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Sample records for atopic keratoconjunctivitis akc

  1. Ocular Surface Squamous Neoplasia Associated with Atopic Keratoconjunctivitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ankit; Espana, Edgar M.; Singh, Arun D.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To describe 2 cases of invasive squamous cell carcinoma that originated in the setting of severe atopic keratoconjunctivitis (AKC). Methods Case one involved a 73-year-old male with atopic eczema and severe AKC who developed a limbal lesion suspicious for ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN). Slit-lamp examination was significant for a new sessile lesion in the temporal limbal region of the left eye. The lesion was treated with excisional biopsy and cryotherapy. Topical therapy with mitomycin C, topical interferon alpha 2b, and topical 5-fluorouracil provided only partial control. Exenteration was eventually needed. Case two involved a 53-year-old male with history of severe AKC and eczema. Computed tomography imaging showed an infiltrative mass of the right orbit. Incisional biopsies confirmed conjunctival squamous cell carcinoma of both sides (invasive in the right eye, in situ in the left eye). Exenteration was needed for control of invasive carcinoma in the right eye. Results Squamous cell carcinoma was treated without success in spite of surgical excision and aggressive treatment with multiple topical agents and multiple applications of cryotherapy. Orbital exenteration was needed in both cases. Conclusion Chronic inflammation associated with AKC may be a risk factor for the development of bilateral, diffuse, invasive, and recurrent OSSN that may require exenteration.

  2. Dermatoceratoconjuntivite atópica em pacientes do Ambulatório de Dermatologia Infanto-Juvenil em centro de referência Atopic keratoconjunctivitis in patients of the pediatric dermatology ambulatory in a reference center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Kaplan Moscovici

    2009-12-01

    ção oftalmológica de rotina desses pacientes, visto que nenhum dos pacientes de nosso estudo estavam em acompanhamento oftalmológico prévio.PURPOSE: To evaluate the frequency of atopic keratoconjunctivitis, its symptoms and changes in patients of Pediatric Dermatology Service of "Santa Casa de Misericordia de São Paulo" Hospital with a previous diagnosis of atopic dermatitis. METHODS: Fifty-two patients with atopic dermatitis under 16 years old (mean age 8.9 ± 4.1 between 2 and 16 years old were evaluated through a protocol of questions and assessment of signs and symptoms. The signs and symptoms were graded from 0 (absent to 4 (highest intensity, and in some cases only as present or not. The analysis was descriptive and statistical, with a 5% significance level. RESULTS: The frequency of atopic keratoconjunctivitis was 76.9% among the 52 patients with atopic dermatitis, including atopic conjunctivitis (26.7% and atopic blepharitis (50.2%. Atopic dermatitis is more frequent in female patients and atopic conjunctivitis in male. Age was practically the same in both groups. The most frequent symptoms were red eye and itching, especially in the atopic conjunctivitis group. Itching was the most intense symptom and was present in all patients of the atopic conjunctivitis group. Blepharitis and papillae were the most common signs. Other signs were less frequent. The tear break-up time was changed in most patients. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of atopic keratoconjunctivitis was 76.9% in patients with atopic dermatitis. Itching was the most frequent symptom, followed by red eye, in patients with atopic conjunctivitis. Blepharitis and papillae were the most frequent signs in patients with atopic conjunctivitis. Due to the increasing prevalence of atopic dermatitis in children, it would be prudent to perform a routine ophthalmologic evaluation of these patients. From the patients evaluated in this study, none had been previously monitored with ophthalmological exams.

  3. Infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (pinkeye)

    OpenAIRE

    Angelos, JA

    2015-01-01

    Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. As is the case for controlling other infectious livestock diseases, the most successful efforts to control infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK) will include consideration of the host, the environment, herd management, and ongoing surveillance even after the immediate crisis has passed. Research over many years has led to the discovery of a variety of antibiotic treatments and antibiotic regimens that can be effective against IBK. The...

  4. Infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (pinkeye).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelos, John A

    2015-03-01

    As is the case for controlling other infectious livestock diseases, the most successful efforts to control infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK) will include consideration of the host, the environment, herd management, and ongoing surveillance even after the immediate crisis has passed. Research over many years has led to the discovery of a variety of antibiotic treatments and antibiotic regimens that can be effective against IBK. The discoveries of Mor bovoculi and reports of IBK associated with Mycoplasma spp without concurrent Mor bovis or Mor bovoculi have raised new questions into the roles that other organisms may play in IBK pathogenesis.

  5. Participação da sensibilidade atópica em pacientes com ceratoconjuntivite alérgica primaveril Participation of atopic sensitivity in patients with vernal allergic keratoconjunctivitis

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    Denise Atique Goulart

    2004-06-01

    acometimento ocular nos indica que a conjuntivite alérgica nada mais é que uma das formas de expressão da atopia, assim como são a rinite, a bronquite e a dermatite.PURPOSE: To study the response to skin prick tests in patients with vernal keratoconjunctivitis and compare with the allergic population without ocular disease. METHODS: We performed skin prick tests in 48 patients with VKC (10 with limbal form, 19 with palpebral and 19 with both. Controls were 52 patients from Allergy Clinic of the Santa Casa de São Paulo, with systemic allergy but without ocular disease. Skin prick tests were performed in 48 patients from the Ocular Allergy Sector at the Ophthalmology Department of the Santa Casa de São Paulo's Hospital, from July 2001 to September 2002. We studied responses to the following allergens: house dust mite, Dermatophagoides pteronissynus, Dermatophagoides farinae, Tyrophagus putrescentiae, Blomia tropicalis, Rhizopus spp, Penicilium, Alternaria alternata and rye grass. RESULTS: Male sex was the most frequent, with 32 patients (66.6% in the study group, and 27 (51.9% in controls. Mean age was 10.0 ± 4.7 years in the study group and 6.83 ± 3.6 in controls. The most frequent allergen was Dermatophagoides pteronissynus, followed by Dermatophagoides farinae, Blomia tropicalis, house dust mite, Tyrophagus putrescentiae and Rhizopus spp. CONCLUSIONS: The resemblance of the results in the control group indicates that allergic conjunctivitis is nothing else but another form of atopy, just as rhinitis, bronchitis and dermatitis.

  6. Atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is an inflammatory skin disease with early onset and with a lifetime prevalence of approximately 20%. The aetiology of atopic dermatitis is unknown, but the recent discovery of filaggrin mutations holds promise that the progression of atopic dermatitis to asthma in later childhood...... may be halted. Atopic dermatitis is not always easily manageable and every physician should be familiar with the fundamental aspects of treatment. This paper gives an overview of the natural history, clinical features, and treatment of atopic dermatitis....

  7. OCULAR COMPLICATIONS IN ATOPIC DERMATITIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Xi; XU Ge-zhi; JIAO Qin; LI Xia; SHI Ruo-fei

    2008-01-01

    Objective To describe the ocular complications of 62 patients with active atopic dermatitis( AD) during the period of 2003 2006. Methods Routine ophthalmic examinations, including slit-lamp microscope, indirect ophthalmoscope or Goldmann three-mirror lens, A-scan and B-scan ultrasound, ultrasound biomicroscope (UBM) and corneal topography, as well as tear film break-up time (BUT) and Schirmer tests were carried out. Results Cataract (28 eyes), keratoconjunctivitis (42 eyes), superficial punctate keratopathy (45 eyes) and tear function abnormality ( 76 eyes) were major ocular complications in AD patients. Retinal detachment (6 eyes) was the most severe ocular complication in the AD patients. Conclusion Ocular complications are common in AD patients and a very careful examination of eyes is essential in treating AD patients. If the eyes can be examed carefully and in time, some operations and severe complications can be avoidable, especially for the patients with retinal breaks or retinal detachment.

  8. Infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, M H; Brightman, A H; Fenwick, B W; Rider, M A

    1998-01-01

    The economic impact of infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK) warrants continued investigation of the mechanisms by which Moraxella bovis survives on and colonizes the corneal surface. Virulent strains of M bovis produce hemolysin and exhibit different plasmid profiles than nonvirulent strains. Interactions among host, environment, vector, season, and concurrent infection influence the prevalence of IBK. Mycoplasma sp. or infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus may enhance or hasten the disease process. The manifestations of IBK may range from mild conjunctivitis to severe ulceration, corneal perforation, and blindness. Treatment of IBK is dictated by economic considerations, intended animal use, and feasibility of administration. Antibiotic therapy is aimed at achieving drug concentrations in tears to meet or exceed the minimum inhibitory concentration for prolonged periods. At present, IBK is not a preventable disease. Affected animals must be separated from the herd and vector control vigorously instituted. Carrier animals must be identified and removed from the herd. Vaccination trials have been unsuccessful because of pili antigen cross-reactivity, variable strains, and uncontrolled environmental factors. Recent investigations have determined that M bovis may utilize host iron sources via iron-repressible outer membrane proteins and siderophores for growth. Elucidation of normal defense mechanisms of the bovine eye may lead to new strategies to enhance the immune response against M bovis.

  9. Atopic eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sara J

    2016-02-01

    Atopic eczema is an itchy inflammatory skin disease with a chronic relapsing-remitting course; it has increased in prevalence in recent decades and now affects up to 25% of school-aged children in the developed world and up to 10% of adults. Recent advances in understanding the aetiology of eczema have focused interest on skin barrier dysfunction as a common precursor and pathological feature. In addition, genetically determined skin barrier dysfunction (associated with mutations in the gene encoding filaggrin) is known to predispose to multiple systemic atopic diseases. First-line treatments for atopic eczema focus on maintaining and repairing the skin barrier (emollients) and reducing inflammation (topical steroids); allergen and irritant avoidance are also important to achieve disease control. Second and third-line treatments include topical calcineurin inhibitors, ultraviolet light and systemic immunosuppressant therapies of which only ciclosporin is licenced for the treatment of atopic eczema in adults. Novel biological therapies are in phase II-III clinical trials.

  10. Atopic dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2007 Oct 17;(4):CD005500. PMID: 17943859 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17943859 . Atopic Dermatitis. Alvero ... 2008 Jan 23;(1):CD005203. PMID: 18254073 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18254073 . Boguniewicz M, Leung ...

  11. Mycoplasmas associated with bovine conjunctivitis and keratoconjunctivitis.

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    Naglić, T; Sanković, F; Madić, J; Hajsig, D; Seol, B; Busch, K

    1996-01-01

    In two separate herds of fattening calves a sudden-onset outbreak of ocular disease with profuse lacrimation occurred. The disease resembled the early stage of infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis but after a few days the clinical signs of bronchopneumonia appeared. From conjunctival swabs Mycoplasma (M.) bovigenitalium, M. bovirhinis and infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR) virus were isolated. Moraxella bovis infection was not established. In one of the herds M. bovigenitalium was also found in the pneumonic lungs of dead calves. In one herd M. bovoculi was isolated from a cow with chronic keratoconjunctivitis, housed together with affected calves. Mycoplasmas were not isolated from ocular swabs of six bulls originating from a Reproductive Centre with temporary occurrence of unilateral serous conjunctivitis resistant to antibiotic therapy.

  12. Experimental production of infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis.

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    Aikman, J G; Allan, E M; Selman, I E

    1985-09-07

    The left eyes of 10 conventional dairy cross calves were inoculated with a pathogenic strain of Moraxella bovis and lesions of infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis developed in nine of these eyes. M bovis was isolated from all inoculated eyes and lesions developed in five out of 10 eyes which had become naturally infected. The clinical and microbiological findings were similar to those described in field cases.

  13. Atopic dermatitis

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    Watson Wade

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Atopic dermatitis (AD is a common, chronic skin disorder that can significantly impact the quality of life of affected individuals as well as their families. Although the pathogenesis of the disorder is not completely understood, it appears to result from the complex interplay between defects in skin barrier function, environmental and infectious agents, and immune abnormalities. There are no specific diagnostic tests for AD; therefore, the diagnosis is based on specific clinical criteria that take into account the patient’s history and clinical manifestations. Successful management of the disorder requires a multifaceted approach that involves education, optimal skin care practices, anti-inflammatory treatment with topical corticosteroids and/or topical calcineurin inhibitors (TCIs, the use of first-generation antihistamines to help manage sleep disturbances, and the treatment of skin infections. Systemic corticosteroids may also be used, but are generally reserved for the acute treatment of severe flare-ups. Topical corticosteroids are the first-line pharmacologic treatments for AD, and evidence suggests that these agents may also be beneficial for the prophylaxis of disease flare-ups. Although the prognosis for patients with AD is generally favourable, those patients with severe, widespread disease and concomitant atopic conditions, such as asthma and allergic rhinitis, are likely to experience poorer outcomes.

  14. Development of a laboratory animal model for infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis.

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    Chandler, R L; Turfrey, B A; Smith, K

    1982-01-01

    Guinea pigs, gerbils, voles, golden hamsters and Chinese hamsters exposed to experimental infection with Moraxella bovis by ocular instillation or associated routes showed transient infections only and no clinical signs. Five strains of mice were of similarly low susceptibility but another, the C57 Bl strain, was relatively susceptible and treatment with corticosteroid before infection regularly produced keratoconjunctivitis. This system therefore offers a promising model for studies on infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis.

  15. Epidemic keratoconjunctivitis and lacrimal excretory system obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, K J; Berger, S T

    1988-10-01

    Epiphora is a common symptom associated with the acute phase of epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC). Reflex lacrimal secretion occurs secondary to conjunctival or corneal inflammation. Acquired obstruction of the lacrimal excretory system may account for persistence of tearing after resolution of the acute inflammatory phase of the viral infection. Three cases of lacrimal excretory system obstruction after EKC are reported. Multifocal obstruction of the canaliculi and nasolacrimal duct is characteristic. Dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) was required to relieve obstruction in all cases. Probing and corticosteroid irrigation may avoid the need for silicone intubation or conjunctivodacryocystorhinostomy in the management of canalicular obstruction. Persistent epiphora after EKC should raise clinical suspicion of acquired dacryostenosis. Early recognition may allow for optimal management.

  16. Atopic dermatitis, atopic eczema, or eczema?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantor, R; Thyssen, J P; Paller, A S;

    2016-01-01

    terms for AD. METHODS: A systematic review of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and LILACS (1945-2016) for the terms AD, atopic eczema (AE), and multiple other eczematous disorders. RESULTS: In MEDLINE, 33 060 were identified, of which 21 299 (64.4%) publications used the term 'AD', 15 510 (46.9%) 'eczema', and only...... 2471 (7.5%) AE. Most of these publications used the term AD (82.0%) or eczema (70.8%) without additional nomenclature; only 1.2% used AE alone. Few publications used the terminology 'childhood eczema', 'flexural eczema', 'infantile eczema', 'atopic neurodermatitis', or 'Besnier's prurigo'. AD...... was rarely used until the late 1970s, after which it became the most commonly used of the three terms and continuously increased until 2015. Atopic eczema decreased between 2008 and 2015. Atopic dermatitis was the most commonly used term in studies across almost all publication types, languages, and journals...

  17. Phototoxic keratoconjunctivitis from coal-tar pitch volatiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmett, E A; Stetzer, L; Taphorn, B

    1977-11-25

    Roofers working with coal-tar pitch develop burning eyes and conjunctivitis which they subjectively associate with sun exposure. A coal-tar pitch distillate instilled in the conjunctivae of rabbits produced minimal or mild irritation in the absence of ultraviolet radiation, but irradiation with long-ultraviolet produced marked photophobia and severe keratoconjunctivitis.

  18. Fluorescence of atopic allergens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berrens, L.

    1967-01-01

    Purified atopic allergens have been found to emit flue fluorescence upon irradiation with ultraviolet light of 365 mμ wavelength. The maximum of fluorescence is in the region 445–490 mμ and the intensity is of the same order of magnitude for different atopic allergens. Synthetic model compounds, inc

  19. Evaluation of FcεRl-binding serum IgE in patients with ocular allergic diseases

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    Satoru Matsumoto

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated high-affinity receptor for IgE (FcεRI- binding serum IgE in patients with atopic keratoconjunctivitis (AKC; n=31 and with seasonal allergic conjunctivitis (SAC; n=13 by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA using a recombinant soluble form of the human FcεRIα ectodomain (soluble α. The quantities of FcεRI-binding IgE are compared with those of total IgE measured by a conventional sandwich ELISA. Both of the quantities of FcεRI-binding and total IgE in AKC were significantly larger than those in SAC (P<0.001. In contrast, the proportion of FcεRI- binding IgE (FcεRI-binding IgE/total IgE; % in SAC was significantly larger than that in AKC (P <0.001, although significant reverse correlation was observed between the proportion of FcεRI-binding IgE and total IgE in both AKC and SAC. Significantly, a higher proportion of FcεRI-binding IgE in SAC than that in AKC may reflect the differences in pathologic states of AKC and SAC that are caused by a disparity in immune responses in these diseases.

  20. Oral cyclosporine therapy for refractory severe vernal keratoconjunctivitis

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    Nikhil S Gokhale

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the success of oral cyclosporine therapy in a patient with severe vision-threatening vernal keratoconjunctivitis. A child presented with severe allergy which was not controlled with topical steroids, cyclosporine and mast cell stabilizers. Oral steroids were required repeatedly to suppress inflammation. Child showed a dramatic improvement and stabilization with oral cyclosporine therapy. Oral cyclosporine therapy can be tried in severe vision-threatening allergy refractory to conventional therapy.

  1. Flexural eczema versus atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Sharon E; Goldenberg, Alina; Nedorost, Susan; Thyssen, Jacob P; Fonacier, Luz; Spiewak, Radoslaw

    2015-01-01

    Flexural eczema and atopic dermatitis are frequently synonymized. As respiratory atopy is rarely tested for and found in these patients, systematically equating a flexural distribution of dermatitis with atopic dermatitis may too frequently result in misclassified diagnoses and potentially missed opportunity for intervention toward improving patients' symptoms and quality of life. We present a critical review of the available evidence for the atopic dermatitis diagnosis and discuss the similarities between atopic dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis. Because neither flexural predilection nor atopy is specific for atopic dermatitis, we conclude that the term atopic dermatitis is a misnomer and propose an etymologic reclassification of atopic dermatitis to "atopy-related" dermatitis. Allergic contact dermatitis can induce an atopic dermatitis-like phenotype, and thus, flexural dermatitis cannot be assumed as atopic without further testing. Patch testing should at least be considered in cases of chronic or recurrent eczema regardless of the working diagnosis.

  2. Therapy of atopic eczema

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    von der Schulenburg, Johann-Matthias

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Major objective is the evaluation of the medical effectiveness of different therapeutical approaches and the cost effectiveness with relevance for Germany. Methods: This health technology assessment (HTA evaluates systemically randomized controlled studies (RCT on the therapy of atopic dermatitis which were published between 1999 and 2004. Further it includes some important clinical studies which have been published after 2004 and other updates the English HTA report by Hoare et al. [1]. Results: Topical corticosteroids and topical calcineurin-inhibitors are the principal substances which are currently used for anti-inflammatory therapy in atopic dermatitis. These substances have shown a significant therapeutic efficacy in controlled studies. In newer controlled studies no difference was observable when corticosteroids were applied once or more than once daily onto the skin. Moreover, there is now one controlled study available which points to the fact that an interval therapy with a stronger topical corticosteroid over a limited time (some weeks may lower the risk of recurrent flares of atopic dermatitis. Both topical calcineurin-inhibitors pimecrolimus and tacrolimus have shown a significant therapeutical efficacy in a number of placebo-controlled prospective studies. The wealth of data is high for these substances. Both substances have been shown to be efficient in infants, children and adult patients with atopic dermatitis. The importance of a so-called basic therapy with emollients which have to be adapted to the current status of skin is generally accepted in clinical practice. Controlled studies show the efficacy of ”basic therapy” - although the level of evidence is quite low for this approach. The skin of patients with atopic dermatitis is colonized in the majority with Staphylococcus aureus, a gram-positive bacterium. Therefore, a therapeutical approach for the treatment of atopic dermatitis is the anti-bacterial or

  3. Therapy of atopic eczema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werfel, Thomas; Claes, Christa; Kulp, Werner; Greiner, Wolfgang; von der Schulenburg, Johann-Matthias

    2006-01-01

    Objectives Major objective is the evaluation of the medical effectiveness of different therapeutical approaches and the cost effectiveness with relevance for Germany. Methods This health technology assessment (HTA) evaluates systemically randomized controlled studies (RCT) on the therapy of atopic dermatitis which were published between 1999 and 2004. Further it includes some important clinical studies which have been published after 2004 and other updates the English HTA report by Hoare et al. [1]. Results Topical corticosteroids and topical calcineurin-inhibitors are the principal substances which are currently used for anti-inflammatory therapy in atopic dermatitis. These substances have shown a significant therapeutic efficacy in controlled studies. In newer controlled studies no difference was observable when corticosteroids were applied once or more than once daily onto the skin. Moreover, there is now one controlled study available which points to the fact that an interval therapy with a stronger topical corticosteroid over a limited time (some weeks) may lower the risk of recurrent flares of atopic dermatitis. Both topical calcineurin-inhibitors pimecrolimus and tacrolimus have shown a significant therapeutical efficacy in a number of placebo-controlled prospective studies. The wealth of data is high for these substances. Both substances have been shown to be efficient in infants, children and adult patients with atopic dermatitis. The importance of a so-called basic therapy with emollients which have to be adapted to the current status of skin is generally accepted in clinical practice. Controlled studies show the efficacy of ”basic therapy” - although the level of evidence is quite low for this approach. The skin of patients with atopic dermatitis is colonized in the majority with Staphylococcus aureus, a gram-positive bacterium. Therefore, a therapeutical approach for the treatment of atopic dermatitis is the anti-bacterial or anti-septic treatment

  4. Primary Sjögren's syndrome and keratoconjunctivitis sicca: Diagnostic methods, frequency and social disease aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Kirsten Birgitte

    ophthalmology, Sjögren's syndrome, keratoconjunctivitis sicca, conjunctiva, dry eye, Schirmer-1 test, Rose Bengal score, break-up time, tear film, Copenhagen criteria......ophthalmology, Sjögren's syndrome, keratoconjunctivitis sicca, conjunctiva, dry eye, Schirmer-1 test, Rose Bengal score, break-up time, tear film, Copenhagen criteria...

  5. Protein Linked to Atopic Dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Matters NIH Research Matters January 14, 2013 Protein Linked to Atopic Dermatitis Normal skin from a ... in mice suggests that lack of a certain protein may trigger atopic dermatitis, the most common type ...

  6. Infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis: a review of cases in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Dominic

    2010-11-01

    Infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK) is a painful ocular disease affecting cattle worldwide. The publications documenting this condition focus on what is the accepted cause of IBK--Moraxella bovis. This article draws on experience and recorded data made at the time of the initial examination and follow-up visits. Laboratory culture of ocular swabs was undertaken where appropriate. Diagnosis of IBK is usually based on clinical signs, environment, and history. Misdiagnosis of the organisms involved is a genuine possibility. This article focuses on recent outbreaks of bovine ocular disease in the United Kingdom in three counties over a 12-month period.

  7. Skin Barrier Dysfunction and the Atopic March

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Maja-Lisa; Agner, Tove; Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2015-01-01

    The atopic diseases: atopic dermatitis, asthma and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis are frequent diseases in the population occurring sequentially in the young (the atopic march).The discovery of filaggrin gene (FLG) mutations and impairments in the skin barrier as predisposing factors for atopic......—with atopic dermatitis and FLG mutations being a prerequisite for the development of the other atopic diseases, particularly asthma. This review discusses the role of the skin barrier function, particularly the role of FLG mutations, in the atopic march....

  8. Tartrazine in atopic eczema.

    OpenAIRE

    Devlin, J.; David, T. J.

    1992-01-01

    Multiple double blind placebo controlled challenges with tartrazine 50 mg (three challenges) and glucose placebo (three challenges) were performed in 12 children with atopic eczema aged 1 to 6 years. The children were selected on the basis of severity (regular clinic attenders) and a parental history that tartrazine provoked worsening of the eczema. In only one patient did the three tartrazine challenge periods correspond with the highest symptom scores or the highest physician observer score...

  9. Flexural eczema versus atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacob, Sharon E; Goldenberg, Alina; Nedorost, Susan;

    2015-01-01

    Flexural eczema and atopic dermatitis are frequently synonymized. As respiratory atopy is rarely tested for and found in these patients, systematically equating a flexural distribution of dermatitis with atopic dermatitis may too frequently result in misclassified diagnoses and potentially missed...... cannot be assumed as atopic without further testing. Patch testing should at least be considered in cases of chronic or recurrent eczema regardless of the working diagnosis....

  10. Atopic asthmatic subjects but not atopic subjects without ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Asthma is a known risk factor for acute ozone-associated respiratory disease. Ozone causes an immediate decrease in lung function and increased airway inflammation. The role of atopy and asthma in modulation of ozone-induced inflammation has not been determined. OBJECTIVE: We sought to determine whether atopic status modulates ozone response phenotypes in human subjects. METHODS: Fifty volunteers (25 healthy volunteers, 14 atopic nonasthmatic subjects, and 11 atopic asthmatic subjects not requiring maintenance therapy) underwent a 0.4-ppm ozone exposure protocol. Ozone response was determined based on changes in lung function and induced sputum composition, including airway inflammatory cell concentration, cell-surface markers, and cytokine and hyaluronic acid concentrations. RESULTS: All cohorts experienced similar decreases in lung function after ozone. Atopic and atopic asthmatic subjects had increased sputum neutrophil numbers and IL-8 levels after ozone exposure; values did not significantly change in healthy volunteers. After ozone exposure, atopic asthmatic subjects had significantly increased sputum IL-6 and IL-1beta levels and airway macrophage Toll-like receptor 4, Fc(epsilon)RI, and CD23 expression; values in healthy volunteers and atopic nonasthmatic subjects showed no significant change. Atopic asthmatic subjects had significantly decreased IL-10 levels at baseline compared with healthy volunteers; IL-10 levels did not significa

  11. Atopic dermatitis and ichthyosis vulgaris.

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    Rabinowitz, L G; Esterly, N B

    1994-06-01

    Atopic dermatitis remains a common skin problem in the pediatric age group. General approaches to management focus on reducing inflammation and pruritus as well as preventing xerosis. Ichthyosis vulgaris is the most common form of the ichthyoses and often is associated with atopic dermatitis. Recognition of these conditions is necessary to institute therapy that will alleviate the discomfort experienced by affected individuals.

  12. Inclusion keratoconjunctivitis ('pink eye') in sheep. A proposal for a new name for chlamydial keratoconjunctivitis in sheep and comment on recent clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogaard, A E

    1984-09-01

    The cytoplasmatic inclusion bodies, which, in 1931, Coles discovered in the corneal cells of sheep suffering from contagious keratoconjunctivitis are now considered to be the reticulate bodies of a chlamydia, Colesiota conjunctivae (synonym: Chlamydia psittaci ovis). According to the postulates of Koch Colesiota conjunctivae is a primary cause of contagious keratoconjunctivitis in sheep, but the clinical picture is complex and is a result of the interaction between the infecting chlamydiae, host resistance factors, and secondary infections caused by opportunistic bacterial ocular pathogens. The clinical syndrome might also be caused by other micro-organisms, such as Mycoplasma conjunctivae or environmental factors, such as dust. However, in these cases, cytoplasmatic inclusion bodies cannot be found in the corneal cells of diseased eyes. To differentiate chlamydial keratoconjunctivitis from keratoconjunctivitis due to other causes, it is proposed to include in the name the laboratory findings typical for this disease: Sheep Inclusion Keratoconjunctivitis. Chlamydia are Gram-negative bacteria, which are obligate intracellular parasites. Prolonged treatment seems to be required to eradicate chlamydiae from a host and antibiotics must reach intracellular levels that are higher than their minimum inhibitory concentration for chlamydiae. Tetracyclines are the drugs of choice. This means that for a microbiological cure, diseased sheep must be injected several times a day for a week or more. Because the disease is usually self-limiting and economic losses are considered low, this seems unnecessary and control of the disease by local treatment of secondary infections seems sufficient. However, this will not prevent spreading of the disease in a herd and relapses may occur.

  13. [Atopic dermatitis and domestic animals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, M

    2000-09-01

    Several arguments are raised attributing to aeroallergens an important role in atopic dermatitis. The aeroallergens that penetrate the epidermis could be fixed by IgE on the Langerhans cells and then induce a cellular mediator reaction comparable to that of allergic contact eczema. Patch tests have been developed to evaluate the role of aeroallergens (dust mites, animal dander, etc.). Preventive anti-dust mites measures in the home of atopic patients are recommended. Eviction of domestic animals (cat, dog, etc.) or avoidance measures for animal dander in the home can produce improvement in atopic dermatitis. Oral specific immunotherapy is being validated as a treatment for this disease.

  14. Orbital Inflammation Developing from Epidemic Keratoconjunctivitis in an Adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung In Kim

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We report a rare case of epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC that developed into an orbital inflammation in an adult. Case Presentation: A 67-year-old Korean man, who had been diagnosed with EKC and treated for conjunctival injection and chemosis in the right eye for 4 days, was referred to Oculoplastics as orbital cellulitis was suspected. At the point of referral, clinical features such as decreased visual acuity, severe eyelid swelling, chemosis, follicles, corneal edema, limitations in lateral eye movement, and diplopia were observed in the right eye. Orbital cellulitis was suspected according to orbital computed tomography scan images, but there was no response to systemic antibiotics. Systemic steroid was administered instead, and then his symptoms and signs started to improve. The final diagnosis of this patient was orbital inflammation related to EKC based on the facts that there was no response to antibiotics, that he presented with contralateral symptoms and signs, that pseudomembrane formation occurred in both eyes, and that the symptoms resolved completely after 2 weeks. Conclusion: Clinicians need to consider the possibility of orbital inflammation developing from EKC, even in an adult patient, and treat the patient properly if the EKC symptoms and signs, such as conjunctival injection and follicles, are accompanied with symptoms and signs similar to orbital cellulitis.

  15. Ocular complications of severe vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC) in Yemen☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Akily, Saleh A.; Bamashmus, Mahfouth A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to assess the ocular complications and visual loss among patients with severe vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC). Methods Four hundred and thirty-one patients with VKC seen at Ibn Al-Haitham Eye Center were the study group. This is a retrospective non-comparative observational study between 01 January 2002 and 31 December 2002. Visual acuity was measured with the standard Snellen visual acuity chart and for children under 5 years of age Kay pictures were used. Visual impairment was assessed by means of the World Health Organization criteria for visual disabilities. Cases with severe VKC that developed ocular complications leading to blindness and severe visual impairment were analyzed. Results The majority of VKC patients were males (75.9%) with a male:female ratio of 3.1:1. A total of 68 (15.7%) patients (54 boys and 14 girls) had severe VKC. The ocular findings among 20 patients with severe VKC that led to blindness and severe visual impairment included keratoconus (7); steroid-induced cataract (5), central corneal scars (5) and steroid-induced glaucoma (3). Two of the keratoconus cases developed acute hydrops. Conclusion Severe VKC in developing countries including Yemen is a potentially blinding disease. Visual loss may be due to keratoconus and corneal scars, as well as complications of the unsupervised use of topically administered corticosteroids. PMID:23960939

  16. Targeting species D adenoviruses replication to counteract the epidemic keratoconjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitenko, Natalia A; Speiseder, Thomas; Groitl, Peter; Spirin, Pavel V; Prokofjeva, Maria M; Lebedev, Timofey D; Rubtsov, Petr M; Lam, Elena; Riecken, Kristoffer; Fehse, Boris; Dobner, Thomas; Prassolov, Vladimir S

    2015-06-01

    Human adenoviruses are non-enveloped DNA viruses causing various infections; their pathogenicity varies dependent on virus species and type. Although acute infections can sometimes take severe courses, they are rarely fatal in immune-competent individuals. Adenoviral conjunctivitis and epidemic keratoconjunctivitis are hyperacute and highly contagious infections of the eye caused by human adenovirus types within species D. Currently there is no causal treatment available to counteract these diseases effectively. The E2B region of the adenovirus genome encodes for the viral DNA polymerase, which is required for adenoviral DNA replication. Here we propose novel model systems to test this viral key factor, DNA polymerase, as a putative target for the development of efficient antiviral therapy based on RNA interference. Using our model cell lines we found that different small interfering RNAs mediate significant suppression (up to 90%) of expression levels of viral DNA polymerase upon transfection. Moreover, permanent expression of short hairpin RNA based on the most effective small interfering RNA led to a highly significant, more than tenfold reduction in replication for different human group D adenoviruses involved in ocular infections.

  17. MMF and eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zierhut, M; Stübiger, N; Siepmann, K; Deuter, C M E

    2005-01-01

    Immunosuppressive treatment has shown to be effective in various ocular inflammatory disorders. Factors limiting their use are the individual response and the rate of side effects. This report summarizes our knowledge about the use of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) in the treatment of ocular cicatricial pemphigoid (OCP), uveitis, atopic keratoconjunctivitis (AKC), prevention of graft rejection after penetrating keratoplasty (PK) and scleritis. Controlled studies have been performed for prevention of graft rejection after PK, showing MMF as effective in the prevention of graft rejection as cyclosporine A. In experimental uveitis, MMF has been demonstrated to be highly effective in prevention of retinal destruction. A number of studies have now shown that MMF also seems effective in uveitis. There are also studies with smaller patient groups which point out the effectiveness of MMF in OCP, AKC, and scleritis. In most of the studies, the spectrum of side effects was small, compared to other immunosuppressives.

  18. Neuropeptides in atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cholis

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available The nervous system, the immune system, and the cutaneous system are not independent systems, but are closely associated and use the same language of cytokines and neurotransmitters. Atopic dermatitis (AD is exacerbated by several factors, such as emotional stress, scratching and sweating. This review presents the role of neuropeptides (NP in AD. In AD, abnormalities occur in distribution of some types of neural filaments and in the associated active NP. Nerve fibre increases. Nerve fibres for substance-P (SP and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP are positive, The cutaneous concentration of SP decreases while vasoactive-intestinal polypeptide (VIP increases. Immunohistochemical examination has revealed neuropeptide-Y (NPY-positive dendritic epidermal cells in AD lesions but no somatostatin (SOM fibres. Neuromediators modulate functions of all cutaneous cellular types, which are all part of the neuroimmunocutaneous system (NCIS: endothelial cells, glandular cells, fibroblasts, epidermal cells and immune cells. Conclusion: during the course of AD, the NICS is destabilized. Evidence show that NP can also be responsible for the induction and maintenance of the cutaneous inflammation process and confirm an involvement in the pathogenesis of AD. Release of the NP by cutaneous nerve potentially explains the role of emotional stress, scratching and sweating in exacerbation of AD. (Med J Indones 2001; 10: 197-200Keywords : neuroimmunocutaneous system, neurotransmitter, neurogenic inflammation

  19. Atopic dermatitis in adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giampaolo Ricci

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder that typically occurs during childhood especially in the first year of life, with a variable frequency from 10% to 30%. Recent studies have shown that in Europe among 10-20% of children with AD suffer from this disorder also in adolescence. AD is a chronic inflammatory skin disease with a typical onset in the first years of life and with a 10- 30% prevalence among young children. AD prevalence in adolescence has been estimated around 5-15% in European countries. AD persists from childhood through adolescence in around 40% of cases and some risk factors have been identified: female sex, sensitization to inhalant and food allergens, allergic asthma and/or rhinoconjunctivitis, the practice of certain jobs. During adolescence, AD mainly appears on the face and neck, often associated with overinfection by Malassezia, and on the palms and soles. AD persistence during adolescence is correlated with psychological diseases such as anxiety; moreover, adolescents affected by AD might have problems in the relationship with their peers. Stress and the psychological problems represent a serious burden for adolescents with AD and cause a significant worsening of the patients’ quality of life (QoL. The pharmacological treatment is similar to other age groups. Educational and psychological approaches should be considered in the most severe cases.

  20. Keratoconjunctivitis associated with Toxoplasma gondii in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinger, Robert L; Schmidt, Karl A; Dubielzig, Richard R

    2009-01-01

    A 12-year-old Pug presented with a 3-mm corneal mass OD. The dog was currently being treated for keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS) and pigmentary keratitis OU. A superficial keratectomy followed by cryotherapy was performed OD. A histopathologic diagnosis of epithelial dysplasia and suppurative keratitis was made and the lesion resolved. Two months later, a yellow/tan conjunctival mass, diffuse chemosis and conjunctival thickening was discovered OD. Necrotizing conjunctivitis with protozoal parasites was diagnosed with histopathology. Complete blood count and a serum biochemistry panel were normal. Neospora caninum and Toxoplasma gondii titers were negative. The conjunctivitis resolved after a 6-week course of oral clindamycin. Two months later, the patient presented with a similar conjunctival mass OS. Toxoplasma gondii was confirmed as the etiologic agent with immunohistochemical staining. Repeat T. gondii titers were negative. Oral clindamycin was re-instituted. The corneal biopsy was re-reviewed and protozoal organisms were discovered. Three months later, a recurrence was suspected and oral ponazuril was initiated for 28 days. There has been no evidence of recurrence since this treatment. Ocular toxoplasmosis is rare in the dog but reports have included episcleritis, scleritis, retinitis, anterior uveitis, ciliary epithelium hyperplasia, optic neuritis and polymyositis. To our knowledge, this is the first confirmed report of toxoplasmosis causing only corneal and conjunctival disease in the dog. We hypothesize that these localized lesions may be associated with topical immunomodulating therapy for KCS. Toxoplasmosis should be considered as a differential for canine conjunctivitis and corneal disease and has the potential to manifest in one or both eyes.

  1. Allogeneic Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation in Dogs With Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt, Maura K. W.; Barros, Michele A.; Martins, João Flávio P.; Vasconcellos, Jose Paulo C.; Morais, Bruna P.; Pompeia, Celine; Bittencourt, Matheus Domingues; Evangelho, Karine dos Santos; Kerkis, Irina; Wenceslau, Cristiane V.

    2016-01-01

    Keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS) is a dysfunction in tear production associated with clinical signs, which include conjunctival hyperemia, ocular discharge, discomfort, pain, and, eventually, corneal vascularization and pigmentation. Immunosuppressive drugs are routinely administrated for long periods to treat KCS but with side effects and limited results. Evaluation of the clinical benefits of intralacrimal transplantation of allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in dogs with mild–moderate and severe KCS was done. A total of 24 eyes with KCS from 15 dogs of different breeds were enrolled in the present study. A single transplantation of MSCs (1 × 106) directly into lacrimal glands (dorsal and third eyelid) was performed. The Schirmer tear tests (STTs) and ocular surface improvements were used to assess short- and long-term effects of these cells. The STTs were carried out on day 0 (before MSCs transplantation) and on days 7, 14, 21, and 28, as well as 6 and 12 months after MSC transplantation. Our data demonstrate that allogeneic MSC transplantation in KCS dogs is safe since no adverse effects were observed immediately after transplantation and in short- and long-term follow-ups. A statistically significant increase in the STT and ocular surface improvements was found in all eyes studied. In all the eyes with mild–moderate KCS, STT values reverted to those of healthy eyes, while in eyes with severe KCS, although complete reversion was not found, there was improvement in tear production and in other clinical signs. Our study shows that a single dose of a low number of MSCs can be used to treat KCS in dogs. In contrast to immunosuppressive drug use, MSC transplantation has an effect over a long period (up to 12 months), even after a single administration, and does not require daily drug administration. PMID:28003932

  2. Effectiveness of two commercial infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P C; Blankenship, T; Hoover, T R; Powe, T; Wright, J C

    1990-07-01

    Two commercially available infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK) vaccines were evaluated for their effectiveness in protecting cattle from disease caused by experimental challenge exposure and natural transmission of Moraxella bovis infections. The study was conducted as 2 experiments, using a total of 81 cattle that were culture-negative for M bovis prior to vaccination. In each experiment, young adult cattle were randomly allotted to 4 groups. Each calf in groups 1 and 2 was vaccinated according to the vaccine manufacturer's directions. Groups 3 and 4 were unvaccinated controls. Three weeks after the last vaccination, each calf in groups 1 and 3 was experimentally challenge exposed by dropping a suspension of viable cells of a virulent strain of M bovis directly onto the corneal surface of each eye. Calves in all 4 groups were then commingled in open pastures so that calves in groups 2 and 4 could be naturally exposed to the calves with experimentally induced infections. Each calf was examined for signs of ocular disease on a regular basis by 2 experienced clinicians who scored each eye for severity of disease on the basis of a prearranged scale. Neither clinician was aware of the vaccination or exposure status of the calf nor to which experimental group they belonged. Lacrimal secretions were collected regularly to determine the number of eyes in which the virulent organism became established. Moraxella bovis with bacterial cultural characteristics similar to those of the virulent strain placed in the eyes of groups 1 and 3 was cultured from greater than or equal to 83% of the eyes of calves in all groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Measurement of the B$0\\atop{d}$ lifetime using B$0\\atop{d}$ → J/ΨK$0\\atop{S}$ decays at D0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balm, Paul Wijnand [Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2004-12-08

    This thesis describes a measurement of the B$0\\atop{d}$ lifetime in the decay to (J/ΨK$0\\atop{S}$), using 114 pb-1 of data collected by the D0 experiment at the Tevatron from October 15, 2002, to June 10, 2003. The measurement is motivated by the tests of the Standard Model that it makes possible. These include tests of Heavy Quark Effective Theory predicting B-meson lifetimes, and of the complex phase in the CKM-matrix as the source of CP-violation in B$0\\atop{d}$ decays to (J/ΨK$0\\atop{S}$).

  4. A Severe Aspect of Pediatric Ocular Allergy to Recognize: Vernal Keratoconjunctivitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hande Taylan Þekeroðlu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine the clinical features of vernal keratoconjunctivitis and to evaluate the safety and the efficacy of the medical treatment on clinical grades. Material and Method: All patients with vernal keratoconjunctivitis who had been treated with mast-cell stabilizers, antihistamines and artificial tear drops previously were enrolled in the study. Topical steroids were added during recurrences, were tapered and discontinued according to the clinical improvement. Topical cyclosporin 0.05% four times daily was used additionally in cases of inadequate response to treatment or evident steroid dependance. Main outcome measures were the clinical features, change of clinical grades, response to treatment, rate of recurrences and side effects of the eyedrops. Results: Twenty patients ( 13 males, 7 females with vernal keratoconjunctivitis in different severity scales were included. The median age of the patients was 10 (9-11 years. The median follow-up time was 35 (15-56 months. Ten patients received topical cyclosporine. The rate of recurrences was similar in patients who received topical cyclosporine compared to those who were followed with topical steroids. (p=0.17 No severe adverse reaction to any of the formulations was seen. Discussion: Topical 0.05% cyclosporin is safe and effective for the treatment of vernal keratoconjunctivitis as a steroid sparing agent. It helps to obtain good clinical response without serious adverse effects and provides improvement on the clinical grades.

  5. Traditional Smallpox Vaccines and Atopic Dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Trials 2016 Research Grant Request DONATE Traditional Smallpox Vaccines and Atopic Dermatitis Frequently Asked Questions Eczema Living ... Involved Eczema Products News Research Donate Traditional Smallpox Vaccines and Atopic Dermatitis Frequently Asked Questions What is ...

  6. The Atopic March. A Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Juan F. Salazar-Espinosa

    2015-01-01

    The atopic march is defined as the progression of atopic diseases, generally during childhood, such as atopic dermatitis, asthma, allergic rhinitis and food allergies. The main risk factors for developing these atopic diseases include genetics, aeroallergens, food allergens, late food introduction to the infant, and living in developing countries. The immunologic contributors to this problem include the Th2 response, epigenetics, and lack of certain factors like thymic stromal lymphopoietin (...

  7. Infrared ocular thermography in dogs with and without keratoconjunctivitis sicca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondi, Flávia; Dornbusch, Peterson T; Sampaio, Manuella; Montiani-Ferreira, Fabiano

    2015-01-01

    Infrared thermography was used to measure temperature differences of the corneal surface between nasal and temporal limbus regions and central cornea of normal dogs and dogs with keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS), in order to establish temperature values in normal canine eyes and in patients with decreased Schirmer tear tests (STT) values. Dogs investigated were all either patients seen at the Veterinary Teaching Hospital of Federal University of Paraná or normal dogs that belonged to the same institution. STT were performed in all eyes. A total of 40 control eyes (STT ≥15 mm/min) and 20 eyes with low STT values (STT ≤14 mm/min) were examined. The mean STT value for eyes with normal STT values was 22.9 ± 3.9 mm/min (mean ± standard deviation), and the mean STT value for eyes with low STT value was 7.2 ± 4.8 mm/min. The mean corneal temperature was significantly lower in eyes with low STT values than in control eyes (P < 0.0001). The following significant correlations were found: (i) Schirmer and breakup time (BUT) (P = 0.0001, r = 0.5); (ii) STT values and corneal surface temperature (P = 0.001, r = 0.256); (iii) STT values and age (P = 0.0001, r = -0.448); (iv) age and corneal surface temperature (P = 0.0001, r = -0.281); and (v) BUT and corneal surface temperature (P = 0.0001, r = 0.36). Thermography is a method that can differentiate between eyes with normal and abnormal STT values. In the future, thermography might be incorporated as part of the ophthalmic examination and perhaps become a popular ancillary test for the diagnoses of ocular surface disorders.

  8. Enhancing best practices in ophthalmology for prevention of nosocomial epidemic keratoconjunctivitis infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alai, Nili

    2016-10-01

    Epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC) outbreaks were reported as early as the 1940s in the United States. Nearly 80 years later, EKC remains a major eye health concern in the US and worldwide. Of particular concern is that a significant number of EKC cluster outbreaks in the US are healthcare acquired infections (HAIs) at ophthalmology offices. Therefore, immediate attention to enhancing best practices of standardization and universal precautions in ophthalmology is paramount.

  9. Periocular necrotizing fasciitis associated with kerato-conjunctivitis and treated with medical management: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shome Debraj

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a 25-year-old systemically healthy male who presented with periocular necrotizing fasciitis (NF in the left eyelid. This was associated with the presence of immunologically mediated marginal kerato-conjunctivitis, in the same eye. This potentially dangerous lid infection and the associated ocular surface infection resolved successfully, with medical management. We report this case to highlight the successful conservative management of periocular NF and the hitherto unreported anterior segment involvement.

  10. The Potential Therapeutic Effect of Green Tea in Treatment of Vernal Keratoconjunctivitis

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Vernal keratoconjunctivitis is a chronic, recurrent and severe ocular allergic disease, which is characterized by persistent allergic inflammation of the conjunctiva. It can be accompanied by ocular discomfort and visual disturbance. All forms are characterized by intense itching, tearing, mucous secretions and a severe photophobia, which often forces children to live virtually in dark places. Conjunctival proliferative changes, such as the formation of giant papillae are the characteristic f...

  11. First observation of the decay $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ →; D$+\\atop{s}$ K and measurement of B($\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ →; D$±\\atop{s}$K)/Br($\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$→; D$+\\atop{s}$ π-)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muelmenstaedt, Johannes [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    We present the first observation of the decay $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ → D$+\\atop{s}$ K and measure the relative branching fraction of $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ → D$+\\atop{s}$ K to $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ → D$+\\atop{s}$ π-. The measurement of the relative branching fraction is performed by applying a fit in invariant mass and specific ionization to 1.2 fb-1 of Ds(φπ)X data collected with the CDF II detector in pp collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We measure B($\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ → D± s K∓¢/B($\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ → D$+\\atop{s}$ π-) = 0.107±0.019(stat)±0.008(sys). The statistical significance of the $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ → D$+\\atop{s}$ K signal is 7.9σ. To cross-check our analysis method, we also measure B($\\bar{B0}$ → D+K-)/B($\\bar{B0}$ → D+π-) and B($\\bar{B0}$ → D*+K-)/B($\\bar{B0}$ → D*+π-) and verify that our results are in agreement with the world average.

  12. First report of Mycoplasma conjunctivae from wild Caprinae with infectious keratoconjunctivitis in the Pyrenees (NE Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco, Ignasi; Mentaberre, Gregorio; Ballesteros, Cristina; Bischof, Daniela F; Lavín, Santiago; Vilei, Edy M

    2009-01-01

    Frequent outbreaks of infectious keratoconjunctivitis have been reported in wild Caprinae in Europe. While etiologic studies in the Alps indicate that the main etiologic agent is Mycoplasma conjunctivae, there are few reports from other mountain areas, such as the Pyrenees, where M. conjunctivae has never been reported. In 2006 and 2007, five adult Pyrenean chamois (Rupicapra pyrenaica; two males and three females) and one adult male European mouflon (Ovis orientalis musimon) were studied; they exhibited clinical symptoms of infectious keratoconjunctivitis such as blindness, corneal opacity, and ulceration. In three of the five chamois tested, and in the mouflon, Mycoplasma conjunctivae was identified from conjunctival swabs by means of a TaqMan(R) polymerase chain reaction based on the lipoprotein gene lppS. Cluster analysis indicated that the three southern chamois isolates form a cluster that is distinct from the mouflon isolate. This is the first report of M. conjunctivae in Pyrenean chamois, and it supports the hypothesis that M. conjunctivae also could be the main cause of infectious keratoconjunctivitis in areas other than the Alps, such as the Pyrenees.

  13. Therapeutic perspectives in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misery, Laurent

    2011-12-01

    Therapy of atopic dermatitis should comprise emollients, topical glucocorticosteroids, or calcineurin inhibitors, phototherapies, immunosuppressants like cyclosporin A, and other treatments. All these treatments should be improved, thanks to research. But new therapeutic perspectives should be given by topical anti-inflammatory substances, selective glucocorticoid receptor agonists, probiotics, interferon γ, TNFα inhibitors, inhibition of T cells or B cells, inhibition of IgE binding, and many other possibilities.

  14. Epidemiology and natural history of atopic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Simon F

    2015-01-01

    The atopic diseases - atopic dermatitis, asthma, and hay fever - pose a great burden to the individual and society, not least, since these diseases have reached epidemic proportions during the past decades in industrialized and, more recently, in developing countries. Whereas the prevalence...... of the atopic diseases now seems to have reached a plateau in many Western countries, they are still on the increase in the developing world. This emphasizes continuing research aimed at identifying the causes, risk factors, and natural history of these diseases. Herein, the fundamental aspects of the natural...... history and epidemiology of the atopic diseases are reviewed....

  15. Japanese Guideline for Atopic Dermatitis 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichiro Katayama

    2014-01-01

    The basics of treatment discussed in this guideline are based on the "Guidelines for the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis 2008" prepared by the Health and Labour Sciences Research and the "Guidelines for the Management of Atopic Dermatitis 2012 (ADGL2012" prepared by the Atopic Dermatitis Guidelines Advisory Committee, Japanese Society of Allergology in principle. The guidelines for the treatment of atopic dermatitis are summarized in the "Japanese Guideline for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Allergic Disease 2013" together with those for other allergic diseases.

  16. Detection of bovine herpesvirus 1 sequences in yaks (Bos grunniens) with keratoconjunctivitis, using a highly sensitive nested polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, S; Das, S; Baruah, K K; Chakravarty, P; Chakrabarty, D; Sarkar, T; Pal, B; De, S; Pan, D; Bera, A K; Bandyopadhyay, S; Bhattacharya, D

    2010-12-01

    Thirty-seven yaks (Bos grunniens) with keratoconjunctivitis and 22 healthy yaks were used to investigate the role of bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) in keratoconjunctivitis in yaks. Nucleic acid sequences of BoHV-1 glycoproteins B and E were detected in conjunctival swabs from all yaks with keratoconjunctivitis using a nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In 21 yaks, BoHV-1 sequences were detected along with Moraxella bovis (M. bovis) and Neisseria spp. The amplified BoHV-1 sequences were identical, and no nucleotide variation was observed when compared with a BoHV-1 reference strain using single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis of the amplified DNA sequences. Interestingly, BoHV-1 sequences could not be detected in samples from healthy yaks. However, conjunctival swabs from two healthy yaks (9.09%) yielded M. bovis and Neisseria spp. Samples from 35 yaks with keratoconjunctivitis showed positive reactions in an avidin biotin enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for BoHV-1 antibodies; all the healthy yaks were seronegative. This is the first report of a possible association of BoHV-1 with keratoconjunctivitis in yaks.

  17. The Atopic March. A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan F. Salazar-Espinosa

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The atopic march is defined as the progression of atopic diseases, generally during childhood, such as atopic dermatitis, asthma, allergic rhinitis and food allergies. The main risk factors for developing these atopic diseases include genetics, aeroallergens, food allergens, late food introduction to the infant, and living in developing countries. The immunologic contributors to this problem include the Th2 response, epigenetics, and lack of certain factors like thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP and filaggrin. As a whole, the therapeutic approach has been changing during recent years because of the discovery of new factors involved in this problem. This article explains the definition of atopic march, the immunological pathway, clinical features, epidemiology and therapeutic approaches to create a context for the broader understanding of this important condition.

  18. Gene-environment interaction in atopic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kahr, Niklas; Naeser, Vibeke; Stensballe, Lone Graff;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The development of atopic diseases early in life suggests an important role of perinatal risk factors. OBJECTIVES: To study whether early-life exposures modify the genetic influence on atopic diseases in a twin population. METHODS: Questionnaire data on atopic diseases from 850....... Significant predictors of atopic diseases were identified with logistic regression and subsequently tested for genetic effect modification using variance components analysis. RESULTS: After multivariable adjustment, prematurity (gestational age below 32 weeks) [odds ratio (OR) = 1.93, confidence interval (CI...... stratified by exposure status showed no significant change in the heritability of asthma according to the identified risk factors. CONCLUSION: In this population-based study of children, there was no evidence of genetic effect modification of atopic diseases by several identified early-life risk factors...

  19. First measurement of the B$0\\atop{2}$ semileptonic branching ratio to an orbitally excited d$**\\atop{s}$ state, Br(B$0\\atop{2}$ → D$-\\atop{s1}$(2536)μ+vX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieger, Jason [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2007-12-08

    In a data sample of approximately 1.3 fb-1 collected with the D0 detector between 2002 and 2006, the orbitally excited charm state D$±\\atop{s1}$(2536)has been observed with a measured mass of 2535.7 ± 0.6(stat) ± 0.5(syst) MeV/c2 via the decay mode B$0\\atop{s}$ → D$-\\atop{s1}$(2536)μ+vX followed by D$±\\atop{s1}$(2536) → DK$0\\atop{S}$. By normalizing to the known branching ratio Br($\\bar{b}$ → D*- μ+vX) and to the number of reconstructed D* mesons with an associated identified muon, a first-ever measurement is made of the product branching ratio ($\\bar{b}$ →} D$-\\atop{s1}$(2536)μ+vX) • Br(D$-\\atop{s1}$ → D*-K$0\\atop{S}$). Assuming that D$-\\atop{s1}$(2536) production in semileptonic decay is entirely from B$0\\atop{s}$, an extraction of the semileptonic branching ratio Br(B$0\\atop{s}$ → D$-\\atop{s1}$(2536)μ+vX) is made. Comparisons are made with theoretical expectations.

  20. Atopic eczema and food allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassmann, Anja; Werfel, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Approximately one-third of children with severe atopic eczema suffer from a food allergy, whereas in adult patients, food allergies are rare. In child patients, three different clinical reaction patterns can be differentiated as follows: (1) immediate-type reactions, (2) isolated late eczematous reactions, and (3) combined immediate-type and late eczematous reactions. In childhood food allergies, food allergens, such as cow's milk or hen's egg, are primarily responsible for allergic reactions, while in adolescents and adults, food allergies often develop consecutively after primary sensitization to pollen allergens. Dysfunctions in the epidermal barrier seem to be vitally important in the development of food allergies in patients with atopic eczema by facilitating sensitization after epicutaneous allergen exposure. Further investigation is required to determine the role of intestinal epithelial barrier defects in the pathogenesis of these allergies as well as the genetic characteristics associated with an increased risk of food allergy. The diagnosis of eczematous reactions to food requires a careful diagnostic procedure, taking into account a patient's history and sensitization patterns. The clinical relevance of sensitization often has to be proven by an oral food challenge, with the rating of the skin condition by validated scores after 24 h and the later evaluation of the eczematous reaction.

  1. [Atopic dermatitis of the adult].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hello, M; Aubert, H; Bernier, C; Néel, A; Barbarot, S

    2016-02-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) of the adult is a common skin disease. Its prevalence has greatly increased during the past decades. AD is commonly associated with other atopic disorders. Its impact on quality of life is often underestimated. Various immunopathologic mechanisms are involved in AD: innate epidermal barrier dysfunction due to filaggrin gene mutations, innate and adaptative abnormalities of the immune system (an initial Th2 phase precedes a chronic Th1 phase), intestinal and cutaneous microbiomes dysbiosis, and environmental factors. Diagnosis of AD is clinical and there is no predictive biomarker of future severity. The main differential diagnoses are: scabies, psoriasis, cutaneous adverse reaction, cutaneous T cell lymphoma, primary immunodeficiency, and Netherton's syndrome. Therapeutic management is challenging and should integrate a therapeutic education program. Topical corticosteroids are the first line treatment, including a preliminary assessment of possible topical corticosteroids phobia. Systemic treatments are recommended in severe, chronic and resistant AD, after careful evaluation in a reference centre. Dupilumab, an IL4/IL13 inhibitor, might be the first effective targeted therapy in AD, whereas therapies that specifically target the mechanisms of pruritus represent an exciting perspective.

  2. The Potential Therapeutic Effect of Green Tea in Treatment of Vernal Keratoconjunctivitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Mosallaei

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Vernal keratoconjunctivitis is a chronic, recurrent and severe ocular allergic disease, which is characterized by persistent allergic inflammation of the conjunctiva. It can be accompanied by ocular discomfort and visual disturbance. All forms are characterized by intense itching, tearing, mucous secretions and a severe photophobia, which often forces children to live virtually in dark places. Conjunctival proliferative changes, such as the formation of giant papillae are the characteristic findings of affected individuals. Giant papillae develop as a result of infiltration of inflammatory cells, changes in the epithelial layer, and increased deposition of extracellular matrix molecules such as collagen and proliferation of conjunctival fibroblasts. Currently several therapeutic options such as corticosteroids, mast cell stabilizers and cyclosporine are applied for treatment of Vernal keratoconjunctivitis but in long-term, the chronic and recurrent nature of this problem leads to failure or appearance of side effects of current treatment in many patients. Recently, Green tea extract and its principal active ingredient, epigallocatechin gallate , are gaining attention and increased usage due to its healthful properties. It has considerable anticatactogenic effect by inducing apoptosis in lens epithelial cells and antioxidant effects. Also its great benefits were achieved in attenuation of damaging influences to the retina caused by ischemia/reperfusion. Based on evidences supported beneficial effects of green tea, we hypothesize that local administration of green tea and its extract seems to be a proper substitute or adjunct to current treatments of Vernal keratoconjunctivitis. This plant contains a series of antioxidants that can abolish the process of allergic cascade. Moreover, by suppressing TNF-alpha potentially, it can reduce proinflammatory reaction, as well as fibroblast proliferation and subsequently decrease giant papilla formation

  3. [Isolation of Chlamydia psittaci and Moraxella bovis from infectious keratoconjunctivitis in lambs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trávnícek, M; Dravecký, T; Balascák, J

    1982-08-01

    Out of 189 lambs in the flock, 25 animals suffered from bilateral or unilateral conjunctivitis, or keratoconjunctivitis. By serological examination (RVK), positive levels of antibodies to the group-specific antigen of Chl. psittaci were found in three out of six lambs examined by laboratory methods. Bacteriological examination of eye smears of six lambs showed in four cases the infection by microorganisms of Moraxella bovis. Smears from the conjunctivas of these lambs were after preparation instilled in the yolk sacs of six to seven days old chicken embryos. One strain of Chlamydia psittaci was isolated from the same material as Moraxella bovis.

  4. Influences of Environmental Chemicals on Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwangmi

    2015-06-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin condition including severe pruritus, xerosis, visible eczematous skin lesions that mainly begin early in life. Atopic dermatitis exerts a profound impact on the quality of life of patients and their families. The estimated lifetime prevalence of atopic dermatitis has increased 2~3 fold during over the past 30 years, especially in urban areas in industrialized countries, emphasizing the importance of life-style and environment in the pathogenesis of atopic diseases. While the interplay of individual genetic predisposition and environmental factors contribute to the development of atopic dermatitis, the recent increase in the prevalence of atopic dermatitis might be attributed to increased exposure to various environmental factors rather than alterations in human genome. In recent decades, there has been an increasing exposure to chemicals from a variety of sources. In this study, the effects of various environmental chemicals we face in everyday life - air pollutants, contact allergens and skin irritants, ingredients in cosmetics and personal care products, and food additives - on the prevalence and severity of atopic dermatitis are reviewed.

  5. Current clinical practice in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odedra, Katy Mara

    2014-08-12

    Atopic dermatitis affects both children and adults, and often presents in early life as itchy, dry skin primarily located on the face, trunk and limbs. There is usually a history of family or personal atopic disease and an increased blood level of the allergic antibody immunoglobulin E. The mainstays of treatment are emollients and corticosteroid ointments and/or creams. Other therapies include immunomodulators and management of any associated infections. Caring for a patient with atopic dermatitis requires skilled assessment, effective education and the ability to involve and support patients and carers in the management of this condition.

  6. Epidemiology of infectious keratoconjunctivitis in cattle in south-east Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takele, G; Zerihun, A

    2000-04-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of infectious keratoconjunctivitis on cross-breed dairy farms and to evaluate factors that influence its distribution. A total of 11 dairy farms and one cattle cross-breeding farm in different parts of Arsi region, south-east Ethiopia were clinically and bacteriologically investigated from February 1989 to December 1990. Out of 5221 local zebu and cross-breed dairy animals, 110 were found to have different degrees of infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis. Of these, 94 (85.5%) were unilateral and 16 (14.5%) were bilateral. The prevalence of the disease was significantly (P 0.750). Moraxella bovis was isolated from 88 (80%) of the 110 bacteriologically positive cases. Of these isolates, 61 (69%) were haemolytic and 27 (31%) were non-haemolytic strains. Infection with M. bovis was unilateral. Concurrent infections with M. bovis included Actinomyces pyogenes 23 (21%), Staphylococcus aureus 17 (15%), Pasteurella haemolytica nine (8%), Escherichia coli eight (7%) and Proteus spp. four (3.6%).

  7. Comparison of atopic cough with cough variant asthma: is atopic cough a precursor of asthma?

    OpenAIRE

    Fujimura, M; Ogawa, H.; Nishizawa, Y; Nishi, K.

    2003-01-01

    Background: We have described a group of patients who present with isolated chronic bronchodilator resistant non-productive cough with an atopic constitution, eosinophilic tracheobronchitis, and airway cough receptor hypersensitivity without bronchial hyperresponsiveness, which we have termed "atopic cough". Although cough variant asthma (in which the cough responds to bronchodilators) is recognised as a precursor of typical asthma, it is not known whether atopic cough is also a precursor of ...

  8. Search for B$0\\atop{s}$ oscillations at D0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bose, Tulika [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Measurement of the B$0\\atop{s}$ oscillation frequency via B$0\\atop{s}$ mixing analyses provides a powerful constraint on the CKM matrix elements. A search for B$0\\atop{s}$ oscillations was performed using data collected by the DØ detector during the period 2002-2005 at the Fermilab Tevatron. Approximately 610 pb-1 of data was analyzed to reconstruct a large set of B0 s mesons in different semileptonic decay modes. Opposite-side flavor tagging algorithms that were tested on semileptonic B0 d decays with the measurement of the B$0\\atop{d}$ mixing frequency were used to determine the initial state flavor of the reconstructed B0 s meson. No significant signal for any particular value of the oscillation frequency was found. A 95% confidence level limit on the B$0\\atop{s}$ oscillation frequency Δms > 7.3 ps-1 and a sensitivity of 9.5 ps-1 were obtained.

  9. Atopic dermatitis: allergic dermatitis or neuroimmune dermatitis?*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, Neide Kalil; Aidé, Márcia Kalil

    2016-01-01

    Advances in knowledge of neurocellulars relations have provided new directions in the understanding and treatment of numerous conditions, including atopic dermatitis. It is known that emotional, physical, chemical or biological stimuli can generate more accentuated responses in atopic patients than in non-atopic individuals; however, the complex network of control covered by these influences, especially by neuropeptides and neurotrophins, and their genetic relations, still keep secrets to be revealed. Itching and airway hyperresponsiveness, the main aspects of atopy, are associated with disruption of the neurosensory network activity. Increased epidermal innervation and production of neurotrophins, neuropeptides, cytokines and proteases, in addition to their relations with the sensory receptors in an epidermis with poor lipid mantle, are the aspects currently covered for understanding atopic dermatitis. PMID:27579744

  10. Skin absorption through atopic dermatitis skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halling-Overgaard, A-S; Kezic, S; Jakasa, I

    2017-01-01

    Patients with atopic dermatitis have skin barrier impairment in both lesional and non-lesional skin. They are typically exposed to emollients daily and topical anti-inflammatory medicaments intermittently, hereby increasing the risk of developing contact allergy and systemic exposed to chemicals...... ingredients found in these topical preparations. We systematically searched for studies that investigated skin absorption of various penetrants, including medicaments, in atopic dermatitis patients, but also animals with experimentally induced dermatitis. We identified 40 articles, i.e. 11 human studies...... examining model penetrants, 26 human studies examining atopic dermatitis drugs and 3 animal studies. We conclude that atopic dermatitis patients have nearly two-fold increased skin absorption when compared to healthy controls. There is a need for well-designed epidemiological and dermato...

  11. Current understanding in pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tess McPherson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been advances in our understanding of the complex pathogenesis of atopic eczema over the past few decades. This article examines the multiple factors which are implicated in this process.

