum infection such as fever and chills correspond to the proinflammatory cytokines produced in response to the parasite components released during the synchronized rupture of schizonts. We recently demonstrated that, among the schizont-released products, merozoites are the predominant components that activate dendritic cells (DCs by TLR9-specific recognition to induce the maturation of cells and to produce proinflammatory cytokines. We also demonstrated that DNA is the active constituent and that formation of a DNA-protein complex is essential for the entry of parasite DNA into cells for recognition by TLR9. However, the nature of endogenous protein-DNA complex in the parasite is not known. In this study, we show that parasite nucleosome constitute the major protein-DNA complex involved in the activation of DCs by parasite nuclear material. The parasite components were fractionated into the nuclear and non-nuclear materials. The nuclear material was further fractionated into chromatin and the proteins loosely bound to chromatin. Polynucleosomes and oligonucleosomes were prepared from the chromatin. These were tested for their ability to activate DCs obtained by the FLT3 ligand differentiation of bone marrow cells from the wild type, and TLR2(-/-, TLR9(-/- and MyD88(-/- mice. DCs stimulated with the nuclear material and polynucleosomes as well as mono- and oligonucleosomes efficiently induced the production of proinflammatory cytokines in a TLR9-dependent manner, demonstrating that nucleosomes (histone-DNA complex represent the major TLR9-specific DC-immunostimulatory component of the malaria parasite nuclear material. Thus, our data provide a significant insight into the activation of DCs by malaria parasites and have important implications for malaria vaccine development.

  16. Understanding publication bias in reintroduction biology by assessing translocations of New Zealand's herpetofauna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kimberly A; Bell, Trent P; Germano, Jennifer M

    2014-08-01

    The intentional translocation of animals is an important tool for species conservation and ecosystem restoration, but reported success rates are low, particularly for threatened and endangered species. Publication bias further distorts success rates because the results of successful translocations may be more likely to be published than failed translocations. We conducted the first comprehensive review of all published and unpublished translocations of herpetofauna in New Zealand to assess publication bias. Of 74 translocations of 29 species in 25 years, 35 have been reported in the published literature, and the outcomes of 12 have been published. Using a traditional definition of success, publication bias resulted in a gross overestimate of translocation success rates (41.7% and 8.1% for published and all translocations, respectively), but bias against failed translocations was minimal (8.3% and 6.8%, respectively). Publication bias against translocations with uncertain outcomes, the vast majority of projects, was also strong (50.0% and 85.1% for published and all translocations, respectively). Recent translocations were less likely to be published than older translocations. The reasons behind translocations were related to publication. A greater percentage of translocations for conservation and research were published (63.3% and 40.0%, respectively) than translocations for mitigation during land development (10.0%). Translocations conducted in collaboration with a university were more frequently published (82.7% and 24.4%, respectively). To account for some of this publication bias, we reassessed the outcome of each translocation using a standardized definition of success, which takes into consideration the species' life history and the time since release. Our standardized definition of translocation success provided a more accurate summary of success rates and allows for a more rigorous evaluation of the causes of translocation success and failure in large

  17. Tracking GLUT2 Translocation by Live-Cell Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsytkin-Kirschenzweig, Sabina; Cohen, Merav; Nahmias, Yaakov

    2018-01-01

    The facilitative glucose transporter (GLUT) family plays a key role in metabolic homeostasis, controlling the absorption rates and rapid response to changing carbohydrate levels. The facilitative GLUT2 transporter is uniquely expressed in metabolic epithelial cells of the intestine, pancreas, liver, and kidney. GLUT2 dysfunction is associated with several pathologies, including Fanconi-Bickel syndrome, a glycogen storage disease, characterized by growth retardation and renal dysfunction. Interestingly, GLUT2 activity is modulated by its cellular localization. Membrane translocation specifically regulates GLUT2 activity in enterocytes, pancreatic β-cells, hepatocytes, and proximal tubule cells. We have established a system to visualize and quantify GLUT2 translocation, and its dynamics, by live imaging of a mCherry-hGLUT2 fusion protein in polarized epithelial cells. This system enables testing of putative modulators of GLUT2 translocation, which are potential drugs for conditions of impaired glucose homeostasis and associated nephropathy.

  18. Translocation techniques used to establish pen farmed Alaskan reindeer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Dieterich

    1990-09-01

    Full Text Available Small herds of reindeer (Rangifer tarandus frequently have been needed to be established in fenced holding pens for research or commercial reasons in Alaska and other areas. Native ranges of reindeer in Alaska were not on road systems, and the diet of the native reindeer had to be changed when they were translocated to small pens. Economics of transportation and feeding played an important role in the feasibility of translocation. Gathering and holding of reindeer for shipment, transport methods, adjustment of free-ranging reindeer to confinement, and a new diet were primary considerations to insure survival. Minimal psychologic stress of short duration, thermoregulation, and physical comfort were extremely important in carrying out a successful translocation. Receiving facilities, feed, and personnel were equally important. A minimum of one month was required to adjust reindeer to confinement and diet change.

  19. Metabolism and long-distance translocation of cytokinins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Toru; Kiba, Takatoshi; Sakakibara, Hitoshi

    2010-01-01

    During plant development, distantly-located organs must communicate in order to adapt morphological and physiological features in response to environmental inputs. Among the recognized signaling molecules, a class of phytohormones known as the cytokinins functions as both local and long-distance regulatory signals for the coordination of plant development. This cytokinin-dependent communication system consists of orchestrated regulation of the metabolism, translocation, and signal transduction of this phytohormone class. Here, to gain insight into this elaborate signaling system, we summarize current models of biosynthesis, trans-membrane transport, and long-distance translocation of cytokinins in higher plants.

  20. Role of non-equilibrium conformations on driven polymer translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katkar, H H; Muthukumar, M

    2018-01-14

    One of the major theoretical methods in understanding polymer translocation through a nanopore is the Fokker-Planck formalism based on the assumption of quasi-equilibrium of polymer conformations. The criterion for applicability of the quasi-equilibrium approximation for polymer translocation is that the average translocation time per Kuhn segment, ⟨τ⟩/NK, is longer than the relaxation time τ0 of the polymer. Toward an understanding of conditions that would satisfy this criterion, we have performed coarse-grained three dimensional Langevin dynamics and multi-particle collision dynamics simulations. We have studied the role of initial conformations of a polyelectrolyte chain (which were artificially generated with a flow field) on the kinetics of its translocation across a nanopore under the action of an externally applied transmembrane voltage V (in the absence of the initial flow field). Stretched (out-of-equilibrium) polyelectrolyte chain conformations are deliberately and systematically generated and used as initial conformations in translocation simulations. Independent simulations are performed to study the relaxation behavior of these stretched chains, and a comparison is made between the relaxation time scale and the mean translocation time (⟨τ⟩). For such artificially stretched initial states, ⟨τ⟩/NK equilibrium approximation. Nevertheless, we observe a scaling of ⟨τ⟩ ∼ 1/V over the entire range of chain stretching studied, in agreement with the predictions of the Fokker-Planck model. On the other hand, for realistic situations where the initial artificially imposed flow field is absent, a comparison of experimental data reported in the literature with the theory of polyelectrolyte dynamics reveals that the Zimm relaxation time (τZimm) is shorter than the mean translocation time for several polymers including single stranded DNA (ssDNA), double stranded DNA (dsDNA), and synthetic polymers. Even when these data are rescaled assuming a

  1. Identification of the chromosomes of the rye translocation tester set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sybenga, J; van Eden, J; van der Meijs, Q G; Roeterdink, B W

    1985-05-01

    Intercrossing the Wageningen translocation tester set of rye and the series of 'Imperial' rye additions to 'Chinese Spring' wheat of Sears yielded 29 chromosome disomic translocation hybrids. Observation of trivalents led to the identification of the chromosomes of the tester set in terms of the terminology system used in the Triticinae. The analysis was complicated by very low chiasma frequencies in some short chromosome segments in the hybrids. Nevertheless, it could be safely concluded that 1R=VII; 2R=III; 3R=II; 4R=IV; 5R=VI; 6R=V; 7R=I, which deviates slightly from previous classifications based on other methods.

  2. Thr translocation of C-14-assimilates in Eragrostis curvula: an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In intact plants C-14-assimilates were translocated from the treated leaf on the primary tiller to young leaves on that tiller, to secondary tillers, and also to the roots. Plants defoliated after labeling revealed movement of materials from the storage organs to all the new leaves. Here these materials were used as a respiratory ...

  3. Introduction: translocal development, development corridors and development chains.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zoomers, E.B.; Westen, A.C.M. van

    2011-01-01

    This paper offers an introduction to this Special Issue of International Development Planning Review. It uses the concepts of translocal development, development corridors and development chains to secure a better grasp of what development means in the context of globalisation and how ‘local

  4. The human minisatellite consensus at breakpoints of oncogene translocations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krowczynska, A.; Krontiris, T.G. (New England Medical Center Hospitals, Boston, MA (United States) Tufts Univ. School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States)); Rudders, R.A. (New England Medical Center Hospitals, Boston, MA (United States))

    1990-03-11

    A reexamination of human minisatellite (hypervariable) regions following the cloning and sequencing of the new minisatellite, VTR1. 1, revealed that many of these structures possessed a strongly conserved copy of the chi-like octamer, GC(A/T)GG(A/T)GG. In oncogene translocations apparently created by aberrant VDJ recombinase activity, this VTR octamer was often found within a few bases of the breakpoint. Three bcl2 rearrangements which occurred within 2 bp of one another were located precisely adjacent to this consensus; it defined the 5{prime} border of that oncogene's major breakpoint cluster. Several c-myc translocations also occurred within 2 bp of this sequence. While the appearance of a chi-like element in polymorphic minisatellite sequences is consistent with a role promoting either recombination or replication slippage, the existence of such elements at sites of somatic translocations suggests chi function in site-specific recombination, perhaps as a subsidiary recognition signal in immunoglobulin gene rearrangement. The authors discuss the implications of these observations for mechanisms by which oncogene translocations and minisatellite sequences are generated.

  5. Passage Times for Polymer Translocation Pulled through a Narrow Pore

    CERN Document Server

    Panja, Debabrata

    2007-01-01

    We study the passage times of a translocating polymer of length $N$ in three dimensions, while it is pulled through a narrow pore with a constant force $F$ applied to one end of the polymer. At small to moderate forces, satisfying the condition $FN^{\

  6. 3D view of chromosomes, DNA damage, and translocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Michal; Hakim, Ofir

    2014-04-01

    The cell nucleus is a busy and organized organelle. In this megalopolis made of billions of nucleotides, protein factors find their target loci to exert nuclear functions such as transcription and replication. Remarkably, despite the lack of internal membrane barrier, the interlinked and tightly regulated nuclear processes occur in spatially organized fashion. These processes can lead to double-strand breaks (DSBs) that compromise the integrity of the genome. Moreover, in some cells like lymphocytes, DNA damage is also targeted within the context of immunoglobulin gene recombination. If not repaired correctly, DSBs can cause chromosomal rearrangements, including translocations which are etiological in numerous tumors. Therefore, the chromosomal locations of DSBs, as well as their spatial positioning, are important contributors to formation of chromosomal translocations at specific genomic loci. To obtain a mechanistic understanding of chromosomal translocations these parameters should be accounted for in a global and integrative fashion. In this review we will discuss recent findings addressing how genome architecture, DNA damage, and repair contribute to the genesis of chromosomal translocations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of cadmium bioaccumulation and translocation by Hopea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    parisa

    2012-04-10

    Apr 10, 2012 ... the metal concentration ratio of plant roots to soil), translocation factor (TF, the metal concentration ratio of plant shoots to .... pH (1:2.5 soil to water). 4.62 ..... with high levels of CdSo4 (50 µM) in hydroponic culture. Cadmium ...

  8. 40 CFR 798.5460 - Rodent heritable translocation assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) HEALTH EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Genetic Toxicity § 798.5460 Rodent... fertile animals for cytological confirmation as translocation heterozygotes. (3) Animal selection—(i... animals shall be used. (iii) Number. (A) The number of male animals necessary is determined by the...

  9. A de novo X;13 translocation with abnormal phenotype.

    OpenAIRE

    Hodgson, S V; Barber, J C; Dowie, A; Dubowitz, V

    1986-01-01

    We describe a female infant who presented with hypotonia and developmental delay. Her karyotype showed a de novo balanced translocation between the X chromosome and chromosome 13, with breakpoints at Xq13 and 13p11. The normal X was late replicating in all cells examined. The cause of this patient's abnormal phenotype is discussed.

  10. Three cases of mosaicism for balanced reciprocal translocations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leegte, B; Sikkema-Raddatz, B; Hordijk, R; Bouman, K; van Essen, T; Castedo, S; de Jong, B

    1998-01-01

    Mosaicism for a balanced reciprocal translocation (BRTM) is rare. As far as we know only 26 cases of BRTM, demonstrated in lymphocyte cultures, have been described, five of which had an abnormal phenotype. Prenatally three confirmed cases with a normal phenotypic outcome have been described. Here we

  11. Black Rhino Translocations within Africa | Knight | Africa Insight

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The responsibility for the conservation of the critically endangered Black Rhinoceros, Diceros bicornis, lies within Africa. This species is managed at the subspecies level and we document nine international translocation case studies involving South Africa since 1962 aimed at re-establishing or boosting populations ...

  12. Chromosomal Translocation in a Child with SLI and Apraxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weistuch, Lucille; Schiff-Myers, Naomi B.

    1996-01-01

    This case study of a 5-year-old boy diagnosed with a specific expressive language impairment with verbal apraxia reports on chromosomal, neurological, speech/language, cognitive, and play evaluations. Evaluation found a chromosomal translocation and a severe expressive speech-language deficit but good nonverbal cognitive and communicative skills.…

  13. Bladder calculus resulting from an intravesical translocation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although perforation of the uterus by an intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD) is commonly encountered, intravesical translocation and secondary calculus formation is a very rare complication.We report a case of a 60-year old multiparous woman in whom an intrauterine contraceptive Copper-T device inserted 12 years ...

  14. Translocation of radioactive paraquat in some veld grasses | TD ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In two pot experiments radioactive paraquat was applied to certain important veld grasses (Experiment I-Aristida junciformis, Themeda triandra, Elyonuris argenteus, Andropogon filifolius, Eragrostis curvula; Experiment II-A. junciformis, E. argenteus) to determine the extent of translocation at a young stage of growth with ...

  15. Centrifugally driven microfluidic disc for detection of chromosomal translocations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøgger, Anna Line; Kwasny, Dorota; Bosco, Filippo G.

    2012-01-01

    and prognosis of patients. In this work we demonstrate a novel, centrifugally-driven microfluidic system for controlled manipulation of oligonucleotides and subsequent detection of chromosomal translocations. The device is fabricated in the form of a disc with capillary burst microvalves employed to control...

  16. Single Molecule Fluorescence Measurements of Ribosomal Translocation Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunlai; Stevens, Benjamin; Kaur, Jaskarin; Cabral, Diana; Liu, Hanqing; Wang, Yuhong; Zhang, Haibo; Rosenblum, Gabriel; Smilansky, Zeev; Goldman, Yale E.; Cooperman, Barry S.

    2011-01-01

    We employ single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) to study structural dynamics over the first two elongation cycles of protein synthesis, using ribosomes containing either Cy3-labeled ribosomal protein L11 and A- or P-site Cy5-labeled tRNA or Cy3 and Cy5 labeled tRNAs. Pre-translocation (PRE) complexes demonstrate fluctuations between classical and hybrid forms, with concerted motions of tRNAs away from L11 and from each other when classical complex converts to hybrid complex. EF-G·GTP binding to both hybrid and classical PRE complexes halts these fluctuations prior to catalyzing translocation to form the post-translocation (POST) complex. EF-G dependent translocation from the classical PRE complex proceeds via transient formation of a short-lived hybrid intermediate. A-site binding of either EF-G to the PRE complex or of aminoacyl-tRNA·EF-Tu ternary complex to the POST complex markedly suppresses ribosome conformational lability. PMID:21549313

  17. Nucleosome assembly factors CAF-1 and HIR modulate epigenetic switching frequencies in an H3K56 acetylation-associated manner in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, John S; Liu, Haoping

    2013-04-01

    CAF-1 and HIR are highly conserved histone chaperone protein complexes that function in the assembly of nucleosomes onto chromatin. CAF-1 is characterized as having replication-coupled nucleosome activity, whereas the HIR complex can assemble nucleosomes independent of replication. Histone H3K56 acetylation, controlled by the acetyltransferase Rtt109 and deacetylase Hst3, also plays a significant role in nucleosome assembly. In this study, we generated a set of deletion mutants to genetically characterize pathway-specific and overlapping functions of CAF-1 and HIR in C. albicans. Their roles in epigenetic maintenance of cell type were examined by using the white-opaque switching system in C. albicans. We show that CAF-1 and HIR play conserved roles in UV radiation recovery, repression of histone gene expression, correct chromosome segregation, and stress responses. Unique to C. albicans, the cac2Δ/Δ mutant shows increased sensitivity to the Hst3 inhibitor nicotinamide, while the rtt109Δ/Δ cac2Δ/Δ and hir1Δ/Δ cac2Δ/Δ mutants are resistant to nicotinamide. CAF-1 plays a major role in maintaining cell types, as the cac2Δ/Δ mutant exhibited increased switching frequencies in both directions and switched at a high frequency to opaque in response to nicotinamide. Like the rtt109Δ/Δ mutant, the hir1Δ/Δ cac2Δ/Δ double mutant is defective in maintaining the opaque cell fate and blocks nicotinamide-induced opaque formation, and the defects are suppressed by ectopic expression of the master white-opaque regulator Wor1. Our data suggest an overlapping function of CAF-1 and HIR in epigenetic regulation of cell fate determination in an H3K56 acetylation-associated manner.

  18. The Ddc1-Mec3-Rad17 sliding clamp regulates histone-histone chaperone interactions and DNA replication-coupled nucleosome assembly in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Rebecca J; Han, Junhong; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2014-04-11

    The maintenance of genome integrity is regulated in part by chromatin structure and factors involved in the DNA damage response pathway. Nucleosome assembly is a highly regulated process that restores chromatin structure after DNA replication, DNA repair, and gene transcription. During S phase the histone chaperones Asf1, CAF-1, and Rtt106 coordinate to deposit newly synthesized histones H3-H4 onto replicated DNA in budding yeast. Here we describe synthetic genetic interactions between RTT106 and the DDC1-MEC3-RAD17 (9-1-1) complex, a sliding clamp functioning in the S phase DNA damage and replication checkpoint response, upon treatment with DNA damaging agents. The DNA damage sensitivity of rad17Δ rtt106Δ cells depends on the function of Rtt106 in nucleosome assembly. Epistasis analysis reveals that 9-1-1 complex components interact with multiple DNA replication-coupled nucleosome assembly factors, including Rtt106, CAF-1, and lysine residues of H3-H4. Furthermore, rad17Δ cells exhibit defects in the deposition of newly synthesized H3-H4 onto replicated DNA. Finally, deletion of RAD17 results in increased association of Asf1 with checkpoint kinase Rad53, which may lead to the observed reduction in Asf1-H3 interaction in rad17Δ mutant cells. In addition, we observed that the interaction between histone H3-H4 with histone chaperone CAF-1 or Rtt106 increases in cells lacking Rad17. These results support the idea that the 9-1-1 checkpoint protein regulates DNA replication-coupled nucleosome assembly in part through regulating histone-histone chaperone interactions.

