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Sample records for atp dependent chromatin

  1. ATP-Dependent Chromatin Remodeling Factors and Their Roles in Affecting Nucleosome Fiber Composition

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    Alexandra Lusser

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors of the SNF2 family are key components of the cellular machineries that shape and regulate chromatin structure and function. Members of this group of proteins have broad and heterogeneous functions ranging from controlling gene activity, facilitating DNA damage repair, promoting homologous recombination to maintaining genomic stability. Several chromatin remodeling factors are critical components of nucleosome assembly processes, and recent reports have identified specific functions of distinct chromatin remodeling factors in the assembly of variant histones into chromatin. In this review we will discuss the specific roles of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors in determining nucleosome composition and, thus, chromatin fiber properties.

  2. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling in the DNA-damage response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lans Hannes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The integrity of DNA is continuously challenged by metabolism-derived and environmental genotoxic agents that cause a variety of DNA lesions, including base alterations and breaks. DNA damage interferes with vital processes such as transcription and replication, and if not repaired properly, can ultimately lead to premature aging and cancer. Multiple DNA pathways signaling for DNA repair and DNA damage collectively safeguard the integrity of DNA. Chromatin plays a pivotal role in regulating DNA-associated processes, and is itself subject to regulation by the DNA-damage response. Chromatin influences access to DNA, and often serves as a docking or signaling site for repair and signaling proteins. Its structure can be adapted by post-translational histone modifications and nucleosome remodeling, catalyzed by the activity of ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes. In recent years, accumulating evidence has suggested that ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes play important, although poorly characterized, roles in facilitating the effectiveness of the DNA-damage response. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the involvement of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling in three major DNA repair pathways: nucleotide excision repair, homologous recombination, and non-homologous end-joining. This shows that a surprisingly large number of different remodeling complexes display pleiotropic functions during different stages of the DNA-damage response. Moreover, several complexes seem to have multiple functions, and are implicated in various mechanistically distinct repair pathways.

  3. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling by Cockayne syndrome protein B and NAP1-like histone chaperones is required for efficient transcription-coupled DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Iltaeg; Tsai, Pei-Fang; Lake, Robert J; Basheer, Asjad; Fan, Hua-Ying

    2013-04-01

    The Cockayne syndrome complementation group B (CSB) protein is essential for transcription-coupled DNA repair, and mutations in CSB are associated with Cockayne syndrome--a devastating disease with complex clinical features, including the appearance of premature aging, sun sensitivity, and numerous neurological and developmental defects. CSB belongs to the SWI2/SNF2 ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler family, but the extent to which CSB remodels chromatin and whether this activity is utilized in DNA repair is unknown. Here, we show that CSB repositions nucleosomes in an ATP-dependent manner in vitro and that this activity is greatly enhanced by the NAP1-like histone chaperones, which we identify as new CSB-binding partners. By mapping functional domains and analyzing CSB derivatives, we demonstrate that chromatin remodeling by the combined activities of CSB and the NAP1-like chaperones is required for efficient transcription-coupled DNA repair. Moreover, we show that chromatin remodeling and repair protein recruitment mediated by CSB are separable activities. The collaboration that we observed between CSB and the NAP1-like histone chaperones adds a new dimension to our understanding of the ways in which ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers and histone chaperones can regulate chromatin structure. Taken together, the results of this study offer new insights into the functions of chromatin remodeling by CSB in transcription-coupled DNA repair as well as the underlying mechanisms of Cockayne syndrome.

  4. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling by Cockayne syndrome protein B and NAP1-like histone chaperones is required for efficient transcription-coupled DNA repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iltaeg Cho

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Cockayne syndrome complementation group B (CSB protein is essential for transcription-coupled DNA repair, and mutations in CSB are associated with Cockayne syndrome--a devastating disease with complex clinical features, including the appearance of premature aging, sun sensitivity, and numerous neurological and developmental defects. CSB belongs to the SWI2/SNF2 ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler family, but the extent to which CSB remodels chromatin and whether this activity is utilized in DNA repair is unknown. Here, we show that CSB repositions nucleosomes in an ATP-dependent manner in vitro and that this activity is greatly enhanced by the NAP1-like histone chaperones, which we identify as new CSB-binding partners. By mapping functional domains and analyzing CSB derivatives, we demonstrate that chromatin remodeling by the combined activities of CSB and the NAP1-like chaperones is required for efficient transcription-coupled DNA repair. Moreover, we show that chromatin remodeling and repair protein recruitment mediated by CSB are separable activities. The collaboration that we observed between CSB and the NAP1-like histone chaperones adds a new dimension to our understanding of the ways in which ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers and histone chaperones can regulate chromatin structure. Taken together, the results of this study offer new insights into the functions of chromatin remodeling by CSB in transcription-coupled DNA repair as well as the underlying mechanisms of Cockayne syndrome.

  5. The ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes CHD6, CHD7, and CHD8 exhibit distinct nucleosome binding and remodeling activities.

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    Manning, Benjamin J; Yusufzai, Timur

    2017-07-14

    Proper chromatin regulation is central to genome function and maintenance. The group III chromodomain-helicase-DNA-binding (CHD) family of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes, comprising CHD6, CHD7, CHD8, and CHD9, has well-documented roles in transcription regulation, impacting both organism development and disease etiology. These four enzymes are similar in their constituent domains, but they fill surprisingly non-redundant roles in the cell, with deficiencies in individual enzymes leading to dissimilar disease states such as CHARGE syndrome or autism spectrum disorders. The mechanisms explaining their divergent, non-overlapping functions are unclear. In this study, we performed an in-depth biochemical analysis of purified CHD6, CHD7, and CHD8 and discovered distinct differences in chromatin remodeling specificities and activities among them. We report that CHD6 and CHD7 both bind with high affinity to short linker DNA, whereas CHD8 requires longer DNA for binding. As a result, CHD8 slides nucleosomes into positions with more flanking linker DNA than CHD7. Moreover, we found that, although CHD7 and CHD8 slide nucleosomes, CHD6 disrupts nucleosomes in a distinct non-sliding manner. The different activities of these enzymes likely lead to differences in chromatin structure and, thereby, transcriptional control, at the enhancer and promoter loci where these enzymes bind. Overall, our work provides a mechanistic basis for both the non-redundant roles and the diverse mutant disease states of these enzymes in vivo. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. ATP-Dependent Chromatin Remodeling Is Required for Base Excision Repair in Conventional but Not in Variant H2A.Bbd Nucleosomes▿

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    Menoni, Hervé; Gasparutto, Didier; Hamiche, Ali; Cadet, Jean; Dimitrov, Stefan; Bouvet, Philippe; Angelov, Dimitar

    2007-01-01

    In eukaryotes, base excision repair (BER) is responsible for the repair of oxidatively generated lesions. The mechanism of BER on naked DNA substrates has been studied in detail, but how it operates on chromatin remains unclear. Here we have studied the mechanism of BER by introducing a single 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG) lesion in the DNA of reconstituted positioned conventional and histone variant H2A.Bbd nucleosomes. We found that 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase, apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease, and polymerase β activities were strongly reduced in both types of nucleosomes. In conventional nucleosomes SWI/SNF stimulated the processing of 8-oxoG by each one of the three BER repair factors to efficiencies similar to those for naked DNA. Interestingly, SWI/SNF-induced remodeling, but not mobilization of conventional nucleosomes, was required to achieve this effect. A very weak effect of SWI/SNF on the 8-oxoG BER removal in H2A.Bbd histone variant nucleosomes was observed. The possible implications of our data for the understanding of in vivo mechanisms of BER are discussed. PMID:17591702

  7. Footprint traversal by adenosine-triphosphate-dependent chromatin remodeler motor

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    Garai, Ashok; Mani, Jesrael; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2012-04-01

    Adenosine-triphosphate (ATP)-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes (CREs) are biomolecular motors in eukaryotic cells. These are driven by a chemical fuel, namely, ATP. CREs actively participate in many cellular processes that require accessibility of specific segments of DNA which are packaged as chromatin. The basic unit of chromatin is a nucleosome where 146 bp ˜ 50 nm of a double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) is wrapped around a spool formed by histone proteins. The helical path of histone-DNA contact on a nucleosome is also called “footprint.” We investigate the mechanism of footprint traversal by a CRE that translocates along the dsDNA. Our two-state model of a CRE captures effectively two distinct chemical (or conformational) states in the mechanochemical cycle of each ATP-dependent CRE. We calculate the mean time of traversal. Our predictions on the ATP dependence of the mean traversal time can be tested by carrying out in vitro experiments on mononucleosomes.

  8. Voltage Dependence of ATP Secretion in Mammalian Taste Cells

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    Romanov, Roman A.; Rogachevskaja, Olga A.; Khokhlov, Alexander A.; Kolesnikov, Stanislav S.

    2008-01-01

    Mammalian type II taste cells release the afferent neurotransmitter adenosine triphosphate (ATP) through ATP-permeable ion channels, most likely to be connexin (Cx) and/or pannexin hemichannels. Here, we show that ion channels responsible for voltage-gated (VG) outward currents in type II cells are ATP permeable and demonstrate a strong correlation between the magnitude of the VG current and the intensity of ATP release. These findings suggest that slowly deactivating ion channels transporting the VG outward currents can also mediate ATP secretion in type II cells. In line with this inference, we studied a dependence of ATP secretion on membrane voltage with a cellular ATP sensor using different pulse protocols. These were designed on the basis of predictions of a model of voltage-dependent transient ATP efflux. Consistently with curves that were simulated for ATP release mediated by ATP-permeable channels deactivating slowly, the bell-like and Langmuir isotherm–like potential dependencies were characteristic of ATP secretion obtained for prolonged and short electrical stimulations of taste cells, respectively. These observations strongly support the idea that ATP is primarily released via slowly deactivating channels. Depolarizing voltage pulses produced negligible Ca2+ transients in the cytoplasm of cells releasing ATP, suggesting that ATP secretion is mainly governed by membrane voltage under our recording conditions. With the proviso that natural connexons and pannexons are kinetically similar to exogenously expressed hemichannels, our findings suggest that VG ATP release in type II cells is primarily mediated by Cx hemichannels. PMID:19029378

  9. Phosphorylation-dependent regulation of plant chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Bigeard, Jean

    2014-07-10

    In eukaryotes, most of the DNA is located in the nucleus where it is organized with histone proteins in a higher order structure as chromatin. Chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins contribute to DNA-related processes such as replication and transcription as well as epigenetic regulation. Protein functions are often regulated by PTMs among which phosphorylation is one of the most abundant PTM. Phosphorylation of proteins affects important properties, such as enzyme activity, protein stability, or subcellular localization. We here describe the main specificities of protein phosphorylation in plants and review the current knowledge on phosphorylation-dependent regulation of plant chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins. We also outline some future challenges to further elucidate protein phosphorylation and chromatin regulation.

  10. Differential expression of ATP-dependent RNA helicase gene in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJL

    2012-02-07

    Feb 7, 2012 ... lysogeny broth (LB) medium at 4°C was induced for VBNC state; activated genes were detected using. mRNA differential display .... 191 amino acids. This cDNA sequence had a homology of 95 to 100% to the nucleotide of adenosine tripho- sphate (ATP)-dependent RNA helicase rh1B gene in different ...

  11. Phenomenological analysis of ATP dependence of motor protein

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yunxin

    2011-01-01

    In this study, through phenomenological comparison of the velocity-force data of processive motor proteins, including conventional kinesin, cytoplasmic dynein and myosin V, we found that, the ratio between motor velocities of two different ATP concentrations is almost invariant for any substall, superstall or negative external loads. Therefore, the velocity of motor can be well approximated by a Michaelis-Menten like formula $V=\\atp k(F)L/(\\atp +K_M)$, with $L$ the step size, and $k(F)$ the external load $F$ dependent rate of one mechanochemical cycle of motor motion in saturated ATP solution. The difference of Michaelis-Menten constant $K_M$ for substall, superstall and negative external load indicates, the ATP molecule affinity of motor head for these three cases are different, though the expression of $k(F)$ as a function of $F$ might be unchanged for any external load $F$. Verifications of this Michaelis-Menten like formula has also been done by fitting to the recent experimental data.

  12. Transcription-dependent association of HDAC2 with active chromatin.

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    Jahan, Sanzida; Sun, Jian-Min; He, Shihua; Davie, James R

    2018-02-01

    Histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) catalyzes deacetylation of histones at the promoter and coding regions of transcribed genes and regulates chromatin structure and transcription. To explore the role of HDAC2 and phosphorylated HDAC2 in gene regulation, we studied the location along transcribed genes, the mode of recruitment and the associated proteins with HDAC2 and HDAC2S394ph in chicken polychromatic erythrocytes. We show that HDAC2 and HDAC2S394ph are associated with transcriptionally active chromatin and located in the interchromatin channels. HDAC2S394ph was present primarly at the upstream promoter region of the transcribed CA2 and GAS41 genes, while total HDAC2 was also found within the coding region of the CA2 gene. Recruitment of HDAC2 to these genes was partially dependent upon on-going transcription. Unmodified HDAC2 was associated with RNA binding proteins and interacted with RNA bound to the initiating and elongating forms of RNA polymerase II. HDAC2S394ph was not associated with RNA polymerase II. These results highlight the differential properties of unmodified and phosphorylated HDAC2 and the organization of acetylated transcriptionally active chromatin in the chicken polychromatic erythrocyte. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. ISWI chromatin remodellers sense nucleosome modifications to determine substrate preference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dann, Geoffrey P; Liszczak, Glen P; Bagert, John D

    2017-01-01

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodellers regulate access to genetic information by controlling nucleosome positions in vivo. However, the mechanism by which remodellers discriminate between different nucleosome substrates is poorly understood. Many chromatin remodelling proteins possess conserved...... activity of all ISWI remodellers evaluated. This dependence also extends to CHD and SWI/SNF family remodellers, suggesting that the acidic patch may be generally required for chromatin remodelling. Critically, remodelling activity can be regulated by modifications neighbouring the acidic patch, signifying...... that it may act as a tunable interaction hotspot for ATP-dependent chromatin remodellers and, by extension, many other chromatin effectors that engage this region of the nucleosome surface....

  14. Metal-dependent regulation of ATP7A and ATP7B in fibroblast cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenartowicz, Malgorzata; Moos, Torben; Ogórek, Mateusz

    2016-01-01

    Deficiency of one of the copper transporters ATP7A and ATP7B leads to the rare X-linked disorder Menkes Disease (MD) or the rare autosomal disorder Wilson disease (WD), respectively. In order to investigate whether the ATP7A and the ATP7B genes may be transcriptionally regulated, we measured...... the expression level of the two genes at various concentrations of iron, copper, and insulin. Treating fibroblasts from controls or from individuals with MD or WD for 3 and 10 days with iron chelators revealed that iron deficiency led to increased transcript levels of both ATP7A and ATP7B. Copper deficiency...... for the two genes were observed in response to iron deficiency, different responses were observed after changes in the access to copper. Mosaic fibroblast cultures from female carriers of MD treated with copper or copper chelator for 6-8 weeks led to clonal selection. Cells that express the normal ATP7A...

  15. Metal-dependent regulation of ATP7A and ATP7B in fibroblast cultures

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    Lenartowicz Malgorzata

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Deficiency of one of the copper transporters ATP7A and ATP7B leads to the rare X-linked disorder Menkes Disease (MD or the rare autosomal disorder Wilson disease (WD, respectively. In order to investigate whether the ATP7A and the ATP7B genes may be transcriptionally regulated, we measured the expression level of the two genes at various concentrations of iron, copper and insulin. Treating fibroblasts from controls or from individuals with MD or WD for 3 and10 days with iron chelators revealed that iron deficiency led to increased transcript levels of both ATP7A and ATP7B. Copper deficiency obtained by treatment with the copper chelator led to a downregulation of ATP7A in the control fibroblasts, but surprisingly not in the WD fibroblasts. In contrast, the addition of copper led to an increased expression of ATP7A, but a decreased expression of ATP7B. Thus, whereas similar regulation patterns for the two genes were observed in response to iron deficiency, different responses were observed after changes in the access to copper. Mosaic fibroblast cultures from female carriers of MD treated with copper or copper chelator for 6-8 weeks led to clonal selection. Cells that express the normal ATP7A allele had a selective growth advantage at high copper concentrations, whereas more surprisingly, cells that express the mutant ATP7A allele had a selective growth advantage at low copper concentrations. Thus, although the transcription of ATP7A is regulated by copper, clonal growth selection in mosaic cell cultures is affected by the level of copper. Female carriers of MD are rarely affected probably due to a skewed inactivation of the X-chromosome bearing the ATP7A mutation.

  16. Temperature dependence of unitary properties of an ATP-dependent potassium channel in cardiac myocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    McLarnon, J G; Hamman, B.N.; Tibbits, G.F.

    1993-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the properties of unitary currents in cultured rat ventricular myocytes has been studied. Currents flowing through an ATP-dependent K+ channel were recorded from inside-out patches with the bath temperature varied from 10 degrees to 30 degrees C. The channel conductance was 56 pS at room temperature (22 degrees C), and the amplitudes of unitary currents and the channel conductance exhibited a relatively weak (Q10 from 1.4 to 1.6) dependence on temperature. The te...

  17. Structure and mechanism of ATP-dependent phospholipid transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez Marques, Rosa Laura; Poulsen, Lisbeth Rosager; Bailly, Aurélien

    2015-01-01

    , despite differences in overall architecture, both appear to operate by an alternating access mechanism and during transport they might allow access of phospholipids to the internal part of the transmembrane domain. The latter feature is obvious for ABC transporters, but phospholipids and other hydrophobic......Background ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters and P4-ATPases are two large and seemingly unrelated families of primary active pumps involved in moving phospholipids from one leaflet of a biological membrane to the other. Scope of review This review aims to identify common mechanistic features...... in the way phospholipid flipping is carried out by two evolutionarily unrelated families of transporters. Major conclusions Both protein families hydrolyze ATP, although they employ different mechanisms to use it, and have a comparable size with twelve transmembrane segments in the functional unit. Further...

  18. β-Actin-dependent global chromatin organization and gene expression programs control cellular identity.

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    Xie, Xin; Almuzzaini, Bader; Drou, Nizar; Kremb, Stephan; Yousif, Ayman; Farrants, Ann-Kristin Östlund; Gunsalus, Kristin; Percipalle, Piergiorgio

    2017-11-03

    During differentiation and development, cell fate and identity are established by waves of genetic reprogramming. Although the mechanisms are largely unknown, during these events, dynamic chromatin reorganization is likely to ensure that multiple genes involved in the same cellular functions are coregulated, depending on the nuclear environment. In this study, using high-content screening of embryonic fibroblasts from a β-actin knockout (KO) mouse, we found major chromatin rearrangements and changes in histone modifications, such as methylated histone (H)3-lysine-(K)9. Genome-wide H3K9 trimethylation-(Me)3 landscape changes correlate with gene up- and down-regulation in β-actin KO cells. Mechanistically, we found loss of chromatin association by the Brahma-related gene (Brg)/Brahma-associated factor (BAF) chromatin remodeling complex subunit Brg1 in the absence of β-actin. This actin-dependent chromatin reorganization was concomitant with the up-regulation of sets of genes involved in angiogenesis, cytoskeletal organization, and myofibroblast features in β-actin KO cells. Some of these genes and phenotypes were gained in a β-actin dose-dependent manner. Moreover, reintroducing a nuclear localization signal-containing β-actin in the knockout cells affected nuclear features and gene expression. Our results suggest that, by affecting the genome-wide organization of heterochromatin through the chromatin-binding activity of the BAF complex, β-actin plays an essential role in the determination of gene expression programs and cellular identity.-Xie, X., Almuzzaini, B., Drou, N., Kremb, S., Yousif, A., Östlund Farrants, A.-K., Gunsalus, K., Percipalle, P. β-Actin-dependent global chromatin organization and gene expression programs control cellular identity. © FASEB.

  19. High-throughput assessment of context-dependent effects of chromatin proteins.

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    Brueckner, Laura; van Arensbergen, Joris; Akhtar, Waseem; Pagie, Ludo; van Steensel, Bas

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin proteins control gene activity in a concerted manner. We developed a high-throughput assay to study the effects of the local chromatin environment on the regulatory activity of a protein of interest. The assay combines a previously reported multiplexing strategy based on barcoded randomly integrated reporters with Gal4-mediated tethering. We applied the assay to Drosophila heterochromatin protein 1a (HP1a), which is mostly known as a repressive protein but has also been linked to transcriptional activation. Recruitment to over 1000 genomic locations revealed that HP1a is a potent repressor able to silence even highly expressing reporter genes. However, the local chromatin context can modulate HP1a function. In pericentromeric regions, HP1a-induced repression was enhanced by twofold. In regions marked by a H3K36me3-rich chromatin signature, HP1a-dependent silencing was significantly decreased. We found no evidence for an activating function of HP1a in our experimental system. Furthermore, we did not observe stable transmission of repression over mitotic divisions after loss of targeted HP1a. The multiplexed tethered reporter assay should be applicable to a large number of chromatin proteins and will be a useful tool to dissect combinatorial regulatory interactions in chromatin.

  20. Activity-dependent modulation of intracellular ATP in cultured cortical astrocytes.

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    Winkler, Ulrike; Seim, Pauline; Enzbrenner, Yvonne; Köhler, Susanne; Sicker, Marit; Hirrlinger, Johannes

    2017-11-01

    Brain function is absolutely dependent on an appropriate supply of energy. A shortfall in supply-as occurs, for instance, following stroke-can lead rapidly to irreversible damage to this vital organ. While the consequences of pathophysiological energy depletion have been well documented, much less is known about the physiological energy dynamics of brain cells, although changes in the intracellular concentration of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the major energy carrier of cells, have been postulated to contribute to cellular signaling. To address this issue more closely, we have investigated intracellular ATP in cultured primary cortical astrocytes by time-lapse microscopy using a genetically encoded fluorescent sensor for ATP. The cytosolic ATP sensor signal decreased after application of the neurotransmitter glutamate in a manner dependent on both glutamate concentration and glutamate transporter activity, but independent of glutamate receptors. The application of dopamine did not affect ATP levels within astrocytes. These results confirm that intracellular ATP levels in astrocytes do indeed respond to changes in physiological activity and pave the way for further studies addressing factors that affect regulation of ATP. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Influence of a CTCF-Dependent Insulator on Multiple Aspects of Enhancer-Mediated Chromatin Organization.

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    Varma, Garima; Rawat, Pratishtha; Jalan, Manisha; Vinayak, Manjula; Srivastava, Madhulika

    2015-10-01

    Developmental stage-specific enhancer-promoter-insulator interactions regulate the chromatin configuration necessary for transcription at various loci and additionally for VDJ recombination at antigen receptor loci that encode immunoglobulins and T-cell receptors. To investigate these regulatory interactions, we analyzed the epigenetic landscape of the murine T-cell receptor β (TCRβ) locus in the presence and absence of an ectopic CTCF-dependent enhancer-blocking insulator, H19-ICR, in genetically manipulated mice. Our analysis demonstrated the ability of the H19-ICR insulator to restrict several aspects of enhancer-based chromatin alterations that are observed during activation of the TCRβ locus for transcription and recombination. The H19-ICR insulator abrogated enhancer-promoter contact-dependent chromatin alterations and additionally prevented Eβ-mediated histone modifications that have been suggested to be independent of enhancer-promoter interaction. Observed enhancer-promoter-insulator interactions, in conjunction with the chromatin structure of the Eβ-regulated domain at the nucleosomal level, provide useful insights regarding the activity of the regulatory elements in addition to supporting the accessibility hypothesis of VDJ recombination. Analysis of H19-ICR in the heterologous context of the developmentally regulated TCRβ locus suggests that different mechanisms proposed for CTCF-dependent insulator action might be manifested simultaneously or selectively depending on the genomic context and the nature of enhancer activity being curtailed. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Influence of a CTCF-Dependent Insulator on Multiple Aspects of Enhancer-Mediated Chromatin Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Garima; Rawat, Pratishtha; Jalan, Manisha; Vinayak, Manjula

    2015-01-01

    Developmental stage-specific enhancer-promoter-insulator interactions regulate the chromatin configuration necessary for transcription at various loci and additionally for VDJ recombination at antigen receptor loci that encode immunoglobulins and T-cell receptors. To investigate these regulatory interactions, we analyzed the epigenetic landscape of the murine T-cell receptor β (TCRβ) locus in the presence and absence of an ectopic CTCF-dependent enhancer-blocking insulator, H19-ICR, in genetically manipulated mice. Our analysis demonstrated the ability of the H19-ICR insulator to restrict several aspects of enhancer-based chromatin alterations that are observed during activation of the TCRβ locus for transcription and recombination. The H19-ICR insulator abrogated enhancer-promoter contact-dependent chromatin alterations and additionally prevented Eβ-mediated histone modifications that have been suggested to be independent of enhancer-promoter interaction. Observed enhancer-promoter-insulator interactions, in conjunction with the chromatin structure of the Eβ-regulated domain at the nucleosomal level, provide useful insights regarding the activity of the regulatory elements in addition to supporting the accessibility hypothesis of VDJ recombination. Analysis of H19-ICR in the heterologous context of the developmentally regulated TCRβ locus suggests that different mechanisms proposed for CTCF-dependent insulator action might be manifested simultaneously or selectively depending on the genomic context and the nature of enhancer activity being curtailed. PMID:26240285

  3. Transcriptional activation by the thyroid hormone receptor through ligand-dependent receptor recruitment and chromatin remodelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Lars; Waterfall, Joshua J; Kim, Dong Wook

    2015-01-01

    A bimodal switch model is widely used to describe transcriptional regulation by the thyroid hormone receptor (TR). In this model, the unliganded TR forms stable, chromatin-bound complexes with transcriptional co-repressors to repress transcription. Binding of hormone dissociates co-repressors and...... process. This dynamic and ligand-dependent interaction with chromatin is likely shared by all steroid hormone receptors regardless of their capacity to repress transcription in the absence of ligand.......A bimodal switch model is widely used to describe transcriptional regulation by the thyroid hormone receptor (TR). In this model, the unliganded TR forms stable, chromatin-bound complexes with transcriptional co-repressors to repress transcription. Binding of hormone dissociates co......-repressors and facilitates recruitment of co-activators to activate transcription. Here we show that in addition to hormone-independent TR occupancy, ChIP-seq against endogenous TR in mouse liver tissue demonstrates considerable hormone-induced TR recruitment to chromatin associated with chromatin remodelling and activated...

  4. Chromatin-dependent and -independent regulation of DNA replication origin activation in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lõoke, Marko; Kristjuhan, Kersti; Värv, Signe; Kristjuhan, Arnold

    2013-02-01

    To elucidate the role of the chromatin environment in the regulation of replication origin activation, autonomously replicating sequences were inserted into identical locations in the budding yeast genome and their activation times in S phase determined. Chromatin-dependent origins adopt to the firing time of the surrounding locus. In contrast, the origins containing two binding sites for Forkhead transcription factors are activated early in the S phase regardless of their location in the genome. Our results also show that genuinely late-replicating parts of the genome can be converted into early-replicating loci by insertion of a chromatin-independent early replication origin, ARS607, whereas insertion of two Forkhead-binding sites is not sufficient for conversion.

  5. Sliding and peeling of histone during chromatin remodelling

    CERN Document Server

    Garai, Ashok; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2011-01-01

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes (CRE) are bio-molecular motors in eukaryotic cells. These are driven by a chemical fuel, namely, adenosine triphosphate (ATP). CREs actively participate in many cellular processes that require accessibility of specific stretches of DNA which are packaged as chromatin. The basic unit of chromatin is a nucleosome where 146 bp $\\sim$ 50 nm of a double stranded DNA (dsDNA) is wrapped around a spool formed by histone proteins. We investigate the mechanism of peeling of the histone spool, and its complete detachment, from the dsDNA by a CRE. Our two-state model of a CRE captures effectively two distinct chemical (or conformational) states in the mechano-chemical cycle of each ATP-dependent CRE. We calculate the mean times for histone detachment. Our predictions on the ATP-dependence of the measurable quantities can be tested by carrying out {\\it in-vitro} experiments.

  6. A Macrohistone Variant Links Dynamic Chromatin Compaction to BRCA1-Dependent Genome Maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simran Khurana

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate DNA double-strand break (DSB repair factor choice is essential for ensuring accurate repair outcome and genomic integrity. The factors that regulate this process remain poorly understood. Here, we identify two repressive chromatin components, the macrohistone variant macroH2A1 and the H3K9 methyltransferase and tumor suppressor PRDM2, which together direct the choice between the antagonistic DSB repair mediators BRCA1 and 53BP1. The macroH2A1/PRDM2 module mediates an unexpected shift from accessible to condensed chromatin that requires the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM-dependent accumulation of both proteins at DSBs in order to promote DSB-flanking H3K9 dimethylation. Remarkably, loss of macroH2A1 or PRDM2, as well as experimentally induced chromatin decondensation, impairs the retention of BRCA1, but not 53BP1, at DSBs. As a result, macroH2A1 and/or PRDM2 depletion causes epistatic defects in DSB end resection, homology-directed repair, and the resistance to poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibition—all hallmarks of BRCA1-deficient tumors. Together, these findings identify dynamic, DSB-associated chromatin reorganization as a critical modulator of BRCA1-dependent genome maintenance.

  7. Multiple aspects of ATP-dependent nucleosome translocation by RSC and Mi-2 are directed by the underlying DNA sequence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joke J F A van Vugt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chromosome structure, DNA metabolic processes and cell type identity can all be affected by changing the positions of nucleosomes along chromosomal DNA, a reaction that is catalysed by SNF2-type ATP-driven chromatin remodelers. Recently it was suggested that in vivo, more than 50% of the nucleosome positions can be predicted simply by DNA sequence, especially within promoter regions. This seemingly contrasts with remodeler induced nucleosome mobility. The ability of remodeling enzymes to mobilise nucleosomes over short DNA distances is well documented. However, the nucleosome translocation processivity along DNA remains elusive. Furthermore, it is unknown what determines the initial direction of movement and how new nucleosome positions are adopted. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have used AFM imaging and high resolution PAGE of mononucleosomes on 600 and 2500 bp DNA molecules to analyze ATP-dependent nucleosome repositioning by native and recombinant SNF2-type enzymes. We report that the underlying DNA sequence can control the initial direction of translocation, translocation distance, as well as the new positions adopted by nucleosomes upon enzymatic mobilization. Within a strong nucleosomal positioning sequence both recombinant Drosophila Mi-2 (CHD-type and native RSC from yeast (SWI/SNF-type repositioned the nucleosome at 10 bp intervals, which are intrinsic to the positioning sequence. Furthermore, RSC-catalyzed nucleosome translocation was noticeably more efficient when beyond the influence of this sequence. Interestingly, under limiting ATP conditions RSC preferred to position the nucleosome with 20 bp intervals within the positioning sequence, suggesting that native RSC preferentially translocates nucleosomes with 15 to 25 bp DNA steps. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Nucleosome repositioning thus appears to be influenced by both remodeler intrinsic and DNA sequence specific properties that interplay to define ATPase

  8. Transfer RNA is an essential component of the ubiquitin- and ATP-dependent proteolytic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciechanover, A.; Wolin, S.L.. Steitz, J.A.; Lodish, H.F.

    1985-03-01

    Protein degradation via the nonlysosomal ATP-dependent pathway in rabbit reticulocytes involves a number of components. In the initial event, ubiquitin, an abundant 76-residue polypeptide, becomes covalently linked to the protein substrate in an ATP-requiring reaction. Once marked in this way, the conjugated protein is proteolyzed in a reaction that also requires ATP. Here the authors show that tRNA is another essential component of the system. Ribonucleases strongly inhibit the ubiquitin- and ATP-dependent degradation of /sup 125/I-labeled bovine serum albumin in the reticulocyte system in vitro. RNAs extracted from fractions of the reticulocyte extract or from mouse cells restore proteolytic activity. When the RNA is fractionated by gel electrophoresis, only the tRNA fraction is active in restoring proteolysis. Furthermore, pure mouse tRNA/sup His/, isolated by immunoprecipitation with patient autoimmune sera, restores the proteolytic activity. The possibility that the level of uncharged tRNA in mammalian cells regulates the ubiquitin- and ATP-dependent proteolytic system is discussed.

  9. Serum albumin promotes ATP-binding cassette transporter-dependent sterol uptake in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marek, Magdalena; Silvestro, Daniele; Fredslund, Maria D.

    2014-01-01

    Sterol uptake in fungi is a multistep process that involves interaction between external sterols and the cell wall, incorporation of sterol molecules into the plasma membrane, and subsequent integration into intracellular membranes for turnover. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters have been....... cerevisiae requires the presence of serum or albumin for efficient cholesterol uptake. These results suggest that albumin can serve as sterol donor in ABC transporter-dependent sterol uptake, a process potentially important for growth of C. glabrata inside infected humans. Serum albumin can serve as sterol...... donor in ATP-binding cassette-transporter-dependent sterol uptake, a process potentially important for growth of Candida glabrata inside infected humans....

  10. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling by the Cockayne syndrome B DNA repair-transcription-coupling factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Citterio (Elisabetta); V. van den Boom (Vincent); G. Schnitzler; R. Kanaar (Roland); E. Bonte (Edgar); R.E. Kingston; W. Vermeulen (Wim); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThe Cockayne syndrome B protein (CSB) is required for coupling DNA excision repair to transcription in a process known as transcription-coupled repair (TCR). Cockayne syndrome patients show UV sensitivity and severe neurodevelopmental abnormalities. CSB is a

  11. Dependence of the Linker Histone and Chromatin Condensation on the Nucleosome Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perišić, Ognjen; Schlick, Tamar

    2017-08-24

    The linker histone (LH), an auxiliary protein that can bind to chromatin and interact with the linker DNA to form stem motifs, is a key element of chromatin compaction. By affecting the chromatin condensation level, it also plays an active role in gene expression. However, the presence and variable concentration of LH in chromatin fibers with different DNA linker lengths indicate that its folding and condensation are highly adaptable and dependent on the immediate nucleosome environment. Recent experimental studies revealed that the behavior of LH in mononucleosomes markedly differs from that in small nucleosome arrays, but the associated mechanism is unknown. Here we report a structural analysis of the behavior of LH in mononucleosomes and oligonucleosomes (2-6 nucleosomes) using mesoscale chromatin simulations. We show that the adapted stem configuration heavily depends on the strength of electrostatic interactions between LH and its parental DNA linkers, and that those interactions tend to be asymmetric in small oligonucleosome systems. Namely, LH in oligonucleosomes dominantly interacts with one DNA linker only, as opposed to mononucleosomes where LH has similar interactions with both linkers and forms a highly stable nucleosome stem. Although we show that the LH condensation depends sensitively on the electrostatic interactions with entering and exiting DNA linkers, other interactions, especially by nonparental cores and nonparental linkers, modulate the structural condensation by softening LH and thus making oligonucleosomes more flexible, in comparison to to mono- and dinucleosomes. We also find that the overall LH/chromatin interactions sensitively depend on the linker length because the linker length determines the maximal nucleosome stem length. For mononucleosomes with DNA linkers shorter than LH, LH condenses fully, while for DNA linkers comparable or longer than LH, the LH extension in mononucleosomes strongly follows the length of DNA linkers

  12. Dot1 binding induces chromatin rearrangements by histone methylation-dependent and -independent mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stulemeijer Iris JE

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methylation of histone H3 lysine 79 (H3K79 by Dot1 is highly conserved among species and has been associated with both gene repression and activation. To eliminate indirect effects and examine the direct consequences of Dot1 binding and H3K79 methylation, we investigated the effects of targeting Dot1 to different positions in the yeast genome. Results Targeting Dot1 did not activate transcription at a euchromatic locus. However, chromatin-bound Dot1 derepressed heterochromatin-mediated gene silencing over a considerable distance. Unexpectedly, Dot1-mediated derepression was established by both a H3K79 methylation-dependent and a methylation-independent mechanism; the latter required the histone acetyltransferase Gcn5. By monitoring the localization of a fluorescently tagged telomere in living cells, we found that the targeting of Dot1, but not its methylation activity, led to the release of a telomere from the repressive environment at the nuclear periphery. This probably contributes to the activity-independent derepression effect of Dot1. Conclusions Targeting of Dot1 promoted gene expression by antagonizing gene repression through both histone methylation and chromatin relocalization. Our findings show that binding of Dot1 to chromatin can positively affect local gene expression by chromatin rearrangements over a considerable distance.

  13. Sucralose, an activator of the glucose-sensing receptor, increases ATP by calcium-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Longfei; Ohtsu, Yoshiaki; Nakagawa, Yuko; Masuda, Katsuyoshi; Kojima, Itaru

    2016-08-31

    Sucralose is an artificial sweetener and activates the glucose-sensing receptor expressed in pancreatic β-cells. Although sucralose does not enter β-cells nor acts as a substrate for glucokinase, it induces a marked elevation of intracellular ATP ([ATP]c). The present study was conducted to identify the signaling pathway responsible for the elevation of [ATP]c induced by sucralose. Previous studies have shown that sucralose elevates cyclic AMP (cAMP), activates phospholipase C (PLC) and stimulates Ca(2+) entry by a Na(+)-dependent mechanism in MIN6 cells. The addition of forskolin induced a marked elevation of cAMP, whereas it did not affect [ATP]c. Carbachol, an activator of PLC, did not increase [ATP]c. In addition, activation of protein kinase C by dioctanoylglycerol did not affect [ATP]c. In contrast, nifedipine, an inhibitor of the voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel, significantly reduced [ATP]c response to sucralose. Removal of extracellular Na(+) nearly completely blocked sucralose-induced elevation of [ATP]c. Stimulation of Na(+) entry by adding a Na(+) ionophore monensin elevated [ATP]c. The monensin-induced elevation of [ATP]c was only partially inhibited by nifedipine and loading of BAPTA, both of which completely abolished elevation of [Ca(2+)]c. These results suggest that Na(+) entry is critical for the sucralose-induced elevation of [ATP]c. Both calcium-dependent and -independent mechanisms are involved in the action of sucralose.

  14. Vitamin D-dependent chromatin association of CTCF in human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neme, Antonio; Seuter, Sabine; Carlberg, Carsten

    2016-11-01

    CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) is a transcription factor being involved in 3D chromatin organization and displays a highly conserved genome-wide binding pattern. In this study, we report the cistrome of CTCF in THP-1 human monocytes and confirm that from the 40,078 CTCF binding sites nearly 85% are identical with those found in K562 monocytes. Quadruplicate chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) demonstrated that at 2130 loci the association strenght of CTCF with genomic DNA was significantly (p<0.05) modulated by stimulation with the natural vitamin D receptor (VDR) ligand 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3). Some 55% of these CTCF sites contribute to DNA looping and mark the anchors of 587 putative topologically associating domains (TADs) containing at least one VDR binding site and one 1,25(OH)2D3 target gene. These TADs can explain the regulatory scenarios of up to 70% of all 1,25(OH)2D3 target genes. A self-organizing map approach subdivided the vitamin D-sensitive CTCF sites into seven classes that can be distinguished by participation in DNA loop formation, binding to open chromatin, carrying binding motifs for CTCF or its relative BORIS, overlap with transcription start site (TSS) regions and binding of VDR. These variant molecular profiles suggest different mechanisms of the 1,25(OH)2D3-dependent action of CTCF. The co-location of VDR and 1,25(OH)2D3-dependent CTCF sites increases in the context of accessible chromatin and TSS regions but does not show any significant correlation with classical DNA binding mechanisms of CTCF. In conclusion, vitamin D-sensitive CTCF sites provide further mechanistic details to the epigenome-wide understanding of 1,25(OH)2D3-mediated gene regulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Mechanistic Basis for ATP-Dependent Inhibition of Glutamine Synthetase by Tabtoxinine-β-lactam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Garrett J; Fang, Luting; Schaefer, Jacob; Singh, Sukrit; Bowman, Gregory R; Wencewicz, Timothy A

    2018-01-09

    Tabtoxinine-β-lactam (TβL), also known as wildfire toxin, is a time- and ATP-dependent inhibitor of glutamine synthetase produced by plant pathogenic strains of Pseudomonas syringae. Here we demonstrate that recombinant glutamine synthetase from Escherichia coli phosphorylates the C3-hydroxyl group of the TβL 3-(S)-hydroxy-β-lactam (3-HβL) warhead. Phosphorylation of TβL generates a stable, noncovalent enzyme-ADP-inhibitor complex that resembles the glutamine synthetase tetrahedral transition state. The TβL β-lactam ring remains intact during enzyme inhibition, making TβL mechanistically distinct from traditional β-lactam antibiotics such as penicillin. Our findings could enable the design of new 3-HβL transition state inhibitors targeting enzymes in the ATP-dependent carboxylate-amine ligase superfamily with broad therapeutic potential in many disease areas.

  16. Insight into the machinery that oils chromatin dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Roni H G; Fernandez-Fuentes, Narcis; Oliva, Baldomero; Beato, Miguel

    2016-11-01

    The packaging of genetic information in form of chromatin within the nucleus provides cells with the ability to store and protect massive amounts of information within a compact space. Storing information within chromatin allows selective access to specific DNA sequences by regulating the various levels of chromatin structure from nucleosomes, to chromatin fibers, loops and topological associating domains (TADs) using mechanisms that are being progressively unravelled. However, a relatively unexplored aspect is the energetic cost of changing the chromatin configuration to gain access to DNA information. Among the enzymes responsible for regulating chromatin access are the ATP-dependent chromatin remodellers that act on nucleosomes and use the energy of ATP hydrolysis to make chromatin DNA more accessible. It is assumed that the ATP used by these enzymes is provided by the mitochondria or by cytoplasmic glycolysis. We hypothesize that though this may be the case for cells in steady state, when gene expression has to be globally reprogramed in response to externals signals or stress conditions, the cell directs energy production to the cell nucleus, where rapid chromatin reorganization is needed for cell survival. We discovered that in response to hormones a nuclear ATP synthesis mechanism is activated that utilizing ADP-ribose and pyrophosphate as substrates. 1 This extra view aims to put this process within its historical context, to describe the enzymatic steps in detail, to propose a possible structure of the ATP synthesising enzyme, and to shed light on how this may link to other reactions within the cell providing a perspective for future lines of investigation.

  17. DNA repair goes hip-hop: SMARCA and CHD chromatin remodellers join the break dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rother, Magdalena B; van Attikum, Haico

    2017-10-05

    Proper signalling and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) is critical to prevent genome instability and diseases such as cancer. The packaging of DNA into chromatin, however, has evolved as a mere obstacle to these DSB responses. Posttranslational modifications and ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling help to overcome this barrier by modulating nucleosome structures and allow signalling and repair machineries access to DSBs in chromatin. Here we recap our current knowledge on how ATP-dependent SMARCA- and CHD-type chromatin remodellers alter chromatin structure during the signalling and repair of DSBs and discuss how their dysfunction impacts genome stability and human disease.This article is part of the themed issue 'Chromatin modifiers and remodellers in DNA repair and signalling'. © 2017 The Authors.

  18. ATP-sensitive voltage- and calcium-dependent chloride channels in sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles from rabbit skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourie, J I

    1997-05-01

    Chloride channels in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) are thought to play an essential role in excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling by balancing charge movement during calcium release and uptake. In this study the nucleotide-sensitivity of Cl- channels in the SR from rabbit skeletal muscle was investigated using the lipid bilayer technique. Two distinct ATP-sensitive Cl- channels that differ in their conductance and kinetic properties and in the mechanism of ATP-induced channel inhibition were observed. The first, a nonfrequent 150 pS channel was inhibited by trans (luminal) ATP, and the second, a common 75 pS small chloride (SCl) channel was inhibited by cis (cytoplasmic) ATP. In the case of the SCl channel the ATP-induced reversible decline in the values of current (maximal current amplitude, Imax and integral current, I') and kinetic parameters (frequency of opening FO, probability of the channel being open PO, mean open TO and closed Tc times) show a nonspecific block of the voltage- and Ca2+-dependent SCl channel. ATP was a more potent blocker from the cytoplasmic side than from the luminal side of the channel. The SCl channel block was not due to Ca2+ chelation by ATP, nor to phosphorylation of the channel protein. The inhibitory action of ATP was mimicked by the nonhydrolyzable analogue adenylylimidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP) in the absence of Mg2+. The inhibitory potency of the adenine nucleotides was charge dependent in the following order ATP4- > ADP3- > > > AMP2-. The data suggest that ATP-induced effects are mediated via an open channel block mechanism. Modulation of the SCl channel by [ATP]cis and [Ca2+]cis indicates that (i) this channel senses the bioenergetic state of the muscle fiber and (ii) it is linked to the ATP-dependent cycling of the Ca2+ between the SR and the sarcoplasm.

  19. Calcium Co-regulates Oxidative Metabolism and ATP Synthase-dependent Respiration in Pancreatic Beta Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marchi, Umberto; Thevenet, Jonathan; Hermant, Aurelie; Dioum, Elhadji; Wiederkehr, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial energy metabolism is essential for glucose-induced calcium signaling and, therefore, insulin granule exocytosis in pancreatic beta cells. Calcium signals are sensed by mitochondria acting in concert with mitochondrial substrates for the full activation of the organelle. Here we have studied glucose-induced calcium signaling and energy metabolism in INS-1E insulinoma cells and human islet beta cells. In insulin secreting cells a surprisingly large fraction of total respiration under resting conditions is ATP synthase-independent. We observe that ATP synthase-dependent respiration is markedly increased after glucose stimulation. Glucose also causes a very rapid elevation of oxidative metabolism as was followed by NAD(P)H autofluorescence. However, neither the rate of the glucose-induced increase nor the new steady-state NAD(P)H levels are significantly affected by calcium. Our findings challenge the current view, which has focused mainly on calcium-sensitive dehydrogenases as the target for the activation of mitochondrial energy metabolism. We propose a model of tight calcium-dependent regulation of oxidative metabolism and ATP synthase-dependent respiration in beta cell mitochondria. Coordinated activation of matrix dehydrogenases and respiratory chain activity by calcium allows the respiratory rate to change severalfold with only small or no alterations of the NAD(P)H/NAD(P)+ ratio. PMID:24554722

  20. A Systematic Analysis of Factors Localized to Damaged Chromatin Reveals PARP-Dependent Recruitment of Transcription Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lior Izhar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Localization to sites of DNA damage is a hallmark of DNA damage response (DDR proteins. To identify DDR factors, we screened epitope-tagged proteins for localization to sites of chromatin damaged by UV laser microirradiation and found >120 proteins that localize to damaged chromatin. These include the BAF tumor suppressor complex and the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS candidate protein TAF15. TAF15 contains multiple domains that bind damaged chromatin in a poly-(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP-dependent manner, suggesting a possible role as glue that tethers multiple PAR chains together. Many positives were transcription factors; > 70% of randomly tested transcription factors localized to sites of DNA damage, and of these, ∼90% were PARP dependent for localization. Mutational analyses showed that localization to damaged chromatin is DNA-binding-domain dependent. By examining Hoechst staining patterns at damage sites, we see evidence of chromatin decompaction that is PARP dependent. We propose that PARP-regulated chromatin remodeling at sites of damage allows transient accessibility of DNA-binding proteins.

  1. Corynebacterium glutamicum glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase isoforms with opposite, ATP-dependent regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omumasaba, Crispinus A; Okai, Naoko; Inui, Masayuki; Yukawa, Hideaki

    2004-01-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum gapA and gapB encode glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases (GAPDHs) that differ in molecular weight and activity in the presence of ATP. Comparative genome analysis revealed that GapA, the product of gapA, represented the canonical GAPDH that is highly conserved across the three major life forms. GapB, with an additional 110-residue-long sequence upstream of its GAPDH-specific domain, was homologous only to select microbial putative GAPDHs. Upon gene disruption, the initial growth rates of the wild-type, DeltagapA and DeltagapB strains on glucose (0.77, 0.00 and 0.76 h(-1), respectively), lactate (0.20, 0.18 and 0.15 h(-1), respectively), pyruvate (0.39, 0.29 and 0.20 h(-1), respectively), and acetate (0.06, 0.06 and 0.04 h(-1), respectively), implied that GapA was indispensable for growth on glucose, that GapB, but not GapA, affected early growth on acetate, and that GapB had a greater influence on growth under gluconeogenic conditions than GapA. The disruption of either gapA or gapB showed no significant effect on the transcription of any of the other gap cluster genes although it led to reduced triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) activities. Glycolytic GAPDH activity at low in vitro ATP concentrations was solely attributed to the 35.9-kDa GapA. At higher ATP concentrations, the same activity was attributed to the 51.2-kDa GapB. Both enzymes, however, exhibited similar NADP-dependent GAPDH activities at the higher ATP concentrations. In effect therefore, the GAPDH-catalyzed reaction at low ATP concentrations was irreversible, with all the glycolytic activity strictly NAD-dependent and attributed to GapA. At higher ATP concentrations, the reaction was reversible, with glycolytic activity NAD- or NADP-dependent and attributed to GapB, while gluconeogenic activity was attributable to both GapA and GapB.

  2. A Poly-ADP-Ribose Trigger Releases the Auto-Inhibition of a Chromatin Remodeling Oncogene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Hari R; Nardozza, Aurelio P; Möller, Ingvar R

    2017-01-01

    DNA damage triggers chromatin remodeling by mechanisms that are poorly understood. The oncogene and chromatin remodeler ALC1/CHD1L massively decompacts chromatin in vivo yet is inactive prior to DNA-damage-mediated PARP1 induction. We show that the interaction of the ALC1 macrodomain with the ATP......DNA damage triggers chromatin remodeling by mechanisms that are poorly understood. The oncogene and chromatin remodeler ALC1/CHD1L massively decompacts chromatin in vivo yet is inactive prior to DNA-damage-mediated PARP1 induction. We show that the interaction of the ALC1 macrodomain...... cancer mutants disrupt ALC1's auto-inhibition and activate chromatin remodeling. Our data show that the NAD+-metabolite and nucleic acid PAR triggers ALC1 to drive chromatin relaxation. Modular allostery in this oncogene tightly controls its robust, DNA-damage-dependent activation....

  3. Dietary protein deficiency reduces lysosomal and nonlysosomal ATP-dependent proteolysis in muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawa, N. E. Jr; Kettelhut, I. C.; Goldberg, A. L.

    1992-01-01

    When rats are fed a protein deficient (PD) diet for 7 days, rates of proteolysis in skeletal muscle decrease by 40-50% (N. E. Tawa, Jr., and A. L. Goldberg. Am. J. Physiol. 263 (Endocrinol. Metab. 26): E317-325, 1992). To identify the underlying biochemical adaptations, we measured different proteolytic processes in incubated muscles. The capacity for intralysosomal proteolysis, as shown by sensitivity to methylamine or lysosomal protease inhibitors, fell 55-75% in muscles from PD rats. Furthermore, extracts of muscles of PD rats showed 30-70% lower activity of many lysosomal proteases, including cathepsins B, H, and C, and carboxypeptidases A and C, as well as other lysosomal hydrolases. The fall in cathepsin B and proteolysis was evident by 3 days on the PD diet, and both returned to control levels 3 days after refeeding of the normal diet. In muscles maintained under optimal conditions, 80-90% of protein breakdown occurs by nonlysosomal pathways. In muscles of PD rats, this ATP-dependent process was also 40-60% slower. Even though overall proteolysis decreased in muscles of PD rats, their capacity for Ca(2+)-dependent proteolysis increased (by 66%), as did the activity of the calpains (+150-250%). Thus the lysosomal and the ATP-dependent processes decrease coordinately and contribute to the fall in muscle proteolysis in PD animals.

  4. ATP, IMP, and glycogen in cod muscle at onset and during development of rigor mortis depend on the sampling location

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cappeln, Gertrud; Jessen, Flemming

    2002-01-01

    Variation in glycogen, ATP, and IMP contents within individual cod muscles were studied in ice stored fish during the progress of rigor mortis. Rigor index was determined before muscle samples for chemical analyzes were taken at 16 different positions on the fish. During development of rigor......, the contents of glycogen and ATP decreased differently in relation to rigor index depending on sampling location. Although fish were considered to be in strong rigor according to the rigor index method, parts of the muscle were not in rigor as high ATP concentrations were found in dorsal and tall muscle....

  5. Initial rate and equilibrium isotope exchange studies on the ATP-dependent activity of polyphosphate Glucokinase from Propionibacterium shermanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, T H; Horn, P J; Pan, W H; Phillips, N F

    1996-05-28

    Polyphosphate glucokinase [EC 2.7.1.63] catalyzes the phosphorylation of glucose using either inorganic polyphosphate [poly(P)] or ATP as the phosphoryl donor. Both activities purified from Propionibacterium shermanii are the functional properties of a single enzyme with separate binding sites for the two phosphoryl donor substrates. The enzyme was found to utilize poly(P) much more efficiently than it does ATP, with a kcat/Kpoly(P) to kcat/KATP ratio of 2800. The catalytic constant for poly(P) is about 2-fold higher than for ATP. Other nucleotides like GTP and dATP also served as substrates with good efficiencies. The ATP-dependent reaction was analyzed using steady-state kinetics and isotopic exchange kinetics at chemical equilibrium. Intersecting initial velocity patterns for both glucose and ATP indicate sequential addition of substrates. Product inhibition studies resulted in two competitive and two noncompetitive patterns, which is characteristic of a Theorell-Chance mechanism or a random mechanism with two dead-end complexes. Results of isotope exchange experiments, however, rule out a Theorell-Chance mechanism, as well as a truly random mechanism. They are not consistent with a partially random mechanism (although a kinetically compulsory order of substrate binding is not excluded), where glucose is preferentially bound to free enzyme before ATP, and ADP is preferentially released as the first product, followed by glucose 6-phosphate. Dead-end inhibition analysis confirms this order of substrate binding. Competitive inhibition of ADP vs ATP is explained as resulting primarily from binding as a dead-end inhibitor (E.Glc.ADP) and not as a product. Another weaker abortive complex, E.ATP.G6P, is also formed. The chemical transformation or the release of ADP is the rate-limiting step in ATP utilization.

  6. Transcriptional regulation of egr-1 gene in murine cells. Towards the understanding of the role of chromatin.

    OpenAIRE

    Tur Arlandis, Gema

    2007-01-01

    Eukaryotic gene expression is a highly regulated process that has to ensure the right cellular response to any type of stimulus. Nevertheless, chromatin structure, despite the fact of being dinamic, imposes certain contraints to this regulation. To solve this restrictions, cells have organized the recruitment of chromatin modifying enzymes and ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling enzymes. The first class of enzymes are responsible for the covalent modifications of histones which alter the glob...

  7. High-throughput assessment of context-dependent effects of chromatin proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brueckner, L. (Laura); Van Arensbergen, J. (Joris); Akhtar, W. (Waseem); L. Pagie (Ludo); B. van Steensel (Bas)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Chromatin proteins control gene activity in a concerted manner. We developed a high-throughput assay to study the effects of the local chromatin environment on the regulatory activity of a protein of interest. The assay combines a previously reported multiplexing strategy

  8. Genome-Wide Analysis of Chromatin States Reveals Distinct Mechanisms of Sex-Dependent Gene Regulation in Male and Female Mouse Liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugathan, Aarathi

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin state maps were developed to elucidate sex differences in chromatin structure and their impact on sex-differential chromatin accessibility and sex-biased gene expression in mouse liver. Genes in active, inactive, and poised chromatin states exhibited differential responsiveness to ligand-activated nuclear receptors and distinct enrichments for functional gene categories. Sex-biased genes were clustered by chromatin environments and mapped to DNase-hypersensitive sites (DHS) classified by sex bias in chromatin accessibility and enhancer modifications. Results were integrated with genome-wide binding data for five transcription factors implicated in growth hormone-regulated, sex-biased liver gene expression, leading to the following findings. (i) Sex-biased DHS, but not sex-biased genes, are frequently characterized by sex-differential chromatin states, indicating distal regulation. (ii) Trimethylation of histone H3 at K27 (H3K27me3) is a major sex-biased repressive mark at highly female-biased but not at highly male-biased genes. (iii) FOXA factors are associated with sex-dependent chromatin opening at male-biased but not female-biased regulatory sites. (iv) Sex-biased STAT5 binding is enriched at sex-biased DHS marked as active enhancers and preferentially targets sex-biased genes with sex-differences in local chromatin marks. (v) The male-biased repressor BCL6 preferentially targets female-biased genes and regulatory sites in a sex-independent chromatin state. (vi) CUX2, a female-specific repressor of male-biased genes, also activates strongly female-biased genes, in association with loss of H3K27me3 marks. Chromatin states are thus a major determinant of sex-biased chromatin accessibility and gene expression, with FOXA pioneer factors proposed to confer sex-dependent chromatin opening and STAT5, but not BCL6, regulating sex-biased genes by binding to sites in a sex-biased chromatin state. PMID:23836885

  9. The intranuclear mobility of messenger RNA binding proteins is ATP dependent and temperature sensitive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calapez, Alexandre; Pereira, Henrique M; Calado, Angelo; Braga, José; Rino, José; Carvalho, Célia; Tavanez, João Paulo; Wahle, Elmar; Rosa, Agostinho C; Carmo-Fonseca, Maria

    2002-12-09

    After being released from transcription sites, messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs) must reach the nuclear pore complexes in order to be translocated to the cytoplasm. Whether the intranuclear movement of mRNPs results largely from Brownian motion or involves molecular motors remains unknown. Here we have used quantitative photobleaching techniques to monitor the intranuclear mobility of protein components of mRNPs tagged with GFP. The results show that the diffusion coefficients of the poly(A)-binding protein II (PABP2) and the export factor TAP are significantly reduced when these proteins are bound to mRNP complexes, as compared with nonbound proteins. The data further show that the mobility of wild-type PABP2 and TAP, but not of a point mutant variant of PABP2 that fails to bind to RNA, is significantly reduced when cells are ATP depleted or incubated at 22 degrees C. Energy depletion has only minor effects on the intranuclear mobility of a 2,000-kD dextran (which corresponds approximately in size to 40S mRNP particles), suggesting that the reduced mobility of PABP2 and TAP is not caused by a general alteration of the nuclear environment. Taken together, the data suggest that the mobility of mRNPs in the living cell nucleus involves a combination of passive diffusion and ATP-dependent processes.

  10. Arsenic Alters ATP-Dependent Ca2+ Signaling in Human Airway Epithelial Cell Wound Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Cara L.; Lantz, R. Clark; Burgess, Jefferey L.; Boitano, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Arsenic is a natural metalloid toxicant that is associated with occupational inhalation injury and contaminates drinking water worldwide. Both inhalation of arsenic and consumption of arsenic-tainted water are correlated with malignant and nonmalignant lung diseases. Despite strong links between arsenic and respiratory illness, underlying cell responses to arsenic remain unclear. We hypothesized that arsenic may elicit some of its detrimental effects on the airway through limitation of innate immune function and, specifically, through alteration of paracrine ATP (purinergic) Ca2+ signaling in the airway epithelium. We examined the effects of acute (24 h) exposure with environmentally relevant levels of arsenic (i.e., arsenic reduces purinergic Ca2+ signaling in a dose-dependent manner and results in a reshaping of the Ca2+ signaling response to localized wounds. We next examined arsenic effects on two purinergic receptor types: the metabotropic P2Y and ionotropic P2X receptors. Arsenic inhibited both P2Y- and P2X-mediated Ca2+ signaling responses to ATP. Both inhaled and ingested arsenic can rapidly reach the airway epithelium where purinergic signaling is essential in innate immune functions (e.g., ciliary beat, salt and water transport, bactericide production, and wound repair). Arsenic-induced compromise of such airway defense mechanisms may be an underlying contributor to chronic lung disease. PMID:21357385

  11. Chromatin Architecture of the Pitx2 Locus Requires CTCF- and Pitx2-Dependent Asymmetry that Mirrors Embryonic Gut Laterality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian C. Welsh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Expression of Pitx2 on the left side of the embryo patterns left-right (LR organs including the dorsal mesentery (DM, whose asymmetric cell behavior directs gut looping. Despite the importance of organ laterality, chromatin-level regulation of Pitx2 remains undefined. Here, we show that genes immediately neighboring Pitx2 in chicken and mouse, including a long noncoding RNA (Pitx2 locus-asymmetric regulated RNA or Playrr, are expressed on the right side and repressed by Pitx2. CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing of Playrr, 3D fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH, and variations of chromatin conformation capture (3C demonstrate that mutual antagonism between Pitx2 and Playrr is coordinated by asymmetric chromatin interactions dependent on Pitx2 and CTCF. We demonstrate that transcriptional and morphological asymmetries driving gut looping are mirrored by chromatin architectural asymmetries at the Pitx2 locus. We propose a model whereby Pitx2 auto-regulation directs chromatin topology to coordinate LR transcription of this locus essential for LR organogenesis.

  12. Chromatin architecture of the Pitx2 locus requires CTCF and Pitx2 dependent asymmetry that mirrors embryonic gut laterality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Ian C.; Kwak, Hojoong; Chen, Frances L.; Werner, Melissa; Shopland, Lindsay S.; Danko, Charles G.; Lis, John T.; Zhang, Min; Martin, James F.; Kurpios, Natasza A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Expression of Pitx2 on the left side of the embryo patterns left-right (LR) organs including the dorsal mesentery (DM), whose asymmetric cell behavior directs gut looping. Despite the importance of organ laterality, chromatin-level regulation of Pitx2 remains undefined. Here we show that genes immediately neighboring Pitx2 in chicken and mouse, including a long noncoding RNA, Playrr (Pitx2 locus asymmetric regulated RNA), are expressed on the right side and repressed by Pitx2. CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing of Playrr, 3D fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and variations of chromatin conformation capture (3C), demonstrate that mutual antagonism between Pitx2 and Playrr is coordinated by asymmetric chromatin interactions dependent on Pitx2 and CTCF. We demonstrate that transcriptional and morphological asymmetries driving gut looping are mirrored by chromatin architectural asymmetries at the Pitx2 locus. We propose a model where Pitx2 auto-regulation directs chromatin topology to coordinate LR transcription of this locus essential for LR organogenesis. PMID:26411685

  13. Chromatin Architecture of the Pitx2 Locus Requires CTCF- and Pitx2-Dependent Asymmetry that Mirrors Embryonic Gut Laterality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Ian C; Kwak, Hojoong; Chen, Frances L; Werner, Melissa; Shopland, Lindsay S; Danko, Charles G; Lis, John T; Zhang, Min; Martin, James F; Kurpios, Natasza A

    2015-10-13

    Expression of Pitx2 on the left side of the embryo patterns left-right (LR) organs including the dorsal mesentery (DM), whose asymmetric cell behavior directs gut looping. Despite the importance of organ laterality, chromatin-level regulation of Pitx2 remains undefined. Here, we show that genes immediately neighboring Pitx2 in chicken and mouse, including a long noncoding RNA (Pitx2 locus-asymmetric regulated RNA or Playrr), are expressed on the right side and repressed by Pitx2. CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing of Playrr, 3D fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), and variations of chromatin conformation capture (3C) demonstrate that mutual antagonism between Pitx2 and Playrr is coordinated by asymmetric chromatin interactions dependent on Pitx2 and CTCF. We demonstrate that transcriptional and morphological asymmetries driving gut looping are mirrored by chromatin architectural asymmetries at the Pitx2 locus. We propose a model whereby Pitx2 auto-regulation directs chromatin topology to coordinate LR transcription of this locus essential for LR organogenesis. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. MORC2 Signaling Integrates Phosphorylation-Dependent, ATPase-Coupled Chromatin Remodeling during the DNA Damage Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-Qiang Li

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin dynamics play a central role in maintaining genome integrity, but how this is achieved remains largely unknown. Here, we report that microrchidia CW-type zinc finger 2 (MORC2, an uncharacterized protein with a derived PHD finger domain and a conserved GHKL-type ATPase module, is a physiological substrate of p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1, an important integrator of extracellular signals and nuclear processes. Following DNA damage, MORC2 is phosphorylated on serine 739 in a PAK1-dependent manner, and phosphorylated MORC2 regulates its DNA-dependent ATPase activity to facilitate chromatin remodeling. Moreover, MORC2 associates with chromatin and promotes gamma-H2AX induction in a PAK1 phosphorylation-dependent manner. Consequently, cells expressing MORC2-S739A mutation displayed a reduction in DNA repair efficiency and were hypersensitive to DNA-damaging agent. These findings suggest that the PAK1-MORC2 axis is critical for orchestrating the interplay between chromatin dynamics and the maintenance of genomic integrity through sequentially integrating multiple essential enzymatic processes.

  15. A conserved residue cluster that governs kinetics of ATP-dependent gating of Kir6.2 potassium channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Roger S; Wright, Jordan; Pless, Stephan Alexander

    2015-01-01

    elements that control the kinetics of ATP-dependent regulation of KATP (Kir6.2 + SUR1) channels using rapid concentration jumps. WT Kir6.2 channels re-open after rapid washout of ATP with a time constant of approximately 60 ms. Extending similar kinetic measurements to numerous mutants revealed fairly...... modest effects on gating kinetics despite significant changes in ATP sensitivity and open probability. However, we identified a pair of highly conserved neighboring amino acids (Trp68, Lys170) that control the rate of channel opening and inhibition in response to ATP. Paradoxically, mutations of Trp68...... or Lys170 markedly slow the kinetics of channel opening (500 ms and 700 ms for Trp68Leu and Lys170Asn, respectively), while increasing channel open probability. Examining the functional effects of these residues using phi-value analysis revealed a steep negative slope. This finding implies...

  16. ATP- and gap junction-dependent intercellular calcium signaling in osteoblastic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, N R; Geist, S T; Civitelli, R

    1997-01-01

    stores. In one model, IP3 traverses gap junctions and initiates the release of intracellular calcium stores in neighboring cells. Alternatively, calcium waves may be mediated not by gap junctional communication, but rather by autocrine activity of secreted ATP on P2 purinergic receptors. We studied...... mechanically induced calcium waves in two rat osteosarcoma cell lines that differ in the gap junction proteins they express, in their ability to pass microinjected dye from cell to cell, and in their expression of P2Y2 (P2U) purinergic receptors. ROS 17/2.8 cells, which express the gap junction protein...... connexin43 (Cx43), are well dye coupled, and lack P2U receptors, transmitted slow gap junction-dependent calcium waves that did not require release of intracellular calcium stores. UMR 106-01 cells predominantly express the gap junction protein connexin 45 (Cx45), are poorly dye coupled, and express P2U...

  17. CgII cleaves DNA using a mechanism distinct from other ATP-dependent restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toliusis, Paulius; Zaremba, Mindaugas; Silanskas, Arunas; Szczelkun, Mark D; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2017-08-21

    The restriction endonuclease CglI from Corynebacterium glutamicum recognizes an asymmetric 5'-GCCGC-3' site and cleaves the DNA 7 and 6/7 nucleotides downstream on the top and bottom DNA strands, respectively, in an NTP-hydrolysis dependent reaction. CglI is composed of two different proteins: an endonuclease (R.CglI) and a DEAD-family helicase-like ATPase (H.CglI). These subunits form a heterotetrameric complex with R2H2 stoichiometry. However, the R2H2·CglI complex has only one nuclease active site sufficient to cut one DNA strand suggesting that two complexes are required to introduce a double strand break. Here, we report studies to evaluate the DNA cleavage mechanism of CglI. Using one- and two-site circular DNA substrates we show that CglI does not require two sites on the same DNA for optimal catalytic activity. However, one-site linear DNA is a poor substrate, supporting a mechanism where CglI complexes must communicate along the one-dimensional DNA contour before cleavage is activated. Based on experimental data, we propose that adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis by CglI produces translocation on DNA preferentially in a downstream direction from the target, although upstream translocation is also possible. Our results are consistent with a mechanism of CglI action that is distinct from that of other ATP-dependent restriction-modification enzymes. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. Dorsal horn neurons release extracellular ATP in a VNUT-dependent manner that underlies neuropathic pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Takahiro; Ozono, Yui; Mikuriya, Satsuki; Kohro, Yuta; Tozaki-Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Iwatsuki, Ken; Uneyama, Hisayuki; Ichikawa, Reiko; Salter, Michael W.; Tsuda, Makoto; Inoue, Kazuhide

    2016-01-01

    Activation of purinergic receptors in the spinal cord by extracellular ATP is essential for neuropathic hypersensitivity after peripheral nerve injury (PNI). However, the cell type responsible for releasing ATP within the spinal cord after PNI is unknown. Here we show that PNI increases expression of vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT) in the spinal cord. Extracellular ATP content ([ATP]e) within the spinal cord was increased after PNI, and this increase was suppressed by exocytotic inhibitors. Mice lacking VNUT did not show PNI-induced increase in [ATP]e and had attenuated hypersensitivity. These phenotypes were recapitulated in mice with specific deletion of VNUT in spinal dorsal horn (SDH) neurons, but not in mice lacking VNUT in primary sensory neurons, microglia or astrocytes. Conversely, ectopic VNUT expression in SDH neurons of VNUT-deficient mice restored PNI-induced increase in [ATP]e and pain. Thus, VNUT is necessary for exocytotic ATP release from SDH neurons which contributes to neuropathic pain. PMID:27515581

  19. Glucose Triggers ATP Secretion from Bacteria in a Growth-Phase-Dependent Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hironaka, Ippei; Iwase, Tadayuki; Sugimoto, Shinya; Okuda, Ken-ichi; Tajima, Akiko; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    ATP modulates immune cell functions, and ATP derived from gut commensal bacteria promotes the differentiation of T helper 17 (Th17) cells in the intestinal lamina propria. We recently reported that Enterococcus gallinarum, isolated from mice and humans, secretes ATP. We have since found and characterized several ATP-secreting bacteria. Of the tested enterococci, Enterococcus mundtii secreted the greatest amount of ATP (>2 μM/108 cells) after overnight culture. Glucose, not amino acids and vitamins, was essential for ATP secretion from E. mundtii. Analyses of energy-deprived cells demonstrated that glycolysis is the most important pathway for bacterial ATP secretion. Furthermore, exponential-phase E. mundtii and Enterococcus faecalis cells secrete ATP more efficiently than stationary-phase cells. Other bacteria, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus aureus, also secrete ATP in exponential but not stationary phase. These results suggest that various gut bacteria, including commensals and pathogens, might secrete ATP at any growth phase and modulate immune cell function. PMID:23354720

  20. Data on force-dependent structural changes of chromatin fibers measured with magnetic tweezers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan-Tso Chien

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The compaction of chromatin fibers regulates the accessibility of embedded DNA, highly associated with transcriptional activities [1]. Single molecule force spectroscopy has revealed the great details of the structural changes of chromatin fibers in the presence of external exerted force [2–7]. However, most of the studies focus on a specific force regime [2,3,8,9]. The data here show force-extension (FE traces of chromatin fibers as measured with magnetic tweezers, covering the force regime from 0 pN to 27 pN. Those traces provide information for further studies at varied force regimes.

