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Sample records for atp-binding protein evolved

  1. Profiling Protein Kinases and Other ATP Binding Proteins in Arabidopsis Using Acyl-ATP Probes*

    OpenAIRE

    Villamor, J. G.; Kaschani, F.; Colby, T; Oeljeklaus, J.; Zhao, D; Kaiser, M.; Patricelli, M. P.; R. A. L. van der Hoorn

    2013-01-01

    Many protein activities are driven by ATP binding and hydrolysis. Here, we explore the ATP binding proteome of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana using acyl-ATP (AcATP)1 probes. These probes target ATP binding sites and covalently label lysine residues in the ATP binding pocket. Gel-based profiling using biotinylated AcATP showed that labeling is dependent on pH and divalent ions and can be competed by nucleotides. The vast majority of these AcATP-labeled proteins are known ATP binding prot...

  2. Isotope-coded ATP Probe for Quantitative Affinity Profiling of ATP-binding Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Yongsheng; Guo, Lei; Wang, Yinsheng

    2013-01-01

    ATP-binding proteins play significant roles in numerous cellular processes. Here, we introduced a novel isotope-coded ATP-affinity probe (ICAP) as acylating agent to simultaneously enrich and incorporate isotope label to ATP-binding proteins. By taking advantage of the quantitative capability of this isotope-coded probe, we devised an affinity profiling strategy to comprehensively characterize ATP-protein interactions at the entire proteome scale. False-positive identification of ATP-binding ...

  3. Data for proteomic analysis of ATP-binding proteins and kinase inhibitor target proteins using an ATP probe

    OpenAIRE

    Jun Adachi; Marina Kishida; Shio Watanabe; Yuuki Hashimoto; Kazuna Fukamizu; Takeshi Tomonaga

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between ATP and ATP-binding proteins (ATPome) are common and are required for most cellular processes. Thus, it is clearly important to identify and quantify these interactions for understanding basic cellular mechanisms and the pathogenesis of various diseases. We used an ATP competition assay (competition between ATP and acyl-ATP probes) that enabled us to distinguish specific ATP-binding proteins from non-specific proteins (Adachi et al., 2014) [1]. As a result, we identified ...

  4. Data for proteomic analysis of ATP-binding proteins and kinase inhibitor target proteins using an ATP probe

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    Jun Adachi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between ATP and ATP-binding proteins (ATPome are common and are required for most cellular processes. Thus, it is clearly important to identify and quantify these interactions for understanding basic cellular mechanisms and the pathogenesis of various diseases. We used an ATP competition assay (competition between ATP and acyl-ATP probes that enabled us to distinguish specific ATP-binding proteins from non-specific proteins (Adachi et al., 2014 [1]. As a result, we identified 539 proteins, including 178 novel ATP-binding protein candidates. We also established an ATPome selectivity profiling method for kinase inhibitors using our cataloged ATPome list. Normally only kinome selectivity is profiled in selectivity profiling of kinase inhibitors. In this data, we expand the profiled targets from the kinome to the ATPome through performance of ATPome selectivity profiling and obtained target profiles of staurosporine and (S-crizotinib. The data accompanying the manuscript on this approach (Adachi et al., 2014 [1] have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001200.

  5. Agrobacterium rhizogenes GALLS protein contains domains for ATP binding, nuclear localization, and type IV secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Larry D; Vergunst, Annette C; Neal-McKinney, Jason; den Dulk-Ras, Amke; Moyer, Deborah M; Hooykaas, Paul J J; Ream, Walt

    2006-12-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Agrobacterium rhizogenes are closely related plant pathogens that cause different diseases, crown gall and hairy root. Both diseases result from transfer, integration, and expression of plasmid-encoded bacterial genes located on the transferred DNA (T-DNA) in the plant genome. Bacterial virulence (Vir) proteins necessary for infection are also translocated into plant cells. Transfer of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and Vir proteins requires a type IV secretion system, a protein complex spanning the bacterial envelope. A. tumefaciens translocates the ssDNA-binding protein VirE2 into plant cells, where it binds single-stranded T-DNA and helps target it to the nucleus. Although some strains of A. rhizogenes lack VirE2, they are pathogenic and transfer T-DNA efficiently. Instead, these bacteria express the GALLS protein, which is essential for their virulence. The GALLS protein can complement an A. tumefaciens virE2 mutant for tumor formation, indicating that GALLS can substitute for VirE2. Unlike VirE2, GALLS contains ATP-binding and helicase motifs similar to those in TraA, a strand transferase involved in conjugation. Both GALLS and VirE2 contain nuclear localization sequences and a C-terminal type IV secretion signal. Here we show that mutations in any of these domains abolished the ability of GALLS to substitute for VirE2. PMID:17012398

  6. Molecular Characterization of LjABCG1, an ATP-Binding Cassette Protein in Lotus japonicus.

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    Akifumi Sugiyama

    Full Text Available LjABCG1, a full-size ABCG subfamily of ATP-binding cassette proteins of a model legume, Lotus japonicus, was reported as a gene highly expressed during the early stages of nodulation, but have not been characterized in detail. In this study we showed that the induction of LjABCG1 expression was remarkable by methyl jasmonate treatment, and reporter gene experiments indicated that LjABCG1 was strongly expressed in the nodule parenchyma and cell layers adjacent to the root vascular tissue toward the nodule. LjABCG1 was suggested to be localized at the plasma membrane based on the fractionation of microsomal membranes as well as separation via aqueous two-phase partitioning. The physiological functions of LjABCG1 in symbiosis and pathogenesis were analyzed in homologous and heterologous systems. LjABCG1 knock-down L. japonicus plants did not show clear phenotypic differences in nodule formation, and not in defense against Pseudomonas syringae, either. In contrast, when LjABCG1 was expressed in the Arabidopsis pdr8-1 mutant, the penetration frequency of Phytophthora infestans, a potato late blight pathogen, was significantly reduced in LjABCG1/pdr8-1 than in pdr8-1 plants. This finding indicated that LjABCG1, at least partially, complemented the phenotype of pdr8 in Arabidopsis, suggesting the multiple roles of this protein in plant-microbe interactions.

  7. Identification of a MAP 2-like ATP-binding protein associated with axoplasmic vesicles that translocate on isolated microtubules

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    Axoplasmic vesicles were purified and observed to translocate on isolated microtubules in an ATP-dependent, trypsin-sensitive manner, implying that ATP-binding polypeptides essential for force generation were present on the vesicle surface. To identify these proteins [alpha 32P]8-azidoadenosine 5'-triphosphate ([alpha 32P]8-N3ATP), a photoaffinity analogue of ATP, was used. The results presented here identify and characterize a vesicle-associated polypeptide having a relative molecular mass o...

  8. Mycobacterium tuberculosis universal stress protein Rv2623 regulates bacillary growth by ATP-Binding: requirement for establishing chronic persistent infection.

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    Joshua E Drumm

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculous latency and reactivation play a significant role in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis, yet the mechanisms that regulate these processes remain unclear. The Mycobacterium tuberculosisuniversal stress protein (USP homolog, rv2623, is among the most highly induced genes when the tubercle bacillus is subjected to hypoxia and nitrosative stress, conditions thought to promote latency. Induction of rv2623 also occurs when M. tuberculosis encounters conditions associated with growth arrest, such as the intracellular milieu of macrophages and in the lungs of mice with chronic tuberculosis. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that Rv2623 regulates tuberculosis latency. We observed that an Rv2623-deficient mutant fails to establish chronic tuberculous infection in guinea pigs and mice, exhibiting a hypervirulence phenotype associated with increased bacterial burden and mortality. Consistent with this in vivo growth-regulatory role, constitutive overexpression of rv2623 attenuates mycobacterial growth in vitro. Biochemical analysis of purified Rv2623 suggested that this mycobacterial USP binds ATP, and the 2.9-A-resolution crystal structure revealed that Rv2623 engages ATP in a novel nucleotide-binding pocket. Structure-guided mutagenesis yielded Rv2623 mutants with reduced ATP-binding capacity. Analysis of mycobacteria overexpressing these mutants revealed that the in vitro growth-inhibitory property of Rv2623 correlates with its ability to bind ATP. Together, the results indicate that i M. tuberculosis Rv2623 regulates mycobacterial growth in vitro and in vivo, and ii Rv2623 is required for the entry of the tubercle bacillus into the chronic phase of infection in the host; in addition, iii Rv2623 binds ATP; and iv the growth-regulatory attribute of this USP is dependent on its ATP-binding activity. We propose that Rv2623 may function as an ATP-dependent signaling intermediate in a pathway that promotes persistent infection.

  9. Computational characterization of TTHA0379: A potential glycerophosphocholine binding protein of Ugp ATP-binding cassette transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandravanshi, Monika; Gogoi, Prerana; Kanaujia, Shankar Prasad

    2016-11-01

    For the de novo biosynthesis of phospholipids, byproducts such as sn-glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) and glycerophosphocholine (GPC) of glycerophospholipid metabolic pathway are imported inside the cell by an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter known as UgpABCE. Of which, UgpA and UgpE constitutes the transmembrane domains (TMDs), UgpC forms the dimer of ATP-hydrolyzing component and UgpB is the periplasmic substrate binding protein. Structurally, UgpABCE transporter displays similarity to the maltose ABC transporter of Escherichia coli; thus, has been grouped into the CUT1 (Carbohydrate Uptake Transporter-1) family of bacterial ABC transporters. Being a member of CUT1 family, several Ugp (Uptake glycerol phosphate) protein sequences in biological database(s) exhibit sequence and structure similarity to sugar ABC transporters and have been annotated as sugar binding proteins; one of such proteins is TTHA0379 from Thermus thermophilus HB8. Here, in this study, we used computational method(s) to distinguish UgpB and sugar binding proteins based on their primary and tertiary structure features. A comprehensive analysis of these proteins indicates that they are evolutionarily related to each other having common conserved features at their primary and tertiary structure levels. However, they display differences at their active sites owing to the dissimilarity in their ligand preferences. In addition, phylogenetic analysis of TTHA0379 along with UgpB and sugar binding proteins reveals that both the groups of proteins forms two distinct clades and TTHA0379 groups with UgpB proteins. Furthermore, analysis of the ligand binding pocket shows that all the essential features of glycerophosphocholine binding protein i.e. UgpB, are conserved in TTHA0379 as well. Combining these features, here, we designate TTHA0379 to be a GPC binding protein.

  10. Cloning and Characterization of the Pseudomonas fluorescens ATP-Binding Cassette Exporter, HasDEF, for the Heme Acquisition Protein HasA

    OpenAIRE

    Idei, Akiko; Kawai, Eri; Akatsuka, Hiroyuki; Omori, Kenji

    1999-01-01

    Two ATP-binding cassette (ABC) exporters are present in Pseudomonas fluorescens no. 33; one is the recently reported AprDEF system and the other is HasDEF, which exports a heme acquisition protein, HasA. The hasDEF genes were cloned by DNA hybridization with a DNA probe coding for the LipB protein, one of the components of the Serratia marcescens ABC exporter Lip system. P. fluorescens HasA showed sequence identity of 40 to 49% with HasA proteins from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marce...

  11. ATP-binding site of adenylate kinase: mechanistic implications of its homology with ras-encoded p21, F1-ATPase, and other nucleotide-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, D C; Kuby, S A; Mildvan, A S

    1986-02-01

    The MgATP binding site of adenylate kinase, located by a combination of NMR and x-ray diffraction, is near three protein segments, five to seven amino acids in length, that are homologous in sequence to segments found in other nucleotide-binding phosphotransferases, such as myosin and F1-ATPase, ras p21 and transducin GTPases, and cAMP-dependent and src protein kinases, suggesting equivalent mechanistic roles of these segments in all of these proteins. Segment 1 is a glycine-rich flexible loop that, on adenylate kinase, may control access to the ATP-binding site by changing its conformation. Segment 2 is an alpha-helix containing two hydrophobic residues that interact with the adenine-ribose moiety of ATP, and a lysine that may bind to the beta- and gamma-phosphates of ATP. Segment 3 is a hydrophobic strand of parallel beta-pleated sheet, terminated by a carboxylate, that flanks the triphosphate binding site. The various reported mutations of ras p21 that convert it to a transforming agent all appear to involve segment 1, and such substitutions may alter the properties of p21 by hindering a conformational change at this segment. In F1-ATPase, the flexible loop may, by its position, control both the accessibility and the ATP/ADP equilibrium constant on the enzyme.

  12. Decipher the mechanisms of protein conformational changes induced by nucleotide binding through free-energy landscape analysis: ATP binding to Hsp70.

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    Adrien Nicolaï

    Full Text Available ATP regulates the function of many proteins in the cell by transducing its binding and hydrolysis energies into protein conformational changes by mechanisms which are challenging to identify at the atomic scale. Based on molecular dynamics (MD simulations, a method is proposed to analyze the structural changes induced by ATP binding to a protein by computing the effective free-energy landscape (FEL of a subset of its coordinates along its amino-acid sequence. The method is applied to characterize the mechanism by which the binding of ATP to the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD of Hsp70 propagates a signal to its substrate-binding domain (SBD. Unbiased MD simulations were performed for Hsp70-DnaK chaperone in nucleotide-free, ADP-bound and ATP-bound states. The simulations revealed that the SBD does not interact with the NBD for DnaK in its nucleotide-free and ADP-bound states whereas the docking of the SBD was found in the ATP-bound state. The docked state induced by ATP binding found in MD is an intermediate state between the initial nucleotide-free and final ATP-bound states of Hsp70. The analysis of the FEL projected along the amino-acid sequence permitted to identify a subset of 27 protein internal coordinates corresponding to a network of 91 key residues involved in the conformational change induced by ATP binding. Among the 91 residues, 26 are identified for the first time, whereas the others were shown relevant for the allosteric communication of Hsp70 s in several experiments and bioinformatics analysis. The FEL analysis revealed also the origin of the ATP-induced structural modifications of the SBD recently measured by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance. The pathway between the nucleotide-free and the intermediate state of DnaK was extracted by applying principal component analysis to the subset of internal coordinates describing the transition. The methodology proposed is general and could be applied to analyze allosteric communication in

  13. Role of NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic motif in the subcellular localization of ATP-binding cassette protein subfamily D: Common features in eukaryotic organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Asaka; Asahina, Kota; Okamoto, Takumi; Kawaguchi, Kosuke [Department of Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Kostsin, Dzmitry G. [Department of Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Institute of Biophysics and Cell Engineering, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Academicheskaya Str. 27, Minsk 220072 (Belarus); Kashiwayama, Yoshinori [Department of Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Takanashi, Kojiro; Yazaki, Kazufumi [Laboratory of Plant Gene Expression, Research Institute for Sustainable Humanosphere, Kyoko University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Imanaka, Tsuneo, E-mail: imanaka@pha.u-toyama.ac.jp [Department of Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Morita, Masashi [Department of Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan)

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • ABCD proteins classifies based on with or without NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic segment. • The ABCD proteins with the segment are targeted peroxisomes. • The ABCD proteins without the segment are targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum. • The role of the segment in organelle targeting is conserved in eukaryotic organisms. - Abstract: In mammals, four ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins belonging to subfamily D have been identified. ABCD1–3 possesses the NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic region and are targeted to peroxisomes, while ABCD4 lacking the region is targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Based on hydropathy plot analysis, we found that several eukaryotes have ABCD protein homologs lacking the NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic segment (H0 motif). To investigate whether the role of the NH{sub 2}-terminal H0 motif in subcellular localization is conserved across species, we expressed ABCD proteins from several species (metazoan, plant and fungi) in fusion with GFP in CHO cells and examined their subcellular localization. ABCD proteins possessing the NH{sub 2}-terminal H0 motif were localized to peroxisomes, while ABCD proteins lacking this region lost this capacity. In addition, the deletion of the NH{sub 2}-terminal H0 motif of ABCD protein resulted in their localization to the ER. These results suggest that the role of the NH{sub 2}-terminal H0 motif in organelle targeting is widely conserved in living organisms.

  14. Role of NH2-terminal hydrophobic motif in the subcellular localization of ATP-binding cassette protein subfamily D: Common features in eukaryotic organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • ABCD proteins classifies based on with or without NH2-terminal hydrophobic segment. • The ABCD proteins with the segment are targeted peroxisomes. • The ABCD proteins without the segment are targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum. • The role of the segment in organelle targeting is conserved in eukaryotic organisms. - Abstract: In mammals, four ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins belonging to subfamily D have been identified. ABCD1–3 possesses the NH2-terminal hydrophobic region and are targeted to peroxisomes, while ABCD4 lacking the region is targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Based on hydropathy plot analysis, we found that several eukaryotes have ABCD protein homologs lacking the NH2-terminal hydrophobic segment (H0 motif). To investigate whether the role of the NH2-terminal H0 motif in subcellular localization is conserved across species, we expressed ABCD proteins from several species (metazoan, plant and fungi) in fusion with GFP in CHO cells and examined their subcellular localization. ABCD proteins possessing the NH2-terminal H0 motif were localized to peroxisomes, while ABCD proteins lacking this region lost this capacity. In addition, the deletion of the NH2-terminal H0 motif of ABCD protein resulted in their localization to the ER. These results suggest that the role of the NH2-terminal H0 motif in organelle targeting is widely conserved in living organisms

  15. Universal stress protein Rv2624c alters abundance of arginine and enhances intracellular survival by ATP binding in mycobacteria

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    Jia, Qiong; Hu, Xinling; Shi, Dawei; Zhang, Yan; Sun, Meihao; Wang, Jianwei; Mi, Kaixia; Zhu, Guofeng

    2016-01-01

    The universal stress protein family is a family of stress-induced proteins. Universal stress proteins affect latency and antibiotic resistance in mycobacteria. Here, we showed that Mycobacterium smegmatis overexpressing M. tuberculosis universal stress protein Rv2624c exhibits increased survival in human monocyte THP-1 cells. Transcriptome analysis suggested that Rv2624c affects histidine metabolism, and arginine and proline metabolism. LC-MS/MS analysis showed that Rv2624c affects the abundance of arginine, a modulator of both mycobacteria and infected THP-1 cells. Biochemical analysis showed that Rv2624c is a nucleotide-binding universal stress protein, and an Rv2624c mutant incapable of binding ATP abrogated the growth advantage in THP-1 cells. Rv2624c may therefore modulate metabolic pathways in an ATP-dependent manner, changing the abundance of arginine and thus increasing survival in THP-1 cells. PMID:27762279

  16. Rescuing Trafficking Mutants of the ATP-binding Cassette Protein, ABCA4, with Small Molecule Correctors as a Treatment for Stargardt Eye Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabirzhanova, Inna; Lopes Pacheco, Miquéias; Rapino, Daniele; Grover, Rahul; Handa, James T; Guggino, William B; Cebotaru, Liudmila

    2015-08-01

    Stargardt disease is the most common form of early onset macular degeneration. Mutations in ABCA4, a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family, are associated with Stargardt disease. Here, we have examined two disease-causing mutations in the NBD1 region of ABCA4, R1108C, and R1129C, which occur within regions of high similarity with CFTR, another ABC transporter gene, which is associated with cystic fibrosis. We show that R1108C and R1129C are both temperature-sensitive processing mutants that engage the cellular quality control mechanism and show a strong interaction with the chaperone Hsp 27. Both mutant proteins also interact with HDCAC6 and are degraded in the aggresome. We also demonstrate that novel corrector compounds that are being tested as treatment for cystic fibrosis, such as VX-809, can rescue the processing of the ABCA4 mutants, particularly their expression at the cell surface, and can reduce their binding to HDAC6. Thus, our data suggest that VX-809 can potentially be developed as a new therapy for Stargardt disease, for which there is currently no treatment. PMID:26092729

  17. ATP binding by the P-loop NTPase OsYchF1 (an unconventional G protein) contributes to biotic but not abiotic stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Ming-Yan; Li, Xiaorong; Miao, Rui; Fong, Yu-Hang; Li, Kwan-Pok; Yung, Yuk-Lin; Yu, Mei-Hui; Wong, Kam-Bo; Chen, Zhongzhou; Lam, Hon-Ming

    2016-03-01

    G proteins are involved in almost all aspects of the cellular regulatory pathways through their ability to bind and hydrolyze GTP. The YchF subfamily, interestingly, possesses the unique ability to bind both ATP and GTP, and is possibly an ancestral form of G proteins based on phylogenetic studies and is present in all kingdoms of life. However, the biological significance of such a relaxed ligand specificity has long eluded researchers. Here, we have elucidated the different conformational changes caused by the binding of a YchF homolog in rice (OsYchF1) to ATP versus GTP by X-ray crystallography. Furthermore, by comparing the 3D relationships of the ligand position and the various amino acid residues at the binding sites in the crystal structures of the apo-bound and ligand-bound versions, a mechanism for the protein's ability to bind both ligands is revealed. Mutation of the noncanonical G4 motif of the OsYchF1 to the canonical sequence for GTP specificity precludes the binding/hydrolysis of ATP and prevents OsYchF1 from functioning as a negative regulator of plant-defense responses, while retaining its ability to bind/hydrolyze GTP and its function as a negative regulator of abiotic stress responses, demonstrating the specific role of ATP-binding/hydrolysis in disease resistance. This discovery will have a significant impact on our understanding of the structure-function relationships of the YchF subfamily of G proteins in all kingdoms of life. PMID:26912459

  18. ATP binding by the P-loop NTPase OsYchF1 (an unconventional G protein) contributes to biotic but not abiotic stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Ming-Yan; Li, Xiaorong; Miao, Rui; Fong, Yu-Hang; Li, Kwan-Pok; Yung, Yuk-Lin; Yu, Mei-Hui; Wong, Kam-Bo; Chen, Zhongzhou; Lam, Hon-Ming

    2016-03-01

    G proteins are involved in almost all aspects of the cellular regulatory pathways through their ability to bind and hydrolyze GTP. The YchF subfamily, interestingly, possesses the unique ability to bind both ATP and GTP, and is possibly an ancestral form of G proteins based on phylogenetic studies and is present in all kingdoms of life. However, the biological significance of such a relaxed ligand specificity has long eluded researchers. Here, we have elucidated the different conformational changes caused by the binding of a YchF homolog in rice (OsYchF1) to ATP versus GTP by X-ray crystallography. Furthermore, by comparing the 3D relationships of the ligand position and the various amino acid residues at the binding sites in the crystal structures of the apo-bound and ligand-bound versions, a mechanism for the protein's ability to bind both ligands is revealed. Mutation of the noncanonical G4 motif of the OsYchF1 to the canonical sequence for GTP specificity precludes the binding/hydrolysis of ATP and prevents OsYchF1 from functioning as a negative regulator of plant-defense responses, while retaining its ability to bind/hydrolyze GTP and its function as a negative regulator of abiotic stress responses, demonstrating the specific role of ATP-binding/hydrolysis in disease resistance. This discovery will have a significant impact on our understanding of the structure-function relationships of the YchF subfamily of G proteins in all kingdoms of life.

  19. Regulation of Yeast Nutrient Permease Endocytosis by ATP-binding Cassette Transporters and a Seven-transmembrane Protein, RSB1*

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Soraya S.; Hanson, Pamela K.; Manoharlal, Raman; Brice, Sarah E.; Cowart, L. Ashley; Moye-Rowley, W. Scott

    2010-01-01

    Ceramide is produced by the condensation of a long chain base with a very long chain fatty acid. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, one of the two major long chain bases is called phytosphingosine (PHS). PHS has been shown to cause toxicity in tryptophan auxotrophic strains of yeast because this bioactive ceramide precursor causes diversion of the high affinity tryptophan permease Tat2 to the vacuole rather than the plasma membrane. Loss of the integral membrane protein Rsb1 increased PHS sensitivi...

  20. Influence of a mutation in the ATP-binding region of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II on its interaction with peptide substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praseeda, Mullasseril; Pradeep, Kurup K; Krupa, Ananth; Krishna, S Sri; Leena, Suseela; Kumar, R Rajeev; Cheriyan, John; Mayadevi, Madhavan; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Omkumar, Ramakrishnapillai V

    2004-03-01

    CaMKII (Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II) is expressed in high concentrations in the brain and is found enriched in the postsynaptic densities. The enzyme is activated by the binding of calmodulin to the autoregulatory domain in the presence of high levels of intracellular Ca2+, which causes removal of auto-inhibition from the N-terminal catalytic domain. Knowledge of the 3D (three-dimensional) structure of this enzyme at atomic resolution is restricted to the association domain, a region at the extreme C-terminus. The catalytic domain of CaMKII shares high sequence similarity with CaMKI. The 3D structure of the catalytic core of CaMKI comprises ATP- and substrate-binding regions in a cleft between two distinct lobes, similar to the structures of all protein kinases solved to date. Mutation of Glu-60, a residue in the ATP-binding region of CaMKII, to glycine exerts different effects on phosphorylation of two peptide substrates, syntide and NR2B ( N -methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 2B) 17-mer. Although the mutation caused increases in the Km values for phosphorylation for both the peptide substrates, the effect on the kcat values for each was different. The kcat value decreased in the case of syntide, whereas it increased in the case of the NR2B peptide as a result of the mutation. This resulted in a significant decrease in the apparent kcat/Km value for syntide, but the change was minimal for the NR2B peptide. These results indicate that different catalytic mechanisms are employed by the kinase for the two peptides. Molecular modelling suggests structural changes are likely to occur at the peptide-binding pocket in the active state of the enzyme as a consequence of the Glu-60-->Gly mutation. PMID:14558884

  1. Human immunodeficiency virus protease inhibitors interact with ATP binding cassette transporter 4/multidrug resistance protein 4: a basis for unanticipated enhanced cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Yu; Takenaka, Kazumasa; Sparreboom, Alex; Cheepala, Satish B; Wu, Chung-Pu; Ekins, Sean; Ambudkar, Suresh V; Schuetz, John D

    2013-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) pharmacotherapy, by combining different drug classes such as nucleoside analogs and HIV protease inhibitors (PIs), has increased HIV-patient life expectancy. Consequently, among these patients, an increase in non-HIV-associated cancers has produced a patient cohort requiring both HIV and cancer chemotherapy. We hypothesized that multidrug resistance protein 4/ATP binding cassette transporter 4 (MRP4/ABCC4), a widely expressed transporter of nucleoside-based antiviral medications as well as cancer therapeutics might interact with PIs. Among the PIs evaluated (nelfinavir, ritonavir, amprenavir, saquinavir, and indinavir), only nelfinavir both effectively stimulated MRP4 ATPase activity and inhibited substrate-stimulated ATPase activity. Saos2 and human embryonic kidney 293 cells engineered to overexpress MRP4 were then used to assess transport and cytotoxicity. MRP4 expression reduced intracellular accumulation of nelfinavir and consequently conferred survival advantage to nelfinavir cytotoxicity. Nelfinavir blocked Mrp4-mediated export, which is consistent with its ability to increase the sensitivity of MRP4-expressing cells to methotrexate. In contrast, targeted inactivation of Abcc4/Mrp4 in mouse cells specifically enhanced nelfinavir and 9-(2-phosphonylmethoxyethyl) adenine cytotoxicity. These results suggest that nelfinavir is both an inhibitor and substrate of MRP4. Because nelfinavir is a new MRP4/ABCC4 substrate, we developed a MRP4/ABCC4 pharmacophore model, which showed that the nelfinavir binding site is shared with chemotherapeutic substrates such as adefovir and methotrexate. Our studies reveal, for the first time, that nelfinavir, a potent and cytotoxic PI, is both a substrate and inhibitor of MRP4. These findings suggest that HIV-infected cancer patients receiving nelfinavir might experience both enhanced antitumor efficacy and unexpected adverse toxicity given the role of MRP4/ABCC4 in exporting nucleoside

  2. Stable ATP binding mediated by a partial NBD dimer of the CFTR chloride channel

    OpenAIRE

    Tsai, Ming-Feng; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a member of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding cassette (ABC) superfamily, is an ATP-gated chloride channel. Like other ABC proteins, CFTR encompasses two nucleotide binding domains (NBDs), NBD1 and NBD2, each accommodating an ATP binding site. It is generally accepted that CFTR’s opening–closing cycles, each completed within 1 s, are driven by rapid ATP binding and hydrolysis events in NBD2. Here, by recording CFTR currents in...

  3. Crystal structure of ATP-binding subunit of an ABC transporter from Geobacillus kaustophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjula, M; Pampa, K J; Kumar, S M; Mukherjee, S; Kunishima, N; Rangappa, K S; Lokanath, N K

    2015-03-27

    The ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters, represent one of the largest superfamilies of primary transporters, which are very essential for various biological functions. The crystal structure of ATP-binding subunit of an ABC transporter from Geobacillus kaustophilus has been determined at 1.77 Å resolution. The crystal structure revealed that the protomer has two thick arms, (arm I and II), which resemble 'L' shape. The ATP-binding pocket is located close to the end of arm I. ATP molecule is docked into the active site of the protein. The dimeric crystal structure of ATP-binding subunit of ABC transporter from G. kaustophilus has been compared with the previously reported crystal structure of ATP-binding subunit of ABC transporter from Salmonella typhimurium.

  4. Genetic association analysis of ATP binding cassette protein family reveals a novel association of ABCB1 genetic variants with epilepsy risk, but not with drug-resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabeesh Balan

    Full Text Available Epilepsy constitutes a heterogeneous group of disorders that is characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures due to widely different etiologies. Multidrug resistance remains a major issue in clinical epileptology, where one third of patients with epilepsy continue to have seizures. Role of efflux transporters in multidrug resistant epilepsy has been attributed to drug-resistant epilepsy although, with discrepant observation in genetic studies. These discrepancies could be attributed to variety of factors such as variable definition of the anti-epileptic drug (AED-resistance, variable epilepsy phenotypes and ethnicities among the studies. In the present study we inquired the role of multidrug transporters ABCB1 and ABCG2 variants in determining AED-resistance and susceptibility to epilepsy in three well-characterized cohorts comprising of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS (prototype for AED-resistant epilepsy; juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME (prototype for AED-responsive epilepsy; and healthy non-epileptic controls, in 738 subjects of Malayalam speaking south Indian ancestry. ABCB1 and ABCG2 variants were not found to be associated with drug resistance when AED-resistant and AED-responsive cohorts were compared. However, a significant association was observed between ABCB1 (C3435T rs1045642 and risk of having epilepsy (MTLE-HS and JME pooled cohort; genotypic p-value = 0.0002; allelic p-value = 0.004. This association was seen persistent with MTLE-HS (genotypic p-value = 0.0008; allelic p-value = 0.004 and also with JME (genotypic p-value = 0.01; allelic p-value = 0.05 cohort individually. In-silico functional prediction indicated that ABCB1 rs1045642 has a deleterious impact on protein coding function and in splicing regulation. We conclude that the ABCB1 and ABCG2 variants do not confer to AED-resistance in the study population. However, ABCB1 rs1045642 increases vulnerability to epilepsy with greater tendency

  5. Genetic association analysis of ATP binding cassette protein family reveals a novel association of ABCB1 genetic variants with epilepsy risk, but not with drug-resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Shabeesh; Bharathan, Sumitha Prameela; Vellichiramal, Neetha Nanoth; Sathyan, Sanish; Joseph, Vijai; Radhakrishnan, Kurupath; Banerjee, Moinak

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy constitutes a heterogeneous group of disorders that is characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures due to widely different etiologies. Multidrug resistance remains a major issue in clinical epileptology, where one third of patients with epilepsy continue to have seizures. Role of efflux transporters in multidrug resistant epilepsy has been attributed to drug-resistant epilepsy although, with discrepant observation in genetic studies. These discrepancies could be attributed to variety of factors such as variable definition of the anti-epileptic drug (AED)-resistance, variable epilepsy phenotypes and ethnicities among the studies. In the present study we inquired the role of multidrug transporters ABCB1 and ABCG2 variants in determining AED-resistance and susceptibility to epilepsy in three well-characterized cohorts comprising of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS) (prototype for AED-resistant epilepsy); juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) (prototype for AED-responsive epilepsy); and healthy non-epileptic controls, in 738 subjects of Malayalam speaking south Indian ancestry. ABCB1 and ABCG2 variants were not found to be associated with drug resistance when AED-resistant and AED-responsive cohorts were compared. However, a significant association was observed between ABCB1 (C3435T) rs1045642 and risk of having epilepsy (MTLE-HS and JME pooled cohort; genotypic p-value = 0.0002; allelic p-value = 0.004). This association was seen persistent with MTLE-HS (genotypic p-value = 0.0008; allelic p-value = 0.004) and also with JME (genotypic p-value = 0.01; allelic p-value = 0.05) cohort individually. In-silico functional prediction indicated that ABCB1 rs1045642 has a deleterious impact on protein coding function and in splicing regulation. We conclude that the ABCB1 and ABCG2 variants do not confer to AED-resistance in the study population. However, ABCB1 rs1045642 increases vulnerability to epilepsy with greater tendency for MTLE

  6. Localization of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transport proteins PfMRP1, PfMRP2, and PfMDR5 at the Plasmodium falciparum plasma membrane.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kavishe, R.A.; Heuvel, J.M.W. van den; Vegte-Bolmer, M. van de; Luty, A.J.; Russel, F.G.M.; Koenderink, J.B.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The spread of drug resistance has been a major obstacle to the control of malaria. The mechanisms underlying drug resistance in malaria seem to be complex and multigenic. The current literature on multiple drug resistance against anti-malarials has documented PfMDR1, an ATP-binding casse

  7. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in normal and pathological lung

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Deen, M; de Vries, EGE; Timens, W; Scheper, RJ; Timmer-Bosscha, H; Postma, DS

    2005-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette ( ABC) transporters are a family of transmembrane proteins that can transport a wide variety of substrates across biological membranes in an energy-dependent manner. Many ABC transporters such as P-glycoprotein ( P-gp), multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 ( MRP1) and breas

  8. Mutant cycles at CFTR’s non-canonical ATP-binding site support little interface separation during gating

    OpenAIRE

    Szollosi, A; Muallem, D. R.; Csanady, L.; P.; Vergani

    2011-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride channel belonging to the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily. ABC proteins share a common molecular mechanism that couples ATP binding and hydrolysis at two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) to diverse functions. This involves formation of NBD dimers, with ATP bound at two composite interfacial sites. In CFTR, intramolecular NBD dimerization is coupled to channel opening. Channel closing is tr...

  9. Atovaquone and quinine anti-malarials inhibit ATP binding cassette transporter activity

    OpenAIRE

    Rijpma, S.R.; Heuvel, J. J.; van de Velden, M.; Sauerwein, R. W.; Russel, F. G.; Koenderink, J.B.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Therapeutic blood plasma concentrations of anti-malarial drugs are essential for successful treatment. Pharmacokinetics of pharmaceutical compounds are dependent of adsorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion. ATP binding cassette (ABC) transport proteins are particularly involved in drug deposition, as they are located at membranes of many uptake and excretory organs and at protective barriers, where they export endogenous and xenobiotic compounds, including pharmaceutica...

  10. Human ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasiliou Vasilis

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There exist four fundamentally different classes of membrane-bound transport proteins: ion channels; transporters; aquaporins; and ATP-powered pumps. ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters are an example of ATP-dependent pumps. ABC transporters are ubiquitous membrane-bound proteins, present in all prokaryotes, as well as plants, fungi, yeast and animals. These pumps can move substrates in (influx or out (efflux of cells. In mammals, ABC transporters are expressed predominantly in the liver, intestine, blood-brain barrier, blood-testis barrier, placenta and kidney. ABC proteins transport a number of endogenous substrates, including inorganic anions, metal ions, peptides, amino acids, sugars and a large number of hydrophobic compounds and metabolites across the plasma membrane, and also across intracellular membranes. The human genome contains 49 ABC genes, arranged in eight subfamilies and named via divergent evolution. That ABC genes are important is underscored by the fact that mutations in at least I I of these genes are already known to cause severe inherited diseases (eg cystic fibrosis and X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy [X-ALD]. ABC transporters also participate in the movement of most drugs and their metabolites across cell surface and cellular organelle membranes; thus, defects in these genes can be important in terms of cancer therapy, pharmacokinetics and innumerable pharmacogenetic disorders.

  11. Role of ATP binding and hydrolysis in the gating of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taras Gout

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The CFTR gene is unique within the ATP-binding cassette (ABC protein family, predominantly of transporters, by coding a chloride channel. The gating mechanism of ABC proteins has been characterized by the ATP Switch model in terms cycles of dimer formation and dissociation linked to ATP binding and hydrolysis, respectively. It would be of interest to assess the extent that Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR, a functional channel, fits the ATP Switch model for ABC transporters. Additional transporter mechanisms, namely those of Pgp and HlyB, are discussed for perspective. Literature search of databases selected key references in comparing and contrasting the gating mechanism. CFTR is a functional chloride channel facilitating transmembrane anion flow down electrochemical gradients. A dysfunctional CFTR protein results in cystic fibrosis, a fatal pleiotropic disease currently managed symptomatically. Understanding the gating mechanism will help target drug development aimed at alleviating and curing the disease.

  12. Characterisation of single domain ATP-binding cassette protien homologues of Theileria parva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibe, M K; Macklin, M; Gobright, E; Bishop, R; Urakawa, T; ole-MoiYoi, O K

    2001-09-01

    Two distinct genes encoding single domain, ATP-binding cassette transport protein homologues of Theileria parva were cloned and sequenced. Neither of the genes is tandemly duplicated. One gene, TpABC1, encodes a predicted protein of 593 amino acids with an N-terminal hydrophobic domain containing six potential membrane-spanning segments. A single discontinuous ATP-binding element was located in the C-terminal region of TpABC1. The second gene, TpABC2, also contains a single C-terminal ATP-binding motif. Copies of TpABC2 were present at four loci in the T. parva genome on three different chromosomes. TpABC1 exhibited allelic polymorphism between stocks of the parasite. Comparison of cDNA and genomic sequences revealed that TpABC1 contained seven short introns, between 29 and 84 bp in length. The full-length TpABC1 protein was expressed in insect cells using the baculovirus system. Application of antibodies raised against the recombinant antigen to western blots of T. parva piroplasm lysates detected an 85 kDa protein in this life-cycle stage.

  13. ATP and AMP Mutually Influence Their Interaction with the ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Adenylate Kinase Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) at Separate Binding Sites*

    OpenAIRE

    Randak, Christoph O.; Dong, Qian; Ver Heul, Amanda R.; Elcock, Adrian H.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an anion channel in the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter protein family. In the presence of ATP and physiologically relevant concentrations of AMP, CFTR exhibits adenylate kinase activity (ATP + AMP ⇆ 2 ADP). Previous studies suggested that the interaction of nucleotide triphosphate with CFTR at ATP-binding site 2 is required for this activity. Two other ABC proteins, Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome protein, ...

  14. The power stroke driven by ATP binding in CFTR as studied by molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa-Hagiya, Tomoka; Furuta, Tadaomi; Chiba, Shuntaro; Sohma, Yoshiro; Sakurai, Minoru

    2013-01-10

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride channel belonging to the ATP binding cassette (ABC) protein superfamily. Currently, it remains unclear how ATP binding causes the opening of the channel gate at the molecular level. To clarify this mechanism, we first constructed an atomic model of the inward-facing CFTR using the X-ray structures of other ABC proteins. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were then performed to explore the structure and dynamics of the inward-facing CFTR in a membrane environment. In the MgATP-bound state, two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) formed a head-to-tail type of dimer, in which the ATP molecules were sandwiched between the Walker A and signature motifs. Alternatively, one of the final MD structures in the apo state was similar to that of a "closed-apo" conformation found in the X-ray analysis of ATP-free MsbA. Principal component analysis for the MD trajectory indicated that NBD dimerization causes significant structural and dynamical changes in the transmembrane domains (TMDs), which is likely indicative of the formation of a chloride ion access path. This study suggests that the free energy gain from ATP binding acts as a driving force not only for NBD dimerization but also for NBD-TMD concerted motions. PMID:23214920

  15. The function of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter ABCB1 is not susceptible to actin disruption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meszaros, Peter; Hummel, Ina; Klappe, Karin; Draghiciu, Oana; Hoekstra, Dick; Kok, Jan W.

    2013-01-01

    Previously we have shown that the activity of the multidrug transporter ABCC1 (multidrug resistance protein 1), and its localization in lipid rafts, depends on cortical actin (Hummel I, Klappe K, Ercan C, Kok JW. Mol. Pharm. 2011 79, 229-40). Here we show that the efflux activity of the ATP-binding

  16. The saci_2123 gene of the hyperthermoacidophile Sulfolobus acidocaldarius encodes an ATP-binding cassette multidrug transporter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Nuan; Driessen, Arnold J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) transporters are capable of secreting structurally and functionally unrelated toxic compounds from the cell. Among this group are ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. These membrane proteins are typically arranged as either hetero- or homo-dimers of ABC half-transporte

  17. Activity-Based Proteomics Reveals Heterogeneous Kinome and ATP-Binding Proteome Responses to MEK Inhibition in KRAS Mutant Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Young Kim

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available One way cancer cells can escape from targeted agents is through their ability to evade drug effects by rapidly rewiring signaling networks. Many protein classes, such as kinases and metabolic enzymes, are regulated by ATP binding and hydrolysis. We hypothesized that a system-level profiling of drug-induced alterations in ATP-binding proteomes could offer novel insights into adaptive responses. Here, we mapped global ATP-binding proteomes perturbed by two clinical MEK inhibitors, AZD6244 and MEK162, in KRAS mutant lung cancer cells as a model system harnessing a desthiobiotin-ATP probe coupled with LC-MS/MS. We observed strikingly unique ATP-binding proteome responses to MEK inhibition, which revealed heterogeneous drug-induced pathway signatures in each cell line. We also identified diverse kinome responses, indicating each cell adapts to MEK inhibition in unique ways. Despite the heterogeneity of kinome responses, decreased probe labeling of mitotic kinases and an increase of kinases linked to autophagy were identified to be common responses. Taken together, our study revealed a diversity of adaptive ATP-binding proteome and kinome responses to MEK inhibition in KRAS mutant lung cancer cells, and our study further demonstrated the utility of our approach to identify potential candidates of targetable ATP-binding enzymes involved in adaptive resistance and to develop rational drug combinations.

  18. New ATP-binding cassette A3 mutation causing surfactant metabolism dysfunction pulmonary type 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piersigilli, Fiammetta; Peca, Donatella; Campi, Francesca; Corsello, Mirta; Landolfo, Francesca; Boldrini, Renata; Danhaive, Olivier; Dotta, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) may occur in term and near-term infants because of mutations in surfactant-related genes. ATP-binding cassette A3 (ABCA3), a phospholipid carrier specifically expressed in the alveolar epithelium, is the most frequently involved protein. We report the case of a couple of late-preterm fraternal twin infants of opposite sex carrying the same compound heterozygous ABCA3 mutations, one of which has never been previously reported, with different disease severity, suggesting variable penetrance or sex-related differences. ABCA3 deficiency should be considered in term or near-term babies who develop unexplained RDS. PMID:26508177

  19. The second extracellular loop of pore-forming subunits of ATP-binding cassette transporters for basic amino acids plays a crucial role in interaction with the cognate solute binding protein(s).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckey, Viola; Weidlich, Daniela; Landmesser, Heidi; Bergmann, Ulf; Schneider, Erwin

    2010-04-01

    In the thermophile Geobacillus stearothermophilus, the uptake of basic amino acids is mediated by an ABC transporter composed of the substrate binding protein (receptor) ArtJ and a homodimer each of the pore-forming subunit, ArtM, and the nucleotide-binding subunit, ArtP. We recently identified two putative binding sites in ArtJ that might interact with the Art(MP)(2) complex, thereby initiating the transport cycle (A. Vahedi-Faridi et al., J. Mol. Biol. 375:448-459, 2008). Here we investigated the contribution of charged amino acid residues in the second extracellular loop of ArtM to contact with ArtJ. Our results demonstrate a crucial role for residues K177, R185, and E188, since mutations to oppositely charged amino acids or glutamine led to a complete loss of ArtJ-stimulated ATPase activity of the complex variants in proteoliposomes. The defects could not be suppressed by ArtJ variants carrying mutations in site I (K39E and K152E) or II (E163K and D170K), suggesting a more complex interplay than that by a single salt bridge. These findings were supported by cross-linking assays demonstrating physical proximity between ArtJ(N166C) and ArtM(E182C). The importance of positively charged residues for receptor-transporter interaction was underscored by mutational analysis of the closely related transporter HisJ/LAO-HisQMP(2) of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. While transporter variants with mutated positively charged residues in HisQ displayed residual ATPase activities, corresponding mutants of HisM could no longer be stimulated by HisJ/LAO. Interestingly, the ATPase activity of the HisQM(K187E)P(2) variant was inhibited by l- and d-histidine in detergent, suggesting a role of the residue in preventing free histidine from gaining access to the substrate binding site within HisQM. PMID:20154136

  20. Alleviation of temperature-sensitive secretion defect of Pseudomonas fluorescens ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, TliDEF, by a change of single amino acid in the ABC protein, TliD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Gyeong Tae; Oh, Joon Young; Park, Ji Hyun; Lim, Hye Jin; Lee, So Jeong; Kim, Eun Young; Choi, Ji-Eun; Jegal, Jonggeon; Song, Bong Keun; Yu, Ju-Hyun; Song, Jae Kwang

    2016-09-01

    An ABC transporter, TliDEF, from Pseudomonas fluorescens SIK W1, mediates the secretion of its cognate lipase, TliA, in a temperature-dependent secretion manner; the TliDEF-mediated secretion of TliA was impossible at the temperatures over 33°C. To isolate a mutant TliDEF capable of secreting TliA at 35°C, the mutagenesis of ABC protein (TliD) was performed. The mutated tliD library where a random point mutation was introduced by error-prone PCR was coexpressed with the wild-type tliE, tliF and tliA in Escherichia coli. Among approximately 10,000 colonies of the tliD library, we selected one colony that formed transparent halo on LB-tributyrin plates at 35°C. At the growth temperature of 35°C, the selected mutant TliD showed 1.75 U/ml of the extracellular lipase activity, while the wild-type TliDEF did not show any detectable lipase activity in the culture supernatant of E. coli. Moreover, the mutant TliD also showed higher level of TliA secretion than the wild-type TliDEF at other culture temperatures, 20°C, 25°C and 30°C. The mutant TliD had a single amino acid change (Ser287Pro) in the predicted transmembrane region in the membrane domain of TliD, implying that the corresponding region of TliD was important for causing the temperature-dependent secretion of TliDEF. These results suggested that the property of ABC transporter could be changed by the change of amino acid in the ABC protein. PMID:27033673

  1. The Second Extracellular Loop of Pore-Forming Subunits of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters for Basic Amino Acids Plays a Crucial Role in Interaction with the Cognate Solute Binding Protein(s)▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckey, Viola; Weidlich, Daniela; Landmesser, Heidi; Bergmann, Ulf; Schneider, Erwin

    2010-01-01

    In the thermophile Geobacillus stearothermophilus, the uptake of basic amino acids is mediated by an ABC transporter composed of the substrate binding protein (receptor) ArtJ and a homodimer each of the pore-forming subunit, ArtM, and the nucleotide-binding subunit, ArtP. We recently identified two putative binding sites in ArtJ that might interact with the Art(MP)2 complex, thereby initiating the transport cycle (A. Vahedi-Faridi et al., J. Mol. Biol. 375:448-459, 2008). Here we investigated the contribution of charged amino acid residues in the second extracellular loop of ArtM to contact with ArtJ. Our results demonstrate a crucial role for residues K177, R185, and E188, since mutations to oppositely charged amino acids or glutamine led to a complete loss of ArtJ-stimulated ATPase activity of the complex variants in proteoliposomes. The defects could not be suppressed by ArtJ variants carrying mutations in site I (K39E and K152E) or II (E163K and D170K), suggesting a more complex interplay than that by a single salt bridge. These findings were supported by cross-linking assays demonstrating physical proximity between ArtJ(N166C) and ArtM(E182C). The importance of positively charged residues for receptor-transporter interaction was underscored by mutational analysis of the closely related transporter HisJ/LAO-HisQMP2 of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. While transporter variants with mutated positively charged residues in HisQ displayed residual ATPase activities, corresponding mutants of HisM could no longer be stimulated by HisJ/LAO. Interestingly, the ATPase activity of the HisQM(K187E)P2 variant was inhibited by l- and d-histidine in detergent, suggesting a role of the residue in preventing free histidine from gaining access to the substrate binding site within HisQM. PMID:20154136

  2. Expression and significance of liver X receptor -β and ATP binding cassette transport protein A1 in human glioblastoma%肝X受体-β和三磷酸腺苷结合盒转运子A1在人脑胶质母细胞瘤中的表达和意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    滕志朋; 王晨; 刘斌; 李昱

    2012-01-01

    目的 研究肝X受体-β(Liver X receptor-β,LXR-β)和三磷酸腺苷结合盒转运子A1( ATP binding cassette transport protein A1,ABCA1)蛋白在人脑胶质母细胞瘤(Glioblastoma,GBM)中的表达及相关性,并探讨其对GBM的意义.方法 分析48例GBM患者的资料,并取患者肿瘤组织石蜡切片,另取19份瘤旁正常脑组织石蜡切片为对照组,采用SP免疫组化法检测LXR-β和ABCA1蛋白的表达,并分析LXR-β与ABCA1表达的相关性.结果 LXR-β和ABCA1蛋白在GBM中的表达率分别为81.3%和77.1%,与对照组(15.8%和26.3%)相比,差异有统计学意义(P<0.001),且LXR-β与ABCA1的表达呈正相关(rs=0.500,P<0.05).患者性别、年龄、胶质瘤复发、手术切除范围、肿瘤最大直径、术后放化疗情况与LXR-β、ABCA1蛋白的表达差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 LXR-3和ABCA1蛋白与GBM的形成和进展有一定关系,有可能成为临床诊断及治疗GBM的生物学指标.%Objective To investigate the expressions of liver X receptor-β (LXR-β) and ATP binding cassette transport protein Al (ABCA1) in human glioblastoma (GBM) and evaluate their relationship as well as their roles in GBM. Methods The clinical data on 48 cases of GBM were analyzed. The tumor tissues of patients were prepared into paraffin sections and determined for expressions of LXR-β and ABCAl by immunohistochemical assay with SP staining, using 19 sections of normal brain tissue as control, based on which the relation ship between expressions of LXR-β and ABCAl was analyzed. Results The expression rates of LXR-β and ABCAl GBM were 81- 3% and 77. 1% respectively, which showed no significant difference with those in control group (15. 8% and 26. 3% respectively )(P 0. 05). Conclusion LXR-β and ABCAl showed a certain relationship to the onset and progress of GBM, which might be used as a biological index for clinical diagnosis and treatment of GBM.

  3. Receptor-transporter interactions of canonical ATP-binding cassette import systems in prokaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Erwin; Eckey, Viola; Weidlich, Daniela; Wiesemann, Nicole; Vahedi-Faridi, Ardeshir; Thaben, Paul; Saenger, Wolfram

    2012-04-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transport systems mediate the translocation of solutes across biological membranes at the expense of ATP. They share a common modular architecture comprising two pore-forming transmembrane domains and two nucleotide binding domains. In prokaryotes, ABC transporters are involved in the uptake of a large variety of chemicals, including nutrients, osmoprotectants and signal molecules. In pathogenic bacteria, some ABC importers are virulence factors. Canonical ABC import systems require an additional component, a substrate-specific receptor or binding protein for function. Interaction of the liganded receptor with extracytoplasmic loop regions of the transmembrane domains initiate the transport cycle. In this review we summarize the current knowledge on receptor-transporter interplay provided by crystal structures as well as by biochemical and biophysical means. In particular, we focus on the maltose/maltodextrin transporter of enterobacteria and the transporters for positively charged amino acids from the thermophile Geobacillus stearothermophilus and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

  4. Receptor-transporter interactions of canonical ATP-binding cassette import systems in prokaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Erwin; Eckey, Viola; Weidlich, Daniela; Wiesemann, Nicole; Vahedi-Faridi, Ardeshir; Thaben, Paul; Saenger, Wolfram

    2012-04-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transport systems mediate the translocation of solutes across biological membranes at the expense of ATP. They share a common modular architecture comprising two pore-forming transmembrane domains and two nucleotide binding domains. In prokaryotes, ABC transporters are involved in the uptake of a large variety of chemicals, including nutrients, osmoprotectants and signal molecules. In pathogenic bacteria, some ABC importers are virulence factors. Canonical ABC import systems require an additional component, a substrate-specific receptor or binding protein for function. Interaction of the liganded receptor with extracytoplasmic loop regions of the transmembrane domains initiate the transport cycle. In this review we summarize the current knowledge on receptor-transporter interplay provided by crystal structures as well as by biochemical and biophysical means. In particular, we focus on the maltose/maltodextrin transporter of enterobacteria and the transporters for positively charged amino acids from the thermophile Geobacillus stearothermophilus and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. PMID:21561685

  5. Serum albumin promotes ATP-binding cassette transporter-dependent sterol uptake in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marek, Magdalena; Silvestro, Daniele; Fredslund, Maria D.;

    2014-01-01

    Sterol uptake in fungi is a multistep process that involves interaction between external sterols and the cell wall, incorporation of sterol molecules into the plasma membrane, and subsequent integration into intracellular membranes for turnover. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters have been...... implicated in sterol uptake, but key features of their activity remain to be elucidated. Here, we apply fluorescent cholesterol (NBD-cholesterol) to monitor sterol uptake under anaerobic and aerobic conditions in two fungal species, Candida glabrata (Cg) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc). We found...... that in both fungal species, ABC transporter-dependent uptake of cholesterol under anaerobic conditions and in mutants lacking HEM1 gene is promoted in the presence of the serum protein albumin that is able to bind the sterol molecule. Furthermore, the C. glabrata ABC transporter CgAus1p expressed in S...

  6. Substrate Specificity and Ionic Regulation of GlnPQ from Lactococcus lactis. An ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter with Four Extracytoplasmic Substrate-Binding Domains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurman-Wolters, Gea K.; Poolman, Bert

    2005-01-01

    We report on the functional characterization of GlnPQ, an ATP-binding cassette transporter with four extracytoplasmic substrate-binding domains. The first predicted transmembrane helix of GlnP was cleaved off in the mature protein and most likely serves as the signal sequence for the extracytoplasmi

  7. The homodimeric ATP-binding cassette transporter LmrA mediates multidrug transport by an alternating two-site (two-cylinder engine) mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veen, HW; Margolles, A; Muller, M; Higgins, CF; Konings, WN

    2000-01-01

    The bacterial LmrA protein and the mammalian multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein are closely related ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters that confer multidrug resistance on cells by mediating the extrusion of drugs at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. The mechanisms by which transport is mediated,

  8. Secretion of natural and synthetic toxic compounds from filamentous fungi by membrane transporters of the ATP-binding cassette and major facilitator superfamily

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stergiopoulos, I.; Zwiers, L.H.; Waard, De M.A.

    2002-01-01

    This review provides an overview of members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) and major facilitator superfamily (MFS) of transporters identified in filamentous fungi. The most common function of these membrane proteins is to provide protection against natural toxic compounds present in the environme

  9. Functional analysis of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter gene family of Tribolium castaneum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Broehan Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters belong to a large superfamily of proteins that have important physiological functions in all living organisms. Most are integral membrane proteins that transport a broad spectrum of substrates across lipid membranes. In insects, ABC transporters are of special interest because of their role in insecticide resistance. Results We have identified 73 ABC transporter genes in the genome of T. castaneum, which group into eight subfamilies (ABCA-H. This coleopteran ABC family is significantly larger than those reported for insects in other taxonomic groups. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that this increase is due to gene expansion within a single clade of subfamily ABCC. We performed an RNA interference (RNAi screen to study the function of ABC transporters during development. In ten cases, injection of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA into larvae caused developmental phenotypes, which included growth arrest and localized melanization, eye pigmentation defects, abnormal cuticle formation, egg-laying and egg-hatching defects, and mortality due to abortive molting and desiccation. Some of the ABC transporters we studied in closer detail to examine their role in lipid, ecdysteroid and eye pigment transport. Conclusions The results from our study provide new insights into the physiological function of ABC transporters in T. castaneum, and may help to establish new target sites for insect control.

  10. The pharmacological impact of ATP-binding cassette drug transporters on vemurafenib-based therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Pu Wu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Melanoma is the most serious type of skin cancer and one of the most common cancers in the world. Advanced melanoma is often resistant to conventional therapies and has high potential for metastasis and low survival rates. Vemurafenib is a small molecule inhibitor of the BRAF serine-threonine kinase recently approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration to treat patients with metastatic and unresectable melanomas that carry an activating BRAF (V600E mutation. Many clinical trials evaluating other therapeutic uses of vemurafenib are still ongoing. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters are membrane proteins with important physiological and pharmacological roles. Collectively, they transport and regulate levels of physiological substrates such as lipids, porphyrins and sterols. Some of them also remove xenobiotics and limit the oral bioavailability and distribution of many chemotherapeutics. The overexpression of three major ABC drug transporters is the most common mechanism for acquired resistance to anticancer drugs. In this review, we highlight some of the recent findings related to the effect of ABC drug transporters such as ABCB1 and ABCG2 on the oral bioavailability of vemurafenib, problems associated with treating melanoma brain metastases and the development of acquired resistance to vemurafenib in cancers harboring the BRAF (V600E mutation.

  11. Serum albumin promotes ATP-binding cassette transporter-dependent sterol uptake in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Magdalena; Silvestro, Daniele; Fredslund, Maria D; Andersen, Tonni G; Pomorski, Thomas G

    2014-12-01

    Sterol uptake in fungi is a multistep process that involves interaction between external sterols and the cell wall, incorporation of sterol molecules into the plasma membrane, and subsequent integration into intracellular membranes for turnover. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters have been implicated in sterol uptake, but key features of their activity remain to be elucidated. Here, we apply fluorescent cholesterol (NBD-cholesterol) to monitor sterol uptake under anaerobic and aerobic conditions in two fungal species, Candida glabrata (Cg) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc). We found that in both fungal species, ABC transporter-dependent uptake of cholesterol under anaerobic conditions and in mutants lacking HEM1 gene is promoted in the presence of the serum protein albumin that is able to bind the sterol molecule. Furthermore, the C. glabrata ABC transporter CgAus1p expressed in S. cerevisiae requires the presence of serum or albumin for efficient cholesterol uptake. These results suggest that albumin can serve as sterol donor in ABC transporter-dependent sterol uptake, a process potentially important for growth of C. glabrata inside infected humans.

  12. A novel ATP-binding cassette transporter, ABCG6 is involved in chemoresistance of Leishmania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BoseDasgupta, Somdeb; Ganguly, Agneyo; Roy, Amit; Mukherjee, Tanmoy; Majumder, Hemanta K

    2008-04-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters constitute the biggest family of membrane proteins involved in drug resistance and other biological activities. Resistance of leishmanial parasites to therapeutic drugs continues to escalate in developing countries and in many instances it is due to overexpressed ABC efflux pumps. Progressively adapted camptothecin (CPT)-resistant parasites show overexpression of a novel ABC transporter, which was classified as ABCG6. Transfection and overexpression of LdABCG6 in wild type parasites, shows its localization primarily in the plasma membrane and flagellar pocket region. Overexpressed LdABCG6 confers substantial CPT resistance to the parasites by rapid drug efflux. Various inhibitors have been tested for their ability to revert the CPT-resistant phenotype to specifically understand the inhibition of LdABCG6 transporter. Transport experiments using everted membrane vesicles were carried out to gain an insight into the kinetics of drug transport. This study provides further knowledge of specific membrane traffic ATPase and its involvement in the chemoresistance of Leishmania. PMID:18243364

  13. Disruption of lolCDE, Encoding an ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter, Is Lethal for Escherichia coli and Prevents Release of Lipoproteins from the Inner Membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Narita, Shin-ichiro; Tanaka, Kimie; Matsuyama, Shin-ichi; Tokuda, Hajime

    2002-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter LolCDE was previously identified, by using reconstituted proteoliposomes, as an apparatus catalyzing the release of outer membrane-specific lipoproteins from the inner membrane of Escherichia coli. Mutations resulting in defective LolD were previously shown to be lethal for E. coli. The amino acid sequences of LolC and LolE are similar to each other, but the necessity of both proteins for lipoprotein release has not been proved. Moreover, previous reconstituti...

  14. Domain Interactions in the Yeast ATP Binding Cassette Transporter Ycf1p: Intragenic Suppressor Analysis of Mutations in the Nucleotide Binding Domains

    OpenAIRE

    Falcón-Pérez, Juan M.; Martínez-Burgos, Mónica; Molano, Jesús; Mazón, María J.; Eraso, Pilar

    2001-01-01

    The yeast cadmium factor (Ycf1p) is a vacuolar ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter required for heavy metal and drug detoxification. Cluster analysis shows that Ycf1p is strongly related to the human multidrug-associated protein (MRP1) and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and therefore may serve as an excellent model for the study of eukaryotic ABC transporter structure and function. Identifying intramolecular interactions in these transporters may help to elucidate ener...

  15. Involvement of F1296 and N1303 of CFTR in induced-fit conformational change in response to ATP binding at NBD2

    OpenAIRE

    Szollosi, A; P.; Vergani; Csanady, L.

    2010-01-01

    The chloride ion channel cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) displays a typical adenosine trisphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) protein architecture comprising two transmembrane domains, two intracellular nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs), and a unique intracellular regulatory domain. Once phosphorylated in the regulatory domain, CFTR channels can open and close when supplied with cytosolic ATP. Despite the general agreement that formation of a head-to-tail NBD dim...

  16. ATP binding to the pseudokinase domain of JAK2 is critical for pathogenic activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammarén, Henrik M; Ungureanu, Daniela; Grisouard, Jean; Skoda, Radek C; Hubbard, Stevan R; Silvennoinen, Olli

    2015-04-14

    Pseudokinases lack conserved motifs typically required for kinase activity. Nearly half of pseudokinases bind ATP, but only few retain phosphotransfer activity, leaving the functional role of nucleotide binding in most cases unknown. Janus kinases (JAKs) are nonreceptor tyrosine kinases with a tandem pseudokinase-kinase domain configuration, where the pseudokinase domain (JAK homology 2, JH2) has important regulatory functions and harbors mutations underlying hematological and immunological diseases. JH2 of JAK1, JAK2, and TYK2 all bind ATP, but the significance of this is unclear. We characterize the role of nucleotide binding in normal and pathogenic JAK signaling using comprehensive structure-based mutagenesis. Disruption of JH2 ATP binding in wild-type JAK2 has only minor effects, and in the presence of type I cytokine receptors, the mutations do not affect JAK2 activation. However, JH2 mutants devoid of ATP binding ameliorate the hyperactivation of JAK2 V617F. Disrupting ATP binding in JH2 also inhibits the hyperactivity of other pathogenic JAK2 mutants, as well as of JAK1 V658F, and prevents induction of erythrocytosis in a JAK2 V617F myeloproliferative neoplasm mouse model. Molecular dynamic simulations and thermal-shift analysis indicate that ATP binding stabilizes JH2, with a pronounced effect on the C helix region, which plays a critical role in pathogenic activation of JAK2. Taken together, our results suggest that ATP binding to JH2 serves a structural role in JAKs, which is required for aberrant activity of pathogenic JAK mutants. The inhibitory effect of abrogating JH2 ATP binding in pathogenic JAK mutants may warrant novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:25825724

  17. Multidrug efflux pumps: the structures of prokaryotic ATP-binding cassette transporter efflux pumps and implications for our understanding of eukaryotic P-glycoproteins and homologues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Ian D; Jones, Peter M; George, Anthony M

    2010-02-01

    One of the Holy Grails of ATP-binding cassette transporter research is a structural understanding of drug binding and transport in a eukaryotic multidrug resistance pump. These transporters are front-line mediators of drug resistance in cancers and represent an important therapeutic target in future chemotherapy. Although there has been intensive biochemical research into the human multidrug pumps, their 3D structure at atomic resolution remains unknown. The recent determination of the structure of a mouse P-glycoprotein at subatomic resolution is complemented by structures for a number of prokaryotic homologues. These structures have provided advances into our knowledge of the ATP-binding cassette exporter structure and mechanism, and have provided the template data for a number of homology modelling studies designed to reconcile biochemical data on these clinically important proteins. PMID:19961540

  18. Multidrug efflux pumps: the structures of prokaryotic ATP-binding cassette transporter efflux pumps and implications for our understanding of eukaryotic P-glycoproteins and homologues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Ian D; Jones, Peter M; George, Anthony M

    2010-02-01

    One of the Holy Grails of ATP-binding cassette transporter research is a structural understanding of drug binding and transport in a eukaryotic multidrug resistance pump. These transporters are front-line mediators of drug resistance in cancers and represent an important therapeutic target in future chemotherapy. Although there has been intensive biochemical research into the human multidrug pumps, their 3D structure at atomic resolution remains unknown. The recent determination of the structure of a mouse P-glycoprotein at subatomic resolution is complemented by structures for a number of prokaryotic homologues. These structures have provided advances into our knowledge of the ATP-binding cassette exporter structure and mechanism, and have provided the template data for a number of homology modelling studies designed to reconcile biochemical data on these clinically important proteins.

