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Sample records for atp dependent chromatin

  1. ATP independent and ATP dependent chromatin remodeling in wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unraveling the biochemistry of chromatin dynamics during DNA replication, repair, recombination as well as transcription is the current challenge in biology. The nucleosomes containing histone octamer are the crucial elements responsible for winding and unwinding eukaryotic DNA. During DNA centric events, these nucleosomes translocate along the DNA with concomitant covalent modifications of histones. We explored these mechanisms in wheat seedlings after irradiation with survivable dose of 60Co-γ radiations. The histones isolated from irradiated seedlings showed that global acetylation of H3 decreased and H4 increased in dose depend manner till 100 grays. Time course of individual modifications showed that for H3K4 and H3K9 acetylation decreased, whereas H3S10, phosphorylation increased. There were fluctuations in acetylation of H4K5, H4K12 and H4K16, whereas H4K8 showed hyperacetylation. We found ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling activity as trans-transfer of the nucleosomes from wheat native donor chromatin on a labeled nucleosome positioning sequence and cis-transfer of the mononucleosomes in vitro. However, there was no significant change in this activity in extracts obtained from irradiated wheat seedlings. This is the first report on, demonstration of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling activity and site specific H3 and H4 modifications in response to exposure to ionizing radiation in case of plants. (author)

  2. ATP-Dependent Chromatin Remodeling Factors and Their Roles in Affecting Nucleosome Fiber Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Lusser

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors of the SNF2 family are key components of the cellular machineries that shape and regulate chromatin structure and function. Members of this group of proteins have broad and heterogeneous functions ranging from controlling gene activity, facilitating DNA damage repair, promoting homologous recombination to maintaining genomic stability. Several chromatin remodeling factors are critical components of nucleosome assembly processes, and recent reports have identified specific functions of distinct chromatin remodeling factors in the assembly of variant histones into chromatin. In this review we will discuss the specific roles of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors in determining nucleosome composition and, thus, chromatin fiber properties.

  3. The Emerging Roles of ATP-Dependent Chromatin Remodeling Enzymes in Nucleotide Excision Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wioletta Czaja

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available DNA repair in eukaryotic cells takes place in the context of chromatin, where DNA, including damaged DNA, is tightly packed into nucleosomes and higher order chromatin structures. Chromatin intrinsically restricts accessibility of DNA repair proteins to the damaged DNA and impacts upon the overall rate of DNA repair. Chromatin is highly responsive to DNA damage and undergoes specific remodeling to facilitate DNA repair. How damaged DNA is accessed, repaired and restored to the original chromatin state, and how chromatin remodeling coordinates these processes in vivo, remains largely unknown. ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers (ACRs are the master regulators of chromatin structure and dynamics. Conserved from yeast to humans, ACRs utilize the energy of ATP to reorganize packing of chromatin and control DNA accessibility by sliding, ejecting or restructuring nucleosomes. Several studies have demonstrated that ATP-dependent remodeling activity of ACRs plays important roles in coordination of spatio-temporal steps of different DNA repair pathways in chromatin. This review focuses on the role of ACRs in regulation of various aspects of nucleotide excision repair (NER in the context of chromatin. We discuss current understanding of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling by various subfamilies of remodelers and regulation of the NER pathway in vivo.

  4. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling in the DNA-damage response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lans Hannes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The integrity of DNA is continuously challenged by metabolism-derived and environmental genotoxic agents that cause a variety of DNA lesions, including base alterations and breaks. DNA damage interferes with vital processes such as transcription and replication, and if not repaired properly, can ultimately lead to premature aging and cancer. Multiple DNA pathways signaling for DNA repair and DNA damage collectively safeguard the integrity of DNA. Chromatin plays a pivotal role in regulating DNA-associated processes, and is itself subject to regulation by the DNA-damage response. Chromatin influences access to DNA, and often serves as a docking or signaling site for repair and signaling proteins. Its structure can be adapted by post-translational histone modifications and nucleosome remodeling, catalyzed by the activity of ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes. In recent years, accumulating evidence has suggested that ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes play important, although poorly characterized, roles in facilitating the effectiveness of the DNA-damage response. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the involvement of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling in three major DNA repair pathways: nucleotide excision repair, homologous recombination, and non-homologous end-joining. This shows that a surprisingly large number of different remodeling complexes display pleiotropic functions during different stages of the DNA-damage response. Moreover, several complexes seem to have multiple functions, and are implicated in various mechanistically distinct repair pathways.

  5. Dysregulation of select ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors in high trait anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wille, Alexandra; Amort, Thomas; Singewald, Nicolas; Sartori, Simone B; Lusser, Alexandra

    2016-09-15

    Enhanced anxiety is a salient feature of a number of psychiatric disorders including anxiety disorders, trauma-related disorders and depression. Although aberrant expression of various genes has been detected in patients suffering from persistent high anxiety as well as in high anxiety rodent models, the molecular mechanisms responsible for altered transcription regulation have been poorly addressed. Transcription regulation intimately involves the contribution of chromatin modifying processes, such as histone modification and ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling, yet their role in pathological anxiety is not known. Here, we investigated for the first time if altered levels of several ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors (ChRFs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) may be linked to high trait anxiety in mice. While we found protein levels of the ChRFs SNF2H, ATRX, CHD1, CHD3 and CHD5 and of HDACs 1-3 and 6 to be similar in most of the tested brain areas of mice with high (HAB) versus normal (NAB) anxiety-related behavior, we observed distinctly altered regulation of SNF2H in the amygdala, and of CHD3 and CHD5 in the ventral hippocampus. In particular, CHD3 and CHD5 exhibited altered expression of protein but not of mRNA in HAB mice. Since both proteins are components of NuRD-like complexes, these results may indicate an impaired equilibrium between different NuRD-like complexes in the ventral hippocampus. Overall, our data provide novel evidence for localized differences of specific ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors in mice with high trait anxiety that may ultimately contribute to altered transcriptional programs resulting in the manifestation of pathological anxiety. PMID:27208790

  6. Diverse functions of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes in development and cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang I. Wu

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian SWI/SNF like Brg1/Brm associated factors (BAF) chromatin-remodeling complexes are able to use energy derived from adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis to change chromatin structures and regulate nuclear processes such as transcription.BAF complexes contain multiple subunits and the diverse subunit compositions provide functional specificities to BAF complexes.In this review,we summarize the functions of BAF subunits during mammalian development and in progression of various cancers.The mechanisms underlying the functional diversity and specificities of BAF complexes will be discussed.

  7. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling facilitates nucleotide excision repair of UV-induced DNA lesions in synthetic dinucleosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Ura, Kiyoe; Araki, Marito; Saeki, Hideaki; Masutani, Chikahide; Ito, Takashi; Iwai, Shigenori; Mizukoshi, Toshimi; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Hanaoka, Fumio

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between chromatin dynamics and nucleotide excision repair (NER), we have examined the effect of chromatin structure on the formation of two major classes of UV-induced DNA lesions in reconstituted dinucleosomes. Furthermore, we have developed a model chromatin-NER system consisting of purified human NER factors and dinucleosome substrates that contain pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidone photoproducts (6-4PPs) either at the center of the nucleosome or in the linker DNA....

  8. Expression-dependent folding of interphase chromatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansjoerg Jerabek

    Full Text Available Multiple studies suggest that chromatin looping might play a crucial role in organizing eukaryotic genomes. To investigate the interplay between the conformation of interphase chromatin and its transcriptional activity, we include information from gene expression profiles into a polymer model for chromatin that incorporates genomic loops. By relating loop formation to transcriptional activity, we are able to generate chromosome conformations whose structural and topological properties are consistent with experimental data. The model particularly allows to reproduce the conformational variations that are known to occur between highly and lowly expressed chromatin regions. As previously observed in experiments, lowly expressed regions of the simulated polymers are much more compact. Due to the changes in loop formation, the distributions of chromatin loops are also expression-dependent and exhibit a steeper decay in highly active regions. As a results of entropic interaction between differently looped parts of the chromosome, we observe topological alterations leading to a preferential positioning of highly transcribed loci closer to the surface of the chromosome territory. Considering the diffusional behavior of the chromatin fibre, the simulations furthermore show that the higher the expression level of specific parts of the chromatin fibre is, the more dynamic they are. The results exhibit that variations of loop formation along the chromatin fibre, and the entropic changes that come along with it, do not only influence the structural parameters on the local scale, but also effect the global chromosome conformation and topology.

  9. Effects of fast neutrons on chromatin: dependence on chromatin structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radu, L. [Dept. of Molecular Genetics, V. Babes National Inst., Bd. Timisoara, Bucharest (Romania); Constantinescu, B. [Dept. of Cyclotron, H. Hulubei National Inst., Bucharest (Romania); Gazdaru, D. [Dept. of Biophysics, Physics Faculty, Univ. of Bucharest (Romania)

    2002-07-01

    The effects of fast neutrons (10-100 Gy) on chromatin extracted from normal (liver of Wistar rats) and tumor (Walker carcinosarcoma maintained on Wistar rats) tissues were compared. The spectroscopic assays used were (i) chromatin intrinsic fluorescence, (ii) time-resolved fluorescence of chromatin-proflavine complexes, and (iii) fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between dansyl chloride and acridine orange coupled to chromatin. For both normal and tumor chromatin, the intensity of intrinsic fluorescence specific for acidic and basic proteins decreased with increasing dose. The relative contributions of the excited-state lifetime of proflavine bound to chromatin were reduced upon fast-neutron irradiation, indicating a decrease in the proportion of chromatin DNA available for ligand binding. The Forster energy transfer efficiencies were also modified by irradiation. These effects were larger for chromatin from tumor tissue. In the range 0-100 Gy, fast neutrons induced alterations in DNA and acidic and basic proteins, as well as in global chromatin structure. The radiosensitivity of chromatin extracted from tumor tissue seems to be higher than that of chromatin extracted from normal tissue, probably because of its higher euchromatin (loose)-heterochromatin (compact) ratio. (author)

  10. ATP-dependent protease in maize mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ATP-dependent protease was identified in the matrix of Zea mays L. Sachara mitochondria. 14C-methylated casein has been used as a substrate, and the matrix ATP-dependent protease exhibited similar sensitivity towards specific inhibitors as the Lon protease from E. coli nd analogues from rat liver and yeast mitochondria. Here we report the existence of Lon like ATP-dependent protease in intact mitochondria prepared from 4-days-old epicotyls of Zea mays L. seedling. Enzyme has been purified from Lubrol treated mitochondria using ion exchange chromatography and gel filtration. The enzyme activity has been estimated using 14C-methylated casein as a substrate and sensitivity of the protease towards the specific inhibitors has been tested. ATP-dependent protease from the mitochondrial matrix of maize exhibit similar sensitivity to the above mentioned inhibitors like Lon protease from yeast and rat liver mitochondria as well as from E. coli. (authors)

  11. Phosphorylation-dependent regulation of plant chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Bigeard, Jean

    2014-07-10

    In eukaryotes, most of the DNA is located in the nucleus where it is organized with histone proteins in a higher order structure as chromatin. Chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins contribute to DNA-related processes such as replication and transcription as well as epigenetic regulation. Protein functions are often regulated by PTMs among which phosphorylation is one of the most abundant PTM. Phosphorylation of proteins affects important properties, such as enzyme activity, protein stability, or subcellular localization. We here describe the main specificities of protein phosphorylation in plants and review the current knowledge on phosphorylation-dependent regulation of plant chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins. We also outline some future challenges to further elucidate protein phosphorylation and chromatin regulation.

  12. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation-dependent Transient Chromatin Decondensation and Histone Displacement following Laser Microirradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickfaden, Hilmar; McDonald, Darin; Kruhlak, Michael J; Haince, Jean-Francois; Th'ng, John P H; Rouleau, Michele; Ishibashi, Toytaka; Corry, Gareth N; Ausio, Juan; Underhill, D Alan; Poirier, Guy G; Hendzel, Michael J

    2016-01-22

    Chromatin undergoes a rapid ATP-dependent, ATM and H2AX-independent decondensation when DNA damage is introduced by laser microirradiation. Although the detailed mechanism of this decondensation remains to be determined, the kinetics of decondensation are similar to the kinetics of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation. We used laser microirradiation to introduce DNA strand breaks into living cells expressing a photoactivatable GFP-tagged histone H2B. We find that poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation mediated primarily by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) is responsible for the rapid decondensation of chromatin at sites of DNA damage. This decondensation of chromatin correlates temporally with the displacement of histones, which is sensitive to PARP inhibition and is transient in nature. Contrary to the predictions of the histone shuttle hypothesis, we did not find that histone H1 accumulated on poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) in vivo. Rather, histone H1, and to a lessor extent, histones H2A and H2B were rapidly depleted from the sites of PAR accumulation. However, histone H1 returns to chromatin and the chromatin recondenses. Thus, the PARP-dependent relaxation of chromatin closely correlates with histone displacement.

  13. Chromatin assembly using Drosophila systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyodorov, Dmitry V; Levenstein, Mark E

    2002-05-01

    To successfully study chromatin structure and activity in vitro, it is essential to have a chromatin assembly system that will prepare extended nucleosome arrays with highly defined protein content that resemble bulk chromatin isolated from living cell nuclei in terms of periodicity and nucleosome positioning. The Drosophila ATP-dependent chromatin assembly system described in this unit meets these requirements. The end product of the reaction described here has highly periodic extended arrays with physiologic spacing and positioning of the nucleosomes.

  14. F1-dependent translation of mitochondrially encoded Atp6p and Atp8p subunits of yeast ATP synthase

    OpenAIRE

    Rak, Malgorzata; Tzagoloff, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    The ATP synthase of yeast mitochondria is composed of 17 different subunit polypeptides. We have screened a panel of ATP synthase mutants for impaired expression of Atp6p, Atp8p, and Atp9p, the only mitochondrially encoded subunits of ATP synthase. Our results show that translation of Atp6p and Atp8p is activated by F1 ATPase (or assembly intermediates thereof). Mutants lacking the α or β subunits of F1, or the Atp11p and Atp12p chaperones that promote F1 assembly, have normal levels of the b...

  15. Phenomenological analysis of ATP dependence of motor protein

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yunxin

    2011-01-01

    In this study, through phenomenological comparison of the velocity-force data of processive motor proteins, including conventional kinesin, cytoplasmic dynein and myosin V, we found that, the ratio between motor velocities of two different ATP concentrations is almost invariant for any substall, superstall or negative external loads. Therefore, the velocity of motor can be well approximated by a Michaelis-Menten like formula $V=\\atp k(F)L/(\\atp +K_M)$, with $L$ the step size, and $k(F)$ the external load $F$ dependent rate of one mechanochemical cycle of motor motion in saturated ATP solution. The difference of Michaelis-Menten constant $K_M$ for substall, superstall and negative external load indicates, the ATP molecule affinity of motor head for these three cases are different, though the expression of $k(F)$ as a function of $F$ might be unchanged for any external load $F$. Verifications of this Michaelis-Menten like formula has also been done by fitting to the recent experimental data.

  16. Metal-Dependent Regulation of ATP7A and ATP7B in Fibroblast Cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenartowicz, Malgorzata; Moos, Torben; Ogórek, Mateusz;

    2016-01-01

    Deficiency of one of the copper transporters ATP7A and ATP7B leads to the rare X-linked disorder Menkes Disease (MD) or the rare autosomal disorder Wilson disease (WD), respectively. In order to investigate whether the ATP7A and the ATP7B genes may be transcriptionally regulated, we measured...

  17. Metal-Dependent Regulation of ATP7A and ATP7B in Fibroblast Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenartowicz, Malgorzata; Moos, Torben; Ogórek, Mateusz; Jensen, Thomas G; Møller, Lisbeth B

    2016-01-01

    Deficiency of one of the copper transporters ATP7A and ATP7B leads to the rare X-linked disorder Menkes Disease (MD) or the rare autosomal disorder Wilson disease (WD), respectively. In order to investigate whether the ATP7A and the ATP7B genes may be transcriptionally regulated, we measured the expression level of the two genes at various concentrations of iron, copper, and insulin. Treating fibroblasts from controls or from individuals with MD or WD for 3 and 10 days with iron chelators revealed that iron deficiency led to increased transcript levels of both ATP7A and ATP7B. Copper deficiency obtained by treatment with the copper chelator led to a downregulation of ATP7A in the control fibroblasts, but surprisingly not in the WD fibroblasts. In contrast, the addition of copper led to an increased expression of ATP7A, but a decreased expression of ATP7B. Thus, whereas similar regulation patterns for the two genes were observed in response to iron deficiency, different responses were observed after changes in the access to copper. Mosaic fibroblast cultures from female carriers of MD treated with copper or copper chelator for 6-8 weeks led to clonal selection. Cells that express the normal ATP7A allele had a selective growth advantage at high copper concentrations, whereas more surprisingly, cells that express the mutant ATP7A allele had a selective growth advantage at low copper concentrations. Thus, although the transcription of ATP7A is regulated by copper, clonal growth selection in mosaic cell cultures is affected by the level of copper. Female carriers of MD are rarely affected probably due to a skewed inactivation of the X-chromosome bearing the ATP7A mutation. PMID:27587995

  18. Effects of nucleotides on ATP-dependent protein translocation into Escherichia coli membrane vesicles.

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, L.; Tai, P C

    1986-01-01

    We have shown previously that Escherichia coli can translocate the same protein either co- or posttranslationally and that ATP hydrolysis is essential for the posttranslational translocation of the precursors of alkaline phosphatase and OmpA protein into inverted E. coli membrane vesicles. ATP-dependent protein translocation has now been further characterized. In the absence of exogenous Mg2+, dATP, formycin A-5'-triphosphate, ATP-alpha-S, and N1-oxide-ATP could replace ATP, but many other nu...

  19. A Chromatin-Focused siRNA Screen for Regulators of p53-Dependent Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammons, Morgan A; Zhu, Jiajun; Berger, Shelley L

    2016-01-01

    The protein product of the Homo sapiens TP53 gene is a transcription factor (p53) that regulates the expression of genes critical for the response to DNA damage and tumor suppression, including genes involved in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, DNA repair, metabolism, and a number of other tumorigenesis-related pathways. Differential transcriptional regulation of these genes is believed to alter the balance between two p53-dependent cell fates: cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. A number of previously identified p53 cofactors covalently modify and alter the function of both the p53 protein and histone proteins. Both gain- and loss-of-function mutations in chromatin modifiers have been strongly implicated in cancer development; thus, we sought to identify novel chromatin regulatory proteins that affect p53-dependent transcription and the balance between the expression of pro-cell cycle arrest and proapoptotic genes. We utilized an siRNA library designed against predicted chromatin regulatory proteins, and identified known and novel chromatin-related factors that affect both global p53-dependent transcription and gene-specific regulators of p53 transcriptional activation. The results from this screen will serve as a comprehensive resource for those interested in further characterizing chromatin and epigenetic factors that regulate p53 transcription. PMID:27334938

  20. Structure and mechanism of ATP-dependent phospholipid transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez Marques, Rosa Laura; Poulsen, Lisbeth Rosager; Bailly, Aurélien;

    2015-01-01

    Background ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters and P4-ATPases are two large and seemingly unrelated families of primary active pumps involved in moving phospholipids from one leaflet of a biological membrane to the other. Scope of review This review aims to identify common mechanistic features...... in the way phospholipid flipping is carried out by two evolutionarily unrelated families of transporters. Major conclusions Both protein families hydrolyze ATP, although they employ different mechanisms to use it, and have a comparable size with twelve transmembrane segments in the functional unit...

  1. Clathrin-coated vesicles contain an ATP-dependent proton pump.

    OpenAIRE

    Forgac, M; Cantley, L; Wiedenmann, B; Altstiel, L; Branton, D

    1983-01-01

    Clathrin-coated vesicles isolated from calf brain contain an ATP-dependent proton pump. Proton movement was monitored by measuring [14C]methylamine distribution. Addition of Mg2+ and ATP to coated vesicles equilibrated with [14C]methylamine resulted in the generation of a 4- to 5-fold concentration gradient, corresponding to a delta pH of 0.6-0.7 units between the medium and the acidic inside of the coated vesicles. ATP-dependent [14C]methylamine uptake was abolished by the proton ionophore c...

  2. ATP-dependent DNA binding, unwinding, and resection by the Mre11/Rad50 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yaqi; Sung, Sihyun; Kim, Youngran; Li, Fuyang; Gwon, Gwanghyun; Jo, Aera; Kim, Ae-Kyoung; Kim, Taeyoon; Song, Ok-Kyu; Lee, Sang Eun; Cho, Yunje

    2016-04-01

    ATP-dependent DNA end recognition and nucleolytic processing are central functions of the Mre11/Rad50 (MR) complex in DNA double-strand break repair. However, it is still unclear how ATP binding and hydrolysis primes the MR function and regulates repair pathway choice in cells. Here,Methanococcus jannaschii MR-ATPγS-DNA structure reveals that the partly deformed DNA runs symmetrically across central groove between two ATPγS-bound Rad50 nucleotide-binding domains. Duplex DNA cannot access the Mre11 active site in the ATP-free full-length MR complex. ATP hydrolysis drives rotation of the nucleotide-binding domain and induces the DNA melting so that the substrate DNA can access Mre11. Our findings suggest that the ATP hydrolysis-driven conformational changes in both DNA and the MR complex coordinate the melting and endonuclease activity.

  3. Sliding and peeling of histone during chromatin remodelling

    CERN Document Server

    Garai, Ashok; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2011-01-01

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes (CRE) are bio-molecular motors in eukaryotic cells. These are driven by a chemical fuel, namely, adenosine triphosphate (ATP). CREs actively participate in many cellular processes that require accessibility of specific stretches of DNA which are packaged as chromatin. The basic unit of chromatin is a nucleosome where 146 bp $\\sim$ 50 nm of a double stranded DNA (dsDNA) is wrapped around a spool formed by histone proteins. We investigate the mechanism of peeling of the histone spool, and its complete detachment, from the dsDNA by a CRE. Our two-state model of a CRE captures effectively two distinct chemical (or conformational) states in the mechano-chemical cycle of each ATP-dependent CRE. We calculate the mean times for histone detachment. Our predictions on the ATP-dependence of the measurable quantities can be tested by carrying out {\\it in-vitro} experiments.

  4. Multiple aspects of atp-dependent nucleosome translocation by rsc and mi-2 are directed by the underlying DNA sequence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vugt, J. van; Jager, M. de; Murawska, M.; Brehm, A.; Noort, J. van; Logie, C.

    2009-01-01

    Background Chromosome structure, DNA metabolic processes and cell type identity can all be affected by changing the positions of nucleosomes along chromosomal DNA, a reaction that is catalysed by SNF2-type ATP-driven chromatin remodelers. Recently it was suggested that in vivo, more than 50% of the

  5. Maintenance of Xist Imprinting Depends on Chromatin Condensation State and Rnf12 Dosage in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Atsushi; Mitani, Atsushi; Miyashita, Toshiyuki; Sado, Takashi; Umezawa, Akihiro; Akutsu, Hidenori

    2016-01-01

    In female mammals, activation of Xist (X-inactive specific transcript) is essential for establishment of X chromosome inactivation. During early embryonic development in mice, paternal Xist is preferentially expressed whereas maternal Xist (Xm-Xist) is silenced. Unlike autosomal imprinted genes, Xist imprinting for Xm-Xist silencing was erased in cloned or parthenogenetic but not fertilized embryos. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the variable nature of Xm-Xist imprinting is poorly understood. Here, we revealed that Xm-Xist silencing depends on chromatin condensation states at the Xist/Tsix genomic region and on Rnf12 expression levels. In early preimplantation, chromatin decondensation via H3K9me3 loss and histone acetylation gain caused Xm-Xist derepression irrespective of embryo type. Although the presence of the paternal genome during pronuclear formation impeded Xm-Xist derepression, Xm-Xist was robustly derepressed when the maternal genome was decondensed before fertilization. Once Xm-Xist was derepressed by chromatin alterations, the derepression was stably maintained and rescued XmXpΔ lethality, indicating that loss of Xm-Xist imprinting was irreversible. In late preimplantation, Oct4 served as a chromatin opener to create transcriptional permissive states at Xm-Xist/Tsix genomic loci. In parthenogenetic embryos, Rnf12 overdose caused Xm-Xist derepression via Xm-Tsix repression; physiological Rnf12 levels were essential for Xm-Xist silencing maintenance in fertilized embryos. Thus, chromatin condensation and fine-tuning of Rnf12 dosage were crucial for Xist imprint maintenance by silencing Xm-Xist. PMID:27788132

  6. Phosphorylation-Dependent Targeting of Tetrahymena HP1 to Condensed Chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yale, Katerina; Tackett, Alan J; Neuman, Monica; Bulley, Emily; Chait, Brian T; Wiley, Emily

    2016-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved proteins related to heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1), originally described in Drosophila, are well known for their roles in heterochromatin assembly and gene silencing. Targeting of HP1 proteins to specific chromatin locales is mediated, at least in part, by the HP1 chromodomain, which binds to histone H3 methylated at lysine 9 that marks condensed regions of the genome. Mechanisms that regulate HP1 targeting are emerging from studies with yeast and metazoans and point to roles for posttranslational modifications. Here, we report that modifications of an HP1 homolog (Hhp1) in the ciliate model Tetrahymena thermophila correlated with the physiological state and with nuclear differentiation events involving the restructuring of chromatin. Results support the model in which Hhp1 chromodomain binds lysine 27-methylated histone H3, and we show that colocalization with this histone mark depends on phosphorylation at a single Cdc2/Cdk1 kinase site in the "hinge region" adjacent to the chromodomain. These findings help elucidate important functional roles of reversible posttranslational modifications of proteins in the HP1 family, in this case, regulating the targeting of a ciliate HP1 to chromatin regions marked with methylated H3 lysine 27. IMPORTANCE Compacting the genome to various degrees influences processes that use DNA as a template, such as gene transcription and replication. This project was aimed at learning more about the cellular mechanisms that control genome compaction. Posttranslational modifications of proteins involved in genome condensation are emerging as potentially important points of regulation. To help elucidate protein modifications and how they affect the function of condensation proteins, we investigated the phosphorylation of the chromatin protein called Hhp1 in the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila. This is one of the first functional investigations of these modifications of a nonhistone chromatin

  7. Glucocorticoids activate the ATP-ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic system in skeletal muscle during fasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, S. S.; Goldberg, A. L.; Goldberger, A. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are essential for the increase in protein breakdown in skeletal muscle normally seen during fasting. To determine which proteolytic pathway(s) are activated upon fasting, leg muscles from fed and fasted normal rats were incubated under conditions that block or activate different proteolytic systems. After food deprivation (1 day), the nonlysosomal ATP-dependent process increased by 250%, as shown in experiments involving depletion of muscle ATP. Also, the maximal capacity of the lysosomal process increased 60-100%, but no changes occurred in the Ca(2+)-dependent or the residual energy-independent proteolytic processes. In muscles from fasted normal and adrenalectomized (ADX) rats, the protein breakdown sensitive to inhibitors of the lysosomal or Ca(2+)-dependent pathways did not differ. However, the ATP-dependent process was 30% slower in muscles from fasted ADX rats. Administering dexamethasone to these animals or incubating their muscles with dexamethasone reversed this defect. During fasting, when the ATP-dependent process rises, muscles show a two- to threefold increase in levels of ubiquitin (Ub) mRNA. However, muscles of ADX animals failed to show this response. Injecting dexamethasone into the fasted ADX animals increased muscle Ub mRNA within 6 h. Thus glucocorticoids activate the ATP-Ub-dependent proteolytic pathway in fasting apparently by enhancing the expression of components of this system such as Ub.

  8. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling in the DNA-damage response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Lans (Hannes); J.A. Marteijn (Jurgen); W. Vermeulen (Wim)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe integrity of DNA is continuously challenged by metabolism-derived and environmental genotoxic agents that cause a variety of DNA lesions, including base alterations and breaks. DNA damage interferes with vital processes such as transcription and replication, and if not repaired prope

  9. Multiple aspects of ATP-dependent nucleosome translocation by RSC and Mi-2 are directed by the underlying DNA sequence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joke J F A van Vugt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chromosome structure, DNA metabolic processes and cell type identity can all be affected by changing the positions of nucleosomes along chromosomal DNA, a reaction that is catalysed by SNF2-type ATP-driven chromatin remodelers. Recently it was suggested that in vivo, more than 50% of the nucleosome positions can be predicted simply by DNA sequence, especially within promoter regions. This seemingly contrasts with remodeler induced nucleosome mobility. The ability of remodeling enzymes to mobilise nucleosomes over short DNA distances is well documented. However, the nucleosome translocation processivity along DNA remains elusive. Furthermore, it is unknown what determines the initial direction of movement and how new nucleosome positions are adopted. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have used AFM imaging and high resolution PAGE of mononucleosomes on 600 and 2500 bp DNA molecules to analyze ATP-dependent nucleosome repositioning by native and recombinant SNF2-type enzymes. We report that the underlying DNA sequence can control the initial direction of translocation, translocation distance, as well as the new positions adopted by nucleosomes upon enzymatic mobilization. Within a strong nucleosomal positioning sequence both recombinant Drosophila Mi-2 (CHD-type and native RSC from yeast (SWI/SNF-type repositioned the nucleosome at 10 bp intervals, which are intrinsic to the positioning sequence. Furthermore, RSC-catalyzed nucleosome translocation was noticeably more efficient when beyond the influence of this sequence. Interestingly, under limiting ATP conditions RSC preferred to position the nucleosome with 20 bp intervals within the positioning sequence, suggesting that native RSC preferentially translocates nucleosomes with 15 to 25 bp DNA steps. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Nucleosome repositioning thus appears to be influenced by both remodeler intrinsic and DNA sequence specific properties that interplay to define ATPase

  10. Transfer RNA is an essential component of the ubiquitin- and ATP-dependent proteolytic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciechanover, A.; Wolin, S.L.. Steitz, J.A.; Lodish, H.F.

    1985-03-01

    Protein degradation via the nonlysosomal ATP-dependent pathway in rabbit reticulocytes involves a number of components. In the initial event, ubiquitin, an abundant 76-residue polypeptide, becomes covalently linked to the protein substrate in an ATP-requiring reaction. Once marked in this way, the conjugated protein is proteolyzed in a reaction that also requires ATP. Here the authors show that tRNA is another essential component of the system. Ribonucleases strongly inhibit the ubiquitin- and ATP-dependent degradation of /sup 125/I-labeled bovine serum albumin in the reticulocyte system in vitro. RNAs extracted from fractions of the reticulocyte extract or from mouse cells restore proteolytic activity. When the RNA is fractionated by gel electrophoresis, only the tRNA fraction is active in restoring proteolysis. Furthermore, pure mouse tRNA/sup His/, isolated by immunoprecipitation with patient autoimmune sera, restores the proteolytic activity. The possibility that the level of uncharged tRNA in mammalian cells regulates the ubiquitin- and ATP-dependent proteolytic system is discussed.

  11. Cloning, sequencing, and expression of Bacillus subtilis genes involved in ATP-dependent nuclease synthesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Kooistra, J; Venema, G

    1991-01-01

    The genes encoding the subunits of the Bacillus subtilis ATP-dependent nuclease (add genes) have been cloned. The genes were located on an 8.8-kb SalI-SmaI chromosomal DNA fragment. Transformants of a recBCD deletion mutant of Escherichia coli with plasmid pGV1 carrying this DNA fragment showed ATP-dependent nuclease activity. Three open reading frames were identified on the 8.8-kb SalI-SmaI fragment, which could encode three proteins with molecular masses of 135 (AddB protein), 141 (AddA pro...

  12. ATP-dependent transport of vinblastine in vesicles from human multidrug-resistant cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horio, M.; Gottesman, M.M.; Pastan, I. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1988-05-01

    Resistance of human cancer cells to multiple cytotoxic hydrophobic agents (multidrug resistance) is due to overexpression of the MDR1 gene, whose product is the plasma membrane P-glycoprotein. Plasma membrane vesicles partially purified from multidrug-resistant human KB carcinoma cells, but not from drug-sensitive cells, accumulate ({sup 3}H)vinblastine in an ATP-dependent manner. This transport is osmotically sensitive, with an apparent K{sub m} of 38 {mu}M for ATP and of {approx} 2 {mu}M for vinblastine. The nonhydrolyzable analog adenosine 5{prime}-({beta},{gamma}-imido)triphosphate does not substitute for ATP but is a competitive inhibitor of ATP for the transport process. Vanadate, and ATPase inhibitor, is a potent noncompetitive inhibitor of transport. These results indicate that hydrolysis of ATP is probably required for active transport vinblastine. Several other drugs to which multidrug-resistant cell lines are resistant inhibit transport, with relative potencies as follows: vincristine > actinomycin D > daunomycin > colchicine = puromycin. Verapamil and quinidine, which reverse the multidrug-resistance phenotype, are good inhibitors of the transport process. These results confirm that multidrug-resistant cells express an energy-dependent plasma membrane transporter for hydrophobic drugs, and establish a system for the detailed biochemical analysis of this transport process.

  13. Stimulation-dependent release, breakdown, and action of endogenous ATP in mouse hemidiaphragm preparation: the possible role of ATP in neuromuscular transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizi, E S; Nitahara, K; Sato, K; Sperlágh, B

    2000-07-01

    In this study the in vitro mouse phrenic nerve- hemidiaphragm preparation was utilized to study the release and extracellular catabolism of endogenous ATP and its action on the postsynaptic site, i.e. on the contraction force evoked by nerve stimulation. ATP, measured by the luciferin-luciferase assay, was released stimulation-dependently from the mouse hemidiaphragm in response to electrical field stimulation at 10 Hz. Blockade of the Na(+) channel activity by tetrodotoxin inhibited the majority of the release of ATP in response to stimulation, showing that it is related to neuronal activity. The nicotinic receptor antagonists d-tubocurarine, and alpha-bungarotoxin and cooling the bath temperature to 7 degrees C also reduced stimulation-induced ATP outflow, suggesting that nicotinic receptors are responsible for the part of the release of ATP that is released from postsynaptic sites in a carrier-mediated manner. Exogenous ATP (20-500 microM) added to the bath was degraded to ADP and AMP by the action of ectoATPase and ectoATPdiphosphohydrolase; the K(m) and v(max) values of these enzymes were 185.8 microM and 55.16 nmol/min.g respectively. However, the total amount of nucleotides ([ATP+ADP+AMP]) was increased after the addition of ATP, indicating that ATP itself promoted further adenine nucleotide release. Twitch contractions of the rat hemidiaphragm preparation evoked by low frequency electrical stimulation was blocked concentration-dependently by the non-depolarizing muscle relaxants d-tubocurarine and pancuronium. Suramin (100 microM-1 mM) reversed neuromuscular blockade by d-tubocurarine and pancuronium; i.e., it shifted their concentration-response curves to the right Taken together our data, that endogenous ATP is released by stimulation and subsequently catabolized in the hemidiaphragm preparation and that suramin inhibits ecto-ATPase activity could be interpreted as meaning that suramin prolongs the action of endogenous ATP to elicit twitch contraction

  14. A futile cycle, formed between two ATP-dependant -glutamyl cycle enzymes, -glutamyl cysteine synthetase and 5-oxoprolinase: the cause of cellular ATP depletion in nephrotic cystinosis?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Akhilesh Kumar; Anand Kumar Bachhawat

    2010-03-01

    Cystinosis, an inherited disease caused by a defect in the lysosomal cystine transporter (CTNS), is characterized by renal proximal tubular dysfunction. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion appears to be a key event in the pathophysiology of the disease, even though the manner in which ATP depletion occurs is still a puzzle. We present a model that explains how a futile cycle that is generated between two ATP-utilizing enzymes of the -glutamyl cycle leads to ATP depletion. The enzyme -glutamyl cysteine synthetase (-GCS), in the absence of cysteine, forms 5-oxoproline (instead of the normal substrate, -glutamyl cysteine) and the 5-oxoproline is converted into glutamate by the ATP-dependant enzyme, 5-oxoprolinase. Thus, in cysteine-limiting conditions, glutamate is cycled back into glutamate via 5-oxoproline at the cost of two ATP molecules without production of glutathione and is the cause of the decreased levels of glutathione synthesis, as well as the ATP depletion observed in these cells. The model is also compatible with the differences seen in the human patients and the mouse model of cystinosis, where renal failure is not observed.

  15. ATP-dependent mitochondrial porphyrin importer ABCB6 protects against phenylhydrazine toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Dagny L; Lynch, John; Wang, Yao; Fukuda, Yu; Nachagari, Deepa; Du, Guoqing; Sun, Daxi; Fan, Yiping; Tsurkan, Lyudmila; Potter, Philip M; Rehg, Jerold E; Schuetz, John D

    2012-04-13

    Abcb6 is a mammalian mitochondrial ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter that regulates de novo porphyrin synthesis. In previous studies, haploinsufficient (Abcb6(+/-)) embryonic stem cells showed impaired porphyrin synthesis. Unexpectedly, Abcb6(-/-) mice derived from these stem cells appeared phenotypically normal. We hypothesized that other ATP-dependent and/or -independent mechanisms conserve porphyrins. Here, we demonstrate that Abcb6(-/-) mice lack mitochondrial ATP-driven import of coproporphyrin III. Gene expression analysis revealed that loss of Abcb6 results in up-regulation of compensatory porphyrin and iron pathways, associated with elevated protoporphyrin IX (PPIX). Phenylhydrazine-induced stress caused higher mortality in Abcb6(-/-) mice, possibly because of sustained elevation of PPIX and an inability to convert PPIX to heme despite elevated ferrochelatase levels. Therefore, Abcb6 is the sole ATP-dependent porphyrin importer, and loss of Abcb6 produces up-regulation of heme and iron pathways necessary for normal development. However, under extreme demand for porphyrins (e.g. phenylhydrazine stress), these adaptations appear inadequate, which suggests that under these conditions Abcb6 is important for optimal survival.

  16. Phosphatidylserine translocation to the mitochondrion is an ATP-dependent process in permeabilized animal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells were pulse labeled with [3H]serine, and the synthesis of phosphatidyl[3H]ethanolamine from phosphatidyl[3H]serine during the subsequent chase was used as a measure of lipid translocation to the mitochondria. When the CHO-K1 cells were pulse labeled and subsequently permeabilized with 50 μg of saponin per ml, there was no significant turnover of nascent phosphatidyl[3H]serine to form phosphatidyl[3H]ethanolamine during an ensuring chase. Supplementation of the permeabilized cells with 2 mM ATP resulted in significant phosphatidyl[3H]ethanolamine synthesis (83% of that found in intact cells) from phosphatidyl[3H]serine during a subsequent 2-hr chase. Phosphatidyl[3H]ethanolamine synthesis essentially ceased after 2 hr in the permeabilized cells. The translocation-dependent synthesis of phosphatidyl[3H]ethanolamine was a saturable process with respect to ATP concentration in permeabilized cells. The conversion of phosphatidyl[3H]serine to phosphatidyl[3H]ethanolamine did not occur in saponin-treated cultures supplemented with 2 mM AMP, 2 mM 5'-adenylyl imidodiphosphate, or apyrase plus 2 mM ATP. ATP was the most effective nucleotide, but the addition of GTP, CTP, UTP, and ADP also supported the translocation-dependent synthesis of phosphatidyl[3H]ethanolamine albeit to a lesser extent. These data provide evidence that the interorganelle translocation of phosphatidylserine requires ATP and is largely independent of soluble cytosolic proteins

  17. Chromatin remodelling complex RSC promotes base excision repair in chromatin of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaja, Wioletta; Mao, Peng; Smerdon, Michael J

    2014-04-01

    The base excision repair (BER) pathway is a conserved DNA repair system required to maintain genomic integrity and prevent mutagenesis in all eukaryotic cells. Nevertheless, how BER operates in vivo (i.e. in the context of chromatin) is poorly understood. We have investigated the role of an essential ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling (ACR) complex RSC (Remodels the Structure of Chromatin) in BER of intact yeast cells. We show that depletion of STH1, the ATPase subunit of RSC, causes enhanced sensitivity to the DNA alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and results in a substantial inhibition of BER, at the GAL1 locus and in the genome overall. Consistent with this observation, the DNA in chromatin is less accessible to micrococcal nuclease digestion in the absence of RSC. Quantitative PCR results indicate that repair deficiency in STH1 depleted cells is not due to changes in the expression of BER genes. Collectively, our data indicates the RSC complex promotes efficient BER in chromatin. These results provide, for the first time, a link between ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling and BER in living cells.

  18. MalT, the regulatory protein of the Escherichia coli maltose system, is an ATP-dependent transcriptional activator.

    OpenAIRE

    Richet, E; Raibaud, O

    1989-01-01

    We show that MalT, the transcriptional activator of the Escherichia coli maltose regulon, specifically binds ATP and dATP with a high affinity (Kd = 0.4 microM) and exhibits a weak ATPase activity. Using an abortive initiation assay, we further show that activation of open complex formation by MalT depends on the presence of ATP in addition to that of maltotriose, the inducer of the maltose system. Similar experiments in which ATP was replaced by ADP or AMP-PNP, a non-hydrolysable analogue of...

  19. Selective and ATP-dependent translocation of peptides by the homodimeric ATP binding cassette transporter TAP-like (ABCB9)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolters, Justina Clarinda; Abele, Rupert; Tampé, Robert

    2005-01-01

    The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP)-like (TAPL, ABCB9) belongs to the ATP-binding cassette transporter family, which translocates a vast variety of solutes across membranes. The function of this half-size transporter has not yet been determined. Here, we show that TAPL forms a h

  20. CHD chromatin remodelers and the transcription cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murawska, Magdalena; Brehm, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    It is well established that ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers modulate DNA access of transcription factors and RNA polymerases by "opening" or "closing" chromatin structure. However, this view is far too simplistic. Recent findings have demonstrated that these enzymes not only set the stage for the transcription machinery to act but are actively involved at every step of the transcription process. As a consequence, they affect initiation, elongation, termination and RNA processing. In this review we will use the CHD family as a paradigm to illustrate the progress that has been made in revealing these new concepts.

  1. Remodelers organize cellular chromatin by counteracting intrinsic histone-DNA sequence preferences in a class-specific manner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.M. Moshkin (Yuri); G.E. Chalkley (Gillian); T.W. Kan (Tsung Wai); B.A. Reddy (Ashok); Z. Özgür (Zeliha); W.F.J. van IJcken (Wilfred); D.H. Dekkers (Dick); J.A.A. Demmers (Jeroen); A.A. Travers (Andrew); C.P. Verrijzer (Peter)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe nucleosome is the fundamental repeating unit of eukaryotic chromatin. Here, we assessed the interplay between DNA sequence and ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling factors (remodelers) in the nucleosomal organization of a eukaryotic genome. We compared the genome-wide distribution of D

  2. ATP-dependent substrate transport by the ABC transporter MsbA is proton-coupled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Himansha; Velamakanni, Saroj; Deery, Michael J.; Howard, Julie; Wei, Shen L.; van Veen, Hendrik W.

    2016-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporters mediate the transbilayer movement of a vast number of substrates in or out of cells in organisms ranging from bacteria to humans. Current alternating access models for ABC exporters including the multidrug and Lipid A transporter MsbA from Escherichia coli suggest a role for nucleotide as the fundamental source of free energy. These models involve cycling between conformations with inward- and outward-facing substrate-binding sites in response to engagement and hydrolysis of ATP at the nucleotide-binding domains. Here we report that MsbA also utilizes another major energy currency in the cell by coupling substrate transport to a transmembrane electrochemical proton gradient. The dependence of ATP-dependent transport on proton coupling, and the stimulation of MsbA-ATPase by the chemical proton gradient highlight the functional integration of both forms of metabolic energy. These findings introduce ion coupling as a new parameter in the mechanism of this homodimeric ABC transporter. PMID:27499013

  3. Chromatin Architecture of the Pitx2 Locus Requires CTCF- and Pitx2-Dependent Asymmetry that Mirrors Embryonic Gut Laterality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian C. Welsh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Expression of Pitx2 on the left side of the embryo patterns left-right (LR organs including the dorsal mesentery (DM, whose asymmetric cell behavior directs gut looping. Despite the importance of organ laterality, chromatin-level regulation of Pitx2 remains undefined. Here, we show that genes immediately neighboring Pitx2 in chicken and mouse, including a long noncoding RNA (Pitx2 locus-asymmetric regulated RNA or Playrr, are expressed on the right side and repressed by Pitx2. CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing of Playrr, 3D fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH, and variations of chromatin conformation capture (3C demonstrate that mutual antagonism between Pitx2 and Playrr is coordinated by asymmetric chromatin interactions dependent on Pitx2 and CTCF. We demonstrate that transcriptional and morphological asymmetries driving gut looping are mirrored by chromatin architectural asymmetries at the Pitx2 locus. We propose a model whereby Pitx2 auto-regulation directs chromatin topology to coordinate LR transcription of this locus essential for LR organogenesis.

  4. Functional Insights into Chromatin Remodelling from Studies on CHARGE Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basson, M. Albert; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny

    2015-01-01

    CHARGE syndrome is a rare genetic syndrome characterised by a unique combination of multiple organ anomalies. Dominant loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 7 (CHD7), which is an ATP-dependent chromatin remodeller, have been identified as the cause

  5. Data on force-dependent structural changes of chromatin fibers measured with magnetic tweezers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan-Tso Chien

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The compaction of chromatin fibers regulates the accessibility of embedded DNA, highly associated with transcriptional activities [1]. Single molecule force spectroscopy has revealed the great details of the structural changes of chromatin fibers in the presence of external exerted force [2–7]. However, most of the studies focus on a specific force regime [2,3,8,9]. The data here show force-extension (FE traces of chromatin fibers as measured with magnetic tweezers, covering the force regime from 0 pN to 27 pN. Those traces provide information for further studies at varied force regimes.

  6. Dietary protein deficiency reduces lysosomal and nonlysosomal ATP-dependent proteolysis in muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawa, N. E. Jr; Kettelhut, I. C.; Goldberg, A. L.

    1992-01-01

    When rats are fed a protein deficient (PD) diet for 7 days, rates of proteolysis in skeletal muscle decrease by 40-50% (N. E. Tawa, Jr., and A. L. Goldberg. Am. J. Physiol. 263 (Endocrinol. Metab. 26): E317-325, 1992). To identify the underlying biochemical adaptations, we measured different proteolytic processes in incubated muscles. The capacity for intralysosomal proteolysis, as shown by sensitivity to methylamine or lysosomal protease inhibitors, fell 55-75% in muscles from PD rats. Furthermore, extracts of muscles of PD rats showed 30-70% lower activity of many lysosomal proteases, including cathepsins B, H, and C, and carboxypeptidases A and C, as well as other lysosomal hydrolases. The fall in cathepsin B and proteolysis was evident by 3 days on the PD diet, and both returned to control levels 3 days after refeeding of the normal diet. In muscles maintained under optimal conditions, 80-90% of protein breakdown occurs by nonlysosomal pathways. In muscles of PD rats, this ATP-dependent process was also 40-60% slower. Even though overall proteolysis decreased in muscles of PD rats, their capacity for Ca(2+)-dependent proteolysis increased (by 66%), as did the activity of the calpains (+150-250%). Thus the lysosomal and the ATP-dependent processes decrease coordinately and contribute to the fall in muscle proteolysis in PD animals.

  7. Regulation of ATP-dependent P-(Ser)-HPr formation in Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus salivarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevenot, T; Brochu, D; Vadeboncoeur, C; Hamilton, I R

    1995-01-01

    Sugar transport via the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) phosphotransferase system involves PEP-dependent phosphorylation of the general phosphotransferase system protein, HPr, at histidine 15. However, gram-positive bacteria can also carry out ATP-dependent phosphorylation of HPr at serine 46 by means of (Ser)HPr kinase. In this study, we demonstrate that (Ser)HPr kinase in crude preparations of Streptococcus mutans Ingbritt and Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 25975 is membrane associated, with pH optima of 7.0 and 7.5, respectively. The latter organism possessed 7- to 27-fold-higher activity than S. mutans NCTC 10449, GS-5, and Ingbritt strains. The enzyme in S. salivarius was activated by fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP) twofold with 0.05 mM ATP, but this intermediate was slightly inhibitory with 1.0 mM ATP at FBP concentrations up to 10 mM. Similar inhibition was observed with the enzyme from S. mutans Ingbritt. A variety of other glycolytic intermediates had no effect on kinase activity under these conditions. The activity and regulation of (Ser)HPr kinase were assessed in vivo by monitoring P-(Ser)-HPr formation in steady-state cells of S. mutans Ingbritt grown in continuous culture with limiting glucose (10 and 50 mM) and with excess glucose (100 and 200 mM). All four forms of HPr [free HPr, P approximately (His)-HPr, P-(Ser)-HPr, and P approximately (His)-P-(Ser)-HPr] could be detected in the cells; however, significant differences in the intracellular levels of the forms were apparent during growth at different glucose concentrations. The total HPr pool increased with increasing concentrations of glucose in the medium, with significant increases in the P-(Ser)-HPr and P approximately HHis)-P-(Ser)-HPr concentrations. For example, while total PEP-dependent phosphorylation [P approximately(His)-HPr plus P approximately (His)-P-(Ser)-HPr] varied only from 21.5 to 52.5 microgram mg of cell protein (-1) in cells grown at the four glucose concentrations, the total ATP-dependent

  8. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation links the chromatin remodeler SMARCA5/SNF2H to RNF168-dependent DNA damage signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Smeenk (Godelieve); W.W. Wiegant (Wouter); J.A. Marteijn (Jurgen); M.S. Luijsterburg (Martijn); N. Sroczynski (Nicholas); T. Costelloe (Thomas); R. Romeijn (Ron); A. Pastink (Albert); N. Mailand (Niels); W. Vermeulen (Wim); H. van Attikum (Haico)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIonizing radiation (IR)-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) arising in native chromatin elicit an RNF8/RNF168-dependent ubiquitylation response, which triggers the recruitment of various repair factors. Precisely how this response is regulated in the context of chromatin remains larg

  9. Functions of the Proteasome on Chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Tyler S.; Tansey, William P.

    2014-01-01

    The proteasome is a large self-compartmentalized protease complex that recognizes, unfolds, and destroys ubiquitylated substrates. Proteasome activities are required for a host of cellular functions, and it has become clear in recent years that one set of critical actions of the proteasome occur on chromatin. In this review, we discuss some of the ways in which proteasomes directly regulate the structure and function of chromatin and chromatin regulatory proteins, and how this influences gene transcription. We discuss lingering controversies in the field, the relative importance of proteolytic versus non-proteolytic proteasome activities in this process, and highlight areas that require further investigation. Our intention is to show that proteasomes are involved in major steps controlling the expression of the genetic information, that proteasomes use both proteolytic mechanisms and ATP-dependent protein remodeling to accomplish this task, and that much is yet to be learned about the full spectrum of ways that proteasomes influence the genome. PMID:25422899

  10. Functions of the Proteasome on Chromatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler S. McCann

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The proteasome is a large self-compartmentalized protease complex that recognizes, unfolds, and destroys ubiquitylated substrates. Proteasome activities are required for a host of cellular functions, and it has become clear in recent years that one set of critical actions of the proteasome occur on chromatin. In this review, we discuss some of the ways in which proteasomes directly regulate the structure and function of chromatin and chromatin regulatory proteins, and how this influences gene transcription. We discuss lingering controversies in the field, the relative importance of proteolytic versus non-proteolytic proteasome activities in this process, and highlight areas that require further investigation. Our intention is to show that proteasomes are involved in major steps controlling the expression of the genetic information, that proteasomes use both proteolytic mechanisms and ATP-dependent protein remodeling to accomplish this task, and that much is yet to be learned about the full spectrum of ways that proteasomes influence the genome.

  11. Protection against Mitochondrial and Metal Toxicity Depends on Functional Lipid Binding Sites in ATP13A2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun Martin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The late endo-/lysosomal P-type ATPase ATP13A2 (PARK9 is implicated in Parkinson’s disease (PD and Kufor-Rakeb syndrome, early-onset atypical Parkinsonism. ATP13A2 interacts at the N-terminus with the signaling lipids phosphatidic acid (PA and phosphatidylinositol (3,5 bisphosphate (PI(3,5P2, which modulate ATP13A2 activity under cellular stress conditions. Here, we analyzed stable human SHSY5Y cell lines overexpressing wild-type (WT or ATP13A2 mutants in which three N-terminal lipid binding sites (LBS1–3 were mutated. We explored the regulatory role of LBS1–3 in the cellular protection by ATP13A2 against mitochondrial stress induced by rotenone and found that the LBS2-3 mutants displayed an abrogated protective effect. Moreover, in contrast to WT, the LBS2 and LBS3 mutants responded poorly to pharmacological inhibition of, respectively, PI(3,5P2 and PA formation. We further demonstrate that PA and PI(3,5P2 are also required for the ATP13A2-mediated protection against the toxic metals Mn2+, Zn2+, and Fe3+, suggesting a general lipid-dependent activation mechanism of ATP13A2 in various PD-related stress conditions. Our results indicate that the ATP13A2-mediated protection requires binding of PI(3,5P2 to LBS2 and PA to LBS3. Thus, targeting the N-terminal lipid binding sites of ATP13A2 might offer a therapeutic approach to reduce cellular toxicity of various PD insults including mitochondrial stress.

  12. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation links the chromatin remodeler SMARCA5/SNF2H to RNF168-dependent DNA damage signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smeenk, G.; Wiegant, W.W.; Luijsterburg, M.S.;

    2013-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) arising in native chromatin elicit an RNF8/RNF168-dependent ubiquitylation response, which triggers the recruitment of various repair factors. Precisely how this response is regulated in the context of chromatin remains largely...... unexplored. Here, we show that SMARCA5/SNF2H, the catalytic subunit of ISWI chromatin remodeling complexes, is recruited to DSBs in a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1)-dependent manner. Remarkably, PARP activity, although dispensable for the efficient spreading of νH2AX into damaged chromatin......, selectively promotes spreading of SMARCA5, the E3 ubiquitin ligase RNF168, ubiquitin conjugates and the ubiquitin-binding factors RAD18 and the RAP80-BRCA1 complex throughout DSB-flanking chromatin. This suggests that PARP regulates the spatial organization of the RNF168-driven ubiquitin response to DNA...

  13. A conserved residue cluster that governs kinetics of ATP-dependent gating of Kir6.2 potassium channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Roger S; Wright, Jordan; Pless, Stephan Alexander;

    2015-01-01

    that these residues play a role in lowering the transition state energy barrier between open and closed channel states. Using unnatural amino acid incorporation, we demonstrate the requirement for a planar amino acid at Kir6.2 position 68 for normal channel gating, potentially necessary to localize the ε-amine of Lys......ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels are heteromultimeric complexes of an inwardly-rectifying Kir channel (Kir6.x) and sulfonylurea receptors (SUR). Their regulation by intracellular ATP and ADP generates electrical signals in response to changes in cellular metabolism. We investigated channel...... elements that control the kinetics of ATP-dependent regulation of KATP (Kir6.2 + SUR1) channels using rapid concentration jumps. WT Kir6.2 channels re-open after rapid washout of ATP with a time constant of approximately 60 ms. Extending similar kinetic measurements to numerous mutants revealed fairly...

  14. ATP-dependent recruitment of export factor Aly/REF onto intronless mRNAs by RNA helicase UAP56.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Ichiro; Ohno, Mutsuhito

    2008-01-01

    Loading of export factors onto mRNAs is a key step in gene expression. In vertebrates, splicing plays a role in this process. Specific protein complexes, exon junction complex and transcription/export complex, are loaded onto mRNAs in a splicing-dependent manner, and adaptor proteins such as Aly/REF in the complexes in turn recruit mRNA exporter TAP-p15 onto the RNA. By contrast, how export factors are recruited onto intronless mRNAs is largely unknown. We previously showed that Aly/REF is preferentially associated with intronless mRNAs in the nucleus. Here we show that Aly/REF could preferentially bind intronless mRNAs in vitro and that this binding was stimulated by RNA helicase UAP56 in an ATP-dependent manner. Consistently, an ATP binding-deficient UAP56 mutant specifically inhibited mRNA export in Xenopus oocytes. Interestingly, ATP activated the RNA binding activity of UAP56 itself. ATP-bound UAP56 therefore bound to both RNA and Aly/REF, and as a result ATPase activity of UAP56 was cooperatively stimulated. These results are consistent with a model in which ATP-bound UAP56 chaperones Aly/REF onto RNA, ATP is then hydrolyzed, and UAP56 dissociates from RNA for the next round of Aly/REF recruitment. Our finding provides a mechanistic insight into how export factors are recruited onto mRNAs.

  15. Transcriptional activation by the thyroid hormone receptor through ligand-dependent receptor recruitment and chromatin remodelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Lars; Waterfall, Joshua J; Kim, Dong Wook;

    2015-01-01

    A bimodal switch model is widely used to describe transcriptional regulation by the thyroid hormone receptor (TR). In this model, the unliganded TR forms stable, chromatin-bound complexes with transcriptional co-repressors to repress transcription. Binding of hormone dissociates co-repressors and...

  16. Serum albumin promotes ATP-binding cassette transporter-dependent sterol uptake in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marek, Magdalena; Silvestro, Daniele; Fredslund, Maria D.;

    2014-01-01

    Sterol uptake in fungi is a multistep process that involves interaction between external sterols and the cell wall, incorporation of sterol molecules into the plasma membrane, and subsequent integration into intracellular membranes for turnover. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters have been...... implicated in sterol uptake, but key features of their activity remain to be elucidated. Here, we apply fluorescent cholesterol (NBD-cholesterol) to monitor sterol uptake under anaerobic and aerobic conditions in two fungal species, Candida glabrata (Cg) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc). We found...... that in both fungal species, ABC transporter-dependent uptake of cholesterol under anaerobic conditions and in mutants lacking HEM1 gene is promoted in the presence of the serum protein albumin that is able to bind the sterol molecule. Furthermore, the C. glabrata ABC transporter CgAus1p expressed in S...

  17. Dorsal horn neurons release extracellular ATP in a VNUT-dependent manner that underlies neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Takahiro; Ozono, Yui; Mikuriya, Satsuki; Kohro, Yuta; Tozaki-Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Iwatsuki, Ken; Uneyama, Hisayuki; Ichikawa, Reiko; Salter, Michael W; Tsuda, Makoto; Inoue, Kazuhide

    2016-01-01

    Activation of purinergic receptors in the spinal cord by extracellular ATP is essential for neuropathic hypersensitivity after peripheral nerve injury (PNI). However, the cell type responsible for releasing ATP within the spinal cord after PNI is unknown. Here we show that PNI increases expression of vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT) in the spinal cord. Extracellular ATP content ([ATP]e) within the spinal cord was increased after PNI, and this increase was suppressed by exocytotic inhibitors. Mice lacking VNUT did not show PNI-induced increase in [ATP]e and had attenuated hypersensitivity. These phenotypes were recapitulated in mice with specific deletion of VNUT in spinal dorsal horn (SDH) neurons, but not in mice lacking VNUT in primary sensory neurons, microglia or astrocytes. Conversely, ectopic VNUT expression in SDH neurons of VNUT-deficient mice restored PNI-induced increase in [ATP]e and pain. Thus, VNUT is necessary for exocytotic ATP release from SDH neurons which contributes to neuropathic pain. PMID:27515581

  18. Prenucleosomes and Active Chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuong, Mai T.; Fei, Jia; Ishii, Haruhiko; Kadonaga, James T.

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin consists of nucleosomes as well as nonnucleosomal histone-containing particles. Here we describe the prenucleosome, which is a stable conformational isomer of the nucleosome that associates with ~80 bp DNA. Prenucleosomes are formed rapidly upon the deposition of histones onto DNA and can be converted into canonical nucleosomes by an ATP-driven chromatin assembly factor such as ACF. Different lines of evidence reveal that there are prenucleosome-sized DNA-containing particles with histones in the upstream region of active promoters. Moreover, p300 acetylates histone H3K56 in prenucleosomes but not in nucleosomes, and H3K56 acetylation is found at active promoters and enhancers. These findings therefore suggest that there may be prenucleosomes or prenucleosome-like particles in the upstream region of active promoters. More generally, we postulate that prenucleosomes or prenucleosome-like particles are present at dynamic chromatin, whereas canonical nucleosomes are at static chromatin. PMID:26767995

  19. Structural studies on Helicobacter pylori ATP-dependent protease, FtsH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystal structures of the Helicobacter pylori FtsH ATPase domain in the nucleotide-free state and complexed with ADP have been determined. The ATP-dependent protease, FtsH, degrades misassembled membrane proteins for quality control like SecY, subunit a of FoF1-ATPase, and YccA, and digests short-lived soluble proteins in order to control their cellular regulation, including σ32, LpxC and λcII. The FtsH protein has an N-terminal transmembrane segment and a large cytosolic region that consists of two domains, an ATPase and a protease domain. To provide a structural basis for the nucleotide-dependent domain motions and a better understanding of substrate translocation, the crystal structures of the Helicobacter pylori (Hp) FtsH ATPase domain in the nucleotide-free state and complexed with ADP, were determined. Two different structures of HpFtsH ATPase were observed, with the nucleotide-free state in an asymmetric unit, and these structures reveal the new forms and show other conformational differences between the nucleotide-free and ADP-bound state compared with previous structures. In particular, one HpFtsH Apo structure has a considerable rotation difference compared with the HpFtsH ADP complex, and this large conformational change reveals that FtsH may have the mechanical force needed for substrate translocation

  20. Structural studies on Helicobacter pylori ATP-dependent protease, FtsH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Hyun; Kang, Gil Bu; Song, Hye-Eun; Park, Sang Jin; Bea, Man-Ho; Eom, Soo Hyun, E-mail: eom@gist.ac.kr [Department of Life Science, Cell Dynamics Research Center, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-01

    The crystal structures of the Helicobacter pylori FtsH ATPase domain in the nucleotide-free state and complexed with ADP have been determined. The ATP-dependent protease, FtsH, degrades misassembled membrane proteins for quality control like SecY, subunit a of FoF1-ATPase, and YccA, and digests short-lived soluble proteins in order to control their cellular regulation, including σ32, LpxC and λcII. The FtsH protein has an N-terminal transmembrane segment and a large cytosolic region that consists of two domains, an ATPase and a protease domain. To provide a structural basis for the nucleotide-dependent domain motions and a better understanding of substrate translocation, the crystal structures of the Helicobacter pylori (Hp) FtsH ATPase domain in the nucleotide-free state and complexed with ADP, were determined. Two different structures of HpFtsH ATPase were observed, with the nucleotide-free state in an asymmetric unit, and these structures reveal the new forms and show other conformational differences between the nucleotide-free and ADP-bound state compared with previous structures. In particular, one HpFtsH Apo structure has a considerable rotation difference compared with the HpFtsH ADP complex, and this large conformational change reveals that FtsH may have the mechanical force needed for substrate translocation.

  1. Serum albumin promotes ATP-binding cassette transporter-dependent sterol uptake in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Magdalena; Silvestro, Daniele; Fredslund, Maria D; Andersen, Tonni G; Pomorski, Thomas G

    2014-12-01

    Sterol uptake in fungi is a multistep process that involves interaction between external sterols and the cell wall, incorporation of sterol molecules into the plasma membrane, and subsequent integration into intracellular membranes for turnover. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters have been implicated in sterol uptake, but key features of their activity remain to be elucidated. Here, we apply fluorescent cholesterol (NBD-cholesterol) to monitor sterol uptake under anaerobic and aerobic conditions in two fungal species, Candida glabrata (Cg) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc). We found that in both fungal species, ABC transporter-dependent uptake of cholesterol under anaerobic conditions and in mutants lacking HEM1 gene is promoted in the presence of the serum protein albumin that is able to bind the sterol molecule. Furthermore, the C. glabrata ABC transporter CgAus1p expressed in S. cerevisiae requires the presence of serum or albumin for efficient cholesterol uptake. These results suggest that albumin can serve as sterol donor in ABC transporter-dependent sterol uptake, a process potentially important for growth of C. glabrata inside infected humans.

  2. Time dependence of X gene reactivation induced by 5-azacytidine: Possible progressive restructuring of chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the theoretical mechanism of DNA demethylation by 5-azacytidine, the complete demethylation of one site will require two cell divisions. If re-expression is directly related to demethylation, a maximal re-expression is expected after two cell divisions. In a hamster x human hybrid cell line containing an inactive human X chromosome treated by 5-azacytidine, the authors show that HPRT reactivation frequency is increased more than 10-fold when cells are allowed to divide 14 times before the selection for the HPRT reactivants. They suggest that the delay corresponds to changes in chromatin conformation

  3. Time dependence of X gene reactivation induced by 5-azacytidine: Possible progressive restructuring of chromatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homman, N.; Heuertz, S.; Hors-Cayla, M.C. (INSERM U 12, Paris (France))

    1987-10-01

    According to the theoretical mechanism of DNA demethylation by 5-azacytidine, the complete demethylation of one site will require two cell divisions. If re-expression is directly related to demethylation, a maximal re-expression is expected after two cell divisions. In a hamster {times} human hybrid cell line containing an inactive human X chromosome treated by 5-azacytidine, the authors show that HPRT reactivation frequency is increased more than 10-fold when cells are allowed to divide 14 times before the selection for the HPRT reactivants. They suggest that the delay corresponds to changes in chromatin conformation.

  4. Properties of mutants of haemophilus influenzae deficient in ATP-dependent deoxyribonuclease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setlow, J.K.

    1976-01-01

    Eight isogenic Haemophilus influenzae strains whose extracts lack ATP-dependent deoxyribonuclease activity (Add/sup -/ mutants) form three complementation and genetic linkage groups. Since there are known to be three subunits of the enzyme, these data suggest that each of the three genes specifies a different subunit. Gel electrophoresis of partially purified mutant extracts indicates that the smallest subunit is missing in one of the groups but is present in all the other mutants. The mutants are more sensitive to a variety of chemical agents than the wild type. The most sensitive mutants lack the ATPase activity associated with the enzyme. These strains exhibit aberrant incorporation of tritiated thymidine, which starts up more rapidly and shuts off sooner than in the wild type. An extracellular compound is responsible for most of this effect, in that wild type cells put into medium in which Add/sup -/ cells have been growing show a similar aberrant incorporation. The effect of these media can be mimicked by cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP, although millimolar concentrations are required. It is postulated that the Add/sup -/ mutants are more permeable to many substances than the wild type, partly because of the extracellular compound usually surrounding them, and the increased permeability might be responsible for the mutants' nonviability.

  5. ATP-dependent removal of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeger, Lisa K; Margot, Nicolas A; Miller, Michael D

    2002-07-01

    Removal of nucleoside chain terminator inhibitors mediated by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) reverse transcriptase (RT) using ATP as an acceptor molecule has been proposed as a novel mechanism of HIV resistance. Recombinant wild-type and mutant HIV type 1 (HIV-1) RT enzymes with thymidine analog resistance mutations D67N, K70R, and T215Y were analyzed for their ability to remove eight nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors in the presence of physiological concentrations of ATP. The order for the rate of removal of the eight inhibitors by the mutant RT enzyme was zidovudine (AZT) > stavudine (d4T) > zalcitabine (ddC) > abacavir > amdoxovir (DAPD) > lamivudine (3TC) > didanosine (ddI) > tenofovir. Thymidine analogs AZT and d4T were the most significantly removed by the mutant enzyme, suggesting that removal of these inhibitors by the ATP-dependent removal mechanism contributes to the AZT and d4T resistance observed in patients with HIV expressing thymidine analog resistance mutations. ATP-dependent removal of tenofovir was 22- to 35-fold less efficient than removal of d4T and AZT, respectively. The addition of ATP and the next complementary deoxynucleoside triphosphate caused a reduction of ATP-mediated removal of d4T, ddC, and DAPD, while AZT and abacavir removal was unaffected. The reduction of d4T, ddC, and DAPD removal in the presence of the deoxynucleoside triphosphate could explain the minor changes in susceptibility to these drugs observed in conventional in vitro phenotypic assays using cells that have higher deoxynucleoside triphosphate pools. The minimal removal of abacavir, ddC, DAPD, 3TC, ddI, and tenofovir is consistent with the minor changes in susceptibility to these drugs observed for HIV mutants with thymidine analog resistance mutations. PMID:12069972

  6. Functional expression of a heterologous nickel-dependent, ATP-independent urease in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milne, N.; Luttik, M.A.H.; Cueto Rojas, H.F.; Wahl, A.; Van Maris, A.J.A.; Pronk, J.T.; Daran, J.G.