  19. Human OGG1 activity in nucleosomes is facilitated by transient unwrapping of DNA and is influenced by the local histone environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilotti, Katharina; Kennedy, Erin E; Li, Chuxuan; Delaney, Sarah

    2017-11-01

    If unrepaired, damage to genomic DNA can cause mutations and/or be cytotoxic. Single base lesions are repaired via the base excision repair (BER) pathway. The first step in BER is the recognition and removal of the nucleobase lesion by a glycosylase enzyme. For example, human oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (hOGG1) is responsible for removal of the prototypic oxidatively damaged nucleobase, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG). To date, most studies of glycosylases have used free duplex DNA substrates. However, cellular DNA is packaged as repeating nucleosome units, with 145 base pair segments of DNA wrapped around histone protein octamers. Previous studies revealed inhibition of hOGG1 at the nucleosome dyad axis and in the absence of chromatin remodelers. In this study, we reveal that even in the absence of chromatin remodelers or external cofactors, hOGG1 can initiate BER at positions off the dyad axis and that this activity is facilitated by spontaneous and transient unwrapping of DNA from the histones. Additionally, we find that solution accessibility as determined by hydroxyl radical footprinting is not fully predictive of glycosylase activity and that histone tails can suppress hOGG1 activity. We therefore suggest that local nuances in the nucleosome environment and histone-DNA interactions can impact glycosylase activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Clipping of Flexible Tails of Histones H3 and H4 Affects the Structure and Dynamics of the Nucleosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurse, Nathan P.; Jimenez-Useche, Isabel; Smith, Ian Tad; Yuan, Chongli

    2013-01-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer was used to monitor the dynamic conformations of mononucleosomes under different chromatin folding conditions to elucidate the role of the flexible N-terminal regions of H3 and H4 histones. The H3 tail was shown to partake in intranucleosomal interactions by restricting the DNA breathing motion and compacting the nucleosome. The H3 tail effects were mostly independent of the ionic strength and valency of the ions. The H4 tail was shown to not greatly affect the nucleosome conformation, but did slightly influence the relative population of the preferred conformation. The role of the H4 tail varied depending on the valency and ionic strength, suggesting that electrostatic forces play a primary role in H4 tail interactions. Interestingly, despite the H4 tail’s lack of influence, when H3 and H4 tails were simultaneously clipped, a more dramatic effect was seen than when only H3 or H4 tails were clipped. The combinatorial effect of H3 and H4 tail truncation suggests a potential mechanism by which various combinations of histone tail modifications can be used to control accessibility of DNA-binding proteins to nucleosomal DNA. PMID:23473491

  1. Lysine methyltransferase G9a is not required for DNMT3A/3B anchoring to methylated nucleosomes and maintenance of DNA methylation in somatic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Shikhar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA methylation, histone modifications and nucleosome occupancy act in concert for regulation of gene expression patterns in mammalian cells. Recently, G9a, a H3K9 methyltransferase, has been shown to play a role in establishment of DNA methylation at embryonic gene targets in ES cells through recruitment of de novo DNMT3A/3B enzymes. However, whether G9a plays a similar role in maintenance of DNA methylation in somatic cells is still unclear. Results Here we show that G9a is not essential for maintenance of DNA methylation in somatic cells. Knockdown of G9a has no measurable effect on DNA methylation levels at G9a-target loci. DNMT3A/3B remain stably anchored to nucleosomes containing methylated DNA even in the absence of G9a, ensuring faithful propagation of methylated states in cooperation with DNMT1 through somatic divisions. Moreover, G9a also associates with nucleosomes in a DNMT3A/3B and DNA methylation-independent manner. However, G9a knockdown synergizes with pharmacologic inhibition of DNMTs resulting in increased hypomethylation and inhibition of cell proliferation. Conclusions Taken together, these data suggest that G9a is not involved in maintenance of DNA methylation in somatic cells but might play a role in re-initiation of de novo methylation after treatment with hypomethylating drugs, thus serving as a potential target for combinatorial treatments strategies involving DNMTs inhibitors.

  2. Major satellite repeat RNA stabilize heterochromatin retention of Suv39h enzymes by RNA-nucleosome association and RNA:DNA hybrid formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez Camacho, Oscar; Galan, Carmen; Swist-Rosowska, Kalina; Ching, Reagan; Gamalinda, Michael; Karabiber, Fethullah; De La Rosa-Velazquez, Inti; Engist, Bettina; Koschorz, Birgit; Shukeir, Nicholas; Onishi-Seebacher, Megumi; van de Nobelen, Suzanne; Jenuwein, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    The Suv39h1 and Suv39h2 histone lysine methyltransferases are hallmark enzymes at mammalian heterochromatin. We show here that the mouse Suv39h2 enzyme differs from Suv39h1 by containing an N-terminal basic domain that facilitates retention at mitotic chromatin and provides an additional affinity for major satellite repeat RNA. To analyze an RNA-dependent interaction with chromatin, we purified native nucleosomes from mouse ES cells and detect that Suv39h1 and Suv39h2 exclusively associate with poly-nucleosomes. This association was attenuated upon RNaseH incubation and entirely lost upon RNaseA digestion of native chromatin. Major satellite repeat transcripts remain chromatin-associated and have a secondary structure that favors RNA:DNA hybrid formation. Together, these data reveal an RNA-mediated mechanism for the stable chromatin interaction of the Suv39h KMT and suggest a function for major satellite non-coding RNA in the organization of an RNA-nucleosome scaffold as the underlying structure of mouse heterochromatin.

  3. Atlas of alien and translocated indigenous aquatic animals in southern Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Moor, IJ

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available This report serves as an introduction to the problem of alien and translocated aquatic animals in southern Africa is given followed by checklists of the different species which have been introduced into or translocated within the subcontinent...

  4. Microbial Translocation in HIV Infection is Associated with Dyslipidemia, Insulin Resistance, and Risk of Myocardial Infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karin Kaereby; Pedersen, Maria; Trøseid, Marius

    2013-01-01

    Microbial translocation has been suggested to be a driver of immune activation and inflammation. We hypothesized that microbial translocation may be related to dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and the risk of coronary heart disease in HIV-infected individuals.......Microbial translocation has been suggested to be a driver of immune activation and inflammation. We hypothesized that microbial translocation may be related to dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and the risk of coronary heart disease in HIV-infected individuals....

  5. Meiotic behaviour and spermatogenesis in male mice heterozygous for translocation types also occurring in man

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhoff, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    In this thesis a start was made with meiotic observations of mouse translocation types - a Robertsonian translocation and a translocation between a metacentric and an acrocentric chromosome - which also occur in man. It is generally accepted that, when no chromosomal rearrangements are involved, man

  6. Protein translocation across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane in cold-adapted organisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Römisch, Karin; Collie, Nicola; Soto, Nelyn; Logue, James; Lindsay, Margaret; Scheper, Wiep; Cheng, Chi-Hing C.

    2003-01-01

    Secretory proteins enter the secretory pathway by translocation across the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) via a channel formed primarily by the Sec61 protein. Protein translocation is highly temperature dependent in mesophilic organisms. We asked whether the protein translocation

  7. Translocation as a conservation tool for Agassiz's desert tortoises: Survivorship, reproduction, and movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    K. E. Nussear; C. R. Tracy; P. A. Medica; D. S. Wilson; R. W. Marlow; P. S. Corn

    2012-01-01

    We translocated 120 Agassiz's desert tortoises to 5 sites in Nevada and Utah to evaluate the effects of translocation on tortoise survivorship, reproduction, and habitat use. Translocation sites included several elevations, and extended to sites with vegetation assemblages not typically associated with desert tortoises in order to explore the possibility of moving...

  8. 40 CFR 798.5955 - Heritable translocation test in drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... drosophila melanogaster. 798.5955 Section 798.5955 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY....5955 Heritable translocation test in drosophila melanogaster. (a) Purpose. The heritable translocation test in Drosophila measures the induction of chromosomal translocations in germ cells of insects...

  9. Carnivore translocations and conservation: insights from population models and field data for fishers (Martes pennanti)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey C. Lewis; Roger A. Powell; William J. Zielinski

    2012-01-01

    Translocations are frequently used to restore extirpated carnivore populations. Understanding the factors that influence translocation success is important because carnivore translocations can be time consuming, expensive, and controversial. Using population viability software, we modeled reintroductions of the fisher, a candidate for endangered or threatened status in...

  10. BAF53b, a Neuron-Specific Nucleosome Remodeling Factor, Is Induced after Learning and Facilitates Long-Term Memory Consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Miran; Choi, Kwang-Yeon; Kim, Jieun; Kim, Mujun; Shim, Jaehoon; Choi, Jun-Hyeok; Cho, Hye-Yeon; Oh, Jung-Pyo; Kim, Hyung-Su; Kaang, Bong-Kiun; Han, Jin-Hee

    2017-03-29

    Although epigenetic mechanisms of gene expression regulation have recently been implicated in memory consolidation and persistence, the role of nucleosome-remodeling is largely unexplored. Recent studies show that the functional loss of BAF53b, a postmitotic neuron-specific subunit of the BAF nucleosome-remodeling complex, results in the deficit of consolidation of hippocampus-dependent memory and cocaine-associated memory in the rodent brain. However, it is unclear whether BAF53b expression is regulated during memory formation and how BAF53b regulates fear memory in the amygdala, a key brain site for fear memory encoding and storage. To address these questions, we used viral vector approaches to either decrease or increase BAF53b function specifically in the lateral amygdala of adult mice in auditory fear conditioning paradigm. Knockdown of Baf53b before training disrupted long-term memory formation with no effect on short-term memory, basal synaptic transmission, and spine structures. We observed in our qPCR analysis that BAF53b was induced in the lateral amygdala neurons at the late consolidation phase after fear conditioning. Moreover, transient BAF53b overexpression led to persistently enhanced memory formation, which was accompanied by increase in thin-type spine density. Together, our results provide the evidence that BAF53b is induced after learning, and show that such increase of BAF53b level facilitates memory consolidation likely by regulating learning-related spine structural plasticity.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Recent works in the rodent brain begin to link nucleosome remodeling-dependent epigenetic mechanism to memory consolidation. Here we show that BAF53b, an epigenetic factor involved in nucleosome remodeling, is induced in the lateral amygdala neurons at the late phase of consolidation after fear conditioning. Using specific gene knockdown or overexpression approaches, we identify the critical role of BAF53b in the lateral amygdala neurons for memory

  11. The NuRD nucleosome remodelling complex and NHK-1 kinase are required for chromosome condensation in oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikalayevich, Elvira; Ohkura, Hiroyuki

    2015-02-01

    Chromosome condensation during cell division is one of the most dramatic events in the cell cycle. Condensin and topoisomerase II are the most studied factors in chromosome condensation. However, their inactivation leads to only mild defects and little is known about the roles of other factors. Here, we took advantage of Drosophilaoocytes to elucidate the roles of potential condensation factors by performing RNA interference (RNAi). Consistent with previous studies, depletion of condensin I subunits or topoisomerase II in oocytes only mildly affected chromosome condensation. In contrast, we found severe undercondensation of chromosomes after depletion of the Mi-2-containing NuRD nucleosome remodelling complex or the protein kinase NHK-1 (also known as Ballchen in Drosophila). The further phenotypic analysis suggests that Mi-2 and NHK-1 are involved in different pathways of chromosome condensation. We show that the main role of NHK-1 in chromosome condensation is to phosphorylate Barrier-to-autointegration factor (BAF) and suppress its activity in linking chromosomes to nuclear envelope proteins. We further show that NHK-1 is important for chromosome condensation during mitosis as well as in oocytes.

  12. A DNA Structural Alphabet Distinguishes Structural Features of DNA Bound to Regulatory Proteins and in the Nucleosome Core Particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Bohdan; Božíková, Paulína; Čech, Petr; Svozil, Daniel; Černý, Jiří

    2017-10-18

    We analyzed the structural behavior of DNA complexed with regulatory proteins and the nucleosome core particle (NCP). The three-dimensional structures of almost 25 thousand dinucleotide steps from more than 500 sequentially non-redundant crystal structures were classified by using DNA structural alphabet CANA (Conformational Alphabet of Nucleic Acids) and associations between ten CANA letters and sixteen dinucleotide sequences were investigated. The associations showed features discriminating between specific and non-specific binding of DNA to proteins. Important is the specific role of two DNA structural forms, A-DNA, and BII-DNA, represented by the CANA letters AAA and BB2: AAA structures are avoided in non-specific NCP complexes, where the wrapping of the DNA duplex is explained by the periodic occurrence of BB2 every 10.3 steps. In both regulatory and NCP complexes, the extent of bending of the DNA local helical axis does not influence proportional representation of the CANA alphabet letters, namely the relative incidences of AAA and BB2 remain constant in bent and straight duplexes.

  13. Splice variants of the SWR1-type nucleosome remodeling factor Domino have distinct functions during Drosophila melanogaster oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börner, Kenneth; Becker, Peter B

    2016-09-01

    SWR1-type nucleosome remodeling factors replace histone H2A by variants to endow chromatin locally with specialized functionality. In Drosophila melanogaster a single H2A variant, H2A.V, combines functions of mammalian H2A.Z and H2A.X in transcription regulation and the DNA damage response. A major role in H2A.V incorporation for the only SWR1-like enzyme in flies, Domino, is assumed but not well documented in vivo. It is also unclear whether the two alternatively spliced isoforms, DOM-A and DOM-B, have redundant or specialized functions. Loss of both DOM isoforms compromises oogenesis, causing female sterility. We systematically explored roles of the two DOM isoforms during oogenesis using a cell type-specific knockdown approach. Despite their ubiquitous expression, DOM-A and DOM-B have non-redundant functions in germline and soma for egg formation. We show that chromatin incorporation of H2A.V in germline and somatic cells depends on DOM-B, whereas global incorporation in endoreplicating germline nurse cells appears to be independent of DOM. By contrast, DOM-A promotes the removal of H2A.V from stage 5 nurse cells. Remarkably, therefore, the two DOM isoforms have distinct functions in cell type-specific development and H2A.V exchange. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. The Nucleosome Remodeling and Deacetylase Complex NuRD Is Built from Preformed Catalytically Active Sub-modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W; Aubert, A; Gomez de Segura, J M; Karuppasamy, M; Basu, S; Murthy, A S; Diamante, A; Drury, T A; Balmer, J; Cramard, J; Watson, A A; Lando, D; Lee, S F; Palayret, M; Kloet, S L; Smits, A H; Deery, M J; Vermeulen, M; Hendrich, B; Klenerman, D; Schaffitzel, C; Berger, I; Laue, E D

    2016-07-17

    The nucleosome remodeling deacetylase (NuRD) complex is a highly conserved regulator of chromatin structure and transcription. Structural studies have shed light on this and other chromatin modifying machines, but much less is known about how they assemble and whether stable and functional sub-modules exist that retain enzymatic activity. Purification of the endogenous Drosophila NuRD complex shows that it consists of a stable core of subunits, while others, in particular the chromatin remodeler CHD4, associate transiently. To dissect the assembly and activity of NuRD, we systematically produced all possible combinations of different components using the MultiBac system, and determined their activity and biophysical properties. We carried out single-molecule imaging of CHD4 in live mouse embryonic stem cells, in the presence and absence of one of core components (MBD3), to show how the core deacetylase and chromatin-remodeling sub-modules associate in vivo. Our experiments suggest a pathway for the assembly of NuRD via preformed and active sub-modules. These retain enzymatic activity and are present in both the nucleus and the cytosol, an outcome with important implications for understanding NuRD function. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Sall4 controls differentiation of pluripotent cells independently of the Nucleosome Remodelling and Deacetylation (NuRD) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Anzy; Ralser, Meryem; Kloet, Susan L; Loos, Remco; Nishinakamura, Ryuichi; Bertone, Paul; Vermeulen, Michiel; Hendrich, Brian

    2016-09-01

    Sall4 is an essential transcription factor for early mammalian development and is frequently overexpressed in cancer. Although it is reported to play an important role in embryonic stem cell (ESC) self-renewal, whether it is an essential pluripotency factor has been disputed. Here, we show that Sall4 is dispensable for mouse ESC pluripotency. Sall4 is an enhancer-binding protein that prevents precocious activation of the neural gene expression programme in ESCs but is not required for maintenance of the pluripotency gene regulatory network. Although a proportion of Sall4 protein physically associates with the Nucleosome Remodelling and Deacetylase (NuRD) complex, Sall4 neither recruits NuRD to chromatin nor influences transcription via NuRD; rather, free Sall4 protein regulates transcription independently of NuRD. We propose a model whereby enhancer binding by Sall4 and other pluripotency-associated transcription factors is responsible for maintaining the balance between transcriptional programmes in pluripotent cells. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. Inferring coarse-grain histone-DNA interaction potentials from high-resolution structures of the nucleosome

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, Sam

    2014-01-01

    The histone-DNA interaction in the nucleosome is a fundamental mechanism of genomic compaction and regulation, which remains largely unkown despite a growing structural knowledge of the complex. Here, we propose a framework for the extraction of a nanoscale histone-DNA force-field from a collection of high-resolution structures, which may be adapted to a larger class of protein-DNA complexes. We apply the procedure on a large crystallographic database extended by snapshots from molecular dynamics simulations. The comparison of the structural models first shows that, at the sites of histone-DNA contact, the DNA base-pairs are locally shifted outwards, consistent with locally repulsive forces exerted by the histones. In a second step, we show that the various force profiles of the analyzed structures derive locally from a unique, sequence-independent, quadratic repulsive force field, while the sequence preferences are entirely due to the internal DNA mechanics. We thus obtain the first knowledge-derived nanosca...

  17. Structural Architecture of the Nucleosome Remodeler ISWI Determined from Cross-Linking, Mass Spectrometry, SAXS, and Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrer, Nadine; Schindler, Christina E M; Bruetzel, Linda K; Forné, Ignasi; Ludwigsen, Johanna; Imhof, Axel; Zacharias, Martin; Lipfert, Jan; Mueller-Planitz, Felix

    2018-02-06

    Chromatin remodeling factors assume critical roles by regulating access to nucleosomal DNA. To determine the architecture of the Drosophila ISWI remodeling enzyme, we developed an integrative structural approach that combines protein cross-linking, mass spectrometry, small-angle X-ray scattering, and computational modeling. The resulting structural model shows the ATPase module in a resting state with both ATPase lobes twisted against each other, providing support for a conformation that was recently trapped by crystallography. The autoinhibiting NegC region does not protrude from the ATPase module as suggested previously. The regulatory NTR domain is located near both ATPase lobes. The full-length enzyme is flexible and can adopt a compact structure in solution with the C-terminal HSS domain packing against the ATPase module. Our data imply a series of conformational changes upon activation of the enzyme and illustrate how the NTR, NegC, and HSS domains contribute to regulation of the ATPase module. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Transcription factor 19 interacts with histone 3 lysine 4 trimethylation and controls gluconeogenesis via the nucleosome-remodeling-deacetylase complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Sabyasachi; Sanyal, Sulagna; Srivastava, Dushyant Kumar; Dasgupta, Dipak; Roy, Siddhartha; Das, Chandrima

    2017-12-15

    Transcription factor 19 (TCF19) has been reported as a type 1 diabetes-associated locus involved in maintenance of pancreatic β cells through a fine-tuned regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis. TCF19 also exhibits genomic association with type 2 diabetes, although the precise molecular mechanism remains unknown. It harbors both a plant homeodomain and a forkhead-associated domain implicated in epigenetic recognition and gene regulation, a phenomenon that has remained unexplored. Here, we show that TCF19 selectively interacts with histone 3 lysine 4 trimethylation through its plant homeodomain finger. Knocking down TCF19 under high-glucose conditions affected many metabolic processes, including gluconeogenesis. We found that TCF19 overexpression represses de novo glucose production in HepG2 cells. The transcriptional repression of key genes, induced by TCF19, coincided with NuRD (nucleosome-remodeling-deacetylase) complex recruitment to the promoters of these genes. TCF19 interacted with CHD4 (chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4), which is a part of the NuRD complex, in a glucose concentration-independent manner. In summary, our results show that TCF19 interacts with an active transcription mark and recruits a co-repressor complex to regulate gluconeogenic gene expression in HepG2 cells. Our study offers critical insights into the molecular mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of gluconeogenesis and into the roles of chromatin readers in metabolic homeostasis. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Analysis of a Polycomb Group Protein Defines Regions That Link Repressive Activity on Nucleosomal Templates to In Vivo Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Ian F. G.; Emmons, Richard B.; Francis, Nicole J.; Wild, Brigitte; Müller, Jürg; Kingston, Robert E.; Wu, Chao-ting

    2005-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) genes propagate patterns of transcriptional repression throughout development. The products of several such genes are part of Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1), which inhibits chromatin remodeling and transcription in vitro. Genetic and biochemical studies suggest the product of the Posterior sex combs (Psc) gene plays a central role in both PcG-mediated gene repression in vivo and PRC1 activity in vitro. To dissect the relationship between the in vivo and in vitro activities of Psc, we identified the lesions associated with 11 genetically characterized Psc mutations and asked how the corresponding mutant proteins affect Psc activity on nucleosomal templates in vitro. Analysis of both single-mutant Psc proteins and recombinant complexes containing mutant protein revealed that Psc encodes at least two functions, complex formation and the inhibition of remodeling and transcription, which require different regions of the protein. There is an excellent correlation between the in vivo phenotypes of mutant Psc alleles and the structure and in vitro activities of the corresponding proteins, suggesting that the in vitro activities of PRC1 reflect essential functions of Psc in vivo. PMID:16024794

  20. Histone H3K56 acetylation, CAF1, and Rtt106 coordinate nucleosome assembly and stability of advancing replication forks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Clemente-Ruiz

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin assembly mutants accumulate recombinogenic DNA damage and are sensitive to genotoxic agents. Here we have analyzed why impairment of the H3K56 acetylation-dependent CAF1 and Rtt106 chromatin assembly pathways, which have redundant roles in H3/H4 deposition during DNA replication, leads to genetic instability. We show that the absence of H3K56 acetylation or the simultaneous knock out of CAF1 and Rtt106 increases homologous recombination by affecting the integrity of advancing replication forks, while they have a minor effect on stalled replication fork stability in response to the replication inhibitor hydroxyurea. This defect in replication fork integrity is not due to defective checkpoints. In contrast, H3K56 acetylation protects against replicative DNA damaging agents by DNA repair/tolerance mechanisms that do not require CAF1/Rtt106 and are likely subsequent to the process of replication-coupled nucleosome deposition. We propose that the tight connection between DNA synthesis and histone deposition during DNA replication mediated by H3K56ac/CAF1/Rtt106 provides a mechanism for the stabilization of advancing replication forks and the maintenance of genome integrity, while H3K56 acetylation has an additional, CAF1/Rtt106-independent function in the response to replicative DNA damage.