  19. Mitochondrial Hsp90 is a ligand-activated molecular chaperone coupling ATP binding to dimer closure through a coiled-coil intermediate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Nuri; Lee, Jungsoon; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Chang, Changsoo; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Lee, Sukyeong; Tsai, Francis T. F.

    2016-01-01

    Heat-shock protein of 90 kDa (Hsp90) is an essential molecular chaperone that adopts different 3D structures associated with distinct nucleotide states: a wide-open, V-shaped dimer in the apo state and a twisted, N-terminally closed dimer with ATP. Although the N domain is known to mediate ATP binding, how Hsp90 senses the bound nucleotide and facilitates dimer closure remains unclear. Here we present atomic structures of human mitochondrial Hsp90N (TRAP1N) and a composite model of intact TRAP1 revealing a previously unobserved coiled-coil dimer conformation that may precede dimer closure and is conserved in intact TRAP1 in solution. Our structure suggests that TRAP1 normally exists in an autoinhibited state with the ATP lid bound to the nucleotide-binding pocket. ATP binding displaces the ATP lid that signals the cis-bound ATP status to the neighboring subunit in a highly cooperative manner compatible with the coiled-coil intermediate state. We propose that TRAP1 is a ligand-activated molecular chaperone, which couples ATP binding to dramatic changes in local structure required for protein folding. PMID:26929380

  20. Oxidized LDL upregulated ATP binding cassette transporter-1 in THP-1 macrophages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao-ke TANG; Guang-hui YI; Jun-hao YANG; Lu-shan LIU; Zuo WANG; Chang-geng RUAN; Yong-zong YANG

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) on ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) in THP-1 macrophages. METHODS: After exposing the cultured THP-1 macrophages to ox-LDL for different periods, cholesterol efflux was determined by FJ-2107P type liquid scintillator. ABCA1 mRNA and protein level were determined by reverse trancriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot, respectively.The cholesterol level in THP-1 macrophage foam cells was detected by high performance liquid chromatography.RESULTS: ox-LDL elevated AB CA1 in both protein and mRNA levels and increased apolipoprotein (apo) A-I-mediated cholesterol efflux in a time- and dose-dependent manner. 22(R)-hydroxyeholesterol and 9-cis-retinoic acid did significantly increase cholesterol efflux in THP-1 macrophage foam cells (P<0.05), respectively. Both of them further promoted cholesterol efflux (P<0.01). As expected, liver X receptor (LXR) agonist decreased content of esterified cholesterol in the macrophage foam cells compared with control, whereas only a slight decrease of free cholesterol was observed. LXR activity was slightly increased by oxidized LDL by 12 % at 12 h compared with 6 h.However, LXR activity was increased about 1.8 times at 24 h, and oxidized LDL further increased LXR activity by about 2.6 times at 48 h. CONCLUSION: ABCA1 gene expression was markedly increased in cholesterol-loaded cells as a result of activation of LXR/RXR. ABCA1 plays an important role in the homeostasis of cholesterol in the macrophages.

  1. Molecular mechanism of ATP binding and ion channel activation in P2X receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hattori, Motoyuki; Gouaux, Eric (Oregon HSU)

    2012-10-24

    P2X receptors are trimeric ATP-activated ion channels permeable to Na{sup +}, K{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+}. The seven P2X receptor subtypes are implicated in physiological processes that include modulation of synaptic transmission, contraction of smooth muscle, secretion of chemical transmitters and regulation of immune responses. Despite the importance of P2X receptors in cellular physiology, the three-dimensional composition of the ATP-binding site, the structural mechanism of ATP-dependent ion channel gating and the architecture of the open ion channel pore are unknown. Here we report the crystal structure of the zebrafish P2X4 receptor in complex with ATP and a new structure of the apo receptor. The agonist-bound structure reveals a previously unseen ATP-binding motif and an open ion channel pore. ATP binding induces cleft closure of the nucleotide-binding pocket, flexing of the lower body {beta}-sheet and a radial expansion of the extracellular vestibule. The structural widening of the extracellular vestibule is directly coupled to the opening of the ion channel pore by way of an iris-like expansion of the transmembrane helices. The structural delineation of the ATP-binding site and the ion channel pore, together with the conformational changes associated with ion channel gating, will stimulate development of new pharmacological agents.

  2. Multidrug transport by ATP binding cassette transporters : a proposed two-cylinder engine mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veen, HW; Higgins, CF; Konings, WN

    2001-01-01

    The elevated expression of ATP binding cassette (ABC) multidrug transporters in multidrug-resistant cells interferes with the drug-based control of cancers and infectious pathogenic microorganisms. Multidrug transporters interact directly with the drug substrates. This review summarizes current insi

  3. Discovery of a novel allosteric inhibitor-binding site in ERK5: comparison with the canonical kinase hinge ATP-binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongming; Tucker, Julie; Wang, Xiaotao; Gavine, Paul R; Phillips, Chris; Augustin, Martin A; Schreiner, Patrick; Steinbacher, Stefan; Preston, Marian; Ogg, Derek

    2016-05-01

    MAP kinases act as an integration point for multiple biochemical signals and are involved in a wide variety of cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, regulation of transcription and development. As a member of the MAP kinase family, ERK5 (MAPK7) is involved in the downstream signalling pathways of various cell-surface receptors, including receptor tyrosine kinases and G protein-coupled receptors. In the current study, five structures of the ERK5 kinase domain co-crystallized with ERK5 inhibitors are reported. Interestingly, three of the compounds bind at a novel allosteric binding site in ERK5, while the other two bind at the typical ATP-binding site. Binding of inhibitors at the allosteric site is accompanied by displacement of the P-loop into the ATP-binding site and is shown to be ATP-competitive in an enzymatic assay of ERK5 kinase activity. Kinase selectivity data show that the most potent allosteric inhibitor exhibits superior kinase selectivity compared with the two inhibitors that bind at the canonical ATP-binding site. An analysis of these structures and comparison with both a previously published ERK5-inhibitor complex structure (PDB entry 4b99) and the structures of three other kinases (CDK2, ITK and MEK) in complex with allosteric inhibitors are presented.

  4. A novel flow cytometric HTS assay reveals functional modulators of ATP binding cassette transporter ABCB6.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishore Polireddy

    Full Text Available ABCB6 is a member of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP-binding cassette family of transporter proteins that is increasingly recognized as a relevant physiological and therapeutic target. Evaluation of modulators of ABCB6 activity would pave the way toward a more complete understanding of the significance of this transport process in tumor cell growth, proliferation and therapy-related drug resistance. In addition, this effort would improve our understanding of the function of ABCB6 in normal physiology with respect to heme biosynthesis, and cellular adaptation to metabolic demand and stress responses. To search for modulators of ABCB6, we developed a novel cell-based approach that, in combination with flow cytometric high-throughput screening (HTS, can be used to identify functional modulators of ABCB6. Accumulation of protoporphyrin, a fluorescent molecule, in wild-type ABCB6 expressing K562 cells, forms the basis of the HTS assay. Screening the Prestwick Chemical Library employing the HTS assay identified four compounds, benzethonium chloride, verteporfin, tomatine hydrochloride and piperlongumine, that reduced ABCB6 mediated cellular porphyrin levels. Validation of the identified compounds employing the hemin-agarose affinity chromatography and mitochondrial transport assays demonstrated that three out of the four compounds were capable of inhibiting ABCB6 mediated hemin transport into isolated mitochondria. However, only verteporfin and tomatine hydrochloride inhibited ABCB6's ability to compete with hemin as an ABCB6 substrate. This assay is therefore sensitive, robust, and suitable for automation in a high-throughput environment as demonstrated by our identification of selective functional modulators of ABCB6. Application of this assay to other libraries of synthetic compounds and natural products is expected to identify novel modulators of ABCB6 activity.

  5. Mutant cycles at CFTR's non-canonical ATP-binding site support little interface separation during gating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szollosi, Andras; Muallem, Daniella R; Csanády, László; Vergani, Paola

    2011-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride channel belonging to the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily. ABC proteins share a common molecular mechanism that couples ATP binding and hydrolysis at two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) to diverse functions. This involves formation of NBD dimers, with ATP bound at two composite interfacial sites. In CFTR, intramolecular NBD dimerization is coupled to channel opening. Channel closing is triggered by hydrolysis of the ATP molecule bound at composite site 2. Site 1, which is non-canonical, binds nucleotide tightly but is not hydrolytic. Recently, based on kinetic arguments, it was suggested that this site remains closed for several gating cycles. To investigate movements at site 1 by an independent technique, we studied changes in thermodynamic coupling between pairs of residues on opposite sides of this site. The chosen targets are likely to interact based on both phylogenetic analysis and closeness on structural models. First, we mutated T460 in NBD1 and L1353 in NBD2 (the corresponding site-2 residues become energetically coupled as channels open). Mutation T460S accelerated closure in hydrolytic conditions and in the nonhydrolytic K1250R background; mutation L1353M did not affect these rates. Analysis of the double mutant showed additive effects of mutations, suggesting that energetic coupling between the two residues remains unchanged during the gating cycle. We next investigated pairs 460-1348 and 460-1375. Although both mutations H1348A and H1375A produced dramatic changes in hydrolytic and nonhydrolytic channel closing rates, in the corresponding double mutants these changes proved mostly additive with those caused by mutation T460S, suggesting little change in energetic coupling between either positions 460-1348 or positions 460-1375 during gating. These results provide independent support for a gating model in which ATP-bound composite site 1 remains

  6. Blood-Brain Barrier Active Efflux Transporters: ATP-Binding Cassette Gene Family

    OpenAIRE

    Löscher, Wolfgang; Potschka, Heidrun

    2005-01-01

    Summary: The blood-brain barrier (BBB) contributes to brain homeostasis by protecting the brain from potentially harmful endogenous and exogenous substances. BBB active drug efflux transporters of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) gene family are increasingly recognized as important determinants of drug distribution to, and elimination from, the CNS. The ABC efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (Pgp) has been demonstrated as a key element of the BBB that can actively transport a huge variety of lip...

  7. ATP-binding cassette transporter controls leaf surface secretion of anticancer drug components in Catharanthus roseus

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Fang; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    The presence of biologically active monoterpenoid indole alkaloids (MIAs) on the leaf surfaces of medicinally important Catharanthus roseus has led to questions about the secretion processes involved and their prevalence within MIA-producing species of plants. This report shows that a transporter closely related to those involved in cuticle assembly in plants and belonging to the pleiotropic drug resistance family of ATP-binding cassette transporters is specialized for transport of the MIA ca...

  8. Regulation of CFTR Cl− channel gating by ATP binding and hydrolysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ikuma, Mutsuhiro; Welsh, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    Opening and closing of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl− channel is regulated by the interaction of ATP with its two cytoplasmic nucleotide-binding domains (NBD). Although ATP hydrolysis by the NBDs is required for normal gating, the influence of ATP binding versus hydrolysis on specific steps in the gating cycle remains uncertain. Earlier work showed that the absence of Mg2+ prevents hydrolysis. We found that even in the absence of Mg2+, ATP could support cha...

  9. Nitric oxide differentially regulates renal ATP-binding cassette transporters during endotoxemia

    OpenAIRE

    Heemskerk, Suzanne; van Koppen, Arianne; van den Broek, Luc; Poelen, Geert J. M.; Wouterse, Alfons C; Dijkman, Henry B. P. M.; Russel, Frans G. M.; Masereeuw, Rosalinde

    2007-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important regulator of renal transport processes. In the present study, we investigated the role of NO, produced by inducible NO synthase (iNOS), in the regulation of renal ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in vivo during endotoxemia. Wistar–Hannover rats were injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS+) alone or in combination with the iNOS inhibitor, aminoguanidine. Controls received detoxified LPS (LPS−). After LPS+, proximal tubular damage and a reduction in renal...

  10. Structural models of zebrafish (Danio rerio NOD1 and NOD2 NACHT domains suggest differential ATP binding orientations: insights from computational modeling, docking and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra Maharana

    Full Text Available Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 1 (NOD1 and NOD2 are cytosolic pattern recognition receptors playing pivotal roles in innate immune signaling. NOD1 and NOD2 recognize bacterial peptidoglycan derivatives iE-DAP and MDP, respectively and undergoes conformational alternation and ATP-dependent self-oligomerization of NACHT domain followed by downstream signaling. Lack of structural adequacy of NACHT domain confines our understanding about the NOD-mediated signaling mechanism. Here, we predicted the structure of NACHT domain of both NOD1 and NOD2 from model organism zebrafish (Danio rerio using computational methods. Our study highlighted the differential ATP binding modes in NOD1 and NOD2. In NOD1, γ-phosphate of ATP faced toward the central nucleotide binding cavity like NLRC4, whereas in NOD2 the cavity was occupied by adenine moiety. The conserved 'Lysine' at Walker A formed hydrogen bonds (H-bonds and Aspartic acid (Walker B formed electrostatic interaction with ATP. At Sensor 1, Arg328 of NOD1 exhibited an H-bond with ATP, whereas corresponding Arg404 of NOD2 did not. 'Proline' of GxP motif (Pro386 of NOD1 and Pro464 of NOD2 interacted with adenine moiety and His511 at Sensor 2 of NOD1 interacted with γ-phosphate group of ATP. In contrast, His579 of NOD2 interacted with the adenine moiety having a relatively inverted orientation. Our findings are well supplemented with the molecular interaction of ATP with NLRC4, and consistent with mutagenesis data reported for human, which indicates evolutionary shared NOD signaling mechanism. Together, this study provides novel insights into ATP binding mechanism, and highlights the differential ATP binding modes in zebrafish NOD1 and NOD2.

  11. Rice Stomatal Closure Requires Guard Cell Plasma Membrane ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter RCN1/OsABCG5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Shuichi; Takano, Sho; Sato, Moeko; Furukawa, Kaoru; Nagasawa, Hidetaka; Yoshikawa, Shoko; Kasuga, Jun; Tokuji, Yoshihiko; Yazaki, Kazufumi; Nakazono, Mikio; Takamure, Itsuro; Kato, Kiyoaki

    2016-03-01

    Water stress is one of the major environmental stresses that affect agricultural production worldwide. Water loss from plants occurs primarily through stomatal pores. Here, we report that an Oryza sativa half-size ATP-binding cassette (ABC) subfamily G protein, RCN1/OsABCG5, is involved in stomatal closure mediated by phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) accumulation in guard cells. We found that the GFP-RCN1/OsABCG5-fusion protein was localized at the plasma membrane in guard cells. The percentage of guard cell pairs containing both ABA and GFP-RCN1/OsABCG5 increased after exogenous ABA treatment, whereas they were co-localized in guard cell pairs regardless of whether exogenous ABA was applied. ABA application resulted in a smaller increase in the percentage of guard cell pairs containing ABA in rcn1 mutant (A684P) and RCN1-RNAi than in wild-type plants. Furthermore, polyethylene glycol (drought stress)-inducible ABA accumulation in guard cells did not occur in rcn1 mutants. Stomata closure mediated by exogenous ABA application was strongly reduced in rcn1 mutants. Finally, rcn1 mutant plants had more rapid water loss from detached leaves than the wild-type plants. These results indicate that in response to drought stress, RCN1/OsABCG5 is involved in accumulation of ABA in guard cells, which is indispensable for stomatal closure. PMID:26708605

  12. ATP-binding cassette transporters and sterol O-acyltransferases interact at membrane microdomains to modulate sterol uptake and esterification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Sonia; Balderes, Dina; Kim, Christine; Guo, Zhongmin A; Wilcox, Lisa; Area-Gomez, Estela; Snider, Jamie; Wolinski, Heimo; Stagljar, Igor; Granato, Juliana T; Ruggles, Kelly V; DeGiorgis, Joseph A; Kohlwein, Sepp D; Schon, Eric A; Sturley, Stephen L

    2015-11-01

    A key component of eukaryotic lipid homeostasis is the esterification of sterols with fatty acids by sterol O-acyltransferases (SOATs). The esterification reactions are allosterically activated by their sterol substrates, the majority of which accumulate at the plasma membrane. We demonstrate that in yeast, sterol transport from the plasma membrane to the site of esterification is associated with the physical interaction of the major SOAT, acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT)-related enzyme (Are)2p, with 2 plasma membrane ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters: Aus1p and Pdr11p. Are2p, Aus1p, and Pdr11p, unlike the minor acyltransferase, Are1p, colocalize to sterol and sphingolipid-enriched, detergent-resistant microdomains (DRMs). Deletion of either ABC transporter results in Are2p relocalization to detergent-soluble membrane domains and a significant decrease (53-36%) in esterification of exogenous sterol. Similarly, in murine tissues, the SOAT1/Acat1 enzyme and activity localize to DRMs. This subcellular localization is diminished upon deletion of murine ABC transporters, such as Abcg1, which itself is DRM associated. We propose that the close proximity of sterol esterification and transport proteins to each other combined with their residence in lipid-enriched membrane microdomains facilitates rapid, high-capacity sterol transport and esterification, obviating any requirement for soluble intermediary proteins.

  13. Evolving new protein-protein interaction specificity through promiscuous intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aakre, Christopher D; Herrou, Julien; Phung, Tuyen N; Perchuk, Barrett S; Crosson, Sean; Laub, Michael T

    2015-10-22

    Interacting proteins typically coevolve, and the identification of coevolving amino acids can pinpoint residues required for interaction specificity. This approach often assumes that an interface-disrupting mutation in one protein drives selection of a compensatory mutation in its partner during evolution. However, this model requires a non-functional intermediate state prior to the compensatory change. Alternatively, a mutation in one protein could first broaden its specificity, allowing changes in its partner, followed by a specificity-restricting mutation. Using bacterial toxin-antitoxin systems, we demonstrate the plausibility of this second, promiscuity-based model. By screening large libraries of interface mutants, we show that toxins and antitoxins with high specificity are frequently connected in sequence space to more promiscuous variants that can serve as intermediates during a reprogramming of interaction specificity. We propose that the abundance of promiscuous variants promotes the expansion and diversification of toxin-antitoxin systems and other paralogous protein families during evolution. PMID:26478181

  14. Transmembrane gate movements in the type II ATP-binding cassette (ABC) importer BtuCD-F during nucleotide cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Benesh; Jeschke, Gunnar; Goetz, Birke A; Locher, Kaspar P; Bordignon, Enrica

    2011-11-25

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are ubiquitous integral membrane proteins that translocate substrates across cell membranes. The alternating access of their transmembrane domains to opposite sides of the membrane powered by the closure and reopening of the nucleotide binding domains is proposed to drive the translocation events. Despite clear structural similarities, evidence for considerable mechanistic diversity starts to accumulate within the importers subfamily. We present here a detailed study of the gating mechanism of a type II ABC importer, the BtuCD-F vitamin B(12) importer from Escherichia coli, elucidated by EPR spectroscopy. Distance changes at key positions in the translocation gates in the nucleotide-free, ATP- and ADP-bound conformations of the transporter were measured in detergent micelles and liposomes. The translocation gates of the BtuCD-F complex undergo conformational changes in line with a "two-state" alternating access model. We provide the first direct evidence that binding of ATP drives the gates to an inward-facing conformation, in contrast to type I importers specific for maltose, molybdate, or methionine. Following ATP hydrolysis, the translocation gates restore to an apo-like conformation. In the presence of ATP, an excess of vitamin B(12) promotes the reopening of the gates toward the periplasm and the dislodgment of BtuF from the transporter. The EPR data allow a productive translocation cycle of the vitamin B(12) transporter to be modeled.

  15. Association of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter A1 Gene Polymorphisms in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus among Malaysians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polin Haghvirdizadeh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is a complex polygenic disorder characterized by impaired insulin resistance, insulin secretion, and dysregulation of lipid and protein metabolism with environmental and genetic factors. ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1 gene polymorphisms are reported as the one of the genetic risk factors for T2DM in various populations with conflicting results. This study was conducted based on PCR-HRM to determine the frequency of ABCA1 gene by rs2230806 (R219K, rs1800977 (C69T, and rs9282541 (R230C polymorphisms Malaysian subjects. Methods. A total of 164 T2DM and 165 controls were recruited and their genotypes for ABCA1 gene polymorphisms were determined based on the real time high resolution melting analysis. Results. There was a significant difference between the subjects in terms of age, BMI, FPG, HbA1c, HDL, LDL, and TG P<0.05. There was a significant association between HOM of R219K P=0.005, among Malaysian subjects; moreover, allele frequency revealed the significant difference in A allele of R219K P=0.003. But, there was no significant difference in genotypic and allelic frequencies of C69T and R230C polymorphism. Conclusion. R219K polymorphism of ABCA1 gene can be considered as a genetic risk factor for T2DM subjects among Malaysians.

  16. High glucose decreases the expression of ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 in human vascular smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiahong Xue; Zuyi Yuan; Yue Wu; Yan Zhao; Zhaofei Wan

    2008-01-01

    Objective:ATP-binding cassette transporters(ABC) A1 and G1 play an important role in mediating cholesterol efflux and preventing macrophage foam cell formation. In this study, we examined the regulation of ABC transporters by high glucose in human vascular smooth muscle cells(VSMCs), the other precursor of foam cells. Methods:Incubation of human VSMCs with D-ghicose(5 to 30 mM) for 1 to 7 days in the presence or absence of antioxidant and nuclear factor(NF)-kB inhibitors, the expressions of ABCA1 and ABCG1 were analyzed by real time PCR and Western blotting. Results:High glucose decreased ABCG1 mRNA and protein expression in cultured VSMCs, whereas the expression of ABCA1 was not significantly decreased. Down-regulation of ABCG1 mRNA expression by high glucose was abolished by antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine(NAC) and NF-kB inhibitors, BAY 11-7085 and tosyl-phenylalanine chloromethyl-ketone(TPCK). Conclusion:High glucose suppresses the expression of ABCG1 in VSMCs, which is the possible mechanism of VSMC derived foam cell transformation.

  17. AztD, a Periplasmic Zinc Metallochaperone to an ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter System in Paracoccus denitrificans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handali, Melody; Roychowdhury, Hridindu; Neupane, Durga P; Yukl, Erik T

    2015-12-11

    Bacterial ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters of transition metals are essential for acquisition of necessary elements from the environment. A large number of Gram-negative bacteria, including human pathogens, have a fourth conserved gene of unknown function adjacent to the canonical permease, ATPase, and solute-binding protein (SBP) genes of the AztABC zinc transporter system. To assess the function of this putative accessory factor (AztD) from Paracoccus denitrificans, we have analyzed its transcriptional regulation, metal binding properties, and interaction with the SBP (AztC). Transcription of the aztD gene is significantly up-regulated under conditions of zinc starvation. Recombinantly expressed AztD purifies with slightly substoichiometric zinc from the periplasm of Escherichia coli and is capable of binding up to three zinc ions with high affinity. Size exclusion chromatography and a simple intrinsic fluorescence assay were used to determine that AztD as isolated is able to transfer bound zinc nearly quantitatively to apo-AztC. Transfer occurs through a direct, associative mechanism that prevents loss of metal to the solvent. These results indicate that AztD is a zinc chaperone to AztC and likely functions to maintain zinc homeostasis through interaction with the AztABC system. This work extends our understanding of periplasmic zinc trafficking and the function of chaperones in this process.

  18. Identification of mutations in regions corresponding to the two putative nucleotide (ATP)-binding folds of the cystic fibrosis gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Additional mutations in the cystic fibrosis (CF) gene were identified in the regions corresponding to the two putative nucleotide (ATP)-binding folds (NBFs) of the predicted polypeptide. The patient cohort included 46 Canadian CF families with well-characterized DNA marker haplotypes spanning the disease locus and several other families from Israel. Eleven mutations were found in the first NBF, 2 were found in the second NBF, but none was found in the R-domain. Seven of the mutations were of the missense type affecting some of the highly conserved amino acid residues in the first NBF; 3 were nonsense mutations; 2 would probably affect mRNA splicing; 2 corresponded to small deletions, including another 3-base-pair deletion different from the major mutation (δF508), which could account for 70% of the CF chromosomes in the population. Nine of these mutations accounted for 12 of the 31 non-δF508 CF chromosomes in the Canadian families. The highly heterogeneous nature of the remaining CF mutations provides important insights into the structure and function of the protein, but it also suggests that DNA-based genetic screening for CF carrier status will not be straightforward

  19. The rem mutations in the ATP-binding groove of the Rad3/XPD helicase lead to Xeroderma pigmentosum-Cockayne syndrome-like phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Herrera-Moyano

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The eukaryotic TFIIH complex is involved in Nucleotide Excision Repair and transcription initiation. We analyzed three yeast mutations of the Rad3/XPD helicase of TFIIH known as rem (recombination and mutation phenotypes. We found that, in these mutants, incomplete NER reactions lead to replication fork breaking and the subsequent engagement of the homologous recombination machinery to restore them. Nevertheless, the penetrance varies among mutants, giving rise to a phenotype gradient. Interestingly, the mutations analyzed reside at the ATP-binding groove of Rad3 and in vivo experiments reveal a gain of DNA affinity upon damage of the mutant Rad3 proteins. Since mutations at the ATP-binding groove of XPD in humans are present in the Xeroderma pigmentosum-Cockayne Syndrome (XP-CS, we recreated rem mutations in human cells, and found that these are XP-CS-like. We propose that the balance between the loss of helicase activity and the gain of DNA affinity controls the capacity of TFIIH to open DNA during NER, and its persistence at both DNA lesions and promoters. This conditions NER efficiency and transcription resumption after damage, which in human cells would explain the XP-CS phenotype, opening new perspectives to understand the molecular basis of the role of XPD in human disease.

  20. ATP-binding cassette subfamily B member 1 (ABCB1) and subfamily C member 10 (ABCC10) are not primary resistance factors for cabazitaxel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rishil J Kathawala; Yi-Jun Wang; Suneet Shukla; Yun-Kai Zhang; Saeed Alqahtani; Amal Kaddoumi; Suresh V Ambudkar; Charles R Ashby Jr; Zhe-Sheng Chen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction:ATP-binding cassette subfamily B member 1 (ABCB1) and subfamily C member 10 (ABCC10) proteins are efflux transporters that couple the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to the translocation of toxic substances and chemotherapeutic drugs out of cells. Cabazitaxel is a novel taxane that differs from paclitaxel by its lower affinity for ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Methods:We determined the effects of cabazitaxel, a novel tubulin-binding taxane, and paclitaxel on paclitaxel-resistant, ABCB1-overexpressing KB-C2 and LLC-MDR1-WT cells and paclitaxel-resistant, ABCC10-overexpressing HEK293/ABCC10 cells by calculating the degree of drug resistance and measuring ATPase activity of the ABCB1 transporter. Results:Decreased resistance to cabazitaxel compared with paclitaxel was observed in KB-C2, LLC-MDR1-WT, and HEK293/ABCC10 cells. Moreover, cabazitaxel had low efficacy, whereas paclitaxel had high efficacy in stimulating the ATPase activity of ABCB1, indicating a direct interaction of both drugs with the transporter. Conclusion:ABCB1 and ABCC10 are not primary resistance factors for cabazitaxel compared with paclitaxel, suggesting that cabazitaxel may have a low affinity for these efflux transporters.

  1. Protection against chemotherapy-induced alopecia: targeting ATP-binding cassette transporters in the hair follicle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslam, Iain S; Pitre, Aaron; Schuetz, John D; Paus, Ralf

    2013-11-01

    Currently, efficacious treatments for chemotherapy-induced alopecia (hair loss) are lacking, and incidences of permanent hair loss following high-dose chemotherapy are on the increase. In this article, we describe mechanisms by which the pharmacological defense status of the hair follicle might be enhanced, thereby reducing the accumulation of cytotoxic cancer drugs and preventing or reducing hair loss and damage. We believe this could be achieved via the selective increase in ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter expression within the hair follicle epithelium, following application of topical agonists for regulatory nuclear receptors. Clinical application would require the development of hair follicle-targeted formulations, potentially utilizing nanoparticle technology. This novel approach has the potential to yield entirely new therapeutic options for the treatment and management of chemotherapy-induced alopecia, providing significant psychological and physical benefit to cancer patients.

  2. Protection against chemotherapy-induced alopecia: targeting ATP-binding cassette transporters in the hair follicle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslam, Iain S; Pitre, Aaron; Schuetz, John D; Paus, Ralf

    2013-11-01

    Currently, efficacious treatments for chemotherapy-induced alopecia (hair loss) are lacking, and incidences of permanent hair loss following high-dose chemotherapy are on the increase. In this article, we describe mechanisms by which the pharmacological defense status of the hair follicle might be enhanced, thereby reducing the accumulation of cytotoxic cancer drugs and preventing or reducing hair loss and damage. We believe this could be achieved via the selective increase in ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter expression within the hair follicle epithelium, following application of topical agonists for regulatory nuclear receptors. Clinical application would require the development of hair follicle-targeted formulations, potentially utilizing nanoparticle technology. This novel approach has the potential to yield entirely new therapeutic options for the treatment and management of chemotherapy-induced alopecia, providing significant psychological and physical benefit to cancer patients. PMID:24100054

  3. TSH increases synthesis of hepatic ATP-binding cassette subfamily A member 1 in hypercholesterolemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tiantian; Zhou, Lingyan; Li, Cong Cong; Shi, Hong; Zhou, Xinli

    2016-07-22

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that thyrotropin (TSH) levels are closely correlated with the severity of hypercholesterolemia. Reverse cholesterol transfer (RCT) plays an important role in regulating bloodcholesterol. However, the molecular mechanism of hypercholesterolemia in subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) has not been fully clarified. The SCH mouse model, which is characterized by elevated serum TSH but not thyroid hormone levels, demonstrated a significant increase in plasma cholesterol compared with controls. Interestingly, Tshr KO mice, with normal thyroid hormone levels after thyroid hormone supplementation, showed lower plasma cholesterol levels compared with their wild-type littermates. ATP binding cassette subfamily A member 1(ABCA1) is a member of the ABC superfamily, which induces transfer of intracellular cholesterol to extracellular apolipoprotein. TSH upregulated hepatic ABCA1 to promote the efflux of intercellular cumulative cholesterol, resulting in increased plasma cholesterol. These data might partially explain the pathogenesis of hypercholesterolemia in SCH. PMID:27179782

  4. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of an ATP-binding cassette transporter OtrC from Streptomyces rimosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Lan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The otrC gene of Streptomyces rimosus was previously annotated as an oxytetracycline (OTC resistance protein. However, the amino acid sequence analysis of OtrC shows that it is a putative ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter with multidrug resistance function. To our knowledge, none of the ABC transporters in S. rimosus have yet been characterized. In this study, we aimed to characterize the multidrug exporter function of OtrC and evaluate its relevancy to OTC production. Results In order to investigate OtrC’s function, otrC is cloned and expressed in E. coli The exporter function of OtrC was identified by ATPase activity determination and ethidium bromide efflux assays. Also, the susceptibilities of OtrC-overexpressing cells to several structurally unrelated drugs were compared with those of OtrC-non-expressing cells by minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC assays, indicating that OtrC functions as a drug exporter with a broad range of drug specificities. The OTC production was enhanced by 1.6-fold in M4018 (P = 0.000877 and 1.4-fold in SR16 (P = 0.00973 duplication mutants, while it decreased to 80% in disruption mutants (P = 0.0182 and 0.0124 in M4018 and SR16, respectively. Conclusions The results suggest that OtrC is an ABC transporter with multidrug resistance function, and plays an important role in self-protection by drug efflux mechanisms. This is the first report of such a protein in S. rimosus, and otrC could be a valuable target for genetic manipulation to improve the production of industrial antibiotics.

  5. ROLE OF ATP BINDING CASSETTE SUB-FAMILY MEMBER 2 (ABCG2) IN MOUSE EMBRYONIC STEM CELL DEVELOPMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ATP binding cassette sub-family member 2 (ABCG2), is a member of the ABC transporter superfamily and a principal xenobiotic transporter. ABCG2 is also highly expressed in certain stem cell populations where it is thought to be related to stem cell plasticity, although the role o...

  6. Selective and ATP-dependent translocation of peptides by the homodimeric ATP binding cassette transporter TAP-like (ABCB9)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolters, Justina Clarinda; Abele, Rupert; Tampé, Robert

    2005-01-01

    The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP)-like (TAPL, ABCB9) belongs to the ATP-binding cassette transporter family, which translocates a vast variety of solutes across membranes. The function of this half-size transporter has not yet been determined. Here, we show that TAPL forms a h

  7. Protein coalitions in a core mammalian biochemical network linked by rapidly evolving proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsoka Sophia

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular ATP levels are generated by glucose-stimulated mitochondrial metabolism and determine metabolic responses, such as glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS from the β-cells of pancreatic islets. We describe an analysis of the evolutionary processes affecting the core enzymes involved in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in mammals. The proteins involved in this system belong to ancient enzymatic pathways: glycolysis, the TCA cycle and oxidative phosphorylation. Results We identify two sets of proteins, or protein coalitions, in this group of 77 enzymes with distinct evolutionary patterns. Members of the glycolysis, TCA cycle, metabolite transport, pyruvate and NADH shuttles have low rates of protein sequence evolution, as inferred from a human-mouse comparison, and relatively high rates of evolutionary gene duplication. Respiratory chain and glutathione pathway proteins evolve faster, exhibiting lower rates of gene duplication. A small number of proteins in the system evolve significantly faster than co-pathway members and may serve as rapidly evolving adapters, linking groups of co-evolving genes. Conclusions Our results provide insights into the evolution of the involved proteins. We find evidence for two coalitions of proteins and the role of co-adaptation in protein evolution is identified and could be used in future research within a functional context.

  8. ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Transporters of the Human Respiratory Tract Pathogen, Moraxella catarrhalis: Role in Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Timothy F; Brauer, Aimee L; Johnson, Antoinette; Kirkham, Charmaine

    2016-01-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis is a human respiratory tract pathogen that causes otitis media (middle ear infections) in children and respiratory tract infections in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In view of the huge global burden of disease caused by M. catarrhalis, the development of vaccines to prevent these infections and better approaches to treatment have become priorities. In previous work, we used a genome mining approach that identified three substrate binding proteins (SBPs) of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters as promising candidate vaccine antigens. In the present study, we performed a comprehensive assessment of 19 SBPs of 15 ABC transporter systems in the M. catarrhalis genome by engineering knockout mutants and studying their role in assays that assess mechanisms of infection. The capacity of M. catarrhalis to survive and grow in the nutrient-limited and hostile environment of the human respiratory tract, including intracellular growth, account in part for its virulence. The results show that ABC transporters that mediate uptake of peptides, amino acids, cations and anions play important roles in pathogenesis by enabling M. catarrhalis to 1) grow in nutrient-limited conditions, 2) invade and survive in human respiratory epithelial cells and 3) persist in the lungs in a murine pulmonary clearance model. The knockout mutants of SBPs and ABC transporters showed different patterns of activity in the assay systems, supporting the conclusion that different SBPs and ABC transporters function at different stages in the pathogenesis of infection. These results indicate that ABC transporters are nutritional virulence factors, functioning to enable the survival of M catarrhalis in the diverse microenvironments of the respiratory tract. Based on the role of ABC transporters as virulence factors of M. catarrhalis, these molecules represent potential drug targets to eradicate the organism from the human respiratory tract. PMID:27391026

  9. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 198756 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available -chain amino acid transport ATP-binding protein LivG (fragment) Microcystis aeruginosa PCC 7941 MRLFGELSALEN...VAIAGHIHNSSNLWTGILGLPVSRREEEKTYKRAGELLDLVGLTDQSNRKARNLAYGDQRRLEIARALALQPQLLLLDEPAAGMNPSEKGSLSQLIRQIRDNLALTVLLIEHHVPLVMGLCDRIAVLDFGKLIALGDPVTVRENRAVIEAYLGDE ...

  10. Conformational changes of the bacterial type I ATP-binding cassette importer HisQMP2 at distinct steps of the catalytic cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuveling, Johanna; Frochaux, Violette; Ziomkowska, Joanna; Wawrzinek, Robert; Wessig, Pablo; Herrmann, Andreas; Schneider, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    Prokaryotic solute binding protein-dependent ATP-binding cassette import systems are divided into type I and type II and mechanistic differences in the transport process going along with this classification are under intensive investigation. Little is known about the conformational dynamics during the catalytic cycle especially concerning the transmembrane domains. The type I transporter for positively charged amino acids from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (LAO-HisQMP2) was studied by limited proteolysis in detergent solution in the absence and presence of co-factors including ATP, ADP, LAO/arginine, and Mg(2+) ions. Stable peptide fragments could be obtained and differentially susceptible cleavage sites were determined by mass spectrometry as Lys-258 in the nucleotide-binding subunit, HisP, and Arg-217/Arg-218 in the transmembrane subunit, HisQ. In contrast, transmembrane subunit HisM was gradually degraded but no stable fragment could be detected. HisP and HisQ were equally resistant under pre- and post-hydrolysis conditions in the presence of arginine-loaded solute-binding protein LAO and ATP/ADP. Some protection was also observed with LAO/arginine alone, thus reflecting binding to the transporter in the apo-state and transmembrane signaling. Comparable digestion patterns were obtained with the transporter reconstituted into proteoliposomes and nanodiscs. Fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy confirmed the change of HisQ(R218) to a more apolar microenvironment upon ATP binding and hydrolysis. Limited proteolysis was subsequently used as a tool to study the consequences of mutations on the transport cycle. Together, our data suggest similar conformational changes during the transport cycle as described for the maltose ABC transporter of Escherichia coli, despite distinct structural differences between both systems.

  11. Structure-guided development of specific pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase inhibitors targeting the ATP-binding pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tso, Shih-Chia; Qi, Xiangbing; Gui, Wen-Jun; Wu, Cheng-Yang; Chuang, Jacinta L; Wernstedt-Asterholm, Ingrid; Morlock, Lorraine K; Owens, Kyle R; Scherer, Philipp E; Williams, Noelle S; Tambar, Uttam K; Wynn, R Max; Chuang, David T

    2014-02-14

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoforms (PDKs 1-4) negatively regulate activity of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex by reversible phosphorylation. PDK isoforms are up-regulated in obesity, diabetes, heart failure, and cancer and are potential therapeutic targets for these important human diseases. Here, we employed a structure-guided design to convert a known Hsp90 inhibitor to a series of highly specific PDK inhibitors, based on structural conservation in the ATP-binding pocket. The key step involved the substitution of a carbonyl group in the parent compound with a sulfonyl in the PDK inhibitors. The final compound of this series, 2-[(2,4-dihydroxyphenyl)sulfonyl]isoindoline-4,6-diol, designated PS10, inhibits all four PDK isoforms with IC50 = 0.8 μM for PDK2. The administration of PS10 (70 mg/kg) to diet-induced obese mice significantly augments pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity with reduced phosphorylation in different tissues. Prolonged PS10 treatments result in improved glucose tolerance and notably lessened hepatic steatosis in the mouse model. The results support the pharmacological approach of targeting PDK to control both glucose and fat levels in obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:24356970

  12. Whole-transcriptome survey of the putative ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter family genes in the latex-producing laticifers of Hevea brasiliensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nie Zhiyi

    Full Text Available The ATP-binding cassette (ABC proteins or transporters constitute a large protein family in plants and are involved in many different cellular functions and processes, including solute transportation, channel regulation and molecular switches, etc. Through transcriptome sequencing, a transcriptome-wide survey and expression analysis of the ABC protein genes were carried out using the laticiferous latex from Hevea brasiliensis (rubber tree. A total of 46 putative ABC family proteins were identified in the H. brasiliensis latex. These consisted of 12 'full-size', 21 'half-size' and 13 other putative ABC proteins, and all of them showed strong conservation with their Arabidopsis thaliana counterparts. This study indicated that all eight plant ABC protein paralog subfamilies were identified in the H. brasiliensis latex, of which ABCB, ABCG and ABCI were the most abundant. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays demonstrated that gene expression of several latex ABC proteins was regulated by ethylene, jasmonic acid or bark tapping (a wound stress stimulation, and that HbABCB15, HbABCB19, HbABCD1 and HbABCG21 responded most significantly of all to the abiotic stresses. The identification and expression analysis of the latex ABC family proteins could facilitate further investigation into their physiological involvement in latex metabolism and rubber biosynthesis by H. brasiliensis.

  13. Genome-wide identification and characterization of ATP-binding cassette transporters in the silkworm, Bombyx mori

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Shumin; Zhou, Shun; Tian, Ling; Guo, Enen; Luan, Yunxia; Zhang, Jianzhen; Li, Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Background The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily is the largest transporter gene family responsible for transporting specific molecules across lipid membranes in all living organisms. In insects, ABC transporters not only have important functions in molecule transport, but also play roles in insecticide resistance, metabolism and development. Results From the genome of the silkworm, Bombyx mori, we have identified 51 putative ABC genes which are classified into eight subfamil...

  14. ATP Binding Cassette Transporter Mediates Both Heme and Pesticide Detoxification in Tick Midgut Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Flavio Alves; Pohl, Paula C; Gandara, Ana Caroline; Ferreira, Jessica da Silva; Nascimento-Silva, Maria Clara; Bechara, Gervásio Henrique; Sorgine, Marcos H F; Almeida, Igor C; Vaz, Itabajara da Silva; Oliveira, Pedro L

    2015-01-01

    In ticks, the digestion of blood occurs intracellularly and proteolytic digestion of hemoglobin takes place in a dedicated type of lysosome, the digest vesicle, followed by transfer of the heme moiety of hemoglobin to a specialized organelle that accumulates large heme aggregates, called hemosomes. In the present work, we studied the uptake of fluorescent metalloporphyrins, used as heme analogs, and amitraz, one of the most regularly used acaricides to control cattle tick infestations, by Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus midgut cells. Both compounds were taken up by midgut cells in vitro and accumulated inside the hemosomes. Transport of both molecules was sensitive to cyclosporine A (CsA), a well-known inhibitor of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Rhodamine 123, a fluorescent probe that is also a recognized ABC substrate, was similarly directed to the hemosome in a CsA-sensitive manner. Using an antibody against conserved domain of PgP-1-type ABC transporter, we were able to immunolocalize PgP-1 in the digest vesicle membranes. Comparison between two R. microplus strains that were resistant and susceptible to amitraz revealed that the resistant strain detoxified both amitraz and Sn-Pp IX more efficiently than the susceptible strain, a process that was also sensitive to CsA. A transcript containing an ABC transporter signature exhibited 2.5-fold increased expression in the amitraz-resistant strain when compared with the susceptible strain. RNAi-induced down-regulation of this ABC transporter led to the accumulation of metalloporphyrin in the digestive vacuole, interrupting heme traffic to the hemosome. This evidence further confirms that this transcript codes for a heme transporter. This is the first report of heme transport in a blood-feeding organism. While the primary physiological function of the hemosome is to detoxify heme and attenuate its toxicity, we suggest that the use of this acaricide detoxification pathway by ticks may represent a new

  15. Endothelial ATP-binding cassette G1 in mouse endothelium protects against hemodynamic-induced atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Shanshan; Wang, Jiaxing; Zhang, Xu; Shi, Ying; Li, Bochuan; Bao, Qiankun; Pang, Wei; Ai, Ding; Zhu, Yi; He, Jinlong

    2016-08-19

    Activated vascular endothelium inflammation under persistent hyperlipidemia is the initial step of atherogenesis. ATP-binding cassette G1 (ABCG1) is a crucial factor maintaining sterol and lipid homeostasis by transporting cholesterol efflux to high-density lipoprotein. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of ABCG1 in endothelial inflammation activation during early-stage atherogenesis in mice and the underlying mechanisms. Endothelial cell (EC)-specific ABCG1 transgenic (EC-ABCG1-Tg) mice were generated and cross-bred with low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (Ldlr(-/-)) mice. After a 4-week Western-type diet, the mice were sacrificed for assessing atherosclerosis. Human umbilical vein ECs were treated with different flows, and ABCG1 was adenovirally overexpressed to investigate the mechanism in vitro. Compared with Ldlr(-/-) mouse aortas, EC-ABCG1-Tg/Ldlr(-/-) aortas showed decreased early-stage lesions. Furthermore, the lesion area in the EC-ABCG1-Tg/Ldlr(-/-) mouse aortic arch but not thoracic aorta was significantly reduced, which suggests a protective role of ABCG1 under atheroprone flow. In vitro, overexpression of ABCG1 attenuated EC activation caused by oscillatory shear stress. Overexpression of ABCG1 blunted cholesterol-activated ECs in vitro. In exploring the mechanisms of ABCG1 attenuating endothelial inflammation, we found that ABCG1 inhibited oscillatory flow-activated nuclear factor kappa B and NLRP3 inflammasome in ECs. ABCG1 may play a protective role in early-stage atherosclerosis by reducing endothelial activation induced by oscillatory shear stress via suppressing the inflammatory response. PMID:27297110

  16. ATP Binding Cassette Transporter Mediates Both Heme and Pesticide Detoxification in Tick Midgut Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio Alves Lara

    Full Text Available In ticks, the digestion of blood occurs intracellularly and proteolytic digestion of hemoglobin takes place in a dedicated type of lysosome, the digest vesicle, followed by transfer of the heme moiety of hemoglobin to a specialized organelle that accumulates large heme aggregates, called hemosomes. In the present work, we studied the uptake of fluorescent metalloporphyrins, used as heme analogs, and amitraz, one of the most regularly used acaricides to control cattle tick infestations, by Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus midgut cells. Both compounds were taken up by midgut cells in vitro and accumulated inside the hemosomes. Transport of both molecules was sensitive to cyclosporine A (CsA, a well-known inhibitor of ATP binding cassette (ABC transporters. Rhodamine 123, a fluorescent probe that is also a recognized ABC substrate, was similarly directed to the hemosome in a CsA-sensitive manner. Using an antibody against conserved domain of PgP-1-type ABC transporter, we were able to immunolocalize PgP-1 in the digest vesicle membranes. Comparison between two R. microplus strains that were resistant and susceptible to amitraz revealed that the resistant strain detoxified both amitraz and Sn-Pp IX more efficiently than the susceptible strain, a process that was also sensitive to CsA. A transcript containing an ABC transporter signature exhibited 2.5-fold increased expression in the amitraz-resistant strain when compared with the susceptible strain. RNAi-induced down-regulation of this ABC transporter led to the accumulation of metalloporphyrin in the digestive vacuole, interrupting heme traffic to the hemosome. This evidence further confirms that this transcript codes for a heme transporter. This is the first report of heme transport in a blood-feeding organism. While the primary physiological function of the hemosome is to detoxify heme and attenuate its toxicity, we suggest that the use of this acaricide detoxification pathway by ticks may

  17. Molecular Events Involved in a Single Cycle of Ligand Transfer from an ATP Binding Cassette Transporter, LolCDE, to a Molecular Chaperone, LolA*

    OpenAIRE

    Taniguchi, Naohiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2008-01-01

    An ATP binding cassette transporter LolCDE complex releases lipoproteins from the inner membrane of Escherichia coli in an ATP-dependent manner, leading to the formation of a complex between a lipoprotein and a periplasmic chaperone, LolA. LolA is proposed to undergo a conformational change upon the lipoprotein binding. The lipoprotein is then transferred from the LolA-lipoprotein complex to the outer membrane via LolB. Unlike most ATP binding cassette transporters med...

  18. Distinct alterations in ATP-binding cassette transporter expression in liver, kidney, small intestine, and brain in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Atsushi; Norikane, Sari; Okada, Ayaka; Adachi, Mamiko; Kato, Yukio; Iwaki, Masahiro

    2014-08-01

    Pathophysiological changes of infection or inflammation are associated with alterations in the production of numerous absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion-related proteins. However, little information is available on the effects of inflammation on the expression levels and activities of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. We examined the effect of acute (on day 7) and chronic (on day 21) inflammation on the expression of ABC transporters in some major tissues in rat. Adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) in rats was used as an animal model for inflammation. The mRNA levels of mdr1a and mdr1b encoding P-glycoprotein (P-gp) decreased significantly in livers of AA rats on day 21. Hepatic protein levels of P-gp, Mrp2, and Bcrp decreased significantly in membranes but not homogenates of AA rats after 7 days and after 21 days of treatment with adjuvant. Contrary to liver, protein levels of P-gp and Mrp2, but not Bcrp in kidney, increased significantly in membranes. The biliary excretion of rhodamine 123 was decreased in rats with chronic inflammation owing to decreases in efflux activities of P-gp. Our results showed that the expression of transporters in response to inflammation was organ dependent. In particular, hepatic and renal P-gp and Mrp2 exhibited opposite changes in membrane protein levels.

  19. ATP-binding cassette-like transporters are involved in the transport of lignin precursors across plasma and vacuolar membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Y.C.; Liu, C.

    2010-12-28

    Lignin is a complex biopolymer derived primarily from the condensation of three monomeric precursors, the monolignols. The synthesis of monolignols occurs in the cytoplasm. To reach the cell wall where they are oxidized and polymerized, they must be transported across the cell membrane. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the transport process are unclear. There are conflicting views about whether the transport of these precursors occurs by passive diffusion or is an energized active process; further, we know little about what chemical forms are required. Using isolated plasma and vacuolar membrane vesicles prepared from Arabidopsis, together with applying different transporter inhibitors in the assays, we examined the uptake of monolignols and their derivatives by these native membrane vesicles. We demonstrate that the transport of lignin precursors across plasmalemma and their sequestration into vacuoles are ATP-dependent primary-transport processes, involving ATP-binding cassette-like transporters. Moreover, we show that both plasma and vacuolar membrane vesicles selectively transport different forms of lignin precursors. In the presence of ATP, the inverted plasma membrane vesicles preferentially take up monolignol aglycones, whereas the vacuolar vesicles are more specific for glucoconjugates, suggesting that the different ATP-binding cassette-like transporters recognize different chemical forms in conveying them to distinct sites, and that glucosylation of monolignols is necessary for their vacuolar storage but not required for direct transport into the cell wall in Arabidopsis.

  20. Repositioning of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors as Antagonists of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters in Anticancer Drug Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Jun Wang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of multidrug resistance (MDR has attenuated the efficacy of anticancer drugs and the possibility of successful cancer chemotherapy. ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters play an essential role in mediating MDR in cancer cells by increasing efflux of drugs from cancer cells, hence reducing the intracellular accumulation of chemotherapeutic drugs. Interestingly, small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs, such as AST1306, lapatinib, linsitinib, masitinib, motesanib, nilotinib, telatinib and WHI-P154, have been found to have the capability to overcome anticancer drug resistance by inhibiting ABC transporters in recent years. This review will focus on some of the latest and clinical developments with ABC transporters, TKIs and anticancer drug resistance.

  1. In Vivo Bioluminescent Imaging of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter-Mediated Efflux at the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhsheshian, Joshua; Wei, Bih-Rong; Hall, Matthew D; Simpson, R Mark; Gottesman, Michael M

    2016-01-01

    We provide a detailed protocol for imaging ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2) function at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) of transgenic mice. D-Luciferin is specifically transported by ABCG2 found on the apical side of endothelial cells at the BBB. The luciferase-luciferin enzymatic reaction produces bioluminescence, which allows a direct measurement of ABCG2 function at the BBB. Therefore bioluminescence imaging (BLI) correlates with ABCG2 function at the BBB and this can be measured by administering luciferin in a mouse model that expresses luciferase in the brain parenchyma. BLI allows for a relatively low-cost alternative for studying transporter function in vivo compared to other strategies such as positron emission tomography. This method for imaging ABCG2 function at the BBB can be used to investigate pharmacokinetic inhibition of the transporter. PMID:27424909

  2. Galectin-3 silencing inhibits epirubicin-induced ATP binding cassette transporters and activates the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway via β-catenin/GSK-3β modulation in colorectal carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Kuo Lee

    Full Text Available Multidrug resistance (MDR, an unfavorable factor compromising the treatment efficacy of anticancer drugs, involves the upregulation of ATP binding cassette (ABC transporters and induction of galectin-3 signaling. Galectin-3 plays an anti-apoptotic role in many cancer cells and regulates various pathways to activate MDR. Thus, the inhibition of galectin-3 has the potential to enhance the efficacy of the anticancer drug epirubicin. In this study, we examined the effects and mechanisms of silencing galectin-3 via RNA interference (RNAi on the β-catenin/GSK-3β pathway in human colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells. Galectin-3 knockdown increased the intracellular accumulation of epirubicin in Caco-2 cells; suppressed the mRNA expression of galectin-3, β-catenin, cyclin D1, c-myc, P-glycoprotein (P-gp, MDR-associated protein (MRP 1, and MRP2; and downregulated the protein expression of P-gp, cyclin D1, galectin-3, β-catenin, c-Myc, and Bcl-2. Moreover, galectin-3 RNAi treatment significantly increased the mRNA level of GSK-3β, Bax, caspase-3, and caspase-9; remarkably increased the Bax-to-Bcl-2 ratio; and upregulated the GSK-3β and Bax protein expressions. Apoptosis was induced by galectin-3 RNAi and/or epirubicin as demonstrated by chromatin condensation, a higher sub-G1 phase proportion, and increased caspase-3 and caspase-9 activity, indicating an intrinsic/mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Epirubicin-mediated resistance was effectively inhibited via galectin-3 RNAi treatment. However, these phenomena could be rescued after galectin-3 overexpression. We show for the first time that the silencing of galectin-3 sensitizes MDR cells to epirubicin by inhibiting ABC transporters and activating the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis through modulation of the β-catenin/GSK-3β pathway in human colon cancer cells.

  3. Advances in research of ATP-binding cassette transporters in drug resistance mechanisms of intractable epilepsy%ATP结合盒式蛋白在难治性癫(痫)耐药性机制的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付帅

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the common diseases in the nervous system with its complicated pathogenesis still remains unknown.The drug resistance mechanism of intractable epilepsy has always been a key point in the research of neuroscience.A possible cause for the drug resistance is the over expression of efflux drug transporters,e.g.ATP-binding cassette transporters,which may decrease extracellular antiepileptic drugs levels in brains of intractable epilepsy patients.ATP-binding cassette transporters are super family of transporter proteins that require ATP hydrolysis for the transport of substrates across membranes,including P-glycoprotein,multidrug resistance-associated protein,major vault protein and breast cancer resistance associated protein.They are major impediment for the AED successful treatment of many forms of refractory epilepsy in human.This paper reviews the research progress on over-expression of ATP-binding cassette transporters and mechanism of drug resistance in intractable epilepsy.%难治性癫(痫)因其耐药机制的复杂性,迄今尚未清楚,目前探究其对抗癫(痫)药物的多重耐药性的一大热点是外流性药物转运蛋白.ATP结合盒式蛋白是外流性药物转运蛋白的代表,其中包括P糖蛋白、多药耐药蛋白、穹窿体主蛋白、乳腺癌耐药蛋白等,它们可以决定抗癫(痫)药物能否有效地作用于癫(痫)部位,而难治性癫(痫)患者对这些蛋白的高表达普遍存在,但是否与疾病耐药性相关仍需进一步探讨.该文从癫(痫)患者的ATP结合盒式蛋白高表达原因和蛋白对药物转运的作用机制方面对患者耐药性影响方面作一综述.

  4. Solution structure of the 45-residue MgATP-binding peptide of adenylate kinase as examined by 2-D NMR, FTIR, and CD spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, D.C.; Byler, D.M.; Susi, H.; Brown, M.; Kuby, S.A.; Mildvan A.S.

    1988-05-17

    The structure of a synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 1-45 of rabbit muscle adenylate kinase has been studied in aqueous solution by two-dimensional NMR, FTIR, and CD spectroscopy. This peptide, which binds MgATP and is believed to represent most of the MgATP-binding site of the enzyme, appears to maintain a conformation similar to that of residues 1-45 in the X-ray structure of intact porcine adenylate kinase, with 42% of the residues of the peptide showing NOEs indicative of phi and psi angles corresponding to those found in the protein. The NMR studies suggest that the peptide is composed of two helical regions of residues 4-7 and 23-29, and three stretches of ..beta..-strand at residues 8-15, 30-32, and 35-40, yielding an overall secondary structure consisting of 24% ..cap alpha..-helix, 38% ..beta..-structure, and 38% aperiodic. Although the resolution-enhanced amide I band of the peptide FTIR spectrum is broad and rather featureless, possible due to disorder, it can be fit by using methods developed on well-characterized globular proteins. The CD spectrum is best fit by assuming the presence of at most 13% ..cap alpha..-helix in the peptide, 24 +/- 2% ..beta..-structure, and 66 +/- 4% aperiodic. The inability of the high-frequency FTIR and CD methods to detect helices in the amount found by NMR may result from the short helical lengths as well as from static and dynamic disorder in the peptide. Upon binding of MgATP, numerous conformation changes in the backbone of the peptide are detected by NMR, with smaller alterations in the overall secondary structure as assess by CD.

  5. ATP-Binding-Cassette Transporters in Biliary Efflux and Drug-Induced Liver Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, Jenny M.

    2013-01-01

    Membrane transport proteins are known to influence the absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity (ADMET) of drugs. At the onset of this thesis work, only a few structure-activity models, in general describing P-glycoprotein (Pgp/ABCB1) interactions, were developed using small datasets with little structural diversity. In this thesis, drug-transport protein interactions were explored using large, diverse datasets representing the chemical space of orally administered registe...

  6. Regulation of ATP-binding cassette transporters and cholesterol efflux by glucose in primary human monocytes and murine bone marrow-derived macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus are at increased risk of developing atherosclerosis. This may be partially attributable to suppression of macrophage ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter mediated cholesterol efflux by sustained elevated blood glucose concentrations. Two models were used...

  7. LrABCF1, a GCN-type ATP-binding cassette transporter from Lilium regale, is involved in defense responses against viral and fungal pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are essential for membrane translocation in diverse biological processes, such as plant development and defense response. Here, a general control non-derepressible (GCN)-type ABC transporter gene, designated LrABCF1, was identified from Cucumber mosaic virus (...

  8. Drug resistance is conferred on the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by expression of full-length melanoma-associated human ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCB5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keniya, Mikhail V; Holmes, Ann R; Niimi, Masakazu; Lamping, Erwin; Gillet, Jean-Pierre; Gottesman, Michael M; Cannon, Richard D

    2014-10-01

    ABCB5, an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, is highly expressed in melanoma cells, and may contribute to the extreme resistance of melanomas to chemotherapy by efflux of anti-cancer drugs. Our goal was to determine whether we could functionally express human ABCB5 in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in order to demonstrate an efflux function for ABCB5 in the absence of background pump activity from other human transporters. Heterologous expression would also facilitate drug discovery for this important target. DNAs encoding ABCB5 sequences were cloned into the chromosomal PDR5 locus of a S. cerevisiae strain in which seven endogenous ABC transporters have been deleted. Protein expression in the yeast cells was monitored by immunodetection using both a specific anti-ABCB5 antibody and a cross-reactive anti-ABCB1 antibody. ABCB5 function in recombinant yeast cells was measured by determining whether the cells possessed increased resistance to known pump substrates, compared to the host yeast strain, in assays of yeast growth. Three ABCB5 constructs were made in yeast. One was derived from the ABCB5-β mRNA, which is highly expressed in human tissues but is a truncation of a canonical full-size ABC transporter. Two constructs contained full-length ABCB5 sequences: either a native sequence from cDNA or a synthetic sequence codon-harmonized for S. cerevisiae. Expression of all three constructs in yeast was confirmed by immunodetection. Expression of the codon-harmonized full-length ABCB5 DNA conferred increased resistance, relative to the host yeast strain, to the putative substrates rhodamine 123, daunorubicin, tetramethylrhodamine, FK506, or clorgyline. We conclude that full-length ABCB5 can be functionally expressed in S. cerevisiae and confers drug resistance.

  9. An ATP Binding Cassette Transporter Mediates the Uptake of α-(1,6)-Linked Dietary Oligosaccharides in Bifidobacterium and Correlates with Competitive Growth on These Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejby, Morten; Fredslund, Folmer; Andersen, Joakim Mark; Vujičić Žagar, Andreja; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Andersen, Thomas Lars; Svensson, Birte; Slotboom, Dirk Jan; Abou Hachem, Maher

    2016-09-16

    The molecular details and impact of oligosaccharide uptake by distinct human gut microbiota (HGM) are currently not well understood. Non-digestible dietary galacto- and gluco-α-(1,6)-oligosaccharides from legumes and starch, respectively, are preferentially fermented by mainly bifidobacteria and lactobacilli in the human gut. Here we show that the solute binding protein (BlG16BP) associated with an ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter from the probiotic Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bl-04 binds α-(1,6)-linked glucosides and galactosides of varying size, linkage, and monosaccharide composition with preference for the trisaccharides raffinose and panose. This preference is also reflected in the α-(1,6)-galactoside uptake profile of the bacterium. Structures of BlG16BP in complex with raffinose and panose revealed the basis for the remarkable ligand binding plasticity of BlG16BP, which recognizes the non-reducing α-(1,6)-diglycoside in its ligands. BlG16BP homologues occur predominantly in bifidobacteria and a few Firmicutes but lack in other HGMs. Among seven bifidobacterial taxa, only those possessing this transporter displayed growth on α-(1,6)-glycosides. Competition assays revealed that the dominant HGM commensal Bacteroides ovatus was out-competed by B. animalis subsp. lactis Bl-04 in mixed cultures growing on raffinose, the preferred ligand for the BlG16BP. By comparison, B. ovatus mono-cultures grew very efficiently on this trisaccharide. These findings suggest that the ABC-mediated uptake of raffinose provides an important competitive advantage, particularly against dominant Bacteroides that lack glycan-specific ABC-transporters. This novel insight highlights the role of glycan transport in defining the metabolic specialization of gut bacteria. PMID:27502277

  10. Residues of a proposed gate region in type I ATP-binding cassette import systems are crucial for function as revealed by mutational analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidlich, Daniela; Wiesemann, Nicole; Heuveling, Johanna; Wardelmann, Kristina; Landmesser, Heidi; Sani, Katayoun Behnam; Worth, Catherine L; Preissner, Robert; Schneider, Erwin

    2013-09-01

    The type I ATP-binding cassette (ABC) importer for positively charged amino acids of the thermophilic bacterium Geobacillus stearothermophilus consists of the extracellular solute binding protein, ArtJ, and a homodimer each of the transmembrane subunit, ArtM, and the nucleotide-binding and -hydrolyzing subunit, ArtP. We have investigated the functional consequences of mutations affecting conserved residues from two peptide regions in ArtM, recently proposed to form a 'gate' by which access of a substrate to the translocation path is controlled (Hollenstein et al., 2007 [14]). Transporter variants were reconstituted into proteoliposomes and assayed for ArtJ/arginine-stimulated ATPase activity. Replacement of residues from region 1 (Arg-63, Pro-66) caused no or only moderate reduction in ATPase activity. In contrast, mutating residues from gate region 2 (Lys-159, Leu-163) resulted in a substantial increase in ATPase activity which, however, as demonstrated for variants ArtM(K159I) and ArtM(K159E), is not coupled to transport. Replacing homologous residues in the closely related histidine transporter of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (HisJ-QMP2) caused different phenotypes. Mutation to isoleucine of HisQ(K163) or HisM(H172), both homologous to ArtM(K159), abolished ATPase activity. The mutations most likely caused a structural change as revealed by limited proteolysis. In contrast, substantial, albeit reduced, enzymatic activity was observed with variants of HisQ(L167→G) or HisM(L176→G), both homologous to ArtM(L163). Our study provides the first experimental evidence in favor of a crucial role of residues from the proposed gate region in type I ABC importer function. PMID:23747295

  11. Targeting of proteins to the thylakoid lumen by the bipartite transit peptide of the 33 kd oxygen-evolving protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Ko, K.; Cashmore, A. R.

    1989-01-01

    Various chimeric precursors and deletions of the 33 kd oxygen-evolving protein (OEE1) were constructed to study the mechanism by which chloroplast proteins are imported and targeted to the thylakoid lumen. The native OEE1 precursor was imported into isolated chloroplasts, processed and localized in the thylakoid lumen. Replacement of the OEE1 transit peptide with the transit peptide of the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase, a stromal protein, resulted in redirection of ma...