  1. Thioredoxin-dependent disulfide bond reduction is required for protamine eviction from sperm chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emelyanov, Alexander V; Fyodorov, Dmitry V

    2016-12-15

    Cysteine oxidation in protamines leads to their oligomerization and contributes to sperm chromatin compaction. Here we identify the Drosophila thioredoxin Deadhead (DHD) as the factor responsible for the reduction of intermolecular disulfide bonds in protamines and their eviction from sperm during fertilization. Protamine chaperone TAP/p32 dissociates DNA-protamine complexes in vitro only when protamine oligomers are first converted to monomers by DHD. dhd-null embryos cannot decondense sperm chromatin and terminate development after the first pronuclear division. Therefore, the thioredoxin DHD plays a critical role in early development to facilitate the switch from protamine-based sperm chromatin structures to the somatic nucleosomal chromatin. © 2016 Emelyanov and Fyodorov; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  2. Cloning, expression, and characterization of the first archaeal ATP-dependent glucokinase from aerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Mitani, Yuri; Goda, Shuichiro; Kawarabayasi, Yutaka; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2003-02-01

    The gene encoding the ATP-dependent glucokinase of hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix was identified, cloned, and functionally expressed in Escherichia coli. The deduced amino acid sequence showed 40% identity to that of the putative glucokinase from hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobacurum aerophilum. The purified recombinant enzyme was a monomer with a molecular mass of 35 kDa. The enzyme retained its full activity on heating at 70 degrees C for 10 min and retained 65% of the activity after 10-min incubation at 100 degrees C. The enzyme exclusively catalyzed the phosphorylation of D-glucose using ATP as a phosphoryl donor. ITP was accepted in addition to ATP. The rate dependence with both glucose and ATP followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics, with apparent K(m) values of 0.054 and 0.50 mM, respectively. The enzyme activity required divalent cations; Mg(2+), which was most effective, could partially be replaced by Mn(2+) or Ca(2+). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the glucokinase from A. pernix does not belong to the clusters of enzymes found in bacteria and eukarya. This is the first description of the characteristics of an ATP-dependent glucokinase from an archaeon.

  3. Rational design of substrate binding pockets in polyphosphate kinase for use in cost-effective ATP-dependent cascade reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hao; Nie, Kaili; Li, Chengcheng; Xu, Haijun; Wang, Fang; Tan, Tianwei; Liu, Luo

    2017-07-01

    Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) is the energy equivalent of the living system. Polyphosphate (polyP) is the ancient energy storage equivalent of organisms. Polyphosphate kinases (PPKs) catalyze the polyP formation or ATP formation, to store energy or to regenerate ATP, respectively. However, most PPKs are active only in the presence of long polyPs, which are more difficult and more expensive to generate than the short polyPs. We investigated the PPK preference towards polyPs by site-directed mutagenesis and computational simulation, to understand the mechanism and further design enzymes for effective ATP regeneration using short polyPs for in vitro cascade reactions, which are highly desired for research and applications. The results suggest that the short polyPs inhibit PPK by blocking the ADP-binding pocket. Structural comparison between PPK (Corynebacterium glutamicum) and PPK (Sinorhizobium meliloti) indicates that three amino acid residues, i.e., lysine, glutamate, and threonine, are involved in the activity towards short polyP by fixing the adenosine group of ADP in between the subunits of the dimer, while the terminal phosphate group of ADP still offers an active site, which presents a binding pocket for ADP. A proposed triple mutant PPK (SMc02148-KET) demonstrates significant activity towards short polyP to form ATP from ADP. The obtained high glutathione titer (38.79 mM) and glucose-6-phosphate titer (87.35 mM) in cascade reactions with ATP regeneration using the triple mutant PPK (SMc02148-KET) reveal that the tailored PPK establishes the effective ATP regeneration system for ATP-dependent reactions.

  4. [Structural studies of chromatin remodeling factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volokh, O I; Derkacheva, N I; Studitsky, V M; Sokolova, O S

    2016-01-01

    Changes of chromatin structure require participation of chromatin remodeling factors (CRFs), which are ATP-dependent multisubunit complexes that change the structure of the nucleosome without covalently modifying its components. CRFs act together with other protein factors to regulate the extent of chromatin condensation. Four CRF families are currently distinguished based on their structural and biochemical characteristics: SWI/SNF, ISWI, Mi-2/CHD, and SWR/INO80. X-ray diffraction analysis and electron microscopy are the main methods to obtain structural information about macromolecules. CRFs are difficult to obtain in crystal because of their large sizes and structural heterogeneity, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is mostly employed in their structural studies. The review considers all structures obtained for CRFs by TEM and discusses several models of CRF-nucleosome interactions.

  5. A futile cycle, formed between two ATP-dependant γ-glutamyl cycle ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thus, in cysteine-limiting conditions, glutamate is cycled back into glutamate via 5-oxoproline at the cost of two ATP molecules without production of glutathione and is the cause of the decreased levels of glutathione synthesis, as well as the ATP depletion observed in these cells. The model is also compatible with the ...

  6. Structural basis of PP2A activation by PTPA, an ATP-dependent activation chaperone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Feng; Stanevich, Vitali; Wlodarchak, Nathan; Sengupta, Rituparna; Jiang, Li; Satyshur, Kenneth A.; Xing, Yongna

    2013-10-08

    Proper activation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) catalytic subunit is central for the complex PP2A regulation and is crucial for broad aspects of cellular function. The crystal structure of PP2A bound to PP2A phosphatase activator (PTPA) and ATPγS reveals that PTPA makes broad contacts with the structural elements surrounding the PP2A active site and the adenine moiety of ATP. PTPA-binding stabilizes the protein fold of apo-PP2A required for activation, and orients ATP phosphoryl groups to bind directly to the PP2A active site. This allows ATP to modulate the metal-binding preferences of the PP2A active site and utilize the PP2A active site for ATP hydrolysis. In vitro, ATP selectively and drastically enhances binding of endogenous catalytic metal ions, which requires ATP hydrolysis and is crucial for acquisition of pSer/Thr-specific phosphatase activity. Furthermore, both PP2A- and ATP-binding are required for PTPA function in cell proliferation and survival. Our results suggest novel mechanisms of PTPA in PP2A activation with structural economy and a unique ATP-binding pocket that could potentially serve as a specific therapeutic target.

  7. Neuronal transporter and astrocytic ATP exocytosis underlie activity-dependent adenosine release in the hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Mark J; Dale, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    The neuromodulator adenosine plays an important role in many physiological and pathological processes within the mammalian CNS. However, the precise mechanisms of how the concentration of extracellular adenosine increases following neural activity remain contentious. Here we have used microelectrode biosensors to directly measure adenosine release induced by focal stimulation in stratum radiatum of area CA1 in mouse hippocampal slices. Adenosine release was both action potential and Ca2+ dependent and could be evoked with low stimulation frequencies and small numbers of stimuli. Adenosine release required the activation of ionotropic glutamate receptors and could be evoked by local application of glutamate receptor agonists. Approximately 40% of stimulated-adenosine release occurred by translocation of adenosine via equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs). This component of release persisted in the presence of the gliotoxin fluoroacetate and thus results from the direct release of adenosine from neurons. A reduction of adenosine release in the presence of NTPDase blockers, in slices from CD73−/− and dn-SNARE mice, provides evidence that a component of adenosine release arises from the extracellular metabolism of ATP released from astrocytes. This component of release appeared to have slower kinetics than the direct ENT-mediated release of adenosine. These data suggest that activity-dependent adenosine release is surprisingly complex and, in the hippocampus, arises from at least two distinct mechanisms with different cellular sources. PMID:23713028

  8. Multidrug resistance in Lactococcus lactis : Evidence for ATP-dependent drug extrusion from the inner leaflet of the cytoplasmic membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolhuis, H; van Veen, H.W.; Molenaar, D.; Poolman, B.; Driessen, A.J.M.; Konings, W.N

    1996-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis possesses an ATP-dependent drug extrusion system which shares functional properties with the mammalian multidrug resistance (MDR) transporter P-glycoprotein, One of the intriguing aspects of both transporters is their ability to interact with a broad range of structurally

  9. Recombination in Escherichia coli V. Genetic analysis of recombinants from crosses with recipients deficient in ATP-dependent exonuclease activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haan, P.G. de; Hoekstra, W.P.M.; Verhoef, C.

    A genetic analysis of recombinants from crosses with recombination-deficient recipients, lacking the ATP-dependent exonuclease activity, demonstrated differences in the inheritance pattern of donor markers compared with a Rec+ recipient. In particular the donor markers proximal to the transfer

  10. [Kinetic regularities of the proceeding and possible reaction mechanism of Mg2+-dependent enzymatic hydrolysis of ATP in the fraction of plasmatic membranes of the smooth muscle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danylovych, H V; Kosterin, S O

    2004-01-01

    Kinetic regularities of the reaction of Ca2+-independent Mg2+-dependent enzymatic hydrolysis of ATP catalyzed by the so-called "basal" Mg2+-ATPase localized in the plasmatic membrane of the uterus smooth-muscle cells have been studied using the methods of kinetic analysis performed under the equilibrium conditions. The analysis was based on the study of the concentration dependence of initial velocity of nucleoside triphosphate hydrolysis in EGTA-containing medium under the change of general concentrations of ATP [ATP]o and Mg2+[Mg2+]o in conditions of their equimolar ratio ([ATP]o/ [Mg2+]o)= 1; here the ratio between the concentrations of free reagents ([ATP4-]o/[Mg2+]o) was equal to 1.25. The obtained concentration dependence was interpreted in terms of two practically possible alternative mechanisms of Mg2+-dependent ATP-hydrolase enzymatic reaction. Mechanism I. Two separate independent centres of Mg ions and ATP binding by the enzymatic protein are supposed to exist, while Mg2+-dependent ATP-hydrolase enzymatic reaction proceeds independent of the equilibrium reaction of Mg ions chelatization of muscleside triphosphate. Mechanism II. The existence of the only centre of the chelate complex Mg2+ATP2- binding is postulated on the enzymatic protein; this process is also realized independent of the binding of Mg2+ and ATP-hydralase reaction catalized by it.

  11. Antispasmodic activity of Symplocos paniculata is mediated through opening of ATP-dependent K+ channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Hussain Janbaz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Symplocos paniculata is a medicinal plant used by native healers to manage gastrointestinal ailments. The crude methanolic extract of S. paniculata was screened pharmacologically both in vitro and in vivo for the validation of its therapeutic potential. It suppressed the spontaneous activity of isolated rabbit jejunum preparations and also caused inhibition of the low K+ (20 mM- induced spastic contractions in isolated rabbit jejunum preparations in a manner comparable to cromakalim. The relaxant effect was found to be blocked following glibenclamide exposure of the isolated tissue preparations similar to cromakalim, suggesting that observed response was likely to be mediated through opening of ATP dependent K+ channels. Following oral administration to mice provided protection against castor oil-induced diarrhea in a manner similar to loperamide. The plant material was found safe in toxicity study up to oral dose of 8 g/kg in mice. Hence, present study provides a scientific basis for the vernacular use of S. paniculata in gastro-intestinal system.

  12. Multitasking in the mitochondrion by the ATP-dependent Lon protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, Sundararajan; Lee, Jae; Singh, Kamalendra; Lee, Irene; Suzuki, Carolyn K

    2012-01-01

    The AAA(+) Lon protease is a soluble single-ringed homo-oligomer, which represents the most streamlined operational unit mediating ATP-dependent proteolysis. Despite its simplicity, the architecture of Lon proteases exhibits a species-specific diversity. Homology modeling provides insights into the structural features that distinguish bacterial and human Lon proteases as hexameric complexes from yeast Lon, which is uniquely heptameric. The best-understood functions of mitochondrial Lon are linked to maintaining proteostasis under normal metabolic conditions, and preventing proteotoxicity during environmental and cellular stress. An intriguing property of human Lon is its specific binding to G-quadruplex DNA, and its association with the mitochondrial genome in cultured cells. A fraction of Lon preferentially binds to the control region of mitochondrial DNA where transcription and replication are initiated. Here, we present an overview of the diverse functions of mitochondrial Lon, as well as speculative perspectives on its role in protein and mtDNA quality control. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. ATP-dependent regulation of actin monomer-filament equilibrium by cyclase-associated protein and ADF/cofilin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Kazumi; Ono, Shoichiro

    2013-07-15

    CAP (cyclase-associated protein) is a conserved regulator of actin filament dynamics. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, CAS-1 is an isoform of CAP that is expressed in striated muscle and regulates sarcomeric actin assembly. In the present study, we report that CAS-2, a second CAP isoform in C. elegans, attenuates the actin-monomer-sequestering effect of ADF (actin depolymerizing factor)/cofilin to increase the steady-state levels of actin filaments in an ATP-dependent manner. CAS-2 binds to actin monomers without a strong preference for either ATP- or ADP-actin. CAS-2 strongly enhances the exchange of actin-bound nucleotides even in the presence of UNC-60A, a C. elegans ADF/cofilin that inhibits nucleotide exchange. UNC-60A induces the depolymerization of actin filaments and sequesters actin monomers, whereas CAS-2 reverses the monomer-sequestering effect of UNC-60A in the presence of ATP, but not in the presence of only ADP or the absence of ATP or ADP. A 1:100 molar ratio of CAS-2 to UNC-60A is sufficient to increase actin filaments. CAS-2 has two independent actin-binding sites in its N- and C-terminal halves, and the C-terminal half is necessary and sufficient for the observed activities of the full-length CAS-2. These results suggest that CAS-2 (CAP) and UNC-60A (ADF/cofilin) are important in the ATP-dependent regulation of the actin monomer-filament equilibrium.

  14. In vitro FRAP reveals the ATP-dependent nuclear mobilization of the exon junction complex protein SRm160

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, Stefan; Chiosea, Simion; Ivshina, Maria; Nickerson, Jeffrey A.

    2004-01-01

    We present a new in vitro system for characterizing the binding and mobility of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)–labeled nuclear proteins by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching in digitonin-permeabilized cells. This assay reveals that SRm160, a splicing coactivator and component of the exon junction complex (EJC) involved in RNA export, has an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)–dependent mobility. Endogenous SRm160, lacking the EGFP moiety, could also be released from sites at splic...

  15. ATP- and NAD+-dependent DNA ligases share an essential function in the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, A.; Gray, F. C; MacNeill, S. A.

    2006-01-01

    DNA ligases join the ends of DNA molecules during replication, repair and recombination. ATP-dependent ligases are found predominantly in the eukarya and archaea whereas NAD+-dependent DNA ligases are found only in the eubacteria and in entomopoxviruses. Using the genetically tractable halophile....... volcanii also encodes an NAD+-dependent DNA ligase family member, LigN, the first such enzyme to be identified in the archaea, and present phylogenetic analysis indicating that the gene encoding this protein has been acquired by lateral gene transfer (LGT) from eubacteria. As with LigA, we show that Lig...

  16. Ammonium ion substitutes for K/sup +/ in ATP-dependent Na/sup +/ transport by basolateral membrane vesicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Towle, D.W.; Hoelleland, T.

    1987-03-01

    Ion-transporting cells from posterior gills of blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) acclimated to low salinity were used as starting material for the preparation of microsomal membrane vesicles by density gradient centrifugation. The Na/sup +/-K/sup +/-adenosinetriphosphatase (ATPase)-enriched basolateral vesicles were loaded with KCl- or NH/sub 4//sup +/-containing medium by dilution and centrifugation, and initial rates of /sup 22/Na/sup +/ uptake into the vesicles were measured by a rapid filtration procedure. Varying the extravesicular sucrose concentration altered equilibrium uptake of /sup 22/Na/sup +/, indicating the existence of osmotically sensitive vesicles. Monensin, a sodium-specific ionophore, enhanced passive uptake of /sup 22/Na/sup +/ across the vesicle membrane in the absence of ATP. With 100 mM KCl in the intravesicular medium, addition of ATP to the extravesicular medium increased initial rates of /sup 22/Na/sup +/ uptake 10- to 20-fold over levels measured without ATP. A nonhydrolyzable ATP analog failed to stimulate /sup 22/Na/sup +/ uptake. Intravesicular K/sup +/ could be replaced by NH/sub 4//sup +/ but not by choline. With NH/sub 4//sup +/ as counterion, Na/sup +/ transport was inhibited by digitoxin, but valinomycin had no effect. A study of the kinetic effects of intravesicular K/sup +/ and NH/sub 4//sup +/ on initial rates of /sup 22/Na/sup +/ uptake indicated the existence of two classes of binding sites, one responding to counterion concentrations in the millimolar range and a second class responding to counterion concentrations over 50 mM. The results indicate that ATP-dependent /sup 22/Na/sup +/ uptake by membrane vesicles from Callinectes sapidus gill, mediated by Na/sup +/-K/sup +/-ATPase, can utilize either K/sup +/ or NH/sub 4//sup +/ as counterion.

  17. NERD, a plant-specific GW protein, defines an additional RNAi-dependent chromatin-based pathway in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontier, Dominique; Picart, Claire; Roudier, François; Garcia, Damien; Lahmy, Sylvie; Azevedo, Jacinthe; Alart, Emilie; Laudié, Michèle; Karlowski, Wojciech M; Cooke, Richard; Colot, Vincent; Voinnet, Olivier; Lagrange, Thierry

    2012-10-12

    In Arabidopsis, transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) can be triggered by 24 nt small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) through the RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) pathway. By functional analysis of NERD, a GW repeat- and PHD finger-containing protein, we demonstrate that Arabidopsis harbors a second siRNA-dependent DNA methylation pathway targeting a subset of nonconserved genomic loci. The activity of the NERD-dependent pathway differs from RdDM by the fact that it relies both on silencing-related factors previously implicated only in posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS), including RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE1/6 and ARGONAUTE2, and most likely on 21 nt siRNAs. A central role for NERD in integrating RNA silencing and chromatin signals in transcriptional silencing is supported by data showing that it binds both to histone H3 and AGO2 proteins and contributes to siRNA accumulation at a NERD-targeted locus. Our results unravel the existence of a conserved chromatin-based RNA silencing pathway encompassing both PTGS and TGS components in plants. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. NQO-Induced DNA-Less Cell Formation Is Associated with Chromatin Protein Degradation and Dependent on A0A1-ATPase in Sulfolobus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyuan Han

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available To investigate DNA damage response in the model crenarchaeon Sulfolobus islandicus, four different DNA damage agents were tested for their effects on cell death of this archaeon, including UV irradiation, methyl methanesulfonate, cisplatin, and 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (NQO. Cell death featured with DNA-less cell formation was revealed in DNA damage treatment with each agent. Cellular responses upon NQO treatment were characterized in details, and following sequential events were revealed, including: a modest accumulation of G1/S phase cells, membrane depolarization, proteolytic degradation of chromatin proteins, and chromosomal DNA degradation. Further insights into the process were gained from studying drugs that affect the archaeal ATP synthase, including a proton gradient uncoupler and an ATP synthase inhibitor. Whereas the proton uncoupler-mediated excess proton influx yielded cell death as observed for the NQO treatment, inhibition of ATP synthase attenuated NQO-induced membrane depolarization and DNA-less cell formation. In conclusion, the NQO-induced cell death in S. islandicus is characterized by proteolytic degradation of chromatin protein, and chromosomal DNA degradation, which probably represents a common feature for the cell death induced by different DNA damage agents.

  19. An Arabidopsis ATP-dependent, DEAD-box RNA helicase loses activity upon iosAsp formation but is restored by Protein Isoaspartyl Methltransferase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabidopsis thaliana PLANT RNA HELICASE75 (AtPRH75) demonstrated an ATP-dependent, RNA duplex unwinding capacity and an ATP-independent, RNA duplex reforming ability. It is known to accumulate isoAsp, but the consequences of isoAsp formation in AtPRH75 are unknown. Duplex unwinding was abolished by ...

  20. Trithorax dependent changes in chromatin landscape at enhancer and promoter regions drive female puberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro, Carlos A; Wright, Hollis; Aylwin, Carlos F; Ojeda, Sergio R; Lomniczi, Alejandro

    2018-01-04

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins control the timing of puberty by repressing the Kiss1 gene in hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons. Here we identify two members of the Trithorax group (TrxG) of modifiers, mixed-lineage leukemia 1 (MLL1), and 3 (MLL3), as central components of an activating epigenetic machinery that dynamically counteracts PcG repression. Preceding puberty, MLL1 changes the chromatin configuration at the promoters of Kiss1 and Tac3, two genes required for puberty to occur, from repressive to permissive. Concomitantly, MLL3 institutes a chromatin structure that changes the functional status of a Kiss1 enhancer from poised to active. RNAi-mediated, ARC-specific Mll1 knockdown reduced Kiss1 and Tac3 expression, whereas CRISPR-Cas9-directed epigenome silencing of the Kiss1 enhancer selectively reduced Kiss1 activity. Both interventions delay puberty and disrupt reproductive cyclicity. Our results demonstrate that an epigenetic switch from transcriptional repression to activation is crucial to the regulatory mechanism controlling the timing of mammalian puberty.

  1. Interaction of G-protein βγ complex with chromatin modulates GPCR-dependent gene regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anushree Bhatnagar

    Full Text Available Heterotrimeric G-protein signal transduction initiated by G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs in the plasma membrane is thought to propagate through protein-protein interactions of subunits, Gα and Gβγ in the cytosol. In this study, we show novel nuclear functions of Gβγ through demonstrating interaction of Gβ(2 with integral components of chromatin and effects of Gβ(2 depletion on global gene expression. Agonist activation of several GPCRs including the angiotensin II type 1 receptor specifically augmented Gβ(2 levels in the nucleus and Gβ(2 interacted with specific nucleosome core histones and transcriptional modulators. Depletion of Gβ(2 repressed the basal and angiotensin II-dependent transcriptional activities of myocyte enhancer factor 2. Gβ(2 interacted with a sequence motif that was present in several transcription factors, whose genome-wide binding accounted for the Gβ(2-dependent regulation of approximately 2% genes. These findings suggest a wide-ranging mechanism by which direct interaction of Gβγ with specific chromatin bound transcription factors regulates functional gene networks in response to GPCR activation in cells.

  2. The transcriptional coactivator SAYP is a trithorax group signature subunit of the PBAP chromatin remodeling complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.E. Chalkley (Gillian); Y.M. Moshkin (Yuri); K. Langenberg (Karin); K. Bezstarosti (Karel); A. Blastyak (Andras); H. Gyurkovics (Henrik); J.A.A. Demmers (Jeroen); C.P. Verrijzer (Peter)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractSWI/SNF ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes (remodelers) perform critical functions in eukaryotic gene expression control. BAP and PBAP are the fly representatives of the two evolutionarily conserved major subclasses of SWI/SNF remodelers. Both complexes share seven core

  3. Global alterations of the transcriptional landscape during yeast growth and development in the absence of Ume6-dependent chromatin modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lardenois, Aurélie; Becker, Emmanuelle; Walther, Thomas; Law, Michael J; Xie, Bingning; Demougin, Philippe; Strich, Randy; Primig, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Chromatin modification enzymes are important regulators of gene expression and some are evolutionarily conserved from yeast to human. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a major model organism for genome-wide studies that aim at the identification of target genes under the control of conserved epigenetic regulators. Ume6 interacts with the upstream repressor site 1 (URS1) and represses transcription by recruiting both the conserved histone deacetylase Rpd3 (through the co-repressor Sin3) and the chromatin-remodeling factor Isw2. Cells lacking Ume6 are defective in growth, stress response, and meiotic development. RNA profiling studies and in vivo protein-DNA binding assays identified mRNAs or transcript isoforms that are directly repressed by Ume6 in mitosis. However, a comprehensive understanding of the transcriptional alterations, which underlie the complex ume6Δ mutant phenotype during fermentation, respiration, or sporulation, is lacking. We report the protein-coding transcriptome of a diploid MAT a/α wild-type and ume6/ume6 mutant strains cultured in rich media with glucose or acetate as a carbon source, or sporulation-inducing medium. We distinguished direct from indirect effects on mRNA levels by combining GeneChip data with URS1 motif predictions and published high-throughput in vivo Ume6-DNA binding data. To gain insight into the molecular interactions between successive waves of Ume6-dependent meiotic genes, we integrated expression data with information on protein networks. Our work identifies novel Ume6 repressed genes during growth and development and reveals a strong effect of the carbon source on the derepression pattern of transcripts in growing and developmentally arrested ume6/ume6 mutant cells. Since yeast is a useful model organism for chromatin-mediated effects on gene expression, our results provide a rich source for further genetic and molecular biological work on the regulation of cell growth and cell differentiation in eukaryotes.

  4. Reprogramming chromatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehrensberger, Andreas Hasso; Svejstrup, Jesper Qualmann

    2012-01-01

    attributed to high kinetic barriers that affect all cells equally and can only be overcome by rare stochastic events. The barriers to reprogramming are likely to involve transformations of chromatin state because (i) inhibitors of chromatin-modifying enzymes can enhance the efficiency of reprogramming...... and (ii) knockdown or knock-out of chromatin-modifying enzymes can lower the efficiency of reprogramming. Here, we review the relationship between chromatin state transformations (chromatin reprogramming) and cellular reprogramming, with an emphasis on transcription factors, chromatin remodeling factors...

  5. The ''self-stirred'' genome: Bulk and surface dynamics of the chromatin globule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidovska, Alexandra

    Chromatin structure and dynamics control all aspects of DNA biology yet are poorly understood. In interphase, time between two cell divisions, chromatin fills the cell nucleus in its minimally condensed polymeric state. Chromatin serves as substrate to a number of biological processes, e.g. gene expression and DNA replication, which require it to become locally restructured. These are energy-consuming processes giving rise to non-equilibrium dynamics. Chromatin dynamics has been traditionally studied by imaging of fluorescently labeled nuclear proteins and single DNA-sites, thus focusing only on a small number of tracer particles. Recently, we developed an approach, displacement correlation spectroscopy (DCS) based on time-resolved image correlation analysis, to map chromatin dynamics simultaneously across the whole nucleus in cultured human cells. DCS revealed that chromatin movement was coherent across large regions (4-5 μm) for several seconds. Regions of coherent motion extended beyond the boundaries of single-chromosome territories, suggesting elastic coupling of motion over length scales much larger than those of genes. These large-scale, coupled motions were ATP-dependent and unidirectional for several seconds. Following these observations, we developed a hydrodynamic theory of active chromatin dynamics, using the two-fluid model and describing the content of cell nucleus as a chromatin solution, which is subject to both passive thermal fluctuations and active (ATP-consuming) scalar and vector events. In this work we continue in our efforts to elucidate the mechanism and function of the chromatin dynamics in interphase. We investigate the chromatin interactions with the nuclear envelope and compare the surface dynamics of the chromatin globule with its bulk dynamics.

  6. Specificity of ATP-dependent and GTP-dependent protein kinases with respect to ribosomal proteins of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Issinger, O G; Kiefer, M C; Traut, R R

    1975-01-01

    of the small ribosomal subunit, and to a lesser extent proteins L7 and L12 or the large subunit. Evidence is presented showing different phosphorylation patterns when either whole subunits or the extracted proteins were used as substrate for the protein kinase. Kinetic studies showed proteins S1 and S4......Two protein kinases differing in substrate specificity were used to phosphorylate the 30-S and the 50-S ribosomal subunits of Escherichia coli. The catalytic subunit from the rabbit skeletal muscle protein kinase phosphorylates proteins S1, S4, S9, S13 and S18 of the 30-S subunit and proteins L2, L......4, L5, L16, L18 and L23 of the 50-S subunit with (gamma-32P)ATP as phosphoryl donor. A second protein kinase isolated from rabbit reticulocytes, formerly shown to phosphorylate preferentially acidic proteins and to use GTP as well as ATP, strongly phosphorylated protein S6, an acidic protein...

  7. The RIG-I ATPase domain structure reveals insights into ATP-dependent antiviral signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civril, Filiz; Bennett, Matthew; Moldt, Manuela; Deimling, Tobias; Witte, Gregor; Schiesser, Stefan; Carell, Thomas; Hopfner, Karl-Peter

    2011-10-28

    RIG-I detects cytosolic viral dsRNA with 5' triphosphates (5'-ppp-dsRNA), thereby initiating an antiviral innate immune response. Here we report the crystal structure of superfamily 2 (SF2) ATPase domain of RIG-I in complex with a nucleotide analogue. RIG-I SF2 comprises two RecA-like domains 1A and 2A and a helical insertion domain 2B, which together form a 'C'-shaped structure. Domains 1A and 2A are maintained in a 'signal-off' state with an inactive ATP hydrolysis site by an intriguing helical arm. By mutational analysis, we show surface motifs that are critical for dsRNA-stimulated ATPase activity, indicating that dsRNA induces a structural movement that brings domains 1A and 2A/B together to form an active ATPase site. The structure also indicates that the regulatory domain is close to the end of the helical arm, where it is well positioned to recruit 5'-ppp-dsRNA to the SF2 domain. Overall, our results indicate that the activation of RIG-I occurs through an RNA- and ATP-driven structural switch in the SF2 domain.

  8. Structural Basis for the Mechanism of ATP-Dependent Acetone Carboxylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mus, Florence; Eilers, Brian J; Alleman, Alexander B; Kabasakal, Burak V; Wells, Jennifer N; Murray, James W; Nocek, Boguslaw P; DuBois, Jennifer L; Peters, John W

    2017-08-03

    Microorganisms use carboxylase enzymes to form new carbon-carbon bonds by introducing carbon dioxide gas (CO2) or its hydrated form, bicarbonate (HCO3-), into target molecules. Acetone carboxylases (ACs) catalyze the conversion of substrates acetone and HCO3- to form the product acetoacetate. Many bicarbonate-incorporating carboxylases rely on the organic cofactor biotin for the activation of bicarbonate. ACs contain metal ions but not organic cofactors, and use ATP to activate substrates through phosphorylation. How the enzyme coordinates these phosphorylation events and new C-C bond formation in the absence of biotin has remained a mystery since these enzymes were discovered. The first structural rationale for acetone carboxylation is presented here, focusing on the 360 kDa (αβγ)2 heterohexameric AC from Xanthobacter autotrophicus in the ligand-free, AMP-bound, and acetate coordinated states. These structures suggest successive steps in a catalytic cycle revealing that AC undergoes large conformational changes coupled to substrate activation by ATP to perform C-C bond ligation at a distant Mn center. These results illustrate a new chemical strategy for the conversion of CO2 into biomass, a process of great significance to the global carbon cycle.

  9. Genesis of chromatin and transcription dynamics in the origin of species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Maria J E; Snel, Berend; Timmers, H Th Marc

    2015-05-07

    Histone proteins compact and stabilize the genomes of Eukarya and Archaea. By forming nucleosome(-like) structures they restrict access of DNA-binding transcription regulators to cis-regulatory DNA elements. Dynamic competition between histones and transcription factors is facilitated by different classes of proteins including ATP-dependent remodeling enzymes that control assembly, access, and editing of chromatin. Here, we summarize the knowledge on dynamics underlying transcriptional regulation across the domains of life with a focus on ATP-dependent enzymes in chromatin structure or in TATA-binding protein activity. These insights suggest directions for future studies on the evolution of transcription regulation and chromatin dynamics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. CTCF-dependent chromatin bias constitutes transient epigenetic memory of the mother at the H19-Igf2 imprinting control region in prospermatogonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Hoon Lee

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Genomic imprints-parental allele-specific DNA methylation marks at the differentially methylated regions (DMRs of imprinted genes-are erased and reestablished in germ cells according to the individual's sex. Imprint establishment at paternally methylated germ line DMRs occurs in fetal male germ cells. In prospermatogonia, the two unmethylated alleles exhibit different rates of de novo methylation at the H19/Igf2 imprinting control region (ICR depending on parental origin. We investigated the nature of this epigenetic memory using bisulfite sequencing and allele-specific ChIP-SNuPE assays. We found that the chromatin composition in fetal germ cells was biased at the ICR between the two alleles with the maternally inherited allele exhibiting more H3K4me3 and less H3K9me3 than the paternally inherited allele. We determined genetically that the chromatin bias, and also the delayed methylation establishment in the maternal allele, depended on functional CTCF insulator binding sites in the ICR. Our data suggest that, in primordial germ cells, maternally inherited allele-specific CTCF binding sets up allele-specific chromatin differences at the ICR. The erasure of these allele-specific chromatin marks is not complete before the process of de novo methylation imprint establishment begins. CTCF-dependent allele-specific chromatin composition imposes a maternal allele-specific delay on de novo methylation imprint establishment at the H19/Igf2 ICR in prospermatogonia.

  11. Characterization of the ATP-Dependent Lon-Like Protease in Methanobrevibacter smithii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihua Pei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Lon protease is highly evolutionarily conserved. However, little is known about Lon in the context of gut microbial communities. A gene encoding a Lon-like protease (Lon-like-Ms was identified and characterized from Methanobrevibacter smithii, the predominant archaeon in the human gut ecosystem. Phylogenetic and sequence analyses showed that Lon-like-Ms and its homologs are newly identified members of the Lon family. A recombinant form of the enzyme was purified by affinity chromatography, and its catalytic properties were examined. Recombinant Lon-like-Ms exhibited ATPase activity and cleavage activity toward fluorogenic peptides and casein. The peptidase activity of Lon-like-Ms relied strictly on Mg2+ (or other divalent cations and ATP. These results highlight a new type of Lon-like protease that differs from its bacterial counterpart.

  12. ATP-mediated transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor in airway epithelial cells involves DUOX1-dependent oxidation of Src and ADAM17.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek Sham

    Full Text Available The respiratory epithelium is subject to continuous environmental stress and its responses to injury or infection are largely mediated by transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and downstream signaling cascades. Based on previous studies indicating involvement of ATP-dependent activation of the NADPH oxidase homolog DUOX1 in epithelial wound responses, the present studies were performed to elucidate the mechanisms by which DUOX1-derived H(2O(2 participates in ATP-dependent redox signaling and EGFR transactivation. ATP-mediated EGFR transactivation in airway epithelial cells was found to involve purinergic P2Y(2 receptor stimulation, and both ligand-dependent mechanisms as well as ligand-independent EGFR activation by the non-receptor tyrosine kinase Src. Activation of Src was also essential for ATP-dependent activation of the sheddase ADAM17, which is responsible for liberation and activation of EGFR ligands. Activation of P2Y(2R results in recruitment of Src and DUOX1 into a signaling complex, and transient siRNA silencing or stable shRNA transfection established a critical role for DUOX1 in ATP-dependent activation of Src, ADAM17, EGFR, and downstream wound responses. Using thiol-specific biotin labeling strategies, we determined that ATP-dependent EGFR transactivation was associated with DUOX1-dependent oxidation of cysteine residues within Src as well as ADAM17. In aggregate, our findings demonstrate that DUOX1 plays a central role in overall epithelial defense responses to infection or injury, by mediating oxidative activation of Src and ADAM17 in response to ATP-dependent P2Y(2R activation as a proximal step in EGFR transactivation and downstream signaling.

  13. Structure and function of a novel type of ATP-dependent Clp protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Fredrik I; Tryggvesson, Anders; Sharon, Michal; Diemand, Alexander V; Classen, Mirjam; Best, Christoph; Schmidt, Ronny; Schelin, Jenny; Stanne, Tara M; Bukau, Bernd; Robinson, Carol V; Witt, Susanne; Mogk, Axel; Clarke, Adrian K

    2009-05-15

    The Clp protease is conserved among eubacteria and most eukaryotes, and uses ATP to drive protein substrate unfolding and translocation into a chamber of sequestered proteolytic active sites. The main constitutive Clp protease in photosynthetic organisms has evolved into a functionally essential and structurally intricate enzyme. The model Clp protease from the cyanobacterium Synechococcus consists of the HSP100 molecular chaperone ClpC and a mixed proteolytic core comprised of two distinct subunits, ClpP3 and ClpR. We have purified the ClpP3/R complex, the first for a Clp proteolytic core comprised of heterologous subunits. The ClpP3/R complex has unique functional and structural features, consisting of twin heptameric rings each with an identical ClpP3(3)ClpR(4) configuration. As predicted by its lack of an obvious catalytic triad, the ClpR subunit is shown to be proteolytically inactive. Interestingly, extensive modification to ClpR to restore proteolytic activity to this subunit showed that its presence in the core complex is not rate-limiting for the overall proteolytic activity of the ClpCP3/R protease. Altogether, the ClpP3/R complex shows remarkable similarities to the 20 S core of the proteasome, revealing a far greater degree of convergent evolution than previously thought between the development of the Clp protease in photosynthetic organisms and that of the eukaryotic 26 S proteasome.

  14. Function of Brg1 Chromatin Remodeling Factor in Sonic Hedgehog-Dependent Medulloblastoma Initiation and Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    be tumor-type dependent, consistent with its diverse subunit compositions and functions in different tissues 71. Using the ATPase dependent...Sci U S A 2010; 107: 9736-9741. 33 Lessard J, Wu JI, Ranish JA, Wan M, Winslow MM, Staahl BT et al. An Essential Switch in Subunit Composition of a...and cancer. Nat Rev Cancer 2011; 11: 481-492. 70 Witkowski L, Carrot -Zhang J, Albrecht S, Fahiminiya S, Hamel N, Tomiak E et al. Germline and

  15. Acetone and Butanone Metabolism of the Denitrifying Bacterium “Aromatoleum aromaticum” Demonstrates Novel Biochemical Properties of an ATP-Dependent Aliphatic Ketone Carboxylase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schühle, Karola

    2012-01-01

    The anaerobic and aerobic metabolism of acetone and butanone in the betaproteobacterium “Aromatoleum aromaticum” is initiated by their ATP-dependent carboxylation to acetoacetate and 3-oxopentanoic acid, respectively. Both reactions are catalyzed by the same enzyme, acetone carboxylase, which was purified and characterized. Acetone carboxylase is highly induced under growth on acetone or butanone and accounts for at least 5.5% of total cell protein. The enzyme consists of three subunits of 85, 75, and 20 kDa, respectively, in a (αβγ)2 composition and contains 1 Zn and 2 Fe per heterohexamer but no organic cofactors. Chromatographic analysis of the ATP hydrolysis products indicated that ATP was exclusively cleaved to AMP and 2 Pi. The stoichiometry was determined to be 2 ATP consumed per acetone carboxylated. Purified acetone carboxylase from A. aromaticum catalyzes the carboxylation of acetone and butanone as the only substrates. However, the enzyme shows induced (uncoupled) ATPase activity with many other substrates that were not carboxylated. Acetone carboxylase is a member of a protein family that also contains acetone carboxylases of various other organisms, acetophenone carboxylase of A. aromaticum, and ATP-dependent hydantoinases/oxoprolinases. While the members of this family share several characteristic features, they differ with respect to the products of ATP hydrolysis, subunit composition, and metal content. PMID:22020645

  16. Chromatin condensation in terminally differentiating mouse erythroblasts does not involve special architectural proteins but depends on histone deacetylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popova, Evgenya Y.; Krauss, Sharon Wald; Short, Sarah A.; Lee, Gloria; Villalobos, Jonathan; Etzell, Joan; Koury, Mark J.; Ney, Paul A.; Chasis, Joel Anne; Grigoryev, Sergei A.

    2008-08-21

    Terminal erythroid differentiation in vertebrates is characterized by progressive heterochromatin formation, chromatin condensation and, in mammals, culminates in nuclear extrusion. To date, although mechanisms regulating avian erythroid chromatin condensation have been identified, little is known regarding this process during mammalian erythropoiesis. To elucidate the molecular basis for mammalian erythroblast chromatin condensation, we used Friend virus-infected murine spleen erythroblasts that undergo terminal differentiation in vitro. Chromatin isolated from early and late stage erythroblasts had similar levels of linker and core histones, only a slight difference in nucleosome repeats, and no significant accumulation of known developmentally-regulated architectural chromatin proteins. However, histone H3(K9) dimethylation markedly increased while histone H4(K12) acetylation dramatically decreased and became segregated from the histone methylation as chromatin condensed. One histone deacetylase, HDAC5, was significantly upregulated during the terminal stages of Friend virus-infected erythroblast differentiation. Treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitor, trichostatin A, blocked both chromatin condensation and nuclear extrusion. Based on our data, we propose a model for a unique mechanism in which extensive histone deacetylation at pericentromeric heterochromatin mediates heterochromatin condensation in vertebrate erythroblasts that would otherwise be mediated by developmentally-regulated architectural proteins in nucleated blood cells.

  17. A Testis-Specific Chaperone and the Chromatin Remodeler ISWI Mediate Repackaging of the Paternal Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile M. Doyen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available During spermatogenesis, the paternal genome is repackaged into a non-nucleosomal, highly compacted chromatin structure. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that Drosophila sperm chromatin proteins are characterized by a motif related to the high-mobility group (HMG box, which we termed male-specific transcript (MST-HMG box. MST77F is a MST-HMG-box protein that forms an essential component of sperm chromatin. The deposition of MST77F onto the paternal genome requires the chaperone function of tNAP, a testis-specific NAP protein. MST77F, in turn, enables the stable incorporation of MST35Ba and MST35Bb into sperm chromatin. Following MST-HMG-box protein deposition, the ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler ISWI mediates the appropriate organization of sperm chromatin. Conversely, at fertilization, maternal ISWI targets the paternal genome and drives its repackaging into de-condensed nucleosomal chromatin. Failure of this transition in ISWI mutant embryos is followed by mitotic defects, aneuploidy, and haploid embryonic divisions. Thus, ISWI enables bi-directional transitions between two fundamentally different forms of chromatin.

  18. Chd1 remodelers maintain open chromatin and regulate the epigenetics of differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Jenna [Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Center for Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet (Sweden); Ekwall, Karl, E-mail: karl.ekwall@ki.se [Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Center for Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet (Sweden); School of Life Sciences, University College Sodertorn, NOVUM, Huddinge (Sweden)

    2010-05-01

    Eukaryotic DNA is packaged around octamers of histone proteins into nucleosomes, the basic unit of chromatin. In addition to enabling meters of DNA to fit within the confines of a nucleus, the structure of chromatin has functional implications for cell identity. Covalent chemical modifications to the DNA and to histones, histone variants, ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers, small noncoding RNAs and the level of chromatin compaction all contribute to chromosomal structure and to the activity or silencing of genes. These chromatin-level alterations are defined as epigenetic when they are heritable from mother to daughter cell. The great diversity of epigenomes that can arise from a single genome permits a single, totipotent cell to generate the hundreds of distinct cell types found in humans. Two recent studies in mouse and in fly have highlighted the importance of Chd1 chromatin remodelers for maintaining an open, active chromatin state. Based on evidence from fission yeast as a model system, we speculate that Chd1 remodelers are involved in the disassembly of nucleosomes at promoter regions, thus promoting active transcription and open chromatin. It is likely that these nucleosomes are specifically marked for disassembly by the histone variant H2A.Z.

  19. Chromatin computation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Bryant

    Full Text Available In living cells, DNA is packaged along with protein and RNA into chromatin. Chemical modifications to nucleotides and histone proteins are added, removed and recognized by multi-functional molecular complexes. Here I define a new computational model, in which chromatin modifications are information units that can be written onto a one-dimensional string of nucleosomes, analogous to the symbols written onto cells of a Turing machine tape, and chromatin-modifying complexes are modeled as read-write rules that operate on a finite set of adjacent nucleosomes. I illustrate the use of this "chromatin computer" to solve an instance of the Hamiltonian path problem. I prove that chromatin computers are computationally universal--and therefore more powerful than the logic circuits often used to model transcription factor control of gene expression. Features of biological chromatin provide a rich instruction set for efficient computation of nontrivial algorithms in biological time scales. Modeling chromatin as a computer shifts how we think about chromatin function, suggests new approaches to medical intervention, and lays the groundwork for the engineering of a new class of biological computing machines.

  20. Chromatin Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    In living cells, DNA is packaged along with protein and RNA into chromatin. Chemical modifications to nucleotides and histone proteins are added, removed and recognized by multi-functional molecular complexes. Here I define a new computational model, in which chromatin modifications are information units that can be written onto a one-dimensional string of nucleosomes, analogous to the symbols written onto cells of a Turing machine tape, and chromatin-modifying complexes are modeled as read-write rules that operate on a finite set of adjacent nucleosomes. I illustrate the use of this “chromatin computer” to solve an instance of the Hamiltonian path problem. I prove that chromatin computers are computationally universal – and therefore more powerful than the logic circuits often used to model transcription factor control of gene expression. Features of biological chromatin provide a rich instruction set for efficient computation of nontrivial algorithms in biological time scales. Modeling chromatin as a computer shifts how we think about chromatin function, suggests new approaches to medical intervention, and lays the groundwork for the engineering of a new class of biological computing machines. PMID:22567109

  1. In silico exploration of the fructose-6-phosphate phosphorylation step in glycolysis: genomic evidence of the coexistence of an atypical ATP-dependent along with a PPi-dependent phosphofructokinase in Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meurice, Guillaume; Deborde, Catherine; Jacob, Daniel; Falentin, Hélène; Boyaval, Patrick; Dimova, Diliana

    2004-01-01

    We performed a detailed bioinformatic study of the catalytic step of fructose-6-phosphate phosphorylation in glycolysis based on the raw genomic draft of Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii (P. shermanii) ATCC9614 [Meurice et al., 2004]. Our results provide the first in silico evidence of the coexistence of genes coding for an ATP-dependent phosphofructokinase (ATP-PFK) and a PPi-dependent phosphofructokinase (PPi-PFK), whereas the fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBP) and ADP-dependent phosphofructokinase (ADP-PFK) are absent. The deduced amino acid sequence corresponding to the PPi-PFK (AJ508922) shares 100% similarity with the already characterised propionibacterial protein (P29495; Ladror et al., 1991]. The unexpected ATP-PFK gene (AJ509827) encodes a protein of 373 aa which is highly similar (50% positive residues) along at least 95% of its sequence length to different well-characterised ATP-PFKs. The characteristic PROSITE pattern important for the enzyme function of ATP-PFKs (PS00433) was conserved in the putative ATP-PFK sequence: 8 out of 9 amino acid residues. According to the recent evolutionary study of PFK proteins with different phosphate donors [Bapteste et al., 2003], the propionibacterial ATP-PFK harbours a G104-K124 residue combination, which strongly suggested that this enzyme belongs to the group of atypical ATP-PFKs. According to our phylogenetic analyses the amino acid sequence of the ATP-PFK is clustered with the atypical ATP-PFKs from group III of the Siebers classification [Siebers et al., 1998], whereas the expected PPi-PFK protein is closer to the PPi-PFKs from clade P [Müller et al., 2001]. The possible significance of the co-existence of these two PFKs and their importance for the regulation of glycolytic pathway flux in P. shermanii is discussed.

  2. A Transient Rise in Free Mg2+Ions Released from ATP-Mg Hydrolysis Contributes to Mitotic Chromosome Condensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeshima, Kazuhiro; Matsuda, Tomoki; Shindo, Yutaka; Imamura, Hiromi; Tamura, Sachiko; Imai, Ryosuke; Kawakami, Syoji; Nagashima, Ryosuke; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Noji, Hiroyuki; Oka, Kotaro; Nagai, Takeharu

    2018-02-05

    For cell division, negatively charged chromatin, in which nucleosome fibers (10 nm fibers) are irregularly folded [1-5], must be condensed into chromosomes and segregated. While condensin and other proteins are critical for organizing chromatin into the appropriate chromosome shape [6-17], free divalent cations such as Mg 2+ and Ca 2+ , which condense chromatin or chromosomes in vitro [18-28], have long been considered important, especially for local condensation, because the nucleosome fiber has a net negative charge and is by itself stretched like "beads on a string" by electrostatic repulsion. For further folding, other positively charged factors are required to decrease the charge and repulsion [29]. However, technical limitations to measure intracellular free divalent cations, but not total cations [30], especially Mg 2+ , have prevented us from elucidating their function. Here, we developed a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based Mg 2+ indicator that monitors free Mg 2+ dynamics throughout the cell cycle. By combining this indicator with Ca 2+ [31] and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) [32] indicators, we demonstrate that the levels of free Mg 2+ , but not Ca 2+ , increase during mitosis. The Mg 2+ increase is coupled with a decrease in ATP, which is normally bound to Mg 2+ in the cell [33]. ATP inhibited Mg 2+ -dependent chromatin condensation in vitro. Chelating Mg 2+ induced mitotic cell arrest and chromosome decondensation, while ATP reduction had the opposite effect. Our results suggest that ATP-bound Mg 2+ is released by ATP hydrolysis and contributes to mitotic chromosome condensation with increased rigidity, suggesting a novel regulatory mechanism for higher-order chromatin organization by the intracellular Mg 2+ -ATP balance. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Crystal structure of the R-protein of the multisubunit ATP-dependent restriction endonuclease NgoAVII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamulaitiene, Giedre; Silanskas, Arunas; Grazulis, Saulius; Zaremba, Mindaugas; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2014-12-16

    The restriction endonuclease (REase) NgoAVII is composed of two proteins, R.NgoAVII and N.NgoAVII, and shares features of both Type II restriction enzymes and Type I/III ATP-dependent restriction enzymes (see accompanying paper Zaremba et al., 2014). Here we present crystal structures of the R.NgoAVII apo-protein and the R.NgoAVII C-terminal domain bound to a specific DNA. R.NgoAVII is composed of two domains: an N-terminal nucleolytic PLD domain; and a C-terminal B3-like DNA-binding domain identified previously in BfiI and EcoRII REases, and in plant transcription factors. Structural comparison of the B3-like domains of R.NgoAVII, EcoRII, BfiI and the plant transcription factors revealed a conserved DNA-binding surface comprised of N- and C-arms that together grip the DNA. The C-arms of R.NgoAVII, EcoRII, BfiI and plant B3 domains are similar in size, but the R.NgoAVII N-arm which makes the majority of the contacts to the target site is much longer. The overall structures of R.NgoAVII and BfiI are similar; however, whilst BfiI has stand-alone catalytic activity, R.NgoAVII requires an auxiliary cognate N.NgoAVII protein and ATP hydrolysis in order to cleave DNA at the target site. The structures we present will help formulate future experiments to explore the molecular mechanisms of intersubunit crosstalk that control DNA cleavage by R.NgoAVII and related endonucleases. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. Dynamics of 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3-dependent chromatin accessibility of early vitamin D receptor target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seuter, Sabine; Pehkonen, Petri; Heikkinen, Sami; Carlberg, Carsten

    2013-12-01

    The signaling cascade of the transcription factor vitamin D receptor (VDR) is triggered by its specific ligand 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1α,25(OH)2D3). In this study we demonstrate that in THP-1 human monocytic leukemia cells 87.4% of the 1034 most prominent genome-wide VDR binding sites co-localize with loci of open chromatin. At 165 of them 1α,25(OH)2D3 strongly increases chromatin accessibility and has at further 217 sites weaker effects. Interestingly, VDR binding sites in 1α,25(OH)2D3-responsive chromatin regions are far more often composed of direct repeats with 3 intervening nucleotides (DR3s) than those in ligand insensitive regions. DR3-containing VDR sites are enriched in the neighborhood of genes that are involved in controling cellular growth, while non-DR3 VDR binding is often found close to genes related to immunity. At the example of six early VDR target genes we show that the slope of their 1α,25(OH)2D3-induced transcription correlates with the basal chromatin accessibility of their major VDR binding regions. However, the chromatin loci controlling these genes are indistinguishable in their VDR association kinetics. Taken together, ligand responsive chromatin loci represent dynamically regulated contact points of VDR with the genome, from where it controls early 1α,25(OH)2D3 target genes. © 2013.

  5. Salinity-dependent copper accumulation in the guppy Poecilia vivipara is associated with CTR1 and ATP7B transcriptional regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Evelise Sampaio; Abril, Sandra Isabel Moreno; Zanette, Juliano; Bianchini, Adalto

    2014-07-01

    Copper (Cu) accumulation and regulation of key-genes involved in Cu homeostasis were evaluated in freshwater- and saltwater-acclimated guppies Poecilia vivipara. Fish were exposed (96h) to environmentally relevant concentrations of dissolved Cu (0, 5.0, 9.0 and 20.0μg/L). In freshwater guppies, gill and liver Cu accumulation was dependent on Cu concentration in the exposure medium. In saltwater guppies, this dependence was observed only in the gut. These findings indicate that Cu accumulation was salinity- and tissue-dependent. Key genes involved in Cu metabolism were sequenced for the first time in P. vivipara. Transcripts coding for the high-affinity copper transporter (CTR1) and copper-transporting ATPase (ATP7B) were identified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and gene sequencing. The full-length CTR1 open reading frame (1560bp) and a partial ATP7B (690bp) were discovered. Predicted amino acid sequences shared high identities with the CTR1 of Fundulus heteroclitus (81%) and the ATP7B of Sparus aurata (87%). Basal transcriptional levels addressed by RT-qPCR in control fish indicate that CTR1 and ATP7B was highly transcribed in liver of freshwater guppies while CTR1 was highly transcribed in gut of saltwater guppies. This could explain the higher Cu accumulation observed in liver of freshwater guppies and in gut of saltwater guppies, because CTR1 is involved in Cu uptake. Reduced gill mRNA expression of CTR1 was observed in freshwater guppies exposed to 20.0μg/L Cu and in saltwater guppies exposed to 5.0μg/L Cu. In turn, reduced mRNA expression of gut ATP7B was observed in freshwater and salt water guppies exposed to 9.0 and 20.0μg/L Cu. Liver CTR1 and ATP7B transcription were not affected by Cu exposure. These findings suggest that gill CTR1 and gut ATP7B are down-regulated to limit Cu absorption after exposure to dissolved Cu, while liver CTR1 and ATP7B levels are maintained to allow Cu storage and detoxification. In conclusion, findings reported here

  6. Dose-dependent ATP depletion and cancer cell death following calcium electroporation, relative effect of calcium concentration and electric field strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Emilie Louise; Sozer, Esin Bengisu; Romeo, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    death and could be a novel cancer treatment. This study aims at understanding the relationship between applied electric field, calcium concentration, ATP depletion and efficacy. METHODS: In three human cell lines--H69 (small-cell lung cancer), SW780 (bladder cancer), and U937 (leukaemia), viability...... was observed with fluorescence confocal microscopy of quinacrine-labelled U937 cells. RESULTS: Both H69 and SW780 cells showed dose-dependent (calcium concentration and electric field) decrease in intracellular ATP (p...-dependently reduced cell survival and intracellular ATP. Increasing extracellular calcium allows the use of a lower electric field. GENERAL SIGNIFICANCE: This study supports the use of calcium electroporation for treatment of cancer and possibly lowering the applied electric field in future trials....

  7. SIRT6 stabilizes DNA-dependent protein kinase at chromatin for DNA double-strand break repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCord, Ronald A; Michishita, Eriko; Hong, Tao

    2009-01-01

    The Sir2 chromatin regulatory factor links maintenance of genomic stability to life span extension in yeast. The mammalian Sir2 family member SIRT6 has been proposed to have analogous functions, because SIRT6-deficiency leads to shortened life span and an aging-like degenerative phenotype in mice......, and SIRT6 knockout cells exhibit genomic instability and DNA damage hypersensitivity. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these defects are not fully understood. Here, we show that SIRT6 forms a macromolecular complex with the DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair factor DNA-PK (DNA......-PKcs) to chromatin in response to DNA damage and stabilizes DNA-PKcs at chromatin adjacent to an induced site-specific DSB. Abrogation of these SIRT6 activities leads to impaired resolution of DSBs. Together, these findings elucidate a mechanism whereby regulation of dynamic interaction of a DNA repair factor...

  8. Assembly of the chloroplast ATP-dependent Clp protease in Arabidopsis is regulated by the ClpT accessory proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjögren, Lars L E; Clarke, Adrian K

    2011-01-01

    The ATP-dependent caseinolytic protease (Clp) is an essential housekeeping enzyme in plant chloroplasts. It is by far the most complex of all known Clp proteases, with a proteolytic core consisting of multiple catalytic ClpP and noncatalytic ClpR subunits. It also includes a unique form of Clp protein of unknown function designated ClpT, two of which exist in the model species Arabidopsis thaliana. Inactivation of ClpT1 or ClpT2 significantly reduces the amount of Clp proteolytic core, whereas loss of both proves seedling lethal under autotrophic conditions. During assembly of the Clp proteolytic core, ClpT1 first binds to the P-ring (consisting of ClpP3-6 subunits) followed by ClpT2, and only then does the P-ring combine with the R-ring (ClpP1, ClpR1-4 subunits). Most of the ClpT proteins in chloroplasts exist in vivo as homodimers, which then apparently monomerize prior to association with the P-ring. Despite their relative abundance, however, the availability of both ClpT proteins is rate limiting for the core assembly, with the addition of recombinant ClpT1 and ClpT2 increasing core content up to fourfold. Overall, ClpT appears to regulate the assembly of the chloroplast Clp protease, revealing a new and sophisticated control mechanism on the activity of this vital protease in plants.

  9. Tetrahydroisoquinolines affect the whole-cell phenotype of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by inhibiting the ATP-dependent MurE ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Juan D; Pesnot, Thomas; Barrera, Diana A; Davies, Heledd M; McMahon, Eleanor; Evangelopoulos, Dimitrios; Mortazavi, Parisa N; Munshi, Tulika; Maitra, Arundhati; Lamming, Eleanor D; Angell, Richard; Gershater, Markus C; Redmond, Joanna M; Needham, Deborah; Ward, John M; Cuca, Luis E; Hailes, Helen C; Bhakta, Sanjib

    2015-01-01

    (S)-Leucoxine, isolated from the Colombian Lauraceae tree Rhodostemonodaphne crenaticupula Madriñan, was found to inhibit the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. A biomimetic approach for the chemical synthesis of a wide array of 1-substituted tetrahydroisoquinolines was undertaken with the aim of elucidating a common pharmacophore for these compounds with novel mode(s) of anti-TB action. Biomimetic Pictet-Spengler or Bischler-Napieralski synthetic routes were employed followed by an evaluation of the biological activity of the synthesized compounds. In this work, the synthesized tetrahydroisoquinolines were found to inhibit the growth of M. tuberculosis H37Rv and affect its whole-cell phenotype as well as the activity of the ATP-dependent MurE ligase, a key enzyme involved in the early stage of cell wall peptidoglycan biosynthesis. As the correlation between the MIC and the half-inhibitory enzymatic concentration was not particularly strong, there is a credible possibility that these compounds have pleiotropic mechanism(s) of action in M. tuberculosis. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

  10. Dose-dependent ATP depletion and cancer cell death following calcium electroporation, relative effect of calcium concentration and electric field strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Emilie Louise; Sozer, Esin Bengisu; Romeo, Stefania; Frandsen, Stine Krog; Vernier, P Thomas; Gehl, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Electroporation, a method for increasing the permeability of membranes to ions and small molecules, is used in the clinic with chemotherapeutic drugs for cancer treatment (electrochemotherapy). Electroporation with calcium causes ATP (adenosine triphosphate) depletion and cancer cell death and could be a novel cancer treatment. This study aims at understanding the relationship between applied electric field, calcium concentration, ATP depletion and efficacy. In three human cell lines--H69 (small-cell lung cancer), SW780 (bladder cancer), and U937 (leukaemia), viability was determined after treatment with 1, 3, or 5 mM calcium and eight 99 μs pulses with 0.8, 1.0, 1.2, 1.4 or 1.6 kV/cm. Fitting analysis was applied to quantify the cell-killing efficacy in presence of calcium. Post-treatment intracellular ATP was measured in H69 and SW780 cells. Post-treatment intracellular ATP was observed with fluorescence confocal microscopy of quinacrine-labelled U937 cells. Both H69 and SW780 cells showed dose-dependent (calcium concentration and electric field) decrease in intracellular ATP (pcalcium (lower EC50 for higher calcium concentrations). Quinacrine fluorescence intensity of calcium-electroporated U937 cells was one third lower than in controls (pCalcium electroporation dose-dependently reduced cell survival and intracellular ATP. Increasing extracellular calcium allows the use of a lower electric field. This study supports the use of calcium electroporation for treatment of cancer and possibly lowering the applied electric field in future trials.

  11. Dynamic energy dependency of Chlamydia trachomatis on host cell metabolism during intracellular growth: Role of sodium-based energetics in chlamydial ATP generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Pingdong; Rosas-Lemus, Mónica; Patel, Dhwani; Fang, Xuan; Tuz, Karina; Juárez, Oscar

    2018-01-12

    Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate intracellular human pathogen responsible for the most prevalent sexually-transmitted infection in the world. For decades C. trachomatis has been considered an "energy parasite" that relies entirely on the uptake of ATP from the host cell. The genomic data suggest that C. trachomatis respiratory chain could produce a sodium gradient that may sustain the energetic demands required for its rapid multiplication. However, this mechanism awaits experimental confirmation. Moreover, the relationship of chlamydiae with the host cell, in particular its energy dependence, is not well understood. In this work, we are showing that C. trachomatis has an active respiratory metabolism that seems to be coupled to the sodium-dependent synthesis of ATP. Moreover, our results show that the inhibition of mitochondrial ATP synthesis at an early stage decreases the rate of infection and the chlamydial inclusion size. In contrast, the inhibition of the chlamydial respiratory chain at mid-stage of the infection cycle decreases the inclusion size but has no effect on infection rate. Remarkably, the addition of monensin, a Na+/H+ exchanger, completely halts the infection. Altogether, our data indicate that chlamydial development has a dynamic relationship with the mitochondrial metabolism of the host, in which the bacterium mostly depends on host ATP synthesis at an early stage, and at later stages it can sustain its own energy needs through the formation of a sodium gradient. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Identification of new protein substrates for the chloroplast ATP-dependent Clp protease supports its constitutive role in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanne, Tara M; Sjögren, Lars L E; Koussevitzky, Shai; Clarke, Adrian K

    2009-01-01

    The ATP-dependent Clp protease in plant chloroplasts consists of a heterogeneous proteolytic core containing multiple ClpP and ClpR paralogues. In this study, we have examined in detail the only viable knockout mutant to date of one of these subunits in Arabidopsis thaliana, ClpR1. Loss of ClpR1 caused a slow-growth phenotype, with chlorotic leaves during early development that later partially recovered upon maturity. Analysis of the Clp proteolytic core in the clpR1 mutant (clpR1-1) revealed approx. 10% of the wild-type levels remaining, probably due to a relative increase in the closely related ClpR3 protein and its partial substitution of ClpR1 in the core complex. A proteomic approach using an in organello proteolytic assay revealed 19 new potential substrates for the chloroplast Clp protease. Many of these substrates were constitutive enzymes involved in different metabolic pathways, including photosynthetic carbon fixation, nitrogen metabolism and chlorophyll/haem biosynthesis, whereas others function in housekeeping roles such as RNA maturation, protein synthesis and maturation, and recycling processes. In contrast, degradation of the stress-related chloroplast proteins Hsp21 (heat-shock protein 21) and lipoxygenase 2 was unaffected in the clpR1-1 line and thus not facilitated by the Clp protease. Overall, we show that the chloroplast Clp protease is principally a constitutive enzyme that degrades numerous stromal proteins, a feature that almost certainly underlies its vital importance for chloroplast function and plant viability.

  13. Engineering an ATP-dependent D-Ala:D-Ala ligase for synthesizing amino acid amides from amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, Yuta; Okazaki, Seiji; Asano, Yasuhisa

    2017-05-01

    We successfully engineered a new enzyme that catalyzes the formation of D-Ala amide (D-AlaNH2) from D-Ala by modifying ATP-dependent D-Ala:D-Ala ligase (EC 6.3.2.4) from Thermus thermophilus, which catalyzes the formation of D-Ala-D-Ala from two molecules of D-Ala. The new enzyme was created by the replacement of the Ser293 residue with acidic amino acids, as it was speculated to bind to the second D-Ala of D-Ala-D-Ala. In addition, a replacement of the position with Glu performed better than that with Asp with regards to specificity for D-AlaNH2 production. The S293E variant, which was selected as the best enzyme for D-AlaNH2 production, exhibited an optimal activity at pH 9.0 and 40 °C for D-AlaNH2 production. The apparent K m values of this variant for D-Ala and NH3 were 7.35 mM and 1.58 M, respectively. The S293E variant could catalyze the synthesis of 9.3 and 35.7 mM of D-AlaNH2 from 10 and 50 mM D-Ala and 3 M NH4Cl with conversion yields of 93 and 71.4 %, respectively. This is the first report showing the enzymatic formation of amino acid amides from amino acids.

  14. Genome-wide overlap in the binding location and function of chromatin-remodeling proteins | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    A single strand of DNA can stretch several meters. Yet dozens of these strands, which can be one-tenth as thin as a human hair, need to fit into the cell’s nucleus. To pack those strands into such a small space, DNA tightly winds itself around histone proteins, forming nucleosomes that are strung together into complexes called chromatin. Beyond efficiently packaging DNA, chromatin also regulates how and when DNA is used. The condensed coiling of the genome makes it inaccessible to proteins such as RNA polymerases and transcription factors that control the expression of specific genes. For DNA to become accessible local chromatin regions need to be “opened” up. This process is called chromatin remodeling, and involves the ATP-dependent removal, ejection, or restructuring of nucleosomes by large, multiprotein enzymes.

  15. Chromatin-dependent repression of the Arabidopsis floral integrator genes involves plant specific PHD-containing proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-González, Leticia; Mouriz, Alfonso; Narro-Diego, Laura; Bustos, Regla; Martínez-Zapater, José Miguel; Jarillo, Jose A; Piñeiro, Manuel

    2014-10-01

    The interplay among histone modifications modulates the expression of master regulatory genes in development. Chromatin effector proteins bind histone modifications and translate the epigenetic status into gene expression patterns that control development. Here, we show that two Arabidopsis thaliana paralogs encoding plant-specific proteins with a plant homeodomain (PHD) motif, SHORT LIFE (SHL) and EARLY BOLTING IN SHORT DAYS (EBS), function in the chromatin-mediated repression of floral initiation and play independent roles in the control of genes regulating flowering. Previous results showed that repression of the floral integrator FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) requires EBS. We establish that SHL is necessary to negatively regulate the expression of SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CO1 (SOC1), another floral integrator. SHL and EBS recognize di- and trimethylated histone H3 at lysine 4 and bind regulatory regions of SOC1 and FT, respectively. These PHD proteins maintain an inactive chromatin conformation in SOC1 and FT by preventing high levels of H3 acetylation, bind HISTONE DEACETYLASE6, and play a central role in regulating flowering time. SHL and EBS are widely conserved in plants but are absent in other eukaryotes, suggesting that the regulatory module mediated by these proteins could represent a distinct mechanism for gene expression control in plants. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  16. Chromatin-Dependent Repression of the Arabidopsis Floral Integrator Genes Involves Plant Specific PHD-Containing Proteins[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-González, Leticia; Mouriz, Alfonso; Narro-Diego, Laura; Bustos, Regla; Martínez-Zapater, José Miguel; Jarillo, Jose A.; Piñeiro, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    The interplay among histone modifications modulates the expression of master regulatory genes in development. Chromatin effector proteins bind histone modifications and translate the epigenetic status into gene expression patterns that control development. Here, we show that two Arabidopsis thaliana paralogs encoding plant-specific proteins with a plant homeodomain (PHD) motif, SHORT LIFE (SHL) and EARLY BOLTING IN SHORT DAYS (EBS), function in the chromatin-mediated repression of floral initiation and play independent roles in the control of genes regulating flowering. Previous results showed that repression of the floral integrator FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) requires EBS. We establish that SHL is necessary to negatively regulate the expression of SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CO1 (SOC1), another floral integrator. SHL and EBS recognize di- and trimethylated histone H3 at lysine 4 and bind regulatory regions of SOC1 and FT, respectively. These PHD proteins maintain an inactive chromatin conformation in SOC1 and FT by preventing high levels of H3 acetylation, bind HISTONE DEACETYLASE6, and play a central role in regulating flowering time. SHL and EBS are widely conserved in plants but are absent in other eukaryotes, suggesting that the regulatory module mediated by these proteins could represent a distinct mechanism for gene expression control in plants. PMID:25281686

  17. ATP-dependent Conformational Changes Trigger Substrate Capture and Release by an ECF-type Biotin Transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkenwirth, Friedrich; Sippach, Michael; Landmesser, Heidi; Kirsch, Franziska; Ogienko, Anastasia; Grunzel, Miriam; Kiesler, Cornelia; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen; Schneider, Erwin; Eitinger, Thomas

    2015-07-03

    Energy-coupling factor (ECF) transporters for vitamins and metal ions in prokaryotes consist of two ATP-binding cassette-type ATPases, a substrate-specific transmembrane protein (S component) and a transmembrane protein (T component) that physically interacts with the ATPases and the S component. The mechanism of ECF transporters was analyzed upon reconstitution of a bacterial biotin transporter into phospholipid bilayer nanodiscs. ATPase activity was not stimulated by biotin and was only moderately reduced by vanadate. A non-hydrolyzable ATP analog was a competitive inhibitor. As evidenced by cross-linking of monocysteine variants and by site-specific spin labeling of the Q-helix followed by EPR-based interspin distance analyses, closure and reopening of the ATPase dimer (BioM2) was a consequence of ATP binding and hydrolysis, respectively. A previously suggested role of a stretch of small hydrophobic amino acid residues within the first transmembrane segment of the S units for S unit/T unit interactions was structurally and functionally confirmed for the biotin transporter. Cross-linking of this segment in BioY (S) using homobifunctional thiol-reactive reagents to a coupling helix of BioN (T) indicated a reorientation rather than a disruption of the BioY/BioN interface during catalysis. Fluorescence emission of BioY labeled with an environmentally sensitive fluorophore was compatible with an ATP-induced reorientation and consistent with a hypothesized toppling mechanism. As demonstrated by [(3)H]biotin capture assays, ATP binding stimulated substrate capture by the transporter, and subsequent ATP hydrolysis led to substrate release. Our study represents the first experimental insight into the individual steps during the catalytic cycle of an ECF transporter in a lipid environment. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. ATP-dependent Conformational Changes Trigger Substrate Capture and Release by an ECF-type Biotin Transporter*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkenwirth, Friedrich; Sippach, Michael; Landmesser, Heidi; Kirsch, Franziska; Ogienko, Anastasia; Grunzel, Miriam; Kiesler, Cornelia; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen; Schneider, Erwin; Eitinger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Energy-coupling factor (ECF) transporters for vitamins and metal ions in prokaryotes consist of two ATP-binding cassette-type ATPases, a substrate-specific transmembrane protein (S component) and a transmembrane protein (T component) that physically interacts with the ATPases and the S component. The mechanism of ECF transporters was analyzed upon reconstitution of a bacterial biotin transporter into phospholipid bilayer nanodiscs. ATPase activity was not stimulated by biotin and was only moderately reduced by vanadate. A non-hydrolyzable ATP analog was a competitive inhibitor. As evidenced by cross-linking of monocysteine variants and by site-specific spin labeling of the Q-helix followed by EPR-based interspin distance analyses, closure and reopening of the ATPase dimer (BioM2) was a consequence of ATP binding and hydrolysis, respectively. A previously suggested role of a stretch of small hydrophobic amino acid residues within the first transmembrane segment of the S units for S unit/T unit interactions was structurally and functionally confirmed for the biotin transporter. Cross-linking of this segment in BioY (S) using homobifunctional thiol-reactive reagents to a coupling helix of BioN (T) indicated a reorientation rather than a disruption of the BioY/BioN interface during catalysis. Fluorescence emission of BioY labeled with an environmentally sensitive fluorophore was compatible with an ATP-induced reorientation and consistent with a hypothesized toppling mechanism. As demonstrated by [3H]biotin capture assays, ATP binding stimulated substrate capture by the transporter, and subsequent ATP hydrolysis led to substrate release. Our study represents the first experimental insight into the individual steps during the catalytic cycle of an ECF transporter in a lipid environment. PMID:25991724

  19. The extent to which ATP demand controls the glycolytic flux depends strongly on the organism and conditions for growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Købmann, Brian Jensen; Westerhoff, H.V.; Snoep, J.L.