    2015-01-01

    In microbial processes for production of proteins, biomass and nitrogen-containing commodity chemicals, ATP requirements for nitrogen assimilation affect product yields on the energy producing substrate. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a current host for heterologous protein production and potential pl

  7. Reprogramming chromatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehrensberger, Andreas Hasso; Svejstrup, Jesper Qualmann

    2012-01-01

    attributed to high kinetic barriers that affect all cells equally and can only be overcome by rare stochastic events. The barriers to reprogramming are likely to involve transformations of chromatin state because (i) inhibitors of chromatin-modifying enzymes can enhance the efficiency of reprogramming...... and (ii) knockdown or knock-out of chromatin-modifying enzymes can lower the efficiency of reprogramming. Here, we review the relationship between chromatin state transformations (chromatin reprogramming) and cellular reprogramming, with an emphasis on transcription factors, chromatin remodeling factors...

  8. Time-dependent FRET with single enzymes: domain motions and catalysis in H(+)-ATP synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienert, Roland; Zimmermann, Boris; Rombach-Riegraf, Verena; Gräber, Peter

    2011-02-25

    H(+)-ATP synthases are molecular machines which couple transmembrane proton transport with ATP synthesis from ADP and inorganic phosphate by a rotational mechanism. Single-pair fluorescence resonance energy transfer (spFRET) in single molecules is a powerful tool to analyse conformational changes. It is used to investigate subunit movements in H(+)-ATP synthases from E. coli (EF(0)F(1)) and from spinach chloroplasts (CF(0)F(1)) during catalysis. The enzymes are incorporated into liposome membranes, and this allows the generation of a transmembrane pH difference, which is necessary for ATP synthesis. After labelling of appropriate sites on different subunits with fluorescence donor and acceptor, the kinetics of spFRET are measured. Analysis of the E(FRET) traces reveals rotational movement of the ε and γ subunits in 120° steps with opposite directions during ATP synthesis and ATP hydrolysis. The stepped movement is characterized by a 120° step faster than 1 ms followed by a rest period with an average dwell time of 15 ms, which is in accordance with the turnover time of the enzyme. In addition to the three conformational states during catalysis, also an inactive conformation is found, which is observed after catalysis.

  9. The transcriptional coactivator SAYP is a trithorax group signature subunit of the PBAP chromatin remodeling complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.E. Chalkley (Gillian); Y.M. Moshkin (Yuri); K. Langenberg (Karin); K. Bezstarosti (Karel); A. Blastyak (Andras); H. Gyurkovics (Henrik); J.A.A. Demmers (Jeroen); C.P. Verrijzer (Peter)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractSWI/SNF ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes (remodelers) perform critical functions in eukaryotic gene expression control. BAP and PBAP are the fly representatives of the two evolutionarily conserved major subclasses of SWI/SNF remodelers. Both complexes share seven core subunit

  10. Towards a multiscale description of microvascular flow regulation: O2-dependent release of ATP from human erythrocytes and the distribution of ATP in capillary networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eGoldman

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Integration of the numerous mechanisms that have been suggested to contribute to optimization of O2 supply to meet O2 need in skeletal muscle requires a systems biology approach which permits quantification of these physiological processes over a wide range of length scales. Here we describe two individual computational models based on in vivo and in vitro studies which, when incorporated into a single robust multiscale model, will provide information on the role of erythrocyte-released ATP in perfusion distribution in skeletal muscle under both physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Healthy human erythrocytes exposed to low O2 tension release ATP via a well characterized signaling pathway requiring activation of the G-protein, Gi, and adenylyl cyclase leading to increases in cAMP. This cAMP then activates PKA and subsequently CFTR culminating in ATP release via pannexin 1. A critical control point in this pathway is the level of cAMP which is regulated by pathway-specific phosphodiesterases. Using time constants (~100ms that are consistent with measured erythrocyte ATP release, we have constructed a dynamic model of this pathway. The model predicts levels of ATP release consistent with measurements obtained over a wide range of hemoglobin O2 saturations (sO2. The model further predicts how insulin, at concentrations found in prediabetes, enhances the activity of PDE3 and reduces intracellular cAMP levels leading to decreased low O2-induced ATP release from erythrocytes. The second model, which couples O2 and ATP transport in capillary networks, shows how intravascular ATP and the resulting conducted vasodilation are affected by local sO2, convection and ATP degradation. This model also predicts network-level effects of decreased ATP release resulting from elevated insulin levels. Taken together, these models lay the groundwork for investigating the systems biology of the regulation of microvascular perfusion distribution by

  11. CTCF-dependent chromatin bias constitutes transient epigenetic memory of the mother at the H19-Igf2 imprinting control region in prospermatogonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Hoon Lee

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Genomic imprints-parental allele-specific DNA methylation marks at the differentially methylated regions (DMRs of imprinted genes-are erased and reestablished in germ cells according to the individual's sex. Imprint establishment at paternally methylated germ line DMRs occurs in fetal male germ cells. In prospermatogonia, the two unmethylated alleles exhibit different rates of de novo methylation at the H19/Igf2 imprinting control region (ICR depending on parental origin. We investigated the nature of this epigenetic memory using bisulfite sequencing and allele-specific ChIP-SNuPE assays. We found that the chromatin composition in fetal germ cells was biased at the ICR between the two alleles with the maternally inherited allele exhibiting more H3K4me3 and less H3K9me3 than the paternally inherited allele. We determined genetically that the chromatin bias, and also the delayed methylation establishment in the maternal allele, depended on functional CTCF insulator binding sites in the ICR. Our data suggest that, in primordial germ cells, maternally inherited allele-specific CTCF binding sets up allele-specific chromatin differences at the ICR. The erasure of these allele-specific chromatin marks is not complete before the process of de novo methylation imprint establishment begins. CTCF-dependent allele-specific chromatin composition imposes a maternal allele-specific delay on de novo methylation imprint establishment at the H19/Igf2 ICR in prospermatogonia.

  12. Identification of ATP-Dependent Phosphofructokinase as a Regulatory Step in the Glycolytic Pathway of the Actinomycete Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alves, A.M.C.R.; Euverink, G.J.W.; Bibb, M.J.; Dijkhuizen, L.

    1997-01-01

    The ATP-dependent phosphofructokinase (ATP-PFK) of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) was purified to homogeneity (1,600-fold) and characterized (110 kDa, with a single type of subunit of 40 kDa); it is allosterically inhibited by phosphoenolpyruvate. Cloning of the pfk gene of S. coelicolor A3(2) and an

  13. The ATP-dependent remodeler RSC transfers histone dimers and octamers through the rapid formation of an unstable encounter intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Claire E; Narlikar, Geeta J

    2010-11-16

    RSC, an essential chromatin remodeling complex in budding yeast, is involved in a variety of biological processes including transcription, recombination, repair, and replication. How RSC participates in such diverse processes is not fully understood. In vitro, RSC uses ATP to carry out several seemingly distinct reactions: it repositions nucleosomes, transfers H2A/H2B dimers between nucleosomes, and transfers histone octamers between pieces of DNA. This raises the intriguing mechanistic question of how this molecular machine can use a single ATPase subunit to create these varied products. Here, we use a FRET-based approach to kinetically order the products of the RSC reaction. Surprisingly, transfer of H2A/H2B dimers and histone octamers is initiated on a time scale of seconds when assayed by FRET, but formation of stable nucleosomal products occurs on a time scale of minutes when assayed by native gel. These results suggest a model in which RSC action rapidly generates an unstable encounter intermediate that contains the two exchange substrates in close proximity. This intermediate then collapses more slowly to form the stable transfer products seen on native gels. The rapid, biologically relevant time scale on which the transfer products are generated implies that such products can play key roles in vivo.

  14. Minor groove binder distamycin remodels chromatin but inhibits transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parijat Majumder

    Full Text Available The condensed structure of chromatin limits access of cellular machinery towards template DNA. This in turn represses essential processes like transcription, replication, repair and recombination. The repression is alleviated by a variety of energy dependent processes, collectively known as "chromatin remodeling". In a eukaryotic cell, a fine balance between condensed and de-condensed states of chromatin helps to maintain an optimum level of gene expression. DNA binding small molecules have the potential to perturb such equilibrium. We present herein the study of an oligopeptide antibiotic distamycin, which binds to the minor groove of B-DNA. Chromatin mobility assays and circular dichroism spectroscopy have been employed to study the effect of distamycin on chromatosomes, isolated from the liver of Sprague-Dawley rats. Our results show that distamycin is capable of remodeling both chromatosomes and reconstituted nucleosomes, and the remodeling takes place in an ATP-independent manner. Binding of distamycin to the linker and nucleosomal DNA culminates in eviction of the linker histone and the formation of a population of off-centered nucleosomes. This hints at a possible corkscrew type motion of the DNA with respect to the histone octamer. Our results indicate that distamycin in spite of remodeling chromatin, inhibits transcription from both DNA and chromatin templates. Therefore, the DNA that is made accessible due to remodeling is either structurally incompetent for transcription, or bound distamycin poses a roadblock for the transcription machinery to advance.

  15. ATP-dependent proteases of bacteria: recognition logic and operating principles

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, Tania A.; Sauer, Robert T.

    2006-01-01

    ATP-powered AAA+ proteases degrade specific proteins in intracellular environments occupied by thousands of different proteins. These proteases operate as powerful molecular machines that unfold stable native proteins before degradation. Understanding how these enzymes choose the ‘right’ protein substrates at the ‘right’ time is key to understanding their biological function. Recently, proteomic approaches have identified numerous substrates for some bacterial enzymes and the sequence motifs ...

  16. The RSC and INO80 chromatin-remodeling complexes in DNA double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Anna L; Downs, Jessica A

    2012-01-01

    In eukaryotes, DNA is packaged into chromatin and is therefore relatively inaccessible to DNA repair enzymes. In order to perform efficient DNA repair, ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling enzymes are required to alter the chromatin structure near the site of damage to facilitate processing and allow access to repair enzymes. Two of the best-studied remodeling complexes involved in repair are RSC (Remodels the Structure of Chromatin) and INO80 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which are both conserved in higher eukaryotes. RSC is very rapidly recruited to breaks and mobilizes nucleosomes to promote phosphorylation of H2A S129 and resection. INO80 enrichment at a break occurs later and is dependent on phospho-S129 H2A. INO80 activity at the break site also facilitates resection. Consequently, both homologous recombination and nonhomologous end-joining are defective in rsc mutants, while subsets of these repair pathways are affected in ino80 mutants.

  17. Cell deformation at the air-liquid interface induces Ca2+-dependent ATP release from lung epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsingh, Ronaldo; Grygorczyk, Alexandra; Solecki, Anna; Cherkaoui, Lalla Siham; Berthiaume, Yves; Grygorczyk, Ryszard

    2011-04-01

    Extracellular nucleotides regulate mucociliary clearance in the airways and surfactant secretion in alveoli. Their release is exquisitely mechanosensitive and may be induced by stretch as well as airflow shear stress acting on lung epithelia. We hypothesized that, in addition, tension forces at the air-liquid interface (ALI) may contribute to mechanosensitive ATP release in the lungs. Local depletion of airway surface liquid, mucins, and surfactants, which normally protect epithelial surfaces, facilitate such release and trigger compensatory mucin and fluid secretion processes. In this study, human bronchial epithelial 16HBE14o(-) and alveolar A549 cells were subjected to tension forces at the ALI by passing an air bubble over the cell monolayer in a flow-through chamber, or by air exposure while tilting the cell culture dish. Such stimulation induced significant ATP release not involving cell lysis, as verified by ethidium bromide staining. Confocal fluorescence microscopy disclosed reversible cell deformation in the monolayer part in contact with the ALI. Fura 2 fluorescence imaging revealed transient intracellular Ca(2+) elevation evoked by the ALI, which did not entail nonspecific Ca(2+) influx from the extracellular space. ATP release was reduced by ∼40 to ∼90% from cells loaded with the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM and was completely abolished by N-ethylmalemide (1 mM). These experiments demonstrate that in close proximity to the ALI, surface tension forces are transmitted directly on cells, causing their mechanical deformation and Ca(2+)-dependent exocytotic ATP release. Such a signaling mechanism may contribute to the detection of local deficiency of airway surface liquid and surfactants on the lung surface. PMID:21239538

  18. Chromatin remodeling protein SMAR1 regulates NF-κB dependent Interleukin-8 transcription in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malonia, Sunil K; Yadav, Bhawna; Sinha, Surajit; Lazennec, Gwendel; Chattopadhyay, Samit

    2014-10-01

    Interleukin-8 (IL-8) is a pleiotropic chemokine involved in metastasis and angiogenesis of breast tumors. The expression of IL-8 is deregulated in metastatic breast carcinomas owing to aberrant NF-κB activity, which is known to positively regulate IL-8 transcription. Earlier, we have shown that tumor suppressor SMAR1 suppresses NF-κB transcriptional activity by modulating IκBα function. Here, we show that NF-κB target gene IL-8, is a direct transcriptional target of SMAR1. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation and reporter assays, we demonstrate that SMAR1 binds to IL-8 promoter MAR (matrix attachment region) and recruits HDAC1 dependent co-repressor complex. Further, we also show that SMAR1 antagonizes p300-mediated acetylation of RelA/p65, a post-translational modification indispensable for IL-8 transactivation. Thus, we decipher a new role of SMAR1 in NF-κB dependent transcriptional regulation of pro-angiogenic chemokine IL-8.

  19. ATP competitive protein kinase C inhibitors demonstrate distinct state-dependent inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida M Smith

    Full Text Available We previously reported that some ATP competitive protein kinase C (PKC inhibitors are either competitive or uncompetitive inhibitors with respect to substrate peptides. In this report, we demonstrate how the interactions between PKC and inhibitors change PKC activation kinetics. A substrate competitive inhibitor, bisindolylmaleimide I, targets activated PKC and stabilizes PKC in the activated conformation. This leads to transient activation and prolonged deactivation of PKC in the presence of bisindolylmaleimide I. In contrast, an uncompetitive substrate inhibitor, bisindolylmaleimide IV, targets quiescent PKC and stabilizes PKC in the quiescent conformation, which generates slower activation and suppressed translocation upon activation of PKC.

  20. Chromatin condensation in terminally differentiating mouse erythroblasts does not involve special architectural proteins but depends on histone deacetylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popova, Evgenya Y.; Krauss, Sharon Wald; Short, Sarah A.; Lee, Gloria; Villalobos, Jonathan; Etzell, Joan; Koury, Mark J.; Ney, Paul A.; Chasis, Joel Anne; Grigoryev, Sergei A.

    2008-08-21

    Terminal erythroid differentiation in vertebrates is characterized by progressive heterochromatin formation, chromatin condensation and, in mammals, culminates in nuclear extrusion. To date, although mechanisms regulating avian erythroid chromatin condensation have been identified, little is known regarding this process during mammalian erythropoiesis. To elucidate the molecular basis for mammalian erythroblast chromatin condensation, we used Friend virus-infected murine spleen erythroblasts that undergo terminal differentiation in vitro. Chromatin isolated from early and late stage erythroblasts had similar levels of linker and core histones, only a slight difference in nucleosome repeats, and no significant accumulation of known developmentally-regulated architectural chromatin proteins. However, histone H3(K9) dimethylation markedly increased while histone H4(K12) acetylation dramatically decreased and became segregated from the histone methylation as chromatin condensed. One histone deacetylase, HDAC5, was significantly upregulated during the terminal stages of Friend virus-infected erythroblast differentiation. Treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitor, trichostatin A, blocked both chromatin condensation and nuclear extrusion. Based on our data, we propose a model for a unique mechanism in which extensive histone deacetylation at pericentromeric heterochromatin mediates heterochromatin condensation in vertebrate erythroblasts that would otherwise be mediated by developmentally-regulated architectural proteins in nucleated blood cells.

  1. Crystal structure of the R-protein of the multisubunit ATP-dependent restriction endonuclease NgoAVII

    OpenAIRE

    Tamulaitiene, Giedre; Silanskas, Arunas; Grazulis, Saulius; Zaremba, Mindaugas; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2014-01-01

    The restriction endonuclease (REase) NgoAVII is composed of two proteins, R.NgoAVII and N.NgoAVII, and shares features of both Type II restriction enzymes and Type I/III ATP-dependent restriction enzymes (see accompanying paper Zaremba et al., 2014). Here we present crystal structures of the R.NgoAVII apo-protein and the R.NgoAVII C-terminal domain bound to a specific DNA. R.NgoAVII is composed of two domains: an N-terminal nucleolytic PLD domain; and a C-terminal B3-like DNA-binding domain i...

  2. Crystal Structure of the R-Protein of the Multisubunit ATP-Dependent Restriction Endonuclease NgoAVII

    OpenAIRE

    Tamulaitiene, G.; Silanskas, A.; Grazulis, S.; Zaremba, M.; Siksnys, V.

    2014-01-01

    The restriction endonuclease (REase) NgoAVII iscomposed of two proteins, R.NgoAVII and N.NgoAVII,and shares features of both Type II restriction en-zymes and Type I/III ATP-dependent restriction en-zymes (see accompanying paper Zaremba et al.,2014). Here we present crystal structures of theR.NgoAVII apo-protein and the R.NgoAVII C-terminaldomain bound to a specific DNA. R.NgoAVII is com-posed of two domains: an N-terminal nucleolytic PLDdomain; and a C-terminal B3-like DNA-binding do-main ide...

  3. Stimulation by ATP of proinsulin to insulin conversion in isolated rat pancreatic islet secretory granules. Association with the ATP-dependent proton pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhodes, C.J.; Lucas, C.A.; Mutkoski, R.L.; Orci, L.; Halban, P.A.

    1987-08-05

    Isolated rat pancreatic islets were pulse-labeled for 5 min with (/sup 3/H)leucine then chased for 25 min, during which time endogenously labeled (/sup 3/H)proinsulin becomes predominantly compartmented in immature secretory granules. The islets were then homogenized in isotonic sucrose (pH 7.4) and a beta-granule preparation obtained by differential centrifugation and discontinuous sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation. This preparation was enriched 8-fold in beta-granules. Aside from contamination with mitochondria and a limited number of lysosomes, the beta-granule preparation was essentially free of any other organelles involved in proinsulin synthesis and packaging (i.e. microsomal elements and, more particularly, Golgi complex). Conversion of endogenously labeled (/sup 3/H)proinsulin was followed in this beta-granule fraction for up to 2 h at 37 degrees C in a buffer (pH 7.3) that mimicked the cationic constituents of B-cell cytosol, during which time 92% of the beta-granules remained intact. Proinsulin conversion was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. The rate of proinsulin conversion to insulin was stimulated by 2.2 +/- 0.1-fold (n = 6) (at a 60-min incubation) in the presence of ATP (2 mM) and an ATP regenerating system compared to beta-granule preparations incubated without ATP. This ATP stimulation was abolished in the presence of beta-granule proton pump ATPase inhibitors (tributyltin, 2.5 microM, or 1,3-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, 50 microM). Inhibitors of mitochondrial proton pump ATPases had no effect on the ATP stimulation of proinsulin conversion. When granules were incubated in a more acidic buffer, proinsulin conversion was increased relative to that at pH 7.3. At pH 5.5, ATP no longer stimulated conversion, and tributyltin and 1,3-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide had no effect.

  4. Stimulation by ATP of proinsulin to insulin conversion in isolated rat pancreatic islet secretory granules. Association with the ATP-dependent proton pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isolated rat pancreatic islets were pulse-labeled for 5 min with [3H]leucine then chased for 25 min, during which time endogenously labeled [3H]proinsulin becomes predominantly compartmented in immature secretory granules. The islets were then homogenized in isotonic sucrose (pH 7.4) and a beta-granule preparation obtained by differential centrifugation and discontinuous sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation. This preparation was enriched 8-fold in beta-granules. Aside from contamination with mitochondria and a limited number of lysosomes, the beta-granule preparation was essentially free of any other organelles involved in proinsulin synthesis and packaging (i.e. microsomal elements and, more particularly, Golgi complex). Conversion of endogenously labeled [3H]proinsulin was followed in this beta-granule fraction for up to 2 h at 37 degrees C in a buffer (pH 7.3) that mimicked the cationic constituents of B-cell cytosol, during which time 92% of the beta-granules remained intact. Proinsulin conversion was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. The rate of proinsulin conversion to insulin was stimulated by 2.2 +/- 0.1-fold (n = 6) (at a 60-min incubation) in the presence of ATP (2 mM) and an ATP regenerating system compared to beta-granule preparations incubated without ATP. This ATP stimulation was abolished in the presence of beta-granule proton pump ATPase inhibitors (tributyltin, 2.5 microM, or 1,3-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, 50 microM). Inhibitors of mitochondrial proton pump ATPases had no effect on the ATP stimulation of proinsulin conversion. When granules were incubated in a more acidic buffer, proinsulin conversion was increased relative to that at pH 7.3. At pH 5.5, ATP no longer stimulated conversion, and tributyltin and 1,3-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide had no effect

  5. A Testis-Specific Chaperone and the Chromatin Remodeler ISWI Mediate Repackaging of the Paternal Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile M. Doyen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available During spermatogenesis, the paternal genome is repackaged into a non-nucleosomal, highly compacted chromatin structure. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that Drosophila sperm chromatin proteins are characterized by a motif related to the high-mobility group (HMG box, which we termed male-specific transcript (MST-HMG box. MST77F is a MST-HMG-box protein that forms an essential component of sperm chromatin. The deposition of MST77F onto the paternal genome requires the chaperone function of tNAP, a testis-specific NAP protein. MST77F, in turn, enables the stable incorporation of MST35Ba and MST35Bb into sperm chromatin. Following MST-HMG-box protein deposition, the ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler ISWI mediates the appropriate organization of sperm chromatin. Conversely, at fertilization, maternal ISWI targets the paternal genome and drives its repackaging into de-condensed nucleosomal chromatin. Failure of this transition in ISWI mutant embryos is followed by mitotic defects, aneuploidy, and haploid embryonic divisions. Thus, ISWI enables bi-directional transitions between two fundamentally different forms of chromatin.

  6. Chd1 remodelers maintain open chromatin and regulate the epigenetics of differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Jenna [Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Center for Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet (Sweden); Ekwall, Karl, E-mail: karl.ekwall@ki.se [Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Center for Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet (Sweden); School of Life Sciences, University College Sodertorn, NOVUM, Huddinge (Sweden)

    2010-05-01

    Eukaryotic DNA is packaged around octamers of histone proteins into nucleosomes, the basic unit of chromatin. In addition to enabling meters of DNA to fit within the confines of a nucleus, the structure of chromatin has functional implications for cell identity. Covalent chemical modifications to the DNA and to histones, histone variants, ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers, small noncoding RNAs and the level of chromatin compaction all contribute to chromosomal structure and to the activity or silencing of genes. These chromatin-level alterations are defined as epigenetic when they are heritable from mother to daughter cell. The great diversity of epigenomes that can arise from a single genome permits a single, totipotent cell to generate the hundreds of distinct cell types found in humans. Two recent studies in mouse and in fly have highlighted the importance of Chd1 chromatin remodelers for maintaining an open, active chromatin state. Based on evidence from fission yeast as a model system, we speculate that Chd1 remodelers are involved in the disassembly of nucleosomes at promoter regions, thus promoting active transcription and open chromatin. It is likely that these nucleosomes are specifically marked for disassembly by the histone variant H2A.Z.

  7. Arsenic alters ATP-dependent Ca²+ signaling in human airway epithelial cell wound response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Cara L; Lantz, R Clark; Burgess, Jefferey L; Boitano, Scott

    2011-05-01

    Arsenic is a natural metalloid toxicant that is associated with occupational inhalation injury and contaminates drinking water worldwide. Both inhalation of arsenic and consumption of arsenic-tainted water are correlated with malignant and nonmalignant lung diseases. Despite strong links between arsenic and respiratory illness, underlying cell responses to arsenic remain unclear. We hypothesized that arsenic may elicit some of its detrimental effects on the airway through limitation of innate immune function and, specifically, through alteration of paracrine ATP (purinergic) Ca²+ signaling in the airway epithelium. We examined the effects of acute (24 h) exposure with environmentally relevant levels of arsenic (i.e., immune functions (e.g., ciliary beat, salt and water transport, bactericide production, and wound repair). Arsenic-induced compromise of such airway defense mechanisms may be an underlying contributor to chronic lung disease. PMID:21357385

  8. ATP-mediated transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor in airway epithelial cells involves DUOX1-dependent oxidation of Src and ADAM17.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek Sham

    Full Text Available The respiratory epithelium is subject to continuous environmental stress and its responses to injury or infection are largely mediated by transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and downstream signaling cascades. Based on previous studies indicating involvement of ATP-dependent activation of the NADPH oxidase homolog DUOX1 in epithelial wound responses, the present studies were performed to elucidate the mechanisms by which DUOX1-derived H(2O(2 participates in ATP-dependent redox signaling and EGFR transactivation. ATP-mediated EGFR transactivation in airway epithelial cells was found to involve purinergic P2Y(2 receptor stimulation, and both ligand-dependent mechanisms as well as ligand-independent EGFR activation by the non-receptor tyrosine kinase Src. Activation of Src was also essential for ATP-dependent activation of the sheddase ADAM17, which is responsible for liberation and activation of EGFR ligands. Activation of P2Y(2R results in recruitment of Src and DUOX1 into a signaling complex, and transient siRNA silencing or stable shRNA transfection established a critical role for DUOX1 in ATP-dependent activation of Src, ADAM17, EGFR, and downstream wound responses. Using thiol-specific biotin labeling strategies, we determined that ATP-dependent EGFR transactivation was associated with DUOX1-dependent oxidation of cysteine residues within Src as well as ADAM17. In aggregate, our findings demonstrate that DUOX1 plays a central role in overall epithelial defense responses to infection or injury, by mediating oxidative activation of Src and ADAM17 in response to ATP-dependent P2Y(2R activation as a proximal step in EGFR transactivation and downstream signaling.

  9. Active remodeling of chromatin and implications for in-vivo folding

    CERN Document Server

    Ramakrishnan, N; Kuttippurathu, Lakshmi; Kumar, P B Sunil; Rao, Madan

    2015-01-01

    Recent high resolution experiments have provided a quantitative description of the statistical properties of interphase chromatin at large scales. These findings have stimulated a search for generic physical interactions that give rise to such specific statistical conformations. Here, we show that an active chromatin model of in-vivo folding, based on the interplay between polymer elasticity, confinement, topological constraints and active stresses arising from the (un)binding of ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling proteins gives rise to steady state conformations consistent with these experiments. Our results lead us to conjecture that the chromatin conformation resulting from this active folding optimizes information storage by co-locating gene loci which share transcription resources.

  10. Loss of apical monocilia on collecting duct principal cells impairs ATP secretion across the apical cell surface and ATP-dependent and flow-induced calcium signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovater, Michael B; Olteanu, Dragos; Hanson, Elizabeth L; Cheng, Nai-Lin; Siroky, Brian; Fintha, Attila; Komlosi, Peter; Liu, Wen; Satlin, Lisa M; Bell, P Darwin; Yoder, Bradley K; Schwiebert, Erik M

    2008-06-01

    Renal epithelial cells release ATP constitutively under basal conditions and release higher quantities of purine nucleotide in response to stimuli. ATP filtered at the glomerulus, secreted by epithelial cells along the nephron, and released serosally by macula densa cells for feedback signaling to afferent arterioles within the glomerulus has important physiological signaling roles within kidneys. In autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) mice and humans, collecting duct epithelial cells lack an apical central cilium or express dysfunctional proteins within that monocilium. Collecting duct principal cells derived from an Oak Ridge polycystic kidney (orpk ( Tg737 ) ) mouse model of ARPKD lack a well-formed apical central cilium, thought to be a sensory organelle. We compared these cells grown as polarized cell monolayers on permeable supports to the same cells where the apical monocilium was genetically rescued with the wild-type Tg737 gene that encodes Polaris, a protein essential to cilia formation. Constitutive ATP release under basal conditions was low and not different in mutant versus rescued monolayers. However, genetically rescued principal cell monolayers released ATP three- to fivefold more robustly in response to ionomycin. Principal cell monolayers with fully formed apical monocilia responded three- to fivefold greater to hypotonicity than mutant monolayers lacking monocilia. In support of the idea that monocilia are sensory organelles, intentionally harsh pipetting of medium directly onto the center of the monolayer induced ATP release in genetically rescued monolayers that possessed apical monocilia. Mechanical stimulation was much less effective, however, on mutant orpk collecting duct principal cell monolayers that lacked apical central monocilia. Our data also show that an increase in cytosolic free Ca(2+) primes the ATP pool that is released in response to mechanical stimuli. It also appears that hypotonic cell swelling and

  11. Plant-like phosphofructokinase from Plasmodium falciparum belongs to a novel class of ATP-dependent enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mony, Binny M; Mehta, Monika; Jarori, Gotam K; Sharma, Shobhona

    2009-11-01

    Malaria parasite-infected erythrocytes exhibit enhanced glucose utilisation and 6-phospho-1-fructokinase (PFK) is a key enzyme in glycolysis. Here we present the characterisation of PFK from the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Of the two putative PFK genes on chromosome 9 (PfPFK9) and 11 (PfPFK11), only the PfPFK9 gene appeared to possess all the catalytic features appropriate for PFK activity. The deduced PfPFK proteins contain domains homologous to the plant-like pyrophosphate (PPi)-dependent PFK beta and alpha subunits, which are quite different from the human erythrocyte PFK protein. The PfPFK9 gene beta and alpha regions were cloned and expressed as His(6)- and GST-tagged proteins in Escherichia coli. Complementation of PFK-deficient E. coli and activity analysis of purified recombinant proteins confirmed that PfPFK9beta possessed catalytic activity. Monoclonal antibodies against the recombinant beta protein confirmed that the PfPFK9 protein has beta and alpha domains fused into a 200 kDa protein, as opposed to the independent subunits found in plants. Despite an overall structural similarity to plant PPi-PFKs, the recombinant protein and the parasite extract exhibited only ATP-dependent enzyme activity, and none with PPi. Unlike host PFK, the Plasmodium PFK was insensitive to fructose-2,6-bisphosphate (F-2,6-bP), phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and citrate. A comparison of the deduced PFK proteins from several protozoan PFK genome databases implicates a unique class of ATP-dependent PFK present amongst the apicomplexan protozoans.

  12. A bacterial ATP-dependent, enhancer binding protein that activates the housekeeping RNA polymerase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, William C.; Kranz, Robert G.

    1998-01-01

    A commonly accepted view of gene regulation in bacteria that has emerged over the last decade is that promoters are transcriptionally activated by one of two general mechanisms. The major type involves activator proteins that bind to DNA adjacent to where the RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme binds, usually assisting in recruitment of the RNAP to the promoter. This holoenzyme uses the housekeeping ς70 or a related factor, which directs the core RNAP to the promoter and assists in melting the DNA near the RNA start site. A second type of mechanism involves the alternative sigma factor (called ς54 or ςN) that directs RNAP to highly conserved promoters. In these cases, an activator protein with an ATPase function oligomerizes at tandem sites far upstream from the promoter. The nitrogen regulatory protein (NtrC) from enteric bacteria has been the model for this family of activators. Activation of the RNAP/ς54 holoenzyme to form the open complex is mediated by the activator, which is tethered upstream. Hence, this class of protein is sometimes called the enhancer binding protein family or the NtrC class. We describe here a third system that has properties of each of these two types. The NtrC enhancer binding protein from the photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter capsulatus, is shown in vitro to activate the housekeeping RNAP/ς70 holoenzyme. Transcriptional activation by this NtrC requires ATP binding but not hydrolysis. Oligomerization at distant tandem binding sites on a supercoiled template is also necessary. Mechanistic and evolutionary questions of these systems are discussed. PMID:9637689

  13. SIRT6 stabilizes DNA-dependent protein kinase at chromatin for DNA double-strand break repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCord, Ronald A; Michishita, Eriko; Hong, Tao;

    2009-01-01

    The Sir2 chromatin regulatory factor links maintenance of genomic stability to life span extension in yeast. The mammalian Sir2 family member SIRT6 has been proposed to have analogous functions, because SIRT6-deficiency leads to shortened life span and an aging-like degenerative phenotype in mice...

  14. Extracellular ATP-induced NO production and its dependence on membrane Ca2+ flux in Salvia miltiorrhiza hairy roots

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Shu-Jing; Wu, Jian-yong

    2008-01-01

    Extracellular ATP (eATP) is a novel signalling agent, and nitric oxide (NO) is a well-established signal molecule with diverse functions in plant growth and development. This study characterizes NO production induced by exogenous ATP and examines its relationship with other important signalling agents, Ca2+ and H2O2 in Salvia miltiorrhiza hairy root culture. Exogenous ATP was applied at 10–500 μM to the hairy root cultures and stimulated NO production was detectable within 30 min. The NO leve...

  15. ATP-dependent and independent functions of Rad54 in genome maintenance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Agarwal (Sheba); W.A. van Cappellen (Gert); A. Guénolé (Aude); B. Eppink (Berina); S.E.V. Linsen (Sam); E. Meijering (Erik); A.B. Houtsmuller (Adriaan); R. Kanaar (Roland); J. Essers (Jeroen)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractRad54, a member of the SWI/SNF protein family of DNA-dependent ATPases, repairs DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) through homologous recombination. Here we demonstrate that Rad54 is required for the timely accumulation of the homologous recombination proteins Rad51 and Brca2 at DSBs. Becau

  16. Cell swelling activates ATP-dependent voltage-gated chloride channels in M-1 mouse cortical collecting duct cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, K; Korbmacher, C

    1996-09-01

    In the present study we used whole-cell patch clamp recordings to investigate swelling-activated Cl-currents (ICl-swell) in M-1 mouse cortical collecting duct (CCD) cells. Hypotonic cell swelling reversibly increased the whole-cell Cl- conductance by about 30-fold. The I-V relationship was outwardly-rectifying and ICl-swell displayed a characteristic voltage-dependence with relatively fast inactivation upon large depolarizing and slow activation upon hyperpolarizing voltage steps. Reversal potential measurements revealed a selectivity sequence SCN- > I- > Br- > Cl- > > gluconate. ICl-swell was inhibited by tamoxifen, NPPB (5-nitro-2(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoate), DIDS (4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid), flufenamic acid, niflumic acid, and glibenclamide, in descending order of potency. Extracellular cAMP had no significant effect. ICl-swell was Ca2+ independent, but current activation depended on the presence of a high-energy gamma-phosphate group from intracellular ATP or ATP gamma S. Moreover, it depended on the presence of intracellular Mg2+ and was inhibited by staurosporine, which indicates that a phosphorylation step is involved in channel activation. Increasing the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration by using ionomycin stimulated Cl- currents with a voltage dependence different from that of ICl-swell. Analysis of whole-cell current records during early onset of ICl-swell and during final recovery revealed discontinuous step-like changes of the whole-cell current level which were not observed under nonswelling conditions. A single-channel I-V curve constructed using the smallest resolvable current transitions detected at various holding potentials and revealed a slope conductance of 55, 15, and 8 pS at +120, 0, and -120 mV, respectively. The larger current steps observed in these recordings had about 2, 3, or 4 times the size of the putative single-channel current amplitude, suggesting a coordinated gating of several individual channels or channel

  17. The downstream atpE cistron is efficiently translated via its own cis-element in partially overlapping atpB–atpE dicistronic mRNAs in chloroplasts

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Haruka; Kuroda, Hiroshi; Yukawa, Yasushi; Sugiura, Masahiro

    2011-01-01

    The chloroplast atpB and atpE genes encode subunits β and ε of the ATP synthase, respectively. They are co-transcribed as dicistronic mRNAs in flowering plants. An unusual feature is an overlap (AUGA) of the atpB stop codon (UGA) with the atpE start codon (AUG). Hence, atpE translation has been believed to depend on atpB translation (i.e. translational coupling). Using an in vitro translation system from tobacco chloroplasts, we showed that both atpB and atpE cistrons are translated from the ...

  18. Salinity-dependent copper accumulation in the guppy Poecilia vivipara is associated with CTR1 and ATP7B transcriptional regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Evelise Sampaio; Abril, Sandra Isabel Moreno; Zanette, Juliano; Bianchini, Adalto

    2014-07-01

    Copper (Cu) accumulation and regulation of key-genes involved in Cu homeostasis were evaluated in freshwater- and saltwater-acclimated guppies Poecilia vivipara. Fish were exposed (96h) to environmentally relevant concentrations of dissolved Cu (0, 5.0, 9.0 and 20.0μg/L). In freshwater guppies, gill and liver Cu accumulation was dependent on Cu concentration in the exposure medium. In saltwater guppies, this dependence was observed only in the gut. These findings indicate that Cu accumulation was salinity- and tissue-dependent. Key genes involved in Cu metabolism were sequenced for the first time in P. vivipara. Transcripts coding for the high-affinity copper transporter (CTR1) and copper-transporting ATPase (ATP7B) were identified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and gene sequencing. The full-length CTR1 open reading frame (1560bp) and a partial ATP7B (690bp) were discovered. Predicted amino acid sequences shared high identities with the CTR1 of Fundulus heteroclitus (81%) and the ATP7B of Sparus aurata (87%). Basal transcriptional levels addressed by RT-qPCR in control fish indicate that CTR1 and ATP7B was highly transcribed in liver of freshwater guppies while CTR1 was highly transcribed in gut of saltwater guppies. This could explain the higher Cu accumulation observed in liver of freshwater guppies and in gut of saltwater guppies, because CTR1 is involved in Cu uptake. Reduced gill mRNA expression of CTR1 was observed in freshwater guppies exposed to 20.0μg/L Cu and in saltwater guppies exposed to 5.0μg/L Cu. In turn, reduced mRNA expression of gut ATP7B was observed in freshwater and salt water guppies exposed to 9.0 and 20.0μg/L Cu. Liver CTR1 and ATP7B transcription were not affected by Cu exposure. These findings suggest that gill CTR1 and gut ATP7B are down-regulated to limit Cu absorption after exposure to dissolved Cu, while liver CTR1 and ATP7B levels are maintained to allow Cu storage and detoxification. In conclusion, findings reported here

  19. Unique Cyclin-Dependent Kinase (CDK) Inhibitors at the ATP-site

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Lin; LUNDGREN Karen; ESCOBAR Jorge; MINNICK Sharon price; HUBER Andrea; KOUDRIAKOVA Tatiana; ARRUDA Jeannie; SISSON Wes; AUST Robert M.; VERKHIVKER Gennady M.; SCHAFFER Lana; CHONG Wesley K. M.; ROSE Peter w.; LEWIS Cristrina T; DUVADIE Rohit K.; CHU Shao Song; YANG Y. Michelle; NONOMIYA Jim; TUCKER Kadthleen D.; KNIGHTON Daniel R.; FERRE RoseAnn

    2001-01-01

    @@ Control of the cell cycle could be applicable in new approaches for cancer chemotherapy. The cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK's) and their corresponding complexes with cyclins are regulatory enzymes for which we have discovered a novel small molecule series of inhibitors, with potencies in the nanomolar range and good selectivity for the CDK's versus other kinases. We will discuss structure-based drug design efforts with crystal structures of complexes with certain CDK's. Cellular effects and some preliminary examination of in vivo cancer efficacy by these inhibitors will also be discussed.

  20. A heme-binding domain controls regulation of ATP-dependent potassium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Mark J; Kapetanaki, Sofia M; Chernova, Tatyana; Jamieson, Andrew G; Dorlet, Pierre; Santolini, Jérôme; Moody, Peter C E; Mitcheson, John S; Davies, Noel W; Schmid, Ralf; Raven, Emma L; Storey, Nina M

    2016-04-01

    Heme iron has many and varied roles in biology. Most commonly it binds as a prosthetic group to proteins, and it has been widely supposed and amply demonstrated that subtle variations in the protein structure around the heme, including the heme ligands, are used to control the reactivity of the metal ion. However, the role of heme in biology now appears to also include a regulatory responsibility in the cell; this includes regulation of ion channel function. In this work, we show that cardiac KATP channels are regulated by heme. We identify a cytoplasmic heme-binding CXXHX16H motif on the sulphonylurea receptor subunit of the channel, and mutagenesis together with quantitative and spectroscopic analyses of heme-binding and single channel experiments identified Cys628 and His648 as important for heme binding. We discuss the wider implications of these findings and we use the information to present hypotheses for mechanisms of heme-dependent regulation across other ion channels.

  1. OVERPRODUCTION OF THE ATP-DEPENDENT NUCLEASE ADDAB IMPROVES THE STRUCTURAL STABILITY OF A MODEL PLASMID SYSTEM IN BACILLUS-SUBTILIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MEIMA, R; HAIJEMA, BJ; VENEMA, G; BRON, S

    1995-01-01

    The effect of the ATP-dependent exonuclease AddAB complex on the structural stability of plasmid pGP1 in Bacillus subtilis was studied. Using deletion mutagenesis and gene amplification techniques, B. subtilis strains were constructed either lacking or overproducing the AddAB complex, a key enzyme i

  2. Integrin-mediated transactivation of P2X7R via hemichannel-dependent ATP release stimulates astrocyte migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Alvaro; Lagos-Cabré, Raúl; Kong, Milene; Cárdenas, Areli; Burgos-Bravo, Francesca; Schneider, Pascal; Quest, Andrew F G; Leyton, Lisette

    2016-09-01

    Our previous reports indicate that ligand-induced αVβ3 integrin and Syndecan-4 engagement increases focal adhesion formation and migration of astrocytes. Additionally, ligated integrins trigger ATP release through unknown mechanisms, activating P2X7 receptors (P2X7R), and the uptake of Ca(2+) to promote cell adhesion. However, whether the activation of P2X7R and ATP release are required for astrocyte migration and whether αVβ3 integrin and Syndecan-4 receptors communicate with P2X7R via ATP remains unknown. Here, cells were stimulated with Thy-1, a reported αVβ3 integrin and Syndecan-4 ligand. Results obtained indicate that ATP was released by Thy-1 upon integrin engagement and required the participation of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), phospholipase-C gamma (PLCγ) and inositol trisphosphate (IP3) receptors (IP3R). IP3R activation leads to increased intracellular Ca(2+), hemichannel (Connexin-43 and Pannexin-1) opening, and ATP release. Moreover, silencing of the P2X7R or addition of hemichannel blockers precluded Thy-1-induced astrocyte migration. Finally, Thy-1 lacking the integrin-binding site did not stimulate ATP release, whereas Thy-1 mutated in the Syndecan-4-binding domain increased ATP release, albeit to a lesser extent and with delayed kinetics compared to wild-type Thy-1. Thus, hemichannels activated downstream of an αVβ3 integrin-PI3K-PLCγ-IP3R pathway are responsible for Thy-1-induced, hemichannel-mediated and Syndecan-4-modulated ATP release that transactivates P2X7Rs to induce Ca(2+) entry. These findings uncover a hitherto unrecognized role for hemichannels in the regulation of astrocyte migration via P2X7R transactivation induced by integrin-mediated ATP release. PMID:27235833

  3. ATP-Dependent C–F Bond Cleavage Allows the Complete Degradation of 4-Fluoroaromatics without Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiedt, Oliver; Mergelsberg, Mario; Boll, Kerstin; Müller, Michael; Adrian, Lorenz; Jehmlich, Nico; von Bergen, Martin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Complete biodegradation of the abundant and persistent fluoroaromatics requires enzymatic cleavage of an arylic C–F bond, probably the most stable single bond of a biodegradable organic molecule. While in aerobic microorganisms defluorination of fluoroaromatics is initiated by oxygenases, arylic C–F bond cleavage has never been observed in the absence of oxygen. Here, an oxygen-independent enzymatic aryl fluoride bond cleavage is described during the complete degradation of 4-fluorobenzoate or 4-fluorotoluene to CO2 and HF in the denitrifying Thauera aromatica: the ATP-dependent defluorination of 4-fluorobenzoyl-coenzyme A (4-F-BzCoA) to benzoyl-coenzyme A (BzCoA) and HF, catalyzed by class I BzCoA reductase (BCR). Adaptation to growth with the fluoroaromatics was accomplished by the downregulation of a promiscuous benzoate-CoA ligase and the concomitant upregulation of 4-F-BzCoA-defluorinating/dearomatizing BCR on the transcriptional level. We propose an unprecedented mechanism for reductive arylic C–F bond cleavage via a Birch reduction-like mechanism resulting in a formal nucleophilic aromatic substitution. In the proposed anionic 4-fluorodienoyl-CoA transition state, fluoride elimination to BzCoA is favored over protonation to a fluorinated cyclic dienoyl-CoA. PMID:27507824

  4. Dose-dependent ATP depletion and cancer cell death following calcium electroporation, relative effect of calcium concentration and electric field strength.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Louise Hansen

    Full Text Available Electroporation, a method for increasing the permeability of membranes to ions and small molecules, is used in the clinic with chemotherapeutic drugs for cancer treatment (electrochemotherapy. Electroporation with calcium causes ATP (adenosine triphosphate depletion and cancer cell death and could be a novel cancer treatment. This study aims at understanding the relationship between applied electric field, calcium concentration, ATP depletion and efficacy.In three human cell lines--H69 (small-cell lung cancer, SW780 (bladder cancer, and U937 (leukaemia, viability was determined after treatment with 1, 3, or 5 mM calcium and eight 99 μs pulses with 0.8, 1.0, 1.2, 1.4 or 1.6 kV/cm. Fitting analysis was applied to quantify the cell-killing efficacy in presence of calcium. Post-treatment intracellular ATP was measured in H69 and SW780 cells. Post-treatment intracellular ATP was observed with fluorescence confocal microscopy of quinacrine-labelled U937 cells.Both H69 and SW780 cells showed dose-dependent (calcium concentration and electric field decrease in intracellular ATP (p<0.05 and reduced viability. The 50% effective cell kill was found at 3.71 kV/cm (H69 and 3.28 kV/cm (SW780, reduced to 1.40 and 1.15 kV/cm (respectively with 1 mM calcium (lower EC50 for higher calcium concentrations. Quinacrine fluorescence intensity of calcium-electroporated U937 cells was one third lower than in controls (p<0.0001.Calcium electroporation dose-dependently reduced cell survival and intracellular ATP. Increasing extracellular calcium allows the use of a lower electric field.This study supports the use of calcium electroporation for treatment of cancer and possibly lowering the applied electric field in future trials.

  5. A nucleosome turnover map reveals that the stability of histone H4 Lys20 methylation depends on histone recycling in transcribed chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, J Peter; Shukla, Manu; Menendez-Benito, Victoria; Norman-Axelsson, Ulrika; Audergon, Pauline; Sinha, Indranil; Tanny, Jason C; Allshire, Robin C; Ekwall, Karl

    2015-06-01

    Nucleosome composition actively contributes to chromatin structure and accessibility. Cells have developed mechanisms to remove or recycle histones, generating a landscape of differentially aged nucleosomes. This study aimed to create a high-resolution, genome-wide map of nucleosome turnover in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The recombination-induced tag exchange (RITE) method was used to study replication-independent nucleosome turnover through the appearance of new histone H3 and the disappearance or preservation of old histone H3. The genome-wide location of histones was determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation-exonuclease methodology (ChIP-exo). The findings were compared with diverse chromatin marks, including histone variant H2A.Z, post-translational histone modifications, and Pol II binding. Finally, genome-wide mapping of the methylation states of H4K20 was performed to determine the relationship between methylation (mono, di, and tri) of this residue and nucleosome turnover. Our analysis showed that histone recycling resulted in low nucleosome turnover in the coding regions of active genes, stably expressed at intermediate levels. High levels of transcription resulted in the incorporation of new histones primarily at the end of transcribed units. H4K20 was methylated in low-turnover nucleosomes in euchromatic regions, notably in the coding regions of long genes that were expressed at low levels. This transcription-dependent accumulation of histone methylation was dependent on the histone chaperone complex FACT. Our data showed that nucleosome turnover is highly dynamic in the genome and that several mechanisms are at play to either maintain or suppress stability. In particular, we found that FACT-associated transcription conserves histones by recycling them and is required for progressive H4K20 methylation.

  6. period-1 encodes an ATP-dependent RNA helicase that influences nutritional compensation of the Neurospora circadian clock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emerson, Jillian M.; Bartholomai, Bradley M.; Ringelberg, Carol; Baker, Scott E.; Loros, Jennifer J.; Dunlap, Jay C.

    2015-12-22

    Mutants in the period-1 (prd-1) gene, characterized by a recessive allele, display a reduced growth rate and period lengthening of the developmental cycle controlled by the circadian clock. We refined the genetic location of prd-1 and used whole genome sequencing to find the mutation defining it, confirming the identity of prd-1 by rescuing the mutant circadian phenotype via transformation. PRD-1 is an RNA helicase whose orthologs, DDX5 and DDX17 in humans and Dbp2p in yeast, are implicated in various processes including transcriptional regulation, elongation, and termination, 23 ribosome biogenesis, and RNA decay. Although prdi-1smutantssiois an ATP-dependent RNA helicase, member of a sub-family display a long period (~25 hrs) circadian developmental cycle, they interestingly display a wild type period when the core circadian oscillator is tracked using a frq-luciferase transcriptional fusion under conditions of limiting nutritional carbon; the core oscillator runs with a long period under glucose-sufficient conditions. Thus PRD-1 clearly impacts the circadian oscillator and is not only part of a metabolic oscillator ancillary to the core clock. PRD-1 is an essential protein and its expression is neither light-regulated nor clock-regulated. However, it is transiently induced by glucose; in the presence of sufficient glucose PRD-1 is in the nucleus until glucose runs out which elicits its disappearance from the nucleus. Because circadian period length is carbon concentration-dependent, prd­-1 may be formally viewed as clock mutant with defective nutritional compensation of circadian period length.

  7. ISWI regulates higher-order chromatin structure and histone H1 assembly in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide F V Corona

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Imitation SWI (ISWI and other ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling factors play key roles in transcription and other processes by altering the structure and positioning of nucleosomes. Recent studies have also implicated ISWI in the regulation of higher-order chromatin structure, but its role in this process remains poorly understood. To clarify the role of ISWI in vivo, we examined defects in chromosome structure and gene expression resulting from the loss of Iswi function in Drosophila. Consistent with a broad role in transcriptional regulation, the expression of a large number of genes is altered in Iswi mutant larvae. The expression of a dominant-negative form of ISWI leads to dramatic alterations in higher-order chromatin structure, including the apparent decondensation of both mitotic and polytene chromosomes. The loss of ISWI function does not cause obvious defects in nucleosome assembly, but results in a significant reduction in the level of histone H1 associated with chromatin in vivo. These findings suggest that ISWI plays a global role in chromatin compaction in vivo by promoting the association of the linker histone H1 with chromatin.

  8. Chromatin Immunoprecipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiehle, Laura; Breiling, Achim

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) is a valuable method to investigate protein-DNA interactions in vivo. Since its discovery it has been indispensable to identify binding sites and patterns of a variety of DNA-interacting proteins, such as transcription factors and regulators, modified histones, and epigenetic modifiers. The Polycomb repressors were the first proteins that have been mapped using this technique, which provided the mechanistic basis for the understanding of their biological function. Cross-linked (XChIP) or native (NChIP) chromatin from tissues or cultured cells is fragmented and the protein of interest is immunoprecipitated using a specific antibody. The co-precipitated DNA is then purified and subjected to analysis by region-specific PCR, DNA microarray (ChIP-on-chip), or next-generation sequencing (ChIP-seq). The assay can therefore produce information about the localization of the analyzed protein at specific candidate loci or throughout the entire genome. In this chapter, we provide a detailed protocol of the basic standard ChIP assay and some remarks about variations. PMID:27659971

  9. Proteins interacting with mitochondrial ATP-dependent Lon protease (MAP1) in Magnaporthe oryzae are involved in rice blast disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiao; Wei, Yi; Wang, Yu-Han; Li, Jian; Wong, Fuk-Ling; Zheng, Ya-Jie; Yan, Hai; Liu, Shao-Shuai; Liu, Jin-Liang; Jia, Bao-Lei; Zhang, Shi-Hong

    2015-10-01

    The ATP-dependent Lon protease is involved in many physiological processes. In bacteria, Lon regulates pathogenesis and, in yeast, Lon protects mitochondia from oxidative damage. However, little is known about Lon in fungal phytopathogens. MAP1, a homologue of Lon in Magnaporthe oryzae, was recently identified to be important for stress resistance and pathogenesis. Here, we focus on a novel pathogenic pathway mediated by MAP1. Based on an interaction system between rice and a tandem affinity purification (TAP)-tagged MAP1 complementation strain, we identified 23 novel fungal proteins from infected leaves using a TAP approach with mass spectrometry, and confirmed that 14 of these proteins physically interact with MAP1 in vivo. Among these 14 proteins, 11 candidates, presumably localized to the mitochondria, were biochemically determined to be substrates of MAP1 hydrolysis. Deletion mutants were created and functionally analysed to further confirm the involvement of these proteins in pathogenesis. The results indicated that all mutants showed reduced conidiation and sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide. Appressorial formations were not affected, although conidia from certain mutants were morphologically altered. In addition, virulence was reduced in four mutants, enhanced (with lesions forming earlier) in two mutants and remained unchanged in one mutant. Together with the known virulence-related proteins alternative oxidase and enoyl-CoA hydratase, we propose that most of the Lon-interacting proteins are involved in the pathogenic regulation pathway mediated by MAP1 in M. oryzae. Perturbation of this pathway may represent an effective approach for the inhibition of rice blast disease. PMID:25605006

  10. Profiling Protein Kinases and Other ATP Binding Proteins in Arabidopsis Using Acyl-ATP Probes*

    OpenAIRE

    Villamor, J. G.; Kaschani, F.; Colby, T; Oeljeklaus, J.; Zhao, D; Kaiser, M.; Patricelli, M. P.; R. A. L. van der Hoorn

    2013-01-01

    Many protein activities are driven by ATP binding and hydrolysis. Here, we explore the ATP binding proteome of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana using acyl-ATP (AcATP)1 probes. These probes target ATP binding sites and covalently label lysine residues in the ATP binding pocket. Gel-based profiling using biotinylated AcATP showed that labeling is dependent on pH and divalent ions and can be competed by nucleotides. The vast majority of these AcATP-labeled proteins are known ATP binding prot...

  11. X-ray effects on the activity of a Mg2+-dependent, Na+- and K+-activable microsomal membrane ATP-ase system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bahviour of a Mg2+-dependent, Na+- and K+-activable ATP-ase sytem on irradiation was investigated using a microsome fraction of guinea pig myocardial cells prepared by fractionated centrifugation. The Na+- and K+-activable component, transport-ATPase, was particularly radiation-sensitive. Three stages of development were observed for a 1,500 R radiation damage until 24 h p.r.. In the first stage, until 30 minutes p.r., the activity of transport-ATP-ase was inhibited. This was followed by repair processes which had reached a peak value clearly higher than the control values at 4 hours p.r.. In the third stage, the activity was reduced again; 15 and 24 hours after termination of exposure, values again were nearly the same as after 30 minutes where a maximum was observed for this radiation dose. Radiation-induced electrolyte displacements, active transport, and radiation-induced inhibition of transport-ATP-ase were correlated and discussed; the assumption was that changes in, the electrolyte conditions in the membranes on irradiation are at least partly due to the described inhibition of transport-ATP-ase. (orig./AJ)

  12. Genomic response to Wnt signalling is highly context-dependent - Evidence from DNA microarray and chromatin immunoprecipitation screens of Wnt/TCF targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Railo, Antti [Oulu Centre for Cell Matrix Research, Biocenter Oulu, Laboratory of Developmental Biology and Department of Medical Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, FIN-90014, University of Oulu, P. O. Box 5000 (Finland); Pajunen, Antti [Department of Biochemistry, University of Oulu (Finland); Itaeranta, Petri; Naillat, Florence; Vuoristo, Jussi; Kilpelaeinen, Pekka [Oulu Centre for Cell Matrix Research, Biocenter Oulu, Laboratory of Developmental Biology and Department of Medical Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, FIN-90014, University of Oulu, P. O. Box 5000 (Finland); Vainio, Seppo, E-mail: Seppo.Vainio@oulu.fi [Oulu Centre for Cell Matrix Research, Biocenter Oulu, Laboratory of Developmental Biology and Department of Medical Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, FIN-90014, University of Oulu, P. O. Box 5000 (Finland)

    2009-10-01

    Wnt proteins are important regulators of embryonic development, and dysregulated Wnt signalling is involved in the oncogenesis of several human cancers. Our knowledge of the downstream target genes is limited, however. We used a chromatin immunoprecipitation-based assay to isolate and characterize the actual gene segments through which Wnt-activatable transcription factors, TCFs, regulate transcription and an Affymetrix microarray analysis to study the global transcriptional response to the Wnt3a ligand. The anti-{beta}-catenin immunoprecipitation of DNA-protein complexes from mouse NIH3T3 fibroblasts expressing a fusion protein of {beta}-catenin and TCF7 resulted in the identification of 92 genes as putative TCF targets. GeneChip assays of gene expression performed on NIH3T3 cells and the rat pheochromocytoma cell line PC12 revealed 355 genes in NIH3T3 and 129 genes in the PC12 cells with marked changes in expression after Wnt3a stimulus. Only 2 Wnt-regulated genes were shared by both cell lines. Surprisingly, Disabled-2 was the only gene identified by the chromatin immunoprecipitation approach that displayed a marked change in expression in the GeneChip assay. Taken together, our approaches give an insight into the complex context-dependent nature of Wnt pathway transcriptional responses and identify Disabled-2 as a potential new direct target for Wnt signalling.

  13. The molecular motor F-ATP synthase is targeted by the tumoricidal protein HAMLET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, James; Sielaff, Hendrik; Nadeem, Aftab; Svanborg, Catharina; Grüber, Gerhard

    2015-05-22

    HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) interacts with multiple tumor cell compartments, affecting cell morphology, metabolism, proteasome function, chromatin structure and viability. This study investigated if these diverse effects of HAMLET might be caused, in part, by a direct effect on the ATP synthase and a resulting reduction in cellular ATP levels. A dose-dependent reduction in cellular ATP levels was detected in A549 lung carcinoma cells, and by confocal microscopy, co-localization of HAMLET with the nucleotide-binding subunits α (non-catalytic) and β (catalytic) of the energy converting F1F0 ATP synthase was detected. As shown by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, HAMLET binds to the F1 domain of the F1F0 ATP synthase with a dissociation constant (KD) of 20.5μM. Increasing concentrations of the tumoricidal protein HAMLET added to the enzymatically active α3β3γ complex of the F-ATP synthase lowered its ATPase activity, demonstrating that HAMLET binding to the F-ATP synthase effects the catalysis of this molecular motor. Single-molecule analysis was applied to study HAMLET-α3β3γ complex interaction. Whereas the α3β3γ complex of the F-ATP synthase rotated in a counterclockwise direction with a mean rotational rate of 3.8±0.7s(-1), no rotation could be observed in the presence of bound HAMLET. Our findings suggest that direct effects of HAMLET on the F-ATP synthase may inhibit ATP-dependent cellular processes. PMID:25681694

  14. The molecular motor F-ATP synthase is targeted by the tumoricidal protein HAMLET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, James; Sielaff, Hendrik; Nadeem, Aftab; Svanborg, Catharina; Grüber, Gerhard

    2015-05-22

    HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) interacts with multiple tumor cell compartments, affecting cell morphology, metabolism, proteasome function, chromatin structure and viability. This study investigated if these diverse effects of HAMLET might be caused, in part, by a direct effect on the ATP synthase and a resulting reduction in cellular ATP levels. A dose-dependent reduction in cellular ATP levels was detected in A549 lung carcinoma cells, and by confocal microscopy, co-localization of HAMLET with the nucleotide-binding subunits α (non-catalytic) and β (catalytic) of the energy converting F1F0 ATP synthase was detected. As shown by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, HAMLET binds to the F1 domain of the F1F0 ATP synthase with a dissociation constant (KD) of 20.5μM. Increasing concentrations of the tumoricidal protein HAMLET added to the enzymatically active α3β3γ complex of the F-ATP synthase lowered its ATPase activity, demonstrating that HAMLET binding to the F-ATP synthase effects the catalysis of this molecular motor. Single-molecule analysis was applied to study HAMLET-α3β3γ complex interaction. Whereas the α3β3γ complex of the F-ATP synthase rotated in a counterclockwise direction with a mean rotational rate of 3.8±0.7s(-1), no rotation could be observed in the presence of bound HAMLET. Our findings suggest that direct effects of HAMLET on the F-ATP synthase may inhibit ATP-dependent cellular processes.

  15. ATP, IMP, and glycogen in cod muscle at onset and during development of rigor mortis depend on the sampling location

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cappeln, Gertrud; Jessen, Flemming

    2002-01-01

    Variation in glycogen, ATP, and IMP contents within individual cod muscles were studied in ice stored fish during the progress of rigor mortis. Rigor index was determined before muscle samples for chemical analyzes were taken at 16 different positions on the fish. During development of rigor, the...

  16. The first archaeal ATP-dependent glucokinase, from the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Aeropyrum pernix, represents a monomeric, extremely thermophilic ROK glucokinase with broad hexose specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Thomas; Reichstein, Bianca; Schmid, Roland; Schönheit, Peter

    2002-11-01

    An ATP-dependent glucokinase of the hyperthermophilic aerobic crenarchaeon Aeropyrum pernix was purified 230-fold to homogeneity. The enzyme is a monomeric protein with an apparent molecular mass of about 36 kDa. The apparent K(m) values for ATP and glucose (at 90 degrees C and pH 6.2) were 0.42 and 0.044 mM, respectively; the apparent V(max) was about 35 U/mg. The enzyme was specific for ATP as a phosphoryl donor, but showed a broad spectrum for phosphoryl acceptors: in addition to glucose, which showed the highest catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)), the enzyme also phosphorylates glucosamin, fructose, mannose, and 2-deoxyglucose. Divalent cations were required for maximal activity: Mg(2+), which was most effective, could partially be replaced with Co(2+), Mn(2+), and Ni(2+). The enzyme had a temperature optimum of at least 100 degrees C and showed significant thermostability up to 100 degrees C. The coding function of open reading frame (ORF) APE2091 (Y. Kawarabayasi, Y. Hino, H. Horikawa, S. Yamazaki, Y. Haikawa, K. Jin-no, M. Takahashi, M. Sekine, S. Baba, A. Ankai, H. Kosugi, A. Hosoyama, S. Fukui, Y. Nagai, K. Nishijima, H. Nakazawa, M. Takamiya, S. Masuda, T. Funahashi, T. Tanaka, Y. Kudoh, J. Yamazaki, N. Kushida, A. Oguchi, and H. Kikuchi, DNA Res. 6:83-101, 145-152, 1999), previously annotated as gene glk, coding for ATP-glucokinase of A. pernix, was proved by functional expression in Escherichia coli. The purified recombinant ATP-dependent glucokinase showed a 5-kDa higher molecular mass on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, but almost identical kinetic and thermostability properties in comparison to the native enzyme purified from A. pernix. N-terminal amino acid sequence of the native enzyme revealed that the translation start codon is a GTG 171 bp downstream of the annotated start codon of ORF APE2091. The amino acid sequence deduced from the truncated ORF APE2091 revealed sequence similarity to members of the ROK family, which

  17. Dose-dependent ATP depletion and cancer cell death following calcium electroporation, relative effect of calcium concentration and electric field strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Emilie Louise; Sozer, Esin Bengisu; Romeo, Stefania;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Electroporation, a method for increasing the permeability of membranes to ions and small molecules, is used in the clinic with chemotherapeutic drugs for cancer treatment (electrochemotherapy). Electroporation with calcium causes ATP (adenosine triphosphate) depletion and cancer cell.......28 kV/cm (SW780), reduced to 1.40 and 1.15 kV/cm (respectively) with 1 mM calcium (lower EC50 for higher calcium concentrations). Quinacrine fluorescence intensity of calcium-electroporated U937 cells was one third lower than in controls (pelectroporation dose......-dependently reduced cell survival and intracellular ATP. Increasing extracellular calcium allows the use of a lower electric field. GENERAL SIGNIFICANCE: This study supports the use of calcium electroporation for treatment of cancer and possibly lowering the applied electric field in future trials....

  18. Assembly of the Arp5 (Actin-related Protein) Subunit Involved in Distinct INO80 Chromatin Remodeling Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Wei; Beckwith, Sean L; Zheng, Tina; Young, Thomas; Dinh, Van T; Ranjan, Anand; Morrison, Ashby J

    2015-10-16

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling, which repositions and restructures nucleosomes, is essential to all DNA-templated processes. The INO80 chromatin remodeling complex is an evolutionarily conserved complex involved in diverse cellular processes, including transcription, DNA repair, and replication. The functional diversity of the INO80 complex can, in part, be attributed to specialized activities of distinct subunits that compose the complex. Furthermore, structural analyses have identified biochemically discrete subunit modules that assemble along the Ino80 ATPase scaffold. Of particular interest is the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Arp5-Ies6 module located proximal to the Ino80 ATPase and the Rvb1-Rvb2 helicase module needed for INO80-mediated in vitro activity. In this study we demonstrate that the previously uncharacterized Ies2 subunit is required for Arp5-Ies6 association with the catalytic components of the INO80 complex. In addition, Arp5-Ies6 module assembly with the INO80 complex is dependent on distinct conserved domains within Arp5, Ies6, and Ino80, including the spacer region within the Ino80 ATPase domain. Arp5-Ies6 interacts with chromatin via assembly with the INO80 complex, as IES2 and INO80 deletion results in loss of Arp5-Ies6 chromatin association. Interestingly, ectopic addition of the wild-type Arp5-Ies6 module stimulates INO80-mediated ATP hydrolysis and nucleosome sliding in vitro. However, the addition of mutant Arp5 lacking unique insertion domains facilitates ATP hydrolysis in the absence of nucleosome sliding. Collectively, these results define the requirements of Arp5-Ies6 assembly, which are needed to couple ATP hydrolysis to productive nucleosome movement.