  12. Lifetime difference in the B$0\\atop{s}$ system from untagged B$0\\atop{s}$ → J/ΨΦ decay at √s= 1.96 TeV at D0 detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra, Avdhesh [Tata Inst. of Fundamental Research (TIFR), Mumbai (India)

    2006-01-01

    In this dissertation, they present a study of the untagged decay of B$0\\atop{s}$ → J/ΨΦ, the final state of which is a superposition of the CP-even and CP-odd states. Within the framework of the standard model (SM), to a good approximation, the two CP eigenstates of the (B$0\\atop{s}$, $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$) system are equivalent to mass eigenstates. The data collected by the D0 detector between June 2002 to August 2004 (an integrated luminosity of approximately 450 pb-1) has been used for the analysis presented in this thesis. From a simultaneous fit to the B$0\\atop{s}$ candidate mass, lifetime, and the angular distribution of the decay products, they obtain the CP-odd fraction in the final state at production time to be 0.16 ±} 0.10(stat) ± 0.02(syst). The average lifetime of the (B$0\\atop{s}$, $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$) system is measured to be 1.39$+0.13\\atop{-0.16}$(stat)$+0.01\\atop{-0.02}$(syst) ps, with the relative width difference between the heavy and light mass eigenstates, Δγ/$\\bar{γ}$ = (γLH)/$\\bar{γ}$ = 0.24$+0.16\\atop{-0.38}$(stat)$+0.03\\atop{-0.04}$(syst). With the additional constraint from the world average of the B$0\\atop{s}$ lifetime measurements using semileptonic decays, they find average lifetime of the (B$0\\atop{s}$, $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$) system 1.39 ± 0.06 ps with Δγ/$\\bar{γ}$ = 0.25$+0.14\\atop{-0.15}$. They have also done B0 lifetime measurement for its analogous decay mode to J/Ψ}K*. With this measurement they get B0 lifetime 1.530 ± 0.043(stat) ± 0.023(syst) ps. Using above results, they get 0.91 ± 0.09(stat) ± 0.003(syst), for the ratio of the B$0\\atop{s}$ and B0 lifetimes ($\\bar{γ}$(B$0\\atop{s}$)/γ(B0)). These measurements are consistent with the predictions of SM within the measurement uncertainty.

  13. Atopic eczema in a multiracial country (Malaysia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaafar, R B; Pettit, J H

    1993-11-01

    A total of 14,342 patients with skin diseases who had attended either the National University of Malaysia skin clinic or a private dermatological office were analysed. Five hundred and thirty-four cases (3.7%) had atopic eczema, the prevalence being highest among the Malays (4.3%). The prevalence of atopic eczema among clinic attenders is lower in all three major Malaysian races when compared with studies from England.

  14. Probiotics and infantile atopic eczema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akelma AZ

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ahmet Zülfikar Akelma,1 Aziz Alper Biten2 1Pediatric Allergy and Immunology Unit, Ankara Kecioren Teaching and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey; 2General Directorate of Management Services, Republic of Turkey Ministry of Health, Ankara, Turkey Abstract: Pediatric eczema is a common disease which causes economic and social burden. Its incidence differs among the societies, with an incidence reported to reach up to 20% in developed countries. Eczema is the first allergic disease seen in the childhood, and it is recognized as a precursor for the development of atopic diseases such as asthma, allergic rhinitis, and food allergy in the forthcoming years of children. Increased incidence of eczema in recent years has led to new research in epidemiology, prevention, and intervention of this disease. It is no doubt important to treat itching, rash, and excoriation of the skin; however, treatment of pediatric eczema should not be considered only as a treatment of skin lesions. Considering skin treatment as the tip of the iceberg, proper management of the allergic processes can be accepted as the rest of the iceberg. The role of probiotics in the prevention of atopic eczema is yet to be clarified. Evidence presented by existing studies suggesting that probiotics may prevent pediatric eczema is not strong enough. A positive effect, if any, may be related with onset time, dose, duration, and use of specific probiotics. To date, there is no strong evidence for use of probiotics in the treatment of eczema; however, administration of probiotics in breast-feeding mothers in the prenatal period and in infants in the postnatal period can be accepted as a safe and helpful option in the prevention of eczema. Nevertheless, there are still questions to be answered in the future about probiotic administration for eczema. Clinical use of probiotics will gradually become more widespread when these questions are answered. Based on current information, the administration

  15. Wheeze in children : the impact of parental education on atopic and non-atopic symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Meer, Gea; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.; Brunekreef, Bert

    2010-01-01

    There is conflicting evidence for the relationship between parental socioeconomic position and their children's asthma. The aim of this study was to investigate relationships between parental education and respiratory symptoms in their children, distinguishing atopic and non-atopic symptoms. A cross

  16. Atopic Dermatitis - A Clinical Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Pramod

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 80 atopic dermatitis cases were studied. The incidence was 4.2 per 1000 among OPD patients. The overall crude M : F ratio was 1.4:1 which after standardization was 0.9:1, 32.5% had the disease for the first time, 48.75% of patients had observed itching preceding rash, 26% of patients gave history of food allergy. The incidence of personal history of atopy and family history of atopy was 56.25% and 63.75% respectively. Facial involvement was common in infant and flexural involvement in adolescent and adult. Vesiculation, papules, erythema were common in all. Lichenification was seen in chronic cases, 18% of the patients had ichtyosis vulgaris and 93% of infantile, 55% of childhood and 57% of adult cases had xerotic skin. Hyperlinear palms were seen in 38% and keratosis pilaris in 34%. Dennie-Morgan line was seen in 50% of the cases. White dermographism was demonstrated in 50% of 66 cases tested. Secondary cutaneous infections were common.

  17. Mixing and CP violation in the B$0\\atop{s}$ meson system at CDF; Mélange et violation de CP dans le système des mésons B$0\\atop{s}$ à CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Giovanni, Gian Piero [Univ. of Paris VI-VII (France)

    2008-01-01

    The two analyses presented in the thesis, the B$0\\atop{s}$ mixing analysis and the B$0\\atop{s}$ → J/ψφ angular analysis, share most of the technical implementations and features. Thus, my choice was to pursue in parallel the common aspects of the analyses, avoiding, whenever possible, repetitions. Each Chapter is split in two parts, the first one dedicated to the B$0\\atop{s}$ mixing analysis and the second one describing the angular analysis on the B$0\\atop{s}$ → J/ψφ decay mode. They are organized as follows. In Chapter 1 we present the theoretical framework of the B$0\\atop{s}$ neutral mesons system. After a general introduction on the Standard Model, we focus on the quantities which are relevant to the Δms measurement and the CP violation phenomena, underlying the details concerning the study of pseudo-scalar to vector vector decays, P → VV, which allow to carry out an angular analysis. A discussion on the implication of the measurements performed in the search of physics beyond the Standard Model is presented. The accelerator facilities and the CDF-II detector are reported in Chapter 2. While describing the detector, more emphasis is given to the components fundamental to perform B physics analyses at CDF. The Chapter 3 is focused on the reconstruction and selection of the data samples. The Chapter starts with a description of the on-line trigger requirements, according to the B$0\\atop{s}$ sample considered, followed by the offline selection criteria implemented to reconstruct B$0\\atop{s}$ semileptonic and hadronic decays, fully and partially reconstructed, for the B$0\\atop{s}$ mixing analysis, as well as the B$0\\atop{s}$ → J/ψφ decay mode for the angular analysis. The subsequent Chapter 4 is dedicated to the revision of the technical ingredients needed in the final analyses. The B$0\\atop{s}$ mixing elements are firstly described. The methodology historically used in the oscillation searches, the 'amplitude scan', is here

  18. Detection of specific Mycoplasma conjunctivae antibodies in the sera of sheep with infectious keratoconjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belloy, L; Giacometti, M; Abdo, E M; Nicolet, J; Krawinkler, M; Janovsky, M; Bruderer, U; Frey, J

    2001-01-01

    The serological cross reactions between Mycoplasma conjunctivae, the etiological agent of infectious keratoconjunctivitis (IKC), and the antigenetically and phylogenetically closely related Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae, which is often found in sheep, were analysed. Cross reacting antigens were identified using sera from sheep with IKC and from sheep of herds known to be free of IKC, as well as rabbit hyperimmune serum specific to the two Mycoplasma species. Cross reactions were predominantly due to the strongly antigenic proteins of 42 kDa and 83 kDa. Serospecific antigens of M. conjunctivae could be separated from cross-reacting antigens by the extraction of Tween 20-soluble membrane proteins. The Tween 20-extracted proteins of the M. conjunctivae strain HRC/581T were used for the development of an indirect ELISA test. This ELISA test was shown to be a useful serological method for the diagnosis of M. conjunctivae infections and to identify infected sheep herds.

  19. Vernal keratoconjunctivitis in an Israeli group of patients and its treatment with sodium cromoglycate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baryishak, Y R; Zavaro, A; Monselise, M; Samra, Z; Sompolinsky, D

    1982-01-01

    Vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC) is usually considered as an allergic eye disorder of type I, and in most therapeutic trials it has been shown to yield to topical treatment with sodium cromoglycate. This has been confirmed in the present study of VKC patients from Israel. However, some of the cases seemed not to benefit from this treatment. In a survey of IgE levels in VKC patients in Israel tear IgE levels were significantly increased in 63.5%, but in 29% of the patients both tear and blood IgE levels were normal to low. The possibility that some of the cases diagnosed as VKC might have another cause than IgE-mediated atopy is discussed. Images PMID:6800400

  20. Bovine infectious keratoconjunctivitis: carrier state of Moraxella bovis and the development of preventive measures against disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, G W; Hughes, D E

    1975-08-15

    Bovine infectious keratoconjunctivitis, which is caused by Moraxella bovis, occurs perennially in all cattle-raising areas. Disease may occur any time during the year but manifests itself often during summer when disease-enhancing factors such as ultraviolet radiation and fly population are increased. Although some recent research findings indicate that cattle can be immunized against the disease, many problems have to be overcome before the cattle industry can benefit from such immunization. Some pressing problems relate to lack of cross-protection between vaccines of different strains of M bovis, resistant or resilient carrier states, and how these factors affect vaccination regimens undertaken. Though cattle vaccinated with 1 strain are somewhat protected against subsequent challange by the same strain, protection against heterologous strains has not been demonstrated. In most herds, cattle harbor M bovis, and these carriers may serve as a source of infection.

  1. Effects of Moraxella bovis vaccination schedules on experimentally induced infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, J J; Selby, L A

    1981-07-01

    An oil-adjuvant Moraxella bovis bacterin was administered to weanling calves, using different vaccination schedules. Calves were given a booster vaccination after 3 weeks and were challenge exposed 2 weeks later with virulent M bovis recovered from calves with clinical infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK). The effects of different routes of vaccination and homologous and heterologous challenge exposure on the incidence, severity, and duration of induced IBK was evaluated. All calves given a placebo developed clinical IBK. Calves vaccinated subcutaneously in the neck had the shortest duration of M bovis infection, the lowest incidence and the shortest duration of acute IBK, and the lowest disease severity score, compared with effects in calves given a placebo or vaccinated subconjunctivally. Calves challenge exposed with the homologous strain of M bovis had more infected eyes, more eyes with acute IBK, longer duration of infection, and a higher severity and duration disease score.

  2. Experimental infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis: efficacy of a vaccine prepared from nonhemolytic strains of Moraxella bovis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, G W; McDonald, T J; Kopecky, K E

    1982-06-01

    Calves vaccinated with a bacterin prepared from 4 nonhemolytic strains of Moraxella bovis were challenge exposed with a virulent hemolytic strain of M bovis. Ten calves were given 2 vaccinal inoculations 21 days apart. Twenty-one days after the last vaccinal inoculation, the eyes of the 10 vaccinated and the eyes of the 12 non-vaccinated calves were exposed to a hemolytic heterologous strain of M bovis. The percentage of eyes with infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis was lower, the lesions were less severe, and the duration of infection was shorter in vaccinated calves than in nonvaccinated calves. Seemingly, the resistance induced by nonhemolytic strains of M bovis was at least comparable with the induced by hemolytic virulent strains of that organism. The nature of the immune response in vaccinated calves is discussed.

  3. Clinical and allergological analysis of ocular manifestations of sick building syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, Yusuke; Kadonosono, Kazuaki; Uchio, Eiichi

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The disease concept of sick building syndrome (SBS) is still unclear. Ocular mucous membrane irritation is one of the major symptoms of SBS. However, the immunological aspects of the ocular complications of SBS are not yet clarified. The clinical and allergological aspects of SBS cases with ocular disorders with special reference to allergic conjunctival diseases (ACD) were analyzed, especially with respect to local immunological features. Methods Twelve cases of SBS with ocular findings and 49 cases of ACD (allergic conjunctivitis [AC], atopic keratoconjunctivitis [AKC], and vernal keratoconjunctivitis [VKC]) for comparison were evaluated. The clinical findings in SBS and ACD were scored, and tear film breakup time (BUT) was measured. Cytokine (interferon-γ [IFN-γ], interleukin [IL]-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-13) concentrations in tears were analyzed by cytometric bead arrays. Eosinophil count in peripheral blood, total IgE in serum, and multiple allergen simultaneous test (MAST) for antigen-specific IgE were also measured. Results In SBS, conjunctival lesions were observed in all cases, and corneal abnormalities were found in two-thirds of the cases. Limbal lesions were observed in 2 pediatric cases. Mean serum total IgE level in SBS was significantly higher than that in AC; however, it was significantly lower than that in AKC and VKC. Eosinophil count in peripheral blood and number of positive allergens in MAST were significantly lower in SBS than in AKC and VKC. Significant elevation of tear IL-4 was observed in SBS and ACD. However, in contrast to ACD, elevation of other cytokines in tears was not observed in SBS. Mean tear BUT in SBS was in the normal range. Conclusion From these results, SBS is thought to be partially induced by an allergic response. However, clinical dissociation of the ocular clinical findings and local immunological features in tear cytokines may suggest that SBS belongs to a different entity from ACD. PMID:28352150

  4. Probiotics and Atopic Dermatitis in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Vincenzo Zuccotti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing interest in the potential beneficial role of probiotic supplementation in the prevention and treatment of atopic diseases in children. Probiotics are defined as ingested live microorganisms that, when administered in an adequate amount, confer a health benefit to the host. They are mainly represented by Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria. Several epidemiological data demonstrate that intestinal microflora of atopic children is different from the one of healthy children. Many literature data show that probiotics may modulate the intestinal microflora composition and may have immunomodulatory effect. Based on this hypothesis, probiotics are supposed to confer benefits to allergic diseases. Administration of probiotics when a natural population of indigenous intestinal bacteria is still developing could theoretically influence immune development by favoring the balance between Th1 and Th2 inflammatory responses. For this reason, some studies have evaluated the potential impact of probiotics supplementation in the prevention of atopic dermatitis, with contrasting results. Clinical improvement in immunoglobulin (IgE-sensitized (atopic eczema following probiotic supplementation has been reported in some published studies and the therapeutic effects of probiotics on atopic dermatitis seemed to be encouraging. However, as far as the usefulness of probiotics as a prevention strategy is concerned, results are still inconclusive. In fact, the clinical benefits of probiotic therapy depend upon numerous factors, such as the type of bacteria, dosing regimen, delivery method and other underlying host factors, such as age and diet. More studies are still needed to definitively prove the role of probiotics in the treatment of allergic eczema.

  5. Five new genome types of adenovirus type 37 caused epidemic keratoconjunctivitis in Sapporo, Japan, for more than 10 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariga, Toshihide; Shimada, Yasushi; Shiratori, Kenji; Ohgami, Kazuhiro; Yamazaki, Shudo; Tagawa, Yoshitsugu; Kikuchi, Masayuki; Miyakita, Yoshie; Fujita, Kozo; Ishiko, Hiroaki; Aoki, Koki; Ohno, Shigeaki

    2005-02-01

    Human adenovirus type 37 (HAdV-37) is a major cause of epidemic keratoconjunctivitis and has recently been the largest causative agent of keratoconjunctivitis in Japan. To investigate the genetic characteristics of HAdV-37 strains isolated in Sapporo, we analyzed the genome types and genetic relationships of 51 strains isolated there from 1990 through 2001. By using DNA restriction analysis, eight genome types (HAdV-37/D1, HAdV-37/D3, and HAdV-37/D6 to HAdV-37/D11) were identified, including five new ones. The restriction fragments of these genome types shared more than 95% identity with those of the prototype strain. By DNA sequence analysis, five and three single nucleotide substitutions, respectively, were found in partial sequences of the hexon and fiber genes. The combinations of mutations resulted in four hexon and fiber types (hx1 to hx4 and f1 to f4) and six hexon/fiber pairs (hx1/f1, hx2/f1, hx1/f2, hx1/f3, hx3/f4, and hx4/f4). The six pairs correlated well with certain genome types. In all three epidemics of keratoconjunctivitis to strike Sapporo in the past 12 years, specific genome types and fiber types were usually isolated: in the first epidemic, HAdV-37/D1 (f1) and HAdV-37/D3 (f1); in the second, HAdV-37/D6 (f2) and HAdV-37/D8 (f3); and in the third, HAdV-37/D10 (f4) and HAdV-37/D11 (f4). We conclude that mutations in the adenovirus genome occurred chronologically and that certain mutations were correlated with the epidemics of adenoviral keratoconjunctivitis.

  6. Atopic dermatitis and the nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misery, Laurent

    2011-12-01

    Due to the narrow associations between the skin, immune system, and nervous system, nerve endings are very important in the pathophysiology of inflammatory dermatoses and especially in atopic dermatitis. Many neurotransmitters and nerve growth factors that are released in blood or skin are involved in neurogenic inflammation, which dramatically enhance the inflammation induced by immune cells. During times of stress, their release is highly enhanced. In atopic dermatitis lesions, there are many specific changes in skin neurobiology and neurophysiology. These interesting data suggest that novel therapeutic possibilities can be imagined.

  7. Probiotic bacteria for prevention of atopic diseases: design and application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niers, L.E.M.

    2009-01-01

    Atopic diseases such as (atopic) eczema, food allergy, asthma, and allergic rhinitis are common diseases. The cumulative incidence during childhood is estimated to be 20 to 30%. In countries with a so called ‘’Western lifestyle’’ an increase in the prevalence of atopic diseases has been observed dur

  8. Atopic dermatitis from adolescence to adulthood in the TOACS cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørtz, Charlotte G; Andersen, K E; Dellgren, C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: While much is known about childhood atopic dermatitis, little is known about persistence of atopic dermatitis into adult life. We report, to our knowledge for the first time, the clinical course of atopic dermatitis in an unselected cohort of adolescents followed into adulthood. METHODS......: The course of atopic dermatitis from adolescence to adulthood was studied prospectively in a cohort of unselected 8th-grade schoolchildren established in 1995 and followed up in 2010 with questionnaire and clinical examination. RESULTS: The lifetime prevalence of atopic dermatitis was high (34...

  9. Association of atopic dermatitis with smoking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantor, Robert; Kim, Ashley; Thyssen, Jacob P;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tobacco exposure might be a modifiable risk factor for atopic dermatitis (AD). OBJECTIVE: We examine the association between AD and exposure to tobacco smoke. METHODS: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies (n = 86) in MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus...

  10. Migration and atopic disorder in Swedish conscripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjern, A; Rasmussen, F; Johansson, M; Aberg, N

    1999-08-01

    We have studied asthma and allergic rhinitis prevalence in Swedish conscripts born 1973-1977 according to the military service conscription register in relation to the socio-economic status and country of birth of the conscripts and their parents, and age when granted residency in Sweden. There was an increase in prevalence of asthma and allergic rhinitis over time in all groups irrespective of country of birth or ethnic origin. Conscripts who themselves were born in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Mediterranean had a significantly lower risk for asthma and allergic rhinitis than Swedish-born conscripts. The risk of atopic disorder among the foreign-born conscripts increased with time of residency in Sweden. Conscripts with mothers from Latin America, Asia and Africa were identified as having the highest risk for atopic disorder among Swedish-born conscripts with high socio-economic status; the adjusted risk ratio (RR) for asthma was 2.6 (95% CI 1.7-4.0) and that for allergic rhinitis was 2.0 (1.5-2.6). The conscripts with mothers from the Mediterranean had the lowest risk for atopic disorders of the Swedish-born conscripts with low socio-economic status; the RR for asthma was 0.43 (0.34-0.56) and that for allergic rhinitis was 0.84 (0.76-0.93). This study demonstrates that factors related to migration and ethnicity are important determinants of atopic disorder among Swedish conscripts.

  11. A Study to Evaluate and Compare the Efficacy and Safety of Topical Cyclosporine A 0.5% with Topical Placebo (Artificial Tears in Alleviating the Principal Signs Associated with Vernal Keratoconjunctivitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abha Gahlot

    2016-03-01

    The use of topical cyclosporine for treatment of vernal keratoconjunctivitis should be encouraged to prevent complications associated with the natural course of the disease and prolonged topical use of corticosteroids. Keywords: vernal keratoconjunctivitis, cyclosporine-A, papillary hypertrophy, limbal changes, itching [Natl J Med Res 2016; 6(1.000: 38-41

  12. Quiescent and Active Tear Protein Profiles to Predict Vernal Keratoconjunctivitis Reactivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Micera

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC is a chronic recurrent bilateral inflammation of the conjunctiva associated with atopy. Several inflammatory and tissue remodeling factors contribute to VKC disease. The aim is to provide a chip-based protein analysis in tears from patients suffering from quiescent or active VKC. Methods. This study cohort included 16 consecutive patients with VKC and 10 controls. Participants were subjected to clinical assessment of ocular surface and tear sampling. Total protein quantification, total protein sketch, and protein array (sixty protein candidates were evaluated. Results. An overall increased Fluorescent Intensity expression was observed in VKC arrays. Particularly, IL1β, IL15, IL21, Eotaxin2, TACE, MIP1α, MIP3α, NCAM1, ICAM2, βNGF, NT4, BDNF, βFGF, SCF, MMP1, and MMP2 were increased in quiescent VKC. Of those candidates, only IL1β, IL15, IL21, βNGF, SCF, MMP2, Eotaxin2, TACE, MIP1α, MIP3α, NCAM1, and ICAM2 were increased in both active and quiescent VKC. Finally, NT4, βFGF, and MMP1 were highly increased in active VKC. Conclusion. A distinct “protein tear-print” characterizes VKC activity, confirming some previously reported factors and highlighting some new candidates common to quiescent and active states. Those candidates expressed in quiescent VKC might be considered as predictive indicators of VKC reactivation and/or exacerbation out-of-season.

  13. Quiescent and Active Tear Protein Profiles to Predict Vernal Keratoconjunctivitis Reactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micera, Alessandra; Di Zazzo, Antonio; Esposito, Graziana; Sgrulletta, Roberto; Calder, Virginia L.; Bonini, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC) is a chronic recurrent bilateral inflammation of the conjunctiva associated with atopy. Several inflammatory and tissue remodeling factors contribute to VKC disease. The aim is to provide a chip-based protein analysis in tears from patients suffering from quiescent or active VKC. Methods. This study cohort included 16 consecutive patients with VKC and 10 controls. Participants were subjected to clinical assessment of ocular surface and tear sampling. Total protein quantification, total protein sketch, and protein array (sixty protein candidates) were evaluated. Results. An overall increased Fluorescent Intensity expression was observed in VKC arrays. Particularly, IL1β, IL15, IL21, Eotaxin2, TACE, MIP1α, MIP3α, NCAM1, ICAM2, βNGF, NT4, BDNF, βFGF, SCF, MMP1, and MMP2 were increased in quiescent VKC. Of those candidates, only IL1β, IL15, IL21, βNGF, SCF, MMP2, Eotaxin2, TACE, MIP1α, MIP3α, NCAM1, and ICAM2 were increased in both active and quiescent VKC. Finally, NT4, βFGF, and MMP1 were highly increased in active VKC. Conclusion. A distinct “protein tear-print” characterizes VKC activity, confirming some previously reported factors and highlighting some new candidates common to quiescent and active states. Those candidates expressed in quiescent VKC might be considered as predictive indicators of VKC reactivation and/or exacerbation out-of-season. PMID:26989694

  14. Feline eosinophilic keratoconjunctivitis: a retrospective study of 45 cases (56 eyes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Eric; Meunier, Valerie

    2013-08-01

    The medical records of 45 cases (56 eyes) of feline eosinophilic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC) diagnosed between 2005 and 2011 were reviewed. Cats were included if a clinical diagnosis of EKC was recorded and eosinophils were found on corneal cytology. Median age at presentation was 5 years (interquartiles 5-9 years) for both males and females. Domestic shorthair was the predominant breed, accounting for 77.8% of the cats. The condition was unilateral in 75.6% of cases, with the superotemporal quadrant of the cornea the most frequently affected position (76.8% of eyes). A history of corneal ulceration was recorded in 37.8% of cases, and corneal ulcers were present at or before diagnosis in 66.7% of the cats. Eosinophils were found in 92.0% of conjunctival scrapings. We performed polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for feline herpesvirus type 1 (FHV-1) for 33/45 cats. Viral DNA was detected in 54.5% of these cats. FHV-1 DNA was detected by PCR in 66.7% of cats with a history and/or presence of a corneal ulcer at first presentation, which is significantly more than those with no corneal ulcer at any time (22.2% FHV-1 DNA detected). Our findings suggest that a corneal ulcer can be present prior to the development of eosinophilic keratitis. Further studies are mandatory to explore the role that FHV-1 could play in EKC-associated corneal ulceration.

  15. Effect of lodoxamide and disodium cromoglycate on tear eosinophil cationic protein in vernal keratoconjunctivitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, A.; Borghesan, F.; Avarello, A.; Plebani, M.; Secchi, A.

    1997-01-01

    AIM—To validate the use of tear eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) as a marker for eosinophil activation, and its pharmacological modulation, in addition to evaluating the efficacy of lodoxamide and sodium cromoglycate in the treatment of vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC).
METHODS—Tears were collected from 30 patients affected by active mild to moderate VKC before and after therapy with disodium cromoglycate 4% (DSCG) (n=15) or lodoxamide 0.1% (n=15) for 10 days. Tear cytology and ECP measurement were performed, and ocular signs and symptoms evaluated.
RESULTS—While statistically significant changes did not occur after DSCG therapy, mean tear ECP increased from 343 (SD 363) µg/l to 571 (777) µg/l due to marked elevation in six eyes. The clinical score in DSCG eyes did not improve. After lodoxamide therapy, both clinical signs and symptoms, and tear ECP levels (560 (756) µg/l to 241 (376) µg/l) decreased significantly (p<0.0001 and p<0.01, respectively). Compared with DSCG treatment, lodoxamide was more effective in reducing signs and symptoms (p<0.005). ECP levels were significantly correlated with signs, symptoms, corneal involvement, and number of eosinophils in tears (p<0.0001).
CONCLUSIONS—In patients with VKC, lodoxamide significantly reduced ECP tear levels, and thus, eosinophil activation, and was more effective than DSCG in reducing clinical signs and symptoms.

 PMID:9135403

  16. Recombinant Moraxella bovoculi cytotoxin-ISCOM matrix adjuvanted vaccine to prevent naturally occurring infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelos, John A; Lane, V Michael; Ball, Louise M; Hess, John F

    2010-03-01

    A randomized, blinded, controlled field trial was conducted during summer 2006 in a northern California, USA, herd of beef cattle to evaluate the efficacy of a recombinant Moraxella bovoculi cytotoxin subunit vaccine to prevent naturally occurring infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK; pinkeye). A convenience sample comprised of 127 steers were administered a subcutaneous dose of either adjuvant alone (ISCOM matrices; control group) or recombinant M. bovoculi cytotoxin carboxy terminus adjuvanted with ISCOM matrices (MbvA group) and were boostered 21 days later. The steers were examined once weekly for 15 weeks for evidence of IBK. No significant difference in the cumulative proportion of corneal ulcerations was detected between groups. Compared to the control calves, the MbvA vaccinates had significantly higher increases in serum neutralizing titers to M. bovoculi hemolysin between week 0 and week 6. The prevalence of M. bovis isolations was higher from ulcerated eyes of calves vaccinated with MbvA as compared to control calves. Vaccination of calves against the carboxy terminus of M. bovoculi RTX toxin resulted in significant increases in serum hemolysin neutralizing titers and may modulate organism type cultured from ulcerated eyes of calves in herds where both M. bovis and M. bovoculi exist. Use of M. bovoculi antigens alone in vaccines to prevent IBK may not be beneficial in herds where IBK is associated with both M. bovoculi and M. bovis.

  17. In vivo confocal microscopy of meibomian glands and palpebral conjunctiva in vernal keratoconjunctivitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaoling Wei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate the correlations between conjunctival inflammatory status and meibomian gland (MG morphology in vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC patients by using in vivo confocal microscopy (CM. Materials and Methods: Nineteen VKC patients (7 limbal, 7 tarsal, and 5 mixed forms and 16 normal volunteers (controls were enrolled. All subjects underwent CM scanning to obtain the images of upper palpebral conjunctiva and MGs. Inflammatory cell (IC density in palpebral conjunctival epithelial and stromal layers, Langerhans cell (LC density at lid margins and the stroma adjacent to the MG, and MG acinar unit density (MGAUD were recorded. The longest and shortest diameters of MG acinar were measured. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare the parameter differences whereas the Spearman′s rank correlation analysis was applied to determine their correlations. Results: Among all groups, no significant statistical differences were found in epithelial and stromal IC densities, mean values of MG acinar unit densities, or longest and shortest diameters. Both LC parameters in the tarsal-mixed groups were significantly higher than those in the limbal and control groups. All LC densities of VKC patients showed a positive correlation with MGAUD and shortest diameter. Conclusions: In VKC patients, the conjunctival inflammatory status could be associated with the MG status. In vivo CM is a noninvasive, efficient tool in the assessment of MG status and ocular surface.

  18. Effect of Cyclosporin a Eye Drop on Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca and Its Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Jinghua; LIU Changming; ZHANG Yuzhao; WANG Hui

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the effect of cyclosporin A (CsA) eye drop on keratoconjunctivitis Sicca (KCS) and its mechanism were studied. The KCS models were established by injecting Pertussis vaccine, complete freunds adjuvant (CFA) and antigen of conjunctiva from isotype mice. Then the KCS models were treated with cyclosporin A eye drop. Changes in breaking-up time (BUT), lacrimal secretion in 30 min and diversion in 24 h were measured. The percentage of beaker cells, the lymphocytic infiltration in conjunctiva were observed. The expression levels of Aquaporin-3(AQP3) in conjunctiva epithelial cells, beaker cells and accessory lacrimal gland were immunohistochemically detected. The results showed that there were significant differences in BUT, the percentage of beaker cells, lacrimal secretion in 30 min, the lymphocytic infiltration and the expression of AQP3 between the experimental group and an control group. It was concludedthat CsA eye drop exerts marked therapeutic effect on KCS by inhibiting T lymph cells, increasing the goblet cells and AQP3 expression in conjunctiva.

  19. Serologic response of vaccinated cattle to strains of Moraxella bovis isolated during epizootics of keratoconjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, G W; Hughes, D E; Booth, G D

    1978-01-01

    In studies to determine whether there were antigenic differences between strains (isolates) of Moraxella bovis, the sera from vaccinated calves were tested with isolates of M bovis while the calves were experiencing epizootics of infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK). Before the epizootics of IBK, the calves were intramuscularly vaccinated with a formalin-killed autogenous M bovis bacterin. During the epizootics, the eyes were examined by cultural technique, and isolates which were obtained were categorized by catalase activity, source (diseased or nondiseased eyes), and reactivity with the various sera. The serum reactivity of the isolates was compared with that of the vaccinal strain. The vaccinal strain and 8 of the 1 5 selected isolates obtained during the 1974 epizootic were catalase negative. Seven of the 15 isolates from the 1974 epizootic and all of the selected isolates from the 1975 epizootic were catalase positive. A significantly higher (P less than 0.01) percentage of calf sera were serologically reactive with the vaccinal strain and other catalase-negative isolates (45.0%) than with catalase-positive isolates (34.8%). The results, although not definitive, suggest that there may be antigenic differences among strains of M bovis. These differences should be considered when cattle are vaccinated against IBK under natural conditions of exposure.

  20. Isolation of Moraxella bovis ribosomes and their subsequent use in a vaccine against infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, G W; Phillips, M; McDonald, T J; Kopecky, K E

    1981-03-01

    A study was conducted to determine whether a Moraxella bovis ribosomal vaccine would protect calves from infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK). Each of 16 calves were given 2 inoculations 21 days apart. Twenty-one days after the 2nd inoculation, 8 of the calves were challenge exposed with a homologous strain culture and 8 calves were challenge exposed to a heterologous strain culture of M bovis. Sedimentation velocity analysis of the ribosomes used in this study indicated that they were mostly 30S and 50S subunits. Chemical assays indicated that the ribosomes were composed of 64% to 65% RNA and 35% to 36% protein. The cesium chloride buoyant density of the ribosomes was 1.62 g/ml. Ribosomes used as antigen gave 1 line of precipitation in a gel-diffusion precipitin test with hyperimmune serum against the whole-cell antigen of the homologous strain of M bovis. The eyes of all the experimentally exposed calves became infected and all calves developed clinical signs of either unilateral or bilateral IBK. None of the sera of the vaccinated calves had detectable precipitins against the ribosomal antigen at the time they were challenge exposed, but most of the sera had precipitins against whole-cell and pilus antigens. The results indicate that M bovis ribosomes, although similar to other bacterial ribosomes, did not protect cattle against IBK.

  1. Infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis: effects of vaccination on Moraxella bovis carrier state in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, G W; McDonald, T J; Kopecky, K E

    1980-02-01

    A study was conducted to determine whether vaccination of cattle while they were undergoing an acute episode of infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK), would cause vaccinated cattle to abort Moraxella bovis infection sooner than nonvaccinated cattle. Fourteen calves were allotted into two groups of seven calves each, and the eyes of each calf were exposed to a virulent culture of M bovis. Twenty days after calves were infected and showing signs of IBK, seven calves were vaccinated with M bovis pilus vaccine made from the exposure strain. Ocular and nasal discharges were collected and examined for M bovis for 64 days. Most calves developed signs of IBK after exposure and all but one calf (nonvaccinated) developed ocular infection with M bovis. The mean number of days (33 and 33.3, respectively) of ocular infection was not significantly (P = 0.05) different in the vaccinated calves than in the nonvaccinated calves. The eyes of the calf that did not become infected with M bovis were infected with nearly a pure culture of Escherichia coli. This calf failed to develop ocular infection, but had M bovis in its nasal discharge throughout the study (64 days). Moraxella bovis was isolated from the nasal discharge of other calves only when there were concurrent ocular infections.

  2. Reproduction of bovine keratoconjunctivitis with a purified haemolytic and cytotoxic fraction of Moraxella bovis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, M K; Moore, L J

    1994-09-01

    Evidence that the beta-haemolysin produced in vitro by Moraxella bovis is an important virulence determinant in vivo was strengthened by studies using a haemolytic preparation of greater purity than previously available. A concentrated haemolytic fraction containing outer-membrane bound vesicles was separated from the cell-free filtrate of a bacterial culture using a process comprising tangential flow ultrafiltration, ion-exchange and gel-filtration high-performance liquid chromatography and centrifugal-driven filtration. The cytotoxicity of haemolytic fractions for calf-corneal epithelial cells in vitro was investigated at progressive stages of this attempted haemolysin purification procedure and the results demonstrated a positive correlation for the levels of haemolytic and cytotoxic activity throughout. Further support for the role of the haemolysin was obtained in vivo following the intra-corneal injection of calves with a crude or a purified haemolytic fraction. The ocular damage caused by both preparations, together with the healing processes and microscopic pathology of the experimentally induced damage closely resembled published descriptions of naturally occurring infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis. No effect was obtained in vitro or in vivo from equivalent fractions prepared from a non-haemolytic strain of M. bovis.

  3. Moraxella bovoculi sp. nov., isolated from calves with infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelos, John A; Spinks, Phillip Q; Ball, Louise M; George, Lisle W

    2007-04-01

    Eighteen isolates of a Gram-negative coccus (strain 237(T)) were cultured from the eyes of dairy and beef calves affected with infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK; 'pinkeye') in northern California, USA, during summer 2002. These isolates had near full-length (1397 bp) 16S rRNA gene sequences that clustered into three groups with 99.9 % sequence similarity. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence, the isolates were most closely associated with Moraxella bovis and Moraxella ovis in clade I of the classical moraxellae. Biochemically, the novel isolates could be distinguished from the other members of the genus Moraxella isolated from animals on the basis of phenylalanine deaminase activity. The results of partial sequence analysis of six housekeeping genes, the 16S-23S rRNA gene interspacer region and partial 23S rRNA gene provide strong support for the inclusion of these isolates in a novel taxon, for which the name Moraxella bovoculi sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is strain 237(T) (=ATCC BAA-1259(T)=CCUG 52049(T)).

  4. Molecular and antigenic characterization of a Mycoplasma bovis strain causing an outbreak of infectious keratoconjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, Alberto; Addis, Maria Filippa; Chessa, Bernardo; Cubeddu, Tiziana; Profiti, Margherita; Rosati, Sergio; Ruiu, Angelo; Pittau, Marco

    2006-01-01

    An unusually high incidence of infectious keratoconjunctivitis followed by pneumonia and arthritis was observed in beef calves of a managed herd. No Moraxella spp. or bacteria other than Mycoplasma spp. were obtained from conjunctival and nasal swabs. A strategy was designed for characterization of bovine mycoplasmas at species and strain level on the basis of a combination of molecular tools and the immunoblotting method. The strategy made it possible to rapidly assign the bacterium responsible for this outbreak to one of the phylogenetic clusters of bovine mycoplasmas delineated in this study and then to identify it as Mycoplasma bovis. The strain, designated Sar 1, showed a 100% 16S rDNA sequence identity with two European strains (120/81 and MC3386) isolated in Germany and Ireland, respectively, and hosts a vsp gene analog to the vspA, vsp422-4, and vsp422-8 genes of the M. bovis reference strain PG45T and of the field strain 422. The use of a cross-reactive rabbit serum developed against the Mycoplasma agalactiae immunodominant antigen P48 confirmed the molecular findings. The immunological response of calves against M. bovis was also investigated. This is the first report on the occurrence of M. bovis on the Island of Sardinia (Italy).

  5. Use of Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca in a Canine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villatoro, Antonio J.; Fernández, Viviana; Rico-Llanos, Gustavo A.; Becerra, José; Andrades, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS) or dry eye disease (DED) is an immune-mediated multifactorial disease, with high level of prevalence in humans and dogs. Our aim in this study was to investigate the therapeutic effects of allogeneic adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (Ad-MSCs) implanted around the lacrimal glands in 12 dogs (24 eyes) with KCS, which is refractory to current available treatments. Schirmer tear test (STT) and ocular surface integrity were assessed at 0 (before treatment), 3, 6, and 9 months after treatment. Average STT values and all clinical signs showed a statistically significant change (P < 0.001) during the follow-up with reduction in all ocular parameters scored: ocular discharge, conjunctival hyperaemia, and corneal changes, and there were no signs of regression or worsening. Implanted cells were well tolerated and were effective reducing clinical signs of KCS with a sustained effect during the study period. None of the animals showed systemic or local complications during the study. To our knowledge, this is the first time in literature that implantation of allogeneic Ad-MSCs around lacrimal glands has been found as an effective therapeutic alternative to treat dogs with KCS. These results could reinforce a good effective solution to be extrapolated to future studies in human. PMID:25802852

  6. Keratoconjunctivitis infectiosa ovis (KIO), 'pink eye' or 'zere oogjes' (a survey).

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, C D

    1983-07-01

    The occurrence of keratoconjunctivitis infectiosa ovis (KIO) in the Netherlands was reported by Hofland et al. in 1969 for the first time. At present the disease is well known in the Netherlands. Nevertheless there are still questions about the causative agent and the most effective and easiest therapy. Most authors suppose that the disease is caused by Colesiota conjunctivae, although others mention infections by other chlamydia, Mycoplasma conjunctivae, Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae, Acholeplasma oculi and a wide variety of bacteria. The diagnosis can be made on the basis of the symptoms and the detection of the agent in conjunctival scrapings. The bacilliform bodies can be found in conjunctival smears in the cytoplasm (Giemsa, Stamp). Many therapies are used topically, parenterally or orally. Locally used eye-ointments must be effective against Colesiota; antimicrobial drugs administered by injection must be effective against the latter and also provide a sufficient cell tissue penetration with excretion into the lacrimal fluids. Injections have proved to be easier to administer, especially in serious outbreaks, but such outbreaks are exceptional (18). Some therapies have been evaluated in small scale experiments (28) as well as in field trials (17).

  7. Skin barrier in atopic dermatitis: beyond filaggrin*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaniboni, Mariana Colombini; Samorano, Luciana Paula; Orfali, Raquel Leão; Aoki, Valéria

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease with a complex pathogenesis, where changes in skin barrier and imbalance of the immune system are relevant factors. The skin forms a mechanic and immune barrier, regulating water loss from the internal to the external environment, and protecting the individual from external aggressions, such as microorganisms, ultraviolet radiation and physical trauma. Main components of the skin barrier are located in the outer layers of the epidermis (such as filaggrin), the proteins that form the tight junction (TJ) and components of the innate immune system. Recent data involving skin barrier reveal new information regarding its structure and its role in the mechanic-immunological defense; atopic dermatitis (AD) is an example of a disease related to dysfunctions associated with this complex. PMID:27579743

  8. First observation of the decay $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ → D$±\\atop{s}$ K and measurement of the relative branching fraction B($\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$→ D$±\\atop{s}$ K)/B($\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$→ D$+\\atop{s}$ π-).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muelmenstaedt, Johannes [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    We present the first observation of the decay $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$→ D$±\\atop{s}$ K∓ and measure the relative branching fraction of $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ → D$±\\atop{s}$ K∓ to $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ → D$+\\atop{s}$ π-. The measurement of the relative branching fraction is performed by applying a fit in invariant mass and specific ionization to 1.2 fb-1 of Ds(φπ)X data collected with the CDF II detector in pp collisions at √ s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We measure B $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ → D$±\\atop{s}$ K∓ /B $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ → D$+\\atop{s}$ π- = 0.107±0.019(stat)±0.008(sys). The statistical significance of the $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ → D$±\\atop{s}$ K signal is 7.9σ. To cross-check our analysis method, we also measure B $\\bar{B0}$→ D+K- /B $\\bar{B0}$ → D+π- and B $\\bar{B0}$ → D+*K- /B $\\bar{B0}$ → D*+π- and verify that our results are in agreement with the world average.

  9. [Prevention of atopic eczema. Evidence based guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, T

    2005-03-01

    With an estimated prevalence of 12% for preschool children and 3% for adults, atopic eczema is a serious public health problem. This disease severely jeopardizes quality of life and is associated with considerable costs. Since there is still no causal therapy, primary and secondary prevention are especially important. Here the evidence basis for recommendations on prevention of atopic eczema is discussed on the basis of the first evidence-based consensus guideline (S3) on allergy prevention. This recommends that babies should be breastfed exclusively for at least 4 months and exposure to passive smoking be avoided even during pregnancy; restriction of the maternal diet during pregnancy has no influence, though during breastfeeding it can lower the incidence of eczema among babies at risk. Thereby this measure should be balanced with potential consequences of malnutrition. There seems to be a positive correlation between keeping small rodents (rabbits, guinea pigs), and possibly cats, and the occurrence of atopic eczema, while keeping dogs has no effect or even a protective effect. Avoidance of an unfavorable indoor climate is probably also helpful in preventing eczema. There is no evidence to support deviating from the current recommendations of the standing committee for vaccination.

  10. Atopic diseases in twins born after assisted reproduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jäderberg, Ida; Thomsen, Simon F; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm

    2012-01-01

    Jäderberg I, Thomsen SF, Kyvik KO, Skytthe A, Backer V. Atopic diseases in twins born after assisted reproduction. Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology 2012; 26: 140-145. We examined the risk of atopic diseases in twins born after assisted reproduction. Data on atopic diseases and assisted...... reproduction in 9694 twin pairs, 3-20 years of age, from the Danish Twin Registry were collected via multidisciplinary questionnaires. The risk of atopic diseases in twins born after assisted reproduction was compared with the risk in twins born after spontaneous conception using logistic regression...

  11. Deep Anterior Lamellar Keratoplasty in Keratoconic Patients with versus without Vernal Keratoconjunctivitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feizi, Sepehr; Javadi, Mohammad Ali; Javadi, Fatemeh; Jafarinasab, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the clinical outcomes of deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty (DALK) for keratoconus in patients with vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC) versus those without VKC. Methods: In this retrospective comparative study, records of 262 eyes with keratoconus (Group 1) and 28 keratoconic eyes with VKC (Group 2) that had undergone DALK were compiled. Reviewed parameters included length of follow-up, best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), refractive error, complications and cumulative graft survival. Results: Mean duration of follow-up was 38.6 ± 20.2 and 34.4 ± 20.9 months in groups 1 and 2, respectively (P = 0.21). Mean post-operative BCVA was 0.19 ± 0.11 and 0.20 ± 0.15 logMAR, in groups 1 and 2 (P = 0.79). BCVA≥20/40 was achieved in 91.6 and 88.5% of eyes in groups 1 and 2, respectively (P = 0.48). Epithelial problems were encountered in 31.3 and 42.9% of operated eyes, respectively (P = 0.16). Vascularization of suture tracts and stitch abscesses were encountered more frequently in the eyes with VKC (P = 0.01 and <0.001, respectively). At the 33-month follow-up examination, rejection-free graft survival rates were 56.0% in group 1 and 33.3% in group 2, with mean durations of 41.0 and 32.1 months, respectively (P = 0.15). Graft survival rates were 98.1% in group 1 and 95.0% in group 2, with mean durations of 88.6 and 88.4 months, respectively (P = 0.74). Conclusion: Clinical outcomes of DALK in keratoconic eyes with VKC were comparable to those in eyes with keratoconus alone. However, complications such as suture tract vascularization and stitch abscesses were more common when VKC coexisted, necessitating closer monitoring. PMID:26425311

  12. Dynamics of an infectious keratoconjunctivitis outbreak by Mycoplasma conjunctivae on Pyrenean Chamois Rupicapra p. pyrenaica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnal, Maríacruz; Herrero, Juan; de la Fe, Christian; Revilla, Miguel; Prada, Carlos; Martínez-Durán, David; Gómez-Martín, Angel; Fernández-Arberas, Olatz; Amores, Joaquín; Contreras, Antonio; García-Serrano, Alicia; de Luco, Daniel Fernández

    2013-01-01

    Between 2006 and 2008, an outbreak of Infectious Keratoconjunctivitis (IKC) affected Pyrenean chamois Rupicapra p. pyrenaica, an endemic subspecies of mountain ungulate that lives in the Pyrenees. The study focused on 14 mountain massifs (180,000 ha) where the species' population is stable. Cases of IKC were detected in ten of the massifs and, in five of them, mortality was substantial. The outbreak spread quickly from the first location detected, with two peaks in mortality that affected one (2007) and three (2008) massifs. In the latter, the peak was seasonal (spring to autumn) and, in the former, the outbreak persisted through winter. To identify the outbreak's aetiology, we examined 105 Pyrenean chamois clinically affected with IKC. TaqMan rt-PCR identified Mycoplasma conjunctivae in 93 (88.5%) of the chamois. Another rt-PCR detected Chlamydophila spp. in 14 of chamois, and 12 of those had mixed infections with mycoplasmas. In the period 2000-2007, the chamois population increased slightly (λ 1.026) but decreased significantly during the IKC outbreak (λ 0.8, 2007-2008; λ 0.85, 2008-2009) before increasing significantly after the outbreak (λ 1.1, 2009-2010). Sex-biased mortality shifted the adult sex ratio toward males (from 0.6 to 0.7 males per female) and reduced productivity slightly. Hunting was practically banned in the massifs where chamois experienced significant mortality and allowed again after the outbreak ended. Long-term monitoring of wild populations provides a basis for understanding the impacts of disease outbreaks and improves management decisions, particularly when species are subject to extractive exploitation.

  13. Skin disease and thyroid autoimmunity in atopic South Italian children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedullà, Marcella; Fierro, Vincenzo; Marzuillo, Pierluigi; Capuano, Francesco; Miraglia del Giudice, Emanuele; Ruocco, Eleonora

    2016-01-01

    AIM To verify the prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity (TA) and the possible association between atopy and TA in children affected by skin disease. METHODS Three hundred and twenty-four children consecutively referred due to skin disease symptoms to our Pediatric Department were enrolled. One hundred and eighty-seven were diagnosed with atopic dermatitis (AD), 95 with acute urticaria, 40 with chronic urticaria (CU), and 2 with alopecia areata (AA). According to the work-up for atopy, the children were divided into two groups: Atopics and non-atopics. TA was diagnosed by serum thyroid peroxidase autoantibodies and/or thyroglobulin autoantibodies levels more than twice normal values over a period of two months by immunoassay. RESULTS In all children with skin disease, a significant prevalence of TA in atopics compared with non-atopics (13.67% vs 2.67%, P = 0.0016) and a significant association between TA and atopy (OR = 5.76, 95%CI: 1.71-19.35) were observed. These findings were confirmed as significant in children with AD: TA in atopics was 11.5%, while TA in non-atopics was 2.7% (P = 0.03, OR = 4.68, 95%CI: 1.02-21.38). In addition, atopics with CU showed a significantly higher prevalence of TA (26.9%), but none of the non-atopics showed CU (P = 0.0326). On the other hand, atopics with AA showed a 100% (2 out of 2) prevalence of TA, compared with none of the non-atopics. CONCLUSION In children with skin disease, atopy seems to be associated with an increased risk of TA. PMID:27610344

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Moraxella bovoculi Strain 237T (ATCC BAA-1259T) Isolated from a Calf with Infectious Bovine Keratoconjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcutt, Michael J; Foecking, Mark F; Martin, Neal T; Mhlanga-Mutangadura, Tendai; Reilly, Thomas J

    2014-06-26

    Moraxella bovoculi is a recently identified species, recovered from the bovine eye, which is under investigation as an etiological agent of infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis. A draft genome sequence of the Moraxella bovoculi type strain 237(T) has been determined to identify features that may be important during host colonization.

  15. ROLE OF ENVIRONMENTAL ALLERGENS ON ATOPIC DERMATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Wardhana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic eczematous skin disease that develops in a patient with atopic diathesis, which is characterized by an increased liability to produce IgE antibodies for allergens mostly derived from environmental or inhalant allergens and food allergens. They are produced by cell-mediated allergic contact reactions, and recently contact sensitivity to various environmental allergens has been demonstrated in patients with AD. Atopic patients are recognized by their ability to produce large amounts of specific IgE antibodies to common substances as environmental allergens, i.e. house dust mites, grass pollens, animal danders, molds, food, etc. These antibodies can be detected by skin prick test. The aim of this study was to identify the sensitization against environmental or inhalants allergens through skin prick tests in the patients with atopic dermatitis. Material and Methods: This is a retrospective, descriptive study. We revised all medical records of patients with AD since January 2002 to December 2004 in the Out Patients Unit of Sanglah General Hospital, Bali-Indonesia. The variables studied were: gender, age, work related, diagnosis associates to AD, and prick test of environmental allergens. Results: In 3 years periods we had revised 46 of patients with AD that was done skin prick tests. The median age was 38 years (range 29-54 years, 34/46 (73.9 % of these were male and 12 (26.1 % female. Twenty nine patients presented pure AD, and 17 patients had AD with asthma and allergic rhinitis. Only 16 (34.7% of patients had no history of allergic disease. Thirsty six of 46 (78.20% of all tested AD patients had a positive skin prick tests against inhalant (aeroallergens 16 patients and food allergens 21 patients. Sixteen patients with positive of skin test include; dust mite in 12 patients, animal dander in 10 patients, grass pollen in 9 patients and cockroach in 6 patients. Conclusion: We concluded that

  16. Topical therapy in atopic dermatitis in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharshini Sathishkumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a common, chronic childhood skin disorder caused by complex genetic, immunological, and environmental interactions. It significantly impairs quality of life for both child and family. Treatment is complex and must be tailored to the individual taking into account personal, social, and emotional factors, as well as disease severity. This review covers the management of AD in children with topical treatments, focusing on: education and empowerment of patients and caregivers, avoidance of trigger factors, repair and maintenance of the skin barrier by correct use of emollients, control of inflammation with topical corticosteroids and calcineurin inhibitors, minimizing infection, and the use of bandages and body suits.

  17. Recalcitrant atopic dermatitis due to allergy to Compositae.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wintzen, M.; Donker, AS; Zuuren, van EJ

    2003-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is often complicated by allergic contact dermatitis, although patch testing may reveal positive reactions of uncertain relevance. We report a case of a 35-year-old woman with recalcitrant atopic dermatitis, with a positive patch-test reaction to Compositae mix (CM). Initially, sens

  18. Atopic diseases by filaggrin mutations and birth year

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, J P; Linneberg, A; Johansen, J D;

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of atopic disorders has increased in recent years. The pathogenesis is complex with genetic and environmental risk factors. Filaggrin loss-of-function mutations are common and associated with atopic disorders. We investigated whether the prevalence of filaggrin mutations increased ...

  19. Endotoxin exposure and atopic sensitization in adult pig farmers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Portengen, L.; Preller, L.; Tielen, M.; Doekes, G.; Heederik, D.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Recent studies have reported a low prevalence of atopic sensitization and respiratory allergy in children growing up on farms. Objectives: We sought to evaluate the dose-response relationship between endotoxin and atopic sensitization in adult farmers and to assess the effect on respirat

  20. The course of life of patients with Childhood Atopic Dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.E.A. Brenninkmeijer; C.M. Legierse; J.H. Sillevis Smitt; B.F. Last; M.A. Grootenhuis; J.D. Bos

    2009-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis mainly covers the period of infancy to adulthood, an important period in the development of an individual. The impairment of quality of life and the psychological wellbeing of children with atopic dermatitis have been well documented but so far no data exist about the impact of ato

  1. Host and environmental contribution to atopic dermatitis in dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looringh van Beeck, F.A.

    2014-01-01

    The research presented in this thesis is focussed on atopic dermatitis in dogs. Atopic dermatitis is a genetically predisposed, inflammatory and pruritic allergic skin disease with characteristic clinical features associated with IgE antibodies most commonly directed against environmental allergens.

  2. Investigations on the immunopathogenesis of atopic dermatitis in cats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosje, Pieternella Janna

    2003-01-01

    The term atopic dermatitis (AD) is commonly used in cats. At present, however, there is little known about the pathogenesis of feline AD. The aim was to investigate various aspects of the immunopathogenesis in a defined group of cats with signs and symptoms of atopic dermatitis and compare our findi

  3. Factors promoting psychological adjustment to childhood atopic eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Hannah; Rostill, Helen; Reed, Julie; Gill, Steve

    2006-06-01

    Research has found that children with atopic eczema are more likely to experience psychosocial difficulties than would be expected within the general population. This article aims to explore the relationship between child, parent and family factors in promoting positive adjustment to atopic eczema. Children aged five to 11 years with atopic eczema and their parents were identified from a specialist children's dermatology clinic. Seventy-four respondents completed questionnaires assessing child behaviour, parental well-being and family functioning. Parental psychological health, a supportive family environment and low impact of atopic eczema on family functioning were found to predict lower levels of internalizing behaviour (anxiety, depression and social withdrawal). These findings emphasize the importance of family and parental psychological processes rather than biomedical variables in promoting positive adjustment to atopic eczema.

  4. Classification of atopic hand eczema and the filaggrin mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giwercman, C.; Lerbaek, A.; Bisgaard, H.

    2008-01-01

    Hand eczema is a common disease with various risk factors of which atopic dermatitis is known to be one of the most important. Recently, two mutations in the gene coding for filaggrin, a protein important for the skin barrier, have repeatedly been shown to be associated with atopic dermatitis....... Moreover, one study point towards an association between the filaggrin null alleles and the subgroup of patients having both hand eczema and atopic dermatitis. For the remainder of hand eczema patients, still unknown genetic risk factors exist. We propose that in future, classification of atopic hand...... eczema should distinguish between patients with and without the filaggrin null alleles and to further differentiate between associations with type I allergy, type IV allergy and exposure to irritants, respectively. Furthermore, we suggest future studies of atopic hand eczema to analyse for the filaggrin...

  5. Contact sensitivity in patients with recalcitrant atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamagawa-Mineoka, Risa; Masuda, Koji; Ueda, Sachiko; Nakamura, Naomi; Hotta, Eri; Hattori, Junko; Minamiyama, Rina; Yamazaki, Akiko; Katoh, Norito

    2015-07-01

    Patients with atopic dermatitis are usually responsive to conventional treatment such as topical steroids; however, they are sometimes refractory to the treatment. The influence of contact sensitivities on the course of patients with recalcitrant atopic dermatitis is not known. The aim of this study was to investigate whether contact sensitivities affect the course of patients with recalcitrant atopic dermatitis. We evaluated 45 patients with atopic dermatitis who had failed conventional therapy. Patch testing was performed with the Japanese standard series, metal series and/or suspected items. A total of 15 patients had a positive patch test reaction to at least one allergen. The most common allergens were nickel, topical drugs and rubber accelerators. Avoidance of products or food containing allergic substances greatly or partially improved skin symptoms in nine patients. These results suggest that contact allergens and metals may be critical factors causing eczematous lesions in patients with recalcitrant atopic dermatitis.

  6. Iatrogenic keratoconjunctivitis sicca in a dog Ceratoconjuntivite seca iatrogênica em cão

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Eliza de Almeida

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Qualitative and quantitative abnormalities in primary components of the tear can alter the dynamics of the lacrimal film, compromising its function. Lipids, an aqueous fraction and mucoproteins constitute the lacrimal film. Keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS is a disease commonly diagnosed in dogs. It is characterized by the deficiency of the aqueous fraction in the lacrimal film that results in dryness, inflammation of the conjunctive and cornea with progressive corneal illness and reduction of vision and pain. Due to the significant contribution of the third eyelid lacrimal gland to the production of the aqueous fraction of the lacrimal film, the removal of this gland when prolapsed is an important cause of iatrogenic keratoconjuctivitis sicca. This paper describes a clinical case of iatrogenic keratoconjuctivitis sicca in a 10 month-old Boston Terrier which was caused by the removal of the third eyelid lacrimal gland due to its prolapse.Anormalidades quali-quantitativas em componentes primários da lágrima podem alterar a dinâmica do filme lacrimal, comprometendo sua função. O filme lacrimal é composto por lipídios, uma fração aquosa e por mucoproteínas. A ceratoconjuntivite seca (CCS é uma enfermidade freqüentemente diagnosticada em cães, caracterizada pela deficiência da fração aquosa do filme lacrimal, resultando em dessecação e inflamação da conjuntiva e córnea, dor, doença corneana progressiva e redução da visão. Devido à contribuição significativa da glândula da terceira pálpebra na produção da porção aquosa do filme lacrimal, a remoção desta glândula, quando prolapsada, constitui-se em importante causa de CCS iatrogênica. Este trabalho relata um caso clínico de ceratoconjuntivite seca iatrogênica, em um cão da raça Boston Terrier de 10 meses de idade, causada pela remoção cirúrgica da glândula lacrimal da terceira pálpebra, quando esta encontrava-se prolapsada.

  7. Topical steroid addiction in atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fukaya M

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Mototsugu Fukaya,1 Kenji Sato,2 Mitsuko Sato,3 Hajime Kimata,4 Shigeki Fujisawa,5 Haruhiko Dozono,6 Jun Yoshizawa,7 Satoko Minaguchi8 1Tsurumai Kouen Clinic, Nagoya, 2Department of Dermatology, Hannan Chuo Hospital, Osaka, 3Sato Pediatric Clinic, Osaka, 4Kimata Hajime Clinic, Osaka, 5Fujisawa Dermatology Clinic, Tokyo, 6Dozono Medical House, Kagoshima, 7Yoshizawa Dermatology Clinic, Yokohama, 8Department of Dermatology, Kounosu Kyousei Hospital, Saitama, Japan Abstract: The American Academy of Dermatology published a new guideline regarding topical therapy in atopic dermatitis in May 2014. Although topical steroid addiction or red burning skin syndrome had been mentioned as possible side effects of topical steroids in a 2006 review article in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, no statement was made regarding this illness in the new guidelines. This suggests that there are still controversies regarding this illness. Here, we describe the clinical features of topical steroid addiction or red burning skin syndrome, based on the treatment of many cases of the illness. Because there have been few articles in the medical literature regarding this illness, the description in this article will be of some benefit to better understand the illness and to spur discussion regarding topical steroid addiction or red burning skin syndrome. Keywords: topical steroid addiction, atopic dermatitis, red burning skin syndrome, rebound, corticosteroid, eczema

  8. New and emerging trends in the treatment of atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina M Gelbard

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Christina M Gelbard1, Adelaide A Hebert1,21Departments of Dermatology; 2Pediatrics, University of Texas-Houston, Houston, TX, USAAbstract: Atopic dermatitis is a chronic, inflammatory skin condition that affects 10% to 20% of children and 1% to 3% of adults in the US. Symptoms often result in sleeplessness, psychological stress, poor self-esteem, anxiety, and poor school or work performance. The cost of atopic dermatitis is estimated to be US$0.9 to 3.8 billion every year. Topical steroids are first-line treatment for atopic dermatitis, and recent advances in vehicle technologies have resulted in improved patient tolerability and compliance. Topical calcineurin inhibitors are also safe and effective topical treatments for atopic dermatitis, and provide an additional therapeutic option for patients with this disease. Systemic immunomodulators are used in the treatment of severe refractory disease. Cyclosporine, methotrexate, azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, and interferon gamma have been used in the management of severe atopic dermatitis. This review highlights the current and emerging trends in the treatment of atopic dermatitis.Keywords: atopic dermatitis, topical corticosteroids, calcineurin inhibitors, methotrexate, cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil, IFN-γ

  9. Atopic diseases in twins born after assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäderberg, Ida; Thomsen, Simon F; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Skytthe, Axel; Backer, Vibeke

    2012-03-01

    We examined the risk of atopic diseases in twins born after assisted reproduction. Data on atopic diseases and assisted reproduction in 9694 twin pairs, 3-20 years of age, from the Danish Twin Registry were collected via multidisciplinary questionnaires. The risk of atopic diseases in twins born after assisted reproduction was compared with the risk in twins born after spontaneous conception using logistic regression and variance components analysis. Children born after assisted reproduction did not have a different risk of atopic outcomes (adjusted odds ratios [95% confidence intervals] for asthma: 0.95 [0.85, 1.07], P = 0.403; hay fever: 1.01 [0.86, 1.18], P = 0.918; and atopic dermatitis: 1.02 [0.81, 1.11], P = 0.773 respectively) compared with children born after spontaneous conception. Assisted reproduction did not modify the heritability of atopic diseases. This study does not support an association between assisted reproduction and development of atopic diseases. This result must be confirmed in subsequent studies, preferably of singleton populations.

  10. Atopic dermatitis. Findings of skin biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piloto Valdés, L; Gómez Echevarría, A H; Valdés Sánchez, A F; Ochoa Ochoa, C; Chong López, A; Mier Naranjo, G

    1990-01-01

    Twenty-eight adult patients with a clinical diagnosis of atopic dermatitis (according to the criteria of Hanifin and Lobitz) were studied at the Allergy Outpatient Service, the Dermatology Service and the Pathological Anatomy Service of the Hermanos Ameijeiras Clinical Surgical Hospital, from January to September 1986. The patients were submitted to a quantification of total serum IgE by means of the ELISA enzymatic ultramicromethod, developed at the Radioimmunoassay National Center, and skin biopsies were carried out by means of the paraffin and direct immunofluorescence methods. The most frequent histopathological findings were acanthosis, espongiosis, parakeratosis and exocitosis, as a chronic inflammatory infiltrate, mainly composed of lymphocytes, mast cells and eosinophils. In the skin direct immunofluorescence method we found depots of IgE in all the patients, having no relation in intensity to total serum IgE values.

  11. Investigations on the immunopathogenesis of atopic dermatitis in cats

    OpenAIRE

    Roosje, Pieternella Janna

    2003-01-01

    The term atopic dermatitis (AD) is commonly used in cats. At present, however, there is little known about the pathogenesis of feline AD. The aim was to investigate various aspects of the immunopathogenesis in a defined group of cats with signs and symptoms of atopic dermatitis and compare our findings with the immunoregulation of atopic dermatitis in humans. The presence of antigen-specific IgE in serum of AD cats was investigated by means of the Prausnitz-Küstner (PK) test and the passive c...

  12. Development of atopic dermatitis in the DARC birth cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eller, Esben; Kjaer, Henrik Fomsgaard; Høst, Arne;

    2009-01-01

    Eller E, Kjaer HF, Høst A, Andersen KE, Bindslev-Jensen C. Development of Atopic Dermatitis in the DARC birth cohort. Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2009. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons A/SThe aim was to describe the relapsing pattern, sensitization and prognosis of atopic dermatitis (AD) in the first 6 yr...... was measured by objective SCORing Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD). Point-prevalence of AD peaked at 18 months of age (10%) and decreased at 36 and 72 months to slightly below 7%. The 6-yr cumulative incidence was 22.8% and sensitization was found in 43% of children with AD. It was predominately sensitization...

  13. Efficacy of Hospital Germicides against Adenovirus 8, a Common Cause of Epidemic Keratoconjunctivitis in Health Care Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutala, William A.; Peacock, Jeffrey E.; Gergen, Maria F.; Sobsey, Mark D.; Weber, David J.