  12. Masitinib Antagonizes ATP-Binding Cassette Subfamily C Member 10-Mediated Paclitaxel Resistance: A Preclinical Study

    OpenAIRE

    Kathawala, Rishil J; Sodani, Kamlesh; Chen, Kang; PATEL, ATISH; Abuznait, Alaa H.; Anreddy, Nagaraju; Sun, Yue-Li; Kaddoumi, Amal; Ashby, Charles R.; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Paclitaxel displays clinical activity against a wide variety of solid tumors. However, resistance to paclitaxel significantly attenuates the response to chemotherapy. The ABC transporter subfamily C member 10 (ABCC10), also known as multi-drug resistance protein 7 (MRP7) efflux transporter, is a major mediator of paclitaxel resistance. In this study, we show that masitinib, a small molecule stem-cell growth factor receptor (c-Kit) tyrosine kinase inhibitor, at non-toxic concentrations, signif...

  13. CryoEM and Molecular Dynamics of the Circadian KaiB-KaiC Complex Indicates That KaiB Monomers Interact with KaiC and Block ATP Binding Clefts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villarreal, Seth A.; Pattanayek, Rekha; Williams, Dewight R.; Mori, Tetsuya; Qin, Ximing; Johnson, Carl H.; Egli, Martin; Stewart, Phoebe L. [Case Western; (Vanderbilt); (Vanderbilt-MED)

    2014-10-02

    The circadian control of cellular processes in cyanobacteria is regulated by a posttranslational oscillator formed by three Kai proteins. During the oscillator cycle, KaiA serves to promote autophosphorylation of KaiC while KaiB counteracts this effect. Here, we present a crystallographic structure of the wild-type Synechococcus elongatus KaiB and a cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) structure of a KaiBC complex. The crystal structure shows the expected dimer core structure and significant conformational variations of the KaiB C-terminal region, which is functionally important in maintaining rhythmicity. The KaiBC sample was formed with a C-terminally truncated form of KaiC, KaiC-Δ489, which is persistently phosphorylated. The KaiB–KaiC-Δ489 structure reveals that the KaiC hexamer can bind six monomers of KaiB, which form a continuous ring of density in the KaiBC complex. We performed cryoEM-guided molecular dynamics flexible fitting simulations with crystal structures of KaiB and KaiC to probe the KaiBC protein–protein interface. This analysis indicated a favorable binding mode for the KaiB monomer on the CII end of KaiC, involving two adjacent KaiC subunits and spanning an ATP binding cleft. A KaiC mutation, R468C, which has been shown to affect the affinity of KaiB for KaiC and lengthen the period in a bioluminescence rhythm assay, is found within the middle of the predicted KaiBC interface. The proposed KaiB binding mode blocks access to the ATP binding cleft in the CII ring of KaiC, which provides insight into how KaiB might influence the phosphorylation status of KaiC.

  14. The ABCC6 transporter: what lessons can be learnt from other ATP-binding cassette transporters?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier M. Vanakker

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available ABC transporters represent a large family of ATP-driven transmembrane transporters involved in uni- or bidirectional transfer of a variety of substrates. Divided in 7 families, they represent 48 transporter proteins, several of which are associated with human disease. Among the latter is ABCC6, a unidirectional exporter protein primarily expressed in liver and kidney. ABCC6 deficiency causes pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE, characterised by calcification and fragmentation of elastic fibres, resulting in oculocutaneous and cardiovascular symptoms. Unique among connective tissue disorders, the relation between the ABCC6 transporter and ectopic mineralization in PXE remains enigmatic, not in the least because of lack of knowledge on the substrate(s of ABCC6 and its unusual expression pattern. Because many features, including structure and transport mechanism, are shared by ABC transporters, it is worthwhile to evaluate if and to what extent the knowledge on the (pathophysiology of other transporters may provide useful clues towards understanding the (pathophysiological role of ABCC6. In this paper, we summarize relevant knowledge and methods for analysis on ABC transporters which may be useful for the further study of ABCC6.

  15. The ATP-binding Cassette Transporter OsABCG15 is Required for Anther Development and Pollen Fertility in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bai-Xiao Niu; Fu-Rong He; Ming He; Ding Ren; Le-Tian Chen; Yao-Guang Liu

    2013-01-01

    Plant male reproductive development is a complex biological process,but the underlying mechanism is not well understood.Here,we characterized a rice (Oryza sativa L.) male sterile mutant.Based on mapbased cloning and sequence analysis,we identified a 1,459-bp deletion in an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporter gene,OsABCG15,causing abnormal anthers and male sterility.Therefore,we named this mutant osabcg15.Expression analysis showed that OsABCG15 is expressed specifically in developmental anthers from stage 8 (meiosis Ⅱ stage) to stage 10 (late microspore stage).Two genes CYP704B2 and WDA1,involved in the biosynthesis of very-long-chain fatty acids for the establishment of the anther cuticle and pollen exine,were downregulated in osabcg15 mutant,suggesting that OsABCG15 may play a key function in the processes related to sporopollenin biosynthesis or sporopollenin transfer from tapetal cells to anther locules.Consistently,histological analysis showed that osabcg15 mutants developed obvious abnormality in postmeiotic tapetum degeneration,leading to rapid degredation of young microspores.The results suggest that OsABCG15 plays a critical role in exine formation and pollen development,similar to the homologous gene of AtABCG26 in Arabidopsis.This work is helpful to understand the regulatory network in rice anther development.

  16. HG-829 is a potent noncompetitive inhibitor of the ATP-binding cassette multidrug resistance transporter ABCB1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caceres, Gisela; Robey, Robert W; Sokol, Lubomir; McGraw, Kathy L; Clark, Justine; Lawrence, Nicholas J; Sebti, Said M; Wiese, Michael; List, Alan F

    2012-08-15

    Transmembrane drug export mediated by the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter P-glycoprotein contributes to clinical resistance to antineoplastics. In this study, we identified the substituted quinoline HG-829 as a novel, noncompetitive, and potent P-glycoprotein inhibitor that overcomes in vitro and in vivo drug resistance. We found that nontoxic concentrations of HG-829 restored sensitivity to P-glycoprotein oncolytic substrates. In ABCB1-overexpressing cell lines, HG-829 significantly enhanced cytotoxicity to daunorubicin, paclitaxel, vinblastine, vincristine, and etoposide. Coadministration of HG-829 fully restored in vivo antitumor activity of daunorubicin in mice without added toxicity. Functional assays showed that HG-829 is not a Pgp substrate or competitive inhibitor of Pgp-mediated drug efflux but rather acts as a noncompetitive modulator of P-glycoprotein transport function. Taken together, our findings indicate that HG-829 is a potent, long-acting, and noncompetitive modulator of P-glycoprotein export function that may offer therapeutic promise for multidrug-resistant malignancies. PMID:22761337

  17. Stickleback embryos use ATP-binding cassette transporters as a buffer against exposure to maternally derived cortisol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paitz, Ryan T; Bukhari, Syed Abbas; Bell, Alison M

    2016-03-16

    Offspring from females that experience stressful conditions during reproduction often exhibit altered phenotypes and many of these effects are thought to arise owing to increased exposure to maternal glucocorticoids. While embryos of placental vertebrates are known to regulate exposure to maternal glucocorticoids via placental steroid metabolism, much less is known about how and whether egg-laying vertebrates can control their steroid environment during embryonic development. We tested the hypothesis that threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) embryos can regulate exposure to maternal steroids via active efflux of maternal steroids from the egg. Embryos rapidly (within 72 h) cleared intact steroids, but blocking ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters inhibited cortisol clearance. Remarkably, this efflux of cortisol was sufficient to prevent a transcriptional response of embryos to exogenous cortisol. Taken together, these findings suggest that, much like their placental counterparts, developing fish embryos can actively regulate their exposure to maternal cortisol. These findings highlight the fact that even in egg-laying vertebrates, the realized exposure to maternal steroids is mediated by both maternal and embryonic processes and this has important implications for understanding how maternal stress influences offspring development. PMID:26984623

  18. Retinoic acid receptor agonists regulate expression of ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayaori, Makoto; Yakushiji, Emi; Ogura, Masatsune; Nakaya, Kazuhiro; Hisada, Tetsuya; Uto-Kondo, Harumi; Takiguchi, Shunichi; Terao, Yoshio; Sasaki, Makoto; Komatsu, Tomohiro; Iizuka, Maki; Yogo, Makiko; Uehara, Yoshinari; Kagechika, Hiroyuki; Nakanishi, Tsuyoshi; Ikewaki, Katsunori

    2012-04-01

    ABC transporter G1 (ABCG1) plays a pivotal role in HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux and atherogenesis. We investigated whether, and how, retinoic acid receptors (RARs) regulate ABCG1 expression in macrophages. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), an RAR ligand, increased ABCG1 protein levels and apoA-I/HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux from the macrophages. Both ATRA and other RAR agonists, TTNPB and Am580, increased major transcripts driven by promoter B upstream of exon 5, though minor transcripts driven by promoter A upstream of exon 1 were only increased by ATRA. The stimulatory effects of ATRA on ABCG1 expression were completely abolished in the presence of RAR/RXR antagonists but were only partially canceled in the presence of an LXR antagonist. Adenovirus with overexpressed oxysterol sulfotransferase abolished the LXR pathway, as previously reported, and ATRA-responsiveness in ABCA1/ABCG1 expressions were respectively attenuated by 38 and 22% compared to the control virus. Promoter assays revealed that ABCG1 levels were regulated more by promoter B than promoter A, and ATRA activated promoter B in a liver X receptor-responsive element (LXRE)-dependent manner. Further, LXRE-B in intron 7, but not LXRE-A in intron 5, enhanced ATRA responsiveness under overexpression of all RAR isoforms-RARα/β/γ. In contrast, the activation of promoter B by TTNPB depended on LXRE-B and RARα, but not on RARβ/γ. Finally, chromatin immunoprecipitation and gel-shift assays revealed a specific and direct repeat 4-dependent binding of RARα to LXRE-B. In conclusion, RAR ligands increase ABCA1/G1 expression and apoA-I/HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux from macrophages, and modulate ABCG1 promoter activity via LXRE-dependent mechanisms.

  19. Metazoans evolved by taking domains from soluble proteins to expand intercellular communication network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Hyun-Jun; Kim, Inhae; Bowie, James U; Kim, Sanguk

    2015-01-01

    A central question in animal evolution is how multicellular animals evolved from unicellular ancestors. We hypothesize that membrane proteins must be key players in the development of multicellularity because they are well positioned to form the cell-cell contacts and to provide the intercellular communication required for the creation of complex organisms. Here we find that a major mechanism for the necessary increase in membrane protein complexity in the transition from non-metazoan to metazoan life was the new incorporation of domains from soluble proteins. The membrane proteins that have incorporated soluble domains in metazoans are enriched in many of the functions unique to multicellular organisms such as cell-cell adhesion, signaling, immune defense and developmental processes. They also show enhanced protein-protein interaction (PPI) network complexity and centrality, suggesting an important role in the cellular diversification found in complex organisms. Our results expose an evolutionary mechanism that contributed to the development of higher life forms. PMID:25923201

  20. Prenatal Ethanol Exposure Up-Regulates the Cholesterol Transporters ATP-Binding Cassette A1 and G1 and Reduces Cholesterol Levels in the Developing Rat Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Chunyan; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Xiaolu; Costa, Lucio G.; Guizzetti, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Aims: Cholesterol plays a pivotal role in many aspects of brain development; reduced cholesterol levels during brain development, as a consequence of genetic defects in cholesterol biosynthesis, leads to severe brain damage, including microcephaly and mental retardation, both of which are also hallmarks of the fetal alcohol syndrome. We had previously shown that ethanol up-regulates the levels of two cholesterol transporters, ABCA1 (ATP binding cassette-A1) and ABCG1, leading to increased cho...

  1. A Selective ATP-binding Cassette Sub-family G Member 2 Efflux Inhibitor Revealed Via High-Throughput Flow Cytometry

    OpenAIRE

    Strouse, J. Jacob; Ivnitski-Steele, Irena; Khawaja, Hadya M.; Perez, Dominique; Ricci, Jerec; Yao, Tuanli; Weiner, Warren S.; Schroeder, Chad E.; Simpson, Denise S.; Maki, Brooks E.; Li, Kelin; Golden, Jennifer E.; Foutz, Terry D.; Waller, Anna; Evangelisti, Annette M.

    2012-01-01

    Chemotherapeutics tumor resistance is a principal reason for treatment failure and clinical and experimental data indicate that multidrug transporters such as ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) B1 and ABCG2 play a leading role by preventing cytotoxic intracellular drug concentrations. Functional efflux inhibition of existing chemotherapeutics by these pumps continues to present a promising approach for treatment. A contributing factor to the failure of existing inhibitors in clinical applications is ...

  2. Genome-wide identification and characterization of ATP-binding cassette transporters in the silkworm, Bombyx mori

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Jianzhen; Luan Yunxia; Guo Enen; Tian Ling; Zhou Shun; Liu Shumin; Li Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily is the largest transporter gene family responsible for transporting specific molecules across lipid membranes in all living organisms. In insects, ABC transporters not only have important functions in molecule transport, but also play roles in insecticide resistance, metabolism and development. Results From the genome of the silkworm, Bombyx mori, we have identified 51 putative ABC genes which are classified into eight...

  3. Influence of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter 1 R219K and M883I Polymorphisms on Development of Atherosclerosis: A Meta-Analysis of 58 Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Yin, Yan-Wei; Li, Jing-Cheng; Gao, Dong; Chen, Yan-Xiu; Li, Bing-Hu; Wang, Jing-Zhou; Liu, Yun; Liao, Shao-Qiong; Zhang, Ming-Jie; Chang-yue GAO; Zhang, Li-li

    2014-01-01

    Background Numerous epidemiological studies have evaluated the associations between ATP-binding cassette transporter 1 (ABCA1) R219K (rs2230806) and M883I (rs4149313) polymorphisms and atherosclerosis (AS), but results remain controversial. The purpose of the present study is to investigate whether these two polymorphisms facilitate the susceptibility to AS using a meta-analysis. Methods PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Medline, Cochrane database, Clinicaltrials.gov, Current Controlled Trials,...

  4. Identification and Characterization of a Brucella abortus ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter Homolog to Rhizobium meliloti ExsA and Its Role in Virulence and Protection in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    G.M.S. Rosinha; Freitas, Daniela A.; Miyoshi, Anderson; Azevedo, Vasco; Campos, Eleonora; Cravero, Silvio L; Rossetti, Osvaldo; Splitter, Gary; S.C. Oliveira

    2002-01-01

    Brucella abortus is a facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes abortion in domestic animals and undulant fever in humans. The mechanism of virulence of Brucella spp. is not fully understood yet. Furthermore, genes that allow Brucella to reach the intracellular niche and to interact with host cells need to be identified. Using the genomic survey sequence (GSS) approach, we identified the gene encoding an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter of B. abortus strain S2308. The ded...

  5. Solution structure and function in trifluoroethanol of PP-50, an ATP-binding peptide from F1ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, W J; Abeygunawardana, C; Gittis, A G; Pedersen, P L; Mildvan, A S

    1995-05-10

    PP-50, a synthetic peptide, based on residues 141-190 of the beta-subunit of mitochondrial F1ATPase, containing the GX4GKT consensus sequence for nucleoside triphosphate binding, binds ATP tightly (Kd = 17.5 microM) as found by fluorescence titration at pH 4.0. CD and 2D proton NMR studies at pH 4.0 revealed two beta-turns, regions of extended secondary structure, transient tertiary structure, and flexibility in the GX4GKT region (W.J. Chuang, C. Abeygunawardana, P. L. Pedersen, and A. S. Mildvan, 1992, Biochemistry 31, 7915-7921). CD titration of PP-50 with trifluoroethanol (TFE) reveals a decrease in ellipticity at 208 and 222 nm, saturating at 25% TFE. Computer analysis indicates that 25% TFE increases the helix content from 5.8 to 28.6%, decreases the beta-structure from 30.2 to 20.2% and decreases the coil content from 64 to 51.2%. Fluorescence titrations of H2ATP2- with PP-50 in 25% TFE yields a Kd of 7.3 microM, 2.4-fold tighter than in H2O, probably due to TFE increasing the activity of H2ATP2- . PP-50 completely quenches the fluorescence of H2ATP2- in 25% TFE, while in H2O the fluorescence quenching is only 62%. In H2O the binding of H2ATP2- increases the structure of PP-50 as detected by CD, but in 25% TFE no significant change in CD is found on binding either H2ATP2- or Mg2+ HATP (Kd = 14 microM). The complete proton NMR spectrum of PP-50 in 25% TFE has been assigned. The solution structure, determined by distance geometry, molecular dynamics with simulated annealing, and energy minimization, consists of a coil (residues 1-8), a strand (residues 9-12), a loop (residues 13-22) containing the GX4GKT consensus sequence (residues 16-23), an alpha-helix (residues 23-36), a turn (residues 38-41), and a coil (residues 42-50), similar to that of the corresponding region of the X-ray structure of F1ATPase (J.P. Abrahams, A.G.W. Leslie, R. Lutter, and J. E. Walker, 1994 Nature 370, 621-628) and to the structure of a homologous peptide from the ATP-binding site of

  6. Solution structure of the 45-residue MgATP-binding peptide of adenylate kinase as examined by 2-D NMR, FTIR, and CD spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, D C; Byler, D M; Susi, H; Brown, E M; Kuby, S A; Mildvan, A S

    1988-05-17

    The structure of a synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 1-45 of rabbit muscle adenylate kinase has been studied in aqueous solution by two-dimensional NMR, FTIR, and CD spectroscopy. This peptide, which binds MgATP and is believed to represent most of the MgATP-binding site of the enzyme [Fry, D.C., Kuby, S.A., & Mildvan, A.S. (1985) Biochemistry 24, 4680-4694], appears to maintain a conformation similar to that of residues 1-45 in the X-ray structure of intact porcine adenylate kinase [Sachsenheimer, W., & Schulz, G.E. (1977) J. Mol. Biol. 114, 23-26], with 42% of the residues of the peptide showing NOEs indicative of phi and psi angles corresponding to those found in the protein. The NMR studies suggest that the peptide is composed of two helical regions of residues 4-7 and 23-29, and three stretches of beta-strand at residues 8-15, 30-32, and 35-40, yielding an overall secondary structure consisting of 24% alpha-helix, 38% beta-structure, and 38% aperiodic. Although the resolution-enhanced amide I band of the peptide FTIR spectrum is broad and rather featureless, possibly due to disorder, it can be fit by using methods developed on well-characterized globular proteins. On this basis, the peptide consists of 35 +/- 10% beta-structure, 60 +/- 12% turns and aperiodic structure, and not more than 10% alpha-helix. The CD spectrum is best fit by assuming the presence of at most 13% alpha-helix in the peptide, 24 +/- 2% beta-structure, and 66 +/- 4% aperiodic. The inability of the high-frequency FTIR and CD methods to detect helices in the amount found by NMR may result from the short helical lengths as well as from static and dynamic disorder in the peptide. Upon binding of MgATP, numerous conformational changes in the backbone of the peptide are detected by NMR, with smaller alterations in the overall secondary structure as assessed by CD. Detailed assignments of resonances in the peptide spectrum and intermolecular NOEs between protons of bound MgATP and

  7. Overexpression of the ATP binding cassette gene ABCA1 determines resistance to Curcumin in M14 melanoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelini Giovanna

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Curcumin induces apoptosis in many cancer cells and it reduces xenograft growth and the formation of lung metastases in nude mice. Moreover, the plant derived polyphenol has been reported to be able to overcome drug resistance to classical chemotherapy. These features render the drug a promising candidate for tumor therapy especially for cancers known for their high rates concerning therapy resistance like melanoma. Results We show here that the melanoma cell line M14 is resistant to Curcumin induced apoptosis, which correlates with the absence of any effect on NFκB signaling. We show that CXCL1 a chemokine that is down regulated in breast cancer cells by Curcumin in an NFκB dependant manner is expressed at variable levels in human melanomas. Yet in M14 cells, CXCL1 expression did not change upon Curcumin treatment. Following the hypothesis that Curcumin is rapidly removed from the resistant cells, we analyzed expression of known multi drug resistance genes and cellular transporters in M14 melanoma cells and in the Curcumin sensitive breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCA1, a gene involved in the cellular lipid removal pathway is over-expressed in resistant M14 melanoma as compared to the sensitive MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Gene silencing of ABCA1 by siRNA sensitizes M14 cells to the apoptotic effect of Curcumin most likely as a result of reduced basal levels of active NFκB. Moreover, ABCA1 silencing alone also induces apoptosis and reduces p65 expression. Conclusion Resistance to Curcumin thus follows classical pathways and ABCA1 expression should be considered as response marker.

  8. Maternal–Fetal Conflict: Rapidly Evolving Proteins in the Rodent Placenta

    OpenAIRE

    Edward B. Chuong; Tong, Wenfei; Hoekstra, Hopi E

    2010-01-01

    Conflicting evolutionary interests between mother and offspring are hypothesized to drive an evolutionary arms race during mammalian pregnancy, and thus, positive selection may cause the rapid divergence of placental proteins that affect maternal or fetal fitness. We investigated the genomic consequences of placental expression in rodents and report that a substantial proportion (20.5%) of genes specifically expressed in the mature placenta are rapidly evolving. Moreover, we found that most r...

  9. The oxygen evolving enhancer protein 1 (OEE) of photosystem II in green algae exhibits thioredoxin activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heide, Heinrich; Kalisz, Henryk M; Follmann, Hartmut

    2004-02-01

    A thioredoxin-like chloroplast protein of the fructosebisphosphatase-stimulating f-type, but with an unusually high molecular mass of 28 kDa has previously been identified and purified to homogeneity in a fractionation scheme for resolution of the acid- and heat-stable, regular-size (12kDa) thioredoxins of the unicellular green algae, Scenedesmus obliquus. An apparently analogous protein of 26 kDa was described in a cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp., but no such large thioredoxin species f exists in the thioredoxin profiles of higher plants. The structure of the 28 kDa protein, which had been envisaged to represent a precursor, or fusion product of the two more specialized, common chloroplast thioredoxins f and m has now been determined by amino acid sequencing. Although it exhibits virtually all the properties and enzyme-modulating activities of a thioredoxin proper this algal protein, surprisingly, does not belong to the thioredoxin family of small redox proteins but is identical with OEE (oxygen evolving enhancer) protein 1, an auxiliary component of the photosystem II manganese cluster. Extracts of Chlorella vulgaris and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii also contain heat-stable protein fractions of 23-26 kDa capable of specifically stimulating chloroplast fructosebisphosphatase in vitro. In contrast, OEE protein 1 from spinach is not able to modulate FbPase or NADP malate dehydrogenase from spinach chloroplasts. A dual function of the OEE protein in algal photosynthesis is envisaged. PMID:15022827

  10. Retinoic acid isomers up-regulate ATP binding cassette A1 and G1 and cholesterol efflux in rat astrocytes: implications for their therapeutic and teratogenic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Costa, Lucio G; Guizzetti, Marina

    2011-09-01

    Recent studies suggest that retinoids may be effective in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, although exposure to an excess of retinoids during gestation causes teratogenesis. Cholesterol is essential for brain development, but high levels of cholesterol have been associated with Alzheimer's disease. We hypothesized that retinoic acid may affect cholesterol homeostasis in rat astrocytes, which regulate cholesterol distribution in the brain, through the up-regulation of cholesterol transporters ATP binding cassette (Abc)a1 and Abcg1. Tretinoin, 13-cis retinoic acid (13-cis-RA), 9-cis-RA, and the selective retinoid X receptor (RXR) agonist methoprene significantly increased cholesterol efflux induced by cholesterol acceptors and protein levels of Abca1 by 2.3- (± 0.25), 3.6- (± 0.42), 4.1- (± 0.5), and 1.75- (± 0.43) fold, respectively, and Abcg1 by 2.1- (± 0.26), 2.2- (± 0.33), 2.5- (± 0.23), and 2.2- (± 0.21) fold, respectively. 13-cis-RA and 9-cis-RA also significantly increased mRNA levels of Abca1 (maximal induction 7.3 ± 0.42 and 2.7 ± 0.17, respectively) and Abcg1 (maximal induction 2.0 ± 0.18 and 1.8 ± 0.09, respectively), and the levels of membrane-bound Abca1 (2.5 ± 0.3 and 2.5 ± 0.40-fold increase, respectively), whereas they significantly decreased intracellular cholesterol content without affecting cholesterol synthesis. The effect of 9-cis-RA on cholesterol homeostasis in astrocytes can be ascribed to the activation of RXR, whereas the effects of 13-cis-RA and tretinoin were independent of either RXRs or retinoic acid receptors. These findings suggest that retinoids affect cholesterol homeostasis in astrocytes and that this effect may be involved in both their therapeutic and teratogenic actions. PMID:21628419

  11. Retinoic acid isomers up-regulate ATP binding cassette A1 and G1 and cholesterol efflux in rat astrocytes: implications for their therapeutic and teratogenic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Costa, Lucio G; Guizzetti, Marina

    2011-09-01

    Recent studies suggest that retinoids may be effective in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, although exposure to an excess of retinoids during gestation causes teratogenesis. Cholesterol is essential for brain development, but high levels of cholesterol have been associated with Alzheimer's disease. We hypothesized that retinoic acid may affect cholesterol homeostasis in rat astrocytes, which regulate cholesterol distribution in the brain, through the up-regulation of cholesterol transporters ATP binding cassette (Abc)a1 and Abcg1. Tretinoin, 13-cis retinoic acid (13-cis-RA), 9-cis-RA, and the selective retinoid X receptor (RXR) agonist methoprene significantly increased cholesterol efflux induced by cholesterol acceptors and protein levels of Abca1 by 2.3- (± 0.25), 3.6- (± 0.42), 4.1- (± 0.5), and 1.75- (± 0.43) fold, respectively, and Abcg1 by 2.1- (± 0.26), 2.2- (± 0.33), 2.5- (± 0.23), and 2.2- (± 0.21) fold, respectively. 13-cis-RA and 9-cis-RA also significantly increased mRNA levels of Abca1 (maximal induction 7.3 ± 0.42 and 2.7 ± 0.17, respectively) and Abcg1 (maximal induction 2.0 ± 0.18 and 1.8 ± 0.09, respectively), and the levels of membrane-bound Abca1 (2.5 ± 0.3 and 2.5 ± 0.40-fold increase, respectively), whereas they significantly decreased intracellular cholesterol content without affecting cholesterol synthesis. The effect of 9-cis-RA on cholesterol homeostasis in astrocytes can be ascribed to the activation of RXR, whereas the effects of 13-cis-RA and tretinoin were independent of either RXRs or retinoic acid receptors. These findings suggest that retinoids affect cholesterol homeostasis in astrocytes and that this effect may be involved in both their therapeutic and teratogenic actions.

  12. Genome-wide identification and characterization of ATP-binding cassette transporters in the silkworm, Bombyx mori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Jianzhen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter superfamily is the largest transporter gene family responsible for transporting specific molecules across lipid membranes in all living organisms. In insects, ABC transporters not only have important functions in molecule transport, but also play roles in insecticide resistance, metabolism and development. Results From the genome of the silkworm, Bombyx mori, we have identified 51 putative ABC genes which are classified into eight subfamilies (A-H by phylogenetic analysis. Gene duplication is very evident in the ABCC and ABCG subfamilies, whereas gene numbers and structures are well conserved in the ABCD, ABCE, ABCF, and ABCH subfamilies. Microarray analysis revealed that expression of 32 silkworm ABC genes can be detected in at least one tissue during different developmental stages, and the expression patterns of some of them were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. A large number of ABC genes were highly expressed in the testis compared to other tissues. One of the ABCG genes, BmABC002712, was exclusively and abundantly expressed in the Malpighian tubule implying that BmABC002712 plays a tissue-specific role. At least 5 ABCG genes, including BmABC005226, BmABC005203, BmABC005202, BmABC010555, and BmABC010557, were preferentially expressed in the midgut, showing similar developmental expression profiles to those of 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E-response genes. 20E treatment induced the expression of these ABCG genes in the midgut and RNA interference-mediated knockdown of USP, a component of the 20E receptor, decreased their expression, indicating that these midgut-specific ABCG genes are 20E-responsive. Conclusion In this study, a genome-wide analysis of the silkworm ABC transporters has been conducted. A comparison of ABC transporters from 5 insect species provides an overview of this vital gene superfamily in insects. Moreover, tissue- and stage-specific expression data of the

  13. Up-regulation of the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 inhibits hepatitis C virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Bocchetta

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV establishes infection using host lipid metabolism pathways that are thus considered potential targets for indirect anti-HCV strategies. HCV enters the cell via clathrin-dependent endocytosis, interacting with several receptors, and virus-cell fusion, which depends on acidic pH and the integrity of cholesterol-rich domains of the hepatocyte membrane. The ATP-binding Cassette Transporter A1 (ABCA1 mediates cholesterol efflux from hepatocytes to extracellular Apolipoprotein A1 and moves cholesterol within cell membranes. Furthermore, it generates high-density lipoprotein (HDL particles. HDL protects against arteriosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. We show that the up-regulation of ABCA1 gene expression and its cholesterol efflux function in Huh7.5 hepatoma cells, using the liver X receptor (LXR agonist GW3965, impairs HCV infection and decreases levels of virus produced. ABCA1-stimulation inhibited HCV cell entry, acting on virus-host cell fusion, but had no impact on virus attachment, replication, or assembly/secretion. It did not affect infectivity or properties of virus particles produced. Silencing of the ABCA1 gene and reduction of the specific cholesterol efflux function counteracted the inhibitory effect of the GW3965 on HCV infection, providing evidence for a key role of ABCA1 in this process. Impaired virus-cell entry correlated with the reorganisation of cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains (lipid rafts. The inhibitory effect could be reversed by an exogenous cholesterol supply, indicating that restriction of HCV infection was induced by changes of cholesterol content/distribution in membrane regions essential for virus-cell fusion. Stimulation of ABCA1 expression by GW3965 inhibited HCV infection of both human primary hepatocytes and isolated human liver slices. This study reveals that pharmacological stimulation of the ABCA1-dependent cholesterol efflux pathway disrupts membrane cholesterol homeostasis

  14. The utility of artificially evolved sequences in protein threading and fold recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brylinski, Michal

    2013-07-01

    Template-based protein structure prediction plays an important role in Functional Genomics by providing structural models of gene products, which can be utilized by structure-based approaches to function inference. From a systems level perspective, the high structural coverage of gene products in a given organism is critical. Despite continuous efforts towards the development of more sensitive threading approaches, confident structural models cannot be constructed for a considerable fraction of proteins due to difficulties in recognizing low-sequence identity templates with a similar fold to the target. Here we introduce a new modeling stratagem, which employs a library of synthetic sequences to improve template ranking in fold recognition by sequence profile-based methods. We developed a new method for the optimization of generic protein-like amino acid sequences to stabilize the respective structures using a combined empirical scoring function, which is compatible with these commonly used in protein threading and fold recognition. We show that the artificially evolved sequences, whose average sequence identity to the wild-type sequences is as low as 13.8%, have significant capabilities to recognize the correct structures. Importantly, the quality of the corresponding threading alignments is comparable to these constructed using conventional wild-type approaches (the average TM-score is 0.48 and 0.54, respectively). Fold recognition that uses data fusion to combine ranks calculated for both wild-type and synthetic template libraries systematically improves the detection of structural analogs. Depending on the threading algorithm used, it yields on average 4-16% higher recognition rates than using the wild-type template library alone. Synthetic sequences artificially evolved for the template structures provide an orthogonal source of signal that could be exploited to detect these templates unrecognized by standard modeling techniques. It opens up new directions in

  15. Evaluation of the role of ATP-binding cassette transporters as a defence mechanism against temephos in populations of Aedes aegypti

    OpenAIRE

    Estelita Pereira Lima; Marília Oliveira Fonseca Goulart; Modesto Leite Rolim Neto

    2014-01-01

    The role of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in the efflux of the insecticide, temephos, was assessed in the larvae of Aedes aegypti. Bioassays were conducted using mosquito populations that were either susceptible or resistant to temephos by exposure to insecticide alone or in combination with sublethal doses of the ABC transporter inhibitor, verapamil (30, 35 and 40 μM). The best result in the series was obtained with the addition of verapamil (40 μM), which led to a 2x increase in t...

  16. Evaluation of the role of ATP-binding cassette transporters as a defence mechanism against temephos in populations of Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Estelita Pereira; Goulart, Marília Oliveira Fonseca; Rolim Neto, Modesto Leite

    2014-11-01

    The role of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in the efflux of the insecticide, temephos, was assessed in the larvae of Aedes aegypti. Bioassays were conducted using mosquito populations that were either susceptible or resistant to temephos by exposure to insecticide alone or in combination with sublethal doses of the ABC transporter inhibitor, verapamil (30, 35 and 40 μM). The best result in the series was obtained with the addition of verapamil (40 μM), which led to a 2x increase in the toxicity of temephos, suggesting that ABC transporters may be partially involved in conferring resistance to the populations evaluated. PMID:25411004

  17. Genetic Analysis of the Mode of Interplay between an ATPase Subunit and Membrane Subunits of the Lipoprotein-Releasing ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter LolCDE†

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, Yasuko; Matsuzawa, Hitomi; Matsuyama, Shin-ichi; Narita, Shin-ichiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2006-01-01

    The LolCDE complex, an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, releases lipoproteins from the inner membrane, thereby initiating lipoprotein sorting to the outer membrane of Escherichia coli. The LolCDE complex is composed of two copies of an ATPase subunit, LolD, and one copy each of integral membrane subunits LolC and LolE. LolD hydrolyzes ATP on the cytoplasmic side of the inner membrane, while LolC and/or LolE recognize and release lipoproteins anchored to the periplasmic leaflet of the i...

  18. Evaluation of the role of ATP-binding cassette transporters as a defence mechanism against temephos in populations of Aedes aegypti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estelita Pereira Lima

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The role of ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters in the efflux of the insecticide, temephos, was assessed in the larvae of Aedes aegypti. Bioassays were conducted using mosquito populations that were either susceptible or resistant to temephos by exposure to insecticide alone or in combination with sublethal doses of the ABC transporter inhibitor, verapamil (30, 35 and 40 μM. The best result in the series was obtained with the addition of verapamil (40 μM, which led to a 2x increase in the toxicity of temephos, suggesting that ABC transporters may be partially involved in conferring resistance to the populations evaluated.

  19. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator: a chloride channel gated by ATP binding and hydrolysis%囊性纤维化跨膜电导调节体:ATP结合和水解门控Cl-通道

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BOMPADRE; Silvia; G; HWANG; Tzyh-Chang

    2007-01-01

    and NBD2). Recent studies reveal that the NBDs of CFTR may dimerize as observed in other ABC proteins. Upon dimerization of CFTR's two NBDs, in a head-to-tail configuration, the two ATP-binding pockets (ABP1 and ABP2) are formed by the canonical Walker A and B motifs from one NBD and the signature sequence from the partner NBD. Mutations of the amino acids that interact with ATP reveal that the two ABPs play distinct roles in controlling ATP-dependent gating of CFTR. It was proposed that binding of ATP to the ABP2, which is formed by the Walker A and B in NBD2 and the signature sequence in NBD1, is critical for catalyzing channel opening. While binding of ATP to the ABP1 alone may not increase the opening rate, it does contribute to the stabilization of the open channel conformation. Several disease-associated mutations of the CFTR channel are characterized by gating defects. Understanding how CFTR's two NBDs work together to gate the channel could provide considerable mechanistic information for future pharmacological studies, which could pave the way for tailored drug design for therapeutical interventions in CF.

  20. Toxic and nontoxic components of botulinum neurotoxin complex are evolved from a common ancestral zinc protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inui, Ken [Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 196 Yasaka, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan); Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, 1-8 Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8472 (Japan); Sagane, Yoshimasa [Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 196 Yasaka, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan); Miyata, Keita [Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 196 Yasaka, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan); Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, 1-8 Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8472 (Japan); Miyashita, Shin-Ichiro [Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 196 Yasaka, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan); Suzuki, Tomonori [Department of Bacteriology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1 Shikata-cho, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Shikamori, Yasuyuki [Agilent Technologies International Japan, Ltd. Takaura-cho 9-1, Hachioji-shi, Tokyo 192-0033 (Japan); Ohyama, Tohru; Niwa, Koichi [Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 196 Yasaka, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan); Watanabe, Toshihiro, E-mail: t-watana@bioindustry.nodai.ac.jp [Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 196 Yasaka, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan)

    2012-03-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BoNT and NTNHA proteins share a similar protein architecture. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NTNHA and BoNT were both identified as zinc-binding proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NTNHA does not have a classical HEXXH zinc-coordinating motif similar to that found in all serotypes of BoNT. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Homology modeling implied probable key residues involved in zinc coordination. -- Abstract: Zinc atoms play an essential role in a number of enzymes. Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), the most potent toxin known in nature, is a zinc-dependent endopeptidase. Here we identify the nontoxic nonhemagglutinin (NTNHA), one of the BoNT-complex constituents, as a zinc-binding protein, along with BoNT. A protein structure classification database search indicated that BoNT and NTNHA share a similar domain architecture, comprising a zinc-dependent metalloproteinase-like, BoNT coiled-coil motif and concanavalin A-like domains. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry analysis demonstrated that every single NTNHA molecule contains a single zinc atom. This is the first demonstration of a zinc atom in this protein, as far as we know. However, the NTNHA molecule does not possess any known zinc-coordinating motif, whereas all BoNT serotypes possess the classical HEXXH motif. Homology modeling of the NTNHA structure implied that a consensus K-C-L-I-K-X{sub 35}-D sequence common among all NTNHA serotype molecules appears to coordinate a single zinc atom. These findings lead us to propose that NTNHA and BoNT may have evolved distinct functional specializations following their branching out from a common ancestral zinc protein.

  1. Toxic and nontoxic components of botulinum neurotoxin complex are evolved from a common ancestral zinc protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► BoNT and NTNHA proteins share a similar protein architecture. ► NTNHA and BoNT were both identified as zinc-binding proteins. ► NTNHA does not have a classical HEXXH zinc-coordinating motif similar to that found in all serotypes of BoNT. ► Homology modeling implied probable key residues involved in zinc coordination. -- Abstract: Zinc atoms play an essential role in a number of enzymes. Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), the most potent toxin known in nature, is a zinc-dependent endopeptidase. Here we identify the nontoxic nonhemagglutinin (NTNHA), one of the BoNT-complex constituents, as a zinc-binding protein, along with BoNT. A protein structure classification database search indicated that BoNT and NTNHA share a similar domain architecture, comprising a zinc-dependent metalloproteinase-like, BoNT coiled-coil motif and concanavalin A-like domains. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry analysis demonstrated that every single NTNHA molecule contains a single zinc atom. This is the first demonstration of a zinc atom in this protein, as far as we know. However, the NTNHA molecule does not possess any known zinc-coordinating motif, whereas all BoNT serotypes possess the classical HEXXH motif. Homology modeling of the NTNHA structure implied that a consensus K-C-L-I-K-X35-D sequence common among all NTNHA serotype molecules appears to coordinate a single zinc atom. These findings lead us to propose that NTNHA and BoNT may have evolved distinct functional specializations following their branching out from a common ancestral zinc protein.

  2. Evolving trends in biosciences: Multi-purpose proteins - GFP and GFP-like proteins

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishna, K.; Ingole, B.S.

    ecological host costs when expressed in transgenic plants. They also appear to be neutral with regard to oral toxicity and allergenicity 12 . When a living cell is seen under a light microscope, only the most morphologically profound cellular events... of the GFP fused to bacterial periplasmic-binding proteins. Different from the Cameleon, a conformational change in the bind- ing properties is directly detected as a change in FRET efficiency 23 . Photosensitizers are chromophores that generate reac...

  3. Antioxidant Activity of Oxygen Evolving Enhancer Protein 1 Purified from Capsosiphon fulvescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Young; Choi, Youn Hee; Lee, Jung Im; Kim, In-Hye; Nam, Taek-Jeong

    2015-06-01

    This study was conducted to determine the antioxidant activity of a protein purified from Capsosiphon fulvescens. The purification steps included sodium acetate (pH 6) extraction and diethylaminoethyl-cellulose, reversed phase Shodex C4P-50 column chromatography. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis indicated that the molecular weight of the purified protein was 33 kDa. The N-terminus and partial peptide amino acid sequence of this protein was identical to the sequence of oxygen evolving enhancer (OEE) 1 protein. The antioxidant activity of the OEE 1 was determined in vitro using a scavenging test with 4 types of reactive oxygen species (ROS), including the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical, hydroxyl radical, superoxide anion, and hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ). OEE 1 had higher H2 O2 scavenging activity, which proved to be the result of enzymatic antioxidants rather than nonenzymatic antioxidants. In addition, OEE 1 showed less H2 O2 -mediated ROS formation in HepG2 cells. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that OEE 1 purified from C. fulvescens is an excellent antioxidant. PMID:25944160

  4. No simple dependence between protein evolution rate and the number of protein-protein interactions: only the most prolific interactors tend to evolve slowly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koonin Eugene V

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been suggested that rates of protein evolution are influenced, to a great extent, by the proportion of amino acid residues that are directly involved in protein function. In agreement with this hypothesis, recent work has shown a negative correlation between evolutionary rates and the number of protein-protein interactions. However, the extent to which the number of protein-protein interactions influences evolutionary rates remains unclear. Here, we address this question at several different levels of evolutionary relatedness. Results Manually curated data on the number of protein-protein interactions among Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins was examined for possible correlation with evolutionary rates between S. cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe orthologs. Only a very weak negative correlation between the number of interactions and evolutionary rate of a protein was observed. Furthermore, no relationship was found between a more general measure of the evolutionary conservation of S. cerevisiae proteins, based on the taxonomic distribution of their homologs, and the number of protein-protein interactions. However, when the proteins from yeast were assorted into discrete bins according to the number of interactions, it turned out that 6.5% of the proteins with the greatest number of interactions evolved, on average, significantly slower than the rest of the proteins. Comparisons were also performed using protein-protein interaction data obtained with high-throughput analysis of Helicobacter pylori proteins. No convincing relationship between the number of protein-protein interactions and evolutionary rates was detected, either for comparisons of orthologs from two completely sequenced H. pylori strains or for comparisons of H. pylori and Campylobacter jejuni orthologs, even when the proteins were classified into bins by the number of interactions. Conclusion The currently available comparative-genomic data do not

  5. Suppression of c-Myc is involved in multi-walled carbon nanotubes' down-regulation of ATP-binding cassette transporters in human colon adenocarcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhaojing [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430030 Wuhan (China); Xu, Yonghong [Institute of Ophthalmological Research, Department of Ophthalmology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, 430060 Wuhan (China); Meng, Xiangning [School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Watari, Fumio [Department of Biomedical, Dental Materials and Engineering, Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8586 (Japan); Liu, Hudan, E-mail: hudanliu@hust.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430030 Wuhan (China); Chen, Xiao, E-mail: mornsmile@yahoo.com [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430030 Wuhan (China)

    2015-01-01

    Over-expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, a large family of integral membrane proteins that decrease cellular drug uptake and accumulation by active extrusion, is one of the major causes of cancer multi-drug resistance (MDR) that frequently leads to failure of chemotherapy. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs)-based drug delivery devices hold great promise in enhancing the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy. However, CNTs' effects on the ABC transporters remain under-investigated. In this study, we found that multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) reduced transport activity and expression of ABC transporters including ABCB1/Pgp and ABCC4/MRP4 in human colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells. Proto-oncogene c-Myc, which directly regulates ABC gene expression, was concurrently decreased in MWCNT-treated cells and forced over-expression of c-Myc reversed MWCNTs' inhibitory effects on ABCB1 and ABCC4 expression. MWCNT-cell membrane interaction and cell membrane oxidative damage were observed. However, antioxidants such as vitamin C, β-mecaptoethanol and dimethylthiourea failed to antagonize MWCNTs' down-regulation of ABC transporters. These data suggest that MWCNTs may act on c-Myc, but not through oxidative stress, to down-regulate ABC transporter expression. Our findings thus shed light on CNTs' novel cellular effects that may be utilized to develop CNTs-based drug delivery devices to overcome ABC transporter-mediated cancer chemoresistance.

  6. Suppression of c-Myc is involved in multi-walled carbon nanotubes' down-regulation of ATP-binding cassette transporters in human colon adenocarcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over-expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, a large family of integral membrane proteins that decrease cellular drug uptake and accumulation by active extrusion, is one of the major causes of cancer multi-drug resistance (MDR) that frequently leads to failure of chemotherapy. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs)-based drug delivery devices hold great promise in enhancing the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy. However, CNTs' effects on the ABC transporters remain under-investigated. In this study, we found that multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) reduced transport activity and expression of ABC transporters including ABCB1/Pgp and ABCC4/MRP4 in human colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells. Proto-oncogene c-Myc, which directly regulates ABC gene expression, was concurrently decreased in MWCNT-treated cells and forced over-expression of c-Myc reversed MWCNTs' inhibitory effects on ABCB1 and ABCC4 expression. MWCNT-cell membrane interaction and cell membrane oxidative damage were observed. However, antioxidants such as vitamin C, β-mecaptoethanol and dimethylthiourea failed to antagonize MWCNTs' down-regulation of ABC transporters. These data suggest that MWCNTs may act on c-Myc, but not through oxidative stress, to down-regulate ABC transporter expression. Our findings thus shed light on CNTs' novel cellular effects that may be utilized to develop CNTs-based drug delivery devices to overcome ABC transporter-mediated cancer chemoresistance

  7. An attenuated mutant of the Rv1747 ATP-binding cassette transporter of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and a mutant of its cognate kinase, PknF, show increased expression of the efflux pump-related iniBAC operon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivey, Vicky L; Whalan, Rachael H; Hirst, Elizabeth M A; Smerdon, Stephen J; Buxton, Roger S

    2013-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transporter Rv1747 is required for the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in mice and in macrophages. Its structure suggests it is an exporter. Rv1747 forms a two-gene operon with pknF coding for the serine/threonine protein kinase PknF, which positively modulates the function of the transporter. We show that deletion of Rv1747 or pknF results in a number of transcriptional changes which could be complemented by the wild type allele, most significantly up-regulation of the iniBAC genes. This operon is inducible by isoniazid and ethambutol and by a broad range of inhibitors of cell wall biosynthesis and is required for efflux pump functioning. However, neither the Rv1747 or pknF mutant showed increased susceptibility to a range of drugs and cell wall stress reagents including isoniazid and ethambutol, cell wall structure and cell division appear normal by electron microscopy, and no differences in lipoarabinomannan were found. Transcription from the pknF promoter was not induced by a range of stress reagents. We conclude that the loss of Rv1747 affects cell wall biosynthesis leading to the production of intermediates that cause induction of iniBAC transcription and implicates it in exporting a component of the cell wall, which is necessary for virulence. PMID:23915284

  8. A far-red fluorescent protein evolved from a cyanobacterial phycobiliprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Erik A; Tran, Geraldine N; Gross, Larry A; Crisp, Jessica L; Shu, Xiaokun; Lin, John Y; Tsien, Roger Y

    2016-09-01

    Far-red fluorescent proteins (FPs) are desirable for in vivo imaging because with these molecules less light is scattered, absorbed, or re-emitted by endogenous biomolecules compared with cyan, green, yellow, and orange FPs. We developed a new class of FP from an allophycocyanin α-subunit (APCα). Native APC requires a lyase to incorporate phycocyanobilin. The evolved FP, which we named small ultra-red FP (smURFP), covalently attaches a biliverdin (BV) chromophore without a lyase, and has 642/670-nm excitation-emission peaks, a large extinction coefficient (180,000 M(-1)cm(-1)) and quantum yield (18%), and photostability comparable to that of eGFP. smURFP has significantly greater BV incorporation rate and protein stability than the bacteriophytochrome (BPH) FPs. Moreover, BV supply is limited by membrane permeability, and smURFPs (but not BPH FPs) can incorporate a more membrane-permeant BV analog, making smURFP fluorescence comparable to that of FPs from jellyfish or coral. A far-red and near-infrared fluorescent cell cycle indicator was created with smURFP and a BPH FP. PMID:27479328

  9. Differential Evolutionary Selection and Natural Evolvability Observed in ALT Proteins of Human Filarial Parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devoe, Neil C; Corbett, Ian J; Barker, Linsey; Chang, Robert; Gudis, Polyxeni; Mullen, Nathan; Perez, Kailey; Raposo, Hugo; Scholz, John; May, Meghan

    2016-01-01

    The abundant larval transcript (ALT-2) protein is present in all members of the Filarioidea, and has been reported as a potential candidate antigen for a subunit vaccine against lymphatic filariasis. To assess the potential for vaccine escape or heterologous protection, we examined the evolutionary selection acting on ALT-2. The ratios of nonsynonymous (K(a)) to synonymous (K(s)) mutation frequencies (ω) were calculated for the alt-2 genes of the lymphatic filariasis agents Brugia malayi and Wuchereria bancrofti and the agents of river blindness and African eyeworm disease Onchocerca volvulus and Loa loa. Two distinct Bayesian models of sequence evolution showed that ALT-2 of W. bancrofti and L. loa were under significant (Pvolvulus were under neutral to stabilizing selection. Diversifying selection as measured by ω values was notably strongest on the region of ALT-2 encoding the signal peptide of L. loa and was elevated in the variable acidic domain of L. loa and W. bancrofti. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the ALT-2 consensus sequences formed three clades: the first consisting of B. malayi, the second consisting of W. bancrofti, and the third containing both O. volvulus and L. loa. ALT-2 selection was therefore not predictable by phylogeny or pathology, as the two species parasitizing the eye were selected differently, as were the two species parasitizing the lymphatic system. The most immunogenic regions of L. loa and W. bancrofti ALT-2 sequence as modeled by antigenicity prediction analysis did not correspond with elevated levels of diversifying selection, and were not selected differently than predicted antigenic epitopes in B. malayi and O. volvulus. Measurements of ALT-2 evolvability made by χ2 analysis between alleles that were stable (O. volvulus and B. malayi) and those that were under diversifying selection (W. bancrofti and L. loa) indicated significant (P<0.01) deviations from a normal distribution for both W. bancrofti and L. loa. The

  10. Differential Evolutionary Selection and Natural Evolvability Observed in ALT Proteins of Human Filarial Parasites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil C Devoe

    Full Text Available The abundant larval transcript (ALT-2 protein is present in all members of the Filarioidea, and has been reported as a potential candidate antigen for a subunit vaccine against lymphatic filariasis. To assess the potential for vaccine escape or heterologous protection, we examined the evolutionary selection acting on ALT-2. The ratios of nonsynonymous (K(a to synonymous (K(s mutation frequencies (ω were calculated for the alt-2 genes of the lymphatic filariasis agents Brugia malayi and Wuchereria bancrofti and the agents of river blindness and African eyeworm disease Onchocerca volvulus and Loa loa. Two distinct Bayesian models of sequence evolution showed that ALT-2 of W. bancrofti and L. loa were under significant (P<0.05; P < 0.001 diversifying selection, while ALT-2 of B. malayi and O. volvulus were under neutral to stabilizing selection. Diversifying selection as measured by ω values was notably strongest on the region of ALT-2 encoding the signal peptide of L. loa and was elevated in the variable acidic domain of L. loa and W. bancrofti. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the ALT-2 consensus sequences formed three clades: the first consisting of B. malayi, the second consisting of W. bancrofti, and the third containing both O. volvulus and L. loa. ALT-2 selection was therefore not predictable by phylogeny or pathology, as the two species parasitizing the eye were selected differently, as were the two species parasitizing the lymphatic system. The most immunogenic regions of L. loa and W. bancrofti ALT-2 sequence as modeled by antigenicity prediction analysis did not correspond with elevated levels of diversifying selection, and were not selected differently than predicted antigenic epitopes in B. malayi and O. volvulus. Measurements of ALT-2 evolvability made by χ2 analysis between alleles that were stable (O. volvulus and B. malayi and those that were under diversifying selection (W. bancrofti and L. loa indicated significant (P<0

  11. Replacement of lysine residue 1030 in the putative ATP-binding region of the insulin receptor abolishes insulin- and antibody-stimulated glucose uptake and receptor kinase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To test whether the tyrosine kinase activity of the insulin receptor is crucial for insulin action, the authors have constructed mutations of the human insulin receptor at Lys-1030, which is in the presumed ATP-binding region. By using oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis, this lysine residue was replaced with either methionine, arginine, or alanine. Chinese hamster ovary cells were transfected by mutant cDNAs and the expressed insulin receptors were characterized. They show here that none of these mutants exhibited insulin-activated autophosphorylation and kinase activity in vitro. They also do not mediate insulin- and antibody-stimulated uptake of 2-deoxyglucose. The tyrosine kinase activity is thus required for a key physiological response of insulin

  12. Mutating the Conserved Q-loop Glutamine 1291 Selectively Disrupts Adenylate Kinase-dependent Channel Gating of the ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Adenylate Kinase Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) and Reduces Channel Function in Primary Human Airway Epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qian; Ernst, Sarah E; Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Shah, Viral S; Ver Heul, Amanda R; Welsh, Michael J; Randak, Christoph O

    2015-05-29

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and two other non-membrane-bound ABC proteins, Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) protein, exhibit adenylate kinase activity in the presence of physiologic concentrations of ATP and AMP or ADP (ATP + AMP ⇆ 2 ADP). The crystal structure of the nucleotide-binding domain of an SMC protein in complex with the adenylate kinase bisubstrate inhibitor P(1),P(5)-di(adenosine-5') pentaphosphate (Ap5A) suggests that AMP binds to the conserved Q-loop glutamine during the adenylate kinase reaction. Therefore, we hypothesized that mutating the corresponding residue in CFTR, Gln-1291, selectively disrupts adenylate kinase-dependent channel gating at physiologic nucleotide concentrations. We found that substituting Gln-1291 with bulky side-chain amino acids abolished the effects of Ap5A, AMP, and adenosine 5'-monophosphoramidate on CFTR channel function. 8-Azidoadenosine 5'-monophosphate photolabeling of the AMP-binding site and adenylate kinase activity were disrupted in Q1291F CFTR. The Gln-1291 mutations did not alter the potency of ATP at stimulating current or ATP-dependent gating when ATP was the only nucleotide present. However, when physiologic concentrations of ADP and AMP were added, adenylate kinase-deficient Q1291F channels opened significantly less than wild type. Consistent with this result, we found that Q1291F CFTR displayed significantly reduced Cl(-) channel function in well differentiated primary human airway epithelia. These results indicate that a highly conserved residue of an ABC transporter plays an important role in adenylate kinase-dependent CFTR gating. Furthermore, the results suggest that adenylate kinase activity is important for normal CFTR channel function in airway epithelia.

  13. Cholesterol efflux via ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and cholesterol uptake via the LDL receptor influences cholesterol-induced impairment of beta cell function in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruit, J. K.; Kremer, P. H. C.; Dai, L.; Tang, R.; Ruddle, P.; de Haan, W.; Brunham, L. R.; Verchere, C. B.; Hayden, M. R.

    2010-01-01

    Cellular cholesterol accumulation is an emerging mechanism for beta cell dysfunction in type 2 diabetes. Absence of the cholesterol transporter ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) results in increased islet cholesterol and impaired insulin secretion, indicating that impaired cholesterol effl

  14. ATP binding to p97/VCP D1 domain regulates selective recruitment of adaptors to its proximal N-domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Sheng Chia

    Full Text Available p97/Valosin-containing protein (VCP is a member of the AAA-ATPase family involved in many cellular processes including cell division, intracellular trafficking and extraction of misfolded proteins in endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD. It is a homohexamer with each subunit containing two tandem D1 and D2 ATPase domains and N- and C-terminal regions that function as adaptor protein binding domains. p97/VCP is directed to its many different functional pathways by associating with various adaptor proteins. The regulation of the recruitment of the adaptor proteins remains unclear. Two adaptor proteins, Ufd1/Npl4 and p47, which bind exclusively to the p97/VCP N-domain and direct p97/VCP to either ERAD-related processes or homotypic fusion of Golgi fragments, were studied here. Surface plasmon resonance biosensor-based assays allowed the study of binding kinetics in real time. In competition experiments, it was observed that in the presence of ATP, Ufd1/Npl4 was able to compete more effectively with p47 for binding to p97/VCP. By using non-hydrolysable ATP analogues and the hexameric truncated p97/N-D1 fragment, it was shown that binding rather than hydrolysis of ATP to the proximal D1 domain strengthened the Ufd1/Npl4 association with the N-domain, thus regulating the recruitment of either Ufd1/Npl4 or p47. This novel role of ATP and an assigned function to the D1 AAA-ATPase domain link the multiple functions of p97/VCP to the metabolic status of the cell.

  15. Kinetics, in silico docking, molecular dynamics, and MM-GBSA binding studies on prototype indirubins, KT5720, and staurosporine as phosphorylase kinase ATP-binding site inhibitors: the role of water molecules examined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Joseph M; Skamnaki, Vicky T; Archontis, Georgios; Lamprakis, Christos; Sarrou, Josephine; Bischler, Nicolas; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros; Zographos, Spyros E; Oikonomakos, Nikos G

    2011-03-01

    With an aim toward glycogenolysis control in Type 2 diabetes, we have investigated via kinetic experiments and computation the potential of indirubin (IC₅₀ > 50 μM), indirubin-3'-oxime (IC₅₀ = 144 nM), KT5720 (K(i) = 18.4 nM) and staurosporine (K(i) = 0.37 nM) as phosphorylase kinase (PhKγtrnc) ATP-binding site inhibitors, with the latter two revealed as potent inhibitors in the low nM range. Because of lack of structural information, we have exploited information from homologous kinase complexes to direct in silico calculations (docking, molecular dynamics, and MMGBSA) to predict the binding characteristics of the four ligands. All inhibitors are predicted to bind in the same active site area as the ATP adenine ring, with binding dominated by hinge region hydrogen bonds to Asp104:O and Met106:O (all four ligands) and also Met106:NH (for the indirubins). The PhKγtrnc-staurosporine complex has the greatest number of receptor-ligand hydrogen bonds, while for the indirubin-3'-oxime and KT5720 complexes there is an important network of interchanging water molecules bridging inhibitor-enzyme contacts. The MM-GBSA results revealed the source of staurosporine's low nM potency to be favorable electrostatic interactions, while KT5720 has strong van der Waals contributions. KT5720 interacts with the greatest number of protein residues either by direct or 1-water bridged hydrogen bond interactions, and the potential for more selective PhK inhibition based on a KT5720 analogue has been established. Including receptor flexibility in Schrödinger induced-fit docking calculations in most cases correctly predicted the binding modes as compared with the molecular dynamics structures; the algorithm was less effective when there were key structural waters bridging receptor-ligand contacts. PMID:21287607

  16. Functional analysis of candidate ABC transporter proteins for sitosterol transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrecht, C; Elliott, J I; Sardini, A;

    2002-01-01

    Two ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins, ABCG5 and ABCG8, have recently been associated with the accumulation of dietary cholesterol in the sterol storage disease sitosterolemia. These two 'half-transporters' are assumed to dimerize to form the complete sitosterol transporter which reduces...... implicated in lipid movement and expressed in tissues with a role in sterol synthesis and absorption, might also be involved in sitosterol transport. Transport by the multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein (P-gp; Abcb1), the multidrug resistance-associated protein (Mrp1; Abcc1), the breast cancer resistance......-specific ABC transporters have acquired specificity to exclude sitosterol and related sterols like cholesterol presumably because the abundance of cholesterol in the membrane would interfere with their action; in consequence, specific transporters have evolved to handle these sterols....

  17. Heterocyclic cyclohexanone monocarbonyl analogs of curcumin can inhibit the activity of ATP-binding cassette transporters in cancer multidrug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revalde, Jezrael L; Li, Yan; Hawkins, Bill C; Rosengren, Rhonda J; Paxton, James W

    2015-02-01

    Curcumin (CUR) is a phytochemical that inhibits the xenobiotic ABC efflux transporters implicated in cancer multidrug resistance (MDR), such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) and multidrug resistance-associated proteins 1 and 5 (MRP1 and MRP5). The use of CUR in the clinic however, is complicated by its instability and poor pharmacokinetic profile. Monocarbonyl analogs of CUR (MACs) are compounds without CUR's unstable β-diketone moiety and were reported to have improved stability and in vivo disposition. Whether the MACs can be used as MDR reversal agents is less clear, as the absence of a β-diketone may negatively impact transporter inhibition. In this study, we investigated 23 heterocyclic cyclohexanone MACs for inhibitory effects against P-gp, BCRP, MRP1 and MRP5. Using flow cytometry and resistance reversal assays, we found that many of these compounds inhibited the transport activity of the ABC transporters investigated, often with much greater potency than CUR. Overall the analogs were most effective at inhibiting BCRP and we identified three compounds, A12 (2,6-bis((E)-2,5-dimethoxy-benzylidene)cyclohexanone), A13 (2,6-bis((E)-4-hydroxyl-3-methoxybenzylidene)-cyclohexanone) and B11 (3,5-bis((E)-2-fluoro-4,5-dimethoxybenzylidene)-1-methylpiperidin-4-one), as the most promising BCRP inhibitors. These compounds inhibited BCRP activity in a non-cell line, non-substrate-specific manner. Their inhibition occurred by direct transporter interaction rather than modulating protein or cell surface expression. From these results, we concluded that MACs, such as the heterocyclic cyclohexanone analogs in this study, also have potential as MDR reversal agents and may be superior alternatives to the unstable parent compound, CUR.

  18. Cuticular Defects in Oryza sativa ATP-binding Cassette Transporter G31 Mutant Plants Cause Dwarfism, Elevated Defense Responses and Pathogen Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garroum, Imène; Bidzinski, Przemyslaw; Daraspe, Jean; Mucciolo, Antonio; Humbel, Bruno M; Morel, Jean-Benoit; Nawrath, Christiane

    2016-06-01

    The cuticle covers the surface of the polysaccharide cell wall of leaf epidermal cells and forms an essential diffusion barrier between plant and environment. Homologs of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter AtABCG32/HvABCG31 clade are necessary for the formation of a functional cuticle in both monocots and dicots. Here we characterize the osabcg31 knockout mutant and hairpin RNA interference (RNAi)-down-regulated OsABCG31 plant lines having reduced plant growth and a permeable cuticle. The reduced content of cutin in leaves and structural alterations in the cuticle and at the cuticle-cell wall interface in plants compromised in OsABCG31 expression explain the cuticle permeability. Effects of modifications of the cuticle on plant-microbe interactions were evaluated. The cuticular alterations in OsABCG31-compromised plants did not cause deficiencies in germination of the spores or the formation of appressoria of Magnaporthe oryzae on the leaf surface, but a strong reduction of infection structures inside the plant. Genes involved in pathogen resistance were constitutively up-regulated in OsABCG31-compromised plants, thus being a possible cause of the resistance to M. oryzae and the dwarf growth phenotype. The findings show that in rice an abnormal cuticle formation may affect the signaling of plant growth and defense. PMID:27121976

  19. Hernandezine, a Bisbenzylisoquinoline Alkaloid with Selective Inhibitory Activity against Multidrug-Resistance-Linked ATP-Binding Cassette Drug Transporter ABCB1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Sung-Han; Lu, Yu-Jen; Yang, Chun-Chiao; Tuo, Wei-Cherng; Li, Yan-Qing; Huang, Yang-Hui; Hsieh, Chia-Hung; Hung, Tai-Ho; Wu, Chung-Pu

    2016-08-26

    The overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug transporter ABCB1 (P-glycoprotein, MDR1) is the most studied mechanism of multidrug resistance (MDR), which remains a major obstacle in clinical cancer chemotherapy. Consequently, resensitizing MDR cancer cells by inhibiting the efflux function of ABCB1 has been considered as a potential strategy to overcome ABCB1-mediated MDR in cancer patients. However, the task of developing a suitable modulator of ABCB1 has been hindered mostly by the lack of selectivity and high intrinsic toxicity of candidate compounds. Considering the wide range of diversity and relatively nontoxic nature of natural products, developing a potential modulator of ABCB1 from natural sources is particularly valuable. Through screening of a large collection of purified bioactive natural products, hernandezine was identified as a potent and selective reversing agent for ABCB1-mediated MDR in cancer cells. Experimental data demonstrated that the bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid hernandezine is selective for ABCB1, effectively inhibits the transport function of ABCB1, and enhances drug-induced apoptosis in cancer cells. More importantly, hernandezine significantly resensitizes ABCB1-overexpressing cancer cells to multiple chemotherapeutic drugs at nontoxic, nanomolar concentrations. Collectively, these findings reveal that hernandezine has great potential to be further developed into a novel reversal agent for combination therapy in MDR cancer patients. PMID:27504669

  20. A Previously Unknown Unique Challenge for Inhibitors of SYK ATP-Binding Site: Role of SYK as A Cell Cycle Checkpoint Regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih M. Uckun

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The identification of SYK as a molecular target in B-lineage leukemia/lymphoma cells prompted the development of SYK inhibitors as a new class of anti-cancer drug candidates. Here we report that induction of the SYK gene expression in human cells causes a significant down-regulation of evolutionarily conserved genes associated with mitosis and cell cycle progression providing unprecedented evidence that SYK is a master regulator of cell cycle regulatory checkpoint genes in human cells. We further show that SYK regulates the G2 checkpoint by physically associating with and inhibiting the dual-specificity phosphatase CDC25C via phosphorylation of its S216 residue. SYK depletion by RNA interference or treatment with the chemical SYK inhibitor prevented nocodazole-treated human cell lines from activating the G2 checkpoint via CDC25C S216-phosphorylation and resulted in polyploidy. Our study provides genetic and biochemical evidence that spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK has a unique role in the activation of the G2 checkpoint in both non-lymphohematopoietic and B-lineage lymphoid cells. This previously unknown role of SYK as a cell cycle checkpoint regulator represents an unforeseen and significant challenge for inhibitors of SYK ATP binding site.