  19. The Chromatin Remodelling Enzymes SNF2H and SNF2L Position Nucleosomes adjacent to CTCF and Other Transcription Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiechens, Nicola; Singh, Vijender; Gkikopoulos, Triantaffyllos; Schofield, Pieta; Rocha, Sonia; Owen-Hughes, Tom

    2016-03-01

    Within the genomes of metazoans, nucleosomes are highly organised adjacent to the binding sites for a subset of transcription factors. Here we have sought to investigate which chromatin remodelling enzymes are responsible for this. We find that the ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling enzyme SNF2H plays a major role organising arrays of nucleosomes adjacent to the binding sites for the architectural transcription factor CTCF sites and acts to promote CTCF binding. At many other factor binding sites SNF2H and the related enzyme SNF2L contribute to nucleosome organisation. The action of SNF2H at CTCF sites is functionally important as depletion of CTCF or SNF2H affects transcription of a common group of genes. This suggests that chromatin remodelling ATPase's most closely related to the Drosophila ISWI protein contribute to the function of many human gene regulatory elements. PMID:27019336

  20. The Chromatin Remodelling Enzymes SNF2H and SNF2L Position Nucleosomes adjacent to CTCF and Other Transcription Factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Wiechens

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Within the genomes of metazoans, nucleosomes are highly organised adjacent to the binding sites for a subset of transcription factors. Here we have sought to investigate which chromatin remodelling enzymes are responsible for this. We find that the ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling enzyme SNF2H plays a major role organising arrays of nucleosomes adjacent to the binding sites for the architectural transcription factor CTCF sites and acts to promote CTCF binding. At many other factor binding sites SNF2H and the related enzyme SNF2L contribute to nucleosome organisation. The action of SNF2H at CTCF sites is functionally important as depletion of CTCF or SNF2H affects transcription of a common group of genes. This suggests that chromatin remodelling ATPase's most closely related to the Drosophila ISWI protein contribute to the function of many human gene regulatory elements.

  1. The Chromatin Remodelling Enzymes SNF2H and SNF2L Position Nucleosomes adjacent to CTCF and Other Transcription Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiechens, Nicola; Singh, Vijender; Gkikopoulos, Triantaffyllos; Schofield, Pieta; Rocha, Sonia; Owen-Hughes, Tom

    2016-03-01

    Within the genomes of metazoans, nucleosomes are highly organised adjacent to the binding sites for a subset of transcription factors. Here we have sought to investigate which chromatin remodelling enzymes are responsible for this. We find that the ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling enzyme SNF2H plays a major role organising arrays of nucleosomes adjacent to the binding sites for the architectural transcription factor CTCF sites and acts to promote CTCF binding. At many other factor binding sites SNF2H and the related enzyme SNF2L contribute to nucleosome organisation. The action of SNF2H at CTCF sites is functionally important as depletion of CTCF or SNF2H affects transcription of a common group of genes. This suggests that chromatin remodelling ATPase's most closely related to the Drosophila ISWI protein contribute to the function of many human gene regulatory elements.

  2. Effects of mexiletine on ATP sensitive K+ channel of rat skeletal muscle fibres: a state dependent mechanism of action

    OpenAIRE

    Tricarico, Domenico; Barbieri, Mariagrazia; Franchini, Carlo; Tortorella, Vincenzo; Conte Camerino, Diana

    1998-01-01

    The effects of mexiletine were evaluated on the ATP-sensitive K+ channel (KATP) of rat skeletal muscle fibres using patch clamp techniques. The effects of mexiletine were studied on macropatch currents 20 s (maximally activated), 8 min (early stage of rundown) and 15 min (late stage of rundown) after excision in the absence or in the presence of internal ADP (50–100 μM) or UDP (500 μM). In addition, the effects of mexiletine were tested on single channel.In the absence of ADP and UDP, mexilet...

  3. Proteomics of a fuzzy organelle: interphase chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustatscher, Georg; Hégarat, Nadia; Wills, Karen L H; Furlan, Cristina; Bukowski-Wills, Jimi-Carlo; Hochegger, Helfrid; Rappsilber, Juri

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin proteins mediate replication, regulate expression, and ensure integrity of the genome. So far, a comprehensive inventory of interphase chromatin has not been determined. This is largely due to its heterogeneous and dynamic composition, which makes conclusive biochemical purification difficult, if not impossible. As a fuzzy organelle, it defies classical organellar proteomics and cannot be described by a single and ultimate list of protein components. Instead, we propose a new approach that provides a quantitative assessment of a protein's probability to function in chromatin. We integrate chromatin composition over a range of different biochemical and biological conditions. This resulted in interphase chromatin probabilities for 7635 human proteins, including 1840 previously uncharacterized proteins. We demonstrate the power of our large-scale data-driven annotation during the analysis of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) regulation in chromatin. Quantitative protein ontologies may provide a general alternative to list-based investigations of organelles and complement Gene Ontology. PMID:24534090

  4. Analysis of the distribution and evolution of the ATP-dependent DNA ligases of bacteria delineates a distinct phylogenetic group 'Lig E'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Adele; Hjerde, Erik; Kahlke, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Prior to the discovery of a minimal ATP-dependent DNA ligase in Haemophilus influenzae, bacteria were thought to only possess a NAD-dependent ligase, which was involved in sealing of Okazaki fragments. We now know that a diverse range of bacterial species possess up to six of these accessory bacterial ATP-dependent DNA ligases (b-ADLs), which vary in size and enzymatic domain associations. Here we compare the domain structure of different types of b-ADLs and investigate their distribution among the bacterial domain to describe possible evolutionary trajectories that gave rise to the sequence and structural diversity of these enzymes. Previous biochemical and genetic analyses have delineated three main classes of these enzymes: Lig B, Lig C and Lig D, which appear to have descended from a common ancestor within the bacterial domain. In the present study, we delineate a fourth group of b-ADLs, Lig E, which possesses a number of unique features at the primary and tertiary structural levels. The biochemical characteristics, domain structure and inferred extracellular location sets this group apart from the other b-ADLs. The results presented here indicate that the Lig E type ligases were horizontally transferred into bacteria in a separate event from other b-ADLs possibly from a bacteriophage. PMID:26412580

  5. MgATP-concentration dependence of protection of yeast vacuolar V-ATPase from inactivation by 7-chloro-4-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole supports a bi-site catalytic mechanism of ATP hydrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milgrom, Elena M. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, State University of New York, Upstate Medical University, 750 East Adams Street, Syracuse, NY 13210 (United States); Milgrom, Yakov M., E-mail: milgromy@upstate.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, State University of New York, Upstate Medical University, 750 East Adams Street, Syracuse, NY 13210 (United States)

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MgATP protects V-ATPase from inactivation by 7-chloro-4-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer V-ATPase activity saturation with MgATP is not sufficient for complete protection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The results support a bi-site catalytic mechanism for V-ATPase. -- Abstract: Catalytic site occupancy of the yeast vacuolar V-ATPase during ATP hydrolysis in the presence of an ATP-regenerating system was probed using sensitivity of the enzyme to inhibition by 7-chloro-4-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole (NBD-Cl). The results show that, regardless of the presence or absence of the proton-motive force across the vacuolar membrane, saturation of V-ATPase activity at increasing MgATP concentrations is accompanied by only partial protection of the enzyme from inhibition by NBD-Cl. Both in the presence and absence of an uncoupler, complete protection of V-ATPase from inhibition by NBD-Cl requires MgATP concentrations that are significantly higher than those expected from the K{sub m} values for MgATP. The results are inconsistent with a tri-site model and support a bi-site model for a mechanism of ATP hydrolysis by V-ATPase.

  6. A novel ATP-dependent conformation in p97 N-D1 fragment revealed by crystal structures of disease-related mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Wai Kwan; Li, Dongyang; Li, Chou-chi; Esser, Lothar; Dai, Renming; Guo, Liang; Xia1, Di (IIT); (NIH)

    2010-11-11

    Mutations in p97, a major cytosolic AAA (ATPases associated with a variety of cellular activities) chaperone, cause inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget's disease of the bone and frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD). IBMPFD mutants have single amino-acid substitutions at the interface between the N-terminal domain (N-domain) and the adjacent AAA domain (D1), resulting in a reduced affinity for ADP. The structures of p97 N-D1 fragments bearing IBMPFD mutations adopt an atypical N-domain conformation in the presence of Mg{sup 2+} {center_dot} ATP{gamma}S, which is reversible by ADP, showing for the first time the nucleotide-dependent conformational change of the N-domain. The transition from the ADP- to the ATP{gamma}S-bound state is accompanied by a loop-to-helix conversion in the N-D1 linker and by an apparent re-ordering in the N-terminal region of p97. X-ray scattering experiments suggest that wild-type p97 subunits undergo a similar nucleotide-dependent N-domain conformational change. We propose that IBMPFD mutations alter the timing of the transition between nucleotide states by destabilizing the ADP-bound form and consequently interfere with the interactions between the N-domains and their substrates.

  7. Yeast rad7-rad16 complex, specific for the nucleotide excision repair of the nontranscribed DNA strand, is an ATP-dependent DNA damage sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In eukaryotes, nucleotide excision repair of ultraviolet light-damaged DNA is a highly intricate process that requires a large number of evolutionary conserved protein factors. Genetic studies in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have indicated a specific role of the RAD7 and RAD16 genes in the repair of transcriptionally inactive DNA. Here we show that the RAD7- and RAD16-encoded products exist as a complex of 1:1 stoichiometry, exhibiting an apparent dissociation constant (Kd) of <4 x 10(-10) M. The Rad7-Rad16 complex has been purified to near homogeneity in this study and is shown to bind, in an ATP-dependent manner and with high specificity, to DNA damaged by ultraviolet light. Importantly, inclusion of the Rad7-Rad16 complex in the in vitro nucleotide excision repair system that consists entirely of purified components results in a marked stimulation of damage specific incision. Thus, Rad7-Rad16 complex is the ATP-dependent DNA damage sensor that specifically functions with the ensemble of nucleotide excision repair factor (NEF) 1, NEF2, NEF3, and replication protein A in the repair of transcriptionally inactive DNA. We name this novel complex of Rad7 and Rad16 proteins NEF4. (author)

  8. The chromatin remodeler SPLAYED regulates specific stress signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin W Walley

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Organisms are continuously exposed to a myriad of environmental stresses. Central to an organism's survival is the ability to mount a robust transcriptional response to the imposed stress. An emerging mechanism of transcriptional control involves dynamic changes in chromatin structure. Alterations in chromatin structure are brought about by a number of different mechanisms, including chromatin modifications, which covalently modify histone proteins; incorporation of histone variants; and chromatin remodeling, which utilizes ATP hydrolysis to alter histone-DNA contacts. While considerable insight into the mechanisms of chromatin remodeling has been gained, the biological role of chromatin remodeling complexes beyond their function as regulators of cellular differentiation and development has remained poorly understood. Here, we provide genetic, biochemical, and biological evidence for the critical role of chromatin remodeling in mediating plant defense against specific biotic stresses. We found that the Arabidopsis SWI/SNF class chromatin remodeling ATPase SPLAYED (SYD is required for the expression of selected genes downstream of the jasmonate (JA and ethylene (ET signaling pathways. SYD is also directly recruited to the promoters of several of these genes. Furthermore, we show that SYD is required for resistance against the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea but not the biotrophic pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. These findings demonstrate not only that chromatin remodeling is required for selective pathogen resistance, but also that chromatin remodelers such as SYD can regulate specific pathways within biotic stress signaling networks.

  9. Toxoplasma gondii TgIST co-opts host chromatin repressors dampening STAT1-dependent gene regulation and IFN-γ-mediated host defenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Gabrielle; Braun, Laurence; Brenier-Pinchart, Marie-Pierre; Vollaire, Julien; Josserand, Véronique; Bertini, Rose-Laurence; Varesano, Aurélie; Touquet, Bastien; De Bock, Pieter-Jan; Coute, Yohann; Tardieux, Isabelle; Bougdour, Alexandre; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali

    2016-08-22

    An early hallmark of Toxoplasma gondii infection is the rapid control of the parasite population by a potent multifaceted innate immune response that engages resident and homing immune cells along with pro- and counter-inflammatory cytokines. In this context, IFN-γ activates a variety of T. gondii-targeting activities in immune and nonimmune cells but can also contribute to host immune pathology. T. gondii has evolved mechanisms to timely counteract the host IFN-γ defenses by interfering with the transcription of IFN-γ-stimulated genes. We now have identified TgIST (T. gondii inhibitor of STAT1 transcriptional activity) as a critical molecular switch that is secreted by intracellular parasites and traffics to the host cell nucleus where it inhibits STAT1-dependent proinflammatory gene expression. We show that TgIST not only sequesters STAT1 on dedicated loci but also promotes shaping of a nonpermissive chromatin through its capacity to recruit the nucleosome remodeling deacetylase (NuRD) transcriptional repressor. We found that during mice acute infection, TgIST-deficient parasites are rapidly eliminated by the homing Gr1(+) inflammatory monocytes, thus highlighting the protective role of TgIST against IFN-γ-mediated killing. By uncovering TgIST functions, this study brings novel evidence on how T. gondii has devised a molecular weapon of choice to take control over a ubiquitous immune gene expression mechanism in metazoans, as a way to promote long-term parasitism. PMID:27503074

  10. Chromatin is wonderful stuff.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. van Driel

    2007-01-01

    Chromatin molecules have properties that set them aside from all other biomacromolecules in the cell. (i) Chromosomes, which are single chromatin molecules, are the largest macromolecules in eukaryotic cells. (ii) Chromatin molecules carry the cell's genetic and epigenetic information and all contro

  11. Nucleosome dynamics during chromatin remodeling in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Srinivas; Henikoff, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Precise positioning of nucleosomes around regulatory sites is achieved by the action of chromatin remodelers, which use the energy of ATP to slide, evict or change the composition of nucleosomes. Chromatin remodelers act to bind nucleosomes, disrupt histone-DNA interactions and translocate the DNA around the histone core to reposition nucleosomes. Hence, remodeling is expected to involve nucleosomal intermediates with a structural organization that is distinct from intact nucleosomes. We describe the identification of a partially unwrapped nucleosome structure using methods that map histone-DNA contacts genome-wide. This alternative nucleosome structure is likely formed as an intermediate or by-product during nucleosome remodeling by the RSC complex. Identification of the loss of histone-DNA contacts during chromatin remodeling by RSC in vivo has implications for the regulation of transcriptional initiation. PMID:26933790

  12. Chromatin Structure and Function

    CERN Document Server

    Wolffe, Alan P

    1999-01-01

    The Third Edition of Chromatin: Structure and Function brings the reader up-to-date with the remarkable progress in chromatin research over the past three years. It has been extensively rewritten to cover new material on chromatin remodeling, histone modification, nuclear compartmentalization, DNA methylation, and transcriptional co-activators and co-repressors. The book is written in a clear and concise fashion, with 60 new illustrations. Chromatin: Structure and Function provides the reader with a concise and coherent account of the nature, structure, and assembly of chromatin and its active

  13. MgATP-concentration dependence of protection of yeast vacuolar V-ATPase from inactivation by 7-chloro-4-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole supports a bi-site catalytic mechanism of ATP hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgrom, Elena M; Milgrom, Yakov M

    2012-06-29

    Catalytic site occupancy of the yeast vacuolar V-ATPase during ATP hydrolysis in the presence of an ATP-regenerating system was probed using sensitivity of the enzyme to inhibition by 7-chloro-4-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole (NBD-Cl). The results show that, regardless of the presence or absence of the proton-motive force across the vacuolar membrane, saturation of V-ATPase activity at increasing MgATP concentrations is accompanied by only partial protection of the enzyme from inhibition by NBD-Cl. Both in the presence and absence of an uncoupler, complete protection of V-ATPase from inhibition by NBD-Cl requires MgATP concentrations that are significantly higher than those expected from the K(m) values for MgATP. The results are inconsistent with a tri-site model and support a bi-site model for a mechanism of ATP hydrolysis by V-ATPase. PMID:22659742

  14. Chromatin Remodelers: From Function to Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gernot Längst

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin remodelers are key players in the regulation of chromatin accessibility and nucleosome positioning on the eukaryotic DNA, thereby essential for all DNA dependent biological processes. Thus, it is not surprising that upon of deregulation of those molecular machines healthy cells can turn into cancerous cells. Even though the remodeling enzymes are very abundant and a multitude of different enzymes and chromatin remodeling complexes exist in the cell, the particular remodeling complex with its specific nucleosome positioning features must be at the right place at the right time in order to ensure the proper regulation of the DNA dependent processes. To achieve this, chromatin remodeling complexes harbor protein domains that specifically read chromatin targeting signals, such as histone modifications, DNA sequence/structure, non-coding RNAs, histone variants or DNA bound interacting proteins. Recent studies reveal the interaction between non-coding RNAs and chromatin remodeling complexes showing importance of RNA in remodeling enzyme targeting, scaffolding and regulation. In this review, we summarize current understanding of chromatin remodeling enzyme targeting to chromatin and their role in cancer development.

  15. Genome-wide nucleosome specificity and function of chromatin remodellers in ES cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Dieuleveult, Maud; Yen, Kuangyu; Hmitou, Isabelle; Depaux, Arnaud; Boussouar, Fayçal; Dargham, Daria Bou; Jounier, Sylvie; Humbertclaude, Hélène; Ribierre, Florence; Baulard, Céline; Farrell, Nina P.; Park, Bongsoo; Keime, Céline; Carrière, Lucie; Berlivet, Soizick; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo; Werner, Michel; Deleuze, Jean-François; Olaso, Robert; Aude, Jean-Christophe; Chantalat, Sophie; Pugh, B. Franklin; Gérard, Matthieu

    2015-01-01

    Summary ATP-dependent chromatin remodellers allow access to DNA for transcription factors and the general transcription machinery, but whether mammalian chromatin remodellers1–3 target specific nucleosomes to regulate transcription is unclear. Here, we present genome-wide remodeller-nucleosome interaction profiles for Chd1, Chd2, Chd4, Chd6, Chd8, Chd9, Brg1 and Ep400 in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. These remodellers bind one or both full nucleosomes that flank MNase-defined nucleosome-free promoter regions (NFRs), where they separate divergent transcription. Surprisingly, large CpG-rich NFRs that extend downstream of annotated transcriptional start sites (TSSs) are nevertheless chromatinized with non-nucleosomal or subnucleosomal histone variants (H3.3 and H2A.Z) and modifications (H3K4me3 and H3K27ac). RNA polymerase (pol) II therefore navigates hundreds of bp of altered chromatin in the sense direction before encountering an MNase-resistant nucleosome at the 3′ end of the NFR. Transcriptome analysis upon remodeller depletion reveals reciprocal mechanisms of transcriptional regulation by remodellers. Whereas at active genes individual remodellers play either positive or negative roles via altering nucleosome stability, at polycomb-enriched bivalent genes the same remodellers act in an opposite manner. These findings indicate that remodellers target specific nucleosomes at the edge of NFRs, where they regulate ES cell transcriptional programs. PMID:26814966

  16. Genome-wide nucleosome specificity and function of chromatin remodellers in ES cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Dieuleveult, Maud; Yen, Kuangyu; Hmitou, Isabelle; Depaux, Arnaud; Boussouar, Fayçal; Bou Dargham, Daria; Jounier, Sylvie; Humbertclaude, Hélène; Ribierre, Florence; Baulard, Céline; Farrell, Nina P; Park, Bongsoo; Keime, Céline; Carrière, Lucie; Berlivet, Soizick; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo; Werner, Michel; Deleuze, Jean-François; Olaso, Robert; Aude, Jean-Christophe; Chantalat, Sophie; Pugh, B Franklin; Gérard, Matthieu

    2016-02-01

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodellers allow access to DNA for transcription factors and the general transcription machinery, but whether mammalian chromatin remodellers target specific nucleosomes to regulate transcription is unclear. Here we present genome-wide remodeller-nucleosome interaction profiles for the chromatin remodellers Chd1, Chd2, Chd4, Chd6, Chd8, Chd9, Brg1 and Ep400 in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. These remodellers bind one or both full nucleosomes that flank micrococcal nuclease (MNase)-defined nucleosome-free promoter regions (NFRs), where they separate divergent transcription. Surprisingly, large CpG-rich NFRs that extend downstream of annotated transcriptional start sites are nevertheless bound by non-nucleosomal or subnucleosomal histone variants (H3.3 and H2A.Z) and marked by H3K4me3 and H3K27ac modifications. RNA polymerase II therefore navigates hundreds of base pairs of altered chromatin in the sense direction before encountering an MNase-resistant nucleosome at the 3' end of the NFR. Transcriptome analysis after remodeller depletion reveals reciprocal mechanisms of transcriptional regulation by remodellers. Whereas at active genes individual remodellers have either positive or negative roles via altering nucleosome stability, at polycomb-enriched bivalent genes the same remodellers act in an opposite manner. These findings indicate that remodellers target specific nucleosomes at the edge of NFRs, where they regulate ES cell transcriptional programs.

  17. Where splicing joins chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Hnilicová, Jarmila; Staněk, David

    2011-01-01

    There are numerous data suggesting that two key steps in gene expression—transcription and splicing influence each other closely. For a long time it was known that chromatin modifications regulate transcription, but only recently it was shown that chromatin and histone modifications play a significant role in pre-mRNA splicing. Here we summarize interactions between splicing machinery and chromatin and discuss their potential functional significance. We focus mainly on histone acetylation and...

  18. Influence of a mutation in the ATP-binding region of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II on its interaction with peptide substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praseeda, Mullasseril; Pradeep, Kurup K; Krupa, Ananth; Krishna, S Sri; Leena, Suseela; Kumar, R Rajeev; Cheriyan, John; Mayadevi, Madhavan; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Omkumar, Ramakrishnapillai V

    2004-03-01

    CaMKII (Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II) is expressed in high concentrations in the brain and is found enriched in the postsynaptic densities. The enzyme is activated by the binding of calmodulin to the autoregulatory domain in the presence of high levels of intracellular Ca2+, which causes removal of auto-inhibition from the N-terminal catalytic domain. Knowledge of the 3D (three-dimensional) structure of this enzyme at atomic resolution is restricted to the association domain, a region at the extreme C-terminus. The catalytic domain of CaMKII shares high sequence similarity with CaMKI. The 3D structure of the catalytic core of CaMKI comprises ATP- and substrate-binding regions in a cleft between two distinct lobes, similar to the structures of all protein kinases solved to date. Mutation of Glu-60, a residue in the ATP-binding region of CaMKII, to glycine exerts different effects on phosphorylation of two peptide substrates, syntide and NR2B ( N -methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 2B) 17-mer. Although the mutation caused increases in the Km values for phosphorylation for both the peptide substrates, the effect on the kcat values for each was different. The kcat value decreased in the case of syntide, whereas it increased in the case of the NR2B peptide as a result of the mutation. This resulted in a significant decrease in the apparent kcat/Km value for syntide, but the change was minimal for the NR2B peptide. These results indicate that different catalytic mechanisms are employed by the kinase for the two peptides. Molecular modelling suggests structural changes are likely to occur at the peptide-binding pocket in the active state of the enzyme as a consequence of the Glu-60-->Gly mutation. PMID:14558884

  19. Optical ATP Biosensor for Extracellular ATP Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, C; Huang, C.-Y.C.; Lin, W-C

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular Adenosine-5′-triphosphate (ATP) is an important multi-functional molecule which can mediate numerous physiological activities by activating purinergic P2 receptors. The objective of this study was to develop a novel optical ATP sensor for in-situ extracellular ATP measurement in biological tissues. The optical ATP sensor was made by applying two layers of sol-gel coating to the end of an optical fiber probe end. The first layer contained ruthenium complex for sensing changes in ...

  20. Cellular ATP Synthesis Mediated by Type III Sodium-dependent Phosphate Transporter Pit-1 Is Critical to Chondrogenesis*

    OpenAIRE

    Sugita, Atsushi; Kawai, Shinji; Hayashibara, Tetsuyuki; Amano, Atsuo; Ooshima, Takashi; Michigami, Toshimi; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Yoneda, Toshiyuki

    2010-01-01

    Disturbed endochondral ossification in X-linked hypophosphatemia indicates an involvement of Pi in chondrogenesis. We studied the role of the sodium-dependent Pi cotransporters (NPT), which are a widely recognized regulator of cellular Pi homeostasis, and the downstream events in chondrogenesis using Hyp mice, the murine homolog of human X-linked hypophosphatemia. Hyp mice showed reduced apoptosis and mineralization in hypertrophic cartilage. Hyp chondrocytes in culture displayed decreased ap...

  1. Cell swelling activates ATP-dependent voltage-gated chloride channels in M-1 mouse cortical collecting duct cells

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    In the present study we used whole-cell patch clamp recordings to investigate swelling-activated Cl-currents (ICl-swell) in M-1 mouse cortical collecting duct (CCD) cells. Hypotonic cell swelling reversibly increased the whole-cell Cl- conductance by about 30-fold. The I-V relationship was outwardly-rectifying and ICl-swell displayed a characteristic voltage-dependence with relatively fast inactivation upon large depolarizing and slow activation upon hyperpolarizing voltage steps. Reversal po...

  2. Glucose-stimulated oscillations in free cytosolic ATP concentration imaged in single islet beta-cells: evidence for a Ca2+-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainscow, Edward K; Rutter, Guy A

    2002-02-01

    Normal glucose-stimulated insulin secretion is pulsatile, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this pulsatility are poorly understood. Oscillations in the intracellular free [ATP]/[ADP] ratio represent one possible mechanism because they would be expected to cause fluctuations in ATP-sensitive K(+) channel activity and hence oscillatory Ca(2+) influx. After imaging recombinant firefly luciferase, expressed via an adenoviral vector in single human or mouse islet beta-cells, we report here that cytosolic free ATP concentrations oscillate and that these oscillations are affected by glucose. In human beta-cells, oscillations were observed at both 3 and 15 mmol/l glucose, but the oscillations were of a longer wavelength at the higher glucose concentration (167 vs. 66 s). Mouse beta-cells displayed oscillations in both cytosolic free [Ca(2+)] and [ATP] only at elevated glucose concentrations, both with a period of 120 s. To explore the causal relationship between [Ca(2+)] and [ATP] oscillations, the regulation of each was further investigated in populations of MIN6 beta-cells. Incubation in Ca(2+)-free medium lowered cytosolic [Ca(2+)] but increased [ATP] in MIN6 cells at both 3 and 30 mmol/l glucose. Removal of external Ca(2+) increased [ATP], possibly by decreasing ATP consumption by endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPases. These results allow a model to be constructed of the beta-cell metabolic oscillator that drives nutrient-induced insulin secretion.

  3. New GroEL-like chaperonin of bacteriophage OBP Pseudomonas fluorescens suppresses thermal protein aggregation in an ATP-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenyuk, Pavel I; Orlov, Victor N; Sokolova, Olga S; Kurochkina, Lidia P

    2016-08-01

    Recently, we discovered and studied the first virus-encoded chaperonin of bacteriophage EL Pseudomonas aeruginosa, gene product (gp) 146. In the present study, we performed bioinformatics analysis of currently predicted GroEL-like proteins encoded by phage genomes in comparison with cellular and mitochondrial chaperonins. Putative phage chaperonins share a low similarity and do not form a monophyletic group; nevertheless, they are closer to bacterial chaperonins in the phylogenetic tree. Experimental investigation of putative GroEL-like chaperonin proteins has been continued by physicochemical and functional characterization of gp246 encoded by the genome of Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteriophage OBP. Unlike the more usual double-ring architecture of chaperonins, including the EL gp146, the recombinant gp246 produced by Escherichia coli cells has been purified as a single heptameric ring. It possesses ATPase activity and does not require a co-chaperonin for its function. In vitro experiments demonstrated that gp246 is able to suppress the thermal protein inactivation and aggregation in an ATP-dependent manner, thus indicating chaperonin function. Single-particle electron microscopy analysis revealed the different conformational states of OBP chaperonin, depending on the bound nucleotide. PMID:27247423

  4. Mutating the Conserved Q-loop Glutamine 1291 Selectively Disrupts Adenylate Kinase-dependent Channel Gating of the ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Adenylate Kinase Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) and Reduces Channel Function in Primary Human Airway Epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qian; Ernst, Sarah E; Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Shah, Viral S; Ver Heul, Amanda R; Welsh, Michael J; Randak, Christoph O

    2015-05-29

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and two other non-membrane-bound ABC proteins, Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) protein, exhibit adenylate kinase activity in the presence of physiologic concentrations of ATP and AMP or ADP (ATP + AMP ⇆ 2 ADP). The crystal structure of the nucleotide-binding domain of an SMC protein in complex with the adenylate kinase bisubstrate inhibitor P(1),P(5)-di(adenosine-5') pentaphosphate (Ap5A) suggests that AMP binds to the conserved Q-loop glutamine during the adenylate kinase reaction. Therefore, we hypothesized that mutating the corresponding residue in CFTR, Gln-1291, selectively disrupts adenylate kinase-dependent channel gating at physiologic nucleotide concentrations. We found that substituting Gln-1291 with bulky side-chain amino acids abolished the effects of Ap5A, AMP, and adenosine 5'-monophosphoramidate on CFTR channel function. 8-Azidoadenosine 5'-monophosphate photolabeling of the AMP-binding site and adenylate kinase activity were disrupted in Q1291F CFTR. The Gln-1291 mutations did not alter the potency of ATP at stimulating current or ATP-dependent gating when ATP was the only nucleotide present. However, when physiologic concentrations of ADP and AMP were added, adenylate kinase-deficient Q1291F channels opened significantly less than wild type. Consistent with this result, we found that Q1291F CFTR displayed significantly reduced Cl(-) channel function in well differentiated primary human airway epithelia. These results indicate that a highly conserved residue of an ABC transporter plays an important role in adenylate kinase-dependent CFTR gating. Furthermore, the results suggest that adenylate kinase activity is important for normal CFTR channel function in airway epithelia.

  5. The RSC Chromatin Remodeling Complex Bears an Essential Fungal-Specific Protein Module With Broad Functional Roles

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Boris; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Tempst, Paul; Bradley R Cairns

    2006-01-01

    RSC is an essential and abundant ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complex from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here we show that the RSC components Rsc7/Npl6 and Rsc14/Ldb7 interact physically and/or functionally with Rsc3, Rsc30, and Htl1 to form a module important for a broad range of RSC functions. A strain lacking Rsc7 fails to properly assemble RSC, which confers sensitivity to temperature and to agents that cause DNA damage, microtubule depolymerization, or cell wall stress (likely via tran...

  6. Crystal structure of Escherichia coli cytidine triphosphate synthetase, a nucleotide-regulated glutamine amidotransferase/ATP-dependent amidoligase fusion protein and homologue of anticancer and antiparasitic drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endrizzi, James A; Kim, Hanseong; Anderson, Paul M; Baldwin, Enoch P

    2004-06-01

    Cytidine triphosphate synthetases (CTPSs) produce CTP from UTP and glutamine, and regulate intracellular CTP levels through interactions with the four ribonucleotide triphosphates. We solved the 2.3-A resolution crystal structure of Escherichia coli CTPS using Hg-MAD phasing. The structure reveals a nearly symmetric 222 tetramer, in which each bifunctional monomer contains a dethiobiotin synthetase-like amidoligase N-terminal domain and a Type 1 glutamine amidotransferase C-terminal domain. For each amidoligase active site, essential ATP- and UTP-binding surfaces are contributed by three monomers, suggesting that activity requires tetramer formation, and that a nucleotide-dependent dimer-tetramer equilibrium contributes to the observed positive cooperativity. A gated channel that spans 25 A between the glutamine hydrolysis and amidoligase active sites provides a path for ammonia diffusion. The channel is accessible to solvent at the base of a cleft adjoining the glutamine hydrolysis active site, providing an entry point for exogenous ammonia. Guanine nucleotide binding sites of structurally related GTPases superimpose on this cleft, providing insights into allosteric regulation by GTP. Mutations that confer nucleoside drug resistance and release CTP inhibition map to a pocket that neighbors the UTP-binding site and can accommodate a pyrimidine ring. Its location suggests that competitive feedback inhibition is affected via a distinct product/drug binding site that overlaps the substrate triphosphate binding site. Overall, the E. coli structure provides a framework for homology modeling of other CTPSs and structure-based design of anti-CTPS therapeutics. PMID:15157079

  7. Physiological levels of ATP Negatively Regulate Proteasome Function

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Hongbiao; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Li, Shujue; Liu, Ningning; Lian, Wen; McDowell, Emily; Zhou, Ping; Zhao, Canguo; Guo, Haiping; Zhang, Change; Yang, Changshan; Wen, Guangmei; Dong, Xiaoxian; Lu, Li; Ma, Ningfang

    2010-01-01

    Intracellular protein degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system is ATP-dependent and the optimal ATP concentration to activate proteasome function in vitro is ~100 μM. Intracellular ATP levels are generally in the low millimolar range but ATP at a level within this range was shown to inhibit proteasome peptidase activities in vitro. Here we report new evidence that supports a hypothesis that intracellular ATP at the physiological levels bidirectionally regulates 26S proteasome proteolyti...

  8. Dose-Dependent ATP Depletion and Cancer Cell Death following Calcium Electroporation, Relative Effect of Calcium Concentration and Electric Field Strength

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Emilie Louise; Sozer, Esin Bengisu; Romeo, Stefania; Frandsen, Stine Krog; Vernier, P. Thomas; Gehl, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Background Electroporation, a method for increasing the permeability of membranes to ions and small molecules, is used in the clinic with chemotherapeutic drugs for cancer treatment (electrochemotherapy). Electroporation with calcium causes ATP (adenosine triphosphate) depletion and cancer cell death and could be a novel cancer treatment. This study aims at understanding the relationship between applied electric field, calcium concentration, ATP depletion and efficacy. Methods In three human ...

  9. Structure and function of ubiquitin: evidence for differential interactions of arginine-74 with the activating enzyme and the proteases of ATP-dependent proteolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ubiquitin was modified with the anionic, arginine-specific reagent 4-(oxoacetyl)phenoxyacetic acid in order to study the relationship between structure and function of the molecule. Four different derivatives (A, B, C, and D) were purified from the reaction mixture by anion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography and subjected to tryptic peptide mapping to determine the location of the modification(s). These derivatives were stable throughout the procedures required for purification, tryptic hydrolysis, and peptide mapping. Derivative A was modified at arginine-42, derivative B at arginine-72, derivative C at arginines-42 and -72, and derivative D at arginine-74. Modification of ubiquitin with 14C-labeled 4-(oxoacetyl)phenoxyacetic acid indicated that the reagent formed a stable, 1:1 complex with arginine residues of the protein. Native ubiquitin and each of the four derivatives were tested for their ability to stimulate 32P exchange between ATP and pyrophosphate, a reaction catalyzed by enzyme 1 of the ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic pathway. A and C were capable of promoting this exchange at a rate only 15% that of native ubiquitin, B stimulated the exchange to 25%, and D stimulated exchange to 60% of the native level. None of the derivative was capable of promoting a significant level of ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis. These results indicate that in this system, the integrity or arginines-42, -72, and -74 is essential for full function of ubiquitin and suggest that the ubiquitin activating enzyme (E1) and the protease(s) of the system recognize different regions or conformations of ubiquitin

  10. Leishmania infantum LeIF protein is an ATP-dependent RNA helicase and an eIF4A-like factor that inhibits translation in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barhoumi, Mourad; Tanner, N K; Banroques, Josette; Linder, Patrick; Guizani, Ikram

    2006-11-01

    LeIF, a Leishmania protein similar to the eukaryotic initiation factor eIF4A, which is a prototype of the DEAD box protein family, was originally described as a Th1-type natural adjuvant and as an antigen that induces an IL12-mediated Th1 response in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of leishmaniasis patients. This study aims to characterize this protein by comparative biochemical and genetic analysis with eIF4A in order to assess its potential as a target for drug development. We show that a His-tagged, recombinant, LeIF protein of Leishmania infantum, which was purified from Escherichia coli, is both an RNA-dependent ATPase and an ATP-dependent RNA helicase in vitro, as described previously for other members of the DEAD box helicase protein family. In vivo experiments show that the LeIF gene cannot complement the deletion of the essential TIF1 and TIF2 genes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that encode eIF4A. In contrast, expression of LeIF inhibits yeast growth when endogenous eIF4A is expressed off only one of its two encoding genes. Furthermore, in vitro binding assays show that LeIF interacts with yeast eIF4G. These results show an unproductive interaction of LeIF with translation initiation factors in yeast. Furthermore, the 25 amino terminal residues were shown to enhance the ability of LeIF to interfere with the translation machinery in yeast. PMID:17087726

  11. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the ATPase domain of the σ(54)-dependent transcription activator NtrC1 from Aquifex aeolicus bound to the ATP analog ADP-BeFx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sysoeva, Tatyana A; Yennawar, Neela; Allaire, Marc; Nixon, B Tracy

    2013-12-01

    One way that bacteria regulate the transcription of specific genes to adapt to environmental challenges is to use different σ factors that direct the RNA polymerase holoenzyme to distinct promoters. Unlike σ(70) RNA polymerase (RNAP), σ(54) RNAP is unable to initiate transcription without an activator: enhancer-binding protein (EBP). All EBPs contain one ATPase domain that belongs to the family of ATPases associated with various cellular activities (AAA+ ATPases). AAA+ ATPases use the energy of ATP hydrolysis to remodel different target macromolecules to perform distinct functions. These mechanochemical enzymes are known to form ring-shaped oligomers whose conformations strongly depend upon nucleotide status. Here, the crystallization of the AAA+ ATPase domain of an EBP from Aquifex aeolicus, NtrC1, in the presence of the non-hydrolyzable ATP analog ADP-BeFx is reported. X-ray diffraction data were collected from two crystals from two different protein fractions of the NtrC1 ATPase domain. Previously, this domain was co-crystallized with ADP and ATP, but the latter crystals were grown from the Walker B substitution variant E239A. Therefore, the new data sets are the first for a wild-type EBP ATPase domain co-crystallized with an ATP analog and they reveal a new crystal form. The resulting structure(s) will shed light on the mechanism of EBP-type transcription activators. PMID:24316836

  12. Interaction of sulfur mustard with rat liver salt fractionated chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Mahvash; Nateghi, M; Rabbani, A

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the interaction of an alkylating agent, sulfur mustard (SM) with rat liver active (S1 and S2) and inactive (P2) chromatin was investigated employing UV/vis spectroscopy and gel electrophoreses. The results show that SM affects the chromatin structure in a dose-dependent manner. The binding of SM to fractions is different. At lower concentrations (<500 microM), SM seems to unfold the structure and at higher concentrations, it induces aggregation and condensation of chromatin possibly via forming cross-links between the chromatin components. The extent of condensation in S2 is higher when compared to the P2 fraction.

  13. Reprogramming the chromatin landscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miranda, Tina B; Voss, Ty C; Sung, Myong-Hee;

    2013-01-01

    , mechanistic details defining the cellular interactions between ER and GR are poorly understood. We investigated genome-wide binding profiles for ER and GR upon coactivation and characterized the status of the chromatin landscape. We describe a novel mechanism dictating the molecular interplay between ER...... and GR. Upon induction, GR modulates access of ER to specific sites in the genome by reorganization of the chromatin configuration for these elements. Binding to these newly accessible sites occurs either by direct recognition of ER response elements or indirectly through interactions with other factors...

  14. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the ATPase domain of the σ54-dependent transcription activator NtrC1 from Aquifex aeolicus bound to the ATP analog ADP–BeFx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study reports the crystallization of a new nucleotide state of the ATPase domain of a bacterial transcription activator NtrC1 from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus. Wild-type NtrC1 ATPase domain was crystallized in the presence of the ATP analog ADP–BeFx–Mg and the crystals diffracted anisotropically to at best 3.2, 5.2 and 3.2 Å resolution in the a*, b* and c* directions, respectively. One way that bacteria regulate the transcription of specific genes to adapt to environmental challenges is to use different σ factors that direct the RNA polymerase holoenzyme to distinct promoters. Unlike σ70 RNA polymerase (RNAP), σ54 RNAP is unable to initiate transcription without an activator: enhancer-binding protein (EBP). All EBPs contain one ATPase domain that belongs to the family of ATPases associated with various cellular activities (AAA+ ATPases). AAA+ ATPases use the energy of ATP hydrolysis to remodel different target macromolecules to perform distinct functions. These mechanochemical enzymes are known to form ring-shaped oligomers whose conformations strongly depend upon nucleotide status. Here, the crystallization of the AAA+ ATPase domain of an EBP from Aquifex aeolicus, NtrC1, in the presence of the non-hydrolyzable ATP analog ADP–BeFx is reported. X-ray diffraction data were collected from two crystals from two different protein fractions of the NtrC1 ATPase domain. Previously, this domain was co-crystallized with ADP and ATP, but the latter crystals were grown from the Walker B substitution variant E239A. Therefore, the new data sets are the first for a wild-type EBP ATPase domain co-crystallized with an ATP analog and they reveal a new crystal form. The resulting structure(s) will shed light on the mechanism of EBP-type transcription activators

  15. The Chromatin Scaffold Protein SAFB1 Renders Chromatin Permissive for DNA Damage Signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altmeyer, Matthias; Toledo Lazaro, Luis Ignacio; Gudjonsson, Thorkell;

    2013-01-01

    Although the general relevance of chromatin modifications for genotoxic stress signaling, cell-cycle checkpoint activation, and DNA repair is well established, how these modifications reach initial thresholds in order to trigger robust responses remains largely unexplored. Here, we identify...... the chromatin-associated scaffold attachment factor SAFB1 as a component of the DNA damage response and show that SAFB1 cooperates with histone acetylation to allow for efficient γH2AX spreading and genotoxic stress signaling. SAFB1 undergoes a highly dynamic exchange at damaged chromatin in a poly......(ADP-ribose)-polymerase 1- and poly(ADP-ribose)-dependent manner and is required for unperturbed cell-cycle checkpoint activation and guarding cells against replicative stress. Altogether, our data reveal that transient recruitment of an architectural chromatin component is required in order to overcome physiological...

  16. ATP as a peripheral mediator of pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, S G; McMahon, S B

    2000-07-01

    This article reviews the extent to which recent studies substantiate the hypothesis that ATP functions as a peripheral pain mediator. The discovery of the P2X family of ion channels (for which ATP is a ligand) and, in particular, the highly selective distribution of the P2X(3) receptor within the rat nociceptive system has inspired a variety of approaches to elucidate the potential role of ATP as a pain mediator. ATP elicits excitatory inward currents in small diameter sensory ganglion cells. These currents resemble those elicited by ATP on recombinantly expressed heteromeric P2X(2/3) channels as well as homomultimers consisting of P2X(2) and P2X(3). In vivo behavioural models have characterised the algogenic properties of ATP in normal conditions and in models of peripheral sensitisation. In humans, iontophoresis of ATP induces modest pain. In rats and humans the response is dependent on capsaicin sensitive neurons and is augmented in the presence of inflammatory mediators. Since ATP can be released in the vicinity of peripheral nociceptive terminals under a variety of conditions, there exists a purinergic chain of biological processes linking tissue damage to pain perception. The challenge remains to prove a physiological role for endogenous ATP in activating this chain of events.

  17. Extracellular ATP signaling and homeostasis in plant cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Jian; Zhang, Chunlan; Zhang, Xuan; Deng, Shurong; Zhao, Rui; Shen, Xin; Chen, Shaoliang

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular ATP (eATP) is now recognized as an important signaling agent in plant growth and defense response to environmental stimuli. eATP has dual functions in plant cell signaling, which is largely dependent on its concentration in the extracellular matrix (ECM). A lethal level of eATP (extremely low or high) causes cell death, whereas a moderate level of eATP benefits plant growth and development. Ecto-apyrases (Nucleoside Triphosphate-Diphosphohydrolase) help control the eATP concentr...

  18. Chromatin replication and epigenome maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alabert, Constance; Groth, Anja

    2012-01-01

    initiates, whereas the replication process itself disrupts chromatin and challenges established patterns of genome regulation. Specialized replication-coupled mechanisms assemble new DNA into chromatin, but epigenome maintenance is a continuous process taking place throughout the cell cycle. If DNA...

  19. Chromatin chemistry goes cellular.

    OpenAIRE

    W. Fischle; D. Schwarzer; Mootz, H.

    2015-01-01

    Analysing post-translational modifications of histone proteins as they occur within chromatin is challenging due to their large number and chemical diversity. A major step forward has now been achieved by using split intein chemistry to engineer functionalized histones within cells.

  20. Histone H2B ubiquitylation represses gametogenesis by opposing RSC-dependent chromatin remodeling at the ste11 master regulator locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Materne, Philippe; Vázquez, Enrique; Sánchez, Mar; Yague-Sanz, Carlo; Anandhakumar, Jayamani; Migeot, Valerie; Antequera, Francisco; Hermand, Damien

    2016-01-01

    In fission yeast, the ste11 gene encodes the master regulator initiating the switch from vegetative growth to gametogenesis. In a previous paper, we showed that the methylation of H3K4 and consequent promoter nucleosome deacetylation repress ste11 induction and cell differentiation (Materne et al., 2015) but the regulatory steps remain poorly understood. Here we report a genetic screen that highlighted H2B deubiquitylation and the RSC remodeling complex as activators of ste11 expression. Mechanistic analyses revealed more complex, opposite roles of H2Bubi at the promoter where it represses expression, and over the transcribed region where it sustains it. By promoting H3K4 methylation at the promoter, H2Bubi initiates the deacetylation process, which decreases chromatin remodeling by RSC. Upon induction, this process is reversed and efficient NDR (nucleosome depleted region) formation leads to high expression. Therefore, H2Bubi represses gametogenesis by opposing the recruitment of RSC at the promoter of the master regulator ste11 gene. PMID:27171419

  1. Histone H2B ubiquitylation represses gametogenesis by opposing RSC-dependent chromatin remodeling at the ste11 master regulator locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Materne, Philippe; Vázquez, Enrique; Sánchez, Mar; Yague-Sanz, Carlo; Anandhakumar, Jayamani; Migeot, Valerie; Antequera, Francisco; Hermand, Damien

    2016-01-01

    In fission yeast, the ste11 gene encodes the master regulator initiating the switch from vegetative growth to gametogenesis. In a previous paper, we showed that the methylation of H3K4 and consequent promoter nucleosome deacetylation repress ste11 induction and cell differentiation (Materne et al., 2015) but the regulatory steps remain poorly understood. Here we report a genetic screen that highlighted H2B deubiquitylation and the RSC remodeling complex as activators of ste11 expression. Mechanistic analyses revealed more complex, opposite roles of H2Bubi at the promoter where it represses expression, and over the transcribed region where it sustains it. By promoting H3K4 methylation at the promoter, H2Bubi initiates the deacetylation process, which decreases chromatin remodeling by RSC. Upon induction, this process is reversed and efficient NDR (nucleosome depleted region) formation leads to high expression. Therefore, H2Bubi represses gametogenesis by opposing the recruitment of RSC at the promoter of the master regulator ste11 gene.

  2. NADH supplementation decreases pinacidil-primed IK(ATP) in ventricular cardiomyocytes by increasing intracellular ATP

    OpenAIRE

    Pelzmann, Brigitte; Hallström, Seth; Schaffer, Peter; Lang, Petra; Nadlinger, Karl; Birkmayer, George D; Vrecko, Karoline; Reibnegger, Gilbert; Koidl, Bernd

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (NADH) supplementation on the metabolic condition of isolated guinea-pig ventricular cardiomyocytes. The pinacidil-primed ATP-dependent potassium current IK(ATP) was used as an indicator of subsarcolemmal ATP concentration and intracellular adenine nucleotide contents were measured.Membrane currents were studied using the patch-clamp technique in the whole-cell recording mode at 36–37°C. Adenine nucleotid...

  3. Proteomic interrogation of human chromatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana P Torrente

    Full Text Available Chromatin proteins provide a scaffold for DNA packaging and a basis for epigenetic regulation and genomic maintenance. Despite understanding its functional roles, mapping the chromatin proteome (i.e. the "Chromatome" is still a continuing process. Here, we assess the biological specificity and proteomic extent of three distinct chromatin preparations by identifying proteins in selected chromatin-enriched fractions using mass spectrometry-based proteomics. These experiments allowed us to produce a chromatin catalog, including several proteins ranging from highly abundant histone proteins to less abundant members of different chromatin machinery complexes. Using a Normalized Spectral Abundance Factor approach, we quantified relative abundances of the proteins across the chromatin enriched fractions giving a glimpse into their chromosomal abundance. The large-scale data sets also allowed for the discovery of a variety of novel post-translational modifications on the identified chromatin proteins. With these comparisons, we find one of the probed methods to be qualitatively superior in specificity for chromatin proteins, but inferior in proteomic extent, evidencing a compromise that must be made between biological specificity and broadness of characterization. Additionally, we attempt to identify proteins in eu- and heterochromatin, verifying the enrichments by characterizing the post-translational modifications detected on histone proteins from these chromatin regions. In summary, our results provide insights into the value of different methods to extract chromatin-associated proteins and provide starting points to study the factors that may be involved in directing gene expression and other chromatin-related processes.

  4. Chromatin associations in Arabidopsis interphase nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veit eSchubert

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The arrangement of chromatin within interphase nuclei seems to be caused by topological constraints and related to gene expression depending on tissue and developmental stage. In yeast and animals it was found that homologous and heterologous chromatin association are required to realize faithful expression and DNA repair. To test whether such associations are present in plants we analysed Arabidopsis thaliana interphase nuclei by FISH using probes from different chromosomes. We found that chromatin fibre movement and variable associations, although in general relatively seldom, may occur between euchromatin segments along chromosomes, sometimes even over large distances. The combination of euchromatin segments bearing high or low co-expressing genes did not reveal different association frequencies probably due to adjacent genes of deviating expression patterns.Based on previous data and on FISH analyses presented here, we conclude that the global interphase chromatin organization in A. thaliana is relatively stable, due to the location of its ten centromeres at the nuclear periphery and of the telomeres mainly at the centrally localized nucleolus. Nevertheless, chromatin movement enables a flexible spatial genome arrangement in plant nuclei.

  5. Imaging Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Megha; Dane, Eric; Conley, Jason; Tantama, Mathew

    2016-08-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a universal mediator of metabolism and signaling across unicellular and multicellular species. There is a fundamental interdependence between the dynamics of ATP and the physiology that occurs inside and outside the cell. Characterizing and understanding ATP dynamics provide valuable mechanistic insight into processes that range from neurotransmission to the chemotaxis of immune cells. Therefore, we require the methodology to interrogate both temporal and spatial components of ATP dynamics from the subcellular to the organismal levels in live specimens. Over the last several decades, a number of molecular probes that are specific to ATP have been developed. These probes have been combined with imaging approaches, particularly optical microscopy, to enable qualitative and quantitative detection of this critical molecule. In this review, we survey current examples of technologies available for visualizing ATP in living cells, and identify areas where new tools and approaches are needed to expand our capabilities.

  6. ISWI and CHD chromatin remodelers bind promoters but act in gene bodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel E Zentner

    Full Text Available ATP-dependent nucleosome remodelers influence genetic processes by altering nucleosome occupancy, positioning, and composition. In vitro, Saccharomyces cerevisiae ISWI and CHD remodelers require ∼30-85 bp of extranucleosomal DNA to reposition nucleosomes, but linker DNA in S. cerevisiae averages <20 bp. To address this discrepancy between in vitro and in vivo observations, we have mapped the genomic distributions of the yeast Isw1, Isw2, and Chd1 remodelers at base-pair resolution on native chromatin. Although these remodelers act in gene bodies, we find that they are also highly enriched at nucleosome-depleted regions (NDRs, where they bind to extended regions of DNA adjacent to particular transcription factors. Surprisingly, catalytically inactive remodelers show similar binding patterns. We find that remodeler occupancy at NDRs and gene bodies is associated with nucleosome turnover and transcriptional elongation rate, suggesting that remodelers act on regions of transient nucleosome unwrapping or depletion within gene bodies subsequent to transcriptional elongation.

  7. Comparison of methods for specific depletion of ATP in Salmonella typhimurium.

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, M. S.; Taylor, B L

    1993-01-01

    Three methods of ATP depletion in Salmonella typhimurium were compared. ATP concentrations were lowest after arsenate treatment. Arsenate or alpha-methylglucoside-plus-azide treatment nonspecifically lowered all nucleotide triphosphate levels. Histidine starvation in a hisF mutant was relatively specific for ATP depletion and therefore has potential in distinguishing ATP-dependent processes from processes dependent on other nucleotides.

  8. Benzoyl-coenzyme A reductase (dearomatizing), a key enzyme of anaerobic aromatic metabolism. ATP dependence of the reaction, purification and some properties of the enzyme from Thauera aromatica strain K172.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boll, M; Fuchs, G

    1995-12-15

    Anoxic metabolism of many aromatic compounds proceeds via the common intermediate benzoyl-CoA. Benzoyl-CoA is dearomatized by benzoyl-CoA reductase (dearomatizing) in a two-electron reduction step, possibly yielding cyclohex-1,5-diene-1-carboxyl-CoA. This process has to overcome a high activation energy and is considered a biological Birch reduction. The central, aromatic-ring-reducing enzyme was investigated for the first time in the denitrifying bacterium Thauera aromatica strain K172. A spectrophotometric assay was developed which was strictly dependent on MgATP, both with cell extract and with purified enzyme. The oxygen-sensitive new enzyme was purified 35-fold with 20% yield under anaerobic conditions in the presence of 0.25 mM dithionite. It had a native molecular mass of approximately 170 kDa and consisted of four subunits a,b,c,d of 48, 45, 38 and 32 kDa. The oligomer composition of the protein most likely is abcd. The ultraviolet/visible spectrum of the protein as isolated, but without dithionite, was characteristic for an iron-sulfur protein with an absorption maximum at 279 nm and a broad shoulder at 390 nm. The estimated molar absorption coefficient at 390 nm was 35,000 M-1 cm-1. Reduction of the enzyme by dithionite resulted in a decrease of absorbance at 390 nm, and the colour turned from greenish-brown to red-brown. The enzyme contained 10.8 +/- 1.5 mol Fe and 10.5 +/- 1.5 mol acid-labile sulfur/mol. Besides zinc (0.5 mol/mol protein) no other metals nor selenium could be detected in significant amounts. The enzyme preparation contained a flavin or flavin-like compound; the estimated content was 0.3 mol/mol enzyme. The enzyme reaction required MgATP and a strong reductant such as Ti(III). The reaction catalyzed is: benzoyl-CoA + 2 Ti(III) + n ATP-->non-aromatic acyl-CoA + 2 Ti(IV) + n ADP + n Pi. The estimated number n of ATP molecules hydrolyzed/two electrons transferred in benzoyl-CoA reduction is 2-4. In the absence of benzoyl-CoA the enzyme

  9. Modulation of Higher Order Chromatin Conformation in Mammalian Cell Nuclei Can Be Mediated by Polyamines and Divalent Cations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwat Visvanathan

    Full Text Available The organisation of the large volume of mammalian genomic DNA within cell nuclei requires mechanisms to regulate chromatin compaction involving the reversible formation of higher order structures. The compaction state of chromatin varies between interphase and mitosis and is also subject to rapid and reversible change upon ATP depletion/repletion. In this study we have investigated mechanisms that may be involved in promoting the hyper-condensation of chromatin when ATP levels are depleted by treating cells with sodium azide and 2-deoxyglucose. Chromatin conformation was analysed in both live and permeabilised HeLa cells using FLIM-FRET, high resolution fluorescence microscopy and by electron spectroscopic imaging microscopy. We show that chromatin compaction following ATP depletion is not caused by loss of transcription activity and that it can occur at a similar level in both interphase and mitotic cells. Analysis of both live and permeabilised HeLa cells shows that chromatin conformation within nuclei is strongly influenced by the levels of divalent cations, including calcium and magnesium. While ATP depletion results in an increase in the level of unbound calcium, chromatin condensation still occurs even in the presence of a calcium chelator. Chromatin compaction is shown to be strongly affected by small changes in the levels of polyamines, including spermine and spermidine. The data are consistent with a model in which the increased intracellular pool of polyamines and divalent cations, resulting from depletion of ATP, bind to DNA and contribute to the large scale hyper-compaction of chromatin by a charge neutralisation mechanism.

  10. The epigenetic regulation of cell cycle and chromatin dynamic by sirtuins

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Redondo, Paloma

    2014-01-01

    Tesi realitzada a l'Institut d'Investigació Biomèdica de Bellvitge (IDIBELL) The chromatin consists of a hierarchical and dynamical structure that is modulated during the different cell cycle stages in order to maintain genome integrity and preserve the genetic information coded in the DNA. The dynamic structure of the chromatin depends on the coordination of the different chromatin remodeling processes: histone modifications, chromatin remodeling enzymes/complexes, DNA methylation and chr...

  11. Genome-Wide Mapping Targets of the Metazoan Chromatin Remodeling Factor NURF Reveals Nucleosome Remodeling at Enhancers, Core Promoters and Gene Insulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, So Yeon; Grisan, Valentina; Jang, Boyun; Herbert, John; Badenhorst, Paul

    2016-04-01

    NURF is a conserved higher eukaryotic ISWI-containing chromatin remodeling complex that catalyzes ATP-dependent nucleosome sliding. By sliding nucleosomes, NURF is able to alter chromatin dynamics to control transcription and genome organization. Previous biochemical and genetic analysis of the specificity-subunit of Drosophila NURF (Nurf301/Enhancer of Bithorax (E(bx)) has defined NURF as a critical regulator of homeotic, heat-shock and steroid-responsive gene transcription. It has been speculated that NURF controls pathway specific transcription by co-operating with sequence-specific transcription factors to remodel chromatin at dedicated enhancers. However, conclusive in vivo demonstration of this is lacking and precise regulatory elements targeted by NURF are poorly defined. To address this, we have generated a comprehensive map of in vivo NURF activity, using MNase-sequencing to determine at base pair resolution NURF target nucleosomes, and ChIP-sequencing to define sites of NURF recruitment. Our data show that, besides anticipated roles at enhancers, NURF interacts physically and functionally with the TRF2/DREF basal transcription factor to organize nucleosomes downstream of active promoters. Moreover, we detect NURF remodeling and recruitment at distal insulator sites, where NURF functionally interacts with and co-localizes with DREF and insulator proteins including CP190 to establish nucleosome-depleted domains. This insulator function of NURF is most apparent at subclasses of insulators that mark the boundaries of chromatin domains, where multiple insulator proteins co-associate. By visualizing the complete repertoire of in vivo NURF chromatin targets, our data provide new insights into how chromatin remodeling can control genome organization and regulatory interactions. PMID:27046080

  12. Genome-Wide Mapping Targets of the Metazoan Chromatin Remodeling Factor NURF Reveals Nucleosome Remodeling at Enhancers, Core Promoters and Gene Insulators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Yeon Kwon

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available NURF is a conserved higher eukaryotic ISWI-containing chromatin remodeling complex that catalyzes ATP-dependent nucleosome sliding. By sliding nucleosomes, NURF is able to alter chromatin dynamics to control transcription and genome organization. Previous biochemical and genetic analysis of the specificity-subunit of Drosophila NURF (Nurf301/Enhancer of Bithorax (E(bx has defined NURF as a critical regulator of homeotic, heat-shock and steroid-responsive gene transcription. It has been speculated that NURF controls pathway specific transcription by co-operating with sequence-specific transcription factors to remodel chromatin at dedicated enhancers. However, conclusive in vivo demonstration of this is lacking and precise regulatory elements targeted by NURF are poorly defined. To address this, we have generated a comprehensive map of in vivo NURF activity, using MNase-sequencing to determine at base pair resolution NURF target nucleosomes, and ChIP-sequencing to define sites of NURF recruitment. Our data show that, besides anticipated roles at enhancers, NURF interacts physically and functionally with the TRF2/DREF basal transcription factor to organize nucleosomes downstream of active promoters. Moreover, we detect NURF remodeling and recruitment at distal insulator sites, where NURF functionally interacts with and co-localizes with DREF and insulator proteins including CP190 to establish nucleosome-depleted domains. This insulator function of NURF is most apparent at subclasses of insulators that mark the boundaries of chromatin domains, where multiple insulator proteins co-associate. By visualizing the complete repertoire of in vivo NURF chromatin targets, our data provide new insights into how chromatin remodeling can control genome organization and regulatory interactions.

  13. The Role of ATP in the Regulation of NCAM Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hübschmann, Martin; Skladchikova, Galina

    2008-01-01

    Extracellular ATP is an abundant signaling molecule that has a number of functions in the nervous system. It is released by both neurons and glial cells, activates purinergic receptors and acts as a trophic factor as well as a neurotransmitter. In this review, we summarize the evidence for a direct...... ATP-NCAM interaction and discuss its functional implications. The ectodomain of NCAM contains the ATP binding Walker motif A and has intrinsic ATPase activity, which could modulate NCAM-dependent signaling processes. NCAM interacts directly with and signals through FGFR. The NCAM binding site to ATP...... overlaps with the site of NCAM-FGFR interaction, and ATP is capable of disrupting NCAM-FGFR binding. This implies that NCAM signaling through FGFR can be regulated by ATP, which is supported by the observation that ATP can abrogate NCAM-induced neurite outgrowth. Finally, ATP can induce NCAM ectodomain...

  14. Load-dependent destabilization of the γ-rotor shaft in FOF1 ATP synthase revealed by hydrogen/deuterium-exchange mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahidi, Siavash; Bi, Yumin; Dunn, Stanley D; Konermann, Lars

    2016-03-01

    FoF1 is a membrane-bound molecular motor that uses proton-motive force (PMF) to drive the synthesis of ATP from ADP and Pi. Reverse operation generates PMF via ATP hydrolysis. Catalysis in either direction involves rotation of the γε shaft that connects the α3β3 head and the membrane-anchored cn ring. X-ray crystallography and other techniques have provided insights into the structure and function of FoF1 subcomplexes. However, interrogating the conformational dynamics of intact membrane-bound FoF1 during rotational catalysis has proven to be difficult. Here, we use hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry to probe the inner workings of FoF1 in its natural membrane-bound state. A pronounced destabilization of the γ C-terminal helix during hydrolysis-driven rotation was observed. This behavior is attributed to torsional stress in γ, arising from γ⋅⋅⋅α3β3 interactions that cause resistance during γ rotation within the apical bearing. Intriguingly, we find that destabilization of γ occurs only when FoF1 operates against a PMF-induced torque; the effect disappears when PMF is eliminated by an uncoupler. This behavior resembles the properties of automotive engines, where bearings inflict greater forces on the crankshaft when operated under load than during idling. PMID:26884184

  15. A Broad Set of Chromatin Factors Influences Splicing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allemand, Eric; Myers, Michael P.; Garcia-Bernardo, Jose; Harel-Bellan, Annick; Krainer, Adrian R.; Muchardt, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Several studies propose an influence of chromatin on pre-mRNA splicing, but it is still unclear how widespread and how direct this phenomenon is. We find here that when assembled in vivo, the U2 snRNP co-purifies with a subset of chromatin-proteins, including histones and remodeling complexes like SWI/SNF. Yet, an unbiased RNAi screen revealed that the outcome of splicing is influenced by a much larger variety of chromatin factors not all associating with the spliceosome. The availability of this broad range of chromatin factors impacting splicing further unveiled their very context specific effect, resulting in either inclusion or skipping, depending on the exon under scrutiny. Finally, a direct assessment of the impact of chromatin on splicing using an in vitro co-transcriptional splicing assay with pre-mRNAs transcribed from a nucleosomal template, demonstrated that chromatin impacts nascent pre-mRNP in their competence for splicing. Altogether, our data show that numerous chromatin factors associated or not with the spliceosome can affect the outcome of splicing, possibly as a function of the local chromatin environment that by default interferes with the efficiency of splicing. PMID:27662573

  16. Two AAA family peroxins, PpPex1p and PpPex6p, interact with each other in an ATP-dependent manner and are associated with different subcellular membranous structures distinct from peroxisomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, K N; Heyman, J A; Subramani, S

    1998-02-01

    Two peroxins of the AAA family, PpPex1p and PpPex6p, are required for peroxisome biogenesis in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Cells from the corresponding deletion strains (Pp delta pex1 and Pp delta pex6) contain only small vesicular remnants of peroxisomes, the bulk of peroxisomal matrix proteins is mislocalized to the cytosol, and these cells cannot grow in peroxisome-requiring media (J. A. Heyman, E. Monosov, and S. Subramani, J. Cell Biol. 127:1259-1273, 1994; A. P. Spong and S. Subramani, J. Cell Biol. 123:535-548, 1993). We demonstrate that PpPex1p and PpPex6p interact in an ATP-dependent manner. Genetically, the interaction was observed in a suppressor screen with a strain harboring a temperature-sensitive allele of PpPEX1 and in the yeast two-hybrid system. Biochemially, these proteins were coimmunoprecipitated with antibodies raised against either of the proteins, but only in the presence of ATP. The protein complex formed under these conditions was 320 to 400 kDa in size, consistent with the formation of a heterodimeric PpPex1p-PpPex6p complex. Subcellular fractionation revealed PpPex1p and PpPex6p to be predominantly associated with membranous subcellular structures distinct from peroxisomes. Based on their behavior in subcellular fractionation experiments including flotation gradients and on the fact that these structures are also present in a Pp delta pex3 strain in which no morphologically detectable peroxisomal remnants have been observed, we propose that these structures are small vesicles. The identification of vesicle-associated peroxins is novel and implies a role for these vesicles in peroxisome biogenesis. We discuss the possible role of the ATP-dependent interaction between PpPex1p and PpPex6p in regulating peroxisome biogenesis events. PMID:9447990

  17. Cas9 Functionally Opens Chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Barkal, Amira A.; Srinivasan, Sharanya; Hashimoto, Tatsunori; Gifford, David K.; Sherwood, Richard I.

    2016-01-01

    Using a nuclease-dead Cas9 mutant, we show that Cas9 reproducibly induces chromatin accessibility at previously inaccessible genomic loci. Cas9 chromatin opening is sufficient to enable adjacent binding and transcriptional activation by the settler transcription factor retinoic acid receptor at previously unbound motifs. Thus, we demonstrate a new use for Cas9 in increasing surrounding chromatin accessibility to alter local transcription factor binding.

  18. Cas9 Functionally Opens Chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Barkal, Amira A.; Srinivasan, Sharanya; Gifford, David K.; Sherwood, Richard I.; Hashimoto, Tatsunori Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Using a nuclease-dead Cas9 mutant, we show that Cas9 reproducibly induces chromatin accessibility at previously inaccessible genomic loci. Cas9 chromatin opening is sufficient to enable adjacent binding and transcriptional activation by the settler transcription factor retinoic acid receptor at previously unbound motifs. Thus, we demonstrate a new use for Cas9 in increasing surrounding chromatin accessibility to alter local transcription factor binding.

  19. Cas9 Functionally Opens Chromatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amira A Barkal

    Full Text Available Using a nuclease-dead Cas9 mutant, we show that Cas9 reproducibly induces chromatin accessibility at previously inaccessible genomic loci. Cas9 chromatin opening is sufficient to enable adjacent binding and transcriptional activation by the settler transcription factor retinoic acid receptor at previously unbound motifs. Thus, we demonstrate a new use for Cas9 in increasing surrounding chromatin accessibility to alter local transcription factor binding.

  20. Organization of higher-level chromatin structures (chromomere, chromonema and chromatin block) examined using visible light-induced chromatin photo-stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheval, E V; Prusov, A N; Kireev, I I; Fais, D; Polyakov, V Yu

    2002-01-01

    The method of chromatin photo-stabilization by the action of visible light in the presence of ethidium bromide was used for investigation of higher-level chromatin structures in isolated nuclei. As a model we used rat hepatocyte nuclei isolated in buffers which stabilized or destabilized nuclear matrix. Several higher-level chromatin structures were visualized: 100nm globules-chromomeres, chains of chromomeres-chromonemata, aggregates of chromomeres-blocks of condensed chromatin. All these structures were completely destroyed by 2M NaCl extraction independent of the matrix state, and DNA was extruded from the residual nuclei (nuclear matrices) into a halo. These results show that nuclear matrix proteins do not play the main role in the maintenance of higher-level chromatin structures. Preliminary irradiation led to the reduction of the halo width in the dose-dependent manner. In regions of condensed chromatin of irradiated nucleoids there were discrete complexes consisting of DNA fibers radiating from an electron-dense core and resembling the decondensed chromomeres or the rosette-like structures. As shown by the analysis of proteins bound to irradiated nuclei upon high-salt extraction, irradiation presumably stabilized the non-histone proteins. These results suggest that in interphase nuclei loop domains are folded into discrete higher-level chromatin complexes (chromomeres). These complexes are possibly maintained by putative non-histone proteins, which are extracted with high-salt buffers from non-irradiated nuclei. PMID:12127937

  1. ATP hydrolysis is required for DEAD-box protein recycling but not for duplex unwinding

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Fei; Putnam, Andrea; Jankowsky, Eckhard

    2008-01-01

    DEAD-box proteins, the largest helicase family, catalyze ATP-dependent remodeling of RNA–protein complexes and the unwinding of RNA duplexes. Because DEAD-box proteins hydrolyze ATP in an RNA-dependent fashion, the energy provided by ATP hydrolysis is commonly assumed to drive the energetically unfavorable duplex unwinding. Here, we show efficient unwinding of stable duplexes by several DEAD-box proteins in the presence of the nonhydrolyzable ATP analog ADP-beryllium fluoride. Another ATP ana...