    2006-01-01

    The inactivation of virus-contaminated nonporous inanimate surfaces was investigated using adenovirus type 8, a common cause of epidemic keratoconjunctivitis. A 10-μl inoculum of adenovirus was placed onto each stainless steel disk (1-cm diameter), and the inoculum was allowed to air dry for 40 min. Twenty-one different germicides (including disinfectants and antiseptics) were selected for this study based on their current uses in health care. After a 1- or 5-minute exposure to 50 μl of the germicide, the virus-germicide test mixture was neutralized and assayed for infectivity. Using an efficacy criterion of a 3-log10 reduction in the titer of virus infectivity and regardless of the virus suspending medium (i.e., hard water, sterile water, and hard water with 5% fetal calf serum), only five disinfectants proved to be effective against the test virus at 1 min: 0.55% ortho-phthalaldehyde, 2.4% glutaraldehyde, 2.65% glutaraldehyde, ∼6,000 ppm chlorine, and ∼1,900 ppm chlorine. Four other disinfectants showed effectiveness under four of the five testing conditions: 70% ethanol, 65% ethanol with 0.63% quaternary ammonium compound, 79.6% ethanol with 0.1% quaternary ammonium compound, and 0.2% peracetic acid. Of the germicides suitable for use as an antiseptic, 70% ethanol achieved a 3-log10 reduction under four of the five test conditions. These results emphasize the need for proper selection of germicides for use in disinfecting noncritical surfaces and semicritical medical devices, such as applanation tonometers, in order to prevent outbreaks of epidemic keratoconjunctivitis. PMID:16569860

  14. Classification of atopic hand eczema and the filaggrin mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    G. Carson, Charlotte; Jørkov, Anne Lerbæk; Bisgaard, Hans

    2008-01-01

    Hand eczema is a common disease with various risk factors of which atopic dermatitis is known to be one of the most important. Recently, two mutations in the gene coding for filaggrin, a protein important for the skin barrier, have repeatedly been shown to be associated with atopic dermatitis....... Moreover, one study point towards an association between the filaggrin null alleles and the subgroup of patients having both hand eczema and atopic dermatitis. For the remainder of hand eczema patients, still unknown genetic risk factors exist. We propose that in future, classification of atopic hand...... mutations. We believe this will increase the possibility of subgrouping this otherwise heterogenic disease and thereby enable a better phenotype-genotype characterization of hand eczema. This could improve the preventive initiatives, secure better information of patients about the prognosis...

  15. Intolerance to oral and intravenous calcium supplements in atopic eczema.

    OpenAIRE

    Devlin, J; David, T J

    1990-01-01

    Children treated with dietary restriction for food intolerance may require calcium supplementation, particularly if cows' milk and milk substitutes are not tolerated. We report two children with atopic eczema who reacted adversely to a number of calcium supplement formulations.

  16. Epogam evening primrose oil treatment in atopic dermatitis and asthma.

    OpenAIRE

    Hederos, C A; Berg, A

    1996-01-01

    Essential fatty acids are claimed to have positive effects in atopic diseases. In a double blind, placebo controlled, parallel group study 58 out of 60 children, with atopic dermatitis and the need for regular treatment with topical skin steroids, completed a 16 weeks' treatment period with either Epogam evening primrose oil or placebo capsules. Twenty two of these subjects also had asthma. The parents used diaries to record symptom scores and concomitant medication. Peak expiratory flow was ...

  17. Evaluation of the child with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruin Weller, M S; Knulst, A C; Meijer, Y; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, C A F M; Pasmans, S G M

    2012-03-01

    Atopic dermatis (AD) is a very common inflammatory skin disease in childhood. Various doctors such as paediatricians, general practitioners, allergologists and dermatologists are regularly consulted by these children and their parents, but there is no clear consensus on the diagnostic work-up that should be performed when evaluating a child with eczema. A careful history, clinical examination and adequate documentation of disease severity are essential in all children with eczema, irrespective of their disease severity. AD is a clinical diagnosis; diagnostic criteria, such as the UK diagnostic criteria, can be helpful for an accurate definition of the disease. A careful history, including alarm symptoms, respiratory symptoms and the impact of the disease on psychosocial functioning is important. Clinical scoring lists such as SCORAD and EASI are well validated for clinical studies; they are, however, not very suitable tools in clinical practice. More simple scoring systems, such as Three Item Severity Score (TIS) and Investigator Global Assessment (IGA), are more easy to use for clinical record keeping in daily practice. Allergen testing in children with AD without a history of acute non-eczematous reactions after allergen exposure is not necessary. In very young children with eczema, not yet exposed to foods, routine allergen testing is not necessary. If in individual cases, the decision is made to perform allergen tests, oral challenges should performed to confirm the diagnoses of food allergy.

  18. Diagnostic criteria for atopic dermatitis in adult Thai population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanitphakdeedecha Rungsima

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Atopic dermatitis is a common disease that is diagnosed by use of Hanifin, Lobitz and Rajka′s criteria based on patient history and clinical features. However these criteria are not suitable for population-based studies. Aims: The purpose of this study is to develop a minimum list of diagnostic criteria for atopic dermatitis that is sensitive, specific, reproducible, noninvasive, applicable to adult Thai population and easy to perform in population-based studies. Settings and Design: This study was conducted at Department of Dermatology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand. Materials and Methods: The new cases of typical mild to moderate atopic dermatitis and exactly age-matched and sex-matched controls presenting with an inflammatory skin disease other than atopic dermatitis were selected from Department of Dermatology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital. Each subject was examined with reference to 31 clinically diagnostic features of atopic dermatitis proposed by Hanifin and Rajka. One hundred and forty patients (70 cases and 70 controls were studied. Statistical Analysis Used: Sensitivity and specificity of each criterion was calculated using the dermatologist′s diagnosis as the standard. Regression techniques were then used to derive a minimum set of diagnostic criteria. Results: Using multiple logistic regression techniques, a minimum set of diagnostic criteria for atopic dermatitis was derived: visible flexural dermatitis, history of flexural dermatitis, duration of rash> 6 months and visible dry skin. Conclusions: A minimum list of diagnostic criteria for atopic dermatitis was derived that should be of use in Thai population-based studies.

  19. Atopic dermatitis and cytokines: the immunoregulatory and therapeutic implications of cytokines in atopic dermatitis--part II: negative regulation and cytokine therapy in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Geunwoong; Lee, Jaeho

    2012-09-01

    Atopic dermatitis is an immunologic disease that results in allergic inflammations of the skin. Cytokines are involved in the negative regulation of immunopathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. Negative immune regulation is also achieved by immune cells in addition to cytokines which are subsequently regulated by a counter-regulatory mechanism. Allergen tolerance is an important aspect of the treatment of atopic dermatitis. Recently, the IL-27, IL-21, and IL-10 cytokines were found to be important components of the counter regulatory mechanism that terminates immune response, and protects the host from excessive immune responses. IL-10 and TGF-β are well-known to be involved in the immune tolerance. IL-10 and IFN-γ are promising cytokines with respect to the prevention of allergen sensitization and the induction of allergen-specific tolerance. In particular, IFN-γ has unique tolerogenic effects with respect to pre-sensitized allergens, especially in atopic dermatitis. In this review, the role of cytokines in the immune tolerance and relevant patents are reviewed, and therapeutic strategies are presented based on the immunologic architecture of AD.

  20. Leptin and Atopic Dermatitis in Korean Elementary School Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SungChul Seo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of atopic dermatitis (AD and obesity have been increasing considerably in Korean school-children. AD is a chronic pruritic recurrent inflammatory skin disorder. Leptin is secreted by adipocytes which has been suggested to be immunologically active; however, their role in AD has not yet been well understood. A total of 227 subjects out of 2,109 elementary school children were defined as having AD based on the ISAAC questionnaire survey. Ninety subjects with AD, aged between 6 and 12 years, completed scoring of severity of AD (SCORAD, skin prick testing, blood tests for total IgE, eosinophil counts, eosinophil cationic protein (ECP and lipid profiles. Serum leptin levels were also measured. A subject with atopic AD was defined as an AD patient showing at least 1 positive reaction to allergens in skin prick testing. There were no significant differences in age, body mass index, percentage of breast milk feeding, mode of delivery, prevalence of atopy, and lipid profiles between atopic AD and non-atopic AD subjects. The serum leptin levels (log mean±SD were significantly higher in non-atopic AD group than in the atopic AD group (0.86±0.57 ng/mL vs 0.53±0.72 ng/mL, p=0.045. Subjects with mild-to-moderate AD showed significantly higher serum leptin levels than those with severe AD (0.77±0.67 ng/mL vs 0.33±0.69 ng/mL, p=0.028. There was a marginal inverse correlation between the SCORAD index and the serum leptin concentration in total AD subjects (r=-0.216, p=0.053. The serum leptin levels were significantly higher in non-atopic AD subjects or mild-to-moderate AD subjects. Leptin did not seem to be associated with IgE-mediated inflammation in AD. Obesity-associated high leptin differed between non-atopic AD and atopic AD subjects.

  1. Elevated cortisol content in dog hair with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seol-Hee; Kim, Sun-A; Shin, Nam-Shik; Hwang, Cheol-Yong

    2016-05-01

    Canine atopic dermatitis (CAD) is a chronic relapsing inflammatory skin disease occurring in 10% of the canine population. Although most studies have focused on the pathophysiological mechanism involved in CAD, the detrimental impact of CAD on quality of life has received only little attention. Hair cortisol analysis is becoming a valuable tool in monitoring chronic stress. To further validate this approach in CAD, we compared the hair cortisol concentration of atopic dogs with that of healthy conditioned dogs. The extent and severity of cutaneous lesions of atopic dermatitis were assessed according to modified CADESI-03 scores. In addition, skin barrier function was evaluated by measuring transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and stratum corneum conductance. The correlation between CAD severity and hair cortisol concentration was evaluated. The level of hair cortisol evaluated by ELISA assay showed that the atopic dermatitis group had significantly increased cortisol levels compared to that of the healthy control group. A significant positive correlation was identified between hair cortisol level and the CADESI score in CAD patients. The TEWL value of the cubital flexor of the forelimb in the atopic group was significantly higher compared to the healthy controls. These findings imply that the hair cortisol analysis can be an effective and objective biomarker in assessment of long-term stress of CAD patients.

  2. Exacerbating factors of itch in atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Murota

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD displays different clinical symptoms, progress, and response to treatment during early infancy and after childhood. After the childhood period, itch appears first, followed by formation of well-circumscribed plaque or polymorphous dermatoses at the same site. When accompanied with dermatitis and dry skin, treatment of skin lesions should be prioritized. When itch appears first, disease history, such as causes and time of appearance of itch should be obtained by history taking. In many cases, itch increases in the evening when the sympathetic nerve activity decreased. Treatment is provided considering that hypersensitivity to various external stimulations can cause itch. Heat and sweating are thought to especially exacerbate itch. Factors causing itch, such as cytokines and chemical messengers, also induce itch mainly by stimulating the nerve. Scratching further aggravates dermatitis. Skin hypersensibility, where other non-itch senses, such as pain and heat, are felt as itch, sometimes occurs in AD. Abnormal elongation of the sensory nerve into the epidermis, as well as sensitizing of the peripheral/central nerve, are possible causes of hypersensitivity, leading to itch. To control itch induced by environmental factors such as heat, treatment for dermatitis is given priority. In the background of itch exacerbated by sweating, attention should be given to the negative impact of sweat on skin homeostasis due to 1 leaving excess sweat on the skin, and 2 heat retention due to insufficient sweating. Excess sweat on the skin should be properly wiped off, and dermatitis should be controlled so that appropriate amount of sweat can be produced. Not only stimulation from the skin surface, but also visual and auditory stimulation can induce new itch. This “contagious itch” can be notably observed in patients with AD. This article reviews and introduces causes of aggravation of itch and information regarding how to cope with such

  3. Clinical Features of Adult/Adolescent Atopic Dermatitis and Chinese Criteria for Atopic Dermatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Liu; Yan Zhao; Zhang-Lei Mu; Qian-Jin Lu; Li Zhang; Xu Yao; Min Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Background:Atopic dermatitis (AD) is an inflammatory skin disease characterized by chronic recurrent dermatitis with profound itching.Most patients have personal and/or family history of atopic diseases.Several criteria have been proposed for the diagnosis of AD.Although the clinical features of childhood AD have been widely studied,there has been less large-scale study on adult/adolescent AD.The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical features of adult/adolescent patients with chronic symmetrical eczema/AD and to propose Chinese diagnostic criteria for adult/adolescent AD.Methods:A hospital-based study was performed.Forty-two dermatological centers participated in this study.Adult and adolescent patients (12 years and over) with chronic symmetrical eczema or AD were included in this study.Questionnaires were completed by both patients and investigators.The valid questionnaires were analyzed using EpiData 3.1 and SPSS 17.0 software.Results:A total of 2662 valid questionnaires were collected (1369 male and 1293 female).Of all 2662 patients,2062 (77.5%) patients had the disease after 12 years old,while only 600 (22.5%) patients had the disease before 12 years old,suggesting late-onset eczema/AD is common.Two thousand one hundred and thirty-nine (80.4%) patients had the disease for more than 6 months.One thousand one hundred and forty-four (43.0%) patients had a personal and/or family history of atopic diseases.One thousand five hundred and forty-eight (58.2%) patients had an elevated total serum IgE and/or eosinophilia and/or positive allergen-specific IgE.Based on these clinical and laboratory features,we proposed Chinese criteria for adult/adolescent AD.Of all 2662 patients,60.3% were satisfied with our criteria,while only 48.2% satisfied with Hanifin Rajka criteria and 32.7% satisfied with Williams criteria,suggesting a good sensitivity of our criteria in adult/adolescent AD patients.Conclusion:Late-onset of eczema or AD is common

  4. Sex Hormones in Allergic Conjunctivitis: Altered Levels of Circulating Androgens and Estrogens in Children and Adolescents with Vernal Keratoconjunctivitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Sacchetti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC is a chronic allergic disease mainly affecting boys in prepubertal age and usually recovering after puberty. To evaluate a possible role of sex hormones in VKC, serum levels of sex hormones in children and adolescents with VKC were assessed. Methods. 12 prepubertal and 7 early pubertal boys with active VKC and 6 male patients with VKC in remission phase at late pubertal age and 48 healthy age and sex-matched subjects were included. Serum concentration of estrone, 17 beta-estradiol, dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate, total testosterone and free testosterone, dihydrotestosterone (DHT, cortisol, delta-4-androstenedione, follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, and sex-hormones binding globuline (SHBG were evaluated. Results. Serum levels of Estrone were significantly increased in all groups of patients with VKC when compared to healthy controls (P<0.001. Prepubertal and early pubertal VKC showed a significant decrease in DHT (P=0.007 and P=0.028, resp. and SHBG (P=0.01 and P=0.002, resp. when compared to controls and serum levels of SHBG were increased in late pubertal VKC in remission phase (P=0.007. Conclusions and Relevance. VKC patients have different circulating sex hormone levels in different phases of the disease and when compared to nonallergic subjects. These findings suggest a role played by sex hormones in the pathogenesis and/or activity of VKC.

  5. Sex Hormones in Allergic Conjunctivitis: Altered Levels of Circulating Androgens and Estrogens in Children and Adolescents with Vernal Keratoconjunctivitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacchetti, Marta; Lambiase, Alessandro; Moretti, Costanzo; Bonini, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC) is a chronic allergic disease mainly affecting boys in prepubertal age and usually recovering after puberty. To evaluate a possible role of sex hormones in VKC, serum levels of sex hormones in children and adolescents with VKC were assessed. Methods. 12 prepubertal and 7 early pubertal boys with active VKC and 6 male patients with VKC in remission phase at late pubertal age and 48 healthy age and sex-matched subjects were included. Serum concentration of estrone, 17 beta-estradiol, dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate, total testosterone and free testosterone, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), cortisol, delta-4-androstenedione, follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, and sex-hormones binding globuline (SHBG) were evaluated. Results. Serum levels of Estrone were significantly increased in all groups of patients with VKC when compared to healthy controls (P < 0.001). Prepubertal and early pubertal VKC showed a significant decrease in DHT (P = 0.007 and P = 0.028, resp.) and SHBG (P = 0.01 and P = 0.002, resp.) when compared to controls and serum levels of SHBG were increased in late pubertal VKC in remission phase (P = 0.007). Conclusions and Relevance. VKC patients have different circulating sex hormone levels in different phases of the disease and when compared to nonallergic subjects. These findings suggest a role played by sex hormones in the pathogenesis and/or activity of VKC. PMID:25756057

  6. A systematic review and meta-analysis of the antibiotic treatment for infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, J N; Yuan, C; Totton, S; Dzikamunhenga, R; Coetzee, J F; da Silva, N; Wang, C; O'Connor, A M

    2016-06-01

    Infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK) is a common and important disease of calves. Without effective vaccines, antibiotic therapy is often implemented to minimize the impact of IBK. This review updates a previously published systematic review regarding comparative efficacy for antibiotic treatments of IBK. Available years of Centre for Biosciences and Agriculture International and MEDLINE databases were searched, including non-English results. Also searched were the American Association of Bovine Practitioners and World Buiatrics Congress conference proceedings from 1996 to 2016, reviews since 2013, reference lists from relevant trials, and U.S. Food and Drug Administration New Animal Drug Application summaries. Eligible studies assessed antibiotic treatment of naturally-occurring IBK in calves randomly allocated to group at the individual level. Outcomes of interest were clinical score, healing time, unhealed ulcer risk, and ulcer surface area. A mixed-effects model comparing active drug with placebo was employed for all outcomes. Heterogeneity was assessed visually and using Cochran's Q-test. Thirteen trials assessing nine treatments were included. Compared with placebo, most antibiotic treatments were effective. There was evidence that the treatment effect differed by day of outcome measurement. Visually, the largest differences were observed 7-14 days post-treatment. These results indicate improved IBK healing with many antibiotics and suggest the need for randomized trials comparing different antibiotic treatments.

  7. Comparison of efficacy and safety of topical Ketotifen (Zaditen with Cromolyn sodium in the treatment of Vernal keratoconjunctivitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MR Shoja

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study compared the efficacy of Ketotifen fumarate .025% (Zaditen with Cromolyn sodium 4% (Opticrom eye drops in prevention of itching, tearing, and redness in Vernal Keratoconjunctivitis (VKC. Methods: This double blind randomized single center clinical trial conducted between April and August 2004 in Yazd. One hundred eligible patients with clinical diagnosis of moderate VKC were randomly prescribed Zaditen (group A: n=50 and Cromolyn sodium (group B: n=50 eye drops for a 4 weeks period. Itching, lacrimation, redness, and photophobia were scored on a 4-points severity scale. Results: After 7 days of treatment, the response rates based on subjects assessment of global efficacy was significantly greater in Ketotifen group (61.5% than in Cromolyn group(53%.A clear response to treatment occurred in 94.4 of Zaditen and 81.2% of Sodium Cromoglycate treated patients. The investigator,s assessment of response rates also showed that Ketotifen was superior to Cromolyn sodium (P=0.001. Ketotifen produced a significantly better outcome than Cromolyn for relief of signs and symptoms of VKC (P<0.05. Ketotifen fumarate treatment significantly reduced the total signs and symptoms score for each patients, in compare with day 0. Conclusion: Ketotifen had a faster onset of action and provided better symptom relief than Cromolyn. The rapid onset of action and symptom control, make Zaditen a valuable treatment for VKC. Keywords : VKC , allergic conjuctivitis , zaditen

  8. Infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis: enhancement of Moraxella bovis pili immunogenicity with diphtheria-tetanus toxoids and pertussis vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, G W; Kopecky, K E; McDonald, T J

    1984-04-01

    A study was conducted to determine whether diphtheria-tetanus-toxoids and pertussis vaccine (DPT) would enhance the immunogenicity of homologous Moraxella bovis pili fractions. Thirty-six calves were divided into 4 groups (I, II, III, and IV) of 9 calves each. Calves in group I were not vaccinated and served as controls. Calves in group II were vaccinated with pili fractions only. Calves in group III were vaccinated with DPT only. Calves in group IV were vaccinated with DPT and pili. Vaccination consisted of 2 inoculations, 21 days apart. Fourteen days after the last vaccinal inoculation was done, the eyes of all calves were exposed to a hemolytic homologous strain of M bovis. The percentage of eyes with disease was significantly less in calves given DPT and pili (P less than 0.001) and calves given pili only (P less than 0.05) than in calves given DPT only or nonvaccinated calves. The lesions were less severe in calves vaccinated with pili only than in calves not vaccinated with pili. Serologic results also showed a positive relationship between the development of serum antibodies against pili and immunity. The results indicate that DPT enhanced the immune response and if used as an adjuvant, might be useful in the development of a vaccine against infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis.

  9. A Moraxella bovis pili vaccine produced by recombinant DNA technology for the prevention of infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepper, A W; Elleman, T C; Hoyne, P A; Lehrbach, P R; Atwell, J L; Schwartzkoff, C L; Egerton, J R; Tennent, J M

    1993-07-01

    Pili (fimbriae) were prepared from Moraxella bovis strain Dalton 2d (Dal2d) and from a derivative of Pseudomonas aeruginosa K/2PfS that contained a plasmid-borne Dal2d pilin gene and produced pili having serogroup-specific identity to Dal2d. Nine calves were vaccinated with two doses each of 30 micrograms authentic M. bovis Dal2d pili in oil adjuvant and 10 calves were vaccinated with a similar dose of P. aeruginosa-derived Dal2d pili in the same formulation. All 19 calves and 10 non-vaccinated controls were challenged by instillation of 1 x 10(9) virulent M. bovis Dal2d cells into both conjunctival sacs 19 days after the second vaccine dose. The serological response to vaccination and the degree of protection against experimentally induced infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK) were assessed. None of the nine calves vaccinated with authentic M. bovis Dal2d pili developed IBK while two of those vaccinated with P. aeruginosa-derived Dal2d pili developed lesions which accounted for a mean group lesion score of 0.3. In contrast, 9 of the 10 non-vaccinated calves developed IBK lesions, the majority of which were progressive, required early treatment and accounted for a mean group lesion score of 1.5. These results demonstrate the potential of a relatively low dose of pili produced by recombinant DNA technology for development of an effective vaccine against IBK.

  10. Ribosomal RNA-based analysis of the bacterial flora from the conjunctivae of cattle with bovine keratoconjunctivitis (BKC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, William R; Hoyt, Phillip G; Hohn, Christina; Higgins, James A

    2008-10-15

    Bovine keratoconjunctivitis (BKC), colloquially referred to as 'pinkeye', is a disease affecting cattle worldwide; it costs cattle producers millions of dollars in economic loss annually. While Moraxella spp. are the primary etiologic agent of pinkeye, surveys of flora from the conjunctivae of livestock from around the world have indicated that a variety of bacterial commensals occupy this niche. We used molecular biology-based methods to determine the composition of bacterial flora in the conjunctivae of normal dairy and beef cattle from Maryland (n=113), and beef cattle with clinical BKC from Louisiana (n=42). Three regimens were used: 16S rRNA PCR and DGGE analysis of amplicons; 16S rRNA PCR and cloning of amplicons into Escherichia coli followed by screening and sequencing of clones harboring inserts; and culture of bacteria on chromogenic agar followed by 16S rRNA PCR and sequencing. Most taxa were comprised of saprophytes found in the environment, such as Bacillus, Pantoea, E. coli, and Exiguobacterium. Moraxella spp. were infrequently observed. Some species, such as Propionibacterium acnes, represent taxa not previously associated with the conjunctivae. Bacillus pumilus and Bacillus licheniformis isolates from the conjunctivae of Maryland cattle were genetically distinct from isolates previously implicated in septic infections in cattle at the same location. We conclude that employing 16S rRNA-based methods for bacterial identification can be useful in defining the flora present in the conjunctivae of normal cattle, and those with BKC.

  11. Resection and Cryotherapy Combined with Amniotic Membrane Transplantation for the Treatment of Vernal Keratoconjunctivitis with Giant Papillae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Dongling; ZHANG Mingchang; HU Yanhua

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of resection and cryotherapy combined with amniotic membrane transplantation (AMT) for the treatment of vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC) with giant papillae (GP). Eight patients (16 eyes involved) with VKC, characterized by GP on the upper tarsal conjunctiva, underwent resection and cryotherapy in combination with AMT. The follow-up lasted for 3-22 months. The results showed that corneal shield ulcers and superficial punctuate keratitis healed during the first week after surgery and did not recur. Fourteen eyes (87.5 %) were symptom-free 1 month after surgery, and no GP, ectropion, trichiasis and other complications were noted, but the blood vessels of upper tarsal conjunctiva could not be clearly seen and a little conjunctival scar was observed. Recurrence of GP was observed in 2 eyes (12.5 %), with the area being less and irritation milder as compared with those before the operation. Among the two eyes, one eye was treated by cyclosporine eyedrops with improvement, but the other eye showed no improvement after the treatment, and underwent a second surgery with a cotton patch soaked in fluorouracil applied onto the supratarsal area after resection and cryotherapy. Four months after the treatment the patient presented no symptoms and GP did not recur. It is concluded that the resection and cryotherapy combined with AMT is an effective and safe treatment for VKC with GP.

  12. 'Pink eye' or 'zere oogjes' or keratoconjunctivitis infectiosa ovis (KIO). Clinical efficacy of a number of antimicrobial therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, C D

    1983-07-01

    In a comparative study the clinical efficacy of five different treatments of keratoconjunctivitis infectiosa ovis (KIO) were tested, namely an intramuscular injection of chloramphenicol base (dosage 15 mg/kg), spiramycin base (Suanovil dosages 10 to 25 mg/kg), oxytetracycline (Engemycine Forte, Terramycin LA, dosages respectively 5 and 10 mg/kg), tiamulin (Dynamutulin, dosage 10 mg/kg) and subcutaneous injection of procaine penicillin G, benzathine penicillin G. and dihydrostreptomycin in the lower eyelid. It appeared from these field trials that spiramycin base, oxytetracycline and tiamulin had a clearly positive effect on the clinical course of 'pink eye', although with tiamulin there was only a temporary effect (high percentage of relapses). In view of the field data the following dosage schemes are, for the time being, advised: spiramycin base (Suanovil), and oxytetracycline (formulation with a good biological availability) both 20 to 30 mg/kg and, if necessary, to be repeated on days 5 and 10 after the first intramuscular injection. The dosage scheme advised for tiamulin is 20-30 mg/kg to be repeated on day 3 and if necessary on days 6 and 9 after the intramuscular injection. In mild cases it is sufficient to rub the eyes with for example oxytetracycline eye-ointment, a few times a day.

  13. Atopic dermatitis and skin allergies - update and outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollenberg, A; Feichtner, K

    2013-12-01

    During the last few years, an impressive amount of experimental studies and clinical trials have dealt with a variety of distinct topics in allergic skin diseases - especially atopic dermatitis. In this update, we discuss selected recent data that provide relevant insights into clinical and pathophysiological aspects of allergic skin diseases or discuss promising targets and strategies for the future treatment of skin allergy. This includes aspects of barrier malfunction and inflammation as well as the interaction of the cutaneous immune system with the skin microbiome and diagnostic procedures for working up atopic dermatitis patients. Additionally, contact dermatitis, urticaria, and drug reactions are addressed in this review. This update summarizes novel evidence, highlighting current areas of uncertainties and debates that will stimulate scientific discussions and research activities in the field of atopic dermatitis and skin allergies in the future.

  14. Adverse reactions to food additives in children with atopic symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, G; Madsen, G; Halken, S

    1994-01-01

    In a multicenter study conducted at four Danish hospital pediatric departments, the parents of 472 consecutive children were informed of this project to determine the incidence of intolerance of food additives among children referred to an allergy clinic with symptoms of asthma, atopic dermatitis......, rhinitis, or urticaria. After a 2-week period on an additive-free diet, the children were challenged with the eliminated additives. The food additives investigated were coloring agents, preservatives, citric acid, and flavoring agents. Carbonated "lemonade" containing the dissolved additives was used...... dermatitis, asthma, urticaria, gastrointestinal symptoms), and citric acid (atopic dermatitis, gastrointestinal symptoms). The incidence of intolerance of food additives was 2% (6/335), as based on the double-blind challenge, and 7% (23/335), as based on the open challenge with lemonade. Children with atopic...

  15. Adverse reactions to food additives in children with atopic symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, G.; Madsen, Charlotte Bernhard; Halken, S.

    1994-01-01

    In a multicenter study conducted at four Danish hospital pediatric departments, the parents of 472 consecutive children were informed of this project to determine the incidence of intolerance of food additives among children referred to an allergy clinic with symptoms of asthma, atopic dermatitis......, rhinitis, or urticaria. After a 2-week period on an additive-free diet, the children were challenged with the eliminated additives. The food additives investigated were coloring agents, preservatives, citric acid, and flavoring agents. Carbonated ''lemonade'' containing the dissolved additives was used...... dermatitis, asthma, urticaria, gastrointestinal symptoms), and citric acid (atopic dermatitis, gastrointestinal symptoms). The incidence of intolerance of food additives was 2% (6/335), as based on the double-blind challenge, and 7% (23/335), as based on the open challenge with lemonade. Children with atopic...

  16. Dendritic Cells, Viruses, and the Development of Atopic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan S. Tam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are important residents of the lung environment. They have been associated with asthma and other inflammatory diseases of the airways. In addition to their antigen-presenting functions, dendritic cells have the ability to modulate the lung environment to promote atopic disease. While it has long been known that respiratory viral infections associate with the development and exacerbation of atopic diseases, the exact mechanisms have been unclear. Recent studies have begun to show the critical importance of the dendritic cell in this process. This paper focuses on these data demonstrating how different populations of dendritic cells are capable of bridging the adaptive and innate immune systems, ultimately leading to the translation of viral illness into atopic disease.

  17. Rozdíly v charakteristice účastníků cyklistických akcí ve Slovinsku v letech 2005 a 2006 Differences in characteristics of cycling event participants in Slovenia in years 2005 and 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Šetina

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Hlavním cílem této studie je nalézt určité charakteristiky náhodně vybraných účastníků cyklistických akcí v letech 2005 a 2006. Dvoudenní rekreační akce na podporu aktivního životního stylu poskytovala možnost cyklistického vyžití pro osoby obou pohlaví, různého věku a různých psychických a fyzických schopností. Náhodně vybraní rekreační cyklisté (261 byli požádáni, aby vyplnili anonymní dotazník. Výsledky ukazují malou, avšak statisticky významnou negativní korelaci (r = –0,268, p < 0,01 mezi frekvencí zapojení do pohybových/sportovních aktivit a věkem. Téměř 50 % účastníků v roce 2005 bylo aktivních 4–6 krát týdně a v následujícím roce to bylo 39 % soutěžících. Je zde také statisticky významný pozitivní vztah mezi frekvencí zapojení do pohybových/sportovních aktivit a subjektivním hodnocením zdravotního stavu v roce 2005 (r = 0,319, p < 0,01 a 2006 (r = 0,311, p < 0,01. Účastníci hodnotili svůj zdravotní stav jako dobrý či velmi dobrý v 83 % (v roce 2005 a v 77 % (v roce 2006. Koeficient také vyjadřuje malou, avšak statisticky významnou negativní korelaci (r = –0,219, p < 0,01 mezi důležitostí pohybových/sportovních aktivit a věkem. Znalost některých charakteristik rekreačních cyklistů může přispět ke zlepšení masových cyklistických (i jiných akcí a zároveň také k vývoji cykloturistiky ve Slovinsku, které má pro tyto aktivity skvělé přírodní podmínky. The main aim of this study is to find out some characteristics of randomly selected cycling event participants in the years 2005 and 2006. A two day recreation and active lifestyle promoting event provided a cycling offer that corresponded to both sexes and people of different ages and psychophysical abilities. Randomly selected recreational cyclists (261 were asked to complete the anonymous questionnaire. The results show a small but statistically significant

  18. Some aspects of hadron-hadron collisions in high energy interactions (B$0\\atop{s}$ mixing oscillations in semileptonic decay at D0 experiment)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naimuddin, Md [Univ. of Delhi, New Delhi (India)

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis, we report the study on one such particle called the B$0\\atop{s}$ meson made up of a bottom and a strange quark. B$0\\atop{s}$ mesons are currently produced in a great numbers only at the Tevatron and we report a study done to measure the mixing parameter Δms between the B$0\\atop{s}$ meson and its anti-particle $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$. Mixing is the ability of a very few neutral mesons to change from their particle to their antiparticle and vice versa. Until recently there existed only a lower limit on this measurement, here we report an upper bound and a most probable value for the mixing parameter. In the following chapter, we discuss the theoretical motivation behind this study. The measurement technique and the different factors that effect the measurement are also given. In Chapter 3, we provide an overview of the experimental setup needed to perform the study. In Chapter 4, we present a new initial state flavor tagging algorithm using electrons and measurement of the B$0\\atop{d}$ mixing parameter Δmd with the new technique. Details of the combined initial state tagging used in the B$0\\atop{s}$ mixing study are also given. A detailed description of the B$0\\atop{s}$ mixing analysis and the results are covered in Chapter 5. And finally the results from all the three channels and a bound on the mixing parameter are presented in Chapter 6.

  19. Apgar score is related to development of atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naeser, Vibeke; Kahr, Niklas; Stensballe, Lone Graff

    2013-01-01

    . We cross-linked with data from the Danish National Birth Registry and performed cotwin control analysis in order to test the impact of birth characteristics on the risk of atopic dermatitis. Results. Apgar score, OR (per unit) = 1.23 (1.06-1.44), P = 0.008, and female sex, OR = 1.31 (1.06-1.61), P....... In this population-based cotwin control study, high Apgar score was a risk factor for atopic dermatitis. This novel finding must be confirmed in subsequent studies....

  20. Breaking the (un)sound barrier: filaggrin is a major gene for atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, Alan D; McLean, W H Irwin

    2006-06-01

    We have recently shown that loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene, carried by about 10% of people of European ethnicity, cause ichthyosis vulgaris and are strong predisposing factors for atopic dermatitis and asthma secondary to atopic dermatitis. These results demonstrate a prominent role for the epidermal barrier in atopic disease and have important implications for the study of complex traits.

  1. Reduced occurrence of early atopic dermatitis because of immunoactive prebiotics among low-atopy-risk infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grueber, Christoph; van Stuijvenberg, Margriet; Mosca, Fabio; Moro, Guido; Chirico, Gaetano; Braegger, Christian P.; Riedler, Josef; Boehm, Guenther; Wahn, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Background: Most infants developing atopic dermatitis have a low risk for atopy. Primary prevention of atopic dermatitis is difficult. Objective: To assess the effect of supplementation of an infant and follow-on formula with prebiotic and immunoactive oligosaccharides on the occurrence of atopic de

  2. [Keeping dogs indoor aggravates infantile atopic dermatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, K; Hizawa, T; Fukuzumi, T; Kataoka, Y

    1999-12-01

    We had a two-month-old girl with severe dermatitis since birth. Her serum RAST to HD, Df and Dp were 1.06, 0.03 and 0.01 Ua/ml respectively. A Yorkshire terrier were kept at her mother's parents' home where the patient had lived for a month since birth. Her eczema, which became markedly aggravated whenever she visited there, improved after the elimination of the dog. We investigated the relationship between keeping dogs and infantile atopic dermatitis. We studied 368 patients under the age of two years (211 boys and 157 girls). Skin symptoms were graded globally mild, moderate or severe. Total serum IgE and specific antibody titer to dog dander were measured. We asked them whether they kept dogs and specifically, where they kept dogs, outdoor, indoor, in their own house, or in their grandparents' house. 197 patients had no contact with dogs, 90 patients kept dogs outdoor and 81 patients did indoor. The positive rate of RAST (> or = 0.7 Ua/ml) to dog dander was 6.1%, 17.8% and 46.9% respectively in these three groups. There were strong statistical differences between three groups. On the other hand, among the 81 patients who kept indoor, the RAST positive rates were almost same regarding where the dogs were kept, in their own house or their grandparents' house. Interestingly this difference happens only with patients under the age of 3 months. Patients older than 4 months showed no significant differences in the positive RAST rates, whether they kept dogs indoor or outdoor. This suggests the sensitization occurs before the age of 3 months. Speaking of symptoms, patients who kept dogs indoor showed significantly more severe symptoms than patients who had no contact with dogs and patients who kept dogs outdoor. There was no significant difference between the symptoms of patients who had no contact with dogs and those of patients who kept dogs outdoor. This implies the patient's symptom will improve only by moving the dog out of the house.

  3. The association of the 'additional height index' with atopic diseases, non-atopic asthma, ischaemic heart disease and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, R V; Vidal, C; Gonzalez-Quintela, A;

    2014-01-01

    outcomes and with ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and IHD mortality. DESIGN: General population-based study. SETTING: Research centre. PARTICIPANTS: A random sample of 2656 men and women living in greater Copenhagen took part in the MONICA10 study (the Danish monitoring trends and determinants...... of cardiovascular disease). In total, 1900 participants with information of parental height were selected. OUTCOME MEASURES: Atopic sensitisation (serum IgE), questionnaire information of atopic dermatitis, rhinoconjunctivitis, asthma or wheezing, and registry-based diagnoses of IHD/IHD mortality from National......OBJECTIVE: Intrauterine growth has been associated with atopic conditions. Growth and adult height have been associated with cardiovascular disease, cancers and mortality but are highly genetic traits. The objectives of the study were as follows: first, to define a height measure indicating...

  4. Asthma and Atopic Dermatitis: A Review of Targeted Inhibition of Interleukin-4 and Interleukin-13 As Therapy for Atopic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzney, Catherine D; Gottlieb, Alice B; Rosmarin, David

    2016-02-01

    Type 2 helper T cell (Th2)-mediated inflammation plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of allergic asthma and atopic dermatitis (AD). Recent research focusing on the suppression of the Th2 axis with targeted inhibitors in atopic disease is showing promising early results. In particular, the simultaneous blockage of interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13 has successfully mitigated symptoms of allergic asthma and AD in preliminary clinical trials. Given the current therapeutic challenges of treating these chronic and severe diseases, this review brings to light new data demonstrating that agents targeting IL-4 and IL-13 are relatively safe and effective medications in blocking the inflammatory cascade responsible for allergic asthma and atopic dermatitis.

  5. Atopic Dermatitis: Clinical Connotations, Especially a Focus on Concomitant Atopic Undertones in Immunocompromised/Susceptible Genetic and Metabolic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Khurana, Ananta; Mendiratta, Vibhu; Saxena, Deepti; Srivastava, Govind; Aggarwal, Ashok K; Chatterjee, Kingshuk

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is an intriguing clinical entity. Its clinical connotations are varied, the updates of which are required to be done periodically. An attempt to bring its various facets have been made highlighting its clinical features keeping in view the major and the minor criteria to facilitate the diagnosis, differential diagnosis, complications, and associated dermatoses. The benefit of the current dissertation may percolate to the trainees in dermatology, in addition to revelations that atopic undertones in genetic susceptibility and metabolic disorder may provide substantive insight for the future in the understanding of thus far enigmatic etiopathogenesis of AD. PMID:27293243

  6. Development of prophylactic recombinant HPV58-attenuated Shigeila live vector vaccine and evaluation of its protective efficacy and immunogenicity in the guinea pig keratoconjunctivitis model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wensheng Li; Hongli Liu; Xiaofeng Yang; Jin Zheng; Yili Wang; Lusheng Si

    2009-01-01

    To develop a prophylactic recombinant HPV58L1-attenuated Shigella live vector vaccine and evaluate its protective efficacy and immunogenicity in the guinea pig keratoconjunctivitis model, the HPV58L1 gene was cloned into vector pUCmt, and then subcloned into the suicide vector pCVD442. The recombinant plasmid pCVD442-HPV58L1 was introduced into attenuated Shigella (sf301:△virG) with the helper plasmid PRK2013 by filter mating. The positive colonies were harvested and confirmed by polymerase chain reaction. The expression of the HPV58L1 protein with a molecu-lar weight of 60 kDa was confirmed by western blot. The ability of the interested protein to self-assemble into virus-like particles was identified by transmission electron microscope, and murine erythrocyte hemagglu-tination assay. The guinea pig keratoconjunctivitis model was used to evaluate the protective efficacy and immunogenicity of the vaccine. Animal experiments showed that there was no keratoconjunctivitis occurred in the immunized group (HPV58-attenuated Shigella), and the serum levels of anti-HPV58L1-IgG and -IgA were obviously increased (P0.05). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assay showed that HPV58L1-specific IgA-antibody-secreting cells (ASC) and IgG-ASC of spleen and lymph nodes were also obviously increased (P<0.01). In this study, a recombi-nant HPV58L1-attenuated Shigella live vector vaccine was successfully constructed, and it could induce strong humoral immune responses in the immunized animals, and induce protective antibody production.

  7. Intracellular IL-4, IL-5, and IFN-γ as the main characteristic of CD4+CD30+ T cells after allergen stimulation in patients with vernal keratoconjunctivitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaña, Diana; Aguilar, Gustavo; Linares, Marisela; Ayala-Balboa, Julio; Santacruz, Concepción; Chávez, Raúl; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Garfias, Yonathan; Lascurain, Ricardo; Jiménez-Martínez, Maria C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC) is a severe form of allergic conjunctivitis, in which inflammatory infiltrates of the conjunctiva are characterized by CD3+ and CD30+ cells. Until today, the functional involvement of CD30+ T cells in VKC was unclear. Our aim was to evaluate the functional characteristics of CD30+ T cells after allergen stimulation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from patients with VKC. Methods Seventeen consecutive patients at the Institute of Ophthalmology with active forms of VKC were included. Results After allergen stimulation, we observed the frequency of CD30+ T cells increased compared with non-stimulated cells (p<0.0001). The CD30+ T cells responded to the specific allergen-inducing expression of intracellular interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-5, and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) compared with the CD30- T cells (p<0.0001). Increased early secretion of soluble CD30 was observed in the supernatant of the cultured cells from patients with keratoconjunctivitis, compared with healthy controls (p=0.03). Blockage with IL-4 significantly diminished CD30 frequency in the allergen-stimulated cells. Conclusions Our results suggest that after allergenic stimulation, CD4+CD30+ cells are the most important source of IL-4, IL-5, and IFN-γ. IL-4 acts as an activation loop that increases CD30 expression on T cells after specific stimulation. These findings suggest that CD4+CD30+ T cells are effector cells and play a significant role in the immune pathogenic response in patients with vernal keratoconjunctivitis. PMID:25999672

  8. Large genomic differences between Moraxella bovoculi isolates acquired from the eyes of cattle with infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis versus the deep nasopharynx of asymptomatic cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Aaron M; Loy, John D; Bono, James L; Smith, Timothy P L; Apley, Mike D; Lubbers, Brian V; DeDonder, Keith D; Capik, Sarah F; Larson, Robert L; White, Brad J; Blom, Jochen; Chitko-McKown, Carol G; Clawson, Michael L

    2016-02-13

    Moraxella bovoculi is a recently described bacterium that is associated with infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK) or "pinkeye" in cattle. In this study, closed circularized genomes were generated for seven M. bovoculi isolates: three that originated from the eyes of clinical IBK bovine cases and four from the deep nasopharynx of asymptomatic cattle. Isolates that originated from the eyes of IBK cases profoundly differed from those that originated from the nasopharynx of asymptomatic cattle in genome structure, gene content and polymorphism diversity and consequently placed into two distinct phylogenetic groups. These results suggest that there are genetically distinct strains of M. bovoculi that may not associate with IBK.

  9. Antigenic relationships of Moraxella bovis isolates recovered from outbreaks of infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis in Argentina, Brazil, and Uruguay between 1983 and 2000

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    Cross-reactivity indices (CRIs) of 28 isolates of Moraxella bovis recovered from outbreaks of infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis in Argentina (A, 11 isolates), Brazil (B, 7), and Uruguay (U, 10) between 1983 and 2000 were estimated. Hyperimmune sera were produced in rabbits and antibody titres determined with each isolate. Isolates showing CRIs3 70 were placed in the same group. Group I had 13 isolates (A, 1; B, 6; U, 6); group II had 6 isolates (A, 4; U, 2); groups III, IV, and V had 2 i...

  10. Treating atopic dermatitis: safety, efficacy, and patient acceptability of a ceramide hyaluronic acid emollient foam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacha O

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Omar Pacha, Adelaide A HebertDepartment of Dermatology, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX, USAAbstract: Advances in current understanding of the pathophysiology of atopic dermatitis have led to improved targeting of the structural deficiencies in atopic skin. Ceramide deficiency appears to be one of the major alterations in atopic dermatitis and the replenishment of this epidermal component through topically applied ceramide based emollients appears to be safe, well tolerated, and effective. Recently a ceramide hyaluronic acid foam has become commercially available and increasing evidence supports its safety and efficacy in patients who suffer from atopic dermatitis.Keywords: atopic dermatitis, ceramide, Hylatopic, eczema, non-steroidal, dermatology

  11. An update on the treatment of canine atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saridomichelakis, Manolis N; Olivry, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Canine atopic dermatitis is a common skin disease seen in veterinary clinical practice. Several factors appear to contribute to the cutaneous inflammation and pruritus. The therapeutic strategy should focus on control of those factors that can be identified and for which interventional measures are feasible; these include ectoparasites, bacterial/fungal infection and dietary hypersensitivity. Ectoparasites, particularly fleas, are not the cause of atopic dermatitis, but they are a confounding factor, which can exacerbate pruritus, and preventative measures are therefore indicated. Bacterial and yeast infections are frequently associated with atopic dermatitis and initial systemic and/or topical therapy should be considered, followed by regular topical treatment for preventing relapse. Concurrent dietary hypersensitivity should be investigated by undertaking an elimination/provocation trial, followed by feeding of a hypoallergenic diet where appropriate. Depending on the severity of the clinical signs of atopic dermatitis and the willingness and expectations of owners, symptomatic treatment and/or specific interventional therapy for environmental allergy (allergen avoidance, allergen-specific immunotherapy) may be implemented. Symptomatic treatment includes use of glucocorticoids (systemically or topically), ciclosporin and oclacitinib. Other treatment modalities of lower or less proven efficacy include antihistamines, dextromethorphan, fatty acids, feline interferon-omega, misoprostol, pentoxifylline, specific serotonin re-uptake inhibitors and tricyclic antidepressant drugs. The therapeutic approach should be reviewed at regular intervals and tailored to the individual's needs. A successful long-term outcome can usually be achieved by combining the various treatment approaches in a way that maximises their benefits and minimises their drawbacks.

  12. Evaluation of severity and therapy in children with atopic dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Wolkerstorfer (Albert)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractAtopic dennatitis (AD) is a conUllon chronically relapsing skin disorder affecting 9-20% of those born after 1970 [Schultz Larsen 1993]. TI,e aetiology is still not entirely elucidated and research is complicated by the multifactorial nature of the disease. Both genetical and environment

  13. Induction of atopic dermatitis by inhalation of house dust mite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tupker, RA; DeMonchy, JGR; Coenraads, PJ; vanderMeer, JB

    1996-01-01

    Background: The pathogenetic role of house dust mite in atopic dermatitis remains controversial. Recent studies have shown that intensive epicutaneous contact of house dust mite allergen with premanipulated skin may induce dematitis. It is, however, uncertain whether such conditions are met during n

  14. Atopic dermatitis with possible polysensitization and monkey esophagus reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease resulting from interactions between environmental and genetic factors. Recent studies link atopic dermatitis with asthma and with eosinophilic esophagitis. Case Report: Based on this association, we investigated by indirect immunofluorescence the immunoreactivity patterns on monkey esophagus substrate utilizing the serum of a patient with severe atopic dermatitis. We also examined the patient′s skin biopsy by H&E histology and immunohistochemistry. We detected strong deposits of albumin, IgE, IgG, IgD, IgA, Complement/C1q and mast cell tryptase in multiples structures of the skin, as well as a broad pattern of intraepithelial staining on monkey esophagus. Strong staining positivity was also detected within the inflammatory infiltrate around the upper dermal vessels, as well as additional positive staining for the human leukocyte antigen system antigens DR DP and DQ. Conclusion: Our findings demonstrate that there could be an indication for testing patients with severe atopic dermatitis for autoreactivity to filaggrin (anti-keratin antibodies utilizing monkey esophagus. Larger studies are needed to clarify any immunologic interaction between the reactivity to albumin and food allergens that may sensitize patients via the esophageal mucosa.

  15. Alcohol during pregnancy and atopic dermatitis in the offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, A; Petersen, Janne; Grønbaek, M;

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is evidence that antenatal factors play a role in the development of atopic dermatitis (AD). However, little is known about the effects of maternal lifestyle factors during pregnancy on the risk of AD in the offspring. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of alcohol consumption...

  16. European birth cohort studies on asthma and atopic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keil, T; Kulig, M; Simpson, A;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The reasons for the rise in asthma and allergies remain unclear. To identify risk or protective factors, it is essential to carry out longitudinal epidemiological studies, preferably birth cohort studies. In Europe, several birth cohort studies on asthma and atopic diseases have been ...

  17. Colloidal oatmeal formulations as adjunct treatments in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Joseph F; Nebus, Judith; Wallo, Warren; Eichenfield, Lawrence F

    2012-07-01

    Colloidal oatmeal has been used for decades to soothe and ameliorate atopic dermatitis and other pruritic and/or xerotic dermatoses. In-vitro and/or in-vivo studies have confirmed the anti-inflammatory, barrier repair, and moisturizing properties of this compound. A broad set of studies has been conducted in recent years to assess the effects of colloidal oatmeal as adjunct treatment in the management of atopic dermatitis (AD). This paper will review these studies. In these investigations, patients in all age groups (3 months to 60 years) with mild to moderate atopic dermatitis were included and allowed to continue their prescribed topical medications. These studies found that the daily use of moisturizers and/or cleansers containing colloidal oatmeal significantly improved many clinical outcomes of atopic dermatitis from baseline: investigator's assessment (IGA), eczema area and severity index (EASI), itch, dryness, and quality of life indices. Safety results showed that the formulations were well tolerated in babies, children, and adults with AD.

  18. The association of intrafamilial violence against children with symptoms of atopic and non-atopic asthma: A cross-sectional study in Salvador, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfim, Camila Barreto; dos Santos, Darci Neves; Barreto, Maurício Lima

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to describe the types of intrafamilial violence perpetrated against children according to living conditions, family factors, and child characteristics, and to identify the association between types of intrafamilial violence and asthma symptoms in atopic and non-atopic children. A cross-sectional study was carried out with 1,370 caregivers as part of the Social Changes, Asthma and Allergy in Latin America (SCAALA) study, conducted in 2006 in Brazil. The study population was selected by random sampling. The main outcome measures were atopic and non-atopic asthma. We investigate the association between intrafamilial violence and asthma symptoms in atopic and non-atopic children. A backward multivariate logistic polytomous regression was performed to verify the main association. Nonviolent discipline (NVD) and maltreatment nonviolent discipline (MNVD) were positively associated with non-atopic asthma symptoms (NVD: odds ratio (OR)=1.95/95% confidence interval (CI)=1.17-3.25; MNVD: OR=1.95/95% CI=1.19-3.20). However, for the most severe intrafamilial violence, this association was not found after control of potential confounders. This study demonstrates the effect of types of intrafamilial violence on non-atopic asthma. Intrafamilial violence against children represents one more component in the determination of non-atopic asthma in Latin America.

  19. Randomized blinded challenge study to assess association between Moraxella bovoculi and Infectious Bovine Keratoconjunctivitis in dairy calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, S; Dewell, R; Tofflemire, K; Whitley, R D; Millman, S T; Opriessnig, T; Rosenbusch, R; Trujillo, J; O'Connor, A M

    2013-05-31

    The objective of this study was to evaluate if Moraxella bovoculi was associated with Infectious Bovine Keratoconjunctivitis (IBK) using a corneal scarification model in calves. A 3-arm single-eye block-randomized and blinded challenge study was designed as follows: corneal scarification only, corneal scarification and inoculation with M. bovoculi (ATCC strain: BAA-1259; origin: CA) and corneal scarification and inoculation with Moraxella bovis (strain Epp63-300; origin: NADC). The study was conducted in 3 replicates of 10-12 animals housed in individual pens with no nose-to-nose contact. Calves were enrolled after an ophthalmologist confirmed the absence of corneal, conjunctival, and eyelid abnormalities. Calves were scarified and inoculated in one randomly selected eye, then observed for the primary outcome of interest (corneal ulcers) until euthanized 10 days following scarification. Research group members assessing the outcome were blind to allocation status. The study was approved by the institutional animal care and use committee. Of 36 animals purchased for the study, 5 were excluded prior to enrollment due to ophthalmic abnormalities. Of the 31 enrolled calves, 9/10 (90%) of M. bovis calves, 0/10 (0%) of M. bovoculi calves and 1/11 (9%) of control calves developed corneal ulcerations consistent with IBK in the scarified eyes. The absence of corneal ulcerations in M. bovoculi BAA-1259 inoculated calves suggests it is not a causal organism for IBK in this model and the pathogenicity of this ATCC strain has not been established. Consistent corneal ulceration development in the M. bovis inoculated group demonstrates the ability of the model to induce IBK ulcers.

  20. Efficacy of Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus 109J for the treatment of dairy calves with experimentally induced infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boileau, Mélanie J; Mani, Rinosh; Breshears, Melanie A; Gilmour, Margi; Taylor, Jared D; Clinkenbeard, Kenneth D

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the efficacy of Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus 109J for the treatment of calves with experimentally induced infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK). ANIMALS 12 healthy dairy calves. PROCEDURES For each calf, a grid keratotomy was performed on both eyes immediately before inoculation with Moraxella bovis hemolytic strain Epp63-300 (n = 11 calves) or nonhemolytic strain 12040577 (1 calf). For each calf inoculated with M bovis Epp63-300, the eyes were randomly assigned to receive an artificial tear solution with (treatment group) or without (control group) lyophilized B bacteriovorus 109J. Six doses of the assigned treatment (0.2 mL/eye, topically, q 48 h) were administered to each eye. On nontreatment days, eyes were assessed and corneal swab specimens and tear samples were collected for bacterial culture. Calves were euthanized 12 days after M bovis inoculation. The eyes were harvested for gross and histologic evaluation and bacterial culture. RESULTS The calf inoculated with M bovis 12040577 did not develop corneal ulcers. Of the 22 eyes inoculated with M bovis Epp63-300, 18 developed corneal ulcers consistent with IBK within 48 hours after inoculation; 4 of those eyes developed secondary corneal ulcers that were not consistent with IBK. Corneal ulcer size and severity and the time required for ulcer healing did not differ between the treatment and control groups. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that B bacteriovorus 109J was not effective for the treatment of IBK; however, the experimental model used produced lesions that did not completely mimic naturally occurring IBK.

  1. Crowding and winter emergency feeding as predisposing factors for kerato-conjunctivitis in semi-domesticated reindeer in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschfalk, A; Josefsen, T D; Steingass, H; Müller, W; Goethe, R

    2003-07-01

    Due to the hard environmental and climatic situation in late winter 1999, a herd of about 200 free-ranging, semi-domesticated reindeer was gathered in a paddock in northern Norway for emergency feeding. About the same number of reindeer was not corralled but supplementary fed on their winter pastures. The fodder was of relatively good quality but very dusty and fed in a very dry environment. Six weeks later, an outbreak of eye-infection was diagnosed in one third of the corralled reindeer; mild symptoms were observed in most of them, but 11 animals showed severe signs of disease. No signs of disease were found in the non-corralled animals. Ten reindeer died through emaciation, the eleventh was sacrificed. Histopathological diagnosis of two severely affected eyes revealed a severe purulent kerato-conjunctivitis with bacteria and plant particles embedded in purulent exudates on the cornea and conjunctiva. In one eye from the two most affected animals Actinomyces pyogenes, coagulase-negative Staphylococci and Escherichia coli and in the other one Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli were found. The bacteria encountered in this study are not considered the primary cause of disease. They seem rather to be opportunistic infectious agents of eyes that have been irritated mechanically through exposure to dusty fodder in a dry environment. The stress through unfamiliar corralling of the reindeer, that followed an insufficient fodder supply, could be considered as an additional infection supporting factor. This case-report emphasises on the importance of different factors involved in favouring outbreaks of disease in reindeer, under intensified husbandry conditions. Even though crowding and emergency feeding may be, at certain circumstances, the only means of survival for reindeer, a negative impact of implied crowding diseases on their productivity, must be considered, as well.

  2. Staphylococcus aureus resistance to topical antimicrobials in atopic dermatitis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessa, Giancarlo Rezende; Quinto, Vanessa Petry; Machado, Daiane Corrêa; Lipnharski, Caroline; Weber, Magda Blessmann; Bonamigo, Renan Rangel; D'Azevedo, Pedro Alves

    2016-01-01

    Background Topical antimicrobial drugs are indicated for limited superficial pyodermitis treatment, although they are largely used as self-prescribed medication for a variety of inflammatory dermatoses, including atopic dermatitis. Monitoring bacterial susceptibility to these drugs is difficult, given the paucity of laboratory standardization. Objective To evaluate the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus topical antimicrobial drug resistance in atopic dermatitis patients. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study of children and adults diagnosed with atopic dermatitis and S. aureus colonization. We used miscellaneous literature reported breakpoints to define S. aureus resistance to mupirocin, fusidic acid, gentamicin, neomycin and bacitracin. Results A total of 91 patients were included and 100 S. aureus isolates were analyzed. All strains were methicillin-susceptible S. aureus. We found a low prevalence of mupirocin and fusidic acid resistance (1.1% and 5.9%, respectively), but high levels of neomycin and bacitracin resistance (42.6% and 100%, respectively). Fusidic acid resistance was associated with more severe atopic dermatitis, demonstrated by higher EASI scores (median 17.8 vs 5.7, p=.009). Our results also corroborate the literature on the absence of cross-resistance between the aminoglycosides neomycin and gentamicin. Conclusions Our data, in a southern Brazilian sample of AD patients, revealed a low prevalence of mupirocin and fusidic acid resistance of S. aureus atopic eczema colonizer strains. However, for neomycin and bacitracin, which are commonly used topical antimicrobial drugs in Brazil, high levels of resistance were identified. Further restrictions on the use of these antimicrobials seem necessary to keep resistance as low as possible. PMID:27828633

  3. Mast cells and atopic dermatitis. Stereological quantification of mast cells in atopic dermatitis and normal human skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, T E; Olesen, A B; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    1997-01-01

    Stereological quantification of mast cell numbers was applied to sections of punch biopsies from lesional and nonlesional skin of atopic dermatitis patients and skin of healthy volunteers. We also investigated whether the method of staining and/or the fixative influenced the results of the determ...... the clinical score and the number of mast cell profiles per millimetre squared. Using stereological techniques, this study indicated that mast cells might participate in the inflammatory process in skin leading to atopic dermatitis.......Stereological quantification of mast cell numbers was applied to sections of punch biopsies from lesional and nonlesional skin of atopic dermatitis patients and skin of healthy volunteers. We also investigated whether the method of staining and/or the fixative influenced the results...... of the determination of the mast cell profile numbers. The punch biopsies were taken from the same four locations in both atopic dermatitis patients and normal individuals. The locations were the scalp, neck and flexure of the elbow (lesional skin), and nates (nonlesional skin). Clinical scoring was carried out...

  4. Pattern of contact sensitization in patients with and without atopic dermatitis in a hospital-based clinical database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Kim Katrine Bjerring; Thomsen, Simon Francis; Jemec, Gregor Borut Ernst;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both atopic dermatitis and contact sensitization are common conditions; however, a definite understanding of the relationship between contact sensitization and atopic dermatitis has not been reached. OBJECTIVES: In this descriptive study, we investigated the differences between positive...... tested at Bispebjerg and Roskilde Hospitals from January 2009 to January 2013. Severe atopic dermatitis was defined as systemic therapy or hospitalization resulting from atopic dermatitis. All other patients with atopic dermatitis were defined as having mild/moderate disease. RESULTS: The study included...

  5. Measurement of the Ratio of Branching Fractions Br(B$0\\atop{s}$ → D$-\\atop{s}$ π+)/Br(B0 → D- π+) at CDF-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furic, Ivan Kresimir [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2004-03-01

    The measurement of B$0\\atop{s}$ mixing is one of the flagship analyses for the Run II B physics program. The sensitivity of the measurement to the frequency of B$0\\atop{s}$ oscillations strongly depends on the number of reconstructed B$0\\atop{s}$ mesons. They present the measurement of the ratio of branching fractions Br(B$0\\atop{s}$ → D$-\\atop{s}$π+)/Br(B0 → D-π+), which directly influences the number of B$0\\atop{s}$ events available for the measurement of B$0\\atop{s}$ mixing at CDF-II. They analyze 115 pb-1 of data collected with the CDF-II detector in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV using a novel displaced track trigger. They reconstruct 78 ± 11 B$0\\atop{s}$ → D$-\\atop{s}$π+ decays at 1153 ± 45 B0 → D-π+ decays with good signal to background ratio. This is the world's largest sample of fully reconstructed B$0\\atop{s}$ → D$-\\atop{s}$π+ decays. They find the ratio of production fractions multiplied by the ratio of branching fractions to be: fs/fd • Br(B$0\\atop{s}$ → D$-\\atop{s}$π+)/Br(B0 → D-π+) = 0.325 ± 0.046(stat) ± 0.034(syst) ± 0.084 (BR). Using the world average value of fs/fd = 0.26 ± 0.03, we infer that the ratio of branching fractions is: Br(B$0\\atop{s}$ → D$-\\atop{s}$π+)/Br(B0 → D-π+) = 1.25 ± 0.18(stat) ± 0.13(syst) ± 0.32(BR) ± 0.14(PR) where the last uncertainty is due to the uncertainty on the world average measurement of the ratio of B$0\\atop{s}$ to B0 production rates, fs/fd.

  6. Poverty, dirt, infections and non-atopic wheezing in children from a Brazilian urban center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooper Philip J

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The causation of asthma is poorly understood. Risk factors for atopic and non-atopic asthma may be different. This study aimed to analyze the associations between markers of poverty, dirt and infections and wheezing in atopic and non-atopic children. Methods 1445 children were recruited from a population-based cohort in Salvador, Brazil. Wheezing was assessed using the ISAAC questionnaire and atopy defined as allergen-specific IgE ≥0.70 kU/L. Relevant social factors, environmental exposures and serological markers for childhood infections were investigated as risk factors using multivariate multinomial logistic regression. Results Common risk factors for wheezing in atopic and non-atopic children, respectively, were parental asthma and respiratory infection in early childhood. No other factor was associated with wheezing in atopic children. Factors associated with wheezing in non-atopics were low maternal educational level (OR 1.49, 95% CI 0.98-2.38, low frequency of room cleaning (OR 2.49, 95% CI 1.27-4.90, presence of rodents in the house (OR 1.48, 95% CI 1.06-2.09, and day care attendance (OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.01-2.29. Conclusions Non-atopic wheezing was associated with risk factors indicative of poverty, dirt and infections. Further research is required to more precisely define the mediating exposures and the mechanisms by which they may cause non-atopic wheeze.

  7. Measurement of the ratio of branching fractions β(B$0\\atop{s}$ → D$-\\atop{s}$ D$+\\atop{s}$) /b (B0 → D- D$+\\atop{s}$) with the CDF detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iyutin, Boris [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2007-03-01

    In this thesis they report the measurement of ratios of branching fractions: β(B$0\\atop{s}$ → D$-\\atop{s}$ π+π+π-)/β(B0 → D-π+π+π-), and β(B0 → D-D$+\\atop{s}$)/β(B0 → D-π+π+π-), using 355 pb-1 of data collected by CDF detector at the Tevatron p$\\bar{p}$ collider at √s = 1.96 TeV.

  8. The role of vitamin D in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dębińska, Anna; Sikorska-Szaflik, Hanna; Urbanik, Magdalena; Boznański, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D has been suggested to have an important impact on a much wider aspects on human health than calcium homeostasis and mineral metabolism, specifically in the field of human immunology. It has been reported that vitamin D influences the regulation of both innate and adaptive immune systems, which makes the association between vitamin D and allergic diseases a field of interest. Although many studies have sought to determine whether vitamin D has an influence on progression of allergic disease, the impact of vitamin D on atopic dermatitis development and severity remains unclear. In this review, we summarize recent studies relating vitamin D to atopic dermatitis and discuss its possible role in the pathogenesis of allergic skin diseases, emphasizing the need for well-designed, prospective trials on vitamin D supplementation in the context of prevention and treatment for allergic conditions.

  9. [Role of Langerhans cells in the physiopathology of atopic dermatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieber, T

    1995-12-01

    The demonstration of IgE receptors on the surface of epidermal dendritic cells and on other antigen presenting cells is a crucial element in the understanding of the pathophysiological role of these cells in the genesis of atopic disease, and especially the atopic dermatitis (AD). The sensibilisation phase to an aeroallergen at the level of nasal or bronchial mucosa and even at the skin may be mediated by dendritic cells expressing Fc epsilon RI. Distinct forms of AD may then represent the equivalent of the ellicitation phase of the classical allergic contact dermatitis. Fc epsilon RI would lead, via specific IgE, to an efficient antigen capture, to the activation of the dendritic cells and finally to an antigen presentation. Thus, AD may represent the paradigma of an IgE-mediated type IV reaction.

  10. Epogam evening primrose oil treatment in atopic dermatitis and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hederos, C A; Berg, A

    1996-12-01

    Essential fatty acids are claimed to have positive effects in atopic diseases. In a double blind, placebo controlled, parallel group study 58 out of 60 children, with atopic dermatitis and the need for regular treatment with topical skin steroids, completed a 16 weeks' treatment period with either Epogam evening primrose oil or placebo capsules. Twenty two of these subjects also had asthma. The parents used diaries to record symptom scores and concomitant medication. Peak expiratory flow was measured and disease activity was monitored by the clinician every four weeks. The plasma concentrations of essential fatty acids increased significantly in the group treated with Epogam capsules. The study demonstrated significant improvements of the eczema symptoms but no significant difference was found between the placebo and the Epogam groups. No therapeutic effect was shown on asthma symptoms or fidget.

  11. European birth cohort studies on asthma and atopic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keil, T; Kulig, M; Simpson, A;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Global Allergy and Asthma European Network (GA2LEN) is a consortium of 26 leading European research centres committed to establish a European research area of excellence in the field of allergy and asthma. AIM: One of the GA2LEN work packages was designed to identify and compare...... asthma and atopic diseases. Data were collected by visiting most of the participating research teams and interviewing all relevant study personnel. For each study, the type of objective/subjective outcome parameters and potentially influential factors were recorded precisely for every time point during...... the existing European birth cohort studies on asthma and atopic diseases. The present review compares their subjective and objective outcomes as well as exposure variables. METHODS: A common database was established to assess study characteristics of observational birth cohort studies designed to examine...

  12. Impact of adult atopic dermatitis on topical drug penetration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia Ortiz, Patricia; Hansen, Steen H; Shah, Vinod P

    2009-01-01

    techniques. Non-invasive measuring methods were used for the quantification of the severity of the dermatitis. Skin thickness and the depth of the microdialysis probes in the skin were measured by 20 MHz ultrasound scanning. Metronidazole concentration, sampled by microdialysis, was 2.4-fold higher...... in the atopic dermatitis compared with uninvolved skin (ppenetration. Thus, the skin layer of interest and the integrity of the skin barrier should be considered when selecting sampling methodology. Microdialysis sampling is the method......Appropriate methodologies for the determination of drug penetration in diseased skin have not yet been established. The aim of this study was to determine the cutaneous penetration of a metronidazole cream formulation in atopic dermatitis, employing dermal microdialysis and tape strip sampling...