  1. Cooperative transcriptional activation of ATP-binding cassette sterol transporters ABCG5 and ABCG8 genes by nuclear receptors including Liver-X-Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Sun Back

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The ATP-binding cassette transporters ABCG5 and ABCG8 formheterodimers that limit absorption of dietary sterols in theintestine and promote cholesterol elimination from the bodythrough hepatobiliary secretion. To identify cis-regulatoryelements of the two genes, we have cloned and analyzedtwenty-three evolutionary conserved region (ECR fragmentsusing the CMV-luciferase reporter system in HepG2 cells. TwoECRs were found to be responsive to the Liver-X-Receptor (LXR.Through elaborate deletion studies, regions containing putativeLXREs were identified and the binding of LXRα wasdemonstrated by EMSA and ChIP assay. When the LXREs wereinserted upstream of the intergenic promoter, synergisticactivation by LXRα/RXRα in combination with GATA4, HNF4α,and LRH-1, which had been shown to bind to the intergenicregion, was observed. In conclusion, we have identified twoLXREs in ABCG5/ABCG8 genes for the first time and proposethat these LXREs, especially in the ECR20, play major roles inregulating these genes. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(6: 322-327

  2. Two different point mutations in ABL gene ATP-binding domain conferring Primary Imatinib resistance in a Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML patient: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iqbal Zafar

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Imatinib (Gleevec is the effective therapy for BCR-ABL positive CML patients. Point mutations have been detected in ATP-binding domain of ABL gene which disturbs the binding of Gleevec to this target leading to resistance. Detection of mutations is helpful in clinical management of imatinib resistance. We established a very sensitive (ASO PCR to detect mutations in an imatinib-resistant CML patient. Mutations C944T and T1052C were detected which cause complete partial imatinib resistance, respectively. This is the first report of multiple point mutations conferring primary imatinib resistance in same patient at the same time. Understanding the biological reasons of primary imatinib resistance is one of the emerging issues of pharmacogenomics and will be helpful in understanding primary resistance of molecularly-targeted cancer therapies. It will also be of great utilization in clinical management of imatinib resistance. Moreover, this ASO-PCR assay is very effective in detecting mutations related to imatinib resistance.

  3. HIV-1 Nef interaction influences the ATP-binding site of the Src-family kinase, Hck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pene-Dumitrescu Teodora

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nef is an HIV-1 accessory protein essential for viral replication and AIDS progression. Nef interacts with a multitude of host cell signaling partners, including members of the Src kinase family. Nef preferentially activates Hck, a Src-family kinase (SFK strongly expressed in macrophages and other HIV target cells, by binding to its regulatory SH3 domain. Recently, we identified a series of kinase inhibitors that preferentially inhibit Hck in the presence of Nef. These compounds also block Nef-dependent HIV replication, validating the Nef-SFK signaling pathway as an antiretroviral drug target. Our findings also suggested that by binding to the Hck SH3 domain, Nef indirectly affects the conformation of the kinase active site to favor inhibitor association. Results To test this hypothesis, we engineered a "gatekeeper" mutant of Hck with enhanced sensitivity to the pyrazolopyrimidine tyrosine kinase inhibitor, NaPP1. We also modified the RT loop of the Hck SH3 domain to enhance interaction of the kinase with Nef. This modification stabilized Nef:Hck interaction in solution-based kinase assays, as a way to mimic the more stable association that likely occurs at cellular membranes. Introduction of the modified RT loop rendered Hck remarkably more sensitive to activation by Nef, and led to a significant decrease in the Km for ATP as well as enhanced inhibitor potency. Conclusions These observations suggest that stable interaction with Nef may induce Src-family kinase active site conformations amenable to selective inhibitor targeting.

  4. An Allosteric Cross-Talk Between the Activation Loop and the ATP Binding Site Regulates the Activation of Src Kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucheta-Martínez, Encarna; Saladino, Giorgio; Morando, Maria Agnese; Martinez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge; Lelli, Moreno; Sutto, Ludovico; D'Amelio, Nicola; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi

    2016-04-01

    Phosphorylation of the activation loop is a fundamental step in the activation of most protein kinases. In the case of the Src tyrosine kinase, a prototypical kinase due to its role in cancer and its historic importance, phosphorylation of tyrosine 416 in the activation loop is known to rigidify the structure and contribute to the switch from the inactive to a fully active form. However, whether or not phosphorylation is able per-se to induce a fully active conformation, that efficiently binds ATP and phosphorylates the substrate, is less clear. Here we employ a combination of solution NMR and enhanced-sampling molecular dynamics simulations to fully map the effects of phosphorylation and ATP/ADP cofactor loading on the conformational landscape of Src tyrosine kinase. We find that both phosphorylation and cofactor binding are needed to induce a fully active conformation. What is more, we find a complex interplay between the A-loop and the hinge motion where the phosphorylation of the activation-loop has a significant allosteric effect on the dynamics of the C-lobe.

  5. Lipid raft involved in drug resistance: relationship between multidrug resistance ATP-binding cassette transporters and lipid raft%脂筏参与耐药: 多药耐药相关ABC转运蛋白与脂筏的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王琳; 贾宇; 姜远英

    2011-01-01

    Lipid rafts have been implicated in many cellular functions, including protein and lipid transport and signal transduction. Recently ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, which are associated with multidrug resistance, have been found in lipid rafts; therefore they might be related to drug resistance. Here we introduce the relationship between the localization and functions of three multi-drug related ABC transporters, including two relevant to multidrug resistance in tumor cells(Pgp/ABCB1 and MRP1/ABCC1) and one relevant to multidrug resistance in Candida albicans (Cdrlp). We also discuss the influence of sphingolipids and cholesterol, two major components of lipid rafts, on the localization and function of the above three ABC transporters.%脂筏(lipid raft)和细胞的许多功能,如信号转导、蛋白质和脂类的转运等都相关.近来有研究发现,与多药耐药密切相关的ABC转运蛋白(ATP-binding cassette transporter)定位于脂筏中,因此推测脂筏可能与耐药性有一定关系.本文综述了3种和耐药相关的ABC转运蛋白的定位与其功能之间的联系,分别是和肿瘤细胞多药耐药相关的ABC转运蛋白Pgp/ABCB1、MRP1/ABCC1以及与白假丝酵母菌(白念珠菌)多药耐药相关的ABC转运蛋白Cdr1p;并进一步讨论了脂筏的重要组成成分胆固醇和鞘脂对上述3种ABC转运蛋白的定位和功能的影响.

  6. Duplicate abalone egg coat proteins bind sperm lysin similarly, but evolve oppositely, consistent with molecular mimicry at fertilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan E Aagaard

    Full Text Available Sperm and egg proteins constitute a remarkable paradigm in evolutionary biology: despite their fundamental role in mediating fertilization (suggesting stasis, some of these molecules are among the most rapidly evolving ones known, and their divergence can lead to reproductive isolation. Because of strong selection to maintain function among interbreeding individuals, interacting fertilization proteins should also exhibit a strong signal of correlated divergence among closely related species. We use evidence of such molecular co-evolution to target biochemical studies of fertilization in North Pacific abalone (Haliotis spp., a model system of reproductive protein evolution. We test the evolutionary rates (d(N/d(S of abalone sperm lysin and two duplicated egg coat proteins (VERL and VEZP14, and find a signal of co-evolution specific to ZP-N, a putative sperm binding motif previously identified by homology modeling. Positively selected residues in VERL and VEZP14 occur on the same face of the structural model, suggesting a common mode of interaction with sperm lysin. We test this computational prediction biochemically, confirming that the ZP-N motif is sufficient to bind lysin and that the affinities of VERL and VEZP14 are comparable. However, we also find that on phylogenetic lineages where lysin and VERL evolve rapidly, VEZP14 evolves slowly, and vice versa. We describe a model of sexual conflict that can recreate this pattern of anti-correlated evolution by assuming that VEZP14 acts as a VERL mimic, reducing the intensity of sexual conflict and slowing the co-evolution of lysin and VERL.

  7. The capacity of Listeria monocytogenes mutants with in-frame deletions in putative ATP-binding cassette transporters to form biofilms and comparison with the wild type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Ceruso

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes (Lm is a food-borne pathogen responsible for human listeriosis, an invasive infection with high mortality rates. Lm has developed efficient strategies for survival under stress conditions such as starvation and wide variations in temperature, pH, and osmolarity. Therefore, Lm can survive in food under multiple stress conditions. Detailed studies to determine the mode of action of this pathogen for survival under stress conditions are important to control Lm in food. It has been shown that genes encoding for ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters are induced in Lm in food, in particular under stress conditions. Previous studies showed that these genes are involved in sensitivity to nisin, acids, and salt. The aim of this study was to determine the involvement of some ABC transporters in biofilm formation. Therefore, deletion mutants of ABC transporter genes (LMOf2365_1875 and LMOf2365_1877 were created in Lm F2365, and then were compared to the wild type for their capacity to form biofilms. Lm strain F2365 was chosen as reference since the genome is fully sequenced and furthermore this strain is particularly involved in food-borne outbreaks of listeriosis. Our results showed that DLMOf2365_1875 had an increased capacity to form biofilms compared to the wild type, indicating that LMOf2365_1875 negatively regulates biofilm formation. A deeper knowledge on the ability to form biofilms in these mutants may help in the development of intervention strategies to control Lm in food and in the environment.

  8. The Capacity of Listeria Monocytogenes Mutants with In-Frame Deletions in Putative ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters to form Biofilms and Comparison with the Wild Type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceruso, Marina; Fratamico, Pina; Chirollo, Claudia; Taglialatela, Rosanna; Cortesi, Maria Luisa

    2014-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) is a food-borne pathogen responsible for human listeriosis, an invasive infection with high mortality rates. Lm has developed efficient strategies for survival under stress conditions such as starvation and wide variations in temperature, pH, and osmolarity. Therefore, Lm can survive in food under multiple stress conditions. Detailed studies to determine the mode of action of this pathogen for survival under stress conditions are important to control Lm in food. It has been shown that genes encoding for ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are induced in Lm in food, in particular under stress conditions. Previous studies showed that these genes are involved in sensitivity to nisin, acids, and salt. The aim of this study was to determine the involvement of some ABC transporters in biofilm formation. Therefore, deletion mutants of ABC transporter genes (LMOf2365_1875 and LMOf2365_1877) were created in Lm F2365, and then were compared to the wild type for their capacity to form biofilms. Lm strain F2365 was chosen as reference since the genome is fully sequenced and furthermore this strain is particularly involved in food-borne outbreaks of listeriosis. Our results showed that ΔLMOf2365_1875 had an increased capacity to form biofilms compared to the wild type, indicating that LMOf2365_1875 negatively regulates biofilm formation. A deeper knowledge on the ability to form biofilms in these mutants may help in the development of intervention strategies to control Lm in food and in the environment. PMID:27800311

  9. Prognostic significance and molecular mechanism of ATP-binding cassette subfamily C member 4 in resistance to neoadjuvant radiotherapy of locally advanced rectal carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqi Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mechanism of radioresistance in rectal carcinoma remains largely unknown. We aimed to evaluate the predictive role of ATP-binding cassette subfamily C member 4 (ABCC4 in locally advanced rectal carcinoma and explore possible molecular mechanisms by which ABCC4 confers the resistance to neoadjuvant radiotherapy. METHODS: The expression of ABCC4 and P53 mutant in biopsy tissue specimens from 121 locally advanced rectal carcinoma patients was examined using immunohistochemistry. The factors contributing to 3-year overall survival and disease-free survival were evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazard model. Lentivirus-mediated small hairpin RNA was applied to inhibit ABCC4 expression in colorectal carcinoma cell line RKO, and investigate the radiosensitivity in xenograft model. Intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate concentration and cell cycle distribution following irradiation were detected. RESULTS: High expression of ABCC4 and p53 mutant in pretreated tumors, poor pathological response, and high final tumor staging were significant factors independently predicted an unfavorable prognosis of locally advanced rectal carcinoma patients after neoadjuvant radiotherapy. Down-regulation of ABCC4 expression significantly enhanced irradiation-induced suppression of tumor growth in xenograft model. Furthermore, down-regulation of ABCC4 expression enhanced intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate production and noticeable deficiency of G1-S phase checkpoint in cell cycle following irradiation. CONCLUSIONS: Our study suggests that ABCC4 serves as a novel predictive biomarker that is responsible for the radioresistance and predicts a poor prognosis for locally advanced rectal carcinoma after neoadjuvant radiotherapy.

  10. Solution structure of the 45-residue ATP-binding peptide of adenylate kinase as determined by 2-D NMR, FTIR, and CD spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, D.C.; Byler, D.M.; Susi, H.; Brown, E.M.; Kuby, S.A.; Mildyan, A.S.

    1986-05-01

    In the X-ray structure of adenylate kinase residues 1-45 exist as 47% ..cap alpha..-helix, 29% ..beta..-structure (strands and turns) and 24% coil. The solution structure of a synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 1-45, which constitutes the MgATP binding site was studied by 3 independent spectroscopic methods. Globularity of the peptide was shown by its broad NMR resonances which narrow upon denaturation, and by its ability to bind MgATP with similar affinity and conformation as the intact enzyme does. COSY and NOESY NMR methods at 250 and 500 MHz reveal proximities among NH, C..cap alpha.., and C..beta.. protons indicative of >20% ..cap alpha..-helix, and >20% ..beta..-structure. Correlation of regions of secondary structure with the primary sequence by 2D NMR indicates at least one ..cap alpha..-helix (res. 23 to 29) and two ..beta..-strands (res. 12 to 15 and 34 to 38). The broad amide I band in the deconvoluted FTIR spectrum could be fit as the sum of 4 peaks due to specific secondary structures, yielding less than or equal to=45% ..cap alpha..-helix, less than or equal to=40% ..beta..-structure and greater than or equal to=15% coil. The CD spectrum, from 185-250 nm, interpreted with a 3-parameter basis set, yielded 20 +/- 5% ..cap alpha..=helix, and less than or equal to=20% ..beta..-structure. The solution structure of peptide 1-45 thus approximates that of residues 1-45 in the crystal.

  11. Evolving New Skeletal Traits by cis-Regulatory Changes in Bone Morphogenetic Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indjeian, Vahan B; Kingman, Garrett A; Jones, Felicity C; Guenther, Catherine A; Grimwood, Jane; Schmutz, Jeremy; Myers, Richard M; Kingsley, David M

    2016-01-14

    Changes in bone size and shape are defining features of many vertebrates. Here we use genetic crosses and comparative genomics to identify specific regulatory DNA alterations controlling skeletal evolution. Armor bone-size differences in sticklebacks map to a major effect locus overlapping BMP family member GDF6. Freshwater fish express more GDF6 due in part to a transposon insertion, and transgenic overexpression of GDF6 phenocopies evolutionary changes in armor-plate size. The human GDF6 locus also has undergone distinctive regulatory evolution, including complete loss of an enhancer that is otherwise highly conserved between chimps and other mammals. Functional tests show that the ancestral enhancer drives expression in hindlimbs but not forelimbs, in locations that have been specifically modified during the human transition to bipedalism. Both gain and loss of regulatory elements can localize BMP changes to specific anatomical locations, providing a flexible regulatory basis for evolving species-specific changes in skeletal form. PMID:26774823

  12. The multi-xenobiotic resistance (MXR) efflux activity in hemocytes of Mytilus edulis is mediated by an ATP binding cassette transporter of class C (ABCC) principally inducible in eosinophilic granulocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rioult, Damien; Pasquier, Jennifer; Boulangé-Lecomte, Céline; Poret, Agnès; Abbas, Imane; Marin, Matthieu; Minier, Christophe; Le Foll, Frank

    2014-08-01

    In marine and estuarine species, immunotoxic and/or immunomodulatory mechanisms are the crossroad of interactions between xenobiotics, microorganisms and physicochemical variations of the environment. In mussels, immunity relies exclusively on innate responses carried out by cells collectively called hemocytes and found in the open hemolymphatic circulatory system of these organisms. However, hemocytes do not form a homogenous population of immune cells since distinct subtypes of mussel blood cells can be distinguished by cytochemistry, flow cytometry or cell motility analysis. Previous studies have also shown that these cells are able to efflux xenobiotics by means of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter activities conferring a multixenobiotic resistance (MXR) phenotype. ABC transporters corresponding to vertebrate class B/P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and to class C/multidrug resistance related protein (MRP) are characterized in Mytilidae. Herein, we have investigated the relative contributions of ABCB- and ABCC-mediated efflux within the different hemocyte subpopulations of Mytilus edulis mussels, collected from areas differentially impacted by chemical contaminants in Normandy (France). RT-PCR analyses provide evidence for the presence of ABCB and ABCC transporters transcripts in hemocytes. Immunodetection of ABCB/P-gp with the monoclonal antibody UIC2 in living hemocytes revealed that expression was restricted to granular structures of spread cells. Efflux transporter activities, with calcein-AM as fluorescent probe, were measured by combining flow cytometry to accurate Coulter cell size measurements in order to get a cell-volume normalized fluorescence concentration. In these conditions, basal fluorescence levels were higher in hemocytes originating from Yport (control site) than in cells collected from the harbor of Le Havre, where mussels are more exposed to with persistent pollutants. By using specific ABCB/P-gp (verapamil, PSC833, zosuquidar) and ABCC/MRP (MK

  13. The multi-xenobiotic resistance (MXR) efflux activity in hemocytes of Mytilus edulis is mediated by an ATP binding cassette transporter of class C (ABCC) principally inducible in eosinophilic granulocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rioult, Damien; Pasquier, Jennifer; Boulangé-Lecomte, Céline; Poret, Agnès; Abbas, Imane; Marin, Matthieu; Minier, Christophe; Le Foll, Frank

    2014-08-01

    In marine and estuarine species, immunotoxic and/or immunomodulatory mechanisms are the crossroad of interactions between xenobiotics, microorganisms and physicochemical variations of the environment. In mussels, immunity relies exclusively on innate responses carried out by cells collectively called hemocytes and found in the open hemolymphatic circulatory system of these organisms. However, hemocytes do not form a homogenous population of immune cells since distinct subtypes of mussel blood cells can be distinguished by cytochemistry, flow cytometry or cell motility analysis. Previous studies have also shown that these cells are able to efflux xenobiotics by means of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter activities conferring a multixenobiotic resistance (MXR) phenotype. ABC transporters corresponding to vertebrate class B/P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and to class C/multidrug resistance related protein (MRP) are characterized in Mytilidae. Herein, we have investigated the relative contributions of ABCB- and ABCC-mediated efflux within the different hemocyte subpopulations of Mytilus edulis mussels, collected from areas differentially impacted by chemical contaminants in Normandy (France). RT-PCR analyses provide evidence for the presence of ABCB and ABCC transporters transcripts in hemocytes. Immunodetection of ABCB/P-gp with the monoclonal antibody UIC2 in living hemocytes revealed that expression was restricted to granular structures of spread cells. Efflux transporter activities, with calcein-AM as fluorescent probe, were measured by combining flow cytometry to accurate Coulter cell size measurements in order to get a cell-volume normalized fluorescence concentration. In these conditions, basal fluorescence levels were higher in hemocytes originating from Yport (control site) than in cells collected from the harbor of Le Havre, where mussels are more exposed to with persistent pollutants. By using specific ABCB/P-gp (verapamil, PSC833, zosuquidar) and ABCC/MRP (MK

  14. A structural classification of substrate-binding proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berntsson, Ronnie P. -A.; Smits, Sander H. J.; Schmitt, Lutz; Slotboom, Dirk-Jan; Poolman, Bert; Rydström, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Substrate-binding proteins (SBP) are associated with a wide variety of protein complexes. The proteins are part of ATP-binding cassette transporters for substrate uptake, ion gradient driven transporters, DNA-binding proteins, as well as channels and receptors from both pro-and eukaryotes. A wealth

  15. Brain inflammation in a chronic epilepsy model : Evolving pattern of the translocator protein during epileptogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amhaoul, Halima; Hamaide, Julie; Bertoglio, Daniele; Reichel, Stephanie Nadine; Verhaeghe, Jeroen; Geerts, Elly; Dam, van Debby; De Deyn, Peter Paul; Kumar-Singh, Samir; Katsifis, Andrew; Van der Linden, Annemie; Staelens, Steven; Dedeurwaerdere, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Aims: A hallmark in the neuropathology of temporal lobe epilepsy is brain inflammation which has been suggested as both a biomarker and a new mechanistic target for treatments. The translocator protein (TSPO), due to its high upregulation under neuroinflammatory conditions and the availability of se

  16. Visualizing Protein Interactions and Dynamics: Evolving a Visual Language for Molecular Animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkinson, Jodie; McGill, Gael

    2012-01-01

    Undergraduate biology education provides students with a number of learning challenges. Subject areas that are particularly difficult to understand include protein conformational change and stability, diffusion and random molecular motion, and molecular crowding. In this study, we examined the relative effectiveness of three-dimensional…

  17. Three functionally diverged major White Spot Syndrome Virus structural proteins evolved by gene duplication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulten, van M.C.W.; Goldbach, R.W.; Vlak, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is an invertebrate virus causing considerable mortality in penaeid shrimp. The oval-to-bacilliform shaped virions, isolated from infected Penaeus monodon, contain four major proteins: VP28, VP26, VP24 and VP19 (28, 26, 24 and 19 kDa, respectively). VP26 and VP24 are

  18. Host response transcriptional profiling reveals extracellular components and ABC (ATP-binding cassette transporters gene enrichment in typhoid fever-infected Nigerian children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Resau James H

    2011-09-01

    bacterial invasion. Distinct gene expression profiles can also be obtained from acute vs. convalescent phase during typhoid fever infection. We found novel down-regulation of ABC (ATP-binding cassette transporters genes such as ABCA7, ABCC5, and ABCD4 and ATPase activity as the highest enriched pathway. Conclusions We identified unique extracellular components and ABC transporters gene enrichments in typhoid fever-infected Nigerian children, which have never been reported. These enriched gene clusters may represent novel targeted pathways to improve diagnostic, prognostic, therapeutic and next-generation vaccine strategies for typhoid fever in Africa.

  19. Evolving Transcription Factor Binding Site Models From Protein Binding Microarray Data

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2016-02-02

    Protein binding microarray (PBM) is a high-throughput platform that can measure the DNA binding preference of a protein in a comprehensive and unbiased manner. In this paper, we describe the PBM motif model building problem. We apply several evolutionary computation methods and compare their performance with the interior point method, demonstrating their performance advantages. In addition, given the PBM domain knowledge, we propose and describe a novel method called kmerGA which makes domain-specific assumptions to exploit PBM data properties to build more accurate models than the other models built. The effectiveness and robustness of kmerGA is supported by comprehensive performance benchmarking on more than 200 datasets, time complexity analysis, convergence analysis, parameter analysis, and case studies. To demonstrate its utility further, kmerGA is applied to two real world applications: 1) PBM rotation testing and 2) ChIP-Seq peak sequence prediction. The results support the biological relevance of the models learned by kmerGA, and thus its real world applicability.

  20. Visualizing protein interactions and dynamics: evolving a visual language for molecular animation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkinson, Jodie; McGill, Gaël

    2012-01-01

    Undergraduate biology education provides students with a number of learning challenges. Subject areas that are particularly difficult to understand include protein conformational change and stability, diffusion and random molecular motion, and molecular crowding. In this study, we examined the relative effectiveness of three-dimensional visualization techniques for learning about protein conformation and molecular motion in association with a ligand-receptor binding event. Increasingly complex versions of the same binding event were depicted in each of four animated treatments. Students (n = 131) were recruited from the undergraduate biology program at University of Toronto, Mississauga. Visualization media were developed in the Center for Molecular and Cellular Dynamics at Harvard Medical School. Stem cell factor ligand and cKit receptor tyrosine kinase were used as a classical example of a ligand-induced receptor dimerization and activation event. Each group completed a pretest, viewed one of four variants of the animation, and completed a posttest and, at 2 wk following the assessment, a delayed posttest. Overall, the most complex animation was the most effective at fostering students' understanding of the events depicted. These results suggest that, in select learning contexts, increasingly complex representations may be more desirable for conveying the dynamic nature of cell binding events.

  1. The photosystem II oxygen-evolving complex protein PsbP interacts with the coat protein of Alfalfa mosaic virus and inhibits virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramaniam, Muthukumar; Kim, Bong-Suk; Hutchens-Williams, Heather M; Loesch-Fries, L Sue

    2014-10-01

    Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) coat protein (CP) is essential for many steps in virus replication from early infection to encapsidation. However, the identity and functional relevance of cellular factors that interact with CP remain unknown. In an unbiased yeast two-hybrid screen for CP-interacting Arabidopsis proteins, we identified several novel protein interactions that could potentially modulate AMV replication. In this report, we focus on one of the novel CP-binding partners, the Arabidopsis PsbP protein, which is a nuclear-encoded component of the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II. We validated the protein interaction in vitro with pull-down assays, in planta with bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays, and during virus infection by co-immunoprecipitations. CP interacted with the chloroplast-targeted PsbP in the cytosol and mutations that prevented the dimerization of CP abolished this interaction. Importantly, PsbP overexpression markedly reduced virus accumulation in infected leaves. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that AMV CP dimers interact with the chloroplast protein PsbP, suggesting a potential sequestration strategy that may preempt the generation of any PsbP-mediated antiviral state. PMID:24940990

  2. Pharmacophore Modeling of Nilotinib as an Inhibitor of ATP-Binding Cassette Drug Transporters and BCR-ABL Kinase Using a Three-Dimensional Quantitative Structure–Activity Relationship Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Shukla, Suneet; Kouanda, Abdul; Silverton, Latoya; Talele, Tanaji T.; Suresh V Ambudkar

    2014-01-01

    Nilotinib (Tasigna) is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor approved by the FDA to treat chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients. It is also a transport substrate of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug efflux transporters ABCB1 (P-glycoprotein, P-gp) and ABCG2 (BCRP), which may have an effect on the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of this drug. The goal of this study was to identify pharmacophoric features of nilotinib in order to potentially develop specific inhibitors of BCR-ABL kinase with mi...

  3. Expression of the nuclear gene encoding oxygen-evolving enhancer protein 2 is required for high levels of photosynthetic oxygen evolution in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    OpenAIRE

    Mayfield, S P; Rahire, M; Frank, G.; Zuber, H.; Rochaix, J D

    1987-01-01

    We have cloned a cDNA encoding a 20-kDa polypeptide, oxygen-evolving enhancer protein 2 (OEE2), in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. This polypeptide has been implicated in photosynthetic oxygen evolution, and it is associated with the photosystem II complex, the site of oxygen evolution in all higher plants and algae. The sequence of OEE2 cDNA, the deduced amino acid sequence of the preprotein, the N-terminal protein sequence of mature OEE2 protein, and the coding regions of the single OEE2 gene ar...

  4. NCYM, a Cis-antisense gene of MYCN, encodes a de novo evolved protein that inhibits GSK3β resulting in the stabilization of MYCN in human neuroblastomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Suenaga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The rearrangement of pre-existing genes has long been thought of as the major mode of new gene generation. Recently, de novo gene birth from non-genic DNA was found to be an alternative mechanism to generate novel protein-coding genes. However, its functional role in human disease remains largely unknown. Here we show that NCYM, a cis-antisense gene of the MYCN oncogene, initially thought to be a large non-coding RNA, encodes a de novo evolved protein regulating the pathogenesis of human cancers, particularly neuroblastoma. The NCYM gene is evolutionally conserved only in the taxonomic group containing humans and chimpanzees. In primary human neuroblastomas, NCYM is 100% co-amplified and co-expressed with MYCN, and NCYM mRNA expression is associated with poor clinical outcome. MYCN directly transactivates both NCYM and MYCN mRNA, whereas NCYM stabilizes MYCN protein by inhibiting the activity of GSK3β, a kinase that promotes MYCN degradation. In contrast to MYCN transgenic mice, neuroblastomas in MYCN/NCYM double transgenic mice were frequently accompanied by distant metastases, behavior reminiscent of human neuroblastomas with MYCN amplification. The NCYM protein also interacts with GSK3β, thereby stabilizing the MYCN protein in the tumors of the MYCN/NCYM double transgenic mice. Thus, these results suggest that GSK3β inhibition by NCYM stabilizes the MYCN protein both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the survival of MYCN transgenic mice bearing neuroblastoma was improved by treatment with NVP-BEZ235, a dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor shown to destabilize MYCN via GSK3β activation. In contrast, tumors caused in MYCN/NCYM double transgenic mice showed chemo-resistance to the drug. Collectively, our results show that NCYM is the first de novo evolved protein known to act as an oncopromoting factor in human cancer, and suggest that de novo evolved proteins may functionally characterize human disease.

  5. Transport of topoisomerase I inhibitors by the breast cancer resistance protein - Potential clinical implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellens, JHM; Maliepaard, M; Scheper, RJ; Scheffer, GL; Jonker, JW; Smit, JW; Beijnen, JH; Schinkel, AH; Liehr, JG; Giovanella, BC; Verschaegen, CF

    2000-01-01

    The multidrug resistance protein BCRP (breast cancer resistance protein) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette family of drug transporters. Overexpression of BCRP caused by exposure of cells to mitoxantrone (MX) or doxorubicin/verapamil resulted in a resistance pattern that is different from what

  6. Tiaozhi Tongmai Granules reduce atherogenesis and promote the expression of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 in rabbit atherosclerotic plaque macrophages and the liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Sun

    2014-07-01

    Conclusions: Tiaozhi Tongmai Granules appear to have an anti-atherogenic effect that is most likely mediated by simultaneously upregulating the protein expression of ABCA1 in rabbit atherosclerotic plaque macrophages and in the liver.

  7. Inhibition of photosystem II photochemistry by Cr is caused by the alteration of both D1 protein and oxygen evolving complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nadia Ait; Dewez, David; Didur, Olivier; Popovic, Radovan

    2006-09-01

    The effect of chromium (Cr) on photosystem II (PSII) electron transport and the change of proteins content within PSII complex were investigated. When Lemna gibba was exposed to Cr during 96 h, growth inhibition was found to be associated with an alteration of the PSII electron transport at both PSII oxidizing and reducing sides. Investigation of fluorescence yields at transients K, J, I, and P suggested for Cr inhibitory effect to be located at the oxygen-evolving complex and Q(A) reduction. Those Cr-inhibitory effects were related to the change of the turnover of PSII D1 protein and the alteration of 24 and 33 kDa proteins of the oxygen-evolving complex. The inhibition of the PSII electron transport and the formation of reactive oxygen species induced by Cr were highly correlated with the decrease in the content of D1 protein and the amount of 24 and 33 kDa proteins. Therefore, functional alteration of PSII activity by Cr was closely related with the structural change within PSII complex. PMID:16969717

  8. Cystathionine beta-Synthase (CBS) Domains 1 and 2 Fulfill Different Roles in Ionic Strength Sensing of the ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter OpuA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karasawa, Akira; Erkens, Guus B.; Berntsson, Ronnie P. -A.; Otten, Renee; Schuurman-Wolters, Gea K.; Mulder, Frans A. A.; Poolman, Bert

    2011-01-01

    The cystathionine beta-synthase module of OpuA in conjunction with an anionic membrane surface acts as a sensor of internal ionic strength, which allows the protein to respond to osmotic stress. We now show by chemical modification and cross-linking studies that CBS2-CBS2 interface residues are crit

  9. Breast cancer resistance protein is localized at the plasma membrane in mitoxantrone- and topotecan-resistant cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffer, GL; Maliepaard, M; Pijnenborg, ACLM; van Gastelen, MA; Schroeijers, AB; Allen, JD; Ross, DD; van der Valk, P; Dalton, WS; Schellens, JHM; Scheper, RJ; de Jong, MC

    2000-01-01

    Tumor cells may display a multidrug resistant phenotype by overexpression of ATP-binding cassette transporters such as multidrug resistance (,MDR1) P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1), and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). The presence of BCRP has thus far been reported sole

  10. New World and Old World Alphaviruses Have Evolved to Exploit Different Components of Stress Granules, FXR and G3BP Proteins, for Assembly of Viral Replication Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dal Young; Reynaud, Josephine M.; Rasalouskaya, Aliaksandra; Akhrymuk, Ivan; Mobley, James A.; Frolov, Ilya; Frolova, Elena I.

    2016-01-01

    The positive-strand RNA viruses initiate their amplification in the cell from a single genome delivered by virion. This single RNA molecule needs to become involved in replication process before it is recognized and degraded by cellular machinery. In this study, we show that distantly related New World and Old World alphaviruses have independently evolved to utilize different cellular stress granule-related proteins for assembly of complexes, which recruit viral genomic RNA and facilitate formation of viral replication complexes (vRCs). Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) utilizes all members of the Fragile X syndrome (FXR) family, while chikungunya and Sindbis viruses exploit both members of the G3BP family. Despite being in different families, these proteins share common characteristics, which determine their role in alphavirus replication, namely, the abilities for RNA-binding and for self-assembly into large structures. Both FXR and G3BP proteins interact with virus-specific, repeating amino acid sequences located in the C-termini of hypervariable, intrinsically disordered domains (HVDs) of viral nonstructural protein nsP3. We demonstrate that these host factors orchestrate assembly of vRCs and play key roles in RNA and virus replication. Only knockout of all of the homologs results in either pronounced or complete inhibition of replication of different alphaviruses. The use of multiple homologous proteins with redundant functions mediates highly efficient recruitment of viral RNA into the replication process. This independently evolved acquisition of different families of cellular proteins by the disordered protein fragment to support alphavirus replication suggests that other RNA viruses may utilize a similar mechanism of host factor recruitment for vRC assembly. The use of different host factors by alphavirus species may be one of the important determinants of their pathogenesis. PMID:27509095

  11. NS4A protein as a marker of HCV history suggests that different HCV genotypes originally evolved from genotype 1b

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asad Sultan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 9.6 kb long RNA genome of Hepatitis C virus (HCV is under the control of RNA dependent RNA polymerase, an error-prone enzyme, for its transcription and replication. A high rate of mutation has been found to be associated with RNA viruses like HCV. Based on genetic variability, HCV has been classified into 6 different major genotypes and 11 different subtypes. However this classification system does not provide significant information about the origin of the virus, primarily due to high mutation rate at nucleotide level. HCV genome codes for a single polyprotein of about 3011 amino acids which is processed into structural and non-structural proteins inside host cell by viral and cellular proteases. Results We have identified a conserved NS4A protein sequence for HCV genotype 3a reported from four different continents of the world i.e. Europe, America, Australia and Asia. We investigated 346 sequences and compared amino acid composition of NS4A protein of different HCV genotypes through Multiple Sequence Alignment and observed amino acid substitutions C22, V29, V30, V38, Q46 and Q47 in NS4A protein of genotype 1b. Furthermore, we observed C22 and V30 as more consistent members of NS4A protein of genotype 1a. Similarly Q46 and Q47 in genotype 5, V29, V30, Q46 and Q47 in genotype 4, C22, Q46 and Q47 in genotype 6, C22, V38, Q46 and Q47 in genotype 3 and C22 in genotype 2 as more consistent members of NS4A protein of these genotypes. So the different amino acids that were introduced as substitutions in NS4A protein of genotype 1 subtype 1b have been retained as consistent members of the NS4A protein of other known genotypes. Conclusion These observations indicate that NS4A protein of different HCV genotypes originally evolved from NS4A protein of genotype 1 subtype 1b, which in turn indicate that HCV genotype 1 subtype 1b established itself earlier in human population and all other known genotypes evolved later as a result of

  12. Change in ATP-binding cassette B1/19, glutamine synthetase and alcohol dehydrogenase gene expression during root elongation in Betula pendula Roth and Alnus glutinosa L. Gaertn in response to leachate and leonardite humic substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahiri, Abdelghani; Delporte, Fabienne; Muhovski, Yordan; Ongena, Marc; Thonart, Philippe; Druart, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Humic substances (HS) are complex and heterogeneous compounds of humified organic matter resulting from the chemical and microbiological decomposition of organic residues. HS have a positive effect on plant growth and development by improving soil structure and fertility. They have long been recognized as plant growth-promoting substances, particularly with regard to influencing nutrient uptake, root growth and architecture. The biochemical and molecular mechanisms through which HS influence plant physiology are not well understood. This study evaluated the bioactivity of landfill leachate and leonardite HS on alder (Alnus glutinosa L. Gaertn) and birch (Betula pendula Roth) during root elongation in vitro. Changes in root development were studied in relation to auxin, carbon and nitrogen metabolisms, as well as to the stress adaptive response. The cDNA fragments of putative genes encoding two ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters (ABCB1 and ABCB19) belonging to the B subfamily of plant ABC auxin transporters were cloned and sequenced. Molecular data indicate that HS and their humic acid (HA) fractions induce root growth by influencing polar auxin transport (PAT), as illustrated by the modulation of the ABCB transporter transcript levels (ABCB1 and ABCB19). There were also changes in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and glutamine synthetase (GS) gene transcript levels in response to HS exposure. These findings confirmed that humic matter affects plant growth and development through various metabolic pathways, including hormonal, carbon and nitrogen metabolisms and stress response or signalization.

  13. Change in ATP-binding cassette B1/19, glutamine synthetase and alcohol dehydrogenase gene expression during root elongation in Betula pendula Roth and Alnus glutinosa L. Gaertn in response to leachate and leonardite humic substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahiri, Abdelghani; Delporte, Fabienne; Muhovski, Yordan; Ongena, Marc; Thonart, Philippe; Druart, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Humic substances (HS) are complex and heterogeneous compounds of humified organic matter resulting from the chemical and microbiological decomposition of organic residues. HS have a positive effect on plant growth and development by improving soil structure and fertility. They have long been recognized as plant growth-promoting substances, particularly with regard to influencing nutrient uptake, root growth and architecture. The biochemical and molecular mechanisms through which HS influence plant physiology are not well understood. This study evaluated the bioactivity of landfill leachate and leonardite HS on alder (Alnus glutinosa L. Gaertn) and birch (Betula pendula Roth) during root elongation in vitro. Changes in root development were studied in relation to auxin, carbon and nitrogen metabolisms, as well as to the stress adaptive response. The cDNA fragments of putative genes encoding two ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters (ABCB1 and ABCB19) belonging to the B subfamily of plant ABC auxin transporters were cloned and sequenced. Molecular data indicate that HS and their humic acid (HA) fractions induce root growth by influencing polar auxin transport (PAT), as illustrated by the modulation of the ABCB transporter transcript levels (ABCB1 and ABCB19). There were also changes in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and glutamine synthetase (GS) gene transcript levels in response to HS exposure. These findings confirmed that humic matter affects plant growth and development through various metabolic pathways, including hormonal, carbon and nitrogen metabolisms and stress response or signalization. PMID:26595095

  14. Distorted octahedral coordination of tungstate in a subfamily of specific binding proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollenstein, K.; Comellas-Bigler, M.; Bevers, L.E.; Feiters, M.C.; Meyer-Klaucke, W.; Hagedoorn, P.-L.; Locher, K.P.

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria and archaea import molybdenum and tungsten from the environment in the form of the oxyanions molybdate (MoO4 2−) and tungstate (WO4 2−). These substrates are captured by an external, high-affinity binding protein, and delivered to ATP binding cassette transporters, which move them across th

  15. Novel mechanism of bacteriocin secretion and immunity carried out by lactococcal multidrug resistance proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gajic, O; Buist, G; Kojic, M; Topisirovic, L; Kuipers, OP; Kok, J

    2003-01-01

    A natural isolate of Lactococcus lactis was shown to produce two narrow spectrum class II bacteriocins, designated LsbA and LsbB. The cognate genes are located on a 5.6-kb plasmid within a gene cluster specifying LmrB, an ATP-binding cassette-type multidrug resistance transporter protein. LsbA is a

  16. Molecular characterization of cDNA encoding oxygen evolving enhancer protein 1 increased by salt treatment in the mangrove Bruguiera gymnorrhiza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugihara, K; Hanagata, N; Dubinsky, Z; Baba, S; Karube, I

    2000-11-01

    Young plants of the common Okinawa mangrove species Bruguiera gymnorrhiza were transferred from freshwater to a medium with seawater salt level (500 mM NaCl). Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed in the leaf extract of the plant a 33 kDa protein with pI 5.2, whose quantity increased as a result of NaCl treatment. The N-terminal amino acids sequence of this protein had a significant homology with mature region of oxygen evolving enhancer protein 1 (OEE1) precursor. The cloning of OEE1 precursor cDNA fragment was carried out by means of reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) using degenerated primers. Both 3'- and 5'-regions were isolated by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) method. The deduced amino acid sequence consisted of 322 amino acids and was 87% identical to that of Nicotiana tabacum. In B. gymnorrhiza, the predicted amino acid sequence of the mature protein starts at the residue number 85 of the open reading frame. The first 84-amino acid residues correspond to a typical transit sequence for the signal directing OEE1 to its appropriate compartment of chloroplast. The expression of OEE1 was analyzed together with other OEE subunits and D1 protein of photosystem II. The transcript levels of all the three OEEs were enhanced by NaCl treatment, but the significant increase of D1 protein was not observed. PMID:11092914

  17. Characterization of DalS, an ATP-binding cassette transporter for D-alanine, and its role in pathogenesis in Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Suzanne E; Tuinema, Brian R; Mok, Mac C Y; Lau, Pui Sai; Bui, Nhat Khai; Tomljenovic-Berube, Ana M; Vollmer, Waldemar; Zhang, Kun; Junop, Murray; Coombes, Brian K

    2012-05-01

    Expansion into new host niches requires bacterial pathogens to adapt to changes in nutrient availability and to evade an arsenal of host defenses. Horizontal acquisition of Salmonella Pathogenicity Island (SPI)-2 permitted the expansion of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium into the intracellular environment of host cells by allowing it to deliver bacterial effector proteins across the phagosome membrane. This is facilitated by the SsrA-SsrB two-component regulatory system and a type III secretion system encoded within SPI-2. SPI-2 acquisition was followed by evolution of existing regulatory DNA, creating an expanded SsrB regulon involved in intracellular fitness and host infection. Here, we identified an SsrB-regulated operon comprising an ABC transporter in Salmonella. Biochemical and structural studies determined that the periplasmic solute-binding component, STM1633/DalS, transports D-alanine and that DalS is required for intracellular survival of the bacteria and for fitness in an animal host. This work exemplifies the role of nutrient exchange at the host-pathogen interface as a critical determinant of disease outcome. PMID:22418438

  18. Spectrum of mutations in the ATP binding domain of ATP7B gene of Wilson Disease in a regional Indian cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guggilla, Sreenivasa Rao; Senagari, Jalandhar Reddy; Rao, P N; Madireddi, Sujatha

    2015-09-10

    Wilson disease is an autosomal recessive disorder of abnormal copper accumulation in the liver, brain, kidney and cornea, resulting in hepatic and neurological abnormalities, which results from impaired ATP7B protein function due to mutations in candidate ATP7B gene, till date more than 500 disease causing mutations were found. In India most disease causing mutations were identified in ATP-BD. DNA samples of the 101 WD cases and 100 control population were analyzed for mutations. 11 mutations were identified in 57 chromosomes. Three novel mutations, c.3310T>A (p.Cys1104Ser), c.3337C>A (p.Leu1113Met) on exon 15 and c.3877G>A (p.Glu1293Lys) on exon 18 were identified for the first time in the ATP7B gene. Two mutations, c.3121C>T (p.Arg1041Trp) and c.3128T>C (p.Leu1043Pro) on exon 14 were discovered for the first time in Indian Wilson disease patients. Four previously reported mutations c.3008C>T, c.3029A>G on exon 13, c.3182G>A on exon 14 and c.3809A>G on exon 18 from South India were also found in this study. Our research has enriched the spectrum of mutations of the ATP7B gene in the south Indian population. The detection of new mutations in the ATP7B gene can aid in genetic counseling and clinical or/prenatal diagnosis.

  19. Structural Basis for Recognizing Phosphoarginine and Evolving Residue-Specific Protein Phosphatases in Gram-Positive Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Fuhrmann

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Many cellular pathways are regulated by the competing activity of protein kinases and phosphatases. The recent identification of arginine phosphorylation as a protein modification in bacteria prompted us to analyze the molecular basis of targeting phospho-arginine. In this work, we characterize an annotated tyrosine phosphatase, YwlE, that counteracts the protein arginine kinase McsB. Strikingly, structural studies of YwlE reaction intermediates provide a direct view on a captured arginine residue. Together with biochemical data, the crystal structures depict the evolution of a highly specific phospho-arginine phosphatase, with the use of a size-and-polarity filter for distinguishing phosphorylated arginine from other phosphorylated side chains. To confirm the proposed mechanism, we performed bioinformatic searches for phosphatases, employing a similar selectivity filter, and identified a protein in Drosophila melanogaster exhibiting robust arginine phosphatase activity. In sum, our findings uncover the molecular framework for specific targeting of phospho-arginine and suggest that protein arginine (dephosphorylation may be relevant in eukaryotes.

  20. NMR studies of the MgATP binding site of adenylate kinase and of a 45-residue peptide fragment of the enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, D C; Kuby, S A; Mildvan, A S

    1985-08-13

    Proton NMR was used to study the interaction of beta,gamma-bidentate Cr3+ATP and MgATP with rabbit muscle adenylate kinase, which has 194 amino acids, and with a synthetic peptide consisting of residues 1-45 of the enzyme, which has previously been shown to bind MgepsilonATP [Hamada, M., Palmieri, R. H., Russell, G. A., & Kuby, S. A. (1979) Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 195, 155-177]. The peptide is globular and binds Cr3+ATP competitively with MgATP with a dissociation constant, KD(Cr3+ATP) = 35 microM, comparable to that of the complete enzyme [KI(Cr3+ATP) = 12 microM]. Time-dependent nuclear Overhauser effects (NOE's) were used to measure interproton distances on enzyme- and peptide-bound MgATP. The correlation time was measured directly for peptide-bound MgATP by studying the frequency dependence of the NOE's at 250 and 500 MHz. The H2' to H1' distance so obtained (3.07 A) was within the range established by X-ray and model-building studies of nucleotides (2.9 +/- 0.2 A). Interproton distances yielded conformations of enzyme- and peptide-bound MgATP with indistinguishable anti-glycosyl torsional angles (chi = 63 +/- 12 degrees) and 3'-endo/O1'-endo ribose puckers (sigma = 96 +/- 12 degrees). Enzyme- and peptide-bound MgATP molecules exhibited different C4'-C5' torsional angles (gamma) of 170 degrees and 50 degrees, respectively. Ten intermolecular NOE's from protons of the enzyme and four such NOE's from protons of the peptide to protons of bound MgATP were detected, which indicated proximity of the adenine ribose moiety to the same residues on both the enzyme and the peptide. Paramagnetic effects of beta,gamma-bidentate Cr3+ATP on the longitudinal relaxation rates of protons of the peptide provided a set of distances to the side chains of five residues, which allowed the location of the bound Cr3+ atom to be uniquely defined. Distances from enzyme-bound Cr3+ATP to the side chains of three residues of the protein agreed with those measured for the peptide. The mutual

  1. Conformational changes and ligand recognition of Escherichia coli D-xylose binding protein revealed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sooriyaarachchi, Sanjeewani; Ubhayasekera, Wimal; Park, Chankyu;

    2010-01-01

    ATP binding cassette transport systems account for most import of necessary nutrients in bacteria. The periplasmic binding component (or an equivalent membrane-anchored protein) is critical to recognizing cognate ligand and directing it to the appropriate membrane permease. Here we report the X-r...

  2. An evolved ribosome-inactivating protein targets and kills human melanoma cells in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Green David E

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few treatment options exist for patients with metastatic melanoma, resulting in poor prognosis. One standard treatment, dacarbazine (DTIC, shows low response rates ranging from 15 to 25 percent with an 8-month median survival time. The development of targeted therapeutics with novel mechanisms of action may improve patient outcome. Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs such as Shiga-like Toxin 1 (SLT-1 represent powerful scaffolds for developing selective anticancer agents. Here we report the discovery and properties of a single chain ribosome-inactivating protein (scRIP derived from the cytotoxic A subunit of SLT-1 (SLT-1A, harboring the 7-amino acid peptide insertion IYSNKLM (termed SLT-1AIYSNKLM allowing the toxin variant to selectively target and kill human melanoma cells. Results SLT-1AIYSNKLM was able to kill 7 of 8 human melanoma cell lines. This scRIP binds to 518-A2 human melanoma cells with a dissociation constant of 18 nM, resulting in the blockage of protein synthesis and apoptosis in such cells. Biodistribution and imaging studies of radiolabeled SLT-1AIYSNKLM administered intravenously into SCID mice bearing a human melanoma xenograft indicate that SLT-1AIYSNKLM readily accumulates at the tumor site as opposed to non-target tissues. Furthermore, the co-administration of SLT-1AIYSNKLM with DTIC resulted in tumor regression and greatly increased survival in this mouse xenograft model in comparison to DTIC or SLT-1AIYSNKLM treatment alone (115 day median survival versus 46 and 47 days respectively; P values IYSNKLM is stable in serum and its intravenous administration resulted in modest immune responses following repeated injections in CD1 mice. Conclusions These results demonstrate that the evolution of a scRIP template can lead to the discovery of novel cancer cell-targeted compounds and in the case of SLT-1AIYSNKLM can specifically kill human melanoma cells in vitro and in vivo.

  3. ATP-Binding Cassette Systems of Brucella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic C. Jenner

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Brucellosis is a prevalent zoonotic disease and is endemic in the Middle East, South America, and other areas of the world. In this study, complete inventories of putative functional ABC systems of five Brucella species have been compiled and compared. ABC systems of Brucella melitensis 16M, Brucella abortus 9-941, Brucella canis RM6/66, Brucella suis 1330, and Brucella ovis 63/290 were identified and aligned. High numbers of ABC systems, particularly nutrient importers, were found in all Brucella species. However, differences in the total numbers of ABC systems were identified (B. melitensis, 79; B. suis, 72; B. abortus 64; B. canis, 74; B. ovis, 59 as well as specific differences in the functional ABC systems of the Brucella species. Since B. ovis is not known to cause human brucellosis, functional ABC systems absent in the B. ovis genome may represent virulence factors in human brucellosis.

  4. A possible role of DNA methylation in functional divergence of a fast evolving duplicate gene encoding odorant binding protein 11 in the honeybee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharski, R; Maleszka, J; Maleszka, R

    2016-06-29

    Although gene duplication is seen as the main path to evolution of new functions, molecular mechanisms by which selection favours the gain versus loss of newly duplicated genes and minimizes the fixation of pseudo-genes are not well understood. Here, we investigate in detail a duplicate honeybee gene obp11 belonging to a fast evolving insect gene family encoding odorant binding proteins (OBPs). We report that obp11 is expressed only in female bees in rare antennal sensilla basiconica in contrast to its tandem partner obp10 that is expressed in the brain in both females and males (drones). Unlike all other obp genes in the honeybee, obp11 is methylated suggesting that functional diversification of obp11 and obp10 may have been driven by an epigenetic mechanism. We also show that increased methylation in drones near one donor splice site that correlates with higher abundance of a transcript variant encoding a truncated OBP11 protein is one way of controlling its contrasting expression. Our data suggest that like in mammals and plants, DNA methylation in insects may contribute to functional diversification of proteins produced from duplicated genes, in particular to their subfunctionalization by generating complementary patterns of expression. PMID:27358363

  5. Human breast cancer resistance protein : Interactions with steroid drugs, hormones, the dietary carcinogen 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo(4,5-b)pyridine, and transport of cimetidine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavek, P; Merino, G; Wagenaar, E; Bolscher, E; Novotna, M; Jonker, JW; Schinkel, AH

    2005-01-01

    The breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) is an ATP-binding cassette drug efflux transporter that extrudes xenotoxins from cells, mediating drug resistance and affecting the pharmacological behavior of many compounds. To study the interaction of human wild-type BCRP with steroid drugs, hormo

  6. Rapid evolution and gene expression: a rapidly evolving Mendelian trait that silences field crickets has widespread effects on mRNA and protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoal, S; Liu, X; Ly, T; Fang, Y; Rockliffe, N; Paterson, S; Shirran, S L; Botting, C H; Bailey, N W

    2016-06-01

    A major advance in modern evolutionary biology is the ability to start linking phenotypic evolution in the wild with genomic changes that underlie that evolution. We capitalized on a rapidly evolving Hawaiian population of crickets (Teleogryllus oceanicus) to test hypotheses about the genomic consequences of a recent Mendelian mutation of large effect which disrupts the development of sound-producing structures on male forewings. The resulting silent phenotype, flatwing, persists because of natural selection imposed by an acoustically orienting parasitoid, but it interferes with mate attraction. We examined gene expression differences in developing wing buds of wild-type and flatwing male crickets using RNA-seq and quantitative proteomics. Most differentially expressed (DE) transcripts were down-regulated in flatwing males (625 up vs. 1716 down), whereas up- and down-regulated proteins were equally represented (30 up and 34 down). Differences between morphs were clearly not restricted to a single pathway, and we recovered annotations associated with a broad array of functions that would not be predicted a priori. Using a candidate gene detection test based on homology, we identified 30% of putative Drosophila wing development genes in the cricket transcriptome, but only 10% were DE. In addition to wing-related annotations, endocrine pathways and several biological processes such as reproduction, immunity and locomotion were DE in the mutant crickets at both biological levels. Our results illuminate the breadth of genetic pathways that are potentially affected in the early stages of adaptation. PMID:26999731

  7. NasFED Proteins Mediate Assimilatory Nitrate and Nitrite Transport in Klebsiella oxytoca (pneumoniae) M5al

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Qitu; Stewart, Valley

    1998-01-01

    Klebsiella oxytoca can use nitrate and nitrite as sole nitrogen sources. The enzymes required for nitrate and nitrite assimilation are encoded by the nasFEDCBA operon. We report here the complete nasFED sequence. Sequence comparisons indicate that the nasFED genes encode components of a conventional periplasmic binding protein-dependent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein (NasF), a homodimeric intrinsic membrane protein (NasE), and a homodimeric ATP-binding cassette (...

  8. Evolvability of Software Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Nasir, Muhammad-Iftikhar; Iqbal, Rizwan

    2008-01-01

    Software evolvability, meeting the future requirements of the customer is one of the emerging challenges which software industry is facing nowadays. Software evolvability is the ability of software system to accommodate future requirements. Studies have shown that software evolvability has large economic benefits but at the same time it’s difficult to assess. Over the time many methods have been derived to assess the software evolvability. Software evolvability depends upon various characteri...

  9. Evolvable synthetic neural system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Steven A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An evolvable synthetic neural system includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to at least one neural basis function. Each neural basis function includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to a heuristic neural system to perform high-level functions and an autonomic neural system to perform low-level functions. In some embodiments, the evolvable synthetic neural system is operably coupled to one or more evolvable synthetic neural systems in a hierarchy.

  10. Heart ATP-Binding Cassette Protein A1 and G1, Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-α and Liver X Receptors Genes Expression in Response to Intensive Treadmill Running and Red Crataegus pentaegyna (Sorkh valik) in Male Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Abbass Ghanbari Niaki; Safieyh Ghanbari Abarghooi; Monireh Gholizadeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The heart has a very high energy demand and to sustain sufficient ATP generation, can use a variety of different carbon substrates as energy sources if available. Objectives: The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effect of a high intensity treadmill running training (8 weeks) with or without aqueous extraction of Crataegus pentaegyna (Sorkh valik) on heart ABCA1, ABCG1, PPARα and LXR genes expression. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 20 Wi...

  11. Conserved allosteric hot spots in the transmembrane domains of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channels and multidrug resistance protein (MRP) pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shipeng; Roessler, Bryan C; Chauvet, Sylvain; Guo, Jingyu; Hartman, John L; Kirk, Kevin L

    2014-07-18

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are an ancient family of transmembrane proteins that utilize ATPase activity to move substrates across cell membranes. The ABCC subfamily of the ABC transporters includes active drug exporters (the multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs)) and a unique ATP-gated ion channel (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)). The CFTR channel shares gating principles with conventional ligand-gated ion channels, but the allosteric network that couples ATP binding at its nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) with conformational changes in its transmembrane helices (TMs) is poorly defined. It is also unclear whether the mechanisms that govern CFTR gating are conserved with the thermodynamically distinct MRPs. Here we report a new class of gain of function (GOF) mutation of a conserved proline at the base of the pore-lining TM6. Multiple substitutions of this proline promoted ATP-free CFTR activity and activation by the weak agonist, 5'-adenylyl-β,γ-imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP). TM6 proline mutations exhibited additive GOF effects when combined with a previously reported GOF mutation located in an outer collar of TMs that surrounds the pore-lining TMs. Each TM substitution allosterically rescued the ATP sensitivity of CFTR gating when introduced into an NBD mutant with defective ATP binding. Both classes of GOF mutations also rescued defective drug export by a yeast MRP (Yor1p) with ATP binding defects in its NBDs. We conclude that the conserved TM6 proline helps set the energy barrier to both CFTR channel opening and MRP-mediated drug efflux and that CFTR channels and MRP pumps utilize similar allosteric mechanisms for coupling conformational changes in their translocation pathways to ATP binding at their NBDs.

  12. The evolvability of programmable hardware

    OpenAIRE

    Raman, K; Wagner, A

    2010-01-01

    In biological systems, individual phenotypes are typically adopted by multiple genotypes. Examples include protein structure phenotypes, where each structure can be adopted by a myriad individual amino acid sequence genotypes. These genotypes form vast connected 'neutral networks' in genotype space. The size of such neutral networks endows biological systems not only with robustness to genetic change, but also with the ability to evolve a vast number of novel phenotypes that occur near any on...

  13. 三磷酸腺苷结合盒转运体A1在巨噬细胞胆固醇流出中的作用%Effects of ATP binding cassette transporter A1 on cholesterol efflux in macrophages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐朝克; 严鹏科; 杨永宗

    2003-01-01

    Tangier disease is caused by mutations in ATP binding cassette transporter AI( ABCA1).ABCA1 interacts with lipid-free apolipoproteins, promoting phospholipid and cholesterol ettlux fzom cells and giving rise to HDL particles. ABCA1 may act as a phospholipid translocase facilitating phospholipid binding to apoA-Ⅰ. ABCA1 gene expression is upregulated in cholesterol-loaded cells as a result of activation of IXR/RXR- mediated gene transcription. LXR and RXR coordinately induce a battery of genes mediating cellular cholesterol efllux, centripetal cholesterol tramport, and cholesterol excretion in bile. Small- molecule activators of LXR/RXR or other stimulators of macrophage or intestinal cholesterol efl]ux hold great promise as future treat-ments for atherosclerosis.

  14. Das OEE-Protein 1 des Photosystem II (oxygen evolving enhancer) der Grünalge Scenedesmus obliquus besitzt Thioredoxin-Aktivität

    OpenAIRE

    Heide, Heinrich

    2002-01-01

    Die Aminosäure-Sequenzierung an dem als "28 kDa-Thioredoxin f" beschriebenen Protein aus der Grünalge Scenedesmus obliquus hat gezeigt, dass dieses Protein mit dem als OEE bekannten Protein 1 aus dem Photosystem II identisch ist. Die früher postulierte Möglichkeit einer Fusion eines Thioredoxins mit einem Protein unbekannter Natur oder Insertion eines Thioredoxinfragments mit der typischen -Trp-Cys-Gly-Pro-Cys-Sequenz in ein solches Protein hat sich nicht bestätigt. Durch Anwendung einer auf ...

  15. Tandutinib (MLN518) reverses multidrug resistance by inhibiting the efflux activity of the multidrug resistance protein 7 (ABCC10)

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Wen; Dai, Chun-ling; Chen, Jun-Jiang; KATHAWALA, RISHIL J.; SUN, YUE-LI; CHEN, HAI-FAN; Fu, Li-wu; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    It is well established that ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter-mediated multidrug resistance (MDR) is one of the major mechanisms that causes resistance to antineoplastic drugs in cancer cells. ABC transporters can significantly decrease the intracellular concentration of antineoplastic drugs by increasing their efflux, thereby lowering their cytotoxic activity. One of these transporters, the multidrug resistance protein 7 (MRP7/ABCC10), has already been shown to produce resistance to ant...

  16. The housekeeping dipeptide permease is the Escherichia coli heme transporter and functions with two optional peptide binding proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Létoffé, Sylvie; Delepelaire, Philippe; Wandersman, Cécile

    2006-01-01

    Heme, a major iron source, is transported through the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria by specific heme/hemoprotein receptors and through the inner membrane by heme-specific, periplasmic, binding protein-dependent, ATP-binding cassette permeases. Escherichia coli K12 does not use exogenous heme, and no heme uptake genes have been identified. Nevertheless, a recombinant E. coli strain expressing just one foreign heme outer membrane receptor can use exogenous heme as an iron source. Thi...

  17. Nucleotide sequence of psbQ gene for 16-kDa protein of oxygen-evolving complex from Arabidopsis thaliana and regulation of its expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, M; Gaur, T; Kochhar, A; Maheshwari, S C; Tyagi, A K

    1999-06-30

    The psbQ gene encoding a 16-kDa polypeptide of the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II has been isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana and characterized. The gene consists of a 28 nucleotide long leader sequence, two introns and three exons encoding a 223-amino-acid precursor polypeptide. The first 75 amino acids act as a transit peptide for the translocation of the polypeptide into the thylakoid lumen. Expression studies show that the gene is light-inducible and expresses only in green tissues with high steady-state mRNA levels in leaves. Using this gene as a probe, restriction fragment length polymorphism between two ecotypes, Columbia and Estland, has also been detected. PMID:10470848

  18. Ras GTPase-like protein MglA, a controller of bacterial social-motility in Myxobacteria, has evolved to control bacterial predation by Bdellovibrio.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S Milner

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus invade Gram-negative bacteria in a predatory process requiring Type IV pili (T4P at a single invasive pole, and also glide on surfaces to locate prey. Ras-like G-protein MglA, working with MglB and RomR in the deltaproteobacterium Myxococcus xanthus, regulates adventurous gliding and T4P-mediated social motility at both M. xanthus cell poles. Our bioinformatic analyses suggested that the GTPase activating protein (GAP-encoding gene mglB was lost in Bdellovibrio, but critical residues for MglA(Bd GTP-binding are conserved. Deletion of mglA(Bd abolished prey-invasion, but not gliding, and reduced T4P formation. MglA(Bd interacted with a previously uncharacterised tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR domain protein Bd2492, which we show localises at the single invasive pole and is required for predation. Bd2492 and RomR also interacted with cyclic-di-GMP-binding receptor CdgA, required for rapid prey-invasion. Bd2492, RomR(Bd and CdgA localize to the invasive pole and may facilitate MglA-docking. Bd2492 was encoded from an operon encoding a TamAB-like secretion system. The TamA protein and RomR were found, by gene deletion tests, to be essential for viability in both predatory and non-predatory modes. Control proteins, which regulate bipolar T4P-mediated social motility in swarming groups of deltaproteobacteria, have adapted in evolution to regulate the anti-social process of unipolar prey-invasion in the "lone-hunter" Bdellovibrio. Thus GTP-binding proteins and cyclic-di-GMP inputs combine at a regulatory hub, turning on prey-invasion and allowing invasion and killing of bacterial pathogens and consequent predatory growth of Bdellovibrio.

  19. Lipase and Protease Double-Deletion Mutant of Pseudomonas fluorescens Suitable for Extracellular Protein Production

    OpenAIRE

    Son, Myunghan; Moon, Yuseok; Oh, Mi Jin; Han, Sang Bin; Park, Ki Hyun; Kim, Jung-Gon; Ahn, Jung Hoon

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens, a widespread Gram-negative bacterium, is an ideal protein manufacturing factory (PMF) because of its safety, robust growth, and high protein production. P. fluorescens possesses a type I secretion system (T1SS), which mediates secretion of a thermostable lipase (TliA) and a protease (PrtA) through its ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter. Recombinant proteins in P. fluorescens are attached to the C-terminal signal region of TliA for transport as fusion proteins to t...