    2002-01-01

    Using molecular genetics we have introduced uncoupled ATPase activity in two different bacterial species, Escherichia coli and Lactococcus lactis, and determined the elasticities of the growth rate and glycolytic flux towards the intracellular [ATP]/[ADP] ratio. During balanced growth in batch cu...

  20. Glucocorticoid receptor binding to chromatin is selectively controlled by the coregulator Hic-5 and chromatin remodeling enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Brian H; Stallcup, Michael R

    2017-06-02

    The steroid hormone-activated glucocorticoid receptor (GR) regulates cellular stress pathways by binding to genomic regulatory elements of target genes and recruiting coregulator proteins to remodel chromatin and regulate transcription complex assembly. The coregulator hydrogen peroxide-inducible clone 5 (Hic-5) is required for glucocorticoid (GC) regulation of some genes but not others and blocks the regulation of a third gene set by inhibiting GR binding. How Hic-5 exerts these gene-specific effects and specifically how it blocks GR binding to some genes but not others is unclear. Here we show that site-specific blocking of GR binding is due to gene-specific requirements for ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes. By depletion of 11 different chromatin remodelers, we found that ATPases chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 9 (CHD9) and Brahma homologue (BRM, a product of the SMARCA2 gene) are required for GC-regulated expression of the blocked genes but not for other GC-regulated genes. Furthermore, CHD9 and BRM were required for GR occupancy and chromatin remodeling at GR-binding regions associated with blocked genes but not at GR-binding regions associated with other GC-regulated genes. Hic-5 selectively inhibits GR interaction with CHD9 and BRM, thereby blocking chromatin remodeling and robust GR binding at GR-binding sites associated with blocked genes. Thus, Hic-5 regulates GR binding site selection by a novel mechanism, exploiting gene-specific requirements for chromatin remodeling enzymes to selectively influence DNA occupancy and gene regulation by a transcription factor. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. The First Archaeal ATP-Dependent Glucokinase, from the Hyperthermophilic Crenarchaeon Aeropyrum pernix, Represents a Monomeric, Extremely Thermophilic ROK Glucokinase with Broad Hexose Specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Thomas; Reichstein, Bianca; Schmid, Roland; Schönheit, Peter

    2002-01-01

    An ATP-dependent glucokinase of the hyperthermophilic aerobic crenarchaeon Aeropyrum pernix was purified 230-fold to homogeneity. The enzyme is a monomeric protein with an apparent molecular mass of about 36 kDa. The apparent Km values for ATP and glucose (at 90°C and pH 6.2) were 0.42 and 0.044 mM, respectively; the apparent Vmax was about 35 U/mg. The enzyme was specific for ATP as a phosphoryl donor, but showed a broad spectrum for phosphoryl acceptors: in addition to glucose, which showed the highest catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km), the enzyme also phosphorylates glucosamin, fructose, mannose, and 2-deoxyglucose. Divalent cations were required for maximal activity: Mg2+, which was most effective, could partially be replaced with Co2+, Mn2+, and Ni2+. The enzyme had a temperature optimum of at least 100°C and showed significant thermostability up to 100°C. The coding function of open reading frame (ORF) APE2091 (Y. Kawarabayasi, Y. Hino, H. Horikawa, S. Yamazaki, Y. Haikawa, K. Jin-no, M. Takahashi, M. Sekine, S. Baba, A. Ankai, H. Kosugi, A. Hosoyama, S. Fukui, Y. Nagai, K. Nishijima, H. Nakazawa, M. Takamiya, S. Masuda, T. Funahashi, T. Tanaka, Y. Kudoh, J. Yamazaki, N. Kushida, A. Oguchi, and H. Kikuchi, DNA Res. 6:83-101, 145-152, 1999), previously annotated as gene glk, coding for ATP-glucokinase of A. pernix, was proved by functional expression in Escherichia coli. The purified recombinant ATP-dependent glucokinase showed a 5-kDa higher molecular mass on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, but almost identical kinetic and thermostability properties in comparison to the native enzyme purified from A. pernix. N-terminal amino acid sequence of the native enzyme revealed that the translation start codon is a GTG 171 bp downstream of the annotated start codon of ORF APE2091. The amino acid sequence deduced from the truncated ORF APE2091 revealed sequence similarity to members of the ROK family, which comprise bacterial sugar kinases and

  2. The molecular motor F-ATP synthase is targeted by the tumoricidal protein HAMLET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, James; Sielaff, Hendrik; Nadeem, Aftab; Svanborg, Catharina; Grüber, Gerhard

    2015-05-22

    HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) interacts with multiple tumor cell compartments, affecting cell morphology, metabolism, proteasome function, chromatin structure and viability. This study investigated if these diverse effects of HAMLET might be caused, in part, by a direct effect on the ATP synthase and a resulting reduction in cellular ATP levels. A dose-dependent reduction in cellular ATP levels was detected in A549 lung carcinoma cells, and by confocal microscopy, co-localization of HAMLET with the nucleotide-binding subunits α (non-catalytic) and β (catalytic) of the energy converting F1F0 ATP synthase was detected. As shown by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, HAMLET binds to the F1 domain of the F1F0 ATP synthase with a dissociation constant (KD) of 20.5μM. Increasing concentrations of the tumoricidal protein HAMLET added to the enzymatically active α3β3γ complex of the F-ATP synthase lowered its ATPase activity, demonstrating that HAMLET binding to the F-ATP synthase effects the catalysis of this molecular motor. Single-molecule analysis was applied to study HAMLET-α3β3γ complex interaction. Whereas the α3β3γ complex of the F-ATP synthase rotated in a counterclockwise direction with a mean rotational rate of 3.8±0.7s(-1), no rotation could be observed in the presence of bound HAMLET. Our findings suggest that direct effects of HAMLET on the F-ATP synthase may inhibit ATP-dependent cellular processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Chromatin architecture of the Pitx2 locus requires CTCF and Pitx2 dependent asymmetry that mirrors embryonic gut laterality

    OpenAIRE

    Welsh, Ian C.; Kwak, Hojoong; Chen, Frances L.; Werner, Melissa; Shopland, Lindsay S.; Danko, Charles G.; Lis, John T.; Zhang, Min; Martin, James F.; Kurpios, Natasza A.

    2015-01-01

    Expression of Pitx2 on the left side of the embryo patterns left-right (LR) organs including the dorsal mesentery (DM), whose asymmetric cell behavior directs gut looping. Despite the importance of organ laterality, chromatin-level regulation of Pitx2 remains undefined. Here, we show that genes immediately neighboring Pitx2 in chicken and mouse, including a long noncoding RNA (Pitx2 locus-asymmetric regulated RNA or Playrr), are expressed on the right side and repressed by Pitx2. CRISPR/Cas9 ...

  4. ISWI regulates higher-order chromatin structure and histone H1 assembly in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide F V Corona

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Imitation SWI (ISWI and other ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling factors play key roles in transcription and other processes by altering the structure and positioning of nucleosomes. Recent studies have also implicated ISWI in the regulation of higher-order chromatin structure, but its role in this process remains poorly understood. To clarify the role of ISWI in vivo, we examined defects in chromosome structure and gene expression resulting from the loss of Iswi function in Drosophila. Consistent with a broad role in transcriptional regulation, the expression of a large number of genes is altered in Iswi mutant larvae. The expression of a dominant-negative form of ISWI leads to dramatic alterations in higher-order chromatin structure, including the apparent decondensation of both mitotic and polytene chromosomes. The loss of ISWI function does not cause obvious defects in nucleosome assembly, but results in a significant reduction in the level of histone H1 associated with chromatin in vivo. These findings suggest that ISWI plays a global role in chromatin compaction in vivo by promoting the association of the linker histone H1 with chromatin.

  5. A Functional Switch of NuRD Chromatin Remodeling Complex Subunits Regulates Mouse Cortical Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Nitarska

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Histone modifications and chromatin remodeling represent universal mechanisms by which cells adapt their transcriptional response to rapidly changing environmental conditions. Extensive chromatin remodeling takes place during neuronal development, allowing the transition of pluripotent cells into differentiated neurons. Here, we report that the NuRD complex, which couples ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling with histone deacetylase activity, regulates mouse brain development. Subunit exchange of CHDs, the core ATPase subunits of the NuRD complex, is required for distinct aspects of cortical development. Whereas CHD4 promotes the early proliferation of progenitors, CHD5 facilitates neuronal migration and CHD3 ensures proper layer specification. Inhibition of each CHD leads to defects of neuronal differentiation and migration, which cannot be rescued by expressing heterologous CHDs. Finally, we demonstrate that NuRD complexes containing specific CHDs are recruited to regulatory elements and modulate the expression of genes essential for brain development.

  6. Global quantitative modeling of chromatin factor interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zhou

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin is the driver of gene regulation, yet understanding the molecular interactions underlying chromatin factor combinatorial patterns (or the "chromatin codes" remains a fundamental challenge in chromatin biology. Here we developed a global modeling framework that leverages chromatin profiling data to produce a systems-level view of the macromolecular complex of chromatin. Our model ultilizes maximum entropy modeling with regularization-based structure learning to statistically dissect dependencies between chromatin factors and produce an accurate probability distribution of chromatin code. Our unsupervised quantitative model, trained on genome-wide chromatin profiles of 73 histone marks and chromatin proteins from modENCODE, enabled making various data-driven inferences about chromatin profiles and interactions. We provided a highly accurate predictor of chromatin factor pairwise interactions validated by known experimental evidence, and for the first time enabled higher-order interaction prediction. Our predictions can thus help guide future experimental studies. The model can also serve as an inference engine for predicting unknown chromatin profiles--we demonstrated that with this approach we can leverage data from well-characterized cell types to help understand less-studied cell type or conditions.

  7. Global Quantitative Modeling of Chromatin Factor Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian; Troyanskaya, Olga G.

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin is the driver of gene regulation, yet understanding the molecular interactions underlying chromatin factor combinatorial patterns (or the “chromatin codes”) remains a fundamental challenge in chromatin biology. Here we developed a global modeling framework that leverages chromatin profiling data to produce a systems-level view of the macromolecular complex of chromatin. Our model ultilizes maximum entropy modeling with regularization-based structure learning to statistically dissect dependencies between chromatin factors and produce an accurate probability distribution of chromatin code. Our unsupervised quantitative model, trained on genome-wide chromatin profiles of 73 histone marks and chromatin proteins from modENCODE, enabled making various data-driven inferences about chromatin profiles and interactions. We provided a highly accurate predictor of chromatin factor pairwise interactions validated by known experimental evidence, and for the first time enabled higher-order interaction prediction. Our predictions can thus help guide future experimental studies. The model can also serve as an inference engine for predicting unknown chromatin profiles — we demonstrated that with this approach we can leverage data from well-characterized cell types to help understand less-studied cell type or conditions. PMID:24675896

  8. Erythrocyte-dependent regulation of human skeletal muscle blood flow: role of varied oxyhemoglobin and exercise on nitrite, S-nitrosohemoglobin, and ATP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufour, Stéphane P; Patel, Rakesh P; Brandon, Angela; Teng, Xinjun; Pearson, James; Barker, Horace; Ali, Leena; Yuen, Ada H Y; Smolenski, Ryszard T; González-Alonso, José

    2010-12-01

    The erythrocyte is proposed to play a key role in the control of local tissue perfusion via three O(2)-dependent signaling mechanisms: 1) reduction of circulating nitrite to vasoactive NO, 2) S-nitrosohemoglobin (SNO-Hb)-dependent vasodilatation, and 3) release of the vasodilator and sympatholytic ATP; however, their relative roles in vivo remain unclear. Here we evaluated each mechanism to gain insight into their roles in the regulation of human skeletal muscle blood flow during hypoxia and hyperoxia at rest and during exercise. Arterial and femoral venous hemoglobin O(2) saturation (O(2)Hb), plasma and erythrocyte NO and ATP metabolites, and leg and systemic hemodynamics were measured in 10 healthy males exposed to graded hypoxia, normoxia, and graded hyperoxia both at rest and during submaximal one-legged knee-extensor exercise. At rest, leg blood flow and NO and ATP metabolites in plasma and erythrocytes remained unchanged despite large alterations in O(2)Hb. During exercise, however, leg and systemic perfusion and vascular conductance increased in direct proportion to decreases in arterial and venous O(2)Hb (r(2) = 0.86-0.98; P = 0.01), decreases in venous plasma nitrite (r(2) = 0.93; P < 0.01), increases in venous erythrocyte nitroso species (r(2) = 0.74; P < 0.05), and to a lesser extent increases in erythrocyte SNO (r(2) = 0.59; P = 0.07). No relationship was observed with plasma ATP (r(2) = 0.01; P = 0.99) or its degradation compounds. These in vivo data indicate that, during low-intensity exercise and hypoxic stress, but not hypoxic stress alone, plasma nitrite consumption and formation of erythrocyte nitroso species are associated with limb vasodilatation and increased blood flow in the human skeletal muscle vasculature.

  9. Erythrocyte-dependent regulation of human skeletal muscle blood flow: role of varied oxyhemoglobin and exercise on nitrite, S-nitrosohemoglobin, and ATP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rakesh P.; Brandon, Angela; Teng, Xinjun; Pearson, James; Barker, Horace; Ali, Leena; Yuen, Ada H. Y.; Smolenski, Ryszard T.; González-Alonso, José

    2010-01-01

    The erythrocyte is proposed to play a key role in the control of local tissue perfusion via three O2-dependent signaling mechanisms: 1) reduction of circulating nitrite to vasoactive NO, 2) S-nitrosohemoglobin (SNO-Hb)-dependent vasodilatation, and 3) release of the vasodilator and sympatholytic ATP; however, their relative roles in vivo remain unclear. Here we evaluated each mechanism to gain insight into their roles in the regulation of human skeletal muscle blood flow during hypoxia and hyperoxia at rest and during exercise. Arterial and femoral venous hemoglobin O2 saturation (O2Hb), plasma and erythrocyte NO and ATP metabolites, and leg and systemic hemodynamics were measured in 10 healthy males exposed to graded hypoxia, normoxia, and graded hyperoxia both at rest and during submaximal one-legged knee-extensor exercise. At rest, leg blood flow and NO and ATP metabolites in plasma and erythrocytes remained unchanged despite large alterations in O2Hb. During exercise, however, leg and systemic perfusion and vascular conductance increased in direct proportion to decreases in arterial and venous O2Hb (r2 = 0.86–0.98; P = 0.01), decreases in venous plasma nitrite (r2 = 0.93; P erythrocyte nitroso species (r2 = 0.74; P erythrocyte SNO (r2 = 0.59; P = 0.07). No relationship was observed with plasma ATP (r2 = 0.01; P = 0.99) or its degradation compounds. These in vivo data indicate that, during low-intensity exercise and hypoxic stress, but not hypoxic stress alone, plasma nitrite consumption and formation of erythrocyte nitroso species are associated with limb vasodilatation and increased blood flow in the human skeletal muscle vasculature. PMID:20852046

  10. PRC2 and SWI/SNF Chromatin Remodeling Complexes in Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadoch, Cigall; Copeland, Robert A; Keilhack, Heike

    2016-03-22

    The dynamic structure of histones and DNA, also known as chromatin, is regulated by two classes of enzymes: those that mediate covalent modifications on either histone proteins or DNA and those that use the energy generated by ATP hydrolysis to mechanically alter chromatic structure. Both classes of enzymes are often found in large protein complexes. In this review, we describe two such complexes: polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), with the protein methyltransferase EZH2 as its catalytic subunit, and the ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler switch/sucrose non-fermentable (SWI/SNF). EZH2 catalyzes the methylation of lysine 27 on histone H3, a covalent chromatin modification that is associated with repressed heterochromatin. The catalytic activity of SWI/SNF, in contrast, leads to a state of open chromatin associated with active transcription. In this review, we discuss the biochemical properties of both complexes, outline the principles of their regulation, and describe their opposing roles in normal development, which can be perturbed in disease settings such as cancer.

  11. A Kir6.2 pore mutation causes inactivation of ATP-sensitive potassium channels by disrupting PIP2-dependent gating.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy D Bushman

    Full Text Available In the absence of intracellular nucleotides, ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP channels exhibit spontaneous activity via a phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2-dependent gating process. Previous studies show that stability of this activity requires subunit-subunit interactions in the cytoplasmic domain of Kir6.2; selective mutagenesis and disease mutations at the subunit interface result in time-dependent channel inactivation. Here, we report that mutation of the central glycine in the pore-lining second transmembrane segment (TM2 to proline in Kir6.2 causes KATP channel inactivation. Unlike C-type inactivation, a consequence of selectivity filter closure, in many K(+ channels, the rate of inactivation in G156P channels was insensitive to changes in extracellular ion concentrations or ion species fluxing through the pore. Instead, the rate of G156P inactivation decreased with exogenous application of PIP2 and increased when PIP2-channel interaction was inhibited with neomycin or poly-L-lysine. These findings indicate the G156P mutation reduces the ability of PIP2 to stabilize the open state of KATP channels, similar to mutations in the cytoplasmic domain that produce inactivation. Consistent with this notion, when PIP2-dependent open state stability was substantially increased by addition of a second gain-of-function mutation, G156P inactivation was abolished. Importantly, bath application and removal of Mg(2+-free ATP or a nonhydrolyzable analog of ATP, which binds to the cytoplasmic domain of Kir6.2 and causes channel closure, recover G156P channel from inactivation, indicating crosstalk between cytoplasmic and transmembrane domains. The G156P mutation provides mechanistic insight into the structural and functional interactions between the pore and cytoplasmic domains of Kir6.2 during gating.

  12. RIG-I forms signaling-competent filaments in an ATP-dependent, ubiquitin-independent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peisley, Alys; Wu, Bin; Yao, Hui; Walz, Thomas; Hur, Sun

    2013-09-12

    Retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 (RIG-I) and melanoma differentiation-associated protein 5 (MDA5) are paralogous receptors for viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) with divergent specificity. We have previously shown that MDA5 forms filaments upon viral dsRNA recognition and that this filament formation is essential for interferon signal activation. Here, we show that while RIG-I binds to a dsRNA end as a monomer in the absence of ATP, it assembles in the presence of ATP into a filament that propagates from the dsRNA end to the interior. Furthermore, RIG-I filaments directly stimulate mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) filament formation without any cofactor, such as polyubiquitin chains, and forced juxtaposition of the isolated signaling domain of RIG-I, as it would be in the filament, is sufficient to activate interferon signaling. Our findings thus define filamentous architecture as a common yet versatile molecular platform for divergent viral RNA detection and proximity-induced signal activation by RIG-I and MDA5. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Identification of critical amino acids in the proximal C-terminal of TREK-2 K+ channel for activation by acidic pHi and ATP-dependent inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Joohan; Jun, Young Keul; Zhang, Yin-Hua; Nam, Joo Hyun; Shin, Dong Hoon; Kim, Sung Joon

    2018-02-01

    TWIK-related two-pore domain K+ channels (TREKs) are regulated by intracellular pH (pHi) and Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2). Previously, Glu306 in proximal C-terminal (pCt) of mouse TREK-1 was identified as the pHi-sensing residue. The direction of PI(4,5)P2 sensitivity is controversial, and we have recently shown that TREKs are inhibited by intracellular ATP via endogenous PI(4,5)P2 formation. Here we investigate the anionic and cationic residues of pCt for the pHi and ATP-sensitivity in human TREK-2 (hTREK-2). In inside-out patch clamp recordings (ITREK-2,i-o), acidic pHi-induced activation was absent in E332A and was partly attenuated in E335A. Neutralization of cationic Lys (K330A) also eliminated the acidic pHi sensitivity of ITREK-2,i-o. Unlike the inhibition of wild-type (WT) ITREK-2,i-o by intracellular ATP, neither E332A nor K330A was sensitive to ATP. Nevertheless, exogenous PI(4,5)P2 (10 μM) abolished ITREK-2 i-o in all the above mutants as well as in WT, indicating unspecific inhibition by exogenous PI(4,5)P2. In whole-cell recordings of TREK-2 (ITREK-2,w-c), K330A and E332A showed higher or fully active basal activity, showing attenuated or insignificant activation by 2-APB, arachidonic acid, or acidic pHe 6.9. ITREK-1,w-c of WT is largely suppressed by pHe 6.9, and the inhibition is slightly attenuated in K312A and E315A. The results show concerted roles of the oppositely charged Lys and Glu in pCt for the ATP-dependent low basal activity and pHi sensitivity.

  14. ATP-dependent arsenical pumps, gene products of the arsenical resistance operon of R-factor R773

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C.M.; San Francisco, M.J.D.; Weigel, U.; Rosen, B.P.

    1986-05-01

    Plasmid-encoded resistance to antibiotics and heavy metals is frequently through synthesis of new transport systems for extrusion of the toxic compound. The inducible arsenical resistance (ars) operon of the conjugative R-factor R773 encodes two transport systems: one for arsenate and one for arsenite. In vivo studies of the energetics of arsenical extrusion have suggested that ATP is the driving force and that a PNF is neither necessary nor sufficient. The 4.3 Kb HindIII fragment containing the ars operon was cloned into M13 mWB2348 in both orientations, a series of ordered deletions were created using Ba131 digestion, and the sequence of the operon determined. Four open reading frames, arsA, B, C, and D, were found. From genetic evidence, the ArsA and B proteins comprise the arsenite pump, while the ArsC and D proteins are involved in arsenate pumping. The arsA ORF encodes a soluble protein of 63,167 Da with two potential adenylate binding sites. The ArsA protein was purified from the cytosol and shown to bind ATP. The arsB ORF encodes a membrane protein of 31,197 Da. The arsC ORF encodes a membrane protein of 17,311 Da. Mini-Nu phage transposition was used to create gene fusions between the arsC gene and lacZ. By immunoprecipitation and immunoblots using anti-..beta..-galactosidase serum, this strain was shown to produce a 133 kDa hybrid protein localized in inner membrane and not found in the cytosol. The arsD ORF encodes a 15,811 Da soluble protein. The ArsD protein has been purified from the cytosol. In summary, the data suggest that the ars operon produces a single transcript for the synthesis of two resistances and two anion pumps.

  15. The CSB chromatin remodeler and CTCF architectural protein cooperate in response to oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Robert J; Boetefuer, Erica L; Won, Kyoung-Jae; Fan, Hua-Ying

    2016-03-18

    Cockayne syndrome is a premature aging disease associated with numerous developmental and neurological abnormalities, and elevated levels of reactive oxygen species have been found in cells derived from Cockayne syndrome patients. The majority of Cockayne syndrome cases contain mutations in the ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler CSB; however, how CSB protects cells from oxidative stress remains largely unclear. Here, we demonstrate that oxidative stress alters the genomic occupancy of the CSB protein and increases CSB occupancy at promoters. Additionally, we found that the long-range chromatin-structure regulator CTCF plays a pivotal role in regulating sites of genomic CSB occupancy upon oxidative stress. We show that CSB directly interacts with CTCF in vitro and that oxidative stress enhances the CSB-CTCF interaction in cells. Reciprocally, we demonstrate that CSB facilitates CTCF-DNA interactions in vitro and regulates CTCF-chromatin interactions in oxidatively stressed cells. Together, our results indicate that CSB and CTCF can regulate each other's chromatin association, thereby modulating chromatin structure and coordinating gene expression in response to oxidative stress. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. Silibinin, a natural flavonoid, induces autophagy via ROS-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction and loss of ATP involving BNIP3 in human MCF7 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Kai; Wang, Wei; Jin, Xin; Wang, Zhaoyang; Ji, Zhiwei; Meng, Guanmin

    2015-06-01

    Silibinin, derived from the milk thistle plant (Silybum marianum), has anticancer and chemopreventive properties. Silibinin has been reported to inhibit the growth of various types of cancer cells. However, the mechanisms by which silibinin exerts an anticancer effect are poorly defined. The present study aimed to investigate whether silibinin-induced cell death might be attributed to autophagy and the underlying mechanisms in human MCF7 breast cancer cells. Our results showed that silibinin-induced cell death was greatly abrogated by two specific autophagy inhibitors, 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and bafilomycin-A1 (Baf-A1). In addition, silibinin triggered the conversion of light chain 3 (LC3)-I to LC3-II, promoted the upregulation of Atg12-Atg5 formation, increased Beclin-1 expression, and decreased the Bcl-2 level. Moreover, we noted elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, concomitant with the dissipation of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) and a drastic decline in ATP levels following silibinin treatment, which were effectively prevented by the antioxidants, N-acetylcysteine and ascorbic acid. Silibinin stimulated the expression of Bcl-2 adenovirus E1B 19-kDa-interacting protein 3 (BNIP3), a pro-death Bcl-2 family member, and silencing of BNIP3 greatly inhibited silibinin-induced cell death, decreased ROS production, and sustained ΔΨm and ATP levels. Taken together, these findings revealed that silibinin induced autophagic cell death through ROS-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction and ATP depletion involving BNIP3 in MCF7 cells.

  17. The NF-κB-dependent and -independent transcriptome and chromatin landscapes of human coronavirus 229E-infected cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Poppe

    2017-03-01

    host cellular chromatin landscape, thereby orchestrating the timely coordinated expression of genes involved in multiple signaling, immunoregulatory and metabolic processes.

  18. Context-dependent codon partition models provide significant increases in model fit in atpB and rbcL protein-coding genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baele, Guy; Van de Peer, Yves; Vansteelandt, Stijn

    2011-05-27

    Accurate modelling of substitution processes in protein-coding sequences is often hampered by the computational burdens associated with full codon models. Lately, codon partition models have been proposed as a viable alternative, mimicking the substitution behaviour of codon models at a low computational cost. Such codon partition models however impose independent evolution of the different codon positions, which is overly restrictive from a biological point of view. Given that empirical research has provided indications of context-dependent substitution patterns at four-fold degenerate sites, we take those indications into account in this paper. We present so-called context-dependent codon partition models to assess previous empirical claims that the evolution of four-fold degenerate sites is strongly dependent on the composition of its two flanking bases. To this end, we have estimated and compared various existing independent models, codon models, codon partition models and context-dependent codon partition models for the atpB and rbcL genes of the chloroplast genome, which are frequently used in plant systematics. Such context-dependent codon partition models employ a full dependency scheme for four-fold degenerate sites, whilst maintaining the independence assumption for the first and second codon positions. We show that, both in the atpB and rbcL alignments of a collection of land plants, these context-dependent codon partition models significantly improve model fit over existing codon partition models. Using Bayes factors based on thermodynamic integration, we show that in both datasets the same context-dependent codon partition model yields the largest increase in model fit compared to an independent evolutionary model. Context-dependent codon partition models hence perform closer to codon models, which remain the best performing models at a drastically increased computational cost, compared to codon partition models, but remain computationally interesting

  19. [Comparative study of calixarene effect on Mg2+ -dependent ATP-hydrolase enzymatic systems from smooth muscle cells of the uterus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labyntseva, R D; Slinchenko, N M; Veklich, T O; Rodik, R V; Cherenok, S O; Boĭko, V I; Kal'chenko, V I; Kosterin, S O

    2007-01-01

    Investigation the influence of calyx[4]arenes C-90, C-91, C-97 and C-99 (codes are indicated) on the enzymatic activity of four functionally different Mg2+ -dependent ATPases from smooth muscle of the uterus: actomyosin ATPase, transporting Ca2+, Mg2+ -ATPase, ouabain-sensible Na+, K+ -ATPase and basal Mg2+ -ATPase. It was shown that calixarenes C-90 and C-91 in concentration 100 microM act multidirectionally on the functionally different Mg2+ -dependent ATP-hydrolase enzymatic systems. These compounds activate effectively the actomyosin ATPase (Ka = 52 +/- 11 microM [Ukrainian character: see text] 8 +/- 2 microM, accordingly), at the same time calixarene C-90 inhibited effectively activity of transporting Ca2+, Mg2+ -ATPase of plasmatic membranes (I(0,5) = 34.6 +/- 6.4 microM), but influence on membrane-bound Na+, K+ -ATPase and basal Mg2+ -ATPase. Calixarene C-91 reduce effectively basal Mg2+ -ATPase activity, insignificantly activating Na+, K+ -ATPase but has no influence on transporting Ca2+, Mg2+ -ATPase activity of plasmatic membranes. Calixarenes C-97 and C-99 (100 microM), which have similar structure, have monodirectional influence on activity of three functionally different Mg2+-dependent ATPases of the myometrium: actomyosin ATPase and two ATPases, that related to the ATP-hydrolases of P-type--Ca2+, Mg2+ -ATPase and Na+, K+ -ATPase of plasmatic membranes. Basal Mg2+ -ATPase is resistant to the action of these two connections. Results of comparative experiments that were obtained by catalytic titration of calixarenes C-97 and C-99 by actomyosin ATPase (I(0,5) = 88 +/- 9 and 86 +/- 8 microM accordingly) and Na+, K+ -ATPase from plasmatic membranes (I(0,5) = 33 +/- 4 and 98 +/- 8 nM accordingly) indicate to the considerably more sensitiveness of Na+, K+ -ATP-ase to these calixarenes than ATPase of contractile proteins. Thus, it is shown that calixarenes have influence on activity of a number of important enzymes, involved in functioning of the smooth muscle

  20. Proteomics of a fuzzy organelle: interphase chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustatscher, Georg; Hégarat, Nadia; Wills, Karen L H; Furlan, Cristina; Bukowski-Wills, Jimi-Carlo; Hochegger, Helfrid; Rappsilber, Juri

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin proteins mediate replication, regulate expression, and ensure integrity of the genome. So far, a comprehensive inventory of interphase chromatin has not been determined. This is largely due to its heterogeneous and dynamic composition, which makes conclusive biochemical purification difficult, if not impossible. As a fuzzy organelle, it defies classical organellar proteomics and cannot be described by a single and ultimate list of protein components. Instead, we propose a new approach that provides a quantitative assessment of a protein's probability to function in chromatin. We integrate chromatin composition over a range of different biochemical and biological conditions. This resulted in interphase chromatin probabilities for 7635 human proteins, including 1840 previously uncharacterized proteins. We demonstrate the power of our large-scale data-driven annotation during the analysis of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) regulation in chromatin. Quantitative protein ontologies may provide a general alternative to list-based investigations of organelles and complement Gene Ontology. PMID:24534090

  1. Identification of novel oxidized protein substrates and physiological partners of the mitochondrial ATP-dependent Lon-like protease Pim1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayot, Aurélien; Gareil, Monique; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2010-01-01

    ATP-dependent proteases are currently emerging as key regulators of mitochondrial functions. Among these proteolytic systems, Pim1, a Lon-like serine protease in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is involved in the control of selective protein turnover in the mitochondrial matrix. In the absence of Pim1......, yeast cells have been shown to accumulate electron-dense inclusion bodies in the matrix space, to lose integrity of mitochondrial genome, and to be respiration-deficient. Because of the severity of phenotypes associated with the depletion of Pim1, this protease appears to be an essential component...... of oxidized protein substrates and physiological partners of Pim1 protease under non-repressing growth conditions. The results presented here supply evidence that Pim1-mediated proteolysis is required for elimination of oxidatively damaged proteins in mitochondria....

  2. Kinetic proofreading of chromatin remodeling: from gene activation to gene repression and back

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghvendra P Singh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling is the active displacement of nucleosomes along or off DNA induced by chromatin remodeling complexes. This key process of gene regulation in eukaryote organisms has recently been argued to be controlled by a kinetic proofreading mechanism. In this paper we present a discussion of the current understanding of this process. We review the case of gene repression via heterochromatin formation by remodelers from the ISWI family and then discuss the activation of the IFN-β gene, where the displacement of the nucleosome is initiated by histone tail acetylations by the enzyme GCN5 which are required for the recruitment of SWI-SNF remodelers. We quantify the speci city of the acetylation step in the remodeling process by peptide docking simulations.

  3. Chromatin is wonderful stuff.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Driel, R.

    2007-01-01

    Chromatin molecules have properties that set them aside from all other biomacromolecules in the cell. (i) Chromosomes, which are single chromatin molecules, are the largest macromolecules in eukaryotic cells. (ii) Chromatin molecules carry the cell's genetic and epigenetic information and all

  4. Upregulation of Ca2+ removal in human skeletal muscle: a possible role for Ca2+-dependent priming of mitochondrial ATP synthesis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, W.J.H.; Renders, M.; Oosterhof, A.; Kuppevelt, A.H.M.S.M. van; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Willems, P.H.G.M.

    2003-01-01

    In muscle, ATP is required for the powerstroke of the myosin head, the detachment of actin and myosin filaments, and the reuptake of Ca2+ into the sarcoplasmic reticulum. During contraction-relaxation, large amounts of ATP are consumed at the sites of action of the myosin-ATPase and sarcoplasmic

  5. Rad51 ATP binding but not hydrolysis is required to recruit Rad10 in synthesis-dependent strand annealing sites in S. cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlin, Justin; Fischhaber, Paula L

    2013-06-01

    Several modes of eukaryotic of DNA double strand break repair (DSBR) depend on synapsis of complementary DNA. The Rad51 ATPase, the S. cerevisiae homolog of E. coli RecA, plays a key role in this process by catalyzing homology searching and strand exchange between an invading DNA strand and a repair template (e.g. sister chromatid or homologous chromosome). Synthesis dependent strand annealing (SDSA), a mode of DSBR, requires Rad51. Another repair enzyme, the Rad1-Rad10 endonuclease, acts in the final stages of SDSA, hydrolyzing 3' overhanging single-stranded DNA. Here we show in vivo by fluorescence microscopy that the ATP binding function of yeast Rad51 is required to recruit Rad10 SDSA sites indicating that Rad51 pre-synaptic filament formation must occur prior to the recruitment of Rad1-Rad10. Our data also show that Rad51 ATPase activity, an important step in Rad51 filament disassembly, is not absolutely required in order to recruit Rad1-Rad10 to DSB sites.

  6. Chromatin Remodelers: From Function to Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gernot Längst

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin remodelers are key players in the regulation of chromatin accessibility and nucleosome positioning on the eukaryotic DNA, thereby essential for all DNA dependent biological processes. Thus, it is not surprising that upon of deregulation of those molecular machines healthy cells can turn into cancerous cells. Even though the remodeling enzymes are very abundant and a multitude of different enzymes and chromatin remodeling complexes exist in the cell, the particular remodeling complex with its specific nucleosome positioning features must be at the right place at the right time in order to ensure the proper regulation of the DNA dependent processes. To achieve this, chromatin remodeling complexes harbor protein domains that specifically read chromatin targeting signals, such as histone modifications, DNA sequence/structure, non-coding RNAs, histone variants or DNA bound interacting proteins. Recent studies reveal the interaction between non-coding RNAs and chromatin remodeling complexes showing importance of RNA in remodeling enzyme targeting, scaffolding and regulation. In this review, we summarize current understanding of chromatin remodeling enzyme targeting to chromatin and their role in cancer development.

  7. Chromatin Structure and Function

    CERN Document Server

    Wolffe, Alan P

    1999-01-01

    The Third Edition of Chromatin: Structure and Function brings the reader up-to-date with the remarkable progress in chromatin research over the past three years. It has been extensively rewritten to cover new material on chromatin remodeling, histone modification, nuclear compartmentalization, DNA methylation, and transcriptional co-activators and co-repressors. The book is written in a clear and concise fashion, with 60 new illustrations. Chromatin: Structure and Function provides the reader with a concise and coherent account of the nature, structure, and assembly of chromatin and its active

  8. Defects in SPT16 or POB3 (yFACT) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cause dependence on the Hir/Hpc pathway: polymerase passage may degrade chromatin structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formosa, Tim; Ruone, Susan; Adams, Melissa D; Olsen, Aileen E; Eriksson, Peter; Yu, Yaxin; Rhoades, Alison R; Kaufman, Paul D; Stillman, David J

    2002-12-01

    Spt16/Cdc68, Pob3, and Nhp6 collaborate in vitro and in vivo as the yeast factor SPN, which is homologous to human FACT. SPN/FACT complexes mediate passage of polymerases through nucleosomes and are important for both transcription and replication. An spt16 mutation was found to be intolerable when combined with a mutation in any member of the set of functionally related genes HIR1, HIR2/SPT1, HIR3/HPC1, or HPC2. Mutations in POB3, but not in NHP6A/B, also display strong synthetic defects with hir/hpc mutations. A screen for other mutations that cause dependence on HIR/HPC genes revealed genes encoding members of the Paf1 complex, which also promotes transcriptional elongation. The Hir/Hpc proteins affect the expression of histone genes and also promote normal deposition of nucleosomes; either role could explain an interaction with elongation factors. We show that both spt16 and pob3 mutants respond to changes in histone gene numbers, but in opposite ways, suggesting that Spt16 and Pob3 each interact with histones but perhaps with different subsets of these proteins. Supporting this, spt16 and pob3 mutants also display different sensitivities to mutations in the N-terminal tails of histones H3 and H4 and to mutations in enzymes that modulate acetylation of these tails. Our results support a model in which SPN/FACT has two functions: it disrupts nucleosomes to allow polymerases to access DNA, and it reassembles the nucleosomes afterward. Mutations that impair the reassembly activity cause chromatin to accumulate in an abnormally disrupted state, imposing a requirement for a nucleosome reassembly function that we propose is provided by Hir/Hpc proteins.

  9. Dbp6p Is an Essential Putative ATP-Dependent RNA Helicase Required for 60S-Ribosomal-Subunit Assembly in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kressler, Dieter; de la Cruz, Jesús; Rojo, Manuel; Linder, Patrick

    1998-01-01

    A previously uncharacterized Saccharomyces cerevisiae open reading frame, YNR038W, was analyzed in the context of the European Functional Analysis Network. YNR038W encodes a putative ATP-dependent RNA helicase of the DEAD-box protein family and was therefore named DBP6 (DEAD-box protein 6). Dbp6p is essential for cell viability. In vivo depletion of Dbp6p results in a deficit in 60S ribosomal subunits and the appearance of half-mer polysomes. Pulse-chase labeling of pre-rRNA and steady-state analysis of pre-rRNA and mature rRNA by Northern hybridization and primer extension show that Dbp6p depletion leads to decreased production of the 27S and 7S precursors, resulting in a depletion of the mature 25S and 5.8S rRNAs. Furthermore, hemagglutinin epitope-tagged Dbp6p is detected exclusively within the nucleolus. We propose that Dbp6p is required for the proper assembly of preribosomal particles during the biogenesis of 60S ribosomal subunits, probably by acting as an rRNA helicase. PMID:9528757

  10. Glucose-dependent de novo lipogenesis in B lymphocytes: a requirement for atp-citrate lyase in lipopolysaccharide-induced differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufort, Fay J; Gumina, Maria R; Ta, Nathan L; Tao, Yongzhen; Heyse, Shannon A; Scott, David A; Richardson, Adam D; Seyfried, Thomas N; Chiles, Thomas C

    2014-03-07

    Bacterially derived lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulates naive B lymphocytes to differentiate into immunoglobulin (Ig)-secreting plasma cells. Differentiation of B lymphocytes is characterized by a proliferative phase followed by expansion of the intracellular membrane secretory network to support Ig production. A key question in lymphocyte biology is how naive B cells reprogram metabolism to support de novo lipogenesis necessary for proliferation and expansion of the endomembrane network in response to LPS. We report that extracellularly acquired glucose is metabolized, in part, to support de novo lipogenesis in response to LPS stimulation of splenic B lymphocytes. LPS stimulation leads to increased levels of endogenous ATP-citrate lyase (ACLY), and this is accompanied by increased ACLY enzymatic activity. ACLY produces cytosolic acetyl-CoA from mitochondrially derived citrate. Inhibition of ACLY activity in LPS-stimulated B cells with the selective inhibitor 2-hydroxy-N-arylbenzenesulfonamide (compound-9; C-9) blocks glucose incorporation into de novo lipid biosynthesis, including cholesterol, free fatty acids, and neutral and acidic phospholipids. Moreover, inhibition of ACLY activity in splenic B cells results in inhibition of proliferation and defective endomembrane expansion and reduced expression of CD138 and Blimp-1, markers for plasma-like B cell differentiation. ACLY activity is also required for LPS-induced IgM production in CH12 B lymphoma cells. These data demonstrate that ACLY mediates glucose-dependent de novo lipogenesis in response to LPS signaling and identify a role for ACLY in several phenotypic changes that define plasma cell differentiation.

  11. The ATP-dependent RNA helicase HrpB plays an important role in motility and biofilm formation in Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granato, Laís Moreira; Picchi, Simone Cristina; Andrade, Maxuel de Oliveira; Takita, Marco Aurélio; de Souza, Alessandra Alves; Wang, Nian; Machado, Marcos Antonio

    2016-03-23

    RNA helicases are enzymes that catalyze the separation of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) using the free energy of ATP binding and hydrolysis. DEAD/DEAH families participate in many different aspects of RNA metabolism, including RNA synthesis, RNA folding, RNA-RNA interactions, RNA localization and RNA degradation. Several important bacterial DEAD/DEAH-box RNA helicases have been extensively studied. In this study, we characterize the ATP-dependent RNA helicase encoded by the hrpB (XAC0293) gene using deletion and genetic complementation assays. We provide insights into the function of the hrpB gene in Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri by investigating the roles of hrpB in biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces and host leaves, cell motility, host virulence of the citrus canker bacterium and growth in planta. The hrpB gene is highly conserved in the sequenced strains of Xanthomonas. Mutation of the hrpB gene (∆hrpB) resulted in a significant reduction in biofilms on abiotic surfaces and host leaves. ∆hrpB also exhibited increased cell dispersion on solid medium plates. ∆hrpB showed reduced adhesion on biotic and abiotic surfaces and delayed development in disease symptoms when sprayed on susceptible citrus leaves. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR assays indicated that deletion of hrpB reduced the expression of four type IV pili genes. The transcriptional start site of fimA (XAC3241) was determined using rapid amplification of 5'-cDNA Ends (5'RACE). Based on the results of fimA mRNA structure predictions, the fimA 5' UTR may contain three different loops. HrpB may be involved in alterations to the structure of fimA mRNA that promote the stability of fimA RNA. Our data show that hrpB is involved in adherence of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri to different surfaces. In addition, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that a DEAH RNA helicase has been implicated in the regulation of type IV pili in Xanthomonas.

  12. period -1 encodes an ATP-dependent RNA helicase that influences nutritional compensation of the Neurospora circadian clock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emerson, Jillian M.; Bartholomai, Bradley M.; Ringelberg, Carol S.; Baker, Scott E.; Loros, Jennifer J.; Dunlap, Jay C.

    2015-12-08

    Mutants in the period-1 (prd-1) gene, characterized by a recessive allele, display a reduced growth rate and period lengthening of the developmental cycle controlled by the circadian clock. We refined the genetic location of prd-1 and used whole genome sequencing to find the mutation defining it, confirming the identity of prd-1 by rescuing the mutant circadian phenotype via transformation. PRD-1 is an RNA helicase whose orthologs, DDX5 and DDX17 in humans and Dbp2p in yeast, are implicated in various processes including transcriptional regulation, elongation, and termination, 23 ribosome biogenesis, and RNA decay. Although prdi-1smutantssiois an ATP-dependent RNA helicase, member of a sub-family display a long period (~25 hrs) circadian developmental cycle, they interestingly display a wild type period when the core circadian oscillator is tracked using a frq-luciferase transcriptional fusion under conditions of limiting nutritional carbon; the core oscillator runs with a long period under glucose-sufficient conditions. Thus PRD-1 clearly impacts the circadian oscillator and is not only part of a metabolic oscillator ancillary to the core clock. PRD-1 is an essential protein and its expression is neither light-regulated nor clock-regulated. However, it is transiently induced by glucose; in the presence of sufficient glucose PRD-1 is in the nucleus until glucose runs out which elicits its disappearance from the nucleus. Because circadian period length is carbon concentration-dependent, prd­-1 may be formally viewed as clock mutant with defective nutritional compensation of circadian period length.

  13. Involvement of an ATP-dependent carboxylase in a CO2-dependent pathway of acetone metabolism by Xanthobacter strain Py2.

    OpenAIRE

    Sluis, M K; Small, F J; Allen, J R; Ensign, S A

    1996-01-01

    The metabolism of acetone by the aerobic bacterium Xanthobacter strain Py2 was investigated. Cell suspensions of Xanthobacter strain Py2 grown with propylene or glucose as carbon sources were unable to metabolize acetone. The addition of acetone to cultures grown with propylene or glucose resulted in a time-dependent increase in acetone-degrading activity. The degradation of acetone by these cultures was prevented by the addition of rifampin and chloramphenicol, demonstrating that new protein...

  14. Mechanisms of constitutive and ATP-evoked ATP release in neonatal mouse olfactory epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayoz Sébastien

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ATP is an extracellular signaling molecule with many ascribed functions in sensory systems, including the olfactory epithelium. The mechanism(s by which ATP is released in the olfactory epithelium has not been investigated. Quantitative luciferin-luciferase assays were used to monitor ATP release, and confocal imaging of the fluorescent ATP marker quinacrine was used to monitor ATP release via exocytosis in Swiss Webster mouse neonatal olfactory epithelial slices. Results Under control conditions, constitutive release of ATP occurs via exocytosis, hemichannels and ABC transporters and is inhibited by vesicular fusion inhibitor Clostridium difficile toxin A and hemichannel and ABC transporter inhibitor probenecid. Constitutive ATP release is negatively regulated by the ATP breakdown product ADP through activation of P2Y receptors, likely via the cAMP/PKA pathway. In vivo studies indicate that constitutive ATP may play a role in neuronal homeostasis as inhibition of exocytosis inhibited normal proliferation in the OE. ATP-evoked ATP release is also present in mouse neonatal OE, triggered by several ionotropic P2X purinergic receptor agonists (ATP, αβMeATP and Bz-ATP and a G protein-coupled P2Y receptor agonist (UTP. Calcium imaging of P2X2-transfected HEK293 “biosensor” cells confirmed the presence of evoked ATP release. Following purinergic receptor stimulation, ATP is released via calcium-dependent exocytosis, activated P2X1,7 receptors, activated P2X7 receptors that form a complex with pannexin channels, or ABC transporters. The ATP-evoked ATP release is inhibited by the purinergic receptor inhibitor PPADS, Clostridium difficile toxin A and two inhibitors of pannexin channels: probenecid and carbenoxolone. Conclusions The constitutive release of ATP might be involved in normal cell turn-over or modulation of odorant sensitivity in physiological conditions. Given the growth-promoting effects of ATP, ATP-evoked ATP

  15. The physics of chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Schiessel, Helmut

    2003-01-01

    Recent progress has been made in the understanding of the physical properties of chromatin -- the dense complex of DNA and histone proteins that occupies the nuclei of plant and animal cells. Here I will focus on the two lowest levels of the hierarchy of DNA folding into the chromatin complex: (i) the nucleosome, the chromatin repeating unit consisting of a globular aggregate of eight histone proteins with the DNA wrapped around: its overcharging, the DNA unwrapping transition, the ''sliding'...

  16. SUMO and Chromatin Remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wotton, David; Pemberton, Lucy F; Merrill-Schools, Jacqueline

    2017-01-01

    Many of the known SUMO substrates are nuclear proteins, which regulate gene expression and chromatin dynamics. Sumoylation, in general, appears to correlate with decreased transcriptional activity, and in many cases modulation of the chromatin template is implicated. Sumoylation of the core histones is associated with transcriptional silencing, and transcription factor sumoylation can decrease gene expression by promoting recruitment of chromatin modifying enzymes. Additionally, sumoylation of transcriptional corepressors and chromatin remodeling enzymes can influence interactions with other transcriptional regulators, and alter their enzymatic activity. In some cases, proteins that are components of transcriptional corepressor complexes have been shown to be SUMO E3 ligases, further emphasizing the integration of sumoylation with the regulation of chromatin remodeling. Despite the evidence suggesting that sumoylation is primarily repressive for access to chromatin, recent analyses suggest that protein sumoylation on the chromatin template may play important roles at highly expressed genes. Elucidating the dynamic interplay of sumoylation with other post-translational modifications of histones and chromatin associated proteins will be key to fully understanding the regulation of access to the chromatin template.

  17. Probabilistic modelling of chromatin code landscape reveals functional diversity of enhancer-like chromatin states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian; Troyanskaya, Olga G.

    2016-01-01

    Interpreting the functional state of chromatin from the combinatorial binding patterns of chromatin factors, that is, the chromatin codes, is crucial for decoding the epigenetic state of the cell. Here we present a systematic map of Drosophila chromatin states derived from data-driven probabilistic modelling of dependencies between chromatin factors. Our model not only recapitulates enhancer-like chromatin states as indicated by widely used enhancer marks but also divides these states into three functionally distinct groups, of which only one specific group possesses active enhancer activity. Moreover, we discover a strong association between one specific enhancer state and RNA Polymerase II pausing, linking transcription regulatory potential and chromatin organization. We also observe that with the exception of long-intron genes, chromatin state transition positions in transcriptionally active genes align with an absolute distance to their corresponding transcription start site, regardless of gene length. Using our method, we provide a resource that helps elucidate the functional and spatial organization of the chromatin code landscape. PMID:26841971

  18. ATP Induces Disruption of Tight Junction Proteins via IL-1 Beta-Dependent MMP-9 Activation of Human Blood-Brain Barrier In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuxing Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB follows brain trauma or central nervous system (CNS stress. However, the mechanisms leading to this process or the underlying neural plasticity are not clearly known. We hypothesized that ATP/P2X7R signaling regulates the integrity of BBB. Activation of P2X7 receptor (P2X7R by ATP induces the release of interleukin-1β (IL-1β, which in turn enhances the activity of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9. Degradation of tight junction proteins (TJPs such as ZO-1 and occludin occurs, which finally contributes to disruption of BBB. A contact coculture system using human astrocytes and hCMEC/D3, an immortalized human brain endothelial cell line, was used to mimic BBB in vitro. Permeability was used to evaluate changes in the integrity of TJPs. ELISA, Western blot, and immunofluorescent staining procedures were used. Our data demonstrated that exposure to the photoreactive ATP analog, 3′-O-(4-benzoylbenzoyl adenosine 5′-triphosphate (BzATP, induced a significant decrease in ZO-1 and occludin expression. Meanwhile, the decrease of ZO-1 and occludin was significantly attenuated by P2X7R inhibitors, as well as IL-1R and MMP antagonists. Further, the induction of IL-1β and MMP-9 was closely linked to ATP/P2X7R-associated BBB leakage. In conclusion, our study explored the mechanism of ATP/P2X7R signaling in the disruption of BBB following brain trauma/stress injury, especially focusing on the relationship with IL-1β and MMP-9.

  19. Chromatin epigenomic domain folding: size matters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand R. Caré

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, chromatin is coated with epigenetic marks which induce differential gene expression profiles and eventually lead to different cellular phenotypes. One of the challenges of contemporary cell biology is to relate the wealth of epigenomic data with the observed physical properties of chromatin. In this study, we present a polymer physics framework that takes into account the sizes of epigenomic domains. We build a model of chromatin as a block copolymer made of domains with various sizes. This model produces a rich set of conformations which is well explained by finite-size scaling analysis of the coil-globule transition of epigenomic domains. Our results suggest that size-dependent folding of epigenomic domains may be a crucial physical mechanism able to provide chromatin with tissue-specific folding states, these being associated with differential gene expression.

  20. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation links the chromatin remodeler SMARCA5/SNF2H to RNF168-dependent DNA damage signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smeenk, G.; Wiegant, W.W.; Luijsterburg, M.S.

    2013-01-01

    , selectively promotes spreading of SMARCA5, the E3 ubiquitin ligase RNF168, ubiquitin conjugates and the ubiquitin-binding factors RAD18 and the RAP80-BRCA1 complex throughout DSB-flanking chromatin. This suggests that PARP regulates the spatial organization of the RNF168-driven ubiquitin response to DNA...... ubiquitin cascade. Moreover, SMARCA5 was found to regulate the ubiquitin response by promoting RNF168 accumulation at DSBs, which subsequently facilitates efficient ubiquitin conjugation and BRCA1 assembly. Underlining the importance of these findings, we show that SMARCA5 depletion renders cells sensitive...

  1. Biophysical comparison of ATP-driven proton pumping mechanisms suggests a kinetic advantage for the rotary process depending on coupling ratio

    OpenAIRE

    Anandakrishnan, Ramu; Zuckerman, Daniel M.

    2017-01-01

    ATP-driven proton pumps, which are critical to the operation of a cell, maintain cytosolic and organellar pH levels within a narrow functional range. These pumps employ two very different mechanisms: an elaborate rotary mechanism used by V-ATPase H+ pumps, and a simpler alternating access mechanism used by P-ATPase H+ pumps. Why are two different mechanisms used to perform the same function? Systematic analysis, without parameter fitting, of kinetic models of the rotary, alternating access an...

  2. Biophysical comparison of ATP-driven proton pumping mechanisms suggests a kinetic advantage for the rotary process depending on coupling ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandakrishnan, Ramu; Zuckerman, Daniel M

    2017-01-01

    ATP-driven proton pumps, which are critical to the operation of a cell, maintain cytosolic and organellar pH levels within a narrow functional range. These pumps employ two very different mechanisms: an elaborate rotary mechanism used by V-ATPase H+ pumps, and a simpler alternating access mechanism used by P-ATPase H+ pumps. Why are two different mechanisms used to perform the same function? Systematic analysis, without parameter fitting, of kinetic models of the rotary, alternating access and other possible mechanisms suggest that, when the ratio of protons transported per ATP hydrolyzed exceeds one, the one-at-a-time proton transport by the rotary mechanism is faster than other possible mechanisms across a wide range of driving conditions. When the ratio is one, there is no intrinsic difference in the free energy landscape between mechanisms, and therefore all mechanisms can exhibit the same kinetic performance. To our knowledge all known rotary pumps have an H+:ATP ratio greater than one, and all known alternating access ATP-driven proton pumps have a ratio of one. Our analysis suggests a possible explanation for this apparent relationship between coupling ratio and mechanism. When the conditions under which the pump must operate permit a coupling ratio greater than one, the rotary mechanism may have been selected for its kinetic advantage. On the other hand, when conditions require a coupling ratio of one or less, the alternating access mechanism may have been selected for other possible advantages resulting from its structural and functional simplicity.

  3. Chromatin deregulation in disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabella, Anne C; Foster, Benjamin M; Bartke, Till

    2016-03-01

    The regulation of chromatin by epigenetic mechanisms plays a central role in gene expression and is essential for development and maintenance of cell identity and function. Aberrant chromatin regulation is observed in many diseases where it leads to defects in epigenetic gene regulation resulting in pathological gene expression programmes. These defects are caused by inherited or acquired mutations in genes encoding enzymes that deposit or remove DNA and histone modifications and that shape chromatin architecture. Chromatin deregulation often results in neurodevelopmental disorders and intellectual disabilities, frequently linked to physical and developmental abnormalities, but can also cause neurodegenerative diseases, immunodeficiency, or muscle wasting syndromes. Epigenetic diseases can either be of monogenic origin or manifest themselves as complex multifactorial diseases such as in congenital heart disease, autism spectrum disorders, or cancer in which mutations in chromatin regulators are contributing factors. The environment directly influences the epigenome and can induce changes that cause or predispose to diseases through risk factors such as stress, malnutrition or exposure to harmful chemicals. The plasticity of chromatin regulation makes targeting the enzymatic machinery an attractive strategy for therapeutic intervention and an increasing number of small molecule inhibitors against a variety of epigenetic regulators are in clinical use or under development. In this review, we will give an overview of the molecular lesions that underlie epigenetic diseases, and we will discuss the impact of the environment and prospects for epigenetic therapies.

  4. Metformin reduces NAD(P)H oxidase activity in mouse cultured podocytes through purinergic dependent mechanism by increasing extracellular ATP concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piwkowska, Agnieszka; Rogacka, Dorota; Jankowski, Maciej; Angielski, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Hyperglycemia affects the functioning numbers of podocytes and leads to a gradual decline of renal function. The normalization of glucose level is a principle therapeutic goal in diabetic patients and metformin is a popular hypoglycemic drug used in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Metformin activates AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) and decreases NAD(P)H oxidase activity in podocytes leading to reduction of free radical generation. Similar effects are observed after activation of P2 receptors. Therefore, we investigated whether metformin increases extracellular ATP concentration and affects the activities of NAD(P)H oxidase and AMPK through P2 receptors. Experiments were performed on cultured mouse podocytes. NAD(P)H oxidase activity was measured by chemiluminescence and changes in AMPK activity were estimated by immunoblotting against AMPKα-Thr(172)-P. Metformin increased extracellular ATP concentration by reduction of ecto-ATPase activity, decreased NAD(P)H oxidase activity and increased AMPK phosphorylation. A P2 receptor antagonist, suramin (300 µM), prevented metformin action on NAD(P)H oxidase and AMPK phosphorylation. The data suggests a novel mechanism of metformin action, at least in podocytes. Metformin, which increases extracellular ATP concentration leads to activation of P2 receptors and consequent modulation of the podocytes' metabolism through AMPK and NAD(P)H oxidase which, in turn, may affect podocyte functioning.

  5. Transcriptional organization of the large and the small ATP synthase operons, atpI/H/F/A and atpB/E, in Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik Ghulam, Mustafa; Zghidi-Abouzid, Ouafa; Lambert, Emeline; Lerbs-Mache, Silva; Merendino, Livia

    2012-06-01

    The ATP synthase is a ubiquitous enzyme which is found in bacteria and eukaryotic organelles. It is essential in the photosynthetic and respiratory processes, by transforming the electrochemical proton gradient into ATP energy via proton transport across the membranes. In Escherichia coli, the atp genes coding for the subunits of the ATP synthase enzyme are grouped in the same transcriptional unit, while in higher plants the plastid atp genes are organized into a large (atpI/H/F/A) and a small (atpB/E) atp operon. By using the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, we have investigated the strategy evolved in chloroplasts to overcome the physical separation of the atp gene clusters and to coordinate their transcription. We show that all the identified promoters in the two atp operons are PEP dependent and require sigma factors for specific recognition. Our results indicate that transcription of the two atp operons is initiated by at least one common factor, the essential SIG2 factor. Our data show that SIG3 and SIG6 also participate in transcription initiation of the large and the small atp operon, respectively. We propose that SIG2 might be the factor responsible for coordinating the basal transcription of the plastid atp genes and that SIG3 and SIG6 might serve to modulate plastid atp expression with respect to physiological and environmental conditions. However, we observe that in the sigma mutants (sig2, sig3 and sig6) the deficiency in the recognition of specific atp promoters is largely balanced by mRNA stabilization and/or by activation of otherwise silent promoters, indicating that the rate-limiting step for expression of the atp operons is mostly post-transcriptional.

  6. Individual Bromodomains of Polybromo-1 Contribute to Chromatin Association and Tumor Suppression in Clear Cell Renal Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Elizabeth G; Dykhuizen, Emily C

    2017-02-17

    The architecture of chromatin is governed, in part, by ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers. These multiprotein complexes contain targeting domains that recognize post-translational marks on histones. One such targeting domain is the bromodomain (BD), which recognizes acetyl-lysines and recruits proteins to sites of acetylation across the genome. Polybromo1 (PBRM1), a subunit of the Polybromo-associated BRG1- or hBRM-associated factors (PBAF) chromatin remodeler, contains six tandem BDs and is frequently mutated in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). Mutations in the PBRM1 gene often lead to the loss of protein expression; however, missense mutations in PBRM1 have been identified and tend to cluster in the BDs, particularly BD2 and BD4, suggesting that individual BDs are critical for PBRM1 function. To study the role of these six BDs, we inactivated each of the six BDs of PBRM1 and re-expressed these mutants in Caki2 cells (ccRCC cells with the loss of function mutation in PBRM1). Four of the six BDs abrogated PBRM1 tumor suppressor function, gene regulation, and chromatin affinity with the degree of importance correlating strongly to the rate of missense mutations in patients. Furthermore, we identified BD2 as the most critical for PBRM1 and confirmed BD2-mediated association to histone H3 peptides acetylated at lysine 14 (H3K14Ac), validating the importance of this specific acetylation mark for PBRM1 binding. From these data, we conclude that four of the BDs act together to target PBRM1 to sites on chromatin; when a single BD is mutated, PBRM1 no longer controls gene expression properly, leading to increased cell proliferation. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Chromatin replication and epigenome maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alabert, Constance; Groth, Anja

    2012-01-01

    initiates, whereas the replication process itself disrupts chromatin and challenges established patterns of genome regulation. Specialized replication-coupled mechanisms assemble new DNA into chromatin, but epigenome maintenance is a continuous process taking place throughout the cell cycle. If DNA...

  8. Chromatin replication and histone dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alabert, Constance; Jasencakova, Zuzana; Groth, Anja

    2017-01-01

    organization into chromatin. We reveal how specialized replication-coupled mechanisms rapidly assemble newly synthesized DNA into nucleosomes, while the complete restoration of chromatin organization including histone marks is a continuous process taking place throughout the cell cycle. Because failure...

  9. Chromatin dynamics in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransz, P.F.; Jong, de J.H.

    2002-01-01

    Recent studies in yeast, animals and plants have provided major breakthroughs in unraveling the molecular mechanism of higher-order gene regulation. In conjunction with the DNA code, proteins that are involved in chromatin remodeling, histone modification and epigenetic imprinting form a large

  10. Reprogramming the chromatin landscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miranda, Tina B; Voss, Ty C; Sung, Myong-Hee

    2013-01-01

    , mechanistic details defining the cellular interactions between ER and GR are poorly understood. We investigated genome-wide binding profiles for ER and GR upon coactivation and characterized the status of the chromatin landscape. We describe a novel mechanism dictating the molecular interplay between ER...

  11. Analysis of Chromatin Organisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2011-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: chromatin, nucleases, sucrose density gradient centrifugation, melting point, gel electrophoresis, ethidium bromide, autoradiography, Southern blotting, Northern blotting, Sanger sequencing, restriction endonucleases, exonucleases, linker DNA, chloroform extraction, nucleosomes,…

  12. Proteomic interrogation of human chromatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana P Torrente

    Full Text Available Chromatin proteins provide a scaffold for DNA packaging and a basis for epigenetic regulation and genomic maintenance. Despite understanding its functional roles, mapping the chromatin proteome (i.e. the "Chromatome" is still a continuing process. Here, we assess the biological specificity and proteomic extent of three distinct chromatin preparations by identifying proteins in selected chromatin-enriched fractions using mass spectrometry-based proteomics. These experiments allowed us to produce a chromatin catalog, including several proteins ranging from highly abundant histone proteins to less abundant members of different chromatin machinery complexes. Using a Normalized Spectral Abundance Factor approach, we quantified relative abundances of the proteins across the chromatin enriched fractions giving a glimpse into their chromosomal abundance. The large-scale data sets also allowed for the discovery of a variety of novel post-translational modifications on the identified chromatin proteins. With these comparisons, we find one of the probed methods to be qualitatively superior in specificity for chromatin proteins, but inferior in proteomic extent, evidencing a compromise that must be made between biological specificity and broadness of characterization. Additionally, we attempt to identify proteins in eu- and heterochromatin, verifying the enrichments by characterizing the post-translational modifications detected on histone proteins from these chromatin regions. In summary, our results provide insights into the value of different methods to extract chromatin-associated proteins and provide starting points to study the factors that may be involved in directing gene expression and other chromatin-related processes.

  13. Kinetics of extracellular ATP in mastoparan 7-activated human erythrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, María Florencia Leal; Incicco, J. Jeremías; Espelt, María Victoria; Verstraeten, Sandra V.; Pignataro, Omar P.; Lazarowski, Eduardo R.; Schwarzbaum, Pablo J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Background The peptide mastoparan 7 (MST7) stimulated ATP release in human erythrocytes. We explored intra- and extracellular processes governing the time-dependent accumulation of extracellular ATP (i.e., ATPe kinetics). Methods Human erythrocytes were treated with MST7 in the presence or absence of two blockers of pannexin 1. ATPe concentration was monitored by luciferin-luciferase based real-time luminometry. Results Exposure of human erythrocytes to MST7 led to an acute increase in [ATPe], followed by a slower increase phase. ATPe kinetics reflected a strong activation of ATP efflux and a low rate of ATPe hydrolysis by ectoATPase activity. Enhancement of [ATPe] by MST7 required adhesion of erythrocytes to poly-D-lysin-coated coverslips, and correlated with a 31% increase of cAMP and 10% cell swelling. However, when MST7 was dissolved in a hyperosmotic medium to block cell swelling, ATPe accumulation was inhibited by 49%. Erythrocytes pre-exposure to 10 μM of either carbenoxolone or probenecid, two blockers of pannexin 1, exhibited a partial reduction of ATP efflux. Erythrocytes from pannexin 1 knockout mice exhibited similar ATPe kinetics as those of wild type mice erythrocytes exposed to pannexin 1 blockers. Conclusions MST7 induced release of ATP required either cell adhesion or strong activation of cAMP synthesis. Part of this release required cell swelling. Kinetic analysis and a data driven model suggested that ATP efflux is mediated by two ATP conduits displaying different kinetics, with one conduit being fully blocked by pannexin 1 blockers. General Significance Kinetic analysis of extracellular ATP accumulation from human erythrocytes and potential effects on microcirculation. PMID:23742824

  14. The chromatin remodelling factor dATRX is involved in heterochromatin formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R Bassett

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite extensive study of heterochromatin, relatively little is known about the mechanisms by which such a structure forms. We show that the Drosophila homologue of the human alpha-thalassemia and mental retardation X-linked protein (dATRX, is important in the formation or maintenance of heterochromatin through modification of position effect variegation. We further show that there are two isoforms of the dATRX protein, the longer of which interacts directly with heterochromatin protein 1 (dHP-1 through a CxVxL motif both in vitro and in vivo. These two proteins co-localise at heterochromatin in a manner dependent on this motif. Consistent with this observation, the long isoform of the dATRX protein localises primarily to the heterochromatin at the chromocentre on salivary gland polytene chromosomes, whereas the short isoform binds to many sites along the chromosome arms. We suggest that the establishment of a regular nucleosomal organisation may be common to heterochromatin and transcriptionally repressed chromatin in other locations, and may require the action of ATP dependent chromatin remodelling factors.

  15. Modulation of Higher Order Chromatin Conformation in Mammalian Cell Nuclei Can Be Mediated by Polyamines and Divalent Cations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwat Visvanathan

    Full Text Available The organisation of the large volume of mammalian genomic DNA within cell nuclei requires mechanisms to regulate chromatin compaction involving the reversible formation of higher order structures. The compaction state of chromatin varies between interphase and mitosis and is also subject to rapid and reversible change upon ATP depletion/repletion. In this study we have investigated mechanisms that may be involved in promoting the hyper-condensation of chromatin when ATP levels are depleted by treating cells with sodium azide and 2-deoxyglucose. Chromatin conformation was analysed in both live and permeabilised HeLa cells using FLIM-FRET, high resolution fluorescence microscopy and by electron spectroscopic imaging microscopy. We show that chromatin compaction following ATP depletion is not caused by loss of transcription activity and that it can occur at a similar level in both interphase and mitotic cells. Analysis of both live and permeabilised HeLa cells shows that chromatin conformation within nuclei is strongly influenced by the levels of divalent cations, including calcium and magnesium. While ATP depletion results in an increase in the level of unbound calcium, chromatin condensation still occurs even in the presence of a calcium chelator. Chromatin compaction is shown to be strongly affected by small changes in the levels of polyamines, including spermine and spermidine. The data are consistent with a model in which the increased intracellular pool of polyamines and divalent cations, resulting from depletion of ATP, bind to DNA and contribute to the large scale hyper-compaction of chromatin by a charge neutralisation mechanism.

  16. Genome-Wide Mapping Targets of the Metazoan Chromatin Remodeling Factor NURF Reveals Nucleosome Remodeling at Enhancers, Core Promoters and Gene Insulators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Yeon Kwon

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available NURF is a conserved higher eukaryotic ISWI-containing chromatin remodeling complex that catalyzes ATP-dependent nucleosome sliding. By sliding nucleosomes, NURF is able to alter chromatin dynamics to control transcription and genome organization. Previous biochemical and genetic analysis of the specificity-subunit of Drosophila NURF (Nurf301/Enhancer of Bithorax (E(bx has defined NURF as a critical regulator of homeotic, heat-shock and steroid-responsive gene transcription. It has been speculated that NURF controls pathway specific transcription by co-operating with sequence-specific transcription factors to remodel chromatin at dedicated enhancers. However, conclusive in vivo demonstration of this is lacking and precise regulatory elements targeted by NURF are poorly defined. To address this, we have generated a comprehensive map of in vivo NURF activity, using MNase-sequencing to determine at base pair resolution NURF target nucleosomes, and ChIP-sequencing to define sites of NURF recruitment. Our data show that, besides anticipated roles at enhancers, NURF interacts physically and functionally with the TRF2/DREF basal transcription factor to organize nucleosomes downstream of active promoters. Moreover, we detect NURF remodeling and recruitment at distal insulator sites, where NURF functionally interacts with and co-localizes with DREF and insulator proteins including CP190 to establish nucleosome-depleted domains. This insulator function of NURF is most apparent at subclasses of insulators that mark the boundaries of chromatin domains, where multiple insulator proteins co-associate. By visualizing the complete repertoire of in vivo NURF chromatin targets, our data provide new insights into how chromatin remodeling can control genome organization and regulatory interactions.