  1. Resistance to therapy in BRCA2 mutant cells due to loss of the nucleosome remodeling factor CHD4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemette, Shawna; Serra, Ryan W; Peng, Min; Hayes, Janelle A; Konstantinopoulos, Panagiotis A; Green, Michael R; Cantor, Sharon B

    2015-03-01

    Hereditary cancers derive from gene defects that often compromise DNA repair. Thus, BRCA-associated cancers are sensitive to DNA-damaging agents such as cisplatin. The efficacy of cisplatin is limited, however, by the development of resistance. One cisplatin resistance mechanism is restoration of homologous recombination (HR), which can result from BRCA reversion mutations. However, in BRCA2 mutant cancers, cisplatin resistance can occur independently of restored HR by a mechanism that remains unknown. Here we performed a genome-wide shRNA screen and found that loss of the nucleosome remodeling factor CHD4 confers cisplatin resistance. Restoration of cisplatin resistance is independent of HR but correlates with restored cell cycle progression, reduced chromosomal aberrations, and enhanced DNA damage tolerance. Suggesting clinical relevance, cisplatin-resistant clones lacking genetic reversion of BRCA2 show de novo loss of CHD4 expression in vitro. Moreover, BRCA2 mutant ovarian cancers with reduced CHD4 expression significantly correlate with shorter progression-free survival and shorter overall survival. Collectively, our findings indicate that CHD4 modulates therapeutic response in BRCA2 mutant cancer cells. © 2015 Guillemette et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  2. Slowing down DNA translocation by a nanofiber meshed layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yue; Xie, Wanyi; Tian, Enling; Ren, Yiwei; Zhu, Jifeng; Deng, Yunsheng; He, Shixuan; Liang, Liyuan; Wang, Yunjiao; Zhou, Daming; Wang, Deqiang

    2018-01-01

    Due to the weak interaction between DNA molecules and the inner surface of nanopores, DNA translocation is very fast, just leaving a short current drop without sufficient information to recognise the nucleotide sequence in the strand. In this paper, we propose a nanopore-nanofiber mesh hybridized structure to decelerate DNA translocation speed. Experimental results reveal that due to hydrophobic interaction between the DNA fragments and the nanofibers, the DNA moving speed can be retarded to two orders of magnitude slower. Furthermore, according to theory simulations, the additional fiber layer will reduce the electric field in the channel but elongate the capture region at the pore orifice, which will be helpful for increasing the capture rate and extending the DNA dwelling time in the meanwhile.

  3. Balanced reciprocal translocation 5,18: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahram Savad

    2014-05-01

    Conclusion: A balanced reciprocal translocation carrier is phenotypically normal, but during meiosis І, carrier chromosomes cant pair normally and form quadrivalant instead of bivalant that depend on type of their segregation (alternate, adjacent 1, adjacent 2,3:1,4:0, produce gametes that are chromosomally unbalanced which can result in early fetus abortion. Considering the number of abnormal gametes, the most effective way to help couples with this problem seems to be PGD 24sure, since it can identify reciprocal and Robertsonian translocation and allows concurrent screening of all chromosomes for aneuploidy. Another technique that can be compared with PGD 24sure is fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH, but it has several technical limitations such as it is expensive and complexity, in addition it has only few probes (for chromosomes 21, 13, 18, X, Y so sometimes necessary to create patient specific protocols.

  4. The Social Construction of Guangzhou as a Translocal Trading Place

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Guangzhou has become a key destination for sub-Saharan African traders. These traders have established multilocal forms of business organisation and, in so doing, have developed diverse practices to overcome geographical, political and cultural boundaries. This paper focuses on these practices, looking at the ways in which the movements, relations and interactions within these organisational formations are produced, transformed and lived. A close ethnographic examination was made of the livelihoods of 33 African traders from 13 sub-Saharan African countries. Through the concept of trans-locality, the organisational formations of these Africans are conceptualised as links between different places on a larger geographical scale; these links then meet on a local scale in the specific place of Guangzhou. Following a relational understanding of spatial constructions in social science, these links are conceptualised as one of the main drivers for the social construction and transformation of the city as a trans-local trading place.

  5. Particles translocate from the vagina to the oviducts and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wehner, A.P.; Hall, A.S.; Weller, R.E.; Lepel, E.A.; Schirmer, R.E.

    1985-03-01

    To investigate whether particles deposited in the vagina translocate to the oviducts, 0.3 ml of a 4% bone black suspension was deposited in the posterior vaginal fornix of each of five cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) during their mid-menstrual cycle. Simultaneously, each animal received 10 units of oxytocin by intramuscular injection. The oviducts of three animals were removed 1 hr after administration of the bone black, while those of the remaining two animals were removed 72 hr after dosing. The removed oviducts were flushed with Hank's solution and then with collagenase solution. The solutions were collected in clean vials and filtered. The filters were examined for bone black particles by light microscopy, as were filters through which solution blanks (negative controls) had been passed. Particles resembling bone black were found on all filters. There were no appreciable differences in the number or shape of these particles between the solution-blank filters and the oviduct-flush filters. The particles on both the solution-blank filters and on the oviduct-flush filters probably originated from environmental contamination by ubiquitous carbon particles. While these results suggested that no translocation took place, translocation could not be ruled out with certainty in the absence of quantitative analyses. A more definitive pilot study was then conducted with two dosed monkeys and one control, using talc labelled by neutron activation to circumvent the problem of environmental contamination. Gamma-Ray analysis of tissue and peritoneal lavage samples for the radionuclides /sup 46/Sc, /sup 59/Fe and /sup 60/Co indicated that no measurable quantities (i.e. greater than 0.5 micrograms) of talc translocated from the deposition site in the vagina to the uterine cavity and beyond.

  6. "Translocal Express" juba täna! / Rael Artel

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Artel, Rael, 1980-

    2009-01-01

    27. märtsil algab Kumu Kunstimuuseumis "Public Preparation'i" ("Avalik ettevalmistus") sarja rahvusvaheline seminar "Translocal Express. Golden Age" ("Translokaalne ekspress. Kuldaeg"), kus on kõne all ajalookirjutamise ja kollektiivse mälu roll praegu domineerivas natsionalistlikus diskursuses ja selle käsitlemine kaasaegses kunstis. Seminaril on lähtutud eelkõige kunstnike Martin Krenni (Viin) ja Kristina Normani teoste tutvustamisest

  7. Identity of distributions of direct uphill and downhill translocation times for particles traversing membrane channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezhkovskii, Alexander M; Hummer, Gerhard; Bezrukov, Sergey M

    2006-07-14

    We study the distribution of direct translocation times for particles passing through membrane channels connecting two reservoirs. The direct translocation time is a conditional first-passage time defined as the residence time of the particle in the channel while passing to the other side of the membrane directly, i.e., without returning to the reservoir from which it entered. We show that the distributions of direct translocation times are identical for translocation in both directions, independent of any asymmetry in the potential across the channel and, hence, the translocation probabilities.

  8. Black bears in Arkansas: Characteristics of a successful translocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kimberly G.; Clark, Joseph D.

    1994-01-01

    In 1958, the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission began translocating black bears (Ursus americanus) from Minnesota to the Interior Highlands (Ozark and Ouachita mountains) of Arkansas where bears had been extirpated early in this century. This project continued for 11 years with little public imput, during which time an estimated 254 bears were released. We estimate there are now >2,500 bears in the Interior Highlands of Arkansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma, making it one of the most successful translocations of a Carnivora. Factors that contributed to the success include use of wild-captured animals, elimination of major factors associated with extirpation, release into prime habitats within the former range, multiple release sites, release of 20–40 animals/year for eight years, and release of mostly males prior to release of mostly females. Studies on two allopatric populations demonstrate that they are now diverging in some demographic characteristics, including litter size, cub survivorship, and adult sex-ratio. Translocation of black bears to the Interior Highlands is successful in terms of numbers of animals, but it will not be truly successful until people accept black bears as part of the regional fauna. To that end, those associated with management and research of bears in Arkansas are now focussing on public education and control of nuisance bears.

  9. Spatial behaviour and survival of translocated wild brown hares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer, C.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The fragility of many populations of brown hares in Western Europe is a concern for managers, hunters and naturalists. We took advantage of a locally high density population to use wild individuals to restock areas where the species had disappeared or was close to disappearing. The aim of the project was to assess the evolution of the spatial behaviour after release using radio–tracking. Over 150 wild brown hares were translocated, one third of which were fitted with radio collars. In addition, fifteen individuals were radio–tagged and released back into the source population as a control. Most individuals settled in less than two months and their seasonal home range, once settled, was similar to that observed in the source population. Mean duration of tracking was not significantly different between the two groups. Moreover, two years after the last translocation, tagged individuals can still be observed, but most hares present are not tagged, which indicates natural reproduction of the released individuals. The translocation of wild individuals thus appears to give encouraging results.

  10. Dominant-lethal mutations and heritable translocations in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Generoso, W.M.

    1983-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations are a major component of radiation or chemically induced genetic damage in mammalian germ cells. The types of aberration produced are dependent upon the mutagen used and the germ-cell stage treated. For example, in male meiotic and postmeiotic germ cells certain alkylating chemicals induce both dominant-lethal mutations and heritable translocations while others induce primarily dominant-lethal mutations. Production of these two endpoints appears to be determined by the stability of alkylation products with the chromosomes. If the reaction products are intact in the male chromosomes at the time of sperm entry, they may be repaired in fertilized eggs. If repair is not effected and the alkylation products persist to the time of pronuclear chromosome replication, they lead to chromatid-type aberrations and eventually to dominant-lethality. The production of heritable translocations, on the other hand, requires a transformation of unstable alkylation products into suitable intermediate lesions. The process by which these lesions are converted into chromosome exchange within the male genome takes place after sperm enters the egg but prior to the time of pronuclear chromosome replication (i.e., chromosome-type). Thus, dominant-lethal mutations result from both chromatid- and chromosome-type aberrations while heritable translocations result primarily from the latter type. DNA target sites associated with the production of these two endpoints are discussed.

  11. A WRKY Transcription Factor Regulates Fe Translocation under Fe Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jing Ying; Li, Chun Xiao; Sun, Li; Ren, Jiang Yuan; Li, Gui Xin; Ding, Zhong Jie; Zheng, Shao Jian

    2016-07-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency affects plant growth and development, leading to reduction of crop yields and quality. Although the regulation of Fe uptake under Fe deficiency has been well studied in the past decade, the regulatory mechanism of Fe translocation inside the plants remains unknown. Here, we show that a WRKY transcription factor WRKY46 is involved in response to Fe deficiency. Lack of WRKY46 (wrky46-1 and wrky46-2 loss-of-function mutants) significantly affects Fe translocation from root to shoot and thus causes obvious chlorosis on the new leaves under Fe deficiency. Gene expression analysis reveals that expression of a nodulin-like gene (VACUOLAR IRON TRANSPORTER1-LIKE1 [VITL1]) is dramatically increased in wrky46-1 mutant. VITL1 expression is inhibited by Fe deficiency, while the expression of WRKY46 is induced in the root stele. Moreover, down-regulation of VITL1 expression can restore the chlorosis phenotype on wrky46-1 under Fe deficiency. Further yeast one-hybrid and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments indicate that WRKY46 is capable of binding to the specific W-boxes present in the VITL1 promoter. In summary, our results demonstrate that WRKY46 plays an important role in the control of root-to-shoot Fe translocation under Fe deficiency condition via direct regulation of VITL1 transcript levels. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  12. A family with Robertsonian translocation: a potential mechanism of speciation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jieping; Li, Xi; Sun, Lei; Xu, Shuqin; Liu, Nian; Yao, Yanyi; Liu, Zhi; Wang, Weipeng; Rong, Han; Wang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Robertsonian translocations occur in approximately one in every 1000 newborns. Although most Robertsonian translocation carriers are healthy and have a normal lifespan, they are at increased risk of spontaneous abortions and risk of producing unbalanced gametes and, therefore unbalanced offspring. Here we reported a previously undescribed Robertsonian translocation. We identified three Robertsonian translocation carriers in this family. Two were heterozygous translocation carriers of 45,XX or XY,der(14;15)(q10;q10) and their son was a homozygous translocation carrier of a 44,XY,der(14;15)(q10;q10), der(14;15)(q10;q10) karyotype. Chromosomal analysis of sperm showed 99.7 % of sperm from the homozygous translocation carrier were normal/balanced while only 79.9 % of sperm from the heterozygous translocation carrier were normal/balanced. There was a significantly higher frequency of aneuploidy for sex chromosome in the heterozygous translocation carrier. The reproductive fitness of Robertsonian translocation carriers is reduced. Robertsonian translocation homozygosity can be a potential speciation in humans with 44 chromosomes.

  13. De novo reciprocal translocation t(5;11)(q22;p15) associated with hydrops fetalis (reciprocal translocation and hydrops fetalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pala, Halil Gursoy; Artunc-Ulkumen, Burcu; Uyar, Yildiz; Bal, Filiz; Baytur, Yesim Bulbul; Koyuncu, Faik Mumtaz

    2015-02-01

    This is a case of a prenatally diagnosed non-immune hydrops fetalis (NIHF) associated with translocation t(5;11)(q22;p15). An association between NIHF and this translocation has not been reported previously. The patient was referred to the perinatology clinic with hydrops fetalis diagnosis at 23 weeks' gestation. We noted that the fetus had bilateral pleural effusion, ascites, widespread subcutaneous edema, membranous ventricular septal defect, hypoplastic fifth finger middle phalanx, clinodactyly, single umbilical artery. We performed cordocentesis. Chromosomal analysis on blood showed a balanced translocation between the long arm of chromosome 5 and the short arm of chromosome 11 with karyotype of 46,XX,t(5;11)(q22;p15). We present prenatal diagnosis of a de novo translocation (5;11) in a hydropic fetus with ultrason abnormalities. In our case, karyotype analysis of the fetus, mother and father provided evidence of a de novo translocation, that might explain the NIHF.

  14. Vaccination with a plasmid DNA cocktail encoding the nucleosomal histones of Leishmania confers protection against murine cutaneous leishmaniosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iborra, Salvador; Soto, Manuel; Carrión, Javier; Alonso, Carlos; Requena, Jose M

    2004-09-28

    Leishmania histones are relevant immunogens for the host immune system during both Leishmania infection and disease. In the present paper we have evaluated the prophylactic value of the four Leishmania infantum histones forming the nucleosomal core in the murine model of cutaneous leishmaniasis. In a first stage, the immune response elicited by the intramuscular injection of a mixture of four plasmid DNAs, encoding the L. infantum histones H2A, H2B, H3 and H4, was determined in BALB/c mice. It was found that the immunized animals developed a specific Th1 immune response, which was associated with an antigen-specific production of interferon (IFN-gamma) and a limited humoral response against histones (dominated by antibodies of the IgG2a isotype). According to the pure Th1-type immune response elicited by the DNA vaccination with Leishmania histones, vaccinated mice showed a solid immunity that efficiently controlled the Leishmania major infection. The protection in mice vaccinated with histone-DNAs was associated with a low humoral response against leishmanial antigens, an enhanced IFN-gamma production and little, if any, IL-4 production. The relative contribution of both CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells to the IFN-gamma production, and the IL-12 dependence were also evaluated. All these data indicated that DNA vaccination with Leishmania histones genes results in a specific Th1-like response during L. major infection, and that both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells contribute to the resistance of vaccinated mice to cutaneous leishmaniasis.

  15. Changes in nucleosome repeat lengths precede replication in the early replicating metallothionein II gene region of cells synchronized in early S phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Anna, J.A.; Tobey, R.A. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

    1989-04-04

    Previous investigations showed that inhibition of DNA synthesis by hydroxyurea, aphidicolin, or 5-fluorodeoxyuridine produced large changes in the composition and nucleosome repeat lengths of bulk chromatin. There the authors report results of investigations to determine whether the changes in nucleosome repeat lengths might be localized in the initiated replicons, as postulated. In most experiments, Chinese hamster (line CHO) cells were synchronized in G1, or they were synchronized in early S phase by allowing G1 cells to enter S phase in medium containing 1 mM hydroxyurea or 5 {mu}g mL{sup {minus}1} aphidicolin, a procedure believed to produce an accumulation of initiated replicons that arise from normally early replicating DNA. Measurements of nucleosome repeat lengths of bulk chromatin, the early replicating unexpressed metallothionein II (MTII) gene region, and a later replicating repeated sequence indicate that the changes in repeat lengths occur preferentially in the early replicating MTII gene region as G1 cells enter and become synchronized in early S phase. During that time, the MTII gene region is not replicated nor is there any evidence for induction of MTII messenger RNA. Thus, the results are consistent with the hypothesis that changes in chromatin structure occur preferentially in the early replicating (presumably initiated) replicons at initiation or that changes in chromatin structure can precede replication during inhibition of DNA synthesis. The shortened repeat lengths that precede MTII replication are, potentially, reversible, because they become elongated when the synchronized early S-phase cells are released to resume cell cycle progression.