  20. The RecX protein interacts with the RecA protein and modulates its activity in Herbaspirillum seropedicae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.W. Galvão

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available DNA repair is crucial to the survival of all organisms. The bacterial RecA protein is a central component in the SOS response and in recombinational and SOS DNA repairs. The RecX protein has been characterized as a negative modulator of RecA activity in many bacteria. The recA and recX genes of Herbaspirillum seropedicae constitute a single operon, and evidence suggests that RecX participates in SOS repair. In the present study, we show that the H. seropedicae RecX protein (RecX Hs can interact with the H. seropedicaeRecA protein (RecA Hs and that RecA Hs possesses ATP binding, ATP hydrolyzing and DNA strand exchange activities. RecX Hs inhibited 90% of the RecA Hs DNA strand exchange activity even when present in a 50-fold lower molar concentration than RecA Hs. RecA Hs ATP binding was not affected by the addition of RecX, but the ATPase activity was reduced. When RecX Hs was present before the formation of RecA filaments (RecA-ssDNA, inhibition of ATPase activity was substantially reduced and excess ssDNA also partially suppressed this inhibition. The results suggest that the RecX Hs protein negatively modulates the RecA Hs activities by protein-protein interactions and also by DNA-protein interactions.

  1. The RecX protein interacts with the RecA protein and modulates its activity in Herbaspirillum seropedicae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galvão, C.W. [Departamento de Biologia Estrutural, Molecular e Genética, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Souza, E.M. [Departamento de Bioquímica e Biologia Molecular, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Etto, R.M. [Departamento de Biologia Estrutural, Molecular e Genética, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Pedrosa, F.O.; Chubatsu, L.S.; Yates, M.G. [Departamento de Bioquímica e Biologia Molecular, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Schumacher, J.; Buck, M. [Department of Life Sciences, Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Steffens, M.B.R. [Departamento de Bioquímica e Biologia Molecular, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2012-10-15

    DNA repair is crucial to the survival of all organisms. The bacterial RecA protein is a central component in the SOS response and in recombinational and SOS DNA repairs. The RecX protein has been characterized as a negative modulator of RecA activity in many bacteria. The recA and recX genes of Herbaspirillum seropedicae constitute a single operon, and evidence suggests that RecX participates in SOS repair. In the present study, we show that the H. seropedicae RecX protein (RecX{sub Hs}) can interact with the H. seropedicae RecA protein (RecA{sub Hs}) and that RecA{sub Hs} possesses ATP binding, ATP hydrolyzing and DNA strand exchange activities. RecX{sub Hs} inhibited 90% of the RecA{sub Hs} DNA strand exchange activity even when present in a 50-fold lower molar concentration than RecA{sub Hs}. RecA{sub Hs} ATP binding was not affected by the addition of RecX, but the ATPase activity was reduced. When RecX{sub Hs} was present before the formation of RecA filaments (RecA-ssDNA), inhibition of ATPase activity was substantially reduced and excess ssDNA also partially suppressed this inhibition. The results suggest that the RecX{sub Hs} protein negatively modulates the RecA{sub Hs} activities by protein-protein interactions and also by DNA-protein interactions.

  2. Evolutionarily evolved discriminators in the 3-TPR domain of the Toc64 family involved in protein translocation at the outer membrane of chloroplasts and mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirus, Oliver; Bionda, Tihana; von Haeseler, Arndt; Schleiff, Enrico

    2009-08-01

    Transport of polypeptides across membranes is a general and essential cellular process utilised by molecular machines. At least one component of these complexes contains a domain composed of three tetratricopeptide repeat (3-TPR) motifs. We have focussed on the receptor Toc64 to elucidate the evolved functional specifications of its 3-TPR domain. Toc64 is a component of the Toc core complex and functionally replaces Tom70 at the outer membrane of mitochondria in plants. Its 3-TPR domain recognises the conserved C-terminus of precursor-bound chaperones. We built homology models of the 3-TPR domain of chloroplastic Toc64 from different species and of the mitochondrial isoform from Arabidopsis. Guided by modelling, we identified residues essential for functional discrimination of the differently located isoforms to be located almost exclusively on the convex surface of the 3-TPR domain. The only exception is at568Ser/ps557Met, which is positioned in the ligand-binding groove. The functional implications of the homology models are discussed.

  3. Inhibiting NF-K B increases cholesterol efflux from THP-1 derived- foam cells treated with Angll via up-regulating the expression of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kun Liu; Yanfu Wang; Zhijian Chen; Yuhua Liao; Xiang Gao; Jian Chen

    2008-01-01

    Objective:To study the role of nuclear factor-kappa B(NF- K B) in cholesterol efflux from THP-I derived-foam cells treated with Angiotensin Ⅱ (Ang Ⅱ ). Methods:Cultured THP-l derived-foam cells were treated with Ang Ⅱ or preincubated with tosyl-phenylalan inechloromethyl-ketone(TPCK) NF-K B inhibitor. The levels of activated NF-K B in the cells were examined by sandwich ELISA. Cellular cholesterol content was studied by electron microscopy scanning and zymochemistry via fluorospectrophotometer and cholesterol efflux was detected by scintillation counting technique. ABCAI mRNA and protein were quantified by RT-PCR and Western blotting. Results:Addition of TPCK to the cells before Ang Ⅱ stimulation attenuated the response of NF- K B p65 nuclear translocation induced by Ang Ⅱ and showed no peak in foam cells group and caused a reduction in cholesterol content and an increase in cholesterol effiux by 24.1%(P < 0.05) and 41.1%(P < 0.05) respectively, when compared with Ang Ⅱ group. In accordance, the ABCAl mRNA and protein were increased by 30% and 19%(P< 0.05) respectively, when compared with Ang Ⅱ group. Conclusion:Ang Ⅱ can down- regulate ABCAI in THP-l derived-foam cells via NF- K B, which leads to less cholesterol effiux and the increase of cholesterol content with the consequence of the promotion of atherosclerosis.

  4. Human small cell lung cancer NYH cells selected for resistance to the bisdioxopiperazine topoisomerase II catalytic inhibitor ICRF-187 demonstrate a functional R162Q mutation in the Walker A consensus ATP binding domain of the alpha isoform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wessel, I; Jensen, L H; Jensen, P B;

    1999-01-01

    -AMSA), which act by stabilizing enzyme-DNA-drug complexes at a stage in which the DNA gate strand is cleaved and the protein is covalently attached to DNA. Human small cell lung cancer NYH cells selected for resistance to ICRF-187 (NYH/187) showed a 25% increase in topoisomerase IIalpha level and no change......Bisdioxopiperazine drugs such as ICRF-187 are catalytic inhibitors of DNA topoisomerase II, with at least two effects on the enzyme: namely, locking it in a closed-clamp form and inhibiting its ATPase activity. This is in contrast to topoisomerase II poisons as etoposide and amsacrine (m...... demonstrated that R162Q conferred resistance to the bisdioxopiperazines ICRF-187 and -193 but not to etoposide or m-AMSA. Both etoposide and m-AMSA induced more DNA cleavage with purified R162Q enzyme than with the wt. The R162Q enzyme has a 20-25% decreased catalytic capacity compared to the wt and was almost...

  5. EVOLVE 2014 International Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Tantar, Emilia; Sun, Jian-Qiao; Zhang, Wei; Ding, Qian; Schütze, Oliver; Emmerich, Michael; Legrand, Pierrick; Moral, Pierre; Coello, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    This volume encloses research articles that were presented at the EVOLVE 2014 International Conference in Beijing, China, July 1–4, 2014.The book gathers contributions that emerged from the conference tracks, ranging from probability to set oriented numerics and evolutionary computation; all complemented by the bridging purpose of the conference, e.g. Complex Networks and Landscape Analysis, or by the more application oriented perspective. The novelty of the volume, when considering the EVOLVE series, comes from targeting also the practitioner’s view. This is supported by the Machine Learning Applied to Networks and Practical Aspects of Evolutionary Algorithms tracks, providing surveys on new application areas, as in the networking area and useful insights in the development of evolutionary techniques, from a practitioner’s perspective. Complementary to these directions, the conference tracks supporting the volume, follow on the individual advancements of the subareas constituting the scope of the confe...

  6. Evolvable Neural Software System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Steven A.

    2009-01-01

    The Evolvable Neural Software System (ENSS) is composed of sets of Neural Basis Functions (NBFs), which can be totally autonomously created and removed according to the changing needs and requirements of the software system. The resulting structure is both hierarchical and self-similar in that a given set of NBFs may have a ruler NBF, which in turn communicates with other sets of NBFs. These sets of NBFs may function as nodes to a ruler node, which are also NBF constructs. In this manner, the synthetic neural system can exhibit the complexity, three-dimensional connectivity, and adaptability of biological neural systems. An added advantage of ENSS over a natural neural system is its ability to modify its core genetic code in response to environmental changes as reflected in needs and requirements. The neural system is fully adaptive and evolvable and is trainable before release. It continues to rewire itself while on the job. The NBF is a unique, bilevel intelligence neural system composed of a higher-level heuristic neural system (HNS) and a lower-level, autonomic neural system (ANS). Taken together, the HNS and the ANS give each NBF the complete capabilities of a biological neural system to match sensory inputs to actions. Another feature of the NBF is the Evolvable Neural Interface (ENI), which links the HNS and ANS. The ENI solves the interface problem between these two systems by actively adapting and evolving from a primitive initial state (a Neural Thread) to a complicated, operational ENI and successfully adapting to a training sequence of sensory input. This simulates the adaptation of a biological neural system in a developmental phase. Within the greater multi-NBF and multi-node ENSS, self-similar ENI s provide the basis for inter-NBF and inter-node connectivity.

  7. DnaK dependence of mutant ethanol oxidoreductases evolved for aerobic function and protective role of the chaperone against protein oxidative damage in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echave, Pedro; Esparza-Cerón, M. Angel; Cabiscol, Elisa; Tamarit, Jordi; Ros, Joaquim; Membrillo-Hernández, Jorge; Lin, E. C. C.

    2002-01-01

    The adhE gene of Escherichia coli encodes a multifunctional ethanol oxidoreductase (AdhE) that catalyzes successive reductions of acetyl-CoA to acetaldehyde and then to ethanol reversibly at the expense of NADH. Mutant JE52, serially selected for acquired and improved ability to grow aerobically on ethanol, synthesized an AdhEA267T/E568K with two amino acid substitutions that sequentially conferred improved catalytic properties and stability. Here we show that the aerobic growth ability on ethanol depends also on protection of the mutant AdhE against metal-catalyzed oxidation by the chaperone DnaK (a member of the Hsp70 family). No DnaK protection of the enzyme is evident during anaerobic growth on glucose. Synthesis of DnaK also protected E. coli from H2O2 killing under conditions when functional AdhE is not required. Our results therefore suggest that, in addition to the known role of protecting cells against heat stress, DnaK also protects numerous kinds of proteins from oxidative damage. PMID:11917132

  8. The surface protein Shr of Streptococcus pyogenes binds heme and transfers it to the streptococcal heme-binding protein Shp

    OpenAIRE

    Lei Benfang; Liu Mengyao; Zhu Hui

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The heme acquisition machinery in Streptococcus pyogenes is believed to consist of the surface proteins, Shr and Shp, and heme-specific ATP-binding cassette transporter HtsABC. Shp has been shown to rapidly transfer its heme to the lipoprotein component, HtsA, of HtsABC. The function of Shr and the heme source of Shp have not been established. Results The objective of this study was to determine whether Shr binds heme and is a heme source of Shp. To achieve the objective, ...

  9. Heme Transfer from Streptococcal Cell Surface Protein Shp to HtsA of Transporter HtsABC

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Mengyao; Lei, Benfang

    2005-01-01

    Human pathogen group A streptococcus (GAS) can take up heme from host heme-containing proteins as a source of iron. Little is known about the heme acquisition mechanism in GAS. We recently identified a streptococcal cell surface protein (designated Shp) and the lipoprotein component (designated HtsA) of an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter made by GAS as heme-binding proteins. In an effort to delineate the molecular mechanism involved in heme acquisition by GAS, heme-free Shp (apo-Shp) a...

  10. Dynamical Allosterism in the Mechanism of Action of DNA Mismatch Repair Protein MutS

    OpenAIRE

    Pieniazek, Susan N.; Hingorani, Manju M.; Beveridge, D.L.

    2011-01-01

    The multidomain protein Thermus aquaticus MutS and its prokaryotic and eukaryotic homologs recognize DNA replication errors and initiate mismatch repair. MutS actions are fueled by ATP binding and hydrolysis, which modulate its interactions with DNA and other proteins in the mismatch-repair pathway. The DNA binding and ATPase activities are allosterically coupled over a distance of ∼70 Å, and the molecular mechanism of coupling has not been clarified. To address this problem, all-atom molecul...

  11. On the origin of evolvable systems : evolvability or extinction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borches, P. Daniel; Bonnema, G. Maarten

    2008-01-01

    System evolvability is vital for the industry for the survival of complex systems. It is however difficult to achieve as this property is not well understood. Therefore there are no formal means of how to Design for Evolvability (DfE). Also there are no applicable ways of assessing evolvability, so

  12. Correlation between R219K polymorphism in the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 gene and ischemic stroke in young adults%ABCA1基因R219K多态性与青年缺血性脑卒中的相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘竞丽; 李劲频; 汪晓玲

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the correlation between the R219K polymorphism in the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) gene and arterial ischemic stroke in young adults. Methods The R219K polymorphism in the ABCA1 from 131 young patients with ischemic stroke and 135 age- and gender-matched controls was explored using polymerase chain reaction technique. The level of plasma lipids in the two groups was determined and carotid ultrasonography was employed to measure the carotid intima-media thickness (IMT). Results The frequency distributions of R219K genotype was significantly different between young patients and controls, and the patients held fewer KK genotypes than the the controls (P0.05); the level of HDL-C in the K allele carriers was significantly higher as compared with that in the non-K allele carriers (P0.05);而携带者HDL-C水平较非携带者增高,差异有统计学意义(P0.05),而携带者的颈动脉内膜、中膜厚度较非携带者明显减少,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05). 结论 ABCA1基因R219K多态性与青年缺血性脑卒中的遗传易感性相关,其中K等位基因可能对缺血性脑卒中有保护作用.推测其保护机制为通过升高血浆HDL-C水平起到减缓颈动脉内膜、中膜增厚,避免动脉粥样硬化的作用.

  13. Preferential binding of Escherichia coli RecF protein to gapped DNA in the presence of adenosine (gamma-thio) triphosphate.

    OpenAIRE

    Hegde, S P; Rajagopalan, M; Madiraju, M V

    1996-01-01

    Escherichia coli RecF protein binds, but does not hydrolyze, ATP. To determine the role that ATP binding to RecF plays in RecF protein-mediated DNA binding, we have determined the interaction between RecF protein and single-stranded (ss)DNA, double-stranded (ds)DNA, and dsDNA containing ssDNA regions (gapped [g]DNA) either alone or in various combinations both in the presence and in the absence of adenosine (gamma-thio) triphosphate, gamma-S-ATP, a nonhydrolyzable ATP analog. Protein-DNA comp...

  14. ATP binding to a multisubunit enzyme: statistical thermodynamics analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yunxin

    2012-01-01

    Due to inter-subunit communication, multisubunit enzymes usually hydrolyze ATP in a concerted fashion. However, so far the principle of this process remains poorly understood. In this study, from the viewpoint of statistical thermodynamics, a simple model is presented. In this model, we assume that the binding of ATP will change the potential of the corresponding enzyme subunit, and the degree of this change depends on the state of its adjacent subunits. The probability of enzyme in a given state satisfies the Boltzmann's distribution. Although it looks much simple, this model can fit the recent experimental data of chaperonin TRiC/CCT well. From this model, the dominant state of TRiC/CCT can be obtained. This study provided a new way to understand biophysical processes by statistical thermodynamics analysis.

  15. How the first biopolymers could have evolved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abkevich, V I; Gutin, A M; Shakhnovich, E I

    1996-01-01

    In this work, we discuss a possible origin of the first biopolymers with stable unique structures. We suggest that at the prebiotic stage of evolution, long organic polymers had to be compact to avoid hydrolysis and had to be soluble and thus must not be exceedingly hydrophobic. We present an algorithm that generates such sequences for model proteins. The evolved sequences turn out to have a stable unique structure, into which they quickly fold. This result illustrates the idea that the unique three-dimensional native structures of first biopolymers could have evolved as a side effect of nonspecific physicochemical factors acting at the prebiotic stage of evolution. PMID:8570645

  16. Evolving Procurement Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bals, Lydia; Laine, Jari; Mugurusi, Godfrey

    Procurement has to find further levers and advance its contribution to corporate goals continuously. This places pressure on its organization in order to facilitate its performance. Therefore, procurement organizations constantly have to evolve in order to match these demands. A conceptual model...... putting the structural elements in focus is derived from the analysis of two case companies, which extends the existing literature and opens new avenues for future research. The findings highlight the importance of taking a contingency perspective on procurement organization, understanding the internal...... in future studies in the fields of hybrid procurement organizations, global sourcing organizations as well as international procurement offices (IPOs). From a practical standpoint, an assessment of external and internal contingencies and their relation to specific structural dimensions that can be chosen...

  17. Evolving Procurement Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bals, Lydia; Laiho, Aki; Laine, Jari

    Procurement has to find further levers and advance its contribution to corporate goals continuously. This places pressure on its organization in order to facilitate its performance. Therefore, Procurement organizations constantly have to evolve in order to match these demands. A conceptual model...... is presented and results of a first case study discussed. The findings highlight the importance of taking a contingency perspective on Procurement organization, understanding the internal and internal contingency factors. From a theoretical perspective, it opens up insights that can be furthermore leveraged...... in future studies in the fields of hybrid procurement organizations, global sourcing organizations as well as international procurement offices (IPOs). From a practical standpoint, an assessment of external and internal contingencies provides the opportunity to consciously match organization to its...

  18. Rapidly Evolving Giant Dermatofibroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. J. Lang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermatofibroma, also known as “fibrous histiocytoma”, is a benign dermal or subcutaneous poorly circumscribed proliferation of spindle-shaped fibroblasts and macrophages in the dermis. Although it is commonly present as a brownish nodule the legs of females, it may also arise on the upper extremities, trunk, and rarely on the head. The exact pathogenesis is unclear. However, it is widely believed that the originating insult to the dermis is a folliculitis, an arthropod bite, or an unspecified initial inflammatory condition. Giant dermatofibromas of greater than 5 cm in diameter are rare, with only 22 cases reported in the literature. We present a case of a rapidly evolving pedunculated mass in the groin of a male patient. Histological examination confirmed this to be a giant dermatofibroma. Though this specimen cannot is not confirmed as such, the cellular subtype is sometimes present as a larger lesion with anecdotal reports of local recurrence and distant metastases. The clinical and radiological features which were somewhat suspicious of malignancy are considered in the context of the definitive pathological diagnosis of a benign lesion.

  19. UKAEA'S evolving contract philosophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) has gone through fundamental change over the last ten years. At the heart of this change has been UKAEA's relationship with the contracting and supply market. This paper describes the way in which UKAEA actively developed the market to support the decommissioning programme, and how the approach to contracting has evolved as external pressures and demands have changed. UKAEA's pro-active approach to industry has greatly assisted the development of a healthy, competitive market for services supporting decommissioning in the UK. There have been difficult changes and many challenges along the way, and some retrenchment was necessary to meet regulatory requirements. Nevertheless, UKAEA has sustained a high level of competition - now measured in terms of competed spend as a proportion of competable spend - with annual out-turns consistently over 80%. The prime responsibility for market development will pass to the new Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) in 2005, as the owner, on behalf of the Government, of the UK's civil nuclear liabilities. The preparatory work for the NDA indicates that the principles established by UKAEA will be carried forward. (author)

  20. Evolving paradigms in pharmacovigilance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewster, Wendy; Gibbs, Trevor; Lacroix, Karol; Murray, Alison; Tydeman, Michael; Almenoff, June

    2006-05-01

    All medicines have adverse effects as well as benefits. The aim of pharmacovigilance is to protect public health by monitoring medicines to identify and evaluate issues and ensure that the overall benefits outweigh the potential risks. The tools and processes used in pharmacovigilance are continually evolving. Increasingly sophisticated tools are being designed to evaluate safety data from clinical trials to enhance the likelihood of detecting safety signals ahead of product registration. Methods include integration of safety data throughout development, meta-analytical techniques, quantitative and qualitative methods for evaluation of adverse event data and graphical tools to explore laboratory and biometric data. Electronic data capture facilitates monitoring of ongoing studies so that it is possible to promptly identify potential issues and manage patient safety. In addition, GSK employs a number of proactive methods for post-marketing signal detection and knowledge management using state-of-the-art statistical and analytical tools. Using these tools, together with safety data collected through pharmacoepidemiologic studies, literature and spontaneous reporting, potential adverse drug reactions can be better identified in marketed products. In summary, the information outlined in this paper provides a valuable benchmark for risk management and pharmacovigilance in pharmaceutical development.

  1. Mdt(A), a New Efflux Protein Conferring Multiple Antibiotic Resistance in Lactococcus lactis and Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Perreten, Vincent; Schwarz, Franziska V.; Teuber, Michael; Levy, Stuart B.

    2001-01-01

    The mdt(A) gene, previously designated mef214, from Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis plasmid pK214 encodes a protein [Mdt(A) (multiple drug transporter)] with 12 putative transmembrane segments (TMS) that contain typical motifs conserved among the efflux proteins of the major facilitator superfamily. However, it also has two C-motifs (conserved in the fifth TMS of the antiporters) and a putative ATP-binding site. Expression of the cloned mdt(A) gene decreased susceptibility to macrolides, lin...

  2. Investigation of the flexibility of protein kinases implicated in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazanetz, Michael P; Laughton, Charles A; Fischer, Peter M

    2014-01-01

    The pathological characteristics of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) have been linked to the activity of three particular kinases--Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β (GSK3β), Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 5 (CDK5) and Extracellular-signal Regulated Kinase 2 (ERK2). As a consequence, the design of selective, potent and drug-like inhibitors of these kinases is of particular interest. Structure-based design methods are well-established in the development of kinase inhibitors. However, progress in this field is limited by the difficulty in obtaining X-ray crystal structures suitable for drug design and by the inability of this method to resolve highly flexible regions of the protein that are crucial for ligand binding. To address this issue, we have undertaken a study of human protein kinases CDK5/p25, CDK5, ERK2 and GSK3β using both conventional molecular dynamics (MD) and the new Active Site Pressurisation (ASP) methodology, to look for kinase-specific patterns of flexibility that could be leveraged for the design of selective inhibitors. ASP was used to examine the intrinsic flexibility of the ATP-binding pocket for CDK5/p25, CDK5 and GSK3β where it is shown to be capable of inducing significant conformational changes when compared with X-ray crystal structures. The results from these experiments were used to quantify the dynamics of each protein, which supported the observations made from the conventional MD simulations. Additional information was also derived from the ASP simulations, including the shape of the ATP-binding site and the rigidity of the ATP-binding pocket. These observations may be exploited in the design of selective inhibitors of GSK3β, CDK5 and ERK2. PMID:24983862

  3. Investigation of the Flexibility of Protein Kinases Implicated in the Pathology of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P. Mazanetz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The pathological characteristics of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD have been linked to the activity of three particular kinases—Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β (GSK3β, Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 5 (CDK5 and Extracellular-signal Regulated Kinase 2 (ERK2. As a consequence, the design of selective, potent and drug-like inhibitors of these kinases is of particular interest. Structure-based design methods are well-established in the development of kinase inhibitors. However, progress in this field is limited by the difficulty in obtaining X-ray crystal structures suitable for drug design and by the inability of this method to resolve highly flexible regions of the protein that are crucial for ligand binding. To address this issue, we have undertaken a study of human protein kinases CDK5/p25, CDK5, ERK2 and GSK3β using both conventional molecular dynamics (MD and the new Active Site Pressurisation (ASP methodology, to look for kinase-specific patterns of flexibility that could be leveraged for the design of selective inhibitors. ASP was used to examine the intrinsic flexibility of the ATP-binding pocket for CDK5/p25, CDK5 and GSK3β where it is shown to be capable of inducing significant conformational changes when compared with X-ray crystal structures. The results from these experiments were used to quantify the dynamics of each protein, which supported the observations made from the conventional MD simulations. Additional information was also derived from the ASP simulations, including the shape of the ATP-binding site and the rigidity of the ATP-binding pocket. These observations may be exploited in the design of selective inhibitors of GSK3β, CDK5 and ERK2.

  4. Origins of Protein Functions in Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seelig, Burchard; Pohorille, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    In modern organisms proteins perform a majority of cellular functions, such as chemical catalysis, energy transduction and transport of material across cell walls. Although great strides have been made towards understanding protein evolution, a meaningful extrapolation from contemporary proteins to their earliest ancestors is virtually impossible. In an alternative approach, the origin of water-soluble proteins was probed through the synthesis and in vitro evolution of very large libraries of random amino acid sequences. In combination with computer modeling and simulations, these experiments allow us to address a number of fundamental questions about the origins of proteins. Can functionality emerge from random sequences of proteins? How did the initial repertoire of functional proteins diversify to facilitate new functions? Did this diversification proceed primarily through drawing novel functionalities from random sequences or through evolution of already existing proto-enzymes? Did protein evolution start from a pool of proteins defined by a frozen accident and other collections of proteins could start a different evolutionary pathway? Although we do not have definitive answers to these questions yet, important clues have been uncovered. In one example (Keefe and Szostak, 2001), novel ATP binding proteins were identified that appear to be unrelated in both sequence and structure to any known ATP binding proteins. One of these proteins was subsequently redesigned computationally to bind GTP through introducing several mutations that introduce targeted structural changes to the protein, improve its binding to guanine and prevent water from accessing the active center. This study facilitates further investigations of individual evolutionary steps that lead to a change of function in primordial proteins. In a second study (Seelig and Szostak, 2007), novel enzymes were generated that can join two pieces of RNA in a reaction for which no natural enzymes are known

  5. Modulation of breast cancer resistance protein mediated atypical multidrug resistance using RNA interference delivered by adenovirus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wen-tong; ZHOU Geng-yin; WANG Chun-ling; GUO Cheng-hao; SONG Xian-rang; CHI Wei-ling

    2005-01-01

    @@ Clinical multidrug resistance (MDR) of malignancies to many antineoplastic agents is the major obstacle in the successful treatment of cancer. The emergence of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), a member of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding cassette (ABC) transporter family, has necessitated the development of antagonists. To overcome the BCRP-mediated atypical MDR, RNA interference (RNAi) delivered by adenovirus targeting BCRP mRNA was used to inhibit the atypical MDR expression by infecting MCF-7/MX100 cell lines with constructed RNAi adenovirus.

  6. Natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graves, C.J.; Ros, V.I.D.; Stevenson, B.; Sniegowski, P.D.; Brisson, D.

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that evolvability - the capacity to evolve by natural selection - is itself the object of natural selection is highly intriguing but remains controversial due in large part to a paucity of direct experimental evidence. The antigenic variation mechanisms of microbial pathogens provide

  7. Mechanisms of DNA Motor Proteins (Helicases)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohman, Timothy M.

    1996-03-01

    DNA helicases are ubiquitous motor proteins that couple the binding and hydrolysis of NTP to the unwinding of duplex (ds) DNA to form the single stranded (ss) DNA intermediates that are required for replication, recombination and repair. We are studying the DNA unwinding mechanisms catalyzed by two helicases from E. coli: Rep and Helicase II (UvrD) by examining the linkage of DNA binding, protein dimerization and nucleotide binding using both thermodynamic and kinetic approaches. A dimer of the Rep protein is the active form of the helicase; however, the dimer forms only upon binding either ss or ds DNA. There are significant cooperative interactions between the two DNA binding sites on the dimer and nucleotides (ATP, ADP) allosterically control the stabilities of the DNA ligation states of the Rep dimer. Based on these studies we have proposed an "active, rolling" mechanism for the Rep dimer unwinding of duplex DNA. An essential intermediate is a complex, in which ss- and ds-DNA bind simultaneously to each subunit of a Rep dimer. This model predicts that Rep helicase translocation along DNA is coupled to ATP binding, whereas ATP hydrolysis drives unwinding of multiple DNA base pairs for each catalytic event. Rapid chemical quench-flow and stopped-flow fluorescence studies of Rep and UvrD- catalyzed DNA unwinding of a series of non-natural DNA substrates support the "active, rolling" mechanism and rule out a strictly "passive" mechanism of unwinding. Kinetic studies of DNA and nucleotide binding and ATP hydrolysis by wild type and mutant Rep proteins will be discussed that bear on the coupling of ATP binding and hydrolysis to translocation along DNA and DNA unwinding.

  8. Regulatory crosstalk by protein kinases on CFTR trafficking and activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farinha, Carlos Miguel; Swiatecka-Urban, Agnieszka; Brautigan, David; Jordan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that functions as a cAMP-activated chloride ion channel in fluid-transporting epithelia. There is abundant evidence that CFTR activity (i.e. channel opening and closing) is regulated by protein kinases and phosphatases via phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Here, we review recent evidence for the role of protein kinases in regulation of CFTR delivery to and retention in the plasma membrane. We review this information in a broader context of regulation of other transporters by protein kinases because the overall functional output of transporters involves the integrated control of both their number at the plasma membrane and their specific activity. While many details of the regulation of intracellular distribution of CFTR and other transporters remain to be elucidated, we hope that this review will motivate research providing new insights into how protein kinases control membrane transport to impact health and disease.

  9. Marshal: Maintaining Evolving Models Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SIFT proposes to design and develop the Marshal system, a mixed-initiative tool for maintaining task models over the course of evolving missions. Marshal-enabled...

  10. 中国人内源性高甘油三酯血症患者ATP结合盒转运子A1基因R219K多态性研究%Analysis of ATP binding cassette A1 gene R219K polymorphism in patients with endogenous hypertriglyceridemia in Chinese population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴银; 白怀; 刘瑞; 刘宇; 刘秉文

    2007-01-01

    目的 研究ATP结合盒转运子A1(ATP binding cassette A1, ABCA1)基因R219K多态性是否与中国人内源性高甘油三酯血症(hypertriglyceridemia, HTG)有关联,为探讨本病的分子遗传基础提供依据.方法 应用聚合酶链反应-限制性片段长度多态性分析法,对成都地区309名汉族人(200名正常人和109例内源性高甘油三酯血症患者)ABCA1基因R219K多态性位点进行分析.结果 中国人ABCA1基因R219K多态位点K等位基因频率在对照组和HTG组分别为0.472与0.436; HTG组和对照组R219K位点之间基因型和等位基因的频率差异无统计学意义.对照组和HTG组KK基因型携带者血清高密度脂蛋白胆固醇(high density lipoprotein-cholesterol, HDL-C)水平均较相应组RR基因型携带者显著升高[(1.48±0.45) mmol/L vs (1.27±0.29) mmol/L, P<0.05;(1.07±0.30) mmol/L vs (0.87±0.19) mmol/L, P<0.05];对照组RK型携带者血清甘油三酯水平较RR型携带者显著降低[(1.22±0.37) mmol/L vs (1.41±0.84) mmol/L, P<0.05],HTG组血清甘油三酯在RR、RK、KK型之间有逐渐降低的趋势[(3.82±2.02) mmol/L vs (3.42±1.67) mmol/L vs (3.33±1.43) mmol/L, P>0.05]; HTG组K等位基因携带者(RK或KK型者)总胆固醇(total cholesterol, TC)/HDL-C比值均较RR型携带者显著降低(KK vs RK vs RR:4.82±1.28 vs 5.42±1.62 vs 6.33±1.70, P<0.05).结论 ABCA1基因R219K多态性不仅与中国成都地区正常汉族人血清HDL-C、甘油三酯含量有关,而且还与内源性高甘油三酯血症患者血清HDL-C水平、TC/HDL-C比值相关联.

  11. Characterization of a novel domain ‘GATE’ in the ABC protein DrrA and its role in drug efflux by the DrrAB complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Han; Rahman, Sadia; Li, Wen; Fu, Guoxing; Kaur, Parjit, E-mail: pkaur@gsu.edu

    2015-03-27

    A novel domain, GATE (Glycine-loop And Transducer Element), is identified in the ABC protein DrrA. This domain shows sequence and structural conservation among close homologs of DrrA as well as distantly-related ABC proteins. Among the highly conserved residues in this domain are three glycines, G215, G221 and G231, of which G215 was found to be critical for stable expression of the DrrAB complex. Other conserved residues, including E201, G221, K227 and G231, were found to be critical for the catalytic and transport functions of the DrrAB transporter. Structural analysis of both the previously published crystal structure of the DrrA homolog MalK and the modeled structure of DrrA showed that G215 makes close contacts with residues in and around the Walker A motif, suggesting that these interactions may be critical for maintaining the integrity of the ATP binding pocket as well as the complex. It is also shown that G215A or K227R mutation diminishes some of the atomic interactions essential for ATP catalysis and overall transport function. Therefore, based on both the biochemical and structural analyses, it is proposed that the GATE domain, located outside of the previously identified ATP binding and hydrolysis motifs, is an additional element involved in ATP catalysis. - Highlights: • A novel domain ‘GATE’ is identified in the ABC protein DrrA. • GATE shows high sequence and structural conservation among diverse ABC proteins. • GATE is located outside of the previously studied ATP binding and hydrolysis motifs. • Conserved GATE residues are critical for stability of DrrAB and for ATP catalysis.

  12. On helicases and other motor proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enemark, Eric J; Joshua-Tor, Leemor

    2008-04-01

    Helicases are molecular machines that utilize energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to move along nucleic acids and to separate base-paired nucleotides. The movement of the helicase can also be described as a stationary helicase that pumps nucleic acid. Recent structural data for the hexameric E1 helicase of papillomavirus in complex with single-stranded DNA and MgADP has provided a detailed atomic and mechanistic picture of its ATP-driven DNA translocation. The structural and mechanistic features of this helicase are compared with the hexameric helicase prototypes T7gp4 and SV40 T-antigen. The ATP-binding site architectures of these proteins are structurally similar to the sites of other prototypical ATP-driven motors such as F1-ATPase, suggesting related roles for the individual site residues in the ATPase activity. PMID:18329872

  13. Theoretical model of the three-dimensional structure of a disease resistance gene homolog encoding resistance protein in Vigna mungo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Jolly; Bahadur, Ranjit P

    2006-10-01

    Plant disease resistance (R) genes, the key players of innate immunity system in plants encode 'R' proteins. 'R' protein recognizes product of avirulance gene from the pathogen and activate downstream signaling responses leading to disease resistance. No three dimensional (3D) structural information of any 'R' proteins is available as yet. We have reported a 'R' gene homolog, the 'VMYR1', encoding 'R' protein in Vigna mungo. Here, we describe the homology modeling of the 'VMYR1' protein. The model was created by using the 3D structure of an ATP-binding cassette transporter protein from Vibrio cholerae as a template. The strategy for homology modeling was based on the high structural conservation in the superfamily of P-loop containing nucleoside triphosphate hydrolase in which target and template proteins belong. This is the first report of theoretical model structure of any 'R' proteins.

  14. Robustness to Faults Promotes Evolvability: Insights from Evolving Digital Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolfi, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate how the need to cope with operational faults enables evolving circuits to find more fit solutions. The analysis of the results obtained in different experimental conditions indicates that, in absence of faults, evolution tends to select circuits that are small and have low phenotypic variability and evolvability. The need to face operation faults, instead, drives evolution toward the selection of larger circuits that are truly robust with respect to genetic variations and that have a greater level of phenotypic variability and evolvability. Overall our results indicate that the need to cope with operation faults leads to the selection of circuits that have a greater probability to generate better circuits as a result of genetic variation with respect to a control condition in which circuits are not subjected to faults. PMID:27409589

  15. A neighbourhood evolving network model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many social, technological, biological and economical systems are best described by evolved network models. In this short Letter, we propose and study a new evolving network model. The model is based on the new concept of neighbourhood connectivity, which exists in many physical complex networks. The statistical properties and dynamics of the proposed model is analytically studied and compared with those of Barabasi-Albert scale-free model. Numerical simulations indicate that this network model yields a transition between power-law and exponential scaling, while the Barabasi-Albert scale-free model is only one of its special (limiting) cases. Particularly, this model can be used to enhance the evolving mechanism of complex networks in the real world, such as some social networks development

  16. Cardiac myosin binding protein C phosphorylation affects cross-bridge cycle's elementary steps in a site-specific manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    Full Text Available Based on our recent finding that cardiac myosin binding protein C (cMyBP-C phosphorylation affects muscle contractility in a site-specific manner, we further studied the force per cross-bridge and the kinetic constants of the elementary steps in the six-state cross-bridge model in cMyBP-C mutated transgenic mice for better understanding of the influence of cMyBP-C phosphorylation on contractile functions. Papillary muscle fibres were dissected from cMyBP-C mutated mice of ADA (Ala273-Asp282-Ala302, DAD (Asp273-Ala282-Asp302, SAS (Ser273-Ala282-Ser302, and t/t (cMyBP-C null genotypes, and the results were compared to transgenic mice expressing wide-type (WT cMyBP-C. Sinusoidal analyses were performed with serial concentrations of ATP, phosphate (Pi, and ADP. Both t/t and DAD mutants significantly reduced active tension, force per cross-bridge, apparent rate constant (2πc, and the rate constant of cross-bridge detachment. In contrast to the weakened ATP binding and enhanced Pi and ADP release steps in t/t mice, DAD mice showed a decreased ADP release without affecting the ATP binding and the Pi release. ADA showed decreased ADP release, and slightly increased ATP binding and cross-bridge detachment steps, whereas SAS diminished the ATP binding step and accelerated the ADP release step. t/t has the broadest effects with changes in most elementary steps of the cross-bridge cycle, DAD mimics t/t to a large extent, and ADA and SAS predominantly affect the nucleotide binding steps. We conclude that the reduced tension production in DAD and t/t is the result of reduced force per cross-bridge, instead of the less number of strongly attached cross-bridges. We further conclude that cMyBP-C is an allosteric activator of myosin to increase cross-bridge force, and its phosphorylation status modulates the force, which is regulated by variety of protein kinases.

  17. Discovery of pyrido[3,4-g]quinazoline derivatives as CMGC family protein kinase inhibitors: Design, synthesis, inhibitory potency and X-ray co-crystal structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esvan, Yannick J; Zeinyeh, Wael; Boibessot, Thibaut; Nauton, Lionel; Théry, Vincent; Knapp, Stefan; Chaikuad, Apirat; Loaëc, Nadège; Meijer, Laurent; Anizon, Fabrice; Giraud, Francis; Moreau, Pascale

    2016-08-01

    The design and synthesis of new pyrido[3,4-g]quinazoline derivatives is described as well as their protein kinase inhibitory potencies toward five CMGC family members (CDK5, CK1, GSK3, CLK1 and DYRK1A). The interest for this original tricyclic heteroaromatic scaffold as modulators of CLK1/DYRK1A activity was validated by nanomolar potencies (compounds 12 and 13). CLK1 co-crystal structures with two inhibitors revealed the binding mode of these compounds within the ATP-binding pocket. PMID:27128181

  18. Evolving Objects for Software Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper is concerned with evolving objects method for softwaredesign that can adapt to the changing environments and requirements automatically. We presen t system architecture with objects library, where there are objects based on dom ain ontologies. We define some genetic operators for objects, and discuss how to apply these genetic operators on objects to get new objects, which can satisfy new requirements.

  19. canEvolve: a web portal for integrative oncogenomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Kemal Samur

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE: Genome-wide profiles of tumors obtained using functional genomics platforms are being deposited to the public repositories at an astronomical scale, as a result of focused efforts by individual laboratories and large projects such as the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA and the International Cancer Genome Consortium. Consequently, there is an urgent need for reliable tools that integrate and interpret these data in light of current knowledge and disseminate results to biomedical researchers in a user-friendly manner. We have built the canEvolve web portal to meet this need. RESULTS: canEvolve query functionalities are designed to fulfill most frequent analysis needs of cancer researchers with a view to generate novel hypotheses. canEvolve stores gene, microRNA (miRNA and protein expression profiles, copy number alterations for multiple cancer types, and protein-protein interaction information. canEvolve allows querying of results of primary analysis, integrative analysis and network analysis of oncogenomics data. The querying for primary analysis includes differential gene and miRNA expression as well as changes in gene copy number measured with SNP microarrays. canEvolve provides results of integrative analysis of gene expression profiles with copy number alterations and with miRNA profiles as well as generalized integrative analysis using gene set enrichment analysis. The network analysis capability includes storage and visualization of gene co-expression, inferred gene regulatory networks and protein-protein interaction information. Finally, canEvolve provides correlations between gene expression and clinical outcomes in terms of univariate survival analysis. CONCLUSION: At present canEvolve provides different types of information extracted from 90 cancer genomics studies comprising of more than 10,000 patients. The presence of multiple data types, novel integrative analysis for identifying regulators of oncogenesis, network

  20. Stability of Evolving Agent Populations

    CERN Document Server

    Briscoe, G

    2007-01-01

    Stability is perhaps the most desired feature in the systems that we design. It is important for us to be able to predict the response of a Multi-Agent System (MAS) to various environmental conditions prior to its actual deployment. The Chli-DeWilde agent stability measure views a MAS as a discrete time Markov chain with a potentially unknown transition probabilities. A MAS is considered to be stable when its state, a stochastic process, has converged to an equilibrium distribution. We investigate an extension of their agent stability definition to include MASs with evolutionary dynamics, focusing on evolving agent populations. Additionally, using our extended agent stability measure, we construct an entropy-based definition for the degree of instability. An example system, the Digital Ecosystem, is considered in detail to investigate the stability of an evolving agent population through simulations. The results are consistent with the original Chli-DeWilde measure.

  1. Increased longevity evolves from grandmothering

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Peter S.; Coxworth, James E.; Hawkes, Kristen

    2012-01-01

    Postmenopausal longevity may have evolved in our lineage when ancestral grandmothers subsidized their daughters' fertility by provisioning grandchildren, but the verbal hypothesis has lacked mathematical support until now. Here, we present a formal simulation in which life spans similar to those of modern chimpanzees lengthen into the modern human range as a consequence of grandmother effects. Greater longevity raises the chance of living through the fertile years but is opposed by costs that...

  2. Mandelbrot Law of Evolving Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Xue-Zao; YANG Zi-Mo; WANG Bing-Hong; ZHOU Tao

    2012-01-01

    We show that the degree distribution of a growing network with linear preferential attachment approximately follows the Mandelbrot law,and propose an analytical method based on a recursive formula that can be used to obtain a more accurate expression of the shifting coefficient.Simulations demonstrate the advantages of our method. This work provides a possible mechanism leading to the Mandelbrot law of evolving networks,and refines the mainstream analytical methods for the shifting coefficient.

  3. A Calculus of Evolving Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dezani-Ciancaglini

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The demands of developing modern, highly dynamic applications have led to an increasing interest in dynamic programming languages and mechanisms. Not only must applications evolve over time, but the object models themselves may need to be adapted to the requirements of different run-time contexts. Class-based models and prototype-based models, for example, may need to co-exist to meet the demands of dynamically evolving applications. Multi-dimensional dispatch, fine-grained and dynamic software composition, and run-time evolution of behaviour are further examples of diverse mechanisms which may need to co-exist in a dynamically evolving run-time environment. How can we model the semantics of these highly dynamic features, yet still offer some reasonable safety guarantees?To this end we present an original calculus in which objects can adapt their behaviour at run-time. Both objects and environments are represented by first-class mappings between variables and values. Message sends are dynamically resolved to method calls. Variables may be dynamically bound, making it possible to model a variety of dynamic mechanisms within the same calculus. Despite the highly dynamic nature of the calculus, safety properties are assured by a type assignment system.

  4. Synchronization in an evolving network

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, R K

    2015-01-01

    In this work we study the dynamics of Kuramoto oscillators on a stochastically evolving network whose evolution is governed by the phases of the individual oscillators and degree distribution. Synchronization is achieved after a threshold connection density is reached. This cumulative effect of topology and dynamics has many real-world implications, where synchronization in a system emerges as a collective property of its components in a self-organizing manner. The synchronous state remains stable as long as the connection density remains above the threshold value, with additional links providing resilience against network fluctuations.

  5. Specificity and function of Archaeal DNA replication initiator proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, Rachel Y.; Xu, Yanqun; Gadelha, Catarina;

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomes with multiple DNA replication origins are a hallmark of Eukaryotes and some Archaea. All eukaryal nuclear replication origins are defined by the origin recognition complex (ORC) that recruits the replicative helicase MCM(2-7) via Cdc6 and Cdt1. We find that the three origins in the...... investigate the role of ATP binding and hydrolysis in initiator function in vivo and in vitro. We find that the ATP-bound form of Orc1-1 is proficient for replication and implicates hydrolysis of ATP in downregulation of origin activity. Finally, we reveal that ATP and DNA binding by Orc1-1 remodels the...... protein's structure rather than that of the DNA template....

  6. Evolving models for peroxisome biogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hettema, Ewald H; Erdmann, Ralf; van der Klei, Ida; Veenhuis, Marten

    2014-01-01

    Significant progress has been made towards our understanding of the mechanism of peroxisome formation, in particular concerning sorting of peroxisomal membrane proteins, matrix protein import and organelle multiplication. Here we evaluate the progress made in recent years. We focus mainly on progres

  7. Small-angle X-ray scattering analysis reveals the ATP-bound monomeric state of the ATPase domain from the homodimeric MutL endonuclease, a GHKL phosphotransferase superfamily protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iino, Hitoshi; Hikima, Takaaki; Nishida, Yuya; Yamamoto, Masaki; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Fukui, Kenji

    2015-05-01

    DNA mismatch repair is an excision system that removes mismatched bases chiefly generated by replication errors. In this system, MutL endonucleases direct the excision reaction to the error-containing strand of the duplex by specifically incising the newly synthesized strand. Both bacterial homodimeric and eukaryotic heterodimeric MutL proteins belong to the GHKL ATPase/kinase superfamily that comprises the N-terminal ATPase and C-terminal dimerization regions. Generally, the GHKL proteins show large ATPase cycle-dependent conformational changes, including dimerization-coupled ATP binding of the N-terminal domain. Interestingly, the ATPase domain of human PMS2, a subunit of the MutL heterodimer, binds ATP without dimerization. The monomeric ATP-bound state of the domain has been thought to be characteristic of heterodimeric GHKL proteins. In this study, we characterized the ATP-bound state of the ATPase domain from the Aquifex aeolicus MutL endonuclease, which is a homodimeric GHKL protein unlike the eukaryotic MutL. Gel filtration, dynamic light scattering, and small-angle X-ray scattering analyses clearly showed that the domain binds ATP in a monomeric form despite its homodimeric nature. This indicates that the uncoupling of dimerization and ATP binding is a common feature among bacterial and eukaryotic MutL endonucleases, which we suggest is closely related to the molecular mechanisms underlying mismatch repair. PMID:25809295

  8. Peripartum hysterectomy: an evolving picture.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Turner, Michael J

    2012-02-01

    Peripartum hysterectomy (PH) is one of the obstetric catastrophes. Evidence is emerging that the role of PH in modern obstetrics is evolving. Improving management of postpartum hemorrhage and newer surgical techniques should decrease PH for uterine atony. Rising levels of repeat elective cesarean deliveries should decrease PH following uterine scar rupture in labor. Increasing cesarean rates, however, have led to an increase in the number of PHs for morbidly adherent placenta. In the case of uterine atony or rupture where PH is required, a subtotal PH is often sufficient. In the case of pathological placental localization involving the cervix, however, a total hysterectomy is required. Furthermore, the involvement of other pelvic structures may prospectively make the diagnosis difficult and the surgery challenging. If resources permit, PH for pathological placental localization merits a multidisciplinary approach. Despite advances in clinical practice, it is likely that peripartum hysterectomy will be more challenging for obstetricians in the future.

  9. Planets in evolved binary systems

    CERN Document Server

    Perets, Hagai B

    2010-01-01

    Exoplanets are typically thought to form in protoplanetary disks left over from protostellar disk of their newly formed host star. However, additional planetary formation and evolution routes may exist in old evolved binary systems. Here we discuss the implications of binary stellar evolution on planetary systems. In these binary systems stellar evolution could lead to the formation of symbiotic stars, where mass is lost from one star and could be transferred to its binary companion, and may form an accretion disk around it. This raises the possibility that such a disk could provide the necessary environment for the formation of a new, second generation of planets in both circumstellar or circumbinary configurations. Pre-existing first generation planets surviving the post-MS evolution of such systems would be dynamically effected by the mass loss in the systems and may also interact with the newly formed disk. Second generation planetary systems should be typically found in white dwarf binary systems, and ma...

  10. A NusG paralogue from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Rv0639, has evolved to interact with ribosomal protein S10 (Rv0700) but not to function as a transcription elongation-termination factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyani, B Sudha; Kunamneni, Radhika; Wal, Megha; Ranjan, Amitabh; Sen, Ranjan

    2015-01-01

    NusG, a well-conserved protein in all the three forms of life, is involved in transcription elongation and termination, as well as in the process of transcription-translation coupling. The existence of species-specific functional, as well as conformational, divergences in NusG makes it an attractive transcription factor to study, especially if it originates from a pathogen. Here, we report functional and conformational characterizations of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) protein Rv0639 that has been annotated as a homologue of Escherichia coli NusG. Rv0639 failed to complement the in vivo functions of E. coli NusG (Ec NusG) and did not exhibit any signature of a transcription elongation-termination factor. However, it retained the ability to bind to its cognate ribosomal protein S10 (Rv0700). Compared with Ec NusG, Rv0639 possesses unique conformational features characterized by altered secondary structures in the C-terminal domain (CTD), an unusually long and disordered linker region between the N-terminal domain (NTD) and CTD, and a folding of its NTD over its CTD. This unusual folded conformation could have imparted specialized functions to this protein, required to adapt the physiology of Mtb. We speculate that in the absence of a bona fide RfaH, a NusG paralogue that is involved in pathogenicity in E. coli, Rv0639 functions as an RfaH-like factor and is involved in pathogenicity using unidentified ops-like sequences in the Mtb genome. And hence, we reannotate Rv0639 as a paralogue of NusG, instead of a homologue.

  11. Lead generation of heat shock protein 90 inhibitors by a combination of fragment-based approach, virtual screening, and structure-based drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Takaaki; Fukami, Takaaki A; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Ono, Naomi; Suda, Atsushi; Shindo, Hidetoshi; Yoon, Dong-Oh; Kim, Sung-Jin; Na, Young-Jun; Aoki, Yuko; Shimma, Nobuo; Tsukuda, Takuo; Shiratori, Yasuhiko

    2011-10-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a molecular chaperone which regulates maturation and stabilization of its substrate proteins, known as client proteins. Many client proteins of Hsp90 are involved in tumor progression and survival and therefore Hsp90 can be a good target for developing anticancer drugs. With the aim of efficiently identifying a new class of orally available inhibitors of the ATP binding site of this protein, we conducted fragment screening and virtual screening in parallel against Hsp90. This approach quickly identified 2-aminotriazine and 2-aminopyrimidine derivatives as specific ligands to Hsp90 with high ligand efficiency. In silico evaluation of the 3D X-ray Hsp90 complex structures of the identified hits allowed us to promptly design CH5015765, which showed high affinity for Hsp90 and antitumor activity in human cancer xenograft mouse models. PMID:21875802

  12. How do drumlin patterns evolve?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, Jeremy; Clark, Chris; Spagnolo, Matteo; Hughes, Anna

    2016-04-01

    The flow of a geomorphic agent over a sediment bed creates patterns in the substrate composed of bedforms. Ice is no exception to this, organising soft sedimentary substrates into subglacial bedforms. As we are yet to fully observe their initiation and evolution beneath a contemporary ice mass, little is known about how patterns in subglacial bedforms develop. Here we study 36,222 drumlins, divided into 72 flowsets, left behind by the former British-Irish Ice sheet. These flowsets provide us with 'snapshots' of drumlin pattern development. The probability distribution functions of the size and shape metrics of drumlins within these flowsets were analysed to determine whether behaviour that is common of other patterned phenomena has occurred. Specifically, we ask whether drumlins i) are printed at a specific scale; ii) grow or shrink after they initiate; iii) stabilise at a specific size and shape; and iv) migrate. Our results indicate that drumlins initiate at a minimum size and spacing. After initiation, the log-normal distribution of drumlin size and shape metrics suggests that drumlins grow, or possibly shrink, as they develop. We find no evidence for stabilisation in drumlin length, supporting the idea of a subglacial bedform continuum. Drumlin migration is difficult to determine from the palaeo-record. However, there are some indications that a mixture of static and mobile drumlins occurs, which could potentially lead to collisions, cannibalisation and coarsening. Further images of modern drumlin fields evolving beneath ice are required to capture stages of drumlin pattern evolution.

  13. CERN internal communication is evolving

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    CERN news will now be regularly updated on the CERN People page (see here).      Dear readers, All over the world, communication is becoming increasingly instantaneous, with news published in real time on websites and social networks. In order to keep pace with these changes, CERN's internal communication is evolving too. From now on, you will be informed of what’s happening at CERN more often via the “CERN people” page, which will frequently be updated with news. The Bulletin is following this trend too: twice a month, we will compile the most important articles published on the CERN site, with a brand-new layout. You will receive an e-mail every two weeks as soon as this new form of the Bulletin is available. If you have interesting news or stories to share, tell us about them through the form at: https://communications.web.cern.ch/got-story-cern-website​. You can also find out about news from CERN in real time...

  14. Economies Evolve by Energy Dispersal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley Salthe

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Economic activity can be regarded as an evolutionary process governed by the 2nd law of thermodynamics. The universal law, when formulated locally as an equation of motion, reveals that a growing economy develops functional machinery and organizes hierarchically in such a way as to tend to equalize energy density differences within the economy and in respect to the surroundings it is open to. Diverse economic activities result in flows of energy that will preferentially channel along the most steeply descending paths, leveling a non-Euclidean free energy landscape. This principle of 'maximal energy dispersal‘, equivalent to the maximal rate of entropy production, gives rise to economic laws and regularities. The law of diminishing returns follows from the diminishing free energy while the relation between supply and demand displays a quest for a balance among interdependent energy densities. Economic evolution is dissipative motion where the driving forces and energy flows are inseparable from each other. When there are multiple degrees of freedom, economic growth and decline are inherently impossible to forecast in detail. Namely, trajectories of an evolving economy are non-integrable, i.e. unpredictable in detail because a decision by a player will affect also future decisions of other players. We propose that decision making is ultimately about choosing from various actions those that would reduce most effectively subjectively perceived energy gradients.

  15. Multiscale modelling of evolving foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saye, R. I.; Sethian, J. A.

    2016-06-01

    We present a set of multi-scale interlinked algorithms to model the dynamics of evolving foams. These algorithms couple the key effects of macroscopic bubble rearrangement, thin film drainage, and membrane rupture. For each of the mechanisms, we construct consistent and accurate algorithms, and couple them together to work across the wide range of space and time scales that occur in foam dynamics. These algorithms include second order finite difference projection methods for computing incompressible fluid flow on the macroscale, second order finite element methods to solve thin film drainage equations in the lamellae and Plateau borders, multiphase Voronoi Implicit Interface Methods to track interconnected membrane boundaries and capture topological changes, and Lagrangian particle methods for conservative liquid redistribution during rearrangement and rupture. We derive a full set of numerical approximations that are coupled via interface jump conditions and flux boundary conditions, and show convergence for the individual mechanisms. We demonstrate our approach by computing a variety of foam dynamics, including coupled evolution of three-dimensional bubble clusters attached to an anchored membrane and collapse of a foam cluster.

  16. MgATP-induced conformational changes in the iron protein from Azotobacter vinelandii, as studied by small-angle x-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L; Gavini, N; Tsuruta, H; Eliezer, D; Burgess, B K; Doniach, S; Hodgson, K O

    1994-02-01

    Small angle x-ray scattering experiments have been carried out on the purified iron proteins of nitrogenase from wild-type Azotobacter vinelandii and from a Nif- mutant strain, A. vinelandii UW91 (which has an A157S mutation). This study was designed to investigate the influence of MgATP and MgADP binding on the protein structure in solution. For the wild-type protein, the binding of MgATP induces a significant conformational change that is observed as a decrease of about 2.0 A in the radius of gyration. In contrast, the binding of MgADP to the wild-type iron protein does not detectably affect the radius of gyration. In the absence of nucleotides, the radius of gyration for the UW91 mutant is indistinguishable from that of the wild-type. However, unlike for the wild-type protein, the radius of gyration of the UW91 iron protein is unaffected by the addition of MgATP. We have previously shown that the UW91 iron protein has a normal [4Fe-4S] cluster and MgATP binding ability but that it is completely blocked for electron transfer and MgATP hydrolysis (Gavini, N., and Burgess, B. K. (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 21179-21186). These x-ray scattering measurements suggest that a conformation different from that of the native state is therefore required for the iron protein to perform electron transfer to the MoFe protein. These results also support the hypothesis that Ala-157 is crucial for the iron protein to establish the electron-transfer-favored conformation induced by MgATP binding. PMID:8106367

  17. The Exploitation of Evolving Resources

    CERN Document Server

    McGlade, Jacqueline; Law, Richard

    1993-01-01

    The impact of man on the biosphere is profound. Quite apart from our capacity to destroy natural ecosystems and to drive species to extinction, we mould the evolution of the survivors by the selection pressures we apply to them. This has implications for the continued health of our natural biological resources and for the way in which we seek to optimise yield from those resources. Of these biological resources, fish stocks are particularly important to mankind as a source of protein. On a global basis, fish stocks provide the major source of protein for human consumption from natural ecosystems, amounting to some seventy million tonnes in 1970. Although fisheries management has been extensively developed over the last century, it has not hitherto considered the evolutionary consequences of fishing activity. While this omission may not have been serious in the past, the ever increasing intensity of exploitation and the deteriorating health of fish stocks has generated an urgent need for a better understanding...

  18. Correlated Flexible Molecular Coding and Molecular Evolvability

    OpenAIRE

    Husimi, Y; Aita, T.; Tabuchi, I.

    2002-01-01

    Evolvability of biopolymers is based on molecular coding. The molecular coding is represented by biopolymer function vs monomeric sequence relationship, that is, a proper fitness landscape on the sequence space. On the other hand, molecular coding is mostly realized by monomeric sequence vs biopolymer structure relationship. We suggest the evolution of evolvability based on flexible or multiplex coding originating from flexible or polymorphic conformation of evolving biopolymers. We report a ...

  19. Evolving expectations from international organisations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author stated that implementation of the geological disposal concept requires a strategy that provides national decision makers with sufficient confidence in the level of long-term safety and protection ultimately achieved. The concept of protection against harm has a broader meaning than radiological protection in terms of risk and dose. It includes the protection of the environment and socio-economic interests of communities. She recognised that a number of countries have established regulatory criteria already, and others are now discussing what constitutes a proper regulatory test and suitable time frame for judging the safety of long-term disposal. Each regulatory programme seeks to define reasonable tests of repository performance, using protection criteria and safety approaches consistent with the culture, values and expectations of the citizens of the country concerned. This means that there are differences in how protection and safety are addressed in national approaches to regulation and in the bases used for that. However, as was recognised in the Cordoba Workshop, it would be important to reach a minimum level of consistency and be able to explain the differences. C. Ruiz-Lopez presented an overview of the development of international guidance from ICRP, IAEA and NEA from the Cordoba workshop up to now, and positions of independent National Advisory Bodies. The evolution of these guidelines over time demonstrates an evolving understanding of long-term implications, with the recognition that dose and risk constraints should not be seen as measures of detriment beyond a few hundred years, the emphasis on sound engineering practices, and the introduction of new concepts and approaches which take into account social and economical aspects (e.g. constrained optimisation, BAT, managerial principles). In its new recommendations, ICRP (draft 2006) recognizes. in particular, that decision making processes may depend on other societal concerns and considers

  20. Multidrug resistance associated proteins in multidrug resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kamlesh Sodani; Atish Patel; Rishil J. Kathawala; Zhe-Sheng Chen

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs) are members of the C family of a group of proteins named ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters.These ABC transporters together form the largest branch of proteins within the human body.The MRP family comprises of 13 members,of which MRP1 to MRP9 are the major transporters indicated to cause multidrug resistance in tumor cells by extruding anticancer drugs out of the cell.They are mainly lipophilic anionic transporters and are reported to transport free or conjugates of glutathione (GSH),glucuronate,or sulphate.In addition,MRP1 to MRP3 can transport neutral organic drugs in free form in the presence of free GSH.Collectively,MRPs can transport drugs that differ structurally and mechanistically,including natural anticancer drugs,nucleoside analogs,antimetabolites,and tyrosine kinase inhibitors.Many of these MRPs transport physiologically important anions such as leukotriene C4,bilirubin glucuronide,and cyclic nucleotides.This review focuses mainly on the physiological functions,cellular resistance characteristics,and probable in vivo role of MRP1 to MRP9.

  1. Recent advances in designing substrate-competitive protein kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ki-Cheol; Kim, So Yeon; Yang, Eun Gyeong

    2012-01-01

    Protein kinases play central roles in cellular signaling pathways and their abnormal phosphorylation activity is inseparably linked with various human diseases. Therefore, modulation of kinase activity using potent inhibitors is an attractive strategy for the treatment of human disease. While most protein kinase inhibitors in clinical development are mainly targeted to the highly conserved ATP-binding sites and thus likely promiscuously inhibit multiple kinases including kinases unrelated to diseases, protein substrate-competitive inhibitors are more selective and expected to be promising therapeutic agents. Most substrate-competitive inhibitors mimic peptides derived from substrate proteins, or from inhibitory domains within kinases or inhibitor proteins. In addition, bisubstrate inhibitors are generated by conjugating substrate-competitive peptide inhibitors to ATP-competitive inhibitors to improve affinity and selectivity. Although structural information on protein kinases provides invaluable guidance in designing substrate-competitive inhibitors, other strategies including bioinformatics, computational modeling, and high-throughput screening are often employed for developing specific substrate-competitive kinase inhibitors. This review focuses on recent advances in the design and discovery of substrate-competitive inhibitors of protein kinases.

  2. Evolving management of colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jochem van der Voort van Zijp; Harald J Hoekstra; Marc D Basson

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews recent advances in surgical techniques and adjuvant therapies for colorectal cancer, including total mesorectal excision, the resection of liver and lung metastasis and advances in chemoradiation and foreshadows some interventions that may lie just beyond the frontier. In particular, little is known about the intracellular and extracellular cascades that may influence colorectal cancer cell adhesion and metastasis. Although the phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinases and focal adhesion associated proteins in response to integrin-mediated cell matrix binding ("outside in integrin signaling") is well described, the stimulation of cell adhesion by intracellular signals activated by pressure prior to adhesion represents a different signal paradigm. However, several studies have suggested that increased pressure and shear stress activate cancer cell adhesion. Further studies of the pathways that regulate integrin-driven cancer cell adhesion may identify/ways to disrupt these signals or block integrin-mediated adhesion so that adhesion and eventual metastasis can be prevented in the future.

  3. Conformational plasticity of the catalytic subunit of protein kinase CK2 and its consequences for regulation and drug design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niefind, Karsten; Issinger, Olaf-Georg

    2010-01-01

    plasticity of important ATP-binding elements - the interdomain hinge region and the glycine-rich loop - was discovered. In fully active CK2alpha the hinge region is open and does not anchor the ATP ribose, but alternatively it can adopt a closed conformation, form hydrogen bonds to the ribose moiety and thus......At the first glance CK2alpha, the catalytic subunit of protein kinase CK2, is a rigid molecule: in contrast to many eukaryotic protein kinases in CK2alpha the canonical regulatory key elements like the activation segment occur exclusively in their typical active conformations. This observation fits...... well to the constitutive activity of the enzyme, meaning, its independence from phosphorylation or other characteristic control factors. Most CK2alpha structures are based on the enzyme from Zea mays, supplemented by an increasing number of human CK2alpha structures. In the latter a surprising...

  4. Mdt(A), a New Efflux Protein Conferring Multiple Antibiotic Resistance in Lactococcus lactis and Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perreten, Vincent; Schwarz, Franziska V.; Teuber, Michael; Levy, Stuart B.