  17. The Core Subunit of A Chromatin-Remodeling Complex, ZmCHB101, Plays Essential Roles in Maize Growth and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaoming; Jiang, Lili; Wu, Rui; Meng, Xinchao; Zhang, Ai; Li, Ning; Xia, Qiong; Qi, Xin; Pang, Jinsong; Xu, Zheng-Yi; Liu, Bao

    2016-12-05

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes play essential roles in the regulation of diverse biological processes by formulating a DNA template that is accessible to the general transcription apparatus. Although the function of chromatin remodelers in plant development has been studied in A. thaliana, how it affects growth and development of major crops (e.g., maize) remains uninvestigated. Combining genetic, genomic and bioinformatic analyses, we show here that the maize core subunit of chromatin remodeling complex, ZmCHB101, plays essential roles in growth and development of maize at both vegetative and reproductive stages. Independent ZmCHB101 RNA interference plant lines displayed abaxially curling leaf phenotype due to increase of bulliform cell numbers, and showed impaired development of tassel and cob. RNA-seq-based transcriptome profiling revealed that ZmCHB101 dictated transcriptional reprogramming of a significant set of genes involved in plant development, photosynthesis, metabolic regulation, stress response and gene expressional regulation. Intriguingly, we found that ZmCHB101 was required for maintaining normal nucleosome density and 45 S rDNA compaction. Our findings suggest that the SWI3 protein, ZmCHB101, plays pivotal roles in maize normal growth and development via regulation of chromatin structure.

  18. H2A.Z mediates different aspects of chromatin function and modulates flowering responses in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarillo, José A; Piñeiro, Manuel

    2015-07-01

    Eukaryotic organisms have canonical histones and a number of histone variants that perform specialized functions and confer particular structural properties to the nucleosomes that contain them. The histone H2A family comprises several variants, with H2A.Z being the most evolutionarily conserved. This variant is essential in eukaryotes and has emerged as a key player in chromatin function, performing an essential role in gene transcription and genome stability. During recent years, biochemical, genetic and genomic studies have begun to uncover the role of several ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes in H2A.Z deposition and removal. These ATPase complexes are widely conserved from yeast to mammals. In Arabidopsis there are homologs for most of the subunits of these complexes, and their functions are just beginning to be unveiled. In this review, we discuss the major contributions made in relation to the biology of the H2A.Z in plants, and more specifically concerning the function of this histone variant in the transition from vegetative to reproductive development. Recent advances in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the H2A.Z-mediated modulation of the floral transition, and thermosensory flowering responses in particular, are discussed. The emerging picture shows that plants contain chromatin-remodeling complexes related to those involved in modulating the dynamics of H2A.Z in other eukaryotes, but their precise biochemical nature remains elusive. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Of giraffes' necks and the inheritance of chromatin states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirrotta, Vincenzo

    2017-05-26

    New work reports that both derepressed and hyper-repressed chromatin states in animals can be transmitted to progeny for many generations. Transmission depends on genomic architecture and histone modifications.

  20. Chromatin and alternative splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alló, M; Schor, I E; Muñoz, M J; de la Mata, M; Agirre, E; Valcárcel, J; Eyras, E; Kornblihtt, A R

    2010-01-01

    Alternative splicing affects more than 90% of human genes. Coupling between transcription and splicing has become crucial in the complex network underlying alternative splicing regulation. Because chromatin is the real template for nuclear transcription, changes in its structure, but also in the "reading" and "writing" of the histone code, could modulate splicing choices. Here, we discuss the evidence supporting these ideas, from the first proposal of chromatin affecting alternative splicing, performed 20 years ago, to the latest findings including genome-wide evidence that nucleosomes are preferentially positioned in exons. We focus on two recent reports from our laboratories that add new evidence to this field. The first report shows that a physiological stimulus such as neuron depolarization promotes intragenic histone acetylation (H3K9ac) and chromatin relaxation, causing the skipping of exon 18 of the neural cell adhesion molecule gene. In the second report, we show how specific histone modifications can be created at targeted gene regions as a way to affect alternative splicing: Using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), we increased the levels of H3K9me2 and H3K27me3 in the proximity of alternative exon 33 of the human fibronectin gene, favoring its inclusion into mature messenger RNA (mRNA) through a mechanism that recalls RNA-mediated transcriptional gene silencing.

  1. The chromatin regulatory code: Beyond a histone code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesne, A.

    2006-03-01

    In this commentary on the contribution by Arndt Benecke in this issue, I discuss why the notion of “chromatin code” introduced and elaborated in this paper is to be preferred to that of “histone code”. Speaking of a code as regards nucleosome conformation and histone tail post-translational modifications only makes sense within the chromatin fiber, where their physico-chemical features can be translated into regulatory programs at the genome level, by means of a complex, multi-level interplay with the fiber architecture and dynamics settled in the course of Evolution. In particular, this chromatin code presumably exploits allosteric transitions of the chromatin fiber. The chromatin structure dependence of its translation suggests two alternative modes of transcription initiation regulation, also proposed in the paper by A. Benecke in this issue for interpreting strikingly bimodal micro-array data.

  2. Genetic analysis of the Staphylococcus epidermidis macromolecular synthesis operon: Serp1129 is an ATP binding protein and sigA transcription is regulated by both sigma(A)- and sigma(B)-dependent promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Kendall A; Kinkead, Lauren C; Larson, Marilynn A; Hinrichs, Steven H; Fey, Paul D

    2010-01-12

    The highly conserved macromolecular synthesis operon (MMSO) contains both dnaG (primase) and sigA (primary sigma factor). However, in previously evaluated gram-positive species, the MMSO is divergent upstream of dnaG. The MMSO of Bacillus subtilis contains three open reading frames (ORFs) that are differentially regulated by multiple promoters. In conjunction with studies to determine the expression profile of dnaG, the MMSO of Staphylococus epidermidis was characterized. The ORFs of S. epidermidis were compared to the previously described MMSO of B. subtilis and two additional ORFs in S. epidermidis, serp1129 and serp1130, were identified. The largest transcript, 4.8 kb in length, was expressed only in exponential growth and encompassed all four ORFs (serp1130, serp1129, dnaG, and sigA). A separate transcript (1.5 kb) comprising serp1130 and serp1129 was expressed in early exponential growth. Two smaller transcripts 1.3 and 1.2 kb in size were detected with a sigA probe in both exponential and post-exponential phases of growth. Western blot analysis correlated with the transcriptional profile and demonstrated that Serp1129 was detected only in the exponential phase of growth. Computational analysis identified that Serp1130 contained a CBS motif whereas Serp1129 contained an ATP/GTP binding motif. Functional studies of Serp1129 demonstrated that it was capable of binding both ATP and GTP. Comparisons with a sigB:dhfr mutant revealed that the 1.3 kb sigA transcript was regulated by a sigma(B)-dependent promoter. These studies demonstrated that the S. epidermidis 1457 MMSO contains two ORFs (serp1129 and serp1130) not described within the B. subtilis MMSO and at least three promoters, one of which is sigma(beta)-dependent. The transcriptional regulation of sigA by sigma(B) provides evidence that the staphylococcal sigma(B)-dependent response is controlled at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. The conservation of serp1129 across multiple gram

  3. Genetic analysis of the Staphylococcus epidermidis Macromolecular Synthesis Operon: Serp1129 is an ATP binding protein and sigA transcription is regulated by both σA- and σB-dependent promoters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinrichs Steven H

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The highly conserved macromolecular synthesis operon (MMSO contains both dnaG (primase and sigA (primary sigma factor. However, in previously evaluated gram-positive species, the MMSO is divergent upstream of dnaG. The MMSO of Bacillus subtilis contains three open reading frames (ORFs that are differentially regulated by multiple promoters. In conjunction with studies to determine the expression profile of dnaG, the MMSO of Staphylococus epidermidis was characterized. Results The ORFs of S. epidermidis were compared to the previously described MMSO of B. subtilis and two additional ORFs in S. epidermidis, serp1129 and serp1130, were identified. The largest transcript, 4.8 kb in length, was expressed only in exponential growth and encompassed all four ORFs (serp1130, serp1129, dnaG, and sigA. A separate transcript (1.5 kb comprising serp1130 and serp1129 was expressed in early exponential growth. Two smaller transcripts 1.3 and 1.2 kb in size were detected with a sigA probe in both exponential and post-exponential phases of growth. Western blot analysis correlated with the transcriptional profile and demonstrated that Serp1129 was detected only in the exponential phase of growth. Computational analysis identified that Serp1130 contained a CBS motif whereas Serp1129 contained an ATP/GTP binding motif. Functional studies of Serp1129 demonstrated that it was capable of binding both ATP and GTP. Comparisons with a sigB:dhfr mutant revealed that the 1.3 kb sigA transcript was regulated by a σB-dependent promoter. Conclusions These studies demonstrated that the S. epidermidis 1457 MMSO contains two ORFs (serp1129 and serp1130 not described within the B. subtilis MMSO and at least three promoters, one of which is σβ-dependent. The transcriptional regulation of sigA by σB provides evidence that the staphylococcal σB-dependent response is controlled at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. The conservation of

  4. Analysis of Chromatin Dynamics during Glucocorticoid Receptor Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burd, Craig J.; Ward, James M.; Crusselle-Davis, Valerie J.; Kissling, Grace E.; Phadke, Dhiral; Shah, Ruchir R.

    2012-01-01

    Steroid hormone receptors initiate a genetic program tightly regulated by the chromatin environment of the responsive regions. Using the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) as a model factor for transcriptional initiation, we classified chromatin structure through formaldehyde-assisted isolation of regulatory elements (FAIRE). We looked at dynamic changes in FAIRE signals during GR activation specifically at regions of receptor interaction. We found a distribution of GR-responsive regions with diverse responses to activation and chromatin modulation. The majority of GR binding regions demonstrate increases in FAIRE signal in response to ligand. However, the majority GR-responsive regions shared a similar FAIRE signal in the basal chromatin state, suggesting a common chromatin structure for GR recruitment. Supporting this notion, global FAIRE sequencing (seq) data indicated an enrichment of signal surrounding the GR binding site prior to activation. Brg-1 knockdown showed response element-specific effects of ATPase-dependent chromatin remodeling. FAIRE induction was universally decreased by Brg-1 depletion, but to varying degrees in a target specific manner. Taken together, these data suggest classes of nuclear receptor response regions that react to activation through different chromatin regulatory events and identify a chromatin structure that classifies the majority of response elements tested. PMID:22451486

  5. The Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Protein Contributes to Normal Compaction of Mitotic Chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikovskaya, Dina; Khoudoli, Guennadi; Newton, Ian P.; Chadha, Gaganmeet S.; Klotz, Daniel; Visvanathan, Ashwat; Lamond, Angus; Swedlow, Jason R.; Näthke, Inke S.

    2012-01-01

    The tumour suppressor Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) is required for proper mitosis; however, the exact role of APC in mitosis is not understood. Using demembranated sperm chromatin exposed to meiotic Xenopus egg extract and HeLa cells expressing fluorescently labelled histones, we established that APC contributes to chromatin compaction. Sperm chromatin in APC-depleted Xenopus egg extract frequently formed tight round or elongated structures. Such abnormally compacted chromatin predominantly formed spindles with low microtubule content. Furthermore, in mitotic HeLa cells expressing GFP- and mCherry-labelled H2B histones, depletion of APC caused a decrease in the donor fluorescence lifetime of neighbouring fluorophores, indicative of excessive chromatin compaction. Profiling the chromatin-associated proteome of sperm chromatin incubated with Xenopus egg extracts revealed temporal APC-dependent changes in the abundance of histones, closely mirrored by chromatin-associated Topoisomerase IIa, condensin I complex and Kif4. In the absence of APC these factors initially accumulated on chromatin, but then decreased faster than in controls. We also found and validated significant APC-dependent changes in chromatin modifiers Set-a and Rbbp7. Both were decreased on chromatin in APC-depleted extract; in addition, the kinetics of association of Set-a with chromatin was altered in the absence of APC. PMID:22719865

  6. Porphyromonas gingivalis attenuates ATP-mediated inflammasome activation and HMGB1 release through expression of a nucleoside-diphosphate kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Larry; Atanasova, Kalina R; Bui, Phuong Q; Lee, Jungnam; Hung, Shu-Chen; Yilmaz, Özlem; Ojcius, David M

    2015-05-01

    Many intracellular pathogens evade the innate immune response in order to survive and proliferate within infected cells. We show that Porphyromonas gingivalis, an intracellular opportunistic pathogen, uses a nucleoside-diphosphate kinase (NDK) homolog to inhibit innate immune responses due to stimulation by extracellular ATP, which acts as a danger signal that binds to P2X7 receptors and induces activation of an inflammasome and caspase-1. Thus, infection of gingival epithelial cells (GECs) with wild-type P. gingivalis results in inhibition of ATP-induced caspase-1 activation. However, ndk-deficient P. gingivalis is less effective than wild-type P. gingivalis in reducing ATP-mediated caspase-1 activation and secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokine, IL-1β, from infected GECs. Furthermore, P. gingivalis NDK modulates release of high-mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1), a pro-inflammatory danger signal, which remains associated with chromatin in healthy cells. Unexpectedly, infection with either wild-type or ndk-deficient P. gingivalis causes release of HMGB1 from the nucleus to the cytosol. But HMGB1 is released to the extracellular space when uninfected GECs are further stimulated with ATP, and there is more HMGB1 released from the cells when ATP-treated cells are infected with ndk-deficient mutant than wild-type P. gingivalis. Our results reveal that NDK plays a significant role in inhibiting P2X7-dependent inflammasome activation and HMGB1 release from infected GECs. Copyright © 2015 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Dynamics of the metal binding domains and regulation of the human copper transporters ATP7B and ATP7A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Corey H; Dolgova, Natalia V; Dmitriev, Oleg Y

    2017-04-01

    Copper transporters ATP7A and ATP7B regulate copper levels in the human cells and deliver copper to the biosynthetic pathways. ATP7A and ATP7B belong to the P-type ATPases and share much of the domain architecture and the mechanism of ATP hydrolysis with the other, well-studied, enzymes of this type. A unique structural feature of the copper ATPases is the chain of six cytosolic metal-binding domains (MBDs), which are believed to be involved in copper-dependent regulation of the activity and intracellular localization of these enzymes. Although the structures of all the MBDs have been solved, the mechanism of copper-dependent regulation of ATP7B and ATP7A, the roles of individual MBDs, and the relationship between the regulatory and catalytic copper binding are still unknown. We describe the structure and dynamics of the MBDs, review the current knowledge about their functional roles and propose a mechanism of regulation of ATP7B by copper-dependent changes in the dynamics and conformation of the MBD chain. Transient interactions between the MBDs, rather than transitions between distinct static conformations are likely to form the structural basis of regulation of the ATP-dependent copper transporters in human cells. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 69(4):226-235, 2017. © 2017 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  8. Chromatin dynamics in genome stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nair, Nidhi; Shoaib, Muhammad; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2017-01-01

    Genomic DNA is compacted into chromatin through packaging with histone and non-histone proteins. Importantly, DNA accessibility is dynamically regulated to ensure genome stability. This is exemplified in the response to DNA damage where chromatin relaxation near genomic lesions serves to promote ...... of chromatin structure regulation in maintaining genome integrity by multiple mechanisms including facilitating DNA repair and directly suppressing endogenous DNA damage.......Genomic DNA is compacted into chromatin through packaging with histone and non-histone proteins. Importantly, DNA accessibility is dynamically regulated to ensure genome stability. This is exemplified in the response to DNA damage where chromatin relaxation near genomic lesions serves to promote...... access of relevant enzymes to specific DNA regions for signaling and repair. Furthermore, recent data highlight genome maintenance roles of chromatin through the regulation of endogenous DNA-templated processes including transcription and replication. Here, we review research that shows the importance...

  9. The specificity and topology of chromatin interaction pathways in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenstra, Tineke L; Benschop, Joris J; Kim, Taesoo; Schulze, Julia M; Brabers, Nathalie A C H; Margaritis, Thanasis; van de Pasch, Loes A L; van Heesch, Sebastiaan A A C; Brok, Mariel O; Groot Koerkamp, Marian J A; Ko, Cheuk W; van Leenen, Dik; Sameith, Katrin; van Hooff, Sander R; Lijnzaad, Philip; Kemmeren, Patrick; Hentrich, Thomas; Kobor, Michael S; Buratowski, Stephen; Holstege, Frank C P

    2011-05-20

    Packaging of DNA into chromatin has a profound impact on gene expression. To understand how changes in chromatin influence transcription, we analyzed 165 mutants of chromatin machinery components in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. mRNA expression patterns change in 80% of mutants, always with specific effects, even for loss of widespread histone marks. The data are assembled into a network of chromatin interaction pathways. The network is function based, has a branched, interconnected topology, and lacks strict one-to-one relationships between complexes. Chromatin pathways are not separate entities for different gene sets, but share many components. The study evaluates which interactions are important for which genes and predicts additional interactions, for example between Paf1C and Set3C, as well as a role for Mediator in subtelomeric silencing. The results indicate the presence of gene-dependent effects that go beyond context-dependent binding of chromatin factors and provide a framework for understanding how specificity is achieved through regulating chromatin. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Tracking the mechanical dynamics of human embryonic stem cell chromatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinde Elizabeth

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A plastic chromatin structure has emerged as fundamental to the self-renewal and pluripotent capacity of embryonic stem (ES cells. Direct measurement of chromatin dynamics in vivo is, however, challenging as high spatiotemporal resolution is required. Here, we present a new tracking-based method which can detect high frequency chromatin movement and quantify the mechanical dynamics of chromatin in live cells. Results We use this method to study how the mechanical properties of chromatin movement in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs are modulated spatiotemporally during differentiation into cardiomyocytes (CM. Notably, we find that pluripotency is associated with a highly discrete, energy-dependent frequency of chromatin movement that we refer to as a ‘breathing’ state. We find that this ‘breathing’ state is strictly dependent on the metabolic state of the cell and is progressively silenced during differentiation. Conclusions We thus propose that the measured chromatin high frequency movements in hESCs may represent a hallmark of pluripotency and serve as a mechanism to maintain the genome in a transcriptionally accessible state. This is a result that could not have been observed without the high spatial and temporal resolution provided by this novel tracking method.

  11. Increased chromatin plasticity supports enhanced metastatic potential of mouse melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maizels, Yael; Elbaz, Adi; Hernandez-Vicens, Rosari; Sandrusy, Oshrat; Rosenberg, Anna; Gerlitz, Gabi

    2017-08-15

    Metastasis formation is strongly dependent on the migration capabilities of tumor cells. Recently it has become apparent that nuclear structure and morphology affect the cellular ability to migrate. Previously we found that migration of melanoma cells is both associated with and dependent on global chromatin condensation. Therefore, we anticipated that tumor progression would be associated with increased chromatin condensation. Interestingly, the opposite has been reported for melanoma. In trying to resolve this contradiction, we show that during growth conditions, tumor progression is associated with global chromatin de-condensation that is beneficial for faster proliferation. However, upon induction of migration, in both low- and high-metastatic mouse melanoma cells chromatin undergoes condensation to support cell migration. Our results reveal that throughout tumor progression induction of chromatin condensation by migration signals is maintained, whereas the organization of chromatin during growth conditions is altered. Thus, tumor progression is associated with an increase in chromatin dynamics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Electron transfer precedes ATP hydrolysis during nitrogenase catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Simon; Danyal, Karamatullah; Shaw, Sudipta; Lytle, Anna K.; Dean, Dennis R.; Hoffman, Brian M.; Antony, Edwin; Seefeldt, Lance C.

    2013-01-01

    The biological reduction of N2 to NH3 catalyzed by Mo-dependent nitrogenase requires at least eight rounds of a complex cycle of events associated with ATP-driven electron transfer (ET) from the Fe protein to the catalytic MoFe protein, with each ET coupled to the hydrolysis of two ATP molecules. Although steps within this cycle have been studied for decades, the nature of the coupling between ATP hydrolysis and ET, in particular the order of ET and ATP hydrolysis, has been elusive. Here, we have measured first-order rate constants for each key step in the reaction sequence, including direct measurement of the ATP hydrolysis rate constant: kATP = 70 s−1, 25 °C. Comparison of the rate constants establishes that the reaction sequence involves four sequential steps: (i) conformationally gated ET (kET = 140 s−1, 25 °C), (ii) ATP hydrolysis (kATP = 70 s−1, 25 °C), (iii) Phosphate release (kPi = 16 s−1, 25 °C), and (iv) Fe protein dissociation from the MoFe protein (kdiss = 6 s−1, 25 °C). These findings allow completion of the thermodynamic cycle undergone by the Fe protein, showing that the energy of ATP binding and protein–protein association drive ET, with subsequent ATP hydrolysis and Pi release causing dissociation of the complex between the Feox(ADP)2 protein and the reduced MoFe protein. PMID:24062462

  13. ATP-independent cooperative binding of yeast Isw1a to bare and nucleosomal DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne De Cian

    Full Text Available Among chromatin remodeling factors, the ISWI family displays a nucleosome-enhanced ATPase activity coupled to DNA translocation. While these enzymes are known to bind to DNA, their activity has not been fully characterized. Here we use TEM imaging and single molecule manipulation to investigate the interaction between DNA and yeast Isw1a. We show that Isw1a displays a highly cooperative ATP-independent binding to and bridging between DNA segments. Under appropriate tension, rare single nucleation events can sometimes be observed and loop DNA with a regular step. These nucleation events are often followed by binding of successive complexes bridging between nearby DNA segments in a zipper-like fashion, as confirmed by TEM observations. On nucleosomal substrates, we show that the specific ATP-dependent remodeling activity occurs in the context of cooperative Isw1a complexes bridging extranucleosomal DNA. Our results are interpreted in the context of the recently published partial structure of Isw1a and support its acting as a "protein ruler" (with possibly more than one tick.

  14. Phosphorylation at Ser²⁶ in the ATP-binding site of Ca²⁺/calmodulin-dependent kinase II as a mechanism for switching off the kinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Mehtap; Gangopadhyay, Samudra S; Leavis, Paul; Grabarek, Zenon; Morgan, Kathleen G

    2013-02-07

    CaMKII (Ca²⁺/calmodulin-dependent kinase II) is a serine/threonine phosphotransferase that is capable of long-term retention of activity due to autophosphorylation at a specific threonine residue within each subunit of its oligomeric structure. The γ isoform of CaMKII is a significant regulator of vascular contractility. Here, we show that phosphorylation of CaMKII γ at Ser²⁶, a residue located within the ATP-binding site, terminates the sustained activity of the enzyme. To test the physiological importance of phosphorylation at Ser²⁶, we generated a phosphospecific Ser²⁶ antibody and demonstrated an increase in Ser²⁶ phosphorylation upon depolarization and contraction of blood vessels. To determine if the phosphorylation of Ser²⁶ affects the kinase activity, we mutated Ser²⁶ to alanine or aspartic acid. The S26D mutation mimicking the phosphorylated state of CaMKII causes a dramatic decrease in Thr²⁸⁷ autophosphorylation levels and greatly reduces the catalytic activity towards an exogenous substrate (autocamtide-3), whereas the S26A mutation has no effect. These data combined with molecular modelling indicate that a negative charge at Ser²⁶ of CaMKII γ inhibits the catalytic activity of the enzyme towards its autophosphorylation site at Thr²⁸⁷ most probably by blocking ATP binding. We propose that Ser²⁶ phosphorylation constitutes an important mechanism for switching off CaMKII activity.

  15. Rosuvastatin activates ATP-binding cassette transporter A1-dependent efflux ex vivo and promotes reverse cholesterol transport in macrophage cells in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Tomohiko; Miura, Shin-ichiro; Tanigawa, Hiroyuki; Kuwano, Takashi; Zhang, Bo; Uehara, Yoshinari; Saku, Keijiro

    2014-10-01

    It is controversial whether statins improve high-density lipoprotein (HDL) function, which plays an important role in reverse cholesterol transport in vivo. The aim of the present study was to clarify the effects of rosuvastatin and atorvastatin on reverse cholesterol transport in macrophage cells in vivo and their underlying mechanisms. Male C57BL mice were divided into 3 groups (rosuvastatin, atorvastatin, and control groups) and orally administered rosuvastatin, atorvastatin, or placebo for 6 weeks under feeding with a 0.5% cholesterol+10% coconut oil diet. After administration, although there were no changes in plasma HDL cholesterol levels among the groups, plasma from the rosuvastatin group showed an increased ability to promote ATP-binding cassette transporter A1-mediated cholesterol efflux ex vivo. In addition, capillary electrophoresis revealed a shift in HDL toward the pre-β HDL fraction only in the rosuvastatin group. Mice in all 3 groups were intraperitoneally injected with (3)H-cholesterol-labeled and cholesterol-loaded macrophages and then were monitored for the appearance of (3)H-tracer in plasma and feces. The amount of (3)H-tracer excreted into feces during 48 hours in the rosuvastatin group was greater than that in the control group. Finally, (3)H-cholesteryl oleate-HDL was intravenously injected into all groups, blood samples were taken, and the count of (3)H-cholesterol was analyzed. Plasma (3)H-cholesteryl oleate-HDL changed similarly, and no differences in fractional catabolic rates were observed. Rosuvastatin enhanced the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1-dependent HDL efflux function of reverse cholesterol transport, and this finding highlights the potential of rosuvastatin for the regression of atherosclerosis. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. The Varicella-Zoster Virus Immediate-Early 63 protein affects chromatin controlled gene transcription in a cell-type dependent manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bontems Sébastien

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Varicella Zoster Virus Immediate Early 63 protein (IE63 has been shown to be essential for VZV replication, and critical for latency establishment. The activity of the protein as a transcriptional regulator is not fully clear yet. Using transient transfection assays, IE63 has been shown to repress viral and cellular promoters containing typical TATA boxes by interacting with general transcription factors. Results In this paper, IE63 regulation properties on endogenous gene expression were evaluated using an oligonucleotide-based micro-array approach. We found that IE63 modulates the transcription of only a few genes in HeLa cells including genes implicated in transcription or immunity. Furthermore, we showed that this effect is mediated by a modification of RNA POL II binding on the promoters tested and that IE63 phosphorylation was essential for these effects. In MeWo cells, the number of genes whose transcription was modified by IE63 was somewhat higher, including genes implicated in signal transduction, transcription, immunity, and heat-shock signalling. While IE63 did not modify the basal expression of several NF-κB dependent genes such as IL-8, ICAM-1, and IκBα, it modulates transcription of these genes upon TNFα induction. This effect was obviously correlated with the amount of p65 binding to the promoter of these genes and with histone H3 acetylation and HDAC-3 removal. Conclusion While IE63 only affected transcription of a small number of cellular genes, it interfered with the TNF-inducibility of several NF-κB dependent genes by the accelerated resynthesis of the inhibitor IκBα.

  17. Optical tweezers stretching of chromatin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pope, L.H.; Bennink, Martin L.; Greve, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Recently significant success has emerged from exciting research involving chromatin stretching using optical tweezers. These experiments, in which a single chromatin fibre is attached by one end to a micron-sized bead held in an optical trap and to a solid surface or second bead via the other end,

  18. Epigenetics & chromatin: Interactions and processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Henikoff (Steven); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractOn 11 to 13 March 2013, BioMed Central will be hosting its inaugural conference, Epigenetics & Chromatin: Interactions and Processes, at Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, MA, USA. Epigenetics & Chromatin has now launched a special article series based on the general themes of the

  19. Chromatin condensation during terminal erythropoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Baobing; Yang, Jing; Ji, Peng

    2016-09-02

    Mammalian terminal erythropoiesis involves gradual but dramatic chromatin condensation steps that are essential for cell differentiation. Chromatin and nuclear condensation is followed by a unique enucleation process, which is believed to liberate more spaces for hemoglobin enrichment and enable the generation of a physically flexible mature red blood cell. Although these processes have been known for decades, the mechanisms are still unclear. Our recent study reveals an unexpected nuclear opening formation during mouse terminal erythropoiesis that requires caspase-3 activity. Major histones, except H2AZ, are partially released from the opening, which is important for chromatin condensation. Block of the nuclear opening through caspase inhibitor or knockdown of caspase-3 inhibits chromatin condensation and enucleation. We also demonstrate that nuclear opening and histone release are cell cycle regulated. These studies reveal a novel mechanism for chromatin condensation in mammalia terminal erythropoiesis.

  20. Determinants of Sir2-Mediated, Silent Chromatin Cohesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Fan; Chou, Chia-Ching; Gartenberg, Marc R

    2016-08-01

    Cohesin associates with distinct sites on chromosomes to mediate sister chromatid cohesion. Single cohesin complexes are thought to bind by encircling both sister chromatids in a topological embrace. Transcriptionally repressed chromosomal domains in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae represent specialized sites of cohesion where cohesin binds silent chromatin in a Sir2-dependent fashion. In this study, we investigated the molecular basis for Sir2-mediated cohesion. We identified a cluster of charged surface residues of Sir2, collectively termed the EKDK motif, that are required for cohesin function. In addition, we demonstrated that Esc8, a Sir2-interacting factor, is also required for silent chromatin cohesion. Esc8 was previously shown to associate with Isw1, the enzymatic core of ISW1 chromatin remodelers, to form a variant of the ISW1a chromatin remodeling complex. When ESC8 was deleted or the EKDK motif was mutated, cohesin binding at silenced chromatin domains persisted but cohesion of the domains was abolished. The data are not consistent with cohesin embracing both sister chromatids within silent chromatin domains. Transcriptional silencing remains largely intact in strains lacking ESC8 or bearing EKDK mutations, indicating that silencing and cohesion are separable functions of Sir2 and silent chromatin. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Titration and hysteresis in epigenetic chromatin silencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayarian, Adel; Sengupta, Anirvan M.

    2013-06-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms of silencing via heritable chromatin modifications play a major role in gene regulation and cell fate specification. We consider a model of epigenetic chromatin silencing in budding yeast and study the bifurcation diagram and characterize the bistable and the monostable regimes. The main focus of this paper is to examine how the perturbations altering the activity of histone modifying enzymes affect the epigenetic states. We analyze the implications of having the total number of silencing proteins, given by the sum of proteins bound to the nucleosomes and the ones available in the ambient, to be constant. This constraint couples different regions of chromatin through the shared reservoir of ambient silencing proteins. We show that the response of the system to perturbations depends dramatically on the titration effect caused by the above constraint. In particular, for a certain range of overall abundance of silencing proteins, the hysteresis loop changes qualitatively with certain jump replaced by continuous merger of different states. In addition, we find a nonmonotonic dependence of gene expression on the rate of histone deacetylation activity of Sir2. We discuss how these qualitative predictions of our model could be compared with experimental studies of the yeast system under anti-silencing drugs.

  2. Chromatin remodeling in plant development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarillo, José A; Piñeiro, Manuel; Cubas, Pilar; Martínez-Zapater, José M

    2009-01-01

    Plant development results from specific patterns of gene expression that are tightly regulated in a spatio-temporal manner. Chromatin remodeling plays a central role in establishing these expression patterns and maintaining epigenetic transcriptional states through successive rounds of mitosis that take place within a cell lineage. Plant epigenetic switches occur not only at the embryo stage, but also during postembryonic developmental transitions, suggesting that chromatin remodeling activities in plants can provide a higher degree of regulatory flexibility which probably underlies their developmental plasticity. Here, we highlight recent progress in the understanding of plant chromatin dynamic organization, facilitating the activation or repression of specific sets of genes involved in different developmental programs and integrating them with the response to environmental signals. Chromatin conformation controls gene expression both in actively dividing undifferentiated cells and in those already fate-determined. In this context, we first describe chromatin reorganization activities required to maintain meristem function stable through DNA replication and cell division. Organ initiation at the apex, with emphasis on reproductive development, is next discussed to uncover the chromatin events involved in the establishment and maintenance of expression patterns associated with differentiating cells; this is illustrated with the complex epigenetic regulation of the Arabidopsis floral repressor FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). Finally, we discuss the involvement of chromatin remodeling in plant responses to environmental cues and to different types of stress conditions.

  3. Chromatin and Transcription in Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rando, Oliver J.; Winston, Fred

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms by which chromatin structure controls eukaryotic transcription has been an intense area of investigation for the past 25 years. Many of the key discoveries that created the foundation for this field came from studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, including the discovery of the role of chromatin in transcriptional silencing, as well as the discovery of chromatin-remodeling factors and histone modification activities. Since that time, studies in yeast have continued to contribute in leading ways. This review article summarizes the large body of yeast studies in this field. PMID:22345607

  4. The binding of lamin B receptor to chromatin is regulated by phosphorylation in the RS region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Makoto; Takeuchi, Masaki; Ito, Hiromi; Furukawa, Kazuhiro; Sugimoto, Kenji; Omata, Saburo; Horigome, Tsuneyoshi

    2002-02-01

    Binding of lamin B receptor (LBR) to chromatin was studied by means of an in vitro assay system involving recombinant fragments of human LBR and Xenopus sperm chromatin. Glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-fused proteins including LBR fragments containing the N-terminal region (residues 1-53) and arginine-serine repeat-containing region (residues 54-89) bound to chromatin. The binding of GST-fusion proteins incorporating the N-terminal and arginine-serine repeat-containing regions to chromatin was suppressed by mild trypsinization of the chromatin and by pretreatment with a DNA solution. A new cell-free system for analyzing the cell cycle-dependent binding of a protein to chromatin was developed from recombinant proteins, a Xenopus egg cytosol fraction and sperm chromatin. The system was applied to analyse the binding of LBR to chromatin. It was shown that the binding of LBR fragments to chromatin was stimulated by phosphorylation in the arginine-serine repeat-containing region by a protein kinase(s) in a synthetic phase egg cytosol. However, the binding of LBR fragments was suppressed by phosphorylation at different residues in the same region by a kinase(s) in a mitotic phase cytosol. These results suggested that the cell cycle-dependent binding of LBR to chromatin is regulated by phosphorylation in the arginine-serine repeat-containing region by multiple kinases.

  5. Dexamethasone Enhances ATP-Induced Inflammatory Responses in Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yi; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2010-01-01

    The purinergic nucleotide ATP is released from stressed cells and is implicated in vascular inflammation. Glucocorticoids are essential to stress responses and are used therapeutically, yet little information is available that describes the effects of glucocorticoids on ATP-induced inflammation. In a human microvascular endothelial cell line, extracellular ATP-induced interleukin (IL)-6 secretion in a dose- and time-dependent manner. When cells were pretreated with dexamethasone, a prototypic glucocorticoid, ATP-induced IL-6 production was enhanced in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Mifepristone, a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, blocked these effects. ATP-induced IL-6 release was significantly inhibited by a phospholipase C inhibitor [1-[6-[((17β)-3-methoxyestra-1,3,5[10]-trien-17-yl)amino]hexyl]-1H-pyrrole-2,5-dione (U73122)] (63.2 ± 3%, p dexamethasone induced mRNA expression of the purinergic P2Y2 receptor (P2Y2R) 1.8- ± 0.1-fold and, when stimulated with ATP, enhanced Ca2+ release and augmented IL-6 mRNA expression. Silencing of the P2Y2R by its small interfering RNA decreased ATP-induced IL-6 production by 81 ± 1% (p Dexamethasone enhanced the transcription rate of P2Y2R mRNA and induced a dose-related increase in the activity of the P2Y2R promoter. Furthermore, dexamethasone-enhanced ATP induction of adhesion molecule transcription and augmented the release of IL-8. Dexamethasone leads to an unanticipated enhancement of endothelial inflammatory mediator production by extracellular ATP via a P2Y2R-dependent mechanism. These data define a novel positive feedback loop of glucocorticoids and ATP-induced endothelial inflammation. PMID:20826566

  6. Brain Function and Chromatin Plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Dulac, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    The characteristics of epigenetic control, including the potential for long-lasting, stable effects on gene expression that outlive an initial transient signal, could be of singular importance for post-mitotic neurons, which are subject to changes with short- to long-lasting influence on their activity and connectivity. Persistent changes in chromatin structure are thought to contribute to mechanisms of epigenetic inheritance. Recent advances in chromatin biology offer new avenues to investig...

  7. Chromatin fiber allostery and the epigenetic code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesne, Annick; Foray, Nicolas; Cathala, Guy; Forné, Thierry; Wong, Hua; Victor, Jean-Marc

    2015-02-01

    The notion of allostery introduced for proteins about fifty years ago has been extended since then to DNA allostery, where a locally triggered DNA structural transition remotely controls other DNA-binding events. We further extend this notion and propose that chromatin fiber allosteric transitions, induced by histone-tail covalent modifications, may play a key role in transcriptional regulation. We present an integrated scenario articulating allosteric mechanisms at different scales: allosteric transitions of the condensed chromatin fiber induced by histone-tail acetylation modify the mechanical constraints experienced by the embedded DNA, thus possibly controlling DNA-binding of allosteric transcription factors or further allosteric mechanisms at the linker DNA level. At a higher scale, different epigenetic constraints delineate different statistically dominant subsets of accessible chromatin fiber conformations, which each favors the assembly of dedicated regulatory complexes, as detailed on the emblematic example of the mouse Igf2-H19 gene locus and its parental imprinting. This physical view offers a mechanistic and spatially structured explanation of the observed correlation between transcriptional activity and histone modifications. The evolutionary origin of allosteric control supports to speak of an ‘epigenetic code’, by which events involved in transcriptional regulation are encoded in histone modifications in a context-dependent way.

  8. Mutations in the beta-subunit Thr(159) and Glu(184) of the Rhodospirillum rubrum F(0)F(1) ATP synthase reveal differences in ligands for the coupled Mg(2+)- and decoupled Ca(2+)-dependent F(0)F(1) activities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nathanson, L; Gromet-Elhanan, Z

    2000-01-01

    ...) ATP synthase of Rhodospirillum rubrum with Ser, Ala, or Val and the Glu(184) with Gln or Lys. The mutant beta subunits were isolated and tested for their capacity to assemble into a beta-less chromatophore F...

  9. How Native and Alien Metal Cations Bind ATP: Implications for Lithium as a Therapeutic Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudev, Todor; Grauffel, Cédric; Lim, Carmay

    2017-02-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the major energy currency of the cell, exists in solution mostly as ATP-Mg. Recent experiments suggest that Mg2+ interacts with the highly charged ATP triphosphate group and Li+ can co-bind with the native Mg2+ to form ATP-Mg-Li and modulate the neuronal purine receptor response. However, it is unclear how the negatively charged ATP triphosphate group binds Mg2+ and Li+ (i.e. which phosphate group(s) bind Mg2+/Li+) and how the ATP solution conformation depends on the type of metal cation and the metal-binding mode. Here, we reveal the preferred ATP-binding mode of Mg2+/Li+ alone and combined: Mg2+ prefers to bind ATP tridentately to each of the three phosphate groups, but Li+ prefers to bind bidentately to the terminal two phosphates. We show that the solution ATP conformation depends on the cation and its binding site/mode, but it does not change significantly when Li+ binds to Mg2+-loaded ATP. Hence, ATP-Mg-Li, like Mg2+-ATP, can fit in the ATP-binding site of the host enzyme/receptor, activating specific signaling pathways.

  10. The Role of ATP in the Regulation of NCAM Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hübschmann, Martin; Skladchikova, Galina

    2008-01-01

    Extracellular ATP is an abundant signaling molecule that has a number of functions in the nervous system. It is released by both neurons and glial cells, activates purinergic receptors and acts as a trophic factor as well as a neurotransmitter. In this review, we summarize the evidence for a dire...... shedding, possibly affecting the structural plasticity associated with learning and memory.......Extracellular ATP is an abundant signaling molecule that has a number of functions in the nervous system. It is released by both neurons and glial cells, activates purinergic receptors and acts as a trophic factor as well as a neurotransmitter. In this review, we summarize the evidence for a direct...... ATP-NCAM interaction and discuss its functional implications. The ectodomain of NCAM contains the ATP binding Walker motif A and has intrinsic ATPase activity, which could modulate NCAM-dependent signaling processes. NCAM interacts directly with and signals through FGFR. The NCAM binding site to ATP...

  11. Two-step ATP-driven opening of cohesin head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos-Alcalde, Íñigo; Mendieta-Moreno, Jesús I; Puisac, Beatriz; Gil-Rodríguez, María Concepción; Hernández-Marcos, María; Soler-Polo, Diego; Ramos, Feliciano J; Ortega, José; Pié, Juan; Mendieta, Jesús; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino

    2017-06-12

    The cohesin ring is a protein complex composed of four core subunits: Smc1A, Smc3, Rad21 and Stag1/2. It is involved in chromosome segregation, DNA repair, chromatin organization and transcription regulation. Opening of the ring occurs at the "head" structure, formed of the ATPase domains of Smc1A and Smc3 and Rad21. We investigate the mechanisms of the cohesin ring opening using techniques of free molecular dynamics (MD), steered MD and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics MD (QM/MM MD). The study allows the thorough analysis of the opening events at the atomic scale: i) ATP hydrolysis at the Smc1A site, evaluating the role of the carboxy-terminal domain of Rad21 in the process; ii) the activation of the Smc3 site potentially mediated by the movement of specific amino acids; and iii) opening of the head domains after the two ATP hydrolysis events. Our study suggests that the cohesin ring opening is triggered by a sequential activation of the ATP sites in which ATP hydrolysis at the Smc1A site induces ATPase activity at the Smc3 site. Our analysis also provides an explanation for the effect of pathogenic variants related to cohesinopathies and cancer.

  12. ATP release and purinergic signaling in NLRP3 inflammasome activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle eCOUILLIN

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The NLRP3 inflammasome is a protein complex involved in IL-1β and IL-18 processing that senses pathogen- and danger-associated molecular patterns. One step- or two step- models have been proposed to explain the tight regulation of IL-1β production during inflammation. Moreover, cellular stimulation triggers ATP release and subsequent activation of purinergic receptors at the cell surface. Importantly some studies have reported roles for extracellular ATP (eATP, in NLRP3 inflammasome activation in response to PAMPs and DAMPs. In this mini review, we will discuss the link between active ATP release, purinergic signaling and NLRP3 inflammasome activation. We will focus on the role of autocrine or paracrine ATP export in particle-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation and discuss how particle activators are competent to induce maturation and secretion of IL-1β through a process that involves, as a first event, extracellular release of endogenous ATP through hemichannel opening, and as a second event, signaling through purinergic receptors that trigger NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Finally, we will review the evidence for ATP as a key proinflammatory mediator released by dying cells. In particular we will discuss how cancer cells dying via autophagy trigger ATP-dependent NLRP3 inflammasome activation in the macrophages engulfing them, eliciting an immunogenic response against tumors.

  13. A chromatin insulator driving three-dimensional Polycomb response element (PRE) contacts and Polycomb association with the chromatin fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comet, Itys; Schuettengruber, Bernd; Sexton, Tom; Cavalli, Giacomo

    2011-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression involves long-distance communication between regulatory elements and target promoters, but how this is achieved remains unknown. Insulator elements have been proposed to modulate the communication between regulatory elements and promoters due to their ability to insulate genes from regulatory elements or to take part in long-distance interactions. Using a high-resolution chromatin conformation capture (H3C) method, we show that the Drosophila gypsy insulator behaves as a conformational chromatin border that is able to prohibit contacts between a Polycomb response element (PRE) and a distal promoter. On the other hand, two spaced gypsy elements form a chromatin loop that is able to bring an upstream PRE in contact with a downstream gene to mediate its repression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) profiles of the Polycomb protein and its associated H3K27me3 histone mark reflect this insulator-dependent chromatin conformation, suggesting that Polycomb action at a distance can be organized by local chromatin topology. PMID:21262819

  14. RNA is an integral component of chromatin that contributes to its structural organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Rodríguez-Campos

    Full Text Available Chromatin structure is influenced by multiples factors, such as pH, temperature, nature and concentration of counterions, post-translational modifications of histones and binding of structural non-histone proteins. RNA is also known to contribute to the regulation of chromatin structure as chromatin-induced gene silencing was shown to depend on the RNAi machinery in S. pombe, plants and Drosophila. Moreover, both in Drosophila and mammals, dosage compensation requires the contribution of specific non-coding RNAs. However, whether RNA itself plays a direct structural role in chromatin is not known. Here, we report results that indicate a general structural role for RNA in eukaryotic chromatin. RNA is found associated to purified chromatin prepared from chicken liver, or cultured Drosophila S2 cells, and treatment with RNase A alters the structural properties of chromatin. Our results indicate that chromatin-associated RNAs, which account for 2%-5% of total chromatin-associated nucleic acids, are polyA(- and show a size similar to that of the DNA contained in the corresponding chromatin fragments. Chromatin-associated RNA(s are not likely to correspond to nascent transcripts as they are also found bound to chromatin when cells are treated with alpha-amanitin. After treatment with RNase A, chromatin fragments of molecular weight >3.000 bp of DNA showed reduced sedimentation through sucrose gradients and increased sensitivity to micrococcal nuclease digestion. This structural transition, which is observed both at euchromatic and heterochromatic regions, proceeds without loss of histone H1 or any significant change in core-histone composition and integrity.

  15. Extracellular ATP inhibits root gravitropism at concentrations that inhibit polar auxin transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wenqiang; Brady, Shari R.; Sun, Yu; Muday, Gloria K.; Roux, Stanley J.

    2003-01-01

    Raising the level of extracellular ATP to mM concentrations similar to those found inside cells can block gravitropism of Arabidopsis roots. When plants are grown in Murashige and Skoog medium supplied with 1 mM ATP, their roots grow horizontally instead of growing straight down. Medium with 2 mM ATP induces root curling, and 3 mM ATP stimulates lateral root growth. When plants are transferred to medium containing exogenous ATP, the gravity response is reduced or in some cases completely blocked by ATP. Equivalent concentrations of ADP or inorganic phosphate have slight but usually statistically insignificant effects, suggesting the specificity of ATP in these responses. The ATP effects may be attributable to the disturbance of auxin distribution in roots by exogenously applied ATP, because extracellular ATP can alter the pattern of auxin-induced gene expression in DR5-beta-glucuronidase transgenic plants and increase the response sensitivity of plant roots to exogenously added auxin. The presence of extracellular ATP also decreases basipetal auxin transport in a dose-dependent fashion in both maize (Zea mays) and Arabidopsis roots and increases the retention of [(3)H]indole-3-acetic acid in root tips of maize. Taken together, these results suggest that the inhibitory effects of extracellular ATP on auxin distribution may happen at the level of auxin export. The potential role of the trans-plasma membrane ATP gradient in auxin export and plant root gravitropism is discussed.

  16. Chromatin-remodeling factor OsINO80 is involved in regulation of gibberellin biosynthesis and is crucial for rice plant growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao; Liu, Yuhao; Shen, Wen-Hui; Yu, Yu; Dong, Aiwu

    2017-10-17

    The phytohormone gibberellin (GA) plays essential roles in plant growth and development. Here, we report that OsINO80, a conserved ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling factor in rice (Oryza sativa), functions in diverse biological processes and GA biosynthesis. OsINO80-knockdown mutants, derived from either T-DNA insertion or RNA interference, display typical GA-deficient phenotypes, including dwarfism, reduced cell length, late flowering, retarded seed germination and impaired reproductive development. Consistently, transcriptome analyses reveal that OsINO80 knockdown results in down-regulation by more than two-fold of over 1000 genes, including the GA biosynthesis genes CPS1 and GA3ox2, and the dwarf phenotype of OsINO80-knockdown mutants can be rescued by the application of exogenous GA3. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments show that OsINO80 directly binds to the chromatin of CPS1 and GA3ox2 loci. Biochemical assays prove that OsINO80 specially interacts with histone variant H2A.Z and the H2A.Z enrichments at CPS1 and GA3ox2 is decreased in OsINO80-knockdown mutants. Thus, our study identified a new rice chromatin-remodeling factor, OsINO80, and demonstrated that OsINO80 is involved in regulation of the GA biosynthesis pathway and plays critical functions at many aspects of rice plant growth and development. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Chromatin challenges during DNA replication and repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Anja; Rocha, Walter; Verreault, Alain

    2007-01-01

    Inheritance and maintenance of the DNA sequence and its organization into chromatin are central for eukaryotic life. To orchestrate DNA-replication and -repair processes in the context of chromatin is a challenge, both in terms of accessibility and maintenance of chromatin organization. To meet...... the challenge of maintenance, cells have evolved efficient nucleosome-assembly pathways and chromatin-maturation mechanisms that reproduce chromatin organization in the wake of DNA replication and repair. The aim of this Review is to describe how these pathways operate and to highlight how the epigenetic...... landscape may be stably maintained even in the face of dramatic changes in chromatin structure....

  18. Prediction of highly expressed genes in microbes based on chromatin accessibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willenbrock, Hanni; Ussery, David

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is well known that gene expression is dependent on chromatin structure in eukaryotes and it is likely that chromatin can play a role in bacterial gene expression as well. Here, we use a nucleosomal position preference measure of anisotropic DNA flexibility to predict highly expressed...

  19. Chromatin remodeling in mammalian embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabot, Birgit; Cabot, Ryan A

    2018-03-01

    The mammalian embryo undergoes a dramatic amount of epigenetic remodeling during the first week of development. In this review, we discuss several epigenetic changes that happen over the course of cleavage development, focusing on covalent marks (e.g., histone methylation and acetylation) and non-covalent remodeling (chromatin remodeling via remodeling complexes; e.g., SWI/SNF-mediated chromatin remodeling). Comparisons are also drawn between remodeling events that occur in embryos from a variety of mammalian species. © 2018 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  20. Dynamic Regulation of Cell Volume and Extracellular ATP of Human Erythrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Florencia Leal Denis

    Full Text Available The peptide mastoparan 7 (MST7 triggered in human erythrocytes (rbcs the release of ATP and swelling. Since swelling is a well-known inducer of ATP release, and extracellular (ATPe, interacting with P (purinergic receptors, can affect cell volume (Vr, we explored the dynamic regulation between Vr and ATPe.We made a quantitative assessment of MST7-dependent kinetics of Vr and of [ATPe], both in the absence and presence of blockers of ATP efflux, swelling and P receptors.In rbcs 10 μM MST7 promoted acute, strongly correlated changes in [ATPe] and Vr. Whereas MST7 induced increases of 10% in Vr and 190 nM in [ATPe], blocking swelling in a hyperosmotic medium + MST7 reduced [ATPe] by 40%. Pre-incubation of rbcs with 10 μM of either carbenoxolone or probenecid, two inhibitors of the ATP conduit pannexin 1, reduced [ATPe] by 40-50% and swelling by 40-60%, while in the presence of 80 U/mL apyrase, an ATPe scavenger, cell swelling was prevented. While exposure to 10 μM NF110, a blocker of ATP-P2X receptors mediating sodium influx, reduced [ATPe] by 48%, and swelling by 80%, incubation of cells in sodium free medium reduced swelling by 92%.Results were analyzed by means of a mathematical model where ATPe kinetics and Vr kinetics were mutually regulated. Model dependent fit to experimental data showed that, upon MST7 exposure, ATP efflux required a fast 1960-fold increase of ATP permeability, mediated by two kinetically different conduits, both of which were activated by swelling and inactivated by time. Both experimental and theoretical results suggest that, following MST7 exposure, ATP is released via two conduits, one of which is mediated by pannexin 1. The accumulated ATPe activates P2X receptors, followed by sodium influx, resulting in cell swelling, which in turn further activates ATP release. Thus swelling and P2X receptors constitute essential components of a positive feedback loop underlying ATP-induced ATP release of rbcs.

  1. Transcriptional networks and chromatin remodeling controlling adipogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siersbæk, Rasmus; Nielsen, Ronni; Mandrup, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    remodeling have revealed 'snapshots' of this cascade and the chromatin landscape at specific time-points of differentiation. These studies demonstrate that multiple adipogenic transcription factors co-occupy hotspots characterized by an open chromatin structure and specific epigenetic modifications...

  2. Guarding against Collateral Damage during Chromatin Transactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altmeyer, Matthias; Lukas, Jiri

    2013-01-01

    Signal amplifications are vital for chromatin function, yet they also bear the risk of transforming into unrestrained, self-escalating, and potentially harmful responses. Examples of inbuilt limitations are emerging, revealing how chromatin transactions are confined within physiological boundaries....

  3. A Long-Distance Chromatin Affair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Denker, Annette; de Laat, Wouter

    2015-01-01

    Changes in transcription factor binding sequences result in correlated changes in chromatin composition locally and at sites hundreds of kilobases away. New studies demonstrate that this concordance is mediated via spatial chromatin interactions that constitute regulatory modules of the human

  4. The lipid flippase heterodimer ATP8B1-CDC50A is essential for surface expression of the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (SLC10A2/ASBT) in intestinal Caco-2 cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Mark, Vincent A.; de Waart, D. Rudi; Ho-Mok, Kam S.; Tabbers, Merit M.; Voogt, Heleen W.; Oude Elferink, Ronald P. J.; Knisely, A. S.; Paulusma, Coen C.

    2014-01-01

    Deficiency of the phospholipid flippase ATPase, aminophospholipid transporter, class I, type 8B, member 1 (ATP8B1) causes progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 1 (PFIC1) and benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis type 1 (BRIC1). Apart from cholestasis, many patients also suffer from

  5. How chromatin is remodelled during DNA repair of UV-induced DNA damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirong Yu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Global genome nucleotide excision repair removes DNA damage from transcriptionally silent regions of the genome. Relatively little is known about the molecular events that initiate and regulate this process in the context of chromatin. We've shown that, in response to UV radiation-induced DNA damage, increased histone H3 acetylation at lysine 9 and 14 correlates with changes in chromatin structure, and these alterations are associated with efficient global genome nucleotide excision repair in yeast. These changes depend on the presence of the Rad16 protein. Remarkably, constitutive hyperacetylation of histone H3 can suppress the requirement for Rad7 and Rad16, two components of a global genome repair complex, during repair. This reveals the connection between histone H3 acetylation and DNA repair. Here, we investigate how chromatin structure is modified following UV irradiation to facilitate DNA repair in yeast. Using a combination of chromatin immunoprecipitation to measure histone acetylation levels, histone acetylase occupancy in chromatin, MNase digestion, or restriction enzyme endonuclease accessibility assays to analyse chromatin structure, and finally nucleotide excision repair assays to examine DNA repair, we demonstrate that global genome nucleotide excision repair drives UV-induced chromatin remodelling by controlling histone H3 acetylation levels in chromatin. The concerted action of the ATPase and C3HC4 RING domains of Rad16 combine to regulate the occupancy of the histone acetyl transferase Gcn5 on chromatin in response to UV damage. We conclude that the global genome repair complex in yeast regulates UV-induced histone H3 acetylation by controlling the accessibility of the histone acetyl transferase Gcn5 in chromatin. The resultant changes in histone H3 acetylation promote chromatin remodelling necessary for efficient repair of DNA damage. Recent evidence suggests that GCN5 plays a role in NER in human cells. Our work provides

  6. How chromatin is remodelled during DNA repair of UV-induced DNA damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shirong; Teng, Yumin; Waters, Raymond; Reed, Simon H

    2011-06-01

    Global genome nucleotide excision repair removes DNA damage from transcriptionally silent regions of the genome. Relatively little is known about the molecular events that initiate and regulate this process in the context of chromatin. We've shown that, in response to UV radiation-induced DNA damage, increased histone H3 acetylation at lysine 9 and 14 correlates with changes in chromatin structure, and these alterations are associated with efficient global genome nucleotide excision repair in yeast. These changes depend on the presence of the Rad16 protein. Remarkably, constitutive hyperacetylation of histone H3 can suppress the requirement for Rad7 and Rad16, two components of a global genome repair complex, during repair. This reveals the connection between histone H3 acetylation and DNA repair. Here, we investigate how chromatin structure is modified following UV irradiation to facilitate DNA repair in yeast. Using a combination of chromatin immunoprecipitation to measure histone acetylation levels, histone acetylase occupancy in chromatin, MNase digestion, or restriction enzyme endonuclease accessibility assays to analyse chromatin structure, and finally nucleotide excision repair assays to examine DNA repair, we demonstrate that global genome nucleotide excision repair drives UV-induced chromatin remodelling by controlling histone H3 acetylation levels in chromatin. The concerted action of the ATPase and C3HC4 RING domains of Rad16 combine to regulate the occupancy of the histone acetyl transferase Gcn5 on chromatin in response to UV damage. We conclude that the global genome repair complex in yeast regulates UV-induced histone H3 acetylation by controlling the accessibility of the histone acetyl transferase Gcn5 in chromatin. The resultant changes in histone H3 acetylation promote chromatin remodelling necessary for efficient repair of DNA damage. Recent evidence suggests that GCN5 plays a role in NER in human cells. Our work provides important insight into

  7. SMC complexes orchestrate the mitotic chromatin interaction landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakui, Yasutaka; Uhlmann, Frank

    2017-09-21

    Chromatin is a very long DNA-protein complex that controls the expression and inheritance of the genetic information. Chromatin is stored within the nucleus in interphase and further compacted into chromosomes during mitosis. This process, known as chromosome condensation, is essential for faithful segregation of genomic DNA into daughter cells. Condensin and cohesin, members of the structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) family, are fundamental for chromosome architecture, both for establishment of chromatin structure in the interphase nucleus and for the formation of condensed chromosomes in mitosis. These ring-shaped SMC complexes are thought to regulate the interactions between DNA strands by topologically entrapping DNA. How this activity shapes chromosomes is not yet understood. Recent high throughput chromosome conformation capture studies revealed how chromatin is reorganized during the cell cycle and have started to explore the role of SMC complexes in mitotic chromatin architecture. Here, we summarize these findings and discuss the conserved nature of chromosome condensation in eukaryotes. We highlight the unexpected finding that condensin-dependent intra-chromosomal interactions in mitosis increase within a distinctive distance range that is characteristic for an organism, while longer and shorter-range interactions are suppressed. This reveals important molecular insight into chromosome architecture.

  8. Supervised learning method for predicting chromatin boundary associated insulator elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarz, Paweł; Wilczyński, Bartek

    2014-12-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the DNA material is densely packed inside the nucleus in the form of a DNA-protein complex structure called chromatin. Since the actual conformation of the chromatin fiber defines the possible regulatory interactions between genes and their regulatory elements, it is very important to understand the mechanisms governing folding of chromatin. In this paper, we show that supervised methods for predicting chromatin boundary elements are much more effective than the currently popular unsupervised methods. Using boundary locations from published Hi-C experiments and modEncode tracks as features, we can tell the insulator elements from randomly selected background sequences with great accuracy. In addition to accurate predictions of the training boundary elements, our classifiers make new predictions. Many of them correspond to the locations of known insulator elements. The key features used for predicting boundary elements do not depend on the prediction method. Because of its miniscule size, chromatin state cannot be measured directly, we need to rely on indirect measurements, such as ChIP-Seq and fill in the gaps with computational models. Our results show that currently, at least in the model organisms, where we have many measurements including ChIP-Seq and Hi-C, we can make accurate predictions of insulator positions.

  9. Impact of chromatin structure on PR signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Lars; Hager, Gordon L

    2012-01-01

    The progesterone receptor (PR) interacts with chromatin in a highly dynamic manner that requires ongoing chromatin remodeling, interaction with chaparones and activity of the proteasome. Here we discuss dynamic interaction of steroid receptor with chromatin, with special attention not only to PR ...

  10. Oxidative stress signaling to chromatin in health and disease

    KAUST Repository

    Kreuz, Sarah

    2016-06-20

    Oxidative stress has a significant impact on the development and progression of common human pathologies, including cancer, diabetes, hypertension and neurodegenerative diseases. Increasing evidence suggests that oxidative stress globally influences chromatin structure, DNA methylation, enzymatic and non-enzymatic post-translational modifications of histones and DNA-binding proteins. The effects of oxidative stress on these chromatin alterations mediate a number of cellular changes, including modulation of gene expression, cell death, cell survival and mutagenesis, which are disease-driving mechanisms in human pathologies. Targeting oxidative stress-dependent pathways is thus a promising strategy for the prevention and treatment of these diseases. We summarize recent research developments connecting oxidative stress and chromatin regulation.

  11. Oxidative stress signaling to chromatin in health and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuz, Sarah; Fischle, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress has a significant impact on the development and progression of common human pathologies, including cancer, diabetes, hypertension and neurodegenerative diseases. Increasing evidence suggests that oxidative stress globally influences chromatin structure, DNA methylation, enzymatic and non-enzymatic post-translational modifications of histones and DNA-binding proteins. The effects of oxidative stress on these chromatin alterations mediate a number of cellular changes, including modulation of gene expression, cell death, cell survival and mutagenesis, which are disease-driving mechanisms in human pathologies. Targeting oxidative stress-dependent pathways is thus a promising strategy for the prevention and treatment of these diseases. We summarize recent research developments connecting oxidative stress and chromatin regulation. PMID:27319358

  12. Spectroscopic study of laser irradiated chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radu, Liliana; Mihailescu, I.; Gazdaru, Doina; Preoteasa, V.

    2013-04-01

    The effects of three UV excimer laser radiations, with wavelengths of 193, 248 and 282 nm respectively, on the structure of chromatin (the complex of deoxyribonucleic acid with proteins that exists in eukaryotic cells nuclei) were investigated. The chromatin was extracted from livers of Winstar rats. The spectroscopic methods used are: fluorescence (Förster) resonance energy transfer (FRET), time resolved fluorescence and steady-state fluorescence. A chromatin deoxyribonucleic acid radiolysis, a chromatin proteins damage and a change of the global chromatin structure on lasers action were indicated by this study. It exists some small differences between the actions of these three laser radiations.

  13. Spectroscopic study of laser irradiated chromatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radu, Liliana, E-mail: liliana1radu@gmail.com [V. Babes National Institute, Department of Molecular Genetics and Radiobiology (Romania); Mihailescu, I. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Department of Lasers (Romania); Gazdaru, Doina [Faculty of Physics, Bucharest University, Department of Biophysics (Romania); Preoteasa, V. [V. Babes National Institute, Department of Molecular Genetics and Radiobiology (Romania)

    2013-04-15

    The effects of three UV excimer laser radiations, with wavelengths of 193, 248 and 282 nm respectively, on the structure of chromatin (the complex of deoxyribonucleic acid with proteins that exists in eukaryotic cells nuclei) were investigated. The chromatin was extracted from livers of Winstar rats. The spectroscopic methods used are: fluorescence (Foerster) resonance energy transfer (FRET), time resolved fluorescence and steady-state fluorescence. A chromatin deoxyribonucleic acid radiolysis, a chromatin proteins damage and a change of the global chromatin structure on lasers action were indicated by this study. It exists some small differences between the actions of these three laser radiations.

  14. Plant chromatin warms up in Madrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarillo, José A; Gaudin, Valerie; Hennig, Lars; Köhler, Claudia; Piñeiro, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    The 3rd European Workshop on Plant Chromatin (EWPC) was held on August 2013 in Madrid, Spain. A number of different topics on plant chromatin were presented during the meeting, including new factors mediating Polycomb Group protein function in plants, chromatin-mediated reprogramming in plant developmental transitions, the role of histone variants, and newly identified chromatin remodeling factors. The function of interactions between chromatin and transcription factors in the modulation of gene expression, the role of chromatin dynamics in the control of nuclear processes and the influence of environmental factors on chromatin organization were also reported. In this report, we highlight some of the new insights emerging in this growing area of research, presented at the 3rd EWPC. PMID:24504145

  15. Open chromatin in plant genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenli; Zhang, Tao; Wu, Yufeng; Jiang, Jiming

    2014-01-01

    Sensitivity to DNase I digestion is an indicator of the accessibility and configuration of chromatin in eukaryotic genomes. Open chromatin exhibits high sensitivity to DNase I cleavage. DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSs) in eukaryotic genomes can be identified through DNase I treatment followed by sequencing (DNase-seq). DHSs are most frequently associated with various cis-regulatory DNA elements, including promoters, enhancers, and silencers in both animal and plant genomes. Genome-wide identification of DHSs provides an efficient method to interpret previously un-annotated regulatory DNA sequences. In this review, we provide an overview of the historical perspective of DHS research in eukaryotes. We summarize the main achievements of DHS research in model animal species and review the recent progress of DHS research in plants. We finally discuss possible future directions of using DHS as a tool in plant genomics research. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Chromatin structure in telomere dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra eGalati

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The establishment of a specific nucleoprotein structure, the telomere, is required to ensure the protection of chromosome ends from being recognized as DNA damage sites. Telomere shortening below a critical length triggers a DNA damage response that leads to replicative senescence. In normal human somatic cells, characterized by telomere shortening with each cell division, telomere uncapping is a regulated process associated with cell turnover. Nevertheless, telomere dysfunction has also been associated with genomic instability, cell transformation and cancer. Despite the essential role telomeres play in chromosome protection and in tumorigenesis, our knowledge of the chromatin structure involved in telomere maintenance is still limited. Here we review the recent findings on chromatin modifications associated with the dynamic changes of telomeres from protected to de-protected state and their role in telomere functions.

  17. Nuclear phosphoinositide regulation of chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Bree L; Blind, Raymond D

    2018-01-01

    Phospholipid signaling has clear connections to a wide array of cellular processes, particularly in gene expression and in controlling the chromatin biology of cells. However, most of the work elucidating how phospholipid signaling pathways contribute to cellular physiology have studied cytoplasmic membranes, while relatively little attention has been paid to the role of phospholipid signaling in the nucleus. Recent work from several labs has shown that nuclear phospholipid signaling can have important roles that are specific to this cellular compartment. This review focuses on the nuclear phospholipid functions and the activities of phospholipid signaling enzymes that regulate metazoan chromatin and gene expression. In particular, we highlight the roles that nuclear phosphoinositides play in several nuclear-driven physiological processes, such as differentiation, proliferation, and gene expression. Taken together, the recent discovery of several specifically nuclear phospholipid functions could have dramatic impact on our understanding of the fundamental mechanisms that enable tight control of cellular physiology. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Chromatin as active matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Ankit; Ganai, Nirmalendu; Sengupta, Surajit; Menon, Gautam I.

    2017-01-01

    Active matter models describe a number of biophysical phenomena at the cell and tissue scale. Such models explore the macroscopic consequences of driving specific soft condensed matter systems of biological relevance out of equilibrium through ‘active’ processes. Here, we describe how active matter models can be used to study the large-scale properties of chromosomes contained within the nuclei of human cells in interphase. We show that polymer models for chromosomes that incorporate inhomogeneous activity reproduce many general, yet little understood, features of large-scale nuclear architecture. These include: (i) the spatial separation of gene-rich, low-density euchromatin, predominantly found towards the centre of the nucleus, vis a vis. gene-poor, denser heterochromatin, typically enriched in proximity to the nuclear periphery, (ii) the differential positioning of individual gene-rich and gene-poor chromosomes, (iii) the formation of chromosome territories, as well as (iv), the weak size-dependence of the positions of individual chromosome centres-of-mass relative to the nuclear centre that is seen in some cell types. Such structuring is induced purely by the combination of activity and confinement and is absent in thermal equilibrium. We systematically explore active matter models for chromosomes, discussing how our model can be generalized to study variations in chromosome positioning across different cell types. The approach and model we outline here represent a preliminary attempt towards a quantitative, first-principles description of the large-scale architecture of the cell nucleus.

  19. ATP as a biological hydrotrope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Avinash; Malinovska, Liliana; Saha, Shambaditya; Wang, Jie; Alberti, Simon; Krishnan, Yamuna; Hyman, Anthony A

    2017-05-19

    Hydrotropes are small molecules that solubilize hydrophobic molecules in aqueous solutions. Typically, hydrotropes are amphiphilic molecules and differ from classical surfactants in that they have low cooperativity of aggregation and work at molar concentrations. Here, we show that adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has properties of a biological hydrotrope. It can both prevent the formation of and dissolve previously formed protein aggregates. This chemical property is manifested at physiological concentrations between 5 and 10 millimolar. Therefore, in addition to being an energy source for biological reactions, for which micromolar concentrations are sufficient, we propose that millimolar concentrations of ATP may act to keep proteins soluble. This may in part explain why ATP is maintained in such high concentrations in cells. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  20. Structure of dimeric ATP synthase from mitochondria : An angular association of monomers induces the strong curvature of the inner membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dudkina, Natalya V.; Heinemeyer, Jesco; Keegstra, Wilko; Boekema, Egbert J.; Braun, Hans-Peter

    2005-01-01

    Respiration in all cells depends upon synthesis of ATP by the ATP synthase complex, a rotary motor enzyme. The structure of the catalytic moiety of ATP synthase, the so-called F1 headpiece, is well established. F1 is connected to the membrane-bound and ion translocating F0 subcomplex by a central

  1. Myc Regulates Chromatin Decompaction and Nuclear Architecture during B Cell Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieffer-Kwon, Kyong-Rim; Nimura, Keisuke; Rao, Suhas S P; Xu, Jianliang; Jung, Seolkyoung; Pekowska, Aleksandra; Dose, Marei; Stevens, Evan; Mathe, Ewy; Dong, Peng; Huang, Su-Chen; Ricci, Maria Aurelia; Baranello, Laura; Zheng, Ying; Tomassoni Ardori, Francesco; Resch, Wolfgang; Stavreva, Diana; Nelson, Steevenson; McAndrew, Michael; Casellas, Adriel; Finn, Elizabeth; Gregory, Charles; St Hilaire, Brian Glenn; Johnson, Steven M; Dubois, Wendy; Cosma, Maria Pia; Batchelor, Eric; Levens, David; Phair, Robert D; Misteli, Tom; Tessarollo, Lino; Hager, Gordon; Lakadamyali, Melike; Liu, Zhe; Floer, Monique; Shroff, Hari; Aiden, Erez Lieberman; Casellas, Rafael

    2017-08-17

    50 years ago, Vincent Allfrey and colleagues discovered that lymphocyte activation triggers massive acetylation of chromatin. However, the molecular mechanisms driving epigenetic accessibility are still unknown. We here show that stimulated lymphocytes decondense chromatin by three differentially regulated steps. First, chromatin is repositioned away from the nuclear periphery in response to global acetylation. Second, histone nanodomain clusters decompact into mononucleosome fibers through a mechanism that requires Myc and continual energy input. Single-molecule imaging shows that this step lowers transcription factor residence time and non-specific collisions during sampling for DNA targets. Third, chromatin interactions shift from long range to predominantly short range, and CTCF-mediated loops and contact domains double in numbers. This architectural change facilitates cognate promoter-enhancer contacts and also requires Myc and continual ATP production. Our results thus define the nature and transcriptional impact of chromatin decondensation and reveal an unexpected role for Myc in the establishment of nuclear topology in mammalian cells. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Chromatin Configuration Determines Cell Responses to Hormone Stimuli | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ever since selective gene expression was established as the central driver of cell behavior, researchers have been working to understand the forces that control gene transcription. Aberrant gene expression can cause or promote many diseases, including cancer, and alterations in gene expression are the goal of many therapeutic agents. Recent work has focused on the potential role of chromatin structure as a contributor to gene regulation. Chromatin can exist in a tightly packed/inaccessible or loose/accessible configuration depending on the interactions between DNA and its associated proteins. Patterns of chromatin structure can differ between cell types and can also change within cells in response to certain signals. Cancer researchers are particularly interested in the role of chromatin in gene regulation because many of the genomic regions found to be associated with cancer risk are in open chromatin structures.