  16. The male germ cell gene regulator CTCFL is functionally different from CTCF and binds CTCF-like consensus sites in a nucleosome composition-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleutels, Frank; Soochit, Widia; Bartkuhn, Marek; Heath, Helen; Dienstbach, Sven; Bergmaier, Philipp; Franke, Vedran; Rosa-Garrido, Manuel; van de Nobelen, Suzanne; Caesar, Lisa; van der Reijden, Michael; Bryne, Jan Christian; van Ijcken, Wilfred; Grootegoed, J Anton; Delgado, M Dolores; Lenhard, Boris; Renkawitz, Rainer; Grosveld, Frank; Galjart, Niels

    2012-06-18

    CTCF is a highly conserved and essential zinc finger protein expressed in virtually all cell types. In conjunction with cohesin, it organizes chromatin into loops, thereby regulating gene expression and epigenetic events. The function of CTCFL or BORIS, the testis-specific paralog of CTCF, is less clear. Using immunohistochemistry on testis sections and fluorescence-based microscopy on intact live seminiferous tubules, we show that CTCFL is only transiently present during spermatogenesis, prior to the onset of meiosis, when the protein co-localizes in nuclei with ubiquitously expressed CTCF. CTCFL distribution overlaps completely with that of Stra8, a retinoic acid-inducible protein essential for the propagation of meiosis. We find that absence of CTCFL in mice causes sub-fertility because of a partially penetrant testicular atrophy. CTCFL deficiency affects the expression of a number of testis-specific genes, including Gal3st1 and Prss50. Combined, these data indicate that CTCFL has a unique role in spermatogenesis. Genome-wide RNA expression studies in ES cells expressing a V5- and GFP-tagged form of CTCFL show that genes that are downregulated in CTCFL-deficient testis are upregulated in ES cells. These data indicate that CTCFL is a male germ cell gene regulator. Furthermore, genome-wide DNA-binding analysis shows that CTCFL binds a consensus sequence that is very similar to that of CTCF. However, only ~3,700 out of the ~5,700 CTCFL- and ~31,000 CTCF-binding sites overlap. CTCFL binds promoters with loosely assembled nucleosomes, whereas CTCF favors consensus sites surrounded by phased nucleosomes. Finally, an ES cell-based rescue assay shows that CTCFL is functionally different from CTCF. Our data suggest that nucleosome composition specifies the genome-wide binding of CTCFL and CTCF. We propose that the transient expression of CTCFL in spermatogonia and preleptotene spermatocytes serves to occupy a subset of promoters and maintain the expression of male germ

  17. Efficient induction of Wheat-agropyron cristatum 6P translocation lines and GISH detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqiang Song

    Full Text Available The narrow genetic background restricts wheat yield and quality improvement. The wild relatives of wheat are the huge gene pools for wheat improvement and can broaden its genetic basis. Production of wheat-alien translocation lines can transfer alien genes to wheat. So it is important to develop an efficient method to induce wheat-alien chromosome translocation. Agropyroncristatum (P genome carries many potential genes beneficial to disease resistance, stress tolerance and high yield. Chromosome 6P possesses the desirable genes exhibiting good agronomic traits, such as high grain number per spike, powdery mildew resistance and stress tolerance. In this study, the wheat-A. cristatum disomic addition was used as bridge material to produce wheat-A. cristatum translocation lines induced by (60Co-γirradiation. The results of genomic in situ hybridization showed that 216 plants contained alien chromosome translocation among 571 self-pollinated progenies. The frequency of translocation was 37.83%, much higher than previous reports. Moreover, various alien translocation types were identified. The analysis of M2 showed that 62.5% of intergeneric translocation lines grew normally without losing the translocated chromosomes. The paper reported a high efficient technical method for inducing alien translocation between wheat and Agropyroncristatum. Additionally, these translocation lines will be valuable for not only basic research on genetic balance, interaction and expression of different chromosome segments of wheat and alien species, but also wheat breeding programs to utilize superior agronomic traits and good compensation effect from alien chromosomes.

  18. Translocation of positively and negatively charged polystyrene nanoparticles in an in vitro placental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloet, Samantha K; Walczak, Agata P; Louisse, Jochem; van den Berg, Hans H J; Bouwmeester, Hans; Tromp, Peter; Fokkink, Remco G; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M

    2015-10-01

    To obtain insight in translocation of nanoparticles across the placental barrier, translocation was studied for one positively and two negatively charged polystyrene nanoparticles (PS-NPs) of similar size in an in vitro model. The model consisted of BeWo b30 cells, derived from a human choriocarcinoma grown on a transwell insert forming a cell layer that separates an apical from a basolateral compartment. PS-NPs were characterized with respect to size, surface charge, morphology and protein corona. Translocation of PS-NPs was not related to PS-NP charge. Two PS-NPs were translocated across the BeWo transwell model to a lower extent than amoxicillin, a model compound known to be translocated over the placental barrier to only a limited extent, whereas one PS-NP showed a slightly higher translocation. Studies on the effect of transporter inhibitors on the translocation of the PS-NPs indicated that their translocation was not mediated by known transporters and mainly dependent on passive diffusion. It is concluded that the BeWo b30 model can be used as an efficient method to get an initial qualitative impression about the capacity of NPs to translocate across the placental barrier and set priorities in further in vivo studies on translocation of NPs to the fetus. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Prenatal diagnosis of sex chromosomal inversion, translocation and deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Ren, Meihong; Song, Guining; Zhang, Yang; Liu, Xuexia; Zhang, Xiaohong; Wang, Jianliu

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to perform comprehensive prenatal diagnosis using various detection techniques on a fetus in a high‑risk pregnant woman, and to provide genetic counseling for the patient and her family so as to avoid birth defects. The routine karyotype analysis via amniocentesis, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and whole genome microarray technique were performed for the prenatal diagnosis of the fetus. The fetal karyotype was 46,X,ish der(X) inv(X)(p22.3q28)t(X;Y)(q28;q11.2)(XYqter+,SRY‑,DXZ1+, RP11‑64L19+,STS+,XYpter+); namely, one fetal X chromosome belonged to the derivative imbalanced chromosome and this chromosome demonstrated complex chromosomal rearrangements involving inversion, translocation and deletion. Notably, pericentric inversion between Xp22.3 and Xq28 was identified, and the chromosomal microarray technique confirmed that the long arm q28 of the derivative X chromosome had a 1.241‑Mb deletion in Xq28, which included Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man genes such as coagulation factor VIII, glucose‑6‑phosphate dehydrogenase, inhibitor of nuclear factor‑κB kinase subunit γ, trimethyllysine hydroxylase ε, Ras‑related protein Rab‑39B and chloride intracellular channel 2. In addition, this chromosome also exhibited the local translocation of fragment Yq11.21‑q11.23, which did not include the sex determining region Y gene. This fetus demonstrated deletion, inversion and translocation syndrome, and may exhibit the corresponding clinical phenotypes (e.g., intellectual disability or general delayed development) (1) of such chromosome abnormalities after birth. Therefore, in prenatal diagnosis, a variety of genetic diagnostic techniques should be comprehensively used based on specific clinical situations, which may accurately reveal the nature, sources and manifestations of the derivative chromosome abnormalities and avoid the birth of children with defects.

  20. International study of factors affecting human chromosome translocations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurdson, Alice J.; Ha, Mina; Hauptmann, Michael; Bhatti, Parveen; Sram, Radim J.; Beskid, Olena; Tawn, E. Janet; Whitehouse, Caroline A.; Lindholm, Carita; Nakano, Mimako; Kodama, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Nori; Vorobtsova, Irena; Oestreicher, Ursula; Stephan, Günther; Yong, Lee C.; Bauchinger, Manfred; Schmid, Ernst; Chung, Hai Won; Darroudi, Firouz; Roy, Laurence; Voisin, Phillipe; Barquinero, Joan F.; Livingston, Gordon; Blakey, David; Hayata, Isamu; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Chunyan; Bennett, L. Michelle; Littlefield, L. Gayle; Edwards, Alan A.; Kleinerman, Ruth A.; Tucker, James D.

    2009-01-01

    Chromosome translocations in peripheral blood lymphocytes of normal, healthy humans increase with age, but the effects of gender, race, and cigarette smoking on background translocation yields have not been examined systematically. Further, the shape of the relationship between age and translocation frequency (TF) has not been definitively determined. We collected existing data from sixteen laboratories in North America, Europe, and Asia on TFs measured in peripheral blood lymphocytes by fluorescence in situ hybridization whole chromosome painting among 1933 individuals. In Poisson regression models, age, ranging from newborns (cord blood) to 85 years, was strongly associated with TF and this relationship showed significant upward curvature at older ages vs. a linear relationship (p <0.001). Ever smokers had significantly higher TFs than non-smokers (rate ratio (RR) = 1.19, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.09–1.30) and smoking modified the effect of age on TFs with a steeper age-related increase among ever smokers compared to non-smokers (p<0.001). TFs did not differ by gender. Interpreting an independent effect of race was difficult owing to laboratory variation. Our study is three times larger than any pooled effort to date, confirming a suspected curvilinear relationship of TF with age. The significant effect of cigarette smoking has not been observed with previous pooled studies of TF in humans. Our data provide stable estimates of background TF by age, gender, race, and smoking status and suggest an acceleration of chromosome damage above age 60 and among those with a history of smoking cigarettes. PMID:18337160

  1. Biopersistence and brain translocation of aluminum adjuvants of vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Kroum Gherardi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum oxyhydroxide (alum is a crystaline compound widely used as an immunologic adjuvant of vaccines. Concerns linked to the use of alum particles emerged following recognition of their causative role in the so-called macrophagic myofasciitis (MMF lesion detected in patients with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue/syndrome. MMF revealed an unexpectedly long-lasting biopersistence of alum within immune cells in presumably susceptible individuals, stressing the previous fundamental misconception of its biodisposition. We previously showed that poorly biodegradable aluminum-coated particles injected into muscle are promptly phagocytozed in muscle and the draining lymph nodes, and can disseminate within phagocytic cells throughout the body and slowly accumulate in brain. This strongly suggests that long-term adjuvant biopersistence within phagocytic cells is a prerequisite for slow brain translocation and delayed neurotoxicity. The understanding of basic mechanisms of particle biopersistence and brain translocation represents a major health challenge, since it could help to define susceptibility factors to develop chronic neurotoxic damage. Biopersistence of alum may be linked to its lysosome-destabilizing effect, which is likely due to direct crystal-induced rupture of phagolysosomal membranes. Macrophages that continuously perceive foreign particles in their cytosol will likely reiterate, with variable interindividual efficiency, a dedicated form of autophagy (xenophagy until they dispose of alien materials. Successful compartmentalization of particles within double membrane autophagosomes and subsequent fusion with repaired and re-acidified lysosomes will expose alum to lysosomal acidic pH, the sole factor that can solubilize alum particles. Brain translocation of alum particles is linked to a Trojan horse mechanism previously described for infectious particles (HIV, HCV, that obeys to CCL2 signaling the major inflammatory monocyte

  2. Markers of immunity and bacterial translocation in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Christian

    2015-01-01

    , in 38 patients with ascites, we found no association between bDNA and immunity, in contrast to some previous findings. In the final paper, exploring one possible translocation route, we hypothesized a difference in bDNA levels between the blood from the veins draining the gut on one hand and the liver...... some concepts of current thinking on cirrhosis pathophysiology, including the relationship of markers of inflammation to haemodynamics, disease stage and prognosis. Our results also add to a growing body of evidence suggesting that bDNA is not a clinically relevant marker of BT....

  3. Microbial translocation and microbiome dysbiosis in HIV-associated immune activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zevin, Alexander S; McKinnon, Lyle; Burgener, Adam; Klatt, Nichole R

    2016-03-01

    This article describes the mechanisms and consequences of both microbial translocation and microbial dysbiosis in HIV infection. Microbes in HIV are likely playing a large role in contributing to HIV pathogenesis, morbidities and mortality. Two major disruptions to microbial systems in HIV infection include microbial translocation and microbiome dysbiosis. Microbial translocation occurs when the bacteria (or bacterial products) that should be in the lumen of the intestine translocate across the tight epithelial barrier into systemic circulation, where they contribute to inflammation and pathogenesis. This is associated with poorer health outcomes in HIV-infected individuals. In addition, microbial populations in the gastrointestinal tract are also altered after HIV infection, resulting in microbiome dysbiosis, which further exacerbates microbial translocation, epithelial barrier disruption, inflammation and mucosal immune functioning. Altered microbial regulation in HIV infection can lead to poor health outcomes, and understanding the mechanisms underlying microbial dysbiosis and translocation may result in novel pathways for therapeutic interventions.

  4. Use of chromosome translocations for measuring prior environment exposures in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, J. D.

    1997-05-01

    Recent advances in cytogenetic methodology are beginning to have a major impact upon our ability to provide assessments of environmental exposure in humans. The advent of fluorescent-based techniques for `painting` whole chromosomes has made the analysis of chromosome translocations rapid, specific, sensitive and routine. Chromosome painting has been used to address a wide variety of scientific questions, resulting in an increased understanding of the biological consequences of adverse environmental exposure. This paper describes the use of chromosome translocations as a biological marker of exposure and effect in humans. The relevance of translocations is discussed, as are the advantages and disadvantages of painting compared to classical cytogenetic methods for translocation evaluation. The factors to consider in the use of translocations as a retrospective indicator of exposure are then described. Several theoretical parameters that are important to the use of translocations are provided, and the paper concludes with a vision for the future of cytogenetic methodology.

  5. Insulin-induced translocation of IR to the nucleus in insulin responsive cells requires a nuclear translocation sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesten, Dov; Horovitz-Fried, Miriam; Brutman-Barazani, Tamar; Sampson, Sanford R

    2018-04-01

    Insulin binding to its cell surface receptor (IR) activates a cascade of events leading to its biological effects. The Insulin-IR complex is rapidly internalized and then is either recycled back to the plasma membrane or sent to lysosomes for degradation. Although most of the receptor is recycled or degraded, a small amount may escape this pathway and migrate to the nucleus of the cell where it might be important in promulgation of receptor signals. In this study we explored the mechanism by which insulin induces IR translocation to the cell nucleus. Experiments were performed cultured L6 myoblasts, AML liver cells and 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Insulin treatment induced a rapid increase in nuclear IR protein levels within 2 to 5 min. Treatment with WGA, an inhibitor of nuclear import, reduced insulin-induced increases nuclear IR protein; IR was, however, translocated to a perinuclear location. Bioinformatics tools predicted a potential nuclear localization sequence (NLS) on IR. Immunofluorescence staining showed that a point mutation on the predicted NLS blocked insulin-induced IR nuclear translocation. In addition, blockade of nuclear IR activation in isolated nuclei by an IR blocking antibody abrogated insulin-induced increases in IR tyrosine phosphorylation and nuclear PKCδ levels. Furthermore, over expression of mutated IR reduced insulin-induced glucose uptake and PKB phosphorylation. When added to isolated nuclei, insulin induced IR phosphorylation but had no effect on nuclear IR protein levels. These results raise questions regarding the possible role of nuclear IR in IR signaling and insulin resistance. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The absorption and translocation of imazaquin in green manures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Garcia Florido

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Green manure species that are tolerant to the herbicide imazaquin can be used in crop rotation schemes that aim to reduce herbicide carryover to sensitive plants such as sunflower or corn. Three different doses of imazaquin (0, 0.15 and 0.28 kgha-1 were applied during the pre-emergence growth stage to Dolichos lablab, Cajanus cajan, Canavalia ensiformis, Crotalaria juncea, C. breviflora, C. spectabilis, Mucuna deeringiana, M. cinerea, M. aterrima, Lupinus albus, Helianthus annuus, Pennisetum glaucum, Avena strigosa and Raphanus sativus, and the results were evaluated in a greenhouse. C. ensiformis and M. cinerea were selected from these species for being the most tolerant, and they were then evaluated for absorption and translocation of 14C-imazaquin in two different growth stages: the cotyledonary stage and the emergence of the first pair of true leaves. M. cinerea individuals showed the best potential for translocating imazaquin to the shoot when compared to C. ensiformes, which accumulated the herbicide mostly in its roots. These plants had a higher ability to accumulate herbicide during their most advanced stage of development, which demonstrates their potential for use in areas that have residual imazaquin.

  7. Clinical Expression of an Inherited Unbalanced Translocation in Chromosome 6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bani Bandana Ganguly

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Unbalanced chromosomal rearrangements are not common; however, they have a significant clinical expression. The parental balanced translocation produces unbalanced chromosome, which is transmitted to next generation through fertilization of gametes carrying the derivative chromosome. The carriers of balanced rearrangements mostly do not have recognizable phenotypic expression. We report a family comprising of healthy and non-consanguineous young parents and their preemie newborn severely affected with congenital anomalies and systemic disorders. Conventional Gbanding analysis of somatic chromosomes identified a balanced translocation, t(6;10(p23;q24, in mother and an unbalanced rearrangement, der(6t(6:10(p23;q24mat, in the child. The child has inherited a derivative chromosome 6 with partial deletion of 6(p23-pter and partial trisomy 10(q24-qter, which has resulted in fusion of genes of two different chromosomes. The prominent phenotypic features of del(6p, including high forehead, flat nasal bridge, agenesis of left ear, atrial septal defect (ASD, craniosynostosis, and growth retardation, are overlapping with specific Axenfeld-Reiger-, Larsen-, and Ritscher-Sinzel/3-C syndromes, however, lacking in ocular anomalies, skeletal laxity, or cerebellar malformation. Therefore, this paper rules out the isolated effect of del(6p23 or trisomy 10(q24 on distinct previously reported syndromes and proposes the combined effect of unbalanced chromosomal alteration.

  8. Pore formation by T3SS translocators: liposome leakage assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faudry, Eric; Perdu, Caroline; Attrée, Ina

    2013-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria utilize a dedicated membrane-embedded apparatus, the type III secretion system (T3SS), to inject proteins into host cells. The passage of the proteins across the target membrane is accomplished by a proteinaceous pore-the translocon-formed within the host-cell cytoplasmic membrane. Translocators bound to their chaperones can be expressed in Escherichia coli and subsequently dissociated from the chaperone by guanidine treatment. The pore formation properties of the translocators can then be studied by an in-vitro liposome leakage assay. Sulforhodamine-B is encapsulated within lipid vesicles during liposome preparation. At high concentration, this fluorochrome exhibits self-quenching limiting fluorescence emission. Upon pore formation, liposome leakage leads to the dilution of Sulforhodamine-B in the medium and fluorescence emission increases. Alternatively, fluorochromes coupled to large dextran molecules can be encapsulated in order to estimate pore dimensions. Here we describe protein expression and purification, dye-liposome preparation, and leakage assay conditions.

  9. Translocation of the neonicotinoid seed treatment clothianidin in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, Adam; Krupke, Christian H

    2017-01-01

    Neonicotinoid seed treatments, typically clothianidin or thiamethoxam, are routinely applied to >80% of maize (corn) seed grown in North America where they are marketed as a targeted pesticide delivery system. Despite this widespread use, the amount of compound translocated into plant tissue from the initial seed treatment to provide protection has not been reported. Our two year field study compared concentrations of clothianidin seed treatments in maize to that of maize without neonicotinoid seed treatments and found neonicotinoids present in root tissues up to 34 days post planting. Plant-bound clothianidin concentrations followed an exponential decay pattern with initially high values followed by a rapid decrease within the first ~20 days post planting. A maximum of 1.34% of the initial seed treatment was successfully recovered from plant tissues in both study years and a maximum of 0.26% was recovered from root tissue. Our findings show neonicotinoid seed treatments may provide protection from some early season secondary maize pests. However, the proportion of the neonicotinoid seed treatment clothianidin translocated into plant tissues throughout the growing season is low overall and this observation may provide a mechanism to explain reports of inconsistent efficacy of this pest management approach and increasing detections of environmental neonicotinoids.

  10. Macular translocation surgery: computer simulation of visual perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, D; Liazos, S; Mehta, J; Farnell, D J J

    2008-06-01

    Macular translocation can be associated with visual improvement, but patients often experience symptoms of confusion or diplopia. There is a high incidence of suppression of the operated or the fellow eye. The aim of this study is to use computer software to examine the pre- and post-operative fundal images, in order to better understand how patients see after macular translocation surgery. We created a graphical user interface that allowed a user to identify and record common landmark points in pre- and post-operative fundal images. We used these points to carry out interpolations using two algorithms, namely bilinear and thin-plate spline transformations. The transformations were applied to the Mona Lisa in order to appreciate how patients might see. Given two sets of corresponding points, both algorithms were able to approximate the effect of the surgery. Bilinear transformation was able to account for changes to the retina as a whole, including rotation, stretches, compression and shear. The thin-plate spline algorithm additionally accounted for the considerable regional and uneven local effects. Applying the later algorithm to the Mona Lisa produced inconsistent and warped images. Our results confirmed that neurosensory redistribution was associated with most cases of MT360. We infer from these results that corresponding retinal elements between two eyes would no longer correspond after surgery. The distortion of images from the operated eye could not be completely corrected by squint surgery, and this may account for the high incidence of suppression of the fellow or the operated eye after surgery.