    2001-01-01

    The mdt(A) gene, previously designated mef214, from Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis plasmid pK214 encodes a protein [Mdt(A) (multiple drug transporter)] with 12 putative transmembrane segments (TMS) that contain typical motifs conserved among the efflux proteins of the major facilitator superfamily. However, it also has two C-motifs (conserved in the fifth TMS of the antiporters) and a putative ATP-binding site. Expression of the cloned mdt(A) gene decreased susceptibility to macrolides, lincosamides, streptogramins, and tetracyclines in L. lactis and Escherichia coli, but not in Enterococcus faecalis or in Staphylococcus aureus. Glucose-dependent efflux of erythromycin and tetracycline was demonstrated in L. lactis and in E. coli. PMID:11257023

  5. Molecular modeling of the human multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1) is a 190 kDa member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily of transmembrane transporters that is clinically relevant for its ability to confer multidrug resistance by actively effluxing anticancer drugs. Knowledge of the atomic structure of MRP1 is needed to elucidate its transport mechanism, but only low resolution structural data are currently available. Consequently, comparative modeling has been used to generate models of human MRP1 based on the crystal structure of the ABC transporter Sav1866 from Staphylococcus aureus. In these Sav1866-based models, the arrangement of transmembrane helices differs strikingly from earlier models of MRP1 based on the structure of the bacterial lipid transporter MsbA, both with respect to packing of the twelve helices and their interactions with the nucleotide binding domains. The functional importance of Tyr324 in transmembrane helix 6 predicted to project into the substrate translocation pathway was investigated

  6. Safety Evaluation of the EVOLVE Blanket Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article summarizes the results of the safety evaluation of the Evaporation of Lithium and Vapor Extraction (EVOLVE) W-alloy first wall (FW) and blanket concept. We have analyzed the EVOLVE design response during a confinement bypass accident. A confinement bypass accident was chosen because, based on previous safety studies, this accident can produce environmental releases by breaching the primary radioactive confinement boundary of EVOLVE, which is the EVOLVE vacuum vessel (VV). As a consequence of a bypass accident, air from a room adjoining the reactor enters the plasma chamber by way of a failed VV port. This air reacts with the high temperature metals inside of the VV to release energy in the case of a lithium spill, or to mobilize radioactive material by oxidation, and then transport this material to the environment by natural convection airflow through the failed VV port. We use the MELCOR code to analyze the response of EVOLVE during this accident. Based on these results, the EVOLVE concept can meet the no-evacuation dose goal set by the DOE Fusion Safety Standard if the EVOLVE confinement building ventilation system is closed within two hours of the onset of this accident

  7. Evolving Recommendations on Prostate Cancer Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brawley, Otis W; Thompson, Ian M; Grönberg, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Results of a number of studies demonstrate that the serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in and of itself is an inadequate screening test. Today, one of the most pressing questions in prostate cancer medicine is how can screening be honed to identify those who have life-threatening disease and need aggressive treatment. A number of efforts are underway. One such effort is the assessment of men in the landmark Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial that has led to a prostate cancer risk calculator (PCPTRC), which is available online. PCPTRC version 2.0 predicts the probability of the diagnosis of no cancer, low-grade cancer, or high-grade cancer when variables such as PSA, age, race, family history, and physical findings are input. Modern biomarker development promises to provide tests with fewer false positives and improved ability to find high-grade cancers. Stockholm III (STHLM3) is a prospective, population-based, paired, screen-positive, prostate cancer diagnostic study assessing a combination of plasma protein biomarkers along with age, family history, previous biopsy, and prostate examination for prediction of prostate cancer. Multiparametric MRI incorporates anatomic and functional imaging to better characterize and predict future behavior of tumors within the prostate. After diagnosis of cancer, several genomic tests promise to better distinguish the cancers that need treatment versus those that need observation. Although the new technologies are promising, there is an urgent need for evaluation of these new tests in high-quality, large population-based studies. Until these technologies are proven, most professional organizations have evolved to a recommendation of informed or shared decision making in which there is a discussion between the doctor and patient. PMID:27249774

  8. Structural and functional studies of conserved nucleotide-binding protein LptB in lipopolysaccharide transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhongshan [Biomedical Research Centre, Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom); College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Biomedical Sciences Research Complex, School of Chemistry, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9ST (United Kingdom); Xiang, Quanju [College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Biomedical Sciences Research Complex, School of Chemistry, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9ST (United Kingdom); Department of Microbiology, College of Resource and Environment Science, Sichuan Agriculture University, Yaan 625000 (China); Zhu, Xiaofeng [College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Dong, Haohao [Biomedical Sciences Research Complex, School of Chemistry, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9ST (United Kingdom); He, Chuan [School of Electronics and Information, Wuhan Technical College of Communications, No. 6 Huangjiahu West Road, Hongshan District, Wuhan, Hubei 430065 (China); Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Yizheng [College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Wang, Wenjian, E-mail: Wenjian166@gmail.com [Laboratory of Department of Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, 58 Zhongshan Road II, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510080 (China); Dong, Changjiang, E-mail: C.Dong@uea.ac.uk [Biomedical Research Centre, Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Determination of the structure of the wild-type LptB in complex with ATP and Mg{sup 2+}. • Demonstrated that ATP binding residues are essential for LptB’s ATPase activity and LPS transport. • Dimerization is required for the LptB’s function and LPS transport. • Revealed relationship between activity of the LptB and the vitality of E. coli cells. - Abstract: Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the main component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, which plays an essential role in protecting the bacteria from harsh conditions and antibiotics. LPS molecules are transported from the inner membrane to the outer membrane by seven LPS transport proteins. LptB is vital in hydrolyzing ATP to provide energy for LPS transport, however this mechanism is not very clear. Here we report wild-type LptB crystal structure in complex with ATP and Mg{sup 2+}, which reveals that its structure is conserved with other nucleotide-binding proteins (NBD). Structural, functional and electron microscopic studies demonstrated that the ATP binding residues, including K42 and T43, are crucial for LptB’s ATPase activity, LPS transport and the vitality of Escherichia coli cells with the exceptions of H195A and Q85A; the H195A mutation does not lower its ATPase activity but impairs LPS transport, and Q85A does not alter ATPase activity but causes cell death. Our data also suggest that two protomers of LptB have to work together for ATP hydrolysis and LPS transport. These results have significant impacts in understanding the LPS transport mechanism and developing new antibiotics.

  9. Identification of ABCC2 as a binding protein of Cry1Ac on brush border membrane vesicles from Helicoverpa armigera by an improved pull-down assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zishan; Wang, Zeyu; Liu, Yuxiao; Liang, Gemei; Shu, Changlong; Song, Fuping; Zhou, Xueping; Bravo, Alejandra; Soberón, Mario; Zhang, Jie

    2016-08-01

    Cry1Ac toxin-binding proteins from Helicoverpa armigera brush border membrane vesicles were identified by an improved pull-down method that involves coupling Cry1Ac to CNBr agarose combined with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). According to the LC-MS/MS results, Cry1Ac toxin could bind to six classes of aminopeptidase-N, alkaline phosphatase, cadherin-like protein, ATP-binding cassette transporter subfamily C protein (ABCC2), actin, ATPase, polycalin, and some other proteins not previously characterized as Cry toxin-binding molecules such as dipeptidyl peptidase or carboxyl/choline esterase and some serine proteases. This is the first report that suggests the direct binding of Cry1Ac toxin to ABCC2 in H. armigera. PMID:27037552

  10. Sex determination: ways to evolve a hermaphrodite.

    OpenAIRE

    Braendle, Christian; Félix, Marie-Anne

    2006-01-01

    Most species of the nematode genus Caenorhabditis reproduce through males and females; C. elegans and C. briggsae, however, produce self-fertile hermaphrodites instead of females. These transitions to hermaphroditism evolved convergently through distinct modifications of germline sex determination mechanisms.

  11. Robot navigation system using intrinsic evolvable hardware

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Recently there has been great interest in the idea that evolvable system based on the principle of ar tifcial intelligence can be used to continuously and autonomously adapt the behaviour of physically embedded systems such as autonomous mobile robots and intelligent home devices. Meanwhile, we have seen the introduc tion of evolvable hardware(EHW): new integrated electronic circuits that are able to continuously evolve to a dapt the chages in the environment implemented by evolutionary algorithms such as genetic algorithm(GA)and reinforcement learning. This paper concentrates on developing a robotic navigation system whose basic behav iours are obstacle avoidance and light source navigation. The results demonstrate that the intrinsic evolvable hardware system is able to create the stable robotiiuc behaviours as required in the real world instead of the tra ditional hardware systems.

  12. The Evolving Domain of Entrepreneurship Research

    OpenAIRE

    Carlsson, Bo; Braunerhjelm, Pontus; McKelvey, Maureen; Olofsson, Christer; Persson, Lars; Ylinenpää, Håkan

    2013-01-01

    Research on entrepreneurship has flourished in recent years and is evolving rapidly. This paper explores the history of entrepreneurship research, how the research domain has evolved, and its current status as an academic field. The need to concretize these issues stems partly from a general interest to define the current research domain, partly from the more specific tasks confronting the prize committee of the Global Award for Entrepreneurship Research. Entrepreneurship has developed in ma...

  13. NasFED proteins mediate assimilatory nitrate and nitrite transport in Klebsiella oxytoca (pneumoniae) M5al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Q; Stewart, V

    1998-03-01

    Klebsiella oxytoca can use nitrate and nitrite as sole nitrogen sources. The enzymes required for nitrate and nitrite assimilation are encoded by the nasFEDCBA operon. We report here the complete nasFED sequence. Sequence comparisons indicate that the nasFED genes encode components of a conventional periplasmic binding protein-dependent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein (NasF), a homodimeric intrinsic membrane protein (NasE), and a homodimeric ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein (NasD). The NasF protein and the related NrtA and CmpA proteins of cyanobacteria contain leader (signal) sequences with the double-arginine motif that is hypothesized to direct prefolded proteins to an alternate protein export pathway. The NasE protein and the related NrtB and CmpB proteins of cyanobacteria contain unusual variants of the EAA loop sequence that defines membrane-intrinsic proteins of ABC transporters. To characterize nitrate and nitrite transport, we constructed in-frame nonpolar deletions of the chromosomal nasFED genes. Growth tests coupled with nitrate and nitrite uptake assays revealed that the nasFED genes are essential for nitrate transport and participate in nitrite transport as well. Interestingly, the delta nasF strain exhibited leaky phenotypes, particularly at elevated nitrate concentrations, suggesting that the NasED proteins are not fully dependent on the NasF protein. PMID:9495773

  14. Effects of ATP-binding cassette exporters on virulence factors in Streptococcus mutans%三磷酸腺苷结合盒外排子对变异链球菌毒力因子影响的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾荟荟; 凌均棨

    2015-01-01

    ABC transporters have been proved to be integral membrane proteins that actively transported a diverse range of substrates across cell membranes. ABC transporters had varied functions, and took part in gene competence, (p)ppGpp accumulation, bacteriocin secretion and immunity in Streptococcus mutans. The structures, functions, mechanisms and inhibitors of the known ABC exporters in Streptococcus mutans were summarized.%三磷酸腺苷结合盒(ABC)转运子是膜蛋白的一部分,透过细胞膜转运各种生物分子,参与多种生理功能。在变异链球菌中,ABC外排子与基因感受态、四(五)磷酸鸟苷[(p)ppGpp]累积、细菌素分泌与免疫密切相关。本文就变异链球菌ABC外排子的结构、生理功能、作用机制和抑制剂作一综述。

  15. Evolved plasmid-host interactions reduce plasmid interference cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Hirokazu; Wegrzyn, Katarznya; Loftie-Eaton, Wesley; Johnson, Jenny; Deckert, Gail E; Rogers, Linda M; Konieczny, Igor; Top, Eva M

    2016-09-01

    Antibiotic selection drives adaptation of antibiotic resistance plasmids to new bacterial hosts, but the molecular mechanisms are still poorly understood. We previously showed that a broad-host-range plasmid was poorly maintained in Shewanella oneidensis, but rapidly adapted through mutations in the replication initiation gene trfA1. Here we examined if these mutations reduced the fitness cost of TrfA1, and whether this was due to changes in interaction with the host's DNA helicase DnaB. The strains expressing evolved TrfA1 variants showed a higher growth rate than those expressing ancestral TrfA1. The evolved TrfA1 variants showed a lower affinity to the helicase than ancestral TrfA1 and were no longer able to activate the helicase at the oriV without host DnaA. Moreover, persistence of the ancestral plasmid was increased upon overexpression of DnaB. Finally, the evolved TrfA1 variants generated higher plasmid copy numbers than ancestral TrfA1. The findings suggest that ancestral plasmid instability can at least partly be explained by titration of DnaB by TrfA1. Thus under antibiotic selection resistance plasmids can adapt to a novel bacterial host through partial loss of function mutations that simultaneously increase plasmid copy number and decrease unfavorably high affinity to one of the hosts' essential proteins. PMID:27121483

  16. Association between two common polymorphisms in ATP-binding cassette A1 gene and coronary heart disease complicated with diabetes in Chinese Han people%三磷酸腺苷结合盒转运子A1启动子区及7外显子基因突变与合并糖尿病的冠心病关联研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    祁莉萍; 严晓伟; 叶平; 党爱民

    2010-01-01

    Objective The promoter-565C/T variant and the 7exon R219K variant are associated with risk of Coronary heart disease (CAD), but the association also remains controversial. At present, there are few studies focusing on the associations between ATP-binding cassette A1 (ABCA1), and CAD with Diabetes mellitus (DM) in Chinese population. Since decreased serum level of HDL-C is often observed in DM,it is natural to hypothesize that polymorphisms of the ABCA1 gene might be related to CAD complicated with DM. Objective To study the mutations and genetic characteristics of ABCA1 promoter -565C/T and 7Exon R219K in CAD with DM patients in Chinese Han people. Methods One hundred and seventy-three patients of CAD with DM and 389 controls were genotyped for-565C/T, R219K used with LDR. Genetic association analysis was performed. Results The frequencies of the CC, CT, and TT genotypes in CAD with DM were 0.360(n=63), 0.482 (n=83) and 0.157 (n=27), respectively. The frequency of the TT genotype and T allele at the-565C/T locus had no significant alterations between CAD with DM patients and Controls (0.157 vs 0.163; 0.398 vs 0.409,P>0.05). The frequency of the AA and GA geno-type at the R219K locus was lower in CAD patients compared with diabetes (0.65 vs 0.73,P=0.079). Logistic re-gression model were performed, revealed no interaction between 2 SNPs and traditional risk factors, but R219K had a protection effect, OR=0.428 (95%CI 0.227-0.603), P=0.009. Conclusions ABCA1 the T allele of-565 C/T SNP has no significant association with CAD with DM. R219K SNP predicts differences in CAD with diabetes. The AA genotype may protect against subclinical cardiovascular disease.%目的 首次研究汉族人群冠心病合并糖尿病与三磷酸腺苷结合盒转运子A1(ABCA1)基因启动子区-565C/T及7外显子R219K基因多态性关联分析.方法 应用连接酶检测反应法对172例合并糖尿病冠心病患者及393例对照组测试-565C/T及R219K基因型.结果

  17. Reliability of genetic networks is evolvable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunewell, Stefan; Bornholdt, Stefan

    2008-06-01

    Control of the living cell functions with remarkable reliability despite the stochastic nature of the underlying molecular networks—a property presumably optimized by biological evolution. We ask here to what extent the ability of a stochastic dynamical network to produce reliable dynamics is an evolvable trait. Using an evolutionary algorithm based on a deterministic selection criterion for the reliability of dynamical attractors, we evolve networks of noisy discrete threshold nodes. We find that, starting from any random network, reliability of the attractor landscape can often be achieved with only a few small changes to the network structure. Further, the evolvability of networks toward reliable dynamics while retaining their function is investigated and a high success rate is found.

  18. Metanetworks of artificially evolved regulatory networks

    CERN Document Server

    Danacı, Burçin

    2014-01-01

    We study metanetworks arising in genotype and phenotype spaces, in the context of a model population of Boolean graphs evolved under selection for short dynamical attractors. We define the adjacency matrix of a graph as its genotype, which gets mutated in the course of evolution, while its phenotype is its set of dynamical attractors. Metanetworks in the genotype and phenotype spaces are formed, respectively, by genetic proximity and by phenotypic similarity, the latter weighted by the sizes of the basins of attraction of the shared attractors. We find that populations of evolved networks form giant clusters in genotype space, have Poissonian degree distributions but exhibit hierarchically organized $k$-core decompositions, while random populations of Boolean graphs are typically so far removed from each other genetically that they cannot form a metanetwork. In phenotype space, the metanetworks of evolved populations are super robust both under the elimination of weak connections and random removal of nodes. ...

  19. Metanetworks of artificially evolved regulatory networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danacı, Burçin; Erzan, Ayşe

    2016-04-01

    We study metanetworks arising in genotype and phenotype spaces, in the context of a model population of Boolean graphs evolved under selection for short dynamical attractors. We define the adjacency matrix of a graph as its genotype, which gets mutated in the course of evolution, while its phenotype is its set of dynamical attractors. Metanetworks in the genotype and phenotype spaces are formed, respectively, by genetic proximity and by phenotypic similarity, the latter weighted by the sizes of the basins of attraction of the shared attractors. We find that evolved populations of Boolean graphs form tree-like giant clusters in genotype space, while random populations of Boolean graphs are typically so far removed from each other genetically that they cannot form a metanetwork. In phenotype space, the metanetworks of evolved populations are super robust both under the elimination of weak connections and random removal of nodes.

  20. Quantifying evolvability in small biological networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemenman, Ilya [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mugler, Andrew [COLUMBIA UNIV; Ziv, Etay [COLUMBIA UNIV; Wiggins, Chris H [COLUMBIA UNIV

    2008-01-01

    The authors introduce a quantitative measure of the capacity of a small biological network to evolve. The measure is applied to a stochastic description of the experimental setup of Guet et al. (Science 2002, 296, pp. 1466), treating chemical inducers as functional inputs to biochemical networks and the expression of a reporter gene as the functional output. The authors take an information-theoretic approach, allowing the system to set parameters that optimise signal processing ability, thus enumerating each network's highest-fidelity functions. All networks studied are highly evolvable by the measure, meaning that change in function has little dependence on change in parameters. Moreover, each network's functions are connected by paths in the parameter space along which information is not significantly lowered, meaning a network may continuously change its functionality without completely losing it along the way. This property further underscores the evolvability of the networks.

  1. Protein Arrays for Multidrug-resistance in Human Leukemia Cell Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhong Lu

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel technique was developed, that was high throughput simultaneousscreening of multiple resistance protein expression based on a protein array system. Themethod combined the advantage of the specificity of enzyme-linked immunosorbentassays with the sensitivity and high throughput of microspot. In this system, the multipleresistance protein arrays were created by spotting the captured antibodies onto the glassslide. The arrays were then incubated with cell samples of leukemia patients. The boundproteins were recognized by biotin-conjugated antibodies and detected by CCD.Experiments demonstrated that three multiple resistance proteins, including Pgp, MRPand BCRP which are members of the ATP-binding-cassette (ABC superfamily ofmembrane transporters could be simultaneously detected using this new approach.Research work shows the result is coincident with flow cytometry (FCM (P>0.01. Itprovided a methodology to develop many high-density protein array systems to detect avariety of proteins. The protein arrays will provide a powerful tool to identify theleukemia cell protein expression and rapidly validate their MDR determination.

  2. Evolving Intelligent Systems Methodology and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Angelov, Plamen; Kasabov, Nik

    2010-01-01

    From theory to techniques, the first all-in-one resource for EIS. There is a clear demand in advanced process industries, defense, and Internet and communication (VoIP) applications for intelligent yet adaptive/evolving systems. Evolving Intelligent Systems is the first self- contained volume that covers this newly established concept in its entirety, from a systematic methodology to case studies to industrial applications. Featuring chapters written by leading world experts, it addresses the progress, trends, and major achievements in this emerging research field, with a strong emphasis on th

  3. Self-Adaptation in Evolving Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Stephens, C R; Mora, J; Waelbroeck, H

    1997-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental analysis is made of the effects of self-adaptation in a simple evolving system. Specifically, we consider the effects of coding the mutation and crossover probabilities of a genetic algorithm evolving in certain model fitness landscapes. The resultant genotype-phenotype mapping is degenerate, there being no direct selective advantage for one probability versus another. We show that the action of mutation and crossover breaks this degeneracy leading to an induced symmetry breaking among the genotypic synonyms. We demonstrate that this induced symmetry breaking allows the system to self-adapt in a time dependent environment.

  4. Market theories evolve, and so do markets

    OpenAIRE

    Friedman, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Responding to Mirowski's target article, this paper discusses some intellectual currents of 1970s-1990s and offers suggestions on measuring market performance, on including automated agents as market participants, on evolving new market formats, and on dealing with highly differentiated goods. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Interactively Evolving Compositional Sound Synthesis Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jónsson, Björn Þór; Hoover, Amy K.; Risi, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    the space of potential sounds that can be generated through such compositional sound synthesis networks (CSSNs). To study the effect of evolution on subjective appreciation, participants in a listener study ranked evolved timbres by personal preference, resulting in preferences skewed toward the first...

  6. Views on Evolvability of Embedded Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laar, P. van de; Punter, T.

    2011-01-01

    Evolvability, the ability to respond effectively to change, represents a major challenge to today's high-end embedded systems, such as those developed in the medical domain by Philips Healthcare. These systems are typically developed by multi-disciplinary teams, located around the world, and are in

  7. Satcom access in the evolved packet core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cano, M.D.; Norp, A.H.J.; Popova, M.P.

    2012-01-01

    Satellite communications (Satcom) networks are increasingly integrating with terrestrial communications networks, namely Next Generation Networks (NGN). In the area of NGN the Evolved Packet Core (EPC) is a new network architecture that can support multiple access technologies. When Satcom is consid

  8. Machine Learning Optimization of Evolvable Artificial Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caschera, F.; Rasmussen, S.; Hanczyc, M.

    2011-01-01

    An evolvable artificial cell is a chemical or biological complex system assembled in laboratory. The system is rationally designed to show life-like properties. In order to achieve an optimal design for the emergence of minimal life, a high dimensional space of possible experimental combinations...

  9. Altered protein expression in gestational diabetes mellitus placentas provides insight into insulin resistance and coagulation/fibrinolysis pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Liu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the placental proteome differences between pregnant women complicated with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM and those with normal glucose tolerance (NGT. METHODS: We used two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE to separate and compare placental protein levels from GDM and NGT groups. Differentially expressed proteins between the two groups were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry and further confirmed by Western blotting. The mRNA levels of related proteins were measured by realtime RT-PCR. Immunohistochemistry (IHC was performed to examine the cellular location of the proteins expressed in placenta villi. RESULTS: Twenty-one protein spots were differentially expressed between GDM and NGT placenta villi in the tested samples, fifteen of which were successfully identified by mass spectrometry. The molecular functions of these differentially expressed proteins include blood coagulation, signal transduction, anti-apoptosis, ATP binding, phospholipid binding, calcium ion binding, platelet activation, and tryptophan-tRNA ligase activity. Both protein and mRNA levels of Annexin A2, Annexin A5 and 14-3-3 protein ζ/δ were up-regulated, while the expression of the Ras-related protein Rap1A was down-regulated in the GDM placenta group. CONCLUSION: Placenta villi derived from GDM pregnant women exhibit significant proteome differences compared to those of NGT mothers. The identified differentially expressed proteins are mainly associated with the development of insulin resistance, transplacental transportation of glucose, hyperglucose-mediated coagulation and fibrinolysis disorders in the GDM placenta villi.

  10. The mechanism of membrane-associated steps in tail-anchored protein insertion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariappan, Malaiyalam; Mateja, Agnieszka; Dobosz, Malgorzata; Bove, Elia; Hegde, Ramanujan S.; Keenan, Robert J. (NIH); (UC)

    2012-06-19

    Tail-anchored (TA) membrane proteins destined for the endoplasmic reticulum are chaperoned by cytosolic targeting factors that deliver them to a membrane receptor for insertion. Although a basic framework for TA protein recognition is now emerging, the decisive targeting and membrane insertion steps are not understood. Here we reconstitute the TA protein insertion cycle with purified components, present crystal structures of key complexes between these components and perform mutational analyses based on the structures. We show that a committed targeting complex, formed by a TA protein bound to the chaperone ATPase Get3, is initially recruited to the membrane through an interaction with Get2. Once the targeting complex has been recruited, Get1 interacts with Get3 to drive TA protein release in an ATPase-dependent reaction. After releasing its TA protein cargo, the now-vacant Get3 recycles back to the cytosol concomitant with ATP binding. This work provides a detailed structural and mechanistic framework for the minimal TA protein insertion cycle.

  11. ATP binding cassette transporters modulate both coelenterazine- and D-luciferin- based bioluminescence imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Ruimin; Vider, Jelena; Serganova, Inna; Blasberg, Ronald G.

    2011-01-01

    Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) of luciferase reporters provides a cost-effective and sensitive means to image biological processes. However, transport of luciferase substrates across the cell membrane does affect BLI-readout-intensity from intact living cells.

  12. ATP-binding cassette transporter controls leaf surface secretion of anticancer drug components in Catharanthus roseus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fang; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2013-09-24

    The Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) is highly specialized for the biosynthesis of many different monoterpenoid indole alkaloids (MIAs), many of which have powerful biological activities. Such MIAs include the commercially important chemotherapy drugs vinblastine, vincristine, and other synthetic derivatives that are derived from the coupling of catharanthine and vindoline. However, previous studies have shown that biosynthesis of these MIAs involves extensive movement of metabolites between specialized internal leaf cells and the leaf epidermis that require the involvement of unknown secretory processes for mobilizing catharanthine to the leaf surface and vindoline to internal leaf cells. Spatial separation of vindoline and catharanthine provides a clear explanation for the low levels of dimers that accumulate in intact plants. The present work describes the molecular cloning and functional identification of a unique catharanthine transporter (CrTPT2) that is expressed predominantly in the epidermis of young leaves. CrTPT2 gene expression is activated by treatment with catharanthine, and its in planta silencing redistributes catharanthine to increase the levels of catharanthine-vindoline drug dimers in the leaves. Phylogenetic analysis shows that CrTPT2 is closely related to a key transporter involved in cuticle assembly in plants and that may be unique to MIA-producing plant species, where it mediates secretion of alkaloids to the plant surface. PMID:24019465

  13. Improved Evolvability in Genetic Programming with Polyandry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anisa Waganda Ragalo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes Polyandry, a new nature-inspired modification to canonical Genetic Programming (GP. Polyandry aims to improve evolvability in GP. Evolvability is a critically important GP trait, the maintenance of which determines the arrival of the GP at the global optimum solution. Specifically evolvability is defined as the ability of the genetic operators employed in GP to produce offspring that are fitter than their parents. When GP fails to exhibit evolvability, further adaptation of the GP individuals towards the global optimum solution becomes impossible. Polyandry improves evolvability by improving the typically disruptive standard GP crossover operator. The algorithm employs a dual strategy towards this goal. The chief part of this strategy is an incorporation of genetic material from multiple mating partners into broods of offspring. Given such a brood, the offspring in the brood then compete according to a culling function, which we make equivalent to the main GP fitness function. Polyandry’s incorporation of genetic material from multiple GP individuals into broods of offspring represents a more aggressive search for building block information. This characteristic of the algorithm leads to an advanced explorative capability in both GP structural space and fitness space. The second component of the Polyandry strategy is an attempt at multiple crossover points, in order to find crossover points that minimize building block disruption from parents to offspring. This strategy is employed by a similar algorithm, Brood Recombination. We conduct experiments to compare Polyandry with the canonical GP. Our experiments demonstrate that Polyandry consistently exhibits better evolvability than the canonical GP. As a consequence, Polyandry achieves higher success rates and finds solutions faster than the latter. The result of these observations is that given certain brood size settings, Polyandry requires less computational effort to

  14. Development of new highly potent imidazo[1,2-b]pyridazines targeting Toxoplasma gondii calcium-dependent protein kinase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moine, Espérance; Dimier-Poisson, Isabelle; Enguehard-Gueiffier, Cécile; Logé, Cédric; Pénichon, Mélanie; Moiré, Nathalie; Delehouzé, Claire; Foll-Josselin, Béatrice; Ruchaud, Sandrine; Bach, Stéphane; Gueiffier, Alain; Debierre-Grockiego, Françoise; Denevault-Sabourin, Caroline

    2015-11-13

    Using a structure-based design approach, we have developed a new series of imidazo[1,2-b]pyridazines, targeting the calcium-dependent protein kinase-1 (CDPK1) from Toxoplasma gondii. Twenty derivatives were thus synthesized. Structure-activity relationships and docking studies confirmed the binding mode of these inhibitors within the ATP binding pocket of TgCDPK1. Two lead compounds (16a and 16f) were then identified, which were able to block TgCDPK1 enzymatic activity at low nanomolar concentrations, with a good selectivity profile against a panel of mammalian kinases. The potential of these inhibitors was confirmed in vitro on T. gondii growth, with EC50 values of 100 nM and 70 nM, respectively. These best candidates also displayed low toxicity to mammalian cells and were selected for further in vivo investigations on murine model of acute toxoplasmosis.

  15. Evolvement Complexity in an Artificial Stock Market

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Chun-Xia; ZHOU Tao; ZHOU Pei-Ling; LIU Jun; TANG Zi-Nan

    2005-01-01

    @@ An artificial stock market is established based on the multi-agent model.Each agent has a limited memory of the history of stock price, and will choose an action according to its memory and trading strategy.The trading strategy of each agent evolves ceaselessly as a result of a self-teaching mechanism.The simulation results exhibit that large events are frequent in the fluctuation of the stock price generated by the present model when compared with a normal process, and the price returns distribution is a L関y distribution in the central part followed by an approximately exponential truncation.In addition, by defining a variable to gauge the evolvement complexity of this system, we have found a phase cross-over from simple-phase to complex-phase along with the increase of the number of individuals, which may be a ubiquitous phenomenon in multifarious real-life systems.

  16. A novel evolving model for power grids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In this paper,a novel power grid evolving model,which can well describe the evolving property of power grids,is presented. Based on the BA model,motivated by the fact that in real power grids,connectivity of node not only depends on its degree,but also is influenced by many uncertain factors,so we introduce the subconnection factor K for each node. Using the mean-field theory,we get the analytical expression of power-law degree distribution with the exponent γ∈ (3,∞ ). Finally,simulation results show that the new model can provide a satisfactory description for empirical characteristics of power network,and power network falls somewhere in between scale-free network and uncertain network.

  17. Evolving neural networks through augmenting topologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Kenneth O; Miikkulainen, Risto

    2002-01-01

    An important question in neuroevolution is how to gain an advantage from evolving neural network topologies along with weights. We present a method, NeuroEvolution of Augmenting Topologies (NEAT), which outperforms the best fixed-topology method on a challenging benchmark reinforcement learning task. We claim that the increased efficiency is due to (1) employing a principled method of crossover of different topologies, (2) protecting structural innovation using speciation, and (3) incrementally growing from minimal structure. We test this claim through a series of ablation studies that demonstrate that each component is necessary to the system as a whole and to each other. What results is significantly faster learning. NEAT is also an important contribution to GAs because it shows how it is possible for evolution to both optimize and complexify solutions simultaneously, offering the possibility of evolving increasingly complex solutions over generations, and strengthening the analogy with biological evolution. PMID:12180173

  18. Learning environments and rapidly evolving handheld technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Ochola, J. Evans; Stachowiak, James R.; Achrazoglou, John G.; David B. Bills

    2013-01-01

    More and more K–12 school teachers are using handheld devices in classrooms. The mobile nature of handheld technologies is often seen as an integral characteristic facilitating collaborative learning and flexible learning arrangements. Since both portable devices and ideas about the learning environment are rapidly evolving, teachers need to be aware of technologies and classroom arrangements that can help improve student performance and classroom experiences.

  19. Evolving Information Filtering for Personalized Information Service

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田范江; 李丛蓉; 王鼎兴

    2001-01-01

    Information filtering (IF) systems are important for personalized information service. However, most current IF systems suffer from low quality and long training time. In this paper, a refined evolving information filtering method is presented. This method describes user's information need from multi-aspects and improves filtering quality through a process like natural selection. Experimental result shows this method can shorten training time, improve filtering quality, and reduce the relevance between filtering results and training sequence.

  20. Dynamics of gene circuits shapes evolvability

    OpenAIRE

    Jim??nez, Alba; Cotterell, James; Munteanu, Andreea; Sharpe, James

    2015-01-01

    To what extent does the dynamical mechanism producing a specific biological phenotype bias the ability to evolve into novel phenotypes? We use the interpretation of a morphogen gradient into a single stripe of gene expression as a model phenotype. Although there are thousands of three-gene circuit topologies that can robustly develop a stripe of gene expression, the vast majority of these circuits use one of just six fundamentally different dynamical mechanisms. Here we explore the potential ...

  1. Circumstellar Molecular Spectra towards Evolved Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Bakker, E J

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the relevance of, and possible scientific gains which can be acquired from studying circumstellar molecular spectra toward evolved stars. Where can we expect circumstellar molecular spectra, why would we want to study these spectra, which molecules might be present, and what can we learn from these studies? We present an overview of reported detections, and discuss some of the results.

  2. Attribute-Efficient Evolvability of Linear Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Angelino, Elaine; Kanade, Varun

    2013-01-01

    In a seminal paper, Valiant (2006) introduced a computational model for evolution to address the question of complexity that can arise through Darwinian mechanisms. Valiant views evolution as a restricted form of computational learning, where the goal is to evolve a hypothesis that is close to the ideal function. Feldman (2008) showed that (correlational) statistical query learning algorithms could be framed as evolutionary mechanisms in Valiant's model. P. Valiant (2012) considered evolvabil...

  3. Safety Analysis of an Evolving Software Architecture

    OpenAIRE

    de Lemos, Rogério

    2000-01-01

    The safety analysis of an evolving software system has to consider the impact that changes might have on the software components, and to provide confidence that the risk is acceptable. If the impact of a change is not thoroughly analysed, accidents can occur as a result of faulty interactions between components, for example. However, the process of safety analysis can be enhanced if appropriate abstractions are provided for modelling and analysing software components and their interactions. I...

  4. Systems of Accumulation and the Evolving MEC

    OpenAIRE

    Ashman, Sam; Fine, Ben; Newman, Susan

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe limitations of the Developmental State Paradigm were discussed in the introductory chapter to this volume. This chapter offers an alternative approach to the DSP through use of the notion of systems of (capital) accumulation and its specific application to South Africa’s evolving political economy, which we characterise as the ‘Minerals-Energy Complex’ (MEC) following Fine and Rustomjee (1996).

  5. The evolving epidemiology of stone disease

    OpenAIRE

    Roudakova, Ksenia; Monga, Manoj

    2014-01-01

    The epidemiology of kidney stones is evolving – not only is the prevalence increasing, but also the gender gap has narrowed. What drives these changes? Diet, obesity or environmental factors? This article will review the possible explanations for a shift in the epidemiology, with the hope of gaining a better understanding of the extent to which modifiable risk factors play a role on stone formation and what measures may be undertaken for disease prevention in view of these changing trends.

  6. The evolving epidemiology of stone disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roudakova, Ksenia; Monga, Manoj

    2014-01-01

    The epidemiology of kidney stones is evolving - not only is the prevalence increasing, but also the gender gap has narrowed. What drives these changes? Diet, obesity or environmental factors? This article will review the possible explanations for a shift in the epidemiology, with the hope of gaining a better understanding of the extent to which modifiable risk factors play a role on stone formation and what measures may be undertaken for disease prevention in view of these changing trends. PMID:24497682

  7. Quantum games on evolving random networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawela, Łukasz

    2016-09-01

    We study the advantages of quantum strategies in evolutionary social dilemmas on evolving random networks. We focus our study on the two-player games: prisoner's dilemma, snowdrift and stag-hunt games. The obtained result show the benefits of quantum strategies for the prisoner's dilemma game. For the other two games, we obtain regions of parameters where the quantum strategies dominate, as well as regions where the classical strategies coexist.

  8. The evolving epidemiology of inflammatory bowel disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, Fergus

    2009-07-01

    Epidemiologic studies in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) include assessments of disease burden and evolving patterns of disease presentation. Although it is hoped that sound epidemiologic studies provide aetiological clues, traditional risk factor-based epidemiology has provided limited insights into either Crohn\\'s disease or ulcerative colitis etiopathogenesis. In this update, we will summarize how the changing epidemiology of IBD associated with modernization can be reconciled with current concepts of disease mechanisms and will discuss studies of clinically significant comorbidity in IBD.

  9. Human Communication Systems Evolve by Cultural Selection

    OpenAIRE

    Fay, Nicolas; Tamariz, Monica; Ellison, T. Mark; Barr, Dale

    2014-01-01

    Human communication systems, such as language, evolve culturally; their components undergo reproduction and variation. However, a role for selection in cultural evolutionary dynamics is less clear. Often neutral evolution (also known as 'drift') models, are used to explain the evolution of human communication systems, and cultural evolution more generally. Under this account, cultural change is unbiased: for instance, vocabulary, baby names and pottery designs have been found to spread throug...

  10. Quantum games on evolving random networks

    CERN Document Server

    Pawela, Łukasz

    2015-01-01

    We study the advantages of quantum strategies in evolutionary social dilemmas on evolving random networks. We focus our study on the two-player games: prisoner's dilemma, snowdrift and stag-hunt games. The obtained result show the benefits of quantum strategies for the prisoner's dilemma game. For the other two games, we obtain regions of parameters where the quantum strategies dominate, as well as regions where the classical strategies coexist.

  11. Emerging and Evolving Ovarian Cancer Animal Models

    OpenAIRE

    Bobbs, Alexander S; Jennifer M. Cole; Cowden Dahl, Karen D.

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer (OC) is the leading cause of death from a gynecological malignancy in the United States. By the time a woman is diagnosed with OC, the tumor has usually metastasized. Mouse models that are used to recapitulate different aspects of human OC have been evolving for nearly 40 years. Xenograft studies in immunocompromised and immunocompetent mice have enhanced our knowledge of metastasis and immune cell involvement in cancer. Patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) can accurately reflect ...

  12. Novel protein kinase signaling systems regulating lifespan identified by small molecule library screening using Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen R Spindler

    Full Text Available Protein kinase signaling cascades control most aspects of cellular function. The ATP binding domains of signaling protein kinases are the targets of most available inhibitors. These domains are highly conserved from mammals to flies. Herein we describe screening of a library of small molecule inhibitors of protein kinases for their ability to increase Drosophila lifespan. We developed an assay system which allowed screening using the small amounts of materials normally present in commercial chemical libraries. The studies identified 17 inhibitors, the majority of which targeted tyrosine kinases associated with the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF/vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF receptors, G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR, Janus kinase (JAK/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT, the insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGFI receptors. Comparison of the protein kinase signaling effects of the inhibitors in vitro defined a consensus intracellular signaling profile which included decreased signaling by p38MAPK (p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK and protein kinase C (PKC. If confirmed, many of these kinases will be novel additions to the signaling cascades known to regulate metazoan longevity.

  13. Breast cancer management: Past, present and evolving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Akram

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is known from ancient time,and the treatment strategy evolved as our understanding of the disease changed with time. In 460 BC Hippocrates described breast cancer as a humoral disease and presently after a lot of studies breast cancer is considered as a local disease with systemic roots. For most of the twentieth century Halsted radical mastectomy was the "established and standardized operation for cancer of the breast in all stages, early or late". New information about tumor biology and its behavior suggested that less radical surgery might be just as effective as the more extensive one. Eventually, with the use of adjuvant therapy likeradiation and systemic therapy, the extent of surgical resection in the breast and axilla got reduced further and led to an era of breast conservation. The radiation treatment of breast cancer has evolved from 2D to 3D Conformal and to accelarated partial breast irradiation, aiming to reduce normal tissue toxicity and overall treatment time. Systemic therapy in the form of hormone therapy, chemotherapy and biological agents is now a well-established modality in treatment of breast cancer. The current perspective of breast cancer management is based on the rapidly evolving and increasingly integrated study on the genetic, molecular , biochemical and cellular basis of disease. The challenge for the future is to take advantage of this knowledge for the prediction of therapeutic outcome and develop therapies and rapidly apply more novel biologic therapeutics.

  14. Markov Chain-based Degree Distributions of Evolving Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang Xing KONG; Zhen Ting HOU; Ding Hua SHI; Quan Rong CHEN; Qing Gui ZHAO

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,we study a class of stochastic processes,called evolving network Markov chains,in evolving networks. Our approach is to transform the degree distribution problem of an evolving network to a corresponding problem of evolving network Markov chains.We investigate the evolving network Markov chains,thereby obtaining some exact formulas as well as a precise criterion for determining whether the steady degree distribution of the evolving network is a power-law or not.With this new method,we finally obtain a rigorous,exact and unified solution of the steady degree distribution of the evolving network.

  15. Structure of the P{sub II} signal transduction protein of Neisseria meningitidis at 1.85 Å resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, Charles E. [Division of Structural Biology, Henry Wellcome Building for Genomic Medicine, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Sainsbury, Sarah; Berrow, Nick S.; Alderton, David [The Oxford Protein Production Facility, Henry Wellcome Building for Genomic Medicine, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Saunders, Nigel J. [The Bacterial Pathogenesis and Functional Genomics Group, The Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3RE (United Kingdom); Stammers, David K. [Division of Structural Biology, Henry Wellcome Building for Genomic Medicine, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); The Oxford Protein Production Facility, Henry Wellcome Building for Genomic Medicine, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Owens, Raymond J., E-mail: ray@strubi.ox.ac.uk [The Oxford Protein Production Facility, Henry Wellcome Building for Genomic Medicine, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Division of Structural Biology, Henry Wellcome Building for Genomic Medicine, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom)

    2006-06-01

    The structure of the P{sub II} signal transduction protein of N. meningitidis at 1.85 Å resolution is described. The P{sub II} signal transduction proteins GlnB and GlnK are implicated in the regulation of nitrogen assimilation in Escherichia coli and other enteric bacteria. P{sub II}-like proteins are widely distributed in bacteria, archaea and plants. In contrast to other bacteria, Neisseria are limited to a single P{sub II} protein (NMB 1995), which shows a high level of sequence identity to GlnB and GlnK from Escherichia coli (73 and 62%, respectively). The structure of the P{sub II} protein from N. meningitidis (serotype B) has been solved by molecular replacement to a resolution of 1.85 Å. Comparison of the structure with those of other P{sub II} proteins shows that the overall fold is tightly conserved across the whole population of related proteins, in particular the positions of the residues implicated in ATP binding. It is proposed that the Neisseria P{sub II} protein shares functions with GlnB/GlnK of enteric bacteria.

  16. Marine Natural Products as Breast Cancer Resistance Protein Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilia Cherigo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP is a protein belonging to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter superfamily that has clinical relevance due to its multi-drug resistance properties in cancer. BCRP can be associated with clinical cancer drug resistance, in particular acute myelogenous or acute lymphocytic leukemias. The overexpression of BCRP contributes to the resistance of several chemotherapeutic drugs, such as topotecan, methotrexate, mitoxantrone, doxorubicin and daunorubicin. The Food and Drugs Administration has already recognized that BCRP is clinically one of the most important drug transporters, mainly because it leads to a reduction of clinical efficacy of various anticancer drugs through its ATP-dependent drug efflux pump function as well as its apparent participation in drug resistance. This review article aims to summarize the different research findings on marine natural products with BCRP inhibiting activity. In this sense, the potential modulation of physiological targets of BCRP by natural or synthetic compounds offers a great possibility for the discovery of new drugs and valuable research tools to recognize the function of the complex ABC-transporters.

  17. Evolvability Is an Evolved Ability: The Coding Concept as the Arch-Unit of Natural Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janković, Srdja; Ćirković, Milan M.

    2016-03-01

    Physical processes that characterize living matter are qualitatively distinct in that they involve encoding and transfer of specific types of information. Such information plays an active part in the control of events that are ultimately linked to the capacity of the system to persist and multiply. This algorithmicity of life is a key prerequisite for its Darwinian evolution, driven by natural selection acting upon stochastically arising variations of the encoded information. The concept of evolvability attempts to define the total capacity of a system to evolve new encoded traits under appropriate conditions, i.e., the accessible section of total morphological space. Since this is dependent on previously evolved regulatory networks that govern information flow in the system, evolvability itself may be regarded as an evolved ability. The way information is physically written, read and modified in living cells (the "coding concept") has not changed substantially during the whole history of the Earth's biosphere. This biosphere, be it alone or one of many, is, accordingly, itself a product of natural selection, since the overall evolvability conferred by its coding concept (nucleic acids as information carriers with the "rulebook of meanings" provided by codons, as well as all the subsystems that regulate various conditional information-reading modes) certainly played a key role in enabling this biosphere to survive up to the present, through alterations of planetary conditions, including at least five catastrophic events linked to major mass extinctions. We submit that, whatever the actual prebiotic physical and chemical processes may have been on our home planet, or may, in principle, occur at some time and place in the Universe, a particular coding concept, with its respective potential to give rise to a biosphere, or class of biospheres, of a certain evolvability, may itself be regarded as a unit (indeed the arch-unit) of natural selection.

  18. Evolvability Is an Evolved Ability: The Coding Concept as the Arch-Unit of Natural Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janković, Srdja; Ćirković, Milan M

    2016-03-01

    Physical processes that characterize living matter are qualitatively distinct in that they involve encoding and transfer of specific types of information. Such information plays an active part in the control of events that are ultimately linked to the capacity of the system to persist and multiply. This algorithmicity of life is a key prerequisite for its Darwinian evolution, driven by natural selection acting upon stochastically arising variations of the encoded information. The concept of evolvability attempts to define the total capacity of a system to evolve new encoded traits under appropriate conditions, i.e., the accessible section of total morphological space. Since this is dependent on previously evolved regulatory networks that govern information flow in the system, evolvability itself may be regarded as an evolved ability. The way information is physically written, read and modified in living cells (the "coding concept") has not changed substantially during the whole history of the Earth's biosphere. This biosphere, be it alone or one of many, is, accordingly, itself a product of natural selection, since the overall evolvability conferred by its coding concept (nucleic acids as information carriers with the "rulebook of meanings" provided by codons, as well as all the subsystems that regulate various conditional information-reading modes) certainly played a key role in enabling this biosphere to survive up to the present, through alterations of planetary conditions, including at least five catastrophic events linked to major mass extinctions. We submit that, whatever the actual prebiotic physical and chemical processes may have been on our home planet, or may, in principle, occur at some time and place in the Universe, a particular coding concept, with its respective potential to give rise to a biosphere, or class of biospheres, of a certain evolvability, may itself be regarded as a unit (indeed the arch-unit) of natural selection.

  19. Competitive interactions of ligands and macromolecular crowders with maltose binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew C Miklos

    Full Text Available Cellular signaling involves a cascade of recognition events occurring in a complex environment with high concentrations of proteins, polysaccharides, and other macromolecules. The influence of macromolecular crowders on protein binding affinity through hard-core repulsion is well studied, and possible contributions of protein-crowder soft attraction have been implicated recently. Here we present direct evidence for weak association of maltose binding protein (MBP with a polysaccharide crowder Ficoll, and that this association effectively competes with the binding of the natural ligand, maltose. Titration data over wide ranges of maltose and Ficoll concentrations fit well with a three-state competitive binding model. Broadening of MBP (1H-(15N TROSY spectra by the addition of Ficoll indicates weak protein-crowder association, and subsequent recovery of sharp NMR peaks upon addition of maltose indicates that the interactions of the crowder and the ligand with MBP are competitive. We hypothesize that, in the Escherichia coli periplasm, the competitive interactions of polysaccharides and maltose with MBP could allow MBP to shuttle between the peptidoglycan attached to the outer membrane and the ATP-binding cassette transporter in the inner membrane.

  20. Characterisation of the salmon cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein for structural studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi L. Pollock

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR is a chloride channel highly expressed in the gills of Salmo salar, with a role in osmoregulation. It shares 60% identity with the human CFTR channel, mutations to which can cause the common genetic disorder cystic fibrosis CF. The expression and localisation of salmon CFTR have been investigated, but the isolated protein has not been extensively characterised. Here we present a protocol for the purification of recombinant salmon CFTR, along with biophysical and structural characterisation of the purified protein. Salmon CFTR was overexpressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, solubilised in the detergent LPG-14 and chromatographically purified by nickel-affinity and size-exclusion chromatography methods. Prior to size-exclusion chromatography samples of salmon CFTR had low purity, and contained large quantities of aggregated protein. Compared to size-exclusion chromatography profiles of other orthologues of CFTR, which had less evidence of aggregation, salmon CFTR appeared to have lower intrinsic stability than human and platypus CFTR. Nonetheless, repeated size-exclusion chromatography allowed monodisperse salmon CFTR to be isolated, and multi-angle light scattering was used to determine its oligomeric state. The monodispersity of the sample and its oligomeric state were confirmed using cryo-electron microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS. These data were also processed to calculate a low-resolution structure of the salmon CFTR, which showed similar architecture to other ATP-binding cassette proteins.

  1. Insect sex determination: it all evolves around transformer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhulst, Eveline C; van de Zande, Louis; Beukeboom, Leo W

    2010-08-01

    Insects exhibit a variety of sex determining mechanisms including male or female heterogamety and haplodiploidy. The primary signal that starts sex determination is processed by a cascade of genes ending with the conserved switch doublesex that controls sexual differentiation. Transformer is the doublesex splicing regulator and has been found in all examined insects, indicating its ancestral function as a sex-determining gene. Despite this conserved function, the variation in transformer nucleotide sequence, amino acid composition and protein structure can accommodate a multitude of upstream sex determining signals. Transformer regulation of doublesex and its taxonomic distribution indicate that the doublesex-transformer axis is conserved among all insects and that transformer is the key gene around which variation in sex determining mechanisms has evolved.

  2. Sequence analysis of the large polymerase (L) protein of the US strain of avian metapneumovirus indicates a close resemblance to that of the human metapneumovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Dhanasekaran; Samal, Siba K

    2004-09-15

    The complete nucleotide sequence of the large polymerase (L) protein of the avian metapneumovirus subgroup C strain Colorado was determined. The L protein gene of avian pneumovirus Colorado isolate (APV-C) was 6173 nucleotides in length from the gene-start to the gene-end and encoded a polypeptide of 2005 amino acids in length. The length of the L protein of APV-C was exactly the same as that of human metapneumovirus (hMPV) and one amino acid longer than the L protein of APV subgroup A. The L protein of APV-C showed 80% amino acid identity with the L protein of hMPV, but only 64% amino acid identity with the L protein of APV-A. The nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences were compared with the corresponding sequences of eleven other paramyxoviruses. All six domains characteristic of paramyxovirus L proteins were also observed in the L protein of APV-C. All the polymerase core motifs in domain III were conserved to nearly 100% in the metapneumoviruses. Similarly, the putative ATP-binding motif in domain VI was completely conserved among the metapneumoviruses and differed in length, by one intermediate residue, from other paramyxoviruses. Phylogenetic analysis of the different L proteins also revealed a closer relationship between APV-C and hMPV.

  3. Phosphorylated and Nonphosphorylated Serine and Threonine Residues Evolve at Different Rates in Mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Sean Chun-Chang; Chen, Feng-Chi; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2010-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation plays an important role in the regulation of protein function. Phosphorylated residues are generally assumed to be subject to functional constraint, but it has recently been suggested from a comparison of distantly related vertebrate species that most phosphorylated residues evolve at the rates consistent with the surrounding regions. To resolve the controversy, we infer the ancestral phosphoproteome of human and mouse to compare the evolutionary rates of phosphorylate...

  4. Survivability is more fundamental than evolvability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Palmer

    Full Text Available For a lineage to survive over long time periods, it must sometimes change. This has given rise to the term evolvability, meaning the tendency to produce adaptive variation. One lineage may be superior to another in terms of its current standing variation, or it may tend to produce more adaptive variation. However, evolutionary outcomes depend on more than standing variation and produced adaptive variation: deleterious variation also matters. Evolvability, as most commonly interpreted, is not predictive of evolutionary outcomes. Here, we define a predictive measure of the evolutionary success of a lineage that we call the k-survivability, defined as the probability that the lineage avoids extinction for k generations. We estimate the k-survivability using multiple experimental replicates. Because we measure evolutionary outcomes, the initial standing variation, the full spectrum of generated variation, and the heritability of that variation are all incorporated. Survivability also accounts for the decreased joint likelihood of extinction of sub-lineages when they 1 disperse in space, or 2 diversify in lifestyle. We illustrate measurement of survivability with in silico models, and suggest that it may also be measured in vivo using multiple longitudinal replicates. The k-survivability is a metric that enables the quantitative study of, for example, the evolution of 1 mutation rates, 2 dispersal mechanisms, 3 the genotype-phenotype map, and 4 sexual reproduction, in temporally and spatially fluctuating environments. Although these disparate phenomena evolve by well-understood microevolutionary rules, they are also subject to the macroevolutionary constraint of long-term survivability.

  5. Structural Analysis of Semi-specific Oligosaccharide Recognition by a Cellulose-binding Protein of Thermotoga maritima Reveals Adaptations for Functional Diversification of the Oligopeptide Periplasmic Binding Protein Fold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuneo, Matthew J.; Beese, Lorena S.; Hellinga, Homme W.; (Duke)

    2010-05-25

    Periplasmic binding proteins (PBPs) constitute a protein superfamily that binds a wide variety of ligands. In prokaryotes, PBPs function as receptors for ATP-binding cassette or tripartite ATP-independent transporters and chemotaxis systems. In many instances, PBPs bind their cognate ligands with exquisite specificity, distinguishing, for example, between sugar epimers or structurally similar anions. By contrast, oligopeptide-binding proteins bind their ligands through interactions with the peptide backbone but do not distinguish between different side chains. The extremophile Thermotoga maritima possesses a remarkable array of carbohydrate-processing metabolic systems, including the hydrolysis of cellulosic polymers. Here, we present the crystal structure of a T. maritima cellobiose-binding protein (tm0031) that is homologous to oligopeptide-binding proteins. T. maritima cellobiose-binding protein binds a variety of lengths of {beta}(1 {yields} 4)-linked glucose oligomers, ranging from two rings (cellobiose) to five (cellopentaose). The structure reveals that binding is semi-specific. The disaccharide at the nonreducing end binds specifically; the other rings are located in a large solvent-filled groove, where the reducing end makes several contacts with the protein, thereby imposing an upper limit of the oligosaccharides that are recognized. Semi-specific recognition, in which a molecular class rather than individual species is selected, provides an efficient solution for the uptake of complex mixtures.

  6. Mobile computing acceptance grows as applications evolve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porn, Louis M; Patrick, Kelly

    2002-01-01

    Handheld devices are becoming more cost-effective to own, and their use in healthcare environments is increasing. Handheld devices currently are being used for e-prescribing, charge capture, and accessing daily schedules and reference tools. Future applications may include education on medications, dictation, order entry, and test-results reporting. Selecting the right handheld device requires careful analysis of current and future applications, as well as vendor expertise. It is important to recognize the technology will continue to evolve over the next three years.

  7. Evolving Networks with Nonlinear Assignment of Weight

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Chao; TANG Yi

    2006-01-01

    We propose a weighted evolving network model in which the underlying topological structure is still driven by the degree according to the preferential attachment rule while the weight assigned to the newly established edges is dependent on the degree in a nonlinear form. By varying the parameter α that controls the function determining the assignment of weight, a wide variety of power-law behaviours of the total weight distributions as well as the diversity of the weight distributions of edges are displayed. Variation of correlation and heterogeneity in the network is illustrated as well.

  8. Mobile computing acceptance grows as applications evolve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porn, Louis M; Patrick, Kelly

    2002-01-01

    Handheld devices are becoming more cost-effective to own, and their use in healthcare environments is increasing. Handheld devices currently are being used for e-prescribing, charge capture, and accessing daily schedules and reference tools. Future applications may include education on medications, dictation, order entry, and test-results reporting. Selecting the right handheld device requires careful analysis of current and future applications, as well as vendor expertise. It is important to recognize the technology will continue to evolve over the next three years. PMID:11806321

  9. Logistic Regression for Evolving Data Streams Classification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Zhi-wu; HUANG Shang-teng; XUE Gui-rong

    2007-01-01

    Logistic regression is a fast classifier and can achieve higher accuracy on small training data. Moreover,it can work on both discrete and continuous attributes with nonlinear patterns. Based on these properties of logistic regression, this paper proposed an algorithm, called evolutionary logistical regression classifier (ELRClass), to solve the classification of evolving data streams. This algorithm applies logistic regression repeatedly to a sliding window of samples in order to update the existing classifier, to keep this classifier if its performance is deteriorated by the reason of bursting noise, or to construct a new classifier if a major concept drift is detected. The intensive experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of this algorithm.

  10. The tree length of an evolving coalescent

    CERN Document Server

    Pfaffelhuber, Peter; Weisshaupt, Heinz

    2009-01-01

    A well-established model for the genealogy of a large population in equilibrium is Kingman's coalescent. For the population together with its genealogy evolving in time, this gives rise to a time-stationary tree-valued process. We study the sum of the branch lengths, briefly denoted as tree length, and prove that the (suitably compensated) sequence of tree length processes converges, as the population size tends to infinity, to a limit process with cadlag paths, infinite infinitesimal variance, and a Gumbel distribution as its equilibrium.

  11. An evolving network model with community structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many social and biological networks consist of communities-groups of nodes within which connections are dense, but between which connections are sparser. Recently, there has been considerable interest in designing algorithms for detecting community structures in real-world complex networks. In this paper, we propose an evolving network model which exhibits community structure. The network model is based on the inner-community preferential attachment and inter-community preferential attachment mechanisms. The degree distributions of this network model are analysed based on a mean-field method. Theoretical results and numerical simulations indicate that this network model has community structure and scale-free properties

  12. Strength dynamics of weighted evolving networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Jian-Jun; Gao Zi-You; Sun Hui-Jun

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, a simple model for the strength dynamics of weighted evolving networks is proposed to characterize the weighted networks. By considering the congestion effects, this approach can yield power law strength distribution appeared on the many real weighted networks, such as traffic networks, internet networks. Besides, the relationship between strength and degree is given. Numerical simulations indicate that the strength distribution is strongly related to the strength dynamics decline. The model also provides us with a better description of the real weighted networks.

  13. Evolved preambles for MAX-SAT heuristics

    CERN Document Server

    Rigo, Luis O

    2011-01-01

    MAX-SAT heuristics normally operate from random initial truth assignments to the variables. We consider the use of what we call preambles, which are sequences of variables with corresponding single-variable assignment actions intended to be used to determine a more suitable initial truth assignment for a given problem instance and a given heuristic. For a number of well established MAX-SAT heuristics and benchmark instances, we demonstrate that preambles can be evolved by a genetic algorithm such that the heuristics are outperformed in a significant fraction of the cases.

  14. Netgram: Visualizing Communities in Evolving Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghvendra Mall

    Full Text Available Real-world complex networks are dynamic in nature and change over time. The change is usually observed in the interactions within the network over time. Complex networks exhibit community like structures. A key feature of the dynamics of complex networks is the evolution of communities over time. Several methods have been proposed to detect and track the evolution of these groups over time. However, there is no generic tool which visualizes all the aspects of group evolution in dynamic networks including birth, death, splitting, merging, expansion, shrinkage and continuation of groups. In this paper, we propose Netgram: a tool for visualizing evolution of communities in time-evolving graphs. Netgram maintains evolution of communities over 2 consecutive time-stamps in tables which are used to create a query database using the sql outer-join operation. It uses a line-based visualization technique which adheres to certain design principles and aesthetic guidelines. Netgram uses a greedy solution to order the initial community information provided by the evolutionary clustering technique such that we have fewer line cross-overs in the visualization. This makes it easier to track the progress of individual communities in time evolving graphs. Netgram is a generic toolkit which can be used with any evolutionary community detection algorithm as illustrated in our experiments. We use Netgram for visualization of topic evolution in the NIPS conference over a period of 11 years and observe the emergence and merging of several disciplines in the field of information processing systems.

  15. Early formation of evolved asteroidal crust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, James M D; Ash, Richard D; Liu, Yang; Bellucci, Jeremy J; Rumble, Douglas; McDonough, William F; Walker, Richard J; Taylor, Lawrence A

    2009-01-01

    Mechanisms for the formation of crust on planetary bodies remain poorly understood. It is generally accepted that Earth's andesitic continental crust is the product of plate tectonics, whereas the Moon acquired its feldspar-rich crust by way of plagioclase flotation in a magma ocean. Basaltic meteorites provide evidence that, like the terrestrial planets, some asteroids generated crust and underwent large-scale differentiation processes. Until now, however, no evolved felsic asteroidal crust has been sampled or observed. Here we report age and compositional data for the newly discovered, paired and differentiated meteorites Graves Nunatak (GRA) 06128 and GRA 06129. These meteorites are feldspar-rich, with andesite bulk compositions. Their age of 4.52 +/- 0.06 Gyr demonstrates formation early in Solar System history. The isotopic and elemental compositions, degree of metamorphic re-equilibration and sulphide-rich nature of the meteorites are most consistent with an origin as partial melts from a volatile-rich, oxidized asteroid. GRA 06128 and 06129 are the result of a newly recognized style of evolved crust formation, bearing witness to incomplete differentiation of their parent asteroid and to previously unrecognized diversity of early-formed materials in the Solar System. PMID:19129845

  16. Collapse of cooperation in evolving games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Alexander J; Plotkin, Joshua B

    2014-12-01

    Game theory provides a quantitative framework for analyzing the behavior of rational agents. The Iterated Prisoner's Dilemma in particular has become a standard model for studying cooperation and cheating, with cooperation often emerging as a robust outcome in evolving populations. Here we extend evolutionary game theory by allowing players' payoffs as well as their strategies to evolve in response to selection on heritable mutations. In nature, many organisms engage in mutually beneficial interactions and individuals may seek to change the ratio of risk to reward for cooperation by altering the resources they commit to cooperative interactions. To study this, we construct a general framework for the coevolution of strategies and payoffs in arbitrary iterated games. We show that, when there is a tradeoff between the benefits and costs of cooperation, coevolution often leads to a dramatic loss of cooperation in the Iterated Prisoner's Dilemma. The collapse of cooperation is so extreme that the average payoff in a population can decline even as the potential reward for mutual cooperation increases. Depending upon the form of tradeoffs, evolution may even move away from the Iterated Prisoner's Dilemma game altogether. Our work offers a new perspective on the Prisoner's Dilemma and its predictions for cooperation in natural populations; and it provides a general framework to understand the coevolution of strategies and payoffs in iterated interactions. PMID:25422421

  17. Structural and functional characterization of solute binding proteins for aromatic compounds derived from lignin: p-coumaric acid and related aromatic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kemin; Chang, Changsoo; Cuff, Marianne; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Landorf, Elizabeth; Mack, Jamey C; Zerbs, Sarah; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Collart, Frank R

    2013-10-01

    Lignin comprises 15-25% of plant biomass and represents a major environmental carbon source for utilization by soil microorganisms. Access to this energy resource requires the action of fungal and bacterial enzymes to break down the lignin polymer into a complex assortment of aromatic compounds that can be transported into the cells. To improve our understanding of the utilization of lignin by microorganisms, we characterized the molecular properties of solute binding proteins of ATP-binding cassette transporter proteins that interact with these compounds. A combination of functional screens and structural studies characterized the binding specificity of the solute binding proteins for aromatic compounds derived from lignin such as p-coumarate, 3-phenylpropionic acid and compounds with more complex ring substitutions. A ligand screen based on thermal stabilization identified several binding protein clusters that exhibit preferences based on the size or number of aromatic ring substituents. Multiple X-ray crystal structures of protein-ligand complexes for these clusters identified the molecular basis of the binding specificity for the lignin-derived aromatic compounds. The screens and structural data provide new functional assignments for these solute-binding proteins which can be used to infer their transport specificity. This knowledge of the functional roles and molecular binding specificity of these proteins will support the identification of the specific enzymes and regulatory proteins of peripheral pathways that funnel these compounds to central metabolic pathways and will improve the predictive power of sequence-based functional annotation methods for this family of proteins.

  18. A possible molecular metric for biological evolvability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aditya Mittal; B Jayaram

    2012-07-01

    Proteins manifest themselves as phenotypic traits, retained or lost in living systems via evolutionary pressures. Simply put, survival is essentially the ability of a living system to synthesize a functional protein that allows for a response to environmental perturbations (adaptation). Loss of functional proteins leads to extinction. Currently there are no universally applicable quantitative metrics at the molecular level for either measuring ‘evolvability’ of life or for assessing the conditions under which a living system would go extinct and why. In this work, we show emergence of the first such metric by utilizing the recently discovered stoichiometric margin of life for all known naturally occurring (and functional) proteins. The constraint of having well-defined stoichiometries of the 20 amino acids in naturally occurring protein sequences requires utilization of the full scope of degeneracy in the genetic code, i.e. usage of all codons coding for an amino acid, by only 11 of the 20 amino acids. This shows that the non-availability of individual codons for these 11 amino acids would disturb the fine stoichiometric balance resulting in non-functional proteins and hence extinction. Remarkably, these amino acids are found in close proximity of any given amino acid in the backbones of thousands of known crystal structures of folded proteins. On the other hand, stoichiometry of the remaining 9 amino acids, found to be farther/distal from any given amino acid in backbones of folded proteins, is maintained independent of the number of codons available to synthesize them, thereby providing some robustness and hence survivability.