  2. RSC Chromatin-Remodeling Complex Is Important for Mitochondrial Function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Yuko; Yu, Feifei; Nakamura, Misaki; Chihara, Yuhki; Okane, Kyo; Sato, Masahiro; Kanai, Muneyoshi; Hamada, Ryoko; Ueno, Masaru; Yukawa, Masashi; Tsuchiya, Eiko

    2015-01-01

    RSC (Remodel the Structure of Chromatin) is an ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complex essential for the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. RSC exists as two distinct isoforms that share core subunits including the ATPase subunit Nps1/Sth1 but contain either Rsc1or Rsc2. Using the synthetic genetic array (SGA) of the non-essential null mutation method, we screened for mutations exhibiting synthetic growth defects in combination with the temperature-sensitive mutant, nps1-105, and found connections between mitochondrial function and RSC. rsc mutants, including rsc1Δ, rsc2Δ, and nps1-13, another temperature-sensitive nps1 mutant, exhibited defective respiratory growth; in addition, rsc2Δ and nps1-13 contained aggregated mitochondria. The rsc2Δ phenotypes were relieved by RSC1 overexpression, indicating that the isoforms play a redundant role in respiratory growth. Genome-wide expression analysis in nps1-13 under respiratory conditions suggested that RSC regulates the transcription of some target genes of the HAP complex, a transcriptional activator of respiratory gene expression. Nps1 physically interacted with Hap4, the transcriptional activator moiety of the HAP complex, and overexpression of HAP4 alleviated respiratory defects in nps1-13, suggesting that RSC plays pivotal roles in mitochondrial gene expression and shares a set of target genes with the HAP complex.

  3. Chromatin remodeling enzyme Snf2h regulates embryonic lens differentiation and denucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shuying; Limi, Saima; McGreal, Rebecca S; Xie, Qing; Brennan, Lisa A; Kantorow, Wanda Lee; Kokavec, Juraj; Majumdar, Romit; Hou, Harry; Edelmann, Winfried; Liu, Wei; Ashery-Padan, Ruth; Zavadil, Jiri; Kantorow, Marc; Skoultchi, Arthur I; Stopka, Tomas; Cvekl, Ales

    2016-06-01

    Ocular lens morphogenesis is a model for investigating mechanisms of cellular differentiation, spatial and temporal gene expression control, and chromatin regulation. Brg1 (Smarca4) and Snf2h (Smarca5) are catalytic subunits of distinct ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes implicated in transcriptional regulation. Previous studies have shown that Brg1 regulates both lens fiber cell differentiation and organized degradation of their nuclei (denucleation). Here, we employed a conditional Snf2h(flox) mouse model to probe the cellular and molecular mechanisms of lens formation. Depletion of Snf2h induces premature and expanded differentiation of lens precursor cells forming the lens vesicle, implicating Snf2h as a key regulator of lens vesicle polarity through spatial control of Prox1, Jag1, p27(Kip1) (Cdkn1b) and p57(Kip2) (Cdkn1c) gene expression. The abnormal Snf2h(-/-) fiber cells also retain their nuclei. RNA profiling of Snf2h(-/) (-) and Brg1(-/-) eyes revealed differences in multiple transcripts, including prominent downregulation of those encoding Hsf4 and DNase IIβ, which are implicated in the denucleation process. In summary, our data suggest that Snf2h is essential for the establishment of lens vesicle polarity, partitioning of prospective lens epithelial and fiber cell compartments, lens fiber cell differentiation, and lens fiber cell nuclear degradation. PMID:27246713

  4. The involvement of hydrogen-producing and ATP-dependent NADPH-consuming pathways in setting the redox poise in the chloroplast of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in anoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clowez, Sophie; Godaux, Damien; Cardol, Pierre; Wollman, Francis-André; Rappaport, Fabrice

    2015-03-27

    Photosynthetic microalgae are exposed to changing environmental conditions. In particular, microbes found in ponds or soils often face hypoxia or even anoxia, and this severely impacts their physiology. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is one among such photosynthetic microorganisms recognized for its unusual wealth of fermentative pathways and the extensive remodeling of its metabolism upon the switch to anaerobic conditions. As regards the photosynthetic electron transfer, this remodeling encompasses a strong limitation of the electron flow downstream of photosystem I. Here, we further characterize the origin of this limitation. We show that it stems from the strong reducing pressure that builds up upon the onset of anoxia, and this pressure can be relieved either by the light-induced synthesis of ATP, which promotes the consumption of reducing equivalents, or by the progressive activation of the hydrogenase pathway, which provides an electron transfer pathway alternative to the CO2 fixation cycle. PMID:25691575

  5. Chromatin Flavors: Chromatin composition and domain organization in Drosophila melanogaster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.G. van Bemmel (Joke)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractChromatin was originally identified by W. Flemming in 1882 as not much more than the stainable substance of the cell nucleus. Flemming named this substance according to the Greek word “chroma”, meaning color. In 1911 chromatin was characterized as proteins, named histones, that were atta

  6. Tracking the mechanical dynamics of human embryonic stem cell chromatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinde Elizabeth

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A plastic chromatin structure has emerged as fundamental to the self-renewal and pluripotent capacity of embryonic stem (ES cells. Direct measurement of chromatin dynamics in vivo is, however, challenging as high spatiotemporal resolution is required. Here, we present a new tracking-based method which can detect high frequency chromatin movement and quantify the mechanical dynamics of chromatin in live cells. Results We use this method to study how the mechanical properties of chromatin movement in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs are modulated spatiotemporally during differentiation into cardiomyocytes (CM. Notably, we find that pluripotency is associated with a highly discrete, energy-dependent frequency of chromatin movement that we refer to as a ‘breathing’ state. We find that this ‘breathing’ state is strictly dependent on the metabolic state of the cell and is progressively silenced during differentiation. Conclusions We thus propose that the measured chromatin high frequency movements in hESCs may represent a hallmark of pluripotency and serve as a mechanism to maintain the genome in a transcriptionally accessible state. This is a result that could not have been observed without the high spatial and temporal resolution provided by this novel tracking method.

  7. ATP responses in human C nociceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliges, Marita; Weidner, Christian; Schmelz, Martin; Schmidt, Roland; Ørstavik, Kristin; Torebjörk, Erik; Handwerker, Hermann

    2002-07-01

    Microelectrode recordings of impulse activity in nociceptive C fibres were performed in cutaneous fascicles of the peroneal nerve at the knee level in healthy human subjects. Mechano-heat responsive C units (CMH), mechano-insensitive but heat-responsive (CH) as well as mechano-insensitive and heat-insensitive C units (CM(i)H(i)) were identified. A subgroup of the mechano-insensitive units was readily activated by histamine. We studied the responsiveness of these nociceptor classes to injection of 20 microl 5 mM adenosintriphosphate (ATP) using saline injections as control. Because of mechanical distension during injection, which typically activates mechano-responsive C fibres, interest was focused on responsiveness to ATP after withdrawal of the injection needle. Post-injection responses were observed in 17/27 (63%) mechano-responsive units and in 14/22 (64%) mechano-insensitive units. Excitation by ATP occurred in 9/11 CH units and in 5/11 CM(i)H(i) units. ATP responsive units were found both within the histamine-responsive and the histamine-insensitive group of mechano-insensitive fibres. ATP responses appeared with a delay of 0-180 s after completion of injection; responses were most pronounced during the first 1-3 min of activation, and irregular ongoing activity was observed for up to 10 or even 20 min. ATP responses were dose-dependent, concentrations lower than 5 mM gave weaker responses. No heat or mechanical sensitisation was observed in any of the major fibre classes. In conclusion, we have shown that ATP injections at high concentrations activate C-nociceptors in healthy human skin, without preference for mechano-responsive or mechano-insensitive units. ATP did not sensitise human C fibres for mechanical or heat stimuli. We discuss how various mechanisms might contribute to the observed responses to ATP. PMID:12098617

  8. Extracellular ATP in the Exocrine Pancreas – ATP Release, Signalling and Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowal, Justyna Magdalena

    ATP plays an important role as an autocrine/paracrine signalling molecule, being released from a number of tissues, in response to physiological and pathophysiological stimuli. Released ATP induces Ca2+ - and/or cAMP - dependent cellular responses via activation of ubiquitously expressed P2X and ...... release. So far, the contribution of duct cells in purinergic signalling has never been studied. This work presents that both acinar and duct cells are sources of extracellular ATP in the exocrine pancreas. Here we show that duct cells release ATP in response to several physiological......, particularly during Ca2+ stress conditions. In conclusion, these studies demonstrate a complex regulation of purinergic signalling in exocrine pancreas. A crucial role for duct cells in mediating extracellular nucleotides homeostasis, involving ATP release, subsequent hydrolysis and conversion via...

  9. The RSC chromatin remodelling ATPase translocates DNA with high force and small step size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirinakis, George; Clapier, Cedric R; Gao, Ying; Viswanathan, Ramya; Cairns, Bradley R; Zhang, Yongli

    2011-06-15

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling complexes use the energy of ATP hydrolysis to reposition and reconfigure nucleosomes. Despite their diverse functions, all remodellers share highly conserved ATPase domains, many shown to translocate DNA. Understanding remodelling requires biophysical knowledge of the DNA translocation process: how the ATPase moves DNA and generates force, and how translocation and force generation are coupled on nucleosomes. Here, we characterize the real-time activity of a minimal RSC translocase 'motor' on bare DNA, using high-resolution optical tweezers and a 'tethered' translocase system. We observe on dsDNA a processivity of ∼35 bp, a speed of ∼25 bp/s, and a step size of 2.0 (±0.4, s.e.m.) bp. Surprisingly, the motor is capable of moving against high force, up to 30 pN, making it one of the most force-resistant motors known. We also provide evidence for DNA 'buckling' at initiation. These observations reveal the ATPase as a powerful DNA translocating motor capable of disrupting DNA-histone interactions by mechanical force.

  10. Epigenetics & chromatin: Interactions and processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Henikoff (Steven); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractOn 11 to 13 March 2013, BioMed Central will be hosting its inaugural conference, Epigenetics & Chromatin: Interactions and Processes, at Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, MA, USA. Epigenetics & Chromatin has now launched a special article series based on the general themes of the confer

  11. The Varicella-Zoster Virus Immediate-Early 63 protein affects chromatin controlled gene transcription in a cell-type dependent manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bontems Sébastien

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Varicella Zoster Virus Immediate Early 63 protein (IE63 has been shown to be essential for VZV replication, and critical for latency establishment. The activity of the protein as a transcriptional regulator is not fully clear yet. Using transient transfection assays, IE63 has been shown to repress viral and cellular promoters containing typical TATA boxes by interacting with general transcription factors. Results In this paper, IE63 regulation properties on endogenous gene expression were evaluated using an oligonucleotide-based micro-array approach. We found that IE63 modulates the transcription of only a few genes in HeLa cells including genes implicated in transcription or immunity. Furthermore, we showed that this effect is mediated by a modification of RNA POL II binding on the promoters tested and that IE63 phosphorylation was essential for these effects. In MeWo cells, the number of genes whose transcription was modified by IE63 was somewhat higher, including genes implicated in signal transduction, transcription, immunity, and heat-shock signalling. While IE63 did not modify the basal expression of several NF-κB dependent genes such as IL-8, ICAM-1, and IκBα, it modulates transcription of these genes upon TNFα induction. This effect was obviously correlated with the amount of p65 binding to the promoter of these genes and with histone H3 acetylation and HDAC-3 removal. Conclusion While IE63 only affected transcription of a small number of cellular genes, it interfered with the TNF-inducibility of several NF-κB dependent genes by the accelerated resynthesis of the inhibitor IκBα.

  12. Nucleosome positioning and composition modulate in silico chromatin flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauvelin, N; Lo, P; Kulaeva, O I; Nizovtseva, E V; Diaz-Montes, J; Zola, J; Parashar, M; Studitsky, V M; Olson, W K

    2015-02-18

    The dynamic organization of chromatin plays an essential role in the regulation of gene expression and in other fundamental cellular processes. The underlying physical basis of these activities lies in the sequential positioning, chemical composition, and intermolecular interactions of the nucleosomes-the familiar assemblies of ∼150 DNA base pairs and eight histone proteins-found on chromatin fibers. Here we introduce a mesoscale model of short nucleosomal arrays and a computational framework that make it possible to incorporate detailed structural features of DNA and histones in simulations of short chromatin constructs. We explore the effects of nucleosome positioning and the presence or absence of cationic N-terminal histone tails on the 'local' inter-nucleosomal interactions and the global deformations of the simulated chains. The correspondence between the predicted and observed effects of nucleosome composition and numbers on the long-range communication between the ends of designed nucleosome arrays lends credence to the model and to the molecular insights gleaned from the simulated structures. We also extract effective nucleosome-nucleosome potentials from the simulations and implement the potentials in a larger-scale computational treatment of regularly repeating chromatin fibers. Our results reveal a remarkable effect of nucleosome spacing on chromatin flexibility, with small changes in DNA linker length significantly altering the interactions of nucleosomes and the dimensions of the fiber as a whole. In addition, we find that these changes in nucleosome positioning influence the statistical properties of long chromatin constructs. That is, simulated chromatin fibers with the same number of nucleosomes exhibit polymeric behaviors ranging from Gaussian to worm-like, depending upon nucleosome spacing. These findings suggest that the physical and mechanical properties of chromatin can span a wide range of behaviors, depending on nucleosome positioning, and

  13. p63 and Brg1 control developmentally regulated higher-order chromatin remodelling at the epidermal differentiation complex locus in epidermal progenitor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardaryev, Andrei N.; Gdula, Michal R.; Yarker, Joanne L.; Emelianov, Vladimir N.; Poterlowicz, Krzysztof; Sharov, Andrey A.; Sharova, Tatyana Y.; Scarpa, Julie A.; Chambon, Pierre; Botchkarev, Vladimir A.; Fessing, Michael Y.

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin structural states and their remodelling, including higher-order chromatin folding and three-dimensional (3D) genome organisation, play an important role in the control of gene expression. The role of 3D genome organisation in the control and execution of lineage-specific transcription programmes during the development and differentiation of multipotent stem cells into specialised cell types remains poorly understood. Here, we show that substantial remodelling of the higher-order chromatin structure of the epidermal differentiation complex (EDC), a keratinocyte lineage-specific gene locus on mouse chromosome 3, occurs during epidermal morphogenesis. During epidermal development, the locus relocates away from the nuclear periphery towards the nuclear interior into a compartment enriched in SC35-positive nuclear speckles. Relocation of the EDC locus occurs prior to the full activation of EDC genes involved in controlling terminal keratinocyte differentiation and is a lineage-specific, developmentally regulated event controlled by transcription factor p63, a master regulator of epidermal development. We also show that, in epidermal progenitor cells, p63 directly regulates the expression of the ATP-dependent chromatin remodeller Brg1, which binds to distinct domains within the EDC and is required for relocation of the EDC towards the nuclear interior. Furthermore, Brg1 also regulates gene expression within the EDC locus during epidermal morphogenesis. Thus, p63 and its direct target Brg1 play an essential role in remodelling the higher-order chromatin structure of the EDC and in the specific positioning of this locus within the landscape of the 3D nuclear space, as required for the efficient expression of EDC genes in epidermal progenitor cells during skin development. PMID:24346698

  14. Optimization of ATP synthase function in mitochondria and chloroplasts via the adenylate kinase equilibrium

    OpenAIRE

    Igamberdiev, Abir U.; Kleczkowski, Leszek A.

    2015-01-01

    The bulk of ATP synthesis in plants is performed by ATP synthase, the main bioenergetics engine of cells, operating both in mitochondria and in chloroplasts. The reaction mechanism of ATP synthase has been studied in detail for over half a century; however, its optimal performance depends also on the steady delivery of ATP synthase substrates and the removal of its products. For mitochondrial ATP synthase, we analyze here the provision of stable conditions for (i) the supply of ADP and Mg2+, ...

  15. RSC facilitates Rad59-dependent homologous recombination between sister chromatids by promoting cohesin loading at DNA double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oum, Ji-Hyun; Seong, Changhyun; Kwon, Youngho; Ji, Jae-Hoon; Sid, Amy; Ramakrishnan, Sreejith; Ira, Grzegorz; Malkova, Anna; Sung, Patrick; Lee, Sang Eun; Shim, Eun Yong

    2011-10-01

    Homologous recombination repairs DNA double-strand breaks by searching for, invading, and copying information from a homologous template, typically the homologous chromosome or sister chromatid. Tight wrapping of DNA around histone octamers, however, impedes access of repair proteins to DNA damage. To facilitate DNA repair, modifications of histones and energy-dependent remodeling of chromatin are required, but the precise mechanisms by which chromatin modification and remodeling enzymes contribute to homologous DNA repair are unknown. Here we have systematically assessed the role of budding yeast RSC (remodel structure of chromatin), an abundant, ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complex, in the cellular response to spontaneous and induced DNA damage. RSC physically interacts with the recombination protein Rad59 and functions in homologous recombination. Multiple recombination assays revealed that RSC is uniquely required for recombination between sister chromatids by virtue of its ability to recruit cohesin at DNA breaks and thereby promoting sister chromatid cohesion. This study provides molecular insights into how chromatin remodeling contributes to DNA repair and maintenance of chromatin fidelity in the face of DNA damage.

  16. Titration and hysteresis in epigenetic chromatin silencing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epigenetic mechanisms of silencing via heritable chromatin modifications play a major role in gene regulation and cell fate specification. We consider a model of epigenetic chromatin silencing in budding yeast and study the bifurcation diagram and characterize the bistable and the monostable regimes. The main focus of this paper is to examine how the perturbations altering the activity of histone modifying enzymes affect the epigenetic states. We analyze the implications of having the total number of silencing proteins, given by the sum of proteins bound to the nucleosomes and the ones available in the ambient, to be constant. This constraint couples different regions of chromatin through the shared reservoir of ambient silencing proteins. We show that the response of the system to perturbations depends dramatically on the titration effect caused by the above constraint. In particular, for a certain range of overall abundance of silencing proteins, the hysteresis loop changes qualitatively with certain jump replaced by continuous merger of different states. In addition, we find a nonmonotonic dependence of gene expression on the rate of histone deacetylation activity of Sir2. We discuss how these qualitative predictions of our model could be compared with experimental studies of the yeast system under anti-silencing drugs. (paper)

  17. ATP increases within the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum upon intracellular Ca2+ release

    OpenAIRE

    Vishnu, Neelanjan; Jadoon Khan, Muhammad; Karsten, Felix; Groschner, Lukas N.; Waldeck-Weiermair, Markus; Rost, Rene; Hallström, Seth; Imamura, Hiromi; Graier, Wolfgang F; Malli, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Multiple functions of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) essentially depend on ATP within this organelle. However, little is known about ER ATP dynamics and the regulation of ER ATP import. Here we describe real-time recordings of ER ATP fluxes in single cells using an ER-targeted, genetically encoded ATP sensor. In vitro experiments prove that the ATP sensor is both Ca2+ and redox insensitive, which makes it possible to monitor Ca2+-coupled ER ATP dynamics specifically. The approach uncovers a c...

  18. Electrophysiology of autonomic neuromuscular transmission involving ATP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneddon, P

    2000-07-01

    Electrophysiological investigations of autonomic neuromuscular transmission have provided great insights into the role of ATP as a neurotransmitter. Burnstock and Holman made the first recordings of excitatory junction potentials (e.j.p.s) produced by sympathetic nerves innervating the smooth muscle of the guinea-pig vas deferens. This led to the identification of ATP as the mediator of e.j.p.s in this tissue, where ATP acts as a cotransmitter with noradrenaline. The e.j.p.s are mediated solely by ATP acting on P2X(1) receptors leading to action potentials and a rapid phasic contraction, whilst noradrenaline mediates a slower, tonic contraction which is not dependent on membrane depolarisation. Subsequent electrophysiological studies of the autonomic innervation of smooth muscles of the urogenital, gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems have revealed a similar pattern of response, where ATP mediates a fast electrical and mechanical response, whilst another transmitter such as noradrenaline, acetylcholine, nitric oxide or a peptide mediates a slower response. The modulation of junction potentials by a variety of pre-junctional receptors and the mechanism of inactivation of ATP as a neurotransmitter will also be described.

  19. Chromatin, epigenetics and stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roloff, Tim C; Nuber, Ulrike A

    2005-03-01

    Epigenetics is a term that has changed its meaning with the increasing biological knowledge on developmental processes. However, its current application to stem cell biology is often imprecise and is conceptually problematic. This article addresses two different subjects, the definition of epigenetics and chromatin states of stem and differentiated cells. We describe mechanisms that regulate chromatin changes and provide an overview of chromatin states of stem and differentiated cells. Moreover, a modification of the current epigenetics definition is proposed that is not restricted by the heritability of gene expression throughout cell divisions and excludes translational gene expression control. PMID:15819395

  20. R-loop: an emerging regulator of chromatin dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qais Al-Hadid; Yanzhong Yang

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic structure of chromatin,which exists in two conformational states:heterochromatin and euchromatin,alters the accessibility of the DNA to regulatory factors during transcription,replication,recombination,and DNA damage repair.Chemical modifications of histones and DNA,as well as adenosine triphospahate-dependent nucleosome remodeling,have been the major focus of research on chromatin dynamics over the past two decades.However,recent studies using a DNA-RNA hybrid-specific antibody and next-generation seque,ncing approaches have revealed that the formation of R-loops,one of the most common non-canonical DNA structures,is an emerging regulator of chromatin states.This review focuses on recent insights into the interplay between R-loop formation and the epigenetic modifications of chromatin in normal and disease states.

  1. Mechanisms that match ATP supply to demand in cardiac pacemaker cells during high ATP demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaniv, Yael; Spurgeon, Harold A.; Ziman, Bruce D.; Lyashkov, Alexey E.

    2013-01-01

    The spontaneous action potential (AP) firing rate of sinoatrial node cells (SANCs) involves high-throughput signaling via Ca2+-calmodulin activated adenylyl cyclases (AC), cAMP-mediated protein kinase A (PKA), and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII)-dependent phosphorylation of SR Ca2+ cycling and surface membrane ion channel proteins. When the throughput of this signaling increases, e.g., in response to β-adrenergic receptor activation, the resultant increase in spontaneous AP firing rate increases the demand for ATP. We hypothesized that an increase of ATP production to match the increased ATP demand is achieved via a direct effect of increased mitochondrial Ca2+ (Ca2+m) and an indirect effect via enhanced Ca2+-cAMP/PKA-CaMKII signaling to mitochondria. To increase ATP demand, single isolated rabbit SANCs were superfused by physiological saline at 35 ± 0.5°C with isoproterenol, or by phosphodiesterase or protein phosphatase inhibition. We measured cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca2+ and flavoprotein fluorescence in single SANC, and we measured cAMP, ATP, and O2 consumption in SANC suspensions. Although the increase in spontaneous AP firing rate was accompanied by an increase in O2 consumption, the ATP level and flavoprotein fluorescence remained constant, indicating that ATP production had increased. Both Ca2+m and cAMP increased concurrently with the increase in AP firing rate. When Ca2+m was reduced by Ru360, the increase in spontaneous AP firing rate in response to isoproterenol was reduced by 25%. Thus, both an increase in Ca2+m and an increase in Ca2+ activated cAMP-PKA-CaMKII signaling regulate the increase in ATP supply to meet ATP demand above the basal level. PMID:23604710

  2. Vernalization-mediated chromatin changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zografos, Brett R; Sung, Sibum

    2012-07-01

    Proper flowering time is vital for reproductive fitness in flowering plants. In Arabidopsis, vernalization is mediated primarily through the repression of a MADS box transcription factor, FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). The induction of a plant homeodomain-containing protein, VERNALIZATION INSENSITIVE 3 (VIN3), by vernalizing cold is required for proper repression of FLC. One of a myriad of changes that occurs after VIN3 is induced is the establishment of FLC chromatin at a mitotically repressed state due to the enrichment of repressive histone modifications. VIN3 induction by cold is the earliest known event during the vernalization response and includes changes in histone modifications at its chromatin. Here, the current understanding of the vernalization-mediated chromatin changes in Arabidopsis is discussed, with a focus on the roles of shared chromatin-modifying machineries in regulating VIN3 and FLC gene family expression during the course of vernalization.

  3. Prohibitins Interact Genetically with Atp23, a Novel Processing Peptidase and Chaperone for the F1FO-ATP Synthase

    OpenAIRE

    Osman, Christof; Wilmes, Claudia; Tatsuta, Takashi; Langer, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    The generation of cellular energy depends on the coordinated assembly of nuclear and mitochondrial-encoded proteins into multisubunit respiratory chain complexes in the inner membrane of mitochondria. Here, we describe the identification of a conserved metallopeptidase present in the intermembrane space, termed Atp23, which exerts dual activities during the biogenesis of the F1FO-ATP synthase. On one hand, Atp23 serves as a processing peptidase and mediates the maturation of the mitochondrial...

  4. Brain Function and Chromatin Plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Dulac, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    The characteristics of epigenetic control, including the potential for long-lasting, stable effects on gene expression that outlive an initial transient signal, could be of singular importance for post-mitotic neurons, which are subject to changes with short- to long-lasting influence on their activity and connectivity. Persistent changes in chromatin structure are thought to contribute to mechanisms of epigenetic inheritance. Recent advances in chromatin biology offer new avenues to investig...

  5. ATP-independent cooperative binding of yeast Isw1a to bare and nucleosomal DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne De Cian

    Full Text Available Among chromatin remodeling factors, the ISWI family displays a nucleosome-enhanced ATPase activity coupled to DNA translocation. While these enzymes are known to bind to DNA, their activity has not been fully characterized. Here we use TEM imaging and single molecule manipulation to investigate the interaction between DNA and yeast Isw1a. We show that Isw1a displays a highly cooperative ATP-independent binding to and bridging between DNA segments. Under appropriate tension, rare single nucleation events can sometimes be observed and loop DNA with a regular step. These nucleation events are often followed by binding of successive complexes bridging between nearby DNA segments in a zipper-like fashion, as confirmed by TEM observations. On nucleosomal substrates, we show that the specific ATP-dependent remodeling activity occurs in the context of cooperative Isw1a complexes bridging extranucleosomal DNA. Our results are interpreted in the context of the recently published partial structure of Isw1a and support its acting as a "protein ruler" (with possibly more than one tick.

  6. The biphasic response of rat vesical smooth muscle to ATP.

    OpenAIRE

    Bolego, C; Pinna, C.; Abbracchio, M. P.; Cattabeni, F.; Puglisi, L.

    1995-01-01

    1. Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) is known to exert a variety of biological effects via the activation of either ionotropic P2x- or G-protein coupled P2Y-purinoceptor subtypes. In this study the effects induced by ATP and ATP analogues on rat bladder strips were characterized at resting tone and in carbachol-prestimulated tissues. 2. ATP exerted a clear concentration-dependent biphasic response, which was maximal at 1 mM concentration and was characterized by an immediate and transient contr...

  7. Selective removal of promoter nucleosomes by the RSC chromatin-remodeling complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorch, Yahli; Griesenbeck, Joachim; Boeger, Hinrich; Maier-Davis, Barbara; Kornberg, Roger D

    2011-08-01

    Purified chromatin rings, excised from the PHO5 locus of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in transcriptionally repressed and activated states, were remodeled with RSC and ATP. Nucleosomes were translocated, and those originating on the promoter of repressed rings were removed, whereas those originating on the open reading frame (ORF) were retained. Treatment of the repressed rings with histone deacetylase diminished the removal of promoter nucleosomes. These findings point to a principle of promoter chromatin remodeling for transcription, namely that promoter specificity resides primarily in the nucleosomes rather than in the remodeling complex that acts upon them.

  8. Single Molecule Studies of Chromatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeans, C; Thelen, M P; Noy, A

    2006-02-06

    In eukaryotic cells, DNA is packaged as chromatin, a highly ordered structure formed through the wrapping of the DNA around histone proteins, and further packed through interactions with a number of other proteins. In order for processes such as DNA replication, DNA repair, and transcription to occur, the structure of chromatin must be remodeled such that the necessary enzymes can access the DNA. A number of remodeling enzymes have been described, but our understanding of the remodeling process is hindered by a lack of knowledge of the fine structure of chromatin, and how this structure is modulated in the living cell. We have carried out single molecule experiments using atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study the packaging arrangements in chromatin from a variety of cell types. Comparison of the structures observed reveals differences which can be explained in terms of the cell type and its transcriptional activity. During the course of this project, sample preparation and AFM techniques were developed and optimized. Several opportunities for follow-up work are outlined which could provide further insight into the dynamic structural rearrangements of chromatin.

  9. Magnetic field affects enzymatic ATP synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchachenko, Anatoly L; Kuznetsov, Dmitry A

    2008-10-01

    The rate of ATP synthesis by creatine kinase extracted from V. xanthia venom was shown to depend on the magnetic field. The yield of ATP produced by enzymes with 24Mg2+ and 26Mg2+ ions in catalytic sites increases by 7-8% at 55 mT and then decreases at 80 mT. For enzyme with 25Mg2+ ion in a catalytic site, the ATP yield increases by 50% and 70% in the fields 55 and 80 mT, respectively. In the Earth field the rate of ATP synthesis by enzyme, in which Mg2+ ion has magnetic nucleus 25Mg, is 2.5 times higher than that by enzymes, in which Mg2+ ion has nonmagnetic, spinless nuclei 24Mg or 26Mg. Both magnetic field effect and magnetic isotope effect demonstrate that the ATP synthesis is an ion-radical process, affected by Zeeman interaction and hyperfine coupling in the intermediate ion-radical pair. PMID:18774801

  10. Chromatin remodelers and their roles in chromatin organization

    OpenAIRE

    Strålfors, Annelie

    2012-01-01

    The DNA in the eukaryotic nucleus is organized into a complex DNA-protein structure called chromatin. The basic repeating unit of chromatin is the nucleosome, which consists of 147 bp of DNA wrapped around a histone protein octamer. The nucleosomes form a “beads on a string” structure, which can be folded into higherorder structures that allow an extensive degree of DNA compaction. This compaction is so effective that 2 meters of DNA can fit into the human cell nucleus with a ...

  11. Translational coupling of the maize chloroplast atpB and atpE genes

    OpenAIRE

    Gatenby, Anthony A.; Rothstein, Steven. J.; Nomura, Masayasu

    1989-01-01

    The genes for the β and ε subunits of maize chloroplast ATP synthase are encoded by the organelle genome, are cotranscribed, and have overlapping translation initiation and termination codons. To determine whether the atpB and atpE genes are translationally coupled, they were transformed into Escherichia coli on a multicopy plasmid. Synthesis of full-length β and ε polypeptides demonstrated correct initiation of translation by the bacterial ribosomes. To assay for translational coupling, the ...

  12. RNA is an integral component of chromatin that contributes to its structural organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Rodríguez-Campos

    Full Text Available Chromatin structure is influenced by multiples factors, such as pH, temperature, nature and concentration of counterions, post-translational modifications of histones and binding of structural non-histone proteins. RNA is also known to contribute to the regulation of chromatin structure as chromatin-induced gene silencing was shown to depend on the RNAi machinery in S. pombe, plants and Drosophila. Moreover, both in Drosophila and mammals, dosage compensation requires the contribution of specific non-coding RNAs. However, whether RNA itself plays a direct structural role in chromatin is not known. Here, we report results that indicate a general structural role for RNA in eukaryotic chromatin. RNA is found associated to purified chromatin prepared from chicken liver, or cultured Drosophila S2 cells, and treatment with RNase A alters the structural properties of chromatin. Our results indicate that chromatin-associated RNAs, which account for 2%-5% of total chromatin-associated nucleic acids, are polyA(- and show a size similar to that of the DNA contained in the corresponding chromatin fragments. Chromatin-associated RNA(s are not likely to correspond to nascent transcripts as they are also found bound to chromatin when cells are treated with alpha-amanitin. After treatment with RNase A, chromatin fragments of molecular weight >3.000 bp of DNA showed reduced sedimentation through sucrose gradients and increased sensitivity to micrococcal nuclease digestion. This structural transition, which is observed both at euchromatic and heterochromatic regions, proceeds without loss of histone H1 or any significant change in core-histone composition and integrity.

  13. The transcriptional coactivator SAYP is a trithorax group signature subunit of the PBAP chromatin remodeling complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalkley, Gillian E; Moshkin, Yuri M; Langenberg, Karin; Bezstarosti, Karel; Blastyak, Andras; Gyurkovics, Henrik; Demmers, Jeroen A A; Verrijzer, C Peter

    2008-05-01

    SWI/SNF ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes (remodelers) perform critical functions in eukaryotic gene expression control. BAP and PBAP are the fly representatives of the two evolutionarily conserved major subclasses of SWI/SNF remodelers. Both complexes share seven core subunits, including the Brahma ATPase, but differ in a few signature subunits; POLYBROMO and BAP170 specify PBAP, whereas OSA defines BAP. Here, we show that the transcriptional coactivator and PHD finger protein SAYP is a novel PBAP subunit. Biochemical analysis established that SAYP is tightly associated with PBAP but absent from BAP. SAYP, POLYBROMO, and BAP170 display an intimately overlapping distribution on larval salivary gland polytene chromosomes. Genome-wide expression analysis revealed that SAYP is critical for PBAP-dependent transcription. SAYP is required for normal development and interacts genetically with core- and PBAP-selective subunits. Genetic analysis suggested that, like BAP, PBAP also counteracts Polycomb silencing. SAYP appears to be a key architectural component required for the integrity and association of the PBAP-specific module. We conclude that SAYP is a signature subunit that plays a major role in the functional specificity of the PBAP holoenzyme.

  14. Prediction of highly expressed genes in microbes based on chromatin accessibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willenbrock, Hanni; Ussery, David

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is well known that gene expression is dependent on chromatin structure in eukaryotes and it is likely that chromatin can play a role in bacterial gene expression as well. Here, we use a nucleosomal position preference measure of anisotropic DNA flexibility to predict highly expressed...

  15. RSC-dependent constructive and destructive interference between opposing arrays of phased nucleosomes in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguli, Dwaipayan; Chereji, Răzvan V; Iben, James R; Cole, Hope A; Clark, David J

    2014-10-01

    RSC and SWI/SNF are related ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling machines that move nucleosomes, regulating access to DNA. We addressed their roles in nucleosome phasing relative to transcription start sites in yeast. SWI/SNF has no effect on phasing at the global level. In contrast, RSC depletion results in global nucleosome repositioning: Both upstream and downstream nucleosomal arrays shift toward the nucleosome-depleted region (NDR), with no change in spacing, resulting in a narrower and partly filled NDR. The global picture of RSC-depleted chromatin represents the average of a range of chromatin structures, with most genes showing a shift of the +1 or the -1 nucleosome into the NDR. Using RSC ChIP data reported by others, we show that RSC occupancy is highest on the coding regions of heavily transcribed genes, though not at their NDRs. We propose that RSC has a role in restoring chromatin structure after transcription. Analysis of gene pairs in different orientations demonstrates that phasing patterns reflect competition between phasing signals emanating from neighboring NDRs. These signals may be in phase, resulting in constructive interference and a regular array, or out of phase, resulting in destructive interference and fuzzy positioning. We propose a modified barrier model, in which a stable complex located at the NDR acts as a bidirectional phasing barrier. In RSC-depleted cells, this barrier has a smaller footprint, resulting in narrower NDRs. Thus, RSC plays a critical role in organizing yeast chromatin.

  16. A novel method for detecting apoptosis shows that hepatocytes undergo a time dependent increase in DNA cleavage and chromatin condensation which is augmented after TGF-beta 1 treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, K; Inayat-Hussain, S H; Couet, C; Qin, H M; Oberhammer, F A

    1996-04-01

    This study describes a new method for quantitating apoptosis in hepatocyte monolayers in which nuclei were isolated from the cells and DNA strand breaks detected by in situ end-labeling and flow cytometry. Most (97%) nuclei from untreated hepatocytes had low end-labelling and were derived from non-apoptotic cells. Approximately 2-3% of the nuclei had high end-labelling and originated from apoptotic hepatocytes. The numbers of these nuclei increased linearly from 3 to 85% between 0 and 48 h after treatment with transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1). However, a morphological assessment of apoptosis with Hoechst H33258 showed that the proportion of apoptotic nuclei plateaued at 18-19% between 24 and 48 h after TGF-beta 1 treatment. Thus, the in situ end-labeling technique also detected DNA cleavage in nuclei which did not have an obvious apoptotic morphology. Confocal microscopy of low and high end-labelled nuclei which had been separated by fluorescent cell sorting showed that nuclei with high levels of end-labeling exhibited a wide diversity of morphologies. These included nuclei with little or no chromatin condensation and nuclei with characteristic apoptotic morphology. In addition, nuclei from untreated hepatocytes contained low levels of DNA cleavage, which were localized in areas of condensed chromatin and increased according to the time in culture. Thus, hepatocytes undergo a progressive and cumulative process of DNA cleavage/chromatin condensation which is markedly enhanced by TGF-beta 1. PMID:8900474

  17. ATP generation in Leishmania donovani amastigote form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anup Kumar Roy

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania is the causative agent of various forms of leishmaniasis, a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. The clinical manifestations of the disease range from selfhealing cutaneous and mucocutaneous skin ulcers to a fatal visceral form named visceral leishmaniasis or kala-azar. The differentiation of Leishmania parasites from the insect stage, the promastigote, towards the pathogenic mammalian stage, the amastigote, is triggered primarily by the rise in ambient temperature encountered during the insect to mammal transmission. The survival of amastigote stage is dependent on that of the host. Regarding energy metabolism, which is an essential factor for the survival, parasites adapt to the environment under low oxygen tension in the host using metabolic systems which are very different from that of the host mammals. The amastigote form of L. donovani is independent on oxidative phosphorylation for ATP production. Indeed, its cell growth was not inhibited by 20-fold excess oligomycin and dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, which are the most specific inhibitors of the mitochondrial FoF1-ATP synthase. In contrast, mitochondrial complex I inhibitor rotenone and complex III inhibitor antimycin A inhibited amastigote cell growth, suggesting the role of complex I and complex III in cell survival. Complex II appeared to have no role in cell survival. To further investigate the site of ATP production, we studied the substrate level phosphorylation, which was involved in the synthesis of ATP. Succinate-pyruvate couple showed the highest substrate level phosphorylation, whereas NADHfumarate and NADH-pyruvate couples failed to produce ATP. In contrast, NADPH-fumarate showed the highest rate of ATP formation in promastigotes. We conclude that substrate level phosphorylation is essential for the growth of L. donovani amastigotes.

  18. Guarding against Collateral Damage during Chromatin Transactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altmeyer, Matthias; Lukas, Jiri

    2013-01-01

    Signal amplifications are vital for chromatin function, yet they also bear the risk of transforming into unrestrained, self-escalating, and potentially harmful responses. Examples of inbuilt limitations are emerging, revealing how chromatin transactions are confined within physiological boundaries....

  19. Chromatin structure regulates gene conversion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Jason Cummings

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Homology-directed repair is a powerful mechanism for maintaining and altering genomic structure. We asked how chromatin structure contributes to the use of homologous sequences as donors for repair using the chicken B cell line DT40 as a model. In DT40, immunoglobulin genes undergo regulated sequence diversification by gene conversion templated by pseudogene donors. We found that the immunoglobulin Vlambda pseudogene array is characterized by histone modifications associated with active chromatin. We directly demonstrated the importance of chromatin structure for gene conversion, using a regulatable experimental system in which the heterochromatin protein HP1 (Drosophila melanogaster Su[var]205, expressed as a fusion to Escherichia coli lactose repressor, is tethered to polymerized lactose operators integrated within the pseudo-Vlambda donor array. Tethered HP1 diminished histone acetylation within the pseudo-Vlambda array, and altered the outcome of Vlambda diversification, so that nontemplated mutations rather than templated mutations predominated. Thus, chromatin structure regulates homology-directed repair. These results suggest that histone modifications may contribute to maintaining genomic stability by preventing recombination between repetitive sequences.

  20. Predicting chromatin organization using histone marks

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Jialiang; Marco, Eugenio; Pinello, Luca; Yuan, Guo-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide mapping of three dimensional chromatin organization is an important yet technically challenging task. To aid experimental effort and to understand the determinants of long-range chromatin interactions, we have developed a computational model integrating Hi-C and histone mark ChIP-seq data to predict two important features of chromatin organization: chromatin interaction hubs and topologically associated domain (TAD) boundaries. Our model accurately and robustly predicts these feat...

  1. Optogenetic control of ATP release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Matthew A.; Joshi, Bipin; Gu, Ling; Feranchak, Andrew; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2013-03-01

    Controlled release of ATP can be used for understanding extracellular purinergic signaling. While coarse mechanical forces and hypotonic stimulation have been utilized in the past to initiate ATP release from cells, these methods are neither spatially accurate nor temporally precise. Further, these methods cannot be utilized in a highly effective cell-specific manner. To mitigate the uncertainties regarding cellular-specificity and spatio-temporal release of ATP, we herein demonstrate use of optogenetics for ATP release. ATP release in response to optogenetic stimulation was monitored by Luciferin-Luciferase assay (North American firefly, photinus pyralis) using luminometer as well as mesoscopic bioluminescence imaging. Our result demonstrates repetitive release of ATP subsequent to optogenetic stimulation. It is thus feasible that purinergic signaling can be directly detected via imaging if the stimulus can be confined to single cell or in a spatially-defined group of cells. This study opens up new avenue to interrogate the mechanisms of purinergic signaling.

  2. Impact of Chromatin on HIV Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Agosto, Luis M.; Matthew Gagne; Henderson, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin influences Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) integration and replication. This review highlights critical host factors that influence chromatin structure and organization and that also impact HIV integration, transcriptional regulation and latency. Furthermore, recent attempts to target chromatin associated factors to reduce the HIV proviral load are discussed.

  3. Is chromatin remodeling required to build sister-chromatid cohesion?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riedel, Christian G; Gregan, Juraj; Gruber, Stephan; Nasmyth, Kim

    2004-01-01

    Chromosome segregation during mitosis and meiosis depends on the linkage of sister DNA molecules after replication. These links, known as sister-chromatid cohesion, are provided by a multi-subunit complex called cohesin. Recent papers suggest that chromatin-remodeling complexes also have a role in t

  4. Oxidative stress signaling to chromatin in health and disease

    KAUST Repository

    Kreuz, Sarah

    2016-06-20

    Oxidative stress has a significant impact on the development and progression of common human pathologies, including cancer, diabetes, hypertension and neurodegenerative diseases. Increasing evidence suggests that oxidative stress globally influences chromatin structure, DNA methylation, enzymatic and non-enzymatic post-translational modifications of histones and DNA-binding proteins. The effects of oxidative stress on these chromatin alterations mediate a number of cellular changes, including modulation of gene expression, cell death, cell survival and mutagenesis, which are disease-driving mechanisms in human pathologies. Targeting oxidative stress-dependent pathways is thus a promising strategy for the prevention and treatment of these diseases. We summarize recent research developments connecting oxidative stress and chromatin regulation.

  5. ATP release and purinergic signaling in NLRP3 inflammasome activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle eCOUILLIN

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The NLRP3 inflammasome is a protein complex involved in IL-1β and IL-18 processing that senses pathogen- and danger-associated molecular patterns. One step- or two step- models have been proposed to explain the tight regulation of IL-1β production during inflammation. Moreover, cellular stimulation triggers ATP release and subsequent activation of purinergic receptors at the cell surface. Importantly some studies have reported roles for extracellular ATP (eATP, in NLRP3 inflammasome activation in response to PAMPs and DAMPs. In this mini review, we will discuss the link between active ATP release, purinergic signaling and NLRP3 inflammasome activation. We will focus on the role of autocrine or paracrine ATP export in particle-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation and discuss how particle activators are competent to induce maturation and secretion of IL-1β through a process that involves, as a first event, extracellular release of endogenous ATP through hemichannel opening, and as a second event, signaling through purinergic receptors that trigger NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Finally, we will review the evidence for ATP as a key proinflammatory mediator released by dying cells. In particular we will discuss how cancer cells dying via autophagy trigger ATP-dependent NLRP3 inflammasome activation in the macrophages engulfing them, eliciting an immunogenic response against tumors.

  6. Calcium and ATP control multiple vital functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2016-01-01

    Life on Planet Earth, as we know it, revolves around adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as a universal energy storing molecule. The metabolism of ATP requires a low cytosolic Ca2+ concentration, and hence tethers these two molecules together. The exceedingly low cytosolic Ca2+ concentration (which in all life forms is kept around 50–100 nM) forms the basis for a universal intracellular signalling system in which Ca2+ acts as a second messenger. Maintenance of transmembrane Ca2+ gradients, in turn, requires ATP-dependent Ca2+ transport, thus further emphasizing the inseparable links between these two substances. Ca2+ signalling controls the most fundamental processes in the living organism, from heartbeat and neurotransmission to cell energetics and secretion. The versatility and plasticity of Ca2+ signalling relies on cell specific Ca2+ signalling toolkits, remodelling of which underlies adaptive cellular responses. Alterations of these Ca2+ signalling toolkits lead to aberrant Ca2+ signalling which is fundamental for the pathophysiology of numerous diseases from acute pancreatitis to neurodegeneration. This paper introduces a theme issue on this topic, which arose from a Royal Society Theo Murphy scientific meeting held in March 2016. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Evolution brings Ca2+ and ATP together to control life and death’. PMID:27377728

  7. Calcium and ATP control multiple vital functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Ole H; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2016-08-01

    Life on Planet Earth, as we know it, revolves around adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as a universal energy storing molecule. The metabolism of ATP requires a low cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration, and hence tethers these two molecules together. The exceedingly low cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration (which in all life forms is kept around 50-100 nM) forms the basis for a universal intracellular signalling system in which Ca(2+) acts as a second messenger. Maintenance of transmembrane Ca(2+) gradients, in turn, requires ATP-dependent Ca(2+) transport, thus further emphasizing the inseparable links between these two substances. Ca(2+) signalling controls the most fundamental processes in the living organism, from heartbeat and neurotransmission to cell energetics and secretion. The versatility and plasticity of Ca(2+) signalling relies on cell specific Ca(2+) signalling toolkits, remodelling of which underlies adaptive cellular responses. Alterations of these Ca(2+) signalling toolkits lead to aberrant Ca(2+) signalling which is fundamental for the pathophysiology of numerous diseases from acute pancreatitis to neurodegeneration. This paper introduces a theme issue on this topic, which arose from a Royal Society Theo Murphy scientific meeting held in March 2016.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolution brings Ca(2+) and ATP together to control life and death'. PMID:27377728

  8. Extracellular ATP inhibits root gravitropism at concentrations that inhibit polar auxin transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wenqiang; Brady, Shari R.; Sun, Yu; Muday, Gloria K.; Roux, Stanley J.

    2003-01-01

    Raising the level of extracellular ATP to mM concentrations similar to those found inside cells can block gravitropism of Arabidopsis roots. When plants are grown in Murashige and Skoog medium supplied with 1 mM ATP, their roots grow horizontally instead of growing straight down. Medium with 2 mM ATP induces root curling, and 3 mM ATP stimulates lateral root growth. When plants are transferred to medium containing exogenous ATP, the gravity response is reduced or in some cases completely blocked by ATP. Equivalent concentrations of ADP or inorganic phosphate have slight but usually statistically insignificant effects, suggesting the specificity of ATP in these responses. The ATP effects may be attributable to the disturbance of auxin distribution in roots by exogenously applied ATP, because extracellular ATP can alter the pattern of auxin-induced gene expression in DR5-beta-glucuronidase transgenic plants and increase the response sensitivity of plant roots to exogenously added auxin. The presence of extracellular ATP also decreases basipetal auxin transport in a dose-dependent fashion in both maize (Zea mays) and Arabidopsis roots and increases the retention of [(3)H]indole-3-acetic acid in root tips of maize. Taken together, these results suggest that the inhibitory effects of extracellular ATP on auxin distribution may happen at the level of auxin export. The potential role of the trans-plasma membrane ATP gradient in auxin export and plant root gravitropism is discussed.

  9. Chromatin Dynamics of Circadian Transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Aguilar-Arnal, Lorena; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The molecular circadian clock orchestrates the daily cyclical expression of thousands of genes. Disruption of this transcriptional program leads to a variety of pathologies, including insomnia, depression and metabolic disorders. Circadian rhythms in gene expression rely on specific chromatin transitions which are ultimately coordinated by the molecular clock. As a consequence, a highly plastic and dynamic circadian epigenome can be delineated across different tissues and cell types. Intrigui...

  10. Microglial migration mediated by ATP-induced ATP release from lysosomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Dou; Qing-ming Luo; Shumin Duan; Hang-jun Wu; Hui-quan Li; Song Qin; Yin-er Wang; Jing Li; Hui-fang Lou; Zhong Chen; Xiao-ming Li

    2012-01-01

    Microglia are highly motile cells that act as the main form of active immune defense in the central nervous system.Attracted by factors released from damaged cells,microglia are recruited towards the damaged or infected site,where they are involved in degenerative and regenerative responses and phagocytotic clearance of cell debris.ATP release from damaged neural tissues has been suggested to mediate the rapid extension of microglial process towards the site of injury.However,the mechanisms of the long-range migration of microglia remain to be clarified.Here,we found that lysosomes in microglia contain abundant ATP and exhibit Ca2+-dependent exocytosis in response to various stimuli.By establishing an efficient in vitro chemotaxis assay,we demonstrated that endogenously-released ATP from microglia triggered by local microinjection of ATPγS is critical for the long-range chemotaxis of microglia,a response that was significantly inhibited in microglia treated with an agent inducing iysosome osmodialysis or in cells derived from mice deficient in Rab 27a (ashen mice),a small GTPase required for the trafficking and exocytosis of secretory iysosomes.These results suggest that microglia respond to extracellular ATP by releasing ATP themselves through lysosomal exocytosis,thereby providing a positive feedback mechanism to generate a long-range extracellular signal for attracting distant microglia to migrate towards and accumulate at the site of injury.

  11. Chromatin remodeling enzyme Brg1 is required for mouse lens fiber cell terminal differentiation and its denucleation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Shuying

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brahma-related gene 1 (Brg1, also known as Smarca4 and Snf2β encodes an adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP-dependent catalytical subunit of the (switch/sucrose nonfermentable (SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complexes. SWI/SNF complexes are recruited to chromatin through multiple mechanisms, including specific DNA-binding factors (for example, heat shock transcription factor 4 (Hsf4 and paired box gene 6 (Pax6, chromatin structural proteins (for example, high-mobility group A1 (HMGA1 and/or acetylated core histones. Previous studies have shown that a single amino acid substitution (K798R in the Brg1 ATPase domain acts via a dominant-negative (dn mechanism. Genetic studies have demonstrated that Brg1 is an essential gene for early (that is, prior implantation mouse embryonic development. Brg1 also controls neural stem cell maintenance, terminal differentiation of multiple cell lineages and organs including the T-cells, glial cells and limbs. Results To examine the roles of Brg1 in mouse lens development, a dnBrg1 transgenic construct was expressed using the lens-specific αA-crystallin promoter in postmitotic lens fiber cells. Morphological studies revealed abnormal lens fiber cell differentiation in transgenic lenses resulting in cataract. Electron microscopic studies showed abnormal lens suture formation and incomplete karyolysis (that is, denucleation of lens fiber cells. To identify genes regulated by Brg1, RNA expression profiling was performed in embryonic day 15.5 (E15.5 wild-type and dnBrg1 transgenic lenses. In addition, comparisons between differentially expressed genes in dnBrg1 transgenic, Pax6 heterozygous and Hsf4 homozygous lenses identified multiple genes coregulated by Brg1, Hsf4 and Pax6. DNase IIβ, a key enzyme required for lens fiber cell denucleation, was found to be downregulated in each of the Pax6, Brg1 and Hsf4 model systems. Lens-specific deletion of Brg1 using conditional gene targeting demonstrated that

  12. Dynamic Regulation of Cell Volume and Extracellular ATP of Human Erythrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal Denis, M. Florencia; Alvarez, H. Ariel; Lauri, Natalia; Alvarez, Cora L.; Chara, Osvaldo; Schwarzbaum, Pablo J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The peptide mastoparan 7 (MST7) triggered in human erythrocytes (rbcs) the release of ATP and swelling. Since swelling is a well-known inducer of ATP release, and extracellular (ATPe), interacting with P (purinergic) receptors, can affect cell volume (Vr), we explored the dynamic regulation between Vr and ATPe. Methods and Treatments We made a quantitative assessment of MST7-dependent kinetics of Vr and of [ATPe], both in the absence and presence of blockers of ATP efflux, swelling and P receptors. Results In rbcs 10 μM MST7 promoted acute, strongly correlated changes in [ATPe] and Vr. Whereas MST7 induced increases of 10% in Vr and 190 nM in [ATPe], blocking swelling in a hyperosmotic medium + MST7 reduced [ATPe] by 40%. Pre-incubation of rbcs with 10 μM of either carbenoxolone or probenecid, two inhibitors of the ATP conduit pannexin 1, reduced [ATPe] by 40–50% and swelling by 40–60%, while in the presence of 80 U/mL apyrase, an ATPe scavenger, cell swelling was prevented. While exposure to 10 μM NF110, a blocker of ATP-P2X receptors mediating sodium influx, reduced [ATPe] by 48%, and swelling by 80%, incubation of cells in sodium free medium reduced swelling by 92%. Analysis and Discussion Results were analyzed by means of a mathematical model where ATPe kinetics and Vr kinetics were mutually regulated. Model dependent fit to experimental data showed that, upon MST7 exposure, ATP efflux required a fast 1960-fold increase of ATP permeability, mediated by two kinetically different conduits, both of which were activated by swelling and inactivated by time. Both experimental and theoretical results suggest that, following MST7 exposure, ATP is released via two conduits, one of which is mediated by pannexin 1. The accumulated ATPe activates P2X receptors, followed by sodium influx, resulting in cell swelling, which in turn further activates ATP release. Thus swelling and P2X receptors constitute essential components of a positive feedback loop

  13. Lysosomal ATP imaging in living cells by a water-soluble cationic polythiophene derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bing-Huan; Geng, Zhi-Rong; Ma, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Cui; Zhang, Zhi-Yang; Wang, Zhi-Lin

    2016-09-15

    Lysosomes in astrocytes and microglia can release ATP as the signaling molecule for the cells through ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis in response to various stimuli. At present, fluorescent probes that can detect ATP in lysosomes have not been reported. In this work, we have developed a new water-soluble cationic polythiophene derivative that can be specifically localized in lysosomes and can be utilized as a fluorescent probe to sense ATP in cells. PEMTEI exhibits high selectivity and sensitivity to ATP at physiological pH values and the detection limit of ATP is as low as 10(-11)M. The probe has low cytotoxicity, good permeability and high photostability in living cells and has been applied successfully to real-time monitoring of the change in concentrations of ATP in lysosomes though fluorescence microscopy. We also demonstrated that lysosomes in Hela cells can release ATP through Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis in response to drug stimuli. PMID:27131993

  14. The CADE ATP System Competition — CASC

    OpenAIRE

    Sutcliffe, Geoff; University of Miami.

    2016-01-01

    The CADE ATP System Competition (CASC) is an annual evaluation of fully automatic automated theorem proving (ATP) systems for classical logic — the world championship for such systems. CASC provides a public evaluation of the relative capabilities of ATP systems, and aims stimulate ATP research towards the development of more powerful ATP systems. Over the years CASC has been a catalyst for impressive improvements in ATP.

  15. Phytochrome B and histone deacetylase 6 control light-induced chromatin compaction in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Tessadori

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Natural genetic variation in Arabidopsis thaliana exists for many traits and often reflects acclimation to local environments. Studying natural variation has proven valuable in the characterization of phenotypic traits and, in particular, in identifying genetic factors controlling these traits. It has been previously shown that chromatin compaction changes during development and biotic stress. To gain more insight into the genetic control of chromatin compaction, we investigated the nuclear phenotype of 21 selected Arabidopsis accessions from different geographic origins and habitats. We show natural variation in chromatin compaction and demonstrate a positive correlation with latitude of geographic origin. The level of compaction appeared to be dependent on light intensity. A novel approach, combining Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL mapping and microscopic examination, pointed at PHYTOCHROME-B (PHYB and HISTONE DEACETYLASE-6 (HDA6 as positive regulators of light-controlled chromatin compaction. Indeed, mutant analyses demonstrate that both factors affect global chromatin organization. HDA6, in addition, strongly promotes the light-mediated compaction of the Nucleolar Organizing Regions (NORs. The accession Cape Verde Islands-0 (Cvi-0, which shows sequence polymorphism in the PHYB gene and in the HDA6 promotor, resembles the hda6 mutant in having reduced chromatin compaction and decreased methylation levels of DNA and histone H3K9 at the NORs. We provide evidence that chromatin organization is controlled by light intensity. We propose that chromatin plasticity is associated with acclimation of Arabidopsis to its environment. The polymorphic alleles such as PHYB and HDA6 control this process.

  16. ATP and potassium ions: a deadly combination for astrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, David G.; Wang, Junjie; Keane, Robert W.; Scemes, Eliana; Dahl, Gerhard

    2014-04-01

    The ATP release channel Pannexin1 (Panx1) is self-regulated, i.e. the permeant ATP inhibits the channel from the extracellular space. The affinity of the ATP binding site is lower than that of the purinergic P2X7 receptor allowing a transient activation of Panx1 by ATP through P2X7R. Here we show that the inhibition of Panx1 by ATP is abrogated by increased extracellular potassium ion concentration ([K+]o) in a dose-dependent manner. Since increased [K+]o is also a stimulus for Panx1 channels, it can be expected that a combination of ATP and increased [K+]o would be deadly for cells. Indeed, astrocytes did not survive exposure to these combined stimuli. The death mechanism, although involving P2X7R, does not appear to strictly follow a pyroptotic pathway. Instead, caspase-3 was activated, a process inhibited by Panx1 inhibitors. These data suggest that Panx1 plays an early role in the cell death signaling pathway involving ATP and K+ ions. Additionally, Panx1 may play a second role once cells are committed to apoptosis, since Panx1 is also a substrate of caspase-3.

  17. The origin of cytosolic ATP in photosynthetic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardeström, Per; Igamberdiev, Abir U

    2016-07-01

    In photosynthetically active cells, both chloroplasts and mitochondria have the capacity to produce ATP via photophosphorylation and oxidative phosphorylation, respectively. Thus, theoretically, both organelles could provide ATP for the cytosol, but the extent, to which they actually do this, and how the process is regulated, both remain unclear. Most of the evidence discussed comes from experiments with rapid fractionation of isolated protoplasts subjected to different treatments in combination with application of specific inhibitors. The results obtained indicate that, under conditions where ATP demand for photosynthetic CO2 fixation is sufficiently high, the mitochondria supply the bulk of ATP for the cytosol. In contrast, under stress conditions where CO2 fixation is severely limited, ATP will build up in chloroplasts and it can then be exported to the cytosol, by metabolite shuttle mechanisms. Thus, depending on the conditions, either mitochondria or chloroplasts can supply the bulk of ATP for the cytosol. This supply of ATP is discussed in relation to the idea that mitochondrial functions may be tuned to provide an optimal environment for the chloroplast. By balancing cellular redox states, mitochondria can contribute to an optimal photosynthetic capacity. PMID:27087668

  18. Glucose generates sub-plasma membrane ATP microdomains in single islet beta-cells. Potential role for strategically located mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, H J; Pouli, A E; Ainscow, E K; Jouaville, L S; Rizzuto, R; Rutter, G A

    1999-05-01

    Increases in the concentration of free ATP within the islet beta-cell may couple elevations in blood glucose to insulin release by closing ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels and activating Ca2+ influx. Here, we use recombinant targeted luciferases and photon counting imaging to monitor changes in free [ATP] in subdomains of single living MIN6 and primary beta-cells. Resting [ATP] in the cytosol ([ATP]c), in the mitochondrial matrix ([ATP]m), and beneath the plasma membrane ([ATP]pm) were similar ( approximately 1 mM). Elevations in extracellular glucose concentration (3-30 mM) increased free [ATP] in each domain with distinct kinetics. Thus, sustained increases in [ATP]m and [ATP]pm were observed, but only a transient increase in [ATP]c. However, detectable increases in [ATP]c and [ATP]pm, but not [ATP]m, required extracellular Ca2+. Enhancement of glucose-induced Ca2+ influx with high [K+] had little effect on the apparent [ATP]c and [ATP]m increases but augmented the [ATP]pm increase. Underlying these changes, glucose increased the mitochondrial proton motive force, an effect mimicked by high [K+]. These data support a model in which glucose increases [ATP]m both through enhanced substrate supply and by progressive Ca2+-dependent activation of mitochondrial enzymes. This may then lead to a privileged elevation of [ATP]pm, which may be essential for the sustained closure of KATP channels. Luciferase imaging would appear to be a useful new tool for dynamic in vivo imaging of free ATP concentration.

  19. Chromatin Modification and Remodeling in Heart Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Delgado-Olguín

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In organogenesis, cell types are specified from determined precursors as morphogenetic patterning takes place. These events are largely controlled by tissue-specific transcription factors. These transcription factors must function within the context of chromatin to activate or repress target genes. Recent evidence suggests that chromatin-remodeling and -modifying factors may have tissue-specific function. Here we review the potential roles for chromatin-remodeling and -modifying proteins in the development of the mammalian heart.

  20. Transcriptional networks and chromatin remodeling controlling adipogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siersbæk, Rasmus; Nielsen, Ronni; Mandrup, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    Adipocyte differentiation is tightly controlled by a transcriptional cascade, which directs the extensive reprogramming of gene expression required to convert fibroblast-like precursor cells into mature lipid-laden adipocytes. Recent global analyses of transcription factor binding and chromatin...... remodeling have revealed 'snapshots' of this cascade and the chromatin landscape at specific time-points of differentiation. These studies demonstrate that multiple adipogenic transcription factors co-occupy hotspots characterized by an open chromatin structure and specific epigenetic modifications....... Such transcription factor hotspots are likely to represent key signaling nodes which integrate multiple adipogenic signals at specific chromatin sites, thereby facilitating coordinated action on gene expression....

  1. Reverse genetic analysis of the yeast RSC chromatin remodeler reveals a role for RSC3 and SNF5 homolog 1 in ploidy maintenance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coen Campsteijn

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The yeast "remodels the structure of chromatin" (RSC complex is a multi-subunit "switching deficient/sucrose non-fermenting" type ATP-dependent nucleosome remodeler, with human counterparts that are well-established tumor suppressors. Using temperature-inducible degron fusions of all the essential RSC subunits, we set out to map RSC requirement as a function of the mitotic cell cycle. We found that RSC executes essential functions during G1, G2, and mitosis. Remarkably, we observed a doubling of chromosome complements when degron alleles of the RSC subunit SFH1, the yeast hSNF5 tumor suppressor ortholog, and RSC3 were combined. The requirement for simultaneous deregulation of SFH1 and RSC3 to induce these ploidy shifts was eliminated by knockout of the S-phase cyclin CLB5 and by transient depletion of replication origin licensing factor Cdc6p. Further, combination of the degron alleles of SFH1 and RSC3, with deletion alleles of each of the nine Cdc28/Cdk1-associated cyclins, revealed a strong and specific genetic interaction between the S-phase cyclin genes CLB5 and RSC3, indicating a role for Rsc3p in proper S-phase regulation. Taken together, our results implicate RSC in regulation of the G1/S-phase transition and establish a hitherto unanticipated role for RSC-mediated chromatin remodeling in ploidy maintenance.

  2. Identification of Novel Proteins Co-Purifying with Cockayne Syndrome Group B (CSB Reveals Potential Roles for CSB in RNA Metabolism and Chromatin Dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Nicolai

    Full Text Available The CSB protein, a member of the SWI/SNF ATP dependent chromatin remodeling family of proteins, plays a role in a sub-pathway of nucleotide excision repair (NER known as transcription coupled repair (TCR. CSB is frequently mutated in Cockayne syndrome group B, a segmental progeroid human autosomal recessive disease characterized by growth failure and degeneration of multiple organs. Though initially classified as a DNA repair protein, recent studies have demonstrated that the loss of CSB results in pleiotropic effects. Identification of novel proteins belonging to the CSB interactome may be useful not only for predicting the molecular basis for diverse pathological symptoms of CS-B patients but also for unraveling the functions of CSB in addition to its authentic role in DNA repair. In this study, we performed tandem affinity purification (TAP technology coupled with mass spectrometry and co-immunoprecipitation studies to identify and characterize the proteins that potentially interact with CSB-TAP. Our approach revealed 33 proteins that were not previously known to interact with CSB. These newly identified proteins indicate potential roles for CSB in RNA metabolism involving repression and activation of transcription process and in the maintenance of chromatin dynamics and integrity.

  3. SLIDE, the Protein Interacting Domain of Imitation Switch Remodelers, Binds DDT-Domain Proteins of Different Subfamilies in Chromatin Remodeling Complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiaqiang Dong; Zheng Gao; Shujing Liu; Guang Li; Zhongnan Yang; Hai Huang; Lin Xu

    2013-01-01

    The Imitation Switch (ISWI) type adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent chromatin remodeling factors are conserved proteins in eukaryotes, and some of them are known to form stable remodeling complexes with members from a family of proteins, termed DDT-domain proteins. Although it is well documented that ISWIs play important roles in different biological processes in many eukaryotic species, the molecular basis for protein interactions in ISWI complexes has not been fully addressed. Here, we report the identification of interaction domains for both ISWI and DDT-domain proteins. By analyzing CHROMATIN REMODELING11 (CHR11) and RINGLET1 (RLT1), an Arabidopsis thaliana ISWI (AtISWI) and AtDDT-domain protein, respectively, we show that the SLIDE domain of CHR11 and the DDT domain together with an adjacent sequence of RLT1 are responsible for their binding. The Arabidopsis genome contains at least 12 genes that encode DDT-domain proteins, which could be grouped into five subfamilies based on the sequence similarity. The SLIDE domain of AtISWI is able to bind members from different AtDDT subfamilies. Moreover, a human ISWI protein SNF2H is capable of binding AtDDT-domain proteins through its SLIDE domain, suggesting that binding to DDT-domain proteins is a conserved biochemical function for the SLIDE domain of ISWIs in eukaryotes.