  13. Selected aspects of quality of life in atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Kasznia-Kocot

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic dermatological disease of multifactorial pathogenesis with persistent pruritus and extreme skin dryness including typical skin changes caused by many interactions between genetic and environmental factors. The study aims to evaluate the selected aspects of quality of life in AD. Material and methods. To what extent does the disease affect the daily practice of the patient and their family, what are their expenditures in connection with the treatment, and also how they perceive themselves and emotional, sexual, social behavior. 71 adult subjects 48(68% women and 23 (32% men were selected from the allergology clinics in the region of Silesia for this questionnaire based study. Results. Pruritus was felt by everyone, skin pain by 69%, and skin burning by 86%. The great majority of subjects had some constrains in doing housework due to skin complaints. The disease also affected professional work and school achievements. Almost everyone agreed that money spent on medication purchase and skin care agents impacted on financial resources. Atopic dermatitis affected 75% in social functioning, leisure time, sports practicing. The disease affected self-esteem level and confidence. Half of the examined subjects experienced bad feelings in contact with a partner, or felt stigmatized by negative reactions of the environment because of the skin appearance. Often atopic dermatitis caused problems with sound sleep (65% various emotional disorders and also disorders in the sexual sphere (32%. Every fourth subject felt depressed and every seventh thought of suicide. Conclusions. Atopic dermatitis is a disease which adversely influences many aspects of life and undoubtedly impairs the quality of life in a serious and distressing way. Therefore its treatment should be supported by psychotherapy.

  14. Brief communication: MRGPRX2, atopic dermatitis and red man syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azimi, Ehsan; Reddy, Vemuri B; Lerner, Ethan A

    2017-03-01

    Vancoymycin causes red man syndrome, an itchy erythematous eruption involving the face, neck and upper torso. Atopic dermatitis also manifests itch and erythema, and staphylococcus δ-toxin contributes to this process. The antibiotic and toxin each provoke mast cell degranulation but the mechanism had not been understood. We have determined that these compounds evoke degranulation via interaction with the same receptor, MRGPRX2, on mast cells. A receptor antagonist inhibits this process. Antagonists of this receptor may have therapeutic potential.

  15. Atopic Dermatitis and Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus in Iranian Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali R.  Tehrani

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Atopic diseases, including asthma, eczema and allergic rhinitis, are characterized by a chronic inflammatory reaction mediated by T helper 2 cells, while type 1 diabetes mellitus is mediated by T helper 1 cells. Approach: The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of atopic dermatitis between children with type 1 diabetes mellitus and age-matched controls. We conducted a case-control study enrolling 150 cases with type 1 diabetes mellitus between 2-20 years from pediatric endocrine out patient clinic and 450 controls randomly selected from the general population matched on sex and age. The diagnosis of atopic dermatitis was determined for patients and controls by the Hanifin and Rajka’s diagnostic criteria. Results: From 150 cases, 75 (50% were male and 75 (50% were female, with the age between 2 and 20 and among the 450 controls, 228 were male (50. 66% and 222 were female (49.33% the age was as the case. Dermatitis past or present, was identified in 1.3% of cases and 3.1% of controls, a difference which was not statistically significant (P>0.05. Conclusion: In present study, the prevalence of atopic dermatitis was comparable in diabetic children and the controls which may be due to difference between races and geographic areas and lack of support for an inverse relationship between the Th2-mediated atopy and th1-mediated autoimmune disorder. Further studies are needed to show the difference in serum IgE and cytokine profiles between the groups.

  16. The role of melatonin in autoimmune and atopic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.R. Calvo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin is the main secretory product synthesized and secreted by the pineal gland during the night. Melatonin is a pleitropic molecule with a wide distribution within phylogenetically distant organisms and has a great functional versatility, including the regulation of circadian and seasonal rhythms and antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. It also possesses the capacity to modulate immune responses by regulation of the TH1/TH2 balance and cytokine production. Immune system eradicates infecting organisms without serious injury to host tissues, but sometimes these responses are inadequately controlled, giving rise to called hypersensitivity diseases, or inappropriately targeted to host tissues, causing the autoimmune diseases. In clinical medicine, the hypersensitivity diseases include the allergic or atopic diseases and the hallmarks of these diseases are the activation of TH2 cells and the production of IgE antibody. Regarding autoimmunity, at the present time we know that the key events in the development of autoimmunity are a failure or breakdown of the mechanisms normally responsible for maintaining self-tolerance in B lymphocytes, T lymphocytes, or both, the recognition of self-antigens by autoreactive lymphocytes, the activation of these cells to proliferate and differentiate into effector cells, and the tissue injury caused by the effector cells and their products. Melatonin treatment has been investigated in atopic diseases, in several animal models of autoimmune diseases, and has been also evaluated in clinical autoimmune diseases. This review summarizes the role of melatonin in atopic diseases (atopic dermatitis and asthma and in several autoimmune diseases, such as arthritis rheumatoid, multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and inflammatory bowel diseases.

  17. Advanced Transport Operating System (ATOPS) utility library software description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinedinst, Winston C.; Slominski, Christopher J.; Dickson, Richard W.; Wolverton, David A.

    1993-01-01

    The individual software processes used in the flight computers on-board the Advanced Transport Operating System (ATOPS) aircraft have many common functional elements. A library of commonly used software modules was created for general uses among the processes. The library includes modules for mathematical computations, data formatting, system database interfacing, and condition handling. The modules available in the library and their associated calling requirements are described.

  18. Evaluating approaches to measuring ocular pain in bovine calves with corneal scarification and infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis-associated corneal ulcerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewell, R D; Millman, S T; Gould, S A; Tofflemire, K L; Whitley, R D; Parsons, R L; Rowe, E W; Liu, F; Wang, C; O'Connor, A M

    2014-03-01

    Infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK) is a common ocular disease in cattle, associated with a 6.8 to 13.6 kg decrease in weaning weight. Antibiotic therapy is available but it is unclear if pain mitigation as an adjunct therapy would reduce the weight loss associated with IBK. Before assessing the impact of pain mitigation therapies, it is first necessary to validate approaches to qualifying ocular pain. The objective of this study was to evaluate approaches to qualifying ocular pain in bovine calves (Bos taurus) with IBK. Our a priori assumption was that scarification or corneal ulcerations consistent with IBK are painful compared to normal eyes. To quantify this difference in pain, we assessed 4 tools: pressure algometry-mechanical nociceptive threshold (PA-MNT), corneal touch thresholds (CTT) obtained with the use of a Cochet-Bonnet aesthesiometer, and assessment for the presence of blepharospasm and photophobia as metrics for pain. Using a 1-eye randomized controlled challenge trial, 31 calves with healthy eyes were randomly allocated to treatment groups, and then a left or right eye was randomly assigned for corneal scarification and inoculation with Moraxella bovoculi or Moraxella bovis. A repeated measures analysis of variance was used for PA-MNT, with significance set at P < 0.05. A log (base 10) transformation was used to stabilize the variance, and Tukey's t tests were used to test differences between assessment days for each landmark. Calves had statistically significantly lower PA-MNT scores (which indicates more pain) the day after scarification relative to baseline measurements (4 d before scarification). For example, at 1 landmark the median PA-MNT (kg/force) prescarification was 4.82 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.92-5.93) and 3.43 (95% CI: 2.79-4.22) postscarification. These data suggest PA-MNT may be a tool for quantifying ocular pain in calves. No differences (P < 0.1) in PA-MNT scores between scarified and not-scarified eyes were

  19. The protective efficacy of pili from different strains of Moraxella bovis within the same serogroup against infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepper, A W; Moore, L J; Atwell, J L; Tennent, J M

    1992-09-01

    Three groups of ten calves were each immunised with a total of 400 micrograms pili prepared from three separate strains of Moraxella bovis in Alhydrogel-oil adjuvant as two divided, equal doses 21 days apart. Groups 1 and 2 each received a monovalent vaccine made from strain 4L and S276R respectively, which belonged to pili serogroup A. Group 3 received vaccine made from pili of strain Maff1, belonging to serogroup F. A further group of ten calves served as non-vaccinated controls. Calves in groups 1 and 2 had developed serogroup A-specific antibody and those in group 3 developed serogroup F-specific antibody, and some evidence of cross-reacting antibody was also detected when measured by an agglutination test using formalin-killed piliated cells of serogroup A strain 4L. Although antibody titres measured against purified pili by ELISA were highest with homologous serogroup antigens, cross-reactive titres to shared epitopes of M. bovis pili were also detected by this method. Ocular challenge of the 40 calves with virulent M. bovis of serogroup A strain S276R was carried out 14 days after the second vaccine dose. All non-vaccinated calves developed infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK). The percentage protection in groups 1 (strain 4L) and 2 (strain S276R) was 60% and 80% respectively (P less than 0.05), with mean lesion scores of 0.7 and 0.3 out of a possible 6.0. The percentage protection of calves in group 3 (strain Maff1) was only 30%, with a mean lesion score of 1.4 compared with 2.2 for non-vaccinated controls. The present findings, together with other evidence indicating that immunity to IBK is serogroup-specific, suggest that inclusion of pili from one representative strain from each of the seven Australian and British serogroups in a polyvalent, subunit vaccine should effectively protect the majority of cattle against IBK caused by most field strains of M. bovis encountered in Australia and the United Kingdom.

  20. Atopic dermatitis in adults: clinical and epidemiological considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Leão Orfali

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic inflammatory disease causing intense pruritus, and with typical clinical features. There are few epidemiological studies concerning AD in adults, as well as little information about its prognostic. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and epidemiological course of adults with AD. METHODS: 80 patients aged above 18 years (mean age = 29 years were selected (30 males and 50 females and interviewed about hospitalization, systemic corticoid usage, age of AD onset, and personal and/or familial history of atopy. Disease severity was evaluated through the Scoring Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD tool. Laboratory examination included IgE serum levels and eosinophil blood count. RESULTS: 71 out of 80 patients referred association with respiratory symptoms (18 had asthma, 17 had rhinitis, and 36 had both conditions; nine out of 80 patients denied any respiratory disease. AD patients were divided in mild (n = 25, moderate (n = 30, and severe (n = 25; 56% had one or more hospitalizations due to AD. A positive association was found between IgE serum levels, eosinophil blood count, and disease severity. CONCLUSION: Adult AD represents a clinical challenge that needs to be better characterized, since it can be misdiagnosed and interferes with the patient's social and personal life. The association of skin and respiratory atopic disease is frequent, and laboratory parameters such as circulating IgE levels and eosinophil blood count may be helpful to assess disease severity.

  1. A comparison between criteria for diagnosing atopic eczema in infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jøhnke, H; Vach, W; Norberg, L A;

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies have shown different estimates of the frequency of atopic eczema (AE) in children. This may be explained by several factors including variations in the definition of AE, study design, age of study group, and the possibility of a changed perception of atopic...... Research Centre (DARC) criteria developed for this study and doctor-diagnosed visible eczema with typical morphology and atopic distribution. Additionally, the U.K. diagnostic criteria based on a questionnaire were used at 1 year of age. Agreement between the four criteria was analysed at each time point......-10%), for the DARC criteria 8.2% (95% CI 6-11%), for visible eczema 12.2% (95% CI 9-16%) and for the U.K. criteria 7.5% (95% CI 5-10%). The pairwise agreement between criteria showed good agreement, with rates varying between 93% and 97% and kappa scores between 0.6 and 0.8. Agreement analysis of diagnoses between...

  2. Melatonin and Atopy: Role in Atopic Dermatitis and Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Marseglia

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin may have important immunostimulatory actions in allergic diseases, in addition to its well-known antioxidant and cytoprotective effects in several inflammatory conditions. The activation of the immune system leads to free radical production associated with decreased melatonin levels and depressed antioxidant enzyme activities in several inflammatory diseases. Many skin disorders, including atopic dermatitis, are accompanied by infiltration and activation of mast cells, which release vasoactive and proinflammatory mediators. Experimental data suggest that melatonin inhibits development of atopic eczema and reduces serum total IgE and IL-4. Allergic asthma is a condition characterized by bronchial hyperresponsiveness and the presence of IgE antibodies in response to inhaled allergens; often there is also enhanced total serum IgE levels. Melatonin regulates smooth muscle tone and influences the immune response. Melatonin may, however, act as a pro-inflammatory agent in asthma leading to bronchial constriction. The safety of melatonin as a sleep-inducing agent has been confirmed in asthmatic subjects, but its routine use is not recommended in bronchial asthma. This review summarizes what is known about the role of melatonin as an immunomodulatory agent in asthma and atopic eczema.

  3. Atopic dermatitis in infants and children in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhar Sandipan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic relapsing eczematous skin disease characterized by pruritus and inflammation and accompanied by cutaneous physiological dysfunction, with a majority of the patients having a personal or family history of "atopic diathesis." The term "atopic diathesis" refers to the presence of allergic rhinitis, bronchial asthma or AD. The universal occurrence of AD is no longer debated. However, published material about its natural history, etiopathogenesis, epidemiology, clinical patterns and management leave a lot to be known in the Indian scenario. In the present write-up, we will try to explore the wealth of knowledge about the disease available in our country and try to unfurl the complex interplay of different factors that are implicated for the development of this condition. The diagnosis of AD is based on a constellation of signs and symptoms. There is no laboratory "gold standard" for the diagnosis of AD. In a majority of the cases, the diagnosis is quite easy. Topical corticosteroids form the mainstay of topical treatment and, along with emollient, are able to control the condition in more than 80% of the cases. However, as use of long-term topical corticosteroid has the potential to produce local and systemic adverse effects, topical tacrolimus has come up as a useful molecule for the long-term control of the disease.

  4. Atopic myelitis in a European woman residing in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacs, Jeremy D; Bodini, Benedetta; Ciccarelli, Olga; Scadding, Glenis K; Thompson, Alan J

    2011-09-01

    Nearly 100 cases of atopic myelitis have been reported in Japan. However, it has only been described in two non-Japanese patients, both from Western Europe. We report a European individual who developed cervical myelitis while resident in Japan. This showed a partial response to corticosteroids. There was no clinical or radiological dissemination for over 5 years, at which time she had a brainstem relapse caused by a new lesion in the medulla oblongata. The patient had high serum total IgE with evidence of allergy to several antigens, including house dust mite and soya. It is possible that the incidence of atopic myelitis may be underestimated where it is not standard practice to measure serum IgE levels in patients with myelopathy. Such cases will instead be subsumed into the diagnostic category of clinically isolated syndrome. However, it remains uncertain whether atopic myelitis is a distinct disease or falls within the spectrum of demyelinating diseases. Further studies are required to fully elucidate the relationship between atopy and the incidence and severity of CNS inflammatory disorders.

  5. Management of Patients with Atopic Dermatitis: The Role of Emollient Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Catherine Mack Correa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis is a common inflammatory skin disorder that afflicts a growing number of young children. Genetic, immune, and environmental factors interact in a complex fashion to contribute to disease expression. The compromised stratum corneum found in atopic dermatitis leads to skin barrier dysfunction, which results in aggravation of symptoms by aeroallergens, microbes, and other insults. Infants—whose immune system and epidermal barrier are still developing—display a higher frequency of atopic dermatitis. Management of patients with atopic dermatitis includes maintaining optimal skin care, avoiding allergic triggers, and routinely using emollients to maintain a hydrated stratum corneum and to improve barrier function. Flares of atopic dermatitis are often managed with courses of topical corticosteroids or calcineurin inhibitors. This paper discusses the role of emollients in the management of atopic dermatitis, with particular emphasis on infants and young children.

  6. Ex Vivo induction of Cytokines by mould components in whole blood of atopic and non-atopic volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Tanja; Sigsgaard, Torben; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva Cecilie

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the time-course release of IL-1beta and IL-8 protein as well as the steady state mRNA level of their genes in human whole blood after stimulation with LPS, beta-1,3-D-glucan and mould extracts. We compared the response of 10 non-atopic and 10 atopic individuals. In parallel......, cytokine protein release and the corresponding steady state mRNA level was determined by the standard ELISA and real-time on-line RT-PCR methods, respectively. Glucan induced the highest level of IL-1beta mRNA and protein release after 3 h. IL-8 was induced at 3 h after glucan, but not after LPS, induction...

  7. Feline atopic dermatitis. A model for Langerhans cell participation in disease pathogenesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Roosje, P. J.; Whitaker-Menezes, D.; Goldschmidt, M. H.; Moore, P F; Willemse, T.; Murphy, G. F.

    1997-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a disorder characterized by cutaneous exanthemata as a consequence of exaggerated eczematous reactions to topical and systemic allergens. Langerhans cells, expressing CD1a and HLA-DR, and dermal dendritic cells, expressing HLA-DR, are known to be potent antigen-presenting cells and are thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. The immunophenotype of lesional skin in atopic dermatitis in humans involves increased numbers of CD1a+/MHC class...

  8. Xerosis is Associated with Atopic Dermatitis, Hand Eczema and Contact Sensitization Independent of Filaggrin Gene Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Johansen, Jeanne D; Zachariae, Claus

    2013-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis, hand eczema and contact sensitization are prevalent disorders, and may, in many cases, be secondary to skin barrier abnormality. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between self-reported generalized xerosis, atopic dermatitis, hand eczema and contact....... Atopic dermatitis and hand eczema were significantly associated with generalized xerosis, whereas contact sensitization (not nickel) showed only a borderline significant association. These results suggest that generalized xerosis may increase the risk of common skin disorders....

  9. Development of atopic dermatitis and its association with prenatal and early life exposures

    OpenAIRE

    Roduit, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Over 20% of children in industrialized countries are affected by atopic dermatitis. From epidemiological studies, it is quite obvious that the worldwide prevalence of atopic dermatitis has considerably increased over the past decades and constitutes a major public health problem. Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that occurs in very early life and frequently precedes the development of asthma and allergic rhinitis during the first several years of life. Although a large...

  10. Sensitization patterns in Compositae-allergic patients with current or past atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Evy; Andersen, Klaus Ejner

    2013-01-01

    -atopics, except that dandelion was an important allergen in children. Cobalt allergy was the most frequent other contact allergy, occurring in 37%. Conclusions. Persons with current or past atopic dermatitis may become sensitized to Compositae at any age, both occupationally and non-occupationally. They should...... be screened for Compositae allergy on equal terms with non-atopics, except that dandelion extract should always be tested in children. Co-sensitization to cobalt was frequent, but probably not related to the plant allergy....

  11. Research statistics in Atopic Eczema: what disease is this?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hon Kam-Lun

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atopic eczema is a common and distressing disease. This study aims to review PubMed indexed research statistics on atopic eczema over a-10 year period to investigate the clinical relevance and research interest about this disease. Methods PubMed (a service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine was searched for the terms “atopic dermatitis” and “eczema”, with limits activated (Humans, Clinical Trial, Meta-Analysis, Randomized Controlled Trial, English, published in the last 10 years, and editorials, letters, practice guidelines, reviews, and animal studies excluded. Journal impact factor (IF is in accordance with Journal Citation Report (JCR 2009, a product of Thomson ISI (Institute for Scientific Information. Results A total of 890 articles were retrieved. Taking out publications that were irrelevant and those without an impact factor, 729 articles were obtained. These articles were grouped into dermatology (n = 337, mean IF: 3.01, allergy/immunology (n = 215, mean IF: 4.89, pediatrics (n = 118, mean IF: 2.53 and miscellaneous subject categories (n = 142, mean IF: 5.10. The impact factors were highest in the miscellaneous category (p = 0.0001, which includes such prestigious journals as the New England journal of Medicine (n = 1, IF: 47.05, the Lancet (n = 4, IF: 30.76 and BMJ (n = 6, IF: 13.66. There was no publication in any family medicine or general practice journal. The British Journal of Dermatology (n = 78, Pediatric Allergy and Immunology (n = 49 and Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (n = 46 had the highest number of publications on the subject. Atopic eczema ranked higher in impact factors in allergy/immunology although more publications appeared in the dermatology category. Conclusions Atopic eczema is a multidisciplinary disease. Its clinical relevance and research interests are definitely beyond that of a mere cutaneous disease. Investigators may

  12. The prevalence of atopic diseases and the patterns of sensitization in adolescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Elisabeth Soegaard; Fomsgaard Kjær, Henrik; Eller, Esben

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atopic diseases are among the most common chronic diseases in adolescents, and it is uncertain whether the prevalence of atopic diseases has reached a plateau or is still increasing. The use of the ISAAC (International Study of Asthma and Allergy in Childhood) questionnaire has provided...... with rhinoconjunctivitis only, rhinoconjunctivitis with concomitant asthma or atopic dermatitis or both 62.5%, 81.5%, 70%, and 100%, respectively, were sensitized, whereas it was 7.7% and 33.3% of children with only asthma or atopic dermatitis. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of rhinoconjunctivitis was high in adolescence...

  13. Lack of association between the MTHFR (C677T) polymorphism and atopic disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, Allan; Thuesen, Betina Heinsbaek; Husemoen, Lise Lotte Nystrup;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Impaired folate metabolism has been suggested as a potential risk factor for the development of asthma and atopic disease. However, there have been conflicting reports on the potential association between atopic disease and a common polymorphism of the methylene-tetrahydrofolate reduc......BACKGROUND: Impaired folate metabolism has been suggested as a potential risk factor for the development of asthma and atopic disease. However, there have been conflicting reports on the potential association between atopic disease and a common polymorphism of the methylene...

  14. Empowering heliotherapy improves clinical outcome and quality of life of psoriasis and atopic dermatitis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karppinen, Toni T; Ylianttila, Lasse; Kautiainen, Hannu; Reunala, Timo; Snellman, Erna

    2015-05-01

    Empowering heliotherapy aims at clinical healing and improved coping with psoriasis and atopic dermatitis, but evidence of long-term effects is scarce. We studied the effect of 2-week empowering heliotherapy in the Canary Islands on clinical outcome and quality of life in 22 psoriasis and 13 atopic dermatitis patients. Empowerment consisted of meeting peers, sharing experiences and performing physical and mental practices. Using the self-administered PASI (SAPASI) psoriasis was alleviated statistically significantly during heliotherapy (p improved (p life quality index (DLQI) improved in both groups (p improvement in psoriasis and atopic dermatitis disease activity, and also in the quality of life of atopic patients.

  15. Increasing Comorbidities Suggest that Atopic Dermatitis Is a Systemic Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Patrick M; Silverberg, Jonathan I; Guttman-Yassky, Emma; Paller, Amy S; Kabashima, Kenji; Amagai, Masayuki; Luger, Thomas A; Deleuran, Mette; Werfel, Thomas; Eyerich, Kilian; Stingl, Georg

    2017-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis comorbidities extend well beyond the march to allergic conditions (food allergy, asthma, allergic rhinitis, allergic conjunctivitis, and eosinophilic esophagitis), suggesting both cutaneous and systemic immune activation. In reviewing atopic dermatitis comorbidities, Councilors of the International Eczema Council found a strong pattern of immune activation in peripheral blood and the propensity to both skin and systemic infections. Associations with cardiovascular, neuropsychiatric, and malignant diseases were increasingly reported, but confirmation of their link with atopic dermatitis requires longitudinal studies. Given the possibility of atopic dermatitis-related systemic immune activation, future investigations of new interventions should concurrently examine the impact on these comorbidities.

  16. Genetic parameters of infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis and its relationship with weight and parasite infestations in Australian tropical Bos taurus cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, A.; O'Neill, C.J.; Thomson, P.C.;

    2012-01-01

    Background: Infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK) or 'pinkeye' is an economically important ocular disease that significantly impacts animal performance. Genetic parameters for IBK infection and its genetic and phenotypic correlations with cattle tick counts, number of helminth (unspecified...... recorded for tick counts, helminth eggs counts as an indicator of intestinal parasites and live weights at several ages including 18 months. Results: Negative genetic correlations were estimated between IBK incidence and weight traits for animals in pre-weaning and post-weaning datasets. Genetic...... correlations among weight measurements were positive, with moderate to high values. Genetic correlations of IBK incidence with tick counts were positive for the pre-weaning and negative for the post-weaning datasets but negative with helminth eggs counts for the pre-weaning dataset and slightly positive...

  17. 儿童泡性角结膜炎25例临床分析%Etiology of children' s phlyctenular keratoconjunctivitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白大勇; 于刚; 崔燕辉; 曹文红; 樊云葳; 陶荣; 吴倩

    2012-01-01

    目的 分析儿童泡性角结膜炎的临床特点.方法 对25例儿童泡性角结膜炎的患者分别行结核菌素试验检测、胸部正位片、过敏原检测、血清总IgE检测,将所得结果进行统计学分析.结果 25例儿童泡性角结膜炎中结核菌素试验呈强阳性4例(16%),阳性7例(28%),弱阳性5例(20%),阴性9例(36%).血清总IgE检测发现,明显升高的患儿14例(56%),升高者7例(28%),未见升高者4 例( 16%).胸部正位片检测发现肺纹理增多者2例(8%).过敏原检测发现,患儿对牛肉、屋尘、猫毛及狗毛皮屑、点青霉分枝孢霉曲霉交链孢霉过敏者各5例;牛奶过敏9例(36%);羊肉过敏10例(40%).相关性分析发现结核菌素试验与血清总IgE检测无线性相关(P =0.493).结论 本研究发现儿童泡性角结膜炎的患者部分结核菌素试验呈强阳性,应当警惕结核菌隐性感染,并适当给予预防性抗痨治疗.84%的患儿血清总IgE升高,说明泡性角结膜炎与Ⅰ型超敏反应也有一定关系.%Objective To analyze the etiology and its relative factor of phlycten-ular keratoconjunctivitis. Methods Twenty-five cases with phlyctenular keratocon-junctivitis were examined by purified protein derivative test( PPD),chest X-ray, anaphy-lactogen,total IgE in serum, then the data were analyzed by statistics. Results PPD test in 4 cases( 16% ) were strong positive,7 cases(28% ) were positive,5 cases(20% ) : were weakly positive,and 9 cases(36% ) were negative. Total IgE in serum in 14 cases (56% ) obviously increasedj cases(28% ) increased,4 cases( 16% ) did not increase. The pulmonary markings in 2 cases(8% ) were more than normal. House dust,beef,cat hair,dog hair,penacin,alternaria,aspergillus fumigalus were found positive respectively in 5 cases by anaphylactogen examination,9 cases(36% ) were found positive in milk, 10 cases(40% ) positive in mutton. There was no linear relation between PPD and total IgE in serum (P = 0

  18. Ceratoconjuntivite cicatricial bilateral associada a líquen plano: relato de caso Lichen planus leading to bilateral cicatrizing keratoconjunctivitis: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Melo Gadelha Pereira Diniz

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Descrevemos um caso de ceratoconjuntivite cicatricial bilateral em uma paciente portadora de líquen plano e apresentamos revisão da literatura mundial sobre esse assunto. Cicatrização conjuntival, com formação de simbléfaro, olho seco, infiltração corneana, neovascularização e afinamento foram os sinais observados. Diagnóstico foi baseado nos achados clínicos e biópsia, após exclusão das causas típicas de ceratoconjuntivite cicatricial.To describe a case of bilateral cicatrizing keratoconjunctivitis in a patient with lichen planus and review the literature. Conjunctiva cicatrization with symblepharon formation, dry eye, corneal infiltration and neovascularization and thinning were the most observed prominent signs. Diagnosis was based on clinical findings and biopsy, after exclusion of typical causes of cicatricial keratoconjuntivitis.

  19. Antigenic relationships of Moraxella bovis isolates recovered from outbreaks of infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis in Argentina, Brazil, and Uruguay between 1983 and 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conceição, Fabrício Rochedo; Paolicchi, Fernando; Cobo, Ana Lia; Gil-Turnes, Carlos

    2003-10-01

    Cross-reactivity indices (CRIs) of 28 isolates of Moraxella bovis recovered from outbreaks of infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis in Argentina (A, 11 isolates), Brazil (B, 7), and Uruguay (U, 10) between 1983 and 2000 were estimated. Hyperimmune sera were produced in rabbits and antibody titres determined with each isolate. Isolates showing CRIs3 70 were placed in the same group. Group I had 13 isolates (A, 1; B, 6; U, 6); group II had 6 isolates (A, 4; U, 2); groups III, IV, and V had 2 isolates each, recovered in Argentina; group VI had 2 isolates, from Uruguay; and group VII had 1 isolate, from Brazil. The CRIs3 70 between vaccine strains and isolates recovered before and after 1990 were 58% and 42%, 50% and 50%, and 33% and 67% with vaccine strains 2419, 2358, and 2439, respectively. Isolate 273, from Uruguay, showed CRIs > 70 with 78% of the isolates and is recommended as the vaccine strain.

  20. Uso da medicação homeopática no tratamento da ceratoconjuntivite primaveril: resultados iniciais Treatment of vernal keratoconjunctivitis with homeopathic medicine: a preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Maciel de Sena

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Apresentar os primeiros resultados do uso da Homeopatia entre os pacientes com conjuntivite primaveril, avaliados no Serviço de Córnea e Doenças Externas do Hospital São Geraldo. MÉTODOS: Foram incluídos no presente estudo 13 pacientes apresentando ceratoconjuntivite primaveril, examinados no período de janeiro de 1998 a dezembro de 1999. A idade média dos pacientes foi de 9,5 anos, sendo nove do sexo masculino e quatro do sexo feminino. Todos os pacientes já haviam feito uso de corticóide tópico antes da sua inclusão no estudo. Antes de iniciar o tratamento homeopático, todos os pacientes foram examinados por um dos autores, sendo acompanhados pelo mesmo médico, mensalmente até os seis meses e depois trimestralmente até completar um ano do tratamento homeopático. O tratamento homeopático foi realizado por meio de uma dose única, via oral, baseando-se na totalidade sintomática do paciente. RESULTADOS: A porcentagem de melhora dos sinais e sintomas, entre os pacientes, foi de: lacrimejamento e dor ocular 100%; secreção ocular 92%; sensação de corpo estranho 86%; prurido e fotofobia 84%; relatavam diminuição ou ausência do desconforto que a ceratoconjuntivite primaveril provocava nas suas atividades diárias 84%; nódulos de Trantas 62,5%; hiperemia conjuntival 61%; erosões epiteliais 58% e hipertrofia da papila tarsal 8%. CONCLUSÃO: Este estudo sugere efeito benéfico da medicação homeopática no tratamento da ceratoconjuntivite primaveril, com melhora dos sinais e sintomas da doença. Sugere-se a realização de estudo duplo-cego, com maior número de casos, para a confirmação desses resultados.PURPOSE: To present a preliminary report of homeopathic medicine in the treatment of vernal keratoconjunctivitis, at the Cornea service, of the São Geraldo Hospital. METHODS: Thirteen patients with vernal keratoconjunctivitis, examined from January 1998 to December 1999, were included in the present study

  1. Prevalence of atopic dermatitis, asthma, allergic rhinitis, and hand and contact dermatitis in adolescents. The Odense Adolescence Cohort Study on Atopic Diseases and Dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørtz, Charlotte G; Lauritsen, J M; Bindslev-Jensen, C

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atopic diseases are common in children and adolescents. However, epidemiological knowledge is sparse for hand eczema and allergic contact dermatitis in this age group. Furthermore, no population-based studies have evaluated the prevalence of atopic diseases and hand and contact...... or past allergic contact dermatitis was found in 7.2% (girls 11.3% vs. boys 2.5%). Contact allergy was most common to nickel (8.6%) and fragrance mix (1.8%). CONCLUSIONS: High prevalence figures were found for atopic diseases, hand eczema and allergic contact dermatitis, and the diseases were closely...

  2. Prevalence, molecular diagnosis and treatment of Mycoplasma conjunctivae isolated from infectious keratoconjunctivitis affected Lohi sheep maintained at Livestock Experiment Station, Bahadurnagar, Okara, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzad, Waseem; Munir, Rashid; Rana, Mohammad Younus; Ahmad, Rashid; Khan, Mohammad Sarwar; Akbar, Ghulam; Ijaz, Mohammad; Mehmood, Fayyaz

    2013-03-01

    Mycoplasma conjunctivae are etiological agents of infectious keratoconjunctivitis (IKC), commonly known as pink-eye in domestic sheep, goats and other wild animals in many parts of the world. A few young Lohi lambs maintained at Livestock Experiment Station (LES), Bahadurnagar, Okara, Pakistan showed clinical signs and symptoms of conjunctivitis, keratitis, severe lacrimation and varying degree of blindness. During January to March, 2011, a total of 36 ocular swabs were collected from IKC affected animals and were processed for isolation, identification, and characterization of M. conjunctivae. Sixteen (44.44 %) out of 36 samples showed turbidity in PPLO broth. Twelve (75 %) out of 16 broth samples showed colony growth on PPLO agar. All 16 (44.44 %) out of 36 turbid broth samples, 12 (75 %) out of 16 cultured on agar plate samples, and 21 (59 %) out of 36 sheep ocular direct swab samples were found positive for M. conjunctivae through polymerase chain reaction test by using M. conjunctivae-specific primer pair McoF1 and McoR1 and detecting a 750 base pair fragment on agarose gel. Topical application of 0.5 % sterile solution of gentamycin (100 mg/ml) (Gentafar 10 %, FARVET, Netherlands) proved suitable for the treatment of IKC in Lohi lambs as all clinical signs of IKC disappeared after 5 days of treatment with this antibiotic. This is the first report about the prevalence, molecular diagnosis, and treatment of M. conjunctivae in Lohi sheep affected with infectious keratoconjunctivitis at LES, Bahadurnagar, Okara, Pakistan.

  3. Using family atopy scores to identify the risk of atopic dermatitis in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melisa Anggraeni

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Atopic dermatitis is the first manifestation of allergic disease in early life. Early interventions may prevent the development of allergy disease. Allergy trace cards have been used to identify the level of allergic risk, based on family atopy scores. Because environmental factors may also influence the development of atopic dermatitis, the usefulness of the allergy trace card needs to be reevaluated. Objective To compare the incidence of atopic dermatitis in infants aged 0-4 months with total family atopy scores of > 0 to those with scores of 0. Methods We conducted this cohort study from June 1, 2012 to December 31, 2012 at Sanglah Hospital, Denpasar. Family atopy score was tabulated from all pregnant woman in the Obstetric Outpatient Clinic and the Maternity Room. Subjects were divided into two groups based on their total family atopy score: those with scores > 0 and those with scores of 0. The appearance of atopic dermatitis symptoms in the infants were evaluated until they reached 4 months of age. The incidence of atopic dermatitis in two groups was compared using Chi-square test. Results The incidence of atopic dermatitis in this study was 10.9%. The group with total family atopy scores of 0 had a significantly higher incidence of atopic dermatitis than the group with scores > 0 (adjusted RR 22.5; 95%CI 8.8 to 57.0; P = 0.001. Conclusion The incidence of atopic dermatitis is higher in infants with total family atopy score > 0 and this group has a 22.5 times higher risk of atopic dermatitis compared to infants with total family atopy score of 0. Allergy trace cards are relevant in differentiating the risk of atopy with regards to development of atopic dermatitis. We suggest that family atopy scores be evaluated during antenatal care in order to limit the development of atopic dermatitis in infants. [Paediatr Indones. 2014;54:330-7.].

  4. IgE, mast cells, and eosinophils in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fu-Tong; Goodarzi, Heidi; Chen, Huan-Yuan

    2011-12-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease with specific immune and inflammatory mechanisms. Atopy is among the major features of the diagnosis criteria for AD but is not an essential feature. Thus, patients diagnosed with AD can be atopic or non-atopic. This review focuses on the role of IgE, mast cells, and eosinophils in the pathogenesis of AD. The known functions of IgE in allergic inflammation suggest that IgE and IgE-mediated mast cell and eosinophil activation contribute to AD, but direct evidence supporting this is scarce. The level of IgE (thus the degree of allergic sensitization) is associated with severity of AD and contributed by abnormality of skin barrier, a key feature of AD. The function of IgE in development of AD is supported by the beneficial effect of anti-IgE therapy in a number of clinical studies. The role of mast cells in AD is suggested by the increase in the mast cell number and mast cell activation in AD lesions and the association between mast cell activation and AD. It is further suggested by their role in mouse models of AD as well as by the effect of therapeutic agents for AD that can affect mast cells. The role of eosinophils in AD is suggested by the presence of eosinophilia in AD patients and eosinophil infiltrates in AD lesions. It is further supported by information that links AD to cytokines and chemokines associated with production, recruitment, and activation of eosinophils.

  5. Autoimmune and Atopic Disorders and Risk of Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hollander, Peter; Rostgaard, Klaus; Smedby, Karin E;

    2015-01-01

    Results from previous investigations have shown associations between the risk of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and a history of autoimmune and atopic diseases, but it remains unknown whether these associations apply to all types of HL or only to specific subtypes. We investigated immune diseases...... and the risk of classical HL in a population-based case-control study that included 585 patients and 3,187 controls recruited from October 1999 through August 2002. We collected information on immune diseases through telephone interviews and performed serological analyses of specific immunoglobulin E...

  6. Erectile Dysfunction in Male Adults With Atopic Dermatitis and Psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, Alexander; Hansen, Peter R; Gislason, Gunnar H;

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Patients with psoriasis have increased risk of cardiovascular disease, but data on atopic dermatitis (AD) are less clear-cut. However, it is well-established that erectile dysfunction (ED) can serve as a risk marker for coronary disease. AIM: To investigate the incidence, prevalence......, socioeconomic status, health care consumption, smoking, alcohol abuse, diabetes, and cholesterol-lowering drug use. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The outcome was initiation of pharmacotherapy used for treatment of ED. RESULTS: The sample consisted of 1,756,679 Danish men (age range = 30-100 years), of which 2...

  7. Alternative, Complementary, and Forgotten Remedies for Atopic Dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison L. Goddard

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis, perhaps more than other dermatologic diseases, has garnered much attention in the realm of alternative medicine. This may be because its etiopathogenesis is incompletely understood, it is increasingly common, and it waxes and wanes often without clear precipitants, opening up many opportunities for misinterpretation. Herein we explore the evidence for a number of different alternative and complementary therapies, from textiles to vitamin supplements. By definition, none have enough data to be deemed “effective” in a conventional sense, but it is hopeful that some show promising evidence that may one day lead to mainstream acceptance with further research.

  8. A Pragmatic Approach to Patch Testing Atopic Dermatitis Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jennifer K; Jacob, Sharon E; Nedorost, Susan T

    2016-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) may complicate the clinical course of atopic dermatitis (AD), and patch testing remains the criterion standard for diagnosing ACD. To date, there have been no guidelines or consensus recommendations on when and how to patch test individuals with AD. Failure...... to patch test when appropriate may result in overlooking an important and potentially curable complicating comorbidity. In this article, we present consensus recommendations regarding when to perform patch testing in the AD patient, best practices, and common pitfalls. Patch testing should be considered...

  9. Advanced Transport Operating System (ATOPS) control display unit software description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slominski, Christopher J.; Parks, Mark A.; Debure, Kelly R.; Heaphy, William J.

    1992-01-01

    The software created for the Control Display Units (CDUs), used for the Advanced Transport Operating Systems (ATOPS) project, on the Transport Systems Research Vehicle (TSRV) is described. Module descriptions are presented in a standardized format which contains module purpose, calling sequence, a detailed description, and global references. The global reference section includes subroutines, functions, and common variables referenced by a particular module. The CDUs, one for the pilot and one for the copilot, are used for flight management purposes. Operations performed with the CDU affects the aircraft's guidance, navigation, and display software.

  10. Evaluation Of Prick Test In Atopic Dermatitis And Chronic Urticaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhar Sandipan

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available “Prick test” was carried out in 15 patients with atopic dermatitis (AD and 10 patients with chronic urticaria (CU. Of the various aeroallergens tested, house dust mite (HDM, pollens, aspergillus furnigatus and insects were found to be most commonly positive. The common food allergens showing prick test positivity were egg white, fish, milk, brinjal, dal, groundnut and banana. Use of nasal filters showed 10-20% improvement in AD and 5 â€" 10% improvement in urticaria. Withdrawal of the responsible food article(s showed 20-30% improvement in patients with AD and urticaria.

  11. Geographical variations in the prevalence of atopic sensitization in six study sites across Canada

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan-Yeung, M; Anthonisen, N R; Becklake, M R;

    2010-01-01

    Geographical variations in atopic sensitization in Canada have not been described previously. This study used the standardized protocol of the European Community Respiratory Health Survey-1 (ECRHS-1) to investigate the distribution and predictors of atopic sensitization in six sites across Canada...

  12. Genomic Insights into the Atopic Eczema-Associated Skin Commensal Yeast Malassezia sympodialis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gioti, Anastasia; Nystedt, Bjorn; Li, Wenjun; Xu, Jun; Andersson, Anna; Averette, Anna F.; Muench, Karin; Wang, Xuying; Kappauf, Catharine; Kingsbury, Joanne M.; Kraak, Bart; Walker, Louise A.; Johansson, Henrik J.; Holm, Tina; Lehtio, Janne; Stajich, Jason E.; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Kahmann, Regine; Kennell, John C.; Cardenas, Maria E.; Lundeberg, Joakim; Saunders, Charles W.; Boekhout, Teun; Dawson, Thomas L.; Munro, Carol A.; de Groot, Piet W. J.; Butler, Geraldine; Heitman, Joseph; Scheynius, Annika

    2013-01-01

    Malassezia commensal yeasts are associated with a number of skin disorders, such as atopic eczema/dermatitis and dandruff, and they also can cause systemic infections. Here we describe the 7.67-Mbp genome of Malassezia sympodialis, a species associated with atopic eczema, and contrast its genome rep

  13. Importance of genetic factors in the etiology of atopic dermatitis: a twin study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Simon F; Ulrik, Charlotte S; Kyvik, Kirsten O;

    2007-01-01

    ?" Latent factor models of genetic and environmental influences were fitted to the observed data using maximum likelihood methods. The overall lifetime prevalence of atopic dermatitis was 7.3%. A cotwin of an affected identical twin had a sevenfold increased risk of atopic dermatitis compared...

  14. Association between non-atopic hand eczema and interleukin-13 gene polymorphism in Taiwanese nursing population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yin-Chun; Tu, Hung-Pin; Wu, Ching-Shuang; Ko, Ying-Chin; Yu, Hsin-Su; Lu, Yi-Wei; Li, Wan-Chen; Chen, Gwo-Shing; Lan, Cheng-Che E

    2012-12-01

    Chronic hand eczema is an important occupational skin disease with atopic dermatitis (AD) and wet work being the most important risk factors. This study was launched to analyse the potential association between AD-related inflammation genes and development of non-atopic hand eczema among nurses in University Hospital. Atopic eczema, non-atopic hand dermatitis and control groups were identified. The association between occurrence of non-atopic hand eczema and interleukin (IL)-13, IL-4 and IL-5 gene variants was analysed. IL13 rs20541 A allele [assuming recessive model; odds ratio (OR) = 3.38, 95% CI: (1.63-7.00)] showed association with development of non-atopic hand eczema. Additive score analyses showed combination of this gene variant with previously identified risk factors including certain SPINK5 polymorphism and more than 10 years of work experience conferred highest risk for development of non-atopic hand eczema. As non-atopic hand eczema made up significant portion of occupational skin diseases, further studies should be focused on this commonly encountered skin condition.

  15. Lower risk of atopic disorders in whole cell pertussis-vaccinated children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.M.D. Bernsen (Roos); J.C. de Jongste (Johan); J.C. van der Wouden (Hans)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThis study addressed whether whole cell pertussis-vaccinated children have a different risk of atopic disorders compared with children who did not receive this vaccination. Data on vaccination status, atopic disorders and child and family characteristics of the children

  16. Behavior modification: a nursing approach for young children with atopic eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, P I

    2001-02-01

    Managing atopic eczema represents one of the most challenging aspects of dermatology nursing, especially in children. A main contributing factor to the difficulty in management is the unrelenting pruritus experienced by sufferers. A practice model for behavior modification can be an effective nursing strategy in the management of pruritus and scratch associated with atopic eczema.

  17. Recall Bias in Childhood Atopic Diseases Among Adults in The Odense Adolescence Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortz, Charlotte G; Andersen, Klaus E; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common disease in childhood and an important risk factor for the later development of other atopic diseases. Many publications on childhood AD use questionnaires based on information obtained in adulthood, which introduce the possibility of recall bias. In a prospectiv...

  18. Severity of atopic disease inversely correlates with intestinal microbiota diversity and butyrate-producing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nylund, L.; Nermes, M.; Isolauri, E.; Salminen, S.; Vos, de W.M.; Satokari, R.

    2015-01-01

    The reports on atopic diseases and microbiota in early childhood remain contradictory and both decreased and increased microbiota diversity have been associated with atopic eczema. In this study, the intestinal microbiota signatures associated with the severity of eczema in 6-month-old infants were

  19. Early childhood environment related to microbial exposure and the occurrence of atopic disease at school age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Meer, G; Janssen, NAH; Brunekreef, B

    2005-01-01

    Background: There is a growing body of evidence that the early childhood environment with respect to day care attendance, older siblings, pet ownership, and early life airway infections may protect from developing atopic disease. Few studies have distinguished between atopic sensitization and sympto

  20. Atopic dermatitis in dogs_novel insights into mechanisms of disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlotter, Y.M.

    2009-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis in dogs Novel insights into mechanisms of disease Atopic dermatitis in dogs is the most important canine pruritic disorder, described for the first time in 1971. It is defined as a genetically-predisposed inflammatory and pruritic allergic skin disease with characteristic clinical

  1. Prebiotics and probiotics: the prevention and reduction in severity of atopic dermatitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foolad, N; Armstrong, A W

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this review was to identify whether supplementation with prebiotics and/or probiotics help prevent the development or reduce the severity of atopic dermatitis in children less than three years of age. Since 1997, immunostimulatory supplements, such as prebiotics and probiotics, have been investigated. Various supplementations include probiotics (single strain or mix), probiotics with formula, probiotics mix with prebiotics, and prebiotics. In this narrative review, we examined 13 key articles on prebiotics and/or probiotics, and their effects on infant atopic dermatitis. Among the selected studies, a total of 3,023 participants received supplements or placebo. Eight out of the 13 (61.5%) studies reported a significant effect on the prevention of atopic dermatitis after supplementation with probiotics and/or prebiotics. Five out of the 13 (38.5%) studies indicated significant reduction in the severity of atopic dermatitis after supplementation. Based on the available studies, supplementation with certain probiotics (Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG) appears to be an effective approach for the prevention and reduction in severity of atopic dermatitis. A mix of specific probiotic strains prevented atopic dermatitis among infants. Based on studies with prebiotics, there was a long-term reduction in the incidence of atopic dermatitis. Supplementation with prebiotics and probiotics appears useful for the reduction in the severity of atopic dermatitis. Additional interventional studies exploring prebiotics and probiotics are imperative before recommendations can be made.

  2. Analysis of food allergy in atopic dermatitis patients - association with concomitant allergic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarmila Celakovská

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A few reports demonstrate the comorbidity of food allergy and allergic march in adult patients. Aims and Objectives: To evaluate, if there is some relation in atopic dermatitis patients at the age 14 years and older who suffer from food allergy to common food allergens to other allergic diseases and parameters as bronchial asthma, allergic rhinitis, duration of atopic dermatitis, family history and onset of atopic dermatitis. Materials and Methods: Complete dermatological and allergological examination was performed; these parameters were examined: food allergy (to wheat flour, cow milk, egg, peanuts and soy, the occurrence of bronchial asthma, allergic rhinitis, duration of atopic dermatitis, family history and onset of atopic dermatitis. The statistical evaluation of the relations among individual parameters monitored was performed. Results: Food allergy was altogether confirmed in 65 patients (29% and these patients suffer significantly more often from bronchial asthma and allergic rhinitis. Persistent atopic dermatitis lesions and positive data in family history about atopy are recorded significantly more often in patients with confirmed food allergy to examined foods as well. On the other hand, the onset of atopic dermatitis under 5 year of age is not recorded significantly more often in patients suffering from allergy to examined foods. Conclusion: Atopic dermatitis patients suffering from food allergy suffer significantly more often from allergic rhinitis, bronchial asthma, persistent eczematous lesions and have positive data about atopy in their family history.

  3. Perceived stress and risk of adult-onset asthma and other atopic disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rod, N H; Kristensen, T S; Lange, Peter;

    2012-01-01

    of adult-onset asthma, allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, and asthma/bronchitis medication. METHODS: Participants (n = 9785) from the Copenhagen City Heart Study, Denmark, free of atopic disorders at baseline in 1981-1983 were asked questions on stress intensity and frequency. They were followed...... for first-time asthma hospitalization in nationwide registers until 2010, with...

  4. A measurement of the Λ$0\\atop{b}$ lifetime at the D0 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewin, Marcus Philip [Lancaster Univ. (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-01

    This thesis describes a measurement of the lifetime of the Λ$0\\atop{b}$ baryon, performed using data from proton-antiproton collisions at a centre of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The decay Λ$0\\atop{b}$ → Λ$+\\atop{c}$μ-$\\bar{v}$μX was reconstructed in approximately 1.3 fbμ-1 of data recorded by the D0 detector in 2002-2006 during Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. A signal of 4437 ± 329 Λ$+\\atop{c}$μ- pairs was obtained, and the Λ$0\\atop{b}$ lifetime was measured using a binned X2 fit, which gives a value {tau}(Λ$0\\atop{b}$) = 1.290$+0.091\\atop{-1.110}$(stat)$+0.085\\atop{-0.091}$(syst) ps. This result is consistent with the world average and is one of the most precise measurements of this quantity.

  5. Allergen-induced cytokine production, atopic disease, IgE, and wheeze in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Contreras, JP; Ly, NR; Gold, DR; He, HZ; Wand, M; Weiss, ST; Perkins, DL; Platts-Mills, TAE; Finn, PW

    2003-01-01

    Background: The early childhood allergen-induced immune responses associated with atopic disease and IgE production in early life are not well understood. Objective: We assessed the relationship of allergen-induced cytokine production by PBMCs to both atopic disease and to IgE increase in a cohort o

  6. Importance of genetic factors in the etiology of atopic dermatitis: a twin study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Simon F; Ulrik, Charlotte S; Kyvik, Kirsten O;

    2007-01-01

    ?" Latent factor models of genetic and environmental influences were fitted to the observed data using maximum likelihood methods. The overall lifetime prevalence of atopic dermatitis was 7.3%. A cotwin of an affected identical twin had a sevenfold increased risk of atopic dermatitis compared......The susceptibility to develop atopic dermatitis can be attributed both to genetic and environmental causes. We estimated the relative impact of genetic and environmental factors in the etiology of atopic dermatitis in a population-based sample of twins. From the birth cohorts of 1953-1982 who were...... enrolled in The Danish Twin Registry, a total of 11,515 twin pairs were identified in a nationwide questionnaire survey. Subjects were classified as atopic dermatitis cases when responding affirmatively to the question, "Do you have, or have you ever had, eczema in the folds of your elbows or knees...

  7. The Importance of Acidification in Atopic Eczema: An Underexplored Avenue for Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panther, David J; Jacob, Sharon E

    2015-05-18

    Atopic dermatitis is a form of dermatitis commonly seen in children and adults. Its pathophysiology is complex and is centered on the barrier function of the epidermis. An important aspect of the skin's barrier is pH, which in turn affects a number of parameters such as the skin flora, protease function, and mediators of inflammation and pruritus. Normal pH for non-neonatal skin is acidic and ranges from 4 to 6. Skin pH in atopic dermatitis patients is often increased into the neutral to basic range, and the resulting cascade of changes contributes to the phenotype of atopic dermatitis. Therefore, the maintenance of normal skin pH remains an important topic in understanding and treating atopic dermatitis. This article will review skin pH and its impact on normal barrier function, pathological pH changes in atopic dermatitis, and the therapeutic considerations related to restoring and maintaining pH balance.

  8. Thymus is enlarged in children with current atopic dermatitis. A cross-sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anne Braae; Andersen, G.; Jeppesen, D.L.;

    2005-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a common skin disorder of unknown aetiology with peak incidence in early childhood. The disease is associated with peripheral T-cell accumulation in the skin. The thymus is a key organ of the cellular immune response early in life. We hypothesized that atopic dermatitis...... is associated with an unbalanced establishment of the peripheral T-lymphocyte system. This cross-sectional study was performed to compare thymus sizes in patients with atopic dermatitis and healthy controls. Thirty-seven children with current atopic dermatitis were enrolled and compared with 29 healthy controls....... An interview and medical examination were performed by one doctor, an ultrasound scan was performed within 3 days of the examination, and the thymus index, a marker of thymus size, was measured. The thymus index was on average 32% higher (95% CI 3%-67%) in children with active atopic dermatitis compared...

  9. Common loss-of-function variants of the epidermal barrier protein filaggrin are a major predisposing factor for atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmer, Colin N A; Irvine, Alan D; Terron-Kwiatkowski, Ana

    2006-01-01

    Atopic disease, including atopic dermatitis (eczema), allergy and asthma, has increased in frequency in recent decades and now affects approximately 20% of the population in the developed world. Twin and family studies have shown that predisposition to atopic disease is highly heritable. Although...

  10. Breastfeeding and atopic eczema in Japanese infants: The Osaka Maternal and Child Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Keiko; Sasaki, Satoshi; Kiyohara, Chikako; Ohya, Yukihiro; Fukushima, Wakaba; Yokoyama, Tetsuji; Hirota, Yoshio

    2009-05-01

    Epidemiological studies associated with breastfeeding have provided conflicting results about whether it is preventive or a risk factor for atopic eczema in children. The current prospective study investigated the relationship between breastfeeding and the risk of atopic eczema in Japan. A birth cohort of 763 infants was followed. The first survey during pregnancy and the second survey between 2 and 9 months postpartum collected information on potential confounding factors and atopic eczema status. Data on breastfeeding and symptoms of atopic eczema were obtained from questionnaires in the third survey from 16 to 24 months postpartum. The following variables were a priori selected as potential confounders: maternal age, maternal and paternal history of asthma, atopic eczema, and allergic rhinitis, indoor domestic pets (cats, dogs, birds, or hamsters), family income, maternal and paternal education, maternal smoking during pregnancy, baby's sex, baby's birth weight, baby's older siblings, household smoking in the same room as the infant, and time of delivery before the third survey. In the third survey, 142 infants (18.6%) were revealed to have developed atopic eczema based on criteria of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood. In an overall analysis, neither exclusive nor partial breastfeeding was significantly related to the risk of atopic eczema. After excluding 64 infants identified with suspected atopic eczema in the second survey, both exclusive breastfeeding for 4 months or more and partial breastfeeding for 6 months or more were independently associated with an increased risk of atopic eczema only among infants with no parental history of allergic disorders [multivariate odds ratios were 2.41 (95% confidence interval, 1.10-5.55) and 3.39 (95% confidence interval, 1.20-12.36), respectively]. The authors found that, overall, neither exclusive nor partial breastfeeding had a strong impact on the risk of atopic eczema. However, a parental

  11. Evaluation of self-esteem and dermatological quality of life in adolescents with atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İjlal Erturan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Atopic dermatitis is a chronic, inflammatory skin disease characterized by itchy skin lesions. Since adolescents are intensely interested in their physical appearance, chronic skin diseases in this period can adversely affect the development of self esteem. Atopic dermatitis is a skin disease that affects the appearance and there is an heightened attention to the body image in adolescence which is an important period of time in the development of self-esteem. Therefore, we aimed to investigate self-esteem and dermatological quality of life in adolescents with atopic dermatitis. Materials and Methods: Thirty-three patients with atopic dermatitis and 33 healthy controls were included in the study. The Piers-Harris Children’s Self-Concept Scale and the Children’s Dermatology Life Quality Index (CDLQI were used for determining self-esteem and quality of life. The Scoring of Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD Index was used to assess the severity of atopic dermatitis. Results: It was found that patient group had lower self-esteem than healthy controls according to the Piers-Harris Children’s Self-Concept Scale. A statistically significant difference was observed in happiness/satisfaction and anxiety subscale scores between the patients and healthy controls while there was no significant difference between the other sub-scale scores. Mean value of dermatological quality of life in patients with atopic dermatitis was significantly lower than in healthy controls. A moderate negative correlation was found between self-esteem and CDLQI scores among adolescents with atopic dermatitis. Discussion: This study results have shown that self-esteem and dermatological quality of life were adversely affected in adolescents with atopic dermatitis irrespective of gender. These patients should be examined psychiatrically besides dermatological examination and treatment. We suggest that improvement will be observed in self-esteem and quality of

  12. A study of white dermographism in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, S S; Edwards, C; Marks, R

    1996-02-01

    Vascular responses of 15 adults with atopic dermatitis (AD), 15 with psoriasis and 15 with normal skin were studied using an automated dermographometer we have designed. The type of colour change, time to onset and the duration of responses were recorded after a constant stroking force was applied to the skin of each subject. Of the 15 patients with atopic dermatitis, 11 had white dermographism (WD) with abnormal looking skin and four had red dermographism (RD) with normal looking skin. All the control subjects had RD. WD in AD had a significantly longer time to onset and shorter duration of response than RD in controls (P < 0.01), whereas RD in AD had a significantly shorter duration of response than RD in controls (P < 0.01). WD in AD changed to RD after topical corticosteroid treatment and this post-treatment RD was quantitatively similar to the RD in AD. We have quantified, for the first time, a subnormal form of RD in clinically normal skin of patients with AD, which is different from that of the RD in normal subjects. We have also shown that WD in AD is altered to this subnormal form of RD after treatment with topical coricosteroids.

  13. What Should General Practice Trainees Learn about Atopic Eczema?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepani Munidasa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Effective atopic eczema (AE control not only improves quality of life but may also prevent the atopic march. The Royal College of General Practitioners’ (RCGP curriculum does not currently provide specific learning outcomes on AE management. We aimed to gain consensus on learning outcomes to inform curriculum development. A modified Delphi method was used with questionnaires distributed to gather the views of a range of health care professionals (HCPs including general practitioners (GPs, dermatologists, dermatology nurses and parents of children with AE attending a dedicated paediatric dermatology clinic. Ninety-one questionnaires were distributed to 61 HCPs and 30 parents; 81 were returned. All agreed that learning should focus on the common clinical features, complications and management of AE and the need to appreciate its psychosocial impact. Areas of divergence included knowledge of alternative therapies. Parents felt GPs should better understand how to identify, manage and refer severe AD and recognized the value of the specialist eczema nurse. Dermatologists and parents highlighted inconsistencies in advice regarding topical steroids. This study identifies important areas for inclusion as learning outcomes on AE management in the RCGP curriculum and highlights the importance of patients and parents as a valuable resource in the development of medical education.

  14. Characterization of food allergies in patients with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jaryoung; Kim, Jungyun; Cho, Sunheui; Noh, Geunwoong; Lee, Sang Sun

    2013-04-01

    We examined the characteristics of food allergy prevalence and suggested the basis of dietary guidelines for patients with food allergies and atopic dermatitis. A total of 2,417 patients were enrolled in this study. Each subject underwent a skin prick test as well as serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) measurement. A double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge was conducted using milk, eggs, wheat, and soybeans, and an oral food challenge was performed using beef, pork, and chicken. Food allergy prevalence was found among 50.7% in patients with atopic dermatitis. Among patients with food allergies (n = 1,225), the prevalence of non-IgE-mediated food allergies, IgE-mediated food allergies, and mixed allergies was discovered in 94.9%, 2.2%, and 2.9% of the patients, respectively. Food allergy prevalence, according to food item, was as follows: eggs = 21.6%, milk = 20.9%, wheat = 11.8%, soybeans = 11.7%, chicken = 11.7%, pork = 8.9% and beef = 9.2%. The total number of reactions to different food items in each patient was also variable at 45.1%, 30.6%, 15.3%, 5.8%, 2.2%, and 1.0% for 1 to 6 reactions, respectively. The most commonly seen combination in patients with two food allergies was eggs and milk. The clinical severity of the reactions observed in the challenge test, in the order of most to least severe, were wheat, beef, soybeans, milk, pork, eggs, and chicken. The minimum and maximum onset times of food allergy reactions were 0.2-24 hrs for wheat, 0.5-48 hrs for beef, 1.0-24 hrs for soybeans, 0.7-24 hrs for milk, 3.0-24 hrs for pork, 0.01-72 hrs for eggs, and 3.0-72 hrs for chicken. In our study, we examined the characteristics of seven popular foods. It will be necessary, however, to study a broader range of foods for the establishment of a dietary guideline. Our results suggest that it may be helpful to identify food allergies in order to improve symptoms in patients with atopic dermatitis.

  15. The multiple factors affecting the association between atopic dermatitis and contact sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyssen, J P; McFadden, J P; Kimber, I

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis are both common skin diseases having an immune pathogenesis. There has been considerable interest about their inter-relationships with regard to altered susceptibility. Recent investigations have shed new light on this important question, and in this article, we explore whether there is evidence that atopic dermatitis affects the risk of contact sensitization and allergic contact dermatitis. The use of topical products to treat xerotic and inflamed skin in atopic dermatitis often results in a higher prevalence of sensitization to, for example, fragrances and other ingredients in emollients. Moreover, the prevalence of metal allergy seems to be increased, probably due to compromised chelation of the metals in the stratum corneum of patients with atopic dermatitis. However, conversely, the T-helper cell 2 bias that characterizes immune responses in atopic dermatitis appears to lower the risk of contact sensitization compared to healthy controls. Based on these observations, we conclude that multiple factors affect the association between atopic dermatitis and contact sensitization, and that these need to be appreciated in the clinical management of atopic dermatitis patients.

  16. Toxocariasis might be an important cause of atopic myelitis in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin-Young; Kim, Byoung-Joon; Lee, Sang-Pyo; Jeung, Yun-Jin; Oh, Mi-Jung; Park, Min-Su; Paeng, Jae-Won; Lee, Byung-Jae; Choi, Dong-Chull

    2009-12-01

    Atopic myelitis is defined as myelitis with atopic diasthesis but the cause is still unknown. Toxocariasis is one of the common causes of hyperIgEaemia that may lead to neurologic manifestations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the sero-prevalence of Toxocara specific IgG Ab among the atopic myelitis patients. We evaluated the medical records of 37 patients with atopic myelitis whose conditions were diagnosed between March 2001 and August 2007. Among them, the 33 sera were analyzed for specific serum IgG Ab to Toxocara excretory-secretory antigens (TES). All of 37 patients had hyperIgEaemia. Specific IgE to D. pteronyssinus and D. farinae was detected in 22 (64.7%) and 34 (100%) patients, respectively, of the 34 patients. Thirty-one of 33 patients (93.9%) were found to be positive by TES IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Based on the image findings of eosinophilic infiltrations in the lung and liver, 8 patients had positive results. These results inferred that the prevalence of toxocariasis was high in patients with atopic myelitis. Our results suggest that toxocariasis might be an important cause of atopic myelitis and Toxocara ELISA is essential for evaluating the causes of atopic myelitis.

  17. Changes of epidermal mu-opiate receptor expression and nerve endings in chronic atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigliardi-Qi, M; Lipp, B; Sumanovski, L T; Buechner, S A; Bigliardi, P L

    2005-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that neuropeptides such as a substance P, neurotrophins or beta-endorphin, an endogenous agonist for mu-opioid receptor, are involved in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis in which mental stress and scratching deteriorate the disease. mu-Opioid receptor, a G-protein-coupled receptor, can be downregulated and internalized by agonists and other factors in vitro. In this study, we investigated the regulation of mu-opioid receptor and nerve endings in atopic dermatitis patients. Skin biopsies from atopic dermatitis patients revealed a significant downregulation of mu-opiate receptor expression in epidermis of atopic dermatitis. Permeabilization of the skin showed that the receptor in keratinocytes from atopic dermatitis is internalized. The mRNA expression pattern of the mu-opiate receptor is different in epidermis taken from patients with chronic atopic dermatitis compared to normal skin. In atopic dermatitis, the mRNA is concentrated in the subcorneal layers of the epidermis and in normal skin in the suprabasal layers. Staining of the nerve endings using protein gene product 9.5 shows a different pattern of epidermal nerve endings in normal skin compared to atopic dermatitis. In normal skin, the epidermal nerve endings are rather thick. However, in atopic dermatitis, the epidermal nerve endings are thin and run straight through the epidermis. Based on these observations and combining the 'intensity' and 'pattern' hypothesis, we propose a new theory especially for histamine-unrelated, peripheral induction of chronic pruritus. We suggest that 'itch' is elicited in the epidermal unmyelinated nerve C-fibers and 'pain' in the dermal unmyelinated nerve fibers. The downregulation of the opioid receptor in the epidermis contributes to the chronic itching. We call this new hypothesis the 'layer hypothesis'.

  18. Pathological changes in platelet histamine oxidases in atopic eczema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhold Kiehl

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased plasma histamine levels were associated with significantly lowered diamine and type B monoamine oxidase activities in platelet-rich plasma of atopic eczema (AE patients. The diamine oxidase has almost normal cofactor levels (pyridoxal phosphate and Cu2+ but the cofactor levels for type B monoamine oxidase (flavin adenine dinucleotide and Fe2+ are lowered. The biogenic amines putrescine, cadaverine, spermidine, spermine, tyramine and serotonin in the sera, as well as dopamine and epinephrine in EDTA-plasma were found to be normal. It is unlikely, therefore, that these amines are responsible for the decreased activities of monoamine and diamine oxidase in these patients. The most likely causative factors for the inhibition of the diamine oxidase are nicotine, alcohol, food additives and other environmental chemicals, or perhaps a genetic defect of the diamine oxidase.

  19. The role of contact dermatitis in patients with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, Marcella; Fonacier, Luz

    2014-01-01

    Because both atopic dermatitis (AD) and contact dermatitis (CD) are characterized by a similar morphologic appearance and similar distribution of skin involvement, the diagnosis of CD in AD has been difficult. Historically, it was thought that patients with AD were unable or less likely to develop CD due to various studies in which patients with AD stimulated with strong allergens failed to develop sensitization at rates similar to patients without AD. However, more recent evidence from the United States and Europe has shown that patients with AD have similar if not higher rates of positive patch test results to common contact allergens, including metals and fragrance, than those patients without AD. In this review, we highlight evidence for and against the role of contact allergy in patients with AD and seek to give clinically relevant management recommendations for the evaluation of CD in the patient with AD.