  3. [ATP pool and bioluminescence in psychrophilic bacteria Photobacterium phosphoreum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekserova, L É; Alenina, K A; Efremenko, E N; Mazhul', M M; Piskunova, N F; Ismailov, A D

    2014-01-01

    Bioluminescence activity and ATP pool were investigated in the culture of psychrophilic bacteria Photobacterium phosphoreum collected-from the exponential and stationary growth phases, as well as immobilized in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) cryogel. In liquid culture, ATP pool remained at an almost a constant level throughout the luminescence cycle (over 100 h). The ATP pool in the stationary-phase and PVA-immobilizedl cells remained constant throughout their incubation in the medium (over 200 h) and in 3% NaCl solution (over 100 h): Quantitative assessment of integral photon yield and ATP pool indicated that bioluminescence decay in growing or stationary cells was not caused by limitation by the energy substrates of the luciferase reaction. Kinetic and quantitative parameters of emission activity and ATP pool excluded the possibility of formation of the aldehyde substrate for luciferase via reduction of the relevant fatty acids in NADPH and ATP-dependent reductase reaction and its oxidation in the monooxygenase reaction. Our results indicate that the aliphatic aldehyde is not utilized in the process of light emission.

  4. Identification of Novel Proteins Co-Purifying with Cockayne Syndrome Group B (CSB Reveals Potential Roles for CSB in RNA Metabolism and Chromatin Dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Nicolai

    Full Text Available The CSB protein, a member of the SWI/SNF ATP dependent chromatin remodeling family of proteins, plays a role in a sub-pathway of nucleotide excision repair (NER known as transcription coupled repair (TCR. CSB is frequently mutated in Cockayne syndrome group B, a segmental progeroid human autosomal recessive disease characterized by growth failure and degeneration of multiple organs. Though initially classified as a DNA repair protein, recent studies have demonstrated that the loss of CSB results in pleiotropic effects. Identification of novel proteins belonging to the CSB interactome may be useful not only for predicting the molecular basis for diverse pathological symptoms of CS-B patients but also for unraveling the functions of CSB in addition to its authentic role in DNA repair. In this study, we performed tandem affinity purification (TAP technology coupled with mass spectrometry and co-immunoprecipitation studies to identify and characterize the proteins that potentially interact with CSB-TAP. Our approach revealed 33 proteins that were not previously known to interact with CSB. These newly identified proteins indicate potential roles for CSB in RNA metabolism involving repression and activation of transcription process and in the maintenance of chromatin dynamics and integrity.

  5. Identification of Novel Proteins Co-Purifying with Cockayne Syndrome Group B (CSB) Reveals Potential Roles for CSB in RNA Metabolism and Chromatin Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolai, Serena; Filippi, Silvia; Caputo, Manuela; Cipak, Lubos; Gregan, Juraj; Ammerer, Gustav; Frontini, Mattia; Willems, Daniela; Prantera, Giorgio; Balajee, Adayabalam S; Proietti-De-Santis, Luca

    2015-01-01

    The CSB protein, a member of the SWI/SNF ATP dependent chromatin remodeling family of proteins, plays a role in a sub-pathway of nucleotide excision repair (NER) known as transcription coupled repair (TCR). CSB is frequently mutated in Cockayne syndrome group B, a segmental progeroid human autosomal recessive disease characterized by growth failure and degeneration of multiple organs. Though initially classified as a DNA repair protein, recent studies have demonstrated that the loss of CSB results in pleiotropic effects. Identification of novel proteins belonging to the CSB interactome may be useful not only for predicting the molecular basis for diverse pathological symptoms of CS-B patients but also for unraveling the functions of CSB in addition to its authentic role in DNA repair. In this study, we performed tandem affinity purification (TAP) technology coupled with mass spectrometry and co-immunoprecipitation studies to identify and characterize the proteins that potentially interact with CSB-TAP. Our approach revealed 33 proteins that were not previously known to interact with CSB. These newly identified proteins indicate potential roles for CSB in RNA metabolism involving repression and activation of transcription process and in the maintenance of chromatin dynamics and integrity.

  6. SwissProt search result: AK241918 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available (ATP-utilizing chromatin assembly and remodeling factor 1) (hACF1) (ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling prot...ein) (Williams syndrome transcription factor-related chromatin remodeli BAZ1A_HUMAN 2e-11 ...

  7. SwissProt search result: AK067393 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available (ATP-utilizing chromatin assembly and remodeling factor 1) (hACF1) (ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling prot...ein) (Williams syndrome transcription factor-related chromatin remodeli BAZ1A_HUMAN 2e-19 ...

  8. SwissProt search result: AK101745 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available (ATP-utilizing chromatin assembly and remodeling factor 1) (hACF1) (ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling prot...ein) (Williams syndrome transcription factor-related chromatin remodeli BAZ1A_HUMAN 3e-18 ...

  9. SwissProt search result: AK063555 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available (ATP-utilizing chromatin assembly and remodeling factor 1) (hACF1) (ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling pro...tein) (Williams syndrome transcription factor-related chromatin remodeli BAZ1A_HUMAN 1e-19 ...

  10. Environmental car exhaust pollution damages human sperm chromatin and DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calogero, A E; La Vignera, S; Condorelli, R A; Perdichizzi, A; Valenti, D; Asero, P; Carbone, U; Boggia, B; De Rosa, N; Lombardi, G; D'Agata, R; Vicari, L O; Vicari, E; De Rosa, M

    2011-06-01

    The adverse role of traffic pollutants on male fertility is well known. Aim of this study was to evaluate their effects on sperm chromatin/DNA integrity. To accomplish this, 36 men working at motorway tollgates and 32 unexposed healthy men (controls) were enrolled. All of them were interviewed about their lifestyle. Hormone, semen samples, and environmental and biological markers of pollution were evaluated. Sperm chromatin and DNA integrity were evaluated by flow cytometry following propidium iodide staining and TUNEL assay, respectively. LH, FSH, and testosterone serum levels were within the normal range in tollgate workers. Sperm concentration, total sperm count, total and progressive motility, and normal forms were significantly lower in these men compared with controls. Motorway tollgate workers had a significantly higher percentage of spermatozoa with damaged chromatin and DNA fragmentation, a late sign of apoptosis, compared with controls. A significant direct correlation was found between spermatozoa with damaged chromatin or fragmented DNA and the length of occupational exposure, suggesting a time-dependent relationship. This study showed that car exhaust exposure has a genotoxic effect on human spermatozoa. This may be of relevant importance not only for the reproductive performance of the men exposed, but also for the offspring health.

  11. ATP synthase in slow- and fast-growing mycobacteria is active in ATP synthesis and blocked in ATP hydrolysis direction.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haagsma, A.C.; Driessen, N.N.; Hahn, M.M.; Lill, H.; Bald, D.

    2010-01-01

    ATP synthase is a validated drug target for the treatment of tuberculosis, and ATP synthase inhibitors are promising candidate drugs for the treatment of infections caused by other slow-growing mycobacteria, such as Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium ulcerans. ATP synthase is an essential enzyme

  12. ATP synthase from slow and fast growing mycobacteria is active in ATP synthesis and blocked in ATP hydrolysis direction.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haagsma, A.C.; Driessen, N.N.; Hahn, M.M.; Lill, H.; Bald, D.

    2010-01-01

    ATP synthase is a validated drug target for the treatment of tuberculosis, and ATP synthase inhibitors are promising candidate drugs for the treatment of infections caused by other slow-growing mycobacteria, such as Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium ulcerans. ATP synthase is an essential enzyme

  13. IUGR increases chromatin-remodeling factor Brg1 expression and binding to GR exon 1.7 promoter in newborn male rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Xingrao; McKnight, Robert A; Gracey Maniar, Lia E; Sun, Ying; Callaway, Christopher W; Majnik, Amber; Lane, Robert H; Cohen, Susan S

    2015-07-15

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) increases the risk for neurodevelopment delay and neuroendocrine reprogramming in both humans and rats. Neuroendocrine reprogramming involves the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene that is epigenetically regulated in the hippocampus. Using a well-characterized rodent model, we have previously shown that IUGR increases GR exon 1.7 mRNA variant and total GR expressions in male rat pup hippocampus. Epigenetic regulation of GR transcription may involve chromatin remodeling of the GR gene. A key chromatin remodeler is Brahma-related gene-1(Brg1), a member of the ATP-dependent SWItch/Sucrose NonFermentable (SWI/SNF) chromatin remodeling complex. Brg1 regulates gene expression by affecting nucleosome repositioning and recruiting transcriptional components to target promoters. We hypothesized that IUGR would increase hippocampal Brg1 expression and binding to GR exon 1.7 promoter, as well as alter nucleosome positioning over GR promoters in newborn male pups. Further, we hypothesized that IUGR would lead to accumulation of specificity protein 1 (Sp1) and RNA pol II at GR exon 1.7 promoter. Indeed, we found that IUGR increased Brg1 expression and binding to GR exon 1.7 promoter. We also found that increased Brg1 binding to GR exon 1.7 promoter was associated with accumulation of Sp1 and RNA pol II carboxy terminal domain pSer-5 (a marker of active transcription). Furthermore, the transcription start site of GR exon 1.7 was located within a nucleosome-depleted region. We speculate that changes in hippocampal Brg1 expression mediate GR expression and subsequently trigger neuroendocrine reprogramming in male IUGR rats. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Seminal fluid from men with agenesis of the Wolffian ducts: zinc-binding properties and effects on sperm chromatin stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvist, U; Kjellberg, S; Björndahl, L; Soufir, J C; Arver, S

    1990-08-01

    Zinc-binding properties were studied in 'prostatic fluid', i.e. in seminal plasma from patients with agenesis of the Wolffian ducts, and in split-ejaculate fractions dominated by seminal vesicular fluid. The effect of seminal fluid, with different zinc-binding properties, on the stability of zinc-dependent sperm chromatin was assessed by exposing sperm to 1% sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) for 60 min. Citrate was the only zinc ligand in 'prostatic fluid', as revealed by gel chromatography. Zinc in this fluid enhanced the stability of sperm chromatin. In contrast, the stability of sperm chromatin was decreased in seminal plasma dominated by vesicular fluid. These results are in accordance with the concept that prostatic fluid ensures the appropriate zinc content and stability of sperm chromatin, whereas abundance of vesicular fluid may jeopardize chromatin stability by reducing chromatin zinc content.

  15. Mitochondrial calcium signaling mediates rhythmic extracellular ATP accumulation in suprachiasmatic nucleus astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkeen, Jeff F; Womac, Alisa D; Earnest, David J; Zoran, Mark J

    2011-06-08

    The master circadian pacemaker located within the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) controls neural and neuroendocrine rhythms in the mammalian brain. Astrocytes are abundant in the SCN, and this cell type displays circadian rhythms in clock gene expression and extracellular accumulation of ATP. Still, the intracellular signaling pathways that link the SCN clockworks to circadian rhythms in extracellular ATP accumulation remain unclear. Because ATP release from astrocytes is a calcium-dependent process, we investigated the relationship between intracellular Ca(2+) and ATP accumulation and have demonstrated that intracellular Ca(2+) levels fluctuate in an antiphase relationship with rhythmic ATP accumulation in rat SCN2.2 cell cultures. Furthermore, mitochondrial Ca(2+) levels were rhythmic and maximal in precise antiphase with the peak in cytosolic Ca(2+). In contrast, our finding that peak mitochondrial Ca(2+) occurred during maximal extracellular ATP accumulation suggests a link between these cellular rhythms. Inhibition of the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter disrupted the rhythmic production and extracellular accumulation of ATP. ATP, calcium, and the biological clock affect cell division and have been implicated in cell death processes. Nonetheless, rhythmic extracellular ATP accumulation was not disrupted by cell cycle arrest and was not correlated with caspase activity in SCN2.2 cell cultures. Together, these results demonstrate that mitochondrial Ca(2+) mediates SCN2.2 rhythms in extracellular ATP accumulation and suggest a role for circadian gliotransmission in SCN clock function.

  16. Single-molecule kinetic analysis of HP1-chromatin binding reveals a dynamic network of histone modification and DNA interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Louise C; Weilandt, Daniel R; Bachmann, Andreas L; Kilic, Sinan; Lechner, Carolin C; Odermatt, Pascal D; Fantner, Georg E; Georgeon, Sandrine; Hantschel, Oliver; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily; Fierz, Beat

    2017-10-13

    Chromatin recruitment of effector proteins involved in gene regulation depends on multivalent interaction with histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) and structural features of the chromatin fiber. Due to the complex interactions involved, it is currently not understood how effectors dynamically sample the chromatin landscape. Here, we dissect the dynamic chromatin interactions of a family of multivalent effectors, heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) proteins, using single-molecule fluorescence imaging and computational modeling. We show that the three human HP1 isoforms are recruited and retained on chromatin by a dynamic exchange between histone PTM and DNA bound states. These interactions depend on local chromatin structure, the HP1 isoforms as well as on PTMs on HP1 itself. Of the HP1 isoforms, HP1α exhibits the longest residence times and fastest binding rates due to DNA interactions in addition to PTM binding. HP1α phosphorylation further increases chromatin retention through strengthening of multivalency while reducing DNA binding. As DNA binding in combination with specific PTM recognition is found in many chromatin effectors, we propose a general dynamic capture mechanism for effector recruitment. Multiple weak protein and DNA interactions result in a multivalent interaction network that targets effectors to a specific chromatin modification state, where their activity is required. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. The architects of crenarchaeal chromatin : A biophysical characterization of chromatin proteins from Sulfolobus solfataricus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, Rosalie Paula Catharina

    2014-01-01

    Understanding of chromatin organization and compaction in Archaea is currently limited. The genome of several megabasepairs long is folded by a set of small chromatin proteins to fit into the micron-sized cell. A first step in understanding archaeal chromatin organization is to study the action of

  18. ATP Release and Effects in Pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, Ivana; Amstrup, Jan; Henriksen, Katrine Lütken

    2003-01-01

    ATP and other nucleotides are released from various cells, but the pathway and physiological stimulus for ATP release are often unclear. The focus of our studies is the understanding of ATP release and signaling in rat exocrine pancreas. In acinar suspension mechanical stimulation, hypotonic shock...

  19. Extracellular ATP induces albuminuria in pregnant rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faas, M.M.; van der Schaaf, G.; Borghuis, T.; Jongman, R.M.; van Pampus, Maria; de Vos, P.; van Goor, Harry; Bakker, W.W.

    BACKGROUND: As circulating plasma ATP concentrations are increased in pre-eclampsia, we tested whether increased plasma ATP is able to induce albuminuria during pregnancy. METHODS: Pregnant (day 14) and non-pregnant rats were infused with ATP (3000 microg/kg bw) via a permanent jugular vein cannula.

  20. The chromatin-remodeling factor CHD4 coordinates signaling and repair after DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Dorthe Helena; Poinsignon, Catherine; Gudjonsson, Thorkell

    2010-01-01

    -dependent chromatin-remodeling protein CHD4 (chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4) as a factor that becomes transiently immobilized on chromatin after IR. Knockdown of CHD4 triggers enhanced Cdc25A degradation and p21(Cip1) accumulation, which lead to more pronounced cyclin-dependent kinase inhibition...... and extended cell cycle delay. At DNA double-strand breaks, depletion of CHD4 disrupts the chromatin response at the level of the RNF168 ubiquitin ligase, which in turn impairs local ubiquitylation and BRCA1 assembly. These cell cycle and chromatin defects are accompanied by elevated spontaneous and IR......-induced DNA breakage, reduced efficiency of DNA repair, and decreased clonogenic survival. Thus, CHD4 emerges as a novel genome caretaker and a factor that facilitates both checkpoint signaling and repair events after DNA damage....

  1. Dual role of PKA in phenotypic modulation of vascular smooth muscle cells by extracellular ATP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogarth, D Kyle; Sandbo, Nathan; Taurin, Sebastien; Kolenko, Vladimir; Miano, Joseph M; Dulin, Nickolai O

    2004-08-01

    Extracellular ATP is released from activated platelets and endothelial cells and stimulates proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). We found that ATP stimulates a profound but transient activation of protein kinase A (PKA) via purinergic P2Y receptors. The specific inhibition of PKA by adenovirus-mediated transduction of the PKA inhibitor (PKI) attenuates VSMC proliferation in response to ATP, suggesting a positive role for transient PKA activation in VSMC proliferation. By contrast, isoproterenol and forskolin, which stimulate a more sustained PKA activation, inhibit VSMC growth as expected. On the other hand, the activity of serum response factor (SRF) and the SRF-dependent expression of smooth muscle (SM) genes, such as SM-alpha-actin and SM22, are extremely sensitive to regulation by PKA, and even transient PKA activation by ATP is sufficient for their downregulation. Analysis of the dose responses of PKA activation, VSMC proliferation, SRF activity, and SM gene expression to ATP, with or without PKI overexpression, suggests the following model for the phenotypic modulation of VSMC by ATP, in which the transient PKA activation plays a critical role. At low micromolar doses, ATP elicits a negligible effect on DNA synthesis but induces profound SRF activity and SM gene expression, thus promoting the contractile VSMC phenotype. At high micromolar doses, ATP inhibits SRF activity and SM gene expression and promotes VSMC growth in a manner dependent on transient PKA activation. Transformation of VSMC by high doses of ATP can be prevented and even reversed by inhibition of PKA activity.

  2. Swi/SNF-GCN5-dependent chromatin remodelling determines induced expression of GDH3, one of the paralogous genes responsible for ammonium assimilation and glutamate biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avendaño, Amaranta; Riego, Lina; DeLuna, Alexander; Aranda, Cristina; Romero, Guillermo; Ishida, Cecilia; Vázquez-Acevedo, Miriam; Rodarte, Beatriz; Recillas-Targa, Félix; Valenzuela, Lourdes; Zonszein, Sergio; González, Alicia

    2005-07-01

    It is accepted that Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome arose from complete duplication of eight ancestral chromosomes; functionally normal ploidy was recovered because of the massive loss of 90% of duplicated genes. There is evidence that indicates that part of this selective conservation of gene pairs is compelling to yeast facultative metabolism. As an example, the duplicated NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase pathway has been maintained because of the differential expression of the paralogous GDH1 and GDH3 genes, and the biochemical specialization of the enzymes they encode. The present work has been aimed to the understanding of the regulatory mechanisms that modulate GDH3 transcriptional activation. Our results show that GDH3 expression is repressed in glucose-grown cultures, as opposed to what has been observed for GDH1, and induced under respiratory conditions, or under stationary phase. Although GDH3 pertains to the nitrogen metabolic network, and its expression is Gln3p-regulated, complete derepression is ultimately determined by the carbon source through the action of the SAGA and SWI/SNF chromatin remodelling complexes. GDH3 carbon-mediated regulation is over-imposed to that exerted by the nitrogen source, highlighting the fact that operation of facultative metabolism requires strict control of enzymes, like Gdh3p, involved in biosynthetic pathways that use tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates.

  3. Nascent chromatin capture proteomics determines chromatin dynamics during DNA replication and identifies unknown fork components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alabert, Constance; Bukowski-Wills, Jimi-Carlo; Lee, Sung-Po

    2014-01-01

    replication in human cells. NCC relies on biotin-dUTP labelling of replicating DNA, affinity purification and quantitative proteomics. Comparing nascent chromatin with mature post-replicative chromatin, we provide association dynamics for 3,995 proteins. The replication machinery and 485 chromatin factors...... with experimentally derived chromatin probabilities to predict a function in nascent chromatin for 93 uncharacterized proteins, and identify FAM111A as a replication factor required for PCNA loading. Together, this provides an extensive resource to understand genome and epigenome maintenance....

  4. A microscopic analysis of Arabidopsis chromatin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemse, J.J.

    2007-01-01

    Genetic information of eukaryotic organisms is stored as DNA in the nuclei of their cells. Nuclear DNA is associated with several proteins, which together form chromatin. The most abundant chromatin proteins arehistones,they arrange the initial packaging step of the DNA. DNA

  5. Chromatin-modifying proteins in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fog, Cathrine K; Jensen, Klaus T; Lund, Anders Henrik

    2007-01-01

    -despite the fact that all cells in the organism contain the same genetic information. A large amount of data gathered over the last decades has demonstrated that deregulation of chromatin-modifying proteins is etiologically involved in the development and progression of cancer. Here we discuss how epigenetic...... alterations influence cancer development and review known cancer-associated alterations in chromatin-modifying proteins....

  6. Open chromatin reveals the functional maize genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Every cellular process mediated through nuclear DNA must contend with chromatin. As results from ENCODE show, open chromatin assays can efficiently integrate across diverse regulatory elements, revealing functional non-coding genome. In this study, we use a MNase hypersensitivity assay to discover o...

  7. Molecular structures guide the engineering of chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekel, Stefan J; Haynes, Karmella A

    2017-07-27

    Chromatin is a system of proteins, RNA, and DNA that interact with each other to organize and regulate genetic information within eukaryotic nuclei. Chromatin proteins carry out essential functions: packing DNA during cell division, partitioning DNA into sub-regions within the nucleus, and controlling levels of gene expression. There is a growing interest in manipulating chromatin dynamics for applications in medicine and agriculture. Progress in this area requires the identification of design rules for the chromatin system. Here, we focus on the relationship between the physical structure and function of chromatin proteins. We discuss key research that has elucidated the intrinsic properties of chromatin proteins and how this information informs design rules for synthetic systems. Recent work demonstrates that chromatin-derived peptide motifs are portable and in some cases can be customized to alter their function. Finally, we present a workflow for fusion protein design and discuss best practices for engineering chromatin to assist scientists in advancing the field of synthetic epigenetics. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Chromatin dynamics resolved with force spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chien, Fan-Tso

    2011-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, genomic DNA is organized in chromatin fibers composed of nucleosomes as structural units. A nucleosome contains 1.7 turns of DNA wrapped around a histone octamer and is connected to the adjacent nucleosomes with linker DNA. The folding of chromatin fibers effectively increases

  9. Sequential chromatin immunoprecipitation protocol for global analysis through massive parallel sequencing (reChIP-seq)

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Marco Antonio Mendoza-Parra, Shankaranarayanan Pattabhiraman & Hinrich Gronemeyer ### Abstract Chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with massive parallel sequencing (ChIP-seq) is increasingly used to study protein-chromatin interactions or local epigenetic modifications at genome-wide scale. ChIP-seq can be performed directly with several ng of immunoprecipitated DNA, which is generally obtained from a several million cells, depending on the quality of the antibody. ChI...

  10. He-Ne laser light induced changes in the state of chromatin in human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shckorbatov, Yu.G. [Kharkov State Univ. (Ukraine). Inst. of Biology

    1999-09-01

    Cells of human buccal epithelium were irradiated in vitro by laser light at a wavelength of 632.8 nm and an intensity of 1 mW/cm{sup 2}. The irradiation induced changes in the chromatin condensation state. The effect of irradiation depends on exposure time, and cells of different donors reveal varying sensitivity to laser light. In some donors 1 s exposure induced decondensation, but 2.5 min and 5 min condensation of chromatin in all donors. (orig.)

  11. TOPICAL REVIEW: The physics of chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiessel, Helmut

    2003-05-01

    Recent progress has been made in the understanding of the physical properties of chromatin - the dense complex of DNA and histone proteins that occupies the nuclei of plant and animal cells. Here I will focus on the two lowest levels of the hierarchy of DNA folding into the chromatin complex. (i) The nucleosome, the chromatin repeating unit consisting of a globular aggregate of eight histone proteins with the DNA wrapped around it: its overcharging, the DNA unwrapping transition, the 'sliding' of the octamer along the DNA. (ii) The 30 nm chromatin fibre, the necklace-like structure of nucleosomes connected via linker DNA: its geometry, its mechanical properties under stretching and its response to changing ionic conditions. I will stress that chromatin combines two seemingly contradictory features: (1) high compaction of DNA within the nuclear envelope and, at the same time, (2) accessibility to genes, promoter regions and gene regulatory sequences.

  12. Modulation of chromatin structure by the FACT histone chaperone complex regulates HIV-1 integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matysiak, Julien; Lesbats, Paul; Mauro, Eric; Lapaillerie, Delphine; Dupuy, Jean-William; Lopez, Angelica P; Benleulmi, Mohamed Salah; Calmels, Christina; Andreola, Marie-Line; Ruff, Marc; Llano, Manuel; Delelis, Olivier; Lavigne, Marc; Parissi, Vincent

    2017-07-28

    Insertion of retroviral genome DNA occurs in the chromatin of the host cell. This step is modulated by chromatin structure as nucleosomes compaction was shown to prevent HIV-1 integration and chromatin remodeling has been reported to affect integration efficiency. LEDGF/p75-mediated targeting of the integration complex toward RNA polymerase II (polII) transcribed regions ensures optimal access to dynamic regions that are suitable for integration. Consequently, we have investigated the involvement of polII-associated factors in the regulation of HIV-1 integration. Using a pull down approach coupled with mass spectrometry, we have selected the FACT (FAcilitates Chromatin Transcription) complex as a new potential cofactor of HIV-1 integration. FACT is a histone chaperone complex associated with the polII transcription machinery and recently shown to bind LEDGF/p75. We report here that a tripartite complex can be formed between HIV-1 integrase, LEDGF/p75 and FACT in vitro and in cells. Biochemical analyzes show that FACT-dependent nucleosome disassembly promotes HIV-1 integration into chromatinized templates, and generates highly favored nucleosomal structures in vitro. This effect was found to be amplified by LEDGF/p75. Promotion of this FACT-mediated chromatin remodeling in cells both increases chromatin accessibility and stimulates HIV-1 infectivity and integration. Altogether, our data indicate that FACT regulates HIV-1 integration by inducing local nucleosomes dissociation that modulates the functional association between the incoming intasome and the targeted nucleosome.

  13. Organization of DNA in chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobell, H M; Tsai, C C; Gilbert, S G; Jain, S C; Sakore, T D

    1976-01-01

    Conformational changes in DNA that accompany drug intercalation have led us to ask if DNA first bends or "kinks" to accept an intercalative drug or dye. Kinking is made possible by altering the normal C2' endo deoxyribose sugar ring puckering in B DNA to a mixed sugar puckering pattern of the type C3' and partially unstacking base-pairs. A kinking scheme such as this would require minimal stereochemical rearrangement and would also involve small energies. This has prompted us to ask more generally if a conformational change such as this could be used by proteins in their interactions with nucleic acids. In this papter we describe an interesting superhelical DNA structure formed by kinking DNA every 10 base-pairs. The structure may be used in the organization of DNA in chromatin. Images PMID:1067602

  14. Organization of DNA in chromatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobell, H.M.; Tsai, C.C.; Gilbert, S.G.; Jain, S.C.; Sakore, T.D.

    1976-09-01

    Conformational changes in DNA that accompany drug intercalation have led us to ask if DNA first bends or ''kinks'' to accept an intercalative drug or dye. Kinking is made possible by altering the normal C2' endo deoxyribose sugar ring puckering in B DNA to a mixed sugar puckering pattern of the type C3' endo (3'--5')C2' endo and partially unstacking base-paris. A kinking scheme such as this would require minimal stereochemical rearrangement and would also involve small energies. This has prompted us to ask more generally if a conformational change such as this could be used by proteins in their interactions with nucleic acids. In this paper we describe an interesting superhelical DNA structure formed by kinking DNA every 10 base-pairs. The structure may be used in the organization of DNA in chromatin.

  15. Inheritance of epigenetic chromatin silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David-Rus, Diana; Mukhopadhyay, Swagatam; Lebowitz, Joel L; Sengupta, Anirvan M

    2009-05-07

    Maintenance of alternative chromatin states through cell divisions pose some fundamental constraints on the dynamics of histone modifications. In this paper, we study the systems biology of epigenetic inheritance by defining and analyzing general classes of mathematical models. We discuss how the number of modification states involved plays an essential role in the stability of epigenetic states. In addition, DNA duplication and the consequent dilution of marked histones act as a large perturbation for a stable state of histone modifications. The requirement that this large perturbation falls into the basin of attraction of the original state sometimes leads to additional constraints on effective models. Two such models, inspired by two different biological systems, are compared in their fulfilling the requirements of multistability and of recovery after DNA duplication. We conclude that in the presence of multiple histone modifications that characterize alternative epigenetic stable states, these requirements are more easily fulfilled.

  16. Structural and mutational analysis of amino acid residues involved in ATP specificity of Escherichia coli acetate kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Aya; Murata, Kousaku; Kawai, Shigeyuki

    2014-11-01

    Acetate kinase (AK) generally utilizes ATP as a phosphoryl donor, but AK from Entamoeba histolytica (PPi-ehiAK) uses pyrophosphate (PPi), not ATP, and is PPi-specific. The determinants of the phosphoryl donor specificity are unknown. Here, we inferred 5 candidate amino acid residues associated with this specificity, based on structural information. Each candidate residue in Escherichia coli ATP-specific AK (ATP-ecoAK), which is unable to use PPi, was substituted with the respective PPi-ehiAK amino acid residue. Each variant ATP-ecoAK had an increased Km for ATP, indicating that the 5 residues are the determinants for the specificity to ATP in ATP-ecoAK. Moreover, Asn-337 of ATP-ecoAK was shown to be particularly significant for the specificity to ATP. The 5 residues are highly conserved in 2625 PPi-ehiAK homologs, implying that almost all organisms have ATP-dependent, rather than PPi-dependent, AK. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Modelling the ATP production in mitochondria

    CERN Document Server

    Saa, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    We revisit here the mathematical model for ATP production in mitochondria introduced recently by Bertram, Pedersen, Luciani, and Sherman (BPLS) as a simplification of the more complete but intricate Magnus and Keizer's model. We correct some inaccuracies in the BPLS original approximations and then analyze some of the dynamical properties of the model. We infer from exhaustive numerical explorations that the enhanced BPLS equations have a unique attractor fixed point for physiologically acceptable ranges of mitochondrial variables and respiration inputs. We determine, in the stationary regime, the dependence of the mitochondrial variables on the respiration inputs, namely the cytosolic concentration of calcium ${\\rm Ca}_{\\rm c}$ and the substrate fructose 1,6-bisphosphate FBP. The same effect of calcium saturation reported for the original BPLS model is observed here. We find out, however, an interesting non-stationary effect: the inertia of the model tends to increase considerably for high concentrations of ...

  18. Radiation-induced DNA damage and chromatin structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydberg, B.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    DNA lesions induced by ionizing radiation in cells are clustered and not randomly distributed. For low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation this clustering occurs mainly on the small scales of DNA molecules and nucleosomes. For example, experimental evidence suggests that both strands of DNA on the nucleosomal surface can be damaged in single events and that this damage occurs with a 10-bp modulation because of protection by histones. For high LET radiation, clustering also occurs on a larger scale and depends on chromatin organization. A particularly significant clustering occurs when an ionizing particle traverses the 30 nm chromatin fiber with generation of heavily damaged DNA regions with an average size of about 2 kbp. On an even larger scale, high LET radiation can produce several DNA double-strand breaks in closer proximity than expected from randomness. It is suggested that this increases the probability of misrejoining of DNA ends and generation of lethal chromosome aberrations.

  19. Cryo-electron microscopy of chromatin biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Marcus D; Costa, Alessandro

    2017-06-01

    The basic unit of chromatin, the nucleosome core particle (NCP), controls how DNA in eukaryotic cells is compacted, replicated and read. Since its discovery, biochemists have sought to understand how this protein-DNA complex can help to control so many diverse tasks. Recent electron-microscopy (EM) studies on NCP-containing assemblies have helped to describe important chromatin transactions at a molecular level. With the implementation of recent technical advances in single-particle EM, our understanding of how nucleosomes are recognized and read looks to take a leap forward. In this review, the authors highlight recent advances in the architectural understanding of chromatin biology elucidated by EM.

  20. Extensive Variation in Chromatin States Across Humans

    KAUST Repository

    Kasowski, M.

    2013-10-17

    The majority of disease-associated variants lie outside protein-coding regions, suggesting a link between variation in regulatory regions and disease predisposition. We studied differences in chromatin states using five histone modifications, cohesin, and CTCF in lymphoblastoid lines from 19 individuals of diverse ancestry. We found extensive signal variation in regulatory regions, which often switch between active and repressed states across individuals. Enhancer activity is particularly diverse among individuals, whereas gene expression remains relatively stable. Chromatin variability shows genetic inheritance in trios, correlates with genetic variation and population divergence, and is associated with disruptions of transcription factor binding motifs. Overall, our results provide insights into chromatin variation among humans.

  1. Optimization of ATP synthase function in mitochondria and chloroplasts via the adenylate kinase equilibrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abir U Igamberdiev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The bulk of ATP synthesis in plants is performed by ATP synthase, the main bioenergetics engine of cells, operating both in mitochondria and in chloroplasts. The reaction mechanism of ATP synthase has been studied in detail for over half a century; however, its optimal performance depends also on the steady delivery of ATP synthase substrates and the removal of its products. For mitochondrial ATP synthase, we analyze here the provision of stable conditions for (i the supply of ADP and Mg2+, supported by adenylate kinase (AK equilibrium in the intermembrane space, (ii the supply of phosphate via membrane transporter in symport with H+, and (iii the conditions of outflow of ATP by adenylate transporter carrying out the exchange of free adenylates. We also show that, in chloroplasts, AK equilibrates adenylates and governs Mg2+ contents in the stroma, optimizing ATP synthase and Calvin cycle operation, and affecting the import of inorganic phosphate in exchange with triose phosphates. It is argued that chemiosmosis is not the sole component of ATP synthase performance, which also depends on AK-mediated equilibrium of adenylates and Mg2+, adenylate transport and phosphate release and supply.

  2. Roles of chromatin insulator proteins in higher-order chromatin organization and transcription regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelmann, Jutta; Valeri, Alessandro; Guillou, Emmanuelle; Cuvier, Olivier; Nollmann, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic chromosomes are condensed into several hierarchical levels of complexity: DNA is wrapped around core histones to form nucleosomes, nucleosomes form a higher-order structure called chromatin, and chromatin is subsequently compartmentalized in part by the combination of multiple specific or unspecific long-range contacts. The conformation of chromatin at these three levels greatly influences DNA metabolism and transcription. One class of chromatin regulatory proteins called insulator factors may organize chromatin both locally, by setting up barriers between heterochromatin and euchromatin, and globally by establishing platforms for long-range interactions. Here, we review recent data revealing a global role of insulator proteins in the regulation of transcription through the formation of clusters of long-range interactions that impact different levels of chromatin organization. PMID:21983085

  3. Structure and Subunit Arrangement of the A-type ATP Synthase Complex from the Archaeon Methanococcus jannaschii Visualized by Electron Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coskun, Ünal; Chaban, Yuriy L.; Lingl, Astrid; Müller, Volker; Keegstra, Wilko; Boekema, Egbert J.; Grüber, Gerhard; Gruber, 27460

    2004-01-01

    In Archaea, bacteria, and eukarya, ATP provides metabolic energy for energy-dependent processes. It is synthesized by enzymes known as A-type or F-type ATP synthase, which are the smallest rotatory engines in nature. Here, we report the first projected structure of an intact A1A0 ATP synthase from

  4. Chromatin Pioneers | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taking advantage of their ability to explore provocative ideas, NCI investigators pioneered the study of chromatin to demonstrate its functional importance and lay the groundwork for understanding its role in cancer and other diseases.

  5. Tissue-specific regulation of chromatin insulator function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzat, Leah H; Dale, Ryan K; Moshkovich, Nellie; Lei, Elissa P

    2012-01-01

    Chromatin insulators organize the genome into distinct transcriptional domains and contribute to cell type-specific chromatin organization. However, factors regulating tissue-specific insulator function have not yet been discovered. Here we identify the RNA recognition motif-containing protein Shep as a direct interactor of two individual components of the gypsy insulator complex in Drosophila. Mutation of shep improves gypsy-dependent enhancer blocking, indicating a role as a negative regulator of insulator activity. Unlike ubiquitously expressed core gypsy insulator proteins, Shep is highly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) with lower expression in other tissues. We developed a novel, quantitative tissue-specific barrier assay to demonstrate that Shep functions as a negative regulator of insulator activity in the CNS but not in muscle tissue. Additionally, mutation of shep alters insulator complex nuclear localization in the CNS but has no effect in other tissues. Consistent with negative regulatory activity, ChIP-seq analysis of Shep in a CNS-derived cell line indicates substantial genome-wide colocalization with a single gypsy insulator component but limited overlap with intact insulator complexes. Taken together, these data reveal a novel, tissue-specific mode of regulation of a chromatin insulator.

  6. Tissue-Specific Regulation of Chromatin Insulator Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzat, Leah H.; Dale, Ryan K.; Moshkovich, Nellie; Lei, Elissa P.

    2012-01-01

    Chromatin insulators organize the genome into distinct transcriptional domains and contribute to cell type–specific chromatin organization. However, factors regulating tissue-specific insulator function have not yet been discovered. Here we identify the RNA recognition motif-containing protein Shep as a direct interactor of two individual components of the gypsy insulator complex in Drosophila. Mutation of shep improves gypsy-dependent enhancer blocking, indicating a role as a negative regulator of insulator activity. Unlike ubiquitously expressed core gypsy insulator proteins, Shep is highly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) with lower expression in other tissues. We developed a novel, quantitative tissue-specific barrier assay to demonstrate that Shep functions as a negative regulator of insulator activity in the CNS but not in muscle tissue. Additionally, mutation of shep alters insulator complex nuclear localization in the CNS but has no effect in other tissues. Consistent with negative regulatory activity, ChIP–seq analysis of Shep in a CNS-derived cell line indicates substantial genome-wide colocalization with a single gypsy insulator component but limited overlap with intact insulator complexes. Taken together, these data reveal a novel, tissue-specific mode of regulation of a chromatin insulator. PMID:23209434

  7. Etiology and Evaluation of Sperm Chromatin Anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marziyeh Tavalaee

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence suggests that human sperm chromatin anomalies adversely affect reproductive outcomesand infertile men possess substantially amount of sperm with chromatin anomalies than fertilemen.Routine semen analysis evaluates parameters such as sperm motility and morphology, but doesnot examine the nuclear DNA integrity of spermatozoa. It has been suggested that altered nuclearchromatin structure or damaged DNA in spermatozoa could modify the special cellular functionsof human spermatozoa, and thereby affect the fertility potential. Intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection(ICSI bypass the barriers to fertilization for such a sperm, then the effect of chromatin anomalies onthe development remains a concern. Therefore, it is essential to develop and use accurate diagnostictests, which may provide better prognostic capabilities than the standard sperm assessments. Thisreview discusses our current understanding of the structure and organization of sperm DNA,the different procedures for assessment of sperm chromatin anomalies including comet assay,Chromomycin A3 (CMA3, sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA, acridine orange test (AOT,terminal TdT-mediated dUTP-nick-end labelling (TUNEL assay, aniline blue and sperm chromatindispersion (SCD test and the impact of chromatin anomalies on reproductive outcome.

  8. Hydrogen peroxide lowers ATP levels in platelets without altering adenyalte energy charge and platelet function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmsen, H; Robkin, L

    1977-03-10

    H2O2 irreversibly reduced metabolic platelet ATP levels with a corresponding accumulation of hypoxanthine. This process was enhanced by sodium azide or potassium cyanide and by increasing H2O2 concentrations. The adenylate energy charge was unaltered when less than two thirds of the metabolic ATP had disappeared but decreased markedly when more ATP disappeared. Platelet shape change, primary aggregation, dense granule and alpha-granule secretion were unaffected by H2O2-induced lowering of ATP provided that the adenylate energy charge did not fall by more than 5%; at greater adenylate energy charge reduction, platelet functions were inhibited. These results indicate that cell functions depend more on adenyalte energy charge than on the ATP level and expands the applicability of this view from bacterial systems to a mammalian cell, the human platelet.

  9. The Role of Light–Dark Regulation of the Chloroplast ATP Synthase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaori Kohzuma

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The chloroplast ATP synthase catalyzes the light-driven synthesis of ATP and is activated in the light and inactivated in the dark by redox-modulation through the thioredoxin system. It has been proposed that this down-regulation is important for preventing wasteful hydrolysis of ATP in the dark. To test this proposal, we compared the effects of extended dark exposure in Arabidopsis lines expressing the wild-type and mutant forms of ATP synthase that are redox regulated or constitutively active. In contrast to the predictions of the model, we observed that plants with wild-type redox regulation lost photosynthetic capacity rapidly in darkness, whereas those expressing redox-insensitive form were far more stable. To explain these results, we propose that in wild-type plants, down-regulation of ATP synthase inhibits ATP hydrolysis, leading to dissipation of thylakoid proton motive force (pmf and subsequent inhibition of protein transport across the thylakoid through the twin arginine transporter (Tat-dependent and Sec-dependent import pathways, resulting in the selective loss of specific protein complexes. By contrast, in mutants with a redox-insensitive ATP synthase, pmf is maintained by ATP hydrolysis, thus allowing protein transport to maintain photosynthetic activities for extended periods in the dark. Hence, a basal level of Tat-dependent, as well as, Sec-dependent import activity, in the dark helps replenishes certain components of the photosynthetic complexes and thereby aids in maintaining overall complex activity. However, the influence of a dark pmf on thylakoid protein import, by itself, could not explain all the effects we observed in this study. For example, we also observed in wild type plants a large transient buildup of thylakoid pmf and nonphotochemical exciton quenching upon sudden illumination of dark adapted plants. Therefore, we conclude that down-regulation of the ATP synthase is probably not related to preventing loss of ATP

  10. Chromatin contributes to structural integrity of promyelocytic leukemia bodies through a SUMO-1-independent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskiw, Christopher H; Dellaire, Graham; Bazett-Jones, David P

    2004-03-05

    Promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein is implicated in transcriptional regulation, apoptosis, DNA repair, and tumor suppression. It is not known, however, whether PML and other components of PML bodies function within the vicinity of the bodies or elsewhere in the nucleoplasm. In this study, we demonstrate that chromatin organization around PML bodies influences their morphology, dynamics, and structural integrity by a SUMO-1-independent mechanism. Following transcriptional inhibition and during early apoptosis, chromatin retracts from the periphery of PML bodies, coinciding with the formation of new PML-containing structures through fission of supramolecular PML-containing microbodies. Both fission and fusion of microbodies with parental PML bodies indicate a loss of structural integrity of the bodies, dependent on the state of the surrounding chromatin. This is supported by the observation that treatment of live cells with DNase I could reproduce the structural instability of PML bodies. In addition, PML bodies, which are normally surrounded by chromatin and are positionally stable, become more dynamic following these treatments, presumably due to the loss of chromatin contacts. Overexpression of SUMO-1, a modification required for PML body formation, did not prevent PML body fission, indicating that chromatin-based integrity of PML body structure occurs through a SUMO-1-independent mechanism.

  11. The p400 ATPase regulates nucleosome stability and chromatin ubiquitination during DNA repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ye; Sun, Yingli; Jiang, Xiaofeng; Ayrapetov, Marina K.; Moskwa, Patryk; Yang, Shenghong; Weinstock, David M.

    2010-01-01

    The complexity of chromatin architecture presents a significant barrier to the ability of the DNA repair machinery to access and repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Consequently, remodeling of the chromatin landscape adjacent to DSBs is vital for efficient DNA repair. Here, we demonstrate that DNA damage destabilizes nucleosomes within chromatin regions that correspond to the γ-H2AX domains surrounding DSBs. This nucleosome destabilization is an active process requiring the ATPase activity of the p400 SWI/SNF ATPase and histone acetylation by the Tip60 acetyltransferase. p400 is recruited to DSBs by a mechanism that is independent of ATM but requires mdc1. Further, the destabilization of nucleosomes by p400 is required for the RNF8-dependent ubiquitination of chromatin, and for the subsequent recruitment of brca1 and 53BP1 to DSBs. These results identify p400 as a novel DNA damage response protein and demonstrate that p400-mediated alterations in nucleosome and chromatin structure promote both chromatin ubiquitination and the accumulation of brca1 and 53BP1 at sites of DNA damage. PMID:20876283

  12. Ionotropic P2X ATP Receptor Channels Mediate Purinergic Signaling in Mouse Odontoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiozaki, Yuta; Sato, Masaki; Kimura, Maki; Sato, Toru; Tazaki, Masakazu; Shibukawa, Yoshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    ATP modulates various functions in the dental pulp cells, such as intercellular communication and neurotransmission between odontoblasts and neurons, proliferation of dental pulp cells, and odontoblast differentiation. However, functional expression patterns and their biophysical properties of ionotropic ATP (P2X) receptors (P2X1-P2X7) in odontoblasts were still unclear. We examined these properties of P2X receptors in mouse odontoblasts by patch-clamp recordings. K(+)-ATP, nonselective P2X receptor agonist, induced inward currents in odontoblasts in a concentration-dependent manner. K(+)-ATP-induced currents were inhibited by P2X4 and P2X7 selective inhibitors (5-BDBD and KN62, respectively), while P2X1 and P2X3 inhibitors had no effects. P2X7 selective agonist (BzATP) induced inward currents dose-dependently. We could not observe P2X1, 2/3, 3 selective agonist (αβ-MeATP) induced currents. Amplitudes of K(+)-ATP-induced current were increased in solution without extracellular Ca(2+), but decreased in Na(+)-free extracellular solution. In the absence of both of extracellular Na(+) and Ca(2+), K(+)-ATP-induced currents were completely abolished. K(+)-ATP-induced Na(+) currents were inhibited by P2X7 inhibitor, while the Ca(2+) currents were sensitive to P2X4 inhibitor. These results indicated that odontoblasts functionally expressed P2X4 and P2X7 receptors, which might play an important role in detecting extracellular ATP following local dental pulp injury.

  13. Chromatin Dynamics during Lytic Infection with Herpes Simplex Virus 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, Kristen L.; Schang, Luis M.

    2013-01-01

    Latent HSV-1 genomes are chromatinized with silencing marks. Since 2004, however, there has been an apparent inconsistency in the studies of the chromatinization of the HSV-1 genomes in lytically infected cells. Nuclease protection and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays suggested that the genomes were not regularly chromatinized, having only low histone occupancy. However, the chromatin modifications associated with transcribed and non-transcribed HSV-1 genes were those associated with active or repressed transcription, respectively. Moreover, the three critical HSV-1 transcriptional activators all had the capability to induce chromatin remodelling, and interacted with critical chromatin modifying enzymes. Depletion or overexpression of some, but not all, chromatin modifying proteins affected HSV-1 transcription, but often in unexpected manners. Since 2010, it has become clear that both cellular and HSV-1 chromatins are highly dynamic in infected cells. These dynamics reconcile the weak interactions between HSV-1 genomes and chromatin proteins, detected by nuclease protection and chromatin immunoprecipitation, with the proposed regulation of HSV-1 gene expression by chromatin, supported by the marks in the chromatin in the viral genomes and the abilities of the HSV-1 transcription activators to modulate chromatin. It also explains the sometimes unexpected results of interventions to modulate chromatin remodelling activities in infected cells. PMID:23863878

  14. Glucose and the ATP paradox in yeast.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Somsen, O.J.G.; Hoeben, M.A.; Esgalhado, M.E.L.M.; Snoep, J.L.; Visser, D.; van der Heijden, R.T.J.M.; Heijnen, J.J.; Westerhoff, H.V.

    2000-01-01

    A sustained decrease in the intracellular ATP concentration has been observed when extra glucose was added to yeast cells growing aerobically under glucose limitation. Because glucose degradation is the main source of ATP-derived free energy, this is a counter-intuitive phenomenon, which cannot be

  15. Optimisation of ATP determination in drinking water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corfitzen, Charlotte B.; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    aliquots of standards increase quality control and ease daily operation. The medium (Lumin(PM) buffer, tap water or MilliQ water) for preparation of ATP-standard dilution significantly affected the rlu response of the ATP-standard dilutions (20% difference). The effect of dilution media and of sample...

  16. Analysis of active and inactive X chromosome architecture reveals the independent organization of 30 nm and large-scale chromatin structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naughton, Catherine; Sproul, Duncan; Hamilton, Charlotte; Gilbert, Nick

    2010-11-12

    Using a genetic model, we present a high-resolution chromatin fiber analysis of transcriptionally active (Xa) and inactive (Xi) X chromosomes packaged into euchromatin and facultative heterochromatin. Our results show that gene promoters have an open chromatin structure that is enhanced upon transcriptional activation but the Xa and the Xi have similar overall 30 nm chromatin fiber structures. Therefore, the formation of facultative heterochromatin is dependent on factors that act at a level above the 30 nm fiber and transcription does not alter bulk chromatin fiber structures. However, large-scale chromatin structures on Xa are decondensed compared with the Xi and transcription inhibition is sufficient to promote large-scale chromatin compaction. We show a link between transcription and large-scale chromatin packaging independent of the bulk 30 nm chromatin fiber and propose that transcription, not the global compaction of 30 nm chromatin fibers, determines the cytological appearance of large-scale chromatin structures. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A Computer Lab Exploring Evolutionary Aspects of Chromatin Structure and Dynamics for an Undergraduate Chromatin Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eirin-Lopez, Jose M.

    2013-01-01

    The study of chromatin constitutes one of the most active research fields in life sciences, being subject to constant revisions that continuously redefine the state of the art in its knowledge. As every other rapidly changing field, chromatin biology requires clear and straightforward educational strategies able to efficiently translate such a…

  18. Ligation-mediated PCR for chromatin-structure analysis of interphase and metaphase chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershkovitz, M; Riggs, A D

    1997-02-01

    Chromatin structure is becoming increasingly recognized as important for a full understanding of gene function and cell memory. With regard to cell memory, which involves the transfer of chromatin-encoded epigenetic information from one cell generation to another, the detailed structure of metaphase chromatin is of crucial importance. In this paper we describe methods for the use of dimethyl sulfate, DNase I, and potassium permanganate for in vivo footprinting and chromatin analysis, with special emphasis on studies of metaphase cells. We review the use of ligation-mediated PCR for the analysis of chromatin, including the human phosphoglycerate kinase promoter, and also report initial studies of a matrix attachment region near the human beta-interferon gene.

  19. ATP release and Ca2+ signalling by human bronchial epithelial cells following Alternaria aeroallergen exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Grady, Scott M; Patil, Nandadavi; Melkamu, Tamene; Maniak, Peter J; Lancto, Cheryl; Kita, Hirohito

    2013-09-15

      Exposure of human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells from normal and asthmatic subjects to extracts from Alternaria alternata evoked a rapid and sustained release of ATP with greater efficacy observed in epithelial cells from asthmatic patients. Previously, Alternaria allergens were shown to produce a sustained increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) that was dependent on the coordinated activation of specific purinergic receptor (P2Y2 and P2X7) subtypes. In the present study, pretreatment with a cell-permeable Ca2+-chelating compound (BAPTA-AM) significantly inhibited ATP release, indicating dependency on [Ca2+]i. Alternaria-evoked ATP release exhibited a greater peak response and a slightly lower EC50 value in cells obtained from asthmatic donors compared to normal control cells. Furthermore, the maximum increase in [Ca2+]i resulting from Alternaria treatment was greater in cells from asthmatic patients compared to normal subjects. The vesicle transport inhibitor brefeldin A and BAPTA-AM significantly blocked Alternaria-stimulated incorporation of fluorescent lipid (FM1-43)-labelled vesicles into the plasma membrane and ATP release. In addition, inhibiting uptake of ATP into exocytotic vesicles with bafilomycin also reduced ATP release comparable to the effects of brefeldin A and BAPTA-AM. These results indicate that an important mechanism for Alternaria-induced ATP release is Ca2+ dependent and involves exocytosis of ATP. Serine and cysteine protease inhibitors also reduced Alternaria-induced ATP release; however, the sustained increase in [Ca2+]i typically observed following Alternaria exposure appeared to be independent of protease-activated receptor (PAR2) stimulation.

  20. TGF-β but not BMP signaling induces prechondrogenic condensation through ATP oscillations during chondrogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyuck Joon

    2012-08-10

    Although both TGF-β and BMP signaling enhance expression of adhesion molecules during chondrogenesis, TGF-β but not BMP signaling can initiate condensation of uncondensed mesenchymal cells. However, it remains unclear what causes the differential effects between TGF-β and BMP signaling on prechondrogenic condensation. Our previous report demonstrated that ATP oscillations play a critical role in prechondrogenic condensation. Thus, the current study examined whether ATP oscillations are associated with the differential actions of TGF-β and BMP signaling on prechondrogenic condensation. The result revealed that while both TGF-β1 and BMP2 stimulated chondrogenic differentiation, TGF-β1 but not BMP2 induced prechondrogenic condensation. It was also found that TGF-β1 but not BMP2 induced ATP oscillations and inhibition of TGF-β but not BMP signaling prevented insulin-induced ATP oscillations. Moreover, blockage of ATP oscillations inhibited TGF-β1-induced prechondrogenic condensation. In addition, TGF-β1-driven ATP oscillations and prechondrogenic condensation depended on Ca(2+) influx via voltage-dependent calcium channels. This study suggests that Ca(2+)-driven ATP oscillations mediate TGF-β-induced the initiation step of prechondrogenic condensation and determine the differential effects between TGF-β and BMP signaling on chondrogenesis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Quantitative analysis of chromatin accessibility in mouse embryonic fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Baowen; Yu, Juan; Chang, Luyuan; Lei, Jiafan; Wen, Zengqi; Liu, Cuifang; Mao, Guankun; Wang, Kehui; Shen, Jie; Xu, Xueqing

    2017-11-04

    Genomic DNA of eukaryotic cells is hierarchically packaged into chromatin by histones. The dynamic organization of chromatin fibers plays a critical role in the regulation of gene transcription and other DNA-associated biological processes. Recently, numerous approaches have been developed to map the chromatin organization by characterizing chromatin accessibilities in genome-wide. However, reliable methods to quantitatively map chromatin accessibility are not well-established, especially not on a genome-wide scale. Here, we developed a modified MNase-seq for mouse embryonic fibroblasts, wherein chromatin was partially digested at multiple digestion times using micrococcal nuclease (MNase), allowing quantitative analysis of local yet genome-wide chromatin compaction. Our results provide strong evidence that the chromatin accessibility at promoter regions are positively correlated with gene activity. In conclusion, our assay is an ideal tool for the quantitative study of gene regulation in the perspective of chromatin accessibility. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. In Situ Hi-C Library Preparation for Plants to Study Their Three-Dimensional Chromatin Interactions on a Genome-Wide Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang

    2017-01-01

    The spatial organization of the genome in the nucleus is critical for many cellular processes. It has been broadly accepted that the packing of chromatin inside the nucleus is not random, but structured at several hierarchical levels. The Hi-C method combines Chromatin Conformation Capture and high-throughput sequencing, which allows interrogating genome-wide chromatin interactions. Depending on the sequencing depth, chromatin packing patterns derived from Hi-C experiments can be viewed on a chromosomal scale or at a local genic level. Here, I describe a protocol of plant in situ Hi-C library preparation, which covers procedures starting from tissue fixation to library amplification.

  3. New mitotic regulators released from chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Hideki; Gruss, Oliver J

    2013-12-16

    Faithful action of the mitotic spindle segregates duplicated chromosomes into daughter cells. Perturbations of this process result in chromosome mis-segregation, leading to chromosomal instability and cancer development. Chromosomes are not simply passengers segregated by spindle microtubules but rather play a major active role in spindle assembly. The GTP bound form of the Ran GTPase (RanGTP), produced around chromosomes, locally activates spindle assembly factors. Recent studies have uncovered that chromosomes organize mitosis beyond spindle formation. They distinctly regulate other mitotic events, such as spindle maintenance in anaphase, which is essential for chromosome segregation. Furthermore, the direct function of chromosomes is not only to produce RanGTP but, in addition, to release key mitotic regulators from chromatin. Chromatin-remodeling factors and nuclear pore complex proteins, which have established functions on chromatin in interphase, dissociate from mitotic chromatin and function in spindle assembly or maintenance. Thus, chromosomes actively organize their own segregation using chromatin-releasing mitotic regulators as well as RanGTP.

  4. Chromatin proteins: key responders to stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen T Smith

    Full Text Available Environments can be ever-changing and stresses are commonplace. In order for organisms to survive, they need to be able to respond to change and adapt to new conditions. Fortunately, many organisms have systems in place that enable dynamic adaptation to immediate stresses and changes within the environment. Much of this cellular response is coordinated by modulating the structure and accessibility of the genome. In eukaryotic cells, the genome is packaged and rolled up by histone proteins to create a series of DNA/histone core structures known as nucleosomes; these are further condensed into chromatin. The degree and nature of the condensation can in turn determine which genes are transcribed. Histones can be modified chemically by a large number of proteins that are thereby responsible for dynamic changes in gene expression. In this Primer we discuss findings from a study published in this issue of PLoS Biology by Weiner et al. that highlight how chromatin structure and chromatin binding proteins alter transcription in response to environmental changes and stresses. Their study reveals the importance of chromatin in mediating the speed and amplitude of stress responses in cells and suggests that chromatin is a critically important component of the cellular response to stress.

  5. New mitotic regulators released from chromatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki eYokoyama

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Faithful action of the mitotic spindle segregates duplicated chromosomes into daughter cells. Perturbations of this process result in chromosome mis-segregation, leading to chromosomal instability and cancer development. Chromosomes are not simply passengers segregated by spindle microtubules but rather play a major active role in spindle assembly. The GTP bound form of the Ran GTPase (RanGTP, produced around chromosomes, locally activates spindle assembly factors. Recent studies have uncovered that chromosomes organize mitosis beyond spindle formation. They distinctly regulate other mitotic events, such as spindle maintenance in anaphase, which is essential for chromosome segregation. Furthermore, the direct function of chromosomes is not only to produce RanGTP but, in addition, to release key mitotic regulators from chromatin. Chromatin-remodeling factors and nuclear pore complex proteins, which have established functions on chromatin in interphase, dissociate from mitotic chromatin and function in spindle assembly or maintenance. Thus, chromosomes actively organize their own segregation using chromatin-releasing mitotic regulators as well as RanGTP.

  6. UTP-induced ATP release is a fine-tuned signalling pathway in osteocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kringelbach, Tina M.; Aslan, Derya; Novak, Ivana

    2014-01-01

    the intracellular calcium concentration and that they release ATP dose-dependently upon stimulation with 1-10 μM UTP. In addition to this, osteocytes release large amounts of ATP upon cell rupture, which might also be a source for other nucleotides, such as UTP. These findings indicate that mechanically induced ATP...... the luciferin-luciferase assay and the release pathway was investigated using pharmacological inhibition. The P2Y receptor profile was analysed using gene expression analysis by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, while functional testing was performed using measurements of intracellular calcium...

  7. Role of the P-Type ATPases, ATP7A and ATP7B in brain copper homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathon eTelianidis

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Over the past two decades there have been significant advances in our understanding of copper homeostasis and the pathological consequences of copper dysregulation. Cumulative evidence is revealing a complex regulatory network of proteins and pathways that maintain copper homeostasis. The recognition of copper dysregulation as a key pathological feature in prominent neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and prion diseases has led to increased research focus on the mechanisms controlling copper homeostasis in the brain. The copper-transporting P-Type ATPases (copper-ATPases, ATP7A and ATP7B, are critical components of the copper regulatory network. Our understanding of the biochemistry and cell biology of these complex proteins has grown significantly since their discovery in 1993. They are large polytopic transmembrane proteins with six copper-binding motifs within the cytoplasmic N-terminal domain, eight transmembrane domains and highly conserved catalytic domains. These proteins catalyze ATP-dependent copper transport across cell membranes for the metallation of many essential cuproenzymes, as well as for the removal of excess cellular copper to prevent copper toxicity. A key functional aspect of these copper transporters is their copper-responsive trafficking between the trans-Golgi network and the cell periphery. ATP7A- and ATP7B-deficiency, due to genetic mutation, underlie the inherited copper transport disorders, Menkes and Wilson diseases, respectively. Their importance in maintaining brain copper homeostasis is underscored by the severe neuropathological deficits in these disorders. Herein we will review and update our current knowledge of these copper transporters in the brain and the central nervous system, their distribution and regulation, their role in normal brain copper homeostasis and how their absence or dysfunction contributes to disturbances in copper homeostasis and neurodegeneration.

  8. Molecular devices for the regulation of chloroplast ATP synthase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hisabori, T.; Konno, H.; Ichimura, H.; Strotmann, H.; Bald, D.

    2002-01-01

    In chloroplasts, synthesis of ATP is energetically coupled with the utilization of a proton gradient formed by photosynthetic electron transport. The involved enzyme, the chloroplast ATP synthase, can potentially hydrolyze ATP when the magnitude of the transmembrane electrochemical potential

  9. The Chromatin Fiber: Multiscale Problems and Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Gungor; Luque, Antoni; Schlick, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    The structure of chromatin, affected by many factors from DNA linker lengths to posttranslational modifications, is crucial to the regulation of eukaryotic cells. Combined experimental and computational methods have led to new insights into its structural and dynamical features, from interactions due to the flexible core histone tails of the nucleosomes to the physical mechanism driving the formation of chromosomal domains. Here we present a perspective of recent advances in chromatin modeling techniques at the atomic, mesoscopic, and chromosomal scales with a view toward developing multiscale computational strategies to integrate such findings. Innovative modeling methods that connect molecular to chromosomal scales are crucial for interpreting experiments and eventually deciphering the complex dynamic organization and function of chromatin in the cell. PMID:26057099

  10. Human INO80/YY1 chromatin remodeling complex transcriptionally regulates the BRCA2- and CDKN1A-interacting protein (BCCIP in cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaming Su

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The BCCIP (BRCA2- and CDKN1A-interacting protein is an important cofactor for BRCA2 in tumor suppression. Although the low expression of BCCIP is observed in multiple clinically diagnosed primary tumor tissues such as ovarian cancer, renal cell carcinoma and colorectal carcinoma, the mechanism of how BCCIP is regulated in cells is still unclear. The human INO80/YY1 chromatin remodeling complex composed of 15 subunits catalyzes ATP-dependent sliding of nucleosomes along DNA. Here, we first report that BCCIP is a novel target gene of the INO80/YY1 complex by presenting a series of experimental evidence. Gene expression studies combined with siRNA knockdown data locked candidate genes including BCCIP of the INO80/YY1 complex. Silencing or over-expressing the subunits of the INO80/YY1 complex regulates the expression level of BCCIP both in mRNA and proteins in cells. Also, the functions of INO80/YY1 complex in regulating the transactivation of BCCIP were confirmed by luciferase reporter assays. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP experiments clarify the enrichment of INO80 and YY1 at +0.17 kb downstream of the BCCIP transcriptional start site. However, this enrichment is significantly inhibited by either knocking down INO80 or YY1, suggesting the existence of both INO80 and YY1 is required for recruiting the INO80/YY1 complex to BCCIP promoter region. Our findings strongly indicate that BCCIP is a potential target gene of the INO80/YY1 complex.

  11. Extracellular ATP Induces Calcium Signaling in Odontoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, B M; Jo, H; Park, G; Kim, Y H; Park, C K; Jung, S J; Chung, G; Oh, S B

    2017-02-01

    Odontoblasts form dentin at the outermost surface of tooth pulp. An increasing level of evidence in recent years, along with their locational advantage, implicates odontoblasts as a secondary role as sensory or immune cells. Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a well-characterized signaling molecule in the neuronal and immune systems, and its potential involvement in interodontoblast communications was recently demonstrated. In an effort to elaborate the ATP-mediated signaling pathway in odontoblasts, the current study performed single-cell reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunofluorescent detection to investigate the expression of ATP receptors related to calcium signal in odontoblasts from incisal teeth of 8- to 10-wk-old rats, and demonstrated an in vitro response to ATP application via calcium imaging experiments. While whole tissue RT-PCR analysis detected P2Y2, P2Y4, and all 7 subtypes (P2X1 to P2X7) in tooth pulp, single-cell RT-PCR analysis of acutely isolated rat odontoblasts revealed P2Y2, P2Y4, P2X2, P2X4, P2X6, and P2X7 expression in only a subset (23% to 47%) of cells tested, with no evidence for P2X1, P2X3, and P2X5 expression. An increase of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in response to 100μM ATP, which was repeated after pretreatment of thapsigargin or under the Ca(2+)-free condition, suggested function of both ionotropic and metabotropic ATP receptors in odontoblasts. The enhancement of ATP-induced calcium response by ivermectin and inhibition by 5-(3-bromophenyl)-1,3-dihydro-2H-benzofuro[3,2-e]-1,4-diazepin-2-one (5-BDBD) confirmed a functional P2X4 subtype in odontoblasts. Positive calcium response to 2',3'-O-(benzoyl-4-benzoyl)-ATP (BzATP) and negative response to α,β-methylene ATP suggested P2X2, P2X4, and P2X7 as functional subunits in rat odontoblasts. Single-cell RT-PCR analysis of the cells with confirmed calcium response and immunofluorescent detection further corroborated the expression of P2X

  12. Decline of Phosphotransfer and Substrate Supply Metabolic Circuits Hinders ATP Cycling in Aging Myocardium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emirhan Nemutlu

    Full Text Available Integration of mitochondria with cytosolic ATP-consuming/ATP-sensing and substrate supply processes is critical for muscle bioenergetics and electrical activity. Whether age-dependent muscle weakness and increased electrical instability depends on perturbations in cellular energetic circuits is unknown. To define energetic remodeling of aged atrial myocardium we tracked dynamics of ATP synthesis-utilization, substrate supply, and phosphotransfer circuits through adenylate kinase (AK, creatine kinase (CK, and glycolytic/glycogenolytic pathways using 18O stable isotope-based phosphometabolomic technology. Samples of intact atrial myocardium from adult and aged rats were subjected to 18O-labeling procedure at resting basal state, and analyzed using the 18O-assisted HPLC-GC/MS technique. Characteristics for aging atria were lower inorganic phosphate Pi[18O], γ-ATP[18O], β-ADP[18O], and creatine phosphate CrP[18O] 18O-labeling rates indicating diminished ATP utilization-synthesis and AK and CK phosphotransfer fluxes. Shift in dynamics of glycolytic phosphotransfer was reflected in the diminished G6P[18O] turnover with relatively constant glycogenolytic flux or G1P[18O] 18O-labeling. Labeling of G3P[18O], an indicator of G3P-shuttle activity and substrate supply to mitochondria, was depressed in aged myocardium. Aged atrial myocardium displayed reduced incorporation of 18O into second (18O2, third (18O3, and fourth (18O4 positions of Pi[18O] and a lower Pi[18O]/γ-ATP[18 O]-labeling ratio, indicating delayed energetic communication and ATP cycling between mitochondria and cellular ATPases. Adrenergic stress alleviated diminished CK flux, AK catalyzed β-ATP turnover and energetic communication in aging atria. Thus, 18O-assisted phosphometabolomics uncovered simultaneous phosphotransfer through AK, CK, and glycolytic pathways and G3P substrate shuttle deficits hindering energetic communication and ATP cycling, which may underlie energetic

  13. Decline of Phosphotransfer and Substrate Supply Metabolic Circuits Hinders ATP Cycling in Aging Myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemutlu, Emirhan; Gupta, Anu; Zhang, Song; Viqar, Maria; Holmuhamedov, Ekhson; Terzic, Andre; Jahangir, Arshad; Dzeja, Petras

    2015-01-01

    Integration of mitochondria with cytosolic ATP-consuming/ATP-sensing and substrate supply processes is critical for muscle bioenergetics and electrical activity. Whether age-dependent muscle weakness and increased electrical instability depends on perturbations in cellular energetic circuits is unknown. To define energetic remodeling of aged atrial myocardium we tracked dynamics of ATP synthesis-utilization, substrate supply, and phosphotransfer circuits through adenylate kinase (AK), creatine kinase (CK), and glycolytic/glycogenolytic pathways using 18O stable isotope-based phosphometabolomic technology. Samples of intact atrial myocardium from adult and aged rats were subjected to 18O-labeling procedure at resting basal state, and analyzed using the 18O-assisted HPLC-GC/MS technique. Characteristics for aging atria were lower inorganic phosphate Pi[18O], γ-ATP[18O], β-ADP[18O], and creatine phosphate CrP[18O] 18O-labeling rates indicating diminished ATP utilization-synthesis and AK and CK phosphotransfer fluxes. Shift in dynamics of glycolytic phosphotransfer was reflected in the diminished G6P[18O] turnover with relatively constant glycogenolytic flux or G1P[18O] 18O-labeling. Labeling of G3P[18O], an indicator of G3P-shuttle activity and substrate supply to mitochondria, was depressed in aged myocardium. Aged atrial myocardium displayed reduced incorporation of 18O into second (18O2), third (18O3), and fourth (18O4) positions of Pi[18O] and a lower Pi[18O]/γ-ATP[18 O]-labeling ratio, indicating delayed energetic communication and ATP cycling between mitochondria and cellular ATPases. Adrenergic stress alleviated diminished CK flux, AK catalyzed β-ATP turnover and energetic communication in aging atria. Thus, 18O-assisted phosphometabolomics uncovered simultaneous phosphotransfer through AK, CK, and glycolytic pathways and G3P substrate shuttle deficits hindering energetic communication and ATP cycling, which may underlie energetic vulnerability of aging

  14. Transcription recovery after DNA damage requires chromatin priming by the H3.3 histone chaperone HIRA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Salomé; Polo, Sophie E; Almouzni, Geneviève

    2013-09-26

    Understanding how to recover fully functional and transcriptionally active chromatin when its integrity has been challenged by genotoxic stress is a critical issue. Here, by investigating how chromatin dynamics regulate transcriptional activity in response to DNA damage in human cells, we identify a pathway involving the histone chaperone histone regulator A (HIRA) to promote transcription restart after UVC damage. Our mechanistic studies reveal that HIRA accumulates at sites of UVC irradiation upon detection of DNA damage prior to repair and deposits newly synthesized H3.3 histones. This local action of HIRA depends on ubiquitylation events associated with damage recognition. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the early and transient function of HIRA in response to DNA damage primes chromatin for later reactivation of transcription. We propose that HIRA-dependent histone deposition serves as a chromatin bookmarking system to facilitate transcription recovery after genotoxic stress. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Identification and Characterization of an ATP Binding Cassette l-Carnitine Transporter in Listeria monocytogenes

    OpenAIRE

    Fraser, Katy R.; Harvie, Duncan; Coote, Peter J.; O'Byrne, Conor P.

    2000-01-01

    We identified an operon in Listeria monocytogenes EGD with high levels of sequence similarity to the operons encoding the OpuC and OpuB compatible solute transporters from Bacillus subtilis, which are members of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) substrate binding protein-dependent transporter superfamily. The operon, designated opuC, consists of four genes which are predicted to encode an ATP binding protein (OpuCA), an extracellular substrate binding protein (OpuCC), and two membrane-associated...