  4. The architects of crenarchaeal chromatin : A biophysical characterization of chromatin proteins from Sulfolobus solfataricus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, Rosalie Paula Catharina

    2014-01-01

    Understanding of chromatin organization and compaction in Archaea is currently limited. The genome of several megabasepairs long is folded by a set of small chromatin proteins to fit into the micron-sized cell. A first step in understanding archaeal chromatin organization is to study the action of i

  5. Impaired contextual fear extinction learning is associated with aberrant regulation of CHD-type chromatin remodeling factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra eWille

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Successful attenuation of fearful memories is a cognitive process requiring initiation of highly coordinated transcription programs. Chromatin-modulating mechanisms such as DNA methylation and histone modifications, including acetylation, are key regulators of these processes. However, knowledge concerning the role of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors (ChRFs being required for successful fear extinction is lacking. Underscoring the potential importance of these factors that alter histone-DNA contacts within nucleosomes are recent genome-wide association studies linking several ChRFs to various human cognitive and psychiatric disorders. To better understand the role of ChRFs in the brain, and since to date little is known about ChRF expression in the brain, we performed a comprehensive survey of expression levels of 24 ATP-dependent remodelers across different brain areas, and we identified several distinct high molecular weight complexes by chromatographic methods. We next aimed to gain novel insight into the potential regulation of ChRFs in different brain regions in association with normal and impaired fear extinction learning. To this end, we established the 129S1/SvImJ (S1 laboratory mouse strain as a model for compromised contextual fear extinction learning that can be rescued by dietary zinc restriction. Using this model along with genetically related but fear extinction-competent 129S6/SvEv (S6 mice as controls, we found that impaired fear extinction in S1 was associated with enhanced ventral hippocampal expression of CHD1 and reduced expression of CHD5 that was normalized following successful rescue of impaired fear extinction. Moreover, a select reduction in CHD3 expression was observed in the ventral hippocampus following successful rescue of fear extinction in S1 mice. Taken together, these data provide novel insight into the regulation of specific ChRFs following an impaired cognitive process and its rescue, and they suggest

  6. Computational strategies to address chromatin structure problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perišić, Ognjen; Schlick, Tamar

    2016-01-01

    While the genetic information is contained in double helical DNA, gene expression is a complex multilevel process that involves various functional units, from nucleosomes to fully formed chromatin fibers accompanied by a host of various chromatin binding enzymes. The chromatin fiber is a polymer composed of histone protein complexes upon which DNA wraps, like yarn upon many spools. The nature of chromatin structure has been an open question since the beginning of modern molecular biology. Many experiments have shown that the chromatin fiber is a highly dynamic entity with pronounced structural diversity that includes properties of idealized zig-zag and solenoid models, as well as other motifs. This diversity can produce a high packing ratio and thus inhibit access to a majority of the wound DNA. Despite much research, chromatin's dynamic structure has not yet been fully described. Long stretches of chromatin fibers exhibit puzzling dynamic behavior that requires interpretation in the light of gene expression patterns in various tissue and organisms. The properties of chromatin fiber can be investigated with experimental techniques, like in vitro biochemistry, in vivo imagining, and high-throughput chromosome capture technology. Those techniques provide useful insights into the fiber's structure and dynamics, but they are limited in resolution and scope, especially regarding compact fibers and chromosomes in the cellular milieu. Complementary but specialized modeling techniques are needed to handle large floppy polymers such as the chromatin fiber. In this review, we discuss current approaches in the chromatin structure field with an emphasis on modeling, such as molecular dynamics and coarse-grained computational approaches. Combinations of these computational techniques complement experiments and address many relevant biological problems, as we will illustrate with special focus on epigenetic modulation of chromatin structure. PMID:27345617

  7. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the ATPase domain of the σ54-dependent transcription activator NtrC1 from Aquifex aeolicus bound to the ATP analog ADP–BeFx

    OpenAIRE

    Sysoeva, Tatyana A.; Yennawar, Neela; Allaire, Marc; Nixon, B. Tracy

    2013-01-01

    This study reports the crystallization of a new nucleotide state of the ATPase domain of a bacterial transcription activator NtrC1 from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus. Wild-type NtrC1 ATPase domain was crystallized in the presence of the ATP analog ADP–BeFx–Mg and the crystals diffracted anisotropically to at best 3.2, 5.2 and 3.2 Å resolution in the a*, b* and c* directions, respectively.

  8. A microscopic analysis of Arabidopsis chromatin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemse, J.J.

    2007-01-01

    Genetic information of eukaryotic organisms is stored as DNA in the nuclei of their cells. Nuclear DNA is associated with several proteins, which together form chromatin. The most abundant chromatin proteins arehistones,they arrange the initial packaging step of the DNA. DNA

  9. Chromatin dynamics resolved with force spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chien, Fan-Tso

    2011-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, genomic DNA is organized in chromatin fibers composed of nucleosomes as structural units. A nucleosome contains 1.7 turns of DNA wrapped around a histone octamer and is connected to the adjacent nucleosomes with linker DNA. The folding of chromatin fibers effectively increases t

  10. Chromatin challenges during DNA replication and repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Anja; Rocha, Walter; Verreault, Alain;

    2007-01-01

    the challenge of maintenance, cells have evolved efficient nucleosome-assembly pathways and chromatin-maturation mechanisms that reproduce chromatin organization in the wake of DNA replication and repair. The aim of this Review is to describe how these pathways operate and to highlight how the epigenetic...

  11. Chromatin-modifying proteins in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fog, Cathrine K; Jensen, Klaus T; Lund, Anders Henrik

    2007-01-01

    -despite the fact that all cells in the organism contain the same genetic information. A large amount of data gathered over the last decades has demonstrated that deregulation of chromatin-modifying proteins is etiologically involved in the development and progression of cancer. Here we discuss how epigenetic...... alterations influence cancer development and review known cancer-associated alterations in chromatin-modifying proteins....

  12. A Long-Distance Chromatin Affair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Denker, Annette; de Laat, Wouter

    2015-01-01

    Changes in transcription factor binding sequences result in correlated changes in chromatin composition locally and at sites hundreds of kilobases away. New studies demonstrate that this concordance is mediated via spatial chromatin interactions that constitute regulatory modules of the human genome

  13. Dynamic chromatin: the regulatory domain organization of eukaryotic gene loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifer, C; Hecht, A; Saueressig, H; Winter, D M; Sippel, A E

    1991-10-01

    It is hypothesized that nuclear DNA is organized in topologically constrained loop domains defining basic units of higher order chromatin structure. Our studies are performed in order to investigate the functional relevance of this structural subdivision of eukaryotic chromatin for the control of gene expression. We used the chicken lysozyme gene locus as a model to examine the relation between chromatin structure and gene function. Several structural features of the lysozyme locus are known: the extension of the region of general DNAasel sensitivity of the active gene, the location of DNA-sequences with high affinity for the nuclear matrix in vitro, and the position of DNAasel hypersensitive chromatin sites (DHSs). The pattern of DHSs changes depending on the transcriptional status of the gene. Functional studies demonstrated that DHSs mark the position of cis-acting regulatory elements. Additionally, we discovered a novel cis-activity of the border regions of the DNAasel sensitive domain (A-elements). By eliminating the position effect on gene expression usually observed when genes are randomly integrated into the genome after transfection, A-elements possibly serve as punctuation marks for a regulatory chromatin domain. Experiments using transgenic mice confirmed that the complete structurally defined lysozyme gene domain behaves as an independent regulatory unit, expressing the gene in a tissue specific and position independent manner. These expression features were lost in transgenic mice carrying a construct, in which the A-elements as well as an upstream enhancer region were deleted, indicating the lack of a locus activation function on this construct. Experiments are designed in order to uncover possible hierarchical relationships between the different cis-acting regulatory elements for stepwise gene activation during cell differentiation. We are aiming at the definition of the basic structural and functional requirements for position independent and high

  14. Chromatin domain boundaries: insulators and beyond

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gong Hong WEI; De Pei LIU; Chih Chuan LIANG

    2005-01-01

    The eukaryotic genome is organized into functionally and structurally distinct domains, representing regulatory units for gene expression and chromosome behavior. DNA sequences that mark the border between adjacent domains are the insulators or boundary elements, which are required in maintenance of the function of different domains. Some insulators need others enable to play insulation activity. Chromatin domains are defined by distinct sets of post-translationally modified histones. Recent studies show that these histone modifications are also involved in establishment of sharp chromatin boundaries in order to prevent the spreading of distinct domains. Additionally, in some loci, the high-order chromatin structures for long-range looping interactions also have boundary activities, suggesting a correlation between insulators and chromatin loop domains. In this review, we will discuss recent progress in the field of chromatin domain boundaries.

  15. Does ATP cross the cell plasma membrane.

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudry, I. H.

    1982-01-01

    Although there is an abundance of evidence which indicates that ATP is released as well as taken up by cells, the concept that ATP cannot cross the cell membrane has tended to prevail. This article reviews the evidence for the release as well as uptake of ATP by cells. The evidence presented by various investigators clearly indicates that ATP can cross the cell membrane and suggests that the release and uptake of ATP are physiological processes.

  16. Computational strategies to address chromatin structure problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perišić, Ognjen; Schlick, Tamar

    2016-06-01

    While the genetic information is contained in double helical DNA, gene expression is a complex multilevel process that involves various functional units, from nucleosomes to fully formed chromatin fibers accompanied by a host of various chromatin binding enzymes. The chromatin fiber is a polymer composed of histone protein complexes upon which DNA wraps, like yarn upon many spools. The nature of chromatin structure has been an open question since the beginning of modern molecular biology. Many experiments have shown that the chromatin fiber is a highly dynamic entity with pronounced structural diversity that includes properties of idealized zig-zag and solenoid models, as well as other motifs. This diversity can produce a high packing ratio and thus inhibit access to a majority of the wound DNA. Despite much research, chromatin’s dynamic structure has not yet been fully described. Long stretches of chromatin fibers exhibit puzzling dynamic behavior that requires interpretation in the light of gene expression patterns in various tissue and organisms. The properties of chromatin fiber can be investigated with experimental techniques, like in vitro biochemistry, in vivo imagining, and high-throughput chromosome capture technology. Those techniques provide useful insights into the fiber’s structure and dynamics, but they are limited in resolution and scope, especially regarding compact fibers and chromosomes in the cellular milieu. Complementary but specialized modeling techniques are needed to handle large floppy polymers such as the chromatin fiber. In this review, we discuss current approaches in the chromatin structure field with an emphasis on modeling, such as molecular dynamics and coarse-grained computational approaches. Combinations of these computational techniques complement experiments and address many relevant biological problems, as we will illustrate with special focus on epigenetic modulation of chromatin structure.

  17. Sequential chromatin immunoprecipitation protocol for global analysis through massive parallel sequencing (reChIP-seq)

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Marco Antonio Mendoza-Parra, Shankaranarayanan Pattabhiraman & Hinrich Gronemeyer ### Abstract Chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with massive parallel sequencing (ChIP-seq) is increasingly used to study protein-chromatin interactions or local epigenetic modifications at genome-wide scale. ChIP-seq can be performed directly with several ng of immunoprecipitated DNA, which is generally obtained from a several million cells, depending on the quality of the antibody. ChI...

  18. Identification of a MAP 2-like ATP-binding protein associated with axoplasmic vesicles that translocate on isolated microtubules

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    Axoplasmic vesicles were purified and observed to translocate on isolated microtubules in an ATP-dependent, trypsin-sensitive manner, implying that ATP-binding polypeptides essential for force generation were present on the vesicle surface. To identify these proteins [alpha 32P]8-azidoadenosine 5'-triphosphate ([alpha 32P]8-N3ATP), a photoaffinity analogue of ATP, was used. The results presented here identify and characterize a vesicle-associated polypeptide having a relative molecular mass o...

  19. Phylogenetic Analysis of the Thylakoid ATP/ADP Carrier Reveals New Insights into Its Function Restricted to Green Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Spetea, Cornelia; Pfeil, Bernard E.; Schoefs, Benoît

    2012-01-01

    ATP is the common energy currency of cellular metabolism in all living organisms. Most of them synthesize ATP in the cytosol or on the mitochondrial inner membrane, whereas land plants, algae, and cyanobacteria also produce it on the thylakoid membrane during the light-dependent reactions of photosynthesis. From the site of synthesis, ATP is transported to the site of utilization via intracellular membrane transporters. One major type of ATP transporters is represented by the mitochondrial AD...

  20. Phylogenetic analysis of the thylakoid ATP/ADP carrier reveals new insights into its function restricted to green plants

    OpenAIRE

    Cornelia eSpetea; Pfeil, Bernard E.; Benoit eSchoefs

    2012-01-01

    ATP is the common energy currency of cellular metabolism in all living organisms. Most of them synthesize ATP in the cytosol or on the mitochondrial inner membrane, whereas land plants, algae and cyanobacteria also produce it on the thylakoid membrane during the light-dependent reactions of photosynthesis. From the site of synthesis, ATP is transported to the site of utilization via intracellular membranes transporters. One major type of ATP transporter is represented by the mitochondrial ADP...

  1. Copper binding triggers compaction in N-terminal tail of human copper pump ATP7B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondol, Tanumoy; Åden, Jörgen; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2016-02-12

    Protein conformational changes are fundamental to biological reactions. For copper ion transport, the multi-domain protein ATP7B in the Golgi network receives copper from the cytoplasmic copper chaperone Atox1 and, with energy from ATP hydrolysis, moves the metal to the lumen for loading of copper-dependent enzymes. Although anticipated, conformational changes involved in ATP7B's functional cycle remain elusive. Using spectroscopic methods we here demonstrate that the four most N-terminal metal-binding domains in ATP7B, upon stoichiometric copper addition, adopt a more compact arrangement which has a higher thermal stability than in the absence of copper. In contrast to previous reports, no stable complex was found in solution between the metal-binding domains and the nucleotide-binding domain of ATP7B. Metal-dependent movement of the first four metal-binding domains in ATP7B may be a trigger that initiates the overall catalytic cycle.

  2. Identification of the Inorganic Pyrophosphate Metabolizing, ATP Substituting Pathway in Mammalian Spermatozoa

    OpenAIRE

    Young-Joo Yi; Miriam Sutovsky; Chelsey Kennedy; Peter Sutovsky

    2012-01-01

    Inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) is generated by ATP hydrolysis in the cells and also present in extracellular matrix, cartilage and bodily fluids. Fueling an alternative pathway for energy production in cells, PPi is hydrolyzed by inorganic pyrophosphatase (PPA1) in a highly exergonic reaction that can under certain conditions substitute for ATP-derived energy. Recombinant PPA1 is used for energy-regeneration in the cell-free systems used to study the zymology of ATP-dependent ubiquitin-proteas...

  3. The alpha-subunit of Leishmania F1 ATP synthase hydrolyzes ATP in presence of tRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Srikanta; Adhya, Samit

    2006-07-14

    Import of tRNAs into the mitochondria of the kinetoplastid protozoon Leishmania requires the tRNA-dependent hydrolysis of ATP leading to the generation of membrane potential through the pumping of protons. Subunit RIC1 of the inner membrane RNA import complex is a bi-functional protein that is identical to the alpha-subunit of F1F0 ATP synthase and specifically binds to a subset (Type I) of importable tRNAs. We show that recombinant, purified RIC1 is a Type I tRNA-dependent ATP hydrolase. The activity was insensitive to oligomycin, sensitive to mutations within the import signal of the tRNA, and required the cooperative interaction between the ATP-binding and C-terminal domains of RIC1. The ATPase activity of the intact complex was inhibited by anti-RIC1 antibody, while knockdown of RIC1 in Leishmania tropica resulted in deficiency of the tRNA-dependent ATPase activity of the mitochondrial inner membrane. Moreover, RIC1 knockdown extracts failed to generate a membrane potential across reconstituted proteoliposomes, as shown by a rhodamine 123 uptake assay, but activity was restored by adding back purified RIC1. These observations identify RIC1 as a novel form of the F1 ATP synthase alpha-subunit that acts as the major energy transducer for tRNA import. PMID:16735512

  4. Extensive Variation in Chromatin States Across Humans

    KAUST Repository

    Kasowski, M.

    2013-10-17

    The majority of disease-associated variants lie outside protein-coding regions, suggesting a link between variation in regulatory regions and disease predisposition. We studied differences in chromatin states using five histone modifications, cohesin, and CTCF in lymphoblastoid lines from 19 individuals of diverse ancestry. We found extensive signal variation in regulatory regions, which often switch between active and repressed states across individuals. Enhancer activity is particularly diverse among individuals, whereas gene expression remains relatively stable. Chromatin variability shows genetic inheritance in trios, correlates with genetic variation and population divergence, and is associated with disruptions of transcription factor binding motifs. Overall, our results provide insights into chromatin variation among humans.

  5. ATP interaction with the open state of the K(ATP) channel.

    OpenAIRE

    Enkvetchakul, D; Loussouarn, G.; Makhina, E; Nichols, C.G.

    2001-01-01

    The mechanism of ATP-sensitive potassium (K(ATP)) channel closure by ATP is unclear, and various kinetic models in which ATP binds to open or to closed states have previously been presented. Effects of phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP2) and multiple Kir6.2 mutations on ATP inhibition and open probability in the absence of ATP are explainable in kinetic models where ATP stabilizes a closed state and interaction with an open state is not required. Evidence that ATP can in fact interact wi...

  6. Chromatin Domains: The Unit of Chromosome Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Jesse R; Gorkin, David U; Ren, Bing

    2016-06-01

    How eukaryotic chromosomes fold inside the nucleus is an age-old question that remains unanswered today. Early biochemical and microscopic studies revealed the existence of chromatin domains and loops as a pervasive feature of interphase chromosomes, but the biological implications of such organizational features were obscure. Genome-wide analysis of pair-wise chromatin interactions using chromatin conformation capture (3C)-based techniques has shed new light on the organization of chromosomes in interphase nuclei. Particularly, the finding of cell-type invariant, evolutionarily conserved topologically associating domains (TADs) in a broad spectrum of cell types has provided a new molecular framework for the study of animal development and human diseases. Here, we review recent progress in characterization of such chromatin domains and delineation of mechanisms of their formation in animal cells. PMID:27259200

  7. Chromatin proteins and modifications as drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helin, Kristian; Dhanak, Dashyant

    2013-01-01

    A plethora of groundbreaking studies have demonstrated the importance of chromatin-associated proteins and post-translational modifications of histones, proteins and DNA (so-called epigenetic modifications) for transcriptional control and normal development. Disruption of epigenetic control...

  8. Lamin C and chromatin organization in Drosophila

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B. V. Gurudatta; L. S. Shashidhara; Veena K. Parnaik

    2010-04-01

    Drosophila lamin C (LamC) is a developmentally regulated component of the nuclear lamina. The lamC gene is situated in the fifth intron of the essential gene tout velu (ttv). We carried out genetic analysis of lamC during development. Phenotypic analyses of RNAi-mediated downregulation of lamC expression as well as targeted misexpression of lamin C suggest a role for lamC in cell survival. Of particular interest in the context of laminopathies is the caspase-dependent apoptosis induced by the overexpression of lamin C. Interestingly, misexpression of lamin C in the central nervous system, where it is not normally expressed, did not affect organization of the nuclear lamina. lamC mutant alleles suppressed position effect variegation normally displayed at near-centromeric and telomeric regions. Further, both downregulation and misexpression of lamin C affected the distribution of heterochromatin protein 1. Our results suggest that Drosophila lamC has a tissue-specific role during development and is required for chromatin organization.

  9. ATP synthase in slow- and fast-growing mycobacteria is active in ATP synthesis and blocked in ATP hydrolysis direction.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haagsma, A.C.; Driessen, N.N.; Hahn, M.M.; Lill, H.; Bald, D.

    2010-01-01

    ATP synthase is a validated drug target for the treatment of tuberculosis, and ATP synthase inhibitors are promising candidate drugs for the treatment of infections caused by other slow-growing mycobacteria, such as Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium ulcerans. ATP synthase is an essential enzyme

  10. Chromatin Dynamics During DNA Replication and Uncharacterized Replication Factors determined by Nascent Chromatin Capture (NCC) Proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabert, Constance; Bukowski-Wills, Jimi-Carlo; Lee, Sung-Bau; Kustatscher, Georg; Nakamura, Kyosuke; de Lima Alves, Flavia; Menard, Patrice; Mejlvang, Jakob; Rappsilber, Juri; Groth, Anja

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY To maintain genome function and stability, DNA sequence and its organization into chromatin must be duplicated during cell division. Understanding how entire chromosomes are copied remains a major challenge. Here, we use Nascent Chromatin Capture (NCC) to profile chromatin proteome dynamics during replication in human cells. NCC relies on biotin-dUTP labelling of replicating DNA, affinity-purification and quantitative proteomics. Comparing nascent chromatin with mature post-replicative chromatin, we provide association dynamics for 3995 proteins. The replication machinery and 485 chromatin factors like CAF-1, DNMT1, SUV39h1 are enriched in nascent chromatin, whereas 170 factors including histone H1, DNMT3, MBD1-3 and PRC1 show delayed association. This correlates with H4K5K12diAc removal and H3K9me1 accumulation, while H3K27me3 and H3K9me3 remain unchanged. Finally, we combine NCC enrichment with experimentally derived chromatin probabilities to predict a function in nascent chromatin for 93 uncharacterized proteins and identify FAM111A as a replication factor required for PCNA loading. Together, this provides an extensive resource to understand genome and epigenome maintenance. PMID:24561620

  11. The Chromatin Fiber: Multiscale Problems and Approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Ozer, Gungor; Luque, Antoni; Schlick, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    The structure of chromatin, affected by many factors from DNA linker lengths to posttranslational modifications, is crucial to the regulation of eukaryotic cells. Combined experimental and computational methods have led to new insights into its structural and dynamical features, from interactions due to the flexible core histone tails of the nucleosomes to the physical mechanism driving the formation of chromosomal domains. Here we present a perspective of recent advances in chromatin modelin...

  12. ATP consumption of eukaryotic flagella measured at a single-cell level

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Daniel T N; Fraden, Seth; Nicastro, Daniela; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-01-01

    The motility of cilia and flagella is driven by thousands of dynein motors that hydrolyze adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Despite decades of genetic, biochemical, structural and biophysical studies, some aspects of ciliary motility remain elusive, such as the regulation of beating patterns and the energetic efficiency of these nanomachines. Here, we introduce an experimental method to measure ATP consumption of actively beating axonemes on a single-cell level. We encapsulated individual sea urchin sperm with demembranated flagellum inside water-in-oil emulsion droplets and measured the axonemes ATP consumption by monitoring fluorescence intensity of a fluorophore-coupled reporter system for ATP turnover in the droplet. Concomitant phase contrast imaging allowed us to extract a linear dependence between the ATP consumption rate and the flagellar beating frequency, with ~2.3e5 ATP molecules consumed per beat of a demembranated flagellum. Increasing the viscosity of the aqueous medium led to modified beating wavef...

  13. Etiology and Evaluation of Sperm Chromatin Anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marziyeh Tavalaee

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence suggests that human sperm chromatin anomalies adversely affect reproductive outcomesand infertile men possess substantially amount of sperm with chromatin anomalies than fertilemen.Routine semen analysis evaluates parameters such as sperm motility and morphology, but doesnot examine the nuclear DNA integrity of spermatozoa. It has been suggested that altered nuclearchromatin structure or damaged DNA in spermatozoa could modify the special cellular functionsof human spermatozoa, and thereby affect the fertility potential. Intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection(ICSI bypass the barriers to fertilization for such a sperm, then the effect of chromatin anomalies onthe development remains a concern. Therefore, it is essential to develop and use accurate diagnostictests, which may provide better prognostic capabilities than the standard sperm assessments. Thisreview discusses our current understanding of the structure and organization of sperm DNA,the different procedures for assessment of sperm chromatin anomalies including comet assay,Chromomycin A3 (CMA3, sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA, acridine orange test (AOT,terminal TdT-mediated dUTP-nick-end labelling (TUNEL assay, aniline blue and sperm chromatindispersion (SCD test and the impact of chromatin anomalies on reproductive outcome.

  14. Changes of IK,ATP current density and allosteric modulation during chronic atrial fibrillation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Gang; HUANG Cong-xin; TANG Yan-hong; JIANG Hong; WAN Jun; CHEN Hui; XIE Qiang; HUANG Zheng-rong

    2005-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common supraventricular arrhythmia in clinical practice. Chronic atrial fibrillation (CAF) is associated with ionic remodeling. However, little is known about the activity of ATP-sensitive potassium current (IK,ATP) during CAF. So we studied the changes of IK,ATP density and allosteric modulation of ATP-sensitivity by intracellular pH during CAF.Methods Myocardium samples were obtained from the right auricular appendage of patients with rheumatic heart disease complicated with valvular disease in sinus rhythm (SR) or CAF. There were 14 patients in SR group and 9 patients in CAF group. Single atrial cells were isolated using an enzyme dispersion technique. IK,ATP was recorded using the whole-cell and inside-out configuration of voltage-clamp techniques. In whole-cell model, myocytes of SR and CAF groups were perfused with simulated ischemic solution to elicit IK,ATP. In inside-out configuration, the internal patch membranes were exposed to different ATP concentrations in pH 7.4 and 6.8.Results Under simulated ischemia, IK,ATP current density of CAF group was significantly higher than in SR group [(83.5±10.8) vs. (58.7±8.4) pA/pF, P<0.01]. IK,ATP of the two groups showed ATP concentration-dependent inhibition. The ATP concentration for 50% current inhibition (IC50) for the SR group was significantly different in pH 7.4 and pH 6.8 (24 vs. 74 μmol/L, P<0.01). The IC50 did not change significantly in CAF group when the pH decreased from 7.4 to 6.8.Conclusions During CAF, IK,ATP current density was increased and its allosteric modulation of ATP-sensitivity by intracellular pH was diminished.

  15. ATP Release and Effects in Pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, Ivana; Amstrup, Jan; Henriksen, Katrine Lütken;

    2003-01-01

    and, most importantly, cholinergic stimulation released 5-20nM ATP into the medium, as monitored by luminescence of the luciferin/luciferase reaction. ATP release was visualized at the single acinus level as luciferin consumption detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The estimated ATP......, primarily in response to cholinergic stimulation, and thus ATP may be a paracrine mediator between pancreatic acini and ducts. Drug Dev. Res. 59:128-135, 2003. © 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc....

  16. Influence of chromatin structure, antibiotics, and endogenous histone methylation on phosphorylation of histones H1 and H3 in the presence of protein kinase A in rat liver nuclei in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prusov, A N; Smirnova, T A; Kolomijtseva, G Ya

    2013-02-01

    In vitro phosphorylation of histones H1 and H3 by cAMP-dependent protein kinase A and endogenous phosphokinases in the presence of [γ-³²P]ATP was studied in isolated rat liver nuclei with different variants of chromatin structural organization: condensed (diameter of fibrils 100-200 nm; N-1) and partly decondensed (diameter of fibrils ~30 nm; N-2). In the N-1 state histone, H1 is phosphorylated approximately twice as much than histone H3. Upon the decondensation of the chromatin in the N-2 state, 1.5-fold decrease of total phosphorylation of H1 is observed, while that of H3 does not change, although the endogenous phosphorylation of both histones is reduced by half. Changes in histone phosphorylation in the presence of low or high concentrations of distamycin and chromomycin differ for H1 and H3 in N-1 and N-2. It was found that distamycin (DM) stimulates the phosphorylation of tightly bound H1 fraction, which is not extractable by polyglutamic acid (PG), especially in N-1. Chromomycin (CM) increases the phosphorylation of both histones in PG extracts and in the nuclear pellets, particularly in N-2. At the same time, in N-1 one can detect phosphorylation of a tightly bound fraction of histones H1 whose N-termini are located on AT-rich sites that become inaccessible for protein kinase in the process of chromatin decondensation in N-2. At the same time, in N-2 the accessibility for protein kinase A of tightly bound H1 fractions, whose N-termini are located on GC-rich sites, increases dramatically. High concentrations of both CM and DM in N-1 and N-2 stimulated phosphorylation of the non-extractable by PG fraction of H1 whose N-termini are located on sites where AT ≈ GC. CM at high concentration stimulated 4-7 times the phosphorylation of a small fraction of H3, which is extracted by PG from both types of nuclei. We detected an effect of endogenous methylation of histones H1 and H3 in the nuclei on their subsequent phosphorylation depending on the chromatin

  17. Genetic variants in chromatin-remodeling pathway associated with lung cancer risk in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Liguo; Zhu, Meng; Wang, Yuzhuo; Cheng, Yang; Liu, Jia; Shen, Wei; Li, Zhihua; Zhang, Jiahui; Wang, Cheng; Jin, Guangfu; Ma, Hongxia; Shen, Hongbing; Hu, Zhibin; Dai, Juncheng

    2016-08-10

    Chromatin remodeling complexes utilize the energy of ATP hydrolysis to remodel nucleosomes and have essential roles in transcriptional modulation. Increasing evidences indicate that these complexes directly interact with numerous proteins and regulate the formation of cancer. However, few studies reported the association of polymorphisms in chromatin remodeling genes and lung cancer. We hypothesized that variants in critical genes of chromatin remodeling pathway might contribute to the susceptibility of lung cancer. To validate this hypothesis, we systematically screened 40 polymorphisms in six key chromatin remodeling genes (SMARCA5, SMARCC2, SMARCD2, ARID1A, NR3C1 and SATB1) and evaluated them with a case-control study including 1341 cases and 1982 controls. Logistic regression revealed that four variants in NR3C1 and SATB1 were significantly associated with lung cancer risk after false discovery rate (FDR) correction [For NR3C1, rs9324921: odds ratio (OR)=1.23, P for FDR=0.029; rs12521436: OR=0.85, P for FDR=0.040; rs4912913: OR=1.17, P for FDR=0.040; For SATB1, rs6808523: OR=1.33, P for FDR=0.040]. Combing analysis presented a significant allele-dosage tendency for the number of risk alleles and lung cancer risk (Ptrendlung tumor and adjacent normal tissues in the database of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) (P=0.009 for rs6808523). These findings suggested that genetic variants in key chromatin remodeling genes may contribute to lung cancer risk in Chinese population. Further large and well-designed studies are warranted to validate our results. PMID:27179949

  18. Host-viral effects of chromatin assembly factor 1 interaction with HCMV IE2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sung-Bau Lee; Li-Jung Juan; Chung-Fan Lee; Derick S-C Ou; Kalpana Dulal; Liang-Hao Chang; Chen-Han Ma; Chien-Fu Huang; Hua Zhu; Young-Sun Lin

    2011-01-01

    Chromatin assembly factor 1 (CAF1) consisting of p150, p60 and p48 is known to assemble histones onto newly synthesized DNA and thus maintain the chromatin structure. Here, we show that CAF1 expression was induced in human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-infected cells, concomitantly with global chromatin decondensation. This apparent conflict was thought to result, in part, from CAF1 mislocalization to compartments of HCMV DNA synthesis through binding of its largest subunit p150 to viral immediate-early protein 2 (IE2). p150 interaction with p60 and IE2 facilitated HCMV DNA synthesis. The IE2Q548R mutation, previously reported to result in impaired HCMV growth with unknown mechanism, disrupted IE2/p150 and IE2/histones association in our study. Moreover, IE2 interaction with histones partly depends on p150, and the HCMV-induced chromatin decondensation was reduced in cells ectopically expressing the p150 mutant defective in IE2 binding. These results not only indicate that CAF1 was hijacked by IE2 to facilitate the replication of the HCMV genome, suggesting chromatin assembly plays an important role in herpesviral DNA synthesis, but also provide a model of the virus-induced chromatin instability through CAF1.

  19. Changes in large-scale chromatin structure and function during oogenesis: a journey in company with follicular cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciano, Alberto M; Franciosi, Federica; Dieci, Cecilia; Lodde, Valentina

    2014-09-01

    The mammalian oocyte nucleus or germinal vesicle (GV) exhibits characteristic chromatin configurations, which are subject to dynamic modifications through oogenesis. Aim of this review is to highlight how changes in chromatin configurations are related to both functional and structural modifications occurring in the oocyte nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments. During the long phase of meiotic arrest at the diplotene stage, the chromatin enclosed within the GV is subjected to several levels of regulation. Morphologically, the chromosomes lose their individuality and form a loose chromatin mass. The decondensed configuration of chromatin then undergoes profound rearrangements during the final stages of oocyte growth that are tightly associated with the acquisition of meiotic and developmental competence. Functionally, the discrete stages of chromatin condensation are characterized by different level of transcriptional activity, DNA methylation and covalent histone modifications. Interestingly, the program of chromatin rearrangement is not completely intrinsic to the oocyte, but follicular cells exert their regulatory actions through gap junction mediated communications and intracellular messenger dependent mechanism(s). With this in mind and since oocyte growth mostly relies on the bidirectional interaction with the follicular cells, a connection between cumulus cells gene expression profile and oocyte developmental competence, according to chromatin configuration is proposed. This analysis can help in identifying candidate genes involved in the process of oocyte developmental competence acquisition and in providing non-invasive biomarkers of oocyte health status that can have important implications in treating human infertility as well as managing breeding schemes in domestic mammals.

  20. An in vitro reconstitution system for the assessment of chromatin protein fluidity during Xenopus development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, Ryuta; Inui, Masafumi; Hayashi, Yohei; Sedohara, Ayako [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Okabayashi, Koji [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); ICORP Organ Regeneration Project, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Ohnuma, Kiyoshi, E-mail: kohnuma@vos.nagaokaut.ac.jp [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Murata, Masayuki [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Asashima, Makoto, E-mail: asashi@bio.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); ICORP Organ Regeneration Project, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Organ Development Research Laboratory, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba Central 4, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8562 (Japan)

    2010-09-17

    Research highlights: {yields} An in vitro reconstitution system was established with isolated nuclei and cytoplasm. {yields} Chromatin fluidities were measured in the system using FRAP. {yields} Chromatin fluidities were higher in the cytoplasm of earlier-stage embryos. {yields} Chromatin fluidities were higher in the earlier-stage nuclei with egg-extract. {yields} Chromatin fluidity may decrease during embryonic development. -- Abstract: Chromatin fluidity, which is one of the indicators of higher-order structures in chromatin, is associated with cell differentiation. However, little is known about the relationships between chromatin fluidity and cell differentiation status in embryonic development. We established an in vitro reconstitution system that uses isolated nuclei and cytoplasmic extracts of Xenopus embryos and a fluorescence recovery after photobleaching assay to measure the fluidities of heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) and histone H1 during development. The HP1 and H1 fluidities of nuclei isolated from the tailbuds of early tadpole stage (stage 32) embryos in the cytoplasmic extracts of eggs and of late blastula stage (stage 9) embryos were higher than those in the cytoplasmic extracts of mid-neurula stage (stage 15) embryos. The HP1 fluidities of nuclei isolated from animal cap cells of early gastrula stage (stage 10) embryos and from the neural plates of neural stage (stage 20) embryos were higher than those isolated from the tailbuds of stage 32 embryos in egg extracts, whereas the HP1 fluidities of these nuclei were the same in the cytoplasmic extracts of stage 15 embryos. These results suggest that chromatin fluidity is dependent upon both cytoplasmic and nuclear factors and decreases during development.

  1. An in vitro reconstitution system for the assessment of chromatin protein fluidity during Xenopus development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → An in vitro reconstitution system was established with isolated nuclei and cytoplasm. → Chromatin fluidities were measured in the system using FRAP. → Chromatin fluidities were higher in the cytoplasm of earlier-stage embryos. → Chromatin fluidities were higher in the earlier-stage nuclei with egg-extract. → Chromatin fluidity may decrease during embryonic development. -- Abstract: Chromatin fluidity, which is one of the indicators of higher-order structures in chromatin, is associated with cell differentiation. However, little is known about the relationships between chromatin fluidity and cell differentiation status in embryonic development. We established an in vitro reconstitution system that uses isolated nuclei and cytoplasmic extracts of Xenopus embryos and a fluorescence recovery after photobleaching assay to measure the fluidities of heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) and histone H1 during development. The HP1 and H1 fluidities of nuclei isolated from the tailbuds of early tadpole stage (stage 32) embryos in the cytoplasmic extracts of eggs and of late blastula stage (stage 9) embryos were higher than those in the cytoplasmic extracts of mid-neurula stage (stage 15) embryos. The HP1 fluidities of nuclei isolated from animal cap cells of early gastrula stage (stage 10) embryos and from the neural plates of neural stage (stage 20) embryos were higher than those isolated from the tailbuds of stage 32 embryos in egg extracts, whereas the HP1 fluidities of these nuclei were the same in the cytoplasmic extracts of stage 15 embryos. These results suggest that chromatin fluidity is dependent upon both cytoplasmic and nuclear factors and decreases during development.

  2. Isotope-coded ATP Probe for Quantitative Affinity Profiling of ATP-binding Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Yongsheng; Guo, Lei; Wang, Yinsheng

    2013-01-01

    ATP-binding proteins play significant roles in numerous cellular processes. Here, we introduced a novel isotope-coded ATP-affinity probe (ICAP) as acylating agent to simultaneously enrich and incorporate isotope label to ATP-binding proteins. By taking advantage of the quantitative capability of this isotope-coded probe, we devised an affinity profiling strategy to comprehensively characterize ATP-protein interactions at the entire proteome scale. False-positive identification of ATP-binding ...

  3. Mechanisms of constitutive and ATP-evoked ATP release in neonatal mouse olfactory epithelium

    OpenAIRE

    Hayoz Sébastien; Jia Cuihong; Hegg CC

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background ATP is an extracellular signaling molecule with many ascribed functions in sensory systems, including the olfactory epithelium. The mechanism(s) by which ATP is released in the olfactory epithelium has not been investigated. Quantitative luciferin-luciferase assays were used to monitor ATP release, and confocal imaging of the fluorescent ATP marker quinacrine was used to monitor ATP release via exocytosis in Swiss Webster mouse neonatal olfactory epithelial slices. Results...

  4. New mitotic regulators released from chromatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki eYokoyama

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Faithful action of the mitotic spindle segregates duplicated chromosomes into daughter cells. Perturbations of this process result in chromosome mis-segregation, leading to chromosomal instability and cancer development. Chromosomes are not simply passengers segregated by spindle microtubules but rather play a major active role in spindle assembly. The GTP bound form of the Ran GTPase (RanGTP, produced around chromosomes, locally activates spindle assembly factors. Recent studies have uncovered that chromosomes organize mitosis beyond spindle formation. They distinctly regulate other mitotic events, such as spindle maintenance in anaphase, which is essential for chromosome segregation. Furthermore, the direct function of chromosomes is not only to produce RanGTP but, in addition, to release key mitotic regulators from chromatin. Chromatin-remodeling factors and nuclear pore complex proteins, which have established functions on chromatin in interphase, dissociate from mitotic chromatin and function in spindle assembly or maintenance. Thus, chromosomes actively organize their own segregation using chromatin-releasing mitotic regulators as well as RanGTP.

  5. Neutron-scattering studies of chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is clear that a knowledge of the basic molecular structure of chromatin is a prerequisite for any progress toward an understanding of chromosome organization. With a two-component system, protein and nucleic acid, neutrons have a particularly powerful application to studies of the spatial arrangements of these components because of the ability, by contrast matching with H2O-D2O mixtures, to obtain neutron-scattering data on the individual components. With this approach it has been shown that the neutron diffraction of chromatin is consistent with a ''beads on a string'' model in which the bead consists of a protein core with DNA coiled on the outside. However, because chromatin is a gel and gives limited structural data, confirmation of such a model requires extension of the neutron studies by deuteration of specific chromatin components and the isolation of chromatin subunits. Although these studies are not complete, the neutron results so far obtained support the subunit model described above

  6. Chromatin ring formation at plant centromeres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veit eSchubert

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We observed the formation of chromatin ring structures at centromeres of somatic rye and Arabidopsis chromosomes. To test whether this behavior is present also in other plant species and tissues we analyzed Arabidopsis, rye, wheat, Aegilops and barley centromeres during cell divisions and in interphase nuclei by immunostaining and FISH. Furthermore, structured illumination microscopy (super-resolution was applied to investigate the ultrastructure of centromere chromatin beyond the classical refraction limit of light. It became obvious, that a ring formation at centromeres may appear during mitosis, meiosis and in interphase nuclei in all species analyzed. However, varying centromere structures, as ring formations or globular organized chromatin fibers, were identified in different tissues of one and the same species. In addition, we found that a chromatin ring formation may also be caused by subtelomeric repeats in barley. Thus, we conclude that the formation of chromatin rings may appear in different plant species and tissues, but that it is not specific for centromere function. Based on our findings we established a model describing the ultrastructure of plant centromeres and discuss it in comparison to previous models proposed for animals and plants.

  7. Systematic dissection of roles for chromatin regulators in a yeast stress response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assaf Weiner

    Full Text Available Packaging of eukaryotic genomes into chromatin has wide-ranging effects on gene transcription. Curiously, it is commonly observed that deletion of a global chromatin regulator affects expression of only a limited subset of genes bound to or modified by the regulator in question. However, in many single-gene studies it has become clear that chromatin regulators often do not affect steady-state transcription, but instead are required for normal transcriptional reprogramming by environmental cues. We therefore have systematically investigated the effects of 83 histone mutants, and 119 gene deletion mutants, on induction/repression dynamics of 170 transcripts in response to diamide stress in yeast. Importantly, we find that chromatin regulators play far more pronounced roles during gene induction/repression than they do in steady-state expression. Furthermore, by jointly analyzing the substrates (histone mutants and enzymes (chromatin modifier deletions we identify specific interactions between histone modifications and their regulators. Combining these functional results with genome-wide mapping of several histone marks in the same time course, we systematically investigated the correspondence between histone modification occurrence and function. We followed up on one pathway, finding that Set1-dependent H3K4 methylation primarily acts as a gene repressor during multiple stresses, specifically at genes involved in ribosome biosynthesis. Set1-dependent repression of ribosomal genes occurs via distinct pathways for ribosomal protein genes and ribosomal biogenesis genes, which can be separated based on genetic requirements for repression and based on chromatin changes during gene repression. Together, our dynamic studies provide a rich resource for investigating chromatin regulation, and identify a significant role for the "activating" mark H3K4me3 in gene repression.

  8. Modelling the ATP production in mitochondria

    CERN Document Server

    Saa, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    We revisit here the mathematical model for ATP production in mitochondria introduced recently by Bertram, Pedersen, Luciani, and Sherman (BPLS) as a simplification of the more complete but intricate Magnus and Keizer's model. We correct some inaccuracies in the BPLS original approximations and then analyze some of the dynamical properties of the model. We infer from exhaustive numerical explorations that the enhanced BPLS equations have a unique attractor fixed point for physiologically acceptable ranges of mitochondrial variables and respiration inputs. We determine, in the stationary regime, the dependence of the mitochondrial variables on the respiration inputs, namely the cytosolic concentration of calcium ${\\rm Ca}_{\\rm c}$ and the substrate fructose 1,6-bisphosphate FBP. The same effect of calcium saturation reported for the original BPLS model is observed here. We find out, however, an interesting non-stationary effect: the inertia of the model tends to increase considerably for high concentrations of ...

  9. Granule-specific ATP requirements for Ca2+-induced exocytosis in human neutrophils. Evidence for substantial ATP-independent release

    OpenAIRE

    Theander, Sten; Lew, Daniel Pablo; Nusse, Olivier

    2002-01-01

    Ca2+-induced exocytosis in neuronal and neuroendocrine cells involves ATP-dependent steps believed to 'prime' vesicles for exocytosis. Primed, docked vesicles are released in response to Ca2+ influx through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. Neutrophils, however, do not possess voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and appear to have no docked vesicles. Furthermore, neutrophils have several types of granules with markedly different Ca2+ requirements for exocytosis. These differential Ca2+ dependencies were u...

  10. Optimization of ATP synthase function in mitochondria and chloroplasts via the adenylate kinase equilibrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abir U Igamberdiev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The bulk of ATP synthesis in plants is performed by ATP synthase, the main bioenergetics engine of cells, operating both in mitochondria and in chloroplasts. The reaction mechanism of ATP synthase has been studied in detail for over half a century; however, its optimal performance depends also on the steady delivery of ATP synthase substrates and the removal of its products. For mitochondrial ATP synthase, we analyze here the provision of stable conditions for (i the supply of ADP and Mg2+, supported by adenylate kinase (AK equilibrium in the intermembrane space, (ii the supply of phosphate via membrane transporter in symport with H+, and (iii the conditions of outflow of ATP by adenylate transporter carrying out the exchange of free adenylates. We also show that, in chloroplasts, AK equilibrates adenylates and governs Mg2+ contents in the stroma, optimizing ATP synthase and Calvin cycle operation, and affecting the import of inorganic phosphate in exchange with triose phosphates. It is argued that chemiosmosis is not the sole component of ATP synthase performance, which also depends on AK-mediated equilibrium of adenylates and Mg2+, adenylate transport and phosphate release and supply.

  11. Synergistic binding of glucose and aluminium ATP to hexokinase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolfitt, A R; Kellett, G L; Hoggett, J G

    1988-08-10

    The binding of glucose, AlATP and AlADP to the monomeric and dimeric forms of the native yeast hexokinase PII isoenzyme and to the proteolytically modified SII monomeric form was monitored at pH 6.7 by the concomitant quenching of intrinsic protein fluorescence. No fluorescence changes were observed when free enzyme was mixed with AlATP at concentrations up to 7500 microM. In the presence of saturating concentrations of glucose, the maximal quenching of fluorescence induced by AlATP was between 1.5 and 3.5% depending on species, and the average value of [L]0.5, the concentration of ligand at half-saturation, over all monomeric species was 0.9 +/- 0.4 microM. The presence of saturating concentrations of AlATP diminished [L]0.5 for glucose binding by between 260- and 670-fold for hexokinase PII and SII monomers, respectively (dependent on the ionic strength), and by almost 4000-fold for PII dimer. The data demonstrate extremely strong synergistic interactions in the binding of glucose and AlATP to yeast hexokinase, arising as a consequence of conformational changes in the free enzyme induced by glucose and in enzyme-glucose complex induced by AlATP. The synergistic interactions of glucose and AlATP are related to their kinetic synergism and to the ability of AlATP to act as a powerful inhibitor of the hexokinase reaction. PMID:3042027

  12. Ca2+-regulated-cAMP/PKA signaling in cardiac pacemaker cells links ATP supply to demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaniv, Yael; Juhaszova, Magdalena; Lyashkov, Alexey E.; Spurgeon, Harold A.; Sollott, Steven J.; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale In sinoatrial node cells (SANC), Ca2+ activates adenylate cyclase (AC) to generate a high basal level of cAMP-mediated/protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent phosphorylation of Ca2+ cycling proteins. These result in spontaneous sarcoplasmic-reticulum (SR) generated rhythmic Ca2+ oscillations during diastolic depolarization, that not only trigger the surface membrane to generate rhythmic action potentials (APs), but, in a feed-forward manner, also activate AC/PKA signaling. ATP is consumed to pump Ca2+ to the SR, to produce cAMP, to support contraction and to maintain cell ionic homeostasis. Objective Since a negative feedback mechanism links ATP-demand to ATP production, we hypothesized that (1) both basal ATP supply and demand in SANC would be Ca2+-cAMP/PKA dependent; and (2) due to its feed–forward nature, a decrease in flux through the Ca2+-cAMP/PKA signaling axis will reduce the basal ATP production rate. Methods and Results O2 consumption in spontaneous beating SANC was comparable to ventricular myocytes (VM) stimulated at 3 Hz. Graded reduction of basal Ca2+-cAMP/PKA signaling to reduce ATP demand in rabbit SANC produced graded ATP depletion (r2=0.96), and reduced O2 consumption and flavoprotein fluorescence. Neither inhibition of glycolysis, selectively blocking contraction nor specific inhibition of mitochondrial Ca2+ flux reduced the ATP level. Conclusions Feed-forward basal Ca2+-cAMP/PKA signaling both consumes ATP to drive spontaneous APs in SANC and is tightly linked to mitochondrial ATP production. Interfering with Ca2+-cAMP/PKA signaling not only slows the firing rate and reduces ATP consumption, but also appears to reduce ATP production so that ATP levels fall. This distinctly differs from VM, which lack this feed-forward basal cAMP/PKA signaling, and in which ATP level remains constant when the demand changes. PMID:21835182

  13. Local Nucleosome Dynamics Facilitate Chromatin Accessibility in Living Mammalian Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saera Hihara

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Genome information, which is three-dimensionally organized within cells as chromatin, is searched and read by various proteins for diverse cell functions. Although how the protein factors find their targets remains unclear, the dynamic and flexible nature of chromatin is likely crucial. Using a combined approach of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, single-nucleosome imaging, and Monte Carlo computer simulations, we demonstrate local chromatin dynamics in living mammalian cells. We show that similar to interphase chromatin, dense mitotic chromosomes also have considerable chromatin accessibility. For both interphase and mitotic chromatin, we observed local fluctuation of individual nucleosomes (∼50 nm movement/30 ms, which is caused by confined Brownian motion. Inhibition of these local dynamics by crosslinking impaired accessibility in the dense chromatin regions. Our findings show that local nucleosome dynamics drive chromatin accessibility. We propose that this local nucleosome fluctuation is the basis for scanning genome information.

  14. FGF signalling regulates chromatin organisation during neural differentiation via mechanisms that can be uncoupled from transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishal S Patel

    Full Text Available Changes in higher order chromatin organisation have been linked to transcriptional regulation; however, little is known about how such organisation alters during embryonic development or how it is regulated by extrinsic signals. Here we analyse changes in chromatin organisation as neural differentiation progresses, exploiting the clear spatial separation of the temporal events of differentiation along the elongating body axis of the mouse embryo. Combining fluorescence in situ hybridisation with super-resolution structured illumination microscopy, we show that chromatin around key differentiation gene loci Pax6 and Irx3 undergoes both decompaction and displacement towards the nuclear centre coincident with transcriptional onset. Conversely, down-regulation of Fgf8 as neural differentiation commences correlates with a more peripheral nuclear position of this locus. During normal neural differentiation, fibroblast growth factor (FGF signalling is repressed by retinoic acid, and this vitamin A derivative is further required for transcription of neural genes. We show here that exposure to retinoic acid or inhibition of FGF signalling promotes precocious decompaction and central nuclear positioning of differentiation gene loci. Using the Raldh2 mutant as a model for retinoid deficiency, we further find that such changes in higher order chromatin organisation are dependent on retinoid signalling. In this retinoid deficient condition, FGF signalling persists ectopically in the elongating body, and importantly, we find that inhibiting FGF receptor (FGFR signalling in Raldh2-/- embryos does not rescue differentiation gene transcription, but does elicit both chromatin decompaction and nuclear position change. These findings demonstrate that regulation of higher order chromatin organisation during differentiation in the embryo can be uncoupled from the machinery that promotes transcription and, for the first time, identify FGF as an extrinsic signal that

  15. CTCF Binding Polarity Determines Chromatin Looping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, Elzo; Vos, Erica S M; Holwerda, Sjoerd J B; Valdes-Quezada, Christian; Verstegen, Marjon J A M; Teunissen, Hans; Splinter, Erik; Wijchers, Patrick J; Krijger, Peter H L; de Laat, Wouter

    2015-01-01

    CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) is an architectural protein involved in the three-dimensional (3D) organization of chromatin. In this study, we assayed the 3D genomic contact profiles of a large number of CTCF binding sites with high-resolution 4C-seq. As recently reported, our data also suggest that ch

  16. Unraveling the mechanisms of chromatin fibril packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilov, Alexey A; Shevelyov, Yuri Y; Ulianov, Sergey V; Khrameeva, Ekaterina E; Kos, Pavel; Chertovich, Alexander; Razin, Sergey V

    2016-05-01

    Recent data indicate that eukaryotic chromosomes are organized into Topologically Associating Domains (TADs); however, the mechanisms underlying TAD formation remain obscure. Based on the results of Hi-C analysis performed on 4 Drosophila melanogaster cell lines, we have proposed that specific properties of nucleosomes in active and repressed chromatin play a key role in the formation of TADs. Our computer simulations showed that the ability of "inactive" nucleosomes to stick to each other and the lack of such ability in "active" nucleosomes is sufficient for spatial segregation of these types of chromatin, which is revealed in the Hi-C analysis as TAD/inter-TAD partitioning. However, some Drosophila and mammalian TADs contain both active and inactive chromatin, a fact that does not fit this model. Herein, we present additional arguments for the model by postulating that transcriptionally active chromatin is extruded on the surface of a TAD, and discuss the possible impact of this organization on the enhancer-promoter communication and on the segregation of TADs. PMID:27249516

  17. Chromatin and epigenetics in all their states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bey, Till; Jamge, Suraj; Klemme, Sonja; Komar, Dorota Natalia; Gall, Le Sabine; Mikulski, Pawel; Schmidt, Martin; Zicola, Johan; Berr, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    In January 2016, the first Epigenetic and Chromatin Regulation of Plant Traits conference was held in Strasbourg, France. An all-star lineup of speakers, a packed audience of 130 participants from over 20 countries, and a friendly scientific atmosphere contributed to make this conference a meetin

  18. Single Chromatin Fibre Assembly Using Optical Tweezers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennink, M.L.; Pope, L.H.; Leuba, S.H.; Grooth, de B.G.; Greve, J.

    2001-01-01

    Here we observe the formation of a single chromatin fibre using optical tweezers. A single -DNA molecule was suspended between two micron-sized beads, one held by a micropipette and the other in an optical trap. The constrained DNA molecule was incubated with Xenopus laevis egg extract in order to r

  19. Research Discovers Frequent Mutations of Chromatin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    With the support of National Natural Science Foundation of China, BGI, the largest genomics organization in the world, and Peking University Shenzhen Hospital, published online in Nature Geneticsics that the study on frequent mutations of chromatin remodeling genes in transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of thebladder on August 8th, 2011. Their study provides a valuable genetic basis for future studies on TCC,

  20. Epigenetic chromatin silencing: bistability and front propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedighi, Mohammad; Sengupta, Anirvan M.

    2007-12-01

    The role of post-translational modification of histones in eukaryotic gene regulation is well recognized. Epigenetic silencing of genes via heritable chromatin modifications plays a major role in cell fate specification in higher organisms. We formulate a coarse-grained model of chromatin silencing in yeast and study the conditions under which the system becomes bistable, allowing for different epigenetic states. We also study the dynamics of the boundary between the two locally stable states of chromatin: silenced and unsilenced. The model could be of use in guiding the discussion on chromatin silencing in general. In the context of silencing in budding yeast, it helps us understand the phenotype of various mutants, some of which may be non-trivial to see without the help of a mathematical model. One such example is a mutation that reduces the rate of background acetylation of particular histone side chains that competes with the deacetylation by Sir2p. The resulting negative feedback due to a Sir protein depletion effect gives rise to interesting counter-intuitive consequences. Our mathematical analysis brings forth the different dynamical behaviors possible within the same molecular model and guides the formulation of more refined hypotheses that could be addressed experimentally.

  1. Impact of chromatin structure on PR signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Lars; Hager, Gordon L

    2012-01-01

    but also to the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), as these receptors share many similarities regarding interaction with, and remodeling of, chromatin. Both receptors can bind nucleosomal DNA and have accordingly been described as pioneering factors. However recent genomic approaches (ChIP-seq and DHS-seq) show...

  2. Histone variants: key players of chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biterge, Burcu; Schneider, Robert

    2014-06-01

    Histones are fundamental structural components of chromatin. Eukaryotic DNA is wound around an octamer of the core histones H2A, H2B, H3, and H4. Binding of linker histone H1 promotes higher order chromatin organization. In addition to their structural role, histones impact chromatin function and dynamics by, e.g., post-translational histone modifications or the presence of specific histone variants. Histone variants exhibit differential expression timings (DNA replication-independent) and mRNA characteristics compared to canonical histones. Replacement of canonical histones with histone variants can affect nucleosome stability and help to create functionally distinct chromatin domains. In line with this, several histone variants have been implicated in the regulation of cellular processes such as DNA repair and transcriptional activity. In this review, we focus on recent progress in the study of core histone variants H2A.X, H2A.Z, macroH2A, H3.3, and CENP-A, as well as linker histone H1 variants, their functions and their links to development and disease.

  3. The great repression: chromatin and cryptic transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Bianca P; Fischer, Tamás

    2013-01-01

    The eukaryotic chromatin structure is essential in correctly defining transcription units. Impairing this structure can activate cryptic promoters, and lead to the accumulation of aberrant RNA transcripts. Here we discuss critical pathways that are responsible for the repression of cryptic transcription and the maintenance of genome integrity.

  4. Assessment of chromatin status (SCSA) in epididymal and ejaculated sperm in Iberian red deer, ram and domestic dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Macias, Vanesa; Martinez-Pastor, Felipe; Alvarez, Mercedes; Garde, Jose Julian; Anel, Enrique; Anel, Luis; de Paz, Paulino

    2006-11-01

    Abnormal chromatin condensation is not detected using classical techniques for sperm analysis. SCSA has demonstrated its usefulness in sperm chromatin analysis in several species (human, bull, stallion and boar). In this work, we studied sperm samples from red deer, ram and dog to analyze the differentiation of chromatin structure applying SCSA in epididymal and ejaculated spermatozoa. Epididymal samples were obtained from the caput, corpus and cauda by means of cuts, and ejaculated ones were obtained by electroejaculation (deer), artificial vagina (ram) and digital manipulation (dog). SCSA results suggested different critical points in sperm maturation (spermatozoa with loose chromatin to more condensed chromatin) among species: from corpus to cauda in ram and from caput to corpus in deer and dog. Moreover, we also detected differences in ruminants and dog, reflected in the appearance of SCSA plots. Indeed, ram and deer samples rendered two peaks within the sperm main population (sperm with condensed chromatin), whereas only one was detected in dog. Although some differences were observed between cauda and ejaculated samples, SCSA parameters indicated good chromatin condensation, making these samples suitable for germplasm banking. Some species-dependent modifications in the analysis of the results may be necessary to take full advantage of its analytical power.

  5. Continuous intravenous infusion of ATP in humans yields large expansions of erythrocyte ATP pools but extracellular ATP pools are elevated only at the start followed by rapid declines

    OpenAIRE

    Rapaport, Eliezer; Salikhova, Anna; Abraham, Edward H.

    2015-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) was investigated in a clinical trial that included 15 patients with advanced malignancies (solid tumors). ATP was administered by continuous intravenous infusions of 8 h once weekly for 8 weeks. Three values of blood ATP levels were determined. These were total blood (erythrocyte) and blood plasma (extracellular) ATP pools along with the initial rate of release of ATP into the blood plasma. We found that values related to erythrocyte ATP...

  6. Fluorogenic ATP Analogues for Online Monitoring of ATP Consumption : Observing Ubiquitin Activation in Real Time

    OpenAIRE

    Hacker, Stephan; Pagliarini, Dana; Tischer, Thomas; Hardt, Normann; Schneider, Daniel; Mex, Martin; Mayer, Thomas; Scheffner, Martin; Marx, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Many enzymes use ATP in signal-transducing processes or as an energy source. New fluorogenic ATP analogues signal ATP consumption by ubiquitin-like protein-activating enzymes in real time. Thus the inhibition and stimulation of these ATP-processing enzymes can be studied without auxiliary enzymes and reagents. beta-Lapachone was identified as an inhibitor of the ubiquitin-activating enzyme UBA1 (see scheme; A=acceptor, D=donor).

  7. Chromatin Dynamics of the mouse β-globin locus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P.C. van de Corput (Mariëtte); E. de Boer (Ernie); T.A. Knoch (Tobias); W.A. van Cappellen (Gert); M. Lesnussa (Michael); H.J.F.M.M. Eussen (Bert)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractLately it has become more clear that (subtle) changes in 3D organization of chromatin can either trigger transcription or silence genes or gene clusters. It has also been postulated that due to changes in chromatin structure, a change in chromatin accessibility of transcription factors

  8. The many faces of plant chromatin: Meeting summary of the 4th European workshop on plant chromatin 2015, Uppsala, Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozgová, Iva; Köhler, Claudia; Gaudin, Valérie; Hennig, Lars

    2015-01-01

    In June 2015, the fourth European Workshop on Plant Chromatin took place in Uppsala, Sweden, bringing together 80 researchers studying various aspects of plant chromatin and epigenetics. The intricate relationships between plant chromatin dynamics and gene expression change, chromatin organization within the plant cell nucleus, and the impact of chromatin structure on plant development were discussed. Among the main highlights of the meeting were an ever-growing list of newly identified players in chromatin structure establishment and the development of novel tools and approaches to foster our understanding of chromatin-mediated gene regulation, taking into account the context of the plant cell nucleus and its architecture. In this report, we summarize some of the main advances and prospects of plant chromatin research presented at this meeting. PMID:26646904

  9. ATP synthesis during exogenous NADH oxidation. A reappraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, P; Azzone, G F

    1982-01-20

    This paper reports a reinvestigation on the pathway for mitochondrial oxidation of exogenous NADH and on the related ATP synthesis, first reported 30 years ago (Lehninger, A.L. (1951) J. Biol. Chem. 190, 345-359). NADH oxidation, both in intact and in water-treated mitochondria, is 90% inhibited by mersalyl, an inhibitor of the outer membrane NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase, and 10% inhibited by rotenone. The mersalyl-sensitive, but not the rotenone-sensitive, portion of NADH oxidation is stimulated by exogenous cytochrome c. Part of ATP synthesis is independent of exogenous NADH and cytochrome c, and is inhibited by rotenone and antimycin A, and is therefore due to oxidation of endogenous substrates. Another part of ATP synthesis is dependent on exogenous NADH and cytochrome c, is insensitive to rotenone and antimycin A, and is due to operation of cytochrome oxidase. It is concluded that (i) oxidation of exogenous NADH in the presence of cytochrome c proceeds mostly through NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase and cytochrome b5 on the outer membrane and then through cytochrome oxidase via the cytochrome c shuttle, and (ii) ATP synthesis during oxidation of exogenous NADH is partly due to oxidation of endogenous substrates and partly to operation of cytochrome oxidase receiving electrons from the outer membrane via cytochrome c. PMID:6275889

  10. Standardizing chromatin research: a simple and universal method for ChIP-seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrigoni, Laura; Richter, Andreas S; Betancourt, Emily; Bruder, Kerstin; Diehl, Sarah; Manke, Thomas; Bönisch, Ulrike

    2016-04-20

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next generation sequencing (ChIP-seq) is a key technique in chromatin research. Although heavily applied, existing ChIP-seq protocols are often highly fine-tuned workflows, optimized for specific experimental requirements. Especially the initial steps of ChIP-seq, particularly chromatin shearing, are deemed to be exceedingly cell-type-specific, thus impeding any protocol standardization efforts. Here we demonstrate that harmonization of ChIP-seq workflows across cell types and conditions is possible when obtaining chromatin from properly isolated nuclei. We established an ultrasound-based nuclei extraction method (NEXSON: Nuclei EXtraction by SONication) that is highly effective across various organisms, cell types and cell numbers. The described method has the potential to replace complex cell-type-specific, but largely ineffective, nuclei isolation protocols. By including NEXSON in ChIP-seq workflows, we completely eliminate the need for extensive optimization and sample-dependent adjustments. Apart from this significant simplification, our approach also provides the basis for a fully standardized ChIP-seq and yields highly reproducible transcription factor and histone modifications maps for a wide range of different cell types. Even small cell numbers (∼10,000 cells per ChIP) can be easily processed without application of modified chromatin or library preparation protocols.

  11. Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics for the Analysis of Chromatin Structure and Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Soldi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin is a highly structured nucleoprotein complex made of histone proteins and DNA that controls nearly all DNA-dependent processes. Chromatin plasticity is regulated by different associated proteins, post-translational modifications on histones (hPTMs and DNA methylation, which act in a concerted manner to enforce a specific “chromatin landscape”, with a regulatory effect on gene expression. Mass Spectrometry (MS has emerged as a powerful analytical strategy to detect histone PTMs, revealing interplays between neighbouring PTMs and enabling screens for their readers in a comprehensive and quantitative fashion. Here we provide an overview of the recent achievements of state-of-the-art mass spectrometry-based proteomics for the detailed qualitative and quantitative characterization of histone post-translational modifications, histone variants, and global interactomes at specific chromatin regions. This synopsis emphasizes how the advances in high resolution MS, from “Bottom Up” to “Top Down” analysis, together with the uptake of quantitative proteomics methods by chromatin biologists, have made MS a well-established method in the epigenetics field, enabling the acquisition of original information, highly complementary to that offered by more conventional, antibody-based, assays.

  12. Undifferentiated embryonic cell transcription factor 1 regulates ESC chromatin organization and gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kooistra, Susanne M; van den Boom, Vincent; Thummer, Rajkumar P;

    2010-01-01

    Previous reports showed that embryonic stem (ES) cells contain hyperdynamic and globally transcribed chromatin-properties that are important for ES cell pluripotency and differentiation. Here, we demonstrate a role for undifferentiated embryonic cell transcription factor 1 (UTF1) in regulating ES...... cell chromatin structure. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation-on-chip analysis, we identified >1,700 UTF1 target genes that significantly overlap with previously identified Nanog, Oct4, Klf-4, c-Myc, and Rex1 targets. Gene expression profiling showed that UTF1 knock down results in increased expression...... of a large set of genes, including a significant number of UTF1 targets. UTF1 knock down (KD) ES cells are, irrespective of the increased expression of several self-renewal genes, Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) dependent. However, UTF1 KD ES cells are perturbed in their differentiation in response...

  13. Reliability of a bioluminescence ATP assay for detection of bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Selan, L.; Berlutti, F; Passariello, C.; Thaller, M C; Renzini, G

    1992-01-01

    The reliability of bioluminescence assays which employ the luciferin-luciferase ATP-dependent reaction to evaluate bacterial counts was studied, both in vitro and on urine specimens. Bioluminescence and cultural results for the most common urinary tract pathogens were analyzed. Furthermore, the influence of the culture medium, of the assaying method, and of the phase of growth on bioluminescence readings was studied. Results show that Proteus, Providencia, and Morganella strains are not corre...

  14. Plasticity of fission yeast CENP-A chromatin driven by relative levels of histone H3 and H4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araceli G Castillo

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The histone H3 variant CENP-A assembles into chromatin exclusively at centromeres. The process of CENP-A chromatin assembly is epigenetically regulated. Fission yeast centromeres are composed of a central kinetochore domain on which CENP-A chromatin is assembled, and this is flanked by heterochromatin. Marker genes are silenced when placed within kinetochore or heterochromatin domains. It is not known if fission yeast CENP-A(Cnp1 chromatin is confined to specific sequences or whether histone H3 is actively excluded. Here, we show that fission yeast CENP-A(Cnp1 can assemble on noncentromeric DNA when it is inserted within the central kinetochore domain, suggesting that in fission yeast CENP-A(Cnp1 chromatin assembly is driven by the context of a sequence rather than the underlying DNA sequence itself. Silencing in the central domain is correlated with the amount of CENP-A(Cnp1 associated with the marker gene and is also affected by the relative level of histone H3. Our analyses indicate that kinetochore integrity is dependent on maintaining the normal ratio of H3 and H4. Excess H3 competes with CENP-A(Cnp1 for assembly into central domain chromatin, resulting in less CENP-A(Cnp1 and other kinetochore proteins at centromeres causing defective kinetochore function, which is manifest as aberrant mitotic chromosome segregation. Alterations in the levels of H3 relative to H4 and CENP-A(Cnp1 influence the extent of DNA at centromeres that is packaged in CENP-A(Cnp1 chromatin and the composition of this chromatin. Thus, CENP-A(Cnp1 chromatin assembly in fission yeast exhibits plasticity with respect to the underlying sequences and is sensitive to the levels of CENP-A(Cnp1 and other core histones.