  20. Fatty acid composition of human milk in atopic Danish mothers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Lotte; Halkjaer, Liselotte Brydensholt; Mikkelsen, Tina Buur

    2006-01-01

    . We also investigated whether differences in diet can explain possible observed differences. DESIGN: Mothers with current or previous asthma (n = 396) were divided into 3 groups according to history of atopic dermatitis and allergic rhinitis. Breast-milk samples were collected from 314 women...... approximately 3 wk after delivery. The habitual diet of the women was assessed with food-frequency questionnaires in the 25th week of gestation (n = 207). Breast-milk samples and simultaneous dietary data from 14 nonatopic mothers were used for comparison. RESULTS: Compared with the milk of nonatopic mothers...... composition were evident between the subject groups. The diets of the groups differed only slightly with respect to protein intake. However, the PUFA composition of the breast milk was associated with diet and time of milk sampling, and the above difference in milk PUFAs disappeared when those factors were...

  1. Findings on the atopic triad from a Danish twin registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, SF; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Kyvik, KO;

    2006-01-01

    in liability between the different diseases were 0.57 (95% CI 0.54-0.59) for asthma and hay fever, 0.40 (95% CI 0.36-0.42) for asthma and eczema, and 0.33 (95% CI 0.29-0.36) for hay fever and eczema. Decomposition of these correlations into their genetic and environmental contributions showed that shared genes...... explained between 70% and 85% of the correlation between the different diseases. The remaining parts were explained by environmental factors shared between the diseases. CONCLUSION: To a large extent, atopic diseases share a common genetic background, although disease-specific genes also play a considerable...... role. These results can prove informative when counselling families with atopy, and may furthermore be used to guide the search for pleiotropic genes of importance for these diseases....

  2. Atopic dermatitis of the face, scalp, and neck

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen-Jarolim, E; Poulsen, L K; With, H;

    1992-01-01

    We have previously reported that a lipophilic yeast, Pityrosporum ovale (P. ovale) produced a high frequency of positive skin prick tests and in vitro histamine-release (HR) tests in patients suffering from atopic dermatitis (AD) of the face, scalp, and neck. In the present study, our aim...... was to confirm the involvement of P. ovale-specific IgE and to produce a standardized extract for diagnostic tests; 7/20 sera from patients with a positive HR test were positive in RAST. Several IgE-binding proteins could be detected with sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, followed...... by immunoblotting. Comparison of different extraction methods demonstrated that allergens were not released from P. ovale until after mechanical destruction of the yeast cells. Extraction of cultured P. ovale, obtained from the skin of various individuals suffering from AD of the face, scalp, and neck, resulted...

  3. Atopic dermatitis severity in the patients with hepatobilliary pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Melnikova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to define severity of atopic dermatitis (AtD in the patients with hepatobiliary pathology. 221 patients with AtD were under investigation. 51 of them had associated biliary dyskinesia, 45 patients had chronic viral hepatitis (CVH without replecative kinesis, 65 patients had chronic viral hepatitis (CVH with replecative kinesis, and 50 patients had no hepatobiliary pathology. The results obtained showed marked effect of the hepato-biliary system pathology on the severity of the AtD pathology. The patients with biliary dyskinesia have a lichenoid kind of AtD and patients with deep-rooted viral hepatitis have an eczematous kind of AtD.

  4. Colloidal oatmeal formulations and the treatment of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Joseph F

    2014-10-01

    Colloidal oatmeal suspensions are currently available in bath soaps, shampoos, shaving gels, and moisturizing creams, and several studies have been conducted that demonstrate the efficacy and safety of colloidal oatmeal for the treatment of inflammatory skin conditions. The diverse chemical polymorphism of oats translates into numerous clinical utilities for atopic dermatitis (AD) and eczema. Avenanthramides are the principle polyphenolic antioxidants in oats, and they have been shown to assuage inflammation in murine models of contact hypersensitivity and neurogenic inflammation and also reduce pruritogen-induced scratching in a murine itch model. Moreover, avenanthramides are a potent antioxidant. This paper will discuss various studies that have found colloidal oatmeal compounds to be beneficial in the treatment of AD and also as adjunctive treatments for AD.

  5. Skin pH, Atopic Dermatitis, and Filaggrin Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandier, Josefine; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Petersen, Lars Jelstrup

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The acidic pH of the skin plays a role in antimicrobial defense by regulating the bacterial skin flora and aspects of barrier. Filaggrin is a co-factor in maintaining a low skin pH because of its degradation into acidic amino acids. Accordingly, lack of filaggrin due to filaggrin...... mutations may influence skin pH. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to determine the epidermal pH in different groups stratified by filaggrin mutations and atopic dermatitis. Further, we investigated the changes in pH according to severity of mutational status among patients with dermatitis, irrespective of skin condition....... METHODS: pH was measured with a multiprobe system pH probe (PH 905), and the study population was composed of 67 individuals, who had all been genotyped for 3 filaggrin mutations (R501X, 2282del4, R2447X). RESULTS: We found no clear pattern in relation to filaggrin mutation carrier status. Individuals...

  6. Alcohol during pregnancy and atopic dermatitis in the offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, A; Petersen, Janne; Grønbaek, M

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is evidence that antenatal factors play a role in the development of atopic dermatitis (AD). However, little is known about the effects of maternal lifestyle factors during pregnancy on the risk of AD in the offspring. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of alcohol consumption...... during pregnancy on the incidence of AD in the offspring. METHODS: A total of 24 341 mother-child pairs enrolled in the Danish National Birth Cohort were followed prospectively. Information about alcohol consumption was obtained by interview at 12 and 30 weeks of gestation. Information about symptoms......, time of onset, and doctor's diagnosis of AD in the offspring was obtained by interview at 18 months of age. The effect of alcohol consumption during pregnancy on the incidence of AD was analysed by Cox regression allowing for different effects of alcohol before (early infancy) and after 2 months (60...

  7. Alcohol during pregnacu and atopic dermatitis in the offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, a; Petersen, Janne; Grønbæk, M

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is evidence that antenatal factors play a role in the development of atopic dermatitis (AD). However, little is known about the effects of maternal lifestyle factors during pregnancy on the risk of AD in the offspring. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of alcohol consumption...... during pregnancy on the incidence of AD in the offspring. METHODS: A total of 24 341 mother-child pairs enrolled in the Danish National Birth Cohort were followed prospectively. Information about alcohol consumption was obtained by interview at 12 and 30 weeks of gestation. Information about symptoms......, time of onset, and doctor's diagnosis of AD in the offspring was obtained by interview at 18 months of age. The effect of alcohol consumption during pregnancy on the incidence of AD was analysed by Cox regression allowing for different effects of alcohol before (early infancy) and after 2 months (60...

  8. In vivo expression of antimicrobial peptides in atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Maja-Lisa; Slotved, Hans-Christian; Krogfelt, Karen A.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to present findings on expression of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in atopic dermatitis (AD) skin, focusing only on in vivo studies, and to discuss differences in results obtained using various skin sampling techniques and different methodology for analysis of AMPs....... The review also includes a discussion of the effect of frequently used treatments on AMP expression. Many studies have shown a reduced level of AMPs in lesional AD skin when compared to psoriatic skin, explaining the high frequency of AD-related infections. Interestingly, however, non-lesional AD skin has...... shown the same upregulation of AMPs after barrier disruption as non-lesional psoriatic skin. Various methods have been used to analyse AMP expression in the skin, and when comparing these methods, differences are revealed in AMP expression depending on the method used for sampling and analysis...

  9. Skin Barrier Function and Its Importance at the Start of the Atopic March

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Mary Beth; Peele, Kathy; Wilson, Nevin W.

    2012-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis can be due to a variety of causes from nonatopic triggers to food allergy. Control of egress of water and protection from ingress of irritants and allergens are key components of cutaneous barrier function. Current research suggests that a degraded barrier function of the skin allows the immune system inappropriate access to environmental allergens. Epidermal aeroallergen exposure may allow sensitization to allergen possibly initiating the atopic march. Further research into connections between epidermal barrier function and possible allergen sensitization will be important to undertake. Future clinical trials focused on skin barrier protection may be of value as a possible intervention in prevention of the initiation of the atopic march. PMID:22619686

  10. [Methodology and didactics of training children and adolescents in topical treatment of atopic dermatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponseti, J; Dimopulos, U; Hübscher, W

    1998-11-01

    There are increasing numbers of education programmes for children and young people with atopic dermatitis. These also include directions for the treatment of atopic dermatitis. However, the methods to be followed and the treatment to be applied are usually not clearly defined or explained. Presented are the key aspects of the local treatment of atopic dermatitis to be taught to children. The introduction of a basic therapeutic concept helps sort out which are the best preparations to use, some with and others without active ingredients. The interactions between basic care, active ingredients and skin conditions are explained in such a way that children can understand them.

  11. Nutrient intake and food restriction in children with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hyunjin; Song, Kyunghee; Kim, Ran; Sim, Jiyeon; Park, Eunah; Ahn, Kangmo; Kim, Jihyun; Han, Youngshin

    2013-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the status of food restriction and the list of restricted foods in children with moderate to severe atopic dermatitis (AD), and to find out the effect of food restriction on the changes in nutrient intake and the severity of the disease. Sixty two patient children aged 12 months to 13 years presenting AD with a SCORing of Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD) index between 20 and 50 were enrolled. The presence of food limitation, and list of restricted foods were surveyed through the caretakers and the patients were divided into 3 groups by the number of restricted food: non-restricted group, one to three restricted group, and more than three restricted group. Dietary intake was assessed for 3 months using a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Half of the subjects restricted foods. The restriction was higher in the order of soda, food additives, walnut, peanut, and other nuts as a single food item; and shellfish and crustacean group, processed foods, nuts, milk & dairy products, and meats as a food group. More than three restricted group ingested more fruits and less fish and meats, resulting in high consumption of vitamin C (p = 0.027). No significant difference in the ratio of nutrient intake by the number of restricted foods was observed in other nutrients. Significant improvement of AD symptom was observed in non-restricted group (p = 0.036) and one to three restricted group (p = 0.003). It is necessary to provide proper nutrition information and systematic and continuous nutrition management for balanced nutrient intake and disease improvement in children with AD.

  12. Stigmatization and self-perception in children with atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernyshov PV

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Pavel V Chernyshov Department of Dermatology and Venereology, National Medical University, Kiev, Ukraine Abstract: Atopic dermatitis (AD is one of the most common skin diseases. Prevalence of AD is highest in childhood. Because of chronicity and often visible lesions, AD may lead to stigmatization and problems with self-perception. However, problems of self-perception and stigmatization in AD children are poorly studied. Literature data on general tendencies of children’s development, clinical course, and epidemiologic tendencies of AD in different age groups make it possible to highlight three main periods in the formation of self-perception and stigmatization. The first period is from early infancy till 3 years of age. The child’s problems in this period depend on parental exhaustion, emotional distress, and security of the mother–child attachment. The child’s AD may form a kind of vicious circle in which severe AD causes parental distress and exhaustion that in turn lead to exacerbation of AD and psychological problems in children. The second period is from 3 till 10 years of age. During this period, development of AD children may be influenced by teasing, bullying, and avoiding by their peers. However, the majority of children in this age group are very optimistic. The third period is from 10 years till adulthood. Problems related to low self-esteem are characteristic during this period. It is important to identify children with AD and their parents who need psychological help and provide them with needs-based consultation and care. Appropriate treatment, medical consultations, and educational programs may help to reduce emotional problems in AD children and their parents. Keywords: atopic dermatitis, stigmatization, self-perception, quality of life, children, pediatric dermatology, skin disease

  13. Bovine beta-lactoglobulin in human milk from atopic and non-atopic mothers. Relationship to maternal intake of homogenized and unhomogenized milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høst, A; Husby, S; Hansen, L G;

    1990-01-01

    ). In a cross-over design the atopic and non-atopic mothers alternated their intake of milk between homogenized and unhomogenized milk each week. On day 7, in each week, consecutive milk samples were taken before and 4, 8, 12 and 24 hr after a single ingestion of 500 ml of homogenized or unhomogenized milk....... Detectable amounts of BLG (0.9-150 micrograms/l, median value 4.2 micrograms/l) were measured in 19/20 of the mothers (95%), in 9 of 10 atopic mothers and in all 10 of 10 non-atopic mothers. No correlation was found between the type of milk preparation (homogenized or unhomogenized) and the presence of BLG......Human milk samples (n = 300) were collected during a 3-week period from 10 healthy mothers and from 10 atopic mothers, all with healthy, solely breast-fed infants. The milk samples were analysed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the content of bovine beta-lactoglobulin (BLG...

  14. Non-invasive measurement of the vascular dynamics of dermographism--comparative study in atopic and non-atopic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornstein, O P; Boissevain, F; Wittmann, H

    1991-02-01

    There is no dissent about the vascular origin of dermographism (D); however, the microcirculatory events underlying this phenomenon are not yet elucidated sufficiently. In particular, the vascular mechanisms producing the white D pattern in atopics are a matter of divergent hypotheses. In order to quantify the D phenomenon reproducibly, we constructed an easily usable device called "Dermographometer" which enables us to apply constant stretching pressure to the skin. We were able to investigate several parameters of microvascular cutaneous reaction to defined skin stretching pressure by laser-Doppler-microfluxmetry and infrared-thermography. These measurements were performed on 23 patients with atopic eczema (AE) and 21 healthy controls under standardized investigative conditions. Only patients under similar therapeutic regimens (no corticosteroids) with dry or lichenified skin inflammation (lumbar area) were included in the study. The basic values of laser-Doppler-fluxmetry (LDF) showed a significant reduction in the intensity of hyperemia in the patients from those in the normal controls; this reaction depended on the visual degree of the dermographic blanching effect (white, delayed white, indifferent, pale-red). Patients with white or indifferent D had the lowest rises in blood flux; those with delayed white or pale-red D had more elevated blood fluxes, but these were still clearly below the mean levels of normal red D. Infrared-thermography showed a significant diminution of both the rise and plateau phase of the radiating temperature in comparison to the controls. Our results support the hypothesis that white D (including different subtypes of its pallor) depends on the degree of local vasoconstriction, possibly in combination with altered blood flow in cutaneous shunt vessels.

  15. Association between filaggrin null mutations and concomitant atopic dermatitis and contact allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, B C; Thyssen, J P; Menné, T;

    2011-01-01

    The phenotypic traits of people with the filaggrin mutation (FLG) genotype and atopic dermatitis (AD) are still under elucidation, and the association with concomitant AD and contact allergy (CA) has not previously been examined....

  16. Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus and antibiotic resistance in children with atopic dermatitis in Arar, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhaifallah A. Alenizi

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: 65% of Saudi children with atopic dermatitis are colonized with S. aureus in their skin lesions. The rate of colonization is affected by severity of the disease and by the age of the patient.

  17. Longitudinal associations between infections and atopic disorders across childhood and dysregulated adrenocortical functioning in early adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttle, Paula L; Serbin, Lisa A; Martin-Storey, Alexa; Stack, Dale M; Schwartzman, Alex E

    2014-07-01

    The present study sought to determine if exposure to common childhood medical problems (i.e., infections and atopic disorders [e.g., allergies, asthma]) may dysregulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Longitudinal data from 96 youth were used to examine this possibility. Medical records were drawn from government databases indicating the frequency of visits to healthcare facilities for infections and atopic disorders from infancy to early adolescence. During early adolescence, participants provided salivary cortisol samples from awakening until bedtime over 2 consecutive days. Individuals with a history of increased number visits for infections across childhood displayed elevated levels of cortisol at awakening whereas individuals with childhood histories of visits for atopic disorders displayed blunted diurnal cortisol slopes. These findings build on previous research documenting associations between infections and atopic disorders and cortisol by identifying longitudinal linkages from early health problems to later HPA axis functioning.

  18. Qualitative vs. quantitative atopic dermatitis criteria - in historical and present perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, R M; Thyssen, J P; Maibach, H I

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes historical aspects, clinical expression and pathophysiology leading to coining of the terms atopy and atopic dermatitis, current diagnostic criteria and further explore the possibility of developing quantitative diagnostic criteria of atopic dermatitis (AD) based on the imp......This review summarizes historical aspects, clinical expression and pathophysiology leading to coining of the terms atopy and atopic dermatitis, current diagnostic criteria and further explore the possibility of developing quantitative diagnostic criteria of atopic dermatitis (AD) based...... phenomenon. Specific pheno- and endotypes are now emerging potentially enabling us to better classify patients with AD, but the influence of these on the diagnosis of AD is so far unclear. Few diagnostic models use quantitative scoring systems to establish AD cases from normal population, which, however, may...

  19. A neural jet charge tagger for the measurement of the B$0\\atop{s}$-$\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ oscillation frequency at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lecci, Claudia [Univ. of Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    A Jet Charge Tagger algorithm for b-flavour tagging for the measurement of Δms at CDF has been presented. The tagger is based on a b-track probability variable and a b-jet probability variable, both obtained by combining the information available in b$\\bar{b}$ events with a Neural Network. The tagging power measured on data is 0.917 ± 0.031% e+SVT sample; 0.938 ± 0.029% μ+SVT sample which is ~30% larger than the cut based Jet Charge Tagger employed for the B$0\\atop{s}$ mixing analysis presented by CDF at the Winter Conferences 2005. The improved power of the tagger is due to the selection of the b-jet with a Neural Network variable, which uses correlated jet variables in an optimal way. The development of the track and jet probability has profited from studies performed on simulated events, which allowed to understand better the features of b$\\bar{b}$ events. For the first time in the CDF B group a Monte Carlo sample comprising flavour creation and additional b$\\bar{b}$ production processes has been examined and compared to Run II data. It has been demonstrated that a Monte Carlo sample with only flavour creation b$\\bar{b}$ production processes is not sufficient to describe b$\\bar{b}$ data collected at CDF. The sample with additional processes introduced in this thesis is thus essential for tagging studies. Although the event description is satisfactory, the flavour information in the Monte Carlo sample differs with respect to data. This difference needs to be clarified by further studies. In addition, the track and the jet probabilities are the first official tools based on Neural Networks for B-Physics at CDF. They have proven that the simulation is understood to such an advanced level that Neural Networks can be employed. Further work is going on in this direction: a Soft Electron and a Soft Muon Tagger based on Neural Networks are under development as of now. Several possible tagger setups have been studied and the Jet Charge Tagger reached

  20. A double blind placebo controlled group comparative study of ophthalmic sodium cromoglycate and nedocromil sodium in the treatment of vernal keratoconjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el Hennawi, M

    1994-05-01

    In a 4 week double masked comparative study, patients received 2% nedocromil sodium (48), 2% sodium cromoglycate (48), or placebo eye drops (42), four times daily, for the treatment of vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC). Clinical examinations of eye condition and symptom severity were made before and after a 1 week baseline before starting test treatment, and after 1, 2, and 4 weeks of treatment. Patients kept daily diary card records of symptom severity and concomitant therapy. At the clinic, significant improvements were seen with both active treatments after 2-4 weeks. During the final visit, significant benefits over placebo were recorded for five ocular signs with nedocromil sodium and three with sodium cromoglycate, bulbar and lower tarsal chemosis being better controlled by nedocromil sodium (p sodium cromoglycate). Diary card trends showed improvement with all three treatments, which was greatest with nedocromil sodium and least with placebo. Compared with placebo, both the active drugs produced statistically significant improvements in general eye condition during weeks 1-2, and nedocromil sodium significantly reduced itching within the first week. Overall, nedocromil sodium had the greatest effect on symptoms, although diary card data revealed no statistically significant differences between the two active drugs. In conclusion, both 2% nedocromil sodium and 2% sodium cromoglycate were effective in controlling VKC when administered four times daily into the eyes, while the marked anti-inflammatory activity of nedocromil sodium was apparent in its more pronounced overall therapeutic effect.

  1. Update on Atopic Dermatitis%异位性皮炎研究现状

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘小钢; 毛舒和

    2002-01-01

    @@ 异位性皮炎(atopic dermatitis,AD)又名异位性湿疹(atopic eczama),特征为具有遗传过敏性湿疹临床表现,常伴哮喘、枯草热、过敏性皮炎湿疹的家族倾向,对异种蛋白质过敏,血清中IgE值高,血液中嗜酸性粒细胞增多.

  2. Infant feeding and the development of food allergies and atopic eczema: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamboni, Sarah E; Allen, Katrina J; Nixon, Rosemary L

    2013-05-01

    There is an increasing awareness of food allergies in the community. Dermatologists frequently see patients with atopic eczema, where parents are extremely concerned about the role of food allergy. Advice given to parents regarding the timing of introduction of solid foods has changed markedly over the past decade. Whereas previous advice advocated delaying the introduction of solid foods until the infant's gastrointestinal system had matured, recent studies suggest that the introduction of solids from around 4 to 6 months may actually prevent the development of allergies. Studies on maternal dietary restrictions during pregnancy and lactation have led researchers to believe that antigen avoidance does not play a significant role in the prevention of atopic disease. Breastfeeding exclusively for 4 to 6 months has multiple benefits for mother and child, however, it does not convincingly prevent food allergies or decrease atopic eczema. New evidence suggests that the use of hydrolysed formulas does not delay or prevent atopic eczema or food allergy. This article aims to highlight current evidence and provide an update for dermatologists on the role of food exposure in the development of atopic disease, namely atopic eczema.

  3. Patch testing with dermatophagoides and its correlation with chronic eczema and atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapur Chetna

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic eczema is commonly encountered in the Indian set up. So also is atopic dermatitis. House dust mites (Dermatophagoides are implicated in various diseases like atopic dermatitis, asthma, and perennial rhinitis. It has also been proven that patch testing with Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (DP is important for detection of contact sensitization in chronic dermatitis. Aims: To study clinical characteristics of DP mix positive patients with regards to chronic dermatitis and atopic dermatitis. Methods: Dermatology outpatients presenting to the department of Skin and STD of Kasturba Medical College (KMC, with clinically diagnosed atopic dermatitis and chronic eczema were chosen for the study. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were well demarked. Eighty six randomly selected patients of dermatitis were subjected to patch testing with standard series and DP mix. Results: Of the 86, 50 (58% showed positive reaction to DP mix. Among these positive patients, chronic dermatitis was seen in 42 (84% with involvement of exposed parts in 37 (74%. Atopic dermatitis was seen in 19 patients (38% from DP positive group whereas it was observed in 4 patients (17% from the other group. Conclusion: Dermatophagoides mix positivity was statistically significant in chronic eczema as well as atopic dermatitis. Patch testing is an important tool to detect delayed type allergy to house dust mite.

  4. Atopic Eczema and Stress among Single Parents and Families: An Empirical Study of 96 Mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieler, Uwe; Schoof, Stefanie; Gieler, Tanja; Scheewe, Sibylle; Schut, Christina; Kupfer, Jörg

    2017-01-04

    This study investigated the extent to which single mothers of children with atopic eczema experience disease-related stress. A total of 96 mothers were divided into 4 groups: mothers living with a partner, who had or did not have a child with atopic eczema, and single mothers, who had or did not have a child with atopic eczema. The following questionnaires were used to assess psychological burden: Short Stress Questionnaire (Kurzer Fragebogen zur Erfassung von Belastung; KFB), Satisfaction with Life Questionnaire (Fragebogen zur Lebenszufriedenheit; FLZ), General Depression Scale (Allgemeine Depressions-Skala; ADS), and the Questionnaire for Parents of Children with Atopic Eczema (Fragebogen für Eltern von Neurodermitis kranken Kindern; FEN). Single mothers had higher levels of helplessness and aggression due to their child's scratching behaviour than did mothers living with a partner and a child with atopic eczema. Single mothers of children with atopic eczema had the highest scores regarding experienced stress in the family and the lowest scores concerning general life satisfaction. Special care should be provided for single mothers with higher stress, in order to teach them how to deal with the scratching behaviour of their children.

  5. Canine atopic dermatitis / Dermatite atópica canina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thalita da Costa Teles

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Canine Atopic Dermatitis is a skin disease of genetic origin. The affected dog becomes sensible to antigens presents in the environment, developing a severe alergic, pruriginous reaction, which intervenes in the quality of life of the patient. Because of the genetic character, that is an illness that in most of the times has no cure, just control. The treatment in general is lifetime. Thus, some used drugs, for example the corticosteroides, might cause collateral effects when used for a long time, and might decrease the lifetime of the animals. By this way, the owner of the dog with atopia, must know about the complications of the disease, and occasional return of the clinical signs during the period of treatment. Therefore, this article has an objective of a review about Canine Atopic Dermatitis that is an increasing problem in the small animal practice.A Dermatite Atópica Canina é uma dermatopatia de origem genética. Os cães acometidos tornam-se sensíveis aos antígenos presentes no meio ambiente, desenvolvendo grave reação alérgica, pruriginosa, que interferem na qualidade de vida do paciente. Devido ao seu caráter genético, esta é uma doença que na maioria das vezes não tem cura, apenas controle. O tratamento em geral é vitalício. Assim sendo, algumas drogas utilizadas, a exemplo dos corticosteróides, podem causar efeitos colaterais que em longo prazo, são capazes de diminuir o período de vida do animal. Desta maneira, o proprietário do cão portador de atopia, precisa ser esclarecido em relação às complicações e provável recidiva dos sinais clínicos, durante o período de tratamento. Portanto, presente artigo tem como objetivo uma revisão sobre Dermatite Atópica Canina, que está se tornando um problema crescente na clínica de pequenos animais.

  6. 黄膏治疗特应性皮炎患者的效果%Herbal Ointment Improves Troubles in Atopic Dermatitis in Not Only NC/Nga Mice Also Atopic Dermatitis Patients.- Which impressions of the ointments stimulate patients? -

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    日置智津子

    2010-01-01

    @@ Background:A subset of common chronic skin condition demonstrates severe atopic dermatitis that is refractory to conventional treatment with topical steroids.The patients on atopic dermatitis (AD)using the Ou-kou (黄膏;a novel herbal ointment)has been shown improved skin condition and better quality of life (QOL).Objective and Methods:This study aimed to show the effect, in mental and skin conditions, of the administration of Ou- kou on atopic dermatitis patients.

  7. Prevalence and Clinical Features of Atopic Dermatitis in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The epidemiology of atopic dermatitis (AD in Chinese outpatients is yet to be clarified. Objectives. To investigate population-based prevalence and clinical features of AD in Chinese outpatients. Methods. A multicenter cross-sectional study was conducted in outpatients with eczema or dermatitis from 39 tertiary hospitals in 15 provinces. Results. This study included 682 patients diagnosed with AD, with the mean age of 28.8±20.1 years and the median course of 5.3±6.9 years. AD patients had more severe itching (30.4% versus 13.8%, p<0.001 and clinically suspected bacterial infection (21.7% versus 16.1%, p<0.001 than those of other types of dermatitis. Older patients were more susceptible to have a history of flexion dermatitis (p<0.001, bacterial infection (p=0.005, and severe itching (p<0.001. Outpatients with clinically suspected bacterial infection had 3.53-fold increased risk of AD than those without it (p<0.001. The morbidity rate of AD in the (20–25°N region is 2.86 times higher than that in the (40–45°N region [OR (95% CI: 0.352 (0.241–0.514, p<0.001]. Conclusions. AD is characterized by unique clinical/demographic features. Bacterial infection and latitude region may have an impact on the incidence of AD in China.

  8. [Atopic dermatitis and food allergy in infancy and childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stögmann, W; Kurz, H

    1996-01-01

    Food allergies are causal factors for atopic dermatitis (AD) in 50% in infancy, in 20 to 30% in childhood, and only in 10 to 15% after puberty and in adulthood. Cow's milk, egg, fish, wheat, soy, nuts and citrus-fruits are the most proven allergens. Pseudoallergens, especially food-additiva, have to be regarded too. For the proof of the clinical relevance that food allergy is causing AD a positive result of elimination and provocation has to be required. When by these diagnostic procedure a special food is found as causing the AD it has to be eliminated in the diet of this patient. In severe cases of AD semi-elementary respectively few foods diets may be necessary. However in most cases of AD the "diet of choice" is an age related normal nutrition. To delay respectively to avoid the manifestation of atopy special recommendations for the nutrition of high risk newborns and infants (especially long breast feeding, late solid feeding) should be considered.

  9. Atopic dermatitis: serum immunoglobulins and T-lymphocyte subpopulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés Sánchez, A F; Gómez Echevarría, A H; Lastra Alfonso, G

    1991-04-01

    A group of patients with atopic dermatitis who attended the Allergy Outpatient Service of the Hermanos Ameijeiras Clinical Surgical Hospital from May, 1987 to May, 1988 were studied. The patients were assigned to 2 groups; the first one composed of 38 patients and the second one composed of 12 non-allergic, supposedly healthy subjects. Different tests were carried out for the quantification of total serum immunoglobulins (A, G, M, E) by means of the radial immunodiffusion method and the ELISA ultramicromethod. They were also submitted to quantification of lymphocyte subpopulations by means of the indirect immunofluorescence test with monoclonal antibodies, using Cuban antiserum prepared at the National Institute of Oncology and Radiobiology. In our study IgG and IgA values were within normal limits in patients, contrary to the statistically significant increase in IgM and IgE values. The relative values of total T-lymphocytes (anti-T3) and of the suppressor lymphocyte subpopulations decreased.

  10. Approach to atopic dermatitis in children by the Family Physician

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alysson Quitério Guilherme

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic and inflammatory disease that affects the skin of children in their early stages of life. Its aetiology remains little understood, but it is known that there is a dysfunction of the skin barrier, which facilitates the penetration of allergens/irritants into the epidermis, causing an inflammatory response with a predominance of Th2 response relative to Th1. The diagnosis is clinical and may be associated with previous and family medical history of atopies such as rhinitis and asthma. AD manifests itself through eczematous, pruritic injuries with the presence of erythema, papules, vesicles, and scales. The main differential diagnoses of AD are seborrheic dermatitis, contact dermatitis, psoriasis and scabies. The treatment is based on the education of patients and their families, plus the control of pruritus with antihistamines and of inflammation with corticosteroids or calcineurin inhibitors. Given the high prevalence and impact of AD on the quality of life of paediatric patients, early diagnosis and an individualized approach are paramount.

  11. Filaggrin Mutation in Korean Patients with Atopic Dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    On, Hye Rang; Lee, Sang Eun; Kim, Song-Ee; Hong, Won Jin; Kim, Hyun Jung; Nomura, Toshifumi; Suzuki, Shotaro; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic, relapsing eczematous inflammatory skin disease. Mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG) are major predisposing factors for AD. Ethnic differences exist between Asian and European populations in the frequency and spectrum of FLG mutations. Moreover, a distinct set of FLG mutations has been reported in Asian populations. The aim of this study was to examine the spectrum of FLG mutations in Koreans with AD. We also investigated the association of FLG mutations and clinical features of AD and compared the Korean FLG landscape with that of other East Asian countries. Materials and Methods Seventy Korean patients with AD were enrolled in this study. Fourteen FLG mutations previously detected in Korean, Japanese, and Chinese patients were screened by genotyping. Results Four FLG null mutations (3321delA, K4022X, S3296X, and S2889X) were identified in eleven patients (15.7%). The most commonly detected mutations in Korean patients with AD were 3321delA (n=6, 9.1%) and K4022X (n=3, 4.5%). FLG mutations were significantly associated with elevated IgE (≥200 KIU/L and/or MAST-CLA >3+, p=0.005), palmar hyperlinearity (p<0.001), and a family history of allergic disease (p=0.021). Conclusion This study expanded our understanding of the landscape of FLG mutations in Koreans and revealed an association between FLG mutations and AD phenotype. PMID:28120571

  12. Salvia plebeia suppresses atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jin Kyeong; Oh, Hyun-Mee; Lee, Soyoung; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Shin, Tae-Yong; Rho, Mun-Chual; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Salvia plebeia R. Br. (Lamiaceae) has been used for folk medicines in Asian countries, including Korea and China, to treat skin inflammatory diseases and asthma. In this study, we investigated the effects of S. plebeia extract (SPE) on atopic dermatitis (AD)-like skin lesions and defined underlying mechanisms of action. We established an AD model in BALB/c mice by repeated local exposure of house dust mite extract (Dermatophagoides farinae extract, DFE) and 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) to the ears. Repeated alternative treatment of DFE/DNCB caused AD-like skin lesions. The oral administration of SPE decreased AD symptoms based on ear thickness and histopathological analysis, in addition to serum IgE and IgG2a levels. SPE suppressed mast cell infiltration into the ear and serum histamine level. SPE inhibited Th1/Th2/Th17 phenotype CD4(+) T lymphocytes expansion in the lymph node and the expression of Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines in the ear tissue. To define the underlying mechanisms of action, the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interferon (IFN)-γ activated human keratinocytes (HaCaT) model was used. SPE significantly suppressed the expression of cytokines and chemokines through the down-regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, nuclear factor-κB, and STAT1 in HaCaT cells. Taken together, our results suggest that SPE might be a candidate for the treatment of AD.

  13. [IgE-autoantibodies in patients with atopic dermatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervazieva, V B; Samoĭlikov, P V; Sveranovskaia, V V

    2009-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a complicated and multifactorial disease. Autoimmune reactions to own antigens (Ag) revealed in AD patients can aggravate a clinical course of this disease. The aim of the study was to identify IgE antibodies (IgE-Abs) to tissue Ags in AD patients and to evaluate a relationship between the levels of these IgE-Abs and the level of the total IgE. Serum samples from 75 AD patients and 24 healthy persons of different age were examined with enzyme immunoassay for IgE-Abs to 7 tissue Ags (keratin, collagen of type III and VI, elastin, myosin, myelin basic protein - MBP, thyroglobulin), total IgE and IgE-Abs to exoallergens. The levels of IgE-Abs to all investigated tissue Ags (except for MBP) were higher (p collagen of type VI (r = 0.32), thyroglobulin (r = 0.78) and of total IgE. Therefore, most of stimulating IgE-autoreactivity Ags are involved in the pathologic process in AD, keratin, collagen of type IV, thyroglobulin being more important. This may aggravate an AD course.

  14. Signal transduction around thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP in atopic asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuepper Michael

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP, a novel interleukin-7-like cytokine, triggers dendritic cell-mediated inflammatory responses ultimately executed by T helper cells of the Th2 subtype. TSLP emerged as a central player in the development of allergic symptoms, especially in the airways, and is a prime regulatory cytokine at the interface of virus- or antigen-exposed epithelial cells and dendritic cells (DCs. DCs activated by epithelium-derived TSLP can promote naïve CD4+ T cells to adopt a Th2 phenotype, which in turn recruite eosinophilic and basophilic granulocytes as well as mast cells into the airway mucosa. These different cells secrete inflammatory cytokines and chemokines operative in inducing an allergic inflammation and atopic asthma. TSLP is, thus, involved in the control of both an innate and an adaptive immune response. Since TSLP links contact of allergen with the airway epithelium to the onset and maintainance of the asthmatic syndrome, defining the signal transduction underlying TSLP expression and function is of profound interest for a better understandimg of the disease and for the development of new therapeutics.

  15. [Examination of effectiveness of olopatadine hydrochloride in atopic dermatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Tadamichi; Mashiko, Maki; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2005-02-01

    Subjective/objective symptoms (itching, papula, erythema, lichenification, desquamation, scratching, erosion) and the levels of IgE, LDH, interleukin (IL) -6, thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC) were compared before and after administering olopatadine hydrochloride (ALLELOCK tablets) to 17 atopic dermatitis (AD) patients. Subject/objective symptoms improved significantly after administering the agent, and the total dosage of the combined topical steroids was also significantly decreased after administration (p<0.05), although IgE, IL-6 and LDH levels did not change, TARC was significantly decreased (p<0.05). The correlation between the levels of IgE, IL-6, LDH and TARC before and after the administration was examined. There was a positive correlation between IgE and TARC (r=0.62, p<0.01) and between IL-6 and TARC (r=0.78, p<0.01). Olopatadine hydrochloride is therefore useful in improving the symptoms in AD, and TARC may be used as an indicator of the symptom improvement.

  16. Role of food allergy in childhood atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Dianne E

    2012-12-01

    The interplay between atopic dermatitis (AD) and food allergy is complex and subject to significant misconceptions both by the general public and the medical community. Childhood AD is a very prevalent disorder. In its moderate and severe forms, AD is a challenging disorder to manage from the perspective of the child, parent and treating doctor. As AD is one of the disease manifestations of atopy, it is unsurprising that many children with AD also have a coexisting IgE-mediated food allergy. It is a common misconception that food allergy is causal in the setting of AD. However, in a proportion of sufferers, food allergy does play a role in triggering or exacerbating pre-existing AD by immune-mediated mechanisms and potentially by non-immune mechanisms. It is, therefore, important to differentiate causality, co-existent disease and disease modifiers in this context. This paper seeks to clarify the role of food allergy in childhood AD, and to outline a rational framework for the diagnosis and approach to food allergy in the context of the management of a child with problematic AD.

  17. [Quantified determination of dermographism in patients with atopic eczema].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönberger, A; Langenstein, B; Heyer, G; Hornstein, O P

    1988-02-01

    The usual method of checking dermatographism (D), which is typically white in atopic eczema (AE), allows only a qualitative rating. To allow reproducible quantification of D we have developed an easily used instrument, called a Dermographometer. This can be fitted with one to three blunt tapered metal bars of different weights applying a constant stretching pressure over the whole skin areas to be examined or different pressures at isolated points. We used this device to study D in 27 patients with AE and in 20 healthy controls. Of the 27 patients, 21 had white D, 2, red D, and 4, none at each pressure applied. In 18 of the controls D was red. In addition, the two groups differed significantly in the time to onset and the duration of the D elicited, which was much longer in patients with AE. Simultaneous and constant application of distinct grades of pressure for quantitative dermatographometry is a method that can reliably be used for the study of inter- and intraindividual variation in vascular reactivity in the course of various dermatoses, especially.

  18. Efficacy of Kampo Medicine in Treating Atopic Dermatitis: An Overview

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    Tadamichi Shimizu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a common inflammatory skin disease with recurring episodes of itching and a chronic relapsing course. Current treatment options for AD include topical agents, such as topical corticosteroids and oral antiallergic drugs. Providing effective long-term treatment is sometimes difficult due to the chronic, relapsing nature of AD; therefore, there is a need to identify better therapeutic options with minimal side effects that are well tolerated over the variable course of the disease. Traditional herbal medicine, also known as Kampo medicine in Japan, has a long history and plays a role in the prevention and treatment of various diseases, including AD. Some Kampo medicines are useful for treating inflammatory skin diseases, and there has been increased interest in using Kampo medicine to develop new therapeutic agents for AD. Standard Kampo formulas for AD are effective in removing the symptoms of “Netsu Sho,” “Ketsu-Kyo,” “Ki-Kyo,” and “O-Ketsu.” This paper discusses the efficacy of Kampo medicines in treating AD. Knowledge of the mechanisms of action of Kampo medicines will result in greater choices of pharmacotherapeutic agents for AD.

  19. Effects of Cymbidium Root Ethanol Extract on Atopic Dermatitis

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    Wan-Joong Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cymbidium has known antibacterial and antiedema activity and has been used as an ingredient in cosmetics and fragrances. The effects of Cymbidium ethanol extract (CYM on allergic response and the underlying mechanisms of action have not been reported. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the effect of CYM on allergic responses. Topical application of CYM was effective against immunoglobulin E (IgE/dinitrophenyl-conjugated bovine serum albumin- (DNP-BSA- induced degranulation of RBL-2H3 cells and anaphylaxis in ICR mice. An allergic dermatitis-like mouse model was used to evaluate the therapeutic potential of CYM in vivo. Continuous application of 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB not only induced dermatitis in ICR mice but also aggravated the skin lesioning. However, the application of CYM decreased skin lesion severity, scratching behavior, and IgE levels. In addition, CYM downregulated the expression of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin- (IL- 4, IL-13, and tumor necrosis factor- (TNF- α. Studies of signal transduction pathways showed that CYM suppressed the phosphorylation of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk, an upstream molecule. It also inhibited the phosphorylation of Akt, phospholipase C- (PLC- γ, and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MEKK. These results indicate that CYM may be effective in preventing and reducing allergic response and may have therapeutic potential as an antiallergic agent in disorders such as atopic dermatitis.

  20. First observations of B$0\\atop{2}$ → J/ψη and B$0\\atop{2}$ → J/ψη'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, J.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, David M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, Bipul; Bischofberger, M.; Bondar, A.; Bozek, A.; Bracko, Marko; Brovchenko, O.; Browder, Thomas E.; Chang, M-C; Chen, A.; Chen, P.; Cheon, B. G.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Choi, S-K.; Choi, Y.; Dalseno, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Eidelman, S.; Esen, Sevda; Fast, James E.; Gaur, Vipin; Garmash, Alexey; Goh, Y. M.; Haba, J.; Hara, Takanori; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Horii, Y.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W. S.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hyun, H. J.; Iijima, Toru; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwabuchi, Masaya; Iwasaki, Y.; Iwashita, T.; Julius, T.; Kang, J. H.; Kapusta, P.; Katayama, N.; Kawasaki, T.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H. O.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, Kay; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kobayashi, N.; Kodys, P.; Korpar, S.; Krizan, P.; Krokovny, Pavel; Kuhr, Thomas; Kumar, R.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, M. J.; Lee, S. H.; Li, Y.; Libby, J.; Liu, C.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z. Q.; Liventsev, Dmitri; Louvot, R.; Matvienko, D.; McOnie, S.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Mori, T.; Muramatsu, N.; Nakamura, I.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nakazawa, H.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nishida, Shohei; Nishimura, K.; Nitoh, O.; Ogawa, S.; Ohshima, T.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, Stephen L.; Ostrowicz, W.; Pakhlova, Galina; Park, C. W.; Park, H. K.; Park, K. S.; Pedlar, Todd K.; Peng, T.; Pestotnik, Rok; Petric, Marko; Piilonen, Leo E.; Prim, M.; Rohrken, M.; Ryu, S.; Sahoo, Himansu B.; Sakai, K.; Sakai, Yoshihide; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Schneider, O.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, Alan J.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, Martin E.; Shapkin, M.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, TA; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Simon, F.; Smerkol, P.; Sohn, Young-Soo; Sokolov, Anatoly; Stanic, S.; Staric, M.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tanaka, Satoru; Tatishvili, Gocha; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Unno, Yuji; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Usov, Y.; Varner, Gary; Varvell, K. E.; Vorobyev, V.; Vossen, Anslem G.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Wicht, J.; Williams, K. M.; Won, Eun Il; Yamashita, Y.; Yuan, C. Z.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2012-05-03

    We report first observations of B$0\\atop{2}$→J/ψη and B$0\\atop{2}$→J/ψη'. The results are obtained from 121.4 fb-1 of data collected at the Υ(5S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB e+e- collider. We obtain the branching fractions B(B$0\\atop{2}$→J/ψη)=[5.10±0.50(stat)±0.25(syst)-0.79+1.14(NBs(*)$\\bar{B}$ s(*))]×10-4, and B(B$0\\atop{2}$→J/ψη')=[3.71±0.61(stat)±0.18(syst)-0.57+0.83(NBs(*)$\\bar{B}$ s(*))]×10-4. The ratio of the two branching fractions is measured to be B(Bs→J/ψη')/B(Bs→J/ψη)=0.73±0.14(stat)±0.02(syst).

  1. Comparison of 1% cyclosporine eye drops in olive oil and in linseed oil to treat experimentally-induced keratoconjunctivitis sicca in rabbits

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    Leticia Rodrigues Parrilha

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTPurpose:To evaluate the effectiveness of topical 1% cyclosporine eye drops diluted in either of the two vehicles-olive and linseed oil-and that of the oils themselves in treating experimentally-induced keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS in rabbits.Methods:KCS was induced in 25 New Zealand rabbits using 1% atropine sulfate eye drops for 7 days before treatment and throughout the treatment period (12 weeks. The rabbits were divided into five groups: one control (C group without KCS induction and four treatment groups in which KCS was induced and treated topically with olive oil (O, linseed oil (L, cyclosporine in olive oil (CO, and cyclosporine in linseed oil (CL. The animals were evaluated using Schirmer tear test 1 (STT, the fluorescein test (FT, tear-film break-up time (TBUT, the rose bengal test (RBT, and histopathological analysis.Results:Values of STT and TBUT significantly decreased 1 week post-induction (p<0.05 and were similar to initial values after the 4th week of treatment, in all groups. After KCS induction, there was significantly less corneal damage in group L than in group CL, as assessed FT and RBT. Histopathology demonstrated that Groups L and CL presented less edema and corneal congestion. There was no significant difference in the goblet cell density (cells/mm2 between the groups (p=0.147.Conclusion:Cyclosporine diluted in olive oil or linseed oil was effective in the treatment of KCS, although it had better efficacy when diluted in linseed oil. Linseed oil presented better effectiveness, whether associated or not, than olive oil. These results may contribute to the creation of novel topical ophthalmic formulations for KCS treatment in future.

  2. The protective efficacy of cloned Moraxella bovis pili in monovalent and multivalent vaccine formulations against experimentally induced infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepper, A W; Atwell, J L; Lehrbach, P R; Schwartzkoff, C L; Egerton, J R; Tennent, J M

    1995-07-01

    Calves were vaccinated with cloned Moraxella bovis pili of serogroup C (experiment 1) or B (experiment 2) either as a monovalent formulation or as part of a multivalent preparation with pili of six other serogroups. Within 4 weeks of the second vaccine dose vaccinated calves and non-vaccinated controls were challenged via the ocular route with either virulent M. bovis strain Dal2d (serogroup C) or M. bovis strain 3WO7 (serogroup B) in experiments 1 and 2, respectively. Calves vaccinated with multivalent vaccines had significantly lower antibody titres than those vaccinated with monovalent preparations. Nevertheless, the levels of protection against infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK) achieved with multivalent vaccines were 72% and 83% for the groups challenged with M. bovis strains of serogroups B and C, respectively. The serogroup C monovalent vaccine gave 100% protection against experimentally induced IBK and M. bovis isolates cultured from the eyes 6 days post-challenge were identified as belonging solely to serogroup C. Unexpectedly, only 25% protection was achieved against homologous strain challenge of calves that received the monovalent serogroup B vaccine. Furthermore, the majority of M. bovis isolates recovered from calves in this group belonged to serogroup C, as did half of those isolates cultured from the multivalent vaccinates. The remaining bacterial isolates from the latter group, together with all isolates from the non-vaccinated controls, belonged to serogroup B. Results are consistent with the hypothesis that derivatives of the serogroup B challenge inoculum had expressed serogroup C pilus antigen within 6 days of the challenge, possibly as a result of pilus gene inversion occurring in response to the presence of specific antibody in eye tissues and tears.

  3. Vaccination against infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis: protective efficacy and antibody response induced by pili of homologous and heterologous strains of Moraxella bovis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepper, A W

    1988-10-01

    The protective effect of 2 Moraxella bovis pili vaccines against infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK) experimentally induced by homologous or heterologous strain challenge with virulent, haemolytic M. bovis strain, Dal 2d, was measured in trials using weaned calves aged 3 to 7 months. Purified pili vaccines were prepared from haemolytic strain Dal 2d, (pilus serogroup IV), and haemolytic strain Epp 63, (pilus serogroup III). Calves were challenged by conjunctival instillation of 1 x 10(9) colony forming units of virulent M. bovis strain Dal 2d 14 days after the second of 2 subcutaneous doses of vaccine. Each consisted of 200 micrograms of pili in alum-oil adjuvant administered at an interval of 21 days. In trial 1 the level of protection against challenge with the homologous strain was 46.7% (p less than 0.01). Small, rapidly resolving lesions of IBK occurred in some vaccinates compared with a larger proportion of severe lesions that required treatment in non-vaccinated calves (p less than 0.025). In trial 2, the level of protection against IBK after exposure of vaccinates to the homologous Dal 2d strain was 72.7%, but no significant level of protection or reduction in the size and duration of lesions was apparent in similarly challenged calves vaccinated with Epp 63 pili when contrasted with susceptible, non-vaccinated controls. No marked reduction in the duration of infection with M. bovis Dal 2d following challenge resulted from vaccination with pili of either of the serogroups III or IV. Rising homologous serum IgG antibody titres to serogroups III and IV pili were recorded in response to vaccination with each antigen.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Feline atopic dermatitis. A model for Langerhans cell participation in disease pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roosje, P J; Whitaker-Menezes, D; Goldschmidt, M H; Moore, P F; Willemse, T; Murphy, G F

    1997-10-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a disorder characterized by cutaneous exanthemata as a consequence of exaggerated eczematous reactions to topical and systemic allergens. Langerhans cells, expressing CD1a and HLA-DR, and dermal dendritic cells, expressing HLA-DR, are known to be potent antigen-presenting cells and are thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. The immunophenotype of lesional skin in atopic dermatitis in humans involves increased numbers of CD1a+/MHC class II+ dendritic cells in addition to activated T cells, mast cells, and macrophages. To establish feline skin as a model for the study of human atopic dermatitis, and to elucidate the role of dendritic cells in feline atopic dermatitis, we investigated the presence of CD1a+ cells and MHC class II+ cells in the epidermis and dermis of lesional feline skin and in skin of healthy control animals. Immunohistochemistry revealed that MHC class II+ epidermal dendritic cells were CD1a+ in normal feline skin and significantly increased numbers of CD1a+ cells and MHC class II+ cells were present in the epidermis and dermis of lesional skin. These data provide the first correlative documentation of CD1a expression by feline dendritic cells containing Birbeck granules, and indicate the utility of feline skin in the study of human cutaneous atopy.

  5. Immunomodulatory Effects of Deokgu Thermomineral Water Balneotherapy on Oxazolone-Induced Atopic Dermatitis Murine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Bok; Kim, Su Jin; Park, Sae Mi; Lee, Kyung Ho; Han, Hyung Jin; Yu, Dong Soo; Woo, So Youn; Yun, Seong Taek; Hamm, Se-Yeong; Kim, Hong Jig

    2016-01-01

    Background Although the therapeutic mechanism of balneotherapy for atopic dermatitis has not been clarified, many atopic patients who visit thermomineral springs have shown clinical improvements. Objective This study was aimed to evaluate the immunomodulatory effect of thermomineral water balneotherapy on the atopic dermatitis murine model. Methods The oxazolone-induced atopic dermatitis murine model was used to evaluate the therapeutic effect of balneotherapy with Deokgu thermomineral water compared with distilled water. Histologic evaluation and confocal microscopic imaging were performed to analyze the lesional expression of cluster-of-differentiation (CD)4 and forkhead box p3 (Foxp3). Lesional mRNA expression of interleukin (IL) 33, thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), and Foxp3 was evaluated by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Results Compared with the distilled water bath group, confocal microscopic evaluation of CD4 and Foxp3 merged images showed increased expression of regulatory T cells in the thermomineral balneotherapy group. The lesional mRNA level of IL-33 showed a reduced trend in the thermomineral balneotherapy group, whereas the level of mRNA of Foxp3 was increased. TSLP showed a decreased trend in both distilled water and thermomineral water bath groups. There was a trend of reduced expression in lesional IL-33 mRNA but increased cell count of CD4+ Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in thermomineral balneotherapy compared with distilled water bath. Conclusion Therefore, thermomineral balneotherapy can be an effective and safe adjuvant therapeutic option for atopic dermatitis. PMID:27081266

  6. Interventions to Increase Treatment Adherence in Pediatric Atopic Dermatitis: A Systematic Review

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    Alexandria M. Bass

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Poor adherence to treatment is a major factor limiting treatment outcomes in patients with atopic dermatitis. The purpose of our systematic review is to identify techniques that have been tested to increase treatment adherence in atopic dermatitis. A MEDLINE search was performed for clinical trials focusing on interventions used to increase adherence in atopic dermatitis. Four articles were retrieved. References of these studies were analyzed yielding three more trials. The seven results were evaluated by comparing the intervention used to improve adherence, how adherence was assessed, and the outcome of the intervention tested. Different approaches to increase adherence such as written eczema action plans, educational workshops, extra office visits, and use of an atopic dermatitis educator were evaluated. All interventions increased adherence rates or decreased severity in patients, except for two. The MEDLINE search yielded limited results due to a lack of studies conducted specifically for atopic dermatitis and adherence was measured using different methods making the studies difficult to compare. Interventions including patient education, eczema action plans, and a quick return for a follow-up visit improve adherence, but based on the lack of clinical trials, developing new techniques to improve adherence could be as valuable as developing new treatments.

  7. Stratum corneum removal facilitates experimental sensitization to mite allergens in atopic dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivry, Thierry; Wofford, Jessica; Paps, Judy S; Dunston, Stanley M

    2011-04-01

    In humans with atopic dermatitis and in mouse models of IgE-mediated allergic diseases, evidence is mounting that the stratum corneum (SC) provides an important barrier against environmental allergens. At this time, it is not known whether the SC has a similar role in dogs, especially in those with atopic dermatitis. The objectives of this pilot study were to determine whether SC removal led to earlier and stronger sensitization of atopic dogs to Dermatophagoides farinae (Df) house dust mites. Five Maltese-beagle atopic (MBA) dogs were sensitized epicutaneously after the SC was removed with ten tape strips (TS group), while sensitization was done without tape strips in five other MBA dogs (nontape stripping; NTS group). During this 16 week study, sensitization was assessed with allergen-specific IgE serology, intradermal testing with Df allergens and determination of stimulation indices of blood mononuclear cells cultured with Df and stained for CD4 and the activation markers CD25 or CD30. Compared with dogs from the NTS group, those of the TS group exhibited earlier rises in Df-specific IgE serum levels, usually had higher allergen-specific IgE titres, showed higher intradermal test reactivity and had earlier increases and higher percentages of CD25- or CD30-positive activated allergen-specific peripheral CD4-positive T lymphocytes. These observations implicate a role of the SC as a barrier limiting sensitization to exogenous allergens in this experimental atopic dog model.

  8. Apgar Score Is Related to Development of Atopic Dermatitis: Cotwin Control Study

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    Vibeke Naeser

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the impact of birth characteristics on the risk of atopic dermatitis in a twin population. Methods. In a population-based questionnaire study of 10,809 twins, 3–9 years of age, from the Danish Twin Registry, we identified 907 twin pairs discordant for parent-reported atopic dermatitis. We cross-linked with data from the Danish National Birth Registry and performed cotwin control analysis in order to test the impact of birth characteristics on the risk of atopic dermatitis. Results. Apgar score, OR (per unit = 1.23 (1.06–1.44, P=0.008, and female sex, OR = 1.31 (1.06–1.61, P=0.012, were risk factors for atopic dermatitis in cotwin control analysis, whereas birth anthropometric factors were not significantly related to disease development. Risk estimates in monozygotic and dizygotic twins were not significantly different for the identified risk factors. Conclusions. In this population-based cotwin control study, high Apgar score was a risk factor for atopic dermatitis. This novel finding must be confirmed in subsequent studies.

  9. Relationship between type 1 diabetes and atopic diseases in a twin population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, S F; Duffy, D L; Kyvik, K O;

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To study the association between type 1 diabetes and atopic diseases in a twin population. METHODS: We performed record linkage between questionnaire-defined atopic dermatitis, asthma and hay fever, and hospital discharge diagnoses of type 1 diabetes in 54,530 Danish twins, 3-71 years of age....... RESULTS: The age- and sex-adjusted risk of atopic dermatitis was decreased in subjects with type 1 diabetes compared with nondiabetic subjects, (2.1%vs 9.9%), odds ratio (OR)= 0.23 (0.07-0.71), P = 0.011, whereas asthma and hay fever were not significantly associated with type 1 diabetes. Within twin...... pairs discordant for type 1 diabetes, the diabetic twin had a lower risk of atopic dermatitis relative to the nondiabetic co-twin. Genetic factors for atopic dermatitis and type 1 diabetes were negatively correlated (r = -0.30), P = 0.0009. CONCLUSIONS: These findings substantiate the Th1 vs Th2 cell...

  10. The Importance of Acidification in Atopic Eczema: An Underexplored Avenue for Treatment

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    David J. Panther

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis is a form of dermatitis commonly seen in children and adults. Its pathophysiology is complex and is centered on the barrier function of the epidermis. An important aspect of the skin’s barrier is pH, which in turn affects a number of parameters such as the skin flora, protease function, and mediators of inflammation and pruritus. Normal pH for non-neonatal skin is acidic and ranges from 4 to 6. Skin pH in atopic dermatitis patients is often increased into the neutral to basic range, and the resulting cascade of changes contributes to the phenotype of atopic dermatitis. Therefore, the maintenance of normal skin pH remains an important topic in understanding and treating atopic dermatitis. This article will review skin pH and its impact on normal barrier function, pathological pH changes in atopic dermatitis, and the therapeutic considerations related to restoring and maintaining pH balance.

  11. The Effect of Hypoallergenic Diagnostic Diet in Adolescents and Adult Patients Suffering from Atopic Dermatitis

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    Jarmila Celakovská

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the effect of a diagnostic hypoallergenic diet on the severity of atopic dermatitis in patients over 14 years of age. Materials and Methods: The diagnostic hypoallergenic diet was recommended to patients suffering from atopic dermatitis for a period of 3 weeks. The severity of atopic dermatitis was evaluated at the beginning and at the end of this diet (SCORAD I, SCORAD II and the difference in the SCORAD over this period was statistically evaluated. Results: One hundred and forty-nine patients suffering from atopic dermatitis were included in the study: 108 women and 41 men. The average age of the subjects was 26.03 (SD: 9.6 years, with the ages ranging from a minimum of 14 years to a maximum of 63 years. The mean SCORAD at the beginning of the study (SCORAD I was 32.9 points (SD: 14.1 and the mean SCORAD at the end of the diet (SCORAD II was 25.2 points (SD: 9.99. The difference between SCORAD I and SCORAD II was evaluated with the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The average decrease of SCORAD was 7.7 points, which was statistically significant (P=.00000. Conclusion: Introduction of the diagnostic hypoallergenic diet may serve as a temporary medical solution" in patients suffering from moderate or severe forms of atopic dermatitis. It is recommended that this diet be used in the diagnostic workup of food allergy.

  12. Effect of prolonged breast-feeding on risk of atopic dermatitis in early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Soyoung; Choi, Won-Jun; Kwon, Ho-Jang; Cho, Yoon Hee; Yum, Hye Yung; Son, Dong Koog

    2014-01-01

    The effect of breast-feeding on the risk of developing atopic disease remains controversial. This study is an investigation of the effect of breast-feeding on current atopic dermatitis (AD) among Korean children. This cross-sectional study of children's histories of current AD and environmental factors was completed by the subjects' parents. The subjects included 10,383 children aged 0-13 years in Seoul, Korea, in 2008. The diagnostic criteria of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood were applied in this study. Adjustments were performed for age, gender, maternal education, smoking in the household, relocation to a new house within 1 year of birth, and parental history of atopic disease. After adjustment for confounders, age and duration of maternal education were found to be inversely associated with the prevalence of AD. Among subjects aged ≤5 years, the prevalence of AD was positively associated with the duration of breast-feeding (p feeding among children >5 years of age. Regardless of parental history of atopic diseases, breast-feeding >12 months was a significant risk factor for AD. The effect of breast-feeding differed by age group. Prolonged breast-feeding increased the risk of AD in children <5 years of age, regardless of parental history of atopic diseases.

  13. Stigmatization and self-perception in children with atopic dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernyshov, Pavel V

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is one of the most common skin diseases. Prevalence of AD is highest in childhood. Because of chronicity and often visible lesions, AD may lead to stigmatization and problems with self-perception. However, problems of self-perception and stigmatization in AD children are poorly studied. Literature data on general tendencies of children’s development, clinical course, and epidemiologic tendencies of AD in different age groups make it possible to highlight three main periods in the formation of self-perception and stigmatization. The first period is from early infancy till 3 years of age. The child’s problems in this period depend on parental exhaustion, emotional distress, and security of the mother–child attachment. The child’s AD may form a kind of vicious circle in which severe AD causes parental distress and exhaustion that in turn lead to exacerbation of AD and psychological problems in children. The second period is from 3 till 10 years of age. During this period, development of AD children may be influenced by teasing, bullying, and avoiding by their peers. However, the majority of children in this age group are very optimistic. The third period is from 10 years till adulthood. Problems related to low self-esteem are characteristic during this period. It is important to identify children with AD and their parents who need psychological help and provide them with needs-based consultation and care. Appropriate treatment, medical consultations, and educational programs may help to reduce emotional problems in AD children and their parents. PMID:27499642

  14. Impact of genetic polymorphisms on paediatric atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Susanna; Patria, Maria Francesca; Spena, Silvia; Codecà, Claudio; Tagliabue, Claudia; Zampiero, Alberto; Lelii, Mara; Montinaro, Valentina; Pelucchi, Claudio; Principi, Nicola

    2015-09-01

    In order to investigate whether polymorphisms of genes encoding some factors of innate and adaptive immunity play a role in the development of, or protection against atopic dermatitis (AD) and condition its severity, we genotyped 33 candidate genes and 47 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using Custom TaqMan Array Microfluidic Cards and an ABI 7900HT analyser (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA, USA). The study involved 104 children with AD (29 with mild-to-moderate and 75 with severe disease; 42 girls; mean age ± SD, 5.8 ± 3.3 years) and 119 healthy controls (49 girls; mean age, 4.8 ± 3.0 years). IL10-rs1800872T, TG and MBL2-rs500737AG were all significantly more frequent among the children with AD (P = 0.015, P = 0.004 and P = 0.030), whereas IL10-rs1800896C and TC were more frequent in those without AD (P = 0.028 and P = 0.032). The VEGFA-rs2146326A and CTLA4-rs3087243AG SNPs were significantly more frequent in the children with mild/moderate AD than in those with severe AD (P = 0.048 andP = 0.036). IL10-rs1800872T and TG were significantly more frequent in the children with AD and other allergic diseases than in the controls (P = 0.014 and P = 0.007), whereas IL10-rs1800896TC and C were more frequent in the controls than in the children with AD and other allergic diseases (P = 0.0055 and P = 0.0034). These findings show that some of the polymorphisms involved in the immune response are also involved in some aspects of the development and course of AD and, although not conclusive, support the immunological hypothesis of the origin of the inflammatory lesions.

  15. Transient Tachypnea of the Newborn May Be the First Presentation of Atopic March

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    Esengül Keleş

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Methods: This study was conducted to determine whether the beginning of atopic march is related to transient tachypnea of the newborn (TTN. Seventy-eight term infants were treated in the newborn Intensive Care Unit due to TTN. A case-matched control group of 78 term newborns without any health problem was selected. Results: There were no statistically significant differences between groups in terms of demographic and clinical characteristics. The rate of childhood asthma and atopic dermatitis among patients with a diagnosis of TTN was found to be higher than the controls (odds ratio [OR]=5.87, 95% confidence interval [CI]=2.88–11.98, P<0.01; OR=2.87, 95% CI=1.30–6.37, P<0.05, respectively. Conclusion: This study showed that TTN may be the first presentation of atopic march and large-scale studies should be performed to elucidate this possible relation.

  16. Influence of weather and climate on subjective symptom intensity in atopic eczema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vocks, E.; Busch, R.; Fröhlich, C.; Borelli, S.; Mayer, H.; Ring, J.

    The frequent clinical observation that the course of atopic eczema, a skin disease involving a disturbed cutaneous barrier function, is influenced by climate and weather motivated us to analyse these relationships biometrically. In the Swiss high-mountain area of Davos the intensity of itching experienced by patients with atopic eczema was evaluated and compared to 15 single meteorological variables recorded daily during an entire 7-year observation period. By means of univariate analyses and multiple regressions, itch intensity was found to be correlated with some meteorological variables. A clear-cut inverse correlation exists with air temperature (coefficient of correlation: -0.235, Peczema is significantly dependent on meteorological conditions. The data suggest that, in patients with atopic eczema, a certain range of thermo-hygric atmospheric conditions with a balance of heat and water loss on the skin surface is essential for the skin to feel comfortable.

  17. Skin Barrier Function and Its Importance at the Start of the Atopic March

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Beth Hogan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis can be due to a variety of causes from nonatopic triggers to food allergy. Control of egress of water and protection from ingress of irritants and allergens are key components of cutaneous barrier function. Current research suggests that a degraded barrier function of the skin allows the immune system inappropriate access to environmental allergens. Epidermal aeroallergen exposure may allow sensitization to allergen possibly initiating the atopic march. Further research into connections between epidermal barrier function and possible allergen sensitization will be important to undertake. Future clinical trials focused on skin barrier protection may be of value as a possible intervention in prevention of the initiation of the atopic march.

  18. Which plant for which skin disease? Part 1: Atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, acne, condyloma and herpes simplex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Juliane; Wölfle, Ute; Weckesser, Steffi; Schempp, Christoph

    2010-10-01

    Plant extracts and isolated compounds are increasingly used in cosmetics and food supplements to improve skin conditions. We first introduce the positive plant monographs with dermatological relevance of the former German Commission E. Subsequently clinical studies with botanicals for atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, acne, condylomata acuminata and herpes simplex are discussed. The best studies have been conducted with atopic dermatitis and psoriasis patients. Mahonia aquifolium, Hypericum perforatum, Glycyrrhiza glabra and certain traditional Chinese therapies have been shown to be effective in the treatment of atopic dermatitis. Mahonia aquifolium, Indigo naturalis and Capsicum frutescens are effective treatments for psoriasis. Green tea extract and tea tree oil have been investigated in the treatment of acne. Podophyllin and green tea extract are effective treatments for condylomata acuminata. Balm mint and a combination of sage and rhubarb have been shown to be effective in the treatment of herpes simplex in proof of concept studies.

  19. Allergic contact dermatitis in patients with atopic dermatitis: A clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma A

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronically relapsing dermatitis with no known cure. Due to the chronic nature of the condition, frequent and long term topical therapy is used. This may lead to sensitization, resulting in allergic contact dermatitis (ACD. AIMS: The aim of the study was to observe the frequency of ACD in atopic patients in this part of the country using Indian standard battery. METHODS: A total number of 30 cases of AD were taken for the study. Diagnosis of AD cases was based on the criteria of Hannifin and Rajka (1980. All the selected cases of AD had mild to moderate grade of severity. All these cases were treated and patch tested during the remission period. The duration of the study was 12 months. RESULTS: Out of the 30 AD cases, 7 cases showed positive ACD with patch test allergens. CONCLUSION: This study shows that ACD is not uncommon amongst atopic individuals.