  19. Detection of timescales in evolving complex systems

    CERN Document Server

    Darst, Richard K; Arenas, Alex; Gómez, Sergio; Saramäki, Jari; Fortunato, Santo

    2016-01-01

    Most complex systems are intrinsically dynamic in nature. The evolution of a dynamic complex system is typically represented as a sequence of snapshots, where each snapshot describes the configuration of the system at a particular instant of time. Then, one may directly follow how the snapshots evolve in time, or aggregate the snapshots within some time intervals to form representative "slices" of the evolution of the system configuration. This is often done with constant intervals, whose duration is based on arguments on the nature of the system and of its dynamics. A more refined approach would be to consider the rate of activity in the system to perform a separation of timescales. However, an even better alternative would be to define dynamic intervals that match the evolution of the system's configuration. To this end, we propose a method that aims at detecting evolutionary changes in the configuration of a complex system, and generates intervals accordingly. We show that evolutionary timescales can be id...

  20. Modelling of the Evolving Stable Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorbjan, Zbigniew

    2014-06-01

    A single-column model of the evolving stable boundary layer (SBL) is tested for self-similar properties of the flow and effects of ambient forcing. The turbulence closure of the model is diagnostic, based on the K-theory approach, with a semi-empirical form of the mixing length, and empirical stability functions of the Richardson number. The model results, expressed in terms of local similarity scales, are universal functions, satisfied in the entire SBL. Based on similarity expression, a realizability condition is derived for the minimum allowable turbulent heat flux in the SBL. Numerical experiments show that the development of "horse-shoe" shaped, fixed-elevation hodographs in the interior of the SBL around sunrise is controlled by effects imposed by surface thermal forcing.

  1. Evolving unipolar memristor spiking neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, David; Bull, Larry; De Lacy Costello, Ben

    2015-10-01

    Neuromorphic computing - brain-like computing in hardware - typically requires myriad complimentary metal oxide semiconductor spiking neurons interconnected by a dense mesh of nanoscale plastic synapses. Memristors are frequently cited as strong synapse candidates due to their statefulness and potential for low-power implementations. To date, plentiful research has focused on the bipolar memristor synapse, which is capable of incremental weight alterations and can provide adaptive self-organisation under a Hebbian learning scheme. In this paper, we consider the unipolar memristor synapse - a device capable of non-Hebbian switching between only two states (conductive and resistive) through application of a suitable input voltage - and discuss its suitability for neuromorphic systems. A self-adaptive evolutionary process is used to autonomously find highly fit network configurations. Experimentation on two robotics tasks shows that unipolar memristor networks evolve task-solving controllers faster than both bipolar memristor networks and networks containing constant non-plastic connections whilst performing at least comparably.

  2. THE J STRUCTURE IN ECONOMIC EVOLVING PROCESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Fukang; CHEN Qinghua

    2003-01-01

    The economic evolution exhibits complexity. Behind the variable and fiuctuant economic data there exists basic characters and rules. One basic structure in economic evolving process called as "J" structure is studied by us. This kind of structure exists in a wide area, such as economic growth, technology innovation, international trade, education, human capital, ecology and environment etc. From the view of economic evolution, J structure has the character that system should suffer the pressure of initial investment with profit decreasing but get larger return afterwards. It is a kind of adaptation in complex economic systems; it reflects the adaptive and reformative ability of the system under the surrounding change. We illustrate the J structure by discussing economic growth. Based on a two-dimension dynamic system the geometric character and mechanism of J structure are studied, also the phase graphs with its condition are given. Also some further works are discussed.

  3. Hyperhidrosis: evolving concepts and a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorkamp, Tobias; Foo, Fung Joon; Khan, Sidra; Schmitto, Jan D; Wilson, Paul

    2010-10-01

    Hyperhidrosis (primary or secondary) describes a disorder of excessive sweating. It has a significant negative impact on quality of life and affects nearly 1% of the population living in the United Kingdom (UK). Axillary involvement is the most common affecting 80% of cases. A common link to these disorders is an extreme non-thermoregulatory sympathetic stimulus of exocrine sweat glands, mostly due to emotional stimuli. Non-surgical treatment involves topical medication, iontophoresis and systemic anti-cholinergics. More recently the use of intradermal botulinum toxin has gained popularity. Surgical treatment reserved for severe cases, not responding to conservative management involves local excision, curettage and thoracoscopic sympathectomy. Evolving concepts for treatment, risks and benefits are discussed in the paper herein. PMID:20709287

  4. Quantum mechanics in an evolving Hilbert space

    CERN Document Server

    Artacho, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    Many basis sets for electronic structure calculations evolve with varying external parameters, such as moving atoms in dynamic simulations, giving rise to extra derivative terms in the dynamical equations. Here we revisit these derivatives in the context of differential geometry, thereby obtaining a more transparent formalisation, and a geometrical perspective for better understanding the resulting equations. The effect of the evolution of the basis set within the spanned Hilbert space separates explicitly from the effect of the turning of the space itself when moving in parameter space, as the tangent space turns when moving in a curved space. New insights are obtained using familiar concepts in that context such as the Riemann curvature. The differential geometry is not strictly that for curved spaces as in general relativity, a more adequate mathematical framework being provided by fibre bundles. The language used here, however, will be restricted to tensors and basic quantum mechanics. The local gauge imp...

  5. Evolved Mechanisms Versus Underlying Conditional Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astorga Miguel López

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The social contracts theory claims that, in social exchange circumstances, human reasoning is not necessarily led by logic, but by certain evolved mental mechanisms that are useful for catching offenders. An emblematic experiment carried out with the intention to prove this thesis is the first experiment described by Fiddick, Cosmides, and Tooby in their paper of 2000. Lopez Astorga has questioned that experiment claiming that its results depend on an underlying conditional logical form not taken into account by Fiddick, Cosmides, and Tooby. In this paper, I propose an explanation alternative to that of Lopez Astorga, which does not depend on logical forms and is based on the mental models theory. Thus, I conclude that this other alternative explanation is one more proof that the experiment in question does not demonstrate the fundamental thesis of the social contracts theory.

  6. Evolving Classifiers: Methods for Incremental Learning

    CERN Document Server

    Hulley, Greg

    2007-01-01

    The ability of a classifier to take on new information and classes by evolving the classifier without it having to be fully retrained is known as incremental learning. Incremental learning has been successfully applied to many classification problems, where the data is changing and is not all available at once. In this paper there is a comparison between Learn++, which is one of the most recent incremental learning algorithms, and the new proposed method of Incremental Learning Using Genetic Algorithm (ILUGA). Learn++ has shown good incremental learning capabilities on benchmark datasets on which the new ILUGA method has been tested. ILUGA has also shown good incremental learning ability using only a few classifiers and does not suffer from catastrophic forgetting. The results obtained for ILUGA on the Optical Character Recognition (OCR) and Wine datasets are good, with an overall accuracy of 93% and 94% respectively showing a 4% improvement over Learn++.MT for the difficult multi-class OCR dataset.

  7. Finch: A System for Evolving Java (Bytecode)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlov, Michael; Sipper, Moshe

    The established approach in genetic programming (GP) involves the definition of functions and terminals appropriate to the problem at hand, after which evolution of expressions using these definitions takes place. We have recently developed a system, dubbed FINCH (Fertile Darwinian Bytecode Harvester), to evolutionarily improve actual, extant software, which was not intentionally written for the purpose of serving as a GP representation in particular, nor for evolution in general. This is in contrast to existing work that uses restricted subsets of the Java bytecode instruction set as a representation language for individuals in genetic programming. The ability to evolve Java programs will hopefully lead to a valuable new tool in the software engineer's toolkit.

  8. Design of Evolvable Hardware for Robotic Navigation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents an integrated on-line learning system toevolve programmabl e logic array (PLA) controllers for navigating an autonomous robot in a two-dime n sional environment. The integrated on-line learning system consists of two lear n ing modules: one is the module of reinforcement learning based on temporal-diff e rence learning based on genetic algorithms, and the other is the module of evolu tionary learning based on genetic algorithms. The control rules extracted from t he module of reinforcement learning can be used as input to the module of evolut ionary learning, and quickly implemented by the PLA through on-line evolution. T he on-line evolution has shown promise as a method of learning systems in compl e x environment. The evolved PLA controllers can successfully navigate the robot t o a target in the two-dimensional environment while avoiding collisions with ra ndomly positioned obstacles.

  9. The Evolving Structure of Galactic Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Martel, H; McGee, S; Gibson, B; Kawata, D; Martel, Hugo; Brook, Chris; Gee, Sean Mc; Gibson, Brad

    2005-01-01

    Observations suggest that the structural parameters of disk galaxies have not changed greatly since redshift 1. We examine whether these observations are consistent with a cosmology in which structures form hierarchically. We use SPH/N-body galaxy-scale simulations to simulate the formation and evolution of Milky-Way-like disk galaxies by fragmentation, followed by hierarchical merging. The simulated galaxies have a thick disk, that forms in a period of chaotic merging at high redshift, during which a large amount of alpha-elements are produced, and a thin disk, that forms later and has a higher metallicity. Our simulated disks settle down quickly and do not evolve much since redshift z~1, mostly because no major mergers take place between z=1 and z=0. During this period, the disk radius increases (inside-out growth) while its thickness remains constant. These results are consistent with observations of disk galaxies at low and high redshift.

  10. Resiliently evolving supply-demand networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubido, Nicolás; Grebogi, Celso; Baptista, Murilo S.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to design a transport network such that commodities are brought from suppliers to consumers in a steady, optimal, and stable way is of great importance for distribution systems nowadays. In this work, by using the circuit laws of Kirchhoff and Ohm, we provide the exact capacities of the edges that an optimal supply-demand network should have to operate stably under perturbations, i.e., without overloading. The perturbations we consider are the evolution of the connecting topology, the decentralization of hub sources or sinks, and the intermittence of supplier and consumer characteristics. We analyze these conditions and the impact of our results, both on the current United Kingdom power-grid structure and on numerically generated evolving archetypal network topologies.

  11. Epidemic spreading on evolving signed networks

    CERN Document Server

    Saeedian, M; Jafari, G R; Kertesz, J

    2016-01-01

    Most studies of disease spreading consider the underlying social network as obtained without the contagion, though epidemic influences peoples willingness to contact others: A friendly contact may be turned to unfriendly to avoid infection. We study the susceptible-infected (SI) disease spreading model on signed networks, in which each edge is associated with a positive or negative sign representing the friendly or unfriendly relation between its end nodes. In a signed network, according to Heiders theory, edge signs evolve such that finally a state of structural balance is achieved, corresponding to no frustration in physics terms. However, the danger of infection affects the evolution of its edge signs. To describe the coupled problem of the sign evolution and disease spreading, we generalize the notion of structural balance by taking into account the state of the nodes. We introduce an energy function and carry out Monte-Carlo simulations on complete networks to test the energy landscape, where we find loc...

  12. Resiliently evolving supply-demand networks

    CERN Document Server

    Rubido, Nicolás; Baptista, Murilo S

    2013-01-01

    The ability to design a transport network such that commodities are brought from suppliers to consumers in a steady, optimal, and stable way is of great importance for nowadays distribution systems. In this Letter, by using the circuit laws of Kirchhoff and Ohm, we provide the exact capacities of the edges that an optimal supply-demand network should have to operate stably under perturbations. The perturbations we consider are the evolution of the connecting topology, the decentralisation of hub sources or sinks, and the intermittence of suppliers/consumers characteristics. We analyse these conditions and the impact of our results, both on the current UK power-grid structure and on numerically generated evolving archetypal network topologies.

  13. A local-world evolving hypernetwork model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang-Yong; Liu, Jian-Guo

    2014-01-01

    Complex hypernetworks are ubiquitous in the real system. It is very important to investigate the evolution mechanisms. In this paper, we present a local-world evolving hypernetwork model by taking into account the hyperedge growth and local-world hyperedge preferential attachment mechanisms. At each time step, a newly added hyperedge encircles a new coming node and a number of nodes from a randomly selected local world. The number of the selected nodes from the local world obeys the uniform distribution and its mean value is m. The analytical and simulation results show that the hyperdegree approximately obeys the power-law form and the exponent of hyperdegree distribution is γ = 2 + 1/m. Furthermore, we numerically investigate the node degree, hyperedge degree, clustering coefficient, as well as the average distance, and find that the hypernetwork model shares the scale-free and small-world properties, which shed some light for deeply understanding the evolution mechanism of the real systems.

  14. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 199795 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available HREVVCLLGASGCGKSSLLMAIAGLKSANKGQIYLEGRPLTSPHPQIGLVFQQAALLPWLSVRQNIGFGLQFTRMDSLSKAELESRINLAITSVNLDKFEQAYPHQLS...ZP_06305797.1 1117:3837 1161:255 1162:536 244599:33 668331:33 533247:33 Nitrate tra...nsport ATP-binding subunits C and D Raphidiopsis brookii D9 MDYHTTVTRSRLTSVGSEPLLKVEGLQMNYKTRRGTYTAFANINLDVC

  15. Functional Characterization of the Canine Heme-Regulated eIF2α Kinase: Regulation of Protein Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimon C. Kanelakis

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The heme-regulated inhibitor (HRI negatively regulates protein synthesis by phosphorylating eukaryotic initiation factor-2α (eIF2α thereby inhibiting protein translation. The importance of HRI in regulating hemoglobin synthesis in erythroid cells makes it an attractive molecular target in need of further characterization. In this work, we have cloned and expressed the canine form of the HRI kinase. The canine nucleotide sequence has 86%, 82%, and 81% identity to the human, mouse, and rat HRI, respectively. It was noted that an isoleucine residue in the ATP binding site of human, rat, and mouse HRI is replaced by a valine in the canine kinase. The expression of canine HRI protein by in vitro translation using wheat germ lysate or in Sf9 cells using a baculovirus expression system was increased by the addition of hemin. Following purification, the canine protein was found to be 72 kD and showed kinase activity determined by its ability to phosphorylate a synthetic peptide substrate. Quercetin, a kinase inhibitor known to inhibit mouse and human HRI, inhibits canine HRI in a concentration-dependent manner. Additionally, quercetin is able to increase de novo protein synthesis in canine reticulocytes. We conclude that the canine is a suitable model species for studying the role of HRI in erythropoiesis.

  16. A putative amino acid ABC transporter substrate-binding protein, NMB1612, from Neisseria meningitidis, induces murine bactericidal antibodies against meningococci expressing heterologous NMB1612 proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Miao-Chiu; Humbert, María Victoria; Laver, Jay R; Phillips, Renee; Heckels, John E; Christodoulides, Myron

    2015-08-26

    The nmb1612 (NEIS1533) gene encoding the ~27-kDa putative amino acid ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, periplasmic substrate-binding protein from Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B (MenB) strain MC58 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and the purified recombinant (r)NMB1612 was used for animal immunization studies. Immunization of mice with rNMB1612 adsorbed to Al(OH)3 and in liposomes with and without MPLA, induced antiserum with bactericidal activity in an assay using baby rabbit complement, against the homologous strain MC58 (encoding protein representative of Allele 62) and killed heterologous strains encoding proteins of three other alleles (representative of Alleles 1, 64 and 68), with similar SBA titres. However, strain MC58 was not killed (titre protein was killed (median titres of 16-64 in the hSBA). Analysis of the NMB1612 amino acid sequences from 4351 meningococcal strains in the pubmlst.org/Neisseria database and a collection of 13 isolates from colonized individuals and from patients, showed that antibodies raised against rNMB1612 could potentially kill at least 72% of the MenB strains in the complete sequence database. For MenB disease occurring specifically in the UK from 2013 to 2015, >91% of the isolates causing disease in this recent period expressed NMB1612 protein encoded by Allele 1 and could be potentially killed by sera raised to the recombinant antigen in the current study. The NMB1612 protein was surface-accessible and expressed by different meningococcal strains. In summary, the properties of (i) NMB1612 protein conservation and expression, (ii) limited amino acid sequence variation between proteins encoded by different alleles, and (iii) the ability of a recombinant protein to induce cross-strain bactericidal antibodies, would all suggest a promising antigen for consideration for inclusion in new meningococcal vaccines.

  17. Evolving Decision Rules to Predict Investment Opportunities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    This paper is motivated by the interest in finding significant movements in financial stock prices. However, when the number of profitable opportunities is scarce, the prediction of these cases is difficult. In a previous work, we have introduced evolving decision rules (EDR) to detect financial opportunities. The objective of EDR is to classify the minority class (positive cases) in imbalanced environments. EDR provides a range of classifications to find the best balance between not making mistakes and not missing opportunities. The goals of this paper are: 1) to show that EDR produces a range of solutions to suit the investor's preferences and 2) to analyze the factors that benefit the performance of EDR. A series of experiments was performed. EDR was tested using a data set from the London Financial Market. To analyze the EDR behaviour, another experiment was carried out using three artificial data sets, whose solutions have different levels of complexity. Finally, an illustrative example was provided to show how a bigger collection of rules is able to classify more positive cases in imbalanced data sets. Experimental results show that: 1) EDR offers a range of solutions to fit the risk guidelines of different types of investors, and 2) a bigger collection of rules is able to classify more positive cases in imbalanced environments.

  18. THE EVOLVING CONCEPT OF SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PETRONELA-SONIA NEDEA

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the years, the definition of sustainability in development literature has varied widely and broadened in scope. The concept arose in response to economic growth models that characterized development approaches over the last half century. It was eventually recognized that such models did not adequately address social inequalities and led to environmental degradation. The concept gained wider use after the World Commission on Environment and Development published "Our common future" (Brundtland 1987. The economic, social, political and ecological dimensions of the rural environment are complex and have multiple implications, starting with theoretical and practical reasons. The process of urbanization that takes place at world-wide level has become one of the global problems of mankind, because of the disparities created between the countryside and the city, which arematerialized in the cultural, economical and social aspects that are synthesized in the terms of urban and rural civilizations, which define the different realities of the geographical space. Because the concept of sustainable agriculture is still evolving, this paper reviews the ideas, practices and policies that make the basis ofsustainable agriculture concept, in order to suggest to others practical steps that may be appropriate for them in moving toward sustainable agriculture.

  19. UKAEA'S evolving contract philosophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicol, R. D. [UK Atomic Energy Authority, UKAEA, Harwell, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    2003-07-01

    The United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) has gone through fundamental change over the last ten years. At the heart of this change has been UKAEA's relationship with the contracting and supply market. This paper describes the way in which UKAEA actively developed the market to support the decommissioning programme, and how the approach to contracting has evolved as external pressures and demands have changed. UKAEA's pro-active approach to industry has greatly assisted the development of a healthy, competitive market for services supporting decommissioning in the UK. There have been difficult changes and many challenges along the way, and some retrenchment was necessary to meet regulatory requirements. Nevertheless, UKAEA has sustained a high level of competition - now measured in terms of competed spend as a proportion of competable spend - with annual out-turns consistently over 80%. The prime responsibility for market development will pass to the new Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) in 2005, as the owner, on behalf of the Government, of the UK's civil nuclear liabilities. The preparatory work for the NDA indicates that the principles established by UKAEA will be carried forward. (author)

  20. Evolving concepts in primary sclerosing cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krones, Elisabeth; Graziadei, Ivo; Trauner, Michael; Fickert, Peter

    2012-03-01

    Patients suffering from primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) show considerable differences regarding clinical manifestations (i.e. large duct versus small-duct PSC, presence or absence of concomitant inflammatory bowel disease), disease progression, risk for malignancy and response to therapy, raising the question whether PSC may represent a mixed bag of diseases of different aetiologies. The growing list of secondary causes and diseases 'mimicking' or even overlapping with PSC (e.g. IgG4-associated sclerosing cholangitis), which frequently causes problems in clear-cut discrimination from classic PSC and the emerging knowledge about potential disease modifier genes (e.g. variants of CFTR, TGR5 and MDR3) support such a conceptual view. In addition, PSC in children differs significantly from PSC in adults in several aspects resulting in distinct therapeutic concepts. From a clinical perspective, appropriate categorization and careful differential diagnosis are essential for the management of concerned patients. Therefore, the aim of the current review is to summarize current and evolving pathophysiological concepts and to provide up-to-date perspectives including future treatment strategies for PSC.

  1. Stability of Evolving Multi-Agent Systems

    CERN Document Server

    De Wilde, Philippe; 10.1109/TSMCB.2011.2110642

    2011-01-01

    A Multi-Agent System is a distributed system where the agents or nodes perform complex functions that cannot be written down in analytic form. Multi-Agent Systems are highly connected, and the information they contain is mostly stored in the connections. When agents update their state, they take into account the state of the other agents, and they have access to those states via the connections. There is also external, user-generated input into the Multi-Agent System. As so much information is stored in the connections, agents are often memory-less. This memory-less property, together with the randomness of the external input, has allowed us to model Multi-Agent Systems using Markov chains. In this paper, we look at Multi-Agent Systems that evolve, i.e. the number of agents varies according to the fitness of the individual agents. We extend our Markov chain model, and define stability. This is the start of a methodology to control Multi-Agent Systems. We then build upon this to construct an entropy-based defi...

  2. The evolved pulsating CEMP star HD112869

    CERN Document Server

    Začs, L; Grankina, A; Deveikis, V; Kaminskyi, B; Pavlenko, Y; Musaev, F

    2015-01-01

    Radial velocity measurements, $BVR_C$ photometry, and high-resolution spectroscopy in the wavelength region from blue to near infrared are employed in order to clarify the evolutionary status of the carbon-enhanced metal-poor star HD112869 with unique ratio of carbon isotopes in the atmosphere. An LTE abundance analysis was carried out using the method of spectral synthesis and new self consistent 1D atmospheric models. The radial velocity monitoring confirmed semiregular variations with a peak-to-peak amplitude of about 10 km $s^{-1}$ and a dominating period of about 115 days. The light, color and radial velocity variations are typical of the evolved pulsating stars. The atmosphere of HD112869 appears to be less metal-poor than reported before, [Fe/H] = -2.3 $\\pm$0.2 dex. Carbon to oxygen and carbon isotope ratios are found to be extremely high, C/O $\\simeq$ 12.6 and $^{12}C/^{13}C \\gtrsim$ 1500, respectively. The s-process elements yttrium and barium are not enhanced, but neodymium appears to be overabundan...

  3. Minority games, evolving capitals and replicator dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss a simple version of the minority game (MG) in which agents hold only one strategy each, but in which their capitals evolve dynamically according to their success and in which the total trading volume varies in time accordingly. This feature is known to be crucial for MGs to reproduce stylized facts of real market data. The stationary states and phase diagram of the model can be computed, and we show that the ergodicity breaking phase transition common for MGs, and marked by a divergence of the integrated response, is present also in this simplified model. An analogous majority game turns out to be relatively void of interesting features, and the total capital is found to diverge in time. Introducing a restraining force leads to a model akin to the replicator dynamics of evolutionary game theory, and we demonstrate that here a different type of phase transition is observed. Finally we briefly discuss the relation of this model with one strategy per player to more sophisticated minority games with dynamical capitals and several trading strategies per agent

  4. Minority games, evolving capitals and replicator dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galla, Tobias; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2009-11-01

    We discuss a simple version of the minority game (MG) in which agents hold only one strategy each, but in which their capitals evolve dynamically according to their success and in which the total trading volume varies in time accordingly. This feature is known to be crucial for MGs to reproduce stylized facts of real market data. The stationary states and phase diagram of the model can be computed, and we show that the ergodicity breaking phase transition common for MGs, and marked by a divergence of the integrated response, is present also in this simplified model. An analogous majority game turns out to be relatively void of interesting features, and the total capital is found to diverge in time. Introducing a restraining force leads to a model akin to the replicator dynamics of evolutionary game theory, and we demonstrate that here a different type of phase transition is observed. Finally we briefly discuss the relation of this model with one strategy per player to more sophisticated minority games with dynamical capitals and several trading strategies per agent.

  5. Tearing Mode Stability of Evolving Toroidal Equilibria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletzer, A.; McCune, D.; Manickam, J.; Jardin, S. C.

    2000-10-01

    There are a number of toroidal equilibrium (such as JSOLVER, ESC, EFIT, and VMEC) and transport codes (such as TRANSP, BALDUR, and TSC) in our community that utilize differing equilibrium representations. There are also many heating and current drive (LSC and TORRAY), and stability (PEST1-3, GATO, NOVA, MARS, DCON, M3D) codes that require this equilibrium information. In an effort to provide seamless compatibility between the codes that produce and need these equilibria, we have developed two Fortran 90 modules, MEQ and XPLASMA, that serve as common interfaces between these two classes of codes. XPLASMA provides a common equilibrium representation for the heating and current drive applications while MEQ provides common equilibrium and associated metric information needed by MHD stability codes. We illustrate the utility of this approach by presenting results of PEST-3 tearing stability calculations of an NSTX discharge performed on profiles provided by the TRANSP code. Using the MEQ module, the TRANSP equilibrium data are stored in a Fortran 90 derived type and passed to PEST3 as a subroutine argument. All calculations are performed on the fly, as the profiles evolve.

  6. Are Electronic Cardiac Devices Still Evolving?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabo, P.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives The goal of this paper is to review some important issues occurring during the past year in Implantable devices. Methods First cardiac implantable device was proposed to maintain an adequate heart rate, either because the heart’s natural pacemaker is not fast enough, or there is a block in the heart’s electrical conduction system. During the last forty years, pacemakers have evolved considerably and become programmable and allow to configure specific patient optimum pacing modes. Various technological aspects (electrodes, connectors, algorithms diagnosis, therapies, …) have been progressed and cardiac implants address several clinical applications: management of arrhythmias, cardioversion / defibrillation and cardiac resynchronization therapy. Results Observed progress was the miniaturization of device, increased longevity, coupled with efficient pacing functions, multisite pacing modes, leadless pacing and also a better recognition of supraventricular or ventricular tachycardia’s in order to deliver appropriate therapy. Subcutaneous implant, new modes of stimulation (leadless implant or ultrasound lead), quadripolar lead and new sensor or new algorithm for the hemodynamic management are introduced and briefly described. Each times, the main result occurring during the two past years are underlined and repositioned from the history, remaining limitations are also addressed. Conclusion Some important technological improvements were described. Nevertheless, news trends for the future are also considered in a specific session such as the remote follow-up of the patient or the treatment of heart failure by neuromodulation. PMID:25123732

  7. The Evolving Luminosity Function of Red Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, M J I; Jannuzi, B T; Brand, K; Benson, A J; Brodwin, M; Croton, D J; Eisenhardt, P R M; Brown, Michael J. I.; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Brand, Kate; Benson, Andrew J.; Brodwin, Mark; Croton, Darren J.; Eisenhardt, Peter R.

    2006-01-01

    We trace the assembly history of red galaxies since z=1, by measuring their evolving space density with the B-band luminosity function. Our sample of 39599 red galaxies, selected from 6.96 square degrees of imaging from the NOAO Deep Wide-Field and Spitzer IRAC Shallow surveys, is an order of magnitude larger, in size and volume, than comparable samples in the literature. We measure a higher space density of z=0.9 red galaxies than some of the recent literature, in part because we account for the faint yet significant galaxy flux which falls outside of our photometric aperture. The B-band luminosity density of red galaxies, which effectively measures the evolution of ~L* galaxies, increases by only 36 percent from z=0 to z=1. If red galaxy stellar populations have faded by 1.24 B-band magnitudes since z=1, the stellar mass contained within the red galaxy population has roughly doubled over the past 8 Gyr. This is consistent with star-forming galaxies being transformed into ~L* red galaxies after a decline in ...

  8. Properties of asymmetrically evolved community networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cui Di; Gao Zi-You; Zheng Jian-Feng

    2009-01-01

    This paper studies a simple asymmetrically evolved community network with a combination of preferential at-tachment and random properties. An important issue about community networks is to discover the different utility increments of two nodes, where the utility is introduced to investigate the asymmetrical effect of connecting two nodes. On the other hand, the connection of two nodes in community networks can be classified as two nodes belonging to the same or to different communities. The simulation results show that the model can reproduce a power-law utility distribution P(u)~ u-σ,σ=2+ 1/p, which can be obtained by using mean-field approximation methods. Furthermore, the model exhibits exponential behaviour with respect to small values of a parameter denoting the random effect in our model at the low-utility region and a power-law feature with respect to big values of this parameter at the high-utility region, which is in good agreement with theoretical analysis. This kind of community network can reproduce a unique utility distribution by theoretical and numerical analysis.

  9. The Role of Trends in Evolving Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Mokryn, Osnat; Shavitt, Yuval

    2013-01-01

    Modeling complex networks has been the focus of much research for over a decade. Preferential attachment (PA) is considered a common explanation to the self organization of evolving networks, suggesting that new nodes prefer to attach to more popular nodes. The PA model results in broad degree distributions, found in many networks, but cannot explain other common properties such as: The growth of nodes arriving late and Clustering (community structure). Here we show that when the tendency of networks to adhere to trends is incorporated into the PA model, it can produce networks with such properties. Namely, in trending networks, newly arriving nodes may become central at random, forming new clusters. In particular, we show that when the network is young it is more susceptible to trends, but even older networks may have trendy new nodes that become central in their structure. Alternatively, networks can be seen as composed of two parts: static, governed by a power law degree distribution, and a dynamic part go...

  10. The evolved function of the oedipal conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephs, Lawrence

    2010-08-01

    Freud based his oedipal theory on three clinical observations of adult romantic relationships: (1) Adults tend to split love and lust; (2) There tend to be sex differences in the ways that men and women split love and lust; (3) Adult romantic relationships are unconsciously structured by the dynamics of love triangles in which dramas of seduction and betrayal unfold. Freud believed that these aspects of adult romantic relationships were derivative expressions of a childhood oedipal conflict that has been repressed. Recent research conducted by evolutionary psychologists supports many of Freud's original observations and suggests that Freud's oedipal conflict may have evolved as a sexually selected adaptation for reproductive advantage. The evolution of bi-parental care based on sexually exclusive romantic bonds made humans vulnerable to the costs of sexual infidelity, a situation of danger that seriously threatens monogamous bonds. A childhood oedipal conflict enables humans to better adapt to this longstanding evolutionary problem by providing the child with an opportunity to develop working models of love triangles. On the one hand, the oedipal conflict facilitates monogamous resolutions by creating intense anxiety about the dangers of sexual infidelity and mate poaching. On the other hand, the oedipal conflict in humans may facilitate successful cheating and mate poaching by cultivating a talent for hiding our true sexual intentions from others and even from ourselves. The oedipal conflict in humans may be disguised by evolutionary design in order to facilitate tactical deception in adult romantic relationships. PMID:20840647

  11. An evolving network model with modular growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zou Zhi-Yun; Liu Peng; Lei Li; Gao Jian-Zhi

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,we propose an evolving network model growing fast in units of module,according to the analysis of the evolution characteristics in real complex networks.Each module is a small-world network containing several interconnected nodes and the nodes between the modules are linked by preferential attachment on degree of nodes.We study the modularity measure of the proposed model,which can be adjusted by changing the ratio of the number of innermodule edges and the number of inter-module edges.In view of the mean-field theory,we develop an analytical function of the degree distribution,which is verified by a numerical example and indicates that the degree distribution shows characteristics of the small-world network and the scale-free network distinctly at different segments.The clustering coefficient and the average path length of the network are simulated numerically,indicating that the network shows the small-world property and is affected little by the randomness of the new module.

  12. An evolving model of online bipartite networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chu-Xu; Zhang, Zi-Ke; Liu, Chuang

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the structure and evolution of online bipartite networks is a significant task since they play a crucial role in various e-commerce services nowadays. Recently, various attempts have been tried to propose different models, resulting in either power-law or exponential degree distributions. However, many empirical results show that the user degree distribution actually follows a shifted power-law distribution, the so-called Mandelbrot’s law, which cannot be fully described by previous models. In this paper, we propose an evolving model, considering two different user behaviors: random and preferential attachment. Extensive empirical results on two real bipartite networks, Delicious and CiteULike, show that the theoretical model can well characterize the structure of real networks for both user and object degree distributions. In addition, we introduce a structural parameter p, to demonstrate that the hybrid user behavior leads to the shifted power-law degree distribution, and the region of power-law tail will increase with the increment of p. The proposed model might shed some lights in understanding the underlying laws governing the structure of real online bipartite networks.

  13. Evolving role of MRI in Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacoub, Joseph H; Obara, Piotr; Oto, Aytekin

    2013-06-01

    MR enterography is playing an evolving role in the evaluation of small bowel Crohn's disease (CD). Standard MR enterography includes a combination of rapidly acquired T2 sequence, balanced steady-state acquisition, and contrast enhanced T1-weighted gradient echo sequence. The diagnostic performance of these sequences has been shown to be comparable, and in some respects superior, to other small bowel imaging modalities. The findings of CD on MR enterography have been well described in the literature. New and emerging techniques such as diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), cinematography, and magnetization transfer, may lead to improved accuracy in characterizing the disease. These advanced techniques can provide quantitative parameters that may prove to be useful in assessing disease activity, severity, and response to treatment. In the future, MR enterography may play an increasing role in management decisions for patients with small bowel CD; however, larger studies are needed to validate these emerging MRI parameters as imaging biomarkers. PMID:23712842

  14. Emergent Spacetime in Stochastically Evolving Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Afshordi, Niayesh

    2014-01-01

    Changing the dimensionality of the space-time at the smallest and largest distances has manifold theoretical advantages. If the space is lower dimensional in the high energy regime, then there are no ultraviolet divergencies in field theories, it is possible to quantize gravity, and the theory of matter plus gravity is free of divergencies or renormalizable. If the space is higher dimensional at cosmological scales, then some cosmological problems (including the cosmological constant problem) can be attacked from a completely new perspective. In this paper, we construct an explicit model of "evolving dimensions" in which the dimensions open up as the temperature of the universe drops. We adopt the string theory framework in which the dimensions are fields that live on the string worldsheet, and add temperature dependent mass terms for them. At the Big Bang, all the dimensions are very heavy and are not excited. As the universe cools down, dimensions open up one by one. Thus, the dimensionality of the space we...

  15. Tv-RIO1 – an atypical protein kinase from the parasitic nematode Trichostrongylus vitrinus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sternberg Paul W

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein kinases are key enzymes that regulate a wide range of cellular processes, including cell-cycle progression, transcription, DNA replication and metabolic functions. These enzymes catalyse the transfer of phosphates to serine, threonine and tyrosine residues, thus playing functional roles in reversible protein phosphorylation. There are two main groups, namely eukaryotic protein kinases (ePKs and atypical protein kinases (aPKs; RIO kinases belong to the latter group. While there is some information about RIO kinases and their roles in animals, nothing is known about them in parasites. This is the first study to characterise a RIO1 kinase from any parasite. Results A full-length cDNA (Tv-rio-1 encoding a RIO1 protein kinase (Tv-RIO1 was isolated from the economically important parasitic nematode Trichostrongylus vitrinus (Order Strongylida. The uninterrupted open reading frame (ORF of 1476 nucleotides encoded a protein of 491 amino acids, containing the characteristic RIO1 motif LVHADLSEYNTL. Tv-rio-1 was transcribed at the highest level in the third-stage larva (L3, and a higher level in adult females than in males. Comparison with homologues from other organisms showed that protein Tv-RIO1 had significant homology to related proteins from a range of metazoans and plants. Amino acid sequence identity was most pronounced in the ATP-binding motif, active site and metal binding loop. Phylogenetic analyses of selected amino acid sequence data revealed Tv-RIO1 to be most closely related to the proteins in the species of Caenorhabditis. A structural model of Tv-RIO1 was constructed and compared with the published crystal structure of RIO1 of Archaeoglobus fulgidus (Af-Rio1. Conclusion This study provides the first insights into the RIO1 protein kinases of nematodes, and a foundation for further investigations into the biochemical and functional roles of this molecule in biological processes in parasitic nematodes.

  16. SwissProt search result: AK101194 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK101194 J033030J11 (Q9X2W0) Microcin J25 export ATP-binding/permease protein mcjD (Micro...cin J25 secretion ATP-binding protein mcjD) (Microcin J25 immunity protein) MCJD_ECOLI 2e-25 ...

  17. SwissProt search result: AK064325 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK064325 002-107-F05 (Q9X2W0) Microcin J25 export ATP-binding/permease protein mcjD (Micro...cin J25 secretion ATP-binding protein mcjD) (Microcin J25 immunity protein) MCJD_ECOLI 2e-26 ...

  18. SwissProt search result: AK121690 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK121690 J033071F24 (Q9X2W0) Microcin J25 export ATP-binding/permease protein mcjD (Micro...cin J25 secretion ATP-binding protein mcjD) (Microcin J25 immunity protein) MCJD_ECOLI 7e-18 ...

  19. SwissProt search result: AK242094 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242094 J075142E09 (Q9X2W0) Microcin J25 export ATP-binding/permease protein mcjD (Micro...cin J25 secretion ATP-binding protein mcjD) (Microcin J25 immunity protein) MCJD_ECOLI 1e-22 ...

  20. SwissProt search result: AK106518 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK106518 002-107-C02 (Q9X2W0) Microcin J25 export ATP-binding/permease protein mcjD (Micro...cin J25 secretion ATP-binding protein mcjD) (Microcin J25 immunity protein) MCJD_ECOLI 3e-25 ...

  1. SwissProt search result: AK058263 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK058263 001-012-H08 (Q9X2W0) Microcin J25 export ATP-binding/permease protein mcjD (Micro...cin J25 secretion ATP-binding protein mcjD) (Microcin J25 immunity protein) MCJD_ECOLI 1e-13 ...

  2. SwissProt search result: AK102879 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK102879 J033112G11 (Q9X2W0) Microcin J25 export ATP-binding/permease protein mcjD (Micro...cin J25 secretion ATP-binding protein mcjD) (Microcin J25 immunity protein) MCJD_ECOLI 2e-32 ...

  3. SwissProt search result: AK106698 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK106698 002-114-D11 (Q9X2W0) Microcin J25 export ATP-binding/permease protein mcjD (Micro...cin J25 secretion ATP-binding protein mcjD) (Microcin J25 immunity protein) MCJD_ECOLI 9e-20 ...

  4. SwissProt search result: AK064221 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK064221 002-104-G01 (Q9X2W0) Microcin J25 export ATP-binding/permease protein mcjD (Micro...cin J25 secretion ATP-binding protein mcjD) (Microcin J25 immunity protein) MCJD_ECOLI 1e-21 ...

  5. SwissProt search result: AK061417 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK061417 006-306-E07 (Q9X2W0) Microcin J25 export ATP-binding/permease protein mcjD (Micro...cin J25 secretion ATP-binding protein mcjD) (Microcin J25 immunity protein) MCJD_ECOLI 2e-13 ...

  6. SwissProt search result: AK109687 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK109687 002-145-D12 (Q9X2W0) Microcin J25 export ATP-binding/permease protein mcjD (Micro...cin J25 secretion ATP-binding protein mcjD) (Microcin J25 immunity protein) MCJD_ECOLI 6e-33 ...

  7. SwissProt search result: AK119849 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK119849 002-178-F06 (Q9X2W0) Microcin J25 export ATP-binding/permease protein mcjD (Micro...cin J25 secretion ATP-binding protein mcjD) (Microcin J25 immunity protein) MCJD_ECOLI 1e-10 ...

  8. SwissProt search result: AK064342 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK064342 002-107-H07 (Q9X2W0) Microcin J25 export ATP-binding/permease protein mcjD (Micro...cin J25 secretion ATP-binding protein mcjD) (Microcin J25 immunity protein) MCJD_ECOLI 4e-35 ...

  9. SwissProt search result: AK103774 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK103774 J033143M23 (Q9X2W0) Microcin J25 export ATP-binding/permease protein mcjD (Micro...cin J25 secretion ATP-binding protein mcjD) (Microcin J25 immunity protein) MCJD_ECOLI 5e-25 ...

  10. SwissProt search result: AK240921 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK240921 J065038F05 (Q9X2W0) Microcin J25 export ATP-binding/permease protein mcjD (Micro...cin J25 secretion ATP-binding protein mcjD) (Microcin J25 immunity protein) MCJD_ECOLI 3e-24 ...

  11. SwissProt search result: AK099941 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK099941 J013121A05 (Q9X2W0) Microcin J25 export ATP-binding/permease protein mcjD (Micro...cin J25 secretion ATP-binding protein mcjD) (Microcin J25 immunity protein) MCJD_ECOLI 1e-24 ...

  12. SwissProt search result: AK099809 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK099809 J013099A18 (Q9X2W0) Microcin J25 export ATP-binding/permease protein mcjD (Micro...cin J25 secretion ATP-binding protein mcjD) (Microcin J25 immunity protein) MCJD_ECOLI 1e-12 ...

  13. SwissProt search result: AK242277 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242277 J075187L21 (Q9X2W0) Microcin J25 export ATP-binding/permease protein mcjD (Micro...cin J25 secretion ATP-binding protein mcjD) (Microcin J25 immunity protein) MCJD_ECOLI 3e-16 ...

  14. SwissProt search result: AK072699 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK072699 J023139I17 (Q9X2W0) Microcin J25 export ATP-binding/permease protein mcjD (Micro...cin J25 secretion ATP-binding protein mcjD) (Microcin J25 immunity protein) MCJD_ECOLI 4e-14 ...

  15. SwissProt search result: AK120269 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK120269 J013047J23 (Q9X2W0) Microcin J25 export ATP-binding/permease protein mcjD (Micro...cin J25 secretion ATP-binding protein mcjD) (Microcin J25 immunity protein) MCJD_ECOLI 6e-17 ...

  16. SwissProt search result: AK069799 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK069799 J023030H03 (Q9X2W0) Microcin J25 export ATP-binding/permease protein mcjD (Micro...cin J25 secretion ATP-binding protein mcjD) (Microcin J25 immunity protein) MCJD_ECOLI 3e-24 ...

  17. SwissProt search result: AK119895 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK119895 002-180-C05 (Q9X2W0) Microcin J25 export ATP-binding/permease protein mcjD (Micro...cin J25 secretion ATP-binding protein mcjD) (Microcin J25 immunity protein) MCJD_ECOLI 3e-17 ...

  18. SwissProt search result: AK120122 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK120122 J013026A05 (Q9X2W0) Microcin J25 export ATP-binding/permease protein mcjD (Micro...cin J25 secretion ATP-binding protein mcjD) (Microcin J25 immunity protein) MCJD_ECOLI 2e-23 ...

  19. SwissProt search result: AK119880 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK119880 002-179-G08 (Q9X2W0) Microcin J25 export ATP-binding/permease protein mcjD (Micro...cin J25 secretion ATP-binding protein mcjD) (Microcin J25 immunity protein) MCJD_ECOLI 7e-21 ...

  20. SwissProt search result: AK065863 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK065863 J013043D07 (Q9X2W0) Microcin J25 export ATP-binding/permease protein mcjD (Micro...cin J25 secretion ATP-binding protein mcjD) (Microcin J25 immunity protein) MCJD_ECOLI 6e-22 ...

  1. SwissProt search result: AK121451 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK121451 J023142K21 (Q9X2W0) Microcin J25 export ATP-binding/permease protein mcjD (Micro...cin J25 secretion ATP-binding protein mcjD) (Microcin J25 immunity protein) MCJD_ECOLI 4e-28 ...

  2. SwissProt search result: AK067140 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK067140 J013094I22 (Q9X2W0) Microcin J25 export ATP-binding/permease protein mcjD (Micro...cin J25 secretion ATP-binding protein mcjD) (Microcin J25 immunity protein) MCJD_ECOLI 3e-24 ...

  3. Superfamilies of Evolved and Designed Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milo, Ron; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Kashtan, Nadav; Levitt, Reuven; Shen-Orr, Shai; Ayzenshtat, Inbal; Sheffer, Michal; Alon, Uri

    2004-03-01

    Complex biological, technological, and sociological networks can be of very different sizes and connectivities, making it difficult to compare their structures. Here we present an approach to systematically study similarity in the local structure of networks, based on the significance profile (SP) of small subgraphs in the network compared to randomized networks. We find several superfamilies of previously unrelated networks with very similar SPs. One superfamily, including transcription networks of microorganisms, represents ``rate-limited'' information-processing networks strongly constrained by the response time of their components. A distinct superfamily includes protein signaling, developmental genetic networks, and neuronal wiring. Additional superfamilies include power grids, protein-structure networks and geometric networks, World Wide Web links and social networks, and word-adjacency networks from different languages.

  4. Emergent spacetime in stochastically evolving dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niayesh Afshordi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Changing the dimensionality of the space–time at the smallest and largest distances has manifold theoretical advantages. If the space is lower dimensional in the high energy regime, then there are no ultraviolet divergencies in field theories, it is possible to quantize gravity, and the theory of matter plus gravity is free of divergencies or renormalizable. If the space is higher dimensional at cosmological scales, then some cosmological problems (including the cosmological constant problem can be attacked from a completely new perspective. In this paper, we construct an explicit model of “evolving dimensions” in which the dimensions open up as the temperature of the universe drops. We adopt the string theory framework in which the dimensions are fields that live on the string worldsheet, and add temperature dependent mass terms for them. At the Big Bang, all the dimensions are very heavy and are not excited. As the universe cools down, dimensions open up one by one. Thus, the dimensionality of the space we live in depends on the energy or temperature that we are probing. In particular, we provide a kinematic Brandenberger–Vafa argument for how a discrete causal set, and eventually a continuum (3+1-dim spacetime along with Einstein gravity emerges in the Infrared from the worldsheet action. The (3+1-dim Planck mass and the string scale become directly related, without any compactification. Amongst other predictions, we argue that LHC might be blind to new physics even if it comes at the TeV scale. In contrast, cosmic ray experiments, especially those that can register the very beginning of the shower, and collisions with high multiplicity and density of particles, might be sensitive to the dimensional cross-over.

  5. Emergent spacetime in stochastically evolving dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changing the dimensionality of the space–time at the smallest and largest distances has manifold theoretical advantages. If the space is lower dimensional in the high energy regime, then there are no ultraviolet divergencies in field theories, it is possible to quantize gravity, and the theory of matter plus gravity is free of divergencies or renormalizable. If the space is higher dimensional at cosmological scales, then some cosmological problems (including the cosmological constant problem) can be attacked from a completely new perspective. In this paper, we construct an explicit model of “evolving dimensions” in which the dimensions open up as the temperature of the universe drops. We adopt the string theory framework in which the dimensions are fields that live on the string worldsheet, and add temperature dependent mass terms for them. At the Big Bang, all the dimensions are very heavy and are not excited. As the universe cools down, dimensions open up one by one. Thus, the dimensionality of the space we live in depends on the energy or temperature that we are probing. In particular, we provide a kinematic Brandenberger–Vafa argument for how a discrete causal set, and eventually a continuum (3+1)-dim spacetime along with Einstein gravity emerges in the Infrared from the worldsheet action. The (3+1)-dim Planck mass and the string scale become directly related, without any compactification. Amongst other predictions, we argue that LHC might be blind to new physics even if it comes at the TeV scale. In contrast, cosmic ray experiments, especially those that can register the very beginning of the shower, and collisions with high multiplicity and density of particles, might be sensitive to the dimensional cross-over

  6. Emergent spacetime in stochastically evolving dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afshordi, Niayesh [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, 31 Caroline St. N., Waterloo, ON, N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, N2L 3G1 (Canada); HEPCOS, Department of Physics, SUNY at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14260-1500 (United States); Stojkovic, Dejan, E-mail: ds77@buffalo.edu [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, 31 Caroline St. N., Waterloo, ON, N2L 2Y5 (Canada); HEPCOS, Department of Physics, SUNY at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14260-1500 (United States)

    2014-12-12

    Changing the dimensionality of the space–time at the smallest and largest distances has manifold theoretical advantages. If the space is lower dimensional in the high energy regime, then there are no ultraviolet divergencies in field theories, it is possible to quantize gravity, and the theory of matter plus gravity is free of divergencies or renormalizable. If the space is higher dimensional at cosmological scales, then some cosmological problems (including the cosmological constant problem) can be attacked from a completely new perspective. In this paper, we construct an explicit model of “evolving dimensions” in which the dimensions open up as the temperature of the universe drops. We adopt the string theory framework in which the dimensions are fields that live on the string worldsheet, and add temperature dependent mass terms for them. At the Big Bang, all the dimensions are very heavy and are not excited. As the universe cools down, dimensions open up one by one. Thus, the dimensionality of the space we live in depends on the energy or temperature that we are probing. In particular, we provide a kinematic Brandenberger–Vafa argument for how a discrete causal set, and eventually a continuum (3+1)-dim spacetime along with Einstein gravity emerges in the Infrared from the worldsheet action. The (3+1)-dim Planck mass and the string scale become directly related, without any compactification. Amongst other predictions, we argue that LHC might be blind to new physics even if it comes at the TeV scale. In contrast, cosmic ray experiments, especially those that can register the very beginning of the shower, and collisions with high multiplicity and density of particles, might be sensitive to the dimensional cross-over.

  7. A rapidly evolving secretome builds and patterns a sea shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Daniel J; McDougall, Carmel; Green, Kathryn; Simpson, Fiona; Wörheide, Gert; Degnan, Bernard M

    2006-01-01

    Background Instructions to fabricate mineralized structures with distinct nanoscale architectures, such as seashells and coral and vertebrate skeletons, are encoded in the genomes of a wide variety of animals. In mollusks, the mantle is responsible for the extracellular production of the shell, directing the ordered biomineralization of CaCO3 and the deposition of architectural and color patterns. The evolutionary origins of the ability to synthesize calcified structures across various metazoan taxa remain obscure, with only a small number of protein families identified from molluskan shells. The recent sequencing of a wide range of metazoan genomes coupled with the analysis of gene expression in non-model animals has allowed us to investigate the evolution and process of biomineralization in gastropod mollusks. Results Here we show that over 25% of the genes expressed in the mantle of the vetigastropod Haliotis asinina encode secreted proteins, indicating that hundreds of proteins are likely to be contributing to shell fabrication and patterning. Almost 85% of the secretome encodes novel proteins; remarkably, only 19% of these have identifiable homologues in the full genome of the patellogastropod Lottia scutum. The spatial expression profiles of mantle genes that belong to the secretome is restricted to discrete mantle zones, with each zone responsible for the fabrication of one of the structural layers of the shell. Patterned expression of a subset of genes along the length of the mantle is indicative of roles in shell ornamentation. For example, Has-sometsuke maps precisely to pigmentation patterns in the shell, providing the first case of a gene product to be involved in molluskan shell pigmentation. We also describe the expression of two novel genes involved in nacre (mother of pearl) deposition. Conclusion The unexpected complexity and evolvability of this secretome and the modular design of the molluskan mantle enables diversification of shell strength and

  8. A rapidly evolving secretome builds and patterns a sea shell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Green Kathryn

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Instructions to fabricate mineralized structures with distinct nanoscale architectures, such as seashells and coral and vertebrate skeletons, are encoded in the genomes of a wide variety of animals. In mollusks, the mantle is responsible for the extracellular production of the shell, directing the ordered biomineralization of CaCO3 and the deposition of architectural and color patterns. The evolutionary origins of the ability to synthesize calcified structures across various metazoan taxa remain obscure, with only a small number of protein families identified from molluskan shells. The recent sequencing of a wide range of metazoan genomes coupled with the analysis of gene expression in non-model animals has allowed us to investigate the evolution and process of biomineralization in gastropod mollusks. Results Here we show that over 25% of the genes expressed in the mantle of the vetigastropod Haliotis asinina encode secreted proteins, indicating that hundreds of proteins are likely to be contributing to shell fabrication and patterning. Almost 85% of the secretome encodes novel proteins; remarkably, only 19% of these have identifiable homologues in the full genome of the patellogastropod Lottia scutum. The spatial expression profiles of mantle genes that belong to the secretome is restricted to discrete mantle zones, with each zone responsible for the fabrication of one of the structural layers of the shell. Patterned expression of a subset of genes along the length of the mantle is indicative of roles in shell ornamentation. For example, Has-sometsuke maps precisely to pigmentation patterns in the shell, providing the first case of a gene product to be involved in molluskan shell pigmentation. We also describe the expression of two novel genes involved in nacre (mother of pearl deposition. Conclusion The unexpected complexity and evolvability of this secretome and the modular design of the molluskan mantle enables

  9. Transcriptomes of Plant Gametophytes Have a Higher Proportion of Rapidly Evolving and Young Genes than Sporophytes

    OpenAIRE

    Gossmann, T.I.; Saleh, D.; Schmid, M.W.; Spence, M A; Schmid, K.J.

    2016-01-01

    Reproductive traits in plants tend to evolve rapidly due to various causes that include plant-pollinator coevolution and pollen competition, but the genomic basis of reproductive trait evolution is still largely unknown. To characterize evolutionary patterns of genome wide gene expression in reproductive tissues in the gametophyte and to compare them to developmental stages of the sporophyte, we analyzed evolutionary conservation and genetic diversity of protein-coding genes using microarray-...

  10. [Characterization of a putative S locus encoded receptor protein kinase and its role in self-incompatibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-01

    The serine/threonine protein kinase (SRK) protein was predicted to be similar to the growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases in animals but its amino acid sequence of the catalytic domain is more similar to that of the catalytic domains of protein serine/threonine kinases than to protein tyrosine kinases. We have shown that the SRK protein has intrinsic scrine/threonine kinase activity. We subcloned the protein kinase-homologous domain of the SRK[sub 6] cDNA into the bacterial expression vector pGEX-3X and we have constructed a second plasmid identical to the first except that it carried a conservative mutation that substituted Arg for the Lys[sup 524] codon of SRK6 This lysine corresponds to the ATP-binding site, is essential in protein kinases, and is a common target for site-directed mutagenesis as a means to obtain kinase-defective proteins. Cultures bearing the wild-type and mutant SRK catalytic domains each produced an approximately 64 kD protein that reacted with anti-SRK6 antibodies. Following pulse-labeling with [sup 32]P we found that the wild-type SRK6 protein but not the mutant form was detectably phosphorylated. Phosphoamino acid analysis of the affinity purified [sup 32]p-labeled GST-SRK6 fusion protein demonstrated that SRK was phosphorylated predominantly on semine and to a lesser extent on threonine, but not on tyrosine. Thus, SRK6 is a functional serine/threonine protein kinase.

  11. Export of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli using ABC transporter with an attached lipase ABC transporter recognition domain (LARD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moon Yuseok

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ATP binding cassette (ABC transporter secretes the protein through inner and outer membranes simultaneously in gram negative bacteria. Thermostable lipase (TliA of Pseudomonas fluorescens SIK W1 is secreted through the ABC transporter. TliA has four glycine-rich repeats (GGXGXD in its C-terminus, which appear in many ABC transporter-secreted proteins. From a homology model of TliA derived from the structure of P. aeruginosa alkaline protease (AprA, lipase ABC transporter domains (LARDs were designed for the secretion of fusion proteins. Results The LARDs included four glycine-rich repeats comprising a β-roll structure, and were added to the C-terminus of test proteins. Either Pro-Gly linker or Factor Xa site was added between fusion proteins and LARDs. We attached different length of LARDs such as LARD0, LARD1 or whole TliA (the longest LARD to three types of proteins; green fluorescent protein (GFP, epidermal growth factor (EGF and cytoplasmic transduction peptide (CTP. These fusion proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli together with ABC transporter of either P. fluorescens or Erwinia chrysanthemi. Export of fusion proteins with the whole TliA through the ABC transporter was evident on the basis of lipase enzymatic activity. Upon supplementation of E. coli with ABC transporter, GFP-LARDs and EGF-LARDs were excreted into the culture supernatant. Conclusion The LARDs or whole TliA were attached to C-termini of model proteins and enabled the export of the model proteins such as GFP and EGF in E. coli supplemented with ABC transporter. These results open the possibility for the extracellular production of recombinant proteins in Pseudomonas using LARDs or TliA as a C-terminal signal sequence.

  12. LSDBs and How They Have Evolved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalgleish, Raymond

    2016-06-01

    Locus specific databases (LSDBs) make a key contribution to our understanding of heritable and acquired human disorders, disease susceptibility, and adverse drug reactions. As data have accumulated in LSDBs, a greater reliance on their use has arisen in clinical practice. Even though LSDBs have existed in recognizable form for only a quarter of a century, their origin lies in the manual cataloging of data that began around 50 years ago. Analysis and recording of sequence variation in the globin genes, and the proteins which they encode, can confidently be said to be the foundation for what we now refer to as LSDBs. Their growth over the years has primarily been underpinned by software developments and the advent of the World Wide Web. However, it is also important to recognize the evolution of reporting standards and reference sequences, without which accurate and consistent reporting of sequence variants would be impossible. Nowadays, LSDBs exist for many human protein-coding genes and the focus of efforts has moved toward minor tidying up of the variant reporting nomenclature and processes for assuring the completeness, correctness, and consistency of the data. The next 25 years will doubtless witness further developments in the evolution of LSDBs. PMID:26919551

  13. A role for multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4; ABCC4) in human dendritic cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Ven, Rieneke; Scheffer, George L; Reurs, Anneke W; Lindenberg, Jelle J; Oerlemans, Ruud; Jansen, Gerrit; Gillet, Jean-Pierre; Glasgow, Joel N; Pereboev, Alexander; Curiel, David T; Scheper, Rik J; de Gruijl, Tanja D

    2008-09-15

    The capacity of dendritic cells (DCs) to migrate from peripheral organs to lymph nodes (LNs) is important in the initiation of a T cell-mediated immune response. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp; ABCB1) and the multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1; ABCC1) have been shown to play a role in both human and murine DC migration. Here we show that a more recently discovered family member, MRP4 (ABCC4), is expressed on both epidermal and dermal human skin DCs and contributes to the migratory capacity of DCs. Pharmacological inhibition of MRP4 activity or down-regulation through RNAi in DCs resulted in reduced migration of DCs from human skin explants and of in vitro generated Langerhans cells. The responsible MRP4 substrate remains to be identified as exogenous addition of MRP4's known substrates prostaglandin E(2), leukotriene B(4) and D(4), or cyclic nucleotides (all previously implicated in DC migration) could not restore migration. This notwithstanding, our data show that MRP4 is an important protein, significantly contributing to human DC migration toward the draining lymph nodes, and therefore relevant for the initiation of an immune response and a possible target for immunotherapy.

  14. Analysis of Hsp90 cochaperone interactions reveals a novel mechanism for TPR protein recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadli, Ahmed; Bruinsma, Elizabeth S; Stensgard, Bridget; Toft, David

    2008-03-01

    The chaperone Hsp90 is required for the appropriate regulation of numerous key signaling molecules, including the progesterone receptor (PR). Many important cochaperones bind Hsp90 through their tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains. Two such proteins, GCUNC45 and FKBP52, assist PR chaperoning and are thought to interact sequentially with PR-Hsp90 complexes. TPR proteins bind to the C-terminal MEEVD sequence of Hsp90, but GCUNC45 has been shown also to bind to a novel site near the N-terminus. We now show that FKBP52 is also able to bind to this site, and that these two cochaperones act competitively, through Hsp90, to modulate PR activity. The N-terminal site involves noncontiguous amino acids within or near the ATP binding pocket of Hsp90. TPR interactions at this site are thus strongly regulated by nucleotide binding and Hsp90 conformation. We propose an expanded model for client chaperoning in which the coordinated use of TPR recognition sites at both N- and C-terminal ends of Hsp90 enhances its ability to coordinate interactions with multiple TPR partners.

  15. 3β-Acetyl Tormentic Acid (3ATA a Novel Modulator of ABCC Proteins Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cerli Rocha Gattass

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug resistance (MDR is considered the main cause of cancer chemotherapy failure and patient relapse. The active drug efflux mediated by transporter proteins of the ABC (ATP-binding cassette family is the most investigated mechanism leading to MDR. With the aim of inhibiting this transport and circumventing MDR, a great amount of work has been dedicated to identifying pharmacological inhibitors of specific ABC transporters. We recently showed that 3β-acetyl tormentic acid (3ATA had no effect on P-gp/ABCB1 activity. Herein, we show that 3ATA strongly inhibited the activity of MRP1/ABCC1. In the B16/F10 and Ma104 cell lines, this effect was either 20X higher or similar to that observed with MK571, respectively. Nevertheless, the low inhibitory effect of 3ATA on A549, a cell line that expresses MRP1-5, suggests that it may not inhibit other MRPs. The use of cells transfected with ABCC2, ABCC3 or ABCC4 showed that 3ATA was also able to modulate these transporters, though with an inhibition ratio lower than that observed for MRP1/ABCC1. These data point to 3ATA as a new ABCC inhibitor and call attention to its potential use as a tool to investigate the function of MRP/ABCC proteins or as a co-adjuvant in the treatment of MDR tumors.

  16. Lysophosphatidylinositol: a novel link between ABC transporters and G-protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruban, Emily L; Ferro, Riccardo; Arifin, Syamsul Ahmad; Falasca, Marco

    2014-10-01

    Lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI) is a well-known bioactive lipid that is able to activate signalling cascades relevant to cell proliferation, migration, survival and tumorigenesis. Our previous work suggested that LPI is involved in cancer progression since it can be released in the medium of Ras-transformed fibroblasts and can function as an autocrine modulator of cell growth. Different research groups have established that LPI is the specific and functional ligand for G-protein-coupled receptor 55 (GPR55) and that this GPR55-LPI axis is able to activate signalling cascades that are relevant for different cell functions. Work in our laboratory has recently unravelled an autocrine loop, by which LPI synthesized by cytosolic phospholipase A₂ (cPLA₂) is pumped out of the cell by ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter C1 (ABCC1)/multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1), initiating a signalling cascade downstream of GPR55. Our current work suggests that blockade of this pathway may represent a novel strategy to inhibit cancer cell proliferation. PMID:25233417

  17. Retinoid regulated macrophage cholesterol efflux involves the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, Pulak R

    2016-06-01

    Elimination of excess cholesteryl esters from macrophage-derived foam cells is known to be a key process in limiting plaque stability and progression of atherosclerotic lesions. We have recently demonstrated that regulation of retinoid mediated cholesterol efflux is influenced by liver X receptor (LXR) signaling in mouse macrophages (Manna, P.R. et al., 2015, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun., 464:312-317). The data presented in this article evaluate the importance of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) in retinoid mediated macrophage cholesterol efflux. Overexpression of StAR in mouse RAW 264.7 macrophages increased the effects of both all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) and 9-cis RA on cholesterol efflux, suggesting StAR enhances the efficacy of retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and/or retinoid X receptor (RXR) ligands. Additional data revealed that atRA enhances (Bu)2cAMP induced StAR and ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 protein levels. Treatment of macrophages transfected with an LXRE reporter plasmid (pLXREx3-Luc) was found to induce the effects of RAR and RXR analogs on LXR activity. PMID:27081671

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0072 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0072 ref|YP_129371.1| putative transport ATP-binding protein CydD [Photobacterium profund...um SS9] emb|CAG19569.1| putative transport ATP-binding protein CydD [Photobacterium profundum SS9] YP_129371.1 1e-112 63% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CINT-01-0025 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CINT-01-0025 ref|NP_692020.1| ABC transporter ATP-binding protein [Oceanobacil...lus iheyensis HTE831] dbj|BAC13055.1| ABC transporter ATP-binding protein [Oceanobacillus iheyensis HTE831] NP_692020.1 0.013 24% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CINT-01-0024 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CINT-01-0024 ref|NP_692020.1| ABC transporter ATP-binding protein [Oceanobacil...lus iheyensis HTE831] dbj|BAC13055.1| ABC transporter ATP-binding protein [Oceanobacillus iheyensis HTE831] NP_692020.1 0.008 24% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DNOV-01-0592 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DNOV-01-0592 ref|YP_711808.1| Putative ATP-binding protein [Frankia alni ACN14...a] emb|CAJ60219.1| Putative ATP-binding protein [Frankia alni ACN14a] YP_711808.1 0.62 36% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DDIS-04-0000 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DDIS-04-0000 ref|NP_889639.1| ABC transporter, ATP-binding protein [Bordetella bronchiseptic...a RB50] emb|CAE33595.1| ABC transporter, ATP-binding protein [Bordetella bronchiseptica RB50] NP_889639.1 4e-68 38% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DRER-26-0282 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DRER-26-0282 ref|NP_325897.1| ABC TRANSPORTER ATP-BINDING PROTEIN [Mycoplasma ...pulmonis UAB CTIP] emb|CAC13239.1| ABC TRANSPORTER ATP-BINDING PROTEIN [Mycoplasma pulmonis] NP_325897.1 0.20 24% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CINT-01-0088 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CINT-01-0088 ref|ZP_00997731.1| ABC transporter, ATP binding/permease protein [Oceanicola bats...ensis HTCC2597] gb|EAQ04798.1| ABC transporter, ATP binding/permease protein [Oceanicola batsensis HTCC2597] ZP_00997731.1 0.040 24% ...