  11. Upward and lateral translocation of /sup 32/P supplied to roots of apple and citrus trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, K.K. (City Coll. of Seoul); Chung, K.H.; Kwon, S.H.

    1976-09-01

    Phosphorus-32 was supplied to the roots of stem-ringed 1-year-old apple trees and 2-year-old citrus trees on which bark segments were isolated above and below the ring. /sup 32/P was translocated to shoots and leaves although considerable translocation occurred especially in wood and bark tissues. The accumulation of /sup 32/P in isolated bark segments indicated that the occurrence of these materials in this tissue was via radial translocation from xylem tissue, and that the main upward translocation pathway of /sup 32/P supplied to roots is through the xylem.

  12. Bordetella effector BopN is translocated into host cells via its N-terminal residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Akio; Nishimura, Ryutaro; Kuwae, Asaomi

    2017-06-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica infects a wide variety of mammals, the type III secretion system (T3SS) being involved in long-term colonization by Bordetella of the trachea and lung. T3SS translocates virulence factors (commonly referred to as effectors) into host cells, leading to alterations in the host's physiological function. The Bordetella effectors BopN and BteA are known to have roles in up-regulation of IL-10 and cytotoxicity, respectively. Nevertheless, the mechanism by which BopN is translocated into host cells has not been examined in sufficient detail. Therefore, to determine the precise mechanisms of translocation of BopN into host cells, truncated derivatives of BopN were built and the derivatives' ability to translocate into host cells evaluated by adenylate cyclase-mediated translocation assay. It was found that N-terminal amino acid (aa) residues 1-200 of BopN are sufficient for its translocation into host cells. Interestingly, BopN translocation was completely blocked by deletion of the N-terminal aa residues 6-50, indicating that the N-terminal region is critical for BopN translocation. Furthermore, BopN appears to play an auxiliary role in BteA-mediated cytotoxicity. Thus, BopN can apparently translocate into host cells and may facilitate activity of BteA. © 2017 The Societies and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  13. Uptake, translocation and metabolism of aminocyclopyrachlor in prickly lettuce, rush skeletonweed and yellow starthistle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jared L; Burke, Ian C; Prather, Timothy S

    2011-10-01

    Aminocyclopyrachlor is a new herbicide proposed to control broadleaf weeds and shrubs in non-crop and rangeland systems. To gain a better understanding of observed field efficacy, the uptake and translocation of foliar-applied aminocyclopyrachlor (DPX-MAT28) and aminocyclopyrachlor methyl ester (DPX-KJM44) were evaluated in two annuals, prickly lettuce (Lactuca serriola L.) and yellow starthistle (Centaurea solstitialis L.), and one perennial, rush skeletonweed (Chondrilla juncea L.). Absorption and translocation varied between species. While absorption of DPX-KJM44 was greater than absorption of DPX-MAT28, rush skeletonweed absorbed the most, followed by yellow starthistle and prickly lettuce. Overall, the total translocation of either herbicide was highest in yellow starthistle, followed by rush skeletonweed and prickly lettuce. Proportional herbicide movement between species was similar, with the majority translocating to developing shoots. However, in rush skeletonweed, early translocation was directed to root tissue. In rush skeletonweed, no DPX-MAT28 metabolism occurred, while DPX-KJM44 was rapidly de-esterified and translocated as DPX-MAT28. Aminocyclopyrachlor absorption and translocation are dependent on active ingredient structure and species sensitivity. Highly sensitive species such as prickly lettuce absorb and translocate less material than relatively less sensitive species such as rush skeletonweed. De-esterification of DPX-KJM44 appears to delay translocation of the resulting acid in yellow starthistle and rush skeletonweed. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. The role of the mature domain of proOmpA in the translocation ATPase reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassilana, M; Arkowitz, R A; Wickner, W

    1992-12-15

    The export of proOmpA, the precursor of outer membrane protein A from Escherichia coli, requires preprotein translocase, which is comprised of SecA, SecY/E, and acidic phospholipids. Previous studies of proOmpA translocation intermediates (Schiebel, E., Driessen, A. J. M., Hartl, F.-U., and Wickner, W. (1991) Cell 64, 927-939) suggested that the "slippage" of the translocating polypeptide chain and the high level of ATP hydrolysis, characteristic of the "translocation ATPase," were part of a futile cycle. To examine the role of the mature domain of proOmpA in its translocation-dependent ATP hydrolysis, we used chemical cleavage to generate NH2-terminal fragments of this preprotein. Each fragment contained the 21-residue leader region and either 53 or 228 residues of the mature domain (preproteins P74 and P249, respectively). As observed with full-length proOmpA, the translocation of each fragment requires ATP and both the SecA and SecY/E domains of translocase and is stimulated by the transmembrane proton electrochemical gradient. The apparent maximal velocities of P74 and proOmpA translocation are similar. While the translocation of P74 and of proOmpA show the same apparent Km for ATP, far less ATP is hydrolyzed during the translocation of P74. Thus, the mature carboxyl-terminal domain of proOmpA has a major role in supporting the translocation ATPase.

  15. Use of wild–caught individuals as a key factor for success in vertebrate translocations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rummel, L.; MartInez-AbraIn, A.; Mayol, J.; Ruiz-Olmo, J.; Mañas, F.; Jimenez, J.; Gomez, J.A.; Oro, D.

    2016-07-01

    Success of vertebrate translocations is crucial to improve efficacy and efficiency of conservation actions but it is often difficult to assess because negative results (failed translocations) are seldom published. We developed surveys and sent them to heads of conservation services in three major Spanish Mediterranean regions. The purpose of our surveys was to determine which methodological factor, that could easily be implemented in practice, was more influential for translocation success. These factors included the origin of translocated individuals (captive or wild) and translocation effort (propagule size and program duration). After analyzing 83 programs, corresponding to 34 different vertebrate species, by means of generalized linear mixed modelling, we found that ‘origin’ was more relevant for translocation success than ‘effort’, although we could not rule out some role of translocation effort. Variance in success of translocation programs involving individuals from wild sources was smaller and consequently results more predictable. Origin interacted with taxa so that success was higher when using wild birds and especially wild fish and mammals, but not when releasing reptiles. Hence, we suggest that, for any given effort, translocation results will be better for most vertebrate taxa if individuals from wild sources are used. When this is not feasible, managers should release captive–reared individuals for a long number of years rather than a short number of years. (Author)

  16. Identification of rye chromosomes: the Giemsa banding pattern and the translocation tester set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, J M; Sybenga, J

    1976-01-01

    The Giemsa banding pattern is given for eleven reciprocal translocations of rye, Secale cereale L., together involving all chromosomes at least once, and one telocentric substitution. It is possible to correlate the identification system based on the Giemsa pattern with that based on the translocation tester set. The location of the translocation break points could be determined very exactly for a number of translocations, somewhat less exactly for others. The variations in the banding pattern, resulting from genetic, environmental and technical variation, make definite identification with the nomenclature system of the different rye additions to wheat difficult. An attempt is made, but some caution is necessary.

  17. Eaf5/7/3 form a functionally independent NuA4 submodule linked to RNA polymerase II-coupled nucleosome recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetto, Dorine; Cramet, Myriam; Wang, Alice Y; Steunou, Anne-Lise; Lacoste, Nicolas; Schulze, Julia M; Côté, Valérie; Monnet-Saksouk, Julie; Piquet, Sandra; Nourani, Amine; Kobor, Michael S; Côté, Jacques

    2014-06-17

    The NuA4 histone acetyltransferase complex is required for gene regulation, cell cycle progression, and DNA repair. Dissection of the 13-subunit complex reveals that the Eaf7 subunit bridges Eaf5 with Eaf3, a H3K36me3-binding chromodomain protein, and this Eaf5/7/3 trimer is anchored to NuA4 through Eaf5. This trimeric subcomplex represents a functional module, and a large portion exists in a native form outside the NuA4 complex. Gene-specific and genome-wide location analyses indicate that Eaf5/7/3 correlates with transcription activity and is enriched over the coding region. In agreement with a role in transcription elongation, the Eaf5/7/3 trimer interacts with phosphorylated RNA polymerase II and helps its progression. Loss of Eaf5/7/3 partially suppresses intragenic cryptic transcription arising in set2 mutants, supporting a role in nucleosome destabilization. On the other hand, loss of the trimer leads to an increase of replication-independent histone exchange over the coding region of transcribed genes. Taken together, these results lead to a model where Eaf5/7/3 associates with elongating polymerase to promote the disruption of nucleosomes in its path, but also their refolding in its wake. © 2014 The Authors.

  18. Computer modeling reveals that modifications of the histone tail charges define salt-dependent interaction of the nucleosome core particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ye; Lyubartsev, Alexander P; Korolev, Nikolay; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2009-03-18

    Coarse-grained Langevin molecular dynamics computer simulations were conducted for systems that mimic solutions of nucleosome core particles (NCPs). The NCP was modeled as a negatively charged spherical particle representing the complex of DNA and the globular part of the histones combined with attached strings of connected charged beads modeling the histone tails. The size, charge, and distribution of the tails relative to the core were built to match real NCPs. Three models of NCPs were constructed to represent different extents of covalent modification on the histone tails: (nonmodified) recombinant (rNCP), acetylated (aNCP), and acetylated and phosphorylated (paNCP). The simulation cell contained 10 NCPs in a dielectric continuum with explicit mobile counterions and added salt. The NCP-NCP interaction is decisively dependent on the modification state of the histone tails and on salt conditions. Increasing the monovalent salt concentration (KCl) from salt-free to physiological concentration leads to NCP aggregation in solution for rNCP, whereas NCP associates are observed only occasionally in the system of aNCPs. In the presence of divalent salt (Mg(2+)), rNCPs form dense stable aggregates, whereas aNCPs form aggregates less frequently. Aggregates are formed via histone-tail bridging and accumulation of counterions in the regions of NCP-NCP contacts. The paNCPs do not show NCP-NCP interaction upon addition of KCl or in the presence of Mg(2+). Simulations for systems with a gradual substitution of K(+) for Mg(2+), to mimic the Mg(2+) titration of an NCP solution, were performed. The rNCP system showed stronger aggregation that occurred at lower concentrations of added Mg(2+), compared to the aNCP system. Additional molecular dynamics simulations performed with a single NCP in the simulation cell showed that detachment of the tails from the NCP core was modest under a wide range of salt concentrations. This implies that salt-induced tail dissociation of the

  19. Vaccination with Leishmania infantum acidic ribosomal P0 but not with nucleosomal histones proteins controls Leishmania infantum infection in hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Lais; Abbehusen, Melissa; Teixeira, Clarissa; Cunha, Jurema; Nascimento, Ivan P; Fukutani, Kyioshi; dos-Santos, Washington; Barral, Aldina; de Oliveira, Camila Indiani; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Soto, Manoel; Brodskyn, Cláudia Ida

    2015-02-01

    Several intracellular Leishmania antigens have been identified in order to find a potential vaccine capable of conferring long lasting protection against Leishmania infection. Histones and Acid Ribosomal proteins are already known to induce an effective immune response and have successfully been tested in the cutaneous leishmaniasis mouse model. Here, we investigate the protective ability of L. infantum nucleosomal histones (HIS) and ribosomal acidic protein P0 (LiP0) against L. infantum infection in the hamster model of visceral leishmaniasis using two different strategies: homologous (plasmid DNA only) or heterologous immunization (plasmid DNA plus recombinant protein and adjuvant). Immunization with both antigens using the heterologous strategy presented a high antibody production level while the homologous strategy immunized group showed predominantly a cellular immune response with parasite load reduction. The pcDNA-LiP0 immunized group showed increased expression ratio of IFN-γ/IL-10 and IFN-γ/TGF-β in the lymph nodes before challenge. Two months after infection hamsters immunized with the empty plasmid presented a pro-inflammatory immune response in the early stages of infection with increased expression ratio of IFN-γ/IL-10 and IFN-γ/TGF-β, whereas hamsters immunized with pcDNA-HIS presented an increase only in the ratio IFN-γ/ TGF-β. On the other hand, hamsters immunized with LiP0 did not present any increase in the IFN-γ/TGF-β and IFN-γ/IL-10 ratio independently of the immunization strategy used. Conversely, five months after infection, hamsters immunized with HIS maintained a pro-inflammatory immune response (ratio IFN-γ/ IL-10) while pcDNA-LiP0 immunized hamsters continued showing a balanced cytokine profile of pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Moreover we observed a significant reduction in parasite load in the spleen, liver and lymph node in this group compared with controls. Our results suggest that vaccination with L. infantum LiP0

  20. Towards elucidating the stability, dynamics and architecture of the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase complex by using quantitative interaction proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloet, Susan L; Baymaz, H Irem; Makowski, Matthew; Groenewold, Vincent; Jansen, Pascal W T C; Berendsen, Madeleine; Niazi, Hassin; Kops, Geert J; Vermeulen, Michiel

    2015-05-01

    The nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD) complex is an evolutionarily conserved chromatin-associated protein complex. Although the subunit composition of the mammalian complex is fairly well characterized, less is known about the stability and dynamics of these interactions. Furthermore, detailed information regarding protein-protein interaction surfaces within the complex is still largely lacking. Here, we show that the NuRD complex interacts with a number of substoichiometric zinc finger-containing proteins. Some of these interactions are salt-sensitive (ZNF512B and SALL4), whereas others (ZMYND8) are not. The stoichiometry of the core subunits is not affected by high salt concentrations, indicating that the core complex is stabilized by hydrophobic interactions. Interestingly, the RBBP4 and RBBP7 proteins are sensitive to high nonionic detergent concentrations during affinity purification. In a subunit exchange assay with stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-treated nuclear extracts, RBBP4 and RBBP7 were identified as dynamic core subunits of the NuRD complex, consistent with their proposed role as histone chaperones. Finally, using cross-linking MS, we have uncovered novel features of NuRD molecular architecture that complement our affinity purification-MS/MS data. Altogether, these findings extend our understanding of MBD3-NuRD structure and stability. MBD3 physically interacts with ZNF512B, HDAC1, ZMYND8, GATAD2B, SALL4, GATAD2A, ZNF592, MTA3, ZNF687, CDK2AP1, CHD3, ZNF532, HDAC2, MTA2, CHD4, MTA1, KPNA2, CHD5, RBBP4 and RBBP7 by pull down (View interaction) CDK2AP1 physically interacts with MBD3, MTA3, HDAC2, GATAD2A, CHD4, CDK2AP1, MTA2, HDAC1, MTA1, CHD3, GATAD2B, MBD2, RBBP4 and RBBP7 by pull down (View interaction) MBD3 physically interacts with MTA2, MTA3, RBBP4, RBBP7, HDAC2, HDAC1, CHD4, CHD3 and MTA1 by cross-linking study (View interaction). © 2014 FEBS.

  1. The binding of lupus-derived autoantibodies to the C-terminal peptide (83-119) of the major SmD1 autoantigen can be mediated by double-stranded DNA and nucleosomes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieker, J.W.C.; Bavel, C.C.A.W. van; Riemekasten, G.; Berden, J.H.M.; Vlag, J. van der

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the binding of lupus-derived autoantibodies, double-stranded DNA and nucleosomes to the positively charged C-terminal SmD1(residues 83-119) peptide and the full-length SmD protein. METHODS: The binding of lupus-derived monoclonal antibodies, sera from patients with systemic

  2. Physical insights into the blood-brain barrier translocation mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodorakis, Panagiotis E.; Müller, Erich A.; Craster, Richard V.; Matar, Omar K.

    2017-08-01

    The number of individuals suffering from diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) is growing with an aging population. While candidate drugs for many of these diseases are available, most of these pharmaceutical agents cannot reach the brain rendering most of the drug therapies that target the CNS inefficient. The reason is the blood-brain barrier (BBB), a complex and dynamic interface that controls the influx and efflux of substances through a number of different translocation mechanisms. Here, we present these mechanisms providing, also, the necessary background related to the morphology and various characteristics of the BBB. Moreover, we discuss various numerical and simulation approaches used to study the BBB, and possible future directions based on multi-scale methods. We anticipate that this review will motivate multi-disciplinary research on the BBB aiming at the design of effective drug therapies.

  3. Microbial translocation and cardiometabolic risk factors in HIV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trøseid, Marius; Manner, Ingjerd W; Pedersen, Karin K

    2014-01-01

    The widespread access to antiretroviral treatment during the past decades has transformed HIV infection from a lethal disease to a chronic condition, in which the relative burden of non-AIDS-related chronic disorders such as cardiovascular disease, malignancy, renal, liver, and bone disease has...... is crucial in order to tailor novel strategies for prophylaxis and treatment. This review will focus on advances in the field that possibly link HIV-induced alterations of the gut mucosa and consequent microbial translocation to cardiometabolic risk factors in HIV infection. Recent work suggests that markers...... increased. The adjusted relative risk for myocardial infarction is reported to be around 2-fold compared to that of the general population, which over time is likely to translate into increased absolute risk in an aging population. Thus, delineating potentially HIV-specific pathogenetic mechanisms...

  4. Logic Gate Operation by DNA Translocation through Biological Nanopores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Yasuga

    Full Text Available Logical operations using biological molecules, such as DNA computing or programmable diagnosis using DNA, have recently received attention. Challenges remain with respect to the development of such systems, including label-free output detection and the rapidity of operation. Here, we propose integration of biological nanopores with DNA molecules for development of a logical operating system. We configured outputs "1" and "0" as single-stranded DNA (ssDNA that is or is not translocated through a nanopore; unlabeled DNA was detected electrically. A negative-AND (NAND operation was successfully conducted within approximately 10 min, which is rapid compared with previous studies using unlabeled DNA. In addition, this operation was executed in a four-droplet network. DNA molecules and associated information were transferred among droplets via biological nanopores. This system would facilitate linking of molecules and electronic interfaces. Thus, it could be applied to molecular robotics, genetic engineering, and even medical diagnosis and treatment.

  5. Logic Gate Operation by DNA Translocation through Biological Nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuga, Hiroki; Kawano, Ryuji; Takinoue, Masahiro; Tsuji, Yutaro; Osaki, Toshihisa; Kamiya, Koki; Miki, Norihisa; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2016-01-01

    Logical operations using biological molecules, such as DNA computing or programmable diagnosis using DNA, have recently received attention. Challenges remain with respect to the development of such systems, including label-free output detection and the rapidity of operation. Here, we propose integration of biological nanopores with DNA molecules for development of a logical operating system. We configured outputs "1" and "0" as single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) that is or is not translocated through a nanopore; unlabeled DNA was detected electrically. A negative-AND (NAND) operation was successfully conducted within approximately 10 min, which is rapid compared with previous studies using unlabeled DNA. In addition, this operation was executed in a four-droplet network. DNA molecules and associated information were transferred among droplets via biological nanopores. This system would facilitate linking of molecules and electronic interfaces. Thus, it could be applied to molecular robotics, genetic engineering, and even medical diagnosis and treatment.

  6. A new reciprocal translocation in a subfertile bull

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darré Roland

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Three bulls of the Montbéliarde breed that exhibited fertility rates lower than 30% following more than 400 artificial inseminations were examined. Semen quality (sperm motility and morphology from these bulls was normal. Fertilizing ability estimated from in vitro embryo production results was studied for two of them. In vitro production rate was very low for one bull (A and normal for the other (B. Cytogenetic analyses were carried out on the three bulls using chromosome banding techniques. These analyses revealed a reciprocal translocation (12;17(q22;q14 in bull B. Based on family analyses, the hypothesis of a de novo origin of this rearrangement is proposed.