  20. Domestic dog exposure at birth reduces the incidence of atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsdottir, S; Thyssen, J P; Stokholm, J

    2016-01-01

    affected the risk of atopic dermatitis in children during the first 3 years of life. METHODS: Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood (COPSAC) are ongoing prospective clinical birth cohort studies. Data from 411 children born to mothers with asthma (COPSAC2000 ) and 700 unselected children...... serum IgE against eight inhalant allergens was sampled after the children's birth and at pregnancy week 24 in the COPSAC2010 cohort. Associations between dog exposure and atopic dermatitis were analyzed by Cox proportional hazard regression models and adjusted for lifestyle confounders. RESULTS...... (COPSAC2010 ) were analyzed following the same protocols at the same research site. Atopic dermatitis was diagnosed prospectively according to the Hanifin-Rajka criteria. Parental history of asthma, eczema, or rhinitis was defined by self-reported physician diagnosis. In the COPSAC2000 , maternal specific...

  1. Staphylococcus aureus clonal dynamics and virulence factors in children with atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomholt, Hans Bredsted; Andersen, KE; Kilian, Mogens

    2005-01-01

    SCORAD value. In 11 of 12 cases with two different clones co-colonizing a child the clones belonged to the same agr group. In conclusion, this limited group of children with atopic dermatitis showed highly variable colonization patterns of S. aureus, and communication between strains by use of agr......A prospective cohort study was undertaken to determine the clonal dynamics of Staphylococcus aureus colonization and infection during 1 y in children with atopic dermatitis, and to correlate specific clones, accessory gene regulator (agr) groups, and production of virulence factors with eczema...... activity. Eleven children were examined every 6 wk with swaps taken from active eczema, anterior nose, axillae and perineum, and scoring of eczema activity by severity scoring of atopic dermatitis (SCORAD). Individual S. aureus clonal types were identified and examined for production of superantigens...

  2. Severity of atopic disease inversely correlates with intestinal microbiota diversity and butyrate-producing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nylund, L; Nermes, M; Isolauri, E; Salminen, S; de Vos, W M; Satokari, R

    2015-02-01

    The reports on atopic diseases and microbiota in early childhood remain contradictory, and both decreased and increased microbiota diversity have been associated with atopic eczema. In this study, the intestinal microbiota signatures associated with the severity of eczema in 6-month-old infants were characterized. Further, the changes in intestinal microbiota composition related to the improvement of this disease 3 months later were assessed. The severity of eczema correlated inversely with microbiota diversity (r = -0.54, P = 0.002) and with the abundance of butyrate-producing bacteria (r = -0.52, P = 0.005). During the 3-month follow-up, microbiota diversity increased (P microbiota and high abundance of butyrate-producing bacteria were associated with milder eczema, thus suggesting they have a role in alleviating symptoms of atopic eczema.

  3. Atopic dermatitis may be a genetically determined dysmaturation of ectodermal tissue, resulting in disturbed T-lymphocyte maturation. A hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thestrup-Pedersen, K; Ellingsen, A R; Olesen, A B

    1997-01-01

    of mature T-lymphocytes in the blood. We suggest that atopic dermatitis is a genetically determined change of ectodermal tissue. The thymic epithelium is derived from the ectoderm, and because of that we hypothesize that the maturation of the T-cell immune system of persons who develop atopic dermatitis...

  4. Different Profile of Interleukin-10 Production in Circulating T Cells from Atopic Asthmatics Compared with Healthy Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Matsumoto

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Interleukin (IL-10 is a pleiotropic cytokine released from various cells, including T cells. Although IL-10 is suggested to inhibit allergic responses, its role in asthma remains uncertain. The purpose of the present study was to compare the profile of IL-10 in circulating T cells from stable atopic asthmatics, atopic nonasthmatics and healthy controls.

  5. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies three new risk loci for atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paternoster, Lavinia; Standl, Marie; Chen, Chih-Mei;

    2011-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a commonly occurring chronic skin disease with high heritability. Apart from filaggrin (FLG), the genes influencing atopic dermatitis are largely unknown. We conducted a genome-wide association meta-analysis of 5,606 affected individuals and 20,565 controls from 16 popul...

  6. An Improved Mouse Model of Atopic Dermatitis and Suppression of Skin Lesions by an Inhibitor of Tec Family Kinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuko Kawakami

    2007-01-01

    Conclusions: We established a highly efficient, highly reproducible protocol to induce skin lesions in NC/Nga mice and successfully applied it to show the efficacy of terreic acid in treating skin lesions. This mouse model of atopic dermatitis will be useful to study the pathogenetic processes of atopic dermatitis and to evaluate the efficacy of drug candidates.

  7. Food compounds inhibit Staphylococcus aureus bacteria and the toxicity of Staphylococcus Enterotoxin A (SEA) associated with atopic dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atopic dermatitis or eczema is characterized by skin rashes and itching is an inflammatory disease that affects 10-20% of children and 1-3% of adults. Staphylococcus aureus bacteria are present on the skin of nearly all patients with atopic dermatitis. Antibiotics that suppress colonization of S. au...

  8. Differential effects of risk factors on infant wheeze and atopic dermatitis emphasize a different etiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, Allan; Simonsen, Jacob B; Petersen, Janne;

    2005-01-01

    indicate that infant wheezing is an atopic phenotype. OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether potential risk factors for infant wheeze and AD have similar effects on these 2 phenotypes, indicating a common etiology. METHODS: A total of 34.793 mother-child pairs enrolled in the Danish National Birth Cohort were......-feeding, number of older siblings, day care attendance, and pets in the home. CONCLUSION: The majority of risk factors had differential effects on infant wheeze and AD indicative of a different etiology. Infant wheezing does not seem to be etiologically linked to the epidemic of atopic disease, and infant...

  9. Heritability of hand eczema is not explained by comorbidity with atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerbaek, Anne; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Mortensen, Jakob;

    2007-01-01

    Genetic factors have been shown to influence the risk of hand eczema, and may theoretically influence the frequency of eruptions as well as age at onset of the disease. However, the result may be confounded by atopic dermatitis, which is a major risk factor for development of hand eczema...... and is known to be influenced by genetic factors. In this study, the importance of genetic and environmental risk factors in the etiology of hand eczema, independent of atopic dermatitis, was investigated in a population-based twin cohort. In addition, any possible genetic influence on frequency of hand eczema...

  10. Formation of Combined Surface Features of Protrusion Array and Wrinkles atop Shape-Memory Polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, L.; Zhao, Y.; Huang, W. M.; Tong, T. H.

    We demonstrate a simple and cost-effective approach to realize two combined surface features of different scales together, namely submillimeter-sized protrusion array and microwrinkles, atop a polystyrene shape-memory polymer. Two different types of protrusions, namely flat-top protrusion and crown-shaped protrusion, were studied. The array of protrusions was produced by the Indentation-Polishing-Heating (IPH) process. Compactly packed steel balls were used for making array of indents. A thin gold layer was sputter deposited atop the polymer surface right after polishing. After heating for shape recovery, array of protrusions with wrinkles on the top due to the buckling of gold layer was produced.

  11. PIXE analysis in uninvolved skin of atopic patients and in aged skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunse, T.; Steigleder, K. (Universitaets-Hautklinik, Koeln (Germany)); Hoefert, M.; Gonsior, B. (Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Ruhr-Universitaet, Bochum (Germany))

    1991-01-01

    PIXE analysis was used to determine the elemental distribution in normal-appearing skin of patients suffering from atopic eczema and in the skin of elderly people. With this technique, elements with atomic numbers {>=} 14 can be detected simultaneously in cryosections of skin biopsies down to a concentration of 1 ppm. Compared with a control group, the epidermal concentrations of Zn and CU, which are constituent parts of a variety of enzymes, were increased in uninvolved skin of patients with atopic eczema. In the epidermis of elderly people the level of K was lower and that of Ca was higher than in the epidermis of a younger age group. (au).

  12. The Importance of Acidification in Atopic Eczema: An Underexplored Avenue for Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    David J. Panther; Jacob, Sharon E.

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a form of dermatitis commonly seen in children and adults. Its pathophysiology is complex and is centered on the barrier function of the epidermis. An important aspect of the skin’s barrier is pH, which in turn affects a number of parameters such as the skin flora, protease function, and mediators of inflammation and pruritus. Normal pH for non-neonatal skin is acidic and ranges from 4 to 6. Skin pH in atopic dermatitis patients is often increased into the neutral to ba...

  13. Type I sensitization in adolescents: prevalence and association with atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørtz, Charlotte G; Lauritsen, Jens M.; Andersen, Klaus Ejner;

    2003-01-01

    dermatitis was found in 21.3%, allergic asthma in 6.9% and allergic rhinitis in 15.7% of the adolescents. One or more positive specific IgE measurements (CAP FEIA) were found in 29.6% of the schoolchildren (inhalant allergens 28.4%, food allergens 8.5%, pityrosporum ovale 1.5%) and a considerable proportion...... were sensitized without clinical relevance. The association between atopic dermatitis and Type I sensitization was related to concomitant inhalant allergy. A clear association with atopic dermatitis was indicated only for the allergen pityrosporum ovale....

  14. Severity of atopic dermatitis and Ascaris lumbricoides infection: an evaluation of CCR4+ and CXCR3+ helper T cell frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Nascimento Silva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Ascaris lumbricoides-infected patients present lower prevalence of severe atopic dermatitis. METHODS: Peripheral blood of infected children with atopic dermatitis was assessed by flow cytometry of the frequency of Th1 and Th2 cells through the expression of CXCR3 and CCR4 chemokine receptors, respectively. RESULTS: Helminth-free patients with atopic dermatitis presented a high frequency of CCR4+Th2 cells. Parasitized patients with atopic dermatitis showed a lower frequency of CXCR3+Th1 cells compared to infected individuals only. CONCLUSIONS: Ascariasis modifies the blood traffic of Th2 cells in atopic dermatitis patients, while the allergic disease down-regulates the traffic of Th1 cells in parasitized patients.

  15. Cost of care of atopic dermatitis in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Handa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Atopic dermatitis (AD is a common dermatologic condition with a prevalence varying from 5% to 15%, and it has been rising over time. Several studies from developed countries have revealed the substantial economic burden of AD on health care budgets. There has been no research however on the cost of care of AD from India a country where health care is self-funded with no health insurance or social security provided by the government. Aim: The aim of our study was to assess prospectively the cost of care of AD in children in an outpatient hospital setting in India. Methods: A total of 40 children with AD, <10 years of age, registered in the pediatric dermatology clinic at our institute were enrolled for the study. All patients were followed-up for 6 months. Demographic information, clinical profile, severity, and the extent of AD were recorded in predesigned performa. Caregivers were asked to fill up a cost assessment questionnaire specially designed for the study. It had a provision for measuring direct, indirect, and provider costs. Results: Of the 40 patients, 37 completed the study. Mean total cost for AD was Rs. 6235.00 ± 3514.00. Direct caregiver cost was Rs. 3022.00 ± 1620.00 of which treatment cost constituted 77.2 ± 11.1%. The total provider cost (cost of consultation, nursing/paramedical staff and infrastructure was Rs. 948.00, which was 15.2% of the total cost of care and the mean indirect cost calculated by adding loss of earnings of parents due to hospital visits was Rs. 2264.00 ± 2392.00 (range: 0-13,332. The mean total cost depending on the severity of AD was Rs. 3579.00 ± 948.00, Rs. 6806.00 ± 3676.00 and Rs. 8991.00 ± 3129.00 for mild, moderate and severe disease, respectively. Conclusions: AD causes a considerable drain on the financial resources of families in India since the treatment is mostly self-funded. Cost of care of AD is high and comparable to those of chronic physical illness, such as diabetes

  16. The impact of keratoconjunctivitis associated with meibomian gland dysfunction%关注睑板腺功能障碍相关的角结膜病变

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪晶

    2015-01-01

    Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) is one of the most common ophthalmologic conditions worldwide.The clinical spectrum of the disease varies.Patients with mild MGD only experience chronic discomfort.Patients with severe dysfunction experience a decrease in vision and then become blind.The pathology of MGD involves meibomian gland destruction and an increase in lipid viscosity that blocks the pore, causing a reduction in glandular lipid secretion and discharge.This leads to a lack of the lipid layer in tear film, therefore causing damage to the ocular surface epithelial cells and inflammation.The keratoconjunctivitis associated with MGD occurs at the inferior corneal area that is in contact with the palpebral margin.Corneal tissue infiltrates the blood vessels.Some patients also suffer from acne and sebaceous gland disorder.Treatment includes cleaning the palpebral margin, supple artificial tear liquid, and treatment for infection and inflammation that prevents ocular tissue damage.Systemic medicine is necessary for patients with severe conditions.Complications need to be treated in a timely manner.%睑板腺功能障碍(MGD)是临床常见的眼表疾病,患病人群大,表现多样,轻重不一.轻者仅表现为眼部不适,重者影响角膜,引起视力下降甚至失明.MGD以睑板腺终末导管的阻塞和睑脂分泌物质和量的异常为主要病理基础,使泪液稳定性下降,引起眼表上皮损伤和炎症细胞的激活,释放炎症因子.MGD相关的角膜病变通常发生在下方角膜缘与睑缘相接触的部位,角膜浸润伴有血管的长入,部分患者合并面部痤疮和其他皮脂腺异常.治疗原则为清洁睑缘、热敷及按摩以促进睑板腺的分泌和排放;补充泪液缓解症状;抗感染和抗炎药物抑制炎症反应,防治组织损伤,重度或有全身疾病者同时给予全身药物治疗;及时处理并发症.

  17. A study of B$0\\atop{s}$ → J/ΨΦ in the D0 experiment and an example of HEP technology transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Daniela Ursula [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)

    2002-08-01

    After years of preparation, data taking with the upgraded D0 detector at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider has begun. The large amount of data produced in a p$\\bar{p}$-collider requires sophisticated triggers to filter out the interesting events. Described in this thesis is the development of trigger software for the newly implemented Silicon Microstrip Tracker. D0 is a multi-purpose detector with a broad physics program. one area being studied at D0 is B mesons. An algorithm for reconstructing the B$0\\atop{s}$ and B$0\\atop{d}$ mesons and for measuring their lifetimes has been developed and is described in this thesis. The results suggest that an improvement of the current lifetime measurements can be achieved within the next two years. The reconstruction of a J/Ψ meson forms the basis for a wide range of b-physics. Data taken with the muon system during the commissioning period of the detector has been analyzed and a signal for the J/Ψ meson has been found. Systematic transfer of HEP technologies into other areas and their commercial exploitation plays an important role in the future of particle physics. An area of particular interest is DNA sequencing as shown by the recent completion of the sequencing of the human genome. The final part of this thesis details the development of a simulation for a high throughput sequencing device which is currently being developed at Imperial College.

  18. Rush allergen specific immunotherapy protocol in feline atopic dermatitis: a pilot study of four cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimmer, Ann M; Griffin, Craig E; Boord, Mona J; Rosenkrantz, Wayne S

    2005-10-01

    Rush immunotherapy has been shown to be as safe as conventional immunotherapy in canine atopic patients. Rush immunotherapy has not been reported in the feline atopic patient. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine a safe protocol for rush immunotherapy in feline atopic patients. Four atopic cats diagnosed by history, physical examination and exclusion of appropriate differential diagnoses were included in the study. Allergens were identified via liquid phase immunoenzymatic testing (VARL: Veterinary Allergy Reference Labs, Pasadena, CA). Cats were premedicated with 1.5 mg triamcinolone orally 24 and 2 h prior to first injection and 10 mg hydroxyzine PO 24, 12 and 2 h prior to first injection. An intravenous catheter was placed prior to first injection. Allergen extracts (Greer Laboratories, Lenoir, North Carolina) were all administered subcutaneously at increasing protein nitrogen units (pnu) every 30 minutes for 5 h to maintenance dose of 15,000 pnus ml-1. Vital signs were assessed every 15 minutes. Two cats developed mild pruritus and the subsequent injection was delayed 30 minutes. No changes in either cat's vital signs were noted, nor was there any further pruritus. All four cats successfully completed rush immunotherapy. Two cats developed a dermal swelling on the dorsal neck one week later. In these four cats, this protocol appeared to be a safe regimen to reach maintenance therapy. A larger sample of feline patients is needed to determine the incidence of adverse reactions and to follow the success of ASIT based upon this method of induction.

  19. Meta-analysis identifies seven susceptibility loci involved in the atopic march

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marenholz, Ingo; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Rueschendorf, Franz; Bauerfeind, Anja; Strachan, David P.; Spycher, Ben D.; Baurecht, Hansjoerg; Margaritte-Jeannin, Patricia; Saaf, Annika; Kerkhof, Marjan; Ege, Markus; Baltic, Svetlana; Matheson, Melanie C.; Li, Jin; Michel, Sven; Ang, Wei Q.; McArdle, Wendy; Arnold, Andreas; Homuth, Georg; Demenais, Florence; Bouzigon, Emmanuelle; Soderhall, Cilla; Pershagen, Goran; de Jongste, Johan C.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Braun-Fahrlaender, Charlotte; Horak, Elisabeth; Ogorodova, Ludmila M.; Puzyrev, Valery P.; Bragina, Elena Yu; Hudson, Thomas J.; Morin, Charles; Duffy, David L.; Marks, Guy B.; Robertson, Colin F.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Musk, Bill; Thompson, Philip J.; Martin, Nicholas G.; James, Alan; Sleiman, Patrick; Toskala, Elina; Rodriguez, Elke; Foelster-Holst, Regina; Franke, Andre; Lieb, Wolfgang; Gieger, Christian; Heinzmann, Andrea; Rietschel, Ernst; Keil, Thomas; Cichon, Sven; Noethen, Markus M.; Pennell, Craig E.; Sly, Peter D.; Schmidt, Carsten O.; Matanovic, Anja; Schneider, Valentin; Heinig, Matthias; Huebner, Norbert; Holt, Patrick G.; Lau, Susanne; Kabesch, Michael; Weidinger, Stefan; Hakonarson, Hakon; Ferreira, Manuel A. R.; Laprise, Catherine; Freidin, Maxim B.; Genuneit, Jon; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Melen, Erik; Dizier, Marie-Helene; Henderson, A. John; Lee, Young Ae

    2015-01-01

    Eczema often precedes the development of asthma in a disease course called the 'atopic march'. To unravel the genes underlying this characteristic pattern of allergic disease, we conduct a multi-stage genome-wide association study on infantile eczema followed by childhood asthma in 12 populations in

  20. Allergic disease and atopic sensitization in children in relation to measles vaccination and measles infection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenlund, H.; Bergstrom, A.; Alm, J.; Swartz, J.; Scheynius, A.; van Hage, M.; Johansen, K.; Brunekreef, B.; von Mutius, E.; Ege, M.; Riedler, J.; Braun-Fahrlander, C.; Waser, M.; Pershagen, G.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to investigate the role of measles vaccination and measles infection in the development of allergic disease and atopic sensitization. METHODS: A total of 14 893 children were included from the cross-sectional, multicenter Prevention of Allergy-Risk Factors for Sensitization in

  1. Allergic Disease and Atopic Sensitization in Children in Relation to Measles Vaccination and Measles Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenlund, Helen; Bergstrom, Anna; Alm, Johan S.; Swartz, Jackie; Scheynius, Annika; van Hage, Marianne; Johansen, Kari; Brunekreef, Bert; von Mutius, Erika; Ege, Markus J.; Riedler, Josef; Braun-Fahrlaender, Charlotte; Waser, Marco; Pershagen, Goran

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. Our aim was to investigate the role of measles vaccination and measles infection in the development of allergic disease and atopic sensitization. METHODS. A total of 14 893 children were included from the cross-sectional, multicenter Prevention of Allergy-Risk Factors for Sensitization in

  2. Drug utilization study of atopic dermatitis in a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veena Rani Vemuri

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: It is essential to rule out helminthic infestation, scabies and seborrhoea dermatitis to make a proper diagnosis of atopic dermatitis. More generic prescribing wherever possible might help to reduce the cost per patient. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(5.000: 2061-2065

  3. Risk for hand eczema in employees with past or present atopic dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coenraads, PJ; Diepgen, TL

    1998-01-01

    Persons with atopic dermatitis run a considerable risk of developing hand eczema when exposed to occupational agents that are a burden to the skin. This also pertains to those with a history of skin atopy in childhood. This review presents estimates of the risk of developing hand eczema and examines

  4. Food hypersensitivity in patients over 14 years of age suffering from atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarmila Čelakovská

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients suffering from atopic dermatitis often describe food hypersensitivity. Rising prevalence of food hypersensitivity and severe allergic reactions to foods have been reported, but the data are scarce. Aims and Objectives: Evaluation of food hypersensitivity reactions in patients suffering from atopic dermatitis. Materials and Methods: The dermatological examination was performed in patients of age 14 years and above and the detailed history was taken concerning the food hypersensitivity. Results: A total of 228 patients were examined-72 men, 156 women, average age 26.2 (SD 9.5 years. The food hypersensitivity reactions were recorded in 196 patients from 228 (86%, no reactions were recorded in 32 patients (24%. Foods with the most often recorded reactions are: Nuts (in 35% of patients, tomatoes (in 20%, and kiwi (in 17, 5%, apples and spices (in 16%, tangerines and oranges (in 15%, capsicum (in 13%, fishes (in 12%, celery (in 9%, and chocolate (in 7%. Conclusion: Food hypersensitivity reactions are recorded in 86% of patients suffering from atopic dermatitis. Nuts, tomatoes, and pollen-associated foods play a role in the majority of patients suffering from atopic dermatitis.

  5. [Results of a multicentric study for the prevention of atopic allergy. 48 months of follow up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, G; Giampietro, P G; Businco, L

    1996-10-01

    With the cooperation of 12 Maternity Hospitals we have started a prospective study to evaluate the effect of dietary and environmental measures in the development of atopic disease in "at risk" newborns. The preventive measures included: exclusive breast feeding for the first 6 months of life, soy milk supplement when breast milk is not sufficient, elimination of house dust, no smoking in the house, etc. All infants were seen at the age of 1, 3, 6, 9, 12 months and twice-a-year afterwards. 1213 babies have been enrolled. At the last follow-up of 48 months 531 children are 4 year old. The cumulative prevalence of atopic disease was 20%: 11 (2%) children developed atopic dermatitis, 69 (13%) asthma, 21 (4%) rinithis, 5 (1%) urticaria. The low prevalence of atopic disease and the trivial course of the allergic manifestations in the children who followed the preventive measures (78/444 = 18%) and the higher (28/87 = 32%) in these who did not (p < 0.01) stressed the importance of such manipulations for the prevention of atopy in "at risk" babies.

  6. Association between bronchial asthma in atopic children and their number of siblings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan El Hakim Siregar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The prevalence of asthma in children has increased in many countries. Environmental factors are believed to play an important role and an inverse relationship between number of siblings and atopic disorders has been observed. Objective To assess for an association between bronchial asthma in atopic children and their number of siblings. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted from June to November 2010 in three elementary schools in Medan, North Sumatera. Trace cards from the Allergy-Immunology Indonesian Pediatric Association (IDAI Working Group and questionnaires on the clinical history of atopy were used to screen children with the risk of atopy. The International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC questionnaire to screen for bronchial asthma was distributed to children aged 7-10 years with a history of asthma, allergic rhinitis or atopic dermatitis. Subjects were divided into two groups, those with <3 siblings and those with ≥3 siblings. Chi-square test was used to analyze differences in bronchial asthma prevalence between the two groups. Results Ninety-six subjects enrolled in the study, with 48 subjects per group. The prevalence of bronchial asthma was significantly higher in atopic children who had <3 siblings than in children with ≥3 siblings (73.5% and 26.5%, respectively; P=0.04. Conclusion Bronchial asthma was significantly more frequent in children with less than 3 siblings compared to those with 3 or more siblings. [Paediatr Indones. 2014;54:289-93.].

  7. Incidence rates of atopic dermatitis, asthma, and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in Danish and Swedish children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokholm, Lonny Merete; Simonsen, Jacob; Haerskjold, Ann;

    2015-01-01

    national registers, we sought to establish up-to-date incidence rates of atopic dermatitis, asthma, and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in the Danish and Swedish child populations. METHODS: Children born in Denmark from 1997 to 2011 or born in Sweden from 2006 to 2010 participated in this cross...

  8. Contact allergy in children with and without atopic dermatitis; which are the frequent allergens?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubbes, S.; Rustemeyer, T.; Schuttelaar, M.L.A.; Sillevis Smitt, J.H.; Middelkamp-Hup, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Data on contact allergies in children are conflicting. This study aims to identify frequent contact allergens and their relevance in children with and without atopic dermatitis (AD). This will allow better identification of potential sensitizers and improve patients' care in children. Me

  9. Molecular diagnostics of psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis and irritant contact dermatitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamsteeg, M.; Jansen, P.A.M.; Vlijmen-Willems, I.M.J.J. van; Erp, P.E.J. van; Rodijk-Olthuis, D.; Valk, P.G.M. van der; Feuth, T.; Zeeuwen, P.L.J.M.; Schalkwijk, J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Microarray studies on the epidermal transcriptome in psoriasis and atopic dermatitis (AD) have revealed genes with disease-specific expression in keratinocytes of lesional epidermis. These genes are possible candidates for disease-specific pathogenetic changes, but could also provide a t

  10. Development of human skin equivalents to unravel the impaired skin barrier in atopic dermatitis skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eweje, M.O.

    2016-01-01

    The studies in this thesis describes the barrier defects in Atopic Dermatitis (AD) skin and various techniques to develop AD Human Skin Equivalents (HSEs) which can be used to better understand the role of several factors in the pathogenesis of AD skin. The results described show that Inflammation p

  11. Prevalence of atopic dermatitis in infants by domestic water hardness and season of birth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engebretsen, Kristiane Aa; Bager, Peter; Wohlfahrt, Jan;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atopic dermatitis (AD) appears to be more common in regions with hard domestic water and in children with a fall/winter birth. However, it is unknown whether a synergistic effect exists. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between domestic water hardness and season of birth, respec...

  12. Meta-analysis identifies seven susceptibility loci involved in the atopic March

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Marenholz (Ingo); J. Esparza-Gordillo (Jorge); F. Rüschendorf (Franz); A. Bauerfeind (Anja); D.P. Strachan (David P.); B.D. Spycher (Ben D.); H. Baurecht (Hansjörg); P. Margaritte-Jeannin (Patricia); A. Sääf (Annika); M. Kerkhof (Marjan); M. Ege (Markus); S. Baltic (Svetlana); J. Matheson; J. Li (Jin); S. Michel (Sven); W.Q. Ang (Wei Q.); W.L. McArdle (Wendy); A. Arnold (Andreas); G. Homuth (Georg); F. Demenais; E. Bouzigon (Emmanuelle); C. Söderhäll (Cilla); G. Pershagen (Göran); J.C. de Jongste (Johan); D.S. Postma (Dirkje); C. Braun-Fahrländer (Charlotte); E. Horak (Elisabeth); L.M. Ogorodova (Ludmila M.); V.P. Puzyrev (Valery P.); E.Y. Bragina (Elena Yu); T.J. Hudson (Thomas); C. Morin (Charles); D.L. Duffy (David); G.B. Marks (Guy B.); C. Robertson; G.W. Montgomery (Grant); A.W. Musk (Arthur); P.J. Thompson (Philip); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); A.L. James (Alan); P.M.A. Sleiman (Patrick); E. Toskala (Elina); P.M. Rodríguez; R. Fölster-Holst (R.); A. Franke (Andre); W. Lieb (Wolfgang); C. Gieger (Christian); A. Heinzmann (Andrea); E. Rietschel (Ernst); M. Keil (Mark); S. Cichon (Sven); M.M. Nöthen (Markus M.); C.E. Pennell (Craig); P.D. Sly; C.O. Schmidt (Carsten Oliver); A. Matanovic (Anja); V. Schneider (Valentin); M. Heinig (Matthias); N. Hübner (Norbert); P.G. Holt (Patrick); S. Lau (Susanne); M. Kabesch (Michael); S. Weidinger (Stefan); H. Hakonarson (Hakon); M.A. Ferreira (Manuel); C. Laprise (Catherine); M.B. Freidin (M.); J. Genuneit (Jon); G.H. Koppelman (Gerard); E. Melén (Erik); M.-H. Dizier; A.J. Henderson (A. John); Y.-A. Lee (Young-Ae)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractEczema often precedes the development of asthma in a disease course called the a € atopic marcha €. To unravel the genes underlying this characteristic pattern of allergic disease, we conduct a multi-stage genome-wide association study on infantile eczema followed by childhood asthma in

  13. Association between medication prescription for atopic diseases and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schans, Jurjen; Pleiter, Janine C.; de Vries, Tjalling W; Schuiling-Veninga, Catharina C M; Bos, Jens H.J.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Hak, Eelko

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data on the association between atopic diseases and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have been inconclusive. OBJECTIVES: To assess whether children with drug-treated ADHD are more likely to receive treatment for asthma, allergic rhinitis, or eczema before the start of ADHD

  14. Association of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and atopic diseases : a case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Schans, Jurjen; Pleiter, Janine C; De Vries, Tjalling W.; Schuiling-Veninga, Catharina C.M.; Bos, Jens H.J.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Hak, Eelko

    2015-01-01

    Background: Data on the association between attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and atopic diseases have been inconclusive. We assessed whether children using ADHD medication are more likely to receive drug treatment for asthma, allergic rhinitis, and/or eczema than children not using AD

  15. Evaluation of skin prick test sensitivity for 37 allergen extracts in atopic patients with nasal polyposis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z A Ashour

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion Negative SPT does not exclude allergy in atopic patients with nasal polyposis. Thus, before delivering a diagnosis of nonallergic rhinitis in patients with negative SPT to common allergen, further tests are needed. We recommend further studies to evaluate the prevalence, immunopathology, and management of local allergic rhinitis.

  16. Two Phase 3 Trials of Dupilumab versus Placebo in Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Eric L; Bieber, Thomas; Guttman-Yassky, Emma; Beck, Lisa A; Blauvelt, Andrew; Cork, Michael J; Silverberg, Jonathan I; Deleuran, Mette; Kataoka, Yoko; Lacour, Jean-Philippe; Kingo, Külli; Worm, Margitta; Poulin, Yves; Wollenberg, Andreas; Soo, Yuhwen; Graham, Neil M H; Pirozzi, Gianluca; Akinlade, Bolanle; Staudinger, Heribert; Mastey, Vera; Eckert, Laurent; Gadkari, Abhijit; Stahl, Neil; Yancopoulos, George D; Ardeleanu, Marius

    2016-12-15

    Background Dupilumab, a human monoclonal antibody against interleukin-4 receptor alpha, inhibits signaling of interleukin-4 and interleukin-13, type 2 cytokines that may be important drivers of atopic or allergic diseases such as atopic dermatitis. Methods In two randomized, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trials of identical design (SOLO 1 and SOLO 2), we enrolled adults with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis whose disease was inadequately controlled by topical treatment. Patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1:1 ratio to receive, for 16 weeks, subcutaneous dupilumab (300 mg) or placebo weekly or the same dose of dupilumab every other week alternating with placebo. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients who had both a score of 0 or 1 (clear or almost clear) on the Investigator's Global Assessment and a reduction of 2 points or more in that score from baseline at week 16. Results We enrolled 671 patients in SOLO 1 and 708 in SOLO 2. In SOLO 1, the primary outcome occurred in 85 patients (38%) who received dupilumab every other week and in 83 (37%) who received dupilumab weekly, as compared with 23 (10%) who received placebo (Pphase 3 trials of identical design involving patients with atopic dermatitis, dupilumab improved the signs and symptoms of atopic dermatitis, including pruritus, symptoms of anxiety and depression, and quality of life, as compared with placebo. Trials of longer duration are needed to assess the long-term effectiveness and safety of dupilumab. (Funded by Sanofi and Regeneron Pharmaceuticals; SOLO 1 ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02277743 ; SOLO 2 ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02277769 .).

  17. Clinical and immunological effects of a forest trip in children with asthma and atopic dermatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Chul Seo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Asthma and atopic dermatitis are common allergic diseases, and their prevalence has increased in urban children. Recently, it is becoming understood that forest environment has favorable health effects in patients with chronic diseases. To investigate favorable clinical and immunologic effects of forest, we examined changes in clinical symptoms, indirect airway inflammatory marker, and serum chemokines before and after a short-term forest trip. The forest trips were performed with 21 children with asthma and 27 children with atopic dermatitis. All participating children were living in air polluted urban inner-city. We measured spirometry and fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO in children with asthma and measured scoring atopic dermatitis (SCORAD index and Thymus and Activation-Regulated Chemokine (TARC/CCL17 and Macrophage-Derived Chemokine (MDC/CCL22 levels in children with atopic dermatitis before and after the forest trip. Indoor air pollutants such as indoor mold, particulate matter 10 (PM10 and total volatile organic compounds (TVOCs of each child's home and the accommodations within forest were measured. A significant increase in forced vital capacity (FVC and a significant decrease in FeNO were observed after the forest trip in children with asthma. SCORAD indices and MDC/CCL22 levels were significantly decreased after the forest trip in children with atopic dermatitis. Airborne mold and PM10 levels in indoor were significantly lower in the forest accommodations than those of children's homes; however, TVOC levels were not different between the two measured sites. Short-term exposure to forest environment may have clinical and immunological effects in children with allergic diseases who were living in the urban community.

  18. Accelerated differentiation of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells in atopic prone mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Eiko; Takano, Hirohisa; Inoue, Ken-Ichiro; Yanagisawa, Rie

    2008-12-20

    NC/Nga mice are atopic prone mice that can be an animal model for human atopic dermatitis (AD). Dendritic cells (DC) as professional antigen-presenting cells (APC) are the most capable inducers of immune responses. The present study using BALB/c, C57BL/6J, and NC/Nga male mice investigated whether differentiation and function of DC were associated with atopic prone. Bone marrow-derived DC (BMDC) were differentiated by culture with granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). At days 0, 6, and 8 of culture with GM-CSF, the expression of MHC class II, co-stimulatory molecules (CD80, CD86), and of DC markers (CD11c, DEC205) was measured by flow cytometry. Antigen-presenting activity of BMDC and cytokine production were measured by ELISA. The cell numbers and the expression of MHC class II, co-stimulatory molecules, and of DC markers on BMDC from NC/Nga mice were significantly larger than those from BALB/c and C57BL/6J mice. Antigen-presenting activity of BMDC was significantly greater in NC/Nga and C57BL/6J mice than in BALB/c mice. BMDC-stimulated IFN-gamma production from T-cells was significantly lower in NC/Nga or BALB/c mice than in C57BL/6J mice, whereas IL-4 production was significantly greater in NC/Nga and C57BL/6J mice than in BALB/c mice. Taken together, GM-CSF-stimulated differentiation of BMDC was more accelerated in atopic prone NC/Nga mice than in the other strains of mice. The enhancement of differentiation and function of DC caused by genetic background may be related, at least partly, to the induction or aggravation of allergic/atopic diseases.

  19. Measurements of CP asymmetries and branching fractions of two-body charmless decays of B0 and B$0\\atop{s}$ mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morello, Michael Joseph [Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa (Italy)

    2007-12-19

    The thesis is organized as follows: Chapter 1 describes the theoretical framework of non-leptonic B$0\\atop{s}$ → H+h'- decays, with a simple overview of the CP violation mechanism within the Standard Model and of the most used phenomenological approaches in the evaluation of strong interaction contributions. The chapter contains also a review of the theoretical expectations and the current experimental measurements along with a discussion about the importance of studying such decays. Chapter 2 contains a general description of the Tevatron collider and of the CDF II detector. Chapter 3 is devoted to the description of the data sample used for the measurement and the method used in extracting the signal from the background. Particular attention is dedicated to the on-line trigger selection, which is crucial to collect a sample enriched in B$0\\atop{s}$ → h+h'- decays. Chapter 4 shows how the information from kinematics and particle identification was used to achieve a statistical discrimination amongst modes to extract individual measurements. The available resolutions in mass or in particle identification are separately insufficient for an event-by-event separation of B$0\\atop{s}$ → h+h'- modes. The choice of observables and the technique used to combine them is an important and innovative aspect of the analysis described in this thesis. Chapter 5 is devoted to the accurate determination of the invariant mass lineshape. This is a crucial ingredient for resolving overlapping mass peaks. This chapter details all resolution effects with particular attention at the tails due to the emission of low-energy photons from charged kaons and pions in the final state (FSR). For the first time the effect of FSR has been accurately accounted for in a CDF analysis. Chapter 6 describes how kinematic and PID information, discussed in chap. 4 and chap. 5 were combined in a maximum Likelihood fit

  20. Measurements of CP asymmetries and branching fractions of two-body charmless decays of B0 and B$0\\atop{s}$ mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morello, Michael Joseph [Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa (Italy)

    2007-12-19

    The thesis is organized as follows: Chapter 1 describes the theoretical framework of non-leptonic B$0\\atop{s}$ → H+h'- decays, with a simple overview of the CP violation mechanism within the Standard Model and of the most used phenomenological approaches in the evaluation of strong interaction contributions. The chapter contains also a review of the theoretical expectations and the current experimental measurements along with a discussion about the importance of studying such decays. Chapter 2 contains a general description of the Tevatron collider and of the CDF II detector. Chapter 3 is devoted to the description of the data sample used for the measurement and the method used in extracting the signal from the background. Particular attention is dedicated to the on-line trigger selection, which is crucial to collect a sample enriched in B$0\\atop{s}$ → h+h'- decays. Chapter 4 shows how the information from kinematics and particle identification was used to achieve a statistical discrimination amongst modes to extract individual measurements. The available resolutions in mass or in particle identification are separately insufficient for an event-by-event separation of B$0\\atop{s}$ → h+h'- modes. The choice of observables and the technique used to combine them is an important and innovative aspect of the analysis described in this thesis. Chapter 5 is devoted to the accurate determination of the invariant mass lineshape. This is a crucial ingredient for resolving overlapping mass peaks. This chapter details all resolution effects with particular attention at the tails due to the emission of low-energy photons from charged kaons and pions in the final state (FSR). For the first time the effect of FSR has been accurately accounted for in a CDF analysis. Chapter 6 describes how kinematic and PID information, discussed in chap. 4 and chap. 5 were combined in a maximum Likelihood fit

  1. Efficacy of topical cobalt chelate CTC-96 against adenovirus in a cell culture model and against adenovirus keratoconjunctivitis in a rabbit model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srivilasa Charlie

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adenovirus (Ad, associated with significant morbidity, has no topical treatment. A leading CTC compound (CTC-96, a CoIII chelate, was found to have potent in vitro and in vivo antiviral efficacy against herpes viruses. In this study CTC-96 is being tested for possible anti-Adenovirus activity. Methods The biological anti-adenovirus activity of CTC-96 in concentrations from 5 to 250 ug/ml, was evaluated initially by viral inactivation (viral exposure to CTC-96 followed by dilution and inoculation of cells, virucidal (viral exposure to CTC-96 and inoculation of cells without dilution and antiviral (effect of CTC-96 on previously adsorbed virus plaque assays on HeLa (human cervical carcinoma, A549 (human lung carcinoma and SIRC (rabbit corneal cells. After verifying the antiviral activity, New Zealand White rabbits were infected with Ad-5 into: 1 the anterior cul-de-sac scarifying the conjunctiva (Group "C+"; 2 the anterior cul-de-sac scarifying the conjunctiva and cornea (Group "CC+"; 3 the stroma (Group "CI+". Controls were sham-infected ("C-", "CC-", "CI-". Other rabbits, after "CC", were treated for 21 days with: 1 placebo, 9x/day ("-"; 2 CTC-96, 50 ug/ml, 9x/day ("50/9"; CTC-96, 50 ug/ml, 6x/day ("50/6"; CTC-96, 25 ug/ml, 6x/day ("25/6". All animals were monitored via examination and plaque assays. Results In vitro viral inactivation, virucidal and antiviral assays all demonstrated CTC-96 to be effective against Adenvirus type 5 (ad-5. The in vivo model of Ad keratoconjunctivitis most similar to human disease and producing highest viral yield was "CC". All eyes (6/6 developed acute conjunctivitis. "CI" yielded more stromal involvement (1/6 and iritis (5/6, but lower clinical scores (area × severity. Infection via "C" was inconsistent (4/6. Fifty (50 ug/ml was effective against Ad-5 at 6x, 9x dosings while 25 ug/ml (6x was only marginally effective. Conclusion CTC-96 demonstrated virucidal activity against Ad5 in tissue

  2. Ceratoconjuntivite alérgica e complicações no segmento ocular anterior de pacientes Evaluation of anterior ocular segment complications in patients with allergic keratoconjunctivitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Bezerra de Menezes Botelho

    2003-01-01

    with secondary anterior segment alterations. Data collected from the charts were: age, gender, kind of allergy, time of disease, time that complication appeared after treatment in our Service, side effects and ocular complications. RESULTS: Complications of anterior segment that caused reduction in visual acuity were: shield ulcers, 5 cases; cataract, 3 cases; corneal opacity, 6 cases; ocular perforation, 2 cases and keratoconus 13 cases. There were 7 surgeries: 2 tectonic penetrating keratoplasty, 4 optic keratoplasty, 4 optic penetrating keratoplasty and one superficial keratectomy. CONCLUSION: Patients with allergic keratoconjunctivitis should be treated in order to prevent ocular complications like keratitis, keratoconus, opacities and cataract.

  3. Indoor risk factors for atopic eczema in school children from East Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, T; Heinrich, J; Wjst, M; Krause, C; Adam, H; Ring, J; Wichmann, H E

    1999-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the relation between environmental influences such as arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury, as well as environmental tobacco smoke, pet keeping, and heating systems on the prevalence of atopic eczema. Therefore, a multicenter cross-sectional study of school children aged 5-14 years, including a standardized questionnaire, blood and urine analyses, and a dermatological examination, was undertaken. A cases-control approach was chosen in order to identify relevant risk factors. A total of 2200 school children (response 79.1%) of two areas (Bitterfeld, Hettstedt) polluted by industrial activities and an agricultural control region (Zerbst) of the former German Democratic Republic were examined. Atopic eczema as identified by dermatological examination and history was the outcome variable of interest. Body burden of arsenic and heavy metals and questionnaire data on environmental tobacco smoke exposure, pet keeping, and heating system were investigated as potential risk factors. The overall prevalence of atopic eczema was 2.6%, with higher prevalences in the industrial areas (2.5 and 2.9%) compared to the control area (1.6%, not significant). Bivariate analyses did not reveal statistically significant associations between atopic eczema and tobacco smoke exposure or the body burden of arsenic and heavy metals. According to multiple logistic regression analysis, atopic eczema was significantly more frequent in predisposed families and those who reported keeping guinea pigs (OR=4.37, CI 2.15-8.91), but not other pets, like dogs, cats, and hamsters. In comparison to a distant heating system, a decreased risk was observed in households with central heating system (OR=0.30, CI 0.10-0.90), whereas the presence of a gas heater with an exhaust pipe connection to the wall was associated with a significantly elevated risk for eczema (OR=8.22, CI 2.44-27.66). The heating system and exposure to certain animal allergens are related to the manifestation

  4. Common burden of chronic skin diseases? Contributors to psychological distress in adults with psoriasis and atopic dermatitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, A.W.M.; Lu, Y.; Duller, P.; Valk, P.G.M. van der; Kraaimaat, F.W.; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic skin diseases, such as atopic dermatitis and psoriasis, are known to affect quality of life by heightening psychological distress. Knowledge about factors contributing to psychological distress is essential for supporting physicians in diagnostic and multidisciplinary treatment o

  5. The CMS forward calorimeter prototype design studies and Ω$0\\atop{C}$ search at E781 experiment at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayan, Ahmet Sedat [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2004-05-01

    In the fit part, the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) forward calorimeter design studies are presented. The forward calorimeter consists of quartz fibers embedded in a steel absorber. Radiation damage studies of the quartz fiber and the absorber as well as the results of the first pre-production prototype PPP-I are presented. In the second part, the Ω$0\\atop{C}$ search studies at the SELEX (E781) experiment at FermiLab are presented. 107 ± 22 Ω$0\\atop{C}$ events are observed in three decay modes. The relative branching ratio (Ω$0\\atop{C}$ → Ω-π-π+π+)/β(Ω$0\\atop{C}$ {yields} Ω-π+) is measured as 2.00 ± 0.45(stat) ± 0.32(sys).

  6. Correlation of the severity of atopic dermatitis with absolute eosinophil counts in peripheral blood and serum IgE levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhar Sandipan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although a number of epidemiological studies, showing incidence and prevalence of atopic dermatitis, were available, scant attention has been paid to the correlation between the parameters of the disease like severity, absolute eosinophil count and IgE level, which has been known to be associated inconsistently. Hence this study was undertaken. METHODS: A total of 102 patients of atopic dermatitis, both children and adults, and 107 age matched controls were studied at the Pediatric Dermatology clinic, Institute of Child Health and department of Dermatology, AMRI-Apollo hospitals, Kolkata. RESULTS: The average age of onset of atopic dermatitis was observed to be 4.55 years. Both the average absolute eosinophil count and IgE levels in patients of atopic dermatitis were significantly higher than that of the controls. Each of these parameters showed significant correlation with severity of the disease and showed a nonhomogeneous distribution reflected by significant association with personal history of bronchial asthma and family history of atopy, when both parents were atopic. CONCLUSIONS: Our study shows that clinical activity of the disease as recorded by the "SCORAD" index can be used as an indicator of the hematological abnormalities as well as to some extent as a prognostic indicator. Family history of atopy correlates with the hematological abnormalities only if both parents are involved and bronchial asthma is the only associated atopic condition which correlates with the parameters of the disease .

  7. Staphylococcus aureus clonal dynamics and virulence factors in children with atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomholt, Hans; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Kilian, Mogens

    2005-01-01

    A prospective cohort study was undertaken to determine the clonal dynamics of Staphylococcus aureus colonization and infection during 1 y in children with atopic dermatitis, and to correlate specific clones, accessory gene regulator (agr) groups, and production of virulence factors with eczema...... activity. Eleven children were examined every 6 wk with swaps taken from active eczema, anterior nose, axillae and perineum, and scoring of eczema activity by severity scoring of atopic dermatitis (SCORAD). Individual S. aureus clonal types were identified and examined for production of superantigens......, toxins, and were assigned to agr groups. S. aureus colonization patterns ranged from rare colonization over transient colonization to persistent colonization by a single clone or a dynamic exchange of up to five clones. Production of no single virulence factor including superantigens and toxins...

  8. Nine-year follow-up of children with atopic dermatitis by general practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misery, Laurent; Ansolabehere, Xavier; Grandfils, Nathalie; Georgescu, Victor; Taieb, Charles

    2014-01-01

    The frequency of associated comorbidity and the cost of treatments in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) followed up in primary care settings are poorly known. We carried out a retrospective cohort study on a longitudinal electronic medical records database of patients consulting a panel of general practitioners in France. All subjects with AD diagnosed during the first year of life were selected and matched with infants without the disease according to sex (1,163 vs. 1,163). Subjects were followed up for 9 years. Associated diseases, drug consumptions and available medical costs were detailed. Comparisons between subjects and controls were carried out. Subjects with AD had more comorbidities than others, especially in respiratory and ophthalmic system organs. The number of prescribed treatments in the field of skin diseases as well as overall medical costs (general practitioner consultations and prescribed drugs) were higher among atopic subjects, but differences were attenuated with age.

  9. Preparation of hydrogels for atopic dermatitis containing natural herbal extracts by gamma-ray irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Youn-Mook; An, Sung-Jun; Kim, Hae-Kyoung [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1266 Sinjeong-dong Jeongeup-si Jellabuk-do, 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yun-Hye [AMOTECH Co., Ltd., Kimpo-City, Kyungki-do (Korea, Republic of); Youn, Min-Ho; Gwon, Hui-Jeong; Shin, Junhwa [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1266 Sinjeong-dong Jeongeup-si Jellabuk-do, 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Nho, Young-Chang [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1266 Sinjeong-dong Jeongeup-si Jellabuk-do, 580-185 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: ycnho@kaeri.re.kr

    2009-07-15

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a familial and chronic inflammatory pruritic skin disease that affects a large number of children and adults in industrialized countries. It is known that one of the prominent features of AD and chronic pruritus is partially due to the histamine released from mast cell. In this work, hydrogel patches with natural herbal extracts were prepared by 'freezing and thawing', and a gamma irradiation. It showed eminent healing results as a consequence of long-term moisturizing effects and natural herbal extracts on atopic wounds. Besides its non-toxicity and human harmlessness, it can be easily attached to or detached from the skin without any trace and help patients to feel refreshment when attached. Based on this work, the hydrogel patches we made can be potentially used as an alternative remedy for not only pruritus in AD, but other dermatitis.

  10. Topical therapy of atopic dermatitis: controversies from Hippocrates to topical immunomodulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilles, Gérard; Wallach, Daniel; Taïeb, Alain

    2007-02-01

    Although atopic dermatitis can be treated efficiently, there is still much controversy about the risk/benefit ratio of both topical corticosteroids and topical immunomodulators. Conflicting data may be found about the usefulness of bathing, diet regulation, and other therapeutic interventions. These controversies result in part from the persistence of Hippocratic doctrines in modern medical thinking. Humoralist and diathetic doctrines, as they pertain to eczema, are reviewed. The paradoxical worsening of oozing and the deadly hazards of hospitalization before the era of antibiotics are brought to mind. We hope that this historical review will improve the understanding of current controversies and help dermatologists to manage patients with atopic dermatitis and other chronic skin diseases.

  11. Psychological evaluation of children atopic dermatitis by Düss test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rita Polo Gascon

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The Atopic Dermatitis is a skin inflammatory disease, chronic and recurrent, characterized by intense itching and skin lesions with typical distribution. Besides the hereditary character, this disease can be influenced by environmental and psychological factors. The objective of this study was to discuss the use of the Fable of Duss test as a projective and psychodiagnostic instrument for children with AD, in order to understand the psychodinamic aspects. We evaluated 33 patients with atopic dermatitis on regular attendance at the Allergic Clinic of Dermatology Department of University Hospital, between 5 and 10 years of both sexes. Based on the results, it was possible to verify that the Fable of Duss test technique for expression emotional conflicts and discovery of the psychic functioning of these patients.

  12. Filaggrin genotype and skin diseases independent of atopic dermatitis in childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Peter; Wohlfahrt, Jan; Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Filaggrin gene (FLG) mutations compromise skin barrier functions and increase risk of atopic dermatitis. We aimed to study effects on other skin diseases using unique data from the Danish registers. METHODS: FLG genotyping of a population-based sample of 1547 children with extracted DNA...... and information on skin diseases from the Danish National Birth Cohort and Health Register, with 18 years follow-up during years 1996-2013. Odds ratios (OR) and hazard ratios (HR) were estimated using logistic regression and Cox regression, respectively, and adjusted for physician-diagnosed atopic dermatitis....... RESULTS: FLG mutations were associated with increased risk of dry skin (OR 1.9, CI 1.1-3.1), and a decreased risk of fungal skin infections at age

  13. Development of atopic dermatitis during the first 3 years of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halkjær, Liselotte Brydensholt; Loland, Lotte; Buchvald, Frederik F;

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the development of atopic dermatitis (AD) during the first 3 years of life and identify the localization of the early skin lesions that predicts the development of AD. DESIGN: Prospective, longitudinal, birth cohort study of children born to mothers with a history of asthma......, followed up for 3 years with scheduled visits every 6 months as well as visits for onset or acute exacerbations of skin symptoms. SETTING: The cohort was recruited from greater Copenhagen, Denmark, and followed up at a clinical research unit, which controlled all diagnoses and treatment of skin diseases...... predicted AD at age 3 years. CONCLUSIONS: Atopic dermatitis begins at the scalp, forehead, ear, and neck in a balaclava-like pattern. Eczema at the arms and joints provides the highest predictive value for the development of AD at age 3 years. This may be used for early prediction and intervention of AD....

  14. Association between parental socioeconomic position and prevalence of asthma, atopic eczema and hay fever in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer-Helmich, Lene; Linneberg, Allan; Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine the prevalence of asthma, atopic eczema and hay fever among children in different age groups and examine the associations with parental socioeconomic position. METHODS: A cross-sectional health survey of four complete birth-cohorts in the municipality of Copenhagen was conducted....... Children aged 11 and 15 years and parents of children aged 3 and 6 years completed questionnaires on symptoms and diseases. Data were linked to national registers on demographics and socioeconomic position measured as education, employment and income. In total, 9720 children/parents responded (50...... and ranged between 15.5% and 17.8%. Odds Ratios for children of parents with the lowest vs. the highest educational level were 1.50 (95% CI = 1.17-1.91) for asthma; 1.68 (95% CI = 1.35-2.10) for hay fever; and 0.75 (95% CI = 0.64-0.89) for atopic eczema. Unemployment was significantly associated...

  15. Current and Future Concepts in Treatment of Childhood Atopic Dermatitis Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Karakoç Aydıner

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder caused by a dysregulation of immune response to allergenic or non-allergenic stimuli. Interplay of several effector cells including migrating lymphocytes, fibrocytes, Langerhans cells, mast cells and epidermal keratinocytes enroll in the development of AD. Atopic dermatitis affects approximately 20% of children and persists in 6% of adults. Relieving acute exacerbations, improving the quality of life and prevention of side effects in the long term are the main steps of the management of AD. Mild to moderate cases can be controlled with avoidance of triggering factors, skin care and topical medications. In severe cases immune suppression is an option with cumulative toxicity and variable efficacy of drugs as a limiting factor. It is essential to develop safer and efficacious alternatives for the treatment of AD, especially in pediatric age group. (Journal of Current Pediatrics 2011; 9: 39-43

  16. Skin prick test results of atopic asthmatic subjects in a chest disease clinic in Sanliurfa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İbrahim Koç

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Skin prick test (SPT is used widely to determine the allergens in atopic patients. In this study, we aimed to determine the spectrum of aeroallergen sensitivity of atopic asthmatic subjects in Şanlıurfa district. Methods: We evaluated clinical, demographic findings and SPT results of 95 male and 162 female in a total 257 patients who had asthma and allergic symptoms. Results: Most common allergens causing a sensitivity reaction detected in our clinic were as follows; cockroach (56.8%, wheat pollen (53.3%, corn pollen (47.4%, grass pollen (36.5%, poplar tree pollen (26%, house dust mite (19.4%, pepper (16.7% and cat dander (15.1%. Conclusion: High levels of sensitivity to wheat and corn pollens and relatively low sensitivity levels of cat dander results meet our expectations in the area of agricultural land and where pet ownership is not common.

  17. Proof of efficacy of Kamillosan(R) cream in atopic eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzelt-Wenczler, R; Ponce-Pöschl, E

    2000-04-19

    Kamillosan(R) cream contains chamomile extract as active principle manufactured from the chamomile sort Manzana which is rich in active principles and has been proved not to exhibit a chamomile-related allergen potential. For this reason Kamillosan(R) cream is suited for local therapy of atopic eczema. In a partially double-blind, randomized study carried out as a half-side comparison, Kamillosan(R) cream was tested vs. 0.5% hydrocortisone cream and the vehicle cream as placebo in patients suffering from medium-degree atopic eczema. After a 2-week treatment Kamillosan(R) cream showed a mild superiority towards 0.5% hydrocortisone and a marginal difference as compared to placebo.

  18. Cutaneous blood flow during white dermographism in patients with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemp, P; Staberg, B

    1982-10-01

    Cutaneous blood flow was determined before and immediately after rubbing the skin of 7 patients with atopic dermatitis and 6 normal subjects, using the local atraumatic 133Xe-method. In the atopic patients the rubbing of eczematous skin produced white dermographism and simultaneously the cutaneous blood flow decreased in all the patients from 15.2 +/- SEM 1.7 ml/100 g . min before the rubbing to 6.2 +/- SEM 1.6 ml/100 g . min during white dermographism (p less than 0.002). In all the normal subjects the rubbing stimulus was followed by an increase in blood flow from 5.2 +/- SEM 0.6 to 24.4 +/- SEM 3.1 ml/100 g . min (p less than 0.001), although red dermographism was not seen in all. It is concluded that the most reasonable explanation for the pallor during white dermographism is the reduced cutaneous blood flow.

  19. Oral and subcutaneous therapy of canine atopic dermatitis with recombinant feline interferon omega.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litzlbauer, Petra; Weber, Karin; Mueller, Ralf S

    2014-03-01

    Canine atopic dermatitis (CAD) is a common allergic skin disease that has been treated with subcutaneously administered interferons (IFN). Recombinant feline IFN-ω (rFeIFN-ω) was reported to be efficacious for CAD. Whether dogs develop neutralizing antibodies against rFeIFN-ω during long-term treatment and whether orally administered IFNs are efficacious in CAD is unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential development of antibodies against rFeIFN-ω in atopic dogs and to compare subcutaneous and oral IFN therapy. Twenty-six atopic dogs were randomly assigned to two groups. The first group (n=15) received eight subcutaneous injections of rFeIFN-ω (Virbagen® omega, Virbac, Carros, France) over four months, the second group (n=11) received rFeIFN-ω daily orally. Concurrent medication was permitted, except systemically acting glucocorticoids and cyclosporin, which had to be withdrawn at least two weeks prior to the study. Serum samples for antibody detection were collected before and after the study. On days 0, 60 and 120 skin lesions and pruritus were evaluated using a validated lesion score (Canine Atopic Dermatitis Extent and Severity Index=CADESI) and a validated pruritus score. Concurrent medications were recorded. For every visit a total score, consisting of CADESI, pruritus score and medication score was created. For antibody detection an indirect ELISA, using Virbagen® omega as antigen, was performed. Comparison of pruritus scores, CADESI and total scores between days 0 and 120 showed improvement in both groups, however, significant improvement could only be detected in the oral group with CADESI and total scores (61%, P=0.04 and 36%, P=0.02 respectively). Serum antibodies against rFeIFN-ω could not be detected in any of the dogs. In this study antibody production could not be demonstrated. It suggests better efficacy with oral IFN administration, which should be further verified in larger, randomized, controlled studies.

  20. Childhood immunization and atopic disease into middle-age--a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheson, Melanie C; Haydn Walters, E; Burgess, John A; Jenkins, Mark A; Giles, Graham G; Hopper, John L; Abramson, Michael J; Dharmage, Shyamali C

    2010-03-01

    The association between childhood immunizations and risk of atopic diseases is unclear. No study has examined possible associations between childhood immunizations and such diseases in middle age. The Tasmanian Longitudinal Health Study (TAHS) is a population based cohort study of respiratory disease. The TAHS participants were followed from 7 to 44 yrs of age. Immunizations during childhood were examined for any association with asthma and atopic disease at age 44 yrs. Multivariable regression models were used to estimate relative risks while adjusting for confounders. Cox regression was used to estimate the association between childhood immunizations and asthma developing after the age of 7 yrs. We found no association between any childhood immunization (Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis, Polio, Smallpox) and asthma (ORs ranged from 0.87 to 1.17 p > 0.05), eczema (ORs ranged from 0.99 to 1.07 p > 0.05), food allergy (ORs ranged from 0.97 to 1.11 p > 0.05), or hay fever (ORs ranged from 1.02 to 1.05 p > 0.05) at age 44. Nor did we find any association between childhood immunizations and an increased risk of incident asthma after the age of 7 yrs (Diphtheria HR = 1.06, 95% CI 0.82, 1.36; Tetanus HR = 1.13, 95% CI 0.88, 1.44; Pertussis HR = 1.03, 95% CI 0.81, 1.30; Polio HR = 1.15, 95% CI 0.86, 1.54; Smallpox HR = 1.21, 95% CI 0.99, 1.48; DTP HR = 1.05, 95% CI 0.85, 1.30). Our analysis does not support any association between common childhood immunizations and risk of asthma and atopic disease in middle-age. Our findings should provide reassurance that in terms of life time risk of asthma and atopic disease, childhood immunization is safe.

  1. The effeciency of combined laser therapy in complex treatment of patients with atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moskvin S.V.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to access the effectiveness of treatment methods in patients with atopic dermatitis, including every alternate day intravenous blood exposure of a low-intensity laser (LIL with a wavelength of 365 nm (LUFOK and 525 nm (green spectrum. Materials and methods. We observed 37 patients with atopic dermatitis (10 females and 27 males with age ranging from 18 to 56 years (mean age 36.2 with duration of disease ranging from 17 to 54 years. In the main group in the complex therapeutic measures has been included traditional method of laser therapy with Laser therapeutic apparatus "Lazmik-VLOK" (registration certificate number RZN 2014/1410 of 02.06.2014 laser emitting heads VLOK CL-365-2 (for LUFOK and CL-525-2 VLOK intravenous blood laser flash coverage. For VLOK we used disposable sterile radiation emitters KIVL-01 TU 9444-005-72085060-2008 Production Research Centre "Matrix" (Moscow, Russia. Results. It is shown that the combined intravenous laser LLLT treatment of blood with a wavelength of 365 nm (or 365-VLOK LUFOK and LLLT with a wavelength of 525 nm (green spectrum VLOK-525 through 10 sessions per day in treatment of patients with atopic dermatitis allows you to get full regression of acute inflamatory symptoms of the disease like — erythema, papules, scaling, excoriations in 87.5% of patients with moderate-severe course of the disease (average index SCORAD 57,5±4,0 and reduce 3.4 times the average index SCORAD (up 21,3±4,0 in patients with severe disease course (original value 72,8±3,0 with an overall positive trend. Conclusion. The use of combined methods of physiotherapy in atopic dermatitis is justified and effective.

  2. A role for Th17 cells in the immunopathogenesis of atopic dermatitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Cesare, Antonella; Di Meglio, Paola; Nestle, Frank O

    2008-11-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common inflammatory skin disease. Both epidermal barrier dysfunction and immunodysregulation are suggested to influence the pathogenesis of AD. AD has been considered a paradigmatic T helper cell (Th) 2-mediated disease, with a switch to a Th1 cell environment during the chronic phase of the disease. Previously unreported findings now suggest a possible role for Th17 cells as well.

  3. Is atopic disease a risk factor for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, J; Buske-Kirschbaum, A; Roessner, V

    2010-12-01

    The increase in prevalence and burden of atopic diseases, i.e. eczema, rhinitis, and asthma over the past decades was paralleled by a worldwide increase in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) diagnoses. We systematically reviewed epidemiologic studies investigating the relationship between atopic diseases and ADHD. Electronic literature search in PubMed and PsycINFO (until 02/2010) supplemented by handsearch yielded 20 relevant studies totaling 170,175 individuals. Relevant data were abstracted independently by two reviewers. Six studies consistently reported a positive association between eczema and ADHD with one study suggesting effect modification by sleeping problems. Twelve studies consistently found a positive association between asthma and ADHD, which, however, appeared to be at least partly explained (confounded) by concurrent or previous eczema. Rhinitis and serum-IgE level were not related to ADHD symptomatology. We conclude that not atopic disease in general, but rather that eczema appears to be independently related to ADHD. Conclusions about temporality and whether the observed association constitutes a causal relationship are impossible, as most studies were cross-sectional (n = 14; 70%) or case-control studies without incident exposure measurement (n = 5; 25%). Another methodological concern is that the criteria to define atopic disease and ADHD were inadequate in most studies. A failure to adjust for confounders in the majority of studies was an additional limitation so that meta-analysis was not indicated. Future interdisciplinary high-quality prospective research is needed to better understand the mechanisms underlying the relationship between eczema and ADHD and to eventually establish targeted preventive and treatment strategies.

  4. Effect of breast-feeding on the development of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaderi, Reza; Makhmalbaf, Zahra

    2005-09-01

    Atopy can be defined as the genetically determined risk to develop allergic disease. Avoidance of one specific allergen may decrease the risk for sensitization against this allergen, but it will not affect atopy. Our aim was to investigate if exclusive breast-feeding is associated with atopic dermatitis during the first 5 years of life. Data on 200 children were taken from parental-administered questionnaires from a case control study in Birjand - Iran (recruited 2003) comprised of a case (100 children with atopic dermatitis) and a control (100 normal children) subgroup. Outcomes were physician-diagnosed atopic dermatitis (AD) and itchy rash. Data were analyzed by using SPSS package, Chi square and Exact Fisher tests.Thirty-four of the case and 50 of control group were exclusively breast-fed, whereas 6 of the case and 2 of control group were exclusively cow milk-fed. These differences were statistically significant. (P less than 0.05). Duration of breast-feeding in case and control group was different. These differences were statistically significant (P less than 0.001). Duration of cow's milk formula feeding in case and control group was different, but these differences were not statistically significant. (P=0.6) Positive family history of allergy in case and control group was 63% and 23% respectively and this difference was statistically significant (P less than 0.001). These findings support the hypothesis that exclusive breast-feeding is a protective factor for development of atopic dermatitis if compared with conventional cow's milk formula.

  5. FY-3A Launched Atop A LM-4C Launch Vehicle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rain.L

    2008-01-01

    @@ FY-3A,the first satellite of China's new generation of polar-orbiting meteorological satellites,was launched into space atop a modified LM-4C launch vehicle.The satellite separated from the rocket 19 minutes after the takeoff.Flying at an altitude of 807km with an inclination of 98.8 degrees,the satellite circles in polar orbit 14 times everyday,covering the whole globe twice a day.

  6. SPECIFIC DIAGNOSTICS OF ATOPIC DERMATITIS IN CHILDREN WITH THE USE OF SCARIFICATION METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shmulich OV

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work there are presented the results of allergy testings of 186 children suffering from atopic dermatitis. The aim of this study was the specification of casually significant allergen depending on sex and age. Results of testing are processed by a method of the mathematiical analysis, raised in nomograms according to which, considering the nosological entity of disease, sex and age of a patient, it is possible to define causally significant allergen.

  7. Stratum corneum lipids, skin barrier function and filaggrin mutations in patients with atopic eczema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungersted, J M; Scheer, H; Mempel, M

    2010-01-01

    Prior to the discovery of filaggrin (FLG) mutations, evidence for an impaired skin barrier in atopic dermatitis (AD) has been documented, and changes in ceramide profile, altered skin pH and increased trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL) in patients with AD have been reported. Until now, no studies...... have analysed stratum corneum (SC) lipids combined with skin barrier parameters in subjects of known FLG genotype....