  5. An ABC transporter B family protein, ABCB19, is required for cytoplasmic streaming and gravitropism of the inflorescence stems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Keishi; Ueda, Haruko; Shimada, Tomoo; Tamura, Kentaro; Koumoto, Yasuko; Tasaka, Masao; Morita, Miyo Terao; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko

    2016-01-01

    A significant feature of plant cells is the extensive motility of organelles and the cytosol, which was originally defined as cytoplasmic streaming. We suggested previously that a three-way interaction between plant-specific motor proteins myosin XIs, actin filaments, and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) was responsible for cytoplasmic streaming. (1) Currently, however, there are no reports of molecular components for cytoplasmic streaming other than the actin-myosin-cytoskeleton and ER-related proteins. In the present study, we found that elongated cells of inflorescence stems of Arabidopsis thaliana exhibit vigorous cytoplasmic streaming. Statistical analysis showed that the maximal velocity of plastid movements is 7.26 µm/s, which is much faster than the previously reported velocities of organelles. Surprisingly, the maximal velocity of streaming in the inflorescence stem cells was significantly reduced to 1.11 µm/s in an Arabidopsis mutant, abcb19-101, which lacks ATP BINDING CASSETTE SUBFAMILY B19 (ABCB19) that mediates the polar transport of the phytohormone auxin together with PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins. Polar auxin transport establishes the auxin concentration gradient essential for plant development and tropisms. Deficiency of ABCB19 activity eventually caused enhanced gravitropic responses of the inflorescence stems and abnormally flexed inflorescence stems. These results suggest that ABCB19-mediated auxin transport plays a role not only in tropism regulation, but also in cytoplasmic streaming.

  6. Identification and characterization of the gltK gene encoding a membrane-associated glucose transport protein of pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adewoye, L O; Worobec, E A

    2000-08-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa oprB gene encodes the carbohydrate-selective OprB porin, which translocates substrate molecules across the outer membrane to the periplasmic glucose-binding protein. We identified and cloned two open reading frames (ORFs) flanking the oprB gene but are not in operonic arrangement with the oprB gene. The downstream ORF encodes a putative polypeptide homologous to members of a family of transcriptional repressors, whereas the oprB gene is preceded by an ORF encoding a putative product, which exhibits strong homology to several carbohydrate transport ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins. The genomic copy of the upstream ORF was mutagenized by homologous recombination. Analysis of the deletion mutant in comparison with the wild type revealed a significant reduction in [14C] glucose transport activity in the mutant strain, suggesting that this ORF likely encodes the inner membrane component of the glucose ABC transporter. It is thus designated gltK gene to reflect its homology to the Pseudomona fluorescens mtlK and its involvement in the high-affinity glucose transport system. Multiple alignment analysis revealed that the P. aeruginosa gltK gene product is a member of the MalK subfamily of ABC proteins. PMID:10940570

  7. Homophyly/Kinship Model: Naturally Evolving Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Angsheng; Li, Jiankou; Pan, Yicheng; Yin, Xianchen; Yong, Xi

    2015-10-01

    It has been a challenge to understand the formation and roles of social groups or natural communities in the evolution of species, societies and real world networks. Here, we propose the hypothesis that homophyly/kinship is the intrinsic mechanism of natural communities, introduce the notion of the affinity exponent and propose the homophyly/kinship model of networks. We demonstrate that the networks of our model satisfy a number of topological, probabilistic and combinatorial properties and, in particular, that the robustness and stability of natural communities increase as the affinity exponent increases and that the reciprocity of the networks in our model decreases as the affinity exponent increases. We show that both homophyly/kinship and reciprocity are essential to the emergence of cooperation in evolutionary games and that the homophyly/kinship and reciprocity determined by the appropriate affinity exponent guarantee the emergence of cooperation in evolutionary games, verifying Darwin’s proposal that kinship and reciprocity are the means of individual fitness. We propose the new principle of structure entropy minimisation for detecting natural communities of networks and verify the functional module property and characteristic properties by a healthy tissue cell network, a citation network, some metabolic networks and a protein interaction network.

  8. The Agrobacterium rhizogenes GALLS gene encodes two secreted proteins required for genetic transformation of plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Larry D; Lee, Lan-Ying; McNett, Henry; Gelvin, Stanton B; Ream, Walt

    2009-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Agrobacterium rhizogenes are related pathogens that cause crown gall and hairy root diseases, which result from integration and expression of bacterial genes in the plant genome. Single-stranded DNA (T strands) and virulence proteins are translocated into plant cells by a type IV secretion system. VirD2 nicks a specific DNA sequence, attaches to the 5' end, and pilots the DNA into plant cells. A. tumefaciens translocates single-stranded DNA-binding protein VirE2 into plant cells where it likely binds T strands and may aid in targeting them into the nucleus. Although some A. rhizogenes strains lack VirE2, they transfer T strands efficiently due to the GALLS gene, which complements an A. tumefaciens virE2 mutant for tumor formation. Unlike VirE2, full-length GALLS (GALLS-FL) contains ATP-binding and helicase motifs similar to those in TraA, a strand transferase involved in conjugation. GALLS-FL and VirE2 contain nuclear localization signals (NLS) and secretion signals. Mutations in any of these domains abolish the ability of the GALLS gene to substitute for virE2. Here, we show that the GALLS gene encodes two proteins from one open reading frame: GALLS-FL and a protein comprised of the C-terminal domain, which initiates at an internal in-frame start codon. On some hosts, both GALLS proteins were required to substitute for VirE2. GALLS-FL tagged with yellow fluorescent protein localized to the nucleus of tobacco cells in an NLS-dependent manner. In plant cells, the GALLS proteins interacted with themselves, VirD2, and each other. VirD2 interacted with GALLS-FL and localized inside the nucleus, where its predicted helicase activity may pull T strands into the nucleus. PMID:18952790

  9. Proteomics-based identification of midgut proteins correlated with Cry1Ac resistance in Plutella xylostella (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jixing; Guo, Zhaojiang; Yang, Zezhong; Zhu, Xun; Kang, Shi; Yang, Xin; Yang, Fengshan; Wu, Qingjun; Wang, Shaoli; Xie, Wen; Xu, Weijun; Zhang, Youjun

    2016-09-01

    The diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.), is a worldwide pest of cruciferous crops and can rapidly develop resistance to many chemical insecticides. Although insecticidal crystal proteins (i.e., Cry and Cyt toxins) derived from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) have been useful alternatives to chemical insecticides for the control of P. xylostella, resistance to Bt in field populations of P. xylostella has already been reported. A better understanding of the resistance mechanisms to Bt should be valuable in delaying resistance development. In this study, the mechanisms underlying P. xylostella resistance to Bt Cry1Ac toxin were investigated using two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and ligand blotting for the first time. Comparative analyses of the constitutive expression of midgut proteins in Cry1Ac-susceptible and -resistant P. xylostella larvae revealed 31 differentially expressed proteins, 21 of which were identified by mass spectrometry. Of these identified proteins, the following fell into diverse eukaryotic orthologous group (KOG) subcategories may be involved in Cry1Ac resistance in P. xylostella: ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter subfamily G member 4 (ABCG4), trypsin, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), vacuolar H(+)-ATPase, actin, glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor attachment 1 protein (GAA1) and solute carrier family 30 member 1 (SLC30A1). Additionally, ligand blotting identified the following midgut proteins as Cry1Ac-binding proteins in Cry1Ac-susceptible P. xylostella larvae: ABC transporter subfamily C member 1 (ABCC1), solute carrier family 36 member 1 (SLC36A1), NADH dehydrogenase iron-sulfur protein 3 (NDUFS3), prohibitin and Rap1 GTPase-activating protein 1. Collectively, these proteomic results increase our understanding of the molecular resistance mechanisms to Bt Cry1Ac toxin in P. xylostella and also demonstrate that resistance to Bt Cry1Ac toxin is complex and multifaceted. PMID:27521921

  10. Proteomic Analysis of the Developmental Trajectory of Human Hepatic Membrane Transporter Proteins in the First Three Months of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooij, Miriam G; van de Steeg, Evita; van Rosmalen, Joost; Windster, Jonathan D; de Koning, Barbara A E; Vaes, Wouter H J; van Groen, Bianca D; Tibboel, Dick; Wortelboer, Heleen M; de Wildt, Saskia N

    2016-07-01

    Human hepatic membrane-embedded transporter proteins are involved in trafficking endogenous and exogenous substrates. Even though impact of transporters on pharmacokinetics is recognized, little is known on maturation of transporter protein expression levels, especially during early life. We aimed to study the protein expression of 10 transporters in liver tissue from fetuses, infants, and adults. Transporter protein expression levels [ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABC)B1, ABCG2, ABCC2, ABCC3, bile salt efflux pump, glucose transporter 1, monocarboxylate transporter 1, organic anion transporter polypeptide (OATP)1B1, OATP2B1, and organic cation/carnitine transporter 2) were quantified using ultraperformance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry in snap-frozen postmortem fetal, infant, and adult liver samples. Protein expression was quantified in isolated crude membrane fractions. The possible association between postnatal and postmenstrual age versus protein expression was studied. We studied 25 liver samples, as follows: 10 fetal [median gestational age 23.2 wk (range 16.4-37.9)], 12 infantile [gestational age at birth 35.1 wk (27.1-41.0), postnatal age 1 wk (0-11.4)], and 3 adult. The relationship of protein expression with age was explored by comparing age groups. Correlating age within the fetal/infant age group suggested four specific protein expression patterns, as follows: stable, low to high, high to low, and low-high-low. The impact of growth and development on human membrane transporter protein expression is transporter-dependent. The suggested age-related differences in transporter protein expression may aid our understanding of normal growth and development, and also may impact the disposition of substrate drugs in neonates and young infants. PMID:27103634

  11. The effect of genetic robustness on evolvability in digital organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjuán Rafael

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent work has revealed that many biological systems keep functioning in the face of mutations and therefore can be considered genetically robust. However, several issues related to robustness remain poorly understood, such as its implications for evolvability (the ability to produce adaptive evolutionary innovations. Results Here, we use the Avida digital evolution platform to explore the effects of genetic robustness on evolvability. First, we obtained digital organisms with varying levels of robustness by evolving them under combinations of mutation rates and population sizes previously shown to select for different levels of robustness. Then, we assessed the ability of these organisms to adapt to novel environments in a variety of experimental conditions. The data consistently support that, for simple environments, genetic robustness fosters long-term evolvability, whereas, in the short-term, robustness is not beneficial for evolvability but may even be a counterproductive trait. For more complex environments, however, results are less conclusive. Conclusion The finding that the effect of robustness on evolvability is time-dependent is compatible with previous results obtained using RNA folding algorithms and transcriptional regulation models. A likely scenario is that, in the short-term, genetic robustness hampers evolvability because it reduces the intensity of selection, but that, in the long-term, relaxed selection facilitates the accumulation of genetic diversity and thus, promotes evolutionary innovation.

  12. Self-Evolvable Systems Machine Learning in Social Media

    CERN Document Server

    Iordache, Octavian

    2012-01-01

    This monograph presents key method to successfully manage the growing  complexity of systems  where conventional engineering and scientific methodologies and technologies based on learning and adaptability come to their limits and new ways are nowadays required. The transition from adaptable to evolvable and finally to self-evolvable systems is highlighted, self-properties such as self-organization, self-configuration, and self-repairing are introduced and challenges and limitations of the self-evolvable engineering systems are evaluated.

  13. Identification and characterization of functionally important elements in the multidrug resistance protein 1 COOH-terminal region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westlake, Christopher J; Payen, Lea; Gao, Mian; Cole, Susan P C; Deeley, Roger G

    2004-12-17

    The ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter, multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1), transports a broad spectrum of conjugated and unconjugated compounds, including natural product chemotherapeutic agents. In this study, we have investigated the importance of the COOH-terminal region of MRP1 for transport activity and basolateral plasma membrane trafficking. The COOH-terminal regions of some ABCC proteins have been implicated in protein trafficking, but the function of this region of MRP1 has not been defined. In contrast to results obtained with other ABCC proteins, we found that the COOH-proximal 30 amino acids of MRP1 can be removed without affecting trafficking to basolateral membranes. However, the truncated protein is inactive. Furthermore, removal of as few as 4 COOH-terminal amino acids profoundly decreases transport activity. Although amino acid sequence conservation of the COOH-terminal regions of ABC proteins is low, secondary structure predictions indicate that they consist of a broadly conserved helix-sheet-sheet-helix-helix structure. Consistent with a conservation of secondary and tertiary structure, MRP1 hybrids containing the COOH-terminal regions of either the homologous MRP2 or the distantly related P-glycoprotein were fully active and trafficked normally. Using mutated proteins, we have identified structural elements containing five conserved hydrophobic amino acids that are required for activity. We show that these are important for binding and hydrolysis of ATP by nucleotide binding domain 2. Based on crystal structures of several ABC proteins, we suggest that the conserved amino acids may stabilize a helical bundle formed by the COOH-terminal three helices and may contribute to interactions between the COOH-terminal region and the protein's two nucleotide binding domains.

  14. Regulation of the Axillary Osmidrosis-Associated ABCC11 Protein Stability by N-Linked Glycosylation: Effect of Glucose Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Yu; Takada, Tappei; Miyata, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Toshihisa; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette C11 (ABCC11) is a plasma membrane protein involved in the transport of a variety of lipophilic anions. ABCC11 wild-type is responsible for the high-secretion phenotypes in human apocrine glands, such as that of wet-type ear wax, and the risk of axillary osmidrosis. We have previously reported that mature ABCC11 is a glycoprotein containing two N-linked glycans at Asn838 and Asn844. However, little is known about the role of N-linked glycosylation in the regulation of ABCC11 protein. In the current study, we investigated the effects of N-linked glycosylation on the protein level and localization of ABCC11 using polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney II cells. When the N-linked glycosylation in ABCC11-expressing cells was chemically inhibited by tunicamycin treatment, the maturation of ABCC11 was suppressed and its protein level was significantly decreased. Immunoblotting analyses demonstrated that the protein level of the N-linked glycosylation-deficient mutant (N838Q and N844Q: Q838/844) was about half of the ABCC11 wild-type level. Further biochemical studies with the Q838/844 mutant showed that this glycosylation-deficient ABCC11 was degraded faster than wild-type probably due to the enhancement of the MG132-sensitive protein degradation pathway. Moreover, the incubation of ABCC11 wild-type-expressing cells in a low-glucose condition decreased mature, glycosylated ABCC11, compared with the high-glucose condition. On the other hand, the protein level of the Q838/844 mutant was not affected by glucose condition. These results suggest that N-linked glycosylation is important for the protein stability of ABCC11, and physiological alteration in glucose may affect the ABCC11 protein level and ABCC11-related phenotypes in humans, such as axillary osmidrosis. PMID:27281343

  15. A bacterial ATP-dependent, enhancer binding protein that activates the housekeeping RNA polymerase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, William C.; Kranz, Robert G.

    1998-01-01

    A commonly accepted view of gene regulation in bacteria that has emerged over the last decade is that promoters are transcriptionally activated by one of two general mechanisms. The major type involves activator proteins that bind to DNA adjacent to where the RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme binds, usually assisting in recruitment of the RNAP to the promoter. This holoenzyme uses the housekeeping ς70 or a related factor, which directs the core RNAP to the promoter and assists in melting the DNA near the RNA start site. A second type of mechanism involves the alternative sigma factor (called ς54 or ςN) that directs RNAP to highly conserved promoters. In these cases, an activator protein with an ATPase function oligomerizes at tandem sites far upstream from the promoter. The nitrogen regulatory protein (NtrC) from enteric bacteria has been the model for this family of activators. Activation of the RNAP/ς54 holoenzyme to form the open complex is mediated by the activator, which is tethered upstream. Hence, this class of protein is sometimes called the enhancer binding protein family or the NtrC class. We describe here a third system that has properties of each of these two types. The NtrC enhancer binding protein from the photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter capsulatus, is shown in vitro to activate the housekeeping RNAP/ς70 holoenzyme. Transcriptional activation by this NtrC requires ATP binding but not hydrolysis. Oligomerization at distant tandem binding sites on a supercoiled template is also necessary. Mechanistic and evolutionary questions of these systems are discussed. PMID:9637689

  16. [Characterization of a putative S locus encoded receptor protein kinase and its role in self-incompatibility]. Progress report, January 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-01

    The serine/threonine protein kinase (SRK) protein was predicted to be similar to the growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases in animals but its amino acid sequence of the catalytic domain is more similar to that of the catalytic domains of protein serine/threonine kinases than to protein tyrosine kinases. We have shown that the SRK protein has intrinsic scrine/threonine kinase activity. We subcloned the protein kinase-homologous domain of the SRK{sub 6} cDNA into the bacterial expression vector pGEX-3X and we have constructed a second plasmid identical to the first except that it carried a conservative mutation that substituted Arg for the Lys{sup 524} codon of SRK6 This lysine corresponds to the ATP-binding site, is essential in protein kinases, and is a common target for site-directed mutagenesis as a means to obtain kinase-defective proteins. Cultures bearing the wild-type and mutant SRK catalytic domains each produced an approximately 64 kD protein that reacted with anti-SRK6 antibodies. Following pulse-labeling with {sup 32}P we found that the wild-type SRK6 protein but not the mutant form was detectably phosphorylated. Phosphoamino acid analysis of the affinity purified {sup 32}p-labeled GST-SRK6 fusion protein demonstrated that SRK was phosphorylated predominantly on semine and to a lesser extent on threonine, but not on tyrosine. Thus, SRK6 is a functional serine/threonine protein kinase.

  17. Functional reconstitution and channel activity measurements of purified wildtype and mutant CFTR protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckford, Paul D W; Li, Canhui; Bear, Christine E

    2015-03-09

    The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a unique channel-forming member of the ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) superfamily of transporters. The phosphorylation and nucleotide dependent chloride channel activity of CFTR has been frequently studied in whole cell systems and as single channels in excised membrane patches. Many Cystic Fibrosis-causing mutations have been shown to alter this activity. While a small number of purification protocols have been published, a fast reconstitution method that retains channel activity and a suitable method for studying population channel activity in a purified system have been lacking. Here rapid methods are described for purification and functional reconstitution of the full-length CFTR protein into proteoliposomes of defined lipid composition that retains activity as a regulated halide channel. This reconstitution method together with a novel flux-based assay of channel activity is a suitable system for studying the population channel properties of wild type CFTR and the disease-causing mutants F508del- and G551D-CFTR. Specifically, the method has utility in studying the direct effects of phosphorylation, nucleotides and small molecules such as potentiators and inhibitors on CFTR channel activity. The methods are also amenable to the study of other membrane channels/transporters for anionic substrates.

  18. Family business: the multidrug-resistance related protein (MRP) ABC transporter genes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolukisaoglu, H Uner; Bovet, Lucien; Klein, Markus; Eggmann, Thomas; Geisler, Markus; Wanke, Dierk; Martinoia, Enrico; Schulz, Burkhard

    2002-11-01

    Despite the completion of the sequencing of the entire genome of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh., the exact determination of each single gene and its function remains an open question. This is especially true for multigene families. An approach that combines analysis of genomic structure, expression data and functional genomics to ascertain the role of the members of the multidrug-resistance-related protein ( MRP) gene family, a subfamily of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters from Arabidopsis is presented. We used cDNA sequencing and alignment-based re-annotation of genomic sequences to define the exact genic structure of all known AtMRP genes. Analysis of promoter regions suggested different induction conditions even for closely related genes. Expression analysis for the entire gene family confirmed these assumptions. Phylogenetic analysis and determination of segmental duplication in the regions of AtMRP genes revealed that the evolution of the extraordinarily high number of ABC transporter genes in plants cannot solely be explained by polyploidisation during the evolution of the Arabidopsis genome. Interestingly MRP genes from Oryza sativa L. (rice; OsMRP) show very similar genomic structures to those from Arabidopsis. Screening of large populations of T-DNA-mutagenised lines of A. thaliana resulted in the isolation of AtMRP insertion mutants. This work opens the way for the defined analysis of a multigene family of important membrane transporters whose broad variety of functions expands their traditional role as cellular detoxifiers. PMID:12430019

  19. Sulfate-binding protein, CysP, is a candidate vaccine antigen of Moraxella catarrhalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Timothy F; Kirkham, Charmaine; Johnson, Antoinette; Brauer, Aimee L; Koszelak-Rosenblum, Mary; Malkowski, Michael G

    2016-07-19

    Moraxella catarrhalis causes otitis media in children and respiratory tract infections in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A vaccine to prevent M. catarrhalis infections would have an enormous impact globally in preventing morbidity caused by M. catarrhalis in these populations. Using a genome mining approach we have identified a sulfate binding protein, CysP, of an ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter system as a novel candidate vaccine antigen. CysP expresses epitopes on the bacterial surface and is highly conserved among strains. Immunization with CysP induces potentially protective immune responses in a murine pulmonary clearance model. In view of these features that indicate CysP is a promising vaccine antigen, we conducted further studies to elucidate its function. These studies demonstrated that CysP binds sulfate and thiosulfate ions, plays a nutritional role for the organism and functions in intracellular survival of M. catarrhalis in human respiratory epithelial cells. The observations that CysP has features of a vaccine antigen and also plays an important role in growth and survival of the organism indicate that CysP is an excellent candidate vaccine antigen to prevent M. catarrhalis otitis media and infections in adults with COPD. PMID:27265455

  20. A Computational Approach towards the Understanding of Plasmodium falciparum Multidrug Resistance Protein 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Saumya K; George, Linz-Buoy; Prasanth Kumar, Sivakumar; Highland, Hyacinth N; Jasrai, Yogesh T; Pandya, Himanshu A; Desai, Ketaki R

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum tremendously affected the chemotherapy worldwide while the intense distribution of chloroquine-resistant strains in most of the endemic areas added more complications in the treatment of malaria. The situation has even worsened by the lack of molecular mechanism to understand the resistance conferred by Plasmodia species. Recent studies have suggested the association of antimalarial resistance with P. falciparum multidrug resistance protein 1 (PfMDR1), an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter and a homologue of human P-glycoprotein 1 (P-gp1). The present study deals about the development of PfMDR1 computational model and the model of substrate transport across PfMDR1 with insights derived from conformations relative to inward- and outward-facing topologies that switch on/off the transportation system. Comparison of ATP docked positions and its structural motif binding properties were found to be similar among other ATPases, and thereby contributes to NBD domains dimerization, a unique structural agreement noticed in Mus musculus Pgp and Escherichia coli MDR transporter homolog (MsbA). The interaction of leading antimalarials and phytochemicals within the active pocket of both wild-type and mutant-type PfMDR1 demonstrated the mode of binding and provided insights of less binding affinity thereby contributing to parasite's resistance mechanism. PMID:25937947

  1. Non-Genomic Origins of Proteins and Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew

    2003-01-01

    It is proposed that evolution of inanimate matter to cells endowed with a nucleic acid- based coding of genetic information was preceded by an evolutionary phase, in which peptides not coded by nucleic acids were able to self-organize into networks capable of evolution towards increasing metabolic complexity. Recent findings that truly different, simple peptides (Keefe and Szostak, 2001) can perform the same function (such as ATP binding) provide experimental support for this mechanism of early protobiological evolution. The central concept underlying this mechanism is that the reproduction of cellular functions alone was sufficient for self-maintenance of protocells, and that self- replication of macromolecules was not required at this stage of evolution. The precise transfer of information between successive generations of the earliest protocells was unnecessary and, possibly, undesirable. The key requirement in the initial stage of protocellular evolution was an ability to rapidly explore a large number of protein sequences in order to discover a set of molecules capable of supporting self- maintenance and growth of protocells. Undoubtedly, the essential protocellular functions were carried out by molecules not nearly as efficient or as specific as contemporary proteins. Many, potentially unrelated sequences could have performed each of these functions at an evolutionarily acceptable level. As evolution progressed, however proteins must have performed their functions with increasing efficiency and specificity. This, in turn, put additional constraints on protein sequences and the fraction of proteins capable of performing their functions at the required level decreased. At some point, the likelihood of generating a sufficiently efficient set of proteins through a non-coded synthesis was so small that further evolution was not possible without storing information about the sequences of these proteins. Beyond this point, further evolution required coupling between

  2. Developing Classroom Based Instructional Products: An Evolving Set of Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedermeyer, Fred C.

    1976-01-01

    The guidelines suggested in this article have evolved from the development of nationally distributed instructional systems over the past seven years at SWRL, a National Institute of Education-sponsored educational research and development laboratory. (Author)

  3. Evolving International Trade and Monetary Regimes and Related Policy Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Kumiharu Shigehara

    1991-01-01

    This essay focuses on some aspects of policy issues relating to evolving international trade and monetary regimes, and patterns of national saving and investment balances conducive to better global economic performance.

  4. Evolvability Analysis Method for Open Source Software Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Chauhan, Muhammad Aufeef

    2011-01-01

    Software systems evolve over the life span to accommodate changes in order to meet technical and business requirements. Evolution of open source software (OSS) is challenging because of involvement from a large number of independent teams and developers who make modifications in the systems according to their own requirements. It is required to evaluate these changes as these are being incorporated into the system against the long term evolvability objectives. This paper presents the analysis...

  5. (N+1)-dimensional Lorentzian evolving wormholes supported by polytropic matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cataldo, Mauricio [Universidad del Bio-Bio, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Concepcion (Chile); Arostica, Fernanda; Bahamonde, Sebastian [Universidad de Concepcion, Departamento de Fisica, Concepcion (Chile)

    2013-08-15

    In this paper we study (N+1)-dimensional evolving wormholes supported by energy satisfying a polytropic equation of state. The considered evolving wormhole models are described by a constant redshift function and generalizes the standard flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetime. The polytropic equation of state allows us to consider in (3+1)-dimensions generalizations of the phantom energy and the generalized Chaplygin gas sources. (orig.)

  6. On the Benefits of Divergent Search for Evolved Representations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehman, Joel; Risi, Sebastian; Stanley, Kenneth O

    2012-01-01

    explicit objectives that are consequently divergent may implicitly reward lineages that continually diverge, thereby indirectly selecting for evolvable representations that are better able to diverge further. This paper reviews a range of past results that support such a hypothesis from a method called...... novelty search, which explicitly rewards novelty, i.e. behaviors that diverge from previously encountered behaviors. In many experiments, novelty search demonstrates significant representational advantages over traditional fitness-based search, such as evolving more compact solutions, uncovering more...

  7. Degree distribution of a new model for evolving networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Xuan Zhang; Qinggui Zhao

    2010-03-01

    We propose and study an evolving network model with both preferential and random attachments of new links, incorporating the addition of new nodes, new links, and the removal of links. We first show that the degree evolution of a node follows a nonhomogeneous Markov chain. Based on the concept of Markov chain, we provide the exact solution of the degree distribution of this model and show that the model can generate scale-free evolving network.

  8. Probing the ATP-induced conformational flexibility of the PcrA helicase protein using molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhashal, Anil R; Choudhury, Chandan Kumar; Roy, Sudip

    2016-03-01

    Helicases are enzymes that unwind double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) into its single-stranded components. It is important to understand the binding and unbinding of ATP from the active sites of helicases, as this knowledge can be used to elucidate the functionality of helicases during the unwinding of dsDNA. In this work, we investigated the unbinding of ATP and its effect on the active-site residues of the helicase PcrA using molecular dynamic simulations. To mimic the unbinding process of ATP from the active site of the helicase, we simulated the application of an external force that pulls ATP from the active site and computed the free-energy change during this process. We estimated an energy cost of ~85 kJ/mol for the transformation of the helicase from the ATP-bound state (1QHH) to the ATP-free state (1PJR). Unbinding led to conformational changes in the residues of the protein at the active site. Some of the residues at the ATP-binding site were significantly reoriented when the ATP was pulled. We observed a clear competition between reorientation of the residues and energy stabilization by hydrogen bonds between the ATP and active-site residues. We also checked the flexibility of the PcrA protein using a principal component analysis of domain motion. We found that the ATP-free state of the helicase is more flexible than the ATP-bound state. PMID:26860503

  9. Blood-Brain Barrier and Breast Cancer Resistance Protein: A Limit to the Therapy of CNS Tumors and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorio, Anna Lisa; da Ros, Martina; Fantappiè, Ornella; Lucchesi, Maurizio; Facchini, Ludovica; Stival, Alessia; Becciani, Sabrina; Guidi, Milena; Favre, Claudio; de Martino, Maurizio; Genitori, Lorenzo; Sardi, Iacopo

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of brain tumors and neurodegenerative diseases, represents an ongoing challenge. In Central Nervous System (CNS) the achievement of therapeutic concentration of chemical agents is complicated by the presence of distinct set of efflux proteins, such as ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporters localized on the Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB). The activity of ABC transporters seems to be a common mechanism that underlies the poor response of CNS diseases to therapies. The molecular characterization of Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP/ABCG2), as an ABC transporter conferring multidrug resistance (MDR), has stimulated many studies to investigate its activity on the BBB, its involvement in physiology and CNS diseases and its role in limiting the delivery of drugs in CNS. In this review, we highlight the activity and localization of BCRP on the BBB and the action that this efflux pump has on many conventional drugs or latest generation molecules used for the treatment of CNS tumors and other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26584727

  10. Complex polymorphisms in the Plasmodium falciparum multidrug resistance protein 2 gene and its contribution to antimalarial response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, Maria Isabel; Osório, Nuno S; Ferreira, Pedro Eduardo; Franzén, Oscar; Dahlstrom, Sabina; Lum, J Koji; Nosten, Francois; Gil, José Pedro

    2014-12-01

    Plasmodium falciparum has the capacity to escape the actions of essentially all antimalarial drugs. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter proteins are known to cause multidrug resistance in a large range of organisms, including the Apicomplexa parasites. P. falciparum genome analysis has revealed two genes coding for the multidrug resistance protein (MRP) type of ABC transporters: Pfmrp1, previously associated with decreased parasite drug susceptibility, and the poorly studied Pfmrp2. The role of Pfmrp2 polymorphisms in modulating sensitivity to antimalarial drugs has not been established. We herein report a comprehensive account of the Pfmrp2 genetic variability in 46 isolates from Thailand. A notably high frequency of 2.8 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)/kb was identified for this gene, including some novel SNPs. Additionally, we found that Pfmrp2 harbors a significant number of microindels, some previously not reported. We also investigated the potential association of the identified Pfmrp2 polymorphisms with altered in vitro susceptibility to several antimalarials used in artemisinin-based combination therapy and with parasite clearance time. Association analysis suggested Pfmrp2 polymorphisms modulate the parasite's in vitro response to quinoline antimalarials, including chloroquine, piperaquine, and mefloquine, and association with in vivo parasite clearance. In conclusion, our study reveals that the Pfmrp2 gene is the most diverse ABC transporter known in P. falciparum with a potential role in antimalarial drug resistance. PMID:25267670

  11. Transcriptional Regulation, Metal Binding Properties and Structure of Pden1597, an Unusual Zinc Transport Protein from Paracoccus denitrificans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handali, Melody; Neupane, Durga P; Roychowdhury, Hridindu; Yukl, Erik T

    2015-05-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters of the cluster 9 family are ubiquitous among bacteria and essential for acquiring Zn(2+) and Mn(2+) from the environment or, in the case of pathogens, from the host. These rely on a substrate-binding protein (SBP) to coordinate the relevant metal with high affinity and specificity and subsequently release it to a membrane permease for translocation into the cytoplasm. Although a number of cluster 9 SBP structures have been determined, the structural attributes conferring Zn(2+) or Mn(2+) specificity remain ambiguous. Here we describe the gene expression profile, in vitro metal binding properties, and crystal structure of a new cluster 9 SBP from Paracoccus denitrificans we have called AztC. Although all of our results strongly indicate Zn(2+) over Mn(2+) specificity, the Zn(2+) ion is coordinated by a conserved Asp residue only observed to date as a metal ligand in Mn(2+)-specific SBPs. The unusual sequence properties of this protein are shared among close homologues, including members from the human pathogens Klebsiella pneumonia and Enterobacter aerogenes, and would seem to suggest a subclass of Zn(2+)-specific transporters among the cluster 9 family. In any case, the unusual coordination environment of AztC expands the already considerable range of those available to Zn(2+)-specific SBPs and highlights the presence of a His-rich loop as the most reliable indicator of Zn(2+) specificity. PMID:25787075

  12. Complex polymorphisms in the Plasmodium falciparum multidrug resistance protein 2 gene and its contribution to antimalarial response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, Maria Isabel; Osório, Nuno S; Ferreira, Pedro Eduardo; Franzén, Oscar; Dahlstrom, Sabina; Lum, J Koji; Nosten, Francois; Gil, José Pedro

    2014-12-01

    Plasmodium falciparum has the capacity to escape the actions of essentially all antimalarial drugs. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter proteins are known to cause multidrug resistance in a large range of organisms, including the Apicomplexa parasites. P. falciparum genome analysis has revealed two genes coding for the multidrug resistance protein (MRP) type of ABC transporters: Pfmrp1, previously associated with decreased parasite drug susceptibility, and the poorly studied Pfmrp2. The role of Pfmrp2 polymorphisms in modulating sensitivity to antimalarial drugs has not been established. We herein report a comprehensive account of the Pfmrp2 genetic variability in 46 isolates from Thailand. A notably high frequency of 2.8 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)/kb was identified for this gene, including some novel SNPs. Additionally, we found that Pfmrp2 harbors a significant number of microindels, some previously not reported. We also investigated the potential association of the identified Pfmrp2 polymorphisms with altered in vitro susceptibility to several antimalarials used in artemisinin-based combination therapy and with parasite clearance time. Association analysis suggested Pfmrp2 polymorphisms modulate the parasite's in vitro response to quinoline antimalarials, including chloroquine, piperaquine, and mefloquine, and association with in vivo parasite clearance. In conclusion, our study reveals that the Pfmrp2 gene is the most diverse ABC transporter known in P. falciparum with a potential role in antimalarial drug resistance.

  13. Biochemical Roles for Conserved Residues in the Bacterial Fatty Acid-binding Protein Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broussard, Tyler C; Miller, Darcie J; Jackson, Pamela; Nourse, Amanda; White, Stephen W; Rock, Charles O

    2016-03-18

    Fatty acid kinase (Fak) is a ubiquitous Gram-positive bacterial enzyme consisting of an ATP-binding protein (FakA) that phosphorylates the fatty acid bound to FakB. In Staphylococcus aureus, Fak is a global regulator of virulence factor transcription and is essential for the activation of exogenous fatty acids for incorporation into phospholipids. The 1.2-Å x-ray structure of S. aureus FakB2, activity assays, solution studies, site-directed mutagenesis, and in vivo complementation were used to define the functions of the five conserved residues that define the FakB protein family (Pfam02645). The fatty acid tail is buried within the protein, and the exposed carboxyl group is bound by a Ser-93-fatty acid carboxyl-Thr-61-His-266 hydrogen bond network. The guanidinium of the invariant Arg-170 is positioned to potentially interact with a bound acylphosphate. The reduced thermal denaturation temperatures of the T61A, S93A, and H266A FakB2 mutants illustrate the importance of the hydrogen bond network in protein stability. The FakB2 T61A, S93A, and H266A mutants are 1000-fold less active in the Fak assay, and the R170A mutant is completely inactive. All FakB2 mutants form FakA(FakB2)2 complexes except FakB2(R202A), which is deficient in FakA binding. Allelic replacement shows that strains expressing FakB2 mutants are defective in fatty acid incorporation into phospholipids and virulence gene transcription. These conserved residues are likely to perform the same critical functions in all bacterial fatty acid-binding proteins.

  14. Expression and characterization of a new valosin-containing protein from silkworm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Chen; Ruo-Ran Wang; Zhen Peng; Qiong Liu; Jia-Zuan Ni

    2012-01-01

    Valosin-containing protein (VCP) is a type-Ⅱ adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) wih extensive biological function in organisms.Silkworm is the second insect model for genetic studies and a bioreactor for proteinaceous drugs and biomaterials.In this paper,a new VCP-like gene was amplified from the fat body of silkworm following genome prediction and spliced expressed sequence tag sequences,using both reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and 3′-RACE (rapid amplification of complementary DNA ends) methods.Bioinformatical analysis showed that the translated amino acid scqucnce containcd a highly conserved domain of VCPs similar to that of many insects.This domain consists of the conserved structure motifs of the ATP binding site and the catalytical center,which is closely related to the insect VCPs in a phylogenetic tree.The silkworm VCP-like gene was successfully inserted into the plasmid and transformed into Escherichia coli cells to express VCP-like protein with ATPase activity.The expression of silkworm VCP-like protein was also confirmed by Western blotting and mass spectrometric analyses.Distribution of the VCP-like gene in various tissues of the silkworm was also studied by real-time PCR.Results showed that the messenger RNA (mRNA) of VCP-like protein is widely expressed in fat body,reproductive organs (testis or ovary),silk gland,head,Malpighian tubule,epidermis and midgut.Among them,fat body has the highest mRNA expression level of the VCP-like gene,while the midgut has the lowest expression level.This study provides groundwork for further study on the structure and function of the new VCP-like protein.

  15. Perturbation Approaches for Exploring Protein Binding Site Flexibility to Predict Transient Binding Pockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokh, Daria B; Czodrowski, Paul; Rippmann, Friedrich; Wade, Rebecca C

    2016-08-01

    Simulations of the long-time scale motions of a ligand binding pocket in a protein may open up new perspectives for the design of compounds with steric or chemical properties differing from those of known binders. However, slow motions of proteins are difficult to access using standard molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and are thus usually neglected in computational drug design. Here, we introduce two nonequilibrium MD approaches to identify conformational changes of a binding site and detect transient pockets associated with these motions. The methods proposed are based on the rotamerically induced perturbation (RIP) MD approach, which employs perturbation of side-chain torsional motion for initiating large-scale protein movement. The first approach, Langevin-RIP (L-RIP), entails a series of short Langevin MD simulations, each starting with perturbation of one of the side-chains lining the binding site of interest. L-RIP provides extensive sampling of conformational changes of the binding site. In less than 1 ns of MD simulation with L-RIP, we observed distortions of the α-helix in the ATP binding site of HSP90 and flipping of the DFG loop in Src kinase. In the second approach, RIPlig, a perturbation is applied to a pseudoligand placed in different parts of a binding pocket, which enables flexible regions of the binding site to be identified in a small number of 10 ps MD simulations. The methods were evaluated for four test proteins displaying different types and degrees of binding site flexibility. Both methods reveal all transient pocket regions in less than a total of 10 ns of simulations, even though many of these regions remained closed in 100 ns conventional MD. The proposed methods provide computationally efficient tools to explore binding site flexibility and can aid in the functional characterization of protein pockets, and the identification of transient pockets for ligand design. PMID:27399277

  16. Motion Tree Delineates Hierarchical Structure of Protein Dynamics Observed in Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Moritsugu

    Full Text Available Molecular dynamics (MD simulations of proteins provide important information to understand their functional mechanisms, which are, however, likely to be hidden behind their complicated motions with a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. A straightforward and intuitive analysis of protein dynamics observed in MD simulation trajectories is therefore of growing significance with the large increase in both the simulation time and system size. In this study, we propose a novel description of protein motions based on the hierarchical clustering of fluctuations in the inter-atomic distances calculated from an MD trajectory, which constructs a single tree diagram, named a "Motion Tree", to determine a set of rigid-domain pairs hierarchically along with associated inter-domain fluctuations. The method was first applied to the MD trajectory of substrate-free adenylate kinase to clarify the usefulness of the Motion Tree, which illustrated a clear-cut dynamics picture of the inter-domain motions involving the ATP/AMP lid and the core domain together with the associated amplitudes and correlations. The comparison of two Motion Trees calculated from MD simulations of ligand-free and -bound glutamine binding proteins clarified changes in inherent dynamics upon ligand binding appeared in both large domains and a small loop that stabilized ligand molecule. Another application to a huge protein, a multidrug ATP binding cassette (ABC transporter, captured significant increases of fluctuations upon binding a drug molecule observed in both large scale inter-subunit motions and a motion localized at a transmembrane helix, which may be a trigger to the subsequent structural change from inward-open to outward-open states to transport the drug molecule. These applications demonstrated the capabilities of Motion Trees to provide an at-a-glance view of various sizes of functional motions inherent in the complicated MD trajectory.

  17. Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2): its role in multidrug resistance and regulation of its gene expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takeo Nakanishi; Douglas D. Ross

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP)/ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2) is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter identified as a molecular cause of multidrug resistance (MDR) in diverse cancer cells.BCRP physiologically functions as a part of a self-defense mechanism for the organism; it enhances elimination of toxic xenobiotic substances and harmful agents in the gut and biliary tract,as well as through the blood-brain,placental,and possibly blood-testis barriers.BCRP recognizes and transports numerous anticancer drugs including conventional chemotherapeutic and targeted small therapeutic molecules relatively new in clinical use.Thus,BCRP expression in cancer cells directly causes MDR by active efflux of anticancer drugs.Because BCRP is also known to be a stem cell marker,its expression in cancer cells could be a manifestation of metabolic and signaling pathways that confer multiple mechanisms of drug resistance,self-renewal (stemness),and invasiveness (aggressiveness),and thereby impart a poor prognosis.Therefore,blocking BCRP-mediated active efflux may provide a therapeutic benefit for cancers.Delineating the precise molecular mechanisms for BCRP gene expression may lead to identification of a novel molecular target to modulate BCRP-mediated MDR.Current evidence suggests that BCRP gene transcription is regulated by a number of trans-acting elements including hypoxia inducible factor 1α, estrogen receptor, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor.Furthermore,alternative promoter usage,demethylation of the BCRP promoter,and histone modificationare likely associated with drug-induced BCRP overexpression in cancer cells.Finally,PI3K/AKT signaling may play a critical role in modulating BCRP function under a variety of conditions.These biological events seem involved in a complicated manner.Untangling the events would be an essential first step to developing a method to modulate BCRP function to aid patients with cancer.This review will

  18. Nucleotide cofactor-dependent structural change of Xenopus laevis Rad51 protein filament detected by small-angle neutron scattering measurements in solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellouze, C.; Kim, H.-K.; Maeshima, K.;

    1997-01-01

    Rad51 protein, a eukaryotic homologue of RecA protein, forms a filamentous complex with DNA and catalyzes homologous recombination. We have analyzed the structure of Xenopus Rad51 protein (XRad51.1) in solution by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The measurements showed that XRad51.1 forms...... a helical filament independently of DNA. The sizes of the cross-sectional and helical pitch of the filament could be determined, respectively, from a Guinier plot and the position of the subsidiary maximum of SANS data. We observed that the helical structure is modified by nucleotide binding as in the case...... of RecA. Upon ATP binding under high-salt conditions (600 mM NaCl), the helical pitch of XRad51.1 filament was increased from 8 to 10 nm and the cross-sectional diameter decreased from 7 to 6 nm. The pitch sizes of XRad51.1 are similar to, though slightly larger than, those of RecA filament under...

  19. Bsep蛋白表达及调控与胆汁淤积的关系%Correlation between Bsep Protein Expression and Regulation and Cholestasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王火平

    2012-01-01

    Bsep protein, also known bile salt export pump, belongs to superfamily of ATP binding cas-sette( ABC )transporters. The research on hepatocellular minute structure confirmed that it's mainly expressed in hepatocytic canalicular membrane, is an important transporter of the process of bile excretion. At present many studies indicate that there is close association between Bsep protein expression changes and functional deficiency and cholestasis. Studies of Bsep protein and other bile salt transporters comprehensively and deeply is helpful to reveal molecular mechanism of cholestasis,providing theoretical basis and new ideas for the prevention , diagnosis and treatment of cholestasis.%Bsep蛋白即胆盐输出泵,属于ATP结合盒转运体超家族.对肝细胞细微结构的研究证实其主要表达于肝细胞胆管膜侧,为胆汁生成过程中重要的转运载体.目前大量研究表明,其表达量变化及功能缺失与胆汁淤积发生之间存在密切关系.对Bsep蛋白及其他胆酸转运体的研究有助于全面深入地揭示胆汁淤积发生的部分分子机制,为胆汁淤积的预防、诊治提供理论依据和新的思路.

  20. Evolving role of MeCP2 in Rett syndrome and autism

    OpenAIRE

    Lasalle, Janine M.; Yasui, Dag H.

    2009-01-01

    Rett syndrome is an X-linked autism-spectrum disorder caused by mutations in MECP2, encoding methyl CpG-binding protein 2. Since the discovery of MECP2 mutations as the genetic cause of Rett syndrome, the understanding of MeCP2 function has evolved. Although MeCP2 was predicted to be a global transcriptional repressor of methylated promoters, large-scale combined epigenomic approaches of MeCP2 binding, methylation and gene expression have demonstrated that MeCP2 binds preferentially to interg...

  1. TGD4 involved in endoplasmic reticulum-to-chloroplast lipid trafficking is a phosphatidic acid binding protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Z.; Xu C.; Benning, C.

    2012-05-01

    The synthesis of galactoglycerolipids, which are prevalent in photosynthetic membranes, involves enzymes at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the chloroplast envelope membranes. Genetic analysis of trigalactosyldiacylglycerol (TGD) proteins in Arabidopsis has demonstrated their role in polar lipid transfer from the ER to the chloroplast. The TGD1, 2, and 3 proteins resemble components of a bacterial-type ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, with TGD1 representing the permease, TGD2 the substrate binding protein, and TGD3 the ATPase. However, the function of the TGD4 protein in this process is less clear and its location in plant cells remains to be firmly determined. The predicted C-terminal {beta}-barrel structure of TGD4 is weakly similar to proteins of the outer cell membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. Here, we show that, like TGD2, the TGD4 protein when fused to DsRED specifically binds phosphatidic acid (PtdOH). As previously shown for tgd1 mutants, tgd4 mutants have elevated PtdOH content, probably in extraplastidic membranes. Using highly purified and specific antibodies to probe different cell fractions, we demonstrated that the TGD4 protein was present in the outer envelope membrane of chloroplasts, where it appeared to be deeply buried within the membrane except for the N-terminus, which was found to be exposed to the cytosol. It is proposed that TGD4 is either directly involved in the transfer of polar lipids, possibly PtdOH, from the ER to the outer chloroplast envelope membrane or in the transfer of PtdOH through the outer envelope membrane.

  2. bMERB domains are bivalent Rab8 family effectors evolved by gene duplication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Amrita; Oprisko, Anastasia; Campos, Jeremy; Fu, Yangxue; Friese, Timon; Itzen, Aymelt; Goody, Roger S; Gazdag, Emerich Mihai; Müller, Matthias P

    2016-01-01

    In their active GTP-bound form, Rab proteins interact with proteins termed effector molecules. In this study, we have thoroughly characterized a Rab effector domain that is present in proteins of the Mical and EHBP families, both known to act in endosomal trafficking. Within our study, we show that these effectors display a preference for Rab8 family proteins (Rab8, 10, 13 and 15) and that some of the effector domains can bind two Rab proteins via separate binding sites. Structural analysis allowed us to explain the specificity towards Rab8 family members and the presence of two similar Rab binding sites that must have evolved via gene duplication. This study is the first to thoroughly characterize a Rab effector protein that contains two separate Rab binding sites within a single domain, allowing Micals and EHBPs to bind two Rabs simultaneously, thus suggesting previously unknown functions of these effector molecules in endosomal trafficking. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18675.001 PMID:27552051

  3. Linoleic acid suppresses cholesterol efflux and ATP-binding cassette transporters in murine bone marrow-derived macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are at increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD), possibly associated with elevated plasma free fatty acid concentrations. Paradoxically, evidence suggests that unsaturated, compared to saturated fatty acids, suppress macrophage chole...

  4. Fluorescence competition assay for the assessment of ATP binding to an isolated domain of Na+, K(+)-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubala, M; Plásek, J; Amler, E

    2004-01-01

    An equation allowing estimation of the dissociation constant for binding of a non-fluorescent ligand to the enzyme is presented that is based on the competitive replacement of the ligand by its fluorescent analog. We derived an explicit formula for the probe fluorescence intensity, which is suitable for nonlinear least-squares analysis. We used this formula to evaluate the binding of ATP to the large cytoplasmic loop of Na+,K(+)-ATPase. The estimated value of KD (6.2+/- 0.7 mM) is comparable with the results from other laboratories for similar constructs obtained by a different method.

  5. Deactivation of the Arabidopsis BRI1 receptor kinase by autophosphorylation within the glycine-rich loop involved in ATP binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    The activity of the dual-specificity brassinosteroid receptor kinase, BRI1, reflects the balance between phosphorylation-dependent activation and several potential mechanisms for deactivation of the receptor. In the present report, we identify regions of the juxtamembrane domain that are essential f...

  6. Conformational changes of the histidine ATP-binding cassette transporter studied by double electron-electron resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sippach, Michael; Weidlich, Daniela; Klose, Daniel; Abé, Christoph; Klare, Johann; Schneider, Erwin; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

    2014-07-01

    The conformational dynamics of the histidine ABC transporter HisQMP2 from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, reconstituted into liposomes, is studied by site-directed spin labeling and double electron-electron resonance spectroscopy in the absence of nucleotides, in the ATP-bound, and in the post-hydrolysis state. The results show that the inter-dimer distances as measured between the Q-loops of HisP2 in the intact transporter resemble those determined for the maltose transporter in all three states of the hydrolysis cycle. Only in the presence of liganded HisJ the closed conformation of the nucleotide binding sites is achieved revealing the transmembrane communication of the presence of substrate. Two conformational states can be distinguished for the periplasmic moiety of HisQMP2 as detected by differences in distributions of interspin distances between positions 86 and 96 or 104 and 197. The observed conformational changes are correlated to proposed open, semi-open and closed conformations of the nucleotide binding domains HisP2. Our results are in line with a rearrangement of transmembrane helices 4 and 4' of HisQM during the closed to the semi-open transition of HisP2 driven by the reorientation of the coupled helices 3a and 3b to occur upon hydrolysis. PMID:24583084

  7. Structural evolution of the protein kinase-like superfamily.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric D Scheeff

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The protein kinase family is large and important, but it is only one family in a larger superfamily of homologous kinases that phosphorylate a variety of substrates and play important roles in all three superkingdoms of life. We used a carefully constructed structural alignment of selected kinases as the basis for a study of the structural evolution of the protein kinase-like superfamily. The comparison of structures revealed a "universal core" domain consisting only of regions required for ATP binding and the phosphotransfer reaction. Remarkably, even within the universal core some kinase structures display notable changes, while still retaining essential activity. Hence, the protein kinase-like superfamily has undergone substantial structural and sequence revision over long evolutionary timescales. We constructed a phylogenetic tree for the superfamily using a novel approach that allowed for the combination of sequence and structure information into a unified quantitative analysis. When considered against the backdrop of species distribution and other metrics, our tree provides a compelling scenario for the development of the various kinase families from a shared common ancestor. We propose that most of the so-called "atypical kinases" are not intermittently derived from protein kinases, but rather diverged early in evolution to form a distinct phyletic group. Within the atypical kinases, the aminoglycoside and choline kinase families appear to share the closest relationship. These two families in turn appear to be the most closely related to the protein kinase family. In addition, our analysis suggests that the actin-fragmin kinase, an atypical protein kinase, is more closely related to the phosphoinositide-3 kinase family than to the protein kinase family. The two most divergent families, alpha-kinases and phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinases (PIPKs, appear to have distinct evolutionary histories. While the PIPKs probably have an

  8. Structural Evolution of the Protein Kinase-Like Superfamily.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The protein kinase family is large and important, but it is only one family in a larger superfamily of homologous kinases that phosphorylate a variety of substrates and play important roles in all three superkingdoms of life. We used a carefully constructed structural alignment of selected kinases as the basis for a study of the structural evolution of the protein kinase-like superfamily. The comparison of structures revealed a "universal core" domain consisting only of regions required for ATP binding and the phosphotransfer reaction. Remarkably, even within the universal core some kinase structures display notable changes, while still retaining essential activity. Hence, the protein kinase-like superfamily has undergone substantial structural and sequence revision over long evolutionary timescales. We constructed a phylogenetic tree for the superfamily using a novel approach that allowed for the combination of sequence and structure information into a unified quantitative analysis. When considered against the backdrop of species distribution and other metrics, our tree provides a compelling scenario for the development of the various kinase families from a shared common ancestor. We propose that most of the so-called "atypical kinases" are not intermittently derived from protein kinases, but rather diverged early in evolution to form a distinct phyletic group. Within the atypical kinases, the aminoglycoside and choline kinase families appear to share the closest relationship. These two families in turn appear to be the most closely related to the protein kinase family. In addition, our analysis suggests that the actin-fragmin kinase, an atypical protein kinase, is more closely related to the phosphoinositide-3 kinase family than to the protein kinase family. The two most divergent families, alpha-kinases and phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinases (PIPKs, appear to have distinct evolutionary histories. While the PIPKs probably have an

  9. A slowly evolving host moves first in symbiotic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damore, James; Gore, Jeff

    2011-03-01

    Symbiotic relationships, both parasitic and mutualistic, are ubiquitous in nature. Understanding how these symbioses evolve, from bacteria and their phages to humans and our gut microflora, is crucial in understanding how life operates. Often, symbioses consist of a slowly evolving host species with each host only interacting with its own sub-population of symbionts. The Red Queen hypothesis describes coevolutionary relationships as constant arms races with each species rushing to evolve an advantage over the other, suggesting that faster evolution is favored. Here, we use a simple game theoretic model of host- symbiont coevolution that includes population structure to show that if the symbionts evolve much faster than the host, the equilibrium distribution is the same as it would be if it were a sequential game where the host moves first against its symbionts. For the slowly evolving host, this will prove to be advantageous in mutualisms and a handicap in antagonisms. The model allows for symbiont adaptation to its host, a result that is robust to changes in the parameters and generalizes to continuous and multiplayer games. Our findings provide insight into a wide range of symbiotic phenomena and help to unify the field of coevolutionary theory.

  10. The value of monitoring to control evolving populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Andrej; Vázquez-García, Ignacio; Mustonen, Ville

    2015-01-27

    Populations can evolve to adapt to external changes. The capacity to evolve and adapt makes successful treatment of infectious diseases and cancer difficult. Indeed, therapy resistance has become a key challenge for global health. Therefore, ideas of how to control evolving populations to overcome this threat are valuable. Here we use the mathematical concepts of stochastic optimal control to study what is needed to control evolving populations. Following established routes to calculate control strategies, we first study how a polymorphism can be maintained in a finite population by adaptively tuning selection. We then introduce a minimal model of drug resistance in a stochastically evolving cancer cell population and compute adaptive therapies. When decisions are in this manner based on monitoring the response of the tumor, this can outperform established therapy paradigms. For both case studies, we demonstrate the importance of high-resolution monitoring of the target population to achieve a given control objective, thus quantifying the intuition that to control, one must monitor. PMID:25587136

  11. Modeling and clustering users with evolving profiles in usage streams

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Chongsheng

    2012-09-01

    Today, there is an increasing need of data stream mining technology to discover important patterns on the fly. Existing data stream models and algorithms commonly assume that users\\' records or profiles in data streams will not be updated or revised once they arrive. Nevertheless, in various applications such asWeb usage, the records/profiles of the users can evolve along time. This kind of streaming data evolves in two forms, the streaming of tuples or transactions as in the case of traditional data streams, and more importantly, the evolving of user records/profiles inside the streams. Such data streams bring difficulties on modeling and clustering for exploring users\\' behaviors. In this paper, we propose three models to summarize this kind of data streams, which are the batch model, the Evolving Objects (EO) model and the Dynamic Data Stream (DDS) model. Through creating, updating and deleting user profiles, these models summarize the behaviors of each user as a profile object. Based upon these models, clustering algorithms are employed to discover interesting user groups from the profile objects. We have evaluated all the proposed models on a large real-world data set, showing that the DDS model summarizes the data streams with evolving tuples more efficiently and effectively, and provides better basis for clustering users than the other two models. © 2012 IEEE.

  12. Expression of human A53T alpha-synuclein in the rat substantia nigra using a novel AAV1/2 vector produces a rapidly evolving pathology with protein aggregation, dystrophic neurite architecture and nigrostriatal degeneration with potential to model the pathology of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Xuan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pathological hallmarks of Parkinson's disease (PD include the presence of alpha-synuclein (α-syn rich Lewy bodies and neurites and the loss of dopaminergic (DA neurons of the substantia nigra (SN. Animal models of PD based on viral vector-mediated over-expression of α-syn have been developed and show evidence of DA toxicity to varying degrees depending on the type of virus used, its concentration, and the serotype of vector employed. To date these models have been variable, difficult to reproduce, and slow in their evolution to achieve a desired phenotype, hindering their use as a model for testing novel therapeutics. To address these issues we have taken a novel vector in this context, that can be prepared in high titer and which possesses an ability to produce neuronally-directed expression, with expression dynamics optimised to provide a rapid rise in gene product expression. Thus, in the current study, we have used a high titer chimeric AAV1/2 vector, to express human A53T α-syn, an empty vector control (EV, or green fluorescent protein (GFP, the latter to control for the possibility that high levels of protein in themselves might contribute to damage. Results We show that following a single 2 μl injection into the rat SN there is near complete coverage of the structure and expression of A53T α-syn or GFP appears throughout the striatum. Within 3 weeks of SN delivery of their respective vectors, aggregations of insoluble α-syn were observed in SN DA neurons. The numbers of DA neurons in the SN were significantly reduced by expression of A53T α-syn (52%, and to a lesser extent by GFP (24%, compared to EV controls (both P P Conclusions In the current implementation of the model, we recapitulate the primary pathological hallmarks of PD, although a proportion of the SN damage may relate to general protein overload and may not be specific for A53T α-syn. Future studies will thus be required to optimise the dose of

  13. Angular Momentum Transport via Internal Gravity Waves in Evolving Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Fuller, Jim; Cantiello, Matteo; Brown, Ben

    2014-01-01

    Recent asteroseismic advances have allowed for direct measurements of the internal rotation rates of many sub-giant and red giant stars. Unlike the nearly rigidly rotating Sun, these evolved stars contain radiative cores that spin faster than their overlying convective envelopes, but slower than they would in the absence of internal angular momentum transport. We investigate the role of internal gravity waves in angular momentum transport in evolving low mass stars. In agreement with previous results, we find that convectively excited gravity waves can prevent the development of strong differential rotation in the radiative cores of Sun-like stars. As stars evolve into sub-giants, however, low frequency gravity waves become strongly attenuated and cannot propagate below the hydrogen burning shell, allowing the spin of the core to decouple from the convective envelope. This decoupling occurs at the base of the sub-giant branch when stars have surface temperatures of roughly 5500 K. However, gravity waves can s...

  14. Evolving Systems: An Outcome of Fondest Hopes and Wildest Dreams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Susan A.; Balas, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    New theory is presented for evolving systems, which are autonomously controlled subsystems that self-assemble into a new evolved system with a higher purpose. Evolving systems of aerospace structures often require additional control when assembling to maintain stability during the entire evolution process. This is the concept of Adaptive Key Component Control that operates through one specific component to maintain stability during the evolution. In addition, this control must often overcome persistent disturbances that occur while the evolution is in progress. Theoretical results will be presented for Adaptive Key Component control for persistent disturbance rejection. An illustrative example will demonstrate the Adaptive Key Component controller on a system composed of rigid body and flexible body modes.

  15. Evolving Lorentzian wormholes supported by phantom matter and cosmological constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we study the possibility of sustaining an evolving wormhole via exotic matter made of phantom energy in the presence of a cosmological constant. We derive analytical evolving wormhole geometries by supposing that the radial tension of the phantom matter, which is negative to the radial pressure, and the pressure measured in the tangential directions have barotropic equations of state with constant state parameters. In this case the presence of a cosmological constant ensures accelerated expansion of the wormhole configurations. More specifically, for positive cosmological constant we have wormholes which expand forever and, for negative cosmological constant we have wormholes which expand to a maximum value and then recollapse. At spatial infinity the energy density and the pressures of the anisotropic phantom matter threading the wormholes vanish; thus these evolving wormholes are asymptotically vacuum Λ-Friedmann models with either open or closed or flat topologies.

  16. Cold Dust in Three Massive Evolved Stars in the LMC

    CERN Document Server

    Boyer, M L; van Loon, J Th; Srinivasan, S; Clayton, G C; Kemper, F; Smith, L J; Matsuura, M; Woods, Paul M; Marengo, M; Meixner, M; Engelbracht, C; Gordon, K D; Hony, S; Indebetouw, R; Misselt, K; Okumura, K; Panuzzo, P; Riebel, D; Roman-Duval, J; Sauvage, M; Sloan, G C

    2010-01-01

    Massive evolved stars can produce large amounts of dust, and far-infrared (IR) data are essential for determining the contribution of cold dust to the total dust mass. Using Herschel, we search for cold dust in three very dusty massive evolved stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud: R71 is a Luminous Blue Variable, HD36402 is a Wolf-Rayet triple system, and IRAS05280-6910 is a red supergiant. We model the spectral energy distributions using radiative transfer codes and find that these three stars have mass-loss rates up to 10^-3 solar masses/year, suggesting that high-mass stars are important contributors to the life-cycle of dust. We found far-IR excesses in two objects, but these excesses appear to be associated with ISM and star-forming regions. Cold dust (T < 100 K) may thus not be an important contributor to the dust masses of evolved stars.

  17. Hybridization Reveals the Evolving Genomic Architecture of Speciation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus R. Kronforst

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The rate at which genomes diverge during speciation is unknown, as are the physical dynamics of the process. Here, we compare full genome sequences of 32 butterflies, representing five species from a hybridizing Heliconius butterfly community, to examine genome-wide patterns of introgression and infer how divergence evolves during the speciation process. Our analyses reveal that initial divergence is restricted to a small fraction of the genome, largely clustered around known wing-patterning genes. Over time, divergence evolves rapidly, due primarily to the origin of new divergent regions. Furthermore, divergent genomic regions display signatures of both selection and adaptive introgression, demonstrating the link between microevolutionary processes acting within species and the origin of species across macroevolutionary timescales. Our results provide a uniquely comprehensive portrait of the evolving species boundary due to the role that hybridization plays in reducing the background accumulation of divergence at neutral sites.

  18. Computational Genetic Regulatory Networks Evolvable, Self-organizing Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Knabe, Johannes F

    2013-01-01

    Genetic Regulatory Networks (GRNs) in biological organisms are primary engines for cells to enact their engagements with environments, via incessant, continually active coupling. In differentiated multicellular organisms, tremendous complexity has arisen in the course of evolution of life on earth. Engineering and science have so far achieved no working system that can compare with this complexity, depth and scope of organization. Abstracting the dynamics of genetic regulatory control to a computational framework in which artificial GRNs in artificial simulated cells differentiate while connected in a changing topology, it is possible to apply Darwinian evolution in silico to study the capacity of such developmental/differentiated GRNs to evolve. In this volume an evolutionary GRN paradigm is investigated for its evolvability and robustness in models of biological clocks, in simple differentiated multicellularity, and in evolving artificial developing 'organisms' which grow and express an ontogeny starting fr...

  19. A sensitive search for methanol line emission toward evolved stars

    CERN Document Server

    Gomez, J F; Suarez, O; Rizzo, J R; de Gregorio-Monsalvo, I

    2014-01-01

    We present a sensitive search for methanol line emission in evolved stars at 1 cm, aiming to detect, for the first time, methanol masers in this type of objects. Our sample comprised post-AGB stars and young planetary nebulae (PNe), whose mass-loss processes and circumstellar structures resemble those of young stellar objects (YSOs), where methanol masers are detected. Class I masers were searched for in 73 objects, whereas Class II ones were searched in 16. No detection was obtained. The non-detection of Class I methanol masers indicated that methanol production in dust grains and/or the enhancement of its gas-phase abundance in the shocked regions of evolved objects are not as efficient as in YSOs. We suggest that relatively more evolved PNe might have a better probability of harboring Class II masers.

  20. Evolving Chart Pattern Sensitive Neural Network Based Forex Trading Agents

    CERN Document Server

    Sher, Gene I

    2011-01-01

    Though machine learning has been applied to the foreign exchange market for quiet some time now, and neural networks have been shown to yield good results, in modern approaches neural network systems are optimized through the traditional methods, and their input signals are vectors containing prices and other indicator elements. The aim of this paper is twofold, the presentation and testing of the application of topology and weight evolving artificial neural network (TWEANN) systems to automated currency trading, and the use of chart images as input to a geometrical regularity aware indirectly encoded neural network systems. This paper presents the benchmark results of neural network based automated currency trading systems evolved using TWEANNs, and compares the generalization capabilities of these direct encoded neural networks which use the standard price vector inputs, and the indirect (substrate) encoded neural networks which use chart images as input. The TWEANN algorithm used to evolve these currency t...