  7. Generation, translocation, and action of nitric oxide in living systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennyson, Andrew G; Lippard, Stephen J

    2011-10-28

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a gaseous diatomic radical that is involved in a wide range of physiological and pathological functions in biology. Conceptually, the biochemistry of NO can be separated into three stages: generation (stage 1), translocation (stage 2), and action (stage 3). In stage 1 the oxygenase domain of NO synthase converts L-arginine to L-citrulline and NO (g). Owing to its short-lived nature, this molecule is converted into a different nitrogen oxide such as NO(2), an organonitrosyl such as a nitrosothiol, or a metal nitrosyl such as a heme-nitrosyl, for transportation in stage 2. Each of these derivatives features unique physical characteristics, chemical reactivity, and biological activity. Upon delivery in stage 3, NO exerts its physiological or pathological function by reaction with biomolecules containing redox-active metals or other residues. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of bacterial translocation in patients with chronic HCV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munteanu, Daniela; Negru, Anca; Radulescu, Mihaela; Mihailescu, Raluca; Arama, St S; Arama, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    The factors involved in the progression of liver disease towards decompensated cirrhosis are not completely elucidated. It seems that bacterial translocation (BT) from the gut to the systemic blood flow has an important role in the disease progression, but literature data are controversial. Our objectives were to evaluate the presence of BT in patients with chronic HCV infection and to assess the correlation between BT and liver fibrosis stages and inflammatory state. We conducted a cross-sectional study on patients with chronic HCV infection in a tertiary care hospital between January and July 2013. Blood samples were collected for aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, platelets, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and tumor necrosis-alpha (TNFα). Plasma LPS were measured by ELISA (Kamiya Biomedical Company Seattle, SUA) and TNFα by DIAsource ImmunoAssay (Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium) kits. Liver fibrosis was evaluated by means of FibroMax (BioPredictive, Paris, France) in all patients. We enrolled 116 patients with CHC, with a sex ratio M/F of 0.55 and a median age of 54 (45-61) years. Most of the patients (32) had compensated cirrhosis (F4). LPS levels were higher in patients with mild fibrosis--median value of 60.34 (32-91.7) ng/mL, than in cirrhotic patients--median value 40.39 (20.2-74.4) ng/mL (p = 0.051). We found no statistical correlation between LPS levels and fibrosis (p = 0.068) or TNFα levels (p = 0.097) CONCLUSIONS: There was BT in patients with CHC but it was not correlated with liver fibrosis stages or systemic inflammation. This may suggest that LPS evaluation may not be the best technique to assess baterial translocation, but further studies are needed.

  9. Resolution of ion translocating proteolipid subclasses active in bacterial calcification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swain, L.D.; Renthal, R.D.; Boyan, B.D. (Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio (USA))

    1989-06-01

    Formation of calcium hydroxyapatite occurs on membrane surfaces via interaction of calcium, inorganic phosphate, phospholipids, calcifiable proteolipids, and ion flux to and from the nucleating site. Recently, this laboratory reported that proteolipids from the calcifying bacterium, Bacterionema matruchotti, act as an ionophore when reconstituted into bacteriorhodopsin-proteoliposomes. This ionophoric activity is blocked by (14C)dicyclohexylcarbodiimide ((14C)DCCD). SDS-PAGE shows that (14C)DCCD binds to a single band of Mr 8500. To determine whether proteins other than the (14C)DCCD-binding protein are involved, we examined the function of proteolipid species extracted by solvents of differing polarity. Proteolipids were isolated independently from chloroform:methanol (2:1) and chloroform:methanol:HCl (200:100:1) extracts of the bacteria by Sephadex LH-20 chromatography and were electrophoresed on 12.5% acrylamide gels. The chloroform:methanol extract contained a major hand at Mr 10,000 that was not present in gels of proteolipid isolated by acidified solvent. Proteolipids extracted in chloroform:methanol:HCl included a broad band at Mr 8500, which co-migrated with the (14C) DCCD-binding protein. The rate and extent of proton translocation were not altered when either proteolipid extract was added individually to bacteriorhodopsin proteoliposomes. However, when proteolipids isolated from the chloroform:methanol and chloroform:methanol:HCl extracts were combined, the rate and extent of translocation were increased. These data demonstrate that at least two proteolipid proteins are necessary for ionophoric activity, the Mr 10,000 protein isolated by chloroform:methanol 2:1 and the (14C)DCCD-binding protein requiring acidified solvent for extraction.

  10. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis by fluorescence in situ hybridization of reciprocal and Robertsonian translocations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Kai Chen

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: There is a trend whereby the outcome for Robertsonian translocation group carriers is better than that for reciprocal translocation group carriers. Aneuploidy screening may possibly be added in order to improve the outcome, especially for individuals with an advanced maternal age. The emergence of an array-based technology should help improve this type of analysis.

  11. ATM modulates the loading of recombination proteins onto a chromosomal translocation breakpoint hotspot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiying Sun

    Full Text Available Chromosome translocations induced by DNA damaging agents, such as ionizing radiation and certain chemotherapies, alter genetic information resulting in malignant transformation. Abrogation or loss of the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM protein, a DNA damage signaling regulator, increases the incidence of chromosome translocations. However, how ATM protects cells from chromosome translocations is still unclear. Chromosome translocations involving the MLL gene on 11q23 are the most frequent chromosome abnormalities in secondary leukemias associated with chemotherapy employing etoposide, a topoisomerase II poison. Here we show that ATM deficiency results in the excessive binding of the DNA recombination protein RAD51 at the translocation breakpoint hotspot of 11q23 chromosome translocation after etoposide exposure. Binding of Replication protein A (RPA and the chromatin remodeler INO80, which facilitate RAD51 loading on damaged DNA, to the hotspot were also increased by ATM deficiency. Thus, in addition to activating DNA damage signaling, ATM may avert chromosome translocations by preventing excessive loading of recombinational repair proteins onto translocation breakpoint hotspots.

  12. Orientation of native versus translocated juvenile lesser spotted eagles (Clanga pomarina) on the first autumn migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyburg, Bernd-U; Bergmanis, Ugis; Langgemach, Torsten; Graszynski, Kai; Hinz, Arno; Börner, Ingo; Meyburg, Christiane; Vansteelant, Wouter M G

    2017-08-01

    The ontogeny of migration routines used by wild birds remains unresolved. Here we investigated the migratory orientation of juvenile lesser spotted eagles (LSE; Clanga pomarina) based on translocation and satellite tracking. Between 2004 and 2016, 85 second-hatched juveniles (Abels) were reared in captivity for release into the declining German population, including 50 birds that were translocated 940 km from Latvia. In 2009, we tracked 12 translocated juveniles, as well as eight native juveniles and nine native adults, to determine how inexperienced birds come to use strategic migration routes. Native juveniles departed around the same time as the adults and six of eight used the eastern flyway around the Mediterranean, which was used by all adults. In contrast, translocated juveniles departed on average 6 days before native LSEs, and five travelled southward and died in the central Mediterranean region. Consequently, fewer translocated juveniles (4/12) than native juveniles (7/8) reached Africa. We conclude that juvenile LSEs have a much better chance of learning the strategic southeastern flyway if they leave at an appropriate time to connect with experienced elders upon departure. It is not clear why translocated juveniles departed so early. Regardless, by the end of the year, most juveniles had perished, whether they were translocated (10/12) or not (6/8). The small number of surviving translocated juveniles thus still represents a significant increase in the annual productivity of the German LSE population in 2009. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Simulations of two-dimensional unbiased polymer translocation using the bond fluctuation model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Panja, D.; Barkema, G.T.

    2010-01-01

    We use the bond fluctuation model (BFM) to study the pore-blockade times of a translocating polymer of length N in two dimensions, in the absence of external forces on the polymer (i.e., unbiased translocation) and hydrodynamic interactions (i.e., the polymer is a Rouse polymer), through a narrow

  14. INTESTINAL BACTERIAL TRANSLOCATION IN EXPERIMENTALLY BURNED MICE WITH WOUNDS COLONIZED BY PSEUDOMONAS-AERUGINOSA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MANSON, WL; COENEN, JMFH; KLASEN, HJ; HORWITZ, EH

    1992-01-01

    Translocation of micro-organisms from the gastrointestinal tract may play a role in the pathogenesis of septic complications in severely burned patients. We therefore investigated the influence of burn wound infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa on translocation in experimentally burned mice. The P.

  15. Xp11.2 translocation renal cell carcinoma diagnosed by immunohistochemistry and cytogenetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswajit Dey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Xp11.2 translocation renal cell carcinomas (TRCCs are a group of neoplasms with distinct clinical, histopathological appearance, immunohistochemical, and cytogenetic profile. We report a case of Xp11.2 translocation TRCC in an 11-year-old male diagnosed based on immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization.

  16. Live birth from a patient with a three-way balanced translocation t(5 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. Array comparative genomic hybridisation (array-CGH) was used to screen embryos for chromosome imbalances. Methods. Embryo biopsy, preimplantation genetic diagnosis using a 24sure+ kit to detect translocations in embryos. Results. Of 10 embryos tested, 2 were found to have an unbalanced translocation, ...

  17. ESX-1-mediated translocation to the cytosol controls virulence of mycobacteria

    KAUST Repository

    Houben, Diane

    2012-05-08

    Mycobacterium species, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae, are among the most potent human bacterial pathogens. The discovery of cytosolic mycobacteria challenged the paradigm that these pathogens exclusively localize within the phagosome of host cells. As yet the biological relevance of mycobacterial translocation to the cytosol remained unclear. In this current study we used electron microscopy techniques to establish a clear link between translocation and mycobacterial virulence. Pathogenic, patient-derived mycobacteria species were found to translocate to the cytosol, while non-pathogenic species did not. We were further able to link cytosolic translocation with pathogenicity by introducing the ESX-1 (type VII) secretion system into the non-virulent, exclusively phagolysosomal Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Furthermore, we show that translocation is dependent on the C-terminus of the early-secreted antigen ESAT-6. The C-terminal truncation of ESAT-6 was shown to result in attenuation in mice, again linking translocation to virulence. Together, these data demonstrate the molecular mechanism facilitating translocation of mycobacteria. The ability to translocate from the phagolysosome to the cytosol is with this study proven to be biologically significant as it determines mycobacterial virulence. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Camplyobacter jejuni translocation across intestinal epithelial cells is facilitated by ganglioside-like lipooligosaccharide structures.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuis, E.E.S.; Louwen, R.; Marrewijk, L. van; Horst, D.; Ruiter, L. de; Heikema, A.P.; Wamel, W.J. van; Wagenaar, J.A.; Endtz, H.P.; Samsom, J.N.; Baarlen, P. van; Akhmanova, A.S.; Belkum, A. van

    2012-01-01

    Translocation across intestinal epithelial cells is an established pathogenic feature of the zoonotic bacterial species Campylobacter jejuni. The number of C. jejuni virulence factors known to be involved in translocation is limited. In the present study we investigated whether sialylation of C.

  19. Campylobacter jejuni Translocation across Intestinal Epithelial Cells Is Facilitated by Ganglioside-Like Lipooligosaccharide Structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louwen, R.; Nieuwenhuis, E.E.S.; Marrewijk, van L.; Horst-Kreft, D.; Ruiter, de L.; Heikema, A.P.; Wamel, van W.J.; Wagenaar, J.A.; Endtz, H.P.; Samsom, J.; Baarlen, van P.; Akhmanova, A.; Belkum, van A.

    2012-01-01

    Translocation across intestinal epithelial cells is an established pathogenic feature of the zoonotic bacterial species Campylobacter jejuni. The number of C. jejuni virulence factors known to be involved in translocation is limited. In the present study, we investigated whether sialylation of C.

  20. Campylobacter jejuni translocation across intestinal epithelial cells is facilitated by ganglioside-like lipooligosaccharide structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.P.L. Louwen (Rogier); E.E.S. Nieuwenhuis (Edward); L. van Marrewijk (Leonie); D. Horst-Kreft (Deborah); L.F. de Ruiter (Lilian); A.P. Heikema (Astrid); W.J.B. van Wamel (Willem); J.A. Wagenaar (Jaap); H.P. Endtz (Hubert); J.N. Samsom (Janneke); P. van Baarlen (Peter); A.S. Akhmanova (Anna); A.F. van Belkum (Alex)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractTranslocation across intestinal epithelial cells is an established pathogenic feature of the zoonotic bacterial species Campylobacter jejuni. The number of C. jejuni virulence factors known to be involved in translocation is limited. In the present study, we investigated whether

  1. Competition between Sec- and TAT-dependent protein translocation in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cristóbal, S.; de Gier, J.-W.; Nielsen, Henrik

    1999-01-01

    Recently, a new protein translocation pathway, the twin-arginine translocation (TAT) pathway, has been identified in both bacteria and chloroplasts. To study the possible competition between the TAT- and the well-characterized Sec translocon-dependent pathways in Escherichia coli, we have fused...

  2. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis for X;autosome translocations : lessons from a case of misdiagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Echten-Arends, J.; Coonen, E.; Reuters, B.; Suijkerbuijk, R. F.; Dul, E. C.; Land, J. A.; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, C. M. A.

    2013-01-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is offered to couples carrying a reciprocal translocation in an attempt to increase their chance of phenotypically normal offspring. For the selection of embryos that are balanced for the translocation chromosomes, it is critical to use a combination of DNA

  3. Orientation of native versus translocated juvenile lesser spotted eagles (Clanga pomarina) on the first autumn migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmanis, Ugis; Langgemach, Torsten; Graszynski, Kai; Hinz, Arno; Börner, Ingo; Meyburg, Christiane; Vansteelant, Wouter M. G.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ontogeny of migration routines used by wild birds remains unresolved. Here we investigated the migratory orientation of juvenile lesser spotted eagles (LSE; Clanga pomarina) based on translocation and satellite tracking. Between 2004 and 2016, 85 second-hatched juveniles (Abels) were reared in captivity for release into the declining German population, including 50 birds that were translocated 940 km from Latvia. In 2009, we tracked 12 translocated juveniles, as well as eight native juveniles and nine native adults, to determine how inexperienced birds come to use strategic migration routes. Native juveniles departed around the same time as the adults and six of eight used the eastern flyway around the Mediterranean, which was used by all adults. In contrast, translocated juveniles departed on average 6 days before native LSEs, and five travelled southward and died in the central Mediterranean region. Consequently, fewer translocated juveniles (4/12) than native juveniles (7/8) reached Africa. We conclude that juvenile LSEs have a much better chance of learning the strategic southeastern flyway if they leave at an appropriate time to connect with experienced elders upon departure. It is not clear why translocated juveniles departed so early. Regardless, by the end of the year, most juveniles had perished, whether they were translocated (10/12) or not (6/8). The small number of surviving translocated juveniles thus still represents a significant increase in the annual productivity of the German LSE population in 2009. PMID:28768749

  4. Live birth from a patient with a three-way balanced translocation t(5 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Three-way balanced translocations are unusual and can lead to infertility as well as abnormal embryos. In this case report, we describe a couple who experienced repeated miscarriages as a result of the male partner being a carrier of a three-way translocation t(5;8;12). Objectives: Array comparative genomic ...

  5. Diagnosis of parental balanced reciprocal translocations by trophectoderm biopsy and comprehensive chromosomal screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundheimer, L W; Liu, L; Buyalos, R P; Hubert, G; Al-Safi, Z; Shamonki, M

    2017-09-12

    This study investigates a case series of eight couples who underwent trophectoderm (TE) biopsy and comprehensive chromosomal screening (CCS) for routine aneuploidy screening and were found to have CCS results concerning for previously undetected parental balanced reciprocal translocations. In each case, controlled ovarian hyperstimulation and in vitro fertilization (IVF) yielded multiple blastocysts that each underwent CCS with high-density oligonucleotide microarray comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Parental translocations were suspected based on the finding of identical break point mutations in multiple embryos from each couple. Confirmation of these suspected translocations within blastocysts was performed with next-generation sequencing (NGS). Subsequent parental karyotypic evaluation resulted in a diagnosis of parental balanced reciprocal translocation in each case. We demonstrated that high-resolution aCGH and NGS on TE biopsies can accurately detect parental reciprocal translocations when previously unrecognized.

  6. ATP-dependent transport of statins by human and rat MRP2/Mrp2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, Lucy C.J., E-mail: Luc_ellis@yahoo.co.uk [Section of Translational Medicine, Division of Applied Biology, Polwarth Building, Foresterhill, Aberdeen AB25 2ZD (United Kingdom); Hawksworth, Gabrielle M. [Section of Translational Medicine, Division of Applied Biology, Polwarth Building, Foresterhill, Aberdeen AB25 2ZD (United Kingdom); Weaver, Richard J. [Biologie Servier, Drug Safety Research Centre, 905 Route de Saran, 45520 Gidy (France)

    2013-06-01

    Multidrug resistance associated protein-2, MRP2 (human), Mrp2 (rat) are an efflux transporter, responsible for the transport of numerous endogenous and xenobiotic compounds including taurocholate, methotrexate and carboxydichlorofluorescein (CDF). The present study aims to characterise transport of statins by human and rat MRP2/Mrp2 using membrane and vesicle preparations. All statins tested (simvastatin, pravastatin, pitavastatin, fluvastatin, atorvastatin, lovastatin and rosuvastatin) stimulated vanadate-sensitive ATPase activity in membranes expressing human or rat MRP2/Mrp2, suggesting that all statins are substrates of human and rat MRP2/Mrp2. The substrate affinity (Km) of all statins for MRP2/Mrp2 was comparable and no correlation between lipophilicity (logD{sub 7.0}) and Km was seen. All statins also inhibited uptake of the fluorescent Mrp2 substrate, CDF (1 μM) into vesicles expressing human or rat MRP2/Mrp2 with similar IC{sub 50} values. Fitting of the inhibitory data to the hill slope equation, gave hill coefficients (h) of greater than one, suggesting that transport involved more than one binding site for inhibitors of MPR2 and Mrp2. We conclude that statins were transported by both human and rat MRP2/Mrp2 with similar affinity. Statins were also shown to compete with other substrates for transport by MRP2/Mrp2 and that this transport involved more than one binding site on the Mrp2/MRP2 protein. - Highlights: • We characterised MRP2 (human)/Mrp2 (rat)-mediated transport of statins. • We show statins were transported by human and rat MRP2/Mrp2. • Statins competed with a known substrate for transport by MRP2/Mrp2. • Competition involved more than one binding site on the MRP2/Mrp2 protein.

  7. A futile cycle, formed between two ATP-dependant γ-glutamyl cycle ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thus, in cysteine-limiting conditions, glutamate is cycled back into glutamate via 5-oxoproline at the cost of two ATP molecules without production of glutathione and is the cause of the decreased levels of glutathione synthesis, as well as the ATP depletion observed in these cells. The model is also compatible with the ...

  8. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling by the Cockayne syndrome B DNA repair-transcription-coupling factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Citterio (Elisabetta); V. van den Boom (Vincent); G. Schnitzler; R. Kanaar (Roland); E. Bonte (Edgar); R.E. Kingston; W. Vermeulen (Wim); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThe Cockayne syndrome B protein (CSB) is required for coupling DNA excision repair to transcription in a process known as transcription-coupled repair (TCR). Cockayne syndrome patients show UV sensitivity and severe neurodevelopmental abnormalities. CSB is a

  9. Arsenic Alters ATP-Dependent Ca2+ Signaling in Human Airway Epithelial Cell Wound Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Cara L.; Lantz, R. Clark; Burgess, Jefferey L.; Boitano, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Arsenic is a natural metalloid toxicant that is associated with occupational inhalation injury and contaminates drinking water worldwide. Both inhalation of arsenic and consumption of arsenic-tainted water are correlated with malignant and nonmalignant lung diseases. Despite strong links between arsenic and respiratory illness, underlying cell responses to arsenic remain unclear. We hypothesized that arsenic may elicit some of its detrimental effects on the airway through limitation of innate immune function and, specifically, through alteration of paracrine ATP (purinergic) Ca2+ signaling in the airway epithelium. We examined the effects of acute (24 h) exposure with environmentally relevant levels of arsenic (i.e., arsenic reduces purinergic Ca2+ signaling in a dose-dependent manner and results in a reshaping of the Ca2+ signaling response to localized wounds. We next examined arsenic effects on two purinergic receptor types: the metabotropic P2Y and ionotropic P2X receptors. Arsenic inhibited both P2Y- and P2X-mediated Ca2+ signaling responses to ATP. Both inhaled and ingested arsenic can rapidly reach the airway epithelium where purinergic signaling is essential in innate immune functions (e.g., ciliary beat, salt and water transport, bactericide production, and wound repair). Arsenic-induced compromise of such airway defense mechanisms may be an underlying contributor to chronic lung disease. PMID:21357385

  10. PROTEIN QUALITY CONTROL IN BACTERIAL CELLS: INTEGRATED NETWORKS OF CHAPERONES AND ATP-DEPENDENT PROTEASES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FLANAGAN,J.M.BEWLEY,M.C.