  8. Glucocorticoid-induced tumour necrosis factor receptor (GITR) and its ligand (GITRL) in atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumgartner-Nielsen, Jane; Vestergaard, Christian; Thestrup-Pedersen, K.

    2006-01-01

    The glucocorticoid-induced tumour necrosis factor receptor-related gene (GITR) is expressed on regulatory T-cells (Treg), which are CD4+CD25+ lymphocytes. Binding of the GITR-ligand (GITRL) leads to downregulation of the regulatory function of Tregs. Patients suffering from a defect in their Treg......-cells are localized in the vicinity of GITRL-expressing cells in atopic dermatitis skin, the GITR/GITRL interaction may serve to perpetuate the inflammation locally....

  9. Dietary Pattern and Nutrient Intake of Korean Children with Atopic Dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Cui, Hui Song; Ahn, In Su; Byun, Yun Sun; Yang, Yoon Seok; Kim, Jin Hye; Chung, Bo Young; Kim, Hye One; Park, Chun Wook

    2014-01-01

    Background Atopic dermatitis (AD) is characterized by itching and eczema-like skin lesions, and its symptoms alleviate with age. Recently, the prevalence of AD has increased among adolescents and adults. The increasing prevalence of AD seems to be related to westernized lifestyles and dietary patterns. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the dietary patterns and nutrient intake of patients with AD. Methods The study population consisted of 50 children with AD who visited the Depar...

  10. Hydrogel-gauze dressing for moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis: development and efficacy study on atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Shiow-Fern; Lew, Pit-Chin; Sin, Yong-Boey

    2014-11-01

    Topical emollients are known to provide symptomatic relief for atopic dermatitis. In hospitals, wet-wrap therapy has been shown to benefit children with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis (AD), but the application of wet-wraps is tedious and time-consuming. Topical emollients have low residence time and often dry out easily. The aim of this work was to develop a hydrogel-gauze dressing that is not only easy to apply but also rehydrates and traps moisture to provide longer relief for AD patients. In this study, a prototype hydrogel-gauze dressing was developed with varying ratios of sodium carboxymethylcellulose (NaCMC) and propylene glycol. The hydrogel-gauze dressings were assessed based on the moisture vapor transmission rate, moisture absorption, mechanical properties and storage stability over three months. Then, the efficacy of the hydrogel-gauze dressing was compared to topical emollients using transgenic NC/Nga mice with AD-like lesions. The NaCMC hydrogel-gauze dressings significantly lowered transepidermal water loss, and the animals displayed a faster recovery, which indicates that hydrogel-gauze dressings can trap moisture more effectively and accelerate AD healing. Hence, we propose that hydrogel-gauze dressings can potentially become an alternative to wet-wrap therapy due to the ease of application and the higher efficacy compared to topical products.

  11. Atopic Manifestations: Dermatitis, Allergic Rhinitis and Asthma in Patients With Hypogammaglobulinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoo Dadkhah

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Most of the hypogammaglobulinemic patients have a clinical history in favor of allergic respiratory disease. Nevertheless, in these patients the importance and prevalence of atopic disorders have not been completely explained. Objectives: This study was aimed to evaluate atopic manifestations (dermatitis, allergic rhinitis and asthma and pulmonary function in patients with hypogammaglobulinemia. Patients and Methods: We used the international study of asthma and allergies in childhood (ISAAC questionnaire in forty-five patients diagnosed with hypogammaglobulinemia and spirometry was done in 41 patients older than 5 years. Results: Spirometry results were normal in 21 (51%, and showed obstructive in 15 (37% and restrictive pattern in 5 (12% of the 41 patients who were evaluated. By the end of the study, asthma was diagnosed in nine (20% patients and other atopies (rhinitis and dermatitis identified in 10 (22%, and four (9%, respectively. Conclusions: Atopic conditions should be investigated in the hypogammaglobulinemic patients and the prevalence in these patients may be higher than in normal population. Also, it is recommended to perform a pulmonary function test as a routine procedure in patients with hypogammaglobulinemia and atopy should be assessed in these patients.

  12. An Analysis of the Filaggrin Gene Polymorphism in Korean Atopic Dermatitis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kui Young; Li, Kapsok; Seok, Joon; Seo, Seong Jun

    2016-07-01

    Research of the FLG mutation in various ethnic groups revealed non-overlapping mutation patterns. In addition, Japanese and Chinese atopic patients showed somewhat different mutations. These ethnic differences make the research on Korean patients mandatory; however, no systematic research on Korean atopic dermatitis (AD) patients has been performed. This study aims to investigate the genetic polymorphism of FLG in Korean atopic dermatitis patients. The study was made up of three groups including 9 Ichthyosis vulgaris (IV) patients, 50 AD patients and 55 normal controls: the ichthyosis group was incorporated due to the reported association between the FLG mutation and IV. In comparison to other sequencing methods, the overlapping long-range PCR was used. We revealed the genetic polymorphism of filaggrin in Koreans, and at the same time, we discovered nonsense mutations in p.Y1767X and p.K4022X in Korean AD patients. By using FLG sequencing techniques confirmed in this study, new mutations or genetic polymorphisms with ethnic characteristics would be detected and further larger studies of repeat number polymorphisms could be performed.

  13. Corticosteroid therapy in the treatment of pediatric patients with atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leopold, Christine

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Health political background: In developed countries 2.5% of the population - mainly children - are affected by atopic dermatitis. During the past few years its prevalence amongst school children has risen decisively and now lies between 8% to 16%. It is the most frequent chronic skin disease amongst school-aged children. Scientific background: Current methods of treating atopic dermatitis among children focus on containing and preventing the illness’s further progression. Preventing dry skin, relieving symptoms (such as pruritis and inflammation of the skin and identifying and avoiding provocating factors are elementary goals of treatment. Successful treatment can substantially increase the children’s quality of life. Possible therapies of children affected by atopic dermatitis include both topically and systemically applied pharmaceuticals. During the past ten years the use of corticosteroids has been the standard topical anti-inflammatory therapy in case of aggravating inflammations. In 2002 a new group of pharmaceutical substances (topical calcineurin inhibitors tacrolimus and pimecrolimus was authorised in Germany for topical anti-inflammatory treatment of patients. Because of its high prevalence atopic dermatitis represents a major expense factor to the German health care system. In 1999 the costs of the treatment of atopic dermatitis with corticosteroids in Germany amounted to 230 million Euro. If other direct costs for the treatment are included, for example hospitalisation or doctor appointments, the total costs amount to 3.57 billion Euro. Research question: How effective and efficient are topical anti-inflammatory treatments of children with atopic dermatitis? Methods: A systematic literature search was performed in 35 international databases which yielded 1335 articles. Following a two-part selection process according to predefined criteria 24 publications were included in the assessment. Results: Of 19 randomised controlled

  14. Transcriptional Analysis of Hair Follicle-Derived Keratinocytes from Donors with Atopic Dermatitis Reveals Enhanced Induction of IL32 Gene by IFN-γ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshie Yoshikawa

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We cultured human hair follicle-derived keratinocytes (FDKs from plucked hairs. To gain insight into gene expression signatures that can distinguish atopic dermatitis from non-atopic controls without skin biopsies, we undertook a comparative study of gene expression in FDKs from adult donors with atopic dermatitis and non-atopic donors. FDK primary cultures (atopic dermatitis, n = 11; non-atopic controls, n = 7 before and after interferon gamma (IFN-γ treatment were used for microarray analysis and quantitative RT-PCR. Comparison of FDKs from atopic and non-atopic donors indicated that the former showed activated pathways with innate immunity and decreased pathways of cell growth, as indicated by increased NLRP2 expression and decreased DKK1 expression, respectively. Treatment with IFN-γ induced the enhanced expression of IL32, IL1B, IL8, and CXCL1 in the cells from atopic donors compared to that in cells from non-atopic donors at 24 h after treatment. IL1B expression in FDKs after IFN-γ treatment correlated with IL32 expression. We hypothesized that overexpression of IL32 in hair follicle keratinocytes of patients with atopic dermatitis would lead to the excessive production of pro-IL1β and that the activation of IL1β from pro-IL1β by inflammasome complex, in which NLRP2 protein might be involved, would be augmented. This is the first report to show enhanced induction of cytokine/chemokine genes by IFN-γ in atopic dermatitis using cultured FDKs.

  15. The clinical observation of keratoconjunctivitis induced by toxic gas of paint%油漆、漆料的有害气体致化学性结膜角膜炎

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙晋; 李琳; 李翔; 韩玉灵; 于慧娟; 龚佳佳

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨油漆、漆料的有害气体致化学性结膜角膜炎的诊断与治疗的方法.方法 对29例(58眼)油漆、漆料的气体致化学性结膜角膜炎的发病特点与临床表现及治疗体会进行归纳总结.结果 全部有类似电光性眼炎的表现.大多合并角膜内皮水肿,甚者上皮迁延不愈导致感染.通过眼部冲洗,1%阿托品散瞳,局部和全身应用抗生素、维生素C、地塞米松,严重者涂抗生素眼膏加压包扎,均能收到良好的治疗效果.结论 凡在临床上发现有类似电光性眼炎表现,且合并角膜内皮水肿,或角膜上皮迁延不愈者应详询有无有害气体接触史以确诊,并按化学性眼炎治疗,以免误诊误治.%Objective To explore the diagnosis and treatment of keratoconjunctivitis induced by toxic gas of paint.Methods The clinical features and treatments were concluded and analyzed about 29 cases (58 eyes) of keratoconjunctivitis induced by toxic gas of paint.Results All cases had clinical manifestion similar with electric ophthalmia.Most cases had corneal endothelial edema,some of which had delay healing of epithelia and epithelial infection.Clinical treatments included irrigation,pupil dilation by 1% atropine,local and systemic application of antibiotics,vitamin C and dexamethason,pressure dressing with antibiotic ointment in severe cases.All the therapeutic measures had good effects.Conclusion Patients with similar electric ophthalmia features and corneal endothelial edema or delayed healing of epithelia should be asked about toxic gas history to avoid misdiagnosis.These patients should be treated as chemical ophthalmia.

  16. Family functioning and illness perception of parents of children with atopic dermatitis, living without skin symptoms, but with psychosomatic symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Orozco, Alain R; Kanán-Cedeño, E G; Guillén Martínez, E; Campos Garibay, M J

    2011-03-01

    Emotional factors and a recurrent psychosomatic environment, have been implicated in the evolution of atopic dermatitis. These, in turn, affect the disease. This study was under taken to evaluate the functioning of families with a child that has atopic dermatitis without skin symptoms and the parents' perceptions of their child's disease.Semi-quantitative and cross-sectional study in which questionnaires were applied: one to study family functioning (Espejel et al. scale) and the second to determine aspects of parental perception of their child's atopic dermatitis. Pearson's correlation was used to analyze the correlation between the categories of the Family Function Scale.The most affected categories of family functioning were authority, handling of disruptive conduct, communication, and negative affect. The most significant positive correlations between the categories of family functioning were: authority and support, r=0.867, pparents, 66.4% thought that the pharmacotherapy used for their child's atopic dermatitis was not effective, and 33.3% of parents stated that the disease had affected their child's daily activities.In families of children with atopic dermatitis, various family environment factors facilitate the recurrence of symptoms even when no cutaneous lesions have been found on the child. The identification and use of family resources to face this disease are aspects that should be taken into consideration during the psychotherapeutic management of these families, putting emphasis on the most affected functional categories of these families in a strategy that should be implanted in a multi-disciplinary context.

  17. Differential effects of peptidoglycan recognition proteins on experimental atopic and contact dermatitis mediated by Treg and Th17 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Shin Yong; Gupta, Dipika; Kim, Chang H; Dziarski, Roman

    2011-01-01

    Skin protects the body from the environment and is an important component of the innate and adaptive immune systems. Atopic dermatitis and contact dermatitis are among the most frequent inflammatory skin diseases and are both determined by multigenic predisposition, environmental factors, and aberrant immune response. Peptidoglycan Recognition Proteins (Pglyrps) are expressed in the skin and we report here that they modulate sensitivity to experimentally-induced atopic dermatitis and contact dermatitis. Pglyrp3(-/-) and Pglyrp4(-/-) mice (but not Pglyrp2(-/-) mice) develop more severe oxazolone-induced atopic dermatitis than wild type (WT) mice. The common mechanism underlying this increased sensitivity of Pglyrp3(-/-) and Pglyrp4(-/-) mice to atopic dermatitis is reduced recruitment of Treg cells to the skin and enhanced production and activation Th17 cells in Pglyrp3(-/-) and Pglyrp4(-/-) mice, which results in more severe inflammation and keratinocyte proliferation. This mechanism is supported by decreased inflammation in Pglyrp3(-/-) mice following in vivo induction of Treg cells by vitamin D or after neutralization of IL-17. By contrast, Pglyrp1(-/-) mice develop less severe oxazolone-induced atopic dermatitis and also oxazolone-induced contact dermatitis than WT mice. Thus, Pglyrp3 and Pglyrp4 limit over-activation of Th17 cells by promoting accumulation of Treg cells at the site of chronic inflammation, which protects the skin from exaggerated inflammatory response to cell activators and allergens, whereas Pglyrp1 has an opposite pro-inflammatory effect in the skin.

  18. Association of atopic diseases and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: A systematic review and meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schans, Jurjen van der; Çiçek, Rukiye; de Vries, Tjalling W; Hak, Eelko; Hoekstra, Pieter J

    2017-03-01

    Over the last decades, the hypothesis has been raised that an atopic response could lead to the development of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This study systematically reviews the observational cross-sectional and longitudinal studies that assessed the association between atopic disorders including asthma, atopic eczema, allergic rhinitis, and ADHD in children and adolescents. For longitudinal studies, a weighted Mantel-Haenszel odds ratio of these associations was estimated. The majority of cross-sectional and longitudinal studies reported a statistically significant positive association. The meta-analysis of longitudinal studies revealed an overall weighted odds ratio for asthma of 1.34 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.24-1.44), 1.32 (95% CI 1.20-1.45) for atopic eczema, and 1.52 (95% CI 1.43-1.63) for allergic rhinitis. Heterogeneity of study data was low (I(2): 0%, p=0.46 and p=0.64, respectively) for both studies examining asthma and eczema but substantial for rhinitis studies (I(2): 82%, p=0.004). This current systematic review provides strong evidence that ADHD is associated with atopic diseases and that individuals have a 30% to 50% greater chance of developing ADHD compared to controls.

  19. Search for Rare Quark-Annihilation Decays, B± → D$(*)±\\atop{s}$Φ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, J. Adam M. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    2006-09-01

    The authors report on a search for the decay B± → D$(*)±\\atop{s}$Φ using 212.2 fb-1 of data collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center between 1999 and 2004. This sample of 234 x 106 e+e- → Y(4S) → B$\\bar{B}$ events yields no significant signal. They report the Bayesian upper limits β(B± → D$(*)±\\atop{s}$Φ) x β(D$(*)±\\atop{s}$ → Φπ±) < 8.6 x 10-8 and β(B± → D$(*)±\\atop{s}$±Φ) x β(Ds± → Φπ±) < 5.4 x 10-7 at the 90% C.L. Using the latest measurement of β(D$(*)±\\atop{s}$ → Φπ±), they report: β(B± → Ds±Φ) < 1.8 x 10-6 and β(B± → D*s±Φ) < 1.1 x 10-5 at the 90% C.L.

  20. Interrelationships between Atopic Disorders in Children: A Meta-Analysis Based on ISAAC Questionnaires.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David H J Pols

    Full Text Available To study the prevalence and interrelationship between asthma, allergic rhinitis and eczema using data obtained from ISAAC questionnaires.The Medline, Pubmed Publisher, EMBASE, Google Scholar and the Cochrane Controlled Clinical Trials Register databases were systematically reviewed to evaluate epidemiological data of children with atopic disorders. To study these interrelationships, a new approach was used. Risk ratios were calculated, describing the risk of having two different atopic disorders when the child is known with one disorder.Included were 31 studies, covering a large number of surveyed children (n=1,430,329 in 102 countries. The calculated worldwide prevalence for asthma, eczema and allergic rhinitis is 12.00% (95% CI: 11.99-12.00, 7.88% (95% CI: 7.88-7.89 and 12.66% (95% CI: 12.65-12.67, respectively. The observed prevalence [1.17% (95% CI: 1.17-1.17] of having all three diseases is 9.8 times higher than could be expected by chance. For children with asthma the calculated risk ratio of having the other two disorders is 5.41 (95% CI: 4.76-6.16, for children with eczema 4.24 (95% CI: 3.75-4.79, and for children with allergic rhinitis 6.20 (95% CI: 5.30-7.27. No studied confounders had a significant influence on these risk ratios.Only a minority of children suffers from all three atopic disorders, however this co-occurrence is significantly higher than could be expected by chance and supports a close relationship of these disorders in children. The data of this meta-analysis supports the hypothesis that there could be a fourth distinct group of children with all three disorders. Researchers and clinicians might need to consider these children as a separate group with distinct characteristics regarding severity, causes, treatment or prognosis.

  1. Serum Levels of Il-8, Tnf-α And Il-6 in Children with Atopic Dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perihan Öztürk

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In­tro­duc­ti­on: Atopic dermatitis (AD is associated with an imbalance between T helper 1 (Th1 and T helper 2 (Th2 cells. It is chronic relapsing inflammatory skin disease affecting especially the children. Recently, it has been intensively studied and new aspects regarding the immunopathogenesis are suggested. Studies about the role of cytokines on formation of atopic diseases are rather new and most of them are based on in vitro observations. It is not completely clear yet how cytokines regulate diseases in vivo and studies about this subject are rather limited. In this study; the serum levels of IL-8, TNF-α, IL-6 and the relationship between these parameters and the disease severity in a group of children with AD were investigated.Materials and Methods: The severity of AD was assessed by the same dermatologist using the Scoring Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD index system. IL-8, TNF-α, and IL-6 levels were measured by ELISA method.Results: Serum levels of IL-8, TNF-α and IL-6 were determined and were found statistically significantly higher in patients than controls. A statistically significant correlation between serum levels of IL-8, TNF-α, and IL-6 and SCORADs in children with AD was determined.Conclusion: These results show that serum levels of IL-8, TNF-α, and IL-6 may be used as important markers in the assessment of disease severity and follow-up of child patients with AD. As a result, the role of cytokines and the relationship between cytokines in the immunopathogenesis of AD are rather complex and still not clearly clarified, further investigations are required to understand this complex process. (Jo­ur­nal of Cur­rent Pe­di­at­rics 2012; 10: 50-4

  2. CLINICAL AND IMMUNOLOGICAL EFFICIENCY OF MURAMYL DIPEPTIDE IN THE TREATMENT OF ATOPIC DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Kolesnikova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased incidence of allergic diseases worldwide reflects some mangles of the existing pharmacotherapy concept which ignores some etiopathogenetic aspects of clinical atopy. Meanwhile, understanding cellular and molecular mechanisms of allergy may create prerequisites for development of new therapeutic areas, in order to effectively influence pathogenesis points of allergic inflammation and, thus, leading to therapeutic success. The review article concerns an antagonism between the two populations of T-helper cells (Th1 and Th2 carried out mainly by the action of IFNγ produced by activated Th1, and IL-4 secreted by activated Th2 which is at the heart of modern concept on the regulation of adaptive immunity. The prospects of immunotherapy of allergic diseases based on the polarization of the immune response are discussed, i.e., an activation of Th1 responses and Th2 suppression. This functional polarization can be mediated by the innate immune receptor agonist, i.e., synthetic and natural minimally-sized biologically active fragments (MBAF with pathogen-associated molecular patterns. In this respect, a very promising drug registered in Russia is based on the synthetic MBAF, glucosaminylmuramyldipeptide (GMDP, The liсopid immunomodulator. This is due to the fact that GMDP, being an active substance of Liсopid, is a highly specific ligand for the NOD2 receptor of innate immunity factors; it may cause activation of the NF-kB transcription factor, and production of multiple immunoregulatory cytokines. Clinical and immunological efficacy of Licopid application in conventional therapy of atopic allergic diseases (asthma, atopic dermatitis, atopic variant of acute obstructive bronchitis is presented as an overview of pre-clinical and clinical trials.

  3. Is frictional lichenoid dermatitis a minor variant of atopic dermatitis or a photodermatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabir Sardana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Frictional lichenoid dermatitis. Background: Frictional lichenoid dermatitis (FLE is an entity that is probably under diagnosed and has been variably associated with either friction and/or atopy with a distinctive seasonal variation. Aims and Objectives : To study correlation of FLE with UV index and to assess its association with atopic dermatitis. Materials and Methods: A cross sectional analysis of children with FLE was done, over a period of 6 years in two tertiary hospitals. A detailed history and examination was done to assess the features of atopic dermatitis. The number of cases seen per month was compared with the mean monthly UV index. Two-tailed significance tests using Pearson′s coefficient of correlation and T-test were used to interpret the data. (P < 0.05. Results: One hundred seventy-four patients were studied using the UKC criterion 17.2% of the patients had AD while xerosis (40.3% was the predominant cutaneous finding. The number of patients seen in summer was more than in winter (P < 0.05 but there was no statistical difference between the cases in winter and spring. There was a significant correlation of the number of cases per month with UV index (P = 0.019. Almost 42% of patients gave a history of recurrence. Conclusions : FLE is probably not associated with atopic dermatitis and is likely to be related to the ambient UV index though a larger cohort with meticulous follow up may be needed to draw a final conclusion. Statistical Analysis Used: The Pearson′s coefficient of correlation was used for comparing the cases per month with the UV index. The tests of hypothesis used included the paired T-tests. F-test of variance, Welch test, Wilcoxon rank sum test and the Kolmogorov-Smirnov Test. P < 0.05 was considered significant.

  4. Atopic dermatitis guideline. Position paper from the Latin American Society of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Jorge; Páez, Bruno; Macías, A; Olmos, C; de Falco, A

    2014-01-01

    As in other regions, the incidence of atopic dermatitis in Latin America has been increasing in recent years. Although there are several clinical guidelines, many of their recommendations cannot be universal since they depend on the characteristics of each region. Thus, we decided to create a consensus guideline on atopic dermatitis applicable in Latin America and other tropical regions, taking into account socio-economic, geographical, cultural and health care system characteristics. The Latin American Society of Allergy Asthma and Immunology (SLAAI) conducted a systematic search for articles related to the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of dermatitis using various electronic resources such as Google, Pubmed, EMBASE (Ovid) and Cochrane data base. We have also looked for all published articles in Latin America on the subject using LILACS (Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences) database. Each section was reviewed by at least two members of the committee, and the final version was subsequently approved by all of them, using the Delphi methodology for consensus building. Afterward, the final document was shared for external evaluation with physicians, specialists (allergists, dermatologists and pediatricians), patients and academic institutions such as universities and scientific societies related to the topic. All recommendations made by these groups were taken into account for the final drafting of the document. There are few original studies conducted in Latin America about dermatitis; however, we were able to create a practical guideline for Latin America taking into account the particularities of the region. Moreover, the integral management was highlighted including many of the recommendations from different participants in the health care of this disease (patients, families, primary care physicians and specialists). This practical guide presents a concise approach to the diagnosis and management of atopic dermatitis that can be

  5. Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate affects immune cells from atopic prone mice in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Eiko; Inoue, Ken-ichiro; Yanagisawa, Rie; Takano, Hirohisa

    2009-05-02

    Phthalate esters as plasticizers have been widespread in the environment and may be associated with development of allergic diseases such as asthma and atopic dermatitis. However, the underlying mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. The present study investigated the effects of di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) on immune cells from atopic prone NC/Nga mice in vitro. Bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDC) as a professional antigen-presenting cell and splenocytes as mixture of immune cells were used. BMDC were differentiated by culture with granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in the presence of DEHP (0.1-10microM) for 6 days. In another experiments, BMDC were differentiated by culture with GM-CSF for 8 days then these BMDC were exposed to DEHP (0.1-100microM) for 24h. Splenocytes were exposed to DEHP for 24h (0.1-100microM) or 72h (0.1-1000nM). After the culture, the phenotypic markers and the function of BMDC and splenocytes were evaluated. BMDC differentiated in the presence of DEHP showed enhancement in the expression of MHC class II, CD86, CD11c and DEC205, and in their antigen-presenting activity. On the other hand, the function of the differentiated BMDC was not activated by DEHP although DEHP partly enhanced their expression of DEC205. DEHP-exposed splenocytes showed increases in their TCR and CD3 expression, interleukin-4 production, and antigen-stimulated proliferation. These results demonstrate that DEHP enhances BMDC differentiation but not activation and also enhances Th2 response in splenocytes from atopic prone mice. The enhancement might contribute to the aggravating effect of DEHP on allergic disorders.

  6. Canine and feline atopic dermatitis: a review of the diagnostic options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, C A

    2001-11-01

    Atopic dermatitis is an inherited pruritic skin disease in dogs and cats. This pruritic skin condition is due to the animal having an allergic reaction to environmental allergens. The environmental allergens that an individual dog or cat is allergic to are specific for that individual animal. Management options for affected dogs and cats include identification of the offending environmental allergens and subsequent avoidance of that allergen, or allergen-specific immunotherapy. Several diagnostic tests are available to veterinarians to try to identify these allergens. The pros and cons of each of these diagnostic tests will be addressed.

  7. Immunophenotyping of the cutaneous cellular infiltrate after atopy patch testing in cats with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roosje, P J; Thepen, T; Rutten, V P M G; van den Brom, W E; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, C A F M; Willemse, T

    2004-10-01

    Cats with spontaneously occurring atopic dermatitis have clinical and immunocytochemical characteristics compatible with these in humans with atopic dermatitis (AD). The atopy patch test (APT) has proven to be a valuable tool in elucidating the disease process in humans. Additionally, the APT is very specific and bypasses the problem of conflicting results due to differences in chronicity of lesions of AD patients. We adapted the APT for use in cats to explore the suitability of the APT as a tool to study the onset of allergic inflammation in cats with atopic dermatitis. APT were performed in AD cats (n = 6) and healthy cats (n = 10). All cats were patch tested with two allergens in three different dilutions and a diluent control. The allergens for the APT were selected from positive intradermal test and /or prick test results and consisted of: Dermatophagoides farinae, D. pteronyssinus, Tyrophagus putrescentiae, and a grass pollen mixture. APT were read after 10, 24 and 48 h, and punch biopsies for immunohistochemical evaluation were collected at these time points. Macroscopically positive APT reactions were observed in three out of six cats at 24 and/or 48 h with allergen concentrations of 25,000 and 100,000 NU/ml. Reactions were not observed at negative control sites and neither in control animals. A significantly increased number of IL-4+, CD4+, CD3+, MHC class II+ and CD1a+ cells was found in one AD cat with positive APT reactions. Five out of six AD cats had significantly increased IL-4+ T cell numbers at 24 and/or 48 h. Our data indicate that in cats, macroscopically positive patch test reactions can be induced, which have a cellular infiltrate similar to that in lesional skin. We found a high specificity and a macroscopically positive APT reaction in half of the cats, which is similar to what is seen in humans. Hence, the APT in cats might be a useful tool in studying the immunopathogenesis of feline atopic dermatitis.

  8. Season of birth and risk of atopic disease among children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Thomas Bøllingtoft; Thomsen, Simon Francis; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Season of birth (SOB) has been regarded as a risk factor for atopy. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between season of birth (SOB) and later development of atopic disease in children and adolescents. METHODS: A total of 1,007 randomly selected subjects, 7 to 17...... not significantly related to SOB. CONCLUSIONS: Atopy itself is independent of season of birth, whereas asthma is more prevalent among subjects born during the autumn. Regarding asthma, these results suggest that the first months of life enclose a period of particular vulnerability towards environmental risk factors...

  9. Skin symptoms in patients with atopic dermatitis using enzyme-containing detergents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Hundevadt; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Mosbech, H

    1998-01-01

    Detergent enzymes may cause skin irritation and occasionally hypersensitivity reactions. The potential hazards of these enzymes have led some physicians to advise atopic dermatitis patients against the use of enzyme-enriched detergents. A three-phased randomised, double-blind, cross-over experiment...... of 25 patients completed the study. The primary efficacy parameters were inter-period changes in corticosteroid usage and changes in SCORAD. Secondary efficacy parameters were altered subjective symptoms scored during the final 2 weeks of each interval. Analyses of all data revealed no statistical......, it is unlikely that consumers with "normal skin" will experience any skin discomfort when enzyme-enriched detergents are used....

  10. Development of human skin equivalents to unravel the impaired skin barrier in atopic dermatitis skin

    OpenAIRE

    Eweje, M.O.

    2016-01-01

    The studies in this thesis describes the barrier defects in Atopic Dermatitis (AD) skin and various techniques to develop AD Human Skin Equivalents (HSEs) which can be used to better understand the role of several factors in the pathogenesis of AD skin. The results described show that Inflammation plays a pivotal role in the development of epidermal and SC features of AD skin and that AD epidermal features can be maintained in vitro when AD skin biopsies are used to generate explant-HSEs. The...

  11. Immunomodulatory effect of water soluble extract separated from mycelium of Phellinus linteus on experimental atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwang Ji

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM is becoming a popular treatment for modulating diverse immune disorders. Phellinus linteus (P. linteus as one of the CAMs has been used to modulate cancers, inflammation and allergic activities. However, little evidence has been shown about its underlying mechanism of action by which it exerts a beneficial role in dermatological disease in vivo. In this study, we examined the immunomodulatory effects of P. linteus on experimental atopic dermatitis (AD and elucidated its action mechanism. Methods The immunomodulatory effect of total extract of P. linteus on IgE production by human myeloma U266B1 cells was measured by ELISA. To further identify the effective components, P. linteus was fractionated into methanol soluble, water soluble and boiling water soluble extracts. Each extract was treated to U266B1 cells and primary B cells to compare their inhibitory effects on IgE secretion. To test the in vivo efficacy, experimental atopic dermatitis (AD was established by alternative treatment of DNCB and house dust mite extract into BALB/c mice. Water soluble extract of P. linteus (WA or ceramide as a positive control were topically applied to ears of atopic mouse every day for 2 weeks and progression of the disease was estimated by the following criteria: (a ear thickness, clinical score, (b serum total IgE, IgG and mite specific IgE level by ELSIA, (c histological examination of ear tissue by H&E staining and (d cytokine profile of total ear cells and CD4+ T cells by real time PCR and ELSIA. Results Treatment of total extracts of P. linteus to U266B1 inhibited IgE secretion. Among the diverse extracts of P. linteus, water soluble extract of P. linteus (WA significantly reduced the IgE production in primary B cells and B cell line U266B1. Moreover, treatment of WA reduced AD symptoms such as ear swelling, erythema, and dryness and decreased recruitment of lymphocyte into the inflamed site

  12. Cedar Pollen Aggravates Atopic Dermatitis in Childhood Monozygotic Twin Patients with Allergic Rhino Conjunctivitis

    OpenAIRE

    Yukako Murakami; Saki Matsui; Akiko Kijima; Shun Kitaba; Hiroyuki Murota; Ichiro Katayama

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of 7-year-old monozygotic twin patients with atopic dermatitis. The HLA haplotypes were HLA A2, A11, B27, B61, DR1, and DR4. Both serum IgE levels and cedar pollen radioallergosorbent test (RAST) scores were high in the twins (elder/younger sister: IgE: 5170/3980 IU/ml and Japansese cedar pollen: >100/64.0) in contrast to low mite and food RAST scores (Dermatophagoides Pterygonium; 0.59/0.4 and egg white 9.24/4.6). The patients showed positive immediate (20 min in both sister...

  13. Immunoproteomic characterization of Ambrosia artemisiifolia pollen allergens in canine atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ognjenovic, Jana; Milcic-Matic, Natalija; Smiljanic, Katarina; Vuckovic, Olga; Burazer, Lidija; Popovic, Nikola; Stanic-Vucinic, Dragana; Velickovic, Tanja Cirkovic

    2013-09-01

    Canine atopic dermatitis (CAD) is an immune system disorder that affects 10-15% of the canine population. Short ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) pollen represents one of the major seasonal sources of allergenic pollen proteins in Europe, particularly in the Pannonian valley of the Balkan region. In Serbia, about 66% of atopic dogs showed a positive intradermal skin test with its pollen extract, which is second to house dust mites. Therefore, characterization of Ambrosia artemisiifolia pollen components, in terms of defining major and minor allergens that induce clinically manifested allergic reaction in dogs, is important for valid diagnosis and efficient therapy. This study has, for the first time, characterized and identified major Ambrosia artemisiifolia allergens in CAD, using an immunoproteomic approach. To assess the prevalence of specific IgE in electrophoretically separated ragweed pollen proteins, individual reactivity of sera from dogs with CAD was analyzed and compared to the reactivity of sera from healthy dogs in the non-reducing conditions, which were found optimal for specific canine IgE detection. A specific IgE band (38 kDa) was recognized as the most dominant allergen in CAD, occurring in 81% of positive dog's sera. 2-D immunoblotting followed by a mass spectrometry peptide fingerprint analyses with pooled canine and human atopic sera, revealed that 38 kDa major Ambrosia atremisiifolia allergens in CAD were all five isoallergens of the Amb a 1 group (antigen E), including the previously named Amb a 2 (antigen K). In contrast to canine sera, human atopic sera also recognized lower mass allergens such as the β fragment of Amb a 1 and profilins (Amb a 8 variants). The most prominent ragweed proteins in CAD, represent, as in humans, variants of all five isoallergens of the Amb a 1 group (pectate lyase): Amb a 1.0101 and its natural variant E1XUL2, Amb a 1.0202, 1.0304, 1.0402 and the natural variant of Amb a 1.0501, E1XUM0, as well as the

  14. Molecular targets of quercetin with anti-inflammatory properties in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuppagounder, Vengadeshprabhu; Arumugam, Somasundaram; Thandavarayan, Rajarajan A; Sreedhar, Remya; Giridharan, Vijayasree V; Watanabe, Kenichi

    2016-04-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is an inflammatory skin disease. Over the past few decades, AD has become more prevalent worldwide. Quercetin, a naturally occurring polyphenol, shows antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiallergic activities. Several recent clinical and preclinical findings suggest quercetin as a promising natural treatment for inflammatory skin diseases. Significant progress in elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying the anti-AD properties of quercetin has been achieved in the recent years. Here, we discuss the use of quercetin as treatment for AD, with a particular focus on the molecular basis of its effect. We also briefly discuss the approaches to improve the bioavailability of quercetin.

  15. Automatic braking system modification for the Advanced Transport Operating Systems (ATOPS) Transportation Systems Research Vehicle (TSRV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coogan, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    Modifications were designed for the B-737-100 Research Aircraft autobrake system hardware of the Advanced Transport Operating Systems (ATOPS) Program at Langley Research Center. These modifications will allow the on-board flight control computer to control the aircraft deceleration after landing to a continuously variable level for the purpose of executing automatic high speed turn-offs from the runway. A bread board version of the proposed modifications was built and tested in simulated stopping conditions. Test results, for various aircraft weights, turnoff speed, winds, and runway conditions show that the turnoff speeds are achieved generally with errors less than 1 ft/sec.

  16. Children with atopic dermatitis and frequent emollient use have increased urinary levels of low molecular weight phthalate metabolites and parabens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Line E K; Main, Katharina M; Frederiksen, Hanne

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Parabens may be added to cosmetic and personal care products for preservation purposes. Low-molecular weight (LMW) phthalate diesters function as plasticizers, fixatives or solvents in such products, but may also be found in small quantities as contaminants from plastic containers....... OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between emollient use, atopic dermatitis and FLG mutations, respectively, with urinary concentrations of phthalate metabolites and parabens in Danish children. METHODS: 845 Danish children 4-9 years of age were studied. Urinary concentrations of phthalate metabolites...... and parabens were determined, and children were genotyped for common FLG loss-of-function mutations. Information about atopic dermatitis and use of emollients was obtained from questionnaires completed by parents. RESULTS: The prevalence of atopic dermatitis was 16.1%. Phthalate metabolite and paraben levels...

  17. Telomerase activity is increased and telomere length shortened in T cells from blood of patients with atopic dermatitis and psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Kehuai; Higashi, N; Hansen, E R;

    2000-01-01

    We studied telomerase activity and telomere length in PBMC and purified CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells from blood obtained from a total of 32 patients with atopic dermatitis, 16 patients with psoriasis, and 30 normal controls. The telomerase activity was significantly increased in PBMC from the patients...... compared with PBMC from normal donors. This increase was most pronounced in the subpopulation of CD4(+) T cells, which were significantly above the activity of the CD8(+) T cells in atopic dermatitis, psoriasis patients, and control persons. The telomere length was significantly reduced in all T cell...... subsets from both atopic dermatitis and psoriasis patients compared with normal individuals. Furthermore, the telomere length was found to be significantly shorter in CD4(+) memory T cells compared with the CD4(+) naive T cells, and both of the cell subsets from diseases were shown to be of significantly...

  18. Digestion of atopic allergens with trypsin α-chymotrypsin and pancreatic kallikrein, and influence of the allergens upon the proteolytic and esterolytic activity of these enzymes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berrens, L.

    1968-01-01

    The action of bovine trypsin, α-chymotrypsin and pancreatic kallikrein upon a number of atopic allergens has been studied by pH-stat measurements during short-term incubation. Most atopic allergens proved chemically resistant towards these enzymes. Graphs of enzyme susceptibility vs. the ratio of ex

  19. Analysis of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) RS23472497 associated with canine atopic dermatitis by ACRS-PCR method

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the paper was to identify of the SNP rs23472497 associated with canine atopic dermatitis (cAD). cAD is a common inflammatory skin disease that is considered to be a naturally occurring, spontaneous model of human atopic dermatitis (eczema). The material involved 60 dogs from 6 different breeds. Canine genomic DNA was isolated from saliva by modified method with using DNAzol® and linear polyacrylamide (LPA) carrier and from blood by using commercial kit NucleospinBlood and used in...

  20. Potential role of reduced environmental UV exposure as a driver of the current epidemic of atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Zirwas, Matthew J; Elias, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    disorders in general), including breast-feeding, tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption, and exposure to domesticated furry pets. Notably, the key role of a compromised barrier of neonatal skin as a predisposing factor in the development of childhood AD has recently been demonstrated. In this article we......The basis for the sudden and dramatic increase in atopic dermatitis (AD) and related atopic diseases in the second half of the 20th century is unclear. The hygiene hypothesis proposes that the transition from rural to urban living leads to reduced childhood exposure to pathogenic microorganisms...

  1. Effect of horse gram lectin (Dolichos biflorus agglutinin) on degranulation of mast cells and basophils of atopic subjects: identification as an allergen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramod, Siddanakoppalu N; Krishnakantha, Thirumalai P; Venkatesh, Yeldur P

    2006-11-01

    Horse gram (Dolichos biflorus) is widely consumed in the tropical south Asian countries including rural areas of India. Since D. biflorus agglutinin (DBA) is an important dietary lectin in horse gram, we have studied its effect on the degranulation of mast cells and basophils of atopic subjects. Allergy to horse gram lectin has not been reported so far. Skin prick test (SPT) was performed with 100 microg/mL of DBA. DBA-specific IgE was detected by dot-blot, and ELISA. Histamine release (HR) assay was carried out using leukocytes from non-atopic and atopic subjects, and rat peritoneal exudate cells. Among the atopic group, 10 of 48 subjects (21%) were found to be positive for DBA by SPT, and none were positive in the non-atopic group (n=20). Two subjects out of the ten who tested positive for DBA by SPT were found to be sensitized to DBA as revealed by the presence of specific IgE by ELISA and dot-blot. The HR was found to be 2- to 3-fold higher in DBA-allergic subjects than in non-atopic and atopic subjects. Basophil HR by DBA was found to be similar in both non-atopic and atopic subjects. However, DBA induces activation of mast cells in vivo in a sub-population (21%) of atopic subjects. Two subjects have been identified as having food allergy to horse gram based on the presence of DBA-specific IgE with a positive correlation to basophil HR. This is the first report of food allergy to horse gram, and DBA has been identified as an allergen.

  2. Dysfunction of pulmonary immuity in atopic asthma: Possible role of T helper cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bice, D.E.; Schuyler, M.R. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-12-01

    Atopic asthma is characterized by the production of allergen-specific IgE and IgG{sub 4} antibody and airway hyperreactivity caused by interactions between the immune system and inhaled allergens. Recent studies suggest that the production of IgE and IgG{sub 4} antibody important in atopic disease requires help from Th2 lymphocytes, while Th1 lymphocytes support the production of immune responses that would not cause asthma. The evaluation of cells from the lungs of asthmatics indicated that they have elevated Th2 immune responses. However, no study has compared the immune responses that develop in asthmatics and normals (people without asthma) after their lungs are exposed to a neoantigen. The purpose of this study was to determine if Th2 immunity would be produced to a neoantigen, keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH), deposited in the lungs of asthmatics, while Th1 immunity would be produced to KLH deposited in the lungs of nonasthmatics. Because the production of IgG{sub 4} requires Th2 immune help, the higher level of anti-KLH IgG{sub 4} in the serum of asthmatics suggests that a Th2 immune response was produced to a neoantigen deposited in their lungs.

  3. Effect of German chamomile oil application on alleviating atopic dermatitis-like immune alterations in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soon-Hee; Heo, Yong; Kim, Young-Chul

    2010-03-01

    Historically, German chamomile (GC) oil has been used for treatment of skin disorders. BALB/c mice were sensitized twice a week with 100 microL of 1% 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) and challenged twice the following week with 100 microL of 0.2% DNCB for atopic dermatitis induction. Thereafter, 3% GC oil was applied daily (70 microL, 6 times week) on the dorsal skin for 4 weeks. Saline or jojoba oil was used for the control mice. Blood was collected after second DNCB challenge, and at 2 and 4 weeks after initiating oil application. Serum IgE levels were significantly lowered in the GC oil application group at the end of the 4-week application period. The GC oil application for 4 weeks resulted in reduction in serum IgG1 level compared with that after 2-week application. The GC oil application group showed a significantly lower serum histamine level than the control group 2 weeks after oil application. Scratching frequency of the GC oil application group was significantly lower than either control groups. This study is to demonstrate GC oil's immunoregulatory potential for alleviating atopic dermatitis through influencing of Th2 cell activation.

  4. A tragic case of atopic eczema: malnutrition and infections despite multivitamins and supplements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kam Lun Hon

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Eczema  is  a  common  childhood  atopic  condition and treatment is with emollients,  topical corticosteroids and  avoidance  of  possible  triggers. S.  aurues colonization is a common complication. During exacerbation,  intensification  of treatment  is needed  to relieve   the  child   from   the   miserable   symptoms   of pruritus   and  sleep  disturbance.   Systemic   antibiotics against S. aureus may be required.We  report  an  infant  with  eczema  who  presented with a generalised rash, cardiac arrest and septic shock. Kwashiorkor-like    protein    energy   malnutrition    was noted presumably due to deviated dietary practice. Childhood  eczema  is an eminently  treatable  atopic disease. Extreme alternative therapy seems not to be efficacious and may even be associated with grave sequelae.

  5. Formulation and clinical evaluation of silymarin pluronic-lecithin organogels for treatment of atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mady FM

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Fatma M Mady,1,2 Hanaa Essa,2 Tarek El-Ammawi,3 Hamdy Abdelkader,2 Amal K Hussein2 1Department of Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Technology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Taibah University, Medina, Saudi Arabia; 2Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, Minia University, Minia, Egypt; 3Department of Dermatology, STDs, and Andrology, Minia University Hospital, Minia, Egypt Abstract: Silymarin is a naturally occurring flavonoid drug; evidence from recent research has highlighted its use as a potential treatment for atopic dermatitis (AD. Both poor water solubility and drug permeability have hindered the percutaneous absorption of silymarin. Formulation of silymarin into pluronic-lecithin organogel (PLO basis for topical skin delivery is the main aim of this work. Six different PLO formulations were prepared containing various pluronic to lecithin ratios using two cosolvent systems of ethyl alcohol and dimethyl sulfoxide. Formulation 2 (20% pluronic and 3% lecithin was found to be the optimal base for topical delivery of silymarin as it showed optimum pH, viscosity, drug content, and satisfactory in vitro silymarin permeation. The silymarin PLO formulation significantly relieved inflammatory symptoms of AD such as redness, swelling, and inflammation. These findings warrant the ability for application of these novel silymarin PLO formulations as a novel treatment for AD. Keywords: silymarin, pluronic lecithin organogel, atopic dermatitis, skin penetration 

  6. Maternal obesity, gestational weight gain, and risk of asthma and atopic disease in offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harpsøe, Maria C; Basit, Saima; Bager, Peter;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: High pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) and excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) are suggested to influence risk of asthma and atopic disease in offspring. OBJECTIVE: We examined the effect of BMI and GWG on risk of asthma, wheezing, atopic eczema (AE), and hay fever in children......-onset wheezing (adjusted OR, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.28-2.73). Maternal BMI and GWG were not associated with AE or hay fever. CONCLUSIONS: Maternal obesity during pregnancy was associated with increased risk of asthma and wheezing in offspring but not with AE and hay fever, suggesting that pathways may be nonallergic....... during the first 7 years of life. METHODS: This was a cohort study of 38,874 mother-child pairs from the Danish National Birth Cohort (enrollment 1996-2002) with information from the 16th week of pregnancy and at age 6 months, 18 months, and 7 years of the child. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% CIs were...

  7. Maternal obesity, gestational weight gain, and risk of asthma and atopic disease in offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harpsøe, Maria C; Basit, Saima; Bager, Peter;

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: High pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) and excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) are suggested to influence risk of asthma and atopic disease in offspring. OBJECTIVE: We examined the effect of BMI and GWG on risk of asthma, wheezing, atopic eczema (AE), and hay fever in children......-onset wheezing (adjusted OR, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.28-2.73). Maternal BMI and GWG were not associated with AE or hay fever. CONCLUSIONS: Maternal obesity during pregnancy was associated with increased risk of asthma and wheezing in offspring but not with AE and hay fever, suggesting that pathways may be nonallergic....... during the first 7 years of life. METHODS: This was a cohort study of 38,874 mother-child pairs from the Danish National Birth Cohort (enrollment 1996-2002) with information from the 16th week of pregnancy and at age 6 months, 18 months, and 7 years of the child. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% CIs were...

  8. Prevalence of Atopic Dermatitis Among Children Under 19 in an East-Hungarian Agricultural County

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    Agnes Kuhnyar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of atopic dermatitis has significantly increased in developed countries during the past several decades. Surveys performed in Hungary also show a growing number of atopic dermatitis (AD cases, although, a carefully designed case-controlled studies have not been performed. Therefore, we investigated the prevalence of AD in individuals under 19 years of age within the agricultural area of East-Hungary. Combined data obtained with Schultz-Larsen questionnaire on 1158 children were analyzed, and 25% of the index persons were examined by dermatologist. The mean prevalence of AD determined by questionnaires appeared to be 17.5% in the entire study population. Result of dermatological examination verified the validity and sensitivity of the questionnaire. A negative correlation was found between the severity of the disease and the length of breast feeding period. (Spearman's correlation coefficient = − 0.2247, p = 0.034. The prevalence of AD in an East-Hungarian agricultural area is nearly as high as that reported for populations residing in industrially developed countries, with a higher prevalence during childhood. Data suggest that premature abruption of breast feeding maybe one of the major factors among other environmental factors that is contributing to the development of AD.

  9. The complex biology and contribution of Staphylococcus aureus in atopic dermatitis, current and future therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepburn, L; Hijnen, D J; Sellman, B R; Mustelin, T; Sleeman, M A; May, R D; Strickland, I

    2016-10-25

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a complex, chronic inflammatory skin disorder affecting more than 10% of UK children and is a major cause of occupation-related disability. A subset of patients, particularly those with severe AD, are persistently colonised with Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and exacerbation of disease is commonly associated with this bacterium by virtue of increased inflammation and allergic sensitisation, aggravated by skin barrier defects. Understanding the complex biology of S. aureus is an important factor when developing new drugs to combat infection. S. aureus generates exoproteins that enable invasion and dissemination within the host skin but can also damage the skin and activate the host immune system. Antibiotics are often used by dermatologists to aid clearance of S. aureus; however, these are becoming less effective and chronic usage discouraged with the emergence of multiple antibiotic-resistant strains. New ways to target S. aureus using monoclonal antibodies and vaccines are now being developed. This review will attempt to evaluate the key biology of S. aureus, current treatment of S. aureus infections in atopic dermatitis and recent advances in developing new anti-S. aureus therapies that have potential in severe AD. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. In vivo blockade of OX40 ligand inhibits thymic stromal lymphopoietin driven atopic inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshasayee, Dhaya; Lee, Wyne P.; Zhou, Meijuan; Shu, Jean; Suto, Eric; Zhang, Juan; Diehl, Laurie; Austin, Cary D.; Meng, Y. Gloria; Tan, Martha; Bullens, Sherron L.; Seeber, Stefan; Fuentes, Maria E.; Labrijn, Aran F.; Graus, Yvo M.F.; Miller, Lisa A.; Schelegle, Edward S.; Hyde, Dallas M.; Wu, Lawren C.; Hymowitz, Sarah G.; Martin, Flavius

    2007-01-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) potently induces deregulation of Th2 responses, a hallmark feature of allergic inflammatory diseases such as asthma, atopic dermatitis, and allergic rhinitis. However, direct downstream in vivo mediators in the TSLP-induced atopic immune cascade have not been identified. In our current study, we have shown that OX40 ligand (OX40L) is a critical in vivo mediator of TSLP-mediated Th2 responses. Treating mice with OX40L-blocking antibodies substantially inhibited immune responses induced by TSLP in the lung and skin, including Th2 inflammatory cell infiltration, cytokine secretion, and IgE production. OX40L-blocking antibodies also inhibited antigen-driven Th2 inflammation in mouse and nonhuman primate models of asthma. This treatment resulted in both blockade of the OX40-OX40L receptor-ligand interaction and depletion of OX40L-positive cells. The use of a blocking, OX40L-specific mAb thus presents a promising strategy for the treatment of allergic diseases associated with pathologic Th2 immune responses. PMID:18060034

  11. Vitamin D deficiency rickets in an adolescent with severe atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borzutzky, Arturo; Grob, Francisca; Camargo, Carlos A; Martinez-Aguayo, Alejandro

    2014-02-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) affects 10% to 20% of children worldwide. Its severity may be inversely correlated with 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) levels. Although low levels of vitamin D (VD) can cause rickets in infants, VD deficiency rickets is an unusual presentation in teenagers. We report the case of a 14-year-old girl with severe AD and fish allergy since early childhood. She lived at high latitude (with less sun exposure) and, because of her atopic disorders, avoided sunlight and fish. Laboratory studies showed elevated alkaline phosphatase and parathyroid hormone levels and low serum calcium; her serum 25OHD level was rickets due to VD deficiency. Treatment with VD increased her 25OHD level to 44 nmol/L, with normalization of alkaline phosphatase, parathyroid hormone, and calcium. Moreover, we observed a dramatic improvement in her AD severity with VD treatment. This case demonstrates the complex interaction between VD deficiency, AD, and food allergy. We advise a high index of suspicion of VD deficiency rickets in children of all ages with AD, particularly during accelerated growth periods and in the presence of other risk factors such as darker skin, living at high latitude, sun avoidance, and low intake of VD-rich foods. The concomitant improvement in bone-related parameters and AD severity may reflect a double benefit of VD treatment, a possibility that warrants research on VD as potential treatment for AD.

  12. Prevalence of Atopic Dermatitis Symptoms among Students in Kurdistan: a North-west Province of Iran

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    Rasoul Nasiri Kalmarzi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Atopic dermatitis (AD, often called eczema or atopic eczema is a very common skin disease; AD looks different in infants, children, and adults. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of the disease in Kurdistan province. Materials and Methods Cross-sectional study using written questionnaires ISAAC  where 4,000 students in two age groups 7-6 and 14 -13 years in the province were using multi-stage sampling was carried out so that the first two floors rural and urban communities in every city and in every school pupil samples were selected based on 8-digit code. Results The prevalence of itchy rashes in the past 6 months, itchy rashes in the past 12 months and rashes at flexural areas were 7.5%, 8.9%, and 10.3%, respectively; the prevalence was higher in 13-14 years old than 6-7 years old and was higher in boys than in girls(Odds Ratio (OR=1.44, Confidence interval (CI= 1.49-2, P

  13. Psychodermatologic Effects of Atopic Dermatitis and Acne: A Review on Self-Esteem and Identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Catherine M; Koo, John; Cordoro, Kelly M

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) and acne vulgaris are among the most-prevalent skin diseases in children. Both have been well documented in the literature to have significant negative effects on quality of life. Herein, we discuss the results of a comprehensive literature review aimed at assessing the impact of acne and AD on self-esteem and identity. We highlight clinical tools for their assessment and offer coping strategies for patients and families. Multiple factors including relationships with parents and classmates, sports participation, and the sex of the patient contribute to the development of self-esteem and identity in individuals with AD and acne. Atopic dermatitis was found to have significant behavioral effects on children, ultimately resulting in a lack of opportunity to develop proper coping. AD had a more-prominent role in identity formation and gender roles in girls. Acne vulgaris was found to have a more direct effect on self-esteem, self-confidence and identity, especially in girls. The Cutaneous Body Image Scale is reviewed and offered as an easy and reliable tool to evaluate a patient's mental perception of the appearance of their skin. Coping strategies that may be offered to patients and families include empowerment and cognitive adaptation.

  14. Homoeopathic treatment in a case of co-morbid atopic dermatitis and depressive disorder

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    Suraia Parveen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a skin disease characterized by itching, typical morphology, and distribution of rash, chronic relapsing course, and personal or family history of “atopic diathesis.” Stress is an important precipitating factor of AD. Stress has also some causal link with depression. Rationale of this case report is to demonstrate the co-occurrence of AD and depression in a patient, and better improvement of AD occurs when homoeopathic treatment focuses on psychological symptoms. Here, a 38-year-old male presented with a 6-month history of eczematous skin lesions with associated symptoms of depression in the background of chronic ongoing stress. A diagnosis of AD with comorbid depression was made. He initially did not show stable improvement on homoeopathic medicine selected on the basis of totality of symptoms and miasmatic background. On changing the medicine giving more priority to psychological symptoms, he gradually showed stable improvement on both the domain of symptoms and reached remission by 3 months. Remission maintained without any recurrence over the next 3½ years. Hence, the main lesson from this case is the demonstration of importance of mental symptoms over other physical symptoms in homoeopathic treatment.

  15. Epidermal barrier defects link atopic dermatitis with altered skin cancer susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipolat, Sara; Hoste, Esther; Natsuga, Ken; Quist, Sven R; Watt, Fiona M

    2014-05-05

    Atopic dermatitis can result from loss of structural proteins in the outermost epidermal layers, leading to a defective epidermal barrier. To test whether this influences tumour formation, we chemically induced tumours in EPI-/- mice, which lack three barrier proteins-Envoplakin, Periplakin, and Involucrin. EPI-/- mice were highly resistant to developing benign tumours when treated with 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). The DMBA response was normal, but EPI-/- skin exhibited an exaggerated atopic response to TPA, characterised by abnormal epidermal differentiation, a complex immune infiltrate and elevated serum thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP). The exacerbated TPA response could be normalised by blocking TSLP or the immunoreceptor NKG2D but not CD4+ T cells. We conclude that atopy is protective against skin cancer in our experimental model and that the mechanism involves keratinocytes communicating with cells of the immune system via signalling elements that normally protect against environmental assaults.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01888.001.

  16. Dermatological Diseases Associated with Pregnancy: Pemphigoid Gestationis, Polymorphic Eruption of Pregnancy, Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy, and Atopic Eruption of Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Christine Sävervall; Freja Lærke Sand; Simon Francis Thomsen

    2015-01-01

    Dermatoses unique to pregnancy are important to recognize for the clinician as they carry considerable morbidity for pregnant mothers and in some instances constitute a risk to the fetus. These diseases include pemphigoid gestationis, polymorphic eruption of pregnancy, intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy, and atopic eruption of pregnancy. This review discusses the pathogenesis, clinical importance, and management of the dermatoses of pregnancy.

  17. Sensitization to food and airborne allergens in children with atopic dermatitis followed up to 7 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Dan; Sjöberg, Olof; Foucard, Tony

    2003-12-01

    Previously we investigated the eczema prognosis and the risk of developing allergic asthma and rhinitis in a cohort of 94 children with atopic dermatitis. In this second study on the same cohort we address the development of sensitization to foods and airborne allergens, risk factors and, the question whether children with atopic dermatitis who will not become sensitized can be recognized early. Children with atopic dermatitis were followed up regularly from infancy or early childhood to 7 years of age with clinical examination and blood sampling. After age 3, skin prick tests with inhalation allergens were performed yearly. In most children both clinical allergy and sensitization to egg and milk were transient but those to peanut were persistent. Eighty per cent of the children became sensitized to airborne allergens and 75% of them noticed symptoms when exposed. Heredity for atopy and eczema, sensitization to hen's egg, and early onset of eczema entailed an increased risk of becoming sensitized. Children never sensitized had late onset of eczema and less heredity for atopic disease but did not differ in other respects from the sensitized children.

  18. Characterization of atopic skin and the effect of a hyperforin-rich cream by laser scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinke, Martina C.; Richter, Heike; Kleemann, Anke; Lademann, Juergen; Tscherch, Kathrin; Rohn, Sascha; Schempp, Christoph M.

    2015-05-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a multifactorial inflammatory skin disease that affects both children and adults in an increasing manner. The treatment of AD often reduces subjective skin parameters, such as itching, dryness, and tension, but the inflammation cannot be cured. Laser scanning microscopy was used to investigate the skin surface, epidermal, and dermal characteristics of dry and atopic skin before and after treatment with an ointment rich in hyperforin, which is known for its anti-inflammatory effects. The results were compared to subjective parameters and transepidermal water loss, stratum corneum moisture, and stratum corneum lipids. Using biophysical methods, in particular laser scanning microscopy, it was found that atopic skin has distinct features compared to healthy skin. Treatment with a hyperforin-rich ointment resulted in an improvement of the stratum corneum moisture, skin surface dryness, skin lipids, and the subjective skin parameters, indicating that the barrier is stabilized and improved by the ointment. But in contrast to the improved skin surface, the inflammation in the deeper epidermis/dermis often continues to exist. This could be clearly shown by the reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) measurements. Therefore, RCM measurements could be used to investigate the progress in treatment of atopic dermatitis.

  19. EFFECT OF INHALED ENDOTOXIN ON AIRWAY AND CIRCULATING INFLAMMATORY CELL PHAGOCYTOSIS AND CD11B EXPRESSION IN ATOPIC ASTHMATIC SUBJECTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effect of inhaled endotoxin on airway and circulating inflammatory cell phagocytosis and CD11b expression in atopic asthmatic subjects Neil E. Alexis, PhD, Marlowe W. Eldridge, MD, David B. Peden, MD, MS Chapel Hill and Research Triangle Park, NCBackgrou...

  20. Patient-Oriented SCORAD (PO-SCORAD): a new self-assessment scale in atopic dermatitis validated in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stalder, J-F; Barbarot, S; Wollenberg, A;

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROund: Patient-oriented medicine is an emerging concept, encouraged by the World Health Organization, to greater involvement of the patient in the management of chronic diseases. The Patient-Oriented SCORing Atopic Dermatitis (PO-SCORAD) index is a self-assessment score allowing the patient ...

  1. No influence of atopic diseases on antibody titres following tetanus, diphtheria and hepatitis B immunisation among adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, N; Kramer, A; Mentel, R; Gürtler, L; John, U; Völzke, H

    2007-12-01

    Several studies have reported associations between reduced humoral immune response to vaccine antigens and diseases with modified reactions of the immune system. We have investigated the influence of atopic diseases on specific IgG levels to tetanus, diphtheria and hepatitis B (HB), following immunisation, in a general adult population. From the Study of Health in Pomerania, a total number of 3,920 subjects aged 20 to 79 years were included in the analyses. Information on immunisation history, as well as behavioural and socio-demographic characteristics were collected. Anti-tetanus IgG, anti-diphtheria IgG and anti-HBs IgG were measured by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using logistic regression. Atopic diseases were reported by 14% of participants. Proportions of 67%, 34% and 10% had been vaccinated against tetanus, diphtheria and hepatitis B within the past ten years, respectively. Multi-variable analyses revealed no associations between the presence of atopic diseases and all of the three vaccine-specific antibody titres. We conclude that there is no reduced immune response related to antibody production following immunisations against tetanus, diphtheria and hepatitis B in adults with atopic diseases.

  2. T-cell repertoire in the blood and lungs of atopic asthmatics before and after ragweed challenge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yurovsky, VV; Weersink, EJM; Meltzer, SS; Moore, WC; Postma, DS; Bleecker, ER; White, B

    1998-01-01

    T cells play a pivotal role in initiating and orchestrating allergic responses in asthma. The goal of this work was to learn whether ragweed challenge in the lungs alters the T-cell repertoire expressed in the blood and lungs of atopic asthmatics. Analyses of cell numbers, differentials, and T-cell

  3. Low birth weight and preterm delivery as risk factors for asthma and atopic dermatitis in young adult males

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, F.H.; Sørensen, Henrik Toft; Gillman, M.W.;

    2000-01-01

    ratio among conscripts born before 34 gestational weeks was 0.8 (95% confidence interval = 0.3–2.0) compared with conscripts born at term. The prevalence of atopic dermatitis was 1.0%. The prevalence odds ratio of atopic dermatitis among those with a birth weight below 2,501 g was 3.0 (95% confidence......Gestational factors have been hypothesized to play a role in the susceptibility to asthma and atopic dermatitis. We examined whether fetal growth was associated with asthma and atopic dermatitis separately in a population of 4,795 male conscripts born between 1973 and 1975 in Denmark....... The prevalence of asthma was 4.7%. The prevalence odds ratio of asthma in conscripts with a birth weight below 2,501 g was 1.5 (95% confidence interval = 0.7–3.1) compared with conscripts with a birth weight of 3,001–3,500 g, adjusted for gestational age and potential confounders. The adjusted prevalence odds...

  4. Genome-wide association study identifies eight new susceptibility loci for atopic dermatitis in the Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, Tomomitsu; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kubo, Michiaki; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Tomita, Kaori; Sakashita, Masafumi; Yamada, Takechiyo; Fujieda, Shigeharu; Tanaka, Shota; Doi, Satoru; Miyatake, Akihiko; Enomoto, Tadao; Nishiyama, Chiharu; Nakano, Nobuhiro; Maeda, Keiko; Okumura, Ko; Ogawa, Hideoki; Ikeda, Shigaku; Noguchi, Emiko; Sakamoto, Tohru; Hizawa, Nobuyuki; Ebe, Koji; Saeki, Hidehisa; Sasaki, Takashi; Ebihara, Tamotsu; Amagai, Masayuki; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Furue, Masutaka; Nakamura, Yusuke; Tamari, Mayumi

    2012-11-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a common inflammatory skin disease caused by interaction of genetic and environmental factors. On the basis of data from a genome-wide association study (GWAS) and a validation study comprising a total of 3,328 subjects with atopic dermatitis and 14,992 controls in the Japanese population, we report here 8 new susceptibility loci: IL1RL1-IL18R1-IL18RAP (P(combined) = 8.36 × 10(-18)), the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region (P = 8.38 × 10(-20)), OR10A3-NLRP10 (P = 1.54 × 10(-22)), GLB1 (P = 2.77 × 10(-16)), CCDC80 (P = 1.56 × 10(-19)), CARD11 (P = 7.83 × 10(-9)), ZNF365 (P = 5.85 × 10(-20)) and CYP24A1-PFDN4 (P = 1.65 × 10(-8)). We also replicated the associations of the FLG, C11orf30, TMEM232-SLC25A46, TNFRSF6B-ZGPAT, OVOL1, ACTL9 and KIF3A-IL13 loci that were previously reported in GWAS of European and Chinese individuals and a meta-analysis of GWAS for atopic dermatitis. These findings advance the understanding of the genetic basis of atopic dermatitis.

  5. Topical Application of Herbal Mixture Extract Inhibits Ovalbumin- or 2,4-Dinitrochlorobenzene-Induced Atopic Dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soon Re Kim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available KM110329 is four traditional herbal medicine mixtures with anti-inflammatory properties. Atopic dermatitis (AD is an inflammatory skin disease associated with enhanced T-helper2 (Th2 lymphocyte response to allergens that results in elevated serum eosinophil and Immunoglobulin E (IgE levels and leukocyte infiltration in atopic skin sites. In this study, we investigated the effect of topical application of KM110329 ethanol extract on the ovalbumin (OVA or 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene- (DNCB- induced AD mouse models. For that purpose, we observed the effects of KM110329 on blood eosinophils, skin mast cells, production of serum IgE, and expression of cytokine mRNA in the atopic dermatitis skin lesions of OVA allergen- or DNCB-treated BALB/c mice. KM110329 significantly reduced blood eosinophils cell numbers in OVA or DNCB-treated BALB/c mice. Histological analyses demonstrated decreased mast cell count as well as dermal infiltration by inflammatory cells. In the skin lesions, mRNA expression of interleukine (IL-4, IL-13, and IL-17 was inhibited by KM110329. KM110329 also suppressed the production of serum IgE level in both the OVA- and DNCB-induced atopic dermatitis model. Taken together, our results showed that topical application of KM110329 extracts exerts beneficial effects in AD symptoms, suggesting that KM110329 might be a useful candidate for the treatment of AD.