  15. Plasticity of fission yeast CENP-A chromatin driven by relative levels of histone H3 and H4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Araceli G; Mellone, Barbara G; Partridge, Janet F; Richardson, William; Hamilton, Georgina L; Allshire, Robin C; Pidoux, Alison L

    2007-07-01

    The histone H3 variant CENP-A assembles into chromatin exclusively at centromeres. The process of CENP-A chromatin assembly is epigenetically regulated. Fission yeast centromeres are composed of a central kinetochore domain on which CENP-A chromatin is assembled, and this is flanked by heterochromatin. Marker genes are silenced when placed within kinetochore or heterochromatin domains. It is not known if fission yeast CENP-A(Cnp1) chromatin is confined to specific sequences or whether histone H3 is actively excluded. Here, we show that fission yeast CENP-A(Cnp1) can assemble on noncentromeric DNA when it is inserted within the central kinetochore domain, suggesting that in fission yeast CENP-A(Cnp1) chromatin assembly is driven by the context of a sequence rather than the underlying DNA sequence itself. Silencing in the central domain is correlated with the amount of CENP-A(Cnp1) associated with the marker gene and is also affected by the relative level of histone H3. Our analyses indicate that kinetochore integrity is dependent on maintaining the normal ratio of H3 and H4. Excess H3 competes with CENP-A(Cnp1) for assembly into central domain chromatin, resulting in less CENP-A(Cnp1) and other kinetochore proteins at centromeres causing defective kinetochore function, which is manifest as aberrant mitotic chromosome segregation. Alterations in the levels of H3 relative to H4 and CENP-A(Cnp1) influence the extent of DNA at centromeres that is packaged in CENP-A(Cnp1) chromatin and the composition of this chromatin. Thus, CENP-A(Cnp1) chromatin assembly in fission yeast exhibits plasticity with respect to the underlying sequences and is sensitive to the levels of CENP-A(Cnp1) and other core histones. PMID:17677001

  16. Optimisation of ATP determination in drinking water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corfitzen, Charlotte B.; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) can be used as a relative measure of cell activity, and is measured by the light output from the reaction between luciferin and ATP catalyzed by firefly luciferase. The measurement has potential as a monitoring and surveillance tool within drinking water distribution...

  17. ATP-triggered anticancer drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Ran; Jiang, Tianyue; Disanto, Rocco; Tai, Wanyi; Gu, Zhen

    2014-03-01

    Stimuli-triggered drug delivery systems have been increasingly used to promote physiological specificity and on-demand therapeutic efficacy of anticancer drugs. Here we utilize adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) as a trigger for the controlled release of anticancer drugs. We demonstrate that polymeric nanocarriers functionalized with an ATP-binding aptamer-incorporated DNA motif can selectively release the intercalating doxorubicin via a conformational switch when in an ATP-rich environment. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration of ATP-responsive nanovehicles is 0.24 μM in MDA-MB-231 cells, a 3.6-fold increase in the cytotoxicity compared with that of non-ATP-responsive nanovehicles. Equipped with an outer shell crosslinked by hyaluronic acid, a specific tumour-targeting ligand, the ATP-responsive nanocarriers present an improvement in the chemotherapeutic inhibition of tumour growth using xenograft MDA-MB-231 tumour-bearing mice. This ATP-triggered drug release system provides a more sophisticated drug delivery system, which can differentiate ATP levels to facilitate the selective release of drugs.

  18. Unexpected role of the copper transporter ATP7A in PDGF-induced vascular smooth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashino, T.; Varadarajan, S.; Urao, N.; Oshikawa, J.; Chen, G. -F.; Wang, H.; Huo, Y.; Finney, L.; Vogt, S.; McKinney, R. D.; Maryon, E. B.; Kaplan, J. H.; Ushio-Fukai, M.; Fukai, T. (Biosciences Division); ( XSD); ( PSC-USR); (Univ. of Illinois at Chicago); (Univ. of Minnesota)

    2010-09-09

    Copper, an essential nutrient, has been implicated in vascular remodeling and atherosclerosis with unknown mechanism. Bioavailability of intracellular copper is regulated not only by the copper importer CTR1 (copper transporter 1) but also by the copper exporter ATP7A (Menkes ATPase), whose function is achieved through copper-dependent translocation from trans-Golgi network (TGN). Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) promotes vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration, a key component of neointimal formation. To determine the role of copper transporter ATP7A in PDGF-induced VSMC migration. Depletion of ATP7A inhibited VSMC migration in response to PDGF or wound scratch in a CTR1/copper-dependent manner. PDGF stimulation promoted ATP7A translocation from the TGN to lipid rafts, which localized at the leading edge, where it colocalized with PDGF receptor and Rac1, in migrating VSMCs. Mechanistically, ATP7A small interfering RNA or CTR small interfering RNA prevented PDGF-induced Rac1 translocation to the leading edge, thereby inhibiting lamellipodia formation. In addition, ATP7A depletion prevented a PDGF-induced decrease in copper level and secretory copper enzyme precursor prolysyl oxidase (Pro-LOX) in lipid raft fraction, as well as PDGF-induced increase in LOX activity. In vivo, ATP7A expression was markedly increased and copper accumulation was observed by synchrotron-based x-ray fluorescence microscopy at neointimal VSMCs in wire injury model. These findings suggest that ATP7A plays an important role in copper-dependent PDGF-stimulated VSMC migration via recruiting Rac1 to lipid rafts at the leading edge, as well as regulating LOX activity. This may contribute to neointimal formation after vascular injury. Our findings provide insight into ATP7A as a novel therapeutic target for vascular remodeling and atherosclerosis.

  19. ATP and Presentation Service for Mizar Formalizations

    CERN Document Server

    Urban, Josef; Sitcliffe, Geoff

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the Automated Reasoning for Mizar (MizAR) service, which integrates several automated reasoning, artificial intelligence, and presentation tools with Mizar and its authoring environment. The service provides ATP assistance to Mizar authors in finding and explaining proofs, and offers generation of Mizar problems as challenges to ATP systems. The service is based on a sound translation from the Mizar language to that of first-order ATP systems, and relies on the recent progress in application of ATP systems in large theories containing tens of thousands of available facts. We present the main features of MizAR services, followed by an account of initial experiments in finding proofs with the ATP assistance. Our initial experience indicates that the tool offers substantial help in exploring the Mizar library and in preparing new Mizar articles.

  20. Blockade of Extracellular ATP Effect by Oxidized ATP Effectively Mitigated Induced Mouse Experimental Autoimmune Uveitis (EAU)

    OpenAIRE

    Ronglan Zhao; Dongchun Liang; Deming Sun

    2016-01-01

    Various pathological conditions are accompanied by ATP release from the intracellular to the extracellular compartment. Extracellular ATP (eATP) functions as a signaling molecule by activating purinergic P2 purine receptors. The key P2 receptor involved in inflammation was identified as P2X7R. Recent studies have shown that P2X7R signaling is required to trigger the Th1/Th17 immune response, and oxidized ATP (oxATP) effectively blocks P2X7R activation. In this study we investigated the effect...

  1. Chromatin Assembly at Kinetochores Is Uncoupled from DNA Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelby, Richard D.; Monier, Karine; Sullivan, Kevin F.

    2000-01-01

    The specification of metazoan centromeres does not depend strictly on centromeric DNA sequences, but also requires epigenetic factors. The mechanistic basis for establishing a centromeric “state” on the DNA remains unclear. In this work, we have directly examined replication timing of the prekinetochore domain of human chromosomes. Kinetochores were labeled by expression of epitope-tagged CENP-A, which stably marks prekinetochore domains in human cells. By immunoprecipitating CENP-A mononucleosomes from synchronized cells pulsed with [3H]thymidine we demonstrate that CENP-A–associated DNA is replicated in mid-to-late S phase. Cytological analysis of DNA replication further demonstrated that centromeres replicate asynchronously in parallel with numerous other genomic regions. In contrast, quantitative Western blot analysis demonstrates that CENP-A protein synthesis occurs later, in G2. Quantitative fluorescence microscopy and transient transfection in the presence of aphidicolin, an inhibitor of DNA replication, show that CENP-A can assemble into centromeres in the absence of DNA replication. Thus, unlike most genomic chromatin, histone synthesis and assembly are uncoupled from DNA replication at the kinetochore. Uncoupling DNA replication from CENP-A synthesis suggests that regulated chromatin assembly or remodeling could play a role in epigenetic centromere propagation. PMID:11086012

  2. Thermodynamics of proton transport coupled ATP synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turina, Paola; Petersen, Jan; Gräber, Peter

    2016-06-01

    The thermodynamic H(+)/ATP ratio of the H(+)-ATP synthase from chloroplasts was measured in proteoliposomes after energization of the membrane by an acid base transition (Turina et al. 2003 [13], 418-422). The method is discussed, and all published data obtained with this system are combined and analyzed as a single dataset. This meta-analysis led to the following results. 1) At equilibrium, the transmembrane ΔpH is energetically equivalent to the transmembrane electric potential difference. 2) The standard free energy for ATP synthesis (reference reaction) is ΔG°(ref)=33.8±1.3kJ/mol. 3) The thermodynamic H(+)/ATP ratio, as obtained from the shift of the ATP synthesis equilibrium induced by changing the transmembrane ΔpH (varying either pH(in) or pH(out)) is 4.0±0.1. The structural H(+)/ATP ratio, calculated from the ratio of proton binding sites on the c-subunit-ring in F(0) to the catalytic nucleotide binding sites on the β-subunits in F(1), is c/β=14/3=4.7. We infer that the energy of 0.7 protons per ATP that flow through the enzyme, but do not contribute to shifting the ATP/(ADP·Pi) ratio, is used for additional processes within the enzyme, such as activation, and/or energy dissipation, due e.g. to internal uncoupling. The ratio between the thermodynamic and the structural H(+)/ATP values is 0.85, and we conclude that this value represents the efficiency of the chemiosmotic energy conversion within the chloroplast H(+)-ATP synthase.

  3. The landscape of accessible chromatin in mammalian preimplantation embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jingyi; Huang, Bo; Chen, He; Yin, Qiangzong; Liu, Yang; Xiang, Yunlong; Zhang, Bingjie; Liu, Bofeng; Wang, Qiujun; Xia, Weikun; Li, Wenzhi; Li, Yuanyuan; Ma, Jing; Peng, Xu; Zheng, Hui; Ming, Jia; Zhang, Wenhao; Zhang, Jing; Tian, Geng; Xu, Feng; Chang, Zai; Na, Jie; Yang, Xuerui; Xie, Wei

    2016-06-30

    In mammals, extensive chromatin reorganization is essential for reprogramming terminally committed gametes to a totipotent state during preimplantation development. However, the global chromatin landscape and its dynamics in this period remain unexplored. Here we report a genome-wide map of accessible chromatin in mouse preimplantation embryos using an improved assay for transposase-accessible chromatin with high throughput sequencing (ATAC-seq) approach with CRISPR/Cas9-assisted mitochondrial DNA depletion. We show that despite extensive parental asymmetry in DNA methylomes, the chromatin accessibility between the parental genomes is globally comparable after major zygotic genome activation (ZGA). Accessible chromatin in early embryos is widely shaped by transposable elements and overlaps extensively with putative cis-regulatory sequences. Unexpectedly, accessible chromatin is also found near the transcription end sites of active genes. By integrating the maps of cis-regulatory elements and single-cell transcriptomes, we construct the regulatory network of early development, which helps to identify the key modulators for lineage specification. Finally, we find that the activities of cis-regulatory elements and their associated open chromatin diminished before major ZGA. Surprisingly, we observed many loci showing non-canonical, large open chromatin domains over the entire transcribed units in minor ZGA, supporting the presence of an unusually permissive chromatin state. Together, these data reveal a unique spatiotemporal chromatin configuration that accompanies early mammalian development. PMID:27309802

  4. ATP4 and ciliation in the neuroectoderm and endoderm of Xenopus embryos and tadpoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Walentek

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available During gastrulation and neurulation, foxj1 expression requires ATP4a-dependent Wnt/β-catenin signaling for ciliation of the gastrocoel roof plate (Walentek et al. Cell Rep. 1 (2012 516–527. and the mucociliary epidermis (Walentek et al. Dev. Biol. (2015 of Xenopus laevis embryos. These data suggested that ATP4a and Wnt/β-catenin signaling regulate foxj1 throughout Xenopus development. Here we analyzed whether foxj1 expression was also ATP4a-dependent in other ciliated tissues of the developing Xenopus embryo and tadpole. We found that in the floor plate of the neural tube ATP4a-dependent canonical Wnt signaling was required for foxj1 expression, downstream of or in parallel to Hedgehog signaling. In the developing tadpole brain, ATP4-function was a prerequisite for the establishment of cerebrospinal fluid flow. Furthermore, we describe foxj1 expression and the presence of multiciliated cells in the developing tadpole gastrointestinal tract. Our work argues for a general requirement of ATP4-dependent Wnt/β-catenin signaling for foxj1 expression and motile ciliogenesis throughout Xenopus development.

  5. Replicating chromatin: a tale of histones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Anja

    2009-01-01

    Chromatin serves structural and functional roles crucial for genome stability and correct gene expression. This organization must be reproduced on daughter strands during replication to maintain proper overlay of epigenetic fabric onto genetic sequence. Nucleosomes constitute the structural...... reassembly on nascent DNA strands. The aim of this review is to discuss how histones - new and old - are handled at the replication fork, highlighting new mechanistic insights and revisiting old paradigms....

  6. Keystone Symposia on Epigenomics and Chromatin Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravnskjær, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Keystone Symposia kicked off the start of 2012 with two joint meetings on Epigenomics and Chromatin Dynamics and a star-studded list of speakers. Held in Keystone, CO, January 17-22, and organized by Steven Jacobsen and Steven Henikoff and by Bradley Cairns and Geneviève Almouzni, respectively, t......, there was plenty happening in these sessions that it did not seem to matter that the ski-slope conditions were not ideal....

  7. Identification of alternative topological domains in chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Filippova, Darya; Patro, Rob; Duggal, Geet; Kingsford, Carl

    2014-01-01

    Chromosome conformation capture experiments have led to the discovery of dense, contiguous, megabase-sized topological domains that are similar across cell types and conserved across species. These domains are strongly correlated with a number of chromatin markers and have since been included in a number of analyses. However, functionally-relevant domains may exist at multiple length scales. We introduce a new and efficient algorithm that is able to capture persistent domains across various r...

  8. Multiscale Identification of Topological Domains in Chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Filippova, Darya; Patro, Rob; Duggal, Geet; Kingsford, Carl

    2013-01-01

    Recent chromosome conformation capture experiments have led to the discovery of dense, contiguous, megabase-sized topological domains that are similar across cell types and conserved across species. These domains are strongly correlated with a number of chromatin markers and have since been included in a number of analyses. However, functionally-relevant domains may exist at multiple length scales. We introduce a new and efficient algorithm that is able to capture persistent domains across va...

  9. Chromatin regulation in drug addiction and depression

    OpenAIRE

    Renthal, William; Nestler, Eric J.

    2009-01-01

    Alterations in gene expression are implicated in the pathogenesis of several neuropsychiatrie disorders, including drug addiction and depression, increasing evidence indicates that changes in gene expression in neurons, in the context of animal models of addiction and depression, are mediated in part by epigenetic mechanisms that alter chromatin structure on specific gene promoters. This review discusses recent findings from behavioral, molecular, and bioinformatic approaches that are being u...

  10. A SWI/SNF Chromatin Remodelling Protein Controls Cytokinin Production through the Regulation of Chromatin Architecture

    KAUST Repository

    Jégu, Teddy

    2015-10-12

    Chromatin architecture determines transcriptional accessibility to DNA and consequently gene expression levels in response to developmental and environmental stimuli. Recently, chromatin remodelers such as SWI/SNF complexes have been recognized as key regulators of chromatin architecture. To gain insight into the function of these complexes during root development, we have analyzed Arabidopsis knock-down lines for one sub-unit of SWI/SNF complexes: BAF60. Here, we show that BAF60 is a positive regulator of root development and cell cycle progression in the root meristem via its ability to down-regulate cytokinin production. By opposing both the deposition of active histone marks and the formation of a chromatin regulatory loop, BAF60 negatively regulates two crucial target genes for cytokinin biosynthesis (IPT3 and IPT7) and one cell cycle inhibitor (KRP7). Our results demonstrate that SWI/SNF complexes containing BAF60 are key factors governing the equilibrium between formation and dissociation of a chromatin loop controlling phytohormone production and cell cycle progression.

  11. Metal Induced Inhibition of Photosynthesis,Photosynthetic Electron Transport Chain and ATP Content of Anabaena doliolum and Chlorella vulgaris:Interaction with Exogenous ATP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIRUPAMAMALLICK; L.C.RAI

    1992-01-01

    This study demonstrates a concentration dependent inhibition of carbon fixation,O2 evolution,photosynthetic electron transport chain and ATP content of A.doliolum and C.vulgaris by Cu,Ni and Fe.Although the mode of inhibition of photosynthetic electron transport chain of both the algae was similar.PS Ⅱdepicted greater sensitivity to the test metals used.The toxicity in both organisms was Cu>Ni>Fe.A.doliolum was,however,more sensitive to Cu and Ni,and C.vulgaris to Fe.Toxicity was generally dependent on metal uptake,which in turn was dependent on their concentrations in the external medium.A partial restoration of nutrient uptake,carbon fixation,and enzyme activities following supplementation of exogenous ATP suggests that ATP regulates toxicity through chelation.

  12. Decline of Phosphotransfer and Substrate Supply Metabolic Circuits Hinders ATP Cycling in Aging Myocardium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emirhan Nemutlu

    Full Text Available Integration of mitochondria with cytosolic ATP-consuming/ATP-sensing and substrate supply processes is critical for muscle bioenergetics and electrical activity. Whether age-dependent muscle weakness and increased electrical instability depends on perturbations in cellular energetic circuits is unknown. To define energetic remodeling of aged atrial myocardium we tracked dynamics of ATP synthesis-utilization, substrate supply, and phosphotransfer circuits through adenylate kinase (AK, creatine kinase (CK, and glycolytic/glycogenolytic pathways using 18O stable isotope-based phosphometabolomic technology. Samples of intact atrial myocardium from adult and aged rats were subjected to 18O-labeling procedure at resting basal state, and analyzed using the 18O-assisted HPLC-GC/MS technique. Characteristics for aging atria were lower inorganic phosphate Pi[18O], γ-ATP[18O], β-ADP[18O], and creatine phosphate CrP[18O] 18O-labeling rates indicating diminished ATP utilization-synthesis and AK and CK phosphotransfer fluxes. Shift in dynamics of glycolytic phosphotransfer was reflected in the diminished G6P[18O] turnover with relatively constant glycogenolytic flux or G1P[18O] 18O-labeling. Labeling of G3P[18O], an indicator of G3P-shuttle activity and substrate supply to mitochondria, was depressed in aged myocardium. Aged atrial myocardium displayed reduced incorporation of 18O into second (18O2, third (18O3, and fourth (18O4 positions of Pi[18O] and a lower Pi[18O]/γ-ATP[18 O]-labeling ratio, indicating delayed energetic communication and ATP cycling between mitochondria and cellular ATPases. Adrenergic stress alleviated diminished CK flux, AK catalyzed β-ATP turnover and energetic communication in aging atria. Thus, 18O-assisted phosphometabolomics uncovered simultaneous phosphotransfer through AK, CK, and glycolytic pathways and G3P substrate shuttle deficits hindering energetic communication and ATP cycling, which may underlie energetic

  13. UTP-induced ATP release is a fine-tuned signalling pathway in osteocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Kringelbach, Tina M.; Aslan, Derya; Novak, Ivana; Schwarz, Peter; Jørgensen, Niklas R.

    2013-01-01

    Osteocytes reside as a cellular network throughout the mineralised matrix of bone and are considered the primary mechanosensors of this tissue. They sense mechanical stimulation such as fluid flow and are able to regulate osteoblast and osteoclast functions on the bone surface. Previously, we found that ATP is released load-dependently from osteocytes from the onset of mechanical stimulation. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate whether and how ATP release can be evoked ...

  14. A tenth atp gene and the conserved atpI gene of a Bacillus atp operon have a role in Mg2+ uptake

    OpenAIRE

    Hicks, David B.; Wang, Zhenxiong; Wei, Yi; Kent, Rebecca; Guffanti, Arthur A.; Banciu, Horia; Bechhofer, David H.; Krulwich, Terry A.

    2003-01-01

    The atp operon of alkaliphilic Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4, as in most prokaryotes, contains the eight structural genes for the F-ATPase (ATP synthase), which are preceded by an atpI gene that encodes a membrane protein of unknown function. A tenth gene, atpZ, has been found in this operon, which is upstream of and overlapping with atpI. Most Bacillus species, and some other bacteria, possess atpZ homologues. AtpZ is predicted to be a membrane protein with a hairpin ...

  15. The structural basis of ATP as an allosteric modulator.

    OpenAIRE

    Shaoyong Lu; Wenkang Huang; Qi Wang; Qiancheng Shen; Shuai Li; Ruth Nussinov; Jian Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) is generally regarded as a substrate for energy currency and protein modification. Recent findings uncovered the allosteric function of ATP in cellular signal transduction but little is understood about this critical behavior of ATP. Through extensive analysis of ATP in solution and proteins, we found that the free ATP can exist in the compact and extended conformations in solution, and the two different conformational characteristics may be responsible for ATP...

  16. The Structural Basis of ATP as an Allosteric Modulator

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Shaoyong; Huang, Wenkang; Wang, Qi; Shen, Qiancheng; Li, Shuai; Nussinov, Ruth; Zhang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine-5’-triphosphate (ATP) is generally regarded as a substrate for energy currency and protein modification. Recent findings uncovered the allosteric function of ATP in cellular signal transduction but little is understood about this critical behavior of ATP. Through extensive analysis of ATP in solution and proteins, we found that the free ATP can exist in the compact and extended conformations in solution, and the two different conformational characteristics may be responsible for ATP...

  17. ATP binding to a multisubunit enzyme: statistical thermodynamics analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yunxin

    2012-01-01

    Due to inter-subunit communication, multisubunit enzymes usually hydrolyze ATP in a concerted fashion. However, so far the principle of this process remains poorly understood. In this study, from the viewpoint of statistical thermodynamics, a simple model is presented. In this model, we assume that the binding of ATP will change the potential of the corresponding enzyme subunit, and the degree of this change depends on the state of its adjacent subunits. The probability of enzyme in a given state satisfies the Boltzmann's distribution. Although it looks much simple, this model can fit the recent experimental data of chaperonin TRiC/CCT well. From this model, the dominant state of TRiC/CCT can be obtained. This study provided a new way to understand biophysical processes by statistical thermodynamics analysis.

  18. A histone H3K36 chromatin switch coordinates DNA double-strand break repair pathway choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Chen-Chun; Deegan, Rachel S; Subramanian, Lakxmi; Gal, Csenge; Sarkar, Sovan; Blaikley, Elizabeth J; Walker, Carol; Hulme, Lydia; Bernhard, Eric; Codlin, Sandra; Bähler, Jürg; Allshire, Robin; Whitehall, Simon; Humphrey, Timothy C

    2014-01-01

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair is a highly regulated process performed predominantly by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR) pathways. How these pathways are coordinated in the context of chromatin is unclear. Here we uncover a role for histone H3K36 modification in regulating DSB repair pathway choice in fission yeast. We find Set2-dependent H3K36 methylation reduces chromatin accessibility, reduces resection and promotes NHEJ, while antagonistic Gcn5-dependent H3K36 acetylation increases chromatin accessibility, increases resection and promotes HR. Accordingly, loss of Set2 increases H3K36Ac, chromatin accessibility and resection, while Gcn5 loss results in the opposite phenotypes following DSB induction. Further, H3K36 modification is cell cycle regulated with Set2-dependent H3K36 methylation peaking in G1 when NHEJ occurs, while Gcn5-dependent H3K36 acetylation peaks in S/G2 when HR prevails. These findings support an H3K36 chromatin switch in regulating DSB repair pathway choice. PMID:24909977

  19. Spectroscopic study of fast-neutron-irradiated chromatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radu, L. [V. Babes National Inst., Dept. of Molecular Genetics, Bucharest (Romania)]. E-mail: serbanradu@pcnet.ro; Gazdaru, D. [Bucharest Univ., Dept. of Biophysics, Physics Faculty, Bucharest (Romania); Constantinescu, B. [H. Hulubei National Inst., Dept. of Cyclotron, Bucharest (Romania)

    2004-02-01

    The effects produced by fast neutrons (0-100 Gy) on chromatin structure were analyzed by (i) [{sup 1}H]-NMR spectroscopy, (ii) time resolved spectroscopy, and (iii) fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Two types of chromatin were tested: (i) a chromatin from a normal tissue (liver of Wistar rats) and (ii) a chromatin from a tumoral tissue (Guerin limphotrope epithelioma, a rat solid tumor). The fast-neutron action on chromatin determines greater values of the [{sup 1}H]-NMR transverse relaxation time, indicating a more injured structure. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements show that the relative contribution of the excited state lifetime of bound ethidium bromide to chromatin DNA diminishes with increasing irradiation doses. This reflects the damage that occurs in DNA structure: production of single- and double-strand breaks due to sugar and base modifications. By the FRET method, the distance between dansyl chloride and acridine orange coupled at chromatin was determined. This distance increases upon fast-neutron action. The radiosensitivity of the tumor tissue chromatin seems higher than that of the normal tissue chromatin, probably because of its higher (loose) euchromatin/(compact) heterochromatin ratio. As the values of the physical parameters analyzed are specific for a determined dose, the establishment of these parameters may constitute a criterion for the microdosimetry of chromatin radiolesions produced by fast neutrons. (author)

  20. Molecular mechanism of ATP binding and ion channel activation in P2X receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hattori, Motoyuki; Gouaux, Eric (Oregon HSU)

    2012-10-24

    P2X receptors are trimeric ATP-activated ion channels permeable to Na{sup +}, K{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+}. The seven P2X receptor subtypes are implicated in physiological processes that include modulation of synaptic transmission, contraction of smooth muscle, secretion of chemical transmitters and regulation of immune responses. Despite the importance of P2X receptors in cellular physiology, the three-dimensional composition of the ATP-binding site, the structural mechanism of ATP-dependent ion channel gating and the architecture of the open ion channel pore are unknown. Here we report the crystal structure of the zebrafish P2X4 receptor in complex with ATP and a new structure of the apo receptor. The agonist-bound structure reveals a previously unseen ATP-binding motif and an open ion channel pore. ATP binding induces cleft closure of the nucleotide-binding pocket, flexing of the lower body {beta}-sheet and a radial expansion of the extracellular vestibule. The structural widening of the extracellular vestibule is directly coupled to the opening of the ion channel pore by way of an iris-like expansion of the transmembrane helices. The structural delineation of the ATP-binding site and the ion channel pore, together with the conformational changes associated with ion channel gating, will stimulate development of new pharmacological agents.

  1. Prokineticin 2 facilitates mechanical allodynia induced by α,β-methylene ATP in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Cuixia; Qiu, Chun-Yu; Gan, Xiong; Liu, Ting-Ting; Qu, Zu-Wei; Rao, Zhiguo; Hu, Wang-Ping

    2015-11-15

    Prokineticin 2 (PK2), a new chemokine, causes mechanical hypersensitivity in the rat hind paw, but little is known about the molecular mechanism. Here, we have found that ionotropic P2X receptor is essential to mechanical allodynia induced by PK2. First, intraplantar injection of high dose (3 or 10 pmol) of PK2 significantly increased paw withdrawal response frequency (%) to innocuous mechanical stimuli (mechanical allodynia). And the mechanical allodynia induced by PK2 was prevented by co-administration of TNP-ATP, a selective P2X receptor antagonist. Second, although low dose (0.3 or 1 pmol) of PK2 itself did not produce an allodynic response, it significantly facilitated the mechanical allodynia evoked by intraplantar injection of α,β-methylene ATP (α,β-meATP). Third, PK2 concentration-dependently potentiated α,β-meATP-activated currents in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Finally, PK2 receptors and intracellular signal transduction were involved in PK2 potentiation of α,β-meATP-induced mechanical allodynia and α,β-meATP-activated currents, since the potentiation were blocked by PK2 receptor antagonist PKRA and selective PKC inhibitor GF 109203X. These results suggested that PK2 facilitated mechanical allodynia induced by α,β-meATP through a mechanism involved in sensitization of cutaneous P2X receptors expressed by nociceptive nerve endings.

  2. Depletion of the chromatin looping proteins CTCF and cohesin causes chromatin compaction: insight into chromatin folding by polymer modelling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariliis Tark-Dame

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Folding of the chromosomal fibre in interphase nuclei is an important element in the regulation of gene expression. For instance, physical contacts between promoters and enhancers are a key element in cell-type-specific transcription. We know remarkably little about the principles that control chromosome folding. Here we explore the view that intrachromosomal interactions, forming a complex pattern of loops, are a key element in chromosome folding. CTCF and cohesin are two abundant looping proteins of interphase chromosomes of higher eukaryotes. To investigate the role of looping in large-scale (supra Mb folding of human chromosomes, we knocked down the gene that codes for CTCF and the one coding for Rad21, an essential subunit of cohesin. We measured the effect on chromosome folding using systematic 3D fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH. Results show that chromatin becomes more compact after reducing the concentration of these two looping proteins. The molecular basis for this counter-intuitive behaviour is explored by polymer modelling usingy the Dynamic Loop model (Bohn M, Heermann DW (2010 Diffusion-driven looping provides a consistent framework for chromatin organization. PLoS ONE 5: e12218.. We show that compaction can be explained by selectively decreasing the number of short-range loops, leaving long-range looping unchanged. In support of this model prediction it has recently been shown by others that CTCF and cohesin indeed are responsible primarily for short-range looping. Our results suggest that the local and the overall changes in of chromosome structure are controlled by a delicate balance between short-range and long-range loops, allowing easy switching between, for instance, open and more compact chromatin states.

  3. Data for proteomic analysis of ATP-binding proteins and kinase inhibitor target proteins using an ATP probe

    OpenAIRE

    Jun Adachi; Marina Kishida; Shio Watanabe; Yuuki Hashimoto; Kazuna Fukamizu; Takeshi Tomonaga

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between ATP and ATP-binding proteins (ATPome) are common and are required for most cellular processes. Thus, it is clearly important to identify and quantify these interactions for understanding basic cellular mechanisms and the pathogenesis of various diseases. We used an ATP competition assay (competition between ATP and acyl-ATP probes) that enabled us to distinguish specific ATP-binding proteins from non-specific proteins (Adachi et al., 2014) [1]. As a result, we identified ...

  4. Probing the ATP Site of GRP78 with Nucleotide Triphosphate Analogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott J Hughes

    Full Text Available GRP78, a member of the ER stress protein family, can relocate to the surface of cancer cells, playing key roles in promoting cell proliferation and metastasis. GRP78 consists of two major functional domains: the ATPase and protein/peptide-binding domains. The protein/peptide-binding domain of cell-surface GRP78 has served as a novel functional receptor for delivering cytotoxic agents (e.g., a apoptosis-inducing peptide or taxol across the cell membrane. Here, we report our study on the ATPase domain of GRP78 (GRP78ATPase, whose potential as a transmembrane delivery system of cytotoxic agents (e.g., ATP-based nucleotide triphosphate analogs remains unexploited. As the binding of ligands (ATP analogs to a receptor (GRP78ATPase is a pre-requisite for internalization, we determined the binding affinities and modes of GRP78ATPase for ADP, ATP and several ATP analogs using surface plasmon resonance and x-ray crystallography. The tested ATP analogs contain one of the following modifications: the nitrogen at the adenine ring 7-position to a carbon atom (7-deazaATP, the oxygen at the β-γ bridge position to a carbon atom (AMPPCP, or the removal of the 2'-OH group (2'-deoxyATP. We found that 7-deazaATP displays an affinity and a binding mode that resemble those of ATP regardless of magnesium ion (Mg++ concentration, suggesting that GRP78 is tolerant to modifications at the 7-position. By comparison, AMPPCP's binding affinity was lower than ATP and Mg++-dependent, as the removal of Mg++ nearly abolished binding to GRP78ATPase. The AMPPCP-Mg++ structure showed evidence for the critical role of Mg++ in AMPPCP binding affinity, suggesting that while GRP78 is sensitive to modifications at the β-γ bridge position, these can be tolerated in the presence of Mg++. Furthermore, 2'-deoxyATP's binding affinity was significantly lower than those for all other nucleotides tested, even in the presence of Mg++. The 2'-deoxyATP structure showed the conformation of the

  5. Probing the ATP Site of GRP78 with Nucleotide Triphosphate Analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Scott J; Antoshchenko, Tetyana; Chen, Yun; Lu, Hua; Pizarro, Juan C; Park, Hee-Won

    2016-01-01

    GRP78, a member of the ER stress protein family, can relocate to the surface of cancer cells, playing key roles in promoting cell proliferation and metastasis. GRP78 consists of two major functional domains: the ATPase and protein/peptide-binding domains. The protein/peptide-binding domain of cell-surface GRP78 has served as a novel functional receptor for delivering cytotoxic agents (e.g., a apoptosis-inducing peptide or taxol) across the cell membrane. Here, we report our study on the ATPase domain of GRP78 (GRP78ATPase), whose potential as a transmembrane delivery system of cytotoxic agents (e.g., ATP-based nucleotide triphosphate analogs) remains unexploited. As the binding of ligands (ATP analogs) to a receptor (GRP78ATPase) is a pre-requisite for internalization, we determined the binding affinities and modes of GRP78ATPase for ADP, ATP and several ATP analogs using surface plasmon resonance and x-ray crystallography. The tested ATP analogs contain one of the following modifications: the nitrogen at the adenine ring 7-position to a carbon atom (7-deazaATP), the oxygen at the β-γ bridge position to a carbon atom (AMPPCP), or the removal of the 2'-OH group (2'-deoxyATP). We found that 7-deazaATP displays an affinity and a binding mode that resemble those of ATP regardless of magnesium ion (Mg++) concentration, suggesting that GRP78 is tolerant to modifications at the 7-position. By comparison, AMPPCP's binding affinity was lower than ATP and Mg++-dependent, as the removal of Mg++ nearly abolished binding to GRP78ATPase. The AMPPCP-Mg++ structure showed evidence for the critical role of Mg++ in AMPPCP binding affinity, suggesting that while GRP78 is sensitive to modifications at the β-γ bridge position, these can be tolerated in the presence of Mg++. Furthermore, 2'-deoxyATP's binding affinity was significantly lower than those for all other nucleotides tested, even in the presence of Mg++. The 2'-deoxyATP structure showed the conformation of the bound

  6. Assembly of telomeric chromatin to create ALTernative endings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Roderick J; Almouzni, Genevieve

    2014-11-01

    Circumvention of the telomere length-dependent mechanisms that control the upper boundaries of cellular proliferation is necessary for the unlimited growth of cancer. Most cancer cells achieve cellular immortality by up-regulating the expression of telomerase to extend and maintain their telomere length. However, a small but significant number of cancers do so via the exchange of telomeric DNA between chromosomes in a pathway termed alternative lengthening of telomeres, or ALT. Although it remains to be clarified why a cell chooses the ALT pathway and how ALT is initiated, recently identified mutations in factors that shape the chromatin and epigenetic landscape of ALT telomeres are shedding light on these mechanisms. In this review, we examine these recent findings and integrate them into the current models of the ALT mechanism. PMID:25172551

  7. Chromatin Dynamics in Vivo: A Game of Musical Chairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniël P. Melters

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Histones are a major component of chromatin, the nucleoprotein complex fundamental to regulating transcription, facilitating cell division, and maintaining genome integrity in almost all eukaryotes. In addition to canonical, replication-dependent histones, replication-independent histone variants exist in most eukaryotes. In recent years, steady progress has been made in understanding how histone variants assemble, their involvement in development, mitosis, transcription, and genome repair. In this review, we will focus on the localization of the major histone variants H3.3, CENP-A, H2A.Z, and macroH2A, as well as how these variants have evolved, their structural differences, and their functional significance in vivo.

  8. Positive Inotropic Effects of Low dATP/ATP Ratios on Mechanics and Kinetics of Porcine Cardiac Muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Schoffstall, Brenda; Clark, Amanda; Chase, P. Bryant

    2006-01-01

    Substitution of 2′-deoxy ATP (dATP) for ATP as substrate for actomyosin results in significant enhancement of in vitro parameters of cardiac contraction. To determine the minimal ratio of dATP/ATP (constant total NTP) that significantly enhances cardiac contractility and obtain greater understanding of how dATP substitution results in contractile enhancement, we varied dATP/ATP ratio in porcine cardiac muscle preparations. At maximum Ca2+ (pCa 4.5), isometric force increased linearly with dAT...

  9. Astrocytes release ATP through lysosomal exocytosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Astrocytes, the most abundant type of glial cells in the brain, have been found to release signaling molecules, including adenosine triphosphate(ATP), the most important energy carrier inside the cell as well as a universal extracellular signaling molecule.

  10. Customized ATP towpreg. [Automated Tow Placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandusky, Donald A.; Marchello, Joseph M.; Baucom, Robert M.; Johnston, Norman J.

    1992-01-01

    Automated tow placement (ATP) utilizes robotic technology to lay down adjacent polymer-matrix-impregnated carbon fiber tows on a tool surface. Consolidation and cure during ATP requires that void elimination and polymer matrix adhesion be accomplished in the short period of heating and pressure rolling that follows towpreg ribbon placement from the robot head to the tool. This study examined the key towpreg ribbon properties and dimensions which play a significant role in ATP. Analysis of the heat transfer process window indicates that adequate heating can be achieved at lay down rates as high as 1 m/sec. While heat transfer did not appear to be the limiting factor, resin flow and fiber movement into tow lap gaps could be. Accordingly, consideration was given to towpreg ribbon having uniform yet non-rectangular cross sections. Dimensional integrity of the towpreg ribbon combined with customized ribbon architecture offer great promise for processing advances in ATP of high performance composites.

  11. Putative molecular mechanism underlying sperm chromatin remodelling is regulated by reproductive hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gill-Sharma Manjeet Kaur

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The putative regulatory role of the male reproductive hormones in the molecular mechanism underlying chromatin condensation remains poorly understood. In the past decade, we developed two adult male rat models wherein functional deficits of testosterone or FSH, produced after treatments with 20 mg/Kg/d of cyproterone acetate (CPA per os, for a period of 15 days or 3 mg/Kg/d of fluphenazine decanoate (FD subcutaneously, for a period of 60 days, respectively, affected the rate of sperm chromatin decondensation in vitro. These rat models have been used in the current study in order to delineate the putative roles of testosterone and FSH in the molecular mechanism underlying remodelling of sperm chromatin. Results We report that deficits of both testosterone and FSH affected the turnover of polyubiquitylated histones and led to their accumulation in the testis. Functional deficits of testosterone reduced expression of MIWI, the 5-methyl cap binding RNA-binding protein (PIWIlike murine homologue of the Drosophila protein PIWI/P-element induced wimpy testis containing a PAZ/Piwi-Argonaut-Zwille domain and levels of histone deacetylase1 (HDAC1, ubiquitin ligating enzyme (URE-B1/E3, 20S proteasome α1 concomitant with reduced expression of ubiquitin activating enzyme (ube1, conjugating enzyme (ube2d2, chromodomain Y like protein (cdyl, bromodomain testis specific protein (brdt, hdac6 (histone deacetylase6, androgen-dependent homeobox placentae embryonic protein (pem/RhoX5, histones h2b and th3 (testis-specific h3. Functional deficits of FSH reduced the expression of cdyl and brdt genes in the testis, affected turnover of ubiquitylated histones, stalled the physiological DNA repair mechanism and culminated in spermiation of DNA damaged sperm. Conclusions We aver that deficits of both testosterone and FSH differentially affected the process of sperm chromatin remodelling through subtle changes in the ‘chromatin condensation

  12. Berberine induces pacemaker potential inhibition via cGMP-dependent ATP-sensitive K+ channels by stimulating mu/delta opioid receptors in cultured interstitial cells of Cajal from mouse small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Hyungwoo; Jung, Myeong Ho; Kwon, Young Kyu; Kim, Byung Joo

    2016-10-01

    Berberine is traditionally used to treat gastrointestinal (GI) motility disorders. The interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) are the pacemaker cells of the gastrointestinal tract, which are responsible for the production of gut movements. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of berberine on pacemaker potentials (PPs) in cultured ICC clusters from the mouse small intestine, and sought to identify the receptors involved and the underlying mechanisms of action. All experiments were performed on cultured ICCs, and a whole‑cell patch‑clamp configuration was used to record PPs from ICC clusters (current clamp mode). Under current clamp mode, berberine was shown to decrease the amplitude and frequency of PPs. However, these effects were suppressed by treatment with glibenclamide, a specific ATP‑sensitive K+ channel blocker. Nor‑binaltorphimine dihydrochloride (a kappa opioid receptor antagonist) did not suppress berberine‑induced PP inhibition, whereas ICI 174,864 (a delta opioid receptor antagonist) and CTOP (a mu opioid receptor antagonist) did suppress the inhibitory effects of berberine. Pretreatment with SQ‑22536 (an adenylate cyclase inhibitor) or with KT‑5720 (a protein kinase A inhibitor) did not suppress the effects of berberine; however, pretreatment with 1H‑[1,2,4] oxadiazolo [4,3‑a] quinoxalin‑1‑one (a guanylate cyclase inhibitor) or KT‑5823 [a protein kinase G (PKG) inhibitor] did. In addition, berberine stimulated cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) production in ICCs. These observations indicate that berberine may inhibit the pacemaker activity of ICC clusters via ATP‑sensitive K+ channels and the cGMP‑PKG‑dependent pathway by stimulating mu and delta opioid receptors. Therefore, berberine may provide a basis for the development of novel agents for the treatment of GI motility dysfunction. PMID:27601272

  13. Prevalence of X-chromatin in Jordanian women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was conducted to evaluate the distribution of X-chromatin among Jordanian women at different age groups. Results will be compared with other studies for possible racial and environmental effects on X-chromatin distribution. Blood samples were drawn from all women subjected to this study by finger prick and stained with Wright's stain. X-chromatin positive polymorphonuclear cells were counted and corrected for percentage. Samples were taken during the late 2002 and early 2003 from healthy women attending routine checkup in health centers in Northern Jordan. The number of X-chromatin was highest in the 50 and above years age group. The number of X-chromatin was 14-18% in other age groups. These results were in accordance with other studies. It seems that racial and environmental factors are ineffective on distribution of X-chromatin in Jordanian women. These data could be used as as reference for further studies. (author)

  14. A role for chromatin topology in imprinted domain regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, William A; Sachani, Saqib S; White, Carlee R; Mann, Mellissa R W

    2016-02-01

    Recently, many advancements in genome-wide chromatin topology and nuclear architecture have unveiled the complex and hidden world of the nucleus, where chromatin is organized into discrete neighbourhoods with coordinated gene expression. This includes the active and inactive X chromosomes. Using X chromosome inactivation as a working model, we utilized publicly available datasets together with a literature review to gain insight into topologically associated domains, lamin-associated domains, nucleolar-associating domains, scaffold/matrix attachment regions, and nucleoporin-associated chromatin and their role in regulating monoallelic expression. Furthermore, we comprehensively review for the first time the role of chromatin topology and nuclear architecture in the regulation of genomic imprinting. We propose that chromatin topology and nuclear architecture are important regulatory mechanisms for directing gene expression within imprinted domains. Furthermore, we predict that dynamic changes in chromatin topology and nuclear architecture play roles in tissue-specific imprint domain regulation during early development and differentiation.

  15. Inverstigation of chromatin folding patterns by atomic force microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGYi; OUYANGZhenqian; 等

    1999-01-01

    The chromatin folding patterns in air and liquid were studied by atomic force microscopy(AFM),A gentle water-air interface method was adopted to spread chromatin from interphase nucleus of chicken erythrocyte.The chromatin was absorbed on APS-mica surface and studied with AFM,Beads-on a-string were observed and many higher-order structrues such as superbeads with dimensions 40-60nm in diameter and 4-7nm in height were found to string together to make chromation fibers.When sample spreading and absorbing time were shortened.higher-order chromatin fibers with 60-120nm in width were observed in air as well as under water environment.These chromatin structures may reflect chromatin folding patterns in the living cells.

  16. Extracellular ATP activates MAPK and ROS signaling during injury response in the fungus Trichoderma atroviride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth eMedina-Castellanos

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The response to mechanical damage is crucial for the survival of multicellular organisms, enabling their adaptation to hostile environments. Trichoderma atroviride, a filamentous fungus of great importance in the biological control of plant diseases, responds to mechanical damage by activating regenerative processes and asexual reproduction (conidiation. During this response, reactive oxygen species (ROS are produced by the NADPH oxidase (Nox1/NoxR complex. To understand the underlying early signaling events, we evaluated molecules such as extracellular ATP (eATP and Ca2+ that are known to trigger wound-induced responses in plants and animals. Concretely, we investigated the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathways by eATP, Ca2+ and ROS. Indeed, application of exogenous ATP and Ca2+ triggered conidiation. Furthermore, eATP promoted the Nox1-dependent production of ROS and activated a MAPK pathway. Mutants in the MAPK-encoding genes tmk1 and tmk3 were affected in wound-induced conidiation, and phosphorylation of both Tmk1 and Tmk3 was triggered by eATP. We conclude that in this fungus, eATP acts as a damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP. Our data indicate the existence of an eATP receptor and suggest that in fungi, eATP triggers pathways that converge to regulate asexual reproduction genes that are required for injury-induced conidiation. By contrast, Ca2+ is more likely to act as a downstream second messenger. The early steps of mechanical damage response in T. atroviride share conserved elements with those known from plants and animals.

  17. Long Noncoding RNAs, Chromatin, and Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P. Caley

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The way in which the genome of a multicellular organism can orchestrate the differentiation of trillions of cells and many organs, all from a single fertilized egg, is the subject of intense study. Different cell types can be defined by the networks of genes they express. This differential expression is regulated at the epigenetic level by chromatin modifications, such as DNA and histone methylation, which interact with structural and enzymatic proteins, resulting in the activation or silencing of any given gene. While detailed mechanisms are emerging on the role of different chromatin modifications and how these functions are effected at the molecular level, it is still unclear how their deposition across the epigenomic landscape is regulated in different cells. A raft of recent evidence is accumulating that implicates long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs in these processes. Most genomes studied to date undergo widespread transcription, the majority of which is not translated into proteins. In this review, we will describe recent work suggesting that lncRNAs are more than transcriptional "noise", but instead play a functional role by acting as tethers and guides to bind proteins responsible for modifying chromatin and mediating their deposition at specific genomic locations. We suggest that lncRNAs are at the heart of developmental regulation, determining the epigenetic status and transcriptional network in any given cell type, and that they provide a means to integrate external differentiation cues with dynamic nuclear responses through the regulation of a metastable epigenome. Better characterization of the lncRNA-protein "interactome" may eventually lead to a new molecular toolkit, allowing researchers and clinicians to modulate the genome at the epigenetic level to treat conditions such as cancer.

  18. Chromatin remodeling regulated by steroid and nuclear receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    Coactivators and corepressors regulate transcription by controlling interactions between sequence-specific transcription factors,the basal transcriptional machinery and the chromatin environment,This review consider the access of nuclear and steroid receptors to chromatin,their use of corepressors and coactivators to modify chromatin structure and the implications for transcriptional control.The assembly of specific nucleoprotein architectures and targeted histone modification emerge as central controlling elements for gene expression.

  19. Combinatorial epigenetic patterns as quantitative predictors of chromatin biology

    OpenAIRE

    Cieślik, Marcin; Bekiranov, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Background Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing (ChIP-seq) is the most widely used method for characterizing the epigenetic states of chromatin on a genomic scale. With the recent availability of large genome-wide data sets, often comprising several epigenetic marks, novel approaches are required to explore functionally relevant interactions between histone modifications. Computational discovery of "chromatin states" defined by such combinatorial interactions enabled desc...

  20. Hydrogen peroxide mediates higher order chromatin degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, H; Konat, G W

    2003-01-01

    Although a large body of evidence supports a causative link between oxidative stress and neurodegeneration, the mechanisms are still elusive. We have recently demonstrated that hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), the major mediator of oxidative stress triggers higher order chromatin degradation (HOCD), i.e. excision of chromatin loops at the matrix attachment regions (MARs). The present study was designed to determine the specificity of H(2)O(2) in respect to HOCD induction. Rat glioma C6 cells were exposed to H(2)O(2) and other oxidants, and the fragmentation of genomic DNA was assessed by field inversion gel electrophoresis (FIGE). S1 digestion before FIGE was used to detect single strand fragmentation. The exposure of C6 cells to H(2)O(2) induced a rapid and extensive HOCD. Thus, within 30 min, total chromatin was single strandedly digested into 50 kb fragments. Evident HOCD was elicited by H(2)O(2) at concentrations as low as 5 micro M. HOCD was mostly reversible during 4-8h following the removal of H(2)O(2) from the medium indicating an efficient relegation of the chromatin fragments. No HOCD was induced by H(2)O(2) in isolated nuclei indicating that HOCD-endonuclease is activated indirectly by cytoplasmic signal pathways triggered by H(2)O(2). The exposure of cells to a synthetic peroxide, i.e. tert-butyrylhydroperoxide (tBH) also induced HOCD, but to a lesser extent than H(2)O(2). Contrary to the peroxides, the exposure of cells to equitoxic concentration of hypochlorite and spermine NONOate, a nitric oxide generator, failed to induce rapid HOCD. These results indicate that rapid HOCD is not a result of oxidative stress per se, but is rather triggered by signaling cascades initiated specifically by H(2)O(2). Furthermore, the rapid and extensive HOCD was observed in several rat and human cell lines challenged with H(2)O(2), indicating that the process is not restricted to glial cells, but rather represents a general response of cells to H(2)O(2). PMID:12421592

  1. [Effect of exogenously administered ATP on heart function and energy status].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernikov, V S; Darbinian, T M; Bakuleva, N P

    1993-01-01

    It has been shown that ATP (24.10(-6) M) administered once into the circulating solution improved strength and speed characteristics of aerobically perfused hearts. The increasing demands of the hearts in oxygen and energy substrates were satisfied due to coronary vessels dilatation without harming the energy status of the myocardium. When the functional parameters of the hearts in the test and control groups did not differ, an exogenously administered ATP was included into the energy metabolism and increased considerably ATP and CP tissue levels, the sum of high-energy phosphates and ATP/ADP ratio. Artificial supplementation of tissue energy resources was accompanied by a decrease in energy-dependent end-diastolic pressure and diastolic left ventricular elasticity and by increased extensibility of the heart muscle, which may improve functional parameters. PMID:8185075

  2. Detection of microbial contaminations in drinking water using ATP measurements – evaluating potential for online monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vang, Óluva Karin; Corfitzen, Charlotte B.; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2011-01-01

    of reagent kit. Surface water diluted 100-1000 times was detected in drinking water with ATP measurements. ATP has the potential as an early warning tool, especially in the period when the contamination concentration is high. 2011 © American Water Works Association AWWA WQTC Conference Proceedings All Rights......There is an increasing call for fast and reliable methods for continuous monitoring of microbial drinking water quality in order to protect public health. The potential for Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) measurements as a real-time analysis for continuous monitoring of microbial drinking water...... quality was investigated through simulation of two contamination scenarios, i.e. drinking water contaminated with waste water and surface water at various concentrations. With ATP measurements it was possible to detect waste water diluted 1000-10,000 times in drinking water depending on sensitivity...

  3. Asymmetry of rotational catalysis of single membrane-bound F0F1-ATP synthase

    CERN Document Server

    Zarrabi, Nawid; Diez, Manuel; Graeber, Peter; Wrachtrup, Joerg; Boersch, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Synthesis of the cellular 'energy currency' ATP is catalyzed by membrane-bound F0F1-ATP synthases. The chemical reaction at three binding sites in the F1 part is coupled to proton translocation through the membrane-integrated F0 part by an internal rotation of subunits. We examined the rotary movements of the epsilon-subunit of the 'rotor' with respect to the b-subunits of the 'stator' by single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Rotation of epsilon during ATP hydrolysis is divided into three major steps with constant FRET level corresponding to three binding sites. Different catalytic activities of the individual binding sites were observed depending on the relative orientation of the 'rotor'. Computer simulations of the FRET signals and non-equally distributed orientations of epsilon strongly corroborate asymmetry of catalysis in F0F1-ATP synthase.

  4. Genome-wide Association of Yorkie with Chromatin and Chromatin-Remodeling Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyangyee Oh

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The Hippo pathway regulates growth through the transcriptional coactivator Yorkie, but how Yorkie promotes transcription remains poorly understood. We address this by characterizing Yorkie’s association with chromatin and by identifying nuclear partners that effect transcriptional activation. Coimmunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry identify GAGA factor (GAF, the Brahma complex, and the Mediator complex as Yorkie-associated nuclear protein complexes. All three are required for Yorkie’s transcriptional activation of downstream genes, and GAF and the Brahma complex subunit Moira interact directly with Yorkie. Genome-wide chromatin-binding experiments identify thousands of Yorkie sites, most of which are associated with elevated transcription, based on genome-wide analysis of messenger RNA and histone H3K4Me3 modification. Chromatin binding also supports extensive functional overlap between Yorkie and GAF. Our studies suggest a widespread role for Yorkie as a regulator of transcription and identify recruitment of the chromatin-modifying GAF protein and BRM complex as a molecular mechanism for transcriptional activation by Yorkie.

  5. Isolation of In Vivo SUMOylated Chromatin-Bound Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bawa-Khalfe, Tasneem

    2016-01-01

    SUMO posttranslational modification directs gene transcription and epigenetic programming to support normal cell function. The dynamic nature of SUMO-modification makes it difficult to identify endogenous protein substrates. Isolation of chromatin-bound SUMO targets is exceptionally challenging, as conventional immunoprecipitation assays are inefficient at concentrating this protein population. This chapter describes a protocol that effectively precipitates chromatin-associated fractions of SUMOylated heterochromatin protein 1α in cultured cells. Techniques to enrich endogenous SUMO substrates at the chromatin are also demonstrated and discussed. This approach could be adapted to evaluate chromatin-bound SUMO targets in additional in vivo systems. PMID:27631808

  6. Androgen receptor serine 81 phosphorylation mediates chromatin binding and transcriptional activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shaoyong; Gulla, Sarah; Cai, Changmeng; Balk, Steven P

    2012-03-01

    Our previous findings indicated that androgen receptor (AR) phosphorylation at serine 81 is stimulated by the mitotic cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1). In this report, we extended our previous study and confirmed that Ser-81 phosphorylation increases during mitosis, coincident with CDK1 activation. We further showed blocking cell cycle at G(1) or S phase did not disrupt androgen-induced Ser-81 phosphorylation and AR-dependent transcription, consistent with a recent report that AR was phosphorylated at Ser-81 and activated by the transcriptional CDK9. To assess the function of Ser-81 phosphorylation in prostate cancer (PCa) cells expressing endogenous AR, we developed a ligand switch strategy using a ligand-binding domain mutation (W741C) that renders AR responsive to the antagonist bicalutamide. An S81A/W741C double mutant AR stably expressed in PCa cells failed to transactivate the endogenous AR-regulated PSA or TMPRSS2 genes. ChIP showed that the S81A mutation prevented ligand-induced AR recruitment to these genes, and cellular fractionation revealed that the S81A mutation globally abrogated chromatin binding. Conversely, the AR fraction rapidly recruited to chromatin after androgen stimulation was highly enriched for Ser-81 phosphorylation. Finally, inhibition of CDK1 and CDK9 decreased AR Ser-81 phosphorylation, chromatin binding, and transcriptional activity. These findings indicate that Ser-81 phosphorylation by CDK9 stabilizes AR chromatin binding for transcription and suggest that CDK1-mediated Ser-81 phosphorylation during mitosis provides a pool of Ser-81 phosphorylation AR that can be readily recruited to chromatin for gene reactivation and may enhance AR activity in PCa.

  7. Changes in ATP Content, Hexokinase Activity, and Glucose Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. I. Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast tumours responding to chemotherapy exhibit decreased [18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([18F]FDG incorporation. Underlying mechanisms of these changes is poorly understood. Here, in MCF-7 cells, responding to chemotherapy drugs commonly utilised in the treatment of breast cancer, [18F]FDG incorporation and several pivotal factors associated with [18F]FDG incorporation investigated. Methods. IC50 and subclinical doxorubicin, docetaxel, and tamoxifen doses determined using MTT assay. [18F]FDG incorporation by cells treated with IC50 drug doses for 48 hours and 72 hours were determined and FDG dephosphorylation estimated by measuring loss of 18F from [18F]FDG-preincubated cells (pulse-chase. Glucose transport determined by measuring initial uptake rate of non-metabolised glucose analogue omethylglucose; hexokinase activity and ATP content measured in cell homogenates; Cell cycle distribution determined using flow cytometry of propidium iodide stained nuclei. Results. [18F]FDG incorporation and ATP content decreased in cells after 72 hours treatment with IC50 doses of tamoxifen, doxorubicin, and docetaxel compared with untreated controls. Decreased glucose transport and/or hexokinase activity accompanied decreased [18F]FDG incorporation by MCF-7 cells treated with tamoxifen or doxorubicin but not docetaxel. Conclusions. Tumour cell [18F]FDG incorporation along with ATP content decreased by treatment with tamoxifen, doxorubicin and docetaxel paralleling clinical observations for solid tumours. Effect of each treatment on glucose transport and hexokinase activity was chemotherapy-drug dependent.

  8. Human ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasiliou Vasilis

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There exist four fundamentally different classes of membrane-bound transport proteins: ion channels; transporters; aquaporins; and ATP-powered pumps. ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters are an example of ATP-dependent pumps. ABC transporters are ubiquitous membrane-bound proteins, present in all prokaryotes, as well as plants, fungi, yeast and animals. These pumps can move substrates in (influx or out (efflux of cells. In mammals, ABC transporters are expressed predominantly in the liver, intestine, blood-brain barrier, blood-testis barrier, placenta and kidney. ABC proteins transport a number of endogenous substrates, including inorganic anions, metal ions, peptides, amino acids, sugars and a large number of hydrophobic compounds and metabolites across the plasma membrane, and also across intracellular membranes. The human genome contains 49 ABC genes, arranged in eight subfamilies and named via divergent evolution. That ABC genes are important is underscored by the fact that mutations in at least I I of these genes are already known to cause severe inherited diseases (eg cystic fibrosis and X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy [X-ALD]. ABC transporters also participate in the movement of most drugs and their metabolites across cell surface and cellular organelle membranes; thus, defects in these genes can be important in terms of cancer therapy, pharmacokinetics and innumerable pharmacogenetic disorders.

  9. UTP-induced ATP release is a fine-tuned signalling pathway in osteocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kringelbach, Tina M; Aslan, Derya; Novak, Ivana; Schwarz, Peter; Jørgensen, Niklas R

    2014-01-01

    Osteocytes reside as a cellular network throughout the mineralised matrix of bone and are considered the primary mechanosensors of this tissue. They sense mechanical stimulation such as fluid flow and are able to regulate osteoblast and osteoclast functions on the bone surface. Previously, we found that ATP is released load-dependently from osteocytes from the onset of mechanical stimulation. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate whether and how ATP release can be evoked in osteocytes via purinergic receptor activation. ATP release was quantified by real-time determination using the luciferin-luciferase assay and the release pathway was investigated using pharmacological inhibition. The P2Y receptor profile was analysed using gene expression analysis by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, while functional testing was performed using measurements of intracellular calcium responses to P2 receptor agonists. These investigations demonstrated that MLO-Y4 osteocytes express functional P2Y(2), P2Y(4), P2Y(12) and P2Y(13) receptors in addition to the previously reported P2X receptors. Further, we found that osteocytes respond to nucleotides such as ATP, UTP and ADP by increasing the intracellular calcium concentration and that they release ATP dose-dependently upon stimulation with 1-10 μM UTP. In addition to this, osteocytes release large amounts of ATP upon cell rupture, which might also be a source for other nucleotides, such as UTP. These findings indicate that mechanically induced ATP signals may be propagated by P2 receptor activation and further ATP release in the osteocyte network and implicate purinergic signalling as a central signalling pathway in osteocyte mechanotransduction. PMID:24374572

  10. CrATP as a new inhibitor of ecto-ATPases of trypanosomatids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, O C; Rios, P F; Esteves, F F; Meyer-Fernandes, J R; Barrabin, H

    2009-01-01

    Trypanosomatid protozoa include heteroxenic species some of them pathogenic for men, animals and plants. Parasite membrane contains ecto-enzymes whose active sites face the external medium rather than the cytoplasm. Herpetomonas sp. displayed a Mg2+-dependent ecto-ATPase activity, a Mg-independent ecto-ADPase and an ecto-phosphatase activity. Both, the ecto-ADPase and phosphatase activities were insensitive to CrATP (chromium(III) adenosine 5'-triphosphate complex). Ecto-ATPase activity was reversibly inhibited. At 2 mm ATP the apparent Ki was 4 x 7+/-1 x 0 microm but a fraction of about 40-50% was insensitive to CrATP. Remarkably, at low substrate concentration (0 x 2 mm) more than 90% of the ecto-ATPase was inhibited with Ki=0 x 33+/-0 x 10 microm. These parameter dependences are interpreted as the presence of 2 ecto-ATPases activities, one of them with high ATP apparent affinity and sensitivity to CrATP. DIDS (4,4 diisothiocyanatostilbene 2,2' disulfonic acid), suramin and ADP were also effective as inhibitors. Only ADP presented no additive inhibition with CrATP. The pattern of partial inhibition by CrATP was also observed for the ecto-ATPase activities of Leishmania amazonensis, Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma rangeli. CrATP emerges as a new inhibitor of ecto-ATPases and as a tool for a better understanding of properties and role of ecto-ATPases in the biology of parasites. PMID:19126268

  11. Noncoding transcription by alternative rna polymerases dynamically regulates an auxin-driven chromatin loop

    KAUST Repository

    Ariel, Federico D.

    2014-08-01

    The eukaryotic epigenome is shaped by the genome topology in three-dimensional space. Dynamic reversible variations in this epigenome structure directly influence the transcriptional responses to developmental cues. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis long intergenic noncoding RNA (lincRNA) APOLO is transcribed by RNA polymerases II and V in response to auxin, a phytohormone controlling numerous facets of plant development. This dual APOLO transcription regulates the formation of a chromatin loop encompassing the promoter of its neighboring gene PID, a key regulator of polar auxin transport. Altering APOLO expression affects chromatin loop formation, whereas RNA-dependent DNA methylation, active DNA demethylation, and Polycomb complexes control loop dynamics. This dynamic chromatin topology determines PID expression patterns. Hence, the dual transcription of a lincRNA influences local chromatin topology and directs dynamic auxin-controlled developmental outputs on neighboring genes. This mechanism likely underscores the adaptive success of plants in diverse environments and may be widespread in eukaryotes. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.

  12. At the intersection of non-coding transcription, DNA repair, chromatin structure, and cellular senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryosuke eOhsawa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available It is well accepted that non-coding RNAs play a critical role in regulating gene expression. Recent paradigm-setting studies are now revealing that non-coding RNAs, other than microRNAs, also play intriguing roles in the maintenance of chromatin structure, in the DNA damage response, and in adult human stem cell aging. In this review, we will discuss the complex inter-dependent relationships among non-coding RNA transcription, maintenance of genomic stability, chromatin structure and adult stem cell senescence. DNA damage-induced non-coding RNAs transcribed in the vicinity of the DNA break regulate recruitment of the DNA damage machinery and DNA repair efficiency. We will discuss the correlation between non-coding RNAs and DNA damage repair efficiency and the potential role of changing chromatin structures around double-strand break sites. On the other hand, induction of non-coding RNA transcription from the repetitive Alu elements occurs during human stem cell aging and hinders efficient DNA repair causing entry into senescence. We will discuss how this fine balance between transcription and genomic instability may be regulated by the dramatic changes to chromatin structure that accompany cellular senescence.

  13. A polycomb group protein is retained at specific sites on chromatin in mitosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole E Follmer

    Full Text Available Epigenetic regulation of gene expression, including by Polycomb Group (PcG proteins, may depend on heritable chromatin states, but how these states can be propagated through mitosis is unclear. Using immunofluorescence and biochemical fractionation, we find PcG proteins associated with mitotic chromosomes in Drosophila S2 cells. Genome-wide sequencing of chromatin immunoprecipitations (ChIP-SEQ from mitotic cells indicates that Posterior Sex Combs (PSC is not present at well-characterized PcG targets including Hox genes in mitosis, but does remain at a subset of interphase sites. Many of these persistent sites overlap with chromatin domain borders described by Sexton et al. (2012, which are genomic regions characterized by low levels of long range contacts. Persistent PSC binding sites flank both Hox gene clusters. We hypothesize that disruption of long-range chromatin contacts in mitosis contributes to PcG protein release from most sites, while persistent binding at sites with minimal long-range contacts may nucleate re-establishment of PcG binding and chromosome organization after mitosis.

  14. SWI/SNF-like chromatin remodeling factor Fun30 supports point centromere function in S. cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mickaël Durand-Dubief

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Budding yeast centromeres are sequence-defined point centromeres and are, unlike in many other organisms, not embedded in heterochromatin. Here we show that Fun30, a poorly understood SWI/SNF-like chromatin remodeling factor conserved in humans, promotes point centromere function through the formation of correct chromatin architecture at centromeres. Our determination of the genome-wide binding and nucleosome positioning properties of Fun30 shows that this enzyme is consistently enriched over centromeres and that a majority of CENs show Fun30-dependent changes in flanking nucleosome position and/or CEN core micrococcal nuclease accessibility. Fun30 deletion leads to defects in histone variant Htz1 occupancy genome-wide, including at and around most centromeres. FUN30 genetically interacts with CSE4, coding for the centromere-specific variant of histone H3, and counteracts the detrimental effect of transcription through centromeres on chromosome segregation and suppresses transcriptional noise over centromere CEN3. Previous work has shown a requirement for fission yeast and mammalian homologs of Fun30 in heterochromatin assembly. As centromeres in budding yeast are not embedded in heterochromatin, our findings indicate a direct role of Fun30 in centromere chromatin by promoting correct chromatin architecture.

  15. ATP as a signaling molecule: the exocrine focus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, Ivana

    2003-01-01

    Why and how do cells release ATP? It is not spilled energy. ATP becomes an extracellular regulator. Various cellular responses are initiated by purinergic receptors and signaling processes and are terminated by breakdown of ATP by ectonucleotidases. In epithelia, ATP regulates salt and water tran...... transport; other effects may be longer lasting....