    2002-10-01

    It is generally accepted that the information necessary to specify the native, functional, three-dimensional structure of a protein is encoded entirely within its amino acid sequence; however, efficient reversible folding and unfolding is observed only with a subset of small single-domain proteins. Refolding experiments often lead to the formation of kinetically-trapped, misfolded species that aggregate, even in dilute solution. In the cellular environment, the barriers to efficient protein folding and maintenance of native structure are even larger due to the nature of this process. First, nascent polypeptides must fold in an extremely crowded environment where the concentration of macromolecules approaches 300-400 mg/mL and on average, each ribosome is within its own diameter of another ribosome (1-3). These conditions of severe molecular crowding, coupled with high concentrations of nascent polypeptide chains, favor nonspecific aggregation over productive folding (3). Second, folding of newly-translated polypeptides occurs in the context of their vehtorial synthesis process. Amino acids are added to a growing nascent chain at the rate of {approx}5 residues per set, which means that for a 300 residue protein its N-terminus will be exposed to the cytosol {approx}1 min before its C-terminus and be free to begin the folding process. However, because protein folding is highly cooperative, the nascent polypeptide cannot reach its native state until a complete folding domain (50-250 residues) has emerged from the ribosome. Thus, for a single-domain protein, the final steps in ffolding are only completed post-translationally since {approx}40 residues of a nascent chain are sequestered within the exit channel of the ribosome and are not available for folding (4). A direct consequence of this limitation in cellular folding is that during translation incomplete domains will exist in partially-folded states that tend to expose hydrophobic residues that are prone to aggregation and/or mislfolding. Thus it is not surprising that, in cells, the protein folding process is error prone and organisms have evolved ''editing'' or quality control (QC) systems to assist in the folding, maintenance and, when necessary, selective removal of damaged proteins. In fact, there is growing evidence that failure of these QC-systems contributes to a number of disease states (5-8). This chapter describes our current understanding of the nature and mechanisms of the protein quality control systems in the cytosol of bacteria. Parallel systems are exploited in the cytosol and mitochondria of eukaryotes to prevent the accumulation of misfolded proteins.

  11. PROTEIN QUALITY CONTROL IN BACTERIAL CELLS: INTEGRATED NETWORKS OF CHAPERONES AND ATP-DEPENDENT PROTEASES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FLANAGAN,J.M.; BEWLEY,M.C.

    2001-12-03

    It is generally accepted that the information necessary to specify the native, functional, three-dimensional structure of a protein is encoded entirely within its amino acid sequence; however, efficient reversible folding and unfolding is observed only with a subset of small single-domain proteins. Refolding experiments often lead to the formation of kinetically-trapped, misfolded species that aggregate, even in dilute solution. In the cellular environment, the barriers to efficient protein folding and maintenance of native structure are even larger due to the nature of this process. First, nascent polypeptides must fold in an extremely crowded environment where the concentration of macromolecules approaches 300-400 mg/mL and on average, each ribosome is within its own diameter of another ribosome (1-3). These conditions of severe molecular crowding, coupled with high concentrations of nascent polypeptide chains, favor nonspecific aggregation over productive folding (3). Second, folding of newly-translated polypeptides occurs in the context of their vehtorial synthesis process. Amino acids are added to a growing nascent chain at the rate of -5 residues per set, which means that for a 300 residue protein its N-terminus will be exposed to the cytosol {approx}1 min before its C-terminus and be free to begin the folding process. However, because protein folding is highly cooperative, the nascent polypeptide cannot reach its native state until a complete folding domain (50-250 residues) has emerged from the ribosome. Thus, for a single-domain protein, the final steps in folding are only completed post-translationally since {approx}40 residues of a nascent chain are sequestered within the exit channel of the ribosome and are not available for folding (4). A direct consequence of this limitation in cellular folding is that during translation incomplete domains will exist in partially-folded states that tend to expose hydrophobic residues that are prone to aggregation and/or misfolding. Thus it is not surprising that, in cells, the protein folding process is error prone and organisms have evolved ''editing'' or quality control (QC) systems to assist in the folding, maintenance and, when necessary, selective removal of damaged proteins. In fact, there is growing evidence that failure of these QC-systems contributes to a number of disease states (5-8). This chapter describes our current understanding of the nature and mechanisms of the protein quality control systems in the cytosol of bacteria. Parallel systems are exploited in the cytosol and mitochondria of eukaryotes to prevent the accumulation of misfolded proteins.

  12. Structural basis of PP2A activation by PTPA, an ATP-dependent activation chaperone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Feng; Stanevich, Vitali; Wlodarchak, Nathan; Sengupta, Rituparna; Jiang, Li; Satyshur, Kenneth A.; Xing, Yongna

    2013-10-08

    Proper activation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) catalytic subunit is central for the complex PP2A regulation and is crucial for broad aspects of cellular function. The crystal structure of PP2A bound to PP2A phosphatase activator (PTPA) and ATPγS reveals that PTPA makes broad contacts with the structural elements surrounding the PP2A active site and the adenine moiety of ATP. PTPA-binding stabilizes the protein fold of apo-PP2A required for activation, and orients ATP phosphoryl groups to bind directly to the PP2A active site. This allows ATP to modulate the metal-binding preferences of the PP2A active site and utilize the PP2A active site for ATP hydrolysis. In vitro, ATP selectively and drastically enhances binding of endogenous catalytic metal ions, which requires ATP hydrolysis and is crucial for acquisition of pSer/Thr-specific phosphatase activity. Furthermore, both PP2A- and ATP-binding are required for PTPA function in cell proliferation and survival. Our results suggest novel mechanisms of PTPA in PP2A activation with structural economy and a unique ATP-binding pocket that could potentially serve as a specific therapeutic target.

  13. Corynebacterium glutamicum glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase isoforms with opposite, ATP-dependent regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omumasaba, Crispinus A; Okai, Naoko; Inui, Masayuki; Yukawa, Hideaki

    2004-01-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum gapA and gapB encode glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases (GAPDHs) that differ in molecular weight and activity in the presence of ATP. Comparative genome analysis revealed that GapA, the product of gapA, represented the canonical GAPDH that is highly conserved across the three major life forms. GapB, with an additional 110-residue-long sequence upstream of its GAPDH-specific domain, was homologous only to select microbial putative GAPDHs. Upon gene disruption, the initial growth rates of the wild-type, DeltagapA and DeltagapB strains on glucose (0.77, 0.00 and 0.76 h(-1), respectively), lactate (0.20, 0.18 and 0.15 h(-1), respectively), pyruvate (0.39, 0.29 and 0.20 h(-1), respectively), and acetate (0.06, 0.06 and 0.04 h(-1), respectively), implied that GapA was indispensable for growth on glucose, that GapB, but not GapA, affected early growth on acetate, and that GapB had a greater influence on growth under gluconeogenic conditions than GapA. The disruption of either gapA or gapB showed no significant effect on the transcription of any of the other gap cluster genes although it led to reduced triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) activities. Glycolytic GAPDH activity at low in vitro ATP concentrations was solely attributed to the 35.9-kDa GapA. At higher ATP concentrations, the same activity was attributed to the 51.2-kDa GapB. Both enzymes, however, exhibited similar NADP-dependent GAPDH activities at the higher ATP concentrations. In effect therefore, the GAPDH-catalyzed reaction at low ATP concentrations was irreversible, with all the glycolytic activity strictly NAD-dependent and attributed to GapA. At higher ATP concentrations, the reaction was reversible, with glycolytic activity NAD- or NADP-dependent and attributed to GapB, while gluconeogenic activity was attributable to both GapA and GapB.

  14. Characterization of the ATP-Dependent Lon-Like Protease in Methanobrevibacter smithii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihua Pei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Lon protease is highly evolutionarily conserved. However, little is known about Lon in the context of gut microbial communities. A gene encoding a Lon-like protease (Lon-like-Ms was identified and characterized from Methanobrevibacter smithii, the predominant archaeon in the human gut ecosystem. Phylogenetic and sequence analyses showed that Lon-like-Ms and its homologs are newly identified members of the Lon family. A recombinant form of the enzyme was purified by affinity chromatography, and its catalytic properties were examined. Recombinant Lon-like-Ms exhibited ATPase activity and cleavage activity toward fluorogenic peptides and casein. The peptidase activity of Lon-like-Ms relied strictly on Mg2+ (or other divalent cations and ATP. These results highlight a new type of Lon-like protease that differs from its bacterial counterpart.

  15. Role of ATP-dependent K channels in the effects of erythropoietin in renal ischaemia injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonguç Utku Yilmaz

    2015-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: Our results showed that the cell proliferative, cytoprotective and anti-apoptotic effects of EPO were associated with KATP channels in the renal tubular cell culture model under hypoxic/normal conditions.

  16. The RIG-I ATPase domain structure reveals insights into ATP-dependent antiviral signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civril, Filiz; Bennett, Matthew; Moldt, Manuela; Deimling, Tobias; Witte, Gregor; Schiesser, Stefan; Carell, Thomas; Hopfner, Karl-Peter

    2011-10-28

    RIG-I detects cytosolic viral dsRNA with 5' triphosphates (5'-ppp-dsRNA), thereby initiating an antiviral innate immune response. Here we report the crystal structure of superfamily 2 (SF2) ATPase domain of RIG-I in complex with a nucleotide analogue. RIG-I SF2 comprises two RecA-like domains 1A and 2A and a helical insertion domain 2B, which together form a 'C'-shaped structure. Domains 1A and 2A are maintained in a 'signal-off' state with an inactive ATP hydrolysis site by an intriguing helical arm. By mutational analysis, we show surface motifs that are critical for dsRNA-stimulated ATPase activity, indicating that dsRNA induces a structural movement that brings domains 1A and 2A/B together to form an active ATPase site. The structure also indicates that the regulatory domain is close to the end of the helical arm, where it is well positioned to recruit 5'-ppp-dsRNA to the SF2 domain. Overall, our results indicate that the activation of RIG-I occurs through an RNA- and ATP-driven structural switch in the SF2 domain.

  17. Structural Basis for the Mechanism of ATP-Dependent Acetone Carboxylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mus, Florence; Eilers, Brian J; Alleman, Alexander B; Kabasakal, Burak V; Wells, Jennifer N; Murray, James W; Nocek, Boguslaw P; DuBois, Jennifer L; Peters, John W

    2017-08-03

    Microorganisms use carboxylase enzymes to form new carbon-carbon bonds by introducing carbon dioxide gas (CO2) or its hydrated form, bicarbonate (HCO3-), into target molecules. Acetone carboxylases (ACs) catalyze the conversion of substrates acetone and HCO3- to form the product acetoacetate. Many bicarbonate-incorporating carboxylases rely on the organic cofactor biotin for the activation of bicarbonate. ACs contain metal ions but not organic cofactors, and use ATP to activate substrates through phosphorylation. How the enzyme coordinates these phosphorylation events and new C-C bond formation in the absence of biotin has remained a mystery since these enzymes were discovered. The first structural rationale for acetone carboxylation is presented here, focusing on the 360 kDa (αβγ)2 heterohexameric AC from Xanthobacter autotrophicus in the ligand-free, AMP-bound, and acetate coordinated states. These structures suggest successive steps in a catalytic cycle revealing that AC undergoes large conformational changes coupled to substrate activation by ATP to perform C-C bond ligation at a distant Mn center. These results illustrate a new chemical strategy for the conversion of CO2 into biomass, a process of great significance to the global carbon cycle.

  18. Multitasking in the mitochondrion by the ATP-dependent Lon protease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Venkatesh, Sundararajan; Lee, Jae; Singh, Kamalendra; Lee, Irene; Suzuki, Carolyn K

    2012-01-01

    .... The best-understood functions of mitochondrial Lon are linked to maintaining proteostasis under normal metabolic conditions, and preventing proteotoxicity during environmental and cellular stress...

  19. The male germ cell gene regulator CTCFL is functionally different from CTCF and binds CTCF-like consensus sites in a nucleosome composition-dependent manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sleutels Frank

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CTCF is a highly conserved and essential zinc finger protein expressed in virtually all cell types. In conjunction with cohesin, it organizes chromatin into loops, thereby regulating gene expression and epigenetic events. The function of CTCFL or BORIS, the testis-specific paralog of CTCF, is less clear. Results Using immunohistochemistry on testis sections and fluorescence-based microscopy on intact live seminiferous tubules, we show that CTCFL is only transiently present during spermatogenesis, prior to the onset of meiosis, when the protein co-localizes in nuclei with ubiquitously expressed CTCF. CTCFL distribution overlaps completely with that of Stra8, a retinoic acid-inducible protein essential for the propagation of meiosis. We find that absence of CTCFL in mice causes sub-fertility because of a partially penetrant testicular atrophy. CTCFL deficiency affects the expression of a number of testis-specific genes, including Gal3st1 and Prss50. Combined, these data indicate that CTCFL has a unique role in spermatogenesis. Genome-wide RNA expression studies in ES cells expressing a V5- and GFP-tagged form of CTCFL show that genes that are downregulated in CTCFL-deficient testis are upregulated in ES cells. These data indicate that CTCFL is a male germ cell gene regulator. Furthermore, genome-wide DNA-binding analysis shows that CTCFL binds a consensus sequence that is very similar to that of CTCF. However, only ~3,700 out of the ~5,700 CTCFL- and ~31,000 CTCF-binding sites overlap. CTCFL binds promoters with loosely assembled nucleosomes, whereas CTCF favors consensus sites surrounded by phased nucleosomes. Finally, an ES cell-based rescue assay shows that CTCFL is functionally different from CTCF. Conclusions Our data suggest that nucleosome composition specifies the genome-wide binding of CTCFL and CTCF. We propose that the transient expression of CTCFL in spermatogonia and preleptotene spermatocytes serves to occupy a

  20. Uptake, translocation, and toxicity of gold nanorods in maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi Shahmansouri, Nastaran

    Nanomaterials are widely used in many different products, such as electronics, cosmetics, industrial goods, biomedical uses, and other material applications. The heavy emission of nanomaterials into the environment has motived increasing concern regarding the effects on ecosystems, food chains, and, human health. Plants can tolerate a certain amount of natural nanomaterials, but large amounts of ENMs released from a variety of industries could be toxic to plants and possibly threaten the ecosystem. Employing phytoremediation as a contamination treatment method may show promise. However a pre-requisite to successful treatment is a better understanding of the behavior and effects of nanomaterials within plant systems. This study is designed to investigate the uptake, translocation, bioavailability, and toxicity of gold nanorods in maize plants. Maize is an important food and feed crop that can be used to understand the potential hazardous effects of nanoparticle uptake and distribution in the food chain. The findings could be an important contribution to the fields of phytoremediation, agri-nanotechnology, and nanoparticle toxicity on plants. In the first experiment, hydroponically grown maize seedlings were exposed to similar doses of commercial non-coated gold nanorods in three sizes, 10x34 nm, 20x75 nm, and 40x96 nm. The three nanorod species were suspended in solutions at concentrations of 350 mg/l, 5.8 mg/l, and 14 mg/l, respectively. Maize plants were exposed to all three solutions resulting in considerably lower transpiration and wet biomass than control plants. Likewise, dry biomass was reduced, but the effect is less pronounced than that of transpiration and wet biomass. The reduced transpiration and water content, which eventually proved fatal to exposed plants, were most likely a result of toxic effect of gold nanorod, which appeared to physically hinder the root system. TEM images proved that maize plants can uptake gold particles and accumulate them in

  1. The impact of translocations on neutral and functional genetic diversity within and among populations of the Seychelles warbler

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wright, David J.; Spurgin, Lewis G.; Collar, Nigel J.; Komdeur, Jan; Burke, Terry; Richardson, David S.

    Translocations are an increasingly common tool in conservation. The maintenance of genetic diversity through translocation is critical for both the short- and long-term persistence of populations and species. However, the relative spatio-temporal impacts of translocations on neutral and functional

  2. Mechanism of Cationic Nanoparticles and Cell-Penetrating Peptides Direct Translocate Across Cell Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiaqi; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    2014-03-01

    Cationic Nanoparticles (NPs) and cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are known effective intracellular delivery agents. These positively charged particles can bypass traditional endocytosis route to enter the cytosol, which is known as direct translocation. However, mechanism of direct translocation of both NPs and CPPs is not well understood. Using Coarse-grained (CG) molecular dynamics simulation, we found that gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as well as HIV-1 Tat peptides can translocate across model biological membranes through nanoscale holes under a transmembrane (TM) potential. After the translocation, the TM is strongly weakened and the holes gradually reseal themselves, while the NPs/CPPs roam freely in the ``intracellular region.'' Both size and shape of the NPs/ CPPs are found to be a determine factor of their translocation behaviour, and the relationship between direct translocation and endocytosis is also discussed. The results provided here establish fundamental rules of direct translocation entry of NPs/CPPs, which may guide the rational design of cationic intracellular nanocarriers.

  3. Lactobacillus plantarum prevents bacterial translocation in rats following ischemia and reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Huang, Qian; Zhang, Wei; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2011-11-01

    Bacterial translocation is considered a major cause of initiation and development of systemic sepsis and multiple organ dysfunction in clinic. The aim of this study was to determine the ability of a defined Lactobacillus plantarum to prevent ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) induced intestinal infection. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated into three groups: (1) controls (sham-operated, no treatment), (2) ischemia/reperfusion and (3) ischemia/reperfusion and Lactobacillus plantarum treatment. Lactobacillus plantarum L2 was administered daily intragastrically 14 days prior to induction of I/R. Rats were then sacrificed, and tissue and blood samples were cultured to determine bacterial translocation. Cytokines in plasma were detected by ELISA. Ileal segments were removed for morphological examination. Intestinal I/R induced excess pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion and barrier dysfunction (increased epithelial cell apoptosis, cecal flora dysbiosis, disruption of mucosa and multiple erosions) in the intestine, associated with increased bacterial translocation to extraintestinal sites. Approximately 87.5% of rats exposed to I/R had bacterial translocation while there was no bacterial translocation in controls. However, pretreatment of animals with Lactobacillus plantarum completely prevented I/R induced bacterial translocation, reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine release, and intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis, resulting in recovered microflora and mucosal integrity. These findings indicate that Lactobacillus plantarum L2 can prevent I/R-induced bacterial translocation and intestinal barrier dysfunction and, thereby, exert beneficial effects in the intestinal tract.