  6. Increase in short-chain ceramides correlates with an altered lipid organization and decreased barrier function in atopic eczema patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Janssens (Michelle); J. van Smeden (Jeroen); G.S. Gooris (Gert); W. Bras (Wim); G. Portale (Guiseppe); P.J. Caspers (Peter); R. Vreeken (Rob); T. Hankemeier (Thomas); S. Kezic (Sanja); R. Wolterbeek (Ron); A.P.M. Lavrijsen (Adriana); J.A. Bouwstra (Joke)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractA hallmark of atopic eczema (AE) is skin barrier dysfunction. Lipids in the stratum corneum (SC), primarily ceramides, fatty acids, and cholesterol, are crucial for the barrier function, but their role in relation to AE is indistinct. Filaggrin is an epithelial barrier protein with a cen

  7. Clinical efficacy of emollients in atopic dermatitis patients – relationship with the skin microbiota modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seité S

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sophie Seité,1 Hana Zelenkova,2 Richard Martin3 1La Roche-Posay Dermatological Laboratories, Asnières, France; 2DOST, Private Clinic of Dermatovenereology, Svidnik, Slovakia; 3L’Oréal Research and Innovation, Tours, France Background: We speculated that an emollient supplemented with a biomass of nonpathogenic bacteria such as Vitreoscilla filiformis (Vf, grown in a medium containing thermal spring water (LRP-TSW; (LRP-Vitreoscilla filiformis biomass [LRP-VFB], could have a beneficial effect for patients with atopic dermatitis (AD. Patients and methods: This double-blind, randomized, comparative study was conducted with 60 patients with moderate AD. Before starting the study, participants were pretreated for 15 days with drug therapy to improve their SCORing Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD by at least 25%. On Day 1, the eligible patients were randomized to either the emollient containing LRP-VFB associated with mannose (Product A or another emollient (product B and were treated twice daily for 1 month. Recurrence of flare-ups and microbial communities were characterized from swabs taken at Day 1 and Day 28, under axenic conditions, from affected (AF and proximal unaffected (UAF skin areas. Results: At Day 1, the average SCORAD of each group and the microbial communities of AF and UAF areas for each participant were similar. One month after the end of the therapeutic treatment (Day 28, the average evolution of SCORAD at Day 28 compared to Day 1 of patients treated with product A was significantly lower than that of the patients treated with product B. A significantly increased level of Xanthomonas genus was noticed in the group treated with product A (versus product B. On the other hand, the level of Staphylococcus genus increased between Day 1 and Day 28 in the group treated with product B, but not in the group treated with product A. Interestingly, these differences were more pronounced for patients in relapse, and the associated SCORAD

  8. [Psychosomatic aspects of parent-child relations in atopic eczema in childhood. I. Psychodiagnostic test procedures in parents and children in comparison with somatic findings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, J; Palos, E; Zimmermann, F

    1986-10-01

    A total of 23 children with atopic eczema and 13 control children suffering from non-atopic dermatological disorders were studied. For children between 8 and 14 years the "Hamburg neuroticism and extraversion scale for children and adolescents" (HANES-KJ) was used. In this test no statistically significant differences were observed between children with atopic eczema and children with other dermatological disorders. The mothers and fathers of atopic children were examined for personality profiles using the "Freiburger personality inventory" (FPI). In the FPI, mothers of children with atopic eczema were shown to be less "spontaneous", more "under control" and less "emotional" than the normal population. The fathers of atopic children showed now significant differences compared with the normal population; however, there was a trend towards increased "irritability". In a comparison of FPI profiles within couples with atopic children, mothers showed less "somatic emotional response" in the FPI profile, while the feature "emotional control" was more prominent in the mothers as compared with the respective fathers.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Family Functioning and Illness Perception of Parents of Children with Atopic Dermatitis, Living without Skin Symptoms, but with Psychosomatic Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain. R. Rodríguez-Orozco

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Emotional factors and a recurrent psychosomatic environment, have been implicated in the evolution of atopic dermatitis. These, in turn, affect the disease.This study was under taken to evaluate the functioning of families with a child that has atopic dermatitis without skin symptoms and the parents’ perceptions of their child’s disease.Semi-quantitative and cross-sectional study in which questionnaires were applied: one to study family functioning (Espejel et al. scale and the second to determine aspects of parental perception of their child’s atopic dermatitis. Pearson’s correlation was used to analyze the correlation between the categories of the Family Function Scale.The most affected categories of family functioning were authority, handling of disruptive conduct, communication, and negative affect. The most significant positive correlations between the categories of family functioning were: authority and support, r=0.867, p<.001; disruptive conduct and communication, r=0.798, p<.001; and support and communication, r=0.731, p<.001. Of the parents, 66.4% thought that the pharmacotherapy used for their child’s atopic dermatitis was not effective, and 33.3% of parents stated that the disease had affected their child’s daily activities.In families of children with atopic dermatitis, various family environment factors facilitate the recurrence of symptoms even when no cutaneous lesions have been found on the child. The identification and use of family resources to face this disease are aspects that should be taken into consideration during the psychotherapeutic management of these families, putting emphasis on the most affected functional categories of these families in a strategy that should be implanted in a multi-disciplinary context.

  10. Potato lectin activates basophils and mast cells of atopic subjects by its interaction with core chitobiose of cell-bound non-specific immunoglobulin E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramod, S N; Venkatesh, Y P; Mahesh, P A

    2007-06-01

    A major factor in non-allergic food hypersensitivity could be the interaction of dietary lectins with mast cells and basophils. Because immunoglobulin E (IgE) contains 10-12% carbohydrates, lectins can activate and degranulate these cells by cross-linking the glycans of cell-bound IgE. The present objective focuses on the effect of potato lectin (Solanum tuberosum agglutinin; STA) for its ability to release histamine from basophils in vitro and mast cells in vivo from non-atopic and atopic subjects. In this study, subjects were selected randomly based on case history and skin prick test responses with food, pollen and house dust mite extracts. Skin prick test (SPT) was performed with STA at 100 microg/ml concentration. Histamine release was performed using leucocytes from non-atopic and atopic subjects and rat peritoneal exudate cells. SPT on 110 atopic subjects using STA showed 39 subjects positive (35%); however, none showed STA-specific IgE; among 20 non-atopic subjects, none were positive by SPT. Maximal histamine release was found to be 65% in atopic subjects (n = 7) compared to 28% in non-atopic subjects (n = 5); the release was inhibited specifically by oligomers of N-acetylglucosamine and correlates well with serum total IgE levels (R(2) = 0.923). Binding of STA to N-linked glycoproteins (horseradish peroxidase, avidin and IgG) was positive by dot blot and binding assay. As potato lectin activates and degranulates both mast cells and basophils by interacting with the chitobiose core of IgE glycans, higher intake of potato may increase the clinical symptoms as a result of non-allergic food hypersensitivity in atopic subjects.

  11. Are cutaneous hypersensitivity tests to inhalant allergens a severity marker for vernal keratoconjunctivitis? Os testes de hipersensibilidade cutânea contra alérgenos inalantes são marcadores de gravidade da ceratoconjuntivite vernal?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauro Augusto de Oliveira

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to analyze the cutaneous sensitivity to a variety of allergens in patients with vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC and to demonstrate the relation between skin response and clinical aspects of the disease. METHODS: Twenty patients with vernal keratoconjunctivitis were randomly chosen from the External Disease and Cornea Sector. They were clinically evaluated, and a score ranging from 0 to 20 was applied based on signs and symptoms on ophthalmic examination. All subjects underwent a skin prick test against standardized allergens, such as house dust mites D. pteronyssinus, D. farinae, and Blomia tropicalis, as well as allergens from cat, dog, fungi and feather. RESULTS: Seventy-five per cent of patients were positive for at least one of the allergens tested. House dust mites were responsible for the majority of the cases (75%. There was a poor correlation between the clinical score and sensitivity to allergens (r= - 0.119 for fungi; r= - 0.174 for dog; r= - 0.243 for house dust mites; r= - 0.090 for feather. A significant correlation was found only for cat allergen extract (r = - 0.510; p=0.024. CONCLUSIONS: Our study demonstrated poor correlation between cutaneous hypersensitivity tests and clinical findings in patients with vernal keratoconjuntivitis. We concluded that skin response to inhalant allergens is not a useful test to identify clinical severity and chronicity of inflammatory process in this disease.OBJETIVO: Avaliar o papel da sensibilização cutânea a diferentes aeroalérgenos em pacientes com ceratoconjuntivite vernal e a correlação entre esta e os aspectos clínicos da doença. MÉTODOS: Vinte pacientes do setor de doenças externas e córnea foram aleatoriamente convidados para participar deste estudo. Os pacientes foram avaliados e a eles foi atribuído um escore clínico variando de 0 a 20 de acordo com sinais e sintomas presentes no exame oftalmológico. Todos os pacientes foram

  12. Vitamin D in atopic dermatitis, chronic urticaria and allergic contact dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, Shannon K; Rainwater, Ellecia; Shure, Anna K; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2016-08-01

    Vitamin D influences allergen-induced pathways in the innate and adaptive immune system, and its potential immunomodulatory role in allergic skin disorders has been explored. This comprehensive review article provides an overview of the role of vitamin D in three common dermatologic conditions: atopic dermatitis (AD), chronic urticaria, and allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). Whereas the literature regarding vitamin D and AD has resulted in mixed findings, several studies have described an inverse relationship between vitamin D levels and AD severity, and improvement in AD with vitamin D supplementation. Similarly, several studies report an inverse relationship between vitamin D levels and severity of chronic urticaria. Although current research in humans remains limited, an increased likelihood of ACD has been demonstrated in vitamin D-deficient mice. Additional well-designed clinical trials will be necessary to determine whether vitamin D supplementation should be recommended for prevention or adjuvant treatment of these common dermatologic conditions.

  13. Griscelli syndrome: A case report of Reye′s syndrome and atopic dermatitis history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirzioglu Z

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Griscelli syndrome (GS is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that results in pigmentary dilution of the skin and the hair (silver hair, with the presence of large clumps of pigment in hair shafts, and an accumulation of melanosomes in melanocytes. Sixty cases of GS have been reported in the literature, but we could find no description of its oro-dental symptoms. Reye′s syndrome (RS is characterized by acute noninflammatory encephalopathy and renal and hepatic failure, while atopic dermatitis (AD is a skin disorder with an immunologic basis. The aim of this paper is to describe the oro-dental and physical findings in a girl who had been diagnosed with GS at 3.5 years of age; she also had AD as well as a history of RS at infancy. We discuss the possible relationship between the three syndromes.

  14. Formulation and clinical evaluation of silymarin pluronic-lecithin organogels for treatment of atopic dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mady, Fatma M; Essa, Hanaa; El-Ammawi, Tarek; Abdelkader, Hamdy; Hussein, Amal K

    2016-01-01

    Silymarin is a naturally occurring flavonoid drug; evidence from recent research has highlighted its use as a potential treatment for atopic dermatitis (AD). Both poor water solubility and drug permeability have hindered the percutaneous absorption of silymarin. Formulation of silymarin into pluronic-lecithin organogel (PLO) basis for topical skin delivery is the main aim of this work. Six different PLO formulations were prepared containing various pluronic to lecithin ratios using two cosolvent systems of ethyl alcohol and dimethyl sulfoxide. Formulation 2 (20% pluronic and 3% lecithin) was found to be the optimal base for topical delivery of silymarin as it showed optimum pH, viscosity, drug content, and satisfactory in vitro silymarin permeation. The silymarin PLO formulation significantly relieved inflammatory symptoms of AD such as redness, swelling, and inflammation. These findings warrant the ability for application of these novel silymarin PLO formulations as a novel treatment for AD. PMID:27022248

  15. Curative effect of BCG-polysaccharide nuceic acid on atopic dermatitis in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu-Hui Wang; Ying Ye; Yi-Qun Zhang; Tao Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To explore the effect of bacilli Galmette-Gurin (BCG)-polysaccharide nuceic acid on atopic dermatitis in mice and its mechanism. Methods: Forty NC/Nga mice were selected and randomly divided into Group A (model group), Group B (dexamethasone treatment group), Group C (BCG polysaccharide nucleic acid treatment group) and Group D (control group) with 10 mice in each group. Atopic dermatitis model were constructed by applying 2, 4-dinitrochlorobenzene on the skin of the mice. Mice in Group D were treated with acetone solution (100μL) on the foot pad and abdomen after hair removal at the age of 7 weeks, then on ear skin at the age of 8-13 weeks. For mice in A, B and C groups, 100μL of acetone solution containing 2, 4-dinitrochlorobenzene was applied to the foot pad and the abdomen at the age of 7 weeks, then on ear skins at the age of 8 to 13 weeks. At the age of 7-13 weeks, mice in Group A and Group D were treated with 100μL saline (i.p.);mice were given dexamethasone (0.1 mL/kg, i.p.) every other day for 7 weeks in Group B;mice were treated with BCG polysaccharide nucleic acid (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) every other day for 7 weeks in Group C. The ear thickness was measured every week and the scratching frequency was recorded 1 times for 10 min a week. The mice were sacrificed after the last administration of drugs. IgE, IL-4, IL-10, IL-12 and IFN-γin the plasma were detected using ELISA, and RT-PCR method was employed to detect the concentrations of IL-4, IL-10, IL-12 and IFN-γproteins. After HE staining, the lesion degree of inflammation in ear tissue was observed microscopically. Results:The ear thickness and scratching frequency of Group A were significantly higher than those in group B, C and D (P0.05);the concentrations of IgE, IL-4 and IL-10 in the plasma and the expression of IL-4, IL-10 mRNA in the spleen tissues of Group A, B and C were all significantly higher than those of Group D (P<0.05);the concentrations of plasma IL-12 and IFN-γ, and spleen

  16. Xerosis is associated with asthma in men independent of atopic dermatitis and filaggrin gene mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engebretsen, K A; Linneberg, Allan René; Thuesen, B H

    2015-01-01

    that asthma (either current or at some point in life) was significantly associated with reporting generalized xerosis (OR 1.32; 95% CI 1.02-1.72). The association was stronger in men (OR 1.79; 95% CI 1.13-2.84) when compared to women (OR 1.18; 95% CI 0.86-1.62). Furthermore, a significant association...... was observed between xerosis and 'allergic asthma' in men (OR 2.13; 95% CI 1.08-4.19). CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate an association between xerosis and asthma in men independent of atopic dermatitis and FLG mutations. Both facilitated allergen sensitization and secondary degradation of filaggrin following...... T-helper cell 2 inflammation might be key elements to understanding this relationship....

  17. Sensitization study of dogs with atopic dermatitis in the central region of Rio Grande do Sul

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    D.T. Pereira

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Canine atopic dermatitis (CAD is a common dermatosis, defined as a genetic-related disease which predisposes to skin inflammation and pruritus, associated to a IgE-specific response in most of cases. Clinical diagnosis may be later complemented by skin allergy and/or serological tests. The aim of these tests is to identify possible allergens in order to enable the clinicians to select candidate antigens for allergen specific immunotherapy. In the present study 58 CAD positive animals were tested. All were submitted to the intradermal test (IDT and screened for the presence of antibodies against different antigens using ELISA. The obtained results show a high prevalence of sensitization among the tested dogs to house dust mites and to pollen ofC. dactylon. With this work it was possible to identify the main allergens involved in immunological response of dogs with CAD living in central area of Rio Grande do Sul.

  18. Variation in genes encoding eosinophil granule proteins in atopic dermatitis patients from Germany

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    Epplen Jörg T

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atopic dermatitis (AD is believed to result from complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors. A main feature of AD as well as other allergic disorders is serum and tissue eosinophilia. Human eosinophils contain high amounts of cationic granule proteins, including eosinophil cationic protein (ECP, eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN, eosinophil peroxidase (EPO and major basic protein (MBP. Recently, variation in genes encoding eosinophil granule proteins has been suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis of allergic disorders. We therefore genotyped selected single nucleotide polymorphisms within the ECP, EDN, EPO and MBP genes in a cohort of 361 German AD patients and 325 healthy controls. Results Genotype and allele frequencies did not differ between patients and controls for all polymorphisms investigated in this study. Haplotype analysis did not reveal any additional information. Conclusion We did not find evidence to support an influence of variation in genes encoding eosinophil granule proteins for AD pathogenesis in this German cohort.

  19. Immune Pathways in Atopic Dermatitis, and Definition of Biomarkers through Broad and Targeted Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri, Yasaman; Guttman-Yassky, Emma

    2015-04-29

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is the most common inflammatory skin disease. Recent research findings have provided an insight into the complex pathogenic mechanisms involved in this disease. Despite a rising prevalence, effective and safe therapeutics for patients with moderate-to-severe AD are still lacking. Biomarkers of lesional, nonlesional skin, and blood have been developed for baseline as well as after treatment with broad and specific treatments (i.e., cyclosporine A and dupilumab). These biomarkers will help with the development of novel targeted therapeutics and assessment of disease reversal, with the promise of a more personalized treatment approach. Since AD involves more than one subtype (i.e., intrinsic/extrinsic, pediatric/adult, etc.), these molecular fingerprints needs to be validated in all subpopulations with AD.

  20. Targeting IgE in Severe Atopic Dermatitis with a Combination of Immunoadsorption and Omalizumab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zink, Alexander; Gensbaur, Anna; Zirbs, Michael;

    2015-01-01

    Patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) tend to have greatly elevated levels of serum immunoglobulin E (IgE). However, the role of IgE in the pathogenesis of AD is debated. This investigator-initiated open-label pilot study evaluates an anti-IgE-treatment approach by combining extracorporeal...... immunoadsorption and anti-IgE antibody omalizumab in 10 patients with severe, therapy-refractory AD. IgE levels decreased after immunoadsorption and decreased continuously in all patients during anti-IgE therapy. The reverse trend was observed during 6 months follow-up without treatment. In parallel...... with these observations, an improvement in AD was observed during the treatment period, with aggravation during follow-up. Further research is needed, based on the principle of reducing IgE levels in order to improve clinical symptoms, using a combination anti-IgE treatment approach, adjusted according to IgE levels....

  1. ORAI1 genetic polymorphisms associated with the susceptibility of atopic dermatitis in Japanese and Taiwanese populations.

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    Wei-Chiao Chang

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease. Multiple genetic and environmental factors are thought to be responsible for susceptibility to AD. In this study, we collected 2,478 DNA samples including 209 AD patients and 729 control subjects from Taiwanese population and 513 AD patients and 1027 control subject from Japanese population for sequencing and genotyping ORAI1. A total of 14 genetic variants including 3 novel single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the ORAI1 gene were identified. Our results indicated that a non-synonymous SNP (rs3741596, Ser218Gly associated with the susceptibility of AD in the Japanese population but not in the Taiwanese population. However, there is another SNP of ORAI1 (rs3741595 associated with the risk of AD in the Taiwanese population but not in the Japanese population. Taken together, our results indicated that genetic polymorphisms of ORAI1 are very likely to be involved in the susceptibility of AD.

  2. Similar appearance, different mechanisms: xerosis in HIV, atopic dermatitis and ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mischo, Meike; von Kobyletzki, Laura B; Bründermann, Erik; Schmidt, Diedrich A; Potthoff, Anja; Brockmeyer, Norbert H; Havenith, Martina

    2014-06-01

    Xerosis is one of the most common dermatologic disorders occurring in the elderly and in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Xerosis has been linked to an impaired skin barrier function of the stratum corneum. Using Raman microspectroscopy, we concentrated on deeper skin layers, viable epidermis and dermis of 47 volunteers and associated molecular alterations to the evolution of xerosis and the skin barrier, for example, lipid, water and antioxidant content. A decrease in lipids within the viable epidermis is found for elderly and HIV-patients. Lipid and water values of AD patients and their healthy reference group are similar. Decreases in lipids and simultaneous increases in water are found in the dermis for HIV and AD patients in comparison to their healthy reference groups. Excessive levels of epidermal carotenoids, mainly lycopene, in HIV-patients were found potentially leading to adverse effects such as premature skin ageing.

  3. ORAI1 genetic polymorphisms associated with the susceptibility of atopic dermatitis in Japanese and Taiwanese populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wei-Chiao; Lee, Chih-Hung; Hirota, Tomomitsu; Wang, Li-Fang; Doi, Satoru; Miyatake, Akihiko; Enomoto, Tadao; Tomita, Kaori; Sakashita, Masafumi; Yamada, Takechiyo; Fujieda, Shigeharu; Ebe, Koji; Saeki, Hidehisa; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Furue, Masutaka; Chen, Wei-Chiao; Chiu, Yi-Ching; Chang, Wei Pin; Hong, Chien-Hui; Hsi, Edward; Juo, Suh-Hang Hank; Yu, Hsin-Su; Nakamura, Yusuke; Tamari, Mayumi

    2012-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease. Multiple genetic and environmental factors are thought to be responsible for susceptibility to AD. In this study, we collected 2,478 DNA samples including 209 AD patients and 729 control subjects from Taiwanese population and 513 AD patients and 1027 control subject from Japanese population for sequencing and genotyping ORAI1. A total of 14 genetic variants including 3 novel single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the ORAI1 gene were identified. Our results indicated that a non-synonymous SNP (rs3741596, Ser218Gly) associated with the susceptibility of AD in the Japanese population but not in the Taiwanese population. However, there is another SNP of ORAI1 (rs3741595) associated with the risk of AD in the Taiwanese population but not in the Japanese population. Taken together, our results indicated that genetic polymorphisms of ORAI1 are very likely to be involved in the susceptibility of AD.

  4. Stratum corneum lipids, skin barrier function and filaggrin mutations in patients with atopic eczema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgh, Julie Kaae; Hellgren, Lars; Jungersted, JM

    2010-01-01

    Background: Prior to the discovery of filaggrin (FLG) mutations, evidence for an impaired skin barrier in atopic dermatitis (AD) has been documented, and changes in ceramide profile, altered skin pH and increased trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL) in patients with AD have been reported. Until now......, no studies have analysed stratum corneum (SC) lipids combined with skin barrier parameters in subjects of known FLG genotype. Methods: A cohort of 49 German individuals genotyped for the most common FLG mutations (R501X, 2282del4) had SC samples taken for lipid analysis by high-performance thin layer...... differences were observed for ceramide 2, 3, 5 and 6. FLGmut individuals had significantly higher skin pH values than individuals not carrying FLG mutations. Patients with AD with FLG mutations had significantly higher erythema compared to patients with AD without FLG mutations. Conclusion: Our results...

  5. Advanced Transport Operating System (ATOPS) Flight Management/Flight Controls (FM/FC) software description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolverton, David A.; Dickson, Richard W.; Clinedinst, Winston C.; Slominski, Christopher J.

    1993-01-01

    The flight software developed for the Flight Management/Flight Controls (FM/FC) MicroVAX computer used on the Transport Systems Research Vehicle for Advanced Transport Operating Systems (ATOPS) research is described. The FM/FC software computes navigation position estimates, guidance commands, and those commands issued to the control surfaces to direct the aircraft in flight. Various modes of flight are provided for, ranging from computer assisted manual modes to fully automatic modes including automatic landing. A high-level system overview as well as a description of each software module comprising the system is provided. Digital systems diagrams are included for each major flight control component and selected flight management functions.

  6. Advanced Transport Operating System (ATOPS) color displays software description microprocessor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slominski, Christopher J.; Plyler, Valerie E.; Dickson, Richard W.

    1992-01-01

    This document describes the software created for the Sperry Microprocessor Color Display System used for the Advanced Transport Operating Systems (ATOPS) project on the Transport Systems Research Vehicle (TSRV). The software delivery known as the 'baseline display system', is the one described in this document. Throughout this publication, module descriptions are presented in a standardized format which contains module purpose, calling sequence, detailed description, and global references. The global reference section includes procedures and common variables referenced by a particular module. The system described supports the Research Flight Deck (RFD) of the TSRV. The RFD contains eight cathode ray tubes (CRTs) which depict a Primary Flight Display, Navigation Display, System Warning Display, Takeoff Performance Monitoring System Display, and Engine Display.

  7. Advanced Transport Operating System (ATOPS) color displays software description: MicroVAX system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slominski, Christopher J.; Plyler, Valerie E.; Dickson, Richard W.

    1992-01-01

    This document describes the software created for the Display MicroVAX computer used for the Advanced Transport Operating Systems (ATOPS) project on the Transport Systems Research Vehicle (TSRV). The software delivery of February 27, 1991, known as the 'baseline display system', is the one described in this document. Throughout this publication, module descriptions are presented in a standardized format which contains module purpose, calling sequence, detailed description, and global references. The global references section includes subroutines, functions, and common variables referenced by a particular module. The system described supports the Research Flight Deck (RFD) of the TSRV. The RFD contains eight Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) which depict a Primary Flight Display, Navigation Display, System Warning Display, Takeoff Performance Monitoring System Display, and Engine Display.

  8. Stereological quantification of lymphocytes in skin biopsies from atopic dermatitis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellingsen, A R; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Larsen, J O;

    2001-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is histologically characterized by lymphocytic infiltration of the skin and quantitative assessment is required. This study introduces stereological techniques to quantify the number of lymphocytes in skin biopsies. Four-millimetre punch biopsies were taken from skin...... with active eczema in 8 adults with AD and from clinically normal skin from 4 of the patients. Five persons without allergy or skin disease served as controls. The mean number of lymphocytes in 4-mm skin biopsies was 469,000 and 124,000 in active eczema and in clinically normal skin, respectively. Compared...... with controls, the number of lymphocytes in biopsies increased by a factor of 6.8 in active eczema and a factor of 1.8 in clinically normal skin. If 20% of skin is affected by eczema the total number of lymphocytes located in the affected skin can be estimated to 1.27 x 10(10). A patient with clinically...

  9. Quality of life measures in Italian children with atopic dermatitis and their families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monti Fiorella

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The impact of atopic dermatitis (AD on children's quality of life (QoL in US and European countries is relatively well known, though rarely evaluated in the Italian population. Moreover, the association between child age and QoL has not been enough investigated, even though few studies detected a worse QoL in youngest AD children. The aim of the study was to evaluate the QoL in an Italian sample of atopic children and their families, also exploring a possible association with child age. Methods 60 AD children aged between 1-12 years and their mothers completed specific QoL questionnaires (IDQoL/CDLQI, DFI and a clinician completed a measure of AD severity (SCORAD. Results AD severity (Objective SCORAD significantly correlated with QoL measures. Severe AD children showed higher IDQoL/CDLQI and DFI scores compared to mild and moderate AD groups (P = 0.006 and P P = 0.014. DFI scores negatively correlated with children's age (P = 0.046, but did not differ when considering child age ranges. Multiple linear regression analyses revealed a significant association between Objective SCORAD and QoL measures. Conclusions A strong association between severe AD and poor QoL, both in children and mothers, was found in the Italian sample, in line with the international literature. Family's QoL scores were sensitively related to AD severity, more than the child's QoL, emphasising that the disease has a deep impact on the family. A significant association between age and QoL was only partially found and needs further investigation.

  10. Evening primrose oil is effective in atopic dermatitis: A randomized placebo-controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senapati Swapan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic, relapsing, itchy dermatosis of multifactorial origin, which commonly starts in childhood. Defective metabolism of essential fatty acids leading to relative dominance of pro-inflammatory prostaglandins (PGE 2 and PGF 2 has been reported as an important factor in the pathogenesis of AD. Evening primrose oil (EPO as a source of gamma-linolenic acid (GLA has been of interest in the management of AD. Aim: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of EPO in atopic dermatitis in our patients. Methods: Consecutive new out-patient department (OPD patients of a referral hospital in Kolkata clinically diagnosed as having AD were randomly allocated to two groups. To the first group, evening primrose oil was supplied as 500-mg oval clear unmarked capsules, while placebo capsules identical in appearance and containing 300 mg of sunflower oil were given to the other group. Treatment continued for a period of 5 months. With pre-designed scoring system (based on four major parameters: extent, intensity, itching, and dryness, clinical evaluation was done at baseline and subsequent monthly visits. Data of the first 25 patients from each group who completed the 5 months of trial were compiled and analyzed. Results: At the end of the fifth month, 24 (96% patients of EPO group and 8 (32% patients of placebo group showed improvement. There was significant difference in outcome of treatment between two groups (P < 0.00001. No significant adverse effect was reported by any patient/guardian at any point of assessment. Conclusion: Evening primrose oil is a safe and effective medicine in management of AD. However, since not all researchers across the world have found the same good result, further large trials on Indian patients are needed.

  11. Elemol from Chamaecyparis obtusa ameliorates 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene-induced atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hyun; Jung, Eui-Man; Ahn, Changhwan; Lee, Geun-Shik; Lee, Su-Yeon; Kim, Seon-Hong; Choi, In-Gyu; Park, Mi-Jin; Lee, Sung-Suk; Choi, Don-Ha; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2015-08-01

    Chamaecyparis obtusa has been traditionally used as an antibiotic agent and in cosmetics for the prevention of microorganism infection and skin troubles. Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that encompasses immunologic responses, susceptibility factors and compromised skin-barrier function. Use of plant medicines in therapeutic treatment of AD has recently been suggested as an alternative therapeutic option. The present study examined the effect of elemol, an active component of Chamaecyparis obtusa, on AD using in vivo and in vitro models. RBL-2H3 cells were stimulated with concanavalin A and dinitrophenyl human serum albumin, and atopic dermatitis was induced in BALB/c mice by topical application of 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) prior to elemol treatment. The mRNA expression was evaluated by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and the levels of β-hexosaminidase and serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) were examined by ELISA. Histological changes were also performed by microscopy. Elemol attenuated the onset of AD-like skin lesions, reduced serum IgE levels and decreased mast cell infiltration into the dermis and hypodermis. In addition, elemol downregulated the transcriptional expression of several pro-inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IκBα, in the skin of the DNCB-induced animal models of AD. In the RBL-2H3 mast cell line, elemol significantly inhibited the mRNA expression of IL-4 and IL-13, and further attenuated the release of β-hexosaminidase from mast cells. Histological examination revealed that elemol significantly ameliorated the DNCB-induced dermal destruction in mice. The results of the present study suggested that elemol may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of AD due to its immunosuppressive effects.

  12. Effect of partial melting on small scale convection atop a mantle plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrusta, R.; Arcay, D.; Tommasi, A.; Gonzalez, A.

    2014-12-01

    A lithospheric plate passing atop a mantle plume is likely to be thermally thinned or "rejuvenated". Geophysical data on the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) depth beneath active hotspots partly validate this prediction, but there is a large variation of the LAB upwelling estimated from different methods. Numerical simulations of plume-lithosphere interactions show that the development of small-scale convection (SSC) in the plume pancake spreading out along the base of the lithosphere is a mechanism able to rejuvenate the lithosphere, even for a fast-moving plate. The triggering of SSC has been shown to depend on the rheological behaviour of the unstable layer underlying the stagnant upper part of the thermal boundary layer (TBL), but the stability of the this layer may also be affected by partial melting.We analyze, using a 2D petrological-thermo-mechanical numerical model, the influence of partial melting on the dynamics of time-dependent SSC instabilities and the resulting rejuvenation of a lithosphere passing atop a mantle plume. These models show a complex behavior, with either an acceleration, no change or a slight decceleration of the SSC onset, due to the competing effects of the latent heat of melting, which cools the plume material, and of the buoyancy increase associated with melting, among which the dominant effect is the depletion in heavy elements of the solid fraction. The viscosity reduction, though significant (up to 2 orders of magnitude) is too localized to affect the SSC dynamics. Despite the presence of partial melting, the mechanical lithosphere erosion in not enhanced significantly relatively to melt-free models.

  13. Sex and the skin: a qualitative study of patients with acne, psoriasis and atopic eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magin, Parker; Heading, Gaynor; Adams, Jon; Pond, Dimity

    2010-08-01

    Quantitative questionnaire-based research has suggested a considerable effect of skin disease on the sexual life of sufferers. In this study, we explored the effects of acne, psoriasis and atopic eczema upon sexual functioning and sexual relationships in the context of a wider exploration of the psychological sequelae of these diseases. We employed a qualitative methodology employing in-depth semi-structured interviews and involving thematic analysis and constant comparison. Participants were patients with currently active acne, psoriasis or atopic eczema. Purposive sampling aimed to obtain a sample reflecting a wide range of participant characteristics including skin disease severity, age, sex, and care by general practitioner or dermatologist. Sixty-two semi-structured interviews were conducted. Acne had adverse effects on participants' self-perceived sexual attractiveness and self-confidence, as did psoriasis and eczema. But psoriasis and eczema also had marked effects on sexual well-being and on capacity for intimacy. These were related to issues of self-esteem and sexual self-image and were often pervasive, resulting in marked behavioural avoidance of intimate situations and continuing effects on sexual well-being even in long-established sexual relationships. Effects of psoriasis and eczema on sexual well-being and sexual relationships were mediated more by appearance and texture of non-genital skin than by involvement of genital skin. We conclude that, while recognising the distressing effects of acne on self-perceived sexual attractiveness, clinicians should be especially aware of the capacity of psoriasis and eczema to profoundly affect patients' psychological and sexual well-being.

  14. HLA-DRB GENES POLYMORPHISM IN CHINESE NORTHERN PATIENTS WITH ATOPIC ASTHMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高金明; 林耀广; 邱长春; 马毅

    1998-01-01

    Objective. Atopie asthma provides a usetul model for evaluating the genetic tactors that control human immune responsiveness. HLA class Ⅱ gene products are involved in the control of immune response. As HLA-DRB gene is the most polymorphic HLA class Ⅱ gene, we investigated whether susceptibility or resistance to the disease is associated with HLA-DRB. Methods. Blood samples were obtained from two groups of unrelated Chinese northern adults: (1) 50 atopic asthma (7 of them with familial aggregation) ; (2) 80 healthy controls without asthma or atopy and other HLA-associated diseases. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral venous blood leucocytes. The polymorphie second exon of HLA-DRB gene was amplified by sequence-specific primer polymerase chain reaction (SSP/PCR) methods. All patients had their serum IgE(total and spscifie) antibody levels by RAST, bronchial reactivity assessed by methaeholine brocho-provocation test and/or hronchodilation test. Results.There was an increased gene frequency of DR52 and DR52 in asthmatic subjects compared with healthy subjects(17% vs 4.3%, P<0. 01% 50% vs 17.5%, P<0. 01), and the decreased frequency of DR2(15) and DR52 in asthmatic patients(7% vs 18%, P<0. 05; 2% vs 33%, P<0. 01). We found the positive association between DR5(13)-DR52 and sIgE antibody responsiveness to d1 (from house dust mite allergen ); negative association between HLA-DRB alleles and TIgE or BHR ( bronchial hyperresponsiveness). Conclusion. The results suggested that HLA haplotype DR6(13)-DR52 was significantly implicated in suseeptibility to house dust mite induced-asthma, at least it would he more closely assocaated with atopic asthms. Conversely, alleles DR2(15) and DR51 might corder protection against the disease. HLA-DRB genes were particularly involved in regulating human atopie immune response in asthma.

  15. Study of Charged Particle Species Produced in Association with $\\bar{B}$0, B-, and $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ Mesons in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96-TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usynin, Denys [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The authors study the yields of charged kaons, charged pions, and protons produced in association with B mesons produced in proton-antiproton collisions at center of mass energy 1960 GeV using 355 pb-1 of data collected with the CDF detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. This is the first reported measurements of these yields at a hadron collider. The B mesons are reconstructed using their semileptonic decays: B0 → ℓ+D-X, D- → K+π-π-; B0 → ℓ+D*-X, D*- → π-$\\bar{D}$0,$\\bar{D}$0 → K+π-; B+ → ℓ+$\\bar{D}$0X, $\\bar{D}$0 → K+π-; Bs→ℓ+D$-\\atop{s}$ X, D$-\\atop{s}$ → π-Φ,Φ → K+K-. The K, π, and p are identified using the Time of Flight detector (TOF), the CDF spectrometer, and the specific ionization (dE/dx) measured in the central drift chamber (COT). The fraction of charged kaons produced in association with $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ mesons is found to be larger than the fraction produced in association with the $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ and B- mesons, as expected from naive models of heavy quark hadronization to mesons. The particle species yields are found to be in qualitative agreement with simulation of B meson production in hadron collisions from the PYTHIA Monte Carlo, although the yield of kaons around $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ mesons is found to be larger in the simulation when compared to the data. These studies are important for understanding methods of identifying the flavor of $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ mesons in measurement of $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ flavor oscillations and charge conjugation-parity (CP) violation in $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ meson decays.

  16. Clinical comparison of human and canine atopic dermatitis using human diagnostic criteria (Japanese Dermatological Association, 2009): proposal of provisional diagnostic criteria for canine atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Yuri; Nagata, Masahiko; Murayama, Nobuo; Nanko, Hiroko; Furue, Masutaka

    2011-08-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common skin disease encountered in both humans and dogs. Canine AD can be used in the analysis of naturally occurring AD; however, details of clinical comparison have been lacking. The purpose of this study is to compare those clinical features using the human diagnostic criteria (Japanese Dermatological Association, 2009). Fifty-one dogs with canine AD were evaluated by the human criteria. Prior to this study, canine AD was basically diagnosed by the fulfillment of two authentic canine AD criteria and a positive reaction against Dermatophagoides farinae in serum immunoglobulin E levels and/or in intradermal tests. Among the human AD criteria items, behavior corresponding to pruritus was observed in all 51 dogs. Skin lesions corresponding to eczematous dermatitis were seen in 50 dogs, and symmetrical distribution of skin lesions was noted in all 51 dogs. A chronic or chronically relapsing course was observed in 50 dogs. Based on these results, the concordance rate for the criteria was 96% (49/51). Differential diagnoses of AD were also investigated in the same manner. The concordance rate for the criteria was 0% (0/69) in scabies, 2% (1/50) in pyoderma, 0% (0/50) in demodicosis, 0% (0/9) in cutaneous lymphoma, 0% (0/2) in ichthyosis, 25% (2/7) in flea allergy, 48% (24/50) in seborrheic dermatitis and 75% (3/4) in food allergy. Canine AD is thus indicated as a valuable counterpart to human AD in clinical aspects. In addition, the human AD criteria could be applicable, with some modification, as provisional diagnostic criteria for canine AD.

  17. The study of microbial-intestinal tissue complex in patients with atopic dermatitis in different periods of clinical course of the disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Babkin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It was examined 40 patients with atopic dermatitis in various stages of the clinical course of dermatosis. It has revealed typical endoscopic changes of the gastrointestinal tract in patients with atopic dermatitis in quiescent and acute stages. It has studied the cellular composition of infiltrates and histomorphology of mucous coat of stomach and distal part of sigmoid colon. It has found the generic dysbiotic malfunctions of intestinal microflora in different periods of the clinical course of dermatosis. It is suggested an assumption about the relations between morphological changes of mucous coat of stomach and distal part of sigmoid colon in patients with atopic dermatitis with symtomatic dysbiotic disorders of the intestine and the severity of skin lesions in atopic dermatitis.

  18. MiR-155 is overexpressed in patients with atopic dermatitis and modulates T-cell proliferative responses by targeting cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonkoly, Enikö; Janson, Peter; Majuri, Marja-Leena;

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short noncoding RNAs that suppress gene expression at the posttranscriptional level. Atopic dermatitis is a common chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by the presence of activated T cells within the skin....

  19. Infectious, atopic and inflammatory diseases, childhood adversities and familial aggregation are independently associated with the risk for mental disorders: Results from a large Swiss epidemiological study

    OpenAIRE

    Ajdacic-Gross, V.; A. Aleksandrowicz; Rodgers, S; Mutsch, M.; Tesic, A.; Müller, M.; Kawohl, W.; Rössler, W.; Seifritz, E; CASTELAO, E.; Strippoli, M.F.; Vandeleur, C.; von Känel, R.; Paolicelli, R.; Landolt, M A

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To examine the associations between mental disorders and infectious, atopic, inflammatory diseases while adjusting for other risk factors. METhODS: We used data from PsyCoLaus, a large Swiss Population Cohort Study (n = 3720; age range 35-66). Lifetime diagnoses of mental disorders were grouped into the following categories: Neurodevelopmental, anxiety (early and late onset), mood and substance disorders. They were regressed on infectious, atopic and other inflammatory diseases adjust...

  20. Filaggrin null mutations increase the risk and persistence of hand eczema in subjects with atopic dermatitis: results from a general population study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Carlsen, B C; Menné, Torkil

    2010-01-01

    Hand eczema is prevalent in the general population. It remains unclear whether or not filaggrin gene (FLG) null mutations increase the overall risk of hand eczema or only increase the risk of hand eczema in subjects with atopic dermatitis.......Hand eczema is prevalent in the general population. It remains unclear whether or not filaggrin gene (FLG) null mutations increase the overall risk of hand eczema or only increase the risk of hand eczema in subjects with atopic dermatitis....

  1. Filaggrin loss-of-function mutations and atopic dermatitis as risk factors for hand eczema in apprentice nurses: part II of a prospective cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background/objectives Environmental exposure and personal susceptibility both contribute to the development of hand eczema. In this study, we investigated the effect of loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG), atopic dermatitis and wet work exposure on the development of hand eczema in apprentice nurses. Methods Dutch apprentice nurses were genotyped for the four most common FLG mutations; atopic dermatitis and hand eczema history were assessed by questionnaire. Exposur...

  2. 紫外线治疗特应性皮炎的进展%Advances in the treatment of atopic dermatitis with ultraviolet rays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周飞红; 喻雅也; 李东升

    2013-01-01

    特应性皮炎是一种慢性复发性炎症性疾病,紫外线通过调节T细胞功能及相关炎症介质而取得良好疗效.不同波段紫外线因其特性而应用于不同类型的特应性皮炎:窄谱中波紫外线治疗儿童期特应性皮炎显示出良好疗效及安全性,认为是慢性患者的首选治疗;急性患者首选长波紫外线照射;局限性皮损选择308 nm准分子激光为佳.紫外线治疗特应性皮炎临床尚处于初级阶段,在照射剂量和照射疗程方面,各家报道不一.%Atopic dermatitis is a chronic recurrent inflammatory disease.By regulating the function of T cells and related inflammation factors,ultraviolet rays (UV) exert a satisfactory therapeutic effect on atopic dermatitis.Because of distinct characteristics,different spectrum of UV is applicable to specific types of atopic dermatitis.Narrow-band UVB shows good efficacy and safety in the treatment of atopic dermatitis in childhood,and is considered to be the best choice for patients with chronic atopic dermatitis; UVA is the preferred choice for patients with acute atopic dermatitis,and 308-nm excimer laser is suitable for local lesions of atopic dermatitis.However,there has been no uniform standard for the dose and duration of UV irradiation in the treatment of atopic dermatitis.

  3. Higher maternal serum concentrations of nicotinamide and related metabolites in late pregnancy are associated with a lower risk of offspring atopic eczema at age 12 months

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Heis, S; Crozier, SR; Robinson, SM; Harvey, NC; Cooper, C; Inskip, HM; Godfrey, KM

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidence that atopic eczema partly originates in utero is increasing, with some studies linking the risk of developing the condition with aspects of maternal diet during pregnancy. Nicotinamide, a naturally occurring nutrient that is maintained through the dietary intakes of vitamin B3 and tryptophan has been used in the treatment of some skin conditions including atopic eczema. Objective To examine the relation of maternal serum concentrations of nicotinamide and related tryptophan metabolites to the risk of atopic eczema in the offspring. Methods Within the UK Southampton Women Survey, infantile atopic eczema at ages 6 and 12 months was ascertained (modified UK Working Party Criteria for the Definition of Atopic Dermatitis). Maternal serum levels of kynurenine, kynurenic acid, anthranilic acid, tryptophan, nicotinamide and N1-methylnicotinamide were measured in late pregnancy by mass spectrometry, n=497 and related to the odds ratio of infantile atopic eczema. Results Maternal nicotinamide and related metabolite concentrations were not associated with offspring atopic eczema at age 6 months. Higher concentrations of nicotinamide and anthranilic acid were, however, associated with a lower risk of eczema at age 12 months (odds ratios 0.69, 95% CI 0.53-0.91 /SD change, p=0.007 and 0.63, 0.48-0.83, p=0.001, respectively). The associations were robust to adjustment for potentially confounding variables. Conclusion and clinical relevance This is the first study linking maternal serum concentrations of nicotinamide and related metabolites to the risk of atopic eczema in the offspring. The findings point to potentially modifiable maternal influences on this complex and highly prevalent condition. PMID:27517618

  4. Alcohol intake in pregnancy increases the child's risk of atopic dermatitis. the COPSAC prospective birth cohort study of a high risk population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Giwercman Carson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Atopic dermatitis has increased four-fold over the recent decades in developed countries, indicating that changes in environmental factors associated with lifestyle may play an important role in this epidemic. It has been proposed that alcohol consumption may be one contributing risk factor in this development. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the impact of alcohol intake during pregnancy on the development of atopic dermatitis during the first 7 years of life. METHOD: The COPSAC cohort is a prospective, longitudinal, birth cohort study of 411 children born to mothers with a history of asthma, followed up for 7 years with scheduled visits every 6 months as well as visits for acute exacerbations of atopic dermatitis. Risk of atopic dermatitis from any alcohol consumption during pregnancy was analyzed as time-to-diagnosis and adjusted for known risk factors. RESULTS: 177 of 411 children developed atopic dermatitis before age 7 years. We found a significant effect of alcohol intake during pregnancy on atopic dermatitis development (HR 1.44, 95% CI 1.05-1.99 p=0.024. This conclusion was unaffected after adjustment for smoking, mother's education and mother's atopic dermatitis. LIMITATIONS: The selection of a high-risk cohort, with all mothers suffering from asthma, and all children having a gestational age above 35 weeks with no congenital abnormality, systemic illness, or history of mechanical ventilation or lower airway infection. CONCLUSION: Alcohol intake by pregnant women with a history of asthma, is significantly associated with an increased risk for the child for developing atopic dermatitis during the first 7 years of life.

  5. Analysis of epidermal lipids in normal and atopic dogs, before and after administration of an oral omega-6/omega-3 fatty acid feed supplement. A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, Iuliana; Pin, Didier; Remoué, Noëlle; Remoué, Nathalie; Osta, Bilal; Callejon, Sylvie; Videmont, Emilie; Gatto, Hugues; Portoukalian, Jacques; Haftek, Marek

    2011-12-01

    Alterations of the lipid expression in the skin of human and canine atopic subjects may be one of the key factors in the disease development. We have analyzed the ultrastructure of the clinically uninvolved skin of atopic dogs and compared it with the lipid composition of their tape-stripped stratum corneum (SC). The effect of a 2 month treatment of atopic dogs by food supplementation with a mixture of essential fatty acids was evaluated on skin samples taken before and after the treatment period. Electron microscopy revealed that the non-lesional skin of atopic dogs exhibited an abnormal and largely incomplete structure of the lamellar lipids with little cohesion between the corneocyte strata. The SC of atopic dogs was characterized by a significant decrease in the lipid content when compared to the healthy controls. Following oral supplementation with the mixture of essential fatty acids, the overall lipid content of the SC markedly increased. This feature was observed both with the free and, most importantly, with the protein-bound lipids (cholesterol, fatty acids and ceramides), the latter constituting the corneocyte-bound scaffold for ordinate organisation of the extracellular lipid bi-layers. Indeed, the semi-quantitative electron microscopy study revealed that the treatment resulted in a significantly improved organization of the lamellar lipids in the lower SC, comparable to that of the healthy dogs. Our results indicate the potential interest of long-term alimentary supplementation with omega-6 and omega-3 essential fatty acids in canine atopic dermatitis.

  6. Chemical Composition and Inhibitory Effect of Lentinula edodes Ethanolic Extract on Experimentally Induced Atopic Dermatitis in Vitro and in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Ju Choi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The ethanolic extract of Lentinula edodes was partially analyzed and then characterized for its efficacy in treating atopic dermatitis. Polyphenols were determined to be the major antioxidant component in the extract (6.12 mg/g, followed by flavonoids (1.76 mg/g, β-carotene (28.75 μg/g, and lycopene (5.25 μg/g. An atopic dermatitis (AD model was established and epidermal and dermal ear thickness, mast cell infiltration, and serum immunoglobulin levels were measured after oral administration of the L. edodes extract for 4 weeks. L. edodes extract decreased Dermatophagoides farinae extract (DFE and 4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB-induced expression of several inflammatory cytokines in the ears, cervical lymph nodes, and splenocytes. Consequently, L. edodes extract may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of AD attributable to its immunomodulatory effects.

  7. Anti-Pruritic Efficacy of Itch Relief Lotion and Cream in Patients With Atopic History: Comparison With Hydrocortisone Cream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirwas, Matthew J; Barkovic, Sylvia

    2017-03-01

    Objective: To evaluate the speed of onset and duration of relief of two ceramide-containing formulations with 1% pramoxine hydroxide (CeraVe® Itch Relief Lotion and Cream,Valeant Pharmaceuticals North America LLC, Irvine, CA) in patients with atopic history, including those with active flare and the comparative efficacy of CeraVe Itch Relief Cream to hydrocortisone 1% cream and night-time itch relief with continued use.

  8. Canine epidermal lipid sampling by skin scrub revealed variations between different body sites and normal and atopic dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Angelbeck-Schulze, Mandy; Mischke, Reinhard; Rohn, Karl; Hewicker-Trautwein, Marion; Naim, Hassan Y.; Bäumer, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Background Previously, we evaluated a minimally invasive epidermal lipid sampling method called skin scrub, which achieved reproducible and comparable results to skin scraping. The present study aimed at investigating regional variations in canine epidermal lipid composition using the skin scrub technique and its suitability for collecting skin lipids in dogs suffering from certain skin diseases. Eight different body sites (5 highly and 3 lowly predisposed for atopic lesions) were sampled by ...

  9. The Effect of Stimuli on Basophil-Mediated Atopic Responses During Asthmatic Lying-In Women and in Newborns

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ling; Guo, Yin-Shi; Jiang, Jin-Qi; Guo, Xue-jun; Yi-ping XU; Tian, Ye; Xiong, Ying; Han, Li

    2012-01-01

    Morbidity from allergic diseases is increasing. Basophils play a critical role in systemic anaphylaxis and chronic allergic inflammation. The prenatal environment must be regarded as a possible early risk factor for allergic diseases in children. Our objective was to determine if basophils harvested from neonates genetically predisposed to atopic disease had different levels of CD63 expression and IL-4 release properties in response to various stimuli (peptidoglycan, Dermatophagoides farinae,...

  10. 175 The Missing Link!! Specialist Nurse-Led Education for Parents of Children With Atopic Eczema

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Deryn

    2012-01-01

    Background Australia's rate of children with food allergy is still on an upward trend. In infants the earliest manifestation is usually atopic eczema. Australian Bureau of Statistics National Health Survey (ABNHS, 2007–2008, p.305) reported hayfever, allergic rhinitis and asthma in the top 10 most commonly reported long-term conditions for children and young people. Early effective management of eczema is essential. Australia's medical model means long wait for allergy appointments with a spe...

  11. Pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis%特应性皮炎发病机制的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宇; 姚煦

    2012-01-01

    特应性皮炎是反复发作的慢性炎症性皮肤病,以皮肤干燥、瘙痒、湿疹样皮疹为特点.其发病率不断上升且病因不明,可能与遗传、环境、皮肤屏障功能缺陷及天然和获得性免疫系统功能异常有关.近年研究发现,特应性皮炎的发病可能与丝聚蛋白基因功能缺失突变,ORMDL3突变,树突细胞功能异常,Th9、Th22、Th17细胞亚群功能异常,IL-31细胞因子产生增加,H4受体表达增加及抗菌肽,神经酰胺和胸腺基质淋巴细胞生成素有关.%Atopic dermatitis is a chronic and recurrent inflarnmatory skin disease characterized by xerosis,pruritus and eczematoid lesions with increased transepidermal water loss.The morbidity of atopic dermatitis has been increasing,while its nature remains unclear.It is likely that genetic background,environment,dcfcctive skin barrier function and abnormal innate and adaptive immunity are all involved in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis.Some recent studies have found many factors that may contribute to the development of atopic dermatitis,including the loss-of-function mutation of filaggrin gene,mutation of ORMDL3gene,dysfunction of dendritic cells,Th9,Th22 and Th17 cells,increased expressions of interleukin-31 and H4 receptor,antimicrobial peptides,ceramide and thymic stromal lymphopoietin.

  12. Circulating IgG autoantibodies to IgE in atopic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinti, I; Brozek, C; Wood, N; Geha, R S; Leung, D Y

    1986-04-01

    Sera from nonatopic healthy donors and patients with hyper-IgE syndrome, allergic respiratory disease, i.e., allergic rhinitis and asthma, and atopic dermatitis were assayed for the presence of IgG and IgM antibodies to IgE. The assay used was based on an ELISA method that measured the binding of IgG or IgM in test sera to myeloma IgE (PS)-coated microtiter wells. The levels of IgG anti-IgE but not of IgM anti-IgE were elevated in patient sera of all three categories tested. The same sera failed to demonstrate increased levels of IgG anti-IgM or IgG anti-IgA. Significant IgG anti-IgE activity remained after absorption of patient sera over pooled human IgG F(ab')2 Sepharose. The IgG anti-IgE activity appeared to be directed toward the Fc portion of IgE because absorption of positive sera over IgE (ADZ) Sepharose but not over myeloma IgG Sepharose completely removed their reactivity with IgE (PS) and because sera from atopic individuals but not from normal subjects contained IgG anti-IgE activity against the protein backbone of the Fc portion of IgE synthesized from a fragment of the cloned gene of human myeloma IgE (ND) heavy chain. Regression analysis demonstrated a weak but significant correlation (r = 0.31; p less than 0.05) between serum IgE levels and IgG anti-IgE activity. Fractionation of sera from the three patient categories by gel filtration over Sepharose 6B revealed that IgG anti-IgE activity was present both as monomeric IgG and in IgE containing immune complexes (IC). Intermediate molecular size IC (between 7S and 19S) were present in all three patient groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Human Breast Milk miRNA, Maternal Probiotic Supplementation and Atopic Dermatitis in Offspring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Rae Simpson

    Full Text Available Perinatal probiotic ingestion has been shown to prevent atopic dermatitis (AD in infancy in a number of randomised trials. The Probiotics in the Prevention of Allergy among Children in Trondheim (ProPACT trial involved a probiotic supplementation regime given solely to mothers in the perinatal period and demonstrated a ~40% relative risk reduction in the cumulative incidence of AD at 2 years of age. However, the mechanisms behind this effect are incompletely understood. Micro-RNAs (miRNA are abundant in mammalian milk and may influence the developing gastrointestinal and immune systems of newborn infants. The objectives of this study were to describe the miRNA profile of human breast milk, and to investigate breast milk miRNAs as possible mediators of the observed preventative effect of probiotics.Small RNA sequencing was conducted on samples collected 3 months postpartum from 54 women participating in the ProPACT trial. Differential expression of miRNA was assessed for the probiotic vs placebo and AD vs non-AD groups. The results were further analysed using functional prediction techniques.Human breast milk samples contain a relatively stable core group of highly expressed miRNAs, including miR-148a-3p, miR-22-3p, miR-30d-5p, let-7b-5p and miR-200a-3p. Functional analysis of these miRNAs revealed enrichment in a broad range of biological processes and molecular functions. Although several miRNAs were found to be differentially expressed on comparison of the probiotic vs placebo and AD vs non-AD groups, none had an acceptable false discovery rate and their biological significance in the development of AD is not immediately apparent from their predicted functional consequences.Whilst breast milk miRNAs have the potential to be active in a diverse range of tissues and biological process, individual miRNAs in breast milk 3 months postpartum are unlikely to play a major role in the prevention of atopic dermatitis in infancy by probiotics ingestion

  14. Clinical efficacy of emollients in atopic dermatitis patients – relationship with the skin microbiota modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seité, Sophie; Zelenkova, Hana; Martin, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Background We speculated that an emollient supplemented with a biomass of nonpathogenic bacteria such as Vitreoscilla filiformis (Vf), grown in a medium containing thermal spring water (LRP-TSW); (LRP-Vitreoscilla filiformis biomass [LRP-VFB]), could have a beneficial effect for patients with atopic dermatitis (AD). Patients and methods This double-blind, randomized, comparative study was conducted with 60 patients with moderate AD. Before starting the study, participants were pretreated for 15 days with drug therapy to improve their SCORing Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD) by at least 25%. On Day 1, the eligible patients were randomized to either the emollient containing LRP-VFB associated with mannose (Product A) or another emollient (product B) and were treated twice daily for 1 month. Recurrence of flare-ups and microbial communities were characterized from swabs taken at Day 1 and Day 28, under axenic conditions, from affected (AF) and proximal unaffected (UAF) skin areas. Results At Day 1, the average SCORAD of each group and the microbial communities of AF and UAF areas for each participant were similar. One month after the end of the therapeutic treatment (Day 28), the average evolution of SCORAD at Day 28 compared to Day 1 of patients treated with product A was significantly lower than that of the patients treated with product B. A significantly increased level of Xanthomonas genus was noticed in the group treated with product A (versus product B). On the other hand, the level of Staphylococcus genus increased between Day 1 and Day 28 in the group treated with product B, but not in the group treated with product A. Interestingly, these differences were more pronounced for patients in relapse, and the associated SCORAD worsening was less in the group treated with product A versus the group treated with product B. Conclusion This study demonstrated that a specific emollient containing a biomass of non-pathogenic bacteria Vf grown in a medium containing TSW and

  15. Adjuvant treatment with the bacterial lysate (OM-85) improves management of atopic dermatitis: A randomized study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodemer, Christine; Guillet, Gerard; Cambazard, Frederic; Boralevi, Franck; Ballarini, Stefania; Milliet, Christian; Bertuccio, Paola; La Vecchia, Carlo; Bach, Jean-François; de Prost, Yves

    2017-01-01

    Background Environmental factors play a major role on atopic dermatitis (AD) which shows a constant rise in prevalence in western countries over the last decades. The Hygiene Hypothesis suggesting an inverse relationship between incidence of infections and the increase in atopic diseases in these countries, is one of the working hypothesis proposed to explain this trend. Objective This study tested the efficacy and safety of oral administration of the bacterial lysate OM-85 (Broncho-Vaxom®, Broncho-Munal®, Ommunal®, Paxoral®, Vaxoral®), in the treatment of established AD in children. Methods Children aged 6 months to 7 years, with confirmed AD diagnosis, were randomized in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to receive, in addition to conventional treatment with emollients and topical corticosteroids, 3.5mg of the bacterial extract OM-85 or placebo daily for 9 months. The primary end-point was the difference between groups in the occurrence of new flares (NF) during the study period, evaluated by Hazard Ratio (HR) derived from conditional Cox proportional hazard regression models accounting for repeated events. Results Among the 179 randomized children, 170 were analysed, 88 in the OM-85 and 82 in the placebo group. As expected most children in both treatment groups experienced at least 1 NF during the study period (75 (85%) patients in the OM-85 group and 72 (88%) in the placebo group). Patients treated with OM-85 as adjuvant therapy had significantly fewer and delayed NFs (HR of repeated flares = 0.80; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.67–0.96), also when potential confounding factors, as family history of atopy and corticosteroids use, were taken into account (HR = 0.82; 95% CI: 0.69–0.98). No major side effect was reported, with comparable and good tolerability for OM-85 and placebo. Conclusions Results show an adjuvant therapeutic effect of a well standardized bacterial lysate OM-85 on established AD. PMID:28333952

  16. Family quality of life among families of children with atopic dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hae Ji; Hwang, Seonyeong; Ahn, Youngmee; Lim, Dae Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Background Atopic dermatitis (AD) may cause emotional distress and impairs the quality of life (QoL) in children and their families. Objective We examined family QoL of children with AD and explored associated factors such as disease severity and psychosocial factors among parents of children with AD. Methods Study participants were 78 children (1 month to 16 years old) diagnosed with AD and their parents visiting an outpatient clinic of the Department of Pediatrics in Inha University Hospital. Data were collected using structured questionnaires and medical record review. Parents completed the Dermatitis Family Impact questionnaire (DFI), the Positive Affect and Negative Affect Schedule, the Satisfaction with Life Scale, and the Korean Parenting Stress Index. For children aged below 6-year-old, parents were asked to complete the Infants' Dermatologic Quality of Life. SCOring Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD), Children's Dermatology Life Quality Index, and the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory version 4.0 Generic Core Scale were also completed. Results The mean age of parents and children were 37.4 ± 5.3 years and 65.1 ± 45.7 months, respectively. Among them, 87.2% of parents were mothers and 60.3% of children were boys. The mean score of DFI was 11.2 ± 6.0. The mean SCORAD score was 28.3 ± 16.1. Family who experienced strong negative emotionality had a 3.8 times higher probability of experiencing a lower QoL than parents who did not (odds ratio [OR], 3.82; p = 0.041). Family of children with higher severity of AD had a 6.6 times (OR, 6.55; p = 0.018) higher probability of experiencing a low family QoL than their less-severe counterparts. Families of girls with AD had a lower QoL (OR, 8.40; p = 0.003) than families of boys. Conclusion Family QoL among parents of children with AD was low and associated with parent’s psychosocial characteristics as well as disease severity of the children. Considering parental involvement in AD management for children, emotional

  17. The efficacy of cyclosporine A in cats with presumed atopic dermatitis: a double blind, randomised prednisolone-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisselink, Marinus A; Willemse, Ton

    2009-04-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of cyclosporine A (CsA) and prednisolone in feline atopic dermatitis (AD) in a randomised, controlled double blind study. Twenty-nine cats with feline AD were randomly allocated to two groups. Eleven cats were treated orally with prednisolone (1mg/kg SID) and 18 were treated with CsA (5mg/kg/day) for 4 weeks. At day 0 (D0) and D28, skin lesions were graded by means of the canine atopic dermatitis extent and severity index (CADESI). Skin biopsies and intradermal allergy tests were performed at D0 and blood samples for haematology and serum biochemistry were collected at D0 and D28. During the trial the cat owners were asked to evaluate the intensity of the pruritus once weekly on a linear analog scale and to record side effects. Based on the CADESI there was no significant difference between the two groups in the amount of remission (P=0.0562) or in the number of cats that improved by >25% (P=0.0571). The effect of CsA and prednisolone on pruritus as evaluated by the owners was not significantly different (P=0.41) between the two groups. No serious side effects were observed. The conclusion was that CsA is an effective alternative to prednisolone therapy in cats with presumed atopic dermatitis.

  18. Nuclear microprobe investigation of the penetration of ultrafine zinc oxide into human skin affected by atopic dermatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szikszai, Z., E-mail: szikszai@atomki.hu [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Debrecen (Hungary); Kertesz, Zs. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Debrecen (Hungary); Bodnar, E. [Department of Dermatology, University of Debrecen, Medical and Health Science Center, Debrecen (Hungary); Borbiro, I. [Abiol Ltd., Debrecen (Hungary); Angyal, A.; Csedreki, L.; Furu, E.; Szoboszlai, Z.; Kiss, A.Z. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Debrecen (Hungary); Hunyadi, J. [Department of Dermatology, University of Debrecen, Medical and Health Science Center, Debrecen (Hungary)

    2011-10-15

    Skin penetration is one of the potential routes for nanoparticles to gain access into the human body. Ultrafine metal oxides, such as titanium dioxide and zinc oxide are widely used in cosmetic and health products like sunscreens. These oxides are potent UV filters and the particle size smaller than 200 nm makes the product more transparent compared to formulations containing coarser particles. The present study continues the work carried out in the frame of the NANODERM: 'Quality of skin as a barrier to ultrafine particles' European project and complements our previous investigations on human skin with compromised barrier function. Atopic dermatitis (a type of eczema) is an inflammatory, chronically relapsing, non-contagious skin disease. It is very common in children but may occur at any age. The exact cause of atopic dermatitis is unknown, but is likely due to a combination of impaired barrier function together with a malfunction in the body's immune system. In this study, skin samples were obtained from two patients suffering from atopic dermatitis. Our results indicate that the ultrafine zinc oxide particles, in a hydrophobic basis gel with an application time of 2 days or 2 weeks, have penetrated deeply into the stratum corneum in these patients. On the other hand, penetration into the stratum spinosum was not observed even in the case of the longer application time.

  19. Nuclear microprobe investigation of the penetration of ultrafine zinc oxide into human skin affected by atopic dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szikszai, Z.; Kertész, Zs.; Bodnár, E.; Borbíró, I.; Angyal, A.; Csedreki, L.; Furu, E.; Szoboszlai, Z.; Kiss, Á. Z.; Hunyadi, J.

    2011-10-01

    Skin penetration is one of the potential routes for nanoparticles to gain access into the human body. Ultrafine metal oxides, such as titanium dioxide and zinc oxide are widely used in cosmetic and health products like sunscreens. These oxides are potent UV filters and the particle size smaller than 200 nm makes the product more transparent compared to formulations containing coarser particles. The present study continues the work carried out in the frame of the NANODERM: “Quality of skin as a barrier to ultrafine particles” European project and complements our previous investigations on human skin with compromised barrier function. Atopic dermatitis (a type of eczema) is an inflammatory, chronically relapsing, non-contagious skin disease. It is very common in children but may occur at any age. The exact cause of atopic dermatitis is unknown, but is likely due to a combination of impaired barrier function together with a malfunction in the body's immune system. In this study, skin samples were obtained from two patients suffering from atopic dermatitis. Our results indicate that the ultrafine zinc oxide particles, in a hydrophobic basis gel with an application time of 2 days or 2 weeks, have penetrated deeply into the stratum corneum in these patients. On the other hand, penetration into the stratum spinosum was not observed even in the case of the longer application time.

  20. Identification of Malassezia species isolated from patients with seborrhoeic dermatitis, atopic dermatitis, pityriasis versicolor and normal subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakabayashi, A; Sei, Y; Guillot, J

    2000-10-01

    We identified Malassezia species isolated from 42 patients with seborrhoeic dermatitis, 17 patients with atopic dermatitis, 22 patients with pityriasis versicolor, 35 normal subjects and 73 healthy medical students. Regarding the prevalence of Malassezia species in the 35 normal subjects, the frequency of isolation of Malassezia globosa was 22%, M. sympodialis 10% and M. furfur 3%. M. slooffiae, M. pachydermatis, M. restricta and M. obtusa were infrequently isolated from normal skin. Two different species were isolated coincidentally from seven samples. In the patients with atopic dermatitis, M. furfur was isolated more frequently from lesional skin (21%) than non-lesional skin (11%). However, there was no statistical significance. Therefore, this result, by itself, is insufficient to prove that M. furfur should be considered to be an exacerbating factor of atopic dermatitis. In seborrhoeic dermatitis, M. furfur (35%) and M. globosa (22%) were isolated from lesional skin on the face at significantly high rates in comparison with the normal subjects. Therefore, M. furfur and/or M. globosa may be pathogens of seborrhoeic dermatitis. M. globosa was isolated at a frequency of 55% from lesional skin of pityriasis versicolor, while all other species were below 10%. These data suggest that the pathogenic species of pityriasis versicolor is M. globosa.