  16. Duchenne muscular dystrophy: normal ATP turnover in cultured cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examines ATP metabolism in cultured muscle cells and fibroblasts from patients with Duchenne dystrophy. ATP and ADP levels were the same in cultured cells from normal subjects and patients and there was no difference in ATP synthesis or degradation. The ATP synthesis was measured by the incorporation of C 14-U-adenine into aTP and ADP. although there was a significant decrease in radioactively labelled ATP after incubation with deoxyglucose in Duchenne muscle cells, there was no difference in ATP concentration of ADP metabolism

  17. Compartmentalized ATP synthesis in skeletal muscle triads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, J W; Thieleczek, R; Varsányi, M; Heilmeyer, L M

    1992-01-21

    Isolated skeletal muscle triads contain a compartmentalized glycolytic reaction sequence catalyzed by aldolase, triosephosphate isomerase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and phosphoglycerate kinase. These enzymes express activity in the structure-associated state leading to synthesis of ATP in the triadic junction upon supply of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate or fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. ATP formation occurs transiently and appears to be kinetically compartmentalized, i.e., the synthesized ATP is not in equilibrium with the bulk ATP. The apparent rate constants of the aldolase and the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase/phosphoglycerate kinase reaction are significantly increased when fructose 1,6-bisphosphate instead of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate is employed as substrate. The observations suggest that fructose 1,6-bisphosphate is especially effectively channelled into the junctional gap. The amplitude of the ATP transient is decreasing with increasing free [Ca2+] in the range of 1 nM to 30 microM. In the presence of fluoride, the ATP transient is significantly enhanced and its declining phase is substantially retarded. This observation suggests utilization of endogenously synthesized ATP in part by structure associated protein kinases and phosphatases which is confirmed by the detection of phosphorylated triadic proteins after gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Endogenous protein kinases phosphorylate proteins of apparent Mr 450,000, 180,000, 160,000, 145,000, 135,000, 90,000, 54,000, 51,000, and 20,000, respectively. Some of these phosphorylated polypeptides are in the Mr range of known phosphoproteins involved in excitation-contraction coupling of skeletal muscle, which might give a first hint at the functional importance of the sequential glycolytic reactions compartmentalized in triads. PMID:1731894

  18. A chromatin insulator driving three-dimensional Polycomb response element (PRE) contacts and Polycomb association with the chromatin fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Comet, Itys; Schuettengruber, Bernd; Sexton, Tom;

    2011-01-01

    to insulate genes from regulatory elements or to take part in long-distance interactions. Using a high-resolution chromatin conformation capture (H3C) method, we show that the Drosophila gypsy insulator behaves as a conformational chromatin border that is able to prohibit contacts between a Polycomb response...... element (PRE) and a distal promoter. On the other hand, two spaced gypsy elements form a chromatin loop that is able to bring an upstream PRE in contact with a downstream gene to mediate its repression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) profiles of the Polycomb protein and its associated H3K27me3...

  19. Dynamic imaging of free cytosolic ATP concentration during fuel sensing by rat hypothalamic neurones: evidence for ATP-independent control of ATP-sensitive K(+) channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainscow, Edward K; Mirshamsi, Shirin; Tang, Teresa; Ashford, Michael L J; Rutter, Guy A

    2002-10-15

    Glucose-responsive (GR) neurons from hypothalamic nuclei are implicated in the regulation of feeding and satiety. To determine the role of intracellular ATP in the closure of ATP-sensitive K(+) (K(ATP)) channels in these cells and associated glia, the cytosolic ATP concentration ([ATP](c)) was monitored in vivo using adenoviral-driven expression of recombinant targeted luciferases and bioluminescence imaging. Arguing against a role for ATP in the closure of K(ATP) channels in GR neurons, glucose (3 or 15 mM) caused no detectable increase in [ATP](c), monitored with cytosolic luciferase, and only a small decrease in the concentration of ATP immediately beneath the plasma membrane, monitored with a SNAP25-luciferase fusion protein. In contrast to hypothalamic neurons, hypothalamic glia responded to glucose (3 and 15 mM) with a significant increase in [ATP](c). Both neurons and glia from the cerebellum, a glucose-unresponsive region of the brain, responded robustly to 3 or 15 mM glucose with increases in [ATP](c). Further implicating an ATP-independent mechanism of K(ATP) channel closure in hypothalamic neurons, removal of extracellular glucose (10 mM) suppressed the electrical activity of GR neurons in the presence of a fixed, high concentration (3 mM) of intracellular ATP. Neurons from both brain regions responded to 5 mM lactate (but not pyruvate) with an oligomycin-sensitive increase in [ATP](c). High levels of the plasma membrane lactate-monocarboxylate transporter, MCT1, were found in both cell types, and exogenous lactate efficiently closed K(ATP) channels in GR neurons. These data suggest that (1) ATP-independent intracellular signalling mechanisms lead to the stimulation of hypothalamic neurons by glucose, and (2) these effects may be potentiated in vivo by the release of lactate from neighbouring glial cells.

  20. Clusterin and COMMD1 Independently Regulate Degradation of the Mammalian Copper ATPases ATP7A and ATP7B

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Materia, Stephanie; Cater, Michael A.; Klomp, Leo W. J.; Mercer, Julian F. B.; La Fontaine, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    ATP7A and ATP7B are copper-transporting P-1B-type ATPases (Cu-ATPases) that are critical for regulating intracellular copper homeostasis. Mutations in the genes encoding ATP7A and ATP7B lead to copper deficiency and copper toxicity disorders, Menkes and Wilson diseases, respectively. Clusterin and C

  1. Release of endogenous ATP during sympathetic nerve stimulation.

    OpenAIRE

    Lew, M. J.; White, T. D.

    1987-01-01

    1 Vas deferens from guinea-pig was stimulated with a suction electrode and both contractions and release of endogenous ATP monitored 2 Release of ATP was tetrodotoxin-sensitive and increased when the number of stimuli was increased. 3 Release of ATP was not due to contraction of the muscle and persisted following block of contractions with prazosin and alpha, beta-methylene ATP. 4 These results indicate that stimulation of the sympathetic nerves in the vas deferens releases endogenous ATP pre...

  2. ATP-consuming and ATP-generating enzymes secreted by pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yegutkin, Gennady G; Samburski, Sergei S; Jalkanen, Sirpa;

    2006-01-01

    Pancreatic acini release ATP in response to various stimuli, including cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8), as we show in the present study. There were indications that pancreatic juice also contains enzymes that could hydrolyze ATP during its passage through the ductal system. The aim of this st......Pancreatic acini release ATP in response to various stimuli, including cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8), as we show in the present study. There were indications that pancreatic juice also contains enzymes that could hydrolyze ATP during its passage through the ductal system. The aim...... of this study was to determine which ATP-degrading and possibly ATP-generating enzymes were present in pancreatic secretion. For this purpose, pancreatic juice was collected from anesthetized rats stimulated with infusion of CCK-8. Purine-converting activities in juice samples were assayed by TLC using either...... [gamma-(32)P]ATP or (14)C/(3)H-labeled and unlabeled nucleotides as appropriate substrates. Data show that the juice contains the enzyme ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase that can hydrolyze both [(14)C]ATP and [(3)H]ADP about equally well, i.e. CD39. Reverse-phase high-performance liquid...

  3. Clinical relevance of ATP-dependent potassium channels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligtenberg, JJM; vanHaeften, TW; Links, TP; Smit, AJ

    1995-01-01

    Many cells are equipped with so-called potassium (K+) channels which have an important role in maintaining transmembrane potential. Closure of these channels leads to membrane depolarization, which can be followed by cell-specific activity such as contraction of vascular smooth muscle, or secretion

  4. Analysis of Chromatin Attachment and Partitioning Functions of Bovine Papillomavirus Type 1 E2 Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Abroi, Aare; Ilves, Ivar; Kivi, Sirje; Ustav, Mart

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the tethering of viral genomes to host cell chromosomes could provide one of the ways to achieve their nuclear retention and partitioning during extrachromosomal maintenance in dividing cells. The data we present here provide firm evidence that the partitioning of the bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV1) genome is dependent on the chromatin attachment process mediated by viral E2 protein and its multiple binding sites. On the other hand, the attachment of E2 ...

  5. Detection of ATP hydrolysis through motion of nanoconfined DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roushan, Maedeh; Livshits, Gideon; Azad, Zubair; Wang, Hong; Riehn, Robert

    Confinement of DNA to nanochannels with a cross-section of 100 ×100 nm2 and hundreds of micrometer long has previously been used to investigate the equilibrium binding properties of proteins to DNA. Here we report on the observation that a range of proteins which catalyze a modification of DNA, and that do so by hydrolyzing ATP, cause a net directed motion of nanochannel-confined DNA. We present a model for this observation that does not require any motor-like action of the protein and that is purely dependent on the catalytic properties.

  6. Lessons from Anaplasma phagocytophilum: Chromatin Remodeling by Bacterial Effectors

    OpenAIRE

    Rennoll-Bankert, Kristen E.; Dumler, J. Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens can alter global host gene expression via histone modifications and chromatin remodeling in order to subvert host responses, including those involved with innate immunity, allowing for bacterial survival. Shigella flexneri, Listeria monocytogenes, Chlamydia trachomatis, and Anaplasma phagocytophilum express effector proteins that modify host histones and chromatin structure. A. phagocytophilum modulates granulocyte respiratory burst in part by dampening transcription of se...

  7. Analysis of chromatin integrity and DNA damage of buffalo spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, K Gh M; El-Sokary, A A E; Abdel-Ghaffar, A E; Abou El-Roos, M E A; Ahmed, Y F

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine chromatin integrity and DNA damage by DNA electrophoresis and comet assays of buffalo fresh and frozen semen. Semen samples were collected from four buffalo bulls and evaluated after freezing for semen motility, viability, sperm abnormalities, chromatin integrity and DNA damage. A significant variation was found in semen parameters after thawing. Highly significant differences (Partificial insemination. PMID:27175169

  8. Rapid genome-scale mapping of chromatin accessibility in tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Lars; Bandle, Russell; John, Sam;

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The challenge in extracting genome-wide chromatin features from limiting clinical samples poses a significant hurdle in identification of regulatory marks that impact the physiological or pathological state. Current methods that identify nuclease accessible chromatin are reliant on la...

  9. Chromatin Regulators as a Guide for Cancer Treatment Choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurard-Levin, Zachary A; Wilson, Laurence O W; Pancaldi, Vera; Postel-Vinay, Sophie; Sousa, Fabricio G; Reyes, Cecile; Marangoni, Elisabetta; Gentien, David; Valencia, Alfonso; Pommier, Yves; Cottu, Paul; Almouzni, Geneviève

    2016-07-01

    The limited capacity to predict a patient's response to distinct chemotherapeutic agents is a major hurdle in cancer management. The efficiency of a large fraction of current cancer therapeutics (radio- and chemotherapies) is influenced by chromatin structure. Reciprocally, alterations in chromatin organization may affect resistance mechanisms. Here, we explore how the misexpression of chromatin regulators-factors involved in the establishment and maintenance of functional chromatin domains-can inform about the extent of docetaxel response. We exploit Affymetrix and NanoString gene expression data for a set of chromatin regulators generated from breast cancer patient-derived xenograft models and patient samples treated with docetaxel. Random Forest classification reveals specific panels of chromatin regulators, including key components of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeler, which readily distinguish docetaxel high-responders and poor-responders. Further exploration of SWI/SNF components in the comprehensive NCI-60 dataset reveals that the expression inversely correlates with docetaxel sensitivity. Finally, we show that loss of the SWI/SNF subunit BRG1 (SMARCA4) in a model cell line leads to enhanced docetaxel sensitivity. Altogether, our findings point toward chromatin regulators as biomarkers for drug response as well as therapeutic targets to sensitize patients toward docetaxel and combat drug resistance. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(7); 1768-77. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27196757

  10. Chromatin architecture and gene expression in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willenbrock, Hanni; Ussery, David

    2004-01-01

    Two recent genome-scale analyses underscore the importance of DNA topology and chromatin structure in regulating transcription in Escherichia coli.......Two recent genome-scale analyses underscore the importance of DNA topology and chromatin structure in regulating transcription in Escherichia coli....

  11. Histone crosstalk directed by H2B ubiquitination is required for chromatin boundary integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiji Kit-Wan Ma

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Genomic maps of chromatin modifications have provided evidence for the partitioning of genomes into domains of distinct chromatin states, which assist coordinated gene regulation. The maintenance of chromatin domain integrity can require the setting of boundaries. The HS4 insulator element marks the 3' boundary of a heterochromatin region located upstream of the chicken β-globin gene cluster. Here we show that HS4 recruits the E3 ligase RNF20/BRE1A to mediate H2B mono-ubiquitination (H2Bub1 at this insulator. Knockdown experiments show that RNF20 is required for H2Bub1 and processive H3K4 methylation. Depletion of RNF20 results in a collapse of the active histone modification signature at the HS4 chromatin boundary, where H2Bub1, H3K4 methylation, and hyperacetylation of H3, H4, and H2A.Z are rapidly lost. A remarkably similar set of events occurs at the HSA/HSB regulatory elements of the FOLR1 gene, which mark the 5' boundary of the same heterochromatin region. We find that persistent H2Bub1 at the HSA/HSB and HS4 elements is required for chromatin boundary integrity. The loss of boundary function leads to the sequential spreading of H3K9me2, H3K9me3, and H4K20me3 over the entire 50 kb FOLR1 and β-globin region and silencing of FOLR1 expression. These findings show that the HSA/HSB and HS4 boundary elements direct a cascade of active histone modifications that defend the FOLR1 and β-globin gene loci from the pervasive encroachment of an adjacent heterochromatin domain. We propose that many gene loci employ H2Bub1-dependent boundaries to prevent heterochromatin spreading.

  12. Spatial and temporal plasticity of chromatin during programmed DNA-reorganization in Stylonychia macronuclear development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Postberg Jan

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: In this study we exploit the unique genome organization of ciliates to characterize the biological function of histone modification patterns and chromatin plasticity for the processing of specific DNA sequences during a nuclear differentiation process. Ciliates are single-cell eukaryotes containing two morphologically and functionally specialized types of nuclei, the somatic macronucleus and the germline micronucleus. In the course of sexual reproduction a new macronucleus develops from a micronuclear derivative. During this process specific DNA sequences are eliminated from the genome, while sequences that will be transcribed in the mature macronucleus are retained. Results: We show by immunofluorescence microscopy, Western analyses and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP experiments that each nuclear type establishes its specific histone modification signature. Our analyses reveal that the early macronuclear anlage adopts a permissive chromatin state immediately after the fusion of two heterochromatic germline micronuclei. As macronuclear development progresses, repressive histone modifications that specify sequences to be eliminated are introduced de novo. ChIP analyses demonstrate that permissive histone modifications are associated with sequences that will be retained in the new macronucleus. Furthermore, our data support the hypothesis that a PIWI-family protein is involved in a transnuclear cross-talk and in the RNAi-dependent control of developmental chromatin reorganization. Conclusion: Based on these data we present a comprehensive analysis of the spatial and temporal pattern of histone modifications during this nuclear differentiation process. Results obtained in this study may also be relevant for our understanding of chromatin plasticity during metazoan embryogenesis.

  13. Real-time imaging of ATP release induced by mechanical stretch in human airway smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahara, Norihiro; Ito, Satoru; Furuya, Kishio; Naruse, Keiji; Aso, Hiromichi; Kondo, Masashi; Sokabe, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2014-12-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells within the airway walls are continually exposed to mechanical stimuli, and exhibit various functions in response to these mechanical stresses. ATP acts as an extracellular mediator in the airway. Moreover, extracellular ATP is considered to play an important role in the pathophysiology of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, it is not known whether ASM cells are cellular sources of ATP secretion in the airway. We therefore investigated whether mechanical stretch induces ATP release from ASM cells. Mechanical stretch was applied to primary human ASM cells cultured on a silicone chamber coated with type I collagen using a stretching apparatus. Concentrations of ATP in cell culture supernatants measured by luciferin-luciferase bioluminescence were significantly elevated by cyclic stretch (12 and 20% strain). We further visualized the stretch-induced ATP release from the cells in real time using a luminescence imaging system, while acquiring differential interference contrast cell images with infrared optics. Immediately after a single uniaxial stretch for 1 second, strong ATP signals were produced by a certain population of cells and spread to surrounding spaces. The cyclic stretch-induced ATP release was significantly reduced by inhibitors of Ca(2+)-dependent vesicular exocytosis, 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid tetraacetoxymethyl ester, monensin, N-ethylmaleimide, and bafilomycin. In contrast, the stretch-induced ATP release was not inhibited by a hemichannel blocker, carbenoxolone, or blockade of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 by short interfering RNA transfection or ruthenium red. These findings reveal a novel property of ASM cells: mechanically induced ATP release may be a cellular source of ATP in the airway. PMID:24885163

  14. Open State Destabilization by Atp Occupancy Is Mechanism Speeding Burst Exit Underlying KATP Channel Inhibition by Atp

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Lehong; Geng, Xuehui; Drain, Peter

    2002-01-01

    The ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel is named after its characteristic inhibition by intracellular ATP. The inhibition is a centerpiece of how the KATP channel sets electrical signaling to the energy state of the cell. In the β cell of the endocrine pancreas, for example, ATP inhibition results from high blood glucose levels and turns on electrical activity leading to insulin release. The underlying gating mechanism (ATP inhibition gating) includes ATP stabilization of closed states, bu...

  15. Mitochondrial ATP synthases cluster as discrete domains that reorganize with the cellular demand for oxidative phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Laure; Laporte, Damien; Duvezin-Caubet, Stephane; Courtout, Fabien; Sagot, Isabelle

    2014-02-15

    Mitochondria are double membrane-bounded organelles that form a dynamic tubular network. Mitochondria energetic functions depend on a complex internal architecture. Cristae, inner membrane invaginations that fold into the matrix space, are proposed to be the site of oxidative phosphorylation, reactions by which ATP synthase produces ATP. ATP synthase is also thought to have a role in crista morphogenesis. To date, the exploration of the processes regulating mitochondrial internal compartmentalization have been mostly limited to electron microscopy. Here, we describe ATP synthase localization in living yeast cells and show that it clusters as discrete inner membrane domains. These domains are dynamic within the mitochondrial network. They are impaired in mutants defective in crista morphology and partially overlap with the crista-associated MICOS-MINOS-MITOS complex. Finally, ATP synthase occupancy increases with the cellular demand for OXPHOS. Overall our data suggest that domains in which ATP synthases are clustered correspond to mitochondrial cristae. Being able to follow mitochondrial sub-compartments in living yeast cells opens new avenues to explore the mechanisms involved in inner membrane remodeling, an architectural feature crucial for mitochondrial activities.

  16. Effects of arachidonic acid on ATP-sensitive K+ current in murine colonic smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Jae Yeoul; Yeum, Cheol Ho; Park, Yoo Whan; Jang, In Youb; Kong, In Deok; Sim, Jae Hoon; So, Insuk; Kim, Ki Whan; You, Ho Jin

    2002-09-01

    The effects of arachidonic acid (AA) and the mechanism through which it modulates ATP-sensitive K+ (K(ATP)) currents were examined in single smooth muscle cells of murine proximal colon. In the current-clamping mode, AA and glibenclamide induced depolarization of membrane potential. Using 0.1 mM ATP and 140 mM K+ solution in the pipette and 90 mM K+ in the bath solution at a -80 mV of holding potential, pinacidil activated the glibenclamide-sensitive inward current. The potential of these currents was reversed to near the equilibrium potential of K+ by 60 mM K+ in the bath solution. AA inhibited K(ATP) currents in a dose-dependent manner. This inhibition was not changed when 1 mM GDPbetaS was present in the pipette. Chelerythrine, protein kinase C inhibitor, did not block the AA effects. Superoxide dismutase and metabolic inhibitors (indomethacin and nordihydroguaiacretic acid) of AA did not affect the AA-induced inhibition. Eicosatetraynoic acid, a nonmetabolizable analogue of AA, inhibited the K(ATP) currents. These results suggest that AA-induced inhibition of K(ATP) currents is not mediated by G-protein or protein kinase C activation. The inhibitory action is likely to be a possible mechanism of AA-induced membrane depolarization. PMID:12396031

  17. ATP Consumption of Eukaryotic Flagella Measured at a Single-Cell Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Daniel T. N.; Heymann, Michael; Fraden, Seth; Nicastro, Daniela; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-12-01

    The motility of cilia and flagella is driven by thousands of dynein motors that hydrolyze adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Despite decades of genetic, biochemical, structural and biophysical studies, some aspects of ciliary motility remain elusive, such as the regulation of beating patterns and the energetic efficiency of these nanomachines. Here, we introduce an experimental method to measure ATP consumption of actively beating axonemes on a single-cell level. We encapsulated individual sea urchin sperm with demembranated flagellum inside water-in-oil emulsion droplets and measured the axonemes ATP consumption by monitoring fluorescence intensity of a fluorophore-coupled reporter system for ATP turnover in the droplet. Concomitant phase contrast imaging allowed us to extract a linear dependence between the ATP consumption rate and the flagellar beating frequency, with ~2.3e5 ATP molecules consumed per beat of a demembranated flagellum. Increasing the viscosity of the aqueous medium led to modified beating waveforms of the axonemes and to higher energy consumption per beat cycle. Our single-cell experimental platform provides both new insights into the beating mechanism of flagella and a powerful tool for future studies.

  18. ATP Consumption of Eukaryotic Flagella Measured at a Single-Cell Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Daniel T N; Heymann, Michael; Fraden, Seth; Nicastro, Daniela; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-12-15

    The motility of cilia and flagella is driven by thousands of dynein motors that hydrolyze adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Despite decades of genetic, biochemical, structural, and biophysical studies, some aspects of ciliary motility remain elusive, such as the regulation of beating patterns and the energetic efficiency of these nanomachines. In this study, we introduce an experimental method to measure ATP consumption of actively beating axonemes on a single-cell level. We encapsulated individual sea urchin sperm with demembranated flagellum inside water-in-oil emulsion droplets and measured the axoneme's ATP consumption by monitoring fluorescence intensity of a fluorophore-coupled reporter system for ATP turnover in the droplet. Concomitant phase contrast imaging allowed us to extract a linear dependence between the ATP consumption rate and the flagellar beating frequency, with ∼2.3 × 10(5) ATP molecules consumed per beat of a demembranated flagellum. Increasing the viscosity of the aqueous medium led to modified beating waveforms of the axonemes and to higher energy consumption per beat cycle. Our single-cell experimental platform provides both new insights, to our knowledge, into the beating mechanism of flagella and a powerful tool for future studies. PMID:26682814

  19. Matching ATP Supply and Demand in Mammalian Heart: In Vivo, In Vitro and In Silico Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaniv, Yael; Juhaszova, Magdalena; Nuss, H. Bradley; Wang, Su; Zorov, Dmitry B.; Lakatta, Edward G.; Sollott, Steven J.

    2010-01-01

    Although the heart rapidly adapts cardiac output to match the body’s circulatory demands, the regulatory mechanisms ensuring that sufficient ATP is available to perform the required cardiac work are not completely understood. Two mechanisms have been suggested to serve as key regulators: (1) ADP and Pi concentrations—ATP utilization/hydrolysis in the cytosol increases ADP and Pi fluxes to mitochondria and hence the amount of available substrates for ATP production increases; and (2) Ca2+ concentration—ATP utilization/hydrolysis is coupled to changes in free cytosolic calcium and mitochondrial calcium, the latter controlling Ca2+-dependent activation of mitochondrial enzymes taking part in ATP production. Here we discuss the evolving perspectives of each of the putative regulatory mechanisms and the precisemolecular targets (dehydrogenase enzymes, ATP synthase) based on existing experimental and theoretical evidence. The data synthesis can generate novel hypotheses and experimental designs to solve the ongoing enigma of energy supply–demand matching in the heart. PMID:20201896

  20. HAMLET interacts with histones and chromatin in tumor cell nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düringer, Caroline; Hamiche, Ali; Gustafsson, Lotta; Kimura, Hiroshi; Svanborg, Catharina

    2003-10-24

    HAMLET is a folding variant of human alpha-lactalbumin in an active complex with oleic acid. HAMLET selectively enters tumor cells, accumulates in their nuclei and induces apoptosis-like cell death. This study examined the interactions of HAMLET with nuclear constituents and identified histones as targets. HAMLET was found to bind histone H3 strongly and to lesser extent histones H4 and H2B. The specificity of these interactions was confirmed using BIAcore technology and chromatin assembly assays. In vivo in tumor cells, HAMLET co-localized with histones and perturbed the chromatin structure; HAMLET was found associated with chromatin in an insoluble nuclear fraction resistant to salt extraction. In vitro, HAMLET bound strongly to histones and impaired their deposition on DNA. We conclude that HAMLET interacts with histones and chromatin in tumor cell nuclei and propose that this interaction locks the cells into the death pathway by irreversibly disrupting chromatin organization.

  1. Genome maintenance in the context of 4D chromatin condensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Sonia; Yang, Fan; Shen, Wen H

    2016-08-01

    The eukaryotic genome is packaged in the three-dimensional nuclear space by forming loops, domains, and compartments in a hierarchical manner. However, when duplicated genomes prepare for segregation, mitotic cells eliminate topologically associating domains and abandon the compartmentalized structure. Alongside chromatin architecture reorganization during the transition from interphase to mitosis, cells halt most DNA-templated processes such as transcription and repair. The intrinsically condensed chromatin serves as a sophisticated signaling module subjected to selective relaxation for programmed genomic activities. To understand the elaborate genome-epigenome interplay during cell cycle progression, the steady three-dimensional genome requires a time scale to form a dynamic four-dimensional and a more comprehensive portrait. In this review, we will dissect the functions of critical chromatin architectural components in constructing and maintaining an orderly packaged chromatin environment. We will also highlight the importance of the spatially and temporally conscious orchestration of chromatin remodeling to ensure high-fidelity genetic transmission. PMID:27098512

  2. The AID-induced DNA damage response in chromatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daniel, Jeremy A; Nussenzweig, André

    2013-01-01

    Chemical modifications to the DNA and histone protein components of chromatin can modulate gene expression and genome stability. Understanding the physiological impact of changes in chromatin structure remains an important question in biology. As one example, in order to generate antibody diversity...... with somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination, chromatin must be made accessible for activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID)-mediated deamination of cytosines in DNA. These lesions are recognized and removed by various DNA repair pathways but, if not handled properly, can lead to formation...... of oncogenic chromosomal translocations. In this review, we focus the discussion on how chromatin-modifying activities and -binding proteins contribute to the native chromatin environment in which AID-induced DNA damage is targeted and repaired. Outstanding questions remain regarding the direct roles...

  3. Data on the kinetics of in vitro assembled chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Völker-Albert, Moritz Carl; Pusch, Miriam Caroline; Schmidt, Andreas; Imhof, Axel

    2016-09-01

    Here, we use LC-MS/MS and SWATH-MS to describe the kinetics of in vitro assembled chromatin supported by an embryo extract prepared from preblastoderm Drosophila melanogaster embryos (DREX). This system allows easy manipulation of distinct aspects of chromatin assembly such as post-translational histone modifications, the levels of histone chaperones and the concentration of distinct DNA binding factors. In total, 480 proteins have been quantified as chromatin enriched factors and their binding kinetics have been monitored in the time course of 15 min, 1 h and 4 h of chromatin assembly. The data accompanying the manuscript on this approach, Völker-Albert et al., 2016 "A quantitative proteomic analysis of in vitro assembled chromatin" [1], has been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium (http://www.proteomexchange.org) via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier submission number PRIDE: PXD002537 and PRIDE: PXD003445. PMID:27331114

  4. Effect of Intramuscular Protons, Lactate, and ATP on Muscle Hyperalgesia in Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas S Gregory

    Full Text Available Chronic muscle pain is a significant health problem leading to disability[1]. Muscle fatigue can exacerbate muscle pain. Metabolites, including ATP, lactate, and protons, are released during fatiguing exercise and produce pain in humans. These substances directly activate purinergic (P2X and acid sensing ion channels (ASICs on muscle nociceptors, and when combined, produce a greater increase in neuron firing than when given alone. Whether the enhanced effect of combining protons, lactate, and ATP is the sum of individual effects (additive or more than the sum of individual effects (synergistic is unknown. Using a rat model of muscle nociceptive behavior, we tested each of these compounds individually over a range of physiologic and supra-physiologic concentrations. Further, we combined all three compounds in a series of dilutions and tested their effect on muscle nociceptive behavior. We also tested a non-hydrolyzable form of ATP (α,β-meATP alone and in combination with lactate and acidic pH. Surprisingly, we found no dose-dependent effect on muscle nociceptive behavior for protons, lactate, or ATP when given alone. We similarly found no effect after application of each two-metabolite combination. Only pH 4 saline and α,β-meATP produced hyperalgesia when given alone. When all 3 substances were combined, however, ATP (2.4μm, lactate (10mM, and acidic pH (pH 6.0 produced an enhanced effect greater than the sum of the effects of the individual components, i.e. synergism. α,β me ATP (3nmol, on the other hand, showed no enhanced effects when combined with lactate (10mM or acidic pH (pH 6.0, i.e. additive. These data suggest that combining fatigue metabolites in muscle produces a synergistic effect on muscle nociception.

  5. Signaling mechanism for modulation by ATP of glycine receptors on rat retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ping-Ping; Zhang, Gong; Zhou, Wei; Weng, Shi-Jun; Yang, Xiong-Li; Zhong, Yong-Mei

    2016-01-01

    ATP modulates voltage- and ligand-gated channels in the CNS via the activation of ionotropic P2X and metabotropic P2Y receptors. While P2Y receptors are expressed in retinal neurons, the function of these receptors in the retina is largely unknown. Using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques in rat retinal slice preparations, we demonstrated that ATP suppressed glycine receptor-mediated currents of OFF type ganglion cells (OFF-GCs) dose-dependently, and the effect was in part mediated by P2Y1 and P2Y11, but not by P2X. The ATP effect was abolished by intracellular dialysis of a Gq/11 protein inhibitor and phosphatidylinositol (PI)-phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor, but not phosphatidylcholine (PC)-PLC inhibitor. The ATP effect was accompanied by an increase in [Ca(2+)]i through the IP3-sensitive pathway and was blocked by intracellular Ca(2+)-free solution. Furthermore, the ATP effect was eliminated in the presence of PKC inhibitors. Neither PKA nor PKG system was involved. These results suggest that the ATP-induced suppression may be mediated by a distinct Gq/11/PI-PLC/IP3/Ca(2+)/PKC signaling pathway, following the activation of P2Y1,11 and other P2Y subtypes. Consistently, ATP suppressed glycine receptor-mediated light-evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents of OFF-GCs. These results suggest that ATP may modify the ON-to-OFF crossover inhibition, thus changing action potential patterns of OFF-GCs. PMID:27357477

  6. On the mechanochemical machinery underlying chromatin remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusufaly, Tahir I.

    This dissertation discuss two recent efforts, via a unique combination of structural bioinformatics and density functional theory, to unravel some of the details concerning how molecular machinery within the eukaryotic cell nucleus controls chromatin architecture. The first, a study of the 5-methylation of cytosine in 5'-CG-3' : 5'-CG-3' base-pair steps, reveals that the methyl groups roughen the local elastic energy landscape of the DNA. This enhances the probability of the canonical B-DNA structure transitioning into the undertwisted A-like and overtwisted C-like forms seen in nucleosomes, or looped segments of DNA bound to histones. The second part focuses on the formation of salt bridges between arginine residues in histones and phosphate groups on the DNA backbone. The arginine residues are ob- served to apply a tunable mechanical load to the backbone, enabling precision-controlled activation of DNA deformations.

  7. Chromatin structure near transcriptionally active genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypersensitive domains are the most prominent features of transcriptionally active chromatin. In the case of the β/sup A/-globin gene, it seems likely that two or more protein factors are capable of binding to the DNA so tightly that the nucleosome is prevented from binding. We have shown that nucleosomes, once bound in the assembly process in vitro, cannot be displaced. The interaction of the 5S gene transcription factor TFIIIA with its target DNA also is blocked by histones, and it has been suggested that the activation of the gene must occur during replication, before histones are reassembled on the DNA. We suppose that a similar mechanism may govern the binding of the hypersensitivity factors. It should be noted that nucleosomes are excluded not only from the sites to which the factors bind, but also from the regions between the two domains and at either side. 12 refs., 6 figs

  8. HDAC up-regulation in early colon field carcinogenesis is involved in cell tumorigenicity through regulation of chromatin structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Stypula-Cyrus

    Full Text Available Normal cell function is dependent on the proper maintenance of chromatin structure. Regulation of chromatin structure is controlled by histone modifications that directly influence chromatin architecture and genome function. Specifically, the histone deacetylase (HDAC family of proteins modulate chromatin compaction and are commonly dysregulated in many tumors, including colorectal cancer (CRC. However, the role of HDAC proteins in early colorectal carcinogenesis has not been previously reported. We found HDAC1, HDAC2, HDAC3, HDAC5, and HDAC7 all to be up-regulated in the field of human CRC. Furthermore, we observed that HDAC2 up-regulation is one of the earliest events in CRC carcinogenesis and observed this in human field carcinogenesis, the azoxymethane-treated rat model, and in more aggressive colon cancer cell lines. The universality of HDAC2 up-regulation suggests that HDAC2 up-regulation is a novel and important early event in CRC, which may serve as a biomarker. HDAC inhibitors (HDACIs interfere with tumorigenic HDAC activity; however, the precise mechanisms involved in this process remain to be elucidated. We confirmed that HDAC inhibition by valproic acid (VPA targeted the more aggressive cell line. Using nuclease digestion assays and transmission electron microscopy imaging, we observed that VPA treatment induced greater changes in chromatin structure in the more aggressive cell line. Furthermore, we used the novel imaging technique partial wave spectroscopy (PWS to quantify nanoscale alterations in chromatin. We noted that the PWS results are consistent with the biological assays, indicating a greater effect of VPA treatment in the more aggressive cell type. Together, these results demonstrate the importance of HDAC activity in early carcinogenic events and the unique role of higher-order chromatin structure in determining cell tumorigenicity.

  9. HDAC up-regulation in early colon field carcinogenesis is involved in cell tumorigenicity through regulation of chromatin structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stypula-Cyrus, Yolanda; Damania, Dhwanil; Kunte, Dhananjay P; Cruz, Mart Dela; Subramanian, Hariharan; Roy, Hemant K; Backman, Vadim

    2013-01-01

    Normal cell function is dependent on the proper maintenance of chromatin structure. Regulation of chromatin structure is controlled by histone modifications that directly influence chromatin architecture and genome function. Specifically, the histone deacetylase (HDAC) family of proteins modulate chromatin compaction and are commonly dysregulated in many tumors, including colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the role of HDAC proteins in early colorectal carcinogenesis has not been previously reported. We found HDAC1, HDAC2, HDAC3, HDAC5, and HDAC7 all to be up-regulated in the field of human CRC. Furthermore, we observed that HDAC2 up-regulation is one of the earliest events in CRC carcinogenesis and observed this in human field carcinogenesis, the azoxymethane-treated rat model, and in more aggressive colon cancer cell lines. The universality of HDAC2 up-regulation suggests that HDAC2 up-regulation is a novel and important early event in CRC, which may serve as a biomarker. HDAC inhibitors (HDACIs) interfere with tumorigenic HDAC activity; however, the precise mechanisms involved in this process remain to be elucidated. We confirmed that HDAC inhibition by valproic acid (VPA) targeted the more aggressive cell line. Using nuclease digestion assays and transmission electron microscopy imaging, we observed that VPA treatment induced greater changes in chromatin structure in the more aggressive cell line. Furthermore, we used the novel imaging technique partial wave spectroscopy (PWS) to quantify nanoscale alterations in chromatin. We noted that the PWS results are consistent with the biological assays, indicating a greater effect of VPA treatment in the more aggressive cell type. Together, these results demonstrate the importance of HDAC activity in early carcinogenic events and the unique role of higher-order chromatin structure in determining cell tumorigenicity.

  10. Molecular Events Involved in a Single Cycle of Ligand Transfer from an ATP Binding Cassette Transporter, LolCDE, to a Molecular Chaperone, LolA*

    OpenAIRE

    Taniguchi, Naohiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2008-01-01

    An ATP binding cassette transporter LolCDE complex releases lipoproteins from the inner membrane of Escherichia coli in an ATP-dependent manner, leading to the formation of a complex between a lipoprotein and a periplasmic chaperone, LolA. LolA is proposed to undergo a conformational change upon the lipoprotein binding. The lipoprotein is then transferred from the LolA-lipoprotein complex to the outer membrane via LolB. Unlike most ATP binding cassette transporters med...

  11. Nascent chromatin capture proteomics determines chromatin dynamics during DNA replication and identifies unknown fork components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alabert, Constance; Bukowski-Wills, Jimi-Carlo; Lee, Sung-Po;

    2014-01-01

    such as CAF-1, DNMT1 and SUV39h1 are enriched in nascent chromatin, whereas 170 factors including histone H1, DNMT3, MBD1-3 and PRC1 show delayed association. This correlates with H4K5K12diAc removal and H3K9me1 accumulation, whereas H3K27me3 and H3K9me3 remain unchanged. Finally, we combine NCC enrichment...

  12. Three-Dimensional, Live-Cell Imaging of Chromatin Dynamics in Plant Nuclei Using Chromatin Tagging Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirakawa, Takeshi; Matsunaga, Sachihiro

    2016-01-01

    In plants, chromatin dynamics spatiotemporally change in response to various environmental stimuli. However, little is known about chromatin dynamics in the nuclei of plants. Here, we introduce a three-dimensional, live-cell imaging method that can monitor chromatin dynamics in nuclei via a chromatin tagging system that can visualize specific genomic loci in living plant cells. The chromatin tagging system is based on a bacterial operator/repressor system in which the repressor is fused to fluorescent proteins. A recent refinement of promoters for the system solved the problem of gene silencing and abnormal pairing frequencies between operators. Using this system, we can detect the spatiotemporal dynamics of two homologous loci as two fluorescent signals within a nucleus and monitor the distance between homologous loci. These live-cell imaging methods will provide new insights into genome organization, development processes, and subnuclear responses to environmental stimuli in plants. PMID:27557696

  13. Possible involvement of ATP-dependent K-channel related mechanisms in the antihypertensive and cough suppressant effects of the novel ACE inhibitor (2S, 3aS, 7aS)-1-(N2-nicotinoyl-L-lysyl-gamma-D-glutamyl)octahydro-1H- indole-2-carboxylic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, S; Takeyama, K; Hosoki, K; Karasawa, T

    1997-06-01

    The antihypertensive and cough suppressant mechanisms of DU-1777 ((2S,3aS,7aS)-1-(N2-nicotinoyl-L-lsyl-gamma-D-glutamyl )octahydro-1H-indole-2 -carboxylic acid, CAS 116662-73-8), a new long-acting angiotensin-1-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, were investigated in vivo and in vitro. The antihypertensive effects of DU-1777 at 10 mg/kg p.o. and cromakalim at 0.3 mg/kg p.o. were partially (about 60%) or fully antagonized by glibenclamide at 10 mg/kg i.v. in 2-kidney, 1-clip renal hypertensive rats (2K-1C RHR). The antihypertensive effects of a Ca blocker (nifedipine) and other ACE inhibitors (captopril, alacepril, enalapril, lisinopril, imidapril and quanapril) were not antagonized by glibenclamide. In deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt hypertensive rats (DOCA-HR), the antihypertensive effects of DU-1777 at 3-30 mg/kg p.o. were fully antagonized by glibenclamide. However, in vitro, DU-1777 (10(-6)-10(-3) mol/l) did not affect aortic ring contractions induced by high K (30 mmol/l). In guinea pig, citric acid induced cough was increased by ACE inhibitors, captopril, alacepril, enalapril and lisinopril (10 and 30 mg/kg p.o.). DU-1777 had a tendency to decrease citric acid induced cough and the effect was antagonized by glibenclamide. These results suggest that while DU-1777 itself does not open ATP-dependent K channel, it indirectly produces these effects through unknown mechanisms in vivo. Moreover, these effects contributed to the antihypertensive effect in DOCA-HR and cough suppressant effect in guinea pigs. PMID:9239450

  14. Monitoring enzymatic ATP hydrolysis by EPR spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Hacker, Stephan M.; Hintze, Christian; Marx, Andreas; Drescher, Malte

    2014-01-01

    An adenosine triphosphate (ATP) analogue modified with two nitroxide radicals is developed and employed to study its enzymatic hydrolysis by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. For this application, we demonstrate that EPR holds the potential to complement fluorogenic substrate analogues in monitoring enzymatic activity.

  15. Torque generation mechanism of ATP synthase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, John; Maric, Sladjana; Scoppa, M.; Cheung, M.

    2010-03-01

    ATP synthase is a rotary motor that produces adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the chemical currency of life. Our proposed electric field driven torque (EFT) model of FoF1-ATP synthase describes how torque, which scales with the number of c-ring proton binding sites, is generated by the proton motive force (pmf) across the mitochondrial inner membrane. When Fo is coupled to F1, the model predicts a critical pmf to drive ATP production. In order to fully understand how the electric field resulting from the pmf drives the c-ring to rotate, it is important to examine the charge distributions in the protonated c-ring and a-subunit containing the proton channels. Our calculations use a self-consistent field approach based on a refinement of reported structural data. The results reveal changes in pKa for key residues on the a-subunit and c-ring, as well as titration curves and protonation state energy diagrams. Health implications will be briefly discussed.

  16. Characteristics of thymine dimer excision from xeroderma pigmentosum chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated thymine dimer excision from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) chromatin in the cell-free reconstruction system. The normal-cell extract performed specific dimer excision from native chromatin and DNA isolated from 100 J/m2-irradiated cells. Such an excision in vitro was rapid and required high concentrations of extract. The extracts of XP group A, C and G cells were unable to excise from their own native-chromatin, but capable of excising from chromatin deprived of loosely bound nonhistone proteins with 0.35 M NaCl, as were from purified DNA. Thus, group A, C and G cells are most likely to be defective in the specific XP factors facilitating the excising activity under multicomponent regulation at the chromatin level. Further, either of group A, C and G extracts successfully complemented the native chromatin of the alternative groups. Uniquely, the XP group D extract excised dimers from native chromatin in the normal fashion under the condition. These results suggest that XP group A, C, D and G cells examined may not be defective in the dimer specific endonuclease and exonuclease per se. 19 references, 3 figures, 2 tables

  17. PREDICTION OF CHROMATIN STATES USING DNA SEQUENCE PROPERTIES

    KAUST Repository

    Bahabri, Rihab R.

    2013-06-01

    Activities of DNA are to a great extent controlled epigenetically through the internal struc- ture of chromatin. This structure is dynamic and is influenced by different modifications of histone proteins. Various combinations of epigenetic modification of histones pinpoint to different functional regions of the DNA determining the so-called chromatin states. How- ever, the characterization of chromatin states by the DNA sequence properties remains largely unknown. In this study we aim to explore whether DNA sequence patterns in the human genome can characterize different chromatin states. Using DNA sequence motifs we built binary classifiers for each chromatic state to eval- uate whether a given genomic sequence is a good candidate for belonging to a particular chromatin state. Of four classification algorithms (C4.5, Naive Bayes, Random Forest, and SVM) used for this purpose, the decision tree based classifiers (C4.5 and Random Forest) yielded best results among those we evaluated. Our results suggest that in general these models lack sufficient predictive power, although for four chromatin states (insulators, het- erochromatin, and two types of copy number variation) we found that presence of certain motifs in DNA sequences does imply an increased probability that such a sequence is one of these chromatin states.

  18. Anti-chromatin antibodies in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Gerloni

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the prevalence and clinical significance of anti-chromatin antibodies (Abs in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA. Methods: IgG anti-chromatin Abs were detected by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, in sera of 94 children with JRA (10 children with systemic, 38 with polyarticular and 46 with oligoarticular disease onset. As control group, 33 age- and-sex-matched healthy children (HC were also examined. Results: Abs to chromatin were detected in 24/94 (25,5% of children suffering from JRA. Particularly, the higher prevalence of anti-chromatin Abs has been found in children with oligoarticular (30,4% and polyarticular (23,7% onset JRA. In these groups Abs titers were significantly higher compared to systemic JRA and HC (p=0.003. Anti-chromatin Abs were observed more frequently in patients with oligoarticular disease and chronic uveitis (21,7%. Furthermore, higher levels of anti-chromatin Abs has been found in all the patients treated with anti-TNFα therapy (p<0.0001. Conclusions: our results confirm previous data about the prevalence of anti-chromatin Abs in JRA. These Abs were significantly higher in the group of patients with oligoarticular onset with past or present hystory of ocular involvement and in the group with polyarticular JRA treated with biologic therapy. A long-term follow-up study could be useful to evaluate the potential utility of these autoantibodies.

  19. Fractal Characterization of Chromatin Decompaction in Live Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Ji; Stypula-Cyrus, Yolanda; Blaha, Catherine S; Roy, Hemant K; Backman, Vadim

    2015-12-01

    Chromatin organization has a fundamental impact on the whole spectrum of genomic functions. Quantitative characterization of the chromatin structure, particularly at submicron length scales where chromatin fractal globules are formed, is critical to understanding this structure-function relationship. Such analysis is currently challenging due to the diffraction-limited resolution of conventional light microscopy. We herein present an optical approach termed inverse spectroscopic optical coherence tomography to characterize the mass density fractality of chromatin, and we apply the technique to observe chromatin decompaction in live cells. The technique makes it possible for the first time, to our knowledge, to sense intracellular morphology with length-scale sensitivity from ∼30 to 450 nm, thus primarily probing the higher-order chromatin structure, without resolving the actual structures. We used chromatin decompaction due to inhibition of histone deacytelases and measured the subsequent changes in the fractal dimension of the intracellular structure. The results were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and confocal fluorescence microscopy.

  20. Chromatinization of the KSHV Genome During the KSHV Life Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timsy Uppal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV belongs to the gamma herpesvirus family and is the causative agent of various lymphoproliferative diseases in humans. KSHV, like other herpesviruses, establishes life-long latent infection with the expression of a limited number of viral genes. Expression of these genes is tightly regulated by both the viral and cellular factors. Recent advancements in identifying the expression profiles of viral transcripts, using tilling arrays and next generation sequencing have identified additional coding and non-coding transcripts in the KSHV genome. Determining the functions of these transcripts will provide a better understanding of the mechanisms utilized by KSHV in altering cellular pathways involved in promoting cell growth and tumorigenesis. Replication of the viral genome is critical in maintaining the existing copies of the viral episomes during both latent and lytic phases of the viral life cycle. The replication of the viral episome is facilitated by viral components responsible for recruiting chromatin modifying enzymes and replication factors for altering the chromatin complexity and replication initiation functions, respectively. Importantly, chromatin modification of the viral genome plays a crucial role in determining whether the viral genome will persist as latent episome or undergo lytic reactivation. Additionally, chromatinization of the incoming virion DNA, which lacks chromatin structure, in the target cells during primary infection, helps in establishing latent infection. Here, we discuss the recent advancements on our understating of KSHV genome chromatinization and the consequences of chromatin modifications on viral life cycle.

  1. Chromatinization of the KSHV Genome During the KSHV Life Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uppal, Timsy [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Nevada, 1664 N Virginia Street, MS 320, Reno, NV 89557 (United States); Jha, Hem C. [Department of Microbiology and the Tumor Virology Program of the Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, 201E Johnson Pavilion, 3610 Hamilton Walk, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Verma, Subhash C. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Nevada, 1664 N Virginia Street, MS 320, Reno, NV 89557 (United States); Robertson, Erle S., E-mail: erle@mail.med.upenn.edu [Department of Microbiology and the Tumor Virology Program of the Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, 201E Johnson Pavilion, 3610 Hamilton Walk, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2015-01-14

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) belongs to the gamma herpesvirus family and is the causative agent of various lymphoproliferative diseases in humans. KSHV, like other herpesviruses, establishes life-long latent infection with the expression of a limited number of viral genes. Expression of these genes is tightly regulated by both the viral and cellular factors. Recent advancements in identifying the expression profiles of viral transcripts, using tilling arrays and next generation sequencing have identified additional coding and non-coding transcripts in the KSHV genome. Determining the functions of these transcripts will provide a better understanding of the mechanisms utilized by KSHV in altering cellular pathways involved in promoting cell growth and tumorigenesis. Replication of the viral genome is critical in maintaining the existing copies of the viral episomes during both latent and lytic phases of the viral life cycle. The replication of the viral episome is facilitated by viral components responsible for recruiting chromatin modifying enzymes and replication factors for altering the chromatin complexity and replication initiation functions, respectively. Importantly, chromatin modification of the viral genome plays a crucial role in determining whether the viral genome will persist as latent episome or undergo lytic reactivation. Additionally, chromatinization of the incoming virion DNA, which lacks chromatin structure, in the target cells during primary infection, helps in establishing latent infection. Here, we discuss the recent advancements on our understating of KSHV genome chromatinization and the consequences of chromatin modifications on viral life cycle.

  2. Chromatinization of the KSHV Genome During the KSHV Life Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) belongs to the gamma herpesvirus family and is the causative agent of various lymphoproliferative diseases in humans. KSHV, like other herpesviruses, establishes life-long latent infection with the expression of a limited number of viral genes. Expression of these genes is tightly regulated by both the viral and cellular factors. Recent advancements in identifying the expression profiles of viral transcripts, using tilling arrays and next generation sequencing have identified additional coding and non-coding transcripts in the KSHV genome. Determining the functions of these transcripts will provide a better understanding of the mechanisms utilized by KSHV in altering cellular pathways involved in promoting cell growth and tumorigenesis. Replication of the viral genome is critical in maintaining the existing copies of the viral episomes during both latent and lytic phases of the viral life cycle. The replication of the viral episome is facilitated by viral components responsible for recruiting chromatin modifying enzymes and replication factors for altering the chromatin complexity and replication initiation functions, respectively. Importantly, chromatin modification of the viral genome plays a crucial role in determining whether the viral genome will persist as latent episome or undergo lytic reactivation. Additionally, chromatinization of the incoming virion DNA, which lacks chromatin structure, in the target cells during primary infection, helps in establishing latent infection. Here, we discuss the recent advancements on our understating of KSHV genome chromatinization and the consequences of chromatin modifications on viral life cycle

  3. Chromatin Landscape of the IRF Genes and Role of the Epigenetic Reader BRD4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachu, Mahesh; Dey, Anup; Ozato, Keiko

    2016-07-01

    Histone post-translational modification patterns represent epigenetic states of genomic genes and denote the state of their transcription, past history, and future potential in gene expression. Genome-wide chromatin modification patterns reported from various laboratories are assembled in the ENCODE database, providing a fertile ground for understanding epigenetic regulation of any genes of interest across many cell types. The IRF family genes critically control innate immunity as they direct expression and activities of interferons. While these genes have similar structural and functional traits, their chromatin landscapes and epigenetic features have not been systematically evaluated. Here, by mining ENCODE database using an imputational approach, we summarize chromatin modification patterns for 6 of 9 IRF genes and show characteristic features that connote their epigenetic states. BRD4 is a BET bromodomain protein that "reads and translates" epigenetic marks into transcription. We review recent findings that BRD4 controls constitutive and signal-dependent transcription of many genes, including IRF genes. BRD4 dynamically binds to various genomic genes with a spatial and temporal specificity. Of particular importance, BRD4 is shown to critically regulate IRF-dependent anti-pathogen protection, inflammatory responses triggered by NF-κB, and the growth and spread of many cancers. The advent of small molecule inhibitors that disrupt binding of BET bromdomain to acetylated histone marks has opened new therapeutic possibilities for cancer and inflammatory diseases.

  4. Chromatin organizer SATB1 is an important determinant of T-cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burute, Mithila; Gottimukkala, Kamal; Galande, Sanjeev

    2012-10-01

    T-cell development and differentiation is coordinated by a multitude of signaling molecules and transcription factors that impart distinct functional properties to progenitors. In this review, we focus on the role of the T lineage-enriched chromatin organizer and regulator SATB1 in T-cell differentiation. SATB1 mediates Wnt signaling by recruiting β-catenin to its genomic targets and coordinates T helper type 2 (T(H)2) differentiation by positively regulating GATA-3. In contrast, maintenance of regulatory T cell (Treg) functions are dependent on inhibition of SATB1-mediated modulation of global chromatin organization. We discuss how regulation of the activity of SATB1 has a critical role in driving these two important differentiation pathways in T cells.

  5. Replication-coupled chromatin assembly of newly synthesized histones: distinct functions for the histone tail domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejlassi-Lassallette, Aïda; Thiriet, Christophe

    2012-02-01

    The maintenance of the genome during replication requires the assembly of nucleosomes with newly synthesized histones. Achieving the deposition of newly synthesized histones in chromatin implies their transport from the cytoplasm to the nucleus at the replication sites. Several lines of evidence have revealed critical functions of the histone tail domains in these conserved cellular processes. In this review, we discuss the role of the amino termini of the nucleosome building blocks, H2A/H2B and H3/H4, in different model systems. The experimental data showed that H2A/H2B tails and H3/H4 tails display distinct functions in nuclear import and chromatin assembly. Furthermore, we describe recent studies exploiting the unique properties of the slime mold, Physarum polycephalum , that have advanced understanding of the function of the highly conserved replication-dependent diacetylation of H4.

  6. Increased Intracellular [dATP] Enhances Cardiac Contraction in Embryonic Chick Cardiomyocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Schoffstall, Brenda; Chase, P. Bryant

    2008-01-01

    Although ATP is the physiological substrate for cardiac contraction, cardiac contractility is significantly enhanced in vitro when only 10% of ATP substrate is replaced with 2’-deoxy-ATP (dATP). To determine the functional effects of increased intracellular [dATP] ([dATP]i) within living cardiac cells, we used hypertonic loading with varying exogenous dATP/ATP ratios, but constant total nucleotide concentration, to elevate [dATP]i in contractile monolayers of embryonic chick cardiomyocytes. T...

  7. Modulation of Extracellular ATP Content of Mast Cells and DRG Neurons by Irradiation: Studies on Underlying Mechanism of Low-Level-Laser Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-level-laser therapy (LLLT is an effective complementary treatment, especially for anti-inflammation and wound healing in which dermis or mucus mast cells (MCs are involved. In periphery, MCs crosstalk with neurons via purinergic signals and participate in various physiological and pathophysiological processes. Whether extracellular ATP, an important purine in purinergic signaling, of MCs and neurons could be modulated by irradiation remains unknown. In this study, effects of red-laser irradiation on extracellular ATP content of MCs and dorsal root ganglia (DRG neurons were investigated and underlying mechanisms were explored in vitro. Our results show that irradiation led to elevation of extracellular ATP level in the human mast cell line HMC-1 in a dose-dependent manner, which was accompanied by elevation of intracellular ATP content, an indicator for ATP synthesis, together with [Ca2+]i elevation, a trigger signal for exocytotic ATP release. In contrast to MCs, irradiation attenuated the extracellular ATP content of neurons, which could be abolished by ARL 67156, a nonspecific ecto-ATPases inhibitor. Our results suggest that irradiation potentiates extracellular ATP of MCs by promoting ATP synthesis and release and attenuates extracellular ATP of neurons by upregulating ecto-ATPase activity. The opposite responses of these two cell types indicate complex mechanisms underlying LLLT.

  8. The stimulating role of subunit F in ATPase activity inside the A1-complex of the Methanosarcina mazei Gö1 A1AO ATP synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dhirendra; Sielaff, Hendrik; Sundararaman, Lavanya; Bhushan, Shashi; Grüber, Gerhard

    2016-02-01

    A1AO ATP synthases couple ion-transport of the AO sector and ATP synthesis/hydrolysis of the A3B3-headpiece via their stalk subunits D and F. Here, we produced and purified stable A3B3D- and A3B3DF-complexes of the Methanosarcina mazei Gö1 A-ATP synthase as confirmed by electron microscopy. Enzymatic studies with these complexes showed that the M. mazei Gö1 A-ATP synthase subunit F is an ATPase activating subunit. The maximum ATP hydrolysis rates (Vmax) of A3B3D and A3B3DF were determined by substrate-dependent ATP hydrolysis experiments resulting in a Vmax of 7.9 s(-1) and 30.4 s(-1), respectively, while the KM is the same for both. Deletions of the N- or C-termini of subunit F abolished the effect of ATP hydrolysis activation. We generated subunit F mutant proteins with single amino acid substitutions and demonstrated that the subunit F residues S84 and R88 are important in stimulating ATP hydrolysis. Hybrid formation of the A3B3D-complex with subunit F of the related eukaryotic V-ATPase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae or subunit ε of the F-ATP synthase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis showed that subunit F of the archaea and eukaryotic enzymes are important in ATP hydrolysis.

  9. Regulation of mitochondrial translation of the ATP8/ATP6 mRNA by Smt1p

    OpenAIRE

    Rak, Malgorzata; Su, Chen Hsien; Xu, Jonathan Tong; Azpiroz, Ricardo; Singh, Angela Mohan; Tzagoloff, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Expression of the mitochondrially encoded ATP6 and ATP8 genes is translationally regulated by F1 ATPase. We report a translational repressor (Smt1p) of the ATP6/8 mRNA that, when mutated, restores translation of the encoded Atp6p and Atp8p subunits of the ATP synthase. Heterozygous smt1 mutants fail to rescue the translation defect, indicating that the mutations are recessive. Smt1p is an intrinsic inner membrane protein, which, based on its sedimentation, has a native size twice that of the ...

  10. Interaction and conformational changes of chromatin with divalent ions.

    OpenAIRE

    Borochov, N; Ausio, J; Eisenberg, H

    1984-01-01

    We have investigated the interaction of divalent ions with chromatin towards a closer understanding of the role of metal ions in the cell nucleus. The first row transition metal ion chlorides MnCl2, CoCl2, NiCl2 and CuCl2 lead to precipitation of chicken erythrocyte chromatin at a significantly lower concentration than the alkali earth metal chlorides MgCl2, CaCl2 and BaCl2. A similar distinction can be made for the compaction of chromatin to the "30 nm" solenoid higher order structure which ...

  11. SUMO-2 Orchestrates Chromatin Modifiers in Response to DNA Damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriks, Ivo A; Treffers, Louise W; Verlaan-de Vries, Matty;

    2015-01-01

    dynamically SUMOylated interaction networks of chromatin modifiers, transcription factors, DNA repair factors, and nuclear body components. SUMOylated chromatin modifiers include JARID1B/KDM5B, JARID1C/KDM5C, p300, CBP, PARP1, SetDB1, and MBD1. Whereas SUMOylated JARID1B was ubiquitylated by the SUMO......-targeted ubiquitin ligase RNF4 and degraded by the proteasome in response to DNA damage, JARID1C was SUMOylated and recruited to the chromatin to demethylate histone H3K4....

  12. Sperm chromatin structure and male fertility: biological and clinical aspects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. Erenpreiss; M. Spano; J. Erenpreisa; M. Bungum; A. Giwercman

    2006-01-01

    Aim: Sperm chromatin/DNA integrity is essential for the accurate transmission of paternal genetic information, and normal sperm chromatin structure is important for sperm fertilizing ability. The routine examination of semen, which includes sperm concentration, motility and morphology, does not identify defects in sperm chromatin structure. The origin of sperm DNA damage and a variety of methods for its assessment are described. Evaluation of sperm DNA damage appears to be a useful tool for assessing male fertility potential both in vivo and in vitro. The possible impact of sperm DNA defects on the offspring is also discussed.

  13. Two weeks of muscle immobilization impairs functional sympatholysis but increases exercise hyperemia and the vasodilatory responsiveness to infused ATP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Stefan P; Mørkeberg, Jakob S; Thaning, Pia;

    2012-01-01

    During exercise, contracting muscles can override sympathetic vasoconstrictor activity (functional sympatholysis). ATP and adenosine have been proposed to play a role in skeletal muscle blood flow regulation. However, little is known about the role of muscle training status on functional......, respectively; P ATP, LBF was reduced in the immobilized leg (P muscle P2Y2 receptor content (P ... with immobilization. These results suggest that muscle inactivity impairs functional sympatholysis and that the magnitude of hyperemia and blood pressure response to exercise is dependent on the training status of the muscle. Immobilization also increases the vasodilatory response to infused ATP....

  14. ATP alters current fluctuations of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator: evidence for a three-state activation mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis gene product cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a low conductance, cAMP-regulated Cl- channel. Removal of cytosolic ATP causes a cessation of cAMP-dependent kinase-phosphorylated CFTR channel activity that resumes upon ATP addition. (Anderson, M. P., H. A. Berger, D. R. Rich, R. J. Gregory, A. E. Smith, and M. J. Welsh. 1991. Cell. 67:775-784). The aim of this study was to quantify possible effects of ATP on CFTR gating. We analyzed multichannel ...

  15. KR-31761, a novel K+(ATP)-channel opener, exerts cardioprotective effects by opening both mitochondrial K+(ATP) and Sarcolemmal K+(ATP) channels in rat models of ischemia/reperfusion-induced heart injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Min-Kyu; Lee, Sung-Hun; Seo, Ho-Won; Yi, Kyu-Yang; Yoo, Sung-Eun; Lee, Byung-Ho; Chung, Hun-Jong; Won, Hyung-Sik; Lee, Chang-Soo; Kwon, Suk-Hyung; Choi, Wahn-Soo; Shin, Hwa-Sup

    2009-02-01

    The cardioprotective effects of KR-31761, a newly synthesized K+(ATP) opener, were evaluated in rat models of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) heart injury. In isolated rat hearts subjected to 30-min global ischemia/30-min reperfusion, KR-31761 perfused prior to ischemia significantly increased both the left ventricular developed pressure (% of predrug LVDP: 17.8, 45.1, 54.2, and 62.6 for the control, 1 microM, 3 microM, and 10 microM, respectively) and double product (DP: heart rate x LVDP; % of predrug DP: 17.5, 44.9, 56.2, and 64.5 for the control, 1 microM, 3 microM, and 10 microM, respectively) at 30-min reperfusion while decreasing the left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP). KR-31761 (10 microM) significantly increased the time to contracture during the ischemic period, whereas it concentration-dependently decreased the lactate dehydrogenase release during reperfusion. All these parameters were significantly reversed by 5-hydroxydecanoate (5-HD, 100 microM) and glyburide (1 microM), selective and nonselective blockers of the mitochondrial K+(ATP) (mitoK+(ATP)) channel and K+(ATP) channel, respectively. In anesthetized rats subjected to 30-min occlusion of left anterior descending coronary artery/2.5-h reperfusion, KR-31761 administered 15 min before the onset of ischemia significantly decreased the infarct size (72.2%, 55.1%, and 47.1% for the control, 0.3 mg/kg, i.v., and 1.0 mg/kg, i.v., respectively); and these effects were completely and almost completely abolished by 5-HD (10 mg/kg, i.v.) and HMR-1098, a selective blocker of sarcolemmal K+(ATP) (sarcK+(ATP)) channel (6 mg/kg, i.v.) administered 5 min prior to KR-31761 (72.3% and 67.9%, respectively). KR-31761 only slightly relaxed methoxamine-precontracted rat aorta (IC50: > 30.0 microM). These results suggest that KR-31761 exerts potent cardioprotective effects through the opening of both mitoK+(ATP) and sarcK+(ATP) channels in rat hearts with a minimal vasorelaxant effect.

  16. Analysis of chromatin attachment and partitioning functions of bovine papillomavirus type 1 E2 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abroi, Aare; Ilves, Ivar; Kivi, Sirje; Ustav, Mart

    2004-02-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the tethering of viral genomes to host cell chromosomes could provide one of the ways to achieve their nuclear retention and partitioning during extrachromosomal maintenance in dividing cells. The data we present here provide firm evidence that the partitioning of the bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV1) genome is dependent on the chromatin attachment process mediated by viral E2 protein and its multiple binding sites. On the other hand, the attachment of E2 and the E2-mediated tethering of reporter plasmids to host chromosomes are not necessarily sufficient for efficient partitioning, suggesting that additional E2-dependent activities might be involved in the latter process. The activity of E2 protein in chromatin attachment and partitioning is more sensitive to the point mutations in the N-terminal domain than its transactivation and replication initiation functions. Therefore, at least part of the interactions of the E2 N-terminal domain with its targets during the chromatin attachment and partitioning processes are likely to involve specific receptors not involved in transactivation and replication activities of the protein. The mutational analysis also indicates that the binding of E2 to chromatin is not achieved through interaction of linear N-terminal subsequences of the E2 protein with putative receptors. Instead, the composite surface elements of the N-terminal domain build up the receptor-binding surface of E2. In this regard, the interaction of BPV1 E2 with its chromosomal targets clearly differs from the interactions of LANA1 protein from Kaposi's sarcoma-associated human herpesvirus and EBNA1 from Epstein-Barr virus with their specific receptors. PMID:14747575

  17. Reinterpreting the action of ATP analogs on K(ATP) channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, David; Gossack, Lindsay; Quast, Ulrich; Bryan, Joseph

    2013-06-28

    Neuroendocrine-type K(ATP) channels, (SUR1/Kir6.2)4, couple the transmembrane flux of K(+), and thus membrane potential, with cellular metabolism in various cell types including insulin-secreting β-cells. Mutant channels with reduced activity are a cause of congenital hyperinsulinism, whereas hyperactive channels are a cause of neonatal diabetes. A current regulatory model proposes that ATP hydrolysis is required to switch SUR1 into post-hydrolytic conformations able to antagonize the inhibitory action of nucleotide binding at the Kir6.2 pore, thus coupling enzymatic and channel activities. Alterations in SUR1 ATPase activity are proposed to contribute to neonatal diabetes and type 2 diabetes risk. The regulatory model is partly based on the reduced ability of ATP analogs such as adenosine 5'-(β,γ-imino)triphosphate (AMP-PNP) and adenosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate) (ATPγS) to stimulate channel activity, presumably by reducing hydrolysis. This study uses a substitution at the catalytic glutamate, SUR(1E1507Q), with a significantly increased affinity for ATP, to probe the action of these ATP analogs on conformational switching. ATPγS, a slowly hydrolyzable analog, switches SUR1 conformations, albeit with reduced affinity. Nonhydrolyzable AMP-PNP and adenosine 5'-(β,γ-methylenetriphosphate) (AMP-PCP) alone fail to switch SUR1, but do reverse ATP-induced switching. AMP-PCP displaces 8-azido-[(32)P]ATP from the noncanonical NBD1 of SUR1. This is consistent with structural data on an asymmetric bacterial ABC protein that shows that AMP-PNP binds selectively to the noncanonical NBD to prevent conformational switching. The results imply that MgAMP-PNP and MgAMP-PCP (AMP-PxP) fail to activate K(ATP) channels because they do not support NBD dimerization and conformational switching, rather than by limiting enzymatic activity. PMID:23665564

  18. Synthesis and fluorescence characteristics of ATP-based FRET probes

    OpenAIRE

    Hardt, Normann; Hacker, Stephan M.; Marx, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) analogues labelled with two dyes suitable for undergoing Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) have the potential to be valuable tools to continuously study the enzymatic activity of ATP consuming enzymes. Here, we present a synthesis strategy that allows obtaining these ATP analogues in a straight-forward manner. Earlier studies indicate that modifying ATP at the O2′- and the γ-position is a very promising starting point for the design of these probes. We synt...

  19. The DNA gyrase-quinolone complex. ATP hydrolysis and the mechanism of DNA cleavage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampranis, S C; Maxwell, A

    1998-01-01

    , S. C., and Maxwell, A. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 22606-22614). The kinetics of ATP hydrolysis via this pathway have been studied and found to differ from those of the reaction of the drug-free enzyme. The quinolone-characteristic ATPase rate is DNA-dependent and can be induced in the presence...

  20. Cowpea chloroplastic ATP synthase is the source of multiple plant defense elicitors during insect herbivory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant responses to damage vary dependant upon the nature of the biotic and abiotic stresses. We recently described an elicitor, from Fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) oral secretions (OS) termed inceptin, derived from chloroplastic ATP synthase '-subunit (cATPC) proteins that activate phytohormo...

  1. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in normal and pathological lung

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Deen, M; de Vries, EGE; Timens, W; Scheper, RJ; Timmer-Bosscha, H; Postma, DS

    2005-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette ( ABC) transporters are a family of transmembrane proteins that can transport a wide variety of substrates across biological membranes in an energy-dependent manner. Many ABC transporters such as P-glycoprotein ( P-gp), multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 ( MRP1) and breas

  2. Atovaquone and quinine anti-malarials inhibit ATP binding cassette transporter activity

    OpenAIRE

    Rijpma, S.R.; Heuvel, J. J.; van de Velden, M.; Sauerwein, R. W.; Russel, F. G.; Koenderink, J.B.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Therapeutic blood plasma concentrations of anti-malarial drugs are essential for successful treatment. Pharmacokinetics of pharmaceutical compounds are dependent of adsorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion. ATP binding cassette (ABC) transport proteins are particularly involved in drug deposition, as they are located at membranes of many uptake and excretory organs and at protective barriers, where they export endogenous and xenobiotic compounds, including pharmaceutica...