  4. Quantitative Analysis of the Nanopore Translocation Dynamics of Simple Structured Polynucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schink, Severin; Renner, Stephan; Alim, Karen; Arnaut, Vera; Simmel, Friedrich C.; Gerland, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Nanopore translocation experiments are increasingly applied to probe the secondary structures of RNA and DNA molecules. Here, we report two vital steps toward establishing nanopore translocation as a tool for the systematic and quantitative analysis of polynucleotide folding: 1), Using α-hemolysin pores and a diverse set of different DNA hairpins, we demonstrate that backward nanopore force spectroscopy is particularly well suited for quantitative analysis. In contrast to forward translocation from the vestibule side of the pore, backward translocation times do not appear to be significantly affected by pore-DNA interactions. 2), We develop and verify experimentally a versatile mesoscopic theoretical framework for the quantitative analysis of translocation experiments with structured polynucleotides. The underlying model is based on sequence-dependent free energy landscapes constructed using the known thermodynamic parameters for polynucleotide basepairing. This approach limits the adjustable parameters to a small set of sequence-independent parameters. After parameter calibration, the theoretical model predicts the translocation dynamics of new sequences. These predictions can be leveraged to generate a baseline expectation even for more complicated structures where the assumptions underlying the one-dimensional free energy landscape may no longer be satisfied. Taken together, backward translocation through α-hemolysin pores combined with mesoscopic theoretical modeling is a promising approach for label-free single-molecule analysis of DNA and RNA folding. PMID:22225801

  5. Quantitative analysis of the nanopore translocation dynamics of simple structured polynucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schink, Severin; Renner, Stephan; Alim, Karen; Arnaut, Vera; Simmel, Friedrich C; Gerland, Ulrich

    2012-01-04

    Nanopore translocation experiments are increasingly applied to probe the secondary structures of RNA and DNA molecules. Here, we report two vital steps toward establishing nanopore translocation as a tool for the systematic and quantitative analysis of polynucleotide folding: 1), Using α-hemolysin pores and a diverse set of different DNA hairpins, we demonstrate that backward nanopore force spectroscopy is particularly well suited for quantitative analysis. In contrast to forward translocation from the vestibule side of the pore, backward translocation times do not appear to be significantly affected by pore-DNA interactions. 2), We develop and verify experimentally a versatile mesoscopic theoretical framework for the quantitative analysis of translocation experiments with structured polynucleotides. The underlying model is based on sequence-dependent free energy landscapes constructed using the known thermodynamic parameters for polynucleotide basepairing. This approach limits the adjustable parameters to a small set of sequence-independent parameters. After parameter calibration, the theoretical model predicts the translocation dynamics of new sequences. These predictions can be leveraged to generate a baseline expectation even for more complicated structures where the assumptions underlying the one-dimensional free energy landscape may no longer be satisfied. Taken together, backward translocation through α-hemolysin pores combined with mesoscopic theoretical modeling is a promising approach for label-free single-molecule analysis of DNA and RNA folding. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Tourette syndrome in a pedigree with a 7;18 translocation: Identification of a YAC spanning the translocation breakpoint at 18q22.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boghosian-Sell, L.; Overhauser, J. [Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Comings, D.E. [City of Hope Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States)

    1996-11-01

    Tourette syndrome is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by the presence of multiple, involuntary motor and vocal tics. Associated pathologies include attention deficit disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Extensive linkage analysis based on an autosomal dominant mode of transmission with reduced penetrance has failed to show linkage with polymorphic markers, suggesting either locus heterogeneity or a polygenic origin for Tourette syndrome. An individual diagnosed with Tourette syndrome has been described carrying a constitutional chromosome translocation. Other family members carrying the translocation exhibit features seen in Tourette syndrome including motor tics, vocal tics, and OCD. Since the disruption of specific genes by a chromosomal rearrangement can elicit a particular phenotype, we have undertaken the physical mapping of the 7;18 translocation such that genes mapping at the site of the breakpoint can be identified and evaluated for a possible involvement in Tourette syndrome. Using somatic cell hybrids retaining either the der(7) or the der(18), a more precise localization of the breakpoints on chromosomes 7 and 18 have been determined. Furthermore, physical mapping has identified two YAC clones that span the translocation breakpoint on chromosome 18 as determined by FISH. These YAC clones will be useful for the eventual identification of genes that map to chromosomes 7 and 18 at the site of the translocation. 41 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  7. A voltage-gated pore for translocation of tRNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koley, Sandip; Adhya, Samit, E-mail: nilugrandson@gmail.com

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •A tRNA translocating complex was assembled from purified proteins. •The complex translocates tRNA at a membrane potential of ∼60 mV. •Translocation requires Cys and His residues in the Fe–S center of RIC6 subunit. -- Abstract: Very little is known about how nucleic acids are translocated across membranes. The multi-subunit RNA Import Complex (RIC) from mitochondria of the kinetoplastid protozoon Leishmania tropica induces translocation of tRNAs across artificial or natural membranes, but the nature of the translocation pore remains unknown. We show that subunits RIC6 and RIC9 assemble on the membrane in presence of subunit RIC4A to form complex R3. Atomic Force Microscopy of R3 revealed particles with an asymmetric surface groove of ∼20 nm rim diameter and ∼1 nm depth. R3 induced translocation of tRNA into liposomes when the pH of the medium was lowered to ∼6 in the absence of ATP. R3-mediated tRNA translocation could also be induced at neutral pH by a K{sup +} diffusion potential with an optimum of 60–70 mV. Point mutations in the Cys{sub 2}–His{sub 2} Fe-binding motif of RIC6, which is homologous to the respiratory Complex III Fe–S protein, abrogated import induced by low pH but not by K{sup +} diffusion potential. These results indicate that the R3 complex forms a pore that is gated by a proton-generated membrane potential and that the Fe–S binding region of RIC6 has a role in proton translocation. The tRNA import complex of L. tropica thus contains a novel macromolecular channel distinct from the mitochondrial protein import pore that is apparently involved in tRNA import in some species.

  8. Histone deacetylase 3 promotes RCAN1 stability and nuclear translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyung Ah; Kang, Hye Seon; Lee, Jee Won; Yoo, Lang; Im, Eunju; Hong, Ahyoung; Lee, Yun Ju; Shin, Woo Hyun; Chung, Kwang Chul

    2014-01-01

    Regulator of calcineurin 1 (RCAN1; also referred as DSCR1 or MCIP1) is located in close proximity to a Down syndrome critical region of human chromosome 21. Although RCAN1 is an endogenous inhibitor of calcineurin signaling that controls lymphocyte activation, apoptosis, heart development, skeletal muscle differentiation, and cardiac function, it is not yet clear whether RCAN1 might be involved in other cellular activities. In this study, we explored the extra-functional roles of RCAN1 by searching for novel RCAN1-binding partners. Using a yeast two-hybrid assay, we found that RCAN1 (RCAN1-1S) interacts with histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) in mammalian cells. We also demonstrate that HDAC3 deacetylates RCAN1. In addition, HDAC3 increases RCAN1 protein stability by inhibiting its poly-ubiquitination. Furthermore, HDAC3 promotes RCAN1 nuclear translocation. These data suggest that HDAC3, a new binding regulator of RCAN1, affects the protein stability and intracellular localization of RCAN1.

  9. Histone deacetylase 3 promotes RCAN1 stability and nuclear translocation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Ah Han

    Full Text Available Regulator of calcineurin 1 (RCAN1; also referred as DSCR1 or MCIP1 is located in close proximity to a Down syndrome critical region of human chromosome 21. Although RCAN1 is an endogenous inhibitor of calcineurin signaling that controls lymphocyte activation, apoptosis, heart development, skeletal muscle differentiation, and cardiac function, it is not yet clear whether RCAN1 might be involved in other cellular activities. In this study, we explored the extra-functional roles of RCAN1 by searching for novel RCAN1-binding partners. Using a yeast two-hybrid assay, we found that RCAN1 (RCAN1-1S interacts with histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3 in mammalian cells. We also demonstrate that HDAC3 deacetylates RCAN1. In addition, HDAC3 increases RCAN1 protein stability by inhibiting its poly-ubiquitination. Furthermore, HDAC3 promotes RCAN1 nuclear translocation. These data suggest that HDAC3, a new binding regulator of RCAN1, affects the protein stability and intracellular localization of RCAN1.

  10. Disrupting Dimerization Translocates Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase to Peroxisomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan W Nelson

    Full Text Available The epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET neutralizing enzyme soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH is a neuronal enzyme, which has been localized in both the cytosol and peroxisomes. The molecular basis for its dual localization remains unclear as sEH contains a functional peroxisomal targeting sequence (PTS. Recently, a missense polymorphism was identified in human sEH (R287Q that enhances its peroxisomal localization. This same polymorphism has also been shown to generate weaker sEH homo-dimers. Taken together, these observations suggest that dimerization may mask the sEH PTS and prevent peroxisome translocation. In the current study, we test the hypothesis that dimerization is a key regulator of sEH subcellular localization. Specifically, we altered the dimerization state of sEH by introducing substitutions in amino acids responsible for the dimer-stabilizing salt-bridge. Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP fusions of each of mutants were co-transfected into mouse primary cultured cortical neurons together with a PTS-linked red fluorescent protein to constitutively label peroxisomes. Labeled neurons were analyzed using confocal microscopy and co-localization of sEH with peroxisomes was quantified using Pearson's correlation coefficient. We find that dimer-competent sEH constructs preferentially localize to the cytosol, whereas constructs with weakened or disrupted dimerization were preferentially targeted to peroxisomes. We conclude that the sEH dimerization status is a key regulator of its peroxisomal localization.

  11. Statistical Inference of DNA Translocation using Parallel Expectation Maximization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmett, Kevin; Rosenstein, Jacob; Pfau, David; Bamberger, Akiva; Shepard, Ken; Wiggins, Chris

    2013-03-01

    DNA translocation through a nanopore is an attractive candidate for a next-generation DNA sequencing platform, however the stochastic motion of the molecules within the pore, allowing both forward and backward movement, prevents easy inference of the true sequence from observed data. We model diffusion of an input DNA sequence through a nanopore as a biased random walk with noise, and describe an algorithm for efficient statistical reconstruction of the input sequence, given data consisting of a set of time series traces. The data is modeled as a Hidden Markov Model, and parallel expectation maximization is used to learn the most probable input sequence generating the observed traces. Bounds on inference accuracy are analyzed as a function of model parameters, including forward bias, error rate, and the number of traces. The number of traces is shown to have the strongest influence on algorithm performance, allowing for high inference accuracy even in extremely noisy environments. Incorrectly identified state transitions account for the majority of inference errors, and we introduce entropy-based metaheuristics for identifying and eliminating these errors. Inference is robust, fast, and scales to input sequences on the order of several kilobases.

  12. Disrupting Dimerization Translocates Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase to Peroxisomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jonathan W; Das, Anjali J; Barnes, Anthony P; Alkayed, Nabil J

    2016-01-01

    The epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET) neutralizing enzyme soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is a neuronal enzyme, which has been localized in both the cytosol and peroxisomes. The molecular basis for its dual localization remains unclear as sEH contains a functional peroxisomal targeting sequence (PTS). Recently, a missense polymorphism was identified in human sEH (R287Q) that enhances its peroxisomal localization. This same polymorphism has also been shown to generate weaker sEH homo-dimers. Taken together, these observations suggest that dimerization may mask the sEH PTS and prevent peroxisome translocation. In the current study, we test the hypothesis that dimerization is a key regulator of sEH subcellular localization. Specifically, we altered the dimerization state of sEH by introducing substitutions in amino acids responsible for the dimer-stabilizing salt-bridge. Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) fusions of each of mutants were co-transfected into mouse primary cultured cortical neurons together with a PTS-linked red fluorescent protein to constitutively label peroxisomes. Labeled neurons were analyzed using confocal microscopy and co-localization of sEH with peroxisomes was quantified using Pearson's correlation coefficient. We find that dimer-competent sEH constructs preferentially localize to the cytosol, whereas constructs with weakened or disrupted dimerization were preferentially targeted to peroxisomes. We conclude that the sEH dimerization status is a key regulator of its peroxisomal localization.

  13. Fusion genes and chromosome translocations in the common epithelial cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Paul A W

    2010-01-01

    It has been known for 25 years that fusion genes play a central role in leukaemias and sarcomas but they have been neglected in the common carcinomas, largely because of technical limitations of cytogenetics. In the last few years it has emerged that gene fusions, caused by chromosome translocations, inversions, deletions, etc., are important in the common epithelial cancers, such as prostate and lung carcinoma. Most prostate cancers, for example, have an androgen-regulated fusion of one of the ETS transcription factor gene family. Early results of genome-wide searches for gene fusions in breast and other epithelial cancers suggest that most individual tumours will have several fused genes. Fusion genes are exceptionally powerful mutations. In their simplest form they can turn on expression by promoter insertion but they can also, for example, force dimerization of a protein or change its subcellular location. They are correspondingly important clinically, in classification and management and as targets for therapy. This review surveys what we know of fusion genes in the carcinomas, summarizes the technical advances that now make it possible to search systematically for such genes, and concludes by putting fusion genes into the current picture of mutation in cancers.

  14. Ready Experimental Translocation of Mycobacterium canettii Yields Pulmonary Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzid, Fériel; Brégeon, Fabienne; Lepidi, Hubert; Donoghue, Helen D; Minnikin, David E; Drancourt, Michel

    2017-12-01

    Mycobacterium canettii, which has a smooth colony morphology, is the tuberculous organism retaining the most genetic traits from the putative last common ancestor of the rough-morphology Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. To explore whether M. canettii can infect individuals by the oral route, mice were fed phosphate-buffered saline or 106M. canettii mycobacteria and sacrificed over a 28-day experiment. While no M. canettii was detected in negative controls, M. canettii-infected mice yielded granuloma-like lesions for 4/4 lungs at days 14 and 28 postinoculation (p.i.) and positive PCR detection of M. canettii for 5/8 mesenteric lymph nodes at days 1 and 3 p.i. and 5/6 pooled stools collected from day 1 to day 28 p.i. Smooth M. canettii colonies grew from 68% of lungs and 36% of spleens and cervical lymph nodes but fewer than 20% of axillary lymph nodes, livers, brown fat samples, kidneys, or blood samples throughout the 28-day experiment. Ready translocation in mice after digestive tract challenge demonstrates the potential of ingested M. canettii organisms to relocate to distant organs and lungs. The demonstration of this relocation supports the possibility that populations may be infected by environmental M. canettii. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  15. Cholesterol Hydroperoxide Generation, Translocation, and Reductive Turnover in Biological Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girotti, Albert W; Korytowski, Witold

    2017-12-01

    Cholesterol is like other unsaturated lipids in being susceptible to peroxidative degradation upon exposure to strong oxidants like hydroxyl radical or peroxynitrite generated under conditions of oxidative stress. In the eukaryotic cell plasma membrane, where most of the cellular cholesterol resides, peroxidation leads to membrane structural and functional damage from which pathological states may arise. In low density lipoprotein, cholesterol and phospholipid peroxidation have long been associated with atherogenesis. Among the many intermediates/products of cholesterol oxidation, hydroperoxide species (ChOOHs) have a number of different fates and deserve special attention. These fates include (a) damage-enhancement via iron-catalyzed one-electron reduction, (b) damage containment via two-electron reduction, and (c) inter-membrane, inter-lipoprotein, and membrane-lipoprotein translocation, which allows dissemination of one-electron damage or off-site suppression thereof depending on antioxidant location and capacity. In addition, ChOOHs can serve as reliable and conveniently detected mechanistic reporters of free radical-mediated reactions vs. non-radical (e.g., singlet oxygen)-mediated reactions. Iron-stimulated peroxidation of cholesterol and other lipids underlies a newly discovered form of regulated cell death called ferroptosis. These and other deleterious consequences of radical-mediated lipid peroxidation will be discussed in this review.

  16. Movilidad y desarrollo translocal en la Nicaragua (semi-rural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Griet Steel

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo pretende contribuir al debate sobre los vínculos entre la movilidad y el desarrollo, explorando el concepto de desarrollo translocal. Basado en trabajo de campo en los municipios de Matiguás y Muy Muy, éste analiza cómo la movilidad da forma a las estrategias de vida de los hogares (semi-rurales en Nicaragua, y explora cómo los diferentes miembros de un hogar utilizan la movilidad física como una estrategia de vida. Argumenta que los habitantes de áreas (semi-rurales consideran distintos tipos de movimientos como estrategias importantes para establecer enlaces entre personas y lugares, y para alcanzar un mejor bienestar en su comunidad natal. Al mismo tiempo muestra cómo la movilidad se forma en una arena de poder, lo que afecta su potencial. De esta manera, este artículo contribuye a un entendimiento dinámico y multidimensional de cómo los procesos de desarrollo dan forma a – y son formados por – la movilidad y la interconectividad.

  17. Fiber: effect on bacterial translocation and intestinal mucin content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, W; Zhang, W; Singh, A; Bain, A; Satchithanandam, S; Klurfeld, D; Rombeau, J

    1995-01-01

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and elemental diet (ED) produce intestinal atrophy and increase bacterial translocation (BT) to mesenteric lymph nodes. The increased rate of BT may be due to alterations in mucosal structure, enzyme activity, or mucin content. Fiber improves intestinal structure and function in rats and may reduce the rate of BT. This study determined whether the addition of fiber to TPN or ED would maintain intestinal integrity and decrease BT to the mesenteric lymph nodes. Fifty-six adult male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent placement of jugular catheters and were assigned to one of five dietary groups: TPN, TPN+oral oat fiber (TPNF) 2 g/day, ED, ED+oral oat fiber (EDF) 2 g/day, or AIN-76 (control); they were pair-fed for 7 days. On day 8 the mesenteric lymph nodes were removed for bacterial cultures; and jejunal mucosal weight, DNA, protein, alkaline phosphatase, maltase, and jejunal mucin content were measured. Enteral nutrition significantly decreased BT when compared to parenteral feeding, and fiber significantly decreased BT when administered to rats receiving TPN or ED. Improvements in intestinal mucosal structure were not consistently associated with decreased rates of BT. Additionally, BT occurred independently of jejunal mucin concentration. Mechanisms other than maintenance of mucosal structure or mucin content are important in the mediation of fiber-induced decreased BT in rats receiving TPN or ED.

  18. Decitabine represses translocated MYC oncogene in Burkitt lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Hanfeng; Xie, Linka; Klapproth, Kay; Weitzer, Clarissa D; Wirth, Thomas; Ushmorov, Alexey

    2013-04-01

    Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is caused by translocation of the MYC gene to an immunoglobulin locus resulting in its constitutive expression depending on the activity of the immunoglobulin (Ig) enhancer elements. Treatment of BL cell lines with epigenetic modifiers is known to repress B-cell-specific genes and to up-regulate B-cell-inappropriate genes including the transcription repressor ID2 expression. We found that the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor decitabine/5-aza-2-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) represses the MYC oncogene on RNA and protein levels by inducing ID2. Down-regulation of MYC was associated with repression of transcriptional activity of the Ig locus and with inhibition of proliferation. The induction of ID2 can be in part explained by activation of the transcription factor NF-κB. We conclude that up-regulation of ID2 contributes to anti-tumour activity of 5-aza-dC via repression of Ig locus activity and consequently MYC expression. Copyright © 2013 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Nanomaterial translocation - the biokinetics, tissue accumulation, toxicity and fate of materials in secondary organs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kermanizadeh, Ali; Balharry, Dominique; Wallin, Håkan

    2015-01-01

    into the toxicity posed by the NMs in these secondary organs is expanding due to the realisation that some materials may reach and accumulate in these target sites. The translocation to secondary organs includes, but is not limited to, the hepatic, central nervous, cardiovascular and renal systems. Current data...... indicates that pulmonary exposure is associated with low (inhalation route-0.00001-1% of total applied dose-24 h) translocation of virtually insoluble NMs such as iridium, carbon black, gold and polystyrene, while slightly higher translocation has been observed for NMs with either slow (e.g. silver, cerium...

  20. Imaging of Carbon Translocation to Fruit Using Carbon-11-Labeled Carbon Dioxide and Positron Emission Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawachi, Naoki; Kikuchi, Kaori; Suzui, Nobuo; Ishii, Satomi; Fujimaki, Shu; Ishioka, Noriko S.; Watabe, Hiroshi

    2011-04-01

    Carbon kinetics into the fruit is an agricultural issue on the growth and development of the sink organs to be harvested. Particularly, photoassimilate translocation and distribution are important topics for understanding the mechanism. In the present work, carbon-11 (11C) labeled photoassimilate translocation into fruits of tomato has been imaged using carbon-11-labeled carbon dioxide and the positron emission tomography (PET). Dynamice PET data of gradual increasing of 11C activity and its distribution is acquired quantitatively in intact plant body. This indicates that the 3-D photoassimilate translocation into the fruits is imaged successfully and carbon kinetics is analyzable to understand the plant physiology and nutrition.