  16. Chromatin proteins and modifications as drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helin, Kristian; Dhanak, Dashyant

    2013-01-01

    is a frequent event in disease, and the first epigenetic-based therapies for cancer treatment have been approved. A generation of new classes of potent and specific inhibitors for several chromatin-associated proteins have shown promise in preclinical trials. Although the biology of epigenetic regulation......A plethora of groundbreaking studies have demonstrated the importance of chromatin-associated proteins and post-translational modifications of histones, proteins and DNA (so-called epigenetic modifications) for transcriptional control and normal development. Disruption of epigenetic control...

  17. Replicating chromatin: a tale of histones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Anja

    2009-01-01

    framework of chromatin and carry information to specify higher-order organization and gene expression. When replication forks traverse the chromosomes, nucleosomes are transiently disrupted, allowing the replication machinery to gain access to DNA. Histone recycling, together with new deposition, ensures...... reassembly on nascent DNA strands. The aim of this review is to discuss how histones - new and old - are handled at the replication fork, highlighting new mechanistic insights and revisiting old paradigms.......Chromatin serves structural and functional roles crucial for genome stability and correct gene expression. This organization must be reproduced on daughter strands during replication to maintain proper overlay of epigenetic fabric onto genetic sequence. Nucleosomes constitute the structural...

  18. FGF signalling regulates chromatin organisation during neural differentiation via mechanisms that can be uncoupled from transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishal S Patel

    Full Text Available Changes in higher order chromatin organisation have been linked to transcriptional regulation; however, little is known about how such organisation alters during embryonic development or how it is regulated by extrinsic signals. Here we analyse changes in chromatin organisation as neural differentiation progresses, exploiting the clear spatial separation of the temporal events of differentiation along the elongating body axis of the mouse embryo. Combining fluorescence in situ hybridisation with super-resolution structured illumination microscopy, we show that chromatin around key differentiation gene loci Pax6 and Irx3 undergoes both decompaction and displacement towards the nuclear centre coincident with transcriptional onset. Conversely, down-regulation of Fgf8 as neural differentiation commences correlates with a more peripheral nuclear position of this locus. During normal neural differentiation, fibroblast growth factor (FGF signalling is repressed by retinoic acid, and this vitamin A derivative is further required for transcription of neural genes. We show here that exposure to retinoic acid or inhibition of FGF signalling promotes precocious decompaction and central nuclear positioning of differentiation gene loci. Using the Raldh2 mutant as a model for retinoid deficiency, we further find that such changes in higher order chromatin organisation are dependent on retinoid signalling. In this retinoid deficient condition, FGF signalling persists ectopically in the elongating body, and importantly, we find that inhibiting FGF receptor (FGFR signalling in Raldh2-/- embryos does not rescue differentiation gene transcription, but does elicit both chromatin decompaction and nuclear position change. These findings demonstrate that regulation of higher order chromatin organisation during differentiation in the embryo can be uncoupled from the machinery that promotes transcription and, for the first time, identify FGF as an extrinsic signal that

  19. Redox regulation of ATP sulfurylase in microalgae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Prioretti, L.; Lebrun, R.; Gontero, B.; Giordano, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 478, č. 4 (2016), s. 1555-1562 ISSN 0006-291X Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : ATP sulfurylase * cysteine * Sulfur metabolism Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.466, year: 2016

  20. Stoichiometry of ATP hydrolysis and chlorophyllide formation of dark-operative protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase from Rhodobacter capsulatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomata, Jiro [Graduate School of Bioagricultural Sciences, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, 464-8601 (Japan); Terauchi, Kazuki [Department of Life Sciences, Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga, 525-8577 (Japan); Fujita, Yuichi, E-mail: fujita@agr.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Bioagricultural Sciences, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, 464-8601 (Japan)

    2016-02-12

    Dark-operative protochlorophyllide (Pchlide) oxidoreductase (DPOR) is a nitrogenase-like enzyme catalyzing a reduction of the C17 = C18 double bond of Pchlide to form chlorophyllide a (Chlide) in bacteriochlorophyll biosynthesis. DPOR consists of an ATP-dependent reductase component, L-protein (a BchL dimer), and a catalytic component, NB-protein (a BchN–BchB heterotetramer). The L-protein transfers electrons to the NB-protein to reduce Pchlide, which is coupled with ATP hydrolysis. Here we determined the stoichiometry of ATP hydrolysis and the Chlide formation of DPOR. The minimal ratio of ATP to Chlide (ATP/2e{sup –}) was 4, which coincides with that of nitrogenase. The ratio increases with increasing molar ratio of L-protein to NB-protein. This profile differs from that of nitrogenase. These results suggest that DPOR has a specific intrinsic property, while retaining the common features shared with nitrogenase. - Highlights: • The stoichiometry of nitrogenase-like protochlorophyllide reductase was determined. • The minimal ATP/2e{sup –} ratio was 4, which coincides with that of nitrogenase. • The ATP/2e{sup –} ratio increases with increasing L-protein/NB-protein molar ratio. • DPOR has an intrinsic property, but retains features shared with nitrogenase.

  1. Symmetry broken and rebroken during the ATP hydrolysis cycle of the mitochondrial Hsp90 TRAP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnatan, Daniel; Betegon, Miguel; Liu, Yanxin; Ramelot, Theresa; Kennedy, Michael A; Agard, David A

    2017-07-25

    Hsp90 is a homodimeric ATP-dependent molecular chaperone that remodels its substrate 'client' proteins, facilitating their folding and activating them for biological function. Despite decades of research, the mechanism connecting ATP hydrolysis and chaperone function remains elusive. Particularly puzzling has been the apparent lack of cooperativity in hydrolysis of the ATP in each protomer. A crystal structure of the mitochondrial Hsp90, TRAP1, revealed that the catalytically active state is closed in a highly strained asymmetric conformation. This asymmetry, unobserved in other Hsp90 homologs, is due to buckling of one of the protomers and is most pronounced at the broadly conserved client-binding region. Here, we show that rather than being cooperative or independent, ATP hydrolysis on the two protomers is sequential and deterministic. Moreover, dimer asymmetry sets up differential hydrolysis rates for each protomer, such that the buckled conformation favors ATP hydrolysis. Remarkably, after the first hydrolysis, the dimer undergoes a flip in the asymmetry while remaining in a closed state for the second hydrolysis. From these results, we propose a model where direct coupling of ATP hydrolysis and conformational flipping rearranges client-binding sites, providing a paradigm of how energy from ATP hydrolysis can be used for client remodeling.

  2. The structural basis of a high affinity ATP binding ε subunit from a bacterial ATP synthase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Krah

    Full Text Available The ε subunit from bacterial ATP synthases functions as an ATP sensor, preventing ATPase activity when the ATP concentration in bacterial cells crosses a certain threshold. The R103A/R115A double mutant of the ε subunit from thermophilic Bacillus PS3 has been shown to bind ATP two orders of magnitude stronger than the wild type protein. We use molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations to derive the structural basis of the high affinity ATP binding to the R103A/R115A double mutant. Our results suggest that the double mutant is stabilized by an enhanced hydrogen-bond network and fewer repulsive contacts in the ligand binding site. The inferred structural basis of the high affinity mutant may help to design novel nucleotide sensors based on the ε subunit from bacterial ATP synthases.

  3. Chromatin Repressive Complexes in Stem Cells, Development, and Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laugesen, Anne; Helin, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    The chromatin environment is essential for the correct specification and preservation of cell identity through modulation and maintenance of transcription patterns. Many chromatin regulators are required for development, stem cell maintenance, and differentiation. Here, we review the roles...

  4. Chromatin Modifications Associated With Diabetes and Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schones, Dustin E; Leung, Amy; Natarajan, Rama

    2015-07-01

    The incidence of obesity across the globe has doubled over the past several decades, leading to escalating rates of diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and other complications. Given this dramatic rise in disease incidence, understanding the cause of these diseases is therefore of paramount importance. Metabolic diseases, such as obesity and diabetes mellitus, result from a multitude of genetic and environmental factors. Although the genetic basis of these diseases has been extensively studied, the molecular pathways whereby environmental factors influence disease progression are only beginning to be understood. One manner by which environmental factors can contribute to disease progression is through modifications to chromatin. The highly structured packaging of the genome into the nucleus through chromatin has been shown to be fundamental to tissue-specific gene regulation. Modifications to chromatin can regulate gene expression and are involved in a myriad of biological functions, and hence, disruption of these modifications is central to many human diseases. These modifications can furthermore be epigenetic in nature, thereby contributing to prolonged disease risk. Recent work has demonstrated that modifications to chromatin are associated with the progression of both diabetes mellitus and obesity, which is the subject of this review. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Keystone Symposia on Epigenomics and Chromatin Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravnskjær, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Keystone Symposia kicked off the start of 2012 with two joint meetings on Epigenomics and Chromatin Dynamics and a star-studded list of speakers. Held in Keystone, CO, January 17-22, and organized by Steven Jacobsen and Steven Henikoff and by Bradley Cairns and Geneviève Almouzni, respectively...

  6. Fibronectin: a chromatin-associated protein?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zardi, L; Siri, A; Carnemolla, B; Santi, L; Gardner, W D; Hoch, S O

    1979-11-01

    We have previously reported that chromatin preparations from human cultured fibroblasts contain a single homologous serum protein. In this paper we present evidence, based on immunological identity and physicochemical properties, that this serum protein is fibronectin. Furthermore, using a radioimmunoassay system, we have estimated that fibronectin represents about 0.7% of the total protein in both chromatin preparations and whole fibroblasts. Using a nitrocellulose filter assay system, we also show that fibronectin is a DNA-binding protein having an equilibrium constant of 4.6 x 10(-6) M. Equilibrium competition experiments have demonstrated that fibronectin has the ability to differentiate among nucleotides, indicating that fibronectin-DNA interaction is at least partially specific, and that a minimum polymer length of 12-18 nucleotides is required for effective binding to occur. Fibronectin has been isolated readily from plasma using DNA-affinity chromatography. We do not have direct evidence that fibronectin is an actual nonhistone chromosomal protein, but fibronectin is a DNA-binding protein (at least under in vitro assay conditions) and appears to be a normal constituent of chromatin as chromatin is currently isolated from cell nuclei.

  7. Chromatin and epigenetics in all their states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bey, Till; Jamge, Suraj; Klemme, Sonja; Komar, Dorota Natalia; Gall, Le Sabine; Mikulski, Pawel; Schmidt, Martin; Zicola, Johan; Berr, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    In January 2016, the first Epigenetic and Chromatin Regulation of Plant Traits conference was held in Strasbourg, France. An all-star lineup of speakers, a packed audience of 130 participants from over 20 countries, and a friendly scientific atmosphere contributed to make this conference a

  8. Using local chromatin structure to improve CRISPR/Cas9 efficiency in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunru; Zeng, Shiyang; Hu, Ruikun; Wang, Xiangxiu; Huang, Weilai; Liu, Jiangfang; Wang, Luying; Liu, Guifen; Cao, Ying; Zhang, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Although the CRISPR/Cas9 has been successfully applied in zebrafish, considerable variations in efficiency have been observed for different gRNAs. The workload and cost of zebrafish mutant screening is largely dependent on the mutation rate of injected embryos; therefore, selecting more effective gRNAs is especially important for zebrafish mutant construction. Besides the sequence features, local chromatin structures may have effects on CRISPR/Cas9 efficiency, which remain largely unexplored. In the only related study in zebrafish, nucleosome organization was not found to have an effect on CRISPR/Cas9 efficiency, which is inconsistent with recent studies in vitro and in mammalian cell lines. To understand the effects of local chromatin structure on CRISPR/Cas9 efficiency in zebrafish, we first determined that CRISPR/Cas9 introduced genome editing mainly before the dome stage. Based on this observation, we reanalyzed our published nucleosome organization profiles and generated chromatin accessibility profiles in the 256-cell and dome stages using ATAC-seq technology. Our study demonstrated that chromatin accessibility showed positive correlation with CRISPR/Cas9 efficiency, but we did not observe a clear correlation between nucleosome organization and CRISPR/Cas9 efficiency. We constructed an online database for zebrafish gRNA selection based on local chromatin structure features that could prove beneficial to zebrafish homozygous mutant construction via CRISPR/Cas9.

  9. On the role of inter-nucleosomal interactions and intrinsic nucleosome dynamics in chromatin function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wladyslaw A. Krajewski

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Evidence is emerging that many diseases result from defects in gene functions, which, in turn, depend on the local chromatin environment of a gene. However, it still remains not fully clear how chromatin activity code is ‘translated’ to the particular ‘activating’ or ‘repressing’ chromatin structural transition. Commonly, chromatin remodeling in vitro was studied using mononucleosomes as a model. However, recent data suggest that structural reorganization of a single mononucleosome is not equal to remodeling of a nucleosome particle under multinucleosomal content – such as, interaction of nucleosomes via flexible histone termini could significantly alter the mode (and the resulting products of nucleosome structural transitions. It is becoming evident that a nucleosome array does not constitute just a ‘polymer’ of individual ‘canonical’ nucleosomes due to multiple inter-nucleosomal interactions which affect nucleosome dynamics and structure. It could be hypothesized, that inter-nucleosomal interactions could act in cooperation with nucleosome inherent dynamics to orchestrate DNA-based processes and promote formation and stabilization of highly-dynamic, accessible structure of a nucleosome array. In the proposed paper we would like to discuss the nucleosome dynamics within the chromatin fiber mainly as it pertains to the roles of the structural changes mediated by inter-nucleosomal interactions.

  10. Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics for the Analysis of Chromatin Structure and Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Soldi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin is a highly structured nucleoprotein complex made of histone proteins and DNA that controls nearly all DNA-dependent processes. Chromatin plasticity is regulated by different associated proteins, post-translational modifications on histones (hPTMs and DNA methylation, which act in a concerted manner to enforce a specific “chromatin landscape”, with a regulatory effect on gene expression. Mass Spectrometry (MS has emerged as a powerful analytical strategy to detect histone PTMs, revealing interplays between neighbouring PTMs and enabling screens for their readers in a comprehensive and quantitative fashion. Here we provide an overview of the recent achievements of state-of-the-art mass spectrometry-based proteomics for the detailed qualitative and quantitative characterization of histone post-translational modifications, histone variants, and global interactomes at specific chromatin regions. This synopsis emphasizes how the advances in high resolution MS, from “Bottom Up” to “Top Down” analysis, together with the uptake of quantitative proteomics methods by chromatin biologists, have made MS a well-established method in the epigenetics field, enabling the acquisition of original information, highly complementary to that offered by more conventional, antibody-based, assays.

  11. Standardizing chromatin research: a simple and universal method for ChIP-seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrigoni, Laura; Richter, Andreas S; Betancourt, Emily; Bruder, Kerstin; Diehl, Sarah; Manke, Thomas; Bönisch, Ulrike

    2016-04-20

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next generation sequencing (ChIP-seq) is a key technique in chromatin research. Although heavily applied, existing ChIP-seq protocols are often highly fine-tuned workflows, optimized for specific experimental requirements. Especially the initial steps of ChIP-seq, particularly chromatin shearing, are deemed to be exceedingly cell-type-specific, thus impeding any protocol standardization efforts. Here we demonstrate that harmonization of ChIP-seq workflows across cell types and conditions is possible when obtaining chromatin from properly isolated nuclei. We established an ultrasound-based nuclei extraction method (NEXSON: Nuclei EXtraction by SONication) that is highly effective across various organisms, cell types and cell numbers. The described method has the potential to replace complex cell-type-specific, but largely ineffective, nuclei isolation protocols. By including NEXSON in ChIP-seq workflows, we completely eliminate the need for extensive optimization and sample-dependent adjustments. Apart from this significant simplification, our approach also provides the basis for a fully standardized ChIP-seq and yields highly reproducible transcription factor and histone modifications maps for a wide range of different cell types. Even small cell numbers (∼10,000 cells per ChIP) can be easily processed without application of modified chromatin or library preparation protocols. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. Chromatin Dynamics of the mouse β-globin locus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P.C. van de Corput (Mariëtte); E. de Boer (Ernie); T.A. Knoch (Tobias); W.A. van Cappellen (Gert); M. Lesnussa (Michael); H.J.F.M.M. Eussen (Bert)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractLately it has become more clear that (subtle) changes in 3D organization of chromatin can either trigger transcription or silence genes or gene clusters. It has also been postulated that due to changes in chromatin structure, a change in chromatin accessibility of transcription factors

  13. Spatially confined folding of chromatin in the interphase nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mateos-Langerak, Julio; Bohn, Manfred; de Leeuw, Wim; Giromus, Osdilly; Manders, Erik M. M.; Verschure, Pernette J.; Indemans, Mireille H. G.; Gierman, Hinco J.; Heermann, Dieter W.; van Driel, Roel; Goetze, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    Genome function in higher eukaryotes involves major changes in the spatial organization of the chromatin fiber. Nevertheless, our understanding of chromatin folding is remarkably limited. Polymer models have been used to describe chromatin folding. However, none of the proposed models gives a

  14. Direct Chromatin PCR (DC-PCR): Hypotonic Conditions Allow Differentiation of Chromatin States during Thermal Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatolin, Sergei; Khan, Shahper N.; Reu, Frederic J.

    2012-01-01

    Current methods to study chromatin configuration are not well suited for high throughput drug screening since they require large cell numbers and multiple experimental steps that include centrifugation for isolation of nuclei or DNA. Here we show that site specific chromatin analysis can be achieved in one step by simply performing direct chromatin PCR (DC-PCR) on cells. The basic underlying observation was that standard hypotonic PCR buffers prevent global cellular chromatin solubilization during thermal cycling while more loosely organized chromatin can be amplified. Despite repeated heating to >90°C, 41 of 61 tested 5′ sequences of silenced genes (CDKN2A, PU.1, IRF4, FOSB, CD34) were not amplifiable while 47 could be amplified from expressing cells. Two gene regions (IRF4, FOSB) even required pre-heating of cells in isotonic media to allow this differentiation; otherwise none of 19 assayed sequences yielded PCR products. Cells with baseline expression or epigenetic reactivation gave similar DC-PCR results. Silencing during differentiation of CD34 positive cord blood cells closed respective chromatin while treatment of myeloma cells with an IRF4 transcriptional inhibitor opened a site to DC-PCR that was occupied by RNA polymerase II and NFκB as determined by ChIP. Translation into real-time PCR can not be achieved with commercial real-time PCR buffers which potently open chromatin, but even with simple ethidium bromide addition to standard PCR mastermix we were able to identify hits in small molecules screens that suppressed IRF4 expression or reactivated CDKN2A in myeloma cells using densitometry or visual inspection of PCR plates under UV light. While need in drug development inspired this work, application to genome-wide analysis appears feasible using phi29 for selective amplification of open cellular chromatin followed by library construction from supernatants since such supernatants yielded similar results as gene specific DC-PCR. PMID:22984542

  15. Human gamma-satellite DNA maintains open chromatin structure and protects a transgene from epigenetic silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Hyun; Ebersole, Thomas; Kouprina, Natalay; Noskov, Vladimir N; Ohzeki, Jun-Ichirou; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Mravinac, Brankica; Sullivan, Beth A; Pavlicek, Adam; Dovat, Sinisa; Pack, Svetlana D; Kwon, Yoo-Wook; Flanagan, Patrick T; Loukinov, Dmitri; Lobanenkov, Victor; Larionov, Vladimir

    2009-04-01

    The role of repetitive DNA sequences in pericentromeric regions with respect to kinetochore/heterochromatin structure and function is poorly understood. Here, we use a mouse erythroleukemia cell (MEL) system for studying how repetitive DNA assumes or is assembled into different chromatin structures. We show that human gamma-satellite DNA arrays allow a transcriptionally permissive chromatin conformation in an adjacent transgene and efficiently protect it from epigenetic silencing. These arrays contain CTCF and Ikaros binding sites. In MEL cells, this gamma-satellite DNA activity depends on binding of Ikaros proteins involved in differentiation along the hematopoietic pathway. Given our discovery of gamma-satellite DNA in pericentromeric regions of most human chromosomes and a dynamic chromatin state of gamma-satellite arrays in their natural location, we suggest that gamma-satellite DNA represents a unique region of the functional centromere with a possible role in preventing heterochromatin spreading beyond the pericentromeric region.

  16. Undifferentiated embryonic cell transcription factor 1 regulates ESC chromatin organization and gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kooistra, Susanne M; van den Boom, Vincent; Thummer, Rajkumar P

    2010-01-01

    Previous reports showed that embryonic stem (ES) cells contain hyperdynamic and globally transcribed chromatin-properties that are important for ES cell pluripotency and differentiation. Here, we demonstrate a role for undifferentiated embryonic cell transcription factor 1 (UTF1) in regulating ES...... cell chromatin structure. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation-on-chip analysis, we identified >1,700 UTF1 target genes that significantly overlap with previously identified Nanog, Oct4, Klf-4, c-Myc, and Rex1 targets. Gene expression profiling showed that UTF1 knock down results in increased expression...... of a large set of genes, including a significant number of UTF1 targets. UTF1 knock down (KD) ES cells are, irrespective of the increased expression of several self-renewal genes, Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) dependent. However, UTF1 KD ES cells are perturbed in their differentiation in response...

  17. Extracellular ATP activates MAPK and ROS signaling during injury response in the fungus Trichoderma atroviride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth eMedina-Castellanos

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The response to mechanical damage is crucial for the survival of multicellular organisms, enabling their adaptation to hostile environments. Trichoderma atroviride, a filamentous fungus of great importance in the biological control of plant diseases, responds to mechanical damage by activating regenerative processes and asexual reproduction (conidiation. During this response, reactive oxygen species (ROS are produced by the NADPH oxidase (Nox1/NoxR complex. To understand the underlying early signaling events, we evaluated molecules such as extracellular ATP (eATP and Ca2+ that are known to trigger wound-induced responses in plants and animals. Concretely, we investigated the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathways by eATP, Ca2+ and ROS. Indeed, application of exogenous ATP and Ca2+ triggered conidiation. Furthermore, eATP promoted the Nox1-dependent production of ROS and activated a MAPK pathway. Mutants in the MAPK-encoding genes tmk1 and tmk3 were affected in wound-induced conidiation, and phosphorylation of both Tmk1 and Tmk3 was triggered by eATP. We conclude that in this fungus, eATP acts as a damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP. Our data indicate the existence of an eATP receptor and suggest that in fungi, eATP triggers pathways that converge to regulate asexual reproduction genes that are required for injury-induced conidiation. By contrast, Ca2+ is more likely to act as a downstream second messenger. The early steps of mechanical damage response in T. atroviride share conserved elements with those known from plants and animals.

  18. Extracellular ATP is internalized by macropinocytosis and induces intracellular ATP increase and drug resistance in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yanrong; Wang, Xuan; Liu, Yi; Li, Yunsheng; Colvin, Robert A; Tong, Lingying; Wu, Shiyong; Chen, Xiaozhuo

    2014-09-01

    ATP plays central roles in cancer metabolism and the Warburg effect. Intratumoral ATP concentrations are up to 10(4) times higher than those of interstitial ATP in normal tissues. However, extracellular ATP is not known to enter cancer cells. Here we report that human A549 lung cancer cells internalized extracellular ATP by macropinocytosis as demonstrated by colocalization of a nonhydrolyzable fluorescent ATP and a macropinocytosis tracer high-molecular-weight dextran, as well as by a macropinocytosis inhibitor study. Extracellular ATP also induced increase of intracellular ATP levels, without involving transcription and translation at significant levels, and cancer cells' resistance to ATP-competitor anticancer drugs, likely through the mechanism of ATP internalization. These findings, described for the first time, have profound implications in ATP-sharing among cancer cells in tumors and highlight a novel anticancer target. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Plasticity of fission yeast CENP-A chromatin driven by relative levels of histone H3 and H4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araceli G Castillo

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The histone H3 variant CENP-A assembles into chromatin exclusively at centromeres. The process of CENP-A chromatin assembly is epigenetically regulated. Fission yeast centromeres are composed of a central kinetochore domain on which CENP-A chromatin is assembled, and this is flanked by heterochromatin. Marker genes are silenced when placed within kinetochore or heterochromatin domains. It is not known if fission yeast CENP-A(Cnp1 chromatin is confined to specific sequences or whether histone H3 is actively excluded. Here, we show that fission yeast CENP-A(Cnp1 can assemble on noncentromeric DNA when it is inserted within the central kinetochore domain, suggesting that in fission yeast CENP-A(Cnp1 chromatin assembly is driven by the context of a sequence rather than the underlying DNA sequence itself. Silencing in the central domain is correlated with the amount of CENP-A(Cnp1 associated with the marker gene and is also affected by the relative level of histone H3. Our analyses indicate that kinetochore integrity is dependent on maintaining the normal ratio of H3 and H4. Excess H3 competes with CENP-A(Cnp1 for assembly into central domain chromatin, resulting in less CENP-A(Cnp1 and other kinetochore proteins at centromeres causing defective kinetochore function, which is manifest as aberrant mitotic chromosome segregation. Alterations in the levels of H3 relative to H4 and CENP-A(Cnp1 influence the extent of DNA at centromeres that is packaged in CENP-A(Cnp1 chromatin and the composition of this chromatin. Thus, CENP-A(Cnp1 chromatin assembly in fission yeast exhibits plasticity with respect to the underlying sequences and is sensitive to the levels of CENP-A(Cnp1 and other core histones.

  20. Human ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasiliou Vasilis

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There exist four fundamentally different classes of membrane-bound transport proteins: ion channels; transporters; aquaporins; and ATP-powered pumps. ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters are an example of ATP-dependent pumps. ABC transporters are ubiquitous membrane-bound proteins, present in all prokaryotes, as well as plants, fungi, yeast and animals. These pumps can move substrates in (influx or out (efflux of cells. In mammals, ABC transporters are expressed predominantly in the liver, intestine, blood-brain barrier, blood-testis barrier, placenta and kidney. ABC proteins transport a number of endogenous substrates, including inorganic anions, metal ions, peptides, amino acids, sugars and a large number of hydrophobic compounds and metabolites across the plasma membrane, and also across intracellular membranes. The human genome contains 49 ABC genes, arranged in eight subfamilies and named via divergent evolution. That ABC genes are important is underscored by the fact that mutations in at least I I of these genes are already known to cause severe inherited diseases (eg cystic fibrosis and X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy [X-ALD]. ABC transporters also participate in the movement of most drugs and their metabolites across cell surface and cellular organelle membranes; thus, defects in these genes can be important in terms of cancer therapy, pharmacokinetics and innumerable pharmacogenetic disorders.

  1. An ATP-competitive inhibitor modulates the allosteric function of the HER3 pseudokinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlefield, Peter; Moasser, Mark M.; Jura, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    The human epidermal growth factor receptor 3 (HER3) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that lacks catalytic activity, but is essential for cellular homeostasis due to its ability to allosterically activate EGFR/HER2. Though catalytically inactive, HER3 binds ATP tightly, hinting at a possible role of the nucleotide-binding pocket in modulating HER3 function. We report a structure of the HER3 pseudokinase bound to the ATP-competitive inhibitor bosutinib. Previously solved structures show that bosutinib can potently interact with multiple kinase domain conformations. In complex with HER3, bosutinib binds to yet another conformation, which is nearly identical to that observed in the HER3/ATP complex. Interestingly, occupation of the ATP-binding site by bosutinib improves the ability of HER3 to act as an allosteric activator of EGFR in vitro by increasing the affinity of the HER3/EGFR heterodimer in a membrane-dependent manner. PMID:24656791

  2. Detection of microbial contaminations in drinking water using ATP measurements – evaluating potential for online monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vang, Óluva Karin; Corfitzen, Charlotte B.; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2011-01-01

    There is an increasing call for fast and reliable methods for continuous monitoring of microbial drinking water quality in order to protect public health. The potential for Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) measurements as a real-time analysis for continuous monitoring of microbial drinking water...... of reagent kit. Surface water diluted 100-1000 times was detected in drinking water with ATP measurements. ATP has the potential as an early warning tool, especially in the period when the contamination concentration is high. 2011 © American Water Works Association AWWA WQTC Conference Proceedings All Rights...... quality was investigated through simulation of two contamination scenarios, i.e. drinking water contaminated with waste water and surface water at various concentrations. With ATP measurements it was possible to detect waste water diluted 1000-10,000 times in drinking water depending on sensitivity...

  3. Mechanisms controlling SMAD-dependent transcription and chromatin modification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baas, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/241270529

    2017-01-01

    Regulation of molecular processes in the cell is critical for proper cellular function and identity. To maintain this function and identity, proteins derived from approximately 20,000 protein coding genes encoded on the human genome need to be present at the right place and at the right time.

  4. Histone demethylase KDM5A regulates the ZMYND8-NuRD chromatin remodeler to promote DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Fade; Clouaire, Thomas; Aguirrebengoa, Marion; Legube, Gaëlle; Miller, Kyle M

    2017-07-03

    Upon DNA damage, histone modifications are dynamically reshaped to accommodate DNA damage signaling and repair within chromatin. In this study, we report the identification of the histone demethylase KDM5A as a key regulator of the bromodomain protein ZMYND8 and NuRD (nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylation) complex in the DNA damage response. We observe KDM5A-dependent H3K4me3 demethylation within chromatin near DNA double-strand break (DSB) sites. Mechanistically, demethylation of H3K4me3 is required for ZMYND8-NuRD binding to chromatin and recruitment to DNA damage. Functionally, KDM5A deficiency results in impaired transcriptional silencing and repair of DSBs by homologous recombination. Thus, this study identifies a crucial function for KDM5A in demethylating H3K4 to allow ZMYND8-NuRD to operate within damaged chromatin to repair DSBs. © 2017 Gong et al.

  5. ATP8B1 and ATP11C: Two Lipid Flippases Important for Hepatocyte Function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naik, Jyoti; de Waart, Dirk R.; Utsunomiya, Karina; Duijst, Suzanne; Mok, Kam Ho; Oude Elferink, Ronald P. J.; Bosma, Piter J.; Paulusma, Coen C.

    2015-01-01

    P4 ATPases are lipid flippases and transport phospholipids from the exoplasmic to the cytosolic leaflet of biological membranes. Lipid flipping is important for the biogenesis of transport vesicles. Recently it was shown that loss of the P4 ATPases ATP8B1 and ATP11C are associated with severe

  6. Muscle interstitial ATP and norepinephrine concentrations in the human leg during exercise and ATP infusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Stefan P.; Gonzalez-Alonso, Jose; Nielsen, Jens Jung

    2009-01-01

    ATP has been proposed to play multiple roles in local skeletal muscle blood flow regulation by inducing vasodilation and modulating sympathetic vasoconstrictor activity, but the mechanism remain unclear. Here we evaluated the effects of arterial ATP infusion and exercise on limb muscle interstitial...... local concentration. Key words: sympathetic nerve activity, vasodilation, endothelium, skeletal muscle....

  7. ATP-consuming and ATP-generating enzymes secreted by pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yegutkin, Gennady G; Samburski, Sergei S; Jalkanen, Sirpa

    2006-01-01

    Pancreatic acini release ATP in response to various stimuli, including cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8), as we show in the present study. There were indications that pancreatic juice also contains enzymes that could hydrolyze ATP during its passage through the ductal system. The aim of this st......Pancreatic acini release ATP in response to various stimuli, including cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8), as we show in the present study. There were indications that pancreatic juice also contains enzymes that could hydrolyze ATP during its passage through the ductal system. The aim...... of this study was to determine which ATP-degrading and possibly ATP-generating enzymes were present in pancreatic secretion. For this purpose, pancreatic juice was collected from anesthetized rats stimulated with infusion of CCK-8. Purine-converting activities in juice samples were assayed by TLC using either...... [gamma-(32)P]ATP or (14)C/(3)H-labeled and unlabeled nucleotides as appropriate substrates. Data show that the juice contains the enzyme ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase that can hydrolyze both [(14)C]ATP and [(3)H]ADP about equally well, i.e. CD39. Reverse-phase high-performance liquid...

  8. ATP: The crucial component of secretory vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estévez-Herrera, Judith; Domínguez, Natalia; Pardo, Marta R; González-Santana, Ayoze; Westhead, Edward W; Borges, Ricardo; Machado, José David

    2016-07-12

    The colligative properties of ATP and catecholamines demonstrated in vitro are thought to be responsible for the extraordinary accumulation of solutes inside chromaffin cell secretory vesicles, although this has yet to be demonstrated in living cells. Because functional cells cannot be deprived of ATP, we have knocked down the expression of the vesicular nucleotide carrier, the VNUT, to show that a reduction in vesicular ATP is accompanied by a drastic fall in the quantal release of catecholamines. This phenomenon is particularly evident in newly synthesized vesicles, which we show are the first to be released. Surprisingly, we find that inhibiting VNUT expression also reduces the frequency of exocytosis, whereas the overexpression of VNUT drastically increases the quantal size of exocytotic events. To our knowledge, our data provide the first demonstration that ATP, in addition to serving as an energy source and purinergic transmitter, is an essential element in the concentration of catecholamines in secretory vesicles. In this way, cells can use ATP to accumulate neurotransmitters and other secreted substances at high concentrations, supporting quantal transmission.

  9. The Role of Chromatin in Adenoviral Vector Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen M. Wong

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Vectors based on adenovirus (Ad are one of the most commonly utilized platforms for gene delivery to cells in molecular biology studies and in gene therapy applications. Ad is also the most popular vector system in human clinical gene therapy trials, largely due to its advantageous characteristics such as high cloning capacity (up to 36 kb, ability to infect a wide variety of cell types and tissues, and relative safety due to it remaining episomal in transduced cells. The latest generation of Ad vectors, helper‑dependent Ad (hdAd, which are devoid of all viral protein coding sequences, can mediate high-level expression of a transgene for years in a variety of species ranging from rodents to non-human primates. Given the importance of histones and chromatin in modulating gene expression within the host cell, it is not surprising that Ad, a nuclear virus, also utilizes these proteins to protect the genome and modulate virus- or vector‑encoded genes. In this review, we will discuss our current understanding of the contribution of chromatin to Ad vector function.

  10. Lamins and lamin-binding proteins in functional chromatin organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotzmann, J; Foisner, R

    1999-01-01

    Lamins are the major components of the nuclear lamina, a two-dimensional filamentous network at the periphery of the nucleus in higher eukaryotes, directly underlying the inner nuclear membrane. Several integral proteins of the inner nuclear membrane bind to lamins and may link the nuclear membrane to the core lamina network. The lamins and the lamin-binding proteins lamina-associated polypeptide (LAP)2beta and lamin B receptor (LBR) have been described to bind to DNA or to interact with chromatin via histones, BAF-1, and HP1 chromodomain proteins, respectively, and may provide anchorage sites for chromatin fibers at the nuclear periphery. In addition, lamin A structures on intranuclear filaments, or lamin B in replication foci have been described in the nuclear interior, but their specific roles remain unclear. An isoform of the LAP2 protein family, LAP2alpha, has been found to colocalize with A-type lamins in the nucleoplasm and might be involved in intranuclear structure organization. In the course of cell-cycle-dependent dynamics of the nucleus in higher eukaryotes, lamins as well as lamin-binding proteins seem to possess important functions during various steps of post-mitotic nuclear reassembly, including cross-linking of chromatides, nuclear membrane targeting, nuclear lamina assembly, and the formation of a replication-competent nucleus.

  11. Chromatin Structure and Radiation-Induced Intrachromosome Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangala; Zhang, Ye; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu

    2011-01-01

    We have recently investigated the location of breaks involved in intrachromosomal type exchange events, using the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique for human chromosome 3. In human epithelial cells exposed to both low- and high-LET radiations in vitro, intrachromosome exchanges were found to occur preferentially between a break in the 3p21 and one in the 3q11. Exchanges were also observed between a break in 3p21 and one in 3q26, but few exchanges were observed between breaks in 3q11 and 3q26, even though the two regions were on the same arm of the chromosome. To explore the relationships between intrachromosome exchanges and chromatin structure, we used probes that hybridize the three regions of 3p21, 3q11 and 3q26, and measured the distance between two of the three regions in interphase cells. We further analyzed fragile sites on the chromosome that have been identified in various types of cancers. Our results demonstrated that the distribution of breaks involved in radiation-induced intrachromosome aberrations depends upon both the location of fragile sites and the folding of chromatins

  12. Functional Interplay of Two Paralogs Encoding SWI/SNF Chromatin-Remodeling Accessory Subunits During Caenorhabditis elegans Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl, Iris; Porta-de-la-Riva, Montserrat; Gómez-Orte, Eva; Rubio-Peña, Karinna; Aristizábal-Corrales, David; Cornes, Eric; Fontrodona, Laura; Osteikoetxea, Xabier; Ayuso, Cristina; Askjaer, Peter; Cabello, Juan; Cerón, Julián

    2016-03-01

    SWI/SNF ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes have been related to several cellular processes such as transcription, regulation of chromosomal stability, and DNA repair. The Caenorhabditis elegans gene ham-3 (also known as swsn-2.1) and its paralog swsn-2.2 encode accessory subunits of SWI/SNF complexes. Using RNA interference (RNAi) assays and diverse alleles we investigated whether ham-3 and swsn-2.2 have different functions during C. elegans development since they encode proteins that are probably mutually exclusive in a given SWI/SNF complex. We found that ham-3 and swsn-2.2 display similar functions in vulva specification, germline development, and intestinal cell proliferation, but have distinct roles in embryonic development. Accordingly, we detected functional redundancy in some developmental processes and demonstrated by RNA sequencing of RNAi-treated L4 animals that ham-3 and swsn-2.2 regulate the expression of a common subset of genes but also have specific targets. Cell lineage analyses in the embryo revealed hyper-proliferation of intestinal cells in ham-3 null mutants whereas swsn-2.2 is required for proper cell divisions. Using a proteomic approach, we identified SWSN-2.2-interacting proteins needed for early cell divisions, such as SAO-1 and ATX-2, and also nuclear envelope proteins such as MEL-28. swsn-2.2 mutants phenocopy mel-28 loss-of-function, and we observed that SWSN-2.2 and MEL-28 colocalize in mitotic and meiotic chromosomes. Moreover, we demonstrated that SWSN-2.2 is required for correct chromosome segregation and nuclear reassembly after mitosis including recruitment of MEL-28 to the nuclear periphery. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  13. Quantification of chromatin condensation level by image processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irianto, Jerome; Lee, David A; Knight, Martin M

    2014-03-01

    The level of chromatin condensation is related to the silencing/activation of chromosomal territories and therefore impacts on gene expression. Chromatin condensation changes during cell cycle, progression and differentiation, and is influenced by various physicochemical and epigenetic factors. This study describes a validated experimental technique to quantify chromatin condensation. A novel image processing procedure is developed using Sobel edge detection to quantify the level of chromatin condensation from nuclei images taken by confocal microscopy. The algorithm was developed in MATLAB and used to quantify different levels of chromatin condensation in chondrocyte nuclei achieved through alteration in osmotic pressure. The resulting chromatin condensation parameter (CCP) is in good agreement with independent multi-observer qualitative visual assessment. This image processing technique thereby provides a validated unbiased parameter for rapid and highly reproducible quantification of the level of chromatin condensation. Copyright © 2013 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Histone phosphorylation: a chromatin modification involved in diverse nuclear events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetto, Dorine; Avvakumov, Nikita; Côté, Jacques

    2012-10-01

    Histone posttranslational modifications are key components of diverse processes that modulate chromatin structure. These marks function as signals during various chromatin-based events, and act as platforms for recruitment, assembly or retention of chromatin-associated factors. The best-known function of histone phosphorylation takes place during cellular response to DNA damage, when phosphorylated histone H2A(X) demarcates large chromatin domains around the site of DNA breakage. However, multiple studies have also shown that histone phosphorylation plays crucial roles in chromatin remodeling linked to other nuclear processes. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of histone phosphorylation and describe the many kinases and phosphatases that regulate it. We discuss the key roles played by this histone mark in DNA repair, transcription and chromatin compaction during cell division and apoptosis. Additionally, we describe the intricate crosstalk that occurs between phosphorylation and other histone modifications and allows for sophisticated control over the chromatin remodeling processes.

  15. Monitoring interactions at ATP-dependent drug efflux pumps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendrikse, NH

    2000-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic treatment of cancer patients is often unsuccessful, due to the involvement of various mechanisms, leading to multidrug resistance (MDR). In this review, I describe the mechanisms involved in MDR. Furthermore, results obtained by imaging of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and the multidrug

  16. Histone chaperone networks shaping chromatin function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammond, Colin; Strømme, Caroline Bianchi; Huang, Hongda

    2017-01-01

    The association of histones with specific chaperone complexes is important for their folding, oligomerization, post-translational modification, nuclear import, stability, assembly and genomic localization. In this way, the chaperoning of soluble histones is a key determinant of histone availabili...... chaperone network and via co-chaperone complexes to match histone supply with demand, thereby promoting proper nucleosome assembly and maintaining epigenetic information by recycling modified histones evicted from chromatin....

  17. Bromodomain Protein Brd4 Associated with Acetylated Chromatin Is Important for Maintenance of Higher-order Chromatin Structure*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ranran; Li, Qing; Helfer, Christine M.; Jiao, Jing; You, Jianxin

    2012-01-01

    Chromatin structure organization is crucial for regulating many fundamental cellular processes. However, the molecular mechanism that regulates the assembly of higher-order chromatin structure remains poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrate that Brd4 (bromodomain-containing protein 4) protein participates in the maintenance of the higher-order chromatin structure. Brd4, a member of the BET family of proteins, has been shown to play important roles in cellular growth control, cell cycle progression, and cancer development. We apply in situ single cell chromatin imaging and micrococcal nuclease (MNase) assay to show that Brd4 depletion leads to a large scale chromatin unfolding. A dominant-negative inhibitor encoding the double bromodomains (BDI/II) of Brd4 can competitively dissociate endogenous Brd4 from chromatin to trigger severely fragmented chromatin morphology. Mechanistic studies using Brd4 truncation mutants reveal that the Brd4 C-terminal domain is crucial for maintaining normal chromatin structure. Using bimolecular fluorescence complementation technology, we demonstrate that Brd4 molecules interact intermolecularly on chromatin and that replacing Brd4 molecules by BDI/II causes abnormal nucleosome aggregation and chromatin fragmentation. These studies establish a novel structural role of Brd4 in supporting the higher chromatin architecture. PMID:22334664

  18. Capturing Structural Heterogeneity in Chromatin Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekundayo, Babatunde; Richmond, Timothy J; Schalch, Thomas

    2017-10-13

    Chromatin fiber organization is implicated in processes such as transcription, DNA repair and chromosome segregation, but how nucleosomes interact to form higher-order structure remains poorly understood. We solved two crystal structures of tetranucleosomes with approximately 11-bp DNA linker length at 5.8 and 6.7 Å resolution. Minimal intramolecular nucleosome-nucleosome interactions result in a fiber model resembling a flat ribbon that is compatible with a two-start helical architecture, and that exposes histone and DNA surfaces to the environment. The differences in the two structures combined with electron microscopy reveal heterogeneous structural states, and we used site-specific chemical crosslinking to assess the diversity of nucleosome-nucleosome interactions through identification of structure-sensitive crosslink sites that provide a means to characterize fibers in solution. The chromatin fiber architectures observed here provide a basis for understanding heterogeneous chromatin higher-order structures as they occur in a genomic context. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Plant chromatin warms up in Madrid: meeting summary of the 3rd European Workshop on Plant Chromatin 2013, Madrid, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarillo, José A; Gaudin, Valérie; Hennig, Lars; Köhler, Claudia; Piñeiro, Manuel

    2014-04-01

    The 3rd European Workshop on Plant Chromatin (EWPC) was held on August 2013 in Madrid, Spain. A number of different topics on plant chromatin were presented during the meeting, including new factors mediating Polycomb Group protein function in plants, chromatin-mediated reprogramming in plant developmental transitions, the role of histone variants, and newly identified chromatin remodeling factors. The function of interactions between chromatin and transcription factors in the modulation of gene expression, the role of chromatin dynamics in the control of nuclear processes and the influence of environmental factors on chromatin organization were also reported. In this report, we highlight some of the new insights emerging in this growing area of research, presented at the 3rd EWPC.

  20. Unbiased chromatin accessibility profiling by RED-seq uncovers unique features of nucleosome variants in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Poshen B; Zhu, Lihua J; Hainer, Sarah J; McCannell, Kurtis N; Fazzio, Thomas G

    2014-12-15

    Differential accessibility of DNA to nuclear proteins underlies the regulation of numerous cellular processes. Although DNA accessibility is primarily determined by the presence or absence of nucleosomes, differences in nucleosome composition or dynamics may also regulate accessibility. Methods for mapping nucleosome positions and occupancies genome-wide (MNase-seq) have uncovered the nucleosome landscapes of many different cell types and organisms. Conversely, methods specialized for the detection of large nucleosome-free regions of chromatin (DNase-seq, FAIRE-seq) have uncovered numerous gene regulatory elements. However, these methods are less successful in measuring the accessibility of DNA sequences within nucelosome arrays. Here we probe the genome-wide accessibility of multiple cell types in an unbiased manner using restriction endonuclease digestion of chromatin coupled to deep sequencing (RED-seq). Using this method, we identified differences in chromatin accessibility between populations of cells, not only in nucleosome-depleted regions of the genome (e.g., enhancers and promoters), but also within the majority of the genome that is packaged into nucleosome arrays. Furthermore, we identified both large differences in chromatin accessibility in distinct cell lineages and subtle but significant changes during differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Most significantly, using RED-seq, we identified differences in accessibility among nucleosomes harboring well-studied histone variants, and show that these differences depend on factors required for their deposition. Using an unbiased method to probe chromatin accessibility genome-wide, we uncover unique features of chromatin structure that are not observed using more widely-utilized methods. We demonstrate that different types of nucleosomes within mammalian cells exhibit different degrees of accessibility. These findings provide significant insight into the regulation of DNA accessibility.

  1. Gadolinium induced effects on mammalian cell motility, adherence and chromatin structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Gabor; Baksa, Viktoria; Kiss, Alexandra; Turani, Melinda; Banfalvi, Gaspar

    2017-02-01

    The toxicity of gadolinium is reduced by chelating agents that render this heavy metal into contrast complexes used for medical magnetic resonance imaging. However, the dissociation of gadolinium chelates is known to generate Gd3+ ions, the cellular toxicity of which has not been tested in details. The cytotoxic effects of Gd(III) ions were evaluated by monitoring the proliferation, measuring the cellular motility and following chromatin changes in various cell lines upon Gd3+ treatment. Measurements applied long-term scanning microscopy and a perfusion platform that replaced the medium with test solutions, bypassed physical contact with the cell culture during experiments, and provided uninterrupted high time-resolution time-lapse photomicrography for an extended period of time. Genotoxicity specific chromatin changes characteristic to Gd(III) were distinguished in human skin keratinocytes (HaCaT), human limbal stem cells (HuLi), colorectal adenocarcinoma (CaCO2), murine squamous carcinoma (SCC) and Indian muntjac (IM) cell lines. Characteristic features of Gd(III) toxicity were: loss of cellular motility, irreversible attachment of cells to the growth surface and cell death. Injury-specific chromatin changes manifested at micromolar Gd3+ concentrations as premature chromatin condensation and highly condensed sticky chromatin patches. Gd(III) concentration- and cell type-dependent reduction of normal adherence, as well as premature chromatin condensation confirmed apoptosis. The risk related to the release of toxic Gd3+ ions from gadolinium complexes and their effects on mono- and multi-layer cellular barriers have to be reconsidered when these chelated complexes are used as contrasting agents especially in relation to possible blood-brain barrier damages.

  2. The physical size of transcription factors is key to transcriptional regulation in chromatin domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeshima, Kazuhiro; Kaizu, Kazunari; Tamura, Sachiko; Nozaki, Tadasu; Kokubo, Tetsuro; Takahashi, Koichi

    2015-02-01

    Genetic information, which is stored in the long strand of genomic DNA as chromatin, must be scanned and read out by various transcription factors. First, gene-specific transcription factors, which are relatively small (˜50 kDa), scan the genome and bind regulatory elements. Such factors then recruit general transcription factors, Mediators, RNA polymerases, nucleosome remodellers, and histone modifiers, most of which are large protein complexes of 1-3 MDa in size. Here, we propose a new model for the functional significance of the size of transcription factors (or complexes) for gene regulation of chromatin domains. Recent findings suggest that chromatin consists of irregularly folded nucleosome fibres (10 nm fibres) and forms numerous condensed domains (e.g., topologically associating domains). Although the flexibility and dynamics of chromatin allow repositioning of genes within the condensed domains, the size exclusion effect of the domain may limit accessibility of DNA sequences by transcription factors. We used Monte Carlo computer simulations to determine the physical size limit of transcription factors that can enter condensed chromatin domains. Small gene-specific transcription factors can penetrate into the chromatin domains and search their target sequences, whereas large transcription complexes cannot enter the domain. Due to this property, once a large complex binds its target site via gene-specific factors it can act as a ‘buoy’ to keep the target region on the surface of the condensed domain and maintain transcriptional competency. This size-dependent specialization of target-scanning and surface-tethering functions could provide novel insight into the mechanisms of various DNA transactions, such as DNA replication and repair/recombination.

  3. Radiation induced chromatin conformation changes analysed by fluorescent localization microscopy, statistical physics, and graph theory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhang

    Full Text Available It has been well established that the architecture of chromatin in cell nuclei is not random but functionally correlated. Chromatin damage caused by ionizing radiation raises complex repair machineries. This is accompanied by local chromatin rearrangements and structural changes which may for instance improve the accessibility of damaged sites for repair protein complexes. Using stably transfected HeLa cells expressing either green fluorescent protein (GFP labelled histone H2B or yellow fluorescent protein (YFP labelled histone H2A, we investigated the positioning of individual histone proteins in cell nuclei by means of high resolution localization microscopy (Spectral Position Determination Microscopy = SPDM. The cells were exposed to ionizing radiation of different doses and aliquots were fixed after different repair times for SPDM imaging. In addition to the repair dependent histone protein pattern, the positioning of antibodies specific for heterochromatin and euchromatin was separately recorded by SPDM. The present paper aims to provide a quantitative description of structural changes of chromatin after irradiation and during repair. It introduces a novel approach to analyse SPDM images by means of statistical physics and graph theory. The method is based on the calculation of the radial distribution functions as well as edge length distributions for graphs defined by a triangulation of the marker positions. The obtained results show that through the cell nucleus the different chromatin re-arrangements as detected by the fluorescent nucleosomal pattern average themselves. In contrast heterochromatic regions alone indicate a relaxation after radiation exposure and re-condensation during repair whereas euchromatin seemed to be unaffected or behave contrarily. SPDM in combination with the analysis techniques applied allows the systematic elucidation of chromatin re-arrangements after irradiation and during repair, if selected sub-regions of

  4. A SWI/SNF Chromatin Remodelling Protein Controls Cytokinin Production through the Regulation of Chromatin Architecture

    KAUST Repository

    Jégu, Teddy

    2015-10-12

    Chromatin architecture determines transcriptional accessibility to DNA and consequently gene expression levels in response to developmental and environmental stimuli. Recently, chromatin remodelers such as SWI/SNF complexes have been recognized as key regulators of chromatin architecture. To gain insight into the function of these complexes during root development, we have analyzed Arabidopsis knock-down lines for one sub-unit of SWI/SNF complexes: BAF60. Here, we show that BAF60 is a positive regulator of root development and cell cycle progression in the root meristem via its ability to down-regulate cytokinin production. By opposing both the deposition of active histone marks and the formation of a chromatin regulatory loop, BAF60 negatively regulates two crucial target genes for cytokinin biosynthesis (IPT3 and IPT7) and one cell cycle inhibitor (KRP7). Our results demonstrate that SWI/SNF complexes containing BAF60 are key factors governing the equilibrium between formation and dissociation of a chromatin loop controlling phytohormone production and cell cycle progression.

  5. The Nuts and Bolts of Transcriptionally Silent Chromatin in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartenberg, Marc R.; Smith, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional silencing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae occurs at several genomic sites including the silent mating-type loci, telomeres, and the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) tandem array. Epigenetic silencing at each of these domains is characterized by the absence of nearly all histone modifications, including most prominently the lack of histone H4 lysine 16 acetylation. In all cases, silencing requires Sir2, a highly-conserved NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase. At locations other than the rDNA, silencing also requires additional Sir proteins, Sir1, Sir3, and Sir4 that together form a repressive heterochromatin-like structure termed silent chromatin. The mechanisms of silent chromatin establishment, maintenance, and inheritance have been investigated extensively over the last 25 years, and these studies have revealed numerous paradigms for transcriptional repression, chromatin organization, and epigenetic gene regulation. Studies of Sir2-dependent silencing at the rDNA have also contributed to understanding the mechanisms for maintaining the stability of repetitive DNA and regulating replicative cell aging. The goal of this comprehensive review is to distill a wide array of biochemical, molecular genetic, cell biological, and genomics studies down to the “nuts and bolts” of silent chromatin and the processes that yield transcriptional silencing. PMID:27516616

  6. Effects of ATP release on mucin5AC secretion in airway epithelial cells by mechanical stretching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ting; Liu, Chunyi; Zhou, Xiangdong; Kolosov, Victor P; Perelman, Juliy M

    2014-01-01

    This study is to determine the effects of ATP and Ca(2+) on mucin5AC (MUC5AC) overexpression in airway epithelial cells in mechanical ventilation. Oxygen was injected into the closed box used in this study to increase the pressure. Gravity-driven draining flow led to formation of a thin liquid film on the upper portion of cell monolayer, exposing cells to the tension forces at the air-liquid interface. The levels of MUC5AC protein and ATP in culture medium were detected by ELISA and high performance liquid chromatography, respectively. Ca(2+) and MUC5AC mRNA in culture cells were detected by flow cytometry and RT-PCR, respectively. Mechanical stretching increased the expression of MUC5AC in cells and the concentration of MUC5AC and ATP in supernatant. BAPTA-AM and EGTA partially reduced the increases in the concentrations of MUC5AC and ATP in supernatant with mechanical ventilation. BAPTA-AM completely inhibited ATP in supernatant with normal breathing conditions. Our results showed that mechanical ventilation increases the secretion of MUC5AC in airway epithelial cells. This is possibly related to Ca(2+)-dependent ATP release and intracellular and external Ca(2+). © 2014 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  7. CO2/HCO3(-)- and calcium-regulated soluble adenylyl cyclase as a physiological ATP sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zippin, Jonathan H; Chen, Yanqiu; Straub, Susanne G; Hess, Kenneth C; Diaz, Ana; Lee, Dana; Tso, Patrick; Holz, George G; Sharp, Geoffrey W G; Levin, Lonny R; Buck, Jochen

    2013-11-15

    The second messenger molecule cAMP is integral for many physiological processes. In mammalian cells, cAMP can be generated from hormone- and G protein-regulated transmembrane adenylyl cyclases or via the widely expressed and structurally and biochemically distinct enzyme soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC). sAC activity is uniquely stimulated by bicarbonate ions, and in cells, sAC functions as a physiological carbon dioxide, bicarbonate, and pH sensor. sAC activity is also stimulated by calcium, and its affinity for its substrate ATP suggests that it may be sensitive to physiologically relevant fluctuations in intracellular ATP. We demonstrate here that sAC can function as a cellular ATP sensor. In cells, sAC-generated cAMP reflects alterations in intracellular ATP that do not affect transmembrane AC-generated cAMP. In β cells of the pancreas, glucose metabolism generates ATP, which corresponds to an increase in cAMP, and we show here that sAC is responsible for an ATP-dependent cAMP increase. Glucose metabolism also elicits insulin secretion, and we further show that sAC is necessary for normal glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in vitro and in vivo.

  8. Mitochondrial function is required for extracellular ATP-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadatomi, Daichi; Nakashioya, Kazutaka; Mamiya, Sayaka; Honda, Shino; Kameyama, Yuka; Yamamura, Yasuo; Tanimura, Susumu; Takeda, Kohsuke

    2017-06-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome plays a critical role in the processing and release of inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18. Accumulating evidence suggests that mitochondria are common mediators of NLRP3 inflammasome activation induced by a wide range of inflammatory stimuli; however, the precise role of mitochondria is still not fully understood. Here, we show that mitochondrial function is required for extracellular ATP-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Extracellular ATP induced the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial fragmentation in a different manner than other stimuli in primary mouse macrophages. CCCP, an uncoupler and antimycin A, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, inhibited IL-1β release induced by ATP but not by other stimuli. CCCP did not inhibit the ATP-induced generation of reactive oxygen species and cell death, both of which are known to promote IL-1β release, but did inhibit the ATP-induced activation of caspase-1, a component of the NLRP3 inflammasome. These results suggest that mitochondrial function is required somewhat specifically for ATP-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation. In contrast to many previous reports that dysfunctional mitochondria promote NLRP3 inflammasome activation, the function of intact mitochondria appears to be required for NLRP3 inflammasome activation, depending on the stimulus. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  9. Extracellular ATP modulates synaptic plasticity induced by activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Yoshihiko; Fujii, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity is believed to be a cellular mechanism for memory formation in the brain. It has been known that the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) is required for persistent forms of memory and induction of synaptic plasticity. Application of mGluR agonists induces synaptic plasticity in the absence of electrical conditioning stimulation, such as high or low frequency stimulation. The direction of the mGluR-induced synaptic plasticity, i.e., either long-term potentiation (LTP) or long-term-depression (LTD), is dependent on whether N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are co-activated with mGluRs. ATP has modulatory effects on neuronal functions and, in particular, there is increasing evidence that it plays a crucial role in synaptic plasticity. LTP can be induced by application of ATP, and this effect is inhibited by NMDAR antagonist. Although cooperative effects of NMDARs and mGluRs and of NMDARs and extracellular ATP in synaptic plasticity have been revealed, the effect of extracellular ATP on mGluR-induced synaptic plasticity is unknown. In this article, we summarize published data on mGluR- and ATP-induced synaptic plasticity, and present new data showing that extracellular ATP facilitates both the LTP and LTD induced by mGluR activation.

  10. An overview and update of ATP7A mutations leading to menkes disease and occipital horn syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tümer, Zeynep

    2013-01-01

    of patients are males. MD occurs because of mutations in the ATP7A gene and the vast majority of ATP7A mutations are intragenic mutations or partial gene deletions. ATP7A is an energy-dependent transmembrane protein, which is involved in the delivery of copper to the secreted copper enzymes and in the export...... of surplus copper from cells. Severely affected MD patients die usually before the third year of life. A cure for the disease does not exist, but very early copper-histidine treatment may correct some of the neurological symptoms. This study reviews 274 published and 18 novel disease causing mutations...... identified in 370 unrelated MD patients, nonpathogenic variants of ATP7A, functional studies of the ATP7A mutations, and animal models of MD....

  11. Effect of Intramuscular Protons, Lactate, and ATP on Muscle Hyperalgesia in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Nicholas S; Whitley, Phillip E; Sluka, Kathleen A

    2015-01-01

    Chronic muscle pain is a significant health problem leading to disability[1]. Muscle fatigue can exacerbate muscle pain. Metabolites, including ATP, lactate, and protons, are released during fatiguing exercise and produce pain in humans. These substances directly activate purinergic (P2X) and acid sensing ion channels (ASICs) on muscle nociceptors, and when combined, produce a greater increase in neuron firing than when given alone. Whether the enhanced effect of combining protons, lactate, and ATP is the sum of individual effects (additive) or more than the sum of individual effects (synergistic) is unknown. Using a rat model of muscle nociceptive behavior, we tested each of these compounds individually over a range of physiologic and supra-physiologic concentrations. Further, we combined all three compounds in a series of dilutions and tested their effect on muscle nociceptive behavior. We also tested a non-hydrolyzable form of ATP (α,β-meATP) alone and in combination with lactate and acidic pH. Surprisingly, we found no dose-dependent effect on muscle nociceptive behavior for protons, lactate, or ATP when given alone. We similarly found no effect after application of each two-metabolite combination. Only pH 4 saline and α,β-meATP produced hyperalgesia when given alone. When all 3 substances were combined, however, ATP (2.4μm), lactate (10mM), and acidic pH (pH 6.0) produced an enhanced effect greater than the sum of the effects of the individual components, i.e. synergism. α,β me ATP (3nmol), on the other hand, showed no enhanced effects when combined with lactate (10mM) or acidic pH (pH 6.0), i.e. additive. These data suggest that combining fatigue metabolites in muscle produces a synergistic effect on muscle nociception.

  12. Effect of Intramuscular Protons, Lactate, and ATP on Muscle Hyperalgesia in Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas S Gregory

    Full Text Available Chronic muscle pain is a significant health problem leading to disability[1]. Muscle fatigue can exacerbate muscle pain. Metabolites, including ATP, lactate, and protons, are released during fatiguing exercise and produce pain in humans. These substances directly activate purinergic (P2X and acid sensing ion channels (ASICs on muscle nociceptors, and when combined, produce a greater increase in neuron firing than when given alone. Whether the enhanced effect of combining protons, lactate, and ATP is the sum of individual effects (additive or more than the sum of individual effects (synergistic is unknown. Using a rat model of muscle nociceptive behavior, we tested each of these compounds individually over a range of physiologic and supra-physiologic concentrations. Further, we combined all three compounds in a series of dilutions and tested their effect on muscle nociceptive behavior. We also tested a non-hydrolyzable form of ATP (α,β-meATP alone and in combination with lactate and acidic pH. Surprisingly, we found no dose-dependent effect on muscle nociceptive behavior for protons, lactate, or ATP when given alone. We similarly found no effect after application of each two-metabolite combination. Only pH 4 saline and α,β-meATP produced hyperalgesia when given alone. When all 3 substances were combined, however, ATP (2.4μm, lactate (10mM, and acidic pH (pH 6.0 produced an enhanced effect greater than the sum of the effects of the individual components, i.e. synergism. α,β me ATP (3nmol, on the other hand, showed no enhanced effects when combined with lactate (10mM or acidic pH (pH 6.0, i.e. additive. These data suggest that combining fatigue metabolites in muscle produces a synergistic effect on muscle nociception.

  13. Distinct Conformation of ATP Molecule in Solution and on Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Eri; Yura, Kei; Nagai, Yoshinori

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a versatile molecule used mainly for energy and a phosphate source. The hydrolysis of γ phosphate initiates the reactions and these reactions almost always start when ATP binds to protein. Therefore, there should be a mechanism to prevent spontaneous hydrolysis reaction and a mechanism to lead ATP to a pure energy source or to a phosphate source. To address these questions, we extensively analyzed the effect of protein to ATP conformation based on the sampling of the ATP solution conformations obtained from molecular dynamics simulation and the sampling of ATP structures bound to protein found in a protein structure database. The comparison revealed mainly the following three points; 1) The ribose ring in ATP molecule, which puckers in many ways in solution, tends to assume either C2' exo or C2' endo when it binds to protein. 2) The adenine ring in ATP molecule, which takes open-book motion with the two ring structures, has two distinct structures when ATP binds to protein. 3) The glycosyl-bond and the bond between phosphate and the ribose have unique torsion angles, when ATP binds to protein. The combination of torsion angles found in protein-bound forms is under-represented in ATP molecule in water. These findings suggest that ATP-binding protein exerts forces on ATP molecule to assume a conformation that is rarely found in solution, and that this conformation change should be a trigger for the reactions on ATP molecule.

  14. PTEN Interacts with Histone H1 and Controls Chromatin Condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhu Hong; Zhu, Minglu; Yang, Jingyi; Liang, Hui; He, Jinxue; He, Shiming; Wang, Pan; Kang, Xi; McNutt, Michael A.; Yin, Yuxin; Shen, Wen H.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Chromatin organization and dynamics are integral to global gene transcription. Histone modification influences chromatin status and gene expression. PTEN plays multiple roles in tumor suppression, development and metabolism. Here we report on the interplay of PTEN, histone H1 and chromatin. We show that loss of PTEN leads to dissociation of histone H1 from chromatin and decondensation of chromatin. PTEN deletion also results in elevation of histone H4 acetylation at lysine 16, an epigenetic marker for chromatin activation. We found that PTEN and histone H1 physically interact through their C-terminal domains. Disruption of the PTEN C-terminus promotes the chromatin association of MOF acetyltransferase and induces H4K16 acetylation. Hyperacetylation of H4K16 impairs the association of PTEN with histone H1, which constitutes regulatory feedback that may deteriorate chromatin stability. Our results demonstrate that PTEN controls chromatin condensation, thus influencing gene expression. We propose that PTEN regulates global gene transcription profiling through histones and chromatin remodeling. PMID:25199838

  15. Nuclear c-Abl-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation induces chromatin structural changes through histone modifications that include H4K16 hypoacetylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoyama, Kazumasa; Fukumoto, Yasunori; Ishibashi, Kenichi; Kubota, Sho; Morinaga, Takao; Horiike, Yasuyoshi; Yuki, Ryuzaburo; Takahashi, Akinori; Nakayama, Yuji; Yamaguchi, Naoto, E-mail: nyama@p.chiba-u.ac.jp

    2011-12-10

    c-Abl tyrosine kinase, which is ubiquitously expressed, has three nuclear localization signals and one nuclear export signal and can shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. c-Abl plays important roles in cell proliferation, adhesion, migration, and apoptosis. Recently, we developed a pixel imaging method for quantitating the level of chromatin structural changes and showed that nuclear Src-family tyrosine kinases are involved in chromatin structural changes upon growth factor stimulation. Using this method, we show here that nuclear c-Abl induces chromatin structural changes in a manner dependent on the tyrosine kinase activity. Expression of nuclear-targeted c-Abl drastically increases the levels of chromatin structural changes, compared with that of c-Abl. Intriguingly, nuclear-targeted c-Abl induces heterochromatic profiles of histone methylation and acetylation, including hypoacetylation of histone H4 acetylated on lysine 16 (H4K16Ac). The level of heterochromatic histone modifications correlates with that of chromatin structural changes. Adriamycin-induced DNA damage stimulates translocation of c-Abl into the nucleus and induces chromatin structural changes together with H4K16 hypoacetylation. Treatment with trichostatin A, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, blocks chromatin structural changes but not nuclear tyrosine phosphorylation by c-Abl. These results suggest that nuclear c-Abl plays an important role in chromatin dynamics through nuclear tyrosine phosphorylation-induced heterochromatic histone modifications.

  16. Cohesin is required for higher-order chromatin conformation at the imprinted IGF2-H19 locus.

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    Raffaella Nativio

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Cohesin is a chromatin-associated protein complex that mediates sister chromatid cohesion by connecting replicated DNA molecules. Cohesin also has important roles in gene regulation, but the mechanistic basis of this function is poorly understood. In mammalian genomes, cohesin co-localizes with CCCTC binding factor (CTCF, a zinc finger protein implicated in multiple gene regulatory events. At the imprinted IGF2-H19 locus, CTCF plays an important role in organizing allele-specific higher-order chromatin conformation and functions as an enhancer blocking transcriptional insulator. Here we have used chromosome conformation capture (3C assays and RNAi-mediated depletion of cohesin to address whether cohesin affects higher order chromatin conformation at the IGF2-H19 locus in human cells. Our data show that cohesin has a critical role in maintaining CTCF-mediated chromatin conformation at the locus and that disruption of this conformation coincides with changes in IGF2 expression. We show that the cohesin-dependent, higher-order chromatin conformation of the locus exists in both G1 and G2 phases of the cell cycle and is therefore independent of cohesin's function in sister chromatid cohesion. We propose that cohesin can mediate interactions between DNA molecules in cis to insulate genes through the formation of chromatin loops, analogous to the cohesin mediated interaction with sister chromatids in trans to establish cohesion.

  17. The Short Isoform of BRD4 Promotes HIV-1 Latency by Engaging Repressive SWI/SNF Chromatin-Remodeling Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Ryan J; Fozouni, Parinaz; Thomas, Sean; Sy, Hendrik; Zhang, Qiang; Zhou, Ming-Ming; Ott, Melanie

    2017-09-21

    BET proteins commonly activate cellular gene expression, yet inhibiting their recruitment paradoxically reactivates latent HIV-1 transcription. Here we identify the short isoform of BET family member BRD4 (BRD4S) as a corepressor of HIV-1 transcription. We found that BRD4S was enriched in chromatin fractions of latently infected T cells, and it was more rapidly displaced from chromatin upon BET inhibition than the long isoform. BET inhibition induced marked nucleosome remodeling at the latent HIV-1 promoter, which was dependent on the activity of BRG1-associated factors (BAF), an SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex with known repressive functions in HIV-1 transcription. BRD4S directly bound BRG1, a catalytic subunit of BAF, via its bromodomain and extraterminal (ET) domain, and this isoform was necessary for BRG1 recruitment to latent HIV-1 chromatin. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) combined with assay for transposase-accessible chromatin coupled to high-throughput sequencing (ATAC-seq) data, we found that the latent HIV-1 promoter phenotypically resembles endogenous long terminal repeat (LTR) sequences, pointing to a select role of BRD4S-BRG1 complexes in genomic silencing of invasive retroelements. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Regulation of Pannexin 1 Surface Expression by Extracellular ATP: Potential Implications for Nervous System Function in Health and Disease

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    Leigh A. Swayne

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Pannexin 1 (Panx1 channels are widely recognized for their role in ATP release, and as follows, their function is closely tied to that of ATP-activated P2X7 purinergic receptors (P2X7Rs. Our recent work has shown that extracellular ATP induces clustering of Panx1 with P2X7Rs and their subsequent internalization through a non-canonical cholesterol-dependent mechanism. In other words, we have demonstrated that extracellular ATP levels can regulate the cell surface expression of Panx1. Here we discuss two situations in which we hypothesize that ATP modulation of Panx1 surface expression could be relevant for central nervous system function. The first scenario involves the development of new neurons in the ventricular zone. We propose that ATP-induced Panx1 endocytosis could play an important role in regulating the balance of cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation within this neurogenic niche in the healthy brain. The second scenario relates to the spinal cord, in which we posit that an impairment of ATP-induced Panx1 endocytosis could contribute to pathological neuroplasticity. Together, the discussion of these hypotheses serves to highlight important outstanding questions regarding the interplay between extracellular ATP, Panx1, and P2X7Rs in the nervous system in health and disease.

  19. Chromatin Dynamics in Vivo: A Game of Musical Chairs

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    Daniël P. Melters

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Histones are a major component of chromatin, the nucleoprotein complex fundamental to regulating transcription, facilitating cell division, and maintaining genome integrity in almost all eukaryotes. In addition to canonical, replication-dependent histones, replication-independent histone variants exist in most eukaryotes. In recent years, steady progress has been made in understanding how histone variants assemble, their involvement in development, mitosis, transcription, and genome repair. In this review, we will focus on the localization of the major histone variants H3.3, CENP-A, H2A.Z, and macroH2A, as well as how these variants have evolved, their structural differences, and their functional significance in vivo.