  3. The yeast chromatin remodeler Rsc1-RSC complex is required for transcriptional activation of autophagy-related genes and inhibition of the TORC1 pathway in response to nitrogen starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Feifei; Imamura, Yuko; Ueno, Masaru; Suzuki, Sho W; Ohsumi, Yoshinori; Yukawa, Masashi; Tsuchiya, Eiko

    2015-09-01

    The yeast RSC, an ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complex, is essential for mitotic and meiotic growth. There are two distinct isoforms of this complex defined by the presence of either Rsc1 or Rsc2; however, the functional differences between these complexes are unclear. Here we show that the RSC complex containing Rsc1, but not Rsc2, functions in autophagy induction. Rsc1 was required not only for full expression of ATG8 mRNA but also for maintenance of Atg8 protein stability. Interestingly, decreased autophagic activity and Atg8 protein stability in rsc1Δ cells, but not the defect in ATG8 mRNA expression, were partially suppressed by deletion of TOR1. In addition, we found that rsc1Δ impaired the binding between the Rho GTPase Rho1 and the TORC1-specific component Kog1, which is required for down-regulation of TORC1 activity. These results suggest that the Rsc1-containing RSC complex plays dual roles in the proper induction of autophagy: 1) the transcriptional activation of autophagy-related genes independent of the TORC1 pathway and 2) the inactivation of TORC1, possibly through enhancement of Rho1-Kog1 binding.

  4. CrATP interferes in the promastigote-macrophage interaction in Leishmania amazonensis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennes-Vidal, V; Castro, R O S; Britto, C; Barrabin, H; D'Avila-Levy, C M; Moreira, O C

    2011-07-01

    Recent have shown the relationship between Ecto-Nucleoside-Triphosphate-Diphosphohydrolases (Ecto-NTPDases or ecto-nucleotidases) and virulence and infectivity in trypanosomatids. In this work, the inhibition of the ecto-ATPase activities and promastigote growth of Leishmania amazonensis by CrATP was characterized. Furthermore, this compound was used to investigate the role of ecto-nucleotidase in the interaction of L. amazonensis with resident peritoneal macrophages obtained from BALB/c mice. CrATP partially inhibits the ecto-ATPase activity, presenting Ki values of 575·7±199·1 and 383·5±79·0 μm, in the presence or absence of 5 mm MgCl2, respectively. The apparent Kms for ATP (2·9±0·5 mm to Mg2+-dependent ecto-ATPase and 0·4±0·2 mm to Mg2+-independent ecto-ATPase activities) are not significantly altered by CrATP, suggesting a reversible non-competitive inhibition of both enzymes. When CrATP was added to the cultivation medium at 500 μm, it drastically inhibited the cellular growth. The interaction of promastigote forms of L. amazonensis with BALB/c peritoneal macrophages is strongly affected by CrATP. When the parasites were treated with 500 μm CrATP before interacting with macrophages, the adhesion and endocytic indices were strongly reduced to 53·0±14·8% and 39·8±1·1%, respectively. These results indicate that ecto-nucleotidase plays an important role in the infection process caused by Leishmania amazonensis. PMID:21679488

  5. Dynamic imaging of free cytosolic ATP concentration during fuel sensing by rat hypothalamic neurones: evidence for ATP-independent control of ATP-sensitive K+ channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainscow, Edward K; Mirshamsi, Shirin; Tang, Teresa; Ashford, Michael L J; Rutter, Guy A

    2002-01-01

    Glucose-responsive (GR) neurons from hypothalamic nuclei are implicated in the regulation of feeding and satiety. To determine the role of intracellular ATP in the closure of ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels in these cells and associated glia, the cytosolic ATP concentration ([ATP]c) was monitored in vivo using adenoviral-driven expression of recombinant targeted luciferases and bioluminescence imaging. Arguing against a role for ATP in the closure of KATP channels in GR neurons, glucose (3 or 15 mm) caused no detectable increase in [ATP]c, monitored with cytosolic luciferase, and only a small decrease in the concentration of ATP immediately beneath the plasma membrane, monitored with a SNAP25–luciferase fusion protein. In contrast to hypothalamic neurons, hypothalamic glia responded to glucose (3 and 15 mm) with a significant increase in [ATP]c. Both neurons and glia from the cerebellum, a glucose-unresponsive region of the brain, responded robustly to 3 or 15 mm glucose with increases in [ATP]c. Further implicating an ATP-independent mechanism of KATP channel closure in hypothalamic neurons, removal of extracellular glucose (10 mm) suppressed the electrical activity of GR neurons in the presence of a fixed, high concentration (3 mm) of intracellular ATP. Neurons from both brain regions responded to 5 mm lactate (but not pyruvate) with an oligomycin-sensitive increase in [ATP]c. High levels of the plasma membrane lactate-monocarboxylate transporter, MCT1, were found in both cell types, and exogenous lactate efficiently closed KATP channels in GR neurons. These data suggest that (1) ATP-independent intracellular signalling mechanisms lead to the stimulation of hypothalamic neurons by glucose, and (2) these effects may be potentiated in vivo by the release of lactate from neighbouring glial cells. PMID:12381816

  6. Somatic ATP release from guinea pig sympathetic neurons does not require calcium-induced calcium release from internal stores

    OpenAIRE

    Merriam, Laura A.; Locknar, Sarah A.; Girard, Beatrice M.; Parsons, Rodney L.

    2010-01-01

    Prior studies indicated that a Ca2+-dependent release of ATP can be initiated from the soma of sympathetic neurons dissociated from guinea pig stellate ganglia. Previous studies also indicated that Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release (CICR) can modulate membrane excitability in these same neurons. As Ca2+ release from internal stores is thought to support somatodendritic transmitter release in other neurons, the present study investigated whether CICR is essential for somatic ATP release from dissociat...

  7. Control of chromatin structure by long noncoding RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhmdorfer, Gudrun; Wierzbicki, Andrzej T.

    2015-01-01

    Long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) is a pivotal factor regulating various aspects of genome activity. Genome regulation via DNA methylation and posttranslational histone modifications is a well-documented function of lncRNA in plants, fungi, and animals. Here, we summarize evidence showing that lncRNA also controls chromatin structure including nucleosome positioning and chromosome looping. We focus on data from plant experimental systems, discussed in the context of other eukaryotes. We explain the mechanisms of lncRNA-controlled chromatin remodeling and the implications of the functional interplay between noncoding transcription and several different chromatin remodelers. We propose that the unique properties of RNA make it suitable for controlling chromatin modifications and structure. PMID:26410408

  8. In vitro binding of nitracrine to DNA in chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmańska, D; Szmigiero, L; Gniazdowski, M

    1989-01-01

    In the presence of sulfhydryl compounds nitracrine, an anticancer drug, binds covalently to DNA. The accessibility of DNA in chromatin both to nitracrine and to 8-methoxypsoralen, which was used as a reference compound in this study, when assayed in NaCl concentrations from 0 to 2 M show similar characteristics. The initial decrease reaches a minimum at 0.15 M NaCl above which dissociation of non-histone proteins and histones at higher ionic strengths is demonstrated by an increase in accessible sites. The relative accessibility of DNA in chromatin to nitracrine is, however, lower than that found for 8-methoxypsoralen. Partial dissociation of chromatin with 0.7 M NaCl increases the accessibility of DNA in chromatin when assayed in the absence of NaCl but has no apparent influence when estimated at ionic strength close to physiological conditions. PMID:2742691

  9. Polymer Physics of the Large-Scale Structure of Chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Simona; Chiariello, Andrea Maria; Annunziatella, Carlo; Esposito, Andrea; Nicodemi, Mario

    2016-01-01

    We summarize the picture emerging from recently proposed models of polymer physics describing the general features of chromatin large scale spatial architecture, as revealed by microscopy and Hi-C experiments. PMID:27659986

  10. Probing Chromatin-modifying Enzymes with Chemical Tools

    KAUST Repository

    Fischle, Wolfgang

    2016-02-04

    Chromatin is the universal template of genetic information in all eukaryotic organisms. Chemical modifications of the DNA-packaging histone proteins and the DNA bases are crucial signaling events in directing the use and readout of eukaryotic genomes. The enzymes that install and remove these chromatin modifications as well as the proteins that bind these marks govern information that goes beyond the sequence of DNA. Therefore, these so-called epigenetic regulators are intensively studied and represent promising drug targets in modern medicine. We summarize and discuss recent advances in the field of chemical biology that have provided chromatin research with sophisticated tools for investigating the composition, activity, and target sites of chromatin modifying enzymes and reader proteins.

  11. HACking the centromere chromatin code: insights from human artificial chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Jan H; Martins, Nuno M C; Larionov, Vladimir; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Earnshaw, William C

    2012-07-01

    The centromere is a specialized chromosomal region that serves as the assembly site of the kinetochore. At the centromere, CENP-A nucleosomes form part of a chromatin landscape termed centrochromatin. This chromatin environment conveys epigenetic marks regulating kinetochore formation. Recent work sheds light on the intricate relationship between centrochromatin state, the CENP-A assembly pathway and the maintenance of centromere function. Here, we review the emerging picture of how chromatin affects mammalian kinetochore formation. We place particular emphasis on data obtained from Human Artificial Chromosome (HAC) biology and the targeted engineering of centrochromatin using synthetic HACs. We discuss implications of these findings, which indicate that a delicate balance of histone modifications and chromatin state dictates both de novo centromere formation and the maintenance of centromere identity in dividing cell populations.

  12. Insights into Chromatin Structure and Dynamics in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Rosa

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The packaging of chromatin into the nucleus of a eukaryotic cell requires an extraordinary degree of compaction and physical organization. In recent years, it has been shown that this organization is dynamically orchestrated to regulate responses to exogenous stimuli as well as to guide complex cell-type-specific developmental programs. Gene expression is regulated by the compartmentalization of functional domains within the nucleus, by distinct nucleosome compositions accomplished via differential modifications on the histone tails and through the replacement of core histones by histone variants. In this review, we focus on these aspects of chromatin organization and discuss novel approaches such as live cell imaging and photobleaching as important tools likely to give significant insights into our understanding of the very dynamic nature of chromatin and chromatin regulatory processes. We highlight the contribution plant studies have made in this area showing the potential advantages of plants as models in understanding this fundamental aspect of biology.

  13. Does seminal fluid viscosity influence sperm chromatin integrity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalkrishnan, K; Padwal, V; Balaiah, D

    2000-01-01

    A retrospective study was undertaken to investigate whether viscosity alters sperm chromatin integrity. Semen samples were obtained from 269 men attending the infertility clinic. The viscosity was measured quantitatively by needle and syringe method and the viscosity ratio was calculated against distilled water. The chromatin integrity was evaluated by in vitro decondensation test using 1% SDS and 6 mM EDTA. According to the viscosity ratios the samples were divided into 2 groups: I, normal (ratio 9, n = 30) viscosity. Chromatin integrity was significantly lower in the group with higher viscosity. Significant decrease in sperm count and motility were seen in group II as compared to group I. Thus, hyperviscosity of seminal fluid alters the sperm chromatin integrity. PMID:11028927

  14. Shelterin Protects Chromosome Ends by Compacting Telomeric Chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandaria, Jigar N; Qin, Peiwu; Berk, Veysel; Chu, Steven; Yildiz, Ahmet

    2016-02-11

    Telomeres, repetitive DNA sequences at chromosome ends, are shielded against the DNA damage response (DDR) by the shelterin complex. To understand how shelterin protects telomere ends, we investigated the structural organization of telomeric chromatin in human cells using super-resolution microscopy. We found that telomeres form compact globular structures through a complex network of interactions between shelterin subunits and telomeric DNA, but not by DNA methylation, histone deacetylation, or histone trimethylation at telomeres and subtelomeric regions. Mutations that abrogate shelterin assembly or removal of individual subunits from telomeres cause up to a 10-fold increase in telomere volume. Decompacted telomeres accumulate DDR signals and become more accessible to telomere-associated proteins. Recompaction of telomeric chromatin using an orthogonal method displaces DDR signals from telomeres. These results reveal the chromatin remodeling activity of shelterin and demonstrate that shelterin-mediated compaction of telomeric chromatin provides robust protection of chromosome ends against the DDR machinery. PMID:26871633

  15. Neutron scattering studies on chromatin higher-order structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graziano, V.; Gerchman, S.E.; Schneider, D.K.; Ramakrishnan, V. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31

    We have been engaged in studies of the structure and condensation of chromatin into the 30nm filament using small-angle neutron scattering. We have also used deuterated histone H1 to determine its location in the chromatin 30nm filament. Our studies indicate that chromatin condenses with increasing ionic strength to a limiting structure that has a mass per unit length of 6-7 nucleosomes/11 nm. They also show that the linker histone H1/H5 is located in the interior of the chromatin filament, in a position compatible with its binding to the inner face of the nucleosome. Analysis of the mass per unit length as a function of H5 stoichiometry suggests that 5-7 contiguous nucleosomes need to have H5 bound before a stable higher order structure can exist.

  16. FACT facilitates chromatin transcription by RNA polymerases I and III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birch, Joanna L; Tan, Bertrand C-M; Panov, Kostya I;

    2009-01-01

    Efficient transcription elongation from a chromatin template requires RNA polymerases (Pols) to negotiate nucleosomes. Our biochemical analyses demonstrate that RNA Pol I can transcribe through nucleosome templates and that this requires structural rearrangement of the nucleosomal core particle....... The subunits of the histone chaperone FACT (facilitates chromatin transcription), SSRP1 and Spt16, co-purify and co-immunoprecipitate with mammalian Pol I complexes. In cells, SSRP1 is detectable at the rRNA gene repeats. Crucially, siRNA-mediated repression of FACT subunit expression in cells results...... in a significant reduction in 47S pre-rRNA levels, whereas synthesis of the first 40 nt of the rRNA is not affected, implying that FACT is important for Pol I transcription elongation through chromatin. FACT also associates with RNA Pol III complexes, is present at the chromatin of genes transcribed by Pol III...

  17. Chromatin remodeling and stem cell theory of relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerny, Jan; Quesenberry, Peter J

    2004-10-01

    The field of stem cell biology is currently being redefined. Stem cell (hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic) differentiation has been considered hierarchical in nature, but recent data suggest that there is no progenitor/stem cell hierarchy, but rather a reversible continuum. The stem cell (hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic) phenotype, the total differentiation capacity (hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic), gene expression as well as other stem cell functional characteristics (homing, receptor and adhesion molecule expression) vary throughout a cell-cycle transit widely. This seems to be dependent on shifting chromatin and gene expression with cell-cycle transit. The published data on DNA methylation, histone acetylation, and also RNAi, the major regulators of gene expression, conjoins very well and provides an explanation for the major issues of stem cell biology. Those features of stem cells mentioned above can be rather difficult to apprehend when a classical hierarchy biology view is applied, but they become clear and easier to understand once they are correlated with the underlining epigenetic changes. We are entering a new era of stem cell biology the era of "chromatinomics." We are one step closer to the practical use of cellular therapy for degenerative diseases.

  18. Atp2c2 Is Transcribed From a Unique Transcriptional Start Site in Mouse Pancreatic Acinar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenech, Melissa A; Sullivan, Caitlin M; Ferreira, Lucimar T; Mehmood, Rashid; MacDonald, William A; Stathopulos, Peter B; Pin, Christopher L

    2016-12-01

    Proper regulation of cytosolic Ca(2+) is critical for pancreatic acinar cell function. Disruptions in normal Ca(2+) concentrations affect numerous cellular functions and are associated with pancreatitis. Membrane pumps and channels regulate cytosolic Ca(2+) homeostasis by promoting rapid Ca(2+) movement. Determining how expression of Ca(2+) modulators is regulated and the cellular alterations that occur upon changes in expression can provide insight into initiating events of pancreatitis. The goal of this study was to delineate the gene structure and regulation of a novel pancreas-specific isoform for Secretory Pathway Ca(2+) ATPase 2 (termed SPCA2C), which is encoded from the Atp2c2 gene. Using Next Generation Sequencing of RNA (RNA-seq), chromatin immunoprecipitation for epigenetic modifications and promoter-reporter assays, a novel transcriptional start site was identified that promotes expression of a transcript containing the last four exons of the Atp2c2 gene (Atp2c2c). This region was enriched for epigenetic marks and pancreatic transcription factors that promote gene activation. Promoter activity for regions upstream of the ATG codon in Atp2c2's 24th exon was observed in vitro but not in in vivo. Translation from this ATG encodes a protein aligned with the carboxy terminal of SPCA2. Functional analysis in HEK 293A cells indicates a unique role for SPCA2C in increasing cytosolic Ca(2+) . RNA analysis indicates that the decreased Atp2c2c expression observed early in experimental pancreatitis reflects a global molecular response of acinar cells to reduce cytosolic Ca(2+) levels. Combined, these results suggest SPCA2C affects Ca(2+) homeostasis in pancreatic acinar cells in a unique fashion relative to other Ca(2+) ATPases. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2768-2778, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27017909

  19. The effect of the neuropeptide substance P on desensitization of ATP receptors of PC12 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Khiroug, L.; Giniatullin, R; Talantova, M.; Nistri, A

    1997-01-01

    Patch clamp recording (whole cell configuration) was employed to investigate the modulatory action of substance P on inward currents elicited by adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP, focally applied via a pressure pipette) from phaechromocytoma (PC12) cells usually held at −70 mV.Bath-applied substance P (0.2–20 μM) had no effect on baseline membrane current but reversibly reduced ATP peak currents in a concentration-dependent fashion. The depressant effect was not associated with a change in the A...

  20. The involvement of P2Y12 receptors, NADPH oxidase, and lipid rafts in the action of extracellular ATP on synaptic transmission at the frog neuromuscular junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giniatullin, A; Petrov, A; Giniatullin, R

    2015-01-29

    Adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) is the main co-transmitter accompanying the release of acetylcholine from motor nerve terminals. Previously, we revealed the direct inhibitory action of extracellular ATP on transmitter release via redox-dependent mechanism. However, the receptor mechanism of ATP action and ATP-induced sources of reactive oxygen sources (ROS) remained not fully understood. In the current study, using microelectrode recordings of synaptic currents from the frog neuromuscular junction, we analyzed the receptor subtype involved in synaptic action of ATP, receptor coupling to NADPH oxidase and potential location of ATP receptors within the lipid rafts. Using subtype-specific antagonists, we found that the P2Y13 blocker 2-[(2-chloro-5-nitrophenyl)azo]-5-hydroxy-6-methyl-3-[(phosphonooxy)methyl]-4-pyridinecarboxaldehyde did not prevent the depressant action of ATP. In contrast, the P2Y12 antagonist 2-methylthioadenosine 5'-monophosphate abolished the inhibitory action of ATP, suggesting the key role of P2Y12 receptors in ATP action. As the action of ATP is redox-dependent, we also tested potential involvement of the NADPH oxidase, known as a common inducer of ROS. The depressant action of extracellular ATP was significantly reduced by diphenyleneiodonium chloride and 4-(2-aminoethyl)-benzenesulfonyl fluoride hydrochloride, two structurally different inhibitors of NADPH oxidase, indicating that this enzyme indeed mediates the action of ATP. Since the location and activity of various receptors are often associated with lipid rafts, we next tested whether ATP-driven inhibition depends on lipid rafts. We found that the disruption of lipid rafts with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin reduced and largely delayed the action of ATP. Taken together, these data revealed key steps in the purinergic control of synaptic transmission via P2Y12 receptors associated with lipid rafts, and identified NADPH oxidase as the main source of ATP-induced inhibitory ROS at the neuromuscular

  1. Chromatin structure modulates DNA repair by photolyase in vivo.

    OpenAIRE

    Suter, B.; Livingstone-Zatchej, M; Thoma, F

    1997-01-01

    Yeast and many other organisms use nucleotide excision repair (NER) and photolyase in the presence of light (photoreactivation) to repair cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), a major class of DNA lesions generated by UV light. To study the role of photoreactivation at the chromatin level in vivo, we used yeast strains which contained minichromosomes (YRpTRURAP, YRpCS1) with well-characterized chromatin structures. The strains were either proficient (RAD1) or deficient (rad1 delta) in NER. In...

  2. Higher order chromatin structure: bridging physics and biology

    OpenAIRE

    Fudenberg, Geoffrey; Mirny, Leonid A.

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in microscopy and genomic techniques have provided new insight into spatial chromatin organization inside of the nucleus. In particular, chromosome conformation capture data has highlighted the relevance of polymer physics for high-order chromatin organization. In this context, we review basic polymer states, discuss how an appropriate polymer model can be determined from experimental data, and examine the success and limitations of various polymer models of high-order interph...

  3. Comparative Features of Copper ATPases ATP7A and ATP7B Heterologously Expressed in COS-1 Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yueyong; Pilankatta, Rajendra; Hatori, Yuta; Lewis, David; Inesi, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    ATP7A and ATP7B are P-type ATPases required for copper homeostasis and involved in the etiology of Menkes and Wilson diseases. We used heterologous expression of ATP7A or ATP7B in COS-1 cells infected with adenovirus vectors to characterize differential features pertinent to each protein expressed in the same mammalian cell type, rather than to extrinsic factors related to different cells sustaining expression. Electrophoretic analysis of the expressed protein, before and after purification, ...

  4. Ectopically tethered CP190 induces large-scale chromatin decondensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahanger, Sajad H.; Günther, Katharina; Weth, Oliver; Bartkuhn, Marek; Bhonde, Ramesh R.; Shouche, Yogesh S.; Renkawitz, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Insulator mediated alteration in higher-order chromatin and/or nucleosome organization is an important aspect of epigenetic gene regulation. Recent studies have suggested a key role for CP190 in such processes. In this study, we analysed the effects of ectopically tethered insulator factors on chromatin structure and found that CP190 induces large-scale decondensation when targeted to a condensed lacO array in mammalian and Drosophila cells. In contrast, dCTCF alone, is unable to cause such a decondensation, however, when CP190 is present, dCTCF recruits it to the lacO array and mediates chromatin unfolding. The CP190 induced opening of chromatin may not be correlated with transcriptional activation, as binding of CP190 does not enhance luciferase activity in reporter assays. We propose that CP190 may mediate histone modification and chromatin remodelling activity to induce an open chromatin state by its direct recruitment or targeting by a DNA binding factor such as dCTCF.

  5. H+/ATP ratio during ATP hydrolysis by mitochondria: modification of the chemiosmotic theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, M D; Lehninger, A L

    1977-05-01

    The stoichiometry of H+ ejection by mitochondria during hydrolysis of a small pulse of ATP (the H+/ATP ratio) has been reexamined in the light of our recent observation that the stoichiometry of H+ ejection during mitochondrial electron transport (the H+/site ratio) was previously underestimated. We show that earlier estimates of the H+/ATP ratio in intact mitochondria were based upon an invalid correction for scaler H+ production and describe a modified method for determination of this ratio which utilizes mersalyl or N-ethylmaleimide to prevent complicating transmembrane movements of phosphate and H+. This method gives a value for the H+/ATP ratio of 2.0 without the need for questionable corrections, compared with a value of 3.0 for the H+/site ratio also obtained by pulse methods. A modified version of the chemiosmotic theory is presented, in which 3 H+ are ejected per pair of electrons traversing each energy-conserving site of the respiratory chain. Of these, 2 H+ return to the matrix through the ATPase to form ATP from ADP and phosphate, and 1 H+ returns through the combined action of the phosphate and adenine nucleotide exchange carriers of the inner membrane to allow the energy-requiring influx of Pi and ADP3- and efflux of ATP4-. Thus, up to one-third of the energy input into synthesis of extramitochondrial ATP may be required for transport work. Since other methods suggest that the H+/site significantly exceeds 3.0, an alternative possibility is that 4 h+ are ejected per site, followed by return of 3 H+ through the ATPase and 1 H+ through the operation of the proton-coupled membrane transport systems.

  6. H+/ATP ratio during ATP hydrolysis by mitochondria: modification of the chemiosmotic theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, M D; Lehninger, A L

    1977-05-01

    The stoichiometry of H+ ejection by mitochondria during hydrolysis of a small pulse of ATP (the H+/ATP ratio) has been reexamined in the light of our recent observation that the stoichiometry of H+ ejection during mitochondrial electron transport (the H+/site ratio) was previously underestimated. We show that earlier estimates of the H+/ATP ratio in intact mitochondria were based upon an invalid correction for scaler H+ production and describe a modified method for determination of this ratio which utilizes mersalyl or N-ethylmaleimide to prevent complicating transmembrane movements of phosphate and H+. This method gives a value for the H+/ATP ratio of 2.0 without the need for questionable corrections, compared with a value of 3.0 for the H+/site ratio also obtained by pulse methods. A modified version of the chemiosmotic theory is presented, in which 3 H+ are ejected per pair of electrons traversing each energy-conserving site of the respiratory chain. Of these, 2 H+ return to the matrix through the ATPase to form ATP from ADP and phosphate, and 1 H+ returns through the combined action of the phosphate and adenine nucleotide exchange carriers of the inner membrane to allow the energy-requiring influx of Pi and ADP3- and efflux of ATP4-. Thus, up to one-third of the energy input into synthesis of extramitochondrial ATP may be required for transport work. Since other methods suggest that the H+/site significantly exceeds 3.0, an alternative possibility is that 4 h+ are ejected per site, followed by return of 3 H+ through the ATPase and 1 H+ through the operation of the proton-coupled membrane transport systems. PMID:17116

  7. NS5ATP6 modulates intracellular triglyceride content through FGF21 and independently of SIRT1 and SREBP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhongshu; Feng, Shenghu; Zhou, Li; Liu, Shunai; Cheng, Jun

    2016-06-17

    The prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is rising strikingly in Western countries and China. The molecular biological mechanism of NAFLD remains unclear, with no effective therapies developed so far. Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is a recently discovered hormone, with safe lipid lowering effects. FGF21 analogs are being developed for clinical application. Here we demonstrated that a novel gene, NS5ATP6, modulated intracellular triglyceride (TG) content independently of sirtuin1 (SIRT1) and sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP1) in HepG2 cells. Interestingly, NS5ATP6 regulated FGF21 expression both at the mRNA and protein levels. The modulatory effects of NS5ATP6 on intracellular TG content depended upon FGF21. Further studies revealed that NS5ATP6 decreased the promoter activity of FGF21. In addition, NS5ATP6 regulated the expression of miR-577, which directly targeted and regulated FGF21. Therefore, miR-577 might be involved in NS5ATP6 regulation of FGF21 at the post-transcriptional level. In conclusion, NS5ATP6 regulates the intracellular TG level via FGF21, and independently of SIRT1 and SREBP1. PMID:27179781

  8. Making Sense of the Tangle: Insights into Chromatin Folding and Gene Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ill-Min; Ketharnathan, Sarada; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Thiruvengadam, Muthu; Rani, Mari Kavitha; Rajakumar, Govindasamy

    2016-01-01

    Proximity ligation assays such as circularized chromosome conformation capture and high-throughput chromosome capture assays have shed light on the structural organization of the interphase genome. Functional topologically associating domains (TADs) that constitute the building blocks of genomic organization are disrupted and reconstructed during the cell cycle. Epigenetic memory, as well as the sequence of chromosomes, regulate TAD reconstitution. Sub-TAD domains that are invariant across cell types have been identified, and contacts between these domains, rather than looping, are speculated to drive chromatin folding. Replication domains are established simultaneously with TADs during the cell cycle and the two correlate well in terms of characteristic features, such as lamin association and histone modifications. CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) and cohesin cooperate across different cell types to regulate genes and genome organization. CTCF elements that demarcate TAD boundaries are commonly disrupted in cancer and promote oncogene activation. Chromatin looping facilitates interactions between distant promoters and enhancers, and the resulting enhanceosome complex promotes gene expression. Deciphering the chromatin tangle requires comprehensive integrative analyses of DNA- and protein-dependent factors that regulate genomic organization. PMID:27669308

  9. An Allosteric Interaction Links USP7 to Deubiquitination and Chromatin Targeting of UHRF1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Min Zhang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The protein stability and chromatin functions of UHRF1 (ubiquitin-like, containing PHD and RING finger domains, 1 are regulated in a cell-cycle-dependent manner. We report a structural characterization of the complex between UHRF1 and the deubiquitinase USP7. The first two UBL domains of USP7 bind to the polybasic region (PBR of UHRF1, and this interaction is required for the USP7-mediated deubiquitination of UHRF1. Importantly, we find that the USP7-binding site of the UHRF1 PBR overlaps with the region engaging in an intramolecular interaction with the N-terminal tandem Tudor domain (TTD. We show that the USP7-UHRF1 interaction perturbs the TTD-PBR interaction of UHRF1, thereby shifting the conformation of UHRF1 from a TTD-“occluded” state to a state open for multivalent histone binding. Consistently, introduction of a USP7-interaction-defective mutation to UHRF1 significantly reduces its chromatin association. Together, these results link USP7 interaction to the dynamic deubiquitination and chromatin association of UHRF1.

  10. Involvement of chromatin and histone acetylation in theregulation of HIV-LTR by thyroid hormone receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The HIV-1 LTR controls the expression of HIV-1 viral genes and thus is critical for viral propagation and pathology.Numerous host factors have been shown to participate in the regulation of the LTR promoter.Among them is the thyroid hormone (T3) receptor (TR).TR has been shown to bind to the critical region of the promoter that contain the NFκB and Sp1 binding sites.Interestingly,earlier transient transfection studies in tissue culture cells have yielded contradicting conclusions on the role of TR in LTR regulation,likely due to the use of different cell types and/or lack of proper chromatin organization.Here,using the frog oocyte as a model system that allows replication-coupled chromatin assembly,mimicking that in somatic cells,we demonstrate that unliganded heterodimers of TR and RXR (9-cis retinoic acid receptor) repress LTR while the addition of T3 relieves the repression and further activates the promoter.More importantly,we show that chromatin and unliganded TR/RXR synergize to repress the promoter in a histone deacetylase-dependent manner.

  11. Fission yeast Scm3: A CENP-A receptor required for integrity of subkinetochore chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidoux, Alison L; Choi, Eun Shik; Abbott, Johanna K R; Liu, Xingkun; Kagansky, Alexander; Castillo, Araceli G; Hamilton, Georgina L; Richardson, William; Rappsilber, Juri; He, Xiangwei; Allshire, Robin C

    2009-02-13

    The mechanisms ensuring specific incorporation of CENP-A at centromeres are poorly understood. Mis16 and Mis18 are required for CENP-A localization at centromeres and form a complex that is conserved from fission yeast to human. Fission yeast sim1 mutants that alleviate kinetochore domain silencing are defective in Scm3(Sp), the ortholog of budding yeast Scm3(Sc). Scm3(Sp) depends on Mis16/18 for its centromere localization and like them is recruited to centromeres in late anaphase. Importantly, Scm3(Sp) coaffinity purifies with CENP-A(Cnp1) and associates with CENP-A(Cnp1) in vitro, yet localizes independently of intact CENP-A(Cnp1) chromatin and is differentially released from chromatin. While Scm3(Sc) has been proposed to form a unique hexameric nucleosome with CENP-A(Cse4) and histone H4 at budding yeast point centromeres, we favor a model in which Scm3(Sp) acts as a CENP-A(Cnp1) receptor/assembly factor, cooperating with Mis16 and Mis18 to receive CENP-A(Cnp1) from the Sim3 escort and mediate assembly of CENP-A(Cnp1) into subkinetochore chromatin. PMID:19217404

  12. Making Sense of the Tangle: Insights into Chromatin Folding and Gene Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ill-Min Chung

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Proximity ligation assays such as circularized chromosome conformation capture and high-throughput chromosome capture assays have shed light on the structural organization of the interphase genome. Functional topologically associating domains (TADs that constitute the building blocks of genomic organization are disrupted and reconstructed during the cell cycle. Epigenetic memory, as well as the sequence of chromosomes, regulate TAD reconstitution. Sub-TAD domains that are invariant across cell types have been identified, and contacts between these domains, rather than looping, are speculated to drive chromatin folding. Replication domains are established simultaneously with TADs during the cell cycle and the two correlate well in terms of characteristic features, such as lamin association and histone modifications. CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF and cohesin cooperate across different cell types to regulate genes and genome organization. CTCF elements that demarcate TAD boundaries are commonly disrupted in cancer and promote oncogene activation. Chromatin looping facilitates interactions between distant promoters and enhancers, and the resulting enhanceosome complex promotes gene expression. Deciphering the chromatin tangle requires comprehensive integrative analyses of DNA- and protein-dependent factors that regulate genomic organization.

  13. An ATP synthase harboring an atypical γ-subunit is involved in ATP synthesis in tomato fruit chromoplasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pateraki, Irini; Renato, Marta; Azcõn-Bieto, Joaquín;

    2013-01-01

    synthesis and accumulation of carotenoids. This transition renders chromoplasts unable to photochemically synthesize ATP, and therefore these organelles need to obtain the ATP required for anabolic processes through alternative sources. It is widely accepted that the ATP used for biosynthetic processes...... physiological conditions found in this organelle. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd....

  14. Pyrazinoic Acid Decreases the Proton Motive Force, Respiratory ATP Synthesis Activity, and Cellular ATP Levels▿†

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, P.; Haagsma, A.C.; Pham, H.; Maaskant, J. J.; Mol, S; Lill, H.; Bald, D

    2011-01-01

    Pyrazinoic acid, the active form of the first-line antituberculosis drug pyrazinamide, decreased the proton motive force and respiratory ATP synthesis rates in subcellular mycobacterial membrane assays. Pyrazinoic acid also significantly lowered cellular ATP levels in Mycobacterium bovis BCG. These results indicate that the predominant mechanism of killing by this drug may operate by depletion of cellular ATP reserves.

  15. The distribution of ATP within tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) embryos correlates with germination whee as total ATP concentration does not

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoelstra, P.; Joosen, R.V.L.; Hilhorst, H.W.M.

    2002-01-01

    The distribution of ATP in tomato seeds was visualized by monitoring the luminescence of frozen sections on top of a gel containing all the components of the luciferase reaction, but excluding ATP. ATP was imaged in germinating tomato seeds at intervals of 3, 6, 17, 24 and 48 h and in seeds with pri

  16. Chromatin-associated degradation is defined by UBXN-3/FAF1 to safeguard DNA replication fork progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, André; Pirson, Paul A; Pilger, Domenic; Halder, Swagata; Achuthankutty, Divya; Kashkar, Hamid; Ramadan, Kristijan; Hoppe, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    The coordinated activity of DNA replication factors is a highly dynamic process that involves ubiquitin-dependent regulation. In this context, the ubiquitin-directed ATPase CDC-48/p97 recently emerged as a key regulator of chromatin-associated degradation in several of the DNA metabolic pathways that assure genome integrity. However, the spatiotemporal control of distinct CDC-48/p97 substrates in the chromatin environment remained unclear. Here, we report that progression of the DNA replication fork is coordinated by UBXN-3/FAF1. UBXN-3/FAF1 binds to the licensing factor CDT-1 and additional ubiquitylated proteins, thus promoting CDC-48/p97-dependent turnover and disassembly of DNA replication factor complexes. Consequently, inactivation of UBXN-3/FAF1 stabilizes CDT-1 and CDC-45/GINS on chromatin, causing severe defects in replication fork dynamics accompanied by pronounced replication stress and eventually resulting in genome instability. Our work identifies a critical substrate selection module of CDC-48/p97 required for chromatin-associated protein degradation in both Caenorhabditis elegans and humans, which is relevant to oncogenesis and aging. PMID:26842564

  17. A chromatin-independent role of Polycomb-like 1 to stabilize p53 and promote cellular quiescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brien, Gerard L; Healy, Evan; Jerman, Emilia; Conway, Eric; Fadda, Elisa; O'Donovan, Darragh; Krivtsov, Andrei V; Rice, Alan M; Kearney, Conor J; Flaus, Andrew; McDade, Simon S; Martin, Seamus J; McLysaght, Aoife; O'Connell, David J; Armstrong, Scott A; Bracken, Adrian P

    2015-11-01

    Polycomb-like proteins 1-3 (PCL1-3) are substoichiometric components of the Polycomb-repressive complex 2 (PRC2) that are essential for association of the complex with chromatin. However, it remains unclear why three proteins with such apparent functional redundancy exist in mammals. Here we characterize their divergent roles in both positively and negatively regulating cellular proliferation. We show that while PCL2 and PCL3 are E2F-regulated genes expressed in proliferating cells, PCL1 is a p53 target gene predominantly expressed in quiescent cells. Ectopic expression of any PCL protein recruits PRC2 to repress the INK4A gene; however, only PCL2 and PCL3 confer an INK4A-dependent proliferative advantage. Remarkably, PCL1 has evolved a PRC2- and chromatin-independent function to negatively regulate proliferation. We show that PCL1 binds to and stabilizes p53 to induce cellular quiescence. Moreover, depletion of PCL1 phenocopies the defects in maintaining cellular quiescence associated with p53 loss. This newly evolved function is achieved by the binding of the PCL1 N-terminal PHD domain to the C-terminal domain of p53 through two unique serine residues, which were acquired during recent vertebrate evolution. This study illustrates the functional bifurcation of PCL proteins, which act in both a chromatin-dependent and a chromatin-independent manner to regulate the INK4A and p53 pathways. PMID:26494712

  18. Inhibition of ATP Synthase by Chlorinated Adenosine Analogue

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Lisa S.; Nowak, Billie J.; Ayres, Mary L.; Krett, Nancy L.; Rosen, Steven T.; Zhang, Shuxing; Gandhi, Varsha

    2009-01-01

    8-Chloroadenosine (8-Cl-Ado) is a ribonucleoside analogue that is currently in clinical trial for chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Based on the decline in cellular ATP pool following 8-Cl-Ado treatment, we hypothesized that 8-Cl-ADP and 8-Cl-ATP may interfere with ATP synthase, a key enzyme in ATP production. Mitochondrial ATP synthase is composed of two major parts; FO intermembrane base and F1 domain, containing α and β subunits. Crystal structures of both α and β subunits that bind to the sub...

  19. Interphase Chromosome Conformation and Chromatin-Chromatin Interactions in Human Epithelial Cells Cultured Under Different Gravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael; Hada, Megumi; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    Microgravity has been shown to alter global gene expression patterns and protein levels both in cultured cells and animal models. It has been suggested that the packaging of chromatin fibers in the interphase nucleus is closely related to genome function, and the changes in transcriptional activity are tightly correlated with changes in chromatin folding. This study explores the changes of chromatin conformation and chromatin-chromatin interactions in the simulated microgravity environment, and investigates their correlation to the expression of genes located at different regions of the chromosome. To investigate the folding of chromatin in interphase under various culture conditions, human epithelial cells, fibroblasts, and lymphocytes were fixed in the G1 phase. Interphase chromosomes were hybridized with a multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) probe for chromosome 3 which distinguishes six regions of the chromosome as separate colors. After images were captured with a laser scanning confocal microscope, the 3-dimensional structure of interphase chromosome 3 was reconstructed at multi-mega base pair scale. In order to determine the effects of microgravity on chromosome conformation and orientation, measures such as distance between homologous pairs, relative orientation of chromosome arms about a shared midpoint, and orientation of arms within individual chromosomes were all considered as potentially impacted by simulated microgravity conditions. The studies revealed non-random folding of chromatin in interphase, and suggested an association of interphase chromatin folding with radiation-induced chromosome aberration hotspots. Interestingly, the distributions of genes with expression changes over chromosome 3 in cells cultured under microgravity environment are apparently clustered on specific loci and chromosomes. This data provides important insights into how mammalian cells respond to microgravity at molecular level.

  20. ATP release, generation and hydrolysis in exocrine pancreatic duct cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowal, Justyna Magdalena; Yegutkin, G.G.; Novak, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    purine homeostasis in a pancreatic duct cell model involving: ATP release by several mechanisms and subsequent nucleotide breakdown and ATP regeneration via counteracting nucleotide-inactivating and nucleotide-phosphorylating ecto-enzymes. We suggest that extracellular ATP homeostasis in pancreatic ducts......Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) regulates pancreatic duct function via P2Y and P2X receptors. It is well known that ATP is released from upstream pancreatic acinar cells. The ATP homeostasis in pancreatic ducts, which secrete bicarbonate-rich fluid, has not yet been examined. First, our...... aim was to reveal whether pancreatic duct cells release ATP locally and whether they enzymatically modify extracellular nucleotides/sides. Second, we wished to explore which physiological and pathophysiological factors may be important in these processes. Using a human pancreatic duct cell line, Capan...

  1. Synergistic augmentation of ATP-induced interleukin-6 production by arsenite in HaCaT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumi, Daigo; Asao, Masashi; Okada, Hideta; Yogi, Kuniko; Miyataka, Hideki; Himeno, Seiichiro

    2016-06-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure causes cutaneous diseases such as hyperkeratosis and skin cancer. However, little information has been available regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying these symptoms. Because extracellular ATP and interleukin-6 (IL-6) are involved in pathological aspects of cutaneous diseases, we examined whether sodium arsenite (As(III)) affects ATP-induced IL-6 production in human epidermal keratinocyte HaCaT cells. The results showed that the addition of As(III) into the medium of HaCaT cells dose dependently increased the production of IL-6 induced by extracellular ATP, although As(III) alone had no effect on IL-6 production. To elucidate the mechanism of the synergistic effect of As(III) on IL-6 production by extracellular ATP, we next examined the phosphorylation of p38, ERK and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), since we found that these signaling molecules were stimulated by exposure to extracellular ATP. The results indicated that ATP-induced phosphorylation of p38, ERK and EGFR was synergistically enhanced by co-exposure to As(III). To clarify the mechanisms underlying the enhanced phosphorylation of p38, ERK and EGFR by As(III), we explored two possible mechanisms: the inhibition of extracellular ATP degradation and the inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) activity by As(III). The degradation of extracellular ATP was not changed by As(III), whereas the activity of PTPs was significantly inhibited by As(III). Our results suggest that As(III) augments ATP-induced IL-6 production in HaCaT cells through enhanced phosphorylation of the EGFR and p38/ERK pathways, which is associated with the inhibition of PTPs activity. PMID:26104857

  2. Discovery of transcription factors and regulatory regions driving in vivo tumor development by ATAC-seq and FAIRE-seq open chromatin profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristofer Davie

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Genomic enhancers regulate spatio-temporal gene expression by recruiting specific combinations of transcription factors (TFs. When TFs are bound to active regulatory regions, they displace canonical nucleosomes, making these regions biochemically detectable as nucleosome-depleted regions or accessible/open chromatin. Here we ask whether open chromatin profiling can be used to identify the entire repertoire of active promoters and enhancers underlying tissue-specific gene expression during normal development and oncogenesis in vivo. To this end, we first compare two different approaches to detect open chromatin in vivo using the Drosophila eye primordium as a model system: FAIRE-seq, based on physical separation of open versus closed chromatin; and ATAC-seq, based on preferential integration of a transposon into open chromatin. We find that both methods reproducibly capture the tissue-specific chromatin activity of regulatory regions, including promoters, enhancers, and insulators. Using both techniques, we screened for regulatory regions that become ectopically active during Ras-dependent oncogenesis, and identified 3778 regions that become (over-activated during tumor development. Next, we applied motif discovery to search for candidate transcription factors that could bind these regions and identified AP-1 and Stat92E as key regulators. We validated the importance of Stat92E in the development of the tumors by introducing a loss of function Stat92E mutant, which was sufficient to rescue the tumor phenotype. Additionally we tested if the predicted Stat92E responsive regulatory regions are genuine, using ectopic induction of JAK/STAT signaling in developing eye discs, and observed that similar chromatin changes indeed occurred. Finally, we determine that these are functionally significant regulatory changes, as nearby target genes are up- or down-regulated. In conclusion, we show that FAIRE-seq and ATAC-seq based open chromatin profiling

  3. Structural Fluctuations of the Chromatin Fiber within Topologically Associating Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiana, Guido; Amitai, Assaf; Pollex, Tim; Piolot, Tristan; Holcman, David; Heard, Edith; Giorgetti, Luca

    2016-03-29

    Experiments based on chromosome conformation capture have shown that mammalian genomes are partitioned into topologically associating domains (TADs), within which the chromatin fiber preferentially interacts. TADs may provide three-dimensional scaffolds allowing genes to contact their appropriate distal regulatory DNA sequences (e.g., enhancers) and thus to be properly regulated. Understanding the cell-to-cell and temporal variability of the chromatin fiber within TADs, and what determines them, is thus of great importance to better understand transcriptional regulation. We recently described an equilibrium polymer model that can accurately predict cell-to-cell variation of chromosome conformation within single TADs, from chromosome conformation capture-based data. Here we further analyze the conformational and energetic properties of our model. We show that the chromatin fiber within TADs can easily fluctuate between several conformational states, which are hierarchically organized and are not separated by important free energy barriers, and that this is facilitated by the fact that the chromatin fiber within TADs is close to the onset of the coil-globule transition. We further show that in this dynamic state the properties of the chromatin fiber, and its contact probabilities in particular, are determined in a nontrivial manner not only by site-specific interactions between strongly interacting loci along the fiber, but also by nonlocal correlations between pairs of contacts. Finally, we use live-cell experiments to measure the dynamics of the chromatin fiber in mouse embryonic stem cells, in combination with dynamical simulations, and predict that conformational changes within one TAD are likely to occur on timescales that are much shorter than the duration of one cell cycle. This suggests that genes and their regulatory elements may come together and disassociate several times during a cell cycle. These results have important implications for transcriptional

  4. Chromatin perturbations during the DNA damage response in higher eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkenist, Christopher J; Kastan, Michael B

    2015-12-01

    The DNA damage response is a widely used term that encompasses all signaling initiated at DNA lesions and damaged replication forks as it extends to orchestrate DNA repair, cell cycle checkpoints, cell death and senescence. ATM, an apical DNA damage signaling kinase, is virtually instantaneously activated following the introduction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN) complex, which has a catalytic role in DNA repair, and the KAT5 (Tip60) acetyltransferase are required for maximal ATM kinase activation in cells exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation. The sensing of DNA lesions occurs within a highly complex and heterogeneous chromatin environment. Chromatin decondensation and histone eviction at DSBs may be permissive for KAT5 binding to H3K9me3 and H3K36me3, ATM kinase acetylation and activation. Furthermore, chromatin perturbation may be a prerequisite for most DNA repair. Nucleosome disassembly during DNA repair was first reported in the 1970s by Smerdon and colleagues when nucleosome rearrangement was noted during the process of nucleotide excision repair of UV-induced DNA damage in human cells. Recently, the multi-functional protein nucleolin was identified as the relevant histone chaperone required for partial nucleosome disruption at DBSs, the recruitment of repair enzymes and for DNA repair. Notably, ATM kinase is activated by chromatin perturbations induced by a variety of treatments that do not directly cause DSBs, including treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors. Central to the mechanisms that activate ATR, the second apical DNA damage signaling kinase, outside of a stalled and collapsed replication fork in S-phase, is chromatin decondensation and histone eviction associated with DNA end resection at DSBs. Thus, a stress that is common to both ATM and ATR kinase activation is chromatin perturbations, and we argue that chromatin perturbations are both sufficient and required for induction of the DNA damage response

  5. Muscle interstitial ATP and norepinephrine concentrations in the human leg during exercise and ATP infusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Stefan P.; Gonzalez-Alonso, Jose; Nielsen, Jens Jung;

    2009-01-01

    .42+/-0.04 and 2.26+/-0.52 mumol/min; mean+/-SEM) and 2) one-leg knee-extensor exercise (18+/-0 and 37+/-2W) in 10 healthy, male subjects. Arterial ATP infusion and exercise increased leg blood flow (LBF) in the experimental leg from ~0.3 L/min at baseline to 4.2+/-0.3 and 4.6+/-0.5 L/min, respectively, whereas...... it was reduced or unchanged in the control leg. During arterial ATP infusion, muscle interstitial ATP, ADP, AMP and adenosine concentrations remained unchanged in both legs, but muscle interstitial NE increased from ~5.9 nmol/L at baseline to 8.3+/-1.2 and 8.7+/-0.7 nmol/L in the experimental and control leg...

  6. ATP from synaptic terminals and astrocytes regulates NMDA receptors and synaptic plasticity through PSD-95 multi-protein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalo, U; Palygin, O; Verkhratsky, A; Grant, S G N; Pankratov, Y

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies highlighted the importance of astrocyte-secreted molecules, such as ATP, for the slow modulation of synaptic transmission in central neurones. Biophysical mechanisms underlying the impact of gliotransmitters on the strength of individual synapse remain, however, unclear. Here we show that purinergic P2X receptors can bring significant contribution to the signalling in the individual synaptic boutons. ATP released from astrocytes facilitates a recruitment of P2X receptors into excitatory synapses by Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism. P2X receptors, co-localized with NMDA receptors in the excitatory synapses, can be activated by ATP co-released with glutamate from pre-synaptic terminals and by glia-derived ATP. An activation of P2X receptors in turn leads to down-regulation of postsynaptic NMDA receptors via Ca(2+)-dependent de-phosphorylation and interaction with PSD-95 multi-protein complex. Genetic deletion of the PSD-95 or P2X4 receptors obliterated ATP-mediated down-regulation of NMDA receptors. Impairment of purinergic modulation of NMDA receptors in the PSD-95 mutants dramatically decreased the threshold of LTP induction and increased the net magnitude of LTP. Our findings show that synergistic action of glia- and neurone-derived ATP can pre-modulate efficacy of excitatory synapses and thereby can have an important role in the glia-neuron communications and brain meta-plasticity. PMID:27640997

  7. Resonance phenomenon of the ATP motor as an ultrasensitive biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peirong; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Xu; Wang, Xia; Li, Xueren; Yue, Jiachang

    2012-09-28

    We designed a rotary biosensor as a damping effector, with the rotation of the F(0)F(1)-ATPase driven by Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) synthesis being indicated by the fluorescence intensity and a damping effect force being induced by the binding of an RNA molecule to its probe on the rotary biosensor. We found that the damping effect could contribute to the resonance phenomenon and energy transfer process of our rotary biosensor in the liquid phase. This result indicates that the ability of the rotary motor to operate in the vibration harmonic mode depends on the environmental conditions and mechanism in that a few molecules of the rotary biosensor could induce all of the sensor molecules to fluoresce together. These findings contribute to the theory study of the ATPase motor and future development of biosensors for ultrasensitive detection. PMID:22960174

  8. The dynamics of individual nucleosomes controls the chromatin condensation pathway: direct AFM visualization of variant chromatin

    CERN Document Server

    Montel, Fabien; Castelnovo, Martin; Bednar, Jan; Dimitrov, Stefan; Angelov, Dimitar; Faivre-Moskalenko, Cendrine

    2009-01-01

    Chromatin organization and dynamics is studied in this work at scales ranging from single nucleosome to nucleosomal array by using a unique combination of biochemical assays, single molecule imaging technique and numerical modeling. We demonstrate that a subtle modification in the nucleosome structure induced by the histone variant H2A.Bbd drastically modifies the higher order organization of the nucleosomal arrays. Importantly, as directly visualized by AFM, conventional H2A nucleosomal arrays exhibit specific local organization, in contrast to H2A.Bbd arrays, which show ?beads on a string? structure. The combination of systematic image analysis and theoretical modeling allows a quantitative description relating the observed gross structural changes of the arrays to their local organization. Our results strongly suggest that higher-order organization of H1-free nucleosomal arrays is mainly determined by the fluctuation properties of individual nucleosomes. Moreover, numerical simulations suggest the existenc...

  9. Bioanalytical Applications of Real-Time ATP Imaging Via Bioluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jason Alan Gruenhagen

    2003-12-12

    The research discussed within involves the development of novel applications of real-time imaging of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP). ATP was detected via bioluminescence and the firefly luciferase-catalyzed reaction of ATP and luciferin. The use of a microscope and an imaging detector allowed for spatially resolved quantitation of ATP release. Employing this method, applications in both biological and chemical systems were developed. First, the mechanism by which the compound 48/80 induces release of ATP from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) was investigated. Numerous enzyme activators and inhibitors were utilized to probe the second messenger systems involved in release. Compound 48/80 activated a G{sub q}-type protein to initiate ATP release from HUVECs. Ca{sup 2+} imaging along with ATP imaging revealed that activation of phospholipase C and induction of intracellular Ca{sup 2+} signaling were necessary for release of ATP. Furthermore, activation of protein kinase C inhibited the activity of phospholipase C and thus decreased the magnitude of ATP release. This novel release mechanism was compared to the existing theories of extracellular release of ATP. Bioluminescence imaging was also employed to examine the role of ATP in the field of neuroscience. The central nervous system (CNS) was dissected from the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis. Electrophysiological experiments demonstrated that the neurons of the Lymnaea were not damaged by any of the components of the imaging solution. ATP was continuously released by the ganglia of the CNS for over eight hours and varied from ganglion to ganglion and within individual ganglia. Addition of the neurotransmitters K{sup +} and serotonin increased release of ATP in certain regions of the Lymnaea CNS. Finally, the ATP imaging technique was investigated for the study of drug release systems. MCM-41-type mesoporous nanospheres were loaded with ATP and end-capped with mercaptoethanol functionalized Cd

  10. CDC28 phosphorylates Cac1p and regulates the association of chromatin assembly factor I with chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Daniel C B; Kakusho, Naoko; You, Zhiying; Gharib, Marlene; Wyse, Brandon; Drury, Erin; Weinreich, Michael; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Masai, Hisao; Yankulov, Krassimir

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin Assembly Factor I (CAF-I) plays a key role in the replication-coupled assembly of nucleosomes. It is expected that its function is linked to the regulation of the cell cycle, but little detail is available. Current models suggest that CAF-I is recruited to replication forks and to chromatin via an interaction between its Cac1p subunit and the replication sliding clamp, PCNA, and that this interaction is stimulated by the kinase CDC7. Here we show that another kinase, CDC28, phosphorylates Cac1p on serines 94 and 515 in early S phase and regulates its association with chromatin, but not its association with PCNA. Mutations in the Cac1p-phosphorylation sites of CDC28 but not of CDC7 substantially reduce the in vivo phosphorylation of Cac1p. However, mutations in the putative CDC7 target sites on Cac1p reduce its stability. The association of CAF-I with chromatin is impaired in a cdc28-1 mutant and to a lesser extent in a cdc7-1 mutant. In addition, mutations in the Cac1p-phosphorylation sites by both CDC28 and CDC7 reduce gene silencing at the telomeres. We propose that this phosphorylation represents a regulatory step in the recruitment of CAF-I to chromatin in early S phase that is distinct from the association of CAF-I with PCNA. Hence, we implicate CDC28 in the regulation of chromatin reassembly during DNA replication. These findings provide novel mechanistic insights on the links between cell-cycle regulation, DNA replication and chromatin reassembly.

  11. CDC28 phosphorylates Cac1p and regulates the association of chromatin assembly factor i with chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Daniel CB; Kakusho, Naoko; You, Zhiying; Gharib, Marlene; Wyse, Brandon; Drury, Erin; Weinreich, Michael; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Masai, Hisao; Yankulov, Krassimir

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin Assembly Factor I (CAF-I) plays a key role in the replication-coupled assembly of nucleosomes. It is expected that its function is linked to the regulation of the cell cycle, but little detail is available. Current models suggest that CAF-I is recruited to replication forks and to chromatin via an interaction between its Cac1p subunit and the replication sliding clamp, PCNA, and that this interaction is stimulated by the kinase CDC7. Here we show that another kinase, CDC28, phosphorylates Cac1p on serines 94 and 515 in early S phase and regulates its association with chromatin, but not its association with PCNA. Mutations in the Cac1p-phosphorylation sites of CDC28 but not of CDC7 substantially reduce the in vivo phosphorylation of Cac1p. However, mutations in the putative CDC7 target sites on Cac1p reduce its stability. The association of CAF-I with chromatin is impaired in a cdc28–1 mutant and to a lesser extent in a cdc7–1 mutant. In addition, mutations in the Cac1p-phosphorylation sites by both CDC28 and CDC7 reduce gene silencing at the telomeres. We propose that this phosphorylation represents a regulatory step in the recruitment of CAF-I to chromatin in early S phase that is distinct from the association of CAF-I with PCNA. Hence, we implicate CDC28 in the regulation of chromatin reassembly during DNA replication. These findings provide novel mechanistic insights on the links between cell-cycle regulation, DNA replication and chromatin reassembly. PMID:25602519

  12. CDC28 phosphorylates Cac1p and regulates the association of chromatin assembly factor I with chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Daniel C B; Kakusho, Naoko; You, Zhiying; Gharib, Marlene; Wyse, Brandon; Drury, Erin; Weinreich, Michael; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Masai, Hisao; Yankulov, Krassimir

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin Assembly Factor I (CAF-I) plays a key role in the replication-coupled assembly of nucleosomes. It is expected that its function is linked to the regulation of the cell cycle, but little detail is available. Current models suggest that CAF-I is recruited to replication forks and to chromatin via an interaction between its Cac1p subunit and the replication sliding clamp, PCNA, and that this interaction is stimulated by the kinase CDC7. Here we show that another kinase, CDC28, phosphorylates Cac1p on serines 94 and 515 in early S phase and regulates its association with chromatin, but not its association with PCNA. Mutations in the Cac1p-phosphorylation sites of CDC28 but not of CDC7 substantially reduce the in vivo phosphorylation of Cac1p. However, mutations in the putative CDC7 target sites on Cac1p reduce its stability. The association of CAF-I with chromatin is impaired in a cdc28-1 mutant and to a lesser extent in a cdc7-1 mutant. In addition, mutations in the Cac1p-phosphorylation sites by both CDC28 and CDC7 reduce gene silencing at the telomeres. We propose that this phosphorylation represents a regulatory step in the recruitment of CAF-I to chromatin in early S phase that is distinct from the association of CAF-I with PCNA. Hence, we implicate CDC28 in the regulation of chromatin reassembly during DNA replication. These findings provide novel mechanistic insights on the links between cell-cycle regulation, DNA replication and chromatin reassembly. PMID:25602519

  13. Circadian rhythms and memory formation: regulation by chromatin remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahar, Saurabh; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetic changes, such as DNA methylation or histone modification, can remodel the chromatin and regulate gene expression. Remodeling of chromatin provides an efficient mechanism of transducing signals, such as light or nutrient availability, to regulate gene expression. CLOCK:BMAL1 mediated activation of clock-controlled genes (CCGs) is coupled to circadian changes in histone modification at their promoters. Several chromatin modifiers, such as the deacetylases SIRT1 and HDAC3 or methyltransferase MLL1, have been shown to be recruited to the promoters of the CCGs in a circadian manner. Interestingly, the central element of the core clock machinery, the transcription factor CLOCK, also possesses histone acetyltransferase activity. Rhythmic expression of the CCGs is abolished in the absence of these chromatin modifiers. Recent research has demonstrated that chromatin remodeling is at the cross-roads of circadian rhythms and regulation of metabolism and aging. It would be of interest to identify if similar pathways exist in the epigenetic regulation of memory formation. PMID:22470318

  14. Circadian Rhythms and Memory Formation: Regulation by Chromatin Remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh eSahar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic changes, such as DNA methylation or histone modification, can remodel the chromatin and regulate gene expression. Remodeling of chromatin provides an efficient mechanism of transducing signals, such as light or nutrient availability, to regulate gene expression. CLOCK:BMAL1 mediated activation of clock-controlled genes (CCGs is coupled to circadian changes in histone modification at their promoters. Several chromatin modifiers, such as the deacetylases SIRT1 and HDAC3 or methyltransferase MLL1, have been shown to be recruited to the promoters of the CCGs in a circadian manner. Interestingly, the central element of the core clock machinery, the transcription factor CLOCK, also possesses histone acetyltransferase activity. Rhythmic expression of the CCGs is abolished in the absence of these chromatin modifiers. Recent research has demonstrated that chromatin remodeling is at the cross-roads of circadian rhythms and regulation of metabolism and aging. It would be of interest to identify if similar pathways exist in the epigenetic regulation of memory formation.

  15. Pravastatin transport across the hepatocyte canalicular membrane requires both ATP and a transmembrane pH gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Y; Okuyama, Y; Miya, H; Matsusita, H; Kitano, M; Kamisako, T; Yamamoto, T

    1996-06-01

    Hepatic excretion of non-bile acid organic anions is reported to be ATP-dependent and a defect of this transport has been reported in congenitally jaundiced rats, animal models of human Dubin-Johnson syndrome. To investigate the effect of the transmembrane pH gradient on hepatocyte canalicular membrane transport of ATP-dependent organic anions, uptake of pravastatin, a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase-inhibiting organic anion, by hepatocyte canalicular membrane vesicles was observed in the presence or absence of transmembrane pH gradients. Uptake was assessed by a rapid filtration technique. ATP-dependent pravastatin uptake was stimulated in the presence of a transmembrane pH gradient (in > out) in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Uptake was dependent on both pravastatin and ATP concentrations and showed saturation kinetics. After intravenous injection of [14C]-pravastatin (0.3 mumol), 81% of the dose was excreted in the bile within 35 min in SD rats, whereas only 20% was excreted in the bile in Eisai hyperbilirubinuria rats. ATP and the pH gradient also co-stimulated the uptake of pravastatin in Eisai hyperbilirubinuria rats, although the K(m) was much higher and Vmax was much lower than corresponding values in SD rats. This coincided well with the marked reduction in vivo biliary excretion of pravastatin in jaundiced rats.

  16. An architectural role of the Escherichia coli chromatin protein FIS in organising DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, R; Lurz, R; Lüder, G; Tolksdorf, C; Travers, A; Muskhelishvili, G

    2001-12-15

    The Escherichia coli chromatin protein FIS modulates the topology of DNA in a growth phase-dependent manner. In this study we have investigated the global effect of FIS binding on DNA architecture in vitro. We show that in supercoiled DNA molecules FIS binds at multiple sites in a non-random fashion and increases DNA branching. This global DNA reshaping effect is independent of the helical phasing of FIS binding sites. We propose, in addition to the previously inferred stabilisation of tightly bent DNA microloops in the upstream regions of certain promoters, that FIS may perform the distinct architectural function of organising branched plectonemes in the E.coli nucleoid.

  17. Ca{sup 2+} influx and ATP release mediated by mechanical stretch in human lung fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murata, Naohiko [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Ito, Satoru, E-mail: itori@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Furuya, Kishio [Mechanobiology Laboratory, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Takahara, Norihiro [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Naruse, Keiji [Department of Cardiovascular Physiology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Aso, Hiromichi; Kondo, Masashi [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Sokabe, Masahiro [Mechanobiology Laboratory, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Hasegawa, Yoshinori [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan)

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • Uniaxial stretching activates Ca{sup 2+} signaling in human lung fibroblasts. • Stretch-induced intracellular Ca{sup 2+} elevation is mainly via Ca{sup 2+} influx. • Mechanical strain enhances ATP release from fibroblasts. • Stretch-induced Ca{sup 2+} influx is not mediated by released ATP or actin cytoskeleton. - Abstract: One cause of progressive pulmonary fibrosis is dysregulated wound healing after lung inflammation or damage in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. The mechanical forces are considered to regulate pulmonary fibrosis via activation of lung fibroblasts. In this study, the effects of mechanical stretch on the intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) and ATP release were investigated in primary human lung fibroblasts. Uniaxial stretch (10–30% in strain) was applied to fibroblasts cultured in a silicone chamber coated with type I collagen using a stretching apparatus. Following stretching and subsequent unloading, [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} transiently increased in a strain-dependent manner. Hypotonic stress, which causes plasma membrane stretching, also transiently increased the [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}. The stretch-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation was attenuated in Ca{sup 2+}-free solution. In contrast, the increase of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} by a 20% stretch was not inhibited by the inhibitor of stretch-activated channels GsMTx-4, Gd{sup 3+}, ruthenium red, or cytochalasin D. Cyclic stretching induced significant ATP releases from fibroblasts. However, the stretch-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation was not inhibited by ATP diphosphohydrolase apyrase or a purinergic receptor antagonist suramin. Taken together, mechanical stretch induces Ca{sup 2+} influx independently of conventional stretch-sensitive ion channels, the actin cytoskeleton, and released ATP.

  18. Long-range looping of a locus control region drives tissue-specific chromatin packing within a multigene cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yu-Cheng; Cooke, Nancy E; Liebhaber, Stephen A

    2016-06-01

    The relationships of higher order chromatin organization to mammalian gene expression remain incompletely defined. The human Growth Hormone (hGH) multigene cluster contains five gene paralogs. These genes are selectively activated in either the pituitary or the placenta by distinct components of a remote locus control region (LCR). Prior studies have revealed that appropriate activation of the placental genes is dependent not only on the actions of the LCR, but also on the multigene composition of the cluster itself. Here, we demonstrate that the hGH LCR 'loops' over a distance of 28 kb in primary placental nuclei to make specific contacts with the promoters of the two GH genes in the cluster. This long-range interaction sequesters the GH genes from the three hCS genes which co-assemble into a tightly packed 'hCS chromatin hub'. Elimination of the long-range looping, via specific deletion of the placental LCR components, triggers a dramatic disruption of the hCS chromatin hub. These data reveal a higher-order structural pathway by which long-range looping from an LCR impacts on local chromatin architecture that is linked to tissue-specific gene regulation within a multigene cluster. PMID:26893355

  19. Gray level co-occurrence matrix algorithm as pattern recognition biosensor for oxidopamine-induced changes in lymphocyte chromatin architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantic, Igor; Dimitrijevic, Draga; Nesic, Dejan; Petrovic, Danica

    2016-10-01

    We demonstrate that a proapoptotic chemical agent, oxidopamine, induces dose dependent changes in chromatin textural patterns which can be quantified using the Gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) method. Peripheral blood (heparin-pretreated) samples were treated with oxidopamine (6-OHDA, 6-hydroxydopamine) to achieve effective concentrations of 100, 200 and 300µM. The samples were smeared on microscope slides and fixated in methanol. The smears were stained using a modification of Feulgen method for DNA visualization. For each stained smear, a sample of 30 lymphocyte chromatin structures were visualized and analyzed. This way, textural parameters for a total of 120 nuclei micrographs were calculated. For each chromatin structure, five different GLCM features were calculated: angular second moment, GLCM entropy, inverse difference moment, GLCM correlation, and GLCM variance. Oxidopamine induced the rise of the values of GLCM entropy and variance, and the reduction of angular second moment, correlation, and inverse difference moment. The trends for GLCM parameter changes were found to be highly significant (palgorithm might be successfully used in detection and evaluation of discrete early apoptotic structural changes in Feulgen-stained chromatin of peripheral blood lymphocytes that are not detectable using conventional microscopy/cell biology techniques. PMID:27424557

  20. Deciphering Noncoding RNA and Chromatin Interactions: Multiplex Chromatin Interaction Analysis by Paired-End Tag Sequencing (mChIA-PET).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Jocelyn; Fullwood, Melissa J

    2017-01-01

    Genomic DNA is dynamically associated with protein factors and folded to form chromatin fibers. The 3-dimensional (3D) configuration of the chromatin will enable the distal genetic elements to come into close proximity, allowing transcriptional regulation. Noncoding RNA can mediate the 3D structure of chromatin. Chromatin Interaction Analysis by Paired-End Tag Sequencing (ChIA-PET) is a valuable and powerful technique in molecular biology which allows the study of unbiased, genome-wide de novo chromatin interactions with paired-end tags. Here, we describe the standard version of ChIA-PET and a Multiplex ChIA-PET version. PMID:27662871