  20. Chromatin Constrains the Initiation and Elongation of DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devbhandari, Sujan; Jiang, Jieqing; Kumar, Charanya; Whitehouse, Iestyn; Remus, Dirk

    2017-01-05

    Eukaryotic chromosomal DNA is faithfully replicated in a complex series of cell-cycle-regulated events that are incompletely understood. Here we report the reconstitution of DNA replication free in solution with purified proteins from the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The system recapitulates regulated bidirectional origin activation; synthesis of leading and lagging strands by the three replicative DNA polymerases Pol α, Pol δ, and Pol ε; and canonical maturation of Okazaki fragments into continuous daughter strands. We uncover a dual regulatory role for chromatin during DNA replication: promoting origin dependence and determining Okazaki fragment length by restricting Pol δ progression. This system thus provides a functional platform for the detailed mechanistic analysis of eukaryotic chromosome replication. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Electric field driven torque in ATP synthase.

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    John H Miller

    Full Text Available FO-ATP synthase (FO is a rotary motor that converts potential energy from ions, usually protons, moving from high- to low-potential sides of a membrane into torque and rotary motion. Here we propose a mechanism whereby electric fields emanating from the proton entry and exit channels act on asymmetric charge distributions in the c-ring, due to protonated and deprotonated sites, and drive it to rotate. The model predicts a scaling between time-averaged torque and proton motive force, which can be hindered by mutations that adversely affect the channels. The torque created by the c-ring of FO drives the γ-subunit to rotate within the ATP-producing complex (F1 overcoming, with the aid of thermal fluctuations, an opposing torque that rises and falls with angular position. Using the analogy with thermal Brownian motion of a particle in a tilted washboard potential, we compute ATP production rates vs. proton motive force. The latter shows a minimum, needed to drive ATP production, which scales inversely with the number of proton binding sites on the c-ring.

  2. Molecular Events Involved in a Single Cycle of Ligand Transfer from an ATP Binding Cassette Transporter, LolCDE, to a Molecular Chaperone, LolA*

    OpenAIRE

    Taniguchi, Naohiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2008-01-01

    An ATP binding cassette transporter LolCDE complex releases lipoproteins from the inner membrane of Escherichia coli in an ATP-dependent manner, leading to the formation of a complex between a lipoprotein and a periplasmic chaperone, LolA. LolA is proposed to undergo a conformational change upon the lipoprotein binding. The lipoprotein is then transferred from the LolA-lipoprotein complex to the outer membrane via LolB. Unlike most ATP binding cassette transporters med...

  3. Putative molecular mechanism underlying sperm chromatin remodelling is regulated by reproductive hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gill-Sharma Manjeet Kaur

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The putative regulatory role of the male reproductive hormones in the molecular mechanism underlying chromatin condensation remains poorly understood. In the past decade, we developed two adult male rat models wherein functional deficits of testosterone or FSH, produced after treatments with 20 mg/Kg/d of cyproterone acetate (CPA per os, for a period of 15 days or 3 mg/Kg/d of fluphenazine decanoate (FD subcutaneously, for a period of 60 days, respectively, affected the rate of sperm chromatin decondensation in vitro. These rat models have been used in the current study in order to delineate the putative roles of testosterone and FSH in the molecular mechanism underlying remodelling of sperm chromatin. Results We report that deficits of both testosterone and FSH affected the turnover of polyubiquitylated histones and led to their accumulation in the testis. Functional deficits of testosterone reduced expression of MIWI, the 5-methyl cap binding RNA-binding protein (PIWIlike murine homologue of the Drosophila protein PIWI/P-element induced wimpy testis containing a PAZ/Piwi-Argonaut-Zwille domain and levels of histone deacetylase1 (HDAC1, ubiquitin ligating enzyme (URE-B1/E3, 20S proteasome α1 concomitant with reduced expression of ubiquitin activating enzyme (ube1, conjugating enzyme (ube2d2, chromodomain Y like protein (cdyl, bromodomain testis specific protein (brdt, hdac6 (histone deacetylase6, androgen-dependent homeobox placentae embryonic protein (pem/RhoX5, histones h2b and th3 (testis-specific h3. Functional deficits of FSH reduced the expression of cdyl and brdt genes in the testis, affected turnover of ubiquitylated histones, stalled the physiological DNA repair mechanism and culminated in spermiation of DNA damaged sperm. Conclusions We aver that deficits of both testosterone and FSH differentially affected the process of sperm chromatin remodelling through subtle changes in the ‘chromatin condensation

  4. Histone deacetylase inhibitors promote the expression of ATP2A3 gene in breast cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras-Leal, Erika; Hernández-Oliveras, Andrés; Flores-Peredo, Lucía; Zarain-Herzberg, Ángel; Santiago-García, Juan

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that expression of Sarco(endo)plasmic Reticulum Ca(2+) -ATPase 2 (SERCA2) is decreased in oral cancer; whereas expression of SERCA3 is considerably decreased or absent in human colon, gastric, breast, and lung cancers. The ATP2A2 and ATP2A3 genes encode SERCA2 and SERCA3 isoforms, respectively. Promoter methylation on CpG islands was responsible for the repression of ATP2A2 gene in human oral cancer samples. On the other hand, histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) up-regulate ATP2A3 expression in gastric, colon, and lung cancer cells in culture, however, the molecular mechanism is unknown. In this study, we investigate whether HDACi and DNA methylation regulate ATP2A2 and ATP2A3 expression in human breast cancer cell lines. Results show a marked induction of SERCA3a and pan-SERCA3 mRNA expression in human MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells treated with sodium butyrate (NaB) or trichostatin A (TSA); whereas SERCA2b mRNA expression did not change significantly. ChIP assays show that NaB or TSA treatment of MDA-MB-231 cells increases H3K9 acetylation on ATP2A3 promoter. NaB also decreases H3K9 trimethylation; suggesting that these modifications stimulate ATP2A3 gene expression, through a chromatin remodeling mechanism. In contrast, NaB or TSA do not increase H3K9-acetylation of ATP2A2 proximal promoter. In addition, treatment with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine did not affect SERCA2b and SERCA3a expression, suggesting that promoter methylation status does not alter their expression in these cell lines. We propose that alteration of SERCA2b/SERCA3a isoform expression ratio could affect calcium management within the cell, and thus, the cellular pathways regulated by calcium could be compromised, such as cellular proliferation or apoptosis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Reading the Epigenetic State of Chromatin Alters its Accessibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Matthew D.

    The eukaryotic genome is organized into a structural polymer called chromatin. Ultimately, all access to genetic information is regulated by chromatin including access required for DNA replication, transcription, and repair. The basic repeating unit of chromatin is the nucleosome which is comprised of ˜147 bp of DNA tightly wrapped around a protein histone octamer core. The histone octamer is made up of eight proteins: two each of histones H2A, H2B, H3, and H4. Many mechanisms exist to regulate access to DNA but one of pivotal importance is the creation of unique nucleosomes through i) integration of histone variants and ii) deposition of post translational modifications (PTMs). These modifications help comprise the epigenome of a cell. Classically, the two mechanisms by which they function have been through a direct regulation of nucleosome dynamics, or through third party proteins which are able to recognize the variants or PTMs and facilitate work. The library of potential PTMs therefore forms a sort of histone code which regulates access to DNA. This thesis investigates the intersection of these mechanisms to determine whether the act of recognizing epigenetic information alters DNA accessibility. The primary method used to determine changes in DNA accessibility is though observing the effective binding affinity of a transcription factor to its target site buried within a recombinantly prepared nucleosome which has been modified to carry a PTM and to report on its wrapping state. We find different regulation depending both on the PTM we investigate and the specific PTM-binding protein. We first investigate the H3K36me3-binding protein PHF1 and find that while the PTM it recognizes, H3K36me3, does not alter DNA accessibility, the binding of its recognition domain and N-terminal domain can illicit a change of DNA accessibility of 8 +/- 2-fold. This means that 8 times less DNA binding protein is required to occupy its target site if the nucleosome is bound by PHF

  6. Reduced Histone Expression or a Defect in Chromatin Assembly Induces Respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdieri, Luciano; Zhang, Tiantian; Rogerson, Daniella; Vancura, Ales

    2016-01-19

    Regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration is a complex process that involves several signaling pathways and transcription factors as well as communication between the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. Here we show that decreased expression of histones or a defect in nucleosome assembly in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae results in increased mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy numbers, oxygen consumption, ATP synthesis, and expression of genes encoding enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). The metabolic shift from fermentation to respiration induced by altered chromatin structure is associated with the induction of the retrograde (RTG) pathway and requires the activity of the Hap2/3/4/5p complex as well as the transport and metabolism of pyruvate in mitochondria. Together, our data indicate that altered chromatin structure relieves glucose repression of mitochondrial respiration by inducing transcription of the TCA cycle and OXPHOS genes carried by both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. A role for chromatin topology in imprinted domain regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, William A; Sachani, Saqib S; White, Carlee R; Mann, Mellissa R W

    2016-02-01

    Recently, many advancements in genome-wide chromatin topology and nuclear architecture have unveiled the complex and hidden world of the nucleus, where chromatin is organized into discrete neighbourhoods with coordinated gene expression. This includes the active and inactive X chromosomes. Using X chromosome inactivation as a working model, we utilized publicly available datasets together with a literature review to gain insight into topologically associated domains, lamin-associated domains, nucleolar-associating domains, scaffold/matrix attachment regions, and nucleoporin-associated chromatin and their role in regulating monoallelic expression. Furthermore, we comprehensively review for the first time the role of chromatin topology and nuclear architecture in the regulation of genomic imprinting. We propose that chromatin topology and nuclear architecture are important regulatory mechanisms for directing gene expression within imprinted domains. Furthermore, we predict that dynamic changes in chromatin topology and nuclear architecture play roles in tissue-specific imprint domain regulation during early development and differentiation.

  8. Capitalizing on disaster: Establishing chromatin specificity behind the replication fork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Srinivas; Ahmad, Kami; Henikoff, Steven

    2017-04-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are packaged into nucleosomal chromatin, and genomic activity requires the precise localization of transcription factors, histone modifications and nucleosomes. Classic work described the progressive reassembly and maturation of bulk chromatin behind replication forks. More recent proteomics has detailed the molecular machines that accompany the replicative polymerase to promote rapid histone deposition onto the newly replicated DNA. However, localized chromatin features are transiently obliterated by DNA replication every S phase of the cell cycle. Genomic strategies now observe the rebuilding of locus-specific chromatin features, and reveal surprising delays in transcription factor binding behind replication forks. This implies that transient chromatin disorganization during replication is a central juncture for targeted transcription factor binding within genomes. We propose that transient occlusion of regulatory elements by disorganized nucleosomes during chromatin maturation enforces specificity of factor binding. © 2017 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The impact of cellular metabolism on chromatin dynamics and epigenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Michael A; Dai, Ziwei; Locasale, Jason W

    2017-11-01

    The substrates used to modify nucleic acids and chromatin are affected by nutrient availability and the activity of metabolic pathways. Thus, cellular metabolism constitutes a fundamental component of chromatin status and thereby of genome regulation. Here we describe the biochemical and genetic principles of how metabolism can influence chromatin biology and epigenetics, discuss the functional roles of this interplay in developmental and cancer biology, and present future directions in this rapidly emerging area.

  10. NET23/STING Promotes Chromatin Compaction from the Nuclear Envelope

    Science.gov (United States)

    de las Heras, Jose I.; Saiz-Ros, Natalia; Makarov, Alexandr A.; Lazou, Vassiliki; Meinke, Peter; Waterfall, Martin; Kelly, David A.; Schirmer, Eric C.

    2014-01-01

    Changes in the peripheral distribution and amount of condensed chromatin are observed in a number of diseases linked to mutations in the lamin A protein of the nuclear envelope. We postulated that lamin A interactions with nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins (NETs) that affect chromatin structure might be altered in these diseases and so screened thirty-one NETs for those that promote chromatin compaction as determined by an increase in the number of chromatin clusters of high pixel intensity. One of these, NET23 (also called STING, MITA, MPYS, ERIS, Tmem173), strongly promoted chromatin compaction. A correlation between chromatin compaction and endogenous levels of NET23/STING was observed for a number of human cell lines, suggesting that NET23/STING may contribute generally to chromatin condensation. NET23/STING has separately been found to be involved in innate immune response signaling. Upon infection cells make a choice to either apoptose or to alter chromatin architecture to support focused expression of interferon genes and other response factors. We postulate that the chromatin compaction induced by NET23/STING may contribute to this choice because the cells expressing NET23/STING eventually apoptose, but the chromatin compaction effect is separate from this as the condensation was still observed when cells were treated with Z-VAD to block apoptosis. NET23/STING-induced compacted chromatin revealed changes in epigenetic marks including changes in histone methylation and acetylation. This indicates a previously uncharacterized nuclear role for NET23/STING potentially in both innate immune signaling and general chromatin architecture. PMID:25386906

  11. ATP induces NO production in hippocampal neurons by P2X(7 receptor activation independent of glutamate signaling.

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    Juan Francisco Codocedo

    Full Text Available To assess the putative role of adenosine triphosphate (ATP upon nitric oxide (NO production in the hippocampus, we used as a model both rat hippocampal slices and isolated hippocampal neurons in culture, lacking glial cells. In hippocampal slices, additions of exogenous ATP or 2'(3'-O-(4-Benzoylbenzoyl ATP (Bz-ATP elicited concentration-dependent NO production, which increased linearly within the first 15 min and plateaued thereafter; agonist EC50 values were 50 and 15 µM, respectively. The NO increase evoked by ATP was antagonized in a concentration-dependent manner by Coomassie brilliant blue G (BBG or by N(ω-propyl-L-arginine, suggesting the involvement of P2X7Rs and neuronal NOS, respectively. The ATP induced NO production was independent of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA receptor activity as effects were not alleviated by DL-2-Amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (APV, but antagonized by BBG. In sum, exogenous ATP elicited NO production in hippocampal neurons independently of NMDA receptor activity.

  12. Chromatin insulators: regulatory mechanisms and epigenetic inheritance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushey, Ashley M.; Dorman, Elizabeth R.; Corces, Victor G.

    2008-01-01

    Enhancer-blocking insulators are DNA elements that disrupt the communication between a regulatory sequence, such as an enhancer or a silencer, and a promoter. Insulators participate in both transcriptional regulation and global nuclear organization, two features of chromatin that are thought to be maintained from one generation to the next through epigenetic mechanisms. Furthermore, there are many regulatory mechanisms in place that enhance or hinder insulator activity. These modes of regulation could be used to establish cell-type specific insulator activity that is epigenetically inherited along a cell and/or organismal lineage. This review will discuss the evidence for epigenetic inheritance and regulation of insulator function. PMID:18851828

  13. Chromatin Architecture Defines the Glucocorticoid Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burd, Craig J.; Archer, Trevor K.

    2013-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) functions to regulate a wide group of physiological processes through hormone inducible interaction with genomic loci and subsequent manipulation of the transcriptional output of target genes. Despite expression in a wide variety of tissues, the GR has diverse roles that are regulated tightly in a cell type specific manner. With the advent of whole genome approaches, the details of that diversity and the mechanisms regulating them are beginning to be elucidated. This review aims describe the recent advances detailing the role chromatin structure plays in dictating GR specificity. PMID:23545159

  14. In Posidonia oceanica cadmium induces changes in DNA methylation and chromatin patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Maria; Chiappetta, Adriana; Bruno, Leonardo; Bitonti, Maria Beatrice

    2012-01-01

    In mammals, cadmium is widely considered as a non-genotoxic carcinogen acting through a methylation-dependent epigenetic mechanism. Here, the effects of Cd treatment on the DNA methylation patten are examined together with its effect on chromatin reconfiguration in Posidonia oceanica. DNA methylation level and pattern were analysed in actively growing organs, under short- (6 h) and long- (2 d or 4 d) term and low (10 μM) and high (50 μM) doses of Cd, through a Methylation-Sensitive Amplification Polymorphism technique and an immunocytological approach, respectively. The expression of one member of the CHROMOMETHYLASE (CMT) family, a DNA methyltransferase, was also assessed by qRT-PCR. Nuclear chromatin ultrastructure was investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Cd treatment induced a DNA hypermethylation, as well as an up-regulation of CMT, indicating that de novo methylation did indeed occur. Moreover, a high dose of Cd led to a progressive heterochromatinization of interphase nuclei and apoptotic figures were also observed after long-term treatment. The data demonstrate that Cd perturbs the DNA methylation status through the involvement of a specific methyltransferase. Such changes are linked to nuclear chromatin reconfiguration likely to establish a new balance of expressed/repressed chromatin. Overall, the data show an epigenetic basis to the mechanism underlying Cd toxicity in plants.

  15. Noncoding transcription by alternative rna polymerases dynamically regulates an auxin-driven chromatin loop

    KAUST Repository

    Ariel, Federico D.

    2014-08-01

    The eukaryotic epigenome is shaped by the genome topology in three-dimensional space. Dynamic reversible variations in this epigenome structure directly influence the transcriptional responses to developmental cues. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis long intergenic noncoding RNA (lincRNA) APOLO is transcribed by RNA polymerases II and V in response to auxin, a phytohormone controlling numerous facets of plant development. This dual APOLO transcription regulates the formation of a chromatin loop encompassing the promoter of its neighboring gene PID, a key regulator of polar auxin transport. Altering APOLO expression affects chromatin loop formation, whereas RNA-dependent DNA methylation, active DNA demethylation, and Polycomb complexes control loop dynamics. This dynamic chromatin topology determines PID expression patterns. Hence, the dual transcription of a lincRNA influences local chromatin topology and directs dynamic auxin-controlled developmental outputs on neighboring genes. This mechanism likely underscores the adaptive success of plants in diverse environments and may be widespread in eukaryotes. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.

  16. At the intersection of non-coding transcription, DNA repair, chromatin structure, and cellular senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryosuke eOhsawa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available It is well accepted that non-coding RNAs play a critical role in regulating gene expression. Recent paradigm-setting studies are now revealing that non-coding RNAs, other than microRNAs, also play intriguing roles in the maintenance of chromatin structure, in the DNA damage response, and in adult human stem cell aging. In this review, we will discuss the complex inter-dependent relationships among non-coding RNA transcription, maintenance of genomic stability, chromatin structure and adult stem cell senescence. DNA damage-induced non-coding RNAs transcribed in the vicinity of the DNA break regulate recruitment of the DNA damage machinery and DNA repair efficiency. We will discuss the correlation between non-coding RNAs and DNA damage repair efficiency and the potential role of changing chromatin structures around double-strand break sites. On the other hand, induction of non-coding RNA transcription from the repetitive Alu elements occurs during human stem cell aging and hinders efficient DNA repair causing entry into senescence. We will discuss how this fine balance between transcription and genomic instability may be regulated by the dramatic changes to chromatin structure that accompany cellular senescence.

  17. A Polycomb Group Protein Is Retained at Specific Sites on Chromatin in Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follmer, Nicole E.; Wani, Ajazul H.; Francis, Nicole J.

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation of gene expression, including by Polycomb Group (PcG) proteins, may depend on heritable chromatin states, but how these states can be propagated through mitosis is unclear. Using immunofluorescence and biochemical fractionation, we find PcG proteins associated with mitotic chromosomes in Drosophila S2 cells. Genome-wide sequencing of chromatin immunoprecipitations (ChIP–SEQ) from mitotic cells indicates that Posterior Sex Combs (PSC) is not present at well-characterized PcG targets including Hox genes in mitosis, but does remain at a subset of interphase sites. Many of these persistent sites overlap with chromatin domain borders described by Sexton et al. (2012), which are genomic regions characterized by low levels of long range contacts. Persistent PSC binding sites flank both Hox gene clusters. We hypothesize that disruption of long-range chromatin contacts in mitosis contributes to PcG protein release from most sites, while persistent binding at sites with minimal long-range contacts may nucleate re-establishment of PcG binding and chromosome organization after mitosis. PMID:23284300

  18. Multi-scale chromatin state annotation using a hierarchical hidden Markov model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco, Eugenio; Meuleman, Wouter; Huang, Jialiang; Glass, Kimberly; Pinello, Luca; Wang, Jianrong; Kellis, Manolis; Yuan, Guo-Cheng

    2017-04-07

    Chromatin-state analysis is widely applied in the studies of development and diseases. However, existing methods operate at a single length scale, and therefore cannot distinguish large domains from isolated elements of the same type. To overcome this limitation, we present a hierarchical hidden Markov model, diHMM, to systematically annotate chromatin states at multiple length scales. We apply diHMM to analyse a public ChIP-seq data set. diHMM not only accurately captures nucleosome-level information, but identifies domain-level states that vary in nucleosome-level state composition, spatial distribution and functionality. The domain-level states recapitulate known patterns such as super-enhancers, bivalent promoters and Polycomb repressed regions, and identify additional patterns whose biological functions are not yet characterized. By integrating chromatin-state information with gene expression and Hi-C data, we identify context-dependent functions of nucleosome-level states. Thus, diHMM provides a powerful tool for investigating the role of higher-order chromatin structure in gene regulation.

  19. RNAi-independent role for Argonaute2 in CTCF/CP190 chromatin insulator function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshkovich, Nellie; Nisha, Parul; Boyle, Patrick J.; Thompson, Brandi A.; Dale, Ryan K.; Lei, Elissa P.

    2011-01-01

    A major role of the RNAi pathway in Schizosaccharomyces pombe is to nucleate heterochromatin, but it remains unclear whether this mechanism is conserved. To address this question in Drosophila, we performed genome-wide localization of Argonaute2 (AGO2) by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-seq in two different embryonic cell lines and found that AGO2 localizes to euchromatin but not heterochromatin. This localization pattern is further supported by immunofluorescence staining of polytene chromosomes and cell lines, and these studies also indicate that a substantial fraction of AGO2 resides in the nucleus. Intriguingly, AGO2 colocalizes extensively with CTCF/CP190 chromatin insulators but not with genomic regions corresponding to endogenous siRNA production. Moreover, AGO2, but not its catalytic activity or Dicer-2, is required for CTCF/CP190-dependent Fab-8 insulator function. AGO2 interacts physically with CTCF and CP190, and depletion of either CTCF or CP190 results in genome-wide loss of AGO2 chromatin association. Finally, mutation of CTCF, CP190, or AGO2 leads to reduction of chromosomal looping interactions, thereby altering gene expression. We propose that RNAi-independent recruitment of AGO2 to chromatin by insulator proteins promotes the definition of transcriptional domains throughout the genome. PMID:21852534

  20. DNA breaks and chromatin structural changes enhance the transcription of autoimmune regulator target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Mithu; Saare, Mario; Maslovskaja, Julia; Kisand, Kai; Liiv, Ingrid; Haljasorg, Uku; Tasa, Tõnis; Metspalu, Andres; Milani, Lili; Peterson, Pärt

    2017-04-21

    The autoimmune regulator (AIRE) protein is the key factor in thymic negative selection of autoreactive T cells by promoting the ectopic expression of tissue-specific genes in the thymic medullary epithelium. Mutations in AIRE cause a monogenic autoimmune disease called autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy. AIRE has been shown to promote DNA breaks via its interaction with topoisomerase 2 (TOP2). In this study, we investigated topoisomerase-induced DNA breaks and chromatin structural alterations in conjunction with AIRE-dependent gene expression. Using RNA sequencing, we found that inhibition of TOP2 religation activity by etoposide in AIRE-expressing cells had a synergistic effect on genes with low expression levels. AIRE-mediated transcription was not only enhanced by TOP2 inhibition but also by the TOP1 inhibitor camptothecin. The transcriptional activation was associated with structural rearrangements in chromatin, notably the accumulation of γH2AX and the exchange of histone H1 with HMGB1 at AIRE target gene promoters. In addition, we found the transcriptional up-regulation to co-occur with the chromatin structural changes within the genomic cluster of carcinoembryonic antigen-like cellular adhesion molecule genes. Overall, our results suggest that the presence of AIRE can trigger molecular events leading to an altered chromatin landscape and the enhanced transcription of low-expressed genes. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Expanding the Circuitry of Pluripotency by Selective Isolation of Chromatin-Associated Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiee, Mahmoud-Reza; Girardot, Charles; Sigismondo, Gianluca; Krijgsveld, Jeroen

    2016-11-03

    Maintenance of pluripotency is regulated by a network of transcription factors coordinated by Oct4, Sox2, and Nanog (OSN), yet a systematic investigation of the composition and dynamics of the OSN protein network specifically on chromatin is still missing. Here we have developed a method combining ChIP with selective isolation of chromatin-associated proteins (SICAP) followed by mass spectrometry to identify chromatin-bound partners of a protein of interest. ChIP-SICAP in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) identified over 400 proteins associating with OSN, including several whose interaction depends on the pluripotent state. Trim24, a previously unrecognized protein in the network, converges with OSN on multiple enhancers and suppresses the expression of developmental genes while activating cell cycle genes. Consistently, Trim24 significantly improved efficiency of cellular reprogramming, demonstrating its direct functionality in establishing pluripotency. Collectively, ChIP-SICAP provides a powerful tool to decode chromatin protein composition, further enhanced by its integrative capacity to perform ChIP-seq. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Multi-scale chromatin state annotation using a hierarchical hidden Markov model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco, Eugenio; Meuleman, Wouter; Huang, Jialiang; Glass, Kimberly; Pinello, Luca; Wang, Jianrong; Kellis, Manolis; Yuan, Guo-Cheng

    2017-04-01

    Chromatin-state analysis is widely applied in the studies of development and diseases. However, existing methods operate at a single length scale, and therefore cannot distinguish large domains from isolated elements of the same type. To overcome this limitation, we present a hierarchical hidden Markov model, diHMM, to systematically annotate chromatin states at multiple length scales. We apply diHMM to analyse a public ChIP-seq data set. diHMM not only accurately captures nucleosome-level information, but identifies domain-level states that vary in nucleosome-level state composition, spatial distribution and functionality. The domain-level states recapitulate known patterns such as super-enhancers, bivalent promoters and Polycomb repressed regions, and identify additional patterns whose biological functions are not yet characterized. By integrating chromatin-state information with gene expression and Hi-C data, we identify context-dependent functions of nucleosome-level states. Thus, diHMM provides a powerful tool for investigating the role of higher-order chromatin structure in gene regulation.

  3. Regulation of chromatin structure in the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa-Garrido, Manuel; Karbassi, Elaheh; Monte, Emma; Vondriska, Thomas M

    2013-01-01

    It has been appreciated for some time that cardiovascular disease involves large-scale transcriptional changes in various cell types. What has become increasingly clear only in the past few years, however, is the role of chromatin remodeling in cardiovascular phenotypes in normal physiology, as well as in development and disease. This review summarizes the state of the chromatin field in terms of distinct mechanisms to regulate chromatin structure in vivo, identifying when these modes of regulation have been demonstrated in cardiovascular tissues. We describe areas in which a better understanding of chromatin structure is leading to new insights into the fundamental biology of cardiovascular disease. 

  4. Formaldehyde Crosslinking: A Tool for the Study of Chromatin Complexes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Elizabeth A.; Frey, Brian L.; Smith, Lloyd M.; Auble, David T.

    2015-01-01

    Formaldehyde has been used for decades to probe macromolecular structure and function and to trap complexes, cells, and tissues for further analysis. Formaldehyde crosslinking is routinely employed for detection and quantification of protein-DNA interactions, interactions between chromatin proteins, and interactions between distal segments of the chromatin fiber. Despite widespread use and a rich biochemical literature, important aspects of formaldehyde behavior in cells have not been well described. Here, we highlight features of formaldehyde chemistry relevant to its use in analyses of chromatin complexes, focusing on how its properties may influence studies of chromatin structure and function. PMID:26354429

  5. Formaldehyde crosslinking: a tool for the study of chromatin complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Elizabeth A; Frey, Brian L; Smith, Lloyd M; Auble, David T

    2015-10-30

    Formaldehyde has been used for decades to probe macromolecular structure and function and to trap complexes, cells, and tissues for further analysis. Formaldehyde crosslinking is routinely employed for detection and quantification of protein-DNA interactions, interactions between chromatin proteins, and interactions between distal segments of the chromatin fiber. Despite widespread use and a rich biochemical literature, important aspects of formaldehyde behavior in cells have not been well described. Here, we highlight features of formaldehyde chemistry relevant to its use in analyses of chromatin complexes, focusing on how its properties may influence studies of chromatin structure and function. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Myogenic Differential Methylation: Diverse Associations with Chromatin Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sruti Chandra

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Employing a new algorithm for identifying differentially methylated regions (DMRs from reduced representation bisulfite sequencing profiles, we identified 1972 hypermethylated and 3250 hypomethylated myogenic DMRs in a comparison of myoblasts (Mb and myotubes (Mt with 16 types of nonmuscle cell cultures. DMRs co-localized with a variety of chromatin structures, as deduced from ENCODE whole-genome profiles. Myogenic hypomethylation was highly associated with both weak and strong enhancer-type chromatin, while hypermethylation was infrequently associated with enhancer-type chromatin. Both myogenic hypermethylation and hypomethylation often overlapped weak transcription-type chromatin and Polycomb-repressed-type chromatin. For representative genes, we illustrate relationships between DNA methylation, the local chromatin state, DNaseI hypersensitivity, and gene expression. For example, MARVELD2 exhibited myogenic hypermethylation in transcription-type chromatin that overlapped a silenced promoter in Mb and Mt while TEAD4 had myogenic hypomethylation in intronic subregions displaying enhancer-type or transcription-type chromatin in these cells. For LSP1, alternative promoter usage and active promoter-type chromatin were linked to highly specific myogenic or lymphogenic hypomethylated DMRs. Lastly, despite its myogenesis-associated expression, TBX15 had multiple hypermethylated myogenic DMRs framing its promoter region. This could help explain why TBX15 was previously reported to be underexpressed and, unexpectedly, its promoter undermethylated in placentas exhibiting vascular intrauterine growth restriction.

  7. Probing Chromatin Modifications in Response to ERK Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oksuz, Ozgur; Tee, Wee-Wei

    2017-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) is a technique used to determine the association of proteins or histone modifications with chromatin regions in living cells or tissues, and is used extensively in the chromatin biology field to study transcriptional and epigenetic mechanisms. Increasing evidence points to an epigenetic coordination of signaling cascades, such as ERK, that regulate key processes in development and disease, revealing novel principles of gene regulation. Here we describe a detailed protocol for performing chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by qPCR (ChIP-qPCR) for probing histone modifications regulated by ERK signaling in mouse ESCs.

  8. Effect of chromatin structure on quantitative ultrasound parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasternak, Maurice; Doss, Lilian; Farhat, Golnaz; Al-Mahrouki, Azza; Kim, Christina Hyunjung; Kolios, Michael; Tran, William Tyler; Czarnota, Gregory J

    2017-03-21

    High-frequency ultrasound (~20 MHz) techniques were investigated using in vitro and ex vivo models to determine whether alterations in chromatin structure are responsible for ultrasound backscatter changes in biological samples. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells and their isolated nuclei were exposed to various chromatin altering treatments. These included 10 different ionic environments, DNA cleaving and unfolding agents, as well as DNA condensing agents. Raw radiofrequency (RF) data was used to generate quantitative ultrasound parameters from spectral and form factor analyses. Chromatin structure was evaluated using electron microscopy. Results indicated that trends in quantitative ultrasound parameters mirrored trends in biophysical chromatin structure parameters. In general, higher ordered states of chromatin compaction resulted in increases to ultrasound paramaters of midband fit, spectral intercept, and estimated scatterer concentration, while samples with decondensed forms of chromatin followed an opposite trend. Experiments with isolated nuclei demonstrated that chromatin changes alone were sufficient to account for these observations. Experiments with ex vivo samples indicated similar effects of chromatin structure changes. The results obtained in this research provide a mechanistic explanation for ultrasound investigations studying scattering from cells and tissues undergoing biological processes affecting chromatin.

  9. The PML-associated protein DEK regulates the balance of H3.3 loading on chromatin and is important for telomere integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanauskiene, Kristina; Delbarre, Erwan; McGhie, James D.; Küntziger, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Histone variant H3.3 is deposited in chromatin at active sites, telomeres, and pericentric heterochromatin by distinct chaperones, but the mechanisms of regulation and coordination of chaperone-mediated H3.3 loading remain largely unknown. We show here that the chromatin-associated oncoprotein DEK regulates differential HIRA- and DAAX/ATRX-dependent distribution of H3.3 on chromosomes in somatic cells and embryonic stem cells. Live cell imaging studies show that nonnucleosomal H3.3 normally destined to PML nuclear bodies is re-routed to chromatin after depletion of DEK. This results in HIRA-dependent widespread chromatin deposition of H3.3 and H3.3 incorporation in the foci of heterochromatin in a process requiring the DAXX/ATRX complex. In embryonic stem cells, loss of DEK leads to displacement of PML bodies and ATRX from telomeres, redistribution of H3.3 from telomeres to chromosome arms and pericentric heterochromatin, induction of a fragile telomere phenotype, and telomere dysfunction. Our results indicate that DEK is required for proper loading of ATRX and H3.3 on telomeres and for telomeric chromatin architecture. We propose that DEK acts as a “gatekeeper” of chromatin, controlling chromatin integrity by restricting broad access to H3.3 by dedicated chaperones. Our results also suggest that telomere stability relies on mechanisms ensuring proper histone supply and routing. PMID:25049225

  10. The Chromatin Scaffold Protein SAFB1 Renders Chromatin Permissive for DNA Damage Signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altmeyer, Matthias; Toledo Lazaro, Luis Ignacio; Gudjonsson, Thorkell

    2013-01-01

    Although the general relevance of chromatin modifications for genotoxic stress signaling, cell-cycle checkpoint activation, and DNA repair is well established, how these modifications reach initial thresholds in order to trigger robust responses remains largely unexplored. Here, we identify the c...

  11. The Fun30 chromatin remodeler Fft3 controls nuclear organization and chromatin structure of insulators and subtelomeres in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babett Steglich

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotic cells, local chromatin structure and chromatin organization in the nucleus both influence transcriptional regulation. At the local level, the Fun30 chromatin remodeler Fft3 is essential for maintaining proper chromatin structure at centromeres and subtelomeres in fission yeast. Using genome-wide mapping and live cell imaging, we show that this role is linked to controlling nuclear organization of its targets. In fft3∆ cells, subtelomeres lose their association with the LEM domain protein Man1 at the nuclear periphery and move to the interior of the nucleus. Furthermore, genes in these domains are upregulated and active chromatin marks increase. Fft3 is also enriched at retrotransposon-derived long terminal repeat (LTR elements and at tRNA genes. In cells lacking Fft3, these sites lose their peripheral positioning and show reduced nucleosome occupancy. We propose that Fft3 has a global role in mediating association between specific chromatin domains and the nuclear envelope.

  12. Modulation of Extracellular ATP Content of Mast Cells and DRG Neurons by Irradiation: Studies on Underlying Mechanism of Low-Level-Laser Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-level-laser therapy (LLLT is an effective complementary treatment, especially for anti-inflammation and wound healing in which dermis or mucus mast cells (MCs are involved. In periphery, MCs crosstalk with neurons via purinergic signals and participate in various physiological and pathophysiological processes. Whether extracellular ATP, an important purine in purinergic signaling, of MCs and neurons could be modulated by irradiation remains unknown. In this study, effects of red-laser irradiation on extracellular ATP content of MCs and dorsal root ganglia (DRG neurons were investigated and underlying mechanisms were explored in vitro. Our results show that irradiation led to elevation of extracellular ATP level in the human mast cell line HMC-1 in a dose-dependent manner, which was accompanied by elevation of intracellular ATP content, an indicator for ATP synthesis, together with [Ca2+]i elevation, a trigger signal for exocytotic ATP release. In contrast to MCs, irradiation attenuated the extracellular ATP content of neurons, which could be abolished by ARL 67156, a nonspecific ecto-ATPases inhibitor. Our results suggest that irradiation potentiates extracellular ATP of MCs by promoting ATP synthesis and release and attenuates extracellular ATP of neurons by upregulating ecto-ATPase activity. The opposite responses of these two cell types indicate complex mechanisms underlying LLLT.

  13. Modulation of extracellular ATP content of mast cells and DRG neurons by irradiation: studies on underlying mechanism of low-level-laser therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lina; Hu, Lei; Grygorczyk, Ryszard; Shen, Xueyong; Schwarz, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Low-level-laser therapy (LLLT) is an effective complementary treatment, especially for anti-inflammation and wound healing in which dermis or mucus mast cells (MCs) are involved. In periphery, MCs crosstalk with neurons via purinergic signals and participate in various physiological and pathophysiological processes. Whether extracellular ATP, an important purine in purinergic signaling, of MCs and neurons could be modulated by irradiation remains unknown. In this study, effects of red-laser irradiation on extracellular ATP content of MCs and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons were investigated and underlying mechanisms were explored in vitro. Our results show that irradiation led to elevation of extracellular ATP level in the human mast cell line HMC-1 in a dose-dependent manner, which was accompanied by elevation of intracellular ATP content, an indicator for ATP synthesis, together with [Ca(2+)]i elevation, a trigger signal for exocytotic ATP release. In contrast to MCs, irradiation attenuated the extracellular ATP content of neurons, which could be abolished by ARL 67156, a nonspecific ecto-ATPases inhibitor. Our results suggest that irradiation potentiates extracellular ATP of MCs by promoting ATP synthesis and release and attenuates extracellular ATP of neurons by upregulating ecto-ATPase activity. The opposite responses of these two cell types indicate complex mechanisms underlying LLLT.

  14. Highly Divergent Mitochondrial ATP Synthase Complexes in Tetrahymena thermophila

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nina, Praveen Balabaskaran; Dudkina, Natalya V.; Kane, Lesley A.; van Eyk, Jennifer E.; Boekema, Egbert J.; Mather, Michael W.; Vaidya, Akhil B.; Eisen, Jonathan A.

    The F-type ATP synthase complex is a rotary nano-motor driven by proton motive force to synthesize ATP. Its F(1) sector catalyzes ATP synthesis, whereas the F(o) sector conducts the protons and provides a stator for the rotary action of the complex. Components of both F(1) and F(o) sectors are

  15. ATP release, generation and hydrolysis in exocrine pancreatic duct cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowal, Justyna Magdalena; Yegutkin, G.G.; Novak, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) regulates pancreatic duct function via P2Y and P2X receptors. It is well known that ATP is released from upstream pancreatic acinar cells. The ATP homeostasis in pancreatic ducts, which secrete bicarbonate-rich fluid, has not yet been examined. First, ou...

  16. Limitations of ATP as a measure of microbial biomass | Stuart ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Estimates of the total living biomass of micro-organisms on decomposing kelp detritus, calculated indirectly from the concentration of ATP, were compared with those obtained directly from cell numbers and volumes. Large overestimates in biomass were obtained from ATP x 250, and C:ATP ratios varied considerably with ...

  17. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in normal and pathological lung

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Deen, M; de Vries, EGE; Timens, W; Scheper, RJ; Timmer-Bosscha, H; Postma, DS

    2005-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette ( ABC) transporters are a family of transmembrane proteins that can transport a wide variety of substrates across biological membranes in an energy-dependent manner. Many ABC transporters such as P-glycoprotein ( P-gp), multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 ( MRP1) and

  18. Mitochondrial ATP depletion disrupts Caco-2 monolayer integrity and internalizes claudin 7

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen Duijghuijsen, Lonneke M.; Grefte, Sander; Boer, de Vincent C.J.; Zeper, Lara; Dartel, van Dorien A.M.; Romijnders-van der Stelt, Inge; Bekkenkamp-Grovenstein, Melissa; Norren, van Klaske; Wichers, Harry J.; Keijer, Jaap

    2017-01-01

    Objective: In vivo studies suggest that intestinal barrier integrity is dependent on mitochondrial ATP production. Here, we aim to provide mechanistic support, using an in vitro model mimicking the oxidative in vivo situation. Methods: Human Caco-2 cells were cultured for 10 days in culture

  19. Creatine kinase-mediated ATP supply fuels actin-based events in phagocytosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, J.W.P.; Pluk, H.; Oerlemans, F.; Leeuwen, F.N. van; Lange, F. de; Fransen, J.; Wieringa, B.

    2008-01-01

    Phagocytosis requires locally coordinated cytoskeletal rearrangements driven by actin polymerization and myosin motor activity. How this actomyosin dynamics is dependent upon systems that provide access to ATP at phagosome microdomains has not been determined. We analyzed the role of brain-type

  20. ATP releasing connexin 30 hemichannels mediate flow-induced calcium signaling in the collecting duct

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Per; Burford, James L; Peti-Peterdi, János

    2013-01-01

    in the distal nephron-collecting duct (CD) and release ATP into the tubular fluid upon mechanical stimuli, leading to reduced salt and water reabsorption. Cx30(-/-) mice show salt-dependent elevations in BP and impaired pressure-natriuresis. Thus, we hypothesized that increased tubular flow rate leads to Cx30...

  1. Mapping chromatin interactions with 5C technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraiuolo, Maria A.; Sanyal, Amartya; Naumova, Natalia; Dekker, Job; Dostie, Josée

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotes, genome organization can be observed on many levels and at different scales. This organization is important not only to reduce chromosome length but also for the proper execution of various biological processes. High-resolution mapping of spatial chromatin structure was made possible by the development of the chromosome conformation capture (3C) technique. 3C uses chemical cross-linking followed by proximity-based ligation of fragmented DNA to capture frequently interacting chromatin segments in cell populations. Several 3C-related methods capable of higher chromosome conformation mapping throughput were reported afterwards. These techniques include the 3C-carbon copy (5C) approach, which offers the advantage of being highly quantitative and reproducible. We provide here a reference protocol for the production of 5C libraries analyzed by next-generation sequencing or onto microarrays. A procedure used to verify that 3C library templates bear the high quality required to produce superior 5C libraries is also described. We believe that this comprehensive detailed protocol will help guide researchers in probing spatial genome organization and its role in various biological processes. PMID:23137922

  2. ATP Maintenance via Two Types of ATP Regulators Mitigates Pathological Phenotypes in Mouse Models of Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Nakano

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease is assumed to be caused by mitochondrial dysfunction in the affected dopaminergic neurons in the brain. We have recently created small chemicals, KUSs (Kyoto University Substances, which can reduce cellular ATP consumption. By contrast, agonistic ligands of ERRs (estrogen receptor-related receptors are expected to raise cellular ATP levels via enhancing ATP production. Here, we show that esculetin functions as an ERR agonist, and its addition to culture media enhances glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration, leading to elevated cellular ATP levels. Subsequently, we show the neuroprotective efficacies of KUSs, esculetin, and GSK4716 (an ERRγ agonist against cell death in Parkinson's disease models. In the surviving neurons, ATP levels and expression levels of α-synuclein and CHOP (an ER stress-mediated cell death executor were all rectified. We propose that maintenance of ATP levels, by inhibiting ATP consumption or enhancing ATP production, or both, would be a promising therapeutic strategy for Parkinson's disease.

  3. Extracellular ATP induces the rapid release of HIV-1 from virus containing compartments of human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziano, Francesca; Desdouits, Marion; Garzetti, Livia; Podini, Paola; Alfano, Massimo; Rubartelli, Anna; Furlan, Roberto; Benaroch, Philippe; Poli, Guido

    2015-06-23

    HIV type 1 (HIV-1) infects CD4(+) T lymphocytes and tissue macrophages. Infected macrophages differ from T cells in terms of decreased to absent cytopathicity and for active accumulation of new progeny HIV-1 virions in virus-containing compartments (VCC). For these reasons, infected macrophages are believed to act as "Trojan horses" carrying infectious particles to be released on cell necrosis or functional stimulation. Here we explored the hypothesis that extracellular ATP (eATP) could represent a microenvironmental signal potentially affecting virion release from VCC of infected macrophages. Indeed, eATP triggered the rapid release of infectious HIV-1 from primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) acutely infected with the CCR5-dependent HIV-1 strain. A similar phenomenon was observed in chronically infected promonocytic U1 cells differentiated to macrophage-like cells (D-U1) by costimulation with phorbol esters and urokinase-type plasminogen activator. Worthy of note, eATP did not cause necrotic, apoptotic, or pyroptotic cell death, and its effect on HIV-1 release was suppressed by Imipramine (an antidepressant agent known to inhibit microvesicle formation by interfering with membrane-associated acid sphingomyelinase). Virion release was not triggered by oxidized ATP, whereas the effect of eATP was inhibited by a specific inhibitor of the P2X7 receptor (P2X7R). Thus, eATP triggered the discharge of virions actively accumulating in VCC of infected macrophages via interaction with the P2X7R in the absence of significant cytopathicity. These findings suggest that the microvesicle pathway and P2X7R could represent exploitable targets for interfering with the VCC-associated reservoir of infectious HIV-1 virions in tissue macrophages.

  4. H+/ATP ratio during ATP hydrolysis by mitochondria: modification of the chemiosmotic theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, M D; Lehninger, A L

    1977-01-01

    The stoichiometry of H+ ejection by mitochondria during hydrolysis of a small pulse of ATP (the H+/ATP ratio) has been reexamined in the light of our recent observation that the stoichiometry of H+ ejection during mitochondrial electron transport (the H+/site ratio) was previously underestimated. We show that earlier estimates of the H+/ATP ratio in intact mitochondria were based upon an invalid correction for scaler H+ production and describe a modified method for determination of this ratio which utilizes mersalyl or N-ethylmaleimide to prevent complicating transmembrane movements of phosphate and H+. This method gives a value for the H+/ATP ratio of 2.0 without the need for questionable corrections, compared with a value of 3.0 for the H+/site ratio also obtained by pulse methods. A modified version of the chemiosmotic theory is presented, in which 3 H+ are ejected per pair of electrons traversing each energy-conserving site of the respiratory chain. Of these, 2 H+ return to the matrix through the ATPase to form ATP from ADP and phosphate, and 1 H+ returns through the combined action of the phosphate and adenine nucleotide exchange carriers of the inner membrane to allow the energy-requiring influx of Pi and ADP3- and efflux of ATP4-. Thus, up to one-third of the energy input into synthesis of extramitochondrial ATP may be required for transport work. Since other methods suggest that the H+/site significantly exceeds 3.0, an alternative possibility is that 4 h+ are ejected per site, followed by return of 3 H+ through the ATPase and 1 H+ through the operation of the proton-coupled membrane transport systems. PMID:17116

  5. Functional K(ATP) channels in the rat retinal microvasculature: topographical distribution, redox regulation, spermine modulation and diabetic alteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizaki, Eisuke; Fukumoto, Masanori; Puro, Donald G

    2009-05-15

    The essential task of the circulatory system is to match blood flow to local metabolic demand. However, much remains to be learned about this process. To better understand how local perfusion is regulated, we focused on the functional organization of the retinal microvasculature, which is particularly well adapted for the local control of perfusion. Here, we assessed the distribution and regulation of functional K(ATP) channels whose activation mediates the hyperpolarization induced by adenosine. Using microvascular complexes freshly isolated from the rat retina, we found a topographical heterogeneity in the distribution of functional K(ATP) channels; capillaries generate most of the K(ATP) current. The initiation of K(ATP)-induced responses in the capillaries supports the concept that the regulation of retinal perfusion is highly decentralized. Additional study revealed that microvascular K(ATP) channels are redox sensitive, with oxidants increasing their activity. Furthermore, the oxidant-mediated activation of these channels is driven by the polyamine spermine, whose catabolism produces oxidants. In addition, our observation that spermine-dependent oxidation occurs predominately in the capillaries accounts for why they generate most of the K(ATP) current detected in retinal microvascular complexes. Here, we also analysed retinal microvessels of streptozotocin-injected rats. We found that soon after the onset of diabetes, an increase in spermine-dependent oxidation at proximal microvascular sites boosts their K(ATP) current and thereby virtually eliminates the topographical heterogeneity of functional K(ATP) channels. We conclude that spermine-dependent oxidation is a previously unrecognized mechanism by which this polyamine modulates ion channels; in addition to a physiological role, spermine-dependent oxidation may also contribute to microvascular dysfunction in the diabetic retina.

  6. Reviewing Ligand-Based Rational Drug Design: The Search for an ATP Synthase Inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsueh-Fen Juan

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Following major advances in the field of medicinal chemistry, novel drugs can now be designed systematically, instead of relying on old trial and error approaches. Current drug design strategies can be classified as being either ligand- or structure-based depending on the design process. In this paper, by describing the search for an ATP synthase inhibitor, we review two frequently used approaches in ligand-based drug design: The pharmacophore model and the quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR method. Moreover, since ATP synthase ligands are potentially useful drugs in cancer therapy, pharmacophore models were constructed to pave the way for novel inhibitor designs.

  7. Cell identity bookmarking through heterogeneous chromatin landscape maintenance during the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Huaibing; Xi, Yanping; Li, Wei; Li, Jin; Li, Yan; Dong, Shihua; Peng, Lina; Liu, Yaping; Yu, Wenqiang

    2017-11-01

    Genetic and epigenetic information are faithfully duplicated and accurately transmitted to daughter cells to preserve cell identity during the cell cycle. However, how the chromatin-based epigenetic information beyond DNA sequence is stably transmitted along with the disruption and re-establishment of chromatin structure within a cell cycle remains largely unexplored. Through comprehensive analysis DNA methylation and nucleosome positioning patterns of HepG2 cells in G0/G1, early S, late S and G2/M phases, we found that DNA methylation may act as the prime element for epigenetic inheritance after replication, as DNA methylation was extremely stable in each cell cycle phase, while nucleosome occupancy showed notable phase dependent fluctuation. Nucleosome-Secured Regions (NSRs) occupied by polycomb-repressed chromatin played a role in repressing the irrelevant cell type-specific genes and were essential for preventing irrelevant transcription factors binding, while the well-defined Nucleosome-Depleted Regions (NDRs) marked the genes crucial for cell identity maintenance. Chromatin structure at NSRs and NDRs was well maintained throughout the cell cycle, which played crucial roles in steadily preserving the transcriptional identity of the cell to fulfill cell identity maintenance. Collectively, our results demonstrated that while chromatin architecture underwent dynamic changes during cell cycle progression, DNA methylation together with NSRs and NDRs were stable epigenetic elements that were required for faithful transmission to the daughter cell to accurately maintain cell identity during the cell cycle. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. p53 binding sites in normal and cancer cells are characterized by distinct chromatin context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Feifei; LoVerso, Peter R; Fisk, Jeffrey N; Zhurkin, Victor B; Cui, Feng

    2017-08-18

    The tumor suppressor protein p53 interacts with DNA in a sequence-dependent manner. Thousands of p53 binding sites have been mapped genome-wide in normal and cancer cells. However, the way p53 selectively binds its cognate sites in different types of cells is not fully understood. Here, we performed a comprehensive analysis of 25 published p53 cistromes and identified 3,551 and 6,039 'high-confidence' binding sites in normal and cancer cells, respectively. Our analysis revealed 2 distinct epigenetic features underlying p53-DNA interactions in vivo. First, p53 binding sites are associated with transcriptionally active histone marks (H3K4me3 and H3K36me3) in normal-cell chromatin, but with repressive histone marks (H3K27me3) in cancer-cell chromatin. Second, p53 binding sites in cancer cells are characterized by a lower level of DNA methylation than their counterparts in normal cells, probably related to global hypomethylation in cancers. Intriguingly, regardless of the cell type, p53 sites are highly enriched in the endogenous retroviral elements of the ERV1 family, highlighting the importance of this repeat family in shaping the transcriptional network of p53. Moreover, the p53 sites exhibit an unusual combination of chromatin patterns: high nucleosome occupancy and, at the same time, high sensitivity to DNase I. Our results suggest that p53 can access its target sites in a chromatin environment that is non-permissive to most DNA-binding transcription factors, which may allow p53 to act as a pioneer transcription factor in the context of chromatin.

  9. Histone crosstalk directed by H2B ubiquitination is required for chromatin boundary integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiji Kit-Wan Ma

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Genomic maps of chromatin modifications have provided evidence for the partitioning of genomes into domains of distinct chromatin states, which assist coordinated gene regulation. The maintenance of chromatin domain integrity can require the setting of boundaries. The HS4 insulator element marks the 3' boundary of a heterochromatin region located upstream of the chicken β-globin gene cluster. Here we show that HS4 recruits the E3 ligase RNF20/BRE1A to mediate H2B mono-ubiquitination (H2Bub1 at this insulator. Knockdown experiments show that RNF20 is required for H2Bub1 and processive H3K4 methylation. Depletion of RNF20 results in a collapse of the active histone modification signature at the HS4 chromatin boundary, where H2Bub1, H3K4 methylation, and hyperacetylation of H3, H4, and H2A.Z are rapidly lost. A remarkably similar set of events occurs at the HSA/HSB regulatory elements of the FOLR1 gene, which mark the 5' boundary of the same heterochromatin region. We find that persistent H2Bub1 at the HSA/HSB and HS4 elements is required for chromatin boundary integrity. The loss of boundary function leads to the sequential spreading of H3K9me2, H3K9me3, and H4K20me3 over the entire 50 kb FOLR1 and β-globin region and silencing of FOLR1 expression. These findings show that the HSA/HSB and HS4 boundary elements direct a cascade of active histone modifications that defend the FOLR1 and β-globin gene loci from the pervasive encroachment of an adjacent heterochromatin domain. We propose that many gene loci employ H2Bub1-dependent boundaries to prevent heterochromatin spreading.

  10. Glucocorticoid regulation of ATP release from spinal astrocytes underlies diurnal exacerbation of neuropathic mechanical allodynia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyanagi, Satoru; Kusunose, Naoki; Taniguchi, Marie; Akamine, Takahiro; Kanado, Yuki; Ozono, Yui; Masuda, Takahiro; Kohro, Yuta; Matsunaga, Naoya; Tsuda, Makoto; Salter, Michael W.; Inoue, Kazuhide; Ohdo, Shigehiro

    2016-01-01

    Diurnal variations in pain hypersensitivity are common in chronic pain disorders, but the underlying mechanisms are enigmatic. Here, we report that mechanical pain hypersensitivity in sciatic nerve-injured mice shows pronounced diurnal alterations, which critically depend on diurnal variations in glucocorticoids from the adrenal glands. Diurnal enhancement of pain hypersensitivity is mediated by glucocorticoid-induced enhancement of the extracellular release of ATP in the spinal cord, which stimulates purinergic receptors on microglia in the dorsal horn. We identify serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase-1 (SGK-1) as the key molecule responsible for the glucocorticoid-enhanced release of ATP from astrocytes. SGK-1 protein levels in spinal astrocytes are increased in response to glucocorticoid stimuli and enhanced ATP release by opening the pannexin-1 hemichannels. Our findings reveal an unappreciated circadian machinery affecting pain hypersensitivity caused by peripheral nerve injury, thus opening up novel approaches to the management of chronic pain. PMID:27739425

  11. Clotrimazole potentiates the inhibitory effects of ATP on the key glycolytic enzyme 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcondes, Mariah Celestino; Sola-Penna, Mauro; Zancan, Patricia

    2010-05-01

    Clotrimazole (CTZ) has been proposed as a potential anti-neoplastic agent, which inhibits glucose metabolism. The present work aimed to evaluate the effects of CTZ on the kinetic mechanism of 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase (PFK). We show that CTZ promotes a dose-dependent inhibition of PFK, presenting a K(i) of 28 +/- 2 microM. Inhibition occurs through the dissociation of the enzyme tetramers, as demonstrated through fluorescence spectroscopy and gel filtration chromatography. Moreover, the affinities of the enzyme for ATP and fructose-6-phosphate are reduced 50% and 30%, respectively. Furthermore, the affinity of PFK for ATP at the inhibitory site becomes 2-fold higher. Altogether, the results presented here suggest that PFK inhibition by CTZ involves a decrease in the affinity of PFK for its substrates at the catalytic site with the concomitant potentiation of the inhibitory properties of ATP. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Nitration of specific tyrosines in FoF1 ATP synthase and activity loss in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Virginia; Traaseth, Nathaniel J; Elfering, Sarah; Fujisawa, Yasuko; Giulivi, Cecilia

    2010-05-01

    It has been reported that C-nitration of proteins occurs under nitrative/oxidative stress; however, its role in pathophysiological situations is not fully understood. In this study, we determined that nitration of Tyr(345) and Tyr(368) in the beta-subunit of the mitochondrial F(o)F(1)-ATPase is a major target for nitrative stress in rat liver under in vivo conditions. The chemical characteristics of these Tyr make them suitable for a facilitated nitration (solvent accessibility, consensus sequence, and pK(a)). Moreover, beta-subunit nitration increased significantly with the age of the rats (from 4 to 80 weeks old) and correlated with decreased ATP hydrolysis and synthesis rates. Although its affinity for ATP binding was unchanged, maximal ATPase activity decreased between young and old rats by a factor of two. These changes directly impacted the available ATP concentration in vivo, and it was expected that they would affect multiple cellular ATP-dependent processes. For instance, at least 50% of available [ATP] in the liver of older rats would have to be committed to sustain maximal Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity, whereas only 30% would be required for young rats. If this requirement was not fulfilled, the osmoregulation and Na(+)-nutrient cotransport in liver of older rats would be compromised. On the basis of our studies, we propose that targeted nitration of the beta-subunit is an early marker for nitrative stress and aging.

  13. The Oligomycin-Sensitivity Conferring Protein of Mitochondrial ATP Synthase: Emerging New Roles in Mitochondrial Pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Antoniel

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The oligomycin-sensitivity conferring protein (OSCP of the mitochondrial FOF1 ATP synthase has long been recognized to be essential for the coupling of proton transport to ATP synthesis. Located on top of the catalytic F1 sector, it makes stable contacts with both F1 and the peripheral stalk, ensuring the structural and functional coupling between FO and F1, which is disrupted by the antibiotic, oligomycin. Recent data have established that OSCP is the binding target of cyclophilin (CyP D, a well-characterized inducer of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP, whose opening can precipitate cell death. CyPD binding affects ATP synthase activity, and most importantly, it decreases the threshold matrix Ca2+ required for PTP opening, in striking analogy with benzodiazepine 423, an apoptosis-inducing agent that also binds OSCP. These findings are consistent with the demonstration that dimers of ATP synthase generate Ca2+-dependent currents with features indistinguishable from those of the PTP and suggest that ATP synthase is directly involved in PTP formation, although the underlying mechanism remains to be established. In this scenario, OSCP appears to play a fundamental role, sensing the signal(s that switches the enzyme of life in a channel able to precipitate cell death.

  14. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as a possible indicator of extraterrestrial biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    The ubiquity of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in terrestrial organisms provides the basis for proposing the assay of this vital metabolic intermediate for detecting extraterrestrial biological activity. If an organic carbon chemistry is present on the planets, the occurrence of ATP is possible either from biosynthetic or purely chemical reactions. However, ATP's relative complexity minimizes the probability of abiogenic synthesis. A sensitive technique for the quantitative detection of ATP was developed using the firefly bioluminescent reaction. The procedure was used successfully for the determination of the ATP content of soil and bacteria. This technique is also being investigated from the standpoint of its application in clinical medicine.

  15. Multiple modes of chromatin remodeling by Forkhead box proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalmansingh, Avin S; Karmakar, Sudipan; Jin, Yetao; Nagaich, Akhilesh K

    2012-07-01

    Forkhead box (FOX) proteins represent a large family of transcriptional regulators unified by their DNA binding domain (DBD) known as a 'forkhead' or 'winged helix' domain. Over 40 FOX genes have been identified in the mammalian genome. FOX proteins share significant sequence similarities in the DBD which allow them to bind to a consensus DNA response element. However, their modes of action are quite diverse as they regulate gene expression by acting as pioneer factors, transcription factors, or both. This review focuses on the mechanisms of chromatin remodeling with an emphasis on three sub-classes-FOXA, FOXO, and FOXP members. FOXA proteins serve as pioneer factors to open up local chromatin structure and thereby increase accessibility of chromatin to factors regulating transcription. FOXP proteins, in contrast, function as classic transcription factors to recruit a variety of chromatin modifying enzymes to regulate gene expression. FOXO proteins represent a hybrid subclass having dual roles as pioneering factors and transcription factors. A subset of FOX proteins interacts with condensed mitotic chromatin and may function as 'bookmarking' agents to maintain transcriptional competence at specific genomic sites. The overall diversity in chromatin remodeling function by FOX proteins is related to unique structural motifs present within the DBD flanking regions that govern selective interactions with core histones and/or chromatin coregulatory proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chromatin in time and space. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. (epigenetic) rule: Chromatin domains as functional and structural ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The nuclear sub- structure which provides a skeletal framework for periodic attachment of the 30nm chromatin fiber to form loop structures has been termed as the .... Various features of the human genome that transcend its primary. DNA sequence, such as chromatin packaging, his- tone modifications, and DNA methylation ...

  17. Human sperm chromatin epigenetic potential: genomics, proteomics, and male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judit Castillo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The classical idea about the function of the mammalian sperm chromatin is that it serves to transmit a highly protected and transcriptionally inactive paternal genome, largely condensed by protamines, to the next generation. In addition, recent sperm chromatin genome-wide dissection studies indicate the presence of a differential distribution of the genes and repetitive sequences in the protamine-condensed and histone-condensed sperm chromatin domains, which could be potentially involved in regulatory roles after fertilization. Interestingly, recent proteomic studies have shown that sperm chromatin contains many additional proteins, in addition to the abundant histones and protamines, with specific modifications and chromatin affinity features which are also delivered to the oocyte. Both gene and protein signatures seem to be altered in infertile patients and, as such, are consistent with the potential involvement of the sperm chromatin landscape in early embryo development. This present work reviews the available information on the composition of the human sperm chromatin and its epigenetic potential, with a particular focus on recent results derived from high-throughput genomic and proteomic studies. As a complement, we provide experimental evidence for the detection of phosphorylations and acetylations in human protamine 1 using a mass spectrometry approach. The available data indicate that the sperm chromatin is much more complex than what it was previously thought, raising the possibility that it could also serve to transmit crucial paternal epigenetic information to the embryo.

  18. The discrepancy between chromatin factor location and effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenstra, Tineke L; Holstege, Frank C P

    2012-01-01

    The influence of chromatin on many cellular processes is well appreciated. Much has been learned by studying the role of chromatin remodeling and modifying complexes on individual genes. The seemingly straightforward models that inevitably arise from such studies are challenged by genome-wide analyses. Two recent studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae provide unprecedented coverage of both the genome-wide location and the effect on gene expression for the majority of chromatin factors. Comparison of the overlap between location and expression effects reveals a large disconnect, with on average only 2.5% of occupied genes showing changes in expression. It is also interesting that only 24% of all expression effects are associated with chromatin factor occupancy. The large difference between location and effect likely reflects general properties inherent to regulation of gene expression through chromatin in yeast. Explanations for the discrepancy include gene-specific properties that exert a requirement for certain factors only on specific genes, as well as functional redundancy, whereby loss of a particular factor is compensated by others that function in a distinct but nevertheless compensatory manner. Since the majority of chromatin factor perturbations do show significant effects on specific subsets of genes, this implies the presence of different types of gene-specific properties that determine which chromatin factors a particular gene requires for proper expression. Understanding these gene-specific properties should be the focus of future studies aimed at understanding regulation of gene expression through chromatin.

  19. Chromatin architecture and gene expression in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willenbrock, Hanni; Ussery, David

    2004-01-01

    Two recent genome-scale analyses underscore the importance of DNA topology and chromatin structure in regulating transcription in Escherichia coli.......Two recent genome-scale analyses underscore the importance of DNA topology and chromatin structure in regulating transcription in Escherichia coli....

  20. A Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of In Vitro Assembled Chromatin*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Völker-Albert, Moritz Carl; Pusch, Miriam Caroline; Fedisch, Andreas; Schilcher, Pierre; Schmidt, Andreas; Imhof, Axel

    2016-01-01

    The structure of chromatin is critical for many aspects of cellular physiology and is considered to be the primary medium to store epigenetic information. It is defined by the histone molecules that constitute the nucleosome, the positioning of the nucleosomes along the DNA and the non-histone proteins that associate with it. These factors help to establish and maintain a largely DNA sequence-independent but surprisingly stable structure. Chromatin is extensively disassembled and reassembled during DNA replication, repair, recombination or transcription in order to allow the necessary factors to gain access to their substrate. Despite such constant interference with chromatin structure, the epigenetic information is generally well maintained. Surprisingly, the mechanisms that coordinate chromatin assembly and ensure proper assembly are not particularly well understood. Here, we use label free quantitative mass spectrometry to describe the kinetics of in vitro assembled chromatin supported by an embryo extract prepared from preblastoderm Drosophila melanogaster embryos. The use of a data independent acquisition method for proteome wide quantitation allows a time resolved comparison of in vitro chromatin assembly. A comparison of our in vitro data with proteomic studies of replicative chromatin assembly in vivo reveals an extensive overlap showing that the in vitro system can be used for investigating the kinetics of chromatin assembly in a proteome-wide manner. PMID:26811354

  1. The nucleosome: orchestrating DNA damage signaling and repair within chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Poonam; Miller, Kyle M

    2016-10-01

    DNA damage occurs within the chromatin environment, which ultimately participates in regulating DNA damage response (DDR) pathways and repair of the lesion. DNA damage activates a cascade of signaling events that extensively modulates chromatin structure and organization to coordinate DDR factor recruitment to the break and repair, whilst also promoting the maintenance of normal chromatin functions within the damaged region. For example, DDR pathways must avoid conflicts between other DNA-based processes that function within the context of chromatin, including transcription and replication. The molecular mechanisms governing the recognition, target specificity, and recruitment of DDR factors and enzymes to the fundamental repeating unit of chromatin, i.e., the nucleosome, are poorly understood. Here we present our current view of how chromatin recognition by DDR factors is achieved at the level of the nucleosome. Emerging evidence suggests that the nucleosome surface, including the nucleosome acidic patch, promotes the binding and activity of several DNA damage factors on chromatin. Thus, in addition to interactions with damaged DNA and histone modifications, nucleosome recognition by DDR factors plays a key role in orchestrating the requisite chromatin response to maintain both genome and epigenome integrity.

  2. Distinct Cellular Assembly Stoichiometry of Polycomb Complexes on Chromatin Revealed by Single-molecule Chromatin Immunoprecipitation Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatavosian, Roubina; Zhen, Chao Yu; Duc, Huy Nguyen; Balas, Maggie M; Johnson, Aaron M; Ren, Xiaojun

    2015-11-20

    Epigenetic complexes play an essential role in regulating chromatin structure, but information about their assembly stoichiometry on chromatin within cells is poorly understood. The cellular assembly stoichiometry is critical for appreciating the initiation, propagation, and maintenance of epigenetic inheritance during normal development and in cancer. By combining genetic engineering, chromatin biochemistry, and single-molecule fluorescence imaging, we developed a novel and sensitive approach termed single-molecule chromatin immunoprecipitation imaging (Sm-ChIPi) to enable investigation of the cellular assembly stoichiometry of epigenetic complexes on chromatin. Sm-ChIPi was validated by using chromatin complexes with known stoichiometry. The stoichiometry of subunits within a polycomb complex and the assembly stoichiometry of polycomb complexes on chromatin have been extensively studied but reached divergent views. Moreover, the cellular assembly stoichiometry of polycomb complexes on chromatin remains unexplored. Using Sm-ChIPi, we demonstrated that within mouse embryonic stem cells, one polycomb repressive complex (PRC) 1 associates with multiple nucleosomes, whereas two PRC2s can bind to a single nucleosome. Furthermore, we obtained direct physical evidence that the nucleoplasmic PRC1 is monomeric, whereas PRC2 can dimerize in the nucleoplasm. We showed that ES cell differentiation induces selective alteration of the assembly stoichiometry of Cbx2 on chromatin but not other PRC1 components. We additionally showed that the PRC2-mediated trimethylation of H3K27 is not required for the assembly stoichiometry of PRC1 on chromatin. Thus, these findings uncover that PRC1 and PRC2 employ distinct mechanisms to assemble on chromatin, and the novel Sm-ChIPi technique could provide single-molecule insight into other epigenetic complexes. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Distinct Cellular Assembly Stoichiometry of Polycomb Complexes on Chromatin Revealed by Single-molecule Chromatin Immunoprecipitation Imaging*♦

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatavosian, Roubina; Zhen, Chao Yu; Duc, Huy Nguyen; Balas, Maggie M.; Johnson, Aaron M.; Ren, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic complexes play an essential role in regulating chromatin structure, but information about their assembly stoichiometry on chromatin within cells is poorly understood. The cellular assembly stoichiometry is critical for appreciating the initiation, propagation, and maintenance of epigenetic inheritance during normal development and in cancer. By combining genetic engineering, chromatin biochemistry, and single-molecule fluorescence imaging, we developed a novel and sensitive approach termed single-molecule chromatin immunoprecipitation imaging (Sm-ChIPi) to enable investigation of the cellular assembly stoichiometry of epigenetic complexes on chromatin. Sm-ChIPi was validated by using chromatin complexes with known stoichiometry. The stoichiometry of subunits within a polycomb complex and the assembly stoichiometry of polycomb complexes on chromatin have been extensively studied but reached divergent views. Moreover, the cellular assembly stoichiometry of polycomb complexes on chromatin remains unexplored. Using Sm-ChIPi, we demonstrated that within mouse embryonic stem cells, one polycomb repressive complex (PRC) 1 associates with multiple nucleosomes, whereas two PRC2s can bind to a single nucleosome. Furthermore, we obtained direct physical evidence that the nucleoplasmic PRC1 is monomeric, whereas PRC2 can dimerize in the nucleoplasm. We showed that ES cell differentiation induces selective alteration of the assembly stoichiometry of Cbx2 on chromatin but not other PRC1 components. We additionally showed that the PRC2-mediated trimethylation of H3K27 is not required for the assembly stoichiometry of PRC1 on chromatin. Thus, these findings uncover that PRC1 and PRC2 employ distinct mechanisms to assemble on chromatin, and the novel Sm-ChIPi technique could provide single-molecule insight into other epigenetic complexes. PMID:26381410

  4. Chromatin relaxation-mediated induction of p19INK4d increases the ability of cells to repair damaged DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María F Ogara

    Full Text Available The maintenance of genomic integrity is of main importance to the survival and health of organisms which are continuously exposed to genotoxic stress. Cells respond to DNA damage by activating survival pathways consisting of cell cycle checkpoints and repair mechanisms. However, the signal that triggers the DNA damage response is not necessarily a direct detection of the primary DNA lesion. In fact, chromatin defects may serve as initiating signals to activate those mechanisms. If the modulation of chromatin structure could initiate a checkpoint response in a direct manner, this supposes the existence of specific chromatin sensors. p19INK4d, a member of the INK4 cell cycle inhibitors, plays a crucial role in regulating genomic stability and cell viability by enhancing DNA repair. Its expression is induced in cells injured by one of several genotoxic treatments like cis-platin, UV light or neocarzinostatin. Nevertheless, when exogenous DNA damaged molecules are introduced into the cell, this induction is not observed. Here, we show that p19INK4d is enhanced after chromatin relaxation even in the absence of DNA damage. This induction was shown to depend upon ATM/ATR, Chk1/Chk2 and E2F activity, as is the case of p19INK4d induction by endogenous DNA damage. Interestingly, p19INK4d improves DNA repair when the genotoxic damage is caused in a relaxed-chromatin context. These results suggest that changes in chromatin structure, and not DNA damage itself, is the actual trigger of p19INK4d induction. We propose that, in addition to its role as a cell cycle inhibitor, p19INK4d could participate in a signaling network directed to detecting and eventually responding to chromatin anomalies.

  5. HDAC up-regulation in early colon field carcinogenesis is involved in cell tumorigenicity through regulation of chromatin structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stypula-Cyrus, Yolanda; Damania, Dhwanil; Kunte, Dhananjay P; Cruz, Mart Dela; Subramanian, Hariharan; Roy, Hemant K; Backman, Vadim

    2013-01-01

    Normal cell function is dependent on the proper maintenance of chromatin structure. Regulation of chromatin structure is controlled by histone modifications that directly influence chromatin architecture and genome function. Specifically, the histone deacetylase (HDAC) family of proteins modulate chromatin compaction and are commonly dysregulated in many tumors, including colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the role of HDAC proteins in early colorectal carcinogenesis has not been previously reported. We found HDAC1, HDAC2, HDAC3, HDAC5, and HDAC7 all to be up-regulated in the field of human CRC. Furthermore, we observed that HDAC2 up-regulation is one of the earliest events in CRC carcinogenesis and observed this in human field carcinogenesis, the azoxymethane-treated rat model, and in more aggressive colon cancer cell lines. The universality of HDAC2 up-regulation suggests that HDAC2 up-regulation is a novel and important early event in CRC, which may serve as a biomarker. HDAC inhibitors (HDACIs) interfere with tumorigenic HDAC activity; however, the precise mechanisms involved in this process remain to be elucidated. We confirmed that HDAC inhibition by valproic acid (VPA) targeted the more aggressive cell line. Using nuclease digestion assays and transmission electron microscopy imaging, we observed that VPA treatment induced greater changes in chromatin structure in the more aggressive cell line. Furthermore, we used the novel imaging technique partial wave spectroscopy (PWS) to quantify nanoscale alterations in chromatin. We noted that the PWS results are consistent with the biological assays, indicating a greater effect of VPA treatment in the more aggressive cell type. Together, these results demonstrate the importance of HDAC activity in early carcinogenic events and the unique role of higher-order chromatin structure in determining cell tumorigenicity.

  6. HDAC up-regulation in early colon field carcinogenesis is involved in cell tumorigenicity through regulation of chromatin structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Stypula-Cyrus

    Full Text Available Normal cell function is dependent on the proper maintenance of chromatin structure. Regulation of chromatin structure is controlled by histone modifications that directly influence chromatin architecture and genome function. Specifically, the histone deacetylase (HDAC family of proteins modulate chromatin compaction and are commonly dysregulated in many tumors, including colorectal cancer (CRC. However, the role of HDAC proteins in early colorectal carcinogenesis has not been previously reported. We found HDAC1, HDAC2, HDAC3, HDAC5, and HDAC7 all to be up-regulated in the field of human CRC. Furthermore, we observed that HDAC2 up-regulation is one of the earliest events in CRC carcinogenesis and observed this in human field carcinogenesis, the azoxymethane-treated rat model, and in more aggressive colon cancer cell lines. The universality of HDAC2 up-regulation suggests that HDAC2 up-regulation is a novel and important early event in CRC, which may serve as a biomarker. HDAC inhibitors (HDACIs interfere with tumorigenic HDAC activity; however, the precise mechanisms involved in this process remain to be elucidated. We confirmed that HDAC inhibition by valproic acid (VPA targeted the more aggressive cell line. Using nuclease digestion assays and transmission electron microscopy imaging, we observed that VPA treatment induced greater changes in chromatin structure in the more aggressive cell line. Furthermore, we used the novel imaging technique partial wave spectroscopy (PWS to quantify nanoscale alterations in chromatin. We noted that the PWS results are consistent with the biological assays, indicating a greater effect of VPA treatment in the more aggressive cell type. Together, these results demonstrate the importance of HDAC activity in early carcinogenic events and the unique role of higher-order chromatin structure in determining cell tumorigenicity.

  7. Insights into dynamic mitotic chromatin organization through the NIMA kinase suppressor SonC, a chromatin-associated protein involved in the DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Jennifer R; Facemyer, Eric M; Shen, Kuo-Fang; Ukil, Leena; Osmani, Stephen A

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex proteins SonA and SonB, the orthologs of mammalian RAE1 and NUP98, respectively, were identified in Aspergillus nidulans as cold-sensitive suppressors of a temperature-sensitive allele of the essential mitotic NIMA kinase (nimA1). Subsequent analyses found that sonB1 mutants exhibit temperature-dependent DNA damage sensitivity. To understand this pathway further, we performed a genetic screen to isolate additional conditional DNA damage-sensitive suppressors of nimA1. We identified two new alleles of SonA and four intragenic nimA mutations that suppress the temperature sensitivity of the nimA1 mutant. In addition, we identified SonC, a previously unstudied binuclear zinc cluster protein involved with NIMA and the DNA damage response. Like sonA and sonB, sonC is an essential gene. SonC localizes to nuclei and partially disperses during mitosis. When the nucleolar organizer region (NOR) undergoes mitotic condensation and removal from the nucleolus, nuclear SonC and histone H1 localize in a mutually exclusive manner with H1 being removed from the NOR region and SonC being absent from the end of the chromosome beyond the NOR. This region of chromatin is adjacent to a cluster of nuclear pore complexes to which NIMA localizes last during its progression around the nuclear envelope during initiation of mitosis. The results genetically extend the NIMA regulatory system to include a protein with selective large-scale chromatin location observed during mitosis. The data suggest a model in which NIMA and SonC, its new chromatin-associated suppressor, might help to orchestrate global chromatin states during mitosis and the DNA damage response.

  8. Epigenetic switch at atp2a2 and myh7 gene promoters in pressure overload-induced heart failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana Angrisano

    Full Text Available Re-induction of fetal genes and/or re-expression of postnatal genes represent hallmarks of pathological cardiac remodeling, and are considered important in the progression of the normal heart towards heart failure (HF. Whether epigenetic modifications are involved in these processes is currently under investigation. Here we hypothesized that histone chromatin modifications may underlie changes in the gene expression program during pressure overload-induced HF. We evaluated chromatin marks at the promoter regions of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ATPase (SERCA-2A and β-myosin-heavy chain (β-MHC genes (Atp2a2 and Myh7, respectively in murine hearts after one or eight weeks of pressure overload induced by transverse aortic constriction (TAC. As expected, all TAC hearts displayed a significant reduction in SERCA-2A and a significant induction of β-MHC mRNA levels. Interestingly, opposite histone H3 modifications were identified in the promoter regions of these genes after TAC, including H3 dimethylation (me2 at lysine (K 4 (H3K4me2 and K9 (H3K9me2, H3 trimethylation (me3 at K27 (H3K27me3 and dimethylation (me2 at K36 (H3K36me2. Consistently, a significant reduction of lysine-specific demethylase KDM2A could be found after eight weeks of TAC at the Atp2a2 promoter. Moreover, opposite changes in the recruitment of DNA methylation machinery components (DNA methyltransferases DNMT1 and DNMT3b, and methyl CpG binding protein 2 MeCp2 were found at the Atp2a2 or Myh7 promoters after TAC. Taken together, these results suggest that epigenetic modifications may underlie gene expression reprogramming in the adult murine heart under conditions of pressure overload, and might be involved in the progression of the normal heart towards HF.

  9. Epigenetic switch at atp2a2 and myh7 gene promoters in pressure overload-induced heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angrisano, Tiziana; Schiattarella, Gabriele Giacomo; Keller, Simona; Pironti, Gianluigi; Florio, Ermanno; Magliulo, Fabio; Bottino, Roberta; Pero, Raffaela; Lembo, Francesca; Avvedimento, Enrico Vittorio; Esposito, Giovanni; Trimarco, Bruno; Chiariotti, Lorenzo; Perrino, Cinzia

    2014-01-01

    Re-induction of fetal genes and/or re-expression of postnatal genes represent hallmarks of pathological cardiac remodeling, and are considered important in the progression of the normal heart towards heart failure (HF). Whether epigenetic modifications are involved in these processes is currently under investigation. Here we hypothesized that histone chromatin modifications may underlie changes in the gene expression program during pressure overload-induced HF. We evaluated chromatin marks at the promoter regions of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ATPase (SERCA-2A) and β-myosin-heavy chain (β-MHC) genes (Atp2a2 and Myh7, respectively) in murine hearts after one or eight weeks of pressure overload induced by transverse aortic constriction (TAC). As expected, all TAC hearts displayed a significant reduction in SERCA-2A and a significant induction of β-MHC mRNA levels. Interestingly, opposite histone H3 modifications were identified in the promoter regions of these genes after TAC, including H3 dimethylation (me2) at lysine (K) 4 (H3K4me2) and K9 (H3K9me2), H3 trimethylation (me3) at K27 (H3K27me3) and dimethylation (me2) at K36 (H3K36me2). Consistently, a significant reduction of lysine-specific demethylase KDM2A could be found after eight weeks of TAC at the Atp2a2 promoter. Moreover, opposite changes in the recruitment of DNA methylation machinery components (DNA methyltransferases DNMT1 and DNMT3b, and methyl CpG binding protein 2 MeCp2) were found at the Atp2a2 or Myh7 promoters after TAC. Taken together, these results suggest that epigenetic modifications may underlie gene expression reprogramming in the adult murine heart under conditions of pressure overload, and might be involved in the progression of the normal heart towards HF.

  10. ATP synthases from archaea: the beauty of a molecular motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grüber, Gerhard; Manimekalai, Malathy Sony Subramanian; Mayer, Florian; Müller, Volker

    2014-06-01

    Archaea live under different environmental conditions, such as high salinity, extreme pHs and cold or hot temperatures. How energy is conserved under such harsh environmental conditions is a major question in cellular bioenergetics of archaea. The key enzymes in energy conservation are the archaeal A1AO ATP synthases, a class of ATP synthases distinct from the F1FO ATP synthase ATP synthase found in bacteria, mitochondria and chloroplasts and the V1VO ATPases of eukaryotes. A1AO ATP synthases have distinct structural features such as a collar-like structure, an extended central stalk, and two peripheral stalks possibly stabilizing the A1AO ATP synthase during rotation in ATP synthesis/hydrolysis at high temperatures as well as to provide the storage of transient elastic energy during ion-pumping and ATP synthesis/-hydrolysis. High resolution structures of individual subunits and subcomplexes have been obtained in recent years that shed new light on the function and mechanism of this unique class of ATP synthases. An outstanding feature of archaeal A1AO ATP synthases is their diversity in size of rotor subunits and the coupling ion used for ATP synthesis with H(+), Na(+) or even H(+) and Na(+) using enzymes. The evolution of the H(+) binding site to a Na(+) binding site and its implications for the energy metabolism and physiology of the cell are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Chromatin Dynamics during Nucleotide Excision Repair: Histones on the Move

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie E. Polo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available It has been a long-standing question how DNA damage repair proceeds in a nuclear environment where DNA is packaged into chromatin. Several decades of analysis combining in vitro and in vivo studies in various model organisms ranging from yeast to human have markedly increased our understanding of the mechanisms underlying chromatin disorganization upon damage detection and re-assembly after repair. Here, we review the methods that have been developed over the years to delineate chromatin alterations in response to DNA damage by focusing on the well-characterized Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER pathway. We also highlight how these methods have provided key mechanistic insight into histone dynamics coupled to repair in mammals, raising new issues about the maintenance of chromatin integrity. In particular, we discuss how NER factors and central players in chromatin dynamics such as histone modifiers, nucleosome remodeling factors, and histone chaperones function to mobilize histones during repair.

  12. HAMLET interacts with histones and chromatin in tumor cell nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düringer, Caroline; Hamiche, Ali; Gustafsson, Lotta; Kimura, Hiroshi; Svanborg, Catharina

    2003-10-24

    HAMLET is a folding variant of human alpha-lactalbumin in an active complex with oleic acid. HAMLET selectively enters tumor cells, accumulates in their nuclei and induces apoptosis-like cell death. This study examined the interactions of HAMLET with nuclear constituents and identified histones as targets. HAMLET was found to bind histone H3 strongly and to lesser extent histones H4 and H2B. The specificity of these interactions was confirmed using BIAcore technology and chromatin assembly assays. In vivo in tumor cells, HAMLET co-localized with histones and perturbed the chromatin structure; HAMLET was found associated with chromatin in an insoluble nuclear fraction resistant to salt extraction. In vitro, HAMLET bound strongly to histones and impaired their deposition on DNA. We conclude that HAMLET interacts with histones and chromatin in tumor cell nuclei and propose that this interaction locks the cells into the death pathway by irreversibly disrupting chromatin organization.

  13. Rapid genome-scale mapping of chromatin accessibility in tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Lars; Bandle, Russell; John, Sam

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The challenge in extracting genome-wide chromatin features from limiting clinical samples poses a significant hurdle in identification of regulatory marks that impact the physiological or pathological state. Current methods that identify nuclease accessible chromatin are reliant....... RESULTS: Here we introduce a novel technique that specifically identifies Tissue Accessible Chromatin (TACh). The TACh method uses pulverized frozen tissue as starting material and employs one of the two robust endonucleases, Benzonase or Cyansase, which are fully active under a range of stringent...... positively with levels of gene transcription. Accessible chromatin identified by TACh overlaps to a large extend with accessible chromatin identified by DNase I using nuclei purified from freshly isolated liver tissue as starting material. The similarities are most pronounced at highly accessible regions...

  14. The AID-induced DNA damage response in chromatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daniel, Jeremy A; Nussenzweig, André

    2013-01-01

    Chemical modifications to the DNA and histone protein components of chromatin can modulate gene expression and genome stability. Understanding the physiological impact of changes in chromatin structure remains an important question in biology. As one example, in order to generate antibody diversity...... with somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination, chromatin must be made accessible for activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID)-mediated deamination of cytosines in DNA. These lesions are recognized and removed by various DNA repair pathways but, if not handled properly, can lead to formation...... of oncogenic chromosomal translocations. In this review, we focus the discussion on how chromatin-modifying activities and -binding proteins contribute to the native chromatin environment in which AID-induced DNA damage is targeted and repaired. Outstanding questions remain regarding the direct roles...

  15. Chromatin Dynamics during Nucleotide Excision Repair: Histones on the Move

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Salomé; Polo, Sophie E.

    2012-01-01

    It has been a long-standing question how DNA damage repair proceeds in a nuclear environment where DNA is packaged into chromatin. Several decades of analysis combining in vitro and in vivo studies in various model organisms ranging from yeast to human have markedly increased our understanding of the mechanisms underlying chromatin disorganization upon damage detection and re-assembly after repair. Here, we review the methods that have been developed over the years to delineate chromatin alterations in response to DNA damage by focusing on the well-characterized Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) pathway. We also highlight how these methods have provided key mechanistic insight into histone dynamics coupled to repair in mammals, raising new issues about the maintenance of chromatin integrity. In particular, we discuss how NER factors and central players in chromatin dynamics such as histone modifiers, nucleosome remodeling factors, and histone chaperones function to mobilize histones during repair. PMID:23109890

  16. Effect of DNA groove binder distamycin A upon chromatin structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parijat Majumder

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Distamycin A is a prototype minor groove binder, which binds to B-form DNA, preferentially at A/T rich sites. Extensive work in the past few decades has characterized the binding at the level of double stranded DNA. However, effect of the same on physiological DNA, i.e. DNA complexed in chromatin, has not been well studied. Here we elucidate from a structural perspective, the interaction of distamycin with soluble chromatin, isolated from Sprague-Dawley rat. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Chromatin is a hierarchical assemblage of DNA and protein. Therefore, in order to characterize the interaction of the same with distamycin, we have classified the system into various levels, according to the requirements of the method adopted, and the information to be obtained. Isothermal titration calorimetry has been employed to characterize the binding at the levels of chromatin, chromatosome and chromosomal DNA. Thermodynamic parameters obtained thereof, identify enthalpy as the driving force for the association, with comparable binding affinity and free energy for chromatin and chromosomal DNA. Reaction enthalpies at different temperatures were utilized to evaluate the change in specific heat capacity (ΔCp, which, in turn, indicated a possible binding associated structural change. Ligand induced structural alterations have been monitored by two complementary methods--dynamic light scattering, and transmission electron microscopy. They indicate compaction of chromatin. Using transmission electron microscopy, we have visualized the effect of distamycin upon chromatin architecture at di- and trinucleosome levels. Our results elucidate the simultaneous involvement of linker bending and internucleosomal angle contraction in compaction process induced by distamycin. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We summarize here, for the first time, the thermodynamic parameters for the interaction of distamycin with soluble chromatin, and elucidate its effect on

  17. Chromatin insulators: lessons from the fly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurudatta, B. V.

    2009-01-01

    Chromatin insulators are DNA–protein complexes with broad functions in nuclear biology. Drosophila has at least five different types of insulators; recent results suggest that these different insulators share some components that may allow them to function through common mechanisms. Data from genome-wide localization studies of insulator proteins indicate a possible functional specialization, with different insulators playing distinct roles in nuclear biology. Cells have developed mechanisms to control insulator activity by recruiting specialized proteins or by covalent modification of core components. Current results suggest that insulators set up cell-specific blueprints of nuclear organization that may contribute to the establishment of different patterns of gene expression during cell differentiation and development. PMID:19752045

  18. Combgap Promotes Ovarian Niche Development and Chromatin Association of EcR-Binding Regions in BR-C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Hitrik

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The development of niches for tissue-specific stem cells is an important aspect of stem cell biology. Determination of niche size and niche numbers during organogenesis involves precise control of gene expression. How this is achieved in the context of a complex chromatin landscape is largely unknown. Here we show that the nuclear protein Combgap (Cg supports correct ovarian niche formation in Drosophila by controlling ecdysone-Receptor (EcR- mediated transcription and long-range chromatin contacts in the broad locus (BR-C. Both cg and BR-C promote ovarian growth and the development of niches for germ line stem cells. BR-C levels were lower when Combgap was either reduced or over-expressed, indicating an intricate regulation of the BR-C locus by Combgap. Polytene chromosome stains showed that Cg co-localizes with EcR, the major regulator of BR-C, at the BR-C locus and that EcR binding to chromatin was sensitive to changes in Cg levels. Proximity ligation assay indicated that the two proteins could reside in the same complex. Finally, chromatin conformation analysis revealed that EcR-bound regions within BR-C, which span ~30 KBs, contacted each other. Significantly, these contacts were stabilized in an ecdysone- and Combgap-dependent manner. Together, these results highlight Combgap as a novel regulator of chromatin structure that promotes transcription of ecdysone target genes and ovarian niche formation.

  19. c-Myb Binding Sites in Haematopoietic Chromatin Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsen, Mads; Klepper, Kjetil; Gundersen, Sveinung; Cuervo, Ignacio; Drabløs, Finn; Hovig, Eivind; Sandve, Geir Kjetil; Gabrielsen, Odd Stokke; Eskeland, Ragnhild

    2015-01-01

    Strict control of tissue-specific gene expression plays a pivotal role during lineage commitment. The transcription factor c-Myb has an essential role in adult haematopoiesis and functions as an oncogene when rearranged in human cancers. Here we have exploited digital genomic footprinting analysis to obtain a global picture of c-Myb occupancy in the genome of six different haematopoietic cell-types. We have biologically validated several c-Myb footprints using c-Myb knockdown data, reporter assays and DamID analysis. We show that our predicted conserved c-Myb footprints are highly dependent on the haematopoietic cell type, but that there is a group of gene targets common to all cell-types analysed. Furthermore, we find that c-Myb footprints co-localise with active histone mark H3K4me3 and are significantly enriched at exons. We analysed co-localisation of c-Myb footprints with 104 chromatin regulatory factors in K562 cells, and identified nine proteins that are enriched together with c-Myb footprints on genes positively regulated by c-Myb and one protein enriched on negatively regulated genes. Our data suggest that c-Myb is a transcription factor with multifaceted target regulation depending on cell type. PMID:26208222

  20. Extracellular ATP regulates cell death of lymphocytes and monocytes induced by membrane-bound lipoproteins of Mycoplasma fermentans and Mycoplasma salivarium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Into, Takeshi; Okada, Kazutaka; Inoue, Nobuo; Yasuda, Motoaki; Shibata, Ken-ichiro

    2002-01-01

    The cytotoxicities of lipoproteins of Mycoplasma fermentans and Mycoplasma salivarium to a lymphocytic cell line, MOLT-4, and a monocytic cell line, HL-60, was upregulated by ATP added extracellularly in a dose-dependent manner. These lipoproteins induced ATP release and plasma membrane permeability increase in these cell lines. In addition, periodate-oxidized ATP, an antagonist for P2X purinergic receptors, suppressed the cytotoxicity of the lipoproteins, suggesting the possibility that P2X receptors for ATP play crucial roles in the cytotoxicity. Activation of caspase-3 induced by the lipoproteins, which was assessed by the cleavage of the synthetic substrate DEVD-pNA and the endogenous substrate poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, was also upregulated and downregulated by extracellular ATP and periodate-oxidized ATP, respectively. On the basis of these results, this study suggests that mycoplasmal lipoproteins induce the permeability increase in lymphocytes and monocytes, by which ATP is released, and the ATP regulates the cytotoxicities of the lipoproteins to the cells, possibly by interaction with ATP receptors such as P2X purinergic receptors.

  1. Post-translational modifications of the intrinsically disordered terminal domains of histone H1: effects on secondary structure and chromatin dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roque, A; Ponte, I; Suau, P

    2017-02-01

    H1 linker histones are involved both in the maintenance of chromatin higher-order structure and in gene regulation. H1 binds to linker DNA regions on the surface of the nucleosome. In higher eukaryotes, H1 contains three distinct domains: a short N-terminal domain (NTD), a central globular domain, and a long C-terminal domain (CTD). Terminal domains determine subtype specificity and to a large extent the linker DNA binding and chromatin condensing properties of histone H1. This review is focused on the recent numerous studies that have provided insights in the role of H1 terminal domains in chromatin dynamics. The N- and C-terminal domains behave as intrinsically disordered proteins with coupled binding and folding. We examine the potential kinetic advantages of intrinsic disorder in the recognition of the specific H1 binding sites in chromatin. As typical intrinsically disordered regions, H1 terminal domains are post-translationally modified. Post-translational modifications in the NTD determine the interaction of histone H1 with other proteins involved in heterochromatin formation and transcriptional regulation, while phosphorylation by cyclin-dependent kinases modulates the secondary structure of the CTD and chromatin condensation. We review the arguments in favor of the involvement of H1 hyperphosphorylation in metaphase chromatin condensation and of partial phosphorylation in interphase chromatin relaxation. In addition, the interplay of histone H1 and other chromatin architectural proteins, such as proteins of the high-mobility group, protamines, and MeCP2, is associated with changes in chromatin structure.

  2. Bioanalytical Applications of Real-Time ATP Imaging Via Bioluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruenhagen, Jason Alan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The research discussed within involves the development of novel applications of real-time imaging of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP). ATP was detected via bioluminescence and the firefly luciferase-catalyzed reaction of ATP and luciferin. The use of a microscope and an imaging detector allowed for spatially resolved quantitation of ATP release. Employing this method, applications in both biological and chemical systems were developed. First, the mechanism by which the compound 48/80 induces release of ATP from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) was investigated. Numerous enzyme activators and inhibitors were utilized to probe the second messenger systems involved in release. Compound 48/80 activated a G{sub q}-type protein to initiate ATP release from HUVECs. Ca2+ imaging along with ATP imaging revealed that activation of phospholipase C and induction of intracellular Ca2+ signaling were necessary for release of ATP. Furthermore, activation of protein kinase C inhibited the activity of phospholipase C and thus decreased the magnitude of ATP release. This novel release mechanism was compared to the existing theories of extracellular release of ATP. Bioluminescence imaging was also employed to examine the role of ATP in the field of neuroscience. The central nervous system (CNS) was dissected from the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis. Electrophysiological experiments demonstrated that the neurons of the Lymnaea were not damaged by any of the components of the imaging solution. ATP was continuously released by the ganglia of the CNS for over eight hours and varied from ganglion to ganglion and within individual ganglia. Addition of the neurotransmitters K+ and serotonin increased release of ATP in certain regions of the Lymnaea CNS. Finally, the ATP imaging technique was investigated for the study of drug release systems. MCM-41-type mesoporous nanospheres were loaded with ATP and end-capped with mercaptoethanol

  3. Differences in ATP Generation Via Glycolysis and Oxidative Phosphorylation and Relationships with Sperm Motility in Mouse Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourmente, Maximiliano; Villar-Moya, Pilar; Rial, Eduardo; Roldan, Eduardo R S

    2015-08-14

    Mouse sperm produce enough ATP to sustain motility by anaerobic glycolysis and respiration. However, previous studies indicated that an active glycolytic pathway is required to achieve normal sperm function and identified glycolysis as the main source of ATP to fuel the motility of mouse sperm. All the available evidence has been gathered from the studies performed using the laboratory mouse. However, comparative studies of closely related mouse species have revealed a wide range of variation in sperm motility and ATP production and that the laboratory mouse has comparatively low values in these traits. In this study, we compared the relative reliance on the usage of glycolysis or oxidative phosphorylation as ATP sources for sperm motility between mouse species that exhibit significantly different sperm performance parameters. We found that the sperm of species with higher oxygen consumption/lactate excretion rate ratios were able to produce higher amounts of ATP, achieving higher swimming velocities. Additionally, we show that the species with higher respiration/glycolysis ratios have a higher degree of dependence upon active oxidative phosphorylation. Moreover, we characterize for the first time two mouse species in which sperm depend on functional oxidative phosphorylation to achieve normal performance. Finally, we discuss that sexual selection could promote adaptations in sperm energetic metabolism tending to increase the usage of a more efficient pathway for the generation of ATP (and faster sperm). © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Replicating centromeric chromatin: Spatial and temporal control of CENP-A assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nechemia-Arbely, Yael; Fachinetti, Daniele; Cleveland, Don W., E-mail: dcleveland@ucsd.edu

    2012-07-15

    The centromere is the fundamental unit for insuring chromosome inheritance. This complex region has a distinct type of chromatin in which histone H3 is replaced by a structurally different homologue identified in humans as CENP-A. In metazoans, specific DNA sequences are neither required nor sufficient for centromere identity. Rather, an epigenetic mark comprised of CENP-A containing chromatin is thought to be the major determinant of centromere identity. In this view, CENP-A deposition and chromatin assembly are fundamental processes for the maintenance of centromeric identity across mitotic and meiotic divisions. Several lines of evidence support CENP-A deposition in metazoans occurring at only one time in the cell cycle. Such cell cycle-dependent loading of CENP-A is found in divergent species from human to fission yeast, albeit with differences in the cell cycle point at which CENP-A is assembled. Cell cycle dependent CENP-A deposition requires multiple assembly factors for its deposition and maintenance. This review discusses the regulation of new CENP-A deposition and its relevance to centromere identity and inheritance.

  5. Thyroid hormone receptor actions on transcription in amphibia: The roles of histone modification and chromatin disruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Yun-Bo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Thyroid hormone (T3 plays diverse roles in adult organ function and during vertebrate development. The most important stage of mammalian development affected by T3 is the perinatal period when plasma T3 level peaks. Amphibian metamorphosis resembles this mammalian postembryonic period and is absolutely dependent on T3. The ability to easily manipulate this process makes it an ideal model to study the molecular mechanisms governing T3 action during vertebrate development. T3 functions mostly by regulating gene expression through T3 receptors (TRs. Studies in vitro, in cell cultures and reconstituted frog oocyte transcription system have revealed that TRs can both activate and repress gene transcription in a T3-dependent manner and involve chromatin disruption and histone modifications. These changes are accompanied by the recruitment of diverse cofactor complexes. More recently, genetic studies in mouse and frog have provided strong evidence for a role of cofactor complexes in T3 signaling in vivo. Molecular studies on amphibian metamorphosis have also revealed that developmental gene regulation by T3 involves histone modifications and the disruption of chromatin structure at the target genes as evidenced by the loss of core histones, arguing that chromatin remodeling is an important mechanism for gene activation by liganded TR during vertebrate development.

  6. Chromatin Kinases Act on Transcription Factors and Histone Tails in Regulation of Inducible Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josefowicz, Steven Z; Shimada, Miho; Armache, Anja; Li, Charles H; Miller, Rand M; Lin, Shu; Yang, Aerin; Dill, Brian D; Molina, Henrik; Park, Hee-Sung; Garcia, Benjamin A; Taunton, Jack; Roeder, Robert G; Allis, C David

    2016-10-20

    The inflammatory response requires coordinated activation of both transcription factors and chromatin to induce transcription for defense against pathogens and environmental insults. We sought to elucidate the connections between inflammatory signaling pathways and chromatin through genomic footprinting of kinase activity and unbiased identification of prominent histone phosphorylation events. We identified H3 serine 28 phosphorylation (H3S28ph) as the principal stimulation-dependent histone modification and observed its enrichment at induced genes in mouse macrophages stimulated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Using pharmacological and genetic approaches, we identified mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinases (MSKs) as primary mediators of H3S28ph in macrophages. Cell-free transcription assays demonstrated that H3S28ph directly promotes p300/CBP-dependent transcription. Further, MSKs can activate both signal-responsive transcription factors and the chromatin template with additive effects on transcription. Specific inhibition of MSKs in macrophages selectively reduced transcription of stimulation-induced genes. Our results suggest that MSKs incorporate upstream signaling inputs and control multiple downstream regulators of inducible transcription. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A taste for ATP: neurotransmission in taste buds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnamon, Sue C.; Finger, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    Not only is ATP a ubiquitous source of energy but it is also used widely as an intercellular signal. For example, keratinocytes release ATP in response to numerous external stimuli including pressure, heat, and chemical insult. The released ATP activates purinergic receptors on nerve fibers to generate nociceptive signals. The importance of an ATP signal in epithelial-to-neuronal signaling is nowhere more evident than in the taste system. The receptor cells of taste buds release ATP in response to appropriate stimulation by tastants and the released ATP then activates P2X2 and P2X3 receptors on the taste nerves. Genetic ablation of the relevant P2X receptors leaves an animal without the ability to taste any primary taste quality. Of interest is that release of ATP by taste receptor cells occurs in a non-vesicular fashion, apparently via gated membrane channels. Further, in keeping with the crucial role of ATP as a neurotransmitter in this system, a subset of taste cells expresses a specific ectoATPase, NTPDase2, necessary to clear extracellular ATP which otherwise will desensitize the P2X receptors on the taste nerves. The unique utilization of ATP as a key neurotransmitter in the taste system may reflect the epithelial rather than neuronal origins of the receptor cells. PMID:24385952

  8. MAPK-triggered chromatin reprogramming by histone deacetylase in plant innate immunity

    KAUST Repository

    Latrasse, David

    2017-07-06

    Microbial-associated molecular patterns activate several MAP kinases, which are major regulators of the innate immune response in Arabidopsis thaliana that induce large-scale changes in gene expression. Here, we determine whether microbial-associated molecular pattern-triggered gene expression involves modifications at the chromatin level.Histone acetylation and deacetylation are major regulators of microbial-associated molecular pattern-triggered gene expression and implicate the histone deacetylase HD2B in the reprogramming of defence gene expression and innate immunity. The MAP kinase MPK3 directly interacts with and phosphorylates HD2B, thereby regulating the intra-nuclear compartmentalization and function of the histone deacetylase.By studying a number of gene loci that undergo microbial-associated molecular pattern-dependent activation or repression, our data reveal a mechanistic model for how protein kinase signaling directly impacts chromatin reprogramming in plant defense.

  9. Transcriptional architecture and chromatin landscape of the core circadian clock in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Nobuya; Yoo, Seung-Hee; Huang, Hung-Chung; Kumar, Vivek; Lee, Choogon; Kim, Tae-Kyung; Takahashi, Joseph S

    2012-10-19

    The mammalian circadian clock involves a transcriptional feed back loop in which CLOCK and BMAL1 activate the Period and Cryptochrome genes, which then feedback and repress their own transcription. We have interrogated the transcriptional architecture of the circadian transcriptional regulatory loop on a genome scale in mouse liver and find a stereotyped, time-dependent pattern of transcription factor binding, RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) recruitment, RNA expression, and chromatin states. We find that the circadian transcriptional cycle of the clock consists of three distinct phases: a poised state, a coordinated de novo transcriptional activation state, and a repressed state. Only 22% of messenger RNA (mRNA) cycling genes are driven by de novo transcription, suggesting that both transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms underlie the mammalian circadian clock. We also find that circadian modulation of RNAPII recruitment and chromatin remodeling occurs on a genome-wide scale far greater than that seen previously by gene expression profiling.

  10. Roles of ATP and NADPH in formation of the fe-s cluster of spinach ferredoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Y; Mitsui, A; Fujita, Y; Matsubara, H

    1991-01-01

    Ferredoxin (Fd) in higher plants is encoded by a nuclear gene, synthesized in the cytoplasm as a larger precursor, and imported into the chloroplast, where it is proteolytically processed, and assembled with the [2Fe-2S] cluster. The final step in the biosynthetic pathway of Fd can be analyzed by a reconstitution system composed of isolated chloroplasts and [(35)S]cysteine, in which [(35)S]sulfide and iron are incorporated into Fd to build up the (35)S-labeled Fe-S cluster. Although a lysed chloroplast system shows obligate requirements for ATP and NADPH, in vitro chemical reconstitution of the Fe-S cluster is generally thought to be energy-independent. The present study investigated whether ATP and NADPH in the chloroplast system of spinach (Spinacia oleracea) are involved in the supply of [(35)S]sulfide or iron, or in Fe-S cluster formation itself. [(35)S]Sulfide was liberated from [(35)S] cysteine in an NADPH-dependent manner, whereas ATP was not necessary for this process. This desulfhydration of [(35)S]cysteine occurred before the formation of the (35)S-labeled Fe-S cluster, and the amount of radioactivity in [(35)S]sulfide was greater than that in (35)S-labeled holo-Fd by a factor of more than 20. Addition of nonradioactive sulfide (Na(2)S) inhibited competitively formation of the (35)S-labeled Fe-S cluster along with the addition of nonradioactive cysteine, indicating that some of the inorganic sulfide released from cysteine is incorporated into the Fe-S cluster of Fd. ATP hydrolysis was not involved in the production of inorganic sulfide or in the supply of iron for assembly into the Fe-S cluster. However, ATP-dependent Fe-S cluster formation was observed even in the presence of sufficient amounts of [(35)S]sulfide and iron. These results suggest a novel type of ATP-dependent in vivo Fe-S cluster formation that is distinct from in vitro chemical reconstitution. The implications of these results for the possible mechanisms of ATP-dependent Fe-S cluster

  11. PREDICTION OF CHROMATIN STATES USING DNA SEQUENCE PROPERTIES

    KAUST Repository

    Bahabri, Rihab R.

    2013-06-01

    Activities of DNA are to a great extent controlled epigenetically through the internal struc- ture of chromatin. This structure is dynamic and is influenced by different modifications of histone proteins. Various combinations of epigenetic modification of histones pinpoint to different functional regions of the DNA determining the so-called chromatin states. How- ever, the characterization of chromatin states by the DNA sequence properties remains largely unknown. In this study we aim to explore whether DNA sequence patterns in the human genome can characterize different chromatin states. Using DNA sequence motifs we built binary classifiers for each chromatic state to eval- uate whether a given genomic sequence is a good candidate for belonging to a particular chromatin state. Of four classification algorithms (C4.5, Naive Bayes, Random Forest, and SVM) used for this purpose, the decision tree based classifiers (C4.5 and Random Forest) yielded best results among those we evaluated. Our results suggest that in general these models lack sufficient predictive power, although for four chromatin states (insulators, het- erochromatin, and two types of copy number variation) we found that presence of certain motifs in DNA sequences does imply an increased probability that such a sequence is one of these chromatin states.

  12. Sm-ChIPi: Single-Molecule Chromatin Immunoprecipitation Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatavosian, Roubina; Ren, Xiaojun

    2018-01-01

    Epigenetic complexes regulate chromatin dynamics via binding to and assembling on chromatin. However, the mechanisms of chromatin binding and assembly of epigenetic complexes within cells remain incompletely understood, partly due to technical challenges. Here, we present a new approach termed single-molecule chromatin immunoprecipitation imaging (Sm-ChIPi) that enables to assess the cellular assembly stoichiometry of epigenetic complexes on chromatin. Sm-ChIPi was developed based on chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by single-molecule fluorescence microscopy imaging. In this method, an epigenetic complex subunit fused with a gene coding for a fluorescent protein is stably expressed in its corresponding knockout cells. Nucleosomes associated with epigenetic complexes are isolated from cells at native conditions and incubated with biotinylated antibodies. The resulting complexes are immobilized on a quartz slide that had been passivated and functionalized with NeutrAvidin. Image stacks are then acquired by using single-molecule TIRF microscopy. The individual spots imaged by TIRF microscopy represent single protein-nucleosome complexes. The number of copies of the protein complexes on a nucleosome is inferred from the fluorescence photobleaching measurements. Sm-ChIPi is a sensitive and direct method that can quantify the cellular assembly stoichiometry of epigenetic complexes on chromatin.

  13. Chromatinization of the KSHV Genome During the KSHV Life Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uppal, Timsy [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Nevada, 1664 N Virginia Street, MS 320, Reno, NV 89557 (United States); Jha, Hem C. [Department of Microbiology and the Tumor Virology Program of the Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, 201E Johnson Pavilion, 3610 Hamilton Walk, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Verma, Subhash C. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Nevada, 1664 N Virginia Street, MS 320, Reno, NV 89557 (United States); Robertson, Erle S., E-mail: erle@mail.med.upenn.edu [Department of Microbiology and the Tumor Virology Program of the Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, 201E Johnson Pavilion, 3610 Hamilton Walk, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2015-01-14

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) belongs to the gamma herpesvirus family and is the causative agent of various lymphoproliferative diseases in humans. KSHV, like other herpesviruses, establishes life-long latent infection with the expression of a limited number of viral genes. Expression of these genes is tightly regulated by both the viral and cellular factors. Recent advancements in identifying the expression profiles of viral transcripts, using tilling arrays and next generation sequencing have identified additional coding and non-coding transcripts in the KSHV genome. Determining the functions of these transcripts will provide a better understanding of the mechanisms utilized by KSHV in altering cellular pathways involved in promoting cell growth and tumorigenesis. Replication of the viral genome is critical in maintaining the existing copies of the viral episomes during both latent and lytic phases of the viral life cycle. The replication of the viral episome is facilitated by viral components responsible for recruiting chromatin modifying enzymes and replication factors for altering the chromatin complexity and replication initiation functions, respectively. Importantly, chromatin modification of the viral genome plays a crucial role in determining whether the viral genome will persist as latent episome or undergo lytic reactivation. Additionally, chromatinization of the incoming virion DNA, which lacks chromatin structure, in the target cells during primary infection, helps in establishing latent infection. Here, we discuss the recent advancements on our understating of KSHV genome chromatinization and the consequences of chromatin modifications on viral life cycle.

  14. Chromatinization of the KSHV Genome During the KSHV Life Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timsy Uppal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV belongs to the gamma herpesvirus family and is the causative agent of various lymphoproliferative diseases in humans. KSHV, like other herpesviruses, establishes life-long latent infection with the expression of a limited number of viral genes. Expression of these genes is tightly regulated by both the viral and cellular factors. Recent advancements in identifying the expression profiles of viral transcripts, using tilling arrays and next generation sequencing have identified additional coding and non-coding transcripts in the KSHV genome. Determining the functions of these transcripts will provide a better understanding of the mechanisms utilized by KSHV in altering cellular pathways involved in promoting cell growth and tumorigenesis. Replication of the viral genome is critical in maintaining the existing copies of the viral episomes during both latent and lytic phases of the viral life cycle. The replication of the viral episome is facilitated by viral components responsible for recruiting chromatin modifying enzymes and replication factors for altering the chromatin complexity and replication initiation functions, respectively. Importantly, chromatin modification of the viral genome plays a crucial role in determining whether the viral genome will persist as latent episome or undergo lytic reactivation. Additionally, chromatinization of the incoming virion DNA, which lacks chromatin structure, in the target cells during primary infection, helps in establishing latent infection. Here, we discuss the recent advancements on our understating of KSHV genome chromatinization and the consequences of chromatin modifications on viral life cycle.

  15. Rapid and reversible epigenome editing by endogenous chromatin regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Simon M G; Kirkland, Jacob G; Chory, Emma J; Husmann, Dylan; Calarco, Joseph P; Crabtree, Gerald R

    2017-09-15

    Understanding the causal link between epigenetic marks and gene regulation remains a central question in chromatin biology. To edit the epigenome we developed the FIRE-Cas9 system for rapid and reversible recruitment of endogenous chromatin regulators to specific genomic loci. We enhanced the dCas9-MS2 anchor for genome targeting with Fkbp/Frb dimerizing fusion proteins to allow chemical-induced proximity of a desired chromatin regulator. We find that mSWI/SNF (BAF) complex recruitment is sufficient to oppose Polycomb within minutes, leading to activation of bivalent gene transcription in mouse embryonic stem cells. Furthermore, Hp1/Suv39h1 heterochromatin complex recruitment to active promoters deposits H3K9me3 domains, resulting in gene silencing that can be reversed upon washout of the chemical dimerizer. This inducible recruitment strategy provides precise kinetic information to model epigenetic memory and plasticity. It is broadly applicable to mechanistic studies of chromatin in mammalian cells and is particularly suited to the analysis of endogenous multi-subunit chromatin regulator complexes.Understanding the link between epigenetic marks and gene regulation requires the development of new tools to directly manipulate chromatin. Here the authors demonstrate a Cas9-based system to recruit chromatin remodelers to loci of interest, allowing rapid, reversible manipulation of epigenetic states.

  16. Anti-chromatin antibodies in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Gerloni

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the prevalence and clinical significance of anti-chromatin antibodies (Abs in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA. Methods: IgG anti-chromatin Abs were detected by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, in sera of 94 children with JRA (10 children with systemic, 38 with polyarticular and 46 with oligoarticular disease onset. As control group, 33 age- and-sex-matched healthy children (HC were also examined. Results: Abs to chromatin were detected in 24/94 (25,5% of children suffering from JRA. Particularly, the higher prevalence of anti-chromatin Abs has been found in children with oligoarticular (30,4% and polyarticular (23,7% onset JRA. In these groups Abs titers were significantly higher compared to systemic JRA and HC (p=0.003. Anti-chromatin Abs were observed more frequently in patients with oligoarticular disease and chronic uveitis (21,7%. Furthermore, higher levels of anti-chromatin Abs has been found in all the patients treated with anti-TNFα therapy (p<0.0001. Conclusions: our results confirm previous data about the prevalence of anti-chromatin Abs in JRA. These Abs were significantly higher in the group of patients with oligoarticular onset with past or present hystory of ocular involvement and in the group with polyarticular JRA treated with biologic therapy. A long-term follow-up study could be useful to evaluate the potential utility of these autoantibodies.

  17. Systematic Identification of Proteins Binding to Chromatin-Embedded Ubiquitylated H2B Reveals Recruitment of SWI/SNF to Regulate Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efrat Shema-Yaacoby

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin posttranslational modifications (PTMs, including monoubiquitylation of histone H2B on lysine 120 (H2Bub1, play a major role in regulating genome functions. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of H2Bub1 activity, a chromatin template uniformly containing H2Bub1 was used as an affinity matrix to identify preferentially interacting human proteins. Over 90 such factors were found, including proteins and protein complexes associated with transcription, RNA posttranscriptional modifications, and DNA replication and repair. Notably, we found that the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex associates preferentially with H2Bub1-rich chromatin. Moreover, SWI/SNF is required for optimal transcription of a subset of genes that are selectively dependent on H2Bub1. Our findings substantially expand the known H2Bub1 interactome and provide insights into the functions of this PTM in mammalian gene regulation.

  18. Chromatin accessibility data sets show bias due to sequence specificity of the DNase I enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashem Koohy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: DNase I is an enzyme which cuts duplex DNA at a rate that depends strongly upon its chromatin environment. In combination with high-throughput sequencing (HTS technology, it can be used to infer genome-wide landscapes of open chromatin regions. Using this technology, systematic identification of hundreds of thousands of DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHS per cell type has been possible, and this in turn has helped to precisely delineate genomic regulatory compartments. However, to date there has been relatively little investigation into possible biases affecting this data. RESULTS: We report a significant degree of sequence preference spanning sites cut by DNase I in a number of published data sets. The two major protocols in current use each show a different pattern, but for a given protocol the pattern of sequence specificity seems to be quite consistent. The patterns are substantially different from biases seen in other types of HTS data sets, and in some cases the most constrained position lies outside the sequenced fragment, implying that this constraint must relate to the digestion process rather than events occurring during library preparation or sequencing. CONCLUSIONS: DNase I is a sequence-specific enzyme, with a specificity that may depend on experimental conditions. This sequence specificity is not taken into account by existing pipelines for identifying open chromatin regions. Care must be taken when interpreting DNase I results, especially when looking at the precise locations of the reads. Future studies may be able to improve the sensitivity and precision of chromatin state measurement by compensating for sequence bias.

  19. Effect of epithelium ATP release on cyclic pressure-induced airway mucus secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Jin; Zhou, Xiang-Dong; Perelman, Juliy M; Kolosov, Victor P

    2014-02-01

    The cyclic mechanical effect of airflow during breathing creates the optimal airway hydration state. MUC (mucin) 5AC is an important component of the airway mucus. The formation of MUC5AC is related to ATP and intracellular calcium in the epithelial cells. In this study, we evaluated the effect of ATP release from intracellular calcium in epithelial cells on cyclic pressure-induced mucus secretion in the airway. 16HBE (human bronchial epithelial cells) were cultured in vitro on cyclically tilted cultured plates and divided into five groups: control, tilt, tilt and BAPTA-AM (1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetra-acetic acid-acetoxymethyl ester), tilt and EGTA and tilt and RB-2 (reactive blue-2). The shear stress and compressive stress were induced by the surface tension of the liquid, atmospheric pressure and liquid gravity. Cell activity, MUC5AC mRNA expression level, MUC5AC protein expression level and ATP release and intracellular calcium changes were measured with the MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide) assay, RT-PCR (reverse transcription-PCR), HPLC and inverted fluorescence microscope, respectively. We detected that cyclic pressure significantly increased MUC5AC secretion and ATP release. The enhanced ATP release could be inhibited by both BAPTA-AM and RB-2, while EGTA did not have a suppressive effect. BAPTA-AM, EGTA and RB-2 did not obviously inhibit MUC5AC mRNA expression. Cyclic pressure did not induce MUC5AC secretion in the airway mucus epithelium via Ca(2+)-dependent ATP release, and nearly all Ca(2+) was provided by stored intracellular Ca(2). © 2014 The author(s).

  20. Exocytosis of ATP from astrocytes modulates phasic and tonic inhibition in the neocortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulyana Lalo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Communication between neuronal and glial cells is important for many brain functions. Astrocytes can modulate synaptic strength via Ca(2+-stimulated release of various gliotransmitters, including glutamate and ATP. A physiological role of ATP release from astrocytes was suggested by its contribution to glial Ca(2+-waves and purinergic modulation of neuronal activity and sleep homeostasis. The mechanisms underlying release of gliotransmitters remain uncertain, and exocytosis is the most intriguing and debated pathway. We investigated release of ATP from acutely dissociated cortical astrocytes using "sniff-cell" approach and demonstrated that release is vesicular in nature and can be triggered by elevation of intracellular Ca(2+ via metabotropic and ionotropic receptors or direct UV-uncaging. The exocytosis of ATP from neocortical astrocytes occurred in the millisecond time scale contrasting with much slower nonvesicular release of gliotransmitters via Best1 and TREK-1 channels, reported recently in hippocampus. Furthermore, we discovered that elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+ in cortical astrocytes triggered the release of ATP that directly activated quantal purinergic currents in the pyramidal neurons. The glia-driven burst of purinergic currents in neurons was followed by significant attenuation of both synaptic and tonic inhibition. The Ca(2+-entry through the neuronal P2X purinoreceptors led to phosphorylation-dependent down-regulation of GABAA receptors. The negative purinergic modulation of postsynaptic GABA receptors was accompanied by small presynaptic enhancement of GABA release. Glia-driven purinergic modulation of inhibitory transmission was not observed in neurons when astrocytes expressed dn-SNARE to impair exocytosis. The astrocyte-driven purinergic currents and glia-driven modulation of GABA receptors were significantly reduced in the P2X4 KO mice. Our data provide a key evidence to support the physiological importance of exocytosis of

  1. Effect of epithelium ATP release on cyclic pressure-induced airway mucus secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Jin; Zhou, Xiang-dong; Perelman, Juliy M.; Kolosov, Victor P.

    2013-01-01

    The cyclic mechanical effect of airflow during breathing creates the optimal airway hydration state. MUC (mucin) 5AC is an important component of the airway mucus. The formation of MUC5AC is related to ATP and intracellular calcium in the epithelial cells. In this study, we evaluated the effect of ATP release from intracellular calcium in epithelial cells on cyclic pressure-induced mucus secretion in the airway. 16HBE (human bronchial epithelial cells) were cultured in vitro on cyclically tilted cultured plates and divided into five groups: control, tilt, tilt and BAPTA–AM (1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetra-acetic acid–acetoxymethyl ester), tilt and EGTA and tilt and RB-2 (reactive blue-2). The shear stress and compressive stress were induced by the surface tension of the liquid, atmospheric pressure and liquid gravity. Cell activity, MUC5AC mRNA expression level, MUC5AC protein expression level and ATP release and intracellular calcium changes were measured with the MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide) assay, RT–PCR (reverse transcription–PCR), HPLC and inverted fluorescence microscope, respectively. We detected that cyclic pressure significantly increased MUC5AC secretion and ATP release. The enhanced ATP release could be inhibited by both BAPTA–AM and RB-2, while EGTA did not have a suppressive effect. BAPTA–AM, EGTA and RB-2 did not obviously inhibit MUC5AC mRNA expression. Cyclic pressure did not induce MUC5AC secretion in the airway mucus epithelium via Ca2+-dependent ATP release, and nearly all Ca2+ was provided by stored intracellular Ca2+. PMID:27919041

  2. Standard Gibbs energy of metabolic reactions: II. Glucose-6-phosphatase reaction and ATP hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meurer, Florian; Do, Hoang Tam; Sadowski, Gabriele; Held, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    ATP (adenosine triphosphate) is a key reaction for metabolism. Tools from systems biology require standard reaction data in order to predict metabolic pathways accurately. However, literature values for standard Gibbs energy of ATP hydrolysis are highly uncertain and differ strongly from each other. Further, such data usually neglect the activity coefficients of reacting agents, and published data like this is apparent (condition-dependent) data instead of activity-based standard data. In this work a consistent value for the standard Gibbs energy of ATP hydrolysis was determined. The activity coefficients of reacting agents were modeled with electrolyte Perturbed-Chain Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (ePC-SAFT). The Gibbs energy of ATP hydrolysis was calculated by combining the standard Gibbs energies of hexokinase reaction and of glucose-6-phosphate hydrolysis. While the standard Gibbs energy of hexokinase reaction was taken from previous work, standard Gibbs energy of glucose-6-phosphate hydrolysis reaction was determined in this work. For this purpose, reaction equilibrium molalities of reacting agents were measured at pH7 and pH8 at 298.15K at varying initial reacting agent molalities. The corresponding activity coefficients at experimental equilibrium molalities were predicted with ePC-SAFT yielding the Gibbs energy of glucose-6-phosphate hydrolysis of -13.72±0.75kJ·mol(-1). Combined with the value for hexokinase, the standard Gibbs energy of ATP hydrolysis was finally found to be -31.55±1.27kJ·mol(-1). For both, ATP hydrolysis and glucose-6-phosphate hydrolysis, a good agreement with own and literature values were obtained when influences of pH, temperature, and activity coefficients were explicitly taken into account in order to calculate standard Gibbs energy at pH7, 298.15K and standard state. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Ca{sup 2+} influx and ATP release mediated by mechanical stretch in human lung fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murata, Naohiko [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Ito, Satoru, E-mail: itori@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Furuya, Kishio [Mechanobiology Laboratory, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Takahara, Norihiro [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Naruse, Keiji [Department of Cardiovascular Physiology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Aso, Hiromichi; Kondo, Masashi [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Sokabe, Masahiro [Mechanobiology Laboratory, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Hasegawa, Yoshinori [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan)

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • Uniaxial stretching activates Ca{sup 2+} signaling in human lung fibroblasts. • Stretch-induced intracellular Ca{sup 2+} elevation is mainly via Ca{sup 2+} influx. • Mechanical strain enhances ATP release from fibroblasts. • Stretch-induced Ca{sup 2+} influx is not mediated by released ATP or actin cytoskeleton. - Abstract: One cause of progressive pulmonary fibrosis is dysregulated wound healing after lung inflammation or damage in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. The mechanical forces are considered to regulate pulmonary fibrosis via activation of lung fibroblasts. In this study, the effects of mechanical stretch on the intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) and ATP release were investigated in primary human lung fibroblasts. Uniaxial stretch (10–30% in strain) was applied to fibroblasts cultured in a silicone chamber coated with type I collagen using a stretching apparatus. Following stretching and subsequent unloading, [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} transiently increased in a strain-dependent manner. Hypotonic stress, which causes plasma membrane stretching, also transiently increased the [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}. The stretch-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation was attenuated in Ca{sup 2+}-free solution. In contrast, the increase of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} by a 20% stretch was not inhibited by the inhibitor of stretch-activated channels GsMTx-4, Gd{sup 3+}, ruthenium red, or cytochalasin D. Cyclic stretching induced significant ATP releases from fibroblasts. However, the stretch-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation was not inhibited by ATP diphosphohydrolase apyrase or a purinergic receptor antagonist suramin. Taken together, mechanical stretch induces Ca{sup 2+} influx independently of conventional stretch-sensitive ion channels, the actin cytoskeleton, and released ATP.

  4. Mitochondrial ATP Depletion Disrupts Caco-2 Monolayer Integrity and Internalizes Claudin 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    JanssenDuijghuijsen, Lonneke M; Grefte, Sander; de Boer, Vincent C J; Zeper, Lara; van Dartel, Dorien A M; van der Stelt, Inge; Bekkenkamp-Grovenstein, Melissa; van Norren, Klaske; Wichers, Harry J; Keijer, Jaap

    2017-01-01

    Objective:In vivo studies suggest that intestinal barrier integrity is dependent on mitochondrial ATP production. Here, we aim to provide mechanistic support, using an in vitro model mimicking the oxidative in vivo situation. Methods: Human Caco-2 cells were cultured for 10 days in culture flasks or for 14 days on transwell inserts in either glucose-containing or galactose-containing medium. Mitochondria were visualized and cellular respiration and levels of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) proteins were determined. Mitochondrial ATP depletion was induced using CCCP, rotenone, or piericidin A (PA). Monolayer permeability was assessed using transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and fluorescein flux. Gene expression and cellular distribution of tight junction proteins were analyzed. Results: Caco-2 cells cultured in galactose-containing, but not in glucose-containing, medium showed increased mitochondrial connectivity, oxygen consumption rates and levels of OXPHOS proteins. Inhibition of mitochondrial ATP production using CCCP, rotenone or PA resulted in a dose-dependent increase in Caco-2 monolayer permeability. In-depth studies with PA showed a six fold decrease in cellular ATP and revealed increased gene expression of tight junction proteins (TJP) 1 and 2, occludin, and claudin 1, but decreased gene expression of claudin 2 and 7. Of these, claudin 7 was clearly redistributed from the cellular membrane into the cytoplasm, while the others were not (TJP1, occludin) or slightly (claudin 2, actin) affected. In vivo studies suggest that intestinal barrier integrity is dependent on mitochondrial ATP production. Here, we aim to provide mechanistic support, using an in vitro model mimicking the oxidative in vivo situation. Conclusions: Well-functioning mitochondria are essential for maintaining cellular energy status and monolayer integrity of galactose grown Caco-2 cells. Energy depletion-induced Caco-2 monolayer permeability may be facilitated by changes in the

  5. Understanding structure, function, and mutations in the mitochondrial ATP synthase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Xu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial ATP synthase is a multimeric enzyme complex with an overall molecular weight of about 600,000 Da. The ATP synthase is a molecular motor composed of two separable parts: F1 and Fo. The F1 portion contains the catalytic sites for ATP synthesis and protrudes into the mitochondrial matrix. Fo forms a proton turbine that is embedded in the inner membrane and connected to the rotor of F1. The flux of protons flowing down a potential gradient powers the rotation of the rotor driving the synthesis of ATP. Thus, the flow of protons though Fo is coupled to the synthesis of ATP. This review will discuss the structure/function relationship in the ATP synthase as determined by biochemical, crystallographic, and genetic studies. An emphasis will be placed on linking the structure/function relationship with understanding how disease causing mutations or putative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in genes encoding the subunits of the ATP synthase, will affect the function of the enzyme and the health of the individual. The review will start by summarizing the current understanding of the subunit composition of the enzyme and the role of the subunits followed by a discussion on known mutations and their effect on the activity of the ATP synthase. The review will conclude with a summary of mutations in genes encoding subunits of the ATP synthase that are known to be responsible for human disease, and a brief discussion on SNPs.

  6. MRT letter: Expression of ATP sensor protein in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishikawa, Jun-ichi; Fujikawa, Makoto; Imamura, Hiromi; Yasuda, Kayo; Noji, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Naoaki; Mitani, Shohei; Yokoyama, Ken

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) is the major energy currency and is involved in many biological processes. The ATP-monitoring system for cells in animals can be helpful to study the relationship between energy metabolism and biological processes. The fluorescent ATP biosensor ATeam (ATP indicator based on Epsilon subunit for Analytical Measurements), which has been reported to monitor ATP levels in cultured cells on the basis of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), was introduced into nematodes by microinjection and UV-irradiation method. To confirm whether ATeam functions as an ATP sensor in nematode cells, the authors measured FRET of ATeam in cells of transgenic nematode. The ATeam was expressed in target cells in nematode. In vulva cells, ATP levels in the cytosol were higher than those in mitochondria. ATeam also sensed ATP level change in cultured cells from the transgenic nematode. These experiments indicated that ATeam is available for detection of changes in ATP levels in nematode cells. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Cloning of the cDNA for the human ATP synthase OSCP subunit (ATP5O) by exon trapping and mapping to chromosome 21q22.1-q22.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Haiming [Geneva Univ. Medical School (Switzerland); Morris, M.A.; Rossier, C. [Cantonal Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland)] [and others

    1995-08-10

    Exon trapping was used to clone portions of potential genes from human chromosome 21. One trapped sequence showed striking homology with the bovine and rat ATP synthase OSCP (oligomycin sensitivity conferring protein) subunit. We subsequently cloned the full-length human ATP synthase OSCP cDNA (GDB/HGMW approved name ATP50) from infant brain and muscle libraries and determined its nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence (EMBL/GenBank Accession No. X83218). The encoded polypeptide contains 213 amino acids, with more than 80% identity to bovine and murine ATPase OSCP subunits and over 35% identity to Saccharomyces cerevisiae and sweet potato sequences. The human ATP5O gene is located at 21q22.1-q22.2, just proximal to D21S17, in YACs 860G11 and 838C7 of the Chumakov et al. YAC contig. The gene is expressed in all human tissues examined, most strongly in muscle and heart. This ATP5O subunit is a key structural component of the stalk of the mitochondrial respiratory chain F{sub 1}F{sub 0}-ATP synthase and as such may contribute in a gene dosage-dependent manner to the phenotype of Down syndrome (trisomy 21). 39 refs., 5 figs.

  8. In vivo ATP synthesis rates in single human muscles during high intensity exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Glenn; Vandenborne, Krista; Elliott, Mark; Leigh, John S

    1999-01-01

    In vivo ATP synthesis rates were measured in the human medial gastrocnemius muscle during high intensity exercise using localized 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS). Six-second localized spectra were acquired during and following a 30 s maximal voluntary rate exercise using a magnetic resonance image-guided spectral localization technique. During 30 s maximal voluntary rate exercise, ATPase fluxes were predominantly met by anaerobic ATP sources. Maximal in vivo glycogenolytic rates of 207 ± 48 mM ATP min−1 were obtained within 15 s, decreasing to 72 ± 34 mM ATP min−1 by the end of 30 s. In contrast, aerobic ATP synthesis rates achieved 85 ± 2 % of their maximal capacity within 9 s and did not change throughout the exercise. The ratio of peak glycolytic ATP synthesis rate to maximal oxidative ATP synthesis was 2.9 ± 0.9. The non-Pi, non-CO2 buffer capacity was calculated to be 27.0 ± 6.2 slykes (millimoles acid added per unit change in pH). At the cessation of exercise, Pi, phosphomonoesters and CO2 were predicted to account for 17.2 ± 1.5, 5.57 ± 0.97 and 2.24 ± 0.34 slykes of the total buffer capacity. Over the approximately linear range of intracellular pH recovery following the post-exercise acidification, pHi recovered at a rate of 0.19 ± 0.03 pH units min−1. Proton transport capacity was determined to be 16.4 ± 4.1 mM (pH unit)−1 min−1 and corresponded to a maximal proton efflux rate of 15.3 ± 2.7 mM min−1. These data support the observation that glycogenolytic and glycolytic rates are elevated in vivo in the presence of elevated Pi levels. The data do not support the hypothesis that glycogenolysis follows Michealis-Menten kinetics with an apparent Km for [Pi]in vivo. In vivo -measured ATP utilization rates and the initial dependence on PCr and glycolysis were similar to those previously reported in in situ studies involving short duration, high intensity exercise. This experimental approach presents a non

  9. Chromatin remodeling and stem cell theory of relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerny, Jan; Quesenberry, Peter J

    2004-10-01

    The field of stem cell biology is currently being redefined. Stem cell (hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic) differentiation has been considered hierarchical in nature, but recent data suggest that there is no progenitor/stem cell hierarchy, but rather a reversible continuum. The stem cell (hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic) phenotype, the total differentiation capacity (hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic), gene expression as well as other stem cell functional characteristics (homing, receptor and adhesion molecule expression) vary throughout a cell-cycle transit widely. This seems to be dependent on shifting chromatin and gene expression with cell-cycle transit. The published data on DNA methylation, histone acetylation, and also RNAi, the major regulators of gene expression, conjoins very well and provides an explanation for the major issues of stem cell biology. Those features of stem cells mentioned above can be rather difficult to apprehend when a classical hierarchy biology view is applied, but they become clear and easier to understand once they are correlated with the underlining epigenetic changes. We are entering a new era of stem cell biology the era of "chromatinomics." We are one step closer to the practical use of cellular therapy for degenerative diseases.

  10. The effect of pH and free Mg2+ on ATP linked enzymes and the calculation of Gibbs free energy of ATP hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Christian; Kashiwaya, Yoshihiro; Veech, Richard L

    2010-12-16

    The apparent equilibrium constants, K′, of biochemical reactions containing substrates which bind [Mg2+] unequally can be significantly altered by changes in free intracellular [Mg2+]. Intracellular free [Mg2+] can be estimated by measurements of [citrate]/[isocitrate], a ratio known to vary with tissue free [Mg2+]. The combined equilibrium constant for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, phosphoglycerate kinase, and triose phosphate isomerase for the three reactions (K(GG-TPI)′) was corrected using new binding constants for dihydroxyacetone-phosphate and 3-phosphoglycerate. The result of this calculation is demonstrated in the calculation of the free energy of ATP hydrolysis. In addition, the dependence of the equilibrium constant for the glutamine synthetase reaction on pH and free [Mg2+] was demonstrated. Furthermore, a theory linking the ΔG′ value of mitochondrial complex I−II and the cytosolic ΔG′ value of ATP hydrolysis is discussed with evidence from previous publications.

  11. Effect of saffron on rat sperm chromatin integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardani, Mohammad; Vaez, Ahmad; Razavi, Shahnaz

    2014-05-01

    Currently, relation between reactive oxygen species (ROS) ROS concentration and semen quality was indicated. Saffron has traditionally been not only considered as a food additive but also as a medicinal herb, which has a good antioxidant properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protection potency of saffron and vitamin E on sperm chromatin integrity. Thirty adult male Wistar rats divided equally into saffron (100 mg/kg), vitamin E (100 mg/kg) and control (0.5cc distilled water /day) groups. After 60 days, cauda epididymis dissected and sperm cells were used for analysis of sperm chromatin packaging by chromomycin A3 (CMA3) staining, and sperm chromatin susceptibility to acid denaturation by acridine orange (AO) staining. The mean percentage of CMA3 positive sperm was significantly decreased in saffron and vitamin E groups relative to control group (psaffron and vitamin E groups as compared with control group (psaffron can protect sperm against DNA damage and chromatin anomalies.

  12. Probing Chromatin-modifying Enzymes with Chemical Tools

    KAUST Repository

    Fischle, Wolfgang

    2016-02-04

    Chromatin is the universal template of genetic information in all eukaryotic organisms. Chemical modifications of the DNA-packaging histone proteins and the DNA bases are crucial signaling events in directing the use and readout of eukaryotic genomes. The enzymes that install and remove these chromatin modifications as well as the proteins that bind these marks govern information that goes beyond the sequence of DNA. Therefore, these so-called epigenetic regulators are intensively studied and represent promising drug targets in modern medicine. We summarize and discuss recent advances in the field of chemical biology that have provided chromatin research with sophisticated tools for investigating the composition, activity, and target sites of chromatin modifying enzymes and reader proteins.

  13. Insights into Chromatin Structure and Dynamics in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Rosa

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The packaging of chromatin into the nucleus of a eukaryotic cell requires an extraordinary degree of compaction and physical organization. In recent years, it has been shown that this organization is dynamically orchestrated to regulate responses to exogenous stimuli as well as to guide complex cell-type-specific developmental programs. Gene expression is regulated by the compartmentalization of functional domains within the nucleus, by distinct nucleosome compositions accomplished via differential modifications on the histone tails and through the replacement of core histones by histone variants. In this review, we focus on these aspects of chromatin organization and discuss novel approaches such as live cell imaging and photobleaching as important tools likely to give significant insights into our understanding of the very dynamic nature of chromatin and chromatin regulatory processes. We highlight the contribution plant studies have made in this area showing the potential advantages of plants as models in understanding this fundamental aspect of biology.

  14. Neutron scattering studies on chromatin higher-order structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graziano, V.; Gerchman, S.E.; Schneider, D.K.; Ramakrishnan, V. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31

    We have been engaged in studies of the structure and condensation of chromatin into the 30nm filament using small-angle neutron scattering. We have also used deuterated histone H1 to determine its location in the chromatin 30nm filament. Our studies indicate that chromatin condenses with increasing ionic strength to a limiting structure that has a mass per unit length of 6-7 nucleosomes/11 nm. They also show that the linker histone H1/H5 is located in the interior of the chromatin filament, in a position compatible with its binding to the inner face of the nucleosome. Analysis of the mass per unit length as a function of H5 stoichiometry suggests that 5-7 contiguous nucleosomes need to have H5 bound before a stable higher order structure can exist.

  15. The centromere: chromatin foundation for the kinetochore machinery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fukagawa, Tatsuo; Earnshaw, William C

    2014-01-01

    Since discovery of the centromere-specific histone H3 variant CENP-A, centromeres have come to be defined as chromatin structures that establish the assembly site for the complex kinetochore machinery...

  16. Commentary: Tone up your chromatin and stay young

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    01/0005-0011. Keywords. Aging; chromatin; epigenetics; histones. Author Affiliations. Navneet K Matharu1 Rakesh K Mishra1. Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology, CSIR Hyderabad 500 007, India. Dates. Early published: 14 March 2011 ...

  17. HACking the centromere chromatin code: insights from human artificial chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Jan H; Martins, Nuno M C; Larionov, Vladimir; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Earnshaw, William C

    2012-07-01

    The centromere is a specialized chromosomal region that serves as the assembly site of the kinetochore. At the centromere, CENP-A nucleosomes form part of a chromatin landscape termed centrochromatin. This chromatin environment conveys epigenetic marks regulating kinetochore formation. Recent work sheds light on the intricate relationship between centrochromatin state, the CENP-A assembly pathway and the maintenance of centromere function. Here, we review the emerging picture of how chromatin affects mammalian kinetochore formation. We place particular emphasis on data obtained from Human Artificial Chromosome (HAC) biology and the targeted engineering of centrochromatin using synthetic HACs. We discuss implications of these findings, which indicate that a delicate balance of histone modifications and chromatin state dictates both de novo centromere formation and the maintenance of centromere identity in dividing cell populations.

  18. Transcription Through Chromatin-Link to Diseases and Therapeutics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 11. Transcription Through Chromatin – Link to Diseases ... Medical Sciences, Madras University, Chennai. Transcription and Disease Laboratory Molecular Biology and Genetics Unit Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research.

  19. Structure of plant nuclear and ribosomal DNA containing chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leber, B; Hemleben, V

    1979-11-10

    Digestion of plant chromatin from Brassica pekinensis and Matthiola incana with staphylococcus nuclease leads to a DNA repeat of 175 plus or minus 8 and a core size of 140 base pairs. DNase I digestion results in multiples of 10 bases. Ribosomal RNN genes were studied as a model system for active plant chromatin because of their great redundancy and their high transcriptional activity in growing and differentiating tissues. The actively transcribed genes were identified by nascent RNA of ribosomal origin still attached to its matrix DNA. Hybridization techniques were used to demonstrate that even transcriptionally active gene sequences are present in nuclease generated chromatin subunits. Comparison of the DNase I kinetics of chromatin digestion with the amount of ribosomal RNA genes which is available for hybridization at the given times indicated that ribosomal RNA genes are digested, but not preferentially degraded by DNase I.

  20. Nascent Connections: R-Loops and Chromatin Patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chédin, Frédéric

    2016-12-01

    RNA molecules, such as long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), have critical roles in regulating gene expression, chromosome architecture, and the modification states of chromatin. Recent developments suggest that RNA also influences gene expression and chromatin patterns through the interaction of nascent transcripts with their DNA template via the formation of co-transcriptional R-loop structures. R-loop formation over specific, conserved, hotspots occurs at thousands of genes in mammalian genomes and represents an important and dynamic feature of mammalian chromatin. Here, focusing primarily on mammalian systems, I describe the accumulating connections and possible mechanisms linking R-loop formation and chromatin patterning. The possible contribution of aberrant R-loops to pathological conditions is also discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.